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Sample records for rna aptamer sequence

  1. In silico selection of RNA aptamers.

    PubMed

    Chushak, Yaroslav; Stone, Morley O

    2009-07-01

    In vitro selection of RNA aptamers that bind to a specific ligand usually begins with a random pool of RNA sequences. We propose a computational approach for designing a starting pool of RNA sequences for the selection of RNA aptamers for specific analyte binding. Our approach consists of three steps: (i) selection of RNA sequences based on their secondary structure, (ii) generating a library of three-dimensional (3D) structures of RNA molecules and (iii) high-throughput virtual screening of this library to select aptamers with binding affinity to a desired small molecule. We developed a set of criteria that allows one to select a sequence with potential binding affinity from a pool of random sequences and developed a protocol for RNA 3D structure prediction. As verification, we tested the performance of in silico selection on a set of six known aptamer-ligand complexes. The structures of the native sequences for the ligands in the testing set were among the top 5% of the selected structures. The proposed approach reduces the RNA sequences search space by four to five orders of magnitude--significantly accelerating the experimental screening and selection of high-affinity aptamers. PMID:19465396

  2. In silico selection of RNA aptamers

    PubMed Central

    Chushak, Yaroslav; Stone, Morley O.

    2009-01-01

    In vitro selection of RNA aptamers that bind to a specific ligand usually begins with a random pool of RNA sequences. We propose a computational approach for designing a starting pool of RNA sequences for the selection of RNA aptamers for specific analyte binding. Our approach consists of three steps: (i) selection of RNA sequences based on their secondary structure, (ii) generating a library of three-dimensional (3D) structures of RNA molecules and (iii) high-throughput virtual screening of this library to select aptamers with binding affinity to a desired small molecule. We developed a set of criteria that allows one to select a sequence with potential binding affinity from a pool of random sequences and developed a protocol for RNA 3D structure prediction. As verification, we tested the performance of in silico selection on a set of six known aptamer–ligand complexes. The structures of the native sequences for the ligands in the testing set were among the top 5% of the selected structures. The proposed approach reduces the RNA sequences search space by four to five orders of magnitude—significantly accelerating the experimental screening and selection of high-affinity aptamers. PMID:19465396

  3. Aptamer-siRNA chimeras for HIV.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Mayumi; Burnett, John C; Rossi, John J

    2015-01-01

    Since 1980s, HIV/AIDS has escalated into a global pandemic. Although combinatorial antiretroviral therapy (cART) regimens can suppress plasma virus levels to below the detection limit and the survival rate of HIV-1 infected patients has been improving, long-term cART holds the potential to cause a number of chronic diseases. RNA interference (RNAi) is considered as a powerful method for developing new generation of therapeutics. Discovery of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) shed light on limitations of targets that are "undruggable" with current technologies. However, delivery remains a major hurdle of siRNA-based therapy. Recent progress in technology of engineering nucleic acid enables a targeted delivery of siRNAs using aptamers, which, as often regarded as nucleic acid "antibodies," can recognize/bind to multiple different proteins and small-molecule targets by forming scaffolds for molecular interactions. SELEX technology enabled to isolate highly target specific aptamers from a random sequence oligonucleotide library. A number of aptamers for HIV-1 proteins as well as host proteins that interact with HIV-1 have been developed and some of them have potent viral neutralization ability and inhibition of HIV-1 infectivity. The availability of these aptamers has given an idea of using aptamers for targeting delivery of siRNAs. So far, aptamers against either HIV-1 gp120 or CD4 have been eagerly evaluated as the aptamer portion of the aptamer-siRNA chimeras for the treatment or prevention of HIV-1. In this chapter, we highlight the development and therapeutic potential of aptamer-siRNA chimeras for HIV-1. PMID:25757623

  4. RNA aptamer inhibitors of a restriction endonuclease

    PubMed Central

    Mondragón, Estefanía; Maher, L. James

    2015-01-01

    Restriction endonucleases (REases) recognize and cleave short palindromic DNA sequences, protecting bacterial cells against bacteriophage infection by attacking foreign DNA. We are interested in the potential of folded RNA to mimic DNA, a concept that might be applied to inhibition of DNA-binding proteins. As a model system, we sought RNA aptamers against the REases BamHI, PacI and KpnI using systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX). After 20 rounds of selection under different stringent conditions, we identified the 10 most enriched RNA aptamers for each REase. Aptamers were screened for binding and specificity, and assayed for REase inhibition. We obtained eight high-affinity (Kd ∼12-30 nM) selective competitive inhibitors (IC50 ∼20-150 nM) for KpnI. Predicted RNA secondary structures were confirmed by in-line attack assay and a 38-nt derivative of the best anti-KpnI aptamer was sufficient for inhibition. These competitive inhibitors presumably act as KpnI binding site analogs, but lack the primary consensus KpnI cleavage sequence and are not cleaved by KpnI, making their potential mode of DNA mimicry fascinating. Anti-REase RNA aptamers could have value in studies of REase mechanism and may give clues to a code for designing RNAs that competitively inhibit DNA binding proteins including transcription factors. PMID:26184872

  5. Structural computational modeling of RNA aptamers.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaojun; Dickey, David D; Chen, Shi-Jie; Giangrande, Paloma H

    2016-07-01

    RNA aptamers represent an emerging class of biologics that can be easily adapted for personalized and precision medicine. Several therapeutic aptamers with desirable binding and functional properties have been developed and evaluated in preclinical studies over the past 25years. However, for the majority of these aptamers, their clinical potential has yet to be realized. A significant hurdle to the clinical adoption of this novel class of biologicals is the limited information on their secondary and tertiary structure. Knowledge of the RNA's structure would greatly facilitate and expedite the post-selection optimization steps required for translation, including truncation (to reduce costs of manufacturing), chemical modification (to enhance stability and improve safety) and chemical conjugation (to improve drug properties for combinatorial therapy). Here we describe a structural computational modeling methodology that when coupled to a standard functional assay, can be used to determine key sequence and structural motifs of an RNA aptamer. We applied this methodology to enable the truncation of an aptamer to prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) with great potential for targeted therapy that had failed previous truncation attempts. This methodology can be easily applied to optimize other aptamers with therapeutic potential. PMID:26972787

  6. Structural computational modeling of RNA aptamers

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaojun; Dickey, David D.; Chen, Shi-Jie; Giangrande, Paloma H.

    2016-01-01

    RNA aptamers represent an emerging class of biologics that can be easily adapted for personalized and precision medicine. Several therapeutic aptamers with desirable binding and functional properties have been developed and evaluated in preclinical studies over the past 25 years. However, for the majority of these aptamers, their clinical potential has yet to be realized. A significant hurdle to the clinical adoption of this novel class of biologicals is the limited information on their secondary and tertiary structure. Knowledge of the RNA’s structure would greatly facilitate and expedite the post-selection optimization steps required for translation, including truncation (to reduce costs of manufacturing), chemical modification (to enhance stability and improve safety) and chemical conjugation (to improve drug properties for combinatorial therapy). Here we describe a structural computational modeling methodology that when coupled to a standard functional assay, can be used to determine key sequence and structural motifs of an RNA aptamer. We applied this methodology to enable the truncation of an aptamer to prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) with great potential for targeted therapy that had failed previous truncation attempts. This methodology can be easily applied to optimize other aptamers with therapeutic potential. PMID:26972787

  7. Stabilized Interleukin-6 receptor binding RNA aptamers

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Cindy; Berg, Katharina; Eydeler-Haeder, Katja; Lorenzen, Inken; Grötzinger, Joachim; Rose-John, Stefan; Hahn, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is a multifunctional cytokine that is involved in the progression of various inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and certain cancers; for example, multiple myeloma or hepatocellular carcinoma. To interfere with IL-6-dependent diseases, targeting IL-6 receptor (IL-6R)-presenting tumor cells using aptamers might be a valuable strategy to broaden established IL-6- or IL-6R-directed treatment regimens. Recently, we reported on the in vitro selection of RNA aptamers binding to the human IL-6 receptor (IL-6R) with nanomolar affinity. One aptamer, namely AIR-3A, was 19 nt in size and able to deliver bulky cargos into IL-6R-presenting cells. As AIR-3A is a natural RNA molecule, its use for in vivo applications might be limited due to its susceptibility to ubiquitous ribonucleases. Aiming at more robust RNA aptamers targeting IL-6R, we now report on the generation of stabilized RNA aptamers for potential in vivo applications. The new 2'-F-modified RNA aptamers bind to IL-6R via its extracellular portion with low nanomolar affinity comparable to the previously identified unmodified counterpart. Aptamers do not interfere with the IL-6 receptor complex formation. The work described here represents one further step to potentially apply stabilized IL-6R-binding RNA aptamers in IL-6R-connected diseases, like multiple myeloma and hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:24440854

  8. Investigating the malleability of RNA aptamers

    SciTech Connect

    Ilgu, Muslum; Wang, Tianjiao; Lamm, Monica H.; Nilsen-Hamilton, Marit

    2013-03-25

    Aptamers are short, single-stranded nucleic acids with structures that frequently change upon ligand binding and are sensitive to the ionic environment. To achieve facile application of aptamers in controlling cellular activities, a better understanding is needed of aptamer ligand binding parameters, structures, intramolecular mobilities and how these structures adapt to different ionic environments with consequent effects on their ligand binding characteristics.The paper discusses the integration of biochemical analysis with NMR spectroscopy and computational modeling to explore the relation between ligand binding and structural malleability of some well-studied aptamers. Several methods for determining aptamer binding affinity and specificity are discussed, including isothermal titration calorimetry, steady state fluorescence of 2-aminopurine substituted aptamers, and dye displacement assays. Also considered are aspects of molecular dynamics simulations specific to aptamers including adding ions and simulating aptamer structure in the absence of ligand when NMR spectroscopy or X-ray crystallography structures of the unoccupied aptamer are not available. We focus specifically on RNA aptamers that bind small molecule ligands as would be applied in sensors or integrated into riboswitches such as to measure the products of metabolic activity.

  9. An L-RNA Aptamer that Binds and Inhibits RNase.

    PubMed

    Olea, Charles; Weidmann, Joachim; Dawson, Philip E; Joyce, Gerald F

    2015-11-19

    L-RNA aptamers were developed that bind to barnase RNase and thereby inhibit the function of the enzyme. These aptamers were obtained by first carrying out in vitro selection of D-RNAs that bind to the full-length synthetic D-enantiomer of barnase, then reversing the mirror and preparing L-RNAs of identical sequence that similarly bind to natural L-barnase. The resulting L-aptamers bind L-barnase with an affinity of ∼100 nM and function as competitive inhibitors of enzyme cleavage of D-RNA substrates. L-RNA aptamers are resistant to degradation by ribonucleases, thus enabling them to function in biological samples, most notably for applications in molecular diagnostics and therapeutics. In addition to the irony of using RNA to inhibit RNase, L-RNA aptamers such as those described here could be used to measure the concentration or inhibit the function of RNase in the laboratory or in biological systems. PMID:26590636

  10. RNA Fluorescence with Light-Up Aptamers

    PubMed Central

    Ouellet, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Seeing is not only believing; it also includes understanding. Cellular imaging with GFP in live cells has been transformative in many research fields. Modulation of cellular regulation is tightly regulated and innovative imaging technologies contribute to further understand cellular signaling and physiology. New types of genetically encoded biosensors have been developed over the last decade. They are RNA aptamers that bind with their cognate fluorogen ligands and activate their fluorescence. The emergence and the evolution of these RNA aptamers as well as their conversion into a wide spectrum of applications are examined in a global way. PMID:27446908

  11. RNA Fluorescence with Light-Up Aptamers.

    PubMed

    Ouellet, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Seeing is not only believing; it also includes understanding. Cellular imaging with GFP in live cells has been transformative in many research fields. Modulation of cellular regulation is tightly regulated and innovative imaging technologies contribute to further understand cellular signaling and physiology. New types of genetically encoded biosensors have been developed over the last decade. They are RNA aptamers that bind with their cognate fluorogen ligands and activate their fluorescence. The emergence and the evolution of these RNA aptamers as well as their conversion into a wide spectrum of applications are examined in a global way. PMID:27446908

  12. Prevention of Serpin Misfolding by RNA Aptamers.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaohua; Declerck, Paul J

    2016-06-23

    Owing to their structural flexibility, most serpins inhibit the cognate proteases in a fast and specific manner and also are susceptible to pathogenic misfolding. In this issue of Cell Chemical Biology, Madsen et al. (2016) report on the selection and characterization of an RNA aptamer that stabilizes α1-antichymotrypsin L55P mutant without interfering with the protease inhibitory activity. PMID:27341430

  13. Identification of RNA aptamers with riboswitching properties.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Christopher; Suess, Beatrix

    2016-03-15

    During the past years customized gene network design has become of tremendous interest among various disciplines in life science. The identification of artificial genetic elements sensitive to internal or external stimuli constitutes the foundation for the design and realization of conditional gene expression systems. Typically, strategies involving selection or screening steps are employed alongside approaches focusing on rational design to select for the desired functionality of a given element. Here we present a fluorescence-based in vivo screening approach that combines an initial in vitro selection with subsequent extensive screening steps and a final rational design to identify RNA based regulators in baker's yeast. These artificial RNA regulators, termed synthetic riboswitches, are derived from RNA aptamers. Our method allows for the separation of aptamers featuring the potential to be transformed into a riboswitch from those inherently unable to confer control over gene expression. The system may be applied to virtually all existing aptamer-ligand pairs and as such presents a powerful means to enhance the setup of switchable genetic circuits. PMID:26672481

  14. Method for Confirming Cytoplasmic Delivery of RNA Aptamers

    PubMed Central

    Dickey, David D; Dassie, Justin P; Giangrande, Paloma H

    2016-01-01

    RNA aptamers are single-stranded RNA oligos that represent a powerful emerging technology with potential for treating numerous diseases. More recently, cell-targeted RNA aptamers have been developed for delivering RNA interference (RNAi) modulators (siRNAs and miRNAs) to specific diseased cells (e.g., cancer cells or HIV infected cells) in vitro and in vivo. However, despite initial promising reports, the broad application of this aptamer delivery technology awaits the development of methods that can verify and confirm delivery of aptamers to the cytoplasm of target cells where the RNAi machinery resides. We recently developed a functional assay (RIP assay) to confirm cellular uptake and subsequent cytoplasmic release of an RNA aptamer which binds to a cell surface receptor expressed on prostate cancer cells (PSMA). To assess cytoplasmic delivery, the aptamer was chemically conjugated to saporin, a ribosome inactivating protein toxin that is toxic to cells only when delivered to the cytoplasm (where it inhibits the ribosome) by a cell-targeting ligand (e.g., aptamer). Here, we describe the chemistry used to conjugate the aptamer to saporin and discuss a gel-based method to verify conjugation efficiency. We also detail an in vitro functional assay to confirm that the aptamer retains function following conjugation to saporin and describe a cellular assay to measure aptamer-mediated saporin-induced cytotoxicity. PMID:26472453

  15. Conformationally selective RNA aptamers allosterically modulate the β2-adrenoceptor.

    PubMed

    Kahsai, Alem W; Wisler, James W; Lee, Jungmin; Ahn, Seungkirl; Cahill Iii, Thomas J; Dennison, S Moses; Staus, Dean P; Thomsen, Alex R B; Anasti, Kara M; Pani, Biswaranjan; Wingler, Laura M; Desai, Hemant; Bompiani, Kristin M; Strachan, Ryan T; Qin, Xiaoxia; Alam, S Munir; Sullenger, Bruce A; Lefkowitz, Robert J

    2016-09-01

    G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) ligands function by stabilizing multiple, functionally distinct receptor conformations. This property underlies the ability of 'biased agonists' to activate specific subsets of a given receptor's signaling profile. However, stabilizing distinct active GPCR conformations to enable structural characterization of mechanisms underlying GPCR activation remains difficult. These challenges have accentuated the need for receptor tools that allosterically stabilize and regulate receptor function through unique, previously unappreciated mechanisms. Here, using a highly diverse RNA library combined with advanced selection strategies involving state-of-the-art next-generation sequencing and bioinformatics analyses, we identify RNA aptamers that bind a prototypical GPCR, the β2-adrenoceptor (β2AR). Using biochemical, pharmacological, and biophysical approaches, we demonstrate that these aptamers bind with nanomolar affinity at defined surfaces of the receptor, allosterically stabilizing active, inactive, and ligand-specific receptor conformations. The discovery of RNA aptamers as allosteric GPCR modulators significantly expands the diversity of ligands available to study the structural and functional regulation of GPCRs. PMID:27398998

  16. Current Progress of RNA Aptamer-Based Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jiehua; Bobbin, Maggie L.; Burnett, John C.; Rossi, John J.

    2012-01-01

    Aptamers are single-stranded nucleic acids that specifically recognize and bind tightly to their cognate targets due to their stable three-dimensional structure. Nucleic acid aptamers have been developed for various applications, including diagnostics, molecular imaging, biomarker discovery, target validation, therapeutics, and drug delivery. Due to their high specificity and binding affinity, aptamers directly block or interrupt the functions of target proteins making them promising therapeutic agents for the treatment of human maladies. Additionally, aptamers that bind to cell surface proteins are well suited for the targeted delivery of other therapeutics, such as conjugated small interfering RNAs (siRNA) that induce RNA interference (RNAi). Thus, aptamer-siRNA chimeras may offer dual-functions, in which the aptamer inhibits a receptor function, while the siRNA internalizes into the cell to target a specific mRNA. This review focuses on the current progress and therapeutic potential of RNA aptamers, including the use of cell-internalizing aptamers as cell-type specific delivery vehicles for targeted RNAi. In particular, we discuss emerging aptamer-based therapeutics that provide unique clinical opportunities for the treatment various cancers and neurological diseases. PMID:23130020

  17. Aptamers and the RNA World, Past and Present

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Larry; Janjic, Nebojsa; Jarvis, Thale; Schneider, Dan; Walker, Jeffrey J.; Wilcox, Sheri K.; Zichi, Dom

    2012-01-01

    Summary Aptamers and the SELEX process were discovered over two decades ago. These discoveries have spawned a productive academic and commercial industry. The collective results provide insights into biology, past and present, through an in vitro evolutionary exploration of the nature of nucleic acids and their potential roles in ancient life. Aptamers have helped usher in an RNA renaissance. Here we explore some of the evolution of the aptamer field and the insights it has provided for conceptualizing an RNA world, from its nascence to our current endeavor employing aptamers in human proteomics to discover biomarkers of health and disease. PMID:21441582

  18. Rationally Designing Aptamer Sequences with Reduced Affinity for Controlled Sensor Performance

    PubMed Central

    Schoukroun-Barnes, Lauren R.; White, Ryan J.

    2015-01-01

    The relative ease of predicting the secondary structure of nucleic acid sequences lends itself to the design of sequences to perform desired functions. Here, we combine the utility of nucleic acid aptamers with predictable control over the secondary structure to rationally design sequences with controlled affinity towards a target analyte when employed as the recognition element in an electrochemical sensor. Specifically, we present a method to modify an existing high-gain aptamer sequence to create sequences that, when employed in an electrochemical, aptamer-based sensor, exhibit reduced affinity towards a small molecule analyte tobramycin. Sensors fabricated with the high-gain parent sequence saturate at concentrations much below the therapeutic window for tobramycin (7–18 µM). Accordingly, the rationale behind modifying this high-gain sequence to reduce binding affinity was to tune sensor performance for optimal sensitivity in the therapeutic window. Using secondary structure predictions and analysis of the NMR structure of an aminoglycoside RNA aptamer bound to tobramycin, we are able to successfully modify the aptamer sequence to tune the dissociation constants of electrochemical aptamer-based sensors between 0.17 and 3 µM. The guidelines we present represent a general strategy to lessening binding affinity of sensors employing aptamer-modified electrodes. PMID:25835184

  19. Aptaligner: Automated Software for Aligning Pseudorandom DNA X-Aptamers from Next-Generation Sequencing Data

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing results from bead-based aptamer libraries have demonstrated that traditional DNA/RNA alignment software is insufficient. This is particularly true for X-aptamers containing specialty bases (W, X, Y, Z, ...) that are identified by special encoding. Thus, we sought an automated program that uses the inherent design scheme of bead-based X-aptamers to create a hypothetical reference library and Markov modeling techniques to provide improved alignments. Aptaligner provides this feature as well as length error and noise level cutoff features, is parallelized to run on multiple central processing units (cores), and sorts sequences from a single chip into projects and subprojects. PMID:24866698

  20. Aptaligner: automated software for aligning pseudorandom DNA X-aptamers from next-generation sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Lu, Emily; Elizondo-Riojas, Miguel-Angel; Chang, Jeffrey T; Volk, David E

    2014-06-10

    Next-generation sequencing results from bead-based aptamer libraries have demonstrated that traditional DNA/RNA alignment software is insufficient. This is particularly true for X-aptamers containing specialty bases (W, X, Y, Z, ...) that are identified by special encoding. Thus, we sought an automated program that uses the inherent design scheme of bead-based X-aptamers to create a hypothetical reference library and Markov modeling techniques to provide improved alignments. Aptaligner provides this feature as well as length error and noise level cutoff features, is parallelized to run on multiple central processing units (cores), and sorts sequences from a single chip into projects and subprojects. PMID:24866698

  1. Structure and Sequence Search on Aptamer-Protein Docking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Jiajie; Bonin, Keith; Guthold, Martin; Salsbury, Freddie

    2015-03-01

    Interactions between proteins and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) play a significant role in the living systems, especially through gene regulation. However, short nucleic acids sequences (aptamers) with specific binding affinity to specific proteins exhibit clinical potential as therapeutics. Our capillary and gel electrophoresis selection experiments show that specific sequences of aptamers can be selected that bind specific proteins. Computationally, given the experimentally-determined structure and sequence of a thrombin-binding aptamer, we can successfully dock the aptamer onto thrombin in agreement with experimental structures of the complex. In order to further study the conformational flexibility of this thrombin-binding aptamer and to potentially develop a predictive computational model of aptamer-binding, we use GPU-enabled molecular dynamics simulations to both examine the conformational flexibility of the aptamer in the absence of binding to thrombin, and to determine our ability to fold an aptamer. This study should help further de-novo predictions of aptamer sequences by enabling the study of structural and sequence-dependent effects on aptamer-protein docking specificity.

  2. Searching the Sequence Space for Potent Aptamers Using SELEX in Silico.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qingtong; Xia, Xiaole; Luo, Zhaofeng; Liang, Haojun; Shakhnovich, Eugene

    2015-12-01

    To isolate functional nucleic acids that bind to defined targets with high affinity and specificity, which are known as aptamers, the systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) methodology has emerged as the preferred approach. Here, we propose a computational approach, SELEX in silico, that allows the sequence space to be more thoroughly explored regarding binding of a certain target. Our approach consists of two steps: (i) secondary structure-based sequence screening, which aims to collect the sequences that can form a desired RNA motif as an enhanced initial library, followed by (ii) sequence enrichment regarding target binding by molecular dynamics simulation-based virtual screening. Our SELEX in silico method provided a practical computational solution to three key problems in aptamer sequence searching: design of nucleic acid libraries, knowledge of sequence enrichment, and identification of potent aptamers. Six potent theophylline-binding aptamers, which were isolated by SELEX in silico from a sequence space containing 4(13) sequences, were experimentally verified to bind theophylline with high affinity: Kd ranging from 0.16 to 0.52 μM, compared with the dissociation constant of the original aptamer-theophylline, 0.32 μM. These results demonstrate the significant potential of SELEX in silico as a new method for aptamer discovery and optimization. PMID:26642994

  3. A self-assembling RNA aptamer-based nanoparticle sensor for fluorometric detection of Neomycin B in milk.

    PubMed

    Ling, Kai; Jiang, Hongyan; Zhang, Linlin; Li, Yang; Yang, Lu; Qiu, Chen; Li, Fu-Rong

    2016-05-01

    To date, there are few reports regarding the development of RNA aptamer-based biosensors for the detection of small molecules. The possible reason is attributed to the weak nuclease resistance of RNA in biological environments. In this study, we have developed an RNA aptamer-based gold nanoparticle (AuNP) sensor for fluorometric detection of Neomycin B in milk. This aptasensor depends on the self-assembly of the RNA aptamer/Neomycin B complex and fluorescence quenching by AuNPs. This biosensor exhibited a low detection limit of 0.01 μM, with a linear dynamic range from 0.1 to 10 μM in milk, and a good selectivity toward Neomycin B. Specifically, because of the shorter RNA fragments and the nuclease inhibition ability of the RNA-modified AuNPs, the RNA sequences remained stable during the experiments. This work will serve as an example for the development of novel biosensors based on RNA aptamers. Graphical Abstract An RNA aptamer-based nanoparticle sensor, developed for the detection of Neomycin B in milk, shows high binding affinity and selectivity. This aptasensor depends on the self-assembly of the aptamer/ligand complex and fluorescence quenching by gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). Because of the shorter RNA fragments and the nuclease inhibition ability of RNA-modified AuNPs, RNA sequences remain stable during the detection. PMID:26942739

  4. Structural basis for recognition of Co2+ by RNA aptamers.

    PubMed

    Wrzesinski, Jan; Jóźwiakowski, Stanisław K

    2008-04-01

    Co(2+) binding RNA aptamers were chosen as research models to reveal the structural basis underlying the recognition of Co(2+) by RNA, with the application of two distinct methods. Using the nucleotide analog interference mapping assay, we found strong interference effects after incorporation of the 7-deaza guanosine phosphorotioate analog into the RNA chain at equivalent positions G27 and G28 in aptamer no. 18 and G25 and G26 in aptamer no. 20. The results obtained by nucleotide analog interference mapping suggest that these guanine bases are crucial for the creation of Co(2+) binding sites and that they appear to be involved in the coordination of the ion to the exposed N7 atom of the tandem guanines. Additionally, most 7-deaza guanosine phosphorotioate and 7-deaza adenosine phosphorotioate interferences were located in the common motifs: loop E-like in aptamer no. 18 and kissing dimer in aptamer no. 20. We also found that purine-rich stretches containing guanines with the highest interference values were the targets for hybridization of 6-mers, which are members of the semi-random oligodeoxyribonucleotide library in both aptamers. It transpired that DNA oligomer directed RNase H digestions are sensitive to Co(2+) and, at an elevated metal ion concentration, the hybridization of oligomers to aptamer targets is inhibited, probably due to higher stability and complexity of the RNA structure. PMID:18312410

  5. Characterisation of aptamer-target interactions by branched selection and high-throughput sequencing of SELEX pools.

    PubMed

    Dupont, Daniel M; Larsen, Niels; Jensen, Jan K; Andreasen, Peter A; Kjems, Jørgen

    2015-12-01

    Nucleic acid aptamer selection by systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) has shown great promise for use in the development of research tools, therapeutics and diagnostics. Typically, aptamers are identified from libraries containing up to 10(16) different RNA or DNA sequences by 5-10 rounds of affinity selection towards a target of interest. Such library screenings can result in complex pools of many target-binding aptamers. New high-throughput sequencing techniques may potentially revolutionise aptamer selection by allowing quantitative assessment of the dynamic changes in the pool composition during the SELEX process and by facilitating large-scale post-SELEX characterisation. In the present study, we demonstrate how high-throughput sequencing of SELEX pools, before and after a single round of branched selection for binding to different target variants, can provide detailed information about aptamer binding sites, preferences for specific target conformations, and functional effects of the aptamers. The procedure was applied on a diverse pool of 2'-fluoropyrimidine-modified RNA enriched for aptamers specific for the serpin plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) through five rounds of standard selection. The results demonstrate that it is possible to perform large-scale detailed characterisation of aptamer sequences directly in the complex pools obtained from library selection methods, thus without the need to produce individual aptamers. PMID:26163061

  6. In vitro selection of RNA aptamers that selectively bind danofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Han, Seung Ryul; Yu, Jaehoon; Lee, Seong-Wook

    2014-06-13

    Danofloxacin is a synthetic fluoroquinolone with broad spectrum antibacterial activity that is used for the treatment of respiratory diseases in animal husbandry. However, danofloxacin has many adverse reactions and is toxic to humans. Especially, it detrimentally affects muscle, central nerve system, peripheral nerve system, liver, and skin in those who ingest foods in which danofloxacin has accumulated. Prescreening and determination of the level of danofloxacin in foods or food products is necessary for human health. Aptamers are composing of oligonucleotides that specifically interact with target molecules. They are emerging as detection/diagnostic ligands. Here, we used the SELEX in vitro selection technology to identify specific and high-affinity RNA aptamers with 2'-fluoro-2'-deoxyribonucleotide modified pyrimidine nucleotides against danofloxacin. Selected RNA aptamers bound specifically to danofloxacin, but not to tetracycline. Truncation of RNA aptamer up to 36 mer did not comprise specificity and affinity. The truncated RNA aptamer specifically bound to target chemical, allowing the discrimination of danofloxacin from other fluoroquinolones. The isolated specific aptamer could be a potential agent used for the rapid and cost-effective detection and sensing of danofloxacin, replacing instrumental methods including the more expensive and time-consuming methods of high performance liquid chromatography and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. PMID:24792181

  7. Intracellular delivery of RNA-based therapeutics using aptamers

    PubMed Central

    Thiel, Kristina W; Giangrande, Paloma H

    2011-01-01

    The clinical potential of siRNAs for silencing genes critical to disease progression is clear, but a fail-proof method for delivering siRNAs to the cytoplasm of diseased tissues or cells has yet to be identified. A variety of delivery approaches have been explored to directly or indirectly couple siRNAs to delivery vehicles. This review explores the use of synthetic single-stranded DNA and RNA aptamers as a means to deliver siRNAs, shRNAs and antisense oligonucleotides for therapeutic intervention. Topics covered include: the advantages and challenges of using aptamers as delivery tools; current aptamer-mediated siRNA delivery platforms for the treatment of cancer and HIV; and emerging methodologies for the identification of aptamers capable of internalizing into target cell types. PMID:21643487

  8. RNA aptamers as effective protein antagonists in a multicellular organism

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Hua; Hoffman, Bryan E.; Lis, John T.

    1999-01-01

    RNA aptamers selected against proteins can be used to modulate specific protein function. Expression of such reagents in cells and whole organisms could provide a means of dissecting and controlling molecular mechanisms in vivo. We demonstrate that Drosophila B52 protein can be specifically inhibited in vitro and in vivo by a multivalent RNA aptamer. This inhibitory aptamer RNA binds B52 avidly and inhibits B52-stimulated pre-mRNA splicing. It can be expressed in cultured cells and whole animals in a stable form that accumulates up to 10% of total mRNA. It binds B52 in vivo and suppresses all phenotypes caused by B52 overexpression. The strategies presented here should prove general in design and expression of functional and therapeutic RNAs. PMID:10468557

  9. Anti-Transcription Factor RNA Aptamers as Potential Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Mondragón, Estefanía

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) are DNA-binding proteins that play critical roles in regulating gene expression. These proteins control all major cellular processes, including growth, development, and homeostasis. Because of their pivotal role, cells depend on proper TF function. It is, therefore, not surprising that TF deregulation is linked to disease. The therapeutic drug targeting of TFs has been proposed as a frontier in medicine. RNA aptamers make interesting candidates for TF modulation because of their unique characteristics. The products of in vitro selection, aptamers are short nucleic acids (DNA or RNA) that bind their targets with high affinity and specificity. Aptamers can be expressed on demand from transgenes and are intrinsically amenable to recognition by nucleic acid-binding proteins such as TFs. In this study, we review several natural prokaryotic and eukaryotic examples of RNAs that modulate the activity of TFs. These examples include 5S RNA, 6S RNA, 7SK, hepatitis delta virus-RNA (HDV-RNA), neuron restrictive silencer element (NRSE)-RNA, growth arrest-specific 5 (Gas5), steroid receptor RNA activator (SRA), trophoblast STAT utron (TSU), the 3′ untranslated region of caudal mRNA, and heat shock RNA-1 (HSR1). We then review examples of unnatural RNA aptamers selected to inhibit TFs nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB), TATA-binding protein (TBP), heat shock factor 1 (HSF1), and runt-related transcription factor 1 (RUNX1). The field of RNA aptamers for DNA-binding proteins continues to show promise. PMID:26509637

  10. An RNA-aptamer-based two-color CRISPR labeling system

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Siyuan; Su, Jun-Han; Zhang, Feng; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2016-01-01

    The spatial organization and dynamics of chromatin play important roles in essential biological functions. However, direct visualization of endogenous genomic loci in living cells has proven to be laborious until the recent development of CRISPR-Cas9-based chromatin labeling methods. These methods rely on the recognition of specific DNA sequences by CRISPR single-guide RNAs (sgRNAs) and fluorescent–protein-fused catalytically inactive Cas9 to label specific chromatin loci in cells. Previously, multicolor chromatin labeling has been achieved using orthogonal Cas9 proteins from different bacterial species fused to different fluorescent proteins. Here we report the development of an alternative two-color CRISPR labeling method using only the well-characterized Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9, by incorporating MS2 or PP7 RNA aptamers into the sgRNA. The MS2 or PP7 aptamers then recruit the corresponding MS2 or PP7 coat proteins fused with different fluorescent proteins to the target genomic loci. Here we demonstrate specific and orthogonal two-color labeling of repetitive sequences in living human cells using this method. By attaching the MS2 or PP7 aptamers to different locations on the sgRNA, we found that extending the tetraloop and stem loop 2 of the sgRNA with MS2 or PP7 aptamers enhances the signal-to-background ratio of chromatin imaging. PMID:27229896

  11. An RNA-aptamer-based two-color CRISPR labeling system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Siyuan; Su, Jun-Han; Zhang, Feng; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2016-01-01

    The spatial organization and dynamics of chromatin play important roles in essential biological functions. However, direct visualization of endogenous genomic loci in living cells has proven to be laborious until the recent development of CRISPR-Cas9-based chromatin labeling methods. These methods rely on the recognition of specific DNA sequences by CRISPR single-guide RNAs (sgRNAs) and fluorescent-protein-fused catalytically inactive Cas9 to label specific chromatin loci in cells. Previously, multicolor chromatin labeling has been achieved using orthogonal Cas9 proteins from different bacterial species fused to different fluorescent proteins. Here we report the development of an alternative two-color CRISPR labeling method using only the well-characterized Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9, by incorporating MS2 or PP7 RNA aptamers into the sgRNA. The MS2 or PP7 aptamers then recruit the corresponding MS2 or PP7 coat proteins fused with different fluorescent proteins to the target genomic loci. Here we demonstrate specific and orthogonal two-color labeling of repetitive sequences in living human cells using this method. By attaching the MS2 or PP7 aptamers to different locations on the sgRNA, we found that extending the tetraloop and stem loop 2 of the sgRNA with MS2 or PP7 aptamers enhances the signal-to-background ratio of chromatin imaging. PMID:27229896

  12. Label-free selection of RNA aptamers for metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Chuhern; Carothers, James M

    2016-08-15

    RNA aptamers can be assembled into genetic regulatory devices that sense and respond to levels of specific cellular metabolites and thus serve an integral part of designing dynamic control into engineered metabolic pathways. Here, we describe a practical method for generating specific and high affinity aptamers to enable the wider use of in vitro selection and a broader application of aptamers for metabolic engineering. Conventional selection methods involving either radioactive labeling of RNA or the use of label-free methods such as SPR to track aptamer enrichment require resources that are not widely accessible to research groups. We present a label-free selection method that uses small volume spectrophotometers to track RNA enrichment paired with previously characterized affinity chromatography methods. Borrowing techniques used in solid phase peptide synthesis, we present an approach for immobilizing a wide range of metabolites to an amino PEGA matrix. As an illustration, we detail laboratory techniques employed to generate aptamers that bind p-aminophenylalanine, a metabolic precursor for bio-based production of plastics and the pristinamycin family of antibiotics. We focused on the development of methods for ligand immobilization, selection via affinity chromatography, and nucleic acid quantification that can be performed with common laboratory equipment. PMID:27339940

  13. Codeine-binding RNA aptamers and rapid determination of their binding constants using a direct coupling surface plasmon resonance assay

    PubMed Central

    Win, Maung Nyan; Klein, Joshua S.; Smolke, Christina D.

    2006-01-01

    RNA aptamers that bind the opium alkaloid codeine were generated using an iterative in vitro selection process. The binding properties of these aptamers, including equilibrium and kinetic rate constants, were determined through a rapid, high-throughput approach using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis to measure real-time binding. The approach involves direct coupling of the target small molecule onto a sensor chip without utilization of a carrier protein. Two highest binding aptamer sequences, FC5 and FC45 with Kd values of 2.50 and 4.00 μM, respectively, were extensively studied. Corresponding mini-aptamers for FC5 and FC45 were subsequently identified through the described direct coupling Biacore assays. These assays were also employed to confirm the proposed secondary structures of the mini-aptamers. Both aptamers exhibit high specificity to codeine over morphine, which differs from codeine by a methyl group. Finally, the direct coupling method was demonstrated to eliminate potential non-specific interactions that may be associated with indirect coupling methods in which protein linkers are commonly employed. Therefore, in addition to presenting the first RNA aptamers to a subclass of benzylisoquinoline alkaloid molecules, this work highlights a method for characterizing small molecule aptamers that is more robust, precise, rapid and high-throughput than other commonly employed techniques. PMID:17038331

  14. RNA mango aptamer-fluorophore: a bright, high-affinity complex for RNA labeling and tracking.

    PubMed

    Dolgosheina, Elena V; Jeng, Sunny C Y; Panchapakesan, Shanker Shyam S; Cojocaru, Razvan; Chen, Patrick S K; Wilson, Peter D; Hawkins, Nancy; Wiggins, Paul A; Unrau, Peter J

    2014-10-17

    Because RNA lacks strong intrinsic fluorescence, it has proven challenging to track RNA molecules in real time. To address this problem and to allow the purification of fluorescently tagged RNA complexes, we have selected a high affinity RNA aptamer called RNA Mango. This aptamer binds a series of thiazole orange (fluorophore) derivatives with nanomolar affinity, while increasing fluorophore fluorescence by up to 1,100-fold. Visualization of RNA Mango by single-molecule fluorescence microscopy, together with injection and imaging of RNA Mango/fluorophore complex in C. elegans gonads demonstrates the potential for live-cell RNA imaging with this system. By inserting RNA Mango into a stem loop of the bacterial 6S RNA and biotinylating the fluorophore, we demonstrate that the aptamer can be used to simultaneously fluorescently label and purify biologically important RNAs. The high affinity and fluorescent properties of RNA Mango are therefore expected to simplify the study of RNA complexes. PMID:25101481

  15. Multifunctional Aptamer-miRNA Conjugates for Targeted Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, Carla L; Cerchia, Laura; Catuogno, Silvia; De Vita, Gennaro; Dassie, Justin P; Santamaria, Gianluca; Swiderski, Piotr; Condorelli, Gerolama; Giangrande, Paloma H; de Franciscis, Vittorio

    2014-01-01

    While microRNAs (miRNAs) clearly regulate multiple pathways integral to disease development and progression, the lack of safe and reliable means for specific delivery of miRNAs to target tissues represents a major obstacle to their broad therapeutic application. Our objective was to explore the use of nucleic acid aptamers as carriers for cell-targeted delivery of a miRNA with tumor suppressor function, let-7g. Using an aptamer that binds to and antagonizes the oncogenic receptor tyrosine kinase Axl (GL21.T), here we describe the development of aptamer-miRNA conjugates as multifunctional molecules that inhibit the growth of Axl-expressing tumors. We conjugated the let-7g miRNA to GL21.T and demonstrate selective delivery to target cells, processing by the RNA interference machinery, and silencing of let-7g target genes. Importantly, the multifunctional conjugate reduced tumor growth in a xenograft model of lung adenocarcinoma. Therefore, our data establish aptamer-miRNA conjugates as a novel tool for targeted delivery of miRNAs with therapeutic potential. PMID:24441398

  16. Screening and Characterization of a Novel RNA Aptamer That Specifically Binds to Human Prostatic Acid Phosphatase and Human Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Hoon Young; Byun, Jonghoe

    2015-01-01

    Prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) expression increases proportionally with prostate cancer progression, making it useful in prognosticating intermediate to high-risk prostate cancers. A novel ligand that can specifically bind to PAP would be very helpful for guiding prostate cancer therapy. RNA aptamers bind to target molecules with high specificity and have key advantages such as low immunogenicity and easy synthesis. Here, human PAP-specific aptamers were screened from a 2′-fluoropyrimidine (FY)-modified RNA library by SELEX. The candidate aptamer families were identified within six rounds followed by analysis of their sequences and PAP-specific binding. A gel shift assay was used to identify PAP binding aptamers and the 6N aptamer specifically bound to PAP with a Kd value of 118 nM. RT-PCR and fluorescence labeling analyses revealed that the 6N aptamer bound to PAP-positive mammalian cells, such as PC-3 and LNCaP. IMR-90 negative control cells did not bind the 6N aptamer. Systematic minimization analyses revealed that 50 nucleotide sequences and their two hairpin structures in the 6N 2′-FY RNA aptamer were equally important for PAP binding. Renewed interest in PAP combined with the versatility of RNA aptamers, including conjugation of anti-cancer drugs and nano-imaging probes, could open up a new route for early theragnosis of prostate cancer. PMID:25591398

  17. Spinach RNA aptamer detects lead (II) with high selectivity†

    PubMed Central

    DasGupta, Saurja; Shelke, Sandip A.; Li, Nan-sheng

    2015-01-01

    Spinach RNA aptamer contains a G-quadruplex motif that serves as a platform for binding and fluorescence activation of a GFP-like fluorophore. Here we show that Pb2+ induces formation of Spinach’s G-quadruplex and activates fluorescence with high selectivity and sensitivity. This device establishes the first example of an RNA-based sensor that provides a simple and inexpensive tool for Pb2+ detection. PMID:25940073

  18. Massively Parallel Interrogation of Aptamer Sequence, Structure and Function

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, N O; Tok, J B; Tarasow, T M

    2008-02-08

    Optimization of high affinity reagents is a significant bottleneck in medicine and the life sciences. The ability to synthetically create thousands of permutations of a lead high-affinity reagent and survey the properties of individual permutations in parallel could potentially relieve this bottleneck. Aptamers are single stranded oligonucleotides affinity reagents isolated by in vitro selection processes and as a class have been shown to bind a wide variety of target molecules. Methodology/Principal Findings. High density DNA microarray technology was used to synthesize, in situ, arrays of approximately 3,900 aptamer sequence permutations in triplicate. These sequences were interrogated on-chip for their ability to bind the fluorescently-labeled cognate target, immunoglobulin E, resulting in the parallel execution of thousands of experiments. Fluorescence intensity at each array feature was well resolved and shown to be a function of the sequence present. The data demonstrated high intra- and interchip correlation between the same features as well as among the sequence triplicates within a single array. Consistent with aptamer mediated IgE binding, fluorescence intensity correlated strongly with specific aptamer sequences and the concentration of IgE applied to the array. The massively parallel sequence-function analyses provided by this approach confirmed the importance of a consensus sequence found in all 21 of the original IgE aptamer sequences and support a common stem:loop structure as being the secondary structure underlying IgE binding. The microarray application, data and results presented illustrate an efficient, high information content approach to optimizing aptamer function. It also provides a foundation from which to better understand and manipulate this important class of high affinity biomolecules.

  19. RNA Aptamer Evolution: Two Decades of SELEction

    PubMed Central

    Aquino-Jarquin, Guillermo; Toscano-Garibay, Julia D.

    2011-01-01

    Aptamers are small non-coding RNAs capable of recognizing, with high specificity and affinity, a wide variety of molecules in a manner that resembles antibodies. This class of nucleic acids is the resulting product of applying a well-established screening method known as SELEX. First developed in 1990, the SELEX process has become a powerful tool to select structured oligonucleotides for the recognition of targets, starting with small molecules, going through protein complexes until whole cells. SELEX has also evolved along with new technologies positioning itself as an alternative in the design of a new class of therapeutic agents in modern molecular medicine. This review is an historical follow-up of SELEX method over the two decades since its first appearance. PMID:22272125

  20. In-gel imaging of RNA processing using Broccoli reveals optimal aptamer expression strategies

    PubMed Central

    Filonov, Grigory S.; Kam, Christina W.; Song, Wenjiao; Jaffrey, Samie R.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY RNA aptamers can be expressed in cells to influence and image cellular processes. Aptamer folding is maintained by inserting the aptamers into highly structured RNA scaffolds. Here we show that commonly used RNA scaffolds exhibit unexpected instability and cleavage in bacterial and mammalian cells. Using an in-gel staining approach for rapid and simple detection of Spinach- or Broccoli-tagged RNAs in cells, we monitored the processing of RNAs tagged with scaffolded aptamers, revealing endonucleolytic cleavage, RNA instability and poor expression. We reengineered a natural three-way junction structure to generate an alternative scaffold that enables stable aptamer expression in cells. This scaffold was used to create cassettes containing up to four Broccoli units, markedly enhancing the brightness of mammalian cells expressing cassette-tagged RNAs. These experiments describe methods for screening RNA cleavage events in cells, and identify cell-compatible scaffolds that enable efficient tagging of RNAs with aptamers for cellular expression. PMID:26000751

  1. Automated physics-based design of synthetic riboswitches from diverse RNA aptamers

    PubMed Central

    Espah Borujeni, Amin; Mishler, Dennis M.; Wang, Jingzhi; Huso, Walker; Salis, Howard M.

    2016-01-01

    Riboswitches are shape-changing regulatory RNAs that bind chemicals and regulate gene expression, directly coupling sensing to cellular actuation. However, it remains unclear how their sequence controls the physics of riboswitch switching and activation, particularly when changing the ligand-binding aptamer domain. We report the development of a statistical thermodynamic model that predicts the sequence-structure-function relationship for translation-regulating riboswitches that activate gene expression, characterized inside cells and within cell-free transcription–translation assays. Using the model, we carried out automated computational design of 62 synthetic riboswitches that used six different RNA aptamers to sense diverse chemicals (theophylline, tetramethylrosamine, fluoride, dopamine, thyroxine, 2,4-dinitrotoluene) and activated gene expression by up to 383-fold. The model explains how aptamer structure, ligand affinity, switching free energy and macromolecular crowding collectively control riboswitch activation. Our model-based approach for engineering riboswitches quantitatively confirms several physical mechanisms governing ligand-induced RNA shape-change and enables the development of cell-free and bacterial sensors for diverse applications. PMID:26621913

  2. Automated physics-based design of synthetic riboswitches from diverse RNA aptamers.

    PubMed

    Espah Borujeni, Amin; Mishler, Dennis M; Wang, Jingzhi; Huso, Walker; Salis, Howard M

    2016-01-01

    Riboswitches are shape-changing regulatory RNAs that bind chemicals and regulate gene expression, directly coupling sensing to cellular actuation. However, it remains unclear how their sequence controls the physics of riboswitch switching and activation, particularly when changing the ligand-binding aptamer domain. We report the development of a statistical thermodynamic model that predicts the sequence-structure-function relationship for translation-regulating riboswitches that activate gene expression, characterized inside cells and within cell-free transcription-translation assays. Using the model, we carried out automated computational design of 62 synthetic riboswitches that used six different RNA aptamers to sense diverse chemicals (theophylline, tetramethylrosamine, fluoride, dopamine, thyroxine, 2,4-dinitrotoluene) and activated gene expression by up to 383-fold. The model explains how aptamer structure, ligand affinity, switching free energy and macromolecular crowding collectively control riboswitch activation. Our model-based approach for engineering riboswitches quantitatively confirms several physical mechanisms governing ligand-induced RNA shape-change and enables the development of cell-free and bacterial sensors for diverse applications. PMID:26621913

  3. In vivo expression and purification of aptamer-tagged small RNA regulators

    PubMed Central

    Said, Nelly; Rieder, Renate; Hurwitz, Robert; Deckert, Jochen; Urlaub, Henning; Vogel, Jörg

    2009-01-01

    Small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs) are an emerging class of post-transcriptional regulators of bacterial gene expression. To study sRNAs and their potential protein interaction partners, it is desirable to purify sRNAs from cells in their native form. Here, we used RNA-based affinity chromatography to purify sRNAs following their expression as aptamer-tagged variants in vivo. To this end, we developed a family of plasmids to express sRNAs with any of three widely used aptamer sequences (MS2, boxB, eIF4A), and systematically tested how the aptamer tagging impacted on intracellular accumulation and target regulation of the Salmonella GcvB, InvR or RybB sRNAs. In addition, we successfully tagged the chromosomal rybB gene with MS2 to observe that RybB-MS2 is fully functional as an envelope stress-induced repressor of ompN mRNA following induction of sigmaE. We further demonstrate that the common sRNA-binding protein, Hfq, co-purifies with MS2-tagged sRNAs of Salmonella. The presented affinity purification strategy may facilitate the isolation of in vivo assembled sRNA–protein complexes in a wide range of bacteria. PMID:19726584

  4. RNA-based networks: using RNA aptamers and ribozymes as synthetic genetic devices.

    PubMed

    Weigand, Julia E; Wittmann, Alexander; Suess, Beatrix

    2012-01-01

    Within the last few years, a set of synthetic riboswitches has been engineered, which expands the toolbox of genetic regulatory devices. Small molecule binding aptamers have been used for the design of such riboswitches by insertion into untranslated regions of mRNAs, exploiting the fact that upon ligand binding the RNA structure interferes either with translation initiation or pre-mRNA splicing in yeast. In combination with self-cleaving ribozymes, aptamers have been used to modulate RNA stability. In this chapter, we discuss the applicability of different aptamers, ways to identify novel genetic devices, the pros and cons of various insertion sites and the application of allosteric ribozymes. Our expertise help to apply synthetic riboswitches to engineer complex genetic circuits. PMID:22083741

  5. Cell-Internalization SELEX: Method for Identifying Cell-Internalizing RNA Aptamers for Delivering siRNAs to Target Cells

    PubMed Central

    Thiel, William H.; Thiel, Kristina W.; Flenker, Katie S.; Bair, Tom; Dupuy, Adam J.; McNamara, James O.; Miller, Francis J.; Giangrande, Paloma H.

    2015-01-01

    After a decade of work to address cellular uptake, the principal obstacle to RNAi-based therapeutics, there is now well-deserved, renewed optimism about RNAi-based drugs. Phase I and II studies have shown safe, strong, and durable-gene knockdown (80–90 %, lasting for a month after a single injection) and/or clinical benefit in treating several liver pathologies. Although promising, these studies have also highlighted the need for robust delivery techniques to develop RNAi therapeutics for treating other organ systems and diseases. Conjugation of siRNAs to cell-specific, synthetic RNA ligands (aptamers) is being proposed as a viable solution to this problem. While encouraging, the extended use of RNA aptamers as a delivery tool for siRNAs awaits the identification of RNA aptamer sequences capable of targeting and entering the cytoplasm of many different cell types. We describe a cell-based selection process for the rapid identification and characterization of RNA aptamers suited for delivering siRNA drugs into the cytoplasm of target cells. This process, termed “cell-internalization SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment),” entails the combination of multiple sophisticated technologies, including cell culture-based SELEX procedures, next-generation sequencing (NGS), and novel bioinformatics tools. PMID:25319652

  6. Isolation of Endogenously Assembled RNA-Protein Complexes Using Affinity Purification Based on Streptavidin Aptamer S1

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yangchao; Yang, Jing; Ye, Wei; Wang, Yuan; Ye, Chuantao; Weng, Daihui; Gao, Huan; Zhang, Fanglin; Xu, Zhikai; Lei, Yingfeng

    2015-01-01

    Efficient isolation of endogenously assembled viral RNA-protein complexes is essential for understanding virus replication mechanisms. We have developed an affinity purification strategy based on an RNA affinity tag that allows large-scale preparation of native viral RNA-binding proteins (RBPs). The streptavidin-binding aptamer S1 sequence was inserted into the 3′ end of dengue virus (DENV) 5′–3′ UTR RNA, and the DENV RNA UTR fused to the S1 RNA aptamer was expressed in living mammalian cells. This allowed endogenous viral ribonucleoprotein (RNP) assembly and isolation of RNPs from whole cell extract, through binding the S1 aptamer to streptavidin magnetic beads. Several novel host DENV RBPs were subsequently identified by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), including RPS8, which we further implicate in DENV replication. We proposed efficient S1 aptamer-based isolation of viral assembled RNPs from living mammalian cells will be generally applicable to the purification of high- and low-affinity RBPs and RNPs under endogenous conditions. PMID:26389898

  7. Isolation of Endogenously Assembled RNA-Protein Complexes Using Affinity Purification Based on Streptavidin Aptamer S1.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yangchao; Yang, Jing; Ye, Wei; Wang, Yuan; Ye, Chuantao; Weng, Daihui; Gao, Huan; Zhang, Fanglin; Xu, Zhikai; Lei, Yingfeng

    2015-01-01

    Efficient isolation of endogenously assembled viral RNA-protein complexes is essential for understanding virus replication mechanisms. We have developed an affinity purification strategy based on an RNA affinity tag that allows large-scale preparation of native viral RNA-binding proteins (RBPs). The streptavidin-binding aptamer S1 sequence was inserted into the 3' end of dengue virus (DENV) 5'-3' UTR RNA, and the DENV RNA UTR fused to the S1 RNA aptamer was expressed in living mammalian cells. This allowed endogenous viral ribonucleoprotein (RNP) assembly and isolation of RNPs from whole cell extract, through binding the S1 aptamer to streptavidin magnetic beads. Several novel host DENV RBPs were subsequently identified by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), including RPS8, which we further implicate in DENV replication. We proposed efficient S1 aptamer-based isolation of viral assembled RNPs from living mammalian cells will be generally applicable to the purification of high- and low-affinity RBPs and RNPs under endogenous conditions. PMID:26389898

  8. Smooth Muscle Cell-targeted RNA Aptamer Inhibits Neointimal Formation.

    PubMed

    Thiel, William H; Esposito, Carla L; Dickey, David D; Dassie, Justin P; Long, Matthew E; Adam, Joshua; Streeter, Jennifer; Schickling, Brandon; Takapoo, Maysam; Flenker, Katie S; Klesney-Tait, Julia; Franciscis, Vittorio de; Miller, Francis J; Giangrande, Paloma H

    2016-04-01

    Inhibition of vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation by drug eluting stents has markedly reduced intimal hyperplasia and subsequent in-stent restenosis. However, the effects of antiproliferative drugs on endothelial cells (EC) contribute to delayed re-endothelialization and late stent thrombosis. Cell-targeted therapies to inhibit VSMC remodeling while maintaining EC health are necessary to allow vascular healing while preventing restenosis. We describe an RNA aptamer (Apt 14) that functions as a smart drug by preferentially targeting VSMCs as compared to ECs and other myocytes. Furthermore, Apt 14 inhibits phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase-B (PI3K/Akt) and VSMC migration in response to multiple agonists by a mechanism that involves inhibition of platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR)-β phosphorylation. In a murine model of carotid injury, treatment of vessels with Apt 14 reduces neointimal formation to levels similar to those observed with paclitaxel. Importantly, we confirm that Apt 14 cross-reacts with rodent and human VSMCs, exhibits a half-life of ~300 hours in human serum, and does not elicit immune activation of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. We describe a VSMC-targeted RNA aptamer that blocks cell migration and inhibits intimal formation. These findings provide the foundation for the translation of cell-targeted RNA therapeutics to vascular disease. PMID:26732878

  9. Biocompatible hydrogel membranes for the protection of RNA aptamer-based electrochemical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoukroun-Barnes, Lauren R.; Wagan, Samiullah; Liu, Juan; Leach, Jennie B.; White, Ryan J.

    2013-05-01

    Electrochemical-aptamer based (E-AB) sensors represent a universal specific, selective, and sensitive sensing platform for the detection of small molecule targets. Their specific detection abilities are afforded by oligonucleotide (RNA or DNA) aptamers employed as electrode-bound biorecognition elements. Sensor signaling is predicated on bindinginduced changes in conformation and/or flexibility of the aptamer that is readily measurable electrochemically. While sensors fabricated using DNA aptamers can achieve specific and selective detection even in unadulterated sample matrices, such as blood serum, RNA-based sensors fail when challenged in the same sample matrix without significant sample pretreatment. This failure is at least partially a result of enzymatic degradation of the RNA sensing element. This degradation destroys the sensing aptamer inhibiting the quantitative measurement of the target analyte and thus limits the application of E-AB sensors constructed with RNA aptamer. To circumvent this, we demonstrate that a biocompatible hydrogel membrane protects the RNA aptamer sensor surface from enzymatic degradation for at least 3 hours - a remarkable improvement over the rapid (~minutes) degradation of unprotected sensors. To demonstrate this, we characterize the response of sensors fabricated with representative DNA and RNA aptamers directed against the aminoglycoside antibiotic, tobramycin in blood serum both protected and unprotected by a polyacrylamide membrane. Furthermore, we find encapsulation of the sensor surface with the hydrogel does not significantly impede the detection ability of aptamer-based sensors. This hydrogel-aptamer interface will thus likely prove useful for the long-term monitoring of therapeutics in complex biological media.

  10. Regression of hepatocarcinoma cells using RNA aptamer specific to alpha-fetoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Young Ju; Lee, Seong-Wook

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Identification of RNA aptamer specific to AFP with high affinity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Specific induction of HCC proliferation by AFP. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Efficient increase in oncogene expression by AFP. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Efficient inhibition of AFP-mediated HCC proliferation by the aptamer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Efficient suppression of AFP-induced oncogene expression of by the aptamer. -- Abstract: Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) is a cancer-associated fetal protein and has long been utilized as a serum fetal defect/tumor marker to monitor distress/disease progression. In addition, AFP is closely associated with the proliferation of hepatocellular carcinoma. Thus, direct targeting of AFP has been recommended for a therapeutic strategy against hepatocellular carcinoma. In this study, we developed and characterized an RNA aptamer that specifically bound to the alpha-fetoprotein using SELEX technology. The aptamer interacted with the AFP with a K{sub D} of {approx}33 nM. Importantly, the identified aptamer specifically and efficiently inhibited the AFP-mediated proliferation of hepatocarcinoma cells in a dose dependent manner. Moreover, the aptamer efficiently down-regulated AFP-induced expression of oncogenes in the cells. These results indicate that an AFP-specific RNA aptamer could be a useful therapeutic and diagnostic agent against AFP-related hepatocellular carcinoma.

  11. Rapid detection of food pathogens using RNA aptamers-immobilized slide.

    PubMed

    Maeng, Jin-Soo; Kim, Namsoo; Kim, Chong-Tai; Han, Seung Ryul; Lee, Young Ju; Lee, Seong-Wook; Lee, Myung-Hyun; Cho, Yong-Jin

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a simple and rapid detection system for foodborne bacteria, which consisted of an optical microscope and its slide chip with artificial antibodies, or RNA aptamers. From an RNA pool, three each RNA aptamers were built by the method of SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment) for components of cell wall, LPS (lipopolysaccharide) from E. coli O157:H7, teichoic acid from Staphylococcus aureus and a cell membrane protein of OmpC from Salmonella typhimurium, respectively. These aptamers were hybridized with thiol-conjugated 16 dT-linker molecules in order to be immobilized on silver surface which was, in advance, fabricated on glass slide, using a spin-coating method. To confirm that each aptamers retained its specific binding activities to their antigenic live bacteria, microscopic view of bound cells immobilized on silver film were observed. Furthermore, we observed the fluorescence-emitting bacteria-aptamer complex immobilized on silver film after adding RNA aptamers hybridized with fluorophore, FAM-conjugated 16 dT-linker molecules. As a result, the RNA aptamers-immobilized slide system developed in this study was a useful new tool to rapidly monitor individual food pathogens. PMID:22966534

  12. Aptamers and aptamer targeted delivery

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Amy C.; Levy, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    When aptamers first emerged almost two decades ago, most were RNA species that bound and tagged or inhibited simple target ligands. Very soon after, the ‘selectionologists’ developing aptamer technology quickly realized more potential for the aptamer. In recent years, advances in aptamer techniques have enabled the use of aptamers as small molecule inhibitors, diagnostic tools and even therapeutics. Aptamers are now being employed in novel applications. We review, herein, some of the recent and exciting applications of aptamers in cell-specific recognition and delivery. PMID:19458497

  13. Inhibition of PAI-1 Antiproteolytic Activity Against tPA by RNA Aptamers

    PubMed Central

    Damare, Jared; Brandal, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1; SERPINE1) inhibits the plasminogen activators: tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) and urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA). Elevated levels of PAI-1 have been correlated with an increased risk for cardiovascular disease. Pharmacologically suppressing PAI-1 might prevent, or successfully treat PAI-1 related vascular diseases. This can potentially be accomplished by using small RNA molecules (aptamers). This study's goal is to develop RNA aptamers to a region of PAI-1 that will prevent the ability of PAI-1 to interact with the plasminogen activators. The aptamers were generated through a systematic evolution of ligands via exponential enrichment approach that ensures the creation of RNA molecules that bind to our target protein, PAI-1. In vitro assays were used to determine the effect of these aptamers on PAI-1's inhibitory activity. Three aptamers that bind to PAI-1 with affinities in the nanomolar range were isolated. The aptamer clones R10-4 and R10-2 inhibited PAI-1's antiproteolytic activity against tPA and disrupted PAI-1's ability to form a stable covalent complex with tPA. Increasing aptamer concentrations correlated positively with an increase in cleaved PAI-1. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of RNA molecules that inhibit the antiproteolytic activity of PAI-1. PMID:24922319

  14. Toggled RNA Aptamers Against Aminoglycosides Allowing Facile Detection of Antibiotics Using Gold Nanoparticle Assays

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We have used systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) to isolate RNA aptamers against aminoglycoside antibiotics. The SELEX rounds were toggled against four pairs of aminoglycosides with the goal of isolating reagents that recognize conserved structural features. The resulting aptamers bind both of their selection targets with nanomolar affinities. They also bind the less structurally related targets, although they show clear specificity for this class of antibiotics. We show that this lack of aminoglycoside specificity is a common property of aptamers previously selected against single compounds and described as “specific”. Broad target specificity aptamers would be ideal for sensors detecting the entire class of aminoglycosides. We have used ligand-induced aggregation of gold-nanoparticles coated with our aptamers as a rapid and sensitive assay for these compounds. In contrast to DNA aptamers, unmodified RNA aptamers cannot be used as the recognition ligand in this assay, whereas 2′-fluoro-pyrimidine derivatives work reliably. We discuss the possible application of these reagents as sensors for drug residues and the challenges for understanding the structural basis of aminoglycoside-aptamer recognition highlighted by the SELEX results. PMID:22793869

  15. Interleukin-6 receptor specific RNA aptamers for cargo delivery into target cells

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Cindy; Eydeler, Katja; Magbanua, Eileen; Zivkovic, Tijana; Piganeau, Nicolas; Lorenzen, Inken; Grötzinger, Joachim; Mayer, Günter; Rose-John, Stefan; Hahn, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    Aptamers represent an emerging strategy to deliver cargo molecules, including dyes, drugs, proteins or even genes, into specific target cells. Upon binding to specific cell surface receptors aptamers can be internalized, for example by macropinocytosis or receptor mediated endocytosis. Here we report the in vitro selection and characterization of RNA aptamers with high affinity (Kd = 20 nM) and specificity for the human IL-6 receptor (IL-6R). Importantly, these aptamers trigger uptake without compromising the interaction of IL-6R with its natural ligands the cytokine IL-6 and glycoprotein 130 (gp130). We further optimized the aptamers to obtain a shortened, only 19-nt RNA oligonucleotide retaining all necessary characteristics for high affinity and selective recognition of IL-6R on cell surfaces. Upon incubation with IL-6R presenting cells this aptamer was rapidly internalized. Importantly, we could use our aptamer, to deliver bulky cargos, exemplified by fluorescently labeled streptavidin, into IL-6R presenting cells, thereby setting the stage for an aptamer-mediated escort of drug molecules to diseased cell populations or tissues. PMID:22258147

  16. Efficient HIV-1 inhibition by a 16 nt-long RNA aptamer designed by combining in vitro selection and in silico optimisation strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Luque, Francisco J.; Stich, Michael; Manrubia, Susanna; Briones, Carlos; Berzal-Herranz, Alfredo

    2014-09-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) genome contains multiple, highly conserved structural RNA domains that play key roles in essential viral processes. Interference with the function of these RNA domains either by disrupting their structures or by blocking their interaction with viral or cellular factors may seriously compromise HIV-1 viability. RNA aptamers are amongst the most promising synthetic molecules able to interact with structural domains of viral genomes. However, aptamer shortening up to their minimal active domain is usually necessary for scaling up production, what requires very time-consuming, trial-and-error approaches. Here we report on the in vitro selection of 64 nt-long specific aptamers against the complete 5'-untranslated region of HIV-1 genome, which inhibit more than 75% of HIV-1 production in a human cell line. The analysis of the selected sequences and structures allowed for the identification of a highly conserved 16 nt-long stem-loop motif containing a common 8 nt-long apical loop. Based on this result, an in silico designed 16 nt-long RNA aptamer, termed RNApt16, was synthesized, with sequence 5'-CCCCGGCAAGGAGGGG-3'. The HIV-1 inhibition efficiency of such an aptamer was close to 85%, thus constituting the shortest RNA molecule so far described that efficiently interferes with HIV-1 replication.

  17. Highly Multiplexed RNA Aptamer Selection using a Microplate-based Microcolumn Device

    PubMed Central

    Reinholt, Sarah J.; Ozer, Abdullah; Lis, John T.; Craighead, Harold G.

