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Sample records for risk classification significantly

  1. Significance, definition, classification and risk factors of chronic kidney disease in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Meyers, A M

    2015-03-01

    Renal dysfunction or chronic kidney disease (CKD) is found in 10% of the global population and is classified into five stages according to the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). No matter where a patient lives, estimation of the GFR is mandatory for decision-making and obtained by the simple measurement of a serum creatinine level. The objective of diagnosing CKD lies in its future prevention, early detection and proper treatment, which will prevent or delay functional deterioration. Primary hypertension (PH) occurs in 25% of South Africa (SA)s black population and is the putative cause of stage 5 CKD in 40 - 60% of these patients. Moreover, in this group, stage 5 CKD occurs at a relatively young age (35 - 45 years) compared with other population groups in whom stage 5 CKD resulting from PH usually occurs between 60 and 70 years of age. In the cohort study, PH has been found in 12 - 16% of black school learners (mean age 17 years) compared with 1.8 - 2% of other ethnic groups (mixed race, Asian, white). End-stage renal failure (ESRF) is the fifth most common cause of death in SA, excluding post-traumatic cases. In addition, undiagnosed or poorly controlled PH is a potent risk factor for other cardiovascular disease (CVD), e.g. congestive cardiac failure, myocardial infarction, stroke. Significant protein is also associated with CVD and protein >1 g/d is a significant risk factor for ESRF. PMID:26294833

  2. Blood lactate levels differ significantly between surviving and nonsurviving patients within the same risk-adjusted Classification for Congenital Heart Surgery (RACHS-1) group after pediatric cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Molina Hazan, Vered; Gonen, Yael; Vardi, Amir; Keidan, Ilan; Mishali, David; Rubinshtein, Marina; Yakov, Yusim; Paret, Gideon

    2010-10-01

    This study aimed to examine the association between lactate levels in the first hours after surgery for congenital heart defects and the results of Risk-Adjusted Classification for Congenital Heart Surgery (RACHS-1) scoring and to evaluate serial lactate levels over time to determine whether they can serve as a supplementary tool for postoperative assessment within the same RACHS-1 group of patients. A retrospective cohort study was performed using data retrieved from a clinical database of 255 children who had surgery for congenital heart defects between 1999 and 2001 at Sheba Medical Center. Lactate levels were measured postoperatively four times (mg/dL units). The last sample was taken at the end of the surgical procedure, and lactate levels were measured at admission to the pediatrics critical care unit, then 6 and 12 h after admission. The lactate level was measured via arterial blood gases. A total of 27 deaths occurred, yielding a mortality rate of 7.4% when Norwood operations were excluded and 10.16% when they were included. The mean initial postoperative lactate level was significantly lower for survivors (42.2 ± 32.0 mg/dL) than for nonsurvivors (85.4 ± 54.1 mg/dL) (p < 0.01). The serial mean lactate levels decreased progressively for all surviving patients (r (2) = 0.96) compared with nonsurvivors (r (2) = 0.02). The lactate levels correlated with the RACHS-1 subgroups at each time point (r (2) > 0.96 for all). The Pearson correlations between postoperative lactate levels (last lactate measurement taken in the operating room) and cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) duration (r = 0.549), clamp duration (r = 0.586), and the inotropic score (r = 0.466) (p < 0.001 for all) were significantly positive. The correlations between the maximum lactate levels (during the first 12 postoperative hours) and CPB duration (r = 0.496), clamp duration (r = 0.509), and the inotropic score (r = 0.633) (p < 0.001 for all) were extremely positive. The early elevation of lactate

  3. Macroscopic serosal classification of colorectal cancer and its clinical significance

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong-Peng; Guo, Peng-Tao; Zhu, Zhi; Zhang, Hao; Xu, Yan; Ma, Si-Ping; Wang, Zhen-Ning; Xu, Hui-Mian

    2015-01-01

    Background: Macroscopic serosal classification of gastric cancer has been reported in previous studies, but rarely reported about it of colorectal cancer. The purpose of this study was to propose a macroscopic serosal classification of colorectal cancer and to investigate clinical significance of this classification. Materials and methods: Morphologic features of colorectal cancer were analyzed according to the macroscopic serosal appearance and clinicopathologic characteristics of these patients were retrospectively reviewed. Microscopic serosal structure was compared between different types under light microscope and transmission electron microscope. Results: Macroscopic serosal classification was divided into normal type, reactive type, nodular type and colloid type according to the macroscopic serosal appearance and microscopic structure. There were significant differences in tumor size, tumor gross type, histological type, histological grade, tumor necrosis, pT stage, number of nodes metastasis, lymph node metastasis ratio, pN stage, M stage and peritoneal metastasis between patients with different serosal types. Univariate analysis of prognosis revealed macroscopic serosal classification as one of factors significantly correlated with patient survival. However, multivariate analysis only revealed TNM stage significantly correlated with patient survival, while macroscopic serosal classification did not, maybe due to insufficient samples. Conclusions: Macroscopic serosal classification of colorectal cancer is preliminarily defined and divided into four types. Different macroscopic serosal types indicate different clinicopathologic features and correlate with prognosis of patients with colorectal cancer, but still cannot be proven as an independent factor. PMID:26884925

  4. A classification scheme for risk assessment methods.

    SciTech Connect

    Stamp, Jason Edwin; Campbell, Philip LaRoche

    2004-08-01

    This report presents a classification scheme for risk assessment methods. This scheme, like all classification schemes, provides meaning by imposing a structure that identifies relationships. Our scheme is based on two orthogonal aspects--level of detail, and approach. The resulting structure is shown in Table 1 and is explained in the body of the report. Each cell in the Table represent a different arrangement of strengths and weaknesses. Those arrangements shift gradually as one moves through the table, each cell optimal for a particular situation. The intention of this report is to enable informed use of the methods so that a method chosen is optimal for a situation given. This report imposes structure on the set of risk assessment methods in order to reveal their relationships and thus optimize their usage.We present a two-dimensional structure in the form of a matrix, using three abstraction levels for the rows and three approaches for the columns. For each of the nine cells in the matrix we identify the method type by name and example. The matrix helps the user understand: (1) what to expect from a given method, (2) how it relates to other methods, and (3) how best to use it. Each cell in the matrix represent a different arrangement of strengths and weaknesses. Those arrangements shift gradually as one moves through the table, each cell optimal for a particular situation. The intention of this report is to enable informed use of the methods so that a method chosen is optimal for a situation given. The matrix, with type names in the cells, is introduced in Table 2 on page 13 below. Unless otherwise stated we use the word 'method' in this report to refer to a 'risk assessment method', though often times we use the full phrase. The use of the terms 'risk assessment' and 'risk management' are close enough that we do not attempt to distinguish them in this report. The remainder of this report is organized as follows. In Section 2 we provide context for this report

  5. Risk Classification and Risk-based Safety and Mission Assurance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leitner, Jesse A.

    2014-01-01

    Recent activities to revamp and emphasize the need to streamline processes and activities for Class D missions across the agency have led to various interpretations of Class D, including the lumping of a variety of low-cost projects into Class D. Sometimes terms such as Class D minus are used. In this presentation, mission risk classifications will be traced to official requirements and definitions as a measure to ensure that projects and programs align with the guidance and requirements that are commensurate for their defined risk posture. As part of this, the full suite of risk classifications, formal and informal will be defined, followed by an introduction to the new GPR 8705.4 that is currently under review.GPR 8705.4 lays out guidance for the mission success activities performed at the Classes A-D for NPR 7120.5 projects as well as for projects not under NPR 7120.5. Furthermore, the trends in stepping from Class A into higher risk posture classifications will be discussed. The talk will conclude with a discussion about risk-based safety and mission assuranceat GSFC.

  6. Classification criteria and probability risk maps: limitations and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Saisana, Michaela; Dubois, Gregoire; Chaloulakou, Archontoula; Spyrellis, Nikolas

    2004-03-01

    Delineation of polluted zones with respect to regulatory standards, accounting at the same time for the uncertainty of the estimated concentrations, relies on classification criteria that can lead to significantly different pollution risk maps, which, in turn, can depend on the regulatory standard itself. This paper reviews four popular classification criteria related to the violation of a probability threshold or a physical threshold, using annual (1996-2000) nitrogen dioxide concentrations from 40 air monitoring stations in Milan. The relative advantages and practical limitations of each criterion are discussed, and it is shown that some of the criteria are more appropriate for the problem at hand and that the choice of the criterion can be supported by the statistical distribution of the data and/or the regulatory standard. Finally, the polluted area is estimated over the different years and concentration thresholds using the appropriate risk maps as an additional source of uncertainty. PMID:15046326

  7. Adiposity significantly modifies genetic risk for dyslipidemia.

    PubMed

    Cole, Christopher B; Nikpay, Majid; Lau, Paulina; Stewart, Alexandre F R; Davies, Robert W; Wells, George A; Dent, Robert; McPherson, Ruth

    2014-11-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies have identified multiple loci robustly associated with plasma lipids, which also contribute to extreme lipid phenotypes. However, these common genetic variants explain <12% of variation in lipid traits. Adiposity is also an important determinant of plasma lipoproteins, particularly plasma TGs and HDL cholesterol (HDLc) concentrations. Thus, interactions between genes and clinical phenotypes may contribute to this unexplained heritability. We have applied a weighted genetic risk score (GRS) for both plasma TGs and HDLc in two large cohorts at the extremes of BMI. Both BMI and GRS were strongly associated with these lipid traits. A significant interaction between obese/lean status and GRS was noted for each of TG (P(Interaction) = 2.87 × 10(-4)) and HDLc (P(Interaction) = 1.05 × 10(-3)). These interactions were largely driven by SNPs tagging APOA5, glucokinase receptor (GCKR), and LPL for TG, and cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP), GalNAc-transferase (GALNT2), endothelial lipase (LIPG), and phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) for HDLc. In contrast, the GRSLDL cholesterol × adiposity interaction was not significant. Sexual dimorphism was evident for the GRSHDL on HDLc in obese (P(Interaction) = 0.016) but not lean subjects. SNP by BMI interactions may provide biological insight into specific genetic associations and missing heritability. PMID:25225679

  8. Neural network diagnostic system for dengue patients risk classification.

    PubMed

    Faisal, Tarig; Taib, Mohd Nasir; Ibrahim, Fatimah

    2012-04-01

    With the dramatic increase of the worldwide threat of dengue disease, it has been very crucial to correctly diagnose the dengue patients in order to decrease the disease severity. However, it has been a great challenge for the physicians to identify the level of risk in dengue patients due to overlapping of the medical classification criteria. Therefore, this study aims to construct a noninvasive diagnostic system to assist the physicians for classifying the risk in dengue patients. Systematic producers have been followed to develop the system. Firstly, the assessment of the significant predictors associated with the level of risk in dengue patients was carried out utilizing the statistical analyses technique. Secondly, Multilayer perceptron neural network models trained via Levenberg-Marquardt and Scaled Conjugate Gradient algorithms was employed for constructing the diagnostic system. Finally, precise tuning for the models' parameters was conducted in order to achieve the optimal performance. As a result, 9 noninvasive predictors were found to be significantly associated with the level of risk in dengue patients. By employing those predictors, 75% prediction accuracy has been achieved for classifying the risk in dengue patients using Scaled Conjugate Gradient algorithm while 70.7% prediction accuracy were achieved by using Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. PMID:20703665

  9. DETERMINING SIGNIFICANT ENDPOINTS FOR ECOLOGICAL RISK ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Risk analyses, both human health and ecological, will be important factors in determining which DOE sites should be cleaned up and in deciding if acceptable performance standards have been met. Risk analysis procedures for humans use the individual as the 'unit' of observation, a...

  10. Drug and Alcohol Use -- A Significant Risk Factor for HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Significant Risk Factor for HIV Drug and Alcohol Use - A Significant Risk Factor for HIV Email ... with HIV currently use drugs or binge on alcohol. Many people are unaware that the increased risk ...

  11. Using QA classification to guide design and manage risk

    SciTech Connect

    Lathrop, J.; DeKlever, R.; Petrie, E.H.

    1993-01-28

    Raytheon Services Nevada has developed a classification process based on probabilistic risk assessment, using accident/impact scenarios for each system classified. Initial classification analyses were performed for the 20 systems of Package IA of the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF). The analyses demonstrated a solid, defensible methodological basis for classification which minimizes the use of direct engineering judgment. They provide guidance for ESF design and risk management through the identification of: The critical characteristics of each system that need to be controlled; and the parts of the information base that most need to be further developed through performance assessment or other efforts.

  12. Inherited Cholesterol Disorder Significantly Boosts Heart Risks

    MedlinePlus

    ... genetic disorder that causes high levels of "bad" LDL cholesterol have an increased risk for heart disease and ... in previous studies. Compared to people with average LDL cholesterol levels (less than 130 mg/dL), those with ...

  13. Significance of clustering and classification applications in digital and physical libraries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triantafyllou, Ioannis; Koulouris, Alexandros; Zervos, Spiros; Dendrinos, Markos; Giannakopoulos, Georgios

    2015-02-01

    Applications of clustering and classification techniques can be proved very significant in both digital and physical (paper-based) libraries. The most essential application, document classification and clustering, is crucial for the content that is produced and maintained in digital libraries, repositories, databases, social media, blogs etc., based on various tags and ontology elements, transcending the traditional library-oriented classification schemes. Other applications with very useful and beneficial role in the new digital library environment involve document routing, summarization and query expansion. Paper-based libraries can benefit as well since classification combined with advanced material characterization techniques such as FTIR (Fourier Transform InfraRed spectroscopy) can be vital for the study and prevention of material deterioration. An improved two-level self-organizing clustering architecture is proposed in order to enhance the discrimination capacity of the learning space, prior to classification, yielding promising results when applied to the above mentioned library tasks.

  14. 21 CFR 812.66 - Significant risk device determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Significant risk device determinations. 812.66... risk device determinations. If an IRB determines that an investigation, presented for approval under § 812.2(b)(1)(ii), involves a significant risk device, it shall so notify the investigator and,...

  15. 21 CFR 812.66 - Significant risk device determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Significant risk device determinations. 812.66... risk device determinations. If an IRB determines that an investigation, presented for approval under § 812.2(b)(1)(ii), involves a significant risk device, it shall so notify the investigator and,...

  16. Risk-based Classification of Incidents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenwell, William S.; Knight, John C.; Strunk, Elisabeth A.

    2003-01-01

    As the penetration of software into safety-critical systems progresses, accidents and incidents involving software will inevitably become more frequent. Identifying lessons from these occurrences and applying them to existing and future systems is essential if recurrences are to be prevented. Unfortunately, investigative agencies do not have the resources to fully investigate every incident under their jurisdictions and domains of expertise and thus must prioritize certain occurrences when allocating investigative resources. In the aviation community, most investigative agencies prioritize occurrences based on the severity of their associated losses, allocating more resources to accidents resulting in injury to passengers or extensive aircraft damage. We argue that this scheme is inappropriate because it undervalues incidents whose recurrence could have a high potential for loss while overvaluing fairly straightforward accidents involving accepted risks. We then suggest a new strategy for prioritizing occurrences based on the risk arising from incident recurrence.

  17. [Changes of 2015 WHO Histological Classification of Lung Cancer 
and the Clinical Significance].

    PubMed

    Yang, Xin; Lin, Dongmei

    2016-06-20

    Due in part to remarkable advances over the past decade in our understanding of lung cancer, particularly in area of medical oncology, molecular biology, and radiology, there is a pressing need for a revised classification, based not on pathology alone, but rather on an integrated multidisciplinary approach to classification of lung cancer. The 2015 World Health Organization (WHO) Classification of Tumors of the Lung, Pleura, Thymus and Heart has just been published with numerous important changes from the 2004 WHO classification. The revised classification has been greatly improved in helping advance the field, increasing the impact of research, improving patient care and assisting in predicting outcome. The most significant changes will be summarized in this paper as follows: (1) main changes of lung adenocarcinoma as proposed by the 2011 International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer/American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society (IASLC/ATS/ERS) classification, (2) reclassifying squamous cell carcinomas into keratinizing, nonkeratinizing, and basaloid subtypes with the nonkeratinizing tumors requiring immunohistochemistry proof of squamous differentiation, (3) restricting the diagnosis of large cell carcinoma only to resected tumors that lack any clear morphologic or immunohistochemical differentiation with reclassification of the remaining former large cell carcinoma subtypes into different categories, (4) grouping of neuroendocrine tumors together in one category, (5) and the current viewpoint of histologic grading of lung cancer. PMID:27335291

  18. Advances in Risk Classification and Treatment Strategies for Neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Navin R; Applebaum, Mark A; Volchenboum, Samuel L; Matthay, Katherine K; London, Wendy B; Ambros, Peter F; Nakagawara, Akira; Berthold, Frank; Schleiermacher, Gudrun; Park, Julie R; Valteau-Couanet, Dominique; Pearson, Andrew D J; Cohn, Susan L

    2015-09-20

    Risk-based treatment approaches for neuroblastoma have been ongoing for decades. However, the criteria used to define risk in various institutional and cooperative groups were disparate, limiting the ability to compare clinical trial results. To mitigate this problem and enhance collaborative research, homogenous pretreatment patient cohorts have been defined by the International Neuroblastoma Risk Group classification system. During the past 30 years, increasingly intensive, multimodality approaches have been developed to treat patients who are classified as high risk, whereas patients with low- or intermediate-risk neuroblastoma have received reduced therapy. This treatment approach has resulted in improved outcome, although survival for high-risk patients remains poor, emphasizing the need for more effective treatments. Increased knowledge regarding the biology and genetic basis of neuroblastoma has led to the discovery of druggable targets and promising, new therapeutic approaches. Collaborative efforts of institutions and international cooperative groups have led to advances in our understanding of neuroblastoma biology, refinements in risk classification, and stratified treatment strategies, resulting in improved outcome. International collaboration will be even more critical when evaluating therapies designed to treat small cohorts of patients with rare actionable mutations. PMID:26304901

  19. 21 CFR 812.66 - Significant risk device determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES INVESTIGATIONAL DEVICE EXEMPTIONS IRB Review and Approval § 812.66 Significant risk device determinations. If an IRB determines that an investigation, presented for approval under... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Significant risk device determinations....

  20. 21 CFR 812.66 - Significant risk device determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES INVESTIGATIONAL DEVICE EXEMPTIONS IRB Review and Approval § 812.66 Significant risk device determinations. If an IRB determines that an investigation, presented for approval under... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Significant risk device determinations....

  1. 21 CFR 812.66 - Significant risk device determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES INVESTIGATIONAL DEVICE EXEMPTIONS IRB Review and Approval § 812.66 Significant risk device determinations. If an IRB determines that an investigation, presented for approval under... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Significant risk device determinations....

  2. Validation Study of Oxford Classification of IgA Nephropathy: The Significance of Extracapillary Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Ninomiya, Toshiharu; Nagata, Masaharu; Mitsuiki, Koji; Hirakata, Hideki

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives The Oxford classification of IgA nephropathy (IgAN) includes mesangial hypercellularity, endocapillary hypercellularity, segmental glomerulosclerosis (S), and tubular atrophy/interstitial fibrosis (T) as prognosticators. The value of extracapillary proliferation (Ex) was not addressed. Because the Oxford classification excludes patients with urinary protein <0.5 g/d and eGFR <30 ml/min per 1.73 m2 at biopsy, the significance of Ex should be confirmed by validation cohorts that include more rapidly progressive cases. We present such a study. Design, setting, participants, & measurements The significance of pathologic features for development end-stage renal failure (ESRF) was examined by multivariate analysis in 702 patients with IgAN. The association of Ex with kidney survival was examined by univariate analysis in 416 patients who met the Oxford criteria and 286 who did not, separately. Results In a multivariate model, S and T were significantly associated with ESRF. With addition of Ex, not S but Ex was significant for ESRF. In univariate analysis, kidney survival was significantly lower in patients with Ex than in those without, in patients who did not meet the Oxford criteria, but such a difference was not found in patients who met it. Conclusions The prognostic significance of Ex was evident in our cohort. It seems that Ex did not emerge from the Oxford classification as a prognosticator because of exclusion of severe cases (eGFR <30 ml/min per 1.73 m2). We suggest that extracapillary proliferation be included in the next version of the Oxford classification of IgAN to widen the scope of the classification. PMID:22157710

  3. Narrow-band imaging observation of colorectal lesions using NICE classification to avoid discarding significant lesions

    PubMed Central

    Hattori, Santa; Iwatate, Mineo; Sano, Wataru; Hasuike, Noriaki; Kosaka, Hidekazu; Ikumoto, Taro; Kotaka, Masahito; Ichiyanagi, Akihiro; Ebisutani, Chikara; Hisano, Yasuko; Fujimori, Takahiro; Sano, Yasushi

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To assess the risk of failing to detect diminutive and small colorectal cancers with the “resect and discard” policy. METHODS: Patients who received colonoscopy and polypectomy were recruited in the retrospective study. Probable histology of the polyps was predicted by six colonoscopists by the use of NICE classification. The incidence of diminutive and small colorectal cancers and their endoscopic features were assessed. RESULTS: In total, we found 681 cases of diminutive (1-5 mm) lesions in 402 patients and 197 cases of small (6-9 mm) lesions in 151 patients. Based on pathology of the diminutive and small polyps, 105 and 18 were non-neoplastic polyps, 557 and 154 were low-grade adenomas, 18 and 24 were high-grade adenomas or intramucosal/submucosal (SM) scanty invasive carcinomas, 1 and 1 were SM-d carcinoma, respectively. The endoscopic features of invasive cancer were classified as NICE type 3 endoscopically. CONCLUSION: The risk of failing to detect diminutive and small colorectal invasive cancer with the “resect and discard” strategy might be avoided through the use of narrow-band imaging observation with the NICE classification scheme and magnifying endoscopy. PMID:25512769

  4. Detection and Classification of Cancer from Microscopic Biopsy Images Using Clinically Significant and Biologically Interpretable Features

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rajesh; Srivastava, Subodh

    2015-01-01

    A framework for automated detection and classification of cancer from microscopic biopsy images using clinically significant and biologically interpretable features is proposed and examined. The various stages involved in the proposed methodology include enhancement of microscopic images, segmentation of background cells, features extraction, and finally the classification. An appropriate and efficient method is employed in each of the design steps of the proposed framework after making a comparative analysis of commonly used method in each category. For highlighting the details of the tissue and structures, the contrast limited adaptive histogram equalization approach is used. For the segmentation of background cells, k-means segmentation algorithm is used because it performs better in comparison to other commonly used segmentation methods. In feature extraction phase, it is proposed to extract various biologically interpretable and clinically significant shapes as well as morphology based features from the segmented images. These include gray level texture features, color based features, color gray level texture features, Law's Texture Energy based features, Tamura's features, and wavelet features. Finally, the K-nearest neighborhood method is used for classification of images into normal and cancerous categories because it is performing better in comparison to other commonly used methods for this application. The performance of the proposed framework is evaluated using well-known parameters for four fundamental tissues (connective, epithelial, muscular, and nervous) of randomly selected 1000 microscopic biopsy images. PMID:27006938

  5. Identification and Classification of Common Risks in Space Science Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hihn, Jairus M.; Chattopadhyay, Debarati; Hanna, Robert A.; Port, Daniel; Eggleston, Sabrina

    2010-01-01

    Due to the highly constrained schedules and budgets that NASA missions must contend with, the identification and management of cost, schedule and risks in the earliest stages of the lifecycle is critical. At the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) it is the concurrent engineering teams that first address these items in a systematic manner. Foremost of these concurrent engineering teams is Team X. Started in 1995, Team X has carried out over 1000 studies, dramatically reducing the time and cost involved, and has been the model for other concurrent engineering teams both within NASA and throughout the larger aerospace community. The ability to do integrated risk identification and assessment was first introduced into Team X in 2001. Since that time the mission risks identified in each study have been kept in a database. In this paper we will describe how the Team X risk process is evolving highlighting the strengths and weaknesses of the different approaches. The paper will especially focus on the identification and classification of common risks that have arisen during Team X studies of space based science missions.

  6. The Mathematics of Risk Classification: Changing Data into Valid Instruments for Juvenile Courts. NCJ 209158

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gottfredson, Don M.; Snyder, Howard N.

    2005-01-01

    This report is meant to help juvenile courts develop practical risk-screening instruments. Courts increasingly are using some method of risk classification to assist in assignment of youth to differential service/supervision programs. A comparison of commonly used or advocated risk classification methods may provide courts with guidance in…

  7. FINAL REPORT. DETERMINING SIGNIFICANT ENDPOINTS FOR ECOLOGICAL RISK ANALYSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research examines the ecological significance of radioactive and heavy metal contamination. Risks to non-human biota at higher levels of biological organization are assessed by using novel biological dosimeters in controlled, manipulative, dose/effects experiments, and by co...

  8. Significant Association Between Adiponutrin and Hepatocellular Carcinoma Risk.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong-Guang; Liu, Fang-Feng; Zhu, Hua-Qiang; Zhou, Xu; Lu, Jun; Chang, Hong; Hu, Jin-Hua

    2015-11-01

    ADPN I148M polymorphism has been consistently reported to play a role in liver-associated diseases, such as alcoholic liver disease, chronic hepatitis C, and liver fat and fibrosis in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. This significant association was also indicated in a series of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) studies, where the significance may be affected due to the small sample sizes. The aim of this study was to reexamine the ADPN-HCC association by use of meta-analysis. Biweekly computer-based literature searches plus manual screening were undertaken in an effort to identify all studies that met the predefined inclusion criteria. The Mantel-Haenszel method was selected to estimate risk effects (odds ratio [OR] and 95% confidence interval [CI]). To examine reliability of the pooled risk effects, we additionally performed sensitivity analysis and publication bias tests. Ten studies (1335 HCC patients and 2927 HCC-free controls) were identified for the meta-analysis. We found significantly increased risk of HCC attributable to presence of ADPN I148M polymorphism, with the highest risk associated with the M/M genotype under the recessive model of inheritance (OR = 2.23, 95% CI = 1.87-2.67, between-study heterogeneity: P = 0.468). The significant increase persisted in Caucasian and African when data were stratified by ethnicity. Subgroup analysis according to source of controls revealed similar risk effects. Our meta-analysis indicates that I148M polymorphism in the ADPN gene may independently contribute to the progression of HCC irrespective of the etiologies. PMID:26632699

  9. External validation of risk classification in patients with docetaxel-treated castration-resistant prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) patients have poor prognoses, and docetaxel (DTX) is among the few treatment options. An accurate risk classification to identify CRPC patient groups for which DTX would be effective is urgently warranted. The Armstrong risk classification (ARC), which classifies CRPC patients into 3 groups, is superior; however, its usefulness remains unclear, and further external validation is required before clinical use. This study aimed to examine the clinical significance of the ARC through external validation in DTX-treated Japanese CRPC patients. Methods CRPC patients who received 2 or more DTX cycles were selected for this study. Patients were classified into good-, intermediate-, and poor-risk groups according to the ARC. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) responses and overall survival (OS) were calculated and compared between the risk groups. A multivariate analysis was performed to clarify the relationship between the ARC and major patient characteristics. Results Seventy-eight CRPC patients met the inclusion criteria. Median PSA levels at DTX initiation was 20 ng/mL. Good-, intermediate-, and poor-risk groups comprised 51 (65%), 17 (22%), and 10 (13%) patients, respectively. PSA response rates ≥30% and ≥50% were 33%, 41%, and 30%, and 18%, 41%, and 20% in the good-, intermediate-, and poor-risk groups, respectivcixely, with no significant differences (p = 0.133 and 0.797, respectively). The median OS in the good-, intermediate-, and poor-risk groups were statistically significant (p < 0.001) at 30.1, 14.2, and 5.7 months, respectively. A multivariate analysis revealed that the ARC and PSA doubling time were independent prognostic factors. Conclusions Most of CRPC patients were classified into good-risk group according to the ARC and the ARC could predict prognosis in DTX-treated CRPC patients. Trial registration University Hospital Medical Information Network Clinical Trials Registry (UMIN-CTR) number

  10. Reappraisal of risk factors for monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance.

    PubMed

    Boursi, Ben; Weiss, Brendan M; Haynes, Kevin; Mamtani, Ronac; Yang, Yu-Xiao

    2016-06-01

    A number of epidemiologic studies have demonstrated associations between obesity and diabetes and the risk of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS). However, since MGUS is an asymptomatic condition we evaluated whether these are true associations or the result of detection-bias. We conducted a nested case-control study using a large primary-care database. Cases were defined as those with incident diagnosis of MGUS. For every case, four eligible controls matched on age, sex, practice site, and duration of follow-up were selected. Exposure variables included obesity and diabetes (including antidiabetic therapies) as well as other metabolic risk factors. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using conditional logistic regression. The study included 2363 MGUS patients and 9193 matched controls. In the primary analysis, obesity and diabetes were associated with higher MGUS risk with an adjusted ORs of 1.15 (95% CI 1.02-1.29) and 1.30 (95% CI 1.13-1.50), respectively. However, after adjustment to the number of laboratory tests prior to the MGUS diagnosis, there was no association between obesity and diabetes and MGUS risk (ORs of 1.08, 95% CI 0.96-1.22 and 1.08, 95% CI 0.93-1.25, respectively). In an additional analysis of antidiabetic therapies and MGUS risk, there was a nonsignificant decrease in MGUS risk among diabetes patients treated with metformin alone compared to subjects without diabetes (OR 0.77, 95% CI 0.56-1.05). In summary, while previously described risk factors for MGUS might be the result of detection bias, metformin should be further evaluated as a possible chemoprevention modality. Am. J. Hematol. 91:581-584, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26953904

  11. Fracture risk in patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance.

    PubMed

    Gregersen, Henrik; Jensen, Paw; Gislum, Mette; Jørgensen, Birgit; Sørensen, Henrik Toft; Nørgaard, Mette

    2006-10-01

    Little information is available on the risk of fractures in patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS). We identified 1535 patients with MGUS between 1978 and 2003 in North Jutland County, Denmark. The population control group consisted of 15 350 persons selected from the Danish Central Population Registry, matched by age and sex. Data on fractures in the two groups were obtained from the regional Hospital Discharge Registry. In the MGUS cohort, 187 first-time fractures were identified during 9754 person-years of follow-up, corresponding to an incidence rate of 19/1000 person-years. The adjusted relative risk for fractures among MGUS patients compared with population controls was 1.4 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.2-1.6]. After 5 years of follow-up, the risk difference was 1.8% (95% CI, 0.5-3.0). Six of the 187 MGUS patients with fractures were later diagnosed with malignant transformation. Relative risks for fractures were increased in IgG-type MGUS [1.3 (95% CI,1.1-1.6)], IgM-type MGUS [1.6 (95% CI, 1.1-2.2)] and MGUS with kappa light chain [1.4 (95% CI, 1.1-1.7)]. MGUS patients had an increased risk of fractures, which could not be explained by comorbidity, advanced age, gender or malignant transformation. PMID:16925792

  12. Revealing Significant Relations between Chemical/Biological Features and Activity: Associative Classification Mining for Drug Discovery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Pulan

    2012-01-01

    Classification, clustering and association mining are major tasks of data mining and have been widely used for knowledge discovery. Associative classification mining, the combination of both association rule mining and classification, has emerged as an indispensable way to support decision making and scientific research. In particular, it offers a…

  13. Ecological Significance of a Geomorphic Stream Classification: Species and Functional Group Composition of Riparian Plant Communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, J. R.; Cooper, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    We tested the ecological significance of a geomorphic classification of Sonoran Desert ephemeral stream channels based on channel plan-form, degree of lateral confinement, and boundary material composition. This typology has been shown to discriminate among channel geometry and hydraulic characteristics for bedrock, bedrock with alluvium, incised alluvium, braided, and piedmont headwater channels. We examined stream reach-scale relationships of geomorphic stream types to the relative cover and density of perennial plant species and functional groups, and identified the dominant fluvial drivers, within riparian communities at 101 ephemeral stream reaches on the U.S. Army Yuma Proving Ground and Barry M. Goldwater Air Force Range in southwestern Arizona, USA. Nonparametric multivariate analysis of variance showed that species and functional group composition differed significantly among geomorphic stream types, both in terms of relative cover and density. Partitioning of among-site multivariate dissimilarity revealed that species compositional differences between stream types were caused largely by variation in the cover and density of the most common members of the regional flora. Distinctive functional group composition among reach types resulted from differences in the cover and density of drought-deciduous shrubs and subshrubs, evergreen trees and shrubs, and photosynthetic-stemmed trees. Comparison of environmental and biotic dissimilarity matrices highlighted the role of channel gradient as the dominant abiotic driver of riparian plant community composition, with stream channel elevation and width:depth providing additional explanatory power. Distinctive riparian plant community composition among the geomorphic stream types demonstrates the ecological significance of this a priori channel classification, and indicates its potential utility in understanding spatial patterns of ecological dynamics, sample stratification for process-based studies, and reference

  14. EPA`s program for risk assessment guidelines: Cancer classification issues

    SciTech Connect

    Wiltse, J.

    1990-12-31

    Issues presented are related to classification of weight of evidence in cancer risk assessments. The focus in this paper is on lines of evidence used in constructing a conclusion about potential human carcinogenicity. The paper also discusses issues that are mistakenly addressed as classification issues but are really part of the risk assessment process. 2 figs.

  15. Genome-wide significant risk associations for mucinous ovarian carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kelemen, Linda E.; Lawrenson, Kate; Tyrer, Jonathan; Li, Qiyuan; M. Lee, Janet; Seo, Ji-Heui; Phelan, Catherine M.; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqin; Spindler, Tassja J.; Aben, Katja K.H.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antonenkova, Natalia; Baker, Helen; Bandera, Elisa V.; Bean, Yukie; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Bisogna, Maria; Bjorge, Line; Bogdanova, Natalia; Brinton, Louise A.; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Bruinsma, Fiona; Butzow, Ralf; Campbell, Ian G.; Carty, Karen; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chen, Y. Ann; Chen, Zhihua; Cook, Linda S.; Cramer, Daniel W.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Cybulski, Cezary; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Dennis, Joe; Dicks, Ed; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Dörk, Thilo; du Bois, Andreas; Dürst, Matthias; Eccles, Diana; Easton, Douglas T.; Edwards, Robert P.; Eilber, Ursula; Ekici, Arif B.; Engelholm, Svend Aage; Fasching, Peter A.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Giles, Graham G.; Glasspool, Rosalind; Goode, Ellen L.; Goodman, Marc T.; Grownwald, Jacek; Harrington, Patricia; Harter, Philipp; Hasmad, Hanis Nazihah; Hein, Alexander; Heitz, Florian; Hildebrandt, Michelle A.T.; Hillemanns, Peter; Hogdall, Estrid; Hogdall, Claus; Hosono, Satoyo; Iversen, Edwin S.; Jakubowska, Anna; Jensen, Allan; Ji, Bu-Tian; Karlan, Beth Y; Kellar, Melissa; Kelley, Joseph L.; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Krakstad, Camilla; Kjaer, Susanne K.; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Lambrechts, Diether; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Le, Nhu D.; Lee, Alice W.; Lele, Shashi; Leminen, Arto; Lester, Jenny; Levine, Douglas A.; Liang, Dong; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lu, Karen; Lubinski, Jan; Lundvall, Lene; Massuger, Leon F.A.G.; Matsuo, Keitaro; McGuire, Valerie; McLaughlin, John R.; McNeish, Iain; Menon, Usha; Modugno, Francesmary; Moes-Sosnowska, Joanna; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Narod, Steven A.; Nedergaard, Lotte; Ness, Roberta B.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Azmi, Mat Adenan Noor; Odunsi, Kunle; Olson, Sara H.; Orlow, Irene; Orsulic, Sandra; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Paul, James; Pearce, Celeste Leigh; Pejovic, Tanja; Pelttari, Liisa M.; Permuth-Wey, Jennifer; Pike, Malcolm C.; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Ramus, Susan J.; Risch, Harvey A.; Rosen, Barry; Rossing, Mary Anne; Rothstein, Joseph H.; Rudolph, Anja; Runnebaum, Ingo B.; Rzepecka, Iwona K.; Salvesen, Helga B.; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Schwaab, Ira; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Shvetsov, Yurii B; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Sieh, Weiva; Song, Honglin; Southey, Melissa C.; Sucheston, Lara; Tangen, Ingvild L.; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Kathryn L.; Thompson, Pamela J; Tworoger, Shelley S.; van Altena, Anne M.; Van Nieuwenhuysen, Els; Vergote, Ignace; Vierkant, Robert A.; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Walsh, Christine; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Whittemore, Alice S.; Wicklund, Kristine G.; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Wlodzimierz, Sawicki; Woo, Yin-Ling; Wu, Xifeng; Wu, Anna H.; Yang, Hannah; Zheng, Wei; Ziogas, Argyrios; Sellers, Thomas A.; Freedman, Matthew L.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Pharoah, Paul D.; Gayther, Simon A.; Berchuck, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified several risk associations for ovarian carcinomas (OC) but not for mucinous ovarian carcinomas (MOC). Genotypes from OC cases and controls were imputed into the 1000 Genomes Project reference panel. Analysis of 1,644 MOC cases and 21,693 controls identified three novel risk associations: rs752590 at 2q13 (P = 3.3 × 10−8), rs711830 at 2q31.1 (P = 7.5 × 10−12) and rs688187 at 19q13.2 (P = 6.8 × 10−13). Expression Quantitative Trait Locus (eQTL) analysis in ovarian and colorectal tumors (which are histologically similar to MOC) identified significant eQTL associations for HOXD9 at 2q31.1 in ovarian (P = 4.95 × 10−4, FDR = 0.003) and colorectal (P = 0.01, FDR = 0.09) tumors, and for PAX8 at 2q13 in colorectal tumors (P = 0.03, FDR = 0.09). Chromosome conformation capture analysis identified interactions between the HOXD9 promoter and risk SNPs at 2q31.1. Overexpressing HOXD9 in MOC cells augmented the neoplastic phenotype. These findings provide the first evidence for MOC susceptibility variants and insights into the underlying biology of the disease. PMID:26075790

  16. Genome-wide significant risk associations for mucinous ovarian carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kelemen, Linda E; Lawrenson, Kate; Tyrer, Jonathan; Li, Qiyuan; Lee, Janet M; Seo, Ji-Heui; Phelan, Catherine M; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Spindler, Tassja J; Aben, Katja K H; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antonenkova, Natalia

    2015-08-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified several risk associations for ovarian carcinomas but not for mucinous ovarian carcinomas (MOCs). Our analysis of 1,644 MOC cases and 21,693 controls with imputation identified 3 new risk associations: rs752590 at 2q13 (P = 3.3 × 10(-8)), rs711830 at 2q31.1 (P = 7.5 × 10(-12)) and rs688187 at 19q13.2 (P = 6.8 × 10(-13)). We identified significant expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) associations for HOXD9 at 2q31.1 in ovarian (P = 4.95 × 10(-4), false discovery rate (FDR) = 0.003) and colorectal (P = 0.01, FDR = 0.09) tumors and for PAX8 at 2q13 in colorectal tumors (P = 0.03, FDR = 0.09). Chromosome conformation capture analysis identified interactions between the HOXD9 promoter and risk-associated SNPs at 2q31.1. Overexpressing HOXD9 in MOC cells augmented the neoplastic phenotype. These findings provide the first evidence for MOC susceptibility variants and insights into the underlying biology of the disease. PMID:26075790

  17. Coronary Artery Calcium Score and Risk Classification for Coronary Heart Disease Prediction: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Polonsky, Tamar S.; McClelland, Robyn L.; Jorgensen, Neal W.; Bild, Diane E.; Burke, Gregory L.; Guerci, Alan D.; Greenland, Philip

    2010-01-01

    Context Coronary artery calcium score (CACS) has been shown to predict future coronary heart disease (CHD) events. However, the extent to which adding CACS to traditional CHD risk factors improves classification of risk is unclear. Objective To determine whether adding CACS to a prediction model based on traditional risk factors improves classification of risk. Design, Setting and Participants CACS was measured by computed tomography on 6,814 participants from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA), a population-based cohort without known cardiovascular disease. Recruitment spanned July 2000 to September 2002; follow-up extended through May 2008. Participants with diabetes were excluded for the primary analysis. Five-year risk estimates for incident CHD were categorized as 0-<3%, 3-<10%, and ≥10% using Cox proportional hazards models. Model 1 used age, gender, tobacco use, systolic blood pressure, antihypertensive medication use, total and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and race/ethnicity. Model 2 used these risk factors plus CACS. We calculated the net reclassification improvement (NRI) and compared the distribution of risk using Model 2 versus Model 1. Main Outcome Measures Incident CHD events Results Over 5.8 years median follow-up, 209 CHD events occurred, of which 122 were myocardial infarction, death from CHD, or resuscitated cardiac arrest. Model 2 resulted in significant improvements in risk prediction compared to Model 1 (NRI=0.25, 95% confidence interval 0.16-0.34, P<0.001). With Model 1, 69% of the cohort was classified in the highest or lowest risk categories, compared to 77% with Model 2. An additional 23% of those who experienced events were reclassified to high risk, and an additional 13% without events were reclassified to low risk using Model 2. Conclusions In the MESA cohort, addition of CACS to a prediction model based on traditional risk factors significantly improved the classification of risk and placed more individuals in

  18. Significance and limitation of the pathological classification of TDP-43 proteinopathy.

    PubMed

    Arai, Tetsuaki

    2014-12-01

    Based on the cerebral tans-activation response DNA protein 43 (TDP-43) immunohistochemistry, frontotemporal lobar degeneration with TDP-43 pathology (FTLD-TDP) is classified into four subtypes: type A has numerous neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions (NCIs) and dystrophic neurites (DNs); type B has numerous NCIs with few DNs; type C is characterized by DNs which are often longer and thicker than DNs in type A, with few NCIs; and type D has numerous neuronal intranuclear inclusions and DNs with few NCIs. The relevance of this classification system is supported by clinical, biochemical and genetic correlations, although there is still significant heterogeneity, especially in cases with type A pathology. The subtypes of TDP-43 pathology should be determined in cases with other neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies, to evaluate the pathological significance of TDP-43 abnormality in them. The results of the biochemical analyses of the diseased brains and the cellular models suggest that different strains of TDP-43 with different conformations may determine the clinicopathological phenotypes of TDP-43 proteinopathy, like prion disease. Clarifying the mechanism of the conformational changes of TDP-43 leading to the formation of multiple abnormal strains may be important for differential diagnosis and developing disease-modifying therapy for TDP-43 proteinopathy. PMID:25196969

  19. How significant is perceived environmental risk to business location decisions?

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, T.; Calzonetti, F.

    1996-12-31

    It has been argued that adverse perceptions of risk associated with high-level nuclear waste (HLNW) facilities will have significant impacts on the attraction of new, and the maintenance of existing business activities in areas in which adverse perceptions develop. We examine this proposition by the considering the importance of environmental amenities and a range of other factors to business location decisions using evidence from surveys of more than 400 manufacturing and business service establishments in Colorado and Utah. We show that the importance of environmental amenities varies according to a number of factors, in particular the type of product (manufactured product or business service), type of establishment (single-establishment firm or establishment of a multilocational firm) and establishment employment size. Policies designed to offset the loss of business activity that might result from adverse risk perceptions associated with HLNW facilities must therefore take into account how sensitive various forms of business activity present or likely to locate in any particular area might be to environmental factors.

  20. A novel integrated cytogenetic and genomic classification refines risk stratification in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Moorman, Anthony V; Enshaei, Amir; Schwab, Claire; Wade, Rachel; Chilton, Lucy; Elliott, Alannah; Richardson, Stacey; Hancock, Jeremy; Kinsey, Sally E; Mitchell, Christopher D; Goulden, Nicholas; Vora, Ajay; Harrison, Christine J

    2014-08-28

    Recent genomic studies have provided a refined genetic map of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and increased the number of potential prognostic markers. Therefore, we integrated copy-number alteration data from the 8 most commonly deleted genes, subordinately, with established chromosomal abnormalities to derive a 2-tier genetic classification. The classification was developed using 809 ALL97/99 patients and validated using 742 United Kingdom (UK)ALL2003 patients. Good-risk (GR) genetic features included ETV6-RUNX1, high hyperdiploidy, normal copy-number status for all 8 genes, isolated deletions affecting ETV6/PAX5/BTG1, and ETV6 deletions with a single additional deletion of BTG1/PAX5/CDKN2A/B. All other genetic features were classified as poor risk (PR). Three-quarters of UKALL2003 patients had a GR genetic profile and a significantly improved event-free survival (EFS) (94%) compared with patients with a PR genetic profile (79%). This difference was driven by a lower relapse rate (4% vs 17%), was seen across all patient subgroups, and was independent of other risk factors. Even genetic GR patients with minimal residual disease (>0.01%) at day 29 had an EFS in excess of 90%. In conclusion, the integration of genomic and cytogenetic data defines 2 subgroups with distinct responses to treatment and identifies a large subset of children suitable for treatment deintensification. PMID:24957142

  1. A hazard and risk classification system for catastrophic rock slope failures in Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermanns, R.; Oppikofer, T.; Anda, E.; Blikra, L. H.; Böhme, M.; Bunkholt, H.; Dahle, H.; Devoli, G.; Eikenæs, O.; Fischer, L.; Harbitz, C. B.; Jaboyedoff, M.; Loew, S.; Yugsi Molina, F. X.

    2012-04-01

    The Geological Survey of Norway carries out systematic geologic mapping of potentially unstable rock slopes in Norway that can cause a catastrophic failure. As catastrophic failure we describe failures that involve substantial fragmentation of the rock mass during run-out and that impact an area larger than that of a rock fall (shadow angle of ca. 28-32° for rock falls). This includes therefore rock slope failures that lead to secondary effects, such as a displacement wave when impacting a water body or damming of a narrow valley. Our systematic mapping revealed more than 280 rock slopes with significant postglacial deformation, which might represent localities of large future rock slope failures. This large number necessitates prioritization of follow-up activities, such as more detailed investigations, periodic monitoring and permanent monitoring and early-warning. In the past hazard and risk were assessed qualitatively for some sites, however, in order to compare sites so that political and financial decisions can be taken, it was necessary to develop a quantitative hazard and risk classification system. A preliminary classification system was presented and discussed with an expert group of Norwegian and international experts and afterwards adapted following their recommendations. This contribution presents the concept of this final hazard and risk classification that should be used in Norway in the upcoming years. Historical experience and possible future rockslide scenarios in Norway indicate that hazard assessment of large rock slope failures must be scenario-based, because intensity of deformation and present displacement rates, as well as the geological structures activated by the sliding rock mass can vary significantly on a given slope. In addition, for each scenario the run-out of the rock mass has to be evaluated. This includes the secondary effects such as generation of displacement waves or landslide damming of valleys with the potential of later

  2. Comparing Sex Offender Risk Classification Using the Static-99 and LSI-R Assessment Instruments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gentry, Amanda L.; Dulmus, Catherine N.; Theriot, Matthew T.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: This study compares sex offender risk classification using two popular actuarial risk assessment instruments--the Static-99 and the Level of Service Inventory-Revised (LSI-R). Despite their extensive use, the two scales assess different types of risk factors and research has yet to compare them. Method: Static-99 and LSI-R risk…

  3. Classification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clary, Renee; Wandersee, James

    2013-01-01

    In this article, Renee Clary and James Wandersee describe the beginnings of "Classification," which lies at the very heart of science and depends upon pattern recognition. Clary and Wandersee approach patterns by first telling the story of the "Linnaean classification system," introduced by Carl Linnacus (1707-1778), who is…

  4. Incorporating Classification Uncertainty in Competing- risks Nest- failure Analysis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nesting birds risk nest failure due to many causes. Though partitioning risk of failure among causes has long been of interest to ornithologists, formal methods for estimating competing risk have been lacking.

  5. Effect of Wound Classification on Risk-Adjustment in American College of Surgeons NSQIP

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Mila H.; Cohen, Mark E.; Bilimoria, Karl Y.; Latus, Melissa S.; Scholl, Lisa M.; Schwab, Bradley J.; Byrd, Claudia M.; Ko, Clifford Y.; Dellinger, E. Patchen; Hall, Bruce L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Surgical wound classification has been used in risk-adjustment models. However, it can be subjective and potentially improperly bias hospital quality comparisons. The objective is to examine the effect of wound classification on hospital performance risk-adjustment models. Study Design Retrospective review of the 2011 ACS NSQIP database was conducted for wound classification categories: clean, clean/contaminated, contaminated, and dirty/infected. To assess the influence of wound classification on risk-adjustment, two models were developed for each outcome: one including and one excluding wound classification. For each model, hospital postoperative complications were estimated using hierarchical multivariable regression methods. Absolute changes in hospital rank, correlations of odds-ratios, and outlier status agreement between models were examined. Results Of the 442,149 cases performed in 315 hospitals: 53.6% were classified as clean; 34.2% clean/contaminated; 6.7% contaminated; and 5.5% dirty/infected. The surgical site infection (SSI) rate was highest in dirty/infected (8.5%) and lowest in clean (1.8%) cases. For overall SSI, the absolute change in risk-adjusted hospital performance rank between models including vs. excluding wound classification was minimal (mean 4.5 out of 315 positions). The correlations between odds ratios of the two performance models were nearly perfect (R=0.9976, P<0.0001), and outlier status agreement was excellent (Kappa=0.9508, P<0.0001). Similar findings were observed in models of subgroups of SSI and other postoperative outcomes. Conclusions In circumstances where alternate information is available for risk-adjustment, there appear to be minimal differences in performance models that include vs. exclude wound classification. Therefore, ACS NSQIP is critically evaluating the continued use of wound classification in hospital performance risk-adjustment models. PMID:25053222

  6. THE USE OF GEOMORPHOLOGICAL CLASSIFICATION FOR RISK MANAGEMENT OF STREAMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Changes in the amount and types of land use in a watershed can destabilize stream channel structure, increase sediment loading and degrade in-stream habitat. Stream classification systems (e.g., Rosgen) may be useful for determining the susceptibility of stream channel segments t...

  7. The large-scale landslide risk classification in catchment scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Che-Hsin; Wu, Tingyeh; Chen, Lien-Kuang; Lin, Sheng-Chi

    2013-04-01

    The landslide disasters caused heavy casualties during Typhoon Morakot, 2009. This disaster is defined as largescale landslide due to the casualty numbers. This event also reflects the survey on large-scale landslide potential is so far insufficient and significant. The large-scale landslide potential analysis provides information about where should be focused on even though it is very difficult to distinguish. Accordingly, the authors intend to investigate the methods used by different countries, such as Hong Kong, Italy, Japan and Switzerland to clarify the assessment methodology. The objects include the place with susceptibility of rock slide and dip slope and the major landslide areas defined from historical records. Three different levels of scales are confirmed necessarily from country to slopeland, which are basin, catchment, and slope scales. Totally ten spots were classified with high large-scale landslide potential in the basin scale. The authors therefore focused on the catchment scale and employ risk matrix to classify the potential in this paper. The protected objects and large-scale landslide susceptibility ratio are two main indexes to classify the large-scale landslide risk. The protected objects are the constructions and transportation facilities. The large-scale landslide susceptibility ratio is based on the data of major landslide area and dip slope and rock slide areas. Totally 1,040 catchments are concerned and are classified into three levels, which are high, medium, and low levels. The proportions of high, medium, and low levels are 11%, 51%, and 38%, individually. This result represents the catchments with high proportion of protected objects or large-scale landslide susceptibility. The conclusion is made and it be the base material for the slopeland authorities when considering slopeland management and the further investigation.

  8. The false classification of extinction risk in noisy environments

    PubMed Central

    Connors, B. M.; Cooper, A. B.; Peterman, R. M.; Dulvy, N. K.

    2014-01-01

    Abundance trends are the basis for many classifications of threat and recovery status, but they can be a challenge to interpret because of observation error, stochastic variation in abundance (process noise) and temporal autocorrelation in that process noise. To measure the frequency of incorrectly detecting a decline (false-positive or false alarm) and failing to detect a true decline (false-negative), we simulated stable and declining abundance time series across several magnitudes of observation error and autocorrelated process noise. We then empirically estimated the magnitude of observation error and autocorrelated process noise across a broad range of taxa and mapped these estimates onto the simulated parameter space. Based on the taxa we examined, at low classification thresholds (30% decline in abundance) and short observation windows (10 years), false alarms would be expected to occur, on average, about 40% of the time assuming density-independent dynamics, whereas false-negatives would be expected to occur about 60% of the time. However, false alarms and failures to detect true declines were reduced at higher classification thresholds (50% or 80% declines), longer observation windows (20, 40, 60 years), and assuming density-dependent dynamics. The lowest false-positive and false-negative rates are likely to occur for large-bodied, long-lived animal species. PMID:24898368

  9. Constructing access in predictive medicine. Comparing classification for hereditary breast cancer risks in England, Germany and the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Aarden, Erik; Van Hoyweghen, Ine; Horstman, Klasien

    2011-02-01

    In the first decade of the twenty-first century, predictive forms of medicine, largely associated with genetics, have become increasingly prominent. This has given rise to questions about the social consequences of this development, for example with regard to the distribution of health care access. Drawing on qualitative interviews with clinic staff and public officials and on document analyses, we analyse how access to risk assessment and monitoring for hereditary breast cancer predispositions in Germany, the Netherlands and England is produced through the interaction of risk classification and health care organisation. For each of the three countries, we show how particular combinations of genetic testing and family history data, classification of risks and allocation of monitoring services in practice contribute to specific forms of inclusion and exclusion. Thus, we show how risk assessment and monitoring in Germany attributes a large role to genetic testing; how family history information plays a large role in the Netherlands; and how regional differences in health care have a significant influence in England. On the basis of our case study, we argue that health care organisation is an important facet of the allocation of health care access, as it plays an important role in mediating the influence of risk assessment technologies and risk categories in health care access. We conclude that the allocation of risk assessment and monitoring in predictive medicine deserve more extensive political attention. PMID:21208700

  10. Credit Risk Evaluation Using a C-Variable Least Squares Support Vector Classification Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Lean; Wang, Shouyang; Lai, K. K.

    Credit risk evaluation is one of the most important issues in financial risk management. In this paper, a C-variable least squares support vector classification (C-VLSSVC) model is proposed for credit risk analysis. The main idea of this model is based on the prior knowledge that different classes may have different importance for modeling and more weights should be given to those classes with more importance. The C-VLSSVC model can be constructed by a simple modification of the regularization parameter in LSSVC, whereby more weights are given to the lease squares classification errors with important classes than the lease squares classification errors with unimportant classes while keeping the regularized terms in its original form. For illustration purpose, a real-world credit dataset is used to test the effectiveness of the C-VLSSVC model.

  11. The ecology of prominences. [classification, morphology and significance to solar physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zirin, H.

    1979-01-01

    The paper discusses the roles of prominences in the solar scheme. Attention is given to classifications and the ways in which prominences exist: hydrostatic support, ballistic support, and magnetic support. In the case of ballistic support, surges are differentiated from sprays which involve the ejection of material that is already above the solar surface. Discussion also covers filimets and fibrils and the conditions for their appearance. It is proposed that most flares originate in prominence instabilities. In addition supergranulation is covered, noting the network is not seen on the boundary of unipolar regions. It is concluded that prominences play a critical role in flares and field reconnection, and the evolution of solar magnetic fields.

  12. Significance of rat mammary tumors for human risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Russo, Jose

    2015-02-01

    We have previously indicated that the ideal animal tumor model should mimic the human disease. This means that the investigator should be able to ascertain the influence of host factors on the initiation of tumorigenesis, mimic the susceptibility of tumor response based on age and reproductive history, and determine the response of the tumors induced to chemotherapy. The utilization of experimental models of mammary carcinogenesis in risk assessment requires that the influence of ovarian, pituitary, and placental hormones, among others, as well as overall reproductive events are taken into consideration, since they are important modifiers of the susceptibility of the organ to neoplastic development. Several species, such as rodents, dogs, cats, and monkeys, have been evaluated for these purposes; however, none of them fulfills all the criteria specified previously. Rodents, however, are the most widely used models; therefore, this work will concentrate on discussing the rat rodent model of mammary carcinogenesis. PMID:25714400

  13. A TEST OF WATERSHED CLASSIFICATION SYSTEMS FOR ECOLOGICAL RISK ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    To facilitate extrapolation among watersheds, ecological risk assessments should be based on a model of underlying factors influencing watershed response, particularly vulnerability. We propose a conceptual model of landscape vulnerability to serve as a basis for watershed classi...

  14. Counterfeit phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors pose significant safety risks.

    PubMed

    Jackson, G; Arver, S; Banks, I; Stecher, V J

    2010-03-01

    Counterfeit drugs are inherently dangerous and a growing problem; counterfeiters are becoming increasingly sophisticated. Growth of the counterfeit medication market is attributable in part to phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor (PDE5i) medications for erectile dysfunction (ED). Millions of counterfeit PDE5is are seized yearly and account for the bulk of all counterfeit pharmaceutical product seizures. It has been estimated that up to 2.5 million men in Europe are exposed to illicit sildenafil, suggesting that there may be as many illegal as legal users of sildenafil. Analysis of the contents of counterfeit PDE5is shows inconsistent doses of active pharmaceutical ingredients (from 0% to > 200% of labelled dose), contaminants (including talcum powder, commercial paint and printer ink) and alternative ingredients that are potentially hazardous. In one analysis, only 10.1% of samples were within 10% of the labelled tablet strength. Estimates place the proportion of counterfeit medications sold over the Internet from 44% to 90%. Of men who purchase prescription-only medication for ED without a prescription, 67% do so using the Internet. Counterfeit PDE5is pose direct and indirect risks to health, including circumvention of the healthcare system. More than 30% of men reported no healthcare interaction when purchasing ED medications. Because > 65% actually had ED, these men missed an opportunity for evaluation of comorbidities (e.g. diabetes and hypertension). Globally, increased obstacles for counterfeiters are necessary to combat pharmaceutical counterfeiting, including fines and penalties. The worldwide nature of the counterfeit problem requires proper coordination between countries to ensure adequate enforcement. Locally, physicians who treat ED need to inform patients of the dangers of ordering PDE5is via the Internet. PMID:20088883

  15. Counterfeit phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors pose significant safety risks

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, G; Arver, S; Banks, I; Stecher, V J

    2010-01-01

    Counterfeit drugs are inherently dangerous and a growing problem; counterfeiters are becoming increasingly sophisticated. Growth of the counterfeit medication market is attributable in part to phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor (PDE5i) medications for erectile dysfunction (ED). Millions of counterfeit PDE5is are seized yearly and account for the bulk of all counterfeit pharmaceutical product seizures. It has been estimated that up to 2.5 million men in Europe are exposed to illicit sildenafil, suggesting that there may be as many illegal as legal users of sildenafil. Analysis of the contents of counterfeit PDE5is shows inconsistent doses of active pharmaceutical ingredients (from 0% to > 200% of labelled dose), contaminants (including talcum powder, commercial paint and printer ink) and alternative ingredients that are potentially hazardous. In one analysis, only 10.1% of samples were within 10% of the labelled tablet strength. Estimates place the proportion of counterfeit medications sold over the Internet from 44% to 90%. Of men who purchase prescription-only medication for ED without a prescription, 67% do so using the Internet. Counterfeit PDE5is pose direct and indirect risks to health, including circumvention of the healthcare system. More than 30% of men reported no healthcare interaction when purchasing ED medications. Because > 65% actually had ED, these men missed an opportunity for evaluation of comorbidities (e.g. diabetes and hypertension). Globally, increased obstacles for counterfeiters are necessary to combat pharmaceutical counterfeiting, including fines and penalties. The worldwide nature of the counterfeit problem requires proper coordination between countries to ensure adequate enforcement. Locally, physicians who treat ED need to inform patients of the dangers of ordering PDE5is via the Internet. PMID:20088883

  16. Identification of a 24-Gene Prognostic Signature That Improves the European LeukemiaNet Risk Classification of Acute Myeloid Leukemia: An International Collaborative Study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zejuan; Herold, Tobias; He, Chunjiang; Valk, Peter J.M.; Chen, Ping; Jurinovic, Vindi; Mansmann, Ulrich; Radmacher, Michael D.; Maharry, Kati S.; Sun, Miao; Yang, Xinan; Huang, Hao; Jiang, Xi; Sauerland, Maria-Cristina; Büchner, Thomas; Hiddemann, Wolfgang; Elkahloun, Abdel; Neilly, Mary Beth; Zhang, Yanming; Larson, Richard A.; Le Beau, Michelle M.; Caligiuri, Michael A.; Döhner, Konstanze; Bullinger, Lars; Liu, Paul P.; Delwel, Ruud; Marcucci, Guido; Lowenberg, Bob; Bloomfield, Clara D.; Rowley, Janet D.; Bohlander, Stefan K.; Chen, Jianjun

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To identify a robust prognostic gene expression signature as an independent predictor of survival of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and use it to improve established risk classification. Patients and Methods Four independent sets totaling 499 patients with AML carrying various cytogenetic and molecular abnormalities were used as training sets. Two independent patient sets composed of 825 patients were used as validation sets. Notably, patients from different sets were treated with different protocols, and their gene expression profiles were derived using different microarray platforms. Cox regression and Kaplan-Meier methods were used for survival analyses. Results A prognostic signature composed of 24 genes was derived from a meta-analysis of Cox regression values of each gene across the four training sets. In multivariable models, a higher sum value of the 24-gene signature was an independent predictor of shorter overall (OS) and event-free survival (EFS) in both training and validation sets (P < .01). Moreover, this signature could substantially improve the European LeukemiaNet (ELN) risk classification of AML, and patients in three new risk groups classified by the integrated risk classification showed significantly (P < .001) distinct OS and EFS. Conclusion Despite different treatment protocols applied to patients and use of different microarray platforms for expression profiling, a common prognostic gene signature was identified as an independent predictor of survival of patients with AML. The integrated risk classification incorporating this gene signature provides a better framework for risk stratification and outcome prediction than the ELN classification. PMID:23382473

  17. Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oza, Nikunj

    2012-03-01

    A supervised learning task involves constructing a mapping from input data (normally described by several features) to the appropriate outputs. A set of training examples— examples with known output values—is used by a learning algorithm to generate a model. This model is intended to approximate the mapping between the inputs and outputs. This model can be used to generate predicted outputs for inputs that have not been seen before. Within supervised learning, one type of task is a classification learning task, in which each output is one or more classes to which the input belongs. For example, we may have data consisting of observations of sunspots. In a classification learning task, our goal may be to learn to classify sunspots into one of several types. Each example may correspond to one candidate sunspot with various measurements or just an image. A learning algorithm would use the supplied examples to generate a model that approximates the mapping between each supplied set of measurements and the type of sunspot. This model can then be used to classify previously unseen sunspots based on the candidate’s measurements. The generalization performance of a learned model (how closely the target outputs and the model’s predicted outputs agree for patterns that have not been presented to the learning algorithm) would provide an indication of how well the model has learned the desired mapping. More formally, a classification learning algorithm L takes a training set T as its input. The training set consists of |T| examples or instances. It is assumed that there is a probability distribution D from which all training examples are drawn independently—that is, all the training examples are independently and identically distributed (i.i.d.). The ith training example is of the form (x_i, y_i), where x_i is a vector of values of several features and y_i represents the class to be predicted.* In the sunspot classification example given above, each training example

  18. Classification, Identification, and Clinical Significance of Haemophilus and Aggregatibacter Species with Host Specificity for Humans

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive update on the current classification and identification of Haemophilus and Aggregatibacter species with exclusive or predominant host specificity for humans. Haemophilus influenzae and some of the other Haemophilus species are commonly encountered in the clinical microbiology laboratory and demonstrate a wide range of pathogenicity, from life-threatening invasive disease to respiratory infections to a nonpathogenic, commensal lifestyle. New species of Haemophilus have been described (Haemophilus pittmaniae and Haemophilus sputorum), and the new genus Aggregatibacter was created to accommodate some former Haemophilus and Actinobacillus species (Aggregatibacter aphrophilus, Aggregatibacter segnis, and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans). Aggregatibacter species are now a dominant etiology of infective endocarditis caused by fastidious organisms (HACEK endocarditis), and A. aphrophilus has emerged as an important cause of brain abscesses. Correct identification of Haemophilus and Aggregatibacter species based on phenotypic characterization can be challenging. It has become clear that 15 to 20% of presumptive H. influenzae isolates from the respiratory tracts of healthy individuals do not belong to this species but represent nonhemolytic variants of Haemophilus haemolyticus. Due to the limited pathogenicity of H. haemolyticus, the proportion of misidentified strains may be lower in clinical samples, but even among invasive strains, a misidentification rate of 0.5 to 2% can be found. Several methods have been investigated for differentiation of H. influenzae from its less pathogenic relatives, but a simple method for reliable discrimination is not available. With the implementation of identification by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry, the more rarely encountered species of Haemophilus and Aggregatibacter will increasingly be identified in clinical microbiology

  19. Classification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oza, Nikunj C.

    2011-01-01

    A supervised learning task involves constructing a mapping from input data (normally described by several features) to the appropriate outputs. Within supervised learning, one type of task is a classification learning task, in which each output is one or more classes to which the input belongs. In supervised learning, a set of training examples---examples with known output values---is used by a learning algorithm to generate a model. This model is intended to approximate the mapping between the inputs and outputs. This model can be used to generate predicted outputs for inputs that have not been seen before. For example, we may have data consisting of observations of sunspots. In a classification learning task, our goal may be to learn to classify sunspots into one of several types. Each example may correspond to one candidate sunspot with various measurements or just an image. A learning algorithm would use the supplied examples to generate a model that approximates the mapping between each supplied set of measurements and the type of sunspot. This model can then be used to classify previously unseen sunspots based on the candidate's measurements. This chapter discusses methods to perform machine learning, with examples involving astronomy.

  20. Analytic estimation of statistical significance maps for support vector machine based multi-variate image analysis and classification

    PubMed Central

    Gaonkar, Bilwaj; Davatzikos, Christos

    2013-01-01

    Multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA) methods such as support vector machines (SVMs) have been increasingly applied to fMRI and sMRI analyses, enabling the detection of distinctive imaging patterns. However, identifying brain regions that significantly contribute to the classification/group separation requires computationally expensive permutation testing. In this paper we show that the results of SVM-permutation testing can be analytically approximated. This approximation leads to more than a thousand fold speed up of the permutation testing procedure, thereby rendering it feasible to perform such tests on standard computers. The speed up achieved makes SVM based group difference analysis competitive with standard univariate group difference analysis methods. PMID:23583748

  1. Classification of debtor credit status and determination amount of credit risk by using linier discriminant function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aidi, Muhammad Nur; Sari, Resty Indah

    2012-05-01

    A decision of credit that given by bank or another creditur must have a risk and it called credit risk. Credit risk is an investor's risk of loss arising from a borrower who does not make payments as promised. The substantial of credit risk can lead to losses for the banks and the debtor. To minimize this problem need a further study to identify a potential new customer before the decision given. Identification of debtor can using various approaches analysis, one of them is by using discriminant analysis. Discriminant analysis in this study are used to classify whether belonging to the debtor's good credit or bad credit. The result of this study are two discriminant functions that can identify new debtor. Before step built the discriminant function, selection of explanatory variables should be done. Purpose of selection independent variable is to choose the variable that can discriminate the group maximally. Selection variables in this study using different test, for categoric variable selection of variable using proportion chi-square test, and stepwise discriminant for numeric variable. The result of this study are two discriminant functions that can identify new debtor. The selected variables that can discriminating two groups of debtor maximally are status of existing checking account, credit history, credit amount, installment rate in percentage of disposable income, sex, age in year, other installment plans, and number of people being liable to provide maintenance. This classification produce a classification accuracy rate is good enough, that is equal to 74,70%. Debtor classification using discriminant analysis has risk level that is small enough, and it ranged beetwen 14,992% and 17,608%. Based on that credit risk rate, using discriminant analysis on the classification of credit status can be used effectively.

  2. Toxic chemical hazard classification and risk acceptance guidelines for use in DOE facilities. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Craig, D.K.; Davis, J.S.; Prowse, J.; Hoffman, P.W.

    1995-03-24

    The concentration-limit guidelines presented in this document apply to airborne releases of chemicals evaluated with respect to human health effects for the purposes of hazard classification and categorization, risk assessment and safety analysis. They apply to all DOE facilities and operations involving the use of potentially hazardous chemicals. The guidelines do not address other nonradiological hazards such as fire, pressure releases (including explosions), and chemical reactivity, but the guidelines are applicable to hazardous chemical releases resulting from these events. This report presents the subcommittee`s evaluation and recommendations regarding analyses of accidentally released toxic chemicals. The premise upon which these recommendations are based is that the mechanism of action of toxic chemicals is fundamentally different from that associated with radionuclides, with the exception of carcinogens. The recommendations reported herein are restricted to the airborne pathway because in an accident scenario this typically represents the most immediately significant route of public exposure. However, the subcommittee recognizes that exposure to chemicals through other pathways, in particular waterborne, can have significant impacts on human health and the environment. Although there are a number of chemicals for which absorption through the skin can contribute measurably to the total dose in chronic (e.g., occupational) exposure situations, this pathway has not been considered for the acute exposure scenarios considered in this report. Later studies. will address these issues if it appears desirable.

  3. Pharmacology of Ultrasonic Vocalizations in adult Rats: Significance, Call Classification and Neural Substrate

    PubMed Central

    Brudzynski, Stefan M.

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacological studies of emotional arousal and initiation of emotional states in rats measured by their ultrasonic vocalizations are reviewed. It is postulated that emission of vocalizations is an inseparable feature of emotional states and it evolved from mother-infant interaction. Positive emotional states are associated with emission of 50 kHz vocalizations that could be induced by rewarding situations and dopaminergic activation of the nucleus accumbens and are mediated by D1, D2, and partially D3 dopamine receptors. Three biologically significant subtypes of 50 kHz vocalizations have been identified, all expressing positive emotional states: (1) flat calls without frequency modulation that serve as contact calls during social interactions; (2) frequencymodulated calls without trills that signal rewarding and significantly motivated situation; and (3) frequency-modulated calls with trills or trills themselves that are emitted in highly emotional situations associated with intensive affective state. Negative emotional states are associated with emission of 22 kHz vocalizations that could be induced by aversive situations, muscarinic cholinergic activation of limbic areas of medial diencephalon and forebrain, and are mediated by M2 muscarinic receptors. Two biologically significant subtypes of 22 kHz vocalizations have been identified, both expressing negative emotional sates: (1) long calls that serve as alarm calls and signal external danger; and (2) short calls that express a state of discomfort without external danger. The positive and negative states with emission of vocalizations are initiated by two ascending reticular activating subsystems: the mesolimbic dopaminergic subsystem as a specific positive arousal system, and the mesolimbic cholinergic subsystem as a specific negative arousal system. PMID:26411761

  4. Differential Risk of Injury in Child Occupants by Passenger Car Classification

    PubMed Central

    Kallan, Michael J.; Durbin, Dennis R.; Elliott, Michael R.; Menon, Rajiv A.; Winston, Flaura K.

