Science.gov

Sample records for ring beam losses

  1. Beam Loss Monitors for NSLS-II Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, S.L.; Cameron, P.

    2011-03-28

    The shielding for the NSLS-II storage ring will provide adequate protection for the full injected beam losses in two cells of the ring around the injection point, but the remainder of the ring is shielded for lower losses of <10% top-off injection beam current. This will require a system to insure that beam losses do not exceed levels for a period of time that could cause excessive radiation exposure outside the shield walls. This beam Loss Control and Monitoring system will have beam loss monitors that will measure where the beam charge is lost around the ring, to warn operators if losses approach the design limits. To measure the charge loss quantitatively, we propose measuring the electron component of the shower as beam electrons hit the vacuum chamber (VC) wall. This will be done using the Cerenkov light as electrons transit ultra-pure fused silica rods placed close to the inner edge of the VC. The entire length of the rod will collect light from the electrons of the spread out shower resulting from the small glancing angle of the lost beam particles to the VC wall. The design and measurements results of the prototype Cerenkov BLM will be presented.

  2. Beam Loss Control for the NSLS-II Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, S.L.; Choi, J.

    2011-03-28

    The shielding design for the NSLS-II storage ring is designed for the full injected beam losses in two periods of the ring around the injection point, but for the remainder of the ring its shielded for {le} 10% top-off injection beam. This will require a system to insure that beam losses do not exceed these levels for time sufficient to cause excessive radiation exposure outside the shield walls. This beam Loss Control and Monitoring (LCM) system will control the beam losses to the more heavily shielded injection region while monitoring the losses outside this region. To achieve this scrapers are installed in the injection region to intercept beam particles that might be lost outside this region. The scrapers will be thin (< 1Xrad) that will allow low energy electrons to penetrate and the subsequent dipole will separate them from the stored beam. These thin scrapers will reduce the radiation from the scraper compared to thicker scrapers. The dipole will provide significant local shielding for particles that hit inside the gap and a source for the loss monitor system that will measure the amount of beam lost in the injection region.

  3. Analysis ob beam losses at PSR (Proton Storage Ring)

    SciTech Connect

    Macek, R.J.; Fitzgerald, D.H.; Hutson, R.L.; Plum, M.A.; Thiessen, H.A.

    1988-01-01

    Beam losses and the resulting component activation at the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring (PSR) have limited operating currents to about 30..mu..A average at a repetition rate of 15 Hz. Loss rates were found to be approximately proportional to the circulating current and can be understood by a detailed accounting of emittance growth in the two step injection process along with Coulomb scattering of the stored beam during multiple traversals of the injection foil. Calculations and simulations of the losses are in reasonable agreement with measurements.

  4. Recording PEP2 Ring Beam Losses at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Zelazny, M.; Gromme, T.; Himel, T.; Hendrickson, L.; Krauter, K.; /SLAC

    2005-09-30

    The PEP2 (e+)(e-) storage rings contain many complex interrelated systems. When the beam aborts, examining a record of the orbit from the time just before the abort can help identify the root cause. At the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) a system has been developed to continuously record beam orbits from Beam Position Monitors (BPMS) into a circular buffer. When the beam is aborted the buffers are frozen and their contents are stored for later analysis. BPM orbits are saved on a turn by turn basis for 2800 turns in both the high energy ring (HER) and the low energy ring (LER). Each BPM Processor (BPMP) can either monitor the HER or the LER, but not both as the readout of the two rings is multiplexed into a single readout channel. Tools exist as part of the SLAC Control Program (SCP) to collect, display, and save the data. A physicist or operator can choose a few BPMS in which to view all 2800 turns to identify the turn in which the beam went awry; then ask for that specific orbit from all of the BPMS in the storage ring to determine the root cause of the abort.

  5. Beam Loss due to Foil Scattering in the SNS Accumulator Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Jeffrey A; Plum, Michael A

    2012-01-01

    In order to better understand the contribution of scattering from the primary stripper foil to losses in the SNS ring, we have carried out calculations using the ORBIT Code aimed at evaluating these losses. These calculations indicate that the probability of beam loss within one turn following a foil hit is ~1.8 10-8 , where is the foil thickness in g/cm2, assuming a carbon foil. Thus, for a typical SNS stripper foil of thickness = 390 g/cm2, the probability of loss within one turn of a foil hit is ~7.0 10-6. This note describes the calculations used to arrive at this result, presents the distribution of these losses around the SNS ring, and compares the calculated results with observed ring losses for a well-tuned production beam.

  6. Three-dimensional particle trajectories and waste beam losses in injection dump beam line of SNS accumulator ring

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jian-Guang; Plum, Michael A

    2008-01-01

    The SNS ring injection dump beam line has been suffering high beam losses since its commissioning. In order to understand the mechanisms of the beam losses, we have performed 3D simulation studies of the beam line. The 3D models consist of three injection chicane dipoles and one injection dump septum magnet. 3D particle trajectories in the models are computed. We then extend particle optics calculations to the injection dump. Our studies have clearly shown some design and operation problems, that cause beam losses in the injection dump beam line. These include incorrect chicane dipole settings, incorrect position of a chicane dipole, too small aperture of injection dump septum, and inadequate focusing downstream. This paper reports our findings and the remedies to the injection beam loss problems.

  7. BEAM-LOSS DRIVEN DESIGN OPTIMIZATION FOR THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE (SNS) RING.

    SciTech Connect

    WEI,J.; BEEBE-WANG,J.; BLASKIEWICZ,M.; CAMERON,P.; DANBY,G.; GARDNER,C.J.; JACKSON,J.; LEE,Y.Y.; LUDEWIG,H.; MALITSKY,N.; RAPARIA,D.; TSOUPAS,N.; WENG,W.T.; ZHANG,S.Y.

    1999-03-29

    This paper summarizes three-stage design optimization for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) ring: linear machine design (lattice, aperture, injection, magnet field errors and misalignment), beam core manipulation (painting, space charge, instabilities, RF requirements), and beam halo consideration (collimation, envelope variation, e-p issues etc.).

  8. Beam loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VanGinneken, A.; Edwards, D.; Harrison, M.

    1989-04-01

    This paper presents results from simulations of beam losses during the operation of a superconducting accelerator. The calculations use a combination of hadron/electromagnetic cascade plus elastic scattering codes with accelerator tracking routines. These calculations have been used in conjunction with the design of the Fermilab Tevatron. First accelerator geometry is described. The rest of the paper discusses a detailed attempt to simulate a fast extraction cycle, essentially in chronological order. Beginning with an unperturbed beam, the simulation generates proton phase-space distributions incident on the electrostatic septum. These interact either elastically or inelastically with the septum wires, and the products of these interactions are traced through the machine. Where these leave the accelerator, energy deposition levels in the magnets are calculated together with the projected response of the beam-loss monitors in this region. Finally, results of the calculation are compared with experimental data. (AIP)

  9. Stripper-foil scan studies of the first-turn beam loss mechanism in the LAMPF proton storage ring (PSR)

    SciTech Connect

    Hutson, R.: Fitzgerald, D.; Frankle, S.; Macek, R.; Plum, M.; Wilkinson, C.

    1993-01-01

    First-turn beam losses in the LAMPF Proton Storage Ring were measured as a function of the left-right position of the carbon foil used to strip neutral hydrogen atoms to H[sup +] for proton injection into the PSR. Two foil thicknesses, 200 and 300 [mu]g/cm[sup 2], were tested. Results indicated that first-turn loss is caused predominately by magnetic field stripping of a small fraction of the H[sub 0] atoms that pass through the stripper foil without being stripped to protons, and the results were not consistent with a mechanism involving protons originating from atoms in the halo of the neutral beam incident on the stripper foil.

  10. Stripper-foil scan studies of the first-turn beam loss mechanism in the LAMPF proton storage ring (PSR)

    SciTech Connect

    Hutson, R.: Fitzgerald, D.; Frankle, S.; Macek, R.; Plum, M.; Wilkinson, C.

    1993-06-01

    First-turn beam losses in the LAMPF Proton Storage Ring were measured as a function of the left-right position of the carbon foil used to strip neutral hydrogen atoms to H{sup +} for proton injection into the PSR. Two foil thicknesses, 200 and 300 {mu}g/cm{sup 2}, were tested. Results indicated that first-turn loss is caused predominately by magnetic field stripping of a small fraction of the H{sub 0} atoms that pass through the stripper foil without being stripped to protons, and the results were not consistent with a mechanism involving protons originating from atoms in the halo of the neutral beam incident on the stripper foil.

  11. CEBAF beam loss accounting

    SciTech Connect

    Ursic, R.; Mahoney, K.; Hovater, C.; Hutton, A.; Sinclair, C.

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes the design and implementation of a beam loss accounting system for the CEBAF electron accelerator. This system samples the beam curent throughout the beam path and measures the beam current accurately. Personnel Safety and Machine Protection systems use this system to turn off the beam when hazardous beam losses occur.

  12. BEAM INSTRUMENTATION FOR THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE RING.

    SciTech Connect

    WITKOVER,R.L.; CAMERON,P.R.; SHEA,T.J.; CONNOLLY,R.C.; KESSELMAN,M.

    1999-03-29

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) will be constructed by a multi-laboratory collaboration with BNL responsible for the transfer lines and ring. [1] The 1 MW beam power necessitates careful monitoring to minimize un-controlled loss. This high beam power will influence the design of the monitors in the high energy beam transport line (HEBT) from linac to ring, in the ring, and in the ring-to-target transfer line (RTBT). The ring instrumentation must cover a 3-decade range of beam intensity during accumulation. Beam loss monitoring will be especially critical since un-controlled beam loss must be kept below 10{sup -4}. A Beam-In-Gap (BIG) monitor is being designed to assure out-of-bucket beam will not be lost in the ring.

  13. Preliminary comments about beam loss

    SciTech Connect

    Groom, D.

    1985-10-01

    A variety of beam loss questions are being investigated. They affect several design issues, ranging from machine-associated background in the detectors to the radiation lifetime of the main-ring magnets: (1) Muons. Oppositely directed muon beams from prompt muon production, primary meson decay, and a variety of other processes radiate from each IR. If they were not fanned by the insertion dipoles, the beams would be sufficiently intense and energetic that they would present a radiation hazard even after penetrating 2 km of soil or rock. (2) Machine-associated background in the IR`s. About 30 mb of the total cross section is elastic or quasi-elastic, and most of the protons are in a Gaussian spot with sigma = 9 mr. These particles are well within the machine acceptance, but there is a grey area in the tail of the distributions in which the scattered particles `almost` remain in orbit - they continue for some distance but eventually hit a wall. (3) Cryogenic load. This problem has been addressed to some degree in the RDS, but considerably more detail is needed. It appears that a very large fraction of the inelastic particle energy will be deposited here. (4) Radiation damage in the ring. The lifetime of both magnets and electronics in the tunnel might be limited by radiation due to particle loss. Early results are not reassuring. Tevatron measurements, reported to the authors by John Elias, indicate that most of the tunnel background comes from particle loss due to beam-gas collisions.

  14. eRHIC ring-ring design with head-on beam-beam compensation

    SciTech Connect

    Montag,C.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Pozdeyev, E.; Fischer, W.; MacKay, W. W.

    2009-05-04

    The luminosity of the eRHIC ring-ring design is limited by the beam-beam effect exerted on the electron beam. Recent simulation studies have shown that the beam-beam limit can be increased by means of an electron lens that compensates the beam-beam effect experienced by the electron beam. This scheme requires proper design of the electron ring, providing the correct betatron phase advance between interaction point and electron lens. We review the performance of the eRHIC ring-ring version and discuss various parameter sets, based on different cooling schemes for the proton/ion beam.

  15. Beam diagnostics at high-intensity storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, M.

    1993-11-01

    Beam diagnostics at high-intensity facilities feature their own special set of problems and characteristics. Issues peculiar to high-intensity storage rings include beam loss, beam halos, extraction efficiency, beam in the gap, clearing electrodes, and beam-profile measurement. The Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring (PSR) is a nice example of a high-intensity storage ring. The author discusses in some detail three diagnostic systems currently in use at the PSR: the beam-loss-monitor system, the electron-clearing system, and the beam-in-the-gap monitor. Much of the discussion is inspired by the problems that were encountered and the useful things learned while commissioning and developing the PSR. Another inspiration is the work on the next-generation neutron-spallation source, also known as the National Center for Neutron Research (NCNR).

  16. Beam diagnostics at high-intensity storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, M. )

    1994-10-10

    Beam diagnostics at high-intensity facilities feature their own special set of problems and characteristics, issues peculiar to high-intensity storage rings include beam loss, beam halos, extraction efficiency, beam in the gap, clearing electrodes, and beam-profile measurement. The Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring (PSR) is a nice example of a high-intensity storage ring. I will discuss in some detail three diagnostic systems currently in use at the PSR: the beam-loss-monitor system, the electron-clearing system, and the beam-in-the-gap monitor. Much of our discussion is inspired by the problems we have encountered and the useful things we have learned while commissioning and developing the PSR. Another inspiration is our work on the next-generation neutron-spallation source, also known as the National Center for Neutron Research (NCNR).

  17. BEAM LOSS MECHANISMS IN HIGH INTENSITY LINACS

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, Michael A

    2012-01-01

    In the present operation of the Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source, 60-Hz, 825-us H beam pulses are accelerated to 910 MeV, and then compressed to less than a microsecond in the storage ring, to deliver 1 MW of beam power to the spallation target. The beam loss in the superconducting portion of the linac is higher than expected, and it has shown a surprising counter-intuitive correlation with quadrupole magnetic fields, with a loss minimum occurring when the quadrupoles are set to approximately half their design values. This behavior can now be explained by a recent set of experiments that show the beam loss is primarily due to intra-beam stripping. Beam halo is another important beam loss contributor, and collimation in the 2.5 MeV Medium Energy Beam Transport has proven to be an effective mitigation strategy. In this presentation, we will summarize these and other beam loss mechanisms that are important for high intensity linacs.

  18. RHIC BEAM LOSS MONITOR SYSTEM INITIAL OPERATION.

    SciTech Connect

    WITKOVER,R.L.; MICHNOFF,R.J.; GELLER,J.M.

    1999-03-29

    The RHIC Beam Loss Monitor (BLM) System is designed to prevent beam loss quenching of the superconducting magnets, and acquire loss data. Four hundred ion chambers are located around the rings to detect losses. The required 8-decade range in signal current is compressed using an RC pre- integrator ahead of a low current amplifier. A beam abort may be triggered if fast or slow losses exceed programmable threshold levels. A micro-controller based VME module sets references and gains and reads trip status for up to 64 channels. Results obtained with the detectors in the RHIC Sextant Test and the prototype electronics in the AGS-to-RHIC (AtR) transfer line are presented along with the present status of the system.

  19. Time Evolution of Beam in the Recycler Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Krish Gounder, John Marriner and Shekhar Mishra

    2003-05-07

    We study the time evolution of the beam current in the Fermilab Recycler Ring due to abrupt physical processes (single coulomb scattering, nuclear scattering) that cause sudden loss of beam, and diffusive processes (multiple coulomb scattering, lattice dependence, etc.) which cause emittance growth. This emittance growth combined with finite aperture of the beam pipe will lead to eventual loss of most beam. We develop a fitting technique to the time evolution of beam current to estimate emittance growth. Finally we compare the directly measured growth with the fitted value.

  20. A storage ring for radioactive beams

    SciTech Connect

    Moltz, D.M.

    1994-05-01

    Preliminary ideas are presented for the scientific justification of a storage ring for radioactive beams. This storage ring would be suitable for many nuclear and atomic physics experiments. Ideally, it would be constructed and tested at an existing low-energy heavy-ion facility before relocation to a major radioactive beam facility.

  1. Measurements of aperture and beam lifetime using movable beam scrapers in Indus-2 electron storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Pradeep; Ghodke, A. D.; Karnewar, A. K.; Holikatti, A. C.; Yadav, S.; Puntambekar, T. A.; Singh, G.; Singh, P.

    2013-12-15

    In this paper, the measurements of vertical and horizontal aperture which are available for stable beam motion in Indus-2 at beam energy 2.5 GeV using movable beam scrapers are presented. These beam scrapers are installed in one of the long straight sections in the ring. With the movement of beam scrapers towards the beam centre, the beam lifetime is measured. The beam lifetime data obtained from the movement of vertical and horizontal beam scrapers are analyzed. The contribution of beam loss due to beam-gas scattering (vacuum lifetime) and electron-electron scattering within a beam bunch (Touschek lifetime) is separated from the measured beam lifetime at different positions of the beam scrapers. Vertical and horizontal beam sizes at scrapers location are estimated from the scraper movement towards the beam centre in quantum lifetime limit and their values closely agree with measured value obtained using X-ray diagnostic beamline.

  2. Beam Loss Monitoring for LHC Machine Protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzer, Eva Barbara; Dehning, Bernd; Effnger, Ewald; Emery, Jonathan; Grishin, Viatcheslav; Hajdu, Csaba; Jackson, Stephen; Kurfuerst, Christoph; Marsili, Aurelien; Misiowiec, Marek; Nagel, Markus; Busto, Eduardo Nebot Del; Nordt, Annika; Roderick, Chris; Sapinski, Mariusz; Zamantzas, Christos

    The energy stored in the nominal LHC beams is two times 362 MJ, 100 times the energy of the Tevatron. As little as 1 mJ/cm3 deposited energy quenches a magnet at 7 TeV and 1 J/cm3 causes magnet damage. The beam dumps are the only places to safely dispose of this beam. One of the key systems for machine protection is the beam loss monitoring (BLM) system. About 3600 ionization chambers are installed at likely or critical loss locations around the LHC ring. The losses are integrated in 12 time intervals ranging from 40 μs to 84 s and compared to threshold values defined in 32 energy ranges. A beam abort is requested when potentially dangerous losses are detected or when any of the numerous internal system validation tests fails. In addition, loss data are used for machine set-up and operational verifications. The collimation system for example uses the loss data for set-up and regular performance verification. Commissioning and operational experience of the BLM are presented: The machine protection functionality of the BLM system has been fully reliable; the LHC availability has not been compromised by false beam aborts.

  3. Polarisation losses in a ring prism cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Kuryatov, V N; Sokolov, A L

    2000-02-28

    The polarisation losses in a ring cavity, formed by total-internal-reflection prisms, were analysed. All the sources of the polarisation losses are indicated and expressions for their calculation are presented. The limit to loss reduction in cavities of this kind, set by the difference between the radii of curvature of the radiation wavefront and of the refracting prism faces, was determined. (laser gyroscopes)

  4. RHIC low energy beam loss projections

    SciTech Connect

    Satogata,T.

    2009-08-01

    For RHIC low-energy operations, we plan to collide Au beams with energies of E = 2:5-10 GeV/u in RHIC. Beams are injected into collision optics, and RHIC runs as a storage ring with no acceleration. At these low energies, observed beam lifetimes are minutes, with measured beam lifetimes of 3.5 min (fast) and 50 min (slow) at E=4.6 GeV/u in the March 2008 test run. With these lifetimes we can operate RHIC as a storage ring to produce reasonable integrated luminosity. This note estimates beam losses and collimator/dump energy deposition in normal injection modes of low energy operation. The main question is whether a normal injection run is feasible for an FY10 10-15 week operations run from a radiation safety perspective. A peripheral question is whether continuous injection operations is feasible from a radiation safety perspective. In continuous injection mode, we fill both rings, then continuously extract and reinject the oldest bunches that have suffered the most beam loss to increase the overall integrated luminosity. We expect to gain a factor of 2-3 in integrated luminosity from continuous injection at lowest energies if implemented[1]. Continuous injection is feasible by FY11 from an engineering perspective given enough effort, but the required extra safety controls and hardware dose risk make it unappealing for the projected luminosity improvement. Low-energy electron cooling will reduce beam losses by at least an order of magnitude vs normal low-energy operations, but low energy cooling is only feasible in the FY13 timescale and therefore beyond the scope of this note. For normal injection low energy estimates we assume the following: (1) RHIC beam total energies are E=2.5-10 GeV/u. (Continuous injection mode is probably unnecessary above total energies of E=7-8 GeV/u.); (2) RHIC operates only as a storage ring, with no acceleration; (3) 110 bunches of about 0.5-1.0 x 10{sup 9} initial bunch intensities (50-100% injection efficiency, likely conservative

  5. Beam Diagnostics of the Small Isochronous Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Felix Marti; Eduard Pozdeyev

    2004-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the beam diagnostic systems in the Small Isochronous Ring (SIR) developed and built at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) at Michigan State University (MSU). SIR is a small-scale experiment that simulates the dynamics of intense beams in large accelerators. A 20 to 30 keV hydrogen or deuterium ion bunch is injected in the ring, extracted after a variable number of turns and its longitudinal profile is studied. Some of the diagnostic tools available in SIR include an emittance measurement system in the injection line, scanning wires in different sections of the ring, phosphor screens at the injection and extraction points and a fast Faraday cup in the extraction line. The design of these systems and the kind of beam information they provide are discussed in detail.

  6. Beam stability issues of the VLHC rings

    SciTech Connect

    K.-Y. Ng

    2001-05-08

    Beam stability issues of the VLHC rings in Phase 1 and Phase 2 are reviewed. For accelerator rings of circumference 232 km and beam pipe radius of the order of 1 cm, the impedance of the vacuum chamber is dominated by the resistive wall. The most dangerous instabilities are the single-bunch transverse mode coupling instability and the transverse coupled bunch instability driven by the resistive wall at sub-revolution frequency. Scaling is studied concerning the thresholds of these instabilities and the dominance of the resistive wall impedance as the size of the accelerator increases.

  7. Storage rings for radioactive ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolden, F.; Dimopoulou, C.; Dolinskii, A.; Steck, M.

    2008-10-01

    Storage rings for radioactive heavy ions can be applied for a wide range of experiments in atomic and nuclear physics. The rare isotope beams are produced in flight via fragmentation or fission of high-intensity primary ions and they circulate in the storage ring at moderately relativistic energies (typically between 0.1 GeV/u up to 1 GeV/u). Due to their production mechanism they are usually highly charged or even fully stripped. The circulating radioactive heavy ion beams can be used to measure nuclear properties such as masses and decay times, which, in turn, can depend strongly on the ionic charge state. The storage rings must have large acceptances and dynamic apertures. The subsequent application of stochastic precooling of the secondary ions which are injected with large transverse and longitudinal emittances, and electron cooling to reach very high phase space densities has turned out to be a helpful tool for experiments with short-lived ions having lifetimes down to a few seconds. Some of these experiments have already been performed at the experimental storage ring ESR at GSI. The storage ring complex of the FAIR project is intended to enhance significantly the range of experimental possibilities. It is planned to extend the scope of experimental possibilities to collisions with electron or antiproton beams.

  8. Comparison of beam transport simulations to measurements at the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkinson, C.; Neri, F.; Fitzgerald, D.H.; Blind, B.; Macek, R.; Plum, M.; Sander, O.; Thiessen, H.A.

    1997-10-01

    The ability to model and simulate beam behavior in the Proton Storage Ring (PSR) of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is an important diagnostic and predictive tool. This paper gives the results of an effort to model the ring apertures and lattice and use beam simulation programs to track the beam. The results are then compared to measured activation levels from beam loss in the ring. The success of the method determines its usefulness in evaluating the effects of planned upgrades to the Proton Storage Ring.

  9. Studies of Beam Dynamics in Cooler Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Dietrich, J.; Stein, J.; Meshkov, I.; Sidorin, A.; Smirnov, A.

    2006-03-20

    This report describes the numerical simulation of the crystalline proton beam formation in COSY using BETACOOL code. The study includes the description of experimental results at NAP-M storage ring where the large reduction of the momentum spread was observed for first time. The present simulation shows that this behavior of proton beam can not be explained as ordered state of protons. The numerical simulation of crystalline proton beams was done for COSY parameters. The number of protons when the ordering state can be observed is limited by value 106 particles and momentum spread less then 10-6. Experimental results for the attempt to achieve of ordered state of proton beam for COSY is presented. This work is supported by RFBR grant no. 05-02-16320 and INTAS grant no. 03-54-5584.

  10. Coherent parasitic energy loss of the recycler beam

    SciTech Connect

    K.Y. Ng

    2004-07-14

    Parasitic energy loss of the particle beam in the Recycler Ring is discussed. The long beam confined between two barrier waves has a spectrum that falls off rapidly with frequency. Discrete summation over the revolution harmonics must be made to obtain the correct energy loss per particle per turn, because only a few lower revolution harmonics of real part of the longitudinal impedance contribute to the parasitic energy loss. The longitudinal impedances of the broadband rf cavities, the broadband resistive-wall monitors, and the resistive wall of the vacuum chamber are discussed. They are the main sources of the parasitic energy loss.

  11. BEAM-BEAM SIMULATIONS FOR THE ERHIC ELECTRON RING.

    SciTech Connect

    MONTAG, C.

    2005-05-16

    To study collisions between polarized electrons and heavy ions or polarized protons at high energy, adding a 10 GeV electron storage ring to the existing RHIC facility is currently under consideration. To achieve high luminosities of several 10{sup 33} cm{sup -2} sec{sup -1} range, a vertical beam-beam tuneshift parameter of {zeta}{sub y} = 0.08 is required for the electron beam. Simulation studies are being performed to study the feasibility of this high tuneshift parameter and explore the potential for even higher tuneshifts. Recent results of these studies are presented.

  12. Simulation of loss of uranium ions due to charge changing processes in the CSRm ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Wen-Heng; Yang, Jian-Cheng; Li, Peng; Li, Zhong-Shan; Shang, Peng; Qu, Guo-Feng; Ge, Wen-Wen; Tang, Mei-Tang; Sha, Xiao-Ping

    2015-04-01

    Significant beam loss caused by the charge exchange processes and ion impact-induced outgassing may restrict the maximum number of accelerated heavy ions during the high intensity operation of an accelerator. In order to control beam loss due to charge exchange processes and confine the generated desorption gas, tracking of the beam loss distribution and installation of absorber blocks with low-desorption rate material at appropriate locations in the main Cooler Storage Ring (CSRm) at the Institute of Modern Physics, Lanzhou, will be performed. The loss simulation of uranium ions with electron-loss is presented in this report and the conclusion is that most charge changed particles are lost in the second dipole of the super-period structure. The calculation of the collimation efficiency of the CSRm ring will be continued in the future. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11305227)

  13. A Beam Transport and Loss simulation with electrostatic beam separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ming-Jen

    1997-05-01

    Eletrostatic beam separator (septa) string is used in the Fermilab fixed target program for slow extraction from Tevatron and for dividing the beam to different experimental area. The loss from beam interaction with the dividing wire plane of the septa is used to determine the alignment of individual septum within a string of many. The interpretation of the real life signal registered at the loss monitors is not always straight forward. A simulation is being done to model the beam split through septa string and the loss pattern at exisiting beam loss monitor locations. This should lead to a better understanding of the signal and help in the alignment operation.

  14. DATA ACQUISITION FOR SNS BEAM LOSS MONITOR SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    YENG,Y.GASSNER,D.HOFF,L.WITKOVER,R.

    2003-10-13

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) beam loss monitor system uses VME based electronics to measure the radiation produced by lost beam. Beam loss signals from cylindrical argon-filled ion chambers and neutron detectors will be conditioned in analog front-end (AFE) circuitry. These signals will be digitized and further processed in a dedicated VME crate. Fast beam inhibit and low-level, long-term loss warnings will be generated to provide machine protection. The fast loss data will have a bandwidth of 35kHz. While the low level, long-term loss data will have much higher sensitivity. This is further complicated by the 3 decade range of intensity as the Ring accumulates beam. Therefore a bandwidth of 100kHz and dynamic range larger than 21 bits data acquisition system will be required for this purpose. Based on the evaluation of several commercial ADC modules in preliminary design phase, a 24 bits Sigma-Delta data acquisition VME bus card was chosen as the SNS BLM digitizer. An associated vxworks driver and EPICS device support module also have been developed at BNL. Simulating test results showed this system is fully qualified for both fast loss and low-level, long-term loss application. The first prototype including data acquisition hardware setup and EPICS software (running database and OPI clients) will be used in SNS Drift Tube Linac (DTL) system commissioning.

  15. Ring Current Ion Losses by Pitch Angle Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walt, M.; Voss, H. D.

    2001-12-01

    The Source/Loss Cone Energetic Particle Spectrometer (SEPS) on the Polar Satellite observes ions above 155 keV with an angular resolution of about 1.5 degrees. When the axis of SEPS is pointing within 10 degrees of the magnetic field direction, the detector measures particles in both the downward and upward loss cones. Measurements of the loss cone fluxes during the magnetic storms of August 6, 1998, August 27, 1998, September 25, 1998, October 19, 1998, and November 13, 1998 often show large fluxes of ring current ions moving downward inside the loss cone. At times these fluxes are comparable to the trapped ion population, indicating that strong pitch angle scattering is taking place at least locally. Although Polar encounters the ring current region at only two magnetic local times during any given storm, the frequent observation of precipitation suggests that pitch angle scattering is an important loss mechanism for ring current ions.

  16. Beam storage studies in the Fermilab main ring

    SciTech Connect

    MacLachlan, J.A.

    1982-05-06

    Bunched beams of 100 and 150 GeV have been stored in the Fermilab Main Ring for periods of up to one hour. The observations of beam current and beam profiles are analyzed for the effects of gas scattering, chromaticity and non-linear magnetic field.