    2016-01-01

    We describe a multiplexed RNA aptamer selection to 19 different targets simultaneously using a microcolumn-based device, MEDUSA (Microplate-based Enrichment Device Used for the Selection of Aptamers), as well as a modified selection process, that significantly reduce the time and reagents needed for selections. We exploited MEDUSA’s reconfigurable design between parallel and serially-connected microcolumns to enable the use of just 2 aliquots of starting library, and its 96-well microplate compatibility to enable the continued use of high-throughput techniques in downstream processes. Our modified selection protocol allowed us to perform the equivalent of a 10-cycle selection in the time it takes for 4 traditional selection cycles. Several aptamers were discovered with nanomolar dissociation constants. Furthermore, aptamers were identified that not only bound with high affinity, but also acted as inhibitors to significantly reduce the activity of their target protein, mouse decapping exoribonuclease (DXO). The aptamers resisted DXO’s exoribonuclease activity, and in studies monitoring DXO’s degradation of a 30-nucleotide substrate, less than 1 μM of aptamer demonstrated significant inhibition of DXO activity. This aptamer selection method using MEDUSA helps to overcome some of the major challenges with traditional aptamer selections, and provides a platform for high-throughput selections that lends itself to process automation. PMID:27432610

  18. Highly Multiplexed RNA Aptamer Selection using a Microplate-based Microcolumn Device.

    PubMed

    Reinholt, Sarah J; Ozer, Abdullah; Lis, John T; Craighead, Harold G

    2016-01-01

    We describe a multiplexed RNA aptamer selection to 19 different targets simultaneously using a microcolumn-based device, MEDUSA (Microplate-based Enrichment Device Used for the Selection of Aptamers), as well as a modified selection process, that significantly reduce the time and reagents needed for selections. We exploited MEDUSA's reconfigurable design between parallel and serially-connected microcolumns to enable the use of just 2 aliquots of starting library, and its 96-well microplate compatibility to enable the continued use of high-throughput techniques in downstream processes. Our modified selection protocol allowed us to perform the equivalent of a 10-cycle selection in the time it takes for 4 traditional selection cycles. Several aptamers were discovered with nanomolar dissociation constants. Furthermore, aptamers were identified that not only bound with high affinity, but also acted as inhibitors to significantly reduce the activity of their target protein, mouse decapping exoribonuclease (DXO). The aptamers resisted DXO's exoribonuclease activity, and in studies monitoring DXO's degradation of a 30-nucleotide substrate, less than 1 μM of aptamer demonstrated significant inhibition of DXO activity. This aptamer selection method using MEDUSA helps to overcome some of the major challenges with traditional aptamer selections, and provides a platform for high-throughput selections that lends itself to process automation. PMID:27432610

  19. An adaptable pentaloop defines a robust neomycin-B RNA aptamer with conditional ligand-bound structures

    PubMed Central

    Ilgu, Muslum; Fulton, D. Bruce; Yennamalli, Ragothaman M.; Lamm, Monica H.; Sen, Taner Z.; Nilsen-Hamilton, Marit

    2014-01-01

    Aptamers can be highly specific for their targets, which implies precise molecular recognition between aptamer and target. However, as small polymers, their structures are more subject to environmental conditions than the more constrained longer RNAs such as those that constitute the ribosome. To understand the balance between structural and environmental factors in establishing ligand specificity of aptamers, we examined the RNA aptamer (NEO1A) previously reported as specific for neomycin-B. We show that NEO1A can recognize other aminoglycosides with similar affinities as for neomycin-B and its aminoglycoside specificity is strongly influenced by ionic strength and buffer composition. NMR and 2-aminopurine (2AP) fluorescence studies of the aptamer identified a flexible pentaloop and a stable binding pocket. Consistent with a well-structured binding pocket, docking analysis results correlated with experimental measures of the binding energy for most ligands. Steady state fluorescence studies of 2AP-substituted aptamers confirmed that A16 moves to a more solvent accessible position upon ligand binding while A14 moves to a less solvent accessible position, which is most likely a base stack. Analysis of binding affinities of NEO1A sequence variants showed that the base in position 16 interacts differently with each ligand and the interaction is a function of the buffer constituents. Our results show that the pentaloop provides NEO1A with the ability to adapt to external influences on its structure, with the critical base at position 16 adjusting to incorporate each ligand into a stable pocket by hydrophobic interactions and/or hydrogen bonds depending on the ligand and the ionic environment. PMID:24757168

  20. RNA aptamers directed to discrete functional sites on a single protein structural domain

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Hua; Fan, Xiaochun; Sevilimedu, Aarti; Lis, John T.

    2007-01-01

    Cellular regulatory networks are organized such that many proteins have few interactions, whereas a few proteins have many. These densely connected protein “hubs” are critical for the system-wide behavior of cells, and the capability of selectively perturbing a subset of interactions at these hubs is invaluable in deciphering and manipulating regulatory mechanisms. SELEX-generated RNA aptamers are proving to be highly effective reagents for inhibiting targeted proteins, but conventional methods generate one or several aptamer clones that usually bind to a single target site most preferred by a nucleic acid ligand. We advance a generalized scheme for isolating aptamers to multiple sites on a target molecule by reducing the ability of the preferred site to select its cognate aptamer. We demonstrate the use of this scheme by generating aptamers directed to discrete functional surfaces of the yeast TATA-binding protein (TBP). Previously we selected “class 1” RNA aptamers that interfere with the TBP's binding to TATA-DNA. By masking TBP with TATA-DNA or an unamplifiable class 1 aptamer, we isolated a new aptamer class, “class 2,” that can bind a TBP·DNA complex and is in competition with binding another general transcription factor, TFIIA. Moreover, we show that both of these aptamers inhibit RNA polymerase II-dependent transcription, but analysis of template-bound factors shows they do so in mechanistically distinct and unexpected ways that can be attributed to binding either the DNA or TFIIA recognition sites. These results should spur innovative approaches to modulating other highly connected regulatory proteins. PMID:17360423

  1. Thermodynamics and kinetics of adaptive binding in the malachite green RNA aptamer.

    PubMed

    Da Costa, Jason B; Andreiev, Aurelia I; Dieckmann, Thorsten

    2013-09-24

    Adaptive binding, the ability of molecules to fold themselves around the structure of a ligand and thereby incorporating it into their three-dimensional fold, is a key feature of most RNA aptamers. The malachite green aptamer (MGA) has been shown to bind several closely related triphenyl dyes with planar and nonplanar structures in this manner. Competitive binding studies using isothermal titration calorimetry and stopped flow kinetics have been conducted with the aim of understanding the adaptive nature of RNA-ligand interaction. The results of these studies reveal that binding of one ligand can reduce the ability of the aptamer pocket to adapt to another ligand, even if this second ligand has a significantly higher affinity to the free aptamer. A similar effect is observed in the presence of Mg(2+) ions which stabilize the binding pocket in a more ligand bound-like conformation. PMID:23984874

  2. RNA Sequencing in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; Teng, Shaolei

    2015-01-01

    Schizophrenia (SCZ) is a serious psychiatric disorder that affects 1% of general population and places a heavy burden worldwide. The underlying genetic mechanism of SCZ remains unknown, but studies indicate that the disease is associated with a global gene expression disturbance across many genes. Next-generation sequencing, particularly of RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq), provides a powerful genome-scale technology to investigate the pathological processes of SCZ. RNA-Seq has been used to analyze the gene expressions and identify the novel splice isoforms and rare transcripts associated with SCZ. This paper provides an overview on the genetics of SCZ, the advantages of RNA-Seq for transcriptome analysis, the accomplishments of RNA-Seq in SCZ cohorts, and the applications of induced pluripotent stem cells and RNA-Seq in SCZ research. PMID:27053919

  3. An RNA aptamer that interferes with the DNA binding of the HSF transcription activator

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiaoching; Shi, Hua; Sevilimedu, Aarti; Liachko, Nicole; Nelson, Hillary C. M.; Lis, John T.

    2006-01-01

    Heat shock factor (HSF) is a conserved and highly potent transcription activator. It is involved in a wide variety of important biological processes including the stress response and specific steps in normal development. Reagents that interfere with HSF function would be useful for both basic studies and practical applications. We selected an RNA aptamer that binds to HSF with high specificity. Deletion analysis defined the minimal binding motif of this aptamer to be two stems and one stem–loop joined by a three-way junction. This RNA aptamer interferes with normal interaction of HSF with its DNA element, which is a key regulatory step for HSF function. The DNA-binding domain plus a flanking linker region on the HSF (DL) is essential for the RNA binding. Additionally, this aptamer inhibits HSF-induced transcription in vitro in the complex milieu of a whole cell extract. In contrast to the previously characterized NF-κB aptamer, the HSF aptamer does not simply mimic DNA binding, but rather binds to HSF in a manner distinct from DNA binding to HSF. PMID:16893958

  4. Methods for Evaluating Cell-Specific, Cell-Internalizing RNA Aptamers

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Luiza I.; Flenker, Katie S.; Hernandez, Frank J.; Klingelhutz, Aloysius J.; II, James O. McNamara; Giangrande, Paloma H.

    2013-01-01

    Recent clinical trials of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) highlight the need for robust delivery technologies that will facilitate the successful application of these therapeutics to humans. Arguably, cell targeting by conjugation to cell-specific ligands provides a viable solution to this problem. Synthetic RNA ligands (aptamers) represent an emerging class of pharmaceuticals with great potential for targeted therapeutic applications. For targeted delivery of siRNAs with aptamers, the aptamer-siRNA conjugate must be taken up by cells and reach the cytoplasm. To this end, we have developed cell-based selection approaches to isolate aptamers that internalize upon binding to their cognate receptor on the cell surface. Here we describe methods to monitor for cellular uptake of aptamers. These include: (1) antibody amplification microscopy, (2) microplate-based fluorescence assay, (3) a quantitative and ultrasensitive internalization method (“QUSIM”) and (4) a way to monitor for cytoplasmic delivery using the ribosome inactivating protein-based (RNA-RIP) assay. Collectively, these methods provide a toolset that can expedite the development of aptamer ligands to target and deliver therapeutic siRNAs in vivo. PMID:23894227

  5. Cell-specific RNA aptamer against human CCR5 specifically targets HIV-1 susceptible and inhibits HIV-1 infectivity

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jiehua; Satheesan, Sangeetha; Li, Haitang; Weinberg, Marc S.; Morris, Kevin V.; Burnett, John; Rossi, John

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5) is a receptor expressed by T-cells and macrophages that serves as a co-receptor for macrophage-tropic HIV-1. Loss of CCR5 is associated with resistance to HIV-1. Here we combine the live cell-based SELEX with high throughput sequencing technology to generate CCR5 RNA aptamers capable of specifically targeting HIV-1 susceptible cells (as siRNA delivery agent) and inhibiting HIV-1 infectivity (as antiviral agent) via block of the CCR5 required for HIV-1 to enter cells. One of the best candidates, G-3, efficiently bound and was internalized into human CCR5 expressing cells. The G-3 specifically neutralized R5 virus infection in primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and in vivo generated human CD4+ T cells with a nanomolar IC50. G-3 was also capable of transferring functional siRNAs to CCR5 expressing cells. Collectively, the cell-specific, internalizing, CCR5-targeted aptamers and aptamer-siRNA conjugates offer promise for overcoming some of the current challenges of drug resistance in HIV-1 by providing cell-type- or tissue-specific delivery of various therapeutic moieties. PMID:25754473

  6. Highly Stable Aptamers Selected from a 2′-Fully Modified fGmH RNA Library for Targeting Biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Adam D.; Kim, Dongwook; Liu, Rihe

    2014-01-01

    When developed as targeting ligands for the in vivo delivery of biomaterials to biological systems, RNA aptamers immediately face numerous obstacles, in particular nuclease degradation and post-selection 2′ modification. This study aims to develop a novel class of highly stable, 2′-fully modified RNA aptamers that are ideal for the targeted delivery of biomaterials. We demonstrated the facile transcription of a fGmH (2′-F-dG, 2′-OMe-dA/dC/dU) RNA library with unexpected hydrophobicity, the direct selection of aptamers from a fGmH RNA library that bind Staphylococcus aureus Protein A (SpA) as a model target, and the superior nuclease and serum stability of these aptamers compared to 2′-partially modified RNA variants. Characterizations of fGmH RNA aptamers binding to purified SpA and to endogenous SpA present on the surface of S. aureus cells demonstrate fGmH RNA aptamer selectivity and stability. Significantly, fGmH RNA aptamers were able to functionalize, stabilize, and further deliver aggregation-prone silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) to S. aureus with SpA-dependent antimicrobial effects. This study describes a novel aptamer class with considerable potential to improve the in vivo applicability of nucleic acid-based affinity molecules to biomaterials. PMID:25443790

  7. Quantitative selection of DNA aptamers through microfluidic selection and high-throughput sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Minseon; Xiao, Yi; Nie, Jeff; Stewart, Ron; Csordas, Andrew T.; Oh, Seung Soo; Thomson, James A.; Soh, H. Tom

    2010-01-01

    We describe the integration of microfluidic selection with high-throughput DNA sequencing technology for rapid and efficient discovery of nucleic acid aptamers. The Quantitative Selection of Aptamers through Sequencing method tracks the copy number and enrichment-fold of more than 10 million individual sequences through multiple selection rounds, enabling the identification of high-affinity aptamers without the need for the pool to fully converge to a small number of sequences. Importantly, this method allows the discrimination of sequences that arise from experimental biases rather than true high-affinity target binding. As a demonstration, we have identified aptamers that specifically bind to PDGF-BB protein with Kd < 3 nM within 3 rounds. Furthermore, we show that the aptamers identified by Quantitative Selection of Aptamers through Sequencing have ∼3–8-fold higher affinity and ∼2–4-fold higher specificity relative to those discovered through conventional cloning methods. Given that many biocombinatorial libraries are encoded with nucleic acids, we extrapolate that our method may be extended to other types of libraries for a range of molecular functions. PMID:20705898

  8. 3D Cell-SELEX: Development of RNA aptamers as molecular probes for PC-3 tumor cell line.

    PubMed

    Souza, Aline G; Marangoni, Karina; Fujimura, Patrícia T; Alves, Patrícia T; Silva, Márcio J; Bastos, Victor Alexandre F; Goulart, Luiz R; Goulart, Vivian A

    2016-02-15

    Human prostate cancer (PCa) is a highly heterogeneous and multifactorial disease. Current clinical biomarkers are not sufficiently accurate, thus being unable to predict the clinical outcome. Therefore, searching for new biomarkers aiming to improve diagnosis, prognosis and therapy is still required. In this study, we performed 3D Cell-SELEX against PC-3 prostate cancer cell line, a novel strategy to select specific nucleic acid ligands against spheroid cells in 3D cell culture. This original system combines Cell-SELEX, a process that exploits the cellular structure to generate specific ligands, and 3D cell culture, an approach that mimics the tissue microenvironment in vitro. In the first round of 3D Cell-SELEX, a negative selection against RWPE-1, non-tumor cell line, was performed to subtract non-tumor specific aptamers. The supernatant was used in eight additional rounds of selection, which were performed against PC-3 cell line. After nine selection cycles, eight PC-3 specific RNA aptamers were selected and sequenced. The aptamers presented sizes between 20 and 50 nucleotides-long, with low free energy (∆G<-13.6), which contributed for their spontaneous folding and high stability. Furthermore, our results showed the aptamer A4 as a specific ligand to prostate tumor cells, with dissociation constant in the nanomolar scale. Therefore, the novel 3D Cell-SELEX procedure improved the selection of PCa cell-surface ligands and the aptamer A4 has shown potential for the identification of prostate tumor cells, suggesting the application of this molecule in further screening assays for PCa. PMID:26821206

  9. The effect of surface contact activation and temperature on plasma coagulation with an RNA aptamer directed against factor IXa.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Anandi; Vogler, Erwin A; Sullenger, Bruce A; Becker, Richard C

    2013-01-01

    The anticoagulant properties of a novel RNA aptamer that binds FIXa depend collectively on the intensity of surface contact activation of human blood plasma, aptamer concentration, and its binding affinity for FIXa. Accordingly, anticoagulation efficiency of plasma containing any particular aptamer concentration is low when coagulation is strongly activated by hydrophilic surfaces compared to the anticoagulation efficiency in plasma that is weakly activated by hydrophobic surfaces. Anticoagulation efficiency is lower at hypothermic temperatures possibly because aptamer-FIXa binding decreases with decreasing temperatures. Experimental results demonstrating these trends are qualitatively interpreted in the context of a previously established model of anticoagulation efficiency of thrombin-binding DNA aptamers that exhibit anticoagulation properties similar to the FIXa aptamer. In principle, FIXa aptamer anticoagulants should be more efficient and therefore more clinically useful than thrombin-binding aptamers because aptamer binding to FIXa competes only with FX that is at much lower blood concentration than fibrinogen (FI) that competes with thrombin-binding aptamers. Our findings may have translatable relevance in the application of aptamer anticoagulants for clinical conditions in which blood is in direct contact with non-biological surfaces such as those encountered in cardiopulmonary bypass circuits. PMID:23054460

  10. Prostate-specific RNA aptamer: promising nucleic acid antibody-like cancer detection

    PubMed Central

    Marangoni, Karina; Neves, Adriana F.; Rocha, Rafael M.; Faria, Paulo R.; Alves, Patrícia T.; Souza, Aline G.; Fujimura, Patrícia T.; Santos, Fabiana A. A.; Araújo, Thaise G.; Ward, Laura S.; Goulart, Luiz R.

    2015-01-01

    We described the selection of a novel nucleic acid antibody-like prostate cancer (PCa) that specifically binds to the single-stranded DNA molecule from a 277-nt fragment that may have been partially paired and bound to the PCA3 RNA conformational structure. PCA3-277 aptamer ligands were obtained, and the best binding molecule, named CG3, was synthesized for validation. Aiming to prove its diagnostic utility, we used an apta-qPCR assay with CG3-aptamer conjugated to magnetic beads to capture PCA3 transcripts, which were amplified 97-fold and 7-fold higher than conventional qPCR in blood and tissue, respectively. Histopathologic analysis of 161 prostate biopsies arranged in a TMA and marked with biotin-labeled CG3-aptamer showed moderate staining in both cytoplasm and nucleus of PCa samples; in contrast, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) samples presented strong nuclear staining (78% of the cases). No staining was observed in stromal cells. In addition, using an apta-qPCR, we demonstrated that CG3-aptamer specifically recognizes the conformational PCA3-277 molecule and at least three other transcript variants, indicating that long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) is processed after transcription. We suggest that CG3-aptamer may be a useful PCa diagnostic tool. In addition, this molecule may be used in drug design and drug delivery for PCa therapy. PMID:26174796

  11. Array-based evolution of DNA aptamers allows modelling of an explicit sequence-fitness landscape

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Christopher G.; Platt, Mark; Rowe, William; Wedge, David C.; Khan, Farid; Day, Philip J. R.; McShea, Andy; Knowles, Joshua; Kell, Douglas B.

    2009-01-01

    Mapping the landscape of possible macromolecular polymer sequences to their fitness in performing biological functions is a challenge across the biosciences. A paradigm is the case of aptamers, nucleic acids that can be selected to bind particular target molecules. We have characterized the sequence-fitness landscape for aptamers binding allophycocyanin (APC) protein via a novel Closed Loop Aptameric Directed Evolution (CLADE) approach. In contrast to the conventional SELEX methodology, selection and mutation of aptamer sequences was carried out in silico, with explicit fitness assays for 44 131 aptamers of known sequence using DNA microarrays in vitro. We capture the landscape using a predictive machine learning model linking sequence features and function and validate this model using 5500 entirely separate test sequences, which give a very high observed versus predicted correlation of 0.87. This approach reveals a complex sequence-fitness mapping, and hypotheses for the physical basis of aptameric binding; it also enables rapid design of novel aptamers with desired binding properties. We demonstrate an extension to the approach by incorporating prior knowledge into CLADE, resulting in some of the tightest binding sequences. PMID:19029139

  12. RNA aptamer against autoantibodies associated with multiple sclerosis and bioluminescent detection probe on its basis.

    PubMed

    Vorobjeva, Maria A; Krasitskaya, Vasilisa V; Fokina, Alesya A; Timoshenko, Valentina V; Nevinsky, Georgy A; Venyaminova, Alya G; Frank, Ludmila A

    2014-03-01

    Nowadays, there are no specific laboratory tests for establishing the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS). The presence of proteolytic autoantibodies against myelin basic protein is now considered as a characteristic feature of MS. New 2'-F-containing RNA aptamer of high affinity and specificity to these antibodies was selected. Covalent conjugate of this aptamer and Ca(2+)-regulated photoprotein obelin was obtained for the first time and applied as a label in bioluminescent microplate assay to detect target antibodies. The developed model solid-phase microassay is simple, fast, and highly sensitive. PMID:24512542

  13. RNA aptamers as conformational probes and regulatory agents for plasminogen activator inhibitor-1.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Jeppe B; Dupont, Daniel M; Andersen, Thomas B; Nielsen, Anne F; Sang, Lu; Brix, Ditte M; Jensen, Jan K; Broos, Thomas; Hendrickx, Maarten L V; Christensen, Anni; Kjems, Jørgen; Andreasen, Peter A

    2010-05-18

    The hallmark of serpins is the ability to undergo the so-called "stressed-to-relaxed" switch during which the surface-exposed reactive center loop (RCL) becomes incorporated as strand 4 in central beta-sheet A. RCL insertion drives not only the inhibitory reaction of serpins with their target serine proteases but also the conversion to the inactive latent state. RCL insertion is coupled to conformational changes in the flexible joint region flanking beta-sheet A. One interesting serpin is plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), a fast and specific inhibitor of the serine proteases tissue-type and urokinase-type plasminogen activator. Via its flexible joints' region, native PAI-1 binds vitronectin and relaxed, protease-complexed PAI-1 certain endocytosis receptors. From a library of 35-nucleotides long 2'-fluoropyrimidine-containing RNA oligonucleotides, we have isolated two aptamers binding PAI-1 by the flexible joint region with low nanomolar K(D) values. One of the aptamers exhibited measurable binding to native PAI-1 only, while the other also bound relaxed PAI-1. While none of the aptamers inhibited the antiproteolytic effect of PAI-1, both aptamers inhibited vitronectin binding and the relaxed PAI-1-binding aptamer also endocytosis receptor binding. The aptamer binding exclusively to native PAI-1 increased the half-life for the latency transition to more than 6 h, manyfold more than vitronectin. Contact with Lys124 in the flexible joint region was critical for strong inhibition of the latency transition and the lack of binding to relaxed PAI-1. We conclude that aptamers yield important information about the serpin conformational switch and, because they can compete with high-affinity protein-protein interactions, may provide leads for pharmacological intervention. PMID:20387790

  14. The isolation of an RNA aptamer targeting to p53 protein with single amino acid mutation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Liang; Rashid, Farooq; Shah, Abdullah; Awan, Hassaan M.; Wu, Mingming; Liu, An; Wang, Jun; Zhu, Tao; Luo, Zhaofeng; Shan, Ge

    2015-01-01

    p53, known as a tumor suppressor, is a DNA binding protein that regulates cell cycle, activates DNA repair proteins, and triggers apoptosis in multicellular animals. More than 50% of human cancers contain a mutation or deletion of the p53 gene, and p53R175 is one of the hot spots of p53 mutation. Nucleic acid aptamers are short single-stranded oligonucleotides that are able to bind various targets, and they are typically isolated from an experimental procedure called systematic evolution of ligand exponential enrichment (SELEX). Using a previously unidentified strategy of contrast screening with SELEX, we have isolated an RNA aptamer targeting p53R175H. This RNA aptamer (p53R175H-APT) has a significantly stronger affinity to p53R175H than to the wild-type p53 in both in vitro and in vivo assays. p53R175H-APT decreased the growth rate, weakened the migration capability, and triggered apoptosis in human lung cancer cells harboring p53R175H. Further analysis actually indicated that p53R175H-APT might partially rescue or correct the p53R175H to function more like the wild-type p53. In situ injections of p53R175H-APT to the tumor xenografts confirmed the effects of this RNA aptamer on p53R175H mutation in mice. PMID:26216949

  15. The isolation of an RNA aptamer targeting to p53 protein with single amino acid mutation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liang; Rashid, Farooq; Shah, Abdullah; Awan, Hassaan M; Wu, Mingming; Liu, An; Wang, Jun; Zhu, Tao; Luo, Zhaofeng; Shan, Ge

    2015-08-11

    p53, known as a tumor suppressor, is a DNA binding protein that regulates cell cycle, activates DNA repair proteins, and triggers apoptosis in multicellular animals. More than 50% of human cancers contain a mutation or deletion of the p53 gene, and p53R175 is one of the hot spots of p53 mutation. Nucleic acid aptamers are short single-stranded oligonucleotides that are able to bind various targets, and they are typically isolated from an experimental procedure called systematic evolution of ligand exponential enrichment (SELEX). Using a previously unidentified strategy of contrast screening with SELEX, we have isolated an RNA aptamer targeting p53R175H. This RNA aptamer (p53R175H-APT) has a significantly stronger affinity to p53R175H than to the wild-type p53 in both in vitro and in vivo assays. p53R175H-APT decreased the growth rate, weakened the migration capability, and triggered apoptosis in human lung cancer cells harboring p53R175H. Further analysis actually indicated that p53R175H-APT might partially rescue or correct the p53R175H to function more like the wild-type p53. In situ injections of p53R175H-APT to the tumor xenografts confirmed the effects of this RNA aptamer on p53R175H mutation in mice. PMID:26216949

  16. Organic additives stabilize RNA aptamer binding of malachite green.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yubin; Chi, Hong; Wu, Yuanyuan; Marks, Robert S; Steele, Terry W J

    2016-11-01

    Aptamer-ligand binding has been utilized for biological applications due to its specific binding and synthetic nature. However, the applications will be limited if the binding or the ligand is unstable. Malachite green aptamer (MGA) and its labile ligand malachite green (MG) were found to have increasing apparent dissociation constants (Kd) as determined through the first order rate loss of emission intensity of the MGA-MG fluorescent complex. The fluorescent intensity loss was hypothesized to be from the hydrolysis of MG into malachite green carbinol base (MGOH). Random screening organic additives were found to reduce or retain the fluorescence emission and the calculated apparent Kd of MGA-MG binding. The protective effect became more apparent as the percentage of organic additives increased up to 10% v/v. The mechanism behind the organic additive protective effects was primarily from a ~5X increase in first order rate kinetics of MGOH→MG (kMGOH→MG), which significantly changed the equilibrium constant (Keq), favoring the generation of MG, versus MGOH without organic additives. A simple way has been developed to stabilize the apparent Kd of MGA-MG binding over 24h, which may be beneficial in stabilizing other triphenylmethane or carbocation ligand-aptamer interactions that are susceptible to SN1 hydrolysis. PMID:27591602

  17. Predicting candidate genomic sequences that correspond to synthetic functional RNA motifs

    PubMed Central

    Laserson, Uri; Gan, Hin Hark; Schlick, Tamar

    2005-01-01

    Riboswitches and RNA interference are important emerging mechanisms found in many organisms to control gene expression. To enhance our understanding of such RNA roles, finding small regulatory motifs in genomes presents a challenge on a wide scale. Many simple functional RNA motifs have been found by in vitro selection experiments, which produce synthetic target-binding aptamers as well as catalytic RNAs, including the hammerhead ribozyme. Motivated by the prediction of Piganeau and Schroeder [(2003) Chem. Biol., 10, 103–104] that synthetic RNAs may have natural counterparts, we develop and apply an efficient computational protocol for identifying aptamer-like motifs in genomes. We define motifs from the sequence and structural information of synthetic aptamers, search for sequences in genomes that will produce motif matches, and then evaluate the structural stability and statistical significance of the potential hits. Our application to aptamers for streptomycin, chloramphenicol, neomycin B and ATP identifies 37 candidate sequences (in coding and non-coding regions) that fold to the target aptamer structures in bacterial and archaeal genomes. Further energetic screening reveals that several candidates exhibit energetic properties and sequence conservation patterns that are characteristic of functional motifs. Besides providing candidates for experimental testing, our computational protocol offers an avenue for expanding natural RNA's functional repertoire. PMID:16254081

  18. In vitro selection and characterization of RNA aptamers binding thyroxine hormone

    PubMed Central

    Lévesque, Dominique; Beaudoin, Jean-Denis; Roy, Sébastien; Perreault, Jean-Pierre

    2006-01-01

    RNA possesses the ability to bind a wide repertoire of small molecules. Some of these binding interactions have been shown to be of primary importance in molecular biology. For example, several classes of mRNA domains, collectively referred to as riboswitches, have been shown to serve as RNA genetic control elements that sense the concentrations of specific metabolites (i.e. acting as direct sensors of chemical compounds). However, to date no RNA species binding a hormone has been reported. Here, we report that the use of an appropriate SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment) strategy results in the isolation of thyroxine-specific aptamers. Further biochemical characterization of these aptamers, including mutational studies, the use of transcripts with site-specific modified nucleotides, nuclease and chemical probing, binding-shift assays and CD, demonstrated that these RNA structures included a G-rich motif, reminiscent of a guanine quadruplex structure, adjacent to a helical region. The presence of the thyroxine appeared to be essential for the formation of the structural motif's scaffold. Moreover, the binding is shown to be specific to thyroxine (T4) and tri-iodothyronine (T3), the active forms of the hormone, whereas other inactive derivatives, including thyronine (T0), do not support complex formation. These results suggest that this aptamer specifically binds to the iodine moieties of the thyroxine, a previously unreported ability for an RNA molecule. PMID:17163839

  19. Molecular interactions and metal binding in the theophylline-binding core of an RNA aptamer.

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, G R; Wick, C L; Shields, T P; Jenison, R D; Pardi, A

    2000-01-01

    An RNA aptamer containing a 15-nt binding site shows high affinity and specificity for the bronchodilator theophylline. A variety of base modifications or 2' deoxyribose substitutions in binding-site residues were tested for theophyllinebinding affinity and the results were compared with the previously determined three-dimensional structure of the RNA-theophylline complex. The RNA-theophylline complex contains a U6-A28-U23 base triple, and disruption of this A28-U23 Hoogsteen-pair by a 7-deaza, 2'-deoxy A28 mutant reduces theophylline binding >45-fold at 25 degrees C. U24 is part of a U-turn in the core of the RNA, and disruption of this U-turn motif by a 2'-deoxy substitution of U24 also reduces theophylline binding by >90-fold. Several mutations outside the "conserved core" of the RNA aptamer showed reduced binding affinity, and these effects could be rationalized by comparison with the three-dimensional structure of the complex. Divalent ions are absolutely required for high-affinity theophylline binding. High-affinity binding was observed with 5 mM Mg2+, Mn2+, or Co2+ ions, whereas little or no significant binding was observed for other divalent or lanthanide ions. A metal-binding site in the core of the complex was revealed by paramagnetic Mn2+-induced broadening of specific RNA resonances in the NMR spectra. When caffeine is added to the aptamer in tenfold excess, the NMR spectra show no evidence for binding in the conserved core and instead the drug stacks on the terminal helix. The lack of interaction between caffeine and the theophylline-binding site emphasizes the extreme molecular discrimination of this RNA aptamer. PMID:10836787

  20. Identification and Characterization of an eIF4e DNA Aptamer That Inhibits Proliferation With High Throughput Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wei Mei; Kong, Kiat Whye; Brown, Christopher John; Quah, Soo Tng; Yeo, Hui Ling; Hoon, Shawn; Seow, Yiqi

    2014-01-01

    Development of DNA aptamer screens that are both simple and informative can increase the success rate of DNA aptamer selection and induce greater adoption. High eIF4e levels contribute to malignancies, thus eIF4e presents itself as a valuable target for DNA aptamer-based inhibition screen. Here, we demonstrate a method for the rapid selection of looped DNA aptamers against eIF4e by combining negative selection and purification in a single step, followed by characterization with high throughput sequencing. The resulting aptamers show functional binding to eIF4e and inhibit translation initiation in biochemical assays. When transfected into cells, eIF4e aptamers cause a dramatic loss of cell proliferation in tumor cells as seen with eIF4e knockdown with antisense oligonucleotides, shRNAs, and siRNAs, hinting at therapeutic possibilities. With the large data set provided by high throughput sequencing, we demonstrate that selection happens in waves and that sequencing data can be used to infer aptamer structure. Lastly, we show that ligation of looped aptamers can enhance their functional effects. These results demonstrate a rapid protocol to screen and optimize aptamers against macromolecules of interest. PMID:25514650

  1. In Vivo Selection Against Human Colorectal Cancer Xenografts Identifies an Aptamer That Targets RNA Helicase Protein DHX9.

    PubMed

    Mi, Jing; Ray, Partha; Liu, Jenny; Kuan, Chien-Tsun; Xu, Jennifer; Hsu, David; Sullenger, Bruce A; White, Rebekah R; Clary, Bryan M

    2016-01-01

    The ability to selectively target disease-related tissues with molecules is critical to the design of effective therapeutic and diagnostic reagents. Recognizing the differences between the in vivo environment and in vitro conditions, we employed an in vivo selection strategy to identify RNA aptamers (targeting motifs) that could localize to tumor in situ. One of the selected molecules is an aptamer that binds to the protein DHX9, an RNA helicase that is known to be upregulated in colorectal cancer. Upon systemic administration, the aptamer preferentially localized to the nucleus of cancer cells in vivo and thus has the potential to be used for targeted delivery. PMID:27115840

  2. A Universal Protein Tag for Delivery of SiRNA-Aptamer Chimeras

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hong Yan; Gao, Xiaohu

    2013-01-01

    siRNA-aptamer chimeras have emerged as one of the most promising approaches for targeted delivery of siRNA due to the modularity of their diblock RNA structure, relatively lower cost over other targeted delivery approaches, and, most importantly, the outstanding potential for clinical translation. However, additional challenges must be addressed for efficient RNA interference (RNAi), in particular, endosomal escape. Currently, vast majority of siRNA delivery vehicles are based on cationic materials, which form complexes with negatively charged siRNA. Unfortunately, these approaches complicate the formulations again by forming large complexes with heterogeneous sizes, unfavorable surface charges, colloidal instability, and poor targeting ligand orientation. Here, we report the development of a small and simple protein tag that complements the therapeutic and targeting functionalities of chimera with two functional domains: a dsRNA binding domain (dsRBD) for siRNA docking and a pH-dependent polyhistidine to disrupt endosomal membrane. The protein selectively tags along the siRNA block of individual chimera, rendering the overall size of the complex small, desirable for deep tissue penetration, and the aptamer block accessible for target recognition. More interestingly, we found that extending the c-terminal polyhistidine segment in the protein tag to 18 amino acids completely abolishes the RNA binding function of dsRBD. PMID:24196104

  3. A Universal Protein Tag for Delivery of SiRNA-Aptamer Chimeras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hong Yan; Gao, Xiaohu

    2013-11-01

    siRNA-aptamer chimeras have emerged as one of the most promising approaches for targeted delivery of siRNA due to the modularity of their diblock RNA structure, relatively lower cost over other targeted delivery approaches, and, most importantly, the outstanding potential for clinical translation. However, additional challenges must be addressed for efficient RNA interference (RNAi), in particular, endosomal escape. Currently, vast majority of siRNA delivery vehicles are based on cationic materials, which form complexes with negatively charged siRNA. Unfortunately, these approaches complicate the formulations again by forming large complexes with heterogeneous sizes, unfavorable surface charges, colloidal instability, and poor targeting ligand orientation. Here, we report the development of a small and simple protein tag that complements the therapeutic and targeting functionalities of chimera with two functional domains: a dsRNA binding domain (dsRBD) for siRNA docking and a pH-dependent polyhistidine to disrupt endosomal membrane. The protein selectively tags along the siRNA block of individual chimera, rendering the overall size of the complex small, desirable for deep tissue penetration, and the aptamer block accessible for target recognition. More interestingly, we found that extending the c-terminal polyhistidine segment in the protein tag to 18 amino acids completely abolishes the RNA binding function of dsRBD.

  4. Aptamer-mediated selective delivery of short RNA therapeutics in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Catuogno, Silvia; de Franciscis, Vittorio

    2014-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is an important biological process that ultimately leads to suppression of gene expression. Activators of RNAi are typically small interfering RNAs (siRNA) and microRNAs (miRNA) that offer considerable therapeutic potnetial. However, a major obstacle to take these these molecules to the clinic is the absence of safe and reliable means for their specific delivery to target cells. In this regard, a highly promising class of molecules is represented by nucleic acid aptamers. These are short, structured, single-stranded RNAs or DNAs oligonucleotides that, by binding with high specificity to target molecules, provide high affinity ligands and potential antagonists of disease-associated proteins. Further, because of the high binding specificity, aptamers represent a powerful tool for the selective delivery of therapeutic cargos, including mi/siRNAs, chemotherapeutics, toxins and nanoparticles to cancer cells or tissues, thus potentially increasing the efficacy of a given therapy as well as reducing toxicity. In this review, we will focus on recent advances in the field of aptamer-mediated mi/siRNA delivery, discussing their potential and challenges in cancer therapy. PMID:25414727

  5. RNA aptamer-based electrochemical biosensor for selective and label-free analysis of dopamine.

    PubMed

    Farjami, Elaheh; Campos, Rui; Nielsen, Jesper S; Gothelf, Kurt V; Kjems, Jørgen; Ferapontova, Elena E

    2013-01-01

    The inherent redox activity of dopamine enables its direct electrochemical in vivo analysis ( Venton , B. J.; Wightman, M. R. Anal. Chem. 2003, 75, 414A). However, dopamine analysis is complicated by the interference from other electrochemically active endogenous compounds present in the brain, including dopamine precursors and metabolites and other neurotransmitters (NT). Here we report an electrochemical RNA aptamer-based biosensor for analysis of dopamine in the presence of other NT. The biosensor exploits a specific binding of dopamine by the RNA aptamer, immobilized at a cysteamine-modified Au electrode, and further electrochemical oxidation of dopamine. Specific recognition of dopamine by the aptamer allowed a selective amperometric detection of dopamine within the physiologically relevant 100 nM to 5 μM range in the presence of competitive concentrations of catechol, epinephrine, norepinephrine, 3,4-dihydroxy-phenylalanine (L-DOPA), 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), methyldopamine, and tyramine, which gave negligible signals under conditions of experiments (electroanalysis at 0.185 V vs Ag/AgCl). The interference from ascorbic and uric acids was eliminated by application of a Nafion-coated membrane. The aptasensor response time was <1 s, and the sensitivity of analysis was 62 nA μM(-1) cm(-2). The proposed design of the aptasensor, based on electrostatic interactions between the positively charged cysteamine-modified electrode and the negatively charged aptamer, may be used as a general strategy not to restrict the conformational freedom and binding properties of surface-bound aptamers and, thus, be applicable for the development of other aptasensors. PMID:23210972

  6. A RNA-DNA Hybrid Aptamer for Nanoparticle-Based Prostate Tumor Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Leach, John C.; Wang, Andrew; Ye, Kaiming; Jin, Sha

    2016-01-01

    The side effects of radio- and chemo-therapy pose long-term challenges on a cancer patient’s health. It is, therefore, highly desirable to develop more effective therapies that can specifically target carcinoma cells without damaging normal and healthy cells. Tremendous efforts have been made in the past to develop targeted drug delivery systems for solid cancer treatment. In this study, a new aptamer, A10-3-J1, which recognizes the extracellular domain of the prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA), was designed. A super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle-aptamer-doxorubicin (SPIO-Apt-Dox) was fabricated and employed as a targeted drug delivery platform for cancer therapy. This DNA RNA hybridized aptamer antitumor agent was able to enhance the cytotoxicity of targeted cells while minimizing collateral damage to non-targeted cells. This SPIO-Apt-Dox nanoparticle has specificity to PSMA+ prostate cancer cells. Aptamer inhibited nonspecific uptake of membrane-permeable doxorubic to the non-target cells, leading to reduced untargeted cytotoxicity and endocytic uptake while enhancing targeted cytotoxicity and endocytic uptake. The experimental results indicate that the drug delivery platform can yield statistically significant effectiveness being more cytotoxic to the targeted cells as opposed to the non-targeted cells. PMID:26985893

  7. In Search of Novel Drug Target Sites on Estrogen Receptors Using RNA Aptamers

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Daiying; Chatakonda, Vamsee-Krishna; Kourtidis, Antonis; Conklin, Douglas S.

    2014-01-01

    Estrogen receptor α (ERα) is a well-validated drug target for a majority of breast cancers. But the target sites on this receptor are far from exhaustively defined. Almost all ER antagonists in clinical use function by binding to the ligand-binding pocket to occlude agonist access. Resistance to this type of drugs may develop over time, not caused by the change of ERα itself, but by changes in ER associated proteins. This observation is fueling the development of reagents that downregulate ER activity through novel binding sites. However, it is challenging to find general ER antagonists that act independently from other known ER ligands. In this report, we describe the utility of RNA aptamers in the search for new drug target sites on ERα. We have identified three high affinity aptamers and characterized one of them in detail. This aptamer interacted with ERα in a way not affected by the presence or absence of either the steroidal ligands or the estrogen response DNA elements, and effectively inhibited ER-mediated transcriptional activation in a breast cancer cell line. Serving as a novel drug lead, it may also be used to guide the rational chemical synthesis of small molecule drugs or to perform screens of small molecule libraries for those that are able to displace the aptamer from its binding site. PMID:24588102

  8. An RNA Aptamer Targets the PDZ-Binding Motif of the HPV16 E6 Oncoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Belyaeva, Tamara A.; Nicol, Clare; Cesur, Özlem; Travé, Gilles; Blair, George Eric; Stonehouse, Nicola J.

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) is a high-risk DNA tumour virus which is the primary causative agent of cervical cancer. Cell transformation arises from deregulated expression of the E6 and E7 oncogenes. E6 has been shown to bind a number of cellular proteins, including p53 and proteins containing a PDZ domain. This study reports the first RNA aptamers to E6. These have been employed as molecular tools to further investigate E6-p53 and E6-PDZ interactions. This study is focussed on two aptamers (termed F2 and F4) which induced apoptosis in cells derived from an HPV16-transformed cervical carcinoma. The molecules were able to inhibit the interaction between E6 and PDZ1 from Magi1, with F2 being the most effective inhibitor. Neither of the aptamers inhibited E6-p53 interaction or p53 degradation. This study shows the specificity of this approach and highlights the potential benefits of the E6 aptamers as potential therapeutic or diagnostic agents in the future. PMID:25062098

  9. Electroanalysis of pM-levels of urokinase plasminogen activator in serum by phosphorothioated RNA aptamer.

    PubMed

    Jarczewska, Marta; Kékedy-Nagy, László; Nielsen, Jesper S; Campos, Rui; Kjems, Jørgen; Malinowska, Elżbieta; Ferapontova, Elena E

    2015-06-01

    Protein biomarkers of cancer allow a dramatic improvement in cancer diagnostics as compared to the traditional histological characterisation of tumours by enabling a non-invasive analysis of cancer development and treatment. Here, an electrochemical label-free assay for urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), a universal biomarker of several cancers, has been developed based on the recently selected uPA-specific fluorinated RNA aptamer, tethered to a gold electrode via a phosphorothioated dA tag, and soluble redox indicators. The binding properties of the uPA-aptamer couple and interference from the non-specific adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) were modulated by the electrode surface charge. A nM uPA electroanalysis at positively charged surfaces, complicated by the competitive adsorption of BSA, was tuned to the pM uPA analysis at negative surface charges of the electrode, being improved in the presence of negatively charged BSA. The aptamer affinity for uPA displayed via the binding/dissociation constant relationship correspondingly increased, ca. three orders of magnitude, from 0.441 to 367. Under optimal conditions, the aptasensor allowed 10(-12)-10(-9) M uPA analysis, also in serum, being practically useful for clinical applications. The proposed strategy for optimization of the electrochemical protein sensing is of particular importance for the assessment and optimization of in vivo protein ligand binding by surface-tethered aptamers. PMID:25620243

  10. Distinct transcriptional responses of RNA polymerases I, II and III to aptamers that bind TBP

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Xiaochun; Shi, Hua; Lis, John T.

    2005-01-01

    The TATA-binding protein (TBP) is a general factor that is involved in transcription by all three types of nuclear RNA polymerase. To delineate the roles played by the DNA-binding surface of TBP in these transcription reactions, we used a set of RNA aptamers directed against TBP and examined their ability to perturb transcription in vitro by the different RNA polymerases. Distinct responses to the TBP aptamers were observed for transcription by different types of polymerase at either the initiation, reinitiation or both stages of the transcription cycle. We further probed the TBP interactions in the TFIIIB•DNA complex to elucidate the mechanism for the different sensitivity of Pol III dependent transcription before and after preinitiation complex (PIC) formation. Lastly, the aptamers were employed to measure the time required for Pol III PIC formation in vitro. This approach can be generalized to define the involvement of a particular region on the surface of a protein at particular stages in a biological process. PMID:15701755

  11. Acyclic Identification of Aptamers for Human alpha-Thrombin Using Over-Represented Libraries and Deep Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Kupakuwana, Gillian V.; Crill, James E.; McPike, Mark P.; Borer, Philip N.

    2011-01-01

    Background Aptamers are oligonucleotides that bind proteins and other targets with high affinity and selectivity. Twenty years ago elements of natural selection were adapted to in vitro selection in order to distinguish aptamers among randomized sequence libraries. The primary bottleneck in traditional aptamer discovery is multiple cycles of in vitro evolution. Methodology/Principal Findings We show that over-representation of sequences in aptamer libraries and deep sequencing enables acyclic identification of aptamers. We demonstrated this by isolating a known family of aptamers for human α-thrombin. Aptamers were found within a library containing an average of 56,000 copies of each possible randomized 15mer segment. The high affinity sequences were counted many times above the background in 2–6 million reads. Clustering analysis of sequences with more than 10 counts distinguished two sequence motifs with candidates at high abundance. Motif I contained the previously observed consensus 15mer, Thb1 (46,000 counts), and related variants with mostly G/T substitutions; secondary analysis showed that affinity for thrombin correlated with abundance (Kd = 12 nM for Thb1). The signal-to-noise ratio for this experiment was roughly 10,000∶1 for Thb1. Motif II was unrelated to Thb1 with the leading candidate (29,000 counts) being a novel aptamer against hexose sugars in the storage and elution buffers for Concanavilin A (Kd = 0.5 µM for α-methyl-mannoside); ConA was used to immobilize α-thrombin. Conclusions/Significance Over-representation together with deep sequencing can dramatically shorten the discovery process, distinguish aptamers having a wide range of affinity for the target, allow an exhaustive search of the sequence space within a simplified library, reduce the quantity of the target required, eliminate cycling artifacts, and should allow multiplexing of sequencing experiments and targets. PMID:21625587

  12. Cellular delivery of shRNA using aptamer-conjugated PLL-alkyl-PEI nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Askarian, Saeedeh; Abnous, Khalil; Taghavi, Sahar; Oskuee, Reza Kazemi; Ramezani, Mohammad

    2015-12-01

    Introduction of an efficient gene delivery vector is still the main challenge of gene therapy. Both polyethylenimine (PEI) and poly(l-lysine) (PLL) comprise disadvantages which limited their application. To explore whether their deficiencies could be compensated by preparing copolymers consisting of both PLL and PEI, we generated several combinations of PLL-alkyl-PEI copolymers conjugated to aptamer and evaluated their both gene delivery efficiency and down-regulation of Bcl-XL, an anti-apoptotic gene, in lung cancer cell line. PLL was conjugated to either 10% or 50% of PEI by grafting different percentages of PEI to alkylated-PLL as core. The properties of modified polymers including size, surface charge density, DNA condensation ability, buffering capacity and cytotoxicity were evaluated. According to transfection results, aptamer conjugated PLL-alkyl-10%-PEI (PLPE8%) was selected for further gene silencing study by plasmid shRNA. Decrease in Bcl-XL gene expression was estimated by both RT-PCR and western-blot experiments. The obtained results revealed that the new copolymers had appropriate nano-scale size (117-128 nm) even after aptamer conjugation (168-183 nm). Moreover, they exhibited increased transfection efficiencies by up to 1.8-5 folds and acceptable cytotoxicity. The apoptosis was induced in transfected cells by shRNA-aptamer-copolymer due to the down-regulation of mRNA and protein levels. This study suggested a new vector for targeted non-viral gene delivery with high transfection efficiency in lung cancer or pulmonary systems. PMID:26433348

  13. AMPLIFICATION OF RIBOSOMAL RNA SEQUENCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This book chapter offers an overview of the use of ribosomal RNA sequences. A history of the technology traces the evolution of techniques to measure bacterial phylogenetic relationships and recent advances in obtaining rRNA sequence information. The manual also describes procedu...

  14. iSpinach: a fluorogenic RNA aptamer optimized for in vitro applications

    PubMed Central

    Autour, Alexis; Westhof, Eric; Ryckelynck, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Using random mutagenesis and high throughput screening by microfluidic-assisted In Vitro Compartmentalization, we report the isolation of an order of magnitude times brighter mutants of the light-up RNA aptamers Spinach that are far less salt-sensitive and with a much higher thermal stability than the parent molecule. Further engineering gave iSpinach, a molecule with folding and fluorescence properties surpassing those of all currently known aptamer based on the fluorogenic co-factor 3,5-difluoro-4-hydroxybenzylidene imidazolinone (DFHBI). We illustrate the potential of iSpinach in a new sensitive and high throughput-compatible fluorogenic assay that measures co-transcriptionally the catalytic constant (kcat) of a model ribozyme. PMID:26932363

  15. iSpinach: a fluorogenic RNA aptamer optimized for in vitro applications.

    PubMed

    Autour, Alexis; Westhof, Eric; Ryckelynck, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Using random mutagenesis and high throughput screening by microfluidic-assisted In Vitro Compartmentalization, we report the isolation of an order of magnitude times brighter mutants of the light-up RNA aptamers Spinach that are far less salt-sensitive and with a much higher thermal stability than the parent molecule. Further engineering gave iSpinach, a molecule with folding and fluorescence properties surpassing those of all currently known aptamer based on the fluorogenic co-factor 3,5-difluoro-4-hydroxybenzylidene imidazolinone (DFHBI). We illustrate the potential of iSpinach in a new sensitive and high throughput-compatible fluorogenic assay that measures co-transcriptionally the catalytic constant (kcat) of a model ribozyme. PMID:26932363

  16. A combinatorial approach to the repertoire of RNA kissing motifs; towards multiplex detection by switching hairpin aptamers.

    PubMed

    Durand, Guillaume; Dausse, Eric; Goux, Emma; Fiore, Emmanuelle; Peyrin, Eric; Ravelet, Corinne; Toulmé, Jean-Jacques

    2016-05-19

    Loop-loop (also known as kissing) interactions between RNA hairpins are involved in several mechanisms in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes such as the regulation of the plasmid copy number or the dimerization of retroviral genomes. The stability of kissing complexes relies on loop parameters (base composition, sequence and size) and base combination at the loop-loop helix - stem junctions. In order to identify kissing partners that could be used as regulatory elements or building blocks of RNA scaffolds, we analysed a pool of 5.2 × 10(6) RNA hairpins with randomized loops. We identified more than 50 pairs of kissing RNA hairpins. Two kissing motifs, 5'CCNY and 5'RYRY, generate highly stable complexes with KDs in the low nanomolar range. Such motifs were introduced in the apical loop of hairpin aptamers that switch between unfolded and folded state upon binding to their cognate target molecule, hence their name aptaswitch. The aptaswitch-ligand complex is specifically recognized by a second RNA hairpin named aptakiss through loop-loop interaction. Taking advantage of our kissing motif repertoire we engineered aptaswitch-aptakiss modules for purine derivatives, namely adenosine, GTP and theophylline and demonstrated that these molecules can be specifically and simultaneously detected by surface plasmon resonance or by fluorescence anisotropy. PMID:27067541

  17. A combinatorial approach to the repertoire of RNA kissing motifs; towards multiplex detection by switching hairpin aptamers

    PubMed Central

    Durand, Guillaume; Dausse, Eric; Goux, Emma; Fiore, Emmanuelle; Peyrin, Eric; Ravelet, Corinne; Toulmé, Jean-Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Loop–loop (also known as kissing) interactions between RNA hairpins are involved in several mechanisms in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes such as the regulation of the plasmid copy number or the dimerization of retroviral genomes. The stability of kissing complexes relies on loop parameters (base composition, sequence and size) and base combination at the loop–loop helix - stem junctions. In order to identify kissing partners that could be used as regulatory elements or building blocks of RNA scaffolds, we analysed a pool of 5.2 × 106 RNA hairpins with randomized loops. We identified more than 50 pairs of kissing RNA hairpins. Two kissing motifs, 5′CCNY and 5′RYRY, generate highly stable complexes with KDs in the low nanomolar range. Such motifs were introduced in the apical loop of hairpin aptamers that switch between unfolded and folded state upon binding to their cognate target molecule, hence their name aptaswitch. The aptaswitch–ligand complex is specifically recognized by a second RNA hairpin named aptakiss through loop–loop interaction. Taking advantage of our kissing motif repertoire we engineered aptaswitch–aptakiss modules for purine derivatives, namely adenosine, GTP and theophylline and demonstrated that these molecules can be specifically and simultaneously detected by surface plasmon resonance or by fluorescence anisotropy. PMID:27067541

  18. Identification of sequence–structure RNA binding motifs for SELEX-derived aptamers

    PubMed Central

    Hoinka, Jan; Zotenko, Elena; Friedman, Adam; Sauna, Zuben E.; Przytycka, Teresa M.

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential Enrichment (SELEX) represents a state-of-the-art technology to isolate single-stranded (ribo)nucleic acid fragments, named aptamers, which bind to a molecule (or molecules) of interest via specific structural regions induced by their sequence-dependent fold. This powerful method has applications in designing protein inhibitors, molecular detection systems, therapeutic drugs and antibody replacement among others. However, full understanding and consequently optimal utilization of the process has lagged behind its wide application due to the lack of dedicated computational approaches. At the same time, the combination of SELEX with novel sequencing technologies is beginning to provide the data that will allow the examination of a variety of properties of the selection process. Results: To close this gap we developed, Aptamotif, a computational method for the identification of sequence–structure motifs in SELEX-derived aptamers. To increase the chances of identifying functional motifs, Aptamotif uses an ensemble-based approach. We validated the method using two published aptamer datasets containing experimentally determined motifs of increasing complexity. We were able to recreate the author's findings to a high degree, thus proving the capability of our approach to identify binding motifs in SELEX data. Additionally, using our new experimental dataset, we illustrate the application of Aptamotif to elucidate several properties of the selection process. Contact: przytyck@ncbi.nlm.nih.gov, Zuben.Sauna@fda.hhs.gov PMID:22689764

  19. RNA aptamers for an essential prebiotic molecule: adenine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meli, M.; Vergne, J.; Josse, T.; Décout, J.-L.; Maurel, M.-C.

    2001-08-01

    Among all known bio-organic molecules within the living cells, RNA molecules are the only ones storing genetic information and performing catalysis. The RNA world hypthesis assumes that livings on earth are derived from an RNA molecular ancestor where RNA both stored the genetic information and catalyzed the first metabolic reactions. Among diverse RNA worlds proposed, it is thought that the invention of translation and encoded peptide synthesis took place with a "breakthrough organism", then giving rise to a ribonucleoprotein (RNP) world. Finally, modern biochemistry arose with the invention of DNA and the birth of modern molecular biology where the information flows from DNA to RNA which directs protein synthesis. Considering modern metabolism, it is possible to assign biochemical traits to the last common ancestor by simple parsimony rules, and assumptions about earlier metabolisms are possible using chemical criteria. According to this point of view, modern metabolism is considered as a palimpsest that has to be read and deciphered in ordered to understand its origin and evolution.

  20. Characterization of an RNA Aptamer Against HPV-16 L1 Virus-Like Particles

    PubMed Central

    Leija-Montoya, Ana Gabriela; Benítez-Hess, María Luisa; Toscano-Garibay, Julia Dolores

    2014-01-01

    The human papillomavirus (HPV) capsid is mainly composed of the L1 protein that can self-assemble into virus-like particles (VLPs) that are structurally and immunologically similar to the infectious virions. We report here the characterization of RNA aptamers that recognize baculovirus-produced HPV-16 L1 VLPs. Interaction and slot-blot binding assays showed that all isolated aptamers efficiently bound HPV-16 VLPs, although the Sc5-c3 aptamer showed the highest specificity and affinity (Kd=0.05 pM). Sc5-c3 secondary structure consisted of a hairpin with a symmetric bubble and an unstructured 3′end. Biochemical and genetic analyses showed that the Sc5-c3 main loop is directly involved on VLPs binding. In particular, binding specificity appeared mediated by five non-consecutive nucleotide positions. Experiments using bacterial-produced HPV-16 L1 resulted in low Sc5-c3 binding, suggesting that recognition of HPV-16 L1 VLPs relies on quaternary structure features not present in bacteria-produced L1 protein. Sc5-c3 produced specific and stable binding to HPV-16 L1 VLPs even in biofluid protein mixes and thus it may provide a potential diagnostic tool for active HPV infection. PMID:25111024

  1. Characterization of an RNA aptamer against HPV-16 L1 virus-like particles.

    PubMed

    Leija-Montoya, Ana Gabriela; Benítez-Hess, María Luisa; Toscano-Garibay, Julia Dolores; Alvarez-Salas, Luis Marat

    2014-10-01

    The human papillomavirus (HPV) capsid is mainly composed of the L1 protein that can self-assemble into virus-like particles (VLPs) that are structurally and immunologically similar to the infectious virions. We report here the characterization of RNA aptamers that recognize baculovirus-produced HPV-16 L1 VLPs. Interaction and slot-blot binding assays showed that all isolated aptamers efficiently bound HPV-16 VLPs, although the Sc5-c3 aptamer showed the highest specificity and affinity (Kd=0.05 pM). Sc5-c3 secondary structure consisted of a hairpin with a symmetric bubble and an unstructured 3'end. Biochemical and genetic analyses showed that the Sc5-c3 main loop is directly involved on VLPs binding. In particular, binding specificity appeared mediated by five non-consecutive nucleotide positions. Experiments using bacterial-produced HPV-16 L1 resulted in low Sc5-c3 binding, suggesting that recognition of HPV-16 L1 VLPs relies on quaternary structure features not present in bacteria-produced L1 protein. Sc5-c3 produced specific and stable binding to HPV-16 L1 VLPs even in biofluid protein mixes and thus it may provide a potential diagnostic tool for active HPV infection. PMID:25111024

  2. Synthetic Polymer Hybridization with DNA and RNA Directs Nanoparticle Loading, Silencing Delivery, and Aptamer Function

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhun; Xia, Xin; Bong, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    We report herein discrete triplex hybridization of DNA and RNA with polyacrylates. Length-monodisperse triazine-derivatized polymers were prepared on gram-scale by reversible addition–fragmentation chain-transfer polymerization. Despite stereoregio backbone heterogeneity, the triazine polymers bind T/U-rich DNA or RNA with nanomolar affinity upon mixing in a 1:1 ratio, as judged by thermal melts, circular dichroism, gel-shift assays, and fluorescence quenching. We call these polyacrylates “bifacial polymer nucleic acids” (bPoNAs). Nucleic acid hybridization with bPoNA enables DNA loading onto polymer nanoparticles, siRNA silencing delivery, and can further serve as an allosteric trigger of RNA aptamer function. Thus, bPoNAs can serve as tools for both non-covalent bioconjugation and structure–function nucleation. It is anticipated that bPoNAs will have utility in both bio- and nanotechnology. PMID:26138550

  3. Synthetic Polymer Hybridization with DNA and RNA Directs Nanoparticle Loading, Silencing Delivery, and Aptamer Function.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhun; Xia, Xin; Bong, Dennis

    2015-07-22

    We report herein discrete triplex hybridization of DNA and RNA with polyacrylates. Length-monodisperse triazine-derivatized polymers were prepared on gram-scale by reversible addition-fragmentation chain-transfer polymerization. Despite stereoregio backbone heterogeneity, the triazine polymers bind T/U-rich DNA or RNA with nanomolar affinity upon mixing in a 1:1 ratio, as judged by thermal melts, circular dichroism, gel-shift assays, and fluorescence quenching. We call these polyacrylates "bifacial polymer nucleic acids" (bPoNAs). Nucleic acid hybridization with bPoNA enables DNA loading onto polymer nanoparticles, siRNA silencing delivery, and can further serve as an allosteric trigger of RNA aptamer function. Thus, bPoNAs can serve as tools for both non-covalent bioconjugation and structure-function nucleation. It is anticipated that bPoNAs will have utility in both bio- and nanotechnology. PMID:26138550

  4. Sequence-dependent folding landscapes of adenine riboswitch aptamers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jong-Chin; Hyeon, Changbong; Thirumalai, D.

    Prediction of the functions of riboswitches requires a quantitative description of the folding landscape so that the barriers and time scales for the conformational change in the switching region in the aptamer can be estimated. Using a combination of all atom molecular dynamics and coarse-grained model simulations we studied the response of adenine (A) binding add and pbuE A-riboswitches to mechanical force. The two riboswitches contain a structurally similar three-way junction formed by three paired helices, P1, P2, and P3, but carry out different functions. Using pulling simulations, with structures generated in MD simulations, we show that after P1 rips the dominant unfolding pathway in add A-riboswitch is the rupture of P2 followed by unraveling of P3. In the pbuE A-riboswitch, after P1 unfolds P3 ruptures ahead of P2. The order of unfolding of the helices, which is in accord with single molecule pulling experiments, is determined by the relative stabilities of the individual helices. Our results show that the stability of isolated helices determines the order of assembly and response to force in these non-coding regions. We use the simulated free energy profile for pbuE A-riboswitch to estimate the time scale for allosteric switching, which shows that this riboswitch is under kinetic control lending additional support to the conclusion based on single molecule pulling experiments. A consequence of the stability hypothesis is that a single point mutation (U28C) in the P2 helix of the add A-riboswitch, which increases the stability of P2, would make the folding landscapes of the two riboswitches similar. This prediction can be tested in single molecule pulling experiments.

  5. Molecular Mechanism for Inhibition of G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 2 by a Selective RNA Aptamer

    SciTech Connect

    Tesmer, Valerie M.; Lennarz, Sabine; Mayer, Günter; Tesmer, John J.G.

    2012-08-31

    Cardiovascular homeostasis is maintained in part by the rapid desensitization of activated heptahelical receptors that have been phosphorylated by G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2). However, during chronic heart failure GRK2 is upregulated and believed to contribute to disease progression. We have determined crystallographic structures of GRK2 bound to an RNA aptamer that potently and selectively inhibits kinase activity. Key to the mechanism of inhibition is the positioning of an adenine nucleotide into the ATP-binding pocket and interactions with the basic {alpha}F-{alpha}G loop region of the GRK2 kinase domain. Constraints imposed on the RNA by the terminal stem of the aptamer also play a role. These results highlight how a high-affinity aptamer can be used to selectively trap a novel conformational state of a protein kinase.

  6. Molecular mechanism for inhibition of G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 by a selective RNA aptamer

    PubMed Central

    Tesmer, Valerie M.; Lennarz, Sabine; Mayer, Günter; Tesmer, John J. G.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Cardiovascular homeostasis is maintained in part by the rapid desensitization of activated heptahelical receptors that have been phosphorylated by G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2). However, during chronic heart failure GRK2 is upregulated and believed to contribute to disease progression. We have determined crystallographic structures of GRK2 bound to an RNA aptamer that potently and selectively inhibits kinase activity. Key to the mechanism of inhibition is the positioning of an adenine nucleotide into the ATP-binding pocket and interactions with the basic αF-αG loop region of the GRK2 kinase domain. Constraints imposed on the RNA by the terminal stem of the aptamer also play a role. These results highlight how a high affinity aptamer can be used to selectively trap a novel conformational state of a protein kinase. PMID:22727813

  7. Aptamers to Escherichia coli core RNA polymerase that sense its interaction with rifampicin, sigma-subunit and GreB.

    PubMed

    Kulbachinskiy, Andrey; Feklistov, Andrey; Krasheninnikov, Igor; Goldfarb, Alex; Nikiforov, Vadim

    2004-12-01

    Bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP) is the central enzyme of gene expression that is responsible for the synthesis of all types of cellular RNAs. The process of transcription is accompanied by complex structural rearrangements of RNAP. Despite the recent progress in structural studies of RNAP, detailed mechanisms of conformational changes of RNAP that occur at different stages of transcription remain unknown. The goal of this work was to obtain novel ligands to RNAP which would target different epitopes of the enzyme and serve as specific probes to study the mechanism of transcription and conformational flexibility of RNAP. Using in vitro selection methods, we obtained 13 classes of ssDNA aptamers against Escherichia coli core RNAP. The minimal nucleic acid scaffold (an oligonucleotide construct imitating DNA and RNA in elongation complex), rifampicin and the sigma70-subunit inhibited binding of the aptamers to RNAP core but did not affect the dissociation rate of preformed RNAP-aptamer complexes. We argue that these ligands sterically block access of the aptamers to their binding sites within the main RNAP channel. In contrast, transcript cleavage factor GreB increased the rate of dissociation of preformed RNAP-aptamer complexes. This suggested that GreB that binds RNAP outside the main channel actively disrupts RNAP-aptamer complexes by inducing conformational changes in the channel. We propose that the aptamers obtained in this work will be useful for studying the interactions of RNAP with various ligands and regulatory factors and for investigating the conformational flexibility of the enzyme. PMID:15606780

  8. Delivery of chemo-sensitizing siRNAs to HER2+-breast cancer cells using RNA aptamers

    PubMed Central

    Thiel, Kristina W.; Hernandez, Luiza I.; Dassie, Justin P.; Thiel, William H.; Liu, Xiuying; Stockdale, Katie R.; Rothman, Alissa M.; Hernandez, Frank J.; McNamara, James O.; Giangrande, Paloma H.