    2003-01-01

    In the United States, passenger cars are the most common passenger vehicle, yet they vary widely in size and crashworthiness. Using data collected from a population-based sample of crashes in State Farm-insured vehicles, we quantified the risk of injury to child occupants by passenger car size and classification. Injury risk is predicted by vehicle weight; however, there is an increased risk in both Large vs. Luxury and Sports vs. Small cars, despite similar average vehicle weights in both comparisons. Parents who are purchasing passenger cars should strongly consider the size of the vehicle and its crashworthiness. PMID:12941234

  5. Differential risk of injury in child occupants by passenger car classification.

    PubMed

    Kallan, Michael J; Durbin, Dennis R; Elliott, Michael R; Menon, Rajiv A; Winston, Flaura K

    2003-01-01

    In the United States, passenger cars are the most common passenger vehicle, yet they vary widely in size and crashworthiness. Using data collected from a population-based sample of crashes in State Farm-insured vehicles, we quantified the risk of injury to child occupants by passenger car size and classification. Injury risk is predicted by vehicle weight; however, there is an increased risk in both Large vs. Luxury and Sports vs. Small cars, despite similar average vehicle weights in both comparisons. Parents who are purchasing passenger cars should strongly consider the size of the vehicle and its crashworthiness. PMID:12941234

  6. Chronic inflammation of the placenta: definition, classification, pathogenesis, and clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chong Jai; Romero, Roberto; Chaemsaithong, Piya; Kim, Jung-Sun

    2015-10-01

    Chronic inflammatory lesions of the placenta are characterized by the infiltration of the organ by lymphocytes, plasma cells, and/or macrophages and may result from infections (viral, bacterial, parasitic) or be of immune origin (maternal anti-fetal rejection). The 3 major lesions are villitis (when the inflammatory process affects the villous tree), chronic chorioamnionitis (which affects the chorioamniotic membranes), and chronic deciduitis (which involves the decidua basalis). Maternal cellular infiltration is a common feature of the lesions. Villitis of unknown etiology (VUE) is a destructive villous inflammatory lesion that is characterized by the infiltration of maternal T cells (CD8+ cytotoxic T cells) into chorionic villi. Migration of maternal T cells into the villi is driven by the production of T-cell chemokines in the affected villi. Activation of macrophages in the villi has been implicated in the destruction of the villous architecture. VUE has been reported in association with preterm and term fetal growth restriction, preeclampsia, fetal death, and preterm labor. Infants whose placentas have VUE are at risk for death and abnormal neurodevelopmental outcome at the age of 2 years. Chronic chorioamnionitis is the most common lesion in late spontaneous preterm birth and is characterized by the infiltration of maternal CD8+ T cells into the chorioamniotic membranes. These cytotoxic T cells can induce trophoblast apoptosis and damage the fetal membranes. The lesion frequently is accompanied by VUE. Chronic deciduitis consists of the presence of lymphocytes or plasma cells in the basal plate of the placenta. This lesion is more common in pregnancies that result from egg donation and has been reported in a subset of patients with premature labor. Chronic placental inflammatory lesions can be due to maternal anti-fetal rejection, a process associated with the development of a novel form of fetal systemic inflammatory response. The syndrome is characterized

  7. Biological meaning, statistical significance, and classification of local spatial similarities in nonhomologous proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Alexandrov, N. N.; Go, N.

    1994-01-01

    We have completed an exhaustive search for the common spatial arrangements of backbone fragments (SARFs) in nonhomologous proteins. This type of local structural similarity, incorporating short fragments of backbone atoms, arranged not necessarily in the same order along the polypeptide chain, appears to be important for protein function and stability. To estimate the statistical significance of the similarities, we have introduced a similarity score. We present several locally similar structures, with a large similarity score, which have not yet been reported. On the basis of the results of pairwise comparison, we have performed hierarchical cluster analysis of protein structures. Our analysis is not limited by comparison of single chains but also includes complex molecules consisting of several subunits. The SARFs with backbone fragments from different polypeptide chains provide a stable interaction between subunits in protein molecules. In many cases the active site of enzyme is located at the same position relative to the common SARFs, implying a function of the certain SARFs as a universal interface of the protein-substrate interaction. PMID:8069217

  8. Classification System for Identifying Women at Risk for Altered Partial Breast Irradiation Recommendations After Breast Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kowalchik, Kristin V.; Vallow, Laura A.; McDonough, Michelle; Thomas, Colleen S.; Heckman, Michael G.; Peterson, Jennifer L.; Adkisson, Cameron D.; Serago, Christopher; McLaughlin, Sarah A.

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To study the utility of preoperative breast MRI for partial breast irradiation (PBI) patient selection, using multivariable analysis of significant risk factors to create a classification rule. Methods and Materials: Between 2002 and 2009, 712 women with newly diagnosed breast cancer underwent preoperative bilateral breast MRI at Mayo Clinic Florida. Of this cohort, 566 were retrospectively deemed eligible for PBI according to the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project Protocol B-39 inclusion criteria using physical examination, mammogram, and/or ultrasound. Magnetic resonance images were then reviewed to determine their impact on patient eligibility. The patient and tumor characteristics were evaluated to determine risk factors for altered PBI eligibility after MRI and to create a classification rule. Results: Of the 566 patients initially eligible for PBI, 141 (25%) were found ineligible because of pathologically proven MRI findings. Magnetic resonance imaging detected additional ipsilateral breast cancer in 118 (21%). Of these, 62 (11%) had more extensive disease than originally noted before MRI, and 64 (11%) had multicentric disease. Contralateral breast cancer was detected in 28 (5%). Four characteristics were found to be significantly associated with PBI ineligibility after MRI on multivariable analysis: premenopausal status (P=.021), detection by palpation (P<.001), first-degree relative with a history of breast cancer (P=.033), and lobular histology (P=.002). Risk factors were assigned a score of 0-2. The risk of altered PBI eligibility from MRI based on number of risk factors was 0:18%; 1:22%; 2:42%; 3:65%. Conclusions: Preoperative bilateral breast MRI altered the PBI recommendations for 25% of women. Women who may undergo PBI should be considered for breast MRI, especially those with lobular histology or with 2 or more of the following risk factors: premenopausal, detection by palpation, and first-degree relative with a history of

  9. Suicide Risk Assessments: Which Suicide Risk Factors Psychiatric Residents Consider Significant?

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Sheng-Min; Hwang, Sunyoung; Yeon, Bora; Choi, Kyoung Ho; Oh, Youngmin; Lee, Hae-Kook; Kweon, Yong-Sil; Lee, Chung Tai

    2015-01-01

    Objective Patients visiting the emergency department (ED) after a suicide attempt are generally assessed for suicide risk by psychiatric residents. Psychiatric residents' competence in evaluating the risk posed by the patients who attempted suicide is critical to preventing suicide. Methods We investigated factors considered important by psychiatric residents when evaluating suicide risk. This study included 140 patients admitted to the ED after attempting suicide. Psychiatric residents rated patients' severity of current and future suicide risk as low/moderate/high using the Brief Emergency Room Suicide Risk Assessment (BESRA). The association between each BESRA variable and level of suicide risk was analyzed. Results Many factors were commonly considered important in evaluating the severity of current and future suicide risk. However, the following factors were only associated with future suicide risk: female gender, having no religion, family psychiatric history, history of axis I disorders, having a will, harboring no regrets, and social isolation. Conclusion Psychiatric residents use diverse factors when assessing suicide risk. Psychiatric residents might put more emphasis on non-modifiable demographic and clinical factors, concrete evidence showing suicide determination, and social isolation to assess the risk of future suicide. PMID:26207124

  10. Dimension Reduction via Unsupervised Learning Yields Significant Computational Improvements for Support Vector Machine Based Protein Family Classification.

    SciTech Connect

    Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Matzke, Melissa M.; Oehmen, Christopher S.

    2009-02-26

    Reducing the dimension of vectors used in training support vector machines (SVMs) results in a proportional speedup in training time. For large-scale problems this can make the difference between tractable and intractable training tasks. However, it is critical that classifiers trained on reduced datasets perform as reliably as their counterparts trained on high-dimensional data. We assessed principal component analysis (PCA) and sequential project pursuit (SPP) as dimension reduction strategies in the biology application of classifying proteins into well-defined functional ‘families’ (SVM-based protein family classification) by their impact on run-time, sensitivity and selectivity. Homology vectors of 4352 elements were reduced to approximately 2% of the original data size without significantly affecting accuracy using PCA and SPP, while leading to approximately a 28-fold speedup in run-time.

  11. Analysis of outcome following robotic assisted radical prostatectomy for patients with high risk prostate cancer as per D’Amico classification

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Narmada Prasad; Murugesan, Anandan; Kumar, Anand; Yadav, Rajiv

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Prognosis of prostate cancer depends on the risk stratification. D’Amico classification, the most commonly used risk stratification method is based on three factors, i.e., prostate specific antigen (PSA), Gleason grade and clinical stage. The impact of presence of multiple risk factors on prognosis after radical prostatectomy has not been studied in Indian patients. We analyzed the outcome of patients with high-risk disease undergoing robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP), as per D’Amico classification. Materials and Methods: Our study is a review of the data of all patients with high-risk prostate cancer who underwent RARP between July 2010 and January 2015. Preoperative, perioperative and outcome data were analyzed for patients with high-risk disease as per D’Amico classification. Results: Of 227 patients who underwent RARP, 90 (39.6%) were in the high-risk group. PSA > 20 ng/ml was the most common risk factor, present in 50 (55.6%) patients. All three risk factors were present in 3 patients, and single risk factor was present in 65 patients. Nine (10%) patients had lymphnode involvement, 18 (20%) had positive margin, and 38 (41.1%) had extraprostatic extension (EPE). Among these adverse outcomes, only EPE showed significant association with multiplicity of risk factors. At 12 months, 27.8% had biochemical recurrence (BCR). 92% of patients were continent at 12 months. Conclusion: About 92% of patients with high-risk disease were continent at 12 months, whereas less than one-third of the patients had BCR. EPE was the only outcome associated with multiplicity of risk factors. Adjuvant treatment is not required in two-thirds of patients. PMID:27127353

  12. Invasive endocervical adenocarcinoma: proposal for a new pattern-based classification system with significant clinical implications: a multi-institutional study.

    PubMed

    Diaz De Vivar, Andrea; Roma, Andres A; Park, Kay J; Alvarado-Cabrero, Isabel; Rasty, Golnar; Chanona-Vilchis, Jose G; Mikami, Yoshiki; Hong, Sung R; Arville, Brent; Teramoto, Norihiro; Ali-Fehmi, Rouba; Rutgers, Joanne K L; Tabassum, Farah; Barbuto, Denise; Aguilera-Barrantes, Irene; Shaye-Brown, Alexandra; Daya, Dean; Silva, Elvio G

    2013-11-01

    The management of endocervical adenocarcinoma is largely based on tumor size and depth of invasion (DOI); however, DOI is difficult to measure accurately. The surgical treatment includes resection of regional lymph nodes, even though most lymph nodes are negative and lymphadenectomies can cause significant morbidity. We have investigated alternative parameters to better identify patients at risk of node metastases. Cases of invasive endocervical adenocarcinoma from 12 institutions were reviewed, and clinical/pathologic features assessed: patients' age, tumor size, DOI, differentiation, lymph-vascular invasion, lymph node metastases, recurrences, and stage. Cases were classified according to a new pattern-based system into Pattern A (well-demarcated glands), B (early destructive stromal invasion arising from well-demarcated glands), and C (diffuse destructive invasion). In total, 352 cases (FIGO Stages I-IV) were identified. Patients' age ranged from 20 to 83 years (mean 45), DOI ranged from 0.2 to 27 mm (mean 6.73), and lymph-vascular invasion was present in 141 cases. Forty-nine (13.9%) demonstrated lymph node metastases. Using this new system, 73 patients (20.7%) with Pattern A tumors (all Stage I) were identified. None had lymph node metastases and/or recurrences. Ninety patients (25.6%) had Pattern B tumors, of which 4 (4.4%) had positive nodes; whereas 189 (53.7%) had Pattern C tumors, of which 45 (23.8%) had metastatic nodes. The proposed classification system can spare 20.7% of patients (Pattern A) of unnecessary lymphadenectomy. Patients with Pattern B rarely present with positive nodes. An aggressive approach is justified in patients with Pattern C. This classification system is simple, easy to apply, and clinically significant. PMID:24071876

  13. A Serial Risk Score Approach to Disease Classification that Accounts for Accuracy and Cost

    PubMed Central

    Huynh, Dat; Laeyendecker, Oliver; Brookmeyer, Ron

    2016-01-01

    Summary The performance of diagnostic tests for disease classification is often measured by accuracy (e.g. sensitivity or specificity); however, costs of the diagnostic test are a concern as well. Combinations of multiple diagnostic tests may improve accuracy, but incur additional costs. Here we consider serial testing approaches that maintain accuracy while controlling costs of the diagnostic tests. We present a serial risk score classification approach. The basic idea is to sequentially test with additional diagnostic tests just until persons are classified. In this way, it is not necessary to test all persons with all tests. The methods are studied in simulations and compared with logistic regression. We applied the methods to data from HIV cohort studies to identify HIV infected individuals who are recently infected (< 1 year) by testing with assays for multiple biomarkers. We find that the serial risk score classification approach can maintain accuracy while achieving a reduction in cost compared to testing all individuals with all assays. PMID:25156309

  14. Rock slope instabilities in Norway: First systematic hazard and risk classification of 22 unstable rock slopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhme, Martina; Hermanns, Reginald L.; Oppikofer, Thierry; Penna, Ivanna

    2016-04-01

    Unstable rock slopes that can cause large failures of the rock-avalanche type have been mapped in Norway for almost two decades. Four sites have earlier been characterized as high-risk objects based on expertise of few researchers. This resulted in installing continuous monitoring systems and set-up of an early-warning system for those four sites. Other unstable rock slopes have not been ranked related to their hazard or risk. There are ca. 300 other sites known of which 70 sites were installed for periodic deformation measurements using multiple techniques (Global Navigation Satellite Systems, extensometers, measurement bolts, and others). In 2012 a systematic hazard and risk classification system for unstable rock slopes was established in Norway and the mapping approach adapted to that in 2013. Now, the first 22 sites were classified for hazard, consequences and risk using this classification system. The selection of the first group of sites to be classified was based on an assumed high hazard or risk and importance given to the sites by Norwegian media and the public. Nine of the classified 22 unstable rock slopes are large sites that deform inhomogeneously or are strongly broken up in individual blocks. This suggests that different failure scenarios are possible that need to be analyzed individually. A total of 35 failure scenarios for those nine unstable rock slopes were considered. The hazard analyses were based on 9 geological parameters defined in the classification system. The classification system will be presented based on the Gamanjunni unstable rock slope. This slope has a well developed back scarp that exposes 150 m preceding displacement. The lateral limits of the unstable slope are clearly visible in the morphology and InSAR displacement data. There have been no single structures observed that allow sliding kinematically. The lower extend of the displacing rock mass is clearly defined in InSAR data and by a zone of higher rock fall activity. Yearly

  15. Adding carotid total plaque area to the Framingham risk score improves cardiovascular risk classification

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Hernan A.; Spence, John David; Armando, Luis J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cardiovascular events (CE) due to atherosclerosis are preventable. Identification of high-risk patients helps to focus resources on those most likely to benefit from expensive therapy. Atherosclerosis is not considered for patient risk categorization, even though a fraction of CE are predicted by Framingham risk factors. Our objective was to assess the incremental value of combining total plaque area (TPA) with the Framingham risk score (FramSc) using post-test probability (Ptp) in order to categorize risk in patients without CE and identify those at high risk and requiring intensive treatment. Material and methods A descriptive cross-sectional study was performed in the primary care setting in an Argentine population aged 22–90 years without CE. Both FramSc based on body mass index and Ptp-TPA were employed in 2035 patients for risk stratification and the resulting reclassification was compared. Total plaque area was measured with a high-resolution duplex ultrasound scanner. Results 57% male, 35% hypertensive, 27% hypercholesterolemia, 14% diabetes. 20.1% were low, 28.5% moderate, and 51.5% high risk. When patients were reclassified, 36% of them changed status; 24.1% migrated to a higher and 13.6% to a lower risk level (κ index = 0.360, SE κ = 0.16, p < 0.05, FramSc vs. Ptp-TPA). With this reclassification, 19.3% were low, 18.9% moderate and 61.8% high risk. Conclusions Quantification of Ptp-TPA leads to higher risk estimation than FramSc, suggesting that Ptp-TPA may be more sensitive than FramSc as a screening tool. If our observation is confirmed with a prospective study, this reclassification would improve the long-term benefits related to CE prevention. PMID:27279842

  16. Precursor Analysis for Flight- and Ground-Based Anomaly Risk Significance Determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groen, Frank

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the precursor analysis for flight and ground based anomaly risk significance. It includes information on accident precursor analysis, real models vs. models, and probabilistic analysis.

  17. Symptomatic Chiari malformation in adults: a new classification based on magnetic resonance imaging with clinical and prognostic significance.

    PubMed

    Pillay, P K; Awad, I A; Little, J R; Hahn, J F

    1991-05-01

    Thirty-five consecutive adults with Chiari malformation and progressive symptoms underwent surgical treatment at a single institution over a 3-year period. All patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging scan before and after surgery. Images of the craniovertebral junction confirmed tonsillar herniation in all cases and allowed the definition of two anatomically distinct categories of the Chiari malformation in this age group. Twenty of the 35 patients had concomitant syringomyelia and were classified as Type A. The remaining 15 patients had evidence of frank herniation of the brain stem below the foramen magnum without evidence of syringomyelia and were labeled Type B. Type A patients had a predominant central cord symptomatology; Type B patients exhibited signs and symptoms of brain stem or cerebellar compression. The principal surgical procedure consisted of decompression of the foramen magnum, opening of the fourth ventricular outlet, and plugging of the obex. Significant improvement in preoperative symptoms and signs was observed in 9 of the 20 patients (45%) with syringomyelia (Type A), as compared to 13 of the 15 patients (87%) without syringomyelia (Type B). Postoperative reduction in syrinx volume was observed in 11 of the 20 patients with syringomyelia, including all 9 patients with excellent results. Magnetic resonance imaging has allowed a classification of the adult Chiari malformation in adults based on objective anatomic criteria, with clinical and prognostic relevance. The presence of syringomyelia implies a less favorable response to surgical intervention. PMID:1876240

  18. Significant interarm blood pressure difference predicts cardiovascular risk in hypertensive patients: CoCoNet study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Su-A; Kim, Jang Young; Park, Jeong Bae

    2016-06-01

    There has been a rising interest in interarm blood pressure difference (IAD), due to its relationship with peripheral arterial disease and its possible relationship with cardiovascular disease. This study aimed to characterize hypertensive patients with a significant IAD in relation to cardiovascular risk. A total of 3699 patients (mean age, 61 ± 11 years) were prospectively enrolled in the study. Blood pressure (BP) was measured simultaneously in both arms 3 times using an automated cuff-oscillometric device. IAD was defined as the absolute difference in averaged BPs between the left and right arm, and an IAD ≥ 10 mm Hg was considered to be significant. The Framingham risk score was used to calculate the 10-year cardiovascular risk. The mean systolic IAD (sIAD) was 4.3 ± 4.1 mm Hg, and 285 (7.7%) patients showed significant sIAD. Patients with significant sIAD showed larger body mass index (P < 0.001), greater systolic BP (P = 0.050), more coronary artery disease (relative risk = 1.356, P = 0.034), and more cerebrovascular disease (relative risk = 1.521, P = 0.072). The mean 10-year cardiovascular risk was 9.3 ± 7.7%. By multiple regression, sIAD was significantly but weakly correlated with the 10-year cardiovascular risk (β = 0.135, P = 0.008). Patients with significant sIAD showed a higher prevalence of coronary artery disease, as well as an increase in 10-year cardiovascular risk. Therefore, accurate measurements of sIAD may serve as a simple and cost-effective tool for predicting cardiovascular risk in clinical settings. PMID:27310982

  19. Application of classification methods in assessment of NATO member countries' economic, security and political risks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odehnal, Jakub

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this paper is to attempt possible quantification of determinants of military expenditure and their application to current NATO member countries. To analyse the economic, security and political risks of NATO member countries, author employ multivariate statistical techniques which take into consideration the multivariate properties of the data sets used as input variables. Classification of countries based on cluster analysis has made it possible to identify disparities between NATO member countries, and thus to describe diverse economic or security environment affecting the amount of military expenditure as a percentage of the respective countries' gross domestic product.

  20. Classification-based data mining for identification of risk patterns associated with hypertension in Middle Eastern population

    PubMed Central

    Ramezankhani, Azra; Kabir, Ali; Pournik, Omid; Azizi, Fereidoun; Hadaegh, Farzad

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hypertension is a critical public health concern worldwide. Identification of risk factors using traditional multivariable models has been a field of active research. The present study was undertaken to identify risk patterns associated with hypertension incidence using data mining methods in a cohort of Iranian adult population. Data on 6205 participants (44% men) age > 20 years, free from hypertension at baseline with no history of cardiovascular disease, were used to develop a series of prediction models by 3 types of decision tree (DT) algorithms. The performances of all classifiers were evaluated on the testing data set. The Quick Unbiased Efficient Statistical Tree algorithm among men and women and Classification and Regression Tree among the total population had the best performance. The C-statistic and sensitivity for the prediction models were (0.70 and 71%) in men, (0.79 and 71%) in women, and (0.78 and 72%) in total population, respectively. In DT models, systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure, age, and waist circumference significantly contributed to the risk of incident hypertension in both genders and total population, wrist circumference and 2-h postchallenge plasma glucose among women and fasting plasma glucose among men. In men, the highest hypertension risk was seen in those with SBP > 115 mm Hg and age > 30 years. In women those with SBP > 114 mm Hg and age > 33 years had the highest risk for hypertension. For the total population, higher risk was observed in those with SBP > 114 mm Hg and age > 38 years. Our study emphasizes the utility of DTs for prediction of hypertension and exploring interaction between predictors. DT models used the easily available variables to identify homogeneous subgroups with different risk pattern for the hypertension. PMID:27583845

  1. Transmission tower classification based on landslide risk Map generated by Geographical Information System (GIS) at Cameron Highlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    K, Hazwani N.; O, Rohayu C.; U, Fathoni; Baharuddin, I. N. Z.; A, Azwin Z.

    2013-06-01

    Transmission tower is usually locates at remote area which is covered by hilly topography. Landslide is mainly occurring at hilly area and causing failure to the tower structure. This phenomenon subsequently will affect the national electricity supply. A landslide risk hazard map is generated using Geographical Information System (GIS). Risk classification is introduced to initiate the monitoring process along Jor-Bintang transmission line, Cameron Highland, Pahang. The classification has been divided into three categories, which are low, medium and high. This method can be applied in slope monitoring activities since all towers have been classified based on their risk level. Therefore, maintenance schedule can be planned smoothly and efficiently.

  2. Transmission tower classification based on landslide risk map generated by Geographical Information System (GIS) at Cameron Highlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    K, Hazwani N.; O, Rohayu C.; U, Fathoni; Baharuddin, Inz

    2013-06-01

    Transmission tower is usually locates at remote area which is covered by hilly topography. Landslide is mainly occurring at hilly area and causing failure to the tower structure. This phenomenon subsequently will affect the national electricity supply. A landslide risk hazard map is generated using Geographical Information System (GIS). Risk classification is introduced to initiate the monitoring process along Jor-Bintang transmission line, Cameron Highland, Pahang. The classification has been divided into three categories, which are low, medium and high. This method can be applied in slope monitoring activities since all towers have been classified based on their risk level. Therefore, maintenance schedule can be planned smoothly and efficiently.

  3. Carfilzomib significantly improves the progression-free survival of high-risk patients in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Rafael; Siegel, David; Dimopoulos, Meletios A.; Špička, Ivan; Masszi, Tamás; Hájek, Roman; Rosiñol, Laura; Goranova-Marinova, Vesselina; Mihaylov, Georgi; Maisnar, Vladimír; Mateos, Maria-Victoria; Wang, Michael; Niesvizky, Ruben; Oriol, Albert; Jakubowiak, Andrzej; Minarik, Jiri; Palumbo, Antonio; Bensinger, William; Kukreti, Vishal; Ben-Yehuda, Dina; Stewart, A. Keith; Obreja, Mihaela; Moreau, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The presence of certain high-risk cytogenetic abnormalities, such as translocations (4;14) and (14;16) and deletion (17p), are known to have a negative impact on survival in multiple myeloma (MM). The phase 3 study ASPIRE (N = 792) demonstrated that progression-free survival (PFS) was significantly improved with carfilzomib, lenalidomide, and dexamethasone (KRd), compared with lenalidomide and dexamethasone (Rd) in relapsed MM. This preplanned subgroup analysis of ASPIRE was conducted to evaluate KRd vs Rd by baseline cytogenetics according to fluorescence in situ hybridization. Of 417 patients with known cytogenetic risk status, 100 patients (24%) were categorized with high-risk cytogenetics (KRd, n = 48; Rd, n = 52) and 317 (76%) were categorized with standard-risk cytogenetics (KRd, n = 147; Rd, n = 170). For patients with high-risk cytogenetics, treatment with KRd resulted in a median PFS of 23.1 months, a 9-month improvement relative to treatment with Rd. For patients with standard-risk cytogenetics, treatment with KRd led to a 10-month improvement in median PFS vs Rd. The overall response rates for KRd vs Rd were 79.2% vs 59.6% (high-risk cytogenetics) and 91.2% vs 73.5% (standard-risk cytogenetics); approximately fivefold as many patients with high- or standard-risk cytogenetics achieved a complete response or better with KRd vs Rd (29.2% vs 5.8% and 38.1% vs 6.5%, respectively). KRd improved but did not abrogate the poor prognosis associated with high-risk cytogenetics. This regimen had a favorable benefit-risk profile in patients with relapsed MM, irrespective of cytogenetic risk status, and should be considered a standard of care in these patients. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01080391. PMID:27439911

  4. Validation study of Oxford Classification of IgA Nephropathy: the significance of extracapillary hypercellularity and mesangial IgG immunostaining.

    PubMed

    Ştefan, Gabriel; Ismail, Gener; Stancu, Simona; Zugravu, Adrian; Andronesi, Andreea; Mandache, Eugen; Mircescu, Gabriel

    2016-08-01

    The Oxford classification (OC) of IgA Nephropathy (IgAN) identified mesangial hypercellularity (M), endocapillary hypercellularity (E), segmental glomerulosclerosis (S), and tubular atrophy/interstitial fibrosis (T) as predictors of outcome. We aimed to validate the OC and to investigate the clinical significance of extracapillary hypercellularity and IgG immunostaining. We examined the renal outcome at December 31, 2014, of 121 adult patients with biopsy proven primary IgAN between 2003 and 2013. The primary endpoint was doubling of serum creatinine or renal replacement therapy initiation. The mean observation period was 59.7 months. Thirty-one percent of the patients presented with a grade of extracapillary hypercellularity. In comparison with the group with no crescents, they had higher grade of inflammation, lower eGFR and increased proteinuria. There were no differences between the IgA and IgA&IgG immunostaining groups regarding the disease progression risk factors. Mean kidney survival time for the entire cohort was 10.6 (9.1, 12.0) years. In the Cox regression model, the independent predictors of decreased renal survival were eGFR at time of biopsy, S1 and the presence of crescents. Our study showed that extracapillary proliferation and S1 had the greatest importance in establishing the renal prognosis of patients with IgAN. PMID:27439692

  5. Classification of worldwide bovine tuberculosis risk factors in cattle: a stratified approach

    PubMed Central

    Humblet, Marie-France; Boschiroli, Maria Laura; Saegerman, Claude

    2009-01-01

    The worldwide status of bovine tuberculosis (bTB) as a zoonosis remains of great concern. This article reviews the main risk factors for bTB in cattle based on a three-level classification: animal, herd and region/country level. A distinction is also made, whenever possible, between situations in developed and developing countries as the difference of context might have consequences in terms of risk of bTB. Recommendations are suggested to animal health professionals and scientists directly involved in the control and prevention of bTB in cattle. The determination of Millenium Development Goals for bTB is proposed to improve the control/eradication of the disease worldwide. PMID:19497258

  6. Acute myeloid leukemia in the era of precision medicine: recent advances in diagnostic classification and risk stratification

    PubMed Central

    Kansal, Rina

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a genetically heterogeneous myeloid malignancy that occurs more commonly in adults, and has an increasing incidence, most likely due to increasing age. Precise diagnostic classification of AML requires clinical and pathologic information, the latter including morphologic, immunophenotypic, cytogenetic and molecular genetic analysis. Risk stratification in AML requires cytogenetics evaluation as the most important predictor, with genetic mutations providing additional necessary information. AML with normal cytogenetics comprises about 40%-50% of all AML, and has been intensively investigated. The currently used 2008 World Health Organization classification of hematopoietic neoplasms has been proposed to be updated in 2016, also to include an update on the classification of AML, due to the continuously increasing application of genomic techniques that have led to major advances in our knowledge of the pathogenesis of AML. The purpose of this review is to describe some of these recent major advances in the diagnostic classification and risk stratification of AML. PMID:27144061

  7. Balancing research and funding using value of information and portfolio tools for nanomaterial risk classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, Matthew E.; Keisler, Jeffrey M.; Zussblatt, Niels P.; Plourde, Kenton J.; Wender, Ben A.; Linkov, Igor

    2016-02-01

    Risk research for nanomaterials is currently prioritized by means of expert workshops and other deliberative processes. However, analytical techniques that quantify and compare alternative research investments are increasingly recommended. Here, we apply value of information and portfolio decision analysis—methods commonly applied in financial and operations management—to prioritize risk research for multiwalled carbon nanotubes and nanoparticulate silver and titanium dioxide. We modify the widely accepted CB Nanotool hazard evaluation framework, which combines nano- and bulk-material properties into a hazard score, to operate probabilistically with uncertain inputs. Literature is reviewed to develop uncertain estimates for each input parameter, and a Monte Carlo simulation is applied to assess how different research strategies can improve hazard classification. The relative cost of each research experiment is elicited from experts, which enables identification of efficient research portfolios—combinations of experiments that lead to the greatest improvement in hazard classification at the lowest cost. Nanoparticle shape, diameter, solubility and surface reactivity were most frequently identified within efficient portfolios in our results.

  8. Balancing research and funding using value of information and portfolio tools for nanomaterial risk classification.

    PubMed

    Bates, Matthew E; Keisler, Jeffrey M; Zussblatt, Niels P; Plourde, Kenton J; Wender, Ben A; Linkov, Igor

    2016-02-01

    Risk research for nanomaterials is currently prioritized by means of expert workshops and other deliberative processes. However, analytical techniques that quantify and compare alternative research investments are increasingly recommended. Here, we apply value of information and portfolio decision analysis-methods commonly applied in financial and operations management-to prioritize risk research for multiwalled carbon nanotubes and nanoparticulate silver and titanium dioxide. We modify the widely accepted CB Nanotool hazard evaluation framework, which combines nano- and bulk-material properties into a hazard score, to operate probabilistically with uncertain inputs. Literature is reviewed to develop uncertain estimates for each input parameter, and a Monte Carlo simulation is applied to assess how different research strategies can improve hazard classification. The relative cost of each research experiment is elicited from experts, which enables identification of efficient research portfolios-combinations of experiments that lead to the greatest improvement in hazard classification at the lowest cost. Nanoparticle shape, diameter, solubility and surface reactivity were most frequently identified within efficient portfolios in our results. PMID:26551015

  9. Classification tree for risk assessment in patients suffering from congestive heart failure via long-term heart rate variability.

    PubMed

    Melillo, Paolo; De Luca, Nicola; Bracale, Marcello; Pecchia, Leandro

    2013-05-01

    This study aims to develop an automatic classifier for risk assessment in patients suffering from congestive heart failure (CHF). The proposed classifier separates lower risk patients from higher risk ones, using standard long-term heart rate variability (HRV) measures. Patients are labeled as lower or higher risk according to the New York Heart Association classification (NYHA). A retrospective analysis on two public Holter databases was performed, analyzing the data of 12 patients suffering from mild CHF (NYHA I and II), labeled as lower risk, and 32 suffering from severe CHF (NYHA III and IV), labeled as higher risk. Only patients with a fraction of total heartbeats intervals (RR) classified as normal-to-normal (NN) intervals (NN/RR) higher than 80% were selected as eligible in order to have a satisfactory signal quality. Classification and regression tree (CART) was employed to develop the classifiers. A total of 30 higher risk and 11 lower risk patients were included in the analysis. The proposed classification trees achieved a sensitivity and a specificity rate of 93.3% and 63.6%, respectively, in identifying higher risk patients. Finally, the rules obtained by CART are comprehensible and consistent with the consensus showed by previous studies that depressed HRV is a useful tool for risk assessment in patients suffering from CHF. PMID:24592473

  10. Relationship between coronary calcium score and high-risk plaque/significant stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Iwasaki, Kohichiro; Matsumoto, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the relationship between coronary calcium score (CCS) and vulnerable plaque/significant stenosis using coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA). METHODS CCTA was performed in 651 patients and these patients were divided into the four groups (CCS 0, 1-100, 101-400 and > 400). We studied the incidence of high-risk plaque, including positive remodeling, low attenuation plaque, spotty calcification, and napkin-ring sign, and significant stenosis in each group. RESULTS High-risk plaque was found in 1.3%, 10.1%, 13.3% and 13.4% of patients with CCS 0, 1-100, 101-400 and > 400, respectively (P < 0.001). The difference was only significant for patients with zero CCS. The incidence of significant stenosis was 0.6%, 7.6%, 13.3% and 26.9% for each patient group, respectively (P < 0.001), which represented a significant stepwise increase as CCS increased. The combined incidence of high-risk plaque and significant stenosis was 1.9%, 17.7%, 26.9% and 40.3% in each patient group, respectively (P < 0.001), again representing a significant stepwise increase with CCS. The rate of major coronary event was 0%, 4.0%, 7.9% and 17.2% in each patient group, respectively (P < 0.001), another significant stepwise increase as CCS increased. CONCLUSION Stepwise increased risk of coronary events associated with increasing CCS is caused by increasing incidence of significant stenosis, while that of high-risk plaque remains the same.

  11. Risk-Aware Planetary Rover Operation: Autonomous Terrain Classification and Path Planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ono, Masahiro; Fuchs, Thoams J.; Steffy, Amanda; Maimone, Mark; Yen, Jeng

    2015-01-01

    Identifying and avoiding terrain hazards (e.g., soft soil and pointy embedded rocks) are crucial for the safety of planetary rovers. This paper presents a newly developed groundbased Mars rover operation tool that mitigates risks from terrain by automatically identifying hazards on the terrain, evaluating their risks, and suggesting operators safe paths options that avoids potential risks while achieving specified goals. The tool will bring benefits to rover operations by reducing operation cost, by reducing cognitive load of rover operators, by preventing human errors, and most importantly, by significantly reducing the risk of the loss of rovers.

  12. Women and eating disorders, Part I: Significance and sociocultural risk factors.

    PubMed

    White, J H

    1992-01-01

    Eating disorders are a significant health problem for women today and therefore are a concern for the health professionals who work with women. The significance of this problem is addressed through epidemiological data from a Western cultural perspective. Many risk factors contribute to the development of these disorders. Broad categories including sociocultural, developmental, familial, and biological factors have been identified by clinicians and researchers. The sociocultural risk factors are the norms, standards, or values of a society. The sociocultural risk factors explored in this article are (a) the value of a thin physique, (b) the value of perfection, (c) the norm of dieting, (d) the influence of the media on these values, and (e) the choice of certain professions. The role of the health professional in prevention with respect to sociocultural factors is discussed. PMID:1478897

  13. Concomitant Sleep Disorders Significantly Increase the Risk of Cardiovascular Disease in Patients with Psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Yi-Ting; Tsai, Yi-Wen; Huang, Weng-Foung; Li, Cheng-Yuan; Wang, Ting-Shun; Tsai, Tsen-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Background The increased rates of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with psoriasis are not adequately explained by traditional risk factors. Whether concomitant sleep disorders (SDs) modify the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in patients with psoriasis remains unknown. Methods Using the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD), we conducted a cohort study to investigate the association between concomitant SDs and CVD risk in patients with psoriasis. Data from 99,628 adults who received a psoriasis diagnosis during the period from 2004 to 2010 were analyzed. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis models were used to compare the risks of ischemic heart disease (IHD) and stroke between patients with and without SDs. Results Psoriasis patients with a concomitant SD had significantly higher risks of IHD (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR], 1.25; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.22–1.28) and stroke (aHR, 1.24; 95% CI, 1.16–1.33) as compared with psoriasis patients without SDs. All psoriasis patient subgroups, including those with mild and severe psoriasis and those with and without arthritis, had increased HRs for IHD and stroke. The increases in IHD and stroke risks conferred by SDs were proportional to the dose of hypnotics used. The effect of SDs on the risks of IHD and stroke was greater in young adults than in middle-aged and older adults. Conclusions The risks of IHD and stroke were higher for psoriasis patients with SDs than for those without SDs. Clinicians should carefully evaluate CVD risk, particularly in young patients with psoriasis. PMID:26745869

  14. Risk Factors for Clinically Significant Intimate Partner Violence among Active-Duty Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith Slep, Amy M.; Foran, Heather M.; Heyman, Richard E.; Snarr, Jeffery D.

    2011-01-01

    Hypothesized risk factors for men's and women's clinically significant intimate partner violence (CS-IPV) from four ecological levels (i.e., individual, family, workplace, community) were tested in a representative sample of active-duty U.S. Air Force members (N = 42,744). When considered together, we expected only individual and family factors to…

  15. An Ecological-Transactional Model of Significant Risk Factors for Child Psychopathology in Outer Mongolia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohrt, Holbrook E.; Kohrt, Brandon A.; Waldman, Irwin; Saltzman, Kasey; Carrion, Victor G.

    2004-01-01

    The present study examined significant risk factors, including child maltreatment, for child psychopathology in a cross-cultural setting. Ninety-nine Mongolian boys, ages 3-10 years, were assessed. Primary caregivers (PCG) completed structured interviews including the Emory Combined Rating Scale (ECRS) and the Mood and Feelings Questionnaire…

  16. Classification of electrical problems detected by infrared thermography using a risk assessment process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, Gregory B.; Huff, Roy

    2016-05-01

    For more than 40 years thermography has been used for electrical problem detection. In addition, since radiometric infrared cameras can establish apparent surface temperature of the problem, a classification system is often utilized based upon surface temperature, or temperature rise above normal operating temperature or ambient air temperature. This however can be an extremely unreliable classification method for a number of reasons including: emissivity and background energy; a lack of regard for failure modes and stressors; surface temperature variability with load and ambient conditions; temperature gradient from internal source to surface; and the presence of convection, just to name a few. Standards, such as NFPA 70B, try to address some of these issues by having very low threshold temperature limits, but this as well has issues including identifying an over-abundance of non-critical problems for immediate repair. This paper will present a risk assessment process and matrix which classifies electrical problems based upon a variety of factors affecting both probability and consequence of electrical component failure. Inherent in this process will be a discussion of understanding and analysing electrical connection failure modes and failure stressors, as well as consideration of both heat energy flow and stored energy rather than only considering surface temperature as a single point predictor of catastrophic failure.

  17. The Usefulness of the TOAST Classification and Prognostic Significance of Pyramidal Symptoms During the Acute Phase of Cerebellar Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Dziadkowiak, Edyta; Chojdak-Łukasiewicz, Justyna; Guziński, Maciej; Noga, Leszek; Paradowski, Bogusław

    2016-04-01

    Cerebellar stroke is a rare condition with very nonspecific clinical features. The symptoms in the acute phase could imitate acute peripheral vestibular disorders or a brainstem lesion. The aim of this study was to assess the usefulness of the Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment (TOAST) classification in cerebellar stroke and the impact of clinical features on the prognosis. We retrospectively analyzed 107 patients with diagnosed ischemic cerebellar infarction. We studied the clinical features and compared them based on the location of the ischemic lesion and its distribution in the posterior interior cerebellar artery (PICA), superior cerebellar artery (SCA), and anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) territories. According to the TOAST classification, stroke was more prevalent in atrial fibrillation (26/107) and when the lesion was in the PICA territory (39/107). Pyramidal signs occurred in 29/107 of patients and were more prevalent when the lesion was distributed in more than two vascular regions (p = 0.00640). Mortality was higher among patients with ischemic lesion caused by cardiac sources (p = 0.00094) and with pyramidal signs (p = 0.00640). The TOAST classification is less useful in assessing supratentorial ischemic infarcts. Cardioembolic etiology, location of the ischemic lesion, and pyramidal signs support a negative prognosis. PMID:26041073

  18. Multicenter study on caries risk assessment in adults using survival Classification and Regression Trees

    PubMed Central

    Arino, Masumi; Ito, Ataru; Fujiki, Shozo; Sugiyama, Seiichi; Hayashi, Mikako

    2016-01-01

    Dental caries is an important public health problem worldwide. This study aims to prove how preventive therapies reduce the onset of caries in adult patients, and to identify patients with high or low risk of caries by using Classification and Regression Trees based survival analysis (survival CART). A clinical data set of 732 patients aged 20 to 64 years in nine Japanese general practices was analyzed with the following parameters: age, DMFT, number of mutans streptococci (SM) and Lactobacilli (LB), secretion rate and buffer capacity of saliva, and compliance with a preventive program. Results showed the incidence of primary carious lesion was affected by SM, LB and compliance with a preventive program; secondary carious lesion was affected by DMFT, SM and LB. Survival CART identified high-risk patients for primary carious lesion according to their poor compliance with a preventive program and SM (≥106 CFU/ml) with a hazard ratio of 3.66 (p = 0.0002). In the case of secondary caries, patients with LB (≥105 CFU/ml) and DMFT (>15) were identified as high risk with a hazard ratio of 3.50 (p < 0.0001). We conclude that preventive programs can be effective in limiting the incidence of primary carious lesion. PMID:27381750

  19. Multicenter study on caries risk assessment in adults using survival Classification and Regression Trees.

    PubMed

    Arino, Masumi; Ito, Ataru; Fujiki, Shozo; Sugiyama, Seiichi; Hayashi, Mikako

    2016-01-01

    Dental caries is an important public health problem worldwide. This study aims to prove how preventive therapies reduce the onset of caries in adult patients, and to identify patients with high or low risk of caries by using Classification and Regression Trees based survival analysis (survival CART). A clinical data set of 732 patients aged 20 to 64 years in nine Japanese general practices was analyzed with the following parameters: age, DMFT, number of mutans streptococci (SM) and Lactobacilli (LB), secretion rate and buffer capacity of saliva, and compliance with a preventive program. Results showed the incidence of primary carious lesion was affected by SM, LB and compliance with a preventive program; secondary carious lesion was affected by DMFT, SM and LB. Survival CART identified high-risk patients for primary carious lesion according to their poor compliance with a preventive program and SM (≥10(6) CFU/ml) with a hazard ratio of 3.66 (p = 0.0002). In the case of secondary caries, patients with LB (≥10(5) CFU/ml) and DMFT (>15) were identified as high risk with a hazard ratio of 3.50 (p < 0.0001). We conclude that preventive programs can be effective in limiting the incidence of primary carious lesion. PMID:27381750

  20. Assessment and risk classification protocol for patients in emergency units1

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Michele de Freitas Neves; Oliveira, Gabriela Novelli; Pergola-Marconato, Aline Maino; Marconato, Rafael Silva; Bargas, Eliete Boaventura; Araujo, Izilda Esmenia Muglia

    2014-01-01

    Objective to develop, validate the contents and verify the reliability of a risk classification protocol for an Emergency Unit. Method the content validation was developed in a University Hospital in a country town located in the state of Sao Paulo and was carried out in two stages: the first with the individual assessment of specialists and the second with the meeting between the researchers and the specialists. The use of the protocol followed a specific guide. Concerning reliability, the concordance or equivalent method among observers was used. Results the protocol developed showed to have content validity and, after the suggested changes were made, there were excellent results concerning reliability. Conclusion the assistance flow chart was shown to be easy to use, and facilitate the search for the complaint in each assistance priority. PMID:26107828

  1. Significantly increased risk of carotid atherosclerosis with arsenic exposure and polymorphisms in arsenic metabolism genes

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, Yi-Chen; Lien, Li-Ming; Chung, Wen-Ting; Hsieh, Fang-I; Hsieh, Pei-Fan; Wu, Meei-Maan; Tseng, Hung-Pin; Chiou, Hung-Yi; Chen, Chien-Jen

    2011-08-15

    Individual susceptibility to arsenic-induced carotid atherosclerosis might be associated with genetic variations in arsenic metabolism. The purpose of this study is to explore the interaction effect on risk of carotid atherosclerosis between arsenic exposure and risk genotypes of purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP), arsenic (+3) methyltransferase (As3MT), and glutathione S-transferase omega 1 (GSTO1) and omega 2 (GSTO2). A community-based case-control study was conducted in northeastern Taiwan to investigate the arsenic metabolic-related genetic susceptibility to carotid atherosclerosis. In total, 863 subjects, who had been genotyped and for whom the severity of carotid atherosclerosis had been determined, were included in the present study. Individual well water was collected and arsenic concentration determined using hydride generation combined with flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The result showed that a significant dose-response trend (P=0.04) of carotid atherosclerosis risk associated with increasing arsenic concentration. Non-significant association between genetic polymorphisms of PNP Gly51Ser, Pro57Pro, As3MT Met287Thr, GSTO1 Ala140Asp, and GSTO2 A-183G and the risk for development of carotid atherosclerosis were observed. However, the significant interaction effect on carotid atherosclerosis risk was found for arsenic exposure (>50 {mu}g/l) and the haplotypes of PNP (p=0.0115). A marked elevated risk of carotid atherosclerosis was observed in subjects with arsenic exposure of >50 {mu}g/l in drinking water and those who carried the PNP A-T haplotype and at least either of the As3MT risk polymorphism or GSTO risk haplotypes (OR, 6.43; 95% CI, 1.79-23.19). In conclusion, arsenic metabolic genes, PNP, As3MT, and GSTO, may exacerbate the formation of atherosclerosis in individuals with high levels of arsenic concentration in well water (>50 {mu}g/l). - Highlights: {yields}Arsenic metabolic genes might be associated with carotid atherosclerosis. {yields

  2. Exploring the color feature power for psoriasis risk stratification and classification: A data mining paradigm.

    PubMed

    Shrivastava, Vimal K; Londhe, Narendra D; Sonawane, Rajendra S; Suri, Jasjit S

    2015-10-01

    A large percentage of dermatologist׳s decision in psoriasis disease assessment is based on color. The current computer-aided diagnosis systems for psoriasis risk stratification and classification lack the vigor of color paradigm. The paper presents an automated psoriasis computer-aided diagnosis (pCAD) system for classification of psoriasis skin images into psoriatic lesion and healthy skin, which solves the two major challenges: (i) fulfills the color feature requirements and (ii) selects the powerful dominant color features while retaining high classification accuracy. Fourteen color spaces are discovered for psoriasis disease analysis leading to 86 color features. The pCAD system is implemented in a support vector-based machine learning framework where the offline image data set is used for computing machine learning offline color machine learning parameters. These are then used for transformation of the online color features to predict the class labels for healthy vs. diseased cases. The above paradigm uses principal component analysis for color feature selection of dominant features, keeping the original color feature unaltered. Using the cross-validation protocol, the above machine learning protocol is compared against the standalone grayscale features with 60 features and against the combined grayscale and color feature set of 146. Using a fixed data size of 540 images with equal number of healthy and diseased, 10 fold cross-validation protocol, and SVM of polynomial kernel of type two, pCAD system shows an accuracy of 99.94% with sensitivity and specificity of 99.93% and 99.96%. Using a varying data size protocol, the mean classification accuracies for color, grayscale, and combined scenarios are: 92.85%, 93.83% and 93.99%, respectively. The reliability of the system in these three scenarios are: 94.42%, 97.39% and 96.00%, respectively. We conclude that pCAD system using color space alone is compatible to grayscale space or combined color and grayscale

  3. Geotechnical Risk Classification for Underground Mines / Klasyfikacja Poziomu Zagrożenia Geotechnicznego W Kopalniach Podziemnych

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Ritesh Kumar; Rinne, Mikael

    2015-03-01

    Underground mining activities are prone to major hazards largely owing to geotechnical reasons. Mining combined with the confined working space and uncertain geotechnical data leads to hazards having the potential of catastrophic consequences. These incidents have the potential of causing multiple fatalities and large financial damages. Use of formal risk assessment in the past has demonstrated an important role in the prediction and prevention of accidents in risk prone industries such as petroleum, nuclear and aviation. This paper proposes a classification system for underground mining operations based on their geotechnical risk levels. The classification is done based on the type of mining method employed and the rock mass in which it is carried out. Mining methods have been classified in groups which offer similar geotechnical risk. The rock mass classification has been proposed based on bulk rock mass properties which are collected as part of the routine mine planning. This classification has been subdivided for various stages of mine planning to suit the extent of available data. Alpha-numeric coding has been proposed to identify a mining operation based on the competency of rock and risk of geotechnical failures. This alpha numeric coding has been further extended to identify mining activity under `Geotechnical Hazard Potential (GHP)'. GHP has been proposed to be used as a preliminary tool of risk assessment and risk ranking for a mining activity. The aim of such classification is to be used as a guideline for the justification of a formal geotechnical risk assessment. Górnictwo podziemne pociąga za sobą różnorakie zagrożenia spowodowane przez uwarunkowania geotechniczne. Urabianie złoża w połączeniu z pracą w zamkniętej przestrzeni oraz z niepewnymi danymi geotechnicznymi powodować może zagrożenia, które w konsekwencji prowadzić mogą do wypadków, a te potencjalnie powodować mogą skutki śmiertelne dla osób oraz

  4. Case-control study of risk factors of myelodysplastic syndromes according to World Health Organization classification in a Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Lv, Ling; Lin, Guowei; Gao, Xiang; Wu, Cuie; Dai, Junmin; Yang, Yongchen; Zou, Hejian; Sun, Hengjuan; Gu, Minghua; Chen, Xi; Fu, Hua; Bao, Liming

    2011-02-01

    Risk factors of mydelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) remain largely unknown. We conducted a hospital-based case-control study consisting of 403 newly diagnosed MDS patients according to World Health Organization classification and 806 individually gender and age-matched patient controls from 27 major hospitals in Shanghai, China, to examine relation of lifestyle, environmental, and occupational factors to risk of MDS. The study showed that all MDS (all subtypes combined) risk factors included anti tuberculosis drugs [odds ratio (OR)(adj) = 3.15; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.22-8.12] as an independent risk factor, benzene (OR(adj) = 3.73; 95% CI = 1.32-10.51), hair dye use (OR = 1.46; 95% CI = 1.03-2.07), new building and renovations (OR = 1.69; 95% CI = 1.11-2.00), pesticides (OR = 2.16; 95% CI = 1.22-3.82), and herbicides (OR = 5.33; 95% CI = 1.41-20.10) as relative risk factors. Risk factors of MDS subtype refractory cytopenia with multiple dysplasia (RCMD) were benzene (OR(adj) = 5.99; 95% CI = 1.19-30.16) and gasoline (OR(adj) = 11.44; 95% CI = 1.31-100.03) as independent risk factors, and traditional Chinese medicines (OR = 2.17; 95% CI = 1.15-4.07), pesticides (OR = 2.92; 95% CI = 1.37-6.25), and herbicides (OR = 12.00; 95% CI = 1.44-99.67) as relative risk factors. Smoking tobacco was significantly associated with refractory anemia with excess of blasts (RAEB) (OR(adj) = 2.43; 95% CI = 1.02-5.77). Education is shown as an independent protective factor against all MDS (OR(adj) = 0.90; 95% CI = 0.83-0.99) and RCMD (OR(adj) = 0.89; 95% CI = 0.79-0.99). These findings suggest that multiple modifiable behavioral, environmental, and occupational factors play a role in MDS etiology, and various MDS subtypes may have different susceptibility. PMID:21264898

  5. An ecological-transactional model of significant risk factors for child psychopathology in outer mongolia.

    PubMed

    Kohrt, Holbrook E; Kohrt, Brandon A; Waldman, Irwin; Saltzman, Kasey; Carrion, Victor G

    2004-01-01

    The present study examined significant risk factors, including child maltreatment, for child psychopathology in a cross-cultural setting. Ninety-nine Mongolian boys, ages 3-10 years, were assessed. Primary caregivers (PCG) completed structured interviews including the Emory Combined Rating Scale (ECRS) and the Mood and Feelings Questionnaire (MFQ). Structural equation modeling identifies eight risk factors affecting child psychopathology: Three with direct effects (severity of physical punishment, PCG's MFQ score, and PCG's education), three with indirect effects (cultural acceptance of violence as discipline, presence of community violence, and contact with extended family), and two with direct and indirect effects (quality of marriage/presence of spousal abuse, and household size). Results support the ecological-transactional theory of developmental psychopathology in a cross-cultural setting. Structural equation modeling provides a useful technique to isolate specific sites for intervention, while maintaining a comprehensive perspective of risk factor interaction. PMID:15577280

  6. Bioinformatics analyses of significant prognostic risk markers for thyroid papillary carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Min, Xiao-Shan; Huang, Peng; Liu, Xu; Dong, Chao; Jiang, Xiao-Lin; Yuan, Zheng-Tai; Mao, Lin-Feng; Chang, Shi

    2015-09-01

    This study was aimed to identify the prognostic risk markers for thyroid papillary carcinoma (TPC) by bioinformatics. The clinical data of TPC and their microRNAs (miRNAs) and genes expression profile data were downloaded from The Cancer Genome Atlas. Elastic net-Cox's proportional regression hazards model (EN-COX) was used to identify the prognostic associated factors. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve and Kaplan-Meier (KM) curve were used to screen the significant prognostic risk miRNA and genes. Then, the target genes of the obtained miRNAs were predicted followed by function prediction. Finally, the significant risk genes were performed literature mining and function analysis. Total 1046 miRNAs and 20531 genes in 484 cases samples were identified after data preprocessing. From the EN-COX model, 30 prognostic risk factors were obtained. Based on the 30 risk factors, 3 miRNAs and 11 genes were identified from the ROC and KM curves. The target genes of miRNA-342 such as B-cell CLL/lymphoma 2 (BCL2) were mainly enriched in the biological process related to cellular metabolic process and Disease Ontology terms of lymphoma. The target genes of miRNA-93 were mainly enriched in the pathway of G1 phase. Among the 11 prognostic risk genes, v-maf avian musculoaponeurotic fibrosarcoma oncogene homologue F (MAFF), SRY (sex-determining region Y)-box 4 (SOX4), and retinoic acid receptor, alpha (RARA) encoded transcription factors. Besides, RARA was enriched in four pathways. These prognostic markers such as miRNA-93, miRNA-342, RARA, MAFF, SOX4, and BCL2 may be used as targets for TPC chemoprevention. PMID:25908172

  7. Interpretation of risk significance of passive component aging using probabilistic structural analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, J.H. ); Atwood, C.L. )

    1993-01-01

    The probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs) being developed at most nuclear power plants to calculate the risk of core damage generally focus on the possible failure of active components. Except as initiating events, the possible failure of passive components is given little consideration. The NRC is sponsoring a project at INEL to investigate the risk significance of passive components as they age. For this project, we developed a technique to calculate the failure probability of passive components over time, and demonstrated the technique by applying it to a weld in the auxiliary feedwater (AFW) system. A decreasing yearly rupture rate for this weld was calculated instead of the increasing rupture rate trend one might expect. We attribute this result to infant mortality; that is, most of those initial flaws that will eventually lead to rupture will do so early in life. This means that although each weld in a population may be wearing out, the population as a whole can exhibit a decreasing rupture rate. This observation has implications for passive components in commercial nuclear plants and other facilities where aging is a concern. For the population of passive components that exhibit a decreasing failure rate, risk increase is not a concern. The next step of the work is to identify the attributes that contribute to this decreasing rate, and to determine any attributes that would contribute to an increasing failure rate and thus to an increased risk.

  8. Interpretation of risk significance of passive component aging using probabilistic structural analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, J.H.; Atwood, C.L.

    1993-05-01

    The probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs) being developed at most nuclear power plants to calculate the risk of core damage generally focus on the possible failure of active components. Except as initiating events, the possible failure of passive components is given little consideration. The NRC is sponsoring a project at INEL to investigate the risk significance of passive components as they age. For this project, we developed a technique to calculate the failure probability of passive components over time, and demonstrated the technique by applying it to a weld in the auxiliary feedwater (AFW) system. A decreasing yearly rupture rate for this weld was calculated instead of the increasing rupture rate trend one might expect. We attribute this result to infant mortality; that is, most of those initial flaws that will eventually lead to rupture will do so early in life. This means that although each weld in a population may be wearing out, the population as a whole can exhibit a decreasing rupture rate. This observation has implications for passive components in commercial nuclear plants and other facilities where aging is a concern. For the population of passive components that exhibit a decreasing failure rate, risk increase is not a concern. The next step of the work is to identify the attributes that contribute to this decreasing rate, and to determine any attributes that would contribute to an increasing failure rate and thus to an increased risk.

  9. Determination of the health of Lunyangwa wetland using Wetland Classification and Risk Assessment Index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanda, Elijah M. M.; Mamba, Bhekie B.; Msagati, Titus A. M.; Msilimba, Golden

    2016-04-01

    Wetlands are major sources of various ecological goods and services including storage and distribution of water in space and time which help in ensuring the availability of surface and groundwater throughout the year. However, there still remains a poor understanding of the range of values of water quality parameters that occur in wetlands either in its impacted state or under natural conditions. It was thus imperative to determine the health of Lunyangwa wetland in Mzuzu City in Malawi in order to classify and determine its state. This study used the Escom's Wetland Classification and Risk Assessment Index Field Guide to determine the overall characteristics of Lunyangwa wetland and to calculate its combined Wetland Index Score. Data on site information, field measurements (i.e. EC, pH, temperature and DO) and physical characteristics of Lunyangwa wetland were collected from March, 2013 to February, 2014. Results indicate that Lunyangwa wetland is a largely open water zone which is dominated by free-floating plants on the water surface, beneath surface and emergent in substrate. Furthermore, the wetland can be classified as of a C ecological category (score = 60-80%), which has been moderately modified with moderate risks of the losses and changes occurring in the natural habitat and biota in the wetland. It was observed that the moderate modification and risk were largely because of industrial, agricultural, urban/social catchment stressors on the wetland. This study recommends an integrated and sustainable management approach coupled with continuous monitoring and evaluation of the health of the wetland for all stakeholders in Mzuzu City. This would help to maintain the health of Lunyangwa wetland which is currently at risk of being further modified due to the identified catchment stressors.

  10. Chronic Disease Disparities by County Economic Status and Metropolitan Classification, Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, 2013

    PubMed Central

    Theis, Kristina A.; Self-Brown, Shannon; Roblin, Douglas W.; Barker, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Racial/ethnic disparities have been studied extensively. However, the combined influence of geographic location and economic status on specific health outcomes is less well studied. This study’s objective was to examine 1) the disparity in chronic disease prevalence in the United States by county economic status and metropolitan classification and 2) the social gradient by economic status. The association of hypertension, arthritis, and poor health with county economic status was also explored. Methods We used 2013 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System data. County economic status was categorized by using data on unemployment, poverty, and per capita market income. While controlling for sociodemographics and other covariates, we used multivariable logistic regression to evaluate the relationship between economic status and hypertension, arthritis, and self-rated health. Results Prevalence of hypertension, arthritis, and poor health in the poorest counties was 9%, 13%, and 15% higher, respectively, than in the most affluent counties. After we controlled for covariates, poor counties still had a higher prevalence of the studied conditions. Conclusion We found that residents of poor counties had a higher prevalence of poor health outcomes than affluent counties, even after we controlled for known risk factors. Further, the prevalence of poor health outcomes decreased as county economics improved. Findings suggest that poor counties would benefit from targeted public health interventions, better access to health care services, and improved food and built environments. PMID:27584875

  11. Diagnosis, risk stratification and management of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance and smoldering multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    van de Donk, N W C J; Mutis, T; Poddighe, P J; Lokhorst, H M; Zweegman, S

    2016-05-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) is one of the most common premalignant disorders. IgG and IgA MGUS are precursor conditions of multiple myeloma (MM), whereas light-chain MGUS is a precursor condition of light-chain MM. Smoldering MM (SMM) is a precursor condition with higher tumor burden and higher risk of progression to symptomatic MM compared to MGUS. Assessment of the risk of progression of patients with asymptomatic monoclonal gammopathies is based on various factors including clonal burden, as well as biological characteristics, such as cytogenetic abnormalities and light-chain production. Several models have been constructed that are useful in daily practice for predicting risk of progression of MGUS or SMM. Importantly, the plasma cell clone may occasionally be responsible for severe organ damage through the production of a M-protein which deposits in tissues or has autoantibody activity. These disorders are rare and often require therapy directed at eradication of the underlying clone. Importantly, recent studies have shown that asymptomatic patients with a bone marrow plasma cell percentage ≥60%, free light-chain ratio ≥100, or >1 focal lesion on MRI (myeloma-defining events) have a 80% risk of developing symptomatic MM within 2 years. These patients are now considered to have MM requiring therapy, similar to patients with symptomatic disease. In this review, we provide an overview of the new diagnostic criteria of the monoclonal gammopathies and discuss risk of progression to active MM. We also provide recommendations for the management of patients with MGUS and SMM including risk-adapted follow-up. PMID:27161311

  12. A novel subtype classification and risk of breast cancer by histone modification profiling.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaohua; Hu, Hanyang; He, Lin; Yu, Xueyuan; Liu, Xiangyu; Zhong, Rong; Shu, Maoguo

    2016-06-01

    Breast cancer has been classified into several intrinsic molecular subtypes on the basis of genetic and epigenetic factors. However, knowledge about histone modifications that contribute to the classification and development of biologically distinct breast cancer subtypes remains limited. Here we compared the genome-wide binding patterns of H3K4me3 and H3K27me3 between human mammary epithelial cells and three breast cancer cell lines representing the luminal, HER2, and basal subtypes. We characterized thousands of unique binding events as well as bivalent chromatin signatures unique to each cancer subtype, which were involved in different epigenetic regulation programs and signaling pathways in breast cancer progression. Genes linked to the unique histone mark features exhibited subtype-specific expression patterns, both in cancer cell lines and primary tumors, some of which were confirmed by qPCR in our primary cancer samples. Finally, histone mark-based gene classifiers were significantly correlated with relapse-free survival outcomes in patients. In summary, we have provided a valuable resource for the identification of novel biomarkers of subtype classification and clinical prognosis evaluation in breast cancers. PMID:27178334

  13. Risk of abnormal triple screen for Down syndrome is significantly higher in patients with female fetuses.

    PubMed

    Spong, C Y; Ghidini, A; Stanley-Christian, H; Meck, J M; Seydel, F D; Pezzullo, J C

    1999-04-01

    Previous studies have shown that mid-trimester maternal serum alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) levels are significantly higher and human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG) levels significantly lower in women with male compared with female fetuses. We have evaluated whether triple-screen criteria are more likely to identify women with female fetuses as at risk for Down syndrome. From the Georgetown University genetics database we obtained the absolute values and corresponding multiples of the median (MoM) for AFP, hCG and unconjugated oestriol (uE3) in singleton gestations for the period database November 1992 July 1996. A Down syndrome risk of 1/270 or greater at mid-trimester was considered as high risk. A total of 977 patients with triple screen and outcome information were identified, including 502 female and 475 male fetuses. Patients with female fetuses were significantly more likely to have lower serum AFP (p=0.003) and a positive triple screen for Down syndrome (72 (14 per cent) versus 45 (9 per cent), p<0.02) than those with male fetuses. The gestational age at triple screen, maternal serum hCG and uE3, race and diabetes were not significantly different between the two groups. Since Down syndrome is less common in female than male fetuses, and the rates of female and male Down syndrome fetuses detected by triple screen and subsequent amniocentesis are not significantly different, the excess of positive mid-trimester maternal serum triple screen in women with female fetuses is likely due to false-positive results. PMID:10327139

  14. Risk classification in mild cognitive impairment patients for developing Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bin; Nakatani, Eiji; Teramukai, Satoshi; Nagai, Yoji; Fukushima, Masanori

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop new risk classifications for conversion to Alzheimer's disease (AD) by comparing the relative reliability of classifiers in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). The 397 MCI subjects and all baseline data, including characteristics, neuropsychological tests, cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers and MRI findings in Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI), were used for analysis by Cox proportional hazard regression, bootstrap sampling, and c-index. Multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed the following factors to be associated with increased risk of conversion from MCI to AD during the 53-month follow-up period: AVLT 30-minute delayed recall, AVLT trial 1, Boston naming, logical delayed recall, trail-making B, CDR-sob, ADAS13, the cortical thickness of the right inferior temporal lobe (st91ta), and the left hippocampus volume. The combinations of ADAS13 at a cutoff point of 15.67 with CDR-sob at 1.5 or with the cortical thickness of the right inferior temporal lobe at 2.56 mm3 produced high conversion rates of 92.7% (82.4%-100.0%) and 88.8% (77.3%-100.0%), respectively, at 48 months. The discriminative ability based on c-index for the proposed combination was 0.68. The sample size was estimated as 504 in the group with a combination of ADAS13 and CDR-sob whose conversion rate is highest. The combination of ADAS13 with CDR-sob at an optimal cutoff point has a high reliability in classifying the MCI patients into high- and low-risk conversion to AD and will be benefit for patients' assessment and potentially facilitate the clinical development of novel therapeutics. PMID:22426014

  15. PERSONAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL RISK FACTORS SIGNIFICANTLY ASSOCIATED WITH ELEVATED BLOOD LEAD LEVELS IN RURAL THAI CHILDREN.

    PubMed

    Swaddiwudhipong, Witaya; Kavinum, Suporn; Papwijitsil, Ratchadaporn; Tontiwattanasap, Worawit; Khunyotying, Wanlee; Umpan, Jiraporn; BoonthuM, Ratchaneekorn; Kaewnate, Yingyot; Boonmee, Sasis; Thongchub, Winai; Rodsung, Thassanee

    2014-11-01

    A community-based study was conducted to determine personal risk factors and environmental sources of lead exposure for elevated blood lead levels (≥ 10 µg/dl, EBLLs) among rural children living at the Thailand-Myanmar border in Tak Province, northwestern Thailand. Six hundred ninety-five children aged 1-14 years old were screened for BLLs. Environmental specimens for lead measurements included samples of water from the streams, taps, and household containers, house floor dust, and foods. Possible lead release from the cooking ware was determined using the leaching method with acetic acid. The overall prevalence of EBLLs was 47.1% and the geometric mean level of blood lead was 9.16 µg/dl. Personal risk factors significantly associated with EBLLs included being male, younger age, anemia, and low weight-for-age. Significant environmental risk factors were exposure to a lead-acid battery of solar energy system and use of a non-certified metal cooking pot. Some families whose children had high BLLs reported production of lead bullets from the used batteries at home. About one-third of the house dust samples taken near batteries contained lead content above the recommended value, compared with none of those taken from other areas and from the houses with no batteries. The metal pots were safe for cooking rice but might be unsafe for acidic food preparation. Both nutritional intervention and lead exposure prevention programs are essential to reduce EBLLs in this population. PMID:26466436

  16. Prognostic significance of neurological signs in high-risk infants - a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Hamer, Elisa G; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this paper was to systematically review the literature on the significance of specific neurological signs in infancy, in particular in infants at risk for developmental problems such as cerebral palsy (CP). A literature search was performed using the databases PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, and AMED. Papers on infantile reactions ('primitive reflexes') and postural reactions were included if data were available allowing for calculation of sensitivity, specificity, or positive and negative predictive value for CP or atypical developmental outcome. Our search identified 23 articles on 20 different neurological signs. Properties of six neurological signs were reported in at least three different papers. The data indicated that, in early infancy, an absent Moro or plantar grasp response may be predictive for adverse developmental outcome. After early infancy, persistence of the Moro response and asymmetric tonic neck reflex was clinically significant. Prediction of a delayed emergence of the parachute reaction increases with age. Abnormal performances on the pull-to-sit manoeuvre and vertical suspension test have predictive significance throughout infancy. The neurological signs reviewed have some predictive value in infants at risk. For most of the signs, criteria for abnormality and significance are age-dependent. PMID:27027608

  17. Hazard interaction analysis for multi-hazard risk assessment: a systematic classification based on hazard-forming environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, B.; Siu, Y. L.; Mitchell, G.

    2015-12-01

    This paper develops a systematic hazard interaction classification based on the geophysical environment that natural hazards arise from - the hazard-forming environment. According to their contribution to natural hazards, geophysical environmental factors in the hazard-forming environment were categorized into two types. The first are relatively stable factors which construct the precondition for the occurrence of natural hazards, whilst the second are trigger factors, which determine the frequency and magnitude of hazards. Different combinations of geophysical environmental factors induce different hazards. Based on these geophysical environmental factors for some major hazards, the stable factors are used to identify which kinds of natural hazards influence a given area, and trigger factors are used to classify the relationships between these hazards into four types: independent, mutex, parallel and series relationships. This classification helps to ensure all possible hazard interactions among different hazards are considered in multi-hazard risk assessment. This can effectively fill the gap in current multi-hazard risk assessment methods which to date only consider domino effects. In addition, based on this classification, the probability and magnitude of multiple interacting natural hazards occurring together can be calculated. Hence, the developed hazard interaction classification provides a useful tool to facilitate improved multi-hazard risk assessment.

  18. Hazard interaction analysis for multi-hazard risk assessment: a systematic classification based on hazard-forming environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Baoyin; Siu, Yim Ling; Mitchell, Gordon

    2016-03-01

    This paper develops a systematic hazard interaction classification based on the geophysical environment that natural hazards arise from - the hazard-forming environment. According to their contribution to natural hazards, geophysical environmental factors in the hazard-forming environment were categorized into two types. The first are relatively stable factors which construct the precondition for the occurrence of natural hazards, whilst the second are trigger factors, which determine the frequency and magnitude of hazards. Different combinations of geophysical environmental factors induce different hazards. Based on these geophysical environmental factors for some major hazards, the stable factors are used to identify which kinds of natural hazards influence a given area, and trigger factors are used to classify the relationships between these hazards into four types: independent, mutex, parallel and series relationships. This classification helps to ensure all possible hazard interactions among different hazards are considered in multi-hazard risk assessment. This can effectively fill the gap in current multi-hazard risk assessment methods which to date only consider domino effects. In addition, based on this classification, the probability and magnitude of multiple interacting natural hazards occurring together can be calculated. Hence, the developed hazard interaction classification provides a useful tool to facilitate improved multi-hazard risk assessment.

  19. Low level of basal testosterone: a significant risk factor for poor oocyte yield after ovulation induction.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jing; Zhang, Qingxue; Li, Yu; Wang, Wenjun; Yang, Dongzi

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study was to further investigate the association of low androgen levels and poor ovarian response or negative pregnancy outcome in in vitro fertilisation treatment using a retrospective cohort study. Chinese women (n=1950) of relatively young age, with normal range of basal FSH and antral follicle count undergoing an in vitro fertilisation cycle were selected and testosterone and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate levels were measured on Day 3 of the menstrual cycle before subsequent in vitro fertilisation treatment. The main outcome measures of the study were ovarian stimulation parameters and clinical pregnancy. Basal testosterone levels of poor responders and non-pregnant women were significantly lower than normal responders and pregnant women, respectively. Patients with low basal testosterone levels had significantly lower number of mature oocytes, cleavage-stage embryos, frozen embryos, lower fertilisation and pregnancy rates and required higher doses of gonadotrophins. Androgen levels had no correlation with early spontaneous abortion rates. Multivariable logistic analysis revealed that low basal testosterone (<0.88nmolL(-1)) was an independent risk factor for poor oocyte yield (odds ratio: 1.61; 95% confidence interval: 1.01-2.57; P=0.045). In conclusion, a low level of basal testosterone was a significant risk factor for poor oocyte yield after ovarian stimulation and might negatively influence pregnancy chances with in vitro fertilisation. Basal dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate levels were not predictive for poor ovarian response or negative pregnancy outcome in this population. PMID:25023952

  20. [Assessment of the significance of climatogeographic conditions as health risk factors].