  17. Beam-storage studies in the Fermilab main ring

    SciTech Connect

    MacLachlan, J.A.

    1982-05-06

    Bunched beams of 100 and 150 GeV have been stored in the Fermilab Main Ring for periods of up to one hour. The observations of beam current and beam profiles are analyzed for the effects of gas scattering, chromaticity and non-linear magnetic field.

  18. Collider ring particle loss tracking with SSCTRK

    SciTech Connect

    Garavaglia, T.; Kauffmann, S.K.; Stiening, R.

    1990-04-01

    The SSCTRK numerical simulation tracking code has been used to study the benefit of increasing the SSC dipole magnet aperture from 4 to 5 cm. This study has been carried out for both hypothetical highly corrected and plausibly corrected machines, the former having no systematic multipole errors and chromaticity identically zero. The choice of tune values, phase advance per cell, random multipole errors, systematic multipole errors and chromaticity (for the plausibly corrected machines), closed orbit error, the criterion for particle loss, etc. are set forth in detail. Runs of 10{sup 5} turns and 3 {times} 10{sup 6} turns are presented together with the approximate dynamic apertures they yield from their particle loss patterns.

  19. A new beam loss detector for low-energy proton and heavy-ion accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhengzheng; Crisp, Jenna; Russo, Tom; Webber, Robert; Zhang, Yan

    2014-12-01

    The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) to be constructed at Michigan State University shall deliver a continuous, 400 kW heavy ion beam to the isotope production target. This beam is capable of inflicting serious damage on accelerator components, e.g. superconducting RF accelerating cavities. A Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) System is essential for detecting beam loss with sufficient sensitivity and promptness to inform the machine protection system (MPS) and operations personnel of impending dangerous losses. Radiation transport simulations reveal shortcomings in the use of ionization chambers for the detection of beam losses in low-energy, heavy-ion accelerators. Radiation cross-talk effects due to the folded geometry of the FRIB LINAC pose further complications to locating specific points of beam loss. We propose a newly developed device, named the Loss Monitor Ring (LMR1

  20. A new method for beam stacking in storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, C.M.; /Fermilab

    2008-06-01

    Recently, I developed a new beam stacking scheme for synchrotron storage rings called 'longitudinal phase-space coating' (LPSC). This scheme has been convincingly validated by multi-particle beam dynamics simulations and has been demonstrated with beam experiments at the Fermilab Recycler. Here, I present the results from both simulations and experiments. The beam stacking scheme presented here is the first of its kind.

  1. Longitudinal stabilisation of bunched beams in a FEL storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migliorati, M.; Palumbo, L.; Dattoli, G.; Mezi, L.; Renieri, A.; Voykov, G. K.

    1997-02-01

    Experimental observations on FEL Storage Rings (Aco, Super-Aco, VEPP3, TERAS) have shown that in a storage ring with an operating FEL there is a mutual effect between the FEL operational mode and the beam longitudinal distribution. The main effects are the birth of a macro-temporal structure of the FEL radiation and a suppression of the synchrotron sidebands, evidence of beam stabilisation against the microwave instabilities. In this paper we discuss the main features of the beam dynamics analysed with a simulation code recently developed, which includes the FEL-beam interaction. Furtherly, we propose an heuristic model which enable to describe in a simple way the overall system.

  2. Beam dynamics of CANDLE storage ring low alpha operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargsyan, A.; Amatuni, G.; Sahakyan, V.; Tsakanov, V.; Zanyan, G.

    2015-10-01

    The generation of the coherent THz radiation and short pulse synchrotron radiation in dedicated electron storage rings requires the study of non-standard magnetic lattices which provide low momentum compaction factor (alpha) of the ring. In the present paper two low alpha operation lattices based on modification of the original beam optics and implementation of inverse bend magnets are studied for CANDLE storage ring. For considered cases an analysis of transverse and longitudinal beam dynamics is given and the feasibility of lattices is discussed.

  3. Spallation neutron source beam loss monitor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gassner, D.; Witkover, R.; Cameron, P.; Power, J.

    2000-11-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source facility to be built at ORNL is designed to accumulate 2×1014 protons at 1.0 GeV and deliver them to the experimental target in one bunch at 60 Hz. To achieve this goal and protect the machine from excessive radiation activation, an uncontrolled loss criteria of 1 part in 104 (1 W/m) has been specified. Measured losses will be conditioned to provide machine tuning data, a beam abort trigger, and logging of loss history. The design of the distributed loss monitor system utilizing argon-filled glass ionization chambers and scintillator-photomultipliers will be presented.

  4. Neutral Beam Ion Loss Modeling for NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    D. Mikkelsen; D.S. Darrow; L. Grisham; R. Akers; S. Kaye

    1999-06-01

    A numerical model, EIGOL, has been developed to calculate the loss rate of neutral beam ions from NSTX and the resultant power density on the plasma facing components. This model follows the full gyro-orbit of the beam ions, which can be a significant fraction of the minor radius. It also includes the three-dimensional structure of the plasma facing components inside NSTX. Beam ion losses from two plasma conditions have been compared: {beta} = 23%, q{sub 0} = 0.8, and {beta} = 40%, q{sub 0} = 2.6. Global losses are computed to be 4% and 19%, respectively, and the power density on the rf antenna is near the maximum tolerable levels in the latter case.

  5. RHIC beam loss monitor system design

    SciTech Connect

    Witkover, R.; Zitvogel, E.; Michnoff, R.

    1997-07-01

    The Beam Loss Monitor (BLM) System is designed to prevent the quenching of RHIC magnets due to beam loss, provide quantitative loss data, and the loss history in the event of a beam abort. The system uses 400 ion chambers of a modified Tevatron design. To satisfy fast (single turn) and slow (100 msec) loss beam criteria and provide sensitivity for studies measurements, a range of over 8 decades is needed. An RC pre-integrator reduces the dynamic range for a low current amplifier. This is digitized for data logging. The output is also applied to an analog multiplier which compensates the energy dependence, extending the range of the abort comparators. High and low pass filters separate the signal to dual comparators with independent programmable trip levels. Up to 64 channels, on 8 VME boards, are controlled by a micro-controller based VME module, decoupling it from the front-end computer (FEC) for real-time operation. Results with the detectors in the RHIC Sextant Test and the electronics in the AGS-to-RHIC (AtR) transfer line will be presented.

  6. COMPUTATIONAL BEAM DYNAMICS STUDIES FOR IMPROVING THE RING INJECTION AND EXTRACTION SYSTEMS IN SNS

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Jeffrey A; Cousineau, Sarah M; Plum, Michael A; Wang, Jian-Guang

    2008-01-01

    The ring injection and extraction systems must function as designed in order for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) to achieve its specified performance. In commissioning and early operations we have encountered problems that have been traced to these systems. We experienced high beam losses in and around the injection dump, the rectification of which has necessitated ongoing study and development by a multidisciplinary team. Results already include a number of enhancements of existing features and the addition of new elements and diagnostics. The problem in the extraction region stems from tilted beam distributions observed in the ring-to-target beam transport line (RTBT) and on the target, thus complicating the control of the beam-on-target distribution. This indicates the inadvertent introduction of x-y beam coupling somewhere upstream of the RTBT. The present paper describes computational studies, using the ORBIT Code, addressed at the detailed understanding and solution of these problems.

  7. Beam losses due to abrupt crab cavity failures in the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, T.; Barranco, J.; Calaga, R.; Tomas, R.; Wenninger, B.; Yee, B.; Zimmermann, F.

    2011-03-28

    A major concern for the implementation of crab crossing in a future High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) is machine protection in an event of a fast crab-cavity failure. Certain types of abrupt crab-cavity amplitude and phase changes are simulated to characterize the effect of failures on the beam and the resulting particle-loss signatures. The time-dependent beam loss distributions around the ring and particle trajectories obtained from the simulations allow for a first assessment of the resulting beam impact on LHC collimators and on sensitive components around the ring. Results for the nominal LHC lattice is presented.

  8. The ATLAS Beam Condition and Beam Loss Monitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolenc, I.

    2010-04-01

    The primary goal of ATLAS Beam Condition Monitor (BCM) and Beam Loss Monitor (BLM) is to protect the ATLAS Inner Detector against damaging LHC beam incidents by initiating beam abort in case of beam failures. Poly-crystalline Chemical Vapour Deposition (pCVD) diamond was chosen as the sensor material for both systems. ATLAS BCM will provide real-time monitoring of instantaneous particle rates close to the interaction point (IP) of ATLAS spectrometer. Using fast front-end and signal processing electronics the time-of-flight and pulse amplitude measurements will be performed to distinguish between normal collisions and background events due to natural or accidental beam losses. Additionally, BCM will also provide coarse relative luminosity information. A second system, the ATLAS BLM, is an independent system which was recently added to complement the BCM. It is a current measuring system and was partially adopted from the BLM system developed by the LHC beam instrumentation group with pCVD diamond pad sensors replacing the ionisation chambers. The design of both systems and results of operation in ATLAS framework during the commissioning with cosmic rays will be reported in this contribution.

  9. Losses of ring current ions by strong pitch angle scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walt, M.; Voss, H. D.

    High angular resolution measurements of 155 keV ions in the ring current during the magnetic storm of August 6, 1998 show filled loss cones indicating that very rapid pitch angle scattering is taking place above the satellite location. The measurements were made with the SEPS detector on the Polar satellite during its passages through the ring current regions, usually at magnetic latitudes near ±45° and at magnetic local times of about 04:00 and 16:00 hrs. The observed strong pitch angle scattering implies a trapping lifetime of less than an hour and may explain the early rapid recovery of Dst during magnetic storms.

  10. Coupled beam motion in a storage ring with crab cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiaobiao

    2016-02-01

    We studied the coupled beam motion in a storage ring between the transverse and longitudinal directions introduced by crab cavities. The analytic form of the linear decoupling transformation is derived. The equilibrium bunch distribution in an electron storage ring with a crab cavity is given, including contribution to the eigenemittance induced by the crab cavity. Application to the short pulse generation scheme using crab cavities is considered.

  11. Coupled beam motion in a storage ring with crab cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xiaobiao

    2015-11-16

    We studied the coupled beam motion in a storage ring between the transverse and longitudinal directions introduced by crab cavities. Analytic form of the linear decoupling transformation is derived. Also, the equilibrium bunch distribution in an electron storage ring with a crab cavity is given, including contribution to the eigen-emittance induced by the crab cavity. Application to the short pulse generation scheme using crab cavities [1] is considered.

  12. Online optimization of storage ring nonlinear beam dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiaobiao; Safranek, James

    2015-08-01

    We propose to optimize the nonlinear beam dynamics of existing and future storage rings with direct online optimization techniques. This approach may have crucial importance for the implementation of diffraction limited storage rings. In this paper considerations and algorithms for the online optimization approach are discussed. We have applied this approach to experimentally improve the dynamic aperture of the SPEAR3 storage ring with the robust conjugate direction search method and the particle swarm optimization method. The dynamic aperture was improved by more than 5 mm within a short period of time. Experimental setup and results are presented.

  13. Complex ABCD transformations for optical ring cavities with losses and gain

    SciTech Connect

    Kudashov, V N; Radin, A M; Plachenov, A B

    1999-04-30

    Complex ABCD field transformations are investigated for inhomogeneous optical ring cavities with losses and gain. It is shown that the sets of eigenfunctions, corresponding to counterpropagating waves, are really biorthogonal: the functions in each of these sets are really orthogonal relative to one another, and have a complex weighting factor independent of the mode number. Bidirectional and unidirectional stability conditions are formulated for such cavities. These conditions are qualitatively different from those for loss-free cavities. A simple algorithm is proposed for the evaluation of the ABCD matrix for a medium with an arbitrary longitudinal inhomogeneity along the beam. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  14. The AGS Booster beam loss monitor system

    SciTech Connect

    Beadle, E.R.; Bennett, G.W.; Witkover, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    A beam loss monitor system has been developed for the Brookhaven National Laboratory Booster accelerator, and is designed for use with intensities of up to 1.5 {times} 10{sup 13} protons and carbon to gold ions at 50-3 {times} 10{sup 9} ions per pulse. This system is a significant advance over the present AGS system by improving the sensitivity, dynamic range, and data acquisition. In addition to the large dynamic range achievable, it is adaptively shifted when high losses are detected. The system uses up to 80 argon filled ion chambers as detectors, as well as newly designed electronics for processing and digitizing detector outputs. The hardware simultaneously integrates each detector output, interfaces to the beam interrupt systems, and digitizes all 80 channels to 21 bits at 170 KHz. This paper discuses the design, construction, and operation of the system. 4 refs., 2 figs.

  15. Beam dynamics in an ultra-low energy storage rings (review of existing facilities and feasibility studies for future experiments)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papash, A. I.; Smirnov, A. V.; Welsch, C. P.

    2014-03-01

    Storage rings operating at ultra-low energies and in particular electrostatic storage rings have proven to be invaluable tools for atomic and molecular physics. Due to the mass independence of the electrostatic rigidity, these machines are able to store a wide range of different particles, from light ions to heavy singly charged bio-molecules. However, earlier measurements showed strong limitations on beam intensity, fast decay of ion current, reduced life time etc. The nature of these effects was not fully understood. Also a large variety of experiments in future generation ultra-low energy storage and decelerator facilities including in-ring collision studies with a reaction microscope require a comprehensive investigation of the physical processes involved into the operation of such rings. In this paper, we present review of non-linear and long term beam dynamics studies on example of the ELISA, AD Recycler, TSR and USR rings using the computer codes BETACOOL, OPERA-3D and MAD-X. The results from simulations were benchmarked against experimental data of beam losses in the ELISA storage ring. We showed that decay of beam intensity in ultra-low energy rings is mainly caused by ion losses on ring aperture due to multiple scattering on residual gas. Beam is lost on ring aperture due to small ring acceptance. Rate of beam losses increases at high intensities because of the intra-beam scattering effect adds to vacuum losses. Detailed investigations into the ion kinetics under consideration of the effects from electron cooling and multiple scattering of the beam on a supersonic gas jet target have been carried out as well. The life time, equilibrium momentum spread and equilibrium lateral spread during collisions with this internal gas jet target were estimated. In addition, the results from experiments at the TSR ring, where low intensity beam of CF+ ions at 93 keV/u has been shrunk to extremely small dimensions have been reproduced. Based on these simulations

  16. BEAM DIAGNOSTICS USING BPM SIGNALS FROM INJECTED AND STORED BEAMS IN A STORAGE RING

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G.M.; Shaftan; T.; Cheng; W.X.; Fliller; R.; Heese; R.; Singh; O.; Willeke; F.

    2011-03-28

    Many modern light sources are operating in top-off injection mode or are being upgraded to top-off injection mode. The storage ring always has the stored beam and injected beam for top-off injection mode. So the BPM data is the mixture of both beam positions and the injected beam position cannot be measured directly. We propose to use dedicated wide band BPM electronics in the NSLS II storage ring to retrieve the injected beam trajectory with the singular value decomposition (SVD) method. The beam position monitor (BPM) has the capability to measure bunch-by-bunch beam position. Similar electronics can be used to measure the bunch-by-bunch beam current which is necessary to get the injection beam position. The measurement precision of current needs to be evaluated since button BPM sum signal has position dependence. The injected beam trajectory can be measured and monitored all the time without dumping the stored beam. We can adjust and optimize the injected beam trajectory to maximize the injection efficiency. We can also measure the storage ring acceptance by mapping the injected beam trajectory.

  17. Neutral Beam Ion Loss Modelling for NSTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darrow, D. S.; Akers, R.; Kaye, S. M.; Mikkelsen, D. R.

    1999-11-01

    The loss of 80 keV D neutral beam ions to the walls has been modeled for a range of plasma conditions in NSTX using the EIGOL code[1]. Initial results of the code are in reasonable agreement with those from the LOCUST code[2]. Both codes predict loss fractions of 20% for a discharge with β_T=40% and q_0=2.6. Losses are strongly concentrated on the front face and edges of the high-harmonic fast wave antenna as it projects farther inward than other internal structures at the midplane. The edges of the passive stabilizer plates near the midplane are also subject to a large flux of lost beam ions under some conditions. The dependence of the loss upon the plasma density profile, I_p, and BT will be presented. [1] D. S. Darrow, et al., in Proceedings of the 26th EPS Conference on Controlled Fusion and Plasma Physics, Maastricht, The Netherlands, 14-18 June 1999. [2] R. Akers, et al., ibid.

  18. Beam position monitors for the Fermilab recycler ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barsotti, E.; Lackey, S.; McClure, C.; Meadowcroft, R.

    1998-12-01

    Fermilab's new Recycler Ring will recover and cool "used" antiprotons at the end of a Tevatron store and also accumulate "new" antiprotons from the antiproton source. A wideband rf system based on barrier buckets will result in unbunched beam, grouped in one to three separate partitions throughout the ring. A new beam position monitor system will measure position of any one partition at a time, using low-frequency signals from beam distribution edges. A signal path including an elliptical split-plate detector, radiation-resistant tunnel preamplifiers, and logarithmic amplifiers, will result in a held output voltage nearly proportional to position. The results will be digitized using Industry Pack technology and a Motorola MVME162 processor board. The data acquisition subsystem, including digitization and timing for 80 position channels, will occupy two VME slots. System design will be described, with some additional emphasis on the use of logamp chips.

  19. A method for generating double-ring-shaped vector beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huan, Chen; Xiao-Hui, Ling; Zhi-Hong, Chen; Qian-Guang, Li; Hao, Lv; Hua-Qing, Yu; Xu-Nong, Yi

    2016-07-01

    We propose a method for generating double-ring-shaped vector beams. A step phase introduced by a spatial light modulator (SLM) first makes the incident laser beam have a nodal cycle. This phase is dynamic in nature because it depends on the optical length. Then a Pancharatnam–Berry phase (PBP) optical element is used to manipulate the local polarization of the optical field by modulating the geometric phase. The experimental results show that this scheme can effectively create double-ring-shaped vector beams. It provides much greater flexibility to manipulate the phase and polarization by simultaneously modulating the dynamic and the geometric phases. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11547017), the Hubei Engineering University Research Foundation, China (Grant No. z2014001), and the Natural Science Foundation of Hubei Province, China (Grant No. 2014CFB578).

  20. Transient beam loading compensation in the Fermilab Main Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Wildman, D.

    1985-10-01

    A requirement for bunch coalescing and bunch rotation for antiproton production in the Fermilab Main Ring is that the net rf voltages be reduced below about 1 kV. At high beam intensities, the fields generated by the beam in a single pass through the rf cavities will exceed this limit. The new compensation system monitors the component of the beam current at the fundamental rf frequency as a function of time. This information is then delayed by a single turn and fed back into the high level rf system to cancel the beam-induced fields. The system has compensated the beam-induced voltage generated by a single booster batch to 5% of its initial value.

  1. Beam loss and radiation effects in the SSC lattice elements

    SciTech Connect

    Baishev, I.S.; Drozhdin, A.I.; Mokhov, N.V. |

    1990-11-01

    The Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) is designed to be an advanced machine with relatively low beam loss-induced radiation levels. However, a fraction of the beam lost in the lattice due to pp-collisions at the interaction points, beam-gas scattering, bearn-halo scraping, various instabilities and errors will result in the irradiation of conventional and superconducting components of the accelerator and experimental apparatus. The level of the beam loss and its distribution along the machine structure has impact on all of the three crucial radiation effects at the SSC: quenching of the superconducting magnets, survivability of the accelerator and detectors components in the near-beam regions, and influence to the environment. This paper, based on the full-scale Monte Carlo simulation, will explore all major sources of beam loss in the Collider and measures to reduce the irradiation of the accelerator components. Basic parameters of the Super Collider accepted throughout this report are as follows: Proton energy E{sub 0} = 20 TeV, injection energy is 2 TeV, number of protons circulating in each of the collider rings is N = 1.3 {times} 10{sup 14}, circumference is 87.12 km, the transverse normalized emittance {var_epsilon}{sub N}({sigma}) = 1 {pi} mm-mrad, for the regular lattice ({beta} = 305 m) the beam R.M.S. sizes are {sigma} = 0.12 mm at 20 TEV and {sigma} = 0.38 mm at the injection energy. The dipole length is 15.815 m with the effective field length of 15.165 m. The magnetic field map for B{sub 0} = 6.5999 T has been calculated with the POISSON program by Greg Snitchler. The turn angle of each dipole is {alpha} = 1.50027 mrad. The dipole aperture is 50 mm. The two beam pipe diameters are studied 33 and 40 mm. The operating temperature is T{sub 0} = 4.35 K.

  2. Collimation system design for beam loss localization with slipstacking injection in the Fermilab Main Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Drozhdin, A.I.; Brown, B.C.; Johnson, D.E.; Koba, K.; Kourbanis, I.; Mokhov, N.V.; Rakhno, I.L.; Sidorov, V.I.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    Results of modeling with the 3-D STRUCT and MARS15 codes of beam loss localization and related radiation effects are presented for the slipstacking injection to the Fermilab Main Injector. Simulations of proton beam loss are done using multi-turn tracking with realistic accelerator apertures, nonlinear fields in the accelerator magnets and time function of the RF manipulations to explain the results of beam loss measurements. The collimation system consists of one primary and four secondary collimators. It intercepts a beam power of 1.6 kW at a scraping rate of 5% of 5.5E+13 ppp, with a beam loss rate in the ring outside the collimation region of 1 W/m or less. Based on thorough energy deposition and radiation modeling, a corresponding collimator design was developed that satisfies all the radiation and engineering constraints.

  3. Analysis of beam loss induced abort kicker instability

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang W.; Sandberg, J.; Ahrens, L.; Fischer, W.; Hahn, H.; Mi, J.; Pai, C.; Tan, Y.

    2012-05-20

    Through more than a decade of operation, we have noticed the phenomena of beam loss induced kicker instability in the RHIC beam abort systems. In this study, we analyze the short term beam loss before abort kicker pre-fire events and operation conditions before capacitor failures. Beam loss has caused capacitor failures and elevated radiation level concentrated at failed end of capacitor has been observed. We are interested in beam loss induced radiation and heat dissipation in large oil filled capacitors and beam triggered thyratron conduction. We hope the analysis result would lead to better protection of the abort systems and improved stability of the RHIC operation.

  4. BEAM LOSS MITIGATION IN THE OAK RIDGE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, Michael A

    2012-01-01

    The Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accelerator complex routinely delivers 1 MW of beam power to the spallation target. Due to this high beam power, understanding and minimizing the beam loss is an ongoing focus area of the accelerator physics program. In some areas of the accelerator facility the equipment parameters corresponding to the minimum loss are very different from the design parameters. In this presentation we will summarize the SNS beam loss measurements, the methods used to minimize the beam loss, and compare the design vs. the loss-minimized equipment parameters.

  5. Luminosity Loss due to Beam Distortion and the Beam-Beam Instability

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Juhao; Raubenheimer, T.O.; Chao, A.W.; Seryi, A.; Sramek, C.K.; /Rice U.

    2005-06-30

    In a linear collider, sources of emittance dilution such as transverse wakefields or dispersive errors will couple the vertical phase space to the longitudinal position within the beam (the so-called ''banana effect''). When the Intersection Point (IP) disruption parameter is large, these beam distortions will be amplified by a single bunch kink instability which will lead to luminosity loss. We study this phenomena both analytically using linear theory and via numerical simulation. In particular, we examine the dependence of the luminosity loss on the wavelength of the beam distortions and the disruption parameter. This analysis may prove useful when optimizing the vertical disruption parameter for luminosity operation with given beam distortions.

  6. Transverse instability of the antiproton beam in the Recycler Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Prost, L.R.; Bhat, C.M.; Burov, A.; Crisp, J.; Eddy, N.; Hu, M.; Shemyakin, A.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    The brightness of the antiproton beam in Fermilab's 8 GeV Recycler ring is limited by a transverse instability. This instability has occurred during the extraction process to the Tevatron for large stacks of antiprotons even with dampers in operation. This paper describes observed features of the instability, introduces the threshold phase density to characterize the beam stability, and finds the results to be in agreement with a resistive wall instability model. Effective exclusion of the longitudinal tails from Landau damping by decreasing the depth of the RF potential well is observed to lower the threshold density by up to a factor of two.

  7. Beam 'notching' tests with the main ring super damper

    SciTech Connect

    Halling, Mike; Crisp, Jim; /Fermilab

    1995-01-01

    The original operations scenario to provide 12 proton bunches for the accelerator studies in the fall had them injecting 12 partial Booster batches into the main ring, accelerating them to flattop, then coalescing them. One of the main limitations of these coalescing studies for the last few months has been the inability of the Booster to provide enough beam without radiation trips. These radiation trips are considered difficult to eliminate due to the fact that the unwanted Booster beam cannot be aborted cleanly. During last week's study period they successfully used a new method that shows much promise.

  8. Ion bunch length effects on the beam-beam interaction and its compensation in a high-luminosity ring-ring electron-ion collider

    SciTech Connect

    Montag C.; Oeftiger, A.; Fischer, W.

    2012-05-20

    One of the luminosity limits in a ring-ring electron-ion collider is the beam-beam effect on the electrons. In the limit of short ion bunches, simulation studies have shown that this limit can be significantly increased by head-on beam-beam compensation with an electron lens. However, with an ion bunch length comparable to the beta-function at the IP in conjunction with a large beam-beam parameter, the electrons perform a sizeable fraction of a betatron oscillation period inside the long ion bunches. We present recent simulation results on the compensation of this beam-beam interaction with multiple electron lenses.

  9. Absolute beam energy measurements in e+e- storage rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Placidi, M.

    1997-01-01

    The CERN Large Electron Positron collider (LEP) was dedicated to the measurement of the mass Mz and the width Γz of the Z0 resonance during the LEP1 phase which terminated in September 1995. The Storage Ring operated in Energy Scan mode during the 1993 and 1995 physics runs by choosing the beam energy Ebeam to correspond to a center-of-mass (CM) energy at the interaction points (IPs) ECMpeak±1762 MeV. After a short review of the techniques usually adopted to set and control the beam energy, this paper describes in more detail two methods adopted at LEP for precise beam energy determination that are essential to reduce the contribution to the systematic error on Mz and Γz. The positron beam momentum was initially determined at the 20-GeV injection energy by measuring the speed of a less relativistic proton beam circulating on the same orbit, taking advantage of the unique opportunity to inject two beams into the LEP at short time intervals. The positron energy at the Z0 peak was in this case derived by extrapolation. Once transverse polarization became reproducible, the Resonant Depolarization (RD) technique was implemented at the Z0 operating energies, providing a ⩽2×10-5 instantaneous accuracy. RD Beam Energy Calibration has been adopted during the LEP Energy Scan campaigns as well as in Accelerator Physics runs for accurate measurement of machine parameters.

  10. Controlling Fano resonance of ring/crescent-ring plasmonic nanostructure with Bessel beam.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Fajun; Zhu, Weiren; Premaratne, Malin; Zhao, Jianlin

    2014-01-27

    We propose a method to dynamically control the Fano resonance of a ring/crescent-ring gold nanostructure by spatially changing the phase distribution of a probe Bessel beam. We demonstrate that a highly tunable Fano interference between the quadrupole and bright dipole modes can be realized in the near-infrared range. Even though a complex interference between a broad resonance and a narrower resonance lead to these observations, we show that a simple coupled oscillator model can accurately describe the behavior, providing valuable insights into the dynamics of the system. A further analysis of this structure uncovers a series of interesting phenomena such as anticrossing, sign changing of coupling and the spectral inversion of quadrupole and bright dipole modes. We further show that near field enhancement at Fano resonance can be actively controlled by modulating the phase distribution of the exciting incident Bessel beam. PMID:24515223

  11. SUPERCONDUCTING RING CYCLOTRON FOR RIKEN RI BEAM FACTORY IN JAPAN

    SciTech Connect

    Okuno, H.; Dantsuka, T.; Yamada, K.; Kase, M.; Maie, T.; Kamigaito, O.

    2010-04-09

    Since 1997, RIKEN Nishina Center has been constructing the Radioactive Isotope Beam Factory (RIBF) and succeeded in beam commissioning of its accelerator complex at the end of 2006. The world's first superconducting ring cyclotron (SRC) is the final booster in the RIBF accelerator complex which is able to accelerate all-element heavy ions to a speed of about 70% of the velocity of light. The ring cyclotron consists of 6 major superconducting sector magnets with a maximum field of 3.8 T. The total stored energy is 235 MJ, and its overall sizes are 19 m diameter, 8 m height and 8,300 tons. The magnet system assembly was completed in August 2005, and successfully reached the maximum field in November 2005. The first beam was extracted at the end of 2006 and the first uranium beam was extracted in March 2007. However operation of the helium refrigerator was not satisfactory although the commissioning of SRC was successful. Operation was stopped every two month due to degradation of its cooling power. In February 2008 the reason of the degradation was revealed to be oil contamination. Operation of the cryogenic system was restarted from August 2008 after hard task to clean up the helium refrigerator and to add oil separators to the compressor. After restoration long-term steady operation to keep the magnet superconducting continued for about 8 months with no sign of degradation of cooling capacity.

  12. Model for nonlinear evolution of localized ion ring beam in magnetoplasma

    SciTech Connect

    Scales, W. A.; Ganguli, G.; Mithaiwala, M.; Rudakov, L.

