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Sample records for ring current decay

  1. Ring current proton decay by charge exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, P. H.; Hoffman, R. A.; Fritz, T.

    1975-01-01

    Explorer 45 measurements during the recovery phase of a moderate magnetic storm have confirmed that the charge exchange decay mechanism can account for the decay of the storm-time proton ring current. Data from the moderate magnetic storm of 24 February 1972 was selected for study since a symmetrical ring current had developed and effects due to asymmetric ring current losses could be eliminated. It was found that after the initial rapid decay of the proton flux, the equatorially mirroring protons in the energy range 5 to 30 keV decayed throughout the L-value range of 3.5 to 5.0 at the charge exchange decay rate calculated by Liemohn. After several days of decay, the proton fluxes reached a lower limit where an apparent equilibrium was maintained, between weak particle source mechanisms and the loss mechanisms, until fresh protons were injected into the ring current region during substorms. While other proton loss mechanisms may also be operating, the results indicate that charge exchange can entirely account for the storm-time proton ring current decay, and that this mechanism must be considered in all studies involving the loss of proton ring current particles.

  2. Three-dimensional ring current decay model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fok, Mei Ching; Moore, Thomas E.; Kozyra, Janet U.; Ho, George C.; Hamilton, Douglas C.

    1995-06-01

    This work is an extension of a previous ring current decay model. In the previous work, a two-dimensional kinetic model was constructed to study the temporal variations of the equatorially mirroring ring current ions, considering charge exchange and Coulomb drag losses along drift paths in a magnetic dipole field. In this work, particles with arbitrary pitch angle are considered. By bounce averaging the kinetic equation of the phase space density, information along magnetic field lines can be inferred from the equator. The three-dimensional model is used to simulate the recovery phase of a model great magnetic storm, similar to that which occurred in early February 1986. The initial distribution of ring current ions (at the minimum Dst) is extrapolated to all local times from AMPTE/CCE spacecraft observations on the dawnside and duskside of the inner magnetosphere spanning the L value range L=2.25 to 6.75. Observations by AMPTE/CCE of ring current distributions over subsequent orbits during the storm recovery phase are compared to model outputs. In general, the calculated ion fluxes are consistent with observations, except for H+ fluxes at tens of keV, which are always overestimated. A newly invented visualization idea, designated as a chromogram, is used to display the spatial and energy dependence of the ring current ion diifferential flux. Important features of storm time ring current, such as day-night asymmetry during injection and drift hole on the dayside at low energies (<10 keV), are manifested in the chromogram representation. The pitch angle distribution is well fit by the function, j0(1+Ayn), where y is sine of the equatorial pitch angle. The evolution of the index n is a combined effect of charge exchange loss and particle drift. At low energies (<30 keV), both drift dispersion and charge exchange are important in determining n. ©American Geophysical 1995

  3. Three-dimensional ring current decay model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fok, Mei-Ching; Moore, Thomas E.; Kozyra, Janet U.; Ho, George C.; Hamilton, Douglas C.

    1995-01-01

    This work is an extension of a previous ring current decay model. In the previous work, a two-dimensional kinetic model was constructed to study the temporal variations of the equatorially mirroring ring current ions, considering charge exchange and Coulomb drag losses along drift paths in a magnetic dipole field. In this work, particles with arbitrary pitch angle are considered. By bounce averaging the kinetic equation of the phase space density, information along magnetic field lines can be inferred from the equator. The three-dimensional model is used to simulate the recovery phase of a model great magnetic storm, similar to that which occurred in early February 1986. The initial distribution of ring current ions (at the minimum Dst) is extrapolated to all local times from AMPTE/CCE spacecraft observations on the dawnside and duskside of the inner magnetosphere spanning the L value range L = 2.25 to 6.75. Observations by AMPTE/CCE of ring current distributions over subsequent orbits during the storm recovery phase are compared to model outputs. In general, the calculated ion fluxes are consistent with observations, except for H(+) fluxes at tens of keV, which are always overestimated. A newly invented visualization idea, designated as a chromogram, is used to display the spatial and energy dependence of the ring current ion differential flux. Important features of storm time ring current, such as day-night asymmetry during injection and drift hole on the dayside at low energies (less than 10 keV), are manifested in the chromogram representation. The pitch angle distribution is well fit by the function, J(sub o)(1 + Ay(sup n)), where y is sine of the equatorial pitch angle. The evolution of the index n is a combined effect of charge exchange loss and particle drift. At low energies (less than 30 keV), both drift dispersion and charge exchange are important in determining n.

  4. The impact of exospheric neutral dynamics on ring current decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilie, R.; Liemohn, M. W.; Skoug, R. M.; Funsten, H. O.; Gruntman, M.; Bailey, J. J.; Toth, G.

    2015-12-01

    The geocorona plays an important role in the energy budget of the Earth's inner magnetosphere since charge exchange of energetic ions with exospheric neutrals makes the exosphere act as an energy sink for ring current particles. Long-term ring current decay following a magnetic storm is mainly due to these electron transfer reactions, leading to the formation energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) that leave the ring current system on ballistic trajectories. The number of ENAs emitted from a given region of space depends on several factors, such as the energy and species of the energetic ion population in that region and the density of the neutral gas with which the ions undergo charge exchange. However, the density and structure of the exosphere are strongly dependent on changes in atmospheric temperature and density as well as charge exchange with the ions of plasmaspheric origin, which depletes the geocorona (by having a neutral removed from the system). Moreover, the radiation pressure exerted by solar far-ultraviolet photons pushes the geocoronal hydrogen away from the Earth in an anti-sunward direction to form a tail of neutral hydrogen. TWINS ENA images provide a direct measurement of these ENA losses and therefore insight into the dynamics of the ring current decay through interactions with the geocorona. We assess the influence of geocoronal neutrals on ring current formation and decay by analysis of the predicted ENA emissions using 6 different geocoronal models and simulations from the HEIDI ring current model during storm time. Comparison with TWINS ENA images shows that the location of the peak ENA enhancements is highly dependent on the distribution of geocoronal hydrogen density. We show that the neutral dynamics has a strong influence on the time evolution of the ring current populations as well as on the formation of energetic neutral atoms.

  5. A three-dimensional ring current decay model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fok, Mei-Ching; Moore, Thomas E.; Kozyra, Janet U.; Ho, George C.; Hamilton, Douglas C.

    1994-01-01

    This work is an extension of a previous ring current decay model. In the previous work, a two-dimensional kinetic model was constructed to study the temporal variations of the equatorially mirroring ring current ions, considering charge exchange and Coulomb drag losses along drift paths in a magnetic dipole field. In this work, particles with arbitrary pitch angle are considered. By bounce averaging the kinetic equation of the phase space density, information along magnetic field lines can be inferred from the equator. The three-dimensional model is used to simulate the recovery phase of a model great magnetic storm, similar to that which occurred in early February 1986. The initial distribution of ring current ions (at the minimum Dst) is extrapolated to all local times from AMPTE/CCE spacecraft observations on the dawn and dusk sides of the inner magnetosphere spanning the L value range L = 2.25 to 6.75. Observations by AMPTE/CCE of ring current distributions over subsequent orbits during the storm recovery phase are compared to model outputs. In general, the calculated ion fluxes are consistent with observations, except for H+ fluxes at tens of keV, which are always over-estimated. A newly-invented visualization idea, designated as a chromogram, is used to display the spatial and energy dependence of the ring current ion differential flux. Important features of storm-time ring current, such as day-night asymmetry during injection and drift hole on the dayside at low energies (less than 10 keV), are manifested in the chromogram representation. The pitch angle distribution is well fit by the function, j(sub o)(1+Ay(exp n)), where y is sine of the equatorial pitch angle. The evolution of the index n is a combined effect of charge exchange loss and particle drift. At low energies (less than 30 keV), both drift dispersion and charge exchange are important in determining n.

  6. Charge Exchange Contribution to the Decay of the Ring Current, Measured by Energetic Neutral Atoms (ENAs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgensen, A. M.; Henderson, M. G.; Roelof, E. C.; Reeves, G. D.; Spence, H. E.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we calculate the contribution of charge exchange to the decay of the ring current. Past works have suggested that charge exchange of ring current protons is primarily responsible for the decay of the ring current during the late recovery phase, but there is still much debate about the fast decay of the early recovery phase. We use energetic neutral atom (ENA) measurements from Polar to calculate the total ENA energy escape. To get the total ENA escape we apply a forward modeling technique, and to estimate the total ring current energy escape we use the Dessler-Parker-Sckopke relationship. We find that during the late recovery phase of the March 10, 1998 storm ENAs with energies greater than 17.5 keV can account for 75% of the estimated energy loss from the ring current. During the fast recovery the measured ENAs can only account for a small portion of the total energy loss. We also find that the lifetime of the trapped ions is significantly shorter during the fast recovery phase than during the late recovery phase, suggesting that different processes are operating during the two phases.

  7. Ring Current Decay During Northward Turnings of The Interplanetary Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monreal MacMahon, R.; Llop, C.; Miranda, R.

    The ring current formation and energization is thought to be the main consequence of geomagnetic storms and its strength is characterized by the Dst index which evolu- tion satisfies a simple and well-known differential equation introduced by Burton et al. (1975). Since then, several attempts and approaches have been done to study the evolution of the ring current whether introducing discrete values or continuous func- tions for the decay time involved. In this work, we study the character of the recovery phase of magnetic storms in response to well defined northward turnings of the inter- planetary magnetic field using our functional form of the decay time of ring current particles introduced previously.

  8. The Roles of Charge Exchange and Flow-Out Losses in Ring Current Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozyra, J. U.; Liemohn, M. W.

    2001-12-01

    It is becoming clear that flow-out losses are an important ring current decay mechanism in addition to charge-exchange losses. Flow out losses result from an imbalance between the energy flux entering the inner magnetosphere from the nightside plasma sheet and that leaving through the dayside magnetopause before the ring current becomes trapped on closed drift paths. The Michigan ring current drift-loss model (RAM) which calculates ring current losses due to Coulomb drag, charge-exchange and flow-out using realistic geocoronal and dynamical plasmasphere models, has been used to model 8 magnetic storms ranging from moderate to superstorm status. In each case, plasma sheet ion distributions measured by the LANL geosynchronous satellites are used to specify the ring current source population and its dynamical variation. The McIlwain (1986) model is used to specify the inner magnetosphere electric potential pattern which is scaled by the observed polar cap potential values (derived from DMSP passes directly or from the AMIE model) and shielded based on the DMSP auroral boundary index (MBI). Model results indicate that flow-out losses can be driven by an abrupt decrease in plasma sheet density, change in plasma sheet temperature and/or weakening of magnetotail convection prior to northward turning of the IMF. When the IMF abruptly turns northward at the end of the main phase, the entire recovery phase can result from charge-exchange loss. Examples of each of these types of decay are given. RAM decay time scales for all modeled storms are plotted against the simultaneous value of solar wind Ey and compared to the results of statistical studies of this relationship in the literature.

  9. Quantum decay of the persistent current in a Josephson junction ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garanin, D. A.; Chudnovsky, E. M.

    2016-03-01

    We study the persistent current in a ring consisting of N ≫1 Josephson junctions threaded by the magnetic flux. When the dynamics of the ring is dominated by the capacitances of the superconducting islands the system is equivalent to the x y spin system in 1 +1 dimensions at the effective temperature T*=√{2 J U } , with J being the Josephson energy of the junction and U being the charging energy of the superconducting island. The numerical problem is challenging due to the absence of thermodynamic limit and slow dynamics of the Kosterlitz-Thouless transition. It is investigated on lattices containing up to ×106 sites. At T*≪J the quantum phase slips are frozen. The low-T* dependence of the persistent current computed numerically agrees quantitatively with the analytical formula provided by the spin-wave approximation. The high-T* behavior depends strongly on the magnetic flux and on the number of superconducting islands N . We present a detailed numerical study of the unbinding of vortex-antivortex pairs responsible for the phase slips, the superconductor-insulator transition, and evolution of the persistent current in a finite-size system.

  10. Saturn's Other Ring Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crary, F. J.

    2014-04-01

    Saturn's main rings orbit the planet within an atmosphere and ionosphere of water, oxygen and hydrogen, produced by meteoritic impacts on and ultraviolet photodesorbtion of the ring particles [Johnson et al., 2006; Luhmann et al., 2006; Tseng et al., 2010]. The neutral atmosphere itself has only been tentatively detected through ultraviolet fluorescents of OH [Hall et al., 1996] while the ionosphere was observed in situ by the Cassini spacecraft shortly after orbital insertion [Coates et al.,2005; Tokar et al. 2005, Waite et al. 2005]. Although the plasma flow velocity of this ionosphere is not well-constrained, but the close association with the rings suggests that its speed would be couppled to the keplarian velocity of the rings themselves. As a result, the motion of the plasma through Saturn's magnetic field would produce an induced voltage, oriented away from the planet outside synchronous orbit and towards the planet inside synchronous orbit. Such a potential could result in currents flowing across the ring plane and closeing along magnetic field lines and through Saturn's ionosphere at latitudes between 36o and 48o. Cassini observations of whistler-mode plasma wave emissions [Xin et al.,2006] centered on synchronous orbit (1.76 Rs, mapping to 41o latitude) have been interpreted as a product of field-aligned electron beams associated with such a current. This presentation will investigate the magnitude of these currents and the resulting Joule heating of the ionosphere. An important constraint is that no auroral ultraviolet emissions have been observed at the relevant latitudes. In contrast, Joule heating could affect infrared emissions from H3+. Variations in H3+ emission associated with Saturn's rings have been reported by O'Donoghue et al., 2013, and interpreted as a result of ring "rain", i.e. precipitating water group species from the rings which alter ionosphereic chemistry and H3+ densities. As noted by O'Donoghue et al., this interpretation may be

  11. Ring current oxygen interaction with micropulsations

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X.

    1992-01-01

    The key issue of this thesis work is to present a new loss mechanism for ring current O[sup +] ions due to the combined effects of convection and corotation electric fields and interaction with geomagnetic pulsations via a magnetic drift-bounce resonance. The author has found the loss of ring current O[sup +] with intermediate energies (20-60keV). The behavior of ring current ions in low-frequency geomagnetic pulsations is investigated analytically and numerically, with particular emphasis on O[sup +] ions whose flux increases dramatically during geomagnetic storms and decays at a rate which is not fully explained by collisional processes. A test-particle code is developed to calculate the motion of the ring current O[sup +] ions in a time-independent dipole magnetic field, convection and corotation electric fields, plus Pc 5 wave fields, for which a simple analytical model has been formulated based on spacecraft observations. For given fields, whether a particle gains or loses energy depends on its initial kinetic energy, pitch angle at the equatorial plane and the position of its guiding center with respect to azimuthal phase of the wave. The simulated ring current O[sup +] distribution function shows a dispersion to higher and lower energies and L values with decreasing local time across the dayside, and a bulk shift to lower energies and higher L values. The former is due to wave-particle interaction causing the ion to lose or gain energy, while the latter is due to the convection electric field. The simulations show that once the particle's kinetic energy drops below that required to overcome the convection potential, the particle will be lost to the dayside magnetopause.

  12. Tilt stability of rotating current rings with passive conductors

    SciTech Connect

    Zweibel, E.G.; Pomphrey, N.

    1984-12-01

    We study the combined effects of rotation and resistive passive conductors on the stability of a rigid current in an external magnetic field. We present numerical and approximate analytical solutions to the equations of motion, which show that the ring is always tilt unstable on the resistive decay timescale of the conductors, although rotation and eddy currents may stabilize it over short times. Possible applications of our model include spheromaks which rotate or which are encircled by energetic particle rings.

  13. The prime killer of the ring current at storm maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daglis, I. A.; Vassiliadis, D.; Kozyra, J. U.; Orsini, S.; Kamide, Y.; Metallinou, F. A.

    2001-12-01

    Charge-exchange decay of the ring current is among the rather successful paradigms in space storm physics. It is generally accepted that charge exchange is the major loss process of the storm-time ring current. Moreover, charge exchange has been considered as the driving mechanism of the two-stage recovery - a particular feature of intense storms reported by S.-I. Akasofu as early as 1963. However, recent observations and modeling studies indicate that convective drift loss through the dayside magnetopause rivals charge exchange in producing the two-stage ring current decay. A comparative study of two intense space storms in June 1991 and September 1998 partly confirmed this scenario, introducing however a solar cycle dependence through the abundance of O+ ions in the inner magnetosphere. We present and discuss these results.

  14. On the dust ring current of Saturn's F-ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, J. R.; Mendis, D. A.

    1982-01-01

    The thin F-ring of Saturn, which is well within the corotating portion of the Saturnian magnetosphere, has been shown by Voyager 1 and 2 observations to be largely composed of small dust grains. Mendis et al. (1982) have argued that with plausible values of the ambient plasma density and temperature near the F-ring, these grains will be charged to around -40 volts. Mendis et al. have shown that within the corotating portion of the magnetosphere such negatively charged grains can move in circular orbits in the equatorial plane. In connection with a relative motion between the negatively charged grains and the corotating positive ions, the F-ring constitutes a ring current. The present investigation has the objective to calculate this current and to show that it would significantly alter the magnetospheric dipole field in the vicinity of the ring. A current of approximately 12,0000 A is obtained. The change in the magnetic field produced by the current could be measured by a spacecraft approaching to within 100 km above or below the F-ring plane.

  15. Ring current instabilities excited by the energetic oxygen ions

    SciTech Connect

    Kakad, A. P.; Singh, S. V.; Lakhina, G. S.

    2007-09-15

    The ring current instabilities driven by the energetic oxygen ions are investigated during the magnetic storm. The electrons and protons are considered to have Maxwellian distributions, while energetic oxygen ions are having loss-cone distribution. Dispersion relation for the quasielectrostatic modes with frequencies {omega}>{omega}{sub cp} (proton cyclotron frequency) and propagating obliquely to the magnetic field is obtained. Dispersion relation is studied numerically for the storm time ring current parameters and it is found that these instabilities are most prominent during intense storms when the oxygen ions become the dominant constituents of the ring current plasma. For some typical storm-time ring current parameters, these modes can produce quasielectrostatic noise in the range of 17-220 Hz, thus providing a possible explanation of the electrostatic noise observed at the inner boundary of the ring current during magnetic storms. Further, these modes can attain saturation electric fields of the order of 100-500 {mu}V/m, and therefore, are expected to scatter O{sup +} ions into the loss-cone giving rise to their precipitation into the atmosphere, thus contributing to the ring current decay.

  16. Ring current development during high speed streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordanova, V. K.; Matsui, H.; Puhl-Quinn, P. A.; Thomsen, M. F.; Mursula, K.; Holappa, L.

    2009-07-01

    Episodes of southward (Bz<0) interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) which lead to disturbed geomagnetic conditions are associated either with coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and possess long and continuous negative IMF Bz excursions, or with high speed solar wind streams (HSS) whose geoeffectiveness is due to IMF Bz profiles fluctuating about zero with various amplitudes and duration. We simulate ring current evolution during a HSS-driven storm that occurred during 24-26 October 2002 and compare its dynamics with a CME-driven storm of similar strength during 22-23 April 2001. We use our kinetic ring current-atmosphere interactions model (RAM), and investigate the mechanisms responsible for trapping particles and for causing their loss. Ring current evolution depends on the interplay of time-dependent inflow of plasma from the magnetotail, particle acceleration and loss (mainly due to charge exchange) along adiabatic drift paths, and outflow of plasma from the dayside magnetopause; all of these processes are incorporated in our model. We compare results from simulations using a newly developed, Cluster data based, University of New Hampshire inner magnetospheric electric field (UNH-IMEF) convection model with simulations using a Volland-Stern (V-S) type convection model. We find that, first, periods of increased magnetospheric convection coinciding with enhancements of plasma sheet density are needed for strong ring current buildup. Second, during the HSS-driven storm the convection potential from UNH-IMEF model is highly variable and causes sporadic shallow injections resulting in a weak ring current. The long period of enhanced convection during the CME-driven storm causes a continuous ion injection penetrating to lower L shells and stronger ring current buildup. V-S model predicts larger ring current injection during both storms. Third, the RAM driven by either convection model underestimates the total ring current energy during the recovery phase of the HSS storm

  17. High-current ion-ring accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Sudan, R.N. )

    1993-03-15

    An accelerator concept is outlined which enables 10[sup 15] to 10[sup 18] ions in the form of a charge neutralized ion ring to be accelerated to GeV energies. A repetition rate of 10 Hz will deliver an average current in the range of 0.1 A.

  18. Recent Simulation Results on Ring Current Dynamics Using the Comprehensive Ring Current Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, Yihua; Zaharia, Sorin G.; Lui, Anthony T. Y.; Fok, Mei-Ching

    2010-01-01

    Plasma sheet conditions and electromagnetic field configurations are both crucial in determining ring current evolution and connection to the ionosphere. In this presentation, we investigate how different conditions of plasma sheet distribution affect ring current properties. Results include comparative studies in 1) varying the radial distance of the plasma sheet boundary; 2) varying local time distribution of the source population; 3) varying the source spectra. Our results show that a source located farther away leads to a stronger ring current than a source that is closer to the Earth. Local time distribution of the source plays an important role in determining both the radial and azimuthal (local time) location of the ring current peak pressure. We found that post-midnight source locations generally lead to a stronger ring current. This finding is in agreement with Lavraud et al.. However, our results do not exhibit any simple dependence of the local time distribution of the peak ring current (within the lower energy range) on the local time distribution of the source, as suggested by Lavraud et al. [2008]. In addition, we will show how different specifications of the magnetic field in the simulation domain affect ring current dynamics in reference to the 20 November 2007 storm, which include initial results on coupling the CRCM with a three-dimensional (3-D) plasma force balance code to achieve self-consistency in the magnetic field.

  19. Ring current electron dynamics during geomagnetic storms based on the Van Allen Probes measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, H.; Li, X.; Baker, D. N.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Fennell, J. F.; Blake, J. B.; Larsen, B. A.; Skoug, R. M.; Funsten, H. O.; Friedel, R. H. W.; Reeves, G. D.; Spence, H. E.; Mitchell, D. G.; Lanzerotti, L. J.

    2016-04-01

    Based on comprehensive measurements from Helium, Oxygen, Proton, and Electron Mass Spectrometer Ion Spectrometer, Relativistic Electron-Proton Telescope, and Radiation Belt Storm Probes Ion Composition Experiment instruments on the Van Allen Probes, comparative studies of ring current electrons and ions are performed and the role of energetic electrons in the ring current dynamics is investigated. The deep injections of tens to hundreds of keV electrons and tens of keV protons into the inner magnetosphere occur frequently; after the injections the electrons decay slowly in the inner belt but protons in the low L region decay very fast. Intriguing similarities between lower energy protons and higher-energy electrons are also found. The evolution of ring current electron and ion energy densities and energy content are examined in detail during two geomagnetic storms, one moderate and one intense. The results show that the contribution of ring current electrons to the ring current energy content is much smaller than that of ring current ions (up to ~12% for the moderate storm and ~7% for the intense storm), and <35 keV electrons dominate the ring current electron energy content at the storm main phases. Though the electron energy content is usually much smaller than that of ions, the enhancement of ring current electron energy content during the moderate storm can get to ~30% of that of ring current ions, indicating a more dynamic feature of ring current electrons and important role of electrons in the ring current buildup. The ring current electron energy density is also shown to be higher at midnight and dawn while lower at noon and dusk.

  20. Investigation of ring current/storm dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Collin, H.L.; Cladis, J.B.; Quinn, J.M.

    1991-08-31

    This study outlines the achievements of the first year of work on data acquired by the Lockheed Ion Mass Spectrometer (IMS-LO), one of the space radiation group of instruments on the Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES). The purpose of IMS-LO is to study the low energy (110eV-35 keV) ion component of the ring current plasma. The primary data processing is proceeding rapidly, as is the construction of databases of validated low energy ion data. A number of events have been selected for special study and one of these has been analysed in detail. A tentative identification has been made of a new mechanism which causes loss of ions.

  1. Engineering aspects of disruption current decay

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, J.G.

    1983-11-01

    Engineering features associated with the configuration of a tokamak can affect the amount of energy that produces melting and damage to the limiters or internal wall surfaces as the result of a major disruption. During the current decay period of a major thermal disruption, the energy that can damage a wall or limiter comes from the external magnetic field. By providing a good conducting torus near the plasma and increasing the plasma circuit resistance, this magnetic energy (transferred by way of the plasma circuit) can be minimized. This report addresses engineering design features to reduce the energy deposited on the inner torus surface that produces melting of the structures.

  2. Latitudinal dependence of nonlinear interaction between electromagnetic ion cyclotron wave and terrestrial ring current ions

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Zhenpeng Zhu, Hui; Zheng, Huinan; Xiao, Fuliang; Zhang, Min; Liu, Y. C.-M.; Shen, Chao; Wang, Yuming; Wang, Shui

    2014-05-15

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves can lead to the rapid decay (on a timescale of hours) of the terrestrial ring current. Such decay process is usually investigated in the framework of quasi-linear theory. Here, both theoretical analysis and test-particle simulation are performed to understand the nonlinear interaction between ring current ions and EMIC waves. In particular, the dependence of the nonlinear wave-particle interaction processes on the ion initial latitude is investigated in detail. These nonlinear processes are classified into the phase trapping and phase bunching, and the phase bunching is further divided into the channel and cluster effects. Compared to the prediction of the quasi-linear theory, the ring current decay rate can be reduced by the phase trapping, increased by the channel effect phase bunching, but non-deterministically influenced by the cluster effect phase bunching. The ion initial latitude changes the occurrence of the phase trapping, modulates the transport direction and strength of the cluster effect phase bunching, and only slightly affects the channel effect phase bunching. The current results suggest that the latitudinal dependence of these nonlinear processes should be considered in the evaluation of the ring current decay induced by EMIC waves.

  3. Limitation of energetic ring current ion spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summers, Danny; Shi, Run

    2015-09-01

    We address the problem of determining the limiting energetic ring current ion spectrum resulting from electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC)-wave-ion interactions. We solve the problem in a relativistic regime, incorporating a cold background multi-ion plasma component and without assuming a predetermined form for the ion energy distribution. The limiting (Kennel-Petschek) spectrum is determined by the condition that the EMIC waves acquire a specified gain over a given convective length scale for all frequencies over which wave growth occurs. We find that the limiting ion spectrum satisfies an integral equation that must be solved numerically. However, at large particle energy E, the limiting spectrum takes the simple form J ∝ 1/E, E → ∞. Moreover, this 1/E spectral shape does not depend on the energetic ion in question nor on the background multi-ion plasma composition. We provide numerical solutions for the limiting spectra for Earth-like parameters. In addition, at four planets, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune, we compare measured ion spectra with corresponding numerical limiting spectra. This paper parallels an earlier analogous study on the limitation of radiation belt electron spectra by whistler mode wave-electron interactions.

  4. Current state of ring imaging Cherenkov detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Coutrakon, G.B.

    1984-02-01

    This paper reviews several ring imaging Cherenkov detectors which are being used or developed to identify particles in high energy physics experiments. These detectors must have good detection efficiency for single photon-electrons and good spatial resolution over a large area. Emphasis is placed on the efficiencies and resolutions of these detectors as determined from ring imaging beam tests and other experiments. Following a brief review of the ring imaging technique, comparative evaluations are made of different forms of detectors and their respective materials.

  5. Wess-Zumino current and the structure of the decay tau- -->K- pi- K+ nu tau.

    PubMed

    Coan, T E; Gao, Y S; Liu, F; Stroynowski, R; Artuso, M; Boulahouache, C; Blusk, S; Butt, J; Dambasuren, E; Dorjkhaidav, O; Haynes, J; Menaa, N; Mountain, R; Muramatsu, H; Nandakumar, R; Redjimi, R; Sia, R; Skwarnicki, T; Stone, S; Wang, J C; Zhang, Kevin; Mahmood, A H; Csorna, S E; Bonvicini, G; Cinabro, D; Dubrovin, M; Bornheim, A; Lipeles, E; Pappas, S P; Shapiro, A; Weinstein, A J; Briere, R A; Chen, G P; Ferguson, T; Tatishvili, G; Vogel, H; Watkins, M E; Adam, N E; Alexander, J P; Berkelman, K; Boisvert, V; Cassel, D G; Duboscq, J E; Ecklund, K M; Ehrlich, R; Galik, R S; Gibbons, L; Gittelman, B; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Hsu, L; Jones, C D; Kandaswamy, J; Kreinick, D L; Kuznetsov, V E; Magerkurth, A; Mahlke-Krüger, H; Meyer, T O; Patterson, J R; Pedlar, T K; Peterson, D; Pivarski, J; Riley, D; Sadoff, A J; Schwarthoff, H; Shepherd, M R; Sun, W M; Thayer, J G; Urner, D; Wilksen, T; Weinberger, M; Athar, S B; Avery, P; Breva-Newell, L; Potlia, V; Stoeck, H; Yelton, J; Eisenstein, B I; Gollin, G D; Karliner, I; Lowrey, N; Naik, P; Sedlack, C; Selen, M; Thaler, J J; Williams, J; Edwards, K W; Besson, D; Gao, K Y; Gong, D T; Kubota, Y; Li, S Z; Poling, R; Scott, A W; Smith, A; Stepaniak, C J; Urheim, J; Metreveli, Z; Seth, K K; Tomaradze, A; Zweber, P; Arms, K; Eckhart, E; Gan, K K; Gwon, C; Severini, H; Skubic, P; Asner, D M; Dytman, S A; Mehrabyan, S; Mueller, J A; Nam, S; Savinov, V; Huang, G S; Miller, D H; Pavlunin, V; Sanghi, B; Shibata, E I; Shipsey, I P J; Adams, G S; Chasse, M; Cummings, J P; Danko, I; Napolitano, J; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Park, C S; Park, W; Thayer, J B; Thorndike, E H

    2004-06-11

    We present the first study of the vector (Wess-Zumino) current in tau(-)-->K-pi-K+nu(tau) decay using data collected with the CLEO III detector at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring. We determine the quantitative contributions to the decay width from the vector and axial vector currents. Within the framework of a model by Kühn and Mirkes, we identify the quantitative contributions to the total decay rate from the intermediate states omegapi, rho(')pi, and K*K. PMID:15245150

  6. The magnetospheric disturbance ring current as a source for probing the deep earth electrical conductivity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Campbell, W.H.

    1990-01-01

    Two current rings have been observed in the equatorial plane of the earth at times of high geomagnetic activity. An eastward current exists between about 2 and 3.5 earth radii (Re) distant, and a larger, more variable companion current exists between about 4 and 9 Re. These current regions are loaded during geomagnetic substorms. They decay, almost exponentially, after the cessation of the particle influx that attends the solar wind disturbance. This review focuses upon characteristics needed for intelligent use of the ring current as a source for induction probing of the earth's mantle. Considerable difficulties are found with the assumption that Dst is a ring-current index. ?? 1990 Birkha??user Verlag.

  7. Magnetic Field Observations of Partial Ring Current during Storm Recovery Phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le, G.; Russell, C. T.; Slavin, J. A.; Lucek, E. A.

    2008-01-01

    We present results of an extensive survey of the magnetic field observations in the inner magnetosphere using 30 years of magnetospheric magnetic field data from Polar, Cluster, ISEE, and AMPTE/CCE missions. The purpose of this study is to understand the magnetic field evolution during the recovery phase of geomagnetic storms, and its implication to the ring current recovery and loss mechanisms of ring current particles. It is now commonly believed that a strong partial ring current is formed during the storm main phase due to the enhanced earthward convection of energetic ions from nightside plasma sheet. But the presence of a strong partial ring current throughout the recovery phase remains controversial. The magnetic field generated by the ring current inflates the inner magnetosphere and causes magnetic field depressions in the equatorial magnetosphere. During the storm recovery phase, we find that the distribution of the equatorial magnetic field depression exhibits similar local time dependence as the ring current distribution obtained from the combined dataset in the earlier study. It shows that a strong partial ring current is a permanent feature throughout the recovery phase. In the early recovery phase, the partial ring current peaks near the dusk terminator as indicated by the peak of the magnetic field depression. As the recovery phase progresses, the partial ring current decays most quickly near the dusk and results in a dusk-to-midnight moving of the peak of the partial ring current. Thus the loss mechanisms work most effectively near the dusk. The magnetic field depression increases the gyroradius of ring current protons to a scale greater or comparable to the thickness of the magnetopause, which increases the chance of ion drift loss near the dusk magnetopause at larger L-shell (L greater than 5). But the drift loss mechanism alone cannot explain the loss of ring current ions especially in the smaller L-shell (L less than 5). The precipitation loss

  8. Performance of high-resolution position-sensitive detectors developed for storage-ring decay experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, T.; Suzaki, F.; Izumikawa, T.; Miyazawa, S.; Morimoto, K.; Suzuki, T.; Tokanai, F.; Furuki, H.; Ichihashi, N.; Ichikawa, C.; Kitagawa, A.; Kuboki, T.; Momota, S.; Nagae, D.; Nagashima, M.; Nakamura, Y.; Nishikiori, R.; Niwa, T.; Ohtsubo, T.; Ozawa, A.; Sato, K.; Sato, S.; Suzuki, S.

    2013-12-01

    As next generation spectroscopic tools, heavy-ion cooler storage rings will be a unique application of highly charged RI beam experiments. Decay spectroscopy of highly charged rare isotopes provides us important information relevant to the stellar conditions, such as for the s- and r-process nucleosynthesis. In-ring decay products of highly charged RI will be momentum-analyzed and reach a position-sensitive detector set-up located outside of the storage orbit. To realize such in-ring decay experiments, we have developed and tested two types of high-resolution position-sensitive detectors: silicon strips and scintillating fibers. The beam test experiments resulted in excellent position resolutions for both detectors, which will be available for future storage-ring experiments.

  9. Large transient fault current test of an electrical roll ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yenni, Edward J.; Birchenough, Arthur G.

    1992-01-01

    The space station uses precision rotary gimbals to provide for sun tracking of its photoelectric arrays. Electrical power, command signals and data are transferred across the gimbals by roll rings. Roll rings have been shown to be capable of highly efficient electrical transmission and long life, through tests conducted at the NASA Lewis Research Center and Honeywell's Satellite and Space Systems Division in Phoenix, AZ. Large potential fault currents inherent to the power system's DC distribution architecture, have brought about the need to evaluate the effects of large transient fault currents on roll rings. A test recently conducted at Lewis subjected a roll ring to a simulated worst case space station electrical fault. The system model used to obtain the fault profile is described, along with details of the reduced order circuit that was used to simulate the fault. Test results comparing roll ring performance before and after the fault are also presented.

  10. Rheology of Rings: Current Status and Future Challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenna, Gregory

    Understanding the dynamics of circular or ring-like polymers has been a subject of investigation since the 1980s and is one which remains an area that is not fully understood. Part of the reason for this is the difficulty of making synthetic rings of sufficient size to establish the nature of the entanglement dynamics, if entanglements even exist in these materials. Furthermore, there is now strong evidence that small amounts of linear impurities can impact the dynamics. Hence, one of the major challenges to our understanding of ring dynamics is to make large molecular weight rings of sufficient purity that the dynamics of the rings themselves can be determined. In the present work the current state of understanding of the dynamics of rings is outlined and current work from our group of collaborators to make extremely large circular polymers using Echeverria Coli as a route to make pure rings (circular DNA) in sufficient quantity and size to determine the dynamics of these materials will be shown. First results of ring dynamics in dilute solution are presented and new results on concentrated and entangled solutions will be discussed. Remaining challenges will be elucidated. Partially supported by the John R. Bradford Endowment and the Paul Whitfield Horn Professorship at Texas Tech University.

  11. Ring current-atmosphere interactions model with stormtime magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vapirev, Alexander Emilov

    An improved version of the ring current-atmosphere interactions kinetic model (RAM) is presented in this thesis. The recent stormtime empirical model T04s and the IGRF model are used to represent the Earth's external and internal magnetic fields respectively. Particle drifts, losses due to charge exchange with geocoronal hydrogen and atmospheric losses are included in the model as they are considered the main mechanisms of ring current development and its following decay. A numerical technique for bounce-averaging along the field lines is introduced and results for the calculated bounce-averaged hydrogen densities and magnetic gradient-curvature drift velocities (general case) for the moderate storm of April 21-25, 2001, are presented. A comparison in the calculations between T04s and a dipole field shows that the bounce-averaged hydrogen density for T04s differs with ˜ 5% from that for a dipole field for quiet time and it may become 30% smaller for disturbed conditions on the nightside for L > 4. The gradient-curvature velocities for T04s at large L-shells are ˜ 20% higher on the nightside and 20% lower on the dayside than those for a dipole field for quiet time. For disturbed conditions they are respectively ˜ 200% higher and 20% lower than the dipole values. The contribution of the cross-B term to the magnetic drift is ˜ 5%. Results for the time evolution of the trapped equatorial flux for H+, He+, and O+ ions for various particle energies and pitch angles obtained by the new model with a non-dipole field (RAM-ND) are presented. The new computations for the April 2001 storm using a Volland-Stern convection model show a slight continued increase in the flux and the total ring current energy for the three ion species even after the storm main phase. A higher increase in the flux is observed towards the dusk side for the RAM-ND model compared to RAM due the difference in the charge exchange rates and the azimuthal drifts for the two different geomagnetic field

  12. The Ring Current's Birth and Development: A Conceptual History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egeland, Alv; Burke, William J.

    2013-04-01

    This talk outlines how our understanding of the ring current evolved during the half-century intervals before and after humans gained direct access to space. Its existence was first suggested by Kristian Birkeland in 1908 - based on his terrella simulations, and later postulated and confirmed in 1910 by Carl Størmer, to explain the locations and equatorward migrations of aurorae under disturbed conditions. In 1917 Adolf Schmidt applied Størmer's ring-current hypothesis to explain the observed negative perturbations in the Earth's magnetic field. More than another decade would pass before Sydney Chapman and Vicenzo Ferraro - in early 1930s, argued for its necessity to explain magnetic signatures observed during the main phases of storms. Simultaneously, Ernst Büche extended Birkeland's terrella experiment with an equatorial electric current that could be turned off or on to demonstrate the latitudinal movements of the aurorae. During the early 1950s Hannes Alfvén first correctly argued that the ring current was a collective plasma effect, but failed to explain the particle entry. In 1957 Fred Singer proposed a ring current model for the main phase of storms that combined Alfvén's guiding-center drift with Størmer's forbidden regions. The Dessler-Parker relation explains that the observed magnetic perturbations are proportional to ring-current energy. In the mid-1960s Louis Frank showed that ions in the newly discovered plasma sheet had the energy needed to explain the ring current's origin. The discovery that O+ ions from the ionosphere contribute a large fractions of the ring current's energy content still challenges scientific understanding.

  13. Ring energy and current considerations for spallation neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Blumberg, L.N.

    1994-04-01

    The most desirable energy E{sub o} of protons from the synchrotron and thus beam current {bar I} to produced a given beam power P{sub B} involves a balanced consideration of neutron production capability, accelerator beam stability, user requirements, and cost considerations. The present solution consists of two 3.6-GeV rings with a 600-MeV Linac injector, a compromise between conflicting factors of cost and technical concern. The authors believe that the design is a conservative one. They could increase the beam energy and/or the repetition rate and thereby decrease the requirement for the number of protons N{sub o} in the ring which in the present design is an extrapolation of about a factor of 7 from existing ring intensities. However, the specified ring acceptance appears quite adequate to contain the required 1.45 10{sup 14} protons/ring and the resulting loss in the target window and target are reasonable. The beam power and current are indeed modest in terms of window and target integrity compared to the 200 MW, 200mA 1-GeV design for the APT. The two-ring approach also offers several practical advantages -- the project is stageable in the sense that only one ring may be required initially to achieve P{sub B} = 2.5 MW power on the target with subsequent expansion to 5 MW with addition of the second ring. Two rings also provide additional reliability in the sense that the user program need not be interrupted by failure of one ring.

  14. Interatomic (Intermolecular) Decay Processes in Clusters: Current Status and Outlook

    SciTech Connect

    Averbukh, V.; Cederbaum, L. S.

    2007-11-29

    Since their theoretical prediction a decade ago, interatomic (intermolecular) Coulombic decay (ICD) and related processes have been in the focus of intensive theoretical and experimental research. The spectacular progress in this direction has been stimulated both by the fundamental importance of the new electronic decay phenomena and by the exciting possibility of their practical application, for example in spectroscopy. We review the current status of the research of interatomic (intermolecular) decay phenomena in clusters and discuss some perspectives of this new field.

  15. Motion and decay of vortex rings submerged in a rotational flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishii, K.; Liu, C. H.

    1987-01-01

    The interaction between vortex rings of finite strength and an axisymmetric rotational background flow is studied by a singular perturbation method, because it is difficult to use a finite-difference method to analyze the viscous decay in the small core of a vortex ring. The analysis is carried out by combining a composite solution of a vortex ring and an unsteady Euler solution for the background rotational flow. Using the method of averaging, a numerical scheme is developed to obtain an Euler solution in which the grid and time-step sizes depend solely on the length and velocity scales of the background flow. Numerical results are presented to illustrate the interaction between the trajectories and decay rates of the vortex rings and the background rotational flow.

  16. Current-driven vortex formation in a magnetic multilayer ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Chunghee; Ng, B. G.; Castaño, F. J.; Mascaro, M. D.; Ross, C. A.

    2009-02-01

    Current-driven domain wall (DW) motion has been studied in the NiFe layer of a Co/Cu/NiFe thin film ring using giant-magnetoresistance measurements in a four-point contact geometry. The NiFe layer is initially in an onion state configuration with two 180° DWs. An electric current drives the walls around the ring so that they annihilate and the NiFe layer forms a DW-free vortex state. The direction of motion of the two DWs is determined by the current polarity, enabling the vortex chirality to be selected.

  17. Solar wind pressure as a source of ring current development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalegaev, Vladimir; Vlasova, Natalia

    The ring current development during magnetic storms was studied on the basis of satellite data and theoretical modeling. Comparative analysis of magnetospheric particle fluxes (30-80 keV protons in the near-equatorial region and in the region of isotropic precipitations) measured by low-altitude polar sun-synchronous NOAA satellites (POES 15, 16, 17) during magnetic storms on 21-22.01.2005 and 14-15.12.2006 was carried out. It was obtained that regardless of the intensity of the geomagnetic disturbance, the proton fluxes as well as isotropic boundary and maximum precipitation locations were approximately the same during maximum of two storms. It was shown that ring current development during 21-22.01.2005 magnetic storm was provided by prolonged extremely strong solar wind influence on the Earth's magnetosphere. Extreme pressure pulse during SSC caused intensive trapped particle radial diffusion and subsequent ring current enhancement similar to that taking place due to particle injection from the tail. Ring current development during 14-15.12.2006 was due to IMF southward turning. Magnetospheric compression during SSC was not too strong to create storm-time ring current.

  18. Numerical Simulations of the Ring Current During Geomagnetic Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, M. W.; Lemon, C.; Guild, T. B.; Schulz, M.; Roeder, J. L.; Lui, A.; Keesee, A. M.; Goldstein, J.; Le, G.; Rodriguez, J. V.

    2012-12-01

    Recent progress in ring current modeling has shown the importance of a self-consistent treatment of particle transport along with magnetic and electric fields in the inner magnetosphere. The ring current intensity and spatial distribution are significantly affected by variations in the plasma sheet (the major source to the ring current), the cross polar cap potential, and compressions and expansions of the magnetosphere. We simulate the ion and electron ring current and plasma sheet by using the magnetically and electrically self-consistent Rice Convection Model-Equilibrium [Lemon et al., JGR, 2004] with a time-varying magnetopause driven by upstream solar wind and interplanetary magnetic (IMF) conditions and with time-varying plasma sheet distributions as boundary conditions. Examples of detailed comparisons of simulated storm events with in-situ magnetic intensities (e. g., GOES, Polar/MPA, or THEMIS) and proton flux spectra (e. g., LANL/MPA and SOPA, Polar/CAMMICE, or THEMIS) and energetic neutral atom (ENA) fluxes (e. g., TWINS) will be shown. We will also present comparisons of observed electron flux spectra with simulations based on a few simple electron loss models. These data-model comparisons test the ability of our model to characterize the ring current environment and the storm-time inner magnetospheric magnetic field.

  19. The source of O+ in the storm time ring current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kistler, L. M.; Mouikis, C. G.; Spence, H. E.; Menz, A. M.; Skoug, R. M.; Funsten, H. O.; Larsen, B. A.; Mitchell, D. G.; Gkioulidou, M.; Wygant, J. R.; Lanzerotti, L. J.

    2016-06-01

    A stretched and compressed geomagnetic field occurred during the main phase of a geomagnetic storm on 1 June 2013. During the storm the Van Allen Probes spacecraft made measurements of the plasma sheet boundary layer and observed large fluxes of O+ ions streaming up the field line from the nightside auroral region. Prior to the storm main phase there was an increase in the hot (>1 keV) and more isotropic O+ ions in the plasma sheet. In the spacecraft inbound pass through the ring current region during the storm main phase, the H+ and O+ ions were significantly enhanced. We show that this enhanced inner magnetosphere ring current population is due to the inward adiabatic convection of the plasma sheet ion population. The energy range of the O+ ion plasma sheet that impacts the ring current most is found to be from ~5 to 60 keV. This is in the energy range of the hot population that increased prior to the start of the storm main phase, and the ion fluxes in this energy range only increase slightly during the extended outflow time interval. Thus, the auroral outflow does not have a significant impact on the ring current during the main phase. The auroral outflow is transported to the inner magnetosphere but does not reach high enough energies to affect the energy density. We conclude that the more energetic O+ that entered the plasma sheet prior to the main phase and that dominates the ring current is likely from the cusp.

  20. Somali Current rings in the eastern Gulf of Aden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fratantoni, David M.; Bower, Amy S.; Johns, William E.; Peters, Hartmut

    2006-09-01

    New satellite-based observations reveal that westward translating anticyclonic rings are generated as a portion of the Somali Current accelerates northward through the Socotra Passage near the mouth of the Gulf of Aden. Rings thus formed exhibit azimuthal geostrophic velocities exceeding 50 cm/s, are comparable in overall diameter to the width of the Gulf of Aden (250 km), and translate westward into the gulf at 5-8 cm/s. Ring generation is most notable in satellite ocean color imagery in November immediately following the transition between southwest (boreal summer) and northeast (winter) monsoon regimes. The observed rings contain anomalous fluid within their core which reflects their origin in the equator-crossing Somali Current system. Estimates of Socotra Passage flow variability derived from satellite altimetry provide evidence for a similar ring generation process in May following the winter-to-summer monsoon transition. Cyclonic recirculation eddies are observed to spin up on the eastern flank of newly formed rings with the resulting vortex pair translating westward together. Recent shipboard and Lagrangian observations indicate that vortices of both sign have substantial vertical extent and may dominate the lateral circulation at all depths in the eastern Gulf of Aden.

  1. Ring Current Modeling in a Realistic Magnetic Field Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fok, M.-C.; Moore, T. E.

    1997-01-01

    A 3-dimensional kinetic model has been developed to study the dynamics of the storm time ring current in a dipole magnetic field. In this paper, the ring current model is extended to include a realistic, time-varying magnetic field model. The magnetic field is expressed as the cross product of the gradients of two Euler potentials and the bounce-averaged particle drifts are calculated in the Euler potential coordinates. A dipolarization event is modeled by collapsing a tail-like magnetosphere to a dipole-like configuration. Our model is able to simulate the sudden enhancements in the ring current ion fluxes and the corresponding ionospheric precipitation during the substorm expansion.

  2. Ring Current Ion Losses by Pitch Angle Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walt, M.; Voss, H. D.

    2001-12-01

    The Source/Loss Cone Energetic Particle Spectrometer (SEPS) on the Polar Satellite observes ions above 155 keV with an angular resolution of about 1.5 degrees. When the axis of SEPS is pointing within 10 degrees of the magnetic field direction, the detector measures particles in both the downward and upward loss cones. Measurements of the loss cone fluxes during the magnetic storms of August 6, 1998, August 27, 1998, September 25, 1998, October 19, 1998, and November 13, 1998 often show large fluxes of ring current ions moving downward inside the loss cone. At times these fluxes are comparable to the trapped ion population, indicating that strong pitch angle scattering is taking place at least locally. Although Polar encounters the ring current region at only two magnetic local times during any given storm, the frequent observation of precipitation suggests that pitch angle scattering is an important loss mechanism for ring current ions.

  3. Study of Ring Current Dynamics During Geomagnetic Storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordanova, Vania K.

    2000-01-01

    This research program considered modeling the dynamical evolution of the ring current during several geomagnetic storms. The first year (6/01/1997-5/31/1998) of this successful collaborative research between the University of New Hampshire (UNH) and the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) was supported by NASA grant NAG5-4680. The second and third years (6/01/1998-5/31/2000) were funded at UNH under NASA grant NAG5-7368. Research work at UNH concentrated on further development of a kinetic model to treat all of the important physical processes that affect the ring current ion population during storm conditions. This model was applied to simulate ring current development during several International Solar-Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) events, and the results were directly compared to satellite observations. A brief description of our major accomplishments and a list of the publications and presentations resulting from this effort are given.

  4. Ring Current Ion Coupling with Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, George V.

    2002-01-01

    A new ring current global model has been developed for the first time that couples the system of two kinetic equations: one equation describes the ring current (RC) ion dynamic, and another equation describes wave evolution of electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves (EMIC). The coupled model is able to simulate, for the first time self-consistently calculated RC ion kinetic and evolution of EMIC waves that propagate along geomagnetic field lines and reflect from the ionosphere. Ionospheric properties affect the reflection index through the integral Pedersen and Hall coductivities. The structure and dynamics of the ring current proton precipitating flux regions, intensities of EMIC, global RC energy balance, and some other parameters will be studied in detail for the selected geomagnetic storms. The space whether aspects of RC modelling and comparison with the data will also be discussed.

  5. Ring Current Ion Coupling with Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov. G. V.; Gamayunov, K. V.; Jordanova, V. K.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A new ring current global model has been developed that couples the system of two kinetic equations: one equation describes the ring current (RC) ion dynamic, and another equation describes wave evolution of electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves (EMIC). The coupled model is able to simulate, for the first time self-consistently calculated RC ion kinetic and evolution of EMIC waves that propagate along geomagnetic field lines and reflect from the ionosphere. Ionospheric properties affect the reflection index through the integral Pedersen and Hall conductivities. The structure and dynamics of the ring current proton precipitating flux regions, intensities of EMIC global RC energy balance, and some other parameters will be studied in detail for the selected geomagnetic storms.

  6. Losses of ring current ions by strong pitch angle scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walt, M.; Voss, H. D.

    High angular resolution measurements of 155 keV ions in the ring current during the magnetic storm of August 6, 1998 show filled loss cones indicating that very rapid pitch angle scattering is taking place above the satellite location. The measurements were made with the SEPS detector on the Polar satellite during its passages through the ring current regions, usually at magnetic latitudes near ±45° and at magnetic local times of about 04:00 and 16:00 hrs. The observed strong pitch angle scattering implies a trapping lifetime of less than an hour and may explain the early rapid recovery of Dst during magnetic storms.

  7. Current loop decay in Rutherford-type cables

    SciTech Connect

    Akhmetov, A.A.; Devred, A.; Schermer, R.I.; Mints, R.G.

    1993-05-01

    Recent measurements of superconducting panicle accelerator magnets made of multistrand Rutherford-type cable have shown that the magnetic field and its main harmonics oscillate along the magnet axis with a wavelength nearly equal to the cable transposition. It was also observed that, at low transport current, the periodic magnetic pitch length. It was also observed that, at low transport current, the periodic magnetic field patterns can persist without any significant decay for more than 12 hours. The coincidence of the wavelength of the magnetic field oscillations with the cable transposition pitch suggests that slowly decaying current loops exist in the cable even at zero transport current. These loops consist of currents flowing along the cable through one set of strands and returning through another set of strands. In this paper, we consider the process of current loop decay in a Rutherford-type cable.

  8. Perimeter ring currents in benzenoids from Pauling bond orders.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Patrick W; Myrvold, Wendy; Jenkinson, Daniel; Bird, William H

    2016-04-28

    It is shown that the ring currents in perimeter hexagonal rings of Kekulean benzenoids, as estimated within the Randić conjugated-circuit model, can be calculated directly without tedious pairwise comparison of Kekulé structures or Kekulé counting for cycle-deleted subgraphs. Required are only the Pauling bond orders of perimeter bonds and the number of Kekulé structures of the benzenoid, both readily available from the adjacency matrix of the carbon skeleton. This approach provides easy calculation of complete current maps for benzenoids in which every face has at least one bond on the perimeter (as in the example of cata-condensed benzenoids), and allows qualitative evaluation of the main ring-current contributions to (1)H chemical shifts in general benzenoids. A combined Randić-Pauling model for correlation of ring current and bond length through bond order is derived and shown to be consistent with resilience of current under bond alternation. PMID:26762560

  9. Modeling the Inner Magnetosphere: Radiation Belts, Ring Current, and Composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glocer, Alex

    2011-01-01

    The space environment is a complex system defined by regions of differing length scales, characteristic energies, and physical processes. It is often difficult, or impossible, to treat all aspects of the space environment relative to a particular problem with a single model. In our studies, we utilize several models working in tandem to examine this highly interconnected system. The methodology and results will be presented for three focused topics: 1) Rapid radiation belt electron enhancements, 2) Ring current study of Energetic Neutral Atoms (ENAs), Dst, and plasma composition, and 3) Examination of the outflow of ionospheric ions. In the first study, we use a coupled MHD magnetosphere - kinetic radiation belt model to explain recent Akebono/RDM observations of greater than 2.5 MeV radiation belt electron enhancements occurring on timescales of less than a few hours. In the second study, we present initial results of a ring current study using a newly coupled kinetic ring current model with an MHD magnetosphere model. Results of a dst study for four geomagnetic events are shown. Moreover, direct comparison with TWINS ENA images are used to infer the role that composition plays in the ring current. In the final study, we directly model the transport of plasma from the ionosphere to the magnetosphere. We especially focus on the role of photoelectrons and and wave-particle interactions. The modeling methodology for each of these studies will be detailed along with the results.

  10. Decay of superfluid currents in the interacting one-dimensional Bose gas

    SciTech Connect

    Cherny, Alexander Yu.; Caux, Jean-Sebastien; Brand, Joachim

    2009-10-15

    We examine the superfluid properties of a one-dimensional (1D) Bose gas in a ring trap based on the model of Lieb and Liniger. While the 1D Bose gas has nonclassical rotational inertia and exhibits quantization of velocities, the metastability of currents depends sensitively on the strength of interactions in the gas: the stronger the interactions, the faster the current decays. It is shown that the Landau critical velocity is zero in the thermodynamic limit due to the first supercurrent state, which has zero energy and finite probability of excitation. We calculate the energy dissipation rate of ring currents in the presence of weak defects, which should be observable on experimental time scales.

  11. Experimental Study on Current Decay Characteristics of Persistent Current HTS Magnet by Alternating Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Young Gun; Lee, Chang Young; Hwang, Young Jin; Lee, Woo Seung; Lee, Jiho; Jo, Hyun Chul; Chung, Yoon Do; Ko, Tae Kuk

    This paper deals with a current decay characteristics of a high temperature superconducting (HTS) magnet operated in persistent current mode (PCM). In superconducting synchronous machine applications such as linear synchronous motor (LSM), the superconducting coil is designed to operate in the PCM to obtain steady magnetic field with DC transport current. This superconducting magnet operates on a direct current, but it can be exposed to alternating magnetic field due to the armature winding. When the magnet is subjected to an external time-varying magnetic field, it is possible to result in a decay of the current in PCM system due to AC loss. In this research, a PCM system with armature coil which generates time-varying magnetic field was fabricated to verify current decay characteristics by external alternating magnetic field. The current decay rate was measured by using a hall sensor as functions of amplitude and frequency of armature coil.

  12. Stormtime transport of ring current and radiation belt ions

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, M.W.; Schulz, M.; Lyons, L.R.; Gorney, D.J.

    1993-04-01

    This is an investigation of stormtime particle transport that leads to formation of the ring current. The method is to trace the guiding-center motion of representative ions (having selected first adiabatic invariants [mu]) in response to model substorm-associated impulses in the convection electric field. The simulation results are compared qualitatively with existing analytically tractable idealizations of particle transport (direct convective access and radial diffusion) in order to assess the limits of validity of these approximations. For [mu] approximately less than 10 MeV/G (E approximately less than 10 keV at L equivalent to 3) the ion drift period on the final (ring-current) drift shell of interest (L equivalent to 3) exceeds the duration of the main phase of the model storm, and the authors find that the transport of ions to this drift shell is appropriately idealized as direct convective access, typically from open drift paths. Ion transport to a final closed drift path from an open (plasma-sheet) drift trajectory is possible for those portions of that drift path that lie outside the mean stormtime separatrix between closed and open drift trajectories, For [mu] approximately 10-25 MeV/G (110 keV approximately less than E approximately less than 280 keV at L equivalent to 3) the drift period at L equivalent to 3 is comparable to the postulated 3-hr duration of the storm, and the mode of transport is transitional between direct convective access and transport that resembles radial diffusion. (This particle population is transitional between the ring current and radiation belt). For [mu] approximately greater than 25 MeV/G (radiation-belt ions having E approximately greater than 280 keV at L equivalent to 3) the ion drift period is considerably shorter than the main phase of a typical storm, and ions gain access to the ring-current region essentially via radial diffusion.

  13. Vibrational effects on UV/Vis laser-driven π-electron ring currents in aromatic ring molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mineo, H.; Lin, S. H.; Fujimura, Y.

    2014-10-01

    We present the results of a theoretical study of vibrational effects on UV/Vis laser-driven π-electron ring currents in aromatic ring molecules. We consider vibrational effects on both coherent and non-coherent (single quantum state) ring currents. The coherent ring current originates from an excitation of a pair of quasi-degenerate electronic states by an ultrashort linearly polarized UV/Vis laser pulse, while the non-coherent ring current originates from by an excitation of a degenerated electronic state of an aromatic ring molecule with high symmetry by a circularly polarized electric field of a UV/Vis laser pulse. The magnitude of a generated ring current can be expressed as an average of those of the bond currents for both the coherent and non-coherent cases. We derive an analytical expression for the magnitude of the bond currents in the adiabatic approximation. Using the expression, we performed calculations of a non-coherent ring current generated in the optically allowed excited state (1E1U) of benzene and the time evolution of coherent ring current of (P)-2,2-biphenol. Vibrational effects on the non-coherent ring current of benzene were found to be negligibly small. We paid particular attention to the vibrational effects induced by the torsion mode on time evolution of the coherent ring current along the bond bridging between the two aromatic rings of (P)-2,2-biphenol. By comparing the time evolution of the coherent ring current with that in the frozen-nuclear approximation, we found that inclusion of the low-frequency torsion mode brings about modulations in the beating in the ring current. The modulations in the time evolution of the coherent ring current were brought about by contribution of several pairs of the coherently excited vibronic states. Coherent vibronic ring currents generated from pairs of the coherently excited vibronic states interfere each other. The existence of the pairs originates from relatively large potential displacement of the

  14. A dissected ring current model for assessing magnetic aromaticity: a general approach for both organic and inorganic rings.

    PubMed

    Foroutan-Nejad, Cina; Shahbazian, Shant; Feixas, Ferran; Rashidi-Ranjbar, Parviz; Solà, Miquel

    2011-08-01

    A model based on classical electrodynamics is used to measure the strength of ring currents of different molecular orbitals, i.e., σ- and π-orbitals, and characteristics of ring current loops, i.e., ring current radii and height of current loops above/below the ring planes, among a number of organic as well as inorganic molecules. For the π-current, the present model represents an improvement of previous approaches to determine ring current intensity. It is proven that the present model is more precise than previous models as they could not explain presence of the minimum in the plot of NICS(πzz) versus distance close to the ring plane. Variations in the charge of molecules and the types of constituent atoms of each species affect the ring current radii of both σ- and π-current loops as well as the height of π-current loops above/below the ring plane. It is suggested that variation in the distribution of the one-electron density in different systems is the main source of differences of the ring current characteristics. PMID:21598277

  15. Studying an Agulhas ring's long-term pathway and decay with finite-time coherent sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froyland, Gary; Horenkamp, Christian; Rossi, Vincent; van Sebille, Erik

    2015-08-01

    Coherent sets in dynamical systems are regions in phase space that optimally "carry mass" with them under the system's evolution, so that these regions experience minimal leakage. The dominant tool for determining coherent sets is the transfer operator, which provides a complete description of Lagrangian mass transport. In this work, we combine existing transfer operator methods with a windowing scheme to study the spatial and temporal evolution of a so-called Agulhas ring: a large anticyclonic mesoscale eddy playing a key role in inter-ocean exchange of climate-relevant properties. Our focus is on ring decay over time and the windowing scheme enables us to study how the most coherent region (our estimate of the ring) varies in position and size over a period of more than two years. We compare the eddy-like structure and its spatio-temporal changes as revealed by our method and by a classical Eulerian approach.

  16. Discussion paper: Partial ring current and polarization jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trakhtengerts, V. Y.; Demekhov, A. G.

    2005-06-01

    We analyze the asymmetric part of the ring current (RC), which appears during the main phase of a magnetic storm and is due to strong precipitation of RC ions into the ionosphere. The precipitation is caused by the pitch angle scattering by ion cyclotron waves and is localized in the evening sector inside the storm time plasmaspheric bulge. The asymmetric (partial) RC together with the precipitation decreases the electric shielding of the inner magnetosphere by the region 2 current system and forms an additional three-dimensional current system at subauroral latitudes. Using a simplified analytical model, we show that such a current system can be a good candidate for explaining the origin of the polarization jet (subauroral ion drift, PJ/SAID), In particular, spatial-temporal characteristics, ionospheric ion velocities, and electric field values for this current system correspond to those in the PJ.

  17. Stability of equilibrium of a superconducting ring that levitates in the field of a fixed ring with constant current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishaev, A. M.; Bush, A. A.; Gavrikov, M. B.; Kamentsev, K. E.; Kozintseva, M. V.; Savel'ev, V. V.; Sigov, A. S.

    2015-11-01

    In order to develop a plasma trap with levitating superconducting magnetic coils, it is necessary to search for their stable levitating states. An analytical expression for the potential energy of a single superconducting ring that captures a fixed magnetic flux in the field of a fixed ring with constant current versus the coordinate of the free ring on the axis of the system, deviation angle of its axis from the axis of the system, and radial displacement of its plane is derived for uniform gravity field in the thin ring approximation. The calculated stable levitation states of the superconducting ring in the field of the ring with constant current are proven in experiments. The generalization of such an approach to the levitation of several rings makes it possible to search for stable levitation states of several coils that form a magnetic system of a multipole trap.

  18. Guiding-Center Simulations of Stormtime Ring Current Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, S.; Chen, M. W.; Lyons, L. R.; Korth, H.; Albert, J. M.

    2001-12-01

    We simulate electron transport in order to examine the stormtime injection of electrons to the ring current. We use the same method and magnetic and electric field model that has been previously used to account for the stormtime injection of ring current ions, to determine the extent to which that model can also account for observed stormtime electron injections. The model traces the guiding-center motion of representative particles, having selected first adiabatic invariants μ , in response to a series of impulsive enhancements in the convection electric field. The magnetic field model is a dipole field plus constant southward IMF. Over this magnetic field model we impose corotation and a 25-kV quiescent Stern-Volland cross polar cap potential. We model a storm by applying an additional enhanced impulsive cross polar cap potential that is less well shielded than the Stern-Volland potential. The average enhancement of this storm-associated potential is 125 kV, and lasts for 6 hours. We performed simulations for representative equatorially-mirroring electrons for μ = 1 MeV/G to 200 MeV/G. Using the simulation results, we map stormtime phase space distributions by invoking Liouville's Theorem modified by losses. We consider electron loss due to precipitation via a model having a MLT-dependent loss rate that is less than strong everywhere in the plasma sheet. We also look at a model with strong diffusion losses within the plasma sheet. We apply a boundary spectrum at geosynchronous orbit that is based on averaging 12 years of geosynchronous LANL/MPA electron data and is parameterized by Kp and binned in 0.5 hr MLT increments. The initial quiescent electron distribution for trapped electrons is taken from the steady-state balance between radial diffusion and weak-pitch-angle-scattering losses. From the simulation results, we find significant stormtime enhancements of ring current electrons at equatorial radial distance r = 2.6 to 6.6 RE for energies from tens of ke

  19. Ring current instabilities in the magnetohydrodynamic frequency range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasegawa, A.; Chen, L.

    1992-01-01

    This report summarizes recent theoretical developments in ring current plasma instabilities in the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) frequency range but with the effect of finite Larmor radius, and discusses its relevance to satellite-based observations. Possible instabilities are the bounce resonant instabilities caused by a humped energy distribution, the drift mirror instability caused by an anisotropic pressure and the drift wave type instability caused by a combination of drift-bounce resonance and reduced Alfven frequency due to a high beta loading of the flux tube. Here, beta is proportional to plasma/magnetic pressures. Mechanisms leading to turbulence are also discussed.

