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Sample records for risk surgical patients

  1. Bariatric surgery: three surgical techniques, patient care, risks, and outcomes.

    PubMed

    McGraw, Carrie A; Wool, Daniel B

    2015-08-01

    The prevalence of obesity in the United States is a serious health concern. Bariatric surgery is a recognized and accepted approach for addressing weight loss and health conditions that occur as a result of morbid or severe obesity. Lifestyle changes, dietary modifications, and regular exercise are required for optimal and lasting surgical weight loss. Perioperative care of bariatric patients requires the use of interventions that differ from those used for nonobese patients, including bariatric-specific equipment, intraoperative monitoring of blood glucose, and postoperative monitoring for respiratory compromise. This articles outlines the risks and typical outcomes associated with three common bariatric procedures-laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding, laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy, Roux-en-Y gastric bypass-to help perioperative nurses and other health care providers successfully advise patients and monitor their care for optimal outcomes. PMID:26227518

  2. Coordinating perioperative care for the 'high risk' general surgical patient using risk prediction scoring.

    PubMed

    Hafiz, Shaziz; Lees, Nicholas Peter

    2016-01-01

    Identifying 'high risk' (> 5% mortality score) emergency general surgical patients early, allows appropriate perioperative care to be allocated by securing critical care beds and ensuring the presence of senior surgeons and senior anesthetists intraoperatively. Scoring systems can be used to predict perioperative risk and coordinate resources perioperatively. Currently it is unclear which estimate of risk correlates with current resource deployment. A retrospective study was undertaken assessing the relationship between deployment of perioperative resources: senior surgeon, senior anesthetist and critical care bed. The study concluded that almost all high risk patients with high POSSUM mortality and morbidity scores had a consultant senior surgeon present intraoperatively. Critically unwell patients with higher operative severity and perioperative morbidity scores received higher care (HDU/ICU) beds postoperatively, ensuring that they received appropriate care if their condition deteriorated. Therefore POSSUM scoring should be used perioperatively in emergency cases to coordinate appropriate perioperative care for high risk general surgical patients. PMID:26901929

  3. Patient Selection and Surgical Management of High-Risk Patients with Morbid Obesity.

    PubMed

    Daniel Guerron, A; Portenier, Dana D

    2016-08-01

    Bariatric surgery is the most effective way to improve comorbidities related to obesity. Since the introduction of minimally invasive laparoscopic surgery in the bariatric surgery techniques, the number of procedures has increased substantially; advances in techniques and the transition from open to minimally invasive procedures have decreased morbidity and mortality. Multidisciplinary teams in charge of the operative planning, surgical act, and postoperative recovery are determinant in the success of the management of high-risk bariatric patients; careful identification and preoperative management of these higher-risk patients is crucial in decreasing complications after weight loss surgery. PMID:27473799

  4. [Assessment of surgical risk in patients with lower limb chronic critical ischaemia].

    PubMed

    Kazakov, Iu I; Lukin, I B; Sokolova, N Iu; Strakhov, M A

    2016-01-01

    Analysed herein are both immediate and remote results of surgical treatment of 93 patients presenting with chronic atherosclerotic occlusion of the femoral-popliteal-tibial segment in the stage of critical ischaemia. The patients were subjected to autovenous femoropopliteal bypass grafting to the isolated arterial segment or balloon angioplasty with stenting of the superficial femoral artery. While choosing the method of arterial reconstruction we assessed concomitant diseases, primarily lesions of the coronary and cerebral circulation. In order to objectively evaluate the patient state, we worked out a scale for assessing surgical risk. Survival rate without amputation after three years in patients with low risk amounted to 71.4%, in those with moderate risk to 60.0%, and in high-risk patients to 43.3%. Patients with initially high risk were found to have a high incidence rate of cardiac and cerebrovascular complications, exceeding 40%. It was shown that the worked out system of assessing the level of surgical risk objectively reflects the prognosis of patient survival following a reconstructive operation. This system of assessment may be appropriate while choosing an optimal method of arterial reconstruction (bypassing operation or endovascular intervention) in patients with atherosclerotic lesions of arteries of the femoropopliteal-tibial segment and critical ischaemia accompanied by severe concomitant pathology. Patients with high surgical risk should preferably be subjected to endovascular reconstruction, while those with low surgical risk should better undergo open shunting bypassing operation, and for those with moderate risk it is acceptable to perform both methods of arterial reconstruction. PMID:27626262

  5. Midregional Proadrenomedullin Improves Risk Stratification beyond Surgical Risk Scores in Patients Undergoing Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Schuetz, Philipp; Huber, Andreas; Müller, Beat; Maisano, Francesco; Taramasso, Maurizio; Moarof, Igal; Obeid, Slayman; Stähli, Barbara E.; Cahenzly, Martin; Binder, Ronald K.; Liebetrau, Christoph; Möllmann, Helge; Kim, Won-Keun; Hamm, Christian; Lüscher, Thomas F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Conventional surgical risk scores lack accuracy in risk stratification of patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). Elevated levels of midregional proadrenomedullin (MR-proADM) levels are associated with adverse outcome not only in patients with manifest chronic disease states, but also in the general population. Objectives We investigated the predictive value of MR-proADM for mortality in an unselected contemporary TAVR population. Methods We prospectively included 153 patients suffering from severe aortic stenosis who underwent TAVR from September 2013 to August 2014. This population was compared to an external validation cohort of 205 patients with severe aortic stenosis undergoing TAVR. The primary endpoint was all cause mortality. Results During a median follow-up of 258 days, 17 out of 153 patients who underwent TAVR died (11%). Patients with MR-proADM levels above the 75th percentile (≥ 1.3 nmol/l) had higher mortality (31% vs. 4%, HR 8.9, 95% CI 3.0–26.0, P < 0.01), whereas patients with EuroSCORE II scores above the 75th percentile (> 6.8) only showed a trend towards higher mortality (18% vs. 9%, HR 2.1, 95% CI 0.8–5.6, P = 0.13). The Harrell’s C-statistic was 0.58 (95% CI 0.45–0.82) for the EuroSCORE II, and consideration of baseline MR-proADM levels significantly improved discrimination (AUC = 0.84, 95% CI 0.71–0.92, P = 0.01). In bivariate analysis adjusted for EuroSCORE II, MR-proADM levels ≥1.3 nmol/l persisted as an independent predictor of mortality (HR 9.9, 95% CI (3.1–31.3), P <0.01) and improved the model’s net reclassification index (0.89, 95% CI (0.28–1.59). These results were confirmed in the independent validation cohort. Conclusions Our study identified MR-proADM as a novel predictor of mortality in patients undergoing TAVR. In the future, MR-proADM should be added to the commonly used EuroSCORE II for better risk stratification of patients suffering from severe aortic stenosis. PMID

  6. Surgical errors and risks – the head and neck cancer patient

    PubMed Central

    Harréus, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Head and neck surgery is one of the basic principles of head and neck cancer therapy. Surgical errors and malpractice can have fatal consequences for the treated patients. It can lead to functional impairment and has impact in future chances for disease related survival. There are many risks for head and neck surgeons that can cause errors and malpractice. To avoid surgical mistakes, thorough preoperative management of patients is mandatory. As there are ensuring operability, cautious evaluation of preoperative diagnostics and operative planning. Moreover knowledge of anatomical structures of the head and neck, of the medical studies and data as well as qualification in modern surgical techniques and the surgeons ability for critical self assessment are basic and important prerequisites for head and neck surgeons in order to make out risks and to prevent from mistakes. Additionally it is important to have profound knowledge in nutrition management of cancer patients, wound healing and to realize and to be able to deal with complications, when they occur. Despite all precaution and surgical care, errors and mistakes cannot always be avoided. For that it is important to be able to deal with mistakes and to establish an appropriate and clear communication and management for such events. The manuscript comments on recognition and prevention of risks and mistakes in the preoperative, operative and postoperative phase of head and neck cancer surgery. PMID:24403972

  7. Transcatheter versus surgical aortic valve replacement in intermediate risk patients: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Misenheimer, Jacob A.; Jones, Wesley; Bahekar, Amol; Caughey, Melissa; Ramm, Cassandra J.; Caranasos, Thomas G.; Yeung, Michael; Vavalle, John P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has been approved in patients with high or prohibited surgical risk for surgery for treatment of severe symptomatic aortic stenosis. Prospective studies examining the benefits of TAVR in intermediate risk patients are ongoing. Other smaller studies including lower risk patients have been conducted, but further meta-analysis of these studies is required to draw more broad comparisons. Methods A Medline search was conducted using standard methodology to search for clinical trials and observational studies including intermediate risk patients. We limited our meta-analysis to studies matching patient populations by propensity scores or randomization and examined clinical outcomes between TAVR and surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR). Results Analysis of the TAVR and SAVR cohorts revealed no significant differences in the outcomes of 30-day [OR (95% CI): 0.85 (0.57, 1.26)] or 1-year mortality [OR (95% CI): 0.96 (0.75, 1.23)]. A trend towards benefit with TAVR was noted in terms of neurological events and myocardial infarction (MI) without statistical significance. A statistically significant decrease in risk of post-procedural acute renal failure in the TAVR group [OR (95% CI): 0.52 (0.27, 0.99)] was observed, but so was a significantly higher rate of pacemaker implantations for the TAVR group [OR (95% CI): 6.51 (3.23, 13.12)]. Conclusions We conclude that in intermediate risk patients undergoing aortic valve replacement, the risk of mortality, neurological outcomes, and MI do not appear to be significantly different between TAVR and SAVR. However, there appears to be a significant reduction in risk of acute renal failure at the expense of an increased risk of requiring a permanent pacemaker in low and intermediate risk patients undergoing TAVR compared to SAVR. PMID:27280087

  8. Management of chronic empyema with unexpandable lung in poor surgical risk patients using an empyema tube

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Abhishek; Jantz, Michael A; Penley, Andrea M; Mehta, Hiren J

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: High preoperative risk precludes decortication and other surgical interventions in some patients with chronic empyema. We manage such patients by converting the chest tube into an “empyema tube,” cutting the tube near the skin and securing the end with a sterile clip to allow for open pleural drainage. The patient is followed serially, and the tube gradually withdrawn based on radiological resolution and amount of drainage. Methods: Between 2010 and 2014, patients with chronic empyema and unexpandable lung, deemed high-risk surgical candidates, had staged chest tube removal, and were included for the study. The volume of fluid drained, culture results, duration of drainage, functional status, and comorbidities were recorded. Measurements and Results: Eight patients qualified. All had resolution of infection. The tube was removed after an average of 73.6 ± 49.73 (95% confidence interval [CI]) days. The mean duration of antibiotic treatment was 5.37 ± 1.04 (95% CI) weeks. None required surgery or experienced complications from an empyema tube. Conclusion: A strategy of empyema tube drainage with staged removal is an option in appropriately selected patients with chronic empyema, unexpandable lung, and poor surgical candidacy. PMID:27185989

  9. The prevalence of risk factors for cardiovascular diseases among Polish surgical patients over 65 years

    PubMed Central

    Kołtuniuk, Aleksandra; Rosińczuk, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are the leading cause of mortality among adults in Poland. A number of risk factors have significant influence on CVD incidence. Early identification of risk factors related to our lifestyle facilitates taking proper actions aiming at the reduction of their negative impact on health. Aim The aim of the study was to compare the prevalence of CVD risk factors between patients aged over 65 years and patients of other age groups in surgical wards. Material and methods The study was conducted for assessment and finding the distribution of major risk factors of CVD among 420 patients aged 18–84 years who were hospitalized in surgical wards. Interview, anthropometric measurements, blood pressure, and fasting blood tests for biochemical analysis were conducted in all subjects. Statistical analysis of the material was performed using Student’s t-test, chi-square test, Fisher’s exact test, Mann–Whitney U-test, and analysis of variance. Results While abdominal obesity (83.3%), overweight and obesity (68%), hypertension (65.1%), hypercholesterolemia (33.3%), and low level of physical activity (29.1%) were the most common CVD risk factors among patients over 65 years old, abdominal obesity (36.2%), overweight and obesity (36.1%), and current smoking were the most common CVD risk factors among patients up to the age of 35. In the age group over 65, the least prevalent risk factors for CVD were diabetes mellitus (14.8%), depressive episodes (13.6%), abuse of alcohol (11.4%), and smoking (7.8%). In the group under 35 years, we have not reported any cases of hypercholesterolemia and a lesser number of patients suffered from diabetes and HTN. Conclusion Distribution of the major risk factors for CVD is quite high in the adult population, especially in the age group over 65, which can result in serious problems of health and increased rates of chronic diseases, especially CVDs. PMID:27257376

  10. Catheter-based or surgical repair of the highest risk secondary mitral regurgitation patients

    PubMed Central

    Arsalan, Mani; Squiers, John J.; DiMaio, J. Michael

    2015-01-01

    Surgical mitral valve repair (MVR) remains the standard of care for patients with severe valve incompetence with clear, proven benefit for patients with primary mitral regurgitation (MR). Secondary MR is a primary disease of the left ventricular (LV) myocardium. Up to 50% of patients develop secondary MR after an acute myocardial infarction (ischemic MR), with approximately 10% of these having severe MR. It is controversial as to whether surgical MVR is beneficial for these patients because valve repair or replacement does not correct the underlying disease. The increased perioperative risk due to decreased LV function makes clinical decision-making even more complex. The recently introduced less-invasive, catheter-based therapies are potential promising solutions for this dilemma. While the MitraClip device is already in widespread clinical use as a viable therapeutic option in higher-risk patients with primary MR and currently in investigational trials for secondary MR, several other devices for both repair and replacement are currently undergoing feasibility trials. Due to the complex structure of the mitral valve, the development of transcatheter mitral valve replacement has been much slower than that of transcatheter aortic valve replacement, but this approach may be an attractive therapeutic option in the future. Currently, the role of surgical therapy in comparison to transcatheter techniques in secondary MR is not well defined. PMID:26309831

  11. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in Lower Surgical Risk Patients: Review of Major Trials and Future Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Saji, Mike; Lim, D Scott

    2016-10-01

    Following the first successful transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) in 2002, TAVR has globally evolved to become a standard procedure in high-risk patients. Surgical aortic valve replacement in non-high-risk patients remains the gold standard for treatment of severe aortic stenosis. However, a paradigm shift appears to be occurring in the direction of treating lower-risk patients, and several studies have suggested its impact on clinical outcomes. In this review, we highlight the current status of TAVR in intermediate-risk patients and review major trials including Placement of AoRTic TraNscathetER (PARTNER) 2A randomized intermediate-risk trial using SAPIEN XT (Edwards Lifesciences Corp, Irvine, CA) recently presented with excellent outcomes and the lowest major complications rate at the American College of Cardiology's 65th Annual Scientific Session in Chicago. Clinical trials in low-risk patients using SAPIEN 3 and CoreValve Evolut R have just been launched, and they are going to be important milestones in the TAVR field. PMID:27600519

  12. Identification of the high risk emergency surgical patient: Which risk prediction model should be used?

    PubMed Central

    Stonelake, Stephen; Thomson, Peter; Suggett, Nigel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction National guidance states that all patients having emergency surgery should have a mortality risk assessment calculated on admission so that the ‘high risk’ patient can receive the appropriate seniority and level of care. We aimed to assess if peri-operative risk scoring tools could accurately calculate mortality and morbidity risk. Methods Mortality risk scores for 86 consecutive emergency laparotomies, were calculated using pre-operative (ASA, Lee index) and post-operative (POSSUM, P-POSSUM and CR-POSSUM) risk calculation tools. Morbidity risk scores were calculated using the POSSUM predicted morbidity and compared against actual morbidity according to the Clavien–Dindo classification. Results The actual mortality was 10.5%. The average predicted risk scores for all laparotomies were: ASA 26.5%, Lee Index 2.5%, POSSUM 29.5%, P-POSSUM 18.5%, CR-POSSUM 10.5%. Complications occurred following 67 laparotomies (78%). The majority (51%) of complications were classified as Clavien–Dindo grade 2–3 (non-life-threatening). Patients having a POSSUM morbidity risk of greater than 50% developed significantly more life-threatening complications (CD 4–5) compared with those who predicted less than or equal to 50% morbidity risk (P = 0.01). Discussion Pre-operative risk stratification remains a challenge because the Lee Index under-predicts and ASA over-predicts mortality risk. Post-operative risk scoring using the CR-POSSUM is more accurate and we suggest can be used to identify patients who require intensive care post-operatively. Conclusions In the absence of accurate risk scoring tools that can be used on admission to hospital it is not possible to reliably audit the achievement of national standards of care for the ‘high-risk’ patient. PMID:26468369

  13. TOTAL LYMPHOCYTE COUNT AND SERUM ALBUMIN AS PREDICTORS OF NUTRITIONAL RISK IN SURGICAL PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    ROCHA, Naruna Pereira; FORTES, Renata Costa

    2015-01-01

    Background: Early detection of changes in nutritional status is important for a better approach to the surgical patient. There are several nutritional measures in clinical practice, but there is not a complete method for determining the nutritional status, so, health professionals should only choose the best method to use. Aim: To evaluate the total lymphocyte count and albumin as predictors of identification of nutritional risk in surgical patients. Methods: Prospective longitudinal study was conducted with 69 patients undergoing surgery of the gastrointestinal tract. The assessment of nutritional status was evaluated by objective methods (anthropometry and biochemical tests) and subjective methods (subjective global assessment). Results: All parameters used in the nutritional assessment detected a high prevalence of malnutrition, with the exception of BMI which detected only 7.2% (n=5). The albumin (p=0.01), the total lymphocytes count (p=0.02), the percentage of adequacy of skinfolds (p<0.002) and the subjective global assessment (p<0.001) proved to be useful as predictors of risk of postoperative complications, since the smaller the values of albumin and lymphocyte count and higher the score the subjective global assessment were higher risks of surgical complications. Conclusions: A high prevalence of malnutrition was found, except for BMI. The use of albumin and total lymphocyte count were good predictor for the risk of postoperative complications and when used with other methods of assessing the nutritional status, such as the subjective global assessment and the percentage of adequacy of skinfolds, can be useful for identification of nutritional risk and postoperative complications. PMID:26537145

  14. Percutaneous Cholecystostomy for Patients with Acute Cholecystitis and an Increased Surgical Risk

    SciTech Connect

    Overhagen, Hans van; Meyers, Hjalmar; Tilanus, Hugo W.; Jeekel, Johannes; Lameris, Johan S.

    1996-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate percutaneous cholecystostomy in patients with acute cholecystitis and an increased surgical risk. Methods: Thirty-three patients with acute cholecystitis (calculous, n= 22; acalculous, n= 11) underwent percutaneous cholecystostomy by means of a transhepatic (n= 21) or transperitoneal (n= 12) access route. Clinical and laboratory parameters were retrospectively studied to determine the benefit from cholecystostomy. Results: All procedures were technically successful. Twenty-two (67%) patients improved clinically within 48 hr; showing a significant decrease in body temperature (n= 13), normalization of the white blood cell count (n= 3), or both (n= 6). There were 6 (18%) minor/moderate complications (transhepatic access, n= 3; transperitoneal access, n= 3). Further treatment for patients with calculous cholecystitis was cholecystectomy (n= 9) and percutaneous and endoscopic stone removal (n= 8). Further treatment for patients with acalculous cholecystitis was cholecystectomy (n= 2) and gallbladder ablation (n= 2). There were 4 deaths (12%) either in hospital or within 30 days of drainage; none of the deaths was procedure-related. Conclusions: Percutaneous cholecystostomy is a safe and effective procedure for patients with acute cholecystitis. For most patients with acalculous cholecystitis percutaneous cholecystostomy may be considered a definitive therapy. In calculous disease this treatment is often only temporizing and a definitive surgical, endoscopic, or radiologic treatment becomes necessary.

  15. Risk factors affecting the survival rate in patients with symptomatic pericardial effusion undergoing surgical intervention

    PubMed Central

    Mirhosseini, Seyed Mohsen; Fakhri, Mohammad; Mozaffary, Amirhossein; Lotfaliany, Mojtaba; Behzadnia, Neda; Ansari Aval, Zahra; Ghiasi, Seyed Mohammad Saeed; Boloursaz, Mohammad Reza; Masjedi, Mohammad Reza

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The optimal management and treatment of pericardial effusion are still controversial. There is limited data related to the risk factors affecting survival in these patients. The aim of this study was to determine the risk factors affecting the survival rate of patients with symptomatic pericardial effusion who underwent surgical interventions. METHODS From 2004 to 2011, we retrospectively analysed 153 patients who underwent subxiphoid pericardial window as their surgical intervention to drain pericardial effusions at the National Research Institute of Tuberculosis and Lung diseases (NRITLD). To determine the effects of risk factors on survival rate, demographic data, clinical records, echocardiographic data, computed tomographic and cytopathological findings and also operative information of patients were recorded. Patients were followed annually until the last clinical follow-up (August 2011). To determine the prognostic factors affecting survival, both univariate analysis and multivariate Cox proportional hazards model were utilized. RESULTS There were 89 men and 64 women with a mean age of 50.3 ± 15.5 years. The most prevalent symptom was dyspnoea. Concurrent malignancies were present in 66 patients. Lungs were the most prevalent primary site for malignancy. The median duration of follow-up was 15 (range 1–85 months). Six-month, 1-year and 18-month survival rates were 85.6, 61.4 and 36.6%, respectively. In a multivariate analysis, positive history of lung cancer (hazard ratio [HR] 2.894, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.362–6.147, P = 0.006) or other organ cancers (HR 2.315, 95% CI 1.009–50311, P = 0.048), presence of a mass in the computed tomography (HR 1.985, 95% CI 1.100–3.581, P = 0.023), and echocardiographic findings compatible with tamponade (HR 1.745, 95% CI 1.048–2.90 P = 0.032) were the three independent predictors of postoperative death. CONCLUSIONS In the surgical management of pericardial effusion, patients with underlying

  16. Risk stratification for the recurrence of trigger thumb after surgical release in the paediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Edwards, D S; Richards, R H

    2016-08-01

    Trigger thumb, or stenosing tenovaginitis, is a relatively uncommon condition affecting the flexor pollicis longus tendon of children. The condition is characterized by the formation of a nodule within the tendon and thickening of the tendon sheath as it passes through the flexor pulley of the thumb at the level of the metacarpo-phalangeal joint. The optimum age for surgical intervention continues to be discussed. The aim of this study is to establish the temporal relationship and surgical variables to determine factors that may contribute to recurrence of the condition. A retrospective analysis of the entire surgical logbook and patient notes of a stand-alone consultant paediatric orthopaedic practice was scrutinized. 94 patients, 107 thumbs, over a 13-year period were operated on for trigger thumb. The recurrence rate was found to be 5.61 %. The average age of patients at primary release who went on to recurrence was 2.8 years, which is significantly younger than those that did not recur (p = 0.044). Sensitivity analysis revealed that the primary procedure at an age of less than 2.5 years confers a higher risk of recurrence. The data presented here advocate surgical release of trigger thumb after 2½ years of age, a senior surgeon as lead operator and a transverse skin incision at the level of the nodule or a more extensive "zig-zag" one to clearly see the structures to be released. We recommend that the surgeon ensures the stenosing pulley and sheath are released in their entirety. PMID:27352865

  17. Intraocular surgery in a large diabetes patient population: risk factors and surgical results.

    PubMed

    Ostri, Christoffer

    2014-05-01

    The prevalence of diabetes is on the increase in developed countries. Accordingly, the prevention and treatment of vision-threatening diabetic eye complications is assuming greater importance. The overall aim of this thesis is to analyse risk factors for intraocular surgery in a large diabetes population and to report surgical results. The specific objectives are to (1) estimate the incidence of diabetic vitrectomy and analyse risk factors (Study I), (2) report long-term results, prognostic factors and incidence of cataract surgery after diabetic vitrectomy (Study II), (3) report results and prognostic factors after cataract surgery in diabetes patients (Study III) and (4) analyse risk factors for diabetic papillopathy with emphasis on metabolic control variability (Study IV). All studies are based on a close-to-complete national surgery register and a large, closely followed diabetic retinopathy screening population. Study I (cohort study, 3980 type 1 diabetes patients) illustrates that diabetic vitrectomy is rarely required in a diabetes patient population with varying degrees of diabetic retinopathy. The risk of reaching diabetic vitrectomy increases fourfold with poor metabolic control, defined as glycosylated haemoglobin A1c > 75 mmol/mol (~9%), which points to good metabolic control as an important preventive measure. Study II (cohort study, 167 diabetes patients) shows that most diabetic vitrectomy patients stand to gain visual acuity ≥0.3 after surgery. Visual acuity is stable after 1 year, and the stability is maintained through 10 years of follow-up. The use of silicone oil for endotamponade is a consistent long-term predictor of low vision after surgery. The risk of requiring cataract surgery after diabetic vitrectomy is substantial, and the risk increases if silicone oil is used. Study III (cohort study, 285 diabetes patients) shows, on the other hand, that diabetes patients can expect a significant improvement in visual acuity after cataract

  18. Risk of Orthopedic Surgical Site Infections in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis Treated with Antitumor Necrosis Factor Alfa Therapy

    PubMed Central

    da Cunha, Bernardo Matos; Maria Henrique da Mota, Licia; dos Santos-Neto, Leopoldo Luiz

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. International guidelines recommend interruption of anti-TNF medications in the perioperative period, but there are no randomized trials to support such recommendation. Objectives. To study literature evidence assessing the risk of surgical site infections in orthopedic surgery patients with RA using anti-TNF drugs, compared to untreated patients or those using conventional DMARD. Methods. Systematic review of cohort studies is concerning surgical site infections in orthopedic procedures in patients with RA. Results. Three studies were selected. Only one was considered of high-quality, albeit with low statistical power. The review resulted in inconclusive data, since the best quality study showed no significant differences between groups, while others showed increased risk of infections in patients using anti-TNF medications. Conclusion. It is unclear whether patients with RA using anti-TNF medications are at increased risk of surgical site infections. Randomized controlled trials or new high quality observational studies are needed to clarify the issue. PMID:22500176

  19. Matrix metalloproteinases and risk stratification in patients undergoing surgical revascularisation for critical limb ischaemia.

    PubMed

    De Caridi, Giovanni; Massara, Mafalda; Spinelli, Francesco; David, Antonio; Gangemi, Sebastiano; Fugetto, Francesco; Grande, Raffaele; Butrico, Lucia; Stefanelli, Roberta; Colosimo, Manuela; de Franciscis, Stefano; Serra, Raffaele

    2016-08-01

    Critical limb ischaemia (CLI) is the most advanced form of peripheral artery disease (PAD) and it is often associated with foot gangrene, which may lead to major amputation of lower limbs, and also with a higher risk of death due to fatal cardiovascular events. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) seem to be involved in atherosclerosis, PAD and CLI. Aim of this study was to evaluate variations in MMP serum levels in patients affected by CLI, before and after lower limb surgical revascularisation through prosthetic or venous bypass. A total of 29 patients (7 females and 22 males, mean age 73·4 years, range 65-83 years) suffering from CLI and submitted to lower extremity bypass (LEB) in our Institution were recruited. Seven patients (group I) underwent LEB using synthetic polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) graft material and 22 patients (group II) underwent LEB using autogenous veins. Moreover, 30 healthy age-sex-matched subjects were also enrolled as controls (group III). We documented significantly higher serum MMPs levels (P < 0·01) in patients with CLI (groups I and II) with respect to control group (group III). Finally, five patients with CLI (17·2%) showed poor outcomes (major amputations or death), and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) test showed very high levels of MMP-1 and MMP-8. MMP serum levels seem to be able to predict the clinical outcomes of patients with CLI. PMID:26012891

  20. TIMP2•IGFBP7 biomarker panel accurately predicts acute kidney injury in high-risk surgical patients

    PubMed Central

    Gunnerson, Kyle J.; Shaw, Andrew D.; Chawla, Lakhmir S.; Bihorac, Azra; Al-Khafaji, Ali; Kashani, Kianoush; Lissauer, Matthew; Shi, Jing; Walker, Michael G.; Kellum, John A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Acute kidney injury (AKI) is an important complication in surgical patients. Existing biomarkers and clinical prediction models underestimate the risk for developing AKI. We recently reported data from two trials of 728 and 408 critically ill adult patients in whom urinary TIMP2•IGFBP7 (NephroCheck, Astute Medical) was used to identify patients at risk of developing AKI. Here we report a preplanned analysis of surgical patients from both trials to assess whether urinary tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 2 (TIMP-2) and insulin-like growth factor–binding protein 7 (IGFBP7) accurately identify surgical patients at risk of developing AKI. STUDY DESIGN We enrolled adult surgical patients at risk for AKI who were admitted to one of 39 intensive care units across Europe and North America. The primary end point was moderate-severe AKI (equivalent to KDIGO [Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes] stages 2–3) within 12 hours of enrollment. Biomarker performance was assessed using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, integrated discrimination improvement, and category-free net reclassification improvement. RESULTS A total of 375 patients were included in the final analysis of whom 35 (9%) developed moderate-severe AKI within 12 hours. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for [TIMP-2]•[IGFBP7] alone was 0.84 (95% confidence interval, 0.76–0.90; p < 0.0001). Biomarker performance was robust in sensitivity analysis across predefined subgroups (urgency and type of surgery). CONCLUSION For postoperative surgical intensive care unit patients, a single urinary TIMP2•IGFBP7 test accurately identified patients at risk for developing AKI within the ensuing 12 hours and its inclusion in clinical risk prediction models significantly enhances their performance. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE Prognostic study, level I. PMID:26816218

  1. Prospective trial of supranormal values of survivors as therapeutic goals in high-risk surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Shoemaker, W C; Appel, P L; Kram, H B; Waxman, K; Lee, T S

    1988-12-01

    Survivors of high-risk surgical operations were previously observed to have significantly higher mean CI, DO2, and VO2 than nonsurvivors. The hypothesis was proposed that increased CI and DO2 are circulatory compensations for increased postoperative metabolism. We tested this hypothesis in two series. In series 1, prospectively allocated by services, mortality and morbidity of the control group were significantly greater than those of the protocol group. In series 2, patients who fulfilled previously defined high-risk criteria were preoperatively randomized to one of three monitoring/treatment groups: CVP-control group, PA-control group and PA-protocol group. Postoperative mortalities in the CVP-control and PA-control groups were not statistically significantly different, but PA-protocol group mortality was significantly reduced compared with its control group. The PA-protocol group had reduced complications, duration of hospitalization, duration in ICU, and mechanical ventilation, and reduced costs when the PA catheter was placed preoperatively and used to augment circulatory responses. PMID:3191758

  2. Fluoroscopy-Guided Percutaneous Gallstone Removal Using a 12-Fr Sheath in High-Risk Surgical Patients with Acute Cholecystitis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yong Joo; Shin, Tae Beom

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the technical feasibility and clinical efficacy of percutaneous transhepatic cholecystolithotomy under fluoroscopic guidance in high-risk surgical patients with acute cholecystitis. Materials and Methods Sixty-three consecutive patients of high surgical risk with acute calculous cholecystitis underwent percutaneous transhepatic gallstone removal under conscious sedation. The stones were extracted through the 12-Fr sheath using a Wittich nitinol stone basket under fluoroscopic guidance on three days after performing a percutaneous cholecystostomy. Large or hard stones were fragmented using either the snare guide wire technique or the metallic cannula technique. Results Gallstones were successfully removed from 59 of the 63 patients (94%). Reasons for stone removal failure included the inability to grasp a large stone in two patients, and the loss of tract during the procedure in two patients with a contracted gallbladder. The mean hospitalization duration was 7.3 days for acute cholecystitis patients and 9.4 days for gallbladder empyema patients. Bile peritonitis requiring percutaneous drainage developed in two patients. No symptomatic recurrence occurred during follow-up (mean, 608.3 days). Conclusion Fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous gallstone removal using a 12-Fr sheath is technically feasible and clinically effective in high-risk surgical patients with acute cholecystitis. PMID:21430938

  3. Risk Factors Associated with Loco-Regional Failure after Surgical Resection in Patients with Resectable Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun Ju; Lee, Woo Jung; Kang, Chang Moo; Hwang, Ho Kyoung; Bang, Seung Min; Song, Si Young; Seong, Jinsil

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the risk factors associated with loco-regional failure after surgical resection and to identify the subgroup that can obtain benefits from adjuvant radiotherapy (RT). Materials and Methods We identified patients treated with surgical resection for resectable pancreatic cancer at Severance hospital between January 1993 and December 2014. Patients who received any neoadjuvant or adjuvant RT were excluded. A total of 175 patients were included. Adjuvant chemotherapy was performed in 107 patients with either a gemcitabine-based regimen (65.4%) or 5-FU based one (34.9%). Results The median loco-regional failure-free survival (LRFFS) and overall survival (OS) were 23.9 and 33.6 months, respectively. A recurrence developed in 108 of 175 patients (61.7%). The predominant pattern of the first failure was distant (42.4%) and 47 patients (26.9%) developed local failure as the first site of recurrence. Multivariate analysis identified initial CA 19–9 ≥ 200 U/mL, N1 stage, perineural invasion (PNI), and resection margin as significant independent risk factors for LRFFS. Patients were divided into four groups according to the number of risk factors, including initial CA 19–9, N stage, and PNI. Patients exhibiting two risk factors had 3.2-fold higher loco-regional failure (P < 0.001) and patients with all risk factors showed a 6.5-fold increase (P < 0.001) compared with those with no risk factors. In the analysis for OS, patients with more than two risk factors also had 3.3- to 6-fold higher risk of death with statistical significance. Conclusion The results suggest that patients who exhibit more than two risk factors have a higher risk of locoregional failure and death. This subgroup could be benefited by the effective local adjuvant treatment. PMID:27332708

  4. Parkinson syndrome. A significant risk factor in the patient with acute surgical disorder.

    PubMed

    Simon, D; Shapira, O M; Mor, E; Pfefferman, R

    1992-01-01

    Ten Parkinsonic patients presenting with acute surgical disease were studied to determine the effects of both conditions on each other and the patient's outcome. Severe motion and communication disturbances led, invariably, to a delay in seeking medical assistance, with most of the patients' presenting symptoms and signs being non-specific and misleading. As a result half the patients presented already in a state of septic shock, and a correct preoperative diagnosis could be achieved in three patients only. The functional status significantly deteriorated in six patients, in four of whom a prolonged rehabilitation course was necessary. Although there was no immediate perioperative mortality, morbidity was significant as 50% and 100% major "surgery-related" and "Parkinson-related" complications accordingly. It is concluded that the coexistence of acute surgical disease with Parkinson syndrome has a profound adverse effect on the patient's outcome. High index of suspicion, early mobilisation, intense physiotherapy and early resumption of the anti-Parkinson drugs are the key points in the management of these patients. PMID:1478816

  5. Using PGD to reduce surgical infection risk.

    PubMed

    Archyangelio, Annesha; Shakhon, Amritpal

    Patients with spinal injuries are at increased risk of surgical site infection due to increased numbers of comorbidities and prolonged surgical procedures. This article describes the impact of a patient group direction that was used in a pre-operative assessment clinic to provide Staphylococcus aureus decolonisation to patients with a spinal injury who required prophylaxis. A post-implementation audit revealed that, in the main, staff and patients adhered to the direction, and infection rates were reduced. PMID:27089755

  6. Effect of early surgery in high surgical risk geriatric patients with femoral neck fracture and taking antiplatelet agents

    PubMed Central

    Sa-ngasoongsong, Paphon; Kulachote, Noratep; Sirisreetreerux, Norachart; Chanplakorn, Pongsthorn; Laohajaroensombat, Sukij; Pinsiranon, Nithiwut; Woratanarat, Patarawan; Kawinwonggowit, Viroj; Suphachatwong, Chanyut; Wajanavisit, Wiwat

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of early surgical intervention on the high surgical risk elderly patients who sustained femoral neck fracture (FNF) and taking concomitant antiplatelet agents. METHODS: Between 2010 and 2012, a prospective study was conducted on 49 geriatric patients, who took antiplatelet agents, sustained FNF and underwent surgery within 72 h [early surgery (ES) group], and these were compared with a retrospective consecutive case series of patients with similar characteristics (45 cases) who had delayed surgery (DS group) after 72 h during an earlier 3-year period. Postoperative outcomes were followed for one year and compared. RESULTS: There were non-significant differences in perioperative blood loss, blood transfusion, intensive care unit requirement and postoperative mortality (P > 0.05 all). There were 2 patients (4%) in the DS group who died after surgery (P = 0.23). However, the ES group showed a significantly better postoperative outcome in terms of postoperative complications, length of hospital stay, and functional outcome (P < 0.05 all). CONCLUSION: Early hip surgery in geriatric hip fracture patients with ongoing antiplatelet treatment was not associated with a significant increase of perioperative blood loss and postoperative mortality. Moreover, ES resulted in a better postoperative surgical outcome. In early hip surgery protocol, the antiplatelet agents are discontinued and the patient is operated on within 72 h after admission, which is safe and effective for the medically fit patients. PMID:26716093

  7. Competing Risk Analysis for Evaluation of Dalteparin Versus Unfractionated Heparin for Venous Thromboembolism in Medical-Surgical Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guowei; Cook, Deborah J.; Levine, Mitchell A.H.; Guyatt, Gordon; Crowther, Mark; Heels-Ansdell, Diane; Holbrook, Anne; Lamontagne, Francois; Walter, Stephen D.; Ferguson, Niall D.; Finfer, Simon; Arabi, Yaseen M.; Bellomo, Rinaldo; Cooper, D. Jamie; Thabane, Lehana

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Failure to recognize the presence of competing risk or to account for it may result in misleading conclusions. We aimed to perform a competing risk analysis to assess the efficacy of the low molecular weight heparin dalteparin versus unfractionated heparin (UFH) in venous thromboembolism (VTE) in medical-surgical critically ill patients, taking death as a competing risk. This was a secondary analysis of a prospective randomized study of the Prophylaxis for Thromboembolism in Critical Care Trial (PROTECT) database. A total of 3746 medical-surgical critically ill patients from 67 intensive care units (ICUs) in 6 countries receiving either subcutaneous UFH 5000 IU twice daily (n = 1873) or dalteparin 5000 IU once daily plus once-daily placebo (n = 1873) were included for analysis. A total of 205 incident proximal leg deep vein thromboses (PLDVT) were reported during follow-up, among which 96 were in the dalteparin group and 109 were in the UFH group. No significant treatment effect of dalteparin on PLDVT compared with UFH was observed in either the competing risk analysis or standard survival analysis (also known as cause-specific analysis) using multivariable models adjusted for APACHE II score, history of VTE, need for vasopressors, and end-stage renal disease: sub-hazard ratio (SHR) = 0.92, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.70–1.21, P-value = 0.56 for the competing risk analysis; hazard ratio (HR) = 0.92, 95% CI: 0.68–1.23, P-value = 0.57 for cause-specific analysis. Dalteparin was associated with a significant reduction in risk of pulmonary embolism (PE): SHR = 0.54, 95% CI: 0.31–0.94, P-value = 0.02 for the competing risk analysis; HR = 0.51, 95% CI: 0.30–0.88, P-value = 0.01 for the cause-specific analysis. Two additional sensitivity analyses using the treatment variable as a time-dependent covariate and using as-treated and per-protocol approaches demonstrated similar findings. This competing risk analysis

  8. Competing Risk Analysis for Evaluation of Dalteparin Versus Unfractionated Heparin for Venous Thromboembolism in Medical-Surgical Critically Ill Patients.

    PubMed

    Li, Guowei; Cook, Deborah J; Levine, Mitchell A H; Guyatt, Gordon; Crowther, Mark; Heels-Ansdell, Diane; Holbrook, Anne; Lamontagne, Francois; Walter, Stephen D; Ferguson, Niall D; Finfer, Simon; Arabi, Yaseen M; Bellomo, Rinaldo; Cooper, D Jamie; Thabane, Lehana

    2015-09-01

    Failure to recognize the presence of competing risk or to account for it may result in misleading conclusions. We aimed to perform a competing risk analysis to assess the efficacy of the low molecular weight heparin dalteparin versus unfractionated heparin (UFH) in venous thromboembolism (VTE) in medical-surgical critically ill patients, taking death as a competing risk.This was a secondary analysis of a prospective randomized study of the Prophylaxis for Thromboembolism in Critical Care Trial (PROTECT) database. A total of 3746 medical-surgical critically ill patients from 67 intensive care units (ICUs) in 6 countries receiving either subcutaneous UFH 5000 IU twice daily (n = 1873) or dalteparin 5000 IU once daily plus once-daily placebo (n = 1873) were included for analysis.A total of 205 incident proximal leg deep vein thromboses (PLDVT) were reported during follow-up, among which 96 were in the dalteparin group and 109 were in the UFH group. No significant treatment effect of dalteparin on PLDVT compared with UFH was observed in either the competing risk analysis or standard survival analysis (also known as cause-specific analysis) using multivariable models adjusted for APACHE II score, history of VTE, need for vasopressors, and end-stage renal disease: sub-hazard ratio (SHR) = 0.92, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.70-1.21, P-value = 0.56 for the competing risk analysis; hazard ratio (HR) = 0.92, 95% CI: 0.68-1.23, P-value = 0.57 for cause-specific analysis. Dalteparin was associated with a significant reduction in risk of pulmonary embolism (PE): SHR = 0.54, 95% CI: 0.31-0.94, P-value = 0.02 for the competing risk analysis; HR = 0.51, 95% CI: 0.30-0.88, P-value = 0.01 for the cause-specific analysis. Two additional sensitivity analyses using the treatment variable as a time-dependent covariate and using as-treated and per-protocol approaches demonstrated similar findings.This competing risk analysis yields no

  9. Carotid Stenting with Distal Protection in High-Surgical-Risk Patients: One-Year Results of the ASTI Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Bosiers, Marc; Scheinert, Dierk; Mathias, Klaus; Langhoff, Ralf; Mudra, Harald; Diaz-Cartelle, Juan

    2015-04-15

    PurposeThis prospective, multicenter, nonrandomized study evaluated the periprocedural and 1-year outcomes in high-surgical-risk patients with carotid artery stenosis treated with the Adapt Carotid Stent plus FilterWire EZ distal protection catheter (Boston Scientific Corporation, Natick, MA).Materials and MethodsThe study enrolled 100 patients (32 symptomatic, 63 asymptomatic, 5 unknown) at high risk for carotid endarterectomy due to prespecified anatomical criteria and/or medical comorbidities. Thirty-day and 1-year follow-up included clinical evaluation, carotid duplex ultrasound, and independent neurologic and NIH stroke scale assessments. One-year endpoints included the composite rate of major adverse events (MAE), defined as death, stroke, and myocardial infarction (MI) and the rates of late ipsilateral stroke (31–365 days), target lesion revascularization, and in-stent restenosis.ResultsOf the 100 enrolled patients, technical success was achieved in 90.9 % (90/99). The 30-day MAE rate (5.1 %) consisted of major stroke (2.0 %) and minor stroke (3.1 %); no deaths or MIs occurred. The 1-year MAE rate (12.2 %) consisted of death, MI, and stroke rates of 4.4, 3.3, and 8.9 %, respectively. Late ipsilateral stroke (31–365 days) rate was 1.1 %. Symptomatic patients had higher rates of death (11.1 vs. 1.7 %) and MI (7.4 vs. 1.7 %), but lower rates of major (7.4 vs. 10.0 %) and minor stroke (0.0 vs. 6.7 %), compared with asymptomatic patients.ConclusionResults through 1 year postprocedure demonstrated that carotid artery stenting with Adapt Carotid Stent and FilterWire EZ is safe and effective in high-risk-surgical patients.