    2012-01-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) expression in breast cancer is associated with an aggressive phenotype and poor prognosis, making it an appealing therapeutic target. Trastuzumab, an HER2 antibody-based inhibitor, is currently the leading targeted treatment for HER2+-breast cancers. Unfortunately, many patients inevitably develop resistance to the therapy, highlighting the need for alternative targeted therapeutic options. In this study, we used a novel, cell-based selection approach for isolating ‘cell-type specific’, ‘cell-internalizing RNA ligands (aptamers)’ capable of delivering therapeutic small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) to HER2-expressing breast cancer cells. RNA aptamers with the greatest specificity and internalization potential were covalently linked to siRNAs targeting the anti-apoptotic gene, Bcl-2. We demonstrate that, when applied to cells, the HER2 aptamer-Bcl-2 siRNA conjugates selectively internalize into HER2+-cells and silence Bcl-2 gene expression. Importantly, Bcl-2 silencing sensitizes these cells to chemotherapy (cisplatin) suggesting a potential new therapeutic approach for treating breast cancers with HER2+-status. In summary, we describe a novel cell-based selection methodology that enables the identification of cell-internalizing RNA aptamers for targeting therapeutic siRNAs to HER2-expressing breast cancer cells. The future refinement of this technology may promote the widespread use of RNA-based reagents for targeted therapeutic applications. PMID:22467215

  9. Recent Progress in Aptamer-Based Functional Probes for Bioanalysis and Biomedicine.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huimin; Zhou, Leiji; Zhu, Zhi; Yang, Chaoyong

    2016-07-11

    Nucleic acid aptamers are short synthetic DNA or RNA sequences that can bind to a wide range of targets with high affinity and specificity. In recent years, aptamers have attracted increasing research interest due to their unique features of high binding affinity and specificity, small size, excellent chemical stability, easy chemical synthesis, facile modification, and minimal immunogenicity. These properties make aptamers ideal recognition ligands for bioanalysis, disease diagnosis, and cancer therapy. This review highlights the recent progress in aptamer selection and the latest applications of aptamer-based functional probes in the fields of bioanalysis and biomedicine. PMID:27243551

  10. Split Spinach Aptamer for Highly Selective Recognition of DNA and RNA at Ambient Temperatures.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Nanami; Kolpashchikov, Dmitry M

    2016-09-01

    Split spinach aptamer (SSA) probes for fluorescent analysis of nucleic acids were designed and tested. In SSA design, two RNA or RNA/DNA strands hybridized to a specific nucleic acid analyte and formed a binding site for low-fluorescent 3,5-difluoro-4-hydroxybenzylidene imidazolinone (DFHBI) dye, which resulted in up to a 270-fold increase in fluorescence. The major advantage of the SSA over state-of-the art fluorescent probes is high selectivity: it produces only background fluorescence in the presence of a single-base-mismatched analyte, even at room temperature. SSA is therefore a promising tool for label-free analysis of nucleic acids at ambient temperatures. PMID:27305425

  11. Targeted Delivery of C/EBPα -saRNA by Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma-specific RNA Aptamers Inhibits Tumor Growth In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Sorah; Huang, Kai-Wen; Reebye, Vikash; Mintz, Paul; Tien, Yu-Wen; Lai, Hong-Shiee; Sætrom, Pål; Reccia, Isabella; Swiderski, Piotr; Armstrong, Brian; Jozwiak, Agnieszka; Spalding, Duncan; Jiao, Long; Habib, Nagy; Rossi, John J

    2016-01-01

    The 5-year survival rate for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) remains dismal despite current chemotherapeutic agents and inhibitors of molecular targets. As the incidence of PDAC constantly increases, more effective multidrug approaches must be made. Here, we report a novel method of delivering antitumorigenic therapy in PDAC by upregulating the transcriptional factor CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-α (C/EBPα), recognized for its antiproliferative effects. Small activating RNA (saRNA) duplexes designed to increase C/EBPα expression were linked onto PDAC-specific 2′-Fluropyrimidine RNA aptamers (2′F-RNA) - P19 and P1 for construction of a cell type–specific delivery vehicle. Both P19- and P1-C/EBPα-saRNA conjugates increased expression of C/EBPα and significantly suppressed cell proliferation. Tail vein injection of the saRNA/aptamer conjugates in PANC-1 and in gemcitabine-resistant AsPC-1 mouse-xenografts led to reduced tumor size with no observed toxicity. To exploit the specificity of the P19/P1 aptamers for PDAC cells, we also assessed if conjugation with Cy3 would allow it to be used as a diagnostic tool on archival human pancreatic duodenectomy tissue sections. Scoring pattern from 72 patients suggested a positive correlation between high fluorescent signal in the high mortality patient groups. We propose a novel aptamer-based strategy for delivery of targeted molecular therapy in advanced PDAC where current modalities fail. PMID:26983359

  12. Nucleic Acid Aptamers: Research Tools in Disease Diagnostics and Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Yadava, Pramod K.

    2014-01-01

    Aptamers are short sequences of nucleic acid (DNA or RNA) or peptide molecules which adopt a conformation and bind cognate ligands with high affinity and specificity in a manner akin to antibody-antigen interactions. It has been globally acknowledged that aptamers promise a plethora of diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Although use of nucleic acid aptamers as targeted therapeutics or mediators of targeted drug delivery is a relatively new avenue of research, one aptamer-based drug “Macugen” is FDA approved and a series of aptamer-based drugs are in clinical pipelines. The present review discusses the aspects of design, unique properties, applications, and development of different aptamers to aid in cancer diagnosis, prevention, and/or treatment under defined conditions. PMID:25050359

  13. Efficient selection of biomineralizing DNA aptamers using deep sequencing and population clustering.

    PubMed

    Bawazer, Lukmaan A; Newman, Aaron M; Gu, Qian; Ibish, Abdullah; Arcila, Mary; Cooper, James B; Meldrum, Fiona C; Morse, Daniel E

    2014-01-28

    DNA-based information systems drive the combinatorial optimization processes of natural evolution, including the evolution of biominerals. Advances in high-throughput DNA sequencing expand the power of DNA as a potential information platform for combinatorial engineering, but many applications remain to be developed due in part to the challenge of handling large amounts of sequence data. Here we employ high-throughput sequencing and a recently developed clustering method (AutoSOME) to identify single-stranded DNA sequence families that bind specifically to ZnO semiconductor mineral surfaces. These sequences were enriched from a diverse DNA library after a single round of screening, whereas previous screening approaches typically require 5-15 rounds of enrichment for effective sequence identification. The consensus sequence of the largest cluster was poly d(T)30. This consensus sequence exhibited clear aptamer behavior and was shown to promote the synthesis of crystalline ZnO from aqueous solution at near-neutral pH. This activity is significant, as the crystalline form of this wide-bandgap semiconductor is not typically amenable to solution synthesis in this pH range. High-resolution TEM revealed that this DNA synthesis route yields ZnO nanoparticles with an amorphous-crystalline core-shell structure, suggesting that the mechanism of mineralization involves nanoscale coacervation around the DNA template. We thus demonstrate that our new method, termed Single round Enrichment of Ligands by deep Sequencing (SEL-Seq), can facilitate biomimetic synthesis of technological nanomaterials by accelerating combinatorial selection of biomolecular-mineral interactions. Moreover, by enabling direct characterization of sequence family demographics, we anticipate that SEL-Seq will enhance aptamer discovery in applications employing additional rounds of screening. PMID:24341560

  14. Co-targeting EGFR and survivin with a bivalent aptamer-dual siRNA chimera effectively suppresses prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hong Yan; Yu, Xiaolin; Liu, Haitao; Wu, Daqing; She, Jin-Xiong

    2016-01-01

    Current targeted therapies using small kinase inhibitors and antibodies have limited efficacy in treating prostate cancer (PCa), a leading cause of cancer death in American men. We have developed a novel strategy by engineering an RNA-based aptamer-siRNA chimera, in which a bivalent aptamer specifically binds prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) via an antibody-like structure to promote siRNA internalization in PCa cells, and two siRNAs specific to EGFR and survivin are fused between two aptamers. The chimera is able to inhibit EGFR and survivin simultaneously and induce apoptosis effectively in vitro and in vivo. In the C4-2 PCa xenograft model, the treatment with the chimera significantly suppresses tumor growth and angiogenesis. The inhibition of angiogenesis is mediated by an EGFR-HIF1α-VEGF-dependent mechanism. Our results support that the bivalent aptamer-driven delivery of two siRNAs could be a new combination therapeutic strategy to effectively inhibit multiple and conventionally “undruggable” targets. PMID:27456457

  15. Co-targeting EGFR and survivin with a bivalent aptamer-dual siRNA chimera effectively suppresses prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong Yan; Yu, Xiaolin; Liu, Haitao; Wu, Daqing; She, Jin-Xiong

    2016-01-01

    Current targeted therapies using small kinase inhibitors and antibodies have limited efficacy in treating prostate cancer (PCa), a leading cause of cancer death in American men. We have developed a novel strategy by engineering an RNA-based aptamer-siRNA chimera, in which a bivalent aptamer specifically binds prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) via an antibody-like structure to promote siRNA internalization in PCa cells, and two siRNAs specific to EGFR and survivin are fused between two aptamers. The chimera is able to inhibit EGFR and survivin simultaneously and induce apoptosis effectively in vitro and in vivo. In the C4-2 PCa xenograft model, the treatment with the chimera significantly suppresses tumor growth and angiogenesis. The inhibition of angiogenesis is mediated by an EGFR-HIF1α-VEGF-dependent mechanism. Our results support that the bivalent aptamer-driven delivery of two siRNAs could be a new combination therapeutic strategy to effectively inhibit multiple and conventionally "undruggable" targets. PMID:27456457

  16. Deciphering the RNA landscape by RNAome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Derks, Kasper W J; Misovic, Branislav; van den Hout, Mirjam C G N; Kockx, Christel E M; Gomez, Cesar Payan; Brouwer, Rutger W W; Vrieling, Harry; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J; van IJcken, Wilfred F J; Pothof, Joris

    2015-01-01

    Current RNA expression profiling methods rely on enrichment steps for specific RNA classes, thereby not detecting all RNA species in an unperturbed manner. We report strand-specific RNAome sequencing that determines expression of small and large RNAs from rRNA-depleted total RNA in a single sequence run. Since current analysis pipelines cannot reliably analyze small and large RNAs simultaneously, we developed TRAP, Total Rna Analysis Pipeline, a robust interface that is also compatible with existing RNA sequencing protocols. RNAome sequencing quantitatively preserved all RNA classes, allowing cross-class comparisons that facilitates the identification of relationships between different RNA classes. We demonstrate the strength of RNAome sequencing in mouse embryonic stem cells treated with cisplatin. MicroRNA and mRNA expression in RNAome sequencing significantly correlated between replicates and was in concordance with both existing RNA sequencing methods and gene expression arrays generated from the same samples. Moreover, RNAome sequencing also detected additional RNA classes such as enhancer RNAs, anti-sense RNAs, novel RNA species and numerous differentially expressed RNAs undetectable by other methods. At the level of complete RNA classes, RNAome sequencing also identified a specific global repression of the microRNA and microRNA isoform classes after cisplatin treatment whereas all other classes such as mRNAs were unchanged. These characteristics of RNAome sequencing will significantly improve expression analysis as well as studies on RNA biology not covered by existing methods. PMID:25826412

  17. Deciphering the RNA landscape by RNAome sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Derks, Kasper WJ; Misovic, Branislav; van den Hout, Mirjam CGN; Kockx, Christel EM; Payan Gomez, Cesar; Brouwer, Rutger WW; Vrieling, Harry; Hoeijmakers, Jan HJ; van IJcken, Wilfred FJ; Pothof, Joris

    2015-01-01

    Current RNA expression profiling methods rely on enrichment steps for specific RNA classes, thereby not detecting all RNA species in an unperturbed manner. We report strand-specific RNAome sequencing that determines expression of small and large RNAs from rRNA-depleted total RNA in a single sequence run. Since current analysis pipelines cannot reliably analyze small and large RNAs simultaneously, we developed TRAP, Total Rna Analysis Pipeline, a robust interface that is also compatible with existing RNA sequencing protocols. RNAome sequencing quantitatively preserved all RNA classes, allowing cross-class comparisons that facilitates the identification of relationships between different RNA classes. We demonstrate the strength of RNAome sequencing in mouse embryonic stem cells treated with cisplatin. MicroRNA and mRNA expression in RNAome sequencing significantly correlated between replicates and was in concordance with both existing RNA sequencing methods and gene expression arrays generated from the same samples. Moreover, RNAome sequencing also detected additional RNA classes such as enhancer RNAs, anti-sense RNAs, novel RNA species and numerous differentially expressed RNAs undetectable by other methods. At the level of complete RNA classes, RNAome sequencing also identified a specific global repression of the microRNA and microRNA isoform classes after cisplatin treatment whereas all other classes such as mRNAs were unchanged. These characteristics of RNAome sequencing will significantly improve expression analysis as well as studies on RNA biology not covered by existing methods. PMID:25826412

  18. An RNA Aptamer Inhibits a Mutation-Induced Inactivating Misfolding of a Serpin.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Jeppe B; Andersen, Lisbeth M; Dupont, Daniel M; Trelle, Morten B; Johansen, Jesper S; Jensen, Jan K; Jørgensen, Thomas J D; Andreasen, Peter A

    2016-06-23

    Most serpins are fast and specific inhibitors of extracellular serine proteases controlling biological processes such as blood coagulation, fibrinolysis, tissue remodeling, and inflammation. The inhibitory activity of serpins is based on a conserved metastable structure and their conversion to a more stable state during reaction with the target protease. However, the metastable state also makes serpins vulnerable to mutations, resulting in disease caused by inactive and misfolded monomeric or polymeric forms ("serpinopathy"). Misfolding can occur either intracellularly (type-I serpinopathies) or extracellularly (type-II serpinopathies). We have isolated a 2'-fluoropyrimidine-modified RNA aptamer, which inhibits a mutation-induced inactivating misfolding of the serpin α1-antichymotrypsin. It is the first agent able to stabilize a type-II mutation of a serpin without interfering with the inhibitory mechanism, thereby presenting a solution for the long-standing challenge of preventing pathogenic misfolding without compromising the inhibitory function. PMID:27265748

  19. RNAome sequencing delineates the complete RNA landscape.

    PubMed

    Derks, Kasper W J; Pothof, Joris

    2015-09-01

    Standard RNA expression profiling methods rely on enrichment steps for specific RNA classes, thereby not detecting all RNA species. For example, small and large RNAs from the same sample cannot be sequenced in a single sequence run. We designed RNAome sequencing, which is a strand-specific method to determine the expression of small and large RNAs from ribosomal RNA-depleted total RNA in a single sequence run. RNAome sequencing quantitatively preserves all RNA classes. This characteristic allows comparisons between RNA classes, thereby facilitating relationships between different RNA classes. Here, we describe in detail the experimental procedure associated with RNAome sequencing published by Derks and colleagues in RNA Biology (2015) [1]. We also provide the R code for the developed Total Rna Analysis Pipeline (TRAP), an algorithm to analyze RNAome sequencing datasets (deposited at the Gene Expression Omnibus data repository, accession number GSE48084). PMID:26484291

  20. Systemic Administration and Targeted Radiosensitization via Chemically Synthetic Aptamer-siRNA Chimeras in Human Tumor Xenografts.

    PubMed

    Ni, Xiaohua; Zhang, Yonggang; Zennami, Kenji; Castanares, Mark; Mukherjee, Amarnath; Raval, Raju R; Zhou, Haoming; DeWeese, Theodore L; Lupold, Shawn E

    2015-12-01

    Radiation therapy is a highly effective tool for treating all stages of prostate cancer, from curative approaches in localized disease to palliative care and enhanced survival for patients with distant bone metastases. The therapeutic index of these approaches may be enhanced with targeted radiation-sensitizing agents. Aptamers are promising nucleic acid delivery agents for short interfering RNAs (siRNA) and short hairpin RNAs (shRNA). We have previously developed a radiation-sensitizing RNA aptamer-shRNA chimera that selectively delivers DNA-PK targeting shRNAs to prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) positive cells in the absence of transfection reagents. Although these chimera are effective, their synthesis requires in vitro transcription and their evaluation was limited to intratumoral administration. Here, we have developed a second-generation aptamer-siRNA chimera that can be assembled through the annealing of three separate chemically synthesized components. The resulting chimera knocked down DNA-PK in PSMA-positive prostate cancer cells, without the need of additional transfection reagents, and enhanced the efficacy of radiation-mediated cell death. Following intravenous injection, the chimera effectively knocked down DNA-PK in established subcutaneous PSMA-positive tumors. Systemic treatment with these radiation-sensitizing agents selectively enhanced the potency of external beam radiation therapy for established PSMA-positive tumors. PMID:26438155

  1. Oligonucleotide-based systems: DNA, microRNAs, DNA/RNA aptamers.

    PubMed

    Jolly, Pawan; Estrela, Pedro; Ladomery, Michael

    2016-06-30

    There are an increasing number of applications that have been developed for oligonucleotide-based biosensing systems in genetics and biomedicine. Oligonucleotide-based biosensors are those where the probe to capture the analyte is a strand of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), ribonucleic acid (RNA) or a synthetic analogue of naturally occurring nucleic acids. This review will shed light on various types of nucleic acids such as DNA and RNA (particularly microRNAs), their role and their application in biosensing. It will also cover DNA/RNA aptamers, which can be used as bioreceptors for a wide range of targets such as proteins, small molecules, bacteria and even cells. It will also highlight how the invention of synthetic oligonucleotides such as peptide nucleic acid (PNA) or locked nucleic acid (LNA) has pushed the limits of molecular biology and biosensor development to new perspectives. These technologies are very promising albeit still in need of development in order to bridge the gap between the laboratory-based status and the reality of biomedical applications. PMID:27365033

  2. RNA sequence analysis using covariance models.

    PubMed Central

    Eddy, S R; Durbin, R

    1994-01-01

    We describe a general approach to several RNA sequence analysis problems using probabilistic models that flexibly describe the secondary structure and primary sequence consensus of an RNA sequence family. We call these models 'covariance models'. A covariance model of tRNA sequences is an extremely sensitive and discriminative tool for searching for additional tRNAs and tRNA-related sequences in sequence databases. A model can be built automatically from an existing sequence alignment. We also describe an algorithm for learning a model and hence a consensus secondary structure from initially unaligned example sequences and no prior structural information. Models trained on unaligned tRNA examples correctly predict tRNA secondary structure and produce high-quality multiple alignments. The approach may be applied to any family of small RNA sequences. Images PMID:8029015

  3. The nucleolin targeting aptamer AS1411 destabilizes Bcl-2 messenger RNA in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Soundararajan, Sridharan; Chen, Weiwei; Spicer, Eleanor K; Courtenay-Luck, Nigel; Fernandes, Daniel J

    2008-04-01

    We sought to determine whether nucleolin, a bcl-2 mRNA-binding protein, has a role in the regulation of bcl-2 mRNA stability in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Furthermore, we examined the efficacy of the aptamer AS1411 in targeting nucleolin and inducing bcl-2 mRNA instability and cytotoxicity in these cells. AS1411 at 5 micromol/L inhibited the growth of MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells, whereas 20 micromol/L AS1411 had no effect on the growth rate or viability of normal MCF-10A mammary epithelial cells. This selectivity of AS1411 was related to a greater uptake of AS1411 into the cytoplasm of MCF-7 cells compared with MCF-10A cells and to a 4-fold higher level of cytoplasmic nucleolin in MCF-7 cells. Stable siRNA knockdown of nucleolin in MCF-7 cells reduced nucleolin and bcl-2 protein levels and decreased the half-life of bcl-2 mRNA from 11 to 5 hours. Similarly, AS1411 (10 micromol/L) decreased the half-life of bcl-2 mRNA in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells to 1.0 and 1.2 hours, respectively. In contrast, AS1411 had no effect on the stability of bcl-2 mRNA in normal MCF-10A cells. AS1411 also inhibited the binding of nucleolin to the instability element AU-rich element 1 of bcl-2 mRNA in a cell-free system and in MCF-7 cells. Together, the results suggest that AS1411 acts as a molecular decoy by competing with bcl-2 mRNA for binding to cytoplasmic nucleolin in these breast cancer cell lines. This interferes with the stabilization of bcl-2 mRNA by nucleolin and may be one mechanism by which AS1411 induces tumor cell death. PMID:18381443

  4. An RNA Aptamer Specific to Hsp70-ATP Conformation Inhibits its ATPase Activity Independent of Hsp40

    PubMed Central

    Thirunavukarasu, Deepak

    2015-01-01

    The highly conserved and ubiquitous molecular chaperone heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) plays a critical role in protein homeostasis (proteostasis). Controlled by its ATPase activity, Hsp70 cycles between two conformations, Hsp70-ATP and Hsp70-ADP, to bind and release its substrate. Chemical tools with distinct modes of action, especially those capable of modulating the ATPase activity of Hsp70, are being actively sought after in the mechanistic dissection of this system. Here, we report a conformation-specific RNA aptamer that binds only to Hsp70-ATP but not to Hsp70-ADP. We have refined this aptamer and demonstrated its inhibitory effect on Hsp70's ATPase activity. We have also shown that this inhibitory effect on Hsp70 is independent of its interaction with the Hsp40 co-chaperone. As Hsp70 is increasingly being recognized as a drug target in a number of age related diseases such as neurodegenerative, protein misfolding diseases and cancer, this aptamer is potentially useful in therapeutic applications. Moreover, this work also demonstrates the feasibility of using aptamers to target ATPase activity as a general therapeutic strategy. PMID:25654640

  5. Label-free RNA aptamer-based capacitive biosensor for the detection of C-reactive protein.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Anjum; Gurbuz, Yasar; Kallempudi, Saravan; Niazi, Javed H

    2010-08-28

    In this study, we report a novel aptamer-based capacitive label-free biosensor for monitoring transducing aptamer-protein recognition events, based on charge distribution under the applied frequency by non-Faradaic impedance spectroscopy (NFIS). This approach to capacitive biosensors is reported for the first time in this study, is reagent-less in processing and is developed using gold interdigitated (GID) capacitor arrays functionalized with synthetic RNA aptamers. The RNA atpamers served as biorecognition elements for C-reactive protein (CRP), a biomarker for cardiovascular disease risk (CVR). The signal is generated as a result of the change in relative capacitance occurring as a result of the formation of an RNA-CRP complex on GID capacitors with the applied AC electrical frequency (50-350 MHz). The dispersion peak of the capacitance curve was dependent on the CRP concentration and tends to shift toward lower frequencies, accompanied by the increase in relaxation time due to the increased size of the aptamer-CRP complex. The dissociation constant (K(d)) calculated from the non-linear regression analysis of the relative capacitance change with the applied frequency showed that strong binding of CRP occurred at 208 MHz (K(d) = 1.6 microM) followed by 150 MHz (K(d) = 4.2 microM) and 306 MHz (K(d) = 3.4 microM) frequencies. The dynamic detection range for CRP is determined to be within 100-500 pg ml(-1). Our results demonstrates the behavior of an RNA-protein complex on GID capacitors under an applied electric field, which can be extended to other pairs of affinity biomolecules as well as for the development of electrical biosensor systems for different applications, including the early diagnosis of diseases. PMID:20648264

  6. Inhibition of HIV transmission in human cervicovaginal explants and humanized mice using CD4 aptamer-siRNA chimeras

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Lee Adam; Trifonova, Radiana; Vrbanac, Vladimir; Basar, Emre; McKernan, Shannon; Xu, Zhan; Seung, Edward; Deruaz, Maud; Dudek, Tim; Einarsson, Jon Ivar; Yang, Linda; Allen, Todd M.; Luster, Andrew D.; Tager, Andrew M.; Dykxhoorn, Derek M.; Lieberman, Judy

    2011-01-01

    The continued spread of the HIV epidemic underscores the need to interrupt transmission. One attractive strategy is a topical vaginal microbicide. Sexual transmission of herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) in mice can be inhibited by intravaginal siRNA application. To overcome the challenges of knocking down gene expression in immune cells susceptible to HIV infection, we used chimeric RNAs composed of an aptamer fused to an siRNA for targeted gene knockdown in cells bearing an aptamer-binding receptor. Here, we showed that CD4 aptamer-siRNA chimeras (CD4-AsiCs) specifically suppress gene expression in CD4+ T cells and macrophages in vitro, in polarized cervicovaginal tissue explants, and in the female genital tract of humanized mice. CD4-AsiCs do not activate lymphocytes or stimulate innate immunity. CD4-AsiCs that knock down HIV genes and/or CCR5 inhibited HIV infection in vitro and in tissue explants. When applied intravaginally to humanized mice, CD4-AsiCs protected against HIV vaginal transmission. Thus, CD4-AsiCs could be used as the active ingredient of a microbicide to prevent HIV sexual transmission. PMID:21576818

  7. RNA aptamers as genetic control devices: the potential of riboswitches as synthetic elements for regulating gene expression.

    PubMed

    Berens, Christian; Groher, Florian; Suess, Beatrix

    2015-02-01

    RNA utilizes many different mechanisms to control gene expression. Among the regulatory elements that respond to external stimuli, riboswitches are a prominent and elegant example. They consist solely of RNA and couple binding of a small molecule ligand to the so-called "aptamer domain" with a conformational change in the downstream "expression platform" which then determines system output. The modular organization of riboswitches and the relative ease with which ligand-binding RNA aptamers can be selected in vitro against almost any molecule have led to the rapid and widespread adoption of engineered riboswitches as artificial genetic control devices in biotechnology and synthetic biology over the past decade. This review highlights proof-of-principle applications to demonstrate the versatility and robustness of engineered riboswitches in regulating gene expression in pro- and eukaryotes. It then focuses on strategies and parameters to identify aptamers that can be integrated into synthetic riboswitches that are functional in vivo, before finishing with a reflection on how to improve the regulatory properties of engineered riboswitches, so that we can not only further expand riboswitch applicability, but also finally fully exploit their potential as control elements in regulating gene expression. PMID:25676052

  8. Chimeric aptamers in cancer cell-targeted drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kanwar, Jagat R; Roy, Kislay; Kanwar, Rupinder K

    2011-01-01

    Aptamers are single-stranded structured oligonucleotides (DNA or RNA) that can bind to a wide range of targets ("apatopes") with high affinity and specificity. These nucleic acid ligands, generated from pools of random-sequence by an in vitro selection process referred to as systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX), have now been identified as excellent tools for chemical biology, therapeutic delivery, diagnosis, research, and monitoring therapy in real-time imaging. Today, aptamers represent an interesting class of modern Pharmaceuticals which with their low immunogenic potential mimic extend many of the properties of monoclonal antibodies in diagnostics, research, and therapeutics. More recently, chimeric aptamer approach employing many different possible types of chimerization strategies has generated more stable and efficient chimeric aptamers with aptamer-aptamer, aptamer-nonaptamer biomacromolecules (siRNAs, proteins) and aptamer-nanoparticle chimeras. These chimeric aptamers when conjugated with various biomacromolecules like locked nucleic acid (LNA) to potentiate their stability, biodistribution, and targeting efficiency, have facilitated the accurate targeting in preclinical trials. We developed LNA-aptamer (anti-nucleolin and EpCAM) complexes which were loaded in iron-saturated bovine lactofeerin (Fe-blf)-coated dopamine modified surface of superparamagnetic iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles (SPIONs). This complex was used to deliver the specific aptamers in tumor cells in a co-culture model of normal and cancer cells. This review focuses on the chimeric aptamers, currently in development that are likely to find future practical applications in concert with other therapeutic molecules and modalities. PMID:21955150

  9. In vivo SELEX for Identification of Brain-penetrating Aptamers

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Congsheng; Chen, Yong Hong; Lennox, Kim A; Behlke, Mark A; Davidson, Beverly L

    2013-01-01

    The physiological barriers of the brain impair drug delivery for treatment of many neurological disorders. One delivery approach that has not been investigated for their ability to penetrate the brain is RNA-based aptamers. These molecules can impart delivery to peripheral tissues and circulating immune cells, where they act as ligand mimics or can be modified to carry payloads. We developed a library of aptamers and an in vivo evolution protocol to determine whether specific aptamers could be identified that would home to the brain after injection into the peripheral vasculature. Unlike biopanning with recombinant bacteriophage libraries, we found that the aptamer library employed here required more than 15 rounds of in vivo selection for convergence to specific sequences. The aptamer species identified through this approach bound to brain capillary endothelia and penetrated into the parenchyma. The methods described may find general utility for targeting various payloads to the brain. PMID:23299833

  10. In silico selection of an aptamer to estrogen receptor alpha using computational docking employing estrogen response elements as aptamer-alike molecules

    PubMed Central

    Ahirwar, Rajesh; Nahar, Smita; Aggarwal, Shikha; Ramachandran, Srinivasan; Maiti, Souvik; Nahar, Pradip

    2016-01-01

    Aptamers, the chemical-antibody substitute to conventional antibodies, are primarily discovered through SELEX technology involving multi-round selections and enrichment. Circumventing conventional methodology, here we report an in silico selection of aptamers to estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) using RNA analogs of human estrogen response elements (EREs). The inverted repeat nature of ERE and the ability to form stable hairpins were used as criteria to obtain aptamer-alike sequences. Near-native RNA analogs of selected single stranded EREs were modelled and their likelihood to emerge as ERα aptamer was examined using AutoDock Vina, HADDOCK and PatchDock docking. These in silico predictions were validated by measuring the thermodynamic parameters of ERα -RNA interactions using isothermal titration calorimetry. Based on the in silico and in vitro results, we selected a candidate RNA (ERaptR4; 5′-GGGGUCAAGGUGACCCC-3′) having a binding constant (Ka) of 1.02 ± 0.1 × 108 M−1 as an ERα-aptamer. Target-specificity of the selected ERaptR4 aptamer was confirmed through cytochemistry and solid-phase immunoassays. Furthermore, stability analyses identified ERaptR4 resistant to serum and RNase A degradation in presence of ERα. Taken together, an efficient ERα-RNA aptamer is identified using a non-SELEX procedure of aptamer selection. The high-affinity and specificity can be utilized in detection of ERα in breast cancer and related diseases. PMID:26899418

  11. Blocking the maturation of OncomiRNAs using pri-miRNA-17∼92 aptamer in retinoblastoma.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Nithya; Kanwar, Jagat R; Kanwar, Rupinder K; Krishnakumar, Subramanian

    2015-02-01

    The miR-17∼92. or oncomiR-1, cluster encodes oncogenic microRNAs (miRNAs), and it also promotes retinoblastoma (RB) tumor formation. Antagomir and miRNA mimics based approaches are widely tried against oncogenic and tumor suppressive miRNAs. Other methods for targeting cancer related miRNAs are still under development. In the current study, we focused on the pri-miRNA-17∼92 aptamer (pri-apt), which can potentially replace the mix of five antagomirs by one aptamer that function to abrogate the maturation of miR-17, miR-18a, and miR-19b (P<0.05) for targeting RB. We used RB cell lines WERI-Rb1 and Y79 as an in vitro model. Cellular changes upon transfecting the pri-apt led to S-phase arrest in WERI-Rb1 cells and onset of apoptosis in both Y79 and WERI-Rb1 cell lines. There was increased cytotoxicity as measured by lactate dehydrogenase activity in pri-apt treated Y79 cells (P<0.05), and significant inhibition of cell proliferation was observed in both of the cell lines. Thus we showed the antiproliferative property of pri-apt in RB cell lines, which can be readily modified by developing appropriate vectors for the delivery of the aptamer specifically to cancer cells. PMID:25513843

  12. Blocking the Maturation of OncomiRNAs Using pri-miRNA-17∼92 Aptamer in Retinoblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Nithya; Kanwar, Jagat R.; Kanwar, Rupinder K.

    2015-01-01

    The miR-17∼92. or oncomiR-1, cluster encodes oncogenic microRNAs (miRNAs), and it also promotes retinoblastoma (RB) tumor formation. Antagomir and miRNA mimics based approaches are widely tried against oncogenic and tumor suppressive miRNAs. Other methods for targeting cancer related miRNAs are still under development. In the current study, we focused on the pri-miRNA-17∼92 aptamer (pri-apt), which can potentially replace the mix of five antagomirs by one aptamer that function to abrogate the maturation of miR-17, miR-18a, and miR-19b (P<0.05) for targeting RB. We used RB cell lines WERI-Rb1 and Y79 as an in vitro model. Cellular changes upon transfecting the pri-apt led to S-phase arrest in WERI-Rb1 cells and onset of apoptosis in both Y79 and WERI-Rb1 cell lines. There was increased cytotoxicity as measured by lactate dehydrogenase activity in pri-apt treated Y79 cells (P<0.05), and significant inhibition of cell proliferation was observed in both of the cell lines. Thus we showed the antiproliferative property of pri-apt in RB cell lines, which can be readily modified by developing appropriate vectors for the delivery of the aptamer specifically to cancer cells. PMID:25513843

  13. Streptavidin aptamers: affinity tags for the study of RNAs and ribonucleoproteins.

    PubMed Central

    Srisawat, C; Engelke, D R

    2001-01-01

    RNA affinity tags would be very useful for the study of RNAs and ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) as a means for rapid detection, immobilization, and purification. To develop a new affinity tag, streptavidin-binding RNA ligands, termed "aptamers," were identified from a random RNA library using in vitro selection. Individual aptamers were classified into two groups based on common sequences, and representative members of the groups had sufficiently low dissociation constants to suggest they would be useful affinity tools. Binding of the aptamers to streptavidin was blocked by presaturation of the streptavidin with biotin, and biotin could be used to dissociate RNA/streptavidin complexes. To investigate the practicality of using the aptamer as an affinity tag, one of the higher affinity aptamers was inserted into RPR1 RNA, the large RNA subunit of RNase P. The aptamer-tagged RNase P could be specifically isolated using commercially available streptavidin-agarose and recovered in a catalytically active form when biotin was used as an eluting agent under mild conditions. The aptamer tag was also used to demonstrate that RNase P exists in a monomeric form, and is not tightly associated with RNase MRP, a closely related ribonucleoprotein enzyme. These results show that the streptavidin aptamers are potentially powerful tools for the study of RNAs or RNPs. PMID:11345441

  14. A Dual-Ligand Liposomal System Composed of a Cell-Penetrating Peptide and a Mitochondrial RNA Aptamer Synergistically Facilitates Cellular Uptake and Mitochondrial Targeting.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yuma; Furukawa, Ryo; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2016-05-01

    It has been reported that the use of mitochondrial RNA aptamers including RNase P (RP) results in the selective mitochondrial delivery of endogenous and exogenous RNAs. The issue of whether these aptamers would be useful ligands for the mitochondrial targeting of a nanoparticle has not been demonstrated to date because nanocarriers modified with these RNA aptamers are insufficiently internalized by cells. We report here on the development of a dual-ligand liposomal system composed of octaarginine (R8), a device that enhances cellular uptake, and an RP aptamer for mitochondrial targeting to permit a nanocarrier to be efficiently delivered to mitochondria. Surprisingly, the cellular uptake of the R8-modified nanocarrier was facilitated by modification with an RP aptamer. The optimal composition of a nanocarrier needed for efficient cellular uptake and mitochondrial targeting was determined. In a confocal laser scanning microscopy analysis, the dual-ligand-modified nanocarrier was found to result in effective mitochondrial targeting through an ATP-dependent pathway and was much more effective than a single-ligand R8-modified nanocarrier. This is the first report of the regulation of intracellular trafficking by a mitochondrial RNA aptamer-modified nanocarrier system. PMID:27056631

  15. EpCAM Aptamer-siRNA Chimera Targets and Regress Epithelial Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Nithya; Kanwar, Jagat R.; Kanwar, Rupinder K.; Sreemanthula, JagadeeshBabu; Biswas, Jyotirmay; Khetan, Vikas; Krishnakumar, Subramanian

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), a cancer stem cell (CSC) marker is over expressed in epithelial cancers and in retinoblastoma (RB). We fabricated an EpCAM targeting aptamer-siRNA chimera and investigated its anti-tumor property and EpCAM intracellular domain (EpICD) mediated signaling in epithelial cancer. The anti-tumor efficacy of EpCAM aptamer-siEpCAM chimera (EpApt-siEp) was evaluated by qPCR, northern and Western blotting in WERI-Rb1- RB cell line, primary RB tumor cells and in MCF7- breast cancer cell line. Anti-tumor activity of EpApt-siEp was studied in vivo using epithelial cancer (MCF7) mice xenograft model. The mechanism and pathways involved in the anti-tumor activity was further studied using protein arrays and qPCR. EpApt-siEp chimera was processed in vitro by dicer enzyme. Treatment of the WERI-Rb1 and MCF7 cells with EpApt-siEp revealed statistically significant down regulation of EpCAM expression (P<0.005) and concomitant reduction in cellular proliferation. In primary RB cells cultured from RB tumors, EpApt-siEp silenced EpCAM, significantly inhibited (P<0.01) cell proliferation and induced cytotoxicity. Knockdown of EpICD expressed in RB primary tumors led to repression of pluripotency markers, SOX2, OCT4, NANOG, and CD133. In vivo studies showed complete tumor growth regression without any toxicity in animals (P<0.001) and tumor tissues showed significant downregulation (P<0.05) of EpCAM, MRP1, ABCG2, stathmin, survivin and upregulation of ATM (P<0.05) leading to apoptosis by intrinsic pathway with minor alteration in cytokines. Our results revealed that EpApt-siEp potentially eradicated EpCAM positive cancer cells through CSC marker suppression and apoptosis, while sparing normal EpCAM negative adjacent cells. PMID:26176230

  16. EpCAM Aptamer-siRNA Chimera Targets and Regress Epithelial Cancer.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Nithya; Kanwar, Jagat R; Kanwar, Rupinder K; Sreemanthula, JagadeeshBabu; Biswas, Jyotirmay; Khetan, Vikas; Krishnakumar, Subramanian

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), a cancer stem cell (CSC) marker is over expressed in epithelial cancers and in retinoblastoma (RB). We fabricated an EpCAM targeting aptamer-siRNA chimera and investigated its anti-tumor property and EpCAM intracellular domain (EpICD) mediated signaling in epithelial cancer. The anti-tumor efficacy of EpCAM aptamer-siEpCAM chimera (EpApt-siEp) was evaluated by qPCR, northern and Western blotting in WERI-Rb1- RB cell line, primary RB tumor cells and in MCF7- breast cancer cell line. Anti-tumor activity of EpApt-siEp was studied in vivo using epithelial cancer (MCF7) mice xenograft model. The mechanism and pathways involved in the anti-tumor activity was further studied using protein arrays and qPCR. EpApt-siEp chimera was processed in vitro by dicer enzyme. Treatment of the WERI-Rb1 and MCF7 cells with EpApt-siEp revealed statistically significant down regulation of EpCAM expression (P<0.005) and concomitant reduction in cellular proliferation. In primary RB cells cultured from RB tumors, EpApt-siEp silenced EpCAM, significantly inhibited (P<0.01) cell proliferation and induced cytotoxicity. Knockdown of EpICD expressed in RB primary tumors led to repression of pluripotency markers, SOX2, OCT4, NANOG, and CD133. In vivo studies showed complete tumor growth regression without any toxicity in animals (P<0.001) and tumor tissues showed significant downregulation (P<0.05) of EpCAM, MRP1, ABCG2, stathmin, survivin and upregulation of ATM (P<0.05) leading to apoptosis by intrinsic pathway with minor alteration in cytokines. Our results revealed that EpApt-siEp potentially eradicated EpCAM positive cancer cells through CSC marker suppression and apoptosis, while sparing normal EpCAM negative adjacent cells. PMID:26176230

  17. Improvement in the drug delivery and anti-tumor efficacy of PEGylated liposomal doxorubicin by targeting RNA aptamers in mice bearing breast tumor model.

    PubMed

    Moosavian, Seyedeh Alia; Abnous, Khalil; Badiee, Ali; Jaafari, Mahmoud Reza

    2016-03-01

    Targeted delivery by ligands such as aptamers, is a promising method to increase the efficiency of PEGylated-liposomal doxorubicin (PL-Dox). In this study, we have successfully conjugated our recently developed anti-breast cancer RNA aptamer (TSA14) to the surface of PL-Dox and characterized for their size, zeta potential, Dox percent encapsulation and release properties in the presence of fetal bovine serum. In vitro experiments showed that aptamer could improve cellular uptake and cytotoxicity of PL-Dox in TUBO breast cell line. In mice bearing TUBO breast tumor, although, the doxorubicin plasma level of liposomal doxorubicin did not significantly change after modification of nanoparticles with aptamer, however, much higher tumor accumulation of Dox as compared with non-targeted liposomes proved the tumor-targeting capability of aptamers. In the same way, aptamer-PL-Dox improved anti-tumor efficiency of liposomes in TUBO breast tumor in mice compared to non-targeted liposomes. Overall, the results showed that aptamer decoration of PL-Dox could significantly improve selectivity and the therapeutic efficacy of liposomal DOX and merits further investigation. PMID:26722819

  18. Aptamers in Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Aptamers are single strand DNA or RNA molecules, selected by an iterative process known as Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment (SELEX). Due to various advantages of aptamers such as high temperature stability, animal free, cost effective production and its high affinity and selectivity for its target make them attractive alternatives to monoclonal antibody for use in diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. Aptamer has been generated against vesicular endothelial growth factor 165 involved in age related macular degeneracy. Macugen was the first FDA approved aptamer based drug that was commercialized. Later other aptamers were also developed against blood clotting proteins, cancer proteins, antibody E, agents involved in diabetes nephropathy, autoantibodies involved in autoimmune disorders, etc. Aptamers have also been developed against viruses and could work with other antiviral agents in treating infections. PMID:27504277

  19. Aptamers and their Applications in Nanomedicine

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hongguang; Zu, Youli

    2015-01-01

    Aptamers are composed of short RNA or single-stranded DNA sequences that, when folded into their unique three-dimensional conformation, can specifically bind to their cognate targets with high specificity and affinity. Although functionally similar to protein antibodies, oligonucleotide aptamers offer several advantages over protein antibodies in biomedical and clinical applications. Additionally, through the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect, nanomedicines can improve the therapeutic index of a treatment and reduce side effects by enhancing accumulation at the disease site. However, this EPR effect is “passive targeting” to tumors and thus, may not be an ideal approach for targeted cancer therapy. To construct ligand-directed “active targeting” nano-based delivery systems, aptamer technology has been widely studied. The aptamer-equipped nanomedicines have been tested for in vitro diagnosis, in vivo imaging, targeted cancer therapy, theranostic approaches, sub-cellular molecule detection, food safety, and environment monitoring. This review will focus on the development of aptamer-conjugated nanomedicines and their application for in vivo imaging, targeted therapy, and theranostics. In some applications, aptamers can also be used as drug carriers or ON/OFF switches. Herein, some outstanding therapeutic approaches are also discussed on a case-by-case basis, such as an “on-command” release system and a combinational therapy strategy. PMID:25677591

  20. Next generation sequencing of viral RNA genomes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background With the advent of Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technologies, the ability to generate large amounts of sequence data has revolutionized the genomics field. Most RNA viruses have relatively small genomes in comparison to other organisms and as such, would appear to be an obvious success story for the use of NGS technologies. However, due to the relatively low abundance of viral RNA in relation to host RNA, RNA viruses have proved relatively difficult to sequence using NGS technologies. Here we detail a simple, robust methodology, without the use of ultra-centrifugation, filtration or viral enrichment protocols, to prepare RNA from diagnostic clinical tissue samples, cell monolayers and tissue culture supernatant, for subsequent sequencing on the Roche 454 platform. Results As representative RNA viruses, full genome sequence was successfully obtained from known lyssaviruses belonging to recognized species and a novel lyssavirus species using these protocols and assembling the reads using de novo algorithms. Furthermore, genome sequences were generated from considerably less than 200 ng RNA, indicating that manufacturers’ minimum template guidance is conservative. In addition to obtaining genome consensus sequence, a high proportion of SNPs (Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms) were identified in the majority of samples analyzed. Conclusions The approaches reported clearly facilitate successful full genome lyssavirus sequencing and can be universally applied to discovering and obtaining consensus genome sequences of RNA viruses from a variety of sources. PMID:23822119

  1. An RNA Aptamer Provides a Novel Approach for the Induction of Apoptosis by Targeting the HPV16 E7 Oncoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Nicol, Clare; Cesur, Özlem; Forrest, Sophie; Belyaeva, Tamara A.; Bunka, David H. J.; Blair, G. Eric; Stonehouse, Nicola J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) is a high-risk DNA tumour virus, which is a major causative agent of cervical cancer. Cellular transformation is associated with deregulated expression of the E6 and E7 oncogenes. E7 has been shown to bind a number of cellular proteins, including the cell cycle control protein pRb. In this study, RNA aptamers (small, single-stranded oligonucleotides selected for high-affinity binding) to HPV16 E7 were employed as molecular tools to further investigate these protein-protein interactions. Methodology/Principal Findings This study is focused on one aptamer (termed A2). Transfection of this molecule into HPV16-transformed cells resulted in inhibition of cell proliferation (shown using real-time cell electronic sensing and MTT assays) due to the induction of apoptosis (as demonstrated by Annexin V/propidium iodide staining). GST-pull down and bead binding assays were used to demonstrate that the binding of A2 required N-terminal residues of E7 known to be involved in interaction with the cell cycle control protein, pRb. Using a similar approach, A2 was shown to disrupt the interaction between E7 and pRb in vitro. Furthermore, transfection of HPV16-transformed cells with A2 appeared to result in the loss of E7 and rise in pRb levels, as observed by immunoblotting. Conclusions/Significance This paper includes the first characterisation of the effects of an E7 RNA aptamer in a cell line derived from a cervical carcinoma. Transfection of cells with A2 was correlated with the loss of E7 and the induction of apoptosis. Aptamers specific for a number of cellular and viral proteins have been documented previously; one aptamer (Macugen) is approved for clinical use and several others are in clinical trials. In addition to its role as a molecular tool, A2 could have further applications in the future. PMID:23738000

  2. antaRNA: ant colony-based RNA sequence design

    PubMed Central

    Kleinkauf, Robert; Mann, Martin; Backofen, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: RNA sequence design is studied at least as long as the classical folding problem. Although for the latter the functional fold of an RNA molecule is to be found, inverse folding tries to identify RNA sequences that fold into a function-specific target structure. In combination with RNA-based biotechnology and synthetic biology, reliable RNA sequence design becomes a crucial step to generate novel biochemical components. Results: In this article, the computational tool antaRNA is presented. It is capable of compiling RNA sequences for a given structure that comply in addition with an adjustable full range objective GC-content distribution, specific sequence constraints and additional fuzzy structure constraints. antaRNA applies ant colony optimization meta-heuristics and its superior performance is shown on a biological datasets. Availability and implementation: http://www.bioinf.uni-freiburg.de/Software/antaRNA Contact: backofen@informatik.uni-freiburg.de Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:26023105

  3. A specific aptamer-cell penetrating peptides complex delivered siRNA efficiently and suppressed prostate tumor growth in vivo.

    PubMed

    Diao, Yanjun; Liu, Jiayun; Ma, Yueyun; Su, Mingquan; Zhang, Hongyi; Hao, Xiaoke

    2016-05-01

    Specific and efficient delivery of siRNA into intended tumor cells remains as a challenge, even though RNAi has been exploited as a new strategy for prostate cancer therapy. This work aims to address both specificity and efficiency of SURVIVIN-siRNA delivery by constructing a therapeutic complex using combinatorial strategies. A fusion protein STD was first expressed to serve as a backbone, consisting of streptavidin, a cell-penetrating peptide called Trans-Activator of Transcription (TAT) and a double-stranded RNA binding domain. A biotinylated Prostate Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA) specific aptamer A10 and SURVIVIN-siRNA were then linked to STD protein to form the therapeutic complex. This complex could specifically targeted PSMA(+) tumor cells. Compared to lipofectamine and A10-siRNA chimera, it demonstrated higher efficiency in delivering siRNA into target cells by 19.2% and 59.9%, and increased apoptosis by 16.8% and 26.1% respectively. Upon systemic administration, this complex also showed significant efficacy in suppressing tumor growth in athymic mice (p <0.001). We conclude that this therapeutic complex could specifically and efficiently deliver SURVIVIN-siRNA to target cells and suppressed tumor growth in vivo, which indicates its potential to be used as a new strategy in prostate cancer therapy. PMID:26954374

  4. Sequence Dependence of Viral RNA Encapsidation.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Joshua; Grosberg, Alexander Y; Bruinsma, Robijn

    2016-07-01

    We develop a Flory mean-field theory for viral RNA (vRNA) molecules that extends the current RNA folding algorithms to include interactions between different sections of the secondary structure. The theory is applied to sequence-selective vRNA encapsidation. The dependence on sequence enters through a single parameter: the largest eigenvalue of the Kramers matrix of the branched polymer obtained by coarse graining the secondary structure. Differences between the work of encapsidation of vRNA molecules and of randomized isomers are found to be in the range of 20 kBT, more than sufficient to provide a strong bias in favor of vRNA encapsidation. The method is applied to a packaging competition experiment where large vRNA molecules compete for encapsidation with two smaller RNA species that together have the same nucleotide sequence as the large molecule. We encounter a substantial, generic free energy bias, that also is of the order of 20 kBT, in favor of encapsidating the single large RNA molecule. The bias is mainly the consequence of the fact that dividing up a large vRNA molecule involves the release of stored elastic energy. This provides an important, nonspecific mechanism for preferential encapsidation of single larger vRNA molecules over multiple smaller mRNA molecules with the same total number of nucleotides. The result is also consistent with recent RNA packaging competition experiments by Comas-Garcia et al.1 Finally, the Flory method leads to the result that when two RNA molecules are copackaged, they are expected to remain segregated inside the capsid. PMID:27116641

  5. An RNA aptamer possessing a novel monovalent cation-mediated fold inhibits lysozyme catalysis by inhibiting the binding of long natural substrates

    PubMed Central

    Padlan, Camille S.; Malashkevich, Vladimir N.; Almo, Steve C.; Levy, Matthew; Brenowitz, Michael; Girvin, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    RNA aptamers are being developed as inhibitors of macromolecular and cellular function, diagnostic tools, and potential therapeutics. Our understanding of the physical nature of this emerging class of nucleic acid–protein complexes is limited; few atomic resolution structures have been reported for aptamers bound to their protein target. Guided by chemical mapping, we systematically minimized an RNA aptamer (Lys1) selected against hen egg white lysozyme. The resultant 59-nucleotide compact aptamer (Lys1.2minE) retains nanomolar binding affinity and the ability to inhibit lysozyme's catalytic activity. Our 2.0-Å crystal structure of the aptamer–protein complex reveals a helical stem stabilizing two loops to form a protein binding platform that binds lysozyme distal to the catalytic cleft. This structure along with complementary solution analyses illuminate a novel protein–nucleic acid interface; (1) only 410 Å2 of solvent accessible surface are buried by aptamer binding; (2) an unusually small fraction (∼18%) of the RNA-protein interaction is electrostatic, consistent with the limited protein phosphate backbone contacts observed in the structure; (3) a single Na+ stabilizes the loops that constitute the protein-binding platform, and consistent with this observation, Lys1.2minE–lysozyme complex formation takes up rather than displaces cations at low ionic strength; (4) Lys1.2minE inhibits catalysis of large cell wall substrates but not catalysis of small model substrates; and (5) the helical stem of Lys1.2minE can be shortened to four base pairs (Lys1.2minF) without compromising binding affinity, yielding a 45-nucleotide aptamer whose structure may be an adaptable protein binding platform. PMID:24570482

  6. Quantitative Assessment of RNA-Protein Interactions with High Throughput Sequencing - RNA Affinity Profiling (HiTS-RAP)

    PubMed Central

    Ozer, Abdullah; Tome, Jacob M.; Friedman, Robin C.; Gheba, Dan; Schroth, Gary P.; Lis, John T.

    2016-01-01

    Because RNA-protein interactions play a central role in a wide-array of biological processes, methods that enable a quantitative assessment of these interactions in a high-throughput manner are in great demand. Recently, we developed the High Throughput Sequencing-RNA Affinity Profiling (HiTS-RAP) assay, which couples sequencing on an Illumina GAIIx with the quantitative assessment of one or several proteins’ interactions with millions of different RNAs in a single experiment. We have successfully used HiTS-RAP to analyze interactions of EGFP and NELF-E proteins with their corresponding canonical and mutant RNA aptamers. Here, we provide a detailed protocol for HiTS-RAP, which can be completed in about a month (8 days hands-on time) including the preparation and testing of recombinant proteins and DNA templates, clustering DNA templates on a flowcell, high-throughput sequencing and protein binding with GAIIx, and finally data analysis. We also highlight aspects of HiTS-RAP that can be further improved and points of comparison between HiTS-RAP and two other recently developed methods, RNA-MaP and RBNS. A successful HiTS-RAP experiment provides the sequence and binding curves for approximately 200 million RNAs in a single experiment. PMID:26182240

  7. Experimental investigation of an RNA sequence space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Youn-Hyung; Dsouza, Lisa; Fox, George E.

    1993-01-01

    Modern rRNAs are the historic consequence of an ongoing evolutionary exploration of a sequence space. These extant sequences belong to a special subset of the sequence space that is comprised only of those primary sequences that can validly perform the biological function(s) required of the particular RNA. If it were possible to readily identify all such valid sequences, stochastic predictions could be made about the relative likelihood of various evolutionary pathways available to an RNA. Herein an experimental system which can assess whether a particular sequence is likely to have validity as a eubacterial 5S rRNA is described. A total of ten naturally occurring, and hence known to be valid, sequences and two point mutants of unknown validity were used to test the usefulness of the approach. Nine of the ten valid sequences tested positive whereas both mutants tested as clearly defective. The tenth valid sequence gave results that would be interpreted as reflecting a borderline status were the answer not known. These results demonstrate that it is possible to experimentally determine which sequences in local regions of the sequence space are potentially valid 5S rRNAs.

  8. RCARE: RNA Sequence Comparison and Annotation for RNA Editing

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The post-transcriptional sequence modification of transcripts through RNA editing is an important mechanism for regulating protein function and is associated with human disease phenotypes. The identification of RNA editing or RNA-DNA difference (RDD) sites is a fundamental step in the study of RNA editing. However, a substantial number of false-positive RDD sites have been identified recently. A major challenge in identifying RDD sites is to distinguish between the true RNA editing sites and the false positives. Furthermore, determining the location of condition-specific RDD sites and elucidating their functional roles will help toward understanding various biological phenomena that are mediated by RNA editing. The present study developed RNA-sequence comparison and annotation for RNA editing (RCARE) for searching, annotating, and visualizing RDD sites using thousands of previously known editing sites, which can be used for comparative analyses between multiple samples. RCARE also provides evidence for improving the reliability of identified RDD sites. RCARE is a web-based comparison, annotation, and visualization tool, which provides rich biological annotations and useful summary plots. The developers of previous tools that identify or annotate RNA-editing sites seldom mention the reliability of their respective tools. In order to address the issue, RCARE utilizes a number of scientific publications and databases to find specific documentations respective to a particular RNA-editing site, which generates evidence levels to convey the reliability of RCARE. Sequence-based alignment files can be converted into VCF files using a Python script and uploaded to the RCARE server for further analysis. RCARE is available for free at http://www.snubi.org/software/rcare/. PMID:26043858

  9. Aptamer-hybrid nanoparticle bioconjugate efficiently delivers miRNA-29b to non-small-cell lung cancer cells and inhibits growth by downregulating essential oncoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Perepelyuk, Maryna; Maher, Christina; Lakshmikuttyamma, Ashakumary; Shoyele, Sunday A

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are potentially attractive candidates for cancer therapy. However, their therapeutic application is limited by lack of availability of an efficient delivery system to stably deliver these potent molecules intracellularly to cancer cells while avoiding healthy cells. We developed a novel aptamer-hybrid nanoparticle bioconjugate delivery system to selectively deliver miRNA-29b to MUC1-expressing cancer cells. Significant downregulation of oncoproteins DNMT3b and MCL1 was demonstrated by these MUC1 aptamer-functionalized hybrid nanoparticles in A549 cells. Furthermore, downregulation of these oncoproteins led to antiproliferative effect and induction of apoptosis in a superior version when compared with Lipofectamine 2000. This novel aptamer-hybrid nanoparticle bioconjugate delivery system could potentially serve as a platform for intracellular delivery of miRNAs to cancer cells, hence improving the therapeutic outcome of lung cancer. PMID:27555773

  10. Aptamer-hybrid nanoparticle bioconjugate efficiently delivers miRNA-29b to non-small-cell lung cancer cells and inhibits growth by downregulating essential oncoproteins.

    PubMed

    Perepelyuk, Maryna; Maher, Christina; Lakshmikuttyamma, Ashakumary; Shoyele, Sunday A

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are potentially attractive candidates for cancer therapy. However, their therapeutic application is limited by lack of availability of an efficient delivery system to stably deliver these potent molecules intracellularly to cancer cells while avoiding healthy cells. We developed a novel aptamer-hybrid nanoparticle bioconjugate delivery system to selectively deliver miRNA-29b to MUC1-expressing cancer cells. Significant downregulation of oncoproteins DNMT3b and MCL1 was demonstrated by these MUC1 aptamer-functionalized hybrid nanoparticles in A549 cells. Furthermore, downregulation of these oncoproteins led to antiproliferative effect and induction of apoptosis in a superior version when compared with Lipofectamine 2000. This novel aptamer-hybrid nanoparticle bioconjugate delivery system could potentially serve as a platform for intracellular delivery of miRNAs to cancer cells, hence improving the therapeutic outcome of lung cancer. PMID:27555773

  11. Exploring TAR–RNA aptamer loop–loop interaction by X-ray crystallography, UV spectroscopy and surface plasmon resonance

    PubMed Central

    Lebars, Isabelle; Legrand, Pierre; Aimé, Ahissan; Pinaud, Noël; Fribourg, Sébastien; Di Primo, Carmelo

    2008-01-01

    In HIV-1, trans-activation of transcription of the viral genome is regulated by an imperfect hairpin, the trans-activating responsive (TAR) RNA element, located at the 5′ untranslated end of all viral transcripts. TAR acts as a binding site for viral and cellular proteins. In an attempt to identify RNA ligands that would interfere with the virus life-cycle by interacting with TAR, an in vitro selection was previously carried out. RNA hairpins that formed kissing-loop dimers with TAR were selected [Ducongé F. and Toulmé JJ (1999) RNA, 5:1605–1614]. We describe here the crystal structure of TAR bound to a high-affinity RNA aptamer. The two hairpins form a kissing complex and interact through six Watson–Crick base pairs. The complex adopts an overall conformation with an inter-helix angle of 28.1°, thus contrasting with previously reported solution and modelling studies. Structural analysis reveals that inter-backbone hydrogen bonds between ribose 2′ hydroxyl and phosphate oxygens at the stem-loop junctions can be formed. Thermal denaturation and surface plasmon resonance experiments with chemically modified 2′-O-methyl incorporated into both hairpins at key positions, clearly demonstrate the involvement of this intermolecular network of hydrogen bonds in complex stability. PMID:18996893

  12. AptaTRACE Elucidates RNA Sequence-Structure Motifs from Selection Trends in HT-SELEX Experiments.

    PubMed

    Dao, Phuong; Hoinka, Jan; Takahashi, Mayumi; Zhou, Jiehua; Ho, Michelle; Wang, Yijie; Costa, Fabrizio; Rossi, John J; Backofen, Rolf; Burnett, John; Przytycka, Teresa M

    2016-07-01

    Aptamers, short RNA or DNA molecules that bind distinct targets with high affinity and specificity, can be identified using high-throughput systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (HT-SELEX), but scalable analytic tools for understanding sequence-function relationships from diverse HT-SELEX data are not available. Here we present AptaTRACE, a computational approach that leverages the experimental design of the HT-SELEX protocol, RNA secondary structure, and the potential presence of many secondary motifs to identify sequence-structure motifs that show a signature of selection. We apply AptaTRACE to identify nine motifs in C-C chemokine receptor type 7 targeted by aptamers in an in vitro cell-SELEX experiment. We experimentally validate two aptamers whose binding required both sequence and structural features. AptaTRACE can identify low-abundance motifs, and we show through simulations that, because of this, it could lower HT-SELEX cost and time by reducing the number of selection cycles required. PMID:27467247

  13. Alternative applications for distinct RNA sequencing strategies

    PubMed Central

    Han, Leng; Vickers, Kasey C.; Samuels, David C.

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in RNA library preparation methods, platform accessibility and cost efficiency have allowed high-throughput RNA sequencing (RNAseq) to replace conventional hybridization microarray platforms as the method of choice for mRNA profiling and transcriptome analyses. RNAseq is a powerful technique to profile both long and short RNA expression, and the depth of information gained from distinct RNAseq methods is striking and facilitates discovery. In addition to expression analysis, distinct RNAseq approaches also allow investigators the ability to assess transcriptional elongation, DNA variance and exogenous RNA content. Here we review the current state of the art in transcriptome sequencing and address epigenetic regulation, quantification of transcription activation, RNAseq output and a diverse set of applications for RNAseq data. We detail how RNAseq can be used to identify allele-specific expression, single-nucleotide polymorphisms and somatic mutations and discuss the benefits and limitations of using RNAseq to monitor DNA characteristics. Moreover, we highlight the power of combining RNA- and DNAseq methods for genomic analysis. In summary, RNAseq provides the opportunity to gain greater insight into transcriptional regulation and output than simply miRNA and mRNA profiling. PMID:25246237

  14. Alternative applications for distinct RNA sequencing strategies.

    PubMed

    Han, Leng; Vickers, Kasey C; Samuels, David C; Guo, Yan

    2015-07-01

    Recent advances in RNA library preparation methods, platform accessibility and cost efficiency have allowed high-throughput RNA sequencing (RNAseq) to replace conventional hybridization microarray platforms as the method of choice for mRNA profiling and transcriptome analyses. RNAseq is a powerful technique to profile both long and short RNA expression, and the depth of information gained from distinct RNAseq methods is striking and facilitates discovery. In addition to expression analysis, distinct RNAseq approaches also allow investigators the ability to assess transcriptional elongation, DNA variance and exogenous RNA content. Here we review the current state of the art in transcriptome sequencing and address epigenetic regulation, quantification of transcription activation, RNAseq output and a diverse set of applications for RNAseq data. We detail how RNAseq can be used to identify allele-specific expression, single-nucleotide polymorphisms and somatic mutations and discuss the benefits and limitations of using RNAseq to monitor DNA characteristics. Moreover, we highlight the power of combining RNA- and DNAseq methods for genomic analysis. In summary, RNAseq provides the opportunity to gain greater insight into transcriptional regulation and output than simply miRNA and mRNA profiling. PMID:25246237

  15. Comparative crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of locked nucleic acid and RNA stems of a tenascin C-binding aptamer

    SciTech Connect

    Förster, Charlotte; Brauer, Arnd B. E.; Brode, Svenja; Schmidt, Kathrin S.; Perbandt, Markus; Meyer, Arne

    2006-07-01

    Locked nucleic acid (LNA) nucleotides are RNA analogues with a useful additional conformational constraint; the current investigation will provide the first crystallographic view of an all-LNA duplex. The pharmacokinetic properties of an aptamer against the tumour-marker protein tenascin-C have recently been successfully improved by the introduction of locked nucleic acids (LNAs) into the terminal stem of the aptamer. Since it is believed that this post-SELEX optimization is likely to provide a more general route to enhance the in vitro and in vivo stability of aptamers, elucidation of the structural basis of this improvement was embarked upon. Here, the crystallographic and X-ray diffraction data of the isolated aptamer stem encompassed in a six-base-pair duplex both with and without the LNA modification are presented. The obtained all-LNA crystals belong to space group P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2 or P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 52.80, c = 62.83 Å; the all-RNA crystals belong to space group R32, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 45.21, c = 186.97 Å, γ = 120.00°.

  16. Isolating aptamers using capillary electrophoresis-SELEX (CE-SELEX).

    PubMed

    Mosing, Renee K; Bowser, Michael T

    2009-01-01

    SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment) is a process for isolating DNA or RNA sequences with high affinity and selectivity for molecular targets from random sequence libraries. These sequences are commonly referred to as aptamers. The process typically requires 10-15 cycles of enrichment, PCR amplification and nucleic acid purification to obtain high-affinity aptamers. We have demonstrated that using capillary electrophoresis (CE) as an enrichment step greatly improves the efficiency of the process. CE-SELEX is capable of isolating high-affinity aptamers in as little as 2-4 rounds of selection, shortening the process time from several weeks to as little as a few days. PMID:19377982

  17. Ets1 identified as a novel molecular target of RNA aptamer selected against metastatic cells for targeted delivery of nano-formulation

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, J; Tikoo, K

    2015-01-01

    Nanomedicine era is not far from its realization, but a major concern of targeted delivery still stands tall in its way. Herein we demonstrate the mechanism underlying the anticancer activity of an RNA aptamer (Apt) conjugated to gefitinib-loaded poly (lactic co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles (GNPs). Apt was selected through Cell-SELEX (systemic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment) process against gefitinib-resistant H1975 lung cancer cells. The selected aptamer exhibited high specificity toward H1975 cells, both qualitatively as well as quantitatively. Software analysis using the MATCH tool predicted Ets1, a proto-oncoprotein, to be the target of the selected aptamer. Interestingly, the localization of identified aptamer varied in descending order of Ets1 expression, wherein maximum localization was observed in H1975 cells than in MDA-MB231, DU-145, H23, H460, A431, A549 and MCF-7 cells, and minimum in L132 cells. Furthermore, Apt-GNP bio-conjugate showed augmented anticancer activity specifically in Ets1-overexpressing cells. In addition, partial depletion of Ets1 in H1975 cells and overexpression of Ets1 in L132 cells reversed the targeting efficacy of the aptamer. Notably, a single intratumoral injection of the Apt-GNP bio-conjugate abrogated the growth of tumor in H1975 xenograft nude mice. Altogether, we present a pioneering platform, involving aptamers, which can be clinically used as a diagnostic marker for metastasis as well as an effective delivery system to escort the pharmaceutical cargo specifically to Ets1-overexpressing highly progressive tumors. PMID:25639877

  18. Ets1 identified as a novel molecular target of RNA aptamer selected against metastatic cells for targeted delivery of nano-formulation.