  20. Short-Term Forecasting of Radiation Belt and Ring Current

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fok, Mei-Ching

    2007-01-01

    A computer program implements a mathematical model of the radiation-belt and ring-current plasmas resulting from interactions between the solar wind and the Earth s magnetic field, for the purpose of predicting fluxes of energetic electrons (10 keV to 5 MeV) and protons (10 keV to 1 MeV), which are hazardous to humans and spacecraft. Given solar-wind and interplanetary-magnetic-field data as inputs, the program solves the convection-diffusion equations of plasma distribution functions in the range of 2 to 10 Earth radii. Phenomena represented in the model include particle drifts resulting from the gradient and curvature of the magnetic field; electric fields associated with the rotation of the Earth, convection, and temporal variation of the magnetic field; and losses along particle-drift paths. The model can readily accommodate new magnetic- and electric-field submodels and new information regarding physical processes that drive the radiation-belt and ring-current plasmas. Despite the complexity of the model, the program can be run in real time on ordinary computers. At present, the program can calculate present electron and proton fluxes; after further development, it should be able to predict the fluxes 24 hours in advance

  1. Radial transport of storm time ring current ions

    SciTech Connect

    Lui, A.T.Y. )

    1993-01-01

    Radial transport of energetic ions for the development of the main phase of geomagnetic storms is investigated with data from the medium energy particle analyzer (MEPA) on the Charge Composition Explorer (CCE) spacecraft, which monitored protons (E[sub p] > 56 keV), helium ions (E[sub He] > 72 keV), and the carbon-nitrogen-oxygen group, which is mostly dominated by oxygen ions (E[sub O] > 137 keV). From a study of four geomagnetic storms, we show that the flux increase of these ions in the inner ring current region (L [approx lt] 5) can be accounted for by an inward displacement of the ring current population by [approximately]0.5 to 3.5 R[sub E]. There is a general trend that a larger inward displacement occurs at higher L shells than at lower ones. These results are in agreement with previous findings. The radially injected population consists of the prestorm population modified by substorm injections which occur on a much shorter rime scale than that of a storm main phase. It is also found that the inward displacement is relatively independent of ion mass and energy, suggesting that the radial transport of these energetic ions is effected primarily by convective motion from a large electric field or by diffusion resulting from magnetic field fluctuations. 27 refs., 5 figs.

  2. Radial transport of storm time ring current ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lui, A. T. Y.

    1993-01-01

    Radial transport of energetic ions for the development of the main phase of geomagnetic storms is investigated with data from the medium energy particle analyzer (MEPA) on the Charge Composition Explorer spacecraft, which monitored protons, helium ions, and the carbon-nitrogen-oxygen group, which is mostly dominated by oxygen ions. From a study of four geomagnetic storms, we show that the flux increase of these ions in the inner ring current region can be accounted for by an inward displacement of the ring current population by 0.5 to 3.5 R(E). There is a general trend that a larger inward displacement occurs at higher L shells than at lower ones. These results are in agreement with previous findings. The radially injected population consists of the prestorm population modified by substorm injections which occur on a much shorter time scale than that for a storm main phase. It is also found that the inward displacement is relatively independent of ion mass and energy, suggesting that the radial transport of these energetic ions is effected primarily by convective motion from a large electric field or by diffusion resulting from magnetic field fluctuations.

  3. Phase space variations of near equatorially mirroring ring current ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, D. J.

    1981-01-01

    Observations of near equatorially mirroring ring current ions before and after a magnetic storm are presented in the form of phase space densities with respect to the first adiabatic invariant. Particle densities were obtained from the medium energy particles instrument covering the energy range 24-2081 keV on ISEE 1 at L values between 3 and 8 earth radii and ratios of the magnetic field at the satellite position to the magnetic field at the magnetic equator less than 1.2. Analysis of the phase space densities through the magnetosphere reveals a well-defined high magnetic moment peak in the prestorm near-equatorial ring current ion phase space density distribution, with the magnetic storm resulting from an enhancement of phase space densities at magnetic moment values below the peak and phase space densities remaining constant above the peak. Results are found to be in good agreement with those obtained by Explorer 45 six years previously, indicating that the observed phase space density variations are characteristic of energetic ion behavior during magnetic storms.

  4. Operational advances in ring current modeling using RAM-SCB

    SciTech Connect

    Welling, Daniel T; Jordanova, Vania K; Zaharia, Sorin G; Morley, Steven K

    2010-12-03

    The Ring current Atmosphere interaction Model with Self-Consistently calculated 3D Magnetic field (RAM-SCB) combines a kinetic model of the ring current with a force-balanced model of the magnetospheric magnetic field to create an inner magnetospheric model that is magnetically self consistent. RAM-SCB produces a wealth of outputs that are valuable to space weather applications. For example, the anisotropic particle distribution of the KeV-energy population calculated by the code is key for predicting surface charging on spacecraft. Furthermore, radiation belt codes stand to benefit substantially from RAM-SCB calculated magnetic field values and plasma wave growth rates - both important for determining the evolution of relativistic electron populations. RAM-SCB is undergoing development to bring these benefits to the space weather community. Data-model validation efforts are underway to assess the performance of the system. 'Virtual Satellite' capability has been added to yield satellite-specific particle distribution and magnetic field output. The code's outer boundary is being expanded to 10 Earth Radii to encompass previously neglected geosynchronous orbits and allow the code to be driven completely by either empirical or first-principles based inputs. These advances are culminating towards a new, real-time version of the code, rtRAM-SCB, that can monitor the inner magnetosphere conditions on both a global and spacecraft-specific level. This paper summarizes these new features as well as the benefits they provide the space weather community.

  5. Modeling Earth's Ring Current Using The CIMI Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craven, J. D., II; Perez, J. D.; Buzulukova, N.; Fok, M. C. H.

    2015-12-01

    Earth's ring current is a result of the injection of charged particles trapped in the magnetosphere from solar storms. The enhancement of the ring current particles produces magnetic depressions and disturbances to the Earth's magnetic field known as geomagnetic storms, which have been modeled using the comprehensive inner magnetosphere-ionosphere (CIMI) model. The purpose of this model is to identify and understand the physical processes that control the dynamics of the geomagnetic storms. The basic procedure was to use the CIMI model for the simulation of 15 storms since 2009. Some of the storms were run multiple times, but with varying parameters relating to the dynamics of the Earth's magnetic field, particle fluxes, and boundary conditions of the inner-magnetosphere. Results and images were placed in the TWINS online catalog page for further analysis and discussion. Particular areas of interest were extreme storm events. A majority of storms simulated had average DST values of -100 nT; these extreme storms exceeded DST values of -200 nT. The continued use of the CIMI model will increase knowledge of the interactions and processes of the inner-magnetosphere as well as lead to a better understanding of extreme solar storm events for the future advancement of space weather physics.

  6. A Dynamic Coupled Magnetosphere-Ionosphere-Ring Current Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pembroke, Asher

    In this thesis we describe a coupled model of Earth's magnetosphere that consists of the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry (LFM) global magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulation, the MIX ionosphere solver and the Rice Convection Model (RCM). We report some results of the coupled model using idealized inputs and model parameters. The algorithmic and physical components of the model are described, including the transfer of magnetic field information and plasma boundary conditions to the RCM and the return of ring current plasma properties to the LFM. Crucial aspects of the coupling include the restriction of RCM to regions where field-line averaged plasma-beta ¡=1, the use of a plasmasphere model, and the MIX ionosphere model. Compared to stand-alone MHD, the coupled model produces a substantial increase in ring current pressure and reduction of the magnetic field near the Earth. In the ionosphere, stronger region-1 and region-2 Birkeland currents are seen in the coupled model but with no significant change in the cross polar cap potential drop, while the region-2 currents shielded the low-latitude convection potential. In addition, oscillations in the magnetic field are produced at geosynchronous orbit with the coupled code. The diagnostics of entropy and mass content indicate that these oscillations are associated with low-entropy flow channels moving in from the tail and may be related to bursty bulk flows and bubbles seen in observations. As with most complex numerical models, there is the ongoing challenge of untangling numerical artifacts and physics, and we find that while there is still much room for improvement, the results presented here are encouraging. Finally, we introduce several new methods for magnetospheric visualization and analysis, including a fluid-spatial volume for RCM and a field-aligned analysis mesh for the LFM. The latter allows us to construct novel visualizations of flux tubes, drift surfaces, topological boundaries, and bursty-bulk flows.

  7. The four-electron diamagnetic ring current of porphycene.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Erich; Fowler, Patrick W

    2003-05-21

    Porphycene, an isomer that can replace porphin in chemical and biochemical contexts, is predicted by ab initio calculation to exhibit a global diatropic pi ring current with bifurcation across the four pyrrole units of the macrocycle. Analysis of the orbital contributions to the current density in porphycene reveals that the global current, with its bifurcation feature, is attributable to the four electrons of the near-degenerate HOMO levels, the same set of active electrons that feature in the well-known four-orbital model of the electronic spectra of porphyrins. Integration of the current density gives 1H, 13C and 15N NMR shieldings that are compatible with the observed low-field shifts of peripheral and bridge protons and high-field shift of the internal NH protons, assignment of the 13C NMR spectrum and the single average 15N chemical shift resulting from rapid NH tautomerism. Geometries were calculated with the DFT B3LYP functional, the current density maps were calculated with the ipsocentric coupled-Hartree-Fock CTOCD-DZ method, and the shieldings with the CTOCD-PZ2 variant, all in the same 6-31G** basis. PMID:12926370

  8. Geomagnetic storms, the Dst ring-current myth and lognormal distributions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Campbell, W.H.

    1996-01-01

    The definition of geomagnetic storms dates back to the turn of the century when researchers recognized the unique shape of the H-component field change upon averaging storms recorded at low latitude observatories. A generally accepted modeling of the storm field sources as a magnetospheric ring current was settled about 30 years ago at the start of space exploration and the discovery of the Van Allen belt of particles encircling the Earth. The Dst global 'ring-current' index of geomagnetic disturbances, formulated in that period, is still taken to be the definitive representation for geomagnetic storms. Dst indices, or data from many world observatories processed in a fashion paralleling the index, are used widely by researchers relying on the assumption of such a magnetospheric current-ring depiction. Recent in situ measurements by satellites passing through the ring-current region and computations with disturbed magnetosphere models show that the Dst storm is not solely a main-phase to decay-phase, growth to disintegration, of a massive current encircling the Earth. Although a ring current certainly exists during a storm, there are many other field contributions at the middle-and low-latitude observatories that are summed to show the 'storm' characteristic behavior in Dst at these observatories. One characteristic of the storm field form at middle and low latitudes is that Dst exhibits a lognormal distribution shape when plotted as the hourly value amplitude in each time range. Such distributions, common in nature, arise when there are many contributors to a measurement or when the measurement is a result of a connected series of statistical processes. The amplitude-time displays of Dst are thought to occur because the many time-series processes that are added to form Dst all have their own characteristic distribution in time. By transforming the Dst time display into the equivalent normal distribution, it is shown that a storm recovery can be predicted with

  9. Modelling the early evolution of a Loop Current ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auladell, M.; Pelegrí, J. L.; García-Olivares, A.; Kirwan, A. D., Jr.; Lipphardt, B. L., Jr.; Martín, J. M.; Pascual, A.; Sangrà, P.; Zweng, M.

    2010-03-01

    The Colorado University Princeton Ocean Model (CUPOM) is used here to study the early stages in the life of Millennium, a mesoscale anticyclonic ring that detached from the Loop Current on April 2001 and lasted for more than 100 days. The numerical near-surface velocity field for the Gulf of Mexico is validated with the altimetry geostrophic velocities. The first 30 days of numerical data, before Millennium interacts with other mesoscalar features, are closely examined both from Eulerian and Lagrangian perspectives. During this time Millennium had a near-constant rotation period of 6.5 days, and particles do not leave the ring. Nevertheless, the distributions of temperature, salinity, and angular velocity confirm the existence of significant (possibly numerical) radial diffusion. Polar-coordinate phase plots for temperature-salinity anomalies and tangential-radial velocities, at several depths, illustrate the presence of an evolving oscillating pattern. Radial and tangential velocities change in phase, associated with vertical displacements of the isothermal and isohaline surfaces. A simple diffusion model with an effective diffusion coefficient of 200 m 2 s - 1 is appropriate to grossly simulate the temporal evolution of angular velocity within Millennium.

  10. Stormtime transport of ring current and radiation belt ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Margaret W.; Schulz, Michael; Lyons, L. R.; Gorney, David J.

    1993-01-01

    This is an investigation of stormtime particle transport that leads to formation of the ring current. Our method is to trace the guiding-center motion of representative ions (having selected first adiabatic invariants mu) in response to model substorm-associated impulses in the convection electric field. We compare our simulation results qualitatively with existing analytically tractable idealizations of particle transport (direct convective access and radial diffusion) in order to assess the limits of validity of these approximations. For mu approximately less than 10 MeV/G (E approximately less than 10 keV at L equivalent to 3) the ion drift period on the final (ring-current) drift shell of interest (L equivalent to 3) exceeds the duration of the main phase of our model storm, and we find that the transport of ions to this drift shell is appropriately idealized as direct convective access, typically from open drift paths. Ion transport to a final closed drift path from an open (plasma-sheet) drift trajectory is possible for those portions of that drift path that lie outside the mean stormtime separatrix between closed and open drift trajectories, For mu approximately 10-25 MeV/G (110 keV approximately less than E approximately less than 280 keV at L equivalent to 3) the drift period at L equivalent to 3 is comparable to the postulated 3-hr duration of the storm, and the mode of transport is transitional between direct convective access and transport that resembles radial diffusion. (This particle population is transitional between the ring current and radiation belt). For mu approximately greater than 25 MeV/G (radiation-belt ions having E approximately greater than 280 keV at L equivalent to 3) the ion drift period is considerably shorter than the main phase of a typical storm, and ions gain access to the ring-current region essentially via radial diffusion. By computing the mean and mean-square cumulative changes in 1/L among (in this case) 12 representative

  11. THE POTENTIAL FOR NEUTRINO PHYSICS AT MUON COLLIDERS AND DEDICATED HIGH CURRENT MUON STORAGE RINGS

    SciTech Connect

    BIGI,I.; BOLTON,T.; FORMAGGIO,J.; HARRIS,D.; MORFIN,J.; SPENTZOURIS,P.; YU,J.; KAYSER,B.; KING,B.J.; MCFARLAND,K.; PETROV,A.; SCHELLMAN,H.; VELASCO,M.; SHROCK,R.

    2000-05-11

    Conceptual design studies are underway for both muon colliders and high-current non-colliding muon storage rings that have the potential to become the first true neutrino factories. Muon decays in long straight sections of the storage rings would produce uniquely intense and precisely characterized two-component neutrino beams--muon neutrinos plus electron antineutrinos from negative muon decays and electron neutrinos plus muon antineutrinos from positive muons. This article presents a long-term overview of the prospects for these facilities to greatly extend the capabilities for accelerator-based neutrino physics studies for both high rate and long baseline neutrino experiments. As the first major physics topic, recent experimental results involving neutrino oscillations have motivated a vigorous design effort towards dedicated neutrino factories that would store muon beams of energies 50 GeV or below. These facilities hold the promise of neutrino oscillation experiments with baselines up to intercontinental distances and utilizing well understood beams that contain, for the first time, a substantial component of multi-GeV electron-flavored neutrinos. In deference to the active and fast-moving nature of neutrino oscillation studies, the discussion of long baseline physics at neutrino factories has been limited to a concise general overview of the relevant theory, detector technologies, beam properties, experimental goals and potential physics capabilities. The remainder of the article is devoted to the complementary high rate neutrino experiments that would study neutrino-nucleon and neutrino-electron scattering and would be performed at high performance detectors placed as close as is practical to the neutrino production straight section of muon storage rings in order to exploit beams with transverse dimensions as small as a few tens of centimeters.

  12. Interhemispheric currents in the ring current region as seen by the Cluster spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenfjord, P.; Ostgaard, N.; Haaland, S.; Laundal, K.; Reistad, J. P.

    2013-12-01

    The existence of interhemispheric currents has been predicted by several authors, but their extent in the ring current has to our knowledge never been studied systematically by using in-situ measurements. These currents have been suggested to be associated with observed asymmetries of the aurora. We perform a statistical study of current density and direction during ring current crossings using the Cluster spacecraft. We analyse the extent of the interhemispheric field aligned currents for a wide range of solar wind conditions. Direct estimations of equatorial current direction and density are achieved through the curlometer technique. The curlometer technique is based on Ampere's law and requires magnetic field measurements from all four spacecrafts. The use of this method requires careful study of factors that limit the accuracy, such as tetrahedron shape and configuration. This significantly limits our dataset, but is a necessity for accurate current calculations. Our goal is to statistically investigate the occurrence of interhemispheric currents, and determine if there are parameters or magnetospheric states on which the current magnitude and directions depend upon.

  13. Limit on Tensor Currents from ^{8}Li β Decay.

    PubMed

    Sternberg, M G; Segel, R; Scielzo, N D; Savard, G; Clark, J A; Bertone, P F; Buchinger, F; Burkey, M; Caldwell, S; Chaudhuri, A; Crawford, J E; Deibel, C M; Greene, J; Gulick, S; Lascar, D; Levand, A F; Li, G; Pérez Galván, A; Sharma, K S; Van Schelt, J; Yee, R M; Zabransky, B J

    2015-10-30

    In the standard model, the weak interaction is formulated with a purely vector-axial-vector (V-A) structure. Without restriction on the chirality of the neutrino, the most general limits on tensor currents from nuclear β decay are dominated by a single measurement of the β-ν[over ¯] correlation in ^{6}He β decay dating back over a half century. In the present work, the β-ν[over ¯]-α correlation in the β decay of ^{8}Li and subsequent α-particle breakup of the ^{8}Be^{*} daughter was measured. The results are consistent with a purely V-A interaction and in the case of couplings to right-handed neutrinos (C_{T}=-C_{T}^{'}) limits the tensor fraction to |C_{T}/C_{A}|^{2}<0.011 (95.5% C.L.). The measurement confirms the ^{6}He result using a different nuclear system and employing modern ion-trapping techniques subject to different systematic uncertainties. PMID:26565463

  14. Ring Current Morphology and the Influence of FACs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunlop, M. W.; Bogdanova, Y.; Shen, C.; Zhang, Q.; Luhr, H.; Yang, Y.; Dandouras, I. S.; Mccullough, C.; Perry, C. H.; Ritter, P.; Rong, Z.; Taylor, M. G.; Fazakerley, A. N.

    2013-12-01

    The imminent launch of the 3 Swarm spacecraft into low, polar Earth orbits; the planned coordination of Swarm with the 4 Cluster spacecraft through joint operations, and the further possible coordination with the recently launched 2 spacecraft RBSP spacecraft, provides an unprecedented, distributed space dataset of 'clustered' multi-point measurements. In anticipation of the direct comparison of Swarm and Cluster, preliminary study of the morphology and influence of the ring current using Cluster has produced a full-circle determination of the in-situ RC and associated FACs directly from the 4-spacecraft perigee observations. Such externally induced magnetic signals have significant effect at low Earth orbit (LEO) so that coordinated measurements of the current systems from ground to the (inner) magnetosphere are highly desirable and may be used to validate the Swarm constellation data. We report here further investigations of the RC morphology and compare the significance of the connecting FACs and partial eastward current using analysis techniques derived from the calculation of curl B and magnetic gradients. We also investigate the consequences for future spacecraft constellations at both Cluster and Swarm, during potential joint operations.

  15. Search for flavor-changing-neutral-current d meson decays.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguilo, E; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Arthaud, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Assis Jesus, A C S; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Ay, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, P; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A-F; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Berntzon, L; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Biscarat, C; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Borissov, G; Bos, K; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calfayan, P; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Caron, S; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chan, K; Chandra, A; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clément, B; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; da Motta, H; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, S J; de Jong, P; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dong, H; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Ford, M; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Gelé, D; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, J; Guo, F; Gutierrez, P; Gutierrez, G; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Hansson, P; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hoeth, H; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hooper, R; Hossain, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Käfer, D; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J R; Kalk, J M; Kappler, S; Karmanov, D; Kasper, J; Kasper, P; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaur, R; Kaushik, V; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Khatidze, D; Kim, H; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Kirsch, M; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kopal, M; Korablev, V M; Kozelov, A V; Krop, D; Kryemadhi, A; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kvita, J; Lacroix, F; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lazoflores, J; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Lellouch, J; Leveque, J; Lewis, P; Li, J; Li, Q Z; Li, L; Lietti, S M; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lounis, A; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Makovec, N; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; Melnitchouk, A; Mendes, A; Mendoza, L; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, J; Meyer, A; Michaut, M; Millet, T; Mitrevski, J; Molina, J; Mommsen, R K; Mondal, N K; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Onoprienko, D; Oshima, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Otero Y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Penning, B; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Polozov, P; Pompos, A; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; Potter, C; Prado da Silva, W L; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rakitine, A; Rangel, M S; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Reucroft, S; Rich, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santoro, A; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schieferdecker, P; Schliephake, T; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Sengupta, S; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Shpakov, D; Siccardi, V; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Snow, J; Snow, G R; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stolin, V; Stone, A; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Strauss, E; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Svoisky, P; Sznajder, A; Talby, M; Tamburello, P; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Telford, P; Temple, J; Tiller, B; Tissandier, F; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Toole, T; Torchiani, I; Trefzger, T; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, S; Uvarov, L; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; van den Berg, P J; van Eijk, B; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Vint, P; Vokac, P; Von Toerne, E; Voutilainen, M; Vreeswijk, M; Wagner, R; Wahl, H D; Wang, L; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, M; Weber, G; Wenger, A; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Zatserklyaniy, A; Zeitnitz, C; Zhang, D; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zivkovic, L; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2008-03-14

    We study the flavor-changing-neutral-current process c-->u micro(+) micro(-) using 1.3 fb(-1) of pp[over ] collisions at square root s = 1.96 TeV recorded by the D0 detector operating at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. We see clear indications of the charged-current mediated D(s)(+) and D(+)-->phipi(+) --> micro(+)micro(-)pi(+) final states with significance greater than 4 standard deviations above background for the D(+) state. We search for the continuum neutral-current decay of D(+)-->pi(+) micro(+) micro(-) in the dimuon invariant mass spectrum away from the phi resonance. We see no evidence of signal above background and set a limit of B(D(+) --> pi(+) micro(+) micro(-))<3.9 x 10(-6) at the 90% C.L. This limit places the most stringent constraint on new phenomena in the c--> u micro(+) micro(-) transition. PMID:18352172

  16. Revisiting the relationship between Loop Current rings and Florida Current transport variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mildner, Tanja C.; Eden, Carsten; Czeschel, Lars

    2013-12-01

    It is suggested that internal ocean variability plays a significant role in Florida Current transport variability on interannual time scales. A clear relationship is found between different stages within a ring shedding cycle of the Loop Current in the Gulf of Mexico and minima in the Florida Current transport in mesoscale eddy-permitting ocean model simulations. Available observations are generally in agreement with such a relation but too sparse to give full evidence. Before the Loop Current intrudes far into the Gulf of Mexico a coherent eddy within the Loop Current partly blocks the inflow from the Caribbean Sea through Yucatan Channel leading to a minimum in the Florida Current transport. Such a blocking situation typically occurs over a period of 1-2 months. The irregular blocking leads to interannual variability explaining large parts of the variability of the Florida Current transport in the model simulations, even exceeding atmospheric forcing variability on the considered time scales. Model simulations without ring shedding produce significantly less variability in Florida Current transport. Simulations without interannual variability in the surface forcing show almost as large (or even larger) interannual Florida Current transport changes as without forcing variability. Adding a seasonal cycle can lead to a beat frequency which might be important for the decadal variability.

  17. Splitting of force-free EMHD current rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenzel, R. L.

    2005-10-01

    Tilting of boundary-free field-reversed configurations has been observed in a laboratory plasma in the regime of electron magnetohydrodynamics (EMHD) [R. L. Stenzel, J. M. Urrutia, K. D. Strohmaier, and M. C. Griskey, Experiments on nonlinear EMHD fields, Physica Scripta T107, 163 (2004)]. Further investigations have revealed that the tilting is not due to magnetic forces, i.e., the torque on a magnetic dipole in an external field, because the magnetic force is balanced by the electric force in EMHD. The force-free current ring splits and moves slowly apart. Transverse gradients cause differences in propagation speed leading to an apparent tilt of the expanding current layer. The gradients are created in the early phase of the FRC creation. The propagation of EMHD fields depends primarily on magnetic field and density both of which are nonlinearly modified. The initially symmetric FRC relaxes into a spatially highly nonuniform field with multiple 3-D null points. Similar phenomena are seen during the interaction of two FRCs and also may occur in strong EMHD turbulence.

  18. Search for right-handed currents in muon decay

    SciTech Connect

    Jodidio, A.E.

    1986-01-01

    Limits are reported on charged right-handed currents, based on precise measurement of the endpoint e/sup +/ spectrum in ..mu../sup +/ decay. Highly polarized ..mu../sup +/ from the TRIUMF ''surface'' muon beam were stopped in high purity metal foils and liquid He targets selected to minimize depolarization effects. Decay e/sup +/ emitted within 160 mrad of the beam direction were momentum-analyzed to 0.15%. Muons were stopped within either a spin-processing transverse field (70-G or 110-G) or a spin-holding longitudinal field (0.3-T or 1.1-T). Data collected with the spin-precessing field were used for the momentum calibration of the spectrometer. The spin-held data were used to measure the relative e/sup +/ rate at the endpoint. An extrapolation was made to extract the endpoint rate opposite to the ..mu../sup +/ spin. In terms of the standard muon decay parameters this rate is given by (1-xi P/sub ..mu../delta/rho) where P/sub ..mu../ is muon polarization. The result for xi P/sub ..mu../delta was consistent with the V-A prediction of 1. It is quoted as a 90% confidence lower limit xi P/sub ..mu../delta/rho > 0.9975 since we are unable to correct for all possible sources of muon depolarization. For the model with manifest left-right symmetry and massless neutrinos the result implies 90% confidence limits m(W/sub 2/) > 432 GeV/c/sup 2/ and -0.050 < xi < 0.035, where W/sub 2/ is the predominantly right-handed boson and xi is the left-right mixing angle. With the assumption of no left-right mixing an equivalent 90% confidence upper limit of 0.025 is obtained on the absolute value of the ratio of a possible V+A amplitude to the dominant V-A amplitude in muon and pion decays. Limits are also deduced on the nu/sub ..mu..L/ mass and helicity in ..pi../sup +/ decay, non-(V-A) couplings in helicity projection form, the mass scale of composite leptons, and the branching ratio for ..-->.. e+f where f (familon) is the neutral massless Nambu-Goldstone boson associated with

  19. Ring Current Dynamics in Moderate and Strong Storms: Comparative Analysis of TWINS and IMAGE/HENA Data with the Comprehensive Ring Current Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buzulukova, N.; Fok, M.-C.; Goldstein, J.; Valek, P.; McComas, D. J.; Brandt, P. C.

    2010-01-01

    We present a comparative study of ring current dynamics during strong and moderate storms. The ring current during the strong storm is studied with IMAGE/HENA data near the solar cycle maximum in 2000. The ring current during the moderate storm is studied using energetic neutral atom (ENA) data from the Two Wide-Angle Imaging Neutral- Atom Spectrometers (TWINS) mission during the solar minimum in 2008. For both storms, the local time distributions of ENA emissions show signatures of postmidnight enhancement (PME) during the main phases. To model the ring current and ENA emissions, we use the Comprehensive Ring Current Model (CRCM). CRCM results show that the main-phase ring current pressure peaks in the premidnight-dusk sector, while the most intense CRCM-simulated ENA emissions show PME signatures. We analyze two factors to explain this difference: the dependence of charge-exchange cross section on energy and pitch angle distributions of ring current. We find that the IMF By effect (twisting of the convection pattern due to By) is not needed to form the PME. Additionally, the PME is more pronounced for the strong storm, although relative shielding and hence electric field skewing is well developed for both events.

  20. Guiding-Center Simulations of Stormtime Ring Current Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, S.; Chen, M. W.; Lyons, L. R.; Korth, H.; Albert, J. M.; Roeder, J. L.; Anderson, P. C.

    2002-12-01

    We examine the stormtime injection of electrons to the stormtime ring current by simulating the drift and loss of electrons from the plasma sheet to the inner magnetosphere. We use a similar method and magnetic and electric field model that Chen et al. [JGR, 99, 5745-5759, 1994] used previously to account for the stormtime injection of ring current ions to determine the extent to which that model can also account for observed stormtime electron injections. The model traces the guiding-center motion of representative particles, having selected first adiabatic invariants μ. The magnetic field model is a dipole field plus constant southward IMF, and we impose corotation and a 25-kV quiescent Stern-Volland cross polar cap potential. We simulate two real storms (August 27, 1990, and October 10, 1990) by applying additional storm-associated enhancements in the convection electric field that are less well shielded than the Stern-Volland field. The enhancements in the cross-polar cap potential are obtained by linearly interpolating DMSP measurements of the cross polar cap potential minus an assumed 25-kV quiescent potential. We perform simulations for representative equatorially-mirroring electrons for μ = 1 MeV/G to 200 MeV/G. Using the simulation results, we map stormtime phase space distributions by invoking Liouville­_s Theorem modified by losses. We consider electron loss due to precipitation via a model in which there is strong diffusion far in the plasma sheet (L > ~8) and weak diffusion within the plasmasphere. The loss rates in the region L ~8 to the plasmapause boundary are based on diffusion rates calculated by Lyons [JGR, 79, 575-580, 1974]. We apply a boundary spectrum at geosynchronous orbit that is based on averaging 12 years of geosynchronous LANL/MPA electron data and is parameterized by Kp and binned in 0.5 hr MLT increments. The initial quiescent electron distribution for trapped electrons is taken from the steady-state balance between radial

  1. Ring Current and Field Aligned Currents from Cluster-Swarm Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J.; Dunlop, M. W.; Yang, Y.; Xiong, C.; Shen, C.; Luhr, H.; Bogdanova, Y.; Olsen, N.; Zhang, Q. H.; Cao, J.; Ritter, P.; Masson, A.; Carr, C.; Haagmans, R.

    2015-12-01

    We explore the capability of Swarm-Cluster coordination for probing the behavior of the field aligned currents (FAC) adjacent to the ring current (RC) at medium and low orbits and show statistical analysis of the local time variation of R1/R2 FACs. The RC and connecting R2 FACs influence the geomagnetic field at low Earth orbit (LEO) and are sampled in situ by the four Cluster spacecraft. Coordination of the configuration of three Swarm spacecraft configurations with the constellation of the four Cluster spacecraft is possible; providing a set of distributed, multi-point measurements covering this region. Particular events showing close coordination of all spacecraft are considered during the start of the Swarm operations. We report here preliminary results of joint signatures of R1 and R2 FACs and demonstrate the use and application of new analysis techniques derived from the calculation of curl B and magnetic gradients to compare estimates of the current distributions. Multi-spacecraft analysis can access perpendicular currents associated with the FAC signatures at the Swam locations. We also show preliminary statistical results of FAC correlations between Swarm spacecraft to reveal local time behaviour. For context, we identify the associated auroral boundaries determine from FAC intensity gradients in order to help interpret and resolve the R1 and R2 FACs. We also show preliminary results of an extended survey of the ring current crossings for different years, using estimates of the local current density, field curvature and total current.

  2. Ring Current and Field Aligned Currents from Cluster-Swarm Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunlop, Malcolm; Yang, Junying; Yang, Yanyan; Xiong, Chao; Lühr, Hermann; Finlay, Christopher C.; Olsen, Nils; Shen, Chao; Bogdanova, Yulia. V.; Zhang, Qinghe; Cao, Jinbin; Ritter, Patricia; Masson, Arnaud; Carr, Chris; Haagmans, Roger

    2016-04-01

    We explore the capability of Swarm-Cluster coordination for probing the behavior of the field aligned currents (FAC) adjacent to the ring current (RC) at medium and low orbits and show statistical analysis of the local time variation of R1/R2 FACs. The RC and connecting R2 FACs influence the geomagnetic field at low Earth orbit (LEO) and are sampled in situ by the four Cluster spacecraft. Coordination of the configuration of three Swarm spacecraft configurations with the constellation of the four Cluster spacecraft is possible; providing a set of distributed, multi-point measurements covering this region. Particular events showing close coordination of all spacecraft are considered during the start of the Swarm operations. We report here preliminary results of joint signatures of R1 and R2 FACs and demonstrate the use and application of new analysis techniques derived from the calculation of curl B and magnetic gradients to compare estimates of the current distributions. Multi-spacecraft analysis can access perpendicular currents associated with the FAC signatures at the Swam locations. For context, we identify the associated auroral boundaries determine from FAC intensity gradients in order to help interpret and resolve the R1 and R2 FACs. We also show preliminary results of an extended survey of the ring current crossings for different years, using estimates of the local current density, field curvature and total current.

  3. Heavy Flavor Decays of the Z0 and a Search for Flavor Changing Neutral Currents

    SciTech Connect

    Walston, S

    2004-06-22

    Presented here are the results of a direct search for flavor changing neutral currents via the rare process Z{sup 0} {yields} bs and a measurement of R{sub bs} = {Lambda}(Z{sup 0} {yields} bs)/{Lambda}(Z{sup 0} {yields} hadrons). Because the decays Z{sup 0} {yields} b{bar b} and Z{sup 0} {yields} c{bar c} contribute significant backgrounds to Z{sup 0} {yields} bs, simultaneous measurements of R{sub b} = {Lambda}(Z{sup 0} {yields} b{bar b})/{Lambda}(Z{sup 0} {yields} hadrons) and R{sub c} = {Lambda}(Z{sup 0} {yields} c{bar c})/{Lambda}(Z{sup 0} {yields} hadrons) were also made. The standard double tag technique was extended and self calibrating tags were used for s, c, and b quarks. These measurements were made possible by the unique capabilities of the SLAC Large Detector (SLD) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC): The b and c tags relied upon the SLD's VXD3 307 megapixel CCD vertex detector for topological and kinematic reconstruction of the B and D decay vertices; the s tag identified K{sup {+-}} mesons using the particle identification capabilities of SLD's Cherenkov Ring Imaging Detector (CRID), and K{sub S}{sup 0} mesons and {Lambda} hadrons by kinematic reconstruction of their decay vertices in SLD's 5120 channel central drift chamber (CDC) particle tracking system.

  4. The Magnetic and Shielding Effects of Ring Current on Radiation Belt Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fok, Mei-Ching

    2012-01-01

    The ring current plays many key roles in controlling magnetospheric dynamics. A well-known example is the magnetic depression produced by the ring current, which alters the drift paths of radiation belt electrons and may cause significant electron flux dropout. Little attention is paid to the ring current shielding effect on radiation belt dynamics. A recent simulation study that combines the Comprehensive Ring Current Model (CRCM) with the Radiation Belt Environment (RBE) model has revealed that the ring current-associated shielding field directly and/or indirectly weakens the relativistic electron flux increase during magnetic storms. In this talk, we will discuss how ring current magnetic field and electric shielding moderate the radiation belt enhancement.

  5. Cyclotron side-band emissions from ring-current electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maeda, K.

    1976-01-01

    The paper examines temporal variations in electron energy spectra and pitch-angle distributions during a VLF-emission event observed by Explorer 45 in the main phase of a magnetic storm. It is noted that the observed event occurred outside the plasmasphere on the night side of the magnetosphere and that the dusk-side plasmapause had a double structure during the event. It is found that the VLF emissions consisted of two frequency bands, corresponding to the whistler and electrostatic modes, and that there was a sharp band of 'missing emissions' along frequencies equal to half the equatorial electron gyrofrequency. A peculiar pitch-angle distribution for high-energy electrons (50 to 350 keV) is noted. It is concluded that the VLF-producing particles were enhanced low-energy (about 5 keV) ring-current electrons which penetrated into the night side of the magnetosphere from the magnetotail plasma sheet and which drifted eastward after encountering the steep gradient of the geomagnetic field.

  6. Ring Current Influence on Ionospheric Morpology using HEIDI/GITM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perlongo, N. J.; Ridley, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    A longstanding challenge for ionosphere-thermosphere models has been the inclusion of accurate and self-consistent electrodynamic inputs in the auroral zone. Phenomenon such as penetration electric fields (PEFs), storm enhanced densities (SEDs), and sub-auroral polarization streams (SAPS) are inextricably linked to the coupled magnetosphere-ionosphere-thermosphere system. To address this, the global ionosphere-thermosphere model (GITM) has been coupled to the hot electron ion drift integrator (HEIDI) model of the inner magnetosphere and ring current. However, since the electrodynamic system is strongly dependent on the ionospheric conductance, HEIDI was first updated to include a self-consistent auroral model. HEIDI now calculates the total energy flux and average energy in the auroral zone by calculating the flux of electrons in the loss cone at each time-step. These are used with the Robinson formula to derive the Hall and Pedersen conductances as well as in the potential solver, along with the field-aligned currents, to generate an electric potential pattern which is subsequently used to advect the particles in HEIDI. The resulting aurora and potentials are then used to drive GITM in a one-way coupling. HEIDI and GITM were run for multiple storms using this configuration, and a number of phenomena were investigated, such as PEFs, SEDs and SAPS, as well as their influence on the thermospheric temperature, density and wind structure. Simulations of real storms were compared to incoherent scatter radar, GPS TEC, and satellite data to understand the differences between the old and new model results.

  7. Ring current behavior as revealed by low altitude observations of auroral and equatorial particle precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soraas, Finn

    The magnetic field at the Earth’s surface exhibits an appreciable Magnetic Local Time (MLT) dependence in the initial and main phase of a geomagnetic storm. The field depression is very asymmetric, with the largest depression in the evening to midnight MLT sector. The ring current behavior during storms is studied by observations of high latitude proton precipitation and the Storm Time Equatorial Belt (STEB). The STEB is manifested by ENA ( Energetic Neutral Atoms ) observed at low altitudes around the geomagnetic equator. These ENAs reveal some of the MLT dependence of the ring current. SuperMAG has introduced a set of partial ring current indices which provides new insight into the ring current development. The ring current behavior inferred from these two sets of observations, particles by the POES and ground magnetic fields by SuperMAG are compared. The proton precipitation at high latitudes mirrors the injection of ions into the ring current radiation belt and is to a large extent modulated by the solar wind pressure. The ring current loss processes can be monitored by the STEB. The STEB shows that the ring current first appears in the midnight/evening sector and then later in the morning sector largely consistent with the expected westward drift of ring current ions.

  8. High Dynamic Pressure and Strong Northward IMF: Ingredients for a New Type of Ring Current on 21-22 January 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozyra, J. U.; Brandt, P. C.; Evans, D. S.; Fang, X.; Fok, M.; Gonzalez, W. D.; Liemohn, M. W.; Lu, G.; Rastaetter, L.; Ridley, A.; Thomsen, M. F.; Tsurutani, B.

    2009-05-01

    During the 21-22 January 2005 magnetic storm, a highly unusual ring current developed dominantly during northward IMF and high dynamic pressure with minimum pressure-corrected symH less than -100 nT. Early in the storm, a short (less than 1 hour) interval of strong southward IMF produced a brief depression in sym H which had already recovered when the main phase development of the ring current began under northward IMF and sustained high solar wind dynamic pressure. During the ring current development, a hot dense plasma sheet was observed at geosynchronous orbit followed by a cold dense plasma sheet. The movement of these dense plasma sheets through the inner magnetosphere during the high dynamic pressure interval in the solar wind produced the ring current, which began to decay immediately following the end of the cold dense plasma sheet interval. The cross polar cap potential reached a maximum during the interval of strongest southward IMF early in the storm. However, the equatorward edge of the auroral oval (as indicated by the MBI index) moved to lowest latitudes as the hot high-density plasma sheet stretched out the magnetotail. Precipitation of protons and electrons at ring current energies maximized during the peak of the ring current development under northward IMF conditions. A simulation of this magnetic storm event using the BATS-R-US MHD model with an inner magnetosphere module based on the Rice Convection model produces all the main features of this unusual ring current development and, in addition, shows that the solar wind-magnetosphere coupling was different during the hot compared to the cold high density plasma sheet intervals. We present a comparison between observations and model results and explore the processes responsible for this unusual ring current and its decay.

  9. Ring Current-Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves Coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron (EMIC) waves, generated by ion temperature anisotropy in Earth s ring current (RC), is the best known example of wave- particle interaction in the magnetosphere. Also, there is much controversy over the importance of EMIC waves on RC depletion. Under certain conditions, relativistic electrons, with energies 21 MeV, can be removed from the outer radiation belt (RB) by EMIC wave scattering during a magnetic storm. That is why the calculation of EMIC waves must be a very critical part of the space weather studies. The new RC model that we have developed and present for the first time has several new features that we have combine together in a one single model: (a) several lower frequency cold plasma wave modes are taken into account; (b) wave tracing of these wave has been incorporated in the energy EMIC wave equation; (c) no assumptions regarding wave shape spectra have been made; (d) no assumptions regarding the shape of particle distribution have been made to calculate the growth rate; (e) pitch-angle, energy, and mix diffusions are taken into account together for the first time; (f) the exact loss-cone RC analytical solution has been found and coupled with bounce-averaged numerical solution of kinetic equation; (g) the EMIC waves saturation due to their modulation instability and LHW generation are included as an additional factor that contributes to this process; and (h) the hot ions were included in the real part of dielectric permittivity tensor. We compare our theoretical results with the different EMIC waves models as well as RC experimental data.

  10. Antiaromatic character of 16 π electron octaethylporphyrins: magnetically induced ring currents from DFT-GIMIC calculations.

    PubMed

    Fliegl, Heike; Pichierri, Fabio; Sundholm, Dage

    2015-03-19

    The magnetically induced current density susceptibility, also called current density, has been calculated for a recently synthesized octaethylporphyrin (OEP) zinc(II) dication with formally 16 π electrons. Numerical integration of the current density passing selected chemical bonds yields the current pathway around the porphyrinoid ring and the strength of the ring current. The current strengths show that the OEP-Zn(II) dication is strongly antiaromatic, as also concluded experimentally. The calculation of the ring current pathway shows that all 24 π electrons participate in the transport of the ring current because the current splits into inner and outer branches of practically equal strengths at the four pyrrolic rings. The corresponding neutral octaethylporphyrinoid without Zn and inner hydrogens is found to be antiaromatic, sustaining a paratropic ring current along the inner pathway with 16 π electrons. The neutral OEP-Zn(II) molecule with formally 18 π electrons is found to be almost as aromatic as free-base porphyrin. However, also in this case, all 26 π electrons contribute to the ring current, as for free-base porphyrin. A comparison of calculated and measured (1)H NMR chemical shifts is presented. The current strength susceptibility under experimental conditions has been estimated by assuming a linear relation between experimental shielding constants and calculated current strengths. PMID:25141236

  11. Search for right-handed currents in muon decay

    SciTech Connect

    Balke, B.; Carr, J.; Gidal, G.; Gobbi, B.; Jodidio, A.; Oram, C.J.; Shinsky, K.A.; Steiner, H.M.; Stoker, D.P.; Strovink, M.

    1984-07-01

    The parameter xi, which characterizes the anisotropy of the emitted electrons relative to the spin direction of the muon, is a sensitive indicator of possible V+A admixtures to the dominant V-A weak interaction responsible for muon decay. We report here new results relating to the measurement of xi based on an experiment performed with a highly polarized surface muon beam at the TRIUMF cyclotron. The muons were stopped in thin metal foils in order to minimize depolarization effects. A spectrometer consisting of magnets and position sensitive detectors was tuned to accept electrons near the end point of the decay spectrum. Two largely independent methods were used to determine xi. In the first we measured the rate of positrons emitted in a direction opposite to the muon's spin as a function of their momentum when the stopping target was immersed in a 1.1 T longitudinal magnetic field. In the second method the stopping muons were subjected to a weak transverse magnetic field and the amplitude of their spin precession oscillation was used to determine xi. Based on the results from both methods lower limits on the mass of an intermediate vector boson which couples to right-handed weak currents are 400 GeV/c/sup 2/ when no constraints are placed on W/sub L/ - W/sub R/ mixing and 470 GeV/c/sup 2/ if mixing is assumed to be absent. These limits represent about an order of magnitude improvement over those obtained from previous measurements of xi. We have used the same apparatus to measure the anisotropic shape parameter delta. Preliminary results are consistent with the expected value of 3/4 with errors that are a factor of two smaller than previous measurements.

  12. A Statistical Study of the Global Structure of the Ring Current

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgensen, A. M.; Spence, H. E.; Hughes, W. J.; Singer, H. J.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we derive the average configuration of the ring current as a function of the state of the magnetosphere as indicated by the Dst index. We sort magnetic field data from the Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) by spatial location and by the Dst index in order to produce magnetic field maps. From these maps we calculate local current systems by taking the curl of the magnetic field. NN7e find both the westward (outer) and the eastward (inner) components of the ring current. We find that the ring current intensity varies linearly with D.St as expected, and that the ring current is asymmetric for all Dst values. The azimuthal peak of the ring current is located in the afternoon sector for quiet conditions, and near midnight for disturbed conditions. The ring current also moves closer to the Earth during disturbed conditions. We are able to recreate the Dst index by integrating the magnetic perturbations caused by the ring current. We find that we needed to apply a 20 nT offset to Dst, and assume a perfectly conducting Earth to obtain an optimal agreement between the computed and the observed Dst. We interpret the 20 nT offset as the magnetic field generated by the quiet time ring current used as baseline in computing Dst.

  13. Search for right-handed currents in muon decay

    SciTech Connect

    Stoker, D.P.

    1983-09-01

    Limits are reported on right-handed currents, based on precise measurement of the e/sup +/ spetrum end point in ..mu../sup +/ decay. Highly polarized muons from the TRIUMF surface beam were stopped in metal foils within a 1.1 T spin-holding longitudinal field or a 70 G spin-precessing field. For the spin-held data, the V-A rate vanishes in the beam direction at the end point. Measurement of this sets the 90% confidence limits xi P/sub mu/delta/rho > 0.9959 and M(W/sub R/) > 380 GeV, where W/sub R/ is the possible right-handed gauge boson. The ..mu.. SR signal amplitude of the spin-precessed data independently sets the limits xi P/sub ..mu../delta/rho > 0.9918 and M(W/sub R/) > 320 GeV. Limits on non-(V-A) currents, familons, and composite leptons are also presented. 27 references.

  14. The plasma environment, charge state, and currents of Saturn's C and D rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, G. R.

    1991-01-01

    The charge state and associated currents of Saturn's C an D rings are studied by modeling the flow of ionospheric plasma from the mid- to low-latitude ionosphere to the vicinity of the rings. It is found that the plasma density near the C and D rings, at a given radial location, will experience a one to two order of magnitude diurnal variation. The surface charge density (SCD) of these rings can show significant radial and azimuthal variations due mainly to variation in the plasma density. The SCD also depends on structural features of the rings such as thickness and the nature of the particle size distribution. The associated azimuthal currents carried by these rings also show large diurnal variations resulting in field-aligned currents which close in the ionosphere. The resulting ionospheric electric field will probably not produce a significant amount of plasma convection in the topside ionosphere and inner plasmasphere.

  15. Strong Pitch-Angle Diffusion of the Ring Current Ions Induced by Electromagnetic ion Cyclotron Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamayunov, K. V.; Khazanov, G. V.

    2005-12-01

    Deep and intense circulation of the magnetospheric plasma during geomagnetic storm is building up an energy content of the terrestrial ring current (RC) to an unusually high level, and the RC intensity strongly influence the storm-time space weather. The recovery of Dst index takes place hours or days after Dst minimum, and is caused by the decay of magnetopause and magnetotail current systems, and removal of the RC ions due to charge exchange, convection through the dayside magnetopause, Coulomb scattering, RC interaction with electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves, and scattering by field-line curvature. During the early recovery phase, the RC loss rate is about one hour or less, and it is more rapid than charge exchange can support. Ion scattering into the loss cone by EMIC waves is believed to be responsible for such fast RC decay during this storm stage. However, most RC-EMIC wave interaction models do not predict the strong pitch-angle diffusion that is theoretically discussed and observed in the Earth magnetosphere (particularly by SEPS detectors on board of the POLAR satellite). In present work, we employ our self-consistent RC-EMIC wave model in order to study systematically the occurrence of the RC strong pitch-angle diffusion caused by interaction with waves during the May 1998 storm. Most of cases of the strong diffusion and of the intense EMIC waves are located in the afternoon-premidnight MLT sector at 3 < L < 6, and exhibit significant linear correlation. During the early recovery phase (at about 08 UT on May 4), the entire RC energy range (less than 450 keV) is subject to strong pitch-angle diffusion. Although the flux transitions between trapped zone and loss cone are steeper for higher energy RC protons than for main body of the distribution function, the pitch-angle distributions are highly isotropic for all energies both inside and outside of the loss cone.

  16. Search for flavor-changing-neutral-current D meson decays

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Aguilo, E.; Ahn, S.H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; /Buenos Aires U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Rio de Janeiro State U. /Sao Paulo, IFT /Alberta U. /Simon Fraser U. /York U., Canada /McGill U. /Hefei, CUST /Andes U., Bogota /Charles U.

    2007-08-01

    We study the flavor-changing-neutral-current process c {yields} u{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} using 1.3 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV recorded by the D0 detector operating at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. We see clear indications of the D{sup +}{sub s} and D{sup +} {yields} {phi}{pi}{sup +} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} final states with significance greater than four standard deviations above background for the D{sup +} state. We search for the continuum decay of D{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} in the dimuon invariant mass spectrum away from the {phi} resonance. We see no evidence of signal above background and set a limit of B(D{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}) < 3.9 x 10{sup -6} at the 90% CL. This limit places the most stringent constraint on new phenomena in the c {yields} u{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} transition.

  17. Comparison study of ring current simulations with and without bubble injections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jian; Toffoletto, Frank R.; Wolf, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    For many years, stand-alone ring current models have been successfully producing storm time ring current enhancements without specifying explicit localized transient injections along their outer boundaries. However, both observations and simulations have suggested that the frequent burst flows or bubble injections can contribute substantially to the storm time ring current energy. In this paper, we investigate the difference in the spatial and temporal development of the ring current distribution with and without bubble injections using the Rice Convection Model-Equilibrium. The comparison study indicates that the simulation with bubble effects smoothed out along geosynchronous orbit can predict approximately the same large-scale ring current pressure distribution and electric potential pattern as the simulation with bubble effects included. Our results suggest that the increase of the hot plasma population along geosynchronous orbit can be envisaged as an integrated effect of bubble injections from the near-Earth plasma sheet. However, the observed fluctuations in the plasma population and electric field can only be captured when the mesoscale injections are included in the simulation. We also confirmed again that adiabatic convection of fully populated flux tubes cannot inject the ring current from the middle plasma sheet. The paper provides a justification for using stand-alone ring current models in the inner magnetosphere to simulate magnetic storms, without explicit consideration of bubbles and magnetic buoyancy effects inside geosynchronous orbit.

  18. Equatorial transport of Saturn's ionosphere as driven by a dust-ring current system

    SciTech Connect

    Ip, W.; Mendis, D.A.

    1983-03-01

    The diurnal modulation of the dust ring current of Saturn's D-ring causes field-aligned Birkeland currents ot flow near the dawn and dusk terminators and close across the mid-latitude ionosphere. One consequence of this current system is the establishment of a global convection pattern in the equatorial outer ionosphere. Outward motion of the dayside ionosheric plasma as well as the corresponding absorption effect of the inner ring system might be one physical cause of the depletion of the ionospheric content of Saturn.

  19. On the equatorial transport of Saturn's ionosphere as driven by a dust-ring current system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ip, W.-H.; Mendis, D. A.

    1983-01-01

    The diurnal modulation of the dust ring current of Saturn's D-ring causes field-aligned Birkeland currents to flow near the dawn and dusk terminators and close across the midlatitude ionosphere. One consequence of this current system is the establishment of a global convection pattern in the equatorial outer ionosphere. Outward motion of the dayside ionospheric plasma as well as the corresponding absorption effect of the inner ring system might be one physical cause of the depletion of the ionospheric content of Saturn.

  20. On the equatorial transport of Saturn's ionosphere as driven by a dust-ring current system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ip, W.-H.; Mendis, D. A.

    1983-03-01

    The diurnal modulation of the dust ring current of Saturn's D-ring causes field-aligned Birkeland currents to flow near the dawn and dusk terminators and close across the mid-latitude ionosphere. One consequence of this current system is the establishment of a global convection pattern in the equatorial outer ionosphere. Outward motion of the dayside ionospheric plasma as well as the corresponding absorption effect of the inner ring system might be one physical cause of the depletion of the ionospheric content of Saturn.

  1. Measurements of the persistent current decay and snapback effect in Tevatron dipole magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Velev, G.V.; Bauer, P.; DiMarco, J.; Hanft, R.; Lamm, M.; Schlabach, P.; Sylvester, C.; Tartaglia, M.; Tompkins, J.C.; /Fermilab

    2006-08-01

    A systematic study of the persistent current decay and snapback effect in the fields of Tevatron accelerator dipoles was performed at the Fermilab Magnet Test Facility (MTF). The decay and snapback were measured under a range of conditions including variations of the current ramp parameters and magnet operational history. The study has mostly focused on the dynamic behavior of the normal sextupole component. In addition, the paper presents the persistent current effects observed in the other allowed field harmonics as well. The results provide new information about the previously observed ''excess'' decay during the first several seconds of the sextupole decay during injection and the correlation between the snapback amplitude and its duration.

  2. Nuclear cascades in Saturn's rings - Cosmic ray albedo neutron decay and origins of trapped protons in the inner magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, J. F.

    1983-05-01

    The nearly equatorial trajectory of the Pioneer 11 spacecraft through Saturn's high energy proton radiation belts and under the main A-B-C rings provided a unique opportunity to study the radial dependence of the greater than 30 MeV proton intensities in the belts in terms of models for secondary nucleon production by cosmic ray interactions in the rings, in situ proton injection in the radiation belts by neutron beta decay, magnetospheric diffusion, and absorption by planetary rings and satellites. Maximum trapped proton intensities measured by Pioneer 11 in the radiation belts are compared with calculated intensities and found consistent with trapping times of roughly 40 years and a radial diffusion coefficient of about 10 to the -15th L to the 9th Rs squared/s. Differential energy spectra proportional to E to the -2 estimated from integral measurements of trapped photons with E greater than 100 MeV are consistent with the beta decay model, but an inferred turndown of the spectra toward lower energies and reported integral proton anisotropies of a specified form both indicate the need for more realistic calculations of the neutron source from the rings and the radiation belt loss processes.

  3. Self-Consistent Ring Current/Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Gamayunov, K. V.; Gallagher, D. L.

    2006-01-01

    The self-consistent treatment of the RC ion dynamics and EMIC waves, which are thought to exert important influences on the ion dynamical evolution, is an important missing element in our understanding of the storm-and recovery-time ring current evolution. For example, the EMlC waves cause the RC decay on a time scale of about one hour or less during the main phase of storms. The oblique EMIC waves damp due to Landau resonance with the thermal plasmaspheric electrons, and subsequent transport of the dissipating wave energy into the ionosphere below causes an ionosphere temperature enhancement. Under certain conditions, relativistic electrons, with energies 21 MeV, can be removed from the outer radiation belt by EMIC wave scattering during a magnetic storm. That is why the modeling of EMIC waves is critical and timely issue in magnetospheric physics. This study will generalize the self-consistent theoretical description of RC ions and EMIC waves that has been developed by Khazanov et al. [2002, 2003] and include the heavy ions and propagation effects of EMIC waves in the global dynamic of self-consistent RC - EMIC waves coupling. The results of our newly developed model that will be presented at the meeting, focusing mainly on the dynamic of EMIC waves and comparison of these results with the previous global RC modeling studies devoted to EMIC waves formation. We also discuss RC ion precipitations and wave induced thermal electron fluxes into the ionosphere.

  4. The two-way relationship between ionospheric outflow and the ring current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welling, D. T.; Jordanova, V. K.; Glocer, A.; Toth, G.; Liemohn, M. W.; Weimer, D. R.

    2015-06-01

    It is now well established that the ionosphere, because it acts as a significant source of plasma, plays a critical role in ring current dynamics. However, because the ring current deposits energy into the ionosphere, the inverse may also be true: the ring current can play a critical role in the dynamics of ionospheric outflow. This study uses a set of coupled, first-principles-based numerical models to test the dependence of ionospheric outflow on ring current-driven region 2 field-aligned currents (FACs). A moderate magnetospheric storm event is modeled with the Space Weather Modeling Framework using a global MHD code (Block Adaptive Tree Solar wind Roe-type Upwind Scheme, BATS-R-US), a polar wind model (Polar Wind Outflow Model), and a bounce-averaged kinetic ring current model (ring current atmosphere interaction model with self-consistent magnetic field, RAM-SCB). Initially, each code is two-way coupled to all others except for RAM-SCB, which receives inputs from the other models but is not allowed to feed back pressure into the MHD model. The simulation is repeated with pressure coupling activated, which drives strong pressure gradients and region 2 FACs in BATS-R-US. It is found that the region 2 FACs increase heavy ion outflow by up to 6 times over the noncoupled results. The additional outflow further energizes the ring current, establishing an ionosphere-magnetosphere mass feedback loop. This study further demonstrates that ionospheric outflow is not merely a plasma source for the magnetosphere but an integral part in the nonlinear ionosphere-magnetosphere-ring current system.

  5. The two-way relationship between ionospheric outflow and the ring current

    SciTech Connect

    Welling, Daniel T.; Jordanova, Vania Koleva; Glocer, Alex; Toth, Gabor; Liemohn, Michael W.; Weimer, Dan R.

    2015-06-01

    It is now well established that the ionosphere, because it acts as a significant source of plasma, plays a critical role in ring current dynamics. However, because the ring current deposits energy into the ionosphere, the inverse may also be true: the ring current can play a critical role in the dynamics of ionospheric outflow. This study uses a set of coupled, first-principles-based numerical models to test the dependence of ionospheric outflow on ring current-driven region 2 field-aligned currents (FACs). A moderate magnetospheric storm event is modeled with the Space Weather Modeling Framework using a global MHD code (Block Adaptive Tree Solar wind Roe-type Upwind Scheme, BATS-R-US), a polar wind model (Polar Wind Outflow Model), and a bounce-averaged kinetic ring current model (ring current atmosphere interaction model with self-consistent magnetic field, RAM-SCB). Initially, each code is two-way coupled to all others except for RAM-SCB, which receives inputs from the other models but is not allowed to feed back pressure into the MHD model. The simulation is repeated with pressure coupling activated, which drives strong pressure gradients and region 2 FACs in BATS-R-US. It is found that the region 2 FACs increase heavy ion outflow by up to 6 times over the non-coupled results. The additional outflow further energizes the ring current, establishing an ionosphere-magnetosphere mass feedback loop. This study further demonstrates that ionospheric outflow is not merely a plasma source for the magnetosphere but an integral part in the nonlinear ionosphere-magnetosphere-ring current system.

  6. The two-way relationship between ionospheric outflow and the ring current

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Welling, Daniel T.; Jordanova, Vania Koleva; Glocer, Alex; Toth, Gabor; Liemohn, Michael W.; Weimer, Dan R.

    2015-06-01

    It is now well established that the ionosphere, because it acts as a significant source of plasma, plays a critical role in ring current dynamics. However, because the ring current deposits energy into the ionosphere, the inverse may also be true: the ring current can play a critical role in the dynamics of ionospheric outflow. This study uses a set of coupled, first-principles-based numerical models to test the dependence of ionospheric outflow on ring current-driven region 2 field-aligned currents (FACs). A moderate magnetospheric storm event is modeled with the Space Weather Modeling Framework using a global MHD code (Block Adaptivemore » Tree Solar wind Roe-type Upwind Scheme, BATS-R-US), a polar wind model (Polar Wind Outflow Model), and a bounce-averaged kinetic ring current model (ring current atmosphere interaction model with self-consistent magnetic field, RAM-SCB). Initially, each code is two-way coupled to all others except for RAM-SCB, which receives inputs from the other models but is not allowed to feed back pressure into the MHD model. The simulation is repeated with pressure coupling activated, which drives strong pressure gradients and region 2 FACs in BATS-R-US. It is found that the region 2 FACs increase heavy ion outflow by up to 6 times over the non-coupled results. The additional outflow further energizes the ring current, establishing an ionosphere-magnetosphere mass feedback loop. This study further demonstrates that ionospheric outflow is not merely a plasma source for the magnetosphere but an integral part in the nonlinear ionosphere-magnetosphere-ring current system.« less

  7. A nearly monochromatic cavity for high current storage rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Auria, Gerardo; Fabris, Alessandro; Massarotti, Antonio; Pasotti, Cristina; Rossi, Carlo; Svandrlik, Michele

    1993-06-01

    A strong damping of the higher order mode (HOM) spectrum of an RF cavity can be obtained by coupling appropriate waveguides directly to the cavity. This type of HOM suppression has been investigated at S.T. After studies and tests on different shapes of cavities, particularly on bell-shaped cavities, it has been decided to design a pill-box cavity for the ELETTRA Storage Ring. A prototype of this cavity has been produced with two waveguide suppressors coupled to it. The suppression effect on the HOM spectrum is described along with discussions on the vacuum window design and on the shape and the material for the waveguide load. The effects on the accelerating mode are shown as well.

  8. Large transient fault current test of an electrical roll ring. [for Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yenni, Edward J.; Birchenough, Arthur G.

    1991-01-01

    The Space Station Freedom uses precision rotary gimbals to provide for sun tracking of its photoelectric arrays. Electrical power, command signals, and data are transferred across the gimbals by roll rings. Roll rings have been shown to be capable of highly efficient electrical transmission and long life, through tests conducted at the NASA Lewis Research Center and Honeywell's Satellite and Space Systems Division in Phoenix, AZ. Large potential fault currents inherent to the power system's DC distribution architecture have brought about the need to evaluate the effects of large transient fault currents on roll rings. A test recently conducted at Lewis subjected a roll ring to a simulated worst case space station electrical fault. The system model used to obtain the fault profile is described, along with details of the reduced order circuit that was used to simulate the fault. Test results comparing roll ring performance before and after the fault are also presented.

  9. The eddy-current technique for nondestructive evaluation of generator retaining rings: Feasibility study: Interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Elmo, P.M.; Nottingham, L.D.

    1988-05-01

    An evaluation of the feasibility of using eddy current nondestructive inspection techniques to detect intergranular stress corrosion in generator rotor retaining rings was conducted by the EPRI NDE Center. Experiments were conducted using a bend-bar containing representative stress corrosion damage, a calibration block containing electrical discharge machined (EDM) notches, and four retired retaining rings containing EDM notches and stress corrosion damage. An eddy current transducer transport was designed and fabricated to interface with an existing computer-controlled, two-axis positioner and digital eddy current data acquisition system. Test results of experiments performed with this equipment on the retaining ring test-bed provided experimental validation of the eddy current method's feasibility as a retaining ring inspection method. Details are given of the system and its performance under laboratory and simulated service-inspection conditions. 9 refs., 47 figs.

  10. Geomagnetic Tail and Ring Current Dynamics and Structure during July 6, 2013 magnetic storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarkov, Ilya

    According to THEMIS and POES satellites the structure and spatial dimensions of ring current and geotal current system are restored. Using models of the main magnetic field of Earth (IGRF-11) and a magnetospheric magnetic field (A2000), the magnetic field of the currents other than the tail and the ring currents was subtracted from measurements. The hourly analysis of dynamics and position of current system of a tail was carried out. Evolution of ring current is estimated by data fluxes of STEB particles, measured by POES satellites at low latitudes. Isotropic boundary, determined by data of POES satellites, was projected to equatorial plane and compared with position of the inner edge of geomagnetic tail current, obtained from THEMIS measurements.

  11. Protons as the prime contributors to the storm time ring current. [measured from Explorer 45

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berko, F. W.; Cahill, L. J., Jr.; Fritz, T. A.

    1974-01-01

    Following a large magnetic storm (17 June 1972), Explorer 45 measured the equatorial particle populations and magnetic field. Using data obtained during the symmetic recovery phase, it is shown that through a series of self-consistent calculations, the measured protons with energies from 1 to 872 keV, can account for the observed ring current magnetic effects within experimental uncertainities. This enables an upper limit to be set for the heavy ion contribution to the storm time ring current.

  12. The Plasma Physics Processes that Drive Ring Current Enhancements during Geomagnetic Storms and Substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cash, Michele Diane

    Geomagnetic storms result when energetic particles of solar and ionospheric origin fill Earth's inner magnetosphere and create a strong westward current, known as the ring current. This dissertation presents results from investigating the plasma dynamics that contribute to the development of Earth's ring current from ionospheric outflow of H+ and O+ ions, and the role of ring current enhancements in the generation of geomagnetic storms and substorms. Modeling was carried via a combined multifluid and particle approach, which enables us to resolve the small-scale dynamics that are key to particle energization within the context of the global magnetosphere. The results presented in this dissertation substantially contribute to our understanding of the development and composition of the ring current during geomagnetic storms and substorms, and offer insight into the ionospheric sources regions for ring current ions, as well as the processes through which these particles are energized, injected, and trapped within the inner magnetosphere. This thesis presents results that show how small-scale particle dynamics within the current sheet, boundary layers, and reconnection regions drive the acceleration of ring current particles within the larger global context of the magnetosphere. Small-scale structures within the magnetotail are shown to be more important in determining when particles are accelerated than the time after particles are initialized in the ionosphere. It is also found that after a period of southward IMF, in which particle energization is observed, a northerly turning of the IMF is necessary in order to trap energetic particles in orbit around the Earth and form a symmetric ring current. Asymmetries in the acceleration mechanisms between ionospheric H+ and O + ions were observed with oxygen ions convecting duskward according to the cross-tail current and gaining more energy than protons, which moved earthward on reconnecting field lines and were accelerated

  13. Concentric rings of polystyrene and titanium dioxide nanoparticles patterned by alternating current signal guided coffee ring effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Jinhua; Lin, Peng; Xia, Qiangfei

    2014-06-01

    The authors studied the surface deposition of nanoparticles by introducing an alternating current (AC) signal into the millimeter-sized nanoparticle droplet. For both polystyrene (PS) in deionized (DI) water and titanium dioxide (TiO2) in toluene, the nanoparticles self-assembled into regular concentric rings over a larger area on the substrate during the droplet drying process. The patterned area decreased, and the inter-ring spacing increased with higher AC frequencies for the TiO2/toluene system, while those for the PS/DI water system only changed slightly. The frequency dependent pattern formation was interpreted by the interaction between different factors such as capillary flow and the AC signal introduced dielectrophoresis force.