  10. First experience with a new negative pressure incision management system on surgical incisions after cardiac surgery in high risk patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Sternal wound infection remains a serious potential complication after cardiac surgery. A recent development for preventing wound complications after surgery is the adjunctive treatment of closed incisions with negative pressure wound therapy. Suggested mechanisms of preventive action are improving the local blood flow, removing fluids and components in these fluids, helping keep the incision edges together, protecting the wound from external contamination and promoting incision healing. This work reports on our initial evaluation and clinical experience with the Prevena™Incision Management System, a recently introduced new negative pressure wound therapy system specifically developed for treating closed surgical incisions and helping prevent potential complications. We evaluated the new treatment on sternal surgical incisions in patients with multiple co-morbidities and consequently a high risk for wound complications. Methods The Prevena™incision management system was used in 10 patients with a mean Fowler risk score of 15.1 [Range 8-30]. The negative pressure dressing was applied immediately after surgery and left in place for 5 days with a continuous application of -125 mmHg negative pressure. Wounds and surrounding skin were inspected immediately after removal of the Prevena™ incision management system and at day 30 after surgery. Results Wounds and surrounding skin showed complete wound healing with the absence of skin lesions due to the negative pressure after removal of the Prevena™ dressing. No device-related complications were observed. No wound complications occurred in this high risk group of patients until at least 30 days after surgery. Conclusions The Prevena™system appears to be safe, easy to use and may help achieve uncomplicated wound healing in patients at risk of developing wound complications after cardiothoracic surgery. PMID:22145641

  11. Fracture risk assessment: improved evaluation of vertebral integrity among metastatic cancer patients to aid in surgical decision-making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augustine, Kurt E.; Camp, Jon J.; Holmes, David R.; Huddleston, Paul M.; Lu, Lichun; Yaszemski, Michael J.; Robb, Richard A.

    2012-03-01

    Failure of the spine's structural integrity from metastatic disease can lead to both pain and neurologic deficit. Fractures that require treatment occur in over 30% of bony metastases. Our objective is to use computed tomography (CT) in conjunction with analytic techniques that have been previously developed to predict fracture risk in cancer patients with metastatic disease to the spine. Current clinical practice for cancer patients with spine metastasis often requires an empirical decision regarding spinal reconstructive surgery. Early image-based software systems used for CT analysis are time consuming and poorly suited for clinical application. The Biomedical Image Resource (BIR) at Mayo Clinic, Rochester has developed an image analysis computer program that calculates from CT scans, the residual load-bearing capacity in a vertebra with metastatic cancer. The Spine Cancer Assessment (SCA) program is built on a platform designed for clinical practice, with a workflow format that allows for rapid selection of patient CT exams, followed by guided image analysis tasks, resulting in a fracture risk report. The analysis features allow the surgeon to quickly isolate a single vertebra and obtain an immediate pre-surgical multiple parallel section composite beam fracture risk analysis based on algorithms developed at Mayo Clinic. The analysis software is undergoing clinical validation studies. We expect this approach will facilitate patient management and utilization of reliable guidelines for selecting among various treatment option based on fracture risk.

  12. Preoperative Evaluation of the Surgical Patient.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Frederick T

    2016-01-01

    Primary care physicians and specialists are frequently involved in the care of surgical patients. Changes in reimbursement have prompted re-examination of preoperative testing and health care expenditures. Physicians have additional incentives to improve health care delivery and reduce costs. The perioperative surgical home concept involves coordinating all aspects of patient care, including behavioral modifications, during the perioperative period. Evidence-based guidelines on preoperative evaluation are available to assist practitioners in managing cardiovascular disease, and communicating surgical risks. Shared decision making in the preoperative period can improve surgical outcomes and patient satisfaction. PMID:27443045

  13. Management of psychosis and agitation in medical-surgical patients who have or are at risk for prolonged QT interval.

    PubMed

    Ries, Rose; Sayadipour, Amirali

    2014-09-01

    We review the literature on management of psychosis and agitation in medical-surgical patients who have or are at risk for prolonged QT interval, a risk factor for torsade de pointes (TdP), and we describe our protocols for treating these patients. We searched PubMed and PsycInfo for relevant studies and found few papers describing options for treating psychosis and agitation in these patients. Prolonged QTc interval has been more often associated with low-potency phenothiazines such as thioridazine; however, it may occur with high potency typical antipsychotics such as fluphenazine and haloperidol as well as with atypical antipsychotics such as quetiapine, risperidone, olanzapine, iloperidone, and particularly ziprasidone. Antipsychotics for which no association with prolonged QTc interval has been shown include lurasidone, clozapine, and aripiprazole. For patients who have risk factors for prolonged QTc interval but whose electrocardiograms do not show this, reasonable first choices include oral or intramuscular olanzapine or aripiprazole, followed by risperidone and quetiapine or oral or intramuscular haloperidol. For those who have prolonged QTc but that measures less than 500 ms, we limit the use of antipsychotics to aripiprazole, olanzapine, risperidone, or quetiapine. Finally, for patients who have a QTc of 500 ms or greater, we rely on aripiprazole, valproate, trazodone, and benzodiazepines. PMID:25226194

  14. Fluid administration, vasopressor use and patient outcomes in a group of high-risk cardiac surgical patients receiving postoperative goal-directed haemodynamic therapy: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Walker, L J C; Young, P J

    2015-09-01

    The role of goal-directed therapy in high-risk cardiac surgical patients has not been determined. This study sought to observe the effect of a postoperative standardised haemodynamic protocol (SHP) on the administration of fluid and vasoactive drugs after high-risk cardiac surgery. This was an interventional pilot study. In 2010 to 2011, the SHP was introduced to the ICU at Wellington Regional Hospital, Wellington, New Zealand, for the perioperative management of patients undergoing high-risk cardiac surgery. A pulmonary artery catheter was inserted in the patients in the study group and fluids and supportive medications were provided in the ICU according to a protocol that targeted a cardiac index ≥ 2 l/min/m², mixed venous oxygen saturation ≥ 60% and a mean arterial pressure of 65 to 75 mmHg. Data from 40 consecutive high-risk cardiac surgical patients assigned to this protocol were compared with a matched cohort of 40 consecutive high-risk cardiac surgical patients receiving 'usual care' in 2009. Baseline characteristics were similar in the two groups. There was no significant difference in the duration of noradrenaline infusion in the SHP cohort compared to historical controls (median [IQR] 18.5 hours [31.63] versus 18 hours [18.3]; P=0.35), despite patients receiving more fluid in their first 12 hours in the ICU (mean 4687 ml [SD ± 2284 ml] versus 1889 ml [SD ± 1344 ml]; P <0.001). The SHP cohort had a higher rate of reintubation (4 in 37 [10.8%] versus 0 in 40 [0%]; P=0.049). The SHP delivered significantly more fluid, but did not reduce the duration of noradrenaline infusion, compared to usual care. PMID:26310413

  15. Risk Factors for Recurrence of Surgically Treated Conventional Spinal Schwannomas: Analysis of 169 Patients from a Multicenter International Database

    PubMed Central

    Fehlings, Michael G.; Nater, Anick; Zamorano, Juan J.; Tetreault, Lindsay A.; Varga, Peter Pal; Gokaslan, Ziya L.; Boriani, Stefano; Fisher, Charles G.; Rhines, Laurence; Bettegowda, Chetan; Kawahara, Norio; Chou, Dean

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective analysis of 169 adult patients operated for a conventional spinal schwannoma from the AOSpine Multicenter Primary Spinal Tumors Database. Objective To identify risk factors for local recurrence of conventional spinal schwannoma in patients who had surgery. Summary of Background Data Schwannomas account for up to 30% of all adult spinal tumors. Total resection is the gold standard for patients with sensory or motor deficits. Local recurrence is reported to be approximately 5% and usually occurs several years after surgery. Methods Rates and time of local recurrence of spinal schwannoma were quantified. Predictive value of various clinical factors was assessed, including age, gender, tumor size, affected spinal segment, and type of surgery. Descriptive statistics and univariate regression analyses were performed. Results Nine (5.32%) out the 169 patients in this study experienced local recurrence approximately 1.7 years post-operatively. Univariate analyses revealed that recurrence tended to occur more often in younger patients (39.33 ± 14.58 years versus 47.01 ± 15.29 years) and in the lumbar segment (55.56%), although this did not reach significance (HR=0.96, p = 0.127; and p = 0.195, respectively). Recurrence also arose in the cervical and sacral spine (22.22%, respectively) but not in the thoracic area. Tumors were significantly larger in patients with recurrence (6.97 ± 4.66 cm versus 3.81 ± 3.34 cm), with extent in the cranial-caudal direction posing the greatest hazard (HR=1.321, p = 0.002). The location of the tumor, whether epidural, intradural, or both (p = 0.246) was not significantly related to recurrence. Regarding surgical technique, over four times as many patients who underwent intralesional resection experienced a recurrence proportionally to patients who underwent en bloc resection (HR = 4.178, p = 0.033). Conclusions The pre-operative size of the conventional spinal schwannoma and intralesional resection are the main

  16. Clarification of the circulatory patho-physiology of anaesthesia - implications for high-risk surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Christopher B; Green, David W

    2014-12-01

    The paper examines the effects of anaesthesia on circulatory physiology and their implications regarding improvement in perioperative anaesthetic management. Changes to current anaesthetic practice, recommended recently, such as the use of flow monitoring in high risk patients, are already beginning to have an impact in reducing complications but not mortality [1]. Better understanding of the patho-physiology should help improve management even further. Analysis of selected individual clinical trials has been used to illustrate particular areas of patho-physiology and how changes in practice have improved outcome. There is physiological support for the importance of achieving an appropriate rate of oxygen delivery (DO2), particularly following induction of anaesthesia. It is suggested that ensuring adequate DO2 during anaesthesia will avoid development of oxygen debt and hence obviate the need to induce a high, compensatory, DO2 in the post-operative period. In contrast to the usual assumptions underlying strategies requiring a global increase in blood flow [1] by a stroke volume near maximization strategy, blood flow control actually resides entirely at the tissues not at the heart. This is important as the starting point for understanding failed circulatory control as indicated by 'volume dependency'. Local adjustments in blood flow at each individual organ - auto-regulation - normally ensure the appropriate local rate of oxygen supply, i.e. local DO2. Inadequate blood volume leads to impairment of the regulation of blood flow, particularly in the individual tissues with least capable auto-regulatory capability. As demonstrated by many studies, inadequate blood flow first occurs in the gut, brain and kidney. The inadequate blood volume which occurs with induction of anaesthesia is not due to blood volume loss, but probably results from redistribution due to veno-dilation. The increase in venous capacity renders the existing blood volume inadequate to maintain

  17. Prevention of VTE in Nonorthopedic Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, David A.; Wren, Sherry M.; Karanicolas, Paul J.; Arcelus, Juan I.; Heit, John A.; Samama, Charles M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: VTE is a common cause of preventable death in surgical patients. Methods: We developed recommendations for thromboprophylaxis in nonorthopedic surgical patients by using systematic methods as described in Methodology for the Development of Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis Guidelines. Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis, 9th ed: American College of Chest Physicians Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines in this supplement. Results: We describe several alternatives for stratifying the risk of VTE in general and abdominal-pelvic surgical patients. When the risk for VTE is very low (< 0.5%), we recommend that no specific pharmacologic (Grade 1B) or mechanical (Grade 2C) prophylaxis be used other than early ambulation. For patients at low risk for VTE (∼1.5%), we suggest mechanical prophylaxis, preferably with intermittent pneumatic compression (IPC), over no prophylaxis (Grade 2C). For patients at moderate risk for VTE (∼3%) who are not at high risk for major bleeding complications, we suggest low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) (Grade 2B), low-dose unfractionated heparin (Grade 2B), or mechanical prophylaxis with IPC (Grade 2C) over no prophylaxis. For patients at high risk for VTE (∼6%) who are not at high risk for major bleeding complications, we recommend pharmacologic prophylaxis with LMWH (Grade 1B) or low-dose unfractionated heparin (Grade 1B) over no prophylaxis. In these patients, we suggest adding mechanical prophylaxis with elastic stockings or IPC to pharmacologic prophylaxis (Grade 2C). For patients at high risk for VTE undergoing abdominal or pelvic surgery for cancer, we recommend extended-duration, postoperative, pharmacologic prophylaxis (4 weeks) with LMWH over limited-duration prophylaxis (Grade 1B). For patients at moderate to high risk for VTE who are at high risk for major bleeding complications or those in whom the consequences of bleeding are believed to be particularly severe, we suggest

  18. Transcatheter versus Surgical Aortic Valve Replacement in Patients with Diabetes and Severe Aortic Stenosis at High Risk for Surgery: An Analysis of the PARTNER Trial

    PubMed Central

    Lindman, Brian R.; Pibarot, Philippe; Arnold, Suzanne V.; Suri, Rakesh; McAndrew, Thomas C.; Maniar, Hersh S.; Zajarias, Alan; Kodali, Susheel; Kirtane, Ajay J.; Thourani, Vinod H.; Tuzcu, E. Murat; Svensson, Lars G.; Waksman, Ron; Smith, Craig R.; Leon, Martin B.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether a less invasive approach to aortic valve replacement (AVR) improves clinical outcomes in diabetic patients with aortic stenosis (AS). Background Diabetes is associated with increased morbidity and mortality after surgical AVR for AS. Methods Among treated patients with severe symptomatic AS at high-risk for surgery in the PARTNER trial, we examined outcomes stratified by diabetes status of patients randomly assigned to transcatheter or surgical AVR. The primary outcome was all-cause mortality at 1 year. Results Among 657 patients enrolled in PARTNER who underwent treatment, there were 275 patients with diabetes (145 transcatheter, 130 surgical). There was a significant interaction between diabetes and treatment group for 1-year all-cause mortality (p=0.048). Among diabetic patients, all-cause mortality at 1 year was 18.0% in the transcatheter group and 27.4% in the surgical group (HR 0.60; 95% CI, 0.36–0.99; p=0.04). Results were consistent among patients treated via transfemoral or transapical routes. In contrast, among non-diabetic patients, there was no significant difference in all-cause mortality at 1 year (p=0.48). Among diabetic patients, the 1-year rates of stroke were similar between treatment groups (3.5% transcatheter vs. 3.5% surgery, p=0.88), but the rates of renal failure requiring dialysis >30 days were lower in the transcatheter group (0% vs. 6.1%, p=0.003). Conclusions Among patients with diabetes and severe symptomatic AS at high-risk for surgery, this post-hoc stratified analysis of the PARTNER trial suggests there is a survival benefit, no increase in stroke, and less renal failure from treatment with transcatheter compared to surgical AVR. PMID:24291272

  19. Obesity and the orthopedic trauma patient: a review of the risks and challenges in medical and surgical management.

    PubMed

    Mulcahey, Mary K; Appleyard, Deborah V; Schiller, Jonathan R; Born, Christopher T

    2011-02-01

    The medical and surgical care of obese trauma patients presents a variety of unique and important challenges. Over the past 30 years, this population has increased dramatically in number, and the optimization of their care demands the attention of the medical community. The problems of caring for an obese trauma patient begin before the actual traumatic event occurs due to their substantially higher incidence of serious comorbidities, such as diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and cardiopulmonary issues. In the setting of trauma, important considerations for the obese patient include careful and expeditious preoperative medical optimization; appropriate deep vein thrombosis prophylaxis; planning for and preventing operative and postoperative challenges (eg, pulmonary and wound complications); and ensuring adequate hospital equipment and staffing resources in the acute and rehabilitative phases of care. This article outlines the scope of the obesity epidemic, reviews the medical consequences of obesity, and highlights surgical considerations specific to the care of orthopedic injuries in the obese trauma patient. PMID:21441770

  20. Surgical Risks Associated with Winter Sport Tourism

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Stéphane; Payet, Cécile; Lifante, Jean-Christophe; Polazzi, Stéphanie; Chollet, François; Carty, Matthew J; Duclos, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    Background Mass tourism during winter in mountain areas may cause significant clustering of body injuries leading to increasing emergency admissions at hospital. We aimed at assessing if surgical safety and efficiency was maintained in this particular context. Methods We selected all emergency admissions of open surgery performed in French hospitals between 2010 and 2012. After identifying mountain areas with increasing volume of surgical stays during winter, we considered seasonal variations in surgical outcomes using a difference-in-differences study design. We computed multilevel regressions to evaluate whether significant increase in emergency cases had an effect on surgical mortality, complications and length of stay. Clustering effect of patients within hospitals was integrated in analysis and surgical outcomes were adjusted for both patient and hospital characteristics. Results A total of 381 hospitals had 559,052 inpatient stays related to emergency open surgery over 3 years. Compared to other geographical areas, a significant peak of activity was noted during winter in mountainous hospitals (Alps, Pyrenees, Vosges), ranging 6-77% volume increase. Peak was mainly explained by tourists’ influx (+124.5%, 4,351/3,496) and increased need for orthopaedic procedures (+36.8%, 4,731/12,873). After controlling for potential confounders, patients did not experience increased risk for postoperative death (ratio of OR 1.01, 95%CI 0.89-1.14, p = 0.891), thromboembolism (0.95, 0.77-1.17, p = 0.621) or sepsis (0.98, 0.85-1.12, p = 0.748). Length of stay was unaltered (1.00, 0.99-1.02, p = 0.716). Conclusion Surgical outcomes are not compromised during winter in French mountain areas despite a substantial influx of major emergencies. PMID:25970625

  1. Extracranial Carotid Artery Stenting in Surgically High-Risk Patients Using the Carotid Wallstent Endoprosthesis:Midterm Clinical and Ultrasound Follow-Up Results

    SciTech Connect

    Maleux, Geert Bernaerts, Pauwel; Thijs, Vincent; Daenens, Kim; Vaninbroukx, Johan; Fourneau, Inge; Nevelsteen, Andre

    2003-08-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility, safety and midterm outcome of elective implantation of the Carotid Wallstent (registered) in patients considered to be at high surgical risk. In a prospective study, 54 carotid artery stenoses in 51 patients were stented over a 24-month period. Three patients underwent bilateral carotid artery stenting. Institutional inclusion criteria for invasive treatment of carotid occlusive disease (carotid endarterectomy or carotid artery stenting) are patients presenting with a 70% or more symptomatic stenosis and those with an 80% or more asymptomatic stenosis having a life-expectancy of more than 1 year. All patients treated by carotid artery stenting were considered at high risk for carotid endarterectomy because of a hostile neck (17 patients-31.5%) or because of severe comorbidities (37 patients-68.5%). No cerebral protection device was used. Of the 54 lesions, 33 (61.1%) were symptomatic and 21 (38.8%) were asymptomatic. Follow-up was performed by physical examination and by duplex ultrasonography at 1 month, 6 months, 1 year and 2 years after the procedure. All 54 lesions could be stented successfully without periprocedural stroke. Advert events during follow-up (mean 13.9 {+-} 5.7 months) were non-stroke-related death in 6 patients (11.1%), minor stroke in 4 stented hemispheres(7.4%), transient ipsilateral facial pain in 1 patient (1.8%),infection of the stented surgical patch in 1 patient (1.8%) and asymptomatic in stent restenosis in 4 patients (7.4%). The percutaneous implantation of the Carotid Wallstent (registered) , even without cerebral protection device, appears to be a safe procedure with acceptable clinical and ultrasonographic follow-up results in patients at high surgical risk. But some late adverse events such as ipsilateral recurrence of non-disabling (minor) stroke or in stent restenosis still remain real challenging problems.

  2. [Ischemic heart disease and arterial hypertention as risk factors of surgical treatment of patients with infrarenal segment of aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Iaitskiĭ, N A; Bedrov, A Ia; Maslevtsov, D V; Tsvetkova, E A; Moiseev, A A

    2013-01-01

    A retrospective analysis of the data of 188 patients with the infrarenal segment of the aortic aneurysm (ISAA) showed, that ischemic heart disease and arterial hypertension were diagnosed practically in all patients--175 (93.0%) and 177 (94.1%) patients respectively. A decreased retractor function of the myocardium was noted in 88 (46.8%) of patients. According to the findings of echocardiography 134 (71.3%) patients had the arterial hypertension of third degree. For the assessment of the influence of the accompanying cardiac pathology on the results of planned surgical treatment and systematization of postoperative cardiac complications the classification, which was proposed by R. B. Rutherford et al. and modified by A. V. Pokrovsky et al. was used. The obtained data point at a direct proportional relationship between the degree of the initial cardiac status, frequency and severity of postoperative cardiac complications in patients after resection of ISAA in 1.6-2.3 times. PMID:23808220

  3. Carpal tunnel syndrome in hemodialysis patients as a dialysis-related amyloidosis manifestation – incidence, risk factors and results of surgical treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kopeć, Jerzy; Gądek, Artur; Drożdż, Maciej; Miśkowiec, Krzysztof; Dutka, Julian; Sydor, Antoni; Chowaniec, Eve; Sułowicz, Władysław

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common complication of dialysis-related amyloidosis (DRA) developing in patients on long-term dialysis therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of CTS and identify factors influencing the development of CTS in patients on maintenance hemodialysis, as well as results of its surgical treatment. Material/Methods The study included 386 patients, among whom CTS was diagnosed in 40 patients (10.4%) on the basis of signs and physical symptoms, as well as by nerve conduction. The group of patients with CTS and the group of patients without CTS were compared according to age (mean 54.50 vs. 56.48 years) and duration of dialysis treatment. Initial analysis of CTS incidence by sex, presence of anti-HCV antibodies, and location of arterio-venous fistula (AV fistula) was undertaken. Results Duration of dialysis treatment was the statistically significant risk factor for the development of CTS (16.05 vs. 4.51 years; p<0.0001). Among patients treated for a long period on hemodialysis (20–30 years), 100% required surgical release procedures, while 66.66% of those treated for 15–19 years, 42.1% of those treated for 10–14 years, and 1.6% of those treated for less than 10 years. CTS was diagnosed more often in anti-HCV-positive patients as compared with anti-HCV-negative patients (47.5 vs. 6.9%; p<0.0001). No significant differences were found when comparing CTS incidence by sex or between the development of CTS requiring surgical release intervention and location of the AV fistula. Conclusions Surgical release procedure of the carpal tunnel gave good treatment results in patients with CTS. PMID:21873947

  4. Risk of Local Failure in Breast Cancer Patients With Lobular Carcinoma In Situ at the Final Surgical Margins: Is Re-excision Necessary?

    SciTech Connect

    Sadek, Betro T.; Shenouda, Mina N.; Abi Raad, Rita F.; Niemierko, Andrzej; Keruakous, Amany R.; Goldberg, Saveli I.; Taghian, Alphonse G.

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To compare the outcome of patients with invasive breast cancer both with and without lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS)-positive/close surgical margins after breast-conserving treatment. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively studied 2358 patients with T1-T2 invasive breast cancer treated with lumpectomy and radiation therapy from January 1980 to December 2009. Median age was 57 years (range, 24-91 years). There were 82 patients (3.5%) with positive/close LCIS margins (<0.2 cm) and 2232 patients (95.7%) with negative margins. A total of 1789 patients (76%) had negative lymph nodes. Patients who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy were excluded. A total of 1783 patients (76%) received adjuvant systemic therapy. Multivariable analysis (MVA) was performed using Cox's proportional hazards model. Results: The 5-year cumulative incidence of locoregional recurrence (LRR) was 3.2% (95% confidence interval [CI] 2.5%-4.1%) for the 2232 patients with LCIS-negative surgical margins (median follow-up 104 months) and 2.8% (95% CI 0.7%-10.8%) for the 82 patients with LCIS-positive/close surgical margins (median follow-up 90 months). This was not statistically significant (P=.5). On MVA, LCIS-positive margins after the final surgery were not associated with increased risk of LRR (hazard ratio [HR] 3.4, 95% CI 0.5-24.5, P=.2). Statistically significant prognostic variables on Cox's MVA for risk of LRR included systemic therapy (HR 0.5, 95% CI 0.33-0.75, P=.001), number of positive lymph nodes (HR 1.11, 95% CI 1.05-1.18, P=.001), menopausal status (HR 0.96, 95% CI 0.95-0.98, P=.001), and histopathologic grade (grade 3 vs grade 1/2) (HR 2.6, 95% CI 1.4-4.7, P=.003). Conclusion: Our results suggest that the presence of LCIS at the surgical margin after lumpectomy does not increase the risk of LRR or the final outcome. These findings suggest that re-excision or mastectomy in patients with LCIS-positive/close final surgical margins is unnecessary.

  5. Length of Stay in Ambulatory Surgical Oncology Patients at High Risk for Sleep Apnea as Predicted by STOP-BANG Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Faiz, Saadia A.; Hernandez, Mike; Bashoura, Lara; Cherian, Sujith V.; French, Katy E.

    2016-01-01

    Background. The STOP-BANG questionnaire has been used to identify surgical patients at risk for undiagnosed obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) by classifying patients as low risk (LR) if STOP-BANG score < 3 or high risk (HR) if STOP-BANG score ≥ 3. Few studies have examined whether postoperative complications are increased in HR patients and none have been described in oncologic patients. Objective. This retrospective study examined if HR patients experience increased complications evidenced by an increased length of stay (LOS) in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU). Methods. We retrospectively measured LOS and the frequency of oxygen desaturation (<93%) in cancer patients who were given the STOP-BANG questionnaire prior to cystoscopy for urologic disease in an ambulatory surgery center. Results. The majority of patients in our study were men (77.7%), over the age of 50 (90.1%), and had BMI < 30 kg/m2 (88.4%). STOP-BANG results were obtained on 404 patients. Cumulative incidence of the time to discharge between HR and the LR groups was plotted. By 8 hours, LR patients showed a higher cumulative probability of being discharged early (80% versus 74%, P = 0.008). Conclusions. Urologic oncology patients at HR for OSA based on the STOP-BANG questionnaire were less likely to be discharged early from the PACU compared to LR patients. PMID:27610133

  6. Length of Stay in Ambulatory Surgical Oncology Patients at High Risk for Sleep Apnea as Predicted by STOP-BANG Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Balachandran, Diwakar D; Faiz, Saadia A; Hernandez, Mike; Kowalski, Alicia M; Bashoura, Lara; Goravanchi, Farzin; Cherian, Sujith V; Rebello, Elizabeth; Kee, Spencer S; French, Katy E

    2016-01-01

    Background. The STOP-BANG questionnaire has been used to identify surgical patients at risk for undiagnosed obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) by classifying patients as low risk (LR) if STOP-BANG score < 3 or high risk (HR) if STOP-BANG score ≥ 3. Few studies have examined whether postoperative complications are increased in HR patients and none have been described in oncologic patients. Objective. This retrospective study examined if HR patients experience increased complications evidenced by an increased length of stay (LOS) in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU). Methods. We retrospectively measured LOS and the frequency of oxygen desaturation (<93%) in cancer patients who were given the STOP-BANG questionnaire prior to cystoscopy for urologic disease in an ambulatory surgery center. Results. The majority of patients in our study were men (77.7%), over the age of 50 (90.1%), and had BMI < 30 kg/m(2) (88.4%). STOP-BANG results were obtained on 404 patients. Cumulative incidence of the time to discharge between HR and the LR groups was plotted. By 8 hours, LR patients showed a higher cumulative probability of being discharged early (80% versus 74%, P = 0.008). Conclusions. Urologic oncology patients at HR for OSA based on the STOP-BANG questionnaire were less likely to be discharged early from the PACU compared to LR patients. PMID:27610133

  7. [Anemia as a surgical risk factor].

    PubMed

    Moral García, Victoria; Ángeles Gil de Bernabé Sala, M; Nadia Diana, Kinast; Pericas, Bartolomé Cantallops; Nebot, Alexia Galindo

    2013-07-01

    Perioperative anemia is common in patients undergoing surgery and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality and a decreased quality of life. The main causes of anemia in the perioperative context are iron deficiency and chronic inflammation. Anemia can be aggravated by blood loss during surgery, and is most commonly treated with allogeneic transfusion. Moreover, blood transfusions are not without risks, once again increasing patient morbidity and mortality. Given these concerns, we propose to review the pathophysiology of anemia in the surgical environment, as well as its treatment through the consumption of iron-rich foods and by oral or intravenous iron therapy (iron sucrose and iron carboxymaltose). In chronic inflammatory anemia, we use erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (erythropoietin alpha) and, in cases of mixed anemia, the combination of both treatments. The objective is always to reduce the need for perioperative transfusions and speed the recovery from postoperative anemia, as well as decrease the patient morbidity and mortality rate. PMID:24314568

  8. Percentage of Surgical Patients Receiving Recommended Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Recommended Care Percentage of Surgical Patients Receiving Recommended Care This is a composite measure based on individual ... Age Group Percentage of Surgical Patients Receiving Recommended Care by Age Group uzrc-9bvr Download these data » ...

  9. Surgical site infection risk factors and risk stratification.

    PubMed

    Florschutz, Anthony V; Fagan, Ryan P; Matar, Wadih Y; Sawyer, Robert G; Berrios-Torres, Sandra I

    2015-04-01

    Preoperative identification of the risk factors for surgical site infection and patient risk stratification are essential for deciding whether surgery is appropriate, educating patients on their individual risk of complications, and managing postoperative expectations. Early identification of these factors is also necessary to help guide both patient medical optimization and perioperative care planning. Several resources are currently available to track and analyze healthcare-associated infections, including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Healthcare Safety Network. In addition, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons are exploring collaborative opportunities for the codevelopment of a hip and/or knee arthroplasty national quality measure for periprosthetic joint infection. PMID:25808971

  10. Risk-adjusted monitoring of binary surgical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Steiner, S H; Cook, R J; Farewell, V T

    2001-01-01

    A graphical procedure suitable for prospectively monitoring surgical performance is proposed. The approach is based on accumulating evidence from the outcomes of all previous surgical patients in a series using a new type of cumulative sum chart. Cumulative sum procedures are designed to "signal" if sufficient evidence has accumulated that the surgical failure rate has changed substantially. In this way, the chart rapidly detects deterioration (or improvement) in surgical performance while not overreacting to the expected fluctuations due to chance. Through the use of a likelihood-based scoring method, the cumulative sum procedure is adapted so that it adjusts for the surgical risk of each patient estimated preoperatively. The procedure is therefore applicable in situations where it is desirable to adjust for a mix of patients. Signals of the chart lead to investigations of the cause and to the timely introduction of remedial measures designed to avoid unnecessary future failures. PMID:11386623

  11. The use of the Airtraq® optical laryngoscope for routine tracheal intubation in high-risk cardio-surgical patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The Airtraq® optical laryngoscope (Prodol Ltd., Vizcaya, Spain) is a novel disposable device facilitating tracheal intubation in routine and difficult airway patients. No data investigating routine tracheal intubation using the Airtaq® in patients at a high cardiac risk are available at present. Purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility and hemodynamic implications of tracheal intubation with the Aitraq® optical laryngoscope, in high-risk cardio-surgical patients. Methods 123 consecutive ASA III patients undergoing elective coronary artery bypass grafting were routinely intubated with the Airtraq® laryngoscope. Induction of anesthesia was standardized according to our institutional protocol. All tracheal intubations were performed by six anesthetists trained in the use of the Airtraq® prior. Results Overall success rate was 100% (n = 123). All but five patients trachea could be intubated in the first attempt (95,9%). 5 patients were intubated in a 2nd (n = 4) or 3rd (n = 1) attempt. Mean intubation time was 24.3 s (range 16-128 s). Heart rate, arterial blood pressure and SpO2 were not significantly altered. Minor complications were observed in 6 patients (4,8%), i.e. two lesions of the lips and four minor superficial mucosal bleedings. Intubation duration (p = 0.62) and number of attempts (p = 0.26) were independent from BMI and Mallampati score. Conclusion Tracheal intubation with the Airtraq® optical laryngoscope was feasible, save and easy to perform in high-risk patients undergoing cardiac surgery. In all patients, a sufficient view on the vocal cords could be obtained, independent from BMI and preoperative Mallampati score. Trial Registration DRKS 00003230 PMID:22011403

  12. Single-port versus conventional multiport access prophylactic laparoscopic bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy in high-risk patients for ovarian cancer: a comparison of surgical outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Angioni, Stefano; Pontis, Alessandro; Sedda, Federica; Zampetoglou, Theodoros; Cela, Vito; Mereu, Liliana; Litta, Pietro

    2015-01-01

    Bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (BSO) in carriers of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations is widely recommended as part of a risk-reduction strategy for ovarian or breast cancer due to an underlying genetic predisposition. BSO is also performed as a therapeutic intervention for patients with hormone-positive premenopausal breast cancer. BSO may be performed via a minimally invasive approach with the use of three to four 5 mm and/or 12 mm ports inserted through a skin incision. To further reduce the morbidity associated with the placement of multiple port sites and to improve cosmetic outcomes, single-port laparoscopy has been developed with a single access point from the umbilicus. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the surgical outcomes associated with reducing the risks of salpingo-oophorectomy performed in a single port, while comparing multiport laparoscopy in women with a high risk for ovarian cancer. Single-port laparoscopy–BSO is feasible and safe, with favorable surgical and cosmetic outcomes when compared to conventional laparoscopy. PMID:26170692

  13. Prevention of Surgical Site Infection After Ankle Surgery Using Vacuum-Assisted Closure Therapy in High-Risk Patients With Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhen-Yu; Liu, Ya-Ke; Chen, Hong-Lin; Liu, Fan

    2016-01-01

    Patients with diabetes have a high risk of surgical site infection (SSI) after ankle surgery. The aim of the present study was to investigate the efficacy of vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) in the prevention of SSI after ankle surgery compared with the efficacy of standard moist wound care (SMWC). A retrospective study was performed of unstable ankle fractures for surgical fixation in patients with diabetes from January 2012 to December 2014. VAC and SMWC were used for surgical incision coverage. The primary outcome was the incidence of SSI, and the secondary outcomes were the length of hospital stay and crude hospital costs. The data from 76 patients were analyzed, with 22 (28.95%) in the VAC group and 54 (71.05%) in the SMWC group. The incidence of SSI was 4.6% in the VAC group compared with 27.8% in the SMWC group (chi-square 5.076; p = .024), and the crude odds ratio for SSI in the VAC group was 0.124 (95% confidence interval 0.002 to 0.938). The length of hospital stay was lower in the VAC group than in the SMWC group (12.6 ± 2.7 days and 15.2 ± 3.5 days, respectively; t = 3.122, p = .003). The crude hospital costs were also lower in the VAC group than in the SMWC group (Chinese yuan 8643.2 ± 1195.3 and 9456.2 ± 1106.3, respectively; t = 2.839, p = .006). After logistic regression analysis, the adjusted odds ratio for the total SSI rate comparing VAC and SMWC was 0.324 (95% confidence interval 0.092 to 0.804; p = .021). Compared with SMWC, VAC can decrease the SSI rate after ankle surgery in patients with diabetes. This finding should be confirmed by prospective, randomized controlled clinical trials. PMID:26603948

  14. The Effect of Preoperative Subcutaneous Fat Thickness on Surgical Site Infection Risk in Patients Undergoing Colorectal Surgery: Results of a Multisite, Prospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Hiromi; Ohno, Kaori; Ikeda, Shunya; Muto, Masaki

    2016-08-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) is one of the most frequent postoperative complications among patients undergoing elective colorectal surgery. A multisite, prospective cohort study was conducted to investigate whether the thickness of subcutaneous fat (TSF) influences the occurrence of SSI in patients undergoing colorectal surgery. Participants included patients scheduled to receive colorectal laparotomy for colorectal cancer and who were under the care of a wound ostomy continence nurse at 17 participating general hospitals in Japan. Patients were not eligible to participate if they had undergone emergency surgery, reoperation, or laparoscopic surgery. Demographic, wound, and surgical data and American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) scale scores were collected and assessed, along with nutritional status, TSF, body mass index, and risk factors for SSI (ie, length of surgery and wound classification). The incidence of SSI and nutritional conditions was assessed weekly for 30 days after surgery. Of the 155 participants (mean age 68.9 ± 10.8 years, 53 [34.2%] of whom were women), 90 (58.1%) underwent rectal surgery, and the remaining 65 underwent colon surgery. Seventy-two (72, 46.5%) of the 155 patients underwent colostomy surgery; 24 (15.5%) developed a SSI. The mean onset of SSI was 7.3 ± 2.9 days after surgery and commonly observed in the stoma group when the ASA score was 3 or higher (P = 0.02). Patients who developed SSI resumed oral dietary intake later than those without SSI (7.4 days versus 4.6 days, P = 0.02). Multivariate analysis indicated TSF >15 mm (P = 0.01), Alb level <3.5 g/dL at postoperative days 14 (P = 0.03) and 21 (P = 0.02), and total protein level <6.8 g/dL at postoperative day 7 (P = 0.02) were statistically significantly correlated with SSI occurrence. These results suggest preoperative TSF and preoperative and postoperative serum albumin levels are independent risk factors for SSI in patients undergoing colorectal surgery, confirming

  15. Tooth extractions in high-risk patients under bisphosphonate therapy and previously affected with osteonecrosis of the jaws: surgical protocol supported by low-level laser therapy.

    PubMed

    Vescovi, Paolo; Giovannacci, Ilaria; Merigo, Elisabetta; Meleti, Marco; Manfredi, Maddalena; Fornaini, Carlo; Nammour, Samir

    2015-05-01

    Trauma during dental surgery is a predisposing factor for medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaws (MRONJ). There are no specific guidelines for the management of dental extractions in patients under bisphosphonate therapy (BPT). The authors proposed in 2013 a successful protocol for tooth extractions in patients under BPT supported by Nd:YAG low-level laser therapy (LLLT). The aim of this study was to validate the safety and efficacy of this protocol reporting the data related to its application in a particular category of patients under BPT at high risk for MRONJ and who were previously affected with MRONJ. Eighty-two tooth extractions were performed in 36 patients previously affected with MRONJ. Antibiotic treatment was administered 3 days before and 2 weeks after tooth extractions. Patients were additionally treated with Nd:YAG LLLT, 5 applications of 1 minute each. Patients were evaluated 3 days and once a week for 2 months after the extractions and every time they received LLLT. In a total of 82 extractions, minimal bone exposure was observed in 2 cases, treated with Er:YAG laser vaporization and then completely healed. The data confirmed that laser biostimulation is a reliable technique that can be considered in the surgical protocol for patients under BPT. PMID:25915674

  16. The PER (Preoperative Esophagectomy Risk) Score: A Simple Risk Score to Predict Short-Term and Long-Term Outcome in Patients with Surgically Treated Esophageal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Reeh, Matthias; Metze, Johannes; Uzunoglu, Faik G.; Nentwich, Michael; Ghadban, Tarik; Wellner, Ullrich; Bockhorn, Maximilian; Kluge, Stefan; Izbicki, Jakob R.; Vashist, Yogesh K.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Esophageal resection in patients with esophageal cancer (EC) is still associated with high mortality and morbidity rates. We aimed to develop a simple preoperative risk score for the prediction of short-term and long-term outcomes for patients with EC treated by esophageal resection. In total, 498 patients suffering from esophageal carcinoma, who underwent esophageal resection, were included in this retrospective cohort study. Three preoperative esophagectomy risk (PER) groups were defined based on preoperative functional evaluation of different organ systems by validated tools (revised cardiac risk index, model for end-stage liver disease score, and pulmonary function test). Clinicopathological parameters, morbidity, and mortality as well as disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were correlated to the PER score. The PER score significantly predicted the short-term outcome of patients with EC who underwent esophageal resection. PER 2 and PER 3 patients had at least double the risk of morbidity and mortality compared to PER 1 patients. Furthermore, a higher PER score was associated with shorter DFS (P < 0.001) and OS (P < 0.001). The PER score was identified as an independent predictor of tumor recurrence (hazard ratio [HR] 2.1; P < 0.001) and OS (HR 2.2; P < 0.001). The PER score allows preoperative objective allocation of patients with EC into different risk categories for morbidity, mortality, and long-term outcomes. Thus, multicenter studies are needed for independent validation of the PER score. PMID:26886613

  17. [Surgical smoke: risks and preventive measures].

    PubMed

    Carbajo-Rodríguez, Hilario; Aguayo-Albasini, José Luis; Soria-Aledo, Víctor; García-López, Concepción

    2009-05-01

    The application of the advanced technologies in medicine has led to the appearance of new risk factors for health personnel. One of these could be the surgical smoke produced by electrosurgical instruments, ultrasounds or laser. However, there is still insufficient evidence in the published population studies on the detrimental effects of chronic exposure to surgical smoke. The main concern on the possible damage to the health of operating room staff is mainly based on the components currently detected until the date and laboratory experiments. Caution must also be used when extrapolating the results of in vitro studies to daily clinical practice. The organisations responsible for protecting the health of the workers in different countries have still not issued guidelines for the treatment and removal of the surgical smoke generated in both open and laparoscopic procedures. In this article we try to present a view of the consequences that surgical smoke has on health and the preventive measures that can be adopted. PMID:19376504

  18. Patients’ awareness of the surgical risks of smoking

    PubMed Central

    Bottorff, Joan L.; Seaton, Cherisse L.; Lamont, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe the smoking patterns of patients receiving elective surgery and their knowledge about the benefits of smoking cessation to inform and strengthen support for patients to quit smoking in order to optimize surgical outcomes. Design Patients who had elective surgery were screened for smoking status, and eligible patients completed a telephone survey. Setting Two regional hospitals in northern British Columbia. Participants Of 1722 patients screened, 373 reported smoking before surgery. Of these, 161 (59.0% women) completed a telephone survey. Main outcome measures Patient smoking cessation, knowledge of the perioperative risks of smoking, use of resources, and health care provider advice and assistance. Results Participants included 66 men and 95 women (mean [SD] age of 51.9 [14.0] years). In total, 7.5% of these patients quit smoking in the 8 weeks before their surgeries, although an additional 38.8% reduced their smoking. Only about half of the patients surveyed were aware that continuing to smoke increased their surgical risks. Further, only half of the patients surveyed reported being advised to quit before their surgeries by a health care professional. Few were using the provincial resources available to support smoking cessation (eg, QuitNow), and 39.6% were unaware of the provincial program to cover the cost of smoking cessation aids (eg, nicotine gum or patches), yet 62.7% of respondents were thinking about quitting smoking. Conclusion Many surgical patients in northern British Columbia who smoked were unaware of the perioperative risks of smoking and the cessation support available to them. An opportunity exists for all health care professionals to encourage more patients to quit in order to optimize their surgical outcomes. PMID:27035005

  19. Costs and Cost-Effectiveness of Carotid Stenting versus Endarterectomy for Patients at Standard Surgical Risk: Results from the Carotid Revascularization Endarterectomy versus Stenting Trial (CREST)

    PubMed Central

    Vilain, Katherine R.; Magnuson, Elizabeth A.; Li, Haiyan; Clark, Wayne M.; Begg, Richard J.; Sam, Albert D.; Sternbergh, W. Charles; Weaver, Fred A.; Gray, William A.; Voeks, Jenifer H.; Brott, Thomas G.; Cohen, David J.