    PubMed

    Kaur, J; Tikoo, K

    2015-10-01

    Nanomedicine era is not far from its realization, but a major concern of targeted delivery still stands tall in its way. Herein we demonstrate the mechanism underlying the anticancer activity of an RNA aptamer (Apt) conjugated to gefitinib-loaded poly (lactic co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles (GNPs). Apt was selected through Cell-SELEX (systemic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment) process against gefitinib-resistant H1975 lung cancer cells. The selected aptamer exhibited high specificity toward H1975 cells, both qualitatively as well as quantitatively. Software analysis using the MATCH tool predicted Ets1, a proto-oncoprotein, to be the target of the selected aptamer. Interestingly, the localization of identified aptamer varied in descending order of Ets1 expression, wherein maximum localization was observed in H1975 cells than in MDA-MB231, DU-145, H23, H460, A431, A549 and MCF-7 cells, and minimum in L132 cells. Furthermore, Apt-GNP bio-conjugate showed augmented anticancer activity specifically in Ets1-overexpressing cells. In addition, partial depletion of Ets1 in H1975 cells and overexpression of Ets1 in L132 cells reversed the targeting efficacy of the aptamer. Notably, a single intratumoral injection of the Apt-GNP bio-conjugate abrogated the growth of tumor in H1975 xenograft nude mice. Altogether, we present a pioneering platform, involving aptamers, which can be clinically used as a diagnostic marker for metastasis as well as an effective delivery system to escort the pharmaceutical cargo specifically to Ets1-overexpressing highly progressive tumors. PMID:25639877

  19. Peptide Aptamers: Development and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Reverdatto, Sergey; Burz, David S.; Shekhtman, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Peptide aptamers are small combinatorial proteins that are selected to bind to specific sites on their target molecules. Peptide aptamers consist of short, 5-20 amino acid residues long sequences, typically embedded as a loop within a stable protein scaffold. Various peptide aptamer scaffolds and in vitro and in vivo selection techniques are reviewed with emphasis on specific biomedical, bioimaging, and bioanalytical applications. PMID:25866267

  20. Transcriptional profiling of Dictyostelium with RNA sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Edward Roshan; Rot, Gregor; Toplak, Marko; Santhanam, Balaji; Curk, Tomaz; Shaulsky, Gad; Zupan, Blaz

    2014-01-01

    Summary Transcriptional profiling methods have been utilized in the analysis of various biological processes in Dictyostelium. Recent advances in high-throughput sequencing have increased the resolution and the dynamic range of transcriptional profiling. Here we describe the utility of RNA-sequencing with the Illumina technology for production of transcriptional profiles. We also describe methods for data mapping and storage as well as common and specialized tools for data analysis, both online and offline. PMID:23494306

  1. Molecular imaging of a cancer-targeting theragnostics probe using a nucleolin aptamer- and microRNA-221 molecular beacon-conjugated nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Kyeoung; Choi, Kyung-Ju; Lee, Minhyung; Jo, Mi-hee; Kim, Soonhag

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNA, miR) have been reported as cancer biomarkers that regulate tumor suppressor genes. Hence, simultaneous detecting and inhibiting of miRNA function will be useful as a cancer theragnostics probe to minimize side effects and invasiveness. In this study, we developed a cancer-targeting therangostics probe in a single system using an AS1411 aptamer - and miRNA-221 molecular beacon (miR-221 MB)-conjugated magnetic fluorescence (MF) nanoparticle (MFAS miR-221 MB) to simultaneously target to cancer tissue, image intracellularly expressed miRNA-221 and treat miRNA-221-involved carcinogenesis. AS1411 aptamer-conjugated MF (MFAS) nanoparticles displayed a great selectivity and delivery into various cancer cell lines. The miR-221 MB detached from the MFAS miR-221 MB in the cytoplasm of C6 cells clearly imaged miRNA-221 biogenesis and simultaneously resulted in antitumor therapeutic effects by inhibiting miRNA function, indicating a successful astrocytoma-targeting theragnostics. MFAS miRNA MB can be easily applied to other cancers by simply changing a targeted miRNA highly expressed in cancers. PMID:21944470

  2. Characterization of 2'-fluoro-RNA aptamers that bind preferentially to disease-associated conformations of prion protein and inhibit conversion.

    PubMed

    Rhie, Alexandre; Kirby, Louise; Sayer, Natalie; Wellesley, Rosanna; Disterer, Petra; Sylvester, Ian; Gill, Andrew; Hope, James; James, William; Tahiri-Alaoui, Abdessamad

    2003-10-10

    We have isolated artificial ligands or aptamers for infectious prions in order to investigate conformational aspects of prion pathogenesis. The aptamers are 2'-fluoro-modified RNA produced by in vitro selection from a large, randomized library. One of these ligands (aptamer SAF-93) had more than 10-fold higher affinity for PrPSc than for recombinant PrPC and inhibited the accumulation of PrPres in near physiological cell-free conversion assay. To understand the molecular basis of these properties and to distinguish specific from non-specific aptamer-PrP interactions, we studied deletion mutants of bovine PrP in denatured, alpha-helix-rich and beta-sheet-rich forms. We provide evidence that, like scrapie-associated fibrils (SAF), the beta-oligomer of PrP bound to SAF-93 with at least 10-fold higher affinity than did the alpha-form. This differential affinity could be explained by the existence of two binding sites within the PrP molecule. Site 1 lies within residues 23-110 in the unstructured N terminus and is a nonspecific RNA binding site found in all forms of PrP. The region between residue 90 and 110 forms a hinge region that is occluded in the alpha-rich form of PrP but becomes exposed in the denatured form of PrP. Site 2 lies in the region C-terminal of residue 110. This site is beta-sheet conformation-specific and is not recognized by control RNAs. Taken together, these data provide for the first time a specific ligand for a disease conformation-associated site in a region of PrP critical for conformational conversion. This aptamer could provide tools for the further analysis of the processes of PrP misfolding during prion disease and leads for the development of diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to TSEs. PMID:12902353

  3. Methods for Improving Aptamer Binding Affinity.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Hijiri; Savory, Nasa; Abe, Koichi; Ikebukuro, Kazunori

    2016-01-01

    Aptamers are single stranded oligonucleotides that bind a wide range of biological targets. Although aptamers can be isolated from pools of random sequence oligonucleotides using affinity-based selection, aptamers with high affinities are not always obtained. Therefore, further refinement of aptamers is required to achieve desired binding affinities. The optimization of primary sequences and stabilization of aptamer conformations are the main approaches to refining the binding properties of aptamers. In particular, sequence optimization using combined in silico sequence recombinations and in vitro functional evaluations is effective for the improvement of binding affinities, however, the binding affinities of aptamers are limited by the low hydrophobicity of nucleic acids. Accordingly, introduction of hydrophobic moieties into aptamers expands the diversity of interactions between aptamers and targets. Moreover, construction of multivalent aptamers by connecting aptamers that recognize distinct epitopes is an attractive approach to substantial increases in binding affinity. In addition, binding affinities can be tuned by optimizing the scaffolds of multivalent constructs. In this review, we summarize the various techniques for improving the binding affinities of aptamers. PMID:27043498

  4. Crystal structure of a mirror-image L-RNA aptamer (Spiegelmer) in complex with the natural L-protein target CCL2

    PubMed Central

    Oberthür, Dominik; Achenbach, John; Gabdulkhakov, Azat; Buchner, Klaus; Maasch, Christian; Falke, Sven; Rehders, Dirk; Klussmann, Sven; Betzel, Christian

    2015-01-01

    We report the crystal structure of a 40mer mirror-image RNA oligonucleotide completely built from nucleotides of the non-natural L-chirality in complex with the pro-inflammatory chemokine L-CLL2 (monocyte chemoattractant protein-1), a natural protein composed of regular L-amino acids. The L-oligonucleotide is an L-aptamer (a Spiegelmer) identified to bind L-CCL2 with high affinity, thereby neutralizing the chemokine's activity. CCL2 plays a key role in attracting and positioning monocytes; its overexpression in several inflammatory diseases makes CCL2 an interesting pharmacological target. The PEGylated form of the L-aptamer, NOX-E36 (emapticap pegol), already showed promising efficacy in clinical Phase II studies conducted in diabetic nephropathy patients. The structure of the L-oligonucleotide·L-protein complex was solved and refined to 2.05 Å. It unveils the L-aptamer's intramolecular contacts and permits a detailed analysis of its structure–function relationship. Furthermore, the analysis of the intermolecular drug–target interactions reveals insight into the selectivity of the L-aptamer for certain related chemokines. PMID:25901662

  5. Crystal structure of a mirror-image L-RNA aptamer (Spiegelmer) in complex with the natural L-protein target CCL2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberthür, Dominik; Achenbach, John; Gabdulkhakov, Azat; Buchner, Klaus; Maasch, Christian; Falke, Sven; Rehders, Dirk; Klussmann, Sven; Betzel, Christian

    2015-04-01

    We report the crystal structure of a 40mer mirror-image RNA oligonucleotide completely built from nucleotides of the non-natural L-chirality in complex with the pro-inflammatory chemokine L-CLL2 (monocyte chemoattractant protein-1), a natural protein composed of regular L-amino acids. The L-oligonucleotide is an L-aptamer (a Spiegelmer) identified to bind L-CCL2 with high affinity, thereby neutralizing the chemokine's activity. CCL2 plays a key role in attracting and positioning monocytes; its overexpression in several inflammatory diseases makes CCL2 an interesting pharmacological target. The PEGylated form of the L-aptamer, NOX-E36 (emapticap pegol), already showed promising efficacy in clinical Phase II studies conducted in diabetic nephropathy patients. The structure of the L-oligonucleotide.L-protein complex was solved and refined to 2.05 Å. It unveils the L-aptamer's intramolecular contacts and permits a detailed analysis of its structure-function relationship. Furthermore, the analysis of the intermolecular drug-target interactions reveals insight into the selectivity of the L-aptamer for certain related chemokines.

  6. Ribosomal RNA sequence suggest microsporidia are extremely ancient eukaryotes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vossbrinck, C. R.; Maddox, J. V.; Friedman, S.; Debrunner-Vossbrinck, B. A.; Woese, C. R.

    1987-01-01

    A comparative sequence analysis of the 18S small subunit ribosomal RNA (rRNA) of the microsporidium Vairimorpha necatrix is presented. The results show that this rRNA sequence is more unlike those of other eukaryotes than any known eukaryote rRNA sequence. It is concluded that the lineage leading to microsporidia branched very early from that leading to other eukaryotes.

  7. Synergistic inhibition of lung cancer cell invasion, tumor growth and angiogenesis using aptamer-siRNA chimeras.

    PubMed

    Lai, Wei-Yun; Wang, Wei-Ya; Chang, Yi-Chung; Chang, Cheng-Ju; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Peck, Konan

    2014-03-01

    Early metastasis is one of the major causes of mortality among patient with lung cancer. The process of tumor metastasis involves a cascade of events, including epithelial-mesenchymal transition, tumor cell migration and invasion, and angiogenesis. To specifically suppress tumor invasion and angiogenesis, two nucleolin aptamer-siRNA chimeras (aptNCL-SLUGsiR and aptNCL-NRP1siR) were used to block key signaling pathways involved in lung cancer metastasis that are pivotal to metastatic tumor cells but not to normal cells under ordinary physiologic conditions. Through nucleolin-mediated endocytosis, the aptNCL-siRNA chimeras specifically and significantly knocked down the expressions of SLUG and NRP1 in nucleolin-expressing cancer cells. Furthermore, simultaneous suppression of SLUG and NRP1 expressions by the chimeras synergistically retarded cancer cell motility and invasive ability. The synergistic effect was also observed in a xenograft mouse model, wherein the combined treatment using two chimeras suppressed tumor growth, the invasiveness, circulating tumor cell amount, and angiogenesis in tumor tissue without affecting liver and kidney functions. This study demonstrates that combined treatment of aptNCL-SLUGsiR and aptNCL-NRP1siR can synergistically suppress lung cancer cell invasion, tumor growth and angiogenesis by cancer-specific targeting combined with gene-specific silencing. PMID:24397988

  8. Advanced Applications of RNA Sequencing and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yixing; Gao, Shouguo; Muegge, Kathrin; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Bing

    2015-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing technologies have revolutionarily advanced sequence-based research with the advantages of high-throughput, high-sensitivity, and high-speed. RNA-seq is now being used widely for uncovering multiple facets of transcriptome to facilitate the biological applications. However, the large-scale data analyses associated with RNA-seq harbors challenges. In this study, we present a detailed overview of the applications of this technology and the challenges that need to be addressed, including data preprocessing, differential gene expression analysis, alternative splicing analysis, variants detection and allele-specific expression, pathway analysis, co-expression network analysis, and applications combining various experimental procedures beyond the achievements that have been made. Specifically, we discuss essential principles of computational methods that are required to meet the key challenges of the RNA-seq data analyses, development of various bioinformatics tools, challenges associated with the RNA-seq applications, and examples that represent the advances made so far in the characterization of the transcriptome. PMID:26609224

  9. Targeted inhibition of {alpha}v{beta}3 integrin with an RNA aptamer impairs endothelial cell growth and survival

    SciTech Connect

    Mi Jing; Zhang Xiuwu; Giangrande, Paloma H.; McNamara, James O.; Nimjee, Shahid M.; Sarraf-Yazdi, Shiva; Sullenger, Bruce A.; Clary, Bryan M. . E-mail: mi001@duke.edu

    2005-12-16

    {alpha}v{beta}3 integrin is a crucial factor involved in a variety of physiological processes, such as cell growth and migration, tumor invasion and metastasis, angiogenesis, and wound healing. {alpha}v{beta}3 integrin exerts its effect by regulating endothelial cell (EC) migration, proliferation, and survival. Inhibiting the function of {alpha}v{beta}3 integrin, therefore, represents a potential anti-cancer, anti-thrombotic, and anti-inflammatory strategy. In this study, we tested an RNA aptamer, Apt-{alpha}v{beta}3 that binds recombinant {alpha}v{beta}3 integrin, for its ability to bind endogenous {alpha}v{beta}3 integrin on the surface of cells in culture and to subsequently affect cellular response. Our data illustrate that Apt-{alpha}v{beta}3 binds {alpha}v{beta}3 integrin expressed on the surface of live HUVECs. This interaction significantly decreases both basal and PDGF-induced cell proliferation as well as inhibition of cell adhesion. Apt-{alpha}v{beta}3 can also reduce PDGF-stimulated tube formation and increase HUVEC apoptosis through inhibition of FAK phosphorylation pathway. Our results demonstrate that by binding to its target, Apt-{alpha}v{beta}3 can efficiently inhibit human EC proliferation and survival, resulting in reduced angiogenesis. It predicts that Apt-{alpha}v{beta}3 could become useful in both tumor imaging and the treatment of tumor growth, atherosclerosis, thrombosis, and inflammation.

  10. Calculation of absolute free energy of binding for theophylline and its analogs to RNA aptamer using nonequilibrium work values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanida, Yoshiaki; Ito, Masakatsu; Fujitani, Hideaki

    2007-08-01

    The massively parallel computation of absolute binding free energy with a well-equilibrated system (MP-CAFEE) has been developed [H. Fujitani, Y. Tanida, M. Ito, G. Jayachandran, C.D. Snow, M.R. Shirts, E.J. Sorin, V.S. Pande, J. Chem. Phys. 123 (2005) 084108]. As an application, we perform the binding affinity calculations of six theophylline-related ligands with RNA aptamer. Basically, our method is applicable when using many compute nodes to accelerate simulations, thus a parallel computing system is also developed. To further reduce the computational cost, the adequate non-uniform intervals of coupling constant λ, connecting two equilibrium states, namely bound and unbound, are determined. The absolute binding energies Δ G thus obtained have effective linear relation between the computed and experimental values. If the results of two other different methods are compared, thermodynamic integration (TI) and molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA) by the paper of Gouda et al. [H. Gouda, I.D. Kuntz, D.A. Case, P.A. Kollman, Biopolymers 68 (2003) 16], the predictive accuracy of the relative values ΔΔ G is almost comparable to that of TI: the correlation coefficients ( R) obtained are 0.99 (this work), 0.97 (TI), and 0.78 (MM-PBSA). On absolute binding energies meanwhile, a constant energy shift of ˜-7 kcal/mol against the experimental values is evident. To solve this problem, several presumable reasons are investigated.

  11. Gene Knockdown by EpCAM Aptamer-siRNA Chimeras Suppresses Epithelial Breast Cancers and Their Tumor-Initiating Cells.

    PubMed

    Gilboa-Geffen, Adi; Hamar, Peter; Le, Minh T N; Wheeler, Lee Adam; Trifonova, Radiana; Petrocca, Fabio; Wittrup, Anders; Lieberman, Judy

    2015-10-01

    Effective therapeutic strategies for in vivo siRNA delivery to knockdown genes in cells outside the liver are needed to harness RNA interference for treating cancer. EpCAM is a tumor-associated antigen highly expressed on common epithelial cancers and their tumor-initiating cells (TIC, also known as cancer stem cells). Here, we show that aptamer-siRNA chimeras (AsiC, an EpCAM aptamer linked to an siRNA sense strand and annealed to the siRNA antisense strand) are selectively taken up and knock down gene expression in EpCAM(+) cancer cells in vitro and in human cancer biopsy tissues. PLK1 EpCAM-AsiCs inhibit colony and mammosphere formation (in vitro TIC assays) and tumor initiation by EpCAM(+) luminal and basal-A triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cell lines, but not EpCAM(-) mesenchymal basal-B TNBCs, in nude mice. Subcutaneously administered EpCAM-AsiCs concentrate in EpCAM(+) Her2(+) and TNBC tumors and suppress their growth. Thus, EpCAM-AsiCs provide an attractive approach for treating epithelial cancer. PMID:26264278

  12. Determining structures of RNA aptamers and riboswitches by X-ray crystallography.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Andrea L; Garst, Andrew D; Batey, Robert T

    2009-01-01

    Structural biology plays a central role in gaining a full understanding of the myriad roles of RNA in biology. In recent years, innovative approaches in RNA purification and crystallographic methods have lead to the visualization of an increasing number of unique structures, providing new insights into its function at the atomic level. This article presents general protocols which have streamlined the process of obtaining a homogeneous sample of properly folded and active RNA in high concentrations that crystallizes well in the presence of a suitable heavy-atom for phasing. Of particular importance are approaches toward RNA crystallography that include exploring "construct space" as opposed to "condition space". Moreover, development of a highly flexible method for experimentally phasing RNA crystals may open the door to a relatively simple means of solving these structures. PMID:19377976

  13. Determining Structures of RNA Aptamers and Riboswitches by X-Ray Crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Andrea L.; Garst, Andrew D.; Batey, Robert T.

    2011-01-01

    Structural biology plays a central role in gaining a full understanding of the myriad roles of RNA in biology. In recent years, innovative approaches in RNA purification and crystallographic methods have lead to the visualization of an increasing number of unique structures, providing new insights into its function at the atomic level. This article presents general protocols which have streamlined the process of obtaining a homogeneous sample of properly folded and active RNA in high concentrations that crystallizes well in the presence of a suitable heavy-atom for phasing. Of particular importance are approaches toward RNA crystallography that include exploring “construct space” as opposed to “condition space”. Moreover, development of a highly flexible method for experimentally phasing RNA crystals may open the door to a relatively simple means of solving these structures. PMID:19377976

  14. De novo assembly of a bell pepper endornavirus genome sequence using RNA sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Jo, Yeonhwa; Choi, Hoseng; Cho, Won Kyong

    2015-01-01

    The genus Endornavirus is a double-stranded RNA virus that infects a wide range of hosts. In this study, we report on the de novo assembly of a bell pepper endornavirus genome sequence by RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq). Our result demonstrates the successful application of RNA-Seq to obtain a complete viral genome sequence from the transcriptome data. PMID:25792042

  15. Nucleic Acid Aptamers as Potential Therapeutic and Diagnostic Agents for Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Shum, Ka-To; Zhou, Jiehua; Rossi, John J.

    2014-01-01

    Lymphomas are cancers that arise from white blood cells and usually present as solid tumors. Treatment of lymphoma often involves chemotherapy, and can also include radiotherapy and/or bone marrow transplantation. There is an un-questioned need for more effective therapies and diagnostic tool for lymphoma. Aptamers are single stranded DNA or RNA oligonucleotides whose three-dimensional structures are dictated by their sequences. The immense diversity in function and structure of nucleic acids enable numerous aptamers to be generated through an iterative in vitro selection technique known as Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment (SELEX). Aptamers have several biochemical properties that make them attractive tools for use as potential diagnostic and pharmacologic agents. Isolated aptamers may directly inhibit the function of target proteins, or they can also be formulated for use as delivery agents for other therapeutic or imaging cargoes. More complex aptamer identification methods, using whole cancer cells (Cell-SELEX), may identify novel targets and aptamers to affect them. This review focuses on recent advances in the use of nucleic acid aptamers as diagnostic and therapeutic agents and as targeted delivery carriers that are relevant to lymphoma. Some representative examples are also discussed. PMID:25057429

  16. Single-Stranded DNA Aptamers against Pathogens and Toxins: Identification and Biosensing Applications

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Ka Lok; Sooter, Letha J.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular recognition elements (MREs) can be short sequences of single-stranded DNA, RNA, small peptides, or antibody fragments. They can bind to user-defined targets with high affinity and specificity. There has been an increasing interest in the identification and application of nucleic acid molecular recognition elements, commonly known as aptamers, since they were first described in 1990 by the Gold and Szostak laboratories. A large number of target specific nucleic acids MREs and their applications are currently in the literature. This review first describes the general methodologies used in identifying single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) aptamers. It then summarizes advancements in the identification and biosensing application of ssDNA aptamers specific for bacteria, viruses, their associated molecules, and selected chemical toxins. Lastly, an overview of the basic principles of ssDNA aptamer-based biosensors is discussed. PMID:26199940

  17. Aptamer Affinity Maturation by Resampling and Microarray Selection.

    PubMed

    Kinghorn, Andrew B; Dirkzwager, Roderick M; Liang, Shaolin; Cheung, Yee-Wai; Fraser, Lewis A; Shiu, Simon Chi-Chin; Tang, Marco S L; Tanner, Julian A

    2016-07-19

    Aptamers have significant potential as affinity reagents, but better approaches are critically needed to discover higher affinity nucleic acids to widen the scope for their diagnostic, therapeutic, and proteomic application. Here, we report aptamer affinity maturation, a novel aptamer enhancement technique, which combines bioinformatic resampling of aptamer sequence data and microarray selection to navigate the combinatorial chemistry binding landscape. Aptamer affinity maturation is shown to improve aptamer affinity by an order of magnitude in a single round. The novel aptamers exhibited significant adaptation, the complexity of which precludes discovery by other microarray based methods. Honing aptamer sequences using aptamer affinity maturation could help optimize a next generation of nucleic acid affinity reagents. PMID:27346322

  18. Engineering a ribozyme cleavage-induced split fluorescent aptamer complementation assay

    PubMed Central

    Ausländer, Simon; Fuchs, David; Hürlemann, Samuel; Ausländer, David; Fussenegger, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Hammerhead ribozymes are self-cleaving RNA molecules capable of regulating gene expression in living cells. Their cleavage performance is strongly influenced by intra-molecular loop–loop interactions, a feature not readily accessible through modern prediction algorithms. Ribozyme engineering and efficient implementation of ribozyme-based genetic switches requires detailed knowledge of individual self-cleavage performances. By rational design, we devised fluorescent aptamer-ribozyme RNA architectures that allow for the real-time measurement of ribozyme self-cleavage activity in vitro. The engineered nucleic acid molecules implement a split Spinach aptamer sequence that is made accessible for strand displacement upon ribozyme self-cleavage, thereby complementing the fluorescent Spinach aptamer. This fully RNA-based ribozyme performance assay correlates ribozyme cleavage activity with Spinach fluorescence to provide a rapid and straightforward technology for the validation of loop–loop interactions in hammerhead ribozymes. PMID:26939886

  19. Engineering a ribozyme cleavage-induced split fluorescent aptamer complementation assay.

    PubMed

    Ausländer, Simon; Fuchs, David; Hürlemann, Samuel; Ausländer, David; Fussenegger, Martin

    2016-06-01

    Hammerhead ribozymes are self-cleaving RNA molecules capable of regulating gene expression in living cells. Their cleavage performance is strongly influenced by intra-molecular loop-loop interactions, a feature not readily accessible through modern prediction algorithms. Ribozyme engineering and efficient implementation of ribozyme-based genetic switches requires detailed knowledge of individual self-cleavage performances. By rational design, we devised fluorescent aptamer-ribozyme RNA architectures that allow for the real-time measurement of ribozyme self-cleavage activity in vitro The engineered nucleic acid molecules implement a split Spinach aptamer sequence that is made accessible for strand displacement upon ribozyme self-cleavage, thereby complementing the fluorescent Spinach aptamer. This fully RNA-based ribozyme performance assay correlates ribozyme cleavage activity with Spinach fluorescence to provide a rapid and straightforward technology for the validation of loop-loop interactions in hammerhead ribozymes. PMID:26939886

  20. DNA aptamers for the detection of Haemophilus influenzae type b by cell SELEX.

    PubMed

    Bitaraf, F S; Rasooli, I; Mousavi Gargari, S L

    2016-03-01

    Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) causes acute bacterial meningitis (ABM) in children, with a mortality rate of about 3-6 % of the affected patients. ABM can lead to death during a period of hours to several days and, hence, rapid and early detection of the infection is crucial. Aptamers, the short single-stranded DNA or RNA with high affinity to target molecules, are selected by a high-flux screening technique known as in vitro screening and systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment technology (SELEX). In this study, whole-cell SELEX was applied for the selection of target-specific aptamers with high affinity to Hib. ssDNA aptamers prepared by lambda exonuclease were incubated with the target cells (Hib). The aptameric binding rate to Hib was characterized for binding affinity after seven SELEX rounds by flow cytometry. The aptamers with higher binding affinity were cloned. Four of 68 aptamer clones were selected for sequencing. The dissociation constant (Kd) of the high-affinity aptamer clones 45 and 63 were 47.10 and 28.46 pM, respectively. These aptamers did not bind to other bacterial species, including the seven meningitis-causing bacteria. They showed distinct affinity to various H. influenzae strains only. These aptamers showed the highest affinity to Hib and the lowest affinity to H. influenzae type c and to other meningitis-causing bacteria. Clone 63 could detect Hib in patients' cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples at 60 colony-forming units (CFU)/mL. The results indicate applicability of the aptamers for rapid and early detection of infections brought about by Hib. PMID:26768582

  1. Nucleotide sequence of Neurospora crassa cytoplasmic initiator tRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Gillum, A M; Hecker, L I; Silberklang, M; Schwartzbach, S D; RajBhandary, U L; Barnett, W E

    1977-01-01

    Initiator methionine tRNA from the cytoplasm of Neurospora crassa has been purified and sequenced. The sequence is: pAGCUGCAUm1GGCGCAGCGGAAGCGCM22GCY*GGGCUCAUt6AACCCGGAGm7GU (or D) - CACUCGAUCGm1AAACGAG*UUGCAGCUACCAOH. Similar to initiator tRNAs from the cytoplasm of other eukaryotes, this tRNA also contains the sequence -AUCG- instead of the usual -TphiCG (or A)- found in loop IV of other tRNAs. The sequence of the N. crassa cytoplasmic initiator tRNA is quite different from that of the corresponding mitochondrial initiator tRNA. Comparison of the sequence of N. crassa cytoplasmic initiator tRNA to those of yeast, wheat germ and vertebrate cytoplasmic initiator tRNA indicates that the sequences of the two fungal tRNAs are no more similar to each other than they are to those of other initiator tRNAs. Images PMID:146192

  2. Aptamer Microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Angel-Syrett, Heather; Collett, Jim; Ellington, Andrew D.

    2009-01-02

    In vitro selection can yield specific, high-affinity aptamers. We and others have devised methods for the automated selection of aptamers, and have begun to use these reagents for the construction of arrays. Arrayed aptamers have proven to be almost as sensitive as their solution phase counterparts, and when ganged together can provide both specific and general diagnostic signals for proteins and other analytes. We describe here technical details regarding the production and processing of aptamer microarrays, including blocking, washing, drying, and scanning. We will also discuss the challenges involved in developing standardized and reproducible methods for binding and quantitating protein targets. While signals from fluorescent analytes or sandwiches are typically captured, it has proven possible for immobilized aptamers to be uniquely coupled to amplification methods not available to protein reagents, thus allowing for protein-binding signals to be greatly amplified. Into the future, many of the biosensor methods described in this book can potentially be adapted to array formats, thus further expanding the utility of and applications for aptamer arrays.

  3. Aptamers and riboswitches: perspectives in biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Weigand, Julia E; Suess, Beatrix

    2009-11-01

    Aptamers are short, single stranded nucleic acids which bind a wide range of different ligands with extraordinary high binding affinity and specificity. The steadily increasing number of aptamers is accompanied by an expanding range of applications in biotechnology. We will describe new developments in the field including the use of aptamers for conditional gene regulation and as biosensors. In addition, we will discuss the potential of aptamers as tags to visualize RNA and protein distribution in living cells and as therapeutics. Furthermore, we will consider biotechnological applications of riboswitches for gene regulation and as drug target. PMID:19756582

  4. Empirical insights into the stochasticity of small RNA sequencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Li-Xuan; Tuschl, Thomas; Singer, Samuel

    2016-04-01

    The choice of stochasticity distribution for modeling the noise distribution is a fundamental assumption for the analysis of sequencing data and consequently is critical for the accurate assessment of biological heterogeneity and differential expression. The stochasticity of RNA sequencing has been assumed to follow Poisson distributions. We collected microRNA sequencing data and observed that its stochasticity is better approximated by gamma distributions, likely because of the stochastic nature of exponential PCR amplification. We validated our findings with two independent datasets, one for microRNA sequencing and another for RNA sequencing. Motivated by the gamma distributed stochasticity, we provided a simple method for the analysis of RNA sequencing data and showed its superiority to three existing methods for differential expression analysis using three data examples of technical replicate data and biological replicate data.

  5. Empirical insights into the stochasticity of small RNA sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Li-Xuan; Tuschl, Thomas; Singer, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    The choice of stochasticity distribution for modeling the noise distribution is a fundamental assumption for the analysis of sequencing data and consequently is critical for the accurate assessment of biological heterogeneity and differential expression. The stochasticity of RNA sequencing has been assumed to follow Poisson distributions. We collected microRNA sequencing data and observed that its stochasticity is better approximated by gamma distributions, likely because of the stochastic nature of exponential PCR amplification. We validated our findings with two independent datasets, one for microRNA sequencing and another for RNA sequencing. Motivated by the gamma distributed stochasticity, we provided a simple method for the analysis of RNA sequencing data and showed its superiority to three existing methods for differential expression analysis using three data examples of technical replicate data and biological replicate data. PMID:27052356

  6. Therapeutic aptamers: developmental potential as anticancer drugs

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji Won; Kim, Hyun Jung; Heo, Kyun

    2015-01-01

    Aptamers, composed of single-stranded DNA or RNA oligonucleotides that interact with target molecules through a specific three-dimensional structure, are selected from pools of combinatorial oligonucleotide libraries. With their high specificity and affinity for target proteins, ease of synthesis and modification, and low immunogenicity and toxicity, aptamers are considered to be attractive molecules for development as anticancer therapeutics. Two aptamers - one targeting nucleolin and a second targeting CXCL12 - are currently undergoing clinical trials for treating cancer patients, and many more are under study. In this mini-review, we present the current clinical status of aptamers and aptamer-based cancer therapeutics. We also discuss advantages, limitations, and prospects for aptamers as cancer therapeutics. [BMB Reports 2015; 48(4): 234-237] PMID:25560701

  7. Characterisation of aptamer–target interactions by branched selection and high-throughput sequencing of SELEX pools

    PubMed Central

    Dupont, Daniel M.; Larsen, Niels; Jensen, Jan. K.; Andreasen, Peter A.; Kjems, Jørgen

    2015-01-01

    Nucleic acid aptamer selection by systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) has shown great promise for use in the development of research tools, therapeutics and diagnostics. Typically, aptamers are identified from libraries containing up to 1016 different RNA or DNA sequences by 5–10 rounds of affinity selection towards a target of interest. Such library screenings can result in complex pools of many target-binding aptamers. New high-throughput sequencing techniques may potentially revolutionise aptamer selection by allowing quantitative assessment of the dynamic changes in the pool composition during the SELEX process and by facilitating large-scale post-SELEX characterisation. In the present study, we demonstrate how high-throughput sequencing of SELEX pools, before and after a single round of branched selection for binding to different target variants, can provide detailed information about aptamer binding sites, preferences for specific target conformations, and functional effects of the aptamers. The procedure was applied on a diverse pool of 2′-fluoropyrimidine-modified RNA enriched for aptamers specific for the serpin plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) through five rounds of standard selection. The results demonstrate that it is possible to perform large-scale detailed characterisation of aptamer sequences directly in the complex pools obtained from library selection methods, thus without the need to produce individual aptamers. PMID:26163061

  8. The Subcellular Localisation of the Human Papillomavirus (HPV) 16 E7 Protein in Cervical Cancer Cells and Its Perturbation by RNA Aptamers

    PubMed Central

    Cesur, Özlem; Nicol, Clare; Groves, Helen; Mankouri, Jamel; Blair, George Eric; Stonehouse, Nicola J.

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common viral infection of the reproductive tract, affecting both men and women. High-risk oncogenic types are responsible for almost 90% of anogenital and oropharyngeal cancers including cervical cancer. Some of the HPV “early” genes, particularly E6 and E7, are known to act as oncogenes that promote tumour growth and malignant transformation. Most notably, HPV-16 E7 interacts with the tumour suppressor protein pRb, promoting its degradation, leading to cell cycle dysregulation in infected cells. We have previously shown that an RNA aptamer (termed A2) selectively binds to HPV16 E7 and is able to induce apoptosis in HPV16-transformed cervical carcinoma cell lines (SiHa) through reduction of E7 levels. In this study, we investigated the effects of the A2 aptamer on E7 localisation in order to define its effects on E7 activity. We demonstrate for the first time that E7 localised to the plasma membrane. In addition, we show that A2 enhanced E7 localisation in the ER and that the A2-mediated reduction of E7 was not associated with proteasomal degradation. These data suggest that A2 perturbs normal E7 trafficking through promoting E7 ER retention. PMID:26131956

  9. Nucleic acid aptamers: clinical applications and promising new horizons

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Xiaohua; Castanares, Mark; Mukherjee, Amarnath; Lupold, Shawn E.

    2011-01-01

    Aptamers are a special class of nucleic acid molecules that are beginning to be investigated for clinical use. These small RNA/DNA molecules can form secondary and tertiary structures capable of specifically binding proteins or other cellular targets; they are essentially a chemical equivalent of antibodies. Aptamers have the advantage of being highly specific, relatively small in size, and non-immunogenic. Since the discovery of aptamers in the early 1990s, great efforts have been made to make them clinically relevant for diseases like cancer, HIV, and macular degeneration. In the last two decades, many aptamers have been clinically developed as inhibitors for targets such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and thrombin. The first aptamer based therapeutic was FDA approved in 2004 for the treatment of age-related macular degeneration and several other aptamers are currently being evaluated in clinical trials. With advances in targeted-therapy, imaging, and nanotechnology, aptamers are readily considered as potential targeting ligands because of their chemical synthesis and ease of modification for conjugation. Preclinical studies using aptamer-siRNA chimeras and aptamer targeted nanoparticle therapeutics have been very successful in mouse models of cancer and HIV. In summary aptamers are in several stages of development, from pre-clinical studies to clinical trials and even as FDA approved therapeutics. In this review, we will discuss the current state of aptamers in clinical trials as well as some promising aptamers in pre-clinical development. PMID:21838685

  10. Structural basis for the targeting of complement anaphylatoxin C5a using a mixed L-RNA/L-DNA aptamer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yatime, Laure; Maasch, Christian; Hoehlig, Kai; Klussmann, Sven; Andersen, Gregers R.; Vater, Axel

    2015-04-01

    L-Oligonucleotide aptamers (Spiegelmers) consist of non-natural L-configured nucleotides and are of particular therapeutic interest due to their high resistance to plasma nucleases. The anaphylatoxin C5a, a potent inflammatory mediator generated during complement activation that has been implicated with organ damage, can be efficiently targeted by Spiegelmers. Here, we present the first crystallographic structures of an active Spiegelmer, NOX-D20, bound to its physiological targets, mouse C5a and C5a-desArg. The structures reveal a complex 3D architecture for the L-aptamer that wraps around C5a, including an intramolecular G-quadruplex stabilized by a central Ca2+ ion. Functional validation of the observed L-aptamer:C5a binding mode through mutational studies also rationalizes the specificity of NOX-D20 for mouse and human C5a against macaque and rat C5a. Finally, our structural model provides the molecular basis for the Spiegelmer affinity improvement through positional L-ribonucleotide to L-deoxyribonucleotide exchanges and for its inhibition of the C5a:C5aR interaction.

  11. Structural basis for the targeting of complement anaphylatoxin C5a using a mixed L-RNA/L-DNA aptamer

    PubMed Central

    Yatime, Laure; Maasch, Christian; Hoehlig, Kai; Klussmann, Sven; Andersen, Gregers R.; Vater, Axel

    2015-01-01

    L-Oligonucleotide aptamers (Spiegelmers) consist of non-natural L-configured nucleotides and are of particular therapeutic interest due to their high resistance to plasma nucleases. The anaphylatoxin C5a, a potent inflammatory mediator generated during complement activation that has been implicated with organ damage, can be efficiently targeted by Spiegelmers. Here, we present the first crystallographic structures of an active Spiegelmer, NOX-D20, bound to its physiological targets, mouse C5a and C5a-desArg. The structures reveal a complex 3D architecture for the L-aptamer that wraps around C5a, including an intramolecular G-quadruplex stabilized by a central Ca2+ ion. Functional validation of the observed L-aptamer:C5a binding mode through mutational studies also rationalizes the specificity of NOX-D20 for mouse and human C5a against macaque and rat C5a. Finally, our structural model provides the molecular basis for the Spiegelmer affinity improvement through positional L-ribonucleotide to L-deoxyribonucleotide exchanges and for its inhibition of the C5a:C5aR interaction. PMID:25901944

  12. Nucleolin-targeting liposomes guided by aptamer AS1411 for the delivery of siRNA for the treatment of malignant melanomas.

    PubMed

    Li, Liyu; Hou, Jianjun; Liu, Xinjie; Guo, Yujia; Wu, Yun; Zhang, Lihe; Yang, Zhenjun

    2014-04-01

    BRAF gene mutation is found in more than 60% of malignant melanomas, which are difficult to treat. In this study, a new tumor-targeting liposome was developed to deliver anti-BRAF siRNA (siBraf) for the treatment of melanomas. Nucleolin is overexpressed on the surface of cancer cells. AS1411, an aptamer showing specific binding to nucleolin, was conjugated to PEGylated cationic liposome as the targeting probe ASLP (AS1411-PEG-liposome). The ASLP/siRNA complex was formed through electrostatic interaction between ASLP and siRNA. The binding of AS1411 to the surface of PEGylated liposomes was confirmed by gel electrophoresis and capillary electrophoresis. Real-time PCR and Western blot analysis showed that ASLP/siBraf exhibited strong silencing activity of BRAF gene. The much higher accumulation of the siRNA in tumor cells comparing with normal cells indicated that ASLP displayed excellent tumor-targeting capability. Notably, ASLP/siBraf showed significant silencing activity in A375 tumor xenograft mice and inhibited the melanoma growth. These results suggested that the new nucleolin-targeted siRNA delivery system by AS1411 may have the potential for the treatment of melanoma. PMID:24486214

  13. DSAP: deep-sequencing small RNA analysis pipeline.

    PubMed

    Huang, Po-Jung; Liu, Yi-Chung; Lee, Chi-Ching; Lin, Wei-Chen; Gan, Richie Ruei-Chi; Lyu, Ping-Chiang; Tang, Petrus

    2010-07-01

    DSAP is an automated multiple-task web service designed to provide a total solution to analyzing deep-sequencing small RNA datasets generated by next-generation sequencing technology. DSAP uses a tab-delimited file as an input format, which holds the unique sequence reads (tags) and their corresponding number of copies generated by the Solexa sequencing platform. The input data will go through four analysis steps in DSAP: (i) cleanup: removal of adaptors and poly-A/T/C/G/N nucleotides; (ii) clustering: grouping of cleaned sequence tags into unique sequence clusters; (iii) non-coding RNA (ncRNA) matching: sequence homology mapping against a transcribed sequence library from the ncRNA database Rfam (http://rfam.sanger.ac.uk/); and (iv) known miRNA matching: detection of known miRNAs in miRBase (http://www.mirbase.org/) based on sequence homology. The expression levels corresponding to matched ncRNAs and miRNAs are summarized in multi-color clickable bar charts linked to external databases. DSAP is also capable of displaying miRNA expression levels from different jobs using a log(2)-scaled color matrix. Furthermore, a cross-species comparative function is also provided to show the distribution of identified miRNAs in different species as deposited in miRBase. DSAP is available at http://dsap.cgu.edu.tw. PMID:20478825

  14. Aptamer-targeted Antigen Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Wengerter, Brian C; Katakowski, Joseph A; Rosenberg, Jacob M; Park, Chae Gyu; Almo, Steven C; Palliser, Deborah; Levy, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Effective therapeutic vaccines often require activation of T cell-mediated immunity. Robust T cell activation, including CD8 T cell responses, can be achieved using antibodies or antibody fragments to direct antigens of interest to professional antigen presenting cells. This approach represents an important advance in enhancing vaccine efficacy. Nucleic acid aptamers present a promising alternative to protein-based targeting approaches. We have selected aptamers that specifically bind the murine receptor, DEC205, a C-type lectin expressed predominantly on the surface of CD8α+ dendritic cells (DCs) that has been shown to be efficient at facilitating antigen crosspresentation and subsequent CD8+ T cell activation. Using a minimized aptamer conjugated to the model antigen ovalbumin (OVA), DEC205-targeted antigen crosspresentation was verified in vitro and in vivo by proliferation and cytokine production by primary murine CD8+ T cells expressing a T cell receptor specific for the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) I-restricted OVA257–264 peptide SIINFEKL. Compared with a nonspecific ribonucleic acid (RNA) of similar length, DEC205 aptamer-OVA-mediated antigen delivery stimulated strong proliferation and production of interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-2. The immune responses elicited by aptamer-OVA conjugates were sufficient to inhibit the growth of established OVA-expressing B16 tumor cells. Our results demonstrate a new application of aptamer technology for the development of effective T cell-mediated vaccines. PMID:24682172

  15. Unbiased Deep Sequencing of RNA Viruses from Clinical Samples.

    PubMed

    Matranga, Christian B; Gladden-Young, Adrianne; Qu, James; Winnicki, Sarah; Nosamiefan, Dolo; Levin, Joshua Z; Sabeti, Pardis C

    2016-01-01

    Here we outline a next-generation RNA sequencing protocol that enables de novo assemblies and intra-host variant calls of viral genomes collected from clinical and biological sources. The method is unbiased and universal; it uses random primers for cDNA synthesis and requires no prior knowledge of the viral sequence content. Before library construction, selective RNase H-based digestion is used to deplete unwanted RNA - including poly(rA) carrier and ribosomal RNA - from the viral RNA sample. Selective depletion improves both the data quality and the number of unique reads in viral RNA sequencing libraries. Moreover, a transposase-based 'tagmentation' step is used in the protocol as it reduces overall library construction time. The protocol has enabled rapid deep sequencing of over 600 Lassa and Ebola virus samples-including collections from both blood and tissue isolates-and is broadly applicable to other microbial genomics studies. PMID:27403729

  16. RNase P-Mediated Sequence-Specific Cleavage of RNA by Engineered External Guide Sequences.

    PubMed

    Derksen, Merel; Mertens, Vicky; Pruijn, Ger J M

    2015-01-01

    The RNA cleavage activity of RNase P can be employed to decrease the levels of specific RNAs and to study their function or even to eradicate pathogens. Two different technologies have been developed to use RNase P as a tool for RNA knockdown. In one of these, an external guide sequence, which mimics a tRNA precursor, a well-known natural RNase P substrate, is used to target an RNA molecule for cleavage by endogenous RNase P. Alternatively, a guide sequence can be attached to M1 RNA, the (catalytic) RNase P RNA subunit of Escherichia coli. The guide sequence is specific for an RNA target, which is subsequently cleaved by the bacterial M1 RNA moiety. These approaches are applicable in both bacteria and eukaryotes. In this review, we will discuss the two technologies in which RNase P is used to reduce RNA expression levels. PMID:26569326

  17. RNase P-Mediated Sequence-Specific Cleavage of RNA by Engineered External Guide Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Derksen, Merel; Mertens, Vicky; Pruijn, Ger J.M.

    2015-01-01

    The RNA cleavage activity of RNase P can be employed to decrease the levels of specific RNAs and to study their function or even to eradicate pathogens. Two different technologies have been developed to use RNase P as a tool for RNA knockdown. In one of these, an external guide sequence, which mimics a tRNA precursor, a well-known natural RNase P substrate, is used to target an RNA molecule for cleavage by endogenous RNase P. Alternatively, a guide sequence can be attached to M1 RNA, the (catalytic) RNase P RNA subunit of Escherichia coli. The guide sequence is specific for an RNA target, which is subsequently cleaved by the bacterial M1 RNA moiety. These approaches are applicable in both bacteria and eukaryotes. In this review, we will discuss the two technologies in which RNase P is used to reduce RNA expression levels. PMID:26569326

  18. Efficient prediction methods for selecting effective siRNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Takasaki, Shigeru

    2010-02-01

    Although short interfering RNA (siRNA) has been widely used for studying gene functions in mammalian cells, its gene silencing efficacy varies markedly and there are only a few consistencies among the recently reported design rules/guidelines for selecting siRNA sequences effective for mammalian genes. Another shortcoming of the previously reported methods is that they cannot estimate the probability that a candidate sequence will silence the target gene. This paper first reviewed the recently reported siRNA design guidelines and clarified the problems concerning the guidelines. It then proposed two prediction methods-Radial Basis Function (RBF) network and decision tree learning-and their combined method for selecting effective siRNA target sequences from many possible candidate sequences. They are quite different from the previous score-based siRNA design techniques and can predict the probability that a candidate siRNA sequence will be effective. The methods imply high estimation accuracy for selecting candidate siRNA sequences. PMID:20022002

  19. The primary nucleotide sequence of U4 RNA.

    PubMed

    Reddy, R; Henning, D; Busch, H

    1981-04-10

    U4 RNA is one of the "capped" nuclear snRNAs recently found to be precipitable by anti-Sm antibodies as ribonucleoprotein particles. U4 RNA, along with other snRNAs, has been implicated in hnRNA processing, mRNA transport, or both (Lerner, M. R., Boyle, J., Mount, S., Wolin, S., and Steitz, J. A. (1980) Nature 283, 220-224). Since the proteins bound to different snRNAs appear to be the same, the functions of different snRNPs might be dependent on the RNA components. To help understand the function of U4 RNP, the nucleotide sequence of U4 RNA was determined. The sequence is (formula see text) In addition to the modified nucleotides in the "cap," U4 RNA contains Am at position 63 and m6A at position 98. It also exhibited A-C microheterogeneity at position 97. PMID:6162848

  20. RNAcentral: an international database of ncRNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The field of non-coding RNA biology has been hampered by the lack of availability of a comprehensive, up-to-date collection of accessioned RNA sequences. Here we present the first release of RNAcentral, a database that collates and integrates information from an international consortium of established RNA sequence databases. The initial release contains over 8.1 million sequences, including representatives of all major functional classes. A web portal (http://rnacentral.org) provides free access to data, search functionality, cross-references, source code and an integrated genome browser for selected species. PMID:25352543

  1. RNAcentral: an international database of ncRNA sequences.

    PubMed

    2015-01-01

    The field of non-coding RNA biology has been hampered by the lack of availability of a comprehensive, up-to-date collection of accessioned RNA sequences. Here we present the first release of RNAcentral, a database that collates and integrates information from an international consortium of established RNA sequence databases. The initial release contains over 8.1 million sequences, including representatives of all major functional classes. A web portal (http://rnacentral.org) provides free access to data, search functionality, cross-references, source code and an integrated genome browser for selected species. PMID:25352543

  2. RNAcentral: an international database of ncRNA sequences

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Williams, Kelly Porter

    2014-10-28

    The field of non-coding RNA biology has been hampered by the lack of availability of a comprehensive, up-to-date collection of accessioned RNA sequences. Here we present the first release of RNAcentral, a database that collates and integrates information from an international consortium of established RNA sequence databases. The initial release contains over 8.1 million sequences, including representatives of all major functional classes. A web portal (http://rnacentral.org) provides free access to data, search functionality, cross-references, source code and an integrated genome browser for selected species.

  3. Aptamers for Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Partha; White, Rebekah R.

    2010-01-01

    Aptamers are a class of therapeutic oligonucleotides that form specific three-dimensional structures that are dictated by their sequences. They are typically generated by an iterative screening process of complex nucleic acid libraries employing a process termed Systemic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment (SELEX). SELEX has traditionally been performed using purified proteins, and cell surface receptors may be challenging to purify in their properly folded and modified conformations. Therefore, relatively few aptamers have been generated that bind cell surface receptors. However, improvements in recombinant fusion protein technology have increased the availability of receptor extracellular domains as purified protein targets, and the development of cell-based selection techniques has allowed selection against surface proteins in their native configuration on the cell surface. With cell-based selection, a specific protein target is not always chosen, but selection is performed against a target cell type with the goal of letting the aptamer choose the target. Several studies have demonstrated that aptamers that bind cell surface receptors may have functions other than just blocking receptor-ligand interactions. All cell surface proteins cycle intracellularly to some extent, and many surface receptors are actively internalized in response to ligand binding. Therefore, aptamers that bind cell surface receptors have been exploited for the delivery of a variety of cargoes into cells. This review focuses on recent progress and current challenges in the field of aptamer-mediated delivery.

  4. Computational approach to analyze isolated ssDNA aptamers against angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Heiat, Mohammad; Najafi, Ali; Ranjbar, Reza; Latifi, Ali Mohammad; Rasaee, Mohammad Javad

    2016-07-20

    Aptamers are oligonucleotides with highly structured molecules that can bind to their targets through specific 3-D conformation. Commonly, not all the nucleotides such as primer binding fixed region and some other sequences are vital for aptamers folding and interaction. Elimination of unnecessary regions needs trustworthy prediction tools to reduce experimental efforts and errors. Here we introduced a manipulated in-silico approach to predict the 3-D structure of aptamers and their target interactions. To design an approach for computational analysis of isolated ssDNA aptamers (FLC112, FLC125 and their truncated core region including CRC112 and CRC125), their secondary and tertiary structures were modeled by Mfold and RNA composer respectively. Output PDB files were modified from RNA to DNA in the discovery studio visualizer software. Using ZDOCK server, the aptamer-target interactions were predicted. Finally, the interaction scores were compared with the experimental results. In-silico interaction scores and the experimental outcomes were in the same descending arrangement of FLC112>CRC125>CRC112>FLC125 with similar intensity. The consistent results of innovative in-silico method with experimental outputs, affirmed that the present method may be a reliable approach. Also, it showed that the exact in-silico predictions can be utilized as a credible reference to find aptameric fragments binding potency. PMID:27188956

  5. Nucleotide sequence of a human tRNA gene heterocluster

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y.N.; Pirtle, I.L.; Pirtle, R.M.

    1986-05-01

    Leucine tRNA from bovine liver was used as a hybridization probe to screen a human gene library harbored in Charon-4A of bacteriophage lambda. The human DNA inserts from plaque-pure clones were characterized by restriction endonuclease mapping and Southern hybridization techniques, using both (3'-/sup 32/P)-labeled bovine liver leucine tRNA and total tRNA as hybridization probes. An 8-kb Hind III fragment of one of these ..gamma..-clones was subcloned into the Hind III site of pBR322. Subsequent fine restriction mapping and DNA sequence analysis of this plasmid DNA indicated the presence of four tRNA genes within the 8-kb DNA fragment. A leucine tRNA gene with an anticodon of AAG and a proline tRNA gene with an anticodon of AGG are in a 1.6-kb subfragment. A threonine tRNA gene with an anticodon of UGU and an as yet unidentified tRNA gene are located in a 1.1-kb subfragment. These two different subfragments are separated by 2.8 kb. The coding regions of the three sequenced genes contain characteristic internal split promoter sequences and do not have intervening sequences. The 3'-flanking region of these three genes have typical RNA polymerase III termination sites of at least four consecutive T residues.

  6. Compilation of 5S rRNA and 5S rRNA gene sequences

    PubMed Central

    Specht, Thomas; Wolters, Jörn; Erdmann, Volker A.

    1990-01-01

    The BERLIN RNA DATABANK as of Dezember 31, 1989, contains a total of 667 sequences of 5S rRNAs or their genes, which is an increase of 114 new sequence entries over the last compilation (1). It covers sequences from 44 archaebacteria, 267 eubacteria, 20 plastids, 6 mitochondria, 319 eukaryotes and 11 eukaryotic pseudogenes. The hardcopy shows only the list (Table 1) of those organisms whose sequences have been determined. The BERLIN RNA DATABANK uses the format of the EMBL Nucleotide Sequence Data Library complemented by a Sequence Alignment (SA) field including secondary structure information. PMID:1692116

  7. Complete sequence of RNA1 and subgenomic RNA3 of Atlantic halibut nodavirus (AHNV).

    PubMed

    Sommerset, Ingunn; Nerland, Audun H

    2004-03-10

    The Nodaviridae are divided into the alphanodavirus genus, which infects insects, and the betanodavirus genus, which infects fishes. Betanodaviruses are the causative agent of viral encephalopathy and retinopathy (VER) in a number of cultivated marine fish species. The Nodaviridae are small non-enveloped RNA viruses that contain a genome consisting of 2 single-stranded positivesense RNA segments: RNA1 (3.1 kb), which encodes the viral part of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp); and RNA2 (1.4 kb), which encodes the capsid protein. In addition to RNA1 and RNA2, a subgenomic transcript of RNA1, RNA3, is present in infected cells. We have cloned and sequenced RNA1 from the Atlantic halibut Hippoglossus hippoglossus nodavirus (AHNV), and for the first time, the sequence of a betanodaviral subgenomic RNA3 has been determined. AHNV RNA1 was 3100 nucleotides in length and contained a main open reading frame encoding a polypeptide of 981 amino acids. Conservative motifs for RdRp were found in the deduced amino acid sequence. RNA3 was 371 nucleotides in length, and contained an open reading frame encoding a peptide of 75 amino acids corresponding to a hypothetical B2 protein, although sequence alignments with the alphanodavirus B2 proteins showed only marginal similarities. AHNV RNA replication in the fish cell-line SSN-1 (derived from striped snakehead) was analysed by Northern blot analysis, which indicated that RNA3 was synthesised in large amounts (compared to RNA1) at an early point in time post-infection. PMID:15109133

  8. Small RNA Deep Sequencing Reveals Role for Arabidopsis thaliana RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerases in Viral siRNA Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Xiaopeng; Bao, Forrest Sheng; Xie, Zhixin

    2009-01-01

    RNA silencing functions as an important antiviral defense mechanism in a broad range of eukaryotes. In plants, biogenesis of several classes of endogenous small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) requires RNA-dependent RNA Polymerase (RDR) activities. Members of the RDR family proteins, including RDR1and RDR6, have also been implicated in antiviral defense, although a direct role for RDRs in viral siRNA biogenesis has yet to be demonstrated. Using a crucifer-infecting strain of Tobacco Mosaic Virus (TMV-Cg) and Arabidopsis thaliana as a model system, we analyzed the viral small RNA profile in wild-type plants as well as rdr mutants by applying small RNA deep sequencing technology. Over 100,000 TMV-Cg-specific small RNA reads, mostly of 21- (78.4%) and 22-nucleotide (12.9%) in size and originating predominately (79.9%) from the genomic sense RNA strand, were captured at an early infection stage, yielding the first high-resolution small RNA map for a plant virus. The TMV-Cg genome harbored multiple, highly reproducible small RNA-generating hot spots that corresponded to regions with no apparent local hairpin-forming capacity. Significantly, both the rdr1 and rdr6 mutants exhibited globally reduced levels of viral small RNA production as well as reduced strand bias in viral small RNA population, revealing an important role for these host RDRs in viral siRNA biogenesis. In addition, an informatics analysis showed that a large set of host genes could be potentially targeted by TMV-Cg-derived siRNAs for posttranscriptional silencing. Two of such predicted host targets, which encode a cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor (CPSF30) and an unknown protein similar to translocon-associated protein alpha (TRAP α), respectively, yielded a positive result in cleavage validation by 5′RACE assays. Our data raised the interesting possibility for viral siRNA-mediated virus-host interactions that may contribute to viral pathogenicity and host specificity. PMID:19308254

  9. Oligonucleotide Aptamers: New Tools for Targeted Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hongguang; Zhu, Xun; Lu, Patrick Y; Rosato, Roberto R; Tan, Wen; Zu, Youli

    2014-01-01

    Aptamers are a class of small nucleic acid ligands that are composed of RNA or single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides and have high specificity and affinity for their targets. Similar to antibodies, aptamers interact with their targets by recognizing a specific three-dimensional structure and are thus termed “chemical antibodies.” In contrast to protein antibodies, aptamers offer unique chemical and biological characteristics based on their oligonucleotide properties. Hence, they are more suitable for the development of novel clinical applications. Aptamer technology has been widely investigated in various biomedical fields for biomarker discovery, in vitro diagnosis, in vivo imaging, and targeted therapy. This review will discuss the potential applications of aptamer technology as a new tool for targeted cancer therapy with emphasis on the development of aptamers that are able to specifically target cell surface biomarkers. Additionally, we will describe several approaches for the use of aptamers in targeted therapeutics, including aptamer-drug conjugation, aptamer-nanoparticle conjugation, aptamer-mediated targeted gene therapy, aptamer-mediated immunotherapy, and aptamer-mediated biotherapy. PMID:25093706

  10. FLDS: A Comprehensive dsRNA Sequencing Method for Intracellular RNA Virus Surveillance.

    PubMed

    Urayama, Syun-Ichi; Takaki, Yoshihiro; Nunoura, Takuro

    2016-03-26

    Knowledge of the distribution and diversity of RNA viruses is still limited in spite of their possible environmental and epidemiological impacts because RNA virus-specific metagenomic methods have not yet been developed. We herein constructed an effective metagenomic method for RNA viruses by targeting long double-stranded (ds)RNA in cellular organisms, which is a hallmark of infection, or the replication of dsRNA and single-stranded (ss)RNA viruses, except for retroviruses. This novel dsRNA targeting metagenomic method is characterized by an extremely high recovery rate of viral RNA sequences, the retrieval of terminal sequences, and uniform read coverage, which has not previously been reported in other metagenomic methods targeting RNA viruses. This method revealed a previously unidentified viral RNA diversity of more than 20 complete RNA viral genomes including dsRNA and ssRNA viruses associated with an environmental diatom colony. Our approach will be a powerful tool for cataloging RNA viruses associated with organisms of interest. PMID:26877136

  11. Deep Sequencing Insights in Therapeutic shRNA Processing and siRNA Target Cleavage Precision

    PubMed Central

    Denise, Hubert; Moschos, Sterghios A.; Sidders, Benjamin; Burden, Frances; Perkins, Hannah; Carter, Nikki; Stroud, Tim; Kennedy, Michael; Fancy, Sally-Ann; Lapthorn, Cris; Lavender, Helen; Kinloch, Ross; Suhy, David; Corbau, Romu

    2014-01-01

    TT-034 (PF-05095808) is a recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype 8 (AAV8) agent expressing three short hairpin RNA (shRNA) pro-drugs that target the hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA genome. The cytosolic enzyme Dicer cleaves each shRNA into multiple, potentially active small interfering RNA (siRNA) drugs. Using next-generation sequencing (NGS) to identify and characterize active shRNAs maturation products, we observed that each TT-034–encoded shRNA could be processed into as many as 95 separate siRNA strands. Few of these appeared active as determined by Sanger 5′ RNA Ligase-Mediated Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends (5-RACE) and through synthetic shRNA and siRNA analogue studies. Moreover, NGS scrutiny applied on 5-RACE products (RACE-seq) suggested that synthetic siRNAs could direct cleavage in not one, but up to five separate positions on targeted RNA, in a sequence-dependent manner. These data support an on-target mechanism of action for TT-034 without cytotoxicity and question the accepted precision of substrate processing by the key RNA interference (RNAi) enzymes Dicer and siRNA-induced silencing complex (siRISC). PMID:24496437

  12. FLDS: A Comprehensive dsRNA Sequencing Method for Intracellular RNA Virus Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Urayama, Syun-ichi; Takaki, Yoshihiro; Nunoura, Takuro

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the distribution and diversity of RNA viruses is still limited in spite of their possible environmental and epidemiological impacts because RNA virus-specific metagenomic methods have not yet been developed. We herein constructed an effective metagenomic method for RNA viruses by targeting long double-stranded (ds)RNA in cellular organisms, which is a hallmark of infection, or the replication of dsRNA and single-stranded (ss)RNA viruses, except for retroviruses. This novel dsRNA targeting metagenomic method is characterized by an extremely high recovery rate of viral RNA sequences, the retrieval of terminal sequences, and uniform read coverage, which has not previously been reported in other metagenomic methods targeting RNA viruses. This method revealed a previously unidentified viral RNA diversity of more than 20 complete RNA viral genomes including dsRNA and ssRNA viruses associated with an environmental diatom colony. Our approach will be a powerful tool for cataloging RNA viruses associated with organisms of interest. PMID:26877136

  13. Complete Genome Sequence of the WHO International Standard for HIV-2 RNA Determined by Deep Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Ham, Claire; Morris, Clare

    2016-01-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) International Standard for HIV-2 RNA nucleic acid assays was characterized by complete genome deep sequencing. The entire coding sequence and flanking long terminal repeats (LTRs), including minority species, were assigned subtype A. This information will aid design, development, and evaluation of HIV-2 RNA amplification assays. PMID:26847885

  14. Using Aptamers for Cancer Biomarker Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yun Min; Donovan, Michael J.; Tan, Weihong

    2013-01-01

    Aptamers are single-stranded synthetic DNA- or RNA-based oligonucleotides that fold into various shapes to bind to a specific target, which includes proteins, metals, and molecules. Aptamers have high affinity and high specificity that are comparable to that of antibodies. They are obtained using iterative method, called (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment) SELEX and cell-based SELEX (cell-SELEX). Aptamers can be paired with recent advances in nanotechnology, microarray, microfluidics, and other technologies for applications in clinical medicine. One particular area that aptamers can shed a light on is biomarker discovery. Biomarkers are important in diagnosis and treatment of cancer. In this paper, we will describe ways in which aptamers can be used to discover biomarkers for cancer diagnosis and therapeutics. PMID:23401749

  15. RNA plasticity and selectivity applicable to therapeutics and novel biosensor development

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Yoshikazu; Ishiguro, Akira; Miyakawa, Shin

    2012-01-01

    Aptamers are short, single-stranded nucleic acid sequences that are selected in vitro from large oligonucleotide libraries based on their high affinity to a target molecule. Hence, aptamers can be thought of as a nucleic acid analog to antibodies. However, several viewpoints hold that the potential of aptamers arises from interesting characteristics that are distinct from, or in some cases, superior to those of antibodies. This review summarizes the recent achievements in aptamer programs developed in our laboratory against basic and therapeutic protein targets. Through these studies, we became aware of the remarkable conformational plasticity and selectivity of RNA, on which the published report has not shed much light even though this is evidently a crucial feature for the strong specificity and affinity of RNA aptamers. PMID:22487172

  16. Sequence-non-specific effects of RNA interference triggers and microRNA regulators

    PubMed Central

    Olejniczak, Marta; Galka, Paulina; Krzyzosiak, Wlodzimierz J.

    2010-01-01

    RNA reagents of diverse lengths and structures, unmodified or containing various chemical modifications are powerful tools of RNA interference and microRNA technologies. These reagents which are either delivered to cells using appropriate carriers or are expressed in cells from suitable vectors often cause unintended sequence-non-specific immune responses besides triggering intended sequence-specific silencing effects. This article reviews the present state of knowledge regarding the cellular sensors of foreign RNA, the signaling pathways these sensors mobilize and shows which specific features of the RNA reagents set the responsive systems on alert. The representative examples of toxic effects caused in the investigated cell lines and tissues by the RNAs of specific types and structures are collected and may be instructive for further studies of sequence-non-specific responses to foreign RNA in human cells. PMID:19843612

  17. The chemical structure of DNA sequence signals for RNA transcription

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, D. G.; Dayhoff, M. O.

    1982-01-01

    The proposed recognition sites for RNA transcription for E. coli NRA polymerase, bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase, and eukaryotic RNA polymerase Pol II are evaluated in the light of the requirements for efficient recognition. It is shown that although there is good experimental evidence that specific nucleic acid sequence patterns are involved in transcriptional regulation in bacteria and bacterial viruses, among the sequences now available, only in the case of the promoters recognized by bacteriophage T7 polymerase does it seem likely that the pattern is sufficient. It is concluded that the eukaryotic pattern that is investigated is not restrictive enough to serve as a recognition site.