  14. The plasma environment, charge state, and currents of Saturn's C and D rings

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, G.R. )

    1991-06-01

    The plasma environment of the Saturnian C and D rings is investigated by modeling the flow of ionospheric plasma from the mid- to low-latitude ionosphere to the vicinity of the rings. The model used is time-dependent and kinetic and incorporates the gravitational, centripetal, magnetic mirror and ambipolar electric forces. It was found that the plasma density near the C and D rings, at a given radial location, will experience a one to two order of magnitude diurnal variation. With a knowledge of the plasma density and temperature near these rings their charge state is investigated by use of a dust cloud charging model. The associated azimuthal currents are also found. Results show that the surface charge density of the C and D rings can show significant radial and azimuthal variations, due mainly to variations in the plasma density. In addition to its plasma density and temperature dependence the surface charge density will also depend on structural features of the rings such as the ring thickness and the nature of the particle size distribution. Its magnitude may vary over seven decades. The associated azimuthal currents carried by these rings will also show large diurnal variations resulting in field-aligned currents which close in the ionosphere as shown by Ip and Mendis (1983). However, the resulting ionospheric electric fields will probably not produce a significant amount of plasma convection in the topside ionosphere and inner plasmasphere as proposed by these authors, due in part to the level of the currents as well as the height-integrated Pedersen conductivities at the local times where the currents close.

  15. Current-induced SQUID behavior of superconducting Nb nano-rings

    PubMed Central

    Sharon, Omri J.; Shaulov, Avner; Berger, Jorge; Sharoni, Amos; Yeshurun, Yosef

    2016-01-01

    The critical temperature in a superconducting ring changes periodically with the magnetic flux threading it, giving rise to the well-known Little-Parks magnetoresistance oscillations. Periodic changes of the critical current in a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID), consisting of two Josephson junctions in a ring, lead to a different type of magnetoresistance oscillations utilized in detecting extremely small changes in magnetic fields. Here we demonstrate current-induced switching between Little-Parks and SQUID magnetoresistance oscillations in a superconducting nano-ring without Josephson junctions. Our measurements in Nb nano-rings show that as the bias current increases, the parabolic Little-Parks magnetoresistance oscillations become sinusoidal and eventually transform into oscillations typical of a SQUID. We associate this phenomenon with the flux-induced non-uniformity of the order parameter along a superconducting nano-ring, arising from the superconducting leads (‘arms’) attached to it. Current enhanced phase slip rates at the points with minimal order parameter create effective Josephson junctions in the ring, switching it into a SQUID. PMID:27321733

  16. Current-induced SQUID behavior of superconducting Nb nano-rings.

    PubMed

    Sharon, Omri J; Shaulov, Avner; Berger, Jorge; Sharoni, Amos; Yeshurun, Yosef

    2016-01-01

    The critical temperature in a superconducting ring changes periodically with the magnetic flux threading it, giving rise to the well-known Little-Parks magnetoresistance oscillations. Periodic changes of the critical current in a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID), consisting of two Josephson junctions in a ring, lead to a different type of magnetoresistance oscillations utilized in detecting extremely small changes in magnetic fields. Here we demonstrate current-induced switching between Little-Parks and SQUID magnetoresistance oscillations in a superconducting nano-ring without Josephson junctions. Our measurements in Nb nano-rings show that as the bias current increases, the parabolic Little-Parks magnetoresistance oscillations become sinusoidal and eventually transform into oscillations typical of a SQUID. We associate this phenomenon with the flux-induced non-uniformity of the order parameter along a superconducting nano-ring, arising from the superconducting leads ('arms') attached to it. Current enhanced phase slip rates at the points with minimal order parameter create effective Josephson junctions in the ring, switching it into a SQUID. PMID:27321733

  17. Current-induced SQUID behavior of superconducting Nb nano-rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharon, Omri J.; Shaulov, Avner; Berger, Jorge; Sharoni, Amos; Yeshurun, Yosef

    2016-06-01

    The critical temperature in a superconducting ring changes periodically with the magnetic flux threading it, giving rise to the well-known Little-Parks magnetoresistance oscillations. Periodic changes of the critical current in a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID), consisting of two Josephson junctions in a ring, lead to a different type of magnetoresistance oscillations utilized in detecting extremely small changes in magnetic fields. Here we demonstrate current-induced switching between Little-Parks and SQUID magnetoresistance oscillations in a superconducting nano-ring without Josephson junctions. Our measurements in Nb nano-rings show that as the bias current increases, the parabolic Little-Parks magnetoresistance oscillations become sinusoidal and eventually transform into oscillations typical of a SQUID. We associate this phenomenon with the flux-induced non-uniformity of the order parameter along a superconducting nano-ring, arising from the superconducting leads (‘arms’) attached to it. Current enhanced phase slip rates at the points with minimal order parameter create effective Josephson junctions in the ring, switching it into a SQUID.

  18. The NICS-XY-scan: identification of local and global ring currents in multi-ring systems.

    PubMed

    Gershoni-Poranne, Renana; Stanger, Amnon

    2014-05-01

    Nucleus-independent chemical shift (NICS)-based methods are very popular for the determination of the induced magnetic field under an external magnetic field. These methods are used mostly (but not only) for the determination of the aromaticity and antiaromaticity of molecules and ions, both qualitatively and quantitatively. The ghost atom that serves as the NICS probe senses the induced magnetic field and reports it in the form of an NMR chemical shift. However, the source of the field cannot be determined by NICS. Thus, in a multi-ring system that may contain more than one induced current circuit (and therefore more than one source of the induced magnetic field) the NICS value may represent the sum of many induced magnetic fields. This may lead to wrong assignments of the aromaticity (and antiaromaticity) of the systems under study. In this paper, we present a NICS-based method for the determination of local and global ring currents in conjugated multi-ring systems. The method involves placing the NICS probes along the X axis, and if needed, along the Y axis, at a constant height above the system under study. Following the change in the induced field along these axes allows the identification of global and local induced currents. The best NICS type to use for these scans is NICSπZZ , but it is shown that at a height of 1.7 Å above the molecular plane, NICSZZ provides the same qualitative picture. This method, namely the NICS-XY-scan, gives information equivalent to that obtained through current density analysis methods, and in some cases, provides even more details. PMID:24677667

  19. On the Role of Global Magnetic Field Configuration in Affecting Ring Current Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, Y.; Zaharia, S. G.; Fok, M. H.

    2010-01-01

    Plasma and field interaction is one important aspect of inner magnetospheric physics. The magnetic field controls particle motion through gradient, curvature drifts and E cross B drift. In this presentation, we show how the global magnetic field affects dynamics of the ring current through simulations of two moderate geomagnetic storms (20 November 2007 and 8-9 March 2008). Preliminary results of coupling the Comprehensive Ring Current Model (CRCM) with a three-dimensional plasma force balance code (to achieve self-consistency in both E and B fields) indicate that inclusion of self-consistency in B tends to mitigate the intensification of the ring current as other similar coupling efforts have shown. In our approach, self-consistency in the electric field is already an existing capability of the CRCM. The magnetic self-consistency is achieved by computing the three-dimensional magnetic field in force balance with anisotropic ring current ion distributions. We discuss the coupling methodology and its further improvement. In addition, comparative studies by using various magnetic field models will be shown. Simulation results will be put into a global context by analyzing the morphology of the ring current, its anisotropy and characteristics ofthe interconnected region 2 field-aligned currents.

  20. Impact of Ring Current Ions on Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Wave Dispersion Relation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Gamayunov, K. V.

    2007-01-01

    Effect of the ring current ions in the real part of electromagnetic ion Cyclotron wave dispersion relation is studied on global scale. Recent Cluster observations by Engebretson et al. showed that although the temperature anisotropy of is energetic (> 10 keV) ring current protons was high during the entire 22 November 2003 perigee pass, electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves were observed only in conjunction with intensification of the ion fluxes below 1 keV by over an order of magnitude. To study the effect of the ring current ions on the wave dispersive properties and the corresponding global wave redistribution, we use a self-consistent model of interacting ring current and electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves, and simulate the May 1998 storm. The main findings of our simulation can be summarized as follows: First, the plasma density enhancement in the night MLT sector during the main and recovery storm phases is mostly caused by injection of suprathermal plasma sheet H + (approximately < 1 keV), which dominate the thermal plasma density. Second, during the recovery storm phases, the ring current modification of the wave dispersion relation leads to a qualitative change of the wave patterns in the postmidnight-dawn sector for L > 4.75. This "new" wave activity is well organized by outward edges of dense suprathermal ring current spots, and the waves are not observed if the ring current ions are not included in the real part of dispersion relation. Third, the most intense wave-induced ring current precipitation is located in the night MLT sector and caused by modification of the wave dispersion relation. The strongest precipitating fluxes of about 8 X 10(exp 6)/ (cm(exp 2) - s X st) are found near L=5.75, MLT=2 during the early recovery phase on 4 May. Finally, the nightside precipitation is more intense than the dayside fluxes, even if there are less intense waves, because the convection field moves ring current ions into the loss cone on the nightside, but drives

  1. Nuclear Structure and Decay Data: Current Status and Future Perspectives

    SciTech Connect

    Kondev, Filip G.; Tuli, Jagdish K.

    2006-03-13

    The nuclear structure databases provide physicists around the world with a useful collection of reliable and well documented datasets. The Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF) database, produced by the International Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Network (NSDD) under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), contains evaluated experimental information for all known nuclei. The bibliographical database Nuclear Science References (NSR) provides references to published data in the field of Nuclear Physics. The Experimental Unevaluated Nuclear Data List (XUNDL) provides a method for rapid access to formatted (compiled) data from recently published articles. Detailed information regarding these databases, as well as other products and services, can be found at the National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC) and IAEA web portals.

  2. Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, R.L.

    1989-01-01

    The essence of vortex physics is that at certain low-energy scales elementary excitations of a point particle theory can behave like strings rather than particles. Vortices are the resulting string-like solutions; their thickness sets the distance scale beyond which physics is string-like rather than particle-like. String degrees of freedom are massless in the sense that excitations on a string can have an arbitrarily low frequency. Non-string degrees of freedom correspond to massive particles and are absent from the low energy spectrum. This article considers only field theories with vortices at low energies. The possible existence of a class of solitons in these vortex theories will be discussed. They are vortex rings: they are localized and finite in energy, and able to carry the quantum numbers of point particles. Rings are thus particle-like solutions of a vortex theory, which is itself a limit of a point particle field theory.

  3. Ultra-sensitive silicon photonic current sensor using a ring resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Bing; Zhao, Changyun; Wang, Gencheng; Dai, Tingge; Wang, Yuehai; Yang, Jianyi; Li, Yubo

    2016-08-01

    We proposed and experimentally investigated a compact and ultra-sensitive integrated photonic current sensor based on a silicon ring resonator in this paper. The current flowing through the integrated resistive TiN heater produces the Joule’s heat and changes the temperature, which results in the change of refractive index and physical dimensions of the ring. An optical spectrum analyzer is used to monitor the resonant wavelength shift of the ring. The experiment results show that the sensor achieves an ultra-high sensitivity of 6.8 × 104 nm A‑2 and good linearity between real-time current and wavelength shift in the test range of 0–10 mA.

  4. Role of Plasma Sheet Source Population in Ring Current Dynamics (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordanova, V.; Yu, Y.; Reeves, G. D.; Kletzing, C.; Spence, H.; Sazykin, S. Y.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the dynamics of ring current particles during disturbed conditions remains a long-standing challenge, moreover these particles represent a seed population for the hazardous radiation belts. The formation of the storm-time ring current depends on two main factors: 1) the plasma sheet as a reservoir supplying particles that are transported earthward, and 2) the electric field as a mechanism that energizes them. To investigate ring current development on a global scale, we use our four-dimensional (4-D) ring current-atmosphere interactions model (RAM-SCB) [Jordanova et al., 2010; Zaharia et al., 2010] which solves the kinetic equation for H+, O+, and He+ ions and electrons using a self-consistently calculated magnetic field in force balance with the anisotropic ring current plasma pressure. The model boundary was recently expanded from geosynchronous orbit to 9 RE, where the plasma boundary conditions are specified from the empirical plasma sheet model TM03 [Tsyganenko and Mukai, 2003] based on Geotail data. We simulate the transport, acceleration, and loss of energetic particles from the magnetotail to the inner magnetosphere during several geomagnetic storms that occurred since the launch of the Van Allen Probes in August 2012. We compare our results with simultaneous plasma and field observations from the Energetic particle, Composition, and Thermal plasma (ECT) [Spence et al., 2013] and the Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) [Kletzing et al., 2013] investigations on the Van Allen Probes. We investigate the role of the plasma sheet source population in global ring current simulations considering various boundary conditions and electric field formulations. An improved understanding of the highly coupled inner magnetosphere system is provided.

  5. The role of substorms in the formation of the ring current

    SciTech Connect

    Rostoker, G.

    1996-07-01

    It has long been recognized that the formation of the terrestrial ring current is accompanied by strong substorm expansive phase activity in the auroral oval. While large amplitude substorm activity seems to be a prerequisite for ring current formation to take place, it has long been puzzling as to why some large amplitude substorm activity in the auroral oval is not associated with significant ring current development. In this paper I shall outline the basis for the renovated boundary layer dynamics model of magnetospheric substorms showing how the onset of the substorm expansive phase can be associated with a sudden decrease in shielding space charge in the region of the near-Earth plasma sheet threaded by Region 2 field-aligned currents. I shall suggest that an episode of sufficiently large southward IMF lasting over a sufficiently lengthy period of time can lead to a sequence of substorm expansive phases, each one being initiated closer to the Earth than the previous one. Each expansive phase is attributed to a sudden decrease in radially localized cross-tail current (viz. a decrease in shielding space charge) and with each onset the inner edge of the plasma sheet moves inward. The inductive electric field associated with each crosstail current decrease is responsible for the acceleration of already energetic particles to energies of significance for ring current formation. Only when the inner edge of the crosstail current is sufficiently close to the Earth do the acceleration processes associated with substorm onset produce a long lived ring current. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. An alternative analysis of low- and high-altitude observations of ring current ions during a storm recovery phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, L. R.

    1977-01-01

    Explorer 45 equatorial observations of ring current ions during a storm recovery phase have shown pitch angle distributions and decay rates inconsistent with proton charge exchange with neutral hydrogen. This inconsistency has led to the suggestion that recovery phase ring current ions at L less than or equal to 4 and energies not greater than 50 keV are dominated by He(+) rather than protons. The absence of He(+) on flux tubes from which H(+) and O(+) were precipitating in ion mass spectrometer measurements made during the same period by the low-altitude polar-orbiting satellite 1971-089A led Sharp et al. to suggest a source of H(+) and O(+) to L = 3 during this period. An alternative explanation, in which the magnetic field lines labeled L = 3 at the earth's surface near local midnight were mapped to about 3.7 earth radii in the equatorial plane during the storm recovery phase and during the period of enhanced activity, is proposed. If the proposed explanation is correct, the observations of Sharp et al. are not incompatible with the conclusion that the recovery phase ions at less than 50 keV were dominated by He(+) for L not greater than 3.7.

  7. Sensitivity to electronvolt-scale sterile neutrinos at a 3.8-GeV/c muon decay ring

    SciTech Connect

    Tunnell, Christopher D.

    2013-03-01

    The liquid-scintillator neutrino-detector (LSND) and mini booster neutrino experiment (MiniBooNE) experiments claim to observe the oscillation $\\bar{v}$μ → $\\bar{v}$e, which can only be explained by additional neutrinos and is a claim that must be further tested. This thesis proposes a new accelerator and experiment called neutrinos from stored muons ( STORM) to refute or confirm the oscillation these claims by studying the CPT-equivalent channel ve → vμ . A 3.8-GeV/c muon decay ring is proposed with neutrino detectors placed 20 m and 2000 m from the decay ring. The detector technology would be a magnetized iron sampling calorimeter, where the magnetic field is induced by a superconducting transmission line. In a frequentist study, the sensitivity of this experiment after 5 years would be >10σ . The range of the thesis discussion starts with the proton front-end design and ends with neutrino parameter estimation. After describing the phenomenology of sterile neutrinos, the facility and detector performance work is presented. Finally, the systematics are explained before the sensitivity and parameter-estimation works are explained

  8. Energy content of stormtime ring current from phase space mapping simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, M.W.; Schulz, M.; Lyons, L.R.

    1993-08-20

    The authors perform a model study to account for the increase in energy content of the trapped-particle population which occurs during the main phase of major geomagnetic storms. They consider stormtime particle transport in the equatorial region of the magnetosphere. They start with a phase space distribution of the ring current before the storm, created by a steady state transport model. They then use a previously developed guiding center particle simulation to map the stormtime ring current phase space, following Liouville's theorem. This model is able to account for the ten to twenty fold increase in energy content of magnetospheric ions during the storm.

  9. Spin polarized current from multiply-coupled rings with Zeeman-split quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Hedin, Eric R.; Joe, Yong S.

    2014-03-21

    We investigate transmission resonances and conductance properties of multiple, serially connected, direct-contact nanoscale rings using the tight-binding model. Quantum dots (QDs) are embedded in the two arms of each ring, and Zeeman-splitting of the QD energy levels is incorporated into the system Hamiltonian. Transmission bands develop as the number of rings in series increases, with a band-gap which is sensitive to the degree of Zeeman splitting and the initial settings of the QD site energy values. The current vs. voltage characteristics of the system can be modulated between Ohmic and semiconducting as a function of the Zeeman splitting. In addition, spin-polarized current results for selected ranges of the Fermi energy.

  10. Self-consistent Model of Magnetospheric Ring Current and Propagating Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves. 2. Wave Induced Ring Current Precipitation and Thermal Electron Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Gamayunov, K. V.; Gallagher, D. L.; Kozyra, J. U.; Liemohn, M. W.

    2007-01-01

    This paper continues presentation and discussion of the results from our new global self-consistent theoretical model of interacting ring current ions and propagating electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves [Khazanov et al., 2006]. To study the effects of electromagnetic ion cyclotron wave propagation and refraction on the wave induced ring current precipitation and heating of the thermal plasmaspheric electrons, we simulate the May 1998 storm. The main findings after a simulation can be summarized as follows. Firstly, the wave induced ring current precipitation exhibits quite a lot of fine structure, and is highly organized by location of the plasmapause gradient. The strongest fluxes of about 4 x 10(exp 6) (cm(raised dot) s(raised dot) sr(raised dot) (sup -1)) are observed during the maill and early recovery phases of the storm. The very interesting and probably more important finding is that in a number of cases the most intense precipitating fluxes are not connected to the most intense waves in simple manner. The characteristics of the wave power spectral density distribution over the wave normal angle are extremely crucial for the effectiveness of the ring current ion scattering. Secondly, comparison of the global proton precipitating patterns with the results from RAM [Kozyra et al., 1997a] reveals that although we observe a qualitative agreement between the localizations of the wave induced precipitations in the models, there is no quantitative agreement between the magnitudes of the fluxes. The quantitative differences are mainly due to a qualitative difference between the characteristics of the wave power spectral density distributions over the wave normal angle in RAM and in our model. Thirdly, the heat fluxes to plasmaspheric electrons caused by Landau resonate energy absorption from electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves are observed in the postnoon-premidnight MLT sector, and can reach the magnitude of 10(exp 11) eV/(cm(sup 2)(raised dot)s). The Coulomb

  11. Role of ULF Waves in Radiation Belt and Ring Current Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, I. R.; Murphy, K. R.; Rae, I. J.; Ozeke, L.; Milling, D. K.

    2013-12-01

    Ultra-low frequency (ULF) waves in the Pc4-5 band can be excited in the magnetosphere by the solar wind. Much recent work has shown how ULF wave power is strongly correlated with solar wind speed. However, little attention has been paid the dynamics of ULF wave power penetration onto low L-shells in the inner magnetosphere. We use more than a solar cycle of ULF wave data, derived from ground-based magnetometer networks, to examine this ULF wave power penetration and its dependence on solar wind and geomagnetic activity indices. In time domain data, we show very clearly that dayside ULF wave power, spanning more than 4 orders of magnitude, follows solar wind speed variations throughout the whole solar cycle - during periods of sporadic solar maximum ICMEs, during declining phase fast solar wind streams, and at solar minimum, alike. We also show that time domain ULF wave power increases during magnetic storms activations, and significantly demonstrate that a deeper ULF wave power penetration into the inner magnetosphere occurs during larger negative excursions in Dst. We discuss potential explanations for this low-L ULF wave power penetration, including the role of plasma mass density (such as during plasmaspheric erosion), or ring current ion instabilities during near-Earth ring current penetration. Interestingly, we also show that both ULF wave power and SAMPEX MeV electron flux show a remarkable similarity in their penetration to low-L, which suggests that ULF wave power penetration may be important for understanding and explaining radiation belt dynamics. Moreover, the correlation of ULF wave power with Dst, which peaks at one day lag, suggests the ULF waves might also be important for the inward transport of ions into the ring current. Current ring current models, which exclude long period ULF wave transport, under-estimate the ring current during fast solar wind streams which is consistent with a potential role for ULF waves in ring current energisation. The

  12. Lepton Universality, |V(Us)| and Search for Second Class Current in Tau Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Swagato; /Victoria U.

    2011-11-10

    Several hundred million {tau} decays have been studied with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. Recent results on Charged Current Lepton Universality and two independent measurements of |V{sub us}| using {tau}{sup -} {yields} e{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub e}{nu}{sub {tau}}, {mu}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {mu}}{nu}{sub {tau}}, {pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}, K{sup -} {nu}{sub {tau}} and K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -} {nu}{sub {tau}} decays, and a search for Second Class Current in {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -} {omega}{nu}{sub {tau}} decays are presented, where the charge conjugate decay modes are also implied.

  13. Theory of magnetospheric hydromagnetic waves excited by energetic ring-current protons

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Liu; Hasegawa, Akira

    1987-06-01

    A general theoretical formulation, allowing finite ion Larmor radii, general magnetic field geometries and plasma equilibria, has been developed to investigate excitations of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) Alfven waves within the earth's magnetosphere by the storm-time energetic ring-current protons. In particular, it is found that for adiabatically injected protons, various predicted instability properties are consistent with satellite observations. 8 refs.

  14. Dynamics and ions composition of the ring current during substorms: the Gorizont-35 results

    SciTech Connect

    Kovtyukh, A.S.; Martinenko, G.B.; Sosnovets, E.N.; Goryainov, M.F.; Savin, B.I.

    1996-07-01

    The geosynchronous satellite Gorizont-35 observations and analysis of the ring current H{sup +} (protons), He{sup 2+} ({alpha}-particles) and O{sup +} ions energy spectra variations near noon (11.30{plus_minus}01.30 LT) and midnight (23.30{plus_minus}01.30 LT) during substorms and storms (11{endash}25 March 1992) are presented. Measurements were made in the energy range {ital E}=41{endash}133 keV/e in seven channels ({Delta}{ital E}/{ital E}{approx_equal}0.1). It has been discovered that the O{sup +} ions are the main component of the ring current energy density during the period of the active Sun. The He{sup 2+} ions are the most dynamic component of the ring current (especially for {ital E}{lt}70 keV/e). At midnight the H{sup +}, He{sup 2+} and O{sup +} ions energy spectra are similar to the same energy per charge presentation form. The obtained data are compared with the AMPTE/CCE(CHEM) results. Formation of the space and energy features mentioned above and variations of ring current ions composition physical processes are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. On the contribution of plasma sheet bubbles to the storm time ring current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jian; Toffoletto, Frank R.; Wolf, Richard A.; Sazykin, Stanislav

    2015-09-01

    Particle injections occur frequently inside 10 Re during geomagnetic storms. They are commonly associated with bursty bulk flows or plasma sheet bubbles transported from the tail to the inner magnetosphere. Although observations and theoretical arguments have suggested that they may have an important role in storm time dynamics, this assertion has not been addressed quantitatively. In this paper, we investigate which process is dominant for the storm time ring current buildup: large-scale enhanced convection or localized bubble injections. We use the Rice Convection Model-Equilibrium (RCM-E) to model a series of idealized storm main phases. The boundary conditions at 14-15 Re on the nightside are adjusted to randomly inject bubbles to a degree roughly consistent with observed statistical properties. A test particle tracing technique is then used to identify the source of the ring current plasma. We find that the contribution of plasma sheet bubbles to the ring current energy increases from ~20% for weak storms to ~50% for moderate storms and levels off at ~61% for intense storms, while the contribution of trapped particles decreases from ~60% for weak storms to ~30% for moderate and ~21% for intense storms. The contribution of nonbubble plasma sheet flux tubes remains ~20% on average regardless of the storm intensity. Consistent with previous RCM and RCM-E simulations, our results show that the mechanisms for plasma sheet bubbles enhancing the ring current energy are (1) the deep penetration of bubbles and (2) the bulk plasma pushed ahead of bubbles. Both the bubbles and the plasma pushed ahead typically contain larger distribution functions than those in the inner magnetosphere at quiet times. An integrated effect of those individual bubble injections is the gradual enhancement of the storm time ring current. We also make two predictions testable against observations. First, fluctuations over a time scale of 5-20 min in the plasma distributions and electric field

  16. Comparative Analysis of Stormtime Ring Currents Under Extreme Solar Wind Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozyra, J. U.; Liemohn, M. W.; Thomsen, M. F.; Borovsky, J. E.; Hairston, M. R.; Ridley, A. J.

    2001-12-01

    Several recent magnetic superstorms (6 April 2000, 15 July 2000 and 31 March 2001) are numerically and observationally analyzed to understand the response of the ring current to extreme values of southward IMF Bz. Simulations of these events were carried out using the Michigan ring current drift-loss model (RAM) driven by dynamical fluxes at the nightside outer boundary based on observations. Plasma sheet distributions measured by satellites were used to specify the ring current source population and its variation during the events. Plasma sheet densities were elevated for all three events but reached their most extreme value (near 10 cm-3) during the March 2001 superstorm which also had the largest ěrtminimum Dst*ěrt. Convection electric fields within the inner magnetosphere were specified based on the McIlwain (1986) model scaled by the polar-cap potential (PCP) derived from DMSP observations. Shielding in the McIlwain model was parametrized based on the DMSP auroral boundary index (MBI). Maximum values of the DMSP PCP were < 250 kV for July 2000 and March 2001 compared to peak values near 600 kV predicted by linear parametrizations based on more moderate storms. It is clear that the relationship between the PCP and solar wind Ey changes dramatically during extreme events and this will have a major impact on ring current energization. We examine the relationship between convection strength (polar cap potential), ion source intensity (near-Earth plasma sheet flux), and ion source composition (H+ versus O+) to understand ring current dynamics and evolution during each of these events. Finally, we compare the differences and similarities in the magnetospheric responses to the three selected intervals of extreme solar wind conditions.

  17. Ring current shifts in (19)F-NMR of membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dongsheng; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2016-05-01

    Fluorine-19 NMR markers are attractive reporter groups for use in studies of complex biomacromolecular systems, in particular also for studies of function-related conformational equilibria and rate processes in membrane proteins. Advantages of (19)F-NMR probes include high sensitivity of the (19)F chemical shifts to variations in the non-covalent environment. Nonetheless, in studies of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) we encountered situations where (19)F chemical shifts were not responsive to conformational changes that had been implicated by other methods. This prompted us to examine possible effects of aromatic ring current fields on the chemical shifts of (19)F-NMR probes used in GPCRs. Analysis of previously reported (19)F-NMR data on the β2-adrenergic receptor and mammalian rhodopsin showed that all (19)F-labeling sites which manifested conformational changes are located near aromatic residues. Although ring current effects are small when compared to other known non-covalent effects on (19)F chemical shifts, there is thus an indication that their contributions are significant when studying activation processes in GPCRs, since the observed activation-related (19)F-NMR chemical shifts are comparable in size to the calculated ring current shifts. Considering the impact of ring current shifts may thus be helpful in identifying promising indigenous or engineered labeling sites for future (19)F-NMR studies of GPCR activation, and novel information may be obtained on the nature of conformational rearrangements near the (19)F-labels. It will then also be interesting to see if the presently indicated role of ring current shifts in membrane protein studies with (19)F-NMR markers can be substantiated by a more extensive data base resulting from future studies. PMID:27240587

  18. An integrating current transformer for fast extraction from the HIRFL-CSR main ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jun-Xia; Zheng, Jian-Hua; Zhao, Tie-Cheng; Mao, Rui-Shi; Yin, Yan; Yuan, You-Jin; Yang, Jian-Cheng

    2010-01-01

    For any experiment that uses the beam of an accelerator, monitoring the beam intensity is always an important concern. It is particularly useful if one can continuously measure the beam current without disturbing the beam. We report here on test experiments for an Integrating Current Transformer (ICT) used to measure fast extraction beams from the HIRFL-CSR main ring (CSRm). The laboratory tests and beam intensity measurement results are presented in this paper. The influence of the kicker noise is also analyzed.

  19. An upper ocean current jet and internal waves in a Gulf Stream warm core ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, T. M.; Stalcup, M. C.

    1984-01-01

    On June 22, 1982, the R/V Endeavor, while participating in a multi-ship study of a warm core ring 82B, encountered a strong front in the core of the ring. The vessel was headed on a radial section outward from ring center while a CTD was repeatedly raised and lowered between 10 and 300 m. Current profiles in the upper 100 m were obtained continuously with a Doppler acoustic profiling system. Above the shallow 45 m seasonal thermocline, a current jet of 4 km width was encountered having a central core of relatively light water and a maximum current of 1.1 m/s. This jet was both highly nonlinear and totally unexpected. A high frequency packet of directional internal waves was acoustically observed in the seasonal thermocline at the outer edge of the jet. Vertical velocities were large enough (6 cm/s) as to be directly observable in the Doppler returns. The waves were propagating from the northeast, parallel to the ship track, and orthogonal to the jet toward the center of the warm core ring. While a nonlinear, centrifugal term was required for the force balance of the jet, the high-frequency internal wave packet could be explained with linear, gravest-mode wave dynamics.

  20. High current operation of a storage-ring free-electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roux, R.; Couprie, M. E.; Bakker, R. J.; Garzella, D.; Nutarelli, D.; Nahon, L.; Billardon, M.

    1998-11-01

    The operation of storage-ring free-electron lasers (SRFEL) at high current still represents a challenge because of the growth of longitudinal beam instabilities. One of these, the quadrupolar coherent synchrotron oscillation, is very harmful for free-electron-laser (FEL) operation. On the Super-ACO storage ring, they either prevent the FEL start-up, or result in a very poor stability of the FEL source. A new feedback system to damp the quadrupolar coherent synchrotron oscillation has been installed on the ring and the stabilized beam parameters have been systematically measured. As a result, the FEL gain is higher and the FEL operates more easily and with a higher average power. Its stability, which is very critical for user applications, has been significantly improved as it has been observed via systematic measurements of FEL dynamics performed with a double sweep streak camera.

  1. Relaxation of persistent current and the energy barrier Ueff(J) close to Tc in a grain-aligned YBa2Cu3O7-δ ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaac, I.; Jung, J.; Murakami, M.; Tanaka, S.; Mohamed, M. A.-K.; Friedrich, L.

    1995-05-01

    Abrikosov flux-creep-induced relaxation of persistent current was investigated close to Tc in a ring-shaped grain-aligned MPMG-processed YBa2Cu3O7-δ (with the c axis perpendicular to the ring's plane). The measurements were performed for a wide range of current (0current circulating in a ring. The magnitude of the current and its decay were inferred from the magnitude and decay of the magnetic field at the ring's center. Relaxation measurements were performed over a time scale between 30 s and 3×104 s. The results revealed two distinct relaxation regimes: (1) a steady-state logarithmic relaxation of the persistent current from an initial value J0 close to Jc and (2) a slow nonsteady nonlogarithmic initial relaxation at low values of J0, which eventually converges to a long-time steady-state logarithmic relaxation. The logarithmic decay of the persistent current is consistent with the Anderson flux-creep model. The slow nonlogarithmic initial relaxation of the persistent current for low values of J0 is due to a transient redistribution of magnetic flux over the sample volume, consistent with a theoretical analysis of nonlinear flux diffusion [Gurevich and Küpfer, Phys. Rev. B 48, 6477 (1993)]. At fixed value of time, Ueff(J) calculated from the Beasley, Labusch, and Webb [Phys. Rev. 181, 682 (1969)] rate equation for thermally activated motion of flux, is current independent up to about 0.6-0.7Jc and at higher currents it drops linearly with increasing current. Ueff(J,T) for a steady-state logarithmic relaxation provides a high-temperature extension of Ueff(J) measured at low temperatures in grain-aligned YBa2Cu3O7-δ with Maley's method [Phys. Rev. B 48, 13 992 (1993)], suggesting a gradual conversion of the flux-creep process from a vortex-glass or collective flux

  2. ULF Waves in the Earth's Inner Magnetosphere: Role in Radiation Belt and Ring Current Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, I. R.; Murphy, K. R.; Rae, J.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Fennell, J. F.; Baker, D. N.; Reeves, G. D.; Spence, H. E.; Ozeke, L.; Milling, D. K.

    2013-05-01

    Ultra-low frequency (ULF) waves in the Pc4-5 band can be excited in the magnetosphere by the solar wind. Much recent work has shown how ULF wave power is strongly correlated with solar wind speed. However, little attention has been paid the dynamics of ULF wave power penetration onto low L-shells in the inner magnetosphere. We use more than a solar cycle of ULF wave data, derived from ground-based magnetometer networks, to examine this ULF wave power penetration and its dependence on solar wind and geomagnetic activity indices. In time domain data, we show very clearly that dayside ULF wave power, spanning more than 4 orders of magnitude, follows solar wind speed variations throughout the whole solar cycle - during periods of sporadic solar maximum ICMEs, during declining phase fast solar wind streams, and at solar minimum, alike. We also show that time domain ULF wave power increases during magnetic storms activations, and significantly demonstrate that a deeper ULF wave power penetration into the inner magnetosphere occurs during larger negative excursions in Dst. We discuss potential explanations for this low-L ULF wave power penetration, including the role of plasma mass density (such as during plasmaspheric erosion), or ring current ion instabilities during near-Earth ring current penetration. Interestingly, we also show that both ULF wave power and SAMPEX MeV electron flux show a remarkable similarity in their penetration to low-L, which suggests that ULF wave power penetration may be important for understanding and explaining radiation belt dynamics. Moreover, the correlation of ULF wave power with Dst, which peaks at one day lag, suggests the ULF waves might also be important for the inward transport of ions into the ring current. Current ring current models, which exclude long period ULF wave transport, under-estimate the ring current during fast solar wind streams which is consistent with a potential role for ULF waves in ring current energisation

  3. Are Ring Current Ions Lost in Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Wave Dispersion Relation?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Gamayunov, K. V.

    2006-01-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves are widely observed in the inner and outer magnetosphere, at geostationary orbit, at high latitudes along the plasmapause, and at the ionospheric altitudes. Interaction of the Ring Current (RC) ions and EMIC waves causes ion scattering into the loss cone and leads to decay of the RC, especially during the main phase of storms when the RC decay times of about one hour or less are observed. The oblique EMIC waves damp due to Landau resonance with the thermal plasmaspheric electrons, and subsequent transport of the dissipating wave energy into the ionosphere below causes an ionosphere temperature enhancement. Induced scattering of these waves by the plasmaspheric thermal ions leads to ion temperature enhancement, and forms a so-called hot zone near the plasmapause where the temperature of core plasma ions can reach tens of thousands of degrees. Relativistic electrons in the outer radiation belt also interact well with the EMIC waves, and during the main and/or recovery phases of the storms these electrons can easily be scattered into the loss cone over a time scale from several hours to a day. The plasma density distribution in the magnetosphere and the ion content play a critical role in EMIC wave generation and propagation, but the wave dispersion relation in the known RC-EMIC wave interaction models is assumed to be determined by the thermal plasma distribution only. In these models, the modification of the EMIC wave dispersion relation caused by the RC ions is not taken into account, and the RC ions are only treated as a source of free energy in order to generate EMIC waves. At the same time, the RC ions can dominate the thermal magnetospheric content in the night MLT sector at great L shells during the main and/or recovery storm phase. In this study, using our self-consistent RC-EMIC wave model [Khazanov et al., 2006], we simulate the May 1998 storm in order to quantify the global EMIC wave redistribution caused by

  4. Effect of Ring Current Ions on Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Wave Dispersion Relation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gamayunov, K. V.; Khazanov, G. V.

    2006-01-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves are widely observed in the inner and outer magnetosphere, at geostationary orbit, at high latitudes along the plasmapause, and at the ionospheric altitudes. Interaction of the Ring Current (RC) ions and EMIC waves causes ion scattering into the loss cone and leads to decay of the RC, especially during the main phase of storms when the RC decay times of about one hour or less are observed. The oblique EMIC waves damp due to Landau resonance with the thermal plasmaspheric electrons, and subsequent transport of the dissipating wave energy into the ionosphere below causes an ionosphere temperature enhancement. Induced scattering of these waves by the plasmaspheric thermal ions leads to ion temperature enhancement, and forms a so-called hot zone near the plasmapause where the temperature of core plasma ions can reach tens of thousands of degrees. Relativistic electrons in the outer radiation belt also interact well with the EMIC waves, and during the main and/or recovery phases of the storms these electrons can easily be scattered into the loss cone over a time scale from several hours to a day. The plasma density distribution in the magnetosphere and the ion content play a critical role in EMIC wave generation and propagation, but the wave dispersion relation in the known RC-EMIC wave interaction models is assumed to be determined by the thermal plasma distribution only. In these models, the modification of the EMIC wave dispersion relation caused by the RC ions is not taken into account, and the RC ions are only treated as a source of free energy in order to generate EMIC waves. At the same time, the RC ions can dominate the thermal magnetospheric content in the night MLT sector at great L shells during the main and/or recovery storm phase. In this study, using our self-consistent RC-EMIC wave model [Khazanov et al., 2006], we simulate the May 1998 storm in order to quantify the global EMIC wave redistribution caused by

  5. The solar wind pressure pulse as a ring current source in the disturbed magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalegaev, Vladimir; Vlasova, Natalia; Nazarkov, Ilya

    2016-07-01

    The solar wind pressure and IMF are the most important factors of interplanetary medium disturbing the Earth's magnetosphere. They determine the momentum/energy transfer inside the magnetopause. The relative dynamics of solar wind pressure and IMF controls the development of the different storm-time magnetospheric currents during disturbances. While the southward turning of IMF is well-known magnetic storm source, the role of the strong pressure pulse under northward IMF is not enough studied. We present the results of studying the solar wind pressure influence on the magnetospheric structure during events on 21-22 January 2005 and 22-23 June 2015 when the main phase of geomagnetic storms developed under IMF Bz>0. Joint analysis of experimental and modeling data was carried out. Equatorial ion fluxes of 30-80 keV protons of the storm time equatorial belt (STEB) measured by low-altitude polar sun-synchronous NOAA POES satellites were used to estimate the ring current evolution. The magnetic field of the large-scale magnetospheric currents was calculated in terms of the paraboloid model of the magnetospheric geomagnetic field A2000. It was found that ring current development during the early main phase of the magnetic storms was provided not only large-scale magnetospheric convection but also by extremely strong solar wind dynamical impact. Interplanetary shock caused intensive trapped particle non-adiabatic radial motion to the lover L-shells during SSC and subsequent ring current enhancement similar to that taking place due to particle injection from the tail. The extreme solar wind pressure pulse can produce the ring current enhancement even under the northward orientation of the interplanetary magnetic field.

  6. Measurements of the normal state persistent current in Au rings at high and low magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petkovic, Ivana; Ngo, Dustin; Lollo, Anthony; Harris, Jack

    2014-03-01

    Flux biased normal metal rings smaller than the phase coherence length can sustain persistent current (PC). We employ cantilever torque magnetometry to detect PC with high sensitivity, efficient background rejection, and in an electromagnetically clean environment. Previously, our group focused on the high magnetic field regime, where the PC is well described by single-particle theory. However at low magnetic field (few flux quanta) interaction effects are expected to be dominant. Previous low field studies by other groups employing SQUID and resonator-based techniques have found that Au, Ag, Cu, and GaAs rings show a large diamagnetic average PC, indicative of attractive e-e interactions. One possible explanation is that the superconductivity that would normally arise from this interaction is suppressed by a small number of magnetic impurities (~ 1 ppm), while the interaction-enhanced persistent current is not. In this talk we will describe measurements of Au rings. We have fabricated arrays of 100,000 rings with 125 nm radius on ultrasensitive silicon cantilevers. At high magnetic fields, we find that the PC agrees with single-particle theory. We also describe the results at low field, expected to give further insight into the many body ground state of this system. We gratefully acknowledge support from NSF Grant #1205861.

  7. Analysis of the magnetically induced current density of molecules consisting of annelated aromatic and antiaromatic hydrocarbon rings.

    PubMed

    Sundholm, Dage; Berger, Raphael J F; Fliegl, Heike

    2016-06-21

    Magnetically induced current susceptibilities and current pathways have been calculated for molecules consisting of two pentalene groups annelated with a benzene (1) or naphthalene (2) moiety. Current strength susceptibilities have been obtained by numerically integrating separately the diatropic and paratropic contributions to the current flow passing planes through chosen bonds of the molecules. The current density calculations provide novel and unambiguous current pathways for the unusual molecules with annelated aromatic and antiaromatic hydrocarbon moieties. The calculations show that the benzene and naphthalene moieties annelated with two pentalene units as in molecules 1 and 2, respectively, are unexpectedly antiaromatic sustaining only a local paratropic ring current around the ring, whereas a weak diatropic current flows around the C-H moiety of the benzene ring. For 1 and 2, the individual five-membered rings of the pentalenes are antiaromatic and a slightly weaker semilocal paratropic current flows around the two pentalene rings. Molecules 1 and 2 do not sustain any net global ring current. The naphthalene moiety of the molecule consisting of a naphthalene annelated with two pentalene units (3) does not sustain any strong ring current that is typical for naphthalene. Instead, half of the diatropic current passing the naphthalene moiety forms a zig-zag pattern along the C-C bonds of the naphthalene moiety that are not shared with the pentalene moieties and one third of the current continues around the whole molecule partially cancelling the very strong paratropic semilocal ring current of the pentalenes. For molecule 3, the pentalene moieties and the individual five-membered rings of the pentalenes are more antiaromatic than for 1 and 2. The calculated current patterns elucidate why the compounds with formally [4n + 2] π-electrons have unusual aromatic properties violating the Hückel π-electron count rule. The current density calculations also provide

  8. State-of-Art Empirical Modeling of Ring Current Plasma Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, C.; Ma, Q.; Wang, C. P.; Bortnik, J.; Thorne, R. M.

    2015-12-01

    The plasma pressure in the inner magnetosphere plays a key role in plasma dynamics by changing magnetic field configurations and generating the ring current. In this study, we present our preliminary results of empirically constructing 2D equatorial ring current pressure and pressure anisotropy spatial distributions controlled by Dst based on measurements from two particle instruments (HOPE and RBSPICE) onboard Van Allen Probes. We first obtain the equatorial plasma perpendicular and parallel pressures for different species including H+, He+, O+ and e- from 20 eV to ~1 MeV, and investigate their relative contributions to the total plasma pressure and pressure anisotropy. We then establish empirical equatorial pressure models within ~ 6 RE using a state-of-art machine learning technique, Support Vector Regression Machine (SVRM). The pressure models predict equatorial perpendicular and parallel plasma thermal pressures (for each species and for total pressures) and pressure anisotropy at any given r, MLT, Bz/Br (equivalent Z distance), and Dst within applicable ranges. We are currently validating our model predictions and investigating how the ring current pressure distributions and the associated pressure gradients vary with Dst index.

  9. Analytic Aharonov-Bohm ringsCurrents readout from Zeeman spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Mufei; Reyes-Serrato, Armando

    2016-06-01

    This paper reports the work on the development and analysis of a model for quantum rings in which persistent currents are induced by Aharonov-Bohm (AB) or other similar effects. The model is based on a centric and annual potential profile. The time-independent Schrödinger equation including an external magnetic field and an AB flux is analytically solved. The outputs, namely energy dispersion and wavefunctions, are analyzed in detail. It is shown that the rotation quantum number m is limited to small numbers, especially in weak confinement, and a conceptual proposal is put forward for acquiring the flux and eventually estimating the persistent currents in a Zeeman spectroscopy. The wavefunctions and electron distributions are numerically studied and compared to one-dimensional (1D) quantum well. It is predicated that the model and its solutions, eigen energy structure and analytic wavefunctions, would be a powerful tool for studying various electric and optical properties of quantum rings.

  10. Macroscopic ion acceleration associated with the formation of the ring current in the earth's magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauk, B. H.; Meng, C.-I.

    1986-01-01

    As an illustration of the operation of macroscopic ion acceleration processes within the earth's magnetosphere, the paper reviews processes thought to be associated with the formation of the earth's ring-current populations. Arguing that the process of global, quasi-curl-free convection cannot explain particle characteristics observed in the middle (geosynchronous) to outer regions, it is concluded that the transport and energization of the seed populations that give rise to the ring-current populations come about in two distinct stages involving distinct processes. Near and outside the geostationary region, the energization and transport are always associated with highly impulsive and relatively localized processes driven by inductive electric fields. The subsequent adiabatic earthward transport is driven principally by enhanced, curl-free global convection fields.

  11. Solar Wind Influence on MLT Dependence of Plasmasheet Conditions and Implications for Ring Current Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, M. W.; Wang, C.; Schulz, M.; Lyons, L. R.

    2006-12-01

    The plasmasheet source for the stormtime ring current depends significantly on the interplanetary conditions during the preceding quiet period. We have investigated how this dependence affects the local-time asymmetries in storm-time ring current development by applying realistic plasmasheet boundary conditions based on averages of GEOTAIL data to a magnetically self-consistent ring-current simulation model. By statistical analysis of GEOTAIL data, Wang et al. [this meeting] have found two interesting trends: (1) For strongly northward IMF (2 nT < IMF B_z < 8 nT), high solar-wind density (> 6.5 cm-3), and lower solar-wind speed (< 400 km/s), the overall plasmasheet ion density is the highest among the northward IMF conditions considered, and there is a strong dawn-dusk asymmetry at radial distances r > 8 R_E with high ion densities and low ion temperatures in the post-midnight quadrant of the plasma sheet. (2) For weakly northward IMF (0 < IMF B_z < 2 nT), high solar-wind speed (> 400 km/s), and lower solar-wind density (< 6.5 cm-3), the overall plasmasheet ion density is the lowest and its temperature is highest in the pre-midnight sector among all the northward IMF conditions considered, and there is no strong density enhancement in the post-midnight quadrant of the plasma sheet at r > 8 R_E, such as is seen on average under condition (1). From simple particle-transport considerations, it is expected that condition (1), under which there is (on average) a dense population of low-energy ions in the post-midnight quadrant, may lead to relative enhancement of the ring-current plasma pressure in the post-midnight quadrant. In contrast, condition (2), in which there is (on average) a dense population of high-energy particles in the pre-midnight quadrant of the plasma sheet, may lead to enhancement of the ring-current plasma pressure in the pre-midnight quadrant rather than elsewhere. We test these hypotheses by carrying out magnetically self-consistent simulations of

  12. The Role of Plasma Sheet Conditions in Ring Current Formation and Energetic Neutral Atom Emissions: TWINS Results and CRCM Comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fok, M.; Buzulukova, N.; McComas, D.; Brandt, P.; Goldstein, J.; Valek, P.; Alquiza, J.

    2009-05-01

    The dynamics of the ring current is sensitive to plasma sheet density and temperature. The situation is further complicated by ionospheric feedback and the existence of electric shielding at low latitudes. Most of the ring current pressure is carried by ions with energies of ~5-50 keV. In this energy range, H-H+ charge exchange cross section falls sharply with increasing energy. As a result, the intensity of energetic neutral atoms (ENA) emitted from the ring current is very sensitive to the ion energy distribution, which, in turn, is controlled by the plasma sheet temperature. Using the Comprehensive Ring Current Model (CRCM) with different plasma sheet models, we calculate ENA emissions during several moderate storms in years 2008 and 2009. We compare the simulated images with those from the TWINS imagers and study the effects of plasma sheet conditions on the ring current and the associated ENA emissions.

  13. Comparisons of Simulated and Observed Stormtime Magnetic Intensities and Ion Densities in the Ring Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, M. W.; Guild, T. B.; Lemon, C. L.; Schulz, M.

    2008-12-01

    Recent progress in ring current and plasma sheet modeling has shown the importance of a self-consistent treatment of particle transport and magnetic and electric fields in the inner magnetosphere. For example, the feedback of the ring current tends to mitigate the build-up of the asymmetric ring current and associated magnetic depressions during storm main phase. Models with and without self-consistency can lead to significantly different magnitudes and spatial distributions of plasma pressure and magnetic intensity during disturbed times. In this study we compare simulated and observed stormtime magnetic intensities and ion densities at geosynchronous altitude to test how well self-consistent simulations can simultaneously reproduce these quantities. We simulate the ring current and plasma sheet for conditions corresponding to the 12-14 August 2000 storm using the self-consistent Rice Convection Model-Equilibrium (RCM-E) [ Lemon et al., JGR, 2004]. Using the empirical IMF-dependent model of Tsyganenko and Mukai [JGR, 2003], we specify the plasma sheet pressure and density at 10 RE as the plasma boundary location in the RCM- E. We compare the simulated magnetic intensity at geosynchronous altitude (6.6 RE) with the magnetic intensity measured by magnetometers on the GOES G8, G10, and G11 satellites. The simulated ion densities at different magnetic local times are compared with those from the re-analysis model of LANL/MPA densities of O'Brien and Lemon [Space Weather, 2007]. This is a first step towards a more extensive comparison that will include other datasets, such as ion and magnetic field data from Polar, at locations closer to the Earth than geosynchronous altitude.

  14. Access of energetic particles to storm time ring current through enhanced radial diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, L.R.; Schulz, M. )

    1989-05-01

    Magnetic storms are distinguishable from other periods of geomagnetic activity by the injection of trapped electrons and ions to the 2{approx lt} L {approx lt} 4 region. It has been proposed previously that this injection results from an inward displacement of the preexisting trapped-particle population by enhanced storm time electric fields. However, high-energy ({approx gt} 40 keV) ring-current particles have drift periods that are typically shorter than the time of the main-phase development, and so the direct radial transport of these particles is restricted. The authors propose here that the transport of {approx gt} 40 keV particles into the storm time ring current can result from enhanced stochastic radial transport driven by fluctuating electric fields during a storm's main phase. They estimate the effects of such electric fields by applying radial-diffusion theory, assuming a preexisting trapped-particle population as the initial conditions, and they demonstrate the feasibility of explaining observed flux increases of {approx gt} 40-keV particles at L{approx lt} 4 by enhanced radial diffusion. It is necessary that new particles be injected near the outer boundary of the trapping region so as to maintain the fluxes there as an outer boundary condition, and they estimate that the {approx gt} 40-keV portion of the storm time ring current at L {approximately} 3 consists of about 50% preexisting and about 50% new particles. They thus find that formation of the storm time ring current may be explainable via a combination of direct radial transport at energies {approx lt} 40 keV and diffusive radial transport at higher energies.

  15. Compensation for the eddy current effect in the APS storage ring vacuum chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Y.

    1990-05-30

    The amplitude attenuation and the phase shift of the correction magnet field inside the APS storage ring vacuum chamber due to the eddy current effect were measured. A circuit to compensate for this effect was then inserted between the signal source and the magnet power supply. The amplitude was restored with an error of less than 20% of the source signal amplitude and the phase shift was reduced from 80{degrees} to 12{degrees} at 10 Hz.

  16. Inner Magnetosphere Modeling at the CCMC: Ring Current, Radiation Belt and Magnetic Field Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastaetter, L.; Mendoza, A. M.; Chulaki, A.; Kuznetsova, M. M.; Zheng, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Modeling of the inner magnetosphere has entered center stage with the launch of the Van Allen Probes (RBSP) in 2012. The Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) has drastically improved its offerings of inner magnetosphere models that cover energetic particles in the Earth's ring current and radiation belts. Models added to the CCMC include the stand-alone Comprehensive Inner Magnetosphere-Ionosphere (CIMI) model by M.C. Fok, the Rice Convection Model (RCM) by R. Wolf and S. Sazykin and numerous versions of the Tsyganenko magnetic field model (T89, T96, T01quiet, TS05). These models join the LANL* model by Y. Yu hat was offered for instant run earlier in the year. In addition to these stand-alone models, the Comprehensive Ring Current Model (CRCM) by M.C. Fok and N. Buzulukova joined as a component of the Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF) in the magnetosphere model run-on-request category. We present modeling results of the ring current and radiation belt models and demonstrate tracking of satellites such as RBSP. Calculations using the magnetic field models include mappings to the magnetic equator or to minimum-B positions and the determination of foot points in the ionosphere.

  17. Analysis of the contributions of ring current and electric field effects to the chemical shifts of RNA bases.

    PubMed

    Sahakyan, Aleksandr B; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2013-02-21

    Ring current and electric field effects can considerably influence NMR chemical shifts in biomolecules. Understanding such effects is particularly important for the development of accurate mappings between chemical shifts and the structures of nucleic acids. In this work, we first analyzed the Pople and the Haigh-Mallion models in terms of their ability to describe nitrogen base conjugated ring effects. We then created a database (DiBaseRNA) of three-dimensional arrangements of RNA base pairs from X-ray structures, calculated the corresponding chemical shifts via a hybrid density functional theory approach and used the results to parametrize the ring current and electric field effects in RNA bases. Next, we studied the coupling of the electric field and ring current effects for different inter-ring arrangements found in RNA bases using linear model fitting, with joint electric field and ring current, as well as only electric field and only ring current approximations. Taken together, our results provide a characterization of the interdependence of ring current and electric field geometric factors, which is shown to be especially important for the chemical shifts of non-hydrogen atoms in RNA bases. PMID:23398371

  18. Simulations of Stormtime Ion Ring Current Formation with AMIE Electric Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, M. W.; Schulz, M.; Lu, G.; Lyons, L. R.

    2002-12-01

    In the past we have traced the bounce-averaged drift motions of particles conserving their first two adiabatic invariants (μ and J) in simplified models of the magnetospheric convection electric field, so as to explain their inward transport to form the ring current. Recently we have begun to trace such guiding-center motions in the more realistic AMIE electric field. The magnetic field model we use for these studies is the Dungey model, which consists of a dipole field plus a uniform southward ``tail'' field (which some interpret as the IMF). Here we map an analytical expansion of the AMIE ionospheric electric potential, expressed as a function of magnetic latitude and magnetic local time, along magnetic field lines (at least for L >= 2) throughout this model magnetosphere and thereby trace the guiding-center drifts of representative singly charged ions for μ values of 1-30 MeV/G (corresponding for J = 0 to energies of 11-330 keV at L = 3). Using these simulation results, we map proton phase space densities according to Liouville's theorem but taking into account losses due to charge exchange. For the purpose of phase space mapping we specify an ``initial" proton ring current distribution by solving the steady-state transport equation that balances quiescent radial diffusion against charge exchange. We use MLT-binned quiet time LANL ion data of Korth et al. [JGR, 104, 25,047-25,061, 1999] as the reference phase space density at geosynchronous altitude. For our stormtime boundary conditions we make use of the Kp-dependent LANL ion data but map them adiabatically (conserving μ while maintaining J = 0) to the boundary of our model magnetosphere. For this study we have performed simulations of the large 19 October 1998 storm and of the extremely large 15 July 2000 ``Bastille Day'' storm. During the 19 October 1998 storm the large AMIE electric field in the evening sector would have led to much faster (access time ~ 20 minutes) inward transport from the plasma sheet

  19. The Effect of Solar Wind Dynamic Pressure on the Physical Processes that Drive the Storm-time Ring Current Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemon, C.; Chen, M. W.; Guild, T. B.

    2011-12-01

    Statistical studies suggest that the solar wind dynamic pressure influences the development of the storm-time ring current, with increased dynamic pressure leading to increased ring current energy. But physical understanding of that relationship is lacking. While magnetospheric compressions drive adiabatic energization of plasma and thereby directly increase the ring current energy, this effect should be reversible, and dynamic pressure can vary rapidly in either direction during magnetic storms. Rather, the process of plasma transport from the plasma sheet to the ring current is affected by magnetopause currents that perturb the background field in the magnetosphere. This perturbation will affect both convective transport and gradient/curvature drift of plasma, which will subsequently further perturb the magnetic and electric fields. Using the Rice Convection Model with a force-equilibrated magnetic field (the RCM-E), we are able to simulate the ring current development in response to varying upstream conditions. This study contrasts the development of the ring current in response to different solar wind dynamic pressure inputs: sustained low dynamic pressure, sustained high dynamic pressure, and low dynamic pressure with a superposed pressure pulse. We quantitatively account for the processes that lead to variations in ring current development during these different upstream driving scenarios. These processes include the effect of the magnetopause currents (and ring and tail currents) on plasma drift paths, modifications of the convection electric field due to adiabatic energization of plasma (electric shielding), and the induction electric fields caused by changes in the magnetopause, ring, and tail currents. Our simulations separately investigate the extent to which ring current enhancements are driven by 1) the impact of the magnetopause currents on the magnetic and (indirectly) electric fields of the inner magnetosphere, 2) the coupling of the plasma sheet to

  20. Lorentz structure of weak current in ν interactions and inverse muon decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Sanjib R.

    1991-04-01

    Neutrino interactions uniquely convey the Lorentz structure of weak current. Two studies that probe this structure are reviewed: structure functions from νμ -and ν μ - induced charged current events; and the inverse muon decay process, νμ+e -→ μ-+ νe. In the first study, the relative absence of νμ-induced charged current events with respect to νμ-induced events at large z (> 0.45) and large y (> 0.70) (investigated by CDHS and CCFR) restricts |η| 2 = |g R/g L| 2 < 0.0015 with 90 % CL (CCFR). Within the framework of left-right symmetric models, this measurement imposes a limit upon the mixing angle of the left and right handed bosons. Unlike the limits imposed by the μ-decay and the nuclear β-decay experiments, the present limit is valid irrespective of the mass of the right handed neutrino. In the second study, recent high statistics measurements of inverse muon decay by CCFR and CHARM II yield a total cross section, σ( νμ+e -→ μ-+ νe) = (17.3±0.72(stat)±0.39(syst)]E ν10 -42 cm 2/GeV. This restricts the scalar coupling of the muon | gLLS| < 0.25 with 90% CL.

  1. Intermolecular shielding from molecular magnetic susceptibility. A new view of intermolecular ring current effects.

    PubMed

    Facelli, Julio C

    2006-03-01

    This paper presents calculations of the NICS (nuclear independent chemical shieldings) in a rectangular grid surrounding the molecules of benzene, naphthalene and coronene. Using the relationship between calculated NICS and the induced magnetic field, the calculated NICS are used to predict intermolecular effects due to molecular magnetic susceptibility or ring current effects. As expected from approximate ring current models, these intermolecular shielding effects are concentrated along the direction perpendicular to the molecular plane and they approach asymptotically to a dipolar functional dependence, i.e. (1-3 cos(2)theta)/r(3)). The deviations from the dipolar functional form require that the calculations of these intermolecular effects be done using a suitable interpolation scheme of the NICS calculated on the grid. The analysis of the NICS tensor components shows that these intermolecular shielding effects should be primarily expected on shielding components of the neighboring molecules nuclei, which are perpendicular to the molecular plane of the aromatic compound generating the induced field. The analysis of the calculated NICS along the series benzene, naphthalene and coronene shows that these intermolecular effects increase monotonically with the number of aromatic rings. PMID:16477673

  2. Coordinated Coverage of the Ring Current, Cusp and Adjacent FACs with Cluster and Swarm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, C.; Dunlop, M. W.; Bogdanova, Y.; Yang, J.; Yang, Y.; Shen, C.; Luhr, H.; Olsen, N.; Zhang, Q. H.; Ritter, P.; Kauristie, K.; Masson, A.; Haagmans, R.

    2014-12-01

    We explore the capability of Swarm-Cluster coordination for probing the behavior of the ring current (RC), field aligned currents (FAC) and cusp currents at medium and low orbits. The RC and connecting R2 FACs influence the geomagnetic field at low Earth orbit (LEO) and are sampled in situ by the four Cluster spacecraft every perigee pass. Coordination of the configuration of the three Swarm spacecraft with the constellation of the four Cluster spacecraft has been planned through joint operations; providing a set of distributed, multi-point measurements covering this region. A particularly close coordination of all spacecraft has been achieved during the start of the Swarm operations. We show preliminary study of the morphology and influence of the ring current from the in-situ RC and associated FACs determined directly from the 4-spacecraft Cluster perigee observations. We report here preliminary results of joint science targets, including coordinated cusp encounters; the comparative significance of the connecting R2 FACs, and the use and application of new analysis techniques derived from the calculation of curl B and magnetic gradients to compare estimates of the current distributions. For context, we will report on the coordination of Champ and Cluster data to interpret and resolve the R1 and R2 FACs using Champ derived models of the associated auroral boundaries.

  3. Current observations with a decaying cosmological constant allow for chaotic cyclic cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, George F. R.; Platts, Emma; Sloan, David; Weltman, Amanda

    2016-04-01

    We use the phase plane analysis technique of Madsen and Ellis [1] to consider a universe with a true cosmological constant as well as a cosmological "constant" that is decaying. Time symmetric dynamics for the inflationary era allows eternally bouncing models to occur. Allowing for scalar field dynamic evolution, we find that if dark energy decays in the future, chaotic cyclic universes exist provided the spatial curvature is positive. This is particularly interesting in light of current observations which do not yet rule out either closed universes or possible evolution of the cosmological constant. We present only a proof of principle, with no definite claim on the physical mechanism required for the present dark energy to decay.

  4. High-Current Effects in the PEP-II Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Wienands, U.; Akre, R.; Bertsche, Kirk J.; Curry, S.; DeBarger, S.; Decker, F.J.; Ecklund, S.; Fisher, A.; Fox, J.; Heifets, S.; Iverson, R.; Krasnykh, A.; Kulikov, A.; Kurita, N.; Novokhatski, A.; Reeck, N.; Seeman, J.; Sullivan, M.; Teytelman, D.; Turner, J.; van Winkle, D.; /SLAC

    2011-11-22

    The PEP-II B-Factory operated at peak and integrated luminosity several times the original design values. Its storage rings operated at world-record beam currents with bunch lengths of about 10 mm. Correspondingly significant heat load was imposed on the vacuum system, both due to synchrotron radiation and by energy loss into higher-order modes. The latter in turn would lead to local heating or discharges wherever such energy got absorbed. Over the course of PEP-II running we experienced numerous such effects, which lead to upgrade programs of significant scope. In the following we will describe the most significant of such effects and their mitigation: (1) Upgrades and repairs of RF seals and shields in both rings; (2) Redesign of overheating stripline kicker electrodes to withstand higher powers; and (3) Redesign and replacement of BPM buttons following failure.

  5. Ring Current Pressure Estimation withRAM-SCB using Data Assimilation and VanAllen Probe Flux Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godinez, H. C.; Yu, Y.; Henderson, M. G.; Larsen, B.; Jordanova, V.

    2015-12-01

    Capturing and subsequently modeling the influence of tail plasma injections on the inner magnetosphere is particularly important for understanding the formation and evolution of Earth's ring current. In this study, the ring current distribution is estimated with the Ring Current-Atmosphere Interactions Model with Self-Consistent Magnetic field (RAM-SCB) using, for the first time, data assimilation techniques and particle flux data from the Van Allen Probes. The state of the ring current within the RAM-SCB is corrected via an ensemble based data assimilation technique by using proton flux from one of the Van Allen Probes, to capture the enhancement of ring current following an isolated substorm event on July 18 2013. The results show significant improvement in the estimation of the ring current particle distributions in the RAM-SCB model, leading to better agreement with observations. This newly implemented data assimilation technique in the global modeling of the ring current thus provides a promising tool to better characterize the effect of substorm injections in the near-Earth regions. The work is part of the Space Hazards Induced near Earth by Large, Dynamic Storms (SHIELDS) project in Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  6. Fluctuation current in a superconducting ring caused by a thin solenoid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuratsuji, Hiroshi; Tsuchida, Satoshi

    2015-07-01

    The fluctuating current due to the Cooper pair is calculated for a superconducting ring threaded by a thin magnetic solenoid that is arranged by time-varying flux. The formulation is based on the Fokker-Planck equation derived by the Langevin-type Landau-Ginzburg equation. The statistical average of the fluctuation current is calculated. As a special case, for the equilibrium state, the current shows a critical behavior near the transition point. In the presence of the time-varying flux, the current is calculated to be a highly nonlinear function of the electric field induced by the time variation of the flux, which yields a sort of the Ohmic law in the limit of the weak field.

  7. Higgs-boson and Z-boson flavor-changing neutral-current decays correlated with B-meson decays in the littlest Higgs model with T parity

    SciTech Connect

    Han Xiaofang; Wang Lei; Yang Jinmin

    2008-10-01

    In the littlest Higgs model with T-parity new flavor-changing interactions between mirror fermions and the standard model (SM) fermions can induce various flavor-changing neutral-current decays for B-mesons, the Z-boson, and the Higgs boson. Since all these decays induced in the littlest Higgs with T-parity model are correlated, in this work we perform a collective study for these decays, namely, the Z-boson decay Z{yields}bs, the Higgs-boson decay h{yields}bs, and the B-meson decays B{yields}X{sub s}{gamma}, B{sub s}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}, and B{yields}X{sub s}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}. We find that under the current experimental constraints from the B-decays, the branching ratios of both Z{yields}bs and h{yields}bs can still deviate from the SM predictions significantly. In the parameter space allowed by the B-decays, the branching ratio of Z{yields}bs can be enhanced up to 10{sup -7} (about one order above the SM prediction) while h{yields}bs can be much suppressed relative to the SM prediction (about one order below the SM prediction)

  8. New physics effects on neutrinoless double beta decay from right-handed current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Shao-Feng; Lindner, Manfred; Patra, Sudhanwa

    2015-10-01

    We study the impact of new physics contributions to neutrinoless double beta decay arising from right-handed current in comparison with the standard mechanism. If the light neutrinos obtain their masses from Type-II seesaw within left-right symmetric model, where the Type-I contribution is suppressed to negligible extent, the right-handed PMNS matrix is the same as its left-handed counterpart, making it highly predictable and testable at next-generation experiments. It is very attractive, especially with recent cosmological constraint favoring the normal hierarchy under which the neutrinoless double beta decay is too small to be observed unless new physics appears as indicated by the recent diboson excess observed at ATLAS. The relative contributions from left- and right-handed currents can be reconstructed with the ratio between lifetimes of two different isotopes as well as the ratio of nuclear matrix elements. In this way, the theoretical uncertainties in the calculation of nuclear matrix elements can be essentially avoided. We also discuss the interplay of neutrinoless double beta decay measurements with cosmology, beta decay, and neutrino oscillation.

