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1

Maternal Risk Factors for Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders  

PubMed Central

Gathering information about drinking during pregnancy is one of the most difficult aspects of studying fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). This information is critical to linking specific risk factors to any particular diagnosis within the FASD continuum. This article reviews highlights from the literature on maternal risk factors for FASD and illustrates that maternal risk is multidimensional, including factors related to quantity, frequency, and timing of alcohol exposure; maternal age; number of pregnancies; number of times the mother has given birth; the mother’s body size; nutrition; socioeconomic status; metabolism; religion; spirituality; depression; other drug use; and social relationships. More research is needed to more clearly define what type of individual behavioral, physical, and genetic factors are most likely to lead to having children with FASD. PMID:23580036

May, Philip A.; Gossage, J. Phillip

2011-01-01

2

Maternal Risk Factors for Congenital Cerebral Palsy  

E-print Network

delivery as the cause for the child’s cerebral palsy. Lie etCerebral palsy, low birthweight and socio-economic deprivation: inequalities in a major causecause for CP, Most studies have focused on prenatal risk factors of cerebral palsy.

Streja, Elani

2012-01-01

3

Maternal parity, fetal and childhood growth, and cardiometabolic risk factors.  

PubMed

We examined the associations of maternal parity with fetal and childhood growth characteristics and childhood cardiometabolic risk factors in a population-based prospective cohort study among 9031 mothers and their children. Fetal and childhood growth were repeatedly measured. We measured childhood anthropometrics, body fat distribution, left ventricular mass, blood pressure, blood lipids, and insulin levels at the age of 6 years. Compared with nulliparous mothers, multiparous mothers had children with higher third trimester fetal head circumference, length and weight growth, and lower risks of preterm birth and small-size-for-gestational-age at birth but a higher risk of large-size-for-gestational-age at birth (P<0.05). Children from multiparous mothers had lower rates of accelerated infant growth and lower levels of childhood body mass index, total fat mass percentage, and total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol than children of nulliparous mothers (P<0.05). They also had a lower risk of childhood overweight (odds ratio, 0.75 [95% confidence interval, 0.63–0.88]). The risk of childhood clustering of cardiometabolic risk factors was not statistically significantly different (odds ratio, 0.82; 95% confidence interval, 0.64–1.05). Among children from multiparous mothers only, we observed consistent trends toward a lower risk of childhood overweight and lower cholesterol levels with increasing parity (P<0.05). In conclusion, offspring from nulliparous mothers have lower fetal but higher infant growth rates and higher risks of childhood overweight and adverse metabolic profile. Maternal nulliparity may have persistent cardiometabolic consequences for the offspring. PMID:24866145

Gaillard, Romy; Rurangirwa, Akashi A; Williams, Michelle A; Hofman, Albert; Mackenbach, Johan P; Franco, Oscar H; Steegers, Eric A P; Jaddoe, Vincent W V

2014-08-01

4

Maternal and fetal risk factors for stillbirth: population based study  

PubMed Central

Objective To assess the main risk factors associated with stillbirth in a multiethnic English maternity population. Design Cohort study. Setting National Health Service region in England. Population 92?218 normally formed singletons including 389 stillbirths from 24 weeks of gestation, delivered during 2009-11. Main outcome measure Risk of stillbirth. Results Multivariable analysis identified a significant risk of stillbirth for parity (para 0 and para ?3), ethnicity (African, African-Caribbean, Indian, and Pakistani), maternal obesity (body mass index ?30), smoking, pre-existing diabetes, and history of mental health problems, antepartum haemorrhage, and fetal growth restriction (birth weight below 10th customised birthweight centile). As potentially modifiable risk factors, maternal obesity, smoking in pregnancy, and fetal growth restriction together accounted for 56.1% of the stillbirths. Presence of fetal growth restriction constituted the highest risk, and this applied to pregnancies where mothers did not smoke (adjusted relative risk 7.8, 95% confidence interval 6.6 to 10.9), did smoke (5.7, 3.6 to 10.9), and were exposed to passive smoke only (10.0, 6.6 to 15.8). Fetal growth restriction also had the largest population attributable risk for stillbirth and was fivefold greater if it was not detected antenatally than when it was (32.0% v 6.2%). In total, 195 of the 389 stillbirths in this cohort had fetal growth restriction, but in 160 (82%) it had not been detected antenatally. Antenatal recognition of fetal growth restriction resulted in delivery 10 days earlier than when it was not detected: median 270 (interquartile range 261-279) days v 280 (interquartile range 273-287) days. The overall stillbirth rate (per 1000 births) was 4.2, but only 2.4 in pregnancies without fetal growth restriction, increasing to 9.7 with antenatally detected fetal growth restriction and 19.8 when it was not detected. Conclusion Most normally formed singleton stillbirths are potentially avoidable. The single largest risk factor is unrecognised fetal growth restriction, and preventive strategies need to focus on improving antenatal detection. PMID:23349424

2013-01-01

5

Maternal and perinatal risk factors for childhood leukemia  

SciTech Connect

This report describes an exploratory population-based study of maternal and perinatal risk factors for childhood leukemia in Sweden. The Swedish National Cancer Registry ascertained 411 cases in successive birth cohorts from 1973 through 1984 recorded in the Swedish Medical Birth Registry. Using the latter, we matched five controls without cancer to each case by sex and month and year of birth. Mothers of children with leukemia were more likely to have been exposed to nitrous oxide anesthesia during delivery than mothers of controls (odds ratio (OR) = 1.3; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.0, 1.6). Children with leukemia were more likely than controls to have Down's syndrome (OR = 32.5; 95% CI = 7.3, 144.0) or cleft lip or cleft palate (OR = 5.0; 95% CI = 1.0, 24.8); to have had a diagnosis associated with difficult labor but unspecified complications (OR = 4.5; 95% CI = 1.1, 18.2) or with other conditions of the fetus or newborn (OR = 1.5; 95% CI = 1.1, 2.1), specifically, uncomplicated physiological jaundice (OR = 1.9; 95% CI = 1.2, 2.9); or to have received supplemental oxygen (OR = 2.6; 95% CI = 1.3, 1.3, 4.9). Because multiple potential risk factors were analyzed in this study, future studies need to check these findings. The authors did not confirm the previously reported higher risks for childhood leukemia associated with being male, having a high birth weight, or being born to a woman of advanced maternal age.

Zack, M.; Adami, H.O.; Ericson, A. (Centers for Disease Control, Atlanta, GA (USA))

1991-07-15

6

Risk Factors Linking Maternal Depressed Mood to Growth in Adolescent Substance Use  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Maternal depression has been implicated in the development of adolescent substance use. Conceptualizing depression as a continuum, the aims of this study are to (a) understand the relationship between maternal depressed mood and risk factors associated with adolescent substance use; (b) understand the relationship between maternal depressed mood…

Cortes, Rebecca C.; Fleming, Charles B.; Mason, W. Alex; Catalano, Richard F.

2009-01-01

7

Community Diagnosis of Maternal Exposure to Risk Factors for Congenital Defects  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: This paper describes a community diagnosis of maternal exposure to risk factors for congenital defects in the population of Pelotas, RS, Brazil (400,000 inhabitants). The authors investigated biological and demographic factors (maternal age, alcohol ingestion and smoking), social and economic factors (family income and type of work), and welfare factors (prenatal care, illnesses during pregnancy, drug therapy, and vaccinations).

Gilberto de Lima Garcias; Lavínia Schüler-Faccini

2003-01-01

8

The Relative Impact of Maternal Depression and Associated Risk Factors on Offspring Psychopathology  

PubMed Central

Background In general, depressed mothers experience more environmental and family risk factors, and lead riskier lifestyles, than mothers who are not depressed. Aims To test whether the exposure of the child to risk factors associated with mental health adds to the prediction of child psychopathology beyond exposure to maternal depression. Method In 7,429 mother-offspring pairs participating in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children in the United Kingdom, maternal depression was assessed at child age 1.5 years; multiple risk factor exposures were examined between birth and child age 2 years; and DSM-IV based externalizing and internalizing diagnoses were evaluated at child age 7.5 years. Results Children of depressed mothers were exposed to more risk factors associated with maternal mental health. Maternal depression increased diagnoses of externalizing and internalizing disorders, but a substantial portion of these associations was explained by increased risk factor exposure (37% and 41%, respectively). At the same time, these risk exposures significantly increased the odds of both externalizing and internalizing diagnoses, over and above the influence of maternal depression. Conclusions Children of depressed mothers are exposed to both maternal psychopathology and risks that are associated with maternal mental health. These results may explain why treating depressed mothers shows beneficial effects for children, but does not completely neutralize the increased risk of psychopathology and impairment. PMID:22241929

Barker, Edward D.; Copeland, William; Maughan, Barbara; Jaffee, Sara R.; Uher, Rudolf

2013-01-01

9

Risk factors for adverse maternal outcomes among women with HELLP (hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelet count) syndrome  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: This study was undertake to determine risk factors for adverse maternal outcomes among women with HELLP (hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelet count) syndrome. Study Design: Maternal medical records of pregnancies complicated by HELLP syndrome managed between July 1, 1992, and April 30, 1999, were reviewed. Risk factors evaluated included maternal age, parity, race, previous preeclampsia, chronic hypertension,

Bassam Haddad; John R. Barton; Jeffrey C. Livingston; Rabih Chahine; Baha M. Sibai

2000-01-01

10

Independence and Interplay between Maternal and Child Risk Factors for Preschool Problem Behaviors?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the independence and interplay between cognitive risk factors (poor executive function/emotion understanding) and maternal risk factors (low education/high depression) for preschool problem behaviors, indexed by multi-measure, multi-informant (mother/teacher/ researcher) ratings. A socio-economically diverse sample of 235…

Hughes, Claire; Ensor, Rosie

2009-01-01

11

Analysis of Maternal Risk Factors Associated With Congenital Vertebral Malformations  

PubMed Central

Study Design A retrospective chart review of cases with congenital vertebral malformations (CVM) and controls with normal spine morphology. Objective To determine the relative contribution of maternal environmental factors (MEF) during pregnancy including maternal insulin dependent diabetes mellitus, valproic acid, alcohol, smoking, hyperthermia, twin gestation, assisted reproductive technology, in-vitro fertilization and maternal clomiphene usage to CVM development. Summary of Background Data Congenital vertebral malformations (CVM) represent defects in formation and segmentation of somites occurring with an estimated incidence of between 0.13–0.50 per 1000 live births. CVM may be associated with congenital scoliosis, Klippel-Feil syndrome, hemifacial microsomia and VACTERL syndromes, and represent significant morbidity due to pain and cosmetic disfigurement. Methods A multicenter retrospective chart review of 229 cases with CVM and 267 controls with normal spine morphology between the ages of 1–50 years was performed in order to obtain the odds ratio (OR) of MEF related to CVM among cases vs. controls. CVM due to an underlying syndrome associated with a known gene mutation or chromosome etiology were excluded. An imputation based analysis was performed in which subjects with no documentation of MEF history were treated as no maternal exposure.” Univariate and multivariate analysis was conducted to calculate the OR. Results Of the 229 total cases, 104 cases had single or multiple CVM without additional congenital malformations (CM) (Group 1) and 125 cases had single or multiple CVM and additional CM (Group 2). Nineteen percent of total cases had an identified MEF. The OR (95% CI, P-value) for MEF history for Group 1 was 6.0 (2.4–15.1, P<0.001) in the univariate analysis. The OR for MEF history in Group 2 was 9.1 (95%CI, P-value) (3.8–21.6, P<0.001) in the univariate analysis. The results were confirmed in the multivariate analysis, after adjusting for age, gender, and institution. Discussion These results support a hypothesis for an association between the above MEF during pregnancy and CVM and have implications for development of prevention strategies. Further prospective studies are needed to quantify association between CVM and specific MEF. PMID:23446706

Hesemann, Jennifer; Lauer, Emily; Ziska, Stephen; Noonan, Kenneth; Nemeth, Blaise; Scott-Schwoerer, Jessica; McCarty, Catherine; Rasmussen, Kristen; Goldberg, Jacob M.; Sund, Sarah; Eickhoff, Jens; Raggio, Cathleen L.; Giampietro, Philip F.

2014-01-01

12

Maternal Depressive Symptoms as a Risk Factor for the Development of Children in Poverty.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Higher rates of mental health problems, including depression, have consistently been documented among lower-income samples, and the highest rates of depression have been found among low-income mothers with young children. This study examined maternal depressive symptoms as a risk factor for the development of children who are already at risk by…

Coiro, Mary Jo

13

Adverse maternal outcomes associated with fetal macrosomia: what are the risk factors beyond birthweight?  

PubMed Central

Background To identify risk factors, beyond fetal weight, associated with adverse maternal outcomes in delivering infants with a birthweight of 4000 g or greater, and to quantify their role in maternal complications. Methods All women (n?=?1564) with singleton pregnancies who attempted vaginal delivery and delivered infants weighing at least 4000 g, in two French tertiary care centers from 2005 to 2008, were included in our study. The studied outcome was maternal complications defined as composite item including the occurrence of a third- or fourth-degree perineal laceration, or the occurrence of severe postpartum hemorrhage requiring the use of prostaglandins, uterine artery embolization, internal iliac artery ligation or haemostatic hysterectomy, or the occurrence of blood transfusion. Univariate analysis, multivariable logistic regression and estimation of attributable risk were used. Results Maternal complications were increased in Asian women (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 3.1; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1–9.3, Attributable risk (AR): 3%), in prolonged labor (aOR?=?1.9 [95% CI; 1.1–3.4], AR?=?12%) and in cesarean delivery during labor (aOR?=?2.2 [95% CI; 1.3–3.9], AR?=?17%). Delivering infants with a birthweight?>?4500 g also increased the occurrence of maternal complications (aOR?=?2.7 [95% CI; 1.4–5.1]) but with an attributable risk of only 10%. Multiparous women with a previous delivery of a macrosomic infant were at lower risk of maternal complications (aOR?=?0.5 [95% CI; 0.2–0.9]). Conclusion In women delivering infants with a birthweight of 4000 g or greater, some maternal characteristics as well as labor parameters may worsen maternal outcome beyond the influence of increased fetal weight. PMID:23565692

2013-01-01

14

Polymorphisms in Genes Involved in Folate Metabolism as Maternal Risk Factors for Down Syndrome  

Microsoft Academic Search

Down syndrome is a complex genetic and metabolic disorder attributed to the presence of three copies of chro- mosome 21. The extra chromosome derives from the mother in 93% of cases and is due to abnormal chromosome segregation during meiosis (nondisjunction). Except for advanced age at conception, maternal risk factors for meiotic nondisjunction are not well established. A recent preliminary

Charlotte A. Hobbs; Stephanie L. Sherman; Ping Yi; Sarah E. Hopkins; Claudine P. Torfs; R. Jean Hine; Marta Pogribna; Rima Rozen; S. Jill James

2000-01-01

15

Maternal Dietary Risk Factors in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (United States)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common childhood cancer, and the second most common cause of mortality in children aged 1–14 years. Recent research has established that the disease can originate in utero, and thus maternal diet may be an important risk factor for ALL.

Christopher D. Jensen; Gladys Block; Patricia Buffler; Xiaomei Ma; Steve Selvin

2004-01-01

16

Maternal and family factors and child eating pathology: risk and protective relationships  

PubMed Central

Background Previous studies have found associations between maternal and family factors and child eating disorder symptoms. However, it is not clear whether family factors predict eating disorder symptoms specifically, or relate to more general child psychopathology, of which eating disorder symptoms may be one component. This study aimed to identify maternal and family factors that may predict increases or decreases in child eating disorder symptoms over time, accounting for children’s body mass index z-scores and levels of general psychological distress. Methods Participants were 221 mother-child dyads from the Childhood Growth and Development Study, a prospective cohort study in Western Australia. Participants were assessed at baseline, 1-year follow-up and 2-year follow-up using interview and self-report measures. Children had a mean age of 10 years at baseline and 46% were male. Linear mixed models and generalised estimating equations were used to identify predictors of children’s eating disorder symptoms, with outcome variables including a global index of eating disorder psychopathology, levels of dietary restraint, levels of emotional eating, and the presence of loss of control (‘binge’) eating. Results Children of mothers with a current or past eating disorder reported significantly higher levels of global eating disorder symptoms and emotional eating than other children, and mothers with a current or past eating disorder reported significantly more concern about their children’s weight than other mothers. Maternal concern about child weight, rather than maternal eating disorder symptoms, was significant in predicting child eating disorder symptoms over time. Family exposure to stress and low maternal education were additional risk factors for eating disorder symptoms, whilst child-reported family satisfaction was a protective factor. Conclusions After adjusting for relevant confounding variables, maternal concern about child weight, children’s level of family satisfaction, family exposure to stress, and maternal education are unique predictors of child eating disorder symptoms. PMID:24808944

2014-01-01

17

Risk factors for maternal mortality in a Tertiary Hospital in Kenya: a case control study  

PubMed Central

Background Maternal mortality is high in Africa, especially in Kenya where there is evidence of insufficient progress towards Millennium Development Goal (MDG) Five, which is to reduce the global maternal mortality rate by three quarters and provide universal access to reproductive health by 2015. This study aims to identify risk factors associated with maternal mortality in a tertiary level hospital in Kenya. Methods A manual review of records for 150 maternal deaths (cases) and 300 controls was undertaken using a standard audit form. The sample included pregnant women aged 15-49 years admitted to the Obstetric and Gynaecological wards at the Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital (MTRH) in Kenya from January 2004 and March 2011. Logistic regression analysis was used to assess risk factors for maternal mortality. Results Factors significantly associated with maternal mortality included: having no education relative to secondary education (OR 3.3, 95% CI 1.1-10.4, p?=?0.0284), history of underlying medical conditions (OR 3.9, 95% CI 1.7-9.2, p?=?0.0016), doctor attendance at birth (OR 4.6, 95% CI 2.1-10.1, p?=?0.0001), having no antenatal visits (OR 4.1, 95% CI 1.6-10.4, p?=?0.0007), being admitted with eclampsia (OR 10.9, 95% CI 3.7-31.9, p?maternal education are important risk factors for maternal mortality, even after adjusting for comorbidities and complications. Antenatal visits can provide opportunities for detecting risk factors for eclampsia, and other underlying illnesses but the visits need to be frequent and timely. Education enables access to information and helps empower women and their spouses to make appropriate decisions during pregnancy. PMID:24447854

2014-01-01

18

The effects of maternal modeling and parenting style on the development of eating disorder risk factors in adolescent daughters  

E-print Network

. The objective of this research was to determine the relationship, if any, of maternal parenting style and eating attitudes to adolescent daughters' development of eating disorder risk factors (self esteem concerns, weight loss behaviors, and food preoccupation...

Maddox, Lori Ann

2012-06-07

19

Identifying maternal risk factors associated with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders: a systematic review.  

PubMed

To identify the demographic, psychological, and social maternal risk factors associated with the development of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD). A bibliographic search was conducted in PubMed, SciELO, Lilacs, Web of Knowledge, and PsycINFO. The Newcastle-Ottawa Quality Assessment Scale (NOS) was used to evaluate the quality of the studies with case-control design. Articles were selected based on their relevance and presentation of data related to statistical comparisons of at least one or more demographic, psychological, or social maternal risk factors for FASD. 738 references were identified, of which 15 met the criteria to be included in the present review. Mothers of FASD children tend to: be older at the time of birth of the affected child, present lower educational level, have other family relatives with alcohol abuse, have other children with FASD, present a pattern of little prenatal care and a distinguishing pattern of alcohol consumption (alcohol use before and during pregnancy, failure to reduce alcohol use during pregnancy, and frequent episodes of binge drinking). Application of the NOS scale of methodological quality indicated that 8 studies (53 %) met the criterion for selection, 4 (27 %) were suitable for the criterion for comparability and only 4 studies were suitable for the exposition criterion. Mothers of FASD children have a distinctive pattern of drinking and accumulate several social risk factors. Maternal age at birth of the child seems to accentuate the risk. There are, however, few controlled studies that are adequate according to the NOS requirements for methodological quality. Fewer are based on the verification of a theoretical model. Clinicians should be aware of the relevance of preventive assessment of FASD risk mothers. PMID:25164262

Esper, Larissa Horta; Furtado, Erikson Felipe

2014-10-01

20

Maternal inexperience as a risk factor of innate fear and PTSD-like symptoms in mice.  

PubMed

In laboratory rats and mice, differences in maternal care during the first week of life have been shown to exert long-lasting consequences on cognitive functioning and stress processing of the offspring. Such epigenetic programming is also assumed to play an important role in the transgenerational transmission of PTSD in humans. Here we studied whether even subtle within-subject differences in maternal care - caused by increasing mothering experience from the first to the second litter - can determine subsequent vulnerability for PTSD-like behaviour. To assess the influence of maternal experience on different components of fear, we analysed the adult male offspring of two subsequent litters (offspring 1, 2) from the same parental C57BL/6NCrl (B6N) and C57BL/6JOla (B6JOla) mice for (i) their innate anxiety behaviour on a modified hole board and (ii) their vulnerability to develop long-lasting PTSD-like fear symptoms ("hyperarousal", contextually conditioned fear) following perception of an inescapable foot shock. Increasing maternal experience reduced the animals' innate fear on the modified hole board (more exploration, less inhibition), the acute stress reaction to the shock and - one month after trauma - the levels of hyperarousal-like behaviour in the PTSD-prone B6N strain. In contrast, both acquisition and extinction of contextually conditioned fear were increased in the second offspring, representing cognitive flexibility. A factor analysis showed that innate fear, "hyperarousal" and conditioned fear represent independent behavioural dimensions. In conclusion, the present study identifies maternal inexperience as a risk factor for the development of PTSD-like symptoms. This effect - occurring in inbred mice on an almost identical genetic background - emphasizes the impact of epigenetic factors in PTSD-like behaviour. PMID:19304295

Siegmund, Anja; Dahlhoff, Maik; Habersetzer, Ursula; Mederer, Anna; Wolf, Eckhard; Holsboer, Florian; Wotjak, Carsten T

2009-09-01

21

Maternal hormonal interventions as a risk factor for Autism Spectrum Disorder: an epidemiological assessment from India.  

PubMed

Globalization and women empowerment have led to stressful life among Indian women. This stress impairs women's hormonal makeup and menstrual cycle, leading to infertility. National Family Health Survey-3 (NFHS-3) reports a decline in fertility status in India, indicating a rise in various infertility treatments involving hormonal interventions. No studies are available from India on the risk association link between maternal hormonal treatments and ASD. Hence, this study explores the association of maternal hormonal interventions with risk for ASD. Parents of 942 children (471 ASD and 471 controls) across 9 cities in India participated in the questionnaire-based study. The questionnaire was pilot tested and validated for its content and reliability as a psychometric instrument. Data collection was done at 70 centres through direct interaction with parents and with the help of trained staff. Statistical analysis of data was carried out using SAS 9.1.3. Out of the 471 ASD cases analysed, 58 mothers had undergone hormonal interventions (12.3 percent) while there were only 22 mothers among controls who underwent hormonal interventions (4.6 percent). According to logistic regression analysis maternal hormonal intervention (OR=2.24) was a significant risk factor for ASD. PMID:24296891

Mamidala, Madhu Poornima; Polinedi, Anupama; Kumar, P T V Praveen; Rajesh, N; Vallamkonda, Omsai Ramesh; Udani, Vrajesh; Singhal, Nidhi; Rajesh, Vidya

2013-12-01

22

Birthweight below the tenth percentile: the relative and attributable risks of maternal tobacco consumption and other factors.  

PubMed

Analysis of 7776 singleton births defined a cohort of babies with birthweight below the 10th percentile after adjusting for gestational age and sex. The relative risk of a baby being small for gestational age in respect to a number of factors, such as parental anthropometry, demographic factors, behavior patterns (tobacco, cannabis, alcohol, and caffeine consumption), maternal pathology, and fetal abnormality, was calculated. The highest relative risks are associated with severe antepartum hemorrhage, severe pre-eclampsia, and severe fetal abnormality. As these are relatively rare events, a more accurate calculation of overall risk to the population as opposed to the individual can be obtained by studying the percent attributable risk of each of the factors. This demonstrates that maternal tobacco consumption is the major environmental risk factor in our population. PMID:8143631

Morrison, J; Williams, G M; Najman, J M; Andersen, M J; Keeping, J D

1993-10-01

23

Risk factors for burns in children: crowding, poverty, and poor maternal education  

PubMed Central

Objective: To characterize the presentation of burns in children and risk factors associated with their occurrence in a developing country as a basis for future prevention programs. Design: Case-control study. Setting: Burn unit of the National Institute of Child Health (Instituto Nacional de Salud del Niño) in Lima, Peru. Methods: A questionnaire was administered to all consenting guardians of children admitted to the burns (cases) and general medicine (controls) units during a period of 14 months. Guardians of patients were questioned regarding etiology of the injury, demographic and socioeconomic data. Results: 740 cases and controls were enrolled. Altogether 77.5% of the cases burns occurred in the patient's home, with 67.8% in the kitchen; 74% were due to scalding. Most involved children younger than 5 years. Lack of water supply (odds ratio (OR) 5.2, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.1 to 12.3), low income (OR 2.8, 95% CI 2.0 to 3.9), and crowding (OR 2.5, 95%CI 1.7 to 3.6) were associated with an increased risk. The presence of a living room (OR 0.6, 95% CI 0.4 to 0.8) and better maternal education (OR 0.6, 95% CI 0.5 to 0.9) were protective factors. Conclusions: To prevent burns interventions should be directed to low socioeconomic status groups; these interventions should be designed accordingly to local risk factors. PMID:11928972

Delgado, J; Ramirez-Cardich, M; Gilman, R; Lavarello, R; Dahodwala, N; Bazan, A; Rodriguez, V; Cama, R; Tovar, M; Lescano, A

2002-01-01

24

Population-based study of risk factors for severe maternal morbidity  

PubMed Central

Summary Background Severe maternal morbidity (SMM) is a serious health condition potentially resulting in death without immediate medical attention, including organ failure, obstetric shock, and elcampsia. SMM affects 20,000 US women every year; however, few population-based studies have examined SMM risk factors. Methods We conducted a population-based case-control study linking birth certificate and hospital discharge data from Washington State (1987–2008), identifying 9,485 women with an antepartum, intrapartum, or postpartum SMM with ?3-day hospitalization or transfer from another facility and 41,112 random controls. Maternal age, race, smoking during pregnancy, parity, preexisting medical condition, multiple birth, prior cesarean delivery, and BMI were assessed as risk factors with logistic regression to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI), adjusted for education and delivery payer source. Results Older women [35–39: OR 1.65 CI 1.52, 1.79; 40+: OR 2.48 CI 2.16, 2.81], non-white women [Black: OR 1.82 CI 1.64, 2.01; American Indian: OR 1.52 CI 1.32, 1.73; Asian/Pacific Islander: OR 1.30 CI 1.19, 1.41; Hispanic: OR 1.17 CI 1.07, 1.27], and women at parity extremes [OR 1.83 CI 1.72, 1.95, nulliparous; OR 1.34 CI 1.23, 1.45, parity 3+] were at greater risk of SMM. Women with a preexisting medical condition [OR 2.10 CI 1.88, 2.33], a multiple birth [OR 2.54 CI 2.26, 2.82], and a prior cesarean delivery [OR 2.08 CI 1.93, 2.23] were also at increased risk. Conclusion The risk factors identified are not modifiable at the individual level; therefore, provider and system-level factors may be the most appropriate target for preventing SMM. PMID:23061686

Gray, Kristen E; Wallace, Erin R; Nelson, Kailey R; Reed, Susan D; Schiff, Melissa A

2012-01-01

25

Maternal SNPs in the p53 pathway: risk factors for trisomy 21?  

PubMed

The p53 family and its regulatory pathway play an important role as regulators of developmental processes, limiting the propagation of aneuploid cells. Its dysfunction or imbalance can lead to pathological abnormalities in humans. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of maternal polymorphisms TP53 c.215G>C (P72R), TP73 4 c.-30G>A and 14 c.-20C>T, MDM2 c.14+309T>G (SNP309), MDM4 c.753+572C>T and USP7 c.2719-234G>A as risk factors for Down Syndrome (DS) birth. A case-control study was conducted with 263 mothers of DS children and 196 control mothers. The distribution of these genotypic variants was similar between case and control mothers. However, the combined alleles TP53 C and MDM2 G, and P53 C and USP7 A increased the risk of having offspring with DS (OR=1.84 and 1.77; 95% CI; P < 0.007 and 0.018, respectively). These results suggest that, although the individual polymorphisms were not associated with DS birth, the effect of the combined genotypes among TP53, MDM2 and USP7 genes indicates a possible role of TP53 and its regulatory pathway as a risk factor for aneuploidy. PMID:23089923

Boquett, Juliano André; Brandalize, Ana Paula Carneiro; Fraga, Lucas Rosa; Schuler-Faccini, Lavínia

2013-01-01

26

Maternal SNPs in the p53 Pathway: Risk Factors for Trisomy 21?  

PubMed Central

The p53 family and its regulatory pathway play an important role as regulators of developmental processes, limiting the propagation of aneuploid cells. Its dysfunction or imbalance can lead to pathological abnormalities in humans. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of maternal polymorphisms TP53 c.215G>C (P72R), TP73 4 c.-30G>A and 14 c.-20C>T, MDM2 c.14+309T>G (SNP309), MDM4 c.753+572C>T and USP7 c.2719-234G>A as risk factors for Down Syndrome (DS) birth. A case-control study was conducted with 263 mothers of DS children and 196 control mothers. The distribution of these genotypic variants was similar between case and control mothers. However, the combined alleles TP53 C and MDM2 G, and TP53 C and USP7 A increased the risk of having offspring with DS (OR = 1.84 and 1.77; 95% CI; P < 0.007 and 0.018, respectively). These results suggest that, although the individual polymorphisms were not associated with DS birth, the effect of the combined genotypes among TP53, MDM2 and USP7 genes indicates a possible role of TP53 and its regulatory pathway as a risk factor for aneuploidy. PMID:23089923

Boquett, Juliano Andre; Brandalize, Ana Paula Carneiro; Fraga, Lucas Rosa; Schuler-Faccini, Lavinia

2013-01-01

27

Activation of the Maternal Immune System as a Risk Factor for Neuropsychiatric Disorders  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Maternal infection can alter the intrauterine environment, placing the developing fetus at risk. Serious infections of the\\u000a mother or the fetus can cause severe problems or even miscarriage. The more common and seemingly benign infections, such as\\u000a influenza, do not appear associated with such severe outcomes. However, recent work has shown that maternal inflammation associated\\u000a with any infection has the

Stephen E. P. Smith; Elaine Hsiao; Paul H. Patterson

28

Maternal Obesity and Energy Intake as Risk Factors of Pregnancy-induced Hypertension among Iranian Women  

PubMed Central

ABSTRACT Pregnancy-induced hypertension is causing striking maternal, foetal and neonatal mortality and morbidity in the world. A case-control study was conducted on 113 women with gestational hypertension and 150 healthy pregnant women at Shahid Akbarabadi Hospital of obstetrics and gynaecology in south of Tehran. Women who were obese (OR 4.44; 95% CI 1.84-10.72) before pregnancy were more likely to develop gestational hypertension. Proportion of having excessive gestational weight gain was positively and significantly associated with development of gestational hypertension (OR 2.70; 95% CI 1.19-6.13). Furthermore, findings revealed that women who were in the highest quartile of mid-arm-circumference had a 3-fold increased risk of gestational hypertension compared to women in the lowest quartile (OR 8.93; 95% CI 2.16-36.93). We found that having been in the highest quartile of energy intake positively correlated with increased risk of gestational hypertension (OR 9.66; 95% CI 3.30-28.21). The results suggest pre-pregnancy obesity, excessive gestational weight gain, and increased intake of energy as potential risk factors of developing gestational hypertension.

Kazemian, Elham; Dorosty-Motlagh, Ahmad Reza; Eshraghian, Mohammad Reza; Bagheri, Minoo

2014-01-01

29

Maternal Smoking during Pregnancy and Children's Cognitive and Physical Development: A Causal Risk Factor?  

PubMed Central

There remains considerable debate regarding the effects of maternal smoking during pregnancy on children's growth and development. Evidence that exposure to maternal smoking during pregnancy is associated with numerous adverse outcomes is contradicted by research suggesting that these associations are spurious. The authors investigated the relation between maternal smoking during pregnancy and 14 developmental outcomes of children from birth through age 7 years, using data from the Collaborative Perinatal Project (1959–1974; n = 52,919). In addition to adjusting for potential confounders measured contemporaneously with maternal smoking, the authors fitted conditional fixed-effects models among siblings that controlled for unmeasured confounders. Results from the conditional analyses indicated a birth weight difference of ?85.63 g associated with smoking of ?20 cigarettes daily during pregnancy (95% confidence interval: ?131.91, ?39.34) and 2.73 times' higher odds of being overweight at age 7 years (95% confidence interval: 1.30, 5.71). However, the associations between maternal smoking and 12 other outcomes studied (including Apgar score, intelligence, academic achievement, conduct problems, and asthma) were entirely eliminated after adjustment for measured and unmeasured confounders. The authors conclude that the hypothesized effects of maternal smoking during pregnancy on these outcomes either are not present or are not distinguishable from a broader range of familial factors associated with maternal smoking. PMID:18653646

Gardener, Hannah; Buka, Stephen L.

2008-01-01

30

Child Health, Maternal Marital and Socioeconomic Factors, and Maternal Health  

PubMed Central

While maternal socioeconomic status and health predict in part children’s future health and socioeconomic prospects, it is possible that the intergenerational association flows in the other direction such that child health affects maternal outcomes. Previous research demonstrates that poor child health increases the risk of adverse maternal physical and mental health outcomes. We hypothesize that poor child health may also increase the risk of poor maternal health outcomes through an interaction between child health and factors associated with health outcomes, such as marital status, marital quality, and socioeconomic status. Using data on women in the National Longitudinal Study of Youth 1979 cohort (N = 2,279), we find evidence that the effects of certain maternal marital quality and socioeconomic factors on maternal physical and mental health depend on child health status and vice versa. PMID:23788824

Witt, Whitney P.

2012-01-01

31

Maternal atopic disease modifies effects of prenatal risk factors on exhaled nitric oxide in infants.  

PubMed

In a prospective healthy birth cohort, we determined whether levels of exhaled nitric oxide (eNO) in healthy unselected infants at the age of 1 month were associated with maternal atopic disease and prenatal and early postnatal environmental exposures. Tidal eNO was measured in 98 healthy, unsedated infants (35 from mothers with atopy) (mean age +/- SD, 36.0 +/- 6.2 days) and was compared with histories taken in standardized interviews. eNO was higher in males compared with females (17.7 vs. 14.6 ppb, p = 0.042) and infants exposed to postnatal maternal smoking (+4.4 ppb, p = 0.027), adjusting for weight and tidal breathing parameters. Prenatal tobacco exposure was associated with higher eNO (+12.0 ppb, p = 0.01) in infants of mothers with asthma and lower eNO (-5.7 ppb) in infants of mothers without asthma (p for interaction < 0.0001). Coffee consumption in pregnancy decreased eNO (-6.0 ppb, p = 0.008) only in children of mothers with atopy (p for interaction = 0.015). Paternal atopy had no influence. In the early phase of immunologic development, before the onset of infections and allergic disease, the effect of prenatal or early postnatal environmental factors on eNO was modified by the presence of maternal atopic disease. This underlines the complex interaction of maternal and environmental factors in the development of airway disease. PMID:15059789

Frey, Urs; Kuehni, Claudia; Roiha, Hanna; Cernelc, Mateja; Reinmann, Benjamin; Wildhaber, Johannes H; Hall, Graham L

2004-08-01

32

Exposure to maternal smoking during pregnancy as a risk factor for tobacco use in adult offspring.  

PubMed

Nicotine from maternal smoking during pregnancy can cross the placental barrier, possibly resulting in fetal brain sensitization, as indicated by studies in which prenatal exposure to maternal smoking was associated with an increased risk of tobacco use among adolescent offspring. We investigated whether this association persists beyond adolescence by studying cigarette smoking and the use of snus (Swedish oral moist snuff) among 983 young adults from a prospective cohort study conducted in Stockholm, Sweden, between 2006 and 2010. Self-reported questionnaire data were linked with data from national population-based registers from 1983 onward. Maternal smoking during pregnancy was consistently associated with snus use in offspring (e.g., for lifetime daily snus use, adjusted odds ratio = 2.04, 95% confidence interval: 1.32, 3.16; for use of >3 cans of snus per week vs. less, odds ratio = 3.85, 95% confidence interval: 1.57, 10.15). No association was apparent with offspring's smoking, age at onset of tobacco use, or changes in use between 2006 and 2010. These findings indicate that prenatal exposure to maternal smoking is associated with regular and heavy nicotine intake from smokeless tobacco rather than from smoking. This should be further explored in epidemiologic studies that simultaneously address the roles of genetics and social environments. PMID:24761008

Rydell, Mina; Magnusson, Cecilia; Cnattingius, Sven; Granath, Fredrik; Svensson, Anna C; Galanti, Maria Rosaria

2014-06-15

33

Maternal Gene Polymorphisms Involved in Folate Metabolism as Risk Factors for Down Syndrome Offspring in Southern Brazil  

PubMed Central

This study aimed to investigate the role of maternal polymorphisms, as well as their risk genotypes combinations of MTR A2756G, MTRR A66G, CBS 844ins68, and RFC A80G, involved in folate/homocysteine metabolism, as possible risk factors for Down syndrome (DS) in Southern Brazil. A case-control study was conducted with 239~mothers of DS children and 197 control mothers. The investigation of polymorphisms was performed by PCR and PCR-RFLP. The distribution of genotypic variants was similar in both groups when they were analyzed separately. An investigation of combined risk genotypes showed that the risk of having a DS child for one, two or three risk genotypes was 6.23, 6.96 and 5.84 (95%CI 1.48–26.26; 1.69–28.66; 1.37–24.86), respectively. The combined MTRR 66G and MTHFR 677T alleles were significantly more common among mothers of children with DS than among control mothers (OR 1.55; IC 95% 1.03–2.35). The results show that individual polymorphisms studied in this work are not associated with DS; however, the effects of the combined risk genotypes among MTR, MTRR, CBS and RFC genes are considered maternal risk factors for DS offspring in our population. PMID:21045269

Brandalize, Ana Paula Carneiro; Bandinelli, Eliane; Santos, Pollyanna Almeida Dos; Schuler-Faccini, Lavinia

2010-01-01

34

Three Maternal Risk Factors Associated with Elevated Risk of Postneonatal Mortality Among Alaska Native Population  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective Compared to non-Natives in Alaska, the Alaska Native population has a postneonatal mortality rate 2.3 times higher (95% CI\\u000a 1.9, 2.7). The objective of the study was to identify variables that account for this elevated risk. Methods The dataset used included birth and death certificate records for all Alaska-resident live births and infant deaths occurring\\u000a during 1992–2004. Race was defined

Margaret H. Blabey; Bradford D. Gessner

2009-01-01

35

Is older maternal age a risk factor for preterm birth and fetal growth restriction? A systematic review.  

PubMed

To determine if there was an association between advancing maternal age and adverse pregnancy outcomes (preterm delivery and small-for-gestational-age births), a systematic review was conducted based on a comprehensive search of the literature from 1985 to 2002. Ten studies met the following inclusion criteria: (1) assessed risk factors for preterm birth by subtype (i.e., idiopathic preterm labor, preterm premature rupture of membranes) and small-for-gestational-age (SGA) birth (fetal growth restriction); (2) used acceptable definitions of these outcomes; (3) were published between January 1985 and December 2002; (4) were restricted to studies that have considered preterm birth due to idiopathic preterm labor or premature rupture of membranes or both; (5) were restricted to singleton live births; (6) were conducted in a developed country; and (7) were published in English. The majority of the studies reviewed found that older maternal age was associated with preterm birth. There is insufficient evidence to determine if older maternal age is an independent and direct risk factor for preterm birth and SGA birth, or a risk marker that exerts its influence on gestational age or birth weight or both through its association with age-dependent confounders. Future research is needed to quantify the independent and unconfounded impact of delayed childbearing on neonatal outcomes, as well as to identify the pathways involved. PMID:16214797

Newburn-Cook, Christine V; Onyskiw, Judee E

2005-10-01

36

National Origin and Behavioural Problems of Toddlers: The Role of Family Risk Factors and Maternal Immigration Characteristics  

PubMed Central

In many societies the prevalence of behavioural problems in school-aged children varies by national origin. We examined the association between national origin and behavioural problems in 1½-year-old children. Data on maternal national origin and the Child Behavior Checklist for toddlers (n?=?4943) from a population-based cohort in the Netherlands were used. Children from various non-Dutch backgrounds all had a significantly higher mean behavioural problem score. After adjustment for family risk factors, like family income and maternal psychopathology, the differences attenuated, but remained statistically significant. Non-Dutch mothers with immigration risk factors, such as older age at immigration or no good Dutch language skills, reported significantly more behavioural problems in their offspring. In conclusion, the present study indicated more behavioural problems in immigrant toddlers from various backgrounds. Researchers and policymakers aiming to tackle disparities in behavioural problems should take into account that risks associated with national origin are intertwined with unfavourable family and immigration characteristics. PMID:20495955

Jansen, Pauline W.; Raat, Hein; Mackenbach, Johan P.; Jaddoe, Vincent W. V.; Hofman, Albert; van Oort, Floor V.; Verhulst, Frank C.

2010-01-01

37

Adolescent Substance Abuse: Risk Factors and Prevention Strategies. Maternal & Child Health Technical Information Bulletin.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The high prevalence of alcohol and substance abuse by adolescents poses a significant threat to the wellness of youth. Adolescents appear to use drugs for a variety of reasons. In addition to the multiple etiologic and risk factors present for substance abuse, there are many pathways teenagers may follow on their way to substance abuse. The…

Werner, Mark J.

38

Risk for Minor Childhood Injury: An Investigation of Maternal and Child Factors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective To examine how maternal and child characteristics interact to moderate injury rate and injury severity for young children. Methods In this study, 149 mothers reported their toddlers' injuries over a 6-month period during biweekly interviews. Mothers completed ques- tionnaires assessing parenting behaviors, psychological characteristics, and their children's injury-relevant behaviors. Results Maternal locus of control was found to moderate the

Amy L. Damashek; Natalie A. Williams; Kenneth J. Sher; Lizette Peterson; Terri Lewis; William Schweinle

2005-01-01

39

Familial Risk Factors to Oppositional Defiant Disorder and Conduct Disorder: Parental Psychopathology and Maternal Parenting  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a sample of 177 clinic-referred children aged 7–13, an association was found between a diagnosis of conduct disorder (CD) and several aspects of family functioning: maternal parenting (supervision and persistence in discipline) and parental adjustment (paternal antisocial personality disorder and paternal substance abuse). Children with oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) were intermediate to families of children with CD and clinic

Paul J. Frick; Benjamin B. Lahey; Rolf Loeber; Magda Stouthamer-Loeber; Mary Anne G. Christ; Kelly Hanson

1992-01-01

40

Risk factors for maternal death in the highlands of rural northern Tanzania: a case-control study  

PubMed Central

Background Tanzania has one of the highest maternal mortality ratios in sub-Saharan Africa. Due to the paucity of epidemiological information on maternal deaths, and the high maternal mortality estimates found earlier in the study area, our objective was to assess determinants of maternal deaths in a rural setting in the highlands of northern Tanzania by comparing the women dying of maternal causes with women from the same population who had attended antenatal clinics in the same time period. Methods A case-control study was done in two administrative divisions in Mbulu and Hanang districts in rural Tanzania. Forty-five cases of maternal death were found through a comprehensive community- and health-facility based study in 1995 and 1996, while 135 antenatal attendees from four antenatal clinics in the same population, geographical area, and time-span of 1995–96 served as controls. The cases and controls were compared using multivariate logistic regression analyses. Odds ratios, with 95% confidence intervals, were used as an approximation of relative risk, and were adjusted for place of residence (ward) and age. Further adjustment was done for potentially confounding variables. Results An increased risk of maternal deaths was found for women from 35–49 years versus 15–24 years (OR 4.0; 95%CI 1.5–10.6). Women from ethnic groups other than the two indigenous groups of the area had an increased risk of maternal death (OR 13.6; 95%CI 2.5–75.0). There was an increased risk when women or husbands adhered to traditional beliefs, (OR 2.1; 95%CI 1.0–4.5) and (OR 2.6; 95%CI 1.2–5.7), respectively. Women whose husbands did not have any formal education appeared to have an increased risk (OR 2.2; 95%CI 1.0–5.0). Conclusion Increasing maternal age, ethnic and religious affiliation, and low formal education of the husbands were associated with increased risk of maternal death. Increased attention needs to be given to formal education of both men and women. In addition, education of the male decision-makers should be given high priority in the community, especially in matters concerning pregnancy and delivery preparedness, since their choice greatly affects the survival of the pregnant and delivering women. PMID:18257937

Evjen-Olsen, Bj?rg; Hinderaker, Sven Gudmund; Lie, Rolv Terje; Bergsj?, Per; Gasheka, Peter; Kvale, Gunnar

2008-01-01

41

Maternal depression and trait anger as risk factors for escalated physical discipline.  

PubMed

To test the hypothesized anger-mediated relation between maternal depression and escalation of physical discipline, 122 economically disadvantaged mothers were assessed for current and lifetime diagnoses of depression using the Current Depressive Episode, Past Depression, and Dysthymia sections of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID) and a measure of current depressive symptoms, the Beck Depression Inventory-Second Edition (BDI-II). Escalation of physical discipline was assessed using a video analog parenting task; maternal anger not specific to discipline was assessed using the Spielberger Trait Anger Expression Inventory. Reports of anger were associated with the diagnosis of depression and depressive symptoms. Bootstrap analyses of indirect effects indicated that the link between depression and escalated discipline was mediated by anger. Parallel analyses based on BDI-II scores identified a marginally significant indirect effect of depression on discipline. Findings suggest that anger and irritability are central to the putative link between depression and harsh discipline. PMID:18174347

Shay, Nicole L; Knutson, John F

2008-02-01

42

Congenital anomalies, labor\\/delivery complications, maternal risk factors and their relationship with perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA)-contaminated public drinking water  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundWe have previously examined the associations between perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) exposure, birth weight and gestational age in individuals exposed to PFOA-contaminated residential drinking water from the Little Hocking Water Association (LHWA). In this investigation, we expand the scope of our analysis to examine the associations between PFOA, congenital anomalies, labor and delivery complications and maternal risk factors.

Lynda A. Nolan; John M. Nolan; Frances S. Shofer; Nancy V. Rodway; Edward A. Emmett

2010-01-01

43

Maternal Early Life Factors Associated with Hormone Levels and the Risk of Having a Child with an Autism Spectrum Disorder in the Nurses Health Study II  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

It is not known whether reproductive factors early in the mother's life influence risk of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). We assessed maternal age at menarche, menstrual cycle characteristics during adolescence, oral contraceptive use prior to first birth, body shape, and body mass index (BMI) in association with ASD using binomial regression in…

Lyall, Kristen; Pauls, David L.; Santangelo, Susan; Spiegelman, Donna; Ascherio, Alberto

2011-01-01

44

Prediction of adolescent smoking from family and social risk factors at 5?years, and maternal smoking in pregnancy and at 5 and 14?years  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aims This study examines associations between maternal smoking and family, social or child risk factors when the child is aged 5 and adolescent smoking. The influence of mothers who smoke in pregnancy or continue to smoke at 14 years was also examined. Design The Mater-University of Queensland Study of Pregnancy is a prospective cohort study. Participants Participants included 8556 women

Frances V. O'Callaghan; Michael O'Callaghan; Jake M. Najman; Gail M. Williams; William Bor; Rosa Alati

2006-01-01

45

Chronic Maternal Depression and Children's Injury Risk  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective A substantial number of mothers of young children suffer from depression. One understudied consequence of maternal depression is how it affects toddlers' injury risk. This study examined links between chronic maternal depression and child injury. Methods A national sample of 1,364 American children was studied. Results Chronic levels of severe maternal depression placed children at increased risk of concurrent

David C. Schwebel; Carl M. Brezausek

2008-01-01

46

Polymorphisms in genes involved in folate metabolism as maternal risk factors for Down syndrome in China  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To explore the relationship between genetic polymorphisms in methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), methionine\\u000a synthase reductase (MTRR), the central enzymes in folate metabolism that affects DNA methylation and synthesis, and the risk\\u000a of Down syndrome in China. Methods: Genomic DNA was isolated from the peripheral lymphocytes of 64 mothers of children with\\u000a Down syndrome and 70 age matched control subjects. Polymerase

Shao-shuai Wang; Fu-yuan Qiao; Ling Feng; Juan-juan Lv

2008-01-01

47

Investigating maternal risk factors as potential targets of intervention to reduce socioeconomic inequality in small for gestational age: a population-based study  

PubMed Central

Background The major aim of this study was to investigate whether maternal risk factors associated with socioeconomic status and small for gestational age (SGA) might be viable targets of interventions to reduce differential risk of SGA by socioeconomic status (socioeconomic SGA inequality) in the metropolitan area of Vancouver, Canada. Methods This study included 59,039 live, singleton births in the Vancouver Census Metropolitan Area (Vancouver) from January 1, 2006 to September 17, 2009. To identify an indicator of socioeconomic SGA inequality, we used hierarchical logistic regression to model SGA by area-level variables from the Canadian census. We then modelled SGA by area-level average income plus established maternal risk factors for SGA and calculated population attributable SGA risk percentages (PAR%) for each variable. Associations of maternal risk factors for SGA with average income were investigated to identify those that might contribute to SGA inequality. Finally, we estimated crude reductions in the percentage and absolute differences in SGA risks between highest and lowest average income quintiles that would result if interventions on maternal risk factors successfully equalized them across income levels or eliminated them altogether. Results Average income produced the most linear and statistically significant indicator of socioeconomic SGA inequality with 8.9% prevalence of SGA in the lowest income quintile compared to 5.6% in the highest. The adjusted PAR% of SGA for variables were: bottom four quintiles of height (51%), first birth (32%), bottom four quintiles of average income (14%), oligohydramnios (7%), underweight or hypertension, (6% each), smoking (3%) and placental disorder (1%). Shorter height, underweight and smoking during pregnancy had higher prevalence in lower income groups. Crude models assuming equalization of risk factors across income levels or elimination altogether indicated little potential change in relative socioeconomic SGA inequality and reduction in absolute SGA inequality for shorter height only. Conclusions Our findings regarding maternal height may indicate trans-generational aetiology for socioeconomic SGA inequalities and/or that adult height influences social mobility. Conditions affecting foetal and childhood growth might be viable targets to reduce absolute socioeconomic SGA inequality in future generations, but more research is needed to determine whether such an approach is appropriate. PMID:22569183

2012-01-01

48

Fathers and Maternal Risk for Physical Child Abuse  

PubMed Central

This study set out to examine father-related factors predicting maternal physical child abuse risk in a national birth cohort of 1,480 families. In-home and phone interviews were conducted with mothers when index children were 3 years old. Predictor variables included the mother–father relationship status; father demographic, economic, and psychosocial variables; and key background factors. Outcome variables included both observed and self-reported proxies of maternal physical child abuse risk. At the bivariate level, mothers married to fathers were at lower risk for most indicators of maternal physical child abuse. However, after accounting for specific fathering factors and controlling for background variables, multivariate analyses indicated that marriage washed out as a protective factor, and on two of three indicators was linked with greater maternal physical abuse risk. Regarding fathering factors linked with risk, fathers’ higher educational attainment and their positive involvement with their children most discernibly predicted lower maternal physical child abuse risk. Fathers’ economic factors played no observable role in mothers’ risk for physical child maltreatment. Such multivariate findings suggest that marriage per se does not appear to be a protective factor for maternal physical child abuse and rather it may serve as a proxy for other father-related protective factors. PMID:19581432

Guterman, Neil B.; Lee, Yookyong; Lee, Shawna J.; Waldfogel, Jane; Rathouz, Paul J.