  18. Aptamer-functionalized peptide H3CR5C as a novel nanovehicle for codelivery of fasudil and miRNA-195 targeting hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ying; Wu, Xin; Gao, Yuan; Zhang, Jigang; Zhang, Dandan; Gu, Shengying; Zhu, Guanhua; Liu, Gaolin; Li, Xiaoyu

    2016-01-01

    Liver cancer is the fifth most commonly diagnosed malignancy, of which hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) represents the dominating histological subtype. Antiangiogenic therapy aimed at vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has shown promising but deficient clinical prospects on account of vasculogenic mimicry, a highly patterned vascular channel distinguished from the endothelium-dependent blood vessel, which may function as blood supply networks occurring in aggressive tumors including HCC. In this study, we used a new cationic peptide, disulfide cross-linked stearylated polyarginine peptide modified with histidine (H3R5), as a reducible vector, cell penetrating peptide-modified aptamer (ST21) with specific binding to HCC cells to conjugate to peptide H3R5 as the targeting probe, miRNA-195 (miR195) as a powerful gene drug to inhibit VEGF, and fasudil to suppress vasculogenic mimicry by blocking ROCK2, all of which were simultaneously encapsulated in the same nanoparticles. Fasudil was loaded by ammonium sulfate-induced transmembrane electrochemical gradient and miR195 was condensed through electrostatic interaction. ST21-H3R5-polyethylene glycol (PEG) exhibited excellent loading capacities for both fasudil and miR195 with adjustable dosing ratios. Western blot analysis showed that FasudilST21-H3R5-PEGmiR195 had strong silencing activity of ROCK2 and VEGF, as compared with FasudilH3R5-PEGmiR195. In vitro and in vivo experiments confirmed that ST21-modified nanoparticles showed significantly higher cellular uptake and therapeutic efficacy in tumor cells or tumor tissues than the unmodified counterparts. These findings suggest that aptamer-conjugated peptide holds great promise for delivering chemical drugs and gene drugs simultaneously to overcome HCC. PMID:27574422

  19. Aptamer-functionalized peptide H3CR5C as a novel nanovehicle for codelivery of fasudil and miRNA-195 targeting hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Wu, Xin; Gao, Yuan; Zhang, Jigang; Zhang, Dandan; Gu, Shengying; Zhu, Guanhua; Liu, Gaolin; Li, Xiaoyu

    2016-01-01

    Liver cancer is the fifth most commonly diagnosed malignancy, of which hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) represents the dominating histological subtype. Antiangiogenic therapy aimed at vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has shown promising but deficient clinical prospects on account of vasculogenic mimicry, a highly patterned vascular channel distinguished from the endothelium-dependent blood vessel, which may function as blood supply networks occurring in aggressive tumors including HCC. In this study, we used a new cationic peptide, disulfide cross-linked stearylated polyarginine peptide modified with histidine (H3R5), as a reducible vector, cell penetrating peptide-modified aptamer (ST21) with specific binding to HCC cells to conjugate to peptide H3R5 as the targeting probe, miRNA-195 (miR195) as a powerful gene drug to inhibit VEGF, and fasudil to suppress vasculogenic mimicry by blocking ROCK2, all of which were simultaneously encapsulated in the same nanoparticles. Fasudil was loaded by ammonium sulfate-induced transmembrane electrochemical gradient and miR195 was condensed through electrostatic interaction. ST21-H3R5-polyethylene glycol (PEG) exhibited excellent loading capacities for both fasudil and miR195 with adjustable dosing ratios. Western blot analysis showed that (Fasudil)ST21-H3R5-PEGmiR195 had strong silencing activity of ROCK2 and VEGF, as compared with (Fasudil)H3R5-PEGmiR195. In vitro and in vivo experiments confirmed that ST21-modified nanoparticles showed significantly higher cellular uptake and therapeutic efficacy in tumor cells or tumor tissues than the unmodified counterparts. These findings suggest that aptamer-conjugated peptide holds great promise for delivering chemical drugs and gene drugs simultaneously to overcome HCC. PMID:27574422

  20. Post-SELEX optimization of aptamers.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shunxiang; Zheng, Xin; Jiao, Binghua; Wang, Lianghua

    2016-07-01

    Aptamers are functional single-stranded DNA or RNA oligonucleotides, selected in vitro by SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment), which can fold into stable unique three-dimensional structures that bind their target ligands with high affinity and specificity. Although aptamers show a number of favorable advantages such as better stability and easier modification when compared with the properties of antibodies, only a handful of aptamers have entered clinical trials and only one, pegaptanib, has received US Food and Drug Administration approval for clinical use. The main reasons that limit the practical application of aptamers are insufficient nuclease stability, bioavailability, thermal stability, or even affinity. Some aptamers obtained from modified libraries show better properties; however, polymerase amplification of nucleic acids containing non-natural bases is currently a primary drawback of the SELEX process. This review focuses on several post-SELEX optimization strategies of aptamers identified in recent years. We describe four common methods in detail: truncation, chemical modification, bivalent or multivalent aptamer construction, and mutagenesis. We believe that these optimization strategies should improve one or more specific properties of aptamers, and the type of feature(s) selected for improvement will be dependent on the application purpose. PMID:27173394

  1. DNA-aptamers binding aminoglycoside antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Nikolaus, Nadia; Strehlitz, Beate

    2014-01-01

    Aptamers are short, single stranded DNA or RNA oligonucleotides that are able to bind specifically and with high affinity to their non-nucleic acid target molecules. This binding reaction enables their application as biorecognition elements in biosensors and assays. As antibiotic residues pose a problem contributing to the emergence of antibiotic-resistant pathogens and thereby reducing the effectiveness of the drug to fight human infections, we selected aptamers targeted against the aminoglycoside antibiotic kanamycin A with the aim of constructing a robust and functional assay that can be used for water analysis. With this work we show that aptamers that were derived from a Capture-SELEX procedure targeting against kanamycin A also display binding to related aminoglycoside antibiotics. The binding patterns differ among all tested aptamers so that there are highly substance specific aptamers and more group specific aptamers binding to a different variety of aminoglycoside antibiotics. Also the region of the aminoglycoside antibiotics responsible for aptamer binding can be estimated. Affinities of the different aptamers for their target substance, kanamycin A, are measured with different approaches and are in the micromolar range. Finally, the proof of principle of an assay for detection of kanamycin A in a real water sample is given. PMID:24566637

  2. Comparison of ribosomal RNA removal methods for transcriptome sequencing workflows in teleost fish

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) is becoming the standard for transcriptome analysis. Removal of contaminating ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is a priority in the preparation of libraries suitable for sequencing. rRNAs are commonly removed from total RNA via either mRNA selection or rRNA depletion. These methods have...

  3. Spliced synthetic genes as internal controls in RNA sequencing experiments.

    PubMed

    Hardwick, Simon A; Chen, Wendy Y; Wong, Ted; Deveson, Ira W; Blackburn, James; Andersen, Stacey B; Nielsen, Lars K; Mattick, John S; Mercer, Tim R

    2016-09-01

    RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) can be used to assemble spliced isoforms, quantify expressed genes and provide a global profile of the transcriptome. However, the size and diversity of the transcriptome, the wide dynamic range in gene expression and inherent technical biases confound RNA-seq analysis. We have developed a set of spike-in RNA standards, termed 'sequins' (sequencing spike-ins), that represent full-length spliced mRNA isoforms. Sequins have an entirely artificial sequence with no homology to natural reference genomes, but they align to gene loci encoded on an artificial in silico chromosome. The combination of multiple sequins across a range of concentrations emulates alternative splicing and differential gene expression, and it provides scaling factors for normalization between samples. We demonstrate the use of sequins in RNA-seq experiments to measure sample-specific biases and determine the limits of reliable transcript assembly and quantification in accompanying human RNA samples. In addition, we have designed a complementary set of sequins that represent fusion genes arising from rearrangements of the in silico chromosome to aid in cancer diagnosis. RNA sequins provide a qualitative and quantitative reference with which to navigate the complexity of the human transcriptome. PMID:27502218

  4. The nucleotide sequence of cowpea mosaic virus B RNA

    PubMed Central

    Lomonossoff, G.P.; Shanks, M.

    1983-01-01

    The complete sequence of the bottom component RNA (B RNA) of cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) has been determined. Restriction enzyme fragments of double-stranded cDNA were cloned in M13 and the sequence of the inserts was determined by a combination of enzymatic and chemical sequencing techniques. Additional sequence information was obtained by primed synthesis on first strand cDNA. The complete sequence deduced is 5889 nucleotides long excluding the 3' poly(A), and contains an open reading frame sufficient to code for a polypeptide of mol. wt. 207 760. The coding region is flanked by a 5' leader sequence of 206 nucleotides and a 3' non-coding region of 82 residues which does not contain a polyadenylation signal. PMID:16453487

  5. Bifunctional combined aptamer for simultaneous separation and detection of thrombin.

    PubMed

    Bing, Tao; Liu, Xiangjun; Cheng, Xiaohong; Cao, Zehui; Shangguan, Dihua

    2010-02-15

    Here we report on the construction and evaluation of a bifunctional combined aptamer (BCA) that consists of a DNA streptavidin-binding aptamer (SBA), a DNA thrombin-binding aptamer (TBA) and a fluorophore. The BCA adopts a new conformation that is very different from simply linking the conformations of the two individual aptamers together, so that it does not bind to streptavidin in the absence of thrombin. Binding of this novel DNA aptamer to streptavidin is triggered by the thrombin binding and depends on the concentration of thrombin. Meanwhile, fluorescence from the streptavidin captured BCA reflects the quantity of the target molecule in the sample. This aptamer combination strategy based on the SBA holds good potential for applications in simultaneous detection and separation of targets of aptamers or certain DNA and RNA targets. PMID:19959350

  6. Identifying novel sequence variants of RNA 3D motifs

    PubMed Central

    Zirbel, Craig L.; Roll, James; Sweeney, Blake A.; Petrov, Anton I.; Pirrung, Meg; Leontis, Neocles B.

    2015-01-01

    Predicting RNA 3D structure from sequence is a major challenge in biophysics. An important sub-goal is accurately identifying recurrent 3D motifs from RNA internal and hairpin loop sequences extracted from secondary structure (2D) diagrams. We have developed and validated new probabilistic models for 3D motif sequences based on hybrid Stochastic Context-Free Grammars and Markov Random Fields (SCFG/MRF). The SCFG/MRF models are constructed using atomic-resolution RNA 3D structures. To parameterize each model, we use all instances of each motif found in the RNA 3D Motif Atlas and annotations of pairwise nucleotide interactions generated by the FR3D software. Isostericity relations between non-Watson–Crick basepairs are used in scoring sequence variants. SCFG techniques model nested pairs and insertions, while MRF ideas handle crossing interactions and base triples. We use test sets of randomly-generated sequences to set acceptance and rejection thresholds for each motif group and thus control the false positive rate. Validation was carried out by comparing results for four motif groups to RMDetect. The software developed for sequence scoring (JAR3D) is structured to automatically incorporate new motifs as they accumulate in the RNA 3D Motif Atlas when new structures are solved and is available free for download. PMID:26130723

  7. Identifying novel sequence variants of RNA 3D motifs.

    PubMed

    Zirbel, Craig L; Roll, James; Sweeney, Blake A; Petrov, Anton I; Pirrung, Meg; Leontis, Neocles B

    2015-09-01

    Predicting RNA 3D structure from sequence is a major challenge in biophysics. An important sub-goal is accurately identifying recurrent 3D motifs from RNA internal and hairpin loop sequences extracted from secondary structure (2D) diagrams. We have developed and validated new probabilistic models for 3D motif sequences based on hybrid Stochastic Context-Free Grammars and Markov Random Fields (SCFG/MRF). The SCFG/MRF models are constructed using atomic-resolution RNA 3D structures. To parameterize each model, we use all instances of each motif found in the RNA 3D Motif Atlas and annotations of pairwise nucleotide interactions generated by the FR3D software. Isostericity relations between non-Watson-Crick basepairs are used in scoring sequence variants. SCFG techniques model nested pairs and insertions, while MRF ideas handle crossing interactions and base triples. We use test sets of randomly-generated sequences to set acceptance and rejection thresholds for each motif group and thus control the false positive rate. Validation was carried out by comparing results for four motif groups to RMDetect. The software developed for sequence scoring (JAR3D) is structured to automatically incorporate new motifs as they accumulate in the RNA 3D Motif Atlas when new structures are solved and is available free for download. PMID:26130723

  8. Fluorescence-Based Strategies to Investigate the Structure and Dynamics of Aptamer-Ligand Complexes.

    PubMed

    Perez-Gonzalez, Cibran; Lafontaine, Daniel A; Penedo, J Carlos

    2016-01-01

    In addition to the helical nature of double-stranded DNA and RNA, single-stranded oligonucleotides can arrange themselves into tridimensional structures containing loops, bulges, internal hairpins and many other motifs. This ability has been used for more than two decades to generate oligonucleotide sequences, so-called aptamers, that can recognize certain metabolites with high affinity and specificity. More recently, this library of artificially-generated nucleic acid aptamers has been expanded by the discovery that naturally occurring RNA sequences control bacterial gene expression in response to cellular concentration of a given metabolite. The application of fluorescence methods has been pivotal to characterize in detail the structure and dynamics of these aptamer-ligand complexes in solution. This is mostly due to the intrinsic high sensitivity of fluorescence methods and also to significant improvements in solid-phase synthesis, post-synthetic labeling strategies and optical instrumentation that took place during the last decade. In this work, we provide an overview of the most widely employed fluorescence methods to investigate aptamer structure and function by describing the use of aptamers labeled with a single dye in fluorescence quenching and anisotropy assays. The use of 2-aminopurine as a fluorescent analog of adenine to monitor local changes in structure and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) to follow long-range conformational changes is also covered in detail. The last part of the review is dedicated to the application of fluorescence techniques based on single-molecule microscopy, a technique that has revolutionized our understanding of nucleic acid structure and dynamics. We finally describe the advantages of monitoring ligand-binding and conformational changes, one molecule at a time, to decipher the complexity of regulatory aptamers and summarize the emerging folding and ligand-binding models arising from the application of these

  9. Fluorescence-Based Strategies to Investigate the Structure and Dynamics of Aptamer-Ligand Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Gonzalez, Cibran; Lafontaine, Daniel A.; Penedo, J. Carlos

    2016-01-01

    In addition to the helical nature of double-stranded DNA and RNA, single-stranded oligonucleotides can arrange themselves into tridimensional structures containing loops, bulges, internal hairpins and many other motifs. This ability has been used for more than two decades to generate oligonucleotide sequences, so-called aptamers, that can recognize certain metabolites with high affinity and specificity. More recently, this library of artificially-generated nucleic acid aptamers has been expanded by the discovery that naturally occurring RNA sequences control bacterial gene expression in response to cellular concentration of a given metabolite. The application of fluorescence methods has been pivotal to characterize in detail the structure and dynamics of these aptamer-ligand complexes in solution. This is mostly due to the intrinsic high sensitivity of fluorescence methods and also to significant improvements in solid-phase synthesis, post-synthetic labeling strategies and optical instrumentation that took place during the last decade. In this work, we provide an overview of the most widely employed fluorescence methods to investigate aptamer structure and function by describing the use of aptamers labeled with a single dye in fluorescence quenching and anisotropy assays. The use of 2-aminopurine as a fluorescent analog of adenine to monitor local changes in structure and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) to follow long-range conformational changes is also covered in detail. The last part of the review is dedicated to the application of fluorescence techniques based on single-molecule microscopy, a technique that has revolutionized our understanding of nucleic acid structure and dynamics. We finally describe the advantages of monitoring ligand-binding and conformational changes, one molecule at a time, to decipher the complexity of regulatory aptamers and summarize the emerging folding and ligand-binding models arising from the application of these

  10. A hepatitis C virus (HCV) internal ribosome entry site (IRES) domain III–IV-targeted aptamer inhibits translation by binding to an apical loop of domain IIId

    PubMed Central

    Kikuchi, Kunio; Umehara, Takuya; Fukuda, Kotaro; Kuno, Atsushi; Hasegawa, Tsunemi; Nishikawa, Satoshi

    2005-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) has a positive single-stranded RNA genome, and translation starts within the internal ribosome entry site (IRES) in a cap-independent manner. The IRES is well conserved among HCV subtypes and has a unique structure consisting of four domains. We used an in vitro selection procedure to isolate RNA aptamers capable of binding to the IRES domains III–IV. The aptamers that were obtained shared the consensus sequence ACCCA, which is complementary to the apical loop of domain IIId that is known to be a critical region of IRES-dependent translation. This convergence suggests that domain IIId is preferentially selected in an RNA–RNA interaction. Mutation analysis showed that the aptamer binding was sequence and structure dependent. One of the aptamers inhibited translation both in vitro and in vivo. Our results indicate that domain IIId is a suitable target site for HCV blockage and that rationally designed RNA aptamers have great potential as anti-HCV drugs. PMID:15681618

  11. Discovering common stem–loop motifs in unaligned RNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    Gorodkin, Jan; Stricklin, Shawn L.; Stormo, Gary D.

    2001-01-01

    Post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression is often accomplished by proteins binding to specific sequence motifs in mRNA molecules, to affect their translation or stability. The motifs are often composed of a combination of sequence and structural constraints such that the overall structure is preserved even though much of the primary sequence is variable. While several methods exist to discover transcriptional regulatory sites in the DNA sequences of coregulated genes, the RNA motif discovery problem is much more difficult because of covariation in the positions. We describe the combined use of two approaches for RNA structure prediction, FOLDALIGN and COVE, that together can discover and model stem–loop RNA motifs in unaligned sequences, such as UTRs from post-transcriptionally coregulated genes. We evaluate the method on two datasets, one a section of rRNA genes with randomly truncated ends so that a global alignment is not possible, and the other a hyper-variable collection of IRE-like elements that were inserted into randomized UTR sequences. In both cases the combined method identified the motifs correctly, and in the rRNA example we show that it is capable of determining the structure, which includes bulge and internal loops as well as a variable length hairpin loop. Those automated results are quantitatively evaluated and found to agree closely with structures contained in curated databases, with correlation coefficients up to 0.9. A basic server, Stem–Loop Align SearcH (SLASH), which will perform stem–loop searches in unaligned RNA sequences, is available at http://www.bioinf.au.dk/slash/. PMID:11353083

  12. Dinoflagellate 17S rRNA sequence inferred from the gene sequence: Evolutionary implications.

    PubMed

    Herzog, M; Maroteaux, L

    1986-11-01

    We present the complete sequence of the nuclear-encoded small-ribosomal-subunit RNA inferred from the cloned gene sequence of the dinoflagellate Prorocentrum micans. The dinoflagellate 17S rRNA sequence of 1798 nucleotides is contained in a family of 200 tandemly repeated genes per haploid genome. A tentative model of the secondary structure of P. micans 17S rRNA is presented. This sequence is compared with the small-ribosomal-subunit rRNA of Xenopus laevis (Animalia), Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Fungi), Zea mays (Planta), Dictyostelium discoideum (Protoctista), and Halobacterium volcanii (Monera). Although the secondary structure of the dinoflagellate 17S rRNA presents most of the eukaryotic characteristics, it contains sufficient archaeobacterial-like structural features to reinforce the view that dinoflagellates branch off very early from the eukaryotic lineage. PMID:16578795

  13. Dinoflagellate 17S rRNA sequence inferred from the gene sequence: Evolutionary implications

    PubMed Central

    Herzog, Michel; Maroteaux, Luc

    1986-01-01

    We present the complete sequence of the nuclear-encoded small-ribosomal-subunit RNA inferred from the cloned gene sequence of the dinoflagellate Prorocentrum micans. The dinoflagellate 17S rRNA sequence of 1798 nucleotides is contained in a family of 200 tandemly repeated genes per haploid genome. A tentative model of the secondary structure of P. micans 17S rRNA is presented. This sequence is compared with the small-ribosomal-subunit rRNA of Xenopus laevis (Animalia), Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Fungi), Zea mays (Planta), Dictyostelium discoideum (Protoctista), and Halobacterium volcanii (Monera). Although the secondary structure of the dinoflagellate 17S rRNA presents most of the eukaryotic characteristics, it contains sufficient archaeobacterial-like structural features to reinforce the view that dinoflagellates branch off very early from the eukaryotic lineage. PMID:16578795

  14. Evaluation of Commercially Available RNA Amplification Kits for RNA Sequencing Using Very Low Input Amounts of Total RNA

    PubMed Central

    Shanker, Savita; Paulson, Ariel; Edenberg, Howard J.; Peak, Allison; Perera, Anoja; Alekseyev, Yuriy O.; Beckloff, Nicholas; Bivens, Nathan J.; Donnelly, Robert; Gillaspy, Allison F.; Grove, Deborah; Gu, Weikuan; Jafari, Nadereh; Kerley-Hamilton, Joanna S.; Lyons, Robert H.; Tepper, Clifford

    2015-01-01

    This article includes supplemental data. Please visit http://www.fasebj.org to obtain this information.Multiple recent publications on RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) have demonstrated the power of next-generation sequencing technologies in whole-transcriptome analysis. Vendor-specific protocols used for RNA library construction often require at least 100 ng total RNA. However, under certain conditions, much less RNA is available for library construction. In these cases, effective transcriptome profiling requires amplification of subnanogram amounts of RNA. Several commercial RNA amplification kits are available for amplification prior to library construction for next-generation sequencing, but these kits have not been comprehensively field evaluated for accuracy and performance of RNA-seq for picogram amounts of RNA. To address this, 4 types of amplification kits were tested with 3 different concentrations, from 5 ng to 50 pg, of a commercially available RNA. Kits were tested at multiple sites to assess reproducibility and ease of use. The human total reference RNA used was spiked with a control pool of RNA molecules in order to further evaluate quantitative recovery of input material. Additional control data sets were generated from libraries constructed following polyA selection or ribosomal depletion using established kits and protocols. cDNA was collected from the different sites, and libraries were synthesized at a single site using established protocols. Sequencing runs were carried out on the Illumina platform. Numerous metrics were compared among the kits and dilutions used. Overall, no single kit appeared to meet all the challenges of small input material. However, it is encouraging that excellent data can be recovered with even the 50 pg input total RNA. PMID:25649271

  15. Aptamer switch probe based on intramolecular displacement.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zhiwen; Mallikaratchy, Prabodhika; Yang, Ronghua; Kim, Youngmi; Zhu, Zhi; Wang, Hui; Tan, Weihong

    2008-08-27

    A novel aptamer-based molecular probe design employing intramolecular signal transduction is demonstrated. The probe is composed of three elements: an aptamer, a short, partially cDNA sequence, and a PEG linker conjugating the aptamer with the short DNA strand. We have termed this aptamer probe an "aptamer switch probe", or ASP. The ASP design utilizes both a fluorophore and a quencher which are respectively modified at the two termini of the ASP. In the absence of the target molecule, the short DNA will hybridize with the aptamer, keeping the fluorophore and quencher in close proximity, thus switching off the fluorescence. However, when the ASP meets its target, the binding between the aptamer and the target molecule will disturb the intramolecular DNA hybridization, move the quencher away from the fluorophore, and, in effect, switch on the fluorescence. Both ATP and human alpha-thrombin aptamers were engineered to demonstrate this design, and both showed that fluorescence enhancement could be quantitatively mediated by the addition of various amounts of target molecules. Both of these ASPs presented excellent selectivity and prompt response toward their targets. With intrinsic advantages resulting from its intramolecular signal transduction architecture, the ASP design holds promising potential for future applications, such as biochip and in situ imaging, which require reusability, excellent stability, prompt response, and high sensitivity. PMID:18680291

  16. repRNA: a web server for generating various feature vectors of RNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bin; Liu, Fule; Fang, Longyun; Wang, Xiaolong; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2016-02-01

    With the rapid growth of RNA sequences generated in the postgenomic age, it is highly desired to develop a flexible method that can generate various kinds of vectors to represent these sequences by focusing on their different features. This is because nearly all the existing machine-learning methods, such as SVM (support vector machine) and KNN (k-nearest neighbor), can only handle vectors but not sequences. To meet the increasing demands and speed up the genome analyses, we have developed a new web server, called "representations of RNA sequences" (repRNA). Compared with the existing methods, repRNA is much more comprehensive, flexible and powerful, as reflected by the following facts: (1) it can generate 11 different modes of feature vectors for users to choose according to their investigation purposes; (2) it allows users to select the features from 22 built-in physicochemical properties and even those defined by users' own; (3) the resultant feature vectors and the secondary structures of the corresponding RNA sequences can be visualized. The repRNA web server is freely accessible to the public at http://bioinformatics.hitsz.edu.cn/repRNA/ . PMID:26085220

  17. RNAcentral: A vision for an international database of RNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Bateman, Alex; Agrawal, Shipra; Birney, Ewan; Bruford, Elspeth A; Bujnicki, Janusz M; Cochrane, Guy; Cole, James R; Dinger, Marcel E; Enright, Anton J; Gardner, Paul P; Gautheret, Daniel; Griffiths-Jones, Sam; Harrow, Jen; Herrero, Javier; Holmes, Ian H; Huang, Hsien-Da; Kelly, Krystyna A; Kersey, Paul; Kozomara, Ana; Lowe, Todd M; Marz, Manja; Moxon, Simon; Pruitt, Kim D; Samuelsson, Tore; Stadler, Peter F; Vilella, Albert J; Vogel, Jan-Hinnerk; Williams, Kelly P; Wright, Mathew W; Zwieb, Christian

    2011-11-01

    During the last decade there has been a great increase in the number of noncoding RNA genes identified, including new classes such as microRNAs and piRNAs. There is also a large growth in the amount of experimental characterization of these RNA components. Despite this growth in information, it is still difficult for researchers to access RNA data, because key data resources for noncoding RNAs have not yet been created. The most pressing omission is the lack of a comprehensive RNA sequence database, much like UniProt, which provides a comprehensive set of protein knowledge. In this article we propose the creation of a new open public resource that we term RNAcentral, which will contain a comprehensive collection of RNA sequences and fill an important gap in the provision of biomedical databases. We envision RNA researchers from all over the world joining a federated RNAcentral network, contributing specialized knowledge and databases. RNAcentral would centralize key data that are currently held across a variety of databases, allowing researchers instant access to a single, unified resource. This resource would facilitate the next generation of RNA research and help drive further discoveries, including those that improve food production and human and animal health. We encourage additional RNA database resources and research groups to join this effort. We aim to obtain international network funding to further this endeavor. PMID:21940779

  18. RNAcentral: A vision for an international database of RNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    Bateman, Alex; Agrawal, Shipra; Birney, Ewan; Bruford, Elspeth A.; Bujnicki, Janusz M.; Cochrane, Guy; Cole, James R.; Dinger, Marcel E.; Enright, Anton J.; Gardner, Paul P.; Gautheret, Daniel; Griffiths-Jones, Sam; Harrow, Jen; Herrero, Javier; Holmes, Ian H.; Huang, Hsien-Da; Kelly, Krystyna A.; Kersey, Paul; Kozomara, Ana; Lowe, Todd M.; Marz, Manja; Moxon, Simon; Pruitt, Kim D.; Samuelsson, Tore; Stadler, Peter F.; Vilella, Albert J.; Vogel, Jan-Hinnerk; Williams, Kelly P.; Wright, Mathew W.; Zwieb, Christian

    2011-01-01

    During the last decade there has been a great increase in the number of noncoding RNA genes identified, including new classes such as microRNAs and piRNAs. There is also a large growth in the amount of experimental characterization of these RNA components. Despite this growth in information, it is still difficult for researchers to access RNA data, because key data resources for noncoding RNAs have not yet been created. The most pressing omission is the lack of a comprehensive RNA sequence database, much like UniProt, which provides a comprehensive set of protein knowledge. In this article we propose the creation of a new open public resource that we term RNAcentral, which will contain a comprehensive collection of RNA sequences and fill an important gap in the provision of biomedical databases. We envision RNA researchers from all over the world joining a federated RNAcentral network, contributing specialized knowledge and databases. RNAcentral would centralize key data that are currently held across a variety of databases, allowing researchers instant access to a single, unified resource. This resource would facilitate the next generation of RNA research and help drive further discoveries, including those that improve food production and human and animal health. We encourage additional RNA database resources and research groups to join this effort. We aim to obtain international network funding to further this endeavor. PMID:21940779

  19. Method for rapid base sequencing in DNA and RNA

    DOEpatents

    Jett, J.H.; Keller, R.A.; Martin, J.C.; Moyzis, R.K.; Ratliff, R.L.; Shera, E.B.; Stewart, C.C.

    1987-10-07

    A method is provided for the rapid base sequencing of DNA or RNA fragments wherein a single fragment of DNA or RNA is provided with identifiable bases and suspended in a moving flow stream. An exonuclease sequentially cleaves individual bases from the end of the suspended fragment. The moving flow stream maintains the cleaved bases in an orderly train for subsequent detection and identification. In a particular embodiment, individual bases forming the DNA or RNA fragments are individually tagged with a characteristic fluorescent dye. The train of bases is then excited to fluorescence with an output spectrum characteristic of the individual bases. Accordingly, the base sequence of the original DNA or RNA fragment can be reconstructed. 2 figs.

  20. Method for rapid base sequencing in DNA and RNA

    DOEpatents

    Jett, James H.; Keller, Richard A.; Martin, John C.; Moyzis, Robert K.; Ratliff, Robert L.; Shera, E. Brooks; Stewart, Carleton C.

    1990-01-01

    A method is provided for the rapid base sequencing of DNA or RNA fragments wherein a single fragment of DNA or RNA is provided with identifiable bases and suspended in a moving flow stream. An exonuclease sequentially cleaves individual bases from the end of the suspended fragment. The moving flow stream maintains the cleaved bases in an orderly train for subsequent detection and identification. In a particular embodiment, individual bases forming the DNA or RNA fragments are individually tagged with a characteristic fluorescent dye. The train of bases is then excited to fluorescence with an output spectrum characteristic of the individual bases. Accordingly, the base sequence of the original DNA or RNA fragment can be reconstructed.

  1. Method for rapid base sequencing in DNA and RNA

    DOEpatents

    Jett, J.H.; Keller, R.A.; Martin, J.C.; Moyzis, R.K.; Ratliff, R.L.; Shera, E.B.; Stewart, C.C.

    1990-10-09

    A method is provided for the rapid base sequencing of DNA or RNA fragments wherein a single fragment of DNA or RNA is provided with identifiable bases and suspended in a moving flow stream. An exonuclease sequentially cleaves individual bases from the end of the suspended fragment. The moving flow stream maintains the cleaved bases in an orderly train for subsequent detection and identification. In a particular embodiment, individual bases forming the DNA or RNA fragments are individually tagged with a characteristic fluorescent dye. The train of bases is then excited to fluorescence with an output spectrum characteristic of the individual bases. Accordingly, the base sequence of the original DNA or RNA fragment can be reconstructed. 2 figs.

  2. Reentrant Melting of RNA with Quenched Sequence Randomness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayrapetyan, G. N.; Iannelli, F.; Lekscha, J.; Morozov, V. F.; Netz, R. R.; Mamasakhlisov, Y. Sh.

    2014-08-01

    The effect of quenched sequence disorder on the thermodynamics of RNA secondary structure formation is investigated for two- and four-letter alphabet models using the constrained annealing approach, from which the temperature behavior of the free energy, specific heat, and helicity is analytically obtained. For competing base pairing energies, the calculations reveal reentrant melting at low temperatures, in excellent agreement with numerical results. Our results suggest an additional mechanism for the experimental phenomenon of RNA cold denaturation.

  3. Sequence determinants of improved CRISPR sgRNA design

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Han; Xiao, Tengfei; Chen, Chen-Hao; Li, Wei; Meyer, Clifford A.; Wu, Qiu; Wu, Di; Cong, Le; Zhang, Feng; Liu, Jun S.; Brown, Myles; Liu, X. Shirley

    2015-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system has revolutionized mammalian somatic cell genetics. Genome-wide functional screens using CRISPR/Cas9-mediated knockout or dCas9 fusion-mediated inhibition/activation (CRISPRi/a) are powerful techniques for discovering phenotype-associated gene function. We systematically assessed the DNA sequence features that contribute to single guide RNA (sgRNA) efficiency in CRISPR-based screens. Leveraging the information from multiple designs, we derived a new sequence model for predicting sgRNA efficiency in CRISPR/Cas9 knockout experiments. Our model confirmed known features and suggested new features including a preference for cytosine at the cleavage site. The model was experimentally validated for sgRNA-mediated mutation rate and protein knockout efficiency. Tested on independent data sets, the model achieved significant results in both positive and negative selection conditions and outperformed existing models. We also found that the sequence preference for CRISPRi/a is substantially different from that for CRISPR/Cas9 knockout and propose a new model for predicting sgRNA efficiency in CRISPRi/a experiments. These results facilitate the genome-wide design of improved sgRNA for both knockout and CRISPRi/a studies. PMID:26063738

  4. Quantifying sequence and structural features of protein-RNA interactions.

    PubMed

    Li, Songling; Yamashita, Kazuo; Amada, Karlou Mar; Standley, Daron M

    2014-09-01

    Increasing awareness of the importance of protein-RNA interactions has motivated many approaches to predict residue-level RNA binding sites in proteins based on sequence or structural characteristics. Sequence-based predictors are usually high in sensitivity but low in specificity; conversely structure-based predictors tend to have high specificity, but lower sensitivity. Here we quantified the contribution of both sequence- and structure-based features as indicators of RNA-binding propensity using a machine-learning approach. In order to capture structural information for proteins without a known structure, we used homology modeling to extract the relevant structural features. Several novel and modified features enhanced the accuracy of residue-level RNA-binding propensity beyond what has been reported previously, including by meta-prediction servers. These features include: hidden Markov model-based evolutionary conservation, surface deformations based on the Laplacian norm formalism, and relative solvent accessibility partitioned into backbone and side chain contributions. We constructed a web server called aaRNA that implements the proposed method and demonstrate its use in identifying putative RNA binding sites. PMID:25063293

  5. Phylogenetic relationships of Cryptosporidium determined by ribosomal RNA sequence comparison.

    PubMed

    Johnson, A M; Fielke, R; Lumb, R; Baverstock, P R

    1990-04-01

    Reverse transcription of total cellular RNA was used to obtain a partial sequence of the small subunit ribosomal RNA of Cryptosporidium, a protist currently placed in the phylum Apicomplexa. The semi-conserved regions were aligned with homologous sequences in a range of other eukaryotes, and the evolutionary relationships of Cryptosporidium were determined by two different methods of phylogenetic analysis. The prokaryotes Escherichia coli and Halobacterium cuti were included as outgroups. The results do not show an especially close relationship of Cryptosporidium to other members of the phylum Apicomplexa. PMID:2332273

  6. Probing dimensionality beyond the linear sequence of mRNA.

    PubMed

    Del Campo, Cristian; Ignatova, Zoya

    2016-05-01

    mRNA is a nexus entity between DNA and translating ribosomes. Recent developments in deep sequencing technologies coupled with structural probing have revealed new insights beyond the classic role of mRNA and place it more centrally as a direct effector of a variety of processes, including translation, cellular localization, and mRNA degradation. Here, we highlight emerging approaches to probe mRNA secondary structure on a global transcriptome-wide level and compare their potential and resolution. Combined approaches deliver a richer and more complex picture. While our understanding on the effect of secondary structure for various cellular processes is quite advanced, the next challenge is to unravel more complex mRNA architectures and tertiary interactions. PMID:26650615

  7. Statistical mechanics of secondary structures formed by random RNA sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bundschuh, Ralf

    2003-03-01

    In addition to its importance for the biological function of RNA molecules RNA secondary structure formation is an interesting system from the statistical physics point of view. The ensemble of secondary structures of random RNA sequences shows a rich phase diagram with distinct native, denatured, molten, and glassy phases separated by thermodynamical phase transitions. These phase transitions are driven by the competition between thermal fluctuations, the disorder frozen into the specific sequence of a given RNA molecule, and the evolutionary bias towards the formation of some biologically relevant structure. Yet, in contrast to the protein folding problem which is driven by very similar principles and shows a similar phase diagram RNA secondary structure formation can be represented by a simple diagrammatic language which allows the application of various analytical and numerical methods. This makes RNA secondary structure formation an ideal model system for heteropolymer folding. In the talk, I will characterize and explain the complex behaviour of RNA folding using several simple models and discuss possible implications to biological processes.

  8. High-throughput RNA interference screening using pooled shRNA libraries and next generation sequencing

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) screening is a state-of-the-art technology that enables the dissection of biological processes and disease-related phenotypes. The commercial availability of genome-wide, short hairpin RNA (shRNA) libraries has fueled interest in this area but the generation and analysis of these complex data remain a challenge. Here, we describe complete experimental protocols and novel open source computational methodologies, shALIGN and shRNAseq, that allow RNAi screens to be rapidly deconvoluted using next generation sequencing. Our computational pipeline offers efficient screen analysis and the flexibility and scalability to quickly incorporate future developments in shRNA library technology. PMID:22018332

  9. Studying RNA Homology and Conservation with Infernal: From Single Sequences to RNA Families.

    PubMed

    Barquist, Lars; Burge, Sarah W; Gardner, Paul P

    2016-01-01

    Emerging high-throughput technologies have led to a deluge of putative non-coding RNA (ncRNA) sequences identified in a wide variety of organisms. Systematic characterization of these transcripts will be a tremendous challenge. Homology detection is critical to making maximal use of functional information gathered about ncRNAs: identifying homologous sequence allows us to transfer information gathered in one organism to another quickly and with a high degree of confidence. ncRNA presents a challenge for homology detection, as the primary sequence is often poorly conserved and de novo secondary structure prediction and search remain difficult. This unit introduces methods developed by the Rfam database for identifying "families" of homologous ncRNAs starting from single "seed" sequences, using manually curated sequence alignments to build powerful statistical models of sequence and structure conservation known as covariance models (CMs), implemented in the Infernal software package. We provide a step-by-step iterative protocol for identifying ncRNA homologs and then constructing an alignment and corresponding CM. We also work through an example for the bacterial small RNA MicA, discovering a previously unreported family of divergent MicA homologs in genus Xenorhabdus in the process. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27322404

  10. IMAGEtags: Quantifying mRNA Transcription in Real Time with Multiaptamer Reporters.

    PubMed

    Ray, J; Shin, I; Ilgu, M; Bendickson, L; Gupta, V; Kraus, G A; Nilsen-Hamilton, M

    2016-01-01

    Cell communications are essential to the organization, development, and maintenance of multicellular organisms. Much of this communication involves changes in RNA transcription and is dynamic. Most methods for studying transcription require interrupting the continuity of cellular function by sacrificing the communicating cells and capturing gene expression information by periodic sampling of individual cells or the population. The IMAGEtag technology to quantify RNA levels in living cells, demonstrated here in yeast, allows individual cells to be tracked over time as they respond to different environmental cues. IMAGEtags are short RNAs consisting of strings of a variable number of tandem aptamers that bind small-molecule ligands. The aptamer strings can vary in length and in configuration of aptamer constituents, such as to contain multiples of the same aptamer or two or more different aptamers that alternate in their occurrence. A minimum effective length is about five aptamers. The maximum length is undefined. The small-molecule ligands are enabled for imaging as fluorophore conjugates. For each IMAGEtag, two fluorophore conjugates are provided, which are FRET pairs. When a cell expresses an RNA containing an IMAGEtag sequence, the aptamers bind their ligands and bring the fluorophores into sufficiently close proximity to allow FRET. The background fluorescence of both fluorophores is minimal in the FRET channel. These features endow IMAGEtags with the sensitivity to report on mRNA expression levels in living cells. PMID:27241755

  11. Transcriptome Profiling of Developing Murine Lens Through RNA Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Shahid Y.; Hackett, Sean F.; Lee, Mei-Chong W.; Pourmand, Nader; Talbot, C. Conover; Riazuddin, S. Amer

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Transcriptome is the entire repertoire of transcripts present in a cell at any particular time. We undertook a next-generation whole transcriptome sequencing approach to gain insight into the transcriptional landscape of the developing mouse lens. Methods We ascertained mouse lenses at six developmental time points including two embryonic (E15 and E18) and four postnatal stages (P0, P3, P6, and P9). The ocular tissue at each time point was maintained as two distinct pools serving as biological replicates for each developmental stage. The mRNA and small RNA libraries were paired-end sequenced on Illumina HiSeq 2000 and subsequently analyzed using bioinformatics tools. Results Mapping of mRNA and small RNA libraries generated 187.56 and 154.22 million paired-end reads, respectively. We detected a total of 14,465 genes in the mouse ocular lens at the above-mentioned six developmental stages. Of these, 46 genes exhibited a 40-fold differential (higher or lower) expression at one the five developmental stages (E18, P0, P3, P6, and P9) compared with their expression level at E15. Likewise, small RNA profiling identified 379 microRNAs (miRNAs) expressed in mouse lens at six developmental time points. Of these, 49 miRNAs manifested an 8-fold differential (higher or lower) expression at one the five developmental stages, as mentioned above compared with their expression level at E15. Conclusions We report a comprehensive profile of developing murine lens transcriptome including both mRNA and miRNA through next-generation RNA sequencing. A complete repository of the lens transcriptome of six developmental time points will be monumental in elucidating processes essential for the development of the ocular lens and maintenance of its transparency. PMID:26225632

  12. In vitro RNA SELEX for the generation of chemically-optimized therapeutic RNA drugs

    PubMed Central

    Urak, Kevin T.; Shore, Sabrina; Rockey, William M.; Chen, Shi-Jie; McCaffrey, Anton P.; Giangrande, Paloma H.

    2016-01-01

    Aptamers are single-stranded DNA or RNA oligonucleotides that can bind with exquisitely high affinity and specificity to target molecules and are thus often referred to as ‘nucleic acid’ antibodies. Oligonucleotide aptamers are derived through a process of directed chemical evolution called SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential enrichment). This chemical equivalent of Darwinian evolution was first described in 1990 by Tuerk & Gold and Ellington & Szostak and has since yielded aptamers for a wide-range of applications, including biosensor technologies, in vitro diagnostics, biomarker discovery, and therapeutics. Since the inception of the original SELEX method, numerous modifications to the protocol have been described to fit the choice of target, specific conditions or applications. Technologies such as high-throughput sequencing methods and microfluidics have also been adapted for SELEX. In this chapter, we outline key steps in the SELEX process for enabling the rapid identification of RNA aptamers for in vivo applications. Specifically, we provide a detailed protocol for the selection of chemically-optimized RNA aptamers using the original in vitro SELEX methodology. In addition, methods for performing next-generation sequencing of the RNAs from each round of selection, based on Illumina sequencing technology, are discussed. PMID:26972786

  13. In vitro RNA SELEX for the generation of chemically-optimized therapeutic RNA drugs.

    PubMed

    Urak, Kevin T; Shore, Sabrina; Rockey, William M; Chen, Shi-Jie; McCaffrey, Anton P; Giangrande, Paloma H

    2016-07-01

    Aptamers are single-stranded DNA or RNA oligonucleotides that can bind with exquisitely high affinity and specificity to target molecules and are thus often referred to as 'nucleic acid' antibodies. Oligonucleotide aptamers are derived through a process of directed chemical evolution called SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential enrichment). This chemical equivalent of Darwinian evolution was first described in 1990 by Tuerk & Gold and Ellington & Szostak and has since yielded aptamers for a wide-range of applications, including biosensor technologies, in vitro diagnostics, biomarker discovery, and therapeutics. Since the inception of the original SELEX method, numerous modifications to the protocol have been described to fit the choice of target, specific conditions or applications. Technologies such as high-throughput sequencing methods and microfluidics have also been adapted for SELEX. In this chapter, we outline key steps in the SELEX process for enabling the rapid identification of RNA aptamers for in vivo applications. Specifically, we provide a detailed protocol for the selection of chemically-optimized RNA aptamers using the original in vitro SELEX methodology. In addition, methods for performing next-generation sequencing of the RNAs from each round of selection, based on Illumina sequencing technology, are discussed. PMID:26972786

  14. Using RNA Sequencing to Classify Organisms into Three Primary Kingdoms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Robert H.

    1983-01-01

    Using the biochemical record to class archaebacteria, eukaryotes, and eubacteria involves abstractions difficult for the concrete learner. Therefore, a method is provided in which students discover some basic tenets of biochemical classification and apply them in a "hands-on" classification problem. The method involves use of RNA sequencing. (JN)

  15. RNA sequencing of the nephron transcriptome: a technical note

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Wook

    2015-01-01

    To understand the functions of the kidney, the transcriptome of each part of the nephron needs to be profiled using a highly sensitive and unbiased tool. RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) has revolutionized transcriptomic research, enabling researchers to define transcription activity and functions of genomic elements with unprecedented sensitivity and precision. Recently, RNA-seq for polyadenylated messenger RNAs [poly(A)′-mRNAs] and classical microdissection were successfully combined to investigate the transcriptome of glomeruli and 14 different renal tubule segments. A rat kidney is perfused with and incubated in collagenase solution, and the digested kidney was manually dissected under a stereomicroscope. Individual glomeruli and renal tubule segments are identified by their anatomical and morphological characteristics and collected in phosphate-buffered saline. Poly(A)′-tailed mRNAs are released from cell lysate, captured by oligo-dT primers, and made into complementary DNAs (cDNAs) using a highly sensitive reverse transcription method. These cDNAs are sheared by sonication and prepared into adapter-ligated cDNA libraries for Illumina sequencing. Nucleotide sequences reported from the sequencing reaction are mapped to the rat reference genome for gene expression analysis. These RNA-seq transcriptomic data were highly consistent with prior knowledge of gene expression along the nephron. The gene expression data obtained in this work are available as a public Web page (https://helixweb.nih.gov/ESBL/Database/NephronRNAseq/) and can be used to explore the transcriptomic landscape of the nephron. PMID:26779425

  16. Sequence specificity of mRNA N6-adenosine methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Csepany, T; Lin, A; Baldick, C J; Beemon, K

    1990-11-25

    The sequence specificity of chicken mRNA N6-adenosine methyltransferase has been investigated in vivo. Localization of six new N6-methyladenosine sites on Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) virion RNA has confirmed our extended consensus sequence for methylation: RGACU, where R is usually a G (7/12). We have also observed A (2/12) and U (3/12) at the -2 position (relative to m6A at +1) but never a C. At the +3 position, the U was observed 10/12 times; an A and a C were observed once each in weakly methylated sequences. The extent of methylation varied between the different sites up to a maximum of about 90%. To test the significance of this consensus sequence, it was altered by site-specific mutagenesis, and methylation was assayed after transfection of mutated RSV DNA into chicken embryo fibroblasts. We found that changing the G at -1 or the U at +3 to any other residue inhibited methylation. However, inhibition of methylation at all four of the major sites in the RSV src gene did not detectably alter the steady-state levels of the three viral RNA species or viral infectivity. Additional mutants that inactivated the src protein kinase activity produced less virus and exhibited relatively less src mRNA in infected cells. PMID:2173695

  17. SRP-RNA sequence alignment and secondary structure.

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, N; Zwieb, C

    1991-01-01

    The secondary structures of the RNAs from the signal recognition particle, termed SRP-RNA, were derived buy comparative analyses of an alignment of 39 sequences. The models are minimal in that only base pairs are included for which there is comparative evidence. The structures represent refinements of earlier versions and include a new short helix. PMID:1707519

  18. siRNA release from pri-miRNA scaffolds is controlled by the sequence and structure of RNA.

    PubMed

    Galka-Marciniak, Paulina; Olejniczak, Marta; Starega-Roslan, Julia; Szczesniak, Michal W; Makalowska, Izabela; Krzyzosiak, Wlodzimierz J

    2016-04-01

    shmiRs are pri-miRNA-based RNA interference triggers from which exogenous siRNAs are expressed in cells to silence target genes. These reagents are very promising tools in RNAi in vivo applications due to their good activity profile and lower toxicity than observed for other vector-based reagents such as shRNAs. In this study, using high-resolution northern blotting and small RNA sequencing, we investigated the precision with which RNases Drosha and Dicer process shmiRs. The fidelity of siRNA release from the commonly used pri-miRNA shuttles was found to depend on both the siRNA insert and the pri-miR scaffold. Then, we searched for specific factors that may affect the precision of siRNA release and found that both the structural features of shmiR hairpins and the nucleotide sequence at Drosha and Dicer processing sites contribute to cleavage site selection and cleavage precision. An analysis of multiple shRNA intermediates generated from several reagents revealed the complexity of shmiR processing by Drosha and demonstrated that Dicer selects substrates for further processing. Aside from providing new basic knowledge regarding the specificity of nucleases involved in miRNA biogenesis, our results facilitate the rational design of more efficient genetic reagents for RNAi technology. PMID:26921501

  19. Toward Rare Blood Cell Preservation for RNA Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Vickovic, Sanja; Ahmadian, Afshin; Lewensohn, Rolf; Lundeberg, Joakim

    2015-07-01

    Cancer is driven by various events leading to cell differentiation and disease progression. Molecular tools are powerful approaches for describing how and why these events occur. With the growing field of next-generation DNA sequencing, there is an increasing need for high-quality nucleic acids derived from human cells and tissues-a prerequisite for successful cell profiling. Although advances in RNA preservation have been made, some of the largest biobanks still do not employ RNA blood preservation as standard because of limitations in low blood-input volume and RNA stability over the whole gene body. Therefore, we have developed a robust protocol for blood preservation and long-term storage while maintaining RNA integrity. Furthermore, we explored the possibility of using the protocol for preserving rare cell samples, such as circulating tumor cells. The results of our study confirmed that gene expression was not impacted by the preservation procedure (r(2) > 0.88) or by long-term storage (r(2) = 0.95), with RNA integrity number values averaging over 8. Similarly, cell surface antigens were still available for antibody selection (r(2) = 0.95). Lastly, data mining for fusion events showed that it was possible to detect rare tumor cells among a background of other cells present in blood irrespective of fixation. Thus, the developed protocol would be suitable for rare blood cell preservation followed by RNA sequencing analysis. PMID:25989392

  20. Learning to Predict miRNA-mRNA Interactions from AGO CLIP Sequencing and CLASH Data.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yuheng; Leslie, Christina S

    2016-07-01

    Recent technologies like AGO CLIP sequencing and CLASH enable direct transcriptome-wide identification of AGO binding and miRNA target sites, but the most widely used miRNA target prediction algorithms do not exploit these data. Here we use discriminative learning on AGO CLIP and CLASH interactions to train a novel miRNA target prediction model. Our method combines two SVM classifiers, one to predict miRNA-mRNA duplexes and a second to learn a binding model of AGO's local UTR sequence preferences and positional bias in 3'UTR isoforms. The duplex SVM model enables the prediction of non-canonical target sites and more accurately resolves miRNA interactions from AGO CLIP data than previous methods. The binding model is trained using a multi-task strategy to learn context-specific and common AGO sequence preferences. The duplex and common AGO binding models together outperform existing miRNA target prediction algorithms on held-out binding data. Open source code is available at https://bitbucket.org/leslielab/chimiric. PMID:27438777

  1. Learning to Predict miRNA-mRNA Interactions from AGO CLIP Sequencing and CLASH Data

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yuheng; Leslie, Christina S.

    2016-01-01

    Recent technologies like AGO CLIP sequencing and CLASH enable direct transcriptome-wide identification of AGO binding and miRNA target sites, but the most widely used miRNA target prediction algorithms do not exploit these data. Here we use discriminative learning on AGO CLIP and CLASH interactions to train a novel miRNA target prediction model. Our method combines two SVM classifiers, one to predict miRNA-mRNA duplexes and a second to learn a binding model of AGO’s local UTR sequence preferences and positional bias in 3’UTR isoforms. The duplex SVM model enables the prediction of non-canonical target sites and more accurately resolves miRNA interactions from AGO CLIP data than previous methods. The binding model is trained using a multi-task strategy to learn context-specific and common AGO sequence preferences. The duplex and common AGO binding models together outperform existing miRNA target prediction algorithms on held-out binding data. Open source code is available at https://bitbucket.org/leslielab/chimiric. PMID:27438777

  2. Identification of ssDNA aptamers specific to clinical isolates of Streptococcus mutans strains with different cariogenicity.

    PubMed

    Cui, Wei; Liu, Jiaojiao; Su, Donghua; Hu, Danyang; Hou, Shuai; Hu, Tongnan; Yang, Jiyong; Luo, Yanping; Xi, Qing; Chu, Bingfeng; Wang, Chenglong

    2016-06-01

    Streptococcus mutans, a Gram-positive facultative anaerobic bacterium, is considered to be a major etiological factor for dental caries. In this study, plaques from dental enamel surfaces of caries-active and caries-free individuals were obtained and cultivated for S. mutans isolation. Morphology examination, biochemical characterization, and polymerase chain reaction were performed to identify S. mutans The cariogenicity of S. mutans strains isolated from clinical specimens was evaluated by testing the acidogenicity, aciduricity, extracellular polysaccharide production, and adhesion ability of the bacteria. Finally, subtractive SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment) technology targeting whole intact cells was used to screen for ssDNA aptamers specific to the strains with high cariogenicity. After nine rounds of subtractive SELEX, sufficient pool enrichment was achieved as shown by radioactive isotope analysis. The enriched pool was cloned and sequenced randomly, followed by MEME online and RNA structure software analysis of the sequences. Results from the flow cytometry indicated that aptamers H1, H16, H4, L1, L10, and H19 could discriminate highly cariogenic S. mutans strains from poorly cariogenic strains. Among these, Aptamer H19 had the strongest binding capacity with cariogenic S. mutans strains with a dissociation constant of 69.45 ± 38.53 nM. In conclusion, ssDNA aptamers specific to highly cariogenic clinical S. mutans strains were successfully obtained. These ssDNA aptamers might be used for the early diagnosis and treatment of dental caries. PMID:27151293

  3. Current progress on aptamer-targeted oligonucleotide therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Dassie, Justin P; Giangrande, Paloma H

    2014-01-01

    Exploiting the power of the RNAi pathway through the use of therapeutic siRNA drugs has remarkable potential for treating a vast array of human disease conditions. However, difficulties in delivery of these and similar nucleic acid-based pharmacological agents to appropriate organs or tissues, remains a major impediment to their broad clinical application. Synthetic nucleic acid ligands (aptamers) have emerged as effective delivery vehicles for therapeutic oligonucleotides, including siRNAs. In this review, we summarize recent attractive developments in creatively employing cell-internalizing aptamers to deliver therapeutic oligonucleotides (e.g., siRNAs, miRNAs, anti-miRs and antisense oligos) to target cells. We also discuss advancements in aptamer-siRNA chimera technology, as well as, aptamer-functionalized nanoparticles for siRNA delivery. In addition, the challenges and future prospects of aptamer-targeted oligonucleotide drugs for clinical translation are further highlighted. PMID:24304250

  4. Structurally complex and highly active RNA ligases derived from random RNA sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ekland, E. H.; Szostak, J. W.; Bartel, D. P.

    1995-01-01

    Seven families of RNA ligases, previously isolated from random RNA sequences, fall into three classes on the basis of secondary structure and regiospecificity of ligation. Two of the three classes of ribozymes have been engineered to act as true enzymes, catalyzing the multiple-turnover transformation of substrates into products. The most complex of these ribozymes has a minimal catalytic domain of 93 nucleotides. An optimized version of this ribozyme has a kcat exceeding one per second, a value far greater than that of most natural RNA catalysts and approaching that of comparable protein enzymes. The fact that such a large and complex ligase emerged from a very limited sampling of sequence space implies the existence of a large number of distinct RNA structures of equivalent complexity and activity.

  5. Integrated microRNA-mRNA analyses reveal OPLL specific microRNA regulatory network using high-throughput sequencing.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chen; Chen, Yu; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Yuanyuan; Shen, Xiaolong; Shi, Changgui; Liu, Yang; Yuan, Wen

    2016-01-01

    Ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) is a genetic disorder which involves pathological heterotopic ossification of the spinal ligaments. Although studies have identified several genes that correlated with OPLL, the underlying regulation network is far from clear. Through small RNA sequencing, we compared the microRNA expressions of primary posterior longitudinal ligament cells form OPLL patients with normal patients (PLL) and identified 218 dysregulated miRNAs (FDR < 0.01). Furthermore, assessing the miRNA profiling data of multiple cell types, we found these dysregulated miRNAs were mostly OPLL specific. In order to decipher the regulation network of these OPLL specific miRNAs, we integrated mRNA expression profiling data with miRNA sequencing data. Through computational approaches, we showed the pivotal roles of these OPLL specific miRNAs in heterotopic ossification of longitudinal ligament by discovering highly correlated miRNA/mRNA pairs that associated with skeletal system development, collagen fibril organization, and extracellular matrix organization. The results of which provide strong evidence that the miRNA regulatory networks we established may indeed play vital roles in OPLL onset and progression. To date, this is the first systematic analysis of the micronome in OPLL, and thus may provide valuable resources in finding novel treatment and diagnostic targets of OPLL. PMID:26868491

  6. DNA module platform for developing colorimetric aptamer sensors.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Yasuyuki; Morita, Yuji; Suga, Hiroaki; Fujiwara, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    Here we present a DNA module platform for developing simple aptamer sensors based on a microarray format combined with secondary structure prediction in silico. The platform comprises four parts: (i) aptamer, (ii) joint module, (iii) terminal stem, and (iv) a DNAzyme that catalyzes a redox reaction controlled by a structural change induced by aptamer/target binding. First, we developed a joint module, capable of sensing a conformational change in the aptamer region, that was linked to the signal transmission activity of a DNAzyme as the reporter in a concentration-dependent manner with the AMP aptamer. This module design was then used to generate an arginine sensor simply by replacing the AMP aptamer region with a previously reported arginine aptamer. Using this DNA module platform, we were also able to customize a microarray containing >10,000 sequences designed by in silico secondary structure prediction and successfully identify a new aptamer against patulin. Our results show that the DNA module platform can be used to readily devise sensors based on known aptamers as well as create new aptamer sensors by array-based screening. PMID:27286805

  7. Hybridization-based aptamer labeling using complementary oligonucleotide platform for PET and optical imaging.

    PubMed

    Park, Jun Young; Lee, Tae Sup; Song, In Ho; Cho, Ye Lim; Chae, Ju Ri; Yun, Mijin; Kang, Hyungu; Lee, Jung Hwan; Lim, Jong Hoon; Cho, Won Gil; Kang, Won Jun

    2016-09-01

    Aptamers are promising next-generation ligands used in molecular imaging and theragnosis. Aptamers are synthetic nucleic acids that can be held together with complementary sequences by base-pair hybridization. In this study, the complementary oligonucleotide (cODN) hybridization-based aptamer conjugation platform was developed to use aptamers as the molecular imaging agent. The cODN was pre-labeled with fluorescent dye or radioisotope and hybridized with a matched sequence containing aptamers in aqueous conditions. The cODN platform-hybridized aptamers exhibited good serum stability and specific binding affinity towards target cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. These results suggest that the newly designed aptamer conjugation platform offers great potential for the versatile application of aptamers as molecular imaging agents. PMID:27258484

  8. Using Small RNA Deep Sequencing Data to Detect Human Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fang; Sun, Yu; Ruan, Jishou; Chen, Rui; Chen, Xin; Chen, Chengjie; Kreuze, Jan F.; Fei, ZhangJun; Zhu, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Small RNA sequencing (sRNA-seq) can be used to detect viruses in infected hosts without the necessity to have any prior knowledge or specialized sample preparation. The sRNA-seq method was initially used for viral detection and identification in plants and then in invertebrates and fungi. However, it is still controversial to use sRNA-seq in the detection of mammalian or human viruses. In this study, we used 931 sRNA-seq runs of data from the NCBI SRA database to detect and identify viruses in human cells or tissues, particularly from some clinical samples. Six viruses including HPV-18, HBV, HCV, HIV-1, SMRV, and EBV were detected from 36 runs of data. Four viruses were consistent with the annotations from the previous studies. HIV-1 was found in clinical samples without the HIV-positive reports, and SMRV was found in Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma cells for the first time. In conclusion, these results suggest the sRNA-seq can be used to detect viruses in mammals and humans. PMID:27066498

  9. Using Small RNA Deep Sequencing Data to Detect Human Viruses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang; Sun, Yu; Ruan, Jishou; Chen, Rui; Chen, Xin; Chen, Chengjie; Kreuze, Jan F; Fei, ZhangJun; Zhu, Xiao; Gao, Shan

    2016-01-01

    Small RNA sequencing (sRNA-seq) can be used to detect viruses in infected hosts without the necessity to have any prior knowledge or specialized sample preparation. The sRNA-seq method was initially used for viral detection and identification in plants and then in invertebrates and fungi. However, it is still controversial to use sRNA-seq in the detection of mammalian or human viruses. In this study, we used 931 sRNA-seq runs of data from the NCBI SRA database to detect and identify viruses in human cells or tissues, particularly from some clinical samples. Six viruses including HPV-18, HBV, HCV, HIV-1, SMRV, and EBV were detected from 36 runs of data. Four viruses were consistent with the annotations from the previous studies. HIV-1 was found in clinical samples without the HIV-positive reports, and SMRV was found in Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma cells for the first time. In conclusion, these results suggest the sRNA-seq can be used to detect viruses in mammals and humans. PMID:27066498

  10. Experimental design, preprocessing, normalization and differential expression analysis of small RNA sequencing experiments

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Prior to the advent of new, deep sequencing methods, small RNA (sRNA) discovery was dependent on Sanger sequencing, which was time-consuming and limited knowledge to only the most abundant sRNA. The innovation of large-scale, next-generation sequencing has exponentially increased knowledge of the biology, diversity and abundance of sRNA populations. In this review, we discuss issues involved in the design of sRNA sequencing experiments, including choosing a sequencing platform, inherent biases that affect sRNA measurements and replication. We outline the steps involved in preprocessing sRNA sequencing data and review both the principles behind and the current options for normalization. Finally, we discuss differential expression analysis in the absence and presence of biological replicates. While our focus is on sRNA sequencing experiments, many of the principles discussed are applicable to the sequencing of other RNA populations. PMID:21356093

  11. HLA typing from RNA-Seq sequence reads.

    PubMed

    Boegel, Sebastian; Löwer, Martin; Schäfer, Michael; Bukur, Thomas; de Graaf, Jos; Boisguérin, Valesca; Türeci, Ozlem; Diken, Mustafa; Castle, John C; Sahin, Ugur

    2012-01-01

    We present a method, seq2HLA, for obtaining an individual's human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I and II type and expression using standard next generation sequencing RNA-Seq data. RNA-Seq reads are mapped against a reference database of HLA alleles, and HLA type, confidence score and locus-specific expression level are determined. We successfully applied seq2HLA to 50 individuals included in the HapMap project, yielding 100% specificity and 94% sensitivity at a P-value of 0.1 for two-digit HLA types. We determined HLA type and expression for previously un-typed Illumina Body Map tissues and a cohort of Korean patients with lung cancer. Because the algorithm uses standard RNA-Seq reads and requires no change to laboratory protocols, it can be used for both existing datasets and future studies, thus adding a new dimension for HLA typing and biomarker studies. PMID:23259685

  12. Using small RNA (sRNA) deep sequencing to understand global virus distribution in plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Small RNAs (sRNAs), a class of regulatory RNAs, have been used to serve as the specificity determinants of suppressing gene expression in plants and animals. Next generation sequencing (NGS) uncovered the sRNA landscape in most organisms including their associated microbes. In the current study, w...