  9. Statistics of large currents in the Kipnis-Marchioro-Presutti model in a ring geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarfaty, Lior; Meerson, Baruch

    2016-03-01

    We use the macroscopic fluctuation theory to determine the statistics of large currents in the Kipnis-Marchioro-Presutti (KMP) model in a ring geometry. About 10 years ago this simple setting was instrumental in identifying a breakdown of the additivity principle in a class of lattice gases at currents exceeding a critical value. Building on earlier work, we assume that, for supercritical currents, the optimal density profile, conditioned on the given current, has the form of a traveling wave (TW). For the KMP model we find this TW analytically, in terms of elliptic functions, for any supercritical current I. Using this TW solution, we evaluate, up to a pre-exponential factor, the probability distribution P(I). We obtain simple asymptotics of the TW and of P(I) for currents close to the critical current, and for currents much larger than the critical current. In the latter case we show that -\\ln P(I)˜ I\\ln I , whereas the optimal density profile acquires a soliton-like shape. Our analytic results are in a very good agreement with Monte-Carlo simulations and numerical solutions of Hurtado and Garrido (2011).

  10. On the coupled interactions between ring current intensity and high-latitude ionospheric electron density variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Sneha; Pallamraju, Duggirala

    2015-04-01

    Investigations on the magnetospheric-ionospheric processes form an important element of research in the understanding of the solar-terrestrial interactions. In this work, we have investigated the linkage between the ring current intensity and the high-latitude ionospheric plasma density variations during different geomagnetic conditions. The Global Positioning System (GPS) derived Vertical Total Electron Content (VTEC) during 2011-2013 over high- and low-latitude stations in both the hemispheres and the symmetric ring current index (SYM-H) have been used in this study. A cross-correlation analysis performed between the variations of these two parameters during a wide range of geomagnetic conditions reveal that there is a seasonal, latitudinal and hemispherical dependence in the interrelationship between SYM-H and VTEC. The best cross-correlation between SYM-H and VTEC over both the hemispheres is obtained during equinoctial months which can be attributed to the semiannual variation of the solar wind-magnetospheric-ionospheric coupling. Summer time VTEC over southern hemisphere exhibits a better correlation with SYM-H index in comparison to that of the northern hemisphere. These results have been explained in the light of relative contributions from seasonal and hemispherical variation that exists in the ionospheric plasma. The results are striking as the correlation is found between the variation in two independent processes occurring at widely separated regions in space, namely, the ring current intensity and the behavior of ionospheric densities at high-latitudes. Season-dependent high- and low-latitude coupling of the ionospheric VTEC is observed during the disturbed geomagnetic conditions.

  11. High-Current Effects in The PEP-II Storage Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Wienands, U.; Sullivan, M.K.; Akre, R.; Cheng, W.; Colocho, W.; DeBarger, S.; Decker, F.-J.; Ecklund, S.; Fisher, A.; Kharakh, D.; Krasnykh, A.; Novokhatski, A.; /SLAC

    2009-06-19

    High beam currents in PEP-II have been a challenge for vacuum system and ring components. For the {approx} 1 cm long bunches peak currents exceed 100 A and modest impedance can give rise to voltage spikes and discharges. During the last two runs, difficulties arose from rf seals at the 'flex flanges' in the HER. High temperatures were seen and the seals turned out to be severely damaged by discharges. In the LER, the horizontal stripline kickers of the bunch-by-bunch feedback system experiences breakdown at high bunch current-Macor pins installed for mechanical stability turned out to be a weak spot causing discharges. Finally, in the HER an experiment to shorten the ion-clearing gap in the beam revealed signs of ion-induced instability indicating that the HER has been operating quite close to the stability limit. The effects shown here are relevant to future high-intensity electron and positron rings like SuperB and PEP-X.

  12. Hysteresis of Current in Noninteracting Atomic Fermi Gases in Optical Ring Potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metcalf, Mekena; Chien, Chih-Chun; Lai, Chen-Yen

    Hysteresis is a ubiquitous phenomenon, which can be found in magnets, superfluids, and other many-body systems. Although interactions are present in most systems exhibiting hysteresis, here we show the current of a non-interacting Fermi gas in an optical ring potential produces hysteresis behavior when driven by a time-dependent artificial gauge field and subject to dissipation. Fermions in a ring potential threaded with flux can exhibit a persistent current when the system is in thermal equilibrium, but cold-atoms are clean and dissipation for reaching thermal equilibrium may be introduced by an external, thermal bath. We use the standard relaxation approximation to model the dynamics of cold-atoms driven periodically by an artificial gauge field. A competition of the driven time and the relaxation time leads to hysteresis of the mass current, and work done on the system, as a function of the relaxation time, exhibits similar behavior as Kramers transition rate in chemical reaction and one-dimensional thermal transport.

  13. Longitudinal Single-Bunch Instability in the ILC Damping Rings: Estimate of Current Threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Venturini, Marco; Venturini, Marco

    2008-06-25

    Characterization of single-bunch instabilities in the International Linear Collider (ILC) damping rings (DRs) has been indicated as a high-priority activity toward completion of an engineering design. In this paper we report on a first estimate ofthe current thresholds for the instability using numerical and analytical models of the wake potentials associated with the various machine components. The numerical models were derived (upon appropriate scaling) from designs of the correspondingcomponents installed in existing machines. The current thresholds for instabilities were determined by numerical solution of the Vlasov equation for the longitudinal dynamics. For the DR baseline lattice as of Feb. 2007 we find the critical current forinstability to be safely above the design specifications leaving room for further optimization of the choice of the momentum compaction.

  14. Bohm-Aharonov and Kondo effects on tunneling currents in a mesoscopic ring

    SciTech Connect

    Davidovich, M.A.; Anda, E.V.; Chiappe, G.

    1997-03-01

    We present an analysis of the Kondo effect on the Bohm-Aharonov oscillations of the tunneling currents in a mesoscopic ring with a quantum dot inserted in one of its arms. The system is described by an Anderson-impurity tight-binding Hamiltonian where the electron-electron interaction is restricted to the dot. The currents are obtained using nonequilibrium Green functions calculated through a cumulant diagrammatic expansion in the chain approximation. It is shown that at low temperature, even with the system out of resonance, the Kondo peak provides a channel for the electron to tunnel through the dot, giving rise to the Bohm-Aharonov oscillations of the current. At high temperature these oscillations are important only if the dot level is aligned to the Fermi level, when the resonance condition is satisfied. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  15. Reprint of : Semiclassical theory of persistent current fluctuations in ballistic chaotic rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brouwer, Piet W.; Danon, Jeroen

    2016-08-01

    The persistent current in a mesoscopic ring has a Gaussian distribution with small non-Gaussian corrections. Here we report a semiclassical calculation of the leading non-Gaussian correction, which is described by the three-point correlation function. The semiclassical approach is applicable to systems in which the electron dynamics is ballistic and chaotic, and includes the dependence on the Ehrenfest time. At small but finite Ehrenfest times, the non-Gaussian fluctuations are enhanced with respect to the limit of zero Ehrenfest time.

  16. Aromatic character of planar boron-based clusters revisited by ring current calculations.

    PubMed

    Pham, Hung Tan; Lim, Kie Zen; Havenith, Remco W A; Nguyen, Minh Tho

    2016-04-28

    The planarity of small boron-based clusters is the result of an interplay between geometry, electron delocalization, covalent bonding and stability. These compounds contain two different bonding patterns involving both σ and π delocalized bonds, and up to now, their aromaticity has been assigned mainly using the classical (4N + 2) electron count for both types of electrons. In the present study, we reexplored the aromatic feature of different types of planar boron-based clusters making use of the ring current approach. B3(+/-), B4(2-), B5(+/-), B6, B7(-), B8(2-), B9(-), B10(2-), B11(-), B12, B13(+), B14(2-) and B16(2-) are characterized by magnetic responses to be doubly σ and π aromatic species in which the π aromaticity can be predicted using the (4N + 2) electron count. The triply aromatic character of B12 and B13(+) is confirmed. The π electrons of B18(2-), B19(-) and B20(2-) obey the disk aromaticity rule with an electronic configuration of [1σ(2)1π(4)1δ(4)2σ(2)] rather than the (4N + 2) count. The double aromaticity feature is observed for boron hydride cycles including B@B5H5(+), Li7B5H5 and M@BnHn(q) clusters from both the (4N + 2) rule and ring current maps. The double π and σ aromaticity in carbon-boron planar cycles B7C(-), B8C, B6C2, B9C(-), B8C2 and B7C3(-) is in conflict with the Hückel electron count. This is also the case for the ions B11C5(+/-) whose ring current indicators suggest that they belong to the class of double aromaticity, in which the π electrons obey the disk aromaticity characteristics. In many clusters, the classical electron count cannot be applied, and the magnetic responses of the electron density expressed in terms of the ring current provide us with a more consistent criterion for determining their aromatic character. PMID:26956732

  17. Suppression of the turbulent decay of an afterspark channel with residual current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonov, Sergey V.; Isaenkov, Yuri I.; Shneider, Mikhail N.

    2007-12-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental study of a pulse discharge in air at atmospheric pressure and the post-discharge channel decay. It is shown for the first time that a relatively small residual current suppresses the development of gas-dynamic instability and stabilizes the channel. The results of the experiments are compared with predictions of our previously developed theoretical model.

  18. Effect of flavor-changing neutral currents in the leptonic asymmetry in Bd decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branco, G. C.; Parada, P. A.; Morozumi, T.; Rebelo, M. N.

    1993-06-01

    We evaluate the charge asymmetry in equal sign dileptons arising from the decay of a Bd0-Bd0 pair, in the presence of Z-mediated flavor-changing neutral currents. We compare our predictions with those of the standard model and the superweak model. Work supported by the Deprtment of Energy, contract DEAC03-76SF00515 and by a fellowship from OTAN (NATO).

  19. Non-Markovian response of ultrafast coherent electronic ring currents in chiral aromatic molecules in a condensed phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mineo, H.; Lin, S. H.; Fujimura, Y.; Xu, J.; Xu, R. X.; Yan, Y. J.

    2013-12-01

    Results of a theoretical study on non-Markov response for femtosecond laser-driven coherent ring currents in chiral aromatic molecules embedded in a condensed phase are presented. Coherent ring currents are generated by coherent excitation of a pair of quasi-degenerated π-electronic excited states. The coherent electronic dynamical behaviors are strongly influenced by interactions between the electronic system and phonon bath in a condensed phase. Here, the bath correlation time is not instantaneous but should be taken to be a finite time in ultrashort time-resolved experiments. In such a case, Markov approximation breaks down. A hierarchical master equation approach for an improved semiclassical Drude dissipation model was adopted to examine the non-Markov effects on ultrafast coherent electronic ring currents of (P)-2,2'-biphenol in a condensed phase. Time evolution of the coherent ring current derived in the hierarchical master equation approach was calculated and compared with those in the Drude model in the Markov approximation and in the static limit. The results show how non-Markovian behaviors in quantum beat signals of ring currents depend on the Drude bath damping constant. Effects of temperatures on ultrafast coherent electronic ring currents are also clarified.

  20. Non-Markovian response of ultrafast coherent electronic ring currents in chiral aromatic molecules in a condensed phase

    SciTech Connect

    Mineo, H.; Lin, S. H.; Fujimura, Y.; Xu, J.; Xu, R. X.; Yan, Y. J.

    2013-12-07

    Results of a theoretical study on non-Markov response for femtosecond laser-driven coherent ring currents in chiral aromatic molecules embedded in a condensed phase are presented. Coherent ring currents are generated by coherent excitation of a pair of quasi-degenerated π-electronic excited states. The coherent electronic dynamical behaviors are strongly influenced by interactions between the electronic system and phonon bath in a condensed phase. Here, the bath correlation time is not instantaneous but should be taken to be a finite time in ultrashort time-resolved experiments. In such a case, Markov approximation breaks down. A hierarchical master equation approach for an improved semiclassical Drude dissipation model was adopted to examine the non-Markov effects on ultrafast coherent electronic ring currents of (P)-2,2{sup ′}-biphenol in a condensed phase. Time evolution of the coherent ring current derived in the hierarchical master equation approach was calculated and compared with those in the Drude model in the Markov approximation and in the static limit. The results show how non-Markovian behaviors in quantum beat signals of ring currents depend on the Drude bath damping constant. Effects of temperatures on ultrafast coherent electronic ring currents are also clarified.

  1. Non-Markovian response of ultrafast coherent electronic ring currents in chiral aromatic molecules in a condensed phase.

    PubMed

    Mineo, H; Lin, S H; Fujimura, Y; Xu, J; Xu, R X; Yan, Y J

    2013-12-01

    Results of a theoretical study on non-Markov response for femtosecond laser-driven coherent ring currents in chiral aromatic molecules embedded in a condensed phase are presented. Coherent ring currents are generated by coherent excitation of a pair of quasi-degenerated π-electronic excited states. The coherent electronic dynamical behaviors are strongly influenced by interactions between the electronic system and phonon bath in a condensed phase. Here, the bath correlation time is not instantaneous but should be taken to be a finite time in ultrashort time-resolved experiments. In such a case, Markov approximation breaks down. A hierarchical master equation approach for an improved semiclassical Drude dissipation model was adopted to examine the non-Markov effects on ultrafast coherent electronic ring currents of (P)-2,2'-biphenol in a condensed phase. Time evolution of the coherent ring current derived in the hierarchical master equation approach was calculated and compared with those in the Drude model in the Markov approximation and in the static limit. The results show how non-Markovian behaviors in quantum beat signals of ring currents depend on the Drude bath damping constant. Effects of temperatures on ultrafast coherent electronic ring currents are also clarified. PMID:24320379

  2. Enhancement of persistent current in mesoscopic rings and cylinders: shortest and next possible shortest higher-order hopping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiti, Santanu K.; Chowdhury, J.; Karmakar, S. N.

    2006-06-01

    We present a detailed study of persistent current and low-field magnetic susceptibility in single isolated normal metal mesoscopic rings and cylinders in the tight-binding model with higher-order hopping integral in the Hamiltonian. Our exact calculations show that order of magnitude enhancement of persistent current takes place even in the presence of disorder if we include the higher-order hopping integral in the Hamiltonian. In strictly one-channel mesoscopic rings the sign of the low-field currents can be predicted exactly even in the presence of impurity. We observe that perfect rings with both odd and even numbers of electrons support only diamagnetic currents. On the other hand in the disordered rings, irrespective of realization of the disordered configurations of the ring, we always get diamagnetic currents with odd numbers of electrons and paramagnetic currents with even numbers of electrons. In mesoscopic cylinders the sign of the low-field currents cannot be predicted exactly since it strongly depends on the total number of electrons, Ne, and also on the disordered configurations of the system. From the variation of persistent current amplitude with system size for constant electron density, we conclude that the enhancement of persistent current due to additional higher-order hopping integrals is visible only in the mesoscopic regime.

  3. Pitch Angle Scattering of Ring Current Ions During a Magnetic Storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walt, M.; Voss, H. D.

    2001-05-01

    On August 6, 1998, a magnetic storm occurred with a minimum Dst of 138 nT. Pitch angle distributions of the ring current ions were obtained with the SEPS/CEPPAD charged particle spectrometer on the NASA POLAR satellite during its passes through the radiation belt region. When SEPS was oriented parallel to the geomagnetic field, SEPS measured the downward and upward ion fluxes inside the loss cones with an angular resolution of about 1.5 deg. During the day following minimum Dst fluxes of 155 keV ions were observed inside the downward loss cone, comparable in intensity to the trapped fluxes measured at equatorial pitch angles of 50 deg. The distributions within the loss cone were uniform, suggesting that strong diffusion was occurring equatorward of the satellite latitude of 45 deg. At L values between 4 and 5 the scattering was strong enough to dominate the losses of ring current ions. During the early recovery phase of the storm the precipitation was greater in the afternoon sector (16:00 MLT) than in the morning sector (4:00 MLT).

  4. Energy transfer between energetic ring current H(+) and O(+) by electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorne, Richard M.; Horne, Richard B.

    1994-01-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves in the frequency range below the helium gyrofrequency can be excited in the equatorial region of the outer magnetosphere by cyclotron resonant instability with anisotropic ring current H(+) ions. As the unducted waves propagate to higher latitudes, the wave normal should become highly inclined to the ambient magnetic field. Under such conditions, wave energy can be absorbed by cyclotron resonant interactions with ambient O(+), leading to ion heating perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field. Resonant wave absorption peaks in the vicinity of the bi-ion frequency and the second harmonic of the O(+) gyrofrequrency. This absorption should mainly occur at latitudes between 10 deg and 30 deg along auroral field lines (L is greater than or equal to 7) in the postnoon sector. The concomitant ion heating perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field can contribute to the isotropization and geomagnetic trapping of collapsed O(+) ion conics (or beams) that originate from a low-altitude ionospheric source region. During geomagnetic storms when the O(+) content of the magnetosphere is significantly enhanced, the absorption of EMIC waves should become more efficient, and it may contribute to the observed acceleration of O(+) ions of ionospheric origin up to ring current energies.

  5. Geomagnetic inverse of the ring current during magnetic storm and its applications in the Dst index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bo, C.

    2012-12-01

    Intensity and lasting time of the main phase were two significantly important parts for the space weather prediction. Furthermore, any improvements of forecasting technique and result depend on the studies of the ring current energization during magnetic storm. It's also helpful to advance our knowledge of the energy transport and transformation when energization was fully understood. In a word, the research progress by the methods of theoretic analysis combined with geomagnetic inverse should be useful to investigate the physical energization with both academic meanings and operational application. This program start with the lognormal fitting of Dst indices and further analyse the energization of the charged particle in traveling magnetosphere by using single particle dynamics and adiabatic theory. The probability distribution function will be proposed in order to extend the single particle problem to many particles which consistent with real physics. After that, a quantitative parameter which called energizing index as describe the efficiency of the ring current energization will be designed. Finally, the two fitting parameters of lognormal will be physically interpreted after compared with the geomagnetic observations and then the theoretic basis for Dst physical predicting can be constructed.

  6. Rings of the North Brazil Current: Their structure and behavior inferred from observations and a numerical simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fratantoni, David M.; Johns, William E.; Townsend, Tamara L.

    1995-01-01

    Large anticyclonic rings are shed from the retroflecting North Brazil Current (NBC) near 8 deg N in the tropical western Atlantic. New subsurface velocity and temperature measurements within three such rings are presented here and are found to be consistent with previous in situ and remotely sensed NBC ring measurements. A high-resolution numerical model of the Atlantic Ocean forced by monthly wind stress and an imposed meridional overturning cell is found to shed NBC rings that approximate those observed. The model rings are more surface-intensified than those observed and somewhat smaller in diameter. Both observed and modeled NBC rings move northwestward along the coast of South America with a speed of 8-16 cm/s, considerably slower than predicted by analytical theories describing westward ring propagation. At least 2-3 rings per year separate from the NBC retroflection. Annually, 1-3 rings translate intact from their formation region near 50 deg W to the islands of the southeastern Caribbean, where they disintegrate after a lifetime of about 100 days. This study is the first to make use of subsurface temperature and velocity data to compute the volume of the anomalous ring core. NBC rings may be responsible for 3-4 Sv of direct mass transport across the equatorial-tropical gyre boundary or 20-25% of the total upper ocean cross-gyre transport required by the Atlantic meridional overturning cell. Translating NBC rings may contribute 20% of the total meridional heat transport by the ocean at this latitude.

  7. Self-Consistent Model of Magnetospheric Ring Current and Propagating Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves. 2; Waves, Precipitating Ring Current Ions, and Thermal Electron Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Gamayunov, K. V.; Gallagher, D. L.

    2006-01-01

    This paper is dedicated to further presentations and discussions of the results from our new global self-consistent theoretical model of interacting ring current ions and electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves [Khazanov et al., 2006; here referred to as Paper 1]. In order to adequately take into account the wave propagation and refraction in a multi-ion plasmasphere, we explicitly include the ray tracing equations in our previous self-consistent model and use the general form of the wave kinetic equation [for details see Paper 1]. To demonstrate the effects of the EMIC wave propagation and refraction on the RC proton precipitations and heating of the thermal plasmaspheric electrons we simulate the May 1998 storm. The main findings of our simulation can be summarized as follows. Firstly, the wave induced precipitations have a quite fine structure, and are highly organized by location of the plasmapause gradient. The strongest fluxes of about 4 (raised dot) 10(exp 6) [(cm (raised dot) s (raised dot) sr)(sup -l)] are observed during the main and early recovery phases of the storm. The very interesting and probably more important finding is that in a number of cases the most intense precipitating fluxes are not simply connected to the most intense EMIC waves. The character of the EMIC wave power spectral density distribution over the equatorial wave normal angle is an extremely crucial for the effectiveness of the RC ion scattering. Secondly, comparison of the global proton precipitating patterns with the results from other ring current model [Kozyra et al., 1997] reveals that although we observe a qualitative agreement between localizations of the wave induced fluxes in the models, there is no quantitative agreement between the magnitudes of these fluxes. These differences are mainly due to a qualitative difference between the characters of the EMIC wave power spectral density distributions over the equatorial wave normal angle. Finally, the two energy sources to the

  8. Electron-phonon interaction effect on persistent current in a one-dimensional quantum ring by using a simple model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omidi, Mahboubeh; Faizabadi, Edris

    2015-09-01

    We use a simple model to study the electron-phonon interaction influences on persistent current in a one-dimensional quantum ring enclosed by a magnetic flux. With increasing the temperature, persistent current amplitude is reduced, especially in a quantum ring with two ions per primitive cell (diatomic ring) because of the participation of optical phonons. Furthermore, the periodicity of the Aharonov-Bohm oscillations changes to Φ0 / 2 (Φ0 is magnetic flux quantum). In a diatomic ring, by increasing the difference between left and right nearest-neighbor hopping integrals at zero temperature, persistent current variations show a transition from metallic to insulator against distinctive behavior at nonzero temperature.

  9. Initial results from a dynamic coupled magnetosphere-ionosphere-ring current model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pembroke, Asher; Toffoletto, Frank; Sazykin, Stanislav; Wiltberger, Michael; Lyon, John; Merkin, Viacheslav; Schmitt, Peter

    2012-02-01

    In this paper we describe a coupled model of Earth's magnetosphere that consists of the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry (LFM) global magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulation, the MIX ionosphere solver and the Rice Convection Model (RCM) and report some results using idealized inputs and model parameters. The algorithmic and physical components of the model are described, including the transfer of magnetic field information and plasma boundary conditions to the RCM and the return of ring current plasma properties to the LFM. Crucial aspects of the coupling include the restriction of RCM to regions where field-line averaged plasma-β ≤ 1, the use of a plasmasphere model, and the MIX ionosphere model. Compared to stand-alone MHD, the coupled model produces a substantial increase in ring current pressure and reduction of the magnetic field near the Earth. In the ionosphere, stronger region-1 and region-2 Birkeland currents are seen in the coupled model but with no significant change in the cross polar cap potential drop, while the region-2 currents shielded the low-latitude convection potential. In addition, oscillations in the magnetic field are produced at geosynchronous orbit with the coupled code. The diagnostics of entropy and mass content indicate that these oscillations are associated with low-entropy flow channels moving in from the tail and may be related to bursty bulk flows and bubbles seen in observations. As with most complex numerical models, there is the ongoing challenge of untangling numerical artifacts and physics, and we find that while there is still much room for improvement, the results presented here are encouraging.

  10. Predictions on the second-class current decays τ-→π-η(')ντ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escribano, R.; Gonzàlez-Solís, S.; Roig, P.

    2016-08-01

    We analyze the second-class current decays τ-→π-η(')ντ in the framework of chiral perturbation theory with resonances. Taking into account π0-η -η' mixing, the π-η(') vector form factor is extracted, in a model-independent way, using existing data on the π-π0 one. For the participant scalar form factor, we have considered different parametrizations ordered according to their increasing fulfillment of analyticity and unitarity constraints. We start with a Breit-Wigner parametrization dominated by the a0(980 ) scalar resonance and after we include its excited state, the a0(1450 ). We follow by an elastic dispersion relation representation through the Omnès integral. Then, we illustrate a method to derive a closed-form expression for the π-η , π-η' (and K-K0) scalar form factors in a coupled-channels treatment. Finally, predictions for the branching ratios and spectra are discussed emphasizing the error analysis. An interesting result of this study is that both τ-→π-η(')ντ decay channels are promising for the soon discovery of second-class currents at Belle-II. We also predict the relevant observables for the partner ηℓ3(') decays, which are extremely suppressed in the Standard Model.

  11. R-parity violation in flavor-changing neutral current processes and top quark decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agashe, K.; Graesser, M.

    1996-10-01

    We show that supersymmetric R-parity-breaking (R/p) interactions always result in flavor changing neutral current processes. Within a single coupling scheme, these processes can be avoided in either the charge +2/3 or the charge -1/3 quark sector, but not both. These processes are used to place constraints on R/p couplings. The constraints on the first and the second generations are better than those existing in the literature. The R/p interactions may result in new top quark decays. Some of these violate electron-muon universality or produce a surplus of b quark events in tt¯ decays. Results from the CDF experiment are used to bound these R/p couplings.

  12. A search for A b‧ quark with flavor changing neutral current decay modes at TRISTAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Doser, M.; Enomoto, R.; Fujii, H.; Fujii, K.; Fujii, T.; Fujimoto, J.; Fujiwara, K.; Fujiwara, N.; Hayashii, H.; Higashi, S.; Howell, B.; Iida, N.; Imanishi, A.; Ikeda, H.; Ishii, T.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, H.; Iwashiro, K.; Kajikawa, R.; Kamae, T.; Kato, S.; Kato, Y.; Kawabata, S.; Kayahara, Y.; Kichimi, H.; Kishida, T.; Kobayashi, M.; Koltick, D.; Kusuki, N.; Levine, I.; Maruyama, A.; Maruyama, K.; Matsushita, K.; Miyamoto, A.; Muramatsu, K.; Nagai, K.; Nagira, T.; Nitoh, O.; Noguchi, S.; Ochiai, F.; Okuno, H.; Okusawa, T.; Onodera, S.; Ozaki, H.; Sasayama, N.; Shimonaka, A.; Shimozawa, K.; Shirahashi, A.; Sugahara, R.; Sugiyama, A.; Suzuki, S.; Takahashi, K.; Takahashi, T.; Takahashi, T.; Takahashi, T.; Takamure, H.; Tauchi, T.; Teramoto, Y.; Tsukamoto, T.; Ukai, K.; Uno, S.; Watanabe, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamashita, S.; Yamauchi, M.; Yoake, Y.; Yoshizawa, J.; Topaz Collaboration

    1990-01-01

    A search for the b‧ quark via flavour changing neutral current (FCNC) decay modes is described. The search was carried out by looking for isolated high energy photon(s) or back to back jet pairs within 4-jet topologies using the data taken by the TOPAZ detector at TRISTAN in the energy range s=50.0-60.8 GeV. As the FCNC decay branching ratio of the b‧ is unknown, the experimental limits are given as a function of mass and branching ratio. Assuming the branching ration of the FCNC mode is 100%, a mass limit for b‧ is set ⩾28.3 GeV/ c2 independent of Br(b‧→b γ).

  13. Current-assisted magnetization switching in a mesoscopic NiFe ring with nanoconstrictions of a wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zhengqi; Zhou, Yun; Du, Yuqing; Moate, Roy; Wilton, David; Pan, Genhua; Chen, Yifang; Cui, Zheng

    2006-04-01

    A mesoscopic NiFe ring with nanoconstrictions of a wire was fabricated by electron beam lithography and lift-off techniques. Magnetic switching and reversal process have been measured by magnetoresistance as a function of the applied current. It is shown that the applied current has an effect on the switching fields and finally affects the reversal process. The decrease or increase in the switching field from the vortex state to the onion state depends on the electron flow with respect to the direction of domain propagation. The spin in the ring switches from an onion state to the opposite onion state in the low applied current via the double switching process. However, the spin in the ring switches directly from an onion state to the opposite due to the spin torque effect when the applied current is higher than the critical current density (of 107A/cm2).

  14. Guiding-Center Simulations of Stormtime Ring Current Electrons in a More Realistic Magnetic Field Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, S.; Chen, M.; Schulz, M.; Lyons, L.

    2003-12-01

    We examine the consequences of using a more realistic magnetic field for simulating stormtime electron ring current formation. In the past, we have simulated the guiding-center drift of electrons from the plasma sheet to the inner magnetosphere and their loss as they drift in a Dungey magnetic field model consisting of a dipole plus uniform southward field. We improve upon this in the present study by including realistic day-night asymmetry and time variations in the magnetic field by varying the magnitude of the added unidirectional southward field with time (UT) and magnetospheric longitude (MLT) so as to match the modeled polar cap boundary to the auroral poleward boundary provided by the empirically-based OVATION model [Newell et al.}, JGR, 2002]. Our model electric field consists of corotation, quiescent Stern-Volland convection, and storm-associated enhancements in the convection electric field that are less well shielded than the Stern-Volland field. Our enhancements in the cross-polar-cap potential are based on DMSP measurements. We trace the guiding-center drifts of representative equatorially-mirroring electrons with first adiabatic invariants μ = 1 -- 200 MeV/G for the 27 August 1990 storm. Using these simulation results, we map stormtime phase space distributions by invoking Liouville's Theorem modified by losses. Our boundary spectrum at geosynchronous orbit and our initial quiescent distribution are taken from CRRES observations. With both the static Dungey and the more realistic magnetic field model, there are significant stormtime enhancements of ring-current electron fluxes at equatorial radial distance r0 = 2.6 to 6.6 RE for energies from tens of keV up to 180 keV. However, the electron drift speed is slower on the dayside than on the nightside in the more realistic asymmetric magnetic field model because the magnetic field intensity is stronger on the dayside than the nightside at a given r0. This makes the stormtime electron ring current more

  15. Effects of pressure anisotropy on magnetospheric magnetohydrodynamics equilibrium of an internal ring current system

    SciTech Connect

    Furukawa, M.

    2014-01-15

    Effects of pressure anisotropy on magnetospheric magnetohydrodynamics equilibrium are studied analytically and numerically, where the plasma is confined by only poloidal magnetic field generated by an internal ring current. The plasma current due to finite pressure can be divided into two components; one remains at isotropic pressure and the other arises from pressure anisotropy. When p{sub ⊥}, the pressure perpendicular to the magnetic field, is larger than p{sub ∥}, the pressure parallel to the magnetic field, those two components of plasma current tend to cancel each other to reduce the total amount of plasma current. Equilibrium beta limit is also examined, where the beta is a ratio of the plasma pressure to the magnetic pressure. The equilibrium beta limit decreases as the pressure anisotropy becomes strong. The beta value is strictly limited by ellipticity of the equilibrium equation when p{sub ∥}>p{sub ⊥}. On the other hand, when p{sub ⊥}>p{sub ∥}, although the tendency of the beta limit agrees with the ellipticity condition of the equilibrium equation, equilibria with a hyperbolic region can be obtained by iterative procedure with practically reasonable convergence criteria.

  16. Decay of a superfluid current of ultracold atoms in a toroidal trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathey, Amy C.; Clark, Charles W.; Mathey, L.

    2014-08-01

    Using a numerical implementation of the truncated Wigner approximation, we simulate the experiment reported by Ramanathan et al. in Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 130401 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.106.130401, in which a Bose-Einstein condensate is created in a toroidal trap and set into rotation via a phase imprinting technique. A potential barrier is then placed in the trap to study the decay of the superflow. We find that the current decays via thermally activated phase slips, which can also be visualized as vortices crossing the barrier region in the radial direction. Adopting the notion of critical velocity used in the experiment, we determine it to be lower than the local speed of sound at the barrier, in contradiction to the predictions of the zero-temperature Gross-Pitaevskii equation. We map out the superfluid decay rate and critical velocity as a function of temperature and observe a strong dependence. Thermal fluctuations offer a partial explanation of the experimentally observed reduction of the critical velocity from the phonon velocity.

  17. An unusual SAR arc observed during ring current development, 4 August 1972. [Stable Auroral Red

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepherd, G. G.; Brace, L. H.; Burrows, J. R.; Hoffman, J. H.; Klumpar, D. M.; James, H. G.; Whitteker, J. H.; Nagy, A. F.; Stathopoulos, E.

    1980-01-01

    An unusual SAR arc observed during the growth phase of the ring current is described. Proton precipitation was observed, with electron temperature enhancements throughout the region, and an F-region trough present at the equatorward boundary; a high flux of low energy at the SAR arc location and a 'slot' in the ambient electron density are characteristic of this event. Comparisons are made with S3-A spacecraft observations made in the equatorial region at the same time and with Isis-II observations of a more normal SAR arc; the kinetic Alfven process described by Hasegawa and Mima (1978) appears to account for the acceleration of these low energy electrons, although an auroral-type acceleration process cannot be excluded.

  18. Assessing the role of oxygen on ring current formation and evolution through numerical experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilie, R.; Liemohn, M. W.; Toth, G.; Yu Ganushkina, N.; Daldorff, L. K. S.

    2015-06-01

    We address the effect of ionospheric outflow and magnetospheric ion composition on the physical processes that control the development of the 5 August 2011 magnetic storm. Simulations with the Space Weather Modeling Framework are used to investigate the global dynamics and energization of ions throughout the magnetosphere during storm time, with a focus on the formation and evolution of the ring current. Simulations involving multifluid (with variable H+/O+ ratio in the inner magnetosphere) and single-fluid (with constant H+/O+ ratio in the inner magnetosphere) MHD for the global magnetosphere with inner boundary conditions set either by specifying a constant ion density or by physics-based calculations of the ion fluxes reveal that dynamical changes of the ion composition in the inner magnetosphere alter the total energy density of the magnetosphere, leading to variations in the magnetic field as well as particle drifts throughout the simulated domain. A low oxygen to hydrogen ratio and outflow resulting from a constant ion density boundary produced the most disturbed magnetosphere, leading to a stronger ring current but misses the timing of the storm development. Conversely, including a physics-based solution for the ionospheric outflow to the magnetosphere system leads to a reduction in the cross-polar cap potential (CPCP). The increased presence of oxygen in the inner magnetosphere affects the global magnetospheric structure and dynamics and brings the nightside reconnection point closer to the Earth. The combination of reduced CPCP together with the formation of the reconnection line closer to the Earth yields less adiabatic heating in the magnetotail and reduces the amount of energetic plasma that has access to the inner magnetosphere.

  19. Comparisons of Simulated and Observed Stormtime Magnetic Intensities and Ion Plasma Parameters in the Ring Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, M. W.; Guild, T. B.; Lemon, C.; Roeder, J. L.; Le, G.; Schulz, M.

    2009-12-01

    Recent progress in ring current and plasma sheet modeling has shown the importance of a self-consistent treatment of particle transport and magnetic and electric fields in the inner magnetosphere. Models with and without self-consistency can lead to significantly different magnitudes and spatial distributions of plasma pressure and magnetic intensity during disturbed times. In this study we compare simulated and observed stormtime magnetic intensities (GOES and Polar/MFE) and ion densities (LANL/MPA and Polar/CAMMICE) to test how well self-consistent simulations can simultaneously reproduce these quantities. We simulate the ring current and plasma sheet for conditions corresponding to the 11 August 2000 storm using the self-consistent Rice Convection Model-Equilibrium (RCM-E) [Lemon et al., JGR, 2004] with a constant magnetopause location. Using the empirical IMF-dependent model of Tsyganenko and Mukai [JGR, 2003], we specify the plasma sheet pressure and density at 10 RE as the plasma boundary location in the RCM-E. The simulated ion densities at different magnetic local times agree fairly well with those from the re-analysis model of LANL/MPA densities of O’Brien and Lemon [Space Weather, 2007]. We compare the simulated magnetic intensity with the magnetic intensity measured by magnetometers on the GOES satellites at geosynchronous altitude (6.6 RE) and on the Polar satellite. Agreement between the simulated and observed magnetic intensities tends to agree better on the nightside than on the dayside in the inner magnetosphere. In particular, the model cannot account for observed drops in the dayside magnetic intensity during decreases in the solar wind pressure. We will modify the RCM-E to include a time-varying magnetopause location to simulate compressions and expansions associated with variations in the solar wind pressure. We investigate whether this will lead to improved agreement between the simulated and model magnetic intensities.

  20. Search for the flavor-changing neutral current decay K sup + yields. pi. sup +. nu. nu

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, M.M. . Joseph Henry Labs.)

    1990-01-01

    The observation that flavor-changing neutral currents (FCNC) in weak decays are highly suppressed was first explained by Glashow, Iliopoulos and Maiani in 1970, and their idea has since become a cornerstone of the Standard Model. They proposed a model of the weak interaction that included a then new fourth quark and which, in a natural way, allowed the existence of a neutral vector boson without inducing FCNC's at tree level. Thus the couplings of the neutral intermediary{hor ellipsis}cause no embarrassment.'' In higher order through, decays like K {yields} {pi}l{bar l} can proceed. Measurements of such processes provide a detailed test of the Standard Model since definite predictions for their rates can be calculated. Conversely, if no contradictions are found and the standard model is assumed to describe the physics, measurements limit the allowed values of the parameters of the model. As is often the case in studying processes that are highly suppressed and heretofore unseen, improvements in the sensitivity of experiments allow the possibility for the discovery of new physics that exhibits a similar experimental signature. This paper describes experiment 787 at Brookhaven which is expected to address some of these issues. The status and future of the experiment will be described here. The main goal of E787 is to measure the rate of K{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{nu}{bar {nu}} at the standard model level. In addition, the experiment has sensitivity to other FCNC decays of the charged kaon, in particular the decays K{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}} and K{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{gamma}{gamma}.

  1. Dynamics of the ring current and ion fluxes at low altitudes during the February 27-28, 2014 magnetic storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalegaev, V. V.; Vlasova, N. A.; Nazarkov, I. S.

    2015-11-01

    A comparative analysis has been performed for the dynamics of the ring current and ion fluxes at low altitudes during the February 27, 2014 geomagnetic storm. We use concurrent experimental data on ion fluxes with an energy of ~30 to 250 keV in the near-equatorial magnetospheric region at altitudes up to 30000 km from the Van Allen Probes satellite and at a polar orbit up to 1000 km from the Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellite (POES). The main phase of the storm was characterized by increased ion fluxes with E < 100 keV and decreased fluxes with E > 100 keV, both near the ring current and in the low-orbit equatorial region, reflecting the fact that the particle spectrum of the ring current in the main phase of the storm becomes softed. The observed phenomenon may originate from the precipitation of ring-current particles registered by POES below the isotropization boundary. It was shown that the variations in ion fluxes at low orbit during the geomagnetic storm generally reflect the ring current dynamics, although each region under consideration has its own specific features complementing the general pattern of the Earth's magnetosphere dynamics.

  2. Improvement of current limitation in the storage ring NIJI-IV

    SciTech Connect

    Yokoyama, M.; Kawai, M.; Hamada, S.

    1995-12-31

    The storage ring NIJI-IV dedicated to free-electron lasers was completed in December 1990. Lasing at 595-352 nm by using the NIJI-IV was accomplished by April 1994. The NIJI-IV has 16 rf-buckets. The electron bunch contributed to FEL gain of the NIJI-IV is only one of 16. In order to get the redundant bunch, make beam quality better, and make the FEL operation easier, a single bunch injection (SBI) system by using a short pulse beam from an electron gun was prepared. The quality of the beam accelerated and bunched by a buncher section has already been investigated. It was convinced that the accelerated short pulse beam satisfies the performance required on the SBI of the NIJI-IV. At present, the operation of the SBI system is being tested. Storage efficiency (the ratio of storage current to injection current) and limitation of storage current by using the SBI system will be reported in this conference. We expect lasing at below 352nm by the SBI.

  3. Storage Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, W.

    2011-01-01

    Storage rings are circular machines that store particle beams at a constant energy. Beams are stored in rings without acceleration for a number of reasons (Tab. 1). Storage rings are used in high-energy, nuclear, atomic, and molecular physics, as well as for experiments in chemistry, material and life sciences. Parameters for storage rings such as particle species, energy, beam intensity, beam size, and store time vary widely depending on the application. The beam must be injected into a storage ring but may not be extracted (Fig. 1). Accelerator rings such as synchrotrons are used as storage rings before and after acceleration. Particles stored in rings include electrons and positrons; muons; protons and anti-protons; neutrons; light and heavy, positive and negative, atomic ions of various charge states; molecular and cluster ions, and neutral polar molecules. Spin polarized beams of electrons, positrons, and protons were stored. The kinetic energy of the stored particles ranges from 10{sup -6} eV to 3.5 x 10{sup 12} eV (LHC, 7 x 10{sup 12} eV planned), the number of stored particles from one (ESR) to 1015 (ISR). To store beam in rings requires bending (dipoles) and transverse focusing (quadrupoles). Higher order multipoles are used to correct chromatic aberrations, to suppress instabilities, and to compensate for nonlinear field errors of dipoles and quadrupoles. Magnetic multipole functions can be combined in magnets. Beams are stored bunched with radio frequency systems, and unbunched. The magnetic lattice and radio frequency system are designed to ensure the stability of transverse and longitudinal motion. New technologies allow for better storage rings. With strong focusing the beam pipe dimensions became much smaller than previously possible. For a given circumference superconducting magnets make higher energies possible, and superconducting radio frequency systems allow for efficient replenishment of synchrotron radiation losses of large current electron or

  4. Relative importance of ring and tail currents to Dst under extremely disturbed conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalegaev, V. V.; Makarenkov, E. V.

    2008-02-01

    Relative ring current (RC) and tail current (TC) contributions to Dst were investigated on the basis of the statistical study of 70 magnetic storms of different intensities. Special attention was paid to the extremely disturbed conditions during magnetic storms in October-November 2003. Variations of the magnetic field produced by magnetospheric currents on the Earth's surface were calculated using paraboloid model of the magnetosphere A2000 [Alexeev, I.I., Belenkaya, E.S., Kalegaev, V.V., Feldstein, Y.I., Grafe, A., 1996. Journal of Geophysical Research 101,7737; Alexeev, I.I., Kalegaev, V.V., Belenkaya, E.S., Bobrovnikov, S.Yu., Feldstein, Ya.I., Gromova, L.I., 2001. Journal of Geophysical Research 106, 25683], taking into account the effect of terrestrial induced currents. For each magnetic storm we calculated Dst and contributions produced by large-scale magnetospheric current systems. The relative RC and TC contributions for each event at the storm maximum were examined in relationship to the peak pressure-corrected Dst value. Analysis of Dst sources confirms the conclusions of Kalegaev and Ganushkina [2005. In: Pulkkinen, T., Tsyganenko, N.A., Friedel, R.H.W. (Eds.), Physics and Modeling of the Inner Magnetosphere, AGU Geophysical Monograph 155. AGU, Washington, DC, p. 293] and Kalegaev and Makarenkov [2006. Geomagnetism and Aeronomy 46, 570] about saturation of the TC effect under extremely disturbed conditions. The RC becomes the dominant Dst source during severe magnetic storms, but during moderate storms its contribution to Dst is comparable with TC's contribution. The RC injection amplitude increases with the growth of magnetospheric disturbance level.

  5. The role of ring current particle injections: Global simulations and Van Allen Probes observations during 17 March 2013 storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yiqun; Jordanova, Vania; Welling, Dan; Larsen, Brian; Claudepierre, Seth G.; Kletzing, Craig

    2014-02-01

    We simulate substorm injections observed by the Van Allen Probes during the 17 March 2013 storm using a self-consistent coupling between the ring current model RAM-SCB and the global MHD model BATS-R-US. This is a significant advancement compared to previous studies that used artificially imposed electromagnetic field pulses to mimic substorm dipolarization and associated inductive electric field. Several substorm dipolarizations and injections are reproduced in the MHD model, in agreement with the timing of shape changes in the AE/AL index. The associated inductive electric field transports plasma sheet plasma to geostationary altitudes, providing the boundary plasma source to the ring current model. It is found that impulsive plasma sheet injections, together with a large-scale convection electric field, are necessary to develop a strong ring current. Comparisons with Van Allen Probes observations show that our model reasonably well captures dispersed electron injections and the global Dst index.

  6. Stormtime ring current and radiation belt ion transport: Simulations and interpretations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, Larry R.; Gorney, David J.; Chen, Margaret W.; Schulz, Michael

    1995-01-01

    We use a dynamical guiding-center model to investigate the stormtime transport of ring current and radiation-belt ions. We trace the motion of representative ions' guiding centers in response to model substorm-associated impulses in the convection electric field for a range of ion energies. Our simple magnetospheric model allows us to compare our numerical results quantitatively with analytical descriptions of particle transport, (e.g., with the quasilinear theory of radial diffusion). We find that 10-145-keV ions gain access to L approximately 3, where they can form the stormtime ring current, mainly from outside the (trapping) region in which particles execute closed drift paths. Conversely, the transport of higher-energy ions (approximately greater than 145 keV at L approximately 3) turns out to resemble radial diffusion. The quasilinear diffusion coefficient calculated for our model storm does not vary smoothly with particle energy, since our impulses occur at specific (although randomly determined) times. Despite the spectral irregularity, quasilinear theory provides a surprisingly accurate description of the transport process for approximately greater than 145-keV ions, even for the case of an individual storm. For 4 different realizations of our model storm, the geometric mean discrepancies between diffusion coefficients D(sup sim, sub LL) obtained from the simulations and the quasilinear diffusion coefficient D(sup ql, sub LL) amount to factors of 2.3, 2.3, 1.5, and 3.0, respectively. We have found that these discrepancies between D(sup sim, sub LL) and D(sup ql, sub LL) can be reduced slightly by invoking drift-resonance broadening to smooth out the sharp minima and maxima in D(sup ql, sub LL). The mean of the remaining discrepancies between D(sup sim, sub LL) and D(sup ql, sub LL) for the 4 different storms then amount to factors of 1.9, 2.1, 1.5, and 2.7, respectively. We find even better agreement when we reduce the impulse amplitudes systematically in

  7. Effect of resistivity profile on current decay time of initial phase of current quench in neon-gas-puff inducing disruptions of JT-60U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawakami, S.; Shibata, Y.; Watanabe, K. Y.; Ohno, N.; Isayama, A.; Takizuka, T.; Kawano, Y.; Okamoto, M.

    2013-11-01

    According to an early work [Y. Shibata et al., Nucl. Fusion 50, 025015 (2010)] on the behavior of the plasma current decay in the JT-60U disruptive discharges caused by the radiative collapse with a massive neon-gas-puff, the increase of the internal inductance mainly determined the current decay time of plasma current during the initial phase of current quench. To investigate what determines the increase of the internal inductance, we focus attention on the relationship between the electron temperature (or the resistivity) profile and the time evolution of the current density profile and carry out numerical calculations. As a result, we find the reason of the increase of the internal inductance: The current density profile at the start of the current quench is broader than an expected current density profile in the steady state, which is determined by the temperature (or resistivity) profile. The current density profile evolves into peaked one and the internal inductance is increasing.

  8. Effect of resistivity profile on current decay time of initial phase of current quench in neon-gas-puff inducing disruptions of JT-60U

    SciTech Connect

    Kawakami, S.; Ohno, N.; Shibata, Y.; Isayama, A.; Kawano, Y.; Watanabe, K. Y.; Takizuka, T.; Okamoto, M.

    2013-11-15

    According to an early work [Y. Shibata et al., Nucl. Fusion 50, 025015 (2010)] on the behavior of the plasma current decay in the JT-60U disruptive discharges caused by the radiative collapse with a massive neon-gas-puff, the increase of the internal inductance mainly determined the current decay time of plasma current during the initial phase of current quench. To investigate what determines the increase of the internal inductance, we focus attention on the relationship between the electron temperature (or the resistivity) profile and the time evolution of the current density profile and carry out numerical calculations. As a result, we find the reason of the increase of the internal inductance: The current density profile at the start of the current quench is broader than an expected current density profile in the steady state, which is determined by the temperature (or resistivity) profile. The current density profile evolves into peaked one and the internal inductance is increasing.

  9. Effects of inner magnetospheric convection on ring current dynamics: March 10-12, 1998

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordanova, V. K.; Kistler, L. M.; Farrugia, C. J.; Torbert, R. B.

    2001-12-01

    A stream-stream interaction region observed by the Wind spacecraft from ~1200 UT to ~2400 UT, March 10, 1998, triggered a major geomagnetic storm which peaked within a few hours at Dst~-130nT and Kp=7+. During the main phase of this storm the north-south component of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) was large and negative (Bz~-15nT), the solar wind velocity was ~550 km/s, and the solar wind dynamic pressure increased to ~10 nPa. We simulated the storm time injection and trapping of H+, O+, and He+ ring current ions using our global drift-loss model with initial and boundary conditions as specified by measurements from the Equator-S ion composition (ESIC) instrument, the HYDRA instrument on Polar, and the hot plasma instruments on geosynchronous spacecraft. We demonstrated effects of magnetospheric convection, comparing results derived from two inner magnetospheric convection models: (1) the 3 hour averaged Kp-dependent Volland-Stern model and (2) the Weimer [1996] IMF-driven model, where we input interplanetary data from the Magnetic Field Investigation (MFI) and Solar Wind Experiment (SWE) instruments on Wind at 30 min resolution. During the main phase of the storm the Volland-Stern model predicted a large-scale electric field of ~1 mV/m at L=2 to L=5, whereas the Weimer model predicted a maximum electric field of ~3.5 mV/m localized near dusk at L~3. We found that both ring current simulations show reasonable agreement with ESIC and HYDRA data at larger L shells and on the nightside. However, the simulation using a Volland-Stern model predicted wider dips in the ion energy spectra than observed at low L shells in the postnoon local time sector. Ions followed paths at larger distances from Earth and experienced less collisional losses in the Weimer convection model. As a result, the agreement between model and data was significantly improved on the dayside when the IMF-driven convection model of Weimer was used.

  10. Evolution of the ring current ion population, as observed by the CRRES/MICS instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Grande, M.; Perry, C.H.; Blake, J.B.; Chen, M.; Fennell, J.; Roeder, J.L.; Wilken, B.

    1996-07-01

    Using the MICS instrument on CRRES, we have examined high charge state magnetospheric ions in the energy range 20{endash}400 keV/Q, believed to be originally solar wind material, as well as singly charged Oxygen and helium. We will present survey plots of MICS data from the whole CRRES mission. These show a number of interesting features. In particular, it can be seen that the generic feature of storm bulk ring current composition changes is the emergence of a concentration of ionospheric material at low ({ital L}=3) altitude, and its rise to higher {ital L}-shells during the recovery. By contrast, solar wind material remains preponderantly at higher {ital L}-shells, and a belt of ring current alphas forms around {ital L}=4. The altitude of the peak in ionospheric material is a strong function of {ital D}st. Substorms are seen to reflect the background composition at energization, with onset properties apparently unrelated to injection composition, but may contribute to the upflow of oxygen subsequent to onset. During the solar storm of March 1991 we see a considerable increase in the numbers of alpha particles, Fe, Si and other species. Simultaneous changes in their charge states are seen. For example, in the case of iron, we can recognize charge peaks around 9 and 16, and swings between the dominant charge state. The swings in other species charge states are consistent with a change in source temperature from 1.1 to 2.5 million degrees, as expected for different streams of coronal origin. It is clear that this material is locally trapped within the magnetosphere, which suggests that not only has there been an abrupt change between fast and slow stream material, but also that this signature has penetrated promptly to geostationary altitude. This hypothesis is to some extent confirmed by data from the GOES 7 satellite, which shows evidence of a sudden compression of the magnetosphere coincident with the start of the main period of high charge state material.

  11. Evolution of the ring current ion population, as observed by the CRRES/MICS instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Grande, M.; Perry, C. H.; Blake, J. B.; Chen, M.; Fennell, J.; Roeder, J. L.; Wilken, B.

    1996-07-25

    Using the MICS instrument on CRRES, we have examined high charge state magnetospheric ions in the energy range 20-400 keV/Q, believed to be originally solar wind material, as well as singly charged Oxygen and helium. We will present survey plots of MICS data from the whole CRRES mission. These show a number of interesting features. In particular, it can be seen that the generic feature of storm bulk ring current composition changes is the emergence of a concentration of ionospheric material at low (L=3) altitude, and its rise to higher L-shells during the recovery. By contrast, solar wind material remains preponderantly at higher L-shells, and a belt of ring current alphas forms around L=4. The altitude of the peak in ionospheric material is a strong function of Dst. Substorms are seen to reflect the background composition at energization, with onset properties apparently unrelated to injection composition, but may contribute to the upflow of oxygen subsequent to onset. During the solar storm of March 1991 we see a considerable increase in the numbers of alpha particles, Fe, Si and other species. Simultaneous changes in their charge states are seen. For example, in the case of iron, we can recognize charge peaks around 9 and 16, and swings between the dominant charge state. The swings in other species charge states are consistent with a change in source temperature from 1.1 to 2.5 million degrees, as expected for different streams of coronal origin. It is clear that this material is locally trapped within the magnetosphere, which suggests that not only has there been an abrupt change between fast and slow stream material, but also that this signature has penetrated promptly to geostationary altitude. This hypothesis is to some extent confirmed by data from the GOES 7 satellite, which shows evidence of a sudden compression of the magnetosphere coincident with the start of the main period of high charge state material. The signature of a change from low to high

  12. Energy dynamics and current sheet structure in fluid and kinetic simulations of decaying magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Makwana, K. D. Cattaneo, F.; Zhdankin, V.; Li, H.; Daughton, W.

    2015-04-15

    Simulations of decaying magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence are performed with a fluid and a kinetic code. The initial condition is an ensemble of long-wavelength, counter-propagating, shear-Alfvén waves, which interact and rapidly generate strong MHD turbulence. The total energy is conserved and the rate of turbulent energy decay is very similar in both codes, although the fluid code has numerical dissipation, whereas the kinetic code has kinetic dissipation. The inertial range power spectrum index is similar in both the codes. The fluid code shows a perpendicular wavenumber spectral slope of k{sub ⊥}{sup −1.3}. The kinetic code shows a spectral slope of k{sub ⊥}{sup −1.5} for smaller simulation domain, and k{sub ⊥}{sup −1.3} for larger domain. We estimate that collisionless damping mechanisms in the kinetic code can account for the dissipation of the observed nonlinear energy cascade. Current sheets are geometrically characterized. Their lengths and widths are in good agreement between the two codes. The length scales linearly with the driving scale of the turbulence. In the fluid code, their thickness is determined by the grid resolution as there is no explicit diffusivity. In the kinetic code, their thickness is very close to the skin-depth, irrespective of the grid resolution. This work shows that kinetic codes can reproduce the MHD inertial range dynamics at large scales, while at the same time capturing important kinetic physics at small scales.

  13. Updated Search for the Flavor-Changing Neutral-Current Decay $D^0 \\to \\mu^+ \\mu^-$

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2010-08-01

    We report on a search for the flavor-changing neutral-current decay D{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96TeV using 360 pb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. A displaced vertex trigger selects long-lived D{sup 0} candidates in the {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}, {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, and K{sup -}{pi}{sup +} decay modes. We use the Cabibbo-favored D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +} channel to optimize the selection criteria in an unbiased manner, and the kinematically similar D{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} channel for normalization. We set an upper limit on the branching fraction {Beta}(D{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}) < 2.1 x 10{sup -7} (3.0 x 10{sup -7}) at the 90% (95%) confidence level.

  14. Superposed Epoch Analysis of Ring Current Geoeffectiveness Related to Solar Wind and Plasma Sheet Drivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liemohm, M. W.; Kozyra, J. U.; Thomsen, M. F.; Borovsky, J. E.; Gahurthakurta, Madulika (Technical Monitor)

    2004-01-01

    The goal of that proposal was to examine the relationship between solar wind drivers and ring current dynamics through data analysis and numerical simulations. The data analysis study was a statistical examination (via superposed epoch analyses) of a solar cycle's worth of storm data. Solar wind data, geophysical indices, and geosynchronous plasma data were collected for every time period with Dst< -50 nT from 1989 through 2002, and the storm list now exceeds 400 entries. This work was first conducted by a summer undergraduate student, Mr. John Vann (University of Kansas), with funding from the NSF Research Experience for Undergraduates program. It was then continued by a University of Michigan graduate student, Mr. Jichun Zhang. Mr. Zhang is now in his fourth year at U-M and is progressing very well toward a PhD in space science. His dissertation will be based on his data analysis and modeling efforts using this geomagnetic storm database. The results of the data analysis study have been the focus of several conference presentations, and the first manuscript has just been published. Two additional papers are presently being prepared, one on average (superposed) solar wind features for various storm subsets (e.g., intense storms at solar maximum), and another on geosynchronous plasma features for these same storm subsets. The latter result was highlighted by the TR&T program director in his presentation at the COSPAR meeting this summer.

  15. VLF-emissions from ring current electrons. An interpretation of the band of missing emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maeda, K.; Smith, P. H.; Anderson, R. R.

    1976-01-01

    VLF-emissions associated with the enhancement of ring current electrons during magnetic storms and substorms which were detected by the equatorially orbiting S-A satellite (Explorer 45) are described. The emissions observed near the geomagnetic equator consist of essentially two frequency regimes, i.e., one above the electron gyrofrequency, f sub H at the equator and the other below f sub H. This is indicated as a part of the wide-band data obtained during the main phase of the December 17, 1971 magnetic storm. The upper figure is the ac-magnetic field data measured by the search-coil magnetometer with the upper cutoff of 3kHz and the lower figure is the ac-electric field data obtained by the electric field sensor with the upper cutoff of 10kHz. These figures show the time sequence of the observed emissions along the inbound orbit (No. 101) of the satellite as f sub H changes approximately from 3 kHz at 20 UT to 6 kHz at 21 UT. The emissions above f sub H are electrostatic mode, which peak near the frequencies of (n + 1/2) f sub H where n is positive integer, and sometimes emissions up to n = 10 are observed. The emissions below f sub H are whistler mode, which have a conspicuous gap along exactly half electron gyrofrequency, f sub H/2.

  16. Crres observations of the composition of the ring-current ion populations

    SciTech Connect

    Roeder, J.L.; Fennell, J.F.; Chen, M.W.; Schulz, M.; Grande, M.

    1995-02-15

    The Magnetospheric Ion Composition Spectrometer onboard the CRRES spacecraft provided mass and charge state composition data for positive ions in the energy-per-charge range 10-425 keV/e. The CRRES data is compared to the AMPTE/CCE observations during both geomagnetically quiet and active periods. The CRRES average radial profiles of H+, He+, and He++ during quiet intervals are remarkably similar to those measured by CCE. The excess of ions measured by CRRES at L <4 compared to standard ion transport models tends to support the necessity of additional ion radial diffusion by ionospheric electric-field variations. A summary is also given of the measured storm-time variations of the major ion populations during the large storm of March 1991. The results are compared to previous observations by the AMPTE/CCE spacecraft during a large storm. The CRRES data confirm that the rapid initial recovery of the Dst magnetic index is due to a momentary change of the relative ion composition of the ring current to an oxygen-dominated state. A preliminary test of the Dessler-Parker-Sckopke relation between the ion energy and the global magnetic perturbation shows that the observed particle fluxes during the March 1991 storm could account for only 30-50% of the variation of the Dst magnetic index.

  17. Polar ionosphere as a source of the storm time ring current

    SciTech Connect

    Cladis, J.B.; Francis, W.E.

    1985-04-01

    The transport of ions from the polar ionosphere to the inner magnetosphere during storm time conditions has been computed using a Monte Carlo diffusion code. The effect of the electrostatic turbulence assumed to be present during the substorm expansion phase was simulated by a process that accelerated the ions stochastically perpendicular to the magnetic field with a diffusion coefficient proportional to the rate of energization of the ions by the induced electric field. This diffusion process was continued as the ions were convected from the plasma sheet boundary layer to the double-spiral injection boundary. Inward of the injection boundary the ions were convected adiabatically. By using as input an O/sup +/ flux of 2.8 x 10/sup 8/ cm/sup -2/ s/sup -1/ (w>10 eV) and an H/sup +/ flux of 5.5 x 10/sup 8/ cm/sup -2/ s/sup -1/ (w>.63 eV) the computed distribution functions of the ions in the ring current were found to be in good agreement, over a wide range in L(4--8), with measurements made with the ISEE 1 satellite during a storm. This O/sup +/ flux and a large part of the H/sup +/ flux appear to be consistent with the DE-1 and DE-2 satellite measurements of the polar ionospheric outflow during disturbed times.

  18. Understanding the Dynamical Evolution of the Earth Radiation Belt and Ring Current Coupled System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shprits, Yuri; Usanova, Maria; Kellerman, Adam; Drozdov, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    Modeling and understanding the ring current and radiation belt-coupled system has been a grand challenge since the beginning of the space age. In this study we show long-term simulations with a 3D Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB) code of modeling the radiation belts with boundary conditions derived from observations around geosynchronous orbit. Simulations can reproduce long term variations of the electron radiation belt fluxes and show the importance of local acceleration, radial diffusion, loss to the atmosphere and loss to the magnetopause. We also present 4D VERB simulations that include convective transport, radial diffusion, pitch angle scattering and local acceleration. VERB simulations show that the lower energy inward transport is dominated by the convection and higher energy transport is dominated by the diffusive radial transport. We also show that at energies of 100s of keV, a number of processes work simultaneously, including convective transport, radial diffusion, local acceleration, loss to the loss cone and loss to the magnetopause. The results of the simulation of the March 2013 storm are compared with Van Allen Probes observations.

  19. A broad-band VLF-burst associated with ring-current electrons. [geomagnetic storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maeda, K.

    1982-01-01

    Frequency band broadening takes place just outside of the nighttime plasmasphere, where the density of cold plasma is known to be very low during the later phase of a geomagnetic storm. Instead of the gradual broadening of several hours duration, a burst type broadening of VLF emission lasting less than ten minutes was observed by Explorer 45 in a similar location. The magnetic field component of this emission is very weak and the frequency spreads below the local half electron cyclotron frequency. Corresponding enhancement of the anisotropic ring current electrons is also very sudden and limited below the order of 10 keV without significant velocity dispersion, in contrast to the gradual broadening events. The cause of this type of emission band spreading can be attributed to the generation of the quasielectrostatic whistler mode emission of short wavelength by hot bimaxwellian electrons surging into the domain of relatively low density magnetized cold plasma. The lack of energy dispersion in the enhanced electrons indicates that the inner edge of the plasma sheet, the source of these hot electrons, is not far from the location of this event.

  20. The Nonlinear Coupling of Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron and Lower Hybrid Waves in the Ring Current Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.

    2004-01-01

    The excitation of lower hybrid waves (LHWs) is a widely discussed mechanism of interaction between plasma species in space, and is one of the unresolved questions of magnetospheric multi-ion plasmas. In this paper we present the morphology, dynamics, and level of LHW activity generated by electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves during the May 2-7, 1998 storm period on the global scale. The LHWs were calculated based on a newly developed self-consistent model (Khazanov et. al., 2002, 2003) that couples the system of two kinetic equations: one equation describes the ring current (RC) ion dynamic, and another equation describes the evolution of EMIC waves. It is found that the LHWs are excited by helium ions due to their mass dependent drift in the electric field of EMIC waves. The level of LHW activity is calculated assuming that the induced scattering process is the main saturation mechanism for these waves. The calculated LHWs electric fields are consistent with the observational data.

  1. Energetic ring current ion spectra shaped by EMIC wave scattering loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summers, Danny; Shi, Run

    2016-07-01

    We address the problem of determining the limiting energetic ring current ion spectrum resulting from electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC)-wave-ion-interactions. We solve the problem in a relativistic regime,incorporating a cold background multi-ion plasma component and without assuming a predetermined form for the particle energy distribution. The limiting spectrum is determined by the condition that the EMIC waves acquire a certain gain over a given convective length scale for all frequencies over which wave growth occurs. We find that the limiting ion spectrum satisfies an integral equation that must be solved numerically. However, at large particle energy E, the limiting spectrum varies simply as 1/E. Moreover,this spectral shape does not depend on the energetic ion in question nor on the background multi-ion plasma composition. We provide numerical solutions for the limiting spectra for Earth-like parameters, and we compare measured ion spectra from the Van Allen Probes with corresponding numerical limiting spectra.

  2. Ion radial diffusion in an electrostatic impulse model for stormtime ring current formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Margaret W.; Schulz, Michael; Lyons, Larry R.; Gorney, David J.

    1992-01-01

    Guiding-center simulations of stormtime transport of ring-current and radiation-belt ions having first adiabatic invariants mu is approximately greater than 15 MeV/G (E is approximately greater than 165 keV at L is approximately 3) are surprisingly well described (typically within a factor of approximately less than 4) by the quasilinear theory of radial diffusion. This holds even for the case of an individual model storm characterized by substorm-associated impulses in the convection electric field, provided that the actual spectrum of the electric field is incorporated in the quasilinear theory. Correction of the quasilinear diffusion coefficient D(sub LL)(sup ql) for drift-resonance broadening (so as to define D(sub LL)(sup ql)) reduced the typical discrepancy with the diffusion coefficients D(sub LL)(sup sim) deduced from guiding-center simulations of representative-particle trajectories to a factor of approximately 3. The typical discrepancy was reduced to a factor of approximately 1.4 by averaging D(sub LL)(sup sim), D(sub LL)(sup ql), and D(sub LL)(sup rb) over an ensemble of model storms characterized by different (but statistically equivalent) sets of substorm-onset times.

  3. B-->K*l+l- decay in the two Higgs doublet model with flavor changing neutral currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliev, T. M.; Iltan, E. O.

    1999-04-01

    We study the decay width, forward-backward asymmetry and the longitudinal lepton polarization for the exclusive decay B-->K*l+l- in the two Higgs doublet model with three level flavor changing neutral currents (model III) and analyse the dependencies of these quantities on the the selected parameters, ξU,D, of model III including the next to leading QCD corrections. It is found that to look for charged Higgs effects, the measurements of the branching ratio, forward-backward asymmetry and the longitudinal lepton polarization for the decayB-->K*l+l- are promising.