    2012-06-15

    An electrostatic hybrid model, which investigates the nonlinear evolution of a localized ion ring beam in a magnetoplasma, is described and applied to the generation and evolution of turbulence in the very low frequency (VLF) ({Omega}{sub ci}<{omega}<{Omega}{sub ce}) range, where {Omega}{sub ci(e)} is the ion (electron) gyro frequency. Electrons are treated as a fluid and the ions with the particle-in-cell method. Although the model is electrostatic, it includes the effects of energy loss by convection of electromagnetic VLF waves out of the instability region by utilizing a phenomenological model for effective collisions with the fluid electrons. In comparison with a more conventional electrostatic hybrid model, the new model shows much more efficient extraction of energy from the ion ring beam and reduced background plasma heating over a range of parameters.

  13. Polarized Ion Beams in Figure-8 Rings of JLab's MEIC

    SciTech Connect

    Derbenev, Yaroslav; Lin, Fanglei; Morozov, Vasiliy; Zhang, Yuhong; Kondratenko, Anatoliy; Kondratenko, M A; Filatov, Yury

    2014-07-01

    The Medium-energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) proposed by Jefferson Lab is designed to provide high polarization of both colliding beams. One of the unique features of JLab's MEIC is figure-8 shape of its rings. It allows preservation and control of polarization of all ion species including small-anomalous-magnetic-moment deuterons during their acceleration and storage. The figure-8 design conceptually expands the capability of obtaining polarized high-energy beams in comparison to conventional designs because of its property of having no preferred periodic spin direction. This allows one to control effectively the beam polarization by means of magnetic insertions with small field integrals. We present a complete scheme for preserving the ion polarization during all stages of acceleration and its control in the collider's experimental straights.

  14. Particle Rate and Host Accelerator Beam Loss on the MICE Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Dobbs, Adam James

    2011-10-01

    A study is presented of particle rates in the MICE Muon Beamline and their relationship to beam loss produced in ISIS. A brief overview of neutrino physics is presented, together with a discussion on the Neutrino Factory as a motivation for MICE. An overview of MICE itself is then presented, highlighting the need for a systematic understanding of the relationship between the MICE target parameters, ISIS beam loss, and MICE particle rate. The variation of beam loss with target depth is examined and observed to be non-linear. The variation of beam loss with respect to the target dip time in the ISIS cycle is examined and observed to be approximately linear for dip times between 11.1 ms and 12.6 ms after ISIS injection, before tailing at earlier dip times. The variation of beam loss with particle rate is also observed to follow an approximately linear relationship from 0.05 V.ms to 4.7 V.ms beam loss, with a further strong indication that this continues up to 7.1 V.ms. Particle identification using time-of-flight data is used to give an insight into the relative abundances of each particle species present in the MICE beam. Estimates of muon rate are then produced as a function of beam loss. At a level of 2 V.ms beam loss ~10:9 muons per spill for a 3.2 ms spill with negative π → μ optics, and ~31:1 muons per 1 ms spill with positive π → μ optics are observed. Simulations using the ORBIT particle tracking code of the beam loss distributions around the ISIS ring, caused by the MICE target, are also presented and the implications for MICE running discussed.

  15. Fermilab main injector: High intensity operation and beam loss control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Bruce C.; Adamson, Philip; Capista, David; Chou, Weiren; Kourbanis, Ioanis; Morris, Denton K.; Seiya, Kiyomi; Wu, Guan Hong; Yang, Ming-Jen

    2013-07-01

    From 2005 through 2012, the Fermilab Main Injector provided intense beams of 120 GeV protons to produce neutrino beams and antiprotons. Hardware improvements in conjunction with improved diagnostics allowed the system to reach sustained operation at 400 kW beam power. Transmission was very high except for beam lost at or near the 8 GeV injection energy where 95% beam transmission results in about 1.5 kW of beam loss. By minimizing and localizing loss, residual radiation levels fell while beam power was doubled. Lost beam was directed to either the collimation system or to the beam abort. Critical apertures were increased while improved instrumentation allowed optimal use of available apertures. We will summarize the improvements required to achieve high intensity, the impact of various loss control tools and the status and trends in residual radiation in the Main Injector.

  16. Analysis of beam loss mechanism in the Project X linac

    SciTech Connect

    Carneiro, J.-P.; Lebedev, V.; Nagaitsev, S.; Ostiguy, J.-F.; Solyak, N.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    Minimization of the beam losses in a multi-MW H{sup -} linac such as ProjectX to a level below 1 W/m is a challenging task. The impact of different mechanism of beam stripping, including stripping in electric and magnetic fields, residual gas, blackbody radiation and intra-beam stripping, is analyzed. Other sources of beam losses are misalignements of beamline elements and errors in RF fields and phases. We present in this paper requirements for dynamic errors and correction schemes to keep beam losses under control.

  17. Local beam position feedback experiments on the ESRF storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Y.; Kahana, E.; Kirchman, J.

    1995-06-01

    This paper describes the results of local beam position feedback experiments conducted on the ESRF storage ring using digital signal processing (DSP) under the trilateral agreement of collaboration among ESRF, APS, and SPring-8. Two rf beam position monitors (BPMS) in the, upstream and downstream of the insertion device (ID) and two x-ray BPMs in the sixth cell were used to monitor the electron beam and the x-ray beam emitted from the ID, respectively. The local bump coefficients were obtained using the technique of singular value decomposition (SVD) on the global response matrix for the bump magnets and all the available BPMs outside the local bump. The local response matrix was then obtained between the two three-magnet bumps and the position monitors. The data sampling frequency was 4 kHz and a proportional, integral, and derivative (PID) controller was used. The result indicates the closed-loop feedback bandwidth close to 100 Hz and clear attenuation ({approx} {minus}40 dB) of the 7-Hz beam motion due to girder vibration resonance. Comparison of the results using the rf BPMs and x-ray BPMs will be also discussed.

  18. Electron storage ring beam lifetime dependence on pressure and pumping speed

    SciTech Connect

    Halama, H.J.

    1984-01-01

    The beam loss in electron storage rings depends to a large extent on the interaction of the beam with heavier residual gas molecules such as CO, CO/sub 2/ and A due to Bremsstrahlung and Coulomb scattering. The gas density inside the vacuum chamber is determined by the surface condition of the vacuum chamber which is bombarded by photons (synchrotron radiation) generated by circulating electron beams and by the installed pumping. During the spring shutdown the x-ray ring vacuum system was updated and baked out. Residual gas spectra obtained were typical of a well baked out system, i.e., hydrogen constituted approx. 95% of the gas and the average pressure was in the 10/sup -10/ Torr range. During initial operation the composition of desorbed gases was 43% H/sub 2/, 25% CO and 16% CO/sub 2/ and CH/sub 4/. After 3 months of beam conditioning desorption dropped by a factor of 5 and the CO, CO/sub 2/ and CH/sub 4/ peaks represented smaller percentage of total desorbed gas. Beam lifetime did not, however, show a corresponding increase. The pumping speed of distributed pumps dropped to zero at 1 x 10/sup -9/ Torr pressure but increased rapidly from approx. 20l/s in low 10/sup -9/ as the pressure increased.

  19. Characterizing and Controlling Beam Losses at the LANSCE Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Rybarcyk, Lawrence J.

    2012-09-12

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) currently provides 100-MeV H{sup +} and 800-MeV H{sup -} beams to several user facilities that have distinct beam requirements, e.g. intensity, micropulse pattern, duty factor, etc. Minimizing beam loss is critical to achieving good performance and reliable operation, but can be challenging in the context of simultaneous multi-beam delivery. This presentation will discuss various aspects related to the observation, characterization and minimization of beam loss associated with normal production beam operations in the linac.

  20. Impedances and beam stability issues of the Fermilab recycler ring

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, King-Yuen

    1996-04-01

    The Fermilab Recycler Ring (permanent magnets) will be built on top of the Fermilab Main Injector sharing the same tunnel; its main function is to recycle the anti-protons after a store in the Tevatron and to provide storage for them after after accumulation and cooling in the Accumulator. Estimates of coupling impedances show domination by space charge. Examination of longitudinal instabilities shows that microwave instability will not occur if there are only N = 2.53 x 10{sup 12} anti-protons in the beam. Longitudinal coupling-bunch instability during injection stacking does not appear possible because of long bunch lengths/short bunch gaps and lack of sharp resonances. Transverse instability, on the other hand, cannot be Landau damped by the momentum spread in the beam, but it can be cured by a small spread in the betatron tunes (either from space charge or an octupole).

  1. Minimization of first-turn losses by excited neutrals in charge-changing injection of accumulator rings

    SciTech Connect

    Jason, A.J.; Blind, B.; Channel, P.; Wang, Tai-Sen

    1994-07-01

    Substantial beam losses, due to production of excited neutrals by the foil stripper, have been observed to occur immediately after injection in accumulator rings that utilize charge-changing injection. A technique is proposed, based on experimental and theoretical results for excited-state production and stripping, that is potentially capable of reducing such losses by a factor greater than 10{sup 4}. In the technique, foil stripping occurs in a shaped magnetic field that resolves the excited atomic levels into immediately stripped states that are within ring acceptance and those that can be ejected from the ring. An added magnetic-mirror-field configuration is Proposed as an effective means of minimizing interactions between stripped electrons and the foil.

  2. Measurements of Beam Ion Loss from the Compact Helical System

    SciTech Connect

    D. S. Darrow, M. Isobe, Takashi Kondo, M. Sasao, and the CHS Group National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu, Japan

    2010-02-03

    Beam ion loss from the Compact Helical System (CHS) has been measured with a scintillator-type probe. The total loss to the probe, and the pitch angle and gyroradius distributions of that loss, have been measured as various plasma parameters were scanned. Three classes of beam ion loss were observed at the probe position: passing ions with pitch angles within 10o of those of transition orbits, ions on transition orbits, and ions on trapped orbits, typically 15o or more from transition orbits. Some orbit calculations in this geometry have been performed in order to understand the characteristics of the loss. Simulation of the detector signal based upon the following of orbits from realistic beam deposition profiles is not able to reproduce the pitch angle distribution of the losses measured. Consequently it is inferred that internal plasma processes, whether magnetohydrodynamic modes, radial electric fields, or plasma turbulence, move previously confined beam ions to transition orbits, resulting in their loss.

  3. Cavity loss factors for non-ultrarelativistic beams

    SciTech Connect

    Kurennoy, S.S.

    1998-12-31

    Cavity loss factors can be easily computed for ultrarelativistic beams using time-domain codes like MAFIA or ABCI. However, for non-ultrarelativistic beams the problem is more complicated because of difficulties with its numerical formulation in the time domain. The authors calculate the loss factors of a non-relativistic bunch and compare results with the relativistic case.

  4. BEAM LOSS ESTIMATES AND CONTROL FOR THE BNL NEUTRINO FACILITY.

    SciTech Connect

    WENG, W.-T.; LEE, Y.Y.; RAPARIA, D.; TSOUPAS, N.; BEEBE-WANG, J.; WEI, J.; ZHANG, S.Y.

    2005-05-16

    The requirement for low beam loss is very important both to protect the beam component, and to make the hands-on maintenance possible. In this report, the design considerations to achieving high intensity and low loss will be presented. We start by specifying the beam loss limit at every physical process followed by the proper design and parameters for realizing the required goals. The process considered in this paper include the emittance growth in the linac, the H{sup -} injection, the transition crossing, the coherent instabilities and the extraction losses.

  5. A Flexible, Low Cost, Beam Loss Monitor Evaluation System

    SciTech Connect

    Hoyes, George Garnet; Pimol, Piti; Juthong, Nawin; Attaphibal, Malee

    2007-01-19

    A flexible, low cost, Beam Loss Monitor (BLM) Evaluation System based on Bergoz BLMs has been developed. Monitors can easily be moved to any location for beam loss investigations and/or monitor usefulness evaluations. Different PC pulse counting cards are compared and tested for this application using the display software developed based on LabVIEW. Beam problems uncovered with this system are presented.

  6. Suppression of Beam-Ion Instability in Electron Rings with Multi-Bunch Train Beam Fillings

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L.; Cai, Y.; Raubenheimer, T.O.; Fukuma, H.; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2011-08-18

    The ion-caused beam instability in the future light sources and electron damping rings can be serious due to the high beam current and ultra-small emittance of picometer level. One simple and effective mitigation of the instability is a multi-bunch train beam filling pattern which can significantly reduce the ion density near the beam, and therefore reduce the instability growth rate up to two orders of magnitude. The suppression is more effective for high intensity beams with low emittance. The distribution and the field of trapped ions are benchmarked to validate the model used in the paper. The wake field of ion-cloud and the beam-ion instability is investigated both analytically and numerically. We derived a simple formula for the build-up of ion-cloud and instability growth rate with the multi-bunch-train filling pattern. The ion instabilities in ILC damping ring, SuperKEKB and SPEAR3 are used to compare with our analyses. The analyses in this paper agree well with simulations.

  7. Beam Loss Studies for the 2-MW LBNE Proton Beam Line

    SciTech Connect

    Drozhdin, A.I.; Childress, S.R.; Mokhov, N.V.; Tropin, I.S.; Zwaska, R.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    Severe limits are put on allowable beam loss during extraction and transport of a 2.3 MW primary proton beam for the Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) at Fermilab. Detailed simulations with the STRUCT and MARS codes have evaluated the impact of beam loss of 1.6 x 10{sup 14} protons per pulse at 120 GeV, ranging from a single pulse full loss to sustained small fractional loss. It is shown that loss of a single beam pulse at 2.3 MW will result in a catastrophic event: beam pipe destruction, damaged magnets and very high levels of residual radiation inside and outside the tunnel. Acceptable beam loss limits have been determined and robust solutions developed to enable efficient proton beam operation under these constraints.

  8. Conceptual design of elliptical cavities for intensity and position sensitive beam measurements in storage rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanjari, M. S.; Chen, X.; Hülsmann, P.; Litvinov, Yu A.; Nolden, F.; Piotrowski, J.; Steck, M.; Stöhlker, Th

    2015-11-01

    Position sensitive beam monitors are indispensable for the beam diagnostics in storage rings. Apart from their applications in the measurements of beam parameters, they can be used in non-destructive in-ring decay studies of radioactive ion beams as well as enhancing precision in the isochronous mass measurement technique. In this work, we introduce a novel approach based on cavities with elliptical cross-section, in order to compensate the limitations of known designs for the application in ion storage rings. The design is aimed primarily for future heavy ion storage rings of the FAIR project. The conceptual design is discussed together with simulation results.

  9. Black rings with fourth dipole cause less hair loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Borun D.

    2012-07-01

    An example of entropy enigma with a controlled CFT dual was recently studied in [1]. The enigmatic bulk configurations, considered within the STU model, can be mapped under spectral flow into black rings with three monopole and dipole charges. Even though the bulk and CFT configurations existed in the same region of parameter space, the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy of the bulk configurations was found to be lower than the microscopic entropy from the CFT. While it is possible that the difference in entropy is due to the bulk and boundary configurations being at different points in the moduli space, it is also possible that the bulk configurations embeddable within the STU model are not the most entropic. New families of BPS black ring solutions with four electric and four dipole magnetic charges have recently been explicitly constructed in [2]. These black rings are not embeddable within the STU model. In this paper we investigate if these black rings can be entropically dominant over the STU model black rings. We find that the new black rings are always entropically subdominant to the STU-model black rings. However, for small fourth dipole charge these black rings continue to be dominant over the BMPV in a small region of parameters and are thus enigmatic.

  10. Simulations and measurements of beam loss patterns at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruce, R.; Assmann, R. W.; Boccone, V.; Bracco, C.; Brugger, M.; Cauchi, M.; Cerutti, F.; Deboy, D.; Ferrari, A.; Lari, L.; Marsili, A.; Mereghetti, A.; Mirarchi, D.; Quaranta, E.; Redaelli, S.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Rossi, A.; Salvachua, B.; Skordis, E.; Tambasco, C.; Valentino, G.; Weiler, T.; Vlachoudis, V.; Wollmann, D.

    2014-08-01

    The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is designed to collide proton beams of unprecedented energy, in order to extend the frontiers of high-energy particle physics. During the first very successful running period in 2010-2013, the LHC was routinely storing protons at 3.5-4 TeV with a total beam energy of up to 146 MJ, and even higher stored energies are foreseen in the future. This puts extraordinary demands on the control of beam losses. An uncontrolled loss of even a tiny fraction of the beam could cause a superconducting magnet to undergo a transition into a normal-conducting state, or in the worst case cause material damage. Hence a multistage collimation system has been installed in order to safely intercept high-amplitude beam protons before they are lost elsewhere. To guarantee adequate protection from the collimators, a detailed theoretical understanding is needed. This article presents results of numerical simulations of the distribution of beam losses around the LHC that have leaked out of the collimation system. The studies include tracking of protons through the fields of more than 5000 magnets in the 27 km LHC ring over hundreds of revolutions, and Monte Carlo simulations of particle-matter interactions both in collimators and machine elements being hit by escaping particles. The simulation results agree typically within a factor 2 with measurements of beam loss distributions from the previous LHC run. Considering the complex simulation, which must account for a very large number of unknown imperfections, and in view of the total losses around the ring spanning over 7 orders of magnitude, we consider this an excellent agreement. Our results give confidence in the simulation tools, which are used also for the design of future accelerators.

  11. Observations And Measurements of Anomalous Hollow Electron Beams in a Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y.K.; Li, J.; Wu, J.; /SLAC

    2006-02-06

    Anomalous hollow electron beams have been recently observed in the Duke storage ring. With a single bunch beam in a lattice with a negative chromaticity, a hollow beam can be created. This beam consists of a solid core beam inside and a large ring beam outside. In this paper, we report the measurements of the hollow beam phenomenon, including its distinct image pattern and spectrum signature, and its evolution with time. By capturing the post-instability bursting beam, the hollow beam is a unique model system for studying transverse instabilities, in particular, the interplay of the wakefield and lattice nonlinearity. The hollow beam can also be used as a tool to study linear and nonlinear particle dynamics in the storage ring.

  12. H- AND PROTON BEAM LOSS COMPARISON AT SNS SUPERCONDUCTING LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, Alexander V; Galambos, John D; Plum, Michael A; Shishlo, Andrei P

    2012-01-01

    A comparison of beam loss in the superconducting part (SCL) of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) linac for H- and protons is presented. During the experiment the nominal beam of negative hydrogen ions in the SCL was replaced by a proton beam created by insertion of a thin stripping carbon foil placed in the low energy section of the linac. The observed significant reduction in the beam loss for protons is explained by a domination of the intra beam stripping mechanism of the beam loss for H-. The details of the experiment are discussed, and a preliminary estimation of the cross section of the reaction H- + H- -> H- + H0 + e is presented. Earlier, a short description of these studies was presented in [1].

  13. BEAM INDUCED ENERGY DEPOSITION IN MUON STORAGE RINGS.

    SciTech Connect

    MOKHOV,N.V.; JOHNSTONE,C.J.; PARKER,B.L.

    2001-06-18

    Beam-induced radiation effects have been simulated for 20 and 50 GeV muon storage rings designed for a Neutrino Factory. It is shown that by appropriately shielding the superconducting magnets, quench stability, acceptable dynamic heat loads, and low residual dose rates can be achieved. Alternatively, if a specially-designed skew focusing magnet without superconducting coils on the magnet's mid-plane is used, then the energy is deposited preferentially in the warm iron yoke or outer cryostat layers and internal shielding may not be required. In addition to the component irradiation analysis, shielding studies have been performed. Calculations of the external radiation were done for both designs but the internal energy deposition calculations for the 20 GeV Study-2 lattice are still in progress.

  14. Beam-induced energy deposition in muon storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolai V. Mokhov; Carol J. Johnstone; Brett Parker

    2001-06-22

    Beam-induced radiation effects have been simulated for 20 and 50 GeV muon storage rings designed for a Neutrino Factory. It is shown that by appropriately shielding the superconducting magnets, quench stability, acceptable dynamic heat loads, and low residual dose rates can be achieved. Alternatively, if a specially-designed skew focusing magnet without superconducting coils on the magnet's mid-plane is used, then the energy is deposited preferentially in the warm iron yoke or outer cryostat layers and internal shielding may not be required. In addition to the component irradiation analysis, shielding studies have been performed. Calculations of the external radiation were done for both designs but the internal energy deposition calculations for the 20 GeV Study-2 lattice are still in progress.

  15. Beam-based modeling and control of storage rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safranek, J.

    1997-05-01

    Analysis of the measured orbit response matrix is a powerful technique for debugging the linear optics of storage rings. The orbit response matrix is the change in orbit at the beam position monitors (BPMs) with changes in steering magnet excitation. Results will be presented from a computer code called LOCO (Linear Optics from Closed Orbits) that has been used to analyze the response matrices from several synchrotron light sources including the ALS, APS, NSLS VUV, NSLS X-Ray, and SRRC storage rings. The analysis accurately determines the individual quadrupole magnet gradients as well as the gains of BPMs and the calibrations of the steering magnets. The coupling terms of the response matrix such as the shift in vertical orbit from horizontal steering magnets can be included in the analysis to give the role of the quadrupoles, BPMs and steering magnets. The LOCO code can also be used to find the changes in quadrupole gradient that best compensate for gradient errors from insertion devices and sextupoles. In this way the design periodicity of the linear optics can be restored.

  16. Stable ring beam of solar wind He2+ in the magnetosheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsubouchi, K.; Nagai, T.; Shinohara, I.

    2016-02-01

    Heavier, or large mass-per-charge, ion species like helium ions (He2+) in the solar wind are decelerated less than protons at the Earth's bow shock. The resulting velocity difference in the magnetosheath forms a ring beam around the core protons. In this study, we identified the presence of such a ring beam composed of He2+ ions in the magnetosheath from observations from the Geotail spacecraft. Previous studies have shown that the ring distribution induces ion cyclotron waves that rapidly scatter the He2+ ring beam, leading to evolution into a shell or to a Maxwellian distribution. In contrast, the present event suggested that the He2+ ring beam persisted for the order of 10 min, i.e., hundreds of ion gyroperiods. One-dimensional hybrid simulations of a quasi-perpendicular, low Mach number shock (θ = 85°,MA ˜ 2.5) showed that the lower density of He2+ ions (less than 1% to protons) is the crucial condition that accounts for the long-duration property of the ring beam. Weaker wave activity was insufficient to scatter He2+ ions, whereas two-dimensional simulations showed a rapid scattering of the ring beam as suggested in the previous studies. Comparison between these results indicated that there are still controversial issues concerning the dynamics of minor ions in the magnetosheath, whether the He2+ ring beam is really stable, and what parameters control the stability condition.

  17. Electron beam stability and beam peak to peak motion data for NSLS X-Ray storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, O.

    1993-07-01

    In the past two years, a significant reduction in electron beam motion has been achieved at the NSLS X-Ray storage ring. The implementation of global analog orbit feedbacks, based on a harmonics correction scheme, has reduced the beam motion globally. Implementation of six local analog feedback systems has reduced the beam motion even further at the corresponding beam line straight sections. This paper presents beam motion measurements, showing the improvement due to the feedback systems. Beam motion is measured using a spectrum analyzer and data is presented at various frequencies, where peaks were observed. Finally, some of the beam motion sources are discussed.

  18. Ring formation in self-focusing of electromagnetic beams in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Faisal, M.; Mishra, S. K.; Verma, M. P.; Sodha, M. S.

    2007-10-15

    This article presents a paraxial theory of ring formation as an initially Gaussian beam propagates in a nonlinear plasma, characterized by significant collisional or ponderomotive nonlinearity. Regions in the axial irradiance-(beam width){sup -2} space, for which the ring formation occurs and the paraxial theory is valid, have been characterized; for typical points in these regions the dependence of the beam width parameter and the radial distribution of irradiance on the distance has been specifically investigated and discussed.

  19. Influence of emitter ring manufacturing tolerances on electron beam quality of high power gyrotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagonakis, Ioannis Gr.; Illy, Stefan; Thumm, Manfred

    2016-08-01

    A sensitivity analysis of manufacturing imperfections and possible misalignments of the emitter ring in the gyrotron cathode structure on the electron beam quality has been performed. It has been shown that a possible radial displacement of the emitter ring of the order of few tens of microns can cause dramatic effects on the beam quality and therefore the gyrotron operation. Two different design approaches are proposed in order to achieve an electron beam which is less sensitive to manufacturing imperfections.

  20. FEL indulators with the hollow-ring electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Epp, V.; Bordovitsyn, V.; Kozhevnikov, A.

    1995-12-31

    A conceptual design of undulators with a modulated longitudinal magnetic field is proposed. The magnetic field is created by use of a solenoid with axis coincident with the electron beam axis. In order to modulate the magnetic field we propose an insertion of a row of alternating ferromagnetic and superconducting diaphragms in line with electron beam. The simulation of two-dimensional distribution of the magnetic field in the plane containing undulator axis was made using the computer code {open_quotes}Mermaid{close_quotes}. The magnetic field was analysed as a function of the system geometry. The dependence on the spacing l between superconducting diaphragms, inner a and outer b radii of the last ones is investigated. Two versions of the device are considered: with ferromagnetic rings made of magnetically soft material placed between the superconducting diaphragms and without them. It is shown that the field modulation depth increases with ratio of b/l and can exceed 50% in case of the ferromagnetic insertions. An approximate analytical calculation of the magnetic field distribution is performed as follows. The axial-symmetrical magnetic field can be defined by the vector potential with only one nonzero component A(r,{phi}) where r and {phi} are the cylindrical coordinates. The solution of the Laplace`s equation is found under the assumption that the magnetic field is infinitely extended and periodic along the z-axis. The boundary conditions are defined by the undulator design. The result is used for the calculation of the particle dynamics and for the investigations of the trajectory stability. The spectral and angular distribution of the radiation emitted from the described systems is found. The estimations show that the proposed design allows to create relatively high magnitude of the magnetic field (up to 1 T) with a short period about 1 cm or less.

  1. Fast PIN-diode beam loss monitors at Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, V.

    1997-07-01

    The article is devoted to results of fine time structure of particle losses in Tevatron with use of fast beam loss monitors (BLM) based on PIN-diodes. An ultimate goal of the new BLMs is to distinguish losses of protons and antiprotons from neighbor bunches with 132 ns bunch spacing in the Tevatron collider upgrade. The devices studied fit well to the goal as they can recognize even seven times closer - 18.9 ns - spaced bunches` losses in the Tevatron fixed target operation regime. We have measured main characteristics of the BLM as well as studied the proton losses over 10 decades of time scale - from dozen of minutes to dozen of nanoseconds. Power spectral density of the losses is compared with spectra of the proton beam motion.

  2. MHD Induced Neutral Beam Ion Loss from NSTX Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    D.S. Darrow, E.D. Fredrickson, N.N. Gorelenkov, A.L. Roquemore, and K. Shinohara

    2007-12-13

    Bursts of ~60 kHz activity on Mirnov coils occur frequently in NSTX plasmas and these are accompanied by bursts of neutral beam ion loss over a range in pitch angles. These losses have been measured with a scintillator type loss probe imaged with a high speed (>10,000 frames/s) video camera, giving the evolution of the energy and pitch angle distributions of the lost neutral beam ions over the course of the events. The instability occurs below the TAE frequency in NSTX (~100 kHz) in high beta plasmas and may be a beta driven Alfvén acoustic (BAAE) mode.

  3. Individual Beam Size And Length Measurements at the SLC Interaction Point Derived From the Beam Energy Loss During a Beam Beam Deflection Scan

    SciTech Connect

    Raimondi, P.; Field, R.Clive; Phinney, N.; Ross, M.C.; Slaton, T.; Traller, R.; /SLAC

    2011-08-26

    At the Interaction Point (IP) of the SLC Final Focus, beam-beam deflection scans routinely provide a measurement of the sum in quadrature of the electron and positron transverse beam sizes, but no information on the individual beam sizes. During the 1996 SLC run, an upgrade to the Final Focus beam position monitor system allowed a first measurement of the absolute beam energy loss of both beams on each step of the deflection scan. A fit to the energy loss distributions of the two beams provides a measurement not only of the individual transverse beam sizes at the IP but also of the individual bunch lengths.

  4. Ring dislocation of a coherence of vortex Bessel beams in turbulent atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukin, Igor P.

    2014-11-01

    Researches of coherent properties of the vortex Bessel optical beams propagating in turbulent atmosphere are theoretically developed. The degree of coherence of vortex Bessel optical beams depending on beam parameters (crosssection wave number and a topological charge) and characteristics of turbulent atmosphere is in details analysed. It is shown, that at low levels of fluctuations in turbulent atmosphere, the degree of coherence of a vortex Bessel optical beam essentially depends on value of a topological charge of a beam. In the central part of a two-dimensional field of degree of coherence the ring dislocations, which number of rings to equally value of a topological charge of a vortex optical beam, is formed. At high levels of fluctuations in turbulent atmosphere, the degree of coherence of a vortex Bessel beam decreases much faster, than it takes place for the fundamental Bessel beam. And, speed of decrease essentially increases in process of growth of value of a topological charge of a beam.

  5. Formation of a ring dislocation of a coherence of a vortex optical beam in turbulent atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukin, Igor P.

    2013-12-01

    Researches of coherent properties of the vortex Bessel optical beams propagating in turbulent atmosphere are theoretically developed. The degree of coherence of vortex Bessel optical beams depending on beam parameters (crosssection wave number and a topological charge) and characteristics of turbulent atmosphere is in details analysed. It is shown, that at low levels of fluctuations in turbulent atmosphere, the degree of coherence of an vortex Bessel optical beam essentially depends on value of a topological charge of a beam. In the central part of a two-dimensional field of degree of coherence the ring dislocations, which number of rings to equally value of a topological charge of a vortex optical beam, is formed. At high levels of fluctuations in turbulent atmosphere, the degree of coherence of a vortex Bessel beam decreases much faster, than it takes place for the fundamental Bessel beam. And, speed of decrease essentially increases in process of growth of value of a topological charge of a beam.