    2012-01-01

    CEA compared with CAS, projected 10-year outcomes from this controlled clinical trial demonstrate only trivial differences in overall healthcare costs and quality-adjusted life expectancy between the 2 strategies. If the CREST results can be replicated in clinical practice, these findings suggest that factors other than cost-effectiveness should be considered when deciding between treatment options for carotid artery stenosis in patients at standard risk for surgical complications. PMID:22821614

  20. Development and validation of the Surgical Outcome Risk Tool (SORT)

    PubMed Central

    Protopapa, K L; Simpson, J C; Smith, N C E; Moonesinghe, S R

    2014-01-01

    Background Existing risk stratification tools have limitations and clinical experience suggests they are not used routinely. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a preoperative risk stratification tool to predict 30-day mortality after non-cardiac surgery in adults by analysis of data from the observational National Confidential Enquiry into Patient Outcome and Death (NCEPOD) Knowing the Risk study. Methods The data set was split into derivation and validation cohorts. Logistic regression was used to construct a model in the derivation cohort to create the Surgical Outcome Risk Tool (SORT), which was tested in the validation cohort. Results Prospective data for 19 097 cases in 326 hospitals were obtained from the NCEPOD study. Following exclusion of 2309, details of 16 788 patients were analysed (derivation cohort 11 219, validation cohort 5569). A model of 45 risk factors was refined on repeated regression analyses to develop a model comprising six variables: American Society of Anesthesiologists Physical Status (ASA-PS) grade, urgency of surgery (expedited, urgent, immediate), high-risk surgical specialty (gastrointestinal, thoracic, vascular), surgical severity (from minor to complex major), cancer and age 65 years or over. In the validation cohort, the SORT was well calibrated and demonstrated better discrimination than the ASA-PS and Surgical Risk Scale; areas under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve were 0·91 (95 per cent c.i. 0·88 to 0·94), 0·87 (0·84 to 0·91) and 0·88 (0·84 to 0·92) respectively (P < 0·001). Conclusion The SORT allows rapid and simple data entry of six preoperative variables, and provides a percentage mortality risk for individuals undergoing surgery. PMID:25388883

  1. Bipolar versus monopolar transurethral resection of the prostate for benign prostatic hyperplasia: safe in patients with high surgical risk

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Er J.; Li, Hao; Sun, Xin B.; Huang, Li; Wang, Li; Gong, Xiao X.; Yang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Here, we compared the effects of bipolar and monopolar transurethral resection of the prostate (B-TURP, M-TURP) for treating elderly patients (≥75 years) with benign prostatic hyperplasia(BPH) who had internal comorbidities. Eligible BPH patients were aged ≥75 years and had at least one internal comorbidity. In this open-label, prospective trial, patients were assigned to B-TURP (n = 75) and M-TURP (n = 88) groups. Data on prostate volume (PV), urination, and time during perioperative period were compared; data associated with urination and complications at one year postoperatively were also compared. Finally, follow-up data were available for 68 and 81 patients in the B-TURP and M-TURP group, respectively. No deaths were recorded. Intraoperative bleeding was lower and irrigation time, indwelling catheter time, and hospital stay were shorter in the B-TURP group than in the M-TURP group (p < 0.001). No difference was observed with respect to operation time (p = 0.058). At one year after the operation, differences with respect to urination and complications were not significant. In conclusion, Short-term efficacy of B-TURP or M-TURP was satisfactory for elderly patients with BPH who had internal comorbidities. Besides, B-TURP is a more sensible choice because it has a lower prevalence of adverse effects. PMID:26892901

  2. Three-Year Outcomes of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation in Patients With Varying Levels of Surgical Risk (from the CoreValve ADVANCE Study).

    PubMed

    Barbanti, Marco; Schiltgen, Molly; Verdoliva, Sarah; Bosmans, Johan; Bleiziffer, Sabine; Gerckens, Ulrich; Wenaweser, Peter; Brecker, Stephen; Gulino, Simona; Tamburino, Corrado; Linke, Axel

    2016-03-01

    This study compared 3-year clinical outcomes of patients who underwent transcatheter aortic valve implantation with the Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) score ≤7% to those of patients with a score >7%. Data were drawn from the ADVANCE study, a multinational post-market clinical trial that enrolled real-world patients with severe aortic stenosis treated with the CoreValve bioprosthesis. Events were independently adjudicated using Valve Academic Research Consortium-1 definitions. A total of 996 patients were implanted: STS ≤7% (n = 697, median STS 4.3%, interquartile range 3.1% to 5.4%) and STS >7% (n = 298, median STS 9.7%, interquartile range 8.0% to 12.4%). At 3 years, the STS ≤7% group had lower rates of all-cause mortality (28.6 vs 45.9, p <0.01) and cardiovascular mortality (19.0 vs 30.2, p <0.01) than the STS >7% group. No differences were observed in cerebrovascular accidents, vascular complications, bleeding, or myocardial infarction. In patients with STS ≤7%, mortality at 3 years was higher in those with moderate or severe aortic regurgitation (AR) at discharge than in those with mild or less AR (39.9% vs 22.9%; hazard ratio 1.98; 95% confidence interval 1.37 to 2.86; p <0.01). Conversely, the severity of AR at discharge did not affect 3-year mortality in patients with STS >7% (42.9% vs 44.6%, moderate/severe vs mild/less; hazard ratio 1.04; 95% confidence interval, 0.62 to 1.75; p = 0.861; p for interaction = 0.047). In conclusion, patients with STS ≤7% had lower rates of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality at 3 years after transcatheter aortic valve implantation. Complication rates were low and stable in both groups, demonstrating the safety of this procedure for patients at various levels of surgical risk. PMID:26762727

  3. [Surgical treatment for patients with hyperparathyroidism].

    PubMed

    Noda, Satoru; Onoda, Naoyoshi

    2016-06-01

    Although parathyroid surgery is not a complicated surgical procedure, enough knowledge of the surgical anatomy and accurate information for localization of involved gland are required from the fact of the variation in the number and the location of the parathyroid gland. Surgical treatment for patients with hyperparathyroidism has been in the transition state from the era of both sides exploration to minimally invasive surgery. In addition, intraoperative radio guide method, intraoperative iPTH measurement, and intraoperative neuromonitoring have been introduced for the safe and reliable operation. PMID:27230845

  4. Transcatheter Mitral Valve Repair in Surgical High-Risk Patients: Gender-Specific Acute and Long-Term Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Tigges, Eike; Kalbacher, Daniel; Thomas, Christina; Appelbaum, Sebastian; Deuschl, Florian; Schofer, Niklas; Schlüter, Michael; Conradi, Lenard; Schirmer, Johannes; Treede, Hendrik; Reichenspurner, Hermann; Blankenberg, Stefan; Schäfer, Ulrich; Lubos, Edith

    2016-01-01

    Background. Analyses emphasizing gender-related differences in acute and long-term outcomes following MitraClip therapy for significant mitral regurgitation (MR) are rare. Methods. 592 consecutive patients (75 ± 8.7 years, 362 men, 230 women) underwent clinical and echocardiographic follow-up for a median of 2.13 (0.99–4.02) years. Results. Significantly higher prevalence of cardiovascular comorbidities, renal failure, and adverse echocardiographic parameters in men resulted in longer device time (p = 0.007) and higher numbers of implanted clips (p = 0.0075), with equal procedural success (p = 1.0). Rehospitalization for heart failure did not differ (p[logrank] = 0.288) while survival was higher in women (p[logrank] = 0.0317). Logarithmic increase of NT-proBNP was a common independent predictor of death. Hypercholesterolemia and peripheral artery disease were predictors of death only in men while ischemic and dilative cardiomyopathy (CM) and age were predictors in women. Independent predictors of rehospitalization for heart failure were severely reduced ejection fraction and success in men while both ischemic and dilative CM, logistic EuroSCORE, and MR severity were predictive in women. Conclusions. Higher numbers of implanted clips and longer device time are likely related to more comorbidities in men. Procedural success and acute and mid-term clinical outcomes were equal. Superior survival for women in long-term analysis is presumably attributable to a comparatively better preprocedural health. PMID:27042662

  5. [Surgical approach to posthepatitic cirrhotic patient today].

    PubMed

    Meriggi, F; Forni, E

    1996-01-01

    A posthepatitic cirrhotic patient may undergo elective or urgent abdominal operation for an extra-hepatic or hepatic disease. According to the high postoperative morbidity (61%), surgery is indicated only for symptomatic or complicated cholelithiasis. A surgical procedure for refractory ascites has been devised to create a permanent peritoneo-venous shunt by a one way pressure-sensitive valve (Leveen). The procedure is simple and brings a long lasting relief with recovery in strength and nutrition and improved kidney function. Sclerotherapy is widely used to treat acute variceal bleeding while repeated sclerotherapy is used in the long-term management to eradicate varices. When indicated, liver transplantation is the best treatment to prevent variceal bleeding recurrence. Also portosystemic shunts effectively prevent recurrent variceal bleeding. They are, however, major operations with an important morbidity and mortality, particularly in poor risk patients. The most advocated shunts today are the Warren distal splenorenal shunt and the Sarfeh portacaval shunt using a small diameter prosthetic H-graft. The transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic stent-shunt (TIPSS) is a new treatment for portal hypertension and its complications. From a haemodynamic point of view it allows balanced hepatic perfusion. Postoperative mortality is rare; further bleeding and encephalopathy are reasonably acceptable. The most relevant complications concern dislocation of the prosthesis, stenosis and thrombosis of the shunt, which can be corrected by non-invasive dilatation. Encephalopathy is the main complication of surgical portosystemic shunts. It is usually controlled by protein diet restriction, and administration of lactulose or oral antibiotics. In severe forms the patients may be treated by an oesophageal transection with oesophagogastric devascularization, and by a postoperative suppression of the portosystemic shunt using external maneuvers. Posthepatitic liver cirrhosis is

  6. Surgical site infection in clean-contaminated head and neck cancer surgery: risk factors and prognosis.

    PubMed

    Hirakawa, Hitoshi; Hasegawa, Yasuhisa; Hanai, Nobuhiro; Ozawa, Taijiro; Hyodo, Ikuo; Suzuki, Mikio

    2013-03-01

    Since new treatment strategies, such as chemoradiotherapy, have been introduced for head and neck cancer, a higher number of unknown factors may be involved in surgical site infection in clean-contaminated head and neck cancer surgery. The aim of the present study was to clarify the risk factors of surgical site infection in clean-contaminated surgery for head and neck cancer and the prognosis of patients with surgical site infection. Participants were 277 consecutive patients with head and neck cancer who underwent clean-contaminated surgery for primary lesions at the Aichi Cancer Center over a 60-month period. A total of 22 putative risk factors were recorded in each patient and statistically analyzed to elucidate surgical site infection related factors. Surgical site infection was observed in 92 (32.1 %) of 277 cases. Univariate analysis indicated that alcohol consumption, T classification, neck dissection, reconstructive procedure, and chemoradiotherapy were significantly associated with surgical site infection. Multiple logistic regression analysis identified two independent risk factors for surgical site infection: reconstructive surgery (p = 0.04; odds ratio (OR) 1.77) and chemoradiotherapy (p = 0.01; OR 1.93). In spite of surgical site infection, the five-year overall survival rate of patients with surgical site infection was not significantly different from those without surgical site infection. Although surgical site infection did not impact the overall survival of patients with surgical procedures, head and neck surgeons should pay attention to patients with previous chemoradiotherapy as well as to those with a high risk of surgical site infection requiring reconstructive surgery. PMID:22865106

  7. Patient outcomes following surgical management of multinodular goiter

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yann-Sheng; Wu, Hsin-Yi; Yu, Ming-Chin; Hsu, Chih-Chieh; Chao, Tzu-Chieh

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: the difference in the risk of thyroid malignancy for patients with multinodular goiter (MNG) and solitary nodular goiter (SNG) remains controversial. Although total thyroidectomy (TT) is the current preferred surgical option for MNG, permanent hypothyroidism in these patients may be a concern. Therefore, we discuss whether nontotal thyroidectomy is a reasonable alternative surgical option. Methods: A retrospective cohort study was performed for 1598 consecutive patients who underwent thyroid surgery for nodular goiter between January 2007 and December 2012. Numerous clinical parameters were collected and analyzed. Results: We reviewed 795 patients with MNG and 803 patients with SNG. The prevalence of malignancy on final pathology was significantly higher in the patients with MNG than in the patients with SNG (15.6% vs 10.1%, P = 0.001). However, a multivariate analysis revealed that this difference was insignificant (P = 0.50). Papillary carcinoma was the predominant type in both groups, but papillary microcarcinoma was more frequently found (41.1%) in the patients with MNG. The only multifocal cancers were of the papillary carcinoma histologic type, and the incidence of multifocal papillary carcinoma was significantly higher in the patients with MNG (23.4% vs 7.4%, P = 0.005). Reoperation was not required for the patients who underwent TT for goiter recurrence or incidental carcinoma. The overall rate of recurrence following nontotal thyroidectomy was 12.2%. Among the patients who underwent reoperation for goiter recurrence, 2 (20.0%) were complicated with permanent hypoparathyroidism. Among the patients who underwent a nontotal bilateral thyroidectomy, an average of 56.5% had permanent hypothyroidism. Conclusions: Multinodularity does not increase the risk of thyroid malignancy. However, patients with MNG who develop papillary carcinoma are at an increased risk of cancer multifocality. If a patient can tolerate lifelong thyroid hormone

  8. Pathogenesis of infection in surgical patients

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Ping; Fang, Xiangming

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Despite the application of prophylactic antimicrobial therapy and advanced technologies, infection remains one of the most common causes of morbidity and mortality in surgical patients. Understanding the pathogenesis of surgical infection would offer new insights into the development of biomarkers to predict and stratify infection in patients, and to explore specific strategies to minimize this serious postoperative complication. Recent findings The acute nonspecific inflammatory response triggered by endogenous danger signals evoked by surgical insult is beneficial, while paradoxically associated with reduced resistance to infection. There is growing evidence indicating that primed inflammation by surgical insult exaggerates the dysregulation of the immune-inflammatory response to the invasion of pathogens postoperatively. Innate immune receptors, such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs), contribute to detecting both pathogen-associated molecular patterns and endogenous damage-associated molecular patterns, and to further amplifying inflammatory responses to infection. Current evidence shows the fascinating role of non-TLRs in the process of infection. Non-TLRs, such as membrane-associated triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells family, cytosolic nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptors and nuclear receptor nuclear family 4 subgroup A receptors, are also crucial in triggering the immune responses and mounting an effective defense against surgical insults and the second hit of infection. Summary Understanding the pivotal role of non-TLRs in sensing exogenous and endogenous molecules, and the influence of primed systemic inflammation and depressed immune status on the defense against pathogen after surgical insult, would be helpful to fully explore the relevant sophisticated phenomena of surgical infection, and to elucidate the occurrence of heterogeneous constellations of clinical signs and symptoms among this special population

  9. [Patients' Rights Act - Relevance for surgical disciplines].

    PubMed

    Haier, J

    2014-01-01

    The new Patients' Rights Act does not reflect rights of patients as professional obligations of physicians for the first time. It adopted common longtime jurisdiction, but in some respects it is going beyond. This law clearly extends the documentation requirements of physicians, especially concerning the extent of documentation. In surgical fields the requirements for enlightening physicians were more strongly worded than in previous jurisdiction. In medical facilities it is now mandatory to establish an internal quality management system. PMID:24390850

  10. [Surgical treatment of bronchiectases in elderly patients].

    PubMed

    Danilov, G P; Makeeva, R P; Shornikov, V A; Zil'ber, E K; Akopov, A L

    2010-01-01

    The authors present experiences with surgical treatment of 29 patients (aged 50-64 years) with bronchiectases. Early and late results were analyzed. It was shown that complex approach to the estimation of the findings of radiography, spiral computed tomography, investigation of the external respiration function, fibrobronchoscopy and bronchoscopy, if necessary, allowed operating the patients older than 50 years with local forms of bronchiectases which gave good results. PMID:21137257

  11. Acute Kidney Injury in the Surgical Patient.

    PubMed

    Hobson, Charles; Singhania, Girish; Bihorac, Azra

    2015-10-01

    Perioperative acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common, morbid, and costly surgical complication. Current efforts to understand and manage AKI in surgical patients focus on prevention, mitigation of further injury when AKI has occurred, treatment of associated conditions, and facilitation of renal recovery. Lesser severity AKI is now understood to be much more common, and more morbid, than was previously thought. The ability to detect AKI within hours of onset would be helpful in protecting the kidney and in preserving renal function, and several imaging and biomarker modalities are currently being evaluated. PMID:26410139

  12. Fungal Septicemia in Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Roberto J.; Wolff, William I.

    1974-01-01

    Opportunistic systemic fungal infections are more frequent than generally realized. Increased awareness and a high index of suspicion of fungal super-infection in the presence of sepsis is required to bring about recognition and therapy. The intravenous catheter is an important portal of entry or may act as a foreign body favoring localization of a septic process. In its presence, fungemia must be guarded against. Whenever an intravenous catheter is removed, its tip should be cultured. Removal alone may be a critical item in therapy. In febrile patients, in whom the course of fever is not established, frequent blood cultures with attention directed specifically at fungi should be obtained. Fungi are not easily isolated and identified and only by requesting special attention from the microbiologist can the diagnosis be established in the average institutional laboratory in time to permit appropriate therapy. Since available therapeutic measures are strikingly effective when instituted early, awareness and alertness on the part of the clinician constitute the key to cure. PMID:4213622

  13. Surgical management of severe scoliosis with high risk pulmonary dysfunction in Duchenne muscular dystrophy: patient function, quality of life and satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Nakazawa, Toshiyuki; Imura, Takayuki; Okada, Takamitsu; Fukushima, Kensuke; Ueno, Masaki; Takahira, Naonobu; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Yamazaki, Masashi; Ohtori, Seiji; Okamoto, Hirotsugu; Okutomi, Toshiyuki; Okamoto, Makihito; Masaki, Takashi; Uchinuma, Eijyu; Sakagami, Hiroyuki

    2010-01-01

    In a previous study, the authors reported the clinical and radiological results of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) scoliosis surgery in 14 patients with a low FVC of <30%. The purpose of this study was to determine if surgery improved function and QOL in these patients. Furthermore, the authors assessed the patients’ and parents’ satisfaction. %FVC increased in all patients after preoperative inspiratory muscle training. Scoliosis surgery in this group of patients presented no increased risk of major complications. All-screw constructions and fusion offered the ability to correct spinal deformity in the coronal and pelvic obliquity initially, intermediate and long-term. All patients were encouraged to continue inspiratory muscle training after surgery. The mean rate of %FVC decline after surgery was 3.6% per year. Most patients and parents believed scoliosis surgery improved their function, sitting balance and quality of life even though patients were at high risk for major complications. Their satisfaction was also high. PMID:20155495

  14. Managing Opioid-Tolerant Patients in the Perioperative Surgical Home.

    PubMed

    Wenzel, John T; Schwenk, Eric S; Baratta, Jaime L; Viscusi, Eugene R

    2016-06-01

    Management of acute postoperative pain is important to decrease perioperative morbidity and improve patient satisfaction. Opioids are associated with potential adverse events that may lead to significant risk. Uncontrolled pain is a risk factor in the transformation of acute pain to chronic pain. Balancing these issues can be especially challenging in opioid-tolerant patients undergoing surgery, for whom rapidly escalating opioid doses in an effort to control pain can be associated with increased complications. In the perioperative surgical home model, anesthesiologists are positioned to coordinate a comprehensive perioperative analgesic plan that begins with the preoperative assessment and continues through discharge. PMID:27208711

  15. Obesity-related insulin resistance: implications for the surgical patient.

    PubMed

    Tewari, N; Awad, S; Macdonald, I A; Lobo, D N

    2015-11-01

    In healthy surgical patients, preoperative fasting and major surgery induce development of insulin resistance (IR). IR can be present in up to 41% of obese patients without diabetes and this can rise in the postoperative period, leading to an increased risk of postoperative complications. Inflammation is implicated in the aetiology of IR. This review examines obesity-associated IR and its implications for the surgical patient. Searches of the Medline and Science Citation Index databases were performed using various key words in combinations with the Boolean operators AND, OR and NOT. Key journals, nutrition and metabolism textbooks and the reference lists of key articles were also hand searched. Adipose tissue has been identified as an active endocrine organ and the chemokines secreted as a result of macrophage infiltration have a role in the pathogenesis of IR. Visceral adipose tissue appears to be the most metabolically active, although results across studies are not consistent. Results from animal and human studies often provide conflicting results, which has rendered the pursuit of a common mechanistic pathway challenging. Obesity-associated IR appears, in part, to be related to inflammatory changes associated with increased adiposity. Postoperatively, the surgical patient is in a proinflammatory state, so this finding has important implications for the obese surgical patient. PMID:26028059

  16. [SURGICAL TREATMENT OF PATIENTS WITH URETERAL RUPTURES].

    PubMed

    Komjakov, B K; Guliev, B G

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze the causes of ureteral ruptures and the types surgical procedures used for their management. Over the period from 2006 to 2014, 7 patients with ureteral ruptures underwent surgical treatment in the Mechnikov N-WSMU clinic. All of them were males aged 50 to 71 years. In all cases, the ureter was injured during ureteroscopy and contact lithotripsy. In two patients the right ureter was cut off at the border of the upper and middle third, in four--at 3-4 cm below pyeloureteral segment, one patient diagnosed with a complete separation of the ureter from the kidney pelvis. Patients, who have suffered a detachment of the ureter in other hospitals, previously underwent surgical exploration of the retroperitoneal space, drainage of the kidney by pyelonephrostomy (5) and ureterocutaneostomy (1). In a case of a patient with an injury that occurred in our clinic, laparoscopic nephrectomy with autologous renal transplantation was carried out. Five patients with extended ureter defects underwent ileo-ureteroplasty. The patient with left ureterocutaneostomy underwent nephrovesical bypass. Patency of the upper urinary tract and kidney function were restored in all patients, all of them were relieved from external drains. The duration of the intestinal plastic averaged 160 minutes, laparoscopic nephrectomy with autologous transplantation--210 min and nephrovesical bypass--110 min. Blood transfusion was required only in autologous graft patient. The ureteral rupture is a serious complication of ureteral endourological procedures in upper urinary tract. It requires such complicated reconstructive operations as autologous transplantation of the kidney or intestinal ureteroplasty. PMID:26390553

  17. Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma: Epidemiology, risk factors, diagnosis and surgical management.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Han; Yang, Tian; Wu, Mengchao; Shen, Feng

    2016-09-01

    Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC), the least common form of cholangiocarcinomas, is a rare hepatobiliary malignancy that arises from the epithelial cells of the intrahepatic bile ducts. The incidence of ICC has been rising in the global scale over the last twenty years, which may reflect both a true increase and the trend of earlier detection of the disease. Other than some well recognized causative risk factors, the association between viral and metabolic factors and ICC pathogenesis has been increasingly identified recently. Surgical resection is currently the only feasible modality with a curative ability, but the resectability and curability remain low. The high invasiveness of ICC predisposes the tumors to multifocality, node metastasis and vascular invasions, leading to poor long-term survival after resection. The role of liver transplantation is controversial, while locoregional treatments and systematic therapies may provide survival benefits, especially in patients with unresectable and advanced tumors. The present review discussed the epidemiology, risk factors, surgical and multimodal management of ICCs, which mainly focused on the outcomes and factors associated with surgical treatment. PMID:26409434

  18. Incidence and Sequelae of Prosthesis-Patient Mismatch in Transcatheter Vs Surgical Valve Replacement in High-Risk Patients with Severe Aortic Stenosis – A PARTNER Trial Cohort A Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pibarot, Philippe; Weissman, Neil J.; Stewart, William J.; Hahn, Rebecca T.; Lindman, Brian R.; McAndrew, Thomas; Kodali, Susheel K.; Mack, Michael J.; Thourani, Vinod H.; Miller, D. Craig; Svensson, Lars G.; Herrmann, Howard C.; Smith, Craig R.; Rodés-Cabau, Josep; Webb, John; Lim, Scott; Xu, Ke; Hueter, Irene; Douglas, Pamela S.; Leon, Martin B.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Little is known about the incidence of prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM) and its impact on outcomes after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). OBJECTIVES The objectives of this study were: 1) to compare the incidence of PPM in the transcatheter and surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) randomized (RCT) arms of the PARTNER-I trial Cohort A; and 2) to assess the impact of PPM on regression of left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy and mortality in these 2 arms and in the TAVR nonrandomized continued access (NRCA) Registry cohort. METHODS The PARTNER trial Cohort A randomized patients 1:1 to TAVR or bioprosthetic SAVR. Postoperative PPM was defined as absent if indexed effective orifice area >0.85, moderate ≥0.65 but ≤0.85, or severe <0.65 cm2/m2. LV mass regression and mortality were analyzed using the SAVR-RCT (n = 270), TAVR-RCT (n = 304) and TAVR-NRCA (n = 1637) cohorts. RESULTS Incidence of PPM was 60.0% (severe: 28.1%) in SAVR-RCT versus 46.4% (severe: 19.7%) in TAVR-RCT (p < 0.001) and 43.8% (severe: 13.6%) in TAVR-NRCA. In patients with aortic annulus diameter < 20 mm, severe PPM developed in 33.7% undergoing SAVR compared to 19.0% undergoing TAVR (p = 0.002). PPM was an independent predictor of less LV mass regression at 1 year in SAVR-RCT (p = 0.017) and TAVR-NRCA (p = 0.012) but not in TAVRRCT (p = 0.35). Severe PPM was an independent predictor of 2-year mortality in SAVR-RCT (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.78; p = 0.041) but not in TAVR-RCT (HR: 0.58; p = 0.11). In the TAVRNRCA, severe PPM was not a predictor of 1-year mortality in the whole cohort (HR: 1.05; p = 0.60) but did independently predict mortality in the subset of patients with no post-procedural aortic regurgitation (HR: 1.88; p = 0.02). CONCLUSIONS In patients with severe aortic stenosis and high surgical risk, PPM is more frequent and more often severe following SAVR than TAVR. Patients with PPM after SAVR have worse survival and less LV mass regression than those without PPM

  19. Hypercalcemia in critically ill surgical patients.

    PubMed Central

    Forster, J; Querusio, L; Burchard, K W; Gann, D S

    1985-01-01

    Critical surgical illness, commonly accompanied by shock, sepsis, multiple transfusions, and renal failure, is usually associated with low total calcium and/or low or normal ionized calcium. A seminal case of hypercalcemia in a surgical intensive care unit (SICU) patient prompted the review of 100 patients with longer than average SICU days (greater than 12) to determine the incidence, associated factors, and possible etiologies of this condition. Ten patients had elevated measured, and five others had elevated calculated, ionized calcium (5.9 +/- 0.25 mg%), an incidence of 15%. Compared to the 85 patients who did not develop hypercalcemia, this population had a significantly higher frequency of the following: renal failure, dialysis, total parenteral nutrition (TPN) usage greater than 21 days, bacteremic days greater than 1, transfusions greater than 24 units, shock greater than 1 day, SICU days greater than 36, and antibiotics used greater than 7. In addition, this group had significantly more days of hypocalcemia early in their hospital course. There was no difference in sex, age, mortality, or incidence of respiratory failure. Two patients studied in depth had renal failure requiring dialysis and no malignancy, milk-alkali syndrome, hyperthyroidism, or hypoadrenalism. Parathormone (PTH) concentrations were high normal or elevated (N terminal 20 and 21 pg/ml; C terminal 130 microliters Eq/ml and 1009 pg/ml) at the time of elevated calcium (total 9.2 to 14.6 mg%; ionized 4.9 to 8.2 mg%). Immobilization does not increase PTH. In renal failure, PTH elevation is a consequence of hypocalcemia rather than hypercalcemia. Moreover, five patients did not have renal failure. Shock, sepsis, and multiple transfusions containing citrate may lower total and/or ionized calcium and thus stimulate PTH secretion. Whatever the mechanism, approximately 15% of critically ill surgical patients develop hypercalcemia, which may represent a new form of hyperparathyroidism. PMID:3931594

  20. Clinical Characteristics and Surgical Outcomes in Patients With Intermittent Exotropia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Min; Chen, Jingchang; Shen, Tao; Kang, Ying; Deng, Daming; Lin, Xiaoming; Wu, Heping; Chen, Qiwen; Ye, Xuelian; Li, Jianqun; Yan, Jianhua

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The clinical characteristics and surgical outcomes in a large sample of patients with intermittent exotropia (IXT) as well as an analysis of risk factors associated with surgical failures are presented in this article. Data from IXT patients who received surgical management at the Eye Hospital, in the Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, of Sun Yat-Sen University, China from January 2009 to December 2013 were reviewed retrospectively. Included within this analysis were data from pre- and postoperative ocular motility, primary alignment, and binocular vision. A total of 1228 patients with IXT were reviewed. Males (50.4%) and females (49.6%) were nearly equally represented in this sample. Thirty-two patients (2.6%) had a family history of strabismus. The mean age at onset was 6.77 ± 6.43 years (range 7 months –48.5 years), mean duration at presentation was 7.35 ± 6.68 years (range 6 months–47 years), and mean age at surgery was 13.7 ± 8.8 years (range 3–49 years). The mean refractive error was −0.84 ± 2.69 diopter in the right eye and −0.72 ± 2.58 diopter in the left eye. Amblyopia (4.2%), oblique muscle dysfunction (7.0%), and dissociated vertical deviation (4.7%) were also present in these patients. The most common subtype of IXT was the basic type (88.1%). Orthophoria was observed in 80.5% of patients and the ratios of surgical undercorrection and overcorrection were 14.7% and 4.8%, respectively, as determined with a mean follow-up time of 7.8 ± 3.7 months. When combining ocular alignment with binocular vision as the success criteria, the success rate decreased to 35.6%. Multivariate risk factor analysis showed that only the loss of stereoacuity (P = 0.002) was associated with a poor outcome. There were no differences in the long-term results between bilateral lateral rectus recession and unilateral lateral rectus recession with medial rectus resection. Most IXT patients displayed normal vision, with few having positive

  1. The anaesthetic assessment, management and risk factors of bariatric surgical patients requiring postoperative intensive care support: a state-wide, five-year cohort study.

    PubMed

    Morgan, D J R; Ho, K M

    2016-03-01

    Bariatric surgery is a rapidly growing and dynamic discipline necessitating a specialised anaesthetic approach coordinating high-risk patients with appropriate post-operative intensive care (ICU) support. The relationship between the anaesthetic and ICU utilisation after bariatric surgery is poorly understood. All adult bariatric surgery patients admitted to any ICU over a five-year period between 2007 and 2011 in Western Australia were identified from hospital admission records and cross-referenced against the Western Australian Department of Health Data Linkage Unit database. During the study period 12,062 patients under went bariatric surgery with 581 (4.8%) patients admitted to ICU immediately following surgery. The mean pre-operative ASA score was 3.3 [standard deviation 1.1] with 76.9% of patients were assessed by their anaesthetist for the first time on the day-of-surgery. Blood pathology (75%) and ECG (46.3%) were the most common preoperative investigations. Intra-operatively, 2.1% of patients had a grade 4 intubation with only 3.4% of patients requiring a videoscopic assisted intubation. Despite being deemed at high risk, 23.6% of patients were managed with 20 gauge or smaller intravenous access. Anaesthetic complications were extremely uncommon (0.5% of all bariatric cases) but accounted for 9.7% of all postoperative ICU admissions. Smoking history, but not body-mass-index (P=0.46), was the only significant prognostic factor for respiratory or airway related anaesthetic complications (P=0.012). In summary, the anaesthesia management of bariatric surgery varied widely in Western Australia, with smoking as the only significant preoperative risk factor for respiratory or airway related anaesthesia complications. PMID:27029656

  2. Review article: Risk factors for poor outcome following surgical treatment for rotator cuff tear.

    PubMed

    Sahni, V; Narang, A M

    2016-08-01

    The Medline database was searched using key words: 'rotator cuff', 'tear', and 'treatment'. 12 studies that involved (1) surgical treatment for rotator cuff tear, (2) measurement of pre- and post-operative pain score, functional score, and/or patient satisfaction, (3) patients that failed to improve functionally or had poor satisfaction, (4) preoperative examination of risk factors that could lead to poor outcome, and (5) a minimum follow-up of 6 months were reviewed to identify risk factors associated with poor outcome following surgical treatment for rotator cuff tear. The most common risk factor was tear size, followed by open compensation claim, age, and time from injury to surgery. PMID:27574276

  3. Efficacy of promethazine suppositories dispensed to outpatient surgical patients.

    PubMed Central

    Wright, C. D.; Jilka, J.; Gentry, W. B.

    1998-01-01

    Postoperative nausea and vomiting frequently complicate outpatient anesthesia and surgery. The duration of treatment for this complication must occasionally extend beyond discharge from the hospital. In this study, we evaluated the commonly used anti-emetic promethazine for its efficacy in the post-discharge period. Adult outpatient surgical patients who had excessive postoperative nausea and vomiting in the recovery room, or who were at risk for postoperative nausea and vomiting following discharge were given two promethazine suppositories (25 mg) for home use. All patients were contacted by our recovery room nurses on the first business day after their surgery and questioned as to their use of the suppositories and, if used, their efficacy. We found that 55 percent of patients given promethazine suppositories for home use had nausea and vomiting in the post-discharge period. Of the patients given promethazine, 89 percent used the suppositories. All of these patients reported improvement in their symptoms following use of the suppositories. None reported adverse effects from the promethazine suppositories. In conclusion, we found promethazine suppositories to be an inexpensive and efficacious treatment for nausea and vomiting in adult outpatient surgical patients following discharge from the hospital. Side-effects were minimal, and our patients voiced no complaints about this mode of therapy. We recommend this therapy for treatment of nausea and vomiting after hospital discharge following adult outpatient surgery. PMID:10527366

  4. REMODELING CHARACTERISTICS AND COLLAGEN DISTRIBUTION IN BIOLOGICAL SCAFFOLD MATERIALS EXPLANTED FROM HUMAN SUBJECTS AFTER ABDOMINAL SOFT TISSUE RECONSTRUCTION: AN ANALYSIS OF SCAFFOLD REMODELING CHARACTERISTICS BY PATIENT RISK FACTORS AND SURGICAL SITE CLASSIFICATIONS

    PubMed Central

    Cavallo, Jaime A.; Roma, Andres A.; Jasielec, Mateusz S.; Ousley, Jenny; Creamer, Jennifer; Pichert, Matthew D.; Baalman, Sara; Frisella, Margaret M.; Matthews, Brent D.; Deeken, Corey R.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The study purpose was to evaluate the associations between patient characteristics or surgical site classifications and the histologic remodeling scores of biologic meshes biopsied from abdominal soft tissue repair sites in the first attempt to generate a multivariable risk prediction model of non-constructive remodeling. INTRODUCTION Host characteristics and surgical site assessments may predict remodeling degree for biologic meshes used to reinforce abdominal tissue repair sites. METHODS Biologic meshes were biopsied from the abdominal tissue repair sites of n=40 patients during an abdominal re-exploration, stained with hematoxylin and eosin, and evaluated according to a semi-quantitative scoring system for remodeling characteristics [cell types (CT), cell infiltration (CI), extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition, scaffold degradation (SD), fibrous encapsulation (FE), and neovascularization (NEO)] and a mean composite score (CR). Biopsies were stained with Sirius Red & Fast Green, and analyzed to determine the collagen I:III ratio. Based on univariate analyses between subject clinical characteristics or surgical site classification and the histologic remodeling scores, cohort variables were selected for multivariable regression models using a p-value ≤0.200. RESULTS The model selection process for CI score yielded 2 variables: age at mesh implantation and mesh classification (c-statistic=0.989). For CR score, the model selection process yielded 2 variables: age at mesh implantation and mesh classification (r2=0.449). CONCLUSION These preliminary results constitute the first steps in generating a risk prediction model that predicts the patients and clinical circumstances most likely to experience non-constructive remodeling of abdominal tissue repair sites with biologic mesh reinforcement. PMID:24374547

  5. Remodeling characteristics and collagen distribution in synthetic mesh materials explanted from human subjects after abdominal wall reconstruction: an analysis of remodeling characteristics by patient risk factors and surgical site classifications

    PubMed Central

    Cavallo, Jaime A.; Roma, Andres A.; Jasielec, Mateusz S.; Ousley, Jenny; Creamer, Jennifer; Pichert, Matthew D.; Baalman, Sara; Frisella, Margaret M.; Matthews, Brent D.

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the associations between patient characteristics or surgical site classifications and the histologic remodeling scores of synthetic meshes biopsied from their abdominal wall repair sites in the first attempt to generate a multivariable risk prediction model of non-constructive remodeling. Methods Biopsies of the synthetic meshes were obtained from the abdominal wall repair sites of 51 patients during a subsequent abdominal re-exploration. Biopsies were stained with hematoxylin and eosin, and evaluated according to a semi-quantitative scoring system for remodeling characteristics (cell infiltration, cell types, extracellular matrix deposition, inflammation, fibrous encapsulation, and neovascularization) and a mean composite score (CR). Biopsies were also stained with Sirius Red and Fast Green, and analyzed to determine the collagen I:III ratio. Based on univariate analyses between subject clinical characteristics or surgical site classification and the histologic remodeling scores, cohort variables were selected for multivariable regression models using a threshold p value of ≤0.200. Results The model selection process for the extracellular matrix score yielded two variables: subject age at time of mesh implantation, and mesh classification (c-statistic = 0.842). For CR score, the model selection process yielded two variables: subject age at time of mesh implantation and mesh classification (r2 = 0.464). The model selection process for the collagen III area yielded a model with two variables: subject body mass index at time of mesh explantation and pack-year history (r2 = 0.244). Conclusion Host characteristics and surgical site assessments may predict degree of remodeling for synthetic meshes used to reinforce abdominal wall repair sites. These preliminary results constitute the first steps in generating a risk prediction model that predicts the patients and clinical circumstances for which non

  6. Obesity and Readmission in Elderly Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Reinke, Caroline E.; Kelz, Rachel R.; Zubizarreta, Jose R.; Mi, Lanyu; Saynisch, Philip; Kyle, Fabienne A.; Even-Shoshan, Orit; Fleisher, Lee A.; Silber, Jeffrey H.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Reducing readmissions has become a focus in efforts by Medicare to improve healthcare quality and reduce costs. This study aimed to determine whether causes for readmission differed between obese and non-obese patients, possibly allowing for targeted interventions. Methods A matched case-control study of Medicare patients admitted between 2002–2006 who were readmitted following hip or knee surgery, colectomy, or thoracotomy was performed. Patients were matched exactly for procedure, while also balancing on hospital, age and sex. Conditional logistic regression was used to study the odds of readmission for very obese cases (BMI > 35kg/m2) versus normal weight patients (BMI of 20–30kg/m2) after further controlling for race, transfer-in and emergency status, and comorbidities. Results Among 15,914 patient admissions we identified 1,380 readmitted patients and 2,760 controls. Risk of readmission was increased for obese vs. non-obese patients, before and after controlling for comorbidities (OR=1.35, P=0.003; OR=1.25, P=0.04). Reasons for readmission varied by procedure but were not different by BMI category. Conclusions Obese patients have an increased risk of readmission, yet reasons for readmission in obese patients appear similar to the non-obese, suggesting that improved post-discharge management for the obese cannot focus on a few specific causes of readmission, but must provide a broad range of interventions. PMID:22938896

  7. Quality of surgical care and readmission in elderly glioblastoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Nuño, Miriam; Ly, Diana; Mukherjee, Debraj; Ortega, Alicia; Black, Keith L.; Patil, Chirag G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Thirty-day readmissions post medical or surgical discharge have been analyzed extensively. Studies have shown that complex interactions of multiple factors are responsible for these hospitalizations. Methods A retrospective analysis was conducted using the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) Medicare database of newly diagnosed elderly glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients who underwent surgical resection between 1991 and 2007. Hospitals were classified into high- or low-readmission rate cohorts using a risk-adjusted methodology. Bivariate comparisons of outcomes were conducted. Multivariate analysis evaluated differences in quality of care according to hospital readmission rates. Results A total of 1,273 patients underwent surgery in 338 hospitals; 523 patients were treated in 228 high-readmission hospitals and 750 in 110 low-readmission hospitals. Patient characteristics for high-versus low-readmission hospitals were compared. In a confounder-adjusted model, patients treated in high- versus low-readmission hospitals had similar outcomes. The hazard of mortality for patients treated at high- compared to low-readmission hospitals was 1.06 (95% CI, 0.095%–1.19%). While overall complications were comparable between high- and low-readmission hospitals (16.3% vs 14.3%; P = .33), more postoperative pulmonary embolism/deep vein thrombosis complications were documented in patients treated at high-readmission hospitals (7.5% vs 4.1%; P = .01). Adverse events and levels of resection achieved during surgery were comparable at high- and low-readmission hospitals. Conclusions For patients undergoing GBM resection, quality of care provided by hospitals with the highest adjusted readmission rates was similar to the care delivered by hospitals with the lowest rates. These findings provide evidence against the preconceived notion that 30-day readmissions can be used as a metric for quality of surgical and postsurgical care. PMID:26034614

  8. Pediatric appendectomy: optimal surgical timing and risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Burjonrappa, Sathyaprasad; Rachel, Dana

    2014-05-01

    Appendicitis is one of the most common pediatric surgical problems. In the older surgical paradigm, appendectomy was considered to be an emergent procedure; however, with changes to resident work hours and other economic factors, the operation has evolved into an urgent and deliberately planned intervention. This paradigm shift in care has not necessarily seen universal buy-in by all stakeholders. Skeptics worry about the higher incidence of complications, particularly intra-abdominal abscess (IAA), associated with the delay to appendectomy with this strategy. Development of IAA after pediatric appendectomy greatly burdens the healthcare system, incapacitates patients, and limits family functionality. The risk factors that influence the development of IAA after appendectomy were evaluated in 220 children admitted to a large urban teaching hospital over a recent 1.5-year period. Preoperative risk factors included in the study were age, sex, weight, ethnicity, duration and nature of symptoms, white cell count, and ultrasound or computed tomography scan findings (appendicolith, peritoneal fluid, abscess, phlegmon), failed nonoperative management, antibiotics administered, and timing. Intraoperative factors included were timing of appendectomy, surgical and pathological findings of perforation, open or laparoscopic procedure, and use of staple or Endoloop to ligate the appendix. Postoperative factors included were duration and type of antibiotic therapy. There were 94 (43%) perforated and 126 (57%) nonperforated appendicitis during the study period. The incidence of postoperative IAA was 4.5 per cent (nine of 220). Children operated on after overnight antibiotics and resuscitation had a significantly lower risk of IAA as compared with children managed by other strategies (P < 0.0003). Of the preoperative factors, only the presence of a fever in the emergency department (P < 0.001) and identification of complicated appendicitis on imaging (P < 0.0001) were significant

  9. Managing anxiety in the elective surgical patient.

    PubMed

    Pritchard, Michael John

    Patients coming into hospital can suffer a great deal of anxiety--Mathews et al (1981) suggested patients who undergo surgery experience acute psychological distress in the pre-operative period. These fears manifest themselves as uncertainty, loss of control and decreased self-esteem, anticipation of postoperative pain, and fear of separation from family (Egan et al, 1992; Asilioglu and Celik, 2004). As technical advances and improved anaesthetic techniques become available to the NHS, the ability to offer day surgery to a wider patient population is increasing. In fact Bernier et al (2003) and Elliott et al (2003) have suggested that 60% of future operations will be day procedures. This means as health-care professionals, nurses will have shorter time available not only to identify patients who may be experiencing anxiety, but also to offer them the support they need to cope with the surgery. Anxiety can have a profound effect on patients--it affects them in a variety of ways, from ignoring the illness, which could have a serious impact on the patient's life, to the constant demand for attention which can take the nurse away from the care of other patients on the ward (Thomas et al, 1995). Recently, there has been increasing interest in the possible influences of properative anxiety on the course and outcome of surgical procedures and the potential benefits of anxiety-reducing interventions (Markland et al, 1993). Caumo et al (2001) suggested that pre-operative management of a patients anxiety would be improved if health-care professionals had more knowledge about the potential predictors of pre-operative anxiety. PMID:19373185

  10. Ethical dilemmas for pediatric surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Boudreaux, Arthur M; Tilden, Samuel J

    2002-03-01

    Anesthesiologists are confronted with interesting and sometimes difficult ethical situations in pediatric surgery. They are forced to deal with everything from "do not resuscitate" issues, heroic last-chance surgical efforts, religious and cultural conflicts, disputes among colleagues, and situations that are, at worst, uncomfortable and, at best, miscarriages of duty. It is incumbent on anesthesiologists to learn how to logically and appropriately handle these issues. The pediatric surgical patient requires special consideration in bioethics. This article discusses the principle of autonomy and its ascension in importance in bioethics. The concepts of informed parental permission, assent, and dissent are presented. The authors provide a framework for ethical problem-solving, as well as a discussion of judicial decision-making. In addition, several examples of clinical-ethical situations and the processes used for resolutions are discussed. By using a well-reasoned ethical decision-making process, any situation, from the simple conflict to the most serious resuscitation and withdrawal of care issues, may be appropriately resolved. PMID:11892507

  11. Intramedullary hemangioblastomas: surgical results in 16 patients.

    PubMed

    Joaquim, Andrei F; Ghizoni, Enrico; dos Santos, Marcos Juliano; Valadares, Marcelo Gomes C; da Silva, Felipe Soares; Tedeschi, Helder

    2015-08-01

    OBJECT Hemangioblastomas are rare, benign, highly vascularized tumors that can be found throughout the neuraxis but are mainly located in the cerebellum and in the spinal cord. Spinal hemangioblastomas can present with motor and sensory deficits, whose severity varies according to the size and location of the tumor. Resection is the best treatment option to avoid neurological deterioration. The authors report surgical results in the treatment of intramedullary hemangioblastomas and discuss the technical nuances important to achieving total resection without adding new deficits. METHODS A consecutive series of patients with intramedullary hemangioblastomas operated on between 2000 and 2014 by the senior author (H.T.) is presented. The functional scale proposed by McCormick was used to evaluate the patients' neurological status before and after surgery. RESULTS Sixteen patients were included in the study and underwent 17 surgeries. Follow-up was at least 6 months. Age at presentation varied from 13 to 58 years (mean 33.8 years). Ten patients (62.5%) were males and 6 patients (37.5%) were females. Seven (43.75%) of the 16 patients had associated von Hippel-Lindau syndrome, with hemangioblastomas also presenting in other locations. Three patients had multiple tumors in the same segment in the spinal cord, and 10 patients (62.5%) presented with cysts. According to the site of presentation, 11 tumors (68.75%) were localized at the cervical region (including the cervicomedullary junction) and 5 tumors (31.25%) at the thoracic level. Total resection was achieved in all cases, evidenced by postoperative MRI. Four patients had some functional worsening immediately after surgery. After 6 months, 1 patient had functional worsening compared with preoperative status, and 2 patients had clinical improvement. The majority of the patients remained clinically stable postoperatively. CONCLUSIONS Adequate knowledge of anatomy and the correct use of microsurgical techniques allowed

  12. EDUCATIONAL SECTION: risk analysis in surgical oncology-part I: concepts and tools.

    PubMed

    Rew, D A

    2000-09-01

    All clinical procedures invoke risk. Many interventions in cancer management carry a particularly high element of risk, expressed through morbidity and premature death. Formal risk analysis is a discipline which is fundamental to engineering, to finance, to the airline industry and many other sectors of public life. Clinical risk analysis involves risk prediction, risk management and risk avoidance. Risk analysis is rarely invoked or taught in the clinical sciences, and management appraisals on individual patients almost never include a formal estimate of risk. Clinical decisions tend to be guided by qualitative judgements, and by the personality interactions of patients and clinicians. A formal evaluation of risk on a case by case and procedural basis might reduce morbidity and cost in surgical oncology practice. This article introduces the concepts, the spectrum and history of risk analysis and the tools for risk prediction. PMID:11034813

  13. Generating patient-specific pulmonary vascular models for surgical planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murff, Daniel; Co-Vu, Jennifer; O'Dell, Walter G.