  4. Penetration of Solar Wind Driven ULF Waves into the Earth's Inner Magnetosphere: Role in Radiation Belt and Ring Current Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Ian; Murphy, Kyle; Rae, Jonathan; Ozeke, Louis; Milling, David

    2013-04-01

    Ultra-low frequency (ULF) waves in the Pc4-5 band can be excited in the magnetosphere by the solar wind. Much recent work has shown how ULF wave power is strongly correlated with solar wind speed. However, little attention has been paid the dynamics of ULF wave power penetration onto low L-shells in the inner magnetosphere. We use more than a solar cycle of ULF wave data, derived from ground-based magnetometer networks, to examine this ULF wave power penetration and its dependence on solar wind and geomagnetic activity indices. In time domain data, we show very clearly that dayside ULF wave power, spanning more than 4 orders of magnitude, follows solar wind speed variations throughout the whole solar cycle - during periods of sporadic solar maximum ICMEs, during declining phase fast solar wind streams, and at solar minimum, alike. We also show that time domain ULF wave power increases during magnetic storms activations, and significantly demonstrate that a deeper ULF wave power penetration into the inner magnetosphere occurs during larger negative excursions in Dst. We discuss potential explanations for this low-L ULF wave power penetration, including the role of plasma mass density (such as during plasmaspheric erosion), or ring current ion instabilities during near-Earth ring current penetration. Interestingly, we also show that both ULF wave power and SAMPEX MeV electron flux show a remarkable similarity in their penetration to low-L, which suggests that ULF wave power penetration may be important for understanding and explaining radiation belt dynamics. Moreover, the correlation of ULF wave power with Dst, which peaks at one day lag, suggests the ULF waves might also be important for the inward transport of ions into the ring current. Current ring current models, which exclude long period ULF wave transport, under-estimate the ring current during fast solar wind streams which is consistent with a potential role for ULF waves in ring current energisation. The

  5. Flavor Changing Neutral Currents in ttbar Decays at D\\O

    SciTech Connect

    McGivern, C.L.; /Kansas U.

    2011-09-01

    We present a search for flavor changing neutral currents (FCNC) in decays of top quarks. The analysis is based on a search for t{bar t} {yields} {ell}'{nu}{ell}{bar {ell}} + jets ({ell},{ell}' = e, {mu}) final states using 4.1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity of p{bar p} collisions at {radical} s = 1.96 TeV. We extract limits on the branching ratio B(t {yields} Zq) (q = u, c quarks), assuming anomalous tuZ or tcZ couplings. We do not observe any sign of such anomalous coupling and set a limit of B < 3.2% at 95% C.L.

  6. Bs-->γγ decay in the two Higgs doublet model with flavor changing neutral currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliev, T. M.; Iltan, E. O.

    1998-11-01

    We calculate the leading logarithmic QCD corrections to the decay Bs-->γγ in the two Higgs doublet model with tree level flavor changing currents (model III) including O7 type long distance effects. Further, we analyze the dependences of the branching ratio B(Bs-->γγ) and the ratio of CP-even and CP-odd amplitude squares, R=\\|A+\\|2/\\|A-\\|2, on the charged Higgs boson mass mH+/- and the selected model III parameters ξU,D including the leading logarithmic QCD corrections. It is found that the measurement of the branching ratio B(Bs-->γγ) is promising to search charged Higgs effects.

  7. Storm- Time Dynamics of Ring Current Protons: Implications for the Long-Term Energy Budget in the Inner Magnetosphere.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gkioulidou, M.; Ukhorskiy, A. Y.; Mitchell, D. G.; Lanzerotti, L. J.

    2015-12-01

    The ring current energy budget plays a key role in the global electrodynamics of Earth's space environment. Pressure gradients developed in the inner magnetosphere can shield the near-Earth region from solar wind-induced electric fields. The distortion of Earth's magnetic field due to the ring current affects the dynamics of particles contributing both to the ring current and radiation belts. Therefore, understanding the long-term evolution of the inner magnetosphere energy content is essential. We have investigated the evolution of ring current proton pressure (7 - 600 keV) in the inner magnetosphere based on data from the Radiation Belt Storm Probes Ion Composition Experiment (RBSPICE) instrument aboard Van Allen Probe B throughout the year 2013. We find that although the low-energy component of the protons (< 80 keV) is governed by convective timescales and is very well correlated with the Dst index, the high-energy component (>100 keV) varies on much longer timescales and shows either no or anti-correlation with the Dst index. Interestingly, the contributions of the high- and low-energy protons to the total energy content are comparable. Our results indicate that the proton dynamics, and as a consequence the total energy budget in the inner magnetosphere (inside geosynchronous orbit), is not strictly controlled by storm-time timescales as those are defined by the Dst index.

  8. Self-Consistent Model of Magnetospheric Ring Current and Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves: The 2-7 May 1998 Storm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Gamayunov, K. V.; Jordanova, V. K.

    2003-01-01

    A complete description of a self-consistent model of magnetospheric ring current interacting with electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves is presented. The model is based on the system of two kinetic equations; one equation describes the ring current ion dynamics, and another equation describes the wave evolution. The effects on ring current ions interacting with electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves and back on waves are considered self-consistently by solving both equations on a global magnetospheric scale under nonsteady state conditions. The developed model is employed to simulate the entire 2-7 May 1998 storm period. First, the trapped number fluxes of the ring current protons are calculated and presented along with comparison with the data measured by the three- dimensional hot plasma instrument Polar/HYDRA. Incorporating in the model the wave-particle interaction leads to much better agreement between the experimental data and the model results. Second, examining of the wave (MLT, L shell) distributions produced by the model during the storm progress reveals an essential intensification of the wave emission about 2 days after the main phase of the storm. This result is well consistent with the earlier ground-based observations. Finally, the theoretical shapes and the occurrence rates of the wave power spectral densities are studied. It is found that about 2 days after the storm s main phase on 4 May, mainly non-Gaussian shapes of power spectral densities are produced.

  9. Charge and current neutralization in the formation of ion rings in a background plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Oliver, B.V.; Ryutov, D.D.; Sudan, R.N. )

    1994-10-01

    For typical field-reversed ion ring experiments, an intense ion beam is injected across a plasma-filled magnetic cusp and propagated into a solenoidal field downstream. The characteristic time [tau] satisfies 2[pi]/[Omega][sub [ital e

  10. Energy dynamics and current sheet structure in fluid and kinetic simulations of decaying magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Makwana, K. D.; Zhdankin, V.; Li, H.; Daughton, W.; Cattaneo, F.

    2015-04-10

    We performed simulations of decaying magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence with a fluid and a kinetic code. The initial condition is an ensemble of long-wavelength, counter-propagating, shear-Alfvén waves, which interact and rapidly generate strong MHD turbulence. The total energy is conserved and the rate of turbulent energy decay is very similar in both codes, although the fluid code has numerical dissipation, whereas the kinetic code has kinetic dissipation. The inertial range power spectrum index is similar in both the codes. The fluid code shows a perpendicular wavenumber spectral slope of k-1.3⊥k⊥-1.3. The kinetic code shows a spectral slope of k-1.5⊥k⊥-1.5 for smallermore » simulation domain, and k-1.3⊥k⊥-1.3 for larger domain. We then estimate that collisionless damping mechanisms in the kinetic code can account for the dissipation of the observed nonlinear energy cascade. Current sheets are geometrically characterized. Their lengths and widths are in good agreement between the two codes. The length scales linearly with the driving scale of the turbulence. In the fluid code, their thickness is determined by the grid resolution as there is no explicit diffusivity. In the kinetic code, their thickness is very close to the skin-depth, irrespective of the grid resolution. Finally, this work shows that kinetic codes can reproduce the MHD inertial range dynamics at large scales, while at the same time capturing important kinetic physics at small scales.« less

  11. Energy dynamics and current sheet structure in fluid and kinetic simulations of decaying magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Makwana, K. D.; Zhdankin, V.; Li, H.; Daughton, W.; Cattaneo, F.

    2015-04-10

    We performed simulations of decaying magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence with a fluid and a kinetic code. The initial condition is an ensemble of long-wavelength, counter-propagating, shear-Alfvén waves, which interact and rapidly generate strong MHD turbulence. The total energy is conserved and the rate of turbulent energy decay is very similar in both codes, although the fluid code has numerical dissipation, whereas the kinetic code has kinetic dissipation. The inertial range power spectrum index is similar in both the codes. The fluid code shows a perpendicular wavenumber spectral slope of k-1.3⊥k⊥-1.3. The kinetic code shows a spectral slope of k-1.5⊥k⊥-1.5 for smaller simulation domain, and k-1.3⊥k⊥-1.3 for larger domain. We then estimate that collisionless damping mechanisms in the kinetic code can account for the dissipation of the observed nonlinear energy cascade. Current sheets are geometrically characterized. Their lengths and widths are in good agreement between the two codes. The length scales linearly with the driving scale of the turbulence. In the fluid code, their thickness is determined by the grid resolution as there is no explicit diffusivity. In the kinetic code, their thickness is very close to the skin-depth, irrespective of the grid resolution. Finally, this work shows that kinetic codes can reproduce the MHD inertial range dynamics at large scales, while at the same time capturing important kinetic physics at small scales.

  12. Effect of Precipitating Electrons on Ring Current Energy Content, Ionospheric Conductance, and Thermospheric Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, M.; Lemon, C. L.; Walterscheid, R. L.; Yoo, B.; Hecht, J. H.; Shprits, Y.; Orlova, K.; Schulz, M.; Evans, J. S.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate how scattering of electrons by waves in the plasma sheet and plasmasphere affects precipitating energy flux distributions during magnetic storms, how the precipitating electrons modify the ionospheric Hall and Pederson conductivity and electric potential, how these processes feedback on magnetospheric particle transport and redistribute the ring current, and how the ionization and energy deposition of precipitating electrons affects thermospheric winds and temperature. Our main approach is to couple simulation models: (1) the magnetically and electrically self-consistent Rice Convection Model - Equilibrium (RCM-E) of the inner magnetosphere, (2) the B3c transport model for electron-proton-hydrogen atom aurora in the ionosphere, and (3) the Thermosphere-Ionsphere-Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIEGCM) of the ionosphere and thermosphere. Realistic descriptions of electron pitch-angle diffusion by whistler chorus in the plasma sheet/magnetotail and hiss in the plasmasphere are included in the RCM-E. We use parameterized rates of electron pitch-angle scattering with whistler chorus of Orlova and Shprits [JGR, 2014] that depend on equatorial radial distance, magnetic activity (Kp), and magnetic local time. To study how the precipitating electron energy flux distributions affect ionospheric conductivity and ionospheric electric potential patterns, we have performed a one-way coupling of the RCM-E and ionospheric B3c model. The simulated precipitating electron flux distributions are used to specify the energy flux and particle heating due to precipitating auroral electrons for TIEGCM simulations of the neutral atmosphere. We simulate a storm event and compare simulated quantities with in situ observations.

  13. Comparative investigation of the energetic ion spectra comprising the magnetospheric ring currents of the solar system

    PubMed Central

    Mauk, B H

    2014-01-01

    Investigated here are factors that control the intensities and shapes of energetic ion spectra that make up the ring current populations of the strongly magnetized planets of the solar system, specifically those of Earth, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. Following a previous and similar comparative investigation of radiation belt electrons, we here turn our attention to ions. Specifically, we examine the possible role of the differential ion Kennel-Petschek limit, as moderated by Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron (EMIC) waves, as a standard for comparing the most intense ion spectra within the strongly magnetized planetary magnetospheres. In carrying out this investigation, the substantial complexities engendered by the very different ion composition distributions of these diverse magnetospheres must be addressed, given that the dispersion properties of the EMIC waves are strongly determined by the ion composition of the plasmas within which the waves propagate. Chosen for comparison are the ion spectra within these systems that are the most intense observed, specifically at 100 keV and 1 MeV. We find that Earth and Jupiter are unique in having their most intense ion spectra likely limited and sculpted by the Kennel-Petschek process. The ion spectra of Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune reside far below their respective limits and are likely limited by interactions with gas and dust (Saturn) and by the absence of robust ion acceleration processes (Uranus and Neptune). Suggestions are provided for further testing the efficacy of the differential Kennel-Petschek limit for ions using the Van Allen Probes. PMID:26167438

  14. MUON STORAGE RINGS - NEUTRINO FACTORIES

    SciTech Connect

    PARSA,Z.

    2000-05-30

    The concept of a muon storage ring based Neutrino Source (Neutrino Factory) has sparked considerable interest in the High Energy Physics community. Besides providing a first phase of a muon collider facility, it would generate more intense and well collimated neutrino beams than currently available. The BNL-AGS or some other proton driver would provide an intense proton beam that hits a target, produces pions that decay into muons. The muons must be cooled, accelerated and injected into a storage ring with a long straight section where they decay. The decays occurring in the straight sections of the ring would generate neutrino beams that could be directed to detectors located thousands of kilometers away, allowing studies of neutrino oscillations with precisions not currently accessible. For example, with the neutrino source at BNL, detectors at Soudan, Minnesota (1,715 km), and Gran Sasso, Italy (6,527 km) become very interesting possibilities. The feasibility of constructing and operating such a muon-storage-ring based Neutrino-Factory, including geotechnical questions related to building non-planar storage rings (e.g. at 8{degree} angle for BNL-Soudan, and 3{degree} angle for BNL-Gran Sasso) along with the design of the muon capture, cooling, acceleration, and storage ring for such a facility is being explored by the growing Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration (NFMCC). The authors present overview of Neutrino Factory concept based on a muon storage ring, its components, physics opportunities, possible upgrade to a full muon collider, latest simulations of front-end, and a new bowtie-muon storage ring design.

  15. Global Simulations of the March 17, 2013 Storm: Importance of Boundary Conditions in Reproducing Ring Current Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Y.; Jordanova, V.; Larsen, B.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Welling, D. T.; Skoug, R. M.; Kletzing, C.

    2013-12-01

    As modeling capabilities become increasingly available for the study of inner magnetospheric dynamics, the models' boundary conditions remain a crucial controlling factor in reproducing observations. In this study, we use the kinetic Ring current-Atmosphere Interaction Model (RAM) two-way coupled with the global MHD model BATS-R-US to study the evolution of the ring current and its feedback to the ionospheric electrodynamics during the March 17, 2013 storm. The MHD code solves fluid quantities and provides the inner magnetosphere code with plasma sheet plasma, which is the primary source for the development of the ring current. In this study, we examine the effect of different boundary conditions in specifying the plasma sheet plasma source on reproducing observations of the inner magnetospheric/subauroral region, such as in-situ observations (e.g., flux, magnetic fields, and electric fields) from Van Allen Probes (RBSP), field-aligned currents from AMPERE, and global convection maps from SuperDARN. These different boundary settings include a Maxwellian distribution assumption with MHD single-fluid temperature and density, a Kappa distribution assumption with MHD single-fluid temperature and density, and a bi-Maxwellian distribution with anisotropic pressures passed from the MHD code. Results indicate that a Kappa distribution at the boundary of RAM leads to a better ring current flux prediction than that with a Maxwellian distribution assumption, as well as a more realistic spatial distribution of ion anisotropy, which is important in driving electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves. The anisotropic pressure coupling between the kinetic code and the MHD code with a bi-Maxwellian function significantly improves the agreement with observations, especially the Dst index prediction.

  16. Modeling of the Convection and Interaction of Ring Current, Plasmaspheric and Plasma Sheet Plasmas in the Inner Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fok, Mei-Ching; Chen, Sheng-Hsien; Buzulukova, Natalia; Glocer, Alex

    2010-01-01

    Distinctive sources of ions reside in the plasmasphere, plasmasheet, and ring current regions at discrete energies constitute the major plasma populations in the inner/middle magnetosphere. They contribute to the electrodynamics of the ionosphere-magnetosphere system as important carriers of the global current system, in triggering; geomagnetic storm and substorms, as well as critical components of plasma instabilities such as reconnection and Kelvin-Helmholtz instability at the magnetospheric boundaries. Our preliminary analysis of in-situ measurements shoves the complexity of the plasmas pitch angle distributions at particularly the cold and warm plasmas, vary dramatically at different local times and radial distances from the Earth in response to changes in solar wind condition and Dst index. Using an MHD-ring current coupled code, we model the convection and interaction of cold, warm and energetic ions of plasmaspheric, plasmasheet, and ring current origins in the inner magnetosphere. We compare our simulation results with in-situ and remotely sensed measurements from recent instrumentation on Geotail, Cluster, THEMIS, and TWINS spacecraft.

  17. The Influence of Solar Extreme Ultraviolet Radiation on Ring Current Ion Composition: Polar and CRRES Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roeder, J. L.; Fennell, J. F.; Pulkkinen, T. I.; Turner, N. E.; Grande, M.

    2001-05-01

    The ion composition observations by the Polar spacecraft from the last solar minimum to the present are compared to similar observations by CRRES in the previous cycle. The Magnetospheric Ion Composition Spectrometer (MICS) was onboard CRRES and is part of the Polar CAMMICE experiment. The MICS sensor provided mass and charge state composition data for the energetic (1-425 keV/q) ions including H+, He+, He++, and O+. The 5-minute average number densities for each species are computed by mapping the MICS fluxes down to the magnetic equator using the measured pitch angle distributions and integrating the equatorial spectrum over the energy range 1-200 keV/q. Approximately 3.5 years of the Polar mission in the rising part of the solar cycle are used for the database. The densities are analyzed statistically with the solar EUV index F10.7 and various geomagnetic indices such as Kp and Dst. The results are compared with a similar study of the ion composition in the energy range 0.9-15.9 keV/q measured by the GEOS 2 satellite during geomagnetically quiet periods [Young et al., 1982], and with the recent survey of the relative composition measured by Polar averaged over all times [Pulkkinen et al., 2000]. It is found that ion densities at L ~ 6-7 during relatively quiet intervals show correlations to the EUV and geomagnetic activity similar to the results of Young et al. [1992]. At lower L the correlation of the ion density with the EUV and activity levels increases substantially, due in part to the extremely low energetic ion densities during the quiet intervals of solar minimum. This may be interpreted as a combination of the solar cycle effects on 1) the ring current source population; and 2) the processes which transport the ions to lower L. The behavior of the ion composition during geomagnetic stormtime is also investigated by restricting the density database to those intervals with the Dst index below a threshold value. Paradoxically, the Polar data shows that the

  18. A Long-term Ring Current Measure Created by Using the VMO MANGO Service Package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bargatze, L. F.; King, T. A.

    2008-12-01

    A set of computational routines called MANGO (Magnetogram Analysis for the Network of Geomagnetic Observatories) is utilized to calculate a new measure of magnetic storm activity for the years 1932 to the near present. The MANGO routines are part of an effort to enhance data services available to users of the Heliophysics VxOs, specifically for the Virtual Magnetospheric Observatory (VMO). The community can utilize MANGO to derive value-added data products and images suitable for publication via the VMO web site. MANGO routines will be demonstrated through their application to study magnetic storms, a field of research that began in 1828 when von Humboldt launched an investigation of observations taken simultaneously from magnetic field stations spread around the Earth. The defining signature of magnetic storms is a worldwide decrease of the horizontal component of the magnetic field caused by fluctuations in the strength of the ring current. In the 1940's, Bartel pushed for deriving an index to measure the strength of magnetic storms. Progress intensified during the International Geophysical Year leading to the definition of the Dst index. The definitive Dst index is calculated at WDC-C2 for Geomagnetism in Kyoto by using a derivation scheme certified by Division V of IAGA. The Dst index time series spans the years 1957 to present with a cadence equal to 1-hr. The new data set we will present is a magnetic storm measure that is similar to the Dst index though it is calculated by using MANGO and a method that differs slightly from the official scheme. The MANGO data service package is based on a set of IDL routines that decompose ground magnetic field observations to isolate secular, diurnal, and disturbance variations of the magnetic field station-by-station. Each MANGO subroutine has been written in modular fashion to allow "plug and play"- style flexibility and each has been designed to account for failure modes and noisy data so that the programs will run to

  19. Coherent π-electron dynamics of (P)-2,2'-biphenol induced by ultrashort linearly polarized UV pulses: angular momentum and ring current.

    PubMed

    Mineo, H; Lin, S H; Fujimura, Y

    2013-02-21

    The results of a theoretical investigation of coherent π-electron dynamics for nonplanar (P)-2,2'-biphenol induced by ultrashort linearly polarized UV pulses are presented. Expressions for the time-dependent coherent angular momentum and ring current are derived by using the density matrix method. The time dependence of these coherences is determined by the off-diagonal density matrix element, which can be obtained by solving the coupled equations of motion of the electronic-state density matrix. Dephasing effects on coherent angular momentum and ring current are taken into account within the Markov approximation. The magnitudes of the electronic angular momentum and current are expressed as the sum of expectation values of the corresponding operators in the two phenol rings (L and R rings). Here, L (R) denotes the phenol ring in the left (right)-hand side of (P)-2,2'-biphenol. We define the bond current between the nearest neighbor carbon atoms Ci and Cj as an electric current through a half plane perpendicular to the Ci-Cj bond. The bond current can be expressed in terms of the inter-atomic bond current. The inter-atomic bond current (bond current) depends on the position of the half plane on the bond and has the maximum value at the center. The coherent ring current in each ring is defined by averaging over the bond currents. Since (P)-2,2'-biphenol is nonplanar, the resultant angular momentum is not one-dimensional. Simulations of the time-dependent coherent angular momentum and ring current of (P)-2,2'-biphenol excited by ultrashort linearly polarized UV pulses are carried out using the molecular parameters obtained by the time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) method. Oscillatory behaviors in the time-dependent angular momentum (ring current), which can be called angular momentum (ring current) quantum beats, are classified by the symmetry of the coherent state, symmetric or antisymmetric. The bond current of the bridge bond linking the L and R

  20. Coherent π-electron dynamics of (P)-2,2'-biphenol induced by ultrashort linearly polarized UV pulses: Angular momentum and ring current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mineo, H.; Lin, S. H.; Fujimura, Y.

    2013-02-01

    The results of a theoretical investigation of coherent π-electron dynamics for nonplanar (P)-2,2'-biphenol induced by ultrashort linearly polarized UV pulses are presented. Expressions for the time-dependent coherent angular momentum and ring current are derived by using the density matrix method. The time dependence of these coherences is determined by the off-diagonal density matrix element, which can be obtained by solving the coupled equations of motion of the electronic-state density matrix. Dephasing effects on coherent angular momentum and ring current are taken into account within the Markov approximation. The magnitudes of the electronic angular momentum and current are expressed as the sum of expectation values of the corresponding operators in the two phenol rings (L and R rings). Here, L (R) denotes the phenol ring in the left (right)-hand side of (P)-2,2'-biphenol. We define the bond current between the nearest neighbor carbon atoms Ci and Cj as an electric current through a half plane perpendicular to the Ci-Cj bond. The bond current can be expressed in terms of the inter-atomic bond current. The inter-atomic bond current (bond current) depends on the position of the half plane on the bond and has the maximum value at the center. The coherent ring current in each ring is defined by averaging over the bond currents. Since (P)-2,2'-biphenol is nonplanar, the resultant angular momentum is not one-dimensional. Simulations of the time-dependent coherent angular momentum and ring current of (P)-2,2'-biphenol excited by ultrashort linearly polarized UV pulses are carried out using the molecular parameters obtained by the time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) method. Oscillatory behaviors in the time-dependent angular momentum (ring current), which can be called angular momentum (ring current) quantum beats, are classified by the symmetry of the coherent state, symmetric or antisymmetric. The bond current of the bridge bond linking the L and R

  1. Saturn's Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuzzi, J. N.

    2014-12-01

    The rings are changing before our eyes; structure varies on all timescales and unexpected things have been discovered. Many questions have been answered, but some answers remain elusive (see Cuzzi et al 2010 for a review). Here we highlight the major ring science progress over the mission to date, and describe new observations planned for Cassini's final three years. Ring Composition and particle sizes: The rings are nearly all water ice with no other ices - so why are they reddish? The C Ring and Cassini Division are "dirtier" than the more massive B and A Rings, as shown by near-IR and, recently, microwave observations. Particle sizes, from stellar and radio occultations, vary from place to place. Ring structure, micro and macro: numerous spiral density waves and ubiquitous "self-gravity wakes" reveal processes which fostered planet formation in the solar system and elsewhere. However, big puzzles remain regarding the main ring divisions, the C Ring plateau structures, and the B Ring irregular structure. Moonlets, inside and out, seen and unseen: Two gaps contain sizeable moonlets, but more gaps seem to contain none; even smaller embedded "propeller" objects wander, systematically or randomly, through the A ring. Rubble pile ringmoons just outside the rings may escaped from the rings, and the recently discovered "Peggy" may be trying this as we watch. Impact bombardment of the rings: Comet fragments set the rings to rippling on century-timescales, and boulders crash through hourly; meanwhile, the constant hail of infalling Kuiper belt material has a lower mass flux than previously thought. Origin and Age of the Rings: The ring mass and bombardment play key roles. The ring mass is well known everywhere but in the B Ring (where most of it is). New models suggest how tidal breakup of evolving moons may have formed massive ancient rings, of which the current ring is just a shadow. During its last three years, the Cassini tour profile will allow entirely new

  2. The effect of guard ring on leakage current and spectroscopic performance of TlBr planar detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kargar, Alireza; Kim, Hadong; Cirignano, Leonard; Shah, Kanai

    2014-09-01

    Four thallium bromide planar detectors were fabricated from materials grown at RMD Inc. The TlBr samples were prepared to investigate the effect of guard ring on device gamma-ray spectroscopy performance, and to investigate the leakage current through surface and bulk. The devices' active area in planar configuration were 4.4 × 4.4 × 1.0 mm3. In this report, the detector fabrication process is described and the resulting energy spectra are discussed. It is shown that the guard ring improves device spectroscopic performance by shielding the sensing electrode from the surface leakage current, and by making the electric filed more uniform in the active region of the device.

  3. Discovery of energetic molecular ions (NO/sup +/ and O/sub 2//sup +/) in the storm time ring current

    SciTech Connect

    Klecker, B.; Moebius, E.; Hovestadt, D.; Scholer, M.; Gloeckler, G.; Ipavich, F.M.

    1986-07-01

    A few hours after the onset of a large geomagnetic storm on September 4, 1984, energetic molecular ions in the mass range 28--32, predminantly NO/sup +/ and O/sub 2//sup +/, have been discovered in the outer ring current at L--7. The data have been obtained with the time-of-flight spectrometer SULEICA on the AMPTE/IRM spacecraft. We find at 160 keV/e a mean abundance ratio of the molecular ions relative to O/sup +/ ions of 0.031 +- 0.004. During quiet times no molecular ions are observed, the 1 sigma upper limit of the ratio derived by averaging over several quiet periods is 0.003. The observations demonstrate the injection of ionospheric plasma into the storm time ring current and the subsequent acceleration to energies of several hundred keV on a time scale of a few hours after the onset of the magnetic storm.

  4. Generation of geometrical phases and persistent spin currents in 1-dimensional rings by Lorentz-violating terms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casana, R.; Ferreira, M. M.; Mouchrek-Santos, V. E.; Silva, Edilberto O.

    2015-06-01

    We have demonstrated that Lorentz-violating terms stemming from the fermion sector of the SME are able to generate geometrical phases on the wave function of electrons confined in 1-dimensional rings, as well as persistent spin currents, in the total absence of electromagnetic fields. We have explicitly evaluated the eigenenergies and eigenspinors of the electrons modified by the Lorentz-violating terms, using them to calculate the dynamic and the Aharonov-Anandan phases in the sequel. The total phase presents a pattern very similar to the Aharonov-Casher phase accumulated by electrons in rings under the action of the Rashba interaction. Finally, the persistent spin current were carried out and used to impose upper bounds on the Lorentz-violating parameters.

  5. Self-Consistent Model of Magnetospheric Ring Current and Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves: The May 2-7, 1998, Storm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Gamayunov, K. V.; Jordanova, V. K.

    2003-01-01

    Complete description of a self-consistent model for magnetospheric ring current interacting with electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves is presented. The model is based on the system of two kinetic equations; one equation describes the ring current ion dynamics, and another equation describes the wave evolution. The effects on ring current ions interacting with electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves, and back on waves, are considered self-consistently by solving both equations on a global magnetospheric scale under non steady-state conditions. In the paper by Khazanov et al. [2002] this self-consistent model has only been shortly outlined, and discussions of many the model related details have been omitted. For example, in present study for the first time a new algorithm for numerical finding of the resonant numbers for quasilinear wave-particle interaction is described, or it is demonstrated that in order to describe quasilinear interaction in a multi-ion thermal plasma correctly, both e and He(+) modes of electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves should be employed. The developed model is used to simulate the entire May 2-7, 1998 storm period. Trapped number fluxes of the ring current protons are calculated and presented along with their comparison with the data measured by the 3D hot plasma instrument Polar/HYDRA. Examining of the wave (MLT, L shell) distributions produced during the storm progress reveals an essential intensification of the wave emissions in about two days after main phase of storm. This result is well consistent with the earlier ground-based observations. Also the theoretical shapes and the occurrence rates for power spectral densities of electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves are studied. It is found that in about 2 days after the storm main phase on May 4, mainly non Gaussian shapes of power spectral densities are produced.

  6. Resonant scattering of radiation belt electrons and ring current protons by EMIC waves in a hot plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, X.; Ni, B.; Xiang, Z.; Zou, Z.; Gu, X.; Fu, S.; Zhou, C.; Zhao, Z.

    2015-12-01

    The full kinetic linear dispersion relation in a warm, multi-ion plasma with hot ring current protons is used to calculate the linear growth rate of parallel propagating electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves. Significant wave growth at relatively small wave numbers occurs for both H+-band and He+-band EMIC waves at the magnetic equator. We find that the growth of H+-band and He+-band EMIC waves remains strong when they propagate to higher latitudes (< 30 degrees). The full hot plasma dispersion relation and cold plasma dispersion relation are used individually to quantify the quasi-linear bounce-averaged pitch angle diffusion rates for radiation belt electrons and ring current protons due to H+-band and He+-band EMIC waves. The results demonstrate considerable differences in the rates of pitch angle scattering caused by He+-band EMIC waves between the use of hot and cold plasma dispersion relation. He+-band EMIC waves can also resonate with lower energies particles (electrons and protons) when the impact of hot plasma is included. In contrast, much smaller differences are seen in the resonant scattering rates for H+-band EMIC waves. Our study strongly suggests that the effect of hot plasmas should be carefully taken into account to approach improved understanding of the exact role that EMIC waves plays in driving the dynamical evolution of radiation belt electrons and ring current protons.

  7. A short review of our current understanding of the development of ring faults during collapse caldera formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geyer, Adelina; Marti, Joan

    2014-09-01

    The term collapse caldera refers to those volcanic depressions resulting from the sinking of the chamber roof due to the rapid withdrawal of magma during the course of an eruption. During the last three decades, collapse caldera dynamics has been the focus of attention of numerous, theoretical, numerical and experimental studies. Nonetheless, even if there is a tendency to go for a general and comprehensive caldera dynamics model, some key aspects remain unclear, controversial or completely unsolved. This is the case of ring fault nucleation points and propagation and dip direction. Since direct information on calderas’ deeper structure comes mainly from partially eroded calderas or few witnessed collapses, ring faults layout at depth remains still uncertain. This has generated a strong debate over the detailed internal fault and fracture configuration of a caldera collapse and, in more detail, how ring faults initiate and propagate. We offer here a very short description of the main results obtained by those analogue and theoretical/mathematical models applied to the study of collapse caldera formation. We place special attention on those observations related to the nucleation and propagation of the collapse-controlling ring faults. This summary is relevant to understand the current state-of-the-art of this topic and it should be taken under consideration in future works dealing with collapse caldera dynamics.

  8. Seven Years (2004-2011) of Cassini Measurements Reveal Strong Local Time Asymmetry of the Saturnian Ring Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergis, N.; Krimigis, S.; Thomsen, M.; Roelof, E.; Mitchell, D.; Hamilton, D.; Krupp, N.; Dougherty, M.; Crary, F.

    2012-04-01

    The Saturnian ring current, initially inferred from magnetic field and particle measurements after the Voyager 1 and 2 flybys, has been studied in substantial detail via in-situ and remote measurements since the July 2004 Cassini orbit insertion. The ring current of Saturn, located between 7 and 15 RS and primarily composed of O+ ions, is characterized by increased suprathermal (> 3 keV) particle pressure with high (> 1) plasma β values and intense dynamic behavior, as revealed by the analysis of combined particle data from the Cassini Magnetospheric Imaging Instrument (MIMI) and the Cassini Plasma Spectrometer instrument (CAPS), and magnetic field measurements from the Cassini magnetometer (MAG). Among the most important findings so far is that the azimuthal ring current flows primarily to balance inertial centrifugal forces inside ~8 RS, but increasingly it is driven by the non-thermal pressure gradient beyond its maximum region (8-12 RS, 100-150 pA/m2) and certainly it dominates farther out. Beyond ~ 10RS, the non-thermal pressure decreases with radial distance faster than the previously assumed 1/r rate and results in a magnetic perturbation of 10-15 nT. In this work we present the most complete (2004-2011) and up-to-date results, focusing on the local time asymmetry of the ring current properties (e.g. particle pressure, current density), and the relative contribution of different components to the radial force balance. The comprehensive spatial and local time coverage provided by the Cassini orbits has revealed that the suprathermal pressure and its corresponding pressure gradient is higher by a factor of 3 to 8 on the night side, in agreement with the observed distribution of energetic particle injections and energetic neutral atom (ENA) emissions. In addition to in-situ measurements, ENA images from the Ion and Neutral Camera (INCA) of Cassini, offer a unique overview of large parts of the Saturnian magnetosphere, depicting the rotation and dynamics of the

  9. Search for flavor-changing neutral current and Lepton-flavor violating decays of D0-->l+l-.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Gaillard, J-M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Shelkov, V G; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Latham, T E; Wilson, F F; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Shen, B C; Wang, K; del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, Sh; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Long, O; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Abe, T; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Smith, J G; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Chen, A; Harton, J L; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Dickopp, M; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Lavin, D; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Treadwell, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Won, E; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Taylor, G P; Charles, M J; Grenier, G J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Yi, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pioppi, M; Davier, M; Giroux, X; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Laplace, S; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Tantot, L; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Back, J J; Cormack, C M; Harrison, P F; Di Lodovico, F; Mohanty, G B; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flaecher, H U; Green, M G; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hart, P A; Hodgkinson, M C; Lafferty, G D; Lyon, A J; Williams, J C; Chen, C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Mangeol, D J J; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; Losecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Tiozzo, G; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; de la Vaissière, Ch; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Malcles, J; Ocariz, J; Pivk, M; Roos, L; T'jampens, S; Therin, G; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Martinez-Vidal, F; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Miftakov, V; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Pierini, M; Piredda, G; Safai Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Christ, S; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Schott, G; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Yumiceva, F X; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Claus, R; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; De Nardo, G; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Elsen, E E; Fan, S; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Simi, G; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Meyer, T I; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Band, H R; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Graham, M; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mihalyi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Tan, P; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Greene, M G; Neal, H

    2004-11-01

    We report on a search for the flavor-changing neutral current decays D0-->e(+)e(-) and D0-->mu(+)mu(-), and the lepton-flavor violating decay D0-->e(+/-)mu(-/+). The measurement is based on 122 fb(-1) of data collected by the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric e(+)e(-) collider. No evidence is found for any of the decays. The upper limits on the branching fractions, at the 90% confidence level, are 1.2x10(-6) for D0-->e(+)e(-), 1.3x10(-6) for D0-->mu(+)mu(-), and 8.1x10(-7) for D0-->e(+/-)mu(-/+). PMID:15600825

  10. I-BIEM calculations of the frequency dispersion and ac current distribution at disk and ring-disk electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cahan, Boris D.

    1991-01-01

    The Iterative Boundary Integral Equation Method (I-BIEM) has been applied to the problem of frequency dispersion at a disk electrode in a finite geometry. The I-BIEM permits the direct evaluation of the AC potential (a complex variable) using complex boundary conditions. The point spacing was made highly nonuniform, to give extremely high resolution in those regions where the variables change most rapidly, i.e., in the vicinity of the edge of the disk. Results are analyzed with respect to IR correction, equipotential surfaces, and reference electrode placement. The current distribution is also examined for a ring-disk configuration, with the ring and the disk at the same AC potential. It is shown that the apparent impedance of the disk is inductive at higher frequencies. The results are compared to analytic calculations from the literature, and usually agree to better than 0.001 percent.

  11. I-BIEM calculations of the frequency dispersion and AC current distribution at disk and ring-disk electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cahan, Boris D.

    1991-01-01

    The Iterative Boundary Integral Equation Method (I-BIEM) has been applied to the problem of frequency dispersion at a disk electrode in a finite geometry. The I-BIEM permits the direct evaluation of the AC potential (a complex variable) using complex boundary conditions. The point spacing was made highly nonuniform, to give extremely high resolution in those regions where the variables change most rapidly, i.e., in the vicinity of the edge of the disk. Results are analyzed with respect to IR correction, equipotential surfaces, and reference electrode placement. The current distribution is also examined for a ring-disk configuration, with the ring and the disk at the same AC potential. It is shown that the apparent impedance of the disk is inductive at higher frequencies. The results are compared to analytic calculations from the literature, and usually agree to better than 0.001 percent.

  12. Van Allen Probes based investigation of storm time enhancements in the duskward electric field to lower L shells and its effect on ring current formation and plasmasphere erosion.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thaller, S. A.; Wygant, J. R.; Dai, L.; Breneman, A. W.; Kersten, K.; Kletzing, C.; Kurth, W. S.; De Pascuale, S.; Bonnell, J. W.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Gkioulidou, M.; Fennell, J. F.

    2014-12-01

    The large scale convection electric field plays a central role in the dynamics of the inner magnetosphere; among which processes are ring current particle injection and plasmasphere erosion. Both of these are important for radiation belt dynamics. The ring current affects magnetic field geometry which in turn affects particle drift paths and plasmasphere erosion shrinks the region characterized by plasmaspheric hiss which would otherwise be present to scatter population of radiation belt seed electrons. Using the Van Allen Probes we investigate enhancements in the duskward electric field to lower L shells (L < 4 RE) and its role in ring current particle energization and erosion of the plasmasphere during two major storms; June 1, 2013 and February 19, 2014. During these storms, the electric field enhanced to low L shells with magnitudes ~1-2 mV/m in the co-rotating frame. The corresponding storm time ring current enhancements and plasmasphere erosions are examined in the context of these electric fields. The intensification in the duskward electric field is of long enough duration to transport particles from locations characteristic of the earthward edge of the plasma sheet (L shells ~ 8-10 RE) to the observed location of the ring current while energizing them though conservation of the first adiabatic invariant to energies typical of the ring current. It is also observed that the range in L shell over which the most intense nightside, duskward, electric field is observed is also that over which the higher pressure region of the ring current is located.

  13. Control of coupled-bunch instabilities in high current storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Lambertson, G.

    1991-04-01

    Intense particle beams may be subject to coupled-bunch instabilities that would grow at rates greater than the bunch oscillation frequencies. The suppression of the growth requires both reduction of the driving impedances and active feedback of bunch motions. The shunt impedances of higher-order cavity resonances can be reduced by passive dampers and the beam impedance within the band of the fundamental resonance can be reduced by rf feedback around the cavity and power amplifier. The feedback of bunch motions composed of numerous coupled-bunch modes requires broad-band systems for which the amplifiers are costly. Examples proposed for electron storage rings are presented. 10 refs, 5 figs.

  14. Relationship between the growth of the ring current and the interplanetary quantity. [solar wind energy-magnetospheric coupling parameter correlation with substorm AE index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akasofu, S.-I.

    1979-01-01

    Akasofu (1979) has reported that the interplanetary parameter epsilon correlates reasonably well with the magnetospheric substorm index AE; in the first approximation, epsilon represents the solar wind coupled to the magnetosphere. The correlation between the interplanetary parameter, the auroral electrojet index and the ring current index is examined for three magnetic storms. It is shown that when the interplanetary parameter exceeds the amount that can be dissipated by the ionosphere in terms of the Joule heat production, the excess energy is absorbed by the ring current belt, producing an abnormal growth of the ring current index.

  15. Measurements of the persistent current decay and snapback effect in Nb3Sn Fermilab-built accelerator prototype magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Velev, G.V.; Chlachidze, G.; DiMarco, J.; Kashikhin, V.V.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    In recent years, Fermilab has been performing an intensive R an D program on Nb{sub 3}Sn accelerator magnets. This program has included dipole and quadrupole magnets for different programs and projects, including LARP and VLHC. A systematic study of the persistent current decay and snapback effect in the fields of these magnets was executed at the Fermilab Magnet Test Facility. The decay and snapback were measured under a range of conditions including variations of the current ramp parameters and flattop and injection plateau durations. This study has mostly focused on the dynamic behavior of the normal sextupole and dodecapole components in dipole and quadrupole magnets respectively. The paper summarizes the recent measurements and presents a comparison with previously measured NbTi magnets.

  16. Self-Consistent Model of Magnetospheric Ring Current and Propagating Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves: Waves in Multi-Ion Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Gamayunov, K. V.; Gallagher, D. L.; Kozyra, J. U.

    2006-01-01

    The further development of a self-consistent theoretical model of interacting ring current ions and electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves (Khazanov et al., 2003) is presented In order to adequately take into account wave propagation and refraction in a multi-ion magnetosphere, we explicitly include the ray tracing equations in our previous self-consistent model and use the general form of the wave kinetic equation. This is a major new feature of the present model and, to the best of our knowledge, the ray tracing equations for the first time are explicitly employed on a global magnetospheric scale in order to self-consistently simulate the spatial, temporal, and spectral evolution of the ring current and of electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves To demonstrate the effects of EMIC wave propagation and refraction on the wave energy distribution and evolution, we simulate the May 1998 storm. The main findings of our simulation can be summarized as follows. First, owing to the density gradient at the plasmapause, the net wave refraction is suppressed, and He+-mode grows preferably at the plasmapause. This result is in total agreement with previous ray tracing studies and is very clearly found in presented B field spectrograms. Second, comparison of global wave distributions with the results from another ring current model (Kozyra et al., 1997) reveals that this new model provides more intense and more highly plasmapause-organized wave distributions during the May 1998 storm period Finally, it is found that He(+)-mode energy distributions are not Gaussian distributions and most important that wave energy can occupy not only the region of generation, i.e., the region of small wave normal angles, but all wave normal angles, including those to near 90 . The latter is extremely crucial for energy transfer to thermal plasmaspheric electrons by resonant Landau damping and subsequent downward heat transport and excitation of stable auroral red arcs.

  17. Self-Consistent Model of Magnetospheric Ring Current and Propagating Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves. 1; Waves in Multi Ion Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Gumayunov, K. V.; Gallagher, D. L.; Kozyra, J. U.

    2006-01-01

    The further development of a self-consistent theoretical model of interacting ring current ions and electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves [Khazanov et al., 2003] is presented. In order to adequately take into account the wave propagation and refraction in a multi-ion plasmasphere, we explicitly include the ray tracing equations in our previous self-consistent model and use the general form of the wave kinetic equation. This is a major new feature of the present model and, to the best of our knowledge, the ray tracing equations for the first time are explicitly employed on a global magnetospheric scale in order to self-consistently simulate spatial, temporal, and spectral evolutions of the ring current and electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves. To demonstrate the effects of EMIC wave propagation and refraction on the EMIC wave energy distributions and evolution we simulate the May 1998 storm. The main findings of our simulation can be summarized as follows. First, due to the density gradient at the plasmapause, the net wave refraction is suppressed, and He(+)-mode grows preferably at plasmapause. This result is in a total agreement with the previous ray tracing studies, and very clear observed in presented B-field spectrograms. Second, comparison the global wave distributions with the results from other ring current model [Kozyra et al., 1997] reveals that our model provides more intense and higher plasmapause organized distributions during the May, 1998 storm period. Finally, the found He(+)-mode energy distributions are not Gaussian distributions, and most important that wave energy can occupy not only the region of generation, i. e. the region of small wave normal angles, but the entire wave normal angle region and even only the region near 90 degrees. The latter is extremely crucial for energy transfer to thermal plasmaspheric electrons by resonant Landau damping, and subsequent downward heat transport and excitation of stable auroral red arcs.

  18. Analysis of longitudinal beam dynamics behavior and rf system operative limits at high-beam currents in storage rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastorides, T.; Rivetta, C.; Fox, J. D.; van Winkle, D.; Teytelman, D.

    2008-06-01

    A dynamics simulation model is used to estimate limits of performance of the positron-electron project (PEP-II). The simulation captures the dynamics and technical limitations of the low level radio frequency (LLRF) system, the high-power rf components, and the low-order mode coupled-bunch longitudinal beam dynamics. Simulation results showing the effect of nonlinearities on the LLRF loops, and studies of the effectiveness of technical component upgrades are reported, as well as a comparison of these results with PEP-II measurements. These studies have led to the estimation of limits and determining factors in the maximum stored current that the low energy ring/high energy ring (LER/HER) can achieve, based on system stability for different rf station configurations and upgrades. In particular, the feasibility of the PEP-II plans to achieve the final goal in luminosity, which required an increase of the beam currents to 4 A for LER and 2.2 A for HER, is studied. These currents are challenging in part because they would push the longitudinal low-order beam mode stability to the limit, and the klystron forward power past a level of satisfactory margin. An acceptable margin is defined in this paper, which in turn determines the corresponding klystron forward power limitation.

  19. Self-Consistent Ring Current Modeling with Propagating Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves in the Presence of Heavy Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, George V.

    2006-01-01

    The self-consistent treatment of the RC ion dynamics and EMIC waves, which are thought to exert important influences on the ion dynamical evolution, is an important missing element in our understanding of the storm-and recovery-time ring current evolution. Under certain conditions, relativistic electrons, with energies 21 MeV, can be removed from the outer radiation belt by EMIC wave scattering during a magnetic storm. That is why the modeling of EMIC waves is critical and timely issue in magnetospheric physics. To describe the RC evolution itself this study uses the ring current-atmosphere interaction model (RAM). RAM solves the gyration and bounce-averaged Boltzmann-Landau equation inside of geosynchronous orbit. Originally developed at the University of Michigan, there are now several branches of this model currently in use as describe by Liemohn namely those at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center This study will generalize the self-consistent theoretical description of RC ions and EMIC waves that has been developed by Khazanov and include the heavy ions and propagation effects of EMIC waves in the global dynamic of self-consistent RC - EMIC waves coupling. The results of our newly developed model that will be presented at GEM meeting, focusing mainly on the dynamic of EMIC waves and comparison of these results with the previous global RC modeling studies devoted to EMIC waves formation. We also discuss RC ion precipitations and wave induced thermal electron fluxes into the ionosphere.

  20. Planetary Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, M. K.; Araki, S.; Black, G. J.; Bosh, A. S.; Brahic, A.; Brooks, S. M.; Charnoz, S.; Colwell, J. E.; Cuzzi, J. N.; Dones, L.; Durisen, R. H.; Esposito, L. W.; Ferrari, C.; Festou, M.; French, R. G.; Giuliatti-Winter, S. M.; Graps, A. L.; Hamilton, D. P.; Horanyi, M.; Karjalainen, R. M.; Krivov, A. V.; Krueger, H.; Larson, S. M.; Levison, H. F.; Lewis, M. C.; Lissauer, J. J.; Murray, C. D.; Namouni, F.; Nicholson, P. D.; Olkin, C. B.; Poulet, F.; Rappaport, N. J.; Salo, H. J.; Schmidt, J.; Showalter, M. R.; Spahn, F.; Spilker, L. J.; Srama, R.; Stewart, G. R.; Yanamandra-Fisher, P.

    2002-08-01

    The past two decades have witnessed dramatic changes in our view and understanding of planetary rings. We now know that each of the giant planets in the Solar System possesses a complex and unique ring system. Recent studies have identified complex gravitational interactions between the rings and their retinues of attendant satellites. Among the four known ring systems, we see elegant examples of Lindblad and corotation resonances (first invoked in the context of galactic disks), electromagnetic resonances, spiral density waves and bending waves, narrow ringlets which exhibit internal modes due to collective instabilities, sharp-edged gaps maintained via tidal torques from embedded moonlets, and tenuous dust belts created by meteoroid impact onto, or collisions between, parent bodies. Yet, as far as we have come, our understanding is far from complete. The fundamental questions confronting ring scientists at the beginning of the twenty-first century are those regarding the origin, age and evolution of the various ring systems, in the broadest context. Understanding the origin and age requires us to know the current ring properties, and to understand the dominant evolutionary processes and how they influence ring properties. Here we discuss a prioritized list of the key questions, the answers to which would provide the greatest improvement in our understanding of planetary rings. We then outline the initiatives, missions, and other supporting activities needed to address those questions, and recommend priorities for the coming decade in planetary ring science.

  1. A Self-Consistent Model of the Interacting Ring Current Ions and Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves, Initial Results: Waves and Precipitating Fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Gamayunov, K. V.; Jordanova, V. K.; Krivorutsky, E. N.

    2002-01-01

    Initial results from a newly developed model of the interacting ring current ions and ion cyclotron waves are presented. The model is based on the system of two kinetic equations: one equation describes the ring current ion dynamics, and another equation describes wave evolution. The system gives a self-consistent description of the ring current ions and ion cyclotron waves in a quasilinear approach. These equations for the ion phase space distribution function and for the wave power spectral density were solved on aglobal magnetospheric scale undernonsteady state conditions during the 2-5 May 1998 storm. The structure and dynamics of the ring current proton precipitating flux regions and the ion cyclotron wave-active zones during extreme geomagnetic disturbances on 4 May 1998 are presented and discussed in detail.

  2. Scalar currents in 0(+) going to 0(+) beta decay and the boron-8 neutrino spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, Chris Eduardo

    2000-07-01

    Two experiments to understand the standard electro-weak model are presented. In one experiment scalar contributions to the weak interaction were searched for by determining with accuracy the e - ν correlation coefficient in a 0+ --> 0+ decay. The correlation coefficient for the 0+ --> 0+ β-decay of 32Ar was measured to be a = 0.9989 +/- 0.0052 +/- 0.0036, for vanishing Fierz interference. This was used to put unprecedented limits on scalar contributions to the weak interaction. In the second experiment the β-delayed α spectrum from 8B was measured. The experiment was designed to overcome systematic uncertainties that plagued previous measurements. This spectrum differs significantly from previous measurements. The measured α spectrum was used to deduce the ν spectrum. This will be used as a benchmark by experiments trying to detect distortions of the solar-ν spectrum in the search for physics beyond the standard model.

  3. A novel ring electrode setup for the recording of somatosensory evoked potentials during transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS).

    PubMed

    Sehm, Bernhard; Hoff, Maike; Gundlach, Christopher; Taubert, Marco; Conde, Virginia; Villringer, Arno; Ragert, Patrick

    2013-01-30

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) modulates cortical excitability thereby influencing behavior and learning. While previous studies focused on tDCS after-effects, limited information about "online" tDCS effects is available. This in turn is an important prerequisite to better characterize and/or optimize tDCS effects. Here, we aimed to explore the feasibility of recording low-artifact somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) during tDCS using a novel ring electrode setup. We recorded SEP before, during and after 10 min of anodal or sham tDCS using a full-band direct current (DC) EEG system in a total number of 3 subjects. SEPs were recorded in the bore of the tDCS ring electrode. Using this approach, no tDCS-induced artifacts could be observed after the application of a standard EEG filter. This new setup might help to better characterize how tDCS alters evoked brain responses thus providing novel insight into underlying physiological effects during stimulation. PMID:23103376

  4. Observed geomagnetic induction effect on Dst-related magnetic observations under different disturbance intensities of the magnetospheric ring current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Dan; Chen, Huaran; Gao, Mengtan

    2015-01-01

    Based on the spherical harmonic expansion of geomagnetic disturbance observed on the mid-latitude surface of the Earth, external and internal field separation is conducted in which the external component is magnetic disturbance caused by the magnetospheric ring current and the internal component is that raised by the correspondingly induced currents within the Earth. The objectives are to evaluate the influences of the induced internal field on the surface magnetic observations and to reveal the response performance of internal geomagnetic induction under different strengths of magnetospheric ring current fluctuations for better understanding of the disturbance storm time ( Dst) index variations. The results show that the ratio of the internal component to surface observation does not remain constant in storm time. During the main phase of the storm, the ratio variation follows the pattern of logarithmic growth with storm evolution up to the top value at the Dst-minimum; then, the ratio slowly decreases in the long recovery phase. Multiple small logarithmic growths are superimposed on the traces of internal ratios, corresponding to temporary ring current intensification during the storm main phase and amplifying the effect of this intensification on surface magnetic observations. With the intensification of magnetospheric storms from the level of (-200 nT, - 100 nT) to (-300 nT, - 200 nT) and (-500 nT, - 300 nT) classified with the Dst-minimum, the top value of the ratio averaged for each storm group in the superposed epoch analysis method increases from the value of 0.295 ± 0.014 to 0.300 ± 0.016 and 0.308 ± 0.015, respectively. It is demonstrated that the geomagnetic induction exceeds the linear relation with the intensification of the external field, which is physically reasonable and coincident with the Faraday's law of induction. Due to the effects of high induction of the oceans and lateral heterogeneity of electric conductivity distribution in the upper

  5. Bounding the B{sub s{yields}{gamma}{gamma}} decay from Higgs mediated flavor changing neutral current transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Aranda, J. I.; Ramirez-Zavaleta, F.; Tututi, E. S.; Toscano, J. J.

    2010-09-01

    The Higgs-mediated flavor violating bottom-strange quarks transitions induced at the one-loop level by a nondiagonal Hbs coupling are studied within the context of an effective Yukawa sector that comprises SU{sub L}(2)xU{sub Y}(1)-invariant operators of up to dimension six. The most recent experimental result on B{yields}X{sub s{gamma}} with hard photons is employed to constrain the Hbs vertex, which is used to estimate the branching ratio for the B{sub s{yields}{gamma}{gamma}} decay. It is found that the B{sub s{yields}{gamma}{gamma}} decay can reach a branching ratio of the order of 4x10{sup -8}, which is 2 orders of magnitude smaller than the current experimental limit.

  6. Study of geomagnetic disturbances and ring current variability during storm and quiet times using wavelet analysis and ground-based magnetic data from multiple stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhonghua

    The magnetosphere-ionosphere contains a number of current systems. These currents vary on a wide range of spatial and temporal scales and physically couple with each other. To study the complicated behaviors of these coupled current systems, the ground-based magnetometer has been a useful tool, but the recorded magnetometer data are always multi-scaled and intermittent due to the nature of these current systems. To distinguish these geomagnetic effects with multiple temporal and frequency scales, the wavelet analysis technique is especially suitable because of its special abilities of presenting information in both temporal and frequency domains. In this dissertation, the geomagnetic disturbances and the ring current variability during storm and quiet times are studied by using wavelet analysis and ground-based magnetic data from multiple stations. The first part of this dissertation investigates the strengths of applying the wavelet procedure to geomagnetic data for ring current study during storm and quiet periods. The second part of this dissertation characterizes the geomagnetic effects caused by symmetric and asymmetric components of ring currents during storm and quiet times by applying wavelet analysis to geomagnetic data from multiple stations. The third part of this dissertation studies the spatial variability of the symmetric ring current by applying the wavelet analysis technique to multiple components of magnetic data from multiple stations. The results show the unique strengths of the wavelet method allow us to quantitatively distinguish the geomagnetic effects on ring current variations from other M-I current systems. The unique strengths of wavelet method also allow us to separate the magnetic effects of the symmetric ring current from those caused by the asymmetric ring current. Quantitative information of the spatial variability of the ring currents is essential for understanding the dynamics of the ring currents, as well as the magnetic storm

  7. An insight into the aromaticity of fullerene anions: experimental evidence for diamagnetic ring currents in the five-membered rings of C(60)(6-) and C(70)(6-).

    PubMed

    Sternfeld, Tamar; Thilgen, Carlo; Hoffman, Roy E; Del Rosario Colorado Heras, María; Diederich, François; Wudl, Fred; Scott, Lawrence T; Mack, James; Rabinovitz, Mordecai

    2002-05-22

    Reduction of the two "closed" [6,6] methanofullerenes, [6,6]C(61)H(2) (1) and [6,6]C(71)H(2) (5), to the corresponding hexaanions with lithium metal causes the bridgehead-bridgehead bonds to open, at least partially, and this change gives rise to diamagnetic ring currents in the resulting homoconjugated six-membered rings (6-MRs). These new ring currents shield the overlying hydrogen atoms on the methylene bridge and induce upfield shifts of 1.60 and 0.11 ppm in their (1)H NMR resonances, respectively. Analogous reduction of the already "open" [5,6]methanofullerenes, [5,6]C(61)H(2) (2) and [5,6]C(71)H(2) (3 and 4), only slightly enhances the shielding of the hydrogen atoms over the homoconjugated 6-MRs (upfield shifts of 0.13, 0.68, and 0.14 ppm, respectively) but leads to exceptionally strong diamagnetic ring currents in the homoconjugated five- membered rings (5-MRs), as evidenced by dramatic shielding of the hydrogen atoms situated over them (upfield shift of 5.01, 6.78, and 1.63 ppm, respectively). The strongest shielding is seen for the hydrogen atom sitting over the 5-MR at the pole of C(71)H(2)(6)(-) (delta = -0.255 ppm) indicating that the excess charge density is concentrated at the poles. PMID:12010047

  8. Application of peptide-mediated ring current shifts to the study of neurophysin-peptide interactions: a partial model of the neurophysin-peptide complex

    SciTech Connect

    Peyton, D.; Sardana, V.; Breslow, E.

    1987-03-24

    Perdeuteriated peptides were synthesized that are capable of binding to the hormone binding site of neurophysin but that differ in the position of aromatic residues. The binding of these peptides to bovine neurophysin I and its des-1-8 derivative was studied by proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in order to identify protein residues near the binding site through the observation of differential ring current effects on assignable protein resonances. Phenylalanine in position 3 of bound peptides was shown to induce significant ring current shifts in several resonances assignable to the 1-8 sequence, including those of Leu-3 and/or Leu-5, but was without effect on Tyr-49 ring protons. The magnitude of these shifts was dependent on the identify of peptide residue 1. By contrast, the sole demonstrable direct effect of an aromatic residue in position 1 was a downfield shift in Tyr-49 ring protons. Study of peptide binding to des-1-8-neurophysin demonstrated similar conformations of native and des-1-8 complexes except for the environment of Tyr-49, confirmed the peptide-induced ring current shift assignments in native neurophysin, and indicated an effect of binding on Thr-9. These observations are integrated with other results to provide a partial model of neurophysin-peptide complexes that places the ring of Tyr-49 at a distance 5-10 A from residue 1 of bound peptide and that places both the 1-8 sequence and the protein backbone region containing Tyr-49 proximal to each other and to peptide residue 3. The peptide-protein topographical relationships deduced from the ring current shift data support and extend the preliminary model suggested by spin-label data and indicate that systematically introduced ring current shifts can be employed to provide a qualitative picture of protein topography.

  9. The Current Status of Precision Superallowed Fermi {beta}-Decay Measurements at TRIUMF-ISAC

    SciTech Connect

    Leach, K. G.

    2011-06-28

    Recent experimental work at the TRIUMF-ISAC radioactive ion-beam facility in Vancouver Canada, has produced several new results related to precise experimental tests of fundamental symmetries. The nature of these programs range from campaigns using existing setups, to the development of new apparats to further the experimental reach. One of the primary goals has been the investigation of superallowed Fermi {beta}-decay, and its relation to Standard Model tests of CVC and CKM unitarity The extraction of experimental {beta}-decay ft values requires the measurement of three quantities: the half-life, the superallowed branching ratio, and the parent-daughter mass difference. TRIUMF-ISAC has the ability to measure each of these values with very high precision, using a gas-proportional-counter, the 8{pi}{gamma}-ray spectrometer, and TITAN, respectively. This report focuses on the recent experimental progress of the superallowed program, as well as highlighting some results from the successful halo-nucleus mass-measurement program at TITAN.

  10. Dynamics of ring current and electric fields in the inner magnetosphere during disturbed periods: CRCM-BATS-R-US coupled model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzulukova, N.; Fok, M.-C.; Pulkkinen, A.; Kuznetsova, M.; Moore, T. E.; Glocer, A.; Brandt, P. C.; Tóth, G.; Rastätter, L.

    2010-05-01

    We present simulation results from a one-way coupled global MHD model (Block-Adaptive-Tree Solar-Wind Roe-Type Upwind Scheme, BATS-R-US) and kinetic ring current models (Comprehensive Ring Current Model, CRCM, and Fok Ring Current, FokRC). The BATS-R-US provides the CRCM/FokRC with magnetic field information and plasma density/temperature at the polar CRCM/FokRC boundary. The CRCM uses an electric potential from the BATS-R-US ionospheric solver at the polar CRCM boundary in order to calculate the electric field pattern consistent with the CRCM pressure distribution. The FokRC electric field potential is taken from BATS-R-US ionospheric solver everywhere in the modeled region, and the effect of Region II currents is neglected. We show that for an idealized case with southward-northward-southward Bz IMF turning, CRCM-BATS-R-US reproduces well known features of inner magnetosphere electrodynamics: strong/weak convection under the southward/northward Bz; electric field shielding/overshielding/penetration effects; an injection during the substorm development; Subauroral Ion Drift or Polarization Jet (SAID/PJ) signature in the dusk sector. Furthermore, we find for the idealized case that SAID/PJ forms during the substorm growth phase, and that substorm injection has its own structure of field-aligned currents which resembles a substorm current wedge. For an actual event (12 August 2000 storm), we calculate ENA emissions and compare with Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration/High Energy Neutral Atom data. The CRCM-BATS-R-US reproduces both the global morphology of ring current and the fine structure of ring current injection. The FokRC-BATS-R-US shows the effect of a realistic description of Region II currents in ring current-MHD coupled models.

  11. Dynamics of Ring Current and Electric Fields in the Inner Magnetosphere During Disturbed Periods: CRCM-BATS-R-US Coupled Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buzulukova, N.; Fok, M.-C.; Pulkkinen, A.; Kuznetsova, M.; Moore, T. E.; Glocer, A.; Brandt, P. C.; Toth, G.; Rastaetter, L.

    2010-01-01

    We present simulation results from a one-way coupled global MHD model (Block-Adaptive-Tree Solar-Wind Roe-Type Upwind Scheme, BATS-R-US) and kinetic ring current models (Comprehensive Ring Current Model, CRCM, and Fok Ring Current, FokRC). The BATS-R-US provides the CRCM/FokRC with magnetic field information and plasma density/temperature at the polar CRCM/FokRC boundary. The CRCM uses an electric potential from the BATS-R-US ionospheric solver at the polar CRCM boundary in order to calculate the electric field pattern consistent with the CRCM pressure distribution. The FokRC electric field potential is taken from BATS-R-US ionospheric solver everywhere in the modeled region, and the effect of Region II currents is neglected. We show that for an idealized case with southward-northward-southward Bz IMF turning, CRCM-BATS-R-US reproduces well known features of inner magnetosphere electrodynamics: strong/weak convection under the southward/northward Bz; electric field shielding/overshielding/penetration effects; an injection during the substorm development; Subauroral Ion Drift or Polarization Jet (SAID/PJ) signature in the dusk sector. Furthermore, we find for the idealized case that SAID/PJ forms during the substorm growth phase, and that substorm injection has its own structure of field-aligned currents which resembles a substorm current wedge. For an actual event (12 August 2000 storm), we calculate ENA emissions and compare with Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration/High Energy Neutral Atom data. The CRCM-BATS-R-US reproduces both the global morphology of ring current and the fine structure of ring current injection. The FokRC-BATS-R-US shows the effect of a realistic description of Region II currents in ring current-MHD coupled models.

  12. Is C50 a superaromat? Evidence from electronic structure and ring current calculations.

    PubMed

    Matías, Ana Sanz; Havenith, Remco W A; Alcamí, Manuel; Ceulemans, Arnout

    2016-04-28

    The fullerene-50 is a 'magic number' cage according to the 2(N + 1)(2) rule. For the three lowest isomers of C50 with trigonal and pentagonal symmetries, we calculate the sphericity index, the spherical parentage of the occupied π-orbitals, and the current density in an applied magnetic field. The minimal energy isomer, with D3 symmetry, comes closest to a spherical aromat or a superaromat. In the D5h bond-stretch isomers the electronic structure shows larger deviations from the ideal spherical shells, with hybridisation or even reversal of spherical parentages. It is shown that relative stabilities of fullerene cages do not correlate well with aromaticity, unlike the magnetic properties which are very sensitive indicators of spherical aromaticity. Superaromatic diamagnetism in the D3 cage is characterized by global diatropic currents, which encircle the whole cage. The breakdown of sphericity in the D5h cages gives rise to local paratropic countercurrents. PMID:26444568

  13. pi. -Electron ring currents and magnetic shielding in oxygen-containing unsaturated heterosystems

    SciTech Connect

    Vysotskii, Yu.B.; Sivyakova, L.N.

    1985-11-01

    A procedure developed previously for the calculation of molecular magnetic characteristics has been applied to calculations of diamagnetic susceptibilities and the chemical shifts of protons and /sup 13/C nuclei of oxygen-containing heterocycles. The results are in accord with experimental data. The distributions of current that are used as the basis for such calculations are discussed, and a scale of aromaticity is given for the systems that have been investigated.