  6. Beam Loss Studies for Rare Isotope Driver Linacs Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, T P; Kurennoy, S S; Billen, J H; Crandall, K R; Qiang, J; Ryne, R D; Mustapha, B; Ostroumov, P; Zhao, Q; York, and R. C.

    2008-03-26

    The Fortran 90 RIAPMTQ/IMPACT code package is a pair of linked beam-dynamics simulation codes that have been developed for end-to-end computer simulations of multiple-charge-state heavy-ion linacs for future exotic-beam facilities. These codes have multiple charge-state capability, and include space-charge forces. The simulations can extend from the low-energy beam-transport line after an ECR ion source to the end of the linac. The work has been performed by a collaboration including LANL, LBNL, ANL, and MSU. The code RIAPMTQ simulates the linac front-end beam dynamics including the LEBT, RFQ, and MEBT. The code IMPACT simulates the beam dynamics of the main superconducting linac. The codes have been benchmarked for rms beam properties against previously existing codes at ANL and MSU. The codes allow high-statistics runs on parallel supercomputing platforms, particularly at NERSC at LBNL, for studies of beam losses. The codes also run on desktop PC computers for low-statistics work. The code package is described in more detail in a recent publication [1] in the Proceedings of PAC07 (2007 US Particle Accelerator Conference). In this report we describe the main activities for the FY07 beam-loss studies project using this code package.

  7. Transverse beam feedback system for PLS storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, J. Y.; Park, M. K.; Kim, D. T.; Kang, H. S.; Hwang, W. H.; Nam, S. H.

    2001-07-01

    As the stored beam current increases over 240 mA, transverse coupled-beam instability limits higher beam current in Pohang Light Source. A bunch by bunch transverse feedback system has been developed to cure these beam instabilities. It consists of beam oscillation detectors, betatron phase adjuster, power amplifiers and a stripline kicker. Design of each circuit and its functions are described with simple trigonometric equations. The result of the beam test has shown more than 30 dB damping of the beam oscillation in the full bandwidth of the system.

  8. Implementation of Beam-Loss Monitor systems for the SSC

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.G.

    1994-07-01

    Beam-Loss Monitors (BLM) are used with each accelerator in the Superconducting Super Collider complex. The primary purpose of these detectors is to protect the accelerators from damage due to the loss of protons. Although the range of primary beam energies to be covered is very large, 20 MeV to 20 TeV, we plan to maintain commonality of detectors and electronics as much as possible. In this report the plans for developing and implementing BLM systems for each of the accelerators will be discussed. Possible solutions to problems that have been identified are presented.

  9. RHIC Beam Loss Monitor System Design and Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witkover, R.; Zitvogel, E.; Michnoff, R.

    1997-05-01

    The Beam Loss Monitor System is designed to prevent the quenching of RHIC magnets due to beam loss, provide quantitative loss data, and the loss history in the event of a beam abort. To satisfy fast (single turn) and slow (100 msec) loss beam abort criteria and provide sensitivity for studies measurements, a range of over 8 decades is needed. The system uses 400 ion chambers of a modified Tevatron design. An RC pre-integrator reduces the dynamic range for a low current amplifier. This is digitized by a standard RHIC VME MADC preceded by a switchable gain amplifier. The output also goes to an analog multiplier used to reduce energy dependence, extending the range of the abort comparators. Fast and slow filters separate the signal to dual comparators with independent trip levels. The gains, fast and slow abort levels, and abort bit masks are set for each channel on receipt of specific RHIC Event Codes. Up to 64 channels, on 8 VME boards, are controlled by a BNL designed micro-controller based VME module, decoupling it from the front-end computer for real-time operation.

  10. Effects of vertical aperture on beam lifetime at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Bizek, H.M.

    1995-06-01

    When a positron`s energy deviation {delta}E/E exceeds the rf acceptance, or when it receives an angular kick for the betatron motion that exceeds some limiting admittance, the positron will be lost. The main contributions to the total beam lifetime come from single Coulomb and Touschek scattering. In this report we investigate the dependence of the residual gas pressure and the vertical aperture of the Advanced Photon Source storage ring on the total beam. lifetime. We present results of calculating the total beam lifetime as a function of vertical aperture for varying average ring pressure, beam current, and coupling coefficient.

  11. Numerical analysis on seismic behavior of reinforced concrete beam to concrete filled steel tubular column connections with ring-beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yi.; Xu, Li. Hua.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents numerical study of the seismic behavior of reinforced concrete beam to concrete filled steel tube column connections with ring-beam. The material stress-strain relations, element type and boundary condition are selected, which are consistent with actual situation. Then the seismic behavior of this type of joint are researched by ABAQUS, and finite element analyses are conducted under cyclic loading. Its parameters are discussed including thickness of steel tubular column wall, sectional dimension of the ring-beam and strength of the core concrete. The results show that the ultimate capacity of the connections is improved with sectional dimension of the ring-beam increased. In the meanwhile, the influence on skeleton curve of the joints is slight of which included thickness of steel tubular column wall and strength of the core concrete.

  12. Theories of statistical equilibrium in electron-positron colliding-beam storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Schonfeld, J.F.

    1985-01-01

    In this lecture I introduce you to some recent theoretical work that represents a significant and long overdue departure from the mainstream of ideas on the physics of colliding- beam storage rings. The goal of the work in question is to understand analytically - without recourse to computer simulation - the role that dissipation and noise play in the observed colliding-beam behavior of electron-positron storage rings.

  13. On focusing of a ring ripple on a Gaussian electromagnetic beam in a plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Misra, Shikha; Mishra, S. K.

    2008-09-15

    In this communication the authors have investigated the focusing of a ring ripple on a Gaussian electromagnetic beam propagating in a plasma, considering each of the three kinds of basic nonlinearities, namely, ponderomotive, collisional, and relativistic. In this analysis, the electric field profile of the propagating beam is assumed to be composed of the radial electric field distribution of the Gaussian beam as well as that of the ring ripple; a paraxial like approach has been adopted to analyze the characteristics of the propagation. Thus, one considers a unique dielectric function for the beam propagation and a radial field sensitive diffraction term, appropriate to the vicinity of the maximum of the irradiance distribution of the ring ripple. Further, the variation of the phase associated with the beam on account of the r independent terms in the eikonal has also been accounted for.

  14. Beam Control and Steering in the University of Maryland Electron Ring (UMER)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, M.; Bai, G.; Bernal, S.; Feldman, D.; Godlove, T.; Haber, I.; Holloway, M.; Kishek, R.; O'Shea, P.; Papadopoulos, C.; Quinn, B.; Reiser, M.; Stratakis, D.; Sutter, D.; Thangaraj, J.; Wilson, M.; Wu, C.

    2006-11-01

    The University of Maryland Electron Ring (UMER) is a low energy, high current recirculator for beam physics research. Ring construction has been completed for multi-turn operation of beams over a broad range of intensities and initial conditions. The electron beam current is adjustable up to 100 mA and pulse length as long as 100 ns. UMER is addressing issues in beam physics relevant to many applications that require intense beams of high quality, such as advanced concept accelerators, free electron lasers, spallalion neutron sources, and future heavy-ion drivers for inertial fusion. The primary focus of this presentation is experimental results in the area of beam steering and control within the injection line and ring. Unique beam steering algorithms now include measurement of the beam response matrix at each quadrupole and matrix inversion by singular value decomposition (SVD). With these advanced steering methods, transport of an intense beam over 50 turns (3600 full lattice periods) of the ring has been achieved.

  15. Simulation Studies of Beam-Beam Effects of a Ring-Ring Electron-Ion Collider Based on CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    Yuhong Zhang,Ji Qiang

    2009-05-01

    The collective beam-beam effect can potentially cause a rapid growth of beam sizes and reduce the luminosity of a collider to an unacceptably low level. The ELIC, a proposed ultra high luminosity electron-ion collider based on CEBAF, employs high repetition rate crab crossing colliding beams with very small bunch transverse sizes and very short bunch lengths, and collides them at up to 4 interaction points with strong final focusing. All of these features can make the beam-beam effect challenging. In this paper, we present simulation studies of the beam-beam effect in ELIC using a self-consistent strong-strong beam-beam simulation code developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. This simulation study is used for validating the ELIC design and for searching for an optimal parameter set.

  16. Reducing support loss in micromechanical ring resonators using phononic band-gap structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Feng-Chia; Hsu, Jin-Chen; Huang, Tsun-Che; Wang, Chin-Hung; Chang, Pin

    2011-09-01

    In micromechanical resonators, energy loss via supports into the substrates may lead to a low quality factor. To eliminate the support loss, in this paper a phononic band-gap structure is employed. We demonstrate a design of phononic-crystal (PC) strips used to support extensional wine-glass mode ring resonators to increase the quality factor. The PC strips are introduced to stop elastic-wave propagation by the band-gap and deaf-band effects. Analyses of resonant characteristics of the ring resonators and the dispersion relations, eigenmodes, and transmission properties of the PC strips are presented. With the proposed resonator architecture, the finite-element simulations show that the leaky power is effectively reduced and the stored energy inside the resonators is enhanced simultaneously as the operating frequencies of the resonators are within the band gap or deaf bands. Realization of a high quality factor micromechanical ring resonator with minimized support loss is expected.

  17. Evolution of the ring Airy Gaussian beams with a spiral phase in the Kerr medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bo; Chen, Chidao; Peng, Xi; Peng, Yulian; Zhou, Meiling; Deng, Dongmei; Guo, Hong

    2016-05-01

    Nonlinear optical phenomena are of great practical interest in optics. The evolution of ring Airy Gaussian beams with a spiral phase in the nonlinear Kerr medium is investigated using the nonlinear Schrödinger equation. Numerical simulations indicate that the distribution factor b can influence the formation of the ring Airy Gaussian beams. Results show that the beams can be oscillating, and the light filament can be achieved under appropriate laser input power. On the other hand, the evolution of the ring Airy Gaussian beams with a spiral phase in the nonlinear Kerr medium can be implemented, and the numerical simulations of the holographic generation of the ring Airy Gaussian vortex beams propagated in the medium demonstrate that the vortex can be preserved along the propagation. The Poynting vector shows that the energy flow of the ring Airy Gaussian beams flows in the opposite direction on both sides of the focus plane; however, for beams with a spiral phase, the flow direction remains the same; the energy flow can rotate in opposite directions on both sides of the focal plane.

  18. New Beam Loss Monitor for 12 GeV Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Jianxun Yan, Kelly Mahoney

    2009-10-01

    This paper describes a new VME based machine protection Beam Loss Monitor (BLM) signal processing board designed at Jefferson Lab to replace the current CAMAC based BLM board. The new eight-channel BLM signal processor has linear, logarithmic, and integrating amplifiers that simultaneously provide the optimal signal processing for each application. Amplified signals are digitized and then further processed through a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA). Combining both the diagnostic and machine protection functions in each channel allows the operator to tune-up and monitor beam operations while the machine protection is integrating the same signal. Other features include extensive built-in-self-test, fast shutdown interface (FSD), and 16-Mbit buffers for beam loss transient play-back. The new VME BLM board features high sensitivity, high resolution, and low cost per channel.

  19. beam loss scenarios for MuCool Test Area

    SciTech Connect

    Rakhno, Igor; Johnstone, Carol; /Fermilab

    2010-08-01

    The MuCool Test Area (MTA) is an intense primary beam facility derived directly from the Fermilab Linac to test heat deposition and other technical concerns associated with the liquid hydrogen targets, gas-filled RF cavities, and other apparatus being developed to cool intense, large-emittance muon beams. In this study the results of Monte Carlo modeling of several beam loss scenarios are presented. The MTA facility was designed to test targets and other muon cooling apparatus using the intense Fermilab Linac beam. The requested intensity of the proton beam for the MTA is essentially full Linac capability, or 1.6 x 10{sup 13} protons per pulse and an energy of 400 MeV. Two modes of operation will be supported in the MuCOOL beamline: one mode for emittance measurements (and beamline studies) and a second mode for MTA experiments. Maximum beam intensity for these two modes is: 9.6 x 10{sup 15} protons/hr - 600 beam pulses/hour of full Linac beam pulse intensity (1.6 x 10{sup 13} protons/pulse) to the emittance beam absorber and 9.6 x 10{sup 14} protons/hour - 60 beam pulses/hour of full Linac beam pulse intensity to experiments in the MTA experimental hall. This extremely high intensity implies careful investigation into and application of proper shielding materials and configuration in order to satisfy the following two requirements: (i) to reduce the instantaneous dose rate outside of the experimental enclosure to prescribed levels appropriate for the area considered; (ii) to ensure the civil construction of the hall is capable of additional shielding and, further, that the weight of the shielding is commensurate with the loading specifications of the enclosure, notably the ceiling. A number of scenarios for beam loss at different locations were studied in order to determine the maximum beam intensity which is in compliance with the existing shielding. The modeling was performed with the MARS15 code.

  20. Beam dynamics in a storage ring for neutral (polar) molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Lambertson, Glen R.

    2003-05-01

    The force from a non-uniform electric field on the electric dipole moment of a molecule may be used to circulate and focus molecules in a storage ring. The nature of the forces from multipole electrodes for bending and focusing are described for strong-field-seeking and for weak-field-seeking molecules. Fringe-field forces are analyzed. Examples of storage ring designs are presented; these include long straight sections and provide bunching and acceleration.

  1. DESIREE - A Double Electrostatic Storage Ring for Merged-Beam Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Danared, H.; Liljeby, L.; Andler, G.; Bagge, L.; Blom, M.; Kaellberg, A.; Leontein, S.; Loefgren, P.; Paal, A.; Rensfelt, K.-G.; Simonsson, A.; Schmidt, H. T.; Cederquist, H.; Larsson, M.; Rosen, S.; Schmidt, K.

    2006-03-20

    DESIREE is a double electrostatic storage ring cooled to cryogenic temperatures. It is built at the Manne Siegbahn Laboratory for merged-beam and single-beam experiments in atomic and molecular physics as well as biophysics. This paper describes the present status of the design of DESIREE.

  2. The Roles of Charge Exchange and Flow-Out Losses in Ring Current Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozyra, J. U.; Liemohn, M. W.

    2001-12-01

    It is becoming clear that flow-out losses are an important ring current decay mechanism in addition to charge-exchange losses. Flow out losses result from an imbalance between the energy flux entering the inner magnetosphere from the nightside plasma sheet and that leaving through the dayside magnetopause before the ring current becomes trapped on closed drift paths. The Michigan ring current drift-loss model (RAM) which calculates ring current losses due to Coulomb drag, charge-exchange and flow-out using realistic geocoronal and dynamical plasmasphere models, has been used to model 8 magnetic storms ranging from moderate to superstorm status. In each case, plasma sheet ion distributions measured by the LANL geosynchronous satellites are used to specify the ring current source population and its dynamical variation. The McIlwain (1986) model is used to specify the inner magnetosphere electric potential pattern which is scaled by the observed polar cap potential values (derived from DMSP passes directly or from the AMIE model) and shielded based on the DMSP auroral boundary index (MBI). Model results indicate that flow-out losses can be driven by an abrupt decrease in plasma sheet density, change in plasma sheet temperature and/or weakening of magnetotail convection prior to northward turning of the IMF. When the IMF abruptly turns northward at the end of the main phase, the entire recovery phase can result from charge-exchange loss. Examples of each of these types of decay are given. RAM decay time scales for all modeled storms are plotted against the simultaneous value of solar wind Ey and compared to the results of statistical studies of this relationship in the literature.

  3. Beam life time studies and design optimization of the Ultra-low energy Storage Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsch, C. P.; Papash, A. I.; Harasimowicz, J.; Karamyshev, O.; Karamysheva, G. A.; Newton, D.; Panniello, M.; Putignano, M.; Siggel-King, M. R. F.; Smirnov, A.

    2014-04-01

    The Ultra-low energy electrostatic Storage Ring (USR) at the future Facility for Low-energy Antiproton and Ion Research (FLAIR) will provide cooled beams of antiprotons in the energy range between 300 keV down to 20 keV. Based on the original design concept developed in 2005, the USR has been completely redesigned over the past few years by the QUASAR Group. The ring structure is now based on a 'split achromat' lattice. This ensures compact ring dimensions of 10 m × 10 m, whilst allowing both, in-ring experiments with gas jet targets and studies with extracted beams. In the USR, a wide range of beam parameters shall be provided, ranging from very short pulses in the nanosecond regime to a coasting beam. In addition, a combined fast and slow extraction scheme will be featured that allows for providing external experiments with cooled beams of different time structure. Detailed investigations into the dynamics of low energy beams, including studies into the long term beam dynamics and ion kinetics, beam life time, equilibrium momentum spread and equilibrium lateral spread during collisions with an internal target were carried out. This required the development of new simulation tools to further the understanding of beam storage with electrostatic fields. In addition, studies into beam diagnostics methods for the monitoring of ultra-low energy ions at beam intensities less than 10 6 were carried out. This includes instrumentation for the early commissioning of the machine, as well as for later operation with antiprotons. In this paper, on overview of the technical design of the USR is given with emphasis on two of the most important operating modes, long term beam dynamics and the design of the beam diagnostics system.

  4. Small size probe for inner profile measurement of pipes using optical fiber ring beam device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakayama, Toshitaka; Machi, Kizuku; Yoshizawa, Toru

    2012-11-01

    The requirements of inner profile measurement of pipes and holes become recently larger and larger, and applications of inner profile measurement have rapidly expanded to medical field as well as industrial fields such as mechanical, automobile and heavy industries. We have proposed measurement method by incorporating a ring beam device that produces a disk beam and have developed various probes for different inner profile measurement. To meet request for applying to smaller diameter pipes, we tried to improve the ring beam light source using a conical mirror, optical fiber collimator and a laser diode. At this moment a probe with the size of 5 mm in diameter has been realized.

  5. Beam Loss and Longitudinal Emittance Growth in SIS

    SciTech Connect

    Kirk, M.; Hofmann, I.; Boine-Frankenheim, O.; Spiller, P.; Huelsmann, P.; Franchetti, G.; Damerau, H.; Koenig, H. Guenter; Klingbeil, H.; Kumm, M.; Moritz, P.; Schuett, P.; Redelbach, A.

    2005-06-08

    Beam losses of several percent occur regularly in SIS. The onset occurs during the RF capture of the beam. Previous studies have revealed that the losses can come from the RF bucket at the start of acceleration being over filled due to the longitudinal bucket acceptance being too small, or due to the mismatch between the mean energy from the UNILAC and synchronous energy of the SIS. The beam losses as measured by a DC beam transformer however show in addition to the sharp initial drop, for the above reasons, a much slower decay in the beam intensity. The speculated cause comes from the incoherent transverse tune shift of the bunched beam, which forces particles into transverse resonant conditions. The longitudinal emittance growth is also another important issue for SIS. Past measurements from Schottky-noise pick-ups have shown a factor of 3-5 increase in the longitudinal emittance depending on the extraction energy; a large factor when compared against expectations from theory. These factors were calculated from the ratio between the normalized relative momentum spread of the DC beam before RF capture and after debunching. In this present work, tomographical techniques have been used to reconstruct the phasespace from a series of bunch profile measurements from a Beam Position Monitor (BPM). Therefore one can find the rate of growth in the longitudinal emittance from a series of high resolution BPM measurements along the RF ramp. Furthermore the initial phasespace density matrix from these reconstructions has been used to generate the initial population of macroparticles for the ESME longitudinal dynamics Particle-In-Cell code, thereby enabling a comparison between the longitudinal emittance growth of the beam under ideal conditions and that of the experiment. The longitudinal emittance growth (rms) during the acceleration ({approx}540ms) was approximately 20%, and that during the RF capture was estimated to have an upper limit of about 40%. Later measurements

  6. RFQ Designs and Beam-Loss Distributions for IFMIF

    SciTech Connect

    Jameson, Robert A

    2007-01-01

    The IFMIF 125 mA cw 40 MeV accelerators will set an intensity record. Minimization of particle loss along the accelerator is a top-level requirement and requires sophisticated design intimately relating the accelerated beam and the accelerator structure. Such design technique, based on the space-charge physics of linear accelerators (linacs), is used in this report in the development of conceptual designs for the Radio-Frequency-Quadrupole (RFQ) section of the IFMIF accelerators. Design comparisons are given for the IFMIF CDR Equipartitioned RFQ, a CDR Alternative RFQ, and new IFMIF Post-CDR Equipartitioned RFQ designs. Design strategies are illustrated for combining several desirable characteristics, prioritized as minimum beam loss at energies above ~ 1 MeV, low rf power, low peak field, short length, high percentage of accelerated particles. The CDR design has ~0.073% losses above 1 MeV, requires ~1.1 MW rf structure power, has KP factor 1.7,is 12.3 m long, and accelerates ~89.6% of the input beam. A new Post-CDR design has ~0.077% losses above 1 MeV, requires ~1.1 MW rf structure power, has KP factor 1.7 and ~8 m length, and accelerates ~97% of the input beam. A complete background for the designs is given, and comparisons are made. Beam-loss distributions are used as input for nuclear physics simulations of radioactivity effects in the IFMIF accelerator hall, to give information for shielding, radiation safety and maintenance design. Beam-loss distributions resulting from a ~1M particle input distribution representative of the IFMIF ECR ion source are presented. The simulations reported were performed with a consistent family of codes. Relevant comparison with other codes has not been possible as their source code is not available. Certain differences have been noted but are not consistent over a broad range of designs and parameter range. The exact transmission found by any of these codes should be treated as indicative, as each has various sensitivities in

  7. Intra-Beam Scattering, Impedance, and Instabilities in Ultimate Storage Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Bane, Karl; /SLAC

    2012-03-28

    We have investigated collective effects in an ultimate storage ring, i.e. one with diffraction limited emittances in both planes, using PEP-X as an example. In an ultimate ring intra-beam scattering (IBS) sets the limit of current that can be stored. In PEP-X, a 4.5 GeV ring running round beams at 200 mA in 3300 bunches, IBS doubles the emittances to 11.5 pm at the design current. The Touschek lifetime is 11 hours. Impedance driven collective effects tend not to be important since the beam current is relatively low. We have investigated collective effects in PEP-X, an ultimate storage ring, i.e. one with diffraction limited emittances (at one angstrom wavelength) in both planes. In an ultimate ring intra-beam scattering (IBS) sets the limit of current that can be stored. In PEP-X, IBS doubles the emittances to 11.5 pm at the design current of 200 mA, assuming round beams. The Touschek lifetime is quite large in PEP-X, 11.6 hours, and - near the operating point - increases with decreasing emittance. It is, however, a very sensitive function of momentum acceptance. In an ultimate ring like PEP-X impedance driven collective effects tend not to be important since the beam current is relatively low. Before ultimate PEP-X can be realized, the question of how to run a machine with round beams needs serious study. For example, in this report we assumed that the vertical emittance is coupling dominated. It may turn out that using vertical dispersion is a preferable way to generate round beams. The choice will affect IBS and the Touschek effect.

  8. Beam loss reduction by magnetic shielding using beam pipes and bellows of soft magnetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamiya, J.; Ogiwara, N.; Hotchi, H.; Hayashi, N.; Kinsho, M.

    2014-11-01

    One of the main sources of beam loss in high power accelerators is unwanted stray magnetic fields from magnets near the beam line, which can distort the beam orbit. The most effective way to shield such magnetic fields is to perfectly surround the beam region without any gaps with a soft magnetic high permeability material. This leads to the manufacture of vacuum chambers (beam pipes and bellows) with soft magnetic materials. A Ni-Fe alloy (permalloy) was selected for the material of the pipe parts and outer bellows parts, while a ferritic stainless steel was selected for the flanges. An austenitic stainless steel, which is non-magnetic material, was used for the inner bellows for vacuum tightness. To achieve good magnetic shielding and vacuum performances, a heat treatment under high vacuum was applied during the manufacturing process of the vacuum chambers. Using this heat treatment, the ratio of the integrated magnetic flux density along the beam orbit between the inside and outside of the beam pipe and bellows became small enough to suppress beam orbit distortion. The outgassing rate of the materials with this heat treatment was reduced by one order magnitude compared to that without heat treatment. By installing the beam pipes and bellows of soft magnetic materials as part of the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex 3 GeV rapid cycling synchrotron beam line, the closed orbit distortion (COD) was reduced by more than 80%. In addition, a 95.5% beam survival ratio was achieved by this COD improvement.

  9. Laser-beam zooming to mitigate crossed-beam energy losses in direct-drive implosions.

    PubMed

    Igumenshchev, I V; Froula, D H; Edgell, D H; Goncharov, V N; Kessler, T J; Marshall, F J; McCrory, R L; McKenty, P W; Meyerhofer, D D; Michel, D T; Sangster, T C; Seka, W; Skupsky, S

    2013-04-01

    Spherically symmetric direct-drive-ignition designs driven by laser beams with a focal-spot size nearly equal to the target diameter suffer from energy losses due to crossed-beam energy transfer (CBET). Significant reduction of CBET and improvements in implosion hydrodynamic efficiency can be achieved by reducing the beam diameter. Narrow beams increase low-mode perturbations of the targets because of decreased illumination uniformity that degrades implosion performance. Initiating an implosion with nominal beams (equal in size to the target diameter) and reducing the beam diameter by ∼ 30%-40% after developing a sufficiently thick target corona, which smooths the perturbations, mitigate CBET while maintaining low-mode target uniformity in ignition designs with a fusion gain ≫ 1. PMID:25166997

  10. Spontaneous and sequential transitions of a Gaussian beam into diffraction rings, single ring and circular array of filaments in a photopolymer.

    PubMed

    Villafranca, Ana B; Saravanamuttu, Kalaichelvi

    2011-08-01

    A Gaussian beam propagating in a photopolymer undergoes self-phase modulation to form diffraction rings and then transforms into a single ring, which in turn ruptures into a necklace of stable self-trapped multimode filaments. The transitions of the beam between the three distinct nonlinear forms only occur at intensities where the beam-induced refractive index profile in the medium slowly evolves from a Gaussian to a flattened Gaussian. PMID:21934919

  11. Fermilab Booster Operational Status: Beam Loss and Collimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webber, Robert C.

    2002-12-01

    Beam loss reduction and control challenges confronting the Fermilab Booster are presented in the context of the current operational status. In Summer 2002 the programmatic demand for 8 GeV protons will increase to 5E20/year. This is an order of magnitude above recent high rates and nearly as many protons as the machine has produced in its entire 30-year lifetime. Catastrophic radiation damage to accelerator components must be avoided, maintenance in an elevated residual radiation environment must be addressed, and operation within a tight safety envelope must be conducted to limit prompt radiation in the buildings and grounds around the Booster. Diagnostic and performance tracking improvements, enhanced orbit control, and a beam loss collimation/localization system are essential elements in the approach to achieving the expected level of performance and are described here.

  12. Parameters of the ring dislocation of a degree of coherence of the vortex Bessel beam in turbulent atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukin, Igor P.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper results of theoretical consideration of behavior of degree of coherence of the coherent vortex Bessel optical beam propagating in turbulent atmosphere are presented. It is shown, that at low levels of fluctuations, in the central part of a two-dimensional field of degree of coherence of the vortex Bessel optical beams the ring dislocation is formed, the number of rings in which is equal to value of a topological charge of an optical beam. The structure of a ring dislocation of degree of coherence of the vortex Bessel optical beams in turbulent atmosphere is studied in detail. For this purpose two characteristics of a ring dislocation are entered: its spatial coordinates and width of a ring. Influence of parameters of an optical beam (a cross-section wave number and a topological charge) and atmospheric turbulence on these characteristics of a ring dislocation of degree of coherence of the vortex Bessel optical beam is considered.

  13. Ring artifacts removal via spatial sparse representation in cone beam CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhongyuan; Li, Guang; Sun, Yi; Luo, Shouhua

    2016-03-01

    This paper is about the ring artifacts removal method in cone beam CT. Cone beam CT images often suffer from disturbance of ring artifacts which caused by the non-uniform responses of the elements in detectors. Conventional ring artifacts removal methods focus on the correlation of the elements and the ring artifacts' structural characteristics in either sinogram domain or cross-section image. The challenge in the conventional methods is how to distinguish the artifacts from the intrinsic structures; hence they often give rise to the blurred image results due to over processing. In this paper, we investigate the characteristics of the ring artifacts in spatial space, different from the continuous essence of 3D texture feature of the scanned objects, the ring artifacts are displayed discontinuously in spatial space, specifically along z-axis. Thus we can easily recognize the ring artifacts in spatial space than in cross-section. As a result, we choose dictionary representation for ring artifacts removal due to its high sensitivity to structural information. We verified our theory both in spatial space and coronal-section, the experimental results demonstrate that our methods can remove the artifacts efficiently while maintaining image details.

  14. Benchmarking of collimation tracking using RHIC beam loss data.

    SciTech Connect

    Robert-Demolaize,G.; Drees, A.

    2008-06-23

    State-of-the-art tracking tools were recently developed at CERN to study the cleaning efficiency of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) collimation system. In order to estimate the prediction accuracy of these tools, benchmarking studies can be performed using actual beam loss measurements from a machine that already uses a similar multistage collimation system. This paper reviews the main results from benchmarking studies performed with specific data collected from operations at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC).