2010-01-01

49

Maternal socialization of emotion : child, maternal, and relational factors.  

E-print Network

??"Previous research has implicated maternal emotion socialization as an important predictor of children's future social competence and behavior. However, the factors related to emotion socialization… (more)

Stone, Caitlin Elizabeth

2005-01-01

50

Testing the fetal overnutrition hypothesis; the relationship of maternal and paternal adiposity to adiposity, insulin resistance and cardiovascular risk factors in Indian children  

PubMed Central

Objective We aimed to test the fetal overnutrition hypothesis by comparing the associations of maternal and paternal adiposity (sum of skinfolds) with adiposity and cardiovascular risk factors in children. Design Children from a prospective birth cohort had anthropometry, fat percentage (bio-impedance), plasma glucose, insulin and lipid concentrations and blood pressure measured at 9·5 years of age. Detailed anthropometric measurements were recorded for mothers (at 30 ± 2 weeks’ gestation) and fathers (5 years following the index pregnancy). Setting Holdsworth Memorial Hospital, Mysore, India. Subjects Children (n 504), born to mothers with normal glucose tolerance during pregnancy. Results Twenty-eight per cent of mothers and 38 % of fathers were overweight/obese (BMI ? 25·0 kg/m2), but only 4 % of the children were overweight/obese (WHO age- and sex-specific BMI ? 18·2 kg/m2). The children’s adiposity (BMI, sum of skinfolds, fat percentage and waist circumference), fasting insulin concentration and insulin resistance increased with increasing maternal and paternal sum of skinfolds adjusted for the child’s sex, age and socio-economic status. Maternal and paternal effects were similar. The associations with fasting insulin and insulin resistance were attenuated after adjusting for the child’s current adiposity. Conclusions In this population, both maternal and paternal adiposity equally predict adiposity and insulin resistance in the children. This suggests that shared family environment and lifestyle, or genetic/epigenetic factors, influence child adiposity. Our findings do not support the hypothesis that there is an intrauterine overnutrition effect of maternal adiposity in non-diabetic pregnancies, although we cannot rule out such an effect in cases of extreme maternal obesity, which is rare in our population. PMID:22895107

Veena, Sargoor R; Krishnaveni, Ghattu V; Karat, Samuel C; Osmond, Clive; Fall, Caroline HD

2012-01-01

51

Risk factors for maternal death in the highlands of rural northern Tanzania: a case-control study  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Tanzania has one of the highest maternal mortality ratios in sub-Saharan Africa. Due to the paucity of epidemiological information on maternal deaths, and the high maternal mortality estimates found earlier in the study area, our objective was to assess determinants of maternal deaths in a rural setting in the highlands of northern Tanzania by comparing the women dying of

Bjørg Evjen-Olsen; Sven Gudmund Hinderaker; Rolv Terje Lie; Per Bergsjø; Peter Gasheka; Gunnar Kvåle

2008-01-01

52

Maternal-Infant Bedsharing: Risk Factors for Bedsharing in a Population-Based Survey of New Mothers and Implications for SIDS Risk Reduction  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: Maternal-infant bedsharing is a common but controversial practice. Little has been published about who bedshares in the United\\u000a States. This information would be useful to inform public policy, to guide clinical practice and to help focus research. The\\u000a objective was to explore the prevalence and determinants of bedsharing in Oregon.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods. Oregon Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS) surveys

Martin B. Lahr; Kenneth D. Rosenberg; Jodi A. Lapidus

2007-01-01

53

Maternal leisure-time physical activities are not determinant risk factors of low birthweight babies: A cross-sectional study of 1,714 pregnant women.  

PubMed

There is a general recognition of the role of low birthweight (LBW) as a major determinant of infant mortality rates. Since the rate of LBW has been increasing over the past fifteen years in Japan, we decided to ascertain the risk factors related to it, and also to verify whether or not maternal leisure-time physical activities including sports activities, before pregnancy and during gestation, affected the rate of LBW babies. In our study of the 2,682 questionnaires delivered within a year to the Municipal Health Centers of the three cities chosen for this study, 1,714 questionnaires were analyzed. The results in a univariate analysis showed that maternal height, pre-pregnancy weight, length of gestation, smoking, hospitalization before the 37th week of gestation, a history of LBW, and occupational activities were significantly associated with LBW. In logistic regression analyses, mothers of smaller stature, less pre-pregnancy weight, less length of gestation and mothers who were, furthermore, hospitalized before the 37th week of gestation, smoked, had previously delivered a LBW baby or had experienced stressful events during pregnancy were more likely to have LBW babies. The results showed that maternal leisure-time physical activities before and/or during pregnancy had no bearing on the delivery of a LBW baby. PMID:21432201

Cavalli, A S; Tanaka, T

2000-07-01

54

Prenatal and Perinatal Risk Factors for Autism in China  

E-print Network

complications in autism. Maternal and Child Health Journal,children’ s autism. Maternal and Child Health Care of China,maternal risk factors for autism spectrum disorders in New South Wales, Australia. Child:

2010-01-01

55

[Positive serology for syphilis in neonatal period: prevalence in secondary level maternity. Association with maternal risk factors and with positive serology for HIV-1].  

PubMed

To study neonatal Syphilis seropositivity incidence, its association with HIV-1 seropositivity and the impact of Congenital Syphilis CDC case definition, cord blood VDRL and Indirect Hemagglutination (IHA) for Syphilis were performed in 3,664 newborns from Dec/91-July/92. A positive group was formed by those with positive VDRL and IHA or just positive IHA. The control group consisted of 200 VDRL and IHA negative neonates. Among the 3,664 neonates 5.6% were seropositive for Syphilis. A significant association was noted (p < or = 0.05) between neonatal seropositivity for Syphilis and mothers older than 20 years, single, with sexual promiscuity, drug use, no pre-natal care, multiparity and previous still-births. All positive neonates fitted in the Presumptive Congenital Syphilis CDC definition. In 50 seropositive for Syphilis neonates ELISA for HIV-1 was performed and 6/50 were positive. Congenital Syphilis is of concern, specially in neonates of mothers with risk factors for Syphilis acquisition. HIV-1 should be considered in seropositive for Syphilis neonates. Adoption of Congenital Syphilis new CDC case definition is advised, particularly in countries where prenatal care is deficient. PMID:8242098

Guinsburg, R; dos Santos, A M; Leal, D V; Pacheco, A A; Okida, K S; Trigueiro, T C; Almeida, M F; Kopelman, B I

1993-01-01

56

Maternal risk factors associated with increased dioxin concentrations in breast milk in a hot spot of dioxin contamination in Vietnam.  

PubMed

This study looked to identify determinants of exposure to dioxin in breast milk from breast-feeding women in a hot spot of dioxin exposure in Vietnam. Breast milk was collected from 140 mothers 1 month after delivery. The risk factors investigated included length of residency, drinking of well water and the frequency of animal food consumption. Cluster analysis was performed to identify dietary patterns of fish and meat portions, fish variety and egg variety. Residency, age and parity were clearly associated with increased dioxin levels. Drinking well water and the consumption of marine crab and shrimps were related to higher levels of furans in breast milk. The consumption of quail eggs also appeared to be associated with increased levels of some dioxin isomers in this area. Some mothers who ate no or less meat than fish and mothers who consumed more freshwater fish than marine fish had lower levels of dioxins in their breast milk. However, the type of water and the eating habits of mothers contributed only partly to the increased dioxin levels in their breast milk; the length of residency was the most important risk factor associated with increased dioxin body burdens of mothers. PMID:24149970

Anh, Nguyen Thi Nguyet; Nishijo, Muneko; Tai, Pham The; Maruzeni, Shoko; Morikawa, Yuko; Anh, Tran Hai; Van Luong, Hoang; Dam, Pham Minh; Nakagawa, Hideaki; Son, Le Ke; Nishijo, Hisao

2014-01-01

57

National Origin and Behavioural Problems of Toddlers: The Role of Family Risk Factors and Maternal Immigration Characteristics  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In many societies the prevalence of behavioural problems in school-aged children varies by national origin. We examined the association between national origin and behavioural problems in 1 1/2-year-old children. Data on maternal national origin and the Child Behavior Checklist for toddlers (n = 4943) from a population-based cohort in the…

Jansen, Pauline W.; Raat, Hein; Mackenbach, Johan P.; Jaddoe, Vincent W. V.; Hofman, Albert; van Oort, Floor V.; Verhulst, Frank C.; Tiemeier, Henning

2010-01-01

58

Research Review: Maternal Prenatal Distress and Poor Nutrition--Mutually Influencing Risk Factors Affecting Infant Neurocognitive Development  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Accumulating data from animal and human studies indicate that the prenatal environment plays a significant role in shaping children's neurocognitive development. Clinical, epidemiologic, and basic science research suggests that two experiences relatively common in pregnancy--an unhealthy maternal diet and psychosocial…

Monk, Catherine; Georgieff, Michael K.; Osterholm, Erin A.

2013-01-01

59

Impact of a Kentucky Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home-Visitation Program on Parental Risk Factors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As public health organizations continue to implement maternal and child health home-visitation programs, more evaluation of these efforts is needed, particularly as it relates to improving parental behaviors. The purpose of our study was to assess the impact of families' participation in a home-visitation program offered by a central Kentucky…

Ferguson, Jonnisa M.; Vanderpool, Robin C.

2013-01-01

60

Intimate Partner Violence, Maternal Stress, Nativity, and Risk for Maternal Maltreatment of Young Children  

PubMed Central

Objectives. We examined the associations of intimate partner violence (IPV) and maternal risk factors with maternal child maltreatment risk within a diverse sample of mothers. Methods. We derived the study sample (N = 2508) from the Fragile Families and Child Well-Being Study. We conducted regression analyses to examine associations between IPV, parenting stress, major depression, key covariates, and 4 proxy variables for maternal child maltreatment. Results. Mothers reported an average of 25 acts of psychological aggression and 17 acts of physical aggression against their 3-year-old children in the year before the study, 11% reported some act of neglect toward their children during the same period, and 55% had spanked their children during the previous month. About 40% of mothers had experienced IPV by their current partner. IPV and maternal parenting stress were both consistent risk factors for all 4 maltreatment proxy variables. Although foreign-born mothers reported fewer incidents of child maltreatment, the IPV relative risk for child maltreatment was greater for foreign-born than for US-born mothers. Conclusions. Further integration of IPV and child maltreatment prevention and intervention efforts is warranted; such efforts must carefully balance the needs of adult and child victims. PMID:19008518

Guterman, Neil B.; Lee, Shawna J.; Rathouz, Paul J.

2009-01-01

61

Commentary: the multifaceted nature of maternal depression as a risk factor for child psychopathology--reflections on Sellers et al. (2014).  

PubMed

While much has been learned about depression in mothers as a risk for the development of psychopathology in offspring, many questions about how the risk is transmitted remain unanswered. Moreover, maternal depression is too often considered to be a unitary construct, ignoring the likely diversity among mothers with depression, which could play essential roles in understanding not only mechanisms of risk but also moderators of risk, i.e. for whom the association between maternal depression and adverse offspring outcomes may be stronger. Sellers et al. address both mechanisms and moderators, thereby contributing to the understanding of risk to offspring of depressed mothers in these two important ways. There is much to learn from this work, on many levels and for different audiences, including both researchers and practitioners. A key take-home message of this study for all readers is that understanding the role of maternal depression in associations with child psychopathology requires a nuanced view of the nature of risk to children from depression in mothers. The often co-occurring disorders and highly correlated additional aspects of the context in which depression occurs play important roles in the development of psychopathology in the offspring of depressed mothers. PMID:24405396

Goodman, Sherryl

2014-01-01

62

Intimate partner violence as a risk factor for postpartum depression among Canadian women in the Maternity Experience Survey  

PubMed Central

Purpose Intimate partner violence is a worldwide public health concern predominantly affecting women of reproductive age. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of exposure to intimate partner violence before, during or after pregnancy on postpartum depression in a nationally representative sample of Canadian women. Methods A cross-sectional analysis was performed using data from the Maternity Experience Survey conducted by Statistics Canada in 2006. A population-based sample of 8,542 women 15 years and older who delivered singleton live births was selected from all Canadian provinces and territories; of those, 6,421 completed a computer-assisted telephone interview. Recent experiences with and threats of physical or sexual violence by an intimate partner were examined in relation to postpartum depression assessed through the Edinburgh Postpartum Depression Scale. Results The prevalence of postpartum depression was 7.5% (95% CI: 6.8, 8.2). Controlling for confounders, odds of postpartum depression were significantly higher among women who reported partner violence in the past two years as opposed to those who did not (adjusted OR=1.61; 95% CI: 1.06, 2.45). Conclusions Intimate partner violence is positively associated with postpartum depression among Canadian women. Implications for healthcare practice are discussed. PMID:20609336

Beydoun, Hind A.; Al-Sahab, Ban; Beydoun, May A.; Tamim, Hala

2014-01-01

63

Depression and anger as risk factors underlying the relationship between maternal substance involvement and child abuse potential?  

PubMed Central

Objective This study examines how emotion regulation deficits in the area of anger arousal and reactivity are associated with child abuse potential in mothers with substance use and depressive disorders in order to identify targeted areas for prevention and treatment. Methods A sample of 152 urban mothers was interviewed on measures of substance use, diagnosis of depression, anger arousal and reactivity, and child abuse potential. Results Linear hierarchical regressions revealed that anger arousal and reactivity exceeded diagnostic and demographic variables in predicting maternal child abuse potential. Additionally, anger arousal and reactivity was found to be a partial mediator of the relationship between diagnostic category and child abuse potential. Conclusions Findings are discussed in relation to a multifaceted model of child abuse potential which broadens the existing literature to include an examination of depression and emotion regulation in order to more fully understand how substance use and child abuse potential are linked. Practice implications Models and approaches which help clients to manage and regulate difficult feeling states, specifically anger, could be helpful, and may be most readily applied in such populations. PMID:20170960

Hien, Denise; Cohen, Lisa R.; Caldeira, Nathilee A.; Flom, Peter; Wasserman, Gail

2013-01-01

64

Maternal and infant use of erythromycin and other macrolide antibiotics as risk factors for infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: To evaluate the risk for infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis (IHPS) among infants prescribed systemic erythromycin, infants prescribed a course of erythromycin ophthalmic ointment, and infants whose mothers were prescribed a macrolide antibiotic during pregnancy. Study design: Retrospective cohort study of infants born at an urban hospital from June 1993 through December 1999. Results: Of 14,876 eligible infants, 43 (0.29%)

Barbara E. Mahon; Marc B. Rosenman; Martin B. Kleiman

2001-01-01

65

A case-control study of maternal risk factors for thyroid cancer in young women (California, United States)  

Microsoft Academic Search

A population-based case-control interview study investigated whether reproductive factors are related to the striking female-over-male excess of thyroid cancer among women of reproductive age in Los Angeles County, CA (United States). As a separate component of that study, mothers of 153 cases and 140 controls who were age 40 or younger at diagnosis or reference date were interviewed by telephone

Kristina Paoff; Susan Preston-Martin; Wendy J. Mack; Kristine Monroe

1995-01-01

66

Risk factors for hypospadias.  

PubMed

Despite being one of the most common congenital defects in boys, the etiology of hypospadias remains largely unknown. In this case-referent study, we evaluated a wide spectrum of potential risk factors for hypospadias. Cases were identified from the hospital information system, and referents were recruited through the parents of the cases. Both parents of cases and referents completed written questionnaires that they received through the mail. Logistic regression analyses were used to assess the independent contribution of different factors to the risk of hypospadias. The final database included 583 cases and 251 referents. Hypospadias more often occurred in children whose father had hypospadias (OR=9.7; 95%CI: 1.3-74.0) and in children with a low birth weight (OR=2.3; 95%CI: 1.2-4.2). Indications for elevated risks were found when mothers were DES-daughters (OR=3.5; 95%CI: 0.8-15.6), fathers were subfertile (OR=1.8; 95%CI: 0.7-4.5), the parents had undergone fertility treatment (OR=2.3; 95%CI: 0.9-5.8), and in twin or triplet pregnancies (OR=2.0; 95%CI: 0.8-5.1). Maternal use of iron supplements (OR=2.2; 95%CI: 0.8-6.0), maternal smoking (OR=1.5; 95%CI: 1.0-2.4), paternal prescriptive drug use (OR=2.6; 95%CI: 1.1-6.6), and paternal exposure to pesticides (OR=2.1; 95%CI: 0.6-7.1) during the 3 months immediately prior to conception or in the first trimester of pregnancy also appeared to increase the risk of hypospadias. The associations found in this study support the hypothesis that genetic predisposition, placental insufficiency, and substances that interfere with natural hormones play a role in the etiology of hypospadias. PMID:17103190

Brouwers, Marijn M; Feitz, Wouter F J; Roelofs, Luc A J; Kiemeney, Lambertus A L M; de Gier, Robert P E; Roeleveld, Nel

2007-07-01

67

Risk factors.  

PubMed

Minimize surprises on your financial statement by adopting a model for integrated risk management that: Examines interrelationships among operations, investments, and financing. Incorporates concepts of the capital asset pricing model to manage unexpected volatility PMID:17240669

Robbins, Catherine J; Connors, K C; Sheehan, Timothy J; Vaughan, James S

2005-06-01

68

Association of aberrant neural synchrony and altered GAD67 expression following exposure to maternal immune activation, a risk factor for schizophrenia  

PubMed Central

A failure of integrative processes within the brain, mediated via altered GABAergic inhibition, may underlie several features of schizophrenia. The present study examined, therefore, whether maternal immune activation (MIA), a risk factor for schizophrenia, altered inhibitory markers in the hippocampus and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), while also altering electroencephalogram (EEG) coherence between these regions. Pregnant rats were treated with saline or polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid mid-gestation. EEG depth recordings were made from the dorsal and ventral hippocampus and mPFC of male adult offspring. Glutamic decarboxylase (GAD67) levels were separately assayed in these regions using western blot. GAD67 expression was also assessed within parvalbumin-positive cells in the dorsal and ventral hippocampus using immunofluorescence alongside stereological analysis of parvalbumin-positive cell numbers. EEG coherence was reduced between the dorsal hippocampus and mPFC, but not the ventral hippocampus and mPFC, in MIA animals. Western blot and immunofluorescence analyses revealed that GAD67 expression within parvalbumin-positive cells was also reduced in the dorsal hippocampus relative to ventral hippocampus in MIA animals when compared with controls. This reduction was observed in the absence of parvalbumin-positive neuronal loss. Overall, MIA produced a selective reduction in EEG coherence between the dorsal hippocampus and mPFC that was paralleled by a similarly specific reduction in GAD67 within parvalbumin-positive cells of the dorsal hippocampus. These results suggest a link between altered inhibitory mechanisms and synchrony and, therefore point to potential mechanisms via which a disruption in neurodevelopmental processes might lead to pathophysiology associated with schizophrenia. PMID:25072323

Dickerson, D D; Overeem, K A; Wolff, A R; Williams, J M; Abraham, W C; Bilkey, D K

2014-01-01

69

Maternal age and risk of stillbirth: a systematic review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: The number of women who delay childbirth to their late 30s and beyond has increased significantly over the past several decades. Studies regarding the relation between older maternal age and the risk of stillbirth have yielded in- consistent conclusions. In this systematic review we explored whether older maternal age is associated with an increased risk of stillbirth. Methods: We

Ling Huang; Reg Sauve; Dean Fergusson MHA; Carl van Walraven

2008-01-01

70

The neglected role of insulin-like growth factors in the maternal circulation regulating fetal growth  

PubMed Central

Maternal insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) play a pivotal role in modulating fetal growth via their actions on both the mother and the placenta. Circulating IGFs influence maternal tissue growth and metabolism, thereby regulating nutrient availability for the growth of the conceptus. Maternal IGFs also regulate placental morphogenesis, substrate transport and hormone secretion, all of which influence fetal growth either via indirect effects on maternal substrate availability, or through direct effects on the placenta and its capacity to supply nutrients to the fetus. The extent to which IGFs influence the mother and/or placenta are dependent on the species and maternal factors, including age and nutrition. As altered fetal growth is associated with increased perinatal morbidity and mortality and a greater risk of developing degenerative diseases in adult life, understanding the role of maternal IGFs during pregnancy is essential in order to identify mechanisms underlying altered fetal growth and offspring programming. PMID:20921199

Sferruzzi-Perri, A N; Owens, J A; Pringle, K G; Roberts, C T

2011-01-01

71

Maternal factors and child's health care use.  

PubMed

There is inadequate data about the association between specific psychosocial factors and pediatric health care use. We hypothesized that maternal substance abuse, depression, and low social support would be associated with increased medical visits, emergency room (ER) use, visits for injuries and delays in immunization. We conducted a prospective study of 202 U.S. families with preschool children in a clinic serving the inner city poor. Psychosocial factors were assessed from standardized screening questionnaires for substance abuse, depression and low social support. Research assistants blind to the study hypothesis reviewed medical records for health care over the year following completion of the questionnaire: number of clinic visits, use of emergency room, visits to the ER or clinic for injuries, and delays in immunizations of two months or more. Among the 202 mothers, the mean age was 24.4 years, 47% were African American, 32% Caucasian, and 14% Asian; 55% were high school graduates. The average household income was $7620 per year; the mean age of children was 12.2 months. Thirty-seven percent of mothers screened positively for substance abuse, 34% for depression, and 60% for low social support. Children had an average of 8.6 clinic visits per year; 41% had an ER visit, 21% had an injury resulting in an ER or clinic visit, and 43% of children under 2 years of age had a delay of 2 months or more in recommended immunizations. After controlling for maternal and child age in a regression equation, none of the psychosocial factors were significant predictors of health care use outcomes.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7747197

Watson, J M; Kemper, K J

1995-03-01

72

[Risk factors for impaired development in children attended at family health units at the end of the first year of life: socio-demographic aspects and maternal mental health].  

PubMed

The scope of this article is to evaluate risk and protection factors for the development of 1-year-olds assisted at family health care units. It is a cross-sectional study involving 65 children of approximately 1 year of age and their mothers attended at two family health care units. The development was assessed using a developmental screening test (Denver II). The mothers filled out the SRQ-20 questionnaire to identify common mental disorder (CMD) indicators. After data collection, descriptive and inferential statistical analysis was performed. Global development was at risk in 43.1% of the children evaluated, and the most affected areas were language and fine motor development; 44.6% of mothers had results indicative of CMD when the child was 1 year of age. In bivariate analysis, reported depression, smoking, infections in pregnancy, CMD after birth and working outside the home were significantly associated with the children's development. After full statistical analysis, CMD was revealed as being a risk factor, and working away from home as being a protection factor. In order to increase the chances of success of programs targeted for children at health care units and avoiding the risk of impaired development, it is important to focus on two aspects: children's stimulation and maternal mental health. PMID:24473618

Ribeiro, Débora Gerardo; Perosa, Gimol Benzaquen; Padovani, Flávia Helena Pereira

2014-01-01

73

Selected environmental risk factors and congenital heart defects.  

PubMed

The aim of the article is to review the published scientific literature and epidemiological studies about the effect of selected environmental risk factors on congenital heart defects in infants. According to recent reports, the prevalence of congenital heart defects is around 1% of live births. Congenital heart malformations are the leading cause of infant mortality. Unfortunately, the majority of the causes of heart defects remain unknown. These malformations are caused by interaction of genetic and environmental factors. The article reviews selected environmental risk factors: maternal illnesses and conditions associated with metabolic disorder (maternal diabetes, obesity, phenylketonuria), maternal lifestyle factors (alcohol use, smoking), which may increase the risk of congenital heart defects. PMID:19124958

Kuciene, Renata; Dulskiene, Virginija

2008-01-01

74

Postpartum Psychosis: Risk Factors Identification  

PubMed Central

Background: A better understanding of risk factors associated with postpartum psychosis may contribute to the better management. Aims: This study was to identify the risk factors contributing to postpartum psychosis. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional, case control study 100 patients of postpartum psychosis (PP) were compared with the healthy controls. Risk factors explored were sociodemographic factors (age, education, occupation, income, and family type); positive family history; pregnancy and perinatal factors (number of antenatal check-up, parity, and complications during pregnancy, perinatal phase or in newborn); and presence of husband during peripartum period. Data were analyzed by graph pad instat software using chi square test and Fisher's exact test. Results: Total of 64% patients and 42% controls were less than 25 years of age (P = 0.001). Among the patients, 62% were primiparae compared with 46% in the controls (P = 0.02). Per capita family income was less than 5000 INR in 72% patients and 56% controls (P = 0.01). Maternal complications during perinatal period were observed in 38% patients and 22% controls (P = 0.01), while the complications in newborns were seen in 21% patients and 8% controls (P = 0.009). Husband was present in 58% patients and 76% controls. (P = 0.006). Conclusions: The risk factors related to PP were younger age, lower per capita income, perinatal and neonatal complications, and absence of husband in peripartum phase. PMID:25006563

Upadhyaya, Suneet Kumar; Sharma, Archana; Raval, Chintan M

2014-01-01

75

The prevalence of severe maternal morbidity and near miss and associated factors in Sergipe, Northeast Brazil  

PubMed Central

Background The investigation of severe maternal morbidity (SAMM) and maternal near miss (NM) and associated risk factors is important for the global reduction of maternal mortality. This study investigated the prevalence of SAMM and NM cases and the associated risk factors in two reference maternity hospitals in a capital city in Northeast-Brazil. Methods A cross-sectional study with a nested case–control component was conducted from June-2011 to May-2012. Case identification was prospective and data collection was performed according to WHO criteria and definitions. Odds ratio with confidence intervals and multivariate analysis were used whenever possible. Results There were 16,243 deliveries, 1,102 SAMM cases, 77 NM cases and 17 maternal deaths. The maternal NM outcome ratio was 5.8 cases/1,000 live births (LB); the total prevalence of SAMM?+?NM was 72.6 cases/1,000 LB, the maternal near miss: mortality ratio was 4.5cases/1 maternal death (18% of mortality index). Management-based criteria were the most common events for NM (87.1%) and hypertensive disorders for SAMM (67.5%). Higher age, previous abortion and caesarean delivery, the non-adhesion to antenatal care, current caesarean delivery and bad perinatal results were associated with SAMM/NM. In the multivariate analysis, patient’s status, previous caesarian and abortion and level of consciousness were significant when analyzed together. Conclusions SAMM and NM situations were prevalent in the studied population and some risk factors seem to be associated with the event, particularly previous gestational antecedents. Protocols based on SAMM/NM situations can save lives and decrease maternal mortality. PMID:24433516

2014-01-01

76

MATERNAL COFFEE AND ALCOHOL CONSUMPTION DURING PREGNANCY, PARENTAL SMOKING AND RISK OF CHILDHOOH ACUTE LEUKEMIA  

E-print Network

1 MATERNAL COFFEE AND ALCOHOL CONSUMPTION DURING PREGNANCY, PARENTAL SMOKING AND RISK OF CHILDHOOH ACUTE LEUKEMIA Short title: Maternal coffee and alcohol consumption, parental smoking and childhood frequency matched controls. The results suggest an association between maternal alcohol and coffee

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

77

Lithiasis and Risk Factors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nephrolithiasis is a worldwide disease with high clinical and economic costs. The increasing incidence in industrialized countries seems to be related to several risk factors, which are partly inherited and partly acquired. Although risk factors in urolithiasis are still under discussion, their identification would provide a notable gain for the patient in terms of stone episodes, and for the health

P. Ferrari; R. Piazza; N. Ghidini; M. Bisi; G. Galizia; G. Ferrari

2007-01-01

78

Determinants of use of maternal health services in Nigeria - looking beyond individual and household factors  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Utilization of maternal health services is associated with improved maternal and neonatal health outcomes. Considering global and national interests in the Millennium Development Goal and Nigeria's high level of maternal mortality, understanding the factors affecting maternal health use is crucial. Studies on the use of maternal care services have largely overlooked community and other contextual factors. This study examined

Stella Babalola; Adesegun Fatusi

2009-01-01

79

[Cerebral palsy: prenatal risk factors].  

PubMed

Prenatal risk factors causing cerebral palsy (CP), here defined as a non-progressive motor abnormality of tone or posture, are much more numerous than once believed, when a great deal of brain injury was attributed to factors surrounding delivery. Scientific advances in genetics and biochemistry, as well as clinical technical advances in, for example, amniotic fluid examination or fetal neuroimaging, has permitted us to find a multiplicity of new etiologies causing neonatal encephalopathy, most of which were formerly attributed to perinatal hypoxia-ischemia. This article reviews an expanded list of etiologies, including asphyxia, which has been found to cause only 6-10% of CP in full term infants, and periventricular leukomalacia, which is associated with 30-50% of CP in premature births. We also review a few of the genetic causes of CP, which lead to metabolic encephalopathies in come cases, to congenital anomalies in others, and sometimes to both. We discuss maternal gestational or intrapartum infections which may affect the fetus by direct in utero contagion or by other less direct means. Inborn metabolic errors affecting the fetus, such as diabetes, are touched on, as are the effects of maternal medications or recreational drugs on the fetus. Finally, we briefly cite the curious phenomenon occurring in multiple births, namely the potential of CP in the surviving infant or infants were the others have died in utero. PMID:12938060

Pascual, J M; Koenigsberger, M R

80

Does maternal body mass index during pregnancy influence risk of schizophrenia in the adult offspring?  

PubMed Central

Summary Maternal obesity in pregnancy has been linked with several adverse outcomes in offspring including schizophrenia. The rising prevalence of obesity may contribute to an increase in the number of schizophrenia cases in the near future; therefore, it warrants further exploration. We reviewed current evidence regarding maternal body mass index (BMI) in pregnancy and risk of schizophrenia in adult offspring. We searched PubMed and Embase databases and included studies that were based on large and representative population-based datasets. A qualitative review was undertaken due to heterogeneity between studies. Four studies with 305 cases of schizophrenia and 24,442 controls were included. Maternal obesity (pre-pregnant BMI over 29 or 30 compared with mothers with low or average BMI) was associated with two- to threefold increased risk of schizophrenia in the adult offspring in two birth cohorts. High maternal BMI at both early and late pregnancy also increased risk of schizophrenia in the offspring. Discrepant findings from one study could be attributable to sample characteristics and other factors. The area needs more research. Future studies should take into account obstetric complications, diabetes, maternal infections and immune responses that might potentially mediate this association. PMID:22188548

Khandaker, G M; Dibben, C R M; Jones, P B

2012-01-01

81

Cerebral Ischemia: New Risk Factors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Stroke is a disease with well-defined modifiable risk factors such as arterial hypertension, smoking, diabetes, hyperlipidemia and atrial fibrillation. The need of new risk factors is based on the fact that only half the cardiovascular disease risk is explained by conventional risk factors. Inflammatory markers, infection, homocysteine and sleep-disordered breathing rank as the four most important new risk factors in

Jaime Diaz; Angel P. Sempere

2004-01-01

82

Is Hearing Loss in Infants Associated With Risk Factors? Evaluation of the Frequency of Risk Factors  

PubMed Central

Objectives To evaluate the frequency of risk factors and their influence on the evoked otoacoustic emission (OAE) of infants. Methods All newborns between November 2009 and June 2012 in Haydarpa?a Numune Education and Research Hospital were tested on distortion evoked OAE screening test. Total of 2,284 infants were examined. Sex, maternal infectious disease, birth type (vaginal birth or caesarean sectio), birth weight, familial hearing loss, intermarriage of parents, hyperbilirubinemia, intensive care were analyzed as risk factors. Results Total of 2,284 neonates were screened (1,220 males and 1,064 females) for the presence of OAE in both ears. Vaginal delivery, maternal infections during pregnancy, intermarriage of parents relative, low birth weight(<1,500 g) are related risk factors to failure of screening with OAE in our study. There was no statistically significant difference in sex ratios, birth weight, familial hearing loss, hyperbilirubinemia, and intensive care stay. Conclusion Risk factors are only as useful as their predictive power. Not enough is known about which risk factors are relevant, which babies have the risk factors, or which babies will fail to attend follow-up, the effectiveness of targeted hearing loss testing is questionable at this point in time. A system needs to be developed to clarify which risk factors are discoverable, predictive and useful.

Oysu, Ça?atay; Toros, Sema Zer; Naibo?lu, Bar??; Verim, Ay?egül

2014-01-01

83

An Analysis of Factors Linked to the Decline in Maternal Mortality in Nepal  

PubMed Central

Nepal experienced a steep decline in maternal mortality between 1996 and 2006, which had again dropped by 2010. The aim of this study was to investigate any trends in factors that may be responsible for this decline. The study was based on a secondary data analysis of maternity care services and socio-demographic variables extracted from the Nepal Demographic Health Surveys (1996, 2001, 2006 and 2011). Complex sample analysis was performed to determine the trends in these variables across the four surveys. Univariate logistic regression was performed for selected maternity care service variables to calculate the average change in odds ratio for each survey. Multivariate logistic regression was performed to determine the trends in the health service uptake adjusting for socio-demographic variables. There were major demographic and socio-economic changes observed between 1996 and 2011: notably fewer women delivering at ‘high risk’ ages, decreased fertility, higher education levels and migration to urban areas. Significant trends were observed for improved uptake of all maternity care services. The largest increase was observed in health facility delivery (odds ratio?=?2.21; 95% confidence interval?=?1.92, 2.34) and women making four or more antenatal visits (odds ratio?=?2.24; 95% confidence interval?=?2.03, 2.47). After adjusting for all socio-demographic factors, the trends were still significant but disparities become more pronounced at the extremes of the socio-economic spectrum. The odds ratios for each maternity care service examined decreased slightly after adjusting for education, indicating that improved levels of education could partly explain these trends. The improved utilisation of maternity care services seems essential to the decline in maternal mortality in Nepal. These findings have implications for policy planning in terms of government resources for maternity care services and the education sector. PMID:24705366

Shrestha, Sanu; Bell, Jacqueline S.; Marais, Debbi

2014-01-01

84

An analysis of factors linked to the decline in maternal mortality in Nepal.  

PubMed

Nepal experienced a steep decline in maternal mortality between 1996 and 2006, which had again dropped by 2010. The aim of this study was to investigate any trends in factors that may be responsible for this decline. The study was based on a secondary data analysis of maternity care services and socio-demographic variables extracted from the Nepal Demographic Health Surveys (1996, 2001, 2006 and 2011). Complex sample analysis was performed to determine the trends in these variables across the four surveys. Univariate logistic regression was performed for selected maternity care service variables to calculate the average change in odds ratio for each survey. Multivariate logistic regression was performed to determine the trends in the health service uptake adjusting for socio-demographic variables. There were major demographic and socio-economic changes observed between 1996 and 2011: notably fewer women delivering at 'high risk' ages, decreased fertility, higher education levels and migration to urban areas. Significant trends were observed for improved uptake of all maternity care services. The largest increase was observed in health facility delivery (odds ratio?=?2.21; 95% confidence interval?=?1.92, 2.34) and women making four or more antenatal visits (odds ratio?=?2.24; 95% confidence interval?=?2.03, 2.47). After adjusting for all socio-demographic factors, the trends were still significant but disparities become more pronounced at the extremes of the socio-economic spectrum. The odds ratios for each maternity care service examined decreased slightly after adjusting for education, indicating that improved levels of education could partly explain these trends. The improved utilisation of maternity care services seems essential to the decline in maternal mortality in Nepal. These findings have implications for policy planning in terms of government resources for maternity care services and the education sector. PMID:24705366

Shrestha, Sanu; Bell, Jacqueline S; Marais, Debbi

2014-01-01

85

Maternal Glycemia and Risk of Large-for-Gestational-Age Babies in a Population-Based Screening  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE — Gestational diabetes is a risk factor for large-for-gestational-age (LGA) new- borns, but many LGA babies are born to mothers with normal glucose tolerance. We aimed to clarify the association of maternal glycemia across the whole distribution with birth weight and risk of LGA births in mothers with normal glucose tolerance. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS — We undertook a

ZSUZSA KERENYI; G. Tamas; M. Kivimaki; ANDREA PETERFALVI; E. Madarasz; ZSOLT BOSNYAK; A. G. Tabak

2009-01-01

86

Maternal and offspring xenobiotic metabolism haplotypes and the risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia  

PubMed Central

Discovering genetic predictors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) necessitates the evaluation of novel factors including maternal genetic effects, which are a proxy for the intrauterine environment, and robust epidemiologic study designs. Therefore, we evaluated five maternal and offspring xenobiotic metabolism haplotypes and the risk of childhood ALL among 120 case-parent triads. Two of the five haplotypes were significantly associated with risk: GSTM3/GSTM4 (P=0.01) and GSTP1 (P=0.02). The EPHX1 haplotype was marginally associated with risk (P=0.05), whereas haplotypes in CYP1B1 and GSTA4 were not. Our results suggest genetic variation in xenobiotic metabolism is important in childhood ALL etiology. PMID:23433810

Nousome, Darryl; Lupo, Philip J.; Okcu, M. Fatih; Scheurer, Michael E.

2013-01-01

87

Atrial natriuretic factor in maternal and fetal sheep  

SciTech Connect

To determine atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) concentrations in the circulation and body fluids of adult pregnant sheep and their fetuses, pregnant ewes were anesthetized with pentobarbital sodium, and the fetuses were exteriorized for sampling. ANF concentration, as measured by radioimmunoassay, was 47 +/- 6 (SE) pg/ml in maternal plasma, which was significantly higher than the 15 +/- 3 pg/ml in maternal urine. In the fetus, plasma ANF concentration was 265 +/- 49 pg/ml, 5.6 times that in maternal plasma. No umbilical arterial and venous difference in ANF concentration was observed. Fetal urine ANF concentration was significantly lower than that in fetal plasma, and was similar to that measured in amniotic and allantoic fluid. In chronically catheterized maternal and fetal sheep, fetal plasma ANF was again 5.1 times that in maternal plasma, and these levels were not different from those measured in acutely anesthetized animals. These results demonstrate that immunoreactive ANF is present in the fetal circulation at levels higher than those found in the mother. The low concentration of ANF in fetal urine suggests that ANF is probably metabolized and/or reabsorbed by the fetal kidney.

Cheung, C.Y.; Gibbs, D.M.; Brace, R.A.

1987-02-01

88

Maternal pre-pregnancy risk drinking and toddler behavior problems: the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study.  

PubMed

Maternal risk drinking may be a risk factor for child behavior problems even if the mother has discontinued this behavior. Whether pre-pregnancy risk drinking is an independent predictor of child behavior problems, or whether a potential effect may be explained by maternal alcohol use during and after pregnancy or other adverse maternal characteristics, is not known. Employing data from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa), longitudinal associations between maternal pre-pregnancy risk drinking and behavior problems in toddlers aged 18 and 36 months were examined. Included in the study was mothers answering MoBa questionnaires when the child was 18 (N = 56,682) and 36 months (N = 46,756), and who had responded to questions regarding pre-pregnancy risk drinking at gestation week 17/18, using the screening instrument T-ACE. Toddler behavior problems were measured with items from Child Behavior Checklist. Associations were analyzed with multivariate logistic regression, controlling for pre and postnatal alcohol use, as well as other relevant covariates. Pre-pregnancy risk drinking was associated with child behavior problems at 18 and 36 months, even after controlling for pre and postnatal alcohol use. Maternal ADHD and anxiety and depression were the only covariates that had any substantial impact on the associations. When all covariates were included in the model, the associations were weak for internalizing behavior problems and non-significant for externalizing behavior problems. Pre-pregnancy risk drinking may predict early development of behavior problems in the offspring. This increased risk may be due to other adverse maternal characteristics associated with risk drinking, in particular co-occurring maternal psychopathology. PMID:25053124

Knudsen, Ann Kristin; Skogen, Jens Christoffer; Ystrom, Eivind; Sivertsen, Børge; Tell, Grethe S; Torgersen, Leila

2014-10-01

89

Risk factors for dementia.  

PubMed

Dementia is a complex human disease. The incidence of dementia among the elderly population is rising rapidly worldwide. In the United States, Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the leading type of dementia and was the fifth and eighth leading cause of death in women and men aged > or = 65 years, respectively, in 2003. In Taiwan and many other counties, dementia is a hidden health issue because of its underestimation in the elderly population. In Western countries, the prevalence of AD increases from 1-3% among people aged 60-64 years to 35% among those aged > 85 years. In Taiwan, the prevalence of dementia for people aged > or = 65 years was 2-4% by 2000. Therefore, it is important to identify protective and risk factors for dementia to prevent this disease at an early stage. Several factors are related to dementia, e.g. age, ethnicity, sex, genetic factors, physical activity, smoking, drug use, education level, alcohol consumption, body mass index, comorbidity, and environmental factors. In this review, we focus on studies that have evaluated the association between these factors and the risk of dementia, especially AD and vascular dementia. We also suggest future research directions for researchers in dementia-related fields. PMID:19864195

Chen, Jen-Hau; Lin, Kun-Pei; Chen, Yen-Ching

2009-10-01

90

Risk Factors for Eating Disorders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors review research on risk factors for eating disorders, restricting their focus to studies in which clear precedence of the hypothesized risk factor over onset of the disorder is established. They illustrate how studies of sociocultural risk factors and biological factors have progressed on parallel tracks and propose that major advances…

Striegel-Moore, Ruth H.; Bulik, Cynthia M.

2007-01-01

91

Risk Factors for Eating Disorders  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors review research on risk factors for eating disorders, restricting their focus to studies in which clear precedence of the hypothesized risk factor over onset of the disorder is established. They illustrate how studies of sociocultural risk factors and biological factors have progressed on parallel tracks and propose that major advances in understanding the etiology of eating disorders require

Ruth H. Striegel-Moore; Cynthia M. Bulik

2007-01-01

92

Maternal weight change before pregnancy in relation with birthweight and risks of adverse pregnancy outcomes  

E-print Network

1 Maternal weight change before pregnancy in relation with birthweight and risks of adverse Tel: +33 1 45 59 51 01 Fax: +33 1 47 26 94 54 ibrahima.diouf@inserm.fr Short title: Maternal weight Journal of Epidemiology 2011;26(10):789-96" DOI : 10.1007/s10654-011-9599-9 #12;2 Abstract Maternal weight

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

93

Maternal and Paternal Smoking During Pregnancy and Risk of ADHD Symptoms in Offspring: Testing for Intrauterine Effects  

PubMed Central

Maternal smoking during pregnancy is associated with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in offspring. It is assumed by many that this association is causal. Others suggest that observed associations are due to unmeasured genetic factors or other confounding factors. The authors compared risks of maternal smoking during pregnancy with those of paternal smoking during pregnancy. With a causal intrauterine effect, no independent association should be observed between paternal smoking and offspring ADHD. If the association is due to confounding factors, risks of offspring ADHD should be of similar magnitudes regardless of which parent smokes. This hypothesis was tested in 8,324 children from a well-characterized United Kingdom prospective cohort study, the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (data from 1991–2000). Associations between offspring ADHD and maternal and paternal smoking during pregnancy were compared using regression analyses. Offspring ADHD symptoms were associated with exposure to both maternal and paternal smoking during pregnancy (mothers: ? = 0.25, 95% confidence interval: 0.18, 0.32; fathers: ? = 0.21, 95% confidence interval: 0.15, 0.27). When paternal smoking was examined in the absence of maternal smoking, associations remained and did not appear to be due to passive smoking exposure in utero. These findings suggest that associations between maternal smoking during pregnancy and child ADHD may be due to genetic or household-level confounding rather than to causal intrauterine effects. PMID:22791738

Langley, Kate; Heron, Jon; Smith, George Davey; Thapar, Anita

2012-01-01

94

Increased Waking Salivary Cortisol and Depression Risk in Preschoolers: The Role of Maternal History of Melancholic Depression and Early Child Temperament  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Elevated morning cortisol is a prospective predictor of major depression and may serve as a vulnerability marker. We examined the relation between morning cortisol and two prominent risk factors for depression in preschool-aged children: maternal depression and child temperament. We also explored whether maternal depression during the…

Dougherty, Lea R.; Klein, Daniel N.; Olino, Thomas M.; Dyson, Margaret; Rose, Suzanne

2009-01-01

95

Consistent effects of high socioeconomic status and low birth order, and the modifying effect of maternal smoking on the risk of allergic disease during childhood  

Microsoft Academic Search

Birth order, maternal age, gestational age, birth weight, maternal smoking, and social class have all been associated with allergic rhinitis, eczema and asthma in childhood, but the consistency of independent effects of these exposures in relation to all of these allergic conditions has not been investigated. We have compared and contrasted the independent effects of these putative risk factors on

S. A. Lewis; J. R. Britton

1998-01-01

96

Modifiable Risk Factors Branch (MRFB)  

Cancer.gov

The Modifiable Risk Factors Branch (MRFB) focuses on factors to reduce cancer risk in humans, including exposures to nutritional components; physical activity and energy balance; alcohol and tobacco; and infectious, physical, and chemical agents.

97

W?hine hauora: linking local hospital and national health information datasets to explore maternal risk factors and obstetric outcomes of New Zealand M?ori and non-M?ori women in relation to infant respiratory admissions and timely immunisations  

PubMed Central

Background Significant health inequities exist around maternal and infant health for M?ori, the indigenous people of New Zealand. The infants of M?ori are more likely to die in their first year of life and also have higher rates of hospital admission for respiratory illnesses, with the greatest burden of morbidity being due to bronchiolitis in those under one year of age. Timely immunisations can prevent some respiratory related hospitalisations, although for M?ori, the proportion of infants with age appropriate immunisations are lower than for non-M?ori. This paper describes the protocol for a retrospective cohort study that linked local hospital and national health information datasets to explore maternal risk factors and obstetric outcomes in relation to respiratory admissions and timely immunisations for infants of M?ori and non-M?ori women. Methods/Design The study population included pregnant women who gave birth in hospital in one region of New Zealand between 1995 and 2009. Routinely collected local hospital data were linked via a unique identifier (National Health Index number) to national health information databases to assess rates of post-natal admissions and access to health services for M?ori and non-M?ori mothers and infants. The two primary outcomes for the study are: 1. The rates of respiratory hospitalisations of infants (? 1 yr of age) calculated for infants of both M?ori and non-M?ori women (for mothers under 20 years of age, and overall) accounting for relationship to parity, maternal age, socioeconomic deprivation index, maternal smoking status. 2. The proportion of infants with age appropriate immunisations at six and 12 months, calculated for both infants born to M?ori women and infants born to non-M?ori women, accounting for relationship to parity, maternal age, socioeconomic deprivation index, smoking status, and other risk factors. Discussion Analysis of a wide range of routinely collected health information in which maternal and infant data are linked will allow us to directly explore the relationship between key maternal factors and infant health, and provide a greater understanding of the causes of health inequalities that exist between the infants of M?ori and non-M?ori mothers. PMID:23837612

2013-01-01

98

Risk Factors of Neural Tube Defects in Northern Iran  

PubMed Central

Background: Neural tube defects (NTDs) including spina bifida and anencephaly are the second most common birth defects with 2.8 per 1000 births in northern Iran. Objectives: This study was conducted to determine the risk factors of neural tube defects in Gorgan, north of Iran. Patients and Methods: This hospital-based, case-control study was carried out on all NTD-affected pregnancies (n = 59) during February 2007 - August 2010, and 160 healthy pregnancies were selected via convenient sampling method in three hospitals in Gorgan, north of Iran. Risk factors including maternal body mass index (BMI), season of birth, gender of the newborn, mother’s age, ethnicity, consanguineous marriage, folic acid consumption, nutrition, habitat, and education, were assessed through interviews with mothers. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to estimate the risks by odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals. Results: The multivariate analysis showed that maternal BMI (normal/underweight OR: 0.23, overweight/underweight OR: 0.15, obese/underweight OR: 0.13) and maternal ethnicity (Fars/Sistani OR: 3.49) and maternal nutrition (good/poor OR: 0.46) were significantly correlated with NTDs in the newborns. Conclusions: This study showed that maternal ethnicity, insufficient nutrition, and BMI, were the main risk factors of NTDs in northern Iran. PMID:25068063

Golalipour, Mohammad Jafar; Qorbani, Mostafa; Mirfazeli, Arezo; Mobasheri, Elham

2014-01-01

99

A thematic analysis of factors influencing recruitment to maternal and perinatal trials  

PubMed Central

Background Recruitment of eligible participants remains one of the biggest challenges to successful completion of randomised controlled trials (RCTs). Only one third of trials recruit on time, often requiring a lengthy extension to the recruitment period. We identified factors influencing recruitment success and potentially effective recruitment strategies. Methods We searched MEDLINE and EMBASE from 1966 to December Week 2, 2006, the Cochrane Library Methodology Register in December 2006, and hand searched reference lists for studies of any design which focused on recruitment to maternal/perinatal trials, or if no studies of maternal or perinatal research could be identified, other areas of healthcare. Studies of nurses' and midwives' attitudes to research were included as none specifically about trials were located. We synthesised the data narratively, using a basic thematic analysis, with themes derived from the literature and after discussion between the authors. Results Around half of the included papers (29/53) were specific to maternal and perinatal healthcare. Only one study was identified which focused on factors for maternal and perinatal clinicians and only seven studies considered recruitment strategies specific to perinatal research. Themes included: participant assessment of risk; recruitment process; participant understanding of research; patient characteristics; clinician attitudes to research and trials; protocol issues; and institutional or organisational issues. While no reliable evidence base for strategies to enhance recruitment was identified in any of the review studies, four maternal/perinatal primary studies suggest that specialised recruitment staff, mass mailings, physician referrals and strategies targeting minority women may increase recruitment. However these findings may only be applicable to the particular trials and settings studied. Conclusion Although factors reported by both participants and clinicians which influence recruitment were quite consistent across the included studies, studies comparing different recruitment strategies were largely missing. Trials of different recruitment strategies could be embedded in large multicentre RCTs, with strategies tailored to the factors specific to the trial and institution. PMID:18687110

Tooher, Rebecca L; Middleton, Philippa F; Crowther, Caroline A

2008-01-01

100

Maternal and neonatal individual risks and benefits associated with caesarean delivery: multicentre prospective study  

PubMed Central

Objective To assess the risks and benefits associated with caesarean delivery compared with vaginal delivery. Design Prospective cohort study within the 2005 WHO global survey on maternal and perinatal health. Setting 410 health facilities in 24 areas in eight randomly selected Latin American countries; 123 were randomly selected and 120 participated and provided data Participants 106?546 deliveries reported during the three month study period, with data available for 97?095 (91% coverage). Main outcome measures Maternal, fetal, and neonatal morbidity and mortality associated with intrapartum or elective caesarean delivery, adjusted for clinical, demographic, pregnancy, and institutional characteristics. Results Women undergoing caesarean delivery had an increased risk of severe maternal morbidity compared with women undergoing vaginal delivery (odds ratio 2.0 (95% confidence interval 1.6 to 2.5) for intrapartum caesarean and 2.3 (1.7 to 3.1) for elective caesarean). The risk of antibiotic treatment after delivery for women having either type of caesarean was five times that of women having vaginal deliveries. With cephalic presentation, there was a trend towards a reduced odds ratio for fetal death with elective caesarean, after adjustment for possible confounding variables and gestational age (0.7, 0.4 to 1.0). With breech presentation, caesarean delivery had a large protective effect for fetal death. With cephalic presentation, however, independent of possible confounding variables and gestational age, intrapartum and elective caesarean increased the risk for a stay of seven or more days in neonatal intensive care (2.1 (1.8 to 2.6) and 1.9 (1.6 to 2.3), respectively) and the risk of neonatal mortality up to hospital discharge (1.7 (1.3 to 2.2) and 1.9 (1.5 to 2.6), respectively), which remained higher even after exclusion of all caesarean deliveries for fetal distress. Such increased risk was not seen for breech presentation. Lack of labour was a risk factor for a stay of seven or more days in neonatal intensive care and neonatal mortality up to hospital discharge for babies delivered by elective caesarean delivery, but rupturing of membranes may be protective. Conclusions Caesarean delivery independently reduces overall risk in breech presentations and risk of intrapartum fetal death in cephalic presentations but increases the risk of severe maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality in cephalic presentations. PMID:17977819

Carroli, Guillermo; Zavaleta, Nelly; Donner, Allan; Wojdyla, Daniel; Faundes, Anibal; Velazco, Alejandro; Bataglia, Vicente; Langer, Ana; Narvaez, Alberto; Valladares, Eliette; Shah, Archana; Campodonico, Liana; Romero, Mariana; Reynoso, Sofia; de Padua, Karla Simonia; Giordano, Daniel; Kublickas, Marius; Acosta, Arnaldo

2007-01-01

101

Advanced maternal age and the risk of perinatal death due to intrapartum anoxia at term  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundAdvanced maternal age is associated with higher risks of intrapartum complications. However, the effect of maternal age on the risk of perinatal death due to these complications is unclear. The aim of the present study was to determine the association between maternal age and delivery-related perinatal death at term.MethodsIn this retrospective cohort study, birth records of 1 043 002 singleton

Dharmintra Pasupathy; Angela M Wood; Jill P Pell; Michael Fleming; Gordon C S Smith

2010-01-01

102

Cumulative Effects of Mothers' Risk and Promotive Factors on Daughters' Disruptive Behavior  

PubMed Central

Little is known about the ways in which the accumulation of maternal factors increases or reduces risk for girls’ disruptive behavior during preadolescence. In the current study, maternal risk and promotive factors and the severity of girls’ disruptive behavior were assessed annually among girls’ ages 7–12 in an urban community sample (N=2043). Maternal risk and promotive factors were operative at different time points in girls’ development. Maternal warmth explained variance in girls’ disruptive behavior, even after controlling for maternal risk factors and relevant child and neighborhood factors. In addition, findings supported the cumulative hypothesis that the number of risk factors increased the chance on girls’ disruptive behavior disorder (DBD), while the number of promotive factors decreased this probability. Daughters of mothers with a history of Conduct Disorder (CD) were exposed to more risk factors and fewer promotive factors compared to daughters of mothers without prior CD. The identification of malleable maternal factors that can serve as targets for intervention has important implications for intergenerational intervention. Cumulative effects show that the focus of prevention efforts should not be on single factors, but on multiple factors associated with girls’ disruptive behavior. PMID:22127641

Hipwell, Alison E.; Vermeiren, Robert; Loeber, Rolf

2012-01-01

103

Concentrations of endothelial nitric oxide synthase, angiotensin-converting enzyme, vascular endothelial growth factor and placental growth factor in maternal blood and maternal metabolic status in pregnancy complicated by hypertensive disorders.  