  14. Particle on a boron disk: ring currents and disk aromaticity in B20(2-).

    PubMed

    Tai, Truong Ba; Havenith, Remco W A; Teunissen, Jos L; Dok, Ahmet R; Hallaert, Simon D; Nguyen, Minh Tho; Ceulemans, Arnout

    2013-09-16

    The B20(2-) cluster is predicted to exhibit a planar sheet-like structure with a circular circumference. Orbital plots and energy correlations demonstrate the close correspondence between the electronic structure of B20(2-) and the Bessel functions describing the waves of a quantum mechanical particle confined to a disk. The π-band of B20(2-), and its B19(-) congener, contains 12 π-electrons, forming a (1σ)(2)(1π)(4)(1δ)(4)(2σ)(2) configuration, which corresponds to a "disk aromaticity" electron count. The analogy not only applies to the π-band, but also extends to the 50 valence σ-electrons. The occupied σ-orbitals are assigned on the basis of radial and angular nodes of the scalar disk waves. The magnetic response of the cluster was examined by Nucleus Independent Chemical Shift (NICS) values and current density calculations based on the ipsocentric model. B20(2-) is found to exhibit a remarkable inner paratropic current in the σ-channel and an outer diatropic current in the π-channel. The orbital excitations responsible for the antiaromaticity in σ and the disk-aromaticity in π are identified. PMID:24011355

  15. The field line topology of a uniform magnetic field superposed on the field of a distributed ring current

    SciTech Connect

    Chance, M.S. . Plasma Physics Lab.); Greene, J.M.; Jensen, T.H. )

    1991-07-01

    A magnetic field line topology with nulls, generated by superimposing a uniform magnetic field onto the field from a distributed ring current, is analyzed. This simple model is amenable to substantial analytical progress and also facilitates the visualization of the three dimensional field geometry. Four nulls are seen to exist and representative field lines and tubes of flux found by numerical integration are presented. An infinite number of topologically distinct flux bundles is found. A convenient mapping is defined which proves very useful in distinguishing between and following the paths of the different tubes of flux as they traverse through the null system. The complexities already present in this simple but nontrivial configuration serve to emphasize the difficulties in analyzing more complicated geometries, but the intuition gained from this study proves beneficial in those cases. One such example is the application to a model of plasmoid formations in the earth's magnetotail. 7 refs., 19 figs.

  16. Self-Consistent Model of Magnetospheric Electric Field, Ring Current, Plasmasphere, and Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves: Initial Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gamayunov, K. V.; Khazanov, G. V.; Liemohn, M. W.; Fok, M.-C.; Ridley, A. J.

    2009-01-01

    Further development of our self-consistent model of interacting ring current (RC) ions and electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves is presented. This model incorporates large scale magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling and treats self-consistently not only EMIC waves and RC ions, but also the magnetospheric electric field, RC, and plasmasphere. Initial simulations indicate that the region beyond geostationary orbit should be included in the simulation of the magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling. Additionally, a self-consistent description, based on first principles, of the ionospheric conductance is required. These initial simulations further show that in order to model the EMIC wave distribution and wave spectral properties accurately, the plasmasphere should also be simulated self-consistently, since its fine structure requires as much care as that of the RC. Finally, an effect of the finite time needed to reestablish a new potential pattern throughout the ionosphere and to communicate between the ionosphere and the equatorial magnetosphere cannot be ignored.

  17. Pitch angle dependence of the charge exchange lifetime of ring current ions in a Mead-Fairfield magnetic field model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, G. K.; Rajaram, R.

    1989-11-01

    This paper examines the necessity of using a realistic magnetospheric magnetic field geometry in the computation of the pitch-angle dependence of the charge exchange lifetime of ring current ions. The Chamberlain (1963) model is used for the atomic hydrogen density, and the pitch-angle dependence of the charge exchange lifetime, tau, has been computed for coefficients corresponding to different levels of geomagnetic activity in the Mead-Fairfield (1975) model of magnetic field. It is shown that using the correct model of the magnetic field is as important as adopting the proper exospheric temperature in the model for the neutral hydrogen model. A local time dependence of the pitch-angle dependence of tau also results from the adoption of a realistic description of the magnetic field.

  18. Saturn's periodic magnetic field perturbations caused by a rotating partial ring current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, P. C.; Khurana, K. K.; Mitchell, D. G.; Sergis, N.; Dialynas, K.; Carbary, J. F.; Roelof, E. C.; Paranicas, C. P.; Krimigis, S. M.; Mauk, B. H.

    2010-11-01

    We demonstrate that the periodic magnetic field perturbations as observed from Cassini are caused by the plasma pressure of the energetic (>2 keV) particle distributions that are periodically injected and subsequently drift around Saturn. Plasma pressures inferred from the Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS) (<2 keV) and the Magnetospheric Imaging Instrument (MIMI) (>2 keV) are used to compute the three-dimensional pressure-driven currents and their associated magnetic field perturbations. The distribution of the “hot” (>2 keV) plasma pressure is derived from Energetic Neutral Atom (ENA) images obtained by the Ion Neutral Camera (INCA) and in-situ spectral measurements. The radial profile of “cold” (<2 keV) plasma pressure is obtained from statistical studies and is assumed to be azimuthally symmetric.

  19. The effect of changing solar wind conditions on the inner magnetosphere and ring current: A model data comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, S.; Spencer, E.

    2015-08-01

    We investigate the rate at which the open drift paths in the near-Earth magnetosphere convert to closed paths during events with a sudden northward turning of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF Bz) after the peak of a geomagnetic storm. The geomagnetic storm on 17 August 2001 with an abrupt turning of the IMF Bz after the peak in SYM-H index is chosen in this study. The Block-Adaptive-Tree Solar-Wind Roe-Type Upwind Scheme model along with the Fok Ring Current (FRC) model available at Community Coordinated Modeling Center is used to model this event. The unique movie maps of the worldwide magnetometer stations are used to compare with the numerical results. The results indicate that ground magnetic disturbance remains asymmetric for some time after the start of the recovery phase even for a storm with abrupt northward turning of the IMF Bz. FRC simulation results suggest that the flow-out losses decrease under weakened magnetospheric convection but at a rate slower than the change in IMF Bz. These results indicate that the flow-out losses rapidly become smaller as the IMF Bz turns northward during the early recovery phase of a storm and the contribution of the tail current to the SYM-H index is important.

  20. Effect of Z Prime -mediated flavor-changing neutral current on B {yields} {pi}{pi} decays

    SciTech Connect

    Sahoo, S.; Das, C. K.; Maharana, L.

    2011-07-15

    We study the effect of Z Prime -mediated flavor-changing neutral current on the B {yields} {pi}{pi} decays. The branching ratios of these decays can be enhanced remarkably in the nonuniversal Z Prime model. Our estimated branching ratios B(B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}) are enhanced significantly from their standard model (SM) value. For g Prime /g = 1, the branching ratios B(B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}) are very close to the recently observed experimental values and for higher values of g Prime /g branching ratios are more. Our calculated branching ratios B(B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) and B(B{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}) are also enhanced from the SM value as well as the recently observed experimental values. These enhancements of branching ratios from their SM value give the possibility of new physics.

  1. Observation of the Baryonic Flavor-Changing Neutral Current Decay Λb0 → Λµ+µ-

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-11-08

    The authors report the first observation of the baryonic flavor-changing neutral current decay Λb0 → Λµ+µ- with 24 signal events and a statistical significance of 5.8 Gaussian standard deviations. This measurement uses a pp¯ collisions data sample corresponding to 6.8 fb-1 at √s = 1.96 TeV collected by the CDF II detector at the Tevatron collider. The total and differential branching ratios for Λb0 → Λµ+µ- are measured. They find Β(Λb0 → Λµ+µ-) = [1.73 ± 0.42(stat) ± 0.55(syst)] x 10-6. They also report the first measurement of the differential branching ratio of Bs0→φµ+µ- using 49 signal events. In addition,more » they report branching ratios for B+→K+µ+µ-, B0→K0µ+µ- and Β→ K*(892)µ+µ- decays.« less

  2. Statistical interpretation of transient current power-law decay in colloidal quantum dot arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibatov, R. T.

    2011-08-01

    A new statistical model of the charge transport in colloidal quantum dot arrays is proposed. It takes into account Coulomb blockade forbidding multiple occupancy of nanocrystals and the influence of energetic disorder of interdot space. The model explains power-law current transients and the presence of the memory effect. The fractional differential analogue of the Ohm law is found phenomenologically for nanocrystal arrays. The model combines ideas that were considered as conflicting by other authors: the Scher-Montroll idea about the power-law distribution of waiting times in localized states for disordered semiconductors is applied taking into account Coulomb blockade; Novikov's condition about the asymptotic power-law distribution of time intervals between successful current pulses in conduction channels is fulfilled; and the carrier injection blocking predicted by Ginger and Greenham (2000 J. Appl. Phys. 87 1361) takes place.

  3. Search for flavor-changing neutral currents in top-quark decays t → Zq in pp collisions at sqrt[s] = 8 TeV.

    PubMed

    Chatrchyan, S; Khachatryan, V; Sirunyan, A M; Tumasyan, A; Adam, W; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Erö, J; Fabjan, C; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hartl, C; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Kiesenhofer, W; Knünz, V; Krammer, M; Krätschmer, I; Liko, D; Mikulec, I; Rabady, D; Rahbaran, B; Rohringer, H; Schöfbeck, R; Strauss, J; Taurok, A; Treberer-Treberspurg, W; Waltenberger, W; Wulz, C-E; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Alderweireldt, S; Bansal, M; Bansal, S; Cornelis, T; De Wolf, E A; Janssen, X; Knutsson, A; Luyckx, S; Mucibello, L; Ochesanu, S; Roland, B; Rougny, R; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Van Spilbeeck, A; Blekman, F; Blyweert, S; D'Hondt, J; Heracleous, N; Kalogeropoulos, A; Keaveney, J; Kim, T J; Lowette, S; Maes, M; Olbrechts, A; Strom, D; Tavernier, S; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Van Onsem, G P; Villella, I; Caillol, C; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Favart, L; Gay, A P R; Hreus, T; Léonard, A; Marage, P E; Mohammadi, A; Perniè, L; Reis, T; Seva, T; Thomas, L; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Wang, J; Adler, V; Beernaert, K; Benucci, L; Cimmino, A; Costantini, S; Dildick, S; Garcia, G; Klein, B; Lellouch, J; Mccartin, J; Ocampo Rios, A A; Ryckbosch, D; Sigamani, M; Strobbe, N; Thyssen, F; Tytgat, M; Walsh, S; Yazgan, E; Zaganidis, N; Basegmez, S; Beluffi, C; Bruno, G; Castello, R; Caudron, A; Ceard, L; Da Silveira, G G; Delaere, C; du Pree, T; Favart, D; Forthomme, L; Giammanco, A; Hollar, J; Jez, P; Komm, M; Lemaitre, V; Liao, J; Militaru, O; Nuttens, C; Pagano, D; Pin, A; Piotrzkowski, K; Popov, A; Quertenmont, L; Selvaggi, M; Vidal Marono, M; Vizan Garcia, J M; Beliy, N; Caebergs, T; Daubie, E; Hammad, G H; Alves, G A; Correa Martins Junior, M; Martins, T; Pol, M E; Souza, M H G; Aldá Júnior, W L; Carvalho, W; Chinellato, J; Custódio, A; Da Costa, E M; De Jesus Damiao, D; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Malbouisson, H; Malek, M; Matos Figueiredo, D; Mundim, L; Nogima, H; Prado Da Silva, W L; Santaolalla, J; Santoro, A; Sznajder, A; Tonelli Manganote, E J; Vilela Pereira, A; Bernardes, C A; Dias, F A; Tomei, T R Fernandez Perez; Gregores, E M; Lagana, C; Mercadante, P G; Novaes, S F; Padula, Sandra S; Genchev, V; Iaydjiev, P; Marinov, A; Piperov, S; Rodozov, M; Sultanov, G; Vutova, M; Dimitrov, A; Hadjiiska, R; Litov, L; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Bian, J G; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Chen, M; Du, R; Jiang, C H; Liang, D; Liang, S; Meng, X; Plestina, R; Tao, J; Wang, X; Wang, Z; Asawatangtrakuldee, C; Ban, Y; Guo, Y; Li, Q; Li, W; Liu, S; Mao, Y; Qian, S J; Wang, D; Zhang, L; Zou, W; Avila, C; Carrillo Montoya, C A; Chaparro Sierra, L F; Florez, C; Gomez, J P; Gomez Moreno, B; Sanabria, J C; Godinovic, N; Lelas, D; Polic, D; Puljak, I; Antunovic, Z; Kovac, M; Brigljevic, V; Kadija, K; Luetic, J; Mekterovic, D; Morovic, S; Tikvica, L; Attikis, A; Mavromanolakis, G; Mousa, J; Nicolaou, C; Ptochos, F; Razis, P A; Finger, M; Finger, M; Abdelalim, A A; Assran, Y; Elgammal, S; Ellithi Kamel, A; 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Würthwein, F; Yagil, A; Yoo, J; Barge, D; Campagnari, C; Danielson, T; Flowers, K; Geffert, P; George, C; Golf, F; Incandela, J; Justus, C; Magaña Villalba, R; Mccoll, N; Pavlunin, V; Richman, J; Rossin, R; Stuart, D; To, W; West, C; Apresyan, A; Bornheim, A; Bunn, J; Chen, Y; Di Marco, E; Duarte, J; Kcira, D; Mott, A; Newman, H B; Pena, C; Rogan, C; Spiropulu, M; Timciuc, V; Wilkinson, R; Xie, S; Zhu, R Y; Azzolini, V; Calamba, A; Carroll, R; Ferguson, T; Iiyama, Y; Jang, D W; Paulini, M; Russ, J; Vogel, H; Vorobiev, I; Cumalat, J P; Drell, B R; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Luiggi Lopez, E; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Stenson, K; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Alexander, J; Chatterjee, A; Eggert, N; Gibbons, L K; Hopkins, W; Khukhunaishvili, A; Kreis, B; Mirman, N; Nicolas Kaufman, G; Patterson, J R; Ryd, A; Salvati, E; Sun, W; Teo, W D; Thom, J; Thompson, J; Tucker, J; Weng, Y; Winstrom, L; Wittich, P; Winn, D; Abdullin, S; Albrow, M; Anderson, J; Apollinari, G; Bauerdick, L A T; Beretvas, A; Berryhill, J; Bhat, P C; Burkett, K; Butler, J N; Chetluru, V; Cheung, H W K; Chlebana, F; Cihangir, S; Elvira, V D; Fisk, I; Freeman, J; Gao, Y; Gottschalk, E; Gray, L; Green, D; Gutsche, O; Hare, D; Harris, R M; Hirschauer, J; Hooberman, B; Jindariani, S; Johnson, M; Joshi, U; Kaadze, K; Klima, B; Kwan, S; Linacre, J; Lincoln, D; Lipton, R; Lykken, J; Maeshima, K; Marraffino, J M; Martinez Outschoorn, V I; Maruyama, S; Mason, D; McBride, P; Mishra, K; Mrenna, S; Musienko, Y; Nahn, S; Newman-Holmes, C; O'Dell, V; Prokofyev, O; Ratnikova, N; Sexton-Kennedy, E; Sharma, S; Spalding, W J; Spiegel, L; Taylor, L; Tkaczyk, S; Tran, N V; Uplegger, L; Vaandering, E W; Vidal, R; Whitmore, J; Wu, W; Yang, F; Yun, J C; Acosta, D; Avery, P; Bourilkov, D; Cheng, T; Das, S; De Gruttola, M; Di Giovanni, G P; Dobur, D; Field, R D; Fisher, M; Fu, Y; Furic, I K; Hugon, J; Kim, B; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kropivnitskaya, A; Kypreos, T; Low, J F; Matchev, K; Milenovic, P; Mitselmakher, G; Muniz, L; Rinkevicius, A; Shchutska, L; Skhirtladze, N; Snowball, M; Yelton, J; Zakaria, M; Gaultney, V; Hewamanage, S; Linn, S; Markowitz, P; Martinez, G; Rodriguez, J L; Adams, T; Askew, A; Bochenek, J; Chen, J; Diamond, B; Haas, J; Hagopian, S; Hagopian, V; Johnson, K F; Prosper, H; Veeraraghavan, V; Weinberg, M; Baarmand, M M; Dorney, B; Hohlmann, M; Kalakhety, H; Yumiceva, F; Adams, M R; Apanasevich, L; Bazterra, V E; Betts, R R; Bucinskaite, I; Cavanaugh, R; Evdokimov, O; Gauthier, L; Gerber, C E; Hofman, D J; Khalatyan, S; Kurt, P; Moon, D H; O'Brien, C; Silkworth, C; Turner, P; Varelas, N; Akgun, U; Albayrak, E A; Bilki, B; Clarida, W; Dilsiz, K; Duru, F; Merlo, J-P; Mermerkaya, H; Mestvirishvili, A; Moeller, A; Nachtman, J; Ogul, H; Onel, Y; Ozok, F; Sen, S; Tan, P; Tiras, E; Wetzel, J; Yetkin, T; Yi, K; Barnett, B A; Blumenfeld, B; Bolognesi, S; Fehling, D; Gritsan, A V; Maksimovic, P; Martin, C; Swartz, M; Whitbeck, A; Baringer, P; Bean, A; Benelli, G; Kenny, R P; Murray, M; Noonan, D; Sanders, S; Sekaric, J; Stringer, R; Wang, Q; Wood, J S; Barfuss, A F; Chakaberia, I; Ivanov, A; Khalil, S; Makouski, M; Maravin, Y; Saini, L K; Shrestha, S; Svintradze, I; Gronberg, J; Lange, D; Rebassoo, F; Wright, D; Baden, A; Calvert, B; Eno, S C; Gomez, J A; Hadley, N J; Kellogg, R G; Kolberg, T; Lu, Y; Marionneau, M; Mignerey, A C; Pedro, K; Skuja, A; Temple, J; Tonjes, M B; Tonwar, S C; Apyan, A; Barbieri, R; Bauer, G; Busza, W; Cali, I A; Chan, M; Di Matteo, L; Dutta, V; Gomez Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; Gulhan, D; Klute, M; Lai, Y S; Lee, Y-J; Levin, A; Luckey, P D; Ma, T; Paus, C; Ralph, D; Roland, C; Roland, G; Stephans, G S F; Stöckli, F; Sumorok, K; Velicanu, D; Veverka, J; Wyslouch, B; Yang, M; Yoon, A S; Zanetti, M; Zhukova, V; Dahmes, B; De Benedetti, A; Gude, A; Kao, S C; Klapoetke, K; Kubota, Y; Mans, J; Pastika, N; Rusack, R; Singovsky, A; Tambe, N; Turkewitz, J; Acosta, J G; Cremaldi, L M; Kroeger, R; Oliveros, S; Perera, L; Rahmat, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D; Avdeeva, E; Bloom, K; Bose, S; Claes, D R; Dominguez, A; Gonzalez Suarez, R; Keller, J; Kravchenko, I; Lazo-Flores, J; Malik, S; Meier, F; Snow, G R; Dolen, J; Godshalk, A; Iashvili, I; Jain, S; Kharchilava, A; Kumar, A; Rappoccio, S; Wan, Z; Alverson, G; Barberis, E; Baumgartel, D; Chasco, M; Haley, J; Massironi, A; Nash, D; Orimoto, T; Trocino, D; Wood, D; Zhang, J; Anastassov, A; Hahn, K A; Kubik, A; Lusito, L; Mucia, N; Odell, N; Pollack, B; Pozdnyakov, A; Schmitt, M; Stoynev, S; Sung, K; Velasco, M; Won, S; Berry, D; Brinkerhoff, A; Chan, K M; Drozdetskiy, A; Hildreth, M; Jessop, C; Karmgard, D J; Kolb, J; Lannon, K; Luo, W; Lynch, S; Marinelli, N; Morse, D M; Pearson, T; Planer, M; Ruchti, R; Slaunwhite, J; Valls, N; Wayne, M; Wolf, M; Antonelli, L; Bylsma, B; Durkin, L S; Flowers, S; Hill, C; Hughes, R; Kotov, K; Ling, T Y; Puigh, D; Rodenburg, M; Smith, G; Vuosalo, C; Winer, B L; Wolfe, H; Wulsin, H W; Berry, E; Elmer, P; Halyo, V; Hebda, P; Hegeman, J; Hunt, A; Jindal, P; Koay, S A; Lujan, P; Marlow, D; Medvedeva, T; Mooney, M; Olsen, J; Piroué, P; Quan, X; Raval, A; Saka, H; Stickland, D; Tully, C; Werner, J S; Zenz, S C; Zuranski, A; Brownson, E; Lopez, A; Mendez, H; Ramirez Vargas, J E; Alagoz, E; Benedetti, D; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; De Mattia, M; Everett, A; Hu, Z; Jones, M; Jung, K; Kress, M; Leonardo, N; Lopes Pegna, D; Maroussov, V; Merkel, P; Miller, D H; Neumeister, N; Radburn-Smith, B C; Shipsey, I; Silvers, D; Svyatkovskiy, A; Wang, F; Xie, W; Xu, L; Yoo, H D; Zablocki, J; Zheng, Y; Parashar, N; Adair, A; Akgun, B; Ecklund, K M; Geurts, F J M; Li, W; Michlin, B; Padley, B P; Redjimi, R; Roberts, J; Zabel, J; Betchart, B; Bodek, A; Covarelli, R; de Barbaro, P; Demina, R; Eshaq, Y; Ferbel, T; Garcia-Bellido, A; Goldenzweig, P; Han, J; Harel, A; Miner, D C; Petrillo, G; Vishnevskiy, D; Zielinski, M; Bhatti, A; Ciesielski, R; Demortier, L; Goulianos, K; Lungu, G; Malik, S; Mesropian, C; Arora, S; Barker, A; Chou, J P; Contreras-Campana, C; Contreras-Campana, E; Duggan, D; Ferencek, D; Gershtein, Y; Gray, R; Halkiadakis, E; Hidas, D; Lath, A; Panwalkar, S; Park, M; Patel, R; Rekovic, V; Robles, J; Salur, S; Schnetzer, S; Seitz, C; Somalwar, S; Stone, R; Thomas, S; Thomassen, P; Walker, M; Rose, K; Spanier, S; Yang, Z C; York, A; Bouhali, O; Eusebi, R; Flanagan, W; Gilmore, J; Kamon, T; Khotilovich, V; Krutelyov, V; Montalvo, R; Osipenkov, I; Pakhotin, Y; Perloff, A; Roe, J; Safonov, A; Sakuma, T; Suarez, I; Tatarinov, A; Toback, D; Akchurin, N; Cowden, C; Damgov, J; Dragoiu, C; Dudero, P R; Kovitanggoon, K; Kunori, S; Lee, S W; Libeiro, T; Volobouev, I; Appelt, E; Delannoy, A G; Greene, S; Gurrola, A; Johns, W; Maguire, C; Mao, Y; Melo, A; Sharma, M; Sheldon, P; Snook, B; Tuo, S; Velkovska, J; Arenton, M W; Boutle, S; Cox, B; Francis, B; Goodell, J; Hirosky, R; Ledovskoy, A; Lin, C; Neu, C; Wood, J; Gollapinni, S; Harr, R; Karchin, P E; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C; Lamichhane, P; Sakharov, A; Belknap, D A; Borrello, L; Carlsmith, D; Cepeda, M; Dasu, S; Duric, S; Friis, E; Grothe, M; Hall-Wilton, R; Herndon, M; Hervé, A; Klabbers, P; Klukas, J; Lanaro, A; Loveless, R; Mohapatra, A; Ojalvo, I; Perry, T; Pierro, G A; Polese, G; Ross, I; Sarangi, T; Savin, A; Smith, W H

    2014-05-01

    A search for flavor-changing neutral currents in top-quark decays t → Zq is performed in events produced from the decay chain tt → Zq+Wb, where both vector bosons decay leptonically, producing a final state with three leptons (electrons or muons). A data set collected with the CMS detector at the LHC is used, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb(-1) of proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV. No excess is seen in the observed number of events relative to the standard model prediction; thus, no evidence for flavor-changing neutral currents in top-quark decays is found. A combination with a previous search at 7 TeV excludes a t → Zq branching fraction greater than 0.05% at the 95% confidence level. PMID:24836238

  4. Persistent current in a correlated quantum ring with electron-phonon interaction in the presence of Rashba interaction and Aharonov-Bohm flux.

    PubMed

    Monisha, P J; Sankar, I V; Sil, Shreekantha; Chatterjee, Ashok

    2016-01-01

    Persistent current in a correlated quantum ring threaded by an Aharonov-Bohm flux is studied in the presence of electron-phonon interactions and Rashba spin-orbit coupling. The quantum ring is modeled by the Holstein-Hubbard-Rashba Hamiltonian and the energy is calculated by performing the conventional Lang-Firsov transformation followed by the diagonalization of the effective Hamiltonian within a mean-field approximation. The effects of Aharonov-Bohm flux, temperature, spin-orbit and electron-phonon interactions on the persistent current are investigated. It is shown that the electron-phonon interactions reduce the persistent current, while the Rashba coupling enhances it. It is also shown that temperature smoothens the persistent current curve. The effect of chemical potential on the persistent current is also studied. PMID:26831831

  5. Persistent current in a correlated quantum ring with electron-phonon interaction in the presence of Rashba interaction and Aharonov-Bohm flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monisha, P. J.; Sankar, I. V.; Sil, Shreekantha; Chatterjee, Ashok

    2016-02-01

    Persistent current in a correlated quantum ring threaded by an Aharonov-Bohm flux is studied in the presence of electron-phonon interactions and Rashba spin-orbit coupling. The quantum ring is modeled by the Holstein-Hubbard-Rashba Hamiltonian and the energy is calculated by performing the conventional Lang-Firsov transformation followed by the diagonalization of the effective Hamiltonian within a mean-field approximation. The effects of Aharonov-Bohm flux, temperature, spin-orbit and electron-phonon interactions on the persistent current are investigated. It is shown that the electron-phonon interactions reduce the persistent current, while the Rashba coupling enhances it. It is also shown that temperature smoothens the persistent current curve. The effect of chemical potential on the persistent current is also studied.

  6. Persistent current in a correlated quantum ring with electron-phonon interaction in the presence of Rashba interaction and Aharonov-Bohm flux

    PubMed Central

    Monisha, P. J.; Sankar, I. V.; Sil, Shreekantha; Chatterjee, Ashok

    2016-01-01

    Persistent current in a correlated quantum ring threaded by an Aharonov-Bohm flux is studied in the presence of electron-phonon interactions and Rashba spin-orbit coupling. The quantum ring is modeled by the Holstein-Hubbard-Rashba Hamiltonian and the energy is calculated by performing the conventional Lang-Firsov transformation followed by the diagonalization of the effective Hamiltonian within a mean-field approximation. The effects of Aharonov-Bohm flux, temperature, spin-orbit and electron-phonon interactions on the persistent current are investigated. It is shown that the electron-phonon interactions reduce the persistent current, while the Rashba coupling enhances it. It is also shown that temperature smoothens the persistent current curve. The effect of chemical potential on the persistent current is also studied. PMID:26831831

  7. Planetary Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Larry

    2014-03-01

    Preface: a personal view of planetary rings; 1. Introduction: the allure of the ringed planets; 2. Studies of planetary rings 1610-2013; 3. Diversity of planetary rings; 4. Individual ring particles and their collisions; 5. Large-scale ring evolution; 6. Moons confine and sculpt rings; 7. Explaining ring phenomena; 8. N-body simulations; 9. Stochastic models; 10. Age and evolution of rings; 11. Saturn's mysterious F ring; 12. Uranus' rings and moons; 13. Neptune's partial rings; 14. Jupiter's ring-moon system after Galileo and New Horizons; 15. Ring photometry; 16. Dusty rings; 17. Concluding remarks; Afterword; Glossary; References; Index.

  8. The Role of ULF Waves in Ring Current and Radiation Belt Dynamics as Revealed by NASA's Van Allen Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claudepierre, S. G.; Mann, I. R.; Takahashi, K.; Toffoletto, F. R.; Wiltberger, M. J.; O'Brien, T. P., III; Fennell, J. F.

    2015-12-01

    NASA's Van Allen Probes have been on orbit since late-August 2012, precessing through all local times over the first two years of the mission, returning high-quality wave and particle observations in the near-Earth space environment. The Probes reveal radiation belt and ring current dynamics with unrivaled accuracy and resolution, providing unambiguous evidence of resonant wave-particle interactions in the inner magnetosphere (e.g., L<7). It is well known that a class of such wave-particle interactions, namely ultra-low frequency (ULF; ~1-10 mHz) wave interactions, contribute to the radial transport of electrons and protons in this region and thus, the large-scale, global morphology of the radiation belts. We focus our investigations on observations of drift-resonance with shock-induced ULF waves, drift-resonance with localized, monochromatic ULF waves, and ULF fluctuations related to nightside particle injections. We also discuss recent advances in the modeling of ULF waves and the challenges that lie ahead.

  9. Self-Consistent Ring Current Modeling with Propagating Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves in the Presence of Heavy Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Gamayunov, K. V.; Gallagher, D. L.; Kozyra, J. U.; Liemohn, M. W.

    2006-01-01

    The self-consistent treatment of the RC ion dynamics and EMlC waves, which are thought to exert important influences on the ion dynamical evolution, is an important missing element in our understanding of the storm-and recovery-time ring current evolution. Under certain conditions, relativistic electrons, with energies greater than or equal to 1 MeV, can be removed from the outer radiation belt by EMlC wave scattering during a magnetic storm (Summers and Thorne, 2003; Albert, 2003). That is why the modeling of EMlC waves is critical and timely issue in magnetospheric physics. This study will generalize the self-consistent theoretical description of RC ions and EMlC waves that has been developed by Khazanov et al. [2002, 2003] and include the heavy ions and propagation effects of EMlC waves in the global dynamic of self-consistent RC - EMlC waves coupling. The results of our newly developed model that will be presented at Huntsville 2006 meeting, focusing mainly on the dynamic of EMlC waves and comparison of these results with the previous global RC modeling studies devoted to EMlC waves formation. We also discuss RC ion precipitations and wave induced thermal electron fluxes into the ionosphere.

  10. Transport of ions in presence of induced electric field and electrostatic turbulence - Source of ions injected into ring current

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cladis, J. B.; Francis, W. E.

    1985-01-01

    The transport of ions from the polar ionosphere to the inner magnetosphere during stormtime conditions has been computed using a Monte Carlo diffusion code. The effect of the electrostatic turbulence assumed to be present during the substorm expansion phase was simulated by a process that accelerated the ions stochastically perpendicular to the magnetic field with a diffusion coefficient proportional to the energization rate of the ions by the induced electric field. This diffusion process was continued as the ions were convected from the plasma sheet boundary layer to the double-spiral injection boundary. Inward of the injection boundary, the ions were convected adiabatically. By using as input an O(+) flux of 2.8 x 10 to the 8th per sq cm per s (w greater than 10 eV) and an H(+) flux of 5.5 x 10 to the 8th per sq cm per s (w greater than 0.63 eV), the computed distribution functions of the ions in the ring current were found to be in good agreement, over a wide range in L (4 to 8), with measurements made with the ISEE-1 satellite during a storm. This O(+) flux and a large part of the H(+) flux are consistent with the DE satellite measurements of the polar ionospheric outflow during disturbed times.

  11. Influence of Critical Current Density on Guidance Force Decay of HTS Bulk Exposed to AC Magnetic Field Perturbation in a Maglev Vehicle System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longcai, Zhang; Jianguo, Kong

    2012-07-01

    Superconducting maglev vehicle is one of the most promising applications of HTS bulks. In such a system, the HTS bulks are always exposed to AC external magnetic field, which is generated by the inhomogeneous surface magnetic field of the NdFeB guideway. In our previous work, we studied the guidance force decay of the YBCO bulk over the NdFdB guideway used in the High-temperature superconducting maglev vehicle system with the application of the AC external magnetic field, and calculated the guidance force decay as a function of time based on an analytic model. In this paper, we investigated the influence of the critical current density on the guidance force decay of HTS bulk exposed to AC field perturbation in the maglev vehicle system and try to adopt a method to suppress the decay. From the results, it was found that the guidance force decay rate was higher for the bulk with lower critical current density. Therefore, we could suppress the guidance force decay of HTS bulk exposed to AC external magnetic field perturbation in the maglev vehicle system by improving critical current density of the bulk.

  12. Vascular rings.

    PubMed

    Backer, Carl L; Mongé, Michael C; Popescu, Andrada R; Eltayeb, Osama M; Rastatter, Jeffrey C; Rigsby, Cynthia K

    2016-06-01

    The term vascular ring refers to congenital vascular anomalies of the aortic arch system that compress the esophagus and trachea, causing symptoms related to those two structures. The most common vascular rings are double aortic arch and right aortic arch with left ligamentum. Pulmonary artery sling is rare and these patients need to be carefully evaluated for frequently associated tracheal stenosis. Another cause of tracheal compression occurring only in infants is the innominate artery compression syndrome. In the current era, the diagnosis of a vascular ring is best established by CT imaging that can accurately delineate the anatomy of the vascular ring and associated tracheal pathology. For patients with a right aortic arch there recently has been an increased recognition of a structure called a Kommerell diverticulum which may require resection and transfer of the left subclavian artery to the left carotid artery. A very rare vascular ring is the circumflex aorta that is now treated with the aortic uncrossing operation. Patients with vascular rings should all have an echocardiogram because of the incidence of associated congenital heart disease. We also recommend bronchoscopy to assess for additional tracheal pathology and provide an assessment of the degree of tracheomalacia and bronchomalacia. The outcomes of surgical intervention are excellent and most patients have complete resolution of symptoms over a period of time. PMID:27301603

  13. Can current New Madrid seismicity be explained as a decaying aftershock sequence?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, M. T.; Hough, S. E.; Felzer, K. R.

    2012-12-01

    It has been suggested that continuing seismicity in the New Madrid, central U.S. region is primarily composed of the continuing long-lived aftershock sequence of the 1811-1812 sequence, and thus cannot be taken as an indication of present-day strain accrual in the region. We examine historical and instrumental seismicity in the New Madrid region to determine if such a model is feasible given 1) the observed protracted nature of past New Madrid sequences, with multiple mainshocks with apparently similar magnitudes; 2) the rate of historically documented early aftershocks from the 1811-1812 sequence; and 3) plausible mainshock magnitudes and aftershock-productivity parameters. We use ETAS modeling to search for sub-critical sets of direct Omori parameters that are consistent with all of these datasets, given a realistic consideration of their uncertainties, and current seismicity in the region. The results of this work will help to determine whether or not future sequences are likely to be clusters of events like those in the past, a key issue for earthquake response planning.

  14. Repetitive formation and decay of current sheets in magnetic loops: An origin of diverse magnetic structures

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Dinesh; Bhattacharyya, R.; Smolarkiewicz, P. K.

    2015-01-15

    In this work, evolution of an incompressible, thermally homogeneous, infinitely conducting, viscous magnetofluid is numerically explored as the fluid undergoes repeated events of magnetic reconnection. The initial magnetic field is constructed by a superposition of two linear force-free fields and has similar morphology as the magnetic loops observed in the solar corona. The results are presented for computations with three distinct sets of footpoint geometries. To onset reconnection, we rely on numerical model magnetic diffusivity, in the spirit of implicit large eddy simulation. It is generally expected that in a high Lundquist number fluid, repeated magnetic reconnections are ubiquitous and hence can lead to a host of magnetic structures with considerable observational importance. In particular, the simulations presented here illustrate formations of magnetic islands, rotating magnetic helices and rising flux ropes—depending on the initial footpoint geometry but through the common process of repeated magnetic reconnections. Further, we observe the development of extended current sheets in two case studies, where the footpoint reconnections generate favorable dynamics.

  15. The Exclusive bar B ->π e+ e- and bar B-> ρ e+ e- Decays in the Two Higgs Doublet Model with Flavor Changing Neutral Currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iltan, E. O.

    We present the leading logarithmic QCD corrections to the matrix element of the decay b→de+e- in the two Higgs doublet model with tree level flavor changing currents (model III). We continue studying the differential branching ratio and the CP-violating asymmetry for the exclusive decays B→πe+e- and B→ρe+e- and analysing the dependencies of these quantities on the selected model III parameters, ξU,D, including the leading logarithmic QCD corrections. Further, we present the forward-backward asymmetry of dileptons for the decay B→ρe+e- and discuss the dependencies to the model III parameters. We observe that there is a possibility to enhance the branching ratios and suppress the CP-violating effects for both decays in the framework of the model III. Therefore, the measurements of these quantities will be an efficient tool to search the new physics beyond the SM.

  16. Accumulation and Decay Characteristics of Exoelectron Sources at MgO Protective Layer Surface in Alternating-Current Plasma Display Panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshino, Kyohei; Nagatomi, Takaharu; Morita, Yukihiro; Oue, Toshiyasu; Kosugi, Naoki; Nishitani, Mikihiko; Kitagawa, Masatoshi; Takai, Yoshizo

    2010-08-01

    The accumulation and decay characteristics of exoelectron sources at a MgO protective layer surface in alternating-current plasma display panels (AC-PDPs) were investigated. The positively charged MgO surface provides a larger number of exoelectrons than the negatively charged surface, indicating that electrons trapped in shallow carrier traps coexist with trapped holes, and exoelectrons are emitted through Auger and/or photoionization processes after their recombination. The exoelectron sources are accumulated by sustain discharges and always decay. The half-life of the decay of the exoelectron sources is relatively long, of the order of a few tens of ms, confirming that the exoelectron emission property at the address discharge in a certain television (TV) field is strongly affected by sustain firings in the previous two TV fields or more. The effects of such a long-term decay of the exoelectron sources should be taken into consideration when designing the driving waveforms of AC-PDPs.

  17. Determining the strength of the ring and the magnetopause currents during the initial phase of a geomagnetic storm using cosmic-ray data

    SciTech Connect

    Flueckiger, E.O.; Smart, D.F.; Shea, M.A.

    1990-02-01

    During a geomagnetic storm the strength of the magnetospheric current systems is strongly increased. In the initial phase of most events, however, the magnetic field at the Earth's equator (as characterized by the Dst index) shows only a relatively small perturbation due to the opposite magnetic effects caused by the magnetopause currents compared to the ring current. Analysis of Dst and of the cosmic ray cutoff rigidity changes at about 55 deg geomagnetic latitude offers the unique possibility to estimate the intensity of these two current systems separately. The procedure is illustrated for the geomagnetic storm on December 17, 1971.

  18. Determining the strength of the ring and the magnetopause currents during the initial phase of a geomagnetic storm using cosmic ray data

    SciTech Connect

    Flueckiger, E.O. ); Smart, D.F.; Shea, M.A. )

    1990-02-01

    During a geomagnetic storm the strength of the magnetospheric current systems is strongly increased. In the initial phase of most events, however, the magnetic field at the Earth's equator (as characterized by the Dst index) shows only a relatively small perturbation due to the opposite magnetic effects caused by the magnetopause currents compared to the ring current. Analysis of Dst and of the cosmic ray cutoff rigidity changes at about 55{degree} geomagnetic latitude offers the unique possibility to estimate the intensity of these two current systems separately. The procedure is illustrated for the geomagnetic storm on December 17, 1971.

  19. Evolution of ring current and radiation belt particles under the influence of storm-time electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Y.; Shinbori, A.; Ono, T.; Iizima, M.; Kumamoto, A.

    2007-06-01

    Electric field and potential distributions in the inner magnetosphere during geomagnetic storms have been investigated using the Akebono/EFD data. Using this electric field, we study injection of ring current particles and acceleration of radiation belt electrons by single-particle calculations. During the main phase, the dawn-dusk electric field is intensified especially in a range of 2 < L < 5 with a maximum amplitude of 6 mV/m on the duskside, and a two-cell convection pattern with a potential difference of 180 kV is identified. The convection pattern on the equatorial plane is significantly distorted with a large potential drop of 70 kV on the dawn and dusk sectors, indicating an intrinsic source of large-scale electric field in the inner magnetosphere. The plasma sheet ions are gathered into the dusk to premidnight sector in the inner magnetosphere in the region of enhanced electric field due to the strong E × B drift. The ions are transported into around 4 RE with an acceleration of more than 1 order of magnitude within 40 min, conserving the first adiabatic invariants. Relativistic electrons with initial energy of some hundreds of kiloelectron volts at 5 RE are energized to more than 100 keV for 3 hours. The energy spectrum during the recovery phase of 9 October 1990 geomagnetic storm observed by the CRRES satellite is reproduced without the radial diffusion or nonadiabatic acceleration by plasma waves. It is possible that this acceleration process is the inhomogeneity of the large-scale electric field, which corresponds to the ∇ × E term along orbits of electrons around the Earth.

  20. World Encircling Tectonic Vortex Street - Geostreams Revisited: The Southern Ring Current EM Plasma-Tectonic Coupling in the Western Pacific Rim

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leybourne, Bruce; Smoot, Christian; Longhinos, Biju

    2014-05-01

    Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) coupling to south polar magnetic ring currents transfers induction energy to the Southern Geostream ringing Antarctica and underlying its encircling mid-ocean ridge structure. Magnetic reconnection between the southward interplanetary magnetic field and the magnetic field of the earth is the primary energy transfer mechanism between the solar wind and the magnetosphere. Induced telluric currents focused within joule spikes along Geostreams heat the southern Pacific. Alignment of the Australian Antarctic Discordance to other tectonic vortexes along the Western Pacific Rim, provide electrical connections to Earths core that modulate global telluric currents. The Banda Sea Triple Junction, a mantle vortex north of Australia, and the Lake Baikal Continental Rift vortex in the northern hemisphere modulate atmospheric Jetstream patterns gravitationally linked to internal density oscillations induced by these telluric currents. These telluric currents are driven by solar magnetic power, rotation and orbital dynamics. A solar rotation 40 day power spectrum in polarity controls north-south migration of earthquakes along the Western Pacific Rim and manifest as the Madden Julian Oscillation a well-documented climate cycle. Solar plasma turbulence cycles related to Hale flares trigger El Nino Southern Oscillations (ENSO's), while solar magnetic field strength frequencies dominate global warming and cooling trends indexed to the Pacific Decadal Oscillation. These Pacific climate anomalies are solar-electro-tectonically modulated via coupling to tropical geostream vortex streets. Particularly the section along the Central Pacific Megatrend connecting the Banda Sea Triple Junction (up welling mantle vortex) north of Australia with the Easter Island & Juan Fernandez twin rotating micro-plates (twin down welling mantle vortexes) along the East Pacific Rise modulating ENSO. Solar eruptions also enhance the equatorial ring current located

  1. Planetary Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Larry W.

    2011-07-01

    Preface; 1. Introduction: the allure of ringed planets; 2. Studies of planetary rings 1610-2004; 3. Diversity of planetary rings; 4. Individual ring particles and their collisions; 5. Large-scale ring evolution; 6. Moons confine and sculpt rings; 7. Explaining ring phenomena; 8. N-Body simulations; 9. Stochastic models; 10. Age and evolution of rings; 11. Saturn's mysterious F ring; 12. Neptune's partial rings; 13. Jupiter's ring-moon system after Galileo; 14. Ring photometry; 15. Dusty rings; 16. Cassini observations; 17. Summary: the big questions; Glossary; References; Index.

  2. Current status of the E(1420)/. iota. (1440) and future prospects of the g sub T decaying into. phi. phi

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, S.U.

    1991-12-01

    A survey is given of the current status of the f{sub 1}(1420)/E and the {eta}(1440)/{iota} in the channels of K {bar K}{pi} and {eta}{pi}{pi}. There is now strong evidence that the {eta}(1440)/{iota} is split into two J{sup PC} = o{sup {minus}+} states in the 1.4--1.5 GeV range with the lower-mass state coupling mostly to a{sub 0}(980){pi} whereas the upper-mass state couples mainly to K*(890){bar K}. Both of them cannot be quarkonia. It appears very likely that the f{sub 1}(1420)/E is an S-wave K*(890){bar K} molecule with a strong overlap with the a{sub 0}(980)/{delta}. It is thought that one or more of the J{sup PC} = 1{sup ++} f{sub 2}(2010)/g{sub r}, F{sub 2}(2300)/g{sub T}{prime} and f{sub 2}(2340)/g{sub f}{double prime} states decaying into {phi}{phi} may be the tensor glueball. The future prospects at BNL and elsewhere for further experimental work on these on other exotic states coupling to {phi}{phi} are discussed.

  3. Remarks concerning the O(Zα2) corrections to Fermi decays, conserved-vector-current predictions, and universality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirlin, A.

    1987-06-01

    Finite-nuclear-size contributions to the O(Zα2) corrections to Fermi decays are studied for realistic nuclear-charge distributions. In conjunction with the results of Koslowsky et al. and recent papers by the author and Zucchini and by Jaus and Rasche, these refinements lead to an average value scrFt=3070.6+/-1.6 s for the accurately measured superallowed Fermi transitions. Correspondingly, Vud=0.9744+/-0.0010 and Vud 2+Vus 2+Vub 2=0.9979+/-0.0021 in good agreement with the three-generation standard model at the level of its quantum corrections. The agreement with conserved-vector-current predictions is very good, with each of the eight transitions differing from the average by <1σ. The consequences of using two other calculations of the nuclear mismatch correction δc, Wilkinson's microscopic analysis and the recent results of Ormand and Brown, are briefly discussed. A useful upper bound on scrFt, independent of the δc calculation, is given.

  4. Conditioning of BPM pickup signals for operations of the Duke storage ring with a wide range of single-bunch current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wei; Li, Jing-Yi; Huang, Sen-Lin; Z. Wu, W.; Hao, H.; P., Wang; K. Wu, Y.

    2014-10-01

    The Duke storage ring is a dedicated driver for the storage ring based oscillator free-electron lasers (FELs), and the High Intensity Gamma-ray Source (HIGS). It is operated with a beam current ranging from about 1 mA to 100 mA per bunch for various operations and accelerator physics studies. High performance operations of the FEL and γ-ray source require a stable electron beam orbit, which has been realized by the global orbit feedback system. As a critical part of the orbit feedback system, the electron beam position monitors (BPMs) are required to be able to precisely measure the electron beam orbit in a wide range of the single-bunch current. However, the high peak voltage of the BPM pickups associated with high single-bunch current degrades the performance of the BPM electronics, and can potentially damage the BPM electronics. A signal conditioning method using low pass filters is developed to reduce the peak voltage to protect the BPM electronics, and to make the BPMs capable of working with a wide range of single-bunch current. Simulations and electron beam based tests are performed. The results show that the Duke storage ring BPM system is capable of providing precise orbit measurements to ensure highly stable FEL and HIGS operations.

  5. Semileptonic B-Meson Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Volk, Alexei; /Dresden, Tech. U.

    2010-08-26

    The study of the semileptonic B-meson decays is the most accessible and cleanest way to determine the CKM matrix elements |V{sub cb}| and V{sub ub}. These decays also provide experimental access to study the QCD form-factors, heavy quark masses, and HQE parameters. The theoretical description of semileptonic B-meson decays at the parton level is very simple because there is no interaction between leptonic and hadronic currents. At the hadron level one needs to introduce corrections due to the strong interaction between quarks. Especially in the description of the inclusive B-meson decays the motion of the b-quark inside the B-meson plays a crucial role. All these effects are described in the frameworks of Heavy Quark Effective Theory (HQET) and Lattice QCD (LQCD). We give an overview about results of studies of semileptonic B-meson decays collected with the BABAR and Belle detectors at the PEP-II and the KEKB e{sup +}e{sup -}-storage rings. We present recent results on hadronic moments measured in inclusive B {yields} X{sub c}lv and B {yields} X{sub u}lv decays and extracted heavy quark masses m{sub b} and m{sub c} and dominant non-perturbative Heavy Quark Expansion (HQE) parameters. We also report the measurements of the CKM matrix elements |V{sub cb}| and |V{sub ub}| in inclusive and in exclusive semileptonic B-meson decays. We describe the studies of the form-factor parameters for the decay B{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup -}l{sup +}v and present the measurement of the B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup -}l{sup +}v form-factor shape.

  6. Storm-associated variations of equatorially mirroring ring current protons, 1-800 keV, at constant first adiabatic invariant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, L. R.; Williams, D. J.

    1976-01-01

    Explorer 45 observations of ring current protons mirroring near the equator, 1-800 keV, are presented at constant first adiabatic invariant mu throughout the period of the December 17, 1971, geomagnetic storm. The parameter mu is obtained from simultaneous magnetic field and particle observations. Particle deceleration in response to the storm time magnetic field decrease causes ring current measurements viewed at constant energy to underestimate the storm time increase in proton intensities at energies not exceeding 200 keV. This adiabatic deceleration also accounts for the large flux decreases observed at energies above 200 keV during the storm, in contradiction with previous results (Soraas and Davis, 1968) obtained using a model for the storm time magnetic field.

  7. Aromatic Ring Currents Illustrated--NMR Spectra of Tin(IV) Porphyrin Complexes. An Advanced Undergraduate Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Dennis P.

    1988-01-01

    Attempts to show that in the closed loops of cyclic structures the protons situated in conic regions above and below the ring will be shielded. Uses the diamagnetic and air stable octahedral tin(IV) complexes of porphyrins for study. Notes complexes crystallize easily and offer spectacular purple colors. (MVL)

  8. Measuring velocity with the {open_quotes}optic boom{close_quotes}: The contribution of the Ring Imaging Cerenkov, Detector to the search for charmless beauty decay at fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Schnathorst, R.

    1992-12-01

    A charged particle traveling in a medium with a speed exceeding the speed of light in that medium produces Cerenkov radiation (light). This effect is, in a very loose sense, the optical analogue of a sonic boom. The light is emitted at a specific angle, {theta}, determined by the velocity, {beta}, of the particle according to the equation {beta}=1/(ncos{theta}) where n is the index of refraction of the medium. In the Ring Imaging Cerenkov Detector (RICH), light emitted at an angle {theta} is focused as a ring of radius r=f tan {theta} (f=local length) onto a detector. The velocity of the particle is calculated from the radius of the circular ring of light striking the detector, allowing the mass of the particle to be determined. E789 makes use of the well-known E605 RICH detector to study D- and B-meson decays. The physics explored by E789 and the operation of the RICH will be described, and images produced by analysis of data from the RICH will be presented.

  9. Search for flavour-changing neutral current top quark decays t → Hq in pp collisions at √{s}=8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Biesuz, N. V.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Bjergaard, D. M.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Blunier, S.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boutle, S. K.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bruscino, N.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.

    2015-12-01

    A search for flavour-changing neutral current decays of a top quark to an uptype quark ( q = u, c) and the Standard Model Higgs boson, where the Higgs boson decays to boverline{b} , is presented. The analysis searches for top quark pair events in which one top quark decays to Wb, with the W boson decaying leptonically, and the other top quark decays to Hq. The search is based on pp collisions at √{s}=8 TeV recorded in 2012 with the ATLAS detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider and uses an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb-1. Data are analysed in the lepton-plus-jets final state, characterised by an isolated electron or muon and at least four jets. The search exploits the high multiplicity of b-quark jets characteristic of signal events, and employs a likelihood discriminant that uses the kinematic differences between the signal and the background, which is dominated by toverline{t}to WbWb decays. No significant excess of events above the background expectation is found, and observed (expected) 95% CL upper limits of 0.56% (0.42%) and 0.61% (0.64%) are derived for the t → Hc and t → Hu branching ratios respectively. The combination of this search with other ATLAS searches in the H → γγ and H → WW *, ττ decay modes significantly improves the sensitivity, yielding observed (expected) 95% CL upper limits on the t → Hc and t → Hu branching ratios of 0.46% (0.25%) and 0.45% (0.29%) respectively. The corresponding combined observed (expected) upper limits on the | λ tcH | and | λ tuH | couplings are 0.13 (0.10) and 0.13 (0.10) respectively. These are the most restrictive direct bounds on tqH interactions measured so far. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  10. A search for effective flavour changing neutral currents in K/sub L//sup 0/ decays

    SciTech Connect

    Mannelli, M.; Greenlee, H.B.; Kasha, H.; Mannelli, E.B.; Schaffner, S.F.; Schmidt, M.P.; Adair, R.K.; Jastrzembski, E.; Larsen, R.C.; Leipuner, L.B.

    1988-01-01

    A dedicated search for the decays K/sub L//sup 0/ /yields/ /mu/e, K/sub L//sup 0/ /yields/ ee and K/sub L//sup 0/ /yields/ /mu//mu/, was carried out at the Brookhaven National Laboratory AGS (E780). The data obtained were also used in a search for the three-body decays K/sub L//sup 0/ /yields/ /pi//sup 0/l /sup /plus/1/sup /minus//. The two body modes were normalized to the kinelatically similar, CP violating, decay K/sub L//sup 0/ /yields/ /pi//sup (plus///pi//sup /minus//; whereas the three body modes were normalized to the decay K/sub L//sup 0/ /yields/ /pi//sup 0//pi//sup /plus//pi//sup /minus//. The search was performed on a sample of K/sup 0/ mesons produced in the forward direction by the interactions of 29 GeV protons on a copper target, and decaying in a 3 meter long region, starting augmented by a hydrogen Cerenkov counter and a lead glass electromagnetic calorimeter, for electron identification, and by a range stack, for muon identification. 9 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Searching for flavor changing neutral currents in t →H c , H →τ τ decays at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xin; Xia, Li-Gang

    2016-06-01

    The prospects of searching for the flavor changing neutral current effect in the decay of t →H c , H →τ τ are investigated with the simulated p -p collision data for the ATLAS detector at the LHC, where the Higgs mass is assumed to be 125 GeV. A fit based on the constraints from the Higgs mass and the tau decay kinematics is performed for each event, which improves significantly the Higgs and top mass reconstruction and helps the signal-background separation. Boosted decision trees discriminants are developed to achieve an optimal sensitivity of searching for the flavor changing neutral current signal. An expected upper limit of the branching ratio B (t →H c ) at 95% confidence level of 0.25% is obtained with a data set of 100 fb-1 at √{s }=13 TeV during the LHC Run-2 period.

  12. Search for the Flavor-Changing Neutral-Current Decays D+ --> π+μ+μ- and D+-->π+e+e-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aitala, E. M.; Amato, S.; Anjos, J. C.; Appel, J. A.; Ashery, D.; Banerjee, S.; Bediaga, I.; Blaylock, G.; Bracker, S. B.; Burchat, P. R.; Burnstein, R. A.; Carter, T.; Carvalho, H. S.; Costa, I.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Darling, C.; Denisenko, K.; Fernandez, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gerzon, S.; Gobel, C.; Gounder, K.; Granite, D.; Halling, A. M.; Herrera, G.; Hurvits, G.; James, C.; Kasper, P. A.; Kondakis, N.; Kwan, S.; Langs, D. C.; Leslie, J.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Lundberg, B.; Manacero, A.; Maytal-Beck, S.; Meadows, B.; de Mello Neto, J. R.; Milburn, R. H.; de Miranda, J. M.; Napier, A.; Nguyen, A.; D'Oliveira, A. B.; O'Shaughnessy, K.; Peng, K. C.; Perera, L. P.; Purohit, M. V.; Quinn, B.; Radeztsky, S.; Rafatian, A.; Reay, N. W.; Reidy, J. J.; Dos Reis, A. C.; Rubin, H. A.; Santha, A. K.; Santoro, A. F.; Schwartz, A. J.; Sheaff, M.; Sidwell, R. A.; Slaughter, A. J.; Smith, J. G.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Stanton, N. R.; Sugano, K.; Summers, D. J.; Takach, S.; Thorne, K.; Tripathi, A. K.; Watanabe, S.; Weiss, R.; Wiener, J.; Witchey, N.; Wolin, E.; Yi, D.; Zaliznyak, R.; Zhang, C.

    1996-01-01

    We report the results of a search for the flavor-changing neutral-current decays D+-->π+μ+μ- and D+-->π+e+e- in data from Fermilab charm hadroproduction experiment E791. No signal above background is found, and we obtain upper limits on branching fractions, B\\(D+-->π+μ+μ-\\)<1.8×10-5 and B\\(D+-->π+e+e-\\)<6.6×10-5, at the 90% confidence level.

  13. Planetary rings

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, R.; Brahic, A.

    1984-01-01

    Among the topics discussed are the development history of planetary ring research, the view of planetary rings in astronomy and cosmology over the period 1600-1900, the characteristics of the ring systems of Saturn and Uranus, the ethereal rings of Jupiter and Saturn, dust-magnetosphere interactions, the effects of radiation forces on dust particles, the collisional interactions and physical nature of ring particles, transport effects due to particle erosion mechanisms, and collision-induced transport processes in planetary rings. Also discussed are planetary ring waves, ring particle dynamics in resonances, the dynamics of narrow rings, the origin and evolution of planetary rings, the solar nebula and planetary disk, future studies of the planetary rings by space probes, ground-based observatories and earth-orbiting satellites, and unsolved problems in planetary ring dynamics.

  14. DC-Powered Jumping Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffery, Rondo N.; Amiri, Farhang

    2016-02-01

    The classroom jumping ring demonstration is nearly always performed using alternating current (AC), in which the ring jumps or flies off the extended iron core when the switch is closed. The ring jumps higher when cooled with liquid nitrogen (LN2). We have performed experiments using DC to power the solenoid and find similarities and significant differences from the AC case. In particular, the ring does not fly off the core but rises a short distance and then falls back. If the ring jumps high enough, the rising and the falling motion of the ring does not follow simple vertical motion of a projectile. This indicates that there are additional forces on the ring in each part of its motion. Four possible stages of the motion of the ring with DC are identified, which result from the ring current changing directions during the jump in response to a changing magnetic flux through the moving ring.

  15. Technique and considerations in the use of 4x1 ring high-definition transcranial direct current stimulation (HD-tDCS).

    PubMed

    Villamar, Mauricio F; Volz, Magdalena Sarah; Bikson, Marom; Datta, Abhishek; Dasilva, Alexandre F; Fregni, Felipe

    2013-01-01

    High-definition transcranial direct current stimulation (HD-tDCS) has recently been developed as a noninvasive brain stimulation approach that increases the accuracy of current delivery to the brain by using arrays of smaller "high-definition" electrodes, instead of the larger pad-electrodes of conventional tDCS. Targeting is achieved by energizing electrodes placed in predetermined configurations. One of these is the 4x1-ring configuration. In this approach, a center ring electrode (anode or cathode) overlying the target cortical region is surrounded by four return electrodes, which help circumscribe the area of stimulation. Delivery of 4x1-ring HD-tDCS is capable of inducing significant neurophysiological and clinical effects in both healthy subjects and patients. Furthermore, its tolerability is supported by studies using intensities as high as 2.0 milliamperes for up to twenty minutes. Even though 4x1 HD-tDCS is simple to perform, correct electrode positioning is important in order to accurately stimulate target cortical regions and exert its neuromodulatory effects. The use of electrodes and hardware that have specifically been tested for HD-tDCS is critical for safety and tolerability. Given that most published studies on 4x1 HD-tDCS have targeted the primary motor cortex (M1), particularly for pain-related outcomes, the purpose of this article is to systematically describe its use for M1 stimulation, as well as the considerations to be taken for safe and effective stimulation. However, the methods outlined here can be adapted for other HD-tDCS configurations and cortical targets. PMID:23893039

  16. Search for the Neutral Current Top Quark Decay t-->Zc Using Ratio of Z-Boson + 4 Jets to W-Boson + 4 Jets Production

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, Jahred A.; Akimoto, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, Dante E.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, Alberto; Antos, Jaroslav; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U.

    2009-05-01

    We have used the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF II) to search for the flavor-changing neutral-current (FCNC) top quark decay t {yields} Zc using a technique employing ratios of W and Z production, measured in p{bar p} data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.52 fb{sup -1}. The analysis uses a comparison of two decay chains, p{bar p} {yields} t{bar t} {yields} WbWb {yields} {ell}{nu}bjjb and p{bar p} {yields} t{bar t} {yields} ZcWb {yields} {ell}{ell}cjjb, to cancel systematic uncertainties in acceptance, efficiency, and luminosity. We validate the modeling of acceptance and efficiency for lepton identification over the multi-year dataset using another ratio of W and Z production, in this case the observed ratio of inclusive production of W to Z bosons. To improve the discrimination against standard model backgrounds to top quark decays, we calculate the top quark mass for each event with two leptons and four jets assuming it is a t{bar t} event with one of the top quarks decaying to Zc. For additional background discrimination we require at least one jet to be identified as originating from a b-quark. No significant signal is found and we set an upper limit on the FCNC branching ratio Br(t {yields} Zc) using a likelihood constructed from the {ell}{ell}cjjb top quark mass distribution and the number of {ell}{nu}bjjb events. Limits are set as a function of the helicity of the Z boson produced in the FCNC decay. For 100% longitudinally polarized Z bosons we find limits of 8.3% and 9.3% (95% C.L.) depending on the assumptions regarding the theoretical top quark pair production cross-section.

  17. Storm-scale ring current morphology inferred from high-resolution empirical magnetic field modeling: storms driven by CMEs, CIRs, and those containing sawtooth and SMC events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, G. K.; Sitnov, M. I.; Ukhorskiy, A. Y.; Ohtani, S.; Vandegriff, J. D.

    2012-12-01

    In spite of several decades of intense investigations, the detailed structure and dynamics of the magnetospheric currents remains unclear especially during disturbed periods associated with magnetic storms and substorms. Until recently, empirical magnetic field models were strongly limited because they were built using predefined, hand-made current structures. New capabilities in the empirical reconstruction of the storm-scale current morphology and its evolution have become possible in the new-generation empirical model, TS07D, where the distribution of storm-scale equatorial currents is determined by regular basis function expansions and is largely dictated by data. We discuss the results of TS07D-based empirical reconstruction of the magnetospheric currents for differing global conditions. Firstly, we examine storms produced by two different drivers, Coronal Mass Ejections (CME) and Corotating Interaction Regions (CIR), and secondly, we examine storms containing two different magnetospheric convection states, those containing quasi-periodic sawtooth events and Steady Magnetospheric Convection (SMC) intervals. A distinctive feature of CME-driven storms is the hook-shaped current developing in the main phase, which combines features of ring and tail currents, while CIR-driven storms are featured by the belt-shaped current and strong reduction of the strength of field-aligned currents. Storms containing sawtooth injections are characterized by the formation of the equatorial storm-time current with an unusually broad radial extension, far beyond geosynchronous orbit across all local times. SMC periods are distinguished by a higher total pressure in the inner magnetosphere extending to larger distances with the appropriate changes in the equatorial currents and their closure paths. New data analysis opportunities offered by the APL-hosted model interface, including run-on-request case studies, the database of pre-processed model coefficients and radiation belt

  18. Search for flavour-changing neutral current top quark decays t → Hq in pp collisions at √s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; et al

    2015-12-10

    A search for flavour-changing neutral current decays of a top quark to an uptype quark (q = u, c) and the Standard Model Higgs boson, where the Higgs boson decays to bb¯, is presented. The analysis searches for top quark pair events in which one top quark decays to Wb, with the W boson decaying leptonically, and the other top quark decays to Hq. The search is based on pp collisions at √s = 8 TeV recorded in 2012 with the ATLAS detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider and uses an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb-1. Data are analysedmore » in the lepton-plus-jets final state, characterised by an isolated electron or muon and at least four jets. The search exploits the high multiplicity of b-quark jets characteristic of signal events, and employs a likelihood discriminant that uses the kinematic differences between the signal and the background, which is dominated by tt¯→ WbWb decays. No significant excess of events above the background expectation is found, and observed (expected) 95% CL upper limits of 0.56% (0.42%) and 0.61% (0.64%) are derived for the t → Hc and t → Hu branching ratios respectively. The combination of this search with other ATLAS searches in the H → γγ and H → WW*, ττ decay modes significantly improves the sensitivity, yielding observed (expected) 95% CL upper limits on the t → Hc and t → Hu branching ratios of 0.46% (0.25%) and 0.45% (0.29%) respectively. The corresponding combined observed (expected) upper limits on the |λ tcH | and |λ tuH | couplings are 0.13 (0.10) and 0.13 (0.10) respectively. As a result, these are the most restrictive direct bounds on tqH interactions measured so far.« less

  19. Search for flavour-changing neutral current top quark decays t → Hq in pp collisions at √s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Biesuz, N. V.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Bjergaard, D. M.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J. -B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Blunier, S.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boutle, S. K.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bruscino, N.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.

    2015-12-10

    A search for flavour-changing neutral current decays of a top quark to an uptype quark (q = u, c) and the Standard Model Higgs boson, where the Higgs boson decays to bb¯, is presented. The analysis searches for top quark pair events in which one top quark decays to Wb, with the W boson decaying leptonically, and the other top quark decays to Hq. The search is based on pp collisions at √s = 8 TeV recorded in 2012 with the ATLAS detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider and uses an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb-1. Data are analysed in the lepton-plus-jets final state, characterised by an isolated electron or muon and at least four jets. The search exploits the high multiplicity of b-quark jets characteristic of signal events, and employs a likelihood discriminant that uses the kinematic differences between the signal and the background, which is dominated by tt¯→ WbWb decays. No significant excess of events above the background expectation is found, and observed (expected) 95% CL upper limits of 0.56% (0.42%) and 0.61% (0.64%) are derived for the t → Hc and t → Hu branching ratios respectively. The combination of this search with other ATLAS searches in the H → γγ and H → WW*, ττ decay modes significantly improves the sensitivity, yielding observed (expected) 95% CL upper limits on the t → Hc and t → Hu branching ratios of 0.46% (0.25%) and 0.45% (0.29%) respectively. The corresponding combined observed (expected) upper limits on the |λ tcH | and |λ tuH | couplings are 0.13 (0.10) and 0.13 (0.10) respectively. As a result, these are the most restrictive direct bounds on tqH interactions measured so far.

  20. Comparison of Simulated and Observed Ring Current Magnetic Field and Ion Fluxes and ENA Intensity during the 5 April 2010 Storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, M. W.; Lemon, C.; Guild, T. B.; Schulz, M.; Lui, A.; Keesee, A. M.; Goldstein, J.; Rodriguez, J. V.

    2011-12-01

    In this study we compare simulated and observed stormtime magnetic intensities, proton flux spectra and ENA intensity for the 5 April 2010 storm (minimum Dst ≈ -73 nT) to test how well self-consistent simulations can simultaneously reproduce these quantities. We simulate the ring current and plasma sheet using the magnetically and electrostatically self-consistent Rice Convection Model-Equilibrium (RCM-E) [Lemon et al., JGR, 2004] with a time-varying magnetopause driven by upstream solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions. We use ion temperatures inferred from TWINS energetic neutral atom (ENA) images and THEMIS/ESA and SST ion data, and proton densities from the empirical IMF-dependent model of Tsyganenko and Mukai [JGR, 2003] to guide our specification of the plasma sheet at 10 RE, our plasma boundary location in the RCM-E. The oxygen to proton density ratio at the plasma boundary is specified from the empirical Young et al. [JGR, 1982] study. We compare the simulated magnetic intensity with the magnetic intensity measured by magnetometers on the GOES satellites at geosynchronous (GEO) altitude (6.6 Earth radii) and on THEMIS satellites. The simulated and observed proton spectra (GOES-14/MAGPD) at GEO and global ENA intensity (TWINS 1 and 2) are compared. We discuss the response of the ring current magnetic field and ion flux distribution to expansions and compressions of the magnetosphere associated with the dynamic solar wind pressure for this storm event.