  15. Rapid Cycling Synchrotrons and Accumulator Rings for High-Intensity Hadron Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jingyu

    2014-02-01

    Boosted by the needs in high-energy physics and nuclear physics and also multidisciplinary applications, high-intensity proton synchrotrons and accumulator rings have been developed quickly around the world over the last 30 years. New projects and plans are proposed with even higher beam power. The proton beam power has increased from less than 10 kW in the 1970s to about 1 MW level today, and the required beam power in the coming decade is a few MW. This article reviews the achievements in designing and constructing rapid cycling synchrotrons (RCSs) and accumulator rings (ARs) and the future development trends, principally on proton beams but also including heavy ion beams. It presents the evolution of RCS and AR machines, today's design philosophy, relevant accelerator physics, and also state-of-the-art accelerator technology.

  16. Beam Tests of a Clearing Electrode for Electron Cloud Mitigation at KEKB Positron Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Suetsugu, Y.; Fukuma, H.; Shibata, K.; Pivi, M.; Wang, L.; /SLAC

    2010-06-15

    In order to mitigate the electron cloud instability in an intense positron ring, an electron clearing electrode with a very thin structure has been developed. The electrode was tested with a positron beam of the KEKB B-factory (KEKB). A drastic reduction in the electron density around the beam was demonstrated in a wiggler magnet with a dipole-type magnetic field of 0.78 T. The clearing electrode was then applied to a copper beam pipe with antechambers assuming an application of the electrode to a wiggler section in the Super KEKB. The beam pipe was installed at a magnetic-free region in the ring and tested with beam. No extra heating of the electrodes and feed-throughs were observed. A reduction in the electron density reasonable in a magnetic-free region was also obtained.

  17. Interstellar He+ Ring-Beam Distributions: Observations and Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drews, C.; Berger, L.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.; Galvin, A. B.

    2013-12-01

    Interstellar pickup ions, which are believed to be injected as a ring-like velocity distributions into the bulk solar wind, are exposed to fluctuations of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) and thus undergo pitch-angle scattering. It is generally assumed that this process can be very efficient on short time scales, and thus velocity distributions of pickup ions were believed to be fully isotropic in nature [Vasyliunas and Siscoe, 1976]. However, unambiguous evidence for this assumption has yet to be found. Indeed, observations of reduced one-dimensional w-spectra for quasi-parallel and -perpendicular IMF orientations revealed a significant difference in flux and spectral shape of interstellar He+ pickup ions, which e.g., Saul et al. [2007], Möbius et al. [1998], and Isenberg [1997] attributed to ineffective scattering across 90° pitch-angle. Here we report systematic measurements of the distribution of the incident angle of interstellar pickup He+ ions as observed by STEREO/Plasma and Supra-Thermal Ion Composition (PLASTIC). We have organized these observations according to the angle spanned by the IMF vector, B, and the solar wind velocity vector. Our measurements show clear evidence of a relatively local injection of He+ pickup ions into the solar wind, which are then seen as a ring distribution perpendicular to B. Changes of the spectral shape and a reduced flux of interstellar He+ during radial IMF configuration, as observed by, e.g., Ulysses/Solar Wind Ion Composition Spectrometer (SWICS), SOHO/Charge Time-Of-Flight (CTOF), Active Magnetospheric Particle Tracer Explorers/SUprathermaL Energy Ionic Charge Analyzer (SULEICA), have generally been attributed to inefficient scattering across 90° pitch-angle. Our observations of the pitch-angle distribution of interstellar He+ suggest that these changes are instead a result of locally injected pickup ions that escape detection for IMF configuration in which the Solar Wind Sector of PLASTIC, as well as SWICS

  18. Beam losses and beam halos in accelerators for new energy sources

    SciTech Connect

    Jameson, R.A.

    1995-12-31

    Large particle accelerators are proposed as drivers for new ways to produce electricity from nuclear fusion and fission reactions. The accelerators must be designed to deliver large particle beam currents to a target facility with very little beam spill along the accelerator itself, in order that accelerator maintenance can be accomplished without remote manipulators. Typically, particle loss is preceded by the formation of a tenuous halo of particles around the central beam core, caused by beam dynamics effects, often coupled with the slight imperfections inevitable in a practical design. If the halo becomes large enough, particles may be scraped off along the accelerator. The tolerance for beam spill in different applications is discussed, halo mechanisms and recent work to explore and understand their dynamics are reviewed, and possible directions for future investigation are outlined. 17 refs., 10 figs.

  19. Feasibility Study of Compact Gas-Filled Storage Ring for 6D Cooling of Muon Beams

    SciTech Connect

    A. Garren, J. Kolonlo

    2005-10-31

    The future of elementary particle physics in the USA depends in part on the development of new machines such as the International Linear Collider, Muon Collider and Neutrino Factories which can produce particle beams of higher energy, intensity, or particle type than now exists. These beams will enable the continued exploration of the world of elementary particles and interactions. In addition, the associated development of new technologies and machines such as a Muon Ring Cooler is essential. This project was to undertake a feasibility study of a compact gas-filled storage ring for 6D cooling of muon beams. The ultimate goal, in Phase III, was to build, test, and operate a demonstration storage ring. The preferred lattice for the storage ring was determined and dynamic simulations of particles through the lattice were performed. A conceptual design and drawing of the magnets were made and a study of the RF cavity and possible injection/ejection scheme made. Commercial applications for the device were investigated and the writing of the Phase II proposal completed. The research findings conclude that a compact gas-filled storage ring for 6D cooling of muon beams is possible with further research and development.

  20. Conceptual design of a linac-stretcher ring to obtain a 2-GeV continuous electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Y.; Holt, R.J.; Jackson, H.E.; Khoe, T.K.; Mavrogenes, G.S.

    1981-01-01

    In order to obtain a high duty factor, > 100 ..mu..A 2-GeV electron beam, we have designed a linac-stretcher ring system. The system is an attractive option because it draws heavily on the existing accelerator technology. The linac-stretcher ring consists of a 2-GeV SLAC-type pulsed linac which injects into a storage ring. In between linac pulses, the stored electron beam is to extract resonantly. This design differs from those discussed recently in several important respects. The storage ring includes an RF system whose purpose is to control the beam orbit and rate of extraction from the ring. With an RF system in the ring, the injection scheme consists of a few turns of synchronous transfers of beam between the linac and storage ring.

  1. The University of Maryland Electron Ring: A Model Recirculator for Intense Beam Physics Research

    SciTech Connect

    Bernal, S.; Li, H.; Cui, Y.; Feldman, D.; Godlove, T.; Haber, I.; Huo, Y.; Harris, J.; Kishek, R.A.; Quinn, B.; Reiser, M.; Walter, M.; Wilson, M.; Zou, Y.; O'Shea, P.G.

    2004-12-07

    The University of Maryland Electron Ring (UMER), designed for transport studies of space-charge dominated beams in a strong focusing lattice, is nearing completion. Low energy, high intensity electron beams provide an excellent model system for experimental studies with relevance to all areas that require high quality, intense charged-particle beams. In addition, UMER constitutes an important tool for benchmarking of computer codes. When completed, the UMER lattice will consist of 36 alternating-focusing (FODO) periods over an 11.5-m circumference. Current studies in UMER over about 2/3 of the ring include beam-envelope matching, halo formation, asymmetrical focusing, and longitudinal dynamics (beam bunch erosion and wave propagation.) Near future, multi-turn operation of the ring will allow us to address important additional issues such as resonance-traversal, energy spread and others. The main diagnostics are phosphor screens and capacitive beam position monitors placed at the center of each 200 bending section. In addition, pepper-pot and slit-wire emittance meters are in operation. The range of beam currents used corresponds to space charge tune depressions from 0.2 to 0.8, which is unprecedented for a circular machine.

  2. BEAM EXTRACTION FROM THE SNS RING AND DESIGN OF EXTRACTION KICKERS.

    SciTech Connect

    TSOUPAS, N.; BLASKIEWICZ, M.; LEE, Y.Y.; MI, J.L.; SOUKAS, A.; WANG, J.G.; WEI, J.; ZHANG, S.Y.

    2000-06-30

    The accumulator ring of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) [1] will accumulate a proton beam, injected from a LINAC, into a single bunch containing {approximately} 2.1 x 10{sup 14} protons at a maximum energy of 1.3 GeV. The single bunch with length {approximately}650 nsec and a gap of {approximately}290 nsec will circulate into the accumulator ring for {approximately}1.0 msec before it is extracted into the RTBT transfer line. The accumulation, extraction frequency is set at 60 Hz. This paper discusses the extraction process and the requirements of the fast beam extraction system.

  3. INCREASED UNDERSTANDING OF BEAM LOSSES FROM THE SNS LINAC PROTON EXPERIMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, Alexander V; Shishlo, Andrei P; Plum, Michael A; Lebedev, Valerie; Laface, Emanuele; Galambos, John D

    2013-01-01

    Beam loss is a major concern for high power hadron accelerators such as the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). An unexpected beam loss in the SNS superconducting linac (SCL) was observed during the power ramp up and early operation. Intra-beam-stripping (IBS) loss, in which interactions between H- particles within the accelerated bunch strip the outermost electron, was recently identified as a possible cause of the beam loss. A set of experiments using proton beam acceleration in the SNS linac was conducted, which supports IBS as the primary beam loss mechanism in the SNS SCL.

  4. Losses of ion energy in the multicomponent beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasanov, Ilkham S.; Gurbanov, Ilgar I.; Akbarov, Elchin M.

    2015-03-01

    Energy losses of near axis ions and decreases in ion current density in the center of a beam were observed in a liquid metal source operating under a charged nanodroplets (In, Sn, Au, Ge) generation regime. In experiments, nanodroplets with the sizes of 2-20 nanometers and a characteristic specific charge of 5 × 104 C/kg were revealed. Energy spectra of ions were defined by means of the filter of speeds with cross-section static electromagnetic fields. A reduction of 4% of the In+ ions energy was observed under the conditions of the curried out measurements. The stream of nanoparticles, in contrast to an ion beam, has a small radial divergence; outside of this stream, change of ion speeds is not observed. Energy losses of ions occur during their flight through small nanoparticles. Penetration depth of the accelerated ions in liquid indium is estimated within the framework of the Lindhard-Scharff-Schiott model. Similar interaction between components occurs in ion-beam systems of complex composition where there is a relative movement of various charged particles.

  5. Interstellar He+ ring-beam distributions: Observations and implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drews, C.; Berger, Lars; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.; Galvin, Antoinette B.

    2013-04-01

    We report systematic measurements of the distribution of the incident angle of interstellar pickup He+ ions as observed by STEREO/Plasma and Supra-Thermal Ion Composition (PLASTIC). We have organized these observations according to the angle spanned by the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF), B→, and the bulk solar wind velocity, vsw→. Our measurements show clear evidence of a relatively local injection of He+ pickup ions into the solar wind, which are then seen as a ring distribution perpendicular to B→. Changes of the spectral shape and a reduced flux of interstellar He+ during radial IMF configuration, as observed by, e.g., Ulysses/Solar Wind Ion Composition Spectrometer (SWICS), SOHO/Charge Time-Of-Flight (CTOF), Active Magnetospheric Particle Tracer Explorers/SUprathermaL Energy Ionic Charge Analyzer (SULEICA), have generally been attributed to inefficient scattering across 90° pitch-angle. Our observations of the pitch-angle distribution of interstellar He+ suggest that these changes are instead a result of locally injected pickup ions that escape detection for IMF configuration in which the Solar Wind Sector of PLASTIC, as well as SWICS, CTOF, and SULEICA, are not sensitive to the measurement of the locally injected pickup ion ring.

  6. Improving the Fermilab Booster Notching Efficiency, Beam Losses and Radiation Levels

    SciTech Connect

    Rakhno, I.L.; Drozhdin, A.I.; Mokhov, N.V.; Sidorov, V.I.; Tropin, I.S.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-14

    A fast vertical 1.08-m long kicker (notcher) located in the Fermilab Booster Long-05 straight section is currently used to remove 3 out of 84 circulating bunches after injection to generate an abort gap. With the maximum magnetic field of 72.5 Gauss, it removes only 87% of the 3-bunch intensity at 400 MeV, with 75% loss on pole tips of the focusing Booster magnets, 11% on the Long-06 collimators, and 1% in the rest of the ring. We propose to improve the notching efficiency and reduce beam loss in the Booster by using three horizontal kickers in the Long-12 section. STRUCT calculations show that using horizontal notchers, one can remove up to 96% of the 3-bunch intensity at 400-700 MeV, directing 95% of it to a new beam dump at the Long-13 section. This fully decouples notching and collimation. The beam dump absorbs most of the impinging proton energy in its jaws. The latter are encapsulated into an appropriate radiation shielding that reduces impact on the machine components, personnel and environment to the tolerable levels. MARS simulations show that corresponding prompt and residual radiation levels can be reduced ten times compared to the current ones.

  7. The LCLS Undulator Beam Loss Monitor Readout System

    SciTech Connect

    Dusatko, John; Browne, M.; Fisher, A.S.; Kotturi, D.; Norum, S.; Olsen, J.; /SLAC

    2012-07-23

    The LCLS Undulator Beam Loss Monitor System is required to detect any loss radiation seen by the FEL undulators. The undulator segments consist of permanent magnets which are very sensitive to radiation damage. The operational goal is to keep demagnetization below 0.01% over the life of the LCLS. The BLM system is designed to help achieve this goal by detecting any loss radiation and indicating a fault condition if the radiation level exceeds a certain threshold. Upon reception of this fault signal, the LCLS Machine Protection System takes appropriate action by either halting or rate limiting the beam. The BLM detector consists of a PMT coupled to a Cherenkov radiator located near the upstream end of each undulator segment. There are 33 BLMs in the system, one per segment. The detectors are read out by a dedicated system that is integrated directly into the LCLS MPS. The BLM readout system provides monitoring of radiation levels, computation of integrated doses, detection of radiation excursions beyond set thresholds, fault reporting and control of BLM system functions. This paper describes the design, construction and operational performance of the BLM readout system.

  8. Higher-order paraxial theory of the propagation of ring rippled laser beam in plasma: Relativistic ponderomotive regime

    SciTech Connect

    Purohit, Gunjan Rawat, Priyanka; Chauhan, Prashant; Mahmoud, Saleh T.

    2015-05-15

    This article presents higher-order paraxial theory (non-paraxial theory) for the ring ripple formation on an intense Gaussian laser beam and its propagation in plasma, taking into account the relativistic-ponderomotive nonlinearity. The intensity dependent dielectric constant of the plasma has been determined for the main laser beam and ring ripple superimposed on the main laser beam. The dielectric constant of the plasma is modified due to the contribution of the electric field vector of ring ripple. Nonlinear differential equations have been formulated to examine the growth of ring ripple in plasma, self focusing of main laser beam, and ring rippled laser beam in plasma using higher-order paraxial theory. These equations have been solved numerically for different laser intensities and plasma frequencies. The well established experimental laser and plasma parameters are used in numerical calculation. It is observed that the focusing of the laser beams (main and ring rippled) becomes fast in the nonparaxial region by expanding the eikonal and other relevant quantities up to the fourth power of r. The splitted profile of laser beam in the plasma is observed due to uneven focusing/defocusing of the axial and off-axial rays. The growths of ring ripple increase when the laser beam intensity increases. Furthermore, the intensity profile of ring rippled laser beam gets modified due to the contribution of growth rate.

  9. Amplification of electromagnetic waves by a ring-beam distribution of moderately relativistic electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shi, B. R.; Gaffey, J. D., Jr.; Wu, C. S.

    1986-01-01

    The possibility of a new mechanism for the excitation of unstable modes in cold background plasmas is indicated in this paper. These beam-cyclotron modes are excited by the presence of the ring-beam distribution of suprathermal electrons. The usual eigenmode excitation of a cold plasma is reviewed, and the new type of instability is examined using a single-harmonic approximation and multiharmonic treatment.

  10. Beam loss ion chamber system upgrade for experimental halls

    SciTech Connect

    D. Dotson; D. Seidman

    2005-08-01

    The Beam loss Ion Chamber System (BLICS) was developed to protect Jefferson Labs transport lines, targets and beam dumps from a catastrophic ''burn through''. Range changes and testing was accomplished manually requiring the experiment to be shut down. The new upgraded system is based around an ''off the shelf'' Programmable Logic Controller located in a single control box supporting up to ten individual detectors. All functions that formerly required an entry into the experimental hall and manual adjustment can be accomplished from the Machine Control Center (MCC). A further innovation was the addition of a High Voltage ''Brick'' at the detector location. A single cable supplies the required voltage for the Brick and a return line for the ion chamber signal. The read back screens display range, trip point, and accumulated dose for each location. The new system is very cost effective and significantly reduces the amount of lost experimental time.

  11. Beam Loss Ion Chamber System Upgrade for Experimental Halls

    SciTech Connect

    D.W. Dotson; D.J. Seidman

    2005-05-16

    The Beam loss Ion Chamber System (BLICS) was developed to protect Jefferson Labs transport lines, targets and beam dumps from a catastrophic ''burn through''. Range changes and testing was accomplished manually requiring the experiment to be shut down. The new upgraded system is based around an ''off the shelf'' Programmable Logic Controller located in a single control box supporting up to ten individual detectors. All functions that formerly required an entry into the experimental hall and manual adjustment can be accomplished from the Machine Control Center (MCC). A further innovation was the addition of a High Voltage ''Brick'' at the detector location. A single cable supplies the required voltage for the Brick and a return line for the ion chamber signal. The read back screens display range, trip point, and accumulated dose for each location. The new system is very cost effective and significantly reduces the amount of lost experimental time.

  12. A parallel particle-in-cell model for beam-beam interaction in high energy ring colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, Ji; Furman, Miguel A.; Ryne, Robert D.

    2004-07-01

    In this paper we present a self-consistent simulation model of colliding beams in high energy ring colliders. The model, which is based on a particle-in-cell method, uses a new developed shifted effective Green function algorithm for the efficient calculation of the beam-beam interaction with arbitrary separation and large aspect ratio. The model uses transfer maps to treat the external focusing elements and a stochastic map to treat radiation damping and quantum excitation of the beams. In the parallel implementation we studied various strategies to deal with the particular nature of the colliding beam system - a system in which there can be significant particle movement between beam-beam collisions. We chose a particle-field decomposition approach instead of the conventional domain decomposition or particle decomposition approach. The particle-field approach leads to good load balance, reduced communication cost, and shows the best scalability on an IBM SP3 among the three parallel implementations we studied. A performance test of the beam-beam model on a Cray T3E, IBM SP3, and a PC cluster is presented. As an application, we studied the flip-flop instability in an electron-positron collider.

  13. Transition from ring to beam arc distributions of water ions near the Space Shuttle orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cairns, Iver H.

    1990-01-01

    The distribution function of water ions produced near the Space Shuttle by charge exchange between ionospheric oxygen ions and outgassed water molecules is studied. The transition from a ring to a beam arc distribution function is described. The number density of water ions is found to increase monotonically with decreasing distance from the Shuttle.

  14. Colliding or co-rotating ion beams in storage rings for EDM search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koop, I. A.

    2015-11-01

    A new approach to search for and measure the electric dipole moment (EDM) of the proton, deuteron and some other light nuclei is presented. The idea of the method is to store two ion beams, circulating with different velocities, in a storage ring with crossed electric and magnetic guiding fields. One beam is polarized and its EDM is measured using the so-called ‘frozen spin’ method. The second beam, which is unpolarized, is used as a co-magnetometer, sensitive to the radial component of the ring’s magnetic field. The particle’s magnetic dipole moment (MDM) couples to the radial magnetic field and mimics the EDM signal. Measuring the relative vertical orbit separation of the two beams, caused by the presence of the radial magnetic field, one can control the unwanted MDM spin precession. Examples of the parameters for EDM storage rings for protons and other species of ions are presented. The use of crossed electric and magnetic fields helps to reduce the size of the ring by a factor of 10-20. We show that the bending radius of such an EDM storage ring could be about 2-3 m. Finally, a new method of increasing the spin coherence time, the so-called ‘spin wheel’, is proposed and its applicability to the EDM search is discussed.

  15. Beam size measurement of the stored electron beam at the APS storage ring using zone plate optics and undulator radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Z.; Lai, B.; Yun, W.

    1997-10-01

    Beam sizes of the stored electron beam at the Advanced Photon Source storage ring were measured using zone-plate optics and undulator radiation. A gold Fresnel zone plate (3.5 {micro}m thick) located 33.9 meters from the x-ray source focused radiation of 18 keV, selected by a cryogenically cooled Si(111) crystal in horizontal deflection, and formed a source image in a transverse plane 2.41 m downstream. The sizes of the source image were determined from measured intensity profiles of x-ray fluorescence from a smooth nickel edge (1.5 {micro}m thick), fabricated using a lithographic technique, while the nickel edge was scanned across over the beam in the transverse plane. The measured vertical and horizontal sizes of the electron beam were 60 {+-} 4.3 {micro}m and 300 {+-} 13 {micro}m, respectively, in reasonable agreement with the expected values.

  16. Ring artifact corrections in flat-panel detector based cone beam CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anas, Emran Mohammad Abu; Kim, Jaegon; Lee, Soo Yeol; Hasan, Md. Kamrul

    2011-03-01

    The use of flat-panel detectors (FPDs) is becoming increasingly popular in the cone beam volume and multi-slice CT imaging. But due to the deficient semiconductor array processing, the diagnostic quality of the FPD-based CT images in both CT systems is degraded by different types of artifacts known as the ring and radiant artifacts. Several techniques have been already published in eliminating the stripe artifacts from the projection data of the multi-slice CT system or in other words, from the sinogram image with a view to suppress the ring and radiant artifacts from the 2-D reconstructed CT images. On the other hand, till now a few articles have been reported to remove the artifacts from the cone beam CT images. In this paper, an effective approach is presented to eliminate the artifacts from the cone beam projection data using the sinogram based stripe artifact removal methods. The improvement in the required diagnostic quality is achieved by applying them both in horizontal and vertical sinograms constituted sequentially from the stacked cone beam projections. Finally, some real CT images have been used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed technique in eliminating the ring and radiant artifacts from the cone beam volume CT images. A comparative study with the conventional sinogram based approaches is also presented to see the effectiveness of the proposed technique.

  17. Spatial profile of laser beam in antiresonant ring cavity: experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabovski, Vitaly V.; Prokhorenko, Valentin I.; Yatskiv, Dmytro Y.

    1996-03-01

    This paper presents results of experimental studies of the spatial profile of the beam in lasers with an antiresonant ring. The near-field profile of the beam was measured by the pin-hole technique. In case of the active crystal placed into the ring, the beam profile was found to be Gaussian within a wide range of the pumping power. Variation of the width of the Gaussian profile is caused by the thermal lens in the active crystal. Measurements of the FWHM of the Gaussian profile demonstrated that it is proportional to the one-fourth power of the focal length of the thermal lens, as in the case of a stable cavity.

  18. Beam Ion Instability in ILC Damping Ring with Multi-Gas Species

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lanfa; Pivi, Mauro; /SLAC

    2012-05-30

    Ion induced beam instability is one critical issue for the electron damping ring of the International Linear Collider (ILC) due to its ultra small emittance of 2 pm. The beam ion instability with various beam filling patterns for the latest lattice DTC02 is studied using PIC code. The code has been benchmarked with SPEAR3 experimental data and there is a good agreement between the simulation and observations. It uses the optics from MAD and can handle arbitrary beam filling pattern and vacuum. Different from previous studies, multi-gas species and exact beam filling patterns have been modeled simultaneously in the study. This feature makes the study more realistic. Analyses have been done to compare with the simulations.

  19. Loss of Water from Saturn's E-Ring Through Ion Pick-Up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leisner, J. S.; Russell, C. T.; Dougherty, M. K.; Blanco-Cano, X.; Smith, E. J.; Tsurutani, B. T.

    2005-01-01

    One of the possible loss processes for Saturn s E-ring is ionization followed by acceleration by the electric field associated with the corotating magnetized plasma. It is possible to determine if this process is occurring by detecting electromagnetic waves at the gyrofrequency of water group ions. If the energy the particle gains in this pick-up process is sufficiently great, the picked up ions will generate ion cyclotron waves. Pioneer 11 and Voyager 1 both observed intervals of such waves associated with water group ions during their passes through Saturn s E-ring. Presently the magnetometer onboard the Cassini spacecraft is also seeing water group ion cyclotron oscillations. The Cassini data allow the spatial and temporal behavior of the waves to be mapped in ways not possible during the previous flybys. Analyses of these waves allow us to study the rate of mass loading and its latitudinal and local time variation. In conjunction with previous data, we can then determine the variation as the inclination of the ring to the Sun changes, in accordance with Saturn's seasons. These waves may be the clue to how Saturn powers its magnetosphere as the newly born ions could be the driver for the radial motion of the plasma and to how the E-ring may play the equivalent role to that of Io in the jovian magnetosphere.

  20. Overcoming the losses of a split ring resonator array with gain

    SciTech Connect

    Fang Anan; Huang Zhixiang; Koschny Thomas; Soukoulis Costas M

    2011-06-16

    We present a computational approach, allowing for a self-consistent treatment of a split ring resonator (SRR) array with a gain layer underneath. We apply three different pumping schemes on the gain layer: (1) homogeneously pumped isotropic gain, (2) homogeneously pumped isotropic gain with a shadow cast by the SRR and (3) anisotropic gain pumped in a selected direction only. We show numerically the magnetic losses of the SRR can be compensated by the gain. The difference on loss compensations among the three pumping schemes is analyzed by the electric field distribution. Studies also show the dielectric background of gain does not affect the loss compensation much for the gain only pumped in the direction parallel to the SRR plane.

  1. Observation of longitudinal diffusion and cooling due to intra-beam scattering at the Fermilab Recycler Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, M.; Nagaitsev, S.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    The Fermilab Recycler Ring is a high-vacuum fixed energy antiproton storage ring with both stochastic (at present) and the future electron cooling systems. In this paper the technique for diffusion rate measurement, beam parameters and the analysis of data are presented, as well as the effect of intra-beam scattering on the operational considerations for the storage and cooling of the antiproton beam in the Recycler.

  2. Beam uniformization and low frequency RF cavities in compact electron storage rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Alfonse N.

    An electron storage ring is currently under construction at Indiana University for extreme environment radiation effects experiments, x-ray production, and particle beam dynamics experiments. For an electron bunch to be successfully stored for long durations, a radio-frequency (RF) resonant structure will be used to provide an adequate RF bucket for longitudinal focusing and replenishment of energy electrons loses via synchrotron radiation. Due to beam line space limitation that are inherent to compact circular particle accelerators, a unique ferrite-loaded quarter-wave RF resonant cavity has been designed and constructed for use in the electron storage ring. The physics of particle accelerators and beams, ferrite-loaded RF resonant cavity theory, and results of the Poisson-SUPERFISH electromagnetic field simulations that were used to guide the specification and design of the RF cavity will be presented. Low-power resonant cavity characterization measurements were used to benchmark the performance of the RF cavity. High-power characterization and measurements with electron beams will be used to validate the performance of the cavity in the electron storage ring. To fulfill the requirements for radiation effect experiments, the storage ring manipulation of beams that utilizes a phase space beam dilution method have been developed for the broadening of the radiation damped electron bunch with longitudinal particle distribution uniformity. The method relies on phase modulation applied to a double RF system to generate large regions of bounded chaotic particle motion in phase space. These region are formed by a multitude of overlapping parametric resonances. Parameters of the double RF system and applied phase modulation can be adjusted to vary the degree of beam dilution. The optimal RF parameters have been found for maximal bunch broadening, uniform longitudinal particle distribution, and bounded particle diffusion. Implementation of the phase space dilution method

  3. Precision analog signal processor for beam position measurements in electron storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Hinkson, J.A.; Unser, K.B.

    1995-05-01

    Beam position monitors (BPM) in electron and positron storage rings have evolved from simple systems composed of beam pickups, coaxial cables, multiplexing relays, and a single receiver (usually a analyzer) into very complex and costly systems of multiple receivers and processors. The older may have taken minutes to measure the circulating beam closed orbit. Today instrumentation designers are required to provide high-speed measurements of the beam orbit, often at the ring revolution frequency. In addition the instruments must have very high accuracy and resolution. A BPM has been developed for the Advanced Light Source (ALS) in Berkeley which features high resolution and relatively low cost. The instrument has a single purpose; to measure position of a stable stored beam. Because the pickup signals are multiplexed into a single receiver, and due to its narrow bandwidth, the receiver is not intended for single-turn studies. The receiver delivers normalized measurements of X and Y posit ion entirely by analog means at nominally 1 V/mm. No computers are involved. No software is required. Bergoz, a French company specializing in precision beam instrumentation, integrated the ALS design m their new BPM analog signal processor module. Performance comparisons were made on the ALS. In this paper we report on the architecture and performance of the ALS prototype BPM.