    PubMed

    Rakhmanov, R S; Gadzhiibragimov, D A; Medzhikova, M A; Kudriavtseva, O A

    2010-01-01

    Under the conditions of hot and mountain-continental climate, the morbidity rates in the inhabitants were estimated to be significantly lower than those in young men who had not been acclimatized or adapted to living conditions and in non-acclimatized men. A role of individual physical environmental factors (temperature, relative humidity, barometric pressure, average and maximum air speed) and integral exposure by the wind chill index (a combined impact of an air speed and ambient temperature) as risk factors to human health was defined, The mountain-continental climate showed a relationship of the influence of these factors to habitation at different altitudes above sea level. PMID:20491267

  1. C9ORF72 Intermediate Repeat Copies Are a Significant Risk Factor for Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nuytemans, Karen; Bademci, Güney; Kohli, Martin M; Beecham, Gary W; Wang, Liyong; Young, Juan I; Nahab, Fatta; Martin, Eden R; Gilbert, John R; Benatar, Michael; Haines, Jonathan L; Scott, William K; Züchner, Stephan; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Vance, Jeffery M

    2013-01-01

    We set out to determine whether expansions in the C9ORF72 repeat found in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) families are associated with Parkinson disease (PD). We determined the repeat size in a total of 889 clinically ascertained patients (including PD and essential tremor plus Parkinsonism (ETP)) and 1144 controls using a repeat-primed PCR assay. We found that large C9ORF72 repeat expansions (>30 repeats) were not contributing to PD risk. However, PD and ETP cases had a significant increase in intermediate (>20 to 30+) repeat copies compared to controls. Overall, 14 cases (13 PD, 1 ETP) and three controls had >20 repeat copies (Fisher's exact test p = 0.002). Further, seven cases and no controls had >23 repeat copies (p = 0.003). Our results suggest that intermediate copy numbers of the C9ORF72 repeat contribute to risk for PD and ETP. This also suggests that PD, ALS and FTD share some pathophysiological mechanisms of disease. Further studies are needed to elucidate the contribution of the C9ORF72 repeat in the overall PD population and to determine whether other common genetic risk factors exist between these neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:23845100

  2. Excessive occupational heat exposure: a significant ergonomic challenge and health risk for current and future workers

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Occupational heat exposure threatens the health of a worker not only when heat illness occurs but also when a worker’s performance and work capacity is impaired. Occupational contexts that involve hot and humid climatic conditions, heavy physical workloads and/or protective clothing create a strenuous and potentially dangerous thermal load for a worker. There are recognized heat prevention strategies and international thermal ergonomic standards to protect the worker. However, such standards have been developed largely in temperate western settings, and their validity and relevance is questionable for some geographical, cultural and socioeconomic contexts where the risk of excessive heat exposure can be high. There is evidence from low- and middle-income tropical countries that excessive heat exposure remains a significant issue for occupational health. Workers in these countries are likely to be at high risk of excessive heat exposure as they are densely populated, have large informal work sectors and are expected to experience substantial increases in temperature due to global climate change. The aim of this paper is to discuss current and future ergonomic risks associated with working in the heat as well as potential methods for maintaining the health and productivity of workers, particularly those most vulnerable to excessive heat exposure. PMID:25057350

  3. Excessive occupational heat exposure: a significant ergonomic challenge and health risk for current and future workers.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Rebekah A I; Epstein, Yoram; Kjellstrom, Tord

    2014-01-01

    Occupational heat exposure threatens the health of a worker not only when heat illness occurs but also when a worker's performance and work capacity is impaired. Occupational contexts that involve hot and humid climatic conditions, heavy physical workloads and/or protective clothing create a strenuous and potentially dangerous thermal load for a worker. There are recognized heat prevention strategies and international thermal ergonomic standards to protect the worker. However, such standards have been developed largely in temperate western settings, and their validity and relevance is questionable for some geographical, cultural and socioeconomic contexts where the risk of excessive heat exposure can be high. There is evidence from low- and middle-income tropical countries that excessive heat exposure remains a significant issue for occupational health. Workers in these countries are likely to be at high risk of excessive heat exposure as they are densely populated, have large informal work sectors and are expected to experience substantial increases in temperature due to global climate change. The aim of this paper is to discuss current and future ergonomic risks associated with working in the heat as well as potential methods for maintaining the health and productivity of workers, particularly those most vulnerable to excessive heat exposure. PMID:25057350

  4. Performance analysis of wavelet transforms and morphological operator-based classification of epilepsy risk levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harikumar, Rajaguru; Vijayakumar, Thangavel

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this paper is to compare the performance of singular value decomposition (SVD), expectation maximization (EM), and modified expectation maximization (MEM) as the postclassifiers for classifications of the epilepsy risk levels obtained from extracted features through wavelet transforms and morphological filters from electroencephalogram (EEG) signals. The code converter acts as a level one classifier. The seven features such as energy, variance, positive and negative peaks, spike and sharp waves, events, average duration, and covariance are extracted from EEG signals. Out of which four parameters like positive and negative peaksand spike and sharp waves, events and average duration are extracted using Haar, dB2, dB4, and Sym 8 wavelet transforms with hard and soft thresholding methods. The above said four features are also extracted through morphological filters. Then, the performance of the code converter and classifiers are compared based on the parameters such as performance index (PI) and quality value (QV).The performance index and quality value of code converters are at low value of 33.26% and 12.74, respectively. The highest PI of 98.03% and QV of 23.82 are attained at dB2 wavelet with hard thresholding method for SVD classifier. All the postclassifiers are settled at PI value of more than 90% at QV of 20.

  5. Which oropharyngeal factors are significant risk factors for obstructive sleep apnea? An age-matched study and dentist perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Ruangsri, Supanigar; Jorns, Teekayu Plangkoon; Puasiri, Subin; Luecha, Thitisan; Chaithap, Chariya; Sawanyawisuth, Kittisak

    2016-01-01

    Objective Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common sleep breathing disorder. Untreated OSA may lead to a number of cardiovascular complications. Dentists may play an important role in OSA detection by conducting careful oral examinations. This study focused on the correlation of oral anatomical features in Thai patients who presented with OSA. Methods We conducted a prospective comparative study at a sleep/hypertension clinic and a dental clinic at Khon Kaen University in Thailand. Patients with OSA were enrolled in the study, along with age-matched patients with non-OSA (controls). Baseline characteristics, clinical data, and oropharyngeal data of all patients were compared between the two groups. Oropharyngeal measurements included tongue size, torus mandibularis, Mallampati classification, palatal space, and lateral pharyngeal wall area. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify the factors associated with OSA. Results During the study period, there were 156 patients who met the study criteria; 78 were patients with OSA and the other 78 were healthy control subjects. In the OSA group, there were 43 males with a mean age of 53 (standard deviation 12.29) years and a mean BMI of 30.86 kg/mm2. There were 37 males in the control group with a mean age of 50 (standard deviation 12.04) years and a mean BMI of 24.03 kg/mm2. According to multivariate logistic analysis, three factors were perfectly associated with OSA, including torus mandibularis class 6, narrow lateral pharyngeal wall, and Mallampati class 4. There were two other significant factors associated with having OSA, namely, BMI and Mallampati classification. The adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence interval) of these two factors were 1.445 (1.017, 2.052) and 5.040 (1.655, 15.358), respectively. Conclusion Dentists may play an important role in the detection of OSA in patients with high BMI through careful oropharyngeal examination in routine dental treatment. A large torus mandibularis

  6. [Naming and classification of steroids and human stress ulcers. Articles of historic significance published by Hans Selye 70 years ago].

    PubMed

    Szabó, Sándor; Gyires, Klára

    2015-08-30

    The name of Hans Selye is mostly known worldwide as the discoverer of stress reaction. Yet, he made numerous other seminal and clinically relevant discoveries. Namely, since he had a focused research on steroid hormones originating from the adrenal cortex that play a crucial role in stress response, he was the first who introduced about 70 years ago the first classification of steroids that is still valid nowadays. This is based on three objective facts: (a) the names of steroid groups are identical with their organ of origin (e.g., corticoids from the adrenal cortex, testoids/androgens from the testis); (b) chemical structures of the steroids are identical within a group (e.g., all corticoids have pregnane nucleus with 21 carbon atoms); and (c) the biological effects are homogenous within a group (e.g., all glucocorticoids exert catabolic effect, while androgens are anabolic). It should be emphasized that Selye also discovered in animal models the pro-inflammmatory effect of mineralocorticoids and the anti-inflammatory properties of glucocorticoids, about 8-10 years before Nobel Prize was awarded to a physician for the first clinical use of adrenocorticotrop hormone and cortisone. Last, but not least, Selye was the first who recognized about 70 years ago the occurence of stress ulcers in humans, based on clinical reports on the huge increase in the number of perforated gastric anti-duodenal ulcers during bombings of London in World War II. The subsequent ulcer research by Selye`s former students and their contemporaries resulted in the recognition of anti-duodenal ulcer effect of dopamine, and the central gastroprotective actions of thyreotrop releasing hormone and endogenous opioids. Thus, Hans Selye made much more contributions to medical science and clinical practice than 'just' the discoverer of biologic stress response. PMID:26299832

  7. The APC I1307K allele conveys a significant increased risk for cancer.

    PubMed

    Leshno, Ari; Shapira, Shiran; Liberman, Eliezer; Kraus, Sarah; Sror, Miri; Harlap-Gat, Amira; Avivi, Doran; Galazan, Lior; David, Maayan; Maharshak, Nitsan; Moanis, Serhan; Arber, Nadir; Moshkowitz, Menachem

    2016-03-15

    This study is the first attempt to evaluate the association between the APC I1307K variant and overall cancer risk. It is unique in both its large sample size and in the reliability of data in the control group. The findings described in this article have major implications in terms of identifying asymptomatic individuals who are at increased risk to harbor cancer and therefore targeted to be enrolled in specific early detection and prevention programs. The prevalence of the APC I1307K missense mutation among Ashkenazi Jews is ∼ 6%. Carriers are at an increased risk for colorectal neoplasia. In this study, we examined the association of this variant with non-colorectal cancers. Consecutive 13,013 healthy subjects who underwent screening at the Integrated Cancer Prevention Center between 2006 and 2014 were enrolled. This population was supplemented with 1,611 cancer patients from the same institution. Demographics, medical history, and pathological data were recorded. Mortality data were obtained from the Ministry of Health's registry. The prevalence of APC I1307K in cancer patients and healthy subjects was compared. The APC I1307K variant was detected in 189 (11.8%) cancer patients compared to 614 (4.7%) healthy subjects, reflecting an adjusted age and sex odds ratio (OR) of 2.53 (p < 0.0001). History of two or more cancer types was associated with a positive carrier prevalence (OR = 4.38 p < 0.0001). Males had significantly increased carrier prevalence in lung, urologic, pancreatic, and skin cancers. The carrier prevalence among females was significantly higher only in breast and skin cancers. Female carriers developed cancer at a significantly older age compared to non-carriers (average 62.7 years vs. 57.8, respectively, p = 0.027), had better survival rates (HR = 0.58, p = 0.022) and overall increased longevity (average age of death 78.8 vs. 70.4 years, respectively, p = 0.003). In conclusion, the APC I1307K variant is a reliable marker for overall cancer risk

  8. Sarcopenia and sarcopenic obesity classifications and cardiometabolic risks in older women.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Enivaldo Pereira; Gadelha, André Bonadias; Safons, Marisete Peralta; Nóbrega, Otávio Toledo; Oliveira, Ricardo Jacó; Lima, Ricardo Moreno

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the association between sarcopenia and sarcopenic obesity (SO) with cardiometabolic risk factors in postmenopausal women. 149 volunteers (67.17±6.12 years) underwent body composition assessment using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and had analyzed blood samples collected for lipid profile, glucose metabolism and C-reactive protein (CRP). Sarcopenia was defined as an appendicular fat-free mass (AFFM) divided by height squared ≤5.45 kg/m(2) while SO was classified based on the residuals of a regression. Waist circumference (WC) and arterial blood pressure were also measured. Student's t-tests and correlations were used for analyses. Prevalence of sarcopenia and SO were respectively 16.8 and 21.5%. WC was significantly correlated with all the examined risk factors. AFFM relative to height squared was positively correlated with systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP), CRP, insulinaemia, HOMA score, and those classified as sarcopenic presented lower HOMA score when compared to nonsarcopenic. Regarding SO, although volunteers classified presented significantly higher fat mass (FM) and lower AFFM, it was not observed association with the examined risk factors. These findings support the association between WC and cardiometabolic risk factors in older women. In contrast, the approaches used to define sarcopenia and SO are not associated with cardiometabolic impairments. PMID:24766993

  9. Ecological status classification of the Taizi River Basin, China: a comparison of integrated risk assessment approaches.

    PubMed

    Fan, Juntao; Semenzin, Elena; Meng, Wei; Giubilato, Elisa; Zhang, Yuan; Critto, Andrea; Zabeo, Alex; Zhou, Yun; Ding, Sen; Wan, Jun; He, Mengchang; Lin, Chunye

    2015-10-01

    Integrated risk assessment approaches allow to achieve a sound evaluation of ecological status of river basins and to gain knowledge about the likely causes of impairment, useful for informing and supporting the decision-making process. In this paper, the integrated risk assessment (IRA) methodology developed in the EU MODELKEY project (and implemented in the MODELKEY Decision Support System) is applied to the Taizi River (China), in order to assess its Ecological and Chemical Status according to EU Water Framework Directive (WFD) requirements. The available dataset is derived by an extensive survey carried out in 2009 and 2010 across the Taizi River catchment, including the monitoring of physico-chemical (i.e. DO, EC, NH3-_N, chemical oxygen demand (COD), biological oxygen demand in 5 days (BOD5) and TP), chemical (i.e. polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and metals), biological (i.e. macroinvertebrates, fish, and algae), and hydromorphological parameters (i.e. water quantity, channel change and morphology diversity). The results show a negative trend in the ecological status from the highland to the lowland of the Taizi River Basin. Organic pollution from agriculture and domestic sources (i.e. COD and BOD5), unstable hydrological regime (i.e. water quantity shortage) and chemical pollutants from industry (i.e. PAHs and metals) are found to be the main stressors impacting the ecological status of the Taizi River Basin. The comparison between the results of the IRA methodology and those of a previous study (Leigh et al. 2012) indicates that the selection of indicators and integrating methodologies can have a relevant impact on the classification of the ecological status. The IRA methodology, which integrates information from five lines of evidence (i.e., biology, physico-chemistry, chemistry, ecotoxicology and hydromorphology) required by WFD, allows to better identify the biological communities that are potentially at risk and the stressors that are most

  10. Significant Impact of the MTHFR Polymorphisms and Haplotypes on Male Infertility Risk

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Nishi; Sarkar, Saumya; David, Archana; Gangwar, Pravin Kumar; Gupta, Richa; Khanna, Gita; Sankhwar, Satya Narayan; Khanna, Anil; Rajender, Singh

    2013-01-01

    Background Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) converts 5,10-methylene tetrahydrofolate to 5-methyl tetrahydrofolate and affects the activity of cellular cycles participating in nucleotide synthesis, DNA repair, genome stability, maintenance of methyl pool, and gene regulation. Genetically compromised MTHFR activity has been suggested to affect male fertility. The objective of the present study was to find the impact on infertility risk of c.203G>A, c.1298A>C, and c.1793G>A polymorphisms in the MTHFR gene. Methods PCR-RFLP and DNA sequencing were used to genotype the common SNPs in the MTHFR gene in 630 infertile and 250 fertile males. Chi-square test was applied for statistical comparison of genotype data. Linkage disequilibrium between the SNPs and the frequency of common haplotypes were assessed using Haploview software. Biochemical levels of total homocysteine (tHcy) and folic acid were measured. Meta-analysis on c.1298A>C polymorphism was performed using data from ten studies, comprising 2734 cases and 2737 controls. Results c.203G>A and c.1298A>C were found to be unrelated to infertility risk. c.1793G>A was protective against infertility (P = 0.0008). c.677C>T and c.1793G>A were in significant LD (D’ = 0.9). Folic acid and tHcy level did not correlate with male infertility. Pooled estimate on c.1298A>C data from all published studies including our data showed no association of this polymorphism with male infertility (Odds ratio = 1.035, P = 0.56), azoospermia (Odds ratio = 0.97, P = 0.74), or oligoasthenoteratozoospermia (Odds ratio = 0.92, p = 0.29). Eight haplotypes with more than 1% frequency were detected, of which CCGA was protective against infertility (p = 0.02), but the significance of the latter was not seen after applying Bonferroni correction. Conclusion Among MTHFR polymorphisms, c.203G>A and c.1298A>C do not affect infertility risk and c.1793G>A is protective against infertility. Haplotype analysis

  11. Clinically Significant Depressive Symptoms as a Risk Factor for HIV Infection Among Black MSM in Massachusetts

    PubMed Central

    Reisner, Sari L.; Skeer, Margie; Bright, Donna; Cranston, Kevin; Isenberg, Deborah; Bland, Sean; Barker, Thomas A.; Mayer, Kenneth H.

    2013-01-01

    High rates of depression have been observed among men who have sex with men (MSM) relative to the general adult male population; however, a dearth of research has explored depression among Black MSM. Black MSM (n = 197) recruited via modified respondent-driven sampling between January and July 2008 completed an interviewer-administered quantitative assessment and voluntary HIV counseling and testing. Bivariate and multivariable logistic regression procedures examined the associations of demographics, behavioral HIV risk factors, and psychosocial variables with depressive symptoms by severity, using the 20-item Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D). Adjusting for demographic and behavioral variables, significant factors associated with (1) clinically significant depressive symptoms (33%; CES-D score ≥ 16): being publicly insured by Medicaid, having serodiscordant anal sex with a casual male partner, and being diagnosed with an STD in the prior 12 months; (2) moderate depressive symptoms (19%; CES-D score 16–26): having serodiscordant unprotected anal sex with a casual male partner and being diagnosed with an STD in the prior 12 months; (3) severe depressive symptoms (14%; CES-D score 27+): being publicly insured by Medicaid and reporting difficulty accessing healthcare in the past 12 months. Moderately depressed Black MSM may be more likely to engage in behaviors that place them at increased risk for HIV and other STDs. HIV prevention interventions for Black MSM may benefit from incorporating screening and/or treatment for depression, allowing MSM who are depressed to respond more effectively to behavioral change approaches. PMID:19462228

  12. Significance of Pre-Radiographic MRI Lesions in Persons at Higher Risk for Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Leena; Chmiel, Joan S.; Almagor, Orit; Dunlop, Dorothy; Guermazi, Ali; Bathon, Joan; Eaton, Charles; Hochberg, Marc; Jackson, Rebecca; Kwoh, Kent; Mysiw, W. Jerry; Crema, Michel; Roemer, Frank; Nevitt, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Objective Little is known about early knee osteoarthritis (OA). The significance of MRI lesions in older persons without radiographic OA is unclear. Our objectives were to determine extent of tissue pathology by MRI and evaluate its significance by testing the hypotheses: cartilage damage, bone marrow lesions (BMLs), and meniscal damage are associated with prevalent frequent knee symptoms and incident persistent symptoms; BMLs and meniscal damage are associated with incident tibiofemoral cartilage damage; BMLs are associated with incident patellofemoral cartilage damage. Methods In a cohort study of 849 OAI (Osteoarthritis Initiative) participants who had bilateral K/L 0, we assessed cartilage, BMLs, and meniscal damage using MOAKS, as well as prevalent frequent knee symptoms, incident persistent symptoms, and incident cartilage damage. Multiple logistic regression (one knee/person) was used to evaluate associations between MRI lesions and each of these outcomes. Results 76% had cartilage damage, 61% BMLs, 21% meniscal tears, and 14% meniscal extrusion. Cartilage damage (any; tibiofemoral and patellofemoral), BMLs (any; tibiofemoral and patellofemoral), meniscal extrusion, and BMI were associated with prevalent frequent symptoms. Cartilage damage (isolated patellofemoral; tibiofemoral and patellofemoral), BMLs (any; isolated patellofemoral; tibiofemoral and patellofemoral), meniscal tears, and BMI were associated with incident persistent symptoms. Hand OA but no individual lesion type was associated with incident tibiofemoral cartilage damage, and BMLs (any; any patellofemoral) with incident patellofemoral damage. Having more lesion types was associated with a greater risk of outcomes. Conclusions MRI-detected lesions are not incidental and may represent early disease in persons at higher risk for knee OA. PMID:24974824

  13. Identifying Adult Dengue Patients at Low Risk for Clinically Significant Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Joshua G. X.; Thein, Tun Linn; Leo, Yee-Sin; Pang, Junxiong; Lye, David C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Clinically significant bleeding is important for subsequent optimal case management in dengue patients, but most studies have focused on dengue severity as an outcome. Our study objective was to identify differences in admission parameters between patients who developed clinically significant bleeding and those that did not. We sought to develop a model for discriminating between these patients. Methods We conducted a retrospective study of 4,383 adults aged >18 years who were hospitalized with dengue infection at Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore from 2005 to 2008. Patients were divided into those with clinically significant bleeding (n = 188), and those without (n = 4,195). Demographic, clinical, and laboratory variables on admission were compared between groups to determine factors associated with clinically significant bleeding during hospitalization. Results On admission, female gender (p<0.001); temperature >38°C (p<0.001); nausea/vomiting (p = 0.009) and abdominal pain/tenderness (p = 0.005); lower systolic blood pressure (p<0.001); higher pulse rate (p<0.001); increased absolute neutrophil count (ANC; p<0.001); reduced absolute lymphocyte count (ALC; p<0.001), haematocrit percentage (p<0.001) and platelet count (p = 0.04), and increased prothrombin time (p = 0.003) were significantly associated with clinically significant bleeding on univariate analysis. Multivariate analysis showed that independent variables in the final model were female gender (aOR 2.85; 95% CI: 1.9–4.33); temperature >38°C (aOR 1.81; 95% CI: 1.27–2.61), nausea/vomiting (aOR 1.39; 95% CI: 0.94–2.12), ANC (aOR 1.3; 95% CI: 1.15–1.46), ALC (aOR 0.4; 95% CI: 0.25–0.64), hematocrit percentage (aOR 0.96; 95% CI: 0.92–1.002) and platelet count (aOR 0.993; 95% CI: 0.988–0.998). At the cutoff of -3.919, the model achieved an AUC of 0.758 (sensitivity:0.87, specificity: 0.38, PPV: 0.06, NPV: 0.98). Conclusion Clinical risk factors associated with clinically significant

  14. Interpretation of fish biomarker data for identification, classification, risk assessment and testing of endocrine disrupting chemicals.

    PubMed

    Dang, ZhiChao

    2016-01-01

    Chemical induced changes in fish biomarkers vitellogenin (VTG), secondary sex characteristics (SSC), and sex ratio indicate modes/mechanisms of action (MOAs) of EAS (estrogen, androgen and steroidogenesis) pathways. These biomarkers could be used for defining MOAs and the causal link between MOAs and adverse effects in fish for the identification of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). This paper compiled data sets of 150 chemicals for VTG, 57 chemicals for SSC and 38 chemicals for sex ratio in fathead minnow, medaka and zebrafish. It showed 1) changes in fish biomarkers can indicate the MOAs as anticipated; 2) in addition to EAS pathways, chemicals with non-EAS pathways induced changes in fish biomarkers; 3) responses of fish biomarkers did not always follow the anticipated patterns of EAS pathways. These responses may result from the interaction of chemical-induced multiple MOAs and confounding factors like fish diet, infection, culture conditions, general toxicity and stress response. The complex response of fish biomarkers to a chemical of interest requires EDC testing at multiple biological levels. Interpretation of fish biomarker data should be combined with relevant information at different biological levels, which is critical for defining chemical specific MOAs. The utility of fish biomarker data for identification, classification, PBT assessment, risk assessment, and testing of EDCs in the regulatory context was discussed. This paper emphasizes the importance of fish biomarker data in the regulatory context, a weight of evidence approach for the interpretation of fish biomarker data and the need for defining levels of evidence for the identification of EDCs. PMID:27155823

  15. Early Recognition and Disease Prediction in the At-Risk Mental States for Psychosis Using Neurocognitive Pattern Classification

    PubMed Central

    Koutsouleris, Nikolaos; Davatzikos, Christos; Bottlender, Ronald; Patschurek-Kliche, Katja; Scheuerecker, Johanna; Decker, Petra; Gaser, Christian; Möller, Hans-Jürgen; Meisenzahl, Eva M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Neuropsychological deficits predate overt psychosis and overlap with the impairments in the established disease. However, to date, no single neurocognitive measure has shown sufficient power for a prognostic test. Thus, it remains to be determined whether multivariate neurocognitive pattern classification could facilitate the diagnostic identification of different at-risk mental states (ARMS) for psychosis and the individualized prediction of illness transition. Methods: First, classification of 30 healthy controls (HC) vs 48 ARMS individuals subgrouped into 20 “early,” 28 “late” ARMS subjects was performed based on a comprehensive neuropsychological test battery. Second, disease prediction was evaluated by categorizing the neurocognitive baseline data of those ARMS individuals with transition (n = 15) vs non transition (n = 20) vs HC after 4 years of follow-up. Generalizability of classification was estimated by repeated double cross-validation. Results: The 3-group cross-validated classification accuracies in the first analysis were 94.2% (HC vs rest), 85.0% (early at-risk subjects vs rest), and, 91.4% (late at-risk subjects vs rest) and 90.8% (HC vs rest), 90.8% (converters vs rest), and 89.0% (nonconverters vs rest) in the second analysis. Patterns distinguishing the early or late ARMS from HC primarily involved the verbal learning/memory domains, while executive functioning and verbal IQ deficits were particularly characteristic of the late ARMS. Disease transition was mainly predicted by executive and verbal learning impairments. Conclusions: Different ARMS and their clinical outcomes may be reliably identified on an individual basis by evaluating neurocognitive test batteries using multivariate pattern recognition. These patterns may have the potential to substantially improve the early recognition of psychosis. PMID:21576280

  16. Significance of DNA adduct studies in animal models for cancer molecular dosimetry and risk assessment.

    PubMed Central

    Beland, F A; Poirier, M C

    1993-01-01

    To elucidate the relationship between DNA adduct formation and tumorigenesis, a number of experiments have been conducted to measure DNA adducts in target tissues from experimental animals during continuous exposure to carcinogens. With aflatoxins, aromatic amines, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, tumor induction appears to be associated with the major DNA adduct detected, whereas with N-nitrosamines the response is normally correlated with minor forms of DNA damage. During continuous carcinogen administration, steady-state adduct concentrations are generally obtained in the target tissues, and there is often a linear correlation between the carcinogen concentration and the steady-state DNA adduct level. Exceptions exist when the mechanism of activation changes or with the onset of significant toxicity. Steady-state DNA adduct levels are often linearly related to the tumorigenic response. Carcinogen-induced cell proliferation occurs when significant deviations from linearity are observed. Because DNA adducts detected in humans are chemically identical to those found in experimental animals, DNA adduct data in animals may contribute to our understanding of human cancer risk. PMID:8319658

  17. [Classification, significance and sequelae of posttraumatic "occult" bone and cartilage fractures of the knee. The role of magnetic resonance].

    PubMed

    Macarini, L; Zaccheo, N; Garribba, A P; Angelelli, G; Rotondo, A

    1995-12-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) shows, in the post-traumatic knee, a fairly high number of bone and cartilage injuries missed by conventional radiography and therefore called occult. Our aim is to classify these injuries, to correlate their site and distribution with associated menisco-ligamentous injuries and with trauma mechanisms. Thirty-eight patients with a history of acute knee trauma and negative X-ray findings were examined with MRI within 15 days of trauma. 1.5- and 0.5-T units and SE T1-weighted GE T2*-weighted and SE T2-weighted sequences were used. The injuries were classified as intraosseous and osteochondral bruises or fractures. Twenty-three patients with menisco-ligamentous injuries were submitted to therapeutic arthroscopy; the sites of bone and cartilage injuries depicted with MRI were studied with arthroscopy. Seven patients were followed-up with MRI at 6-12 months to investigate subchondral injury evolution: 5 of 7 patients were also submitted to arthroscopy. MRI showed a statistically significant correlation between site and distribution of bone and cartilage injuries and between internal derangement and trauma mechanisms, i.e., contusion, distortion, stress. In our experience, MRI could identify and characterize occult subchondral injuries, thus allowing appropriate treatment. PMID:8685452

  18. Reassessing the cultural and psychopharmacological significance of Banisteriopsis caapi: preparation, classification and use among the Piaroa of Southern Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Rodd, Robin

    2008-09-01

    Recent attention to the monoamine oxidase inhibiting properties of Banisteriopsis caapi's harmala alkaloids has precluded a balanced assessment of B. caapi's overall significance to indigenous South American societies. Relatively little attention has been paid to the cultural contexts, local meanings and patterns of use of B. caapi among snuff-using societies, such as the Piaroa, who do not prepare decoctions containing N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) admixtures. This article reviews the psychopharmacological literature on B. caapi in light of recent ethnographic work conducted among the Piaroa of southern Venezuela. Piaroa shamans use only B. caapi's cambium, identify at least five distinct varieties of B. caapi, and emphasise the plant's importance for heightening empathy. Some Piaroa people also attribute a range of extra-shamanic uses to B. caapi, including as a stimulant and hunting aid. In light of the psychopharmacological complexity of harmala alkaloids, and ethnographic evidence for a wide range of B. caapi uses,future research should reconsider B. caapi's cultural heritage and psychopharmacological potential as a stimulant and antidepressant-like substance. PMID:19004422

  19. Classification of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Using Significance Analysis of Microarray-Gene Set Reduction Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Wang, Linlin; Du, Bochuan; Wang, Tianjiao; Tian, Pu

    2016-01-01

    Among non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), adenocarcinoma (AC), and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) are two major histology subtypes, accounting for roughly 40% and 30% of all lung cancer cases, respectively. Since AC and SCC differ in their cell of origin, location within the lung, and growth pattern, they are considered as distinct diseases. Gene expression signatures have been demonstrated to be an effective tool for distinguishing AC and SCC. Gene set analysis is regarded as irrelevant to the identification of gene expression signatures. Nevertheless, we found that one specific gene set analysis method, significance analysis of microarray-gene set reduction (SAMGSR), can be adopted directly to select relevant features and to construct gene expression signatures. In this study, we applied SAMGSR to a NSCLC gene expression dataset. When compared with several novel feature selection algorithms, for example, LASSO, SAMGSR has equivalent or better performance in terms of predictive ability and model parsimony. Therefore, SAMGSR is a feature selection algorithm, indeed. Additionally, we applied SAMGSR to AC and SCC subtypes separately to discriminate their respective stages, that is, stage II versus stage I. Few overlaps between these two resulting gene signatures illustrate that AC and SCC are technically distinct diseases. Therefore, stratified analyses on subtypes are recommended when diagnostic or prognostic signatures of these two NSCLC subtypes are constructed. PMID:27446945

  20. Clinically occult interstitial fibrosis in smokers: classification and significance of a surprisingly common finding in lobectomy specimens.

    PubMed

    Katzenstein, Anna-Luise A; Mukhopadhyay, Sanjay; Zanardi, Conrado; Dexter, Elizabeth

    2010-03-01

    This study reports the presence of surprisingly frequent and often severe interstitial fibrosis in cigarette smokers with no clinical evidence of interstitial lung disease. Twenty-three lobectomy specimens excised for neoplasms, including 20 from smokers, were extensively sampled, and examined semi-quantitatively for interstitial fibrosis, fibroblast foci, peribronchiolar metaplasia, honey-comb change, emphysema, and respiratory bronchiolitis. Interstitial fibrosis involving greater than 25% of slides was identified in 12 of 20 smokers (60%), but in none of the three never-smokers. Three cases were classified as specific forms of interstitial lung disease, including one each of usual interstitial pneumonia, Langerhans cell histiocytosis, and asbestosis. The remaining 9 cases did not fit with a named interstitial lung disease and were considered to represent examples of smoking-related interstitial fibrosis. This lesion was characterized by varying degrees of alveolar septal widening by collagen deposition along with emphysema and respiratory bronchiolitis. The fibrosis occurred both in subpleural and in deeper parenchyma. It surrounded enlarged airspaces of emphysema, but it also involved non-emphysematous parenchyma. Clinical progression was not documented in any case, although follow-up was short. These observations highlight the spectrum of unexpected fibrosis that is frequently encountered in lobectomy specimens from cigarette smokers. Additional investigation will be required to determine the clinical significance of smoking-related interstitial fibrosis and its relationship, if any, to other smoking-related diseases. It is important, however, that smoking-related interstitial fibrosis be distinguished from specific forms of fibrosing lung disease that may be associated with poor prognoses, especially usual interstitial pneumonia. PMID:20004953

  1. Identifying HIV most-at-risk groups in Malawi for targeted interventions. A classification tree model

    PubMed Central

    Emina, Jacques B O; Madise, Nyovani; Kuepie, Mathias; Zulu, Eliya M; Ye, Yazoume

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To identify HIV-socioeconomic predictors as well as the most-at-risk groups of women in Malawi. Design A cross-sectional survey. Setting Malawi Participants The study used a sample of 6395 women aged 15–49 years from the 2010 Malawi Health and Demographic Surveys. Interventions N/A Primary and secondary outcome measures Individual HIV status: positive or not. Results Findings from the Pearson χ2 and χ2 Automatic Interaction Detector analyses revealed that marital status is the most significant predictor of HIV. Women who are no longer in union and living in the highest wealth quintiles households constitute the most-at-risk group, whereas the less-at-risk group includes young women (15–24) never married or in union and living in rural areas. Conclusions In the light of these findings, this study recommends: (1) that the design and implementation of targeted interventions should consider the magnitude of HIV prevalence and demographic size of most-at-risk groups. Preventive interventions should prioritise couples and never married people aged 25–49 years and living in rural areas because this group accounts for 49% of the study population and 40% of women living with HIV in Malawi; (2) with reference to treatment and care, higher priority must be given to promoting HIV test, monitoring and evaluation of equity in access to treatment among women in union disruption and never married or women in union aged 30–49 years and living in urban areas; (3) community health workers, households-based campaign, reproductive-health services and reproductive-health courses at school could be used as canons to achieve universal prevention strategy, testing, counselling and treatment. PMID:23793677

  2. Factors associated with an increased risk of vertebral fracture in monoclonal gammopathies of undetermined significance.

    PubMed

    Piot, J M; Royer, M; Schmidt-Tanguy, A; Hoppé, E; Gardembas, M; Bourrée, T; Hunault, M; François, S; Boyer, F; Ifrah, N; Renier, G; Chevailler, A; Audran, M; Chappard, D; Libouban, H; Mabilleau, G; Legrand, E; Bouvard, B

    2015-01-01

    Monoclonal gammopathies of undetermined significance (MGUS) have been shown to be associated with an increased risk of fractures. This study describes prospectively the bone status of MGUS patients and determines the factors associated with vertebral fracture. We included prospectively 201 patients with MGUS, incidentally discovered, and with no known history of osteoporosis: mean age 66.6±12.5 years, 48.3% women, 51.7% immunoglobulin G (IgG), 33.3% IgM and 10.4% IgA. Light chain was kappa in 64.2% patients. All patients had spinal radiographs and bone mineral density measurement in addition to gammopathy assessment. At least one prevalent non-traumatic vertebral fracture was discovered in 18.4% patients and equally distributed between men and women. Fractured patients were older, had a lower bone density and had also more frequently a lambda light chain isotype. Compared with patients with κ light chain, the odds ratio of being fractured for patients with λ light chain was 4.32 (95% confidence interval 1.80-11.16; P=0.002). These results suggest a high prevalence of non-traumatic vertebral fractures in MGUS associated with lambda light chain isotype and not only explained by low bone density. PMID:26314987

  3. Factors associated with an increased risk of vertebral fracture in monoclonal gammopathies of undetermined significance

    PubMed Central

    Piot, J M; Royer, M; Schmidt-Tanguy, A; Hoppé, E; Gardembas, M; Bourrée, T; Hunault, M; François, S; Boyer, F; Ifrah, N; Renier, G; Chevailler, A; Audran, M; Chappard, D; Libouban, H; Mabilleau, G; Legrand, E; Bouvard, B

    2015-01-01

    Monoclonal gammopathies of undetermined significance (MGUS) have been shown to be associated with an increased risk of fractures. This study describes prospectively the bone status of MGUS patients and determines the factors associated with vertebral fracture. We included prospectively 201 patients with MGUS, incidentally discovered, and with no known history of osteoporosis: mean age 66.6±12.5 years, 48.3% women, 51.7% immunoglobulin G (IgG), 33.3% IgM and 10.4% IgA. Light chain was kappa in 64.2% patients. All patients had spinal radiographs and bone mineral density measurement in addition to gammopathy assessment. At least one prevalent non-traumatic vertebral fracture was discovered in 18.4% patients and equally distributed between men and women. Fractured patients were older, had a lower bone density and had also more frequently a lambda light chain isotype. Compared with patients with κ light chain, the odds ratio of being fractured for patients with λ light chain was 4.32 (95% confidence interval 1.80–11.16; P=0.002). These results suggest a high prevalence of non-traumatic vertebral fractures in MGUS associated with lambda light chain isotype and not only explained by low bone density. PMID:26314987

  4. Anabolic steroids detected in bodybuilding dietary supplements - a significant risk to public health.

    PubMed

    Abbate, V; Kicman, A T; Evans-Brown, M; McVeigh, J; Cowan, D A; Wilson, C; Coles, S J; Walker, C J

    2015-07-01

    Twenty-four products suspected of containing anabolic steroids and sold in fitness equipment shops in the United Kingdom (UK) were analyzed for their qualitative and semi-quantitative content using full scan gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), accurate mass liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS), high pressure liquid chromatography with diode array detection (HPLC-DAD), UV-Vis, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. In addition, X-ray crystallography enabled the identification of one of the compounds, where reference standard was not available. Of the 24 products tested, 23 contained steroids including known anabolic agents; 16 of these contained steroids that were different to those indicated on the packaging and one product contained no steroid at all. Overall, 13 different steroids were identified; 12 of these are controlled in the UK under the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971. Several of the products contained steroids that may be considered to have considerable pharmacological activity, based on their chemical structures and the amounts present. This could unwittingly expose users to a significant risk to their health, which is of particular concern for naïve users. PMID:25284752

  5. Derivation of a No-significant-risk-level (NSRL) for dermal exposures to diethanolamine.

    PubMed

    Kirman, C R; Hughes, B; Becker, R A; Hays, S M

    2016-04-01

    Diethanolamine (DEA) has been found to produce liver and kidney tumors in mice following lifetime dermal exposures. Data regarding the mode of action by which DEA produces these tumors were used to support a dose-response assessment that resulted in a no-significant-risk-level (NSRL) for dermal exposures to DEA. DEA and its metabolites are structural analogs to endogenous agents important to choline homeostasis. Sufficient information is available to support an epigenetic MOA involving the perturbation of choline homeostasis and hepatic methylation reactions in the formation of mouse liver tumors. This MOA may also apply to mouse kidney tumors, but direct measurements for key events in kidney are lacking. For both tumor types, dose-response data were pooled across four cancer bioassays conducted for DEA and DEA-containing condensates in order to provide a more robust characterization of the dose-response relationships. Doses were expressed in terms of dermally absorbed dose so that the dose-dependency and species differences in the dermal absorption of DEA were addressed. The resulting NSRL value of 3400 ug/day for dermal exposures to DEA is considered to be protective of human health for both tumor endpoints. PMID:26850685

  6. Methodology to identify risk-significant components for inservice inspection and testing

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, M.T.; Hartley, R.S.; Jones, J.L. Jr.; Kido, C.; Phillips, J.H.

    1992-08-01

    Periodic inspection and testing of vital system components should be performed to ensure the safe and reliable operation of Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear processing facilities. Probabilistic techniques may be used to help identify and rank components by their relative risk. A risk-based ranking would allow varied DOE sites to implement inspection and testing programs in an effective and cost-efficient manner. This report describes a methodology that can be used to rank components, while addressing multiple risk issues.

  7. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health as a Framework for Providing Patient- and Family-Centered Audiological Care for Older Adults and Their Significant Others.

    PubMed

    Grenness, Caitlin; Meyer, Carly; Scarinci, Nerina; Ekberg, Katie; Hickson, Louise

    2016-08-01

    Hearing impairment is highly prevalent in the older population, and it impacts communication and quality of life for both the people with the hearing difficulties and their significant others. In this article, typical audiological assessment and management of an older adult is contrasted with a best practice approach wherein the World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) framework is applied. The aim of the comparison is to demonstrate how the ICF expands our focus: rather than merely focusing on impairment, we also consider the activities, participation, and contextual factors for both the person with the hearing impairment and his or her family. A case example of an older patient and her spouse is provided, and their shared experience of the patient's hearing impairment is mapped onto the ICF framework. Family-centered hearing care is recommended for individualizing care and improving outcomes for older patients and their families. PMID:27489398

  8. Polychlorinated biphenyls still pose significant health risks to northwest Atlantic harbor seals.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Susan D; Berger, Michelle L; Weijs, Liesbeth; Päpke, Olaf; Covaci, Adrian

    2014-08-15

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) have been detected at relatively high concentrations in harbor seals, apex predators in the northwest Atlantic. As part of an ongoing assessment of the effects of PCBs on population health, we analyzed tri- to deca-PCBs in the liver of 56 harbor seals (6 adult males, 50 pups) and in 11 blubber samples (4 adult males, 7 pups) and examined tissue-specific accumulation patterns, biomagnification potential, and toxic implications of current PCB concentrations. Hepatic ∑30PCB concentrations (overall mean±standard deviation: 76,860±111,800 ng/g lipid weight, lw) were higher than blubber concentrations (48,180±69,420 ng/g lw). Regional trends were suggestive of fresh PCB inputs from the industrialized, densely populated southern coast of New England versus the rural north. The lack of temporal trends confirmed that tissue concentrations of PCBs have plateaued since the early 1990s. Tissue distribution of PCBs varied significantly by age and, surprisingly by gender among the pups. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) revealed that lighter PCBs are selectively transferred from mother to pup blubber in relation to lipid solubility (log Kow), but heavier PCBs may be efficiently transferred during late lactation from mother to pup liver. Biomagnification factors (BMFs) for ∑6PCBs from prey fish to adult male seals ranged from 90 to 547 in the liver and 88 to 532 in the blubber, and suggested that molecular structure and metabolic capacity were more important influences than log Kow on the retention of PCBs. Blubber concentrations of ∑30PCBs in 87% of the pups were an order of magnitude higher than recent toxic reference values (TRVs) calculated for ∑154PCBs in nursing harbor seals, suggesting that the pups are at risk for PCB-mediated toxicity at a vulnerable stage of development. Given the recurring pattern of epizootics in these seals, the health of the population is of concern. PMID:24875260

  9. Effect of Adding McKenzie Syndrome, Centralization, Directional Preference, and Psychosocial Classification Variables to a Risk-Adjusted Model Predicting Functional Status Outcomes for Patients With Lumbar Impairments.

    PubMed

    Werneke, Mark W; Edmond, Susan; Deutscher, Daniel; Ward, Jason; Grigsby, David; Young, Michelle; McGill, Troy; McClenahan, Brian; Weinberg, Jon; Davidow, Amy L

    2016-09-01

    Study Design Retrospective cohort. Background Patient-classification subgroupings may be important prognostic factors explaining outcomes. Objectives To determine effects of adding classification variables (McKenzie syndrome and pain patterns, including centralization and directional preference; Symptom Checklist Back Pain Prediction Model [SCL BPPM]; and the Fear-Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire subscales of work and physical activity) to a baseline risk-adjusted model predicting functional status (FS) outcomes. Methods Consecutive patients completed a battery of questionnaires that gathered information on 11 risk-adjustment variables. Physical therapists trained in Mechanical Diagnosis and Therapy methods classified each patient by McKenzie syndromes and pain pattern. Functional status was assessed at discharge by patient-reported outcomes. Only patients with complete data were included. Risk of selection bias was assessed. Prediction of discharge FS was assessed using linear stepwise regression models, allowing 13 variables to enter the model. Significant variables were retained in subsequent models. Model power (R(2)) and beta coefficients for model variables were estimated. Results Two thousand sixty-six patients with lumbar impairments were evaluated. Of those, 994 (48%), 10 (<1%), and 601 (29%) were excluded due to incomplete psychosocial data, McKenzie classification data, and missing FS at discharge, respectively. The final sample for analyses was 723 (35%). Overall R(2) for the baseline prediction FS model was 0.40. Adding classification variables to the baseline model did not result in significant increases in R(2). McKenzie syndrome or pain pattern explained 2.8% and 3.0% of the variance, respectively. When pain pattern and SCL BPPM were added simultaneously, overall model R(2) increased to 0.44. Although none of these increases in R(2) were significant, some classification variables were stronger predictors compared with some other variables included in

  10. Viral respiratory diseases in children: classification, etiology, epidemiology, and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Hemming, V G

    1994-05-01

    The epidemiology, molecular structure, cell tropism, and pathophysiology of many human disease-causing viruses have been painstakingly and elegantly characterized during the past 50 years. Vaccines and antiviral drugs of varying efficacy were developed and tested. Despite the relegation of smallpox to a freezer chest and the progress in the control of measles and hepatitis B, the viruses that cause respiratory tract infections remain significant causes of illness and death in pediatric populations worldwide. This discussion surveys the virus groups that contain nearly 200 distinct viruses that cause sporadic and epidemic respiratory infections in children. The epidemiology of infection with the influenza A and B, parainfluenza, and respiratory syncytial viruses and adenoviruses and their impact on infants and children and the groups at highest risk for morbid outcomes are discussed. PMID:8169752

  11. USUING STREAM MORPHOLOGY CLASSIFICATION TO MANAGE ECOLOGICAL RISKS FROM LAND USE CHANGES IN THE LMR WATERSHED

    EPA Science Inventory

    Changes in the amount and types of land use in a watershed can destabilize stream channel structure, increase sediment loading and degrade in-stream habitat. Stream classification systems (e.g. Rosgen) may be useful for determining the susceptibility of stream channel segments t...

  12. USING STREAM MORPHOLOGY CLASSIFICATION TO MANAGE ECOLOGICAL RISKS FROM LAND USE CHANGES IN THE LMR WATERSHED

    EPA Science Inventory

    Changes in the amount and types of land use in a watershed can destabilize stream channel structure, increase sediment loading and degrade in-stream habitat. Stream classification systems (e.g. Rosgen) may be useful for determining the susceptibility of stream channel segments t...

  13. Classification-based data mining for identification of risk patterns associated with hypertension in Middle Eastern population: A 12-year longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Ramezankhani, Azra; Kabir, Ali; Pournik, Omid; Azizi, Fereidoun; Hadaegh, Farzad

    2016-08-01

    Hypertension is a critical public health concern worldwide. Identification of risk factors using traditional multivariable models has been a field of active research. The present study was undertaken to identify risk patterns associated with hypertension incidence using data mining methods in a cohort of Iranian adult population.Data on 6205 participants (44% men) age > 20 years, free from hypertension at baseline with no history of cardiovascular disease, were used to develop a series of prediction models by 3 types of decision tree (DT) algorithms. The performances of all classifiers were evaluated on the testing data set.The Quick Unbiased Efficient Statistical Tree algorithm among men and women and Classification and Regression Tree among the total population had the best performance. The C-statistic and sensitivity for the prediction models were (0.70 and 71%) in men, (0.79 and 71%) in women, and (0.78 and 72%) in total population, respectively. In DT models, systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure, age, and waist circumference significantly contributed to the risk of incident hypertension in both genders and total population, wrist circumference and 2-h postchallenge plasma glucose among women and fasting plasma glucose among men. In men, the highest hypertension risk was seen in those with SBP > 115 mm Hg and age > 30 years. In women those with SBP > 114 mm Hg and age > 33 years had the highest risk for hypertension. For the total population, higher risk was observed in those with SBP > 114 mm Hg and age > 38 years.Our study emphasizes the utility of DTs for prediction of hypertension and exploring interaction between predictors. DT models used the easily available variables to identify homogeneous subgroups with different risk pattern for the hypertension. PMID:27583845

  14. Automatic Classification of Structured Product Labels for Pregnancy Risk Drug Categories, a Machine Learning Approach

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Laritza M.; Fushman, Dina Demner

    2015-01-01

    With regular expressions and manual review, 18,342 FDA-approved drug product labels were processed to determine if the five standard pregnancy drug risk categories were mentioned in the label. After excluding 81 drugs with multiple-risk categories, 83% of the labels had a risk category within the text and 17% labels did not. We trained a Sequential Minimal Optimization algorithm on the labels containing pregnancy risk information segmented into standard document sections. For the evaluation of the classifier on the testing set, we used the Micromedex drug risk categories. The precautions section had the best performance for assigning drug risk categories, achieving Accuracy 0.79, Precision 0.66, Recall 0.64 and F1 measure 0.65. Missing pregnancy risk categories could be suggested using machine learning algorithms trained on the existing publicly available pregnancy risk information. PMID:26958248

  15. [The significance of high sensitive C reactive protein as a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases].

    PubMed

    Meguro, Shu; Ishibashi, Midori; Takei, Izumi

    2012-04-01

    Chronic inflammation is involved in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Several prospective studies have indicated that an elevated high sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) level is a risk factor for CVD. These results were also confirmed by prospective studies in Japan both for primary and secondary prevention. A randomized control study using statins also revealed that lower levels of both LDL cholesterol and hs-CRP were independently related to the incidence of CVD. Recent meta-analysis revealed that hs-CRP was a risk factor not only for CVD but for other diseases including cancers. It revealed that the absolute value of hs-CRP varied among the study populations. The mechanism of how hs-CRP is associated with the pathogenesis of CVD is not fully understood. Generally, inflammation in the vascular wall and the release of inflammatory cytokines from macrophages was considered to the main mechanism, but infection with such as chlamydia or Helicobacter pylori, and periodontal disease have been postulated as the causes of systemic inflammation. Recently, visceral fat accumulation and its cross-interaction with inflammatory cells have been proposed as the cause of systemic inflammation as "innate inflammation". Our original cross sectional studies also showed the correlations of hs-CRP with BMI and triglyceride. Although there is no specific therapy for the reduction of hs-CRP, we have to consider hs-CRP as a risk factor for CVD which complements other classical risk factors. PMID:22686046

  16. Relationship between obesity and the risk of clinically significant depression: Mendelian randomisation study

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Chi-Fa; Rivera, Margarita; Craddock, Nick; Owen, Michael J.; Gill, Michael; Korszun, Ania; Maier, Wolfgang; Mors, Ole; Preisig, Martin; Rice, John P.; Rietschel, Marcella; Jones, Lisa; Middleton, Lefkos; Aitchison, Kathy J.; Davis, Oliver S. P.; Breen, Gerome; Lewis, Cathryn; Farmer, Anne; McGuffin, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background Obesity has been shown to be associated with depression and it has been suggested that higher body mass index (BMI) increases the risk of depression and other common mental disorders. However, the causal relationship remains unclear and Mendelian randomisation, a form of instrumental variable analysis, has recently been employed to attempt to resolve this issue. Aims To investigate whether higher BMI increases the risk of major depression. Method Two instrumental variable analyses were conducted to test the causal relationship between obesity and major depression in RADIANT, a large case-control study of major depression. We used a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in FTO and a genetic risk score (GRS) based on 32 SNPs with well-established associations with BMI. Results Linear regression analysis, as expected, showed that individuals carrying more risk alleles of FTO or having higher score of GRS had a higher BMI. Probit regression suggested that higher BMI is associated with increased risk of major depression. However, our two instrumental variable analyses did not support a causal relationship between higher BMI and major depression (FTO genotype: coefficient –0.03, 95% CI –0.18 to 0.13, P = 0.73; GRS: coefficient –0.02, 95% CI –0.11 to 0.07, P = 0.62). Conclusions Our instrumental variable analyses did not support a causal relationship between higher BMI and major depression. The positive associations of higher BMI with major depression in probit regression analyses might be explained by reverse causality and/or residual confounding. PMID:24809401

  17. An assessment of the risk significance of human errors in selected PSAs and operating events

    SciTech Connect

    Palla, R.L. Jr.; El-Bassioni, A. . Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation); Higgins, J. )

    1991-01-01

    Sensitivity studies based on Probabilistic Safety Assessments (PSAs) for a pressurized water reactor and a boiling water reactor are described. In each case human errors modeled in the PSAs were categorized according to such factors as error type, location, timing, and plant personnel involved. Sensitivity studies were then conducted by varying the error rates in each category and evaluating the corresponding change in total core damage frequency and accident sequence frequency. Insights obtained are discussed and reasons for differences in risk sensitivity between plants are explored. A separate investigation into the role of human error in risk-important operating events is also described. This investigation involved the analysis of data from the USNRC Accident Sequence Precursor program to determine the effect of operator-initiated events on accident precursor trends, and to determine whether improved training can be correlated to current trends. The findings of this study are also presented. 5 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Constructing a holistic approach to disaster risk reduction: the significance of focusing on vulnerability reduction.

    PubMed

    Palliyaguru, Roshani; Amaratunga, Dilanthi; Baldry, David

    2014-01-01

    As a result of the increase in natural disaster losses, policy-makers, practitioners, and members of the research community around the world are seeking effective and efficient means of overcoming or minimising them. Although various theoretical constructs are beneficial to understanding the disaster phenomenon and the means of minimising losses, the disaster risk management process becomes less effective if theory and practice are set apart from one another. Consequently, this paper seeks to establish a relationship between two theoretical constructs, 'disaster risk reduction (DRR)' and 'vulnerability reduction', and to develop a holistic approach to DRR with particular reference to improving its applicability in practical settings. It is based on a literature review and on an overall understanding gained through two case studies of post-disaster infrastructure reconstruction projects in Sri Lanka and three expert interviews in Sri Lanka and the United Kingdom. PMID:24325238

  19. Relative significance of heat transfer processes to quantify tradeoffs between complexity and accuracy of energy simulations with a building energy use patterns classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidarinejad, Mohammad

    This dissertation develops rapid and accurate building energy simulations based on a building classification that identifies and focuses modeling efforts on most significant heat transfer processes. The building classification identifies energy use patterns and their contributing parameters for a portfolio of buildings. The dissertation hypothesis is "Building classification can provide minimal required inputs for rapid and accurate energy simulations for a large number of buildings". The critical literature review indicated there is lack of studies to (1) Consider synoptic point of view rather than the case study approach, (2) Analyze influence of different granularities of energy use, (3) Identify key variables based on the heat transfer processes, and (4) Automate the procedure to quantify model complexity with accuracy. Therefore, three dissertation objectives are designed to test out the dissertation hypothesis: (1) Develop different classes of buildings based on their energy use patterns, (2) Develop different building energy simulation approaches for the identified classes of buildings to quantify tradeoffs between model accuracy and complexity, (3) Demonstrate building simulation approaches for case studies. Penn State's and Harvard's campus buildings as well as high performance LEED NC office buildings are test beds for this study to develop different classes of buildings. The campus buildings include detailed chilled water, electricity, and steam data, enabling to classify buildings into externally-load, internally-load, or mixed-load dominated. The energy use of the internally-load buildings is primarily a function of the internal loads and their schedules. Externally-load dominated buildings tend to have an energy use pattern that is a function of building construction materials and outdoor weather conditions. However, most of the commercial medium-sized office buildings have a mixed-load pattern, meaning the HVAC system and operation schedule dictate

  20. Determining significant endpoints for ecological risk analyses. 1997 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Hinton, T.G.; Congdon, J.; Rowe, C.; Scott, D.; Bedford, J.; Whicker, F.W.

    1997-11-01

    'This report summarizes the first year''s progress of research funded under the Department of Energy''s Environmental Management Science Program. The research was initiated to better determine ecological risks from toxic and radioactive contaminants. More precisely, the research is designed to determine the relevancy of sublethal cellular damage to the performance of individuals and to identify characteristics of non-human populations exposed to chronic, low-level radiation, as is typically found on many DOE sites. The authors propose to establish a protocol to assess risks to non-human species at higher levels of biological organization by relating molecular damage to more relevant responses that reflect population health. They think that they can achieve this by coupling changes in metabolic rates and energy allocation patterns to meaningful population response variables, and by using novel biological dosimeters in controlled, manipulative dose/effects experiments. They believe that a scientifically defensible endpoint for measuring ecological risks can only be determined once its understood the extent to which molecular damage from contaminant exposure is detrimental at the individual and population levels of biological organization.'

  1. Prognostic Significance of Serial Q/ST-T Changes by the Minnesota Code and Novacode In the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhu-ming; Prineas, Ronald J.; Soliman, Elsayed Z.; Baggett, Chris; Heiss, Gerardo

    2016-01-01

    Aims To compare the value of serial electrocardiographic (ECG) changes by the 2 most widely used ECG classification systems--the Minnesota Code (MC) and Novacode (Nova) for the prediction of subsequent coronary heart disease (CHD) and total mortality. Methods and Result We studied 12-lead ECGs from 12,477 participants (average age 54 years at baseline; 58% women; 76% non-Hispanic white) in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study, who were free of CHD at baseline in 1987, had both good quality ECGs at baseline and at first study-scheduled follow up visit, and had ECG QRS duration < 120ms. A total 2,119 participants died (17%), including 280 CHD deaths during an average of 17 years follow-up. Cox regression models assessed outcome associated with significant serial ECG changes by MC and Nova separately. For CHD death the Hazard ratio was 6.8 (95% confidence interval 3.5-13.3) for incident Nova myocardial infarction (MI), and 5.7 (95% confidence interval 2.7-11.9) for MC-MI in a multivariable model adjusted for clinical, demographic characteristics, and ECG left ventricular hypertrophy. The increased risk for total mortality doubled for both Nova and MC serial ECG MI. Major evolving ST-T wave abnormalities alone were associated with a ≥132% increased risk for CHD death and a 50% increased risk for total mortality by either Nova or MC. Conclusion ECG serial change by both MC and Nova are equally valuable predictors for future fatal cardiac events and total mortality and hence equally useful prognostic indicators in clinical trials and epidemiologic studies. PMID:21997257

  2. Identifying unique and shared risk factors for physical intimate partner violence and clinically-significant physical intimate partner violence.

    PubMed

    Slep, Amy M Smith; Foran, Heather M; Heyman, Richard E; Snarr, Jeffery D; Usaf Family Advocacy Research Program

    2014-12-01

    Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a significant public health concern. To date, risk factor research has not differentiated physical violence that leads to injury and/or fear (i.e., clinically significant IPV; CS-IPV) from general physical IPV. Isolating risk relations is necessary to best inform prevention and treatment efforts. The current study used an ecological framework and evaluated relations of likely risk factors within individual, family, workplace, and community levels with both CS-IPV and general IPV to determine whether they were related to one type of IPV, both, or neither for both men and women. Probable risk and promotive factors from multiple ecological levels of influence were selected from the literature and assessed, along with CS-IPV and general IPV, via an anonymous, web-based survey. The sample comprised US Air Force (AF) active duty members and civilian spouses (total N = 36,861 men; 24,331 women) from 82 sites worldwide. Relationship satisfaction, age, and alcohol problems were identified as unique risk factors (in the context of the 23 other risk factors examined) across IPV and CS-IPV for men and women. Other unique risk factors were identified that differed in prediction of IPV and CS-IPV. The results suggest a variety of both established and novel potential foci for indirectly targeting partner aggression and clinically-significant IPV by improving people's risk profiles at the individual, family, workplace, and community levels. Aggr. Behav. 9999:XX-XX, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25474230

  3. Identifying unique and shared risk factors for physical intimate partner violence and clinically-significant physical intimate partner violence.

    PubMed

    Slep, Amy M Smith; Foran, Heather M; Heyman, Richard E; Snarr, Jeffery D; Usaf Family Advocacy Research Program

    2015-05-01

    Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a significant public health concern. To date, risk factor research has not differentiated physical violence that leads to injury and/or fear (i.e., clinically significant IPV; CS-IPV) from general physical IPV. Isolating risk relations is necessary to best inform prevention and treatment efforts. The current study used an ecological framework and evaluated relations of likely risk factors within individual, family, workplace, and community levels with both CS-IPV and general IPV to determine whether they were related to one type of IPV, both, or neither for both men and women. Probable risk and promotive factors from multiple ecological levels of influence were selected from the literature and assessed, along with CS-IPV and general IPV, via an anonymous, web-based survey. The sample comprised US Air Force (AF) active duty members and civilian spouses (total N = 36,861 men; 24,331 women) from 82 sites worldwide. Relationship satisfaction, age, and alcohol problems were identified as unique risk factors (in the context of the 23 other risk factors examined) across IPV and CS-IPV for men and women. Other unique risk factors were identified that differed in prediction of IPV and CS-IPV. The results suggest a variety of both established and novel potential foci for indirectly targeting partner aggression and clinically-significant IPV by improving people's risk profiles at the individual, family, workplace, and community levels. Aggr. Behav. 41:227-241, 2015. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27541201

  4. Brief Report: Classification of Adolescent Suicide and Risk-Taking Deaths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sankey, Melissa; Lawrence, Ruth

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the suicide and risk-taking deaths of adolescents aged 12-17 years between January 1996 and December 2000. The methodology consisted of a case file review of government records. One hundred and eighty-seven adolescents (133 males, 54 females) died by suicide and risk-taking and could be classified into three distinct groups:…

  5. Determining significant endpoints for ecological risk analyses. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Hinton, T.G.; Congdon, J.; Scott, D.; Rowe, C.; Bedford, J.; Whicker, W.

    1998-06-01

    'The goal of this report is to establish a protocol for assessing risks to non-human populations exposed to environmental stresses typically found on many DOE sites. The authors think that they can achieve this by using novel biological dosimeters in controlled, manipulative dose/effects experiments, and by coupling changes in metabolic rates and energy allocation patterns to meaningful population response variables (such as age-specific survivorship, reproductive output, age at maturity and longevity). This research is needed to determine the relevancy of sublethal cellular damage to the performance of individuals and populations exposed to chronic, low-level radiation, and radiation with concomitant exposure to chemicals. They believe that a scientifically defensible endpoint for measuring ecological risks can only be determined once its understood the extent to which molecular damage from contaminant exposure is detrimental at the individual and population levels of biological organization. The experimental facility will allow them to develop a credible assessment tool for appraising ecological risks, and to evaluate the effects of radionuclide/chemical synergisms on non-human species. This report summarizes work completed midway of a 3-year project that began in November 1996. Emphasis to date has centered on three areas: (1) developing a molecular probe to measure stable chromosomal aberrations known as reciprocal translocations, (2) constructing an irradiation facility where the statistical power inherent in replicated mesocosms can be used to address the response of non-human organisms to exposures from low levels of radiation and metal contaminants, and (3) quantifying responses of organisms living in contaminated mesocosms and field sites.'

  6. Risk factors and clinical significance of ertapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae in hospitalised patients.

    PubMed

    Orsi, G B; García-Fernández, A; Giordano, A; Venditti, C; Bencardino, A; Gianfreda, R; Falcone, M; Carattoli, A; Venditti, M

    2011-05-01

    Ertapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae (ER-Kp) is an emerging healthcare-associated pathogen. In order to identify risk factors associated with ER-Kp acquisition, the records of 100 patients from whom K. pneumoniae had been isolated between July 2008 and December 2009 were reviewed. These comprised 38 with ER-Kp (28 infected, 10 colonised) and 62 with ertapenem-susceptible K. pneumoniae (ES-Kp) (43 infected, 19 colonised). Multilocus sequence typing (MSLT) and porin gene investigation performed on 25 ER-Kp strains showed that 24 belonged to the ST37 lineage, expressing a novel OmpK36 variant and not expressing OmpK35. Breakthrough bacteraemia occurred in 13 (52%) of 25 bloodstream infections (BSIs). Among nine ER-Kp BSIs, five were complicated by breakthrough bacteraemia, of which four developed during carbapenem therapy. Among 16 ES-Kp BSIs, breakthrough bacteraemia developed in eight patients (50%), but only one occurred (12%) during carbapenem therapy. Logistic regression analysis showed that carbapenems (odds ratio: 12.9; 95% confidence interval: 3.09-53.7; P < 0.001), second generation cephalosporins (11.8; 1.87-74.4; P < 0.01), endoscopy (5.59; 1.32-23.6; P < 0.02), acute renal failure (5.32; 1.13-25.1; P=0.034) and third generation cephalosporins (4.15; 1.09-15.8; P < 0.01) were independent risk factors for acquisition of ER-Kp. Our findings confirm that prior use of certain antimicrobials, specifically carbapenems and cephalosporins, are primary independent risk factors for colonisation or infection with ER-Kp. PMID:21450365

  7. Brief Communication: Newly developing rift in Larsen C Ice Shelf presents significant risk to stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, D.; Luckman, A. J.; Cook, A.; Bevan, S.; Kulessa, B.; Hubbard, B.; Holland, P. R.

    2015-06-01

    An established rift in the Larsen C Ice Shelf, formerly constrained by a suture zone containing marine ice, grew rapidly during 2014 and is likely in the near future to generate the largest calving event since the 1980s and result in a new minimum area for the ice shelf. Here we investigate the recent development of the rift, quantify the projected calving event and, using a numerical model, assess its likely impact on ice shelf stability. We find that the ice front is at risk of becoming unstable when the anticipated calving event occurs.

  8. 100-years of Australian bushfire property losses: is the risk significant and is it increasing?

    PubMed

    McAneney, John; Chen, Keping; Pitman, Andy

    2009-06-01

    This study examines the bushfire (wildland fire) risk to the built environment in Australia. The most salient result is that the annual probability of building destruction has remained almost constant over the last century despite large demographic and social changes as well as improvements in fire fighting technique and resources. Most historical losses have taken place in a few extreme fires which if repeated are likely to overwhelm even the most professional of fire services. We also calculate the average annual probability of a random home on the urban-bushland interface being destroyed by a bushfire to be of the order of 1 in 6500, a factor 6.5 times lower than the ignition probability of a structural house fire. Thus on average and if this risk was perceived rationally, the incentive for individual homeowners to mitigate and reduce the bushfire danger even further is low. This being the case and despite predictions of an increasing likelihood of conditions favouring bushfires under global climate change, we suspect that building losses due to bushfires are unlikely to alter materially in the near future. PMID:19410362

  9. Significant factors of aviation insurance and risk management strategy: an empirical study of Taiwanese airline carriers.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi Hsin; Chang, Yu Hern

    2008-04-01

    Aviation insurance premiums have become a heavy burden for the airline industry since September 11, 2001. Although the industry must constantly balance its operations between profitability and safety, the reality is that airlines are in the business of making money. Therefore, their ability to reduce cost and manage risk is a key factor for success. Unlike past research, which used subjective judgment methods, this study applied quantitative historical data (1999-2000) and gray relation analysis to identify the primary factors influencing ratemaking for aviation insurance premiums. An empirical study of six airlines in Taiwan was conducted to determine these factors and to analyze the management strategies used to deal with them. Results showed that the loss experience and performance of individual airlines were the key elements associated with aviation insurance premiums paid by each airline. By identifying and understanding the primary factors influencing ratemaking for aviation insurance, airlines will better understand their relative operational strengths and weaknesses, and further help top management identify areas for further improvement. Knowledge of these factors combined with effective risk management strategies, may result in lower premiums and operating costs for airline companies. PMID:18419661

  10. Assessment on the classification of landslide risk level using Genetic Algorithm of Operation Tree in central Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Chiang; Yeh, Hui-Chung; Chen, Yen-Chang

    2015-04-01

    This study assessed the classification of landslide areas by Genetic Algorithm of Operation Tree (GAOT) of Chen-Yu-Lan River upstream watershed of National Taiwan University Experimental Forest (NTUEF) after the Typhoon Morakot in 2009 using remotely and geological data. Landslides of 624.5 ha which accounting for 1.9% of total area were delineated with the threshold of slope (22°) and area size (1 hectare), 48 landslide sites were located in the upstream Chen-Yu-Lan watershed using FORMOSAT-II satellite imagery, the aerial photo and GIS related coverage. The five risk levels of these landslide areas was classified by the area, elevation, slope order, aspect, erosion order and geological factor order using the Simplicity Method suggested in the Technical Regulations for Soil and Water Conservation of Taiwan. If all the landslide sites were considered, the accuracy of classification using GAOT is 97.9%, superior than the K-means, Ward method, Shared Nearest Neighbor method, Maximum Likelihood Classifier and Bayesian Classifier; if 36 sites were used as training samples and the rest 12 sites were tested, the accuracy still can reach 81.3%. More geological data, anthropogenic influence and hydrological factors may be necessary for clarifying the landside area and the results benefit the assessment for future correction and management of the authorities.

  11. Motion Analysis and the Anterior Cruciate Ligament: Classification of Injury Risk.

    PubMed

    Bates, Nathaniel A; Hewett, Timothy E

    2016-02-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries are common, catastrophic events that incur large expense and lead to degradation of the knee. As such, various motion capture techniques have been applied to identify athletes who are at increased risk for suffering ACL injuries. The objective of this clinical commentary was to synthesize information related to how motion capture analyses contribute to the identification of risk factors that may predict relative injury risk within a population. Individuals employ both active and passive mechanisms to constrain knee joint articulation during motion. There is strong evidence to indicate that athletes who consistently classify as high-risk loaders during landing suffer from combined joint stability deficits in both the active and passive knee restraints. Implementation of prophylactic neuromuscular interventions and biofeedback can effectively compensate for some of the deficiencies that result from poor control of the active knee stabilizers and reduce the incidence of ACL injuries. PMID:26383143

  12. Radioactive and mixed waste - risk as a basis for waste classification. Symposium proceedings No. 2

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-21

    The management of risks from radioactive and chemical materials has been a major environmental concern in the United states for the past two or three decades. Risk management of these materials encompasses the remediation of past disposal practices as well as development of appropriate strategies and controls for current and future operations. This symposium is concerned primarily with low-level radioactive wastes and mixed wastes. Individual reports were processed separately for the Department of Energy databases.

  13. Significance of model credibility in estimating climate projection distributions for regional hydroclimatological risk assessments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brekke, L.D.; Dettinger, M.D.; Maurer, E.P.; Anderson, M.

    2008-01-01

    Ensembles of historical climate simulations and climate projections from the World Climate Research Programme's (WCRP's) Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 3 (CMIP3) multi-model dataset were investigated to determine how model credibility affects apparent relative scenario likelihoods in regional risk assessments. Methods were developed and applied in a Northern California case study. An ensemble of 59 twentieth century climate simulations from 17 WCRP CMIP3 models was analyzed to evaluate relative model credibility associated with a 75-member projection ensemble from the same 17 models. Credibility was assessed based on how models realistically reproduced selected statistics of historical climate relevant to California climatology. Metrics of this credibility were used to derive relative model weights leading to weight-threshold culling of models contributing to the projection ensemble. Density functions were then estimated for two projected quantities (temperature and precipitation), with and without considering credibility-based ensemble reductions. An analysis for Northern California showed that, while some models seem more capable at recreating limited aspects twentieth century climate, the overall tendency is for comparable model performance when several credibility measures are combined. Use of these metrics to decide which models to include in density function development led to local adjustments to function shapes, but led to limited affect on breadth and central tendency, which were found to be more influenced by 'completeness' of the original ensemble in terms of models and emissions pathways. ?? 2007 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  14. The significance of the subchronic toxicity in the dietary risk assessment of pesticides.