PubMed

Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (HDPs) are associated with altered maternal metabolism, impaired perinatal outcome and increased risk for remote maternal complications. The aim of our study was to analyse associations between circulating levels of angiogenic factors and markers of oxidative stress and metabolic status in women with HDP. Forty-six women in singleton pregnancies complicated by HDP and 30 healthy controls were enrolled in a prospective observational study. Serum concentrations of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), angiotensin-converting enzyme, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and placental growth factor (PlGF) were measured in the third trimester and correlated with maternal anthropometrics and metabolic status. We found significantly lower eNOS levels in patients with severe hypertension vs controls, a strong association between eNOS and PlGF in the study group, a significant association between maternal prepregnancy body mass index (BMI) and VEGF levels and an inverse correlation between VEGF and PlGF. Maternal prepregnancy BMI was the only independent predictor for VEGF concentrations. We noted reduced levels of PlGF and eNOS and increased VEGF levels in women with severe hypertension/preeclampsia. First, different forms of HDP are associated with different alteration patterns in concentrations of angiogenic factors and markers of oxidative stress. Second, maternal prepregnancy BMI, but not body weight, is a significant predictor for VEGF levels in late pregnancy. PMID:25186136

Zawiejska, A; Wender-Ozegowska, E; Iciek, R; Brazert, J

2014-11-01

104

Agreement between maternal report and antenatal records for a range of pre and peri-natal factors: The influence of maternal and child characteristics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Events during pregnancy and labour may influence the future health and well-being of offspring. Many studies rely on maternal reports of pre and peri-natal factors. Both maternal and child characteristics may potentially influence the reliability and accuracy of maternal recall. However, this has not been previously examined. Aims: To examine agreement between information from maternally reported questionnaires and medical

Frances Rice; Allyson Lewis; Gordon Harold; Marianne van den Bree; Jacky Boivin; Dale F. Hay; Michael J. Owen; Anita Thapar

2007-01-01

105

Children's Intellectual and Emotional-Behavioral Adjustment at 4 Years as a Function of Cocaine Exposure, Maternal Characteristics, and Environmental Risk  

PubMed Central

The authors examined 223 children at age 4 years for the effects of prenatal cocaine exposure, exposure to other substances, maternal and environmental risk factors, and neonatal medical problems on IQ, externalizing problems, and internalizing problems. Regression analyses showed that maternal verbal IQ and low environmental risk predicted child IQ. Cocaine exposure negatively predicted children’s overall IQ and verbal reasoning scores, but only for boys. Cocaine exposure also predicted poorer short-term memory. Maternal harsh discipline, maternal depressive symptoms, and increased environmental risk predicted externalizing problems. In contrast, only maternal depressive symptoms predicted internalizing problems. These findings indicate that early exposure to substances is largely unrelated to subsequent IQ or adjustment, particularly for girls. PMID:12220044

Bennett, David S.; Bendersky, Margaret; Lewis, Michael

2006-01-01

106

Maternal and Infant Gene-Folate Interactions and the Risk of Neural Tube Defects  

PubMed Central

Neural tube defects (NTDs) are common, serious malformations with a complex etiology that suggests involvement of both genetic and environmental factors. The authors evaluated maternal or offspring folate-related gene variants and interactions between the gene variants and maternal intake of folates on the risk of NTDs in their offspring. A case-control study was conducted on mothers and/or their fetuses and infants who were born in California from 1999–2003 with an NTD (cases n = 222, including 24 mother-infant pairs) or without a major malformation (controls n = 454, including 186 mother-infant pairs). Maternal intake of folates was assessed by food frequency questionnaire and genotyping was performed on samples from mothers and infants. For mothers in the lowest folate-intake group, risk of NTDs in offspring was significantly decreased for maternal MTHFR SNPs rs1476413, rs1801131 and rs1801133 (odds ratio (OR) = 0.55, 80% confidence interval (CI): 0.20, 1.48; OR = 0.58, 80% CI: 0.24, 1.43; OR = 0.69, 80% CI: 0.41, 1.17, respectively), and TYMS SNPs rs502396 and rs699517 (OR= 0.91, 80% CI: 0.53, 1.56; OR = 0.70, 80% CI: 0.38, 1.29). A gene-only effect was observed for maternal SHMT1 SNP rs669340 (OR = 0.69, 95% CI: 0.49, 0.96). When there was low maternal folate intake, risk of NTDs was significantly increased for infant MTHFD1 SNPs rs2236224, rs2236225 and rs11627387 (OR = 1.58, 80% CI: 0.99, 2.51; OR = 1.53, 80% CI: 0.95, 2.47; OR = 4.25, 80% CI: 2.33, 7.75, respectively) and SHMT1 SNP rs12939757 (OR = 2.01, 80% CI: 1.20, 3.37), but decreased for TYMS SNP rs2847153 (OR = 0.73, 80% CI: 0.37, 1.45). Although power to detect interaction effects was low for this birth defects association study, the gene-folate interactions observed in this study represent preliminary findings that will be useful for informing future studies on the complex etiology of NTDs. PMID:22903727

Etheredge, Analee J.; Finnell, Richard H.; Carmichael, Suzan L.; Lammer, Edward J.; Zhu, Huiping; Mitchell, Laura E.; Shaw, Gary M.

2012-01-01

107

Risk factors for dystocia in pigtailed macaques (Macaca nemestrina).  

PubMed

Dystocia (difficult labor) is an important component of the management of nonhuman primates and results in significant fetal and maternal morbidity and increased use of veterinary resources. Dystocias can arise from abnormalities of the maternal pelvis or fetus or uncoordinated uterine activity. Although risk factors for stillbirths have been established in nonhuman primates, risk factors for dystocias have not. The objective of this study was to determine maternal and fetal risk factors for dystocia in macaques. Retrospective data were collected from 83 pigtailed macaques (Macaca nemestrina) diagnosed with dystocia. The diagnosis of dystocia was made based on clinical or pathologic evidence. Maternal records of age, reproductive history, experimental history, clinical records, and fetal birth weight and any applicable fetal necropsy reports were reviewed. The gestational age of the fetus, the infant's birth weight, total previous births by the dam, and the proportions of both viable delivery (inverse effect) and surgical pregnancy interventions (direct effect) in the dam's history generated a model that maximized the experimental variance for predicting dystocia in the current pregnancy and explained 24% of the dystocia deliveries. The number of total previous births and proportion of previous cesarean sections accounted for the greatest effect. This model can identify individual dams within a colony that are at risk for dystocias and allow for changes in breeding colony management, more intense monitoring of dams at risk, or allocation of additional resources. PMID:21535929

Stockinger, Diane E; Torrence, Anne E; Hukkanen, Renee R; Vogel, Keith W; Hotchkiss, Charlotte E; Ha, James C

2011-04-01

108

Multiple jeopardy: Risk and protective factors among addicted mothers' offspring  

PubMed Central

Objectives of this study were to ascertain risk and protective factors in the adjustment of 78 school-age and teenage offspring of opioid- and cocaine-abusing mothers. Using a multimethod, multiinformant approach, child outcomes were operationalized via lifetime psychiatric diagnoses and everyday social competence (each based on both mother and child reports), and dimensional assessments of symptoms (mother report). Risk/protective factors examined included the child sociodemographic attributes of gender, age, and ethnicity, aspects of maternal psychopathology, and both mother's and children's cognitive functioning. Results revealed that greater child maladjustment was linked with increasing age, Caucasian (as opposed to African American) ethnicity, severity of maternal psychiatric disturbance, higher maternal cognitive abilities (among African Americans) and lower child cognitive abilities (among Caucasians). Limitations of the study are discussed, as are implications of findings for future research. PMID:9524811

LUTHAR, SUNIYA S.; CUSHING, GRETTA; MERIKANGAS, KATHLEEN R.; ROUNSAVILLE, BRUCE J.

2012-01-01

109

Maternal effects and range expansion: a key factor in a dynamic process?  

E-print Network

resource availability and sex-specific birth order is robust across populations. Thus, this maternal effectMaternal effects and range expansion: a key factor in a dynamic process? Rene´e A. Duckworth offspring phenotype in response to changes in current environmental conditions, making maternal effects

Duckworth, Renée

110

Maternal genitourinary infections and the risk of gastroschisis.  

PubMed

Genitourinary infections (GUIs) have been associated with increased risk of gastroschisis in 2 studies. Using data collected in the Slone Epidemiology Center Birth Defects Study, we examined the association between GUI and gastroschisis. From 1998 to 2010, mothers of 249 gastroschisis cases and 7,104 controls were interviewed within 6 months of delivery about pregnancy events, including vaginal infections, genital herpes, urinary tract infections (UTIs), and other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). Women were considered exposed if they reported at least 1 instance of a GUI in the first trimester. Logistic regression models were used to calculate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Women who reported having any GUI had an adjusted odds ratio of 1.8 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.3, 2.4). The highest risk was seen among women who reported a UTI only (adjusted odds ratio = 2.3, 95% CI: 1.5, 3.5), while the odds ratio for an STD only was slightly elevated (adjusted odds ratio = 1.2, 95% CI: 1.0, 1.5). Among women under 25 years of age, the odds ratio for UTI only was 2.6 (95% CI: 1.7, 4.0), and among older women it was 1.8 (95% CI: 0.6, 5.9). When we considered the joint association of UTIs and young maternal age, a synergistic effect was observed. The results of this study add further evidence that UTIs may increase the risk of gastroschisis. PMID:25073472

Yazdy, Mahsa M; Mitchell, Allen A; Werler, Martha M

2014-09-01

111

Stroke - risk factors  

MedlinePLUS

... a higher risk of getting heart disease than women, except in older adults. Your genes or race. If your parents had a stroke, you are at higher risk. African Americans, Mexican Americans, American Indians, Hawaiians, and some Asian Americans ...

112

Risk Factors for Smoking in Rural Women  

PubMed Central

Abstract Background This study examined the association between social, demographic, and psychologic factors and smoking status among Appalachian Ohio women. A secondary aim examined whether specific factors could be identified and segmented for future tailored treatment of tobacco dependence. Methods A cross-sectional survey (n=570) obtained information about social, demographic, and psychologic factors and smoking. Logistic regression described associations between these characteristics and smoking status. Chi-square automatic interaction detection (CHAID) analyses identified subgroups at risk for smoking. Results Fifty-two percent never smoked, with 20.5% and 27.5% categorized as former and current smokers, respectively. Women with low adult socioeconomic position (SEP) were more likely to smoke (odds ratio [OR] 3.05, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.74-5.34) compared to high SEP women. Other factors associated with current smoking included age 31–50 (OR 2.30, 95% CI 1.22-4.33), age 18–30 (OR 3.29, 95% CI 1.72-5.34), Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression scale (CES-D) score?16 (OR 1.99, 95% CI 1.31-3.05), and first pregnancy at age<20 (OR 1.74, 95% CI 1.14-2.66). The prevalence of smoking was 50% among those with four or more risk factors compared to 10% for those reporting no risk factors. CHAID analyses identified low adult SEP and depressive symptoms as the combination of risk factors most strongly associated with smoking; 49.3% of women in this subgroup currently smoked. Conclusions Low SEP in adulthood, maternal circumstances, and depressive symptoms are associated with current smoking. Tailored cessation interventions that address these risk factors should be developed and further evaluated in an attempt to reduce disparities in smoking prevalence among this vulnerable group of women. PMID:22360694

Salsberry, Pamela J.; Ferketich, Amy K.; Ahijevych, Karen L.; Hood, Nancy E.; Paskett, Electra D.

2012-01-01

113

Reduced brain corticotropin-releasing factor receptor activation is required for adequate maternal care and maternal aggression in lactating rats.  

PubMed

The brain corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) system triggers a variety of neuroendocrine and behavioural responses to stress. Whether maternal behaviour and emotionality in lactation are modulated by CRF has rarely been investigated. In the present study, we measured CRF mRNA expression within the parvocellular part of the paraventricular nucleus in virgin and lactating Wistar rats bred for high (HAB) and low (LAB) anxiety-related behaviour or non-selected for anxiety (NAB). Further, we intracerebroventricularly infused synthetic CRF or the CRF receptor (CRF-R) antagonist D-Phe to manipulate CRF-R1/2 non-specifically in lactating HAB, LAB, and NAB dams, and monitored maternal care, maternal motivation, maternal aggression, and anxiety. The CRF mRNA expression in the parvocellular part of the paraventricular nucleus was higher in HAB vs. LAB rats independent of reproductive status. The lactation-specific decrease of CRF mRNA was confirmed in LAB and NAB dams but was absent in HAB dams. Intracerebroventricular CRF decreased maternal care under basal conditions in the home cage in all breeding lines and reduced attack behaviour in HAB and LAB dams during maternal defence. In contrast, D-Phe rescued maternal care after exposure to maternal defence in the home cage without influencing maternal aggression. Furthermore, D-Phe decreased and CRF tended to increase anxiety in HAB/NAB and LAB dams, respectively, suggesting an anxiogenic effect of CRF in lactating females. In conclusion, low CRF-R activation during lactation is an essential prerequisite for the adequate occurrence of maternal behaviour. PMID:23742269

Klampfl, Stefanie M; Neumann, Inga D; Bosch, Oliver J

2013-09-01

114

Environmental risk factors for heart disease.  

PubMed

In this review, we discuss current evidence linking environmental pollutants to cardiovascular disease (CVD). Extensive evidence indicates that environmental factors contribute to CVD risk, incidence, and severity. Migrant studies show that changes in the environment could substantially alter CVD risk in a genetically stable population. Additionally, CVD risk is affected by changes in nutritional and lifestyle choices. Recent studies in the field of environmental cardiology suggest that environmental toxins also influence CVD. Exposure to tobacco smoke is paradigmatic of such environmental risk and is strongly and positively associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. In animal models of exposure, tobacco smoke induces endothelial dysfunction and prothrombotic responses and exacerbates atherogenesis and myocardial ischemic injury. Similar mechanism may be engaged by other pollutants or food constituents. Several large population-based studies indicate that exposure to fine or ultrafine particulate air pollution increases CVD morbidity and mortality, and the plausibility of this association is supported by data from animal studies. Exposure to other chemicals such as polyaromatic hydrocarbons, aldehydes, and metals has also been reported to elevate CVD risk by affecting atherogenesis, thrombosis, or blood pressure regulation. Maternal exposure to drugs, toxins, and infection has been linked with cardiac birth defects and premature CVD in later life. Collectively, the data support the notion that chronic environmental stress is an important determinant of CVD risk. Further work is required to assess the magnitude of this risk fully and to delineate specific mechanisms by which environmental toxins affect CVD. PMID:19119685

O'Toole, Timothy E; Conklin, Daniel J; Bhatnagar, Aruni

2008-01-01

115

Maternal cigarette smoking during pregnancy and risk of oral clefts in newborns.  

PubMed

The results of previous epidemiologic research on the possible association between maternal smoking during pregnancy and risk of oral clefts in offspring have been inconsistent. This may be due in part to methodological limitations, including imprecise measurement of tobacco use, failure to consider etiologic heterogeneity among types of oral clefts, and confounding. This analysis, based on a large case-control study, further evaluated the effect of first trimester maternal smoking on oral facial cleft risk by examining the dose-response relationship according to specific cleft type and according to whether or not additional malformations were present. A number of factors, including dietary and supplemental folate intake and family history of clefts, were evaluated as potential confounders and effect modifiers. Data on 3,774 mothers interviewed between 1976 and 1992 by the Slone Epidemiology Unit Birth Defects Study were used. Study subjects were actively ascertained from sites in areas around Boston, Massachusetts and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; the state of Iowa; and southeastern Ontario, Canada. Cases were infants with isolated defects--cleft lip alone (n = 334), cleft lip and palate (n = 494), or cleft palate alone (n = 244)--and infants with clefts plus (+) additional malformations: cleft lip+ (n = 58), cleft lip and palate+ (n = 140), or cleft palate+ (n = 209). Controls were infants with defects other than clefts, excluding defects possibly associated with maternal cigarette use. There were no associations with maternal smoking for any oral cleft group, except for a positive dose response among infants with cleft lip and palate+ (for light smokers, odds ratio (OR) = 1.09 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.6, 1.9); for moderate smokers, OR = 1.84 (95% CI: 1.2, 2.9); and for heavy smokers, OR = 1.85 (95% CI: 1.0, 3.5), relative to nonsmokers). This finding may be related to the additional malformations rather than to the cleft itself. PMID:10512422

Lieff, S; Olshan, A F; Werler, M; Strauss, R P; Smith, J; Mitchell, A

1999-10-01

116

Risk factors for depressive symptoms during pregnancy.  

PubMed

The present study examined risk factors for depression during pregnancy in a very large population sample. Two research questions have been addressed: first, the association between demographic factors and past negative obstetrical outcomes on depression severity scores, and second, the differences in these factors between women recruited at a university medical center and maternal health centers (MHC). The study included more than 5,000 pregnant women attending regular appointments at the University Obstetrics and Gynecology Clinic or at several MHCs in Eastern Iowa. Participants completed a Beck depression inventory (BDI) and a demographic questionnaire. We performed a statistical analysis on the association between risk factors and depression severity scores. Regression analysis revealed that week of pregnancy, site of recruitment, years of education, income, marital status, employment, and number of miscarriages and stillbirths were significant predictors of total BDI score. Compared to their university counterparts, participants at MHCs had more depressive symptoms, were younger, mostly single, and had lower socioeconomic status and more past negative obstetrical outcomes. Our study can inform providers about some of the risk factors during depression screening in pregnancy to increase diagnostic vigilance and tailor the level of prenatal care accordingly. PMID:20872153

Koleva, Hristina; Stuart, Scott; O'Hara, Michael W; Bowman-Reif, Jennifer

2011-04-01

117

Prenatal Risk Factors for Autism: A Comprehensive Meta-analysis  

PubMed Central

Background The etiology of autism is unknown, although prenatal exposures have been the focus of epidemiologic research for over 40 years. Aims To provide the first quantitative review and meta-analysis of the association between maternal pregnancy complications and pregnancy-related factors and risk of autism. Methods PubMed, Embase, and PsycInfo databases were searched for epidemiologic studies that examined the association between pregnancy-related factors and autism. Forty studies were eligible for inclusion in the meta-analysis. Summary effect estimates were calculated for factors examined in multiple studies. Results Over 50 prenatal factors have been examined. The factors associated with autism risk in the meta-analysis were advanced parental age at birth, maternal prenatal medication use, bleeding, gestational diabetes, being first born vs. third or later, and having a mother born abroad. The factors with the strongest evidence against a role in autism risk included previous fetal loss and maternal hypertension, proteinuria, preeclampsia, and swelling. Conclusions There is insufficient evidence to implicate any one prenatal factor in autism aetiology, although there is some evidence to suggest that exposure to pregnancy complications may increase the risk. PMID:19567888

Gardener, Hannah; Spiegelman, Donna; Buka, Stephen L.

2013-01-01

118

Maternal diet modulates the risk for neural tube defects in a mouse model of diabetic pregnancy  

PubMed Central

Pregnancies complicated by maternal diabetes have long been known to carry a higher risk for congenital malformations, such as neural tube defects. Using the FVB inbred mouse strain and the Streptozotocin-induced diabetes model, we tested whether the incidence of neural tube defects in diabetic pregnancies can be modulated by maternal diet. In a comparison of two commercial mouse diets, which are considered nutritionally replete, we found that maternal consumption of the unfavorable diet was associated with a more than three-fold higher rate of neural tube defects. Our results demonstrate that maternal diet can act as a modifier of the risk for abnormal development in high-risk pregnancies, and provide support for the possibility that neural tube defects in human diabetic pregnancies might be preventable by optimized maternal nutrition. PMID:20868740

Kappen, Claudia; Kruger, Claudia; MacGowan, Jacalyn; Salbaum, J. Michael

2010-01-01

119

Smoking – A Renal Risk Factor  

Microsoft Academic Search

One of the most important tasks of clinical and experimental nephrology is to identify the risk factors of progression of renal failure. A major renal risk factor which has not been sufficiently acknowledged despite increasing evidence is cigarette smoking. Diabetologists were the first to recognize the adverse effects of smoking on the kidney: both in type 1 and in type

Stephan R. Orth

2000-01-01

120

Maternal Appraisal Styles, Family Risk Status and Anger Biases of Children  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study investigated the relationship between maternal appraisal styles, family risk status, and anger biases in children. Participants included 90 mothers and their children between 3–6 years of age. Eighty families were followed up 1 year later. Maternal appraisal styles were assessed via a naturalistic story-reading method, and Time 1 and Time 2 emotion biases included teacher ratings of

Carol A. Root; Jennifer M. Jenkins

2005-01-01

121

Predicting Preschool Cognitive Development from Infant Temperament, Maternal Sensitivity, and Psychosocial Risk  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This longitudinal study investigated the relative contributions of infant temperament, maternal sensitivity, and psychosocial risk to individual differences in preschool children's cognitive development. It also examined specific moderating effects between predictors as well as the specific mediating role of maternal sensitivity in the relation…

Lemelin, Jean-Pascal; Tarabulsy, George M.; Provost, Marc A.

2006-01-01

122

Maternal Weight Gain in Pregnancy and Risk of Obesity among Offspring: A Systematic Review  

PubMed Central

Objectives. To systematically review the evidence from prospective and retrospective cohort studies on the association between gestational weight gain (GWG) and offspring's body weight. Methods. Electronic databases PubMed, Web of Science, CINAHL, and Academic Search Premiere were searched from inception through March 18, 2013. Included studies (n = 23) were English articles that examined the independent associations of GWG with body mass index (BMI) and/or overweight status in the offspring aged 2 to 18.9 years. Two authors independently extracted the data and assessed methodological quality of the included studies. Results. Evidence from cohort studies supports that total GWG and exceeding the Institute of Medicine maternal weight gain recommendation were associated with higher BMI z-score and elevated risk of overweight or obesity in offspring. The evidence of high rate of GWG during early- and mid-pregnancy is suggestive. Additionally, the evidence on inadequate GWG and net GWG in relation to body weight outcomes in offspring is insufficient to draw conclusions. Conclusions. These findings suggest that GWG is a potential risk factor for childhood obesity. However, findings should be interpreted with caution due to measurement issues of GWG and potential confounding effects of shared familial characteristics (i.e., genetics and maternal and child's lifestyle factors). PMID:25371815

Lau, Erica Y.; Liu, Junxiu; McDonald, Samantha M.

2014-01-01

123

Success factors for reducing maternal and child mortality.  

PubMed

Reducing maternal and child mortality is a priority in the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), and will likely remain so after 2015. Evidence exists on the investments, interventions and enabling policies required. Less is understood about why some countries achieve faster progress than other comparable countries. The Success Factors for Women's and Children's Health studies sought to address this knowledge gap using statistical and econometric analyses of data from 144 low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) over 20 years; Boolean, qualitative comparative analysis; a literature review; and country-specific reviews in 10 fast-track countries for MDGs 4 and 5a. There is no standard formula--fast-track countries deploy tailored strategies and adapt quickly to change. However, fast-track countries share some effective approaches in addressing three main areas to reduce maternal and child mortality. First, these countries engage multiple sectors to address crucial health determinants. Around half the reduction in child mortality in LMICs since 1990 is the result of health sector investments, the other half is attributed to investments made in sectors outside health. Second, these countries use strategies to mobilize partners across society, using timely, robust evidence for decision-making and accountability and a triple planning approach to consider immediate needs, long-term vision and adaptation to change. Third, the countries establish guiding principles that orient progress, align stakeholder action and achieve results over time. This evidence synthesis contributes to global learning on accelerating improvements in women's and children's health towards 2015 and beyond. PMID:25110379

Kuruvilla, Shyama; Schweitzer, Julian; Bishai, David; Chowdhury, Sadia; Caramani, Daniele; Frost, Laura; Cortez, Rafael; Daelmans, Bernadette; de Francisco, Andres; Adam, Taghreed; Cohen, Robert; Alfonso, Y Natalia; Franz-Vasdeki, Jennifer; Saadat, Seemeen; Pratt, Beth Anne; Eugster, Beatrice; Bandali, Sarah; Venkatachalam, Pritha; Hinton, Rachael; Murray, John; Arscott-Mills, Sharon; Axelson, Henrik; Maliqi, Blerta; Sarker, Intissar; Lakshminarayanan, Rama; Jacobs, Troy; Jacks, Susan; Mason, Elizabeth; Ghaffar, Abdul; Mays, Nicholas; Presern, Carole; Bustreo, Flavia

2014-07-01

124

Maternal Substance Use and HIV Status: Adolescent Risk and Resilience  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We examined the risk and protective factors and mental health problems of 105 low SES, urban adolescents whose mothers were coping with alcohol abuse and other drug problems. Approximately half of the mothers were also HIV-infected. As hypothesized, there were few differences between adolescents of HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected mothers in…

Leonard, Noelle R.; Gwadz, Marya Viorst; Cleland, Charles M.; Vekaria, Pooja C.; Ferns, Bill

2008-01-01

125

What Are Coronary Heart Disease Risk Factors?  

MedlinePLUS

... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Are Coronary Heart Disease Risk Factors? Coronary heart disease risk factors are conditions or habits that raise your risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) and heart attack . These risk factors also ...

126

Maternal and neonatal factors impacting response to methadone therapy in infants treated for neonatal abstinence syndrome  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective:To identify maternal and neonatal factors that impact response to methadone therapy for neonatal abstinence syndrome.Study Design:This is a retrospective review of 128 infants that received pharmacotherapy for opiate withdrawal to identify factors associated with favorable response to methadone therapy. Maternal and neonatal data were analyzed with univariate statistics and multivariate logistic regression.Result:Maternal methadone maintenance dose during pregnancy correlated with

B Isemann; J Meinzen-Derr; H Akinbi

2011-01-01

127

Risk factors for periodontal disease.  

PubMed

Risk factors play an important role in an individual's response to periodontal infection. Identification of these risk factors helps to target patients for prevention and treatment, with modification of risk factors critical to the control of periodontal disease. Shifts in our understanding of periodontal disease prevalence, and advances in scientific methodology and statistical analysis in the last few decades, have allowed identification of several major systemic risk factors for periodontal disease. The first change in our thinking was the understanding that periodontal disease is not universal, but that severe forms are found only in a portion of the adult population who show abnormal susceptibility. Analysis of risk factors and the ability to statistically adjust and stratify populations to eliminate the effects of confounding factors have allowed identification of independent risk factors. These independent but modifiable, risk factors for periodontal disease include lifestyle factors, such as smoking and alcohol consumption. They also include diseases and unhealthy conditions such as diabetes mellitus, obesity, metabolic syndrome, osteoporosis, and low dietary calcium and vitamin D. These risk factors are modifiable and their management is a major component of the contemporary care of many periodontal patients. Genetic factors also play a role in periodontal disease and allow one to target individuals for prevention and early detection. The role of genetic factors in aggressive periodontitis is clear. However, although genetic factors (i.e., specific genes) are strongly suspected to have an association with chronic adult periodontitis, there is as yet no clear evidence for this in the general population. It is important to pursue efforts to identify genetic factors associated with chronic periodontitis because such factors have potential in identifying patients who have a high susceptibility for development of this disease. Many of the systemic risk factors for periodontal disease, such as smoking, diabetes and obesity, and osteoporosis in postmenopausal women, are relatively common and can be expected to affect most patients with periodontal disease seen in clinics and dental practices. Hence, risk factor identification and management has become a key component of care for periodontal patients. PMID:23574464

Genco, Robert J; Borgnakke, Wenche S

2013-06-01

128

BIRTH DEFECTS RISK ASSOCIATED WITH MATERNAL SPORT FISH CONSUMPTION: POTENTIAL EFFECT MODIFICATION BY SEX OF OFFSPRING  

EPA Science Inventory

Contaminated sport fish consumption may result in exposure to various reproductive and developmental toxicants, including pesticides and other suspected endocrine disruptors. We investigated the relation between maternal sport fish meals and risk of major birth defects among infa...

129

Comparing factors associated with maternal and adolescent reports of adolescent traumatic event exposure.  

PubMed

Existing research indicates that there is very little agreement between youth and their parents on youth trauma exposure and subsequent treatment. Few studies, however, have attempted to examine factors that may contribute to this lack of agreement. This study addressed this gap by examining youth and maternal-reported youth traumatic event exposure using a sample of 100 urban, African American adolescent-maternal dyads. Cumulative report of youth potentially traumatic event exposure (57%) was higher than youth (41%) and maternal (27%) reports. Findings indicate that there was agreement for sexual assault, being shot or stabbed, and auto accidents. Maternal depression was the only factor that was associated with both youth and maternal report of youth qualifying event. Other factors that distinguished youth reports included maternal event exposure, substance use disorder, antisocial personality behaviors, and youth reports of arguments with the mother and running away from home. Implications for reconciling reports of trauma exposure among youth and their mothers are discussed. PMID:24206543

Johnson, Sharon D

2014-06-01

130

Maternal Stress, Social Support, and Risk of Neural Tube Defects Among Mexican Americans  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Studies suggest that maternal psychologic stress can increase the risk of congenital malformations, including neural tube defects (NTDs). We examined whether maternal stress and lack of social support contribute to NTD risk in a population living along the Texas-Mexico border. Methods: Case mothers (N 184) were Mexican-American wo- men with NTD-affected pregnancies who delivered during 1995 to 2000 in

Lucina Suarez; Kathryn Cardarelli; Kate Hendricks

2003-01-01

131

Maternal factors relating to breast-feeding duration in areas around Guadalajara, Mexico.  

PubMed

To investigate breast-feeding patterns and factors encouraging early weaning, a survey was conducted in Tonalá and Tlaquepaque, two suburbs within Guadalajara's metropolitan area, in 1991. For this purpose a multiphase probabilistic sample of infants born in these areas from May 1990 through April 1991 was selected. This was done by choosing at random primary health care units in the study areas, health posts associated with these units, and all infants meeting the above criteria at each selected post. A total of 166 homes was visited and interviews were conducted with 141 mothers (91% of the 155 predicted) in June and July 1991. These interviews made use of a 33-item questionnaire developed for the purpose; the interviewers were social workers previously trained in such activities. Logistic regression models were used to calculate the relative risk (RR) and probability of early weaning being associated with certain variables. To help ensure the validity of the results, several regression models were constructed for the purpose of selecting the one best fitting the data. In addition, the attributable population risk (APR) was calculated. The results indicate that failure to breast-feed and early weaning were prevalent in the study population, 34.8% of the study infants being breast-fed less than 1 month. Three risk factors were associated statistically (P < 0.05) with early weaning, these being maternal age < 20 years (RR = 3.75; 95% CI = 1.53-9.19), maternal marital status single (RR = 2.88; 95% CI = 1.08-7.69), and social status of the main family provider other than "worker"--i.e., employee, professional (RR = 2.72; 95% CI = 1.17-6.28). The likelihood that a study infant would have been breast-fed less than a month was 0.84 if the infant was exposed to all three of these identified risk factors and 0.15 if he or she was exposed to none of them. The high percentages of study mothers less then 20 years old and with a social status other than "worker" were reflected in high attributable population found for these variables. In general, the findings point up a need to reduce the influence of these risk factors and to prolong maternal breast-feeding in the study population. PMID:8312958

Vega López, M G; González Pérez, G J

1993-01-01

132

Risk factors for equine laminitis  

E-print Network

logistic regression to assess age, breed, sex, and seasonality as risk factors for equine laminitis. There were 70 acute cases, 183 chronic cases, and 779 controls. No statistical association was found between age, breed, sex, or seasonality...

Polzer, John Patrick

2012-06-07

133

Success factors for reducing maternal and child mortality  

PubMed Central

Abstract Reducing maternal and child mortality is a priority in the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), and will likely remain so after 2015. Evidence exists on the investments, interventions and enabling policies required. Less is understood about why some countries achieve faster progress than other comparable countries. The Success Factors for Women’s and Children’s Health studies sought to address this knowledge gap using statistical and econometric analyses of data from 144 low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) over 20 years; Boolean, qualitative comparative analysis; a literature review; and country-specific reviews in 10 fast-track countries for MDGs 4 and 5a. There is no standard formula – fast-track countries deploy tailored strategies and adapt quickly to change. However, fast-track countries share some effective approaches in addressing three main areas to reduce maternal and child mortality. First, these countries engage multiple sectors to address crucial health determinants. Around half the reduction in child mortality in LMICs since 1990 is the result of health sector investments, the other half is attributed to investments made in sectors outside health. Second, these countries use strategies to mobilize partners across society, using timely, robust evidence for decision-making and accountability and a triple planning approach to consider immediate needs, long-term vision and adaptation to change. Third, the countries establish guiding principles that orient progress, align stakeholder action and achieve results over time. This evidence synthesis contributes to global learning on accelerating improvements in women’s and children’s health towards 2015 and beyond. PMID:25110379

Schweitzer, Julian; Bishai, David; Chowdhury, Sadia; Caramani, Daniele; Frost, Laura; Cortez, Rafael; Daelmans, Bernadette; de Francisco, Andres; Adam, Taghreed; Cohen, Robert; Alfonso, Y Natalia; Franz-Vasdeki, Jennifer; Saadat, Seemeen; Pratt, Beth Anne; Eugster, Beatrice; Bandali, Sarah; Venkatachalam, Pritha; Hinton, Rachael; Murray, John; Arscott-Mills, Sharon; Axelson, Henrik; Maliqi, Blerta; Sarker, Intissar; Lakshminarayanan, Rama; Jacobs, Troy; Jacks, Susan; Mason, Elizabeth; Ghaffar, Abdul; Mays, Nicholas; Presern, Carole; Bustreo, Flavia

2014-01-01

134

Attachment Security: The Role of Infant, Maternal, and Contextual Factors .  

E-print Network

??Research addressing the antecedents of attachment security has traditionally focused on maternal sensitivity, but it has become increasingly clear that attachment security is multiply determined,… (more)

Swanson, Heather

2011-01-01

135

Risk of childhood injuries after prenatal exposure to maternal bereavement: a Danish National Cohort Study  

PubMed Central

Objectives The aim of this study was to assess the risk of injuries among children exposed to a stressful life exposure (defined as bereavement) before conception or during fetal life. Design Population-based cohort study. Setting Denmark. Participants All singleton births in Denmark between 1 January 1995 and 31 December 2006 were identified. These newborns were then linked to mothers, fathers, grandparents and siblings using individually assigned civil personal registration numbers. Primary and secondary outcome measures We identified that data on childhood injuries were obtained from the Danish National Patient Registry, which contains data on all hospital stays and outpatient visits. Incidence rate ratios (IRRs) were estimated from birth using log-linear Poisson regression models, and person-years were used as the offset variable. Age, residence, calendar period, maternal education, maternal income and parental-cohabitation status are treated as time-dependent variables (records were extracted from the offspring's birth year). Results Exposure to maternal bereavement due to a father's death had the strongest association with childhood injuries, especially when the cause of death was due to a traumatic event (adjusted estimates of IRR (aIRR): 1.25, 95%CI: 0.99 to 1.58). We did not find an association for childhood injuries and maternal bereavement due to grandparent's death, and we only found an association for sibling death when restricting to deaths due to traumatic events (aIRR: 1.20, 95%CI:1.03 to 1.39). Conclusions The aetiology of childhood injuries is complex and may be related to events that take place during prenatal life. This study suggests that exposure to a stressful life event during gestation may be linked to injury susceptibility in childhood. However, changes in postnatal family conditions related to loss or genetic factors may also play a role. Background Developmental plasticity related to early life exposures leading to disease programming in offspring is a theory with substantial theoretical and empirical support. Prenatal stress exposure has been linked to neurological outcomes, such as temperament, behavioural problems, cognitive function and affective disorders. If exposure modifies risk-seeking behaviour, perceived danger and reaction time, it is also expected to modify injury risk. PMID:23613570

Virk, Jasveer; Li, Jiong; Lauritsen, Jens; Olsen, Jørn

2013-01-01

136

Maternal unemployment: an indicator of spontaneous preterm delivery risk  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to assess the association between maternal employment and preterm delivery. A nationwide case–control\\u000a study was conducted in 25 Portuguese public maternities. During a 4-month period, 769 consecutive single spontaneous preterm\\u000a (<37 gestation weeks) live births and 1,053 term singleton babies born immediately after each preterm, were evaluated. Information\\u000a was obtained by attending physicians using

Teresa Rodrigues; Henrique Barros

2008-01-01

137

The impact of maternal obesity on intrapartum outcomes in otherwise low risk women: secondary analysis of the Birthplace national prospective cohort study  

PubMed Central

Objectives?To evaluate the impact of maternal BMI on intrapartum interventions and adverse outcomes that may influence choice of planned birth setting in healthy women without additional risk factors. Design?Prospective cohort study. Setting?Stratified random sample of English obstetric units. Sample?17 230 women without medical or obstetric risk factors other than obesity. Methods?Multivariable log Poisson regression was used to evaluate the effect of BMI on risk of intrapartum interventions and adverse maternal and perinatal outcomes adjusted for maternal characteristics. Main outcome measures?Maternal intervention or adverse outcomes requiring obstetric care (composite of: augmentation, instrumental delivery, intrapartum caesarean section, general anaesthesia, blood transfusion, 3rd/4th degree perineal tear); neonatal unit admission or perinatal death. Results?In otherwise healthy women, obesity was associated with an increased risk of augmentation, intrapartum caesarean section and some adverse maternal outcomes but when interventions and outcomes requiring obstetric care were considered together, the magnitude of the increased risk was modest (adjusted RR 1.12, 95% CI 1.02–1.23, for BMI > 35 kg/m2 relative to low risk women of normal weight). Nulliparous low risk women of normal weight had higher absolute risks and were more likely to require obstetric intervention or care than otherwise healthy multiparous women with BMI > 35 kg/m2 (maternal composite outcome: 53% versus 21%). The perinatal composite outcome exhibited a similar pattern. Conclusions?Otherwise healthy multiparous obese women may have lower intrapartum risks than previously appreciated. BMI should be considered in conjunction with parity when assessing the potential risks associated with birth in non-obstetric unit settings. PMID:24034832

Hollowell, J; Pillas, D; Rowe, R; Linsell, L; Knight, M; Brocklehurst, P

2014-01-01

138

Relation of maternal responsiveness during infancy to the development of behavior problems in high-risk youths.  

PubMed

Although problematic parenting has been consistently associated with behavior problems in youths, prospective links between early parenting and childhood behavior problems are less well established. This study examined the association of maternal responsiveness (MRes) during infancy and behavior problems in middle childhood (N = 77). MRes was significantly associated with disruptive behavior problems but was unrelated to attention problems. Absence of MRes during infancy increased the risk of disruptive behavior problems in middle childhood, even with concurrent parenting and established risk factors for disruptive behavior controlled. MRes also interacted with concurrent family risk to predict disruptive behavior symptoms. These findings underscore the importance of early parenting for developmental pathways to disruptive behavior disorders in high-risk youths. The identification of a relatively modifiable early risk factor for disruptive behavior problems has important implications for prevention. PMID:10082027

Wakschlag, L S; Hans, S L

1999-03-01

139

Risk of Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia by Second Trimester Maternal Serum Levels of Alpha-fetoprotein, Human Chorionic Gonadotrophin, and Unconjugated Estriol  

PubMed Central

Although maternal serum alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), human chorionic gonandotrophin (hCG), and estriol play important roles in immunomodulation and immunoregulation during pregnancy, their relationship to the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) in young infants is unknown despite BPD being associated with pre- and postnatal inflammatory factors. The objective of this population-based study was to examine whether second trimester levels of AFP, hCG, and unconjugated estriol (uE3) were associated with an increased risk of BPD. We found that these serum biomarkers were associated with an increased risk of BPD. Risks were especially high when AFP and/or hCG levels were above the 95th percentile and/or when uE3 levels were below the 5th percentile (relative risks (RRs) 3.1 to 6.7). Risks increased substantially when two or more biomarker risks were present (RRs 9.9 to 75.9). Data suggested that pregnancies which had a biomarker risk and yielded an offspring with BPD were more likely to have other factors present that suggested early intrauterine fetal adaptation to a stress including maternal hypertension and asymmetric growth restriction. PMID:22391642

Jelliffe-Pawlowski, Laura L.; Shaw, Gary M.; Stevenson, David K.; Oehlert, John W.; Quaintance, Cele; Santos, Allan J.; Baer, Rebecca J.; Currier, Robert J.; O'Brodovich, Hugh M.; Gould, Jeffrey B.

2013-01-01

140

Maternal Genetic Variation Accounts in Part for the Associations of Maternal Size during Pregnancy with Offspring Cardiometabolic Risk in Adulthood  

PubMed Central

Background Maternal pre-pregnancy body-mass index (ppBMI) and gestational weight gain (GWG) are associated with cardiometabolic risk (CMR) traits in the offspring. The extent to which maternal genetic variation accounts for these associations is unknown. Methods/Results In 1249 mother-offspring pairs recruited from the Jerusalem Perinatal Study, we used archival data to characterize ppBMI and GWG and follow-up data from offspring to assess CMR, including body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, glucose, insulin, blood pressure, and lipid levels, at an average age of 32. Maternal genetic risk scores (GRS) were created using a subset of SNPs most predictive of ppBMI, GWG, and each CMR trait, selected among 1384 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) characterizing variation in 170 candidate genes potentially related to fetal development and/or metabolic risk. We fit linear regression models to examine the associations of ppBMI and GWG with CMR traits with and without adjustment for GRS. Compared to unadjusted models, the coefficient for the association of a one-standard-deviation (SD) difference in GWG and offspring BMI decreased by 41% (95%CI ?81%, ?11%) from 0.847 to 0.503 and the coefficient for a 1SD difference in GWG and WC decreased by 63% (95%CI ?318%, ?11%) from 1.196 to 0.443. For other traits, there were no statistically significant changes in the coefficients for GWG with adjustment for GRS. None of the associations of ppBMI with CMR traits were significantly altered by adjustment for GRS. Conclusions Maternal genetic variation may account in part for associations of GWG with offspring BMI and WC in young adults. PMID:24670385

Wander, Pandora L.; Hochner, Hagit; Sitlani, Colleen M.; Enquobahrie, Daniel A.; Lumley, Thomas; Lawrence, Gabriela M.; Burger, Ayala; Savitsky, Bella; Manor, Orly; Meiner, Vardiella; Hesselson, Stephanie; Kwok, Pui Y.; Siscovick, David S.; Friedlander, Yechiel

2014-01-01

141

Parent Involvement in School: Conceptualizing Multiple Dimensions and Their Relations with Family and Demographic Risk Factors.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Explores the association between parental involvement (PI) and children's positive academic performance and social competence. Study examines the relations between a set of family and demographic risk factors and PI. Results reveal different patterns of relations between the risk factors studied-parental education, maternal depression, and…

Kohl, Gwynne O.; Lengua, Liliana J.; McMahon, Robert J.

2000-01-01

142

The ghosts of predators past: population cycles and the role of maternal programming under fluctuating predation risk.  