    2015-03-01

    Each year in the U.S., 7.4 million surgical procedures involving the major vessels are performed. Many of our patients require multiple surgeries, and many of the procedures include "surgical exploration". Procedures of this kind come with a significant amount of risk, carrying up to a 17.4% predicted mortality rate. This is especially concerning for our target population of pediatric patients with congenital abnormalities of the heart and major pulmonary vessels. This paper offers a novel approach to surgical planning which includes studying virtual and physical models of pulmonary vasculature of an individual patient before operation obtained from conventional 3D X-ray computed tomography (CT) scans of the chest. These models would provide clinicians with a non-invasive, intricately detailed representation of patient anatomy, and could reduce the need for invasive planning procedures such as exploratory surgery. Researchers involved in the AirPROM project have already demonstrated the utility of virtual and physical models in treatment planning of the airways of the chest. Clinicians have acknowledged the potential benefit from such a technology. A method for creating patient-derived physical models is demonstrated on pulmonary vasculature extracted from a CT scan with contrast of an adult human. Using a modified version of the NIH ImageJ program, a series of image processing functions are used to extract and mathematically reconstruct the vasculature tree structures of interest. An auto-generated STL file is sent to a 3D printer to create a physical model of the major pulmonary vasculature generated from 3D CT scans of patients.

  14. TextWithSurgeryPatients - A Research Hypothesis in Enhancing Education and Physical Assessment for Abdominal Surgical Patients.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    Medical surgical nurses may not have the time or resources to provide effective pre- and post-operative instructions for patients in today's healthcare system. And, making timely physical assessments following discharge from the hospital is not always straightforward. Therefore, the risk for readmission associated with post-surgical complications is a concern. At present, mobile healthcare technologies and patient care are precipitously evolving and may serve as a resource to enhance communication between the healthcare provider and patient. A mobile telephone text message (short message service [SMS]) intervention for abdominal surgical patients may foster effective education (communication) and timely self-reported physical assessment in the home environment hence preventing deleterious outcomes. The aim of this research proposal is to identify the feasibility of using a SMS intervention via smart phones to improve health outcomes via timely communication, reach large numbers of at-risk surgical patients and, establish and sustain uniform protocols in a cost-efficient manner. PMID:27332251

  15. Postoperative delirium in the elderly surgical patient.

    PubMed

    Sieber, Frederick E

    2009-09-01

    Delirium is a common complication in the geriatric population following cardiac and noncardiac procedures. Postoperative delirium is a significant financial burden on the United States health care system and is independently associated with prolonged hospital stay, increased risk of early and long term mortality, increased physical dependence, and an increased rate of nursing home placement. The Confusion Assessment Method (CAM) is a bedside rating scale developed to assist nonpsychiatrically trained clinicians in the rapid and accurate diagnosis of delirium. The CAM has been adapted for use in ventilated intensive care unit (ICU) patients in the form of the CAM-ICU. The onset of delirium involves an interaction between predisposing and precipitating risk factors for delirium. The mainstay of delirium management is prevention. The approach involves control or elimination of modifiable risk factors. It is controversial whether anesthetic technique determines delirium. However, important modifiable risk factors under the anesthesiologist's control include adequate postoperative pain management, careful drug selection, and embracing and participating in a multidisciplinary care model for these complicated patients. PMID:19825486

  16. Caring for Surgical Patients With Piercings.

    PubMed

    Smith, Francis Duval

    2016-06-01

    Body piercing, a type of body modification that is practiced in many cultures, creates an unnatural tract through tissue that is then held open by artificial means. Today, professional body piercing is often performed in piercing establishments that are subject to dissimilar forms of regulation. The most frequently reported medical complication of body piercing and similar body modifications, such as dermal implantation, is infection. Patients with piercings who undergo surgery may have additional risks for infection, electrical burns, trauma, or airway obstruction. The published research literature on piercing prevalence, complications, regulations, education, and nursing care is outdated. The purpose of this article is to educate nurses on topics related to nursing care for patients with piercings and similar body modifications, including the history, prevalence, motivations for, and perceptions of body piercings as well as possible complications, devices used, locations, healing times, regulations, patient education, and other health concerns. PMID:27234793

  17. Derivation and Validation of the Surgical Site Infections Risk Model Using Health Administrative Data.

    PubMed

    van Walraven, Carl; Jackson, Timothy D; Daneman, Nick

    2016-04-01

    OBJECTIVE Surgical site infections (SSIs) are common hospital-acquired infections. Tracking SSIs is important to monitor their incidence, and this process requires primary data collection. In this study, we derived and validated a method using health administrative data to predict the probability that a person who had surgery would develop an SSI within 30 days. METHODS All patients enrolled in the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) from 2 sites were linked to population-based administrative datasets in Ontario, Canada. We derived a multivariate model, stratified by surgical specialty, to determine the independent association of SSI status with patient and hospitalization covariates as well as physician claim codes. This SSI risk model was validated in 2 cohorts. RESULTS The derivation cohort included 5,359 patients with a 30-day SSI incidence of 6.0% (n=118). The SSI risk model predicted the probability that a person had an SSI based on 7 covariates: index hospitalization diagnostic score; physician claims score; emergency visit diagnostic score; operation duration; surgical service; and potential SSI codes. More than 90% of patients had predicted SSI risks lower than 10%. In the derivation group, model discrimination and calibration was excellent (C statistic, 0.912; Hosmer-Lemeshow [H-L] statistic, P=.47). In the 2 validation groups, performance decreased slightly (C statistics, 0.853 and 0.812; H-L statistics, 26.4 [P=.0009] and 8.0 [P=.42]), but low-risk patients were accurately identified. CONCLUSION Health administrative data can effectively identify postoperative patients with a very low risk of surgical site infection within 30 days of their procedure. Records of higher-risk patients can be reviewed to confirm SSI status. Infect. Control Hosp. Epidemiol. 2016;37(4):455-465. PMID:26785686

  18. Reducing the risk of surgical site infections: does chlorhexidine gluconate provide a risk reduction benefit?

    PubMed

    Edmiston, Charles E; Bruden, Benjamin; Rucinski, Maria C; Henen, Cindy; Graham, Mary Beth; Lewis, Brian L

    2013-05-01

    Chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG) has been available as a topical antiseptic for over 50 years, having broad clinical application throughout the health care environment. Evidence-based clinical studies have shown chlorhexidine gluconate to be a safe and effective perioperative skin-prepping agent. Renewed interest has emerged for use of the antiseptic bath/shower to reduce the microbial skin burden prior to hospital admission. Recent clinical studies have documented that multiple applications of 2% or 4% CHG using a standardized protocol results in high skin surface concentrations sufficient to inhibit/kill skin colonizing flora, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. A new focus for the use of CHG in surgical patients involves irrigation of the wound prior to closure with 0.05% CHG followed by saline rinse. Recent laboratory studies suggest that, following a 1-minute exposure, 0.05% CHG produces a >5-log reduction against selective health care-associated pathogens and reduces microbial adherence to the surface of implantable biomedical devices. General, orthopedic, cardiothoracic, and obstetrical surgical studies have documented the safety of selective CHG formulations in elective surgical procedures. The following discussion will address both the evidence-based literature and preliminary findings suggesting that CHG has a broad and safe range of applications when used as an adjunctive interventional strategy for reducing the risk of postoperative surgical site infections (SSI). PMID:23622749

  19. Incisional Reinforcement in High-Risk Patients

    PubMed Central

    Feldmann, Timothy F.; Young, Monica T.; Pigazzi, Alessio

    2014-01-01

    Hernia formation after surgical procedures continues to be an important cause of surgical morbidity. Incisional reinforcement at the time of the initial operation has been used in some patient populations to reduce the risk of subsequent hernia formation. In this article, reinforcement techniques in different surgical wounds are examined to identify situations in which hernia formation may be prevented. Mesh use for midline closure, pelvic floor reconstruction, and stoma site reinforcement is discussed. Additionally, the use of retention sutures, closure of the open abdomen, and reinforcement after component separation are examined using current literature. Although existing studies do not support the routine use of mesh reinforcement for all surgical incisions, certain patient populations appear to benefit from reinforcement with lower rates of subsequent hernia formation. The identification and characterization of these groups will guide the future use of mesh reinforcement in surgical incisions. PMID:25435823

  20. Washed cell salvage in surgical patients

    PubMed Central

    Meybohm, Patrick; Choorapoikayil, Suma; Wessels, Anke; Herrmann, Eva; Zacharowski, Kai; Spahn, Donat R.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Cell salvage is commonly used as part of a blood conservation strategy. However concerns among clinicians exist about the efficacy of transfusion of washed cell salvage. Methods: We performed a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials in which patients, scheduled for all types of surgery, were randomized to washed cell salvage or to a control group with no cell salvage. Data were independently extracted, risk ratio (RR), and weighted mean differences (WMD) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Data were pooled using a random effects model. The primary endpoint was the number of patients exposed to allogeneic red blood cell (RBC) transfusion. Results: Out of 1140 search results, a total of 47 trials were included. Overall, the use of washed cell salvage reduced the rate of exposure to allogeneic RBC transfusion by a relative 39% (RR = 0.61; 95% CI 0.57 to 0.65; P < 0.001), resulting in an average saving of 0.20 units of allogeneic RBC per patient (weighted mean differences [WMD] = −0.20; 95% CI −0.22 to −0.18; P < 0.001), reduced risk of infection by 28% (RR = 0.72; 95% CI 0.54 to 0.97; P = 0.03), reduced length of hospital stay by 2.31 days (WMD = −2.31; 95% CI −2.50 to −2.11; P < 0.001), but did not significantly affect risk of mortality (RR = 0.92; 95% CI 0.63 to 1.34; P = 0.66). No statistical difference could be observed in the number of patients exposed to re-operation, plasma, platelets, or rate of myocardial infarction and stroke. Conclusions: Washed cell salvage is efficacious in reducing the need for allogeneic RBC transfusion and risk of infection in surgery. PMID:27495095

  1. Length of preoperative hospital stay: a risk factor for reducing surgical infection in femoral fracture cases

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Hoberdan Oliveira; Rezende, Edna Maria; Couto, Bráulio Roberto Gonçalves Marinho

    2015-01-01

    Objective To analyze infections of the surgical site among patients undergoing clean-wound surgery for correction of femoral fractures. Methods This was a historical cohort study developed in a large-sized hospital in Belo Horizonte. Data covering the period from July 2007 to July 2009 were gathered from the records in electronic medical files, relating to the characteristics of the patients, surgical procedures and surgical infections. The risk factors for infection were identified by means of statistical tests on bilateral hypotheses, taking the significance level to be 5%. Continuous variables were evaluated using Student's t test. Categorical variables were evaluated using the chi-square test, or Fisher's exact test, when necessary. For each factor under analysis, a point estimate and the 95% confidence interval for the relative risk were obtained. In the final stage of the study, multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed. Results 432 patients who underwent clean-wound surgery for correcting femoral fractures were included in this study. The rate of incidence of surgical site infections was 4.9% and the risk factors identified were the presence of stroke (odds ratio, OR = 5.0) and length of preoperative hospital stay greater than four days (OR = 3.3). Conclusion To prevent surgical site infections in operations for treating femoral fractures, measures involving assessment of patients’ clinical conditions by a multiprofessional team, reduction of the length of preoperative hospital stay and prevention of complications resulting from infections will be necessary.

  2. Management of vitiligo patients with surgical interventions.

    PubMed

    Shokeen, Divya

    2016-05-01

    Vitiligo is an acquired depigmentation disorder of unknown etiology. Medical treatments are usually reasonably effective for nonstable vitiligo patches; however, for vitiligo patches that have been stable for a substantial period of time, surgical intervention should be considered. In this article, surgical interventions for vitiligo are reviewed, including split-thickness skin grafting, suction blister grafting, miniature punch grafting, and cultured melanocyte transplantation. PMID:27274556

  3. Evaluation of the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program Universal Surgical Risk Calculator for a gynecologic oncology service

    PubMed Central

    Szender, J. Brian; Frederick, Peter J.; Eng, Kevin H.; Akers, Stacey N.; Lele, Shashikant B.; Odunsi, Kunle

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) is aimed at preventing perioperative complications. An online calculator was recently published but the primary studies used limited gynecologic surgery data. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the performance of the NSQIP Universal Surgical Risk Calculator (URC) on the patients of a gynecologic oncology service. Study Design We reviewed 628 consecutive surgeries performed by our gynecologic oncology service between July 2012 and June 2013. Demographic data including diagnosis and cancer stage, if applicable, were collected. Charts were reviewed to determine complication rates. Specific complications were: death, pneumonia, cardiac complications, surgical site or urinary infections (SSI, UTI), renal failure, or thromboemboli (VTE). Data were compared with modeled outcomes using Brier scores and ROC curves. Significance was declared based on p < 0.05. Results The model accurately predicated death and VTE, with Brier scores of 0.004 and 0.003, respectively. Predicted risk was 50% greater than experienced for UTI; the experienced SSI and pneumonia rates were 43% and 36% greater than predicted. For any complication, the Brier score, 0.023, indicates poor performance of the model. Conclusions In this study of gynecologic surgeries, we could not verify the predictive value of the URC for cardiac complications, SSI, and pneumonia. One disadvantage of applying a URC to multiple subspecialties is that with some categories, complications are not accurately estimated. Our data demonstrate that some predicted risks reported by the calculator need to be interpreted with reservation. PMID:25628106

  4. Surgical management of osteonecrosis of the femoral head in patients with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Kamath, Atul F; McGraw, Michael H; Israelite, Craig L

    2015-11-18

    Sickle cell disease is a known risk factor for osteonecrosis of the hip. Necrosis within the femoral head may cause severe pain, functional limitations, and compromise quality of life in this patient population. Early stages of avascular necrosis of the hip may be managed surgically with core decompression with or without autologous bone grafting. Total hip arthroplasty is the mainstay of treatment of advanced stages of the disease in patients who have intractable pain and are medically fit to undergo the procedure. The management of hip pathology in sickle cell disease presents numerous medical and surgical challenges, and the careful perioperative management of patients is mandatory. Although there is an increased risk of medical and surgical complications in patients with sickle cell disease, total hip arthroplasty can provide substantial relief of pain and improvement of function in the appropriately selected patient. PMID:26601059

  5. Surgical management of osteonecrosis of the femoral head in patients with sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Kamath, Atul F; McGraw, Michael H; Israelite, Craig L

    2015-01-01

    Sickle cell disease is a known risk factor for osteonecrosis of the hip. Necrosis within the femoral head may cause severe pain, functional limitations, and compromise quality of life in this patient population. Early stages of avascular necrosis of the hip may be managed surgically with core decompression with or without autologous bone grafting. Total hip arthroplasty is the mainstay of treatment of advanced stages of the disease in patients who have intractable pain and are medically fit to undergo the procedure. The management of hip pathology in sickle cell disease presents numerous medical and surgical challenges, and the careful perioperative management of patients is mandatory. Although there is an increased risk of medical and surgical complications in patients with sickle cell disease, total hip arthroplasty can provide substantial relief of pain and improvement of function in the appropriately selected patient. PMID:26601059

  6. Surgical innovation-enhanced quality and the processes that assure patient/provider safety: A surgical conundrum.

    PubMed

    Bruny, Jennifer; Ziegler, Moritz

    2015-12-01

    Innovation is a crucial part of surgical history that has led to enhancements in the quality of surgical care. This comprises both changes which are incremental and those which are frankly disruptive in nature. There are situations where innovation is absolutely required in order to achieve quality improvement or process improvement. Alternatively, there are innovations that do not necessarily arise from some need, but simply are a new idea that might be better. All change must assure a significant commitment to patient safety and beneficence. Innovation would ideally enhance patient care quality and disease outcomes, as well stimulate and facilitate further innovation. The tensions between innovative advancement and patient safety, risk and reward, and demonstrated effectiveness versus speculative added value have created a contemporary "surgical conundrum" that must be resolved by a delicate balance assuring optimal patient/provider outcomes. This article will explore this delicate balance and the rules that govern it. Recommendations are made to facilitate surgical innovation through clinical research. In addition, we propose options that investigators and institutions may use to address competing priorities. PMID:26653169

  7. Preoperative patient assessment: Identifying patients at high risk.

    PubMed

    Boehm, O; Baumgarten, G; Hoeft, A

    2016-06-01

    Postoperative mortality remains alarmingly high with a mortality rate ranging between 0.4% and 4%. A small subgroup of multimorbid and/or elderly patients undergoing different surgical procedures naturally confers the highest risk of complications and perioperative death. Therefore, preoperative assessment should identify these high-risk patients and stratify them to individualized monitoring and treatment throughout all phases of perioperative care. A "tailored" perioperative approach might help further reduce perioperative morbidity and mortality. This article aims to elucidate individual morbidity-specific risks. It further suggests approaches to detect patients at the risk of perioperative complications. PMID:27396802

  8. Surgical Management of the Pediatric Cochlear Implant Patient.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Seth M.; Haynes, David S.

    2003-01-01

    This article discusses the surgical management of children receiving cochlear implants. It identifies preoperative considerations to select patients likely to benefit, contraindications, some new surgical techniques, complications, special considerations (otitis media, meningitis, head growth, inner ear malformations, and cochlear obstruction).…

  9. Hepaticojejunostomy--analysis of risk factors for postoperative bile leaks and surgical complications.

    PubMed

    Antolovic, Dalibor; Koch, Moritz; Galindo, Luis; Wolff, Sandra; Music, Emira; Kienle, Peter; Schemmer, Peter; Friess, Helmut; Schmidt, Jan; Büchler, Markus W; Weitz, Jürgen

    2007-05-01

    Anastomoses between the jejunum and the bile duct are an important component of many surgical procedures; however, risk factors for clinically relevant bile leaks have not yet been adequately defined. The objective of this study was to describe the incidence of bile leaks after hepaticojejunostomy and to define predictive factors associated with this risk and with surgical morbidity. Between October 2001 and April 2004, hepaticojejunostomies were performed in 519 patients in a standardized way. Patient- and treatment-related data were documented prospectively. A bile leak was defined as bilirubin concentration in the drains exceeding serum bilirubin with a consecutive change of clinical management or occurrence of a bilioma necessitating drainage. Surgical morbidity occurred in 15% of patients, the incidence of a bile leak was 5.6%. Multivariate analysis confirmed preoperative radiochemotherapy, preoperative low cholinesterase levels, biliary complications after liver transplantation necessitating a hepaticojejunostomy, and simultaneous liver resection as risk factors for bile leakages, whereas biliary complications after liver transplantation necessitating hepaticojejunostomy, simultaneous liver resection, and diabetes mellitus were significantly associated with postoperative surgical morbidity. Our results demonstrate that hepaticojejunostomy is a safe procedure if performed in a standardized fashion. The above found factors may help to better predict the risk for complications after hepaticojejunostomy. PMID:17394045

  10. High-risk prostate cancer: the role of surgical management.

    PubMed

    Morlacco, Alessandro; Karnes, R Jeffrey

    2016-06-01

    High-risk prostate cancer (HR Pca) is a highly heterogeneous disease from a biological and clinical standpoint, and it carries a significant chance of morbidity and mortality. Despite the impact of PSA screening, a significant number of men continue to present with high risk disease and need adequate management: clinical evidence shows that a considerable fraction on men with HR PCa can be actually cured with either uni- or multi-modality approaches. Surgical treatment, once considered unfeasible in this setting, is acquiring more and more diffusion in modern clinical practice. Herein we discuss the main treatment strategies for high-risk prostate cancer, providing an expert opinion on the role of surgical management and its outcomes in the most recent literature. PMID:27155934

  11. Approaches towards training in human risk management of surgical technology.

    PubMed

    Geissler, Norman; Machno, Andrej; Sánchez-Peralta, Luisa F; Pagador, José Blas; Sánchez-Margallo, Francisco M; Korb, Werner

    2016-04-01

    A safe application of modern surgical technology and computer-assisted surgery devices is based on an operation by adequately trained surgeons who are familiar with the benefits and limitations of the devices. We analyzed the in-depth interviews with seven Spanish and 10 German surgeons. Together with other studies, this analysis highlights the need for specific training in technological competence for surgeons. One way to train technological competence is to help surgeons understanding the basic principles of medical devices as well as explaining the basic concepts of risk analysis and risk management. Based on this premise, a stage model for risk assessment was developed and adapted for the training of surgeons. This was developed further into a train the trainer (TTT) concept, which was then evaluated for two example cases. During TTT-training, the trainers (expert surgeons) performed a risk analysis for several medical devices. Afterwards, the trainers organized a surgical workshop for surgical trainees (resident surgeons), in which high-fidelity simulators and the original medical devices were used. The results showed that the surgeons performed the risk analysis correctly with the stage model and afterwards were able to successfully apply the results in the workshop context. PMID:27096765

  12. Patients' Perspectives of Surgical Safety: Do They Feel Safe?

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Jennifer L.; Tillman, Matthew M.; Wehbe-Janek, Hania; Song, Juhee; Papaconstantinou, Harry T.

    2015-01-01

    Background Increased focus on reducing patient harm has led to surgical safety initiatives, including time-out, surgical safety checklists, and debriefings. The perception of the lay public of the surgical safety process is largely unknown. Methods A 20-question survey focused on perceptions of surgical safety practice was distributed to a random sample of patients following elective operations requiring hospitalization. Responses were measured by a 7-point Likert scale. Qualitative feedback was obtained through nonphysician-moderated sessions. Participation was voluntary and anonymous. Results Surveys were distributed to 345 patients of whom 102 (29.5%) responded. Overall, patients felt safe as evidenced by scores for the questions “I felt safe the day of my surgery” (6.53 ± 0.72) and “Mistakes rarely happen during surgery” (5.39 ± 1.51). Patients undergoing their first surgery and patients with higher income levels were associated with a significant decrease in specific safety perceptions. Qualitative feedback sessions identified the physician-patient relationship as the most important factor positively influencing patient safety perceptions. Conclusion Current surgical safety practice is perceived positively by our patients; however, patients still identify physician-patient interactions, relationships, and trust as the most positive factors influencing their perception of the safety environment. PMID:26130976

  13. Perioperative Warming in Surgical Patients: A Comparison of Interventions.

    PubMed

    Rowley, Brenda; Kerr, Marsi; Van Poperin, Judy; Everett, Cindy; Stommel, Manfred; Lehto, Rebecca H

    2015-08-01

    The four arm study investigates how use of a preoperative forced-air warming blanket and adjustment of ambient surgical room temperature may contribute to prevention of perioperative hypothermia. Active warming interventions may prevent the drop in core temperature that occur as a result of surgical anesthesia. Core body temperatures from a convenience sample of 220 adult surgical patients were sequentially monitored in the preoperative, intraoperative, and post-anesthesia care units (PACU) while receiving: (a) routine surgical care, (b) application of preoperative forced-air warming blanket, (c) application of preoperative forced-air warming blanket with adjustment of ambient surgical room temperatures, or (d) adjustment of ambient surgical room temperature only. Sample characteristics were evenly distributed among the four groups. There were no statistical differences in PACU core body temperatures. The application of forced-air warming blankets and room temperature adjustment interventions were not more effective than current practice in preventing perioperative hypothermia. PMID:24913925

  14. Providing care for critically ill surgical patients: challenges and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Tisherman, Samuel A; Kaplan, Lewis; Gracias, Vicente H; Beilman, Gregory J; Toevs, Christine; Byrnes, Matthew C; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2013-07-01

    Providing optimal care for critically ill and injured surgical patients will become more challenging with staff shortages for surgeons and intensivists. This white paper addresses the historical issues behind the present situation, the need for all intensivists to engage in dedicated critical care per the intensivist model, and the recognition that intensivists from all specialties can provide optimal care for the critically ill surgical patient, particularly with continuing involvement by the surgeon of record. The new acute care surgery training paradigm (including trauma, surgical critical care, and emergency general surgery) has been developed to increase interest in trauma and surgical critical care, but the number of interested trainees remains too few. Recommendations are made for broadening the multidisciplinary training and practice opportunities in surgical critical care for intensivists from all base specialties and for maintaining the intensivist model within acute care surgery practice. Support from academic and administrative leadership, as well as national organizations, will be needed. PMID:23754675

  15. Inadvertant hypothermia and active warming for surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Tanner, Judith

    Inadvertant hypothermia is common among surgical patients and can result in serious complications. This article describes active warming systems which can be used preoperatively and intraoperatively to prevent hypothermia and maintain normothermia (normal body temperature). PMID:22067488

  16. Surgical Ventricular Entry is a Key Risk Factor for Leptomeningeal Metastasis of High Grade Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Roelz, Roland; Reinacher, Peter; Jabbarli, Ramazan; Kraeutle, Rainer; Hippchen, Beate; Egger, Karl; Weyerbrock, Astrid; Machein, Marcia

    2015-01-01

    Leptomeningeal metastasis (LM) of high grade gliomas (HGG) can lead to devastating disease courses. Understanding of risk factors for LM is important to identify patients at risk. We reviewed patient records and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of all patients with a first diagnosis of HGG who underwent surgery in our institution between 2008 and 2012. To assess the influence of potential risk factors for LM and the impact of LM on survival multivariate statistics were performed. 239 patients with a diagnosis of HGG and at least 6 months of MRI and clinical follow-up were included. LM occurred in 27 (11%) patients and was symptomatic in 17 (65%). A strong correlation of surgical entry to the ventricle and LM was found (HR: 8.1). Ventricular entry was documented in 137 patients (57%) and LM ensued in 25 (18%) of these. Only two (2%) of 102 patients without ventricular entry developed LM. Median overall survival of patients after diagnosis of LM (239 days) was significantly shorter compared to patients without LM (626 days). LM is a frequent complication in the course of disease of HGG and is associated with poor survival. Surgical entry to the ventricle is a key risk factor for LM. PMID:26635136

  17. The Impact of Perceived Frailty on Surgeons’ Estimates of Surgical Risk

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Mark K.; Farnan, Jeanne; Hemmerich, Josh A.; Slawinski, Kris; Acevedo, Julissa; Small, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Background Physicians are only moderately accurate in estimating surgical risk based on clinical vignettes. We assessed the impact of perceived frailty by measuring the influence of a short video of a standardized patient on surgical risk estimates. Methods Thoracic surgeons and cardiothoracic trainees estimated the risk of major complications for lobectomy based on clinical vignettes of varied risk categories (low, average, high). After each vignette, subjects viewed a randomly selected video of a standardized patient exhibiting either vigorous or frail behavior, then re-estimated risk. Subjects were asked to rate 5 vignettes paired with 5 different standardized patients. Results Seventy-one physicians participated. Initial risk estimates varied according to the vignette risk category: low, 15.2 ± 11.2% risk; average, 23.7 ± 16.1%; high, 37.3 ± 18.9%; p<0.001 by ANOVA. Concordant information in vignettes and videos moderately altered estimates (high risk vignette, frail video: 10.6 ± 27.5% increase in estimate, p=0.006; low risk vignette, vigorous video: 14.5 ± 45.0% decrease, p=0.009). Discordant findings influenced risk estimates more substantially (high risk vignette, vigorous video: 21.2 ± 23.5% decrease in second risk estimate, p<0.001; low risk vignette, frail video: 151.9 ± 209.8% increase, p<0.001). Conclusions Surgeons differentiated relative risk of lobectomy based on clinical vignettes. The effect of viewing videos was small when vignettes and videos were concordant; the effect was more substantial when vignettes and videos were discordant. The information will be helpful in training future surgeons in frailty recognition and risk estimation. PMID:24932570

  18. Surgical History and the Risk of Endometriosis: A Hospital-Based Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xishi; Long, Qiqi; Guo, Sun-Wei

    2016-09-01

    Women tend to receive more surgical procedures than men. Our mouse study shows that surgical stress promotes the development of endometriosis. This study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that surgery increases the risk of endometriosis. We recruited 208 patients with ovarian endometrioma and 212 age-matched patients with ovarian teratoma and retrieved information on the history of any surgical procedures after menarche, grouped by laparotomy, laparoscopy, gynecologically related procedures, cesarean section, and surgeries performed on torso and extremities was recorded. We then evaluated the association, if any, between endometriosis and history of surgical procedures. Cases and controls were comparable with respect to age, marital status, education level, and occupation. Eleven (5.3%) cases had laparotomy before the index surgery while 4 (1.9%) controls did. Sixty-six (31.7%) cases had Cesarean section while 53 (25.0%) controls did. Multivariate analysis identified age, at the index surgery laparotomy, and cesarean section as 3 factors positively associated with the risk of endometriosis while parity was found to be negatively associated with the risk. Laparotomy was associated with increased risk of endometriosis (odds ratio [OR] = 3.64, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.08-12.31), while cesarean section was associated with 2-fold increase in risk (OR = 2.16, 95% CI = 1.31-3.55). Both laparotomy and cesarean section may increase the risk of endometriosis probably by activation of adrenergic signaling, thus facilitating angiogenesis and accelerating the growth of endometriotic lesions that are already in existence. This finding may have important ramifications for the perioperative management of patients with increased risk or recurrence risk of endometriosis. PMID:26919976

  19. Obesity and the Risk for Surgical Site Infection in Abdominal Surgery.

    PubMed

    Winfield, Robert D; Reese, Stacey; Bochicchio, Kelly; Mazuski, John E; Bochicchio, Grant V

    2016-04-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for surgical site infection (SSI) after abdominal procedures; however, data characterizing the risk of SSI in obese patients during abdominal procedures are lacking. We hypothesized that obesity is an independent risk factor for SSI across wound classes. We analyzed American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP) data for 2011. We calculated body mass index (BMI), classifying patients according to National Institute of Health (NIH) BMI groups. We excluded records in which height/weight was not recorded and patients with BMI less than 18.5. We examined patients undergoing open abdominal procedures, performing univariate and multivariate analyses to assess the relative contribution of obesity to SSI. Study criteria were met by 89,148 patients. Obese and morbidly obese patients had significantly greater SSI rates in clean and clean-contaminated cases but not contaminated or dirty/infected cases. Logistic regression confirmed obesity and morbid obesity as being independently associated with the overall SSI development, specifically in clean [Obesity odds ratio (OR) = 1.757, morbid obesity OR = 2.544, P < 0.001] and clean-contaminated (obesity OR = 1.239, morbid obesity OR = 1.287, P < 0.001) cases. Obesity is associated with increased risk of SSI overall, specifically in clean and clean-contaminated abdominal procedures; this is independent of diabetes mellitus. Novel techniques are needed to reduce SSI in this high-risk patient population. PMID:27097626

  20. Bridging Protocol for Surgical Patients: One Clinic's Experience Facilitating a Safe Anticoagulation Intervention.

    PubMed

    Thiessen, Lorena; Grabowski, Dean; Siragusa, Lanette; Young, R Shawn

    2015-12-01

    Surgical candidates often present with complex medical histories that necessitate an individualized approach to care to minimize surgical and anesthetic risk. Patients on warfarin require exceptionally careful clinical assessment, consideration, and consistency to reduce the risk of perioperative thromboembolism and bleeding complications. In response to this need, Victoria General Hospital in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada developed a bridging protocol based on evidence-based guidelines and a checklist tool to incorporate and communicate the necessary tasks among the interprofessional team. The purpose of this initiative was to create a patient-focused process to assist those at risk for a thromboembolic event to navigate through a clear, consistent, and collaborative surgical experience whenever cessation and resumption of warfarin administration was required. PMID:26596383

  1. Prevalence of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in non-surgical patients at hospital admission.

    PubMed

    Lawall, Holger; Hoffmanns, Wibke; Hoffmanns, Phillip; Rapp, Uli; Ames, Michael; Pira, Alessandro; Paar, W Dieter; Bramlage, Peter; Diehm, Curt

    2007-10-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is known as a common complication in surgical and non-surgical patients. We hypothesized that according to the underlying risk factors and the acute illness, the prevalence ofVTE in non-surgical patients admitted to hospital is widely underestimated. For three months each patient admitted to the department of internal medicine with an acute illness, but without known deep venous thrombosis (DVT) was investigated by ultrasound compression sonography. Patients' history, risk factors and extent of immobilisation were documented. In patients with newly detected DVT D-dimer and fibrinogen were measured as well as computer tomography scans performed. Follow-up investigations of the DVT population were performed at four weeks and three months. Six hundred seventeen patients (49.3% men) were included. In 16 patients (men = 7) a previously unknown thrombosis (2.6%) was detected, mainly in patients with acute cardio-pulmonary disease (56%) and the elderly (mean age 75.6 years). Eight patients had femoro-popliteal (50.0%), four a femoral (25.0%), and four a popliteal vein thrombosis (25.0%). Five had pulmonary embolism (31.3%). In patients with DVT D-dimer was 875 +/- 1,228 mg/l, fibrinogen 568 +/- 215 mg/dl and C-reactive-protein 58.54 +/- 73.65 mg/dl. One patient died from sepsis during hospitalisation, one died from sudden cardiac death at home. None of the other 14 surviving patients relapsed. The study shows a 2.6% risk for DVT in outpatients with acute illness admitted to the department of internal medicine. These data demonstrate the high risk of DVT is in non-surgical patients. Early prophylaxis has to be considered in internal medicine patients especially in the elderly. PMID:17938799

  2. Risk factors for surgically-removed fibroids in a large cohort of teachers

    PubMed Central

    Templeman, Claire; Marshall, Sarah F; Clarke, Christina A.; Henderson, Katherine DeLellis; Largent, Joan; Neuhausen, Susan; Reynolds, Peggy; Ursin, Giske; Bernstein, Leslie

    2009-01-01

    Objective To describe reproductive and lifestyle correlates of surgically confirmed fibroids. Design Prospective Cohort Study Setting The California Teachers Study (CTS), an ongoing prospective study of over 133,000 female teachers and school administrators identified through the California State Teachers Retirement System. Patients CTS cohort members reporting no prior history of fibroids were ascertained prospectively for surgical diagnosis of fibroids using hospital patient discharge records. Main Outcome Measure(s) Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression methods were used to assess the association of self-reported menstrual, reproductive, and lifestyle characteristics with fibroids, using ages at the start and end of follow-up (in months) to define time on study. Hazard rate ratios, presented as relative risks (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI), were estimated. Results The strongest risk factor we identified was African-American race/ethnicity, as compared to non-Latina white women. We observed a reduced risk of fibroids for postmenopausal women in comparison to premenopausal women, but use of hormone replacement therapies (regardless of formulation) were associated with an increased risk. Other risk factors included race, a family history of fibroids, being overweight and drinking alcohol, Smoking and diabetes were associated with a decreased risk of fibroids. Conclusions These observations provide a more detailed epidemiologic profile of women with surgically managed fibroids PMID:19019355

  3. Surgical management in patient with uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Murthy, Somasheila I; Pappuru, Rajeev Reddy; Latha, K Madhavi; Kamat, Sripathi; Sangwan, Virender S

    2013-01-01

    Surgery in the management of uveitis can be divided based on indication: either for therapeutic or can be for diagnostic purposes or to manage complications. The commonest indications include: Visual rehabilitation: surgery for removal of cataract, band keratopathy, corneal scars, pupillary membranes, removal of dense vitreous membranes, management of complications: anti-glaucoma surgery, vitreous hemorrhage, retinal detachment and chronic hypotony and diagnostic: aqueous tap, vitreous biopsy, tissue biopsy (iris, choroid). In this review, we shall describe the surgical technique for visual rehabilitation and for management of complications. PMID:23803480

  4. Pain Intensity and Patients’ Acceptance of Surgical Complication Risks With Lumbar Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Bono, Christopher M.; Harris, Mitchel B.; Warholic, Natalie; Katz, Jeffrey N.; Carreras, Edward; White, Andrew; Schmitz, Miguel; Wood, Kirkham B.; Losina, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Cross-sectional study with prospective recruitment Objective To determine the relationship of pain intensity (back and leg) on patients’ acceptance of surgical complication risks when deciding whether or not to undergo lumbar spinal fusion. Background To formulate informed decisions regarding lumbar fusion surgery, preoperative discussions should include a review of the risk of complications balanced with the likelihood of symptom relief. Pain intensity has the potential to influence a patient’s decision to consent to lumbar fusion. We hypothesized that pain intensity is associated with a patient’s acceptance of surgical complication risks. Methods Patients being seen for the first time by a spine surgeon for treatment of a non-traumatic or non-neoplastic spinal disorder completed a structured questionnaire. It posed 24 scenarios, each presenting a combination of risks of 3 complications (nerve damage, wound infection, nonunion) and probabilities of symptom relief. For each scenario, the patient indicated whether he/she would/would not consent to a fusion for low back pain (LBP). The sum of the scenarios in which the patient responded that he or she would elect surgery was calculated to represent acceptance of surgical complication risks. A variety of other data were also recorded, including age, gender, education level, race, history of non-spinal surgery, duration of pain, and history of spinal injections. Data were analyzed using bivariate analyses and multivariate regression analyses. Results The mean number of scenarios accepted by 118 enrolled subjects was 10.2 (median 8, standard deviation 8.5, range 0 to 24, or 42.5% of scenarios). In general, subjects were more likely to accept scenarios with lower risks and higher efficacy. Spearman’s rank correlation estimates demonstrated a moderate association between the LBP intensity and acceptance of surgical complication risks (r=0.37, p=0.0001) while leg pain intensity had a weak but positive

  5. Perioperative Hemoglobin Trajectory in Adult Cardiac Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Scott, David A.; Tung, Hon-Ming Andrew; Slater, Reuben