    PubMed

    Zarn, Jürg A; Hänggi, Emanuel; Kuchen, Arnold; Schlatter, Josef R

    2010-10-01

    Based on 289 public pesticide evaluations, geometric means of subchronic/chronic No Observed Adverse Effect Level (NOAEL) ratios of 2.6, 2.5 and 1.6 in mice, rats and dogs were calculated. The 75th percentiles are 5.5, 5.1 and 3.2. Higher ratios correlate with increased dose spacing in chronic studies and may be mainly explained therewith. In rats fed at constant pesticide concentrations in feed, the mean chronic dose decreases by 1.7- and 2.7-fold compared to the subchronic and subacute phase. These dose decreases match the subchronic/chronic NOAEL ratios. The ratio of predicted rat chronic NOAEL (dose decrement adjusted subchronic NOAEL) to experimental chronic NOAEL is 1.5 and the 75th percentile is 3.0. In dietary risk assessment, the Acute Reference Dose and the Acceptable Daily Intake (derived from acute and chronic NOAEL) are compared to acute (IESTI) or mean (TMDI) exposure estimates. Because IESTI and TMDI base on acute or mean food consumption they differ by orders of magnitude for certain commodities. As subchronic and chronic NOAEL are similar, it remains to be shown whether pesticide intake estimates based on mean food consumption are adequate measures to compare against the ADI if repeated daily exposures considerably higher than mean exposures may occur. PMID:20406660

  15. Parkinson syndrome. A significant risk factor in the patient with acute surgical disorder.

    PubMed

    Simon, D; Shapira, O M; Mor, E; Pfefferman, R

    1992-01-01

    Ten Parkinsonic patients presenting with acute surgical disease were studied to determine the effects of both conditions on each other and the patient's outcome. Severe motion and communication disturbances led, invariably, to a delay in seeking medical assistance, with most of the patients' presenting symptoms and signs being non-specific and misleading. As a result half the patients presented already in a state of septic shock, and a correct preoperative diagnosis could be achieved in three patients only. The functional status significantly deteriorated in six patients, in four of whom a prolonged rehabilitation course was necessary. Although there was no immediate perioperative mortality, morbidity was significant as 50% and 100% major "surgery-related" and "Parkinson-related" complications accordingly. It is concluded that the coexistence of acute surgical disease with Parkinson syndrome has a profound adverse effect on the patient's outcome. High index of suspicion, early mobilisation, intense physiotherapy and early resumption of the anti-Parkinson drugs are the key points in the management of these patients. PMID:1478816

  16. A significant association between BDNF promoter methylation and the risk of drug addiction.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xuting; Ji, Huihui; Liu, Guili; Wang, Qinwen; Liu, Huifen; Shen, Wenwen; Li, Longhui; Xie, Xiaohu; Zhou, Wenhua; Duan, Shiwei

    2016-06-10

    As a member of the neurotrophic factor family, brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays an important role in the survival and differentiation of neurons. The aim of our work was to evaluate the role of BDNF promoter methylation in drug addiction. A total of 60 drug abusers (30 heroin and 30 methylamphetamine addicts) and 52 healthy age- and gender-matched controls were recruited for the current case control study. Bisulfite pyrosequencing technology was used to determine the methylation levels of five CpGs (CpG1-5) on the BDNF promoter. Among the five CpGs, CpG5 methylation was significantly lower in drug abusers than controls. Moreover, significant associations were found between CpG5 methylation and addictive phenotypes including tension-anxiety, anger-hostility, fatigue-inertia, and depression-dejection. In addition, luciferase assay showed that the DNA fragment of BDNF promoter played a key role in the regulation of gene expression. Our results suggest that BDNF promoter methylation is associated with drug addiction, although further studies are needed to understand the mechanisms by which BDNF promoter methylation contributes to the pathophysiology of drug addiction. PMID:26976342

  17. A Prolonged Time Interval Between Trauma and Prophylactic Radiation Therapy Significantly Increases the Risk of Heterotopic Ossification

    SciTech Connect

    Mourad, Waleed F.; Packianathan, Satyaseelan; Shourbaji, Rania A.; Zhang Zhen; Graves, Mathew; Khan, Majid A.; Baird, Michael C.; Russell, George; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To ascertain whether the time from injury to prophylactic radiation therapy (RT) influences the rate of heterotopic ossification (HO) after operative treatment of displaced acetabular fractures. Methods and Materials: This is a single-institution, retrospective analysis of patients referred for RT for the prevention of HO. Between January 2000 and January 2009, 585 patients with displaced acetabular fractures were treated surgically followed by RT for HO prevention. We analyzed the effect of time from injury on prevention of HO by RT. In all patients, 700 cGy was prescribed in a single fraction and delivered within 72 hours postsurgery. The patients were stratified into five groups according to time interval (in days) from the date of their accident to the date of RT: Groups A {<=}3, B {<=}7, C {<=}14, D {<=}21, and E >21days. Results: Of the 585 patients with displaced acetabular fractures treated with RT, (18%) 106 patients developed HO within the irradiated field. The risk of HO after RT increased from 10% for RT delivered {<=}3 days to 92% for treatment delivered >21 days after the initial injury. Wilcoxon test showed a significant correlation between the risk of HO and the length of time from injury to RT (p < 0.0001). Chi-square test and multiple logistic regression analysis showed no significant association between all other factors and the risk of HO (race, gender, cause and type of fracture, surgical approach, or the use of indomethacin). Conclusions: Our data suggest that there is higher incidence and risk of HO if prophylactic RT is significantly delayed after a displaced acetabular fracture. Thus, RT should be administered as early as clinically possible after the trauma. Patients undergoing RT >3 weeks from their displaced acetabular fracture should be informed of the higher risk (>90%) of developing HO despite prophylaxis.

  18. Risk of significant cytopenias after treatment with tocilizumab in systemic juvenile arthritis patients with a history of macrophage activation syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Tocilizumab (TCZ) is the first FDA- approved treatment for systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA). We report 3 cases of cytopenias in children with sJIA treated with TCZ. Two of the children who developed significant cytopenias shortly after initiation of TCZ had a history of macrophage activation syndrome. We raise the possibility that patients with a tendency towards MAS have an increased risk of developing cytopenias when treated with tocilizumab. PMID:22931129

  19. Severe Obesity and Cardiometabolic Risk in Children: Comparison from Two International Classification Systems

    PubMed Central

    Valerio, Giuliana; Maffeis, Claudio; Balsamo, Antonio; Del Giudice, Emanuele Miraglia; Brufani, Claudia; Grugni, Graziano; Licenziati, Maria Rosaria; Brambilla, Paolo; Manco, Melania

    2013-01-01

    Objectives There is no agreed-upon definition for severe obesity (Sev-OB) in children. We compared estimates of Sev-OB as defined by different cut-points of body mass index (BMI) from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) or the World Health Organization (WHO) curves and the ability of each set of cut-points to screen for the presence of cardiometabolic risk factors. Research Design and Methods Cross-sectional, multicenter study involving 3,340 overweight/obese young subjects. Sev-OB was defined as BMI ≥99th percentile or ≥1.2 times the 95th percentile of the CDC or the WHO curves. High blood pressure, hypertriglyceridemia, low High Density Lipoprotein -cholesterol and impaired fasting glucose were considered as cardiometabolic risk factors. Results The estimated prevalence of Sev-OB varied widely between the two reference systems. Either using the cut-point ≥99th percentile or ≥1.2 times the 95th percentile, less children were defined as Sev-OB by CDC than WHO (46.8 vs. 89.5%, and 63.3 vs. 80.4%, respectively p<0.001). The CDC 99th percentile had lower sensitivity (58.5 vs 94.2), higher specificity (57.6 vs 12.3) and higher positive predictive value (34.4 vs 28.9) than WHO in identifying obese children with ≥2 cardiometabolic risk factors. These differences were mitigated using the 1.2 times the 95th percentile (sensitivity 73.9 vs. 88.1; specificity 40.7 vs. 22.5; positive predictive value 32.1 vs. 30.1). Substantial agreement between growth curves was found using the 1.2 times the 95th percentile, in particular in children ≤10 years. Conclusions Estimates of Sev-OB and cardiometabolic risk as defined by different cut-points of BMI are influenced from the reference systems used. The 1.2 times the 95th percentile of BMI of either CDC or WHO standard has a discriminatory advantage over the 99th percentile for identifying severely obese children at increased cardiometabolic risk, particularly under 10 years of age. PMID:24386280

  20. [Significance of subjective evaluation of life events as risk factors for predicting future suicide attempts].

    PubMed

    Chrostek Maj, J; Polewka, A; Kroch, S; Mikołaszek-Boba, M; Rachel, W; Datka, W

    2001-01-01

    Among the total population of 180 patients undergoing medical examination between March and December 2000, hospitalized for suicide attempts (drug intoxication) in the Department of Clinical Toxicology CM UJ in Kraków, 159 persons were examined by means of modified questionnaire of life events based on a scale elaborated by Thomas Holmes and Richard Rache. The patients were divided into 2 groups--first group comprised patients after first suicide attempt and second group consisted of those who had reattempted suicide. In regard to sex and age there were no significant differences between these two groups and the total population of 180 patients. In order to obtain the patients' subjective evaluation of the influence of their course of life on their attempting suicide, we asked the patients to select from the list of life events those that had affected their mental and physical state during of whole their life. Objectivization of life events was based on the 'units of life change' by T. Holmes and R. Rache. The sum of units of life events was 373 scores (SD +/- 200, in the range of 39-1042 units). From the total list of life events (max. score--1513) we selected the events estimated at 40 and more units of life change. Those were; marriage, divorce, separation, marital reconciliation, patient's illness, change of behavior and illness of a close relative, death of a husband/wife, child, close relative, imprisonment, pregnancy, unemployment, retirement. In the patients' subjective evaluation part, the events most frequently selected by the patients as those that had affected their mental state were: death of a close relative (56.6%), illness of a relative (40.8%), patient's illness (37.7%). A high number of patients stated events testifying to a conflict in marriage--45.7% of patients stated marital separation, and reconciliation, and 27% of patients stated unemployment as a fact that had influenced their mental state. 30.6% of these patients belonged to the first

  1. Atherosclerotic plaque tissue characterization in 2D ultrasound longitudinal carotid scans for automated classification: a paradigm for stroke risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Acharya, U Rajendra; Mookiah, Muthu Rama Krishnan; Vinitha Sree, S; Afonso, David; Sanches, Joao; Shafique, Shoaib; Nicolaides, Andrew; Pedro, L M; Fernandes E Fernandes, J; Suri, Jasjit S

    2013-05-01

    In the case of carotid atherosclerosis, to avoid unnecessary surgeries in asymptomatic patients, it is necessary to develop a technique to effectively differentiate symptomatic and asymptomatic plaques. In this paper, we have presented a data mining framework that characterizes the textural differences in these two classes using several grayscale features based on a novel combination of trace transform and fuzzy texture. The features extracted from the delineated plaque regions in B-mode ultrasound images were used to train several classifiers in order to prepare them for classification of new test plaques. Our CAD system was evaluated using two different databases consisting of 146 (44 symptomatic to 102 asymptomatic) and 346 (196 symptomatic and 150 asymptomatic) images. Both these databases differ in the way the ground truth was determined. We obtained classification accuracies of 93.1 and 85.3 %, respectively. The techniques are low cost, easily implementable, objective, and non-invasive. For more objective analysis, we have also developed novel integrated indices using a combination of significant features. PMID:23292291

  2. Can I be sued for that? Liability risk and the disclosure of clinically significant genetic research findings

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, Amy L.; Knoppers, Bartha Maria; Zawati, Ma’n H.; Clayton, Ellen Wright

    2014-01-01

    Genomic researchers increasingly are faced with difficult decisions about whether, under what circumstances, and how to return research results and significant incidental findings to study participants. Many have argued that there is an ethical—maybe even a legal—obligation to disclose significant findings under some circumstances. At the international level, over the last decade there has begun to emerge a clear legal obligation to return significant findings discovered during the course of research. However, there is no explicit legal duty to disclose in the United States. This creates legal uncertainty that may lead to unmanaged variation in practice and poor quality care. This article discusses liability risks associated with the disclosure of significant research findings for investigators in the United States. PMID:24676095

  3. Evaluation and applications of the clinically significant change method with the Violence Risk Scale-Sexual Offender version: implications for risk-change communication.

    PubMed

    Olver, Mark E; Beggs Christofferson, Sarah M; Wong, Stephen C P

    2015-02-01

    We examined the use of the clinically significant change (CSC) method with the Violence Risk Scale-Sexual Offender version (VRS-SO), and its implications for risk communication, in a combined sample of 945 treated sexual offenders from three international settings, followed up for a minimum 5 years post-release. The reliable change (RC) index was used to identify thresholds of clinically meaningful change and to create four CSC groups (already okay, recovered, improved, unchanged) based on VRS-SO dynamic scores and amount of change made. Outcome analyses demonstrated important CSC-group differences in 5-year rates of sexual and violent recidivism. However, when baseline risk was controlled via Cox regression survival analysis, the pattern and magnitude of CSC-group differences in sexual and violent recidivism changed to suggest that observed variation in recidivism base rates could be at least partly explained by pre-existing group differences in risk level. Implications for communication of risk-change information and applications to clinical practice are discussed. PMID:25693953

  4. Redefining ALL classification: toward detecting high-risk ALL and implementing precision medicine

    PubMed Central

    Hunger, Stephen P.

    2015-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the commonest childhood tumor and remains a leading cause of cancer death in the young. In the last decade, microarray and sequencing analysis of large ALL cohorts has revolutionized our understanding of the genetic basis of this disease. These studies have identified new ALL subtypes, each characterized by constellations of structural and sequence alterations that perturb key cellular pathways, including lymphoid development, cell-cycle regulation, and tumor suppression; cytokine receptor, kinase, and Ras signaling; and chromatin modifications. Several of these pathways, particularly kinase-activating lesions and epigenetic alterations, are logical targets for new precision medicine therapies. Genomic profiling has also identified important interactions between inherited genetic variants that influence the risk of leukemia development and the somatic genetic alterations that are required to establish the leukemic clone. Moreover, sequential sequencing studies at diagnosis, remission, and relapse have provided important insights into the relationship among genetic variants, clonal heterogeneity, and the risk of relapse. Ongoing studies are extending our understanding of coding and noncoding genetic alterations in B-progenitor and T-lineage ALL and using these insights to inform the development of faithful experimental models to test the efficacy of new treatment approaches. PMID:25999453

  5. Redefining ALL classification: toward detecting high-risk ALL and implementing precision medicine.

    PubMed

    Hunger, Stephen P; Mullighan, Charles G

    2015-06-25

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the commonest childhood tumor and remains a leading cause of cancer death in the young. In the last decade, microarray and sequencing analysis of large ALL cohorts has revolutionized our understanding of the genetic basis of this disease. These studies have identified new ALL subtypes, each characterized by constellations of structural and sequence alterations that perturb key cellular pathways, including lymphoid development, cell-cycle regulation, and tumor suppression; cytokine receptor, kinase, and Ras signaling; and chromatin modifications. Several of these pathways, particularly kinase-activating lesions and epigenetic alterations, are logical targets for new precision medicine therapies. Genomic profiling has also identified important interactions between inherited genetic variants that influence the risk of leukemia development and the somatic genetic alterations that are required to establish the leukemic clone. Moreover, sequential sequencing studies at diagnosis, remission, and relapse have provided important insights into the relationship among genetic variants, clonal heterogeneity, and the risk of relapse. Ongoing studies are extending our understanding of coding and noncoding genetic alterations in B-progenitor and T-lineage ALL and using these insights to inform the development of faithful experimental models to test the efficacy of new treatment approaches. PMID:25999453

  6. The Society for Vascular Surgery Lower Extremity Threatened Limb Classification System: risk stratification based on wound, ischemia, and foot infection (WIfI).

    PubMed

    Mills, Joseph L; Conte, Michael S; Armstrong, David G; Pomposelli, Frank B; Schanzer, Andres; Sidawy, Anton N; Andros, George

    2014-01-01

    Critical limb ischemia, first defined in 1982, was intended to delineate a subgroup of patients with a threatened lower extremity primarily because of chronic ischemia. It was the intent of the original authors that patients with diabetes be excluded or analyzed separately. The Fontaine and Rutherford Systems have been used to classify risk of amputation and likelihood of benefit from revascularization by subcategorizing patients into two groups: ischemic rest pain and tissue loss. Due to demographic shifts over the last 40 years, especially a dramatic rise in the incidence of diabetes mellitus and rapidly expanding techniques of revascularization, it has become increasingly difficult to perform meaningful outcomes analysis for patients with threatened limbs using these existing classification systems. Particularly in patients with diabetes, limb threat is part of a broad disease spectrum. Perfusion is only one determinant of outcome; wound extent and the presence and severity of infection also greatly impact the threat to a limb. Therefore, the Society for Vascular Surgery Lower Extremity Guidelines Committee undertook the task of creating a new classification of the threatened lower extremity that reflects these important considerations. We term this new framework, the Society for Vascular Surgery Lower Extremity Threatened Limb Classification System. Risk stratification is based on three major factors that impact amputation risk and clinical management: Wound, Ischemia, and foot Infection (WIfI). The implementation of this classification system is intended to permit more meaningful analysis of outcomes for various forms of therapy in this challenging, but heterogeneous population. PMID:24126108

  7. Incidence of and significant risk factors for aminoglycoside-associated nephrotoxicity in patients dosed by using individualized pharmacokinetic monitoring.

    PubMed

    Bertino, J S; Booker, L A; Franck, P A; Jenkins, P L; Franck, K R; Nafziger, A N

    1993-01-01

    Incidence of and risk factors for aminoglycoside-associated nephrotoxicity (AAN) were evaluated in 1489 patients prospectively monitored with individualized pharmacokinetic monitoring (IPM). Incidence of AAN was 7.9% with individual (univariate) risk factors including advanced age, decreased albumin, poor nutritional status, pneumonia, concurrent furosemide, amphotericin B, vancomycin, cephalosporin, or piperacillin, intensive care unit treatment, leukemia, rapidly fatal illness, liver or renal disease, reduced aminoglycoside clearance, elevated initial steady-state trough concentration (Cminss), volume of distribution or half-life, duration of therapy, total dose, fever, male gender, shock, pleural effusion, and ascites. Multiple logistic regression revealed that Cminss, concurrent clindamycin, vancomycin, piperacillin, or cephalosporin, ascites, advanced age, male gender, decreased albumin, duration of therapy, and leukemia were significant independent risk factors for AAN. Positive predictive value of the model was 30.8%; negative predictive value was 91.7%. No identifiable risk factor alone or in combination was of sufficient sensitivity to reliably predict AAN, but use of IPM may lower the incidence of AAN. PMID:8418164

  8. Radial Artery Coursing Behind the Biceps Brachii Tendon: Significance for the Transradial Catheterization and a Clinically Oriented Classification of the Radial Artery Variations

    SciTech Connect

    Jelev, L. Surchev, L.

    2008-09-15

    In routine clinical practice the variations of the radial artery are the main reason for technical failure during transradial catheterization. If these variations are well documented, however, they do not represent a problem in the transradial approach. Therefore, we report here a rare case of the radial artery which is very strange but potentially valuable for the clinical practice: it arises at a right angle from the brachial artery and passes behind the biceps brachii tendon. Based on our findings and on an extensive literature review, we propose for the first time a clinically oriented classification of the variations of the radial artery. This classification is related to the catheterization success at the usual access site of the radial artery at the wrist.

  9. Silica dust, diesel exhaust, and painting work are the significant occupational risk factors for lung cancer in nonsmoking Chinese men

    PubMed Central

    Tse, L A; Yu, IT-s; Au, J S K; Qiu, H; Wang, X-r

    2011-01-01

    Background: Few epidemiological studies have explored the associations between occupational exposures and lung cancer in lifelong nonsmoking men. Methods: We obtained lifetime occupational history and other relevant information for 132 newly diagnosed lung cancer cases among nonsmoking Chinese men and 536 nonsmoking community referents. Unconditional multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to estimate the odds ratio (OR) of lung cancer for specific occupational exposures. Results: Significantly increased lung cancer risk was found for nonsmoking workers occupationally exposed to silica dust (OR=2.58, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.11, 6.01), diesel exhaust (OR=3.47, 95% CI: 1.08, 11.14), spray painting (OR=2.81, 95% CI: 1.14, 6.93), and nonspray painting work (OR=2.36, 95% CI: 1.04, 5.37). Silica dust exposure was associated with a significantly increased risk of adenocarcinoma (OR=2.91, 95% CI: 1.10, 7.68). We observed a positive gradient of all lung cancers and of adenocarcinoma with duration of employment for workers exposed to silica dust and spray painting. Conclusion: This study found an increased risk of lung cancer among nonsmoking Chinese men occupationally exposed to silica dust, diesel exhaust, and painting work. PMID:21102581

  10. Review of temporomandibular joint pathology. Part I: classification, epidemiology and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Poveda Roda, Rafael; Bagan, José V; Díaz Fernández, José María; Hernández Bazán, Sergio; Jiménez Soriano, Yolanda

    2007-08-01

    Pathology of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) affects an important part of the population, though it is not viewed as a public health problem. Between 3-7% of the population seeks treatment for pain and dysfunction of the ATM or related structures. The literature reports great variability in the prevalence of the clinical symptoms (6-93%) and signs (0-93%), probably as a result of the different clinical criteria used. In imaging studies it is common to observe alterations that have no clinical expression of any kind. Radiographic changes corresponding to osteoarthrosis are observed in 14-44% of the population. Age is a risk factor, though with some particularities. In elderly patients there is an increased prevalence of clinical and radiological signs, though also a lesser prevalence of symptoms and of treatment demands than in younger adults. Approximately 7% of the population between 12 and 18 years of age is diagnosed with mandibular pain-dysfunction. Temporomandibular dysfunction (TMD) is more frequent in females. No clear relationship has been established between occlusal alterations and TMJ disease. Only disharmony between centric relation and maximum intercuspidation, and unilateral crossbite, have demonstrated a certain TMJ disease-predictive potential. Both local and systemic hyperlaxity has been postulated as a possible cause of TMD. Parafunctional habits and bruxism are considered risk factors of TMD with odds ratios (ORs) of up to 4.8. Psychophysiological theory holds stress as a determinant factor in myofascial pain. Genetic factors and orthodontic treatment have not been shown to cause TMD. PMID:17664915

  11. The Risk Factors for Failure of an Upper Extremity Replantation: Is the Use of Cigarettes/Tobacco a Significant Factor?

    PubMed Central

    He, Ji-Yin; Chen, Shih-Heng; Tsai, Tsu-Min

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to explore the potential risk factors associated with the failure of an upper extremity replantation with a focus on cigarette or tobacco use. Patients and Methods A cohort of 102 patients with 149 replants (6 extremities, 143 digits) and a mean age of 41 years (range 5 to 72 years) was enrolled in this study. The data collected included age, gender, tobacco/cigarettes use, trauma mechanism, underlying disease (e.g., hypertension (HTN), diabetes mellitus (DM), etc.), and vein graft use. An analysis with a multivariable regression was conducted to identify the risk factors of replant failure and their respective odds ratios (ORs). Results Multilevel generalized linear mixed models (GLMMs) with a binomial distribution and logit link showed that smoking did not increase the risk of replant failure (p = 0.234). In addition, the survival of replants was not affected by DM or HTN (p = 0.285 and 0.938, respectively). However, the replantation results were significantly affected by the age of the patients and the mechanism of injury. Patients older than 50 years and those with avulsion or crush injuries tended to have a higher risk of replant failure (OR = 2.29, 6.45, and 5.42, respectively; p = 0.047, 0.028, and 0.032, respectively). Conclusions This study showed that the use of cigarettes/tobacco did not affect the replantation outcome. The main risks for replant failure included being older than 50 years and the trauma mechanism (avulsion or crush injuries). PMID:26513147

  12. Low RBM3 Protein Expression Correlates with Clinical Stage, Prognostic Classification and Increased Risk of Treatment Failure in Testicular Non-Seminomatous Germ Cell Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Olofsson, Sven-Erik; Nodin, Björn; Gaber, Alexander; Eberhard, Jakob; Uhlén, Mathias; Jirström, Karin; Jerkeman, Mats

    2015-01-01

    Background Expression of the RNA-binding motif protein 3 (RBM3) has been shown to correlate with favourable clinicopathological parameters and prognosis in several cancer diseases. The aim of this study was to examine the expression and prognostic ability of RBM3 in patients with testicular non-seminomatous germ cell tumours (NSGCT). Patients and Methods Immunohistochemical RBM3 expression was analysed in tissue microarrays with tumours from 206 patients. Chi-square test was applied to analyze associations between RBM3 expression and clinicopathological parameters. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to assess the impact of RBM3 expression on cancer-specific survival (CSS) and failure-free survival (FFS). Cox regression proportional hazards models were used to estimate the relative risk for failure. Results In the entire cohort, there was a significant association between clinical stage (p=0.044) and RBM3 expression. Weak RBM3 expression correlated with a significantly reduced FFS [79.3% versus 90.4% (p=0.019)] and CSS [87.5% versus 97.3% (p=0.047)]. For patients with metastatic disease (n = 88), significant associations were found between RBM3 expression and IGCCC group (p=0.007). The FFS was significantly inferior for patients with low tumour-specific RBM3 expression [59.3% versus 79.0% (p=0.013)], and this association remained significant in a multivariable model for patients with metastatic disease (HR=3.67; 95% CI 1.14, 11.89). Conclusion Low RBM3 expression is an independent predictor of treatment failure in metastatic NSGCT, in relation to the prognostic factors included in the International Germ Cell Consensus Classification (IGCCC). These findings suggest that RBM3 may be a potential biomarker for treatment stratification in patients with metastatic non-seminomatous germ cell tumours, and therefore merit further validation. PMID:25811459

  13. Significant associations between hemostatic/fibrinolytic systems and accumulation of cardiovascular risk factors in Japanese elementary schoolchildren.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lisheng; Horigome, Hitoshi; Kato, Yoshiaki; Kikuchi, Toshihiro; Nakahara, Satoko; Sumazaki, Ryo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish the reference values of hemostatic/fibrinolytic markers and investigate their relationship with physical constitution and cardiovascular risk factors in a normal schoolchildren population. This study comprised 148 healthy Japanese children aged 9-10 years (males 73; females 75). We performed laboratory tests including blood levels of leptin, high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), hemostatic and fibrinolytic markers [plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1), coagulation factor VII (FVII), coagulation factor X (FX), fibrinogen (Fbg), protein C, protein S], as well as common biochemical markers in the morning after an overnight fast. We investigated the mean, 10th, 50th and 90th percentile values of these markers. All parameters were compared between two groups, that is those with body mass index (BMI) 90th percentile or higher and BMI less than 90th percentile, and between subgroups based on the number of cardiovascular risk factors. Multiple-linear regression was used to assess associations between these hematological parameters and the components related to metabolic syndrome (MetS). Alanine aminotransferase (ALT), uric acid, leptin, hs-CRP, and all hemostatic/fibrinolytic markers (PAI-1, FVII, FX, Fbg, protein C, protein S) tested were significantly higher in the group with BMI 90th percentile or higher, and increased with accumulation of cardiovascular risk factors. Multiple-linear regression analysis showed that these values were associated with one or more components related to MetS. Reference values of hemostatic/fibrinolytic markers in Japanese schoolchildren were obtained. Many hemostatic/fibrinolytic markers showed significant association with BMI and accumulation of cardiovascular risk factors in normal Japanese schoolchildren. PMID:25185676

  14. Favorable vs Unfavorable Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer: A Review of the New Classification System and Its Impact on Treatment Recommendations.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Nicholas A; Anscher, Mitchell S

    2016-03-01

    The population of patients with intermediate-risk prostate cancer are a large and heterogeneous group with highly variable prognoses, which present a challenge to efforts to develop standardized treatment recommendations. New classification systems have been proposed that modify the existing National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines and that subdivide men with intermediate-risk prostate cancer into favorable and unfavorable subgroups. This review will examine the changing landscape of intermediate-risk prostate cancer and the effects on treatment decisions that may result from this new classification. The literature provides evidence that men with favorable intermediate-risk prostate cancer have prostate cancer-specific mortality and all-cause mortality rates similar to the rates in patients with low-risk prostate cancer and thus may be candidates for active surveillance, dose-escalated radiation therapy without short-term androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), or, interestingly, standard-dose radiation therapy plus short-term ADT. Conversely, patients with unfavorable intermediate-risk prostate cancer have prostate cancer-specific mortality and all-cause mortality rates similar to the rates in patients with high-risk prostate cancer. These patients would not be candidates for active surveillance and may in fact require long-term ADT in addition to standard-dose or dose-escalated radiation therapy instead of 4 to 6 months of ADT. PMID:26984216

  15. Significance of Travel to Rural Areas as a Risk Factor for Malarial Anemia in an Urban Setting

    PubMed Central

    Siri, Jose G.; Wilson, Mark L.; Murray, Susan; Rosen, Daniel H.; Vulule, John M.; Slutsker, Laurence; Lindblade, Kim A.

    2010-01-01

    The epidemiology of malaria in urban environments is poorly characterized, yet increasingly problematic. We conducted an unmatched case–control study of risk factors for malarial anemia with high parasitemia in urban Kisumu, Kenya, from June 2002 through February 2003. Cases (n = 80) were hospital patients with a hemoglobin level ≤ 8 g/dL and a Plasmodium parasite density ≥ 10,000/μL. Controls (n = 826) were healthy respondents to a concurrent citywide knowledge, attitude, and practice survey. Children who reported spending at least one night per month in a rural area were especially at risk (35% of cases; odds ratio = 9.3, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 4.4–19.7, P < 0.0001), and use of mosquito coils, bed net ownership, and house construction were non-significant, potentially indicating that malaria exposure during rural travel comprises an important element of risk. Control of severe malaria in an urban setting may be complicated by Plasmodium infections acquired elsewhere. Epidemiologic studies of urban malaria in low transmission settings should take travel history into account. PMID:20207862

  16. Significant association between FasL gene -844T/C polymorphism and risk to hepatocellular carcinoma in Egyptian patients.

    PubMed

    Khalifa, Rania H; Bahgat, Dina M Rasheed; Darwish, Hatem Abdel Hamid; Shahin, Rasha Mohamad Hosny

    2016-04-01

    Fas/Fas ligand (FasL) system is the most critical apoptotic signaling entity in the extrinsic apoptotic pathway; hence mutations affecting this pathway may prevent the immune system from the removal of newly-formed tumor cells, and thus lead to tumor formation. The present study investigated the association between the FasL -844T/C polymorphism and the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in a cohort of Egyptian patients and explored the relationship of various clinical and pathological parameters with this single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). Blood samples were withdrawn from hundred HCC patients and 100 age-, sex- and ethnically matched controls. The FasL -844T/C (rs763110) gene polymorphism was typed from genomic DNA using polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) assay. Genotype distributions and allelic frequencies between patients and control subjects showed that the TT homozygous patients were two times more likely to develop HCC (p=0.011). Also, the T allele was found to be a significant risk factor for the disease (OR 1.970, 95% CI 1.250-3.105, p=0.003). No association was detected between different parameters of the disease and the SNP. For the first time, our results suggest that the -844T/C polymorphism in the FasL gene confers risk to HCC. The alarming increase in the incidence of HCC in Egypt encourages further studies to document our results in a larger sample, and recommends more genetic studies hoping to define a genomic risk prediction specific to this cancer in our population. PMID:26891954

  17. Trihalomethanes in Lisbon indoor swimming pools: occurrence, determining factors, and health risk classification.

    PubMed

    Silva, Zelinda Isabel; Rebelo, Maria Helena; Silva, Manuela Manso; Alves, Ana Martins; Cabral, Maria da Conceição; Almeida, Ana Cristina; Aguiar, Fátima Rôxo; de Oliveira, Anabela Lopes; Nogueira, Ana Cruz; Pinhal, Hermínia Rodrigues; Aguiar, Pedro Manuel; Cardoso, Ana Sofia

    2012-01-01

    Characterization of water quality from indoor swimming pools, using chorine-based disinfection techniques, was performed during a 6-mo period to study the occurrence, distribution, and concentration factors of trihalomethanes (THM). Several parameters such as levels of water THM, water and air chloroform, water bromodichloromethane (BDCM), water dibromochloromethane (DBCM), water bromoform (BF), free residual chlorine (FrCl), pH, water and air temperature, and permanganate water oxidizability (PWO) were determined in each pool during that period. Chloroform (CF(W)) was the THM detected at higher concentrations in all pools, followed by BDCM, DBCM, and BF detected at 99, 34, and 6% of the samples, respectively. Water THM concentrations ranged from 10.1 to 155 μg/L, with 6.5% of the samples presenting values above 100 μg/L (parametric value established in Portuguese law DL 306/2007). In this study, air chloroform (CF(Air)) concentrations ranged from 45 to 373 μg/m³ with 24% of the samples presenting values above 136 μg/m³ (considered high exposure value). Several significant correlations were observed between total THM and other parameters, namely, CF(W), CF(Air), FrCl, water temperature (T(W)), and PWO. These correlations indicate that FrCl, T(W) and PWO are parameters that influence THM formation. The exposure criterion established for water THM enabled the inclusion of 67% of Lisbon pools in the high exposure group, which reinforces the need for an improvement in pool water quality. PMID:22788374

  18. The Clinical Significance of Separate Measurements of Carotid Arterial Wall to Assess the Risk Factor for Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji-Hoon; Kim, Gee-Hee; Moon, Keon-Woong; Yoo, Ki-Dong; Kim, Chul-Min

    2016-01-01

    Background Carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) is associated with several risk factors for atherosclerosis and has been consistently linked to cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease. The clinical significance of separate measurements of CIMT, which is the sum of the intima (IT) and media thickness (MT), to use as an assessment of risk for atherosclerosis has not yet been fully established. Methods Among 3377 patients who underwent B-mode ultrasound of carotid arteries and coronary angiography in the Medical Department of St. Mary's Hospital from September 2003 to March 2009, 1146 subjects (M:F = 616:530; mean age, 57.7 ± 12.1 years) who were diagnosed with normal coronary arteries were enrolled in this study. IT, MT, and CIMT of the enrolled patients were manually measured using high-frequency ultrasonography (15 MHz linear array transducer). Results In multivariate logistic regression analysis, age (β = 0.063, p < 0.0001), body mass index (BMI) (β = 0.028, p = 0.018), and hypertension (HTN) (β = 0.046, p = 0.0002) were associated with MT (R2 = 0.256) and the IT/MT ratio (R2 = 0.209). Age (β = 0.065, p < 0.0001), BMI (β = 0.025, p = 0.038), hemoglobin A1c (β = 0.045, p = 0.045), and HTN (β = 0.043, p = 0.0006) correlated with mean CIMT (R2 = 0.230). Age (β = -0.071, p < 0.0001) and BMI (β = -0.046, p = 0.002) were associated with the IT/MT ratio (R2 = 0.219) on the left side. Age (β = 0.093, p < 0.0001) was related to MT (R2 = 0.265) and mean CIMT (R2 = 0.243) on the left side. Conclusion We noted different atherosclerotic risk factors were related to measurements of the arterial wall in different ways. Therefore, separate measurements of CIMT might be a useful method to assess the risk for atherosclerosis. PMID:27081444

  19. Security classification of information

    SciTech Connect

    Quist, A.S.

    1993-04-01

    This document is the second of a planned four-volume work that comprehensively discusses the security classification of information. The main focus of Volume 2 is on the principles for classification of information. Included herein are descriptions of the two major types of information that governments classify for national security reasons (subjective and objective information), guidance to use when determining whether information under consideration for classification is controlled by the government (a necessary requirement for classification to be effective), information disclosure risks and benefits (the benefits and costs of classification), standards to use when balancing information disclosure risks and benefits, guidance for assigning classification levels (Top Secret, Secret, or Confidential) to classified information, guidance for determining how long information should be classified (classification duration), classification of associations of information, classification of compilations of information, and principles for declassifying and downgrading information. Rules or principles of certain areas of our legal system (e.g., trade secret law) are sometimes mentioned to .provide added support to some of those classification principles.

  20. NT-proBNP: Is It a More Significant Risk Factor for Mortality Than Troponin T in Incident Hemodialysis Patients?

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Hyung Jung; Lee, Mi Jung; Lee, Hye Sun; Park, Jung Tak; Han, Seung Hyeok; Yoo, Tae-Hyun; Kim, Yong-Lim; Kim, Yon Su; Yang, Chul Woo; Kim, Nam-Ho; Kang, Shin-Wook

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Numerous studies have demonstrated that cardiac biomarkers are significant predictors of cardiovascular (CV) and all-cause mortality in ESRD patients, but most of the studies were retrospective or included small numbers of patients, only prevalent dialysis patients, or measured 1 or 2 biomarkers. This study was to analyze the association between 3 cardiac biomarkers and mortality in incident HD patients. A prospective cohort of 864 incident HD patients was followed for 30 months. Based on the median values of baseline NT-proBNP, cTnT, and hsCRP, the patients were divided into “high” and “low” groups, and CV and all-cause mortality were compared between each group. Additionally, time-dependent ROC curves were constructed, and the NRI and IDI of the models with various biomarkers were calculated. The CV survival rates were significantly lower in the “high” NT-proBNP and cTnT groups compared to the corresponding “low” groups, while there was no significant difference in CV survival rate between the 2 hsCRP groups. However, all-cause mortality rates were significantly higher in all 3 “high” groups compared to each lower group. In multivariate analyses, only Ln NT-proBNP was found to be an independent predictor of mortality. Moreover, NT-proBNP was a more prognostic marker for mortality compared to cTnT. In conclusion, NT-proBNP is the biomarker that results in the most added prognostic value on top of traditional risk factors for CV and all-cause mortality in incident HD patients. PMID:25501091

  1. Polymorphism of adhesion molecule CD31 is not a significant risk factor for graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Nichols, W C; Antin, J H; Lunetta, K L; Terry, V H; Hertel, C E; Wheatley, M A; Arnold, N D; Siemieniak, D R; Boehnke, M; Ginsburg, D

    1996-12-15

    Mismatch between bone marrow transplant (BMT) patient and donor for an amino acid polymorphism within the adhesion molecule CD31 has recently been reported to increase risk for the development of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). We further examined this association in a larger series of 301 BMT patients (227 with grade III/IV GVHD and 74 with grade 0 GVHD) and their HLA-identical sibling donors. CD31 genotypes were determined by polymerase chain reaction and restriction endonuclease digestion. The role of mismatch at the CD31 locus in the development of GVHD was assessed by analyzing the extent of CD31 identity and CD31 compatibility among the grade 0 GVHD and grade III/IV GVHD sibling pairs. No significant association between CD31 mismatch and the development of severe GVHD was detected in our overall patient population. Sixty-three percent of grade III/IV GVHD sibling pairs and 69% of grade 0 GVHD sibling pairs had CD31 genotypes that were identical (P = .36, odds ratio = 1.30). In addition, neither the grade 0 GVHD group (P = .10) nor the grade III/IV GVHD group (P = .27) differed significantly from the expected probability of identity between sibling pairs. Mismatch at the CD31 polymorphism between recipients and donors showed no consistent association with the development of GVHD. Current evidence does not support the value of CD31 mismatch in the selection of BMT donors. PMID:8977234

  2. Clinical Application of Revised Laboratory Classification Criteria for Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome: Is the Follow-Up Interval of 12 Weeks Instead of 6 Weeks Significantly Useful?

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang Hyuk; Park, Chan-Jeoung; Chi, Hyun-Sook

    2016-01-01

    Background. According to revised classification criteria of true antiphospholipid antibody syndrome, at least one of three antiphospholipid antibodies should be present on two or more occasions at least 12 weeks apart. However, it can be inconvenient to perform follow-up tests with interval of 12 weeks. We investigated clinical application of follow-up tests with interval of 12 weeks. Method. Totals of 67, 199, and 332 patients tested positive initially for the lupus anticoagulants confirm, the anti-β2 glycoprotein-I antibody, and the anti-cardiolipin antibody test, respectively, from Jan 2007 to Jul 2009. We investigated clinical symptoms of patients, follow-up interval, and results of each test. Results. Among patients with initial test positive, 1.5%–8.5% were subjected to follow-up tests at interval of more than 12 weeks. Among 25 patients with negative conversion in tests, patients with interval of more than 12 weeks showed clinical symptom positivity of 33.3%, which was higher than that of 12.5% with 6–12 weeks. Among 34 patients with persistent test positive, clinical symptoms positivity trended to be more evident in patients at interval of 6–12 weeks (47.4% versus 26.7%, P = 0.191) than more than 12 weeks. Conclusion. Less than 10% of patients with initial test positive had follow-up tests at interval of more than 12 weeks and the patients with persistent test positive at interval of more than 12 weeks showed trends toward having lower clinical symptoms than 6–12 weeks. More research is needed focused on the evidence that follow-up test at interval of more than 12 weeks should be performed instead of 6 weeks. PMID:27610369

  3. Clinical Application of Revised Laboratory Classification Criteria for Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome: Is the Follow-Up Interval of 12 Weeks Instead of 6 Weeks Significantly Useful?

    PubMed

    Park, Sang Hyuk; Jang, Seongsoo; Park, Chan-Jeoung; Chi, Hyun-Sook

    2016-01-01

    Background. According to revised classification criteria of true antiphospholipid antibody syndrome, at least one of three antiphospholipid antibodies should be present on two or more occasions at least 12 weeks apart. However, it can be inconvenient to perform follow-up tests with interval of 12 weeks. We investigated clinical application of follow-up tests with interval of 12 weeks. Method. Totals of 67, 199, and 332 patients tested positive initially for the lupus anticoagulants confirm, the anti-β 2 glycoprotein-I antibody, and the anti-cardiolipin antibody test, respectively, from Jan 2007 to Jul 2009. We investigated clinical symptoms of patients, follow-up interval, and results of each test. Results. Among patients with initial test positive, 1.5%-8.5% were subjected to follow-up tests at interval of more than 12 weeks. Among 25 patients with negative conversion in tests, patients with interval of more than 12 weeks showed clinical symptom positivity of 33.3%, which was higher than that of 12.5% with 6-12 weeks. Among 34 patients with persistent test positive, clinical symptoms positivity trended to be more evident in patients at interval of 6-12 weeks (47.4% versus 26.7%, P = 0.191) than more than 12 weeks. Conclusion. Less than 10% of patients with initial test positive had follow-up tests at interval of more than 12 weeks and the patients with persistent test positive at interval of more than 12 weeks showed trends toward having lower clinical symptoms than 6-12 weeks. More research is needed focused on the evidence that follow-up test at interval of more than 12 weeks should be performed instead of 6 weeks. PMID:27610369

  4. Predicting the Risk for Central Pain Using the Sensory Components of the International Standards for Neurological Classification of Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Levitan, Yuval; Zeilig, Gabi; Bondi, Moshe; Ringler, Erez; Defrin, Ruth

    2015-11-01

    Central neuropathic pain (CP) after spinal cord injury (SCI) is excruciating and difficult to manage. Pre-emptive treatment could be initiated in patients at risk for CP providing that it can be predicted. A combination of psychophysical tests could predict CP, but the process necessitates sophisticated equipment and constant monitoring. A simple predictive tool for CP is required. The aim of this study was to test the predictability for CP of the sensory component of the International Standards for Neurological Classification of Spinal Cord Injury (SC-ISNCSCI), routinely performed on all SCI patients. In an historical-prospective study, the SC-ISNCSCI and background variables were extracted from medical records of 115 SCI patients. In a prospective study, 20 SCI patients underwent the SC-ISNCSCI at admission and were followed-up for 12 months. In both studies, pinprick (PP) and light touch (LT) scores from the SC-ISNCSCI and the difference between them (LT-PP) were compared between those who eventually developed CP and those who did not. Heat-pain and touch thresholds were measured and correlated with the SC-ISNCSCI to test its validity. In both studies, patients who developed CP had, prior to CP, lower PP than LT scores, and lower PP scores than those who did not develop CP. At-level delta LT-PP score>1 best predicted CP; the odds of developing CP with LT-PP>1 was 24.4 times that of the reverse category (LT-PP<1). Heat-pain and touch thresholds significantly correlated with PP and LT. We conclude that the SC-ISNCSCI can be used as a clinical biomarker of CP with high probability. PMID:26244708

  5. Lack of Significant Effects of Chlamydia trachomatis Infection on Cervical Adenocarcinoma Risk: Nested Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Smelov, Vitaly; Gheit, Tarik; Sundström, Karin; Ploner, Alexander; McKay-Chopin, Sandrine; Eklund, Carina; Tommasino, Massimo; Dillner, Joakim

    2016-01-01

    Background A role of Chlamydia trachomatis in HPV-induced cervical carcinogenesis has been reported for cervical cancer but studies on cervical adenocarcinoma are limited. Methods A total of 1,553 cervical smears taken up to 26 years before diagnosis in a large population-based nested case-control study of cervical adenocarcinoma (AC, 132 cases with matched controls), and adenocarcinoma in situ (AIS, 159 cases with matched controls) were tested for C. trachomatis and HPV DNA by a type-specific PCR bead-based multiplex genotyping (TS-MPG) assay. Results Only 1.7% of samples were positive for C. trachomatis, with no significant differences between AC/AIS cases and controls. HPV-positivity was detected in 49.3% of C. trachomatis-negative and 65.4% C. trachomatis-positive samples, respectively. Conclusions A large prospective study did not find any risk for cervical adenocarcinoma and/or AIS conferred by C. trachomatis infection. Impact C. trachomatis appears not to be involved in cervical adenocarcinomas. PMID:27227411

  6. Urine phyto-oestrogen metabolites are not significantly associated with risk of type 2 diabetes: the Singapore Chinese health study.

    PubMed

    Talaei, Mohammad; Lee, Bee L; Ong, Choon N; van Dam, Rob M; Yuan, Jian M; Koh, Woon P; Pan, An

    2016-05-01

    We evaluated the relationship between urine concentrations of phyto-oestrogens (isoflavones and lignans) and risk of incident type 2 diabetes in middle-aged and elderly Chinese residing in Singapore. Urine metabolites of isoflavones and lignans were assayed by HPLC among 564 diabetes cases and 564 matched controls in a case-control study nested within the Singapore Chinese Health Study cohort. Participants were free of diagnosed diabetes, CVD and cancer at morning urine collections during 1999-2004. Cases were participants who reported to have physician-diagnosed diabetes at follow-up visits during 2006-2010, whereas controls were randomly selected among those who remained free of diabetes and were matched to the index cases by age, sex, dialect group and date of urine collection. Conditional logistic regression models were used to calculate OR and 95 % CI with adjustment for potential confounders. The mean age of the participants at the time of urine collection was 59·8 years, and the average interval between urine collection and diabetes diagnosis was 4·0 years. The multivariate-adjusted OR for diabetes were 1·00 (reference), 0·76 (95 % CI 0·52, 1·11), 0·78 (95 % CI 0·53, 1·14) and 0·79 (95 % CI 0·54, 1·15) across quartiles of urine isoflavones (P for trend=0·54), and were 1·00 (reference), 0·87 (95 % CI 0·60, 1·27), 1·10 (95 % CI 0·77, 1·56) and 0·93 (95 % CI 0·63, 1·37) for lignans (P for trend=0·93). The results were similar in men and women, as well as for individual metabolites of isoflavones (genistein, daidzein, glycitin and equol) or lignans (enterodiol and enterolactone). The present study did not find a significant association between urine phyto-oestrogen metabolites and risk of type 2 diabetes in Chinese adults. PMID:26949260

  7. Application of linear graph embedding as a dimensionality reduction technique and sparse representation classifier as a post classifier for the classification of epilepsy risk levels from EEG signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhakar, Sunil Kumar; Rajaguru, Harikumar

    2015-12-01

    The most common and frequently occurring neurological disorder is epilepsy and the main method useful for the diagnosis of epilepsy is electroencephalogram (EEG) signal analysis. Due to the length of EEG recordings, EEG signal analysis method is quite time-consuming when it is processed manually by an expert. This paper proposes the application of Linear Graph Embedding (LGE) concept as a dimensionality reduction technique for processing the epileptic encephalographic signals and then it is classified using Sparse Representation Classifiers (SRC). SRC is used to analyze the classification of epilepsy risk levels from EEG signals and the parameters such as Sensitivity, Specificity, Time Delay, Quality Value, Performance Index and Accuracy are analyzed.

  8. Identification of Sexually Abused Female Adolescents at Risk for Suicidal Ideations: A Classification and Regression Tree Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brabant, Marie-Eve; Hebert, Martine; Chagnon, Francois

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the clinical profiles of 77 female teenager survivors of sexual abuse and examined the association of abuse-related and personal variables with suicidal ideations. Analyses revealed that 64% of participants experienced suicidal ideations. Findings from classification and regression tree analysis indicated that depression,…

  9. ECOLOGICAL CLASSIFICATION OF RIVERS FOR ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT: DEMONSTRATION, VALIDATION, AND APPLICATION TO REGIONAL RISK ASSESSMENT ACROSS ILLINOIS, MICHIGAN, AND WISCONSIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Our goal is to couple landscape-based modeling from large, regional data sets and regional Land Transformation Models with a valley segment ecological classification approach already being employed in several Midwestern states. Objectives include completion of a GI...

  10. Evaluation of diet quality and weight status of children from a low socioeconomic urban environment supports "at risk" classification.

    PubMed

    Langevin, Denise D; Kwiatkowski, Cynthia; McKay, M Geraldine; Maillet, Julie O'Sullivan; Touger-Decker, Riva; Smith, Jeffrey K; Perlman, Adam

    2007-11-01

    This cross-sectional study evaluated diet quality and weight status in 248 randomly selected low-income urban children, aged 7 to 13 years, who were participating in a larger study on the effectiveness of multivitamin supplementation on school performance. Food frequency questionnaires were used to determine intake of total calories and food groups, selected micronutrients, and amount and percent of calories from sweets. Results were compared to age-appropriate recommendations of the Food Guide Pyramid and to the Dietary Reference Intakes. Height, weight, and ages obtained from current-year student health records were used to calculate body mass index (calculated as kg/m(2)) percentile for age. Of 193 participants with usable food frequencies and available weight, height, sex, and age, 22% (n=43) were at risk for overweight and 36% (n=69) were overweight. More than 75% of participants failed to meet recommended servings for grains, vegetables, dairy, and fruit groups, and mean intake of each of these food groups was significantly less than recommendations (P<0.001). Twenty-five percent or more of subjects did not meet Recommended Dietary Allowances for iron and folate. Mean intake of calcium was below the Adequate Intake for calcium and 76% of children 8 years old and younger and 93% of children 9 years old and older did not meet the Adequate Intake for calcium. Mean calorie intake was 1,723 kcal (standard deviation+/-924) and mean percent of calories from carbohydrate, protein, and fat was 57%, 13%, and 32%, respectively. No correlation was found between total calories, total dietary sugar, or percent of calories from sweets and body mass index. Results of this study suggest that these urban children may be "at risk," based on the high percentage who are overweight and have insufficient food group consumption and micronutrient intake. PMID:17964318

  11. Short-term weight gain and breast cancer risk by hormone receptor classification among pre- and postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Rosner, Bernard; Eliassen, A Heather; Toriola, Adetunji T; Hankinson, Susan E; Willett, Walter C; Natarajan, Loki; Colditz, Graham A

    2015-04-01

    Obesity is well established as a cause of postmenopausal breast cancer incidence and mortality. In contrast, adiposity in early life reduces breast cancer incidence. However, whether short-term weight change influences breast cancer risk is not well known. We followed a cohort of 77,232 women from 1980 to 2006 (1,445,578 person-years), with routinely updated risk factor information, documenting 4196 incident cases of invasive breast cancer. ER and PR status were obtained from pathology reports and medical records yielding a total of 2033 ER+/PR+ tumors, 595 ER-/PR- tumors, 512 ER+/PR- tumors. The log incidence breast cancer model was used to assess the association of short-term weight gain (over past 4 years) while controlling for average BMI before and after menopause. Short-term weight change was significantly associated with breast cancer risk (RR 1.20; 95 % CI 1.09-1.33) for a 4-year weight gain of ≥15 lbs versus no change (≤5 lbs) (P_trend < 0.001). The association was stronger for premenopausal women (RR 1.38; 95 % CI 1.13-1.69) (P_trend = 0.004) than for postmenopausal women (RR 1.10; 95 % CI 0.97-1.25) (P_trend = 0.063). Short-term weight gain during premenopause had a stronger association for ER+/PR- (RR per 25 lb weight gain = 2.19; 95 % CI 1.33-3.61, P = 0.002) and ER-/PR- breast cancer (RR per 25 lb weight gain = 1.61; 95 % CI 1.09-2.38, P = 0.016) than for ER+/PR+ breast cancer (RR per 25 lb weight gain = 1.13; 95 % CI 0.89-1.43, P = 0.32). There are deleterious effects of short-term weight gain, particularly during pre-menopause, even after controlling for average BMI before and after menopause. The association was stronger for ER+/PR- and ER-/PR- than for ER+/PR+ breast cancer. PMID:25796612

  12. Integrating Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Assay With Clinical Parameters Improves Risk Classification for Relapse and Survival in Head-and-Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Christine H.; Hammond, Elizabeth M.; Trotti, Andy M.; Wang Huijun; Spencer, Sharon; Zhang Huazhong; Cooper, Jay; Jordan, Richard; Rotman, Marvin H.; Ang, K. Kian

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) overexpression has been consistently found to be an independent predictor of local-regional relapse (LRR) after radiotherapy. We assessed the extent by which it can refine risk classification for overall survival (OS) and LRR in patients with head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Methods and Materials: EGFR expression in locally advanced HNSCC was measured by immunohistochemistry in a series of patients randomized to receive accelerated or conventional radiation regimens in a Phase III trial. Subsequently, data of the two series were pooled (N = 533) for conducting a recursive partitioning analysis that incorporated clinical parameters (e.g., performance status, primary site, T and N categories) and four molecular markers (EGFR, p53, Ki-67, and microvessel density). Results: This study confirmed that patients with higher than median levels of tumor EGFR expression had a lower OS (relative risk [RR]: 1.90, p = 0.0010) and a higher LRR (RR: 1.91, p = 0.0163). Of the four markers analyzed, only EGFR was found to contribute to refining classification of patients into three risk classes with distinct OS and LRR outcomes. The addition of EGFR to three clinical parameters could identify patients having up to a fivefold difference in the risk of LRR. Conclusions: Adding pretreatment EGFR expression data to known robust clinical prognostic variables improved the estimation of the probability for OS and LRR after radiotherapy. Its use for stratifying or selecting patients with defined tumor feature and pattern of relapse for enrollment into clinical trials testing specific therapeutic strategy warrants further investigation.

  13. An integrated framework for safety, quality and risk management: an information and incident management system based on a universal patient safety classification

    PubMed Central

    Runciman, W B; Williamson, J A H; Deakin, A; Benveniste, K A; Bannon, K; Hibbert, P D

    2006-01-01

    More needs to be done to improve safety and quality and to manage risks in health care. Existing processes are fragmented and there is no single comprehensive source of information about what goes wrong. An integrated framework for the management of safety, quality and risk is needed, with an information and incident management system based on a universal patient safety classification. The World Alliance for Patient Safety provides a platform for the development of a coherent approach; 43 desirable attributes for such an approach are discussed. An example of an incident management and information system serving a patient safety classification is presented, with a brief account of how and where it is currently used. Any such system is valueless unless it improves safety and quality. Quadruple‐loop learning (personal, local, national and international) is proposed with examples of how an exemplar system has been successfully used at the various levels. There is currently an opportunity to “get it right” by international cooperation via the World Health Organization to develop an integrated framework incorporating systems that can accommodate information from all sources, manage and monitor things that go wrong, and allow the worldwide sharing of information and the dissemination of tools for the implementation of strategies which have been shown to work. PMID:17142615

  14. The Association of Pediatric LDL-cholesterol and HDL-cholesterol Dyslipidemia Classifications and Change in Dyslipidemia Status with Carotid Intima-Media Thickness in Adulthood: Evidence from the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study, the Bogalusa Heart Study, and the Childhood Determinants of Adult Health (CDAH) Study

    PubMed Central

    Magnussen, Costan G.; Venn, Alison; Thomson, Russell; Juonala, Markus; Srinivasan, Sathanur R.; Viikari, Jorma S.A.; Berenson, Gerald S.; Dwyer, Terence; Raitakari, Olli T.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives – To determine which of the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) or National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) LDL-cholesterol and HDL-cholesterol classifications of dyslipidemia status in adolescents is most effective at predicting high common carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT) in adulthood. Background – Two classifications of pediatric dyslipidemia status have been proposed. No study has assessed which of these is most effective for predicting adolescents who will develop preclinical atherosclerosis in adulthood. Methods – Three population-based, prospective cohort studies that collected lipoprotein measurements on 1711 adolescents aged 12–18 years who were re-measured as young adults aged 29–39 years. Lipoproteins in adolescence were classified according to NCEP and NHANES cut-points, while high IMT in adulthood was defined as those at or above the age, sex, race, and cohort specific 90th percentile of IMT. Results – Independent of the classification employed, adolescents with dyslipidemia were at significantly increased risk of having high IMT in adulthood (relative risks from 1.6 to 2.5). Differences in predictive capacity between both classifications were minimal. Overweight or obese adolescents with dyslipidemia had increased carotid IMT (males, 0.11mm; females, 0.08mm) in adulthood compared with those who did not have both risk factors. Adolescent dyslipidemia status was more strongly associated with high IMT in adulthood than change in dyslipidemia status. Conclusions – Pediatric dyslipidemia classifications perform equally in the prediction of adolescents who are at increased risk of high IMT in young adulthood. Our data suggest that dyslipidemia screening could be limited to overweight or obese adolescents. PMID:19264243

  15. A hospital-based case-control study of acute myeloid leukemia in Shanghai: analysis of environmental and occupational risk factors by subtypes of the WHO classification.

    PubMed

    Wong, Otto; Harris, Fran; Armstrong, Thomas W; Hua, Fu

    2010-03-19

    The objectives were: (1) to investigate potential environmental and occupational risk factors of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and (2) to explore the relationships between risk factors and AML subtypes according to the World Health Organization (WHO) classification. The investigation was a hospital-based case-control study consisting of 722 newly diagnosed AML cases (August 2003 through June 2007) and 1444 individually gender-age-matched patient controls at 29 hospitals in Shanghai. A 17-page questionnaire was used to obtain information on demographics, medical history, family history, lifestyle risk factors, employment history, residential history, and occupational and non-occupational exposures. Certain occupations of interest triggered a second questionnaire, which was occupation-specific and asked for more details about jobs, tasks, materials used and work environment. Exposure assessments were based on the questionnaires, on-site workplace investigations, data published in the Chinese literature, historical exposure measurements maintained by government health agencies, and expert opinions of a panel of local scientists who were familiar with workplaces in Shanghai. Risk estimates (odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals) of individual risk factors were calculated using conditional logistic regression models. A number of potential environmental and occupational risk factors were associated with an increased risk of AML (all subtypes combined) and/or individual subtypes; including home or workplace renovation, living on a farm, planting crops, raising livestock or animals, farm workers, metal workers, rubber and plastic workers, wood and furniture workers, printers, loading and unloading workers, automobile manufacturing, general construction, and food and beverage industry (restaurants and other eateries). Exposures associated with an increased risk of AML (all subtypes combined) and/or individual subtypes included benzene, diesel fuel, metals, insecticides

  16. A clinically applicable molecular-based classification for endometrial cancers

    PubMed Central

    Talhouk, A; McConechy, M K; Leung, S; Li-Chang, H H; Kwon, J S; Melnyk, N; Yang, W; Senz, J; Boyd, N; Karnezis, A N; Huntsman, D G; Gilks, C B; McAlpine, J N

    2015-01-01

    Background: Classification of endometrial carcinomas (ECs) by morphologic features is inconsistent, and yields limited prognostic and predictive information. A new system for classification based on the molecular categories identified in The Cancer Genome Atlas is proposed. Methods: Genomic data from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) support classification of endometrial carcinomas into four prognostically significant subgroups; we used the TCGA data set to develop surrogate assays that could replicate the TCGA classification, but without the need for the labor-intensive and cost-prohibitive genomic methodology. Combinations of the most relevant assays were carried forward and tested on a new independent cohort of 152 endometrial carcinoma cases, and molecular vs clinical risk group stratification was compared. Results: Replication of TCGA survival curves was achieved with statistical significance using multiple different molecular classification models (16 total tested). Internal validation supported carrying forward a classifier based on the following components: mismatch repair protein immunohistochemistry, POLE mutational analysis and p53 immunohistochemistry as a surrogate for ‘copy-number' status. The proposed molecular classifier was associated with clinical outcomes, as was stage, grade, lymph-vascular space invasion, nodal involvement and adjuvant treatment. In multivariable analysis both molecular classification and clinical risk groups were associated with outcomes, but differed greatly in composition of cases within each category, with half of POLE and mismatch repair loss subgroups residing within the clinically defined ‘high-risk' group. Combining the molecular classifier with clinicopathologic features or risk groups provided the highest C-index for discrimination of outcome survival curves. Conclusions: Molecular classification of ECs can be achieved using clinically applicable methods on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples, and provides

  17. Does the use of salmon frames as bait for lobster/crab creel fishing significantly increase the risk of disease in farmed salmon in Scotland?

    PubMed

    Murray, Alexander G

    2015-07-01

    Salmon farming is an important economic activity, and employer, particularly for remoter areas of Scotland; crustacean fisheries are also significant small businesses in these areas. Salmon frames (the head and spine that remain after evisceration and filleting) are sometimes used to bait the creel pots used to catch lobsters and crabs. These frames may contain pathogens that could potentially be spread to salmon farms in the vicinity of creel fisheries. Therefore, an analysis has been carried out for key pathogens of farmed salmon to assess the risks associated with this process. Infection of farms via creel bait requires that: (1) pathogens are present in salmon at harvest; (2) they are not removed from the salmon that used for bait during processing; (3) they transmit from creel pot baits to salmon farms. This last step is critical and leads to most of the uncertainty in results. Risk were assessed for 7 viruses, 3 bacteria, and 3 eukaryotic parasites of importance to salmon farming. A potentially significant risk was identified in association with disease control programmes if fish were filleted at a secondary processor; such a situation should arise only rarely. A very low risk, per event, was identified from imports, however, because of large numbers of Norwegian imports processed in the UK this risk is always present. Risks were at worst of low (disease control) or very low (imports) probability and are significant only because of the magnitude of consequences. PMID:25980750

  18. Which Measures of Health Status Assessment are the Most Significant in Organized Cohorts with Low Current Cardiovascular Risk? The Screening Study of Penitentiary Staff in Saratov Region, Russia

    PubMed Central

    Kiselev, Anton R.; Balashov, Sergey V.; Posnenkova, Olga M.; Prokhorov, Mikhail D.; Gridnev, Vladimir I.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present study was to compare different methods of health status assessment in organized cohort of penitentiary employees in Saratov Region, Russian Federation. Materials and Methods: 1,014 penitentiary employees (81.8% male) aged 33.4±6.8 years were included in the cohort study. All participants underwent an annual preventive health examination in the Center of Medical and Social Rehabilitation of Russian Federal Penitentiary Service in Saratov Region. The prevalence of common cardiovascular risk factors was assessed. Risk Score and the number of fulfilled health metrics proposed by American Heart Association (AHA) were calculated for each participant. Results: It is shown that penitentiary staff in Saratov Region is characterized by low current risk score (1.2±0.8%), but high prevalence of such risk factors as increased body weight and obesity (51%), tobacco use or passive smoking (81%), and unhealthy diet (55%). 98.4% of participants had the Score level of ≤5%, but only 4.5% of penitentiary staff met the ideal cardiovascular health (they met all seven AHA health metrics). One fifth of the participants met three or less AHA health metrics. A statistically significant correlation between the risk Score and the number of fulfilled AHA health metrics is revealed (Chi-square = 5.1, p=0.024). The probability of fulfilment of less than 5 AHA health metrics in subjects with medium risk score is shown to be almost twofold greater than in subjects with low risk Score. However, there are a lot of differences in the assessment of cardiovascular health by risk Score and AHA health metrics. Conclusion: AHA health metrics are more preferable than the risk Score or assessment of separate cardiovascular risk factors for preventive management in organized cohorts with low current cardiovascular risk such as penitentiary staff in Saratov Region. PMID:27026764

  19. Improving the Significance of MM/SD Risk Analysis by Application of the SRL Ballistic Limit Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schafer, Frank; Putzar, Robin; Ryan, Shannon; Lambert, Michel

    2009-03-01

    In this paper, a new ballistic limit equation (BLE) for satellite equipment placed behind satellite structure walls is presented. Application of this equation in micrometeoroid and space debris (MM/SD) risk analysis (RA) tools for satellites can lead to a more realistic quantitative assessment of the actual failure risk of satellite equipment from hypervelocity impacts (HVI) and hence, of the failure risk of a satellite. This is because in contrast to the BLEs that are currently in use in RA tools, in the new equation the intrinsic shielding capabilities of the satellite equipment are considered explicitly.The BLE has been developed for application to configurations consisting of a Whipple shield or a honeycomb sandwich panel placed in front of a backwall. It considers explicitly the thickness, material and spacing of each of the three involved plates. The backwall represents the cover plate or the external wall of spacecraft equipment that is placed behind the spacecraft's structure wall. The BLE has been experimentally calibrated to the most common spacecraft equipment: fuel and heat pipes, pressure vessels, electronics boxes, harness, and batteries. Further, suitable failure criteria have been defined for each equipment type. The critical projectile masses calculated with the new BLE for satellite equipment placed behind satellite structure walls are considerably larger than the critical projectile masses calculated for the standalone structure wall of the satellite.

  20. A significantly joint effect between arsenic and occupational exposures and risk genotypes/diplotypes of CYP2E1, GSTO1 and GSTO2 on risk of urothelial carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.-H.; Yeh, S.-D.; Shen, K.-H.; Shen, Cheng-Huang; Juang, G.-D.; Hsu, L.-I; Chiou, H.-Y.; Chen, C.-J.

    2009-11-15

    Cigarette smoking, arsenic and occupational exposures are well-known risk factors for the development of urothelial carcinoma (UC). Therefore, the aim of this study is to investigate whether the effect of cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, arsenic and occupational exposures on risk of UC could be modified by genetic polymorphisms of cytochrome P450 2E1 and glutathione S-transferase omega. A hospital-based case-control study consisted of 520 histologically confirmed UC cases, and 520 age- and gender-matched cancer-free controls were carried out from September 1998 to December 2007. Genotyping of CYP2E1, GSTO1 and GSTO2 was determined by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). Subjects with both of cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption have a significantly increased UC risk (odds ratio [OR] = 2.9; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.9-4.4). Significantly increased UC risks of 1.5 and 1.9 were found for study subjects with high arsenic exposure and those who have been exposed to two or more occupational exposures, respectively. A significantly increased UC risk of 3.9 was observed in study subjects with H2-H2 diplotype of GSTO1 and GSTO2. The significantly highest UC risk of 9.0 was found for those with all environmental risk factors of cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, arsenic and occupational exposures and two or more risk genotypes/diplotypes of CYP2E1, GSTO1 and GSTO2. Our findings suggest that a significantly joint effect of cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, arsenic and occupational exposures and risk genotypes/diplotypes of CYP2E1, GSTO1 and GSTO2 on risk of UC was found.

  1. High Dose Atorvastatin Associated with Increased Risk of Significant Hepatotoxicity in Comparison to Simvastatin in UK GPRD Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Alan T.; Johnson, Paul C. D.; Hall, Gillian C.; Ford, Ian; Mills, Peter R.

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims Occasional risk of serious liver dysfunction and autoimmune hepatitis during atorvastatin therapy has been reported. We compared the risk of hepatotoxicity in atorvastatin relative to simvastatin treatment. Methods The UK GPRD identified patients with a first prescription for simvastatin [164,407] or atorvastatin [76,411] between 1997 and 2006, but with no prior record of liver disease, alcohol-related diagnosis, or liver dysfunction. Incident liver dysfunction in the following six months was identified by biochemical value and compared between statin groups by Cox regression model adjusting for age, sex, year treatment started, dose, alcohol consumption, smoking, body mass index and comorbid conditions. Results Moderate to severe hepatotoxicity [bilirubin >60μmol/L, AST or ALT >200U/L or alkaline phosphatase >1200U/L] developed in 71 patients on atorvastatin versus 101 on simvastatin. Adjusted hazard ratio [AHR] for all atorvastatin relative to simvastatin was 1.9 [95% confidence interval 1.4–2.6]. High dose was classified as 40–80mg daily and low dose 10–20mg daily. Hepatotoxicity occurred in 0.44% of 4075 patients on high dose atorvastatin [HDA], 0.07% of 72,336 on low dose atorvastatin [LDA], 0.09% of 44,675 on high dose simvastatin [HDS] and 0.05% of 119,732 on low dose simvastatin [LDS]. AHRs compared to LDS were 7.3 [4.2–12.7] for HDA, 1.4 [0.9–2.0] for LDA and 1.5 [1.0–2.2] for HDS. Conclusions The risk of hepatotoxicity was increased in the first six months of atorvastatin compared to simvastatin treatment, with the greatest difference between high dose atorvastatin and low dose simvastatin. The numbers of events in the analyses were small. PMID:26983033

  2. Classification Options

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Exceptional Children, 1978

    1978-01-01

    The interview presents opinions of Nicholas Hobbs on the classification of exceptional children, including topics such as ecologically oriented classification systems, the role of parents, and need for revision of teacher preparation programs. (IM)

  3. Identification of sexually abused female adolescents at risk for suicidal ideations: a classification and regression tree analysis.

    PubMed

    Brabant, Marie-Eve; Hébert, Martine; Chagnon, François

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the clinical profiles of 77 female teenager survivors of sexual abuse and examined the association of abuse-related and personal variables with suicidal ideations. Analyses revealed that 64% of participants experienced suicidal ideations. Findings from classification and regression tree analysis indicated that depression, posttraumatic stress symptoms, and hopelessness discriminated profiles of suicidal and nonsuicidal survivors. The elevated prevalence of suicidal ideations among adolescent survivors of sexual abuse underscores the importance of investigating the presence of suicidal ideations in sexual abuse survivors. However, suicidal ideation is not the sole variable that needs to be investigated; depression, hopelessness and posttraumatic stress symptoms are also related to suicidal ideations in survivors and could therefore guide interventions. PMID:23428149

  4. Significance of Lymph Node Ratio in Defining Risk Category in Node-positive Early Stage Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Nicole D.; Frumovitz, Michael; Schmeler, Kathleen M.; dos Reis, Ricardo; Munsell, Mark F.; Eifel, Patricia J.; Soliman, Pamela T.; Nick, Alpa M.; Westin, Shannon N.; Ramirez, Pedro T.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The ratio of positive to negative lymph nodes, or lymph node ratio (LNR), is an important prognostic factor in several solid tumors. The objective of this study was to determine if LNR can be used to define a high-risk category of patients with node-positive early stage cervical cancer. Methods We performed a retrospective review of patients diagnosed with node-positive stage I or II cervical cancer who underwent radical hysterectomy and pelvic +/− para-aortic lymphadenectomy at MD Anderson from January 1990 through December 2011. Univariate and multivariate analysis was used to identify prognostic factors for progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Results Ninety-five patients met inclusion criteria and were included in the analysis. Median total nodes removed were 19 (range 1–58), and median number of positive nodes was 1 (range 1–12). Fifty-eight patients (61%) received radiation with concurrent cisplatin and 27 patients (28%) received radiotherapy alone. Twenty-one (22%) patients recurred. On multivariate analysis, a LNR > 6.6% was associated with a worse PFS (HR=2.97, 95% CI 1.26–7.02, p=0.01), and a LNR > 7.6% with a worse OS (HR=3.96, 95% CI 1.31–11.98, p=0.01). On multivariate analysis, positive margins were associated with worse PFS (p=0.001) and OS (p=0.002), and adjuvant radiotherapy (p=0.01) with improved OS. Conclusions LNR appears to be a useful tool to identify patients with worse prognosis in node-positive early stage cervical cancer. LNR may be used in addition to pathologic risk factors to tailor adjuvant treatment in this population. PMID:25451695

  5. Effectiveness of Computer-Assisted Instruction on Enhancing the Classification Skill in Second-Graders at Risk for Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohammed, Adel Abdulla; Kanpolat, Yavuz Erhan

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Computers and other technological instruments in general have become a more common practice in our schools nowadays, and Computer-assisted instruction (CAI) has been recently provided in various formats from kindergartens on. It can help children at-risk for learning disabilities. Method: This study investigated the effectiveness of…

  6. Interaction between ALOX5AP and CYP3A5 gene variants significantly increases the risk for cerebral infarctions in Chinese.