  4. First storage of ion beams in the Double Electrostatic Ion-Ring Experiment: DESIREE

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, H. T.; Thomas, R. D.; Gatchell, M.; Rosen, S.; Reinhed, P.; Loefgren, P.; Braennholm, L.; Blom, M.; Bjoerkhage, M.; Baeckstroem, E.; Alexander, J. D.; Leontein, S.; Zettergren, H.; Liljeby, L.; Kaellberg, A.; Simonsson, A.; Hellberg, F.; Mannervik, S.; Larsson, M.; Geppert, W. D.; and others

    2013-05-15

    We report on the first storage of ion beams in the Double ElectroStatic Ion Ring ExpEriment, DESIREE, at Stockholm University. We have produced beams of atomic carbon anions and small carbon anion molecules (C{sub n}{sup -}, n= 1, 2, 3, 4) in a sputter ion source. The ion beams were accelerated to 10 keV kinetic energy and stored in an electrostatic ion storage ring enclosed in a vacuum chamber at 13 K. For 10 keV C{sub 2}{sup -} molecular anions we measure the residual-gas limited beam storage lifetime to be 448 s {+-} 18 s with two independent detector systems. Using the measured storage lifetimes we estimate that the residual gas pressure is in the 10{sup -14} mbar range. When high current ion beams are injected, the number of stored particles does not follow a single exponential decay law as would be expected for stored particles lost solely due to electron detachment in collision with the residual-gas. Instead, we observe a faster initial decay rate, which we ascribe to the effect of the space charge of the ion beam on the storage capacity.

  5. Loss of accuracy using smeared properties in composite beam modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ning

    Advanced composite materials have broad, proven applications in many engineering systems ranging from sports equipment sectors to components on the space shuttle because of their lightweight characteristics and significantly high stiffness. Together with this merit of composite materials is the challenge of improving computational simulation process for composites analysis. Composite structures, particularly composite laminates, usually consist of many layers with different lay-up angles. The anisotropic and heterogeneous features render 3D finite element analysis (FEA) computationally expensive in terms of the computational time and the computing power. At the constituent level, composite materials are heterogeneous. But quite often one homogenizes each layer of composites, i.e. lamina, and uses the homogenized material properties as averaged (smeared) values of those constituent materials for analysis. This is an approach extensively used in design and analysis of composite laminates. Furthermore, many industries tempted to use smeared properties at the laminate level to further reduce the model of composite structures. At this scale, smeared properties are averaged material properties that are weighted by the layer thickness. Although this approach has the advantage of saving computational time and cost of modeling significantly, the prediction of the structural responses may not be accurate, particularly the pointwise stress distribution. Therefore, it is important to quantify the loss of accuracy when one uses smeared properties. In this paper, several different benchmark problems are carefully investigated in order to exemplify the effect of the smeared properties on the global behavior and pointwise stress distribution of the composite beam. In the classical beam theory, both Newtonian method and variational method include several ad hoc assumptions to construct the model, however, these assumptions are avoided if one uses variational asymptotic method. VABS

  6. Compact and broadband circularly polarized ring antenna with wide beam-width for multiple global navigation satellite systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hong-Lin; Hu, Bin-Jie; Zhang, Xiu-Yin

    2012-02-01

    A compact and broadband circularly polarized (CP) annular ring antenna with wide beam-width is proposed for multiple global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) in the L1 band. The annular ring is excited by two modified L-probes with quadrature phase difference. It has a 36.3% 10-dB return loss bandwidth and a 13% 3-dB axial ratio bandwidth, because of the orthogonal L-probes with 90° phase difference. The measured peak gain of the antenna is 3.9 dBic. It can detect the satellites at lower elevation as its half power beam-width (HPBW) is 113° in both the x—z and y—z planes, achieving a cross-polarization level of larger than 25 dB. Noticeably, the antenna achieves 89% size reduction compared with the conventional half wavelength patch antennas. It can be used in hand-held navigation devices of multiple GNSS such as COMPASS, Galileo, GPS and GLONASS.

  7. Oxygen gas-sheet beam profile monitor for the synchrotron and storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Y.; Fujisawa, T.; Morimoto, T.; Fujita, Y.; Honma, T.; Muto, S.; Noda, K.; Sato, Y.; Yamada, S.

    2004-07-01

    A fast, non-destructive beam-profile monitor was developed using an oxygen gas-sheet target in the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba synchrotron. The size of the gas-sheet target was 85 mm in width and 1.3 mm in thickness, of which the density was 1×10 -4 Pa. The base vacuum in the ring was not deteriorated by this gas-sheet target, and was on the order of 10 -8 Pa. In typical cases, carbon ion beams are accelerated from 6 to 290-430 MeV/n for cancer therapy, in which the intensity is 2.5×10 8 particles/bunch. For these beams, two-dimensional beam profiles were successfully measured within the time (˜100 ns) of the bunch separation. This article describes both the technical and physical aspects of the monitor together with some results.

  8. Beam pinging, sweeping, shaking, and electron/ion collecting, at the Proton Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Hardek, T.W.; Macek, R.J.; Plum, M.A.; Wang, T.S.F.

    1993-01-01

    We have built, installed and tested a pinger for use as a general diagnostic at the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring (PSR). Two 4-m-long parallel-plate electrodes with a plate spacing of 10.2 cm provide kicks of up to 1.1 mrad. A pair of solid-state pulsers may be operated in a single-pulse mode for beam pinging (tune measurements) or in a burst mode at up to 700 kHz pulse rates for beam sweeping. During our 1992 operating period we used the pinger for beam sweeping, for beam shaking, for measuring the tune shift, and we have used it as an ion chamber. Using the pinger as an ion chamber during production conditions has yielded some surprising results.

  9. Beam pinging, sweeping, shaking, and electron/ion collecting, at the Proton Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Hardek, T.W.; Macek, R.J.; Plum, M.A.; Wang, T.S.F.

    1993-06-01

    We have built, installed and tested a pinger for use as a general diagnostic at the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring (PSR). Two 4-m-long parallel-plate electrodes with a plate spacing of 10.2 cm provide kicks of up to 1.1 mrad. A pair of solid-state pulsers may be operated in a single-pulse mode for beam pinging (tune measurements) or in a burst mode at up to 700 kHz pulse rates for beam sweeping. During our 1992 operating period we used the pinger for beam sweeping, for beam shaking, for measuring the tune shift, and we have used it as an ion chamber. Using the pinger as an ion chamber during production conditions has yielded some surprising results.

  10. Storage Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, W.

    2011-01-01

    Storage rings are circular machines that store particle beams at a constant energy. Beams are stored in rings without acceleration for a number of reasons (Tab. 1). Storage rings are used in high-energy, nuclear, atomic, and molecular physics, as well as for experiments in chemistry, material and life sciences. Parameters for storage rings such as particle species, energy, beam intensity, beam size, and store time vary widely depending on the application. The beam must be injected into a storage ring but may not be extracted (Fig. 1). Accelerator rings such as synchrotrons are used as storage rings before and after acceleration. Particles stored in rings include electrons and positrons; muons; protons and anti-protons; neutrons; light and heavy, positive and negative, atomic ions of various charge states; molecular and cluster ions, and neutral polar molecules. Spin polarized beams of electrons, positrons, and protons were stored. The kinetic energy of the stored particles ranges from 10{sup -6} eV to 3.5 x 10{sup 12} eV (LHC, 7 x 10{sup 12} eV planned), the number of stored particles from one (ESR) to 1015 (ISR). To store beam in rings requires bending (dipoles) and transverse focusing (quadrupoles). Higher order multipoles are used to correct chromatic aberrations, to suppress instabilities, and to compensate for nonlinear field errors of dipoles and quadrupoles. Magnetic multipole functions can be combined in magnets. Beams are stored bunched with radio frequency systems, and unbunched. The magnetic lattice and radio frequency system are designed to ensure the stability of transverse and longitudinal motion. New technologies allow for better storage rings. With strong focusing the beam pipe dimensions became much smaller than previously possible. For a given circumference superconducting magnets make higher energies possible, and superconducting radio frequency systems allow for efficient replenishment of synchrotron radiation losses of large current electron or

  11. Comb-assisted cavity ring-down spectroscopy of a buffer-gas-cooled molecular beam.

    PubMed

    Santamaria, Luigi; Sarno, Valentina Di; Natale, Paolo De; Rosa, Maurizio De; Inguscio, Massimo; Mosca, Simona; Ricciardi, Iolanda; Calonico, Davide; Levi, Filippo; Maddaloni, Pasquale

    2016-06-22

    We demonstrate continuous-wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy of a partially hydrodynamic molecular beam emerging from a buffer-gas-cooling source. Specifically, the (ν1 + ν3) vibrational overtone band of acetylene (C2H2) around 1.5 μm is accessed using a narrow-linewidth diode laser stabilized against a GPS-disciplined rubidium clock via an optical frequency comb synthesizer. As an example, the absolute frequency of the R(1) component is measured with a fractional accuracy of ∼1 × 10(-9). Our approach represents the first step towards the extension of more sophisticated cavity-enhanced interrogation schemes, including saturated absorption cavity ring-down or two-photon excitation, to buffer-gas-cooled molecular beams. PMID:27273337

  12. An ion-beam injection line for the ELASR storage ring at KACST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Ghazaly, M. O. A.; Behery, S. A.; Almuqhim, A. A.; Almalki, M. H.; Alshammari, S. M.; Alrashdi, A. O.; Alamer, H. S.; Jabr, A. S.; Lanazi, A. Z.

    2016-01-01

    A versatile ion injector beam-line has been developed for the specific use in the multi-purpose low-energy, storage ring facility at the King Abdulaziz City for Sciences and Technology (KACST) in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. It incorporates a purpose-developed, high-resolution mass analyzing magnet and it is thereby dedicated to provide the ELASR storage ring with beams of ions of specific mass. It is also intended to operate independently as a single-pass experiment. This versatile ion-injection line was constructed in a staged approach, in which an axial injection version was built first, commissioned and is currently operating. The injection line in its final design is now being assembled and commissioned at KACST.

  13. Beam loss by collimation in a neutralizer duct

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, G.W.; Willmann, P.A.

    1980-04-03

    Beam fractions lost by collimation in a neutralizer duct are computed in x-x' phase space by using three examples of slab beam distributions under a broad range of duct dimensions, beam half-widths, and beam divergences. The results can be used to design compact neutralizers and to specify beam requirements. The computer code ILOST can be used under a broad range of beam conditions to compute the fraction lost by collimation.

  14. Nitride ion beam mixing of piston rings for high temperature diesel engine

    SciTech Connect

    Bryzik, W.; Kamo, R.; Woods, M.

    1995-05-01

    Direct ion implantation and ion beam mixing surface treatment processes are being explored to enhance the friction and wear characteristics of piston rings for the adiabatic diesel engine. Bench test results to temperatures of 540{degrees}C indicate that titanium nitride and chrome nitride ion beam mixing of M2 steel produces superior friction and wear properties compared to traditional plasma-sprayed chrome oxide and chrome carbide coatings. Friction was reduced by factor of two and wear was reduced by a factor of 20. 10 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Progress on optimization of the nonlinear beam dynamics in the MEIC collider rings

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2015-07-13

    One of the key design features of the Medium-energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) proposed by Jefferson Lab is a small beta function at the interaction point (IP) allowing one to achieve a high luminosity of up to 1034 cm-2s-1. The required strong beam focusing unavoidably causes large chromatic effects such as chromatic tune spread and beam smear at the IP, which need to be compensated. This paper reports recent progress in our development of a chromaticity correction scheme for the ion ring including optimization of dynamic aperture and momentum acceptance.

  16. Progress on Optimization of the Nonlinear Beam Dynamics in the MEIC Collider Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Morozov, Vasiliy S.; Derbenev, Yaroslav S.; Lin, Fanglei; Pilat, Fulvia; Zhang, Yuhong; Cai, Y.; Nosochkov, Y. M.; Sullivan, Michael; Wang, M.-H.; Wienands, Uli

    2015-09-01

    One of the key design features of the Medium-energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) proposed by Jefferson Lab is a small beta function at the interaction point (IP) allowing one to achieve a high luminosity of up to 1034 cm-2s-1. The required strong beam focusing unavoidably causes large chromatic effects such as chromatic tune spread and beam smear at the IP, which need to be compensated. This paper reports recent progress in our development of a chromaticity correction scheme for the ion ring including optimization of dynamic aperture and momentum acceptance.

  17. Ring beam shaping optics fabricated with ultra-precision cutting for YAG laser processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwano, Ryoichi; Koga, Toshihiko; Tokunaga, Tsuyoshi; Wakayama, Toshitaka; Otani, Yukitoshi; Fujii, Nobuyuki

    2012-03-01

    In this study, a method for generating ring intensity distribution at a refraction-type lens with an aspheric element was proposed, and the beam shaping optical element was finished using only ultra-precision cutting. The shape of the optical element and its irradiance pattern were determined from numerical calculation based on its geometrical and physical optics. An ultra-precision lathe was employed to fabricate beam shaping optical elements, and acrylic resin was used as the material. The transmittance of an optical element (a rotationally symmetrical body) with an aspheric surface fabricated using a single-crystal diamond tool was over 98%, and its surface roughness was 9.6 nm Ra. The method enabled the formation of a circular melting zone on a piece of stainless steel with a thickness of 300 μm through pulse YAG laser ( λ 1:06 μm) processing such that the average radius was 610 μm and the width was 100-200 μm. Circular processing using a ring beam shaping optical element can be realized by single-pulse beam irradiation without beam scanning.

  18. Analysis of longitudinal beam dynamics behavior and rf system operative limits at high-beam currents in storage rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastorides, T.; Rivetta, C.; Fox, J. D.; van Winkle, D.; Teytelman, D.

    2008-06-01

    A dynamics simulation model is used to estimate limits of performance of the positron-electron project (PEP-II). The simulation captures the dynamics and technical limitations of the low level radio frequency (LLRF) system, the high-power rf components, and the low-order mode coupled-bunch longitudinal beam dynamics. Simulation results showing the effect of nonlinearities on the LLRF loops, and studies of the effectiveness of technical component upgrades are reported, as well as a comparison of these results with PEP-II measurements. These studies have led to the estimation of limits and determining factors in the maximum stored current that the low energy ring/high energy ring (LER/HER) can achieve, based on system stability for different rf station configurations and upgrades. In particular, the feasibility of the PEP-II plans to achieve the final goal in luminosity, which required an increase of the beam currents to 4 A for LER and 2.2 A for HER, is studied. These currents are challenging in part because they would push the longitudinal low-order beam mode stability to the limit, and the klystron forward power past a level of satisfactory margin. An acceptable margin is defined in this paper, which in turn determines the corresponding klystron forward power limitation.

  19. Comparative study of beam losses and heat loads reduction methods in MITICA beam source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartori, E.; Agostinetti, P.; Dal Bello, S.; Marcuzzi, D.; Serianni, G.; Sonato, P.; Veltri, P.

    2014-02-01

    In negative ion electrostatic accelerators a considerable fraction of extracted ions is lost by collision processes causing efficiency loss and heat deposition over the components. Stripping is proportional to the local density of gas, which is steadily injected in the plasma source; its pumping from the extraction and acceleration stages is a key functionality for the prototype of the ITER Neutral Beam Injector, and it can be simulated with the 3D code AVOCADO. Different geometric solutions were tested aiming at the reduction of the gas density. The parameter space considered is limited by constraints given by optics, aiming, voltage holding, beam uniformity, and mechanical feasibility. The guidelines of the optimization process are presented together with the proposed solutions and the results of numerical simulations.

  20. Comparative study of beam losses and heat loads reduction methods in MITICA beam source

    SciTech Connect

    Sartori, E. Agostinetti, P.; Dal Bello, S.; Marcuzzi, D.; Serianni, G.; Veltri, P.; Sonato, P.

    2014-02-15

    In negative ion electrostatic accelerators a considerable fraction of extracted ions is lost by collision processes causing efficiency loss and heat deposition over the components. Stripping is proportional to the local density of gas, which is steadily injected in the plasma source; its pumping from the extraction and acceleration stages is a key functionality for the prototype of the ITER Neutral Beam Injector, and it can be simulated with the 3D code AVOCADO. Different geometric solutions were tested aiming at the reduction of the gas density. The parameter space considered is limited by constraints given by optics, aiming, voltage holding, beam uniformity, and mechanical feasibility. The guidelines of the optimization process are presented together with the proposed solutions and the results of numerical simulations.

  1. Measurement of the longitudinal parameters of an electron beam in a storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Krinsky, S.

    1989-01-01

    We discuss the determination of the longitudinal parameters of a bunched beam of electrons or positrons circulating in a storage ring. From the analysis of the beam current observed at a fixed azimuthal location, one can learn much about the longitudinal behavior. We present an elementary analysis of the time-dependence of the current. In particular, we discuss the determination of the average current, bunch length, synchrotron oscillation frequency, and the coherent synchrotron oscillation modes associated with longitudinal instabilities. A brief discussion is also given of the incoherent synchrotron oscillations, or Schottky noise. We review the electromagnetic field traveling with a charge in uniform motion, and introduce some of the most common devices used to detect this field: capacitive pick-up, stripline monitor, and DC beam current transformer. Our paper is organized as follows: We discuss the analysis of the time-dependence of the beam current. Then, the measurement of the current is considered. Finally, we describe some measurements of energy spread and bunch lengthening made recently at SLAC on the SLC damping ring. 12 refs., 6 figs.

  2. Characterization of beam dynamics in the APS injector rings using time-resolved imaging techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, B.X.; Lumpkin, A.H.; Borland, M.

    1997-06-01

    Images taken with streak cameras and gated intensified cameras with both time (longitudinal) and spatial (transverse) resolution reveal a wealth of information about circular accelerators. The authors illustrate a novel technique by a sequence of dual-sweep streak camera images taken at a high dispersion location in the booster synchrotron, where the horizontal coordinate is strongly correlated with the particle energy and the {open_quotes}top-view{close_quotes} of the beam gives a good approximation to the particle density distribution in the longitudinal phase space. A sequence of top-view images taken fight after injection clearly shows the beam dynamics in the phase space. We report another example from the positron accumulator ring for the characterization of its beam compression bunching with the 12th harmonic rf.

  3. Combined Laser and Electron Cooling of Bunched C3+ Ion Beams at the Storage Ring ESR

    SciTech Connect

    Schramm, U.; Bussmann, M.; Habs, D.; Kuehl, T.; Beller, P.; Franzke, B.; Nolden, F.; Steck, M.; Saathoff, G.; Reinhardt, S.; Karpuk, S.

    2006-03-20

    We report on first laser cooling studies of bunched beams of triply charged carbon ions stored at an energy of 1.46 GeV at the ESR (GSI). Despite for the high beam energy and charge state laser cooling provided a reduction of the momentum spread of one order of magnitude in space-charge dominated bunches as compared to electron cooling. For ion currents exceeding 10 {mu}A intra-beam-scattering losses could not be compensated by the narrow band laser system presently in use. Yet, no unexpected problems occurred encouraging the envisaged extension of the laser cooling to highly relativistic beams. At ESR, especially the combination with modest electron cooling provided three-dimensionally cold beams in the plasma parameter range of unity, where ordering effects can be expected and a still unexplained signal reduction of the Schottky signal is observed.

  4. Measurement of inner and/or outer profiles of pipes using ring beam devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakayama, T.; Yoshizawa, T.

    2009-11-01

    Inner profile measurement is an important matter in such fields as medicine, dentistry and anthropology as well as mechanical engineering and industry. Here we propose a measurement method for inner diameter of pipes and/or holes. The key device in this technique is a ring beam device which consists of a conical mirror and a laser diode. And the fundamental principle is based on optical sectioning without any contact probe. The optically sectioned profile of an inner wall of a pipe-like object is analyzed to give the inner profile in addition to the inner diameter. This optical instrument with a simple and small configuration is now under development for practical uses. In the hitherto-tried experimental works, the availability of this instrument has been highly evaluated and usability for practical applications is expected, especially, for measurement and inspection of mechanical components and elements besides pipes. This ring beam device consisting of a conical mirror and a LD is assembled to form a disklike light beam sheet. We show measurement result of pipes and holes, and, at the same time, report a compact inner profile measuring instrument. Both the ring beam device and a miniaturized CCD camera are fabricated in a glass tube. Availability of this instrument is shown by measuring the inner profiles of various pipes. In response to this trial, there appeared a strong request that not only the internal but external profiles should be measured simultaneously. Therefore we propose an improved method for measuring the external profile in addition to the internal profile. In our arrangement, one pair of concaved conical mirrors is used for the external profile measurement. In combination with the inner profile measurement technique, simultaneous measurement of the inner and outer profiles becomes attainable. A measurement result on a bevel gear shows availability of newly proposed principle. Now we are aiming to realize simultaneous measurement of the internal

  5. Surface Area Loss and Increased Sphericity Account for the Splenic Entrapment of Subpopulations of Plasmodium falciparum Ring-Infected Erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Safeukui, Innocent; Buffet, Pierre A.; Perrot, Sylvie; Sauvanet, Alain; Aussilhou, Beatrice; Dokmak, Safi; Couvelard, Anne; Hatem, Dominique Cazals; Mohandas, Narla; David, Peter H.; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile; Milon, Geneviève

    2013-01-01

    Ex vivo perfusion of human spleens revealed innate retention of numerous cultured Plasmodium falciparum ring-infected red blood cells (ring-iRBCs). Ring-iRBC retention was confirmed by a microsphiltration device, a microbead-based technology that mimics the mechanical filtering function of the human spleen. However, the cellular alterations underpinning this retention remain unclear. Here, we use ImageStream technology to analyze infected RBCs’ morphology and cell dimensions before and after fractionation with microsphiltration. Compared to fresh normal RBCs, the mean cell membrane surface area loss of trophozoite-iRBCs, ring-iRBCs and uninfected co-cultured RBCs (uRBCs) was 14.2% (range: 8.3–21.9%), 9.6% (7.3–12.2%) and 3.7% (0–8.4), respectively. Microsphilters retained 100%, ∼50% and 4% of trophozoite-iRBCs, ring-iRBCs and uRBCs, respectively. Retained ring-iRBCs display reduced surface area values (estimated mean, range: 17%, 15–18%), similar to the previously shown threshold of surface-deficient RBCs retention in the human spleen (surface area loss: >18%). By contrast, ring-iRBCs that successfully traversed microsphilters had minimal surface area loss and normal sphericity, suggesting that these parameters are determinants of their retention. To confirm this hypothesis, fresh normal RBCs were exposed to lysophosphatidylcholine to induce a controlled loss of surface area. This resulted in a dose-dependent retention in microsphilters, with complete retention occurring for RBCs displaying >14% surface area loss. Taken together, these data demonstrate that surface area loss and resultant increased sphericity drive ring-iRBC retention in microsphilters, and contribute to splenic entrapment of a subpopulation of ring-iRBCs. These findings trigger more interest in malaria research fields, including modeling of infection kinetics, estimation of parasite load, and analysis of risk factors for severe clinical forms. The determination of the threshold of

  6. Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, R.L.

    1989-01-01

    The essence of vortex physics is that at certain low-energy scales elementary excitations of a point particle theory can behave like strings rather than particles. Vortices are the resulting string-like solutions; their thickness sets the distance scale beyond which physics is string-like rather than particle-like. String degrees of freedom are massless in the sense that excitations on a string can have an arbitrarily low frequency. Non-string degrees of freedom correspond to massive particles and are absent from the low energy spectrum. This article considers only field theories with vortices at low energies. The possible existence of a class of solitons in these vortex theories will be discussed. They are vortex rings: they are localized and finite in energy, and able to carry the quantum numbers of point particles. Rings are thus particle-like solutions of a vortex theory, which is itself a limit of a point particle field theory.

  7. Transition from ring to beam arc distributions of water ions near the space shuttle orbiter

    SciTech Connect

    Cairns, I.H. )

    1990-09-01

    The distribution function of water ions produced near the space shuttle by charge exchange between ionospheric oxygen ions and outgassed water molecules is investigated using solutions of Liouville's equation with a source term modeling the charge exchange process. A transition from ring distributions to beamlike distributions termed beam arc distributions is found with decreasing distance upstream from the orbiter. This beam arc distribution corresponds to a finite section of a ring distribution and not to a conventional beam distribution. The ratio of water ion number density to oxygen ion number density is calculated; typical values within 50 m of the shuttle are in excess of 2% with a maximum value of the order of 20% for nominal parameters, suggsting that these ions must be considered with interpreting particle data from near the space shuttle. An argument for a plasma density enhancement of the order of 10% very close to the shuttle, due to kinematic effects (corresponding to pileup of plasma) and not to plasma creation, is also presented. This kinetmatic density enhancement is insufficient, by an order of magnitude, to explain the plasma density enhancements inferred from Spacelab 2 data.

  8. Measurement of the beam longitudinal profile in a storage ring bynon-linear laser mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Beche, J.-F.; Byrd, J.; De Santis, S.; Denes, P.; Placidi, M.; Turner, W.; Zolotorev, M.

    2004-05-03

    We report on the development of a new technique for the measurement of the longitudinal beam profile in storage rings. This technique, which has been successfully demonstrated at the Advanced Light Source, mixes the synchrotron radiation with the light from a mode-locked solid state laser oscillator in a non-linear crystal. The up-converted radiation is then detected with a photomultiplier and processed to extract, store, and display the required information. The available choices of laser repetition frequency, pulse width, and phase modulation give a wide range of options for matching the bunch configuration of a particular storage ring. Besides the dynamic measurement of the longitudinal profile of each bunch, the instrument can monitor the evolution of the bunch tails, the presence of untrapped particles and their diffusion into nominally empty RF buckets (''ghostbunches'').

  9. Size modulated transition in the fluid-structure interaction losses in nano mechanical beam resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishwakarma, S. D.; Pandey, A. K.; Parpia, J. M.; Verbridge, S. S.; Craighead, H. G.; Pratap, R.

    2016-05-01

    An understanding of the dominant dissipative mechanisms is crucial for the design of a high-Q doubly clamped nanobeam resonator to be operated in air. We focus on quantifying analytically the viscous losses—the squeeze film damping and drag force damping—that limit the net quality factor of a beam resonator, vibrating in its flexural fundamental mode with the surrounding fluid as air at atmospheric pressure. Specifically, drag force damping dominates at smaller beam widths and squeeze film losses dominate at larger beam widths, with no significant contribution from structural losses and acoustic radiation losses. The combined viscous losses agree well with the experimentally measured Q of the resonator over a large range of beam widths, within the limits of thin beam theory. We propose an empirical relation between the maximum quality factor and the ratio of maximum beam width to the squeeze film air gap thickness.

  10. Studies of Limits on Uncontrolled Heavy Ion Beam Losses for Allowing Hands-On Maintenance

    SciTech Connect

    Reginald M. Ronningen; Igor Remec

    2010-09-11

    Dose rates from accelerator components activated by 1 W/m beam losses are obtained semiempirically for a 1 GeV proton beam and by use of Monte Carlo transport codes for the proton beam and for 777 MeV/u 3He, 500 MeV/u 48Ca, 86Kr, 136Xe, and 400 MeV/u 238U ions. The dose rate obtained by the semi-empirical method, 0.99 mSv/h (99 mrem/h) at 30 cm, 4 h after 100 d irradiation by a 1-GeV proton beam, is consistent with studies at several accelerator facilities and with adopted hands-on maintenance dose rate limits. Monte Carlo simulations verify this result for protons and extend studies to heavy ion beam losses in drift-tube linac and superconducting linac accelerating structures. The studies indicate that the 1 W/m limit imposed on uncontrolled beam losses for high-energy proton beams might be relaxed for heavy ion beams. These studies further suggest that using the ratio of neutrons produced by a heavy ion beam to neutrons produced by a proton beam along with the dose rate from the proton beam (for thin-target scenarios) should allow an estimate of the dose rates expected from heavy ion beam losses.

  11. Fail-safe ion chamber beam loss monitor system for personnel protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, D.; Plum, M. A.; Browman, A. A.; Macek, R. J.

    1999-01-01

    A fail-safe beam loss monitor system has been designed for use in the Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE) Radiation Security System (RSS). The latest version (Model III) has been in use since 1991. This system has been carefully designed to protect personnel from large radiation doses caused by errant beam conditions during beam transport. Due to limited shielding between the beam transport lines and occupied areas, personnel can safely occupy these areas only if the beam losses in the transport lines are sufficiently low. Although the usual solution is to increase the bulk shielding between the beam lines and the occupied areas, the physical dimensions of the site do not permit additional shielding to be added. In this paper we will discuss the design and implementation of the fail-safe beam loss monitor system.

  12. "DIAGNOSTIC" PULSE FOR SINGLE-PARTICLE-LIKE BEAM POSITION MEASUREMENTS DURING ACCUMULATION/PRODUCTION MODE IN THE LOS ALAMOS PROTON STORAGE RING

    SciTech Connect

    Kolski, Jeffrey S.; Baily, Scott A.; Bjorklund, Eric A.; Bolme, Gerald O.; Hall, Michael J.; Kwon, Sung I.; Martinez, Martin P.; Prokop, Mark S.; Shelley, Fred E. Jr.; Torrez, Phillip A.

    2012-05-14

    Beam position monitors (BPMs) are the primary diagnostic in the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring (PSR). When injecting one turn, the transversemotion is approximated as a single particle with initial betatron position and angle {rvec x}{sub 0} and {rvec x}'{sub 0}. With single-turn injection, we fit the betatron tune, closed orbit (CO), and injection offset ({rvec x}{sub 0} and {rvec x}'{sub 0} at the injection point) to the turn-by-turn beam position. In production mode, we accumulate multiple turns, the transverse phase space fills after 5 injections (horizontal and vertical fractional betatron tunes {approx}0.2) resulting in no coherent betatron motion, and only the CO may be measured. The injection offset, which determines the accumulated beam size and is very sensitive to steering upstream of the ring, is not measurable in production mode. We describe our approach and ongoing efforts to measure the injection offset during production mode by injecting a 'diagnostic' pulse {approx}50 {micro}s after the accumulated beam is extracted. We also study the effects of increasing the linac RF gate length to accommodate the diagnostic pulse on the production beam position, transverse size, and loss.