  13. Durable Knockdown and Protection From HIV Transmission in Humanized Mice Treated With Gel-formulated CD4 Aptamer-siRNA Chimeras

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Lee Adam; Vrbanac, Vladimir; Trifonova, Radiana; Brehm, Michael A; Gilboa-Geffen, Adi; Tanno, Serah; Greiner, Dale L; Luster, Andrew D; Tager, Andrew M; Lieberman, Judy

    2013-01-01

    The continued spread of HIV underscores the need to interrupt transmission. One attractive strategy, in the absence of an effective vaccine, is a topical microbicide, but the need for application around the time of sexual intercourse leads to poor patient compliance. Intravaginal (IVAG) application of CD4 aptamer-siRNA chimeras (CD4-AsiCs) targeting the HIV coreceptor CCR5, gag, and vif protected humanized mice from sexual transmission. In non-dividing cells and tissue, RNAi-mediated gene knockdown lasts for several weeks, providing an opportunity for infrequent dosing not temporally linked to sexual intercourse, when compliance is challenging. Here, we investigate the durability of gene knockdown and viral inhibition, protection afforded by CCR5 or HIV gene knockdown on their own, and effectiveness of CD4-AsiCs formulated in a gel in polarized human cervicovaginal explants and in humanized mice. CD4-AsiC–mediated gene knockdown persisted for several weeks. Cell-specific gene knockdown and protection were comparable in a hydroxyethylcellulose gel formulation. CD4-AsiCs against CCR5 or gag/vif performed as well as a cocktail in humanized mice. Transmission was completely blocked by CCR5 CD4-AsiCs applied 2 days before challenge. Significant, but incomplete, protection also occurred when exposure was delayed for 4 or 6 days. CD4-AsiCs targeting gag/vif provided some protection when administered only after exposure. These data suggest that CD4-AsiCs are a promising approach for developing an HIV microbicide. PMID:23629001

  14. Aptamer selection by direct microfluidic recovery and surface plasmon resonance evaluation.

    PubMed

    Dausse, Eric; Barré, Aurélien; Aimé, Ahissan; Groppi, Alexis; Rico, Alain; Ainali, Chrysanthi; Salgado, Gilmar; Palau, William; Daguerre, Emilie; Nikolski, Macha; Toulmé, Jean-Jacques; Di Primo, Carmelo

    2016-06-15

    A surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based SELEX approach has been used to raise RNA aptamers against a structured RNA, derived from XBP1 pre-mRNA, that folds as two contiguous hairpins. Thanks to the design of the internal microfluidic cartridge of the instrument, the selection was performed during the dissociation phase of the SPR analysis by recovering the aptamer candidates directly from the target immobilized onto the sensor chip surface. The evaluation of the pools was performed by SPR, simultaneously, during the association phase, each time the amplified and transcribed candidates were injected over the immobilized target. SPR coupled with SELEX from the first to the last round allowed identifying RNA aptamers that formed highly stable loop-loop complexes (KD equal to 8nM) with the hairpin located on the 5' side of the target. High throughput sequencing of two key rounds confirmed the evolution observed by SPR and also revealed the selection of hairpins displaying a loop not fully complementary to the loop of its target. These candidates were selected mainly because they bound 79 times faster to the target than those having a complementary loop. SELEX coupled with SPR is expected to speed up the selection process because selection and evaluation are performed simultaneously. PMID:26874109

  15. Aptamers: A Feasible Technology in Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Villanueva, H.; Pastor, F.

    2016-01-01

    Aptamers are single-chained RNA or DNA oligonucleotides (ODNs) with three-dimensional folding structures which allow them to bind to their targets with high specificity. Aptamers normally show affinities comparable to or higher than that of antibodies. They are chemically synthesized and therefore less expensive to manufacture and produce. A variety of aptamers described to date have been shown to be reliable in modulating immune responses against cancer by either blocking or activating immune receptors. Some of them have been conjugated to other molecules to target the immune system and reduce off-target side effects. Despite the success of first-line treatments against cancer, the elevated number of relapsing cases and the tremendous side effects shown by the commonly used agents hinder conventional treatments against cancer. The advantages provided by aptamers could enhance the therapeutic index of a given strategy and therefore enhance the antitumor effect. Here we recapitulate the provided benefits of aptamers with immunomodulatory activity described to date in cancer therapy and the benefits that aptamer-based immunotherapy could provide either alone or combined with first-line treatments in cancer therapy. PMID:27413756

  16. General approach for engineering small-molecule-binding DNA split aptamers.

    PubMed

    Kent, Alexandra D; Spiropulos, Nicholas G; Heemstra, Jennifer M

    2013-10-15

    Here we report a general method for engineering three-way junction DNA aptamers into split aptamers. Split aptamers show significant potential for use as recognition elements in biosensing applications, but reliable methods for generating these sequences are currently lacking. We hypothesize that the three-way junction is a "privileged architecture" for the elaboration of aptamers into split aptamers, as it provides two potential splitting sites that are distal from the target binding pocket. We propose a general method for split aptamer engineering that involves removing one loop region, then systematically modifying the number of base pairs in the remaining stem regions in order to achieve selective assembly only in the presence of the target small molecule. We screen putative split aptamer sequence pairs using split aptamer proximity ligation (StAPL) technology developed by our laboratory, but we validate that the results obtained using StAPL translate directly to systems in which the aptamer fragments are assembling noncovalently. We introduce four new split aptamer sequences, which triples the number of small-molecule-binding DNA split aptamers reported to date, and the methods described herein provide a reliable route for the engineering of additional split aptamers, dramatically advancing the potential substrate scope of DNA assembly based biosensors. PMID:24033257

  17. tRNA-Related Sequences Trigger Systemic mRNA Transport in Plants[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wenna; Kollwig, Gregor; Apelt, Federico; Walther, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    In plants, protein-coding mRNAs can move via the phloem vasculature to distant tissues, where they may act as non-cell-autonomous signals. Emerging work has identified many phloem-mobile mRNAs, but little is known regarding RNA motifs triggering mobility, the extent of mRNA transport, and the potential of transported mRNAs to be translated into functional proteins after transport. To address these aspects, we produced reporter transcripts harboring tRNA-like structures (TLSs) that were found to be enriched in the phloem stream and in mRNAs moving over chimeric graft junctions. Phenotypic and enzymatic assays on grafted plants indicated that mRNAs harboring a distinctive TLS can move from transgenic roots into wild-type leaves and from transgenic leaves into wild-type flowers or roots; these mRNAs can also be translated into proteins after transport. In addition, we provide evidence that dicistronic mRNA:tRNA transcripts are frequently produced in Arabidopsis thaliana and are enriched in the population of graft-mobile mRNAs. Our results suggest that tRNA-derived sequences with predicted stem-bulge-stem-loop structures are sufficient to mediate mRNA transport and seem to be necessary for the mobility of a large number of endogenous transcripts that can move through graft junctions. PMID:27268430

  18. tRNA-Related Sequences Trigger Systemic mRNA Transport in Plants.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenna; Thieme, Christoph J; Kollwig, Gregor; Apelt, Federico; Yang, Lei; Winter, Nikola; Andresen, Nadine; Walther, Dirk; Kragler, Friedrich

    2016-06-01

    In plants, protein-coding mRNAs can move via the phloem vasculature to distant tissues, where they may act as non-cell-autonomous signals. Emerging work has identified many phloem-mobile mRNAs, but little is known regarding RNA motifs triggering mobility, the extent of mRNA transport, and the potential of transported mRNAs to be translated into functional proteins after transport. To address these aspects, we produced reporter transcripts harboring tRNA-like structures (TLSs) that were found to be enriched in the phloem stream and in mRNAs moving over chimeric graft junctions. Phenotypic and enzymatic assays on grafted plants indicated that mRNAs harboring a distinctive TLS can move from transgenic roots into wild-type leaves and from transgenic leaves into wild-type flowers or roots; these mRNAs can also be translated into proteins after transport. In addition, we provide evidence that dicistronic mRNA:tRNA transcripts are frequently produced in Arabidopsis thaliana and are enriched in the population of graft-mobile mRNAs. Our results suggest that tRNA-derived sequences with predicted stem-bulge-stem-loop structures are sufficient to mediate mRNA transport and seem to be necessary for the mobility of a large number of endogenous transcripts that can move through graft junctions. PMID:27268430

  19. Divergent RNA editing frequencies in hornwort mitochondrial nad5 sequences.

    PubMed

    Duff, R Joel

    2006-02-01

    Hornwort mitochondrial genomes have some of the highest rates of RNA editing among plants. Comparison of eleven partial mitochondrial nad5 genomic and cDNA sequences from diverse taxa of hornworts reveal 125 edited sites in only 1107 nt. No single sample exhibits more than half of these sites. Ten of the 11 hornwort taxa have between 35 and 54 edited sties each; whereas, the eleventh taxon, Leiosporoceros, which represents a potential sister taxa to all other hornworts, has only eight sites. Comparison of multiple cDNA sequences from several individuals reveals the presence of many immature transcripts showing the heterogonous nature of the progression of editing. Phylogenetic analyses of hornwort genomic and cDNAs sequences reveal that 65 of the 94 phylogenetically informative sites within the hornwort clade are edited positions. PMID:16376027

  20. Aptamer sandwich assays: human α-thrombin detection using liposome enhancement.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Katie A; Wang, Yang; Baeumner, Antje J

    2010-11-01

    Fluorescent dye-encapsulating liposomes tagged with aptamers were developed and used as reporting signals in an aptamer-based sandwich assay. α-Thrombin was utilized as a prototypical analyte as two well-studied aptamers binding distinct epitopes are available to form a sandwich complex. Cholesteryl-TEG-modified aptamers were embedded into the liposomal lipid bilayer while the interior cavity of the liposomes encapsulated fluorescent sulforhodamine B dye. Such liposomes successfully formed a sandwich complex with α-thrombin and a microtiter plate immobilized aptamer, proving that aptamers retain their ability to fold when anchored to the liposome surface. Parameters studied included liposomal aptamer coverage, sandwich aptamer orientation, aptamer label orientation, aptamer spacer length and type, incubation buffer, and aptamer concentration. The optimized conditions found here in the fluorescence assay led to a limit of detection of 64 pM or 2.35 ng/mL, corresponding to 6.4 fmol or 235 pg, respectively, in a 100 μL volume. This is an order of magnitude lower than previous sandwich aptamer assays using the same sequences with lowest reported limits of detection of 0.45 nM. In addition, the assay was applied successfully to the detection of α-thrombin in human plasma. The success of this method in a standard microtiter plate format and the relatively facile functionalization of liposomes with aptamers suggest that this approach provides a versatile option for routine analytical applications. PMID:20596697

  1. SimFuse: A Novel Fusion Simulator for RNA Sequencing (RNA-Seq) Data.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yuxiang; Tambouret, Yann; Monti, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    The performance evaluation of fusion detection algorithms from high-throughput sequencing data crucially relies on the availability of data with known positive and negative cases of gene rearrangements. The use of simulated data circumvents some shortcomings of real data by generation of an unlimited number of true and false positive events, and the consequent robust estimation of accuracy measures, such as precision and recall. Although a few simulated fusion datasets from RNA Sequencing (RNA-Seq) are available, they are of limited sample size. This makes it difficult to systematically evaluate the performance of RNA-Seq based fusion-detection algorithms. Here, we present SimFuse to address this problem. SimFuse utilizes real sequencing data as the fusions' background to closely approximate the distribution of reads from a real sequencing library and uses a reference genome as the template from which to simulate fusions' supporting reads. To assess the supporting read-specific performance, SimFuse generates multiple datasets with various numbers of fusion supporting reads. Compared to an extant simulated dataset, SimFuse gives users control over the supporting read features and the sample size of the simulated library, based on which the performance metrics needed for the validation and comparison of alternative fusion-detection algorithms can be rigorously estimated. PMID:26839886

  2. Sequence and expression of ferredoxin mRNA in barley

    SciTech Connect

    Zielinski, R.; Funder, P.M.; Ling, V. )

    1990-05-01

    We have isolated and structurally characterized a full-length cDNA clone encoding ferredoxin from a {lambda}gt10 cDNA library prepared from barley leaf mRNA. The ferredoxin clone (pBFD-1) was fused head-to-head with a partial-length cDNA clone encoding calmodulin, and was fortuitously isolated by screening the library with a calmodulin-specific oligonucleotide probe. The mRNA sequence from which pBFD-1 was derived is expressed exclusively in the leaf tissues of 7-d old barley seedlings. Barley pre-ferredoxin has a predicted size of 15.3 kDal, of which 4.6 kDal are accounted for by the transit peptide. The polypeptide encoded by pBFD-1 is identical to wheat ferredoxin, and shares slightly more amino acid sequence similarity with spinach ferredoxin I than with ferredoxin II. Ferredoxin mRNA levels are rapidly increased 10-fold by white light in etiolated barley leaves.

  3. Facilitated Tau Degradation by USP14 Aptamers via Enhanced Proteasome Activity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung Hoon; Shin, Seung Kyun; Jiang, Yanxialei; Choi, Won Hoon; Hong, Chaesun; Kim, Dong-Eun; Lee, Min Jae

    2015-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) is the primary mechanism by which intracellular proteins, transcription factors, and many proteotoxic proteins with aggregation-prone structures are degraded. The UPS is reportedly downregulated in various neurodegenerative disorders, with increased proteasome activity shown to be beneficial in many related disease models. Proteasomes function under tonic inhibitory conditions, possibly via the ubiquitin chain-trimming function of USP14, a proteasome-associated deubiquitinating enzyme (DUB). We identified three specific RNA aptamers of USP14 (USP14-1, USP14-2, and USP14-3) that inhibited its deubiquitinating activity. The nucleotide sequences of these non-cytotoxic USP14 aptamers contained conserved GGAGG motifs, with G-rich regions upstream, and similar secondary structures. They efficiently elevated proteasomal activity, as determined by the increased degradation of small fluorogenic peptide substrates and physiological polyubiquitinated Sic1 proteins. Additionally, proteasomal degradation of tau proteins was facilitated in the presence of the UPS14 aptamers in vitro. Our results indicate that these novel inhibitory UPS14 aptamers can be used to enhance proteasome activity, and to facilitate the degradation of proteotoxic proteins, thereby protecting cells from various neurodegenerative stressors. PMID:26041011

  4. Application of aptamers in diagnostics, drug-delivery and imaging.

    PubMed

    Chandola, Chetan; Kalme, Sheetal; Casteleijn, Marco G; Urtti, Arto; Neerathilingam, Muniasamy

    2016-09-01

    Aptamers are small, single-stranded oligonucleotides (DNA or RNA) that bind to their target with high specificity and affinity. Although aptamers are analogous to antibodies for a wide range of target recognition and variety of applications, they have significant advantages over antibodies. Since aptamers have recently emerged as a class of biomolecules with an application in a wide array of fields, we need to summarize the latest developments herein. In this review we will discuss about the latest developments in using aptamers in diagnostics, drug delivery and imaging. We begin with diagnostics, discussing the application of aptamers for the detection of infective agents itself, antigens/ toxins (bacteria), biomarkers (cancer), or a combination. The ease of conjugation and labelling of aptamers makes them a potential tool for diagnostics. Also, due to the reduced off-target effects of aptamers, their use as a potential drug delivery tool is emerging rapidly. Hence, we discuss their use in targeted delivery in conjugation with siRNAs, nanoparticles, liposomes, drugs and antibodies. Finally, we discuss about the conjugation strategies applicable for RNA and DNA aptamers for imaging. Their stability and self-assembly after heating makes them superior over protein-based binding molecules in terms of labelling and conjugation strategies. PMID:27581942

  5. Pharmacokinetic characterization of an RNA aptamer against osteopontin (OPN) and demonstration of in vivo efficacy in reversing growth of human breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Talbot, Lindsay Jones; Mi, Zhiyong; Bhattacharya, Syamal Dave; Kim, Victoria; Guo, Hongtao; Kuo, Paul C.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction We report pharmacokinetic (PK) data, evaluation of modifications for increased stability, evaluation for cellular uptake, and mediation of regression of breast cancer for the aptamer OPN-R3. Methods OPN-R3 aptamer was assessed for PK data in vivo with additional comparison of IV and SQ dosing. Five aptamer variants were generated by differential 2’-O-methylation for comparison with parent. OPN-R3-Cy3 was incubated with MDA-MB231 cells and cellular uptake evaluated under confocal microscopy. Mice were treated with OPN-R3, mutant, or saline three weeks after inoculation with MDA-MB231 cells and tumor size was evaluated. Results OPN-R3 PK data were: t1/2 7.76 hrs, Tmax 3 hrs, Cmax 13.2 mmol/L, MRT 9 hrs, AUC (0-t) 161.9 mmol-hr/L, Kd 57.2 nM. Half-life was higher when given IV versus SQ (E1/2 7.93 hrs vs 0.74 hrs). 2’ methylation of all available bases increased unmodified aptamer stability and affinity (t1/2 6.2 hrs, Kd 520 nM) but this did not improve on parent aptamer (t1/2 7.78 hours, Kd 18 nM). The aptamer remained extracellular. OPN-R3 caused regression of tumor to levels seen at 1 wk after tumor inoculation. Conclusions We show efficacy of OPN-R3 for reversing growth of breast cancer cells with adequate pharmacokinetic stability for clinical application. PMID:21801960

  6. Chaining sequence/structure seeds for computing RNA similarity.

    PubMed

    Bourgeade, Laetitia; Chauve, Cédric; Allali, Julien

    2015-03-01

    We describe a new method to compare a query RNA with a static set of target RNAs. Our method is based on (i) a static indexing of the sequence/structure seeds of the target RNAs; (ii) searching the target RNAs by detecting seeds of the query present in the target, chaining these seeds in promising candidate homologs; and then (iii) completing the alignment using an anchor-based exact alignment algorithm. We apply our method on the benchmark Bralibase2.1 and compare its accuracy and efficiency with the exact method LocARNA and its recent seeds-based speed-up ExpLoc-P. Our pipeline RNA-unchained greatly improves computation time of LocARNA and is comparable to the one of ExpLoc-P, while improving the overall accuracy of the final alignments. PMID:25768236

  7. [Nucleotide sequence determination of yeast mitochondrial phenylalanine-tRNA].

    PubMed

    Martin, R; Sibler, A P; Schneller, J M; Keith, G; Stahl, A J; Dirheimer, G

    1978-10-01

    The primary structure of mitochondrial tRNAPhe from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, purified by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, was determined using, standard procedures on in vivo 32P-labeled tRNA, as well as the new 5'-end postlabeling techniques. We propose a cloverleaf model which allows for tertiary interaction between cytosine in position 46 and guanine in position 15 and maximizes base pairing in the psi C stem, thus excluding the uracile in position 50 from base pairing in the psi C stem. Comparison of the primary structure of this tRNA with all other known procaryotic, chloroplastic or cytoplasmic tRNAsPhe sequences does not lead to any conclusion about the endosymbiotic theory of mitochondria evolution. PMID:103657

  8. Assessing long-distance RNA sequence connectivity via RNA-templated DNA–DNA ligation

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Christian K; Olson, Sara; Graveley, Brenton R; Zamore, Phillip D; Moore, Melissa J

    2015-01-01

    Many RNAs, including pre-mRNAs and long non-coding RNAs, can be thousands of nucleotides long and undergo complex post-transcriptional processing. Multiple sites of alternative splicing within a single gene exponentially increase the number of possible spliced isoforms, with most human genes currently estimated to express at least ten. To understand the mechanisms underlying these complex isoform expression patterns, methods are needed that faithfully maintain long-range exon connectivity information in individual RNA molecules. In this study, we describe SeqZip, a methodology that uses RNA-templated DNA–DNA ligation to retain and compress connectivity between distant sequences within single RNA molecules. Using this assay, we test proposed coordination between distant sites of alternative exon utilization in mouse Fn1, and we characterize the extraordinary exon diversity of Drosophila melanogaster Dscam1. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03700.001 PMID:25866926

  9. Legume genomics: understanding biology through DNA and RNA sequencing

    PubMed Central

    O'Rourke, Jamie A.; Bolon, Yung-Tsi; Bucciarelli, Bruna; Vance, Carroll P.

    2014-01-01

    Background The legume family (Leguminosae) consists of approx. 17 000 species. A few of these species, including, but not limited to, Phaseolus vulgaris, Cicer arietinum and Cajanus cajan, are important dietary components, providing protein for approx. 300 million people worldwide. Additional species, including soybean (Glycine max) and alfalfa (Medicago sativa), are important crops utilized mainly in animal feed. In addition, legumes are important contributors to biological nitrogen, forming symbiotic relationships with rhizobia to fix atmospheric N2 and providing up to 30 % of available nitrogen for the next season of crops. The application of high-throughput genomic technologies including genome sequencing projects, genome re-sequencing (DNA-seq) and transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) by the legume research community has provided major insights into genome evolution, genomic architecture and domestication. Scope and Conclusions This review presents an overview of the current state of legume genomics and explores the role that next-generation sequencing technologies play in advancing legume genomics. The adoption of next-generation sequencing and implementation of associated bioinformatic tools has allowed researchers to turn each species of interest into their own model organism. To illustrate the power of next-generation sequencing, an in-depth overview of the transcriptomes of both soybean and white lupin (Lupinus albus) is provided. The soybean transcriptome focuses on analysing seed development in two near-isogenic lines, examining the role of transporters, oil biosynthesis and nitrogen utilization. The white lupin transcriptome analysis examines how phosphate deficiency alters gene expression patterns, inducing the formation of cluster roots. Such studies illustrate the power of next-generation sequencing and bioinformatic analyses in elucidating the gene networks underlying biological processes. PMID:24769535

  10. Long Non-Coding RNA and Alternative Splicing Modulations in Parkinson's Leukocytes Identified by RNA Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Soreq, Lilach; Guffanti, Alessandro; Salomonis, Nathan; Simchovitz, Alon; Israel, Zvi; Bergman, Hagai; Soreq, Hermona

    2014-01-01

    The continuously prolonged human lifespan is accompanied by increase in neurodegenerative diseases incidence, calling for the development of inexpensive blood-based diagnostics. Analyzing blood cell transcripts by RNA-Seq is a robust means to identify novel biomarkers that rapidly becomes a commonplace. However, there is lack of tools to discover novel exons, junctions and splicing events and to precisely and sensitively assess differential splicing through RNA-Seq data analysis and across RNA-Seq platforms. Here, we present a new and comprehensive computational workflow for whole-transcriptome RNA-Seq analysis, using an updated version of the software AltAnalyze, to identify both known and novel high-confidence alternative splicing events, and to integrate them with both protein-domains and microRNA binding annotations. We applied the novel workflow on RNA-Seq data from Parkinson's disease (PD) patients' leukocytes pre- and post- Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) treatment and compared to healthy controls. Disease-mediated changes included decreased usage of alternative promoters and N-termini, 5′-end variations and mutually-exclusive exons. The PD regulated FUS and HNRNP A/B included prion-like domains regulated regions. We also present here a workflow to identify and analyze long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) via RNA-Seq data. We identified reduced lncRNA expression and selective PD-induced changes in 13 of over 6,000 detected leukocyte lncRNAs, four of which were inversely altered post-DBS. These included the U1 spliceosomal lncRNA and RP11-462G22.1, each entailing sequence complementarity to numerous microRNAs. Analysis of RNA-Seq from PD and unaffected controls brains revealed over 7,000 brain-expressed lncRNAs, of which 3,495 were co-expressed in the leukocytes including U1, which showed both leukocyte and brain increases. Furthermore, qRT-PCR validations confirmed these co-increases in PD leukocytes and two brain regions, the amygdala and substantia

  11. Use of Unamplified RNA/cDNA-Hybrid Nanopore Sequencing for Rapid Detection and Characterization of RNA Viruses.

    PubMed

    Kilianski, Andy; Roth, Pierce A; Liem, Alvin T; Hill, Jessica M; Willis, Kristen L; Rossmaier, Rebecca D; Marinich, Andrew V; Maughan, Michele N; Karavis, Mark A; Kuhn, Jens H; Honko, Anna N; Rosenzweig, C Nicole

    2016-08-01

    Nanopore sequencing, a novel genomics technology, has potential applications for routine biosurveillance, clinical diagnosis, and outbreak investigation of virus infections. Using rapid sequencing of unamplified RNA/cDNA hybrids, we identified Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus and Ebola virus in 3 hours from sample receipt to data acquisition, demonstrating a fieldable technique for RNA virus characterization. PMID:27191483

  12. Use of Unamplified RNA/cDNA–Hybrid Nanopore Sequencing for Rapid Detection and Characterization of RNA Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Kilianski, Andy; Roth, Pierce A.; Liem, Alvin T.; Hill, Jessica M.; Willis, Kristen L.; Rossmaier, Rebecca D.; Marinich, Andrew V.; Maughan, Michele N.; Karavis, Mark A.; Kuhn, Jens H.; Honko, Anna N.

    2016-01-01

    Nanopore sequencing, a novel genomics technology, has potential applications for routine biosurveillance, clinical diagnosis, and outbreak investigation of virus infections. Using rapid sequencing of unamplified RNA/cDNA hybrids, we identified Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus and Ebola virus in 3 hours from sample receipt to data acquisition, demonstrating a fieldable technique for RNA virus characterization. PMID:27191483

  13. PlantMirnaT: miRNA and mRNA integrated analysis fully utilizing characteristics of plant sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Rhee, S; Chae, H; Kim, S

    2015-07-15

    miRNA is known to regulate up to several hundreds coding genes, thus the integrated analysis of miRNA and mRNA expression data is an important problem. Unfortunately, the integrated analysis is challenging since it needs to consider expression data of two different types, miRNA and mRNA, and target relationship between miRNA and mRNA is not clear, especially when microarray data is used. Fortunately, due to the low sequencing cost, small RNA and RNA sequencing are routinely processed and we may be able to infer regulation relationships between miRNAs and mRNAs more accurately by using sequencing data. However, no method is developed specifically for sequencing data. Thus we developed PlantMirnaT, a new miRNA-mRNA integrated analysis system. To fully leverage the power of sequencing data, three major features are developed and implemented in PlantMirnaT. First, we implemented a plant-specific short read mapping tool based on recent discoveries on miRNA target relationship in plant. Second, we designed and implemented an algorithm considering miRNA targets in the full intragenic region, not just 3' UTR. Lastly but most importantly, our algorithm is designed to consider quantity of miRNA expression and its distribution on target mRNAs. The new algorithm was used to characterize rice under drought condition using our proprietary data. Our algorithm successfully discovered that two miRNAs, miRNA1425-5p, miRNA 398b, that are involved in suppression of glucose pathway in a naturally drought resistant rice, Vandana. The system can be downloaded at https://sites.google.com/site/biohealthinformaticslab/resources. PMID:25863133

  14. Globin mRNA contains a sequence complementary to double-stranded region of nuclear pre-mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Ryskov, A P; Tokarskaya, O V; Georgiev, G P; Coutelle, C; Thiele, B

    1976-01-01

    Melted ds RNA isolated from rabbit bone marrow pre-mRNA was hybridized with excess of globin mRNA which was prepared from rabbit reticulocytes. 7-9% of ds sequences became RNAase-stable and about 30% of the sequences could be bound to poly(U)-Sepharose through poly (A) of mRNA. The size of RNAase-stable hybrid is about 30 nucleotides, that is one fourth of the length of one strand of the ds RNA. PMID:986644

  15. Clinical applications of nucleic acid aptamers in cancer

    PubMed Central

    PEI, XIAOYU; ZHANG, JUN; LIU, JIE

    2014-01-01

    Nucleic acid aptamers are small single-stranded DNA or RNA oligonucleotide segments, which bind to their targets with high affinity and specificity via unique three-dimensional structures. Aptamers are generated by an iterative in vitro selection process, termed as systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment. Owing to their specificity, non-immunogenicity, non-toxicity, easily modified chemical structure and wide range of targets, aptamers appear to be ideal candidates for various clinical applications (diagnosis or treatment), such as cell detection, target diagnosis, molecular imaging and drug delivery. Several aptamers have entered the clinical pipeline for applications in diseases such as macular degeneration, coronary artery bypass graft surgery and various types of cancer. The aim of this review was to summarize and highlight the clinical applications of aptamers in cancer diagnosis and treatment. PMID:24772298

  16. Selection of DNA aptamers against epidermal growth factor receptor with high affinity and specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Deng-Liang; Song, Yan-Ling; Zhu, Zhi; Li, Xi-Lan; Zou, Yuan; Yang, Hai-Tao; Wang, Jiang-Jie; Yao, Pei-Sen; Pan, Ru-Jun; Yang, Chaoyong James; Kang, De-Zhi

    2014-10-31

    Highlights: • This is the first report of DNA aptamer against EGFR in vitro. • Aptamer can bind targets with high affinity and selectivity. • DNA aptamers are more stable, cheap and efficient than RNA aptamers. • Our selected DNA aptamer against EGFR has high affinity with K{sub d} 56 ± 7.3 nM. • Our selected DNA aptamer against EGFR has high selectivity. - Abstract: Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR/HER1/c-ErbB1), is overexpressed in many solid cancers, such as epidermoid carcinomas, malignant gliomas, etc. EGFR plays roles in proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis and metastasis of malignant cancer cells and is the ideal antigen for clinical applications in cancer detection, imaging and therapy. Aptamers, the output of the systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX), are DNA/RNA oligonucleotides which can bind protein and other substances with specificity. RNA aptamers are undesirable due to their instability and high cost of production. Conversely, DNA aptamers have aroused researcher’s attention because they are easily synthesized, stable, selective, have high binding affinity and are cost-effective to produce. In this study, we have successfully identified DNA aptamers with high binding affinity and selectivity to EGFR. The aptamer named TuTu22 with K{sub d} 56 ± 7.3 nM was chosen from the identified DNA aptamers for further study. Flow cytometry analysis results indicated that the TuTu22 aptamer was able to specifically recognize a variety of cancer cells expressing EGFR but did not bind to the EGFR-negative cells. With all of the aforementioned advantages, the DNA aptamers reported here against cancer biomarker EGFR will facilitate the development of novel targeted cancer detection, imaging and therapy.

  17. A method for clustering of miRNA sequences using fragmented programming.

    PubMed

    Ivashchenko, Anatoly; Pyrkova, Anna; Niyazova, Raigul

    2016-01-01

    Clustering of miRNA sequences is an important problem in molecular genetics associated cellular biology. Thousands of such sequences are known today through advancement in sophisticated molecular tools, sequencing techniques, computational resources and rule based mathematical models. Analysis of such large-scale miRNA sequences for inferring patterns towards deducing cellular function is a great challenge in modern molecular biology. Therefore, it is of interest to develop mathematical models specific for miRNA sequences. The process is to group (cluster) such miRNA sequences using well-defined known features. We describe a method for clustering of miRNA sequences using fragmented programming. Subsequently, we illustrated the utility of the model using a dendrogram (a tree diagram) for publically known A.thaliana miRNA nucleotide sequences towards the inference of observed conserved patterns. PMID:27212839

  18. Aptamers in Affinity Separations: Stationary Separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravelet, Corinne; Peyrin, Eric

    The use of DNA or RNA aptamers as tools in analytical chemistry is a very promising field of research because of their capabilities to bind specifically the target molecules with an affinity similar to that of antibodies. Notably, they appear to be of great interest as target-specific ligands for the separation and capture of various analytes in affinity chromatography and related affinity-based methods such as magnetic bead technology. In this chapter, the recent developments of these aptamer-based separation/capture approaches are addressed.

  19. Enhancing aptamer function and stability via in vitro selection using modified nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Meek, Kirsten N; Rangel, Alexandra E; Heemstra, Jennifer M

    2016-08-15

    Nucleic acid aptamers have emerged as a promising alternative to antibodies for use as recognition elements in therapeutics, bioimaging, and analytical applications. A key benefit that aptamers possess relative to antibodies is their ability to be chemically synthesized. This advantage, coupled with the broad range of modified nucleotide building blocks that can be constructed using chemical synthesis, has enabled the discovery and development of modified aptamers having extraordinary affinity, specificity, and biostability. Early efforts to generate modified aptamers focused on selection of a native DNA or RNA aptamer, followed by post-selection trial-and-error testing of modifications. However, recent advances in polymerase engineering and templated nucleic acid synthesis have enabled the direct selection of aptamers having modified backbones and nucleobases. This review will discuss these technological advances and highlight the improvements in aptamer function that have been realized through in vitro selection of non-natural nucleic acids. PMID:27012179

  20. Improved definition of the mouse transcriptome via targeted RNA sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Michael B.; Mercer, Tim R.; Crawford, Joanna; Malquori, Lorenzo; Notredame, Cedric; Dinger, Marcel E.; Mattick, John S.

    2016-01-01

    Targeted RNA sequencing (CaptureSeq) uses oligonucleotide probes to capture RNAs for sequencing, providing enriched read coverage, accurate measurement of gene expression, and quantitative expression data. We applied CaptureSeq to refine transcript annotations in the current murine GRCm38 assembly. More than 23,000 regions corresponding to putative or annotated long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) and 154,281 known splicing junction sites were selected for targeted sequencing across five mouse tissues and three brain subregions. The results illustrate that the mouse transcriptome is considerably more complex than previously thought. We assemble more complete transcript isoforms than GENCODE, expand transcript boundaries, and connect interspersed islands of mapped reads. We describe a novel filtering pipeline that identifies previously unannotated but high-quality transcript isoforms. In this set, 911 GENCODE neighboring genes are condensed into 400 expanded gene models. Additionally, 594 GENCODE lncRNAs acquire an open reading frame (ORF) when their structure is extended with CaptureSeq. Finally, we validate our observations using current FANTOM and Mouse ENCODE resources. PMID:27197243

  1. A novel electrochemical detection method for aptamer biosensors.

    PubMed

    Bang, Gyeong Sook; Cho, Suhyeong; Kim, Byung-Gee

    2005-12-15

    A beacon aptamer-based biosensor for the detection of thrombin was developed using electrochemical transduction method. Gold surface was modified with a beacon aptamer covalently linked at 5'-terminus with a linker containing a primary aliphatic amine. Methylene blue (MB) was intercalated into the beacon sequence, and used as an electrochemical marker. When the beacon aptamer immobilized on gold surface encounters thrombin, the hairpin forming beacon aptamer is conformationally changed to release the intercalated MB, resulting a decrease in electrical current intensity in voltamogram. The peak signal of the MB is clearly decreased by the binding of thrombin onto the beacon aptamer. The linear range of the signal was observed between 0 and 50.8 nM of thrombin with 0.999 correlation factor. This method was able to linearly and selectively detect thrombin with a detection limit of 11 nM. PMID:16257654

  2. Sequence of the 16S ribosomal RNA from Halobacterium volcanii, an archaebacterium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, R.; Lanter, J. M.; Woese, C. R.

    1983-01-01

    The sequence of the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) from the archaebacterium Halobacterium volcanii has been determined by DNA sequencing methods. The archaebacterial rRNA is similar to its eubacterial counterpart in secondary structure. Although it is closer in sequence to the eubacterial 16S rRNA than to the eukaryotic 16S-like rRNA, the H. volcanii sequence also shows certain points of specific similarity to its eukaryotic counterpart. Since the H. volcanii sequence is closer to both the eubacterial and the eukaryotic sequences than these two are to one another, it follows that the archaebacterial sequence resembles their common ancestral sequence more closely than does either of the other two versions.

  3. Comparative RNA sequencing reveals substantial genetic variation in endangered primates

    PubMed Central

    Perry, George H.; Melsted, Páll; Marioni, John C.; Wang, Ying; Bainer, Russell; Pickrell, Joseph K.; Michelini, Katelyn; Zehr, Sarah; Yoder, Anne D.; Stephens, Matthew; Pritchard, Jonathan K.; Gilad, Yoav

    2012-01-01

    Comparative genomic studies in primates have yielded important insights into the evolutionary forces that shape genetic diversity and revealed the likely genetic basis for certain species-specific adaptations. To date, however, these studies have focused on only a small number of species. For the majority of nonhuman primates, including some of the most critically endangered, genome-level data are not yet available. In this study, we have taken the first steps toward addressing this gap by sequencing RNA from the livers of multiple individuals from each of 16 mammalian species, including humans and 11 nonhuman primates. Of the nonhuman primate species, five are lemurs and two are lorisoids, for which little or no genomic data were previously available. To analyze these data, we developed a method for de novo assembly and alignment of orthologous gene sequences across species. We assembled an average of 5721 gene sequences per species and characterized diversity and divergence of both gene sequences and gene expression levels. We identified patterns of variation that are consistent with the action of positive or directional selection, including an 18-fold enrichment of peroxisomal genes among genes whose regulation likely evolved under directional selection in the ancestral primate lineage. Importantly, we found no relationship between genetic diversity and endangered status, with the two most endangered species in our study, the black and white ruffed lemur and the Coquerel's sifaka, having the highest genetic diversity among all primates. Our observations imply that many endangered lemur populations still harbor considerable genetic variation. Timely efforts to conserve these species alongside their habitats have, therefore, strong potential to achieve long-term success. PMID:22207615

  4. High-throughput illumina strand-specific RNA sequencing library preparation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Conventional Illumina RNA-Seq does not have the resolution to decode the complex eukaryote transcriptome due to the lack of RNA polarity information. Strand-specific RNA sequencing (ssRNA-Seq) can overcome these limitations and as such is better suited for genome annotation, de novo transcriptome as...

  5. Research Techniques Made Simple: Methodology and Clinical Applications of RNA Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Whitley, Sarah K; Horne, William T; Kolls, Jay K

    2016-08-01

    RNA sequencing is a method of transcriptome profiling that utilizes next-generation sequencing technology. It offers several distinct advantages over hybridization-based approaches, most notably superior sensitivity and the capacity for de novo transcript discovery. This article describes RNA sequencing methodology, summarizes important technological advances and challenges, and discusses applications for this technique in the field of dermatology. PMID:27450500

  6. Modulations of RNA sequences by cytokinin in pumpkin cotyledons

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.; Ertl, J.; Chen, C.

    1987-04-01

    Polyadenylated mRNAs from excised pumpkin cotyledons treated with or without 10/sup -4/ M benzyladenine (BA) for various time periods in suspension culture were assayed by in vitro translation in the presence of (/sup 35/S) methionine. The radioactive polypeptides were analyzed by one- and two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Specific sequences of mRNAs were enhanced, reduced, induced, or suppressed by the hormone within 60 min of the application of BA to the cotyledons. Four independent cDNA clones of cytokinin-modulated mRNAs have been selected and characterized. RNA blot hybridization using the four cDNA probes also indicates that the levels of specific mRNAs are modulated upward or downward by the hormone.

  7. The Microglial Sensome Revealed by Direct RNA Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Hickman, Suzanne E.; Kingery, Nathan D.; Ohsumi, Toshiro; Borowsky, Mark; Wang, Li-chong; Means, Terry K.; Khoury, Joseph El

    2013-01-01

    Microglia, the principal neuroimmune sentinels of the brain, continuously sense changes in their environment and respond to invading pathogens, toxins and cellular debris. Microglia exhibit plasticity and can assume neurotoxic or neuroprotective priming states that determine their responses to danger. We used direct RNA sequencing, without amplification or cDNA synthesis, to determine the quantitative transcriptomes of microglia of healthy adult and aged mice. We validated our findings by fluorescent dual in-situ hybridization, unbiased proteomic analysis and quantitative PCR. We report here that microglia have a distinct transcriptomic signature and express a unique cluster of transcripts encoding proteins for sensing endogenous ligands and microbes that we term the “sensome”. With aging, sensome transcripts for endogenous ligand recognition are downregulated, whereas those involved in microbe recognition and host defense are upregulated. In addition, aging is associated with an overall increase in expression of microglial genes involved in neuroprotection. PMID:24162652

  8. Copying of RNA Sequences without Pre-Activation

    PubMed Central

    Jauker, Mario; Griesser, Helmut; Richert, Clemens

    2015-01-01

    Template-directed incorporation of nucleotides at the terminus of a growing complementary strand is the basis of replication. For RNA, this process can occur in the absence of enzymes, if the ribonucleotides are first converted to an active species with a leaving group. Thus far, the activation required a separate chemical step, complicating prebiotically plausible scenarios. Here we show that a combination of a carbodiimide and an organocatalyst induces near-quantitative incorporation of any of the four ribonucleotides. Upon in situ activation, adenosine monophosphate was found to also form oligomers in aqueous solution. So, both de novo strand formation and sequence-specific copying can occur without an artificial synthetic step. PMID:26435291

  9. Aptamers: Active Targeting Ligands for Cancer Diagnosis and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xu; Chen, Jiao; Wu, Min; Zhao, Julia Xiaojun

    2015-01-01

    Aptamers, including DNA, RNA and peptide aptamers, are a group of promising recognition units that can specifically bind to target molecules and cells. Due to their excellent specificity and high affinity to targets, aptamers have attracted great attention in various fields in which selective recognition units are required. They have been used in biosensing, drug delivery, disease diagnosis and therapy (especially for cancer treatment). In this review, we summarized recent applications of DNA and RNA aptamers in cancer theranostics. The specific binding ability of aptamers to cancer-related markers and cancer cells ensured their high performance for early diagnosis of cancer. Meanwhile, the efficient targeting ability of aptamers to cancer cells and tissues provided a promising way to deliver imaging agents and drugs for cancer imaging and therapy. Furthermore, with the development of nanoscience and nanotechnology, the conjugation of aptamers with functional nanomaterials paved an exciting way for the fabrication of theranostic agents for different types of cancers, which might be a powerful tool for cancer treatment. PMID:25699094

  10. [The use of oligonucleotide aptamers in cancer therapy].

    PubMed

    Odrzywolski, Adrian; Waśko, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Aptamers are a new class of molecules which originated in the 1990s. They are usually RNA or DNA oligonucleotides, the length of which ranges between 20 and 80 nt. They are produced using the SELEX method that allows one to obtain aptamers that bind to virtually any molecule of interest, providing a high specificity. Aptamers are an alternative to antibodies because on the one hand, their sensitivity is at a similar or sometimes even higher level, while on the other hand they do not show immunogenicity, and may be synthesized in vitro. To date, a broad range of different applications of aptamers has been described: as components of biosensors, or use in various laboratory techniques, such as microarrays or chromatography. One of the most important is the use of aptamers in medicine, especially in the fight against cancer. They can be used both for diagnosis and for the eradication of cancers - particularly through the delivery of drugs. Currently, most transport-related research is devoted to the delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs, such as doxorubicin. This was used in research on liver cancer cells, prostate, and acute lymphoblastic leukemia blast cells. Another possibility is to use aptamers to deliver siRNAs. In this way inhibition of the quality control process of the mRNA in tumor cells is possible. An aptamer complex with the drug allows for direct delivery of the active substance in a particular cell type, substantially eliminating the non-specific effect of the drug. PMID:27180958

  11. FASTR: A novel data format for concomitant representation of RNA sequence and secondary structure information.

    PubMed

    Bose, Tungadri; Dutta, Anirban; Mh, Mohammed; Gandhi, Hemang; Mande, Sharmila S

    2015-09-01

    Given the importance of RNA secondary structures in defining their biological role, it would be convenient for researchers seeking RNA data if both sequence and structural information pertaining to RNA molecules are made available together. Current nucleotide data repositories archive only RNA sequence data. Furthermore, storage formats which can frugally represent RNA sequence as well as structure data in a single file, are currently unavailable. This article proposes a novel storage format, 'FASTR', for concomitant representation of RNA sequence and structure. The storage efficiency of the proposed FASTR format has been evaluated using RNA data from various microorganisms. Results indicate that the size of FASTR formatted files (containing both RNA sequence as well as structure information) are equivalent to that of FASTA-format files, which contain only RNA sequence information. RNA secondary structure is typically represented using a combination of a string of nucleotide characters along with the corresponding dot-bracket notation indicating structural attributes. 'FASTR' - the novel storage format proposed in the present study enables a frugal representation of both RNA sequence and structural information in the form of a single string. In spite of having a relatively smaller storage footprint, the resultant 'fastr' string(s) retain all sequence as well as secondary structural information that could be stored using a dot-bracket notation. An implementation of the 'FASTR' methodology is available for download at http://metagenomics.atc.tcs.com/compression/fastr. PMID:26333403

  12. New wheat microRNA using whole-genome sequence.

    PubMed

    Kurtoglu, Kuaybe Yucebilgili; Kantar, Melda; Budak, Hikmet

    2014-06-01

    MicroRNAs are post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression, taking roles in a variety of fundamental biological processes. Hence, their identification, annotation and characterization are of great significance, especially in bread wheat, one of the main food sources for humans. The recent availability of 5× coverage Triticum aestivum L. whole-genome sequence provided us with the opportunity to perform a systematic prediction of a complete catalogue of wheat microRNAs. Using an in silico homology-based approach, stem-loop coding regions were derived from two assemblies, constructed from wheat 454 reads. To avoid the presence of pseudo-microRNAs in the final data set, transposable element related stem-loops were eliminated by repeat analysis. Overall, 52 putative wheat microRNAs were predicted, including seven, which have not been previously published. Moreover, with distinct analysis of the two different assemblies, both variety and representation of putative microRNA-coding stem-loops were found to be predominant in the intergenic regions. By searching available expressed sequences and small RNA library databases, expression evidence for 39 (out of 52) putative wheat microRNAs was provided. Expression of three of the predicted microRNAs (miR166, miR396 and miR528) was also comparatively quantified with real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCR. This is the first report on in silico prediction of a whole repertoire of bread wheat microRNAs, supported by the wet-lab validation. PMID:24395439

  13. RNA Sequencing Identifies Novel Translational Biomarkers of Kidney Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Craciun, Florin L; Bijol, Vanesa; Ajay, Amrendra K; Rao, Poornima; Kumar, Ramya K; Hutchinson, John; Hofmann, Oliver; Joshi, Nikita; Luyendyk, James P; Kusebauch, Ulrike; Moss, Christopher L; Srivastava, Anand; Himmelfarb, Jonathan; Waikar, Sushrut S; Moritz, Robert L; Vaidya, Vishal S

    2016-06-01

    CKD is the gradual, asymptomatic loss of kidney function, but current tests only identify CKD when significant loss has already happened. Several potential biomarkers of CKD have been reported, but none have been approved for preclinical or clinical use. Using RNA sequencing in a mouse model of folic acid-induced nephropathy, we identified ten genes that track kidney fibrosis development, the common pathologic finding in patients with CKD. The gene expression of all ten candidates was confirmed to be significantly higher (approximately ten- to 150-fold) in three well established, mechanistically distinct mouse models of kidney fibrosis than in models of nonfibrotic AKI. Protein expression of these genes was also high in the folic acid model and in patients with biopsy-proven kidney fibrosis. mRNA expression of the ten genes increased with increasing severity of kidney fibrosis, decreased in response to therapeutic intervention, and increased only modestly (approximately two- to five-fold) with liver fibrosis in mice and humans, demonstrating specificity for kidney fibrosis. Using targeted selected reaction monitoring mass spectrometry, we detected three of the ten candidates in human urine: cadherin 11 (CDH11), macrophage mannose receptor C1 (MRC1), and phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP). Furthermore, urinary levels of each of these three proteins distinguished patients with CKD (n=53) from healthy individuals (n=53; P<0.05). In summary, we report the identification of urinary CDH11, MRC1, and PLTP as novel noninvasive biomarkers of CKD. PMID:26449608

  14. Aptamers as a novel tool for diagnostics and therapy.

    PubMed

    Kadioglu, Onat; Malczyk, Anna Helena; Greten, Henry Johannes; Efferth, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Aptamers are short single-stranded DNA or RNA oligonucleotides that are capable of binding small molecules, proteins, or nucleotides with high specificity. They show a stable conformation and high binding affinity for their target molecules. There are numerous applications for aptamers in biotechnology, molecular diagnostics and targeted therapy of diseases. Their production is cheap, and they generally display lower immunogenicity than monoclonal antibodies. In the present review, we give an introduction to the preparation of aptamers and provide examples for their use in biotechnology, diagnostics and therapy of diseases. PMID:25637166

  15. Targeted RNA Sequencing Assay to Characterize Gene Expression and Genomic Alterations.

    PubMed

    Martin, Dorrelyn P; Miya, Jharna; Reeser, Julie W; Roychowdhury, Sameek

    2016-01-01

    RNA sequencing (RNAseq) is a versatile method that can be utilized to detect and characterize gene expression, mutations, gene fusions, and noncoding RNAs. Standard RNAseq requires 30 - 100 million sequencing reads and can include multiple RNA products such as mRNA and noncoding RNAs. We demonstrate how targeted RNAseq (capture) permits a focused study on selected RNA products using a desktop sequencer. RNAseq capture can characterize unannotated, low, or transiently expressed transcripts that may otherwise be missed using traditional RNAseq methods. Here we describe the extraction of RNA from cell lines, ribosomal RNA depletion, cDNA synthesis, preparation of barcoded libraries, hybridization and capture of targeted transcripts and multiplex sequencing on a desktop sequencer. We also outline the computational analysis pipeline, which includes quality control assessment, alignment, fusion detection, gene expression quantification and identification of single nucleotide variants. This assay allows for targeted transcript sequencing to characterize gene expression, gene fusions, and mutations. PMID:27585245

  16. Light-up and FRET aptamer reporters; evaluating their applications for imaging transcription in eukaryotic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ilgu, Muslum; Ray, Judhajeet; Bendickson, Lee; Wang, Tianjiao; Geraskin, Ivan M.; Kraus, George A.; Nilsen-Hamilton, Marit

    2015-12-17

    The regulation of RNA transcription is central to cellular function. Changes in gene expression drive differentiation and cellular responses to events such as injury. RNA trafficking can also have a large impact on protein expression and its localization. Thus, the ability to image RNA transcription and trafficking in real time and in living cells is a worthwhile goal that has been difficult to achieve. The availability of “light-up” aptamers that cause an increase in fluorescence of their ligands when bound by the aptamer have shown promise for reporting on RNA production and localization in vivo. Here we have investigated two light-up aptamers (the malachite green aptamer and the Spinach aptamers) for their suitabilities as reporters of RNA expression in vivo using two eukaryotic cell types, yeast and mammalian. Our analysis focused on the aptamer ligands, their contributions to background noise, and the impact of tandem aptamer strings on signal strength and ligand affinity. Whereas the background fluorescence is very low in vitro, this is not always true for cell imaging. Our results suggest the need for caution in using light-up aptamers as reporters for imaging RNA. In particular, images should be collected and analyzed by operators blinded to the sample identities. The appropriate control condition of ligand with the cells in the absence of aptamer expression must be included in each experiment. This control condition establishes that the specific interaction of ligand with aptamer, rather than nonspecific interactions with unknown cell elements, is responsible for the observed fluorescent signals. As a result, high background signals due to nonspecific interactions of aptamer ligands with cell components can be minimized by using IMAGEtags (Intracellular Multiaptamer GEnetic tags), which signal by FRET and are promising RNA reporters for imaging transcription.

  17. Light-up and FRET aptamer reporters; evaluating their applications for imaging transcription in eukaryotic cells

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ilgu, Muslum; Ray, Judhajeet; Bendickson, Lee; Wang, Tianjiao; Geraskin, Ivan M.; Kraus, George A.; Nilsen-Hamilton, Marit

    2015-12-17

    The regulation of RNA transcription is central to cellular function. Changes in gene expression drive differentiation and cellular responses to events such as injury. RNA trafficking can also have a large impact on protein expression and its localization. Thus, the ability to image RNA transcription and trafficking in real time and in living cells is a worthwhile goal that has been difficult to achieve. The availability of “light-up” aptamers that cause an increase in fluorescence of their ligands when bound by the aptamer have shown promise for reporting on RNA production and localization in vivo. Here we have investigated twomore » light-up aptamers (the malachite green aptamer and the Spinach aptamers) for their suitabilities as reporters of RNA expression in vivo using two eukaryotic cell types, yeast and mammalian. Our analysis focused on the aptamer ligands, their contributions to background noise, and the impact of tandem aptamer strings on signal strength and ligand affinity. Whereas the background fluorescence is very low in vitro, this is not always true for cell imaging. Our results suggest the need for caution in using light-up aptamers as reporters for imaging RNA. In particular, images should be collected and analyzed by operators blinded to the sample identities. The appropriate control condition of ligand with the cells in the absence of aptamer expression must be included in each experiment. This control condition establishes that the specific interaction of ligand with aptamer, rather than nonspecific interactions with unknown cell elements, is responsible for the observed fluorescent signals. As a result, high background signals due to nonspecific interactions of aptamer ligands with cell components can be minimized by using IMAGEtags (Intracellular Multiaptamer GEnetic tags), which signal by FRET and are promising RNA reporters for imaging transcription.« less

  18. Light-up and FRET aptamer reporters; evaluating their applications for imaging transcription in eukaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Ilgu, Muslum; Ray, Judhajeet; Bendickson, Lee; Wang, Tianjiao; Geraskin, Ivan M; Kraus, George A; Nilsen-Hamilton, Marit

    2016-04-01

    The regulation of RNA transcription is central to cellular function. Changes in gene expression drive differentiation and cellular responses to events such as injury. RNA trafficking can also have a large impact on protein expression and its localization. Thus, the ability to image RNA transcription and trafficking in real time and in living cells is a worthwhile goal that has been difficult to achieve. The availability of "light-up" aptamers that cause an increase in fluorescence of their ligands when bound by the aptamer have shown promise for reporting on RNA production and localization in vivo. Here we have investigated two light-up aptamers (the malachite green aptamer and the Spinach aptamers) for their suitabilities as reporters of RNA expression in vivo using two eukaryotic cell types, yeast and mammalian. Our analysis focused on the aptamer ligands, their contributions to background noise, and the impact of tandem aptamer strings on signal strength and ligand affinity. Whereas the background fluorescence is very low in vitro, this is not always true for cell imaging. Our results suggest the need for caution in using light-up aptamers as reporters for imaging RNA. In particular, images should be collected and analyzed by operators blinded to the sample identities. The appropriate control condition of ligand with the cells in the absence of aptamer expression must be included in each experiment. This control condition establishes that the specific interaction of ligand with aptamer, rather than nonspecific interactions with unknown cell elements, is responsible for the observed fluorescent signals. High background signals due to nonspecific interactions of aptamer ligands with cell components can be minimized by using IMAGEtags (Intracellular Multiaptamer GEnetic tags), which signal by FRET and are promising RNA reporters for imaging transcription. PMID:26707205

  19. Complete sequence and gene organization of the Nosema spodopterae rRNA gene.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Shu-Jen; Huang, Wei-Fone; Wang, Chung-Hsiung

    2005-01-01

    By sequencing the entire ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene of Nosema spodopterae, we show here that its gene organization follows a pattern similar to the Nosema type species, Nosema bombycis, i.e. 5'-large subunit rRNA (2,497 bp)-internal transcribed spacer (185 bp)-small subunit rRNA (1,232 bp)-intergenic spacer (277 bp)-5S rRNA (114 bp)-3'. Gene sequences and the secondary structures of large subunit rRNA, small subunit rRNA, and 5S rRNA are compared with the known corresponding sequences and structures of closely related microsporidia. The results suggest that the Nosema genus may be heterogeneous and that the rRNA gene organization may be a useful characteristic for determining which species are closely related to the type species. PMID:15702980

  20. International interlaboratory study comparing single organism 16S rRNA gene sequencing data: Beyond consensus sequence comparisons.

    PubMed

    Olson, Nathan D; Lund, Steven P; Zook, Justin M; Rojas-Cornejo, Fabiola; Beck, Brian; Foy, Carole; Huggett, Jim; Whale, Alexandra S; Sui, Zhiwei; Baoutina, Anna; Dobeson, Michael; Partis, Lina; Morrow, Jayne B

    2015-03-01

    This study presents the results from an interlaboratory sequencing study for which we developed a novel high-resolution method for comparing data from different sequencing platforms for a multi-copy, paralogous gene. The combination of PCR amplification and 16S ribosomal RNA gene (16S rRNA) sequencing has revolutionized bacteriology by enabling rapid identification, frequently without the need for culture. To assess variability between laboratories in sequencing 16S rRNA, six laboratories sequenced the gene encoding the 16S rRNA from Escherichia coli O157:H7 strain EDL933 and Listeria monocytogenes serovar 4b strain NCTC11994. Participants performed sequencing methods and protocols available in their laboratories: Sanger sequencing, Roche 454 pyrosequencing(®), or Ion Torrent PGM(®). The sequencing data were evaluated on three levels: (1) identity of biologically conserved position, (2) ratio of 16S rRNA gene copies featuring identified variants, and (3) the collection of variant combinations in a set of 16S rRNA gene copies. The same set of biologically conserved positions was identified for each sequencing method. Analytical methods using Bayesian and maximum likelihood statistics were developed to estimate variant copy ratios, which describe the ratio of nucleotides at each identified biologically variable position, as well as the likely set of variant combinations present in 16S rRNA gene copies. Our results indicate that estimated variant copy ratios at biologically variable positions were only reproducible for high throughput sequencing methods. Furthermore, the likely variant combination set was only reproducible with increased sequencing depth and longer read lengths. We also demonstrate novel methods for evaluating variable positions when comparing multi-copy gene sequence data from multiple laboratories generated using multiple sequencing technologies. PMID:27077030

  1. Improved Aptamers for the Diagnosis and Potential Treatment of HER2-Positive Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gijs, Marlies; Penner, Gregory; Blackler, Garth B.; Impens, Nathalie R.E.N.; Baatout, Sarah; Luxen, André; Aerts, An M.

    2016-01-01

    Aptamers provide a potential source of alternative targeting molecules for existing antibody diagnostics and therapeutics. In this work, we selected novel DNA aptamers targeting the HER2 receptor by an adherent whole-cell SELEX approach. Individual aptamers were identified by next generation sequencing and bioinformatics analysis. Two aptamers, HeA2_1 and HeA2_3, were shown to bind the HER2 protein with affinities in the nanomolar range. In addition, both aptamers were able to bind with high specificity to HER2-overexpressing cells and HER2-positive tumor tissue samples. Furthermore, we demonstrated that aptamer HeA2_3 is being internalized into cancer cells and has an inhibitory effect on cancer cell growth and viability. In the end, we selected novel DNA aptamers with great potential for the diagnosis and possible treatment of HER2-positive cancer. PMID:27213406

  2. Rationally Manipulating Aptamer Binding Affinities in a Stem-Loop Molecular Beacon

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Single-stranded DNA sequences that are highly specific for a target ligand are called aptamers. While the incorporation of aptamer sequences into stem-loop molecular beacons has become an essential tool in optical biosensors, the design principles that determine the magnitude of binding affinity and its relationship to placement of the aptamer sequence in the stem-loop architecture are not well defined. By controlled placement of the aptamer along the loop region of the molecular beacon, it is observed that the binding affinity can be tuned over 4 orders of magnitude (1.3 nM – 203 μM) for the Huizenga and Szostak ATP DNA aptamer sequence. It is observed that the Kd is enhanced for the fully exposed sequence, with reduced binding affinity when the aptamer is part of the stem region of the beacon. Analysis of the ΔG values indicate a clear correlation between the aptamer hybridized length in the stem and its observed Kd. The use of a nanometal surface energy transfer probe method for monitoring ATP binding to the aptamer sequence allows the observation of negative cooperativity between the two ATP binding events. Maintenance of the high binding affinity of this ATP aptamer and the observation of two separate Kd’s for ATP binding indicate NSET as an effective, nonmanipulative, optical method for tracking biomolecular changes. PMID:25170558

  3. Sequence analysis of a cluster of twenty-one tRNA genes in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed Central

    Green, C J; Vold, B S

    1983-01-01

    The DNA sequence of a cluster of twenty-one tRNA genes distal to a rRNA gene set in B. subtilis was determined. None of the tRNA genes are repeated in the sequence. The only classes of tRNAs that are not represented are those for cysteine, glutamine, tryptophan, and tyrosine. Three of the tRNA genes in this cluster do not have the 3'-CCA sequence encoded in the gene. There is no RNA polymerase terminator sequence in the region between the 5S gene and the first tRNA gene or within the tRNA gene cluster. A terminator sequence was found directly after the last tRNA gene. This rRNA and tRNA gene cluster probably represents one transcriptional unit. However, there may be an RNA polymerase promoter site within this sequence, which raises some interesting questions concerning the regulation of transcription for these tRNA genes. PMID:6310512

  4. Sequences far downstream from the classical tRNA promoter elements bind RNA polymerase III transcription factors.

    PubMed Central

    Young, L S; Rivier, D H; Sprague, K U

    1991-01-01

    We have examined the interaction of transcription factors TFIIIC and TFIIID with a silkworm alanine tRNA gene. Previous functional analysis showed that the promoter for this gene is unusually large compared with the classical tRNA promoter elements (the A and B boxes) and includes sequences downstream from the transcription termination site. The goal of the experiments reported here was to determine which sequences within the full promoter make stable contacts with transcription factors. We show that when TFIIIC and TFIIID are combined, a complex is formed with the tRNA(Ala)C gene. Neither factor alone can form this complex. DNase I digestion of gene-factor complexes reveals that most of the tRNA(Ala)C promoter is in contact with factors. The protected region extends from -1 to at least +136 and includes both the A and B boxes and the previously identified downstream promoter sequences. Analysis of mutant promoters shows that sequence-specific contacts throughout the protected region are required for binding. The role of 3'-flanking sequences in transcription factor binding explains the contribution of these sequences to the tRNA(Ala)C promoter. We discuss the possibility that such sequences affect promoter strength in other tRNA genes. Images PMID:1996100

  5. Aptamer-based nanobiosensors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeon Seok; Raston, Nurul Hanun Ahmad; Gu, Man Bock

    2016-02-15

    It has been more than two decades since aptamer and the systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) method were discovered by Larry Gold and Andrew Ellington in 1990, respectively. Based on the various advantages of aptamers, they have become a potent rival of antibodies in therapeutics and bio-analysis. Especially, the recent advances in aptamer biosensor application are remarkable due to its intrinsic properties of aptamers as nucleic acids and target induced conformational changes, in addition to the introduction of graphene oxide-based easy and simple immobilization-free screening method even for dual aptamers. In addition, the incorporation of various nanomaterials such as metallic nanoparticles, carbon materials, and functional nanospheres in aptasensors has facilitated the improvement of analytical performance and commercial application of aptasensors. In this review, recent prominent reports on aptasensors utilizing nanomaterials were introduced to understand the principle of aptamer-based biosensors and provide an insight for new strategies of aptasensors and the application of various nanomaterials. The perspective on aptamer-based biosensors and diagnostics was also discussed in view of technology and market. PMID:26139320

  6. A single DNA aptamer functions as a biosensor for ricin.

    PubMed

    Lamont, Elise A; He, Lili; Warriner, Keith; Labuza, Theodore P; Sreevatsan, Srinand

    2011-10-01

    The use of microorganisms or toxins as weapons of death and fear is not a novel concept; however, the modes by which these agents of bioterrorism are deployed are increasingly clever and insidious. One mechanism by which biothreats are readily disseminated is through a nation's food supply. Ricin, a toxin derived from the castor bean plant, displays a strong thermostability and remains active at acidic and alkaline pHs. Therefore, the CDC has assigned ricin as a category B reagent since it may be easily amendable as a deliberate food biocontaminate. Current tools for ricin detection utilize enzymatic activity, immunointeractions and presence of castor bean DNA. Many of these tools are confounded by complex food matrices, display a limited dynamic range of detection and/or lack specificity. Aptamers, short RNA and single stranded DNA sequences, have increased affinity to their selected receptors, experience little cross-reactivity to other homologous compounds and are currently being sought after as biosensors for bacterial contaminants in food. This paper describes the selection and characterization of a single, dominant aptamer, designated as SSRA1, against the B-chain of ricin. SSRA1 displays one folding conformation that is stable across 4-63 °C (ΔG = -5.05). SSRA1 is able to concentrate at least 30 ng mL(-1) of ricin B chain from several liquid food matrices and outcompetes a currently available ELISA kit and ricin aptamer. Furthermore, we show detection of 25 ng mL(-1) of intact ricin A-B complex using SSRA1 combined with surface enhanced Raman scattering technique. Thus, SSRA1 would serve well as pre-analytical tool for processing of ricin from liquid foods to aid current diagnostics as well as a sensor for direct ricin detection. PMID:21748194

  7. Real-Time PCR-Coupled CE-SELEX for DNA Aptamer Selection

    PubMed Central

    Ruff, Patrick; Pai, Rekha B.; Storici, Francesca

    2012-01-01

    Aptamers are short nucleic acid or peptide sequences capable of binding to a target molecule with high specificity and affinity. Also known as “artificial antibodies,” aptamers provide many advantages over antibodies. One of the major hurdles to aptamer isolation is the initial time and effort needed for selection. The systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) is the traditional procedure for generating aptamers, but this process is lengthy and requires a large quantity of target and starting aptamer library. A relatively new procedure for generating aptamers using capillary electrophoresis (CE), known as CE-SELEX, is faster and more efficient than SELEX but requires laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) to detect the aptamer-target complexes. Here, we implemented an alternative system without LIF using real-time- (RT-) PCR to indirectly measure aptamer-target complexes. In three rounds of selection, as opposed to ten or more rounds common in SELEX protocols, a specific aptamer for bovine serum albumin (BSA) was obtained. The specificity of the aptamer to BSA was confirmed by electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs), an unlabeled competitor assay, and by a supershift assay. The system used here provides a cost effective and a highly efficient means of generating aptamers. PMID:27335672

  8. Optimal terminal sequences for continuous or serial isothermal amplification of dsRNA with norovirus RNA replicase.

    PubMed

    Arai, Hidenao; Nishigaki, Koichi; Nemoto, Naoto; Suzuki, Miho; Husimi, Yuzuru

    2014-01-01

    The norovirus RNA replicase (NV3D(pol), 56 kDa, single chain monomeric protein) can amplify double-stranded (ds) RNA isothermally. It will play an alternative role in the in vitro evolution against traditional Qβ RNA replicase, which cannot amplify dsRNA and consists of four subunits, three of which are borrowed from host E.coli. In order to identify the optimal 3'-terminal sequence of the RNA template for NV3D(pol), an in vitro selection using the serial transfer was performed for a random library having the 3'-terminal sequence of ---UUUUUUNNNN-3'. The population landscape on the 4-dimensional sequence space of the 17(th) round of transfer gave a main peak around ---CAAC-3'. In the preceding studies on the batch amplification reaction starting from a single-stranded RNA, a template with 3'-terminal C-stretch was amplified effectively. It was confirmed that in the batch amplification the ---CCC-3' was much more effective than the ---CAAC-3', but in the serial transfer condition in which the ----CAAC-3' was sustained stably, the ---CCC-3' was washed out. Based on these results we proposed the existence of the "shuttle mode" replication of dsRNA. We also proposed the optimal terminal sequences of RNA for in vitro evolution with NV3D(pol). PMID:27493494

  9. Optimal terminal sequences for continuous or serial isothermal amplification of dsRNA with norovirus RNA replicase

    PubMed Central

    Arai, Hidenao; Nishigaki, Koichi; Nemoto, Naoto; Suzuki, Miho; Husimi, Yuzuru

    2014-01-01

    The norovirus RNA replicase (NV3Dpol, 56 kDa, single chain monomeric protein) can amplify double-stranded (ds) RNA isothermally. It will play an alternative role in the in vitro evolution against traditional Qβ RNA replicase, which cannot amplify dsRNA and consists of four subunits, three of which are borrowed from host E.coli. In order to identify the optimal 3′-terminal sequence of the RNA template for NV3Dpol, an in vitro selection using the serial transfer was performed for a random library having the 3′-terminal sequence of ---UUUUUUNNNN-3′. The population landscape on the 4-dimensional sequence space of the 17th round of transfer gave a main peak around ---CAAC-3′. In the preceding studies on the batch amplification reaction starting from a single-stranded RNA, a template with 3′-terminal C-stretch was amplified effectively. It was confirmed that in the batch amplification the ---CCC-3′ was much more effective than the ---CAAC-3′, but in the serial transfer condition in which the ----CAAC-3′ was sustained stably, the ---CCC-3′ was washed out. Based on these results we proposed the existence of the “shuttle mode” replication of dsRNA. We also proposed the optimal terminal sequences of RNA for in vitro evolution with NV3Dpol. PMID:27493494

  10. Fiber optic biosensor using aptamer as receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Shuqin; Cai, Xiaokun; Tan, Xianglin; Zhu, Yexiang; Lu, Bin

    2001-09-01

    Reagentless biosensor that can directly transducer molecular recognition to optical signal should potentiate the development of sensor array fora wide variety of analytes. Nucleic acid aptamer can bind ligand tightly and specifically with conformational change of aptamer, and can be used as a receptor in biosensor. We have therefore developed a fiber-optic biosensor by aptamer connected with molecular beacon. Molecular beacons consist of an oligonucleotide sequence containing complementary sequence sections at either end. These two sequence containing segments base pair with each other to form a hairpin shaped loop structure, the fluorophore and quencher were attached at 5 foot- and 3 foot-end of molecular beacon respectively. When thrombin binding to the stem-loop of molecular beacon aptamer, the pseudoknot structure was interrupted, resulting a release of fluorescence from quenching and a increase in fluorescence emission. This novel biosensor system in this project has a large potential and is specific and sensitivity. A similar strategy could be used to study other analytes such as protein and small molecules.