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Preoperative anemia and nadir hemoglobin (Hb) during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) have been identified as significant risk factors for blood transfusion during cardiac surgery. The aim of this study was to confirm the association between preoperative anemia, perioperative fluid management, and blood transfusion. In addition, the proportion of elective cardiac surgery patients presenting for surgery with anemia was identified to examine whether the opportunity exists for timely diagnosis and intervention. Data from referral until hospital discharge were comprehensively reviewed over a 12-month period for all nonemergency cardiac surgical patients operated on in our institution. Of the 342 patients identified, elective cases were referred a median of 35 days before preoperative clinic and operated on a median of 14 days subsequently. Subacute cases had a median of 3 days from referral to surgery. As per the World Health Organization (WHO) criteria for anemia, 24.2% of elective and 29.6% of subacute patients were anemic. Blood transfusion was administered to 46.2% of patients during their admission. Transfusion was more likely in patients who were female (odds ratio [OR]: 2.45, 95%confidence interval [CI]: 1.28–4.70), had a low body mass index (BMI) (OR: .89, 95% CI: .84–.94), preoperative anemia (OR: 5.15, 95% CI: 2.59–10.24), or renal impairment (OR: 5.44, 95% CI: 2.42–12.22). Hemodilution minimization strategies reduced the Hb fall during CPB, but not transfusion rates. This study identifies a high prevalence of preoperative anemia with sufficient time for elective referrals to undergo appropriate diagnosis and interventions. It also confirms that low red cell mass (anemia and low BMI) and renal impairment are predictors of perioperative blood transfusion. Perfusion strategies to reduce hemodilution are effective at minimizing the intraoperative fall in Hb concentration but did not influence transfusion rate. PMID:26543251

  6. What Determines the Surgical Patient Experience? Exploring the Patient, Clinical Staff, and Administration Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Mazurenko, Olena; Zemke, Dina; Lefforge, Noelle; Shoemaker, Stowe; Menachemi, Nir

    2015-01-01

    Hospitals are increasingly concerned with enhancing surgical patient experience given that Medicare reimbursements are now tied in part to patient satisfaction. Surgical patients' experience may be influenced by several factors (e.g., integration of care, technical aspects of care), which are ranked differently in importance by clinicians and patients. Strategies designed to improve patient experience can be informed by our research, which examines the determinants of the surgical patient experience from the perspective of multiple healthcare team members. We conducted 12 focus groups with surgical patients, family members, physicians, nurses, and hospital administrators at one acute care, for-profit hospital in a western state and analyzed the content for determinants of the overall surgical patient experience. Specifically, we analyzed the content of the conversations to determine how frequently participants discussed the determinants of the surgical patient experience and how positive, negative, or neutral the comments were. The study's findings suggest that surgical patients and members of the healthcare team have similar views regarding the most important factors in the patient experience-namely, interdisciplinary relationships, technical infrastructure, and staffing. The study results will be used to improve care in this facility and can inform the development of initiatives aimed at improving the surgical patient experience elsewhere. Our study could serve as a model for how other facilities can analyze the surgical patient experience from the perspectives of different stakeholders and improve their performance on the basis of data directly relevant to their organization. PMID:26554144

  7. Sodium bicarbonate use and the risk of hypernatremia in thoracic aortic surgical patients with metabolic acidosis following deep hypothermic circulatory arrest

    PubMed Central

    Ghadimi, Kamrouz; Gutsche, Jacob T.; Ramakrishna, Harish; Setegne, Samuel L.; Jackson, Kirk R.; Augoustides, John G.; Ochroch, E. Andrew; Weiss, Stuart J.; Bavaria, Joseph E.; Cheung, Albert T.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Metabolic acidosis after deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA) for thoracic aortic operations is commonly managed with sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3). The purpose of this study was to determine the relationships between total NaHCO3 dose and the severity of metabolic acidosis, duration of mechanical ventilation, duration of vasoactive infusions, and Intensive Care Unit (ICU) or hospital length of stay (LOS). Methods: In a single center, retrospective study, 87 consecutive elective thoracic aortic operations utilizing DHCA, were studied. Linear regression analysis was used to test for the relationships between the total NaHCO3 dose administered through postoperative day 2, clinical variables, arterial blood gas values, and short-term clinical outcomes. Results: Seventy-five patients (86%) received NaHCO3. Total NaHCO3 dose averaged 136 ± 112 mEq (range: 0.0–535 mEq) per patient. Total NaHCO3 dose correlated with minimum pH (r = 0.41, P < 0.0001), minimum serum bicarbonate (r = −0.40, P < 0.001), maximum serum lactate (r = 0.46, P = 0.007), duration of metabolic acidosis (r = 0.33, P = 0.002), and maximum serum sodium concentrations (r = 0.29, P = 0.007). Postoperative hypernatremia was present in 67% of patients and peaked at 12 h following DHCA. Eight percent of patients had a serum sodium ≥ 150 mEq/L. Total NaHCO3 dose did not correlate with anion gap, serum chloride, not the duration of mechanical ventilator support, vasoactive infusions, ICU or hospital LOS. Conclusion: Routine administration of NaHCO3 was common for the management of metabolic acidosis after DHCA. Total dose of NaHCO3 was a function of the severity and duration of metabolic acidosis. NaHCO3 administration contributed to postoperative hypernatremia that was often severe. The total NaHCO3 dose administered was unrelated to short-term clinical outcomes. PMID:27397449

  8. Toward strategies for cost containment in surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Drucker, W R; Gavett, J W; Kirshner, R; Messick, W J; Ingersoll, G

    1983-09-01

    The University of Rochester, Department of Surgery, in response to an experimental community-wide limit on hospital budgets, studied high-cost general surgical patients as a potential source of leverage for containment of hospital costs. It was found that a small number of patients impact significantly on hospital costs. In 1980, 3935 patients at Strong Memorial Hospital (SMH) had at least one contact with a general surgical patient care or intensive care unit; 261 patients (6.6%) had total 1980 charges of more than $20,000 each. They contributed 32% of the total of both general surgical charges and patient days. A subset of 2021 patients was selected to represent more precisely the general surgical patient. The 85 high-cost patients (4.2%) of this subset were chosen for intensive study. These patients generated a significant and disproportionate per cent of total (2021) general surgical charges (26.8%) and hospital days (27.6%). Average total charges were more than 8 times those of the complementary general surgical subset (1936). Nineteen of the 85 patients (22.3%) died in the hospital and 42 patients (49.4%) were dead within 2 1/2 years. Forty patients (of the 85) were then further identified as "complex", based on multiple, usually unrelated, illnesses and multiple annual admissions. Tending to be elderly with poor prognoses, 60% of them had died by April 1983. The major criterion of complexity was the lack of a well-focused medical problem; the cure for one problem simply relinquished primacy to another. A parallel study of hospital ancillary procedures disclosed a similar high-cost pattern. Of approximately 4000 ancillary procedures, 100 (2.5%) had annual charges of $100,000 or over, accounting for two-thirds of total 1980 ancillary charges. Roughly 20% of a single patient's ordered procedures accounted for 80% of the patient's ancillary charges, thus allowing concentrated study of a relatively small number of charges. Means for cost containment may be

  9. Toward strategies for cost containment in surgical patients.

    PubMed Central

    Drucker, W R; Gavett, J W; Kirshner, R; Messick, W J; Ingersoll, G

    1983-01-01

    The University of Rochester, Department of Surgery, in response to an experimental community-wide limit on hospital budgets, studied high-cost general surgical patients as a potential source of leverage for containment of hospital costs. It was found that a small number of patients impact significantly on hospital costs. In 1980, 3935 patients at Strong Memorial Hospital (SMH) had at least one contact with a general surgical patient care or intensive care unit; 261 patients (6.6%) had total 1980 charges of more than $20,000 each. They contributed 32% of the total of both general surgical charges and patient days. A subset of 2021 patients was selected to represent more precisely the general surgical patient. The 85 high-cost patients (4.2%) of this subset were chosen for intensive study. These patients generated a significant and disproportionate per cent of total (2021) general surgical charges (26.8%) and hospital days (27.6%). Average total charges were more than 8 times those of the complementary general surgical subset (1936). Nineteen of the 85 patients (22.3%) died in the hospital and 42 patients (49.4%) were dead within 2 1/2 years. Forty patients (of the 85) were then further identified as "complex", based on multiple, usually unrelated, illnesses and multiple annual admissions. Tending to be elderly with poor prognoses, 60% of them had died by April 1983. The major criterion of complexity was the lack of a well-focused medical problem; the cure for one problem simply relinquished primacy to another. A parallel study of hospital ancillary procedures disclosed a similar high-cost pattern. Of approximately 4000 ancillary procedures, 100 (2.5%) had annual charges of $100,000 or over, accounting for two-thirds of total 1980 ancillary charges. Roughly 20% of a single patient's ordered procedures accounted for 80% of the patient's ancillary charges, thus allowing concentrated study of a relatively small number of charges. Means for cost containment may be

  10. Elderly Diabetic Patient with Surgical Site Mucormycosis Extending to Bowel

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Atul K; Vora, Himanshu J; Patel, Ketan K; Patel, Bhavin

    2010-01-01

    Mucormycosis is rare in clinical practice. Most infections are acquired by inhalation; other portals of entry are traumatic implantation and ingestion in immunocompromised host. Mucormycosis is life threatening infection in immunocompromised host with variable moratlity ranging from 15-81% depending upon site of infection. General treatment principles include early diagnosis, correction of underlying immunosuppression and metabolic disturbances, adequate surgical debridement along with amphotericin therapy. We describe surgical site mucormycosis extended to involve large bowel in elderly diabetic patient. PMID:20606975

  11. Elderly diabetic patient with surgical site mucormycosis extending to bowel.

    PubMed

    Patel, Atul K; Vora, Himanshu J; Patel, Ketan K; Patel, Bhavin

    2010-05-01

    Mucormycosis is rare in clinical practice. Most infections are acquired by inhalation; other portals of entry are traumatic implantation and ingestion in immunocompromised host. Mucormycosis is life threatening infection in immunocompromised host with variable moratlity ranging from 15-81% depending upon site of infection. General treatment principles include early diagnosis, correction of underlying immunosuppression and metabolic disturbances, adequate surgical debridement along with amphotericin therapy. We describe surgical site mucormycosis extended to involve large bowel in elderly diabetic patient. PMID:20606975

  12. Diabetes Mellitus as a Risk Factor in Glaucoma's Physiopathology and Surgical Survival Time: A Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Costa, Lívio; Cunha, João Paulo; Amado, Duarte; Pinto, Luís Abegão; Ferreira, Joana

    2015-01-01

    Glaucoma is a multifactorial condition under serious influence of many risk factors. The role of diabetes mellitus (DM) in glaucoma etiology or progression remains inconclusive. Although, the diabetic patients have different healing mechanism comparing to the general population and it has a possible-negative role on surgical outcomes. This review article attempts to analyze the association of both diseases, glaucoma and DM, before and after the surgery. The epidemiological studies, based mainly in population prevalence analyzes, have shown opposite outcomes in time and even in the most recent articles also the association remains inconclusive. On the contrary, the experimental models based on animal induced chronic hyperglycemia have shown an important association of both diseases, explained by common neurodegenerative mechanisms. Diabetic patients have a different wound healing process in the eye viz-a-viz other organs. The healing process is more and it results in lower surgical survival time, higher intraocular pressure (IOP) levels and, therefore, these patients usually need more medication to lower the IOP. Both randomized and nonrandomized retrospective and experimental molecular studies have shown the association between DM and glaucoma. Further studies are needed to get better explanations about outcomes on more recent surgical procedures and with the exponential use of antifibrotics. How to cite this article: Costa L, Cunha JP, Amado D, Pinto LA, Ferreira J. Diabetes Mellitus as a Risk Factor in Glaucoma's Physiopathology and Surgical Survival Time: A Literature Review. J Curr Glaucoma Pract 2015;9(3):81-85. PMID:26997842

  13. Quality of life of patients surgically treated for ameloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Lawal, Hammed Sikiru; Adebola, Rafel Adetokunbo; Arotiba, Juwon Tunde; Amole, Ibiyinka Olushola; Efunkoya, Akinwale Adeyemi; Omeje, Uchenna Kelvin; Amole, Taiwo Gboluwaga; Adeoye, Joshua Biodun

    2016-01-01

    Background: The surgical management of ameloblastoma can have a profound functional and psychological effect on a patient's quality of life (QoL). The aim of this study was to compare the pre- and post-operative QoL outcomes of patients requiring surgical treatment for ameloblastoma. Patients and Methods: A total number of 30 patients were identified as fulfilling the criteria for this study. They included 18 males and 12 females, aged between 14 and 47 years with a mean of 27.3 years (standard deviation 10.2). Each patient completed a modified version of the University of Washington QoL questionnaire version 4, a day to surgery and postoperatively on the 7th day, 3 months, and 6 months. Results: Following surgical treatment of patients for ameloblastoma, the QoL decreased immediately after surgery. It then gradually improved over time and exceeded the preoperative value at 6 months postoperatively. When analyzed with respect to location, posteriorly placed tumors had the best postoperative QoL outcome. Patients expressed concern more about their appearance preoperatively while postoperative concerns were mostly focused on their ability to chew. Conclusion: Significant improvement occurred in QoL scores following surgical management of ameloblastoma. The small sample size utilized in this study limits a definitive conclusion. A larger multicenter study is therefore recommended. PMID:27226682

  14. Surgical Face Masks Worn by Patients with Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Mphahlele, Matsie; Stoltz, Anton; Venter, Kobus; Mathebula, Rirhandzu; Masotla, Thabiso; Lubbe, Willem; Pagano, Marcello; First, Melvin; Jensen, Paul A.; van der Walt, Martie; Nardell, Edward A.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: Drug-resistant tuberculosis transmission in hospitals threatens staff and patient health. Surgical face masks used by patients with tuberculosis (TB) are believed to reduce transmission but have not been rigorously tested. Objectives: We sought to quantify the efficacy of surgical face masks when worn by patients with multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB). Methods: Over 3 months, 17 patients with pulmonary MDR-TB occupied an MDR-TB ward in South Africa and wore face masks on alternate days. Ward air was exhausted to two identical chambers, each housing 90 pathogen-free guinea pigs that breathed ward air either when patients wore surgical face masks (intervention group) or when patients did not wear masks (control group). Efficacy was based on differences in guinea pig infections in each chamber. Measurements and Main Results: Sixty-nine of 90 control guinea pigs (76.6%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 68–85%) became infected, compared with 36 of 90 intervention guinea pigs (40%; 95% CI, 31–51%), representing a 56% (95% CI, 33–70.5%) decreased risk of TB transmission when patients used masks. Conclusions: Surgical face masks on patients with MDR-TB significantly reduced transmission and offer an adjunct measure for reducing TB transmission from infectious patients. PMID:22323300

  15. Cardiac Papillary Fibroelastoma: Single-Institution Experience with 14 Surgical Patients.

    PubMed

    Abu Saleh, Walid K; Al Jabbari, Odeaa; Ramlawi, Basel; Reardon, Michael J

    2016-04-01

    In general, treatment for symptomatic and asymptomatic cardiac papillary fibroelastoma is surgical resection-particularly of left-sided lesions, because of the risk of systemic embolization. However, few institutions have enough experience with these tumors to validate this approach. We present our institutional experience with papillary fibroelastoma and discuss our current approach. We searched our institution's cardiac tumor database, identified all patients diagnosed with cardiac papillary fibroelastoma from 1992 through 2014, and recorded the clinical and pathologic characteristics of each case. We found 14 patients (mean age, 60.5 ± 12.3 yr) who had 18 lesions. Eleven patients (79%) were symptomatic; however, we could not always definitively associate their symptoms with a cardiac tumor. Most lesions were solitary and ≤1.5 cm in diameter; half involved the left side of the heart. All 18 lesions were surgically excised. There were no operative or 30-day deaths, and no patient needed valve replacement postoperatively. There was one late death; at one year, another 3 patients were lost to follow-up, and the others were alive without tumor recurrence. Because of the embolic risk inherent to intracardiac masses and our relatively good postoperative outcomes, we recommend the surgical resection of all left-sided papillary fibroelastomas in surgical candidates, and we discuss with patients the advisability of resecting right-sided lesions. PMID:27127431

  16. Surgical Outcomes in Patients with High Spinal Instability Neoplasm Score Secondary to Spinal Giant Cell Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Elder, Benjamin D.; Sankey, Eric W.; Goodwin, C. Rory; Kosztowski, Thomas A.; Lo, Sheng-Fu L.; Bydon, Ali; Wolinsky, Jean-Paul; Gokaslan, Ziya L.; Witham, Timothy F.; Sciubba, Daniel M.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective review. Objective To describe the surgical outcomes in patients with high preoperative Spinal Instability Neoplastic Score (SINS) secondary to spinal giant cell tumors (GCT) and evaluate the impact of en bloc versus intralesional resection and preoperative embolization on postoperative outcomes. Methods A retrospective analysis was performed on 14 patients with GCTs of the spine who underwent surgical treatment prior to the use of denosumab. A univariate analysis was performed comparing the patient demographics, perioperative characteristics, and surgical outcomes between patients who underwent en bloc marginal (n = 6) compared with those who had intralesional (n = 8) resection. Results Six patients underwent en bloc resections and eight underwent intralesional resection. Preoperative embolization was performed in eight patients. All patients were alive at last follow-up, with a mean follow-up length of 43 months. Patients who underwent en bloc resection had longer average operative times (p = 0.0251), higher rates of early (p = 0.0182) and late (p = 0.0389) complications, and a higher rate of surgical revision (p = 0.0120). There was a 25% (2/8 patients) local recurrence rate for intralesional resection and a 0% (0/6 patients) local recurrence rate for en bloc resection (p = 0.0929). Conclusions Surgical excision of spinal GCTs causing significant instability, assessed by SINS, is associated with high intraoperative blood loss despite embolization and independent of resection method. En bloc resection requires a longer operative duration and is associated with a higher risk of complications when compared with intralesional resection. However, the increased morbidity associated with en bloc resection may be justified as it may minimize the risk of local recurrence. PMID:26835198

  17. Anesthetic issues and perioperative blood pressure management in patients who have cerebrovascular diseases undergoing surgical procedures.

    PubMed

    Jellish, W Scott

    2006-11-01

    Patients who have cerebrovascular disease and vascular insufficiency routinely have neurosurgical and nonneurosurgical procedures. Anesthetic priorities must provide a still bloodless operative field while maintaining cardiovascular stability and renal function. Patients who have symptoms or a history of cerebrovascular disease are at increased risk for stroke, cerebral hypoperfusion, and cerebral anoxia. Type of surgery and cardiovascular status are key concerns when considering neuroprotective strategies. Optimization of current condition is important for a good outcome; risks must be weighed against perceived benefits in protecting neurons. Anesthetic use and physiologic manipulations can reduce neurologic injury and assure safe and effective surgical care when cerebral hypoperfusion is a real and significant risk. PMID:16935193

  18. Pain management in the pediatric surgical patient.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Vance Y; Zenger, David; Steele, Scott R

    2012-06-01

    Surgeons performing painful, invasive procedures in pediatric patients must be cognizant of both the potential short- and long-term detrimental effects of inadequate analgesia. This article reviews the available tools, sedation procedures, the management of intraoperative, postoperative, and postprocedural pain, and the issues surrounding neonatal addiction. PMID:22595704

  19. Analysis of the Risk Factors Affecting the Surgical Site Infection after Cranioplasty Following Decompressive Craniectomy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Seong; Kim, Sung Kwon; Park, Hyun; Kang, Dong-Ho; Lee, Chul-Hee; Hwang, Soo-Hyun; Jung, Jin-Myung; Han, Jong-Woo

    2015-01-01

    Objective The risk factors for surgical site infections (SSIs) after cranioplasty following decompressive craniectomy remain unclear. The goal of this study was to analyze the risk factors related to developing SSIs after cranioplasty and to suggest valuable predictors. Methods A retrospective review was conducted of patients who underwent cranioplasty following decompressive craniectomy at our institution from January 2011 to December 2014, a total of 78 patients who underwent 78 cranioplasties. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were carried out to determine possible risk factors related to developing SSIs. We analyzed both patient-specific and surgery-specific factors. Results The overall rate of SSIs was 9.0% (7/78). SSIs after cranioplasty were significantly related to being female, having the primary etiology of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and having had a bilateral cranioplasty in the univariate analysis. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that being female [odds ratio (OR) 5.98, p=0.000] and having had a bilateral cranioplasty (OR 4.00, p=0.001) significantly increased the risk of SSIs. Conclusion Based on our data, cranioplasty following decompressive craniectomy is associated with a high incidence of SSI. Being female, having a primary etiology of TBI and having had a bilateral cranioplasty may be risk factors for surgical site infections after cranioplasty. PMID:27169073

  20. Surgical management of bilateral bronchiectases: results in 29 patients.

    PubMed

    Aghajanzadeh, Manucher; Sarshad, Ali; Amani, Hosin; Alavy, Ali

    2006-06-01

    Bronchiectasis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in developing countries. Staged bilateral segmental resection of the lungs is performed in selected patients. Our experience of surgical removal of 87 bilateral bronchiectases in 29 patients during an 11-year period was reviewed retrospectively. High-resolution computed tomography was performed preoperatively in all patients to locate the anatomic sites of bronchiectasis. The mortality and morbidity of the surgical procedure, clinical symptoms, age distribution, etiology, bacteriology, and operative procedures were analyzed. There were 22 males (76%) and 7 females (24%), aged 5 to 60 years, with a mean age of 30 years. Complications developed in 11 patients (38%); atelectasia was the most common (14%). There was one hospital death. Clinical symptoms disappeared in 19 (66%) patients, improved in 5 (17%), and were unchanged in 4 (14%). Staged bilateral resection for bronchiectases can be performed at any age with acceptable morbidity and mortality. PMID:16714699

  1. Frailty and cardiovascular disease: potential role of gait speed in surgical risk stratification in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Frailty is a state of late life decline and vulnerability, typified by physical weakness and decreased physiologic reserve. The epidemiology and pathophysiology of frailty share features with those of cardiovascular disease. Gait speed can be used as a measure of frailty and is a powerful predictor of mortality. Advancing age is a potent risk factor for cardiovascular disease and has been associated with an increased risk of adverse outcomes. Older adults comprise approximately half of cardiac surgery patients, and account for nearly 80% of the major complications and deaths following surgery. The ability of traditional risk models to predict mortality and major morbidity in older patients being considered for cardiac surgery may improve if frailty, as measured by gait speed, is included in their assessment. It is possible that in the future frailty assessment may assist in choosing among therapies (e.g., surgical vs. percutaneous aortic valve replacement for patients with aortic stenosis). PMID:25678904

  2. Current surgical instrument labeling techniques may increase the risk of unintentionally retained foreign objects: a hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Marking of surgical instruments is essential to ensure their proper identification after sterile processing. The National Quality Forum defines unintentionally retained foreign objects in a surgical patient as a serious reportable event also called "never event." Presentation of the hypothesis We hypothesize that established practices of surgical instrument identification using unkempt tape labels and plastic tags may expose patients to "never events" from retained disintegrating labels. Testing of the hypothesis We demonstrate the near miss of a "never event" during a surgical case in which the breakage of an instrument label remained initially unwitnessed. A fragment of the plastic label was accidentally found in the wound upon closing. Further clinical testing of the occurrence of this "never event" appears not feasible. As the name implies a patient should never be exposed to the risk of fragmenting labels. Implication of the hypothesis Current practice does not mandate verifying intact instrument markers as part of the instrument count. The clinical confirmation of our hypothesis mandates a change in perioperative practice: Mechanical labels need to undergo routine inspection and maintenance. The perioperative count must not only verify the quantity of surgical instruments but also the intactness of labels to ensure that no part of an instrument is left behind. Proactive maintenance of taped and dipped labels should be performed routinely. The implementation of newer labeling technologies - such as laser engraved codes - appears to eliminate risks seen in traditional mechanical labels. This article reviews current instrument marking technologies, highlights shortcomings and recommends safe instrument handling and marking practices implementing newer available technologies. PMID:24079615

  3. External Dacryocystorhinostomy: Characteristics and Surgical Outcomes in Patients with and without Previous Dacryocystitis.

    PubMed

    Rabina, Gilad; Golan, Shani; Neudorfer, Meira; Leibovitch, Igal

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To compare pre- and postoperative characteristics and surgical success rates of patients with and without previous episodes of dacryocystitis, who underwent external dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR) for nasolacrimal duct obstruction (NLDO). Methods. The medical files of all patients who underwent external DCR between 2006 and 2011 in our institution were reviewed. The retrieved data of patients with and without previous episodes of dacryocystitis were compared. Surgical success was determined by postoperative followup of at least 6 months. Results. A total of 185 patients with NLDO underwent external DCR of whom 152 (100 females and 52 males, mean age 67 ± 15 years) met the inclusion criteria. Sixty had previous episodes of dacryocystitis and 92 did not. Left-side obstruction was more common than right-side obstruction among patients with previous episodes of dacryocystitis (48.3% versus 31.7%, resp., P = 0.031). Glaucoma patients were significantly more likely to develop dacryocystitis than patients without glaucoma (P = 0.002). The success rate of external DCR was 94.4% for patients with previous episodes of dacryocystitis and 86.7% for patients without (P = 0.337). Conclusions. The surgical outcomes of external DCR in patients with or without a previous episode of dacryocystitis were similar. Patients with glaucoma and NLDO had a significantly higher risk of developing dacryocystitis. PMID:24455195

  4. External Dacryocystorhinostomy: Characteristics and Surgical Outcomes in Patients with and without Previous Dacryocystitis

    PubMed Central

    Rabina, Gilad; Golan, Shani; Neudorfer, Meira; Leibovitch, Igal

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To compare pre- and postoperative characteristics and surgical success rates of patients with and without previous episodes of dacryocystitis, who underwent external dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR) for nasolacrimal duct obstruction (NLDO). Methods. The medical files of all patients who underwent external DCR between 2006 and 2011 in our institution were reviewed. The retrieved data of patients with and without previous episodes of dacryocystitis were compared. Surgical success was determined by postoperative followup of at least 6 months. Results. A total of 185 patients with NLDO underwent external DCR of whom 152 (100 females and 52 males, mean age 67 ± 15 years) met the inclusion criteria. Sixty had previous episodes of dacryocystitis and 92 did not. Left-side obstruction was more common than right-side obstruction among patients with previous episodes of dacryocystitis (48.3% versus 31.7%, resp., P = 0.031). Glaucoma patients were significantly more likely to develop dacryocystitis than patients without glaucoma (P = 0.002). The success rate of external DCR was 94.4% for patients with previous episodes of dacryocystitis and 86.7% for patients without (P = 0.337). Conclusions. The surgical outcomes of external DCR in patients with or without a previous episode of dacryocystitis were similar. Patients with glaucoma and NLDO had a significantly higher risk of developing dacryocystitis. PMID:24455195

  5. Patient views on financial relationships between surgeons and surgical device manufacturers

    PubMed Central

    Camp, Mark W.; Gross, Allan E.; McKneally, Martin F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Over the past decade, revelations of inappropriate financial relationships between surgeons and surgical device manufacturers have challenged the presumption that surgeons can collaborate with surgical device manufacturers without damaging public trust in the surgical profession. We explored postoperative Canadian patients’ knowledge and opinions about financial relationships between surgeons and surgical device manufacturers. Methods This complex issue was explored using qualitative methods. We conducted semistructured face-to-face interviews with postoperative patients in follow-up arthroplasty clinics at an academic hospital in Toronto, Canada. Interviews were audiotaped, transcribed and analyzed. Patient-derived concepts and themes were uncovered. Results We interviewed 33 patients. Five major themes emerged: 1) many patients are unaware of the existence of financial relationships between surgeons and surgical device manufacturers; 2) patients approve of financial relationships that support innovation and research but are opposed to relationships that involve financial incentives that benefit only the surgeon and the manufacturer; 3) patients do not support disclosure of financial relationships during the consent process as it may shift focus away from the more important risks; 4) patients support oversight at the professional level but reject the idea of government involvement in oversight; and 5) patients entrust their surgeons to make appropriate patient-centred choices. Conclusion This qualitative study deepens our understanding of financial relationships between surgeons and industry. Patients support relationships with industry that provide potential benefit to current or future patients. They trust our ability to self-regulate. Disclosure combined with appropriate oversight will strengthen public trust in professional collaboration with industry. PMID:26384147

  6. SURgical interventions with FEIBA (SURF): international registry of surgery in haemophilia patients with inhibitory antibodies.

    PubMed

    Négrier, C; Lienhart, A; Numerof, R; Stephens, D; Wong, W Y; Baghaei, F; Yee, T T

    2013-05-01

    Factor VIII Inhibitor Bypassing Activity (FEIBA) can effectively achieve haemostasis in haemophilia patients with inhibitors. Further evaluation of FEIBA in surgical settings is of significant interest considering the relatively limited prospective data published to date. The aim of the study is to evaluate the perioperative efficacy and safety of FEIBA in haemophilia patients with inhibitors. Haemophilia patients with inhibitors who underwent surgical procedures and received FEIBA for perioperative haemostatic control were prospectively enrolled in an open-label, noninterventional, postauthorization study [SURgical interventions with FEIBA (SURF)]. Outcome measures included haemostatic efficacy, safety, FEIBA exposure and blood loss associated with the perioperative use of FEIBA. Thirty-five surgical procedures were performed at 19 centres worldwide in patients with congenital haemophilia A, congenital haemophilia B, or acquired haemophilia A. Haemorrhagic risk was severe in 37.1% (13 of 35) of the procedures, moderate in 25.7% (9 of 35) and mild in 37.1% (13 of 35). One moderate risk surgery was excluded from the efficacy analyses because it did not meet all protocol requirements. Haemostasis was judged to be 'good' or 'excellent' in 91.2% (31 of 34) of surgical procedures and 'fair' in 8.8% (3 of 34). Among the 12 adverse events, three were serious adverse events (SAEs), two of which were unrelated to FEIBA therapy; one SAE, a clot in an arteriovenous fistula, was deemed to be possibly related to therapy. This prospective investigation confirms that FEIBA can be safely and effectively used when performing surgical procedures in haemophilia patients with inhibitors. PMID:23282031

  7. Mixed fibers diet in surgical ICU septic patients.

    PubMed

    Chittawatanarat, Kaweesak; Pokawinpudisnun, Piman; Polbhakdee, Yaowalak

    2010-01-01

    Diarrhea commonly occurs in surgical critically ill patients, especially septic patients and fiber formulas have been reported to improve diarrhea. Most reports have used soluble or insoluble fiber exclusively, while the effects of a mixed fiber diet remain unclear. This study compares diarrhea scores between mixed-fiber and non-fiber diets in surgical septic patients receiving broad spectrum antibiotics. We conducted a prospective randomized control double blind study in a general surgical ICU. Patients who received broad spectrum antibiotics and no contraindication to enteral feeding were randomly allocated to a fiber or non-fiber diet for up to 14 days. Nutritional delivery and diarrhea scores were recorded daily. Intention to treat analysis was performed. Thirty-four patients were enrolled in the study, 17 in the fiber group and 17 in non-fiber group. These two patients groups were similar in demographics, disease severity, nutritional status, cause of sepsis and total feeding per day. The proportion of patients with diarrhea score ≥12 was higher in the non-fiber group than in the fiber group, but the difference was not statistically significant [8/17 (47.06%) vs. 4/17(23.53%); p=0.15]. However, the fiber group had a lower mean diarrhea score (fiber vs. non-fiber = 3.6 ± 2.3 vs. 6.3 ± 3.6; p=0.005), as well as a lower global diarrhea score from the generalized estimation equation model for repeated measurement [Coefficient -3.03 (95%CI= -5.03 to -0.92); p=0.005]. In summary, a mixed fiber diet formula can reduce the diarrhea score in surgical critically ill septic patients who received broad spectrum antibiotics. PMID:21147705

  8. [Surgical service for patients with purulonecrotic complications of diabetic foot].

    PubMed

    Malakhov, Iu S; Aver'ianov, D A; Ivanov, A V; Stepaniuk, A V; Kozovoĭ, I Ia

    2013-04-01

    The article deals with staging surgical service for patients with ulceronecrotic damages of the distal parts of lower extremities associated with diabetic foot. The authors grounded the deadlines of sanitive operations, performing after reconstructive vascular operations, on the basis of assessment of outflow tract according to Rutherford and index of TcPO2 increase. High efficiency of revascularization in order to maintenance of lower-extremity function in patients with complicated forms of diabetic foot is proved. PMID:24000608

  9. Prevalence and Determinants of Depression and Anxiety Symptoms in Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Shoar, Saeed; Naderan, Mohammad; Aghajani, Motahareh; Sahimi-Izadian, Elaheh; Hosseini-Araghi, Negin; Khorgami, Zhamak

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Mood disorders are prevalent in hospitalized patients. However, risk factors for early diagnosis have not been studied exclusively in surgical patients. Our study aimed to investigate the prevalence and determinants of depression and anxiety symptoms in surgical patients. Methods We included 392 surgical patients in this prospective cross-sectional study, which took place between June 2011 and June 2012. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) was used to screen for symptoms of depression and anxiety at weekly interviews. Regression analysis was performed to identify risk factors for early (the day after admission) and late (one week or more) in-hospital psychiatry symptoms. Results Depression and anxiety symptoms increased from the time of admission toward longer hospital stay. Scores obtained in the second and third weeks of admission were associated with the need for surgery while HADS in the third week was associated with lack of familial support and being under the poverty line (p < 0.050). Regression model analysis showed that early depression was associated with female gender, and early anxiety was inversely affected by female gender and protected by higher education level. A history of mood disorder was a risk factor. Later anxiety was also associated with longer hospital stay. Conclusions Depression and anxiety symptoms are a major concern in surgical patients especially in females and those with a history of mood disorders or lower educational level. Patients with a longer hospital stay, in particular, those with underlying diseases, postoperative complications, lack of familial support, and the need for reoperation were also at increased risk. PMID:27162587

  10. Umbilical hernia in patients with liver cirrhosis: A surgical challenge

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Julio C U; Claus, Christiano M P; Campos, Antonio C L; Costa, Marco A R; Blum, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Umbilical hernia occurs in 20% of the patients with liver cirrhosis complicated with ascites. Due to the enormous intraabdominal pressure secondary to the ascites, umbilical hernia in these patients has a tendency to enlarge rapidly and to complicate. The treatment of umbilical hernia in these patients is a surgical challenge. Ascites control is the mainstay to reduce hernia recurrence and postoperative complications, such as wound infection, evisceration, ascites drainage, and peritonitis. Intermittent paracentesis, temporary peritoneal dialysis catheter or transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt may be necessary to control ascites. Hernia repair is indicated in patients in whom medical treatment is effective in controlling ascites. Patients who have a good perspective to be transplanted within 3-6 mo, herniorrhaphy should be performed during transplantation. Hernia repair with mesh is associated with lower recurrence rate, but with higher surgical site infection when compared to hernia correction with conventional fascial suture. There is no consensus on the best abdominal wall layer in which the mesh should be placed: Onlay, sublay, or underlay. Many studies have demonstrated several advantages of the laparoscopic umbilical herniorrhaphy in cirrhotic patients compared with open surgical treatment. PMID:27462389

  11. Umbilical hernia in patients with liver cirrhosis: A surgical challenge.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Julio C U; Claus, Christiano M P; Campos, Antonio C L; Costa, Marco A R; Blum, Caroline

    2016-07-27

    Umbilical hernia occurs in 20% of the patients with liver cirrhosis complicated with ascites. Due to the enormous intraabdominal pressure secondary to the ascites, umbilical hernia in these patients has a tendency to enlarge rapidly and to complicate. The treatment of umbilical hernia in these patients is a surgical challenge. Ascites control is the mainstay to reduce hernia recurrence and postoperative complications, such as wound infection, evisceration, ascites drainage, and peritonitis. Intermittent paracentesis, temporary peritoneal dialysis catheter or transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt may be necessary to control ascites. Hernia repair is indicated in patients in whom medical treatment is effective in controlling ascites. Patients who have a good perspective to be transplanted within 3-6 mo, herniorrhaphy should be performed during transplantation. Hernia repair with mesh is associated with lower recurrence rate, but with higher surgical site infection when compared to hernia correction with conventional fascial suture. There is no consensus on the best abdominal wall layer in which the mesh should be placed: Onlay, sublay, or underlay. Many studies have demonstrated several advantages of the laparoscopic umbilical herniorrhaphy in cirrhotic patients compared with open surgical treatment. PMID:27462389

  12. Surgical management of patients receiving haemodialysis for chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Yassin, S; Ezz, M

    1995-10-01

    This study was carried out on 22 patients seeking dental extractions of one molar tooth. The first group consisted of 12 patients suffering from chronic renal failure undergoing haemodialysis, while the other group consisted of 10 apparently healthy dental patients acting as a control group. The scope of this work is based on the proper handling and management of chronic renal failure patients receiving haemodialysis and undergoing an oral surgical procedure. Complete blood picture, screening of bleeding and coagulation and postextraction complications were monitored for the two groups. PMID:9497692

  13. Evaluation of perioperative risk in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Aubrun, F; Gazon, M; Schoeffler, M; Benyoub, K

    2012-05-01

    From a medical point of view, aging is characterized by a potential failure to maintain homeostasis under conditions of physiological stress. This failure is associated with an increase in vulnerability. Physiological changes associated with aging are progressive but concomitant injury or diseases may rapidly worsen the health status of the patient. Increasing age independently predicts morbidity and mortality. Hypertension and dyspnea are probably two of the most frequent risk factors in elderly patients. The history of the elderly patient should assess functional status, including cardiovascular reserve sufficient to withstand very stressful operations. The type of surgery has important implications for perioperative risk and emergency surgery, particularly in the elderly, is associated with a high risk of morbidity. Elderly patients who are otherwise acceptable surgical candidates should not be denied surgery based solely on their age and concerns for postoperative renal, cardiovascular, cognitive or pulmonary complications. Renal impairment becomes more prevalent with advancing age as the glomerular filtration rate decreases. The surgical site is the single most important predictor of pulmonary complications. Concerning postoperative comfort and neurological complications, age is the highest risk factor for developing dementia. Pain is underassessed and undermanaged. The elderly are at higher risk of adverse consequences from unrelieved or undertreated pain. PMID:22269928

  14. Risk Assessment Tool for Pressure Ulcer Development in Indian Surgical Wards.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Sushma; Sharma, Deborshi; Rana, Anshika; Pathak, Reetesh; Lal, Romesh; Kumar, Ajay; Biswal, U C

    2015-06-01

    The aims of this paper were to compare the predictive validity of three pressure ulcer (PU) risk scales-the Norton scale, the Braden scale, and the Waterlow scale-and to choose the most appropriate calculator for predicting PU risk in surgical wards of India. This is an observational prospective cohort study in a tertiary educational hospital in New Delhi among 100 surgical ward patients from April to July 2011. The main outcomes measured included sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PVP) and negative predictive value (PVN), and the area under the curve of the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve of the three PU risk assessment scales. Based on the cutoff points found most appropriate in this study, the sensitivity, specificity, PVP, and PVN were as follows: the Norton scale (cutoff, 16) had the values of 95.6, 93.5, 44.8, and 98.6, respectively; the Braden scale (cutoff, 17) had values of 100, 89.6, 42.5, and 100, respectively; and the Waterlow scale (cutoff, 11) had 91.3, 84.4, 38.8, and 97, respectively. According to the ROC curve, the Norton scale is the most appropriate tool. Factors such as physical condition, activity, mobility, body mass index (BMI), nutrition, friction, and shear are extremely significant in determining risk of PU development (p < 0.0001). The Norton scale is most effective in predicting PU risk in Indian surgical wards. BMI, mobility, activity, nutrition, friction, and shear are the most significant factors in Indian surgical ward settings with necessity for future comparison with established scales. PMID:26246703

  15. Management of patients with risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Waldfahrer, Frank

    2013-01-01

    This review addresses concomitant diseases and risk factors in patients treated for diseases of the ears, nose and throat in outpatient and hospital services. Besides heart disease, lung disease, liver disease and kidney disease, this article also covers disorders of coagulation (including therapy with new oral anticoagulants) and electrolyte imbalance. Special attention is paid to the prophylaxis, diagnosis and treatment of perioperative delirium. It is also intended to help optimise the preparation for surgical procedures and pharmacotherapy during the hospital stay. PMID:24403970

  16. Surgical Management of Urolithiasis in Patients after Urinary Diversion

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Wen; Yang, Bicheng; He, Fang; Wang, Liang; Swami, Sunil; Zeng, Guohua

    2014-01-01

    Objective To present our experience in surgical management of urolithiasis in patients after urinary diversion. Patients and Methods Twenty patients with urolithiasis after urinary diversion received intervention. Percutaneous nephrolithotomy, percutaneous based antegrade ureteroscopy with semi-rigid or flexible ureteroscope, transurethral reservoir lithotripsy, percutaneous pouch lithotripsy and open operation were performed in 8, 3, 2, 6, and 1 patients, respectively. The operative finding and complications were retrospectively collected and analyzed. Results The mean stone size was 4.5±3.1 (range 1.5–11.2) cm. The mean operation time was 82.0±11.5 (range 55–120) min. Eighteen patients were rendered stone free with a clearance of 90%. Complications occurred in 3 patients (15%). Two patients (10%) had postoperative fever greater than 38.5°C, and one patient (5%) suffered urine extravasations from percutaneous tract. Conclusions The percutaneous based procedures, including percutaneous nephrolithotomy, antegrade ureteroscopy with semi-rigid ureteroscope or flexible ureteroscope from percutaneous tract, and percutaneous pouch lithotripsy, provides a direct and safe access to the target stones in patients after urinary diversion, and with high stone free rate and minor complications. The surgical management of urolithiasis in patients after urinary diversion requires comprehensive evaluation and individualized consideration depending upon the urinary diversion type, stone location, stone burden, available resource and surgeon experience. PMID:25360621

  17. The importance and provision of oral hygiene in surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Ford, Samuel J

    2008-10-01

    The provision of mouth care on the general surgical ward and intensive care setting has recently gained momentum as an important aspect of patient care. Oropharyngeal morbidity can cause pain and disordered swallowing leading to reluctance in commencing or maintaining an adequate dietary intake. On the intensive care unit, aside from patient discomfort and general well-being, oral hygiene is integral to the prevention of ventilator-associated pneumonia. Chlorhexidine (0.2%) is widely used to decrease oral bacterial loading, dental bacterial plaque and gingivitis. Pineapple juice has gained favour as a salivary stimulant in those with a dry mouth or coated tongue. Tooth brushing is the ideal method of promoting oral hygiene. Brushing is feasible in the vast majority, although access is problematic in ventilated patients. Surgical patients undergoing palliative treatment are particularly prone to oral morbidity that may require specific but simple remedies. Neglect of basic aspects of patient care, typified by poor oral hygiene, can be detrimental to surgical outcome. PMID:18947816

  18. Wernicke's encephalopathy in a malnourished surgical patient: clinical features and magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Nolli, M; Barbieri, A; Pinna, C; Pasetto, A; Nicosia, F

    2005-11-01

    We report a clinical and neuroradiological description of a severe case of Wernicke's encephalopathy in a surgical patient. After colonic surgery for neoplasm, he was treated for a long time with high glucose concentration total parenteral nutrition. In the early post-operative period, the patient showed severe encephalopathy with ataxia, ophthalmoplegia and consciousness disorders. We used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to confirm the clinical suspicion of Wernicke's encephalopathy. The radiological feature showed hyperintense lesions which were symmetrically distributed along the bulbo-pontine tegmentum, the tectum of the mid-brain, the periacqueductal grey substance, the hypothalamus and the medial periventricular parts of the thalamus. This progressed to typical Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome with ataxia and memory and cognitive defects. Thiamine deficiency is a re-emerging problem in non-alcoholic patients and it may develop in surgical patients with risk factors such as malnutrition, prolonged vomiting and long-term high glucose concentration parenteral nutrition. PMID:16223408

  19. Surgical therapy in transsexual patients: a multi-disciplinary approach.

    PubMed

    Monstrey, S; Hoebeke, P; Dhont, M; De Cuypere, G; Rubens, R; Moerman, M; Hamdi, M; Van Landuyt, K; Blondeel, P

    2001-01-01

    A transsexual patient has the constant and persistent conviction that he or she belongs to the opposite sex, thus creating a deeply seated gender identity conflict. With psychotherapy being unsuccessful, it has been proven that in carefully selected patients, gender reassignment or adjusting the body to the mind (both with hormones and surgery) is the best way to normalize their lives. Optimal treatment of these patients requires the multidisciplinary approach of a gender team with the input of several specialties. Such a team consists of a nucleus of physicians who sees the patient more frequently: the psychiatrist, the endocrinologist, the plastic surgeon, the gynecologist and the urologist and a more peripheral group that sees the patients more incidentally: the psychologist, the otorhinolaryngologist, the dermatologist, the speech therapist, the lawyer, the nurse and the social worker. Between 1987 and 1999, a total of 71 male-to-female (MTF) and 54 female-to-male transsexuals have undergone gender confirming surgery in our hospital. This article gives a review and an update on the different surgical procedures as well as on the outcome in our patient population. The results in this series of patients clearly demonstrate that a close cooperation of the different surgical specialties, within our multidisciplinary gender team, is the key to success in treating transsexual patients. PMID:11758101

  20. The impact of surgical outcome after pancreaticoduodenectomy in elderly patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The elderly population has increased in many countries. Indications for cancer treatment in elderly patients have expanded, because surgical techniques and medical management have improved remarkably. Pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) requires high-quality techniques and perioperative management methods. If it is possible for elderly patients to withstand an aggressive surgery, age should not be considered a contraindication for PD. Appropriate preoperative evaluation of elderly patients will lead to their safer management. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the safety of PD in patients older than 75 years and to show the influence of advanced age on the morbidity and mortality associated with this operation. Patients and methods Subjects were 98 patients who underwent PD during the time period from April 2005 to April 2011. During this study, 31 patients were 75 years of age or older (group A), and the other 67 patients were less than 75 years old (group B). Preoperative demographic and clinical data, surgical procedure, pathologic diagnosis, postoperative course and complication details were collected prospectively and they were analyzed in two group. Results There was no statistical difference between patient groups in terms of gender, comorbidity, preoperative drainage, diagnosis, or laboratory data. Preoperative albumin values were lower in group A (P = 0.04). The mean surgical time in group A was 408.1 ± 73.47 min. Blood loss and blood transfusion were not significantly different between both groups. There was no statistical differences in mortality rate (P = 0.14), morbidity rate (P = 0.43), and mean length of hospital stay (P = 0.22) between both groups. Long-term survival was also no statistically significant difference between the two groups using the log-rank test (P = 0.10). Conclusion It cannot be ignored that the elderly population is getting larger. We must investigate the management of elderly patients after PD and prepare

  1. ADDUCTOR POLLICIS MUSCLE AS PREDICTOR OF MALNUTRITION IN SURGICAL PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    de MELO, Camila Yandara Sousa Vieira; da SILVA, Silvia Alves

    2014-01-01

    Background In the compromised nutritional status, there is excessive skeletal muscle loss and decreased inflammatory response, contributing to increased morbidity and mortality and length of stay. Aim To estimate the prevalence of malnutrition by measuring adductor pollicis muscle using cutoffs for surgical patients suggested in the literature. Methods Cross-sectional study with 151 patients scheduled for elective surgical procedure. Nutritional assessment was performed by classical anthropometric measurements: arm circumference, triceps skinfold thickness, arm muscle circumference, corrected arm muscle area, BMI and percentage of weight loss and the extent of the adductor pollicis muscle in both hands. Results The prevalence of malnutrition in patients was high. A significant association between nutritional diagnosis according to the measures of adductor pollicis muscle and arm circumference, BMI and triceps skinfold thickness but there was no association with arm muscular circumference, arm muscular area or percentage of weight loss. Conclusion The adductor pollicis muscle has proved to be a good method to diagnose muscle depletion and malnutrition in surgical patients. PMID:24676291

  2. Patient Satisfaction of Surgical Treatment of Clitoral Phimosis and Labial Adhesions Caused by Lichen Sclerosus

    PubMed Central

    King, Michelle; Rieff, Mollie; Krapf, Jill; Goldstein, Andrew T.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Lichen sclerosus (LS) is a chronic inflammatory dermatosis, usually affecting the anogenital skin in women. This chronic inflammation can cause scarring of genitalia including narrowing of the introitus and phimosis of the clitoris. These architectural changes can lead to recurrent tearing during intercourse (vulvar granuloma fissuratum) and decreased clitoral sensation. Surgical correction of vulvar granuloma fissuratum (VGF) and clitoral phimosis can be performed, but there is little data on the patient satisfaction and complications following these surgical procedures. Aim To evaluate patient experience and outcomes in women undergoing surgical correction of scarring caused by anogenital LS. Methods A retrospective chart review of patients at a vulvar disorders clinic was performed to identify women who had undergone surgical correction of clitoral phimosis or lysis of vulvar adhesions for VGF due to LS. Twenty‐eight women were contacted via telephone between 4 and 130 months postoperatively. An eight‐question survey was used to determine patient experience and outcomes. Main Outcome Measures All participants completed an eight‐question survey to evaluate patient satisfaction with the surgery, effects on clitoral sensation, orgasm and pain with intercourse, postoperative symptoms or complications, and the presence of recurrent vulvar scarring. Results Participants reported that they were either very satisfied (44%) or satisfied (40%) with the procedure. Of the women who experienced decreased clitoral sensation prior to surgery, 75% endorsed increased clitoral sensitivity postoperatively. Of the women who had dyspareunia prior to surgery, the majority of women reported having pain‐free sex (33%) or improved but not completely pain‐free sex (58%) after surgery. There were no complications or symptoms made worse by the surgical procedures. Conclusions This study shows high patient satisfaction and low complication risk associated

  3. Surgical Delay of the Nipple–Areolar Complex in High-risk Nipple-sparing Mastectomy Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Martinovic, Maryann E.; Pellicane, James V.