  13. A Main Ring bunch length monitor by detecting two frequency components of the beam

    SciTech Connect

    Ieiri, T.; Jackson, G.

    1989-06-02

    The bunch length is measured by detecting two revolution frequency harmonics of the beam and taking the ratio of their amplitudes. Two heterodyne receivers have been made to direct them, one at 53MHz and the other at 159MHz. These signals are picked-up by a stripline detector. An analog circuit provides a signal proportional to the bunch length. The monitor measures variation of the bunch length as a function of time in the Main Ring. The measured signal, which sometimes shows that the bunches are tumbling in phase space, can be damped by feedback to the RF amplitude modulator. 9 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Simulation of crystalline beams in storage rings using molecular dynamics technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meshkov, I.; Katayama, T.; Sidorin, A.; Smirnov, A.; Syresin, E.; Trubnikov, G.; Tsutsui, H.

    2006-03-01

    Achieving very low temperatures in the beam rest frame can present new possibilities in accelerator physics. Increasing luminosity in the collider and in experiments with targets is a very important asset for investigating rare radioactive isotopes. The ordered state of circulating ion beams was observed at several storage rings: NAP-M [Budker, et al., in: Proceedings of the 4th All-Union Conference on Charged-Particle Accelerators [in Russian], vol. 2, Nauka, Moscow, 1975, p. 309; Budker et al., Part. Accel. 7 (1976) 197; Budker et al., At. Energ. 40 (1976) 49. E. Dementev, N. Dykansky, A. Medvedko et al., Prep. CERN/PS/AA 79-41, Geneva, 1979] (Novosibirsk), ESR [M. Steck et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 77 (1996) 3803] and SIS [Hasse and Steck, Ordered ion beams, in: Proceeding of EPAC '2000] (Darmstadt), CRYRING [Danared et al., Observation of ordered ion beams in CRYRING, in: Proceeding of PAC '2001] (Stockholm) and PALLAS [Schramm et al., in: J.L. Duggan (Eds.), Proceedings of the Conference on Appl. of Acc. in Research and Industry AIP Conference Proceedings, p. 576 (to be published)] (Munich). In this report, the simulation of 1D crystalline beams with BETACOOL code is presented. The sudden reduction of momentum spread in the ESR experiment is described with this code. Simulation shows good agreement with experimental results and also with the intrabeam scattering (IBS) theory [Martini, Intrabeam scattering in the ACOOL-AA machines, CERN PS/84-9 AA, Geneva, 1984]. The code was used to calculate characteristics of the ordered state of ion beams for the TARN-II [Katayama, TARN II project, in: Proceedings of the IUCF workshop on nuclear physics with stored cooled beams, Spencer, IN, USA, 1984].

  15. Issues and experience with controlling beam loss at the Tevatron collider

    SciTech Connect

    Annala, Gerald; /Fermilab

    2007-07-01

    Controlling beam loss in the Tevatron collider is of great importance because of the delicate nature of the cryogenic magnet system and the collider detectors. Maximizing the physics potential requires optimized performance as well as protection of all equipment. The operating history of the Tevatron has significantly influenced the way losses are managed. The development of beam loss management in the Tevatron will be presented.

  16. Scientific potential and design considerations for an undulator beam line on Aladdin storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Arko, A. J.; Bader, S. D.; Dehmer, Joseph L.; Kim, S. H.; Knapp, G. S.; Shenoy, G. K.; Veal, B. W.; Young, C. E.; Brown, F. C.; Weaver, J. W.

    1985-04-08

    The unique features of undulator radiation, i.e., high photon flux and brightness, partial coherence, small beam divergence, spectral tunability, etc., mandate that undulators be included in the future plans for Aladdin. This will make it possible to perform the next generation of experiments in photon-stimulated spectroscopies. A team of scientists (see Appendix) has now been assembled to build an insertion device (ID) and the associated beam line at Aladdin. In considering the specifications for the ID, it was assumed that the ID beamline will be an SRC user facility. Consequently, design parameters were chosen with the intent of maximizing experimental flexibility consistent with a conservative design approach. A tunable ''clamshell'' undulator device was Chosen with a first harmonic tunable from 35 to 110 eV to operate on a 1 GeV storage ring. Higher harmonics will be utilized for experiments needing higher photon energies.

  17. Vertical split-ring resonator based anomalous beam steering with high extinction ratio

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Wei-Lun; Wu, Pin Chieh; Chen, Jia-Wern; Chen, Ting-Yu; Cheng, Bo Han; Chen, Wei Ting; Huang, Yao-Wei; Liao, Chun Yen; Sun, Greg; Tsai, Din Ping

    2015-01-01

    Metasurfaces created artificially with metal nanostructures that are patterned on surfaces of different media have shown to possess “unusual” abilities to manipulate light. Limited by nanofabrication difficulties, so far most reported works have been based on 2D metal structures. We have recently developed an advanced e-beam process that allowed for the deposition of 3D nanostructures, namely vertical split-ring resonators (VSRRs), which opens up another degree of freedom in the metasurface design. Here we explore the functionality of beam steering with phase modulation by tuning only the vertical dimension of the VSRRs and show that anomalous steering reflection of a wide range of angles can be accomplished with high extinction ratio using the finite-difference-time-domain simulation. We also demonstrate that metasurfaces made of 3D VSRRs can be made with roughly half of the footprint compared to that of 2D nano-rods, enabling high density integration of metal nanostructures. PMID:26054048

  18. Modeling and Simulation of the Longitudinal Beam Dynamics - RF Station Interaction in the LHC Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Mastorides, T; Rivetta, C.; Fox, J.D.; Winkle, D.Van; Baudrenghien, P.; Tuckmantel, J.; /CERN

    2008-07-07

    A non-linear time-domain simulation has been developed to study the interaction between longitudinal beam dynamics and RF stations in the LHC rings. The motivation for this tool is to determine optimal LLRF configurations, to study system sensitivity on various parameters, and to define the operational and technology limits. It will be also used to study the effect of RF station noise, impedance, and perturbations on the beam life time and longitudinal emittance. It allows the study of alternative LLRF implementations and control algorithms. The insight and experience gained from our PEP-II simulation is important for this work. In this paper we discuss properties of the simulation tool that will be helpful in analyzing the LHC RF system and its initial results. Partial verification of the model with data taken during the LHC RF station commissioning is presented.

  19. Photodissociation of an Internally Cold Beam of CH+ Ions in a Cryogenic Storage Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, A. P.; Becker, A.; Blaum, K.; Breitenfeldt, C.; George, S.; Göck, J.; Grieser, M.; Grussie, F.; Guerin, E. A.; von Hahn, R.; Hechtfischer, U.; Herwig, P.; Karthein, J.; Krantz, C.; Kreckel, H.; Lohmann, S.; Meyer, C.; Mishra, P. M.; Novotný, O.; Repnow, R.; Saurabh, S.; Schwalm, D.; Spruck, K.; Sunil Kumar, S.; Vogel, S.; Wolf, A.

    2016-03-01

    We have studied the photodissociation of CH+ in the Cryogenic Storage Ring at ambient temperatures below 10 K. Owing to the extremely high vacuum of the cryogenic environment, we were able to store CH+ beams with a kinetic energy of ˜60 keV for several minutes. Using a pulsed laser, we observed Feshbach-type near-threshold photodissociation resonances for the rotational levels J =0 - 2 of CH+, exclusively. In comparison to updated, state-of-the-art calculations, we find excellent agreement in the relative intensities of the resonances for a given J , and we can extract time-dependent level populations. Thus, we can monitor the spontaneous relaxation of CH+ to its lowest rotational states and demonstrate the preparation of an internally cold beam of molecular ions.

  20. Photodissociation of an Internally Cold Beam of CH^{+} Ions in a Cryogenic Storage Ring.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, A P; Becker, A; Blaum, K; Breitenfeldt, C; George, S; Göck, J; Grieser, M; Grussie, F; Guerin, E A; von Hahn, R; Hechtfischer, U; Herwig, P; Karthein, J; Krantz, C; Kreckel, H; Lohmann, S; Meyer, C; Mishra, P M; Novotný, O; Repnow, R; Saurabh, S; Schwalm, D; Spruck, K; Sunil Kumar, S; Vogel, S; Wolf, A

    2016-03-18

    We have studied the photodissociation of CH^{+} in the Cryogenic Storage Ring at ambient temperatures below 10 K. Owing to the extremely high vacuum of the cryogenic environment, we were able to store CH^{+} beams with a kinetic energy of ∼60  keV for several minutes. Using a pulsed laser, we observed Feshbach-type near-threshold photodissociation resonances for the rotational levels J=0-2 of CH^{+}, exclusively. In comparison to updated, state-of-the-art calculations, we find excellent agreement in the relative intensities of the resonances for a given J, and we can extract time-dependent level populations. Thus, we can monitor the spontaneous relaxation of CH^{+} to its lowest rotational states and demonstrate the preparation of an internally cold beam of molecular ions. PMID:27035300

  1. Parametric Modeling of Electron Beam Loss in Synchrotron Light Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Sayyar-Rodsari, B.; Schweiger, C.; Hartman, E.; Corbett, J.; Lee, M.; Lui, P.; Paterson, E.; /SLAC

    2007-11-28

    Synchrotron light is used for a wide variety of scientific disciplines ranging from physical chemistry to molecular biology and industrial applications. As the electron beam circulates, random single-particle collisional processes lead to decay of the beam current in time. We report a simulation study in which a combined neural network (NN) and first-principles (FP) model is used to capture the decay in beam current due to Touschek, Bremsstrahlung, and Coulomb effects. The FP block in the combined model is a parametric description of the beam current decay where model parameters vary as a function of beam operating conditions (e.g. vertical scraper position, RF voltage, number of the bunches, and total beam current). The NN block provides the parameters of the FP model and is trained (through constrained nonlinear optimization) to capture the variation in model parameters as operating condition of the beam changes. Simulation results will be presented to demonstrate that the proposed combined framework accurately models beam decay as well as variation to model parameters without direct access to parameter values in the model.

  2. Two-channel method for measuring losses in a ring optical resonator at a wavelength of 632.8 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azarova, V. V.; Bessonov, A. S.; Bondarev, A. L.; Makeev, A. P.; Petrukhin, E. A.

    2016-07-01

    A two-channel method is proposed for measuring losses in an optical ring resonator (RR), in which eigenmodes (counterpropagating waves) are excited by means of a Zeeman ring He – Ne laser with a wavelength of 632.8 nm. The measured frequency splitting of the laser counterpropgating waves is used to determine the absolute value of losses in an exemplary RR. The value of losses in the measured RR is determined by comparing the resonance width of the output radiation intensity with the resonance width of the radiation intensity for an exemplary resonator. The algorithm of intensity resonance processing takes into account the distortions caused by the dynamic effect, which allows a significant increase in the accuracy (up to 1% – 2%) and sensitivity of the proposed method. The measured losses in the RR with a perimeter of 28 cm constitute 80 – 5000 ppm.

  3. Beam loss studies in high-intensity heavy-ion linacs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostroumov, P. N.; Aseev, V. N.; Mustapha, B.

    2004-09-01

    The proposed Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) Facility, an innovative exotic-beam facility for the production of high-quality beams of short-lived isotopes, consists of a fully superconducting 1.4GV driver linac and a 140MV postaccelerator. To produce sufficient intensities of secondary beams the driver linac will provide 400kW primary beams of any ion from hydrogen to uranium. Because of the high intensity of the primary beams the beam losses must be minimized to avoid radioactivation of the accelerator equipment. To keep the power deposited by the particles lost on the accelerator structures below 1 W/m, the relative beam losses per unit length should be less than 10-5, especially along the high-energy section of the linac. A new beam dynamics simulation code TRACK has been developed and used for beam loss studies in the RIA driver linac. In the TRACK code, ions are tracked through the three-dimensional electromagnetic fields of every element of the linac starting from the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source to the production target. The simulation starts with a multicomponent dc ion beam extracted from the ECR. The space charge forces are included in the simulations. They are especially important in the front end of the driver linac. Beam losses are studied by tracking a large number of particles (up to 106) through the whole linac considering all sources of error such us element misalignments, rf field errors, and stripper thickness fluctuations. For each configuration of the linac, multiple sets of error values have been randomly generated and used in the calculations. The results are then combined to calculate important beam parameters, estimate beam losses, and characterize the corresponding linac configuration. To track a large number of particles for a comprehensive number of error sets (up to 500), the code TRACK was parallelized and run on the Jazz computer cluster at ANL.

  4. Beam loss scenarios and strategies for machine protection at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, R.; Assmann, R.; Burkhardt, H.; Carlier, E.; Dehning, B.; Goddard, B.; Jeanneret, J. B.; Kain, V.; Puccio, B.; Wenninger, J.

    2003-12-01

    At the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) with nominal parameters at 7 TeV, each proton beam has an energy of more than 330 MJ threatening to damage accelerator equipment in case of uncontrolled beam loss. To prevent such damage, kickers are fired in case of failure deflecting the beams into dump blocks. The dump blocks are the only elements that can safely absorb the beams without damage. The time constant for particle losses depends on the specific failure and ranges from microseconds to several seconds. Starting with some typical failure scenarios, the strategy for the protection during LHC beam operation is illustrated. The systems designed to ensure safe operation, such as beam dump, beam instruments, collimators / absorbers and interlocks are discussed.

  5. First atomic physics experiments with cooled stored ion beams at the Heidelberg heavy-ion ring TSR

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, A.; Balykin, V.; Baumann, W.; Berger, J.; Bisoffi, G.; Blatt, P.; Blum, M.; Faulstich, A.; Friedrich, A.; Gerhard, M.; Geyer, C.; Grieser, M.; Grieser, R.; Habs, D.; Heyng, H.W.; Hochadel, B.; Holzer, B.; Huber, G.; Jaeschke, E.; Jung, M.; Karafillidis, A.; Kilgus, G.; Klein, R.; Kraemer, D.; Krause, P.; Krieg, M.; Kuehl, T.; Matl, K.; Mueller, A.; Music, M.; Neumann, R.; Neureither, G.; Ott, W.; Petrich, W.; Povh, B.; Repnow, R.; Schroeder, S.; Schuch, R.; Schwalm, D.; Sigray, P.; Steck, M.; Stokstad, R.; Szmola, E.; Wagner, M.; Wanner, B.; Welti, K.; Zwickler, S. Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg Manne Siegbahn Institute , Stockholm Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet Giessen, Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Mainz Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung , Darmstadt (Fed

    1990-06-01

    An overview of atomic physics experiments at the heavy ion Test Storage Ring (TSR) is given. Highly charged ions up to fully stripped silicon have been stored at energies between 4 and 12 MeV/u. The enhancement of the beam intensity by stacking, the beam lifetime, and electron cooling of these ion beams are discussed. Radiative and state-selective dielectronic recombination rates of hydrogen-like oxygen ions with free electrons from the electron cooler were measured. Beam noise spectra are being investigated with regard to collective effects caused by the Coulomb interaction in the cold ion beams. Resonance fluorescence from stored single-charged ions was observed using tunable narrow-band lasers. First indications of laser cooling in a storage ring were seen.

  6. Annular spherically focused ring transducers for improved single-beam acoustical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitri, F. G.

    2016-02-01

    The use of ultrasonic transducers with a central hollow is suggested for improved single-beam acoustical tweezers applications. Within the framework of the Fresnel-Kirchhoff parabolic approximation, a closed-form partial-wave series expansion (PWSE) for the incident velocity potential (or pressure) field is derived for an annular spherically focused ring (asfr) with uniform vibration across its surface in spherical coordinates. The Rayleigh-Sommerfeld diffraction integral and the addition theorems for the Legendre and spherical wave functions are used to obtain the PWSE assuming a weakly focused beam (with a focusing angle α ≤ 20°). The PWSE allows evaluating the incident field from the finite asfr in 3D. Moreover, the obtained solution allows computing efficiently the acoustic scattering and radiation force on a sphere centered on the beam's axis of wave propagation. The analytical solution is valid for wavelengths largely exceeding the radius of the asfr and when the viscosity of the surrounding fluid can be neglected. Numerical predictions for the beam-forming, scattering, and axial time-averaged radiation force are performed with particular emphasis on the asfr thickness, the axial distance separating the sphere from the center of the transducer, the (non-dimensional) size of the transducer, as well as the sphere's elastic properties without restriction to the long- (i.e., Rayleigh) or the short-wavelength (i.e., ray acoustics) regimes. Potential applications of the present solution are in beam-forming design, particle tweezing, and manipulation due to negative forces using ultrasonic asfr transducers.

  7. Design of Injection and Extraction at an 8-GeV Booster Ring and the J-PARC Main Ring for Multi-MW Output Beam Power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Hiroyuki; Hotchi, Hideaki; Igarashi, Susumu; Sato, Yoichi; Koseki, Tadashi

    The 240-kW output beam power in the MR has been achieved for a 30-GeV user operation with the repetition cycle of 2.48 sec and injecting proton beams of 380-kW equivalent intensity from RCS. The MR aims to realize 750-kW beam operation with faster repetition cycle of ˜1 s and injecting proton beams of 600-kW equivalent intensity from RCS. The MR is developing the new type power supplies of MR main magnets and high-impedance core of MR RF cavities toward faster repetition cycle. We are now exploring the further beam power upgrade scenario of the J-PARC accelerators. As one possible scenario toward a multi-MW output beam power from MR, a new 8-GeV booster ring (BR) between RCS and MR is also designed. The injection energy of the MR increases from present 3-GeV to 8-GeV. The higher injection energy of the MR would be able to mitigate a space charge force in MR injection energy region and secure the acceptance clearance of beam from MR physical aperture. In this paper, the designed injection and extraction system of BR are described. Additionally, a new concept of BR extraction and MR injection toward multi-MW output beam power are described.

  8. Three-dimensional ordering of cold ion beams in a storage ring: A molecular-dynamics simulation study

    SciTech Connect

    Yuri, Yosuke

    2015-06-29

    Three-dimensional (3D) ordering of a charged-particle beams circulating in a storage ring is systematically studied with a molecular-dynamics simulation code. An ion beam can exhibit a 3D ordered configuration at ultralow temperature as a result of powerful 3D laser cooling. Various unique characteristics of the ordered beams, different from those of crystalline beams, are revealed in detail, such as the single-particle motion in the transverse and longitudinal directions, and the dependence of the tune depression and the Coulomb coupling constant on the operating points.

  9. Simulation and optimization of beam losses during continuous transfer extraction at the CERN Proton Synchrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barranco García, Javier; Gilardoni, Simone

    2011-03-01

    The proton beams used for the fixed target physics at the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) are extracted from the Proton Synchrotron (PS) by a multiturn technique called continuous transfer (CT). During the CT extraction, large losses are observed in locations where the machine aperture should be large enough to accommodate the circulating beam. This limits the maximum intensity deliverable due to the induced stray radiation outside the PS tunnel. Scattered particles from the interaction with the electrostatic septum are identified as the possible source of these losses. This article presents a detailed study aiming to understand the origin of losses and propose possible cures. The simulations could reproduce accurately the beam loss pattern measured in real machine operation and determine the beam shaving, intrinsic to the extraction process, as the cause for the unexpected losses. Since these losses are unavoidable, the proposed solution implies a new optics scheme displacing the losses to a region with better shielding. New simulations demonstrate the satisfactory performance of the new extraction optics and its suitability to be implemented in the machine. Finally, beam loss measurements in these new operation conditions confirmed the previous simulation results.

  10. Development of an inner profile measurement instrument using a ring beam device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshizawa, T.; Wakayama, T.

    2010-11-01

    Inner profile measurement is an important matter in such fields as medicine, dentistry and anthropology as well as mechanical engineering and other industrial applications. Here we describe recent development of our measurement principle for inner diameter of pipes and/or holes. The key device in this technique is a ring beam device which consists of a conical mirror and a laser diode. And the fundamental principle is based on optical sectioning without using any contact type stylus. The optically sectioned profile of an inner wall of a pipe-like object is analyzed to give the inner profile in addition to the inner diameter. This optical instrument with a simple and small configuration is now under development for practical uses. In our hitherto trial experimental works, the availability of this instrument has been evaluated in many cases and availability for practical applications is expected, especially, for measurement and inspection of mechanical components and elements besides pipes. This ring beam device consisting of a conical mirror and a LD is assembled to form a disk-like light sheet. We show measurement result of pipes and holes, and, at the same time, report a compact inner profile measuring instrument at this point. Both the ring beam device and a miniaturized CCD camera are fabricated into a glass tube. Availability of this instrument is shown by measuring the inner profiles of various pipes. In response to this trial, there appeared a strong request that not only the internal but external profiles should be measured simultaneously. Therefore we propose potentially possible method for measurement of external profile at the same time with internal profile. If one pair of concave mirrors are used in our arrangement, external profile is captured. In combination with inner profile measurement technique, simultaneous measurement of inner and outer profiles becomes attainable. A measurement result on a bevel gear shows availability of here proposed

  11. RESULTS OF BACKGROUND SUBTRACTION TECHNIQUES ON THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE BEAM LOSS MONITORS

    SciTech Connect

    Pogge, James R; Zhukov, Alexander P

    2010-01-01

    Recent improvements to the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) beam loss monitor (BLM) designs have been made with the goal of significantly reducing background noise. This paper outlines this effort and analyzes the results. The significance of this noise reduction is the ability to use the BLM sensors [1], [2], [3] distributed throughout the SNS accelerator as a method to monitor activation of components as well as monitor beam losses.

  12. Electron beam guiding by grooved SiO2 parallel plates without energy loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Yingli; Yu, Deyang; Liu, Junliang; Zhang, Mingwu; Yang, Bian; Zhang, Yuezhao; Cai, Xiaohong

    2015-12-01

    Using a pair of grooved SiO2 parallel plates, stably guided electron beams were obtained without energy loss at 800-2000 eV. This shows that the transmitted electrons are guided by a self-organized repulsive electric field, paving the way for a self-adaptive manipulation of electron beams.

  13. Electron beam guiding by grooved SiO{sub 2} parallel plates without energy loss

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Yingli; Yu, Deyang Liu, Junliang; Zhang, Mingwu; Yang, Bian; Zhang, Yuezhao; Cai, Xiaohong

    2015-12-21

    Using a pair of grooved SiO{sub 2} parallel plates, stably guided electron beams were obtained without energy loss at 800–2000 eV. This shows that the transmitted electrons are guided by a self-organized repulsive electric field, paving the way for a self-adaptive manipulation of electron beams.

  14. PRELIMINARY DESIGN OF THE BEAM LOSS MONITORING SYSTEM FOR THE SNS.

    SciTech Connect

    WITKOVER,R.; GASSNER,D.

    2002-05-06

    The SNS to be built at Oak Ridge National Laboratory will provide a high average intensity 1 GeV beam to produce spallation neutrons. Loss of a even small percentage of this intense beam would result in high radiation. The Beam Loss Monitor (ELM) system must detect such small, long term losses yet be capable of measuring infrequent short high losses. The large dynamic range presents special problems for the system design. Ion chambers will be used as the detectors. A detector originally designed for the FNAL Tevatron, was considered but concerns about ion collection times and low collection efficiency at high loss rates favor a new design. The requirements and design concepts of the proposed approach will be presented. Discussion of the design and testing of the ion chambers and the analog j-Point end electronics will be presented. The overall system design will be described.

  15. Beam loss and backgrounds in the CDF and D0 detectors due to nuclear elastic beam-gas scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandr I. Drozhdin; Valery A. Lebedev; Nikolai V. Mokhov

    2003-05-27

    Detailed simulations were performed on beam loss rates in the vicinity of the Tevatron Collider detectors due to beam-gas nuclear elastic interactions. It turns out that this component can drive the accelerator-related background rates in the CDF and D0 detectors, exceeding those due to outscattering from collimation system, inelastic beam-gas interactions and other processes [1, 2]. Results of realistic simulations with the STRUCT and MARS codes are presented for the interaction region components and the CDF and D0 detectors. It is shown that a steel mask placed upstream of the detectors can reduce the background rates by almost an order of magnitude.

  16. Tight focusing of a double-ring-shaped, azimuthally polarized beam through a dielectric interface.

    PubMed

    Shu, Jianhua; Chen, Ziyang; Pu, Jixiong; Liu, Yongxin

    2014-06-01

    We investigate the tight focusing properties of a double-ring-shaped, azimuthally polarized vector beam (DRS-APVB) by use of vectorial Debye theory. It is shown that a dark channel with an ultralong depth of focus (~106λ) and subwavelength focal holes (~0.5λ) can be generated by focusing a DRS-APVB through a dielectric interface with an annular high-numerical aperture (NA) objective lens. The influence of the NA of the objective, the relative refractive indices of two dielectric media, and the probe depth of the system on the focusing properties of the dark channel has been studied in detail. Such a non-diffracting dark channel could find potential applications in atom optical experiments, such as with atomic lenses, atom traps, and atom switches. PMID:24977354

  17. Generating Ultrashort Coherent Soft X-ray Radiation in Storage Rings Using Angular-modulated Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, D.; Wan, W.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2010-08-23

    A technique is proposed to generate ultrashort coherent soft x-ray radiation in storage rings using angular-modulated electron beams. In the scheme a laser operating in the TEM01 mode is first used to modulate the angular distribution of the electron beam in an undulator. After passing through a special beam line with non-zero transfer matrix element R{sub 54}, the angular modulation is converted to density modulation which contains considerable higher harmonic contents of the laser. It is found that the harmonic number can be one or two orders of magnitude higher than the standard coherent harmonic generation method which relies on beam energy modulation. The technique has the potential of generating femtosecond coherent soft x-ray radiation directly from an infrared seed laser and may open new research opportunities for ultrafast sciences in storage rings.

  18. Direct focusing error correction with ring-wide TBT beam position data

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, M.J.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    Turn-By-Turn (TBT) betatron oscillation data is a very powerful tool in studying machine optics. Hundreds and thousands of turns of free oscillations are taken in just few tens of milliseconds. With beam covering all positions and angles at every location TBT data can be used to diagnose focusing errors almost instantly. This paper describes a new approach that observes focusing error collectively over all available TBT data to find the optimized quadrupole strength, one location at a time. Example will be shown and other issues will be discussed. The procedure presented clearly has helped to reduce overall deviations significantly, with relative ease. Sextupoles, being a permanent feature of the ring, will need to be incorporated into the model. While cumulative effect from all sextupoles around the ring may be negligible on turn-to-turn basis it is not so in this transfer line analysis. It should be noted that this procedure is not limited to looking for quadrupole errors. By modifying the target of minimization it could in principle be used to look for skew quadrupole errors and sextupole errors as well.

  19. Fairy Ring Disease of Cranberry: Assessment of Crop Losses and Impact on Cultivar Genotype

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fairy ring is a disease of cultivated cranberries common in the eastern growing regions of the U.S., especially New Jersey and Massachusetts. Rings may persist for many years and current recommendations are costly and largely ineffective. The goal of this study was to accurately assess the impact of...

  20. Behavioral responses to tooth loss in wild ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta) at the Beza Mahafaly Special Reserve, Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Millette, James B; Sauther, Michelle L; Cuozzo, Frank P

    2009-09-01

    Severe dental wear and tooth loss is often assumed to impede the processing, breakdown, and energetic conversion of food items, thereby negatively impacting individual health, reproduction, and survival. Ring-tailed lemurs at the Beza Mahafaly Special Reserve demonstrate exceptionally high frequencies of severe dental wear and antemortem tooth loss, yet often survive multiple years with these impairments. To test the hypothesis that these lemurs mitigate tooth loss through behavioral adjustments, we collected 191 h of observational data from 16 focal subjects, eight without tooth loss and eight with between 3% and 44% loss. These data indicate dentally-impaired ring-tailed lemurs show compensatory behaviors consistent with the demands of living in a social group. During early afternoon (12:00-14:30 h) individuals with loss showed trends towards higher frequencies of foraging and grooming, while individuals without loss rested significantly more often. Individuals with >10% loss (n = 7) showed higher frequencies of feeding, foraging, and grooming, and lower frequencies of resting during this period than individuals with <10% loss (n = 9). Individuals with tooth loss maintained relatively higher levels of feeding and foraging throughout the day. These individuals licked tamarind fruit at higher frequencies, likely spending more time softening it before ingestion. These individuals did not demonstrate longer feeding bouts overall, although bouts involving tamarinds were significantly longer. Individuals with marked toothcomb wear engaged in higher rates of certain types of allogrooming, demonstrating that social behaviors are used to compensate for reduced grooming efficiency. These data have implications for interpreting behavioral responses to dental impairment in the fossil record. PMID:19373842

  1. Basis for low beam loss in the high-current APT linac

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, T.P.; Gray, E.R.; Krawczyk, F.L.; Kurennoy, S.S.; Lawrence, G.P.; Ryne, R.D.; Crandall, K.R.

    1998-12-31

    The present evidence that the APT proton linac design will meet its goal of low beam loss operation. The conclusion has three main bases: (1) extrapolation from the understanding of the performance of the 800-MeV LANSCE proton linac at Los Alamos, (2) the theoretical understanding of the dominant halo-forming mechanism in the APT accelerator from physics models and multiparticle simulations, and (3) the conservative approach and key principles underlying the design of the APT linac, which are aimed at minimizing beam halo and providing large apertures to reduce beam loss to a very low value.