PubMed

Maternal effects may be a major factor influencing the demography of populations. In mammals, the transmission of stress hormones between mother and offspring may play an important role in these effects. Laboratory studies have shown that stressors during pregnancy and lactation result in lifelong programming of the offspring phenotype. However, the relevance of these studies to free-living mammals is unclear. The 10-year snowshoe hare (Lepus americanus) cycle is intimately linked to fluctuating predation pressure and predation risk. The enigma of these cycles is the lack of population growth following the decline phase, when the predators have virtually all disappeared and the food supply is ample. We have shown that a predator-induced increase in maternal stress hormone levels resulted in a decline in reproduction. Here we examine population and hormone changes over a four-year period from the increase (2005) to the decline (2008). We report (1) that an index of maternal stress (fecal corticosteroid metabolite [FCM] concentrations) fluctuates in synchrony with predator density during the breeding season; (2) that maternal FCM levels are echoed in their offspring, and this occurs at a population-wide level; and (3) that higher maternal FCM levels at birth are correlated with an increased responsiveness of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in their progeny. Our results show an intergenerational inheritance of stress hormones in a free-ranging population of mammals. We propose that the lack of recovery of reproductive rates during the early low phase of the hare cycle may be the result of the impacts of intergenerational, maternally inherited stress hormones caused by high predation risk during the decline phase. PMID:21058558

Sheriff, Michael J; Krebs, Charles J; Boonstra, Rudy

2010-10-01

143

Sexual Harassment: Identifying Risk Factors  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new model of the etiology of sexual harassment,the four-factor model, is presented and compared with several models of sexual harassment including the biological model, the organizational model, the sociocultural model,and the sexrole spillover model. A number of risk factors associated with sexually harassing behavior are examined within the framework of the four-factor model of sexual harassment. These include characteristics

Elizabeth A. O'Hare; William O'Donohue

1998-01-01

144

National data system on near miss and maternal death: shifting from maternal risk to public health impact in Nigeria  

PubMed Central

Background The lack of reliable and up-to-date statistics on maternal deaths and disabilities remains a major challenge to the implementation of Nigeria's Road Map to Accelerate the Millennium Development Goal related to Maternal Health (MDG-5). There are currently no functioning national data sources on maternal deaths and disabilities that could serve as reference points for programme managers, health advocates and policy makers. While awaiting the success of efforts targeted at overcoming the barriers facing establishment of population-based data systems, referral institutions in Nigeria can contribute their quota in the quest towards MDG-5 by providing good quality and reliable information on maternal deaths and disabilities on a continuous basis. This project represents the first opportunity to initiate a scientifically sound and reliable quantitative system of data gathering on maternal health profile in Nigeria. Objective The primary objective is to create a national data system on maternal near miss (MNM) and maternal mortality in Nigerian public tertiary institutions. This system will conduct periodically, both regionally and at country level, a review of the magnitude of MNM and maternal deaths, nature of events responsible for MNM and maternal deaths, indices for the quality of care for direct obstetric complications and the health service events surrounding these complications, in an attempt to collectively define and monitor the standard of comprehensive emergency obstetric care in the country. Methods This will be a nationwide cohort study of all women who experience MNM and those who die from pregnancy, childbirth and puerperal complications using uniform criteria among women admitted in tertiary healthcare facilities in the six geopolitical zones in Nigeria. This will be accomplished by establishing a network of all public tertiary obstetric referral institutions that will prospectively collect specific information on potentially fatal maternal complications. For every woman enrolled, the health service events (care pathways) within the facility will be evaluated to identify areas of substandard care/avoidable factors through clinical audit by the local research team. A summary estimate of the frequencies of MNM and maternal deaths will be determined at intervals and indicators of quality of care (case fatality rate, both total and cause-specific and mortality index) will be evaluated at facility, regional and country levels. Management Overall project management will be from the Centre for Research in Reproductive Health (CRRH), Sagamu, Nigeria. There will be at least two meetings and site visits for efficient coordination of the project by regional coordinators and central coordinating staff. Data will be transferred electronically by hospital and regional coordinators and managed at the Data Management Unit of CRRH, Sagamu, Nigeria. Expected outcomes The outcome of the study would provide useful information to the health practitioners, policy-makers and international partners on the strengths and weaknesses of the infrastructures provided for comprehensive emergency obstetric care in Nigeria. The successful implementation of this project will pave way for the long-awaited Confidential Enquiries into Maternal Deaths that would guide the formulation and or revision of obstetric policies and practices in Nigeria. Lessons learnt from the establishment of this data system can also be used to set up similar structures at lower levels of healthcare delivery in Nigeria. PMID:19508717

Oladapo, Olufemi T; Adetoro, Olalekan O; Fakeye, Oluwarotimi; Ekele, Bissallah A; Fawole, Adeniran O; Abasiattai, Aniekan; Kuti, Oluwafemi; Tukur, Jamilu; Ande, Adedapo BA; Dada, Olukayode A

2009-01-01

145

Young maternal age and low birth weight risk: An exploration of racial/ethnic disparities in the birth outcomes of mothers in the United States1  

PubMed Central

This study considers how low birth weight (LBW) prevalence varies by race/ethnicity and maternal age and explores mechanisms that explain disparities. Results show that maternal age patterns in LBW risk for African Americans differ from whites and foreign- and U.S.-born Hispanics. Background socioeconomic disadvantage, together with current socioeconomic status and smoking during pregnancy, explain almost all of the LBW disparity between white teenage mothers and their older counterparts. These findings suggest that social disadvantage is a primary driver in unfavorable birth outcomes among white teenage mothers compared to older white mothers. Alternatively, background disadvantage and other social characteristics explain very little of the LBW disparities among African Americans and U.S.- and foreign-born Hispanics. Overall, these results indicate LBW disparities by maternal age are a complex product of socioeconomic disadvantage and current social and behavioral factors, such that LBW risk does not operate uniformly by race/ethnicity or maternal age. PMID:25328275

Dennis, Jeff A.; Mollborn, Stefanie

2014-01-01

146

Related Factors of Insulin Resistance in Korean Children: Adiposity and Maternal Insulin Resistance  

PubMed Central

Increased adiposity and unhealthy lifestyle augment the risk for type 2 diabetes in children with familial predisposition. Insulin resistance (IR) is an excellent clinical marker for identifying children at high risk for type 2 diabetes. This study was conducted to investigate parental, physiological, behavioral and socio-economic factors related to IR in Korean children. This study is a cross-sectional study using data from 111 children aged 7 years and their parents. Homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was calculated using fasting glucose and insulin level as a marker of IR. All children’s adiposity indices (r = 0.309–0.318, all P-value = 0.001) and maternal levels of fasting insulin (r = 0.285, P-value = 0.003) and HOMA-IR (r = 0.290, P-value = 0.002) were positively correlated with children’s HOMA-IR level. There was no statistical difference of children’s HOMA-IR level according to children’s lifestyle habits and socioeconomic status of families. An increase of 1 percentage point in body fat was related to 2.7% increase in children’s HOMA-IR (P-value < 0.001) and an increase of 1% of maternal level of HOMA-IR was related to 0.2% increase in children’s HOMA-IR (P-value = 0.002). This study shows that children’s adiposity and maternal IR are positively associated with children’s IR. PMID:22408591

Cho, Young-Gyu; Kang, Jae-Heon; Hur, Yang-Im; Song, Jihyun; Lee, Kang-Sook

2011-01-01

147

Identifying factors associated with maternal deaths in Jharkhand, India: a verbal autopsy study.  

PubMed

Maternal mortality has been identified as a priority issue in health policy and research in India. The country, with an annual decrease of maternal mortality rate by 4.9% since 1990, now records 63,000 maternal deaths a year. India tops the list of countries with high maternal mortality. Based on a verbal autopsy study of 403 maternal deaths, conducted in 2008, this paper explores the missed opportunities to save maternal lives, besides probing into the socioeconomic factors contributing to maternal deaths in Jharkhand, India. This cross-sectional study was carried out in two phases, and a multistage sampling design was used in selecting deaths for verbal autopsy. Informed consent was taken into consideration before verbal autopsy. The analytical approach includes bivariate analysis using SPSS 15, besides triangulation of qualitative and quantitative findings. Most of the deceased were poor (89%), non-literates (85%), and housewives (74%). Again, 80% died in the community/at home, 28% died during pregnancy while another 26% died during delivery. Any antenatal care was received by merely 28% women, and only 20% of the deliveries were conducted by skilled birth attendants (doctors and midwives). Delays in decision-making, travel, and treatment compounded by ignorance of obstetric complications, inadequate use of maternal healthcare services, poor healthcare infrastructure, and harmful rituals are the major contributing factors of maternal deaths in India. PMID:23930345

Khan, Nizamuddin; Pradhan, Manas Ranjan

2013-06-01

148

Social and behavioral risk factors for obesity in early childhood  

PubMed Central

Objective While multiple social and behavioral risk factors associated with obesity co-occur among young children, most studies have examined them separately. The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between social risk factors, behavioral problems, health behaviors and obesity among preschool children in the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study (N=1589). Methods A cumulative social risk score was created by summing maternal reports of intimate partner violence, food insecurity, housing insecurity, maternal depressive symptoms, maternal substance use, and father's incarceration, obtained when the child was 3 years old. Mothers reported on the child's internalizing and externalizing behaviors with the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) at age 5. Mothers also reported on hours the child spent watching TV and sleeping as well as servings of soda or juice drinks the child consumed per day. Child height and weight were measured at age 5. Obesity was defined as Body Mass Index (BMI) >=95th percentile. Results In regression analyses adjusted for health behaviors, behavioral problems and socio-demographic factors, cumulative social risk was associated with obesity among girls. Externalizing behavioral problems, were associated with obesity among girls (PR 1.5 95%CI 1.2, 1.7) and boys (PR 1.3 95%CI 1.1, 1.6). Short sleep duration was also associated with obesity among girls (PR 1.2 95% CI 1.0, 1.4) and boys (PR 1.3 95%CI 1.1, 1.5) even after adjusting for behavioral problems and social risk factors. Watching more than 2 hours of television per day was associated with obesity among boys (PR 1.5, 95%CI 1.2, 1.9) but not girls. Conclusions Co-occurring social and behavioral risk factors are associated with obesity among five-year old children. PMID:24131877

Suglia, Shakira F.; Duarte, Cristiane S.; Chambers, Earle C.; Boynton-Jarrett, Renee

2014-01-01

149

Maternal Use of Antibiotics, Hospitalisation for Infection during Pregnancy, and Risk of Childhood Epilepsy: A Population-Based Cohort Study  

PubMed Central

Background Maternal infection during pregnancy may be a risk factor for epilepsy in offspring. Use of antibiotics is a valid marker of infection. Methodology/Principal Findings To examine the relationship between maternal infection during pregnancy and risk of childhood epilepsy we conducted a historical cohort study of singletons born in northern Denmark from 1998 through 2008 who survived ?29 days. We used population-based medical databases to ascertain maternal use of antibiotics or hospital contacts with infection during pregnancy, as well as first-time hospital contacts with a diagnosis of epilepsy among offspring. We compared incidence rates (IR) of epilepsy among children of mothers with and without infection during pregnancy. We examined the outcome according to trimester of exposure, type of antibiotic, and total number of prescriptions, using Poisson regression to estimate incidence rate ratios (IRRs) while adjusting for covariates. Among 191 383 children in the cohort, 948 (0.5%) were hospitalised or had an outpatient visit for epilepsy during follow-up, yielding an IR of 91 per 100 000 person-years (PY). The five-year cumulative incidence of epilepsy was 4.5 per 1000 children. Among children exposed prenatally to maternal infection, the IR was 117 per 100 000 PY, with an adjusted IRR of 1.40 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.22–1.61), compared with unexposed children. The association was unaffected by trimester of exposure, antibiotic type, or prescription count. Conclusions/Significance Prenatal exposure to maternal infection is associated with an increased risk of epilepsy in childhood. The similarity of estimates across types of antibiotics suggests that processes common to all infections underlie this outcome, rather than specific pathogens or drugs. PMID:22295115

Nørgaard, Mette; Ehrenstein, Vera; Nielsen, Rikke Beck; Bakketeig, Leiv Sigmund; Sørensen, Henrik Toft

2012-01-01

150

Prenatal maternal immune disruption and sex-dependent risk for psychoses.  

PubMed

Background. Previous studies suggest that abnormalities in maternal immune activity during pregnancy alter the offspring's brain development and are associated with increased risk for schizophrenia (SCZ) dependent on sex. Method. Using a nested case-control design and prospectively collected prenatal maternal sera from which interleukin (IL)-1?, IL-8, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-? and IL-10 were assayed, we investigated sex-dependent associations between these cytokines and 88 psychotic cases [SCZ = 44; affective psychoses (AP) = 44] and 100 healthy controls from a pregnancy cohort followed for > 40 years. Analyses included sex-stratified non-parametric tests adjusted for multiple comparisons to screen cytokines associated with SCZ risk, followed by deviant subgroup analyses using generalized estimating equation (GEE) models. Results. There were higher prenatal IL-6 levels among male SCZ than male controls, and lower TNF-? levels among female SCZ than female controls. The results were supported by deviant subgroup analyses with significantly more SCZ males with high IL-6 levels (>highest quartile) compared with controls [odd ratio (OR)75 = 3.33, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.13-9.82], and greater prevalence of low TNF-? levels (risk for psychoses depending on psychosis subtype and offspring sex. PMID:25065485

Goldstein, J M; Cherkerzian, S; Seidman, L J; Donatelli, J-A L; Remington, A G; Tsuang, M T; Hornig, M; Buka, S L

2014-11-01

151

[Adopted children: risk factors and neuropsychological problems].  

PubMed

In recent years there has been a striking increase in the number of transnational adoptions in our country, which follows the trend already observed in other developed European countries. Major contributing factors to this phenomenon have been the improvements in socioeconomic conditions in our country, the drop in the birth rate, with the corresponding decrease in the number of children available for adoption, and the disappearance of orphanages. This growing demand can be met by developing countries, in which the birth rate is still high and there are only limited chances of being able to maintain offspring. The children that are adopted come mainly from countries in Central and South America, Eastern Europe and Asia. Pathologies that can be expected in adopted children include general paediatric conditions, especially infections (which are often autochthonous ailments in their own country) and malnutrition, as well as neuropsychological and developmental disorders, such as psychomotor retardation, conduct and behavioural disorders, which sometimes stem from conflicts arising in the process of adaptation, communication problems, which occasionally reflect an autistic like disorder, and the problems deriving from the circumstances that condition the donation of the child for adoption (perinatal pathology, maternal drug addiction and withdrawal symptoms, maternal psychopathology.). The pathology, history and prognosis of the adopted child depend on several different factors that act in an accumulative fashion. The country of origin plays a decisive role in the type of pathology, according to the level of the health care system that exists there, the existence of adoption programmes that are regulated by law, etc. The child's age at adoption marks the difference in the optimisation of their development, if they have early access to a stable family unit. Having stayed in institutions and the length of time spent there is a risk factor for presenting a neuropsychological pathology. On many occasions the scarce information available about the child's medical history makes it more difficult to anticipate the appearance of certain problems. The existence of social risk factors in the biological families is a conditioning factor in increased morbidity. We describe a short series of adopted patients who were attended in our Neuropaediatric clinic, and we analyse the above mentioned conditioning variables and the most frequent pathologies. PMID:12599110

Hernández-Muela, S; Mulas, F; Téllez de Meneses, M; Roselló, B

2003-02-01

152

The Impact of Low-risk Prematurity on Maternal Behaviour and Toddler Outcomes  

Microsoft Academic Search

This short-term longitudinal research project was designed to compare the maternal behaviour of mothers whose toddlers had been born preterm with the maternal behaviour of mothers whose toddlers had been born at term; the outcomes for the toddlers were also assessed. Twenty-one toddlers who had been born preterm with low medical risk (1460-2420 grams) were compared with 21 term toddlers

Marguerite Stevenson Barratt; Mary A. Roach; Lewis A. Leavitt

1996-01-01

153

Risk Factors for Acute Leukemia in Children: A Review  

PubMed Central

Although overall incidence is rare, leukemia is the most common type of childhood cancer. It accounts for 30% of all cancers diagnosed in children younger than 15 years. Within this population, acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) occurs approximately five times more frequently than acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) and accounts for approximately 78% of all childhood leukemia diagnoses. Epidemiologic studies of acute leukemias in children have examined possible risk factors, including genetic, infectious, and environmental, in an attempt to determine etiology. Only one environmental risk factor (ionizing radiation) has been significantly linked to ALL or AML. Most environmental risk factors have been found to be weakly and inconsistently associated with either form of acute childhood leukemia. Our review focuses on the demographics of childhood leukemia and the risk factors that have been associated with the development of childhood ALL or AML. The environmental risk factors discussed include ionizing radiation, non-ionizing radiation, hydrocarbons, pesticides, alcohol use, cigarette smoking, and illicit drug use. Knowledge of these particular risk factors can be used to support measures to reduce potentially harmful exposures and decrease the risk of disease. We also review genetic and infectious risk factors and other variables, including maternal reproductive history and birth characteristics. PMID:17366834

Belson, Martin; Kingsley, Beverely; Holmes, Adrianne

2007-01-01

154

Risk of Early-Onset Neonatal Infection with Maternal Infection or Colonization: A Global Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis  

PubMed Central

Background Neonatal infections cause a significant proportion of deaths in the first week of life, yet little is known about risk factors and pathways of transmission for early-onset neonatal sepsis globally. We aimed to estimate the risk of neonatal infection (excluding sexually transmitted diseases [STDs] or congenital infections) in the first seven days of life among newborns of mothers with bacterial infection or colonization during the intrapartum period. Methods and Findings We searched PubMed, Embase, Scopus, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, and the World Health Organization Regional Databases for studies of maternal infection, vertical transmission, and neonatal infection published from January 1, 1960 to March 30, 2013. Studies were included that reported effect measures on the risk of neonatal infection among newborns exposed to maternal infection. Random effects meta-analyses were used to pool data and calculate the odds ratio estimates of risk of infection. Eighty-three studies met the inclusion criteria. Seven studies (8.4%) were from high neonatal mortality settings. Considerable heterogeneity existed between studies given the various definitions of laboratory-confirmed and clinical signs of infection, as well as for colonization and risk factors. The odds ratio for neonatal lab-confirmed infection among newborns of mothers with lab-confirmed infection was 6.6 (95% CI 3.9–11.2). Newborns of mothers with colonization had a 9.4 (95% CI 3.1–28.5) times higher odds of lab-confirmed infection than newborns of non-colonized mothers. Newborns of mothers with risk factors for infection (defined as prelabour rupture of membranes [PROM], preterm <37 weeks PROM, and prolonged ROM) had a 2.3 (95% CI 1.0–5.4) times higher odds of infection than newborns of mothers without risk factors. Conclusions Neonatal infection in the first week of life is associated with maternal infection and colonization. High-quality studies, particularly from settings with high neonatal mortality, are needed to determine whether targeting treatment of maternal infections or colonization, and/or prophylactic antibiotic treatment of newborns of high risk mothers, may prevent a significant proportion of early-onset neonatal sepsis. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary PMID:23976885

Chan, Grace J.; Lee, Anne CC; Baqui, Abdullah H.; Tan, Jingwen; Black, Robert E.

2013-01-01

155

Children's Risk and Protective Factors Protective INDIVIDUAL Risk  

E-print Network

Children's Risk and Protective Factors Protective INDIVIDUAL Risk problem-solving skills rules, expectations, rewards encourage children's participation at home alone Protective FRIENDS Risk organizations media influence Source: Bogenschneider, K. (1996) An ecology risk protective theory for building

156

Maternal Factors Influencing Infant Total Body Iron at Birth and Four Months of Age  

E-print Network

Iron is necessary in fetal development, however little research has been conducted to assess factors that affect both maternal and fetal total body iron. The objective of this research is to investigate infant iron status at birth and 4 months...

Scroggs, Sarah Catherine

2011-05-31

157

Maternal Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase C677T Polymorphism and Down Syndrome Risk: A Meta-Analysis from 34 Studies  

PubMed Central

Background Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) is a key enzyme of folate metabolic pathway which catalyzes the irreversible conversion of 5, 10-methylenetetrahydrofolate to 5-methyltetrahydrofolate. 5-methyltetrahydrofolate donates methyl group for the methylation of homocysteine to methionine. Several studies have investigated maternal MTHFR C677T polymorphism as a risk factor for DS, but the results were controversial and inconclusive. To come into a conclusive estimate, authors performed a meta-analysis. Aim A meta-analysis of published case control studies was performed to investigate the association between maternal MTHFR C677T polymorphism and Down syndrome. Methods PubMed, Google Scholar, Elsevier, Springer Link databases were searched to select the eligible case control studies using appropriate keywords. The pooled odds ratio (OR) with 95%confidence interval were calculated for risk assessment. Results Thirty four studies with 3,098 DS case mothers and 4,852 control mothers were included in the present meta-analysis. The pooled OR was estimated under five genetic models and significant association was found between maternal MTHFR 677C>T polymorphism and Down syndrome under four genetic models except recessive model (for T vs. C, OR?=?1.26, 95% CI?=?1.09–1.46, p?=?0.001; for TT vs. CC, OR?=?1.49, 95% CI?=?1.13–1.97, p?=?0.008; for CT vs. CC, OR?=?1.29, 95% CI?=?1.10–1.51, p?=?0.001; for TT+CT vs. CC, OR?=?1.35, 95% CI?=?1.13–1.60, p?=?0.0008; for TT vs. CT+CC, OR?=?0.76, 95% CI?=?0.60–0.94, p?=?0.01). Conclusion The results of the present meta-analysis support that maternal MTHFR C677T polymorphism is a risk factor for DS- affected pregnancy. PMID:25265565

Rai, Vandana; Yadav, Upendra; Kumar, Pradeep; Yadav, Sushil Kumar; Mishra, Om Prakesh

2014-01-01

158

Effects of Maternal Nutrition, Resource Use and Multi-Predator Risk on Neonatal White-Tailed Deer Survival  

PubMed Central

Growth of ungulate populations is typically most sensitive to survival of neonates, which in turn is influenced by maternal nutritional condition and trade-offs in resource selection and avoidance of predators. We assessed whether resource use, multi-predator risk, maternal nutritional effects, hiding cover, or interactions among these variables best explained variation in daily survival of free-ranging neonatal white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) during their post-partum period (14 May–31 Aug) in Michigan, USA. We used Cox proportional hazards mixed-effects models to assess survival related to covariates of resource use, composite predation risk of 4 mammalian predators, fawn body mass at birth, winter weather, and vegetation growth phenology. Predation, particularly from coyotes (Canis latrans), was the leading cause of mortality; however, an additive model of non-ideal resource use and maternal nutritional effects explained 71% of the variation in survival. This relationship suggested that dams selected areas where fawns had poor resources, while greater predation in these areas led to additive mortalities beyond those related to resource use alone. Also, maternal nutritional effects suggested that severe winters resulted in dams producing smaller fawns, which decreased their likelihood of survival. Fawn resource use appeared to reflect dam avoidance of lowland forests with poor forage and greater use by wolves (C. lupus), their primary predator. While this strategy led to greater fawn mortality, particularly by coyotes, it likely promoted the life-long reproductive success of dams because many reached late-age (>10 years old) and could have produced multiple generations of fawns. Studies often link resource selection and survival of ungulates, but our results suggested that multiple factors can mediate that relationship, including multi-predator risk. We emphasize the importance of identifying interactions among biological and environmental factors when assessing survival of ungulates. PMID:24968318

Duquette, Jared F.; Belant, Jerrold L.; Svoboda, Nathan J.; Beyer, Dean E.; Lederle, Patrick E.

2014-01-01

159

Cloning and roles of goldfish maternal factor ?-Catenin cDNA in embryonic development  

Microsoft Academic Search

Interaction between nucleus and cytoplasm has been focused in the field of animal embryonic development, in which study of\\u000a maternal factors is required positively. ?-Catenin, an important maternal factor in early embryogenesis, has been analyzed\\u000a in its expression pattern and functions in this paper. We have cloned goldfish?-Catenin cDNA gene and compared it with zebrafish?-Catenin cDNA. High homology was found

Jingpu Zhang; Weixian Wang; Shaoxia Zhu

2004-01-01

160

Maternal MTHFR polymorphisms and risk of spontaneous abortion  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective. To asses the association between intake of folate and B vitamins and the incidence of spontaneous abortion (SA) according to the maternal methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) polymorphisms (677 C>T and 1298 A>C). Material and Methods. We conducted a nested case-control study within a perinatal cohort of women re - cruited in the state of Morelos, Mexico. Twenty-three women with SA

María del Rosario Rodríguez-Guillén; Luisa Torres-Sánchez; Jia Chen; Marcia Galván-Portillo; Julia Blanco-Muñoz; Miriam Aracely Anaya; Irma Silva-Zolezzi; María A Hernández-Valero; Lizbeth López-Carrillo

2009-01-01

161

Risk factors for neonatal encephalopathy in Kathmandu, Nepal, a developing country: unmatched case-control study  

PubMed Central

Objective To determine the risk factors for neonatal encephalopathy among term infants in a developing country. Design Unmatched case-control study. Setting Principal maternity hospital of Kathmandu, Nepal. Subjects All 131 infants with neonatal encephalopathy from a population of 21?609 infants born over an 18 month period, and 635 unmatched infants systematically recruited over 12 months. Main outcome measures Adjusted odds ratio estimates for antepartum and intrapartum risk factors. Results The prevalence of neonatal encephalopathy was 6.1 per 1000 live births of which 63% were infants with moderate or severe encephalopathy. The risk of death from neonatal encephalopathy was 31%. The risk of neonatal encephalopathy increased with increasing maternal age and decreasing maternal height. Antepartum risk factors included primiparity (odds ratio 2.0) and non-attendance for antenatal care (2.1). Multiple births were at greatly increased risk (22). Intrapartum risk factors included non-cephalic presentation (3.4), prolonged rupture of membranes (3.8), and various other complications. Particulate meconium was strongly associated with encephalopathy (18). Induction of labour with oxytocin was associated with encephalopathy in 12 of 41 deliveries (5.7). Overall, 78 affected infants (60%) compared with 36 controls (6%) either had evidence of intrapartum compromise or were born after an intrapartum difficulty likely to result in fetal compromise. A concentration of maternal haemoglobin of less than 8.0 g/dl in the puerperium was significantly associated with encephalopathy (2.5) as was a maternal thyroid stimulating hormone concentration greater than 5 mIU/l (2.1). Conclusions Intrapartum risk factors remain important for neonatal encephalopathy in developing countries. There is some evidence of a protective effect from antenatal care. The use of oxytocin in low income countries where intrapartum monitoring is suboptimal presents a major risk to the fetus. More work is required to explore the association between maternal deficiency states and neonatal encephalopathy. PMID:10797030

Ellis, Matthew; Manandhar, Nilu; Manandhar, Dharma S; Costello, Anthony M de L

2000-01-01

162

Postpartum Behavioral Profiles in Wistar Rats Following Maternal Separation - Altered Exploration and Risk-Assessment Behavior in MS15 Dams.  

PubMed

The rodent maternal separation (MS) model is frequently used to investigate the impact of early environmental factors on adult neurobiology and behavior. The majority of MS studies assess effects in the offspring and few address the consequences of repeated pup removal in the dam. Such studies are of interest since alterations detected in offspring subjected to MS may, at least in part, be mediated by variations in maternal behavior and the amount of maternal care provided by the dam. The aim of this study was to investigate how daily short (15 min; MS15) and prolonged (360 min; MS360) periods of MS affects the dam by examining postpartum behavioral profiles using the multivariate concentric square field (MCSF) test. The dams were tested on postpartum days 24-25, i.e., just after the end of the separation period and weaning. The results reveal a lower exploratory drive and lower risk-assessment behavior in MS15 dams relative to MS360 or animal facility reared dams. The present results contrast some of the previously reported findings and provide new information about early post-weaning behavioral characteristics in a multivariate setting. Plausible explanations for the results are provided including a discussion how the present results fit into the maternal mediation hypothesis. PMID:20617189

Daoura, Loudin; Hjalmarsson, My; Oreland, Sadia; Nylander, Ingrid; Roman, Erika

2010-01-01

163

Maternal vitamin use, genetic variation of infant methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase, and risk for spina bifida.  

PubMed

Maternal periconceptional use of vitamin supplements containing folic acid substantially reduces the risk of neural tube defects (NTDs) in the offspring. The mechanism underlying this reduction in risk is unknown. Several recent studies have reported an association between homozygosity for a variant form (the C677T genotype) of the 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene and risk for NTDs in individuals. It has been hypothesized that maternal folic acid supplementation prevents NTDs by partially correcting reduced MTHFR activity associated with the variant form of the enzyme. Using data from two California case-control interview studies (1987-1991 birth cohorts), the authors investigated whether an interaction for spina bifida risk existed between infant MTHFR C677T genotype and maternal use of supplements containing folic acid. The authors genotyped the allelic variants of MTHFR in 214 liveborn case infants with spina bifida and 503 control infants for whom information on maternal periconceptional vitamin use was available. The percentage of all case infants with the C677T MTHFR mutation, for both homozygous (TT) and heterozygous (TC) genotypes, was slightly higher than that of controls. The C677T genotype was substantially more frequent among both case and control Hispanic infants than among non-Hispanic infants. Among all infants whose mothers did not periconceptionally use vitamins containing folic acid, the risk of spina bifida, as measured by the odds ratio, was 1.6 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.8-3.1) for all infants with the TT genotype and 2.0 (95% CI 0.5-7.4) for non-Hispanic white infants with the TT genotype, as compared with infants with the CC genotype. This result indicates a modestly increased risk associated with the C677T genotype. A lower risk estimate (odds ratio=1.2, 95% CI 0.4-4.0) was observed among infants whose mothers periconceptionally used vitamin supplements containing folic acid. This population-based California study found a modestly increased risk of spina bifida among infants who were homozygous for the C677T genotype, but only minimal evidence of an interaction between the C677T genotype and maternal folic acid intake in the occurrence of spina bifida. If this mutant MTHFR genotype plays a role in the association between maternal vitamin use and NTD risk, it may be a small role, or it may be conditional on maternal genotype. PMID:9663401

Shaw, G M; Rozen, R; Finnell, R H; Wasserman, C R; Lammer, E J

1998-07-01

164

Risk factors for cryptorchism among populations at differing risks of testicular cancer  

PubMed Central

Background Cryptorchism is strongly associated with the development of testicular germ cell tumours (TGCTs), possibly owing to a common aetiology. However, while TGCT incidence varies greatly between white and black men, little variability has been reported between the two groups in cryptorchism prevalence. This may suggest that cryptorchism risk factors differ by ethnicity. Methods To examine this hypothesis, a prospective analysis was conducted among black and white participants in the US Collaborative Perinatal Project. White participants included 238 cryptorchid sons and 12 296 non-cryptorchid sons, while black participants included 188 cryptorchid sons and 11 942 non-cryptorchid sons. Results While cryptorchism was significantly more common among white sons (1.90% vs 1.55%; P = 0.04), the difference was incompatible with the 5-fold difference in TGCT rates. The principal maternal risk factors among white sons were age (P = 0.03), hypertension/proteinuria (P = 0.006), and length of time to become pregnant (P = 0.055), while major maternal risk factors among black sons were age (P = 0.06), height (P = 0.007), weight (P = 0.06), and radiation exposure (P = 0.02). Only maternal height, however, had a different relationship with risk among black and white sons. Neonatal associations with risk (shorter gestational age, lower birthweight, shorter length) were similar in the two groups. Conclusions These results do not support the hypothesis that the risk factors for cryptorchism vary dramatically by ethnicity but may suggest that cryptorchism is not as closely linked to TGCT among black men as among white men. PMID:16492711

McGlynn, Katherine A; Graubard, Barry I; Klebanoff, Mark A; Longnecker, Matthew P

2006-01-01

165

Risk factors for cerebral palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cerebral palsy is a major cause of crippling in children, but it’s etiology is poorly understood. This case control study\\u000a was done to assess some of the identified risk factors for cerebral palsy. 125 cerebral palsy cases selected from hospital\\u000a clinic and 125 age and sex matched neighbourhood controls, all aged less than 5 years and residing in Delhi (India)

Sahu Suvanand; S. K. Kapoor; V. F. Reddaiah; U. Singh; K. R. Sundaram

1997-01-01

166

Risk factors for placenta accreta  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To identify risk factors associated with placenta accreta in a large cohort study.Methods: Data for this study came from the Taiwan Down Syndrome Screening Group, an ongoing project on feasibility of serum screening in an Asian population. Women who had serum screening for Down syndrome at 14–22 weeks’ gestation using alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and free ?-hCG between January 1994 and

Tai-Ho Hung; Wen-Yi Shau; Ching-Chang Hsieh; Tsung-Hong Chiu; Jenn-Jeih Hsu; T’Sang-T’Ang Hsieh

1999-01-01

167

Maternal caregiving and girls’ depressive symptoms and antisocial behavior trajectories: An examination among high-risk youth  

PubMed Central

Past research has identified parental depression and family-of-origin maltreatment as precursors to adolescent depression and antisocial behavior. Caregiving experiences have also been identified as a factor that may ameliorate or accentuate adolescent psychopathology trajectories. Using the unique attributes of two geographically diverse, yet complementary longitudinal research designs, the present study examined the role of maternal caregiver involvement as a factor that promotes resilience-based trajectories related to depressive symptom and antisocial behaviors among adolescent girls. The first sample comprises a group of US-based adolescent girls in foster care (n = 100; mean age = 11.50 years), all of whom have had a history of childhood maltreatment and removal from the home of their biological parent(s). The second sample comprises a group of UK-based adolescent girls at high familial risk for depression (n = 145; mean age = 11.70 years), with all girls having a biological mother who has experienced recurrent depression. Study analyses examined the role of maternal caregiving on girls’ trajectories of depression and antisocial behavior, while controlling for levels of co-occurring psychopathology at each time point across the study period. Results suggest increasing trajectories of depressive symptoms, controlling for antisocial behavior, for girls at familial risk for depression, but decreasing trajectories for girls in foster care. A similar pattern of results was noted for antisocial behavior trajectories, controlling for depressive symptoms. Maternal caregiver involvement was differentially related to intercept and slope parameters in both samples. Results are discussed with respect to the identification of family level promotive factors aimed at reducing negative developmental trajectories among high-risk youth. PMID:25422973

Harold, Gordon T.; Leve, Leslie D.; Kim, Hyoun K.; Mahedy, Liam; Gaysina, Darya; Thapar, Anita; Collishaw, Stephan

2014-01-01

168

Maternal plasma fetal DNA fractions in pregnancies with low and high risks for fetal chromosomal aneuploidies.  

PubMed

Recently published international guidelines recommend the clinical use of noninvasive prenatal test (NIPT) for aneuploidy screening only among pregnant women whose fetuses are deemed at high risk. The applicability of NIPT to aneuploidy screening among average risk pregnancies requires additional supportive evidence. A key determinant of the reliability of aneuploidy NIPT is the fetal DNA fraction in maternal plasma. In this report, we investigated if differences in fetal DNA fractions existed between different pregnancy risk groups. One hundred and ninety-five singleton pregnancies with male fetuses divided into 3 groups according to first trimester screening parameters were examined for fetal DNA percentage by counting Y chromosome DNA sequences using massively parallel sequencing. Fetal DNA fractions were compared between risk groups and assessed for correlations with first trimester screening parameters. There was no statistically significant difference in fetal DNA fractions across the high, intermediate and low risk groups. Fetal DNA fraction showed a strong negative correlation with maternal weight. Fetal DNA fraction also showed weak but significant correlations with gestational age, crown-rump length, multiple of medians of free ?-subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin and pregnancy-associated plasma protein A. Similar fetal DNA fractions in maternal plasma between high, intermediate and low risk pregnant women is a precondition for uniform performance of the aneuploidy NIPTs for the general population. This study thus shows that the aneuploidy screening by NIPT is likely to offer similar analytical reliability without respect to the a priori fetal aneuploidy risk. PMID:24586333

Hudecova, Irena; Sahota, Daljit; Heung, Macy M S; Jin, Yongjie; Lee, Wing S; Leung, Tak Y; Lo, Yuk Ming Dennis; Chiu, Rossa W K

2014-01-01

169

Maternal Residential Atrazine Exposure and Risk for Choanal Atresia and Stenosis in Offspring  

PubMed Central

Objective To assess the relationship between estimated residential maternal exposure to atrazine during pregnancy and risk for choanal atresia or stenosis in offspring. Study Design Data for 280 nonsyndromic cases and randomly selected, population-based controls delivered during 1999 to 2008 were obtained from the Texas Birth Defects Registry. County-level estimates of atrazine levels obtained from the United States Geological Survey were assigned to cases and controls based on maternal county of residence at delivery. Unconditional logistic regression was used to assess the relationship between maternal residential atrazine exposure and risk for choanal atresia or stenosis in offspring. Results Compared to offspring of mothers with low levels of estimated residential atrazine exposure, those with high levels had nearly a two-fold increase in risk for choanal atresia or stenosis (adjusted odds ratio: 1.79, 95% confidence interval: 1.17–2.74). A significant linear trend was also observed with increasing levels of atrazine exposure (adjusted P = 0.002). Conclusions A link between maternal exposure to endocrine disruptors, such as atrazine, and choanal atresia risk is plausible based on previous findings. Our results further support this hypothesis. PMID:23036484

Agopian, A.J.; Cai, Yi; Langlois, Peter H.; Canfield, Mark A.; Lupo, Philip J.

2014-01-01

170

Maternal Risk of Breeding Failure Remained Low throughout the Demographic Transitions in Fertility and  

E-print Network

Maternal Risk of Breeding Failure Remained Low throughout the Demographic Transitions in Fertility Low throughout the Demographic Transitions in Fertility and Age at First Reproduction in Finland. PLo) to a low one (less than three children per mother) as a key feature of the first demographic transition [1

Lummaa, Virpi

171

Multilevel Mediation: Cumulative Contextual Risk, Maternal Differential Treatment, and Children's Behavior within Families  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study tests the hypothesis that links between contextual risk and children's outcomes are partially explained by differential parenting. Using multi-informant measurement and including up to four children per family (M[subscript age] = 3.51, SD = 2.38) in a sample of 397 families, indirect effects (through maternal differential…

Meunier, Jean Christophe; Boyle, Michael; O'Connor, Thomas G.; Jenkins, Jennifer M.

2013-01-01

172

Maternal Antisocial Behavior, Parenting Practices, and Behavior Problems in Boys at Risk for Antisocial Behavior  

Microsoft Academic Search

We investigated the independent contributions of maternal history of antisocial behavior and parenting practices to the worsening course of sons' behavior problems in a sample of young urban boys at risk for antisocial behavior. Mothers reported on boys' behavior problems at baseline and one year later, as well as on their own history of antisocial behavior before and after age

Miriam K. Ehrensaft; Gail A. Wasserman; Lena Verdelli; Steven Greenwald; Laurie S. Miller; Mark Davies

2003-01-01

173

Fetal risk through maternal Amanita phalloides poisoning at the end of pregnancy.  

PubMed

There is a paucity of knowledge about prenatal and perinatal risks through maternal amatoxin poisoning. No symptoms of amatoxin intoxication, except for a slight temporary increase in liver enzymes activity, occurred in a term newborn after delivery despite an Amanita phalloides intoxication of the mother 2 days before. Considering previous reports, severe fetal intoxication may not occur during the entire pregnancy. PMID:19031349

Wacker, Annette; Riethmüller, Joachim; Zilker, Thomas; Felgenhauer, Norbert; Abele, Harald; Poets, Christian F; Goelz, Rangmar

2009-03-01

174

Advancing Maternal Age Is Associated with Increasing Risk for Autism: A Review and Meta-Analysis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: We conducted a meta-analysis of epidemiological studies investigating the association between maternal age and autism. Method: Using recommended guidelines for performing meta-analyses, we systematically selected, and extracted results from, epidemiological scientific studies reported before January 2012. We calculated pooled risk

Sandin, Sven; Hultman, Christina M.; Kolevzon, Alexander; Gross, Raz; MacCabe, James H.; Reichenberg, Abraham

2012-01-01

175

Maternal Pre-Pregnancy Obesity and Risk for Inattention and Negative Emotionality in Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: This study aimed to replicate and extend previous work showing an association between maternal pre-pregnancy adiposity and risk for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms in children. Methods: A Swedish population-based prospective pregnancy-offspring cohort was followed up when children were 5 years old (N = 1,714).…

Rodriguez, Alina

2010-01-01

176

Factors influencing length of maternal care in brown bears ( Ursus arctos ) and its effect on offspring  

Microsoft Academic Search

Length of maternal care, i.e. the interval between successfully raised litters, is the most important factor explaining the variation in reproductive rate among brown-bear ( Ursus arctos) populations. In this paper, we examine the variation in length of maternal care in radio-marked brown bears and its effect on their offspring in northern Sweden. Young stayed with their mothers for 1.4–1.5

Bjørn Dahle; Jon E. Swenson

2003-01-01

177

Pregnancy characteristics and maternal breast cancer risk: a review of the epidemiologic literature  

Microsoft Academic Search

The short- and long-term effects of pregnancy on breast cancer risk are well documented. Insight into potential biological\\u000a mechanisms for these associations may be gained by studying breast cancer risk and pregnancy characteristics (e.g., preeclampsia,\\u000a twining), which may reflect hormone levels during pregnancy. To date, no review has synthesized the published literature for\\u000a pregnancy characteristics and maternal breast cancer using

Sarah Nechuta; Nigel Paneth; Ellen M. Velie

2010-01-01

178

Maternal Plasma 25-Hydroxyvitamin D Concentrations and the Risk for Gestational Diabetes Mellitus  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundEvidence is accumulating for a role of vitamin D in maintaining normal glucose homeostasis. However, studies that prospectively examined circulating concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-[OH] D) in relation to diabetes risk are limited. Our objective is to determine the association between maternal plasma 25-[OH] D concentrations in early pregnancy and the risk for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM).MethodsA nested case-control study

Cuilin Zhang; Chunfang Qiu; Frank B. Hu; Robert M. David; Rob M. van Dam; Alexander Bralley; Michelle A. Williams; Per Westermark

2008-01-01

179

About Alzheimer's Disease: Risk Factors and Prevention  

MedlinePLUS

... National Alzheimer's Project Act (NAPA) About ADEAR About Alzheimer's Disease: Risk Factors and Prevention We can’t control some risk factors for Alzheimer's disease such as age and genetic profile. But scientists ...

180

Heart Disease Risk Factors You Can Control  

MedlinePLUS

... and Stroke Heart disease risk factors you can control Did you know? In women, high triglycerides combined ... information on Heart disease risk factors you can control Read more from womenshealth.gov Heart Disease Fact ...

181

Maternal Depression, Maternal Expressed Emotion, and Youth Psychopathology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Across development, maternal depression has been found to be a risk factor for youth psychopathology generally and youth depression specifically. Maternal Expressed Emotion (EE) has been examined as a predictor of outcome among youth with depression. The present study explored the associations between youth psychopathology and two…

Tompson, Martha C.; Pierre, Claudette B.; Boger, Kathryn Dingman; McKowen, James W.; Chan, Priscilla T.; Freed, Rachel D.

2010-01-01

182

Prenatal versus postnatal maternal factors in the development of infection-induced working memory impairments in mice.  

PubMed

Prenatal maternal infection is an environmental risk factor for neurodevelopmental psychiatric illness and disease-associated cognitive impairments. Modeling this epidemiological link in animals shows that prenatal immune challenge is capable of inducing long-lasting deficits in numerous cognitive domains. Here, we combined a neonatal cross-fostering design with a mouse model of prenatal immune challenge induced by maternal gestational treatment with the viral mimetic poly(I:C) to dissect the relative contribution of prenatal and postnatal maternal effects on the offspring. We show that offspring prenatally exposed to poly(I:C) display significant impairments in spatial matching-to-position working memory and spatial novelty presence regardless of whether they are raised by gestationally immune-challenged or non-challenged control surrogate mothers. Likewise, prenatally immune challenged offspring exhibit reduced glutamic acid decarboxylase 65-kDa (GAD65) and 67-kDa (GAD67) gene expression in the adult medial prefrontal cortex and dorsal hippocampus largely independently of the postnatal rearing conditions. In addition, we confirm that being raised by a gestationally immune-challenged surrogate mother is sufficient to increase the offspring's locomotor response to systemic amphetamine treatment. Our data thus suggest that prenatal infection-induced deficits in spatial short-term memory are mediated by prenatal maternal effects on the offspring. At the same time, our study adds further weight to the notion that being reared by a surrogate mother that experienced immune activation during pregnancy may constitute a risk factor for specific dopaminergic abnormalities. PMID:23876745

Richetto, Juliet; Calabrese, Francesca; Meyer, Urs; Riva, Marco A

2013-10-01

183

Human Chorionic Gonadotropin in Pregnancy and Maternal Risk of Breast Cancer  

PubMed Central

Full-term pregnancies are associated with long-term reductions in maternal risk of breast cancer, but the biological determinants of the protection are unknown. Experimental observations suggest that human Chorionic Gonadotropin (hCG), a major hormone of pregnancy, could play a role in this association. A case-control study (242 cases, 450 controls) nested within the Northern Sweden Maternity Cohort included women who had donated a blood sample during the first trimester of a first full-term pregnancy. Total hCG was determined on Immulite 2000 analyzer. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated through conditional logistic regression. Maternal breast cancer risk decreased with increasing hCG (upper tertile OR, 0.67; CI, 0.46-0.99) especially for pregnancies before age 25 (upper tertile OR, 0.41; CI, 0.21-0.80). The association diverged according to age at diagnosis: risk was reduced after age 40 (upper tertile OR: 0.60; CI, 0.39-0.91) and appeared to increase before age 40 (upper tertile OR: 1.78; CI, 0.72-4.38). Risk was reduced among those diagnosed 10 years or longer after blood draw (upper tertile OR, 0.60; CI, 0.40-0.90), but not so among those diagnosed within 10 years (upper tertile OR, 4.33; CI, 0.86-21.7). These observations suggest that the association between pregnancy hCG and subsequent maternal risk of breast cancer is modified by age at diagnosis. While the hormone appears to be a determinant of the reduced risk around or after age 50, it might not confer protection against, or it could even increase the risk of, cancers diagnosed in the years immediately following pregnancy. PMID:20713523

Toniolo, Paolo; Grankvist, Kjell; Wulff, Marianne; Chen, Tianhui; Johansson, Robert; Schock, Helena; Lenner, Per; Hallmans, Goran; Lehtinen, Matti; Kaaks, Rudolf; Wadell, Goran; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Lundin, Eva; Lukanova, Annekatrin

2010-01-01

184

Maternal Socio-Demographic Factors Influencing the Initiation and Exclusivity of Breastfeeding in a Nigerian Semi-Urban Setting  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background The success of breastfeeding promotion is influenced by maternal factors. Therefore, it is vital to examine the influence\\u000a of basic maternal demographic factors on breastfeeding practices. Objective To determine the influence of maternal socio-demographic factors on the initiation and exclusivity of breastfeeding. Method A cross-sectional survey of mothers of children aged from 1 to 24 months attending a Nigerian Infant

Tinuade A. Ogunlesi

2010-01-01

185

A flexible Bayesian hierarchical model of preterm birth risk among US Hispanic subgroups in relation to maternal nativity and education  

PubMed Central

Background Previous research has documented heterogeneity in the effects of maternal education on adverse birth outcomes by nativity and Hispanic subgroup in the United States. In this article, we considered the risk of preterm birth (PTB) using 9 years of vital statistics birth data from New York City. We employed finer categorizations of exposure than used previously and estimated the risk dose-response across the range of education by nativity and ethnicity. Methods Using Bayesian random effects logistic regression models with restricted quadratic spline terms for years of completed maternal education, we calculated and plotted the estimated posterior probabilities of PTB (gestational age < 37 weeks) for each year of education by ethnic and nativity subgroups adjusted for only maternal age, as well as with more extensive covariate adjustments. We then estimated the posterior risk difference between native and foreign born mothers by ethnicity over the continuous range of education exposures. Results The risk of PTB varied substantially by education, nativity and ethnicity. Native born groups showed higher absolute risk of PTB and declining risk associated with higher levels of education beyond about 10 years, as did foreign-born Puerto Ricans. For most other foreign born groups, however, risk of PTB was flatter across the education range. For Mexicans, Central Americans, Dominicans, South Americans and "Others", the protective effect of foreign birth diminished progressively across the educational range. Only for Puerto Ricans was there no nativity advantage for the foreign born, although small numbers of foreign born Cubans limited precision of estimates for that group. Conclusions Using flexible Bayesian regression models with random effects allowed us to estimate absolute risks without strong modeling assumptions. Risk comparisons for any sub-groups at any exposure level were simple to calculate. Shrinkage of posterior estimates through the use of random effects allowed for finer categorization of exposures without restricting joint effects to follow a fixed parametric scale. Although foreign born Hispanic women with the least education appeared to generally have low risk, this seems likely to be a marker for unmeasured environmental and behavioral factors, rather than a causally protective effect of low education itself. PMID:21504612

2011-01-01

186

Configurations of Common Childhood Psychosocial Risk Factors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Co-occurrence of psychosocial risk factors is commonplace, but little is known about psychiatrically-predictive configurations of psychosocial risk factors. Methods: Latent class analysis (LCA) was applied to 17 putative psychosocial risk factors in a representative population sample of 920 children ages 9 to 17. The resultant class…

Copeland, William; Shanahan, Lilly; Costello, E. Jane; Angold, Adrian

2009-01-01

187

Risk of fetal Down's syndrome based on maternal age and varying combinations of maternal serum markers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Serum samples from 320 women with chromosomally normal fetuses and from 50 women with fetuses affected by Down's syndrome\\u000a were assayed retrospectively for human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), pregnancy-specific?\\u000a 1 glycoprotein (SP1), alpha fetoprotein (AFP), and unconjugated estriol (uE3) between 14 and 21 weeks of gestation. Nonparametric\\u000a discriminant analysis was applied to calculate Down syndrome risks on the basis of various

I. Bartels; B. Bockel; J. Caesar; M. Krawczak; M. Thiele; R. Rauskolb

1994-01-01

188

Free ?-human chorionic gonadotropin, total human chorionic gonadotropin and maternal risk of breast cancer  

PubMed Central

Background We investigated whether the free ?-human chorionic gonadotropin (free ?-hCG) would provide additional information to that provided by total hCG alone and thus be useful in future epidemiological studies relating hCG to maternal breast cancer risk. Materials & methods Cases (n = 159) and controls (n = 286) were a subset of our previous study within the Northern Sweden Maternity Cohort on total hCG during primiparous pregnancy and breast cancer risk. Results The associations between total hCG (hazard ratio: 0.79; 95% CI: 0.49–1.27), free ?-hCG (hazard ratio: 0.85; 95% CI: 0.33–2.18) and maternal risk of breast cancer were very similar in all analyses and mutual adjustment for either one had minor effects on the risk estimates. Conclusion In the absence of a reliable assay on intact hCG, total hCG alone can be used in epidemiological studies investigating hCG and breast cancer risk, as free ?-hCG does not appear to provide any additional information. PMID:24559445

Toriola, Adetunji T; Tolockiene, Egle; Schock, Helena; Surcel, Helja-Marja; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Wadell, Goran; Toniolo, Paolo; Lundin, Eva; Grankvist, Kjell; Lukanova, Annekatrin

2014-01-01

189

Knockdown of Maternal Homeobox Transcription Factor SEBOX Gene Impaired Early Embryonic Development in Porcine Parthenotes  

PubMed Central

Abstract A number of germ cell-specific transcription factors essential for ovarian formation and folliculogenesis have been identified and studied. However, the role of these factors during early embryonic development has been poorly explored. In the present study, we investigated the role of SEBOX, a maternal homeobox transcription factor, during early embryonic development in porcine parthenotes. mRNA for SEBOX is preferentially expressed in oocytes, and expression persists until embryonic genome activation (EGA). Knockdown of SEBOX by siRNA disrupted early embryonic development, but not oocyte maturation. Many maternal genes essential for early embryonic development were upregulated in SEBOX-depleted embryos. Moreover, some pluripotency-associated genes, including SOX2 and NANOG, were upregulated when SEBOX was knocked down. Therefore, our data demonstrate that SEBOX is required for early embryonic development in pigs and appears to regulate the degradation of maternal transcripts and the expression of pluripotency genes. PMID:24018616

ZHENG, Zhong; ZHAO, Ming-Hui; JIA, Jia-Lin; HEO, Young-Tae; CUI, Xiang-Shun; OH, Jeong Su; KIM, Nam-Hyung

2013-01-01

190

An Investigation of the Relations between School Concentrations of Student Risk Factors and Student Educational Well-Being  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated the unique relations between school concentrations of student risk factors and measures of reading, mathematics, and attendance. It used an integrated administrative data system to create a combined data set of risks (i.e., birth risks, teen mother, low maternal education, homelessness, maltreatment, and lead exposure) for…

Fantuzzo, John W.; LeBoeuf, Whitney A.; Rouse, Heather L.

2014-01-01

191

Pre-pregnancy maternal overweight and obesity increase the risk for affective disorders in offspring.  

PubMed

Maternal pre-pregnancy obesity has been linked with an increased risk for negative emotionality and inattentiveness in offspring in early childhood. The aim of this study was to examine the association between maternal pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI) and the development of affective problems (dysthymic disorder, major depressive disorder) throughout childhood and adolescence. In the Western Australian Pregnancy Cohort (Raine) Study, 2900 women provided data on their pre-pregnancy weight, and height measurements were taken at 18 weeks of gestation. BMI was calculated and categorized using standardized methods. Live-born children (n = 2868) were followed up at ages 5, 8, 10, 14 and 17 years using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-oriented scales of the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL/4-18). Longitudinal models were applied to assess the relationships between maternal pre-pregnancy BMI and affective problems from age 5 through 17. There was a higher risk of affective problems between the ages of 5 and 17 years among children of women who were overweight and obese compared with the offspring of women in the healthy pre-pregnancy weight range (BMI 18.5-24.99) after adjustment for confounders, including paternal BMI. Maternal pre-pregnancy overweight and obesity may be implicated in the development of affective problems, including depression, in their offspring later in life. PMID:25080181

Robinson, M; Zubrick, S R; Pennell, C E; Van Lieshout, R J; Jacoby, P; Beilin, L J; Mori, T A; Stanley, F J; Newnham, J P; Oddy, W H

2013-02-01

192

Cumulative Risk and Adolescent's Internalizing and Externalizing Problems: The Mediating Roles of Maternal Responsiveness and Self-Regulation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of the present study was to examine longitudinal associations among maternal responsiveness, self-regulation, and behavioral adjustment in adolescents. The authors used structural equation modeling to test a model that demonstrates that the effects of early cumulative risk on behavioral problems is mediated by maternal responsiveness…

Doan, Stacey N.; Fuller-Rowell, Thomas E.; Evans, Gary W.