  11. Aptamer binding and neutralization of β1-adrenoceptor autoantibodies: basics and a vision of its future in cardiomyopathy treatment.

    PubMed

    Haberland, Annekathrin; Wallukat, Gerd; Schimke, Ingolf

    2011-08-01

    Autoantibodies directed against the second extracellular receptor loop of the β(1) receptor (β(1)-ECII-AABs) that belong to the superfamily of G protein-coupled receptors have been frequently found in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy, Chagas' cardiomyopathy, and peripartum cardiomyopathy and have been clearly evidenced to be related to disease pathogenesis. Consequently, specific proteins or peptides used as binders in immunoapheresis or as in vivo neutralizers of β(1)-ECII-AABs have been suggested for patient treatment. Aptamers, which are target specifically selected short single- or double-stranded RNA or DNA sequences, are a recently introduced new molecule class applicable to bind and neutralize diverse molecule species, including antibodies. This article reviews selection technologies and characteristics of aptamers with respect to a single-stranded DNA aptamer recently identified as having a very high affinity against β(1)-ECII-AABs. The potential of this aptamer for the elimination of β(1)-ECII-AABs and in vivo neutralization is critically analyzed in view of its potential for future use in cardiomyopathy treatment. PMID:22814426

  12. Equally parsimonious pathways through an RNA sequence space are not equally likely

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Y. H.; DSouza, L. M.; Fox, G. E.

    1997-01-01

    An experimental system for determining the potential ability of sequences resembling 5S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) to perform as functional 5S rRNAs in vivo in the Escherichia coli cellular environment was devised previously. Presumably, the only 5S rRNA sequences that would have been fixed by ancestral populations are ones that were functionally valid, and hence the actual historical paths taken through RNA sequence space during 5S rRNA evolution would have most likely utilized valid sequences. Herein, we examine the potential validity of all sequence intermediates along alternative equally parsimonious trajectories through RNA sequence space which connect two pairs of sequences that had previously been shown to behave as valid 5S rRNAs in E. coli. The first trajectory requires a total of four changes. The 14 sequence intermediates provide 24 apparently equally parsimonious paths by which the transition could occur. The second trajectory involves three changes, six intermediate sequences, and six potentially equally parsimonious paths. In total, only eight of the 20 sequence intermediates were found to be clearly invalid. As a consequence of the position of these invalid intermediates in the sequence space, seven of the 30 possible paths consisted of exclusively valid sequences. In several cases, the apparent validity/invalidity of the intermediate sequences could not be anticipated on the basis of current knowledge of the 5S rRNA structure. This suggests that the interdependencies in RNA sequence space may be more complex than currently appreciated. If ancestral sequences predicted by parsimony are to be regarded as actual historical sequences, then the present results would suggest that they should also satisfy a validity requirement and that, in at least limited cases, this conjecture can be tested experimentally.

  13. Selection of 2′-deoxy-2′-fluoroarabinonucleotide (FANA) aptamers that bind HIV-1 reverse transcriptase with picomolar affinity

    PubMed Central

    Alves Ferreira-Bravo, Irani; Cozens, Christopher; Holliger, Philipp; DeStefano, Jeffrey J.

    2015-01-01

    Using a Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment (SELEX) protocol capable of selecting xeno-nucleic acid (XNA) aptamers, a 2′-deoxy-2′-fluoroarabinonucleotide (FANA) aptamer (referred to as FA1) to HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (HIV-1 RT) was selected. FA1 bound HIV-1 RT with KD,app values in the low pM range under different ionic conditions. Comparisons to published HIV-1 RT RNA and DNA aptamers indicated that FA1 bound at least as well as these aptamers. FA1 contained a 20 nucleotide 5′ DNA sequence followed by a 57 nucleotide region of FANA nucleotides. Removal of the fourteen 5′ DNA nucleotides did not affect binding. FA1's predicted structure was composed of four stems and four loops. All stem nucleotides could be modified to G-C base pairs (14 total changes) with a small effect on binding. Eliminating or altering most loop sequences reduced or abolished tight binding. Overall, results suggested that the structure and the sequence of FA1 were important for binding. FA1 showed strong inhibition of HIV-1 RT in extension assays while no specific binding to avian myeloblastosis or Moloney murine leukemia RTs was detected. A complete DNA version of FA1 showed low binding to HIV-1 RT, emphasizing the unique properties of FANA in HIV-1 RT binding. PMID:26476448

  14. High-throughput-sequencing-based identification of a grapevine fanleaf virus satellite RNA in Vitis vinifera.

    PubMed

    Chiumenti, Michela; Mohorianu, Irina; Roseti, Vincenzo; Saldarelli, Pasquale; Dalmay, Tamas; Minafra, Angelantonio

    2016-05-01

    A new satellite RNA (satRNA) of grapevine fanleaf virus (GFLV) was identified by high-throughput sequencing of high-definition (HD) adapter libraries from grapevine plants of the cultivar Panse precoce (PPE) affected by enation disease. The complete nucleotide sequence was obtained by automatic sequencing using primers designed based on next-generation sequencing (NGS) data. The full-length sequence, named satGFLV-PPE, consisted of 1119 nucleotides with a single open reading frame from position 15 to 1034. This satRNA showed maximum nucleotide sequence identity of 87 % to satArMV-86 and satGFLV-R6. Symptomatic grapevines were surveyed for the presence of the satRNA, and no correlation was found between detection of the satRNA and enation symptom expression. PMID:26873812

  15. Nucleotide sequence of 5S ribosomal RNA from Aspergillus nidulans and Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed Central

    Piechulla, B; Hahn, U; McLaughlin, L W; Küntzel, H

    1981-01-01

    The nucleotide sequences of 5S rRNA molecules isolated from the cytosol and the mitochondria of the ascomycetes A. nidulans and N. crassa were determined by partial chemical cleavage of 3'-terminally labelled RNA. The sequence identity of the cytosolic and mitochondrial RNA preparations confirms the absence of mitochondrion-specific 5S rRNA in these fungi. The sequences of the two organisms differ in 35 positions, and each sequence differs from yeast 5S rRNA in 44 positions. Both molecules contain the sequence GCUC in place of GAAC or GAUY found in all other 5S rRNAs, indicating that this region is not universally involved in base-pairing to the invariant GTpsiC sequence of tRNAs. Images PMID:6453331

  16. Inhibition of hepatitis C virus infection by NS5A-specific aptamer.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaoyan; Gao, Yimin; Xue, Binbin; Wang, Xiaohong; Yang, Darong; Qin, Yuwen; Yu, Rong; Liu, Nianli; Xu, Li; Fang, Xiaohong; Zhu, Haizhen

    2014-06-01

    To increase efficacy of hepatitis C treatment, future regiments will incorporate multiple direct-acting antiviral drugs. HCV NS5A protein was expressed and purified. Aptamers against NS5A were screened and obtained by the selective evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment approach and the antiviral actions of the aptamers were tested. The mechanisms through which the aptamers exert their antiviral activity were explored. The aptamers NS5A-4 and NS5A-5 inhibit HCV RNA replication and infectious virus production without causing cytotoxicity in human hepatocytes. The aptamers do not affect hepatitis B virus replication in HepG2.2.15 cells. Interferon beta (IFN-β) and interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) are not induced by the aptamers in HCV-infected hepatocytes. Further study shows that domain I and domain III of NS5A protein are involved in the suppression of HCV RNA replication and infectious virus production by NS5A-4. Y2105H within NS5A is the major resistance mutation identified. NS5A aptamer disrupts the interaction of NS5A with core protein. The data suggest that the aptamers against NS5A protein may exert antiviral effects through inhibiting viral RNA replication, preventing the interaction of NS5A with core protein. Aptamers for NS5A may be used to understand the mechanisms of virus replication and assembly and served as potential therapeutic agents for hepatitis C. PMID:24713119

  17. Detection of mRNA sequences in nuclear 30S ribonucleoprotein subcomplexes.

    PubMed Central

    Kinniburgh, A J; Martin, T E

    1976-01-01

    RNA from nuclear 30S ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes of mouse ascites cells has been shows to contain sequences homologous to poly(A) + mRNA by its ability to hybridize with complementary DNA prepared from poly(A) + mRNA template. Analysis of the hybridization kinetics of poly(A) + mRNA with its own complementary DNA revealed several abundancy classes. The total complexity of poly(A) + mRNA from ascites cells was estimated to be approximately 30,000 sequences of average molecular weight (6 X 10(5)). When the hybridization reaction of 30S RNP-RNA with mRNA-specific cDNA was compared to the homologous reaction the majority, and most probably all, of the poly(A) + mRNA sequences were found to be present in the RNA. The kinetics of hybridization suggest that 10-15% of the RNA in this RNP complex is homologous to poly(A) + mRNA. The 30S RNP subcomplexes therefore contain nuclear poly(A) + mRNA sequences as well as the bulk of heterogeneous RNA. PMID:1066686

  18. Dual-colour imaging of RNAs using quencher- and fluorophore-binding aptamers.

    PubMed

    Arora, Ankita; Sunbul, Murat; Jäschke, Andres

    2015-12-01

    In order to gain deeper insight into the functions and dynamics of RNA in cells, the development of methods for imaging multiple RNAs simultaneously is of paramount importance. Here, we describe a modular approach to image RNA in living cells using an RNA aptamer that binds to dinitroaniline, an efficient general contact quencher. Dinitroaniline quenches the fluorescence of different fluorophores when directly conjugated to them via ethylene glycol linkers by forming a non-fluorescent intramolecular complex. Since the binding of the RNA aptamer to the quencher destroys the fluorophore-quencher complex, fluorescence increases dramatically upon binding. Using this principle, a series of fluorophores were turned into fluorescent turn-on probes by conjugating them to dinitroaniline. These probes ranged from fluorescein-dinitroaniline (green) to TexasRed-dinitroaniline (red) spanning across the visible spectrum. The dinitroaniline-binding aptamer (DNB) was generated by in vitro selection, and was found to bind all probes, leading to fluorescence increase in vitro and in living cells. When expressed in E. coli, the DNB aptamer could be labelled and visualized with different-coloured fluorophores and therefore it can be used as a genetically encoded tag to image target RNAs. Furthermore, combining contact-quenched fluorogenic probes with orthogonal DNB (the quencher-binding RNA aptamer) and SRB-2 aptamers (a fluorophore-binding RNA aptamer) allowed dual-colour imaging of two different fluorescence-enhancing RNA tags in living cells, opening new avenues for studying RNA co-localization and trafficking. PMID:26175046

  19. Identification of the target binding site of ethanolamine-binding aptamers and its exploitation for ethanolamine detection.

    PubMed

    Heilkenbrinker, Alexandra; Reinemann, Christine; Stoltenburg, Regina; Walter, Johanna-Gabriela; Jochums, André; Stahl, Frank; Zimmermann, Stefan; Strehlitz, Beate; Scheper, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Aptamers are promising recognition elements for sensitive and specific detection of small molecules. We have previously selected ssDNA aptamers for ethanolamine, one of the smallest aptamer targets so far. The work presented here focuses on the determination of the binding region within the aptamer structure and its exploitation for the development of an aptamer-based assay for detection of ethanolamine. Sequence analysis of the aptamers resulted in the identification of a G-rich consensus sequence, which was able to fold in a typical two- or three-layered G-quartet structure. Experiments with stepwise truncated variants of the aptamers revealed that the consensus sequence is responsible and sufficient for binding to the target. On the basis of the knowledge of the aptamers binding site, we developed an aptamer-based microarray assay relying on competition between ethanolamine and an oligonucleotide complementary to the consensus sequence. Competitive binding of ethanolamine and fluorescently labeled complementary oligonucleotides resulted in fluorescence intensities dependent on ethanolamine concentration with a limit of detection of 10 pM. This method enables detection of small molecules without any labeling of analytes. The competitive assay could potentially be transferred to other aptamers and thus provides a promising system for aptamer-based detection of diverse small molecules. PMID:25435319

  20. 5S rRNA sequences from four marine invertebrates and implications for base pairing models of metazoan sequences.

    PubMed

    Walker, W F; Doolittle, W F

    1983-08-11

    The nucleotide sequences of 5S rRNAs from the starfish Asterias vulgaris, the squid Illex illecebrosus, the sipunculid Phascolopsis gouldii and the jellyfish Aurelia aurita were determined. The sequence from Asterias lends support for one of two previous base pairing models for helix E in metazoan sequences. The Aurelia sequence differs by five nucleotides from that previously reported and does not violate the consensus secondary structure model for eukaryotic 5S rRNA. PMID:6136024

  1. Aptamer-aptamer linkage based aptasensor for highly enhanced detection of small molecules.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Van-Thuan; Lee, Bang Hyun; Kim, Sang Hoon; Gu, Man Bock

    2016-06-01

    The multi-target colorimetric aptasensors can be easily fabricated by using two different aptamer sequences. However, there have been no research reports about improvement or enhancing of colorimetric signals based on the aggregation properties of AuNPs. Herein, we report a simple and efficient method to control and enhance the function of the multi-target aptasensor using an aptamer-aptamer linkage method. The aptasensor was developed for highly sensitive multiple-target detection of small molecules. The extension of aptamer DNA sequences using this method resulted in the enhanced analytical sensitivity of this aptasensor in sensing applications for two small molecule targets. Furthermore, the mechanism of the interaction between DNA aptamer and AuNPs was studied by measuring the zeta potential to explain the enhancement of the sensitivity of this multi-target aptasensor. The limit of detection of this multi-target aptasensor was found to be 1 nM and 37 nM for kanamycin (KAN) and chlortetracycline (CHLOR), respectively. It is 25-fold lower than in the previous report using an AuNP-based sensor for defining the limit of detection (LOD) of KAN and five times lower than the LOD for CHLOR. This aptasensor has great potential in the simultaneous detection of a wide range of KAN and CHLOR concentrations. PMID:27221154

  2. Maternal Plasma DNA and RNA Sequencing for Prenatal Testing.

    PubMed

    Tamminga, Saskia; van Maarle, Merel; Henneman, Lidewij; Oudejans, Cees B M; Cornel, Martina C; Sistermans, Erik A

    2016-01-01

    Cell-free DNA (cfDNA) testing has recently become indispensable in diagnostic testing and screening. In the prenatal setting, this type of testing is often called noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT). With a number of techniques, using either next-generation sequencing or single nucleotide polymorphism-based approaches, fetal cfDNA in maternal plasma can be analyzed to screen for rhesus D genotype, common chromosomal aneuploidies, and increasingly for testing other conditions, including monogenic disorders. With regard to screening for common aneuploidies, challenges arise when implementing NIPT in current prenatal settings. Depending on the method used (targeted or nontargeted), chromosomal anomalies other than trisomy 21, 18, or 13 can be detected, either of fetal or maternal origin, also referred to as unsolicited or incidental findings. For various biological reasons, there is a small chance of having either a false-positive or false-negative NIPT result, or no result, also referred to as a "no-call." Both pre- and posttest counseling for NIPT should include discussing potential discrepancies. Since NIPT remains a screening test, a positive NIPT result should be confirmed by invasive diagnostic testing (either by chorionic villus biopsy or by amniocentesis). As the scope of NIPT is widening, professional guidelines need to discuss the ethics of what to offer and how to offer. In this review, we discuss the current biochemical, clinical, and ethical challenges of cfDNA testing in the prenatal setting and its future perspectives including novel applications that target RNA instead of DNA. PMID:27117661

  3. Distinct tmRNA sequence elements facilitate RNase R engagement on rescued ribosomes for selective nonstop mRNA decay

    PubMed Central

    Venkataraman, Krithika; Zafar, Hina; Karzai, A. Wali

    2014-01-01

    trans-Translation, orchestrated by SmpB and tmRNA, is the principal eubacterial pathway for resolving stalled translation complexes. RNase R, the leading nonstop mRNA surveillance factor, is recruited to stalled ribosomes in a trans-translation dependent process. To elucidate the contributions of SmpB and tmRNA to RNase R recruitment, we evaluated Escherichia coli–Francisella tularensis chimeric variants of tmRNA and SmpB. This evaluation showed that while the hybrid tmRNA supported nascent polypeptide tagging and ribosome rescue, it suffered defects in facilitating RNase R recruitment to stalled ribosomes. To gain further insights, we used established tmRNA and SmpB variants that impact distinct stages of the trans-translation process. Analysis of select tmRNA variants revealed that the sequence composition and positioning of the ultimate and penultimate codons of the tmRNA ORF play a crucial role in recruiting RNase R to rescued ribosomes. Evaluation of defined SmpB C-terminal tail variants highlighted the importance of establishing the tmRNA reading frame, and provided valuable clues into the timing of RNase R recruitment to rescued ribosomes. Taken together, these studies demonstrate that productive RNase R-ribosomes engagement requires active trans-translation, and suggest that RNase R captures the emerging nonstop mRNA at an early stage after establishment of the tmRNA ORF as the surrogate mRNA template. PMID:25200086

  4. Aptamers against pathogenic microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Davydova, Anna; Vorobjeva, Maria; Pyshnyi, Dmitrii; Altman, Sidney; Vlassov, Valentin; Venyaminova, Alya

    2016-11-01

    An important current issue of modern molecular medicine and biotechnology is the search for new approaches to early diagnostic assays and adequate therapy of infectious diseases. One of the promising solutions to this problem might be a development of nucleic acid aptamers capable of interacting specifically with bacteria, protozoa, and viruses. Such aptamers can be used for the specific recognition of infectious agents as well as for blocking of their functions. The present review summarizes various modern SELEX techniques used in this field, and of several currently identified aptamers against viral particles and unicellular organisms, and their applications. The prospects of applying nucleic acid aptamers for the development of novel detection systems and antibacterial and antiviral drugs are discussed. PMID:26258445

  5. Inhibition of hepatitis C virus production by aptamers against the core protein.

    PubMed

    Shi, Shali; Yu, Xiaoyan; Gao, Yimin; Xue, Binbin; Wu, Xinjiao; Wang, Xiaohong; Yang, Darong; Zhu, Haizhen

    2014-02-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein is essential for virus assembly. HCV core protein was expressed and purified. Aptamers against core protein were raised through the selective evolution of ligands by the exponential enrichment approach. Detection of HCV infection by core aptamers and the antiviral activities of aptamers were characterized. The mechanism of their anti-HCV activity was determined. The data showed that selected aptamers against core specifically recognize the recombinant core protein but also can detect serum samples from hepatitis C patients. Aptamers have no effect on HCV RNA replication in the infectious cell culture system. However, the aptamers inhibit the production of infectious virus particles. Beta interferon (IFN-β) and interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) are not induced in virally infected hepatocytes by aptamers. Domains I and II of core protein are involved in the inhibition of infectious virus production by the aptamers. V31A within core is the major resistance mutation identified. Further study shows that the aptamers disrupt the localization of core with lipid droplets and NS5A and perturb the association of core protein with viral RNA. The data suggest that aptamers against HCV core protein inhibit infectious virus production by disrupting the localization of core with lipid droplets and NS5A and preventing the association of core protein with viral RNA. The aptamers for core protein may be used to understand the mechanisms of virus assembly. Core-specific aptamers may hold promise for development as early diagnostic reagents and potential therapeutic agents for chronic hepatitis C. PMID:24307579

  6. Characterising the Canine Oral Microbiome by Direct Sequencing of Reverse-Transcribed rRNA Molecules.

    PubMed

    McDonald, James E; Larsen, Niels; Pennington, Andrea; Connolly, John; Wallis, Corrin; Rooks, David J; Hall, Neil; McCarthy, Alan J; Allison, Heather E

    2016-01-01

    PCR amplification and sequencing of phylogenetic markers, primarily Small Sub-Unit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) genes, has been the paradigm for defining the taxonomic composition of microbiomes. However, 'universal' SSU rRNA gene PCR primer sets are likely to miss much of the diversity therein. We sequenced a library comprising purified and reverse-transcribed SSU rRNA (RT-SSU rRNA) molecules from the canine oral microbiome and compared it to a general bacterial 16S rRNA gene PCR amplicon library generated from the same biological sample. In addition, we have developed BIONmeta, a novel, open-source, computer package for the processing and taxonomic classification of the randomly fragmented RT-SSU rRNA reads produced. Direct RT-SSU rRNA sequencing revealed that 16S rRNA molecules belonging to the bacterial phyla Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, Proteobacteria and Spirochaetes, were most abundant in the canine oral microbiome (92.5% of total bacterial SSU rRNA). The direct rRNA sequencing approach detected greater taxonomic diversity (1 additional phylum, 2 classes, 1 order, 10 families and 61 genera) when compared with general bacterial 16S rRNA amplicons from the same sample, simultaneously provided SSU rRNA gene inventories of Bacteria, Archaea and Eukarya, and detected significant numbers of sequences not recognised by 'universal' primer sets. Proteobacteria and Spirochaetes were found to be under-represented by PCR-based analysis of the microbiome, and this was due to primer mismatches and taxon-specific variations in amplification efficiency, validated by qPCR analysis of 16S rRNA amplicons from a mock community. This demonstrated the veracity of direct RT-SSU rRNA sequencing for molecular microbial ecology. PMID:27276347

  7. Characterising the Canine Oral Microbiome by Direct Sequencing of Reverse-Transcribed rRNA Molecules

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, James E.; Larsen, Niels; Pennington, Andrea; Connolly, John; Wallis, Corrin; Rooks, David J.; Hall, Neil; McCarthy, Alan J.; Allison, Heather E.

    2016-01-01

    PCR amplification and sequencing of phylogenetic markers, primarily Small Sub-Unit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) genes, has been the paradigm for defining the taxonomic composition of microbiomes. However, ‘universal’ SSU rRNA gene PCR primer sets are likely to miss much of the diversity therein. We sequenced a library comprising purified and reverse-transcribed SSU rRNA (RT-SSU rRNA) molecules from the canine oral microbiome and compared it to a general bacterial 16S rRNA gene PCR amplicon library generated from the same biological sample. In addition, we have developed BIONmeta, a novel, open-source, computer package for the processing and taxonomic classification of the randomly fragmented RT-SSU rRNA reads produced. Direct RT-SSU rRNA sequencing revealed that 16S rRNA molecules belonging to the bacterial phyla Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, Proteobacteria and Spirochaetes, were most abundant in the canine oral microbiome (92.5% of total bacterial SSU rRNA). The direct rRNA sequencing approach detected greater taxonomic diversity (1 additional phylum, 2 classes, 1 order, 10 families and 61 genera) when compared with general bacterial 16S rRNA amplicons from the same sample, simultaneously provided SSU rRNA gene inventories of Bacteria, Archaea and Eukarya, and detected significant numbers of sequences not recognised by ‘universal’ primer sets. Proteobacteria and Spirochaetes were found to be under-represented by PCR-based analysis of the microbiome, and this was due to primer mismatches and taxon-specific variations in amplification efficiency, validated by qPCR analysis of 16S rRNA amplicons from a mock community. This demonstrated the veracity of direct RT-SSU rRNA sequencing for molecular microbial ecology. PMID:27276347

  8. Tetrathiobacter kashmirensis Strain CA-1 16S rRNA gene complete sequence.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study used 1326 base pair 16S rRNA gene sequence methods to confirm the identification of a bacterium as Tetrathiobacter kashmirensis. Morphological, biochemical characteristics, and fatty acid profiles are consistent with the 16S rRNA gene sequence identification of the bacterium. The isolate...

  9. Aptamer-Gated Nanoparticles for Smart Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Ozalp, Veli Cengiz; Eyidogan, Fusun; Oktem, Huseyin Avni

    2011-01-01

    Aptamers are functional nucleic acid sequences which can bind specific targets. An artificial combinatorial methodology can identify aptamer sequences for any target molecule, from ions to whole cells. Drug delivery systems seek to increase efficacy and reduce side-effects by concentrating the therapeutic agents at specific disease sites in the body. This is generally achieved by specific targeting of inactivated drug molecules. Aptamers which can bind to various cancer cell types selectively and with high affinity have been exploited in a variety of drug delivery systems for therapeutic purposes. Recent progress in selection of cell-specific aptamers has provided new opportunities in targeted drug delivery. Especially functionalization of nanoparticles with such aptamers has drawn major attention in the biosensor and biomedical areas. Moreover, nucleic acids are recognized as an attractive building materials in nanomachines because of their unique molecular recognition properties and structural features. A active controlled delivery of drugs once targeted to a disease site is a major research challenge. Stimuli-responsive gating is one way of achieving controlled release of nanoparticle cargoes. Recent reports incorporate the structural properties of aptamers in controlled release systems of drug delivering nanoparticles. In this review, the strategies for using functional nucleic acids in creating smart drug delivery devices will be explained. The main focus will be on aptamer-incorporated nanoparticle systems for drug delivery purposes in order to assess the future potential of aptamers in the therapeutic area. Special emphasis will be given to the very recent progress in controlled drug release based on molecular gating achieved with aptamers.

  10. In silico detection of tRNA sequence features characteristic to aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase class membership

    PubMed Central

    Jakó, Éena; Ittzés, Péter; Szenes, Áron; Kun, Ádám; Szathmáry, Eörs; Pál, Gábor

    2007-01-01

    Aminoacyl tRNA synthetases (aaRS) are grouped into Class I and II based on primary and tertiary structure and enzyme properties suggesting two independent phylogenetic lineages. Analogously, tRNA molecules can also form two respective classes, based on the class membership of their corresponding aaRS. Although some aaRS–tRNA interactions are not extremely specific and require editing mechanisms to avoid misaminoacylation, most aaRS–tRNA interactions are rather stereospecific. Thus, class-specific aaRS features could be mirrored by class-specific tRNA features. However, previous investigations failed to detect conserved class-specific nucleotides. Here we introduce a discrete mathematical approach that evaluates not only class-specific ‘strictly present’, but also ‘strictly absent’ nucleotides. The disjoint subsets of these elements compose a unique partition, named extended consensus partition (ECP). By analyzing the ECP for both Class I and II tDNA sets from 50 (13 archaeal, 30 bacterial and 7 eukaryotic) species, we could demonstrate that class-specific tRNA sequence features do exist, although not in terms of strictly conserved nucleotides as it had previously been anticipated. This finding demonstrates that important information was hidden in tRNA sequences inaccessible for traditional statistical methods. The ECP analysis might contribute to the understanding of tRNA evolution and could enrich the sequence analysis tool repertoire. PMID:17704131

  11. HIGH SEQUENCE DIVERSITY IN THE RNA SYNTHESIZED AT THE LAMPBRUSH STAGE OF OÖGENESIS*

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Eric H.; Hough, Barbara R.

    1969-01-01

    Many diverse RNA's are synthesized in the lampbrush stage oöcyte of Xenopus, as shown by the presence of different nucleotide sequences in the RNA population. This fact has been established by hybridizing lampbrush stage oöcyte RNA with an isolated nonrepetitive fraction of Xenopus DNA. Images PMID:5257126

  12. High sequence diversity in the RNA synthesized at the lampbrush stage of oögenesis.

    PubMed

    Davidson, E H; Hough, B R

    1969-06-01

    Many diverse RNA's are synthesized in the lampbrush stage oöcyte of Xenopus, as shown by the presence of different nucleotide sequences in the RNA population. This fact has been established by hybridizing lampbrush stage oöcyte RNA with an isolated nonrepetitive fraction of Xenopus DNA. PMID:5257126

  13. Profiling miRNA Expression in Bovine Tissues by Deep Sequencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    miRNA are short RNA sequences ( ~ 21 nt long) that have been recently identified and were found to play an important role in gene regulation and controlling major cellular processes. Several miRNA are found to be evolutionarily conserved among the mammalian species. Some miRNAs are even conserved be...

  14. Transcription profile of boar spermatozoa as revealed by RNA-sequencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) overcomes the limitations of the current hybridization-based techniques to detect the actual pool of RNA transcripts in spermatozoa. The application of this technology in livestock can speed the discovery of potential predictors of male fertility. As a first ...

  15. Strand-specific libraries for high throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) prepared without poly(A) selection

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background High throughput DNA sequencing technology has enabled quantification of all the RNAs in a cell or tissue, a method widely known as RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq). However, non-coding RNAs such as rRNA are highly abundant and can consume >70% of sequencing reads. A common approach is to extract only polyadenylated mRNA; however, such approaches are blind to RNAs with short or no poly(A) tails, leading to an incomplete view of the transcriptome. Another challenge of preparing RNA-Seq libraries is to preserve the strand information of the RNAs. Design Here, we describe a procedure for preparing RNA-Seq libraries from 1 to 4 μg total RNA without poly(A) selection. Our method combines the deoxyuridine triphosphate (dUTP)/uracil-DNA glycosylase (UDG) strategy to achieve strand specificity with AMPure XP magnetic beads to perform size selection. Together, these steps eliminate gel purification, allowing a library to be made in less than two days. We barcode each library during the final PCR amplification step, allowing several samples to be sequenced in a single lane without sacrificing read length. Libraries prepared using this protocol are compatible with Illumina GAII, GAIIx and HiSeq 2000 platforms. Discussion The RNA-Seq protocol described here yields strand-specific transcriptome libraries without poly(A) selection, which provide approximately 90% mappable sequences. Typically, more than 85% of mapped reads correspond to protein-coding genes and only 6% derive from non-coding RNAs. The protocol has been used to measure RNA transcript identity and abundance in tissues from flies, mice, rats, chickens, and frogs, demonstrating its general applicability. PMID:23273270

  16. Fluorescent Aptamer Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hui William; Kim, Youngmi; Meng, Ling; Mallikaratchy, Prabodhika; Martin, Jennifer; Tang, Zhiwen; Shangguan, Dihua; O'Donoghue, Meghan; Tan, Weihong

    Aptamers are single-stranded nucleic acid probes that can be evolved to have high specificity and affinity for different targets. These targets include biomar-ker proteins, small molecules, and even whole live cells that express a variety of surface proteins of interest. Aptamers offer several advantages over protein-based molecular probes such as low immunogenic activity, flexible modification, and in vitro synthesis. In addition, aptamers used as molecular probes can be made with easy signaling for binding with their corresponding targets. There are a few different fluorescence-based signal transduction mechanisms, such as direct fluorophore labeling, fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), fluorescence quenching, fluorescence anisotropy, and light-switching excimers. These signaling processes in combination with various labeling strategies of nucleic acid aptamers contribute to simple, rapid, sensitive, and selective biological assays. In this chapter, we discuss the optical signaling of aptamers for single proteins such as α-thrombin and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF). We also present detailed discussion about fluorescent aptamers developed from cell-based systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) for the recognition of different target tumor cells.

  17. Changes in nuclear and polysomal polyadenylated RNA sequences during rat-liver regeneration.

    PubMed Central

    Wilkes, P R; Birnie, G D; Paul, J

    1979-01-01

    Nuclear and polysomal polyadenylated RNA populations of normal and 16 hour regenerating rat liver have been compared by mRNA-cDNA hybridisations and by unique DNA saturation experiments. It was found that nuclear polyadenylated RNA hybridises to 6.8% of unique DNA in both normal and 16 hour regenerating rat liver. However, cross-hybridisation experiments using cDNA have shown that 10-15% by weight of nuclear polyadenylated RNA sequences are specific to 16 hour regenerating rat-liver. Since both unique DNA and cDNA hybridisation have shown that normal and 16 hour regenerating rat-liver polysomal polyadenylated RNA populations are qualitatively very similar sequences specific to 16 hour regenerating rat-liver nuclear polyadenylated RNA are nucleus confined. Polysomal RNA sequences which were abundant in normal rat-liver have become less abundant in regenerating rat liver. PMID:461186

  18. JAR3D Webserver: Scoring and aligning RNA loop sequences to known 3D motifs.

    PubMed

    Roll, James; Zirbel, Craig L; Sweeney, Blake; Petrov, Anton I; Leontis, Neocles

    2016-07-01

    Many non-coding RNAs have been identified and may function by forming 2D and 3D structures. RNA hairpin and internal loops are often represented as unstructured on secondary structure diagrams, but RNA 3D structures show that most such loops are structured by non-Watson-Crick basepairs and base stacking. Moreover, different RNA sequences can form the same RNA 3D motif. JAR3D finds possible 3D geometries for hairpin and internal loops by matching loop sequences to motif groups from the RNA 3D Motif Atlas, by exact sequence match when possible, and by probabilistic scoring and edit distance for novel sequences. The scoring gauges the ability of the sequences to form the same pattern of interactions observed in 3D structures of the motif. The JAR3D webserver at http://rna.bgsu.edu/jar3d/ takes one or many sequences of a single loop as input, or else one or many sequences of longer RNAs with multiple loops. Each sequence is scored against all current motif groups. The output shows the ten best-matching motif groups. Users can align input sequences to each of the motif groups found by JAR3D. JAR3D will be updated with every release of the RNA 3D Motif Atlas, and so its performance is expected to improve over time. PMID:27235417

  19. Development, screening, and analysis of DNA aptamer libraries potentially useful for diagnosis and passive immunity of arboviruses

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Nucleic acid aptamers have long demonstrated the capacity to bind viral envelope proteins and to inhibit the progression of pathogenic virus infections. Here we report on initial efforts to develop and screen DNA aptamers against recombinant envelope proteins or synthetic peptides and whole inactivated viruses from several virulent arboviruses including Chikungunya, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF), dengue, tickborne encephalitis and West Nile viruses. We also analyzed sequence data and secondary structures for commonalities that might reveal consensus binding sites among the various aptamers. Some of the highest affinity and most specific aptamers in the down-selected libraries were demonstrated to have diagnostic utility in lateral flow chromatographic assays and in a fluorescent aptamer-magnetic bead sandwich assay. Some of the reported aptamers may also be able to bind viral envelope proteins in vivo and therefore may have antiviral potential in passive immunity or prophylactic applications. Results Several arbovirus DNA aptamer sequences emerged multiple times in the various down selected aptamer libraries thereby suggesting some consensus sequences for binding arbovirus envelope proteins. Screening of aptamers by enzyme-linked aptamer sorbent assay (ELASA) was useful for ranking relative aptamer affinities against their cognate viral targets. Additional study of the aptamer sequences and secondary structures of top-ranked anti-arboviral aptamers suggest potential virus binding motifs exist within some of the key aptamers and are highlighted in the supplemental figures for this article. One sequence segment (ACGGGTCCGGACA) emerged 60 times in the anti-CCHF aptamer library, but nowhere else in the anti-arbovirus library and only a few other times in a larger library of aptamers known to bind bacteria and rickettsia or other targets. Diagnostic utility of some of the aptamers for arbovirus detection in lateral flow chromatographic assays and a

  20. Post-ExSELEX stabilization of an unnatural-base DNA aptamer targeting VEGF165 toward pharmaceutical applications.

    PubMed

    Kimoto, Michiko; Nakamura, Mana; Hirao, Ichiro

    2016-09-01

    A new technology, genetic alphabet expansion using artificial bases (unnatural bases), has created high-affinity DNA ligands (aptamers) that specifically bind to target proteins by ExSELEX (genetic alphabet Expansion for Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment). We recently found that the unnatural-base DNA aptamers can be stabilized against nucleases, by introducing an extraordinarily stable, unique hairpin DNA (mini-hairpin DNA) and by reinforcing the stem region with G-C pairs. Here, to establish this aptamer generation method, we examined the stabilization of a high-affinity anti-VEGF165 unnatural-base DNA aptamer. The stabilized aptamers displayed significantly increased thermal and nuclease stabilities, and furthermore, exhibited higher affinity to the target. As compared to the well-known anti-VEGF165 RNA aptamer, pegaptanib (Macugen), our aptamers did not require calcium ions for binding to VEGF165 Biological experiments using cultured cells revealed that our stabilized aptamers efficiently inhibited the interaction between VEGF165 and its receptor, with the same or slightly higher efficiency than that of the pegaptanib RNA aptamer. The development of cost-effective and calcium ion-independent high-affinity anti-VEGF165 DNA aptamers encourages further progress in diagnostic and therapeutic applications. In addition, the stabilization process provided additional information about the key elements required for aptamer binding to VEGF165. PMID:27387284

  1. Post-ExSELEX stabilization of an unnatural-base DNA aptamer targeting VEGF165 toward pharmaceutical applications

    PubMed Central

    Kimoto, Michiko; Nakamura, Mana; Hirao, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    A new technology, genetic alphabet expansion using artificial bases (unnatural bases), has created high-affinity DNA ligands (aptamers) that specifically bind to target proteins by ExSELEX (genetic alphabet Expansion for Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment). We recently found that the unnatural-base DNA aptamers can be stabilized against nucleases, by introducing an extraordinarily stable, unique hairpin DNA (mini-hairpin DNA) and by reinforcing the stem region with G–C pairs. Here, to establish this aptamer generation method, we examined the stabilization of a high-affinity anti-VEGF165 unnatural-base DNA aptamer. The stabilized aptamers displayed significantly increased thermal and nuclease stabilities, and furthermore, exhibited higher affinity to the target. As compared to the well-known anti-VEGF165 RNA aptamer, pegaptanib (Macugen), our aptamers did not require calcium ions for binding to VEGF165. Biological experiments using cultured cells revealed that our stabilized aptamers efficiently inhibited the interaction between VEGF165 and its receptor, with the same or slightly higher efficiency than that of the pegaptanib RNA aptamer. The development of cost-effective and calcium ion-independent high-affinity anti-VEGF165 DNA aptamers encourages further progress in diagnostic and therapeutic applications. In addition, the stabilization process provided additional information about the key elements required for aptamer binding to VEGF165. PMID:27387284

  2. Replicating satellite RNA induces sequence-specific DNA methylation and truncated transcripts in plants.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, M B; Wesley, S V; Finnegan, E J; Smith, N A; Waterhouse, P M

    2001-01-01

    Tobacco plants were transformed with a chimeric transgene comprising sequences encoding beta-glucuronidase (GUS) and the satellite RNA (satRNA) of cereal yellow dwarf luteovirus. When transgenic plants were infected with potato leafroll luteovirus (PLRV), which replicated the transgene-derived satRNA to a high level, the satellite sequence of the GUS:Sat transgene became densely methylated. Within the satellite region, all 86 cytosines in the upper strand and 73 of the 75 cytosines in the lower strand were either partially or fully methylated. In contrast, very low levels of DNA methylation were detected in the satellite sequence of the transgene in uninfected plants and in the flanking nonsatellite sequences in both infected and uninfected plants. Substantial amounts of truncated GUS:Sat RNA accumulated in the satRNA-replicating plants, and most of the molecules terminated at nucleotides within the first 60 bp of the satellite sequence. Whereas this RNA truncation was associated with high levels of satRNA replication, it appeared to be independent of the levels of DNA methylation in the satellite sequence, suggesting that it is not caused by methylation. All the sequenced GUS:Sat DNA molecules were hypermethylated in plants with replicating satRNA despite the phloem restriction of the helper PLRV. Also, small, sense and antisense approximately 22 nt RNAs, derived from the satRNA, were associated with the replicating satellite. These results suggest that the sequence-specific DNA methylation spread into cells in which no satRNA replication occurred and that this was mediated by the spread of unamplified satRNA and/or its associated 22 nt RNA molecules. PMID:11214177

  3. Integration of Expressed Sequence Tag Data Flanking Predicted RNA Secondary Structures Facilitates Novel Non-Coding RNA Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Krzyzanowski, Paul M.; Price, Feodor D.; Muro, Enrique M.; Rudnicki, Michael A.; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A.

    2011-01-01

    Many computational methods have been used to predict novel non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), but none, to our knowledge, have explicitly investigated the impact of integrating existing cDNA-based Expressed Sequence Tag (EST) data that flank structural RNA predictions. To determine whether flanking EST data can assist in microRNA (miRNA) prediction, we identified genomic sites encoding putative miRNAs by combining functional RNA predictions with flanking ESTs data in a model consistent with miRNAs undergoing cleavage during maturation. In both human and mouse genomes, we observed that the inclusion of flanking ESTs adjacent to and not overlapping predicted miRNAs significantly improved the performance of various methods of miRNA prediction, including direct high-throughput sequencing of small RNA libraries. We analyzed the expression of hundreds of miRNAs predicted to be expressed during myogenic differentiation using a customized microarray and identified several known and predicted myogenic miRNA hairpins. Our results indicate that integrating ESTs flanking structural RNA predictions improves the quality of cleaved miRNA predictions and suggest that this strategy can be used to predict other non-coding RNAs undergoing cleavage during maturation. PMID:21698286

  4. Integration of expressed sequence tag data flanking predicted RNA secondary structures facilitates novel non-coding RNA discovery.

    PubMed

    Krzyzanowski, Paul M; Price, Feodor D; Muro, Enrique M; Rudnicki, Michael A; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A

    2011-01-01

    Many computational methods have been used to predict novel non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), but none, to our knowledge, have explicitly investigated the impact of integrating existing cDNA-based Expressed Sequence Tag (EST) data that flank structural RNA predictions. To determine whether flanking EST data can assist in microRNA (miRNA) prediction, we identified genomic sites encoding putative miRNAs by combining functional RNA predictions with flanking ESTs data in a model consistent with miRNAs undergoing cleavage during maturation. In both human and mouse genomes, we observed that the inclusion of flanking ESTs adjacent to and not overlapping predicted miRNAs significantly improved the performance of various methods of miRNA prediction, including direct high-throughput sequencing of small RNA libraries. We analyzed the expression of hundreds of miRNAs predicted to be expressed during myogenic differentiation using a customized microarray and identified several known and predicted myogenic miRNA hairpins. Our results indicate that integrating ESTs flanking structural RNA predictions improves the quality of cleaved miRNA predictions and suggest that this strategy can be used to predict other non-coding RNAs undergoing cleavage during maturation. PMID:21698286

  5. A Small Aptamer with Strong and Specific Recognition of the Triphosphate of ATP

    PubMed Central

    Sazani, Peter L.; Larralde, Rosa

    2004-01-01

    We report the in vitro selection of an RNA-based ATP aptamer with the ability to discriminate between adenosine ligands based on their 5‘ phosphorylation state. Previous selection of ATP aptamers yielded molecules that do not significantly discriminate between ligands at the 5‘ position. By applying a selective pressure that demands recognition of the 5‘ triphosphate, we obtained an aptamer that binds to ATP with a Kd of approximately 5 μM, and to AMP with a Kd of approximately 5.5 mM, a difference of 1100-fold. This aptamer demonstrates the ability of small RNAs to interact with negatively charged moieties. PMID:15237981

  6. The use of exome capture RNA-seq for highly degraded RNA with application to clinical cancer sequencing.

    PubMed

    Cieslik, Marcin; Chugh, Rashmi; Wu, Yi-Mi; Wu, Ming; Brennan, Christine; Lonigro, Robert; Su, Fengyun; Wang, Rui; Siddiqui, Javed; Mehra, Rohit; Cao, Xuhong; Lucas, David; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Robinson, Dan

    2015-09-01

    RNA-seq by poly(A) selection is currently the most common protocol for whole transcriptome sequencing as it provides a broad, detailed, and accurate view of the RNA landscape. Unfortunately, the utility of poly(A) libraries is greatly limited when the input RNA is degraded, which is the norm for research tissues and clinical samples, especially when specimens are formalin-fixed. To facilitate the use of RNA sequencing beyond cell lines and in the clinical setting, we developed an exome-capture transcriptome protocol with greatly improved performance on degraded RNA. Capture transcriptome libraries enable measuring absolute and differential gene expression, calling genetic variants, and detecting gene fusions. Through validation against gold-standard poly(A) and Ribo-Zero libraries from intact RNA, we show that capture RNA-seq provides accurate and unbiased estimates of RNA abundance, uniform transcript coverage, and broad dynamic range. Unlike poly(A) selection and Ribo-Zero depletion, capture libraries retain these qualities regardless of RNA quality and provide excellent data from clinical specimens including formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) blocks. Systematic improvements across key applications of RNA-seq are shown on a cohort of prostate cancer patients and a set of clinical FFPE samples. Further, we demonstrate the utility of capture RNA-seq libraries in a patient with a highly malignant solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) enrolled in our clinical sequencing program called MI-ONCOSEQ. Capture transcriptome profiling from FFPE revealed two oncogenic fusions: the pathognomonic NAB2-STAT6 inversion and a therapeutically actionable BRAF fusion, which may drive this specific cancer's aggressive phenotype. PMID:26253700

  7. High-throughput cellular RNA device engineering.

    PubMed

    Townshend, Brent; Kennedy, Andrew B; Xiang, Joy S; Smolke, Christina D

    2015-10-01

    Methods for rapidly assessing sequence-structure-function landscapes and developing conditional gene-regulatory devices are critical to our ability to manipulate and interface with biology. We describe a framework for engineering RNA devices from preexisting aptamers that exhibit ligand-responsive ribozyme tertiary interactions. Our methodology utilizes cell sorting, high-throughput sequencing and statistical data analyses to enable parallel measurements of the activities of hundreds of thousands of sequences from RNA device libraries in the absence and presence of ligands. Our tertiary-interaction RNA devices performed better in terms of gene silencing, activation ratio and ligand sensitivity than optimized RNA devices that rely on secondary-structure changes. We applied our method to build biosensors for diverse ligands and determine consensus sequences that enable ligand-responsive tertiary interactions. These methods advance our ability to develop broadly applicable genetic tools and to elucidate the underlying sequence-structure-function relationships that empower rational design of complex biomolecules. PMID:26258292

  8. Globin mRNA reduction for whole-blood transcriptome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Krjutškov, Kaarel; Koel, Mariann; Roost, Anne Mari; Katayama, Shintaro; Einarsdottir, Elisabet; Jouhilahti, Eeva-Mari; Söderhäll, Cilla; Jaakma, Ülle; Plaas, Mario; Vesterlund, Liselotte; Lohi, Hannes; Salumets, Andres; Kere, Juha

    2016-01-01

    The transcriptome analysis of whole-blood RNA by sequencing holds promise for the identification and tracking of biomarkers; however, the high globin mRNA (gmRNA) content of erythrocytes hampers whole-blood and buffy coat analyses. We introduce a novel gmRNA locking assay (GlobinLock, GL) as a robust and simple gmRNA reduction tool to preserve RNA quality, save time and cost. GL consists of a pair of gmRNA-specific oligonucleotides in RNA initial denaturation buffer that is effective immediately after RNA denaturation and adds only ten minutes of incubation to the whole cDNA synthesis procedure when compared to non-blood RNA analysis. We show that GL is fully effective not only for human samples but also for mouse and rat, and so far incompletely studied cow, dog and zebrafish. PMID:27515369

  9. Globin mRNA reduction for whole-blood transcriptome sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Krjutškov, Kaarel; Koel, Mariann; Roost, Anne Mari; Katayama, Shintaro; Einarsdottir, Elisabet; Jouhilahti, Eeva-Mari; Söderhäll, Cilla; Jaakma, Ülle; Plaas, Mario; Vesterlund, Liselotte; Lohi, Hannes; Salumets, Andres; Kere, Juha

    2016-01-01

    The transcriptome analysis of whole-blood RNA by sequencing holds promise for the identification and tracking of biomarkers; however, the high globin mRNA (gmRNA) content of erythrocytes hampers whole-blood and buffy coat analyses. We introduce a novel gmRNA locking assay (GlobinLock, GL) as a robust and simple gmRNA reduction tool to preserve RNA quality, save time and cost. GL consists of a pair of gmRNA-specific oligonucleotides in RNA initial denaturation buffer that is effective immediately after RNA denaturation and adds only ten minutes of incubation to the whole cDNA synthesis procedure when compared to non-blood RNA analysis. We show that GL is fully effective not only for human samples but also for mouse and rat, and so far incompletely studied cow, dog and zebrafish. PMID:27515369

  10. Identification of Epithelial Ovarian Tumor-Specific Aptamers

    PubMed Central

    Benedetto, Gregory; Hamp, Timothy J.; Wesselman, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is often diagnosed in late stages with few treatment options and poor long-term prognosis. New clinical tools for early detection of ovarian malignancies will significantly help reduce mortality and improve current long-term survival rates. The objective of this work was to identify ovarian tumor-specific single-stranded DNA aptamers that bind to malignant ovarian tumor cells and internalize with high affinity and specificity. Aptamers can identify unique tumor biomarkers, can aid in early detection and diagnosis of neoplastic disorders, and can be functionalized by conjugation to small molecules. To identify aptamers from random single-stranded DNA pools (60 bases long), we used whole Cell-SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment) to enrich and isolate tumor-specific aptamers that bind to tumor-specific receptors in their native state on the cell surface. Next-Generation sequencing identified seven novel aptamers and detailed analyses of three are described. Aptamers bound to, and were internalized by, target Caov-3 cell populations, but not nontarget nonmalignant ovarian epithelial HOSE 6-3 cells or multiple other epithelial tumor cell lines. Furthermore, aptamers showed unique binding affinities with apparent dissociation constants (Kd) measuring in the submicromolar range supporting their physiological relevance and potential use in clinical applications. PMID:25894736

  11. Aptamers: A promising chemical antibody for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Gang; Wilson, George; Hebbard, Lionel; Duan, Wei; Liddle, Christopher; George, Jacob; Qiao, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Aptamers, also known as chemical antibodies, are single-stranded nucleic acid oligonucleotides which bind to their targets with high specificity and affinity. They are typically selected by repetitive in vitro process termed systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX). Owing to their excellent properties compared to conventional antibodies, notably their smaller physical size and lower immunogenicity and toxicity, aptamers have recently emerged as a new class of agents to deliver therapeutic drugs to cancer cells by targeting specific cancer-associated hallmarks. Aptamers can also be structurally modified to make them more flexible in order to conjugate other agents such as nano-materials and therapeutic RNA agents, thus extending their applications for cancer therapy. This review presents the current knowledge on the practical applications of aptamers in the treatment of a variety of cancers. PMID:26863567

  12. A Review of Methods for Measuring Aptamer-ProteinEquilibria

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Meng; Bowser, Michael T.

    2010-01-01

    Aptamers are single stranded DNA or RNA molecules that have been selected using in vitro techniques to bind target molecules with high affinity and selectivity, rivaling antibodies in many ways. In order to use aptamers in research and clinical applications, a thorough understanding of aptamer-target binding is necessary. In this article, we review methods for assessing aptamer-protein binding using separation based techniques such as dialysis, ultrafiltration, gel and capillary electrophoresis, and HPLC; as well as mixture based techniques such as fluorescence intensity and anisotropy, UV-Vis absorption and circular dichroism, surface plasmon resonance, and isothermal titration calorimetry. For each method the principle, range of application and important features, such as sample consumption, experimental time and complexity, are summarized and compared. PMID:21237304

  13. Aptamers: A promising chemical antibody for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Gang; Wilson, George; Hebbard, Lionel; Duan, Wei; Liddle, Christopher; George, Jacob; Qiao, Liang

    2016-03-22

    Aptamers, also known as chemical antibodies, are single-stranded nucleic acid oligonucleotides which bind to their targets with high specificity and affinity. They are typically selected by repetitive in vitro process termed systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX). Owing to their excellent properties compared to conventional antibodies, notably their smaller physical size and lower immunogenicity and toxicity, aptamers have recently emerged as a new class of agents to deliver therapeutic drugs to cancer cells by targeting specific cancer-associated hallmarks. Aptamers can also be structurally modified to make them more flexible in order to conjugate other agents such as nano-materials and therapeutic RNA agents, thus extending their applications for cancer therapy. This review presents the current knowledge on the practical applications of aptamers in the treatment of a variety of cancers. PMID:26863567

  14. Sequence-specific cleavage of dsRNA by Mini-III RNase

    PubMed Central

    Głów, Dawid; Pianka, Dariusz; Sulej, Agata A.; Kozłowski, Łukasz P.; Czarnecka, Justyna; Chojnowski, Grzegorz; Skowronek, Krzysztof J.; Bujnicki, Janusz M.

    2015-01-01

    Ribonucleases (RNases) play a critical role in RNA processing and degradation by hydrolyzing phosphodiester bonds (exo- or endonucleolytically). Many RNases that cut RNA internally exhibit substrate specificity, but their target sites are usually limited to one or a few specific nucleotides in single-stranded RNA and often in a context of a particular three-dimensional structure of the substrate. Thus far, no RNase counterparts of restriction enzymes have been identified which could cleave double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) in a sequence-specific manner. Here, we present evidence for a sequence-dependent cleavage of long dsRNA by RNase Mini-III from Bacillus subtilis (BsMiniIII). Analysis of the sites cleaved by this enzyme in limited digest of bacteriophage Φ6 dsRNA led to the identification of a consensus target sequence. We defined nucleotide residues within the preferred cleavage site that affected the efficiency of the cleavage and were essential for the discrimination of cleavable versus non-cleavable dsRNA sequences. We have also determined that the loop α5b-α6, a distinctive structural element in Mini-III RNases, is crucial for the specific cleavage, but not for dsRNA binding. Our results suggest that BsMiniIII may serve as a prototype of a sequence-specific dsRNase that could possibly be used for targeted cleavage of dsRNA. PMID:25634891

  15. In vitro selection of an RNA sequence that interacts with high affinity with thymidylate synthase

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xiukun; Mizunuma, Nobuyuki; Chen, Tian-men; Copur, Sitki M.; Maley, Gladys F.; Liu, Jun; Maley, Frank; Chu, Edward

    2000-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the repressive effect of thymidylate synthase (TS) mRNA translation is mediated by direct binding of TS itself to two cis-acting elements on its cognate mRNA. To identify the optimal RNA nucleotides that interact with TS, we in vitro synthesized a completely degenerate, linear RNA pool of 25 nt and employed in vitro selection to isolate high affinity RNA ligands that bind human TS protein. After 10 rounds of selection and amplification, a single RNA molecule was selected that bound TS protein with nearly 20-fold greater affinity than native, wild-type TS RNA sequences. Secondary structure analysis of this RNA sequence predicted it to possess a stem–loop structure. Deletion and/or modification of the UGU loop element within the RNA sequence decreased binding to TS by up to 1000-fold. In vivo transfection experiments revealed that the presence of the selected RNA sequence resulted in a significant increase in the expression of a heterologous luciferase reporter construct in human colon cancer H630 and TS-overexpressing HCT-C:His-TS+ cells, but not in HCT-C18 cells expressing a functionally inactive TS. In addition, the presence of this element in H630 cells leads to induced expression of TS protein. An immunoprecipitation method using RT–PCR confirmed a direct interaction between human TS protein and the selected RNA sequence in transfected human cancer H630 cells. This study identified a novel RNA sequence from a degenerate RNA library that specifically interacts with TS. PMID:11058126

  16. In vitro selection of an RNA sequence that interacts with high affinity with thymidylate synthase.

    PubMed

    Lin, X; Mizunuma, N; Chen, T; Copur, S M; Maley, G F; Liu, J; Maley, F; Chu, E

    2000-11-01

    Previous studies have shown that the repressive effect of thymidylate synthase (TS) mRNA translation is mediated by direct binding of TS itself to two cis-acting elements on its cognate mRNA. To identify the optimal RNA nucleotides that interact with TS, we in vitro synthesized a completely degenerate, linear RNA pool of 25 nt and employed in vitro selection to isolate high affinity RNA ligands that bind human TS protein. After 10 rounds of selection and amplification, a single RNA molecule was selected that bound TS protein with nearly 20-fold greater affinity than native, wild-type TS RNA sequences. Secondary structure analysis of this RNA sequence predicted it to possess a stem-loop structure. Deletion and/or modification of the UGU loop element within the RNA sequence decreased binding to TS by up to 1000-fold. In vivo transfection experiments revealed that the presence of the selected RNA sequence resulted in a significant increase in the expression of a heterologous luciferase reporter construct in human colon cancer H630 and TS-overexpressing HCT-C:His-TS+ cells, but not in HCT-C18 cells expressing a functionally inactive TS. In addition, the presence of this element in H630 cells leads to induced expression of TS protein. An immunoprecipitation method using RT-PCR confirmed a direct interaction between human TS protein and the selected RNA sequence in transfected human cancer H630 cells. This study identified a novel RNA sequence from a degenerate RNA library that specifically interacts with TS. PMID:11058126

  17. Modified AS1411 Aptamer Suppresses Hepatocellular Carcinoma by Up-Regulating Galectin-14

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeong-Hoon; Lee, Dong Hyeon; Cho, Eun Ju; Yu, Su Jong; Kim, Yoon Jun; Kim, Jong In; Im, Jong Hun; Lee, Jung Hwan; Oh, Eun Ju; Yoon, Jung-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Aptamers are small synthetic oligonucleotides that bind to target proteins with high specificity and affinity. AS1411 is an aptamer that binds to nucleolin, which is overexpressed in the cytoplasm and occurs on the surface of cancer cells. We investigated the therapeutic potential of aptamers in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) by evaluating anti-tumor effects and confirming the affinity and specificity of AS1411- and modified AS1411-aptamers in HCC cells. Cell growth was assessed using the MTS assay, and cell death signaling was explored by immunoblot analysis. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting was performed to evaluate the affinity and specificity of AS1411-aptamers in SNU-761 HCC cells. We investigated the in vivo effects of the AS1411-aptamer using BALB/c nude mice in a subcutaneous xenograft model with SNU-761 cells. Treatment with a modified AS1411-aptamer significantly decreased in vitro (under normoxic [P = 0.035] and hypoxic [P = 0.018] conditions) and in vivo (under normoxic conditions, P = 0.041) HCC cell proliferation compared to control aptamers. AS1411- and control aptamers failed to control HCC cell proliferation. However, AS1411- and the modified AS1411-aptamer did not induce caspase activation. Decrease in cell growth by AS1411 or modified AS1411 was not prevented by caspase or necrosis inhibitors. In a microarray, AS1411 significantly enhanced galectin-14 expression. Suppression of HCC cell proliferation by the modified AS1411-aptamer was attenuated by galectin-14 siRNA transfection. Modified AS1411-aptamer suppressed HCC cell growth in vitro and in vivo by up-regulating galectin-14 expressions. Modified AS1411-aptamers may have therapeutic potential as a novel targeted therapy for HCC. PMID:27494117

  18. Modified AS1411 Aptamer Suppresses Hepatocellular Carcinoma by Up-Regulating Galectin-14.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yuri; Lee, Yun Bin; Lee, Jeong-Hoon; Lee, Dong Hyeon; Cho, Eun Ju; Yu, Su Jong; Kim, Yoon Jun; Kim, Jong In; Im, Jong Hun; Lee, Jung Hwan; Oh, Eun Ju; Yoon, Jung-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Aptamers are small synthetic oligonucleotides that bind to target proteins with high specificity and affinity. AS1411 is an aptamer that binds to nucleolin, which is overexpressed in the cytoplasm and occurs on the surface of cancer cells. We investigated the therapeutic potential of aptamers in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) by evaluating anti-tumor effects and confirming the affinity and specificity of AS1411- and modified AS1411-aptamers in HCC cells. Cell growth was assessed using the MTS assay, and cell death signaling was explored by immunoblot analysis. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting was performed to evaluate the affinity and specificity of AS1411-aptamers in SNU-761 HCC cells. We investigated the in vivo effects of the AS1411-aptamer using BALB/c nude mice in a subcutaneous xenograft model with SNU-761 cells. Treatment with a modified AS1411-aptamer significantly decreased in vitro (under normoxic [P = 0.035] and hypoxic [P = 0.018] conditions) and in vivo (under normoxic conditions, P = 0.041) HCC cell proliferation compared to control aptamers. AS1411- and control aptamers failed to control HCC cell proliferation. However, AS1411- and the modified AS1411-aptamer did not induce caspase activation. Decrease in cell growth by AS1411 or modified AS1411 was not prevented by caspase or necrosis inhibitors. In a microarray, AS1411 significantly enhanced galectin-14 expression. Suppression of HCC cell proliferation by the modified AS1411-aptamer was attenuated by galectin-14 siRNA transfection. Modified AS1411-aptamer suppressed HCC cell growth in vitro and in vivo by up-regulating galectin-14 expressions. Modified AS1411-aptamers may have therapeutic potential as a novel targeted therapy for HCC. PMID:27494117

  19. Nucleotide sequence of 3' untranslated portion of human alpha globin mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, J T; deRiel, J K; Forget, B G; Marotta, C A; Weissman, S M

    1977-01-01

    We have determined the nucleotide sequence of 75 nucleotides of the 3'-untranslated portion of normal human alpha globin mRNA which corresponds to the elongated amino acid sequence of the chain termination mutant Hb Constant Spring. This was accomplished by sequence analysis of cDNA fragments obtained by restriction endonuclease or T4 endonuclease IV cleavage of human globin cDNA synthesized from globin mRNA by use of viral reverse transcriptase. Analysis of cRNA synthesized from cDNA by use of RNA polymerase provided additional confirmatory sequence information. Possible polymorphism has been identified at one site of the sequence. Our sequence overlaps with, and extends the sequence of 43 nucleotides determined by Proudfood and coworkers for the very 3'-terminal portion of human alpha globin mRNA. The complete 3'-untranslated sequence of human alpha globin mRNA (112 nucleotides including termination codon) shows little homology to that of the human or rabbit beta globin mRNAs except for the presence of the hexanucleotide sequence AAUAAA which is found in most eukaryotic mRNAs near the 3'-terminal poly (A). Images PMID:909779

  20. Interspersion of sequences in avian myeloblastosis virus rna that rapidly hybridize with leukemic chicken cell DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Drohan, W N; Shoyab, M; Wall, R; Baluda, M A

    1975-01-01

    Liquid hybridization of progressively smaller fragments (35S, 27S, 15.5S, 12.5S, and 8S) of poly(A)-selected avian myeloblastosis virus RNA with excess DNA from leukemic chicken myeloblasts revealed that all sizes of RNA contained sequences complementary to both slowly and rapidly hybridizing cellular DNA sequences. Apparently, the RNA sequences which hybridize rapidly with excesses of cellular DNA are not restricted to any one region of the avian myeloblastosis virus 35S RNA. Instead, they appear to be randomly distributed over the entire 35S avian myeloblastosis virus RNA molecule with some positioned within 200 nucleotides of the poly(A) tract at the 3' end of the RNA. PMID:163372

  1. Molecular basis of sequence-specific recognition of pre-ribosomal RNA by nucleolin

    PubMed Central

    Allain, Frédéric H.-T.; Bouvet, Philippe; Dieckmann, Thorsten; Feigon, Juli

    2000-01-01

    The structure of the 28 kDa complex of the first two RNA binding domains (RBDs) of nucleolin (RBD12) with an RNA stem–loop that includes the nucleolin recognition element UCCCGA in the loop was determined by NMR spectroscopy. The structure of nucleolin RBD12 with the nucleolin recognition element (NRE) reveals that the two RBDs bind on opposite sides of the RNA loop, forming a molecular clamp that brings the 5′ and 3′ ends of the recognition sequence close together and stabilizing the stem–loop. The specific interactions observed in the structure explain the sequence specificity for the NRE sequence. Binding studies of mutant proteins and analysis of conserved residues support the proposed interactions. The mode of interaction of the protein with the RNA and the location of the putative NRE sites suggest that nucleolin may function as an RNA chaperone to prevent improper folding of the nascent pre-rRNA. PMID:11118222

  2. DNA Aptamers against the Lup an 1 Food Allergen

    PubMed Central

    Nadal, Pedro; Pinto, Alessandro; Svobodova, Marketa; Canela, Nuria; O'Sullivan, Ciara K.

    2012-01-01

    Using in vitro selection, high affinity DNA aptamers to the food allergen Lup an 1, ß-conglutin, were selected from a pool of DNA, 93 bases in length, containing a randomised sequence of 49 bases. ß-conglutin was purified from lupin flour and chemically crosslinked to carboxylated magnetic beads. Peptide mass fingerprinting was used to confirm the presence of the ß-conglutin. Single stranded DNA was generated from the randomised pool using T7 Gene 6 Exonuclease and was subsequently incubated with the magnetic beads and the captured DNA was released and amplified prior to a further round of Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment (SELEX). Evolution was monitored using enzyme linked oligonucleotide assay and surface plasmon resonance. Once a plateau in evolution was reached, the isolated DNA sequences were cloned and sequenced. The consensus motif was identified via alignment of the sequences and the affinities of these sequences for immobilised ß-conglutin were determined using surface plasmon resonance. The selected aptamer was demonstrated to be highly specific, showing no cross-reactivity with other flour ingredients or with other conglutin fractions of lupin. The secondary structures of the selected aptamers were predicted using m-fold. Finally, the functionality of the selected aptamers was demonstrated using a competitive assay for the quantitative detection of ß-conglutin. . Future work will focus on structure elucidation and truncation of the selected sequences to generate a smaller aptamer for application to the analysis of the Lup an 1 allergen in foodstuffs. PMID:22529997

  3. Sequence-specific RNA Photocleavage by Single-stranded DNA in Presence of Riboflavin.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yongyun; Chen, Gangyi; Yuan, Yi; Li, Na; Dong, Juan; Huang, Xin; Cui, Xin; Tang, Zhuo

    2015-01-01

    Constant efforts have been made to develop new method to realize sequence-specific RNA degradation, which could cause inhibition of the expression of targeted gene. Herein, by using an unmodified short DNA oligonucleotide for sequence recognition and endogenic small molecule, vitamin B2 (riboflavin) as photosensitizer, we report a simple strategy to realize the sequence-specific photocleavage of targeted RNA. The DNA strand is complimentary to the target sequence to form DNA/RNA duplex containing a G • U wobble in the middle. The cleavage reaction goes through oxidative elimination mechanism at the nucleoside downstream of U of the G • U wobble in duplex to obtain unnatural RNA terminal, and the whole process is under tight control by using light as switch, which means the cleavage could be carried out according to specific spatial and temporal requirements. The biocompatibility of this method makes the DNA strand in combination with riboflavin a promising molecular tool for RNA manipulation. PMID:26461456

  4. Sequence-specific RNA Photocleavage by Single-stranded DNA in Presence of Riboflavin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yongyun; Chen, Gangyi; Yuan, Yi; Li, Na; Dong, Juan; Huang, Xin; Cui, Xin; Tang, Zhuo

    2015-10-01

    Constant efforts have been made to develop new method to realize sequence-specific RNA degradation, which could cause inhibition of the expression of targeted gene. Herein, by using an unmodified short DNA oligonucleotide for sequence recognition and endogenic small molecue, vitamin B2 (riboflavin) as photosensitizer, we report a simple strategy to realize the sequence-specific photocleavage of targeted RNA. The DNA strand is complimentary to the target sequence to form DNA/RNA duplex containing a G•U wobble in the middle. The cleavage reaction goes through oxidative elimination mechanism at the nucleoside downstream of U of the G•U wobble in duplex to obtain unnatural RNA terminal, and the whole process is under tight control by using light as switch, which means the cleavage could be carried out according to specific spatial and temporal requirements. The biocompatibility of this method makes the DNA strand in combination with riboflavin a promising molecular tool for RNA manipulation.