    2016-01-01

    Summary: As nipple-sparing mastectomy gains increasing popularity, minimizing the risk of nipple necrosis continues to be of critical importance to patients and surgeons. Patients with large or ptotic breasts, scars from previous cosmetic and/or oncologic breast surgery, or previous irradiation have often been denied nipple-sparing mastectomy (NSM) because of increased risk of nipple necrosis. A variety of interventions have been suggested to minimize the ischemic insult to the nipple–areolar complex (NAC). This article presents our experience in 26 high-risk patients with surgical delay of the NAC. PMID:27482499

  4. Surgical Team Stability and Risk of Sharps-Related Blood and Body Fluid Exposures During Surgical Procedures.

    PubMed

    Myers, Douglas J; Lipscomb, Hester J; Epling, Carol; Hunt, Debra; Richardson, William; Smith-Lovin, Lynn; Dement, John M

    2016-05-01

    OBJECTIVE To explore whether surgical teams with greater stability among their members (ie, members have worked together more in the past) experience lower rates of sharps-related percutaneous blood and body fluid exposures (BBFE) during surgical procedures. DESIGN A 10-year retrospective cohort study. SETTING A single large academic teaching hospital. PARTICIPANTS Surgical teams participating in surgical procedures (n=333,073) performed during 2001-2010 and 2,113 reported percutaneous BBFE were analyzed. METHODS A social network measure (referred to as the team stability index) was used to quantify the extent to which surgical team members worked together in the previous 6 months. Poisson regression was used to examine the effect of team stability on the risk of BBFE while controlling for procedure characteristics and accounting for procedure duration. Separate regression models were generated for percutaneous BBFE involving suture needles and those involving other surgical devices. RESULTS The team stability index was associated with the risk of percutaneous BBFE (adjusted rate ratio, 0.93 [95% CI, 0.88-0.97]). However, the association was stronger for percutaneous BBFE involving devices other than suture needles (adjusted rate ratio, 0.92 [95% CI, 0.85-0.99]) than for exposures involving suture needles (0.96 [0.88-1.04]). CONCLUSIONS Greater team stability may reduce the risk of percutaneous BBFE during surgical procedures, particularly for exposures involving devices other than suture needles. Additional research should be conducted on the basis of primary data gathered specifically to measure qualities of relationships among surgical team personnel. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;37:512-518. PMID:26856378

  5. Surgical Treatment and Recurrence of Cutaneous Nasal Malignancies: A 26-Year Retrospective Review of 1795 Patients.

    PubMed

    Christopoulos, George; Sergentanis, Theodoros N; Karantonis, Fotis; Karypidis, Dimitrios; Hampsas, Grigoris; Kostopoulos, Epaminondas; Kostaki, Maria; Papadopoulos, Othon

    2016-08-01

    Frequent localization of facial malignancies in the nasal area and their required complete surgical extirpation pose a significant challenge to the plastic surgeon, who is called to perform a suitable delicate reconstruction of produced nasal skin defects. The present study was aimed to examine the role of tumor characteristics in the prognosis of patients with nasal skin cancer undergoing surgical management.A retrospective review of 1795 patients operated on for nasal cutaneous neoplasms during a 26-year period is presented in our study. Descriptive statistics were appropriately calculated; multivariate Cox regression analysis was performed regarding the possible risk factors for recurrence. Only those with a complete follow-up were included in the study. The mean age of our study population was 66.7 years with a male majority (52.4%). Basal cell carcinoma appeared as the most common histological type (87.7%), followed by squamous cell carcinoma (7.9%); the latter correlated with poor prognosis.The nasal sidewalls were the most frequent lesion location (29.8%), followed by the alae (27.8%), dorsum (21.7%), and tip (19.3%). The columella was very rarely affected (0.5%) but was associated with increased recurrence [hazard ratio, 4.74; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.12-20.00; P = 0.034]. Most patients were treated with elliptical excision and direct closure (58.7%). Local flaps (31.0%) and skin grafting (9.0%) proved very reliable surgical options, especially for larger, high-risk lesions. Recurrence transpired in 46 patients (2.6%) and 4 skin cancer-related deaths occurred.Surgical modality of choice should be individualized and carefully adjusted to patients' needs. Moreover, more elective techniques, such as Mohs micrographic surgery or cumulative therapeutic approaches, like irradiation, should be examined as a beneficial aid to confront high-risk malignancies. PMID:26207539

  6. Quality of life in patients with ulcerative colitis treated surgically

    PubMed Central

    Kozłowska, Katarzyna A.; Krokowicz, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Ulcerative colitis belongs to the group of inflammatory bowel diseases. The specific symptoms and chronic nature of the disease significantly affect the quality of patients’ lives. Quality-of-life assessment helps to define its determining factors as well as the efficiency of surgical procedures. Aim Quality-of-life evaluation of patients with ulcerative colitis treated surgically. Material and methods A retrospective review was carried out on 35 patients with ulcerative colitis, who were treated surgically in the Clinic of General and Colorectal Surgery, University of Medical Sciences in Poznan. The research tools used to assess the quality of life consisted of: the Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire, a Polish version of the Short Form Health Survey-36, and a questionnaire. Results The mean of the IBDQ scale was 152.51, and the median was 161. In this scale, a higher score indicates better quality of life. The situation in the subjective SF-36 scale is reversed: a lower score indicates better quality of life. The mean of the SF-36 was 115.94, and the median was 58. Many discrepancies in the field (e.g. the influence of determining factors) create a niche for further studies. Conclusions Moreover, quality-of-life evaluation may lead to better patient care, understanding their problems or treatment modifications, and finally may become a kind of therapy efficiency parameter. PMID:25276253

  7. Identifying medical-surgical nursing staff perceptions of the drug-abusing patient.

    PubMed

    Nilsen, Stacy L; Stone, Wendy L; Burleson, Stephanie L

    2013-01-01

    Nurses report a negative, stereotypical, and moralistic view of substance-abusing patients. Unaddressed bias may impede delivery of quality care. There is limited research of the needs specific to medical-surgical nursing staff interacting with substance-abusing patients. Nursing therapeutic commitment refers to the degree the nurse feels prepared with an adequate knowledge base, professional support, and personal ownership of a patient condition. Low therapeutic commitment correlates with job dissatisfaction. The Drug and Drug Problems Perceptions Questionnaire assesses healthcare provider attitude and therapeutic commitment to patients using or abusing medication or illicit substances. This therapeutic commitment survey serves as a staff needs assessment for a targeted educational innovation. The results show that the medical and surgical nursing staff has a constructive attitude and a moderately high degree of therapeutic commitment to the drug-abusing patient population, similar to more specialized multidisciplinary, mental healthcare workers. This study showed that medical-surgical nurses feel professionally responsible and clinically supported with patients with primary or comorbid drug abuse. Consistent with established results, focused and ongoing education on the risk factors, outcomes, and physical and psychological effects of illicit substances is necessary to improve therapeutic commitment to drug-dependent patients. PMID:24621546

  8. Surgonomics as a health care financing policy for hospitalized surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, E; Goldstein, J; Benacquista, T; Mulloy, K; Wise, L

    1989-05-01

    The Medicare system of prospective payment to hospitals based on diagnostic related groups (DRG) has been severely criticized at a number of levels. Many states are using DRG prospective "All Payor Systems" for reimbursement to hospitals with the federal DRG system as a model. In All Payor Systems, Medicare, Medicaid, Blue Cross and other commercial insurers pay by the DRG mode; the state of New York has been All Payor since 1 January 1988. This study simulated DRG All Payor methods on a large sample (N = 17,560) of surgical patients for a two year period, using both federal and New York DRG reimbursement methods currently in effect. Both Medicare and Medicaid patients had, on average, a longer length of stay in the hospital and higher total cost of hospitalization compared with patients from Blue Cross and other commercial payors. Medicare and Medicaid patients also had a greater severity of illness compared with patients from Blue Cross or other payors. All except commercial insurors (that is, Medicaid, Blue Cross and Medicare) had greater financial risk under the DRG All Payor scheme. Results from our study suggest that federal, state and private payors may not be adequately reimbursing health care providers for the care of the hospitalized surgical patient under the DRG prospective scheme of hospital payment. It appears that the financing policy for health care, especially at the federal and state level, could limit both the access and quality of care for surgical patients. PMID:2496483

  9. Suprastomal tracheal stenosis after dilational and surgical tracheostomy in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Koitschev, A; Simon, C; Blumenstock, G; Mach, H; Graumüller, S

    2006-09-01

    We have previously reported cases of severe suprastomal stenosis after tracheostomy. In this observational study we investigated the occurrence of suprastomal stenosis as a late complication. Patients with persistent tracheostomy after intensive care underwent an endoscopic examination of tracheostoma, larynx and trachea. A percutaneous dilational tracheostomy was employed in 105 (71.9%) and surgical tracheostomy in 41 (28.1%) of the cases (n = 146). The incidence of severe suprastomal stenosis (grade II > 50% of the lumen) was 23.8% (25 of 105) after dilational tracheostomy and 7.3% (3 of 41) after surgical tracheostomy (p = 0.033). Age, gender, underlying disease, ventilation time, and swallowing ability were not significantly associated with the tracheal pathology. This study suggests that dilational tracheostomy is associated with an increased risk of severe suprastomal tracheal stenosis compared to the surgical technique. PMID:16922748

  10. Surgical prevention of femoral neck fractures in elderly osteoporotic patients. A literature review

    PubMed Central

    Chiarello, Eugenio; Tedesco, Giuseppe; Cadossi, Matteo; Capra, Paola; Terrando, Silvio; Miti, Andrea; Giannini, Sandro

    2016-01-01

    Summary Fragility fractures of the femur are one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The incidence of new contralateral hip fractures in elderly osteoporotic patients ranges from 7 to 12% within 2 years after the first fracture. Secondary prevention can be divided in: pharmacological therapy based on the prescription of anti-osteoporotic drugs with different mechanism of action and non-pharmacological therapy which is based on modification of environmental risk factors, on a healthy diet with daily supplements of calcium and vitamin D and calcium and on the use of hip protectors. Recently a new form of prevention is becoming achievable: surgical prevention; the rationale of surgical reinforcement is the need to increase the resistance of the femoral neck to the compression and distraction forces acting on it. In this paper we analyse all the experimental and “on the market” device available for the surgical prevention of femoral neck fracture. PMID:27252744

  11. [Full attention to several key issues in surgical treatment for the elderly patients with gastrointestinal cancer].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhenggang

    2016-05-25

    With the development of population aging in our country, the incidence of gastrointestinal cancer is increasing. The risk of developing gastrointestinal cancer in elderly over 75 years was 5-6 times and the risk of death of gastrointestinal cancer was 7-8 times of the general population. As compared to non-elderly, the incidence of gastric cancer was not decreased obviously but the total incidence of colorectal cancer was increased more quickly. Therefore, screening of gastrointestinal cancer should be performed in the elderly for early discovery, diagnosis and treatment. Because of the insidious onset of the illness in elderly patients, gastrointestinal cancers are mostly diagnosed at advanced or late stage(stage III( or IIII(). Well differentiated cancer is more common, such as papillary or tubular adenocarcinoma. Lauren type, Borrmann II( or III( are more common in gastric cancer, which are relatively favorable. Compared with non-elderly patients, many elderly patients also suffer from comorbid diseases with higher operation risk and postoperative complication rates. Therefore, we must pay great attention to the perioperative management and the surgical operation for the elderly patients. In this paper, several key issues involved the development trend of incidence and mortality of gastrointestinal cancer, the clinicopathological characteristics, the comorbidity and surgical treatment in the elderly patients with gastrointestinal cancer will be elaborated, aiming at promoting further attention to the clinical therapeutic strategies, management measures and prognostic factors for the elderly patients with gastrointestinal cancer. PMID:27215510

  12. The use of sequential compression devices in the ophthalmic surgical patient.

    PubMed

    Dansby-Kelly, Annquinetta F

    2009-01-01

    A pulmonary embolus (PE) is a blockage of the pulmonary artery caused by the formation of a clot. Fifteen percent of patients who develop a pulmonary embolus may die. What is the likelihood that the surgical ophthalmic patient will develop a pulmonary embolus during surgery? The risk is high, especially for patients with a multiplicity of health concerns, such as heart disease, diabetes, ischemia and obesity. Prophylactic measures are the key to managing the embolytic patient. The application of sequential compression devices (SCDs) is effective in preventing deep vein thrombosis (DVT), venous thromboembolism (VTE) and pulmonary embolus (PE). There has been controversy over whether it is necessary to use SCDs as prophylaxes to prevent a pulmonary embolus (PE) in the ophthalmic surgical patient. The patients who are at greatest risk are those who have procedures lasting 30 minutes or more and those who have a multiplicity of health concerns. In the ophthalmic world, little consideration has been given to using SCDs. The question is, "What would be the likelihood that an ophthalmic patient develop a pulmonary embolus (PE) during surgery?" The answer would be "high," especially in patients with medical histories with poor prognoses. PMID:19708429

  13. Diabetes and Risk of Surgical Site Infection: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kaye, Keith S.; Knott, Caitlin; Nguyen, Huong; Santarossa, Maressa; Evans, Richard; Bertran, Elizabeth; Jaber, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the independent association between diabetes and SSI across multiple surgical procedures. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis. Methods Studies indexed in PubMed published between December 1985 and through July 2015 were identified through the search terms “risk factors” or “glucose” and “surgical site infection”. A total of 3,631 abstracts were identified through the initial search terms. Full texts were reviewed for 522 articles. Of these, 94 articles met the criteria for inclusion. Standardized data collection forms were used to extract study-specific estimates for diabetes, blood glucose levels, and body mass index (BMI). Random-effects meta-analysis was used to generate pooled estimates and meta-regression was used to evaluate specific hypothesized sources of heterogeneity. Results The primary outcome was SSI, as defined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention surveillance criteria. The overall effect size for the association between diabetes and SSI was OR=1.53 (95% Predictive Interval 1.11, 2.12, I2: 57.2%). SSI class, study design, or patient BMI did not significantly impact study results in a meta-regression model. The association was higher for cardiac surgery 2.03 (95% Predictive Interval 1.13, 4.05) compared to surgeries of other types (p=0.001). Conclusion These results support the consideration of diabetes as an independent risk factor for SSIs for multiple surgical procedure types. Continued efforts are needed to improve surgical outcomes for diabetic patients. PMID:26503187

  14. Risk Factors for Surgical Recurrence after Ileocolic Resection of Crohn’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Unkart, Jonathan T.; Anderson, Lauren; Li, Ellen; Miller, Candace; Yan, Yan; Gu, C. Charles; Chen, Jiajing; Stone, Christian D.; Hunt, Steven; Dietz, David W.

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE We evaluated the effect of potential clinical factors on surgical recurrence of ileal Crohn’s disease after initial ileocolic resection. METHODS One hundred seventy-six patients with ileal Crohn’s disease who underwent an ileocolic resection with anastomosis were identified from our database. The outcome of interest was time from first to second ileocolic resection. Survival analysis was used to assess the significance of the Montreal phenotype classification, smoking habit, a family history of inflammatory bowel disease and other clinical variables. RESULTS In our final Cox model, a family history of inflammatory bowel disease (hazard ratio 2.24, 95 percent confidence interval 1.16–4.30, P=0.016), smoking at time of initial ileocolic resection (hazard ratio 2.08, 95 percent confidence interval 1.11–3.91, P=0.023) was associated with an increased risk of a second ileocolic resection while postoperative prescription of immunomodulators (hazard ratio 0.40, 95 percent confidence interval 0.18–0.88, P= 0.022) was associated with a decreased risk of a second ileocolic resection. CONCLUSIONS Both a family history of inflammatory bowel disease and smoking at the time of the initial ileocolic resection are associated with an increased risk of a second ileocolic resection. Postoperative prescription of immunomodulators is associated with a reduced risk of surgical recurrence. This study supports the concept that both genetic and environmental factors influence the risk of surgical recurrence of ileal Crohn’s disease. PMID:18536967

  15. Thoracic wall defects: surgical management of 205 consecutive patients

    SciTech Connect

    Pairolero, P.C.; Arnold, P.G.

    1986-07-01

    In this article, we review our experience during the past 9 years with 205 consecutive thoracic wall reconstructions. The 100 female and 105 male patients ranged in age from 12 to 85 years (mean, 53.4 years). One hundred fourteen patients had thoracic wall tumors, 56 had radiation necrosis, 56 had infected median sternotomy wounds, and 8 had costochondritis. Twenty-nine of these patients had combinations of the aforementioned conditions. One hundred seventy-eight patients underwent skeletal resection. A mean of 5.4 ribs were resected in 142 patients. Total or partial sternectomies were performed in 60. Skeletal defects were closed with prosthetic material in 66 patients and with autogenous ribs in 12. One hundred sixty-eight patients underwent 244 muscle flap procedures: 149 pectoralis major, 56 latissimus dorsi, 14 rectus abdominis, 13 serratus anterior, 8 external oblique, 2 trapezius, and 2 advancement of diaphragm. The omentum was transposed in 20 patients. The mean number of operations per patient was 1.9 (range, 1 to 8). The mean duration of hospitalization was 16.5 days. One perioperative death occurred (at 29 days). Four patients required tracheostomy. During a mean follow-up of 32.4 months, there were 49 late deaths, predominantly due to malignant disease. All 204 patients who were alive 30 days after operation had excellent surgical results at last follow-up examination or at the time of death due to causes unrelated to the reconstructive procedure.

  16. Successful surgical management of ruptured umbilical hernias in cirrhotic patients.

    PubMed

    Chatzizacharias, Nikolaos A; Bradley, J Andrew; Harper, Simon; Butler, Andrew; Jah, Asif; Huguet, Emmanuel; Praseedom, Raaj K; Allison, Michael; Gibbs, Paul

    2015-03-14

    Acute umbilical hernia rupture in patients with hepatic cirrhosis and ascites is an unusual, but potentially life-threatening complication, with postoperative morbidity about 70% and mortality between 60%-80% after supportive care and 6%-20% after urgent surgical repair. Management options include primary surgical repair with or without concomitant portal venous system decompression for the control of the ascites. We present a retrospective analysis of our centre's experience over the last 6 years. Our cohort consisted of 11 consecutive patients (median age: 53 years, range: 36-63 years) with advanced hepatic cirrhosis and refractory ascites. Appropriate patient resuscitation and optimisation with intravenous fluids, prophylactic antibiotics and local measures was instituted. One failed attempt for conservative management was followed by a successful primary repair. In all cases, with one exception, a primary repair with non-absorbable Nylon, interrupted sutures, without mesh, was performed. The perioperative complication rate was 25% and the recurrence rate 8.3%. No mortality was recorded. Median length of hospital stay was 14 d (range: 4-31 d). Based on our experience, the management of ruptured umbilical hernias in patients with advanced hepatic cirrhosis and refractory ascites is feasible without the use of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt routinely in the preoperative period, provided that meticulous patient optimisation is performed. PMID:25780312

  17. Thickness of the adductor pollicis muscle in nutritional assessment of surgical patients

    PubMed Central

    Valente, Katarina Papera; Silva, Naira Marceli Fraga; Faioli, Amanda Barcelos; Barreto, Marina Abelha; de Moraes, Rafael Araújo Guedes; Guandalini, Valdete Regina

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To evaluate the correlation between thickness of the muscle adductor pollicis and anthropometric measurements, body mass index and Subjective Global Assessment in the nutritional assessment of surgical patients. Methods The study population comprised patients admitted to the general and reconstructive surgery unit of a university hospital in the city of Vitória (ES), Brazil. The inclusion criteria were patients evaluated in the first 48 hours of admission, aged ≥20 years, hemodynamically stable, with no edema or ascites. Data analysis was performed using the software Statistical Package for Social Science 21.0, significance level of 5%. Results The sample consisted of 150 patients that were candidates to surgery, mean age of 42.7±12.0 years. The most common reasons for hospitalization were surgical procedures, gastrintestinal diseases and neoplasm. Significant association was observed between thickness of adductor pollicis muscle and Subjective Global Assessment (p=0.021) and body mass index (p=0.008) for nutritional risk. Significant correlation was found between thickness of adductor pollicis muscle and arm muscle circumference, corrected arm muscle area, calf circumference and body mass index. There were no significant correlations between thickness of adductor pollicis muscle and triceps skinfold and age. Conclusion The use of thickness of adductor pollicis muscle proved to be an efficient method to detect malnutrition in surgical patients and it should be added to the screening process of hospitalized patients, since it is easy to perform, inexpensive and noninvasive. PMID:27074229

  18. Long-term prognosis of patients with surgical wound infections.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, K B; Gottschau, A

    1997-10-01

    This study examined if surgical wound infections (SWI) result in a severe prognosis regarding general health and increase the consumption of social resources. A group of 1301 patients were interviewed by self-administered questionnaires during 1993-1994, while operated during hospitalization in seven Danish hospitals. These patients were followed up at least once by similar questionnaires at a median time of 5.5 and 10.0 months postoperatively. The consequences of surgically diagnosed SWI were analyzed in a hospital cohort of 58 infected patients and 648 controls. Postdischarge infections were analyzed in a patient cohort of 263 cases and 767 controls. Changes in health was measured by the General Health Questionnaire, Activities of Daily Living index, and self-assessed health. Consumption of resources were estimated by reliance on assistance from family and friends, use of home services, and contacts to doctors. It was found that the long-term prognosis of general health was unaffected by SWIs. However significantly increased social dependence was found for patients with SWIs compared to uninfected patients. Almost one-fourth of the operations were complicated by an SWI. Most of the infections were recognized only after discharge and were thought to be of minor importance, which may explain why no chronic impairment of the health was found for patients with an SWI. A bias toward no-effect may have been introduced if patients with severe SWIs abstained from participation. The societal cost of care for patients with minor infections seems to be large. The causal relation between outcome and SWI needs to be further investigated. PMID:9327669

  19. Results of Surgical Therapy in Patients with Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Vlad, Mihaela; Zosin, Ioana; Timar, Bogdan; Lazar, Fulger; Vlad, Adrian; Timar, Romulus; Cornianu, Marioara

    2016-08-01

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) is a rare form of malignancy, having an intermediate prognosis. Controversies exist regarding the best surgical approach. The aim of the study was to analyze the outcome in a group of patients with MTC, diagnosed and followed up in a single care center. We performed a retrospective analysis of all the patients diagnosed with MTC in the Department of Endocrinology from the County Emergency Hospital Timisoara between 1992 and 2012. The study group included 19 patients, 6 men (31.6 %), mean age 41.2 ± 12.5 years (20-72 years). The preoperative diagnosis was based on the protocol for nodular thyroid disease. Total or near-total thyroidectomy was performed in 10 out of 16 patients who could be operated. Postoperative follow-up included repeated measurements of serum calcitonin and imaging investigations. Nine out of the total of 19 (47.3 %) patients had hereditary forms of MTC. Most of the cases (84.2 %) were submitted to surgery. The median duration of follow-up was 84 months. The pTNM staging indicated that the majority of the patients with hereditary MTC were diagnosed in an earlier stage. Disease remission was achieved in 7 cases (43.8 %). Four patients, all with sporadic forms, died. Survival rates at 1, 5 and 10 years were significantly higher (p = 0.048) in patients with hereditary MTC. An early diagnosis of MTC allows a better surgical approach and an improved survival rate. We support the general recommendation that modified radical neck dissection is not necessary for all the patients with MTC. PMID:27574350

  20. Surgical patents and patients--the ethical dilemmas.

    PubMed

    Tołłoczko, Tadeusz

    2005-01-01

    It is obvious that every inventor should be rewarded for the intellectual effort, and at the same time be encouraged to successively improve his or her discovery and to work on subsequent innovations. Patents also ensure that patent owners are officially protected against intellectual piracy, but protection of intellectual property may be difficult to accomplish. Nevertheless, it all comes down to this basic question: Does a contradiction exist between medical ethics and the "Medical and Surgical Procedure Patents" system? It may well turn out that medical-procedure patents can have a negative influence on the standard of medical care. Medical-method patents may also interfere with the physician-patient relationship. At present, physicians do not question the usefulness of patent protection for medicines, biotechnology, equipment and devices, but they strongly oppose it for surgical procedures. PMID:15727000

  1. The Incidence of Peripheral Catheter-Related Thrombosis in Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Amy; Heal, Clare; Banks, Jennifer; Abraham, Breanna; Capati, Gian; Pretorius, Casper

    2016-01-01

    Background. Central venous catheters and peripherally inserted central catheters are well established risk factors for upper limb deep vein thrombosis. There is limited literature on the thrombosis rates in patients with peripheral catheters. A prospective observational study was conducted to determine the incidence of peripheral catheter-related thrombosis in surgical patients. Methods. Patients deemed high risk for venous thrombosis with a peripheral catheter were considered eligible for the study. An ultrasound was performed on enrolment into the study and at discharge from hospital. Participants were reviewed twice a day for clinical features of upper limb deep vein thrombosis during their admission and followed up at 30 days. Results. 54 patients were included in the study. The incidence of deep vein thrombosis and superficial venous thrombosis was 1.8% and 9.2%, respectively. All cases of venous thrombosis were asymptomatic. Risk factor analysis was limited by the low incidence of thrombosis. Conclusion. This study revealed a low incidence of deep vein thrombosis in surgical patients with peripheral catheters (1.8%). The study was underpowered; therefore the association between peripheral catheters and thrombosis is unable to be established. Future studies with larger sample sizes are required to determine the association between peripheral catheters and thrombosis. PMID:26904283

  2. Surgical and prosthetic reconsiderations in patients with maxillectomy.

    PubMed

    Lethaus, B; Lie, N; de Beer, F; Kessler, P; de Baat, C; Verdonck, H W

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish and evaluate new possibilities for rehabilitation of patients with obturator prosthesis who had undergone partial or total maxillectomy because of tumour ablation surgery. Eleven patients with maxillary defects were reconstructed with a computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing designed prosthesis. Missing retention was gained by inserting implants in the remaining bone, so that an expansion of the surgical defect to gain further retention could be avoided. All patients were treated successfully according to the previously described treatment plan. The Obturator Functioning Scale (OFS) of the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Centre was applied to evaluate the functional quality of the obturator prosthesis and patient's satisfaction. It showed good results in all fields of functional outcome and social acceptance. PMID:20002530

  3. Violent Behavior among hospitalized medical and surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Ochitill, H N; Krieger, M

    1982-02-01

    To characterize violent behavior in hospitalized medical and surgical patients, we reviewed documented violent incidents at the San Francisco General Hospital during a two-year period. Twenty-nine incidents of verbal and physical violence occurred. One patient was gravely ill and three were delirious. All the incidents were associated with increased levels of tension and loss of impulse control. In most cases, contention with the staff regarding pain medication or ward regulations was a precipitating event. Of the 28 patients with mental disorders, 19 were substance abusers, six had organic brain syndrome, tw had neurosis, and one had schizophrenia. The findings suggest that physicians should be more sensitive to patient characteristics and to the situational characteristics of the violent incident. Explicit measures that anticipate and reduce violent behavior are reviewed. PMID:7058353

  4. Incidence and risk factors for surgical infection after total knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Babkin, Yuri; Raveh, David; Lifschitz, Moshe; Itzchaki, Menachem; Wiener-Well, Yonit; Kopuit, Puah; Jerassy, Ziona; Yinnon, Amos M

    2007-01-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) after total knee replacement (TKR) is a devastating complication. We performed a retrospective study of all consecutive TKRs performed during a 2-y period. Surgical site infection (SSI) was defined by standard criteria. All patients were examined 1 y following surgery. Of 180 patients undergoing TKR, 10 (5.6%) developed a superficial (3, 1.7%) or deep (7, 3.9%) SSI. Two independent risk factors for SSI were detected: left knees became infected more often (9/ 92, 9.8%) than right knees (1/88, 1.1%) (Relative Risk 6.7 +/- 95% CI 1.7-26.8); and 7/72 (9.7%) patients receiving a type-1 prosthesis developed infection versus 3/104 (3.1%) receiving a type-2 prosthesis (RR 4.7, 95% CI 1.18-18.4). Investigation of the operating room revealed 3 problems: there was significant traffic through the door on the left of the patient; a nonstandard horizontal-flow air conditioner had been installed above that door; a tool-washing sink was in use on the other side of that door. Infection control guidelines were rehearsed: the sink was removed, the air conditioner was disconnected, and the door was locked. In a prospective survey performed 2 y later only 1/45 patients (2.2%) undergoing TKR developed a superficial SSI (p = 0.5). Correction of independent risk factors for infection following TKR led to a decrease in SSI rate. PMID:17852911

  5. Selected surgical managements in snoring and obstructive sleep apnea patients

    PubMed Central

    Olszewska, Ewa; Rutkowska, Justyna; Czajkowska, Aneta; Rogowski, Marek

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background The diagnostic process and the surgical procedures in patients with snoring and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) are crucial. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of surgical treatment in snoring and OSAS patients. Material/Methods A precise laryngological examination and screening polysomnography (Poly-Mesam) were performed in all patients with mild, moderate and severe OSAS before and 6 months after surgery. The patients completed questionnaires concerning their complaints. We included patients qualified to septoplasty, laser-assisted uvulopalatoplasty (LAUP), uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (UPPP) and radiofrequency-induced thermotherapy of the tongue base (RITT). Outcome evaluation of surgery was performed on the basis of data received from follow-up laryngological examinations, selected parameters obtained from the Poly-Mesam test and follow-up questionnaires. Results In most cases we observed improvement, defined as decreasing some sleep parameters, such as a respiratory disturbance index (RDI), by more than 50%, decreasing the loudness of snoring, decreasing the number of hypopneas, and obtaining better blood saturation values. After UPPP we noticed changes in retropalatal space, soft palate dimensions and uvula-posterior pharyngeal wall distance. In the postoperative period we did not observe severe complications. In some cases we found short-lived palatal deficiency after UPPP. Patients after RITT experienced discomfort and throat pain lasting from 2 to 4 days. In 2 patients we observed swelling of the tongue base, which decreased after few days. Conclusions Surgery in OSAS contributes to normalization of some sleep parameters. The majority of patients experienced improvement after surgery. PMID:22207114

  6. Surgical Margins and the Risk of Local-Regional Recurrence After Mastectomy Without Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Childs, Stephanie K.; Chen Yuhui; Duggan, Margaret M.; Golshan, Mehra; Pochebit, Stephen; Wong, Julia S.; Bellon, Jennifer R.