2012-01-01

193

Maternal characteristics and risk of severe neonatal thrombocytopenia and intracranial hemorrhage in pregnancies complicated by autoimmune thrombocytopenia  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE: The antenatal and intrapartum management of women with autoimmune thrombocytopenia is controversial. The current approach emphasizes an effort to identify maternal characteristics predictive of severe neonatal thrombocytopenia or to measure fetal platelet counts and perform cesarean section in patients considered to be at risk for neonatal intracranial hemorrhage. In the current study we review our experience with maternal autoimmune

Susan D. Payne; Robert Resnik; Thomas R. Moore; Herman L. Hedriana; Thomas F. Kelly

1997-01-01

194

What Are the Risk Factors for Eye Cancer?  

MedlinePLUS

... eye cancer? What are the risk factors for eye cancer? A risk factor is anything that affects ... or no known risk factors. Risk factors for eye melanoma Race/ethnicity The risk of intraocular melanoma ...

195

Genetic risk factors of atherothrombosis.  

PubMed

Atherothrombosis is a preventable and multifaceted pathological disorder whose pathogenesis involves a large number of biological pathways such as lipid and hormonal metabolism, inflammation, and hemostasis. Although it has been known for a long time that atherosclerosis has a sizable hereditary component, research in the field of genetics of cardiovascular disease is still ongoing, with doubts often outweighing certainties. A large amount of evidence gathered so far allows to identify at least 5 potential important pathways that can be specifically targeted by genetic studies-lipoprotein metabolism, inflammation, the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, platelet function, blood coagulation, and fibrinolysis. Owing to a large number of published studies that have investigated the role of genetic polymorphisms in the pathogenesis of atherothrombosis and its complications, in this review, we focused on data emerging from meta?analyses. The available evidence suggests that some selected polymorphisms in low?density lipoprotein metabolism, C?reactive protein, and blood coagulation (especially factor V Leiden, prothrombin G20210A polymorphism, and plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 4G/5G polymorphism) deserve particular attention. Of note, however, it seems implausible that one single polymorphism will add much to the current approach of risk assessment based on conventional risk factors. A paradigm shift would hence be needed in the current approach to the genetics of atherothrombosis, wherein the investigation of entire pathways rather than assessment of single mutations will likely provide more useful information for complex conditions that involve large numbers of genes and are subjected to environmental regulation of gene expression and cellular phenotype. PMID:25072406

Montagnana, Martina; Danese, Elisa; Lippi, Giuseppe

2014-09-30

196

Maternal and neonatal factors associated with mode of delivery under a universal newborn hearing screening programme in Lagos, Nigeria  

PubMed Central

Background Emerging evidence from a recent pilot universal newborn hearing screening (UNHS) programme suggests that the burden of obstetric complications associated with mode of delivery is not limited to maternal and perinatal mortality but may also include outcomes that undermine optimal early childhood development of the surviving newborns. However, the potential pathways for this association have not been reported particularly in the context of a resource-poor setting. This study therefore set out to establish the pattern of delivery and the associated neonatal outcomes under a UNHS programme. Methods A cross-sectional study in which all consenting mothers who delivered in an inner-city tertiary maternity hospital in Lagos, Nigeria from May 2005 to December 2007 were enrolled during the UNHS programme. Socio-demographic, obstetric and neonatal factors independently associated with vaginal, elective and emergency caesarean deliveries were determined using multinomial logistic regression analyses. Results Of the 4615 mothers enrolled, 2584 (56.0%) deliveries were vaginal, 1590 (34.4%) emergency caesarean and 441 (9.6%) elective caesarean section. Maternal age, parity, social class and all obstetric factors including lack of antenatal care, maternal HIV and multiple gestations were associated with increased risk of emergency caesarean delivery compared with vaginal delivery. Only parity, lack of antenatal care and prolonged/obstructed labour were associated with increased risk of emergency compared with elective caesarean delivery. Infants delivered by vaginal method or by emergency caesarean section were more likely to be associated with the risk of sensorineural hearing loss but less likely to be associated with hyperbilirubinaemia compared with infants delivered by elective caesarean section. Emergency caesarean delivery was also associated with male gender, low five-minute Apgar scores and admission into special care baby unit compared with vaginal or elective caesarean delivery. Conclusions The vast majority of caesarean delivery in this population occur as emergencies and are associated with socio-demographic factors as well as several obstetric complications. Mode of delivery is also associated with the risk of sensorineural hearing loss and other adverse birth outcomes that lie on the causal pathways for potential developmental deficits. PMID:19732443

Olusanya, Bolajoko O; Solanke, Olumuyiwa A

2009-01-01

197

Risk factors for pelvis fracture in older persons.  

PubMed

From 1996 to 2001, the authors undertook a case-control study of 192 pelvis fracture cases (men and women) and 2,402 controls aged > or = 45 years at five Kaiser Permanente medical centers in Northern California. Most information on potential risk factors was obtained by means of an interviewer-administered questionnaire. Number of fractures since age 45 years and a maternal history of hip fracture were associated with increased risks. Several factors thought to protect against loss of bone mass, including recent use of menopausal hormone therapy (adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 0.55, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.33, 0.91) and high body mass index (weight (kg)/height (m)2; per 5-unit increase, adjusted OR = 0.65, 95% CI: 0.52, 0.81), were associated with decreased risks, while cigarette smoking (adjusted OR = 2.17, 95% CI: 1.34, 3.52) and hysterectomy (adjusted OR = 1.75, 95% CI: 1.15, 2.66) were associated with increased risks. Various conditions related to propensity to fall were associated with increased risks. Most indicators of frailty, including use of walking aids and needing help with or being unable to perform various activities of daily living, conferred increased risks. Thus, low bone mass, frailty, and probably a propensity to fall appear to be associated with increased risk of pelvis fracture. PMID:16221810

Kelsey, Jennifer L; Prill, Mila M; Keegan, Theresa H M; Quesenberry, Charles P; Sidney, Steven

2005-11-01

198

Family Factors Predicting Categories of Suicide Risk  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We compared family risk and protective factors among potential high school dropouts with and without suicide-risk behaviors (SRB) and examined the extent to which these factors predict categories of SRB. Subjects were randomly selected from among potential dropouts in 14 high schools. Based upon suicide-risk status, 1,083 potential high school…

Randell, Brooke P.; Wang, Wen-Ling; Herting, Jerald R.; Eggert, Leona L.

2006-01-01

199

Maternal intake of supplemental iron and risk of autism spectrum disorder.  

PubMed

Iron deficiency affects 40%-50% of pregnancies. Iron is critical for early neurodevelopmental processes that are dysregulated in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). We examined maternal iron intake in relation to ASD risk in California-born children enrolled in a population-based case-control study (the Childhood Autism Risks from Genetics and the Environment (CHARGE) Study) from 2003 to 2009 with a diagnosis of ASD (n = 520) or typical development (n = 346) that was clinically confirmed using standardized assessments. Mean maternal daily iron intake was quantified on the basis of frequency, dose, and brands of supplements and cereals consumed each month from 3 months before pregnancy through the end of pregnancy and during breastfeeding (the index period), as reported in parental interviews. Mothers of cases were less likely to report taking iron-specific supplements during the index period (adjusted odds ratio = 0.63, 95% confidence interval: 0.44, 0.91), and they had a lower mean daily iron intake (51.7 (standard deviation, 34.0) mg/day) than mothers of controls (57.1 (standard deviation, 36.6) mg/day; P = 0.03). The highest quintile of iron intake during the index period was associated with reduced ASD risk compared with the lowest (adjusted odds ratio = 0.49, 95% confidence interval: 0.29, 0.82), especially during breastfeeding. Low iron intake significantly interacted with advanced maternal age and metabolic conditions; combined exposures were associated with a 5-fold increased ASD risk. Further studies of this link between maternal supplemental iron and ASD are needed to inform ASD prevention strategies. PMID:25249546

Schmidt, Rebecca J; Tancredi, Daniel J; Krakowiak, Paula; Hansen, Robin L; Ozonoff, Sally

2014-11-01

200

Maternal occupational exposure to asthmogens during pregnancy and risk of asthma in 7-year-old children: a cohort study  

PubMed Central

Objectives The objective of this study was to examine whether maternal exposure to asthmogens during pregnancy is associated with the development of asthma in 7-year-old Danish children, taking atopic status and sex into consideration. Design The study is a prospective follow-up of a birth cohort. Setting and participants A total of 41?724 women and their children from The Danish National Birth Cohort were categorised according to maternal occupational exposure. Exposure information was obtained by combining job title in pregnancy and 18?months after pregnancy with a commonly used asthma Job Exposure Matrix. Primary and secondary outcome measures Primary outcome was parent-reported asthma among their 7-year-old children in an internet-based questionnaire. Secondary outcome was asthma among the same children with or without atopic dermatitis and among boys and girls, respectively. Results Prenatal exposure to low molecular weight (LMW) agents was borderline associated with asthma in children with OR 1.17 (0.95 to 1.44) for children with atopic dermatitis and 1.10 (0.98 to 1.22) for children without. Maternal postnatal exposure was associated with asthma (OR 1.15 (1.04 to 1.28). After mutual adjustment,postnatal exposure (OR 1.13 (0.99 to 1.29) and the combined effects of prenatal and postnatal exposure (OR 1.34 (1.19 to 1.51)) seem to increase the risk of asthma in children. No significant associations were observed for other prenatal or postnatal exposures. The gender of the child did not modify the aforementioned associations. Conclusions Maternal occupational exposures during pregnancy do not seem to be a substantial risk factor for the development of asthma in 7-year-old children. Maternal prenatal and postnatal exposures to LMW agents may predispose the propensity of the children to develop asthma. Future studies should prioritise the characterisation of the timing of exposure in relation to the birth. PMID:23585388

Christensen, Berit Hvass; Thulstrup, Ane Marie; Hougaard, Karin S?rig; Skadhauge, Lars R; Hansen, Kirsten Skamstrup; Frydenberg, Morten; Schlunssen, Vivi

2013-01-01

201

What does Access to Maternal Care Mean Among the Urban Poor? Factors Associated with Use of Appropriate Maternal Health Services in the Slum Settlements of Nairobi, Kenya  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives The study seeks to improve understanding of maternity health seeking behaviors in resource-deprived urban settings. The objective\\u000a of this paper is to identify the factors which influence the choice of place of delivery among the urban poor, with a distinction\\u000a between sub-standard and “appropriate” health facilities. Methods The data are from a maternal health project carried out in two

Jean-Christophe Fotso; Alex Ezeh; Nyovani Madise; Abdhallah Ziraba; Reuben Ogollah

2009-01-01

202

Pneumococcal Disease Risk Factors and Transmission  

MedlinePLUS

... Organization National Foundation for Infectious Diseases Risk Factors & Transmission Share Compartir On this Page Children at Risk ... the brain and spinal cord) Who smoke cigarettes Transmission Pneumococcal bacteria spread from person-to-person by ...

203

"It takes a village" to support the vocabulary development of children with multiple risk factors.  

PubMed

Data from a nationally representative sample from Turkey (N = 1,017) were used to investigate the environmental factors that support the receptive vocabulary of 3-year-old children who differ in their developmental risk due to family low economic status and elevated maternal depressive symptoms. Children's vocabulary knowledge was strongly associated with language stimulation and learning materials in all families regardless of risk status. Maternal warmth and responsiveness supported vocabulary competence in families of low economic status only when maternal depressive symptoms were low. In families with the highest levels of risk, that is, with depression and economic distress jointly present, support by the extended family and neighbors for caring for the child protected children's vocabulary development against these adverse conditions. The empirical evidence on the positive contribution of extrafamilial support to young children's receptive vocabulary under adverse conditions allows an expansion of our current theorizing about influences on language development. PMID:24188041

Baydar, Nazli; Küntay, Aylin C; Yagmurlu, Bilge; Aydemir, Nuran; Cankaya, Dilek; Göksen, Fatos; Cemalcilar, Zeynep

2014-04-01

204

Maternal factors contributing to under-five mortality at birth order 1 to 5 in India: a comprehensive multivariate study.  

PubMed

The objective of the study is to assess maternal factors contributing to under-five mortality at birth order 1 to 5 in India. Data for this study was derived from the children's record of the 2007 India National Family Health Survey, which is a nationally representative cross-sectional household survey. Data is segregated according to birth order 1 to 5 to assess mother's occupation, Mother's education, child's gender, Mother's age, place of residence, wealth index, mother's anaemia level, prenatal care, assistance at delivery , antenatal care, place of delivery and other maternal factors contributing to under-five mortality. Out of total 51555 births, analysis is restricted to 16567 children of first birth order, 14409 of second birth order, 8318 of third birth order, 5021 of fourth birth order and 3034 of fifth birth order covering 92% of the total births taken place 0-59 months prior to survey. Mother's average age in years for birth orders 1 to 5 are 23.7, 25.8, 27.4, 29 and 31 years, respectively. Most mothers whose children died are Hindu, with no formal education, severely anaemic and working in the agricultural sector. In multivariate logistic models, maternal education, wealth index and breastfeeding are protective factors across all birth orders. In birth order model 1 and 2, mother's occupation is a significant risk factor. In birth order models 2 to 5, previous birth interval of lesser than 24 months is a risk factor. Child's gender is a risk factor in birth order 1 and 5. Information regarding complications in pregnancy and prenatal care act as protective factors in birth order 1, place of delivery and immunization in birth order 2, and child size at birth in birth order 4. Prediction models demonstrate high discrimination that indicates that our models fit the data. The study has policy implications such as enhancing the Information, Education and Communication network for mothers, especially at higher birth orders, in order to reduce under-five mortality. The study emphasises the need of developing interventions to address the issues of anaemia, mothers working in the agricultural sector and improving relevant literacy among mothers. PMID:23961385

Singh, Rajvir; Tripathi, Vrijesh

2013-01-01

205

Factors Impacting the Assessment of Maternal Culpability in Cases of Alleged Fetal Abuse  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

These studies explored attitudes toward maternal culpability in cases of alleged fetal abuse. In experiment one, general culpability for the use of various substances during pregnancy was assessed as well as the impact of other potentially relevant factors. One hundred and twenty students completed the survey. Participants overwhelmingly supported…

McCoy, Monica L.

2003-01-01

206

Factors Affecting Latina Immigrants’ Perceptions of Maternal Health Care: Findings From a Qualitative Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Due to the influx of Latino immigration in the United States, health care services are faced with the challenge of meeting the needs of this growing population. In this qualitative study, we explored Latina immigrants’ experiences with maternal health care services. We found that despite enduring language barriers and problems, Spanish-speaking women expressed satisfaction with their care. Factors influencing women's

Tilly A. Gurman; Davida Becker

2008-01-01

207

Initiating a Caregiving Relationship: Pregnancy and Childbirth Factors as Predictors of Maternal Sensitivity  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of this study was to investigate the relations between pregnancy and childbirth factors and subsequent quality of maternal interactive behavior in a sample of 116 full-term infants and their mothers. Mothers reported on the conditions of childbirth when infants were 6-8 months of age, and their interactive behavior was observed during a…

Bernier, Annie; Jarry-Boileau, Veronique; Tarabulsy, George M.; Miljkovitch, Raphaele

2010-01-01

208

Stroke risk factors and prevention  

MedlinePLUS

... a higher risk of getting heart disease than women except in older adults. Your genes or race. If your parents had a stroke, you are at higher risk. African-Americans, Mexican Americans, American Indians, Hawaiians, and some Asian Americans ...

209

Risk and Resilience: The Moderating Role of Social Coping for Maternal Mental Health in a Setting of Political Conflict  

PubMed Central

Violence can threaten individual well-being and tear at the social fabric of communities. At the same time, suffering can mobilize social coping and mutual support. Thus, the backdrop of political violence increases risk factors and stimulates resilience. The current study examined the moderating role of social coping as reflective of risk and resiliency in Northern Ireland, a setting of protracted conflict. Specifically, structural equation modeling was used to investigate whether social coping protects from or exacerbates the negative impact of sectarian crime and nonsectarian crime on maternal mental health (N=631). Nonsectarian crime predicted greater psychological distress for mothers in Belfast. Mixed support was found for the buffering and depletion moderation hypotheses; social coping functioned differently for nonsectarian crime and sectarian crime. Greater social coping buffered mothers’ psychological distress from the negative effects of nonsectarian crime, but exacerbated maternal mental health problems when facing sectarian crime. Results suggest that social coping is a complex phenomenon, particularly in settings of protracted political violence. Implications for interventions aimed at alleviating psychological distress by enhancing mothers’ social coping in contexts of intergroup conflict are discussed. PMID:22506629

Taylor, Laura K.; Merrilees, Christine E.; Cairns, Ed; Shirlow, Peter; Goeke-Morey, Marcie; Cummings, E. Mark

2012-01-01

210

Factors influencing maternal nutrition in rural Nepal: an exploratory research project.  

PubMed

In this pilot project we examined factors contributing to maternal nutrition among women of child-bearing age in the Western Region of Nepal. We found that rural women are interested in learning about nutrition regardless of educational attainment and that level of education is strongly associated with interest in learning about nutrition (p <.001). Although the majority of women with no education expressed interest in learning about nutrition (71%), a substantial percentage (22%) were not interested. Education and the teaching of basic health messages may hold important benefits for improving maternal and child health. PMID:24228638

Schumer, Jean E; Bernell, Stephanie L; Bovbjerg, Viktor E; Long, Marie L

2014-10-01

211

Factors affecting utilization of skilled maternal care in Northwest Ethiopia: a multilevel analysis  

PubMed Central

Background The evaluation of all potential sources of low skilled maternal care utilization is crucial for Ethiopia. Previous studies have largely disregarded the contribution of different levels. This study was planned to assess the effect of individual, communal, and health facility characteristics in the utilization of antenatal, delivery, and postnatal care by a skilled provider. Methods A linked facility and population-based survey was conducted over three months (January - March 2012) in twelve “kebeles” of North Gondar Zone, Amhara Region. A total of 1668 women who had births in the year preceding the survey were selected for analysis. Using a multilevel modelling, we examined the effect of cluster variation and a number of individual, communal (kebele), and facility-related variables for skilled maternal care utilization. Result About 32.3%, 13.8% and 6.3% of the women had the chance to get skilled providers for their antenatal, delivery and postnatal care, respectively. A significant heterogeneity was observed among clusters for each indicator of skilled maternal care utilization. At the individual level, variables related to awareness and perceptions were found to be much more relevant for skilled maternal service utilization. Preference for skilled providers and previous experience of antenatal care were consistently strong predictors of all indicators of skilled maternal health care utilizations. Birth order, maternal education, and awareness about health facilities to get skilled professionals were consistently strong predictors of skilled antenatal and delivery care use. Communal factors were relevant for both delivery and postnatal care, whereas the characteristics of a health facility were more relevant for use of skilled delivery care than other maternity services. Conclusion Factors operating at individual and “kebele” levels play a significant role in determining utilization of skilled maternal health services. Interventions to create better community awareness and perception about skilled providers and their care, and ensuring the seamless performance of health care facilities have been considered crucial to improve skilled maternal services in the study area. Such interventions should target underprivileged women. PMID:23587369

2013-01-01

212

Stress fractures: Pathophysiology, epidemiology, and risk factors  

Microsoft Academic Search

A stress fracture represents the inability of the skeleton to withstand repetitive bouts of mechanical loading, which results\\u000a in structural fatigue and resultant signs and symptoms of localized pain and tenderness. To prevent stress fractures, an appreciation\\u000a of their risk factors is required. These are typically grouped into extrinsic and intrinsic risk factors. Extrinsic risk factors\\u000a for stress fractures are

Stuart J. Warden; David B. Burr; Peter D. Brukner

2006-01-01

213

Risk of Low Birth Weight Associated with Advanced Maternal Age Among Four Ethnic Groups in the United States  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: To examine and compare the risk of low birth weight associated with delayed childbearing in four ethnic groups using nationally representative data in the United States. Methods: We compared the risk of low (Results: African Americans and Puerto Ricans, and to a lesser extent Mexican Americans, had higher risk differences associated with advanced maternal age. For first births, the

Babak Khoshnood; Stephen Wall; Kwang-sun Lee

2005-01-01

214

What Are the Risk Factors for Testicular Cancer?  

MedlinePLUS

... testicular cancer? What are the risk factors for testicular cancer? A risk factor is anything that changes your ... known risk factors. Even if a person with testicular cancer has a risk factor, it’s often very hard ...

215

Improving risk factor modification: a global approach.  

PubMed

Despite recent advances in treating cardiovascular disease, many of the predisposing risk factors for heart disease are increasing in prevalence, raising concern that heart disease rates may rise in the years to come. When faced with the range of risk factors such as obesity, smoking, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and diabetes, the clinician needs to address all components. After assessing an individual patient's global risk, the clinician should use a comprehensive risk-modifying strategy that incorporates therapeutic lifestyle changes and pharmacologic therapy. Key elements of lifestyle changes are individualized treatment plans and frequent follow-up, whereas approaches to improve medical therapy include using structured programs to increase awareness and implementation of risk-reducing medications. Improving risk factor modification requires a global approach, not only in addressing the spectrum of risk factors, but also in using the full range of strategies available to clinicians. PMID:19863873

Muchiteni, Tshaka; Borden, William B

2009-11-01

216

MATERNAL OCCUPATIONAL EXPOSURE TO POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS AND RISK OF ORAL CLEFT-AFFECTED PREGNANCIES  

PubMed Central

Objective Evaluate whether there is an association between maternal occupational exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and oral cleftsin offspring. This is the first human study of PAHs and clefts of which the authors are aware. Design Case-control study. Setting, Participants Data for 1997–2002 from the National Birth Defects Prevention Study, a large population-based case-control study in the US, were analyzed. Maternal telephone interviews yielded information on jobs held in the month before through three months after conception. Two industrial hygienists independently assessed occupational exposure to PAHs ; all jobs rated as exposed or with rating difficulty were reviewed with a third industrial hygienist to reach consensus on all exposure parameters. Logistic regression estimated crude and adjusted odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL±P) and cleft palate alone (CP). Results There were 2989 controls( 3.5% exposed), 805 cases of CL±P (5.8% exposed) and 439 cases of CP (4.6% exposed). The odds of maternal occupational exposure to PAH (any vs none) during pregnancy was increased for CL±P cases as compared with controls (OR 1.69, 95% CI 1.18–2.40); the OR was 1.47 (95% CI 1.02–2.12) adjusted for maternal education. There was a statistically significant adjusted exposure-response relationship for CL±P (ptrend = 0.02). ORs for CP were not statistically significant. Conclusions Maternal occupational exposure to PAHs was associated with increased risk of cleft lip with or without cleft palate in offspring. PMID:23136939

Langlois, Peter H; Hoyt, Adrienne T; Lupo, Philip J; Lawson, Christina C; Waters, Martha A; Desrosiers, Tania A; Shaw, Gary M; Romitti, Paul A; Lammer, Edward J

2014-01-01

217

Factors Associated with Perceived Stress and Stressful Life Events in Pregnant Women: Findings from the Canadian Maternity Experiences Survey  

Microsoft Academic Search

Prenatal maternal stress has been linked to multiple adverse outcomes. Researchers have used a variety of methods to assess\\u000a maternal stress. The purpose of this study was to explore and compare factors associated with stress in pregnancy as measured\\u000a by perceived stress and stressful life events. We analyzed data from the Canadian Maternity Experiences Survey. A randomly\\u000a selected sample of

Dawn Kingston; Maureen Heaman; Deshayne Fell; Susie Dzakpasu; Beverley Chalmers

218

Neighborhoods and cardiovascular risk: Beyond individual-level risk factors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Efforts to prevent and treat cardiovascular disease have traditionally focused on individual-level risk factors. However,\\u000a recent work has highlighted the role of residential environments in shaping the distribution of cardiovascular outcomes and\\u000a risk factors. Living in disadvantaged neighborhoods has been associated with greater cardiovascular disease risk even after\\u000a accounting for personal measures of socioeconomic status. Current research efforts focus on

Ana V. Diez Roux; Kiarri Kershaw; Lynda Lisabeth

2008-01-01

219

What Are the Risk Factors for Neuroblastoma?  

MedlinePLUS

... But these factors usually take many years to influence cancer risk, and they are not thought to play much of a role in childhood cancers, including neuroblastomas. No environmental factors (such as ...

220

Prenatal and Early Life Factors and Risk of Parkinson's Disease  

PubMed Central

Few studies have investigated the relation between early life factors and risk of Parkinson’s disease (PD), although a potential role of exposures during pregnancy and childhood has been hypothesized. The study population comprised participants in two prospective cohorts: the Nurses’ Health Study (121,701 female nurses followed from 1976–2002) and the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (51,529 male health professionals followed from 1986–2002). PD risk was examined in relation to season of birth, birthweight, parental age at birth, preterm birth, multiple birth, ever having been breast-fed, and handedness. We identified 659 incident PD cases. No significant relation with PD was observed for birthweight, paternal age, preterm birth, multiple birth, and having been breast-fed. A modest non-significant association was suggested for season of birth (30 percent higher risk of PD associated with spring vs. winter birth), and for older maternal age at birth (75 percent increased risk among those with mothers age 30 and over vs. less than 20). Left-handedness was associated with a 62 percent increased risk of PD in women, but not in men. Further investigation of the relation between prenatal, perinatal, or neonatal factors and PD in other study populations is suggested. PMID:20740569

Gardener, Hannah; Gao, Xiang; Chen, Honglei; Schwarzschild, Michael A.; Spiegelman, Donna; Ascherio, Alberto

2011-01-01

221

Maternal and offspring genetic variants of AKR1C3 and the risk of childhood leukemia  

PubMed Central

The aldo-keto reductase 1C3 (AKR1C3) gene located on chromosome 10p15-p14, a regulator of myeloid cell proliferation and differentiation, represents an important candidate gene for studying human carcinogenesis. In a prospectively enrolled population-based case–control study of Han Chinese conducted in Kaohsiung in southern Taiwan, a total of 114 leukemia cases and 221 controls <20 years old were recruited between November 1997 and December 2005. The present study set out to evaluate the association between childhood leukemia and both maternal and offspring's genotypes. To do so, we conducted a systematic assessment of common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at the 5? flanking 10 kb to 3? UTR of AKR1C3 gene. Gln5His and three tagSNPs (rs2245191, rs10508293 and rs3209896) and one multimarker (rs2245191, rs10508293 and rs3209896) were selected with average 90% coverage of untagged SNPs by using the HapMap II data set. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were adjusted for age and gender. After correcting for multiple comparisons, we observed that risk of developing childhood leukemia is significantly associated with rs10508293 polymorphism on intron 4 of the AKR1C3 gene in both offspring alone and in the combined maternal and offspring genotypes (nominal P < 0.0001, permutation P < 0.005). The maternal methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase A1298C polymorphism was found to be an effect modifier of the maternal intron 4 polymorphism of the AKR1C3 gene (rs10508293) and the childhood leukemia risk. In conclusion, this study suggests that AKR1C3 polymorphisms may be important predictive markers for childhood leukemia susceptibility. PMID:18339682

Liu, Chen-yu; Hsu, Yi-Hsiang; Pan, Pi-Chen; Wu, Ming-Tsang; Ho, Chi-Kung; Su, Li; Xu, Xin; Li, Yi; Christiani, David C.

2008-01-01

222

Prematurity, maternal stress and mother–child interactions  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectivePrevious studies have shown that premature birth and the immaturity of the child can affect the quality of the parent–child relationship. The present study examines the relationship between maternal and infant interactional behavior over time and infant perinatal risk factors as well as maternal perinatal recollected traumatic experience. Few studies have explored the relationship between maternal stress and the quality

Carole Muller-Nix; Margarita Forcada-Guex; Blaise Pierrehumbert; Lyne Jaunin; Ayala Borghini; François Ansermet

2004-01-01

223

Histone variant H3.3 is an essential maternal factor for oocyte reprogramming.  

PubMed

Mature oocyte cytoplasm can reprogram somatic cell nuclei to the pluripotent state through a series of sequential events including protein exchange between the donor nucleus and ooplasm, chromatin remodeling, and pluripotency gene reactivation. Maternal factors that are responsible for this reprogramming process remain largely unidentified. Here, we demonstrate that knockdown of histone variant H3.3 in mouse oocytes results in compromised reprogramming and down-regulation of key pluripotency genes; and this compromised reprogramming for developmental potentials and transcription of pluripotency genes can be rescued by injecting exogenous H3.3 mRNA, but not H3.2 mRNA, into oocytes in somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos. We show that maternal H3.3, and not H3.3 in the donor nucleus, is essential for successful reprogramming of somatic cell nucleus into the pluripotent state. Furthermore, H3.3 is involved in this reprogramming process by remodeling the donor nuclear chromatin through replacement of donor nucleus-derived H3 with de novo synthesized maternal H3.3 protein. Our study shows that H3.3 is a crucial maternal factor for oocyte reprogramming and provides a practical model to directly dissect the oocyte for its reprogramming capacity. PMID:24799717

Wen, Duancheng; Banaszynski, Laura A; Liu, Ying; Geng, Fuqiang; Noh, Kyung-Min; Xiang, Jenny; Elemento, Olivier; Rosenwaks, Zev; Allis, C David; Rafii, Shahin

2014-05-20

224

Risk factors for suicide in later life  

Microsoft Academic Search

Suicide rates are higher in later life than in any other age group. The design of effective suicide prevention strategies hinges on the identification of specific, quantifiable risk factors. Methodological challenges include the lack of systematically applied terminology in suicide and risk factor research, the low base rate of suicide, and its complex, multidetermined nature.Although variables in mental, physical, and

Yeates Conwell; Paul R. Duberstein; Eric D. Caine

2002-01-01

225

Risk Factors for Forced Migrant Flight  

Microsoft Academic Search

An important type of medical study seeks to establish the risk factors for contracting various diseases. A similar, but very small, vein of research exists in peace and conflict studies, and we seek to contribute to it. Our study evaluates whether variables shown to explain variance in numbers of forced migrants can serve as risk factors that might aid contingency

Jacqueline H. Rubin; Will H. Moore

2007-01-01

226

Familial Risk Factors Favoring Drug Addiction Onset  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study, primarily aimed at identification of familial risk factors favoring drug addiction onset, was carried out throughout 2008 and 2009. The study comprised a total of 146 addicts and 134 control subjects. Based on the study outcome, it can be concluded that in the families the addicts were born into, familial risk factors capable of influencing their psychosocial development

Jadranka Ivandi? Zimi?; Vlado Juki?

2012-01-01

227

Developmental Risk Factors for Sexual Offending.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study involving 64 Australian sex offenders and 33 non-sex offenders found childhood emotional abuse and family dysfunction, childhood behavior problems, and childhood sexual abuse were developmental risk factors for paraphilia. Emotional abuse and family dysfunction was found to be a risk factor for pedophilia, exhibitionism, rape, or multiple…

Lee, Joseph K. P.; Jackson, Henry J.; Pattison, Pip; Ward, Tony

2002-01-01

228

Risk factors identified for certain lymphoma subtypes  

Cancer.gov

In a large international collaborative analysis of risk factors for non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), scientists were able to quantify risk associated with medical history, lifestyle factors, family history of blood or lymph-borne cancers, and occupation for 11 different NHL subtypes, including less common subtypes.

229

Osteoporosis Risk Factors in Eighth Grade Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents findings from food frequency questionnaires and surveys of 138 Midwestern eighth-grade student-parent pairs. The study examined the incidence of modifiable and nonmodifiable osteoporosis risk factors and compared gender differences. Data analysis indicated that many adolescents possessed several modifiable and nonmodifiable risk factors

Lysen, Victoria C.; Walker, Robert

1997-01-01

230

Risk Factor Intervention for Health Maintenance  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Risk factors for disease consist of personal habits such as cigarette smoking and excessive alcohol consumption, and bodily characteristics such as hypertension and high serum cholesterol. Progress in identifying, quantifying, and controlling risk factors is opening the way to the prevention of disease. (BB)

Breslow, Lester

1978-01-01

231

Vascular risk factors and diabetic neuropathy  

Microsoft Academic Search

background Other than glycemic control, there are no treatments for diabetic neuropathy. Thus, identifying potentially modifiable risk factors for neuropathy is crucial. We studied risk factors for the development of distal symmetric neuropathy in 1172 patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus from 31 centers participating in the European Diabetes (EURODIAB) Prospective Complications Study. methods Neuropathy was assessed at baseline (1989

Solomon Tesfaye; Nish Chaturvedi; Simon E. M. Eaton

2005-01-01

232

Dietary Research - Risk Factor Monitoring & Methods Branch  

Cancer.gov

Diet, in all its complexity, is considered one of the major risk factors for cancer and is therefore a primary area of research within the Risk Factor Monitoring and Methods Branch. We work collaboratively with a wide range of researchers to conduct an integrated program that serves NCI as well as the extramural community.

233

Maternal nutrition and oral health factors in early childhood caries  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background. Early Childhood Caries (ECC) is the most common chronic infectious disease of childhood worldwide. Seven of ten American children have one or more decayed or filled primary teeth by age five. ECC prevalence is especially high in lower socio-economic ethnic populations. Commonly recognized as a diet-induced disease, focal etiological factors include cariogenic bacteria, fermentable carbohydrates, and a susceptible newly

Sue Etta Daily Cunningham

2007-01-01

234

Maternal Socioeconomic Status and the Risk of Congenital Heart Defects in Offspring: A Meta-Analysis of 33 Studies  

PubMed Central

Background We conducted this meta-analysis to address the open question of a possible association between maternal socioeconomic status and congenital heart defects (CHDs). Methods We searched MEDLINE and EMBASE from their inception to January 1, 2014 for case-control and cohort studies that assessed the association between maternal socioeconomic status and the risk of CHDs. Study-specific relative risk estimates were polled according to random-effect or fixed-effect models. Results From 3343 references, a total of 31 case-control studies and 2 cohort studies were enrolled in this meta-analysis, including more than 50,000 cases. We observed that maternal educational attainment, family income and maternal occupation were negatively associated with an 11% (pooled RR?=?1.11, 95% CI: 1.03, 1.21), 5% (pooled RR?=?1.05, 95% CI: 1.01, 1.09) and 51% (pooled RR?=?1.51, 95% CI: 1.02, 2.24) increased risk of CHDs, respectively. In a subgroup analysis by geographic region, the results were inconsistent for the European region (RR?=?1.29, 95% CI: 0.99–1.69) and USA/Canada region (RR?=?1.06, 95% CI: 0.97, 1.16) in maternal educational attainment. Conclusion In summary, this meta-analysis suggests that a lower degree of maternal socioeconomic status is modestly associated with an increased risk of CHDs. However, further investigations are needed to confirm the association. PMID:25347676

Yang, Lei; Da, Min; Fan, Changfeng; Wang, Song; Mo, Xuming

2014-01-01

235

Clinical complications in pregnant women with sickle cell disease: prospective study of factors predicting maternal death or near miss  

PubMed Central

Objective To evaluate complications in pregnant women with sickle cell disease, especially those leading to maternal death or near miss (severe obstetric complications). Methods A prospective cohort of 104 pregnant women registered in the Blood Center of Belo Horizonte (Hemominas Foundation) was followed up at high-risk prenatal units. They belonged to Group I (51 hemoglobin SS and three hemoglobin S/?0-thalassemia) or Group II (49 hemoglobin SC and one hemoglobin S/?+-thalassemia). Both groups had similar median ages. Predictive factors for ‘near miss’ or maternal death with p-value ? 0.25 in the univariate analysis were included in a multivariate logistic model (significance set for p-value ? 0.05). Results Group I had more frequent episodes of vaso-occlusive crises, more transfusions in the antepartum and postpartum, and higher percentage of preterm deliveries than Group II. Infections and painful crises during the postpartum period were similar in both the groups. The mortality rate was 4.8%: three deaths in Group I and two in Group II. One-third of the women in both the groups experienced near miss. The most frequent event was pneumonia/acute chest syndrome. Alpha-thalassemia co-inheritance and ?-gene haplotypes were not associated with near miss or maternal death. In multivariate analysis predictors of near miss or death were parity above one and baseline red blood cell macrocytosis. In Group I, baseline hypoxemia (saturation < 94%) was also predictive of near miss or death. Conclusion One-third of pregnant women had near miss and 4.8% died. Both hemoglobin SS and SC pregnant women shared the same risk of death or of severe complications, especially pulmonary events. PMID:25031164

Resende Cardoso, Patricia Santos; Lopes Pessoa de Aguiar, Regina Amelia; Viana, Marcos Borato

2014-01-01

236

Optic nerve hypoplasia in North America: a re-appraisal of perinatal risk factors  

PubMed Central

Purpose The purpose of this study is to describe and clarify the birth and prenatal characteristics of a large cohort of children with optic nerve hypoplasia. Methods This is a descriptive report of 204 patients aged ? 36 months and enrolled in a prospective study at the Children’s Hospital Los Angeles. Birth characteristics, including complications, were abstracted from study files and medical records. Systematic maternal interviews were conducted to obtain detailed prenatal histories. National birth data were used for comparison with birth findings. Results Birth characteristics were unremarkable for birthweight and gestation, but significant for increased frequency of caesarean delivery and fetal and neonatal complications. Young maternal age and primaparity were dominating maternal features. Preterm labour, gestational vaginal bleeding, low maternal weight gain and weight loss during pregnancy were prevalent. Conclusions These findings confirm young maternal age and primaparity as associated risk factors, challenge many other suggested factors such as alcohol and drug abuse, and introduce potentially significant prenatal characteristics such as maternal weight loss and early gestational vaginal bleeding as aetiological correlates. PMID:19141149

Garcia-Filion, Pamela; Fink, Cassandra; Geffner, Mitchell E.; Borchert, Mark

2012-01-01

237

Pre- and perinatal risk factors for autism spectrum disorder in a new jersey cohort.  

PubMed

This study evaluated the prevalence of pre- and perinatal risk factors in a cohort of children with autism spectrum disorders compared with the New Jersey population. Our cohort included 268 individuals with an autism spectrum disorder. Birth histories were obtained by a self-administered questionnaire. The autism spectrum disorders cohort rates of 7 perinatal risk factors were significantly higher than New Jersey state rates: mother's age 35 years or older, low birth weight, multiple gestation, prematurity, vaginal bleeding, prolonged labor, and hypoxia. Analysis of clustering of risk factors in the cohort showed no significant differences across maternal and paternal age groups. Older mothers in the cohort had a higher risk of infant hypoxia. Multiple risk factors during pregnancy appear to be associated with a higher risk of autism spectrum disorders in offspring, supporting the hypothesis that environmental influences in conjunction with genetics contribute to the causes of autism spectrum disorders. PMID:24413357

Maramara, Lauren A; He, Wenzhuan; Ming, Xue

2014-12-01

238

Factors That Contribute to the Improvement in Maternal Parenting after Separation from a Violent Husband or Partner  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors test the hypothesis that separation from a violent husband or partner improves maternal parenting in Japan and examine how childhood abuse history (CAH), experience of domestic violence (DV), mental health problems, husband or partner's child maltreatment, and other demographic factors affect maternal parenting after such separation. A…

Fujiwara, Takeo; Okuyama, Makiko; Izumi, Mayuko

2012-01-01

239

Affective and physiological factors predicting maternal response to infant crying  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study evaluated physiological, affective, and perceptual factors hypothesized to predict how quickly 45 primiparous mothers of 7–9-month-old infants would respond to non-distressed infant crying. Aversiveness ratings of the non-distressed cries of one's “own” infant and physiological reactivity to one's “own” infant crying accounted for a significant amount of the variance in a Cox proportional hazards regression analysis of speed

Tamara Del Vecchio; Abbe Walter; Susan G. O’Leary

2009-01-01

240

Lifestyle Factors and Stroke Risk  

MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

... of having a stroke caused by a cerebral infarction, or blockage in a blood vessel, decreased steadily ... 5 had a 62% lower risk of cerebral infarction. One of the study authors said the results ...

241

Cryptosporidium Epidemiology and Risk Factors  

MedlinePLUS

... risk for infection, such as: Children who attend day care centers, including diaper-aged children Child care workers ... Work: Cryptosporidium CryptoNet Information For Immunocompromised Persons Travelers Day Care Facilities Boil Water Advisories Healthy Water Links Healthy ...

242

What Are the Risk Factors?  

MedlinePLUS

... For more information, visit Lung Cancer Prevention. Also, arsenic in drinking water (primarily from private wells) can increase the risk ... lung cancer. For more information, visit the EPA's Arsenic in Drinking Water. Related Links Harms of Smoking and Health Benefits ...

243

Maternal depressive history, teen 5HTTLPR genotype, and the processing of emotional faces: Exploring mechanisms of risk.  

PubMed

Variations in the serotonin transporter gene (5HTTLPR) and biased processing of face-emotion displays both have been implicated in the transmission of depression risk, but little is known about developmental influences on these relationships. Within a community sample of adolescents, we examine whether 5HTTLPR genotype moderates the link between maternal depressive history and errors in face-emotion labeling. When controlling for current levels of depression and anxiety among youth, a two-way interaction between maternal depressive history and 5HTTLPR genotype was detected. Specifically, adolescents whose mothers reported a depressive history and who had a low expressing genotype made more errors in classifying emotional faces when compared with adolescents with an intermediate or high expressing genotype, with or without maternal depression history. These findings highlight the complex manner in which maternal depression and genetic risk may interact to predict individual differences in social information processing. PMID:21092937

Jacobs, Rachel H; Pine, Daniel S; Schoeny, Michael E; Henry, David B; Gollan, Jackie K; Moy, Gregory; Cook, Edwin H; Wakschlag, Lauren S

2011-01-01

244

Maternal depressive history, teen 5HTTLPR genotype, and the processing of emotional faces: Exploring mechanisms of risk  

PubMed Central

Variations in the serotonin transporter gene (5HTTLPR) and biased processing of face-emotion displays both have been implicated in the transmission of depression risk, but little is known about developmental influences on these relationships. Within a community sample of adolescents, we examine whether 5HTTLPR genotype moderates the link between maternal depressive history and errors in face-emotion labeling. When controlling for current levels of depression and anxiety among youth, a two-way interaction between maternal depressive history and 5HTTLPR genotype was detected. Specifically, adolescents whose mothers reported a depressive history and who had a low expressing genotype made more errors in classifying emotional faces when compared with adolescents with an intermediate or high expressing genotype, with or without maternal depression history. These findings highlight the complex manner in which maternal depression and genetic risk may interact to predict individual differences in social information processing, as it is moderated by the 5HTTLPR genotype. PMID:21092937

Jacobs, Rachel H.; Pine, Daniel S.; Schoeny, Michael E.; Henry, David B.; Gollan, Jackie K.; Moy, Gregory; Cook, Edwin H.; Wakschlag, Lauren S.

2010-01-01

245

Italian risk factor-based screening for gestational diabetes.  

PubMed

There is a debate about whether universal or risk factors-based screening is most appropriate for gestational diabetes diagnosis. The aim of our retrospective study was to compare in our population the universal screening test recommended by the International Association of Diabetes in Pregnancy Study Group (IADPSG) panel and the American Diabetes Association (ADA) versus the selective screening proposed by the United Kingdom National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence guidelines (NICE) but modified by the Italian National Institute of Health. From May 2010 to October 2011 all consecutive pregnant women were screened for gestational diabetes according to the IADPSG's panel criteria, while all the risk factors for each patient were registered. Of the 1015 pregnant women included in the study, 113 (11%) were diagnosed with gestational diabetes and 26 (23%) of them would not have been identified by the selective screening proposed by the Italian National Institute of Health. However, all the risk factors considered by the selective screening revealed a good predictive role except for maternal age ? 35 years (OR: 0.98). In the group without the risk factors considered, it was reported the predictive role for gestational diabetes of prepregnancy BMI and nulliparity. The selective risk factors-based screening proposed by the Italian National Institute of Health has detected 77% of gestational diabetes cases in our population, sparing the oral glucose tolerance test for more than 40% of pregnant women at the same time. More information on the clinical impact of this choice could be obtained by a strict analysis of treatment, perinatal outcome and follow-up of an adequate sample size of "missed" gestational diabetes. PMID:24175881

Corrado, F; Pintaudi, B; Di Vieste, G; Interdonato, M L; Magliarditi, M; Santamaria, A; D'Anna, R; Di Benedetto, A

2014-09-01

246

Maternal and in utero determinants of type 2 diabetes risk in the young.  

PubMed

The global prevalence of diabetes mellitus has reached epidemic proportions. In 2010, it was estimated that 6.4 % of the adult population (285 million) have diabetes. In recent years, the incidence of type 2 diabetes (T2D), a condition traditionally associated with aging, has been steadily increasing among younger individuals. It is now a well-established notion that the early-life period is a critical window of development and that influences during this period can "developmentally prime" the metabolic status of the adult. This review discusses the role of maternal and in utero influences on the developmental priming of T2D risk. Both human epidemiological studies and experimental animal models are beginning to demonstrate that early dietary challenges can accelerate the onset of age-associated metabolic disturbances, including insulin resistance, T2D, obesity, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease. These findings show that poor maternal nutrition can prime a prediabetes phenotype, often manifest as insulin resistance, by very early stages of life. Thus, the maternal diet is a critical determinant of premature T2D risk. While the mechanisms that link early nutrition to age-associated metabolic decline are currently unclear, preliminary findings suggest perturbations in a number of processes involved in cellular aging, such as changes in longevity-associated Sirtuin activity, epigenetic regulation of key metabolic genes, and mitochondrial dysfunction. Preliminary studies show that pharmacological interventions in utero and dietary supplementation in early postnatal life may alleviate insulin resistance and reduce T2D risk. However, further studies are warranted to fully understand the relationship between the early environment and long-term effects on metabolism. Such mechanistic insights will facilitate strategic interventions that prevent accelerated metabolic decline and the premature onset of T2D in the current and future generations. PMID:24292969

Bruce, Kimberley D

2014-01-01

247

Vehicle emission unit risk factors for transportation risk assessments  

SciTech Connect

When the transportation risk posed by shipments of hazardous chemical and radioactive materials is being assessed, it is necessary to evaluate the risks associated with both vehicle emissions and cargo-related risks. Diesel exhaust and fugitive dust emissions from vehicles transporting hazardous shipments lead to increased air pollution, which increases the risk of latent fatalities in the affected population along the transport route. The estimated risk from these vehicle-related sources can often by as large or larger than the estimated risk associated with the material being transported. In this paper, data from the US Environmental Protection Agency's Motor Vehicle-Related Air Toxics Study are first used to develop latent cancer fatality estimates per kilometer of travel in rural and urban areas for all diesel truck classes. These unit risk factors are based on studies investigating the carcinogenic nature of diesel exhaust. With the same methodology, the current per=kilometer latent fatality risk factor used in transportation risk assessment for heavy diesel trucks in urban areas is revised and the analysis expanded to provide risk factors for rural areas and all diesel truck classes. These latter fatality estimates may include, but are not limited to, cancer fatalities and are based primarily on the most recent epidemiological data available on mortality rates associated with ambient air PM-10 concentrations.

Biwer, B.M.; Butler, J.P.

1999-12-01

248

Maternal hormone levels among populations at high and low risk of testicular germ cell cancer  

PubMed Central

Ethnic differences in maternal oestrogen levels have been suggested as explaining the significantly higher risk of testicular germ cell tumours (TGCT) of white men than black men in the United States. We therefore examined levels of maternal oestrogens, as well as testosterone and alphafetoprotein (AFP), in 150 black and 150 white mothers in the Collaborative Perinatal Project. Serum levels of estradiol (total, free and bioavailable), estriol, testosterone (total, free and bioavailable), sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), and AFP were examined during first and third trimesters. We found that the black mothers, rather than the white mothers, had significantly higher estradiol levels in first trimester (P=0.05). Black mothers also had significantly higher levels of all testosterone (P<0.001) and AFP (P<0.001) in both trimesters. In addition, the ratios of sex hormones (estradiol/testosterone) were significantly lower among black mothers. These findings provide little support to the oestrogen hypothesis, but are consistent with higher levels of testosterones and/or AFP being associated with reduced risk of TGCT; alternatively, lower oestrogen/androgen ratios may be associated with reduced risk. PMID:15841083

Zhang, Y; Graubard, B I; Klebanoff, M A; Ronckers, C; Stanczyk, F Z; Longnecker, M P; McGlynn, K A

2005-01-01

249

Maternal early pregnancy body mass index and risk of preterm birth  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective  To determine the association between maternal body mass index (BMI) in early pregnancy and the risk of preterm birth (PTB)\\u000a in Chinese women.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Data were obtained from a population-based perinatal care program in China during 1993–2005. Women whose height and weight\\u000a information was recorded at the first prenatal visit in the first trimester of pregnancy and delivered a singleton live

Ting WangJun; Jun Zhang; Xinrong Lu; Wei Xi; Zhu Li

250

Duration of Lactation and Risk Factors for Maternal Cardiovascular Disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

disease. METHODS: We examined data from 139,681 postmeno- pausal women (median age 63 years) who reported at least one live birth on enrolling in the Women's Health Initiative observational study or controlled trials. Multi- variable models were used to control for sociodemo- graphic (age, parity, race, education, income, age at menopause), lifestyle, and family history variables when examining the effect

Eleanor Bimla Schwarz; Roberta M. Ray; Alison M. Stuebe; Matthew A. Allison; Roberta B. Ness; Matthew S. Freiberg; Jane A. Cauley

2009-01-01

251

Evidence of gene-environment interaction for the IRF6 gene and maternal multivitamin supplementation in controlling the risk of cleft lip with/without cleft palate  

PubMed Central

Although multiple genes have been identified as genetic risk factors for isolated, non-syndromic cleft lip with/without cleft palate (CL/P), a complex and heterogeneous birth defect, interferon regulatory factor 6 gene (IRF6) is one of the best documented genetic risk factors. In this study, we tested for association between markers in IRF6 and CL/P in 326 Chinese case–parent trios, considering gene–environment interaction for two common maternal exposures, and parent-of-origin effects. CL/P case–parent trios from three sites in mainland China and Taiwan were genotyped for 22 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in IRF6. The transmission disequilibrium test was used to test for marginal effects of individual SNPs. We used PBAT to screen the SNPs and haplotypes for gene–environment (G × E) interaction and conditional logistic regression models to quantify effect sizes for SNP–environment interaction. After Bonferroni correction, 14 SNPs showed statistically significant association with CL/P. Evidence of G × E interaction was found for both maternal exposures, multivitamin supplementation and environmental tobacco smoke (ETS). Two SNPs showed evidence of interaction with multivitamin supplementation in conditional logistic regression models (rs2076153 nominal P = 0.019, rs17015218 nominal P = 0.012). In addition, rs1044516 yielded evidence for interaction with maternal ETS (nominal P = 0.041). Haplotype analysis using PBAT also suggested interaction between SNPs in IRF6 and both multivitamin supplementation and ETS. However, no evidence for maternal genotypic effects or significant parent-of-origin effects was seen in these data. These results suggest IRF6 gene may influence risk of CL/P through interaction with multivitamin supplementation and ETS in the Chinese population. PMID:20652317

Wu, Tao; Liang, Kung Yee; Hetmanski, Jacqueline B.; Ruczinski, Ingo; Fallin, Margaret Daniele; Ingersoll, Roxann G.; Wang, Hong; Huang, Shangzhi; Ye, Xiaoqian; Wu-Chou, Yah-Huei; Chen, Philip K.; Jabs, Ethylin W.; Shi, Bing; Redett, Richard; Scott, Alan F.