  1. Search for the Flavor Changing Neutral Current Decay t $\\to Zq$ in $p \\bar{p}$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, : T.

    2008-05-01

    We report a search for the flavor changing neutral current (FCNC) decay of the top quark t {yields} Zq (q = u, c) in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.9 fb{sup -1} collected by the CDF II detector. This decay is strongly suppressed in the standard model (SM) and a signal at the Tevatron would be an indication of physics beyond the SM. Using Z+ {ge} 4 jet final state candidate events, both with and without an identified bottom quark jet, we discriminate signal from background by exploring kinematic constraints present in FCNC events and obtain an upper limit of {Beta}(t {yields} Zq) < 3.7% at 95% C.L.

  2. Search for the flavor-changing neutral-current decay t-->Zq in pp collisions at sqrt[s] = 1.96 TeV.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Adelman, J; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Alvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Azzurri, P; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Bednar, P; Beecher, D; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bridgeman, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calancha, C; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Dagenhart, D; Datta, M; Davies, T; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'Orso, M; Deluca, C; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; Derwent, P F; di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garberson, F; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Genser, K; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Gessler, A; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jha, M K; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kar, D; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kephart, R; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Koay, S A; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kurata, M; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; LeCompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, S W; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C S; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lovas, L; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Luci, C; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyake, H; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlok, J; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norman, M; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Griso, S Pagan; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Pueschel, E; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Saarikko, H; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Saltó, O; Saltzberg, D; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M A; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shiraishi, S; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sutherland, M; Suslov, I; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Tourneur, S; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Vallecorsa, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, M; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vogel, M; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Wagner, W; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zhang, X; Zheng, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2008-11-01

    We report a search for the flavor-changing neutral-current decay of the top quark t-->Zq (q=u, c) in pp collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.9 fb(-1) collected by the CDF II detector. This decay is strongly suppressed in the standard model and an observation of a signal at the Fermilab Tevatron would be an indication of physics beyond the standard model. Using Z+ > or = 4 jet final state candidate events, with and without an identified bottom quark jet, we obtain an upper limit of B(t-->Zq) < 3.7% at 95% C.L. PMID:19113262

  3. Search for V + A current in top quark decay in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abulencia, A.; Adelman, J.; Affolder, T.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Aoki, M.; Apollinari, G.; Arguin, J.-F.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Ashmanskas, W.; Attal, A.; Azfar, F.; Azzi-Bacchetta, P.

    2006-09-01

    The authors report an upper limit on the fraction of V + A current, f{sub V+A}, in top quark decays, using approximately 700 pb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV acquired by the upgraded Collider Detector at Fermilab. For the decay t {yields} Wb {yields} {ell}{nu}b (where {ell} = e or {mu}), the invariant mass of the charged lepton and the bottom quark jet is sensitive to the polarization of the W boson. They determine f{sub V+A} = -0.06 {+-} 0.25 given a top quark mass of 175 GeV/c{sup 2}. They set an upper limit on f{sub V+A} of 0.29 at the 95% confidence level, which represents an improvement by a factor of two on the previous best direct limit.

  4. Search for V+A current in top quark decay in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abulencia, A.; Adelman, J.; Affolder, T.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; Annovi, A.; /Taiwan, Inst. Phys. /Argonne /Barcelona, IFAE /Baylor U. /INFN, Bologna /Bologna U. /Brandeis U. /UC, Davis /UCLA /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara

    2006-08-01

    The authors report an upper limit on the fraction of V + A current, f{sub V+A}, in top quark decays, using approximately 700 pb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV acquired by the upgraded Collider Detector at Fermilab. For the decay t {yields} wb {yields} {ell}vb (where {ell} = e or {mu}), the invariant mass of the charged lepton and the bottom quark jet is sensitive to the polarization of the W boson. They determine f{sub V+A} = -0.06 {+-} 0.25 given a top quark mass of 175 GeV/c{sup 2}. They set an upper limit on f{sub V+A} of 0.29 at the 95% confidence level, which represents an improvement by a factor of two on the previous best direct limit.

  5. Baryonic B Decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chistov, R.

    2016-02-01

    In this talk the decays of B-mesons into baryons are discussed. Large mass of B-meson makes possible the decays of the type B → baryon (+mesons). Experimental observations and measurements of these decays at B-factories Belle and BaBar have stimulate the development of theoretical models in this field. We briefly review the experimental results together with the current theoretical models which describe baryonic B decays.

  6. Effect of Applied Toroidal Electric Field on the Growth/Decay of Plateau-Phase Runaway Electron Currents in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Hollmann, E. M.; Parks, P. B.; Humphrey, D. A.; Brooks, N. H.; Commaux, Nicolas JC; Eidietis, N. W.; Evans, T.E.; James, A. N.; Jernigan, T. C.; Jernigan, Thomas C; Munoz, J.; Strait, E. J.; Tsui, C.; Wesley, J. C.; Yu, J.H.

    2011-01-01

    Large relativistic runaway electron currents (0.1-0.5 MA) persisting for similar to 100 ms are created in the DIII-D tokamak during rapid discharge shut down caused by argon pellet injection. Slow upward and downward ramps in runaway currents were found in response to externally applied loop voltages. Comparison between the observed current growth/decay rate and the rate expected from the knock-on avalanche mechanism suggests that classical collisional dissipation of runaways alone cannot account for the measured growth/damping rates. It appears that a fairly constant anomalous dissipation rate of order 10 s(-1) exists, possibly stemming from radial transport or direct orbit losses to the vessel walls, although the possibility of an apparent loss due to current profile shrinking cannot be ruled out at present.

  7. Saturn's rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    When seen from the unlit side, the rings of Saturn present a much different appearance from that familiar to telescopic observers. Relatively opaque areas like the B Ring turn black, while lightly populated zones, such as the C Ring and the Cassini Division, prove to excellent diffuse transmitters of sunlight. The A Ring, with intermediate opacity, is at an intermediate level of brightness.

  8. Saturn's Rings, the Yarkovsky Effects, and the Ring of Fire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubincam, David

    2004-01-01

    Saturn's icy ring particles, with their low thermal conductivity, are almost ideal for the operation of the Yarkovsky effects. The dimensions of Saturn's A and B rings may be determined by a near balancing of the seasonal Yarkovsky effect with the Yarkovsky- Schach effect. The two effects, which are photon thrust due to temperature gradients, may confine the A and B rings to within their observed dimensions. The C ring may be sparsely populated with icy particles because Yarkovsky drag has pulled them into Saturn, leaving the more slowly orbitally decaying rocky particles. Icy ring particles ejected from the B ring and passing through the C ring, as well as some of the slower rocky particles, should fall on Saturn's equator, where they may create a luminous "Ring of Fire" around Saturn's equator. This predicted Ring of Fire may be visible to Cassini's camera. Curiously, the speed of outwards Yarkovsky orbital evolution appears to peak near the Cassini Division. The connection between the two is not clear. D. Nesvorny has speculated that the resonance at the outer edge of the B ring may impede particles from evolving via Yarkovsky across the Division. If supply from the B ring is largely cut off, then Yarkovsky may push icy particles outward, away from the inner edge of the A ring, leaving only the rocky ones in the Division. The above scenarios depend delicately on the properties of the icy particles.

  9. Characterization of Downstream Ion Energy Distributions From a High Current Hollow Cathode in a Ring Cusp Discharge Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John E.; Patterson, Michael J.

    2003-01-01

    The presence of energetic ions produced by a hollow cathodes operating at high emission currents (greater than 10 Angstroms) has been documented in the literature. As part of an ongoing effort to uncover the underlying physics of the formation of these ions, ion efflux from a high current hollow cathode operating in an ion thruster discharge chamber was investigated. Using a spherical sector electrostatic energy analyzer located downstream of the discharge cathode, the ion energy distribution over a 0 to 60 eV energy range was measured. The sensitivity of the ion energy distribution function to zenith angle was also assessed at 3 different positions: 0, 15, and 25 degrees. The measurements suggest that the majority of the ion current at the measuring point falls into the analyzer with an energy approximately equal to the discharge voltage. The ion distribution, however, was found to be quite broad. The high energy tail of the distribution function tended to grow with increasing discharge current. Sensitivity of the profiles to flow rate at fixed discharge current was also investigated. A simple model is presented that provides a potential mechanism for the production of ions with energies above the discharge voltage.

  10. Top pair production cross section at s**(1/2) = 1.96 TeV and a search for v + a current in top quark decay

    SciTech Connect

    Cabrera, S.; /Valencia U., IFIC

    2006-09-01

    Possible effects from physics beyond the Standard Model have been investigated in top quark decays from a data sample enriched in t{bar t} events produced in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV with an integrated luminosity of approximately 700 pb{sup -1} and collected with the CDF II detector. The combined t{bar t} production cross section measurement 7.3 {+-} 0.9 pb agrees with the QCD NLO predictions: 6.7 {+-} 0.8 pb assuming m{sub top} = 175 GeV/c{sup 2}. The fraction of the V + A current in top quark decay, f{sub V+A}, is determined using the invariant mass of the charged lepton and the bottom quark jet in the decay chain t {yields} Wb {yields} {ell}{nu}b (where {ell} = e or {mu}). The measured value f{sub V+A} = - 0.06 {+-} 0.25 under the assumption m{sub top} = 175 GeV/c{sup 2} is in agreement with the Standard Model. They set an upper limit on f{sub V+A} of 0.29 at the 95% confidence level.

  11. EBT ring physics

    SciTech Connect

    Uckan, N.A.

    1980-04-01

    This workshop attempted to evaluate the status of the current experimental and theoretical understanding of hot electron ring properties. The dominant physical processes that influence ring formation, scaling, and their optimal behavior are also studied. Separate abstracts were prepared for each of the 27 included papers. (MOW)

  12. Superallowed 0+→0+ nuclear β decays: A critical survey with tests of the conserved vector current hypothesis and the standard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, J. C.; Towner, I. S.

    2005-05-01

    A complete and critical survey is presented of all half-life, decay-energy, and branching-ratio measurements related to 20 superallowed 0+→0+ decays; no measurements are ignored, although some are rejected for cause and others updated. A new calculation of the statistical rate function f is described and experimental ft values determined. The associated theoretical corrections needed to convert these results into “corrected” Ft values are discussed, and careful attention is paid to the origin and magnitude of their uncertainties. As an exacting confirmation of the conserved vector current hypothesis, the corrected Ft values are seen to be constant to three parts in 104. These data are also used to set a new limit on any possible scalar interaction (assuming maximum parity violation) of CS/CV=-(0.00005±0.00130). The average Ft value obtained from the survey, when combined with the muon liftime, yields the up-down quark-mixing element of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix, Vud=0.9738±0.0004, and the unitarity test on the top row of the matrix becomes |Vud|2+|Vus|2+|Vub|2=0.9966±0.0014 using the Particle Data Group's currently recommended values for Vus and Vub. If Vus comes instead from two recent results on Ke3 decay, the unitarity sum becomes 0.9996(11). Either result can be expressed in terms of the possible existence of right-hand currents. Finally, we discuss the priorities for future theoretical and experimental work with the goal of making the CKM unitarity test more definitive.

  13. Integrated semiconductor ring lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jezierski, A. F.; Laybourn, P. J. R.

    1988-02-01

    Ring-waveguide and pill-box structures down to 12 microns in diameter, made in GaAs/GaAlAs heterostructure material, have been designed with output stripe waveguides coupled to the rings via Y-junctions. The waveguides were defined by reactive ion etching, although the inner boundaries of some of the ring waveguides relied on stress and carrier confinement. Lasing has been observed with pulsed drive current, and has been shown to correspond to resonances in the rings, although other resonances have been observed in some of the structures. This type of structure is suitable for use as a light source in monolithic integrated optics.

  14. Search for rare B decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, H.; Hamacher, T.; Hofmann, R. P.; Kirchhoff, T.; Mankel, R.; Nau, A.; Nowak, S.; Reßing, D.; Schröder, H.; Schulz, H. D.; Walter, M.; Wurth, R.; Hast, C.; Kapitza, H.; Kolanoski, H.; Kosche, A.; Lange, A.; Lindner, A.; Schieber, M.; Siegmund, T.; Spaan, B.; Thurn, H.; Töpfer, D.; Wegener, D.; Eckstein, P.; Frankl, C.; Graf, J.; Schmidtler, M.; Schramm, M.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Waldi, R.; Reim, K.; Wegener, H.; Eckmann, R.; Kuipers, H.; Mai, O.; Mundt, R.; Oest, T.; Reiner, R.; Schmidt-Parzefall, W.; Stiewe, J.; Werner, S.; Ehret, K.; Hofmann, W.; Hüpper, A.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Spengler, J.; Krieger, P.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Prentice, J. D.; Saull, P. R. B.; Tzamariudaki, K.; van de Water, R. G.; Yoon, T.-S.; Schneider, M.; Weseler, S.; Kernel, G.; Križan, P.; Križnič, E.; Podobnik, T.; Živko, T.; Balagura, V.; Barsuk, S.; Belyaev, I.; Chistov, R.; Danilov, M.; Gershtein, L.; Gershtein, Yu.; Golutyin, A.; Korolko, I.; Kostina, G.; Litvintsev, D.; Pakhlov, P.; Semenov, S.; Snizhko, A.; Tichomirov, I.; Zaitsev, Yu.; Argus Collaboration

    1995-02-01

    Using the ARGUS detector at the e +e - storage ring DORIS II at DESY, we have searched for decays b → sgluon through full reconstruction of a whole event. Two B overlineB decays were found with one of B meson decaying into a final state without charmed particles. We also obtained an upper limit of Br(B + → τ+ντ) of 1.04% at 90% CL.

  15. Clusters in storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Hvelplund, P.; Andersen, J. U.; Hansen, K.

    1999-01-15

    Anions of fullerenes and small metal clusters have been stored in the storage rings ASTRID and ELISA. Decays on a millisecond time scale are due to electron emission from metastable excited states. For the fullerenes the decay curves have been interpreted in terms of thermionic emission quenched by radiative cooling. The stored clusters were heated by a Nd:YAG laser resulting in increased emission rates. With an OPO laser this effect was used to study the wavelength dependence of the absorption of light in hot C{sub 60}{sup -} ion molecules.

  16. One ring to rule them all: Current trends in combating bacterial resistance to the β-lactams.

    PubMed

    King, Dustin T; Sobhanifar, Solmaz; Strynadka, Natalie C J

    2016-04-01

    From humble beginnings of a contaminated petri dish, β-lactam antibiotics have distinguished themselves among some of the most powerful drugs in human history. The devastating effects of antibiotic resistance have nevertheless led to an "arms race" with disquieting prospects. The emergence of multidrug resistant bacteria threatens an ever-dwindling antibiotic arsenal, calling for new discovery, rediscovery, and innovation in β-lactam research. Here the current state of β-lactam antibiotics from a structural perspective was reviewed. PMID:26813250

  17. The Nonlinear Coupling of Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron and Lower Hybrid Waves in the Ring Current Region: The Magnetic Storm May 1-7 1998

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Krivorutsky, E.; Gamayunov, K.; Avanov, L.

    2003-01-01

    The excitation of lower hybrid waves (LHWs) is a widely discussed mechanism of interaction between plasma species in space, and is one of the unresolved questions of magnetospheric multi-ion plasmas. In this paper we present the morphology, dynamics, and level of LHW activity generated by electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves during the May 2-7, 1998 storm period on the global scale. The LHWs were calculated based on our newly developed self-consistent model that couples the system of two kinetic equations: one equation describes the ring current (RC) ion dynamic, and another equation describes the evolution of EMIC waves. It is found that the LHWs are excited by helium ions due to their mass dependent drift in the electric field of EMIC waves. The level of LHW activity is calculated assuming that the induced scattering process is the main saturation mechanism for these waves. The calculated LHWs electric fields are consistent with the observational data.

  18. Stereo ENA Imaging of the Ring Current and Multi-point Measurements of Suprathermal Particles and Magnetic Fields by TRIO-CINEMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, R. P.; Sample, J. G.; Immel, T. J.; Lee, D.; Horbury, T. S.; Jin, H.; SEON, J.; Wang, L.; Roelof, E. C.; Lee, E.; Parks, G. K.; Vo, H.

    2012-12-01

    The TRIO (Triplet Ionospheric Observatory) - CINEMA (Cubesat for Ions, Neutrals, Electrons, & Magnetic fields) mission consists of three identical 3-u cubesats to provide high sensitivity, high cadence, stereo measurements of Energetic Neutral Atoms (ENAs) from the Earth's ring current with ~1 keV FWHM energy resolution from ~4 to ~200 keV, as well as multi-point in situ measurements of magnetic fields and suprathermal electrons (~2 -200 keV) and ions (~ 4 -200 keV) in the auroral and ring current precipitation regions in low Earth orbit (LEO). A new Suprathermal Electron, Ion, Neutral (STEIN) instrument, using a 32-pixel silicon semiconductor detector with an electrostatic deflection system to separate ENAs from ions and from electrons below 30 keV, will sweep over most of the sky every 15 s as the spacecraft spins at 4 rpm. In addition, inboard and outboard (on an extendable 1m boom) miniature magnetoresistive sensor magnetometers will provide high cadence 3-axis magnetic field measurements. An S-band transmitter will be used to provide ~8 kbps orbit-average data downlink to the ~11m diameter antenna of the Berkeley Ground Station.The first CINEMA (funded by NSF) is scheduled for launch on August 14, 2012 into a 65 deg. inclination LEO. Two more identical CINEMAs are being developed by Kyung Hee University (KHU) in Korea under the World Class University (WCU) program, for launch in November 2012 into a Sun-synchronous LEO to form TRIO-CINEMA. A fourth CINEMA is being developed for a 2013 launch into LEO. This LEO constellation of nanosatellites will provide unique measurements highly complementary to NASA's RBSP and THEMIS missions. Furthermore, CINEMA's development of miniature particle and magnetic field sensors, and cubesat-size spinning spacecraft may be important for future constellation space missions. Initial results from the first CINEMA will be presented if available.

  19. Comparisons of Simulated and Observed Stormtime Magnetic Intensities, Ion Plasma Parameters, and ENA Proton Flux in the Ring Current During Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, M. W.; Lemon, C.; Guild, T. B.; Schulz, M.; Roeder, J. L.; Le, G.; Lui, T.; Goldstein, J.

    2010-12-01

    In this study we compare simulated and observed stormtime magnetic intensities, proton flux spectra and/or ENA fluxes for two storm events to test how well self-consistent simulations can simultaneously reproduce these quantities. We simulate the ring current and plasma sheet using the magnetically and electrostatically self-consistent Rice Convection Model-Equilibrium (RCM-E) [Lemon et al., JGR, 2004] with a time-varying magnetopause driven by upstream solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions. Using either in-situ data (e.g., LANL/MPA and SOPA) or the empirical IMF-dependent model of Tsyganenko and Mukai [JGR, 2003], we specify the plasma sheet pressure and density at 10 Earth radii as the plasma boundary location in the RCM-E. We compare the simulated magnetic intensity with the magnetic intensity measured by magnetometers on the GOES satellites at geosynchronous altitude (6.6 Earth radii) and any other available satellite. We simulate a larger (11 August 2000; minimum Dst = -106 nT) and a smaller (6 April 2010; minimum Dst = 73 nT) storm. For the 11 August 2000 storm, we compare simulated and observed proton spectra (LANL/MPA and SOPA and Polar/CAMMICE). For the more recent 6 April 2010 storm we compare simulated and observed proton spectra (THEMIS) and energetic neutral atom (ENA) flux (TWINS). We discuss the response of the ring current magnetic field and ion flux distribution to expansions and compressions of the magnetosphere associated with the dynamic solar wind pressure for these storm events.

  20. Detection of a coherent boson current in the normal state of a high-temperature superconductor YBa2Cu3Oy film patterned to micrometer-sized rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawabata, K.; Tsukui, S.; Shono, Y.; Michikami, O.; Sasakura, H.; Yoshiara, K.; Kakehi, Y.; Yotsuya, T.

    1998-08-01

    The key to clarifying the mechanism of the appearance of high Tc in the high-temperature superconductor seems to be related to the anomalous properties in its normal state [H. Yasuoka, S. Kambe, Y. Itoh, and T. Machi, Physica B 199-200, 278 (1994); H. Ding T. Yokoya, J. C. Campuzano, T. Takahashi, M. Randeria, M. R. Norman, T. Mochiki, K. Kadowaki, and J. Giapintzakis, Nature (London) 382, 51 (1996); and T. Ito, K. Takenaka, and S. Uchida, Phys. Rev. Lett. 70, 3995 (1993)]. Related to this is the presence of Bose-electron-type species such as paired holes [V. J. Emery and S. A. Kivelson, Nature (London) 374, 434 (1995)] and holons [P. W. Anderson, G. Bakaran, Z. Zou, and T. Hsu, Phys. Rev. Lett. 58, 2790 (1987)] in the normal state which has been proposed by theoreticians. We have succeeded in detecting the coherent Bose species in the normal state of YBa2Cu3Oy. The idea [L. P. Levy, G. Dolan, J. Dunsmuir, and H. Bouchiat, Phys. Rev. Lett. 64, 2074 (1990)] of having the detected oscillation of a fermion persisting current caused by the Aharanov-Bohm effect on magnetic field scanning in the assemblage of the mesoscopic rings of metal was employed in the assemblage of a ring patterned in the YB2Cu3Oy film. The sensitivity of our detection system is not high enough to detect fermions, but it is high enough for detecting coherent bosons if they exist. Oscillations with flux periods corresponding to h/2e have been found at T>Tc, even at temperatures 30 K or more above Tc inserted in the patterned YBa2Cu3Oy film, but have not been found in the patterned Au or Pd films. To explain the coherent current circulating in a ring with a circumference as long as 40 μm, presumably in the prestage to the superconducting stage, the possible coexistence of a minority of coherent bosons and a majority of incoherent bosons is discussed. The detection of minority coherent bosons in the background of a majority of incoherent species is possible in this method.

  1. Vascular ring

    MedlinePlus

    ... with aberrant subclavian and left ligamentum ateriosus; Congenital heart defect - vascular ring; Birth defect heart - vascular ring ... accounts for less than 1% of all congenital heart problems. The condition occurs as often in males ...

  2. Neptune's rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This 591-second exposure of the rings of Neptune were taken with the clear filter by the Voyager 2 wide-angle camera. The two main rings are clearly visible and appear complete over the region imaged. Also visible in this image is the inner faint ring and the faint band which extends smoothly from the ring roughly halfway between the two bright rings. Both of these newly discovered rings are broad and much fainter than the two narrow rings. The bright glare is due to over-exposure of the crescent on Neptune. Numerous bright stars are evident in the background. Both bright rings have material throughout their entire orbit, and are therefore continuous. The Voyager Mission is conducted by JPL for NASA's Office of Space Science and Applications.

  3. Storage Ring EDM Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semertzidis, Yannis K.

    2016-04-01

    Dedicated storage ring electric dipole moment (EDM) methods show great promise advancing the sensitivity level by a couple orders of magnitude over currently planned hadronic EDM experiments. We describe the present status and recent updates of the field.

  4. Top quark forward-backward asymmetry, flavor-changing neutral-current decays, and like-sign pair production as a joint probe of new physics

    SciTech Connect

    Cao Junjie; Wang Lin; Wu Lei; Yang Jinmin

    2011-10-01

    The anomaly of the top quark forward-backward asymmetry A{sub FB}{sup t} observed at the Tevatron can be explained by the t-channel exchange of a neutral gauge boson (Z{sup '}) which has sizable flavor-changing coupling for top and up quarks. This gauge boson can also induce the top quark flavor-changing neutral-current (FCNC) decays and the like-sign top pair production at the LHC. In this work, we focus on two models which predict such a Z', namely, the left-right model and the U(1){sub X} model, to investigate the correlated effects on A{sub FB}{sup t}, the FCNC decays t{yields}uV (V=g, Z, {gamma}) and the like-sign top pair production at the LHC. We also pay special attention to the most recently measured A{sub FB}{sup t} in the large top pair invariant mass region. We find that under the current experimental constraints both models can alleviate the deviation of A{sub FB}{sup t} and, meanwhile, enhance the like-sign top pair production to the detectable level of the LHC. We also find that the two models give different predictions for the observables and their correlations, and thus they may even be distinguished by jointly studying these top quark observables.

  5. DC-Powered Jumping Ring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeffery, Rondo N.; Farhang, Amiri

    2016-01-01

    The classroom jumping ring demonstration is nearly always performed using alternating current (AC), in which the ring jumps or flies off the extended iron core when the switch is closed. The ring jumps higher when cooled with liquid nitrogen (LN2). We have performed experiments using DC to power the solenoid and find similarities and significant…

  6. a Measurement of the Asymmetry Parameter for Argon -35 Beta-Decay as a Test of the Conserved Vector Current Hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Converse, Alexander Milovan

    The spatial asymmetry of positrons emitted parallel and antiparallel to the spin axis of a polarized sample of ^{35}Ar has been measured. The measured asymmetry parameter for the mixed Fermi--Gamow - Teller decay ^{35}Ar( beta^+)^{35}Cl is A_0 = 0.427(23). This agrees with the value predicted by the Standard Model, A _0^{rm theory} = 0.4302(86). The Standard Model prediction assumes vector-axial vector couplings and the validity of the conserved vector current hypothesis; the vector coupling strength is derived from comparative half-lives of pure Fermi 0^+to0^+ transitions, and the ratio of axial vector to vector coupling strengths is calculated using the ^ {35}Ar comparative half-life. In the measurement, polarized ^{35}Ar was created by bombarding a Cl_2 target with 68% polarized 9.2 MeV protons. Positrons emitted at 0^circ and 180 ^circ with respect to the ^{35}Ar polarization axis were observed with DeltaE-E plastic scintillator detectors. The ^{35}Ar polarization was determined from the asymmetry of positrons emitted in the decays ^{35}Ar( beta^+)^{35}Cl ^*, which were identified by the observation of coincident gamma - rays in pure Ge detectors. The decay to the first excited state of ^{35}Cl is pure Gamow - Teller, so its asymmetry parameter may be derived from angular momentum coupling arguments without reference to the Standard Model. The relative uncertainty in this measurement, DeltaA_0 /A_0 = 5.4%, is the quadratic sum of the statistical error, 5.4%, and systematic errors, 0.5%. In light of published measurements of the neutron asymmetry parameter, which are accurate to 1.5% and disagree with the Standard Model prediction by more than 2 sigma, it might be worthwhile to repeat the measurement of the ^{35}Ar ground state asymmetry parameter to obtain statistical precision of <2%.

  7. Relationship between architecture, filament breakage and critical current decay in Nb3Sn composite wires repeatedly in-plane bent at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badica, P.; Awaji, S.; Oguro, H.; Nishijima, G.; Watanabe, K.

    2006-04-01

    Six Nb3Sn composite wires with different architectures ('central and near-the-edge reinforcement') were repeatedly in-plane bent at room temperature (in-plane 'pre-bending'). Breakage behaviour was revealed from scanning electron microscopy observations by semi-quantitative analysis of the filament crack formation and evolution. Cracks are formed in the transversal and longitudinal directions. Transversal cracks show some tolerance to the applied bending strain due to the fact that filaments are composite materials; residual Nb core can arrest development of a partial transversal crack initiated in the Nb3Sn outer part of the filament. Together with the density of cracks C and the evolution of this parameter with pre-bending strain, ɛpb, in different regions of the wire, R-ɛpb curves are important to understand breakage behaviour of the wires. R is the ratio (number of full transversal cracks)/(number of full transversal cracks + number of partial transversal cracks). Parameters C and R allow us to reveal and satisfactorily understand the wire architecture—breakage—critical current decay relationship when pre-bending treatment is applied. As a consequence, breakage criteria necessary to minimize Ic decay were defined and the positive influence of the reinforcement in preventing breakage was observed. It was also found that, in this regard, more Nb in the CuNb reinforcement, for the investigated wires, is better, if the heat treatment for the wire synthesis is performed at 670 °C for 96 h. A different heat treatment, 650 °C for 240 h, is less efficient in preventing filament breakage. Our results suggest the possibility of control and improvement of the breakage susceptibility of the filaments in the wires and, hence, of the bending Ic decay, through the wise design of the wire architecture (i.e. by correlating design with the choice of composing materials and heat treatments).

  8. Computer controlled performance mapping of thermionic converters: effect of collector, guard-ring potential imbalances on the observed collector current-density, voltage characteristics and limited range performance map of an etched-rhenium, niobium planar converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manista, E. J.

    1972-01-01

    The effect of collector, guard-ring potential imbalance on the observed collector-current-density J, collector-to-emitter voltage V characteristic was evaluated in a planar, fixed-space, guard-ringed thermionic converter. The J,V characteristic was swept in a period of 15 msec by a variable load. A computerized data acquisition system recorded test parameters. The results indicate minimal distortion of the J,V curve in the power output quadrant for the nominal guard-ring circuit configuration. Considerable distortion, along with a lowering of the ignited-mode striking voltage, was observed for the configuration with the emitter shorted to the guard ring. A limited-range performance map of an etched-rhenium, niobium, planar converter was obtained by using an improved computer program for the data acquisition system.

  9. Transport through an Anderson impurity: Current ringing, nonlinear magnetization, and a direct comparison of continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo and hierarchical quantum master equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Härtle, R.; Cohen, G.; Reichman, D. R.; Millis, A. J.

    2015-08-01

    We give a detailed comparison of the hierarchical quantum master equation (HQME) method to a continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo (CT-QMC) approach, assessing the usability of these numerically exact schemes as impurity solvers in practical nonequilibrium calculations. We review the main characteristics of the methods and discuss the scaling of the associated numerical effort. We substantiate our discussion with explicit numerical results for the nonequilibrium transport properties of a single-site Anderson impurity. The numerical effort of the HQME scheme scales linearly with the simulation time but increases (at worst exponentially) with decreasing temperature. In contrast, CT-QMC is less restricted by temperature at short times, but in general the cost of going to longer times is also exponential. After establishing the numerical exactness of the HQME scheme, we use it to elucidate the influence of different ways to induce transport through the impurity on the initial dynamics, discuss the phenomenon of coherent current oscillations, known as current ringing, and explain the nonmonotonic temperature dependence of the steady-state magnetization as a result of competing broadening effects. We also elucidate the pronounced nonlinear magnetization dynamics, which appears on intermediate time scales in the presence of an asymmetric coupling to the electrodes.

  10. Observation of the Baryonic Flavor-Changing Neutral Current Decay Λb0 → Λµ+µ-

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-11-08

    The authors report the first observation of the baryonic flavor-changing neutral current decay Λb0 → Λµ+µ- with 24 signal events and a statistical significance of 5.8 Gaussian standard deviations. This measurement uses a pp¯ collisions data sample corresponding to 6.8 fb-1 at √s = 1.96 TeV collected by the CDF II detector at the Tevatron collider. The total and differential branching ratios for Λb0 → Λµ+µ- are measured. They find Β(Λb0 → Λµ+µ-) = [1.73 ± 0.42(stat) ± 0.55(syst)] x 10-6. They also report the first measurement of the differential branching ratio of Bs0→φµ+µ- using 49 signal events. In addition, they report branching ratios for B+→K+µ+µ-, B0→K0µ+µ- and Β→ K*(892)µ+µ- decays.

  11. Search for the Flavor Changing Neutral Current Decay t → Z q at √(s) = 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Gimmell, Jennifer Lindsay

    2009-01-01

    This thesis reports the results of a search for the flavor changing neutral current decay of the top quark, t → Zq, in decays of t$\\bar{t}$ pairs produced in p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. This search is performed on a data sample recorded by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF), corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.9 fb-1. This search follows a previous CDF analysis that resulted in an upper limit for the branching fraction β(t → Zq) of 10.4% at 95% C.L. using a dataset equivalent to 1.1 fb-1 of integrated luminosity. This thesis extends to 1.9 fb-1 of data, and has improved sensitivity to the small signal with the introduction of a template fit technique that includes systematic uncertainties by a linear interpolation between templates. Using a Feldman-Cousins construction, an upper limit at 95% C.L. is set on β(t → Zq) of 3.7%, with the expected upper limit in absence of a signal is 5.0 ± 2.2% for a top mass of 175 GeV/c2.

  12. Flavor-changing neutral current in production and decay of pseudoscalar mesons in a type III two-Higgs-doublet-model with four-texture Yukawa couplings

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez-Bock, M.; Lopez-Castro, G.; Lopez-Lozano, L.; Rosado, A.

    2009-09-01

    We study flavor-violating processes in the production or decay of a neutral pseudoscalar meson P{sup 0} in the framework of a type-III two Higgs doublet model with four-texture Yukawa couplings. We use a version of the model where Yukawa interactions of neutral Higgs bosons allow for flavor change at the tree-level, but conserve CP symmetry. The physical Yukawa couplings respect CP-invariance due to the Hermiticity conditions that we impose on the fermion mass matrices. We focus on all possible {tau}{sup {+-}}{yields}l{sup {+-}}P{sup 0} and P{sup 0}{yields}l{sup +}l{sup '-} decay channels, where l, l{sup '} are charged leptons. We find that these processes provide complementary information on quark and lepton flavor-changing neutral current Yukawa couplings. In particular flavor-violating parameters in the quark sector, {chi}{sub sb} and {chi}{sub db}, are significantly constrained by present experimental data, whereas the corresponding parameters in the leptonic sector are less constrained.

  13. Uncertainty Quantification for Nuclear Currents: A Bayesian χ-EFT view of the Triton and β- Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendt, Kyle

    2014-09-01

    Chiral Effective Field Theory (χ-EFT) provides a framework for the generation and systematic improvement of model independent inter-nucleon interaction Hamiltonians and nuclear current operators. Within χ-EFT, short and mid distance physics is encoded through a gradient expansion and multiple pion exchange parameterized by a set of low energy constants (LECs). The LECs are often constrained via non-linear least squares using nuclear bound state and scattering observables. This has produced reasonable low-energy descriptions in the past, but has been plagued by LECs that are unnaturally large. Additional issues manifest in medium mass nuclei where the χ-EFT Hamiltonians fail to adequately describe saturation properties. It has been suggested that Bayesian approaches may remedy the unnaturally large LECs using carefully selected priors. Other analyses have suggested that the inclusion and feedback of nuclear currents into the constraints of the LECs may improve saturation properties. We combine these approaches using Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) to study and quantify uncertainties in the Triton and the χ-EFT axial-vector current, with the aim of providing a foundation for quantifying χ-EFT uncertainties for weak processes in nuclei. Chiral Effective Field Theory (χ-EFT) provides a framework for the generation and systematic improvement of model independent inter-nucleon interaction Hamiltonians and nuclear current operators. Within χ-EFT, short and mid distance physics is encoded through a gradient expansion and multiple pion exchange parameterized by a set of low energy constants (LECs). The LECs are often constrained via non-linear least squares using nuclear bound state and scattering observables. This has produced reasonable low-energy descriptions in the past, but has been plagued by LECs that are unnaturally large. Additional issues manifest in medium mass nuclei where the χ-EFT Hamiltonians fail to adequately describe saturation properties. It has

  14. GUARD RING SEMICONDUCTOR JUNCTION

    DOEpatents

    Goulding, F.S.; Hansen, W.L.

    1963-12-01

    A semiconductor diode having a very low noise characteristic when used under reverse bias is described. Surface leakage currents, which in conventional diodes greatly contribute to noise, are prevented from mixing with the desired signal currents. A p-n junction is formed with a thin layer of heavily doped semiconductor material disposed on a lightly doped, physically thick base material. An annular groove cuts through the thin layer and into the base for a short distance, dividing the thin layer into a peripheral guard ring that encircles the central region. Noise signal currents are shunted through the guard ring, leaving the central region free from such currents. (AEC)

  15. Multi-point observations of energetic particle injection deep into the inner magnetosphere: Implications for the ring current and radiation belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, G. D.; Larsen, B.; Friedel, R. H. W.; Henderson, M. G.; Skoug, R. M.; Funsten, H. O.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Fennell, J.; Tu, W.; Cunningham, G.; Spence, H. E.

    2014-12-01

    For thirty years, the "injection boundary" model of substorm injections has provided a framework for studies of the impulsive transport of energetic electrons and ions into the inner magnetosphere. New, multi-satellite observations of substorm injections show signatures that require revision and rethinking of the classical picture. Recent observations by the LANL-GEO and GOES energetic particle instruments provide unprecedented coverage at geosynchronous orbit while the Van Allen Probes satellites provide simultaneous multi-point measurements inside geosynchronous orbit. With these satellites we can observe injections at three different radial distances and up to ten different local times - simultaneously. These observations reveal a complex and varied set of dynamics that have important implications for the development of the radiation belts and ring current. In this study we look specifically at the radial penetration of energetic particle injections in storms and substorms. Radial alignments of satellites confirm and extend the CRRES/LANL-GEO observations of relatively slow inward propagation of the injection region inside geosynchronous orbit [1]. At the same time, synoptic Van Allen Probes observations show frequent storm-time "injection" of energetic (~50-500 keV) electrons to very low L-shells (L < 3) that have not previously been reported. The radial distribution of electrons and ions injected during storms and substorms have profound implications for the generation of waves, for the availability of a radiation belt "seed population", and for the radial distribution of ring current ions. In this paper we will use multi-point satellite observations to understand the processes that inject energetic particles into the inner magnetosphere, the Earthward propagation of these injections, the conditions that control variation in Earthward extent of energetic particle injections, and how particles can be injected deep inside the plasmasphere and even through the

  16. Astrophysical data on 5 eV to 1 keV radiation from the radiative decay of fundamental particles - Current limits and prospects for improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowyer, Stuart; Malina, Roger F.

    1986-01-01

    Line emission from the decay of fundamental particles, integrated over cosmological distances, can give rise to detectable spectral features in the diffuse astronomical background between 5 eV and 1 keV. Spectroscopic observations may allow these features to be separated from line emission from the numerous local sources of radiation. The current observational status and existing evidence for such features are reviewed. No definitive detections of nongalactic line features have been made. Several local sources of background mask the features at many wavelengths and confuse the interpretation of the data. No systematic spectral observations have been carried out to date. Upcoming experiments which can be expected to provide significantly better constraints on the presence of spectral features in the diffuse background from 5 eV to 1 keV are reviewed.

  17. PEP storage ring: current status

    SciTech Connect

    Rees, J.R.

    1981-02-01

    This report comments on the performance of the subsystems of PEP, discusses the beam dynamical behavior of the machine and compares it with our expectations and, finally, describes plans for improving PEP.

  18. Modeling a Rotating Partial Ring Current in the Saturn's Magnetosphere as a Source of B-field Periodicities: A Progress Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsyganenko, N. A.; Brandt, P. C.; Khurana, K. K.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2010-12-01

    periodically injected energetic (>2 keV) particles that form a partial ring current (PRC) co-rotating with the planet. Plasma pressures inferred from the Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS) (<2 keV) and the Magnetospheric Imaging Instrument (MIMI) (>2 keV) will be used to compute the currents and their associated magnetic field perturbations. The distribution of the "hot" (>2 keV)plasma pressure is derived from Energetic Neutral Atom (ENA) images, obtained by the Ion Neutral Camera (INCA) and in-situ spectral measurements.

  19. Calibrated high-precision 17O-excess measurements using cavity ring-down spectroscopy with laser-current-tuned cavity resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steig, E. J.; Gkinis, V.; Schauer, A. J.; Schoenemann, S. W.; Samek, K.; Hoffnagle, J.; Dennis, K. J.; Tan, S. M.

    2014-08-01

    High-precision analysis of the 17O / 16O isotope ratio in water and water vapor is of interest in hydrological, paleoclimate, and atmospheric science applications. Of specific interest is the parameter 17O excess (Δ17O), a measure of the deviation from a~linear relationship between 17O / 16O and 18O / 16O ratios. Conventional analyses of Δ17O of water are obtained by fluorination of H2O to O2 that is analyzed by dual-inlet isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). We describe a new laser spectroscopy instrument for high-precision Δ17O measurements. The new instrument uses cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) with laser-current-tuned cavity resonance to achieve reduced measurement drift compared with previous-generation instruments. Liquid water and water-vapor samples can be analyzed with a better than 8 per meg precision for Δ17O using integration times of less than 30 min. Calibration with respect to accepted water standards demonstrates that both the precision and the accuracy of Δ17O are competitive with conventional IRMS methods. The new instrument also achieves simultaneous analysis of δ18O, Δ17O and δD with precision of < 0.03‰, < 0.02 and < 0.2‰, respectively, based on repeated calibrated measurements.

  20. Planetary Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.

    1994-01-01

    Just over two decades ago, Jim Pollack made a critical contribution to our understanding of planetary ring particle properties, and resolved a major apparent paradox between radar reflection and radio emission observations. At the time, particle properties were about all there were to study about planetary rings, and the fundamental questions were, why is Saturn the only planet with rings, how big are the particles, and what are they made of? Since then, we have received an avalanche of observations of planetary ring systems, both from spacecraft and from Earth. Meanwhile, we have seen steady progress in our understanding of the myriad ways in which gravity, fluid and statistical mechanics, and electromagnetism can combine to shape the distribution of the submicron-to-several-meter size particles which comprise ring systems into the complex webs of structure that we now know them to display. Insights gained from studies of these giant dynamical analogs have carried over into improved understanding of the formation of the planets themselves from particle disks, a subject very close to Jim's heart. The now-complete reconnaissance of the gas giant planets by spacecraft has revealed that ring systems are invariably found in association with families of regular satellites, and there is ark emerging perspective that they are not only physically but causally linked. There is also mounting evidence that many features or aspects of all planetary ring systems, if not the ring systems themselves, are considerably younger than the solar system

  1. Superallowed 0+→0+ nuclear β decays: A new survey with precision tests of the conserved vector current hypothesis and the standard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, J. C.; Towner, I. S.

    2009-05-01

    A new critical survey is presented of all half-life, decay-energy, and branching-ratio measurements related to 20 superallowed 0+→0+β decays. Compared with our last review, there are numerous improvements: First, we have added 27 recently published measurements and eliminated 9 references, either because they have been superseded by much more precise modern results or because there are now reasons to consider them fatally flawed; of particular importance, the new data include a number of high-precision Penning-trap measurements of decay energies. Second, we have used the recently improved isospin symmetry-breaking corrections, which were motivated by these new Penning-trap results. Third, our calculation of the statistical rate function f now accounts for possible excitation in the daughter atom, a small effect but one that merits inclusion at the present level of experimental precision. Finally, we have re-examined the systematic uncertainty associated with the isospin symmetry-breaking corrections by evaluating the radial-overlap correction using Hartree-Fock radial wave functions and comparing the results with our earlier calculations, which used Saxon-Woods wave functions; the provision for systematic uncertainty has been changed as a consequence. The new “corrected” Ft values are impressively constant and their average, when combined with the muon lifetime, yields the up-down quark-mixing element of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix, Vud=0.97425±0.00022. The unitarity test on the top row of the matrix becomes |Vud|2+|Vus|2+|Vub|2=0.99995±0.00061. Both Vud and the unitarity sum have significantly reduced uncertainties compared with our previous survey, although the new value of Vud is statistically consistent with the old one. From these data we also set limits on the possible existence of scalar interactions, right-hand currents, and extra Z bosons. Finally, we discuss the priorities for future theoretical and experimental work with the goal

  2. Observation of Infrared Free-Induction Decay and Optical Nutation Signals from Nitrous Oxide Using a Current Modulated Quantum Cascade Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Duxbury, Geoffrey; Kelly, James F.; Blake, Thomas A.; Langford, Nigel

    2012-05-07

    Free induction decay (FID), optical nutation and rapid passage induced (RP) signals in nitrous oxide, under both optically thin and optically thick conditions, have been observed using a rapid current pulse modulation, or chirp, applied to the slow current ramp of a quantum cascade (QC) laser. The variation in optical depth was achieved by increasing the pressure of nitrous oxide in a long pathlength multipass absorption cell. This allows the variation of optical depth to be achieved over a range of low gas pressures. Since, even at the highest gas pressure used in the cell, the chirp rate of the QC laser is faster than the collisional reorientation time of the molecules, there is minimal collisional damping, allowing a large macroscopic polarization of the molecular dipoles to develop. This is referred to as rapid passage induced gain. The resultant FID signals are enhanced due to the constructive interference between the field within the gas generated by the slow ramp of the laser (pump), and the fast chirp of the laser (probe) signal generated by pulse modulation of the continuously operating QC laser. The FID signals obtained at large 2 optical depth have not been observed previously in the mid-infrared regions, and unusual oscillatory signals have been observed at the highest gas pressures used.

  3. Observation of infrared free-induction decay and optical nutation signals from nitrous oxide using a current modulated quantum cascade laser.

    PubMed

    Duxbury, Geoffrey; Kelly, James F; Blake, Thomas A; Langford, Nigel

    2012-05-01

    Free induction decay (FID), optical nutation, and rapid passage induced signals in nitrous oxide, under both optically thin and optically thick conditions, have been observed using a rapid current pulse modulation, or chirp, applied to the slow current ramp of a quantum cascade (QC) laser. The variation in optical depth was achieved by increasing the pressure of nitrous oxide in a long path length multipass absorption cell. This allows the variation of optical depth to be achieved over a range of low gas pressures. Since, even at the highest gas pressure used in the cell, the chirp rate of the QC laser is faster than the collisional reorientation time of the molecules, there is minimal collisional damping, allowing a large macroscopic polarization of the molecular dipoles to develop. This is referred to as rapid passage induced polarization. The resultant FID signals are enhanced due to the constructive interference between the field within the gas generated by the slow ramp of the laser (pump), and that of the fast chirp of the laser (probe) signal generated by pulse modulation of the continuously operating QC laser. The FID signals obtained at large optical depth have not been observed previously in the mid-infrared regions, and unusual oscillatory signals have been observed at the highest gas pressures used. PMID:22583240

  4. Search for flavour-changing neutral current top-quark decays to \\varvec{qZ} in \\varvec{pp} collision data collected with the ATLAS detector at \\varvec{√{s}=8} TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Bieniek, S. P.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. 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R.; Suzuki, S.; Svatos, M.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tam, J. Y. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tannoury, N.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Temple, D.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thun, R. P.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todome, K.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; True, P.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turra, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ugland, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vannucci, F.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloce, L. M.; Veloso, F.; Velz, T.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, A.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, D.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yao, W.-M.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yuen, S. P. Y.; Yurkewicz, A.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zeng, Q.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.

    2016-01-01

    A search for the flavour-changing neutral-current decay t→ qZ is presented. Data collected by the ATLAS detector during 2012 from proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider at a centre-of-mass energy of √{s}=8 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb^{-1}, are analysed. Top-quark pair-production events with one top quark decaying through the t→ qZ (q=u,c) channel and the other through the dominant Standard Model mode t→ bW are considered as signal. Only the decays of the Z boson to charged leptons and leptonic W boson decays are used. No evidence for a signal is found and an observed (expected) upper limit on the t→ qZ branching ratio of 7× 10^{-4} (8× 10^{-4}) is set at the 95 % confidence level

  5. Initial measurements of O-ion and He-ion decay rates observed from the Van Allen probes RBSPICE instrument

    PubMed Central

    Gerrard, Andrew; Lanzerotti, Louis; Gkioulidou, Matina; Mitchell, Donald; Manweiler, Jerry; Bortnik, Jacob; Keika, Kunihiro

    2014-01-01

    H-ion (∼45 keV to ∼600 keV), He-ion (∼65 keV to ∼520 keV), and O-ion (∼140 keV to ∼1130 keV) integral flux measurements, from the Radiation Belt Storm Probe Ion Composition Experiment (RBSPICE) instrument aboard the Van Allan Probes spacecraft B, are reported. These abundance data form a cohesive picture of ring current ions during the first 9 months of measurements. Furthermore, the data presented herein are used to show injection characteristics via the He-ion/H-ion abundance ratio and the O-ion/H-ion abundance ratio. Of unique interest to ring current dynamics are the spatial-temporal decay characteristics of the two injected populations. We observe that He-ions decay more quickly at lower L shells, on the order of ∼0.8 day at L shells of 3–4, and decay more slowly with higher L shell, on the order of ∼1.7 days at L shells of 5–6. Conversely, O-ions decay very rapidly (∼1.5 h) across all L shells. The He-ion decay time are consistent with previously measured and calculated lifetimes associated with charge exchange. The O-ion decay time is much faster than predicted and is attributed to the inclusion of higher-energy (> 500 keV) O-ions in our decay rate estimation. We note that these measurements demonstrate a compelling need for calculation of high-energy O-ion loss rates, which have not been adequately studied in the literature to date. Key Points We report initial observations of ring current ions We show that He-ion decay rates are consistent with theory We show that O-ions with energies greater than 500 keV decay very rapidly PMID:26167435

  6. Current-use pesticides in seawater and their bioaccumulation in polar bear-ringed seal food chains of the Canadian Arctic.

    PubMed

    Morris, Adam D; Muir, Derek C G; Solomon, Keith R; Letcher, Robert J; McKinney, Melissa A; Fisk, Aaron T; McMeans, Bailey C; Tomy, Gregg T; Teixeira, Camilla; Wang, Xiaowa; Duric, Mark

    2016-07-01

    The distribution of current-use pesticides (CUPs) in seawater and their trophodynamics were investigated in 3 Canadian Arctic marine food chains. The greatest ranges of dissolved-phase concentrations in seawater for each CUP were endosulfan sulfate (less than method detection limit (MDL) to 19 pg L(-1) ) > dacthal (0.76-15 pg L(-1) ) > chlorpyrifos (less than MDL to 8.1 pg L(-1) ) > pentachloronitrobenzene (less than MDL to 2.6 pg L(-1) ) > α-endosulfan (0.20-2.3 pg L(-1) ). Bioaccumulation factors (BAFs, water-respiring organisms) were greatest in plankton, including chlorothalonil (log BAF = 7.4 ± 7.1 L kg(-1) , mean ± standard error), chlorpyrifos (log BAF = 6.9 ± 6.7 L kg(-1) ), and α-endosulfan (log BAF = 6.5 ± 6.0 L kg(-1) ). The largest biomagnification factors (BMFs) were found for dacthal in the capelin:plankton trophic relationship (BMF = 13 ± 5.0) at Cumberland Sound (Nunvavut), and for β-endosulfan (BMF = 16 ± 4.9) and α-endosulfan (BMF = 9.3 ± 2.8) in the polar bear-ringed seal relationship at Barrow and Rae Strait (NU), respectively. Concentrations of endosulfan sulfate exhibited trophic magnification (increasing concentrations with increasing trophic level) in the poikilothermic portion of the food web (trophic magnification factor = 1.4), but all of the CUPs underwent trophic dilution in the marine mammal food web, despite some trophic level-specific biomagnification. Together, these observations are most likely indicative of metabolism of these CUPs in mammals. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:1695-1707. © 2016 SETAC. PMID:27027986

  7. Mass of Saturn's A ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horn, L. J.; Russell, C. T.

    1993-01-01

    The mass of Saturn's A ring is reestimated using the behavior of spiral density waves embedded in the ring. The Voyager photopolarimeter (PPS) observed the star delta-Scorpii as it was occulted by Saturn's rings during the Voyager 2 flyby of Saturn in 1981 producing a radial profile of the rings. We examined forty spiral density waves in the Voyager PPS data of the A ring including 10 weaker waves that have not been previously analyzed by means of an autoregressive power spectral technique called Burg. The strengths of this new method for ring studies are that weaker, less extended waves are easily detected and characterized. This method is also the first one which does not require precise knowledge of the resonance location and phase of the wave in order to calculate the surface mass density. Uncertainties of up to 3 km are present in the currently available radial scales for Saturn's rings.

  8. Recent experiments with ring Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckel, S.; Kumar, A.; Anderson, N. W.; Campbell, G. K.

    2016-05-01

    Here, we present three recent results of our experiments with ring-shaped 23 Na Bose-Einstein condensates. First, we present results of the effect of temperature on the decay of persistent currents in the presence of a local, stationary perturbation, or weak link. When the weak link rotates, it can drive transitions between quantized persistent current states in the ring, that form hysteresis loops whose size depends strongly on temperature. We find that our data does not fit with a simple model of thermal activation. Second, we present a new method to measure the quantized persistent current state of the ring in a minimally-destructive way. This technique uses phonons as probes of the background flow through the Doppler effect. Finally, we present a set of experiments designed to reproduce the horizon problem in the early universe. Supersonic expansion of the ring creates causally-disconnected regions of BEC whose phase evolves at different rates. When the expansion stops and these regions are allowed to recombine, they form topological excitations. These excitations can be predicted using a simple theory that shows excellent agreement with the data.

  9. Current status of the E(1420)/{iota}(1440) and future prospects of the g{sub T} decaying into {phi}{phi}

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, S.U.

    1991-12-01

    A survey is given of the current status of the f{sub 1}(1420)/E and the {eta}(1440)/{iota} in the channels of K {bar K}{pi} and {eta}{pi}{pi}. There is now strong evidence that the {eta}(1440)/{iota} is split into two J{sup PC} = o{sup {minus}+} states in the 1.4--1.5 GeV range with the lower-mass state coupling mostly to a{sub 0}(980){pi} whereas the upper-mass state couples mainly to K*(890){bar K}. Both of them cannot be quarkonia. It appears very likely that the f{sub 1}(1420)/E is an S-wave K*(890){bar K} molecule with a strong overlap with the a{sub 0}(980)/{delta}. It is thought that one or more of the J{sup PC} = 1{sup ++} f{sub 2}(2010)/g{sub r}, F{sub 2}(2300)/g{sub T}{prime} and f{sub 2}(2340)/g{sub f}{double_prime} states decaying into {phi}{phi} may be the tensor glueball. The future prospects at BNL and elsewhere for further experimental work on these on other exotic states coupling to {phi}{phi} are discussed.

  10. Measurements of Charged Current Lepton Universality and |Vus| using Tau Lepton Decays to e- v v, __- v v, pi- v and K- v

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, Bernard; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2011-06-30

    Using 467 fb{sup -1} of e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation data collected with the BABAR detector, they measure {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} {mu}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {mu}}{nu}{sub {tau}})/{Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} e{sup -} {bar {nu}}{sub e}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = (0.9796 {+-} 0.0016 {+-} 0.0036), {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -} {nu}{sub {tau}})/{Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} e{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub e}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = (0.5945 {+-} 0.0014 {+-} 0.0061), and {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}})/{Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} e{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub e}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = (0.03882 {+-} 0.00032 {+-} 0.00057), where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. From these precision {tau} measurements, they test the Standard Model assumption of {mu}-e and {tau}-{mu} charge current lepton universality and provide determinations of |V{sub us}| experimentally independent of the decay of a kaon.

  11. Remarks concerning the O(Z. cap alpha. /sup 2/) corrections to Fermi decays, conserved-vector-current predictions, and universality

    SciTech Connect

    Sirlin, A.

    1987-06-01

    Finite-nuclear-size contributions to the O(Z..cap alpha../sup 2/) corrections to Fermi decays are studied for realistic nuclear-charge distributions. In conjunction with the results of Koslowsky et al. and recent papers by the author and Zucchini and by Jaus and Rasche, these refinements lead to an average value scrFt = 3070.6 +- 1.6 s for the accurately measured superallowed Fermi transitions. Correspondingly, V/sub u//sub d/ = 0.9744 +- 0.0010 and V/sub u//sub d/ /sup 2/+V/sub us/ /sup 2/+V/sub ub/ /sup 2/ = 0.9979 +- 0.0021 in good agreement with the three-generation standard model at the level of its quantum corrections. The agreement with conserved-vector-current predictions is very good, with each of the eight transitions differing from the average by <1sigma. The consequences of using two other calculations of the nuclear mismatch correction delta/sub c/, Wilkinson's microscopic analysis and the recent results of Ormand and Brown, are briefly discussed. A useful upper bound on scrFt, independent of the delta/sub c/ calculation, is given.

  12. Rings dominate western Gulf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal L., Francisco V.; Vidal L., Victor M. V.; Molero, José María Pérez

    Surface and deep circulation of the central and western Gulf of Mexico is controlled by interactions of rings of water pinched from the gulf's Loop Current. The discovery was made by Mexican oceanographers who are preparing a full-color, 8-volume oceanographic atlas of the gulf.Anticyclonic warm-core rings pinch off the Loop Current at a rate of about one to two per year, the scientists of the Grupo de Estudios Oceanográficos of the Instituto de Investigaciones Eléctricas (GEO-IIE) found. The rings migrate west until they collide with the continental shelf break of the western gulf, almost always between 22° and 23°N latitude. On their westward travel they transfer angular momentum and vorticity to the surrounding water, generating cyclonic circulations and vortex pairs that completely dominate the entire surface and deep circulation of the central and western gulf.

  13. Relationships of storm-time changes in thermospheric mass density with solar wind/IMF parameters and ring current index of Sym-H

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yunliang; Ma, S. Y.; Xiong, Chao; Luehr, Hermann

    The total air mass densities at about 500 km altitude are derived using super-STAR accelerom-eter measurements onboard GRACE satellites for 25 great magnetic storms with minimum Dst less than 100 nT during 2002 to 2006 years. Taking NRLMSISE-00 model-predicted densities without active ap index input as a reference baseline of quiet-time mass density, the storm-time changes in upper thermospheric mass densities are obtained by subtraction for all the storm events and sorted into different grids of latitude by local time sector. The relationships of the storm-time density changes with various interplanetary parameters and magnetospheric ring current index of Sym-H are statistically investigated. The parameters include Akasofu energy coupling function, the merging electric field Em, the magnitude of IMF component in the GSM y-z plane etc. as calculated from OMNI data at 1 AU. It is found that the storm-time changes in the upper thermospheric mass density have the best linear correlation with the Sym-H index in general, showing nearly zero time delay at low-latitudes and a little time ahead at high-latitudes for most cases. Unexpectedly, the magnitude of IMF component in the y-z plane, Byz, shows correlation with storm-time mass density changes better and closer than Akasofu function and even Em. And, the mass density changes lag behind Byz about 1-4 hours for most cases at low-latitudes. The correlations considered above are local time dependent, showing the lowest at dusk sectors. For the largest superstorm of November 2003, the changes in mass density are correlated very closely with Byz, Em, and Sym-H index, showing correlation coefficients averaged over all latitudes in noon sector as high as 0.93, 0.91 and 0.90 separately. The physical factors controlling the lag times between the mass density changes at mid-low-latitudes and the interplanetary parameter variations are also analyzed. The results in this study may pro-vide useful suggestions for establishing

  14. Bound-state beta decay of highly ionized atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, K.; Boyd, R.N.; Mathews, G.J.; Yokoi, K.

    1987-10-01

    Nuclear ..beta.. decays of highly ionized atoms under laboratory conditions are studied. Theoretical predictions of ..beta..-decay rates are given for a few cases in which bound-state ..beta.. decay produces particularly interesting effects. A possible storage-ring experiment is proposed for measuring bound-state ..beta..-decay rates, which will be most easily applied to the decay of /sup 3/H/sup +/. .AE

  15. Running Rings Around the Web.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDermott, Irene E.

    1999-01-01

    Describes the development and current status of WebRing, a service that links related Web sites into a central hub. Discusses it as a viable alternative to other search engines and examines issues of free speech, use by the business sector, and implications for WebRing after its purchase by Yahoo! (LRW)

  16. Ring Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennefeld, M.; Materne, J.

    1980-09-01

    Among the 338 exotic, intriguing and/or fascinating objects contained in Arp's catalogue of peculiar galaxies, two, Arp 146 and 147, are calling special attention as a presumably separate class of objects displaying closed rings with almost empty interior. It is difficult to find out when, historically speaking, attention was called first to this type of object as a peculiar class, but certainly ga1axies with rings were widely found and recognized in the early sixties, ul}der others by Vorontsov-Velyaminov (1960), Sandage (1961) in the Hubble Atlas or de Vaucouleurs (1964) in the first reference catalogue of ga1axies. The most recent estimates by Arp and Madore (1977) from a search on about 200 Schmidt plates covering 7,000 square degrees give 3.6 per cent of ring galaxies among 2,784 peculiar galaxies found. However, despite the mythological perfection associated with a circle, some ordering is necessary before trying to understand the nature of such objects. This is particularly true because a large fraction of those galaxies with rings are probably normal spiral galaxies of type RS or S(r) as defined by de Vaucouleurs, where the spiral arms are simply "closing the circle". A good example of such "ordinary" galaxy is NGC 3081 in the Hubble Atlas .

  17. Search for B0 decays to invisible final states and to nunugamma.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Gaillard, J-M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Shelkov, V G; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Latham, T E; Wilson, F F; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Shen, B C; Wang, K; del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, Sh; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Levy, S L; Long, O; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schmitz, R E; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Abe, T; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Smith, J G; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Chen, A; Harton, J L; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q L; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Dickopp, M; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Lavin, D; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Treadwell, E; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Brandenburg, G; Morii, M; Won, E; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Taylor, G P; Charles, M J; Grenier, G J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Yi, J; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Laplace, S; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Tantot, L; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Back, J J; Cormack, C M; Harrison, P F; Di Lodovico, F; Mohanty, G B; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flaecher, H U; Green, M G; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hart, P A; Hodgkinson, M C; Lafferty, G D; Lyon, A J; Williams, J C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Mangeol, D J J; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Gabriel, T A; Allmendinger, T; Brau, B; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Tiozzo, G; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; de la Vaissière, Ch; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Malcles, J; Ocariz, J; Pivk, M; Roos, L; T'Jampens, S; Therin, G; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Anulli, F; Biasini, M; Peruzzi, I M; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Del Gamba, V; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Martinez-Vidal, F; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Miftakov, V; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Pierini, M; Piredda, G; Safai Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Christ, S; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Langer, M; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Schott, G; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Yumiceva, F X; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; De Nardo, G; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Elsen, E E; Fan, S; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Simi, G; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Meyer, T I; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Borean, C; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Graham, M; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mihalyi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Rubin, A E; Sekula, S J; Tan, P; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Greene, M G; Neal, H

    2004-08-27

    We establish upper limits on branching fractions for B0 decays to final states where the decay products are purely invisible (i.e., no observable final state particles) and for B0 decays to nunugamma. Within the standard model, these decays have branching fractions that are below current experimental sensitivity, but various models of physics beyond the standard model predict significant contributions from these channels. Using 88.5 x 10(6) BB pairs collected at the Upsilon(4S) resonance by the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II e(+)e- storage ring at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, we establish upper limits at the 90% confidence level of 22 x 10(-5) for the branching fraction of B0-->invisible and 4.7 x 10(-5) for the branching fraction of B0-->nunugamma. PMID:15447092

  18. Tooth Decay

    MedlinePlus

    ... decay starts in the outer layer, called the enamel. Without a filling, the decay can get deep into the tooth and its nerves and cause a toothache or abscess. To help prevent cavities Brush your teeth every day with a fluoride toothpaste Clean between ...

  19. Measurements of the Rare Decays B -> Kl+l- and B ->K*l+l-

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Prairie View A-M /Princeton U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Stony Brook /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Vanderbilt U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U.

    2005-07-06

    The authors present measurements of the flavor-changing neutral current decays B {yields} K{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -} and B {yields} K*{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}, where {ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -} is either an e{sup +}e{sup -} or {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} pair. The data sample comprises 229 x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring.

  20. The Search for Proton Decay.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshak, Marvin L.

    1984-01-01

    Provides the rationale for and examples of experiments designed to test the stability of protons and bound neutrons. Also considers the unification question, cosmological implications, current and future detectors, and current status of knowledge on proton decay. (JN)

  1. Radiative B Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Bard, D.; /Imperial Coll., London

    2011-11-23

    I discuss recent results in radiative B decays from the Belle and BaBar collaborations. I report new measurements of the decay rate and CP asymmetries in b {yields} s{gamma} and b {yields} d{gamma} decays, and measurements of the photon spectrum in b {yields} s{gamma}. Radiative penguin decays are flavour changing neutral currents which do not occur at tree level in the standard model (SM), but must proceed via one loop or higher order diagrams. These transitions are therefore suppressed in the SM, but offer access to poorlyknown SM parameters and are also a sensitive probe of new physics. In the SM, the rate is dominated by the top quark contribution to the loop, but non-SM particles could also contribute with a size comparable to leading SM contributions. The new physics effects are potentially large which makes them theoretically very interesting, but due to their small branching fractions they are typically experimentally challenging.

  2. Structure and evolution of Saturn's rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esposito, L. W.

    1986-01-01

    It is noted that many Voyager observations on the structure and evolution of Saturn's rings remain largely unexplained. The variation of ring thickness and particle size with composition may be partly explained by the input of density waves in the 'heating' of such rings as the outer A ring; in addition, the particles appear to resemble Weidenschilling et al.'s (1984) 'ephemeral bodies' rather than chunks of ice. It is suggested that many current difficulties may be resolved by positing that at least ring A is young, having been created by the destruction of one of the ring moons.

  3. Jovian Magnetospheric Interactions with Io, Amalthea, and the Planetary Rings: Current and Expected Results from the Galileo Orbiter Heavy Ion Counter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, J. F.