    PubMed

    Chi, Li-Fen; Yi, Xing-Yang; Shao, Min-Jie; Lin, Jing; Zhou, Qiang

    2014-05-01

    In this study, we investigated associations between susceptibility genes and cerebral infarctions in a Chinese population, and whether gene-gene interactions increase the risk of cerebral infarctions. Overall, 292 patients with cerebral infarctions and 259 healthy control individuals were included. Eight variants in five candidate genes were examined for the risk of stroke, including the SG13S32 (rs9551963), SG13S42 (rs4769060), SG13S89 (rs4769874), and SG13S114 (rs10507391) variants of the 5-lipoxygenase activating protein (ALOX5AP) gene, the G860A (rs751141) variant of the soluble epoxide hydrolase (EPHX2) gene, the A1075C (rs1057910) variant of the CYP2C9*2 gene, the C430T (rs1799853) variant of the CYP2C9*3 gene, and the A6986G (rs776746) variant of the CYP3A5 gene. Gene-gene interactions were explored using generalized multifactor dimensionality reduction methods. There were no statistically significant differences in the frequencies of the genotypes of the eight candidate genes. The generalized multifactor dimensionality reduction analysis showed a significant gene-gene interaction between SG13S114 and A6986G, with scores of 10 for cross-validation consistency and 9 for the sign test (P=0.0107). These gene-gene interactions predicted a significantly higher risk of cerebral infarction (adjusted for age, hypertension, and diabetes mellitus; odds ratio=1.80495%, confidence interval: 1.180-2.759, P=0.006). A two-loci gene interaction confers a significantly higher risk for cerebral infarction. The combinational analysis used in this study may be helpful in the elucidation of genetic risk factors for common and complex diseases. PMID:24368493

  7. Mechanisms and genetic determinants regulating sterol absorption, circulating LDL levels, and sterol elimination: implications for classification and disease risk

    PubMed Central

    Calandra, Sebastiano; Tarugi, Patrizia; Speedy, Helen E.; Dean, Andrew F.; Bertolini, Stefano; Shoulders, Carol C.

    2011-01-01

    This review integrates historical biochemical and modern genetic findings that underpin our understanding of the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) dyslipidemias that bear on human disease. These range from life-threatening conditions of infancy through severe coronary heart disease of young adulthood, to indolent disorders of middle- and old-age. We particularly focus on the biological aspects of those gene mutations and variants that impact on sterol absorption and hepatobiliary excretion via specific membrane transporter systems (NPC1L1, ABCG5/8); the incorporation of dietary sterols (MTP) and of de novo synthesized lipids (HMGCR, TRIB1) into apoB-containing lipoproteins (APOB) and their release into the circulation (ANGPTL3, SARA2, SORT1); and receptor-mediated uptake of LDL and of intestinal and hepatic-derived lipoprotein remnants (LDLR, APOB, APOE, LDLRAP1, PCSK9, IDOL). The insights gained from integrating the wealth of genetic data with biological processes have important implications for the classification of clinical and presymptomatic diagnoses of traditional LDL dyslipidemias, sitosterolemia, and newly emerging phenotypes, as well as their management through both nutritional and pharmaceutical means. PMID:21862702

  8. Mechanisms and genetic determinants regulating sterol absorption, circulating LDL levels, and sterol elimination: implications for classification and disease risk.

    PubMed

    Calandra, Sebastiano; Tarugi, Patrizia; Speedy, Helen E; Dean, Andrew F; Bertolini, Stefano; Shoulders, Carol C

    2011-11-01

    This review integrates historical biochemical and modern genetic findings that underpin our understanding of the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) dyslipidemias that bear on human disease. These range from life-threatening conditions of infancy through severe coronary heart disease of young adulthood, to indolent disorders of middle- and old-age. We particularly focus on the biological aspects of those gene mutations and variants that impact on sterol absorption and hepatobiliary excretion via specific membrane transporter systems (NPC1L1, ABCG5/8); the incorporation of dietary sterols (MTP) and of de novo synthesized lipids (HMGCR, TRIB1) into apoB-containing lipoproteins (APOB) and their release into the circulation (ANGPTL3, SARA2, SORT1); and receptor-mediated uptake of LDL and of intestinal and hepatic-derived lipoprotein remnants (LDLR, APOB, APOE, LDLRAP1, PCSK9, IDOL). The insights gained from integrating the wealth of genetic data with biological processes have important implications for the classification of clinical and presymptomatic diagnoses of traditional LDL dyslipidemias, sitosterolemia, and newly emerging phenotypes, as well as their management through both nutritional and pharmaceutical means. PMID:21862702

  9. Atrial fibrillation burden and atrial fibrillation type: Clinical significance and impact on the risk of stroke and decision making for long-term anticoagulation.

    PubMed

    Boriani, Giuseppe; Pettorelli, Daniele

    2016-08-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common arrhythmia increasing the risk of morbidity and adverse outcomes (stroke, heart failure, death). AF is found in 1-2% of the general population, with increasing prevalence with aging. Its exact epidemiological profile is incomplete and underestimated, because 10-40% of AF patients (particularly the elderly) can be asymptomatic ("clinically silent or subclinical AF"), with occasional electrocardiographic diagnosis. The research interest on silent AF has increased by the evidence that its outcome is no less severe, in terms of risks of stroke and death, than that for symptomatic patients. Data collected from more than 18,000 patients indicate that cardiac implantable electrical devices (CIEDs) are validated tools for detecting silent AF and measuring the time spent in AF, defined as "AF burden." A maximum daily AF burden of ≥5-6min, but particularly ≥1h, is associated with a significant increase in the risk of stroke, and may be clinically relevant to improve current risk stratification based on risk scores and for "personalizing" prescription of oral anticoagulants. An in-depth study of the temporal relationship between AF and ischemic stroke showed that data from CIEDs reveal a complex scenario, by which AF is certainly a risk factor for cardioembolic stroke, with a cause-effect relationship related to atrial thrombi, but can also be a simple "marker of risk," with a noncausal association with stroke. In such cases, stroke is possibly related to atheroemboli from the aorta, the carotid arteries, or other sources. PMID:27196706

  10. Risk Factors at Time of Primary ACL Reconstruction that Contribute to Significant Chondral Surface Change at Time of Revision ACL Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Kaeding, Christopher C.; Group, Mars

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Articular cartilage health is an important issue following primary anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR). It is not clear what risk factors at the time of primary reconstruction affect future articular cartilage health. The purpose of this study was to examine risk factors affecting chondral surface change in a cohort from the time of primary ACLR to revision ACLR. Methods: Subjects who had both primary and revision data contained in the MOON and MARS registries were included. Data included chondral surface status (grade and size) at time of primary and revision, meniscal status (no treatment/repair, ≤33% excision, >33% excision) at time of primary, time from primary to revision ACLR, and age, sex, BMI, Marx, KOOS, and IKDC at time of revision. Significant chondral surface change was defined as >25% deterioration between time of primary and revision in the femoral condyle, tibial plateau, patella, or trochlea. Logistic regression was used to test each variable’s contribution to significant chondral surface change in the medial compartment, lateral compartment, and patellofemoral compartment. Results: 134 subjects met our inclusion criteria. 34/134 (25.4%) had significant lateral compartment chondral surface change, 32/134 (23.9%) had significant medial compartment chondral surface change, and 31/134 (23.1%) had significant patellofemoral chondral surface change. Median age at time of revision was 19.5 years [IQ range 17-25] and median time from primary to revision was 462.5 days [IQ range 292-1049]. KOOS and IKDC at revision were not associated with significant chondral surface change in any compartment. Patients with >33% of their lateral meniscus excised had 13.5 times the odds of having significant lateral compartment surface change compared to subjects who either did not have lateral meniscal damage, had it repaired, or had an excision of ≤33% controlling for age (p<0.001). Patients with ≤33% excision of their medial meniscus had

  11. Remote sensing (normalized difference vegetation index) classification of risk versus minimal risk habitats for human exposure to Ixodes pacificus (Acari: Ixodidae) nymphs in Mendocino County, California.

    PubMed

    Eisen, Rebecca J; Eisen, Lars; Lane, Robert S

    2005-01-01

    In California, Ixodes pacificus Cooley & Kohls nymphs have been implicated as the primary bridging vectors to humans of the spirochetal bacterium causing Lyme disease (Borrelia burgdorferi). Because the nymphs typically do not ascend emergent vegetation, risk of human exposure is minimal in grasslands, chaparral, and woodland-grass. Instead, woodlands with a ground cover dominated by leaf litter (hereinafter referred to as woodland-leaf) have emerged as a primary risk habitat for exposure to B. burgdorferi-infected nymphs. As a means of differentiating woodland-leaf habitats from others with minimal risk (e.g., chaparral, grassland, and woodland-grass), we constructed a maximum likelihood model of these habitat types within a 7,711-ha area in southeastern Mendocino County based on the normalized difference vegetation index derived from Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper imagery (based on a 30 by 30-m pixel size) over four seasons. The overall accuracy of the model to discriminate woodland-leaf, woodland-grass, open grassland, and chaparral was 83.85% (Kappa coefficient of 0.78). Validation of the accuracy of the model to classify woodland-leaf yielded high values both for producer accuracy (93.33% of validated woodland-leaf pixels correctly classified by the model) and user accuracy (96.55% of model-classified validation pixels correctly categorized as woodland-leaf). Woodland-leaf habitats were found to be highly aggregated within the examined area. In conclusion, our model successfully used remotely sensed data as a predictor of habitats where humans are at risk for Lyme disease in the far-western United States. PMID:15691012

  12. Heterogeneous methodology of racial/ethnic classification may be responsible for the different risk assessments for prostate cancer between Black and White men in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Frederico R.; Xavier, Luiz Ricardo T. P.; Romero, Antonio W.; de Almeida, Rui Manuel S.; Matias, Jorge Eduardo F; Tambara, Renato

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate if the different results of prostate cancer risk between black and white Brazilian men may be associated with the varying methodology used to define participants as either Blacks or Whites. Patients and Methods We evaluated median PSA values, rate of PSA level ≥4.0 ng/mL, indications for prostate biopsy, prostate cancer detection rate, biopsy/cancer rate, cancer/biopsy rate, and the relative risk of cancer between blacks versus whites, blacks versus non-blacks (browns and whites), non-whites (browns and blacks) versus whites, African versus non-African descendants, and African descendants or blacks versus non-African descendants and non-blacks. Results From 1544 participants, there were 51.4% whites, 37.2% browns, 11.4% blacks, and 5.4% African descendants. Median PSA level was 0.9 ng/mL in whites, browns, and non-African descendants, compared to 1.2 ng/mL in blacks, and African descendants or blacks, and 1.3 ng/mL in African descendants. Indications for prostate biopsy were present in 16.9% for African descendants, 15.9% of black, 12.3% of white, 11.4% for non-African descendants, and 9.9% of brown participants. Prostate cancer was diagnosed in 30.3% of performed biopsies: 6.2% of African descendants, 5.1% of blacks, 3.3% of whites, 3.0% of non-African descendants, and 2.6% of browns. Conclusions Median PSA values were higher for Blacks versus Whites in all classification systems, except for non-white versus white men. The rate of prostate biopsy, prostate cancer detection rate, and relative risk for cancer was increased in African descendants, and African descendants or blacks, compared to non-African descendants, and non-African descendants and non-blacks, respectively. PMID:26005980

  13. Prognostic significance of L1CAM expression and its association with mutant p53 expression in high-risk endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Van Gool, Inge C; Stelloo, Ellen; Nout, Remi A; Nijman, Hans W; Edmondson, Richard J; Church, David N; MacKay, Helen J; Leary, Alexandra; Powell, Melanie E; Mileshkin, Linda; Creutzberg, Carien L; Smit, Vincent T H B M; Bosse, Tjalling

    2016-02-01

    Studies in early-stage, predominantly low- and intermediate-risk endometrial cancer have demonstrated that L1 cell adhesion molecule (L1CAM) overexpression identifies patients at increased risk of recurrence, yet its prognostic significance in high-risk endometrial cancer is unclear. To evaluate this, its frequency, and the relationship of L1CAM with the established endometrial cancer biomarker p53, we analyzed the expression of both markers by immunohistochemistry in a pilot series of 116 endometrial cancers (86 endometrioid, 30 non-endometrioid subtype) with high-risk features (such as high tumor grade and deep myometrial invasion) and correlated results with clinical outcome. We used The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) endometrial cancer series to validate our findings. Using the previously reported cutoff of 10% positive staining, 51/116 (44%) tumors were classified as L1CAM-positive, with no significant association between L1CAM positivity and the rate of distant metastasis (P=0.195). However, increasing the threshold for L1CAM positivity to 50% resulted in a reduction of the frequency of L1CAM-positive tumors to 24% (28/116), and a significant association with the rate of distant metastasis (P=0.018). L1CAM expression was strongly associated with mutant p53 in the high-risk and TCGA series (P<0.001), although a substantial fraction (36% of endometrioid, 10% of non-endometrioid morphology) of p53-mutant endometrial cancers displayed <10% L1CAM positivity. Moreover, 30% of p53-wild-type non-endometrioid endometrial cancers demonstrated diffuse L1CAM staining, suggesting p53-independent mechanisms of L1CAM overexpression. In conclusion, the previously proposed threshold for L1CAM positivity of >10% does not predict prognosis in high-risk endometrial cancer, whereas an alternative threshold (>50%) does. L1CAM expression is strongly, but not universally, associated with mutant p53, and may be strong enough for clinical implementation as prognostic marker in combination

  14. Distribution of Ticks and the Risk of Lyme Disease and Other Tick-Borne Pathogens of Public Health Significance in Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Clow, Katie M; Ogden, Nicholas H; Lindsay, L Robbin; Michel, Pascal; Pearl, David L; Jardine, Claire M

    2016-04-01

    Over the past two decades, the northward spread of Ixodes scapularis across Ontario, Canada, has accelerated and the risk of Lyme disease has increased. Active surveillance is a recognized and effective method for detecting reproducing populations of I. scapularis. In this study, we conducted field sampling consistent with an active surveillance approach from May to October 2014 at 104 sites in central, eastern, and southern Ontario to determine the current distribution of I. scapularis and other tick species, and enhance our understanding of the geographic risk associated with Borrelia burgdorferi and other tick-borne pathogens of public health significance in this region. I. scapularis was present at 20 of the 104 sites visited. Individuals of the tick species Dermacentor variabilis, Haemaphysalis leporispalustris, and Ixodes dentatus were also collected. I. scapularis was positive by PCR for B. burgdorferi at five sites. These sites formed a significant spatial cluster in eastern Ontario. No ticks were PCR positive for Borrelia miyamotoi, Anaplasma phagocytophilum, and Babesia microti. This study provides an up-to-date picture of the distribution of I. scapularis and other tick species, and the risk of B. burgdorferi and other pathogens of public health significance in central, eastern, and southern Ontario. This information may allow for more effective surveillance efforts and public health interventions for Lyme disease and other tick-borne diseases in this region. PMID:26870937

  15. Genome-wide association study of alcohol dependence:significant findings in African- and European-Americans including novel risk loci.

    PubMed

    Gelernter, J; Kranzler, H R; Sherva, R; Almasy, L; Koesterer, R; Smith, A H; Anton, R; Preuss, U W; Ridinger, M; Rujescu, D; Wodarz, N; Zill, P; Zhao, H; Farrer, L A

    2014-01-01

    We report a GWAS of alcohol dependence (AD) in European-American (EA) and African-American (AA) populations, with replication in independent samples of EAs, AAs and Germans. Our sample for discovery and replication was 16 087 subjects, the largest sample for AD GWAS to date. Numerous genome-wide significant (GWS) associations were identified, many novel. Most associations were population specific, but in several cases were GWS in EAs and AAs for different SNPs at the same locus,showing biological convergence across populations. We confirmed well-known risk loci mapped to alcohol-metabolizing enzyme genes, notably ADH1B (EAs: Arg48His, P=1.17 × 10(-31); AAs: Arg369Cys, P=6.33 × 10(-17)) and ADH1C in AAs (Thr151Thr, P=4.94 × 10(-10)), and identified novel risk loci mapping to the ADH gene cluster on chromosome 4 and extending centromerically beyond it to include GWS associations at LOC100507053 in AAs (P=2.63 × 10(-11)), PDLIM5 in EAs (P=2.01 × 10(-8)), and METAP in AAs (P=3.35 × 10(-8)). We also identified a novel GWS association (1.17 × 10(-10)) mapped to chromosome 2 at rs1437396, between MTIF2 and CCDC88A, across all of the EA and AA cohorts, with supportive gene expression evidence, and population-specific GWS for markers on chromosomes 5, 9 and 19. Several of the novel associations implicate direct involvement of, or interaction with, genes previously identified as schizophrenia risk loci. Confirmation of known AD risk loci supports the overall validity of the study; the novel loci are worthy of genetic and biological follow-up. The findings support a convergence of risk genes (but not necessarily risk alleles) between populations, and, to a lesser extent, between psychiatric traits. PMID:24166409

  16. Endodontic classification.

    PubMed

    Morse, D R; Seltzer, S; Sinai, I; Biron, G

    1977-04-01

    Clinical and histopathologic findings are mixed in current endodontic classifications. A new system, based on symptomatology, may be more useful in clincial practice. The classifications are vital asymptomatic, hypersensitive dentin, inflamed-reversible, inflamed/dengenerating without area-irreversible, inflamed/degenerating with area-irreversible, necrotic without area, and necrotic with area. PMID:265327

  17. Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) and smoldering (asymptomatic) multiple myeloma: IMWG consensus perspectives risk factors for progression and guidelines for monitoring and management.

    PubMed

    Kyle, R A; Durie, B G M; Rajkumar, S V; Landgren, O; Blade, J; Merlini, G; Kröger, N; Einsele, H; Vesole, D H; Dimopoulos, M; San Miguel, J; Avet-Loiseau, H; Hajek, R; Chen, W M; Anderson, K C; Ludwig, H; Sonneveld, P; Pavlovsky, S; Palumbo, A; Richardson, P G; Barlogie, B; Greipp, P; Vescio, R; Turesson, I; Westin, J; Boccadoro, M

    2010-06-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) was identified in 3.2% of 21 463 residents of Olmsted County, Minnesota, 50 years of age or older. The risk of progression to multiple myeloma, Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia, AL amyloidosis or a lymphoproliferative disorder is approximately 1% per year. Low-risk MGUS is characterized by having an M protein <15 g/l, IgG type and a normal free light chain (FLC) ratio. Patients should be followed with serum protein electrophoresis at six months and, if stable, can be followed every 2-3 years or when symptoms suggestive of a plasma cell malignancy arise. Patients with intermediate and high-risk MGUS should be followed in 6 months and then annually for life. The risk of smoldering (asymptomatic) multiple myeloma (SMM) progressing to multiple myeloma or a related disorder is 10% per year for the first 5 years, 3% per year for the next 5 years and 1-2% per year for the next 10 years. Testing should be done 2-3 months after the initial recognition of SMM. If the results are stable, the patient should be followed every 4-6 months for 1 year and, if stable, every 6-12 months. PMID:20410922

  18. JAK2 p.V617F allele burden in myeloproliferative neoplasms one month after allogeneic stem cell transplantation significantly predicts outcome and risk of relapse

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Thoralf; Edelmann, Anja; Siebolts, Udo; Krahl, Rainer; Nehring, Claudia; Jäkel, Nadja; Cross, Michael; Maier, Jacqueline; Niederwieser, Dietger; Wickenhauser, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    The risk profile and prognosis of patients with myelofibrosis is well described by the Dynamic International Prognostic Scoring System risk categorization. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation is considered for intermediate-2/high risk disease. However, indicators of prognosis after transplantation are still lacking. Seventy simultaneously collected pairs of trephine and blood samples were quantified for JAK2 p.V617F allele burden to compare test sensitivity. The course of 30 patients with JAK2 p.V617F-positive myeloproliferative neoplasia was correlated with allele burden after transplantation. Monitoring can be performed on full blood samples as well as trephine biopsies, provided that techniques with ample sensitivity (0.01% to 0.001%) are available. Measurement of allele burden on day 28 after transplantation discriminates two prognostic groups: patients with a JAK2 p.V617F allele burden >1% have a significantly higher risk of relapse of JAK2 p.V617F positive neoplasia (P=0.04) and a poorer overall survival (P<0.01). In conclusion, measurement of JAK2 p.V617F allele burden early after transplantation is an important predictive parameter in monitoring patients following this treatment. As this might provide an important tool in early management of imminent early relapse it will be important to define consensus guidelines for optimal monitoring. PMID:23300178

  19. The Clinical Significance and Risk Factors of Anti-Platelet Factor 4/heparin Antibody on Maintenance Hemodialysis Patients: A Two-Year Prospective Follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Li; Lin, Hongli; Li, Jijun; Zhao, Jiuyang; Zhang, Zhimin; Lun, Lide; Zhang, Jianrong; Li, Mingxu; Huang, Qi; Yang, Yang; Jiang, Shimin; Wang, Yong; Zhu, Hanyu; Chen, Xiangmei

    2013-01-01

    Background Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia is an immune response mediated by anti-PF4/heparin antibody, which is clinically characterized by thrombocytopenia and thromboembolic events. In this study, a prospective and multi-center clinical investigation determined the positive rate of anti-PF4/heparin antibody in maintenance hemodialysis patients in China, identified the related risk factors, and further explored the effect of the anti-PF4/heparin antibody on bleeding, thromboembolic events, and risk of death in the patients. Methods The serum anti-PF4/heparin antibody was measured in 661 patients from nine hemodialysis centers, detected by IgG-specific ELISA and followed by confirmation with excess heparin. Risk factors of these patients were analyzed. Based on a two-year follow-up, the association between the anti-PF4/heparin antibody and bleeding, thromboembolic events, and risk of death in the patients was investigated. Results The positivity rate of the anti-PF4/heparin antibody in maintenance hemodialysis patients was 5.6%. With diabetes as an independent risk factor, the positivity rate of the anti-PF4/heparin antibody decreased in the patients undergoing weekly dialyses ≥3 times. The positivity rate of the anti-PF4/heparin antibody was not related to the occurrence of clinical thromboembolic events and was not a risk factor for death within two years in maintenance hemodialysis patients. Negativity for the anti-PF4/heparin antibody combined with a reduction of the platelet count or combined with the administration of antiplatelet drugs yielded a significant increase in bleeding events. However, the composite determination of the anti-PF4/heparin antibody and thrombocytopenia, as well as the administration of antiplatelet drugs, was not predictive for the risk of thromboembolic events in the maintenance hemodialysis patients. Conclusions A single detection of the anti-PF4/heparin antibody did not predict the occurrence of clinical bleeding, thromboembolic

  20. Direct targeting of risk factors significantly increases the detection of liver cirrhosis in primary care: a cross-sectional diagnostic study utilising transient elastography

    PubMed Central

    Harman, David J; Ryder, Stephen D; James, Martin W; Jelpke, Matthew; Ottey, Dominic S; Wilkes, Emilie A; Card, Timothy R; Aithal, Guruprasad P; Guha, Indra Neil

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To assess the feasibility of a novel diagnostic algorithm targeting patients with risk factors for chronic liver disease in a community setting. Design Prospective cross-sectional study. Setting Two primary care practices (adult patient population 10 479) in Nottingham, UK. Participants Adult patients (aged 18 years or over) fulfilling one or more selected risk factors for developing chronic liver disease: (1) hazardous alcohol use, (2) type 2 diabetes or (3) persistently elevated alanine aminotransferase (ALT) liver function enzyme with negative serology. Interventions A serial biomarker algorithm, using a simple blood-based marker (aspartate aminotransferase:ALT ratio for hazardous alcohol users, BARD score for other risk groups) and subsequently liver stiffness measurement using transient elastography (TE). Main outcome measures Diagnosis of clinically significant liver disease (defined as liver stiffness ≥8 kPa); definitive diagnosis of liver cirrhosis. Results We identified 920 patients with the defined risk factors of whom 504 patients agreed to undergo investigation. A normal blood biomarker was found in 62 patients (12.3%) who required no further investigation. Subsequently, 378 patients agreed to undergo TE, of whom 98 (26.8% of valid scans) had elevated liver stiffness. Importantly, 71/98 (72.4%) patients with elevated liver stiffness had normal liver enzymes and would be missed by traditional investigation algorithms. We identified 11 new patients with definite cirrhosis, representing a 140% increase in the number of diagnosed cases in this population. Conclusions A non-invasive liver investigation algorithm based in a community setting is feasible to implement. Targeting risk factors using a non-invasive biomarker approach identified a substantial number of patients with previously undetected cirrhosis. Trial registration number The diagnostic algorithm utilised for this study can be found on clinicaltrials.gov (NCT02037867), and is

  1. Moderate Weight Reduction in an Outpatient Obesity Intervention Program Significantly Reduces Insulin Resistance and Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease in Severely Obese Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Grulich-Henn, J.; Lichtenstein, S.; Hörster, F.; Hoffmann, G. F.; Nawroth, P. P.; Hamann, A.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Metabolic risk factors like insulin resistance and dyslipidemia are frequently observed in severly obese children. We investigated the hypothesis that moderate weight reduction by a low-threshold intervention is already able to reduce insulin resistance and cardiovascular risk factors in severely obese children. Methods. A group of 58 severely obese children and adolescents between 8 and 17 years participating in a six-month-long outpatient program was studied before and after treatment. The program included behavioral treatment, dietary education and specific physical training. Metabolic parameters were measured in the fasting state, insulin resistance was evaluated in an oral glucose tolerance test. Results. Mean standard deviation score of the body mass index (SDS-BMI) in the study group dropped significantly from +2.5 ± 0.5 to 2.3 ± 0.6 (P < 0.0001) after participation in the program. A significant decrease was observed in HOMA (6.3 ± 4.2 versus 4.9 ± 2.4, P < 0.03, and in peak insulin levels (232.7 ± 132.4 versus 179.2 ± 73.3 μU/mL, P < 0.006). Significant reductions were also observed in mean levels of hemoglobin A1c, total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol. Conclusions. These data demonstrate that already moderate weight reduction is able to decrease insulin resistance and dyslipidemia in severely obese children and adolescents. PMID:21904547

  2. CFH, C3 and ARMS2 Are Significant Risk Loci for Susceptibility but Not for Disease Progression of Geographic Atrophy Due to AMD

    PubMed Central

    Fritsche, Lars G.; Schmitz-Valckenberg, Steffen; Göbel, Arno; Adrion, Christine; Herold, Christine; Keilhauer, Claudia N.; Mackensen, Friederike; Mößner, Andreas; Pauleikhoff, Daniel; Weinberger, Andreas W. A.; Mansmann, Ulrich; Holz, Frank G.; Becker, Tim; Weber, Bernhard H. F.

    2009-01-01

    Background Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a prevalent cause of blindness in Western societies. Variants in the genes encoding complement factor H (CFH), complement component 3 (C3) and age-related maculopathy susceptibility 2 (ARMS2) have repeatedly been shown to confer significant risks for AMD; however, their role in disease progression and thus their potential relevance for interventional therapeutic approaches remains unknown. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we analyzed association between variants in CFH, C3 and ARMS2 and disease progression of geographic atrophy (GA) due to AMD. A quantitative phenotype of disease progression was computed based on longitudinal observations by fundus autofluorescence imaging. In a subset of 99 cases with pure bilateral GA, variants in CFH (Y402H), C3 (R102G), and ARMS2 (A69S) are associated with disease (P = 1.6×10−9, 3.2×10−3, and P = 2.6×10−12, respectively) when compared to 612 unrelated healthy control individuals. In cases, median progression rate of GA over a mean follow-up period of 3.0 years was 1.61 mm2/year with high concordance between fellow eyes. No association between the progression rate and any of the genetic risk variants at the three loci was observed (P>0.13). Conclusions/Significance This study confirms that variants at CFH, C3, and ARMS2 confer significant risks for GA due to AMD. In contrast, our data indicate no association of these variants with disease progression which may have important implications for future treatment strategies. Other, as yet unknown susceptibilities may influence disease progression. PMID:19823576

  3. Areca Nut Chewing and an Impaired Estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate as Significant Risk Factors for Non-Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Jian; Xu, Ran; Zhao, Xiaokun; Zhong, Zhaohui; Zhang, Lei; Zhu, Xuan; Wu, Shuiqing; Ai, Kai

    2016-01-01

    The present study sought to investigate the predictive value of preoperative clinicopathological variables, with a special focus on areca nut chewing, on disease recurrence and progression in patients with non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). Data from 242 patients diagnosed with NMIBC between 2008 and 2013 were analyzed retrospectively. Fifteen clinicopathological variables were analyzed to evaluate their prognostic value. During a mean observation period of 21 months, disease recurrence occurred in 140 patients (57.9%). On multivariate analysis, heavy-areca nut chewing (HR = 2.18, 95% CI: 1.37–3.47), current smoking (HR = 3.09, 95% CI: 1.99–4.80), moderately impaired estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) (HR = 1.76, 95% CI: 1.09–2.83), severely impaired eGFR (HR = 3.32, 95% CI: 1.70–6.48) and tumor grade (HR = 1.94, 95% CI: 1.36–2.77) were independent factors for recurrence, based on which a risk factor model was developed to stratify patients into high, medium and low risk groups. In conclusion, our study suggests that in addition to quitting smoking, quitting areca nut chewing may also reduce the risk of first recurrence in NMBIC patients, monitoring and preserving their renal function may be beneficial as well. Further prospective studies are needed to verify the prognostic significance of these factors and the risk stratification model in this population. PMID:27385379

  4. Cardiac magnetic resonance and computed tomography angiography for clinical imaging of stable coronary artery disease. Diagnostic classification and risk stratification

    PubMed Central

    Korosoglou, Grigorios; Giusca, Sorin; Gitsioudis, Gitsios; Erbel, Christian; Katus, Hugo A.

    2014-01-01

    Despite advances in the pharmacologic and interventional treatment of coronary artery disease (CAD), atherosclerosis remains the leading cause of death in Western societies. X-ray coronary angiography has been the modality of choice for diagnosing the presence and extent of CAD. However, this technique is invasive and provides limited information on the composition of atherosclerotic plaque. Coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) and cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) have emerged as promising non-invasive techniques for the clinical imaging of CAD. Hereby, CCTA allows for visualization of coronary calcification, lumen narrowing and atherosclerotic plaque composition. In this regard, data from the CONFIRM Registry recently demonstrated that both atherosclerotic plaque burden and lumen narrowing exhibit incremental value for the prediction of future cardiac events. However, due to technical limitations with CCTA, resulting in false positive or negative results in the presence of severe calcification or motion artifacts, this technique cannot entirely replace invasive angiography at the present time. CMR on the other hand, provides accurate assessment of the myocardial function due to its high spatial and temporal resolution and intrinsic blood-to-tissue contrast. Hereby, regional wall motion and perfusion abnormalities, during dobutamine or vasodilator stress, precede the development of ST-segment depression and anginal symptoms enabling the detection of functionally significant CAD. While CT generally offers better spatial resolution, the versatility of CMR can provide information on myocardial function, perfusion, and viability, all without ionizing radiation for the patients. Technical developments with these 2 non-invasive imaging tools and their current implementation in the clinical imaging of CAD will be presented and discussed herein. PMID:25147526

  5. Transplant outcomes of the triple-negative NPM1/FLT3-ITD/CEBPA mutation subgroup are equivalent to those of the favourable ELN risk group, but significantly better than the intermediate-I risk group after allogeneic transplant in normal-karyotype AML.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jae-Sook; Kim, Hyeoung-Joon; Kim, Yeo-Kyeoung; Jung, Sung-Hoon; Yang, Deok-Hwan; Lee, Je-Jung; Kim, Nan Young; Choi, Seung Hyun; Jung, Chul Won; Jang, Jun-Ho; Kim, Hee Je; Moon, Joon Ho; Sohn, Sang Kyun; Won, Jong-Ho; Kim, Sung-Hyun; Kim, Dennis Dong Hwan

    2016-03-01

    The prognostic significance of molecular mutations (FLT3-ITD, NPM1, and CEBPA mutations) was examined in patients with normal-karyotype acute myeloid leukaemia (NK-AML) after allogeneic haematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). In total, 115 patients received allogeneic HCT for NK-AML and were evaluated for FLT3-ITD, NPM1, and CEBPA mutations in diagnostic samples and for long-term outcomes following HCT, retrospectively. The prevalences of FLT3-ITD(pos), NPM1 (mut), and CEBPA (dm) (double mutations) were 32.2, 43.5, and 24.6 %, respectively. The triple-negative group (NPM1 (wild)/FLT3-ITD(neg)/non-CEBPA (dm)) showed a similar transplant outcome to those in the favourable European LeukemiaNet (ELN) risk group for overall survival (OS) (60.9 vs. 63.7 %; p = 0.810), but a more favourable OS than others in the intermediate-I risk group (40.0 %; p = 0.034). Also, the triple-negative group showed a similar relapse rate at 5 years compared with those in the favourable risk group (9.7 vs. 15.5 %; p = 0.499), but a lower rate of relapse than the others in the intermediate-I risk group (15.5 vs. 48.6 %; p = 0.004). The 5-year relapse incidences were 4.0 % (NPM1 (mut)/FLT3-ITD(neg)), 14.7 % (CEBPA (dm)), 15.5 % (NPM1 (wild)/FLT3-ITD(neg)/non-CEBPA (dm)), 39.1 % (NPM1 (mut)/FLT3-ITD(pos)/non-CEBPA (dm)), and 66.7 % (NPM1 (wild)/FLT3-ITD(pos)/non-CEBPA (dm)). Thus, the triple-negative (NPM1 (wild)/FLT3-ITD(neg)/non-CEBPA (dm)) group showed favourable long-term outcomes after allogeneic HCT in NK-AML, similar to those of the favourable risk group by the ELN risk classification. PMID:26692090

  6. Automatic Classification of Marine Mammals with Speaker Classification Methods.

    PubMed

    Kreimeyer, Roman; Ludwig, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    We present an automatic acoustic classifier for marine mammals based on human speaker classification methods as an element of a passive acoustic monitoring (PAM) tool. This work is part of the Protection of Marine Mammals (PoMM) project under the framework of the European Defense Agency (EDA) and joined by the Research Department for Underwater Acoustics and Geophysics (FWG), Bundeswehr Technical Centre (WTD 71) and Kiel University. The automatic classification should support sonar operators in the risk mitigation process before and during sonar exercises with a reliable automatic classification result. PMID:26611006

  7. Form classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, K. V. Umamaheswara; Govindaraju, Venu

    2008-01-01

    The problem of form classification is to assign a single-page form image to one of a set of predefined form types or classes. We classify the form images using low level pixel density information from the binary images of the documents. In this paper, we solve the form classification problem with a classifier based on the k-means algorithm, supported by adaptive boosting. Our classification method is tested on the NIST scanned tax forms data bases (special forms databases 2 and 6) which include machine-typed and handwritten documents. Our method improves the performance over published results on the same databases, while still using a simple set of image features.

  8. Extreme-Risk Prostate Adenocarcinoma Presenting With Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) >40 ng/ml: Prognostic Significance of the Preradiation PSA Nadir

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, Abraham S.; Mydin, Aminudin; Jones, Stuart O.; Christie, Jennifer; Lim, Jan T.W.; Truong, Pauline T.; Ludgate, Charles M.

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To examine the impact of patient, disease, and treatment characteristics on survival outcomes in patients treated with neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) and radical external-beam radiotherapy (RT) for clinically localized, extreme-risk prostate adenocarcinoma with a presenting prostate-specific antigen (PSA) concentration of >40 ng/ml. Methods and Materials: A retrospective chart review was conducted of 64 patients treated at a single institution between 1991 and 2000 with ADT and RT for prostate cancer with a presenting PSA level of >40 ng/ml. The effects of patient age, tumor (presenting PSA level, Gleason score, and T stage), and treatment (total ADT duration and pre-RT PSA level) characteristics on rates of biochemical disease-free survival (bDFS), prostate cancer-specific survival (PCSS), and overall survival (OS) were examined. Results: Median follow-up time was 6.45 years (range, 0.09-15.19 years). Actuarial bDFS, PCSS, and OS rates at 5 years were 39%, 87%, and 78%, respectively, and 17%, 64%, and 45%, respectively, at 10 years. On multivariate analysis, the pre-RT PSA level ({<=}0.1 versus >0.1 ng/ml) was the single most significant prognostic factor for bDFS (p = 0.033) and OS (p = 0.018) rates, whereas age, T stage, Gleason score, and ADT duration ({<=}6 versus >6 months) were not predictive of outcomes. Conclusion: In prostate cancer patients with high presenting PSA levels, >40 ng/ml, treated with combined modality, neoadjuvant ADT, and RT, the pre-RT PSA nadir, rather than ADT duration, was significantly associated with improved survival. This observation supports the use of neoadjuvant ADT to drive PSA levels to below 0.1 ng/ml before initiation of RT, to optimize outcomes for patients with extreme-risk disease.

  9. Developmental trajectories of clinically significant attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms from grade 3 through 12 in a high-risk sample: Predictors and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Sasser, Tyler R; Kalvin, Carla B; Bierman, Karen L

    2016-02-01

    Developmental trajectories of clinically significant attention-deficit/hyperactivity (ADHD) symptoms were explored in a sample of 413 children identified as high risk because of elevated kindergarten conduct problems. Symptoms of inattention and hyperactivity-impulsivity were modeled simultaneously in a longitudinal latent class analyses, using parent reports collected in Grades 3, 6, 9, and 12. Three developmental trajectories emerged: (1) low levels of inattention and hyperactivity (low), (2) initially high but then declining symptoms (declining), and (3) continuously high symptoms that featured hyperactivity in childhood and early adolescence and inattention in adolescence (high). Multinomial logistic regressions examined child characteristics and family risk factors as predictors of ADHD trajectories. Relative to the low class, children in the high and declining classes displayed similar elevations of inattention and hyperactivity in early childhood. The high class was distinguished from the declining class by higher rates of aggression and hyperactivity at school and emotion dysregulation at home. In contrast, the declining class displayed more social isolation at home and school, relative to the low class. Families of children in both high and declining trajectory classes experienced elevated life stressors, and parents of children in the high class were also more inconsistent in their discipline practices relative to the low class. By late adolescence, children in the high class were significantly more antisocial than those in the low class, with higher rates of arrests, school dropout, and unemployment, whereas children in the declining class did not differ from those in the low trajectory class. The developmental and clinical implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:26854506

  10. Landscape Risk Factors for Lyme Disease in the Eastern Broadleaf Forest Province of the Hudson River Valley and the Effect of Explanatory Data Classification Resolution

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study assessed how landcover classification affects associations between landscape characteristics and Lyme disease rate. Landscape variables were derived from the National Land Cover Database (NLCD), including native classes (e.g., deciduous forest, developed low intensity)...

  11. Classifying Classification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novakowski, Janice

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the experience of a group of first-grade teachers as they tackled the science process of classification, a targeted learning objective for the first grade. While the two-year process was not easy and required teachers to teach in a new, more investigation-oriented way, the benefits were great. The project helped teachers and…

  12. Stomatin-like protein 2 overexpression in papillary thyroid carcinoma is significantly associated with high-risk clinicopathological parameters and BRAFV600E mutation.

    PubMed

    Bartolome, Aleksandar; Boskovic, Srdjan; Paunovic, Ivan; Bozic, Vesna; Cvejic, Dubravka

    2016-04-01

    Stomatin-like protein 2 (SLP-2), a member of the stomatin protein family, has emerged as a potential molecular hallmark of tumor progression in several human malignancies. The aim of this study was to analyze SLP-2 expression pattern in benign and malignant thyroid tumors (n = 210) and to examine its relationship with clinicopathological parameters and BRAFV600E mutation in thyroid cancer. SLP-2 immunohistochemical expression was not detected in benign adenomas and was absent/weak in follicular and anaplastic carcinomas. High expression levels of SLP-2, found only in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC), particularly in the classical variant, were significantly associated with adverse clinicopathological parameters: lymph node metastasis (p = 0.002), extrathyroid invasion (p < 0.001), pT status (p < 0.001), and advanced tumor stage (p = 0.001). Additional genotyping of PTC cases for the BRAFV600E mutation revealed for the first time a close relation between SLP-2 overexpression and the presence of BRAF mutation (p = 0.02) with high positive rates of lymph node metastasis (70%) and extrathyroid invasion (80%) in these cases. The significant association of SLP-2 overexpression with unfavorable clinicopathological characteristics and BRAFV600E mutation indicates that SLP-2 may have a role in aggressiveness of BRAF-mutated PTC and that SLP-2 evaluation could be clinically useful in identification of high-risk PTC patients. PMID:26750533

  13. Revised Risk Classification for Pediatric Extracranial Germ Cell Tumors Based on 25 Years of Clinical Trial Data From the United Kingdom and United States

    PubMed Central

    Frazier, A. Lindsay; Hale, Juliet P.; Rodriguez-Galindo, Carlos; Dang, Ha; Olson, Thomas; Murray, Matthew J.; Amatruda, James F.; Thornton, Claire; Arul, G. Suren; Billmire, Deborah; Shaikh, Furqan; Pashankar, Farzana; Stoneham, Sara; Krailo, Mark; Nicholson, James C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To risk stratify malignant extracranial pediatric germ cell tumors (GCTs). Patients and Methods Data from seven GCT trials conducted by the Children's Oncology Group (United States) or the Children's Cancer and Leukemia Group (United Kingdom) between 1985 and 2009 were merged to create a data set of patients with stage II to IV disease treated with platinum-based therapy. A parametric cure model was used to evaluate the prognostic importance of age, tumor site, stage, histology, tumor markers, and treatment regimen and estimate the percentage of patients who achieved long-term disease-free (LTDF) survival in each subgroup of the final model. Validation of the model was conducted using the bootstrap method. Results In multivariable analysis of 519 patients with GCTs, stage IV disease (P = .001), age ≥ 11 years (P < .001), and tumor site (P < .001) were significant predictors of worse LTDF survival. Elevated alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) ≥ 10,000 ng/mL was associated with worse outcome, whereas pure yolk sac tumor (YST) was associated with better outcome, although neither met criteria for statistical significance. The analysis identified a group of patients age > 11 years with either stage III to IV extragonadal tumors or stage IV ovarian tumors with predicted LTDF survival < 70%. A bootstrap procedure showed retention of age, tumor site, and stage in > 94%, AFP in 12%, and YST in 27% of the replications. Conclusion Clinical trial data from two large national pediatric clinical trial organizations have produced a new evidence-based risk stratification of malignant pediatric GCTs that identifies a poor-risk group warranting intensified therapy. PMID:25452439

  14. REMODELING CHARACTERISTICS AND COLLAGEN DISTRIBUTION IN BIOLOGICAL SCAFFOLD MATERIALS EXPLANTED FROM HUMAN SUBJECTS AFTER ABDOMINAL SOFT TISSUE RECONSTRUCTION: AN ANALYSIS OF SCAFFOLD REMODELING CHARACTERISTICS BY PATIENT RISK FACTORS AND SURGICAL SITE CLASSIFICATIONS

    PubMed Central

    Cavallo, Jaime A.; Roma, Andres A.; Jasielec, Mateusz S.; Ousley, Jenny; Creamer, Jennifer; Pichert, Matthew D.; Baalman, Sara; Frisella, Margaret M.; Matthews, Brent D.; Deeken, Corey R.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The study purpose was to evaluate the associations between patient characteristics or surgical site classifications and the histologic remodeling scores of biologic meshes biopsied from abdominal soft tissue repair sites in the first attempt to generate a multivariable risk prediction model of non-constructive remodeling. INTRODUCTION Host characteristics and surgical site assessments may predict remodeling degree for biologic meshes used to reinforce abdominal tissue repair sites. METHODS Biologic meshes were biopsied from the abdominal tissue repair sites of n=40 patients during an abdominal re-exploration, stained with hematoxylin and eosin, and evaluated according to a semi-quantitative scoring system for remodeling characteristics [cell types (CT), cell infiltration (CI), extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition, scaffold degradation (SD), fibrous encapsulation (FE), and neovascularization (NEO)] and a mean composite score (CR). Biopsies were stained with Sirius Red & Fast Green, and analyzed to determine the collagen I:III ratio. Based on univariate analyses between subject clinical characteristics or surgical site classification and the histologic remodeling scores, cohort variables were selected for multivariable regression models using a p-value ≤0.200. RESULTS The model selection process for CI score yielded 2 variables: age at mesh implantation and mesh classification (c-statistic=0.989). For CR score, the model selection process yielded 2 variables: age at mesh implantation and mesh classification (r2=0.449). CONCLUSION These preliminary results constitute the first steps in generating a risk prediction model that predicts the patients and clinical circumstances most likely to experience non-constructive remodeling of abdominal tissue repair sites with biologic mesh reinforcement. PMID:24374547

  15. Remodeling characteristics and collagen distribution in synthetic mesh materials explanted from human subjects after abdominal wall reconstruction: an analysis of remodeling characteristics by patient risk factors and surgical site classifications

    PubMed Central

    Cavallo, Jaime A.; Roma, Andres A.; Jasielec, Mateusz S.; Ousley, Jenny; Creamer, Jennifer; Pichert, Matthew D.; Baalman, Sara; Frisella, Margaret M.; Matthews, Brent D.

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the associations between patient characteristics or surgical site classifications and the histologic remodeling scores of synthetic meshes biopsied from their abdominal wall repair sites in the first attempt to generate a multivariable risk prediction model of non-constructive remodeling. Methods Biopsies of the synthetic meshes were obtained from the abdominal wall repair sites of 51 patients during a subsequent abdominal re-exploration. Biopsies were stained with hematoxylin and eosin, and evaluated according to a semi-quantitative scoring system for remodeling characteristics (cell infiltration, cell types, extracellular matrix deposition, inflammation, fibrous encapsulation, and neovascularization) and a mean composite score (CR). Biopsies were also stained with Sirius Red and Fast Green, and analyzed to determine the collagen I:III ratio. Based on univariate analyses between subject clinical characteristics or surgical site classification and the histologic remodeling scores, cohort variables were selected for multivariable regression models using a threshold p value of ≤0.200. Results The model selection process for the extracellular matrix score yielded two variables: subject age at time of mesh implantation, and mesh classification (c-statistic = 0.842). For CR score, the model selection process yielded two variables: subject age at time of mesh implantation and mesh classification (r2 = 0.464). The model selection process for the collagen III area yielded a model with two variables: subject body mass index at time of mesh explantation and pack-year history (r2 = 0.244). Conclusion Host characteristics and surgical site assessments may predict degree of remodeling for synthetic meshes used to reinforce abdominal wall repair sites. These preliminary results constitute the first steps in generating a risk prediction model that predicts the patients and clinical circumstances for which non

  16. Development of a New Classification Method for Penile Squamous Cell Carcinoma Based on Lymph Node Density and Standard Pathological Risk Factors: The ND Staging System

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zai-Shang; Yao, Kai; Chen, Peng; Wang, Bin; Mi, Qi-Wu; Chen, Jie-Ping; Li, Yong-Hong; Deng, Chuang-Zhong; Liu, Zhuo-Wei; Qin, Zi-Ke; Zhou, Fang-Jian; Han, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Object: In this study, we evaluated the role of lymph node density (LND) and validated whether LND increases the accuracy of survival prediction when combined with the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) pathological node (N) staging system for penile cancer (7th edition). Methods: A total of 270 Chinese penile cancer patients treated between March 1999 and October 2014 were retrospectively analyzed. LND was analyzed as a trichotomous variable for the prediction of DSS in this cohort. We developed a new prediction model, which we refer to as the ND staging system, that is based on LND and pathological N staging. The predictive accuracy of this model was further assessed using the concordance index. Results: LND was correlated with the laterality of lymph node metastasis, extranodal extension, pelvic lymph node metastases, and pathologic tumor (T) and N stages (P<0.05). In separate multivariate Cox regression models, the LND (hazard ratio [HR], 1.966, 95% confidence interval [CI], (1.112-3.473, P=0.020) yielded independent effects on the outcome. According to the LND classification, the 3-year disease-specific survival (DSS) rates for patients with LNDs <7.0%, 7.0 to 16.9%, and ≥17.0% were 90.9%, 66.5%, and 22.2%, respectively (P<7.0%; 7.0%-16.9%=0.006; P7.0-16.9%; ≥17.0%=0.001). The corresponding rates were 95.7%, 76.7%, and 28.1% for the ND1, ND2, and ND3 patients, respectively (PND1-ND2=0.047; PND2-ND3<0.001). The indexes indicated that the accuracy of the pathological ND category that incorporated LND was significantly increased. Conclusion: LND was associated with some prognosticators and is thus a prognostic factor. The ND staging system that incorporates the LND better reflects the prognoses of penile cancer patients. PMID:26918038

  17. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and β-blocker transformation products may not pose a significant risk of toxicity to aquatic organisms in wastewater effluent-dominated receiving waters.

    PubMed

    Brown, Alistair K; Challis, Jonathan K; Wong, Charles S; Hanson, Mark L

    2015-10-01

    A probabilistic ecological risk assessment was conducted for the transformation products (TPs) of 3 β-blockers (atenolol, metoprolol, and propranolol) and 5 selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs; citalopram, fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, paroxetine, and sertraline) to assess potential threats to aquatic organisms in effluent-dominated surface waters. To this end, the pharmacokinetic literature, the University of Minnesota's Biocatalysis/Biodegradation Database Pathway Prediction System aerobic microbial degradation software, and photolysis literature pertaining to β-blockers and SSRIs were used to determine their most likely TPs formed via human metabolism, aerobic biodegradation, and photolysis, respectively. Monitoring data from North American and European surface waters receiving human wastewater inputs were the basis of the exposure characterizations of the parent compounds and the TPs, where available. In most cases, where monitoring data for TPs did not exist, we assumed a conservative 1:1 parent-to-TP production ratio (i.e., 100% of parent converted). The US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA)'s EPISuite and ECOSAR v1.11 software were used to estimate acute and chronic toxicities to aquatic organisms. Hazard quotients, which were calculated using the 95(th) percentile of the exposure distributions, ranged from 10(-11) to 10(-3) (i.e., all significantly less than 1). Based on these results, the TPs of interest would be expected to pose little to no environmental risk in surface waters receiving wastewater inputs. Overall, we recommend developing analytical methods that can isolate and quantify human metabolites and TPs at environmentally relevant concentrations to confirm these predictions. Further, we recommend identifying the major species of TPs from classes of pharmaceuticals that could elicit toxic effects via specific modes of action (e.g., norfluoxetine via the serotonin 5-hydroxytryptamine [5-HT]1A receptors) and conducting aquatic toxicity

  18. Risk.

    PubMed

    Cole, Stephen R; Hudgens, Michael G; Brookhart, M Alan; Westreich, Daniel

    2015-02-15

    The epidemiologist primarily studies transitions between states of health and disease. The purpose of the present article is to define a foundational parameter for such studies, namely risk. We begin simply and build to the setting in which there is more than 1 event type (i.e., competing risks or competing events), as well as more than 1 treatment or exposure level of interest. In the presence of competing events, the risks are a set of counterfactual cumulative incidence functions for each treatment. These risks can be depicted visually and summarized numerically. We use an example from the study of human immunodeficiency virus to illustrate concepts. PMID:25660080

  19. Total Arterial Revascularization with Radial Artery T-grafts in Patients with Significant Left Main Stem Stenosis Is Not Associated with Higher Perioperative Risk.

    PubMed

    Fleissner, Felix; Reitz, Michael; Cebotari, Serghei; Kaufeld, Tim; Haverich, Axel; Shrestha, Malakh; Ismail, Issam; Martens, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Background Total arterial revascularization (TAR) has become a standard procedure for the treatment of coronary multivessel disease, due to the superior long-term patency rates of arterial grafts as compared with saphenous vein graft material. Controversies about the use of TAR in patients with left main coronary artery disease exist. Hence, we ought to determine whether left main coronary artery disease is a risk factor for early postoperative mortality and morbidity after TAR using the in situ left internal thoracic artery (LITA) and radial artery as composite T-graft. Methods A total of 904 consecutive patients were included in this retrospective study. They underwent first-time coronary artery bypass grafting surgery in our institution, receiving TAR using the in situ LITA and RA T-graft. Of these patients, 247 (27%) had left main coronary artery disease (Group LMSS) and 657 (73%) had no significant left main coronary artery stenosis (Group nLMSS). Results Results were comparable. Mortality and perioperative myocardial infarction rates were 0.4% LMSS versus 0.3% nLMSS, p = 1, and 2% LMSS versus 2% nLMSS, p = 0.81, respectively. Stroke rate, acute renal failure rate, and reoperation rates were 2% LMSS versus 1% nLMSS, p = 0.36, 7% LMSS versus 8% nLMSS, p = 0.41, and 2% LMSS versus 3% nLMSS, p = 0.5, respectively. Postoperative stay was shorter in the LMSS group (8.1 ± 4.3 days vs. 8.9 ± 6.1 days nLMSS, p = 0.048). Conclusion Our perioperative results indicate that TAR in patients with left main stenosis is safe and feasible. Long-term results will have to be awaited to further evaluate prognostic outcome. PMID:26334240

  20. Classification systems for stalking behavior.

    PubMed

    Racine, Christopher; Billick, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Stalking is a complex behavioral phenomenon that is unique in that it necessarily involves a prolonged dyadic relationship between both a perpetrator and a victim. Since criminalization of stalking behavior in the 1990s, different conceptual typologies have attempted to classify this behavior to assess risk and aid in management decisions. The authors reviewed the current literature regarding the most recent and accepted stalking classification systems. The three predominant stalker typologies currently in use include Zona's stalker-victim types, Mullen's stalker typology, and the RECON stalker typology. Of these, the RECON classification system alone was developed in an attempt to separate stalkers into groups based on previously known risk factors for behaviorally based phenomenon such as propensity for violence. Understanding and simplifying these classification systems may enhance the potential that new research will lead to evidence-based management and treatment strategies in the stalking situation. PMID:23980606

  1. Significant Treasures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Ian A.

    1999-01-01

    Provides a crossword puzzle with an answer key corresponding to the book entitled "Significant Treasures/Tresors Parlants" that is filled with color and black-and-white prints of paintings and artifacts from 131 museums and art galleries as a sampling of the 2,200 such Canadian institutions. (CMK)

  2. Classification in Australia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKinlay, John

    Despite some inroads by the Library of Congress Classification and short-lived experimentation with Universal Decimal Classification and Bliss Classification, Dewey Decimal Classification, with its ability in recent editions to be hospitable to local needs, remains the most widely used classification system in Australia. Although supplemented at…

  3. Prognostic significance of minimal residual disease in high risk B-ALL: a report from Children's Oncology Group study AALL0232.

    PubMed

    Borowitz, Michael J; Wood, Brent L; Devidas, Meenakshi; Loh, Mignon L; Raetz, Elizabeth A; Salzer, Wanda L; Nachman, James B; Carroll, Andrew J; Heerema, Nyla A; Gastier-Foster, Julie M; Willman, Cheryl L; Dai, Yunfeng; Winick, Naomi J; Hunger, Stephen P; Carroll, William L; Larsen, Eric

    2015-08-20

    Minimal residual disease (MRD) is highly prognostic in pediatric B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL). In Children's Oncology Group high-risk B-ALL study AALL0232, we investigated MRD in subjects randomized in a 2 × 2 factorial design to receive either high-dose methotrexate (HD-MTX) or Capizzi methotrexate (C-MTX) during interim maintenance (IM) or prednisone or dexamethasone during induction. Subjects with end-induction MRD ≥0.1% or those with morphologic slow early response were nonrandomly assigned to receive a second IM and delayed intensification phase. MRD was measured by 6-color flow cytometry in 1 of 2 reference labs, with excellent agreement between the two. Subjects with end-induction MRD <0.01% had a 5-year event-free survival (EFS) of 87% ± 1% vs 74% ± 4% for those with MRD 0.01% to 0.1%; increasing MRD amounts was associated with progressively worse outcome. Subjects converting from MRD positive to negative by end consolidation had a relatively favorable 79% ± 5% 5-year disease-free survival vs 39% ± 7% for those with MRD ≥0.01%. Although HD-MTX was superior to C-MTX, MRD retained prognostic significance in both groups (86% ± 2% vs 58% ± 4% for MRD-negative vs positive C-MTX subjects; 88% ± 2% vs 68% ± 4% for HD-MTX subjects). Intensified therapy given to subjects with MRD >0.1% did not improve either 5-year EFS or overall survival (OS). However, these subjects showed an early relapse rate similar to that seen in MRD-negative ones, with EFS/OS curves for patients with 0.1% to 1% MRD crossing those with 0.01% to 0.1% MRD at 3 and 4 years, thus suggesting that the intensified therapy altered the disease course of MRD-positive subjects. Additional interventions targeted at the MRD-positive group may further improve outcome. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00075725. PMID:26124497

  4. A hospital-based case-control study of non-Hodgkin lymphoid neoplasms in Shanghai: analysis of environmental and occupational risk factors by subtypes of the WHO classification.

    PubMed

    Wong, Otto; Harris, Fran; Armstrong, Thomas W; Hua, Fu

    2010-03-19

    The objectives were (1) to investigate potential environmental and occupational risk factors of non-Hodgkin lymphoid neoplasms (NHLN), and (2) to explore the relationships between risk factors and NHLN subtypes according to the World Health Organization (WHO) classification. The investigation was a hospital-based case-control study consisting of 649 newly diagnosed NHLN cases (August 2003 through January 2008) and 1298 individually gender-age-matched patient controls at 25 hospitals in Shanghai. A 17-page questionnaire was used to obtain information on demographics, medical history, family history, lifestyle risk factors, employment history, residential history, and occupational and non-occupational exposures. Certain occupations of interest triggered a second questionnaire, which was occupation-specific and asked for more details about jobs, tasks, materials used and work environment. Exposure assessments were based on the questionnaires, on-site workplace investigations, data published in the Chinese literature, historical exposure measurements maintained by government health agencies, and expert opinions of a panel of local scientists who were familiar with workplaces in Shanghai. Risk estimates (odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals) of individual risk factors were calculated using conditional logistic regression models. A number of potential environmental and occupational risk factors were associated with an increased risk of NHLN (all subtypes combined) and/or individual subtypes; including home/workplace renovation, living on a farm, planting crops, raising livestock or animals, farm workers, fabric sewing and cutting workers, welders and sheet metal workers, masonry and plastering workers, product and chemical testing workers, toy manufacturing, agriculture industry, and beauty salon. Exposures associated with an increased risk of NHLN (all subtypes combined) and/or individual subtypes included benzene, solvents, petroleum fuels, metals, insecticides

  5. STI/HIV Sexual Risk Behavior and Prevalent STI Among Incarcerated African American Men in Committed Partnerships: The Significance of Poverty, Mood Disorders, and Substance Use.

    PubMed

    Khan, M R; Golin, C E; Friedman, S R; Scheidell, J D; Adimora, A A; Judon-Monk, S; Hobbs, M M; Dockery, G; Griffin, S; Oza, K K; Myers, D; Hu, H; Medina, K P; Wohl, D A

    2015-08-01

    African Americans face disproportionate sexually transmitted infection including HIV (STI/HIV), with those passing through a correctional facility at heightened risk. There is a need to identify modifiable STI/HIV risk factors among incarcerated African Americans. Project DISRUPT is a cohort study of incarcerated African American men recruited from September 2011 through January 2014 from prisons in North Carolina who were in committed partnerships with women at prison entry (N = 207). During the baseline (in-prison) study visit, participants responded to a risk behavior survey and provided a urine specimen, which was tested for STIs. Substantial proportions reported multiple partnerships (42 %), concurrent partnerships (33 %), and buying sex (11 %) in the 6 months before incarceration, and 9 % tested positive for an STI at baseline (chlamydia: 5.3 %, gonorrhea: 0.5 %, trichomoniasis: 4.9 %). Poverty and depression appeared to be strongly associated with sexual risk behaviors. Substance use was linked to prevalent STI, with binge drinking the strongest independent risk factor (adjusted odds ratio: 3.79, 95 % CI 1.19-12.04). There is a continued need for improved prison-based STI testing, treatment, and prevention education as well as mental health and substance use diagnosis. PMID:25863467

  6. STI/HIV Sexual Risk Behavior and Prevalent STI among Incarcerated African American Men in Committed Intimate Partnerships: The Significance of Poverty, Mood Disorders, and Substance Use

    PubMed Central

    Khan, MR; Golin, CE; Friedman, SR; Scheidell, JD; Adimora, AA; Judon-Monk, S; Hobbs, MM; Dockery, G; Griffin, S; Oza, KK; Myers, D; Hu, H; Medina, KP; Wohl, DA

    2015-01-01

    African Americans face disproportionate sexually transmitted infection including HIV (STI/HIV), with those passing through a correctional facility at heightened risk. There is a need to identify modifiable STI/HIV risk factors among incarcerated African Americans. Project DISRUPT is a cohort study of incarcerated African American men recruited from September 2011 through January 2014 from prisons in North Carolina who were in committed partnerships with women at prison entry (N=207). During the baseline (in-prison) study visit, participants responded to a risk behavior survey and provided a urine specimen, which was tested for STIs. Substantial proportions reported multiple partnerships (42%), concurrent partnerships (33%), and buying sex (11%) in the six months before incarceration, and 9% tested positive for an STI at baseline (chlamydia: 5.3%, gonorrhea: 0.5%, trichomoniasis: 4.9%). Poverty and depression appeared to be strongly associated with sexual risk behaviors. Substance use was linked to prevalent STI, with binge drinking the strongest independent risk factor (adjusted odds ratio (AOR): 3.79, 95% CI: 1.19–12.04). There is a continued need for improved prison-based STI testing, treatment, and prevention education as well as mental health and substance use diagnosis. PMID:25863467

  7. Classification and knowledge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtz, Michael J.

    1989-01-01

    Automated procedures to classify objects are discussed. The classification problem is reviewed, and the relation of epistemology and classification is considered. The classification of stellar spectra and of resolved images of galaxies is addressed.

  8. Remote Sensing Information Classification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rickman, Douglas L.

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the classification of Remote Sensing data in relation to epidemiology. Classification is a way to reduce the dimensionality and precision to something a human can understand. Classification changes SCALAR data into NOMINAL data.

  9. Could the significantly increased risk of rheumatoid arthritis reported in Italian male steel workers be explained by occupational exposure to cadmium?

    PubMed

    Murphy, Daniel; James, Benjamin; Hutchinson, David

    2016-01-01

    Multiple chronic disease risks have been identified in Italian furnace workers. A range of potential toxins have been identified in foundry dust. We suggest that the heavy metal cadmium (Cd) plays an important role in the development of chronic diseases, notably rheumatoid arthrits, and propose that research into the mechanism of action be undertaken to discover the aetiology of this link. PMID:27152117

  10. Prognostic relevance of morphological classification models for myelodysplastic syndromes in an era of the revised International Prognostic Scoring System.

    PubMed

    van Spronsen, Margot F; Ossenkoppele, Gert J; Westers, Theresia M; van de Loosdrecht, Arjan A

    2016-03-01

    Numerous morphological classification models have been developed to organise the heterogeneous spectrum of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). While the 2008 update of the World Health Organisation (WHO) is the current standard, the publication of the revised International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS-R) has illustrated the need for supplemental prognostic information. The aim of this study was to investigate whether morphological classification models for MDS - of both the French-American-British (FAB) group and WHO - provide reliable criteria for their classification into homogeneous and clinically relevant categories with prognostic relevance beyond the IPSS-R. We reclassified 238 MDS patients using each of the FAB, WHO 2001 and WHO 2008 criteria and studied classification categories in terms of clinical, haematological and cytogenetic features. Subsequently, we calculated prognostic scores using the IPSS-R and investigated whether the morphological classification models had significantly prognostic value in patients stratified by the IPSS-R and vice versa. By adopting the FAB, WHO 2001 and WHO 2008 classifications, MDS patients were organised into homogeneous categories with intrinsic prognostic information. However, whereas the morphological classification models showed no prognostic value beyond the IPSS-R, the IPSS-R had significant prognostic value beyond the FAB, WHO 2001 and WHO 2008 classifications. Even though morphological classification models for MDS might be clinically relevant from a prognostic point of view, their relevance in terms of risk stratification is evidently limited in light of the IPSS-R. Therefore, we suggest to stop the use of morphological classification models for MDS for risk stratification in routine clinical practice. PMID:26798967

  11. In Peru, reporting male sex partners imparts significant risk of incident HIV/STI infection: all men engaging in same-sex behavior need prevention services

    PubMed Central

    Konda, Kelika A.; Lescano, Andres G.; Celentano, David D.; Hall, Eric; Montano, Silvia M.; Kochel, Tadeusz J.; Coates, Thomas J.; Cáceres, Carlos F.

    2013-01-01

    Background Detailed information on the sexual behavior of bisexual, non-gay identified men and the relationship between same-sex behavior and HIV/STI incidence are limited. This study provides information on the sexual behavior with male partners of non-gay identified men in urban, coastal Peru and the relationship of this behavior with HIV/STI incidence. Methods We analyzed data from 2146 non-gay identified men with a baseline and then two years of annual follow-up, including detailed information on sexual behavior with up to 5 sex partners, to determine characteristics associated with bisexual behavior. Discrete time proportional hazards models were used to determine the effect of self-reported sex with men on subsequent HIV/STI incidence. Results Over the three study visits, sex with a man was reported by 18.9% of men, 90% of whom also reported sex with a female partner. At baseline, reported bisexual behavior was associated with other sexual risk behaviors such as exchanging sex for money and increased risk of HIV, HSV-2, and gonorrhea. The number of study visits in which recent sex with men was reported was positively correlated with risk of other sexual risk behaviors and incident HIV, HSV-2, and gonorrhea. Recent sex with a man was associated with increased HIV/STI incidence, HR 1.79 (95% CI 1.19 – 2.70), after adjusting for socio-demographics and other sexual risk behaviors. Conclusions Given the prevalence of recent sex with men and the relationship of this behavior with HIV/STI incidence, interventions with non-gay identified men who have sex with men and their partners are warranted. PMID:23965772

  12. Landscape risk factors for Lyme disease in the eastern broadleaf forest province of the Hudson River valley and the effect of explanatory data classification resolution.

    PubMed

    Messier, Kyle P; Jackson, Laura E; White, Jennifer L; Hilborn, Elizabeth D

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed how landcover classification affects associations between landscape characteristics and Lyme disease rate. Landscape variables were derived from the National Land Cover Database (NLCD), including native classes (e.g., deciduous forest, developed low intensity) and aggregate classes (e.g., forest, developed). Percent of each landcover type, median income, and centroid coordinates were calculated by census tract. Regression results from individual and aggregate variable models were compared with the dispersion parameter-based R(2) (Rα(2)) and AIC. The maximum Rα(2) was 0.82 and 0.83 for the best aggregate and individual model, respectively. The AICs for the best models differed by less than 0.5%. The aggregate model variables included forest, developed, agriculture, agriculture-squared, y-coordinate, y-coordinate-squared, income and income-squared. The individual model variables included deciduous forest, deciduous forest-squared, developed low intensity, pasture, y-coordinate, y-coordinate-squared, income, and income-squared. Results indicate that regional landscape models for Lyme disease rate are robust to NLCD landcover classification resolution. PMID:25779905

  13. Sources of variation in hydrological classifications: Time scale, flow series origin and classification procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peñas, Francisco J.; Barquín, José; Álvarez, César

    2016-07-01

    Classification of flow regimes in water management and hydroecological research has grown significantly in recent years. However, depending on available data and the procedures applied, there may be several credible classifications for a specific catchment. In this study, three inductive classifications derived from different initial flow data and one expert-driven classification were defined. The hydrological interpretation, statistical performance and spatial correspondence of these classifications were compared. Daily Gauged Classification (DC) was derived from daily flow data while Monthly Gauged Classification (MC) and Monthly Modeled Classification (MMC) were derived from monthly flow series, using gauged and modeled flow data, respectively. Expert-Driven Classification (EDC) was based on a Spanish nationwide hydrological classification, which is being used in the current River Basin Management Plans. The results showed that MC accounted for much of the critical hydrological information variability comprised within the DC. However, it also presented limitations regarding the inability to represent important hydroecological attributes, especially those related to droughts and high flow events. In addition, DC and MC presented an equivalent performance more than 60% of the time and obtained a mean ARI value of 0.4, indicating a similar classification structure. DC and MC outperformed MMC 100% and more than 50% of the times when they were compared by means of the classification strength and ANOVA, respectively. MMC also showed low correspondence with these classifications (ARI = 0.20). Thus, the use of modeled flow series should be limited to poorly gauged areas. Finally, the significantly reduced performance and the uneven distribution of classes found in EDC questions its application for different management objectives. This study shows that the selection of the most suitable approach according to the available data has significant implications for the

  14. Chronotropic response during treadmill exercise and subclinical carotid atherosclerosis after adjusting for the calibrated SCORE risk classification: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Liontou, Catherine; Chrysohoou, Christina; Skoumas, John; Panagiotakos, Demosthenes B; Pitsavos, Christos; Stefanadis, Christodoulos

    2016-02-01

    Carotid atherosclerosis (CA) and chronotropic incompetence (CI) during exercise are two independent cardiovascular risk factors. Aim of the current study was to investigate the possible association between them, in apparently healthy individuals, after adjusting for the 10-year cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk score. This cross-sectional study consisted of 139 apparently healthy subjects, 40-65 years old, who underwent treadmill exercise test (Bruce protocol used), which showed no evidence of ischemia. Heart rate reserve (HR reserve) was calculated to assess chronotropic response; a value of ≤ 0.80 is considered CI. CA was assessed by the presence of carotid plaque(s) in common and internal carotid arteries and carotid bulb bilaterally, using B-mode ultrasound. A calibrated version of SCORE (i.e., HellenicSCORE) was used to estimate the 10-year fatal CVD risk; participants were classified into low-, moderate- or high-risk group. CI was present in 7.9 % and CA in 18.7 % of the participants. After adjusting for 10-year CVD risk and other key confounders, odds of CA were 8.6 times higher in subjects with CI compared to their counterparts with normal chronotropic response to exercise. The results of the study indicate that CI during exercise can lead to high clinical suspicion of CA in apparently healthy individuals. PMID:25252777

  15. Variations in Prevalent Cardiovascular Disease and Future Risk by Metabolic Syndrome Classification in the REasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) Study

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Todd M.; Voeks, Jenifer H.; Bittner, Vera; Safford, Monika M.

    2010-01-01

    Background The International Diabetes Federation (IDF) and Adult Treatment Panel (ATP) III define metabolic syndrome (MetSyn) differently, with unclear implications for cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Methods We examined 22,719 participants in the REasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) study. We classified participants as: no MetSyn, MetSyn by ATP-III and IDF criteria, MetSyn by ATP-only, or MetSyn by IDF-only. To assess current CVD, we determined the odds of self-reported CVD by MetSyn category using multivariable logistic regression, controlling for socio-demographic and behavioral factors. To estimate future coronary heart disease (CHD) risk, we calculated Framingham risk scores (FRS). Results Overall, 10,785 individuals (47%) had MetSyn. Of these, 79% had MetSyn by both definitions, 6% by ATP-only, and 14% by IDF-only. Compared to those without MetSyn, ATP-only individuals had the highest odds of current CVD and of having a FRS >20%. Also compared to those without MetSyn, IDF-only individuals had 43% higher odds of current CVD and two-fold increased odds of having a FRS >20%. Conclusions Consistent with previous reports, ATP-III MetSyn criteria identified individuals with increased odds of CVD and elevated future CHD risk. However, the IDF definition identified a clinically important number of additional individuals at excess CVD risk. PMID:20211299

  16. Significance of the Amyloidogenic Transthyretin Val 122 Ile allele in African-Americans in the Arteriosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) and Cardiovascular Health (CHS) Studies

    PubMed Central

    Buxbaum, Joel; Alexander, Alice; Koziol, James; Tagoe, Clement; Fox, Ervin; Kitzman, Dalane

    2010-01-01

    Many African-Americans carry an amyloidogenic transthyretin mutation (TTR V122I), with a high risk for cardiac TTR amyloid deposition after age 65. We wished to determine the allele frequency and its clinical penetrance in community-dwelling African-Americans. Study subjects 5000 consenting African-Americans, ages 41 to 93, in two community studies of cardiovascular risk (CHS and ARIC). Methods genotyping of banked DNA for TTR V122I allele status; review of cardiovascular and demographic parameters in CHS and ARIC databases with statistical comparisons of the frequency of congestive heart failure, survival and occurrence of features of cardiac amyloidosis, in carriers of the amyloidogenic allele and controls. Results 119 (3.23%) of 3712 ARIC and 17 (2.12%) of 805 CHS African-Americans carried TTR V122I. After age 65 (CHS) the frequency of congestive heart failure (38% vs 15%, RR 2.62, p = 0.04) and mortality (76% vs 53 %, RR 1.46, p =0.08) were higher in V122I allele carriers than in age, gender and ethnically matched controls. In ARIC (all subjects younger than 65) there were no differences between carriers and non-carriers in mortality, frequency of congestive heart failure or findings consistent with cardiac amyloidosis. Conclusions Heterozygosity for the amyloidogenic TTR V122I mutation is relatively common in community dwelling African-Americans. Before 65 the allele has no discernible impact on cardiac function or mortality. After age 70carriers show a higher frequency of congestive failure and greater mortality with more echocardiographic evidence suggestive of cardiac amyloidosis, findings consistent with age dependent clinical penetrance of this autosomal dominant gene. PMID:20435197

  17. New classification of landslide-inducing anthropogenic activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michoud, C.; Jaboyedoff, M.; Derron, M.-H.; Nadim, F.; Leroi, E.