2010-01-01

252

The Maternally Expressed WRKY Transcription Factor TTG2 Controls Lethality in Interploidy Crosses of Arabidopsis  

PubMed Central

The molecular mechanisms underlying lethality of F1 hybrids between diverged parents are one target of speciation research. Crosses between diploid and tetraploid individuals of the same genotype can result in F1 lethality, and this dosage-sensitive incompatibility plays a role in polyploid speciation. We have identified variation in F1 lethality in interploidy crosses of Arabidopsis thaliana and determined the genetic architecture of the maternally expressed variation via QTL mapping. A single large-effect QTL, DR. STRANGELOVE 1 (DSL1), was identified as well as two QTL with epistatic relationships to DSL1. DSL1 affects the rate of postzygotic lethality via expression in the maternal sporophyte. Fine mapping placed DSL1 in an interval encoding the maternal effect transcription factor TTG2. Maternal parents carrying loss-of-function mutations in TTG2 suppressed the F1 lethality caused by paternal excess interploidy crosses. The frequency of cellularization in the endosperm was similarly affected by both natural variation and ttg2 loss-of-function mutants. The simple genetic basis of the natural variation and effects of single-gene mutations suggests that F1 lethality in polyploids could evolve rapidly. Furthermore, the role of the sporophytically active TTG2 gene in interploidy crosses indicates that the developmental programming of the mother regulates the viability of interploidy hybrid offspring. PMID:19071961

Dilkes, Brian P; Spielman, Melissa; Weizbauer, Renate; Watson, Brian; Burkart-Waco, Diana; Scott, Rod J; Comai, Luca

2008-01-01

253

Maternal leptin, adiponectin, resistin, visfatin and tumor necrosis factor-alpha in normal and gestational diabetes.  

PubMed

Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a common medical complication associated with pregnancy. The present study evaluates the changes in maternal adipocytokines (leptin, adiponectin, resistin, visfatin and tumor necrosis factor-alpha; TNF-?) in pregnancy complicated with GDM compared to normal pregnancy at 2nd and 3rd trimesters. The study included total number of 142 pregnant women classified into 4 groups: normal pregnancy (n = 33) and pregnancy with GDM (n = 24) both at 2nd trimester and normal pregnancy (n = 38) and GDM (n = 47) at 3rd trimester. Both GDM groups were significantly presented with elevated body mass index, fasting blood sugar and abnormal oral glucose tolerance test compared to their matched control. Results indicated reduction in maternal serum leptin and adiponectin in GDM compared to normal pregnancy at 3rd trimester. Elevated resistin and TNF-? were evident among pregnancy complicated with GDM at both tested trimesters. On the other hand, significant elevation in maternal visfatin was noted between GDM and matched control at 2nd trimester only. Significant increase in maternal leptin and visfatin and resistin was noted by advances in gestational period in healthy pregnancy. On the other hand, reduced adiponectin and elevated visfatin mean values were noticed in GDM at 3rd compared to 2nd trimester. It could be concluded that increased insulin resistance accompanies GDM is associated with suppressed leptin and adiponectin and increased resistin and TNF-? which might suggest their involvement in the development of GDM. PMID:25298627

Noureldeen, Amani F H; Qusti, Safaa Y; Al-Seeni, Madeha N; Bagais, Maram H

2014-10-01

254

Childhood conduct disorder trajectories, prior risk factors and cannabis use at age 16: birth cohort study  

PubMed Central

AimsTo investigate the prevalence of cannabis use and problem use in boys and girls at age 16 years, and to investigate the role of adversity in early life and of conduct disorder between the ages of 4 and 13 years as risk factors for these outcomes. DesignBirth cohort study. SettingEngland. ParticipantsA total of 4159 (2393 girls) participants in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) birth cohort providing information on cannabis use at age 16. MeasurementsCannabis use and problem cannabis use at age 16 were assessed by postal questionnaire. Material adversity, maternal substance use, maternal mental health and child conduct disorder were all assessed by maternal report. FindingsCannabis use was more common among girls than boys (21.4% versus 18.3%, P?=?0.005). Problem cannabis use was more common in boys than girls (3.6% versus 2.8%, P?=?0.007). Early-onset persistent conduct problems were associated strongly with problem cannabis use [odds ratio (OR)?=?6.46, 95% confidence interval (CI)?=?4.06–10.28]. Residence in subsidized housing (OR?=?3.10, 95% CI?=?1.95, 4.92); maternal cannabis use (OR 8.84, 95% CI 5.64–13.9) and any maternal smoking in the postnatal period (OR?=?2.69, 95% CI?=?1.90–3.81) all predicted problem cannabis use. Attributable risks for adolescent problem cannabis use associated with the above factors were 25, 13, 17 and 24%, respectively. ConclusionsMaternal smoking and cannabis use, early material disadvantage and early-onset persistent conduct problems are important risk factors for adolescent problem cannabis use. This may have implications for prevention. PMID:23734913

Heron, Jon; Barker, Edward D; Joinson, Carol; Lewis, Glyn; Hickman, Matthew; Munafo, Marcus; Macleod, John

2013-01-01

255

Pregnancy characteristics and maternal breast cancer risk: a review of the epidemiologic literature  

PubMed Central

The short- and long-term effects of pregnancy on breast cancer risk are well documented. Insight into potential biological mechanisms for these associations may be gained by studying breast cancer risk and pregnancy characteristics (e.g., preeclampsia, twining), which may reflect hormone levels during pregnancy. To date, no review has synthesized the published literature for pregnancy characteristics and maternal breast cancer using systematic search methods. We conducted a systematic search to identify all published studies. Using PUBMED (to 31 July 2009), 42 relevant articles were identified. Several studies suggest that multiple births may be associated with a lowered breast cancer risk of about 10–30%, but results were inconsistent across 18 studies. The majority of 13 studies suggest about a 20–30% reduction in risk with preeclampsia and/or gestational hypertension. Six of seven studies reported no association for infant sex and breast cancer risk. Data are sparse and conflicting for other pregnancy characteristics such as gestational age, fetal growth, pregnancy weight gain, gestational diabetes, and placental abnormalities. The most consistent findings in a generally sparse literature are that multiple births and preeclampsia may modestly reduce breast cancer risk. Additional research is needed to elucidate associations between pregnancy characteristics, related hormonal profiles, and breast cancer risk. PMID:20224871

Paneth, Nigel; Velie, Ellen M.

2013-01-01

256

Maternal Serum B 12 Levels and Risk for Neural Tube Defects in a Texas-Mexico Border Population  

Microsoft Academic Search

PURPOSE: Neural tube defects (NTDs) are common birth defects that can be prevented with folate fortification and supplementation. Studies suggest that other nutrients may also be essential to neural tube closure and have a potential role in risk reduction, with vitamin B12 mentioned most often. We determined the effect of maternal serum B12 levels, measured postpartum, on the risk of

Lucina Suarez; Kate Hendricks; Marilyn Felkner; Elaine Gunter

2003-01-01

257

Genetic Insights into Cardiometabolic Risk Factors  

PubMed Central

Many biochemical traits are recognised as risk factors, which contribute to or predict the development of disease. Only a few are in widespread use, usually to assist with treatment decisions and motivate behavioural change. The greatest effort has gone into evaluation of risk factors for cardiovascular disease and/or diabetes, with substantial overlap as ‘cardiometabolic’ risk. Over the past few years many genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have sought to account for variation in risk factors, with the expectation that identifying relevant polymorphisms would improve our understanding or prediction of disease; others have taken the direct approach of genomic case-control studies for the corresponding diseases. Large GWAS have been published for coronary heart disease and Type 2 diabetes, and also for associated biomarkers or risk factors including body mass index, lipids, C-reactive protein, urate, liver function tests, glucose and insulin. Results are not encouraging for personal risk prediction based on genotyping, mainly because known risk loci only account for a small proportion of risk. Overlap of allelic associations between disease and marker, as found for low density lipoprotein cholesterol and heart disease, supports a causal association, but in other cases genetic studies have cast doubt on accepted risk factors. Some loci show unexpected effects on multiple markers or diseases. An intriguing feature of risk factors is the blurring of categories shown by the correlation between them and the genetic overlap between diseases previously thought of as distinct. GWAS can provide insight into relationships between risk factors, biomarkers and diseases, with potential for new approaches to disease classification. PMID:24659834

Whitfield, John B

2014-01-01

258

Cardiovascular risk factors and future risk of Alzheimer's disease.  

PubMed

Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disorder in elderly people, but there are still no curative options. Senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles are considered hallmarks of AD, but cerebrovascular pathology is also common. In this review, we summarize findings on cardiovascular disease (CVD) and risk factors in the etiology of AD. Firstly, we discuss the association of clinical CVD (such as stroke and heart disease) and AD. Secondly, we summarize the relation between imaging makers of pre-clinical vascular disease and AD. Lastly, we discuss the association of cardiovascular risk factors and AD. We discuss both established cardiovascular risk factors and emerging putative risk factors, which exert their effect partly via CVD. PMID:25385322

de Bruijn, Renée Fag; Ikram, M Arfan

2014-01-01

259

Adiponectin is present in human milk and is associated with maternal factors1-3  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background:Previousstudieshaveshownthathumanmilkhasarole inthegastrointestinal,neural,andimmunedevelopmentofneonates.If present in milk, adiponectin would be a promising candidate for influ- encing infant development, given its metabolic functions. Objectives: Our objectives were to determine whether adiponectin is present in human milk and to characterize maternal factors asso- ciated with potential variation in milk adiponectin concentrations. Design: We quantified adiponectin concentrations in human milk samples from donors to the

Lisa J Martin; Jessica G Woo; Sheela R Geraghty; Mekibib Altaye; Barbara S Davidson; Walter Banach; Lawrence M Dolan; Guillermo M Ruiz-Palacios; Ardythe L Morrow

260

Small Business Failure and External Risk Factors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Unlike much of the previous literature, which has generally focused on internal risk factors, this study seeks to explore the impact of macro-economic factors on small business mortality. The results suggest that economic factors appear to be associated with between 30% and 50% of small business failures, depending on the definition of failure used. As expected, failure rates were positively

Jim Everett; John Watson

1998-01-01

261

Risk factors for thrombosis in Serbian children.  

PubMed

Venous and arterial thromboses are increasingly encountered in the pediatric population. We present results of a case-control study of inherited and acquired risk factors for thrombosis in 129 pediatric patients from the first day of life to 18 years. The aims of study were to determine the importance of thrombophilic risk factors and comorbidity as a cause of thrombosis in children. Single thrombophilic risk factor was found in 24.4% (n?=?21), whereas combined thrombophilic factors were found in 15.1% (n?=?13) patients. A total of 87.2% of the children had recognized thrombophilic risk factors for thrombosis and/or additional comorbid risk factors. The single independent risk factors for thrombosis were mutation of factor V Leiden (P?=?0.021), lupus anticoagulant antibodies (P?=?0.028), and comorbidity (P?=?0.000). Mutation of factor V Leiden [odds ratio (OR), 6.2 (95% confidence interval, CI 1.1-38.1, P?=?0.048] was found to be a risk factor for venous thrombosis. Lupus anticoagulant antibodies were related to both venous (P?=?0.008) and arterial thrombosis (P?=?0.016). The frequency of inherited thrombophilic factors were the same in neonates and adolescents (23%). The prothrombotic gene mutations were present in 18.6% (n?=?8) of asymptomatic children. Our study confirms that thrombosis in children is a multifactorial disorder, and associated most with the underlying medical disease (comorbidity) for vein thrombosis [OR, 18.6 (95% CI 3.7-93.4), P?=?0.000] and for arterial thrombosis [OR, 10.5 (95% CI 2.2-49.9) P?=?0.003]. Inherited thrombophilic disorders contributed to the development of thrombosis in children. PMID:24030120

Serbic-Nonkovic, Olivera M; Kuzmanovic, Milos B; Rakicevic, Ljiljana B; Djordjevic, Valentina J; Veljkovic, Dobrila K; Prijic, Sergej M; Kovacevic, Gordana S; Rakonjac, Zorica M; Kosutic, Jovan Lj; Vujic, Dragana S; Micic, Dragan V; Jankovic, Borisav Z; Radojkovic, Dragica P

2014-01-01

262

Risk factors for the delivery of macrosomic infants at the university hospital of the west indies.  

PubMed

Objective?The aim of this study is to determine the risk factors for the delivery of macrosomic infants at the University Hospital of the West Indies over a 3-year period. Design and Methods?A retrospective, descriptive, case-controlled study was performed. Data were extracted from the maternal medical records of 316 macrosomic infants (weighing???4,000 g) and 316 controls (weighing from 2,500-3,999 g) delivered at the University Hospital of the West Indies. Descriptive analyses were performed comparing maternal characteristics between the two groups. Risk factors were determined using multiple logistic regression models. Results?The incidence of macrosomia for the study period was 4.3%. Women who delivered a macrosomic infant were older, taller, and heavier with a greater body mass index at the start of the pregnancy and gained more weight during pregnancy than their counterparts in the control group (p?Maternal obesity, height?>?164 cm, abnormalities of glucose control, weight gain?>?15?kg, gestational age?>?40 weeks, and male gender of the infant were found to increase the risk of delivering a macrosomic infant by over 2-fold (p?risk factor was that of having had a previous macrosomic infant which increased the risk of delivering a macrosomic infant by as much as 6-fold (adjusted odds ratio, 6.0; 95% confidence interval, 1.9-18.7). Conclusion?The maternal risk factors for fetal macrosomia identified in this study mirror those of previous studies. PMID:24792768

Richardson, C; Trotman, H

2014-11-01

263

Evaluation of Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Risk Factors  

PubMed Central

Background. Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is one of the most common psychiatric disorders among children. The aim of this study was to evaluate risk factors for ADHD in children. Method. In this case-control study, 404 children between 4 and 11 years old were selected by cluster sampling method from preschool children (208 patients as cases and 196 controls). All the participants were interviewed by a child and adolescent psychiatrist to survey risk factors of ADHD. Results. Among cases, 59.3% of children were boys and 38.4% were girls, which is different to that in control group with 40.7% boys and 61.6% girls. The chi-square showed statistically significance (P value < 0.0001). The other significant factors by chi-square were fathers' somatic or psychiatric disease (P value < 0.0001), history of trauma and accident during pregnancy (P value = 0.039), abortion proceeds (P value < 0.0001), unintended pregnancy (P value < 0.0001), and history of head trauma (P value < 0.0001). Conclusions. Findings of our study suggest that maternal and paternal adverse events were associated with ADHD symptoms, but breast feeding is a protective factor. PMID:24319465

Golmirzaei, Javad; Namazi, Shole; Amiri, Shahrokh; Zare, Shahram; Rastikerdar, Najme; Hesam, Ali Akbar; Rahami, Zahra; Ghasemian, Fatemeh; Namazi, Seyyed Shojaeddin; Paknahad, Abbas; Mahmudi, Forugh; Mahboobi, Hamidreza; Khorgoei, Tahereh; Niknejad, Bahareh; Dehghani, Fatemeh; Asadi, Shima

2013-01-01

264

Maternal Age at First Birth and Boys' Risk for Conduct Disorder.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Studied multigenerational links between maternal history of problem behavior, mother's age at birth of first child, and child conduct disorder in boys. Found that maternal age at first birth was associated with child's conduct disorder, and maternal history of problem behavior was also associated with early maternal age at first birth and the…

Wakschlag, Lauren S.; Gordon, Rachel A.; Lahey, Benjamin B.; Loeber, Rolf; Green, Stephanie M.; Leventhal, Bennett L.

2000-01-01

265

Major Risk Factors for Heart Disease: Diabetes  

MedlinePLUS

... risk factors include physical inactivity and a family history of diabetes. Type 2 diabetes also is more common among American Indians, Hispanic Americans, African Americans, Asian Americans, and Pacific Islanders. Women who have had ...

266

Behavioral Risk Factors for AIDS among Adolescents.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document examines the incidence of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) among adolescents in the United States and identifies several risk factors for AIDS among this population. It classifies adolescents' risk for contracting human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection by the degree to which adolescents engage in behaviors that are…

Millstein, Susan G.

267

Improving risk factor modification: A global approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

Despite recent advances in treating cardiovascular disease, many of the predisposing risk factors for heart disease are increasing\\u000a in prevalence, raising concern that heart disease rates may rise in the years to come. When faced with the range of risk factors\\u000a such as obesity, smoking, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and diabetes, the clinician needs to address all components. After\\u000a assessing an individual

Tshaka Muchiteni; William B. Borden

2009-01-01

268

Individual risk factors for school bullying  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article reviews individual risk factors for bullying, especially gender, age, aggressiveness, low intelligence and achievement, hyperactivity-impulsiveness, low empathy, low self-esteem, depression, unpopularity, and physical and biological features. It also reports individual, family and socio-economic predictors and correlates of bullying discovered in a longitudinal survey of 411 London boys. The most important individual risk factors are low impulsiveness and low

David P Farrington; Anna Costanza Baldry

2010-01-01

269

Risk Factors for Injuries in Football  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: The injury risk in football is high, but little is known about causes of injury.Purpose: To identify risk factors for football injuries using a multivariate model.Study Design: Prospective cohort study.Methods: Participants were 306 male football players from the two highest divisions in Iceland. Before the 1999 football season started, the following factors were examined: height, weight, body composition, flexibility,

Arni Arnason; Stefan B. Sigurdsson; Arni Gudmundsson; Ingar Holme; Lars Engebretsen; Roald Bahr

2004-01-01

270

Early pregnancy sex steroids and maternal risk of epithelial ovarian cancer.  

PubMed

Well-established associations between reproductive characteristics and epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) support an involvement of sex steroid hormones in the etiology of EOC. Limited previous studies have evaluated circulating androgens and the risk of EOC, and estrogens and progesterone have been investigated in only one of the previous studies. Furthermore, there is little data on potential heterogeneity in the association between circulating hormones and EOC by histological subgroup. Therefore, we conducted a nested case-control study within the Finnish Maternity Cohort and the Northern Sweden Maternity Cohort to investigate the associations between circulating pre-diagnostic sex steroid concentrations and the histological subtypes of EOC. We identified 1052 EOC cases among cohort members diagnosed after recruitment (1975-2008) and before March 2011. Up to three controls were individually matched to each case (n=2694). Testosterone, androstenedione, 17-hydroxyprogesterone (17-OHP), progesterone, estradiol (E2), and sex hormone-binding globulin levels were measured in serum samples collected during the last pregnancy before EOC diagnosis. We used conditional logistic regression to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% CIs. Associations between hormones and EOC differed with respect to tumor histology and invasiveness. Sex steroid concentrations were not associated with invasive serous tumors; however, doubling of testosterone and 17-OHP concentration was associated with approximately 40% increased risk of borderline serous tumors. A doubling of androgen concentrations was associated with a 50% increased risk of mucinous tumors. The risk of endometrioid tumors increased with higher E2 concentrations (OR: 1.89 (1.20-2.98)). This large prospective study in pregnant women supports a role of sex steroid hormones in the etiology of EOC arising in the ovaries. PMID:25270324

Schock, Helena; Surcel, Heljä-Marja; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Grankvist, Kjell; Lakso, Hans-Åke; Fortner, Renée Turzanski; Kaaks, Rudolf; Pukkala, Eero; Lehtinen, Matti; Toniolo, Paolo; Lundin, Eva

2014-12-01

271

Maternal use of oral contraceptives and risk of hypospadias - a population-based case-control study.  

PubMed

The aim of this population-based case-control study was to examine the risk of isolated hypospadias in boys born to mothers who have used oral contraceptives in early pregnancy. The study was based on data from the Hungarian Case-Control Surveillance of Congenital Abnormalities from 1980 to 1996, and included 3,038 boys with hypospadias (cases), 24,799 boys without congenital abnormalities (CA-free controls), and 11,881 boys with abnormalities other than hypospadias. We used unconditional logistic regression to adjust for birth order, maternal age, maternal employment status, maternal diabetes, and pre-eclampsia. When comparing cases with CA-free controls the OR for maternal use of OC was 1.21 (95% CI: 0.67-2.17). When comparing cases with boys with other abnormalities, the OR for maternal use of OC was 0.83 (95% CI: 0.46-1.50). Our data showed that self-reported maternal use of oral contraceptives during pregnancy was not associated with an increased risk of hypospadias in the offspring. PMID:17077991

Wogelius, Pia; Horváth-Puhó, Erzsébet; Pedersen, Lars; Nørgaard, Mette; Czeizel, Andrew E; Sørensen, Henrik Toft

2006-01-01

272

Risk Factors of Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma  

PubMed Central

Introduction Despite decades of intensive research, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL) remains poorly understood and is largely incurable. NHL is a heterogeneous group of malignancies with multiple subtypes, each of which has distinct morphologic, immunophenotypic, and clinical features. Identifying the risk factors for NHL may improve our understanding of the underlying biological mechanisms and have an impact on clinical practice. Areas covered This article provides a review of several aspects of NHL, including epidemiology and subtype classification, clinical, environmental, genetic, and genomic risk factors identified for etiology and prognosis, and available statistical and bioinformatics tools for identification of genetic and genomic risk factors from the analysis of high-throughput studies. Expert opinion Multiple clinical and environmental risk factors have been identified. However, they have failed to provide practically effective prediction. Genetic and genomic risk factors identified from high-throughput studies have suffered a lack of reproducibility. The identification of genetic/genomic risk factors demands innovative statistical and bioinformatics tools. Although multiple analysis methods have been developed, there is still room for improvement. There is a critical need for well-designed, prospective, large-scale pangenomic studies. PMID:22059093

Zhang, Yawei; Dai, Ying; Zheng, Tongzhang; Ma, Shuangge

2011-01-01

273

Psychological Risk Factors in Headache  

PubMed Central

Headache is a chronic disease that occurs with varying frequency and results in varying levels of disability. To date, the majority of research and clinical focus has been on the role of biological factors in headache and headache-related disability. However, reliance on a purely biomedical model of headache does not account for all aspects of headache and associated disability. Using a biopsychosocial framework, the current manuscript expands the view of what factors influence headache by considering the role psychological (i.e., cognitive and affective) factors have in the development, course, and consequences of headache. The manuscript initially reviews evidence showing that neural circuits responsible for cognitive–affective phenomena are highly interconnected with the circuitry responsible for headache pain. The manuscript then reviews the influence cognitions (locus of control and self-efficacy) and negative affect (depression, anxiety, and anger) have on the development of headache attacks, perception of headache pain, adherence to prescribed treatment, headache treatment outcome, and headache-related disability. The manuscript concludes with a discussion of the clinical implications of considering psychological factors when treating headache. PMID:17371358

Nicholson, Robert A.; Houle, Timothy T.; Rhudy, Jamie L.; Norton, Peter J.

2008-01-01

274

Risk Factors for Children's Receptive Vocabulary Development from Four to Eight Years in the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children  

PubMed Central

Receptive vocabulary develops rapidly in early childhood and builds the foundation for language acquisition and literacy. Variation in receptive vocabulary ability is associated with variation in children's school achievement, and low receptive vocabulary ability is a risk factor for under-achievement at school. In this study, bivariate and multivariate growth curve modelling was used to estimate trajectories of receptive vocabulary development in relation to a wide range of candidate child, maternal and family level influences on receptive vocabulary development from 4–8 years. The study sample comprised 4332 children from the first nationally representative Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (LSAC). Predictors were modeled as risk variables with the lowest level of risk as the reference category. In the multivariate model, risks for receptive vocabulary delay at 4 years, in order of magnitude, were: Maternal Non- English Speaking Background (NESB), low school readiness, child not read to at home, four or more siblings, low family income, low birthweight, low maternal education, maternal mental health distress, low maternal parenting consistency, and high child temperament reactivity. None of these risks were associated with a lower rate of growth from 4–8 years. Instead, maternal NESB, low school readiness and maternal mental health distress were associated with a higher rate of growth, although not sufficient to close the receptive vocabulary gap for children with and without these risks at 8 years. Socio-economic area disadvantage, was not a risk for low receptive vocabulary ability at 4 years but was the only risk associated with a lower rate of growth in receptive vocabulary ability. At 8 years, the gap between children with and without socio-economic area disadvantage was equivalent to eight months of receptive vocabulary growth. These results are consistent with other studies that have shown that social gradients in children's developmental outcomes increase over time. PMID:24039856

Taylor, Catherine L.; Christensen, Daniel; Lawrence, David; Mitrou, Francis; Zubrick, Stephen R.

2013-01-01

275

Risk factors for childhood malnutrition in Roma settlements in Serbia  

PubMed Central

Background Children living in Roma settlements in Central and Eastern Europe face extreme levels of social exclusion and poverty, but their health status has not been well studied. The objective of this study was to elucidate risk factors for malnutrition in children in Roma settlements in Serbia. Methods Anthropometric and sociodemographic measures were obtained for 1192 Roma children under five living in Roma settlements from the 2005 Serbia Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey. Multiple logistic regression was used to relate family and child characteristics to the odds of stunting, wasting, and underweight. Results The prevalence of stunting, wasting, and underweight was 20.1%, 4.3%, and 8.0%, respectively. Nearly all of the children studied fell into the lowest quintile of wealth for the overall population of Serbia. Children in the lowest quintile of wealth were four times more likely to be stunted compared to those in the highest quintile, followed by those in the second lowest quintile (AOR = 2.1) and lastly by those in the middle quintile (AOR = 1.6). Children who were ever left in the care of an older child were almost twice as likely to stunted as those were not. Children living in urban settlements showed a clear disadvantage with close to three times the likelihood of being wasted compared to those living in rural areas. There was a suggestion that maternal, but not paternal, education was associated with stunting, and maternal literacy was significantly associated with wasting. Whether children were ever breastfed, immunized or had diarrhoeal episodes in the past two weeks did not show strong correlations to children malnutrition status in this Roma population. Conclusions There exists a gradient relationship between household wealth and stunting even within impoverished settlements, indicating that among poor and marginalized populations socioeconomic inequities in child health should be addressed. Other areas on which to focus future research and public health intervention include maternal literacy, child endangerment practices, and urban settlements. PMID:20727212

2010-01-01

276

Polymorphisms of haemostasis genes as risk factors for preterm delivery.  

PubMed

Clinical trials evaluating the potential benefit of anticoagulant treatment in pregnant women with inherited thrombophilia are based on the observation that a genetic predisposition to thrombosis is associated with frequent abortions and preterm birth. It was the aim of our study to delineate the impact of genetic polymorphisms with prothrombotic and antithrombotic effects on the occurrence of preterm birth in a large cohort of very-low-birth-weight (VLBW)-infants and their mothers. We examined the factor V Leiden and the prothrombin G20210A mutation, the factor VII 121del/ins and the factor XIII Val34Leu polymorphism in preterm very-low-birth-weight (VLBW, n=593) and term-born-infants (n=278) and their mothers (n=785). The primary outcome was preterm vs.term birth. From all polymorphisms tested, the maternal factor VII-121del/ins polymorphism (26.2 vs. 17.6 %; p=0.009) and the infant's factor VII-121del/ins polymorphism (29.0 vs. 20.0 %; p=0.009) were more frequent in singleton VLBW and their mothers compared to term infants and their mothers. Furthermore, the frequency of the factor XIII-Val34Leu polymorphism was significantly lower in singleton VLBW than in term infant controls (5.1 vs. 9.6%, p=0.025). In a multivariate regression analysis, previous preterm delivery (OR=3.8, 95% CI: 1.7-8.4), the maternal carrier status of the factor-VII-121del/ins polymorphism (OR=1.7, 95% CI: 1.12-2.5, p=0.007) and the lower frequency of infant's factor-XIII-Val34Leu polymorphism (OR=0.53; 95% CI: 0.29-0.96; p=0.038) were found to be independently associated with preterm delivery. InVLBW mothers with pathological CTG as cause of preterm delivery, the frequency of factor V Leiden mutation was significantly increased compared to VLBW mothers without pathological CTG (14.1 vs. 6.1%, p=0.01). The investigated haemostasis gene polymorphisms have a much lower impact on subsequent preterm delivery than known risk factors such as previous preterm birth. The reported association of the factor-VII-121del/ins polymorphism on preterm delivery and its clinical relevance needs to be further elucidated. PMID:16113789

Härtel, Christoph; von Otte, Sören; Koch, Julia; Ahrens, Peter; Kattner, Evelyn; Segerer, Hugo; Möller, Jens; Diedrich, Klaus; Göpel, Wolfgang

2005-07-01

277

Risk Factors for Buruli Ulcer, Benin  

PubMed Central

We identified risk factors for Buruli ulcer (BU) in Benin in an unmatched case-control study at the Centre Sanitaire et Nutritionnel Gbemoten in southern Benin. A total of 2,399 persons admitted from 1997 through 2003 and 1,444 unmatched patients with other conditions in 2002 were recruited. Adjusted odds ratios were determined for age, sex, place of residence, Mycobacterium bovis BCG vaccination at birth, type of water for domestic use, and occupation. Children <15 years of age and adults >49 years of age had a higher risk for BU. Use of unprotected water from swamps was associated with increased risk for BU; this association was strongest in adults >49 years of age. Sex was not a risk factor for BU. Our data showed that BU was mainly associated with age, place of residence, and water sources in all age groups. Risk for BU was higher in BCG-vaccinated patients >5 years of age. PMID:17073079

Debacker, Martine; Portaels, Francoise; Aguiar, Julia; Steunou, Christian; Zinsou, Claude; Meyers, Wayne

2006-01-01

278

Environmental risk factors for inflammatory bowel disease.  

PubMed

Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) are chronic immunologically mediated diseases that often have a relapsing-remitting course in young persons. Genetic-risk polymorphisms explain less than one third of the heritability of disease. Epidemiologic and laboratory data suggest that environmental factors play a significant role in influencing the risk and natural history of disease. Smoking is the most widely and consistently described risk factor. It, however, increases the risk of CD while conferring protection against UC. The gut microbiome is a key component in the development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Several external factors potentially exert an effect by influencing the composition of the gut microbiome or disrupting the intestinal barrier. These external influences include the use of antibiotics or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and the presence of enteric infections. Data on diet have been inconsistent, but high fiber intake, particularly of soluble fiber, appears to protect against CD, whereas protein intake may increase disease risk. Vitamin D may also play an important protective role, particularly in patients with CD. Neurobehavioral factors, such as stress and depression, also influence the risk of IBD. Systematic and rigorous studies of environmental exposures in the management of IBD are needed. In particular, studies of whether environmental factors can be modified to reduce the likelihood of relapse or improve patient outcomes would be valuable. PMID:23935543

Ananthakrishnan, Ashwin N

2013-06-01

279

Maternal Characteristics Predicting Young Girls' Disruptive Behavior  

PubMed Central

Little is known about the relative predictive utility of maternal characteristics and parenting skills on the development of girls’ disruptive behavior. The current study used five waves of parent and child-report data from the ongoing Pittsburgh Girls Study to examine these relationships in a sample of 1,942 girls from age 7 to 12 years. Multivariate Generalized Estimating Equation (GEE) analyses indicated that European American race, mother’s prenatal nicotine use, maternal depression, maternal conduct problems prior to age 15, and low maternal warmth explained unique variance. Maladaptive parenting partly mediated the effects of maternal depression and maternal conduct problems. Both current and early maternal risk factors have an impact on young girls’ disruptive behavior, providing support for the timing and focus of the prevention of girls’ disruptive behavior. PMID:21391016

van der Molen, Elsa; Hipwell, Alison E.; Vermeiren, Robert; Loeber, Rolf

2011-01-01

280

Protective Factors as Moderators of Risk Factors in Adolescence Bullying  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study examined the role played by protective factors in moderating the effects of risk factors over bullying and victimization in a sample of 679 male adolescents recruited in Italian high schools. Boys’ involvement in bullying revealed that one in three students has bullied others at least sometimes in the previous three months, and one in six has been

Anna C. Baldry; David P. Farrington

2005-01-01

281

Maternal exposure to magnetic fields from high-voltage power lines and the risk of birth defects.  

PubMed

The issue of adverse human health effects due to exposure to electromagnetic fields is still unclear, and congenital anomalies are among the outcomes that have been inconsistently associated with such exposure. We conducted a population-based, case-control study to examine the risk of congenital anomalies associated with maternal exposure to magnetic fields (MF) from high-voltage power lines during pregnancy in a community in northern Italy. We identified 228 cases of congenital malformations diagnosed in live births, stillbirths, and induced abortions among women living in the municipality of Reggio Emilia during the period 1998-2006, and a reference group of healthy newborns was matched for year of birth, maternal age, and hospital of birth. We identified maternal residence during early pregnancy and used Geographic Information System to determine whether the residences were within geocoded corridors with MF ?0.1 ?T near high-voltage power lines, then calculated the relative risk (RR) of congenital anomalies associated with maternal exposure. One case and 5 control mothers were classified as exposed, and the RR associated with MF ?0.1 ?T was 0.2 (95% CI: 0.0-2.0) after adjusting for maternal education. While small or moderate effects may have gone undetected due to low statistical power, the results of this study overall do not provide support for major effects of a teratogenic risk due to exposure to MF during early pregnancy. PMID:22826845

Malagoli, Carlotta; Crespi, Catherine M; Rodolfi, Rossella; Signorelli, Carlo; Poli, Maurizio; Zanichelli, Paolo; Fabbi, Sara; Teggi, Sergio; Garavelli, Livia; Astolfi, Gianni; Calzolari, Elisa; Lucenti, Carlo; Vinceti, Marco

2012-07-01

282

Cannabis use motives and personality risk factors.  

PubMed

According to the model of substance abuse of Conrod, Pihl, Stewart, and Dongier (2000), four personality factors (i.e., anxiety sensitivity [AS], introversion/hopelessness [I/H], sensation seeking [SS], and impulsivity [IMP]) are associated with elevated risk for substance use/misuse, with each personality factor being related to preference for particular drugs of abuse (e.g., AS with anxiolytics). However, cannabis use has not been consistently linked to any one of these personality factors. This may be due to the heterogeneity in cannabis use motives. The present study explored the association between these four personality risk factors and different cannabis use motives. Cannabis users completed an interview about their motives for cannabis use as well as the self-report Substance Use Risk Profile Scale (SURPS; Woicik, Conrod, Stewart, & Pihl, 2009), which measures the four personality risk factors. Results showed that AS was associated with conformity motives and I/H was associated with coping motives for cannabis use. SS was positively associated with expansion motives and IMP was associated with drug availability motives. Thus, personality risk factors in the model of Conrod et al. (2000) are associated with distinct cannabis use motives in a pattern consistent with theory. PMID:24368004

Hecimovic, Karen; Barrett, Sean P; Darredeau, Christine; Stewart, Sherry H

2014-03-01

283

Common risk factors in bank stocks  

E-print Network

with market, size, and value factors. The small-minus-big portfolio SMB, mimicking the size risk factor, is constructed as the monthly difference between the simple average of the returns on the three small-ME portfolios (S/L, S/M, and S/H) and the simple...- term corporate bonds (Aaa/Baa) and the yield of a market portfolio of long-term government bonds at the end of period t. t SMB = Small minus big portfolio that mimics the size risk factor at the end of period t. t HML = High minus low...

Viale, Ariel Marcelo

2007-09-17

284

Correlation between maternal hepatitis B surface antigen carrier status with social, medical and family factors in an endemic area: have we overlooked something?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose  Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is endemic in many countries, but the risk factors for HBV carriage in the obstetric population\\u000a are unclear.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  A survey on 1,580 women attending the antenatal clinic in an endemic region was conducted in order to examine the prevalence\\u000a of and factors associated with maternal HBV carriage, including socio-demographic, medical, and previous obstetrical and family

O. K. Chan; T. T. Lao; S. S. H. Suen; T. K. Lau; T. Y. Leung

285

[Risk factor asbestos (author's transl)].  

PubMed

In the G.D.R. asbestos is used at a large industrial scale. The material is of interest for oncologists and industrial hygienists due to its fibrogenic and cancerogenic potencies. Both carcinomas of the respiratory organs and the rare malignant mesotheliomas are accepted as occupational diseases due to asbestos. In a retrospective study 915 cases of malignant mesotheliomas covered by the National Cancer Registry over a period of 6 years--all histologically established--were analysed. 36.7% originated from occupational handling of asbestos, 0.8% by non-occupational asbestos contacts. In another 9.1% of the cases asbestos may have been the underlying cause. 33.7% have had no asbestos contact; for 19.7% the data available were insufficient. Among the asbestos-containing materials used packing and insulating materials were prevailing in 47.7%, asbestos-containing talc in 19.6%. In 6.9% of the cases mesothelioma affection was due to wearing fire protective clothing. Different duration of exposure and especially long latency periods demonstrates difficulties interpreting the results concerning the relation between working conditions and illness. Primary (technical) prevention by reduction of asbestos dust emission, limited use of asbestos and lifelong monitoring of asbestos workers are necessary to reduce the tumour risk. PMID:7337538

Konetzke, G W; Beck, B

1981-01-01

286

Maternal Plasma Fibronectin and Advanced Oxidative Protein Products for the Prediction of Preeclampsia in High Risk Pregnancies: A Prospective Cohort Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To determine whether maternal plasma fibronectin and advanced oxidative protein products (AOPP) can be used for the prediction of preeclampsia in high-risk women. Study Design: One hundred pregnant women at high risk of preeclampsia were enrolled in this prospective cohort study. Maternal plasma total fibronectin and AOPP levels were measured at 19–25 weeks of gestation. AOPP levels were also

Cem Dane; Hasan Buyukasik; Banu Dane; Murat Yayla

2009-01-01

287

Self-Regulation and Self-Worth of Black Children Reared in Economically Stressed, Rural, Single Mother-Headed FamiliesThe Contribution of Risk and Protective Factors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Risk and protective factors were examined to identify processes in rural, single-parent, Black families that are linked with positive child outcomes. Results can be linked to the competency and resiliency models. Protective domains promoted greater child selfregulation, with parenting protective factors promoting greater self-regulation than child and community protection. Maternal risk had the greatest negative effect on child selfworth. Results

VELMA McBRIDE MURRY; GENE H. BRODY

1999-01-01

288

Maternal serum lead levels and risk of preeclampsia in pregnant women: a cohort study in a maternity hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia  

PubMed Central

Preeclampsia is one of the major cause of maternal morbidity and mortality. Despite numerous studies, the etiology of preeclampsia has not yet been fully elucidated. There has been confliction in results on the role of maternal lead in preeclampsia. Keeping in view with the scarcity of data on role of lead in preeclamptic women of Saudi Arabia and the disparity in earlier findings, the present study was carried out to determine the levels of maternal serum lead in patients with preeclampsia in comparison to normal pregnancy. The study consisted of 120 pregnant women divided into three groups of 40 each, control, HR group and PET group. The serum levels of lead were estimated by Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. We found that the mean value of serum lead was 18.23 ± 2.34, 20.08 ± 2.15 and 27.18 ± 2.13 µg/dl in control, high risk group and preeclamptic group respectively. The levels of Pb were found to decrease significantly (P < 0.05) in preeclamptic group compared to control. However, there was no significant change in levels of Pb when HR group was compared to Control and preeclamptic group. In the present study, we observed that serum levels of lead were positively correlated with systolic and diastolic blood pressure and were statistically significant (P < 0.05). However, negative correlation was observed between Pb and BMI ruling out the association of BMI with preeclampsia. It is thus concluded that preeclampsia is associated with significant increase in maternal lead and these increasing levels of serum lead pose a significant risk in pregnant women to preeclampsia. PMID:25031738

Jameil, Noura Al

2014-01-01

289

Risk of retinoblastoma is associated with a maternal polymorphism in dihydrofolatereductase (DHFR) and pre-natal folic acid intake  

PubMed Central

Background Incidence of unilateral retinoblastoma varies globally suggesting possible environmental contributors to disease incidence. Maternal intake of naturally occurring folate from vegetables during pregnancy is inversely associated with risk of retinoblastoma in offspring. Methods Using a case-control study design, we examined the association between retinoblastoma risk and maternal variations in the folate-metabolizing genes, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR677C>T, rs1801133) and dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR 19base pair deletion of intron 1a [DHFR19bpdel], rs70991108). In central Mexico, we enrolled 103 mothers of children with newly diagnosed unilateral retinoblastoma and 97 control mothers who had healthy children in an IRB approved study. Mothers were interviewed regarding perinatal characteristics including use of prenatal vitamin supplements and gave peripheral blood samples used for PCR-based genotyping of rs1801133 and rs70991108. Results The risk of having a child with unilateral retinoblastoma were associated with maternal homozygosity for DHFR19bpdel (OR=3.78, 95%CI:1.89,7.55; p=0.0002), even after controlling for child’s DHFR19bpdel genotype (OR=2.81, 95%CI:1.32,5.99; p=0.0073). In a subgroup of 167 mothers with data on prenatal intake of supplements containing folic acid (a synthetic form of folate), DHFR19bpdel-associated risk was significantly elevated only among those who reported taking folic acid supplements. Maternal MTHFR genotype was unrelated to risk of having a child with retinoblastoma. Conclusion Maternal homozygosity for a polymorphism in the DHFR gene necessary for converting synthetic folic acid into biological folate is associated with increased risk for retinoblastoma. Prenatal ingestion of synthetic folic acid supplements may be associated with increased risk for early childhood carcinogenesis in a genetically susceptible subset of the population. PMID:22648968

Orjuela, MA; Cabrera-Munoz, L; Paul, L; Ramirez-Ortiz, MA; Liu, X; Chen, J; Mejia-Rodriguez, F; Medina-Sanson, A; Diaz-Carreno, S; Suen, IH; Selhub, J; Ponce-Castaneda, MV

2012-01-01

290

Lower macrophage migration inhibitory factor concentrations in maternal serum before pre-eclampsia onset.  

PubMed

Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) plays a pivotal role in pregnancy-related proinflammatory processes, such as placentation and labor. Differential MIF concentrations have been correlated with pathological events during pregnancy, such as recurrent miscarriages and severe pre-eclampsia (PE). The aim of this study was to prospectively investigate whether maternal MIF serum levels are already altered in early pregnancy before PE onset. Women (n=2,821) before 20 weeks of gestational age were recruited for a prospective study on early markers of PE. Forty-eight consecutive pregnancies that developed PE and 79 normotensive pregnancies that delivered at term were chosen. Maternal MIF serum levels were assessed by ELISA. We found significantly lower MIF serum levels in women who developed PE (4,967 ± 3,119 pg/mL) compared to controls (7,640 ± 5,519 pg/mL) (mean ± standard deviation, P<0.001). Our findings indicate that low maternal MIF serum levels in early pregnancy may contribute to abnormal placental development. PMID:24606610

Cardaropoli, Simona; Ietta, Francesca; Romagnoli, Roberta; Rolfo, Alessandro; Paulesu, Luana; Todros, Tullia

2014-07-01

291

[Cardiovascular risk and associated factors in schoolchildren in Belém, Pará State, Brazil].  

PubMed

This cross-sectional study aimed to identify risk factors for cardiovascular disease in a stratified cluster sample of 557 schoolchildren (6-19 years) in Belém, Pará State, Brazil. Potential risk factors were obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes, smoking, physical inactivity, and atherogenic diet. Socio-demographic and lifestyle variables were tested in a binary logistic regression model. The most prevalent risk factors were overweight (20.4%), dyslipidemia (48.1%), and physical inactivity (66.2%). Children below ten years of age and those from higher-income families and with higher maternal schooling showed greater odds of developing overweight; meanwhile, those with overweight were more prone to developing hypercholesterolemia and hypertriglyceridemia. The findings point to the need to implement strategies to prevent overweight in early childhood, through balanced nutrition and regular physical activity, in order to effectively reduce the prevalence of risk factors in schoolchildren. PMID:24714947

Ribas, Simone Augusta; Silva, Luiz Carlos Santana da

2014-03-01

292

Cigarette smoking during pregnancy in rural Nepal. Risk factors and effects of ?-carotene and vitamin A supplementation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: We examined risk factors of smoking and the association between smoking and pregnancy-related and 6-month infant mortality in rural Nepal, where 30% women reported smoking during pregnancy.Design: Cross-sectional analysis of risk factors associated with smoking status and health consequences of smoking, using prospective data collected as part of a randomized community trial to examine the effect of maternal vitamin

P Christian; K P West; J Katz; E Kimbrough-Pradhan; S C LeClerq; S K Khatry; S R Shrestha

2004-01-01

293

Breast feeding in Israel: maternal factors associated with choice and duration.  

PubMed Central

STUDY OBJECTIVES--To determine the influence of maternal characteristics on the incidence and duration of breast feeding. DESIGN--All the women who delivered in three obstetric wards within a two year period were surveyed. These three wards cover 93% of all births in the Jerusalem district. Women were interviewed on breast feeding of the previous child on the first or second day post partum by a research nurse. PARTICIPANTS--Altogether 8486 women whose previous pregnancy had resulted in a live born singleton who survived for at least one year. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS--Breast feeding information was linked to demographic and health information from hospital records. Using logistic regression analysis, failure to start breast feeding was best predicted (p < 0.001) by caesarean delivery, infant's birth weight, maternal smoking habits, and mother being non-immigrant. Maternal age (< 24 or > 40 years) and father being an ultraorthodox Jew were also positively (p < 0.05) associated with the decision to breast feed. Long term breast feeding (three months or more) was strongly affected (p < 0.001) by maternal education level, with both women with the fewest and the greatest number of years of schooling more likely to breast feed. A similar association was observed in all ethnic groups. Primipara and grandmultipara (parity > 4), new immigrants, ultraorthodox Jews, and non-smokers breast fed their babies for longer. CONCLUSIONS--The importance of maternal characteristics in relation to breast feeding was shown. Caesarean delivery and the infant's birth weight were strongly related to the decision to breast feed as were the demographic characteristics of mother's age and her country of birth. Education was not related to this decision but was strongly associated with the duration of breast feeding, as was parity. The behavioural characteristics of smoking and being ultraorthodox were related to both the decision to start and the duration of breast feeding. Efforts to encourage breast feeding ought to be targeted during the hospital stay and post partum period towards women identified as being at increased risk. PMID:8051528

Ever-Hadani, P; Seidman, D S; Manor, O; Harlap, S

1994-01-01

294

Physiological, Behavioral and Maternal Factors That Contribute to Size Variation in Larval Amphibian Populations  

PubMed Central

Size variance among similarly aged individuals within populations is a pattern common to many organisms that is a result of interactions between intrinsic and extrinsic traits of individuals. While genetic and maternal effects, as well as physiological and behavioral traits have been shown to contribute to size variation in animal populations, teasing apart the influence of such factors on individual growth rates remain a challenge. Furthermore, tracing the effects of these interactions across life stages and in shaping adult phenotypes also requires further exploration. In this study we investigated the relationship between genetics, hatching patterns, behaviors, neuroendocrine stress axis activity and variance in growth and metamorphosis among same-aged larval amphibians. Through parallel experiments we found that in the absence of conspecific interactions, hatch time and to a lesser extent egg clutch identity (i.e. genetics and maternal effects) influenced the propensity for growth and development in individual tadpoles and determined metamorphic traits. Within experimental groups we found that variance in growth rates was associated with size-dependent foraging behaviors and responses to food restriction. We also found an inverse relationship between glucocorticoid (GC) hormone levels and body mass and developmental stage among group-reared tadpoles, which suggests that GC expression plays a role in regulating differing within-population growth trajectories in response to density-dependent conditions. Taken together these findings suggest that factors that influence hatching conditions can have long-term effects on growth and development. These results also raise compelling questions regarding the extent to which maternal and genetic factors influence physiological and behavioral profiles in amphibians. PMID:24143188

Warne, Robin W.; Kardon, Adam; Crespi, Erica J.

2013-01-01

295

Optimizing benefits of influenza virus vaccination during pregnancy: potential behavioral risk factors and interventions.  