    2002-05-01

    The energetic (keV to MeV) heavy ion population in the inner jovian magnetosphere, out to Io's orbit, originates mostly from acceleration of Io plasma torus ions and contributes to erosion of satellite surfaces and ring particles by sputtering. Photo- and plasma-ionization of iogenic neutrals, magnetospheric pickup of the resultant ions, and magnetospheric acceleration processes produce high fluxes of oxygen and sulfur ions at total energies above 40 MeV which are measured by the Heavy Ion Counter (HIC) instrument on the Galileo Orbiter. Directional measurements during the spacecraft's 20-second spin period allow determination of local anisotropy distributions with respect to magnetic pitch angles of magnetospheric ions and to absorption by satellite surfaces approached during close flybys. Numerical modeling of anisotropy data from these flybys allows limits to be set on the ion charge states and on models for the magnetic environments including possible presence of internal field sources. The Io phase of the Galileo satellite tour has concluded with successful HIC and magnetometer data return from five of seven flybys, including two passes (I31 and I32) over Io's poles. The absorption signatures from the polar passes are very different from the more equatorial ones (J0, I24, I27) and modeling is in progress to determine best-fit configurations of Io's global magnetic environment. Due to high electronic thresholds for the heavy ion measurements, HIC has been insensitive to magnetospheric electron and proton backgrounds during these flybys and is expected to return good data for the upcoming Amalthea flyby on Nov. 5, 2002. This assumes that spacecraft systems will survive the return to perijove (2.0 Rj) just outside Jupiter's main ring (1.8 Rj), first traversed by Pioneer 11 in Dec. 1974 and again by the Galileo Probe twenty-one years later. Detectors on both of these latter spacecraft resolved the cutoff of magnetospheric ion flux by interaction with the jovian

  4. The Phase Shift in the Jumping Ring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeffery, Rondo N.; Amiri, Farhang

    2008-01-01

    The popular physics demonstration experiment known as Thomson's Jumping Ring (JR) has been variously explained as a simple example of Lenz's law, or as the result of a phase shift of the ring current relative to the induced emf. The failure of the first-quadrant Lenz's law explanation is shown by the time the ring takes to jump and by levitation.…

  5. Decay curve study in a standard electron capture decay

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, D.; Fukuda, M.; Kisamori, K.; Kuwada, Y.; Makisaka, K.; Matsumiya, R.; Matsuta, K.; Mihara, M.; Takagi, A.; Yokoyama, R.; Izumikawa, T.; Ohtsubo, T.; Suzuki, T.; Yamaguchi, T.

    2010-05-12

    We have searched for a time-modulated decay in a standard electron capture experiment for {sup 140}Pr, in order to confirm a report from GSI, where an oscillatory decay has been observed for hydrogen-like {sup 140}Pr and {sup 142}Pm ions in the cooler storage ring. {sup 140}Pr has been produced with the {sup 140}Ce(p, n) reaction by a pulsed proton beam accelerated from the Van de Graaff accelerator at Osaka University. Resultant time dependence of the K{sub a}lpha and K{sub b}eta X-ray intensities from the daughter shows no oscillatory behavior.

  6. A search for flavour changing neutral currents in top-quark decays in pp collision data collected with the ATLAS detector at √s = 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Aad, Georges

    2012-09-30

    A search for flavour changing neutral current (FCNC) processes in top-quark decays by the ATLAS Collaboration is presented. Data collected from pp collisions at the LHC at a centre-of-mass energy of √s = 7 TeV during 2011, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.1 fb⁻¹, were used. A search was performed for top-quark pair-production events, with one top quark decaying through the t → Zq FCNC (q = u, c) channel, and the other through the Standard Model dominant mode t → Wb. Only the decays of the Z boson to charged leptons and leptonic W-boson decays were considered as signal. Consequently, the final-state topology is characterised by the presence of three isolated charged leptons, at least two jets and missing transverse momentum from the undetected neutrino. No evidence for an FCNC signal was found. An upper limit on the t → Zq branching ratio of BR(t → Zq) < 0.73% is set at the 95% confidence level.

  7. Measurement of the τ-→ηπ-π+π-ντ branching fraction and a search for a second-class current in the τ-→η'(958)π-ντ decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Boutigny, D.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Tico, J. Garra; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Abrams, G. S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D. N.; Button-Shafer, J.; Cahn, R. N.; Groysman, Y.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Kadyk, J. A.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Kukartsev, G.; Pegna, D. Lopes; Lynch, G.; Mir, L. M.; Orimoto, T. J.; Osipenkov, I. L.; Ronan, M. T.; Tackmann, K.; Tanabe, T.; Wenzel, W. A.; Del Amo Sanchez, P.; Hawkes, C. M.; Watson, A. T.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Walker, D.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T.; Fulsom, B. G.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Khan, A.; Saleem, M.; Teodorescu, L.; Blinov, V. E.; Bukin, A. D.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Bondioli, M.; Curry, S.; Eschrich, I.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Lund, P.; Mandelkern, M.; Martin, E. C.; Stoker, D. P.; Abachi, S.; Buchanan, C.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Shen, B. C.; Vitug, G. M.; Zhang, L.; Paar, H. P.; Rahatlou, S.; Sharma, V.; Berryhill, J. W.; Campagnari, C.; Cunha, A.; Dahmes, B.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; Beck, T. W.; Eisner, A. M.; Flacco, C. J.; Heusch, C. A.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Schalk, T.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Wilson, M. G.; Winstrom, L. O.; Chen, E.; Cheng, C. H.; Fang, F.; Hitlin, D. G.; Narsky, I.; Piatenko, T.; Porter, F. C.; Andreassen, R.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Mishra, K.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Blanc, F.; Bloom, P. C.; Chen, S.; Ford, W. T.; Hirschauer, J. F.; Kreisel, A.; Nagel, M.; Nauenberg, U.; Olivas, A.; Smith, J. G.; Ulmer, K. A.; Wagner, S. R.; Zhang, J.; Gabareen, A. M.; Soffer, A.; Toki, W. H.; Wilson, R. J.; Winklmeier, F.; Altenburg, D. D.; Feltresi, E.; Hauke, A.; Jasper, H.; Merkel, J.; Petzold, A.; Spaan, B.; Wacker, K.; Klose, V.; Kobel, M. J.; Lacker, H. M.; Mader, W. F.; Nogowski, R.; Schubert, J.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Sundermann, J. E.; Volk, A.; Bernard, D.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Latour, E.; Lombardo, V.; Thiebaux, Ch.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Gradl, W.; Muheim, F.; Playfer, S.; Robertson, A. I.; Watson, J. E.; Xie, Y.; Andreotti, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cecchi, A.; Cibinetto, G.; Franchini, P.; Luppi, E.; Negrini, M.; Petrella, A.; Piemontese, L.; Prencipe, E.; Santoro, V.; Anulli, F.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Buzzo, A.; Contri, R.; Lo Vetere, M.; Macri, M. M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Santroni, A.; Tosi, S.; Chaisanguanthum, K. S.; Morii, M.; Wu, J.; Dubitzky, R. S.; Marks, J.; Schenk, S.; Uwer, U.; Bard, D. J.; Dauncey, P. D.; Flack, R. L.; Nash, J. A.; Vazquez, W. Panduro; Tibbetts, M.; Behera, P. K.; Chai, X.; Charles, M. J.; Mallik, U.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Dong, L.; Eyges, V.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rubin, A. E.; Gao, Y. Y.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Lae, C. K.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Schott, G.; Arnaud, N.; Béquilleux, J.; D'Orazio, A.; Davier, M.; Grosdidier, G.; Höcker, A.; Lepeltier, V.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Pruvot, S.; Rodier, S.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Serrano, J.; Sordini, V.; Stocchi, A.; Wang, L.; Wang, W. F.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Bingham, I.; Burke, J. P.; Chavez, C. A.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Schofield, K. C.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; George, K. A.; di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Flaecher, H. U.; Hopkins, D. A.; Paramesvaran, S.; Salvatore, F.; Wren, A. C.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Allison, J.; Barlow, N. R.; Barlow, R. J.; Chia, Y. M.; Edgar, C. L.; Lafferty, G. D.; West, T. J.; Yi, J. I.; Anderson, J.; Chen, C.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Simi, G.; Tuggle, J. M.; Dallapiccola, C.; Hertzbach, S. S.; Li, X.; Moore, T. B.; Salvati, E.; Saremi, S.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Fisher, P. H.; Koeneke, K.; Sciolla, G.; Spitznagel, M.; Taylor, F.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Zhao, M.; Zheng, Y.; McLachlin, S. E.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Lazzaro, A.; Palombo, F.; Bauer, J. M.; Cremaldi, L.; Eschenburg, V.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sanders, D. A.; Summers, D. J.; Zhao, H. W.; Brunet, S.; Côté, D.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; Viaud, F. B.; Nicholson, H.; de Nardo, G.; Fabozzi, F.; Lista, L.; Monorchio, D.; Sciacca, C.; Baak, M. A.; Raven, G.; Snoek, H. L.; Jessop, C. P.; Knoepfel, K. J.; Losecco, J. M.; Benelli, G.; Corwin, L. A.; Honscheid, K.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Morris, J. P.; Rahimi, A. M.; Regensburger, J. J.; Sekula, S. J.; Wong, Q. K.; Blount, N. L.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Igonkina, O.; Kolb, J. A.; Lu, M.; Rahmat, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Strube, J.; Torrence, E.; Gagliardi, N.; Gaz, A.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Pompili, A.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Voci, C.; Ben-Haim, E.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; David, P.; Del Buono, L.; de La Vaissière, Ch.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Malclès, J.; Ocariz, J.; Perez, A.; Prendki, J.; Gladney, L.; Biasini, M.; Covarelli, R.; Manoni, E.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Cenci, R.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Marchiori, G.; Mazur, M. A.; Morganti, M.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Biesiada, J.; Elmer, P.; Lau, Y. P.; Lu, C.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Baracchini, E.; Bellini, F.; Cavoto, G.; Del Re, D.; di Marco, E.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Jackson, P. D.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Morganti, S.; Piredda, G.; Polci, F.; Renga, F.; Voena, C.; Ebert, M.; Hartmann, T.; Schröder, H.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Castelli, G.; Franek, B.; Olaiya, E. O.; Roethel, W.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Escalier, M.; Gaidot, A.; Ganzhur, S. F.; de Monchenault, G. Hamel; Kozanecki, W.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Zito, M.; Chen, X. R.; Liu, H.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Allen, M. T.; Aston, D.; Bartoldus, R.; Bechtle, P.; Claus, R.; Coleman, J. P.; Convery, M. R.; Dingfelder, J. C.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R. C.; Glanzman, T.; Gowdy, S. J.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kaminski, J.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Li, S.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Marsiske, H.; Messner, R.; Muller, D. R.; Nelson, S.; O'Grady, C. P.; Ofte, I.; Perazzo, A.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Schwiening, J.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Sun, S.; Suzuki, K.; Swain, S. K.; Thompson, J. M.; Va'Vra, J.; Wagner, A. P.; Weaver, M.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Yarritu, A. K.; Yi, K.; Young, C. C.; Ziegler, V.; Burchat, P. R.; Edwards, A. J.; Majewski, S. A.; Miyashita, T. S.; Petersen, B. A.; Wilden, L.; Ahmed, S.; Alam, M. S.; Bula, R.; Ernst, J. A.; Pan, B.; Saeed, M. A.; Wappler, F. R.; Zain, S. B.; Spanier, S. M.; Wogsland, B. J.; Eckmann, R.; Ritchie, J. L.; Ruland, A. M.; Schilling, C. J.; Schwitters, R. F.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Ye, S.; Bianchi, F.; Gallo, F.; Gamba, D.; Pelliccioni, M.; Bomben, M.; Bosisio, L.; Cartaro, C.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Azzolini, V.; Lopez-March, N.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Milanes, D. A.; Oyanguren, A.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bhuyan, B.; Hamano, K.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Ilic, J.; Latham, T. E.; Mohanty, G. B.; Band, H. R.; Chen, X.; Dasu, S.; Flood, K. T.; Hollar, J. J.; Kutter, P. E.; Pan, Y.; Pierini, M.; Prepost, R.; Wu, S. L.; Neal, H.

    2008-06-01

    The τ-→ηπ-π+π-ντ decay with the η→γγ mode is studied using 384fb-1 of data collected by the BABAR detector. The branching fraction is measured to be (1.60±0.05±0.11)×10-4. It is found that τ-→f1(1285)π-ντ→ηπ-π+π-ντ is the dominant decay mode with a branching fraction of (1.11±0.06±0.05)×10-4. The first error on the branching fractions is statistical and the second systematic. Note that no particle identification algorithm is applied to the charged tracks to distinguish pions from kaons. In addition, a 90% confidence level upper limit on the branching fraction of the τ-→η'(958)π-ντ decay is measured to be 7.2×10-6. This last decay proceeds through a second-class current and is expected to be forbidden in the limit of isospin symmetry.

  8. Measurement of the tau- to eta pi-pi+pi-nu tau Branching Fraction and a Search for a Second-Class Current in the tau- to eta'(958)pi-nu tau Decay

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Boutigny, D.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, David Nathan; Button-Shafer, J.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /Frascati /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Karlsruhe U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /Pisa U. /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U.

    2008-03-24

    The {tau}{sup -} {yields} {eta}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} decay with the {eta} {yields} {gamma}{gamma} mode is studied using 384 fb{sup -1} of data collected by the BABAR detector. The branching fraction is measured to be (1.60 {+-} 0.05 {+-} 0.11) x 10{sup -4}. It is found that {tau}{sup -} {yields} f{sub 1}(1285){pi}{sup -} {nu}{sub {tau}} {yields} {eta}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} is the dominant decay mode with a branching fraction of (1.11 {+-} 0.06 {+-} 0.05) x 10{sup -4}. The first error on the branching fractions is statistical and the second systematic. In addition, a 90% confidence level upper limit on the branching fraction of the {tau}{sup -} {yields} {eta}{prime}(958){pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} decay is measured to be 7.2 x 10{sup -6}. This last decay proceeds through a second-class current and is expected to be forbidden in the limit of isospin symmetry.

  9. Search for flavour-changing neutral current top-quark decays to qZ in pp collision data collected with the ATLAS detector at √s = 8 TeV

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; et al

    2016-01-08

    A search for the flavour-changing neutral-current decay t → qZ is presented. Data collected by the ATLAS detector during 2012 from proton–proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider at a centre-of-mass energy of √s = 8 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb–1 , are analysed. Top-quark pair-production events with one top quark decaying through the t → qZ ( q=u,c ) channel and the other through the dominant Standard Model mode t → bW are considered as signal. Only the decays of the Z boson to charged leptons and leptonic W boson decays are used. Furthermore, nomore » evidence for a signal is found and an observed (expected) upper limit on the t → qZ branching ratio of 7×10–4 ( 8×10–4) is set at the 95 % confidence level« less

  10. Ringing wormholes

    SciTech Connect

    Konoplya, R.A.; Molina, C.

    2005-06-15

    We investigate the response of traversable wormholes to external perturbations through finding their characteristic frequencies and time-domain profiles. The considered solution describes traversable wormholes between the branes in the two brane Randall-Sundrum model and was previously found within Einstein gravity with a conformally coupled scalar field. The evolution of perturbations of a wormhole is similar to that of a black hole and represents damped oscillations (ringing) at intermediately late times, which are suppressed by power-law tails (proportional to t{sup -2} for monopole perturbations) at asymptotically late times.

  11. CROSS-DISCIPLINARY PHYSICS AND RELATED AREAS OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY: Simulation of Phase-Change Random Access Memory with Ring-Type Contactor for Low Reset Current by Finite Element Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Yue-Feng; Ling, Yun; Song, Zhi-Tang; Feng, Song-Lin

    2008-09-01

    A three-dimensional finite element models for phase change random access memory (PCRAM) is established to simulate thermal and electrical behaviours during RESET operation. The RESET behaviours of the conventional structure (CS) and the ring-type contact in bottom electrode (RIB) are compared with each other. The simulation results indicate that the RIB cell has advantages of high heat efficiency for melting phase change material in cell, reduction of contact area and lower RESET current with maintaining good resistance contrast. The RESET current decreases from 1.26mA to 1.2mA and the heat consumption in GST material during programming increases from 12% to 37% in RIB structure. Thus the RIB structure PCRAM cell is suitable for future device with high heat efficiency and smaller RESET current.

  12. Radiative Penguin and Leptonic Rare Decays at BABAR

    SciTech Connect

    Paoloni, E

    2004-07-06

    Recent BABAR results on rare B decays involving flavour-changing neutral currents or purely leptonic final states are presented. New measurements of the CP asymmetries in B {yields} K*{gamma}, B {yields} K*{sub 2}(1430){gamma}, and b {yields} s{gamma} are reported, as well as a new measurement of the B {yields} K*{gamma} branching fraction. Also reported are updated limits on B {yields} {mu}{nu} and recent measurements of B {yields} K(*){ell}{ell} and b {yields} s{ell}{ell}. The data sample comprises 123 {center_dot} 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring.

  13. Search for the flavor-changing neutral current decay B0s--> mu(+) mu(-) in pp Collisions at sqrt[s] = 1.96 TeV with the D0 detector.

    PubMed

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    2005-02-25

    We present the results of a search for the flavor-changing neutral current decay B(0)(s)--> mu(+) mu(-) using a data set with integrated luminosity of 240 pb(-1) of pp collisions at sqrt[s] = 1.96 TeV collected with the D0 detector in run II of the Fermilab Tevatron collider. We find the upper limit on the branching fraction to be B(B(0)(s)--> mu(+) mu(-)) < or= 5.0 x 10(-7) at the 95% C.L. assuming no contributions from the decay B(0)(d)--> mu(+) mu(-) in the signal region. This limit is the most stringent upper bound on the branching fraction B(0)(s)--> mu(+) mu(-) to date. PMID:15783803

  14. Reply to "Comment on 'A Self-Consistent Model of the Interacting Ring Current Ions and Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves, Initial Results: Waves and Precipitation Fluxes' and 'Self-Consistent Model of the Magnetospheric Ring Current and Propagating Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves: Waves in Multi-Ion Magnetosphere' by Khazanov et al. et al."

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Gamayunov, K. V.; Gallagher, D. L.; Kozyra, J. W.

    2007-01-01

    It is well-known that the effects of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves on ring current (RC) ion and radiation belt (RB) electron dynamics strongly depend on such particle/wave characteristics as the phase-space distribution function, frequency, wavenormal angle, wave energy, and the form of wave spectral energy density. The consequence is that accurate modeling of EMIC waves and RC particles requires robust inclusion of the interdependent dynamics of wave growth/damping, wave propagation, and[ particles. Such a self-consistent model is being progressively developed by Khazanov et al. [2002, 2006, 2007]. This model is based on a system of coupled kinetic equations for the RC and EMIC wave power spectral density along with the ray tracing equations. Thome and Home [2007] (hereafter referred to as TH2007) call the Khazanov et al. [2002, 2006] results into question in their Comment. The points in contention can be summarized as follows. TH2007 claim that: (1) "the important damping of waves by thermal heavy ions is completely ignored", and Landau damping during resonant interaction with thermal electrons is not included in our model; (2) EMIC wave damping due to RC O + is not included in our simulation; (3) non-linear processes limiting EMIC wave amplitude are not included in our model; (4) growth of the background fluctuations to a physically significantamplitude"must occur during a single transit of the unstable region" with subsequent damping below bi-ion latitudes,and consequently"the bounce averaged wave kinetic equation employed in the code contains a physically erroneous 'assumption". Our reply will address each of these points as well as other criticisms mentioned in the Comment. TH2007 are focused on two of our papers that are separated by four years. Significant progress in the self-consistent treatment of the RC-EMIC wave system has been achieved during those years. The paper by Khazanov et al. [2006] presents the latest version of our model, and in

  15. HESYRL storage ring vacuum system

    SciTech Connect

    Li, G.; Pang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Zhou, H.; Zhang, Z.; Jiang, D.; Xu, B.; Xu, S.

    1988-09-30

    The Storage Ring Vacuum System of the Synchrotron Radiation source project of HESYRL (Hefei Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory) in USTC, Hefei, Anhui, China, will be completed this year. Since the designed beam current of the 800 MeV electron storage ring is 300 mA, synchrotron radiation and hence high photon stimulated degassing will occur in the vacuum chamber. In order to get the stored beam lifetime of several hours, the pressure must be maintained at 10/sup -8/ approx.10/sup -9/ Torr. The gas desorption from synchrotron radiation and thermal outgas has been calculated. The UHV system of the storage ring and vacuum pretreatment methods are described in this paper.

  16. New concepts for damping rings

    SciTech Connect

    Raimondi, P.; Wolski, A.

    2002-05-30

    The requirements for very low emittance and short damping time in the damping rings of future linear colliders, naturally lead to very small beta functions and dispersion in the ring arcs. This makes it difficult to make chromatic correction while maintaining good dynamics. We have therefore developed a lattice with very simple arcs (designed to give the best product of emittance and damping time), and with separate chromatic correction in a dedicated section. The chromatic correction is achieved using a series of non-interleaved sextupole pairs. The performance of such a solution is comparable to that of current damping ring designs, while there are a number of potential advantages.

  17. Ion Rings for Magnetic Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Greenly, John, B.

    2005-07-31

    This Final Technical Report presents the results of the program, Ion Rings for Magnetic Fusion, which was carried out under Department of Energy funding during the period August, 1993 to January, 2005. The central objective of the program was to study the properties of field-reversed configurations formed by ion rings. In order to reach this objective, our experimental program, called the Field-reversed Ion Ring Experiment, FIREX, undertook to develop an efficient, economical technology for the production of field-reversed ion rings. A field-reversed configuration (FRC) in which the azimuthal (field-reversing) current is carried by ions with gyro-radius comparable to the magnetic separatrix radius is called a field-reversed ion ring. A background plasma is required for charge neutralization of the ring, and this plasma will be confined within the ring's closed magnetic flux. Ion rings have long been of interest as the basis of compact magnetic fusion reactors, as the basis for a high-power accelerator for an inertial fusion driver, and for other applications of high power ion beams or plasmas of high energy density. Specifically, the FIREX program was intended to address the longstanding question of the contribution of large-orbit ions to the observed stability of experimental FRCs to the MHD tilt mode. Typical experimental FRCs with s {approx} 2-4, where s is the ratio of separatrix radius to ion gyro-radius, have been stable to tilting, but desired values for a fusion reactor, s > 20, should be unstable. The FIREX ring would consist of a plasma with large s for the background ions, but with s {approx} 1 for the ring ions. By varying the proportions of these two populations, the minimum proportion of large-orbit ions necessary for stability could be determined. The incorporation of large-orbit ions, perhaps by neutral-beam injection, into an FRC has been advanced for the purpose of stabilizing, heating, controlling angular momentum, and aiding the formation of a

  18. Beauty meson decays to charmonium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ershov, Alexey Valerievich

    2001-10-01

    We study decays of beauty (B) mesons into the final states containing charmonium mesons. The data were collected by the CLEO experiment at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring from 1990 to 1999. First, we describe a technique that significantly improves the reconstruction efficiency for decays of J/ y and y (2S) mesons into a pair of leptons. This reconstruction method is used in all the analyses presented in this dissertation. Then we present a study of B decays to the χc 1 and χc2 charmonium states and compare our results with the predictions of different theoretical models of charmonium production. After that we report the first observation of the decay B --> J/ y φK, which is the first B meson decay requiring a creation of an additional ss¯ quark pair. Then we measure the B0 and B+ meson masses from B0 --> y (') K0S and B+ --> y (') K+ decays. The method employed eliminates the dominant systematic uncertainty associated with the previous B meson mass measurements at the e+e- colliders and results in a significant improvement in precision. After that we present a study of three B0 decay modes useful for time-dependent CP asymmetry measurements. In this study we reconstruct B0 --> J/ y K0S , B0 --> χc 1 K0S , and B0 --> J/ y π0 decays. The latter two decay modes are observed for the first time. We describe a K0S --> π0π0 detection technique and its application to the reconstruction of the decay B 0 --> J/ y K0S . Then we present a sensitivity study for the measurement of the mixing-induced CP violation in the neutral B meson system (parameter sin 2β) at CLEO using the method that requires a measurement of the decay time of only one meson in a B0overline B0 pair. Finally, we search for direct CP violation in decays B+/- --> J/ y K+/- and B +/- --> y (2S) K+/- . The results of this search are consistent with the Standard Model expectations and provide the first experimental test of the assumption that direct CP violation is negligible in B --> y (') K decays.

  19. Improved Limits on $B^{0}$ Decays to Invisible $(+gamma)$ Final States

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, David Nathan; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; McKenna, J.A.; So, R.Y.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V.E.; /more authors..

    2013-11-01

    We establish improved upper limits on branching fractions for B{sup 0} decays to final states where the decay products are purely invisible (i.e., no observable final state particles) and for final states where the only visible product is a photon. Within the Standard Model, these decays have branching fractions that are below the current experimental sensitivity, but various models of physics beyond the Standard Model predict significant contributions for these channels. Using 471 million B{bar B} pairs collected at the {Upsilon} (4S) resonance by the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, we establish upper limits at the 90% confidence level of 2.4 x 10{sup -5} for the branching fraction of B{sup 0} {yields} invisible and 1.7 x 10{sup -5} for the branching fraction of B{sup 0} {yields} invisible + {gamma}.

  20. Study of High-multiplicity 3-prong and 5-prong Tau Decays at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J.P

    2012-06-01

    We present measurements of the branching fractions of 3-prong and 5-prong {tau} decay modes using a sample of 430 million {tau} lepton pairs, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 468 fb{sup -1}, collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric energy e{sup +}e{sup -} storage rings. The {tau}{sup -} {yields} (3{pi}){sup -} {eta}{nu}{sub {tau}}, {tau}{sup -} {yields} (3{pi}){sup -} {yields} {omega}{nu}{sub {tau}} and {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -} f{sub 1}(1285){nu}{sub {tau}} branching fractions are presented as well as a new limit on the branching fraction of the isospin-forbidden, second-class current {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -} {eta}{prime}(958){nu}{sub {tau}} decay. We find no evidence for charged kaons in these decay modes and place the first upper limits on their branching fractions.

  1. The origin and evolution of the Uranian dust rings

    SciTech Connect

    Colwell, J.E.

    1989-01-01

    The numerous dust bands discovered by Voyager 2 at Uranus have lifetimes on the order of 100 years against orbital decay by exospheric drag. A system of low optical depth rings of 10 meter to 1 km sized bodies (moonlet belts) are proposed as continuing sources of the dust particles. The ring system is modeled as a Markov Chain consisting of states through which dust particle evolve with time. Physical processes included in the model are orbit decay by exospheric drag and Poynting-Robertson light drag; destruction of grains by meteoroid impact; transport of dust through the classical rings and moonlet belts; creation of dust particles from meteoroid impacts onto rings, moons, and moonlet belts; liberation of regolith material through ring and moonlet belt particle collisions; and sweepup of ejecta by ring and moonlet belt particles. The optical depth profiles for the main rings from Voyager 2 Photopolarimeter Subsystem (PPS) occultation observation are used in modeling the transport of dust through the rings. Simulations of the Uranus ring system show that this model reproduces the observed characteristics of the Uranus dust rings. The moonlet belt model is applied to the rings of Jupiter, Saturn, and Neptune, and is capable of reproducing some of the observed characteristics of those ring systems. The moonlet belt objects fit on a collisionally derived power-law size distribution with the other components of the ring moon systems. Since the rings and moonlet belts have lifetimes due to viscous spreading less than the age of the solar system, a net model of planetary rings emerges in which the rings are continually created from the disruption of small satellites by meteoroid bombardment.

  2. Ring torque on Janus and the melting of Enceladus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lissauer, J. J.; Peale, S. J.; Cuzzi, J. N.

    1984-05-01

    Voyager 2 images show parts of Enceladus' surface to be very smooth, lacking craters down to the resolution limit of 4 km. This absence of craters indicates geologically recent resurfacing, probably due to internal melting. However, calculations of current heating mechanisms, including radioactive decay and tidal heating due to Enceladus' resonance with Dione, yield heating rates too small to cause melting. The orbital mean motion of Janus (1980S1) is slightly less than twice that of Enceladus and, according to theoretical calculations, is currently decreasing as Janus' orbit evolves outward due to resonant torques from Saturn's ring. The authors discuss a mechanism which, although requiring a priori unlikely events, appear to have the potential of easing, if not solving, several of these problems simultaneously.

  3. Search for the flavor changing neutral current B-meson decays B^+arrow μ^+ μ^- K^+ and B^0arrow μ^+ μ^-K^*0 at CDF.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdmann, Wolfram; Speer, Thomas

    1997-04-01

    We present a search for rare B-meson decays B^+arrow μ^+ μ^- K^+ and B^0arrow μ^+ μ^-K^*0 using data from pbarp collisions at √s = 1.8 TeV recorded with CDF during the 1994 to 95 running period. We set upper limits on BR(B^+arrow μ^+ μ^- K^+) and BR(B^0arrow μ^+ μ^-K^*0). ^ Supported by U.S. DOE DE-AC02-76CH03000. ^*We thank the Fermilab staff and the technical staffs of the participating institutions for their vital contributions. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy and National Science Foundation; the Italian Instituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare; the Ministry of Education, Science and Culture of Japan; the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada; the National Science Council of the Republic of China; and the A. P. Sloan Foundation.

  4. Asymmetric dipolar ring

    DOEpatents

    Prosandeev, Sergey A.; Ponomareva, Inna V.; Kornev, Igor A.; Bellaiche, Laurent M.

    2010-11-16

    A device having a dipolar ring surrounding an interior region that is disposed asymmetrically on the ring. The dipolar ring generates a toroidal moment switchable between at least two stable states by a homogeneous field applied to the dipolar ring in the plane of the ring. The ring may be made of ferroelectric or magnetic material. In the former case, the homogeneous field is an electric field and in the latter case, the homogeneous field is a magnetic field.

  5. 20 - 50 GeV muon storage rings for a neutrino factory

    SciTech Connect

    Rees, G.H.; Johnstone, C.; Meot, F.; /DAPNIA, Saclay

    2006-07-01

    Muon decay rings are under study as part of an International Scoping Study (ISS) for a future Neutrino Factory. Both isosceles triangle- and racetrack-shaped rings are being considered for a 20 GeV muon energy, but with upgrade potentials of 40 or 50 GeV. Both rings are designed with long straights to optimize directional muon decay. The neutrinos from muon decay pass to one or two distant detectors; the racetrack ring has one very long production straight aligned with one detector while the triangular ring has two straights which can be aligned with two detectors. Decay ring specifications and lattice studies are the primary topic of this paper. Injection, collimation, and the RF system are covered in a second contribution to these proceedings.

  6. Seal Out Tooth Decay

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topics > Tooth Decay (Caries) > Seal Out Tooth Decay Seal Out Tooth Decay Main Content What are dental ... back teeth decay so easily? Who should get seal​ants? Should sealants be put on baby teeth? ...

  7. Saturn's Spectacular Ring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Saturn's beautiful rings have fascinated astronomers since they were first observed by Galileo in 1610. The main rings consist of solid particles mostly in the 1 cm - 10 m range, composed primarily of water ice. The ring disk is exceptionally thin - the typical local thickness of the bright rings is tens of meters, whereas the diameter of the main rings is 250,000 km! The main rings exhibit substantial radial variations "ringlets", many of which are actively maintained via gravitational perturbations from Saturn's moons. Exterior to the main rings lie tenuous dust rings, which have little mass but occupy a very large volume of space. This seminar will emphasize the physics of ring-moon interactions, recent advances in our understanding of various aspects of the rings obtained from observations taken during 1995 when the rings appeared edge-on to the Earth and then to the Sun, and observations in subsequent years from HST.

  8. Beam dynamics in an ultra-low energy storage rings (review of existing facilities and feasibility studies for future experiments)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papash, A. I.; Smirnov, A. V.; Welsch, C. P.

    2014-03-01

    Storage rings operating at ultra-low energies and in particular electrostatic storage rings have proven to be invaluable tools for atomic and molecular physics. Due to the mass independence of the electrostatic rigidity, these machines are able to store a wide range of different particles, from light ions to heavy singly charged bio-molecules. However, earlier measurements showed strong limitations on beam intensity, fast decay of ion current, reduced life time etc. The nature of these effects was not fully understood. Also a large variety of experiments in future generation ultra-low energy storage and decelerator facilities including in-ring collision studies with a reaction microscope require a comprehensive investigation of the physical processes involved into the operation of such rings. In this paper, we present review of non-linear and long term beam dynamics studies on example of the ELISA, AD Recycler, TSR and USR rings using the computer codes BETACOOL, OPERA-3D and MAD-X. The results from simulations were benchmarked against experimental data of beam losses in the ELISA storage ring. We showed that decay of beam intensity in ultra-low energy rings is mainly caused by ion losses on ring aperture due to multiple scattering on residual gas. Beam is lost on ring aperture due to small ring acceptance. Rate of beam losses increases at high intensities because of the intra-beam scattering effect adds to vacuum losses. Detailed investigations into the ion kinetics under consideration of the effects from electron cooling and multiple scattering of the beam on a supersonic gas jet target have been carried out as well. The life time, equilibrium momentum spread and equilibrium lateral spread during collisions with this internal gas jet target were estimated. In addition, the results from experiments at the TSR ring, where low intensity beam of CF+ ions at 93 keV/u has been shrunk to extremely small dimensions have been reproduced. Based on these simulations

  9. Top decays in extended models

    SciTech Connect

    Gaitan, R.; Miranda, O. G.; Cabral-Rosetti, L. G.

    2009-04-20

    Top quark decays are interesting as a mean to test the Standard Model (SM) predictions. The Cabbibo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM)-suppressed process t{yields}cWW, and the rare decays t{yields}cZ, t{yields}H{sup 0}+c, and t{yields}c{gamma} an excellent window to probe the predictions of theories beyond the SM. We evaluate the flavor changing neutral currents (FCNC) decay t{yields}H{sup 0}+c in the context of Alternative Left-Right symmetric Models (ALRM) with extra isosinglet heavy fermions; the FCNC decays may place at tree level and are only supressed by the mixing between ordinary top and charm quarks. We also comment on the decay process t{yields}c+{gamma}, which involves radiative corrections.

  10. Simulation of current-filament dynamics and relaxation in the Pegasus ST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Bryan, J. B.; Sovinec, C. R.

    2012-10-01

    Nonlinear numerical computation is used to investigate the relaxation of non-axisymmetric current-channels from washer-gun plasma sources into ``tokamak-like'' plasmas in the Pegasus ST. Resistive MHD simulations with the NIMROD code utilize ohmic heating, temperature-dependent resistivity, and anisotropic, temperature-dependent thermal conduction to reproduce critical transport effects. With sufficient injected current, adjacent passes of the current channel merge periodically, releasing axisymmetric current rings from the driven channel. The current rings provide a new phenomenological understanding for filament relaxation in Pegasus [O'Bryan, Sovinec, Bird. Phys. Plas. submitted]. After large-scale poloidal-field reversal, a hollow current profile and significant poloidal flux amplification accumulate over many reconnection cycles. When the current injection ceases, closed flux surfaces form quickly. Better electron thermal confinement with a two-temperature model produces a slower rate of decay for plasma current and internal energy than the single-temperature MHD model.

  11. Radioactive decays of highly-charged ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, B. S.; Najafi, M. A.; Atanasov, D. R.; Blaum, K.; Bosch, F.; Brandau, C.; Chen, X. C.; Dillmann, I.; Dimopoulou, Ch.; Faestermann, Th.; Geissel, H.; Gernhäuser, R.; Hillenbrand, P.-M.; Kovalenko, O.; Kozhuharov, C.; Litvinov, S. A.; Litvinov, Yu. A.; Maier, L.; Nolden, F.; Piotrowski, J.; Sanjari, M. S.; Scheidenberger, C.; Spillmann, U.; Steck, M.; Stöhlker, Th.; Trageser, Ch.; Tu, X. L.; Weick, H.; Winckler, N.; Xu, H. S.; Yamaguchi, T.; Yan, X. L.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhou, X. H.

    2015-05-01

    Access to stored and cooled highly-charged radionuclides offers unprecedented opportunities to perform high-precision investigations of their decays. Since the few-electron ions, e.g. hydrogen- or helium-like ions, are quantum mechanical systems with clear electronic ground state configurations, the decay studies of such ions are performed under well-defined conditions and allow for addressing fundamental aspects of the decay process. Presented here is a compact review of the relevant experiments conducted at the Experimental Storage Ring ESR of GSI. A particular emphasis is given to the investigations of the two-body beta decay, namely the bound-state β-decay and its time-mirrored counterpart, orbital electron-capture.

  12. Suppressed Charmed B Decay

    SciTech Connect

    Snoek, Hella Leonie

    2009-06-02

    This thesis describes the measurement of the branching fractions of the suppressed charmed B0 → D*- a0+ decays and the non-resonant B0 → D*- ηπ+ decays in approximately 230 million Υ(4S) → B$\\bar{B}$ events. The data have been collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center in California. Theoretical predictions of the branching fraction of the B0 → D*- a{sub 0}+ decays show large QCD model dependent uncertainties. Non-factorizing terms, in the naive factorization model, that can be calculated by QCD factorizing models have a large impact on the branching fraction of these decay modes. The predictions of the branching fractions are of the order of 10-6. The measurement of the branching fraction gives more insight into the theoretical models. In general a better understanding of QCD models will be necessary to conduct weak interaction physics at the next level. The presence of CP violation in electroweak interactions allows the differentiation between matter and antimatter in the laws of physics. In the Standard Model, CP violation is incorporated in the CKM matrix that describes the weak interaction between quarks. Relations amongst the CKM matrix elements are used to present the two relevant parameters as the apex of a triangle (Unitarity Triangle) in a complex plane. The over-constraining of the CKM triangle by experimental measurements is an important test of the Standard Model. At this moment no stringent direct measurements of the CKM angle γ, one of the interior angles of the Unitarity Triangle, are available. The measurement of the angle γ can be performed using the decays of neutral B mesons. The B0 → D*- a0+ decay is sensitive to the angle γ and, in comparison to the current decays that are being employed, could significantly

  13. STUDIES OF RADIATIVE PENGUIN DECAYS AT BABAR

    SciTech Connect

    Jessop, C

    2003-10-27

    The electromagnetic radiative ''penguin'' decays b {yields} s{gamma}, b {yields} d{gamma} are sensitive to physics beyond the Standard Model. The authors present recent studies made with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring.

  14. Stirling engine piston ring

    DOEpatents

    Howarth, Roy B.

    1983-01-01

    A piston ring design for a Stirling engine wherein the contact pressure between the piston and the cylinder is maintained at a uniform level, independent of engine conditions through a balancing of the pressure exerted upon the ring's surface and thereby allowing the contact pressure on the ring to be predetermined through the use of a preloaded expander ring.

  15. Actin Rings of Power.

    PubMed

    Schwayer, Cornelia; Sikora, Mateusz; Slováková, Jana; Kardos, Roland; Heisenberg, Carl-Philipp

    2016-06-20

    Circular or ring-like actin structures play important roles in various developmental and physiological processes. Commonly, these rings are composed of actin filaments and myosin motors (actomyosin) that, upon activation, trigger ring constriction. Actomyosin ring constriction, in turn, has been implicated in key cellular processes ranging from cytokinesis to wound closure. Non-constricting actin ring-like structures also form at cell-cell contacts, where they exert a stabilizing function. Here, we review recent studies on the formation and function of actin ring-like structures in various morphogenetic processes, shedding light on how those different rings have been adapted to fulfill their specific roles. PMID:27326928

  16. New Dust Belts of Uranus: One Ring, Two Ring, Red Ring, Blue Ring

    SciTech Connect

    de Pater, I; Hammel, H B; Gibbard, S G; Showalter, M R

    2006-02-02

    We compare near-infrared observations of the recently discovered outer rings of Uranus with HST results. We find that the inner ring, R/2003 U 2, is red, whereas the outer ring, R/2003 U 1, is very blue. Blue is an unusual color for rings; Saturn's enigmatic E ring is the only other known example. By analogy to the E ring, R/2003 U 1 is probably produced via impacts into the embedded moon Mab, which apparently orbits at a location where non-gravitational perturbations favor the survival and spreading of sub-micron sized dust. R/2003 U 2 more closely resembles Saturn's G ring.

  17. Voyager Photometry of Saturn's A Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dones, Luke; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.; Showalter, Mark R.

    1993-01-01

    Saturn's A Ring samples a wide range of dynamical environments, from the relatively unperturbed, optically thick inner region to the outer part of the ring, which contains numerous density waves. We analyze Voyager images of the A Ring to determine how the reflectivity of different radial regions varies with lighting and viewing geometry. We model our data with a classical radiative transfer code that includes the illumination of the rings by the Sun and Saturn. The particles in the inner and mid-A Ring have Bond albedos near 0.5 and are more backscattering than satellites of comparable albedo. The region outside the Encke Gap becomes progressively less backscattering with increasing radius. Particle properties change abruptly outside the Keeler Gap; particles here have an albedo near 0.6 and a Lambert-like phase function. In contrast with previous suggestions, the abundance of free, submicrometer "dust" is small throughout the entire A Ring; this conclusion holds even in the outermost A Ring, which is strongly perturbed by density waves. Models derived from low-phase data, assuming only macroscopic particles, correctly predict the highphase reflectivity of the outer A Ring and individual strong density waves in the mid-A Ring. However, the inner and mid-A Ring are typically darker at high phase by a factor of two than our models predict. This discrepancy may be due to the reduced multiple scattering from a layer in which the particles are more closely packed. We have also studied the quadrupole azimuthal brightness asymmetry of the A Ring. The asymmetry has a full amplitude of 35% in the mid-A Ring in low-phase Voyager 2 images. We present results on its behavior and possible implications for the structure of the rings. Finally, we compare our results with studies using other data sets to synthesize our current understanding of the nature of the A Ring.

  18. Anatomy of decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bel, Lennaert; De Bruyn, Kristof; Fleischer, Robert; Mulder, Mick; Tuning, Niels

    2015-07-01

    The decays B {/d 0} → D {/d -} D {/d +} and B {/s 0} → D {/s -} D {/s +} probe the CP-violating mixing phases ϕ d and ϕ s , respectively. The theoretical uncertainty of the corresponding determinations is limited by contributions from penguin topologies, which can be included with the help of the U-spin symmetry of the strong interaction. We analyse the currently available data for B {/d, s 0} → D {/d, s -} D {/d, s +} decays and those with similar dynamics to constrain the involved non-perturbative parameters. Using further information from semileptonic B {/d 0} → D {/d -} ℓ + ν ℓ decays, we perform a test of the factorisation approximation and take non-factorisable SU(3)-breaking corrections into account. The branching ratios of the B {/d 0} → D {/d -} D {/d +}, B {/s 0} → D {/s -} D {/d +} and B {/s 0} → D {/s -} D {/s +}, B {/d 0} → D {/d -} D {/s +} decays show an interesting pattern which can be accommodated through significantly enhanced exchange and penguin annihilation topologies. This feature is also supported by data for the B {/s 0} → D {/d -} D {/d +} channel. Moreover, there are indications of potentially enhanced penguin contributions in the B {/d 0} → D {/d -} D {/d +} and B {/s 0} → D {/s -} D {/s +} decays, which would make it mandatory to control these effects in the future measurements of ϕ d and ϕ s . We discuss scenarios for high-precision measurements in the era of Belle II and the LHCb upgrade.

  19. Collective effects in isochronous storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, A.W.; Kim, K.-J.

    1996-01-01

    We studied the collective instabilities in isochronous storage rings using a linac-type analysis. Simple criteria for avoiding the longitudinal and transverse instabilities are developed by employing a two-particle model. Numerical examples show that these conditions do not impose serious performance restrictions for two of the currently proposed isochronous storage rings.

  20. Optimizing Thomson's jumping ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tjossem, Paul J. H.; Brost, Elizabeth C.

    2011-04-01

    The height to which rings will jump in a Thomson jumping ring apparatus is the central question posed by this popular lecture demonstration. We develop a simple time-averaged inductive-phase-lag model for the dependence of the jump height on the ring material, its mass, and temperature and apply it to measurements of the jump height for a set of rings made by slicing copper and aluminum alloy pipe into varying lengths. The data confirm a peak jump height that grows, narrows, and shifts to smaller optimal mass when the rings are cooled to 77 K. The model explains the ratio of the cooled/warm jump heights for a given ring, the reduction in optimal mass as the ring is cooled, and the shape of the mass resonance. The ring that jumps the highest is found to have a characteristic resistance equal to the inductive reactance of the set of rings.

  1. Magnet designs for muon collider ring and interactions regions

    SciTech Connect

    Zlobin, A.V.; Alexahin, Y.I.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Mokhov, N.V.; /Fermilab

    2010-05-01

    Conceptual designs of superconducting magnets for the storage ring of a Muon Collider with a 1.5 TeV c.o.m. energy and an average luminosity of 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} are presented. All magnets are based on Nb{sub 3}Sn superconductor and designed to provide an adequate operating field/field gradient in the aperture with the critical current margin required for reliable magnet operation in the machine. Magnet cross-sections were optimized to achieve the accelerator field quality in the magnet aperture occupied with beams. The magnets and corresponding protective measures are designed to handle about 0.5 kW/m of dynamic heat load from the muon beam decays. Magnet parameters are reported and compared with the requirements.

  2. The Ring Imaging Cherenkov detectors of DELPHI

    SciTech Connect

    Adam, W.; Albrecht, E.; Allen, D.

    1995-08-01

    A Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detector system has been built and is now in full operation within the DELPHI experiment. Large data samples of Z{sup 0} decays are being collected with good resolution on the observed Cherenkov angles. Several studies of Z{sup 0} decays using the RICH have already been performed on limited samples. Disturbance of the detector operation caused by shrinkage of polymeric construction materials and by migration of radiator substance is reported. These effects have been counteracted and do not endanger the quality of the data.

  3. Jupiter's Main Ring/Ring Halo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A mosaic of four images taken through the clear filter (610 nanometers) of the solid state imaging (CCD) system aboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft on November 8, 1996, at a resolution of approximately 46 kilometers (28.5 miles) per picture element (pixel) along Jupiter's rings. Because the spacecraft was only about 0.5 degrees above the ring plane, the image is highly foreshortened in the vertical direction. The images were obtained when Galileo was in Jupiter's shadow, peering back toward the Sun; the ring was approximately 2.3 million kilometers (1.4 million miles) away. The arc on the far right of the image is produced when sunlight is scattered by small particles comprising Jupiter's upper atmospheric haze. The ring also efficiently scatters light, indicating that much of its brightness is due to particles that are microns or less in diameter. Such small particles are believed to have human-scale lifetimes, i.e., very brief compared to the solar system's age.

    Jupiter's ring system is composed of three parts - - a flat main ring, a lenticular halo interior to the main ring, and the gossamer ring, outside the main ring. The near and far arms of Jupiter's main ring extend horizontally across the mosaic, joining together at the ring's ansa, on the figure's far left side. The near arm of the ring appears to be abruptly truncated close to the planet, at the point where it passes into Jupiter's shadow. Some radial structure is barely visible across the ring's ansa (top image). A faint mist of particles can be seen above and below the main rings. This vertically extended 'halo' is unusual in planetary rings, and is probably caused by electromagnetic forces pushing the smallest grains out of the ring plane. Because of shadowing, the halo is not visible close to Jupiter in the lower right part of the mosaic. To accentuate faint features in the bottom image of the ring halo, different brightnesses are shown through color. Brightest features are white or yellow and the

  4. Measurements of charged current lepton universality and |Vus| using tau lepton decays to e- ν(e) ν(τ), μ- ν(μ) ν(τ), π- ν(τ), and K- ν(τ).

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prencipe, E; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Garra Tico, J; Grauges, E; Martinelli, M; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Lynch, G; Osipenkov, I L; Tackmann, K; Tanabe, T; Hawkes, C M; Soni, N; Watson, A T; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Asgeirsson, D J; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Barrett, M; Khan, A; Randle-Conde, A; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Atmacan, H; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Vitug, G M; Yasin, Z; Sharma, V; Campagnari, C; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Martinez, A J; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Wang, L; Winstrom, L O; Cheng, C H; Doll, D A; Echenard, B; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Ongmongkolkul, P; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Hirschauer, J F; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Karbach, T M; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Kobel, M J; Nogowski, R; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Bernard, D; Latour, E; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Playfer, S; Watson, J E; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Fioravanti, E; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Munerato, M; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Santoro, V; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Contri, R; Guido, E; Lo Vetere, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Adametz, A; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bernlochner, F U; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Lueck, T; Volk, A; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Arnaud, N; Béquilleux, J; D'Orazio, A; Davier, M; Derkach, D; Firmino da Costa, J; Grosdidier, G; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Malaescu, B; Pruvot, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Burke, J P; Chavez, C A; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Clarke, C K; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Sigamani, M; Cowan, G; Paramesvaran, S; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Gradl, W; Hafner, A; Alwyn, K E; Bailey, D; Barlow, R J; Jackson, G; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Dallapiccola, C; Salvati, E; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Henderson, S W; Sciolla, G; Spitznagel, M; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Schram, M; Biassoni, P; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Stracka, S; Cremaldi, L; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sonnek, P; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Simard, M; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, G; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; LoSecco, J M; Wang, W F; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Sekula, S J; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Castelli, G; Gagliardi, N; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Del Amo Sanchez, P; Ben-Haim, E; Bonneaud, G R; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Marchiori, G; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Prendki, J; Sitt, S; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Lopes Pegna, D; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Anulli, F; Baracchini, E; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Gioi, L Li; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Esteve, L; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Benitez, J F; Cenci, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Franco Sevilla, M; Gabareen, A M; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kaminski, J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Lindquist, B; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Macfarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; Neal, H; Nelson, S; O'Grady, C P; Ofte, I; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; West, C A; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Ziegler, V; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Bellis, M; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Miyashita, T S; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Zain, S B; Soffer, A; Spanier, S M; Wogsland, B J; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Wray, B C; Drummond, B W; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Bianchi, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Milanes, D A; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Choi, H H F; Hamano, K; King, G J; Kowalewski, R; Lewczuk, M J; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Gershon, T J; Harrison, P F; Ilic, J; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Puccio, E M T; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Vuosalo, C O; Wu, S L

    2010-07-30

    Using 467  fb(-1) of e+e- annihilation data collected with the BABAR detector, we measure (B(τ- → μ- ν(μ) ν(τ)))/(B(τ- → e- ν(e) ν(τ))) =(0.9796±0.0016±0.0036), (B(τ- → π- ν(τ)))/(B(τ- → e- ν(e) ν(τ))) = (0.5945±0.0014±0.0061), and (B(τ- → K- ν(τ)))/(B(τ- → e- ν(e) ν(τ))) = (0.03882±0.00032±0.00057), where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. From these precision τ measurements, we test the standard model assumption of μ-e and τ-μ charge current lepton universality and provide determinations of |Vus| experimentally independent of the decay of a kaon. PMID:20867905

  5. On semi ring bornologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imran, A. N.; Rakhimov, I. S.; Husain, Sh. K. Said

    2016-06-01

    Our main focus in this work is to introduce new structure bornological semi rings. This generalizes the theory of algebraic semi rings from the algebraic setting to the framework of bornological sets. We give basic properties for this new structure. As well as, We study the fundamental construction of bornological semi ring as product, inductive limits and projective limits and their extensions on bornological semi ring. Additionally, we introduce the category of bornological semi rings and study product and pullback (fiber product) in the category of bornological semi rings.

  6. Tau decays into K* mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, H.; Hamacher, T.; Hofmann, R. P.; Kirchhoff, T.; Mankel, R.; Nau, A.; Nowak, S.; Schröder, H.; Schulz, H. D.; Walter, M.; Wurth, R.; Hast, C.; Kapitza, H.; Kolanoski, H.; Kosche, A.; Lange, A.; Lindner, A.; Schieber, M.; Siegmund, T.; Spaan, B.; Thurn, H.; Töpfer, D.; Wegener, D.; Eckstein, P.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Waldi, R.; Reim, K.; Wegener, H.; Eckmann, R.; Kuipers, H.; Mai, O.; Mundt, R.; Oest, T.; Reiner, R.; Schmidt-Parzefall, W.; Stiewe, J.; Werner, S.; Ehret, K.; Hofmann, W.; Hüpper, A.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Spengler, J.; Krieger, P.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Saull, P. R. B.; Tzamariudaki, K.; van de Water, R. G.; Yoon, T.-S.; Frankl, C.; Reßing, D.; Schmidtler, M.; Schneider, M.; Weseler, S.; Kernel, G.; Križan, P.; Križnič, E.; Podobnik, T.; Živko, T.; Balagura, V.; Belyaev, I.; Schechelnitsky, S.; Danilov, M.; Doutskoy, A.; Gershtein, Yu.; Golutvin, A.; Korolko, I.; Kostina, G.; Litvintsev, D.; Lubimov, V.; Pakhlov, P.; Semenov, S.; Snizhko, A.; Tichomirov, I.; Zaitsev, Yu.

    1995-06-01

    Using the ARGUS detector at the storage ring DORIS II we have measured τ decays into three charged mesons containing K * mesons. Exploiting the good particle identification capabilities of the detector we have determined the following branching ratios:Brleft( {tau ^ - to overline {K^{*0} } π ^ - v_tau } right) = left( {0.25 ± 0.10 ± 0.05} right)% , B r (τ-→ K *0 K - v τ)= (0.20±0.05±0.04)%, and B r (τ-→ K *- X 0 v τ) =(1.15±0.15-0.18 +0.13)%.

  7. Saturn’s ring temperatures at equinox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spilker, Linda; Ferrari, Cecile; Morishima, Ryuji

    2013-09-01

    Modeling the thermal emission of Saturn’s rings is challenging due to the numerous heating sources as well as the structural properties of the disk and of the particles that are closely related. At equinox, however, rings are externally heated by Saturn alone and the problem is somewhat simplified. We test the abilities of our current models to reproduce the temperatures observed with the Cassini-CIRS instrument around equinox in August 2009. A simple semi-analytic model with the mutual shadowing effect can mostly explain the radial profile of the equinox ring temperatures, except the model predicts lower temperatures than those observed for the A ring. The temperature variation at a given saturnocentric radius is primarily caused by observational geometry variations relative to Saturn. The observed temperature increases with decreasing Saturn-ring-observer angle. In addition, we found evidence that the leading hemispheres of particles are warmer than the trailing hemispheres at least for the C ring and probably for the A and B rings as well. This is explained if some fraction of particles has spin rates lower than the synchronous rotation rate as predicted by N-body simulations. The spin model for a monolayer ring (Ferrari, C., Leyrat, C. [2006]. Astron. Astrophys. 447, 745-760) can fit the temperature variations with spacecraft longitude observed in the C ring with currently known thermal properties and a mixing of slow and fast rotators. The multilayer model (Morishima, R., Salo, H., Ohtsuki, K. [2009]. Icarus 201, 634-654) can reproduce the temperatures of the B and C rings but gives A ring temperatures that are significantly lower than those observed as does the simple semi-analytic model. More advanced models which take into account self-gravity wakes may explain the A ring temperature behavior.

  8. Saturn’s ring temperatures at equinox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spilker, Linda J.; Ferrari, C.; Morishima, R.

    2013-10-01

    Modeling the thermal emission of Saturn's rings is challenging due to the numerous heating sources as well as the structural properties of the disk and of the particles that are closely related. At equinox, however, the main rings are externally heated by Saturn alone and the problem is somewhat simplified. We test the abilities of our current models to reproduce the temperatures observed with the Cassini CIRS instrument around equinox in August 2009. A simple semi-analytic model which includes mutual shadowing effects can mostly explain the radial profile of the equinox ring temperatures, except the model predicts lower temperatures than those observed for the A ring. The temperature variation at a given saturnocentric radius is primarily caused by observational geometry variations relative to Saturn. The observed temperature increases with decreasing Saturn-ring-observer angle. In addition, we found evidence that the leading hemispheres of particles are warmer than the trailing hemispheres at least for the C ring and probably for the A and B rings as well. This is explained if some fraction of particles has spin rates lower than the synchronous rotation rate as predicted by N-body simulations. The spin model for a monolayer ring (Ferrari, C., Leyrat, C., 2006, Astron. Astrophys. 447, 745-760) can fit the temperature variations with spacecraft longitude observed in the C ring with currently known thermal properties and a mixing of slow and fast rotators. The multilayer model (Morishima, R., Salo, H., Ohtsuki, K., 2009, Icarus 201, 634-654) can reproduce the temperatures of the B and C rings but gives A ring temperatures that are significantly lower than those observed as does the simple semi-analytic model. More advanced models which take into account self-gravity wakes may explain the A ring temperature behavior.

  9. Intrinsic structure in Saturn's rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albers, N.

    2015-10-01

    Saturn's rings are the most prominent in our Solar system and one example of granular matter in space. Dominated by tides and inelastic collisions the system is highly flattened being almost 300000km wide while only tens of meters thick. Individual particles are composed of primarily water ice and range from microns to few tens of meters in size. Apparent patterns comprise ringlets, gaps, kinematic wakes, propellers, bending waves, and the winding spiral arms of density waves. These large-scale structures are perturbations foremost created by external as well as embedded moons. Observations made by the Cassini spacecraft currently in orbit around Saturn show these structures in unprecedented detail. But high-resolution measurements reveal the presence of small-scale structures throughout the system. These include self-gravity wakes (50-100m), overstable waves (100-300m), subkm structure at the A and B ring edges, "straw" and "ropy" structures (1-3km), and the C ring "ghosts". Most of these had not been anticipated and are found in perturbed regions, driven by resonances with external moons, where the system undergoes periodic phases of compression and relaxation that correlate with the presence of structure. High velocity dispersion and the presence of large clumps imply structure formation on time scales as short as one orbit (about 10 hours). The presence of these intrinsic structures is seemingly the response to varying local conditions such as internal density, optical depth, underlying particle size distribution, granular temperature, and distance from the central planet. Their abundance provides evidence for an active and dynamic ring system where aggregation and fragmentation are ongoing on orbital timescales. Thus a kinetic description of the rings may be more appropriate than the fluid one. I will present Cassini Ultraviolet Spectrometer (UVIS) High Speed Photometer (HSP) occultations, Voyager 1 and 2 Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS), and high

  10. Remote Sensing of Dipole Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooker, Stanford B.; Mied, Richard P.; Brown, James W.; Kirwan, A. D., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    Historical satellite-derived sea surface temperature (SST) data are reanalyzed with a zebra color palette and a thermal separatrix method. The new results from this reanalysis are as follows: (a) Thirteen observational sequences of six rings from the Gulf Stream and the Brazil Current, which have historically been interpreted as solitary vortices or monopoles are shown to have a dipolar character; (b) some of these dipole rings have been observed in the open ocean, thereby eliminating the possibility that they are sustained by topographic interactions with the continental slope; (c) whether interacting with other features or evolving as isolated circulations, dipoles are seen to rotate within a relatively narrow range of approximately 4-8 deg/day (interacting) and 10-11 deg/day (isolated); and (d) feature tracking delineates energetic fluid in both vortices and eliminates the possibility of interpreting dipole rings as transient features produced by active monopoles and patches of entrained fluid.

  11. Semileptonic Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Luth, Vera G.; /SLAC

    2012-10-02

    The following is an overview of the measurements of the CKM matrix elements |V{sub cb}| and |V{sub ub}| that are based on detailed studies of semileptonic B decays by the BABAR and Belle Collaborations and major advances in QCD calculations. In addition, a new and improved measurement of the ratios R(D{sup (*)}) = {Beta}({bar B} {yields} D{sup (*)}{tau}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}})/{Beta}({bar B} {yields} D{sup (*)}{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {ell}}) is presented. Here D{sup (*)} refers to a D or a D* meson and {ell} is either e or {mu}. The results, R(D) = 0.440 {+-} 0.058 {+-} 0.042 and R(D*) = 0.332 {+-} 0.024 {+-} 0.018, exceed the Standard Model expectations by 2.0{sigma} and 2.7{sigma}, respectively. Taken together, they disagree with these expectations at the 3.4{sigma} level. The excess of events cannot be explained by a charged Higgs boson in the type II two-Higgs-doublet model.

  12. Dental Caries (Tooth Decay)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Find Data by Topic > Dental Caries (Tooth Decay) Dental Caries (Tooth Decay) Main Content Dental caries (tooth decay) remains the most prevalent chronic ... important source of information on oral health and dental care in the United States since the early ...

  13. New dust belts of Uranus: one ring, two ring, red ring, blue ring.

    PubMed

    de Pater, Imke; Hammel, Heidi B; Gibbard, Seran G; Showalter, Mark R

    2006-04-01

    We compared near-infrared observations of the recently discovered outer rings of Uranus with Hubble Space Telescope results. We find that the inner ring, R/2003 U 2, is red, whereas the outer ring, R/2003 U 1, is very blue. Blue is an unusual color for rings; Saturn's enigmatic E ring is the only other known example. By analogy to the E ring, R/2003 U 1 is probably produced by impacts into the embedded moon Mab, which apparently orbits at a location where nongravitational perturbations favor the survival and spreading of submicron-sized dust. R/2003 U 2 more closely resembles Saturn's G ring, which is red, a typical color for dusty rings. PMID:16601188

  14. Atmospheric, Ionospheric, and Energetic Radiation Environments of Saturn's Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, J. F.; Kollmann, P.; Sittler, E. C., Jr.; Johnson, R. E.; Sturner, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    Planetary magnetospheric and high-energy cosmic ray interactions with Saturn's rings were first explored in-situ during the Pioneer 11 flyby in 1979. The following Voyager flybys produced a wealth of new information on ring structure and mass, and on spatial structure of the radiation belts beyond the main rings. Next came the Cassini Orbiter flyover of the rings during Saturn Orbital Insertion in 2004 with the first in-situ measurements of the ring atmosphere and plasma ionosphere. Cassini has since fully explored the radiation belt and magnetospheric plasma region beyond the main rings, discovering how Enceladus acts as a source of water group neutrals and water ions for the ion plasma. But do the main rings also substantially contribute by UV photolysis to water group plasma (H+, O+, OH+, H2O+, H3O+, O2+) and neutrals inwards from Enceladus? More massive rings, than earlier inferred from Pioneer 11 and Voyager observations, would further contribute by bulk ring ice radiolysis from interactions of galactic cosmic ray particles. Products of these interactions include neutron-decay proton and electron injection into the radiation belts beyond the main rings. How does radiolysis from moon and ring sweeping of the radiation belt particles compare with direct gas and plasma sources from the main rings and Enceladus? Can the magnetospheric ion and electron populations reasonably be accounted for by the sum of the ring-neutron-decay and outer magnetospheric inputs? Pioneer 11 made the deepest radial penetration into the C-ring, next followed by Cassini SOI. What might Cassini's higher-inclination proximal orbits reveal about the atmospheric, ionospheric, and energetic radiation environments in the D-ring and the proximal gap region? Recent modeling predicts a lower-intensity innermost radiation belt extending from the gap to the inner D-ring. Other remaining questions include the lifetimes of narrow and diffuse dust rings with respect to plasma and energetic particle

  15. Saturn's F-Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This narrow-angle camera image of Saturn's F Ring was taken through the Clear filter while at a distance of 6.9 million km from Saturn on 8 November 1980. The brightness variations of this tightly-constrained ring shown here indicate that the ring is less uniform in makeup than the larger rings. JPL managed the Voyager Project for NASA's Office of Space Science

  16. Neptune - full ring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    This pair of Voyager 2 images (FDS 11446.21 and 11448.10), two 591-s exposures obtained through the clear filter of the wide angle camera, show the full ring system with the highest sensitivity. Visible in this figure are the bright, narrow N53 and N63 rings, the diffuse N42 ring, and (faintly) the plateau outside of the N53 ring (with its slight brightening near 57,500 km).

  17. Electro-optical hybrid slip ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, En

    2005-11-01

    The slip ring is a rotary electrical interface, collector, swivel or rotary joint. It is a physical system that can perform continuous data transfer and data exchange between a stationary and a rotating structure. A slip ring is generally used to transfer data or power from an unrestrained, continuously rotating electro-mechanical system in real-time, thereby simplifying operations and eliminating damage-prone wires dangling from moving joints. Slip rings are widely used for testing, evaluating, developing and improving various technical equipment and facilities with rotating parts. They are widely used in industry, especially in manufacturing industries employing turbo machinery, as in aviation, shipbuilding, aerospace, defense, and in precise facilities having rotating parts such as medical Computerized Tomography (CT) and MRI scanners and so forth. Therefore, any improvement in slip ring technology can impact large markets. Research and development in this field will have broad prospects long into the future. The goal in developing the current slip ring technology is to improve and increase the reliability, stability, anti-interference, and high data fidelity between rotating and stationary structures. Up to now, there have been numerous approaches used for signal and data transfer utilizing a slip ring such as metal contacts, wires, radio transmission, and even liquid media. However, all suffer from drawbacks such as data transfer speed limitations, reliability, stability, electro-magnetic interference and durability. The purpose of the current research is to break through these basic limitations using an optical solution, thereby improving performance in current slip ring applications. This dissertation introduces a novel Electro-Optical Hybrid Slip Ring technology, which makes "through the air" digital-optical communication between stationary and rotating systems a reality with high data transfer speed, better reliability and low interference susceptibility

  18. Trapped particle absorption by the Ring of Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fillius, W.

    1983-01-01

    The interaction of trapped radiation with the ring of Jupiter is investigated. Because it is an identical problem, the rings of Saturn and Uranus are also examined. Data from the Pioneer II encounter, deductions for some of the properties of the rings of Jupiter and Saturn. Over a dozen Jupiter magnetic field models are available in a program that integrates the adiabatic invariants to compute B and L. This program is to label our UCSD Pioneer II encounter data with the most satisfactory of these models. The expected effects of absorbing material on the trapped radiation are studied to obtain the loss rate as a function of ring properties. Analysis of the particle diffusion problem rounds out the theoretical end of the ring absorption problem. Other projects include identification of decay products for energetic particle albedo off the rings and moons of Saturn and a search for flux transfer events at the Jovian magnetopause.

  19. Semileptonic B-Meson Decays at Babar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigamani, Michael

    2011-10-01

    Presented are selected results from semileptonic B-meson decays at BABAR. Two measurements of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element |Vcb| are reported, using moments of the hadronic-mass spectrum in inclusive bar B -> Xc l ^ - bar v decays, and also exclusive bar B -> Dl ^ - bar vl decays. These results are based on data samples of 232 (inclusive bar B -> Xc l ^ - bar v) and 460 (exclusive bar B -> Dl ^ - bar vl ) million Υ (4S) -> Bbar B decays recorded by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e+e-storage rings. Semileptonic events are identified by requiring a lepton (e or μ) in events tag