  2. Reliability of Beam Loss Monitor Systems for the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Guaglio, G.; Dehning, B.; Santoni, C.

    2005-06-08

    The increase of beam energy and beam intensity, together with the use of super conducting magnets, opens new failure scenarios and brings new criticalities for the whole accelerator protection system. For the LHC beam loss protection system, the failure rate and the availability requirements have been evaluated using the Safety Integrity Level (SIL) approach. A downtime cost evaluation is used as input for the SIL approach. The most critical systems, which contribute to the final SIL value, are the dump system, the interlock system, the beam loss monitors system, and the energy monitor system. The Beam Loss Monitors System (BLMS) is critical for short and intense particles losses at 7 TeV and assisted by the Fast Beam Current Decay Monitors at 450 GeV. At medium and higher loss time it is assisted by other systems, such as the quench protection system and the cryogenic system. For BLMS, hardware and software have been evaluated in detail. The reliability input figures have been collected using historical data from the SPS, using temperature and radiation damage experimental data as well as using standard databases. All the data has been processed by reliability software (Isograph). The analysis spaces from the components data to the system configuration.

  3. The upgraded data acquisition system for beam loss monitoring at the Fermilab Tevatron and Main Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Baumbaugh, A.; Briegel, C.; Brown, B.C.; Capista, D.; Drennan, C.; Fellenz, B.; Knickerbocker, K.; Lewis, J.D.; Marchionni, A.; Needles, C.; Olson, M.; /Fermilab

    2011-11-01

    A VME-based data acquisition system for beam-loss monitors has been developed and is in use in the Tevatron and Main Injector accelerators at the Fermilab complex. The need for enhanced beam-loss protection when the Tevatron is operating in collider-mode was the main driving force for the new design. Prior to the implementation of the present system, the beam-loss monitor system was disabled during collider operation and protection of the Tevatron magnets relied on the quench protection system. The new Beam-Loss Monitor system allows appropriate abort logic and thresholds to be set over the full set of collider operating conditions. The system also records a history of beam-loss data prior to a beam-abort event for post-abort analysis. Installation of the Main Injector system occurred in the fall of 2006 and the Tevatron system in the summer of 2007. Both systems were fully operation by the summer of 2008. In this paper we report on the overall system design, provide a description of its normal operation, and show a number of examples of its use in both the Main Injector and Tevatron.

  4. H- Beam Loss and Evidence for Intrabeam Stripping in the LANSCE Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Rybarcyk, Lawrence J.; Kelsey, Charles T. IV; McCrady, Rodney C.; Pang, Xiaoying

    2012-05-15

    The LANSCE accelerator complex is a multi-beam, multi-user facility that provides high-intensity H{sup +} and H{sup -} particle beams for a variety of user programs. At the heart of the facility is a room temperature linac that is comprised of 100-MeV drift tube and 800-MeV coupled cavity linac (CCL) structures. Although both beams are similar in intensity and emittance at 100 MeV, the beam-loss monitors along the CCL show a trend of increased loss for H{sup -} that is not present for H{sup +}. This difference is attributed to stripping mechanisms that affect H{sup -} and not H{sup +}. We present the results of an analysis of H{sup -} beam loss along the CCL that incorporates beam spill measurements, beam dynamics simulations, analytical models and radiation transport estimates using the MCNPX code. The results indicate a significant fraction of these additional losses result from intrabeam stripping.

  5. Stochastic Orbit Loss of Neutral Beam Ions From NSTX Due to Toroidal Alfven Eigenmode Avalanches

    SciTech Connect

    Darrow, D S; Fredrickson, E D; Gorelenkov, N N; Gorelenkova, M; Kubota, S; Medley, S S; Podesta, M; Shi, L

    2012-07-11

    Short toroidal Alfven eigenmode (TAE) avalanche bursts in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) cause a drop in the neutron rate and sometimes a loss of neutral beam ions at or near the full injection energy over an extended range of pitch angles. The simultaneous loss of wide ranges of pitch angle suggests stochastic transport of the beam ions occurs. When beam ion orbits are followed with a guiding center code that incorporates plasma's magnetic equilibrium plus the measured modes, the predicted ranges of lost pitch angle are similar to those seen in the experiment, with distinct populations of trapped and passing orbits lost. These correspond to domains where the stochasticity extends in the orbit phase space from the region of beam ion deposition to the loss boundary.

  6. ACCELERATOR PHYSICS MODEL OF EXPECTED BEAM LOSS ALONG THE SNS ACCELERATOR FACILITY DURING NORMAL OPERATION.

    SciTech Connect

    CATALAN - LASHERAS,N.; COUSINEAU,S.; GALAMBOS,J.; HOLTKAMP,N.; RAPARIA,D.; SHAFER,R.; STAPLES,J.; STOVALL,J.; TANKE,E.; WANGLER,T.; WEI,J.

    2002-06-03

    The most demanding requirement in the design of the SNS accelerator chain is to keep the accelerator complex under hands-on maintenance. This requirement implies a hard limit for residual radiation below 100 mrem/hr at one feet from the vacuum pipe and four hours after shutdown for hundred days of normal operation. It has been shown by measurements as well as simulation [l] that this limit corresponds to 1-2 Watts/meter average beam losses. This loss level is achievable all around the machine except in specific areas where remote handling will be necessary. These areas have been identified and correspond to collimation sections and dumps where a larger amount of controlled beam loss is foreseen. Even if the average level of loss is kept under 1 W/m, there are circumstances under which transient losses occur in the machine. The prompt radiation or potential damage in the accelerator components can not be deduced from an average beam loss of 1 W/m. At the same time, controlled loss areas require a dedicated study to clarify the magnitude and distribution of the beam loss. From the front end to the target, we have estimated the most probable locations for transient losses and given an estimate of their magnitude and frequency. This information is essential to calculate the necessary shielding or determine the safety procedures during machine operation. Losses in controlled areas, and the cleaning systems are the subject of Section 2. The inefficiency of each system will be taken into account for the discussion on Section 3 where n controlled loss is estimated. Section 4 summarizes our findings and presents a global view of the losses along the accelerator chain.

  7. Location of Maximum Credible Beam Losses in LCLS Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Stan

    2010-12-13

    The memo describes the maximum credible beam the LCLS injector can produce and lose at various locations along the beamline. The estimation procedure is based upon three previous reports [1, 2, 3]. While specific numbers have been updated to accurately reflect the present design parameters, the conclusions are very similar to those given in Ref 1. The source of the maximum credible beam results from the explosive electron emission from the photocathode if the drive laser intensity exceeds the threshold for plasma production. In this event, the gun's RF field can extract a large number of electrons from this plasma which are accelerated out of the gun and into the beamline. This electron emission persists until it has depleted the gun of all its energy. Hence the number of electrons emitted per pulse is limited by the amount of stored RF energy in the gun. It needs to be emphasized that this type of emission is highly undesirable, as it causes permanent damage to the cathode.

  8. The energy-dependent electron loss model for pencil beam dose kernels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chvetsov, Alexei V.; Sandison, George A.; Yeboah, Collins

    2000-10-01

    The `monoenergetic' electron loss model was derived in a previous work to account for pathlength straggling in the Fermi-Eyges pencil beam problem. In this paper, we extend this model to account for energy-loss straggling and secondary knock-on electron transport in order to adequately predict a depth dose curve. To model energy-loss straggling, we use a weighted superposition of a discrete number of monoenergetic pencil beams with different initial energies where electrons travel along the depth-energy characteristics in the continuous slowing down approximation (CSDA). The energy straggling spectrum at depth determines the weighting assigned to each monoenergetic pencil beam. Supplemented by a simple transport model for the secondary knock-on electrons, the `energy-dependent' electron loss model predicts both lateral and depth dose distributions from the electron pencil beams in good agreement with Monte Carlo calculations and measurements. The calculation of dose distribution from a pencil beam takes 0.2 s on a Pentium III 500 MHz computer. Being computationally fast, the `energy-dependent' electron loss model can be used for the calculation of 3D energy deposition kernels in dose optimization schemes without using precalculated or measured data.

  9. The role of electronic energy loss in ion beam modification of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, William J.; Duffy, Dorothy M.; Thome, Lionel; Zhang, Yanwen

    2014-10-05

    The interaction of energetic ions with solids results in energy loss to both atomic nuclei and electrons in the solid. In this article, recent advances in understanding and modeling the additive and competitive effects of nuclear and electronic energy loss on the response of materials to ion irradiation are reviewed. Experimental methods and large-scale atomistic simulations are used to study the separate and combined effects of nuclear and electronic energy loss on ion beam modification of materials. The results demonstrate that nuclear and electronic energy loss can lead to additive effects on irradiation damage production in some materials; while in other materials, the competitive effects of electronic energy loss leads to recovery of damage induced by elastic collision cascades. Lastly, these results have significant implications for ion beam modification of materials, non-thermal recovery of ion implantation damage, and the response of materials to extreme radiation environments.

  10. The role of electronic energy loss in ion beam modification of materials

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Weber, William J.; Duffy, Dorothy M.; Thome, Lionel; Zhang, Yanwen

    2014-10-05

    The interaction of energetic ions with solids results in energy loss to both atomic nuclei and electrons in the solid. In this article, recent advances in understanding and modeling the additive and competitive effects of nuclear and electronic energy loss on the response of materials to ion irradiation are reviewed. Experimental methods and large-scale atomistic simulations are used to study the separate and combined effects of nuclear and electronic energy loss on ion beam modification of materials. The results demonstrate that nuclear and electronic energy loss can lead to additive effects on irradiation damage production in some materials; while inmore » other materials, the competitive effects of electronic energy loss leads to recovery of damage induced by elastic collision cascades. Lastly, these results have significant implications for ion beam modification of materials, non-thermal recovery of ion implantation damage, and the response of materials to extreme radiation environments.« less

  11. First calibration of a Cherenkov beam loss sensor at ALICE using SiPM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intermite, A.; Putignano, M.; Wolski, A.

    2012-06-01

    The need for real-time monitoring of beam losses, including evaluation of their intensity and localization of their exact position, together with the possibility to overcome the limitations due to the reduced space for the diagnostics, makes exploitation of the Cherenkov effect in optical fibres, one of the most suitable candidates for beam loss monitoring. In this article, we report on the first tests of an optical fibre beam loss monitor based on large numerical aperture pure silica fibres and silicon photomultipliers. The tests were carried out at the ALICE accelerator research and development facility, Daresbury Laboratories, UK. In contrast to the results already published where the fibres are longitudinally placed with respect to the accelerator beam path and the losses are multidirectional charged particle showers, for the first time a dedicated set-up with an incident accelerator beam impinging directly on the optical fibre was used for optimizing the collection efficiency of the Cherenkov effect as a function of the incident angle by changing the fibre direction. For this purpose large core fibres were used together with the latest generation silicon detector instead of the standard photomultiplier tubes commonly used for Cherenkov beam loss monitoring. The experiments described in this contribution aim to demonstrate the suitability of the optical fibre sensor for loss monitoring, to optimize the Collection Efficiency (CE) of the Cherenkov photons inside the fibre as a function of the particle incident angle, to calibrate the sensor and calculate its sensitivity, and to understand the limits of temporal resolution of losses from different bunches in the accelerator.

  12. SNS Ring Operational Experience and Power Ramp Up Status

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, Michael A

    2009-01-01

    The SNS Ring has now been operating for about 3.5 years, and our march continues to increase the beam power to the full design value of 1.4 MW. The Ring is a loss-limited machine, and in general the radioactivation levels are good, but there are some unanticipated hot spots that we are working to improve. High intensity collective effects such as space-charge and beam instability have had minimal impact on beam operations to date. The cross plane coupling issue in the ring to target beam transport line has been solved. We will also discuss the status of equipment upgrades in the high-energy beam transport beam line, the injection-dump beam transport line, the ring, and the ring-to-target beam transport line.

  13. Measured and simulated heavy-ion beam loss patterns at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermes, P. D.; Bruce, R.; Jowett, J. M.; Redaelli, S.; Salvachua Ferrando, B.; Valentino, G.; Wollmann, D.

    2016-05-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN pushes forward to new regimes in terms of beam energy and intensity. In view of the combination of very energetic and intense beams together with sensitive machine components, in particular the superconducting magnets, the LHC is equipped with a collimation system to provide protection and intercept uncontrolled beam losses. Beam losses could cause a superconducting magnet to quench, or in the worst case, damage the hardware. The collimation system, which is optimized to provide a good protection with proton beams, has shown a cleaning efficiency with heavy-ion beams which is worse by up to two orders of magnitude. The reason for this reduced cleaning efficiency is the fragmentation of heavy-ion beams into isotopes with a different mass to charge ratios because of the interaction with the collimator material. In order to ensure sufficient collimation performance in future ion runs, a detailed theoretical understanding of ion collimation is needed. The simulation of heavy-ion collimation must include processes in which 82+208Pb ions fragment into dozens of new isotopes. The ions and their fragments must be tracked inside the magnetic lattice of the LHC to determine their loss positions. This paper gives an overview of physical processes important for the description of heavy-ion loss patterns. Loss maps simulated by means of the two tools ICOSIM [1,2] and the newly developed STIER (SixTrack with Ion-Equivalent Rigidities) are compared with experimental data measured during LHC operation. The comparison shows that the tool STIER is in better agreement.

  14. Blowup of a weak beam due to interaction with a strong beam in an electron storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Kheifets, S.

    1983-07-01

    The theoretical description of the beam-beam interaction presented here takes into account all the important features of the beam-beam phenomenon: the nonlinear beam-beam force and its dependnce on both transverse coordinates, damping of the oscillations, presence of noise in the particle motion, in particular the quantum noise in its synchrotron radiation, actual machine functions, layout and the number B of interaction points, and to some extent imperfections present in the machine. The model deals not with a separate particle, but with the beam as a whole using phase space distribution functions and the average (unperturbed and perturbed) characteristics of the bunch.

  15. Modeling the response of a fast ion loss detector using orbit tracing techniques in a neutral beam prompt-loss study on the DIII-D tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Pace, D. C.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Muscatello, C. M.; Zhu, Y. B.; Fisher, R. K.; Van Zeeland, M. A.; Garcia-Munoz, M.; Darrow, D. S.; Nazikian, R.

    2010-10-15

    A numerical model describing the expected measurements of neutral beam prompt-losses by a newly commissioned fast ion loss detector (FILD) in DIII-D is presented. This model incorporates the well understood neutral beam deposition profiles from all eight DIII-D beamlines to construct a prompt-loss source distribution. The full range of detectable ion orbit phase space available to the FILD is used to calculate ion trajectories that overlap with neutral beam injection footprints. Weight functions are applied to account for the level of overlap between these detectable orbits and the spatial and velocity (pitch) properties of ionized beam neutrals. An experimental comparison is performed by firing each neutral beam individually in the presence of a ramping plasma current. Fast ion losses determined from the model are in agreement with measured losses.

  16. Simultaneous linear optics and coupling correction for storage rings with turn-by-turn beam position monitor data

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xi; Huang, Xiaobiao

    2015-11-10

    We propose a method to simultaneously correct linear optics errors and linear coupling for storage rings using turn-by-turn (TbT) beam position monitor (BPM) data. The independent component analysis (ICA) method is used to isolate the betatron normal modes from the measured TbT BPM data. The betatron amplitudes and phase advances of the projections of the normal modes on the horizontal and vertical planes are then extracted, which, combined with dispersion measurement, are used to fit the lattice model. Furthermore, the fitting results are used for lattice correction. Our method has been successfully demonstrated on the NSLS-II storage ring.

  17. Loss of c-Cbl RING finger function results in high-intensity TCR signaling and thymic deletion

    PubMed Central

    Thien, Christine B F; Blystad, Frøydis D; Zhan, Yifan; Lew, Andrew M; Voigt, Valentina; Andoniou, Christopher E; Langdon, Wallace Y

    2005-01-01

    Signaling from the T-cell receptor (TCR) in thymocytes is negatively regulated by the RING finger-type ubiquitin ligase c-Cbl. To further investigate this regulation, we generated mice with a loss-of-function mutation in the c-Cbl RING finger domain. These mice exhibit complete thymic deletion by young adulthood, which is not caused by a developmental block, lack of progenitors or peripheral T-cell activation. Rather, this phenotype correlates with greatly increased expression of the CD5 and CD69 activation markers and increased sensitivity to anti-CD3-induced cell death. Thymic loss contrasts the normal fate of the c-Cbl−/− thymus, even though thymocytes from both mutant mice show equivalent enhancement in proximal TCR signaling, Erk activation and calcium mobilization. Remarkably, only the RING finger mutant thymocytes show prominent TCR-directed activation of Akt. We show that the mutant c-Cbl protein itself is essential for activating this pathway by recruiting the p85 regulatory subunit of PI 3-kinase. This study provides a unique model for analyzing high-intensity TCR signals that cause thymocyte deletion and highlights multiple roles of c-Cbl in regulating this process. PMID:16211006

  18. Cavity loss factors of non-relativistic beams for Project X

    SciTech Connect

    Lunin, A.; Yakovlev, V.; Kazakov, S.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    Cavity loss factor calculation is an important part of the total cryolosses estimation for the super conductive (SC) accelerating structures. There are two approaches how to calculate cavity loss factors, the integration of a wake potential over the bunch profile and the addition of loss factors for individual cavity modes. We applied both methods in order to get reliable results for non-relativistic beam. The time domain CST solver was used for a wake potential calculation and the frequency domain HFSS code was used for the cavity eigenmodes spectrum findings. Finally we present the results of cavity loss factors simulations for a non-relativistic part of the ProjectX and analyze it for various beam parameters.

  19. Anomalous Beam-Ion Loss in TFTR Reversed Magnetic Shear Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ruskov, E.; Bell, M.; Budny, R.V.; McCune, D.C.; Medley, S.S.; Redi, M.H.; Scott, S.; Synakowski, E.J.; von Goeler, S.; White, R.B.; Zweben, S.J.

    1999-02-01

    Anomalous beam-ion loss has been observed in an experiment with short tritium beam pulses injected into deuterium-beam-heated Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor plasmas (P{sub NBI}=15 thinspthinspMW) with reversed magnetic shear (RS). Comparisons of the measured total 14thinspthinspMeV neutron emission, the neutron flux along eight radial locations, and the perpendicular plasma stored energy with predictions from an extensive set of TRANSP simulations suggest that about 40{percent} beam power is lost on a time scale much shorter than the tritium beam pulse length {Delta}t=70 thinspthinspms. In contrast with recent results [K. Tobita {ital et al.,} Nucl.thinspthinspFusion {bold 37}, 1583 (1997)] from RS experiments at JT-60U, we were not able to show conclusively that magnetic field ripple is responsible for this anomaly. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  20. Anomalous Beam-Ion Loss in TFTR Reversed Magnetic Shear Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruskov, E.; Bell, M.; Budny, R. V.; McCune, D. C.; Medley, S. S.; Redi, M. H.; Scott, S.; Synakowski, E. J.; von Goeler, S.; White, R. B.; Zweben, S. J.

    1999-02-01

    Anomalous beam-ion loss has been observed in an experiment with short tritium beam pulses injected into deuterium-beam-heated Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor plasmas ( PNBI = 15 MW) with reversed magnetic shear (RS). Comparisons of the measured total 14 MeV neutron emission, the neutron flux along eight radial locations, and the perpendicular plasma stored energy with predictions from an extensive set of TRANSP simulations suggest that about 40% beam power is lost on a time scale much shorter than the tritium beam pulse length Δt = 70 ms. In contrast with recent results [K. Tobita et al., Nucl. Fusion 37, 1583 (1997)] from RS experiments at JT-60U, we were not able to show conclusively that magnetic field ripple is responsible for this anomaly.

  1. Energy matching of 1. 2 GeV positron beam to the SLC (Stanford Linear Collider) damping ring

    SciTech Connect

    Clendenin, J.E.; Helm, R.H.; Jobe, R.K.; Kulikov, A.; Sheppard, J.C.

    1989-08-01

    Positrons collected at the SLC positron source are transported over a 2-km path at 220 MeV to be reinjected into the linac for acceleration to 1.2 GeV, the energy of the emittance damping ring. Since the positron bunch length is a significant fraction of a cycle of the linac-accelerating RF, the energy spread at 1.2 GeV is considerably larger than the acceptance of the linac-to-ring (LTR) transport system. Making use of the large pathlength difference at the beginning of the LTR due to this energy spread, a standard SLAC 3-m accelerating section has been installed in the LTR to match the longitudinal phase space of the positron beam to the acceptance of the damping ring. The design of the matching system is described, and a comparison of operating results within simulations is presented. 5 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Two-dimensional finite-element analyses of simulated rotor-fragment impacts against rings and beams compared with experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stagliano, T. R.; Witmer, E. A.; Rodal, J. J. A.

    1979-01-01

    Finite element modeling alternatives as well as the utility and limitations of the two dimensional structural response computer code CIVM-JET 4B for predicting the transient, large deflection, elastic plastic, structural responses of two dimensional beam and/or ring structures which are subjected to rigid fragment impact were investigated. The applicability of the CIVM-JET 4B analysis and code for the prediction of steel containment ring response to impact by complex deformable fragments from a trihub burst of a T58 turbine rotor was studied. Dimensional analysis considerations were used in a parametric examination of data from engine rotor burst containment experiments and data from sphere beam impact experiments. The use of the CIVM-JET 4B computer code for making parametric structural response studies on both fragment-containment structure and fragment-deflector structure was illustrated. Modifications to the analysis/computation procedure were developed to alleviate restrictions.

  3. Multiple-electron losses in uranium ion beams in heavy ion synchrotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozyk, L.; Chill, F.; Litsarev, M. S.; Tolstikhina, I. Yu.; Shevelko, V. P.

    2016-04-01

    Charge changing processes as the result of collisions with residual gas particles are the main cause of beam loss in high energy medium charge state heavy ion beams. To investigate the magnitude of this effect for heavy ion synchrotrons like the planned SIS100 at GSI, the multiple-electron and the total electron-loss cross sections are calculated for Uq+ ions, q = 10, 28, 40, 73, colliding with typical gas components H2, He, C, N2, O2, and Ar at ion energies E = 1 MeV/u-10 GeV/u. The total electron-capture cross sections for U28+ and U73+ ions interacting with these gases are also calculated. Most of these cross sections are new and presented for the first time. Calculated charge-changing cross sections are used to determine the ion-beam lifetimes τ for U28+ ions which agree well with the recently measured values at SIS18/GSI in the energy range E = 10-200 MeV/u. Using simulations made by the StrahlSim code with the reference ion U28+, it is found that in SIS100 the beam loss caused by single and multiple electron losses has only little impact on the residual gas density due to the high efficiency of the ion catcher system.

  4. Modelling of Ion Bernstein Wave-Driven Deuterium Beam Ion Losses in TFTR.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heeter, R. F.; Fisch, N. J.; Darrow, D. S.; Herrmann, M. C.; Majeski, R.

    1996-11-01

    A 1-D velocity-space diffusion/drag model is used to understand MeV-range deuterium beam ion losses driven by mode-converted Ion Bernstein Waves in TFTR. [D. Darrow et. al., this conference.] Simulated losses provide insight into the nature of the loss process and an estimation of the velocity diffusion coefficent. Implications for channeling of alpha particle energy to fuel ions are discussed. [Work supported by U.S. DoE contract DE-AC02-76-CH03073; two of the authors (RFH and MCH) also acknowledge the support of the Fannie and John Hertz Foundation.

  5. Observations of neutral beam and ICRF tail ion losses due to Alfven modes in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Darrow, D.S.; Zweben, S.J.; Chang, Z.

    1996-04-01

    Fast ion losses resulting from MHD modes at the Alfven frequency, such as the TAE, have been observed in TFTR. The modes have been driven both by neutral beam ions, at low B{sub T}, and by H-minority ICRF tail ions at higher B{sub T}. The measurements indicate that the loss rate varies linearly with the mode amplitude, and that the fast ion losses during the mode activity can be significant, e.g. up to 10% of the input power is lost in the worst case.

  6. Enhanced relativistic-electron-beam energy loss in warm dense aluminum.

    PubMed

    Vaisseau, X; Debayle, A; Honrubia, J J; Hulin, S; Morace, A; Nicolaï, Ph; Sawada, H; Vauzour, B; Batani, D; Beg, F N; Davies, J R; Fedosejevs, R; Gray, R J; Kemp, G E; Kerr, S; Li, K; Link, A; McKenna, P; McLean, H S; Mo, M; Patel, P K; Park, J; Peebles, J; Rhee, Y J; Sorokovikova, A; Tikhonchuk, V T; Volpe, L; Wei, M; Santos, J J

    2015-03-01

    Energy loss in the transport of a beam of relativistic electrons in warm dense aluminum is measured in the regime of ultrahigh electron beam current density over 2×10^{11}  A/cm^{2} (time averaged). The samples are heated by shock compression. Comparing to undriven cold solid targets, the roles of the different initial resistivity and of the transient resistivity (upon target heating during electron transport) are directly observable in the experimental data, and are reproduced by a comprehensive set of simulations describing the hydrodynamics of the shock compression and electron beam generation and transport. We measured a 19% increase in electron resistive energy loss in warm dense compared to cold solid samples of identical areal mass. PMID:25793822

  7. Distributed beam loss monitor based on the Cherenkov effect in an optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltseva, Yu; Emanov, F. A.; Petrenko, A. V.; Prisekin, V. G.

    2015-05-01

    This review discusses a distributed beam loss monitor which is based on the Cherenkov effect in an optical fiber and which has been installed at the VEPP-5 Injection Complex at the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics. The principle of the device operation consists in detecting the Cherenkov radiation generated in an optical fiber by relativistic charged particles that are produced in an electromagnetic shower when highly relativistic beam particles (electrons or positrons) hit the accelerator vacuum chamber wall. Our experiments used a photomultiplier tube (PMT) to detect the Cherenkov light. Knowing when the PMT signal arrives tells us where the beam loss occurs. Using a 20-m-long optical fiber allowed a detector spatial resolution of 3 m. The way to improve the resolution is to optimize the monitor working conditions and optical fiber and PMT parameters, potentially leading to a resolution of as fine as 0.5 m according to our estimates.

  8. Effects of a hybrid superconducting three-pole wiggler on the stored beam at the SAGA-LS storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koda, Shigeru; Iwasaki, Yoshitaka; Takabayashi, Yuichi; Kaneyasu, Tatsuo

    2012-08-01

    Practical effects of a hybrid three-pole wiggler on the beam was investigated at 1.4 GeV storage ring of Saga light source in the viewpoint of evaluation of the applicability of the wiggler on actual storage ring. The wiggler was developed to generate hard X-rays up to 40 keV approximately. The magnet system consisted of three isolated poles—a superconducting main pole and two normal-conducting side poles. To suppress the increase in the second magnetic field integral caused by the isolated pole structure, thick field clamps that generate a negative field for the main pole were located at both ends of the main pole. This isolated pole structure with field clamps generated an unusual field distribution. The practical effects of the wiggler field on the storage ring (e.g., the focusing force, the sextupole strength, radiation power and the beam emittance ) were investigated by performing measurements. The results agreed roughly with practical field calculation model, which was corrected by result of the magnetic field measurement. Practical multipole effects were relatively tolerable or controllable. In addition, the employment of the field clamps and the normal-conducting side pole, which contributed to the decrease of peak field of the side poles, brought about reduction of beam effects due to curvature distribution at the side poles.

  9. Reliability of Beam Loss Monitors System for the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Guaglio, G.; Dehning, B.; Santoni, C.

    2004-11-10

    The employment of superconducting magnets in high energy colliders opens challenging failure scenarios and brings new criticalities for the whole system protection. For the LHC beam loss protection system, the failure rate and the availability requirements have been evaluated using the Safety Integrity Level (SIL) approach. A downtime cost evaluation is used as input for the SIL approach. The most critical systems, which contribute to the final SIL value, are the dump system, the interlock system, the beam loss monitors system and the energy monitor system. The Beam Loss Monitors System (BLMS) is critical for short and intense particle losses, while at medium and higher loss time it is assisted by other systems, such as the quench protection system and the cryogenic system. For BLMS, hardware and software have been evaluated in detail. The reliability input figures have been collected using historical data from the SPS, using temperature and radiation damage experimental data as well as using standard databases. All the data have been processed by reliability software (Isograph). The analysis ranges from the components data to the system configuration.

  10. SIMULATION STUDY AND INITIAL TEST OF THESNS RING RF SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yan; Ma, Hengjie; Holmes, Jeffrey A; Champion, Mark; Chu, Paul; Cousineau, Sarah M; Hardek, Thomas W; Plum, Michael A; Danilov, Viatcheslav; Piller, Chip

    2008-01-01

    The rfsimulator code was developed for the study of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) dual-harmonic ring RF control. It uses time-domain solvers to compute beam-cavity interactions and FFT methods to simulate the time responses of the linear RF system. The important elements of the system considered in the model include beam loading, dynamic cavity detuning, circuit bandwidth, loop delay, proportional-integral controller for feedback and adaptive feed forward, stochastic noise, width-in-turn loop parameter change, beam current fluctuation, and bunch leakage. As the beam power increases, beam loss in the ring goes up and thus precise control of the bunching RF phase and amplitude is required to limit beam loss. The code will help in the development of a functional RF control and in achieving the goal of minimizing beam loss in the accumulator ring.