    2012-04-01

    Although landslides are usually considered typical examples of natural hazards, they can be influenced by human activities. Many examples can be found in the literature about slope instabilities induced by anthropogenic activities, ranging from small superficial landslides to rock avalanches. Research on this topic is of primary importance for understanding and mitigation of landslide risk. Indeed, slope stabilities influenced by human actions contribute significantly to the risk level because, by definition, they are located where elements at risk and people are present. Within the framework of the European project SafeLand "Living with Landslide Risk in Europe", the authors analyzed the landslides induced by anthropogenic factors in Europe and elsewhere (SafeLand deliverable D1.6). During the bibliographical research, it appeared that a complete and illustrated classification on human activities influencing slope stabilities does not yet exist. Therefore, a new classification was introduced by Michoud et al. (2011) about anthropogenic activities affecting slope stability conditions. This classification takes into account conceptual processes leading to landslides (Terzaghi, 1950; Jaboyedoff and Derron, 2005) and the distinction between destabilization factors and triggering factors (Vaunat et al., 1994; Leroueil et al., 1996). The classification was tested and improved through fifty-eight well-documented case studies, even lots of large landslides, such as Elm, Aberfan, Namsos and Rissa landslides, etc. Furthermore, the boundary between natural and "anthropogenic" landslide triggers (e.g. water run-off modified by new land-uses, creating landslides some km farther), and the time during which changes and reactions are to be considered as direct consequences of human activities were highlighted. Finally, anthropogenic influences can also be positive and examples of (non-voluntary) positive human impacts on slope stability are presented. Jaboyedoff, M. and Derron, M

  18. HIF-1α 1772 C/T and 1790 G/A Polymorphisms Are Significantly Associated with Higher Cancer Risk: An Updated Meta-Analysis from 34 Case-Control Studies

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chi; Qin, Qin; Liu, Jia; Xu, Li-Ping; Zhao, Lian-Jun; Zhang, Qu; Cai, Jing; Ma, Jian-Xin; Cheng, Hong-Yan; Sun, Xin-Chen

    2013-01-01

    Background HIF-1 activates various genes in cancer progression and metastasis. HIF-1α 1772 C/T and 1790 G/A polymorphisms are reportedly associated with cancer risk; however, the results are inconclusive. Methodology/Principal Findings A meta-analysis of 34 studies that involved 7522 cases and 9847 controls for 1772 C/T and 24 studies that involved 4884 cases and 8154 controls for 1790 G/A was conducted to identify the association of C/T and G/A polymorphisms with cancer risk. Odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were used to assess the strength of association. HIF-1α 1772 C/T and 1790 G/A polymorphisms were associated with higher cancer risk in homozygote comparison (1772C/T: TT vs. CC: OR = 2.45, 95% CI: 1.52, 3.96; Pheterogeneity = 0.028; 1790G/A: AA vs. GG: OR=4.74, 95% CI: 1.78, 12.6; Pheterogeneity < 0.01), dominant model (1772C/T: TT/CT vs. CC: OR = 1.27, 95% CI: 1.04, 1.55; Pheterogeneity < 0.01, 1790G/A: AA/GA vs. GG: OR = 1.65, 95% CI: 1.05, 2.60; Pheterogeneity < 0.01), T allele versus C allele (T vs. C: OR = 1.42, 95% CI: 1.18, 1.70; Pheterogeneity < 0.01), and A allele versus G allele (A vs. G: OR = 1.83, 95% CI: 1.13, 2.96; Pheterogeneity < 0.01). On a subgroup analysis, the 1772 C/T polymorphism was significantly linked to higher risks for breast cancer, lung cancer, prostate cancer, and cervical cancer, whereas the 1790 G/A polymorphism was significantly linked to higher risks for lung cancer and prostate cancer. A significantly increased cancer risk was found in both Asians and Caucasians for 1772C/T polymorphism, whereas a significantly increased cancer risk was found in Caucasians in the heterozygote comparison and recessive model for 1790G/A polymorphism. Conclusions HIF-1α 1772 C/T and 1790 G/A polymorphisms are significantly associated with higher cancer risk. PMID:24260383

  19. From landscape to domain: Soils role in landscape classifications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil landscape classifications are designed to divide landscapes into units with significance for the provisioning and regulating of ecosystem services and the development of conservation plans for natural resources. More specifically, such classifications serve as the basis for stratifying manageme...

  20. Robustness of RISMC Insights under Alternative Aleatory/Epistemic Uncertainty Classifications: Draft Report under the Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Pathway of the DOE Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program

    SciTech Connect

    Unwin, Stephen D.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Johnson, Kenneth I.

    2012-09-20

    The Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) pathway is a set of activities defined under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program. The overarching objective of RISMC is to support plant life-extension decision-making by providing a state-of-knowledge characterization of safety margins in key systems, structures, and components (SSCs). A technical challenge at the core of this effort is to establish the conceptual and technical feasibility of analyzing safety margin in a risk-informed way, which, unlike conventionally defined deterministic margin analysis, would be founded on probabilistic characterizations of uncertainty in SSC performance. In the context of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) technology, there has arisen a general consensus about the distinctive roles of two types of uncertainty: aleatory and epistemic, where the former represents irreducible, random variability inherent in a system, whereas the latter represents a state of knowledge uncertainty on the part of the analyst about the system which is, in principle, reducible through further research. While there is often some ambiguity about how any one contributing uncertainty in an analysis should be classified, there has nevertheless emerged a broad consensus on the meanings of these uncertainty types in the PRA setting. However, while RISMC methodology shares some features with conventional PRA, it will nevertheless be a distinctive methodology set. Therefore, the paradigms for classification of uncertainty in the PRA setting may not fully port to the RISMC environment. Yet the notion of risk-informed margin is based on the characterization of uncertainty, and it is therefore critical to establish a common understanding of uncertainty in the RISMC setting.

  1. Prognostic significance of pattern and burden of metastatic disease in patients with stage 4 neuroblastoma: A study from the International Neuroblastoma Risk Group database.

    PubMed

    Morgenstern, Daniel A; London, Wendy B; Stephens, Derek; Volchenboum, Samuel L; Simon, Thorsten; Nakagawara, Akira; Shimada, Hiroyuki; Schleiermacher, Gudrun; Matthay, Katherine K; Cohn, Susan L; Pearson, Andrew D J; Irwin, Meredith S

    2016-09-01

    Neuroblastoma is a childhood cancer with remarkably divergent tumour behaviour and the presence of metastatic disease is a powerful predictor of adverse outcome. However, the importance of the involvement of specific metastatic sites or overall metastatic burden in determining outcome has not been fully explored. We analysed data from the International Neuroblastoma Risk Group database for 2250 patients with stage 4 disease treated from 1990 to 2002. Metastatic burden was assessed using a 'metastatic site index' (MSI), a score based on the number of metastatic systems involved. Overall, involvement of bone marrow, bone, lung, central nervous system, or other sites was associated with worse outcome. For patients aged ≥18 months, involvement of liver had the greatest impact on outcome and was associated with tumour MYCN amplification and adrenal primary and lung metastases. Increased MSI was associated with worse outcome and higher baseline ferritin/lactate dehydrogenase. We explored the impact of initial treatment approach on these associations. Limiting the analysis to patients allocated to protocols including stem cell transplant (SCT), there was no longer an association of outcome with metastatic involvement of any individual system or increasing MSI. Thus, treatment escalation with SCT (and the addition of differentiating agents to maintenance therapy) appears to have provided maximal benefit to patients with greatest metastatic disease burden. These findings underscore the importance of examining prognostic factors in the context of specific treatments since the addition of new therapies may change or even negate the predictive impact of a particular variable. PMID:27434878

  2. A genome-wide association study of posttraumatic stress disorder identifies the retinoid-related orphan receptor alpha (RORA) gene as a significant risk locus

    PubMed Central

    Logue, Mark W.; Baldwin, Clinton; Guffanti, Guia; Melista, Efi; Wolf, Erika J.; Reardon, Annemarie F.; Uddin, Monica; Wildman, Derek; Galea, Sandro; Koenen, Karestan C.; Miller, Mark W.

    2012-01-01

    We describe the results of the first genome-wide association study of PTSD performed using trauma-exposed white non-Hispanic participants from a cohort of veterans and their intimate partners (295 cases and 196 controls). Several SNPs yielded evidence of association. One SNP (rs8042149), located in the retinoid-related orphan receptor alpha gene (RORA), reached genome-wide significance. Nominally significant associations were observed for other RORA SNPs in two African American replication samples—one from the veteran cohort (43 cases and 41 controls) and another independent cohort (100 cases and 421 controls). However, only the associated SNP from the veteran African American replication sample survived gene-level multiple testing correction. RORA has been implicated in prior GWAS studies of psychiatric disorders and is known to play an important role in neuroprotection and other behaviorally-relevant processes. This study represents an important step towards identifying the genetic underpinnings of PTSD. PMID:22869035

  3. Missing data in randomized controlled trials testing palliative interventions pose a significant risk of bias and loss of power: a systematic review and meta-analyses

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Jamilla A.; White, Ian R.; Langan, Dean; Johnson, Miriam J.; Currow, David C.; Torgerson, David J.; Bland, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess the risk posed by missing data (MD) to the power and validity of trials evaluating palliative interventions. Study Design and Setting A systematic review of MD in published randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of palliative interventions in participants with life-limiting illnesses was conducted, and random-effects meta-analyses and metaregression were performed. CENTRAL, MEDLINE, and EMBASE (2009–2014) were searched with no language restrictions. Results One hundred and eight RCTs representing 15,560 patients were included. The weighted estimate for MD at the primary endpoint was 23.1% (95% confidence interval [CI] 19.3, 27.4). Larger MD proportions were associated with increasing numbers of questions/tests requested (odds ratio [OR], 1.19; 95% CI 1.05, 1.35) and with longer study duration (OR, 1.09; 95% CI 1.02, 1.17). Meta-analysis found evidence of differential rates of MD between trial arms, which varied in direction (OR, 1.04; 95% CI 0.90, 1.20; I2 35.9, P = 0.001). Despite randomization, MD in the intervention arms (vs. control) were more likely to be attributed to disease progression unrelated to the intervention (OR, 1.31; 95% CI 1.02, 1.69). This was not the case for MD due to death (OR, 0.92; 95% CI 0.78, 1.08). Conclusion The overall proportion and differential rates and reasons for MD reduce the power and potentially introduce bias to palliative care trials. PMID:26718729

  4. The Application of Classification and Regression Trees for the Triage of Women for Referral to Colposcopy and the Estimation of Risk for Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia: A Study Based on 1625 Cases with Incomplete Data from Molecular Tests

    PubMed Central

    Pouliakis, Abraham; Karakitsou, Efrossyni; Chrelias, Charalampos; Pappas, Asimakis; Panayiotides, Ioannis; Valasoulis, George; Kyrgiou, Maria; Paraskevaidis, Evangelos; Karakitsos, Petros

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Nowadays numerous ancillary techniques detecting HPV DNA and mRNA compete with cytology; however no perfect test exists; in this study we evaluated classification and regression trees (CARTs) for the production of triage rules and estimate the risk for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) in cases with ASCUS+ in cytology. Study Design. We used 1625 cases. In contrast to other approaches we used missing data to increase the data volume, obtain more accurate results, and simulate real conditions in the everyday practice of gynecologic clinics and laboratories. The proposed CART was based on the cytological result, HPV DNA typing, HPV mRNA detection based on NASBA and flow cytometry, p16 immunocytochemical expression, and finally age and parous status. Results. Algorithms useful for the triage of women were produced; gynecologists could apply these in conjunction with available examination results and conclude to an estimation of the risk for a woman to harbor CIN expressed as a probability. Conclusions. The most important test was the cytological examination; however the CART handled cases with inadequate cytological outcome and increased the diagnostic accuracy by exploiting the results of ancillary techniques even if there were inadequate missing data. The CART performance was better than any other single test involved in this study. PMID:26339651

  5. Preventing risk for significant behavior problems through a cognitive-behavioral intervention: effects of the tools for getting along curriculum at one-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Smith, Stephen W; Daunic, Ann P; Barber, Brian R; Aydin, Burak; Van Loan, Christopher L; Taylor, Gregory G

    2014-10-01

    Efficient and effective social-emotional learning programs increase the likelihood of success in school for all students, and particularly for those who may develop emotional or behavior problems. In this study, we followed a sub-sample of students 1 year after their participation in a randomized controlled trial of the effects of the Tools for Getting Along (TFGA) curriculum. TFGA is a universally delivered, preventive cognitive-behavioral curricular intervention designed to improve upper elementary school students' emotional and behavioral self-regulation. To determine effects at 1-year follow-up, we assessed 720 out of the 1,296 original students across TFGA and control conditions on measures of curricular knowledge, teacher-rated executive function and behavior, and student-reported anger and social problem solving. Findings indicated a continued positive effect on curricular knowledge for students taught TFGA relative to controls. We also found significant pretest by condition interaction effects on teacher reports of skills associated with executive function, including inhibitory control and shift (cognitive flexibility), and on teacher reported internalizing and externalizing behavior. Specifically, students with poorer scores on these measures at pretest benefited from TFGA at follow-up relative to comparable students in the control condition. Finally, we found marginally significant pretest by condition interaction effects on proactive aggression, outward expressions of anger, and the executive function related skills of initiating activities and using working memory. Counter to expectations, we found negative TFGA effects on student-reported trait anger and anger control. PMID:25062801

  6. A new theory-based social classification in Japan and its validation using historically collected information.

    PubMed

    Hiyoshi, Ayako; Fukuda, Yoshiharu; Shipley, Martin J; Bartley, Mel; Brunner, Eric J

    2013-06-01

    Studies of health inequalities in Japan have increased since the millennium. However, there remains a lack of an accepted theory-based classification to measure occupation-related social position for Japan. This study attempts to derive such a classification based on the National Statistics Socio-economic Classification in the UK. Using routinely collected data from the nationally representative Comprehensive Survey of the Living Conditions of People on Health and Welfare, the Japanese Socioeconomic Classification was derived using two variables - occupational group and employment status. Validation analyses were conducted using household income, home ownership, self-rated good or poor health, and Kessler 6 psychological distress (n ≈ 36,000). After adjustment for age, marital status, and area (prefecture), one step lower social class was associated with mean 16% (p < 0.001) lower income, and a risk ratio of 0.93 (p < 0.001) for home ownership. The probability of good health showed a trend in men and women (risk ratio 0.94 and 0.93, respectively, for one step lower social class, p < 0.001). The trend for poor health was significant in women (odds ratio 1.12, p < 0.001) but not in men. Kessler 6 psychological distress showed significant trends in men (risk ratio 1.03, p = 0.044) and in women (1.05, p = 0.004). We propose the Japanese Socioeconomic Classification, derived from basic occupational and employment status information, as a meaningful, theory-based and standard classification system suitable for monitoring occupation-related health inequalities in Japan. PMID:23631782

  7. Alpha2C-adrenoceptor Del322-325 polymorphism and risk of psychiatric disorders: significant association with opiate abuse and dependence.

    PubMed

    Rivero, Guadalupe; Martín-Guerrero, Idoia; de Prado, Elena; Gabilondo, Ane M; Callado, Luis F; García-Sevilla, Jesús A; García-Orad, África; Meana, J Javier

    2016-06-01

    Objectives α2C-adrenoceptors (α2C-AR) are involved in behavioural responses relevant to psychiatric disorders and suicide completion. The genetic polymorphism α2CDel322-325-AR confers a loss-of-function phenotype. Functional human studies have associated α2CDel322-325-AR polymorphism with major depression pathophysiology. The aim of this study was to analyse, for the first time, the association of α2CDel322-325-AR polymorphism with suicide completion and with related psychiatric disorders: major depression, schizophrenia, opiate and alcohol abuse and dependence. Methods Post-mortem brain DNA was extracted (n = 516) and genotyping performed by HaeIII restriction endonuclease digestion of PCR products and DNA fragment analysis on capillary sequencer. Amplified products were sequenced to confirm the presence of the polymorphism. Results The frequency of α2CDel322-325-AR in suicide (9%, n = 236) and non-suicide victims (11%, n = 280) was similar. Genotype frequencies for the α2CDel322-325-AR polymorphism in depressed (15%, n = 39) and schizophrenic subjects (18%, n = 39) were higher than in controls (7%, n = 187), but these differences did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.125 and P = 0.063, respectively). A selective and significant association of α2CDel322-325-AR polymorphism with opiate abuse and dependence was found (23%, n = 35, P = 0.011). Conclusions Our results indicate that α2CDel322-325-AR may play a role in the pathophysiology of opiate abuse and dependence and raise the interest for larger genetic associative studies. PMID:27007576

  8. Will weight loss cause significant dosimetric changes of target volumes and organs at risk in nasopharyngeal carcinoma treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy?

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chuanben; Fei, Zhaodong; Chen, Lisha; Bai, Penggang; Lin, Xiang; Pan, Jianji

    2014-04-01

    This study aimed to quantify dosimetric effects of weight loss for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Overall, 25 patients with NPC treated with IMRT were enrolled. We simulated weight loss during IMRT on the computer. Weight loss model was based on the planning computed tomography (CT) images. The original external contour of head and neck was labeled plan 0, and its volume was regarded as pretreatment normal weight. We shrank the external contour with different margins (2, 3, and 5 mm) and generated new external contours of head and neck. The volumes of reconstructed external contours were regarded as weight during radiotherapy. After recontouring outlines, the initial treatment plan was mapped to the redefined CT scans with the same beam configurations, yielding new plans. The computer model represented a theoretical proportional weight loss of 3.4% to 13.7% during the course of IMRT. The dose delivered to the planning target volume (PTV) of primary gross tumor volume and clinical target volume significantly increased by 1.9% to 2.9% and 1.8% to 2.9% because of weight loss, respectively. The dose to the PTV of gross tumor volume of lymph nodes fluctuated from −2.0% to 1.0%. The dose to the brain stem and the spinal cord was increased (p < 0.001), whereas the dose to the parotid gland was decreased (p < 0.001). Weight loss may lead to significant dosimetric change during IMRT. Repeated scanning and replanning for patients with NPC with an obvious weight loss may be necessary.

  9. Classification, Identification, and Clinical Significance of Proteus, Providencia, and Morganella

    PubMed Central

    O'Hara, Caroline Mohr; Brenner, Frances W.; Miller, J. Michael

    2000-01-01

    This review presents the current taxonomy of the genera Proteus, Providencia, and Morganella, along with the current methods for the identification of each species within the three genera, incorporating both conventional biochemical and commercial methods. While all of these organisms are ubiquitous in the environment, individual case reports and nosocomial outbreak reports that demonstrate their ability to cause major infectious disease problems are presented. Lastly, anticipated antimicrobial susceptibility patterns are reviewed. Many of these organisms are easily controlled, but the advent of newer and more powerful antimicrobial agents has led to some problems of which laboratorians need to be aware. PMID:11023955

  10. New Classification of Headache

    PubMed Central

    Gawel, Marek J.

    1992-01-01

    The Headache Classification Committee of the International Headache Society has developed a new classification system for headache, cranial neuralgia, and facial pain. The value of the classification for the practising clinician is that it forces him or her to take a more careful history in order to determine the nature of the headache. This article reviews the classification system and gives examples of case histories and subsequent diagnoses. PMID:21221276

  11. Hepatic Fibrosis Progression in HIV-Hepatitis C Virus Co-Infection – The Effect of Sex on Risk of Significant Fibrosis Measured by Aspartate-to-Platelet Ratio Index

    PubMed Central

    Rollet-Kurhajec, Kathleen C.; Moodie, Erica E. M.; Walmsley, Sharon; Cooper, Curtis; Pick, Neora; Klein, Marina B.

    2015-01-01

    Background In Hepatitis C virus (HCV) mono-infection, male sex is associated with faster liver fibrosis progression but the effects of sex have not been well studied in HIV-HCV co-infected patients. We examined the influence of sex on progression to significant liver fibrosis in HIV-HCV co-infected adults receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) using the aspartate aminotransferase-to-platelet ratio index (APRI) as a surrogate biomarker of liver fibrosis. Methods We evaluated 308 HIV infected, HCV RNA positive participants of a Canadian multicentre prospective cohort receiving antiretrovirals and without significant liver fibrosis or end-stage liver disease at baseline. We used multivariate discrete-time proportional hazards models to assess the effect of sex on time to significant fibrosis (APRI≥1.5) adjusting for baseline age, alcohol use, cigarette smoking, HCV duration, and APRI and time-updated CD4 count and HIV RNA. Results Overall, 55 (18%) participants developed an APRI ≥ 1.5 over 544 person-years of at-risk follow-up time; 18 (21%) women (incidence rate (IR)=14.0/100 PY; 7.5-20.4) and 37 (17%) men (IR=8.9/100 PY; 6.0-11.8). Women had more favourable profiles with respect to traditional risk factors for liver disease progression (younger, shorter duration of HCV infection and less alcohol use). Despite this, female sex was associated with a greater than two-fold increased risk of fibrosis progression (adjusted hazard rate (HR) =2.23; 1.22-4.08). Conclusions HIV-HCV co-infected women receiving antiretroviral therapy were at significantly greater risk of progressing to liver fibrosis as measured by APRI compared with men. Enhanced efforts to engage and treat co-infected women for HCV are needed. PMID:26090666

  12. A Retrospective Analysis of Incidence and Its Associated Risk Factors of Upper Urinary Tract Recurrence following Radical Cystectomy for Bladder Cancer with Transitional Cell Carcinoma: The Significance of Local Pelvic Recurrence and Positive Lymph Node

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Han; Yang, Hyung-Kook; Lee, Jung Hoon; Lee, Eun-Sik

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study is to examine the incidence and risk factors of upper urinary tract recurrence (UUTR) following radical cystectomy (RC) in bladder cancer and to evaluate its relationship with neobladder (Neo) or ileal conduit (IC). Materials and Methods All clinicopathologic parameters and perioperative parameters of 311 patients who underwent RC with either Neo or IC by a single surgeon from 1999 to 2012 were retrospectively included in this study. Patients with a history of renal surgery, concomitant UUTR, or a histopathology of non-transitional cell carcinoma were excluded. For statistical analyses of predictive risk factors of UUTR, a multivariate analysis was performed with known risk factors of UUTR, including type of urinary diversion with significance defined as P < 0.05. Results During the median follow-up period of 53 months, 143 (46.0%) IC and 168 (54.0%) Neo were performed, resulting in 11 (3.5%) cases of UUTR (Neo 7 and IC 4) after RC and all patients then underwent nephroureterectomy. No significant differences in incidence and overall survival in UUTR were observed according different types of urinary diversion (p = 483), and the prognosis for survival of Neo was insignificantly better than that of IC (5-year overall survival 78% vs 74%, respectively, p>0.05). Higher number of positive lymph nodes (HR 9.03) and the presence of pelvic local recurrence (HR 7286.08) were significant predictive factors of UUTR (p<0.05). Conclusion This study reports a UUTR rate of 3.5%, and positive lymph nodes and presence of local recurrence at the pelvis as important risk factors. No significant differences in incidence and survival were observed between Neo and IC. PMID:24798444

  13. Classification of articulators.

    PubMed

    Rihani, A

    1980-03-01

    A simple classification in familiar terms with definite, clear characteristics can be adopted. This classification system is based on the number of records used and the adjustments necessary for the articulator to accept these records. The classification divides the articulators into nonadjustable, semiadjustable, and fully adjustable articulators (Table I). PMID:6928204

  14. Government Classification: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Karen M.

    Classification of government documents (confidential, secret, top secret) is a system used by the executive branch to, in part, protect national security and foreign policy interests. The systematic use of classification markings with precise definitions was established during World War I, and since 1936 major changes in classification have…

  15. Classification: Something to Think About.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isenberg, Joan P.; Jacobs, Judith E.

    1981-01-01

    Advocates the use of classification activities in the elementary school curriculum as a means of developing thinking skills in children. Critical preclassification skills, classification activities (including simple and multiple classification), and classification tasks and materials are discussed. (Author/RH)

  16. ENIGMA--evidence-based network for the interpretation of germline mutant alleles: an international initiative to evaluate risk and clinical significance associated with sequence variation in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes.

    PubMed

    Spurdle, Amanda B; Healey, Sue; Devereau, Andrew; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Monteiro, Alvaro N A; Nathanson, Katherine L; Radice, Paolo; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Tavtigian, Sean; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Couch, Fergus J; Goldgar, David E

    2012-01-01

    As genetic testing for predisposition to human diseases has become an increasingly common practice in medicine, the need for clear interpretation of the test results is apparent. However, for many disease genes, including the breast cancer susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2, a significant fraction of tests results in the detection of a genetic variant for which disease association is not known. The finding of an "unclassified" variant (UV)/variant of uncertain significance (VUS) complicates genetic test reporting and counseling. As these variants are individually rare, a large collaboration of researchers and clinicians will facilitate studies to assess their association with cancer predisposition. It was with this in mind that the ENIGMA consortium (www.enigmaconsortium.org) was initiated in 2009. The membership is both international and interdisciplinary, and currently includes more than 100 research scientists and clinicians from 19 countries. Within ENIGMA, there are presently six working groups focused on the following topics: analysis, clinical, database, functional, tumor histopathology, and mRNA splicing. ENIGMA provides a mechanism to pool resources, exchange methods and data, and coordinately develop and apply algorithms for classification of variants in BRCA1 and BRCA2. It is envisaged that the research and clinical application of models developed by ENIGMA will be relevant to the interpretation of sequence variants in other disease genes. PMID:21990146

  17. Holistic facial expression classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghent, John; McDonald, J.

    2005-06-01

    This paper details a procedure for classifying facial expressions. This is a growing and relatively new type of problem within computer vision. One of the fundamental problems when classifying facial expressions in previous approaches is the lack of a consistent method of measuring expression. This paper solves this problem by the computation of the Facial Expression Shape Model (FESM). This statistical model of facial expression is based on an anatomical analysis of facial expression called the Facial Action Coding System (FACS). We use the term Action Unit (AU) to describe a movement of one or more muscles of the face and all expressions can be described using the AU's described by FACS. The shape model is calculated by marking the face with 122 landmark points. We use Principal Component Analysis (PCA) to analyse how the landmark points move with respect to each other and to lower the dimensionality of the problem. Using the FESM in conjunction with Support Vector Machines (SVM) we classify facial expressions. SVMs are a powerful machine learning technique based on optimisation theory. This project is largely concerned with statistical models, machine learning techniques and psychological tools used in the classification of facial expression. This holistic approach to expression classification provides a means for a level of interaction with a computer that is a significant step forward in human-computer interaction.

  18. Prognostic Role of the Endoscopic Classification "DICA".

    PubMed

    Tursi, Antonio; Brandimarte, Giovanni; Di Mario, Francesco; Elisei, Walter; Scarpignato, Carmelo; Picchio, Marcello

    2016-10-01

    Diverticular inflammation and complication assessment (DICA) endoscopic classification has been recently developed for patients suffering from diverticulosis and diverticular disease. Its predictive value in those patients was recently retrospectively assessed. For each patient, the following parameters were recorded: age, severity of DICA, presence of abdominal pain, C-reactive protein, fecal calprotectin test (if available) at the time of diagnosis, months of follow-up, therapy taken during the follow-up to maintain remission (if any), occurrence/recurrence of diverticulitis, and need of surgery. A total of 1651 patients (793 male, 858 female, mean age 66.6±11.1 y) were enrolled: 939 (56.9%) classified as DICA 1, 501 (30.3%) as DICA 2, and 211 (12.8%) as DICA 3. The median follow-up was 24 (9 to 138) months. Acute diverticulitis (AD) occurred/recurred in 263 (15.9%) patients, and surgery was necessary in 57 (21.7%) cases. DICA was the only factor significantly associated with the occurrence/recurrence of diverticulitis and surgery either at univariate (χ=405.029; P<0.0001) or multivariate analysis (hazard ratio=4.319; 95% CI, 3.639-5.126; P<0.0001). Only in DICA 2 patients scheduled therapy was effective for prevention of AD occurrence/recurrence with a hazard ratio (95% CI) of 0.598 (0.391-0.914) (P=0.006, log-rank test). Mesalazine-based therapies reduced the risk of AD occurrence/recurrence and need of surgery with a hazard ratio (95% CI) of 0.2103 (0.122-0.364) and 0.459 (0.258-0.818), respectively. DICA classification seems to be a valid parameter to predict the risk of diverticulitis occurrence/recurrence in patients suffering from diverticular disease of the colon. PMID:27622352

  19. Cancer markers: integratively annotated classification.

    PubMed

    Orsini, M; Travaglione, A; Capobianco, E

    2013-11-10

    Translational cancer genomics research aims to ensure that experimental knowledge is subject to computational analysis, and integrated with a variety of records from omics and clinical sources. The data retrieval from such sources is not trivial, due to their redundancy and heterogeneity, and the presence of false evidence. In silico marker identification, therefore, remains a complex task that is mainly motivated by the impact that target identification from the elucidation of gene co-expression dynamics and regulation mechanisms, combined with the discovery of genotype-phenotype associations, may have for clinical validation. Based on the reuse of publicly available gene expression data, our aim is to propose cancer marker classification by integrating the prediction power of multiple annotation sources. In particular, with reference to the functional annotation for colorectal markers, we indicate a classification of markers into diagnostic and prognostic classes combined with susceptibility and risk factors. PMID:23928109

  20. Support Vector Machine Implementations for Classification & Clustering

    PubMed Central

    Winters-Hilt, Stephen; Yelundur, Anil; McChesney, Charlie; Landry, Matthew

    2006-01-01

    Background We describe Support Vector Machine (SVM) applications to classification and clustering of channel current data. SVMs are variational-calculus based methods that are constrained to have structural risk minimization (SRM), i.e., they provide noise tolerant solutions for pattern recognition. The SVM approach encapsulates a significant amount of model-fitting information in the choice of its kernel. In work thus far, novel, information-theoretic, kernels have been successfully employed for notably better performance over standard kernels. Currently there are two approaches for implementing multiclass SVMs. One is called external multi-class that arranges several binary classifiers as a decision tree such that they perform a single-class decision making function, with each leaf corresponding to a unique class. The second approach, namely internal-multiclass, involves solving a single optimization problem corresponding to the entire data set (with multiple hyperplanes). Results Each SVM approach encapsulates a significant amount of model-fitting information in its choice of kernel. In work thus far, novel, information-theoretic, kernels were successfully employed for notably better performance over standard kernels. Two SVM approaches to multiclass discrimination are described: (1) internal multiclass (with a single optimization), and (2) external multiclass (using an optimized decision tree). We describe benefits of the internal-SVM approach, along with further refinements to the internal-multiclass SVM algorithms that offer significant improvement in training time without sacrificing accuracy. In situations where the data isn't clearly separable, making for poor discrimination, signal clustering is used to provide robust and useful information – to this end, novel, SVM-based clustering methods are also described. As with the classification, there are Internal and External SVM Clustering algorithms, both of which are briefly described. PMID:17118147

  1. Periodic health examination, 1993 update: 3. Periodontal diseases: classification, diagnosis, risk factors and prevention. Canadian Task Force on the Periodic Health Examination.

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, A I; Lewis, D W

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the 1979 Canadian Task Force on the Periodic Health Examination recommendations on the diagnosis and prevention of periodontal disease. OPTIONS: Self-care at home, professional care, treatment with antimicrobial agents and management of patients at high risk. OUTCOMES: Maintaining the gingiva, alveolar bone and periodontal ligament in a healthy state (absence of gingival bleeding and no loss of epithelial attachment). EVIDENCE: A literature search for articles published from 1980 to 1993 was conducted. Selected studies published before 1980 were also reviewed if there were no recent updates. Evidence was evaluated and classified as good, fair or poor according to the criteria of the task force. VALUES: The task force's evidence-based rules for recommendations were used. In addition, whenever feasible, and on the basis of advice from the reviewers and experts, recommendations were modified in the interest of maintaining oral health (e.g., dental flossing in children). BENEFITS, HARMS AND COSTS: The recommendations are not expected to increase the costs of preventing periodontal diseases for the general population. They could benefit dental patients and reduce costs because they are based on the periodontal needs of patients rather than on the current universal application approach. PMID:8221425

  2. On the nature of global classification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheelis, M. L.; Kandler, O.; Woese, C. R.

    1992-01-01

    Molecular sequencing technology has brought biology into the era of global (universal) classification. Methodologically and philosophically, global classification differs significantly from traditional, local classification. The need for uniformity requires that higher level taxa be defined on the molecular level in terms of universally homologous functions. A global classification should reflect both principal dimensions of the evolutionary process: genealogical relationship and quality and extent of divergence within a group. The ultimate purpose of a global classification is not simply information storage and retrieval; such a system should also function as an heuristic representation of the evolutionary paradigm that exerts a directing influence on the course of biology. The global system envisioned allows paraphyletic taxa. To retain maximal phylogenetic information in these cases, minor notational amendments in existing taxonomic conventions should be adopted.

  3. Recursive heuristic classification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkins, David C.

    1994-01-01

    The author will describe a new problem-solving approach called recursive heuristic classification, whereby a subproblem of heuristic classification is itself formulated and solved by heuristic classification. This allows the construction of more knowledge-intensive classification programs in a way that yields a clean organization. Further, standard knowledge acquisition and learning techniques for heuristic classification can be used to create, refine, and maintain the knowledge base associated with the recursively called classification expert system. The method of recursive heuristic classification was used in the Minerva blackboard shell for heuristic classification. Minerva recursively calls itself every problem-solving cycle to solve the important blackboard scheduler task, which involves assigning a desirability rating to alternative problem-solving actions. Knowing these ratings is critical to the use of an expert system as a component of a critiquing or apprenticeship tutoring system. One innovation of this research is a method called dynamic heuristic classification, which allows selection among dynamically generated classification categories instead of requiring them to be prenumerated.

  4. 1p/19q-driven prognostic molecular classification for high-grade oligodendroglial tumors.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Haihui; Zhang, Zhe; Ren, Xiaohui; Zeng, Wei; Jia, Wenqing; Wang, Junmei; Lin, Song

    2014-12-01

    The subjectivity in pathological diagnosis of anaplastic oligoastrocytoma (AOA) and uncertainty in designation of glioblastoma with oligodendroglioma component (GBMO) were two major dilemmas which puzzled neuro-pathologists and neurosurgeons. The present study was designed to project a molecular classification scheme based on the status of chromosome 1p and 19q. Patients (n = 117) with histological diagnosis of primary high-grade oligodendroglial tumors (HGOs) enrolled in the study. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for chromosomes 1p and 19q was performed. Univariate analysis showed that higher tumor grade, 1p/19q maintenance and 1q/19p co polysomy were confirmed as risk factors in HGOs (P < 0.01). Accordingly, patients with HGOs were divided into four subtypes which conferred remarkably distinct prognosis based on the number of risk factors (0 risk factor: HGOs-1, 1 risk factor: HGOs-2, 2 risk factors: HGOs-3, 3 risk factors: HGOs-4). Cox regression model revealed that the tumor grade was no longer independently associated with survival, while the molecular classification scheme showed a marked prognostic significance (HR = 0.359, 95 % CI 0.261-0.494, P < 0.001 for progression-free survival (PFS); HR = 0.393, 95 % CI 0.283-0.546, P < 0.001 for overall survival (OS)). The classification scheme incorporating traditional pathology with molecular information can be served as a supplement of the current WHO classification system and contribute to the personalized treatment decision-making. PMID:25151507

  5. Urban land cover classification using hyperspectral data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegde, G.; Ahamed, J. Mohammed; Hebbar, R.; Raj, U.

    2014-11-01

    Urban land cover classification using remote sensing data is quite challenging due to spectrally and spatially complex urban features. The present study describes the potential use of hyperspectral data for urban land cover classification and its comparison with multispectral data. EO-1 Hyperion data of October 05, 2012 covering parts of Bengaluru city was analyzed for land cover classification. The hyperspectral data was initially corrected for atmospheric effects using MODTRAN based FLAASH module and Minimum Noise Fraction (MNF) transformation was applied to reduce data dimensionality. The threshold Eigen value of 1.76 in VNIR region and 1.68 in the SWIR region was used for selection of 145 stable bands. Advanced per pixel classifiers viz., Spectral Angle Mapper (SAM) and Support Vector Machine (SVM) were used for general urban land cover classification. Accuracy assessment of the classified data revealed that SVM was quite superior (82.4 per cent) for urban land cover classification as compared to SAM (67.1 per cent). Selecting training samples using end members significantly improved the classification accuracy by 20.1 per cent in SVM. The land cover classification using multispectral LISS-III data using SVM showed lower accuracy mainly due to limitation of spectral resolution. The study indicated the requirement of additional narrow bands for achieving reasonable classification accuracy of urban land cover. Future research is focused on generating hyperspectral library for different urban features.

  6. Introduction to Kernel Methods: Classification of Multivariate Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fauvel, M.

    2016-05-01

    In this chapter, kernel methods are presented for the classification of multivariate data. An introduction example is given to enlighten the main idea of kernel methods. Then emphasis is done on the Support Vector Machine. Structural risk minimization is presented, and linear and non-linear SVM are described. Finally, a full example of SVM classification is given on simulated hyperspectral data.

  7. Classification images: A review.

    PubMed

    Murray, Richard F

    2011-01-01

    Classification images have recently become a widely used tool in visual psychophysics. Here, I review the development of classification image methods over the past fifteen years. I provide some historical background, describing how classification images and related methods grew out of established statistical and mathematical frameworks and became common tools for studying biological systems. I describe key developments in classification image methods: use of optimal weighted sums based on the linear observer model, formulation of classification images in terms of the generalized linear model, development of statistical tests, use of priors to reduce dimensionality, methods for experiments with more than two response alternatives, a variant using multiplicative noise, and related methods for examining nonlinearities in visual processing, including second-order Volterra kernels and principal component analysis. I conclude with a selective review of how classification image methods have led to substantive findings in three representative areas of vision research, namely, spatial vision, perceptual organization, and visual search. PMID:21536726

  8. Classification of Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Oudiz, Ronald J

    2016-08-01

    The classification of pulmonary hypertension (PH) is an attempt to define subtypes of PH based on clinical presentation, underlying physiology, and treatment implications. Five groups of PH have been defined, and the classification scheme has been refined over the years to guide clinicians in the diagnosis and management of PH. Understanding the classification of PH is paramount before embarking on a work-up of patients with PH or suspected PH because treatment and outcome can vary greatly. PMID:27443133

  9. Classiology and soil classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozhkov, V. A.

    2012-03-01

    Classiology can be defined as a science studying the principles and rules of classification of objects of any nature. The development of the theory of classification and the particular methods for classifying objects are the main challenges of classiology; to a certain extent, they are close to the challenges of pattern recognition. The methodology of classiology integrates a wide range of methods and approaches: from expert judgment to formal logic, multivariate statistics, and informatics. Soil classification assumes generalization of available data and practical experience, formalization of our notions about soils, and their representation in the form of an information system. As an information system, soil classification is designed to predict the maximum number of a soil's properties from the position of this soil in the classification space. The existing soil classification systems do not completely satisfy the principles of classiology. The violation of logical basis, poor structuring, low integrity, and inadequate level of formalization make these systems verbal schemes rather than classification systems sensu stricto. The concept of classification as listing (enumeration) of objects makes it possible to introduce the notion of the information base of classification. For soil objects, this is the database of soil indices (properties) that might be applied for generating target-oriented soil classification system. Mathematical methods enlarge the prognostic capacity of classification systems; they can be applied to assess the quality of these systems and to recognize new soil objects to be included in the existing systems. The application of particular principles and rules of classiology for soil classification purposes is discussed in this paper.

  10. Classification of Stellar Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrison, R.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    How does a scientist approach the problem of trying to understand countless billions of objects? One of the first steps is to organize the data and set up a classification scheme which can provide the best insights into the nature of the objects. Perception and insight are the main purposes of classification. In astronomy, where there are `billions and billions' of stars, classification is an ong...

  11. 41 CFR 105-62.101 - Security classification categories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... vitally affecting the national security, intelligence sources and methods, and the compromise of vital... revelation of significant military plans or intelligence operations. This classification shall be...

  12. 41 CFR 105-62.101 - Security classification categories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... vitally affecting the national security, intelligence sources and methods, and the compromise of vital... revelation of significant military plans or intelligence operations. This classification shall be...

  13. Sub-Classification of Lateral Cervical Lymph Node Metastasis in Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma by Pathologic Criteria

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Min Ji; Kim, Won Gu; Jang, Eun Kyung; Choi, Yun Mi; Song, Dong Eun; Sung, Tae-Yon; Yoon, Jong Ho; Chung, Ki-Wook; Hong, Suck Joon; Ryu, Jin-Sook; Han, Ji Min; Kim, Tae Yong; Shong, Young Kee; Kim, Won Bae

    2015-01-01

    Background Lateral cervical lymph node (LCLN) metastasis, or pathologic N1b disease, is an important risk factor in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). However, many patients have favorable prognosis even with pathologic N1b patients in clinical practice. The study aims to identify high- and intermediate-risk groups based on initial pathologic characteristics in these patients. Patients This study included 518 classical PTC patients confirmed as pathologic N1b at initial surgery between 2001 and 2010. All patients underwent a single fixed activity (5.6 GBq) of radioactive I-131 remnant ablation. Results Patients with a primary tumor larger than 4 cm, gross extrathyroidal extension, metastatic LN larger than 3 cm, or greater than 10 metastatic LCLN were classified as high-risk group. These comprehensive pathologic criteria were retrieved from cox proportional hazard models. Twenty two percent of patients (n = 113) were classified as high-risk and 78% (n = 405) as intermediate-risk group. Successful ablation was identified in only 32% of the patients in the high-risk group and 61% in the intermediate-risk group (p < 0.001). The difference between the two risk groups was independent to gender. There was a significant difference in disease-free survival between the high- and intermediate- risk N1b groups during 5.1 years of median follow-up (84% vs. 59%, p < 0.001). Distant metastasis was more prevalent in the high-risk group (20%) than in the intermediate-risk group (4%, p < 0.001). Conclusions The prognosis of PTC patients with LCLN metastasis varies depending on initial pathologic characteristics. We proposed the comprehensive pathologic criteria for sub-classification of N1b into high- and intermediate-risk groups and this sub-classification may permit personalized management of N1b PTC patients. PMID:26186205

  14. Classification of Itch.

    PubMed

    Ständer, Sonja

    2016-01-01

    Chronic pruritus has diverse forms of presentation and can appear not only on normal skin [International Forum for the Study of Itch (IFSI) classification group II], but also in the company of dermatoses (IFSI classification group I). Scratching, a natural reflex, begins in response to itch. Enough damage can be done to the skin by scratching to cause changes in the primary clinical picture, often leading to a clinical picture predominated by the development of chronic scratch lesions (IFSI classification group III). An internationally recognized, standardized classification system was created by the IFSI to not only aid in clarifying terms and definitions, but also to harmonize the global nomenclature for itch. PMID:27578063

  15. Age matters in the prevalence and clinical significance of ultra-high-risk for psychosis symptoms and criteria in the general population: Findings from the BEAR and BEARS-kid studies

    PubMed Central

    Schimmelmann, Benno G; Michel, Chantal; Martz-Irngartinger, Alexandra; Linder, Caroline; Schultze-Lutter, Frauke

    2015-01-01

    Early detection of psychosis is an important topic in psychiatry. Yet, there is limited information on the prevalence and clinical significance of high-risk symptoms in children and adolescents as compared to adults. We examined ultra-high-risk (UHR) symptoms and criteria in a sample of individuals aged 8-40 years from the general population of Canton Bern, Switzerland, enrolled from June 2011 to May 2014. The current presence of attenuated psychotic symptoms (APS) and brief intermittent psychotic symptoms (BLIPS) and the fulfillment of onset/worsening and frequency requirements for these symptoms in UHR criteria were assessed using the Structured Interview for Psychosis Risk Syndromes. Additionally, perceptive and non-perceptive APS were differentiated. Psychosocial functioning and current non-psychotic DSM-IV axis I disorders were also surveyed. Well-trained psychologists performed assessments. Altogether, 9.9% of subjects reported APS and none BLIPS, and 1.3% met all the UHR requirements for APS. APS were related to more current axis I disorders and impaired psychosocial functioning, indicating some clinical significance. A strong age effect was detected around age 16: compared to older individuals, 8-15-year olds reported more perceptive APS, that is, unusual perceptual experiences and attenuated hallucinations. Perceptive APS were generally less related to functional impairment, regardless of age. Conversely, non-perceptive APS were related to low functioning, although this relationship was weaker in those below age 16. Future studies should address the differential effects of perceptive and non-perceptive APS, and their interaction with age, also in terms of conversion to psychosis. PMID:26043337

  16. Influence of anthropogenic activities on PAHs in sediments in a significant gulf of low-latitude developing regions, the Beibu Gulf, South China Sea: distribution, sources, inventory and probability risk.

    PubMed

    Li, Pingyang; Xue, Rui; Wang, Yinghui; Zhang, Ruijie; Zhang, Gan

    2015-01-15

    Fifteen polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in 41 surface sediment samples and a sediment core (50 cm) from the Beibu Gulf, a significant low-latitude developing gulf, were analyzed. PAHs concentrations were 3.01-388 ng g(-)(1) (mean 95.5 ng g(-)(1)) in the surface sediments and 10.5-87.1 ng g(-)(1) (average 41.1 ng g(-)(1)) in the sediment core. Source apportionment indicated that PAHs were generated from coke production and vehicular emissions (39.4%), coal and biomass combustion (35.8%), and petrogenic sources (24.8%). PAHs were mainly concentrated in the industrialized and urbanized regions and the harbor, and were transported by atmospheric deposition to the marine matrix. The mass inventory (1.57-2.62t) and probability risk showed sediments here served as an important reservoir but low PAH risk. Different from oil and natural gas in developed regions, coal combustion has always been a significant energy consumption pattern in this developing region for the past 30 years (56 ± 5%). PMID:25467868

  17. A Standardized Classification for Subdural Hematomas- I.

    PubMed

    Alves, José Luís; Santiago, João Gonçalo; Costa, Guerreiro; Mota Pinto, Anabela

    2016-09-01

    Subdural hematomas are a frequent and highly heterogeneous traumatic disorder, with significant clinical and socioeconomic consequences. In clinical and medicolegal practice, subdural hematomas are classified according to its apparent age, which significantly influences its intrinsic pathogenic behavior, forensic implications, clinical management, and outcome. Although practical, this empirical classification is somewhat arbitrary and scarcely informative, considering the remarkable heterogeneity of this entity. The current research project aims at implementing a comprehensive multifactorial classification of subdural hematomas, allowing a more standardized and coherent assessment and management of this condition. This new method of classification of subdural hematomas takes into account its intrinsic and extrinsic features, using imaging data and histopathological elements, to provide an easily apprehensible and intuitive nomenclature. The proposed classification unifies and organizes all relevant details concerning subdural hematomas, hopefully improving surgical care and forensic systematization. PMID:27428027

  18. Functional Basis of Microorganism Classification

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Chengsheng; Delmont, Tom O.; Vogel, Timothy M.; Bromberg, Yana

    2015-01-01

    Correctly identifying nearest “neighbors” of a given microorganism is important in industrial and clinical applications where close relationships imply similar treatment. Microbial classification based on similarity of physiological and genetic organism traits (polyphasic similarity) is experimentally difficult and, arguably, subjective. Evolutionary relatedness, inferred from phylogenetic markers, facilitates classification but does not guarantee functional identity between members of the same taxon or lack of similarity between different taxa. Using over thirteen hundred sequenced bacterial genomes, we built a novel function-based microorganism classification scheme, functional-repertoire similarity-based organism network (FuSiON; flattened to fusion). Our scheme is phenetic, based on a network of quantitatively defined organism relationships across the known prokaryotic space. It correlates significantly with the current taxonomy, but the observed discrepancies reveal both (1) the inconsistency of functional diversity levels among different taxa and (2) an (unsurprising) bias towards prioritizing, for classification purposes, relatively minor traits of particular interest to humans. Our dynamic network-based organism classification is independent of the arbitrary pairwise organism similarity cut-offs traditionally applied to establish taxonomic identity. Instead, it reveals natural, functionally defined organism groupings and is thus robust in handling organism diversity. Additionally, fusion can use organism meta-data to highlight the specific environmental factors that drive microbial diversification. Our approach provides a complementary view to cladistic assignments and holds important clues for further exploration of microbial lifestyles. Fusion is a more practical fit for biomedical, industrial, and ecological applications, as many of these rely on understanding the functional capabilities of the microbes in their environment and are less concerned

  19. Hydropedological insights when considering catchment classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouma, J.; Droogers, P.; Sonneveld, M. P. W.; Ritsema, C. J.; Hunink, J. E.; Immerzeel, W. W.; Kauffman, S.

    2011-06-01

    Soil classification systems are analysed to explore the potential of developing classification systems for catchments. Soil classifications are useful to create systematic order in the overwhelming quantity of different soils in the world and to extrapolate data available for a given soil type to soils elsewhere with identical classifications. This principle also applies to catchments. However, to be useful, soil classifications have to be based on permanent characteristics as formed by the soil forming factors over often very long periods of time. When defining permanent catchment characteristics, discharge data would therefore appear to be less suitable. But permanent soil characteristics do not necessarily match with characteristics and parameters needed for functional soil characterization focusing, for example, on catchment hydrology. Hydropedology has made contributions towards the required functional characterization of soils as is illustrated for three recent hydrological catchment studies. However, much still needs to be learned about the physical behaviour of anisotropic, heterogeneous soils with varying soil structures during the year and about spatial and temporal variability. The suggestion is made therefore to first focus on improving simulation of catchment hydrology, possibly incorporating hydropedological expertise, before embarking on a catchment classification effort which involves major input of time and involves the risk of distraction. In doing so, we suggest to also define other characteristics for catchment performance than the traditionally measured discharge rates. Such characteristics may well be derived from societal issues being studied, as is illustrated for the Green Water Credits program.

  20. Library Classification 2020

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    In this article the author explores how a new library classification system might be designed using some aspects of the Dewey Decimal Classification (DDC) and ideas from other systems to create something that works for school libraries in the year 2020. By examining what works well with the Dewey Decimal System, what features should be carried…

  1. Linear Classification Functions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huberty, Carl J.; Smith, Jerry D.

    Linear classification functions (LCFs) arise in a predictive discriminant analysis for the purpose of classifying experimental units into criterion groups. The relative contribution of the response variables to classification accuracy may be based on LCF-variable correlations for each group. It is proved that, if the raw response measures are…

  2. Improving classification of psychoses.

    PubMed

    Lawrie, Stephen M; O'Donovan, Michael C; Saks, Elyn; Burns, Tom; Lieberman, Jeffrey A

    2016-04-01

    Psychosis has been recognised as an abnormal state in need of care throughout history and by diverse cultures. Present classifications of psychotic disorder remain based on the presence of specific psychotic symptoms, relative to affective and other symptoms, and their sequence and duration. Although extant diagnostic classifications have restricted validity, they have proven reliability and most clinicians and some patients find them useful. Moreover, these classifications have yet to be replaced by anything better. We propose that an expansion of the subgrouping approach inherent to classification will provide incremental improvement to present diagnostic constructs-as has worked in the rest of medicine. We also propose that subgroups could be created both within and across present diagnostic classifications, taking into consideration the potential value of continuous measures (eg, duration of psychotic symptoms and intelligence quotient). Health-care workers also need to work with service users and carers to develop and adapt approaches to diagnosis that are seen as helpful. PMID:27063387

  3. 2-Stage Classification Modeling

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1994-11-01

    CIRCUIT2.4 is used to design optimum two-stage classification configurations and operating conditions for energy conservation. It permits simulation of five basic grinding-classification circuits, including one single-stage and four two-stage classification arrangements. Hydrocyclones, spiral classifiers, and sieve band screens can be simulated, and the user may choose the combination of devices for the flowsheet simulation. In addition, the user may select from four classification modeling methods to achieve the goals of a simulation project using themore » most familiar concepts. Circuit performance is modeled based on classification parameters or equipment operating conditions. A modular approach was taken in designing the program, which allows future addition of other models with relatively minor changes.« less

  4. Feature extraction via KPCA for classification of gait patterns.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianning; Wang, Jue; Liu, Li

    2007-06-01

    Automated recognition of gait pattern change is important in medical diagnostics as well as in the early identification of at-risk gait in the elderly. We evaluated the use of Kernel-based Principal Component Analysis (KPCA) to extract more gait features (i.e., to obtain more significant amounts of information about human movement) and thus to improve the classification of gait patterns. 3D gait data of 24 young and 24 elderly participants were acquired using an OPTOTRAK 3020 motion analysis system during normal walking, and a total of 36 gait spatio-temporal and kinematic variables were extracted from the recorded data. KPCA was used first for nonlinear feature extraction to then evaluate its effect on a subsequent classification in combination with learning algorithms such as support vector machines (SVMs). Cross-validation test results indicated that the proposed technique could allow spreading the information about the gait's kinematic structure into more nonlinear principal components, thus providing additional discriminatory information for the improvement of gait classification performance. The feature extraction ability of KPCA was affected slightly with different kernel functions as polynomial and radial basis function. The combination of KPCA and SVM could identify young-elderly gait patterns with 91% accuracy, resulting in a markedly improved performance compared to the combination of PCA and SVM. These results suggest that nonlinear feature extraction by KPCA improves the classification of young-elderly gait patterns, and holds considerable potential for future applications in direct dimensionality reduction and interpretation of multiple gait signals. PMID:17509708

  5. Multiple Spectral-Spatial Classification Approach for Hyperspectral Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarabalka, Yuliya; Benediktsson, Jon Atli; Chanussot, Jocelyn; Tilton, James C.

    2010-01-01

    A .new multiple classifier approach for spectral-spatial classification of hyperspectral images is proposed. Several classifiers are used independently to classify an image. For every pixel, if all the classifiers have assigned this pixel to the same class, the pixel is kept as a marker, i.e., a seed of the spatial region, with the corresponding class label. We propose to use spectral-spatial classifiers at the preliminary step of the marker selection procedure, each of them combining the results of a pixel-wise classification and a segmentation map. Different segmentation methods based on dissimilar principles lead to different classification results. Furthermore, a minimum spanning forest is built, where each tree is rooted on a classification -driven marker and forms a region in the spectral -spatial classification: map. Experimental results are presented for two hyperspectral airborne images. The proposed method significantly improves classification accuracies, when compared to previously proposed classification techniques.

  6. Classification of hydrological parameter sensitivity and evaluation of parameter transferability across 431 US MOPEX basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Huiying; Hou, Zhangshuan; Huang, Maoyi; Bao, Jie; Sun, Yu; Tesfa, Teklu; Ruby Leung, L.

    2016-05-01

    The Community Land Model (CLM) represents physical, chemical, and biological processes of the terrestrial ecosystems that interact with climate across a range of spatial and temporal scales. As CLM includes numerous sub-models and associated parameters, the high-dimensional parameter space presents a formidable challenge for quantifying uncertainty and improving Earth system predictions needed to assess environmental changes and risks. This study aims to evaluate the potential of transferring hydrologic model parameters in CLM through sensitivity analyses and classification across watersheds from the Model Parameter Estimation Experiment (MOPEX) in the United States. The sensitivity of CLM-simulated water and energy fluxes to hydrological parameters across 431 MOPEX basins are first examined using an efficient stochastic sampling-based sensitivity analysis approach. Linear, interaction, and high-order nonlinear impacts are all identified via statistical tests and stepwise backward removal parameter screening. The basins are then classified according to their parameter sensitivity patterns (internal attributes), as well as their hydrologic indices/attributes (external hydrologic factors) separately, using Principal component analysis (PCA) and expectation-maximization (EM) - based clustering approach. Similarities and differences among the parameter sensitivity-based classification system (S-Class), the hydrologic indices-based classification (H-Class), and the Koppen climate classification systems (K-Class) are discussed. Within each parameter sensitivity-based classification system (S-Class) with similar parameter sensitivity characteristics, similar inversion modeling setups can be used for parameter calibration, and the parameters and their contribution or significance to water and energy cycling may also be more transferrable. This classification study provides guidance on identifiable parameters, and on parameterization and inverse model design for CLM but the

  7. Biological sequence classification with multivariate string kernels.

    PubMed

    Kuksa, Pavel P

    2013-01-01

    String kernel-based machine learning methods have yielded great success in practical tasks of structured/sequential data analysis. They often exhibit state-of-the-art performance on many practical tasks of sequence analysis such as biological sequence classification, remote homology detection, or protein superfamily and fold prediction. However, typical string kernel methods rely on the analysis of discrete 1D string data (e.g., DNA or amino acid sequences). In this paper, we address the multiclass biological sequence classification problems using multivariate representations in the form of sequences of features vectors (as in biological sequence profiles, or sequences of individual amino acid physicochemical descriptors) and a class of multivariate string kernels that exploit these representations. On three protein sequence classification tasks, the proposed multivariate representations and kernels show significant 15-20 percent improvements compared to existing state-of-the-art sequence classification methods. PMID:24384708

  8. IDENTIFYING ROOF FALL PREDICTORS USING FUZZY CLASSIFICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Bertoncini, C. A.; Hinders, M. K.

    2010-02-22

    Microseismic monitoring involves placing geophones on the rock surfaces of a mine to record seismic activity. Classification of microseismic mine data can be used to predict seismic events in a mine to mitigate mining hazards, such as roof falls, where properly bolting and bracing the roof is often an insufficient method of preventing weak roofs from destabilizing. In this study, six months of recorded acoustic waveforms from microseismic monitoring in a Pennsylvania limestone mine were analyzed using classification techniques to predict roof falls. Fuzzy classification using features selected for computational ease was applied on the mine data. Both large roof fall events could be predicted using a Roof Fall Index (RFI) metric calculated from the results of the fuzzy classification. RFI was successfully used to resolve the two significant roof fall events and predicted both events by at least 15 hours before visual signs of the roof falls were evident.

  9. Delaware Alternative Classifications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Jay

    1975-01-01

    This article discusses the species designation and taxonomies of Delaware and Algonkian and presents eight classifications of taxa by form, habitat, color, movement, sound, use, relationship, and appearance. Relevant research is also reviewed. (CLK)

  10. Interactions Between Genome-wide Significant Genetic Variants and Circulating Concentrations of Insulin-like Growth Factor 1, Sex Hormones, and Binding Proteins in Relation to Prostate Cancer Risk in the National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Tsilidis, Konstantinos K.; Travis, Ruth C.; Appleby, Paul N.; Allen, Naomi E.; Lindstrom, Sara; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Cox, David; Hsing, Ann W.; Ma, Jing; Severi, Gianluca; Albanes, Demetrius; Virtamo, Jarmo; Boeing, Heiner; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Johansson, Mattias; Quirós, J. Ramón; Riboli, Elio; Siddiq, Afshan; Tjønneland, Anne; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Tumino, Rosario; Gaziano, J. Michael; Giovannucci, Edward; Hunter, David J.; Kraft, Peter; Stampfer, Meir J.; Giles, Graham G.; Andriole, Gerald L.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Hayes, Richard B.; Key, Timothy J.

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified many single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with prostate cancer risk. There is limited information on the mechanistic basis of these associations, particularly about whether they interact with circulating concentrations of growth factors and sex hormones, which may be important in prostate cancer etiology. Using conditional logistic regression, the authors compared per-allele odds ratios for prostate cancer for 39 GWAS-identified SNPs across thirds (tertile groups) of circulating concentrations of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3), testosterone, androstenedione, androstanediol glucuronide, estradiol, and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) for 3,043 cases and 3,478 controls in the Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium. After allowing for multiple testing, none of the SNPs examined were significantly associated with growth factor or hormone concentrations, and the SNP-prostate cancer associations did not differ by these concentrations, although 4 interactions were marginally significant (MSMB-rs10993994 with androstenedione (uncorrected P = 0.008); CTBP2-rs4962416 with IGFBP-3 (uncorrected P = 0.003); 11q13.2-rs12418451 with IGF-1 (uncorrected P = 0.006); and 11q13.2-rs10896449 with SHBG (uncorrected P = 0.005)). The authors found no strong evidence that associations between GWAS-identified SNPs and prostate cancer are modified by circulating concentrations of IGF-1, sex hormones, or their major binding proteins. PMID:22459122

  11. Supernova Photometric Lightcurve Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaidi, Tayeb; Narayan, Gautham

    2016-01-01

    This is a preliminary report on photometric supernova classification. We first explore the properties of supernova light curves, and attempt to restructure the unevenly sampled and sparse data from assorted datasets to allow for processing and classification. The data was primarily drawn from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) simulated data, created for the Supernova Photometric Classification Challenge. This poster shows a method for producing a non-parametric representation of the light curve data, and applying a Random Forest classifier algorithm to distinguish between supernovae types. We examine the impact of Principal Component Analysis to reduce the dimensionality of the dataset, for future classification work. The classification code will be used in a stage of the ANTARES pipeline, created for use on the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope alert data and other wide-field surveys. The final figure-of-merit for the DES data in the r band was 60% for binary classification (Type I vs II).Zaidi was supported by the NOAO/KPNO Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) Program which is funded by the National Science Foundation Research Experiences for Undergraduates Program (AST-1262829).

  12. Repeat Cardiovascular Risk Assessment after Four Years: Is There Improvement in Risk Prediction?

    PubMed Central

    Chamnan, Parinya; Simmons, Rebecca K.; Sharp, Stephen J.; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Griffin, Simon J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Framingham risk equations are widely used to predict cardiovascular disease based on health information from a single time point. Little is known regarding use of information from repeat risk assessments and temporal change in estimated cardiovascular risk for prediction of future cardiovascular events. This study was aimed to compare the discrimination and risk reclassification of approaches using estimated cardiovascular risk at single and repeat risk assessments Methods Using data on 12,197 individuals enrolled in EPIC-Norfolk cohort, with 12 years of follow-up, we examined rates of cardiovascular events by levels of estimated absolute risk (Framingham risk score) at the first and second health examination four years later. We calculated the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (aROC) and risk reclassification, comparing approaches using information from single and repeat risk assessments (i.e., estimated risk at different time points). Results The mean Framingham risk score increased from 15.5% to 17.5% over a mean of 3.7 years from the first to second health examination. Individuals with high estimated risk (≥20%) at both health examinations had considerably higher rates of cardiovascular events than those who remained in the lowest risk category (<10%) in both health examinations (34.0 [95%CI 31.7–36.6] and 2.7 [2.2–3.3] per 1,000 person-years respectively). Using information from the most up-to-date risk assessment resulted in a small non-significant change in risk classification over the previous risk assessment (net reclassification improvement of -4.8%, p>0.05). Using information from both risk assessments slightly improved discrimination compared to information from a single risk assessment (aROC 0.76 and 0.75 respectively, p<0.001). Conclusions Using information from repeat risk assessments over a period of four years modestly improved prediction, compared to using data from a single risk assessment. However, this

  13. Developmental dyslexia: predicting individual risk

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Paul A; Hulme, Charles; Nash, Hannah M; Gooch, Debbie; Hayiou-Thomas, Emma; Snowling, Margaret J

    2015-01-01

    Background Causal theories of dyslexia suggest that it is a heritable disorder, which is the outcome of multiple risk factors. However, whether early screening for dyslexia is viable is not yet known. Methods The study followed children at high risk of dyslexia from preschool through the early primary years assessing them from age 3 years and 6 months (T1) at approximately annual intervals on tasks tapping cognitive, language, and executive-motor skills. The children were recruited to three groups: children at family risk of dyslexia, children with concerns regarding speech, and language development at 3;06 years and controls considered to be typically developing. At 8 years, children were classified as ‘dyslexic’ or not. Logistic regression models were used to predict the individual risk of dyslexia and to investigate how risk factors accumulate to predict poor literacy outcomes. Results Family-risk status was a stronger predictor of dyslexia at 8 years than low language in preschool. Additional predictors in the preschool years include letter knowledge, phonological awareness, rapid automatized naming, and executive skills. At the time of school entry, language skills become significant predictors, and motor skills add a small but significant increase to the prediction probability. We present classification accuracy using different probability cutoffs for logistic regression models and ROC curves to highlight the accumulation of risk factors at the individual level. Conclusions Dyslexia is the outcome of multiple risk factors and children with language difficulties at school entry are at high risk. Family history of dyslexia is a predictor of literacy outcome from the preschool years. However, screening does not reach an acceptable clinical level until close to school entry when letter knowledge, phonological awareness, and RAN, rather than family risk, together provide good sensitivity and specificity as a screening battery. PMID:25832320

  14. Hydropedological insights when considering catchment classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouma, J.; Droogers, P.; Sonneveld, M. P. W.; Ritsema, C. J.; Hunink, J. E.; Immerzeel, W. W.; Kauffman, S.

    2011-02-01

    Soil classification systems are analysed in relation to the functioning and characterisation of catchments. Soil classifications are useful to create systematic order in the overwhelming quantity of different soils in the world and to extrapolate data available for a given soil type to soils elsewhere with identical classifications. However, such classifications are based on permanent characteristics as formed by the soil forming factors over often very long periods of time and this does not necessarily match with characteristics and parameters needed for functional soil characterization focusing, for example, on catchment hydrology. Hydropedology has made contributions towards functional characterization of soils as is illustrated for recent hydrological catchment studies. However, much still needs to be learned about the physical behaviour of anisotropic, heterogeneous field soils with varying soil structures during the year and the suggestion is made to first focus on improving simulation of catchment hydrology, incorporating hydropedological expertise, before embarking on a classification effort which involves major input of time and involves the risk of distraction. In doing so, we advise to also define other characteristics for catchment performance than the traditionally measured discharge rates.

  15. Mapping "At Risk" Snow in the Pacific Northwest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolin, A. W.; Daly, C.

    2005-12-01

    One of the most visible and widely felt impacts of climate change is the change (mostly loss) of low elevation snow cover in the mid-latitudes. Snow cover that accumulates at temperatures close to the ice-water phase transition is at greater risk to climate warming than cold climate snow packs because it affects both precipitation phase and ablation rates. Changes in such climatologically sensitive snow packs can impact hydropower generation, reservoir storage, rain-on-snow floods, and winter recreation. Using a climatologically based global snow cover classification (Sturm et al., 1995) "at risk" snow is defined as lower elevation maritime and alpine snow classes. This original classification was produced globally at 0.5-degree resolution and used monthly means of temperature and precipitation as well as vegetation cover to map snow climates. In this work, the classification is updated for the Pacific Northwest region using fields of temperature and precipitation from PRISM as well as MODIS-derived global maps of vegetation cover. This new classification has significantly improved grid resolution (4 km x 4 km) and is able to clearly identify regions of ephemeral and lower elevation maritime and alpine snow that are thought to be at risk in a climate warming scenario. Results indicate that the economic impacts of this shift from snow- to rain-dominated winter precipitation that lower elevation ski areas in the region would experience significant negative impacts.

  16. Dynamic Scene Classification Using Redundant Spatial Scenelets.

    PubMed

    Du, Liang; Ling, Haibin

    2016-09-01

    Dynamic scene classification started drawing an increasing amount of research efforts recently. While existing arts mainly rely on low-level features, little work addresses the need of exploring the rich spatial layout information in dynamic scene. Motivated by the fact that dynamic scenes are characterized by both dynamic and static parts with spatial layout priors, we propose to use redundant spatial grouping of a large number of spatiotemporal patches, named scenelet, to represent a dynamic scene. Specifically, each scenelet is associated with a category-dependent scenelet model to encode the likelihood of a specific scene category. All scenelet models for a scene category are jointly learned to encode the spatial interactions and redundancies among them. Subsequently, a dynamic scene sequence is represented as a collection of category likelihoods estimated by these scenelet models. Such presentation effectively encodes the spatial layout prior together with associated semantic information, and can be used for classifying dynamic scenes in combination with a standard learning algorithm such as k -nearest neighbor or linear support vector machine. The effectiveness of our approach is clearly demonstrated using two dynamic scene benchmarks and a related application for violence video classification. In the nearest neighbor classification framework, for dynamic scene classification, our method outperforms previous state-of-the-arts on both Maryland "in the wild" dataset and "stabilized" dynamic scene dataset. For violence video classification on a benchmark dataset, our method achieves a promising classification rate of 87.08%, which significantly improves previous best result of 81.30%. PMID:26302526

  17. Challenges in the classification of fibrotic ILD.

    PubMed

    Bendstrup, Elisabeth; Maher, Toby M; Manali, Effrosyni D; Wijsenbeek, Marlies

    2015-01-01

    According to current international guidelines the idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIPs) are grouped into three categories; major, rare, and unclassifiable. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is one of the major IIPs and has been recognised as a distinct clinical entity since 2001. This has led to significant advances in our understanding and treatment of the disease and to the identification of new therapeutic targets. While multidisciplinary team assessment yields a definite diagnosis in many cases of interstitial lung disease (ILD), 15-25% of patients remain unclassifiable. This can be due to inadequate clinical, pathological, or radiological data (e.g., where a biopsy is not performed) or because results of investigations show major discrepancies, overlapping features, or mixed patterns. Patients with unclassifiable disease tend to be of similar age to those with IPF and older than those with connective tissue disorders. Survival of patients with unclassifiable disease is intermediate between IPF and non-IPF ILD. There is no single recommended treatment for patients with unclassifiable disease. However, the ILD-GAP index has recently been validated in this group and can risk-stratify patients based on four easily measurable variables. "Disease behaviour classification" (DBC) is an alternative, pragmatic approach to managing patients with unclassifiable disease. The ILD-GAP index has been shown to provide strong prognostic information in these hard-to-treat patients. In the future, new diagnostic tools such as protein biomarkers may become available to help guide therapeutic decisions. PMID:26237436

  18. Comparison of serum creatinine, cystatin C, and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin for acute kidney injury occurrence according to risk, injury, failure, loss, and end-stage criteria classification system in early after living kidney donation.

    PubMed

    Hekmat, Reza; Mohebi, Mahmood

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the kidney function after living kidney donation, we measured serum creatinine (SCr), cystatin C, and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) of 42 living donors before uninephrectomy and in three immediate days after it. We also evaluated the prevalence of the occurrence of the different stages of acute kidney injury (AKI) classified according to risk, injury, failure, loss, and end-stage (RIFLE) criteria, and accuracy of each of these three biomarkers for predicting them were evaluated. Significant serum NGAL (s-NGAL) changes were limited to the 1 st day after donation, whereas SCr and cystatin C changes continued to the third day after donation. s-NGAL level in the 1 st day and serum cystatin C in the 3 rd day after donation, respectively, had the largest area under curve and best sensitivity and specificity for Stage 1 (risk) AKI prediction. During the immediate three days after donation, about half of patients suffered from AKI; mostly Stage 1 (injury). The sequence of the emergence of s-NGAL and s-cystatin C in the 1 st and 3 rd days as biomarkers with highest accuracy and power for RIFLE criteria defined AKI stage discrimination in our study was comparable to previous studies. We conclude that our study suggests that AKI was best detected in the 1 st day after uninephrectomy by the s-NGAL levels, whereas cystatin C was the best in the 3 rd day after donation for detection of AKI. PMID:27424680

  19. Concepts of Classification and Taxonomy Phylogenetic Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraix-Burnet, D.