PubMed

Pregnant women and infants are at high risk for complications, hospitalization, and death due to influenza. It is well-established that influenza vaccination during pregnancy reduces rates and severity of illness in women overall. Maternal vaccination also confers antibody protection to infants via both transplacental transfer and breast milk. However, as in the general population, a relatively high proportion of pregnant women and their infants do not achieve protective antibody levels against influenza virus following maternal vaccination. Behavioral factors, particularly maternal weight and stress exposure, may affect initial maternal antibody responses, maintenance of antibody levels over time (i.e., across pregnancy), as well as the efficiency of transplacental antibody transfer to the fetus. Conversely, behavioral interventions including acute exercise and stress reduction can enhance immune protection following vaccination. Such behavioral interventions are particularly appealing in pregnancy because they are safe and non-invasive. The identification of individual risk factors for poor responses to vaccines and the application of appropriate interventions represent important steps towards personalized health care. PMID:24709586

Christian, Lisa M

2014-05-23

296

Perinatal risk factors for childhood obesity and metabolic dysregulation123  

PubMed Central

Background: Childhood obesity has increased significantly in recent decades. Objective: The objective was to examine the perinatal risk factors related to childhood obesity. Design: In a prospective study, 89 women with normal glucose tolerance (NGT) or gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and their offspring were evaluated at birth and at 8.8 ± 1.8 y. At birth, obstetrical data, parental anthropometric measures, and neonatal body composition were assessed; at follow-up, diet and activity were assessed and laboratory studies were conducted. Weight was classified by using weight for age and sex, and body composition was measured by using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. In childhood, data were analyzed as tertiles and prediction models were developed by using logistic and stepwise regression. Results: No significant differences in Centers for Disease Control and Prevention weight percentiles, body composition, and most metabolic measures were observed between children of mothers with NGT and GDM at follow-up. Children in the upper tertile for weight had greater energy intake (P = 0.02), skinfold thickness (P = 0.0001), and leptin concentrations (P < 0.0001) than did those in tertiles 1 and 2. Children in the upper tertile for percentage body fat had greater waist circumference (P = 0.0001), insulin resistance (P = 0.002), and triglyceride (P = 0.009) and leptin (P = 0.0001) concentrations than did children in tertiles 1 and 2. The correlation between body fat at birth and follow-up was r = 0.29 (P = 0.02). The strongest perinatal predictor for a child in the upper tertile for weight was maternal pregravid body mass index (BMI; kg/m2) >30 (odds ratio: 3.75; 95% CI: 1.39, 10.10; P = 0.009) and for percentage body fat was maternal pregravid BMI >30 (odds ratio: 5.45; 95% CI: 1.62, 18.41; P = 0.006). Conclusion: Maternal pregravid BMI, independent of maternal glucose status or birth weight, was the strongest predictor of childhood obesity. PMID:19759171

Farrell, Kristen; Thomas, Alicia; Huston-Presley, Larraine; Mencin, Patricia; de Mouzon, Sylvie Hauguel; Amini, Saeid B

2009-01-01

297

Risk factors and mortality among newborns with persistent pulmonary hypertension  

PubMed Central

Objective: To determine the risk factors for persistent pulmonary hypertension of newborns (PPHN) and their influence on mortality. Methods: This was an observational study conducted at The Children’s Hospital & the Institute of Child Health, Multan, Pakistan, from July 2011 to June 2012.All admitted babies who had respiratory distress, cyanosis and evidence of hypoxia on ABG,s were diagnosed provided that they were having right- to- left or bidirectional hemodynamic shunting at the ductus arteriosus or at patent foramen ovale along with Tricuspid regurgitation (TR) jet >40 mm of Hg on echocardiography. All the demographic, maternal, antenatal, natal and postnatal data were recorded on a predesigned Performa. Results: There were 79 patients, including 61 males and 18 females. The most common risk factors observed in our study were male sex (72.1%), cesarean section mode of delivery (54.2%), positive pressure ventilation while resuscitation (44.2%) birth asphyxia (40.4%) and meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS)35.4%. It was found that male sex (88.8%), cesarean-section delivery (77.7%), respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) 44.8% and sepsis (44.4%) were more associated with PPHN in premature infants than with term and post term infants. Out of the total 79 patients, death occurred among 7 preterm and 14 terms and post term infants. As a whole, cesarean section mode of delivery (71.4%), birth asphyxia (57.1%) and female sex (52.4%) were found major risk factors associated with mortality. However, respiratory distress syndrome (Relative Risk RR=5), birth asphyxia (RR=2.5) and male sex (RR=2)were found to be associated with increased risk of mortality in preterm than term and post term infants. Conclusion: Male gender, cesarean section mode of delivery, MAS and RDS are the major risk factors for PPHN in any age group. RDS, Birth asphyxia and male sex are associated with increased risk of mortality in pre term than term and post term infants. PMID:24353699

Razzaq, Athar; Iqbal Quddusi, Ahmed; Nizami, Naila

2013-01-01

298

Refugee, asylum seeker, immigrant women and postnatal depression: rates and risk factors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Postnatal depression (PND) is recognised as a common maternal health problem, but little evidence examines PND among refugee,\\u000a asylum seeker and immigrant women in developed country settings. This review aimed to identify the rates of PND and highlight\\u000a common risk factors among this group of women. An iterative and dynamic literature search was conducted across ten databases\\u000a to identify published

Catherine H. Collins; Cathy Zimmerman; Louise M. Howard

2011-01-01

299

Overweight and Severe Acute Maternal Morbidity in a Low-Risk Pregnant Population in The Netherlands  

PubMed Central

Objective To investigate the association between overweight and severe acute maternal morbidity (SAMM) in a low-risk pregnant population. Design Nationwide case-control study. Setting The Netherlands, august 2004 to august 2006. Population 1567 cases from initially primary care and 2994 women from primary care practices as controls, out of 371 012 women delivering in the Netherlands during the study period Methods Cases were women with SAMM obtained from a nationwide prospective study. All women in this cohort who initially had low-risk pregnancies were compared with low-risk women without SAMM to calculate odd ratios (ORs) to develop SAMM by body mass index (BMI) category. We divided body mass index in three overweight categories and calculated the ORs (95% CI) of total SAMM and per specific endpoint by logistic regression, with normal weight as reference. We adjusted for age, parity and socio-economic status. Main Outcome Measures SAMM, defined as Intensive Care Unit (ICU)-admission, Uterine Rupture, Eclampsia or Major Obstetric Haemorrhage (MOH) Results SAMM was reported in 1567 cases which started as low-risk pregnancies. BMI was available in 1097 (70.0%) cases and 2994 control subjects were included. Analysis showed a dose response relation for overweight (aOR, 1.3; 95% CI, 1.0-1.5), obese (aOR, 1.4; 95% CI, 1.1-1.9) and morbidly obese (aOR, 2.1; 95% CI, 1.3-3.2) women to develop SAMM compared to normal weight. Sub analysis showed the same dose response relation for ICU-admission, Uterine Rupture and Eclampsia. We found no association for MOH. Conclusion Overweight without pre-existent co-morbidity is an important risk-indicator for developing SAMM. This risk increases with an increasing body mass index. PMID:24069316

Witteveen, Tom; Zwart, Joost J.; Gast, Karin B.; Bloemenkamp, Kitty W. M.; van Roosmalen, Jos

2013-01-01

300

Sexually dimorphic effects of maternal separation stress on corticotrophin-releasing factor and vasopressin systems in the adult rat brain  

Microsoft Academic Search

Neonatal maternal separation has been widely used to model the well-established causal relationship between stress in early life and the later development of depression. As corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF) and vasopressin (AVP) have been implicated in depression, we aimed to determine the long-term effects of maternal separation stress on these neuropeptide systems, and also to explore whether these effects are gender-dependent.

Lieve Desbonnet; Lillian Garrett; Emma Daly; Kieran W. McDermott; Timothy G. Dinan

2008-01-01

301

Family and child factors related to the use of non-maternal infant care: An English study  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper explores factors related to the use, amount and type of non-maternal child care infants experience in their first year, reporting on a prospective longitudinal study of 1201 families recruited from two different regions in England. The selection and timing of non-maternal child care was investigated within a socio-ecological model that took account of child and family characteristics as

Kathy Sylva; Alan Stein; Penelope Leach; Jacqueline Barnes; Lars-Erik Malmberg

2007-01-01

302

Maternal Diabetes and the Risk of Autism Spectrum Disorders in the Offspring: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We performed a systematic literature search regarding maternal diabetes before and during pregnancy and the risk of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) in the offspring. Of the 178 potentially relevant articles, 12 articles including three cohort studies and nine case-control studies were included in the meta-analysis. Both the meta-analyses of cohort…

Xu, Guifeng; Jing, Jin; Bowers, Katherine; Liu, Buyun; Bao, Wei

2014-01-01

303

Psychological Factors Linked to Risk Perception  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Risks are mental models, which allow people to cope with dangerous phenomena (Renn, 2008; Jasanoff, 1998). The term "risk" refers to the likelihood of an adverse effect resulting from an event. The aim of the present study is to identify the psychological factors that are most predictive of risk perception in relation with age, gender, educational level and socio-economical status. Earthquake hazard was considered, because it is an emerging danger for Bucharest. 80% of the laypeople sample are waiting for this event to happen in the next three years. By integrating all the research data, it was attempted to build a risk profile of the investigated population, which could be used by institutions responsible for earthquake risk mitigation situations in Bucharest. This research appealed to the social learning Rotter (1966), auto-effectiveness Bandura (1977; 1983), and anxiety and stress theories. We used psychological variables that measured stress, personal effectiveness and the belief in personal control. The multi-modal risk perception questionnaire was structured on a 49 items sequence. The sample was composed of 1.376 participants recruited on a voluntary basis. The characteristics of risk (like probability and magnitude, time scales) are perceived differently according to psychological factors that play a role also in biases in people's ability to draw inferences from probabilistic information (like cognitive dissonance). Since the 1970's, it has been argued that those who perceive life's events as being beyond their locus of control (external locus of control) are significantly more anxious and less adapted. In this research, strongest associations and significant differences were obtained between sex, age and income categories with Stress vulnerability factor and the External Locus of Control factor. The profile of the low risk perceiver is that of a young, more educated, male individual with a higher self- efficacy level and an internal locus of control.

Arma?, I.; Creãu, R. Z.; St?nciugelu, I.

2012-04-01

304

Risk Factors for Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting  

Microsoft Academic Search

Knowledge of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) risk factors allows anesthesiologists to opti- mize the use of prophylactic regimens. Modern PONV risk research began in the 1990s with publica- tion of studies using logistic regression analysis to simultaneously identify multiple independent PONV predictors and publication of meta-analyses and systematic reviews. This literature shows that fe- male gender post-puberty, nonsmoking status,

Tong J. Gan

2006-01-01

305

Circulating sex steroids during pregnancy and maternal risk of non-epithelial ovarian cancer  

PubMed Central

Background Sex steroid hormones have been proposed to play a role in the development of non-epithelial ovarian cancers (NEOC) but so far no direct epidemiological data are available. Methods A case-control study was nested within the Finnish Maternity Cohort, the world’s largest bio-repository of serum specimens from pregnant women. Study subjects were selected among women who donated a blood sample during a singleton pregnancy that led to the birth of their last child preceding diagnosis of NEOC. Case subjects were 41 women with sex-cord stromal tumors (SCST) and 21 with germ cell tumors (GCT). Three controls, matching the index case for age, parity at the index pregnancy, and date at blood donation were selected (n=171). Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) associated with concentrations of testosterone, androstenedione, 17-OH-progesterone, progesterone, estradiol and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) were estimated through conditional logistic regression. Results For SCST, doubling of testosterone, androstenedione and 17-OH-progesterone concentrations were associated with about 2-fold higher risk of SCST [ORs and 95% CI of 2.16 (1.25–3.74), 2.16 (1.20–3.87), and 2.62 (1.27–5.38), respectively]. These associations remained largely unchanged after excluding women within 2, 4 or 6 years lag-time between blood donation and cancer diagnosis. Sex steroid hormones concentrations were not related to maternal risk of GCT. Conclusions This is the first prospective study providing initial evidence that elevated androgens play a role in the pathogenesis of SCST. Impact Our study may note a particular need for larger confirmatory investigations on sex steroids and NEOC. PMID:21177423

Chen, Tianhui; Surcel, Helja-Marja; Lundin, Eva; Kaasila, Marjo; Lakso, Hans Ake; Schock, Helena; Kaaks, Rudolf; Koskela, Pentti; Grankvist, Kjell; Hallmans, Goran; Pukkala, Eero; Jacquotte, Anne Zeleniuch; Toniolo, Paolo; Lehtinen, Matti; Lukanova, Annekatrin

2011-01-01

306

Risk factors for developing congenital nasolacrimal duct obstruction  

PubMed Central

Objective To identify potential risk factors for developing congenital nasolacrimal duct obstruction (CNLDO). Study design and methods A cross-sectional study. A quantitative questionnaire was distributed to a sample of mothers attending the Pediatrics Clinic at King Khalid University Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Results A total of 756 mothers responded to our questionnaire. Of the 756 filled questionnaires, 389 (51.67%) were male children. 5.3% of the mothers lived in non-urban settings. CNLDO was reported in the children attending the clinic by 17.1% (129/756) of their mothers. Average age (±SD) of infants when persistent tearing was noticed was 3.2 ± 2.7 months, while average age (±SD) of resolution was 9.6 ± 3.7 months. Of the children with CNLDO, 37.2% (48/129) still have persistent tearing at the time of distributing the questionnaire. Among the group with CNLDO, 17% (22/129) of their mothers have experienced an infection during pregnancy (p = 0.022). Within the same group, 14.7% (19/129) of the affected children were reported by their mothers to have other children with CNLDO which was statistically significant (p = <0.001). Conclusion CNLDO could have a genetic predisposition and maternal infection is a possible risk factor for developing CNLDO. Surgical management awareness should be emphasized to relieve children from this relatively common and benign condition. PMID:24526860

Aldahash, Faisal D.; Al-Mubarak, Muhammad F.; Alenizi, Saad H.; Al-Faky, Yasser H.

2013-01-01

307

Prenatal maternal factors in the development of cognitive impairments in the offspring.  

PubMed

Different environmental factors acting during sensitive prenatal periods can have a negative impact on neurodevelopment and predispose the individual to the development of various psychiatric conditions that often share cognitive impairments as a common component. As cognitive symptoms remain one of the most challenging and resistant aspects of mental illness to be treated pharmacologically, it is important to investigate the mechanisms underlying such cognitive deficits, with particular focus on the impact of early life adverse events that predispose the individual to mental disorders. Multiple clinical studies have, in fact, repeatedly confirmed that prenatal maternal factors, such as infection, stress or malnutrition, are pivotal in shaping behavioral and cognitive functions of the offspring, and in the past decade many preclinical studies have investigated this hypothesis. The purpose of this review is to describe recent preclinical studies aimed at dissecting the relative impact of various prenatal maternal factors on the development of cognitive impairments in offspring, focusing on animal models of prenatal stress and prenatal infection. These recent studies point to the pivotal role of prenatal stressful experiences in shaping memory and learning functions associated with specific brain structures, such as the hippocampus and the prefrontal cortex. More importantly, such experimental evidence suggests that different insults converge on similar downstream functional targets, such as cognition, which may therefore represent an endophenotype for several pathological conditions. Future studies should thus focus on investigating the mechanisms contributing to the convergent action of different prenatal insults in order to identify targets for novel therapeutic intervention. PMID:24794049

Richetto, Juliet; Riva, Marco A

2014-10-01

308

Cardiovascular Risk Factors in the Antiphospholipid Syndrome  

PubMed Central

A major cause of morbidity and mortality in the context of the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is the occurrence of thrombotic events. Besides the pathogenic roles of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL), other risk factors and medical conditions, which are conditions for traditional risk of an individual without the APS, can coexist in this patient, raising their risk of developing thrombosis. Therefore, the clinical and laboratory investigation of comorbidities known to increase cardiovascular risk in patients with antiphospholipid antibody syndrome is crucial for the adoption of a more complete and effective treatment. Experimental models and clinical studies show evidence of association between APS and premature formation of atherosclerotic plaques. Atherosclerosis has major traditional risk factors: hypertension, diabetes mellitus, obesity, dyslipidemia, smoking, and sedentary lifestyle that may be implicated in vascular involvement in patients with APS. The influence of nontraditional risk factors as hyperhomocysteinemia, increased lipoprotein a, and anti-oxLDL in the development of thromboembolic events in APS patients has been studied in scientific literature. Metabolic syndrome with all its components also has been recently studied in antiphospholipid syndrome and is associated with arterial events. PMID:25133195

da Silva, Felipe Freire; Levy, Roger Abramino; de Carvalho, Jozelio Freire

2014-01-01

309

Water aerobics II: maternal body composition and perinatal outcomes after a program for low risk pregnant women  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of water aerobics during pregnancy. METHODS: A randomized controlled trial carried out in 71 low-risk sedentary pregnant women, randomly allocated to water aerobics or no physical exercise. Maternal body composition and perinatal outcomes were evaluated. For statistical analysis Chi-square, Fisher's or Student's t-tests were applied. Risk ratios and their 95% CI were estimated

Sergio R Cavalcante; Jose G Cecatti; Rosa I Pereira; Erica P Baciuk; Ana L Bernardo; Carla Silveira

2009-01-01

310

A flexible Bayesian hierarchical model of preterm birth risk among US Hispanic subgroups in relation to maternal nativity and education  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Previous research has documented heterogeneity in the effects of maternal education on adverse birth outcomes by nativity\\u000a and Hispanic subgroup in the United States. In this article, we considered the risk of preterm birth (PTB) using 9 years of\\u000a vital statistics birth data from New York City. We employed finer categorizations of exposure than used previously and estimated\\u000a the risk

Jay S Kaufman; Richard F MacLehose; Elizabeth A Torrone; David A Savitz

2011-01-01

311

Maternal intra-partum fever.  

PubMed

Maternal intra-partum fever commonly complicates the process of labour. Its occurrence is often regarded as being synonymous with the presence of chorioamnionitis. This inevitably results in the administration of antibiotics to the affected mother. Review of the literature however suggests that this approach is not always appropriate. Non-infective causes of this condition that are often overlooked include the use of epidural analgesia for pain relief, normal thermal physiological changes in women not using any form of analgesia and delivery in an overheated room. Women with certain risk factors such as nulliparity and a long latent phase of labour are also more prone to developing maternal intra-partum fever. Irrespective of its aetiology, maternal intra-partum fever carries risks both for the mother and her unborn child. Putting more thought into the care of these patients will go a long way in reducing the maternal and neonatal morbidity associated with this complication. PMID:17365450

Apantaku, O; Mulik, V

2007-01-01

312

Risk Factors for Preterm Birth among HIV-Infected Tanzanian Women: A Prospective Study  

PubMed Central

Premature delivery, a significant cause of child mortality and morbidity worldwide, is particularly prevalent in the developing world. As HIV is highly prevalent in much of sub-Saharan Africa, it is important to determine risk factors for prematurity among HIV-positive pregnancies. The aims of this study were to identify risk factors of preterm (<37 weeks) and very preterm (<34 weeks) birth among a cohort of 927 HIV positive women living in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, who enrolled in the Tanzania Vitamin and HIV Infection Trial between 1995 and 1997. Multivariable relative risk regression models were used to determine the association of potential maternal risk factors with premature and very premature delivery. High rates of preterm (24%) and very preterm birth (9%) were found. Risk factors (adjusted RR (95% CI)) for preterm birth were mother <20 years (1.46 (1.10, 1.95)), maternal illiteracy (1.54 (1.10, 2.16)), malaria (1.42 (1.11, 1.81)), Entamoeba coli (1.49 (1.04, 2.15)), no or low pregnancy weight gain, and HIV disease stage ?2 (1.41 (1.12, 1.50)). Interventions to reduce pregnancies in women under 20, prevent and treat malaria, reduce Entamoeba coli infection, and promote weight gain in pregnant women may have a protective effect on prematurity. PMID:25328529

Zack, Rachel M.; Golan, Jenna; Aboud, Said; Msamanga, Gernard; Spiegelman, Donna; Fawzi, Wafaie

2014-01-01

313

Prevalence and risk factors for Hepatitis C and HIV1 infections among pregnant women in Central Brazil  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Hepatitis C (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections are a major burden to public health worldwide. Routine antenatal HIV-1 screening to prevent maternal-infant transmission is universally recommended. Our objectives were to evaluate the prevalence of and potential risk factors for HCV and HIV infection among pregnant women who attended prenatal care under the coverage of public health in

Zelma B Costa; Gustavo C Machado; Mariza M Avelino; Clidenor Gomes Filho; Jose V Macedo Filho; Ana L Minuzzi; Marilia D Turchi; Mariane MA Stefani; Wayner Vieira de Souza; Celina MT Martelli

2009-01-01

314

Gastric cancer: prevention, risk factors and treatment  

PubMed Central

Cancer starts with a change in one single cell. This change may be initiated by external agents and genetic factors. Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide and accounts for 7.6 million deaths (around 13% of all deaths) in 2008. Lung, stomach, liver, colon and breast cancer cause the most cancer deaths each year. In this review, different aspects of gastric cancer; including clinical, pathological characteristic of gastric cancer, etiology, incidence, risk factors, prevention and treatment are studied. PMID:24834180

Zali, Hakimeh; Azodi, Mona

2011-01-01

315

Risk Factors for Homelessness among Women Veterans  

Microsoft Academic Search

:Background. Women veterans are three to four times more likely than non-veteran women to become homeless. However, their risk factors for homelessness have not been defined. Methods. Case-control study of non-institutionalized homeless women veterans (n533) and age-matched housed women veterans (n=165). Health, health care, and factors associated with homelessness were assessed using multiple logistic regression with a Monte Carlo algorithm

Donna L. Washington; Elizabeth M. Yano; James McGuire; Vivian Hines; Martin Lee; Lillian Gelberg

2010-01-01

316

Risk Factors for Homelessness among Women Veterans  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background. Women veterans are three to four times more likely than non-veteran women to become homeless. However, their risk factors for homelessness have not been defined. Methods. Case-control study of non-institutionalized homeless women veterans (n533) and age-matched housed women veterans (n=165). Health, health care, and factors associated with homelessness were assessed using multiple logistic regression with a Monte Carlo algorithm

MPH Elizabeth M. Yano MSPH Donna L. Washington; MSPH Lillian Gelberg

2010-01-01

317

Birth weight and other prenatal factors and risk of breast cancer in Asian Americans  

PubMed Central

Little is known about the role of birth weight and other prenatal factors in the etiology of breast cancer in Asian-Americans. We investigated the relation between birth weight and other prenatal factors and breast cancer risk in a population-based case-control study in Los Angeles County that included 2,259 Asian American women with incident, histologically confirmed breast cancer and 2,019 control women, who were frequency matched to cases on age, Asian ethnicity and neighborhood of residence. Breast cancer risk nearly doubled (odds ratio (OR)=1.92, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.12-3.29) among those with high (?4000 g) birth weight compared to those with low (<2500 g) birth weight after adjusting for age at menarche, parity, adult weight and other covariates. Risk increased 8% per 500 g increase in birth weight (p trend=0.10). We observed a significant relationship between birth weight and age at menarche in both cases and controls. Mean birth weight was higher (2948 g) for control women who had early menarche (age ?11 years) compared to those who had menarche late (age ?15 years) (2807 g) (P trend =0.016); results were similar among case patients (P trend=0.022). Older maternal age was also a risk factor; risk increased by 6% (95% CI=1.01-1.12) per 5 years increase in maternal age with adjustment for parity and other risk factors. Our results support the hypothesis that high birth weight and older maternal age at pregnancy may have contributed to the rising breast cancer incidence in Asian Americans. PMID:21710135

Wu, Anna H; McKean-Cowdin, Roberta; Tseng, Chiu-Chen

2014-01-01

318

Paternally Expressed Peg3 Controls Maternally Expressed Zim1 as a Trans Factor  

PubMed Central

The expression of two adjacent imprinted genes, Peg3 and Zim1, is inversely correlated: down-regulation of Peg3 coinciding with up-regulation of Zim1. The current study characterized this inverse correlation using a mutant allele targeting Peg3. According to the results, the mutation on the paternal allele of Peg3 resulted in a dramatic increase in the transcription levels of the maternal allele of Zim1, suggesting the involvement of unknown trans factors in this trans-allelic event. Subsequent ChIP experiments revealed that the protein encoded by Peg3 itself binds to the zinc finger exon of Zim1, which is modified with the repression mark H3K9me3. Interestingly, the levels of H3K9me3 on Zim1 are also reduced in the mutant cells lacking the protein PEG3, suggesting potential roles for PEG3 in establishing H3K9me3 on Zim1. Reintroducing PEG3 into the mutant cell restored down-regulation of Zim1, confirming the predicted repressor role for Peg3 on Zim1. Overall, these results demonstrated that paternally expressed Peg3 controls maternally expressed Zim1 as a trans factor. The current study also provides the first case for the trans-allelic interaction of two oppositely imprinted genes through their gene products. PMID:25265264

Ye, An; He, Hongzhi; Kim, Joomyeong

2014-01-01

319

Exploring Risk Factors for Follicular Lymphoma  

PubMed Central

Follicular lymphoma (FL) is an indolent malignancy of germinal center B cells with varied incidence across racial groups and geographic regions. Improvements in the classification of non-Hodgkin lymphoma subtypes provide an opportunity to explore associations between environmental exposures and FL incidence. Our paper found that aspects of Western lifestyle including sedentary lifestyle, obesity, and diets high in meat and milk are associated with an increased risk of FL. Diets rich in fruits and vegetables, polyunsaturated fatty acids, vitamin D, and certain antioxidants are inversely associated with FL risk. A medical history of Sjogren's syndrome, influenza vaccination, and heart disease may be associated with FL incidence. Associations between FL and exposure to pesticides, industrial solvents, hair dyes, and alcohol/tobacco were inconsistent. Genetic risk factors include variants at the 6p21.32 region of the MHC II locus, polymorphisms of the DNA repair gene XRCC3, and UV exposure in individuals with certain polymorphisms of the vitamin D receptor. Increasing our understanding of risk factors for FL must involve integrating epidemiological studies of genetics and exposures to allow for the examination of risk factors and interactions between genes and environment. PMID:23028387

Ambinder, Alexander J.; Shenoy, Pareen J.; Malik, Neha; Maggioncalda, Alison; Nastoupil, Loretta J.; Flowers, Christopher R.

2012-01-01

320

Risk factors in child abuse and neglect  

Microsoft Academic Search

Our knowledge of those factors which place children at risk for physical or sexual abuse is both limited and imprecise. The reasons for these limitations derive from both practical methodological constraints and a lack of definitional consensus among researchers in this field. This paper discusses the difficulties, both methodological and practical, involved in the development of a scientifically- based knowledge

David L. Pogge

1992-01-01

321

Risk Factors for Paternal Physical Child Abuse  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: This study uses the developmental-ecological framework to examine a comprehensive set of paternal factors hypothesized to be linked to risk for paternal child abuse (PCA) among a diverse sample of fathers. Attention was given to fathers' marital status and their race/ethnicity (White, African American, and Hispanic). Methods: Interviews…

Lee, Shawna J.; Guterman, Neil B.; Lee, Yookyong

2008-01-01

322

Framing Risk: Audience and Reader Factors.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Finds that lay readers respond to the risk implicit in news stories involving science and technology along four factors: (1) the proposition that science and technology are expensive and risky; (2) the idea that science and technology can have negative effects; (3) concerns associated with control and dependency; and (4) fear that science and…

Hornig, Susanna

1992-01-01

323

Gastric Cancer: Epidemiology and Risk Factors  

Microsoft Academic Search

The incidence of gastric cancer is decreasing and lies between 10 and 15 new cases per 100,000 population per year in most Western countries. Peak age is between 60 and 80 years. While distal gastric cancers account for the overall decrease in gastric cancer, tumors in the proximal stomach (cardia and esophagogastric junction) are on the rise. Recognized risk factors

Guenter J. Krejs

2010-01-01

324

Risk Factors for Depression in Early Adolescence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to identify salient risk factors for depression in early adolescence from a group of common predictors. The following nine predictors were examined: (1) perceived quality of peer relationships, (2) perceived parental nurturance, (3) perceived parental rejection, (4) self-esteem, (5) body image, (6) pubertal status,…

MacPhee, Angela R.; Andrews, Jac J. W.

2006-01-01

325

Risk factors for myocardial infarction in Brazil  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundApproximately three-quarters of cardiovascular disease deaths in the world come from developing countries, and acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is an important cause of death. Brazil is one of the largest countries in Latin America and the contemporary evaluation of risk factors for AMI is crucial for a more efficacious disease management.

Leopoldo S Piegas; Álvaro Avezum; Júlio César R Pereira; João Manoel Rossi Neto; Clóvis Hoepfner; Jorge A Farran; Rui F Ramos; Ari Timerman; José Péricles Esteves

2003-01-01

326

Risk factors for perineal injury during delivery  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: We sought to identify risk factors for anal sphincter injury during vaginal delivery. Study Design: This was a retrospective, case-control study. We reviewed 2078 records of vaginal deliveries within a 2-year period from May 1, 1999, through April 30, 2001. Cases (n = 91) during the study period were defined as parturients who had documentation of greater than a

L. M. Christianson; V. E. Bovbjerg; E. C. McDavitt; K. L. Hullfish

2003-01-01

327

Risk and protection factors in fatal accidents  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper aims at addressing the interest and appropriateness of performing accident severity analyses that are limited to fatal accident data. Two methodological issues are specifically discussed, namely the accident-size factors (the number of vehicles in the accident and their level of occupancy) and the comparability of the baseline risk. It is argued that – although these two issues are

Emmanuelle Dupont; Heike Martensen; Eleonora Papadimitriou; George Yannis

2010-01-01

328

Risk factors for driving into flooded roads  

Microsoft Academic Search

Motor vehicle-related deaths account for more than half of all flood fatalities in the United States, but to date, very little is known about the risk factors associated with why people drive into flooded roads. Using data from survey questionnaires administered in Denver, CO, and Austin, TX, this paper suggests that people who do not take warnings seriously are more

Sheldon D. Drobot; C. Benight; E. C. Gruntfest

2007-01-01

329

Risk Factors for P.A.D.  

MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

... and habits increase your risk of developing P.A.D. Andrew: I smoked like a house afire for many years. Rita: I did ... that my blood pressure being high could be a contributing factor to P.A.D. Mike: I ...

330

Identifying risk factors for medical injury  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective. To examine multiple risk factors for medical injury using administrative data. Design. This cross-sectional study used logistic regression models to examine associations among patient characteristics such as age, sex, and insurance payer status and hospital characteristics such as ownership, teaching status and trauma level, and comorbidities and presence of a medical injury diagnosis. Data were from the Bureau of

CLARE E. GUSE; HONGYAN YANG; PETER M. LAYDE

2006-01-01

331

Environmental Risk Factors in Hospital Suicide  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Suicide of hospitalized patients is the most common sentinel event reviewed by The Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations. Shorter lengths of stay, sicker patients, and higher patient to staff ratios challenge the ability of the hospital to maintain safety. Risk factors associated with the physical environment of the…

Lieberman, Daniel Z.; Resnik, Harvey L.P.; Holder-Perkins, Vicenzio

2004-01-01

332

Perinatal Risk Factors for Mild Motor Disability  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aetiology of mild motor disability (MMD) is a complex issue and as yet is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to identify the prevalence of perinatal risk factors in a cohort of 10-year-old boys and girls with (n = 362) and without (n = 1193) MMD. Among the males with MMD there was a higher prevalence of postpartum haemorrhage,…

Hands, Beth; Kendall, Garth; Larkin, Dawne; Parker, Helen

2009-01-01

333

Risk Factors for Preterm Birth in Korea  

Microsoft Academic Search

Preterm birth is a major determinant of neonatal morbidity and mortality and remains one of the most serious problems in obstetrics. The aim of this study was to investigate the risk factors for preterm birth in Korean pregnant women. A total of 2,645 women were evaluated between 20 and 42 weeks’ gestation at 5 centers using a prospective study design.

Young Ju Kim; Bo Eun Lee; Hye Sook Park; Jung Goo Kang; Joo Oh Kim; Eun Hee Ha

2005-01-01

334

Adolescent Suicide Risk: Four Psychosocial Factors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Suicide is a leading cause of death among adolescents. This study examined the suicidal ideation, behavior, and attempt history of 100 adolescents ages seventeen to nineteen. Four psychosocial factors were found to be important for overall suicide risk: hopelessness, hostility, negative self-concept, and isolation. It is suggested that focusing on…

Rutter, Philip A.; Behrendt, Andrew E.

2004-01-01

335

Risk Factors for Rural Residential Fires  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Context and Purpose: Rural households report high fire-related mortality and injury rates, but few studies have examined the risk factors for fires. This study aims to identify occupant and household characteristics that are associated with residential fires in a rural cohort. Methods: Of 1,005 households contacted in a single rural county, 691…

Allareddy, Veerasathpurush; Peek-Asa, Corinne; Yang, Jingzhen; Zwerling, Craig

2007-01-01

336

Risk Factors for Domestic Violence in Curacao  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

One out of three people (25% of men, 38% of women) in Curacao have experienced some form of domestic violence at some point in their adult lives. The most significant risk factors for domestic violence in Curacao are the female gender, a young age, low education, and experiencing domestic violence victimization in childhood. Divorce, single…

van Wijk, N. Ph. L.; de Bruijn, J. G. M.

2012-01-01

337

Risk Factors and Prodromal Eating Pathology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Prospective studies have identified factors that increase risk for eating pathology onset, including perceived pressure for thinness, thin-ideal internalization, body dissatisfaction, dietary restraint, and negative affect. Research also suggests that body dissatisfaction and dietary restraint may constitute prodromal stages of the development of…

Stice, Eric; Ng, Janet; Shaw, Heather

2010-01-01

338

Risk Factors for Smoking Behaviors among Adolescents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many students in Korea begin to use tobacco and develop a regular smoking habit before they reach adulthood. Yet, little is known about various signs contributing to the transition of the student smoking behaviors. This study used a national sample to explore and compare risk factors for smoking behaviors. Three types of smoking behaviors were…

Chung, Sung Suk; Joung, Kyoung Hwa

2014-01-01

339

Impact of Prenatal Risk Factors on Congenital Heart Disease in the Current Era  

PubMed Central

Background The healthcare burden related to congenital heart disease (CHD) is increasing with improving survival. We assessed changing trends in prenatal risk factors for CHD in the current era in a Canadian cohort. Methods and Results CHD patients <18 years old (n=2339) and controls without structural heart disease (n=199) were prospectively enrolled in an Ontario province?wide biobank registry from 2008–2011. Family history, frequency of extra?cardiac anomalies (ECAs), and antenatal risk factors were assessed. Temporal trends were analyzed and associations with CHD were measured using linear and logistic regression. Family history of CHD and frequency of major ECAs was higher in cases versus controls (P<0.001). Despite an increase in genetic testing in the recent era, only 9.5% of cases with CHD had a confirmed genetic diagnosis. Yield of genetic testing (ie, frequency of abnormal results) was higher in familial and syndromic cases. There was an increase in parental age at conception, maternal prepregnancy body mass index, maternal urinary tract infections, type 1 diabetes, and exposure to nonfertility medications during pregnancy from 1990–2011. Later year of birth, family history of CHD, presence of major ECAs, maternal smoking during pregnancy, and maternal medication exposure were associated with increased odds of CHD (P<0.05 for all). Advanced parental age was associated with increased odds of CHD caused by genetic abnormalities. Conclusions The increase in prenatal risk factors for CHD highlights the need for more rigorous ascertainment of genetic and environmental factors including gene?environment interactions that contribute to CHD. PMID:23727699

Fung, Alan; Manlhiot, Cedric; Naik, Sapna; Rosenberg, Herschel; Smythe, John; Lougheed, Jane; Mondal, Tapas; Chitayat, David; McCrindle, Brian W.; Mital, Seema

2013-01-01

340

Major Risk Factors for Heart Disease: High Blood Cholesterol  

MedlinePLUS

... Major Risk Factors for Heart Disease High Blood Cholesterol High blood cholesterol is another major risk factor for heart disease ... can do something about. The higher your blood cholesterol level, the greater your risk for developing heart ...

341

What Are the Risk Factors for Breast Cancer in Men?  

MedlinePLUS

... in men? What are the risk factors for breast cancer in men? A risk factor is anything that ... old when they are diagnosed. Family history of breast cancer Breast cancer risk is increased if other members ...

342

Heart Disease Risk Factors | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine  

MedlinePLUS

... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Women's Heart Disease Heart Disease Risk Factors Past Issues / Winter 2014 Table of ... or habits may raise your risk for coronary heart disease (CHD). These conditions are known as risk factors. ...

343

Maternal Metabolic Conditions and Risk for Autism and Other Neurodevelopmental Disorders  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: We examined whether metabolic conditions (MCs) during pregnancy (diabetes, hypertension, and obesity) are associated with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), developmental delays (DD), or impairments in specific domains of development in the offspring. METHODS: Children aged 2 to 5 years (517 ASD, 172 DD, and 315 controls) were enrolled in the CHARGE (Childhood Autism Risks from Genetics and the Environment) study, a population-based, case-control investigation between January 2003 and June 2010. Eligible children were born in California, had parents who spoke English or Spanish, and were living with a biological parent in selected regions of California. Children’s diagnoses were confirmed by using standardized assessments. Information regarding maternal conditions was ascertained from medical records or structured interview with the mother. RESULTS: All MCs were more prevalent among case mothers compared with controls. Collectively, these conditions were associated with a higher likelihood of ASD and DD relative to controls (odds ratio: 1.61 [95% confidence interval: 1.10–2.37; odds ratio: 2.35 [95% confidence interval: 1.43–3.88], respectively). Among ASD cases, children of women with diabetes had Mullen Scales of Early Learning (MSEL) expressive language scores 0.4 SD lower than children of mothers without MCs (P < .01). Among children without ASD, those exposed to any MC scored lower on all MSEL and Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales (VABS) subscales and composites by at least 0.4 SD (P < .01 for each subscale/composite). CONCLUSIONS: Maternal MCs may be broadly associated with neurodevelopmental problems in children. With obesity rising steadily, these results appear to raise serious public health concerns. PMID:22492772

Walker, Cheryl K.; Bremer, Andrew A.; Baker, Alice S.; Ozonoff, Sally; Hansen, Robin L.; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva

2012-01-01

344

Maternal Benzene Exposure during Pregnancy and Risk of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Meta-Analysis of Epidemiologic Studies  

PubMed Central

Background The prevalence of childhood leukemia is increasing rapidly all over the world. However, studies on maternal benzene exposure during pregnancy and childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have not been systematically assessed. Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis to investigate the association between maternal solvent, paint, petroleum exposure, and smoking during pregnancy and risk of childhood ALL. Methods Relevant studies up to September 1st, 2013 were identified by searching the PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane library and the Web of Science databases. The effects were pooled using either fixed or random effect models based on the heterogeneity of the studies. Results Twenty-eight case-control studies and one cohort study were included for analysis, with a total of 16,695 cases and 1,472,786 controls involved. Pooled odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) for ALL was 1.25 (1.09, 1.45) for solvent, 1.23 (1.02, 1.47) for paint, 1.42 (1.10, 1.84) for petroleum exposure, and 0.99 (0.93, 1.06) for maternal smoking during pregnancy. No publication bias was found in this meta-analysis and consistent results were observed for subgroup and sensitivity analyses. Conclusions Childhood ALL was associated with maternal solvent, paint, and petroleum exposure during pregnancy. No association was found between ALL and maternal smoking during pregnancy. Avoidance of maternal occupational and environmental benzene exposure during pregnancy could contribute to a decrease in the risk of childhood ALL. PMID:25333868

Li, Zhen; Zhu, Jie; Bi, Yongyi; Bai, YuE; Wang, Hong

2014-01-01

345

[Venous thromboembolic pathology. New acquired risk factors or new data on acquired risk factors].  

PubMed

Many acquired risk factors may be identified to avoid the scholarly nature of these interminable lists, they may be reclassified with respect to their originality or their mechanism of action and those of current interest, whose data is still often hypothetical but recent, can be underlined. The following order may be proposed: risk factors which cannot be changed: age (which remains the principal factor) and gender (women being at higher risk than men); true acquired risk factors such as cancer, dysimmune conditions (more specifically, the antiphospholipid syndrome) and hormone replacement therapy (oestroprogestative contraception which has been updated by the debate about "third generation pills" and the risk related to progesterone-like substances themselves; hormone replacement therapy of the menopause which still has no clinical trials to assess "our" forms with natural hormones administered transdermally or transmucosally). Smoking has also been accused of being a risk factor for venous thrombosis in the latest clinical trials. Metabolic factors increase the risk of thrombosis: this is established for obesity, still suspected for hyperhomocystonaemia, the abnormalities being the result of complex gene-environment interactions. Other dysmetabolic conditions (diabetes, hypercholesterolaemia, hypertriglyceridaemia), responsible for arterial complications, are not clearly related to increased venous thromboembolic risk although a preventive effect of statins (yet another I) has just been reported. Similarly to these metabolic factors, the origin of which, genetic or environmental, is difficult to establish, interest has recently been shown in quantitative and functional changes in blood clotting factors. This has been established for arterial disease for fibrinogen but, in addition to this factor which slightly increases the risk of venous thrombosis, increases of factor VIII independent of inflammatory conditions, of blood group and Von Willebrand factor, which all influence the level of factor VIII, an increase by 150% of the normal increases the risk of venous thromboembolic disease by 3 or 4 times. As for factor VIII, increases in factor IX, factor XI, and resistance to activated C protein (independently of the Leiden mutation on the gene for factor V), are also associated in increased venous thromboembolic risk. Without knowing into which category to classify them, previous personal and family history of thromboembolic disease, in the absence of the already mentioned hereditary risk factors, must be noted. Finally, amongst the acquired risk factors, the authors also list conditions of blood stasis and vascular lesions with or without hypercoagulability (surgery, prolonged hospital stays, cardiac failure, paralysis, pregnancy...). Of these acquired conditions which increase the risk of thrombotic complications, particular attention has been given over the last few years to forced immobilisation in uncomfortable positions as in certain forms of transport. Although clinical reports have discordant results, it would seem that the risk is increased and the benefits of supportive elastic stockings have been confirmed. If the acquired risk is identified and quantified for a patient, it allows evaluation of global risk and the installation of appropriate therapeutic measures. PMID:11794976

Drouet, L

2001-11-01

346

Maternal smoking during pregnancy and postnatal exposure to environmental tobacco smoke as predisposition factors to acute respiratory infections.  

PubMed Central

This study compared susceptibility to respiratory morbidity in a cohort of 9-year-old children exposed congenitally and postnatally to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) to susceptibility in a cohort of unexposed children. The epidemiologic study included 1129 children: 594 boys and 535 girls attending the second grade of grammar schools in Kraków, Poland. We found strong evidence that children exposed to ETS in their homes were more susceptible to acute respiratory tract illnesses than unexposed children. A dose-response relationship between degree of exposure [for lower ETS exposure, odds ratio (OR) = 1.32; for higher ETS exposure, OR = 1.74] supports a causal explanation for the association observed. The significant trend of increased risk of respiratory infections due to ETS level in nonatopic children whose mothers did not smoke cigarettes during pregnancy suggests a direct effect of ETS exposure on the child's respiratory health. ETS combined with allergy nearly tripled the risk of acute respiratory tract illness (OR = 3.39; 95% CI, 1.93-5.93), and maternal smoking during pregnancy had a modifying effect on the risk of respiratory illnesses due to ETS after accounting for atopy. The stronger effect of ETS in atopic children and in those whose mothers smoked during pregnancy may be result of biologic interaction of endogenous and environmental factors. The results of this study are of relevance to public health policy, as children with higher risk of respiratory infections may be more susceptible to environmental hazards later in adolescence or in adulthood. Respiratory infections also increase demands for medical interventions in terms of outpatient services and hospital administrations. In addition, respiratory illnesses cause missed school days, and caring for a sick child may lead to absenteeism from work. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. PMID:9171991

Jedrychowski, W; Flak, E

1997-01-01

347

Children at risk: II. Risk factors and clinic utilization.  

PubMed

Using a strategy involving multiple raters and instruments, the authors compared 134 clinic subjects with controls matched on sex, age, and socioeconomic status to determine how various risk factors are related to clinic utilization apart from their effects on children's symptomatology. Parental psychopathology, family size, and marital status were most predictive of children's symptom levels, while stress levels, family size, and marital status were most predictive of clinic utilization. Although children's total symptom levels explained 27.6% of the variance in clinic utilization, other factors (family size, family history of divorce, stress, and parental psychopathology) explained an additional 13.2% of the variance. Findings indicate that clinicians and health care planners must carefully assess variables other than children's symptom levels in order to better understand children's mental health services utilization, develop more robust models of risk, and increase the effectiveness of our efforts directed towards prevention and intervention. PMID:2228937

Jensen, P S; Bloedau, L; Davis, H

1990-09-01

348

Do Canadian Prenatal Records Support Evidence-Based Practices to Reduce Maternal Smoking?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: Maternal smoking remains the most important modifiable risk factor for adverse perinatal outcomes. Integrating evidence-based screening questions and intervention guides for maternal smoking into standardized prenatal records may improve the identification and treatment of pregnant smokers. This study sought to identify and compare how prenatal records across Canadian provinces and territories currently address the issue of maternal tobacco use.

Sonia Semenic; Nancy Edwards

2006-01-01

349

Infant and parent factors associated with early maternal sensitivity: A caregiver-attachment systems approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

We examined variations in maternal sensitivity at 6 months of child age as a function of child negativity and maternal physiology. We expected maternal vagal withdrawal in response to infant negative affect to facilitate the maintenance of sensitivity, but only for mothers of securely attached children. One hundred and forty-eight infant-mother dyads were observed in multiple contexts at 6 months

W. Roger Mills-Koonce; Jean-Louis Gariépy; Cathi Propper; Kelly Suttona; Susan Calkins; Ginger Moore; Martha Cox

2007-01-01

350

Temporal Shifts in Cardiovascular Risk Factor Distribution  

PubMed Central

Background Complementary strategies to shift risk factor population distributions and target high-risk individuals are required to reduce the burden of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Purpose To examine secular changes in glucose and CVD risk factors over 20 years during an individual and population-based CVD prevention program in Västerbotten County, Sweden. Methods Population-based health promotion intervention was conducted and annual invitation for individuals turning 40, 50, and 60 years to attend a health assessment, including an oral glucose tolerance test, biochemical measures, and a questionnaire. Data were collected between 1991 and 2010, analyzed in 2012 and available for 120,929 individuals. Linear regression modeling examined age-adjusted differences in CVD risk factor means over time. Data were direct-age-standardized to compare disease prevalence. Results Between 1991–1995 and 2006–2010, mean age-adjusted cholesterol (men=?0.53, 95% CI=?0.55, ?0.50 mmol/L; women=?0.48, 95% CI=?0.50, ?0.45 mmol/L) and systolic blood pressure declined (men=?3.06, 95% CI=?3.43, ?2.70 mm Hg; women=?5.27, 95% CI=?5.64, ?4.90 mm Hg), with corresponding decreases in the age-standardized prevalence of hypertension and hyperlipidemia. Mean age-adjusted 2-hour plasma glucose (men=0.19, 95% CI=0.15, 0.23 mmol/L; women=0.08, 95% CI=0.04, 0.11 mmol/L) and BMI increased (men=1.12, 95% CI=1.04, 1.21; women=0.65, 95% CI=0.55, 0.75), with increases in the age-standardized prevalence of diabetes and obesity. Conclusions These data demonstrate the potential of combined individual- and population-based approaches to CVD risk factor control and highlight the need for additional strategies addressing hyperglycemia and obesity. PMID:24439344

Long, Grainne H.; Simmons, Rebecca K.; Norberg, Margareta; Wennberg, Patrik; Lindahl, Bernt; Rolandsson, Olov; Griffin, Simon J.; Weinehall, Lars

2014-01-01

351

Socioeconomic factors and the risk for sarcoma.  

PubMed

Sarcomas are a heterogeneous group of rare malignancies arising from mesenchymal tissue. Although several occupational exposures have been evaluated in association with sarcoma, little is known about the role of socioeconomic indicators such as education. Socioeconomic status has been found to be associated with risk of development of several types of cancers, primarily lung, gastric, and cervical cancers. We conducted a hospital-based case-control study to evaluate the association of socioeconomic level with the risk for sarcoma. A total of 371 incident cases of sarcoma were matched in terms of age, sex, and year of enrollment in the study with 742 cancer-free controls. Education and income levels were evaluated as the indicators of socioeconomic status. Higher education (college level) was associated with a significantly lower risk for sarcoma [odds ratio (OR)=0.48, 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.29-0.80], even after adjusting for important confounders. After stratifying by sex, significantly lower risk for sarcoma was observed among men who had college level education compared with men with a level of education of eighth grade or lower (OR=0.38, 95% CI=0.19-0.74). A significant association between education and the risk for sarcoma remained after stratifying by income (OR=0.49, 95% CI=0.28-0.86, among the low income group). When analyzed as a composite exposure, individuals with high education and high income status had significantly lower risk for sarcoma compared with those with low income and low education status (OR=0.41, 95% CI=0.23-0.71). Thus, socioeconomic factors may play a significant role in determining the risk for sarcoma and should be explored further to elucidate the underlying factors that may explain these sociodemographic inequalities related to sarcoma. PMID:24356343

Hampras, Shalaka S; Moysich, Kirsten B; Marimuthu, Sathiya P; Ravi, Vinod; Jayaprakash, Vijayvel

2014-11-01

352

Vaginal cuff dehiscence: Risk factors and management  

PubMed Central

Vaginal cuff dehiscence and evisceration are rare but serious complications of pelvic surgery, specifically hysterectomy. The data on risks of vaginal cuff dehiscence are variable and there is no consensus on how to manage this complication. In our review, we present a summary of the risk factors, presenting symptoms, precipitating events, and management options for patients who present with vaginal cuff dehiscence after pelvic surgery. In addition, we provide a review of the current literature on this important surgical outcome and suggestions for future research on the incidence and prevention of vaginal cuff dehiscence. PMID:21974989

Cronin, Beth; Sung, Vivian W.; Matteson, Kristen A.

2011-01-01

353

Effects of caesarean section on maternal health in low risk nulliparous women: a prospective matched cohort study in Shanghai, China  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Rates of caesarean section are progressively increasing in many parts of the world. As a result of psychosocial factors there has been an increasing tendency for pregnant women without justifiable medical indications for caesarean section to ask for this procedure in China. A critical examination of this issue in relation to maternal outcomes is important. At present there are

Bing-shun Wang; Li-feng Zhou; David Coulter; Hong Liang; Ye Zhong; Yu-na Guo; Li-ping Zhu; Xiao-ling Gao; Wei Yuan; Er-sheng Gao

2010-01-01

354

Maternal Clinical Diagnoses and Hospital Variation in the Risk of Cesarean Delivery: Analyses of a National US Hospital Discharge Database  

PubMed Central

Background Cesarean delivery is the most common inpatient surgery in the United States, where 1.3 million cesarean sections occur annually, and rates vary widely by hospital. Identifying sources of variation in cesarean use is crucial to improving the consistency and quality of obstetric care. We used hospital discharge records to examine the extent to which variability in the likelihood of cesarean section across US hospitals was attributable to individual women's clinical diagnoses. Methods and Findings Using data from the 2009 and 2010 Nationwide Inpatient Sample from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project—a 20% sample of US hospitals—we analyzed data for 1,475,457 births in 1,373 hospitals. We fitted multilevel logistic regression models (patients nested in hospitals). The outcome was cesarean (versus vaginal) delivery. Covariates included diagnosis of diabetes in pregnancy, hypertension in pregnancy, hemorrhage during pregnancy or placental complications, fetal distress, and fetal disproportion or obstructed labor; maternal age, race/ethnicity, and insurance status; and hospital size and location/teaching status. The cesarean section prevalence was 22.0% (95% confidence interval 22.0% to 22.1%) among women with no prior cesareans. In unadjusted models, the between-hospital variation in the individual risk of primary cesarean section was 0.14 (95% credible interval 0.12 to 0.15). The difference in the probability of having a cesarean delivery between hospitals was 25 percentage points. Hospital variability did not decrease after adjusting for patient diagnoses, socio-demographics, and hospital characteristics (0.16 [95% credible interval 0.14 to 0.18]). A limitation is that these data, while nationally representative, did not contain information on parity or gestational age. Conclusions Variability across hospitals in the individual risk of cesarean section is not decreased by accounting for differences in maternal diagnoses. These findings highlight the need for more comprehensive or linked data including parity and gestational age as well as examination of other factors—such as hospital policies, practices, and culture—in determining cesarean section use. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary PMID:25333943

Kozhimannil, Katy B.; Arcaya, Mariana C.; Subramanian, S. V.