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: Although positive surgical margins are generally associated with a higher risk of local-regional recurrence (LRR) for most solid tumors, their significance after mastectomy remains unclear. We sought to clarify the influence of the mastectomy margin on the risk of LRR. Methods and Materials: The retrospective cohort consisted of 397 women who underwent mastectomy and no radiation for newly diagnosed invasive breast cancer from 1998-2005. Time to isolated LRR and time to distant metastasis (DM) were evaluated by use of cumulative-incidence analysis and competing-risks regression analysis. DM was considered a competing event for analysis of isolated LRR. Results: The median follow-up was 6.7 years (range, 0.5-12.8 years). The superficial margin was positive in 41 patients (10%) and close ({<=}2 mm) in 56 (14%). The deep margin was positive in 23 patients (6%) and close in 34 (9%). The 5-year LRR and DM rates for all patients were 2.4% (95% confidence interval, 0.9-4.0) and 3.5% (95% confidence interval, 1.6-5.3) respectively. Fourteen patients had an LRR. Margin status was significantly associated with time to isolated LRR (P=.04); patients with positive margins had a 5-year LRR of 6.2%, whereas patients with close margins and negative margins had 5-year LRRs of 1.5% and 1.9%, respectively. On univariate analysis, positive margins, positive nodes, lymphovascular invasion, grade 3 histology, and triple-negative subtype were associated with significantly higher rates of LRR. When these factors were included in a multivariate analysis, only positive margins and triple-negative subtype were associated with the risk of LRR. Conclusions: Patients with positive mastectomy margins had a significantly higher rate of LRR than those with a close or negative margin. However, the absolute risk of LRR in patients with a positive surgical margin in this series was low, and therefore the benefit of postmastectomy radiation in this population with otherwise favorable

  7. A review of surgical strategies for penile prosthesis implantation in patients with Peyronie's disease.

    PubMed

    Anaissie, James; Yafi, Faysal A

    2016-06-01

    The introduction of the inflatable penile prosthesis (IPP) has revolutionized the treatment of patients with both Peyronie's disease (PD) and erectile dysfunction (ED). A thorough literature review was performed in order to review the surgical strategies used to treat PD, using the PubMed online database with the keywords "penile prosthesis", "surgical management" and "Peyronie's disease". Patient satisfaction rates of 72-100% and partner satisfaction rates of 89% have been reported in the literature, although strong preoperative education may be needed to prepare patients for risks such as penile shortening, seen in up to 54% of patients. Three-piece IPPs are most commonly used, and when comparing the two most popular models (AMS 700 CX vs. Coloplast Titan), no significant differences were seen in functional outcomes or patient satisfaction. Simple insertion of an IPP has been shown to resolve curvature in 33-90% of patients, but surgeons may often need to also utilize ancillary straightening procedures for residual curvatures. Manual modeling can correct residual curvature with an 86-100% success rate, but with a 4% risk of urethral injury. When the post-modeling residual curvature exceeds 30 degrees, a plaque-releasing incision or plication is recommended to further reduce curvature. Grafting is recommended if the resulting incisional defect is larger than two centimeters. Alternative straightening techniques such as plication prior to IPP insertion, endoscopic plaque resection, the "scratch technique" and bone saw plaque incision have also been described. PMID:27298781

  8. Long-term prognosis in patients with clipped unruptured cerebral aneurysms--increased cerebrovascular events in patients with surgically treated unruptured aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Hokari, Masaaki; Kuroda, Satoshi; Nakayama, Naoki; Houkin, Kiyohiro; Ishikawa, Tatsuya; Kamiyama, Hiroyasu

    2013-10-01

    We retrospectively investigated surgical immediate and long-term overall results after clipping of the unruptured aneurysms. Between 1991 and 2008, 166 patients underwent neck clipping of unruptured saccular aneurysms at our institute. Patients were subsequently followed to clarify the occurrence of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), and stroke other than SAH, aneurysm recurrence, cerebrovascular death, all-cause death, and risk factors. Surgical complication was noted in 14 patients (8.4%) and surgical morbidity in two patients (1.2%). Of 164 patients except for these two patients who suffered surgical morbidity, we could obtain more than 3 years follow-up information for 144 patients (87.8%). There were 49 men and 95 women. The mean age was 58.5 years, and mean follow-up period was 7.9 years. Eight cases had died during follow-up (hepatic insufficiency in one, renal insufficiency in one, suicide in one, intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) in two, SAH in one, and pneumonia after stroke in two). Therefore, the cause of death was stroke and late effects of stroke. Twelve symptomatic cerebrovascular events (cerebral infarction in seven, ICH in four, and SAH in one) occurred in ten patients. Consequently, annual risk of SAH after clipping of unruptured aneurysms was 0.085%. Besides, annual risk of stroke in those patients was 1.06%, and this incidence was higher than that in the general population. Although this study confirmed the good surgical result, annual risk of stroke after clipping of unruptured aneurysms was much higher than that in the general population. The long-term periodic examination to detect recurrent aneurysms and appropriate management to prevent stroke should be performed for patients with surgically treated unruptured aneurysm. PMID:23605078

  9. Medical-Surgical Nurses' Perceptions of Psychiatric Patients: A Review of the Literature With Clinical and Practice Applications.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Vinette; Ellis, Horace; Barrett, Barbara

    2016-04-01

    The literature consistently shows that medical-surgical nurses frequently lack the knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary to render holistic nursing care to patients with severe mental illness (SMI). The negative perceptions often portrayed by medical-surgical nurses towards SMI patients with comorbid medical-surgical disorders must be addressed in order to ameliorate treatment gaps. Current concepts, issues, and challenges associated with the perceptions of nurses who care for patients with (SMI) in medical-surgical settings can prove overwhelming to both nurses and patients, and can result in concerning practice gaps. In accordance with a contemporary model of patient-centered care, it is imperative that medical-surgical nurses acquire the knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary to work with this high-risk population. Cultivating an environment that promotes apposite attitudes along with effective training programs for medical-surgical nurses, may shift negative perceptions and ultimately meet best practice standards and improve outcomes for patients with SMI. PMID:26992881

  10. Neural network adapted to wound cell analysis in surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Viljanto, Jouko; Koski, Antti

    2011-01-01

    Assessment of the real state of wound healing of closed surgical wounds is uncertain both clinically and from conventional laboratory tests. Therefore, a novel approach based on early analysis of exactly timed wound cells, computerized further with an artificial neural network, was developed. At the end of routine surgery performed on 481 children under 18 years of age, a specific wound drain Cellstick™ was inserted subcutaneously between the wound edges to harvest wound cells. The Cellsticks™ were removed from 1 to 50 hours, mainly at hour 3 or 24 postsurgery. Immediately, the cellular contents were washed out using a pump constructed for the purpose. After cytocentrifugation, the cells were stained and counted differentially. Based on their relative proportions at selected time intervals, an artificial self-organizing neural map was developed. This was further transformed to a unidirectional linear graph where each node represents one set of relative cell quantities. As early as 3 hours, but more precisely 24 hours after surgery, the location of the nodes on this graph showed individually the patients' initial speed of wound inflammatory cell response. Similarly, timed Cellstick™ specimens from new surgical patients could be analyzed, computerized, and compared with these node values to assess their initial speed in wound inflammatory cell response. Location of the node on the graph does not express the time lapse after surgery but the speed of wound inflammatory cell response in relation to that of other patients. PMID:21362082

  11. Thinking in three's: Changing surgical patient safety practices in the complex modern operating room

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs, Verna C

    2012-01-01

    The three surgical patient safety events, wrong site surgery, retained surgical items (RSI) and surgical fires are rare occurrences and thus their effects on the complex modern operating room (OR) are difficult to study. The likelihood of occurrence and the magnitude of risk for each of these surgical safety events are undefined. Many providers may never have a personal experience with one of these events and training and education on these topics are sparse. These circumstances lead to faulty thinking that a provider won’t ever have an event or if one does occur the provider will intuitively know what to do. Surgeons are not preoccupied with failure and tend to usually consider good outcomes, which leads them to ignore or diminish the importance of implementing and following simple safety practices. These circumstances contribute to the persistent low level occurrence of these three events and to the difficulty in generating sufficient interest to resource solutions. Individual facilities rarely have the time or talent to understand these events and develop lasting solutions. More often than not, even the most well meaning internal review results in a new line to a policy and some rigorous enforcement mandate. This approach routinely fails and is another reason why these problems are so persistent. Vigilance actions alone have been unsuccessful so hospitals now have to take a systematic approach to implementing safer processes and providing the resources for surgeons and other stakeholders to optimize the OR environment. This article discusses standardized processes of care for mitigation of injury or outright prevention of wrong site surgery, RSI and surgical fires in an action-oriented framework illustrating the strategic elements important in each event and focusing on the responsibilities for each of the three major OR agents-anesthesiologists, surgeons and nurses. A Surgical Patient Safety Checklist is discussed that incorporates the necessary elements to

  12. Thinking in three's: changing surgical patient safety practices in the complex modern operating room.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, Verna C

    2012-12-14

    The three surgical patient safety events, wrong site surgery, retained surgical items (RSI) and surgical fires are rare occurrences and thus their effects on the complex modern operating room (OR) are difficult to study. The likelihood of occurrence and the magnitude of risk for each of these surgical safety events are undefined. Many providers may never have a personal experience with one of these events and training and education on these topics are sparse. These circumstances lead to faulty thinking that a provider won't ever have an event or if one does occur the provider will intuitively know what to do. Surgeons are not preoccupied with failure and tend to usually consider good outcomes, which leads them to ignore or diminish the importance of implementing and following simple safety practices. These circumstances contribute to the persistent low level occurrence of these three events and to the difficulty in generating sufficient interest to resource solutions. Individual facilities rarely have the time or talent to understand these events and develop lasting solutions. More often than not, even the most well meaning internal review results in a new line to a policy and some rigorous enforcement mandate. This approach routinely fails and is another reason why these problems are so persistent. Vigilance actions alone have been unsuccessful so hospitals now have to take a systematic approach to implementing safer processes and providing the resources for surgeons and other stakeholders to optimize the OR environment. This article discusses standardized processes of care for mitigation of injury or outright prevention of wrong site surgery, RSI and surgical fires in an action-oriented framework illustrating the strategic elements important in each event and focusing on the responsibilities for each of the three major OR agents-anesthesiologists, surgeons and nurses. A Surgical Patient Safety Checklist is discussed that incorporates the necessary elements to

  13. Orthodontic and surgical treatment of a patient with hemifacial microsomia.

    PubMed

    Zanardi, Gustavo; Parente, Eduardo Varela; Esteves, Lucas Senhorinho; Louro, Rafael Seabra; Capelli, Jonas

    2012-04-01

    This article describes the surgical and orthodontic treatment of a 12-year-old boy with a significant deformity and functional involvement caused by hemifacial microsomia. The left mandibular ramus and condyle were hypoplastic and abnormal in form and location. The lower third of the face was increased, with mandibular retrusion and significant facial asymmetry. He had difficulties in speaking and chewing and problems related to his facial appearance, which caused severe psychosocial disturbances. The patient received orthodontic treatment and temporomandibular joint reconstruction with a costochondral graft on the left side while he was still growing. Three-year follow-up records are presented. PMID:22449593

  14. Surgical management of cleft lip in pedo-patients.

    PubMed

    Taware, C P; Kulkarni, S R

    1991-01-01

    The Present article describes in short etiology of cleft lip and cleft palate. With this in-born defect, patient develops crucial problems with feeding, phonation, overall growth and development of affected and allied soft and hard tissue structures. This in turn results in deformity and asymmetry which is going to affect functional requirements as well as aesthetic outlook. Hence it really becomes mandatory to correct this defect surgically as early as possible, at stipulated timings so as to avoid present and future anticipated problems. PMID:1820390

  15. Functional changes of intestinal mucosal barrier in surgically critical patients

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yuan-yuan; Liu, Mu-lin; He, Xian-di; Jiang, Cong-qiao; Liu, Rui-lin

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The gut is capable of inducing multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS). In the diagnosis and treatment of critical ill patients, doctors should pay particular attention to the protection or recovery of intestinal barrier function. However, no reliable diagnostic criteria are available clinically. This study aimed to assess the changes of intestinal mucosal barrier function in surgically critical ill patients as well as their significance. METHODS: Thirty-eight surgically critical ill patients were enrolled as a study group (APACHE II>8 scores), and 15 non-critical ill patients without intestinal dysfunction were selected as a control group (APACHE II<6). General information, symptoms, physical signs, and APACHE II scores of the patients were recorded. The patients in the study group were subdivided into an intestinal dysfunction group (n=26) and a non-intestinal dysfunction group (n=12). Three ml venous blood was collected from the control group on admission and the same volume of plasma was collected from the study group both on admission and in the period of recovery. The plasma concentrations of endotoxin, diamine oxidase (DAO), D-lactate, and intestinal fatty-acid binding protein (iFABP) were detected respectively. The data collected were analyzed by the SPSS 17.0 software for Windows. RESULTS: The levels of variables were significantly higher in the study group than in the control group (P<0.01). They were higher in the intestinal dysfunction group than in the non-intestinal dysfunction group (DAO P<0.05, endotoxin, D-lactate, iFABP P<0.01). In the non-intestinal dysfunction group compared with the control group, the level of endotoxin was not significant (P>0.05), but the levels of DAO, D-lactate and iFABP were statistically significant (P<0.05). The levels of variables in acute stage were higher than those in recovery stage (P<0.01). The death group showed higher levels of variables than the survival group (endotoxin and D-lactate P<0.01, DAO

  16. Patients' perspective in the surgical decision-making process.

    PubMed

    Lim, Eric

    2012-11-01

    Barriers can arise if surgeons are unable to effectively convey information on benefits and risks or are unwilling to offer management choices based on patients' preferences. Facilitating shared decision making, allowing patients to carefully think and consider the alternatives, and empowering them to share in the decision-making process improve patient satisfaction and treatment adherence and represent the hallmark of an excellent clinician. PMID:23084617

  17. Surgical strategy: matching the patient with the procedure.

    PubMed

    Hentz, Vincent R

    2002-08-01

    The general indications, timing, and choice of procedure can be determined by asking and answering the following questions appropriately: 1. Has the patient achieved neurologic, emotional, and social stability? 2. What is the patient's current level of motor and sensory resources and function? The number and strength of muscles remaining under good voluntary control are the most important variables. 3. Are the patient's expectations realistic? 4. Does the patient possess the necessary intelligence and motivation? Some procedures, such as arthrodesis of a specific joint, require little motivation to succeed; however, a complex set of muscle-tendon transfers requires a great deal of motor reeducation for the patient to achieve an optimal result. 5. Does the patient have the necessary time to invest in achieving a good result? The patient must be able to set aside the time necessary for postoperative immobilization in a cast or splint and for therapy and reeducation. 6. Are the necessary support services and personnel available and committed? 7. Have all preoperative obstacles to success been considered and has a plan developed to overcome any remaining obstacles? 8. Does the patient understand the potential complications and benefits? 9. Can the patient and professional team tolerate a complication, failure, or suboptimal result? Both the medical staff and the patient must be prepared for complications that may lead to a suboptimal outcome or frank failure. 10. Are the patient's current health and well-being ideal? 11. Is the surgical plan consistent with the patient's physical resources, goals, and expectations? 12. Does an alternate plan exist? 13. Does the surgeon understand the scope of the complications and how to salvage an acceptable result should a complication occur? PMID:12474600

  18. A review of important medical and surgical considerations for obese patients undergoing arthroscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Prodromo, John; Rackley, Justin; Mulcahey, Mary K

    2016-09-01

    Obesity represents a unique challenge in orthopaedic surgery, the impact of which is seen through all phases of injury: in the development of disease, during the operative procedure, and throughout the rehabilitation period. Given the high prevalence of obesity in the United States and around the world, this patient population represents a substantial proportion of patients in need of orthopedic care. The effects of this disease constrain both medical and financial resources. For obese patients undergoing orthopedic procedures, adequate steps must be taken to minimize the risks that occur before, during, and after surgical intervention. This literature review discusses the impact of obesity on arthroscopic procedures, with a focus on procedures involving the shoulder, hip, and knee. The management of obese patients during the perioperative period should address the specific concerns relating to these patients. Obesity is a risk factor for numerous comorbidities, is associated with surgical complications, and is a predictor of poor functional outcomes following arthroscopy. Efforts to minimize the negative impact of obesity on arthroscopic procedures are crucial. PMID:27578242

  19. The outcome of surgical fixation of mid shaft clavicle fractures; looking at patient satisfaction and comparing surgical approaches

    PubMed Central

    Alshameeri, Zeiad A.; Katam, Krishnaiah; Alsamaq, Mohammed; Sonsale, Paresh

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Clavicle fractures represent 2.5% of fractures in adults and almost 44% of shoulder injuries. The treatment is usually non-surgical with good results; however, significantly displaced fractures can be associated with high non-union rate and therefore many would advocate surgical fixation. This is traditionally carried out by direct approach over the clavicle but an infraclavicular approach has also been used for clavicular fixation. The aim of this study was to identify the main indications for surgical intervention at our unit and patient satisfaction following surgery. We also wanted to compare the direct and the infraclavicular surgical approaches in relation to the outcome of surgical intervention. Materials and Methods: Retrospective study looking at all the clavicle fractures managed surgically over 5 years at our department. Information relating to surgical indication, surgical approach, complications, outcome, patient satisfaction, and oxford shoulder score were collected. Results: A total of 35 patients were identified, the majority were males (n = 25) and most (n = 29) were working at the time of injury. The commonest indication for surgery was displacement with shortening (n = 16). The infraclavicular approach was used in the majority of patients (n = 21), the rest (n = 14) had direct incision. Evidence of radiological and union was achieved in all patients after an average of 13 (8-24) weeks. There were no major complications but minor complications were reported in 28% and 19% of cases with direct and infraclavicular approaches, respectively. Plates were removed from six symptomatic patients; infraclavicular (n = 2) and direct approach (n = 4). Four asymptomatic plates were removed on patients’ requests. All patients returned to work (after an average 2.6 months), had good oxford shoulder score between 12-20, regardless of the surgical approach used. All patients except one would recommend it to a friend. Conclusion: Our study showed

  20. Atrial fibrillation in patients undergoing surgical revascularization: an update on pharmacologic prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Rostagno, Carlo

    2012-12-01

    Atrial fibrillation occurs in 20-50% of patients after surgical revascularization (40% have more than 1 episode), with a peak between 2nd and 3rd postoperative days. Postoperative atrial fibrillation (POAF) has been associated with an increase in adverse events, length of hospital stay and, therefore, cost of care, and late mortality. A higher risk profile in patients who develop POAF may contribute to the higher late mortality rate. The pathogenesis of PAOF is multi factorial: transient ischemia during surgical procedure, neurohormonal activation, electrolyte imbalance, fluid overload and finally an exaggerated inflammatory response have been associated with POAF. Advanced age, an history of AF or heart failure and, finally, COPD are clinically independent risk factors related to POAF. The lower incidence of POAF reported after off-pump CABG in comparison to conventional cardiopulmonary by-pass CABG techniques has not been confirmed. The administration of antiarrhythmic drugs (amiodarone, metoprolol, sotalol and recently propafenone and landiolol) before and /or after surgical procedure has been extensively investigated and most of the investigators have demonstrated a favorable effect on POAF incidence. The decreased incidence of POAF and related shorter hospital stay by PUFA administration during hospitalization needs to be confirmed. Preliminary results suggest that pre-treatment with the antianginal drug ranolazine may significantly decrease POAF incidence. Treatments directed to antagonize inflammation are presently under investigation. Recently, a randomized study with naproxen, although effective on POAF, was interrupted due to increased risk of nephrotoxicty. Despite different action mechanisms, both hydrocortisone and statins have been shown to decrease post-operative AF risk. No data at present exist on the effects of association of these drugs. Aim of the present review was to update the current practice and report the recent results of research in the

  1. Quality of sleep in postoperative surgical oncologic patients.

    PubMed

    Barichello, Elizabeth; Sawada, Namie Okino; Sonobe, Helena Megumi; Zago, Márcia Maria Fontão

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate surgical-oncologic patients' quality of sleep through the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) questionnaire. It is an exploratory study with transversal-observational design, in 46 postoperative head & neck and urology cancer patients. The PSQI questionnaire was used to evaluate the subjective quality of sleep and the occurrence of sleep disorders. Six PSQI components were statistically significant and 78.3% of the interviewees had impaired subjective quality of sleep. Among factors leading to sleep disorders we point out: taking too long to fall asleep; waking up in the middle of the night; getting up to go to the bathroom and napping during the day. This study is expected to sensitize the nursing team regarding the need to investigate quality of sleep and causes of its disorders in cancer survivors for an effective course of action. PMID:19820854

  2. Clinical significance of surgical margin status in patients subjected to radical prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Dobruch, Jakub; Nyk, Lukasz; Skrzypczyk, Michał; Chłosta, Piotr; Dzik, Tomasz; Borówka, Andrzej

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the clinical value of positive surgical margins (PSM) in patients subjected to radical prostatectomy (RP). The data of men who were subjected to RP from the 1st of January, 2001 to the 30th of May, 2010 were analyzed. Specimens with PSM were again evaluated to confirm the presence of positive margins. PSM were found in 64 (25%) out of 255 analyzed patients. Out of all clinical features, only biopsy Gleason score and clinical stage of the disease were found to be predictive of PSM. Biochemical recurrence (BR) was found in 42 (16.5%) men, among them 17 (26.6%) had PSM and 25 (13.1%) had negative margins. The risk of BR in those with "focal" PSM (<3 mm) did not differ from the risk of BR observed in patients without PSM. In contrast, the likelihood of BR was significantly greater in cases of PSM in which maximum longitude exceeded 3 mm. Reevaluation of the PSM specimens revealed equivocal margins status in six cases. PSM are not inevitably associated with BR. The risk of failure is influenced by their length. Reevaluation of the prostate specimen may lead to surgical margins status modification. PMID:24578961

  3. Patient Participation in Surgical Treatment Decision Making from the Patients' Perspective: Validation of an Instrument

    PubMed Central

    Heggland, Liv-Helen; Øgaard, Torvald; Mikkelsen, Aslaug; Hausken, Kjell

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe the development of a new, brief, easy-to-administer self-reported instrument designed to assess patient participation in decision making in surgical treatment. We describe item generation, psychometric testing, and validity of the instrument. The final scale consisted of four factors: information dissemination (5 items), formulation of options (4 items), integration of information (4 items), and control (3 items). The analysis demonstrated a reasonable level of construct validity and reliability. The instrument applies to patients in surgical wards and can be used to identify the health services that are being provided and the areas that could strengthen patient participation. PMID:22830010

  4. Costs and risks of weekend anesthesia staffing at 6 independently managed surgical suites.

    PubMed

    Dexter, Franklin; Epstein, Richard H; Marsh, H Michael

    2002-10-01

    We previously developed a statistical method that managers can use to assure that nurse anesthetists are on call on weekends for as few hours as possible while providing a specified level of care for operating room (OR) patients. The statistically derived staffing solutions are optimal, meaning that the total number of staffed hours is guaranteed to be as low as possible to achieve the specified risk of being unable to care for patients as promptly as they had in the recent past. We used the statistical method to review nurse anesthetist weekend staffing at 6 surgical suites that were part of a healthcare system with a cost-conscious management team. Four of the suites had already made staffing changes resulting in a greater than 6% risk of being understaffed. One suite had adequate current staffing but slightly exceeded the minimum total staffing hours. One suite had more anesthetist coverage than was needed, resulting in excess staffing costs greater than $200,000 per year. We conclude that the principal value of the statistical method may be in helping healthcare system administrators and anesthetists quantify the impact of contemplated reductions in staffing on their risk of understaffing and prologing patients' wait for OR care. PMID:12425127

  5. Patient Perspectives on Post-Discharge Surgical Site Infections: Towards a Patient-Centered Mobile Health Solution

    PubMed Central

    Sanger, Patrick C.; Hartzler, Andrea; Han, Sarah M.; Armstrong, Cheryl A. L.; Stewart, Mark R.; Lordon, Ross J.; Lober, William B.; Evans, Heather L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Post-discharge surgical site infections (SSI) are a major source of morbidity, expense and anxiety for patients. However, patient perceptions about barriers experienced while seeking care for post-discharge SSI have not been assessed in depth. We explored patient experience of SSI and openness to a mobile health (mHealth) wound monitoring “app” as a novel solution to address this problem. Methods Mixed method design with semi-structured interviews and surveys. Participants were patients who had post-discharge surgical wound complications after undergoing operations with high risk of SSI, including open colorectal or ventral hernia repair surgery. The study was conducted at two affiliated teaching hospitals, including an academic medical center and a level 1 trauma center. Results From interviews with 13 patients, we identified 3 major challenges that impact patients' ability to manage post-discharge surgical wound complications, including required knowledge for wound monitoring from discharge teaching, self-efficacy for wound monitoring at home, and accessible communication with their providers about wound concerns. Patients found an mHealth wound monitoring application highly acceptable and articulated its potential to provide more frequent, thorough, and convenient follow-up that could reduce post-discharge anxiety compared to the current practice. Major concerns with mHealth wound monitoring were lack of timely response from providers and inaccessibility due to either lack of an appropriate device or usability challenges. Conclusions Our findings reveal gaps and frustrations with post-discharge care after surgery which could negatively impact clinical outcomes and quality of life. To address these issues, we are developing mPOWEr, a patient-centered mHealth wound monitoring application for patients and providers to collaboratively bridge the care transition between hospital and home. PMID:25436912

  6. Diabetes Mellitus as a Risk Factor in Glaucoma’s Physiopathology and Surgical Survival Time: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Cunha, João Paulo; Amado, Duarte; Pinto, Luís Abegão; Ferreira, Joana

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Glaucoma is a multifactorial condition under serious influence of many risk factors. The role of diabetes mellitus (DM) in glaucoma etiology or progression remains inconclusive. Although, the diabetic patients have different healing mechanism comparing to the general population and it has a possible-negative role on surgical outcomes. This review article attempts to analyze the association of both diseases, glaucoma and DM, before and after the surgery. The epidemiological studies, based mainly in population prevalence analyzes, have shown opposite outcomes in time and even in the most recent articles also the association remains inconclusive. On the contrary, the experimental models based on animal induced chronic hyperglycemia have shown an important association of both diseases, explained by common neurodegenerative mechanisms. Diabetic patients have a different wound healing process in the eye viz-a-viz other organs. The healing process is more and it results in lower surgical survival time, higher intraocular pressure (IOP) levels and, therefore, these patients usually need more medication to lower the IOP. Both randomized and nonrandomized retrospective and experimental molecular studies have shown the association between DM and glaucoma. Further studies are needed to get better explanations about outcomes on more recent surgical procedures and with the exponential use of antifibrotics. How to cite this article: Costa L, Cunha JP, Amado D, Pinto LA, Ferreira J. Diabetes Mellitus as a Risk Factor in Glaucoma’s Physiopathology and Surgical Survival Time: A Literature Review. J Curr Glaucoma Pract 2015;9(3):81-85. PMID:26997842

  7. Patient-tailored conservative surgical treatment of invasive uterine cervical squamous cell carcinoma. A review.

    PubMed

    Menczer, J

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this paper was to review currently available data regarding the results of a more conservative, patient-tailored surgical approach in selected cases of early invasive uterine squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). A PubMed search of investigations in the English language published from January 2000 to September 2012 containing the terms conservative surgery, conservative treatment, trachelectomy, parametrectomy, lymphadenectomy, sentinel lymph node biopsy and fertility sparing surgery in combination with SCC was made. Conization only is optimal for women with stage Ia1 disease mainly in tumors without lymph vascular space involvement (LVSI). In stage Ib1 patients interested to maintain reproductive capacity, vaginal or abdominal radical trachelectomy are the procedures of choice. Patients with small tumors (<2 cm), no deep invasion, no LVSI, and negative pelvic nodes are at very low risk of parametrial involvement and parametrectomy may be omitted in them. Such patients may benefit from less radical surgery and may be candidates for simple hysterectomy, simple trachelectomy, or conization with pelvic lymphadenectomy. Sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsy is apparently a good predictor of node metastases and allows the performance of lymphadenectomy only in SLN positive cases. Thus lymphadenectomy may also be omitted in some patients. In young women with locally advanced tumors, neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by fertility-sparing surgery may also be a feasible treatment. A more conservative, patient-tailored surgical approach in selected cases of early SCC is possible resulting in lower morbidity and preservation of fertility without compromising the outcome. PMID:24051940

  8. Surgical Correction of Scoliosis in Children with Spastic Quadriplegia: Benefits, Adverse Effects, and Patient Selection

    PubMed Central

    Legg, Julian; Davies, Evan; Raich, Annie L.; Dettori, Joseph R.; Sherry, Ned

    2014-01-01

    Study Rationale Cerebral palsy (CP) is a group of nonprogressive syndromes of posture and motor impairment associated with lesions of the immature brain. Spastic quadriplegia is the most severe form with a high incidence of scoliosis, back pain, respiratory compromise, pelvic obliquity, and poor sitting balance. Surgical stabilization of the spine is an effective technique for correcting deformity and restoring sitting posture. The decision to operate in this group of patients is challenging. Objectives The aim of this study is to determine the benefits of surgical correction of scoliosis in children with spastic quadriplegia, the adverse effects of this treatment, and what preoperative factors affect patient outcome after surgical correction. Materials and Methods A systematic review was undertaken to identify studies describing benefits and adverse effects of surgery in spastic quadriplegia. Factors affecting patient outcome following surgical correction of scoliosis were assessed. Studies involving adults and nonspastic quadriplegia were excluded. Results A total of 10 case series and 1 prospective and 3 retrospective cohort studies met inclusion criteria. There was significant variation in the overall risk of complications (range, 10.9−70.9%), mortality (range, 2.8−19%), respiratory/pulmonary complications (range, 26.9−57.1%), and infection (range, 2.5−56.8%). Factors associated with a worse outcome were a significant degree of thoracic kyphosis, days in the intensive care unit, and poor nutritional status. Conclusion Caregivers report a high degree of satisfaction with scoliosis surgery for children with spastic quadriplegia. There is limited evidence of preoperative factors that can predict patient outcome after scoliosis. There is a need for well-designed prospective studies of scoliosis surgery in spastic quadriplegia. PMID:24715871

  9. Surgical transposition of the ovaries: Imaging findings in 14 patients

    SciTech Connect

    Kier, R.; Chambers, S.K. )

    1989-11-01

    Pelvic radiation therapy for cervical or vaginal cancer often leads to ovarian failure. To remove the ovaries from the radiation portal and preserve their function, they can be transposed to the lateral abdomen. Serial imaging studies in 14 patients who had undergone ovarian transposition (five bilateral, nine unilateral) were reviewed. Images obtained included 32 CT scans, 20 sonograms, and one MR image. Most transposed ovaries were located along the paracolic gutters near the iliac crests, creating an extrinsic mass effect on adjacent bowel. Detection of surgical clips on the ovary on CT scans allowed confident recognition of all 19 transposed ovaries. Cysts in the transposed ovaries, noted on most imaging studies, did not correlate with complications of pain or hormonal dysfunction. In one case, a large physiologic cyst in a transposed ovary distorted the cecum and was mistaken for a mucocele of the appendix. In another case, a large ovarian cyst was thought to be tumor recurrence or a lymphocele. These findings indicate that although the transposed ovaries can be recognized on CT scans by the surgical clips attached to the ovaries, the appearance of the ovary does not predict reliably the development of complications.

  10. Futility and the care of surgical patients: ethical dilemmas.

    PubMed

    Grant, Scott B; Modi, Parth K; Singer, Eric A

    2014-07-01

    Futility has been a contentious topic in medicine for several decades. Surgery in critical or end-of-life situations often raises difficult questions about futility. In this article, we discuss the definition of futility, methods for resolving futility disputes, and some ways to reframe the futility debate to a more fruitful discussion about the goals of care, better communication between surgeon and patient/surrogate, and palliative surgical care. Many definitions of futile therapy have been discussed. The most controversial of these is "qualitative futility" which describes a situation in which the treatment provided is likely to result in an unacceptable quality of life. This is an area of continued controversy because it has been impossible to identify universally held beliefs about acceptable quality of life. Many authors have described methods for resolving futility disputes, including community standards and legalistic multi-step due process protocols. Others, however, have abandoned the concept of futility altogether as an unhelpful term. Reframing the issue of futility as one of inadequate physician-patient communication, these authors have advocated for methods of improving communication and strengthening the patient-physician relationship. Finally, we discuss the utilization of consultants who may be of use in resolving futility disputes: ethics committees, palliative care specialists, pastoral care teams, and dedicated patient advocates. Involving these specialists in a futility conflict can help improve communication and provide invaluable assistance in arriving at the appropriate treatment decision. PMID:24849199

  11. Diffusion of Surgical Innovations, Patient Safety, and Minimally Invasive Radical Prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, J. Kellogg; Messer, Karen; Palazzi, Kerrin; Stroup, Sean; Chang, David

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Surgical innovations disseminate in the absence of coordinated systems to ensure their safe integration into clinical practice, potentially exposing patients to increased risk for medical error. OBJECTIVE To investigate associations of patient safety with the diffusion of minimally invasive radical prostatectomy (MIRP) resulting from the development of the da Vinci robot. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS A cohort study of 401 325 patients in the Nationwide Inpatient Sample who underwent radical prostatectomy during MIRP diffusion between January 1, 2003, and December 31, 2009. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES We used Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety Indicators (PSIs), which measure processes of care and surgical provider performance. We estimated the prevalence of MIRP among all prostatectomies and compared PSI incidence between MIRP and open radical prostatectomy in each year during the study. We also collected estimates of MIRP incidence attributed to the manufacturer of the da Vinci robot. RESULTS Patients who underwent MIRP were more likely to be white (P = .004), have fewer comorbidities (P = .02), and have undergone surgery in higher-income areas (P = .005). The incidence of MIRP was substantially lower than da Vinci manufacturer estimates. Rapid diffusion onset occurred in 2006, when MIRP accounted for 10.4% (95% CI, 10.2-10.7) of all radical prostatectomies in the United States. In 2005, MIRP was associated with an increased adjusted risk for any PSI (adjusted odds ratio, 2.0; 95% CI, 1.1-3.7; P = .02) vs open radical prostatectomy. Stratification by hospital status demonstrated similar patterns: rapid diffusion onset among teaching hospitals occurred in 2006 (11.7%; 95% CI, 11.3-12.0), with an increased risk for PSI for MIRP in 2005 (adjusted odds ratio, 2.7; 95% CI, 1.4-5.3; P = .004), and onset among nonteaching hospitals occurred in 2008 (27.1%; 95% CI, 26.6-27.7), with an increased but nonsignificant risk for PSI in 2007

  12. Surgical Management in a Patient With Complex Uveitic Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhu; Wang, Xiao-Yu; Han, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Uveitic glaucoma (UG) is secondary glaucoma, present as a clinical challenge in both diagnosis and management. We report a case of complex UG, which initially presented as pupillary block and rupture of the anterior lens capsule. We performed cataract extraction with preservation of posterior capsule. Then, the case turned to aphakic malignant glaucoma. We performed anterior vitrectomy with posterior capsule resection in this case. After the second operation, the patient had a satisfactory recovery. Specifically, ultrasonographic biomicroscopy was useful during the diagnosis process and follow-up period in this case. UG presenting as pupillary block, rupture of the anterior lens capsule, and aqueous misdirection seldom presents in clinical practice. Earlier and more active surgical intervention may be necessary for effective preservation of visual function in complex cases of UG. PMID:26252285

  13. Video consultation for trauma and emergency surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Bellal; Hadeed, George; Sadoun, Moutamn; Rhee, Peter M; Weinstein, Ronald S

    2012-01-01

    The saying goes that a picture is worth a thousand words, but what then is the value of video? For the care of trauma and emergency surgical patients, the use of video consultation between medical providers may be worth its weight in gold. Telemedicine has become an important tool in reducing the disparity among the haves and the have not's, in this case facilities with a trauma service and those without. This article presents the use of live video for trauma consultations between the only level 1 trauma center in Southern Arizona and several smaller rural hospitals. We also expand on what we believe the future and direction of telesurgery in the fields of critical care and trauma surgery. PMID:22948367

  14. Risk factors for worsened muscle strength after the surgical treatment of arteriovenous malformations of the eloquent motor area.

    PubMed

    Lin, Fuxin; Zhao, Bing; Wu, Jun; Wang, Lijun; Jin, Zhen; Cao, Yong; Wang, Shuo

    2016-08-01

    OBJECT Case selection for the surgical treatment of arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) of the eloquent motor area remains challenging. The aim of this study was to determine the risk factors for worsened muscle strength after surgery in patients with this disorder. METHODS At their hospital the authors retrospectively studied 48 consecutive patients with AVMs involving motor cortex and/or the descending pathway. All patients had undergone preoperative functional MRI (fMRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), followed by resection. Both functional and angioarchitectural factors were analyzed with respect to the change in muscle strength. Functional factors included lesion-to-corticospinal tract distance (LCD) on DTI and lesion-to-activation area distance (LAD) and cortical reorganization on fMRI. Based on preoperative muscle strength, the changes in muscle strength at 1 week and 6 months after surgery were defined as short-term and long-term surgical outcomes, respectively. Statistical analysis was performed using the statistical package SPSS (version 20.0.0, IBM Corp.). RESULTS Twenty-one patients (43.8%) had worsened muscle strength 1 week after surgery. However, only 10 patients (20.8%) suffered from muscle strength worsening 6 months after surgery. The LCD was significantly correlated with short-term (p < 0.001) and long-term (p < 0.001) surgical outcomes. For long-term outcomes, patients in the 5 mm ≥ LCD > 0 mm (p = 0.009) and LCD > 5 mm (p < 0.001) categories were significantly associated with a lower risk of permanent motor worsening in comparison with patients in the LCD = 0 mm group. No significant difference was found between patients in the 5 mm ≥ LCD > 0 mm group and LCD > 5 mm group (p = 0.116). Nidus size was the other significant predictor of short-term (p = 0.021) and long-term (p = 0.016) outcomes. For long-term outcomes, the area under the ROC curve (AUC) was 0.728, and the cutoff point was 3.6 cm. Spetzler-Martin grade was not associated with

  15. The Pulmonary Thromboembolism as a Risk of Surgical Treatments and the Role of Anticoagulant Prophylaxiss

    PubMed Central

    Cukic, Vesna

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Our objective is to show the number of patients with postoperative pulmonary thromboembolism (PPTE) treated in Intensive care unit of Clinic for pulmonary diseases an TB “Podhrastovi” in three-year period : from June 1, 2011 - June 1, 2014 and to indicate the importance of various surgical operations in the development of pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE). Material and methods: This is the retrospective study which shows the number of patients with PPTE treated in Intensive care unit of Clinic for pulmonary diseases an TB “Podhrastovi” in three-year period : from 01.06.2011.-01.06.2014. It represents the number of these patients, per cent of patients with PPTE of total patients with PTE, age and sex of patients, type of surgery, period expressed in days from surgery to diagnosis of PTE, presence of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) of lower extremities, massiveness of PPTE e.g. level of pulmonary artery with embolus. Results: In three-year period 232 patients with PTE were treated in Intensive care unit of Clinic “Podhrastovi”. 60 of them or 25.86% were patients with 24 males or 40% middle-aged 58.5 years, and 36 females or 60% middle-aged 56.3 years. PPTE developed in 15 patients with abdominal, 11 with urologic, 8 with gynecologic, 15 with orthopedic, 4 with cardiologic, 2 with vascular, 3 with neurosurgical, 1 with glandular and 1 with orl operations. The average period from operation to diagnosis of PPTE was 10.5 days for women, and 13.8 days for men. Only two patients had acute DVT after operation (one man and one woman), and five had amnesias of previous DVT or PTE. The level or the site of pulmonary embolus was different from segmental to main branches of pulmonary artery. Conclusion: Different surgical operations are the big risk factor for the development of PTE. There is great significance of anticoagulant prophylaxis before surgery even in patients with no anamnesis of previous DVT or PTE. PMID:25568626

  16. Determinants of Malnutrition and Post-operative Complications in Hospitalized Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    de Aquino, José Luiz Braga

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The study aimed to determine the nutritional status (NS) of hospitalized surgical patients and investigate a possible association between NS and type of disease, type of surgery and post-operative complications. The gender, age, disease, surgery, complications, length of hospital stay, number of medications, laboratory test results, and energy intake of 388 hospitalized surgical patients were recorded. NS was determined by classical anthropometry. The inclusion criteria were: nutritional status assessment done within the first 24 hours of admission, age ≥20 years, and complete medical history. Univariate and multiple Cox's regression analyses were employed to determine which variables were possible risk factors of malnutrition and complications. Malnutrition was more common in males (p=0.017), individuals aged 70 to 79 years (p=0.000), and individuals with neoplasms and digestive tract diseases (p=0.000). Malnourished individuals had longer hospital stays (p=0.013) and required more medications (p=0.001). The risk of malnutrition was associated with age and disease. Individuals aged 70 years or more had a two-fold increased risk of malnutrition (p=0.014; RR=2.207; 95% CI 1.169-4.165); those with neoplasms (p=0.008; RR=14.950; 95% CI 2.011-111.151) and those having digestive tract diseases (p=0.009; RR=14.826; 95% CI 1.939-113.362) had a 14-fold increased risk of malnutrition. Complications prevailed in older individuals (p=0.016), individuals with longer hospital stays (p=0.007), and individuals who died (p=0.002). The risk of complications was associated with age and BMI. In the present study, the risk of malnutrition was associated with age and type of disease; old age and low BMI may increase complications. PMID:25395903

  17. Performance of Surgical Risk Scores to Predict Mortality after Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Leonardo Sinnott; Caramori, Paulo Ricardo Avancini; Nunes Filho, Antonio Carlos Bacelar; Katz, Marcelo; Guaragna, João Carlos Vieira da Costa; Lemos, Pedro; Lima, Valter; Abizaid, Alexandre; Tarasoutchi, Flavio; de Brito Jr, Fabio S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Predicting mortality in patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) remains a challenge. Objectives To evaluate the performance of 5 risk scores for cardiac surgery in predicting the 30-day mortality among patients of the Brazilian Registry of TAVI. Methods The Brazilian Multicenter Registry prospectively enrolled 418 patients undergoing TAVI in 18 centers between 2008 and 2013. The 30-day mortality risk was calculated using the following surgical scores: the logistic EuroSCORE I (ESI), EuroSCORE II (ESII), Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) score, Ambler score (AS) and Guaragna score (GS). The performance of the risk scores was evaluated in terms of their calibration (Hosmer–Lemeshow test) and discrimination [area under the receiver–operating characteristic curve (AUC)]. Results The mean age was 81.5 ± 7.7 years. The CoreValve (Medtronic) was used in 86.1% of the cohort, and the transfemoral approach was used in 96.2%. The observed 30-day mortality was 9.1%. The 30-day mortality predicted by the scores was as follows: ESI, 20.2 ± 13.8%; ESII, 6.5 ± 13.8%; STS score, 14.7 ± 4.4%; AS, 7.0 ± 3.8%; GS, 17.3 ± 10.8%. Using AUC, none of the tested scores could accurately predict the 30-day mortality. AUC for the scores was as follows: 0.58 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.49 to 0.68, p = 0.09] for ESI; 0.54 (95% CI: 0.44 to 0.64, p = 0.42) for ESII; 0.57 (95% CI: 0.47 to 0.67, p = 0.16) for AS; 0.48 (95% IC: 0.38 to 0.57, p = 0.68) for STS score; and 0.52 (95% CI: 0.42 to 0.62, p = 0.64) for GS. The Hosmer–Lemeshow test indicated acceptable calibration for all scores (p > 0.05). Conclusions In this real world Brazilian registry, the surgical risk scores were inaccurate in predicting mortality after TAVI. Risk models specifically developed for TAVI are required. PMID:26247244

  18. A Novel Prevention Bundle to Reduce Surgical Site Infections in Pediatric Spinal Fusion Patients.

    PubMed

    Gould, Jane M; Hennessey, Patricia; Kiernan, Andrea; Safier, Shannon; Herman, Martin

    2016-05-01

    BACKGROUND The Surgical Care Improvement Project bundle emphasizes operative infection prevention practices. Despite implementing the Surgical Care Improvement Project bundle in 2008, spinal fusion surgical site infections (SF-SSI) continued to be prevalent for this low-volume, high-risk surgery. OBJECTIVE To design a combined pre-, peri-, and postoperative bundle (PPPB) that would lead to sustained reductions in SF-SSI rates. DESIGN Quality improvement project, before-after trial with cost-effectiveness analysis. SETTING Children's hospital. PATIENTS All spinal fusion patients, 2008-2015. INTERVENTION A multidisciplinary team developed the PPPB composed of Surgical Care Improvement Project elements plus improved wound care practices, nursing standard of care, dedicated nursing unit, dermatology assessment tool and consultation, nursing education tool using "teach back" technique, and a "Back Home" kit. SF-SSI rates were compared before (2008-2010) and after (2011-February 2015) implementation of PPPB. PPPB compliance was monitored. RESULTS A total of 224 SF surgeries were performed from 2008 to February 2015. Pre-PPPB analysis revealed median time to SF-SSI of 28 days, secondary to skin and bowel flora. Mean 3-year pre-PPPB SF-SSI rate per 100 SF surgeries was 8.2 (8/98) (2008: 13.3 [4/30], 2009: 2.7 [1/37], 2010: 9.7 [3/31]). Mean SF-SSI rate after PPPB was 2.4 (3/126) (January 2011-February 2015); there was a 71% reduction in mean SSI rate (P=.0695). No SF-SSI occurred in neuromuscular patients (P=.008) after PPPB. Compliance with PPPB elements has been 100%. CONCLUSIONS PPPB led to sustained improvement in SF-SSI rates over 50 months. The PPPB could be reproduced for other surgeries. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;37:527-534. PMID:26818613

  19. Benefits of Surgical Treatment for Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms in Elderly Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jang, E-Wook; Jung, Jin-Young; Hong, Chang-Ki

    2011-01-01

    Objective Due to longer life spans, patients newly diagnosed with unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIAs) are increasing in number. This study aimed to evaluate how management of UIAs in patients age 65 years and older affects the clinical outcomes and post-procedural morbidity rates in these patients. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 109 patients harboring 136 aneurysms across 12 years, between 1997 and 2009, at our institute. We obtained the following data from all patients : age, sex, location and size of the aneurysm(s), presence of symptoms, risk factors for stroke, treatment modality, and postoperative 1-year morbidity and mortality. We classified these patients into three groups : Group A (surgical clipping), Group B (coil embolization), and Group C (observation only). Results Among the 109 patients, 56 (51.4%) underwent clipping treatment, 25 (23%) patients were treated with coiling, and 28 observation only. The overall morbidity and mortality rates were 2.46% and 0%, respectively. The morbidity rate was 1.78% for clipping and 4% for coiling. Factors such as hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hypercholesterolemia, smoking, and family history of stroke were correlated with unfavorable outcomes. Two in the observation group refused follow-up and died of intracranial ruptured aneurysms. The observation group had a 7% mortality rate. Conclusion Our results show acceptable favorable outcome of treatment-related morbidity comparing with the natural history of unruptured cerebral aneurysm. Surgical clipping did not lead to inferior outcomes in our study, although coil embolization is generally more popular for treating elderly patients. In the treatment of patients more than 65 years old, age is not the limiting factor. PMID:21494358

  20. Surgical management of severe scoliosis with high-risk pulmonary dysfunction in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Takaso, Masashi; Nakazawa, Toshiyuki; Imura, Takayuki; Takahira, Naonobu; Itoman, Moritoshi; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Yamazaki, Masashi; Otori, Seiji; Akazawa, Tsutomu; Minami, Shohei; Kotani, Toshiaki

    2010-03-01

    Between 2005 and 2007, 14 patients who had severe scoliosis in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and a poor forced vital capacity (FVC) of <30% at admission underwent scoliosis surgery. FVC on admission was 21.6% (range, 16-27%). The patients were given respiratory muscle training using a pulmonary trainer (Threshold IMT, Philips Respironics, Inc.) for six weeks before operation. FVC increased to 26.2% (range, 22-31%) the day before operation. The mean preoperative scoliosis was 98 degrees (range, 81 degrees-130 degrees). All patients underwent posterior fusion and all-screw construction and were extubated on the operative day. No patients developed any respiratory complications. The postoperative scoliosis was 34 degrees (range, 20 degrees-40 degrees) (65%). FVC remained stable at six weeks after operation. FVC decreased to 19.8% (range, 16-25%) and the mean scoliosis was 35 degrees (range, 23 degrees-40 degrees) (64%) at two years after operation. DMD patients with severe scoliosis and FVC considered too low to permit reasonable surgical risk could undergo surgery and could benefit from surgery. PMID:19340426

  1. Surgical management of severe scoliosis with high-risk pulmonary dysfunction in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Nakazawa, Toshiyuki; Imura, Takayuki; Takahira, Naonobu; Itoman, Moritoshi; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Yamazaki, Masashi; Otori, Seiji; Akazawa, Tsutomu; Minami, Shohei; Kotani, Toshiaki

    2009-01-01

    Between 2005 and 2007, 14 patients who had severe scoliosis in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and a poor forced vital capacity (FVC) of <30% at admission underwent scoliosis surgery. FVC on admission was 21.6% (range, 16–27%). The patients were given respiratory muscle training using a pulmonary trainer (Threshold IMT, Philips Respironics, Inc.) for six weeks before operation. FVC increased to 26.2% (range, 22–31%) the day before operation. The mean preoperative scoliosis was 98° (range, 81°–130°). All patients underwent posterior fusion and all-screw construction and were extubated on the operative day. No patients developed any respiratory complications. The postoperative scoliosis was 34° (range, 20°–40°) (65%). FVC remained stable at six weeks after operation. FVC decreased to 19.8% (range, 16–25%) and the mean scoliosis was 35° (range, 23°–40°)(64%) at two years after operation. DMD patients with severe scoliosis and FVC considered too low to permit reasonable surgical risk could undergo surgery and could benefit from surgery. PMID:19340426

  2. Stratification of risk to the surgical team in removal of small arms ammunition implanted in the craniofacial region: case report.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Jonathan A; Laughlin, Ian; Newberry, Shane; Ryhn, Michael; Pasley, Jason; Newberry, Travis

    2016-09-01

    In cases of penetrating injury with implantation of small arms ammunition, it can often be difficult to tell the difference between simple ballistics and ballistics associated with unexploded ordnances (UXOs). In the operative environment, where highly flammable substances are often close to the surgical site, detonation of UXOs could have catastrophic consequences for both the patient and surgical team. There is a paucity of information in the literature regarding how to evaluate whether an implanted munition contains explosive material. This report describes a patient who presented during Operation Enduring Freedom with an implanted munition suspicious for a UXO and the subsequent workup organized by Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Company prior to surgical removal. Clinical risk factors for UXOs include assassination attempts and/or wartime settings. Specific radiological features suggestive of a UXO include projectile size greater than 7.62-mm caliber, alterations in density of the tip, as well as radiological evidence of a hollowed-out core. If an implanted UXO is suspected, risks to the surgical and anesthesia teams can be minimized by notifying the nearest military installation with EOD capabilities and following clinical practice guidelines set forth by the Joint Theater Trauma System. PMID:26832604

  3. ["Incidental" thyroid carcinoma among patients in surgical treatment for nontumors thyroid desease].