    2016-05-01

    Phylogenetic approaches to classification have been heavily developed in biology by bioinformaticians. But these techniques have applications in other fields, in particular in linguistics. Their main characteristics is to search for relationships between the objects or species in study, instead of grouping them by similarity. They are thus rather well suited for any kind of evolutionary objects. For nearly fifteen years, astrocladistics has explored the use of Maximum Parsimony (or cladistics) for astronomical objects like galaxies or globular clusters. In this lesson we will learn how it works.

  20. [Definition, etiology, classification and presentation forms].

    PubMed

    Mas Garriga, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is defined as a degenerative process affecting the joints as a result of mechanical and biological disorders that destabilize the balance between the synthesis and degradation of joint cartilage, stimulating the growth of subchondral bone; chronic synovitis is also present. Currently, the joint is considered as a functional unit that includes distinct tissues, mainly cartilage, the synovial membrane, and subchondral bone, all of which are involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. Distinct risk factors for the development of osteoarthritis have been described: general, unmodifiable risk factors (age, sex, and genetic makeup), general, modifiable risk factors (obesity and hormonal factors) and local risk factors (prior joint anomalies and joint overload). Notable among the main factors related to disease progression are joint alignment defects and generalized osteoarthritis. Several classifications of osteoarthritis have been proposed but none is particularly important for the primary care management of the disease. These classifications include etiological (primary or idiopathic forms and secondary forms) and topographical (typical and atypical localizations) classifications, the Kellgren and Lawrence classification (radiological repercussions) and that of the American College of Rheumatology for osteoarthritis of the hand, hip and knee. The prevalence of knee osteoarthritis is 10.2% in Spain and shows a marked discrepancy between clinical and radiological findings. Hand osteoarthritis, with a prevalence of symptomatic involvement of around 6.2%, has several forms of presentation (nodal osteoarthritis, generalized osteoarthritis, rhizarthrosis, and erosive osteoarthritis). Symptomatic osteoarthritis of the hip affects between 3.5% and 5.6% of persons older than 50 years and has different radiological patterns depending on femoral head migration. PMID:24467954

  1. Image Quaty Assessment for Vhr Remote Sensing Image Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhipeng; Shen, Li; Wu, Linmei

    2016-06-01

    The data from remote sensing images are widely used for characterizing land use and land cover at present. With the increasing availability of very high resolution (VHR) remote sensing images, the remote sensing image classification becomes more and more important for information extraction. The VHR remote sensing images are rich in details, but high within-class variance as well as low between-class variance make the classification of ground cover a difficult task. What's more, some related studies show that the quality of VHR remote sensing images also has a great influence on the ability of the automatic image classification. Therefore, the research that how to select the appropriate VHR remote sensing images to meet the application of classification is of great significance. In this context, the factors of VHR remote sensing image classification ability are discussed and some indices are selected for describing the image quality and the image classification ability objectively. Then, we explore the relationship of the indices of image quality and image classification ability under a specific classification framework. The results of the experiments show that these image quality indices are not effective for indicating the image classification ability directly. However, according to the image quality metrics, we can still propose some suggestion for the application of classification.

  2. Impact of structure space continuity on protein fold classification

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jinrui; Zhang, Jianzhi

    2016-01-01

    Protein structure classification hierarchically clusters domain structures based on structure and/or sequence similarities and plays important roles in the study of protein structure-function relationship and protein evolution. Among many classifications, SCOP and CATH are widely viewed as the gold standards. Fold classification is of special interest because this is the lowest level of classification that does not depend on protein sequence similarity. The current fold classifications such as those in SCOP and CATH are controversial because they implicitly assume that folds are discrete islands in the structure space, whereas increasing evidence suggests significant similarities among folds and supports a continuous fold space. Although this problem is widely recognized, its impact on fold classification has not been quantitatively evaluated. Here we develop a likelihood method to classify a domain into the existing folds of CATH or SCOP using both query-fold structure similarities and within-fold structure heterogeneities. The new classification differs from the original classification for 3.4–12% of domains, depending on factors such as the structure similarity score and original classification scheme used. Because these factors differ for different biological purposes, our results indicate that the importance of considering structure space continuity in fold classification depends on the specific question asked. PMID:27006112

  3. Special nuclear material information, security classification guidance. Instruction

    SciTech Connect

    Flickinger, A.

    1982-12-03

    The Instruction reissues DoD Instruction 5210.67, July 5, 1979, and provides security classification guidance for information concerning significant quantities of special nuclear material, other than that contained in nuclear weapons and that used in the production of energy in the reactor plant of nuclear-powered ships. Security classification guidance for these data in the latter two applications is contained in Joint DoE/DoD Nuclear Weapons Classification Guide and Joint DoE/DoD Classification Guide for the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program.

  4. Vertebral fracture classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Bruijne, Marleen; Pettersen, Paola C.; Tankó, László B.; Nielsen, Mads

    2007-03-01

    A novel method for classification and quantification of vertebral fractures from X-ray images is presented. Using pairwise conditional shape models trained on a set of healthy spines, the most likely unfractured shape is estimated for each of the vertebrae in the image. The difference between the true shape and the reconstructed normal shape is an indicator for the shape abnormality. A statistical classification scheme with the two shapes as features is applied to detect, classify, and grade various types of deformities. In contrast with the current (semi-)quantitative grading strategies this method takes the full shape into account, it uses a patient-specific reference by combining population-based information on biological variation in vertebra shape and vertebra interrelations, and it provides a continuous measure of deformity. Good agreement with manual classification and grading is demonstrated on 204 lateral spine radiographs with in total 89 fractures.

  5. Commission 45: Spectral Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giridhar, Sunetra; Gray, Richard O.; Corbally, Christopher J.; Bailer-Jones, Coryn A. L.; Eyer, Laurent; Irwin, Michael J.; Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; Majewski, Steven; Minniti, Dante; Nordström, Birgitta

    This report gives an update of developments (since the last General Assembly at Prague) in the areas that are of relevance to the commission. In addition to numerous papers, a new monograph entitled Stellar Spectral Classification with Richard Gray and Chris Corbally as leading authors will be published by Princeton University Press as part of their Princeton Series in Astrophysics in April 2009. This book is an up-to-date and encyclopedic review of stellar spectral classification across the H-R diagram, including the traditional MK system in the blue-violet, recent extensions into the ultraviolet and infrared, the newly defined L-type and T-type spectral classes, as well as spectral classification of carbon stars, S-type stars, white dwarfs, novae, supernovae and Wolf-Rayet stars.

  6. Automatic classification of blank substrate defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boettiger, Tom; Buck, Peter; Paninjath, Sankaranarayanan; Pereira, Mark; Ronald, Rob; Rost, Dan; Samir, Bhamidipati

    2014-10-01

    Mask preparation stages are crucial in mask manufacturing, since this mask is to later act as a template for considerable number of dies on wafer. Defects on the initial blank substrate, and subsequent cleaned and coated substrates, can have a profound impact on the usability of the finished mask. This emphasizes the need for early and accurate identification of blank substrate defects and the risk they pose to the patterned reticle. While Automatic Defect Classification (ADC) is a well-developed technology for inspection and analysis of defects on patterned wafers and masks in the semiconductors industry, ADC for mask blanks is still in the early stages of adoption and development. Calibre ADC is a powerful analysis tool for fast, accurate, consistent and automatic classification of defects on mask blanks. Accurate, automated classification of mask blanks leads to better usability of blanks by enabling defect avoidance technologies during mask writing. Detailed information on blank defects can help to select appropriate job-decks to be written on the mask by defect avoidance tools [1][4][5]. Smart algorithms separate critical defects from the potentially large number of non-critical defects or false defects detected at various stages during mask blank preparation. Mechanisms used by Calibre ADC to identify and characterize defects include defect location and size, signal polarity (dark, bright) in both transmitted and reflected review images, distinguishing defect signals from background noise in defect images. The Calibre ADC engine then uses a decision tree to translate this information into a defect classification code. Using this automated process improves classification accuracy, repeatability and speed, while avoiding the subjectivity of human judgment compared to the alternative of manual defect classification by trained personnel [2]. This paper focuses on the results from the evaluation of Automatic Defect Classification (ADC) product at MP Mask

  7. Classification images with uncertainty

    PubMed Central

    Tjan, Bosco S.; Nandy, Anirvan S.

    2009-01-01

    Classification image and other similar noise-driven linear methods have found increasingly wider applications in revealing psychophysical receptive field structures or perceptual templates. These techniques are relatively easy to deploy, and the results are simple to interpret. However, being a linear technique, the utility of the classification-image method is believed to be limited. Uncertainty about the target stimuli on the part of an observer will result in a classification image that is the superposition of all possible templates for all the possible signals. In the context of a well-established uncertainty model, which pools the outputs of a large set of linear frontends with a max operator, we show analytically, in simulations, and with human experiments that the effect of intrinsic uncertainty can be limited or even eliminated by presenting a signal at a relatively high contrast in a classification-image experiment. We further argue that the subimages from different stimulus-response categories should not be combined, as is conventionally done. We show that when the signal contrast is high, the subimages from the error trials contain a clear high-contrast image that is negatively correlated with the perceptual template associated with the presented signal, relatively unaffected by uncertainty. The subimages also contain a “haze” that is of a much lower contrast and is positively correlated with the superposition of all the templates associated with the erroneous response. In the case of spatial uncertainty, we show that the spatial extent of the uncertainty can be estimated from the classification subimages. We link intrinsic uncertainty to invariance and suggest that this signal-clamped classification-image method will find general applications in uncovering the underlying representations of high-level neural and psychophysical mechanisms. PMID:16889477

  8. Trichromatic opponent color classification.

    PubMed

    Chichilnisky, E J; Wandell, B A

    1999-10-01

    Stimuli varying in intensity and chromaticity, presented on numerous backgrounds, were classified into red/green, blue/yellow and white/black opponent color categories. These measurements revealed the shapes of the boundaries that separate opponent colors in three-dimensional color space. Opponent color classification boundaries were generally not planar, but their shapes could be summarized by a piecewise linear model in which increment and decrement color signals are combined with different weights at two stages to produce opponent color sensations. The effect of background light on classification was largely explained by separate gain changes in increment and decrement cone signals. PMID:10615508

  9. Classification of syringomyelia.

    PubMed

    Milhorat, T H

    2000-01-01

    Syringomyelia poses special challenges for the clinician because of its complex symptomatology, uncertain pathogenesis, and multiple options of treatment. The purpose of this study was to classify intramedullary cavities according to their most salient pathological and clinical features. Pathological findings obtained in 175 individuals with tubular cavitations of the spinal cord were correlated with clinical and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings in a database of 927 patients. A classification system was developed in which the morbid anatomy, cause, and pathogenesis of these lesions are emphasized. The use of a disease-based classification of syringomyelia facilitates diagnosis and the interpretation of MR imaging findings and provides a guide to treatment. PMID:16676921

  10. WHO classification of myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN): A critical update.

    PubMed

    Kvasnicka, Hans Michael

    2013-12-01

    Although the revised World Health Organization (WHO) criteria for the diagnosis and classification of myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) were defined by a panel of expert hematopathologists and clinicians, controversy has been repeatedly expressed questioning the clinical usefulness and reproducibility of these diagnostic guidelines. In particular, the distinction between essential thrombocythemia (ET), early/prefibrotic primary myelofibrosis (PMF) and initial stages of polycythemia vera (PV) is still a matter of debate. In this context, it has been argued that clinical correlations with histological features were not firmly substantiated. On the other hand, recently published data from independently performed studies have repeatedly validated the reproducibility of the WHO criteria and provided persuasive evidence that discrimination of early/prefibrotic PMF has a significant impact on the risk of myelofibrotic and leukemic transformation. However, as has been explicitly required, the WHO concept is based on the recognition of characteristic bone marrow patterns and a consensus of clinical and molecular data. PMID:24146204

  11. Classification, clinical features, and genetics of neural tube defects

    PubMed Central

    Salih, Mustafa A.; Murshid, Waleed R.; Seidahmed, Mohammed Z.

    2014-01-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) constitute a major health burden (0.5-2/1000 pregnancies worldwide), and remain a preventable cause of still birth, neonatal, and infant death, or significant lifelong handicaps. The malformations result from failure of the neural folds to fuse in the midline, and form the neural tube between the third and the fourth week of embryonic development. This review article discusses their classification, clinical features, and genetics. Most NTDs are sporadic and both genetic, and non-genetic environmental factors are involved in its etiology. Consanguinity was suggested to contribute to the high incidence of NTDs in several countries, including Saudi Arabia. Syndromes, often associated with chromosomal anomalies, account for <10% of all NTDs; but a higher proportion (20%) has been documented in Saudi Arabia. Genetic predisposition constitutes the major underlying risk factor, with a strong implication of genes that regulate folate one-carbon metabolism and planar cell polarity. PMID:25551113

  12. Year 2000 Computing Crisis: Significant Risks Remain to Department of Education's Student Financial Aid Systems. Testimony before the Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations, Committee on Education and the Workforce, House of Representatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willemssen, Joel C.

    This testimony discusses the risks faced by the U.S. Department of Education due to the year 2000 (Y2K) computing crisis, focusing on student financial aid systems, the actions the Department has taken in recent months to address these risks, and the key issues the Department must deal with if its computer systems are to be ready for the century…

  13. The Influence of Hindu Epistemology on Ranganathan's Colon Classification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maurer, Bradley Gerald

    This study attempted to determine the influence of Hindu epistemology on Ranganathan's Colon Classification. Only the epistemological schools of Hindu philosophy and the Idea Plane element of Colon Classification were included. A literature search revealed that, although there is significant literature on each side of the problem, no bridges exist…

  14. Text Passage Retrieval Based on Colon Classification: Retrieval Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shepherd, Michael A.

    1981-01-01

    Reports the results of experiments using colon classification for the analysis, representation, and retrieval of primary information from the full text of documents. Recall, precision, and search length measures indicate colon classification did not perform significantly better than Boolean or simple word occurrence systems. Thirteen references…

  15. 41 CFR 105-62.101 - Security classification categories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... classification categories. As set forth in Executive Order 12065, official information or material which requires... three categories: Namely, Top Secret, Secret, or Confidential, depending on its degree of significance... provided by statute. The three classification categories are defined as follows: (a) Top Secret. Top...

  16. Life-Style Classification of Adult High School Noncompleters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Larry G.

    1987-01-01

    The study sought to identify and describe life-style classifications that exist among adult high school noncompleters and to analyze significant differences that exist among categories. Findings suggest six broad classifications: (1) Entrepreneurs, (2) Superiors, (3) Regulars, (4) Suppliants, (5) Marginals, and (6) Underclass. (Author/CH)

  17. Qualitative methods for assessing risk

    SciTech Connect

    Mahn, J.A.; Hannaman, G.W.; Kryska, P.

    1995-04-01

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE) non-nuclear facilities generally require only a qualitative accident analysis to assess facility risks in accordance with DOE Order 5481.1B, Safety Analysis and Review System. Achieving a meaningful qualitative assessment of risk necessarily requires the use of suitable non-numerical assessment criteria. Typically, the methods and criteria for assigning facility-specific accident scenarios to the qualitative severity and likelihood classification system in the DOE order requires significant judgment in many applications. Systematic methods for more consistently assigning the total accident scenario frequency and associated consequences are required to substantiate and enhance future risk ranking between various activities at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). SNL`s Risk Management and National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Department has developed an improved methodology for performing qualitative risk assessments in accordance wi the DOE order requirements. Products of this effort are an improved set of qualitative description that permit (1) definition of the severity for both technical and programmatic consequences that may result from a variety of accident scenarios, and (2) qualitative representation of the likelihood of occurrence. These sets of descriptions are intended to facilitate proper application of DOE criteria for assessing facility risks.

  18. Genomic Classification of Cutaneous Melanoma.

    PubMed

    2015-06-18

    We describe the landscape of genomic alterations in cutaneous melanomas through DNA, RNA, and protein-based analysis of 333 primary and/or metastatic melanomas from 331 patients. We establish a framework for genomic classification into one of four subtypes based on the pattern of the most prevalent significantly mutated genes: mutant BRAF, mutant RAS, mutant NF1, and Triple-WT (wild-type). Integrative analysis reveals enrichment of KIT mutations and focal amplifications and complex structural rearrangements as a feature of the Triple-WT subtype. We found no significant outcome correlation with genomic classification, but samples assigned a transcriptomic subclass enriched for immune gene expression associated with lymphocyte infiltrate on pathology review and high LCK protein expression, a T cell marker, were associated with improved patient survival. This clinicopathological and multi-dimensional analysis suggests that the prognosis of melanoma patients with regional metastases is influenced by tumor stroma immunobiology, offering insights to further personalize therapeutic decision-making. PMID:26091043

  19. p63 expression confers significantly better survival outcomes in high-risk diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and demonstrates p53-like and p53-independent tumor suppressor function.

    PubMed

    Xu-Monette, Zijun Y; Zhang, Shanxiang; Li, Xin; Manyam, Ganiraju C; Wang, Xiao-Xiao; Xia, Yi; Visco, Carlo; Tzankov, Alexandar; Zhang, Li; Montes-Moreno, Santiago; Dybkaer, Karen; Chiu, April; Orazi, Attilio; Zu, Youli; Bhagat, Govind; Richards, Kristy L; Hsi, Eric D; Choi, William W L; van Krieken, J Han; Huh, Jooryung; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Ferreri, Andrés J M; Zhao, Xiaoying; Møller, Michael B; Parsons, Ben M; Winter, Jane N; Piris, Miguel A; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Young, Ken H

    2016-02-01

    The role of p53 family member p63 in oncogenesis is the subject of controversy. Limited research has been done on the clinical implications of p63 expression in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). In this study, we assessed p63 expression in de novo DLBCL samples (n=795) by immunohistochemistry with a pan-p63-monoclonal antibody and correlated it with other clinicopathologic factors and clinical outcomes. p63 expression was observed in 42.5% of DLBCL, did not correlate with p53 levels, but correlated with p21, MDM2, p16INK4A, Ki-67, Bcl-6, IRF4/MUM-1 and CD30 expression, REL gains, and BCL6 translocation. p63 was an independent favorable prognostic factor in DLBCL, which was most significant in patients with International Prognostic Index (IPI) >2, and in activated-B-cell-like DLBCL patients with wide- type TP53. The prognostic impact in germinal-center-B-cell-like DLBCL was not apparent, which was likely due to the association of p63 expression with high-risk IPI, and potential presence of ∆Np63 isoform in TP63 rearranged patients (a mere speculation). Gene expression profiling suggested that p63 has both overlapping and distinct functions compared with p53, and that p63 and mutated p53 antagonize each other. In summary, p63 has p53-like and p53-independent functions and favorable prognostic impact, however this protective effect can be abolished by TP53 mutations. PMID:26878872

  20. p63 expression confers significantly better survival outcomes in high-risk diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and demonstrates p53-like and p53-independent tumor suppressor function

    PubMed Central

    Manyam, Ganiraju C.; Wang, Xiao-xiao; Xia, Yi; Visco, Carlo; Tzankov, Alexandar; Zhang, Li; Montes-Moreno, Santiago; Dybkaer, Karen; Chiu, April; Orazi, Attilio; Zu, Youli; Bhagat, Govind; Richards, Kristy L.; Hsi, Eric D.; Choi, William W.L.; van Krieken, J. Han; Huh, Jooryung; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Ferreri, Andrés J.M.; Zhao, Xiaoying; Møller, Michael B.; Parsons, Ben M.; Winter, Jane N.; Piris, Miguel A.; Medeiros, L. Jeffrey; Young, Ken H.

    2016-01-01

    The role of p53 family member, p63 in oncogenesis is the subject of controversy. Limited research has been done on the clinical implications of p63 expression in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). In this study, we assessed p63 expression in de novo DLBCL samples (n=795) by immunohistochemistry with a pan-p63-monoclonal antibody and correlated it with other clinicopathologic factors and clinical outcomes. p63 expression was observed in 42.5% of DLBCL, did not correlate with p53 levels, but correlated with p21, MDM2, p16INK4A, Ki-67, Bcl-6, IRF4/MUM-1 and CD30 expression, REL gains, and BCL6 translocation. p63 was an independent favorable prognostic factor in DLBCL, which was most significant in patients with International Prognostic Index (IPI) >2, and in activated-B-cell–like DLBCL patients with wide-type TP53. The prognostic impact in germinal-center-B-cell–like DLBCL was not apparent, which was likely due to the association of p63 expression with high-risk IPI, and potential presence of ∆Np63 isoform in TP63 rearranged patients (a mere speculation). Gene expression profiling suggested that p63 has both overlapping and distinct functions compared with p53, and that p63 and mutated p53 antagonize each other. In summary, p63 has p53-like and p53-independent functions and favorable prognostic impact, however this protective effect can be abolished by TP53 mutations. PMID:26878872

  1. Validation of the Killip-Kimball Classification and Late Mortality after Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    de Mello, Bruno Henrique Gallindo; Oliveira, Gustavo Bernardes F.; Ramos, Rui Fernando; Lopes, Bernardo Baptista C.; Barros, Cecília Bitarães S.; Carvalho, Erick de Oliveira; Teixeira, Fabio Bellini P.; Arruda, Guilherme D'Andréa S.; Revelo, Maria Sol Calero; Piegas, Leopoldo Soares

    2014-01-01

    Background The classification or index of heart failure severity in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) was proposed by Killip and Kimball aiming at assessing the risk of in-hospital death and the potential benefit of specific management of care provided in Coronary Care Units (CCU) during the decade of 60. Objective To validate the risk stratification of Killip classification in the long-term mortality and compare the prognostic value in patients with non-ST-segment elevation MI (NSTEMI) relative to patients with ST-segment elevation MI (STEMI), in the era of reperfusion and modern antithrombotic therapies. Methods We evaluated 1906 patients with documented AMI and admitted to the CCU, from 1995 to 2011, with a mean follow-up of 05 years to assess total mortality. Kaplan-Meier (KM) curves were developed for comparison between survival distributions according to Killip class and NSTEMI versus STEMI. Cox proportional regression models were developed to determine the independent association between Killip class and mortality, with sensitivity analyses based on type of AMI. Results: The proportions of deaths and the KM survival distributions were significantly different across Killip class >1 (p <0.001) and with a similar pattern between patients with NSTEMI and STEMI. Cox models identified the Killip classification as a significant, sustained, consistent predictor and independent of relevant covariables (Wald χ2 16.5 [p = 0.001], NSTEMI) and (Wald χ2 11.9 [p = 0.008], STEMI). Conclusion The Killip and Kimball classification performs relevant prognostic role in mortality at mean follow-up of 05 years post-AMI, with a similar pattern between NSTEMI and STEMI patients. PMID:25014060

  2. An Integrative Dimensional Classification of Personality Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Widiger, Thomas A.; Livesley, W. John; Clark, Lee Anna

    2009-01-01

    Psychological assessment research concerns how to describe psychological dysfunction in ways that are both valid and useful. Recent advances in assessment research hold the promise of facilitating significant improvements in description and diagnosis. One such contribution is in the classification of personality disorder symptomatology. The…

  3. Eating Disorder Diagnoses: Empirical Approaches to Classification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wonderlich, Stephen A.; Joiner, Thomas E., Jr.; Keel, Pamela K.; Williamson, Donald A.; Crosby, Ross D.

    2007-01-01

    Decisions about the classification of eating disorders have significant scientific and clinical implications. The eating disorder diagnoses in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed.; DSM-IV; American Psychiatric Association, 1994) reflect the collective wisdom of experts in the field but are frequently not supported in…

  4. Soil Classification and Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemson Univ., SC. Vocational Education Media Center.

    This instructional unit was designed to enable students, primarily at the secondary level, to (1) classify soils according to current capability classifications of the Soil Conservation Service, (2) select treatments needed for a given soil class according to current recommendations provided by the Soil Conservation Service, and (3) interpret a…

  5. The Biglan Classification Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoecker, Judith L.

    This study replicated previous research that tested the validity of A. Biglan's classification scheme, a theoretical framework for empirically examining the differences among academic disciplines and classifying them according to three dimensions (hard-soft, pure-applied, life-nonlife). In addition, new data were used to attempt continued…

  6. The Classification Conundrum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Granger, Charles R.

    1983-01-01

    Argues against the five-kingdom scheme of classification as using inconsistent criteria, ending up with divisions that are forced, not natural. Advocates an approach using cell type/complexity and modification of the metabolic machinery, recommending the five-kingdom scheme as starting point for class discussion on taxonomy and its conceptual…

  7. Homographs: Classification and Identification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pacak, M.; Henisz, Bozena

    1968-01-01

    Homographs are defined in this study as sets of word forms which are spelled alike but which have entirely or partially different meanings and which may have different syntactic functions (that is, they belong to more than one form class or to more than one subclass of a form class). This report deals with the classification and identification of…

  8. Equivalent Diagnostic Classification Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maris, Gunter; Bechger, Timo

    2009-01-01

    Rupp and Templin (2008) do a good job at describing the ever expanding landscape of Diagnostic Classification Models (DCM). In many ways, their review article clearly points to some of the questions that need to be answered before DCMs can become part of the psychometric practitioners toolkit. Apart from the issues mentioned in this article that…

  9. Improving Student Question Classification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heiner, Cecily; Zachary, Joseph L.

    2009-01-01

    Students in introductory programming classes often articulate their questions and information needs incompletely. Consequently, the automatic classification of student questions to provide automated tutorial responses is a challenging problem. This paper analyzes 411 questions from an introductory Java programming course by reducing the natural…

  10. Revisiting Classification and Identification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keogh, Barbara K.

    2005-01-01

    This article discusses issues of classification and identification, while evaluating some of the continuing controversies about learning disabilities (LD) related to those topics. The author suggests that many problems have to do with confusion between the two. Despite years of effort and an extraordinary increase in the number of individuals…

  11. Shark Teeth Classification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Tom; Creel, Sally; Lee, Velda

    2009-01-01

    On a recent autumn afternoon at Harmony Leland Elementary in Mableton, Georgia, students in a fifth-grade science class investigated the essential process of classification--the act of putting things into groups according to some common characteristics or attributes. While they may have honed these skills earlier in the week by grouping their own…

  12. Automated classification of colon polyps in endoscopic image data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Sebastian; Palm, Stephan; Tischendorf, Jens J. W.; Behrens, Alexander; Trautwein, Christian; Aach, Til

    2012-03-01

    Colon cancer is the third most commonly diagnosed type of cancer in the US. In recent years, however, early diagnosis and treatment have caused a significant rise in the five year survival rate. Preventive screening is often performed by colonoscopy (endoscopic inspection of the colon mucosa). Narrow Band Imaging (NBI) is a novel diagnostic approach highlighting blood vessel structures on polyps which are an indicator for future cancer risk. In this paper, we review our automated inter- and intra-observer independent system for the automated classification of polyps into hyperplasias and adenomas based on vessel structures to further improve the classification performance. To surpass the performance limitations we derive a novel vessel segmentation approach, extract 22 features to describe complex vessel topologies, and apply three feature selection strategies. Tests are conducted on 286 NBI images with diagnostically important and challenging polyps (10mm or smaller) taken from our representative polyp database. Evaluations are based on ground truth data determined by histopathological analysis. Feature selection by Simulated Annealing yields the best result with a prediction accuracy of 96.2% (sensitivity: 97.6%, specificity: 94.2%) using eight features. Future development aims at implementing a demonstrator platform to begin clinical trials at University Hospital Aachen.

  13. Classification and Pathology of Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Min

    2016-07-01

    Advancement in the understanding of lung tumor biology enables continued refinement of lung cancer classification, reflected in the recently introduced 2015 World Health Organization classification of lung cancer. In small biopsy or cytology specimens, special emphasis is placed on separating adenocarcinomas from the other lung cancers to effectively select tumors for targeted molecular testing. In resection specimens, adenocarcinomas are further classified based on architectural pattern to delineate tissue types of prognostic significance. Neuroendocrine tumors are divided into typical carcinoid, atypical carcinoid, small cell carcinoma, and large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma based on a combination of features, especially tumor cell proliferation rate. PMID:27261908

  14. [Classification of primary bone tumors].

    PubMed

    Dominok, G W; Frege, J

    1986-01-01

    An expanded classification for bone tumors is presented based on the well known international classification as well as earlier systems. The current status and future trends in this area are discussed. PMID:3461626

  15. ECOLOGICAL CLASSIFICATION ISSUES AND RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Purposes and need for ecological classification will be discussed. Some brief examples will highlight regional and watershed approaches, general issues of extrapolation and classification helpful to monitoring/assessment design for larger aquatic systems, and some specific concep...

  16. Effects of two classification strategies on a Benthic Community Index for streams in the Northern Lakes and Forests Ecoregion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Butcher, Jason T.; Stewart, Paul M.; Simon, Thomas P.

    2003-01-01

    Ninety-four sites were used to analyze the effects of two different classification strategies on the Benthic Community Index (BCI). The first, a priori classification, reflected the wetland status of the streams; the second, a posteriori classification, used a bio-environmental analysis to select classification variables. Both classifications were examined by measuring classification strength and testing differences in metric values with respect to group membership. The a priori (wetland) classification strength (83.3%) was greater than the a posteriori (bio-environmental) classification strength (76.8%). Both classifications found one metric that had significant differences between groups. The original index was modified to reflect the wetland classification by re-calibrating the scoring criteria for percent Crustacea and Mollusca. A proposed refinement to the original Benthic Community Index is suggested. This study shows the importance of using hypothesis-driven classifications, as well as exploratory statistical analysis, to evaluate alternative ways to reveal environmental variability in biological assessment tools.

  17. Land Cover Classification in a Complex Urban-Rural Landscape with Quickbird Imagery

    PubMed Central

    Moran, Emilio Federico.

    2010-01-01

    High spatial resolution images have been increasingly used for urban land use/cover classification, but the high spectral variation within the same land cover, the spectral confusion among different land covers, and the shadow problem often lead to poor classification performance based on the traditional per-pixel spectral-based classification methods. This paper explores approaches to improve urban land cover classification with Quickbird imagery. Traditional per-pixel spectral-based supervised classification, incorporation of textural images and multispectral images, spectral-spatial classifier, and segmentation-based classification are examined in a relatively new developing urban landscape, Lucas do Rio Verde in Mato Grosso State, Brazil. This research shows that use of spatial information during the image classification procedure, either through the integrated use of textural and spectral images or through the use of segmentation-based classification method, can significantly improve land cover classification performance. PMID:21643433

  18. Efficient Fingercode Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hong-Wei; Law, Kwok-Yan; Gollmann, Dieter; Chung, Siu-Leung; Li, Jian-Bin; Sun, Jia-Guang

    In this paper, we present an efficient fingerprint classification algorithm which is an essential component in many critical security application systems e. g. systems in the e-government and e-finance domains. Fingerprint identification is one of the most important security requirements in homeland security systems such as personnel screening and anti-money laundering. The problem of fingerprint identification involves searching (matching) the fingerprint of a person against each of the fingerprints of all registered persons. To enhance performance and reliability, a common approach is to reduce the search space by firstly classifying the fingerprints and then performing the search in the respective class. Jain et al. proposed a fingerprint classification algorithm based on a two-stage classifier, which uses a K-nearest neighbor classifier in its first stage. The fingerprint classification algorithm is based on the fingercode representation which is an encoding of fingerprints that has been demonstrated to be an effective fingerprint biometric scheme because of its ability to capture both local and global details in a fingerprint image. We enhance this approach by improving the efficiency of the K-nearest neighbor classifier for fingercode-based fingerprint classification. Our research firstly investigates the various fast search algorithms in vector quantization (VQ) and the potential application in fingerprint classification, and then proposes two efficient algorithms based on the pyramid-based search algorithms in VQ. Experimental results on DB1 of FVC 2004 demonstrate that our algorithms can outperform the full search algorithm and the original pyramid-based search algorithms in terms of computational efficiency without sacrificing accuracy.

  19. Two-gene signature improves the discriminatory power of IASLC/ATS/ERS classification to predict the survival of patients with early-stage lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yifeng; Hou, Likun; Yang, Yu; Xie, Huikang; Yang, Yang; Li, Zhigang; Zhao, Heng; Gao, Wen; Su, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Background In this study, we investigated the contribution of a gene expression–based signature (composed of BAG1, BRCA1, CDC6, CDK2AP1, ERBB3, FUT3, IL11, LCK, RND3, SH3BGR) to survival prediction for early-stage lung adenocarcinoma categorized by the new International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC)/the American Thoracic Society (ATS)/the European Respiratory Society (ERS) classification. We also aimed to verify whether gene signature improves the risk discrimination of IASLC/ATS/ERS classification in early-stage lung adenocarcinoma. Patients and methods Total RNA was extracted from 93 patients with pathologically confirmed TNM stage Ia and Ib lung adenocarcinoma. The mRNA expression levels of ten genes in the signature (BAG1, BRCA1, CDC6, CDK2AP1, ERBB3, FUT3, IL11, LCK, RND3, and SH3BGR) were detected using real-time polymerase chain reaction. Each patient was categorized according to the new IASLC/ATS/ERS classification by accessing hematoxylin–eosin-stained slides. The corresponding Kaplan–Meier survival analysis by the log-rank statistic, multivariate Cox proportional hazards modeling, and c-index calculation were conducted using the programming language R (Version 2.15.1) with the “risksetROC” package. Results The multivariate analysis demonstrated that the risk factor of the ten-gene expression signature can significantly improve the discriminatory value of TNM staging in survival prediction, but not the value of the IASLC/ATS/ERS classification. Further analysis suggested that only BRCA1 and ERBB3 in the signature were independent risk factors after adjusting for the IASLC/ATS/ERS classification by Cox regression. A new algorithm of the two-gene expression signature containing BRCA1 and ERBB3 was generated. Adding the two-gene signature into the IASLC/ATS/ERS classification model further improved the discriminatory c-statistic from 0.728 to 0.756. Conclusion The two-gene signature composed of BRCA1 and ERBB3 was an independent

  20. Post-Mortem Evaluation of Amyloid-Dopamine Terminal PET Dementia Classifications

    PubMed Central

    Albin, Roger L.; Fisher-Hubbard, Amanda; Shanmugasundaram, Krithika; Koeppe, Robert A.; Burke, James F.; Camelo-Piragua, Sandra; Lieberman, Andrew P.; Giordani, Bruno; Frey, Kirk A.

    2016-01-01

    Clinical classification of early dementia and mild cognitive impairment is imprecise. We reported previously that molecular imaging classification of early dementia and mild cognitive impairment with dual amyloid and dopamine terminal positron emission tomography differs significantly from expert clinical classification. We now report pathologic diagnoses in a substantial subset of our previously imaged subjects. Among 36 subjects coming to autopsy, imaging classifications and pathologic diagnosis were concordant in 33 cases (κ=0.85). This approach enhanced specificity of Alzheimer disease diagnosis. The strong concordance of imaging based classifications and pathologic diagnoses suggests that this imaging approach will be useful in establishing more accurate and convenient classification biomarkers for dementia research. PMID:26183692

  1. Fetal heart rate classification using generative models.

    PubMed

    Dash, Shishir; Quirk, J Gerald; Djurić, Petar M

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents novel methods for classification of fetal heart rate (FHR) signals into categories that are meaningful for clinical implementation. They are based on generative models (GMs) and Bayesian theory. Instead of using scalar features that summarize information obtained from long-duration data, the models allow for explicit use of feature sequences derived from local patterns of FHR evolution. We compare our methods with a deterministic expert system for classification and with a support vector machine approach that relies on system-identification and heart rate variability features. We tested the classifiers on 83 retrospectively collected FHR records, with the gold-standard true diagnosis defined using umbilical cord pH values. We found that our methods consistently performed as well as or better than these, suggesting that the use of GMs and the Bayesian paradigm can bring significant improvement to automatic FHR classification approaches. PMID:24951678

  2. A comparative evaluation of sequence classification programs

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background A fundamental problem in modern genomics is to taxonomically or functionally classify DNA sequence fragments derived from environmental sampling (i.e., metagenomics). Several different methods have been proposed for doing this effectively and efficiently, and many have been implemented in software. In addition to varying their basic algorithmic approach to classification, some methods screen sequence reads for ’barcoding genes’ like 16S rRNA, or various types of protein-coding genes. Due to the sheer number and complexity of methods, it can be difficult for a researcher to choose one that is well-suited for a particular analysis. Results We divided the very large number of programs that have been released in recent years for solving the sequence classification problem into three main categories based on the general algorithm they use to compare a query sequence against a database of sequences. We also evaluated the performance of the leading programs in each category on data sets whose taxonomic and functional composition is known. Conclusions We found significant variability in classification accuracy, precision, and resource consumption of sequence classification programs when used to analyze various metagenomics data sets. However, we observe some general trends and patterns that will be useful to researchers who use sequence classification programs. PMID:22574964

  3. [Risk Assessment and Risk Management of Chemicals in China].

    PubMed

    Wang, Tie-yu; Zhou, Yun-qiao; Li, Qi-feng; Lü, Yong-long

    2016-02-15

    Risk assessment and risk management have been increasingly approved as an effective approach for appropriate disposal and scientific management of chemicals. This study systematically analyzed the risk assessment methods of chemicals from three aspects including health risk, ecological risk and regional risk. Based on the current situation of classification and management towards chemicals in China, a specific framework of risk management on chemicals was proposed by selecting target chemicals, predominant industries and related stakeholders as the objects. The results of the present study will provide scientific support for improving risk assessment and reasonable management of chemicals in China. PMID:27363124

  4. Authenticity detection in image classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nova, Luis C.; Passos, Emmanuel P. L.

    1992-09-01

    Famous artists' paintings, in general, allow for a large number of forgeries. In the work of a great Brazilian painter, Candido Portinari, we try to detect fake works through their image. To reach classifying results we must extract from digitalized images features that distinguish Portinari's original paintings from the false ones. So, it has been noted that the degree of variation of gray tones in a brush stroke reflects each painter's particular style on the painting. It is a feature that can be easily detected by the power spectrum of the detail image. However, as power spectra have large amounts of data, we use just some significant values of them for the classification. These selected pixels of the spectrum image are in a line which is perpendicular to the direction the brush passed, i.e., they indicate the variation of gray tones in the brush stroke. The data described previously are used as input for further classification by a backpropagation neural network. This neural net was exhaustively trained and has topology and parameters appropriate to the problem. Two output units indicate the major result: original or false.

  5. Classification SAR targets with support vector machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Lanying

    2007-02-01

    With the development of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) technology, automatic target recognition (ATR) is becoming increasingly important. In this paper, we proposed a 3-class target classification system in SAR images. The system is based on invariant wavelet moments and support vector machine (SVM) algorithm. It is a two-stage approach. The first stage is to extract and select a small set of wavelet invariant moment features to indicate target images. The wavelet invariant moments take both advantages of the wavelet inherent property of multi-resolution analysis and moment invariants quality of invariant to translation, scaling changes and rotation. The second stage is classification of targets with SVM algorithm. SVM is based on the principle of structural risk minimization (SRM), which has been shown better than the principle of empirical risk minimization (ERM) which is used by many conventional networks. To test the performance and efficiency of the proposed method, we performed experiments on invariant wavelet moments, different kernel functions, 2-class identification, and 3-class identification. Test results show that wavelet invariant moments indicate the target effectively; linear kernel function achieves better results than other kernel functions, and SVM classification approach performs better than conventional nearest distance approach.

  6. Automated Defect Classification (ADC)

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1998-01-01

    The ADC Software System is designed to provide semiconductor defect feature analysis and defect classification capabilities. Defect classification is an important software method used by semiconductor wafer manufacturers to automate the analysis of defect data collected by a wide range of microscopy techniques in semiconductor wafer manufacturing today. These microscopies (e.g., optical bright and dark field, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, etc.) generate images of anomalies that are induced or otherwise appear on wafermore » surfaces as a result of errant manufacturing processes or simple atmospheric contamination (e.g., airborne particles). This software provides methods for analyzing these images, extracting statistical features from the anomalous regions, and applying supervised classifiers to label the anomalies into user-defined categories.« less

  7. Tree Classification Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buntine, Wray

    1993-01-01

    This paper introduces the IND Tree Package to prospective users. IND does supervised learning using classification trees. This learning task is a basic tool used in the development of diagnosis, monitoring and expert systems. The IND Tree Package was developed as part of a NASA project to semi-automate the development of data analysis and modelling algorithms using artificial intelligence techniques. The IND Tree Package integrates features from CART and C4 with newer Bayesian and minimum encoding methods for growing classification trees and graphs. The IND Tree Package also provides an experimental control suite on top. The newer features give improved probability estimates often required in diagnostic and screening tasks. The package comes with a manual, Unix 'man' entries, and a guide to tree methods and research. The IND Tree Package is implemented in C under Unix and was beta-tested at university and commercial research laboratories in the United States.

  8. North American Magazine Coverage of Skin Cancer and Recreational Tanning Before and After the WHO/IARC 2009 Classification of Indoor Tanning Devices as Carcinogenic.

    PubMed

    McWhirter, Jennifer E; Hoffman-Goetz, Laurie

    2015-09-01

    The mass media is an influential source of skin cancer information for the public. In 2009, the World Health Organization's International Agency for Research on Cancer classified UV radiation from tanning devices as carcinogenic. Our objective was to determine if media coverage of skin cancer and recreational tanning increased in volume or changed in nature after this classification. We conducted a directed content analysis on 29 North American popular magazines (2007-2012) to investigate the overall volume of articles on skin cancer and recreational tanning and, more specifically, the presence of skin cancer risk factors, UV behaviors, and early detection information in article text (n = 410) and images (n = 714). The volume of coverage on skin cancer and recreational tanning did not increase significantly after the 2009 classification of tanning beds as carcinogenic. Key-related messages, including that UV exposure is a risk factor for skin cancer and that indoor tanning should be avoided, were not reported more frequently after the classification, but the promotion of the tanned look as attractive was conveyed more often in images afterwards (p < .01). Content promoting high-SPF sunscreen use increased after the classification (p < .01), but there were no significant positive changes in the frequency of coverage of skin cancer risk factors, other UV behaviors, or early detection information over time. The classification of indoor tanning beds as carcinogenic had no significant impact on the volume or nature of skin cancer and recreational tanning coverage in magazines. PMID:25189799

  9. Granular loess classification based

    SciTech Connect

    Browzin, B.S.

    1985-05-01

    This paper discusses how loess might be identified by two index properties: the granulometric composition and the dry unit weight. These two indices are necessary but not always sufficient for identification of loess. On the basis of analyses of samples from three continents, it was concluded that the 0.01-0.5-mm fraction deserves the name loessial fraction. Based on the loessial fraction concept, a granulometric classification of loess is proposed. A triangular chart is used to classify loess.

  10. Histologic classification of gliomas.

    PubMed

    Perry, Arie; Wesseling, Pieter

    2016-01-01

    Gliomas form a heterogeneous group of tumors of the central nervous system (CNS) and are traditionally classified based on histologic type and malignancy grade. Most gliomas, the diffuse gliomas, show extensive infiltration in the CNS parenchyma. Diffuse gliomas can be further typed as astrocytic, oligodendroglial, or rare mixed oligodendroglial-astrocytic of World Health Organization (WHO) grade II (low grade), III (anaplastic), or IV (glioblastoma). Other gliomas generally have a more circumscribed growth pattern, with pilocytic astrocytomas (WHO grade I) and ependymal tumors (WHO grade I, II, or III) as the most frequent representatives. This chapter provides an overview of the histology of all glial neoplasms listed in the WHO 2016 classification, including the less frequent "nondiffuse" gliomas and mixed neuronal-glial tumors. For multiple decades the histologic diagnosis of these tumors formed a useful basis for assessment of prognosis and therapeutic management. However, it is now fully clear that information on the molecular underpinnings often allows for a more robust classification of (glial) neoplasms. Indeed, in the WHO 2016 classification, histologic and molecular findings are integrated in the definition of several gliomas. As such, this chapter and Chapter 6 are highly interrelated and neither should be considered in isolation. PMID:26948349

  11. Classification of mental disorders*

    PubMed Central

    Stengel, E.

    1959-01-01

    One of the fundamental difficulties in devising a classification of mental disorders is the lack of agreement among psychiatrists regarding the concepts upon which it should be based: diagnoses can rarely be verified objectively and the same or similar conditions are described under a confusing variety of names. This situation militates against the ready exchange of ideas and experiences and hampers progress. As a first step towards remedying this state of affairs, the author of the article below has undertaken a critical survey of existing classifications. He shows how some of the difficulties created by lack of knowledge regarding pathology and etiology may be overcome by the use of “operational definitions” and outlines the basic principles on which he believes a generally acceptable international classification might be constructed. If this can be done it should lead to a greater measure of agreement regarding the value of specific treatments for mental disorders and greatly facilitate a broad epidemiological approach to psychiatric research. PMID:13834299

  12. Seismic event classification system

    DOEpatents

    Dowla, F.U.; Jarpe, S.P.; Maurer, W.

    1994-12-13

    In the computer interpretation of seismic data, the critical first step is to identify the general class of an unknown event. For example, the classification might be: teleseismic, regional, local, vehicular, or noise. Self-organizing neural networks (SONNs) can be used for classifying such events. Both Kohonen and Adaptive Resonance Theory (ART) SONNs are useful for this purpose. Given the detection of a seismic event and the corresponding signal, computation is made of: the time-frequency distribution, its binary representation, and finally a shift-invariant representation, which is the magnitude of the two-dimensional Fourier transform (2-D FFT) of the binary time-frequency distribution. This pre-processed input is fed into the SONNs. These neural networks are able to group events that look similar. The ART SONN has an advantage in classifying the event because the types of cluster groups do not need to be pre-defined. The results from the SONNs together with an expert seismologist's classification are then used to derive event classification probabilities. 21 figures.

  13. Seismic event classification system

    DOEpatents

    Dowla, Farid U.; Jarpe, Stephen P.; Maurer, William

    1994-01-01

    In the computer interpretation of seismic data, the critical first step is to identify the general class of an unknown event. For example, the classification might be: teleseismic, regional, local, vehicular, or noise. Self-organizing neural networks (SONNs) can be used for classifying such events. Both Kohonen and Adaptive Resonance Theory (ART) SONNs are useful for this purpose. Given the detection of a seismic event and the corresponding signal, computation is made of: the time-frequency distribution, its binary representation, and finally a shift-invariant representation, which is the magnitude of the two-dimensional Fourier transform (2-D FFT) of the binary time-frequency distribution. This pre-processed input is fed into the SONNs. These neural networks are able to group events that look similar. The ART SONN has an advantage in classifying the event because the types of cluster groups do not need to be pre-defined. The results from the SONNs together with an expert seismologist's classification are then used to derive event classification probabilities.

  14. Neuromuscular disease classification system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sáez, Aurora; Acha, Begoña; Montero-Sánchez, Adoración; Rivas, Eloy; Escudero, Luis M.; Serrano, Carmen

    2013-06-01

    Diagnosis of neuromuscular diseases is based on subjective visual assessment of biopsies from patients by the pathologist specialist. A system for objective analysis and classification of muscular dystrophies and neurogenic atrophies through muscle biopsy images of fluorescence microscopy is presented. The procedure starts with an accurate segmentation of the muscle fibers using mathematical morphology and a watershed transform. A feature extraction step is carried out in two parts: 24 features that pathologists take into account to diagnose the diseases and 58 structural features that the human eye cannot see, based on the assumption that the biopsy is considered as a graph, where the nodes are represented by each fiber, and two nodes are connected if two fibers are adjacent. A feature selection using sequential forward selection and sequential backward selection methods, a classification using a Fuzzy ARTMAP neural network, and a study of grading the severity are performed on these two sets of features. A database consisting of 91 images was used: 71 images for the training step and 20 as the test. A classification error of 0% was obtained. It is concluded that the addition of features undetectable by the human visual inspection improves the categorization of atrophic patterns.

  15. Object classification using local subspace projection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nealy, Jennifer; Muise, Robert

    2011-06-01

    We consider the problem of object classification from image data. Significant challenges are presented when objects can be imaged from different view angles and have different distortions. For example, a vehicle will appear completely different depending on the viewing angle of the sensor but must still be classified as the same vehicle. In regards to face recognition, a person may have a variety of facial expressions and a pattern recognition algorithm would need to account for these distortions. Traditional algorithms such as PCA filters are linear in nature and cannot account for the underlying non-linear structure which characterizes an object. We examine nonlinear manifold techniques applied to the pattern recognition problem. One mathematical construct receiving significant research attention is diffusion maps, whereby the underlying training data are remapped so that Euclidean distance in the mapped data is equivalent to the manifold distance of the original dataset. This technique has been used successfully for applications such as data organization, noise filtering, and anomaly detection with only limited experiments with object classification. For very large datasets (size N), pattern classification with diffusion maps becomes rather onerous as there is a requirement for the eigenvectors of an NxN matrix. We characterize the performance of a 40 person facial recognition problem with standard K-NN classifier, a diffusion distance classifier, and standard PCA. We then develop a local subspace projection algorithm which approximates the diffusion distance without the prohibitive computations and shows comparable classification performance.

  16. AVHRR channel selection for land cover classification

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maxwell, S.K.; Hoffer, R.M.; Chapman, P.L.

    2002-01-01

    Mapping land cover of large regions often requires processing of satellite images collected from several time periods at many spectral wavelength channels. However, manipulating and processing large amounts of image data increases the complexity and time, and hence the cost, that it takes to produce a land cover map. Very few studies have evaluated the importance of individual Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) channels for discriminating cover types, especially the thermal channels (channels 3, 4 and 5). Studies rarely perform a multi-year analysis to determine the impact of inter-annual variability on the classification results. We evaluated 5 years of AVHRR data using combinations of the original AVHRR spectral channels (1-5) to determine which channels are most important for cover type discrimination, yet stabilize inter-annual variability. Particular attention was placed on the channels in the thermal portion of the spectrum. Fourteen cover types over the entire state of Colorado were evaluated using a supervised classification approach on all two-, three-, four- and five-channel combinations for seven AVHRR biweekly composite datasets covering the entire growing season for each of 5 years. Results show that all three of the major portions of the electromagnetic spectrum represented by the AVHRR sensor are required to discriminate cover types effectively and stabilize inter-annual variability. Of the two-channel combinations, channels 1 (red visible) and 2 (near-infrared) had, by far, the highest average overall accuracy (72.2%), yet the inter-annual classification accuracies were highly variable. Including a thermal channel (channel 4) significantly increased the average overall classification accuracy by 5.5% and stabilized inter-annual variability. Each of the thermal channels gave similar classification accuracies; however, because of the problems in consistently interpreting channel 3 data, either channel 4 or 5 was found to be a more

  17. Genome‐wide significant schizophrenia risk variation on chromosome 10q24 is associated with altered cis‐regulation of BORCS7, AS3MT, and NT5C2 in the human brain

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, Rodrigo R. R.; Troakes, Claire; Nolan, Matthew; Srivastava, Deepak P.; Murray, Robin M.

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome 10q24.32‐q24.33 is one of the most robustly supported risk loci to emerge from genome‐wide association studies (GWAS) of schizophrenia. However, extensive linkage disequilibrium makes it difficult to distinguish the actual susceptibility gene(s) at the locus, limiting its value for improving biological understanding of the condition. In the absence of coding changes that can account for the association, risk is likely conferred by altered regulation of one or more genes in the region. We, therefore, used highly sensitive measures of allele‐specific expression to assess cis‐regulatory effects associated with the two best‐supported schizophrenia risk variants (SNP rs11191419 and indel ch10_104957618_I/rs202213518) on the primary positional candidates BORCS7, AS3MT, CNNM2, and NT5C2 in the human brain. Heterozygosity at rs11191419 was associated with increased allelic expression of BORCS7 and AS3MT in the fetal and adult brain, and with reduced allelic expression of NT5C2 in the adult brain. Heterozygosity at ch10_104957618_I was associated with reduced allelic expression of NT5C2 in both the fetal and adult brain. Comparisons between cDNA ratios in heterozygotes and homozygotes for the risk alleles indicated that cis‐effects on NT5C2 expression in the adult dorsolateral prefrontal cortex could be largely accounted for by genotype at these two risk variants. While not excluding effects on other genes in the region, this study implicates altered neural expression of BORCS7, AS3MT, and NT5C2 in susceptibility to schizophrenia arising from genetic variation at the chromosome 10q24 locus. © 2016 The Authors. American Journal of Medical Genetics Part B: Neuropsychiatric Genetics Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27004590

  18. Genome-wide significant schizophrenia risk variation on chromosome 10q24 is associated with altered cis-regulation of BORCS7, AS3MT, and NT5C2 in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Rodrigo R R; Troakes, Claire; Nolan, Matthew; Srivastava, Deepak P; Murray, Robin M; Bray, Nicholas J

    2016-09-01

    Chromosome 10q24.32-q24.33 is one of the most robustly supported risk loci to emerge from genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of schizophrenia. However, extensive linkage disequilibrium makes it difficult to distinguish the actual susceptibility gene(s) at the locus, limiting its value for improving biological understanding of the condition. In the absence of coding changes that can account for the association, risk is likely conferred by altered regulation of one or more genes in the region. We, therefore, used highly sensitive measures of allele-specific expression to assess cis-regulatory effects associated with the two best-supported schizophrenia risk variants (SNP rs11191419 and indel ch10_104957618_I/rs202213518) on the primary positional candidates BORCS7, AS3MT, CNNM2, and NT5C2 in the human brain. Heterozygosity at rs11191419 was associated with increased allelic expression of BORCS7 and AS3MT in the fetal and adult brain, and with reduced allelic expression of NT5C2 in the adult brain. Heterozygosity at ch10_104957618_I was associated with reduced allelic expression of NT5C2 in both the fetal and adult brain. Comparisons between cDNA ratios in heterozygotes and homozygotes for the risk alleles indicated that cis-effects on NT5C2 expression in the adult dorsolateral prefrontal cortex could be largely accounted for by genotype at these two risk variants. While not excluding effects on other genes in the region, this study implicates altered neural expression of BORCS7, AS3MT, and NT5C2 in susceptibility to schizophrenia arising from genetic variation at the chromosome 10q24 locus. © 2016 The Authors. American Journal of Medical Genetics Part B: Neuropsychiatric Genetics Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27004590

  19. Webcam classification using simple features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pramoun, Thitiporn; Choe, Jeehyun; Li, He; Chen, Qingshuang; Amornraksa, Thumrongrat; Lu, Yung-Hsiang; Delp, Edward J.

    2015-03-01

    Thousands of sensors are connected to the Internet and many of these sensors are cameras. The "Internet of Things" will contain many "things" that are image sensors. This vast network of distributed cameras (i.e. web cams) will continue to exponentially grow. In this paper we examine simple methods to classify an image from a web cam as "indoor/outdoor" and having "people/no people" based on simple features. We use four types of image features to classify an image as indoor/outdoor: color, edge, line, and text. To classify an image as having people/no people we use HOG and texture features. The features are weighted based on their significance and combined. A support vector machine is used for classification. Our system with feature weighting and feature combination yields 95.5% accuracy.

  20. Robust spike classification based on frequency domain neural waveform features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chenhui; Yuan, Yuan; Si, Jennie

    2013-12-01

    Objective. We introduce a new spike classification algorithm based on frequency domain features of the spike snippets. The goal for the algorithm is to provide high classification accuracy, low false misclassification, ease of implementation, robustness to signal degradation, and objectivity in classification outcomes. Approach. In this paper, we propose a spike classification algorithm based on frequency domain features (CFDF). It makes use of frequency domain contents of the recorded neural waveforms for spike classification. The self-organizing map (SOM) is used as a tool to determine the cluster number intuitively and directly by viewing the SOM output map. After that, spike classification can be easily performed using clustering algorithms such as the k-Means. Main results. In conjunction with our previously developed multiscale correlation of wavelet coefficient (MCWC) spike detection algorithm, we show that the MCWC and CFDF detection and classification system is robust when tested on several sets of artificial and real neural waveforms. The CFDF is comparable to or outperforms some popular automatic spike classification algorithms with artificial and real neural data. Significance. The detection and classification of neural action potentials or neural spikes is an important step in single-unit-based neuroscientific studies and applications. After the detection of neural snippets potentially containing neural spikes, a robust classification algorithm is applied for the analysis of the snippets to (1) extract similar waveforms into one class for them to be considered coming from one unit, and to (2) remove noise snippets if they do not contain any features of an action potential. Usually, a snippet is a small 2 or 3 ms segment of the recorded waveform, and differences in neural action potentials can be subtle from one unit to another. Therefore, a robust, high performance classification system like the CFDF is necessary. In addition, the proposed algorithm

  1. Analysis of the classification of US and Canadian intensive test sites using the Image 100 hybrid classification system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hocutt, W. T. (Principal Investigator)

    1978-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Labeling of wheat rather than total grains, particularly with only one acquisition, led to significant overestimates in some segments. The Image-100 software and procedures were written to facilitate classification of the LACIE segments but were not designed to record data for later accuracy assessment. A much better evaluation would have been possible if accuracy assessment data had been collected following each satisfactory classification.

  2. On the Classification of Psychology in General Library Classification Schemes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soudek, Miluse

    1980-01-01

    Holds that traditional library classification systems are inadequate to handle psychological literature, and advocates the establishment of new theoretical approaches to bibliographic organization. (FM)

  3. Remote Sensing Classification Uncertainty: Validating Probabilistic Pixel Level Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrettas, Michail; Cornford, Dan; Bastin, Lucy; Pons, Xavier; Sevillano, Eva; Moré, Gerard; Serra, Pere; Ninyerola, Miquel

    2013-04-01

    There already exists an extensive literature on classification of remotely sensed imagery, and indeed classification more widely, that considers a wide range of probabilistic and non-probabilistic classification methodologies. Although for many probabilistic classification methodologies posterior class probabilities are produced per pixel (observation) these are often not communicated at the pixel level, and typically not validated at the pixel level. Most often the probabilistic classification in converted into a hard classification (of the most probable class) and the accuracy of the resulting classification is reported in terms of a global confusion matrix, or some score derived from this. For applications where classification accuracy is spatially variable and where pixel level estimates of uncertainty can be meaningfully exploited in workflows that propagate uncertainty validating and communicating the pixel level uncertainty opens opportunities for more refined and accountable modelling. In this work we describe our recent work applying and validation of a range of probabilistic classifiers. Using a multi-temporal Landsat data set of the Ebro Delta in Catalonia, which has been carefully radiometrically and geometrically corrected, we present a range of Bayesian classifiers from simple Bayesian linear discriminant analysis to a complex variational Gaussian process based classifier. Field study derived labelled data, classified into 8 classes, which primarily consider land use and the degree of flooding in what is a rice growing region, are used to train the pixel level classifiers. Our focus is not so much on the classification accuracy, but rather the validation of the probabilistic classification made by all methods. We present a range of validation plots and scores, many of which are used for probabilistic weather forecast verification, but are new to remote sensing classification including of course the standard measures of misclassification, but also

  4. Geographical classifications to guide rural health policy in Australia.

    PubMed

    McGrail, Matthew R; Humphreys, John S

    2009-01-01

    The Australian Government's recent decision to replace the Rural Remote and Metropolitan Area (RRMA) classification with the Australian Standard Geographical Classification - Remoteness Areas (ASGC-RA) system highlights the ongoing significance of geographical classifications for rural health policy, particularly in relation to improving the rural health workforce supply. None of the existing classifications, including the government's preferred choice, were designed specifically to guide health resource allocation, and all exhibit strong weaknesses when applied as such. Continuing reliance on these classifications as policy tools will continue to result in inappropriate health program resource distribution. Purely 'geographical' classifications alone cannot capture all relevant aspects of rural health service provision within a single measure. Moreover, because many subjective decisions (such as the choice of algorithm and breakdown of groupings) influence a classification's impact and acceptance from its users, policy-makers need to specify explicitly the purpose and role of their different programs as the basis for developing and implementing appropriate decision tools such as 'rural-urban' classifications. Failure to do so will continue to limit the effectiveness that current rural health support and incentive programs can have in achieving their objective of improving the provision of health care services to rural populations though affirmative action programs. PMID:19995449

  5. Classification of airborne laser scanning data using JointBoost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Bo; Huang, Xianfeng; Zhang, Fan; Sohn, Gunho

    2015-02-01

    The demands for automatic point cloud classification have dramatically increased with the wide-spread use of airborne LiDAR. Existing research has mainly concentrated on a few dominant objects such as terrain, buildings and vegetation. In addition to those key objects, this paper proposes a supervised classification method to identify other types of objects including power-lines and pylons from point clouds using a JointBoost classifier. The parameters for the learning model are estimated with various features computed based on the geometry and echo information of a LiDAR point cloud. In order to overcome the shortcomings stemming from the inclusion of bare ground data before classification, the proposed classifier directly distinguishes terrain using a feature step-off count. Feature selection is conducted using JointBoost to evaluate feature correlations thus improving both classification accuracy and operational efficiency. In this paper, the contextual constraints for objects extracted by graph-cut segmentation are used to optimize the initial classification results obtained by the JointBoost classifier. Our experimental results show that the step-off count significantly contributes to classification. Seventeen effective features are selected for the initial classification results using the JointBoost classifier. Our experiments indicate that the proposed features and method are effective for classification of airborne LiDAR data from complex scenarios.

  6. Interactive Classification Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deBessonet, Cary

    2000-01-01

    The investigators upgraded a knowledge representation language called SL (Symbolic Language) and an automated reasoning system called SMS (Symbolic Manipulation System) to enable the more effective use of the technologies in automated reasoning and interactive classification systems. The overall goals of the project were: 1) the enhancement of the representation language SL to accommodate a wider range of meaning; 2) the development of a default inference scheme to operate over SL notation as it is encoded; and 3) the development of an interpreter for SL that would handle representations of some basic cognitive acts and perspectives.

  7. Learning classification trees

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buntine, Wray

    1991-01-01

    Algorithms for learning classification trees have had successes in artificial intelligence and statistics over many years. How a tree learning algorithm can be derived from Bayesian decision theory is outlined. This introduces Bayesian techniques for splitting, smoothing, and tree averaging. The splitting rule turns out to be similar to Quinlan's information gain splitting rule, while smoothing and averaging replace pruning. Comparative experiments with reimplementations of a minimum encoding approach, Quinlan's C4 and Breiman et al. Cart show the full Bayesian algorithm is consistently as good, or more accurate than these other approaches though at a computational price.

  8. Evaluating LANDSAT wildland classification accuracies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toll, D. L.

    1980-01-01

    Procedures to evaluate the accuracy of LANDSAT derived wildland cover classifications are described. The evaluation procedures include: (1) implementing a stratified random sample for obtaining unbiased verification data; (2) performing area by area comparisons between verification and LANDSAT data for both heterogeneous and homogeneous fields; (3) providing overall and individual classification accuracies with confidence limits; (4) displaying results within contingency tables for analysis of confusion between classes; and (5) quantifying the amount of information (bits/square kilometer) conveyed in the LANDSAT classification.

  9. Simplified classification of spontaneous abortions.

    PubMed Central

    Rushton, D I

    1978-01-01

    A simple classification of products of conception aborted in early pregnancy is described. This classification bears a closer relation to the aetiology of the abortions and the timing of the teratological insult in those conceptuses with morphological abnormalities than have previous classifications. It is hoped it may be of value in counselling patients who abort recurrently and also in the assessment of some environmental hazards purported to cause early pregnancy wastage and congenital malformations. Images PMID:564967

  10. Insomnia: I. Classification, assessment and pharmaceutical treatment.

    PubMed

    Cleghorn, J M; Kaplan, R D; Bellissimo, A; Szatmari, P

    1983-08-01

    Insomnia is a public health problem because of its high prevalence, the risk of hypnotic drug abuse, and self medication combined with alcohol and other nonprescription chemicals. Clinical experience has given rise to a descriptive classification of the insomnias many of which are secondary to medical disease. The information now available allows us to suggest a systematic approach to the assessment of insomnia emphasizing its history, events associated with sleep onset, observable behaviour and experience associated with interruptions in sleep. This paper attempts to organize the present state of knowledge in a format that can be taught to general physicians who deal with the most insomnia patients. PMID:6627189

  11. Medulloblastoma: molecular pathways and histopathological classification

    PubMed Central

    Borowska, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Malignant brain tumors are the leading cause of cancer death among pediatric patients, and medulloblastoma constitutes 20% of them. Currently, the treatment is risk-adapted. Maximum surgical resection is recommended, always followed by chemotherapy and neuroaxis radiotherapy. In spite of the improving survival rate, survivors succumb to treatment-induced side effects. To reduce toxic effects, molecular-targeted treatment is proposed. Medulloblastoma research is very robust, and new articles on the subject are published daily. In the current review we have tried to bring together molecular pathophysiology of the neoplasm and current pathological classification, thus making an effort to relate tumor biology and the histological picture. PMID:27279861

  12. Medulloblastoma: molecular pathways and histopathological classification.

    PubMed

    Borowska, Anna; Jóźwiak, Jarosław

    2016-06-01

    Malignant brain tumors are the leading cause of cancer death among pediatric patients, and medulloblastoma constitutes 20% of them. Currently, the treatment is risk-adapted. Maximum surgical resection is recommended, always followed by chemotherapy and neuroaxis radiotherapy. In spite of the improving survival rate, survivors succumb to treatment-induced side effects. To reduce toxic effects, molecular-targeted treatment is proposed. Medulloblastoma research is very robust, and new articles on the subject are published daily. In the current review we have tried to bring together molecular pathophysiology of the neoplasm and current pathological classification, thus making an effort to relate tumor biology and the histological picture. PMID:27279861

  13. "At risk" women who think that they have no chance of getting HIV: self-assessed perceived risks.

    PubMed

    Klein, Hugh; Elifson, Kirk W; Sterk, Claire E

    2003-01-01

    During the past two decades, a fair amount of inconclusive research has been conducted to examine the relationship between perceived risk of contracting HIV and actual HIV risk behavior practices. The present study examines HIV risk perceptions among a sample of 250 urban, economically-disadvantaged, primarily minority women. In particular, we focus on differences between those saying that they have no chance whatsoever of contracting HIV and those who indicated at least some possibility of becoming HIV-infected. Three research questions are addressed: (1) Are there differences between these groups attributable to their risk behavior practices? (2) To what extent do women who think that they are not at risk for HIV engage in risky behaviors that could expose them to HIV? (3) What are the most salient predictors of the women's perceived risk classification? Results showed that women perceiving themselves to have at least some HIV risk engaged in higher rates of risky behaviors than their counterparts who perceived themselves to have no possibility of contracting HIV. Despite this finding, more than one-half of the "no perceived risk of HIV" sample had engaged in at least one risky practice during the preceding year and more than one-quarter had engaged in at least two such behaviors. Age, childhood maltreatment experiences, self-esteem, number of HIV risk behaviors practiced, amount of illegal drug use reported, and number of times having sex were significant predictors of women's perception of having some HIV risk versus having no HIV risk. PMID:14655794

  14. Deep Reconstruction Models for Image Set Classification.

    PubMed

    Hayat, Munawar; Bennamoun, Mohammed; An, Senjian

    2015-04-01

    Image set classification finds its applications in a number of real-life scenarios such as classification from surveillance videos, multi-view camera networks and personal albums. Compared with single image based classification, it offers more promises and has therefore attracted significant research attention in recent years. Unlike many existing methods which assume images of a set to lie on a certain geometric surface, this paper introduces a deep learning framework which makes no such prior assumptions and can automatically discover the underlying geometric structure. Specifically, a Template Deep Reconstruction Model (TDRM) is defined whose parameters are initialized by performing unsupervised pre-training in a layer-wise fashion using Gaussian Restricted Boltzmann Machines (GRBMs). The initialized TDRM is then separately trained for images of each class and class-specific DRMs are learnt. Based on the minimum reconstruction errors from the learnt class-specific models, three different voting strategies are devised for classification. Extensive experiments are performed to demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed framework for the tasks of face and object recognition from image sets. Experimental results show that the proposed method consistently outperforms the existing state of the art methods. PMID:26353289

  15. Lightcurve Based Classification Of Transients Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donalek, Ciro; Graham, M. J.; Mahabal, A.; Djorgovski, S. G.; Drake, A. J.; Moghaddam, B.; Turmon, M.; Chen, Y.; Sharma, N.

    2012-01-01

    In many scientific fields, a new generation of instruments is generating exponentially growing data streams, that may enable significant new discoveries. The requirement to perform the analysis rapidly and objectively, coupled with the huge amount of data available, implies a need for an automated event detection, classification, and decision making. In astronomy, this is the case with the new generation of synoptic sky surveys, that discover an ever increasing number of transient events. However, not all of them are equally interesting and worthy of a follow-up with limited resources. This presents some unusual classification challenges: the data are sparse, heterogeneous and incomplete; evolving in time; and most of the relevant information comes from a variety of archival data and contextual information. We are exploring a variety of machine learning techniques, using the ongoing CRTS sky survey as a testbed: Bayesian Network, [dm,dt] histograms, Decision Trees, Neural Networks, Symbolic Regression. In this work we focus on the lightcurve based classification using an hierarchical approach where some astrophysically motivated major features are used to separate different groups of classes. Proceeding down the classification hierarchy every node uses those classifiers that are demonstrated to work best for that particular task.

  16. Use of Classification Agreement Analyses to Evaluate RTI Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanDerHeyden, Amanda

    2010-01-01

    RTI as a framework for decision making has implications for the diagnosis of specific learning disabilities. Any diagnostic tool must meet certain standards to demonstrate that its use leads to predictable decisions with minimal risk. Classification agreement analyses are described as optimal for demonstrating the technical adequacy of RTI…

  17. Considerations of Unmanned Aircraft Classification for Civil Airworthiness Standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddalon, Jeffrey M.; Hayhurst, Kelly J.; Morris, A. Terry; Verstynen, Harry A.

    2013-01-01

    The use of unmanned aircraft in the National Airspace System (NAS) has been characterized as the next great step forward in the evolution of civil aviation. Although use of unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) in military and public service operations is proliferating, civil use of UAS remains limited in the United States today. This report focuses on one particular regulatory challenge: classifying UAS to assign airworthiness standards. Classification is useful for ensuring that meaningful differences in design are accommodated by certification to different standards, and that aircraft with similar risk profiles are held to similar standards. This paper provides observations related to how the current regulations for classifying manned aircraft, based on dimensions of aircraft class and operational aircraft categories, could apply to UAS. This report finds that existing aircraft classes are well aligned with the types of UAS that currently exist; however, the operational categories are more difficult to align to proposed UAS use in the NAS. Specifically, the factors used to group manned aircraft into similar risk profiles do not necessarily capture all relevant UAS risks. UAS classification is investigated through gathering approaches to classification from a broad spectrum of organizations, and then identifying and evaluating the classification factors from these approaches. This initial investigation concludes that factors in addition to those currently used today to group manned aircraft for the purpose of assigning airworthiness standards will be needed to adequately capture risks associated with UAS and their operations.