2014-01-01

355

Maternal caffeine exposure impairs insulin secretion by pancreatic ?-cells and increases the risk of type II diabetes mellitus in offspring.  

PubMed

Maternal caffeine exposure may be one of the causes for intrauterine growth retardation and low birth weight (LBW), and increased risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in the adulthood has been associated with LBW. However, whether maternal caffeine exposure contributes to T2DM development of her offspring has not been fully investigated. We have investigated the influence of maternal caffeine exposure on glucose homeostasis in vivo and effects of long-term caffeine load on insulin secretion of ?-cells. The intake of caffeine during gestation markedly decreases birth weight and postnatal body weight of the offspring. Serum insulin levels of adult offspring after oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) were significantly lower in the caffeine group compared to the control, although plasma glucose levels were not significantly altered. Proteome analysis of pancreas of adult offspring identified 24 proteins that were differentially expressed between the caffeine and control groups, including proteins involved in energy metabolism. In a rat pancreatic ?-cell line Rin-5f cells, caffeine downregulated expression of one of the proteins involved in insulin synthesis, P4hb, and there was reduced transcriptional expression of insulin. While basal insulin secretion of caffeine-treated cells was elevated, insulin secretion after glucose challenge in long-term caffeine-treated cells was significantly reduced, with increased apoptosis of ?-cells. These results indicate that maternal caffeine exposure may result in potentially abnormal glucose homeostasis and increase the risk of T2DM in the offspring adulthood. PMID:24890676

Sun, Tingting; Guo, Jinghui; Chen, Hui; Zhang, Jieting; Zhang, Xiaohu; Jiang, Xiaohua; Wang, Fuqiang; Xu, Zhiyang; Huang, Xiaoyan; Sha, Jiahao; Chan, Hsiao Chang

2014-10-01

356

Maternal Exposure to Intimate Partner Violence and the Risk of Undernutrition Among Children Younger Than 5 Years in Bangladesh  

PubMed Central

Objectives. We examined the association between maternal experiences of intimate partner violence (IPV) and the risk of undernutrition among children younger than 5 years in Bangladesh. Methods. We used data from the 2007 Bangladesh Demographic Health Survey. Our analyses were based on the responses of 1851 married women living with at least 1 child younger than 5 years. Exposure was determined from maternal reports of physical and sexual IPV. Outcomes included underweight, stunting, and wasting. Results. Twenty-nine percent of the respondents had experienced IPV in the year preceding the survey. Maternal experience of any physical or sexual IPV was associated with an increased risk of stunting (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]?=?1.59; 95% confidence interval [CI]?=?1.23, 2.08) and underweight (AOR?=?1.33; 95% CI?=?1.04, 1.71) but was not significantly associated with wasting (AOR?=?1.08; 95% CI?=?0.78, 1.49). Conclusions. The association between maternal exposure to physical or sexual IPV and child underweight and stunting suggests that partner violence plays a significant role in compromising child health by impairing child nutrition. Our findings reinforce the evidence that improving child nutrition is an additional reason to strengthen efforts to protect women from physical and sexual IPV. PMID:22676499

Rahman, Mosiur; Yasuoka, Junko; Otsuka, Keiko; Yoshikawa, Kayoko; Jimba, Masamine

2012-01-01

357

Homocysteine as a risk factor for CVD mortality in men with other CVD risk factors: the Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor (KIHD) Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract. Virtanen JK, Voutilainen S, Alfthan G, Korhonen MJ, Rissanen TH, Mursu J, Kaplan GA, Salonen JT (University of Kuopio, Kuopio; National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland; University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, USA; and Oy Jurilab Ltd, Kuopio, Finland). Homocysteine as a risk factor for CVD mortality in men,with other CVD risk factors: the Kuopio Ischaemic,Heart Disease Risk Factor (KIHD)

J. K. V IRTANEN; T. H. R ISSANEN

2005-01-01

358

Maternal Dietary Intake of Vitamin A and Risk of Orofacial Clefts: A Population-Based Case-Control Study in Norway  

Microsoft Academic Search

A population-based case-control study was carried out in Norway between 1996 and 2001. The aim was to evaluate the association between maternal intake of vitamin A from diet and supplements and risk of having a baby with an orofacial cleft. Data on maternal dietary intake were available from 535 cases (188 with cleft palate only and 347 with cleft lip

Anne Marte W. Johansen; Rolv T. Lie; Allen J. Wilcox; Lene F. Andersen; Christian A. Drevon

2008-01-01

359

Maternal Health and HIV  

Microsoft Academic Search

The HIV\\/AIDS epidemic is one of the major factors affecting women's health, with 20 million women living with HIV and more than two million pregnancies in HIV-positive women each year. Most HIV infections in women are in resource-constrained settings where the risk of maternal morbidity and mortality is also unacceptably high, and where most of the 529,000 deaths from complications

James McIntyre

2005-01-01

360

Adverse Effects of Heavy Prenatal Maternal Smoking on Attentional Control in Children with ADHD  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: Exposure to heavy maternal cigarette smoking in pregnancy and severe maternal psychosocial stress during pregnancy appear to be important risk factors for the development of ADHD. This study aimed to determine whether these perinatal risk factors were associated with neuropsychological deficits commonly seen in ADHD. Method: We examined…

Motlagh, Maria G.; Sukhodolsky, Denis G.; Landeros-Weisenberger, Angeli; Katsovich, Liliya; Thompson, Nancy; Scahill, Lawrence; King, Robert A.; Peterson, Bradley S.; Schultz, Robert T.; Leckman, James F.

2011-01-01

361

Intensive risk factor control in stroke prevention  

PubMed Central

Stroke prevention is an urgent priority because of the aging of the population and the steep association of age and risk of stroke. Direct costs of stroke are expected to more than double in the US between 2012 and 2030. By getting everything right, patients can reduce the risk of stroke by 80% or more; however, getting everything right is a tall order. Roughly in order of importance, this requires smoking cessation, maintenance of a healthy weight, a Cretan Mediterranean diet, blood pressure control, lipid-lowering drugs, appropriate use of antiplatelet agents and anticoagulants, and appropriate carotid endarterectomy and stenting. A new approach called “treating arteries instead of targeting risk factors” appears promising but requires validation in randomized trials. PMID:24167723

2013-01-01

362

Maternal smoking during pregnancy and conduct problems in high-risk youth: a developmental framework.  

PubMed

Smoking during pregnancy is associated with adverse consequences for children. Most recently, it has been established as a risk factor for developmental psychopathology, specifically Conduct Disorder (CD). Although this association has been shown to be robust, developmental pathways from exposure to CD have not been established. We examined how prenatal exposure to cigarettes interacts with child and family factors to increase risk of CD symptoms in a longitudinal study of 10-year-old urban, African-American youth (N = 77). The effects of prenatal exposure at school age were moderated by child sex. Boys whose mothers smoked during pregnancy were significantly more likely to develop CD symptoms, but exposure did not increase risk in girls. A similar trend was found during infancy: prenatal smoking was associated with low sociability/negative emotionality only for boys. The effects of smoking during pregnancy were also moderated by the quality of the early caregiving environment. Exposed boys whose mothers were unresponsive during infancy were at increased risk of CD symptoms, but exposed boys with early responsive mothers were not. Prospective studies, with developmentally based measures of behavior across time, are critical for further elucidating pathways from prenatal exposure to cigarettes to the development of clinical disorder. The identification of a potentially modifiable, prenatal risk factor for early onset developmental psychopathology has important implications for prevention. PMID:12030696

Wakschlag, Lauren S; Hans, Sydney L

2002-01-01

363

Maternal History and Uterine Artery Doppler in the Assessment of Risk for Development of Early- and Late-Onset Preeclampsia and Intrauterine Growth Restriction  

PubMed Central

Objective. To examine the value of one-step uterine artery Doppler at 20 weeks of gestation in the prediction pre-eclampsia (PE) and/or intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR). Methods. A prospective multicentre study that included all women with singleton pregnancies at 19–22 weeks of gestation (w). The mean pulsatility index (mPI) of both uterine arteries was calculated. Receiver-operating characteristics curves (ROC) were drawn to compare uterine artery Doppler and maternal risk factors for the prediction of early-onset PE and/or IUGR (before 32 w) and late-onset PE and/or IUGR. Results. 6,586 women were included in the study. Complete outcome data was recorded for 6,035 of these women (91.6%). PE developed in 75 (1.2%) and IUGR in 69 (1.1%) cases. Uterine Doppler mPI was 0.99 and the 90th centile was 1.40. For 10% false-positive rate, uterine Doppler mPI identified 70.6% of pregnancies that subsequently developed early-onset PE and 73.3% of pregnancies that developed early-onset IUGR. The test had a lower detection rate for the late-onset forms of the disease (23.5% for PE and 30% for IUGR). Maternal history has a low sensitivity in the detection of early-onset cases, although it is better at detecting late-onset PE. Conclusion. Uterine artery Doppler and maternal risk factors seem to select two different populations - early and late-onset PE which might suggest a different pathogenesis. PMID:19936122

Llurba, Elisa; Carreras, Elena; Gratacos, Eduard; Juan, Miquel; Astor, Judith; Vives, Angels; Hermosilla, Eduard; Calero, Ines; Millan, Pilar; Garcia-Valdecasas, Barbara; Cabero, Lluis

2009-01-01

364

Risk factors for depression in adolescence.  

PubMed

Public health concern regarding depression has recently increased as a result of the rise in the rate of adolescent suicide, with a probable concomitant rise in the rate of depression in this age group. The rise appears to be both a period effect, in that increased rates are now observed across age categories, and a cohort effect, in that being born after 1960 also contributes to the increase. The clinical phenomena and epidemiology of depression in adolescence are reviewed. Diagnostic criteria for depressive mood and depressive syndrome are similar to those in adults. However, the predictive value of a depressive episode in adolescence, and whether the occurrence of depression in adolescence is a transient developmental experience or whether it predicts a particular subtype of future depression, are at present unknown. The familial, social and personal risk factors for adolescent depression are reviewed, The major factors are: parental history of affective illness, childhood experience of parental loss, and female gender. Other factors, such as birth order and sibling factors, socio-economic status, race, religion, geography, concomitant medical illness, intelligence, career aspirations, substance abuse and life events, are reviewed, although their relative contributions as risk factors are less clear-cut. It is proposed that cross-sectional, retrospective and longitudinal studies are required to clarify important areas of uncertainty. PMID:3889900

Wells, V E; Deykin, E Y; Klerman, G L

1985-01-01

365

Risk factors for hypospadias in China  

PubMed Central

This case-controlled study was designed to evaluate the association between various baseline parental factors and the risk of hypospadias in China. Patients were selected from tertiary referral hospitals in Anhui, a province in mid-eastern China. A questionnaire was given to the parents of each patient. The final database included 193 cases and 835 controls. The incidence of additional coexistent anomalies was 13.0%, primarily cryptorchidism (9.8%). Ten patients (5.1%) were from families with genital anomaly, including five families (2.6%) with hypospadias. The risks of hypospadias was higher for children of mothers > 35 (odds ratio [OR] =1.47) and < 18 (OR = 2.95) years of age, and in mothers who had consumed alcohol (OR = 2.67), used drugs (OR = 1.53) and had an infection (OR = 1.87) during pregnancy. The risk of hypospadias was also higher when mothers (OR = 1.68) and fathers (OR = 1.74) were engaged in agriculture. Other factors assessed were not associated with the risk of hypospadias. PMID:24875823

Xu, Ling-Fan; Liang, Chao-Zhao; Lipianskaya, Julia; Chen, Xian-Guo; Fan, Song; Zhang, Li; Zhou, Jun; Tai, Sheng; Jiang, Chang-Qin

2014-01-01

366

Risk factors for hypospadias in China.  

PubMed

This case-controlled study was designed to evaluate the association between various baseline parental factors and the risk of hypospadias in China. Patients were selected from tertiary referral hospitals in Anhui, a province in mid-eastern China. A questionnaire was given to the parents of each patient. The final database included 193 cases and 835 controls. The incidence of additional coexistent anomalies was 13.0%, primarily cryptorchidism (9.8%). Ten patients (5.1%) were from families with genital anomaly, including five families (2.6%) with hypospadias. The risks of hypospadias was higher for children of mothers > 35 (odds ratio [OR] =1.47) and < 18 (OR = 2.95) years of age, and in mothers who had consumed alcohol (OR = 2.67), used drugs (OR = 1.53) and had an infection (OR = 1.87) during pregnancy. The risk of hypospadias was also higher when mothers (OR = 1.68) and fathers (OR = 1.74) were engaged in agriculture. Other factors assessed were not associated with the risk of hypospadias. PMID:24875823

Xu, Ling-Fan; Liang, Chao-Zhao; Lipianskaya, Julia; Chen, Xian-Guo; Fan, Song; Zhang, Li; Zhou, Jun; Tai, Sheng; Jiang, Chang-Qin

2014-01-01

367

Management of patients with risk factors.  

PubMed

This review addresses concomitant diseases and risk factors in patients treated for diseases of the ears, nose and throat in outpatient and hospital services. Besides heart disease, lung disease, liver disease and kidney disease, this article also covers disorders of coagulation (including therapy with new oral anticoagulants) and electrolyte imbalance. Special attention is paid to the prophylaxis, diagnosis and treatment of perioperative delirium. It is also intended to help optimise the preparation for surgical procedures and pharmacotherapy during the hospital stay. PMID:24403970

Waldfahrer, Frank

2013-01-01

368

Treatment of Risk Factors to Prevent Stroke  

Microsoft Academic Search

Much of the decline in stroke incidence and mortality for the past several decades in Western countries has been attributed\\u000a to better treatment of risk factors. Many epidemiological studies and clinical trials confirmed the importance of managing\\u000a hypertension. Comparative trials of anti-hypertensive drugs or drug classes have not yielded clear results, but blood pressure\\u000a variability may play an important role

Junya Aoki; Ken Uchino

2011-01-01

369

Risk factors for uterine prolapse in Nepal  

Microsoft Academic Search

Uterine prolapse is a significant public health problem in Nepal. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of\\u000a uterine prolapse and to define possible risk factors for this disease in the Kathmandu Valley of Nepal. This clinical report\\u000a consists of an analysis of data from Dr. Iwamura Memorial Hospital and Research Center (IMHARC) in Bhaktapur, between July

Barbara Bodner-Adler; Chanda Shrivastava; Klaus Bodner

2007-01-01

370

Management of patients with risk factors  

PubMed Central

This review addresses concomitant diseases and risk factors in patients treated for diseases of the ears, nose and throat in outpatient and hospital services. Besides heart disease, lung disease, liver disease and kidney disease, this article also covers disorders of coagulation (including therapy with new oral anticoagulants) and electrolyte imbalance. Special attention is paid to the prophylaxis, diagnosis and treatment of perioperative delirium. It is also intended to help optimise the preparation for surgical procedures and pharmacotherapy during the hospital stay. PMID:24403970

Waldfahrer, Frank

2013-01-01

371

Obesity Policy Research - Risk Factor Monitoring & Methods  

Cancer.gov

Obesity is a risk factor for various types of cancer and for other chronic diseases and conditions such as type II diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease and stroke. Obesity prevalence in the United States has risen substantially in the last 50 years, particularly since the early 1980s. Experiences with tobacco control and other public health initiatives suggest that public policy may be a powerful tool to improve diet and physical activity behavior at the population level.

372

Risk factors for late kidney allograft failure  

Microsoft Academic Search

Risk factors for late kidney allograft failure.BackgroundWhile graft survival rates in the short term have improved dramatically, only a modest improvement has been shown in long-term graft survival rates. We evaluated the causes of late failure in renal allograft recipients treated with cyclosporine A (CsA).MethodsA total of 864 adults with a functioning graft at one year were evaluated. The end

Claudio Ponticelli; Margarita Villa; Giuseppe Montagnino; Antonio Tarantino

2002-01-01

373

Hepatocellular Carcinoma – Epidemiological Trends and Risk Factors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the third most common cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide with about 600,000 patients dying from the disease annually. In 70–90%, HCC develops on the background of chronic liver cirrhosis or inflammation. Risk factors and etiologies vary among geographical regions. In regions with a high incidence the majority of cases are related to HBV and HCV hepatitis.

Kerstin Schütte; Jan Bornschein; Peter Malfertheiner

2009-01-01

374

Risk Factors for Fluconazole-Resistant Candidemia ?  

PubMed Central

Previous studies have sought to determine the risk factors associated with candidemia caused by non-albicans Candida spp. or with potentially fluconazole-resistant Candida spp. (C. glabrata and C. krusei). Non-albicans Candida strains are a heterogeneous group that includes species with different levels of virulence, and only a limited number of C. glabrata isolates are resistant to fluconazole. We set out to identify the risk factors associated with microbiologically proven fluconazole-resistant candidemia. A prospective study including adult patients with candidemia was performed. Data were collected on patient demographics; underlying diseases; exposure to corticosteroids, antibiotics, or fluconazole; and invasive procedures. Risk factors associated either with non-albicans Candida spp. or potentially fluconazole-resistant Candida spp. (C. glabrata or C. krusei) or with Candida spp. with microbiologically confirmed fluconazole resistance were assessed using logistic regressions. We included 226 candidemia episodes. Non-albicans Candida isolates accounted for 53.1% of the fungal isolates, but only 18.2% of the cases were caused by potentially fluconazole-resistant organisms. Thirty isolates exhibited microbiologically confirmed fluconazole resistance. The multivariate analysis revealed that independent predictors associated with fluconazole-resistant Candida spp. were neutropenia (odds ratio [OR] = 4.94; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.50 to 16.20; P = 0.008), chronic renal disease (OR = 4.82; 95% CI = 1.47 to 15.88; P = 0.01), and previous fluconazole exposure (OR = 5.09; 95% CI = 1.66 to 15.6; P = 0.004). Independently significant variables associated with non-albicans Candida bloodstream infection or with potentially fluconazole-resistant Candida spp. did not include previous fluconazole exposure. We concluded that prior fluconazole treatment is an independent risk factor only for candidemia caused by microbiologically confirmed fluconazole resistant species. Our findings may be of value for selecting empirical antifungal therapy. PMID:20498325

Garnacho-Montero, Jose; Diaz-Martin, Ana; Garcia-Cabrera, Emilio; Ruiz Perez de Pipaon, Maite; Hernandez-Caballero, Clara; Aznar-Martin, Javier; Cisneros, Jose M.; Ortiz-Leyba, Carlos

2010-01-01

375

Tobacco as a Cardiovascular Risk Factor  

Microsoft Academic Search

Tobacco use in the form of cigarettes has long been established as a major risk factor for coronary heart disease (CHD). It\\u000a is the most preventable cause of mortality. Each year, cigarette smoking causes more than 400,000 deaths in the United States\\u000a alone, more than the number of American lives lost during World War I, Korea, and Vietnam combined (1,2).

Robyn Bergman Buchsbaum; Jeffrey Craig Buchsbaum

376

Prenatal, perinatal and neonatal risk factors of Autism Spectrum Disorder: a comprehensive epidemiological assessment from India.  

PubMed

Incidence of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is increasing across the globe and no data is available from India regarding the risk factors of ASD. In this regard a questionnaire based epidemiological assessment was carried out on prenatal, perinatal and neonatal risk factors of ASD across 8 cities in India. A retrospective cohort of 942 children was enrolled for the study. 471 children with ASD, under age of 10, were analyzed for pre-, peri-, and neonatal factors and were compared with the observations from equal number of controls. The quality control of the questionnaire and data collection was done thoroughly and the observations were computed statistically. A total of 25 factors were evaluated by unadjusted and adjusted analysis in this study. Among the prenatal factors considered, advanced maternal age, fetal distress and gestational respiratory infections were found to be associated with ASD and had an odds ratio of 1.8. Evaluation of perinatal and neonatal risk factors showed labor complications, pre-term birth, neonatal jaundice, delayed birth cry and birth asphyxia to be associated with ASD with an odds ratio greater than 1.5. This important study, first of its kind in Indian population gives a firsthand account of the relation of pre-, peri- and neonatal risk factors on ASD from an ethnically and socially diverse country like India, the impact of which was unknown earlier. This advocates additional focused investigations on physiological and genetic changes contributed by these risk factor inducing environments. PMID:23816633

Mamidala, Madhu Poornima; Polinedi, Anupama; P T V, Praveen Kumar; Rajesh, N; Vallamkonda, Omsai Ramesh; Udani, Vrajesh; Singhal, Nidhi; Rajesh, Vidya

2013-09-01

377

Maternal Adjustment and Infant Outcome in Medically Defined High-Risk Pregnancy.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Explored relation of biological and psychosocial risk factors to infant development among pregnant women who had pregestational diabetes, gestational diabetes, or were nondiabetic. Found that infants of diabetic mothers scored lower on the Bayley Scales at 1 year and revealed fewer positive and more negative behaviors than infants of nondiabetic…

Levy-Shiff, Rachel; Lerman, Maya; Har-Even, Dov; Hod, Moshe

2002-01-01

378

Studying Risk Factors Associated with Human Leptospirosis  

PubMed Central

Background: Leptospirosis is one of the most under diagnosed and underreported disease in both developed and developing countries including India. It is established that environmental conditions and occupational habit of the individuals put them at risk of acquiring disease, which varies from community to community. Various seroprevalence studies across the world have documented emerging situation of this neglected tropical disease, but limited have probed to identify the risk factors, especially in India. Objectives: The objective of this study was to identify the environmental and occupational risk factors associated with the disease in Udupi District. Materials and Methods: This population-based case-control study was carried out in Udupi, a District in Southern India from April 2012 until August 2012. Udupi is considered to be endemic for Leptospirosis and reported 116 confirmed cases in the year 2011. Seventy of 116 laboratory confirmed cases and 140 sex matched neighborhood healthy controls participated in the study. A predesigned, semi-structured and validated questionnaire was used for data collection through house to house visit and observations were noted about environmental conditions. Univariate analysis followed by multivariate analysis (back ward conditional logistic regression) was performed by using STATA version 9.2 (StataCorp, College Station, TX, USA) to identify potential risk factors. Results: Occupational factors such as outdoor activities (matched odds ratio [OR] of 3.95, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.19-13.0), presence of cut or wound at body parts during work (matched OR: 4.88, CI: 1.83-13.02) and environmental factors such as contact with rodents through using the food materials ate by rat (matched OR: 4.29, CI: 1.45-12.73) and contact with soil or water contaminated with urine of rat (matched OR: 4.58, CI: 1.43-14.67) were the risk factors identified to be associated with disease. Conclusion: Leptospirosis is still considered as neglected disease in the district. Early diagnosis and prompt treatment of cases can save many lives. However, there is a need of integrated rodent control measures with great effort to increase awareness and education among subjects in controlling the disease. PMID:24741223

Kamath, Ramachandra; Swain, Subhashisa; Pattanshetty, Sanjay; Nair, N Sreekumaran

2014-01-01

379

Environmental Risk Factors for Congenital Heart Disease in the Shandong Peninsula, China: A Hospital-based Case-Control Study  

PubMed Central

Background In China, and in Shandong province, the proportionate contribution of birth defects to infant mortality has increased, and congenital heart disease (CHD) is now the most common cause of birth defects. The cause of approximately 90% of cases of congenital heart disease is multifactorial. Little is known about modifiable environmental risk factors or regional differences. We investigated putative environmental risk factors for congenital heart disease in the Shandong province of China in order to improve prevention of CHD. Methods We conducted a hospital-based 1:2 matched case–control study of 164 patients with congenital heart diseases and 328 controls, all of whom were retrospectively interviewed. Univariate and multivariate analyses were conducted to identify environmental risk factors for CHD. Results The environmental risk factors associated with CHD were mother’s education level (odds ratio [OR], 0.31; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.15–0.67), neonatal asphyxia or hypoxia (OR, 3.74; 95% CI, 1.25–11.18), number of previous pregnancies (OR, 2.68; 95% CI, 1.44–4.97), maternal upper respiratory tract infection (OR, 4.12; 95% CI, 1.56–10.85), maternal infection (OR, 7.98; 95% CI, 2.14–29.72), maternal B-mode ultrasound examination (OR, 4.05; 95% CI, 1.48–11.08), and maternal mental stress (OR, 3.93; 95% CI, 1.94–7.94) during early pregnancy. No significant interactions were observed among these factors. Conclusions Augmenting maternal mental healthcare, obtaining regular health counseling and testing during pregnancy, preventing upper respiratory tract infections, limiting medication during early pregnancy, offering health promotion and health education to women of childbearing age (especially those with less formal education), and improving obstetric procedures and techniques may lower the occurrence of congenital heart disease. PMID:19398851

Liu, Shiwei; Liu, Junxiu; Tang, Ji; Ji, Jiafen; Chen, Jingwu; Liu, Changyun

2009-01-01

380

Factors associated with maternal choice to provide breast milk for low birthweight infants.  

PubMed Central

Factors associated with maternal choice to provide milk for premature infants were investigated in 925 mother/infant pairs in five hospitals. A well educated, married, primiparous mother aged 20 or over who delivered a baby boy by caesarean section was nearly 1000 times more likely to choose to express her milk than a mother who was poorly educated, single, multiparous, and aged under 20, delivering a female infant vaginally. Evidence from the five centres suggested that hospital staff have little influence on a mother's choice of feeding method. The major differences between the populations of babies whose mothers do or do not choose to provide milk, raise important issues concerning the interpretation of data from non-randomised clinical trials of feeding premature infants. PMID:3348648

Lucas, A; Cole, T J; Morley, R; Lucas, P J; Davis, J A; Bamford, M F; Crowle, P; Dossetor, J F; Pearse, R; Boon, A

1988-01-01

381

Disentangling nutritional factors and household characteristics related to child stunting and maternal overweight in Guatemala.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to identify nutritional factors and households characteristics associated with child stunting, maternal overweight and the familial coexistence of both types of malnutrition. In Guatemala, 2000, with nationally representative data, we selected 2261 households with at least one child aged 12-60 months and his/her mother. Nutritional status was assessed in children (e.g., stunting as height-for-age Z-score<-2) and mothers (e.g., overweight as body mass index > or =25 kg/m(2)) and identified the presence of both, child stunting and maternal overweight in the same household (SCOM). With logistic regression models we assessed the association of the malnutrition indicators with individual and household socio-economic and health characteristics. SCOM was identified in 18% of households. Socio-economic status (SES) of SCOM households was significantly lower than SES of households with non-stunted children. SCOM households, compared to those with normal-stature children and normal weight mothers, were more likely to have mothers of short stature (adjusted odds ratio-OR+/-95% CI=3.1 (2.1-4.7)), higher parity (1.2 (1.1-1.3)), currently working (1.7 (1.1-2.6), and self-identified as indigenous (2.0 (1.3-3.1)). Factors associated with stunting in children such as poverty, maternal short stature and indigenousness, were predictors of SCOM. These findings support the notion that SCOM is an extension of the malnutrition spectrum in the most disadvantaged population groups in countries that are in the middle of their nutrition transitions such as Guatemala. At the same time it revealed that these populations are already in the stage of chronic, nutrition related diseases associated with less physical activity and more access to highly processed foods of low cost, high dietary energy and low nutrient density in important population groups. The challenge for the decision makers and service deliverers is to guide SCOM households to deal equally with both extremes of the malnutrition continuum. PMID:20541480

Lee, Jounghee; Houser, Robert F; Must, Aviva; de Fulladolsa, Patricia Palma; Bermudez, Odilia I

2010-07-01

382

Levels of risk: maternal-, middle childhood-, and neighborhood-level predictors of adolescent disinhibitory behaviors from a longitudinal birth cohort in the United States  

PubMed Central

Objective Disruptive behavior in adolescence may indicate a broad vulnerability to disinhibition, which begins in childhood and culminates in adult externalizing psychopathology. We utilized prospective birth cohort data to assess childhood predictors of adolescent disinhibition. We also examined the effect of pre-adolescent fluctuation in cognitive ability. Methods Data were drawn from the Child Health and Development Study cohort, born 1961–1963; we used the subsample who participated in follow-up through adolescence (n=1752). Six indicators of behavioral disinhibition (BD), reported in adolescence, were analyzed as a count outcome. Predictor variables were drawn from several waves of data collection and included individual-, maternal-, and neighborhood-level measures. Cognitive ability was assessed with the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test at two time points. Neighborhood characteristics were assessed using census data from 1970. Results Number of BD indicators was predicted by maternal characteristics at prenatal assessment (maternal age and alcohol consumption) and age-10 assessment (maternal smoking, education, and separation from father). Characteristics of the child that predicted BD included birth order and conduct problems in middle childhood. Neighborhood poverty did not predict BD. Regardless of initial cognitive ability score, movement to a higher quartile by adolescence was associated with lower BD, while movement to a lower quartile was associated with higher BD. Conclusion Risk for adolescent BD exists prenatally and extends through middle childhood. Change in cognitive ability during pre-adolescence emerged as a potentially important factor that merits further investigation. A greater focus on the life course can aid in comprehensively understanding disruptive behavior emergence in adolescence. PMID:21483643

Keyes, Katherine M.; Keyes, Margaret A.; March, Dana; Susser, Ezra

2010-01-01

383

The Mental Health Risk of Mothers and Children: The Role of Maternal HIV Infection  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Rates of mental health problems in mothers and children in families affected by maternal HIV as compared to those not affected by maternal HIV but living in similar inner-city, low-SES, primarily ethnic-minority neighborhoods were examined. In addition, correspondence between mother and child mental health was explored. Interviews were conducted…

Brackis-Cott, Elizabeth; Mellins, Claude Ann; Dolezal, Curtis; Spiegel, Dina

2007-01-01

384

Adolescent Perceptions of Maternal Approval of Birth Control and Sexual Risk Behavior.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Used data from the Longitudinal Study of Adolescent health to examine the relationship between adolescent perception of maternal approval of the use of birth control and sexual outcomes over 12 months. Overall, adolescents' perceptions of maternal approval related to an increased likelihood of sexual intercourse in the next year and an increase in…

Jaccard, James; Dittus, Patricia J.

2000-01-01

385

It takes a village: community education predicts paediatric lower-respiratory infection risk better than maternal education  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundFew studies have evaluated the contribution of community and parental education levels in determining paediatric outcomes, including lower-respiratory infection (LRI), the leading global cause of child mortality.MethodsThe authors evaluated the association between community and maternal educational attainment and LRI risk among Medicaid-enrolled children age <2 years in Alaska, which has one of the highest LRI incidences ever reported. An individual-level

Bradford D Gessner; Marc-Andre R Chimonas; Sue C Grady

2010-01-01

386

Relation of Maternal Race to the Risk of Preterm, Non-Low Birth Weight Infants: a Population Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors used 1982-1983 Illinois vital records and 1980 US Census income data to determine the contnbution of maternal race to the risk of preterm (<260 days), non-low birth weight (>2,500 g) infants. This older cohort was chosen to avoid the confounding effect of cocaine associated with its increased local availability after 1985. In Chicago, the unadjusted preterm, non-low birth

James W. Collins; Nancy A. Hammond

387

Significant human risk factors in aircraft maintenance technicians  

Microsoft Academic Search

We examined significant human risk factors in aircraft maintenance technicians (AMTs) in the airline industry. We conducted an empirical study of Taiwan’s airlines to determine these risk factors and to illustrate how a quantifiable evaluation approach integrates experts’ opinions about the relative importance of risk factors. We developed an expert questionnaire and modified the human factors SHELL model to categorize

Yu-Hern Chang; Ying-Chun Wang

2010-01-01

388

Identification of caries risk factors in toddlers.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to identify risk factors to predict caries progression in toddlers in primary-healthcare settings for the cost-effective targeting of preventive and referral strategies. We examined 329 children (26 ± 6 mos old) twice, one year apart, in Indiana, USA. A 107-item structured interview was used to collect information from the primary caregiver and child on factors/beliefs/perceptions/behaviors that could affect caries development, transmission of bacteria, medical-dental health, and access to care. Bacterial levels, gingivitis, dental plaque, and caries experience were assessed. Multiple-variable logistic regression models of caries progression toward cavitation included family caries experience, transmission-related behaviors, dietary factors, health beliefs, and lower income, but differed in selected predictors/predictive power by race/ethnicity. Addition of clinical variables did not significantly improve the prediction. PMID:21173434

Fontana, M; Jackson, R; Eckert, G; Swigonski, N; Chin, J; Zandona, A Ferreira; Ando, M; Stookey, G K; Downs, S; Zero, D T

2011-02-01

389

Identification of Caries Risk Factors in Toddlers  

PubMed Central

The purpose of this study was to identify risk factors to predict caries progression in toddlers in primary-healthcare settings for the cost-effective targeting of preventive and referral strategies. We examined 329 children (26 ± 6 mos old) twice, one year apart, in Indiana, USA. A 107-item structured interview was used to collect information from the primary caregiver and child on factors/beliefs/perceptions/behaviors that could affect caries development, transmission of bacteria, medical-dental health, and access to care. Bacterial levels, gingivitis, dental plaque, and caries experience were assessed. Multiple-variable logistic regression models of caries progression toward cavitation included family caries experience, transmission-related behaviors, dietary factors, health beliefs, and lower income, but differed in selected predictors/predictive power by race/ethnicity. Addition of clinical variables did not significantly improve the prediction. PMID:21173434

Fontana, M.; Jackson, R.; Eckert, G.; Swigonski, N.; Chin, J.; Zandona, A. Ferreira; Ando, M.; Stookey, G.K.; Downs, S.; Zero, D.T.

2011-01-01

390

Work and Pregnancy: Individual and Organizational Factors Influencing Organizational Commitment, Timing of Maternity Leave, and Return to Work  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors surveyed 86 pregnant women (73%White, 8% Asian, 7% African American, 6% Hispanic, and1% Native American) to examine individual andorganizational factors associated with organizationalcommitment and planned timing of their maternity leavesand return to work after childbirth. Women whoseorganizations offered guaranteed jobs after childbirthplanned to work later into their pregnancies and toreturn to work sooner after childbirth. Women whoperceived supportive

Karen S. Lyness; Cynthia A. Thompson; Anne Marie Francesco; Michael K. Judiesch

1999-01-01

391

Interrelations between Maternal Smoking during Pregnancy, Birth Weight and Sociodemographic Factors in the Prediction of Early Cognitive Abilities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Maternal prenatal smoking, birth weight and sociodemographic factors were investigated in relation to cognitive abilities of 1544 children (aged 3.5 years) participating in the Quebec Longitudinal Study of Children's Development. The Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT) was used to assess verbal ability, the Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale…

Huijbregts, S. C. J.; Seguin, J. R.; Zelazo, P. D.; Parent, S.; Japel, C.; Tremblay, R. E.

2006-01-01

392

Understanding the Psychosocial and Environmental Factors and Barriers Affecting Utilization of Maternal Healthcare Services in Kalomo, Zambia: A Qualitative Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This qualitative study aimed to identify psychosocial and environmental factors contributing to low utilization of maternal healthcare services in Kalomo, Zambia. Twelve focus group discussions (n = 141) and 35 in-depth interviews were conducted in six health centre catchment areas. Focus group discussions comprised women of reproductive age…

Sialubanje, Cephas; Massar, Karlijn; Hamer, Davidson H.; Ruiter, Robert A. C.

2014-01-01

393

Incidence and Risk Factors of Parastomal Hernia  

PubMed Central

Purpose Among the various stoma complications, the parastomal hernia (PSH) is the most common. Prevention of PSH is very important to improve the quality of life and to prevent further serious complications. The aim of this study was to analyze the incidence and the risk factors of PSH. Methods From January 2002 and October 2008, we retrospectively reviewed 165 patients who underwent an end colostomy. As a routine oncologic follow-up, abdomino-pelvic computed tomography was used to examine the occurrence of the PSH. The associations of age, sex, body mass index (BMI), history of steroid use and comorbidities to the development of the PSH were analyzed. The median duration of the follow-up was 36 months (0 to 99 months). Results During follow-up, 50 patients developed a PSH and the 5-year cumulative incidence rate of a PSH, obtained by using the Kaplan-Meier method, was 37.8%. In the multivariate COX analysis, female gender (hazard ratio [HR], 3.29; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.77 to 6.11; P < 0.0001), age over 60 years (HR, 2.37; 95% CI, 1.26 to 4.46; P = 0.01), BMI more than 25 kg/m2 (HR, 1.8; 95% CI, 1.02 to 3.16; P = 0.04), and hypertension (HR, 2.08; 95% CI, 1.14 to 3.81; P = 0.02) were all independent risk factors for the development of a PSH. Conclusion The 5-year incidence rate of a PSH was 37.8%. The significant risk factors of a PSH were as follows: female gender, age over 60 years, BMI more than 25 kg/m2, and hypertension. Using a prophylactic mesh during colostomy formation might be advisable when the patients have these factors. PMID:23185703

Sohn, Yeun Ju; Shin, Ui Sup; Jee, Sun Hee

2012-01-01

394

Risk Factors for Idiopathic Optic Neuritis Recurrence  

PubMed Central

Background Approximately 30–50% of idiopathic optic neuritis (ION) patients experience one or multiple episodes of recurrence. The aim of this study was to search for risk factors for ION recurrence. Methods Clinical data on hospitalized patients diagnosed with ION between January 2003 and January 2011 at the First Affiliated Hospital of Guangxi Medical University were retrospectively collected. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed on factors that might cause ION recurrence. In total, 115 ION cases (32 recurrent and 83 non-recurrent cases) with complete data were analyzed. The length of the follow-up period ranged from 12 to 108 months (median: 42 months). Results The univariate analysis showed that the recurrence rate for unilateral ION was higher than that for bilateral ION (40% vs. 12%, p?=?0.001). Underlying diseases had a significant impact on recurrence (p<0.001): the recurrence rates due to neuromyelitis optica (NMO), multiple sclerosis (MS), demyelinating lesions alone of the central nervous system, and unknown causes were 89%, 70%, 41%, and 8.7%, respectively. The multivariate analysis showed that the factors causing relatively high recurrence rates included NMO (odds ratio [OR], 73.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 7.3 to 740.9), MS (OR, 33.9; 95% CI, 5.2 to 222.2), and demyelinating lesions alone (OR, 8.9; 95% CI, 2.3 to 34.4), unilateral involvement (OR, 5.7; 95% CI, 1.5 to 21.3), relatively low initial glucocorticoid dosage (equivalent to ?100 mg prednisone/day) (OR, 4.3; 95% CI, 1.0 to 17.9). Conclusion Underlying diseases, laterality (unilateral or bilateral), and initial glucocorticoid dosage are important risk factors of ION recurrence. Clinical physicians are advised to treat ION patients with a sufficient dose of glucocorticoid in the initial treatment stage to reduce the recurrence risk. PMID:25255372

Zhang, Yu-Jiao; Li, Kaijun; He, Jian-Feng

2014-01-01

395

Maternal and Fetal Factors Associated with Mortality and Morbidity in a Multi-Racial/Ethnic Registry of Anti-SSA/Ro Associated Cardiac Neonatal Lupus  

PubMed Central

Background Cardiac manifestations of neonatal lupus (cardiac-NL) include conduction disease and rarely an isolated cardiomyopathy. This study was initiated to determine the mortality and morbidity of cardiac-NL and associated risk factors in a multi-racial/ethnic US-based registry to provide insights into the pathogenesis of antibody mediated injury and data for counseling. Methods and Results Three hundred and twenty-five offspring exposed to maternal anti-SSA/Ro antibodies with cardiac-NL met entry criteria. Maternal, fetal echocardiographic, and neonatal risk factors were assessed for association with mortality. Fifty-seven (17.5%) died; 30% in utero. The probability of in utero death was 6%. The cumulative probability of survival at 10 years for a child born alive was 86%. Fetal echocardiographic risk factors associated with increased mortality in a multivariable analysis of all cases included hydrops and endocardial fibroelastosis (EFE). Significant predictors of in utero death were hydrops and earlier diagnosis, and for postnatal death, hydrops, EFE, and lower ventricular rate. Isolated heart block was associated with a 7.8% case fatality rate whereas the concomitant presence of dilated cardiomyopathy or EFE quadrupled the case fatality rate. There was a significantly higher case fatality rate in minorities compared to Caucasians, who were at a lower risk of hydrops and EFE. Pacing was required in 70% and cardiac transplantation in four children. Conclusion Nearly one-fifth of fetuses who develop cardiac-NL die from complications which are predicted by echocardiographic abnormalities consistent with antibody associated disease beyond the AV node. The disparity in outcomes observed between minorities and Caucasians warrants further investigation. PMID:21969015

Izmirly, Peter M.; Saxena, Amit; Kim, Mimi Y.; Wang, Dan; Sahl, Sara K.; Llanos, Carolina; Friedman, Deborah; Buyon, Jill P.

2011-01-01

396

Erosion--diagnosis and risk factors  

PubMed Central

Dental erosion is a multifactorial condition: The interplay of chemical, biological and behavioural factors is crucial and helps explain why some individuals exhibit more erosion than others. The erosive potential of erosive agents like acidic drinks or foodstuffs depends on chemical factors, e.g. pH, titratable acidity, mineral content, clearance on tooth surface and on its calcium-chelation properties. Biological factors such as saliva, acquired pellicle, tooth structure and positioning in relation to soft tissues and tongue are related to the pathogenesis of dental erosion. Furthermore, behavioural factors like eating and drinking habits, regular exercise with dehydration and decrease of salivary flow, excessive oral hygiene and, on the other side, an unhealthy lifestyle, e.g. chronic alcoholism, are predisposing factors for dental erosion. There is some evidence that dental erosion is growing steadily. To prevent further progression, it is important to detect this condition as early as possible. Dentists have to know the clinical appearance and possible signs of progression of erosive lesions and their causes such that adequate preventive and, if necessary, therapeutic measures can be initiated. The clinical examination has to be done systematically, and a comprehensive case history should be undertaken such that all risk factors will be revealed. PMID:18228059

Jaeggi, T.

2008-01-01

397

Allergy: A Risk Factor for Suicide?  

PubMed Central

Opinion statement The rates of depression, anxiety, and sleep disturbance (suicide risk factors) are greater in patients with allergic rhinitis than in the general population. The rate of allergy is also greater in patients with depression. Preliminary data suggest that patients with a history of allergy may have an increased rate of suicide. Clinicians should actively inquire to diagnose allergy in patients with depression and depression in patients with allergy. Spring peaks of suicide are highly replicated, but their origin is poorly understood. Preliminary epidemiologic data suggest that seasonal spring peaks in aeroallergens are associated with seasonal spring peaks in suicide. Our research in Brown Norway rats demonstrates that sensitization and exposure to aeroallergens induces anxiety-like and aggressive behaviors as well as allergy-related helper T-cell type 2 (Th2) cytokine gene expression in the prefrontal cortex. Thus, it is possible that sensitization and exposure to aeroallergens, which peak in spring, may be conducive to seasonal exacerbation of suicide risk factors such as anxiety, depression, hostility/ aggression, and sleep disturbance. Connecting allergy with suicide and suicide risk factors adds to previous neurologic literature connecting allergy with migraines and seizure disorders. Our recent report of Th2 (allergy-mediating) cytokine expression in the orbito-frontal cortex of suicide victims should lead to future studies to test the hypothesis that mediators of allergic inflammation in the nasal cavities may result in Th2 cytokine expression in the brain, influencing affect and behavioral modulation. Certain medications used to treat allergy can exacerbate suicide risk factors, potentially worsening suicide risk and even triggering suicide. Systemic (but not topical) corticosteroids have been associated with manic and depressive episodes and mixed mood states. Recently, the US Food and Drug Administration started investigating the possibility that montelukast may trigger suicide. Although this association requires further exploration and confirmation, clinicians should err on the side of caution, inquiring about past suicide attempts; hopelessness; reasons for living; and suicidal ideation, intent, or plan; and referring the patient to a mental health professional for evaluation if appropriate. PMID:18782509

Postolache, Teodor T.; Komarow, Hirsh; Tonelli, Leonardo H.

2008-01-01

398

Maternal health interventions in resource limited countries: a systematic review of packages, impacts and factors for change  

PubMed Central

Background The burden of maternal mortality in resource limited countries is still huge despite being at the top of the global public health agenda for over the last 20 years. We systematically reviewed the impacts of interventions on maternal health and factors for change in these countries. Methods A systematic review was carried out using the guidelines for Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA). Articles published in the English language reporting on implementation of interventions, their impacts and underlying factors for maternal health in resource limited countries in the past 23 years were searched from PubMed, Popline, African Index Medicus, internet sources including reproductive health gateway and Google, hand-searching, reference lists and grey literature. Results Out of a total of 5084 articles resulting from the search only 58 qualified for systematic review. Programs integrating multiple interventions were more likely to have significant positive impacts on maternal outcomes. Training in emergency obstetric care (EmOC), placement of care providers, refurbishment of existing health facility infrastructure and improved supply of drugs, consumables and equipment for obstetric care were the most frequent interventions integrated in 52% - 65% of all 54 reviewed programs. Statistically significant reduction of maternal mortality ratio and case fatality rate were reported in 55% and 40% of the programs respectively. Births in EmOC facilities and caesarean section rates increased significantly in 71% - 75% of programs using these indicators. Insufficient implementation of evidence-based interventions in resources limited countries was closely linked to a lack of national resources, leadership skills and end-users factors. Conclusions This article presents a list of evidenced-based packages of interventions for maternal health, their impacts and factors for change in resource limited countries. It indicates that no single magic bullet intervention exists for reduction of maternal mortality and that all interventional programs should be integrated in order to bring significant changes. State leaders and key actors in the health sectors in these countries and the international community are proposed to translate the lessons learnt into actions and intensify efforts in order to achieve the goals set for maternal health. PMID:21496315

2011-01-01

399

Risk factors for low birthweight in the public-hospitals at Peshawar, NWFP-Pakistan  

PubMed Central

Background Low birthweight is a widely used indicator of newborn health. This study investigates the association of birthweight <2.5 kg (LBW) with a wide range of factors related to geo-demographics, maternal health and pregnancy history in public hospitals at Peshawar, North West Frontier Province (NWFP) Pakistan. It is noted that that Low birthweight may arise for two different reasons, one related to gestational age and the other corresponding to births that are small for gestational age (SGA). Methods Data on geo-demographics, maternal health indicators, pregnancy history and outcome scores for newborn babies and their families (n = 1039) were collected prospectively between August and November 2003 in a cross-sectional survey of four public hospitals in Peshawar, NWFP-Pakistan. Crude and adjusted odds ratios were used to investigate the factors affecting incidence of LBW, by multivariate logistic regression. Gestational age was included as an explanatory variable therefore the additional covariates identified by model selection are expected to account for SGA. Results The main geo-demographic risk factors for SGA identified in this study, controlling for gestational age of less than 37 weeks, are maternal age, nationality and consanguinity. Presentation with anaemia and the history of previous abortion/miscarriage were also found to be significant independent factors. The adjusted odds ratio for gestational age showed the largest effect in explaining the incidence of LBW. The next highest odds ratio was for maternal age below 20 years. The explanatory model included two pairwise interactions, for which the predicted incidence figures for LBW show an increase among the Tribal area with presentation of anaemia, and among full term babies with their mothers having a previous history of abortion/miscarriage. Conclusion In addition to gestational age, specific factors related to geo-demographics (maternal age, consanguinity and nationality), maternal health (anaemia) and pregnancy history (abortion/miscarriage) were significantly associated with the incidence of LBW observed at the four hospitals surveyed in Peshawar. These results indicate that cultural factors can adversely affect the incidence of SGA in this area of Pakistan. PMID:18533023

Badshah, Sareer; Mason, Linda; McKelvie, Kenneth; Payne, Roger; Lisboa, Paulo JG

2008-01-01

400

Differences in Risk Factors for Retinopathy of Prematurity Development in Paired Twins: A Chinese Population Study  

PubMed Central

Purpose. To determine the differences in risk factors for retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) in paired twins. Methods. A retrospective medical record review was performed for all paired twins screened for ROP between 2007 and 2012. Screening was offered to very low birth weight (?1500 grams) and preterm (?32 weeks) neonates. Twins 1 and 2 were categorized based on the order of delivery. Maternal and neonatal covariates were analyzed using univariate and multivariate regression analyses for both ROP and Type 1 ROP. Results. In 34 pairs of Chinese twins, the mean gestational age (GA) was 30.2 ± 2.0 weeks. In Twin 1, smaller GA (OR = 0.44, P = 0.02), higher mean oxygen concentration (OR = 1.34, P = 0.03), presence of thrombocytopenia (OR = 1429.60, P < 0.0001), and intraventricular hemorrhage (OR = 18.67, P = 0.03) were significant risk factors for ROP. For Twin 2, a smaller GA (OR = 0.45, P = 0.03) was the only risk factor. There were no significant risk factors for ROP in Twin 1 or Twin 2 on multivariate analysis. Conclusion. In Chinese twin pairs, smaller GA was the only common risk factor for ROP while Twin 1 was more susceptible to the postnatal risks for ROP.

Cheng, Edith; Liu, Catherine C. L.; Chu, Benjamin C. Y.; Yuen, Can Y. F.

2014-01-01

401

Factors associated with breastfeeding self-efficacy: Maternal depression, infant weight gain, and milk-intake.  

E-print Network

??Recent evidence suggests that greater levels of breastfeeding self-efficacy are associated with breastfeeding continuation while lower levels are associated with maternal depression. The present study… (more)

Jackson, Shera

2012-01-01

402

Maternal Medication and Herbal Use and Risk for Hypospadias: Data from the National Birth Defects Prevention Study, 1997--2007  

PubMed Central

Purpose Investigate associations between maternal use of common medications and herbals during early pregnancy and risk for hypospadias in male infants. Methods We used data from the National Birth Defects Prevention Study, a multi-site, population-based, case-control study. We analyzed data from 1,537 infants with second-or third-degree isolated hypospadias and 4,314 liveborn male control infants without major birth defects, with estimated dates of delivery from 1997–2007. Exposure was reported use of prescription or over-the-counter medications or herbal products, from 1 month before to 4 months after conception. Adjusted odds ratios (aORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using multivariable logistic regression, adjusting for maternal age, race/ethnicity, education, pre-pregnancy BMI, previous live births, maternal sub-fertility, study site, and year. Results We assessed 64 medication and 24 herbal components. Maternal uses of most components were not associated with an increased risk of hypospadias. Two new associations were observed for venlafaxine (aOR 2.4; 95% CI 1.0, 6.0) and progestin only oral contraceptives (aOR 1.9, 95% CI 1.1, 3.2). The previously reported association for clomiphene citrate was confirmed (aOR 1.9, 95% CI 1.2, 3.0). Numbers were relatively small for exposure to other specific patterns of fertility agents, but elevated aORs were observed for the most common of them. Conclusions Overall, findings were reassuring that hypospadias is not associated with most medication components examined in this analysis. New associations will need to be confirmed in other studies. Increased risks for hypospadias associated with various fertility agents raises the possibility of confounding by underlying subfertility. PMID:23620412