    PubMed

    Nechaĭ, O P; Larin, O S; Cheren'ko, S M; Sheptukha, S A; Smoliar, V A; Zolotar'ov, P O

    2012-07-01

    Incidence of unexpected diagnosis of thyroid carcinoma among operations on benign thyroid surgical diseases (nodular goiter and Graves' disease) was studied in 608 patients within 2008-2009 years in specialized clinic of endocrine surgery. In 56 (9.2%) patients the "incidental" thyroid carcinoma including 43 (77%) - papillary microcarcinoma were diagnosed in histological investigations. In 10 (18%) patients which were performed within the first postoperative week. Repeated surgery demonstrates increased risk of complication (damage of parathyroid glands, recurrent laryngeal nerves and other anatomic structures of neck) considering less favoring conditions for secondary operations, it is worth to implement wider indications to frozen section, radical primary operation (total thyroidectomy at multi-nodular bilateral goiter and Graves' disease), and also maximal complete examination prior to surgery. PMID:23033769

  4. Surgical vs. non-surgical treatment in women with pelvic floor dysfunction: Patient-centered goals at one year

    PubMed Central

    Hullfish, Kathie L.; Bovbjerg, Viktor E.; Gurka, Matthew J.; Steers, William D.

    2009-01-01

    Objective In women with pelvic floor dysfunction (PFD), we assessed the degree to which treatment (surgical vs. non-surgical) was associated with achievement of patient-centered goals, satisfaction with care, and quality of life. Study design Prospective cohort. Between September 2003 and December 2004 we recruited women during their first referral visit for PFD treatment at our outpatient Urogynecology Clinic. At the first visit, women enumerated up to five personal treatment goals, and “anchored” each goal by anticipating best and worst possible outcomes. At 12 month follow-up, women were asked to indicate their level of goal attainment (−2, worst outcome; +2, best outcome). At baseline and follow-up, women completed short forms of the Incontinence Impact Questionnaire (IIQ-7) and Urogenital Distress Inventory (UDI-6) (range 0–100, high scores indicating greater impact or distress). Patients indicated level of treatment satisfaction on a 4 level ordinal scale. Results Of the 127 study participants with complete data, 46 (36.2 %) were managed surgically and 81 (63.8%) non surgically. There were no major demographic differences between the two groups in terms of age, race, weight, prior PFD surgery, and vaginal parity. The surgical group was more likely to have received baseline diagnosis of pelvic organ prolapse (80 % vs 60 %, p = 0.0259), and be post-menopausal (89 % vs 72 %, p = 0.0261). There were no significant differences in the distribution of goal type (symptom relief, activity, self image, general health) by treatment status (p = 0.1074). Using logistic regression to adjust for age and baseline diagnosis, surgically managed patients at one year were significantly more likely to report complete primary goal attainment (odds ratio (OR) = 4.42; p = 0.0154) and complete treatment satisfaction (OR = 6.12; p = 0.0109). For all participants, one-year IIQ-7 and UDI-6 scores were significantly correlated with primary goal attainment scores. Conclusions In

  5. 3-D Storybook: Effects on Surgical Knowledge and Anxiety Among Four- to Six-Year-Old Surgical Patients.

    PubMed

    Macindo, John Rey B; Macabuag, Katherine R; Macadangdang, Carlo Miguel P; Macaranas, Margaux Valerie S; Macarilay, Marianne Jezelle Jem T; Madriñan, Natasha Nikki M; Villarama, Rouena S

    2015-07-01

    Inadequate surgical knowledge potentiates anxiety; however, no methodology simultaneously addresses anxiety and surgical knowledge. Our quasi-experimental study determined the effectiveness of a three-dimensional (3-D) storybook in increasing surgical knowledge and decreasing anxiety among young children scheduled for planned or required major surgeries. We studied 20 randomly assigned participants who received either the 3-D storybook or traditional health teaching. A presurgical knowledge questionnaire and modified Yale Preoperative Anxiety Scale assessed surgical knowledge and anxiety. Data were analyzed with one-way and repeated-measures multivariate analysis of variance. Results showed that both groups had higher knowledge scores (F = 8.94; P = .008) and lower anxiety scores (F = 5.13; P = .036) after the intervention. The children who received information from the 3-D storybook exhibited a significantly higher posttest knowledge score (F = 11.71; P = .003) and lower anxiety score (F = 10.05; P = .005) than the traditionally educated group of children. The 3-D storybook effectively increased surgical knowledge and decreased anxiety and could be used as an alternative method to prepare pediatric surgical patients. PMID:26119618

  6. Interhospital transfer: an independent risk factor for mortality in the surgical intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Arthur, Katherine R; Kelz, Rachel R; Mills, Angela M; Reinke, Caroline E; Robertson, Mathew P; Sims, Carrie A; Pascual, Jose L; Reilly, Patrick M; Holena, Daniel N

    2013-09-01

    Interhospital transfer (IHT) is associated with mortality in medical and mixed intensive care units (ICUs), but few studies have examined this relationship in a surgical ICU (SICU) setting. We hypothesized that IHT is associated with increased mortality in SICU patients relative to ICU patients admitted within the hospital. We reviewed SICU and transfer center databases from a tertiary academic center over a 2-year period. Inclusion criteria included age 18 years or older and SICU admission 24 hours or greater. Demographic data, admission service, and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II scores were captured. The primary end point was ICU mortality. Univariate logistic regression was used to test the association between variables and mortality. Factors found to be associated with mortality at P < 0.1 were entered into a multivariable model. Of 4542 admissions, 416 arrived by IHT. Compared with the non-IHT group, the IHT group was older (age 58.3 years [interquartile range, 47.8 to 70.6] vs. 57.8 years [interquartile range, 44.1 to 68.8] years, P = 0.036), sicker (APACHE II score 16.5 [interquartile range, 12 to 23] vs. 14 [interquartile range, 10 to 20], P < 0.001), and more likely to be white (82% [n = 341] vs. 69% [n = 2865], P < 0.001). Mortality rates in IHT patients were highest on the emergency surgery (18%), transplant surgery (16%), and gastrointestinal surgery (8%) services. After adjusting for age and APACHE II score, IHT remained a risk factor for ICU mortality (odds ratio, 1.60; 95% confidence interval, 1.04 to 2.45; P = 0.032) in SICU patients. Interhospital transfer is an independent risk factor for mortality in the SICU population; this risk is unevenly distributed through service lines. Further efforts to determine the cause of this association are warranted. PMID:24069990

  7. Patient-specific system for prognosis of surgical treatment outcomes of human cardiovascular system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golyadkina, Anastasiya A.; Kalinin, Aleksey A.; Kirillova, Irina V.; Kossovich, Elena L.; Kossovich, Leonid Y.; Menishova, Liyana R.; Polienko, Asel V.

    2015-03-01

    Object of study: Improvement of life quality of patients with high stroke risk ia the main goal for development of system for patient-specific modeling of cardiovascular system. This work is dedicated at increase of safety outcomes for surgical treatment of brain blood supply alterations. The objects of study are common carotid artery, internal and external carotid arteries and bulb. Methods: We estimated mechanical properties of carotid arteries tissues and patching materials utilized at angioplasty. We studied angioarchitecture features of arteries. We developed and clinically adapted computer biomechanical models, which are characterized by geometrical, physical and mechanical similarity with carotid artery in norm and with pathology (atherosclerosis, pathological tortuosity, and their combination). Results: Collaboration of practicing cardiovascular surgeons and specialists in the area of Mathematics and Mechanics allowed to successfully conduct finite-element modeling of surgical treatment taking into account various features of operation techniques and patching materials for a specific patient. Numerical experiment allowed to reveal factors leading to brain blood supply decrease and atherosclerosis development. Modeling of carotid artery reconstruction surgery for a specific patient on the basis of the constructed biomechanical model demonstrated the possibility of its application in clinical practice at approximation of numerical experiment to the real conditions.

  8. A review of surgical strategies for penile prosthesis implantation in patients with Peyronie’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Anaissie, James

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of the inflatable penile prosthesis (IPP) has revolutionized the treatment of patients with both Peyronie’s disease (PD) and erectile dysfunction (ED). A thorough literature review was performed in order to review the surgical strategies used to treat PD, using the PubMed online database with the keywords “penile prosthesis”, “surgical management” and “Peyronie’s disease”. Patient satisfaction rates of 72–100% and partner satisfaction rates of 89% have been reported in the literature, although strong preoperative education may be needed to prepare patients for risks such as penile shortening, seen in up to 54% of patients. Three-piece IPPs are most commonly used, and when comparing the two most popular models (AMS 700 CX vs. Coloplast Titan), no significant differences were seen in functional outcomes or patient satisfaction. Simple insertion of an IPP has been shown to resolve curvature in 33–90% of patients, but surgeons may often need to also utilize ancillary straightening procedures for residual curvatures. Manual modeling can correct residual curvature with an 86–100% success rate, but with a 4% risk of urethral injury. When the post-modeling residual curvature exceeds 30 degrees, a plaque-releasing incision or plication is recommended to further reduce curvature. Grafting is recommended if the resulting incisional defect is larger than two centimeters. Alternative straightening techniques such as plication prior to IPP insertion, endoscopic plaque resection, the “scratch technique” and bone saw plaque incision have also been described. PMID:27298781

  9. Surgical complications associated with primary closure in patients with diabetic foot osteomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    García-Morales, Esther; Lázaro-Martínez, José Luis; Aragón-Sánchez, Javier; Cecilia-Matilla, Almudena; García-Álvarez, Yolanda; Beneit-Montesinos, Juan Vicente

    2012-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of complications associated with primary closure in surgical procedures performed for diabetic foot osteomyelitis compared to those healed by secondary intention. In addition, further evaluation of the surgical digital debridement for osteomyelitis with primary closure as an alternative to patients with digital amputation was also examined in our study. Methods Comparative study that included 46 patients with diabetic foot ulcerations. Surgical debridement of the infected bone was performed on all patients. Depending on the surgical technique used, primary surgical closure was performed on 34 patients (73.9%, Group 1) while the rest of the 12 patients were allowed to heal by secondary intention (26.1%, Group 2). During surgical intervention, bone samples were collected for both microbiological and histopathological analyses. Post-surgical complications were recorded in both groups during the recovery period. Results The average healing time was 9.9±SD 8.4 weeks in Group 1 and 19.1±SD 16.9 weeks in Group 2 (p=0.008). The percentage of complications was 61.8% in Group 1 and 58.3% in Group 2 (p=0.834). In all patients with digital ulcerations that were necessary for an amputation, a primary surgical closure was performed with successful outcomes. Discussion Primary surgical closure was not associated with a greater number of complications. Patients who received primary surgical closure had faster healing rates and experienced a lower percentage of exudation (p=0.05), edema (p<0.001) and reinfection, factors that determine the delay in wound healing and affect the prognosis of the surgical outcome. Further research with a greater number of patients is required to better define the cases for which primary surgical closure may be indicated at different levels of the diabetic foot. PMID:23050062

  10. Risk Factors for Survival following Open Surgical Repair of Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: A 13-Year Experience

    PubMed Central

    Ozen, Anil; Hanedan, Muhammet Onur; Songur, Çetin Murat; Boysan, Emre; Unal, Ertekin Utku; Mola, Serkan; Erkengel, Halil Ibrahim; Kubat, Emre; Iscan, Zafer; Tutun, Ufuk; Sarıtas, Ahmet; Birincioglu, Cemal Levent

    2015-01-01

    Background: Surgical treatment of a ruptured abdominal aorta aneurysm (RAAA) continues to present a significant challenge to surgeons. There are some patient factors such as age and gender that cannot be changed, and comorbid conditions can be optimized but not eliminated. The purpose of this study was to identify the risk factors affecting high mortality after the surgical repair of an RAAA. Methods: Data on 121 patients who underwent surgical repair for RAAAs between January 1997 and June 2011 in our institution were collected retrospectively. All the patients had been diagnosed by computed tomography (CT) scans, and intraoperative extra-luminal blood was visualized intraoperatively. Variables studied comprised demographic data; preoperative, operative, and postoperative data; and the causes of mortality. Multivariate regression analysis was used to determine the predictors of mortality. Results: One hundred eight (89.2%) patients were male and 13 (10.7%) were female at an average age of 68.9 ± 10.5 years. Totally, 121 patients underwent surgery for RAAAs. Fifty-four patients had aortic tube grafts, 32 aortobiiliac grafts, 20 aortobifemoral grafts, 1 aortoiliac graft, and 1 aortofemoral graft for the replacement of the RAAAs. Seven patients had only surgical exploration. Operative mortality was 41.3% (50 patients). The factors associated with mortality were preoperative shock, free blood, positive inotropic agent, hematocrit value, and need for blood and plasma. In the multivariate analysis, preoperative shock and positive inotropic agents were found to be significant as the predictors of death (OR: 19.8, 95%CI: 3.2-122.8 and OR: 8.6, 95% CI: 2.9-26.3, respectively). Conclusion: This study revealed that the preoperative clinical findings affected the mortality associated with RAAAs. PMID:26697083

  11. Chronic rhinosinusitis in patients requiring surgical repair of a midface fracture.

    PubMed

    Yelverton, Joshua C; Jackson, Peter; Schmidt, Robert S

    2014-09-01

    Midface fractures commonly occur following trauma to the face and may cause changes in the normal sinus outflow system. To the best of our knowledge, no study has examined the incidence of rhinosinusitis following midface fractures. We report the incidence of chronic rhinosinusitis in patients who underwent surgical repair of a midface fracture. Our evaluation tool was the 20-item Sino-Nasal Outcome Test quality-of-life survey (SNOT-20). We mailed a demographic survey and the SNOT-20 questionnaire to 486 eligible patients who had undergone surgical repair of either a midface (n = 234) or mandible (n = 252) fracture; we had intended to use the latter cohort as a control group. Of the 234 midface patients, 34 (14.5%) returned a usable survey, but only 7 of the 252 mandibular patients (2.8%) did so, which was not a sufficient number for analysis; therefore we used normative data obtained from another study for comparison purposes. The mean SNOT-20 score in our cohort was 24.15, which was similar to the 28.7 mean score in the control cohort of patients with rhinosinusitis. The highest mean scores for the individual components of the SNOT-20 were for "Wake up at night," "Lack of a good night's sleep," "Wake up tired," and "Frustrated/restless/irritable." The components that the most patients found bothersome were "Facial pain/pressure," "Need to blow nose," "Runny nose," and "Lack of a good night's sleep." We conclude that patients who experience a midface fracture have a much higher risk of developing chronic rhinosinusitis that negatively affects their long-term quality of life. These patients should be monitored with long-term follow-up and treated appropriately. PMID:25255355

  12. Minor Postoperative Increases of Creatinine Are Associated with Higher Mortality and Longer Hospital Length of Stay in Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kork, Felix; Balzer, Felix; Spies, Claudia D.; Wernecke, Klaus-Dieter; Ginde, Adit A.; Jankowski, Joachim; Eltzschig, Holger K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Surgical patients frequently experience postoperative increases in creatinine levels. The authors hypothesized that even small increases in postoperative creatinine levels are associated with adverse outcomes. Methods The authors examined the association of postoperative changes from preoperative baseline creatinine with all-cause in-hospital mortality and hospital length of stay (HLOS) in a retrospective analysis of surgical patients at a single tertiary care center between January 2006 and June 2012. Results The data of 39,369 surgical patients (noncardiac surgery n = 37,345; cardiac surgery n = 2,024) were analyzed. Acute kidney injury (AKI)—by definition of the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcome group—was associated with a five-fold higher mortality (odds ratio [OR], 4.8; 95% CI, 4.1 to 5.7; P < 0.001) and a longer HLOS of 5 days (P < 0.001) after adjusting for age, sex, comorbidities, congestive heart failure, preoperative hemoglobin, preoperative creatinine, exposure to radiocontrast agent, type of surgery, and surgical AKI risk factors. Importantly, even minor creatinine increases (Δcreatinine 25 to 49% above baseline but < 0.3 mg/dl) not meeting AKI criteria were associated with a two-fold increased risk of death (OR, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.3 to 2.4; P < 0.001) and 2 days longer HLOS (P < 0.001). This was more pronounced in noncardiac surgery patients. Patients with minor creatinine increases had a five-fold risk of death (OR, 5.4; 95% CI, 1.5 to 20.3; P < 0.05) and a 3-day longer HLOS (P < 0.01) when undergoing noncardiac surgery. Conclusions Even minor postoperative increases in creatinine levels are associated with adverse outcomes. These results emphasize the importance to find effective therapeutic approaches to prevent or treat even mild forms of postoperative kidney dysfunction to improve surgical outcomes. PMID:26492475

  13. Predictive Score Card in Lumbar Disc Herniation: Is It Reflective of Patient Surgical Success after Discectomy?

    PubMed

    Azimi, Parisa; Benzel, Edward C; Montazeri, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Does the Finneson-Cooper score reflect the true value of predicting surgical success before discectomy? The aim of this study was to identify reliable predictors for surgical success two year after surgery for patients with LDH. Prospective analysis of 154 patients with LDH who underwent single-level lumbar discectomy was performed. Pre- and post-surgical success was assessed by the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) over a 2-year period. The Finneson-Cooper score also was used for evaluation of the clinical results. Using the ODI, surgical success was defined as a 30% (or more) improvement on the ODI score from the baseline. The ODI was considered the gold standard in this study. Finally, the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive power of the Finneson-Cooper score in predicting surgical success were calculated. The mean age of the patients was 49.6 (SD = 9.3) years and 47.4% were male. Significant improvement from the pre- to post-operative ODI scores was observed (P < 0.001). Post-surgical success was 76.0% (n = 117). The patients' rating on surgical success assessments by the ODI discriminated well between sub-groups of patients who differed with respect to the Finneson-Cooper score. Regarding patients' surgical success, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the Finneson-Cooper ratings correlated with success rate. The findings indicated that the Finneson-Cooper score was reflective of surgical success before discectomy. PMID:27100287

  14. [Surgical revascularization in patients with acute myocardial infarction].

    PubMed

    Beyersdorf, F; Sarai, K; Mitrev, Z; Eckel, L; Maul, F D; Wendt, T; Satter, P

    1993-01-01

    blood (score 1.5 +/- 0.3; p < 0.05). Enzyme release and ECG-changes were similar in both groups postoperatively. While only 2 of 39 patients died in the controlled reperfusion group (5.1%), mortality increased to 11.1% (4/36) if normal blood is used as the primary reperfusate. Our data show, that the surgical revascularization during acute myocardial infarction can be performed with acceptable mortality and morbidity rates. Further improvement of the results can be obtained if controlled regional reperfusion for the previously ischemic area is used. PMID:8493826

  15. Incidence and Risk Factors Associated with Readmission After Surgical Treatment for Adrenocortical Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Valero-Elizondo, Javier; Kim, Yuhree; Prescott, Jason D.; Margonis, Georgios A.; Tran, Thuy B.; Postlewait, Lauren M.; Maithel, Shishir K.; Wang, Tracy S.; Glenn, Jason A.; Hatzaras, Ioannis; Shenoy, Rivfka; Phay, John E.; Keplinger, Kara; Fields, Ryan C.; Jin, Linda X.; Weber, Sharon M.; Salem, Ahmed; Sicklick, Jason K.; Gad, Shady; Yopp, Adam C.; Mansour, John C.; Duh, Quan-Yang; Seiser, Natalie; Solorzano, Carmen C.; Kiernan, Colleen M.; Votanopoulos, Konstantinos I.; Levine, Edward A.; Poultsides, George A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is a rare disease with a poor prognosis. Given the lack of data on readmission after resection of ACC, the objective of the current study was to define the incidence of readmission, as well as identify risk factors associated with readmission among patients with ACC who underwent surgical resection. Methods Two hundred nine patients who underwent resection of ACC between January 1993 and December 2014 at 1 of 13 major centers in the USA were identified. Demographic and clinicopathological data were collected and analyzed relative to readmission. Results Median patient age was 52 years, and 62 % of the patients were female. Median tumor size was 12 cm, and the majority of patients had an American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) class of 3–4 (n=85, 56 %). The overall incidence of readmission within 90 days from surgery was 18 % (n=38). Factors associated with readmission included high ASA class (odds ratio (OR), 4.88 (95 % confidence interval (CI), 1.75–13.61); P=0.002), metastatic disease on presentation (OR, 2.98 (95 % CI, 1.37–6.46); P=0.006), EBL (>700 mL: OR, 2.75 (95 % CI, 1.16–6.51); P=0.02), complication (OR, 1.91 (95 % CI, 1.20–3.05); P=0.007), and prolonged length of stay (LOS; ≥9 days: OR, 4.12 (95 % CI, 1.88–9.01); P<0.001). On multivariate logistic regression, a high ASA class (OR, 4.01 (95 % CI, 1.44–11.17); P=0.008) and metastatic disease on presentation (OR, 3.44 (95 % CI, 1.34–8.84); P=0.01) remained independently associated with higher odds of readmission. Conclusion Readmission following surgery for ACC was common as one in five patients experienced a readmission. Patients with a high ASA class and metastatic disease on presentation were over four and three times more likely to be readmitted after surgical treatment for ACC, respectively. PMID:26286367

  16. [Surgical correction of dislipodemia in patients with obesity].

    PubMed

    Fishman, M B; Mirchuk, K K; Chie, Ma; Muzhikov, S P

    2014-01-01

    The results of surgical treatment of 139 patients with metabolic syndrome, obesity and dislipodemia were analyzed. Modern bariatric operations (4 types) were performed by using laparoscopic method. There were regulated bandages of the stomach (RBS), lengthwise gastric resections (LGR), biliopancreatic and stomach bypass surgeries (BBS, SBS). Results of five-year follow-up indicated that restrictive operations on the stomach (RBS, LGR) aimed to correct overweight and dislipodemia had some limitations to application in a varying degree. The RBS operation should be appropriate to use for women of the young age group, when an initial body-weight index wasn't more than 43 kg/m2. The LGR operation was effective for men of the young age group and women in case of moderately expressed dislipodemia and in case when the initial body-weight index didn't exceed more than 45 kg/m2. Combined bariatric operations (BBS, SBS) were most likely effective on body weight and dislipodemia. PMID:25823310

  17. Perioperative ω-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Nutritional Support in Gastrointestinal Cancer Surgical Patients: A Systematic Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ying-Jie; Liu, Lian; Xiao, Jing; Cao, Bang-Wei

    2016-01-01

    This study was a systematic evaluation of the beneficial effects of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) in abdominal cancer surgical patients. A literature search of the databases PubMed, Medline, Cochrane, and EMBASE was conducted for studies published up to November 2014 in English language journals. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) examining the effects of n-3 PUFA intake relative to conventional nutrition in surgical patients were included. The main outcomes were the duration of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), length of hospital stay (LOS), serum C-reactive protein (CRP) levels, and postoperative complications. We identified 15 RCTs among 158 relevant trials. The results indicated the associations between n-3 PUFA intake and reduced LOS [mean differences (MDs), -2.47 d; 95% confidence intervals (CIs), -3.25 to -1.69], duration of SIRS (MD, -0.57 d; 95% CI, -0.92 to -0.22), and serum CRP levels (MD, -3.97 mg/l; 95% CI, -7.88 to -0.07) compared with consumption of conventional nutrition, as well as reduced incidence of postoperative infectious complications (risk ratio, 0.66; 95% CI, 0.49-0.87). This systematic evaluation suggests that n-3 PUFA significantly reduces the postoperative infectious complication rate, and shortens hospitalization and SIRS duration, particularly in malnourished gastrointestinal cancer patients. PMID:27115734

  18. Psychological modulation in patients surgically intervened for gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Lara, F J Pérez; Carranque, G; Oehling, H; Hernández, J M; Oliva, H

    2014-08-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) has been related with certain psychological dimensions. The influence of mood, emotional intelligence, and perceived quality of life on clinical symptoms and outcome of antireflux surgery was evaluated in GERD patients with and without hiatal hernia. The study included 61 patients who were diagnosed with GERD between 2003 and 2008: 16 of them without hiatal hernia (group A) and 45 of them with hiatal hernia (group B). All of these patients had undergone laparoscopic antireflux surgery. Patients were clinically examined and evaluated with the following instruments: Short Form (SF)-36 Health Survey, Gastrointestinal Quality of Life Index, Hospital Anxiety and Depression (HAD) Scale, and Trait Meta-Mood Scale (TMMS)-24. Proportions were compared by using the chi-squared test; averages were compared by using the Student's t-test (with Bonferroni's correction). In general, our patients intervened for GERD showed results lower than normal or close to the lower limit of normal in the administered tests. Patients in the group without hernia were younger (P < 0.001) and with lower American Society of Anaesthesiologists risk. They showed higher scores in the SF-36 dimensions: Physical Functioning, Physical Role and Emotional Role, and lower scores in the Social Role (P < 0.001). They showed lower scores in the Emotional dimension of Gastrointestinal Quality of Life Index (P = 0.0068) and worse results in the Hospital Anxiety and Depression subscales of Anxiety (P < 0.001) and Depression (not significant). Men in the group without hernia showed higher scores than men in the group with hernia in the TMMS subscales corresponding to Emotional Clarity and Emotional Repair (P < 0.001). Women in the group with hernia showed higher scores than women in the group without hernia regarding Emotional Clarity (P = 0.0012). GERD patients showed poor results in all the tests, and patients without hiatal hernia compared with patients with hernia showed

  19. Multiscale modeling and surgical planning for single ventricle heart patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsden, Alison

    2011-11-01

    Single ventricle heart patients are among the most challenging for pediatric cardiologists to treat, and typically undergo a palliative course of three open-heart surgeries starting immediately after birth. We will present recent tools for modeling blood flow in single ventricle heart patients using a multiscale approach that couples a 3D Navier-Stokes domain to a 0D closed loop lumped parameter network comprised of circuit elements. This coupling allows us to capture the effect of changes in local geometry, such as shunt sizes, on global circulatory dynamics, such as cardiac output. A semi-implicit numerical method is formulated to solve the coupled system in which flow and pressure information is passed between the two domains at the inlets and outlets of the model. A finite element method with outflow stabilization is applied in the 3D Navier-Stokes domain, and the LPN system of ordinary differential equations is solved numerically using a Runge-Kutta method. These tools are coupled via automated scripts to a derivative-free optimization method. Optimization is used to systematically explore surgical designs using clinically relevant cost functions for two stages of single ventricle repair. First, we will present results from optimization of the first stage Blalock Taussig Shunt. Second, we will present results from optimization of a new Y-graft design for the third stage of single ventricle repair called the Fontan surgery. The Y-graft is shown, in simulations, to successfully improve hepatic flow distribution, a known clinical problem. Preliminary clinical experience with the Y-graft will be discussed.

  20. The Department of Veterans Affairs' NSQIP: the first national, validated, outcome-based, risk-adjusted, and peer-controlled program for the measurement and enhancement of the quality of surgical care. National VA Surgical Quality Improvement Program.

    PubMed Central

    Khuri, S F; Daley, J; Henderson, W; Hur, K; Demakis, J; Aust, J B; Chong, V; Fabri, P J; Gibbs, J O; Grover, F; Hammermeister, K; Irvin, G; McDonald, G; Passaro, E; Phillips, L; Scamman, F; Spencer, J; Stremple, J F

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide reliable risk-adjusted morbidity and mortality rates after major surgery to the 123 Veterans Affairs Medical Centers (VAMCs) performing major surgery, and to use risk-adjusted outcomes in the monitoring and improvement of the quality of surgical care to all veterans. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Outcome-based comparative measures of the quality of surgical care among surgical services and surgical subspecialties have been elusive. METHODS: This study included prospective assessment of presurgical risk factors, process of care during surgery, and outcomes 30 days after surgery on veterans undergoing major surgery in 123 medical centers; development of multivariable risk-adjustment models; identification of high and low outlier facilities by observed-to-expected outcome ratios; and generation of annual reports of comparative outcomes to all surgical services in the Veterans Health Administration (VHA). RESULTS: The National VA Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) data base includes 417,944 major surgical procedures performed between October 1, 1991, and September 30, 1997. In FY97, 11 VAMCs were low outliers for risk-adjusted observed-to-expected mortality ratios; 13 VAMCs were high outliers for risk-adjusted observed-to-expected mortality ratios. Identification of high and low outliers by unadjusted mortality rates would have ascribed an outlier status incorrectly to 25 of 39 hospitals, an error rate of 64%. Since 1994, the 30-day mortality and morbidity rates for major surgery have fallen 9% and 30%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Reliable, valid information on patient presurgical risk factors, process of care during surgery, and 30-day morbidity and mortality rates is available for all major surgical procedures in the 123 VAMCs performing surgery in the VHA. With this information, the VHA has established the first prospective outcome-based program for comparative assessment and enhancement of the quality of surgical care among multiple

  1. Implications of a two-step procedure in surgical management of patients with early-stage endometrioid endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bleu, Géraldine; Merlot, Benjamin; Boulanger, Loïc; Vinatier, Denis; Kerdraon, Olivier; Collinet, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Objective Since European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) recommendations and French guidelines, pelvic lymphadenectomy should not be systematically performed for women with early-stage endometrioid endometrial cancer (EEC) preoperatively assessed at presumed low- or intermediate-risk. The aim of our study was to evaluate the change of our surgical practices after ESMO recommendations, and to evaluate the rate and morbidity of second surgical procedure in case of understaging after the first surgery. Methods This retrospective single-center study included women with EEC preoperatively assessed at presumed low- or intermediate-risk who had surgery between 2006 and 2013. Two periods were defined the times before and after ESMO recommendations. Demographics characteristics, surgical management, operative morbidity, and rate of understaging were compared. The rate of second surgical procedure required for lymph node resection during the second period and its morbidity were also studied. Results Sixty-one and sixty-two patients were operated for EEC preoperatively assessed at presumed low-or intermediate-risk before and after ESMO recommendations, respectively. Although immediate pelvic lymphadenectomy was performed more frequently during the first period than the second period (88.5% vs. 19.4%; p<0.001), the rate of postoperative risk-elevating or upstaging were comparable between the two periods (31.1% vs. 27.4%; p=0.71). Among the patients requiring second surgical procedure during the second period (21.0%), 30.8% did not undergo the second surgery due to their comorbidity or old age. For the patients who underwent second surgical procedure, mean operative time of the second procedure was 246.1±117.8 minutes. Third operation was required in 33.3% of them because of postoperative complications. Conclusion Since ESMO recommendations, second surgical procedure for lymph node resection is often required for women with EEC presumed at low- or intermediate-risk. This

  2. Preoperative telemedicine evaluation of surgical mission patients: should we use it routinely?

    PubMed

    Latifi, Rifat; Mora, Francisco; Bekteshi, Flamur; Rivera, Renato

    2014-01-01

    Low-cost telemedicine is a viable and secure tool for preoperative evaluation of surgical mission patients. It increases efficiency and optimizes the use of existing resources. More specifically, it helps ensure an accurate assessment of patients before the surgical team arrives, reduces on-site prescreening time, and decreases the number of surgical candidates on the waiting list. Routine use of telemedicine in surgical missions most likely would reduce preoperative times and the number of operations canceled at the last minute. Moreover, it may be effectively used for long-term follow-up care, including the management of any postoperative complications. PMID:24552027

  3. The Practical Application of Clinical Prediction Rules: A Commentary Using Case Examples in Surgical Patients with Degenerative Cervical Myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Tetreault, Lindsay; Le, David; Côté, Pierre; Fehlings, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Commentary. Objective This commentary aims to discuss the practical applications of a clinical prediction rule (CPR) developed to predict functional status in patients undergoing surgery for the treatment of degenerative cervical myelopathy. Methods Clinical cases from the AOSpine CSM-North America study were used to illustrate the application of a prediction rule in a surgical setting and to highlight how this CPR can be used to ultimately enhance patient care. Results A CPR combines signs and symptoms, patient characteristics, and other predictive factors to estimate disease probability, treatment prognosis, or risk of complications. These tools can influence allocation of health care resources, inform clinical decision making, and guide the design of future research studies. In a surgical setting, CPRs can be used to (1) manage patients' expectations of outcome and, in turn, improve overall satisfaction; (2) facilitate shared decision making between patient and physician; (3) identify strategies to optimize surgical results; and (4) reduce heterogeneity of care and align surgeons' perceptions of outcome with objective evidence. Conclusions Valid and clinically-relevant CPRs have tremendous value in a surgical setting. PMID:26682095

  4. Predictive Score Card in Lumbar Disc Herniation: Is It Reflective of Patient Surgical Success after Discectomy?

    PubMed Central

    Azimi, Parisa; Benzel, Edward C.; Montazeri, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Does the Finneson–Cooper score reflect the true value of predicting surgical success before discectomy? The aim of this study was to identify reliable predictors for surgical success two year after surgery for patients with LDH. Prospective analysis of 154 patients with LDH who underwent single-level lumbar discectomy was performed. Pre- and post-surgical success was assessed by the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) over a 2-year period. The Finneson-Cooper score also was used for evaluation of the clinical results. Using the ODI, surgical success was defined as a 30% (or more) improvement on the ODI score from the baseline. The ODI was considered the gold standard in this study. Finally, the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive power of the Finneson–Cooper score in predicting surgical success were calculated. The mean age of the patients was 49.6 (SD = 9.3) years and 47.4% were male. Significant improvement from the pre- to post-operative ODI scores was observed (P < 0.001). Post-surgical success was 76.0% (n = 117). The patients’ rating on surgical success assessments by the ODI discriminated well between sub-groups of patients who differed with respect to the Finneson–Cooper score. Regarding patients’ surgical success, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the Finneson-Cooper ratings correlated with success rate. The findings indicated that the Finneson–Cooper score was reflective of surgical success before discectomy. PMID:27100287

  5. Surgical Quality Is More Than Volume: The Association between Changing Urologists and Complications for Patients with Localized Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    DuGoff, Eva H; Bekelman, Justin E; Stuart, Elizabeth A; Armstrong, Katrina; Pollack, Craig Evan

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To examine the association of changing urologists on surgical complications in men with prostate cancer. Data Sources/Study Setting Registry and administrative claims data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare database from 1995 to 2005. Study Design A cross-sectional observational study of men with prostate cancer who underwent radical prostatectomy. Methods Subjects were classified as having “changed urologists” if they had a different urologist who diagnosed their cancer from the one who performed their surgery. “Doubly robust” propensity score weighted multivariable logistic regression models were used to investigate the effect of changing urologists on 30-day surgical complications, late urinary complications, and long-term incontinence. Principal Findings Men who changed urologists between diagnosis and treatment had significantly lower odds of 30-day surgical complications compared with men who did not change urologists (odds ratio: 0.82; 95 percent confidence interval: 0.76–0.89), after adjustment. Changing urologists was associated with lower risks of 30-day complications for both black and white men compared with staying with the same urologist for their diagnosis and surgical treatment. Conclusions Urologist changing is associated with the observed variation in complications following radical prostatectomy. This may suggest that patients are responding to aspects of surgical quality not captured in surgical volume. PMID:24461049

  6. [The surgical risk in sleep apnea: the implications for tonsillectomies].

    PubMed

    Pérez-Padilla, R; Vázquez-García, J C; Meza-Vargas, S

    1999-01-01

    Hypertrophy of tonsils or adenoids is the commonest cause of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in children. Adenotonsillectomy (AT) is frequently curative in children with OSA but riskier than the same procedure without OSA. It is crucial to identify OSA among the patients programmed for AT because they require a detailed evaluation, frequently including total or limited polysomnogram. Patients with OSA need a continuous surveillance before, during, and after surgery, ideally in a referral hospital. PMID:10596490

  7. Risk of angioedema following invasive or surgical procedures in HAE type I and II – the natural history

    PubMed Central

    Aygören-Pürsün, E; Martinez Saguer, I; Kreuz, W; Klingebiel, T; Schwabe, D

    2013-01-01

    Background Hereditary angioedema (HAE), caused by deficiency in C1-inhibitor (C1-INH), leads to unpredictable edema of subcutaneous tissues with potentially fatal complications. As surgery can be a trigger for edema episodes, current guidelines recommend preoperative prophylaxis with C1-INH or attenuated androgens in patients with HAE undergoing surgery. However, the risk of an HAE attack in patients without prophylaxis has not been quantified. Objectives This analysis examined rates of perioperative edema in patients with HAE not receiving prophylaxis. Methods This was a retrospective analysis of records of randomly selected patients with HAE type I or II treated at the Frankfurt Comprehensive Care Centre. These were examined for information about surgical procedures and the presence of perioperative angioedema. Results A total of 331 patients were included; 247 underwent 700 invasive procedures. Of these procedures, 335 were conducted in 144 patients who had not received prophylaxis at the time of surgery. Categories representing significant numbers of procedures were abdominal (n = 113), ENT (n = 71), and gynecological (n = 58) procedures. The rate of documented angioedema without prophylaxis across all procedures was 5.7%; in 24.8% of procedures, the presence of perioperative angioedema could not be excluded, leading to a maximum potential risk of 30.5%. Predictors of perioperative angioedema could not be identified. Conclusion The risk of perioperative angioedema in patients with HAE type I or II without prophylaxis undergoing surgical procedures ranged from 5.7% to 30.5% (CI 3.5–35.7%). The unpredictability of HAE episodes supports current international treatment recommendations to consider short-term prophylaxis for all HAE patients undergoing surgery. PMID:23968383

  8. Surgical repair of Stanford type A aortic dissection in elderly patients: a contemporary systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chivasso, Pierpaolo; Guida, Gustavo; Vohra, Hunaid A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The results of surgical treatment of type A aortic dissection (AAD) in the elderly are controversial and aggravated by a higher operative mortality rate. The studies published in this subset of patients are mainly retrospective analyses or small samples from international registries. We sought to investigate this topic by conducting a contemporary meta-analysis of the most recent observational studies. Methods A systematic literature search was conducted for any study published in the last five years on aortic dissection treated surgically in patients 70 years and older. A pooled risk-ratio meta-analysis has been conducted three main post-operative outcomes: short-term mortality, stroke and acute kidney injury. Results A total of 11 retrospective observational studies have been included in the quantitative meta-analysis. Pooled meta-analysis showed an increased risk of short term mortality for the elderly population [relative risk (RR) =2.25; 95% CI, 1.79–2.83; I2=0%; P<0.0001], and this has been confirmed in a sub-analysis of patients 80 years and older. The risk of having stroke (RR =1.15; 95% CI, 0.89–1.5; I2=0%; P=0.28) and acute kidney injury (RR =0.79; 95% CI, 0.5–1.25, I2=14%, P=0.31) after surgery were comparable to the younger cohort of patients. Conclusions Although affected by an increased risk of short-term mortality in the elderly, surgical repair remains the treatment of choice for AAD. The main post-operative outcomes are comparable to younger patients and the mid-term survival rates are acceptable. PMID:27563539

  9. Surgical Revascularization versus Percutaneous Coronary Intervention and Optimal Medical Therapy in Diabetic Patients with Multi-Vessel Coronary Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Giustino, Gennaro; Dangas, George D

    2015-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the leading cause of death in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). Patients with DM and CAD undergoing revascularization with either a surgical or a percutaneous approach are at higher risk of adverse outcomes and mortality compared with non-DM patients. It is within this background that the optimal choice of revascularization is of critical importance in this high-risk population. The large FREEDOM trial randomized 1900 patients with DM and multivessel CAD to either revascularization with coronary artery by-pass graft (CABG) surgery or percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Compared with PCI, CABG significantly reduced the rates of death and myocardial infarction but was associated with a higher risk of stroke. In a real-world setting the decision-making process for the optimal revascularization strategy in these patients is challenging as many clinical factors may influence the decision to either pursue a surgical or a percutaneous revascularization. However, the current consensus is that CABG should be the preferred revascularization strategy in diabetic patients with extensive multivessel CAD. PMID:26255239

  10. The Associated Venous Anomalies Variant and Adjacent Brain Function on Iron Sensitive Image Indicate Surgical Risk of Cavernous Malformation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Li; Chen, Xiao-Lin; Ma, Jun; Zhao, Yuan-Li

    2016-01-01

    The cavernous malformations (CMs) associated with venous anomalies (VAs) are now being described with increasing frequency. Assessment of the associated VAs is overlooked in surgical management of the CM. The clinical profiles of CMs with VAs were reviewed to investigate the value of T2* gradient echo (GRE)/susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) in surgical risk evaluation. Twenty-six patients with symptomatic CMs associated with VAs between 2008 and 2013 were identified. Demographic, clinical, and radiological data were reviewed and functional outcomes were assessed using the modified Rankin Scale (mRS). The T2* GRE/SWI could allow more accurate evaluation of the boundary and drainage vicinity of VAs than contrast-enhanced images (6 vs. 2 patients with VAs on the eloquent region). Patients with VAs adjacent to eloquent brain showed poorer outcomes than those who had VAs in non-eloquent areas (P = 0.005), while the CMs adjacent to eloquent brain did not correlated with poor outcomes (P = 0.15). Type I and III variants of VAs were also significantly associated with poor outcomes, compared with type II variant (P = 0.002). Careful evaluation of VAs variant type and the association between VAs and eloquent brain is helpful for the management of CMs associated with VAs. We recommend T2* GRE/SWI in patients with CMs to assess the associated VAs. The evaluation of VA drainage vicinity on T2* GRE/SWI would be more useful for designing treatment strategies and risk stratification. PMID:26489407