  18. Classification of Liver Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Rizoli, Sandro B.; Brenneman, Frederick D.; Hanna, Sherif S.; Kahnamoui, Kamyar

    1996-01-01

    The classification of liver injuries is important for clinical practice, clinical research and quality assurance activities. The Organ Injury Scaling (OIS) Committee of the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma proposed the OIS for liver trauma in 1989. The purpose ofthe present study was to apply this scale to a cohort ofliver trauma patients managed at a single Canadian trauma centre from January 1987 to June 1992.170 study patients were identified and reviewed. The mean age was 30, with 69% male and a mean ISS of 33.90% had a blunt mechanism ofinjury. The 170 patients were categorized into the 60IS grades ofliver injury. The number of units of blood transfused, the magnitude of the operative treatment required, the liver-related complications and the liver-related mortality correlated well with the OIS grade. The OIS grade was unable to predict the need for laparotomy or the length of stay in hospital. We conclude that the OIS is a useful, practical and important tool for the categorization of liver injuries, and it may prove to be the universally accepted classification scheme in liver trauma. PMID:8809585

  19. "Interactive Classification Technology"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deBessonet, Cary

    1999-01-01

    The investigators are upgrading a knowledge representation language called SL (Symbolic Language) and an automated reasoning system called SMS (Symbolic Manipulation System) to enable the technologies to be used in automated reasoning and interactive classification systems. The overall goals of the project are: a) the enhancement of the representation language SL to accommodate multiple perspectives and a wider range of meaning; b) the development of a sufficient set of operators to enable the interpreter of SL to handle representations of basic cognitive acts; and c) the development of a default inference scheme to operate over SL notation as it is encoded. As to particular goals the first-year work plan focused on inferencing and.representation issues, including: 1) the development of higher level cognitive/ classification functions and conceptual models for use in inferencing and decision making; 2) the specification of a more detailed scheme of defaults and the enrichment of SL notation to accommodate the scheme; and 3) the adoption of additional perspectives for inferencing.

  20. Waste classification sampling plan

    SciTech Connect

    Landsman, S.D.

    1998-05-27

    The purpose of this sampling is to explain the method used to collect and analyze data necessary to verify and/or determine the radionuclide content of the B-Cell decontamination and decommissioning waste stream so that the correct waste classification for the waste stream can be made, and to collect samples for studies of decontamination methods that could be used to remove fixed contamination present on the waste. The scope of this plan is to establish the technical basis for collecting samples and compiling quantitative data on the radioactive constituents present in waste generated during deactivation activities in B-Cell. Sampling and radioisotopic analysis will be performed on the fixed layers of contamination present on structural material and internal surfaces of process piping and tanks. In addition, dose rate measurements on existing waste material will be performed to determine the fraction of dose rate attributable to both removable and fixed contamination. Samples will also be collected to support studies of decontamination methods that are effective in removing the fixed contamination present on the waste. Sampling performed under this plan will meet criteria established in BNF-2596, Data Quality Objectives for the B-Cell Waste Stream Classification Sampling, J. M. Barnett, May 1998.

  1. PSC: protein surface classification

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Yan Yuan; Li, Wen-Hsiung

    2012-01-01

    We recently proposed to classify proteins by their functional surfaces. Using the structural attributes of functional surfaces, we inferred the pairwise relationships of proteins and constructed an expandable database of protein surface classification (PSC). As the functional surface(s) of a protein is the local region where the protein performs its function, our classification may reflect the functional relationships among proteins. Currently, PSC contains a library of 1974 surface types that include 25 857 functional surfaces identified from 24 170 bound structures. The search tool in PSC empowers users to explore related surfaces that share similar local structures and core functions. Each functional surface is characterized by structural attributes, which are geometric, physicochemical or evolutionary features. The attributes have been normalized as descriptors and integrated to produce a profile for each functional surface in PSC. In addition, binding ligands are recorded for comparisons among homologs. PSC allows users to exploit related binding surfaces to reveal the changes in functionally important residues on homologs that have led to functional divergence during evolution. The substitutions at the key residues of a spatial pattern may determine the functional evolution of a protein. In PSC (http://pocket.uchicago.edu/psc/), a pool of changes in residues on similar functional surfaces is provided. PMID:22669905

  2. The Transporter Classification Database

    PubMed Central

    Saier, Milton H.; Reddy, Vamsee S.; Tamang, Dorjee G.; Västermark, Åke

    2014-01-01

    The Transporter Classification Database (TCDB; http://www.tcdb.org) serves as a common reference point for transport protein research. The database contains more than 10 000 non-redundant proteins that represent all currently recognized families of transmembrane molecular transport systems. Proteins in TCDB are organized in a five level hierarchical system, where the first two levels are the class and subclass, the second two are the family and subfamily, and the last one is the transport system. Superfamilies that contain multiple families are included as hyperlinks to the five tier TC hierarchy. TCDB includes proteins from all types of living organisms and is the only transporter classification system that is both universal and recognized by the International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. It has been expanded by manual curation, contains extensive text descriptions providing structural, functional, mechanistic and evolutionary information, is supported by unique software and is interconnected to many other relevant databases. TCDB is of increasing usefulness to the international scientific community and can serve as a model for the expansion of database technologies. This manuscript describes an update of the database descriptions previously featured in NAR database issues. PMID:24225317

  3. Molecular classification of gliomas.

    PubMed

    Masui, Kenta; Mischel, Paul S; Reifenberger, Guido

    2016-01-01

    The identification of distinct genetic and epigenetic profiles in different types of gliomas has revealed novel diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive molecular biomarkers for refinement of glioma classification and improved prediction of therapy response and outcome. Therefore, the new (2016) World Health Organization (WHO) classification of tumors of the central nervous system breaks with the traditional principle of diagnosis based on histologic criteria only and incorporates molecular markers. This will involve a multilayered approach combining histologic features and molecular information in an "integrated diagnosis". We review the current state of diagnostic molecular markers for gliomas, focusing on isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 or 2 (IDH1/IDH2) gene mutation, α-thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome X-linked (ATRX) gene mutation, 1p/19q co-deletion and telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter mutation in adult tumors, as well as v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B1 (BRAF) and H3 histone family 3A (H3F3A) aberrations in pediatric gliomas. We also outline prognostic and predictive molecular markers, including O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter methylation, and discuss the potential clinical relevance of biologic glioblastoma subtypes defined by integration of multiomics data. Commonly used methods for individual marker detection as well as novel large-scale DNA methylation profiling and next-generation sequencing approaches are discussed. Finally, we illustrate how advances in molecular diagnostics affect novel strategies of targeted therapy, thereby raising new challenges and identifying new leads for personalized treatment of glioma patients. PMID:26948350

  4. Identification of the high risk emergency surgical patient: Which risk prediction model should be used?

    PubMed Central

    Stonelake, Stephen; Thomson, Peter; Suggett, Nigel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction National guidance states that all patients having emergency surgery should have a mortality risk assessment calculated on admission so that the ‘high risk’ patient can receive the appropriate seniority and level of care. We aimed to assess if peri-operative risk scoring tools could accurately calculate mortality and morbidity risk. Methods Mortality risk scores for 86 consecutive emergency laparotomies, were calculated using pre-operative (ASA, Lee index) and post-operative (POSSUM, P-POSSUM and CR-POSSUM) risk calculation tools. Morbidity risk scores were calculated using the POSSUM predicted morbidity and compared against actual morbidity according to the Clavien–Dindo classification. Results The actual mortality was 10.5%. The average predicted risk scores for all laparotomies were: ASA 26.5%, Lee Index 2.5%, POSSUM 29.5%, P-POSSUM 18.5%, CR-POSSUM 10.5%. Complications occurred following 67 laparotomies (78%). The majority (51%) of complications were classified as Clavien–Dindo grade 2–3 (non-life-threatening). Patients having a POSSUM morbidity risk of greater than 50% developed significantly more life-threatening complications (CD 4–5) compared with those who predicted less than or equal to 50% morbidity risk (P = 0.01). Discussion Pre-operative risk stratification remains a challenge because the Lee Index under-predicts and ASA over-predicts mortality risk. Post-operative risk scoring using the CR-POSSUM is more accurate and we suggest can be used to identify patients who require intensive care post-operatively. Conclusions In the absence of accurate risk scoring tools that can be used on admission to hospital it is not possible to reliably audit the achievement of national standards of care for the ‘high-risk’ patient. PMID:26468369

  5. ANALYSIS OF A CLASSIFICATION ERROR MATRIX USING CATEGORICAL DATA TECHNIQUES.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosenfield, George H.; Fitzpatrick-Lins, Katherine

    1984-01-01

    Summary form only given. A classification error matrix typically contains tabulation results of an accuracy evaluation of a thematic classification, such as that of a land use and land cover map. The diagonal elements of the matrix represent the counts corrected, and the usual designation of classification accuracy has been the total percent correct. The nondiagonal elements of the matrix have usually been neglected. The classification error matrix is known in statistical terms as a contingency table of categorical data. As an example, an application of these methodologies to a problem of remotely sensed data concerning two photointerpreters and four categories of classification indicated that there is no significant difference in the interpretation between the two photointerpreters, and that there are significant differences among the interpreted category classifications. However, two categories, oak and cottonwood, are not separable in classification in this experiment at the 0. 51 percent probability. A coefficient of agreement is determined for the interpreted map as a whole, and individually for each of the interpreted categories. A conditional coefficient of agreement for the individual categories is compared to other methods for expressing category accuracy which have already been presented in the remote sensing literature.

  6. Flood Classification Using Support Vector Machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melsen, Lieke A.; Torfs, Paul J. J.; Brauer, Claudia C.

    2013-04-01

    Lowland floods are in general considered to be less extreme than mountainous floods. In order to investigate this, seven lowland floods in the Netherlands were selected and compared to mountainous floods from the study of Marchi et al. (2010). Both a 2D and 3D approach of the statistical two-group classification method support vector machines (Cortes and Vapnik, 1995) were used to find a statistical difference between the two flood types. Support vector machines were able to draw a decision plane between the two flood types, misclassifying one out of seven lowland floods, and one out of 67 mountainous floods. The main difference between the two flood types can be found in the runoff coefficient (with lowland floods having a lower runoff coefficient than mountainous floods), the cumulative precipitation causing the flood (which was lower for lowland floods), and, obviously, the relief ratio. Support vector machines have proved to be useful for flood classification and might be applicable in future classification studies. References Cortes, C., and V. Vapnik. "Support-Vector Networks." Machine Learning 20: (1995) 273-297. Marchi, L., M. Borga, E. Preciso, and E. Gaume. "Characterisation of selected extreme flash floods in Europe and implications for flood risk management." Journal of Hydrology 394: (2010) 118-133.

  7. Developing Methods Using ToxCast Data for the Classification and Prioritization of Antimicrobials and Inerts

    EPA Science Inventory

    Improved chemical risk management and increased efficiency of chemical prioritization, classification and assessment are major goals within EPA. Towards achieving these goals, EPA's ToxCast™ research program has been designed to rapidly screen hundreds to thousands of chemicals' ...

  8. Multichannel weighted speech classification system for prediction of major depression in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Kuan Ee Brian; Lech, Margaret; Allen, Nicholas B

    2013-02-01

    Early identification of adolescents at high imminent risk for clinical depression could significantly reduce the burden of the disease. This study demonstrated that acoustic speech analysis and classification can be used to determine early signs of major depression in adolescents, up to two years before they meet clinical diagnostic criteria for the full-blown disorder. Individual contributions of four different types of acoustic parameters [prosodic, glottal, Teager's energy operator (TEO), and spectral] to depression-related changes of speech characteristics were examined. A new computational methodology for the early prediction of depression in adolescents was developed and tested. The novel aspect of this methodology is in the introduction of multichannel classification with a weighted decision procedure. It was observed that single-channel classification was effective in predicting depression with a desirable specificity-to-sensitivity ratio and accuracy higher than chance level only when using glottal or prosodic features. The best prediction performance was achieved with the new multichannel method, which used four features (prosodic, glottal, TEO, and spectral). In the case of the person-based approach with two sets of weights, the new multichannel method provided a high accuracy level of 73% and the sensitivity-to-specificity ratio of 79%/67% for predicting future depression. PMID:23192475

  9. Classification in Astronomy: Past and Present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feigelson, Eric

    2012-03-01

    Astronomers have always classified celestial objects. The ancient Greeks distinguished between asteros, the fixed stars, and planetos, the roving stars. The latter were associated with the Gods and, starting with Plato in his dialog Timaeus, provided the first mathematical models of celestial phenomena. Giovanni Hodierna classified nebulous objects, seen with a Galilean refractor telescope in the mid-seventeenth century into three classes: "Luminosae," "Nebulosae," and "Occultae." A century later, Charles Messier compiled a larger list of nebulae, star clusters and galaxies, but did not attempt a classification. Classification of comets was a significant enterprise in the 19th century: Alexander (1850) considered two groups based on orbit sizes, Lardner (1853) proposed three groups of orbits, and Barnard (1891) divided them into two classes based on morphology. Aside from the segmentation of the bright stars into constellations, most stellar classifications were based on colors and spectral properties. During the 1860s, the pioneering spectroscopist Angelo Secchi classified stars into five classes: white, yellow, orange, carbon stars, and emission line stars. After many debates, the stellar spectral sequence was refined by the group at Harvard into the familiar OBAFGKM spectral types, later found to be a sequence on surface temperature (Cannon 1926). The spectral classification is still being extended with recent additions of O2 hot stars (Walborn et al. 2002) and L and T brown dwarfs (Kirkpatrick 2005). Townley (1913) reviews 30 years of variable star classification, emerging with six classes with five subclasses. The modern classification of variable stars has about 80 (sub)classes, and is still under debate (Samus 2009). Shortly after his confirmation that some nebulae are external galaxies, Edwin Hubble (1926) proposed his famous bifurcated classification of galaxy morphologies with three classes: ellipticals, spirals, and irregulars. These classes are still

  10. In silico docking of methyl isocyanate (MIC) and its hydrolytic product (1, 3-dimethylurea) shows significant interaction with DNA Methyltransferase 1 suggests cancer risk in Bhopal-Gas- Tragedy survivors.

    PubMed

    Khan, Inbesat; Senthilkumar, Chinnu Sugavanam; Upadhyay, Nisha; Singh, Hemant; Sachdeva, Meenu; Jatawa, Suresh Kumar; Tiwari, Archana

    2015-01-01

    DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) is a relatively large protein family responsible for maintenance of normal methylation, cell growth and survival in mammals. Toxic industrial chemical exposure associated methylation misregulation has been shown to have epigenetic influence. Such misregulation could effectively contribute to cancer development and progression. Methyl isocyanate (MIC) is a noxious industrial chemical used extensively in the production of carbamate pesticides. We here applied an in silico molecular docking approach to study the interaction of MIC with diverse domains of DNMT1, to predict cancer risk in the Bhopal population exposed to MIC during 1984. For the first time, we investigated the interaction of MIC and its hydrolytic product (1,3-dimethylurea) with DNMT1 interacting (such as DMAP1, RFTS, and CXXC) and catalytic (SAM, SAH, and Sinefungin) domains using computer simulations. The results of the present study showed a potential interaction of MIC and 1,3-dimethylurea with these domains. Obviously, strong binding of MIC with DNMT1 interrupting normal methylation will lead to epigenetic alterations in the exposed humans. We suggest therefore that the MIC- exposed individuals surviving after 1984 disaster have excess risk of cancer, which can be attributed to alterations in their epigenome. Our findings will help in better understanding the underlying epigenetic mechanisms in humans exposed to MIC. PMID:26625778

  11. Mass spectrometry cancer data classification using wavelets and genetic algorithm.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thanh; Nahavandi, Saeid; Creighton, Douglas; Khosravi, Abbas

    2015-12-21

    This paper introduces a hybrid feature extraction method applied to mass spectrometry (MS) data for cancer classification. Haar wavelets are employed to transform MS data into orthogonal wavelet coefficients. The most prominent discriminant wavelets are then selected by genetic algorithm (GA) to form feature sets. The combination of wavelets and GA yields highly distinct feature sets that serve as inputs to classification algorithms. Experimental results show the robustness and significant dominance of the wavelet-GA against competitive methods. The proposed method therefore can be applied to cancer classification models that are useful as real clinical decision support systems for medical practitioners. PMID:26611346

  12. [Submitting studies without significant results].

    PubMed

    Texier, Gaëtan; Meynard, Jean-Baptiste; Michel, Rémy; Migliani, René; Boutin, Jean-Paul

    2007-03-01

    When a study finds that no exposure factor or therapy is significantly related to a given effect, researchers legitimately wonder if the results should be submitted for publication and to what journal. Clinical trials that report significant associations have a higher probability of publication, a phenomenon known as selective publication. The principal reasons of this selective publication include author self-censorship, peer-reviewing, trials not intended for publication, interpretation of the p value, cost of journal subscriptions, and policies. Subsequent reviews and meta-analyses are biased by the unavailability of nonsignificant results. Suggestions for preventing this risk include university training, trial registries, an international standard randomised controlled trial number (ISRCTN), Cochrane collaboration, and the gray literature. Journals (including electronic journals) interested in studies with nonsignificant results are listed. New technologies are changing the relations between publishers, libraries, authors and readers. PMID:17287106

  13. 7 CFR 27.34 - Classification procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Classification procedure. 27.34 Section 27.34... REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSIFICATION UNDER COTTON FUTURES LEGISLATION Regulations Classification and Micronaire Determinations § 27.34 Classification procedure. Classification shall proceed as rapidly as possible, but...

  14. 5 CFR 9901.221 - Classification requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... SECURITY PERSONNEL SYSTEM (NSPS) Classification Classification Process § 9901.221 Classification... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Classification requirements. 9901.221... jobs as he or she considers necessary for the purpose of this section. (d) A classification action...

  15. Validation of WHO classification-based Prognostic Scoring System (WPSS) for myelodysplastic syndromes and comparison with the revised International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS-R). A study of the International Working Group for Prognosis in Myelodysplasia (IWG-PM).

    PubMed

    Della Porta, M G; Tuechler, H; Malcovati, L; Schanz, J; Sanz, G; Garcia-Manero, G; Solé, F; Bennett, J M; Bowen, D; Fenaux, P; Dreyfus, F; Kantarjian, H; Kuendgen, A; Levis, A; Cermak, J; Fonatsch, C; Le Beau, M M; Slovak, M L; Krieger, O; Luebbert, M; Maciejewski, J; Magalhaes, S M M; Miyazaki, Y; Pfeilstöcker, M; Sekeres, M A; Sperr, W R; Stauder, R; Tauro, S; Valent, P; Vallespi, T; van de Loosdrecht, A A; Germing, U; Haase, D; Greenberg, P L; Cazzola, M

    2015-07-01

    A risk-adapted treatment strategy is mandatory for myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). We refined the World Health Organization (WHO)-classification-based Prognostic Scoring System (WPSS) by determining the impact of the newer clinical and cytogenetic features, and we compared its prognostic power to that of the revised International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS-R). A population of 5326 untreated MDS was considered. We analyzed single WPSS parameters and confirmed that the WHO classification and severe anemia provide important prognostic information in MDS. A strong correlation was found between the WPSS including the new cytogenetic risk stratification and WPSS adopting original criteria. We then compared WPSS with the IPSS-R prognostic system. A highly significant correlation was found between the WPSS and IPSS-R risk classifications. Discrepancies did occur among lower-risk patients in whom the number of dysplastic hematopoietic lineages as assessed by morphology did not reflect the severity of peripheral blood cytopenias and/or increased marrow blast count. Moreover, severe anemia has higher prognostic weight in the WPSS versus IPSS-R model. Overall, both systems well represent the prognostic risk of MDS patients defined by WHO morphologic criteria. This study provides relevant in formation for the implementation of risk-adapted strategies in MDS. PMID:25721895

  16. Proposed clinical internal carotid artery classification system

    PubMed Central

    Abdulrauf, Saleem I; Ashour, Ahmed M; Marvin, Eric; Coppens, Jeroen; Kang, Brian; Hsieh, Tze Yu Yeh; Nery, Breno; Penanes, Juan R; Alsahlawi, Aysha K; Moore, Shawn; Al-Shaar, Hussam Abou; Kemp, Joanna; Chawla, Kanika; Sujijantarat, Nanthiya; Najeeb, Alaa; Parkar, Nadeem; Shetty, Vilaas; Vafaie, Tina; Antisdel, Jastin; Mikulec, Tony A; Edgell, Randall; Lebovitz, Jonathan; Pierson, Matt; Pires de Aguiar, Paulo Henrique; Buchanan, Paula; Di Cosola, Angela; Stevens, George

    2016-01-01

    cavernous sinus) starting at the crossing of the fourth cranial nerve on the lateral aspect of the cavernous ICA and located directly lateral to the sphenoid sinus; (7) ring segment (ICA between the 2 dural rings) starting at the crossing of the third cranial nerve on the lateral aspect of the ICA; (8) cisternal segment starting at the distal dural ring. Conclusions: The classification may be applied uniformly to all skull base surgical approaches including lateral microsurgical and ventral endoscopic approaches, obviating the need for 2 separate classification systems. The classification allows extrapolation of relevant clinical information because each named segment may indicate potential surgical risk to specific structures.

  17. The Papanicolaou Society of Cytopathology classification for pulmonary specimens: an overview.

    PubMed

    Layfield, L J

    2016-06-01

    The Papanicolaou Society of Cytopathology has formulated guidelines for respiratory cytology which include a classification scheme. The recommended classification scheme is based on the expertise of the committee members, extensive review of the literature and feedback from presentations at national and international meetings. Each category of the classification system is closely defined and link to a known risk for malignancy. The classification contains six categories designated as: 1) Non-diagnostic; 2) Negative for Malignancy; 3) Atypical; 4) Neoplastic (Benign and low grade cancer); 5) Suspicious for Malignancy; and 6) Malignant. PMID:27221749

  18. Classification of Motor Imagery EEG Signals with Support Vector Machines and Particle Swarm Optimization.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yuliang; Ding, Xiaohui; She, Qingshan; Luo, Zhizeng; Potter, Thomas; Zhang, Yingchun

    2016-01-01

    Support vector machines are powerful tools used to solve the small sample and nonlinear classification problems, but their ultimate classification performance depends heavily upon the selection of appropriate kernel and penalty parameters. In this study, we propose using a particle swarm optimization algorithm to optimize the selection of both the kernel and penalty parameters in order to improve the classification performance of support vector machines. The performance of the optimized classifier was evaluated with motor imagery EEG signals in terms of both classification and prediction. Results show that the optimized classifier can significantly improve the classification accuracy of motor imagery EEG signals. PMID:27313656

  19. Classification of Motor Imagery EEG Signals with Support Vector Machines and Particle Swarm Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yuliang; Ding, Xiaohui; She, Qingshan; Luo, Zhizeng; Potter, Thomas; Zhang, Yingchun

    2016-01-01

    Support vector machines are powerful tools used to solve the small sample and nonlinear classification problems, but their ultimate classification performance depends heavily upon the selection of appropriate kernel and penalty parameters. In this study, we propose using a particle swarm optimization algorithm to optimize the selection of both the kernel and penalty parameters in order to improve the classification performance of support vector machines. The performance of the optimized classifier was evaluated with motor imagery EEG signals in terms of both classification and prediction. Results show that the optimized classifier can significantly improve the classification accuracy of motor imagery EEG signals. PMID:27313656

  20. 14 CFR 1203.501 - Applying derivative classification markings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... INFORMATION SECURITY PROGRAM Derivative Classification § 1203.501 Applying derivative classification markings... classification decisions: (b) Verify the information's current level of classification so far as...

  1. ALHAMBRA survey: morphological classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pović, M.; Huertas-Company, M.; Márquez, I.; Masegosa, J.; Aguerri, J. A. López; Husillos, C.; Molino, A.; Cristóbal-Hornillos, D.

    2015-03-01

    The Advanced Large Homogeneous Area Medium Band Redshift Astronomical (ALHAMBRA) survey is a photometric survey designed to study systematically cosmic evolution and cosmic variance (Moles et al. 2008). It employs 20 continuous medium-band filters (3500 - 9700 Å), plus JHK near-infrared (NIR) bands, which enable measurements of photometric redshifts with good accuracy. ALHAMBRA covers > 4 deg2 in eight discontinuous regions (~ 0.5 deg2 per region), of theseseven fields overlap with other extragalactic, multiwavelength surveys (DEEP2, SDSS, COSMOS, HDF-N, Groth, ELAIS-N1). We detect > 600.000 sources, reaching the depth of R(AB) ~ 25.0, and photometric accuracy of 2-4% (Husillos et al., in prep.). Photometric redshifts are measured using the Bayesian Photometric Redshift (BPZ) code (Benítez et al. 2000), reaching one of the best accuracies up to date of δz/z <= 1.2% (Molino et al., in prep.). To deal with the morphological classification of galaxies in the ALHAMBRA survey (Pović et al., in prep.), we used the galaxy Support Vector Machine code (galSVM; Huertas-Company 2008, 2009), one of the new non-parametric methods for morphological classification, specially useful when dealing with low resolution and high-redshift data. To test the accuracy of our morphological classification we used a sample of 3000 local, visually classified galaxies (Nair & Abraham 2010), moving them to conditions typical of our ALHAMBRA data (taking into account the background, redshift and magnitude distributions, etc.), and measuring their morphology using galSVM. Finally, we measured the morphology of ALHAMBRA galaxies, obtaining for each source seven morphological parameters (two concentration indexes, asymmetry, Gini, M20 moment of light, smoothness, and elongation), probability if the source belongs to early- or late-type, and its error. Comparing ALHAMBRA morph COSMOS/ACS morphology (obtained with the same method) we expect to have qualitative separation in two main morphological

  2. Dissimilarity representations in lung parenchyma classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sørensen, Lauge; de Bruijne, Marleen

    2009-02-01

    A good problem representation is important for a pattern recognition system to be successful. The traditional approach to statistical pattern recognition is feature representation. More specifically, objects are represented by a number of features in a feature vector space, and classifiers are built in this representation. This is also the general trend in lung parenchyma classification in computed tomography (CT) images, where the features often are measures on feature histograms. Instead, we propose to build normal density based classifiers in dissimilarity representations for lung parenchyma classification. This allows for the classifiers to work on dissimilarities between objects, which might be a more natural way of representing lung parenchyma. In this context, dissimilarity is defined between CT regions of interest (ROI)s. ROIs are represented by their CT attenuation histogram and ROI dissimilarity is defined as a histogram dissimilarity measure between the attenuation histograms. In this setting, the full histograms are utilized according to the chosen histogram dissimilarity measure. We apply this idea to classification of different emphysema patterns as well as normal, healthy tissue. Two dissimilarity representation approaches as well as different histogram dissimilarity measures are considered. The approaches are evaluated on a set of 168 CT ROIs using normal density based classifiers all showing good performance. Compared to using histogram dissimilarity directly as distance in a emph{k} nearest neighbor classifier, which achieves a classification accuracy of 92.9%, the best dissimilarity representation based classifier is significantly better with a classification accuracy of 97.0% (text{emph{p" border="0" class="imgtopleft"> = 0.046).

  3. Pressure ulcer classification: defining early skin damage.

    PubMed

    Russell, Linda

    2002-09-01

    This article is the second of a two-part series. The first part (Russell, 2002) looked at various systems and pitfalls of pressure ulcer classification systems. This article focuses on the difficulties of defining early skin damage. Patients' quality of life suffers significantly with a pressure ulcer. The smell of the exudate may be an embarrassment to the patient. The pain and the distress the patient will experience will not easily be forgotten, i.e. the number of dressings required for a deep pressure ulcer, even after the pressure ulcer has healed, will be a memorable intrusion to the patient's daily routine. Early detection of pressure ulcers and timely intervention are essential in the management of patients with pressure ulcers. Controversy exists over the definition of the first three stages of pressure ulcers, but there is consensus on the definition of deep tissue damage. If the pressure ulcer is covered with black necrotic tissue it is difficult to establish depth of the tissue damage. Intact skin can cause problems, as a sacrum may be purple but intact. There is still considerable debate with regard to reactive hyperaemia, as the exact time parameters for persistent erythema to occur are unknown. Little is understood with regard to the exact pathophysiology of reactive hyperaemia and this area requires further investigation. Blistered skin and skin tone also cause confusion in grading of pressure ulcers. The problems associated with classification of pressure ulcers, using colour classification systems, are discussed and the implications for practice are considered. The confusion surrounding early classification of pressure ulcers is discussed and it is hoped that such confusion can be addressed by standardizing training using one national classification system. PMID:12362151

  4. Pattern classification and reconstruction for hyperspectral imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei

    In this dissertation, novel techniques for hyperspectral classification and signal reconstruction from random projections are presented. A classification paradigm designed to exploit the rich statistical structure of hyperspectral data is proposed. The proposed framework employs the local Fisher's discriminant analysis to reduce the dimensionality of the data while preserving its multimodal structure, followed by a subsequent Gaussian-mixture-model or support-vector-machine classifier. An extension of this framework in a kernel induced space is also studied. This classification approach employs a maximum likelihood classifier and dimensionality reduction based on a kernel local Fisher's discriminant analysis. The technique imposes an additional constraint on the kernel mapping---it ensures that neighboring points in the input space stay close-by in the projected subspace. In a typical remote sensing flow, the sender needs to invoke an appropriate compression strategy for downlinking signals (e.g., imagery to a base station). Signal acquisition using random projections significantly decreases the sender-side computational cost, while preserving useful information. In this dissertation, a novel class-dependent hyperspectral image reconstruction strategy is also proposed. The proposed method employs statistics pertinent to each class as opposed to the average statistics estimated over the entire dataset, resulting in a more accurate reconstruction from random projections. An integrated spectral-spatial model for signal reconstruction from random projections is also developed. In this approach, spatially homogeneous segments are combined with spectral pixel-wise classification results in the projected subspace. An appropriate reconstruction strategy, such as compressive projection principal component analysis (CPPCA), is employed individually in each category based on this integrated map. The proposed method provides better reconstruction performance as compared to

  5. Significant lexical relationships

    SciTech Connect

    Pedersen, T.; Kayaalp, M.; Bruce, R.

    1996-12-31

    Statistical NLP inevitably deals with a large number of rare events. As a consequence, NLP data often violates the assumptions implicit in traditional statistical procedures such as significance testing. We describe a significance test, an exact conditional test, that is appropriate for NLP data and can be performed using freely available software. We apply this test to the study of lexical relationships and demonstrate that the results obtained using this test are both theoretically more reliable and different from the results obtained using previously applied tests.

  6. A Functional Classification of Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKinlay, Donald Bruce

    The need for more and better manpower information is hampered by the lack of adequate occupational data classification systems. The diversity of interests in occupations probably accounts for the absence of consensus regarding either the general outlines or the specific details of a standardized occupational classification system which would…

  7. A New Classification of Sandstone.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brewer, Roger Clay; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Introduced is a sandstone classification scheme intended for use with thin-sections and hand specimens. Detailed is a step-by-step classification scheme. A graphic presentation of the scheme is presented. This method is compared with other existing schemes. (CW)

  8. Early Classification of Reading Performance in Children Identified or At Risk for Emotional and Behavioral Disorders: A Discriminant Analysis Using the Dynamic Indicators of Basic Early Literacy Skills (DIBELS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez, Jorge E.; Vannest, Kimberly J.; Reid, Robert

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated the ability of the kindergarten and first grade Dynamic Indicators of Basic Early Literacy Skills (DIBELS), measures of early literacy development, to discriminate among low average, average, and above average students considered at risk emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) on the Total Reading cluster of the Woodcock…

  9. The development of an MSS satellite imagery classification expert system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engle, S. W.

    1985-01-01

    Unsupervised image classification of Landsat MSS imagery entails a significant part of the remote sensing, image analysis effort. Expert systems, a technology developed in the field of artificial intelligence, offers the potential to automate this process, thus greatly increasing the efficiency with which an analyst can perform unsupervised image classification and making the knowledge of the image analyst available to a community of nonexperts. Such a system, under development at the NASA/Ames Research Center, is described and planned enhancements are discussed.

  10. Predictive Classification Trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dlugosz, Stephan; Müller-Funk, Ulrich

    CART (Breiman et al., Classification and Regression Trees, Chapman and Hall, New York, 1984) and (exhaustive) CHAID (Kass, Appl Stat 29:119-127, 1980) figure prominently among the procedures actually used in data based management, etc. CART is a well-established procedure that produces binary trees. CHAID, in contrast, admits multiple splittings, a feature that allows to exploit the splitting variable more extensively. On the other hand, that procedure depends on premises that are questionable in practical applications. This can be put down to the fact that CHAID relies on simultaneous Chi-Square- resp. F-tests. The null-distribution of the second test statistic, for instance, relies on the normality assumption that is not plausible in a data mining context. Moreover, none of these procedures - as implemented in SPSS, for instance - take ordinal dependent variables into account. In the paper we suggest an alternative tree-algorithm that: Requires explanatory categorical variables

  11. Classification-based reasoning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gomez, Fernando; Segami, Carlos

    1991-01-01

    A representation formalism for N-ary relations, quantification, and definition of concepts is described. Three types of conditions are associated with the concepts: (1) necessary and sufficient properties, (2) contingent properties, and (3) necessary properties. Also explained is how complex chains of inferences can be accomplished by representing existentially quantified sentences, and concepts denoted by restrictive relative clauses as classification hierarchies. The representation structures that make possible the inferences are explained first, followed by the reasoning algorithms that draw the inferences from the knowledge structures. All the ideas explained have been implemented and are part of the information retrieval component of a program called Snowy. An appendix contains a brief session with the program.

  12. Bayesian classification theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, Robin; Stutz, John; Cheeseman, Peter

    1991-01-01

    The task of inferring a set of classes and class descriptions most likely to explain a given data set can be placed on a firm theoretical foundation using Bayesian statistics. Within this framework and using various mathematical and algorithmic approximations, the AutoClass system searches for the most probable classifications, automatically choosing the number of classes and complexity of class descriptions. A simpler version of AutoClass has been applied to many large real data sets, has discovered new independently-verified phenomena, and has been released as a robust software package. Recent extensions allow attributes to be selectively correlated within particular classes, and allow classes to inherit or share model parameters though a class hierarchy. We summarize the mathematical foundations of AutoClass.

  13. Classification of personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Tyrer, P; Alexander, J

    1979-08-01

    An interview schedule was used to record the personality traits of 130 psychiatric patients, 65 with a primary clinical diagnosis of personality disorder and 65 with other diagnoses. The results were analysed by factor analysis and three types of cluster analysis. Factor analysis showed a similar structure of personality variables in both groups of patients, supporting the notion that personality disorders differ only in degree from the personalities of other psychiatric patients. Cluster analysis revealed five discrete categories; sociopathic, passive-dependent, anankastic, schizoid and a non-personality-disordered group. Of all the personality-disordered patients 63 per cent fell into the passive-dependent or sociopathic category. The results suggest that the current classification of personality disorder could be simplified. PMID:497619

  14. Robust Vertex Classification.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li; Shen, Cencheng; Vogelstein, Joshua T; Priebe, Carey E

    2016-03-01

    For random graphs distributed according to stochastic blockmodels, a special case of latent position graphs, adjacency spectral embedding followed by appropriate vertex classification is asymptotically Bayes optimal; but this approach requires knowledge of and critically depends on the model dimension. In this paper, we propose a sparse representation vertex classifier which does not require information about the model dimension. This classifier represents a test vertex as a sparse combination of the vertices in the training set and uses the recovered coefficients to classify the test vertex. We prove consistency of our proposed classifier for stochastic blockmodels, and demonstrate that the sparse representation classifier can predict vertex labels with higher accuracy than adjacency spectral embedding approaches via both simulation studies and real data experiments. Our results demonstrate the robustness and effectiveness of our proposed vertex classifier when the model dimension is unknown. PMID:26340770

  15. Unsupervised hyperspectral image classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Xiaoli; Chang, Chein-I.

    2007-09-01

    Two major issues encountered in unsupervised hyperspectral image classification are (1) how to determine the number of spectral classes in the image and (2) how to find training samples that well represent each of spectral classes without prior knowledge. A recently developed concept, Virtual dimensionality (VD) is used to estimate the number of spectral classes of interest in the image data. This paper proposes an effective algorithm to generate an appropriate training set via a recently developed Prioritized Independent Component Analysis (PICA). Two sets of hyperspectral data, Airborne Visible Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) Cuprite data and HYperspectral Digital Image Collection Experiment (HYDICE) data are used for experiments and performance analysis for the proposed method.

  16. A procedure for blending manual and correlation-based synoptic classifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frakes, Brent; Yarnal, Brent

    1997-11-01

    Manual and correlation-based (also known as Lund or Kirchhofer) classifications are important to synoptic climatology, but both have significant drawbacks. Manual classifications are inherently subjective and labour intensive, whereas correlation-based classifications give the investigator little control over the map-patterns generated by the computer. This paper develops a simple procedure that combines these two classification methods, thereby minimizing these weaknesses. The hybrid procedure utilizes a relatively short-term manual classification to generate composite pressure surfaces, which are then used as seeds in a long-term correlation-based computer classification. Overall, the results show that the hybrid classification reproduces the manual classification while optimizing speed, objectivity and investigator control, thus suggesting that the hybrid procedure is superior to the manual or correlation classifications as they are currently used. More specifically, the results demonstrate little difference between the hybrid procedure and the original manual classification at monthly and longer time-scales, with less internal variation in the hybrid types than in the subjective categories. However, the two classifications showed substantial differences at the daily level, not because of poor performance by the hybrid procedure, but because of errors introduced by the subjectivity of the manual classification.

  17. Statistical Significance Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLean, James E., Ed.; Kaufman, Alan S., Ed.

    1998-01-01

    The controversy about the use or misuse of statistical significance testing has become the major methodological issue in educational research. This special issue contains three articles that explore the controversy, three commentaries on these articles, an overall response, and three rejoinders by the first three authors. They are: (1)…

  18. Lack of Statistical Significance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kehle, Thomas J.; Bray, Melissa A.; Chafouleas, Sandra M.; Kawano, Takuji

    2007-01-01

    Criticism has been leveled against the use of statistical significance testing (SST) in many disciplines. However, the field of school psychology has been largely devoid of critiques of SST. Inspection of the primary journals in school psychology indicated numerous examples of SST with nonrandom samples and/or samples of convenience. In this…

  19. Robotic Rock Classification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hebert, Martial

    1999-01-01

    This report describes a three-month research program undertook jointly by the Robotics Institute at Carnegie Mellon University and Ames Research Center as part of the Ames' Joint Research Initiative (JRI.) The work was conducted at the Ames Research Center by Mr. Liam Pedersen, a graduate student in the CMU Ph.D. program in Robotics under the supervision Dr. Ted Roush at the Space Science Division of the Ames Research Center from May 15 1999 to August 15, 1999. Dr. Martial Hebert is Mr. Pedersen's research adviser at CMU and is Principal Investigator of this Grant. The goal of this project is to investigate and implement methods suitable for a robotic rover to autonomously identify rocks and minerals in its vicinity, and to statistically characterize the local geological environment. Although primary sensors for these tasks are a reflection spectrometer and color camera, the goal is to create a framework under which data from multiple sensors, and multiple readings on the same object, can be combined in a principled manner. Furthermore, it is envisioned that knowledge of the local area, either a priori or gathered by the robot, will be used to improve classification accuracy. The key results obtained during this project are: The continuation of the development of a rock classifier; development of theoretical statistical methods; development of methods for evaluating and selecting sensors; and experimentation with data mining techniques on the Ames spectral library. The results of this work are being applied at CMU, in particular in the context of the Winter 99 Antarctica expedition in which the classification techniques will be used on the Nomad robot. Conversely, the software developed based on those techniques will continue to be made available to NASA Ames and the data collected from the Nomad experiments will also be made available.

  20. Classification of Rainbows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricard, J. L.; Peter, A. L.; Barckicke, J.

    2015-12-01

    CLASSIFICATION OF RAINBOWS Jean Louis Ricard,1,2,* Peter Adams ,2 and Jean Barckicke 2,3 1CNRM, Météo-France,42 Avenue Gaspard Coriolis, 31057 Toulouse, France 2CEPAL, 148 Himley Road, Dudley, West Midlands DY1 2QH, United Kingdom 3DP/Compas,Météo-France,42 Avenue Gaspard Coriolis, 31057 Toulouse, France *Corresponding author: Dr_Jean_Ricard@yahoo,co,ukRainbows are the most beautiful and most spectacular optical atmospheric phenomenon. Humphreys (1964) pointedly noted that "the "explanations" generally given of the rainbow [ in textbooks] may well be said to explain beautifully that which does not occur, and to leave unexplained which does" . . . "The records of close observations of rainbows soon show that not even the colors are always the same". Textbooks stress that the main factor affecting the aspect of the rainbow is the radius of the water droplets. In his well-known textbook entitled "the nature of light & colour in the open air", Minnaert (1954) gives the chief features of the rainbow depending on the diameter of the drops producing it. For this study, we have gathered hundreds of pictures of primary bows. We sort out the pictures into classes. The classes are defined in a such way that rainbows belonging to the same class look similar. Our results are surprising and do not confirm Minnaert's classification. In practice, the size of the water droplets is only a minor factor controlling the overall aspect of the rainbow. The main factor appears to be the height of the sun above the horizon. At sunset, the width of the red band increases, while the width of the other bands of colours decreases. The orange, the violet, the blue and the green bands disappear completely in this order. At the end, the primary bow is mainly red and slightly yellow. Picture = Contrast-enhanced photograph of a primary bow picture (prepared by Andrew Dunn).

  1. Vietnamese Document Representation and Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Giang-Son; Gao, Xiaoying; Andreae, Peter

    Vietnamese is very different from English and little research has been done on Vietnamese document classification, or indeed, on any kind of Vietnamese language processing, and only a few small corpora are available for research. We created a large Vietnamese text corpus with about 18000 documents, and manually classified them based on different criteria such as topics and styles, giving several classification tasks of different difficulty levels. This paper introduces a new syllable-based document representation at the morphological level of the language for efficient classification. We tested the representation on our corpus with different classification tasks using six classification algorithms and two feature selection techniques. Our experiments show that the new representation is effective for Vietnamese categorization, and suggest that best performance can be achieved using syllable-pair document representation, an SVM with a polynomial kernel as the learning algorithm, and using Information gain and an external dictionary for feature selection.

  2. Adjusting Population Risk for Functional Health Status.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Richard L; Hughes, John S; Goldfield, Norbert I

    2016-04-01

    Risk adjustment accounts for differences in population mix by reducing the likelihood of enrollee selection by managed care plans and providing a correction to otherwise biased reporting of provider or plan performance. Functional health status is not routinely included within risk-adjustment methods, but is believed by many to be a significant enhancement to risk adjustment for complex enrollees and patients. In this analysis a standardized measure of functional health was created using 3 different source functional assessment instruments submitted to the Medicare program on condition of payment. The authors use a 5% development sample of Medicare claims from 2006 and 2007, including functional health assessments, and develop a model of functional health classification comprising 9 groups defined by the interaction of self-care, mobility, incontinence, and cognitive impairment. The 9 functional groups were used to augment Clinical Risk Groups, a diagnosis-based patient classification system, and when using a validation set of 100% of Medicare data for 2010 and 2011, this study found the use of the functional health module to improve the fit of observed enrollee cost, measured by the R(2) statistic, by 5% across all Medicare enrollees. The authors observed complex nonlinear interactions across functional health domains when constructing the model and caution that functional health status needs careful handling when used for risk adjustment. The addition of functional health status within existing risk-adjustment models has the potential to improve equitable resource allocation in the financing of care costs for more complex enrollees if handled appropriately. (Population Health Management 2016;19:136-144). PMID:26348621

  3. 5 CFR 1312.7 - Derivative classification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., DOWNGRADING, DECLASSIFICATION AND SAFEGUARDING OF NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION Classification and Declassification of National Security Information § 1312.7 Derivative classification. A derivative classification means that the information is in substance the same information that is currently classified, usually...

  4. 5 CFR 1312.7 - Derivative classification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., DOWNGRADING, DECLASSIFICATION AND SAFEGUARDING OF NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION Classification and Declassification of National Security Information § 1312.7 Derivative classification. A derivative classification means that the information is in substance the same information that is currently classified, usually...

  5. 5 CFR 1312.7 - Derivative classification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., DOWNGRADING, DECLASSIFICATION AND SAFEGUARDING OF NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION Classification and Declassification of National Security Information § 1312.7 Derivative classification. A derivative classification means that the information is in substance the same information that is currently classified, usually...

  6. 5 CFR 1312.7 - Derivative classification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., DOWNGRADING, DECLASSIFICATION AND SAFEGUARDING OF NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION Classification and Declassification of National Security Information § 1312.7 Derivative classification. A derivative classification means that the information is in substance the same information that is currently classified, usually...

  7. 5 CFR 1312.7 - Derivative classification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., DOWNGRADING, DECLASSIFICATION AND SAFEGUARDING OF NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION Classification and Declassification of National Security Information § 1312.7 Derivative classification. A derivative classification means that the information is in substance the same information that is currently classified, usually...

  8. Lauren classification and individualized chemotherapy in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    MA, JUNLI; SHEN, HONG; KAPESA, LINDA; ZENG, SHAN

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common malignancies worldwide. During the last 50 years, the histological classification of gastric carcinoma has been largely based on Lauren's criteria, in which gastric cancer is classified into two major histological subtypes, namely intestinal type and diffuse type adenocarcinoma. This classification was introduced in 1965, and remains currently widely accepted and employed, since it constitutes a simple and robust classification approach. The two histological subtypes of gastric cancer proposed by the Lauren classification exhibit a number of distinct clinical and molecular characteristics, including histogenesis, cell differentiation, epidemiology, etiology, carcinogenesis, biological behaviors and prognosis. Gastric cancer exhibits varied sensitivity to chemotherapy drugs and significant heterogeneity; therefore, the disease may be a target for individualized therapy. The Lauren classification may provide the basis for individualized treatment for advanced gastric cancer, which is increasingly gaining attention in the scientific field. However, few studies have investigated individualized treatment that is guided by pathological classification. The aim of the current review is to analyze the two major histological subtypes of gastric cancer, as proposed by the Lauren classification, and to discuss the implications of this for personalized chemotherapy. PMID:27123046

  9. [The AOSpine Classification of Thoraco-Lumbar Spine Injuries].

    PubMed

    Kandziora, F; Schleicher, P; Schnake, K J; Reinhold, M; Aarabi, B; Bellabarba, C; Chapman, J; Dvorak, M; Fehlings, M; Grossman, R; Kepler, C K; Öner, C; Shanmuganathan, R; Vialle, L R; Vaccaro, A R

    2016-02-01

    Optimal treatment of injuries to the thoracolumbar spine is based on a detailed analysis of instability, as indicated by injury morphology and neurological status, together with significant modifying factors. A classification system helps to structure this analysis and should also provide guidance for treatment. Existing classification systems, such as the Magerl classification, are complex and do not include the neurological status, while the TLICS system has been accused of over-simplifying the influence of fracture morphology and instability. The AOSpine classification group has developed a new classification system, based mainly upon the Magerl and TLICS classifications, and with the aim of overcoming these drawbacks. This differentiates three main types of injury: Type A lesions are compression lesions to the anterior column; Type B lesions are distraction lesions of either the anterior or the posterior column; Type C lesions are translationally unstable lesions. Type A and B lesions are split into subgroups. The neurological damage is graded in 5 steps, ranging from a transient neurological deficit to complete spinal cord injury. Additional modifiers describe disorders which affect treatment strategy, such as osteoporosis or ankylosing diseases. Evaluations of intra- and inter-observer reliability have been very promising and encourage the introduction of this AOSpine classification of thoracolumbar injuries to the German speaking community. PMID:27340713

  10. Significant Tsunami Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunbar, P. K.; Furtney, M.; McLean, S. J.; Sweeney, A. D.

    2014-12-01

    Tsunamis have inflicted death and destruction on the coastlines of the world throughout history. The occurrence of tsunamis and the resulting effects have been collected and studied as far back as the second millennium B.C. The knowledge gained from cataloging and examining these events has led to significant changes in our understanding of tsunamis, tsunami sources, and methods to mitigate the effects of tsunamis. The most significant, not surprisingly, are often the most devastating, such as the 2011 Tohoku, Japan earthquake and tsunami. The goal of this poster is to give a brief overview of the occurrence of tsunamis and then focus specifically on several significant tsunamis. There are various criteria to determine the most significant tsunamis: the number of deaths, amount of damage, maximum runup height, had a major impact on tsunami science or policy, etc. As a result, descriptions will include some of the most costly (2011 Tohoku, Japan), the most deadly (2004 Sumatra, 1883 Krakatau), and the highest runup ever observed (1958 Lituya Bay, Alaska). The discovery of the Cascadia subduction zone as the source of the 1700 Japanese "Orphan" tsunami and a future tsunami threat to the U.S. northwest coast, contributed to the decision to form the U.S. National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program. The great Lisbon earthquake of 1755 marked the beginning of the modern era of seismology. Knowledge gained from the 1964 Alaska earthquake and tsunami helped confirm the theory of plate tectonics. The 1946 Alaska, 1952 Kuril Islands, 1960 Chile, 1964 Alaska, and the 2004 Banda Aceh, tsunamis all resulted in warning centers or systems being established.The data descriptions on this poster were extracted from NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) global historical tsunami database. Additional information about these tsunamis, as well as water level data can be found by accessing the NGDC website www.ngdc.noaa.gov/hazard/

  11. Improving the classification of nuclear receptors with feature selection.

    PubMed

    Gao, Qing-Bin; Jin, Zhi-Chao; Ye, Xiao-Fei; Wu, Cheng; Lu, Jian; He, Jia

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear receptors are involved in multiple cellular signaling pathways that affect and regulate processes. Because of their physiology and pathophysiology significance, classification of nuclear receptors is essential for the proper understanding of their functions. Bhasin and Raghava have shown that the subfamilies of nuclear receptors are closely correlated with their amino acid composition and dipeptide composition [29]. They characterized each protein by a 400 dimensional feature vector. However, using high dimensional feature vectors for characterization of protein sequences will increase the computational cost as well as the risk of overfitting. Therefore, using only those features that are most relevant to the present task might improve the prediction system, and might also provide us with some biologically useful knowledge. In this paper a feature selection approach was proposed to identify relevant features and a prediction engine of support vector machines was developed to estimate the prediction accuracy of classification using the selected features. A reduced subset containing 30 features was accepted to characterize the protein sequences in view of its good discriminative power towards the classes, in which 18 are of amino acid composition and 12 are of dipeptide composition. This reduced feature subset resulted in an overall accuracy of 98.9% in a 5-fold cross-validation test, higher than 88.7% of amino acid composition based method and almost as high as 99.3% of dipeptide composition based method. Moreover, an overall accuracy of 93.7% was reached when it was evaluated on a blind data set of 63 nuclear receptors. On the other hand, an overall accuracy of 96.1% and 95.2% based on the reduced 12 dipeptide compositions was observed simultaneously in the 5-fold cross-validation test and the blind data set test, respectively. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of the present method. PMID:19601913

  12. A neural network approach to cloud classification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan; Weger, Ronald C.; Sengupta, Sailes K.; Welch, Ronald M.

    1990-01-01

    It is shown that, using high-spatial-resolution data, very high cloud classification accuracies can be obtained with a neural network approach. A texture-based neural network classifier using only single-channel visible Landsat MSS imagery achieves an overall cloud identification accuracy of 93 percent. Cirrus can be distinguished from boundary layer cloudiness with an accuracy of 96 percent, without the use of an infrared channel. Stratocumulus is retrieved with an accuracy of 92 percent, cumulus at 90 percent. The use of the neural network does not improve cirrus classification accuracy. Rather, its main effect is in the improved separation between stratocumulus and cumulus cloudiness. While most cloud classification algorithms rely on linear parametric schemes, the present study is based on a nonlinear, nonparametric four-layer neural network approach. A three-layer neural network architecture, the nonparametric K-nearest neighbor approach, and the linear stepwise discriminant analysis procedure are compared. A significant finding is that significantly higher accuracies are attained with the nonparametric approaches using only 20 percent of the database as training data, compared to 67 percent of the database in the linear approach.

  13. Video salient event classification using audio features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corchs, Silvia; Ciocca, Gianluigi; Fiori, Massimiliano; Gasparini, Francesca

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this work is to detect the events in video sequences that are salient with respect to the audio signal. In particular, we focus on the audio analysis of a video, with the goal of finding which are the significant features to detect audio-salient events. In our work we have extracted the audio tracks from videos of different sport events. For each video, we have manually labeled the salient audio-events using the binary markings. On each frame, features in both time and frequency domains have been considered. These features have been used to train different classifiers: Classification and Regression Trees, Support Vector Machine, and k-Nearest Neighbor. The classification performances are reported in terms of confusion matrices.

  14. Update on the classification of hemangioma.

    PubMed

    George, Antony; Mani, Varghese; Noufal, Ahammed

    2014-09-01

    Despite the fact that a biological classification of congenital vascular tumors and malformations was first published in 1982 by Mulliken and Glowacki, significant confusion still prevails due to the indiscriminate and interchangeable use of the terms hemangioma and vascular malformation. Hemangiomas are true neoplasms of endothelial cells and should be differentiated from vascular malformations which are localized defects of vascular morphogenesis. On an analysis of various scientific articles and latest edition of medical text books an inappropriate use of various terms for vascular lesions was found, contributing further towards the confusion. The widely accepted International Society for the Study of Vascular Anomalies (ISSVA) classification differentiates lesions with proliferative endothelium from lesions with structural anomalies and has been very helpful in standardizing the terminologies. In addition to overcoming obstacles in communication when describing a vascular lesion, it is important that we adhere to the correct terminology, as the therapeutic guidelines, management and follow-up of these lesions differ. PMID:25364160

  15. A Classification-based Review Recommender

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Mahony, Michael P.; Smyth, Barry

    Many online stores encourage their users to submit product/service reviews in order to guide future purchasing decisions. These reviews are often listed alongside product recommendations but, to date, limited attention has been paid as to how best to present these reviews to the end-user. In this paper, we describe a supervised classification approach that is designed to identify and recommend the most helpful product reviews. Using the TripAdvisor service as a case study, we compare the performance of several classification techniques using a range of features derived from hotel reviews. We then describe how these classifiers can be used as the basis for a practical recommender that automatically suggests the mosthelpful contrasting reviews to end-users. We present an empirical evaluation which shows that our approach achieves a statistically significant improvement over alternative review ranking schemes.

  16. Caesarean Section in Peru: Analysis of Trends Using the Robson Classification System

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cesarean section rates continue to increase worldwide while the reasons appear to be multiple, complex and, in many cases, country specific. Over the last decades, several classification systems for caesarean section have been created and proposed to monitor and compare caesarean section rates in a standardized, reliable, consistent and action-oriented manner with the aim to understand the drivers and contributors of this trend. The aims of the present study were to conduct an analysis in the three Peruvian geographical regions to assess levels and trends of delivery by caesarean section using the Robson classification for caesarean section, identify the groups of women with highest caesarean section rates and assess variation of maternal and perinatal outcomes according to caesarean section levels in each group over time. Material and Methods Data from 549,681 pregnant women included in the Peruvian Perinatal Information System database from 43 maternal facilities in three Peruvian geographical regions from 2000 and 2010 were studied. The data were analyzed using the Robson classification and women were studied in the ten groups in the classification. Cochran-Armitage test was used to evaluate time trends in the rates of caesarean section rates and; logistic regression was used to evaluate risk for each classification. Results The caesarean section rate was 27% and a yearly increase in the overall caesarean section rates from 2000 to 2010 from 23.5% to 30% (time trend p<0.001) was observed. Robson groups 1, 3 (nulliparous and multiparas, respectively, with a single cephalic term pregnancy in spontaneous labour), 5 (multiparas with a previous uterine scar with a single, cephalic, term pregnancy) and 7 (multiparas with a single breech pregnancy with or without previous scars) showed an increase in the caesarean section rates over time. Robson groups 1 and 3 were significantly associated with stillbirths (OR 1.43, CI95% 1.17–1.72; OR 3.53, CI95% 2.95

  17. Significance of quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) results in evaluation of three ELISAs and Western blot tests for detection of antibodies to human immunodeficiency virus in a high-risk population.

    PubMed Central

    Nishanian, P; Taylor, J M; Korns, E; Detels, R; Saah, A; Fahey, J L

    1987-01-01

    The characteristics of primary (first) tests with three enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antibody were determined. The three ELISAs were performed on 3,229, 3,130, and 685 specimens from high-risk individuals using the Litton (LT; Litton Bionetics Laboratory Products, Charleston, S.C.), Dupont (DP; E. I. du Pont de Nemours & Co., Inc., Wilmington, Del.), and Genetic Systems (GS; Genetic Systems, Seattle, Wash.) kits, respectively. Evaluation was based on the distribution of quantitative test results (such as optical densities), a comparison with Western blot (WB) results, reproducibility of the tests, and identification of seroconverters. The performances of the GS and the DP kits were good by all four criteria and exceeded that of the LT kit. Primary ELISA-negative results were not always confirmed with repeat ELISA and by WB testing. The largest percentage of these unconfirmed negative test results came from samples with quantitative results in the fifth percentile nearest the cutoff. Thus, supplementary testing was indicated for samples with test results in this borderline negative range. Similarly, borderline positive primary ELISA results that were quantitatively nearest (fifth percentile) the cutoff value were more likely to be antibody negative on supplementary testing than samples with high antibody values. In this study, results of repeated tests by GS ELISA showed the least change from first test results. DP ELISA showed more unconfirmed primary positive test results, and LT ELISA showed more unconfirmed primary negative test results. Designation of a specimen with a single ELISA quantitative level near the cutoff value as positive or negative should be viewed with skepticism. A higher than normal proportion of specimens with high negative optical densities by GS ELISA (fifth percentile nearest the cutoff) and also negative by WB were found to be from individuals in the process of seroconversion. PMID

  18. Comparison of the ESHRE–ESGE and ASRM classifications of Müllerian duct anomalies in everyday practice

    PubMed Central

    Ludwin, A.; Ludwin, I.

    2015-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Does the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology–European Society for Gynaecological Endoscopy (ESHRE–ESGE) classification of female genital tract malformations significantly increase the frequency of septate uterus diagnosis relative to the American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM) classification? SUMMARY ANSWER Use of the ESHRE–ESGE classification, compared with the ASRM classification, significantly increased the frequency of septate uterus recognition. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY The ESHRE–ESGE criteria were supposed to eliminate the subjective diagnoses of septate uterus by the ASRM criteria and replace the complementary absolute morphometric criteria. However, the clinical value of the ESHRE–ESGE classification in daily practice is difficult to appreciate. The application of the ESHRE–ESGE criteria has resulted in a significantly increased recognition of residual septum after hysteroscopic metroplasty, with a possible risk of overdiagnosis of septate uterus and problems for its management. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, AND DURATION A prospective observational study was performed with 261 women consecutively enrolled between June and September 2013. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, AND METHODS Non-pregnant women of reproductive age presented for evaluation to a private medical center. A gynecological examination and 3D ultrasonography were performed to assess the anatomy of the uterus, cervix and vagina. Congenital anomalies were diagnosed using the ASRM classification with additional morphometric criteria as well as with the ESHRE–ESGE classification. We compared the frequency and concordance of diagnoses of septate uterus and all congenital malformations of the uterus according to both classifications. The morphological characteristics of septate uterus recognized by both criteria were compared. MAIN RESULTS AND ROLE OF CHANCE Of the 261 patients enrolled in this study, septate uterus was diagnosed in 44 (16.9%) and 16 (6

  19. Tree Classification with Fused Mobile Laser Scanning and Hyperspectral Data

    PubMed Central

    Puttonen, Eetu; Jaakkola, Anttoni; Litkey, Paula; Hyyppä, Juha

    2011-01-01

    Mobile Laser Scanning data were collected simultaneously with hyperspectral data using the Finnish Geodetic Institute Sensei system. The data were tested for tree species classification. The test area was an urban garden in the City of Espoo, Finland. Point clouds representing 168 individual tree specimens of 23 tree species were determined manually. The classification of the trees was done using first only the spatial data from point clouds, then with only the spectral data obtained with a spectrometer, and finally with the combined spatial and hyperspectral data from both sensors. Two classification tests were performed: the separation of coniferous and deciduous trees, and the identification of individual tree species. All determined tree specimens were used in distinguishing coniferous and deciduous trees. A subset of 133 trees and 10 tree species was used in the tree species classification. The best classification results for the fused data were 95.8% for the separation of the coniferous and deciduous classes. The best overall tree species classification succeeded with 83.5% accuracy for the best tested fused data feature combination. The respective results for paired structural features derived from the laser point cloud were 90.5% for the separation of the coniferous and deciduous classes and 65.4% for the species classification. Classification accuracies with paired hyperspectral reflectance value data were 90.5% for the separation of coniferous and deciduous classes and 62.4% for different species. The results are among the first of their kind and they show that mobile collected fused data outperformed single-sensor data in both classification tests and by a significant margin. PMID:22163894

  20. A Novel Vehicle Classification Using Embedded Strain Gauge Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wenbin; Wang, Qi; Suo, Chunguang

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a new vehicle classification and develops a traffic monitoring detector to provide reliable vehicle classification to aid traffic management systems. The basic principle of this approach is based on measuring the dynamic strain caused by vehicles across pavement to obtain the corresponding vehicle parameters – wheelbase and number of axles – to then accurately classify the vehicle. A system prototype with five embedded strain sensors was developed to validate the accuracy and effectiveness of the classification method. According to the special arrangement of the sensors and the different time a vehicle arrived at the sensors one can estimate the vehicle's speed accurately, corresponding to the estimated vehicle wheelbase and number of axles. Because of measurement errors and vehicle characteristics, there is a lot of overlap between vehicle wheelbase patterns. Therefore, directly setting up a fixed threshold for vehicle classification often leads to low-accuracy results. Using the machine learning pattern recognition method to deal with this problem is believed as one of the most effective tools. In this study, support vector machines (SVMs) were used to integrate the classification features extracted from the strain sensors to automatically classify vehicles into five types, ranging from small vehicles to combination trucks, along the lines of the Federal Highway Administration vehicle classification guide. Test bench and field experiments will be introduced in this paper. Two support vector machines classification algorithms (one-against-all, one-against-one) are used to classify single sensor data and multiple sensor combination data. Comparison of the two classification method results shows that the classification accuracy is very close using single data or multiple data. Our results indicate that using multiclass SVM-based fusion multiple sensor data significantly improves the results of a single sensor data, which is trained on the

  1. Classification of breast tissue density by optical transillumination spectroscopy: optical and physiological effects governing predictive value

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blyschak, Kristina; Simick, Michelle K.; Jong, Roberta A.; Lilge, Lothar D.

    2003-12-01

    Preventive oncology is in need of a risk assessment technique that can identify individuals at high risk for breast cancer and that has the ability to monitor the efficacy of a risk reducing intervention. Optical transillumination spectroscopy (OTS) was shown to give information about breast tissue composition and tissue density. OTS is non-invasive, and in contrast to mammography, uses non-ionizing radiation. It is safe and can be used frequently on younger women, potentially permitting early risk detection and thus increasing the time available for risk reduction interventions to assert their influence. Before OTS can be used as a risk assessment and/or monitoring technique, its predictive ability needs to be demonstrated and maximized through the construction of mathematical models relating OTS and risk. To establish a correlation between OTS and mammographic density, Principle Components Analysis (PCA), using risk classification, is employed. PCA scores are presented in 3D cluster plots and a plane of differentiation that separates high and low tissue density is used to calculate the predictive value. Stratificaiton of PCA for measurement position on the breast in cranial-caudal projection is introduced. Analysis of PCA scores as a function of the volunteer's age and body mass index (BMI) is examined. A small but significant correlation between the component scores and age or BMI is noted but the correlation is dependnet on the tissue density category examined. Correction of the component scores for age and BMI is not recommended, since a priori knowledge of a women's tissue density is required. Stratification for the center and distal measurement positions provides a predictive value for OTS above 96%.

  2. Target Decomposition Techniques & Role of Classification Methods for Landcover Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Dharmendra; Mittal, Gunjan

    Target decomposition techniques aims at analyzing the received scattering matrix from polari-metric data to extract information about the scattering processes. Incoherent techniques have been modeled in recent years for providing more general approach for decomposition of natural targets. Therefore, there is a need to study and critically analyze the developing models for their suitability in classification of land covers. Moreover, the classification methods used for the segmentation of various landcovers from the decomposition techniques need to be examined as the appropriate selection of these methods affect the performance of the decomposition tech-niques for landcover classification. Therefore in the present paper, it is attempted to check the performance of various model based and an eigen vector based decomposition techniques for decomposition of Polarimetric PALSAR (Phased array type L band SAR) data. Few generic supervised classifiers were used for classification of decomposed images into three broad classes of water, urban and agriculture lands. For the purpose, algorithms had been applied twice on pre-processed PALSAR raw data once on spatial averaged (mean filtering on 33 window) data and the other on data, multilooked in azimuth direction by six looks and then filtered using Wishart Gamma MAP on 55 window. Classification of the decomposed images from each of the methods had been done using four supervised classifiers (parallelepiped, minimum distance, Mahalanobis and maximum likelihood). Ground truth data generated with the help of ground survey points, topographic sheet and google earth was used for the computation of classification accuracy. Parallelepiped classifier gave better classification accuracy of water class for all the models excluding H/A/Alpha. Minimum distance classifier gave better classification results for urban class. Maximum likelihood classifier performed well as compared to other classifiers for classification of vegetation class

  3. Towards Automatic Classification of Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Armañanzas, Rubén; Ascoli, Giorgio A.

    2015-01-01

    The classification of neurons into types has been much debated since the inception of modern neuroscience. Recent experimental advances are accelerating the pace of data collection. The resulting information growth of morphological, physiological, and molecular properties encourages efforts to automate neuronal classification by powerful machine learning techniques. We review state-of-the-art analysis approaches and availability of suitable data and resources, highlighting prominent challenges and opportunities. The effective solution of the neuronal classification problem will require continuous development of computational methods, high-throughput data production, and systematic metadata organization to enable cross-lab integration. PMID:25765323

  4. Statistical or biological significance?

    PubMed

    Saxon, Emma

    2015-01-01

    Oat plants grown at an agricultural research facility produce higher yields in Field 1 than in Field 2, under well fertilised conditions and with similar weather exposure; all oat plants in both fields are healthy and show no sign of disease. In this study, the authors hypothesised that the soil microbial community might be different in each field, and these differences might explain the difference in oat plant growth. They carried out a metagenomic analysis of the 16 s ribosomal 'signature' sequences from bacteria in 50 randomly located soil samples in each field to determine the composition of the bacterial community. The study identified >1000 species, most of which were present in both fields. The authors identified two plant growth-promoting species that were significantly reduced in soil from Field 2 (Student's t-test P < 0.05), and concluded that these species might have contributed to reduced yield. PMID:26541972

  5. The Use and Abuse of Diagnostic/Classification Criteria

    PubMed Central

    June, Rayford R.; Aggarwal, Rohit

    2015-01-01

    In rheumatic diseases, classification criteria have been developed to identify well-defined homogenous cohorts for clinical research. Although, they are commonly used in clinical practice, their use may not be appropriate for routine diagnostic clinical care. Classification criteria are being revised with improved methodology and further understanding of disease pathophysiology, but still may not encompass all unique clinical situations to be applied for diagnosis of heterogeneous, rare, evolving rheumatic diseases. Diagnostic criteria development is challenging primarily due to difficulty for universal application given significant differences in prevalence of rheumatic diseases based on geographical area and clinic settings. Despite these shortcomings, the clinician can still use classification criteria for understanding the disease as well as a guide for diagnosis with a few caveats. We present the limits of current classification criteria, describe their use and abuse in clinical practice, and how they should be used with caution when applied in clinics. PMID:26096094

  6. Representation and classification for high-throughput data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wessels, Lodewyk F. A.; Reinders, Marcel J. T.; van Welsem, Tibor; Nederlof, Petra M.

    2002-06-01

    Survival prediction and optimal treatment choice for cancer patients are dependent on correct disease classification. This classification can be improved significantly when high- throughput data such as microarray expression analysis is employed. These data sets usually suffer from the dimensionality problem: many features and few patients. Consequently, care must be taken when feature selection is performed and classifiers for disease classification are designed. In this paper we investigate several issues associated with this problem, including 1) data representation; 2) the type of classifier employed and 3) classifier construction, with specific emphasis on feature selection approaches. More specifically, 'filter' and 'wrapper' approaches for feature selection are studied. The different representations, selection criteria, classifiers and feature selection approaches are evaluated with regard to the effect on true classification performance. As test cases we employ a Comparative Genomic Hybridization breast cancer data sets and two publicly available gene expression data sets.

  7. Guideline classification to assist modeling, authoring, implementation and retrieval.

    PubMed Central

    Bernstam, E.; Ash, N.; Peleg, M.; Tu, S.; Boxwala, A. A.; Mork, P.; Shortliffe, E. H.; Greenes, R. A.

    2000-01-01

    The National Guideline Clearinghouse (NGC) and its guideline classification system are significant contributions to the study of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) and their incorporation into routine clinical care. The NGC classification system is primarily designed to support guideline retrieval. We believe that a guideline classification system should also support identification of features that relate to incorporation of executable CPGs into computer-based applications for sharing and delivering guideline-based advice. We have developed a proposed expansion of the NGC guideline classification for this purpose. The axes of the proposed scheme have implications for designing formal models and structures for representing and authoring CPGs. This scheme also has implications for future research. PMID:11079846

  8. Anthropological significance of phenylketonuria.

    PubMed

    Saugstad, L F

    1975-01-01

    The highest incidence rates of phenylketonuria (PKU) have been observed in Ireland and Scotlant. Parents heterozygous for PKU in Norway differ significantly from the general population in the Rhesus, Kell and PGM systems. The parents investigated showed an excess of Rh negative, Kell plus and PGM type 1 individuals, which makes them similar to the present populations in Ireland and Scotlant. It is postulated that the heterozygotes for PKU in Norway are descended from a completely assimilated sub-population of Celtic origin, who came or were brought here, 1ooo years ago. Bronze objects of Western European (Scottish, Irish) origin, found in Viking graves widely distributed in Norway, have been taken as evidence of Vikings returning with loot (including a number of Celts) from Western Viking settlements. The continuity of residence since the Viking age in most habitable parts of Norway, and what seems to be a nearly complete regional relationship between the sites where Viking graves contain western imported objects and the birthplaces of grandparents of PKUs identified in Norway, lend further support to the hypothesis that the heterozygotes for PKU in Norway are descended from a completely assimilated subpopulation. The remarkable resemblance between Iceland and Ireland, in respect of several genetic markers (including the Rhesus, PGM and Kell systems), is considered to be an expression of a similar proportion of people of Celtic origin in each of the two countries. Their identical, high incidence rates of PKU are regarded as further evidence of this. The significant decline in the incidence of PKU when one passes from Ireland, Scotland and Iceland, to Denmark and on to Norway and Sweden, is therefore explained as being related to a reduction in the proportion of inhabitants of Celtic extraction in the respective populations. PMID:803884

  9. New Classification of Herlyn-Werner-Wunderlich Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lan; Chen, Na; Tong, Jia-Li; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Lei; Lang, Jing-He

    2015-01-01

    Background: Uterus didelphys and blind hemivagina associated with ipsilateral renal agenesis are collectively known as Herlyn-Werner-Wunderlich syndrome (HWWS). In the literature, the syndrome often appears as a single case report or as a small series. In our study, we reviewed the characteristics of all HWWS patients at Peking Union Medical College Hospital (PUMCH) and suggested a new classification for this syndrome because the clinical characteristics differed significantly between the completely and incompletely obstructed vaginal septum. This new classification allows for earlier diagnosis and treatment. Methods: From January 1986 to March 2013, all diagnosed cases of HWWS at PUMCH were reviewed. A retrospective long-term follow-up study of the clinical presentation, surgical prognosis, and pregnancy outcomes was performed. Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS, version 15.0 (IBM, Armonk, NY, USA). Between-group comparisons were performed using the χ2 test, Fisher's exact test, and the t-test. The significance level for all analyses was set at P < 0.05. Results: The clinical data from 79 patients with HWWS were analyzed until March 31, 2013. According to our newly identified characteristics, we recommend that the syndrome be classified by the complete or incomplete obstruction of the hemivagina as follows: Classification 1, a completely obstructed hemivagina and Classification 2, an incompletely obstructed hemivagina. The clinical details associated with these two types are distinctly different. Conclusions: HWWS patients should be differentiated according to these two classifications. The two classifications could be generalized by gynecologists world-wide. PMID:25591566

  10. [Risk and risk perception].