  5. Plant RNA virus sequences identified in kimchi by microbial metatranscriptome analysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Seon; Jung, Ji Young; Wang, Yao; Oh, Hye Ji; Choi, Dongjin; Jeon, Che Ok; Hahn, Yoonsoo

    2014-07-01

    Plant pathogenic RNA viruses are present in a variety of plant-based foods. When ingested by humans, these viruses can survive the passage through the digestive tract, and are frequently detected in human feces. Kimchi is a traditional fermented Korean food made from cabbage or vegetables, with a variety of other plant-based ingredients, including ground red pepper and garlic paste. We analyzed microbial metatranscriptome data from kimchi at five fermentation stages to identify plant RNA virus-derived sequences. We successfully identified a substantial amount of plant RNA virus sequences, especially during the early stages of fermentation: 23.47% and 16.45% of total clean reads on days 7 and 13, respectively. The most abundant plant RNA virus sequences were from pepper mild mottle virus, a major pathogen of red peppers; this constituted 95% of the total RNA virus sequences identified throughout the fermentation period. We observed distinct sequencing read-depth distributions for plant RNA virus genomes, possibly implying intrinsic and/or technical biases during the metatranscriptome generation procedure. We also identified RNA virus sequences in publicly available microbial metatranscriptome data sets. We propose that metatranscriptome data may serve as a valuable resource for RNA virus detection, and a systematic screening of the ingredients may help prevent the use of virus-infected low-quality materials for food production. PMID:24836186

  6. Common 5S rRNA variants are likely to be accepted in many sequence contexts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Zhengdong; D'Souza, Lisa M.; Lee, Youn-Hyung; Fox, George E.

    2003-01-01

    Over evolutionary time RNA sequences which are successfully fixed in a population are selected from among those that satisfy the structural and chemical requirements imposed by the function of the RNA. These sequences together comprise the structure space of the RNA. In principle, a comprehensive understanding of RNA structure and function would make it possible to enumerate which specific RNA sequences belong to a particular structure space and which do not. We are using bacterial 5S rRNA as a model system to attempt to identify principles that can be used to predict which sequences do or do not belong to the 5S rRNA structure space. One promising idea is the very intuitive notion that frequently seen sequence changes in an aligned data set of naturally occurring 5S rRNAs would be widely accepted in many other 5S rRNA sequence contexts. To test this hypothesis, we first developed well-defined operational definitions for a Vibrio region of the 5S rRNA structure space and what is meant by a highly variable position. Fourteen sequence variants (10 point changes and 4 base-pair changes) were identified in this way, which, by the hypothesis, would be expected to incorporate successfully in any of the known sequences in the Vibrio region. All 14 of these changes were constructed and separately introduced into the Vibrio proteolyticus 5S rRNA sequence where they are not normally found. Each variant was evaluated for its ability to function as a valid 5S rRNA in an E. coli cellular context. It was found that 93% (13/14) of the variants tested are likely valid 5S rRNAs in this context. In addition, seven variants were constructed that, although present in the Vibrio region, did not meet the stringent criteria for a highly variable position. In this case, 86% (6/7) are likely valid. As a control we also examined seven variants that are seldom or never seen in the Vibrio region of 5S rRNA sequence space. In this case only two of seven were found to be potentially valid. The

  7. Preparation of cDNA libraries for high-throughput RNA sequencing analysis of RNA 5′ ends

    PubMed Central

    Vvedenskaya, Irina O.; Goldman, Seth R.; Nickels, Bryce E.

    2015-01-01

    Summary We provide a detailed protocol for preparing cDNA libraries suitable for high throughput sequencing that are derived specifically from the 5′ ends of RNA (5′ specific RNA-seq). The protocol describes how cDNA libraries for 5′ specific RNA-seq can be tailored to analyze specific classes of RNAs based upon the phosphorylation status of the 5′ end. Thus, the analysis of cDNA libraries generated by these methods provides information regarding both the sequence and phosphorylation status of the 5′ ends of RNAs. 5′ specific RNA-seq can be used to analyze transcription initiation and post-transcriptional processing of RNAs with single base pair resolution on a genome-wide level. PMID:25665566

  8. 5S RNA sequence from the Philosamia silkworm: evidence for variable evolutionary rates in insect 5S RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Xian-Rong, G; Nicoghosian, K; Cedergren, R J

    1982-01-01

    The primary structure of 5S RNA isolated from the posterior silkgland of Philosamia cynthia ricini was determined using three in vitro labelling techniques. The derived sequence consists of 119 nucleotides and can be folded into the secondary structure model proposed for eukaryotic 5S RNAs. This 5S RNA differs from the Bombyx mori molecule in 9 positions and from the Drosophila melanogaster sequence in 14 positions. The comparison of evolutionary rates in insect 5S RNA with inferred rates in other eukaryotic phyla leads to the conclusion that 5S RNA evolution is not constant in different eukaryotic branches, a condition which must be taken into account in phylogenetic tree constructions. Images PMID:7145713

  9. Sequencing 16S rRNA gene fragments using the PacBio SMRT DNA sequencing system

    PubMed Central

    Jenior, Matthew L.; Koumpouras, Charles C.; Westcott, Sarah L.; Highlander, Sarah K.

    2016-01-01

    Over the past 10 years, microbial ecologists have largely abandoned sequencing 16S rRNA genes by the Sanger sequencing method and have instead adopted highly parallelized sequencing platforms. These new platforms, such as 454 and Illumina’s MiSeq, have allowed researchers to obtain millions of high quality but short sequences. The result of the added sequencing depth has been significant improvements in experimental design. The tradeoff has been the decline in the number of full-length reference sequences that are deposited into databases. To overcome this problem, we tested the ability of the PacBio Single Molecule, Real-Time (SMRT) DNA sequencing platform to generate sequence reads from the 16S rRNA gene. We generated sequencing data from the V4, V3–V5, V1–V3, V1–V5, V1–V6, and V1–V9 variable regions from within the 16S rRNA gene using DNA from a synthetic mock community and natural samples collected from human feces, mouse feces, and soil. The mock community allowed us to assess the actual sequencing error rate and how that error rate changed when different curation methods were applied. We developed a simple method based on sequence characteristics and quality scores to reduce the observed error rate for the V1–V9 region from 0.69 to 0.027%. This error rate is comparable to what has been observed for the shorter reads generated by 454 and Illumina’s MiSeq sequencing platforms. Although the per base sequencing cost is still significantly more than that of MiSeq, the prospect of supplementing reference databases with full-length sequences from organisms below the limit of detection from the Sanger approach is exciting. PMID:27069806

  10. Sequencing 16S rRNA gene fragments using the PacBio SMRT DNA sequencing system.

    PubMed

    Schloss, Patrick D; Jenior, Matthew L; Koumpouras, Charles C; Westcott, Sarah L; Highlander, Sarah K

    2016-01-01

    Over the past 10 years, microbial ecologists have largely abandoned sequencing 16S rRNA genes by the Sanger sequencing method and have instead adopted highly parallelized sequencing platforms. These new platforms, such as 454 and Illumina's MiSeq, have allowed researchers to obtain millions of high quality but short sequences. The result of the added sequencing depth has been significant improvements in experimental design. The tradeoff has been the decline in the number of full-length reference sequences that are deposited into databases. To overcome this problem, we tested the ability of the PacBio Single Molecule, Real-Time (SMRT) DNA sequencing platform to generate sequence reads from the 16S rRNA gene. We generated sequencing data from the V4, V3-V5, V1-V3, V1-V5, V1-V6, and V1-V9 variable regions from within the 16S rRNA gene using DNA from a synthetic mock community and natural samples collected from human feces, mouse feces, and soil. The mock community allowed us to assess the actual sequencing error rate and how that error rate changed when different curation methods were applied. We developed a simple method based on sequence characteristics and quality scores to reduce the observed error rate for the V1-V9 region from 0.69 to 0.027%. This error rate is comparable to what has been observed for the shorter reads generated by 454 and Illumina's MiSeq sequencing platforms. Although the per base sequencing cost is still significantly more than that of MiSeq, the prospect of supplementing reference databases with full-length sequences from organisms below the limit of detection from the Sanger approach is exciting. PMID:27069806

  11. a Simple Symmetric Algorithm Using a Likeness with Introns Behavior in RNA Sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regoli, Massimo

    2009-02-01

    The RNA-Crypto System (shortly RCS) is a symmetric key algorithm to cipher data. The idea for this new algorithm starts from the observation of nature. In particular from the observation of RNA behavior and some of its properties. The RNA sequences has some sections called Introns. Introns, derived from the term "intragenic regions", are non-coding sections of precursor mRNA (pre-mRNA) or other RNAs, that are removed (spliced out of the RNA) before the mature RNA is formed. Once the introns have been spliced out of a pre-mRNA, the resulting mRNA sequence is ready to be translated into a protein. The corresponding parts of a gene are known as introns as well. The nature and the role of Introns in the pre-mRNA is not clear and it is under ponderous researches by Biologists but, in our case, we will use the presence of Introns in the RNA-Crypto System output as a strong method to add chaotic non coding information and an unnecessary behaviour in the access to the secret key to code the messages. In the RNA-Crypto System algoritnm the introns are sections of the ciphered message with non-coding information as well as in the precursor mRNA.

  12. Deep Sequencing of RNA from Ancient Maize Kernels

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Morten; Cappellini, Enrico; Romero-Navarro, J. Alberto; Wales, Nathan; Alquezar-Planas, David E.; Penfield, Steven; Brown, Terence A.; Vielle-Calzada, Jean-Philippe; Montiel, Rafael; Jørgensen, Tina; Odegaard, Nancy; Jacobs, Michael; Arriaza, Bernardo; Higham, Thomas F. G.; Ramsey, Christopher Bronk; Willerslev, Eske; Gilbert, M. Thomas P.

    2013-01-01

    The characterization of biomolecules from ancient samples can shed otherwise unobtainable insights into the past. Despite the fundamental role of transcriptomal change in evolution, the potential of ancient RNA remains unexploited – perhaps due to dogma associated with the fragility of RNA. We hypothesize that seeds offer a plausible refuge for long-term RNA survival, due to the fundamental role of RNA during seed germination. Using RNA-Seq on cDNA synthesized from nucleic acid extracts, we validate this hypothesis through demonstration of partial transcriptomal recovery from two sources of ancient maize kernels. The results suggest that ancient seed transcriptomics may offer a powerful new tool with which to study plant domestication. PMID:23326310

  13. Enzymatic aminoacylation of sequence-specific RNA minihelices and hybrid duplexes with methionine.

    PubMed Central

    Martinis, S A; Schimmel, P

    1992-01-01

    RNA hairpin helices whose sequences are based on the acceptor stems of alanine and histidine tRNAs are specifically aminoacylated with their cognate amino acids. In these examples, major determinants for the identities of the respective tRNAs reside in the acceptor stem; the anticodon and other parts of the tRNA are dispensable for aminoacylation. In contrast, the anticodon is a major determinant for the identity of a methionine tRNA. RNA hairpin helices and hybrid duplexes that reconstruct the acceptor-T psi C stem and the acceptor stem, respectively, of methionine tRNA were investigated here for aminoacylation with methionine. Direct visualization of the aminoacylated RNA product on an acidic polyacrylamide gel by phosphor imaging demonstrated specific aminoacylation with substrates that contained as few as 7 base pairs. No aminoacylation with methionine was detected with several analogous RNA substrates whose sequences were based on noncognate tRNAs. While the efficiency of aminoacylation is reduced by orders of magnitude relative to methionine tRNA, the results establish that specific aminoacylation with methionine of small duplex substrates can be achieved without the anticodon or other domains of the tRNA. The results, combined with earlier studies, suggest a highly specific adaptation of the structures of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases to the acceptor stems of their cognate tRNAs, resulting in a relationship between the nucleotide sequences/structures of small RNA duplexes and specific amino acids. Images PMID:1729719

  14. Combined DECS Analysis and Next-Generation Sequencing Enable Efficient Detection of Novel Plant RNA Viruses.

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, Hironobu; Tomita, Reiko; Katsu, Koji; Uehara, Takuya; Atsumi, Go; Tateda, Chika; Kobayashi, Kappei; Sekine, Ken-Taro

    2016-03-01

    The presence of high molecular weight double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) within plant cells is an indicator of infection with RNA viruses as these possess genomic or replicative dsRNA. DECS (dsRNA isolation, exhaustive amplification, cloning, and sequencing) analysis has been shown to be capable of detecting unknown viruses. We postulated that a combination of DECS analysis and next-generation sequencing (NGS) would improve detection efficiency and usability of the technique. Here, we describe a model case in which we efficiently detected the presumed genome sequence of Blueberry shoestring virus (BSSV), a member of the genus Sobemovirus, which has not so far been reported. dsRNAs were isolated from BSSV-infected blueberry plants using the dsRNA-binding protein, reverse-transcribed, amplified, and sequenced using NGS. A contig of 4,020 nucleotides (nt) that shared similarities with sequences from other Sobemovirus species was obtained as a candidate of the BSSV genomic sequence. Reverse transcription (RT)-PCR primer sets based on sequences from this contig enabled the detection of BSSV in all BSSV-infected plants tested but not in healthy controls. A recombinant protein encoded by the putative coat protein gene was bound by the BSSV-antibody, indicating that the candidate sequence was that of BSSV itself. Our results suggest that a combination of DECS analysis and NGS, designated here as "DECS-C," is a powerful method for detecting novel plant viruses. PMID:27072419

  15. Combined DECS Analysis and Next-Generation Sequencing Enable Efficient Detection of Novel Plant RNA Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Yanagisawa, Hironobu; Tomita, Reiko; Katsu, Koji; Uehara, Takuya; Atsumi, Go; Tateda, Chika; Kobayashi, Kappei; Sekine, Ken-Taro

    2016-01-01

    The presence of high molecular weight double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) within plant cells is an indicator of infection with RNA viruses as these possess genomic or replicative dsRNA. DECS (dsRNA isolation, exhaustive amplification, cloning, and sequencing) analysis has been shown to be capable of detecting unknown viruses. We postulated that a combination of DECS analysis and next-generation sequencing (NGS) would improve detection efficiency and usability of the technique. Here, we describe a model case in which we efficiently detected the presumed genome sequence of Blueberry shoestring virus (BSSV), a member of the genus Sobemovirus, which has not so far been reported. dsRNAs were isolated from BSSV-infected blueberry plants using the dsRNA-binding protein, reverse-transcribed, amplified, and sequenced using NGS. A contig of 4,020 nucleotides (nt) that shared similarities with sequences from other Sobemovirus species was obtained as a candidate of the BSSV genomic sequence. Reverse transcription (RT)-PCR primer sets based on sequences from this contig enabled the detection of BSSV in all BSSV-infected plants tested but not in healthy controls. A recombinant protein encoded by the putative coat protein gene was bound by the BSSV-antibody, indicating that the candidate sequence was that of BSSV itself. Our results suggest that a combination of DECS analysis and NGS, designated here as “DECS-C,” is a powerful method for detecting novel plant viruses. PMID:27072419

  16. Translation and Clinical Development of Antithrombotic Aptamers.

    PubMed

    Nimjee, Shahid M; Povsic, Thomas J; Sullenger, Bruce A; Becker, Richard C

    2016-06-01

    Thrombosis is a necessary physiological process to protect the body from uncontrolled bleeding. Pathological thrombus formation can lead to devastating clinical events including heart attack, stroke, deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, and disseminated intravascular coagulation. Numerous drugs have been developed to inhibit thrombosis. These have been targeted to coagulation factors along with proteins and receptors that activate platelets. While these drugs are effective at preventing blood clotting, their major side effect is inadvertent hemorrhage that can result in significant morbidity and mortality. There exists a need for anticoagulants that are not only effective at preventing thrombosis but can also be readily reversed. Aptamers offer a potential solution, representing a new class of drug agents that can be isolated to any protein and where antidote oligonucleotides can be designed based on the sequence of the aptamer. We present a summary of the anticoagulant and antithrombotic aptamers that have been identified and their stage of development and comment on the future of aptamer-based drug development to treat thrombosis. PMID:26882082

  17. Sequence and functional characterization of RNase P RNA from the chl alb containing cyanobacterium Prochlorothrix hollandica.

    PubMed

    Fingerhut, C; Schön, A

    1998-05-29

    Only a few complete sequences and very limited functional data are available for the catalytic RNA component of cyanobacterial RNase P. The RNase P RNA from the chl alb containing cyanobacterium Prochlorothrix hollandica belongs to a rarely found structural subtype with an extended P15/16 domain. We have established conditions for optimal in vitro ribozyme activity, and determined the kinetic parameters for cleavage of pre-tRNA(Tyr). Analysis of pre-tRNA mutants revealed that the T-stem sequence only plays a modulating role, whereas the CCA end is essential for efficient product formation. PMID:9654127

  18. Self-Assembled Hybrid Aptamer-Fc Conjugates for Targeted Delivery: A Modular Chemoenzymatic Approach.

    PubMed

    Dickgiesser, Stephan; Rasche, Nicolas; Nasu, Daichi; Middel, Stephen; Hörner, Sebastian; Avrutina, Olga; Diederichsen, Ulf; Kolmar, Harald

    2015-09-18

    Over the past decade, DNA and RNA aptamers have attracted keen research interest due to their ability to specifically bind targets of therapeutic relevance. However, their application is often hampered by a short serum half-life and missing effector functions. Conjugation of aptamers to antibody Fc fragments could improve pharmacokinetics, enable immune effector mechanisms, and provide an option for the introduction of desired payloads (e.g., toxins or fluorescent dyes). We developed a modular scaffold-supported system based on human IgG1 Fc fragments, which allows for its dual functionalization with moieties of interest. In our approach, two bioorthogonal, enzyme-mediated reactions were used in combination with oxime ligation and self-assembly based on PNA-DNA base pairing. Thus, an engineered synthetic peptide nucleic acid (PNA) oligomer was coupled to the C-termini of the Fc dimer upon sequence-specific sortase A-mediated transpeptidation. Hybridization of the resulting Fc-PNA conjugate with a tailored DNA aptamer that binds cancer-related hepatocyte growth factor receptor (c-MET) led to a hybrid construct which showed strong and specific binding to c-MET and was readily internalized by c-MET-overexpressing cells. To install an additional orthogonally addressable site, aldehyde tag technology was applied followed by oxime ligation with an aminooxy-bearing fluorescent dye as model cargo. Delivery of fluorescent probe specifically to c-MET-overexpressing cells was confirmed by flow cytometry. Our approach can provide access to engineered aptamer-Fc conjugates with desired target specificity and cytotoxic payloads. PMID:26131766

  19. Predicting RNA secondary structures from sequence and probing data.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Ronny; Wolfinger, Michael T; Tanzer, Andrea; Hofacker, Ivo L

    2016-07-01

    RNA secondary structures have proven essential for understanding the regulatory functions performed by RNA such as microRNAs, bacterial small RNAs, or riboswitches. This success is in part due to the availability of efficient computational methods for predicting RNA secondary structures. Recent advances focus on dealing with the inherent uncertainty of prediction by considering the ensemble of possible structures rather than the single most stable one. Moreover, the advent of high-throughput structural probing has spurred the development of computational methods that incorporate such experimental data as auxiliary information. PMID:27064083

  20. RNA sequencing of Sleeping Beauty transposon-induced tumors detects transposon-RNA fusions in forward genetic cancer screens.

    PubMed

    Temiz, Nuri A; Moriarity, Branden S; Wolf, Natalie K; Riordan, Jesse D; Dupuy, Adam J; Largaespada, David A; Sarver, Aaron L

    2016-01-01

    Forward genetic screens using Sleeping Beauty (SB)-mobilized T2/Onc transposons have been used to identify common insertion sites (CISs) associated with tumor formation. Recurrent sites of transposon insertion are commonly identified using ligation-mediated PCR (LM-PCR). Here, we use RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) data to directly identify transcriptional events mediated by T2/Onc. Surprisingly, the majority (∼80%) of LM-PCR identified junction fragments do not lead to observable changes in RNA transcripts. However, in CIS regions, direct transcriptional effects of transposon insertions are observed. We developed an automated method to systematically identify T2/Onc-genome RNA fusion sequences in RNA-seq data. RNA fusion-based CISs were identified corresponding to both DNA-based CISs (Cdkn2a, Mycl1, Nf2, Pten, Sema6d, and Rere) and additional regions strongly associated with cancer that were not observed by LM-PCR (Myc, Akt1, Pth, Csf1r, Fgfr2, Wisp1, Map3k5, and Map4k3). In addition to calculating recurrent CISs, we also present complementary methods to identify potential driver events via determination of strongly supported fusions and fusions with large transcript level changes in the absence of multitumor recurrence. These methods independently identify CIS regions and also point to cancer-associated genes like Braf. We anticipate RNA-seq analyses of tumors from forward genetic screens will become an efficient tool to identify causal events. PMID:26553456

  1. RNA sequencing of Sleeping Beauty transposon-induced tumors detects transposon-RNA fusions in forward genetic cancer screens

    PubMed Central

    Temiz, Nuri A.; Moriarity, Branden S.; Wolf, Natalie K.; Riordan, Jesse D.; Dupuy, Adam J.; Largaespada, David A.; Sarver, Aaron L.

    2016-01-01

    Forward genetic screens using Sleeping Beauty (SB)-mobilized T2/Onc transposons have been used to identify common insertion sites (CISs) associated with tumor formation. Recurrent sites of transposon insertion are commonly identified using ligation-mediated PCR (LM-PCR). Here, we use RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) data to directly identify transcriptional events mediated by T2/Onc. Surprisingly, the majority (∼80%) of LM-PCR identified junction fragments do not lead to observable changes in RNA transcripts. However, in CIS regions, direct transcriptional effects of transposon insertions are observed. We developed an automated method to systematically identify T2/Onc-genome RNA fusion sequences in RNA-seq data. RNA fusion-based CISs were identified corresponding to both DNA-based CISs (Cdkn2a, Mycl1, Nf2, Pten, Sema6d, and Rere) and additional regions strongly associated with cancer that were not observed by LM-PCR (Myc, Akt1, Pth, Csf1r, Fgfr2, Wisp1, Map3k5, and Map4k3). In addition to calculating recurrent CISs, we also present complementary methods to identify potential driver events via determination of strongly supported fusions and fusions with large transcript level changes in the absence of multitumor recurrence. These methods independently identify CIS regions and also point to cancer-associated genes like Braf. We anticipate RNA-seq analyses of tumors from forward genetic screens will become an efficient tool to identify causal events. PMID:26553456

  2. The nucleotide sequence of the large ribosomal RNA gene and the adjacent tRNA genes from rat mitochondria.

    PubMed Central

    Saccone, C; Cantatore, P; Gadaleta, G; Gallerani, R; Lanave, C; Pepe, G; Kroon, A M

    1981-01-01

    We have sequenced the Eco R(1) fragment D from rat mitochondrial DNA. It contains one third of the tRNA (Val) gene (the remaining part has been sequenced from the 3' end of the Eco R(1) fragment A) the complete gene for the large mt 16S rRNA, the tRNA (Leu) gene and the 5' end of an unidentified reading frame. The mt gene for the large rRNA from rat has been aligned with the homologous genes from mouse and human using graphic computer programs. Hypervariable regions at the center of the molecule and highly conserved regions toward the 3' end have been detected. The mt gene for tRNA Leu is of the conventional type and its primary structure is highly conserved among mammals. The mt gene for tRNA(Val) shows characteristics similar to those of other mt tRNA genes but the degree of homology is lower. Comparative studies confirm that AGA and AGG are read as stop codons in mammalian mitochondria. PMID:6913863

  3. miRBase: integrating microRNA annotation and deep-sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Kozomara, Ana; Griffiths-Jones, Sam

    2011-01-01

    miRBase is the primary online repository for all microRNA sequences and annotation. The current release (miRBase 16) contains over 15,000 microRNA gene loci in over 140 species, and over 17,000 distinct mature microRNA sequences. Deep-sequencing technologies have delivered a sharp rise in the rate of novel microRNA discovery. We have mapped reads from short RNA deep-sequencing experiments to microRNAs in miRBase and developed web interfaces to view these mappings. The user can view all read data associated with a given microRNA annotation, filter reads by experiment and count, and search for microRNAs by tissue- and stage-specific expression. These data can be used as a proxy for relative expression levels of microRNA sequences, provide detailed evidence for microRNA annotations and alternative isoforms of mature microRNAs, and allow us to revisit previous annotations. miRBase is available online at: http://www.mirbase.org/. PMID:21037258

  4. Use of S1 nuclease in deep sequencing for detection of double-stranded RNA viruses.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Saya; Nagai, Makoto; Moriyama, Hiromitsu; Fukuhara, Toshiyuki; Koyama, Satoshi; Omatsu, Tsutomu; Furuya, Tetsuya; Shirai, Junsuke; Mizutani, Tetsuya

    2015-09-01

    Metagenomic approach using next-generation DNA sequencing has facilitated the detection of many pathogenic viruses from fecal samples. However, in many cases, majority of the detected sequences originate from the host genome and bacterial flora in the gut. Here, to improve efficiency of the detection of double-stranded (ds) RNA viruses from samples, we evaluated the applicability of S1 nuclease on deep sequencing. Treating total RNA with S1 nuclease resulted in 1.5-28.4- and 10.1-208.9-fold increases in sequence reads of group A rotavirus in fecal and viral culture samples, respectively. Moreover, increasing coverage of mapping to reference sequences allowed for sufficient genotyping using analytical software. These results suggest that library construction using S1 nuclease is useful for deep sequencing in the detection of dsRNA viruses. PMID:25843154

  5. Deletion analysis of the 5' untranslated leader sequence of tobacco mosaic virus RNA.

    PubMed

    Takamatsu, N; Watanabe, Y; Iwasaki, T; Shiba, T; Meshi, T; Okada, Y

    1991-03-01

    To determine the sequences essential for viral multiplication in the 5' untranslated leader sequence of tobacco mosaic virus RNA, mutant TMV-L (a tomato strain) RNAs which carry several deletions in this 71-nucleotide sequence were constructed by an in vitro transcription system and their multiplication was analyzed by introducing mutant RNA into tobacco protoplasts by electroporation. Large deletions of the sequence from nucleotides 9 to 47 or 25 to 71 abolished viral multiplication; when about 10-nucleotide deletions were introduced throughout this 5' leader sequence, only deletion of the sequence from nucleotides 2 to 8 abolished detectable viral multiplication. This mutant RNA, however, directed the synthesis of the 130,000-molecular-weight protein in a rabbit reticulocyte lysate in vitro translation system, and consequently this 5'-proximal portion appears likely to be essential for replication. PMID:1995954

  6. Sequence variation between 462 human individuals fine-tunes functional sites of RNA processing.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Pedro G; Oti, Martin; Barann, Matthias; Wieland, Thomas; Ezquina, Suzana; Friedländer, Marc R; Rivas, Manuel A; Esteve-Codina, Anna; Rosenstiel, Philip; Strom, Tim M; Lappalainen, Tuuli; Guigó, Roderic; Sammeth, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in the cost-efficiency of sequencing technologies enabled the combined DNA- and RNA-sequencing of human individuals at the population-scale, making genome-wide investigations of the inter-individual genetic impact on gene expression viable. Employing mRNA-sequencing data from the Geuvadis Project and genome sequencing data from the 1000 Genomes Project we show that the computational analysis of DNA sequences around splice sites and poly-A signals is able to explain several observations in the phenotype data. In contrast to widespread assessments of statistically significant associations between DNA polymorphisms and quantitative traits, we developed a computational tool to pinpoint the molecular mechanisms by which genetic markers drive variation in RNA-processing, cataloguing and classifying alleles that change the affinity of core RNA elements to their recognizing factors. The in silico models we employ further suggest RNA editing can moonlight as a splicing-modulator, albeit less frequently than genomic sequence diversity. Beyond existing annotations, we demonstrate that the ultra-high resolution of RNA-Seq combined from 462 individuals also provides evidence for thousands of bona fide novel elements of RNA processing-alternative splice sites, introns, and cleavage sites-which are often rare and lowly expressed but in other characteristics similar to their annotated counterparts. PMID:27617755

  7. RNA editing generates cellular subsets with diverse sequence within populations.

    PubMed

    Harjanto, Dewi; Papamarkou, Theodore; Oates, Chris J; Rayon-Estrada, Violeta; Papavasiliou, F Nina; Papavasiliou, Anastasia

    2016-01-01

    RNA editing is a mutational mechanism that specifically alters the nucleotide content in transcribed RNA. However, editing rates vary widely, and could result from equivalent editing amongst individual cells, or represent an average of variable editing within a population. Here we present a hierarchical Bayesian model that quantifies the variance of editing rates at specific sites using RNA-seq data from both single cells, and a cognate bulk sample to distinguish between these two possibilities. The model predicts high variance for specific edited sites in murine macrophages and dendritic cells, findings that we validated experimentally by using targeted amplification of specific editable transcripts from single cells. The model also predicts changes in variance in editing rates for specific sites in dendritic cells during the course of LPS stimulation. Our data demonstrate substantial variance in editing signatures amongst single cells, supporting the notion that RNA editing generates diversity within cellular populations. PMID:27418407

  8. RNA editing generates cellular subsets with diverse sequence within populations

    PubMed Central

    Harjanto, Dewi; Papamarkou, Theodore; Oates, Chris J.; Rayon-Estrada, Violeta; Papavasiliou, F. Nina; Papavasiliou, Anastasia

    2016-01-01

    RNA editing is a mutational mechanism that specifically alters the nucleotide content in transcribed RNA. However, editing rates vary widely, and could result from equivalent editing amongst individual cells, or represent an average of variable editing within a population. Here we present a hierarchical Bayesian model that quantifies the variance of editing rates at specific sites using RNA-seq data from both single cells, and a cognate bulk sample to distinguish between these two possibilities. The model predicts high variance for specific edited sites in murine macrophages and dendritic cells, findings that we validated experimentally by using targeted amplification of specific editable transcripts from single cells. The model also predicts changes in variance in editing rates for specific sites in dendritic cells during the course of LPS stimulation. Our data demonstrate substantial variance in editing signatures amongst single cells, supporting the notion that RNA editing generates diversity within cellular populations. PMID:27418407

  9. Analysis of a marine picoplankton community by 16S rRNA gene cloning and sequencing.

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, T M; DeLong, E F; Pace, N R

    1991-01-01

    The phylogenetic diversity of an oligotrophic marine picoplankton community was examined by analyzing the sequences of cloned ribosomal genes. This strategy does not rely on cultivation of the resident microorganisms. Bulk genomic DNA was isolated from picoplankton collected in the north central Pacific Ocean by tangential flow filtration. The mixed-population DNA was fragmented, size fractionated, and cloned into bacteriophage lambda. Thirty-eight clones containing 16S rRNA genes were identified in a screen of 3.2 x 10(4) recombinant phage, and portions of the rRNA gene were amplified by polymerase chain reaction and sequenced. The resulting sequences were used to establish the identities of the picoplankton by comparison with an established data base of rRNA sequences. Fifteen unique eubacterial sequences were obtained, including four from cyanobacteria and eleven from proteobacteria. A single eucaryote related to dinoflagellates was identified; no archaebacterial sequences were detected. The cyanobacterial sequences are all closely related to sequences from cultivated marine Synechococcus strains and with cyanobacterial sequences obtained from the Atlantic Ocean (Sargasso Sea). Several sequences were related to common marine isolates of the gamma subdivision of proteobacteria. In addition to sequences closely related to those of described bacteria, sequences were obtained from two phylogenetic groups of organisms that are not closely related to any known rRNA sequences from cultivated organisms. Both of these novel phylogenetic clusters are proteobacteria, one group within the alpha subdivision and the other distinct from known proteobacterial subdivisions. The rRNA sequences of the alpha-related group are nearly identical to those of some Sargasso Sea picoplankton, suggesting a global distribution of these organisms. Images PMID:2066334

  10. Informatics for RNA Sequencing: A Web Resource for Analysis on the Cloud.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Malachi; Walker, Jason R; Spies, Nicholas C; Ainscough, Benjamin J; Griffith, Obi L

    2015-08-01

    Massively parallel RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) has rapidly become the assay of choice for interrogating RNA transcript abundance and diversity. This article provides a detailed introduction to fundamental RNA-seq molecular biology and informatics concepts. We make available open-access RNA-seq tutorials that cover cloud computing, tool installation, relevant file formats, reference genomes, transcriptome annotations, quality-control strategies, expression, differential expression, and alternative splicing analysis methods. These tutorials and additional training resources are accompanied by complete analysis pipelines and test datasets made available without encumbrance at www.rnaseq.wiki. PMID:26248053

  11. Informatics for RNA Sequencing: A Web Resource for Analysis on the Cloud

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, Malachi; Walker, Jason R.; Spies, Nicholas C.; Ainscough, Benjamin J.; Griffith, Obi L.

    2015-01-01

    Massively parallel RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) has rapidly become the assay of choice for interrogating RNA transcript abundance and diversity. This article provides a detailed introduction to fundamental RNA-seq molecular biology and informatics concepts. We make available open-access RNA-seq tutorials that cover cloud computing, tool installation, relevant file formats, reference genomes, transcriptome annotations, quality-control strategies, expression, differential expression, and alternative splicing analysis methods. These tutorials and additional training resources are accompanied by complete analysis pipelines and test datasets made available without encumbrance at www.rnaseq.wiki. PMID:26248053

  12. Phylogenetic analysis of oryx species using partial sequences of mitochondrial rRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Khan, H A; Arif, I A; Al Farhan, A H; Al Homaidan, A A

    2008-01-01

    We conducted a comparative evaluation of 12S rRNA and 16S rRNA genes of the mitochondrial genome for molecular differentiation among three oryx species (Oryx leucoryx, Oryx dammah and Oryx gazella) with respect to two closely related outgroups, addax and roan. Our findings showed the failure of 12S rRNA gene to differentiate between the genus Oryx and addax, whereas a 342-bp partial sequence of 16S rRNA accurately grouped all five taxa studied, suggesting the utility of 16S rRNA segment for molecular phylogeny of oryx at the genus and possibly species levels. PMID:19048493

  13. Genomic SELEX for Hfq-binding RNAs identifies genomic aptamers predominantly in antisense transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, C.; Gesell, T.; Zimmermann, B.; Schoeberl, U.; Bilusic, I.; Rajkowitsch, L.; Waldsich, C.; von Haeseler, A.; Schroeder, R.

    2010-01-01

    An unexpectedly high number of regulatory RNAs have been recently discovered that fine-tune the function of genes at all levels of expression. We employed Genomic SELEX, a method to identify protein-binding RNAs encoded in the genome, to search for further regulatory RNAs in Escherichia coli. We used the global regulator protein Hfq as bait, because it can interact with a large number of RNAs, promoting their interaction. The enriched SELEX pool was subjected to deep sequencing, and 8865 sequences were mapped to the E. coli genome. These short sequences represent genomic Hfq-aptamers and are part of potential regulatory elements within RNA molecules. The motif 5′-AAYAAYAA-3′ was enriched in the selected RNAs and confers low-nanomolar affinity to Hfq. The motif was confirmed to bind Hfq by DMS footprinting. The Hfq aptamers are 4-fold more frequent on the antisense strand of protein coding genes than on the sense strand. They were enriched opposite to translation start sites or opposite to intervening sequences between ORFs in operons. These results expand the repertoire of Hfq targets and also suggest that Hfq might regulate the expression of a large number of genes via interaction with cis-antisense RNAs. PMID:20348540

  14. Chromosomal localization and sequence variation of 5S rRNA gene in five Capsicum species.

    PubMed

    Park, Y K; Park, K C; Park, C H; Kim, N S

    2000-02-29

    Chromosomal localization and sequence analysis of the 5S rRNA gene were carried out in five Capsicum species. Fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed that chromosomal location of the 5S rRNA gene was conserved in a single locus at a chromosome which was assigned to chromosome 1 by the synteny relationship with tomato. In sequence analysis, the repeating units of the 5S rRNA genes in the Capsicum species were variable in size from 278 bp to 300 bp. In sequence comparison of our results to the results with other Solanaceae plants as published by others, the coding region was highly conserved, but the spacer regions varied in size and sequence. T stretch regions, just after the end of the coding sequences, were more prominant in the Capsicum species than in two other plants. High G x C rich regions, which might have similar functions as that of the GC islands in the genes transcribed by RNA PolII, were observed after the T stretch region. Although we could not observe the TATA like sequences, an AT rich segment at -27 to -18 was detected in the 5S rRNA genes of the Capsicum species. Species relationship among the Capsicum species was also studied by the sequence comparison of the 5S rRNA genes. While C. chinense, C. frutescens, and C. annuum formed one lineage, C. baccatum was revealed to be an intermediate species between the former three species and C. pubescens. PMID:10774742

  15. MicroRNA Expression Profile in Penile Cancer Revealed by Next-Generation Small RNA Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuanwei; Xu, Bo; Zhou, Jun; Fan, Song; Hao, Zongyao; Shi, Haoqiang; Zhang, Xiansheng; Kong, Rui; Xu, Lingfan; Gao, Jingjing; Zou, Duohong; Liang, Chaozhao

    2015-01-01

    Penile cancer (PeCa) is a relatively rare tumor entity but possesses higher morbidity and mortality rates especially in developing countries. To date, the concrete pathogenic signaling pathways and core machineries involved in tumorigenesis and progression of PeCa remain to be elucidated. Several studies suggested miRNAs, which modulate gene expression at posttranscriptional level, were frequently mis-regulated and aberrantly expressed in human cancers. However, the miRNA profile in human PeCa has not been reported before. In this present study, the miRNA profile was obtained from 10 fresh penile cancerous tissues and matched adjacent non-cancerous tissues via next-generation sequencing. As a result, a total of 751 and 806 annotated miRNAs were identified in normal and cancerous penile tissues, respectively. Among which, 56 miRNAs with significantly different expression levels between paired tissues were identified. Subsequently, several annotated miRNAs were selected randomly and validated using quantitative real-time PCR. Compared with the previous publications regarding to the altered miRNAs expression in various cancers and especially genitourinary (prostate, bladder, kidney, testis) cancers, the most majority of deregulated miRNAs showed the similar expression pattern in penile cancer. Moreover, the bioinformatics analyses suggested that the putative target genes of differentially expressed miRNAs between cancerous and matched normal penile tissues were tightly associated with cell junction, proliferation, growth as well as genomic instability and so on, by modulating Wnt, MAPK, p53, PI3K-Akt, Notch and TGF-β signaling pathways, which were all well-established to participate in cancer initiation and progression. Our work presents a global view of the differentially expressed miRNAs and potentially regulatory networks of their target genes for clarifying the pathogenic transformation of normal penis to PeCa, which research resource also provides new insights

  16. New perspectives on the diversification of the RNA interference system: insights from comparative genomics and small RNA sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Burroughs, Alexander Maxwell; Ando, Yoshinari; Aravind, L

    2014-01-01

    Our understanding of the pervasive involvement of small RNAs in regulating diverse biological processes has been greatly augmented by recent application of deep-sequencing technologies to small RNA across diverse eukaryotes. We review the currently-known small RNA classes and place them in context of the reconstructed evolutionary history of the RNAi protein machinery. This synthesis indicates the earliest versions of eukaryotic RNAi systems likely utilized small RNA processed from three types of precursors: 1) sense-antisense transcriptional products, 2) genome-encoded, imperfectly-complementary hairpin sequences, and 3) larger non-coding RNA precursor sequences. Structural dissection of PIWI proteins along with recent discovery of novel families (including Med13 of the Mediator complex) suggest that emergence of a distinct architecture with the N-terminal domains (also occurring separately fused to endoDNases in prokaryotes) formed via duplication of an ancestral unit was key to their recruitment as primary RNAi effectors and use of small RNAs of certain preferred lengths. Prokaryotic PIWI proteins are typically components of several RNA-directed DNA restriction or CRISPR/Cas systems. However, eukaryotic versions appear to have emerged from a subset that evolved RNA-directed RNA interference. They were recruited alongside RNaseIII domains and RdRP domains, also from prokaryotic systems, to form the core eukaryotic RNAi system. Like certain regulatory systems, RNAi diversified into two distinct but linked arms concomitant with eukaryotic nucleo-cytoplasmic compartmentalization. Subsequent elaboration of RNAi proceeded via diversification of the core protein machinery through lineage-specific expansions and recruitment of new components from prokaryotes (nucleases and small RNA-modifying enzymes), allowing for diversification of associating small RNAs. PMID:24311560

  17. Methods To Identify Aptamers against Cell Surface Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Cibiel, Agnes; Dupont, Daniel Miotto; Ducongé, Frédéric

    2011-01-01

    Aptamers are nucleic acid-based ligands identified through a process of molecular evolution named SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential enrichment). During the last 10-15 years, numerous aptamers have been developed specifically against targets present on or associated with the surface of human cells or infectious pathogens such as viruses, bacteria, fungi or parasites. Several of the aptamers have been described as potent probes, rivalling antibodies, for use in flow cytometry or microscopy. Some have also been used as drugs by inhibiting or activating functions of their targets in a manner similar to neutralizing or agonistic antibodies. Additionally, it is straightforward to conjugate aptamers to other agents without losing their affinity and they have successfully been used in vitro and in vivo to deliver drugs, siRNA, nanoparticles or contrast agents to target cells. Hence, aptamers identified against cell surface biomarkers represent a promising class of ligands. This review presents the different strategies of SELEX that have been developed to identify aptamers for cell surface-associated proteins as well as some of the methods that are used to study their binding on living cells.

  18. Aptamers Binding to c-Met Inhibiting Tumor Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Piater, Birgit; Doerner, Achim; Guenther, Ralf; Kolmar, Harald; Hock, Bjoern

    2015-01-01

    The human receptor tyrosine kinase c-Met plays an important role in the control of critical cellular processes. Since c-Met is frequently over expressed or deregulated in human malignancies, blocking its activation is of special interest for therapy. In normal conditions, the c-Met receptor is activated by its bivalent ligand hepatocyte growth factor (HGF). Also bivalent antibodies can activate the receptor by cross linking, limiting therapeutic applications. We report the generation of the RNA aptamer CLN64 containing 2’-fluoro pyrimidine modifications by systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX). CLN64 and a previously described single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) aptamer CLN3 exhibited high specificities and affinities to recombinant and cellular expressed c-Met. Both aptamers effectively inhibited HGF-dependent c-Met activation, signaling and cell migration. We showed that these aptamers did not induce c-Met activation, revealing an advantage over bivalent therapeutic molecules. Both aptamers were shown to bind overlapping epitopes but only CLN3 competed with HGF binding to cMet. In addition to their therapeutic and diagnostic potential, CLN3 and CLN64 aptamers exhibit valuable tools to further understand the structural and functional basis for c-Met activation or inhibition by synthetic ligands and their interplay with HGF binding. PMID:26658271

  19. Sequence analysis of the 3' non-coding region of mouse immunoglobulin light chain messenger RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Hamlyn, P H; Gillam, S; Smith, M; Milstein, C

    1977-01-01

    Using an oligonucleotide d(pT10-C-A) as primer, cDNA has been transcribed from the 3' non-coding region of mouse immunoglobulin light chain mRNA and sequenced by a modification1 of the 'plus-minus' gel method2. The sequence obtained has partially corrected and extended a previously obtained sequence3. The new data contains an unusual sequence in which a trinucleotide is repeated seven times. Images PMID:405661

  20. Fluorescent in situ sequencing (FISSEQ) of RNA for gene expression profiling in intact cells and tissues

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Je Hyuk; Daugharthy, Evan R.; Scheiman, Jonathan; Kalhor, Reza; Ferrante, Thomas C.; Terry, Richard; Turczyk, Brian M.; Yang, Joyce L.; Lee, Ho Suk; Aach, John; Zhang, Kun; Church, George M.

    2014-01-01

    RNA sequencing measures the quantitative change in gene expression over the whole transcriptome, but it lacks spatial context. On the other hand, in situ hybridization provides the location of gene expression, but only for a small number of genes. Here we detail a protocol for genome-wide profiling of gene expression in situ in fixed cells and tissues, in which RNA is converted into cross-linked cDNA amplicons and sequenced manually on a confocal microscope. Unlike traditional RNA-seq our method enriches for context-specific transcripts over house-keeping and/or structural RNA, and it preserves the tissue architecture for RNA localization studies. Our protocol is written for researchers experienced in cell microscopy with minimal computing skills. Library construction and sequencing can be completed within 14 d, with image analysis requiring an additional 2 d. PMID:25675209

  1. Empirical analysis of RNA robustness and evolution using high-throughput sequencing of ribozyme reactions.

    PubMed

    Hayden, Eric J

    2016-08-15

    RNA molecules provide a realistic but tractable model of a genotype to phenotype relationship. This relationship has been extensively investigated computationally using secondary structure prediction algorithms. Enzymatic RNA molecules, or ribozymes, offer access to genotypic and phenotypic information in the laboratory. Advancements in high-throughput sequencing technologies have enabled the analysis of sequences in the lab that now rivals what can be accomplished computationally. This has motivated a resurgence of in vitro selection experiments and opened new doors for the analysis of the distribution of RNA functions in genotype space. A body of computational experiments has investigated the persistence of specific RNA structures despite changes in the primary sequence, and how this mutational robustness can promote adaptations. This article summarizes recent approaches that were designed to investigate the role of mutational robustness during the evolution of RNA molecules in the laboratory, and presents theoretical motivations, experimental methods and approaches to data analysis. PMID:27215494

  2. RNA sequencing using fluorescent-labeled dideoxynucleotides and automated fluorescence detection.

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, G J

    1990-01-01

    Although dideoxy terminated sequencing of RNA, using reverse transcriptase and oligodeoxynucleotide primers, is now a well established method, the accuracy is limited by sequence ambiguities due to unspecific chain termination events. A protocol is described which circumvents these ambiguities by using fluorescence labels tagged to dideoxynucleotides. Only chain terminations caused by dideoxynucleotides were detected while premature terminated cDNA's remain undetectable. In addition, the remaining multiple signals at nucleotide positions can be assigned to sequence heterogeneities within the RNA sequence to be determined. Images PMID:1690393

  3. RNA sequence and transcriptional properties of the 3' end of the Newcastle disease virus genome

    SciTech Connect

    Kurilla, M.G.; Stone, H.O.; Keene, J.D.

    1985-09-01

    The 3' end of the genomic RNA of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) has been sequenced and the leader RNA defined. Using hybridization to a 3'-end-labeled genome, leader RNA species from in vitro transcription reactions and from infected cell extracts were found to be 47 and 53 nucleotides long. In addition, the start site of the 3'-proximal mRNA was determined by sequence analysis of in vitro (beta-32P)GTP-labeled transcription products. The genomic sequence extending beyond the leader region demonstrated an open reading frame for at least 42 amino acids and probably represents the amino terminus of the nucleocapsid protein (NP). The terminal 8 nucleotides of the NDV genome were identical to those of measles virus and Sendai virus while the sequence of the distal half of the leader region was more similar to that of vesicular stomatitis virus. These data argue for strong evolutionary relatedness between the paramyxovirus and rhabdovirus groups.

  4. One-step selection of Vaccinia virus-binding DNA aptamers by MonoLEX

    PubMed Central

    Nitsche, Andreas; Kurth, Andreas; Dunkhorst, Anna; Pänke, Oliver; Sielaff, Hendrik; Junge, Wolfgang; Muth, Doreen; Scheller, Frieder; Stöcklein, Walter; Dahmen, Claudia; Pauli, Georg; Kage, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    Background As a new class of therapeutic and diagnostic reagents, more than fifteen years ago RNA and DNA aptamers were identified as binding molecules to numerous small compounds, proteins and rarely even to complete pathogen particles. Most aptamers were isolated from complex libraries of synthetic nucleic acids by a process termed SELEX based on several selection and amplification steps. Here we report the application of a new one-step selection method (MonoLEX) to acquire high-affinity DNA aptamers binding Vaccinia virus used as a model organism for complex target structures. Results The selection against complete Vaccinia virus particles resulted in a 64-base DNA aptamer specifically binding to orthopoxviruses as validated by dot blot analysis, Surface Plasmon Resonance, Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy and real-time PCR, following an aptamer blotting assay. The same oligonucleotide showed the ability to inhibit in vitro infection of Vaccinia virus and other orthopoxviruses in a concentration-dependent manner. Conclusion The MonoLEX method is a straightforward procedure as demonstrated here for the identification of a high-affinity DNA aptamer binding Vaccinia virus. MonoLEX comprises a single affinity chromatography step, followed by subsequent physical segmentation of the affinity resin and a single final PCR amplification step of bound aptamers. Therefore, this procedure improves the selection of high affinity aptamers by reducing the competition between aptamers of different affinities during the PCR step, indicating an advantage for the single-round MonoLEX method. PMID:17697378

  5. Large-scale sequencing and the natural history of model human RNA viruses

    PubMed Central

    Dugan, Vivien G; Saira, Kazima; Ghedin, Elodie

    2012-01-01

    RNA virus exploration within the field of medical virology has greatly benefited from technological developments in genomics, deepening our understanding of viral dynamics and emergence. Large-scale first-generation technology sequencing projects have expedited molecular epidemiology studies at an unprecedented scale for two pathogenic RNA viruses chosen as models: influenza A virus and dengue. Next-generation sequencing approaches are now leading to a more in-depth analysis of virus genetic diversity, which is greater for RNA than DNA viruses because of high replication rates and the absence of proofreading activity of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. In the field of virus discovery, technological advancements and metagenomic approaches are expanding the catalogs of novel viruses by facilitating our probing into the RNA virus world. PMID:23682295

  6. Small RNA and RNA-IP Sequencing Identifies and Validates Novel MicroRNAs in Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chin-Han; Liao, Ko-Hsun; Shih, Chuan-Chi; Chan, Chia-Hao; Hsieh, Jui-Yu; Tsai, Cheng-Fong; Wang, Hsei-Wei; Chang, Shing-Jyh

    2016-03-01

    Organ regeneration therapies using multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are currently being investigated for a variety of common complex diseases. Understanding the molecular regulation of MSC biology will benefit regenerative medicine. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) act as regulators in MSC stemness. There are approximately 2500 currently known human miRNAs that have been recorded in the miRBase v21 database. In the present study, we identified novel microRNAs involved in MSC stemness and differentiation by obtaining the global microRNA expression profiles (miRNomes) of MSCs from two anatomical locations bone marrow (BM-MSCs) and umbilical cord Wharton's jelly (WJ-MSCs) and from osteogenically and adipogenically differentiated progenies of BM-MSCs. Small RNA sequencing (smRNA-seq) and bioinformatics analyses predicted that 49 uncharacterized miRNA candidates had high cellular expression values in MSCs. Another independent batch of Ago1/2-based RNA immunoprecipitation (RNA-IP) sequencing datasets validated the existence of 40 unreported miRNAs in cells and their associations with the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC). Nine of these 40 new miRNAs were universally overexpressed in both MSC types; nine others were overexpressed in differentiated cells. A novel miRNA (UNI-118-3p) was specifically expressed in BM-MSCs, as verified using RT-qPCR. Taken together, this report offers comprehensive miRNome profiles for two MSC types, as well as cells differentiated from BM-MSCs. MSC transplantation has the potential to ameliorate degenerative disorders and repair damaged tissues. Interventions involving the above 40 new microRNA members in transplanted MSCs may potentially guide future clinical applications. PMID:26910904

  7. The nucleotide sequence at the 5' end of foot and mouth disease virus RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Harris, T J

    1979-01-01

    Foot and mouth disease virus RNA has been treated with RNase H in the presence of oligo (dG) specifically to digest the poly(C) tract which lies near the 5' end of the molecule (10). The short (S) fragment containing the 5' end of the RNA was separated from the remainder of the RNA (L fragment) by gel electrophoresis. RNA ligase mediated labelling of the 3' end of S fragment showed that the RNase H digestion gave rise to molecules that differed only in the number of cytidylic acid residues remaining at their 3' ends and did not leave the unique 3' end necessary for fast sequence analysis. As the 5' end of S fragment prepared form virus RNA is blocked by VPg, S fragment was prepared from virus specific messenger RNA which does not contain this protein. This RNA was labelled at the 5' end using polynucleotide kinase and the sequence of 70 nucleotides at the 5' end determined by partial enzyme digestion sequencing on polyacrylamide gels. Some of this sequence was confirmed from an analysis of the oligonucleotides derived by RNase T1 digestion of S fragment. The sequence obtained indicates that there is a stable hairpin loop at the 5' terminus of the RNA before an initiation codon 33 nucleotides from the 5' end. In addition, the RNase T1 analysis suggests that there are short repeated sequences in S fragment and that an eleven nucleotide inverted complementary repeat of a sequence near the 3' end of the RNA is present at the junction of S fragment and the poly(C) tract. Images PMID:231762

  8. Comprehensive analysis of human small RNA sequencing data provides insights into expression profiles and miRNA editing

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Jing; Wu, Yuliang; Zhang, Xiantong; Liao, Yifang; Sibanda, Vusumuzi Leroy; Liu, Wei; Guo, An-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play key regulatory roles in various biological processes and diseases. A comprehensive analysis of large scale small RNA sequencing data (smRNA-seq) will be very helpful to explore tissue or disease specific miRNA markers and uncover miRNA variants. Here, we systematically analyzed 410 human smRNA-seq datasets, which samples are from 24 tissue/disease/cell lines. We tested the mapping strategies and found that it was necessary to make multiple-round mappings with different mismatch parameters. miRNA expression profiles revealed that on average ∼70% of known miRNAs were expressed at low level or not expressed (RPM < 1) in a sample and only ∼9% of known miRNAs were relatively highly expressed (RPM > 100). About 30% known miRNAs were not expressed in all of our used samples. The miRNA expression profiles were compiled into an online database (HMED, http://bioinfo.life.hust.edu.cn/smallRNA/). Dozens of tissue/disease specific miRNAs, disease/control dysregulated miRNAs and miRNAs with arm switching events were discovered. Further, we identified some highly confident editing sites including 24 A-to-I sites and 23 C-to-U sites. About half of them were widespread miRNA editing sites in different tissues. We characterized that the 2 types of editing sites have different features with regard to location, editing level and frequency. Our analyses for expression profiles, specific miRNA markers, arm switching, and editing sites, may provide valuable information for further studies of miRNA function and biomarker finding. PMID:25692236

  9. Complete Sequence Construction of the Highly Repetitive Ribosomal RNA Gene Repeats in Eukaryotes Using Whole Genome Sequence Data.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Saumya; Ganley, Austen R D

    2016-01-01

    The ribosomal RNA genes (rDNA) encode the major rRNA species of the ribosome, and thus are essential across life. These genes are highly repetitive in most eukaryotes, forming blocks of tandem repeats that form the core of nucleoli. The primary role of the rDNA in encoding rRNA has been long understood, but more recently the rDNA has been implicated in a number of other important biological phenomena, including genome stability, cell cycle, and epigenetic silencing. Noncoding elements, primarily located in the intergenic spacer region, appear to mediate many of these phenomena. Although sequence information is available for the genomes of many organisms, in almost all cases rDNA repeat sequences are lacking, primarily due to problems in assembling these intriguing regions during whole genome assemblies. Here, we present a method to obtain complete rDNA repeat unit sequences from whole genome assemblies. Limitations of next generation sequencing (NGS) data make them unsuitable for assembling complete rDNA unit sequences; therefore, the method we present relies on the use of Sanger whole genome sequence data. Our method makes use of the Arachne assembler, which can assemble highly repetitive regions such as the rDNA in a memory-efficient way. We provide a detailed step-by-step protocol for generating rDNA sequences from whole genome Sanger sequence data using Arachne, for refining complete rDNA unit sequences, and for validating the sequences obtained. In principle, our method will work for any species where the rDNA is organized into tandem repeats. This will help researchers working on species without a complete rDNA sequence, those working on evolutionary aspects of the rDNA, and those interested in conducting phylogenetic footprinting studies with the rDNA. PMID:27576718

  10. Method for rapid base sequencing in DNA and RNA with two base labeling

    DOEpatents

    Jett, J.H.; Keller, R.A.; Martin, J.C.; Posner, R.G.; Marrone, B.L.; Hammond, M.L.; Simpson, D.J.

    1995-04-11

    A method is described for rapid-base sequencing in DNA and RNA with two-base labeling and employing fluorescent detection of single molecules at two wavelengths. Bases modified to accept fluorescent labels are used to replicate a single DNA or RNA strand to be sequenced. The bases are then sequentially cleaved from the replicated strand, excited with a chosen spectrum of electromagnetic radiation, and the fluorescence from individual, tagged bases detected in the order of cleavage from the strand. 4 figures.

  11. Method for rapid base sequencing in DNA and RNA with two base labeling

    DOEpatents

    Jett, James H.; Keller, Richard A.; Martin, John C.; Posner, Richard G.; Marrone, Babetta L.; Hammond, Mark L.; Simpson, Daniel J.

    1995-01-01

    Method for rapid-base sequencing in DNA and RNA with two-base labeling and employing fluorescent detection of single molecules at two wavelengths. Bases modified to accept fluorescent labels are used to replicate a single DNA or RNA strand to be sequenced. The bases are then sequentially cleaved from the replicated strand, excited with a chosen spectrum of electromagnetic radiation, and the fluorescence from individual, tagged bases detected in the order of cleavage from the strand.

  12. ARM-Seq: AlkB-facilitated RNA methylation sequencing reveals a complex landscape of modified tRNA fragments

    PubMed Central

    Cozen, Aaron E.; Quartley, Erin; Holmes, Andrew D.; Robinson, Eva H.; Phizicky, Eric M.; Lowe, Todd M.

    2015-01-01

    High throughput RNA sequencing has accelerated discovery of the complex regulatory roles of small RNAs, but RNAs containing modified nucleosides may escape detection when those modifications interfere with reverse transcription during RNA-seq library preparation. Here we describe AlkB-facilitated RNA Methylation sequencing (ARM-Seq) which uses pre-treatment with Escherichia coli AlkB to demethylate 1-methyladenosine, 3-methylcytidine, and 1-methylguanosine, all commonly found in transfer RNAs. Comparative methylation analysis using ARM-Seq provides the first detailed, transcriptome-scale map of these modifications, and reveals an abundance of previously undetected, methylated small RNAs derived from tRNAs. ARM-Seq demonstrates that tRNA-derived small RNAs accurately recapitulate the m1A modification state for well-characterized yeast tRNAs, and generates new predictions for a large number of human tRNAs, including tRNA precursors and mitochondrial tRNAs. Thus, ARM-Seq provides broad utility for identifying previously overlooked methyl-modified RNAs, can efficiently monitor methylation state, and may reveal new roles for tRNA-derived RNAs as biomarkers or signaling molecules. PMID:26237225

  13. tRNAfeature: An algorithm for tRNA features to identify tRNA genes in DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cheng-Hong; Lin, Yu-Da; Chuang, Li-Yeh

    2016-09-01

    The identification of transfer RNAs (tRNAs) is critical for a detailed understanding of the evolution of biological organisms and viruses. However, some tRNAs are difficult to recognize due to their unusual sub-structures and may result in the detection of the wrong anticodon. Therefore, the detection of unusual sub-structures of tRNA genes remains an important challenge. In this study, we propose a method to identify tRNA genes based on tRNA features. tRNAfeature attempts to refold the sequence with single-stranded regions longer than those found in the canonical and conventional structural models for tRNA. We predicted a set of 53926 archaeal, eubacterial and eukaryotic tRNA genes annotated in tRNADB-CE and scanned the tRNA genes in whole genome sequencing. The results indicate that tRNAfeature is more powerful than other existing methods for identifying tRNAs. PMID:27291467

  14. Accurate taxonomy assignments from 16S rRNA sequences produced by highly parallel pyrosequencers

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zongzhi; DeSantis, Todd Z.; Andersen, Gary L.; Knight, Rob

    2008-01-01

    The recent introduction of massively parallel pyrosequencers allows rapid, inexpensive analysis of microbial community composition using 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequences. However, a major challenge is to design a workflow so that taxonomic information can be accurately and rapidly assigned to each read, so that the composition of each community can be linked back to likely ecological roles played by members of each species, genus, family or phylum. Here, we use three large 16S rRNA datasets to test whether taxonomic information based on the full-length sequences can be recaptured by short reads that simulate the pyrosequencer outputs. We find that different taxonomic assignment methods vary radically in their ability to recapture the taxonomic information in full-length 16S rRNA sequences: most methods are sensitive to the region of the 16S rRNA gene that is targeted for sequencing, but many combinations of methods and rRNA regions produce consistent and accurate results. To process large datasets of partial 16S rRNA sequences obtained from surveys of various microbial communities, including those from human body habitats, we recommend the use of Greengenes or RDP classifier with fragments of at least 250 bases, starting from one of the primers R357, R534, R798, F343 or F517. PMID:18723574

  15. Species Identification and Profiling of Complex Microbial Communities Using Shotgun Illumina Sequencing of 16S rRNA Amplicon Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Lay, Christophe; Ho, Eliza Xin Pei; Low, Louie; Hibberd, Martin Lloyd; Nagarajan, Niranjan

    2013-01-01

    The high throughput and cost-effectiveness afforded by short-read sequencing technologies, in principle, enable researchers to perform 16S rRNA profiling of complex microbial communities at unprecedented depth and resolution. Existing Illumina sequencing protocols are, however, limited by the fraction of the 16S rRNA gene that is interrogated and therefore limit the resolution and quality of the profiling. To address this, we present the design of a novel protocol for shotgun Illumina sequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene, optimized to amplify more than 90% of sequences in the Greengenes database and with the ability to distinguish nearly twice as many species-level OTUs compared to existing protocols. Using several in silico and experimental datasets, we demonstrate that despite the presence of multiple variable and conserved regions, the resulting shotgun sequences can be used to accurately quantify the constituents of complex microbial communities. The reconstruction of a significant fraction of the 16S rRNA gene also enabled high precision (>90%) in species-level identification thereby opening up potential application of this approach for clinical microbial characterization. PMID:23579286

  16. High-Throughput Mapping of Single-Neuron Projections by Sequencing of Barcoded RNA.

    PubMed

    Kebschull, Justus M; Garcia da Silva, Pedro; Reid, Ashlan P; Peikon, Ian D; Albeanu, Dinu F; Zador, Anthony M

    2016-09-01

    Neurons transmit information to distant brain regions via long-range axonal projections. In the mouse, area-to-area connections have only been systematically mapped using bulk labeling techniques, which obscure the diverse projections of intermingled single neurons. Here we describe MAPseq (Multiplexed Analysis of Projections by Sequencing), a technique that can map the projections of thousands or even millions of single neurons by labeling large sets of neurons with random RNA sequences ("barcodes"). Axons are filled with barcode mRNA, each putative projection area is dissected, and the barcode mRNA is extracted and sequenced. Applying MAPseq to the locus coeruleus (LC), we find that individual LC neurons have preferred cortical targets. By recasting neuroanatomy, which is traditionally viewed as a problem of microscopy, as a problem of sequencing, MAPseq harnesses advances in sequencing technology to permit high-throughput interrogation of brain circuits. PMID:27545715

  17. Research Techniques Made Simple: Bacterial 16S Ribosomal RNA Gene Sequencing in Cutaneous Research.

    PubMed

    Jo, Jay-Hyun; Kennedy, Elizabeth A; Kong, Heidi H

    2016-03-01

    Skin serves as a protective barrier and also harbors numerous microorganisms collectively comprising the skin microbiome. As a result of recent advances in sequencing (next-generation sequencing), our understanding of microbial communities on skin has advanced substantially. In particular, the 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing technique has played an important role in efforts to identify the global communities of bacteria in healthy individuals and patients with various disorders in multiple topographical regions over the skin surface. Here, we describe basic principles, study design, and a workflow of 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing methodology, primarily for investigators who are not familiar with this approach. This article will also discuss some applications and challenges of 16S ribosomal RNA sequencing as well as directions for future development. PMID:26902128

  18. Discovery and development of anticancer aptamers.

    PubMed

    Ireson, Christopher R; Kelland, Lloyd R

    2006-12-01

    Aptamers, also termed as decoys or "chemical antibodies," represent an emerging class of therapeutics. They are short DNA or RNA oligonucleotides or peptides that assume a specific and stable three-dimensional shape in vivo, thereby providing specific tight binding to protein targets. In some cases and as opposed to antisense oligonucleotides, effects can be mediated against extracellular targets, thereby preventing a need for intracellular transportation. The first aptamer approved for use in man is a RNA-based molecule (Macugen, pegaptanib) that is administered locally (intravitreally) to treat age-related macular degeneration by targeting vascular endothelial growth factor. The most advanced aptamer in the cancer setting is AS1411, formerly known as AGRO100, which is being administered systemically in clinical trials. AS1411 is a 26-mer unmodified guanosine-rich oligonucleotide, which induces growth inhibition in vitro, and has shown activity against human tumor xenografts in vivo. The mechanism underlying its antiproliferative effects in cancer cells seems to involve initial binding to cell surface nucleolin and internalization, leading to an inhibition of DNA replication. In contrast to other unmodified oligonucleotides, AS1411 is relatively stable in serum-containing medium, probably as a result of the formation of dimers and a quartet structure. In a dose escalation phase I study in patients with advanced solid tumors, doses up to 10 mg/kg/d (using a four or seven continuous infusion regime) have been studied. Promising signs of activity have been reported (multiple cases of stable disease and one near complete response in a patient with renal cancer) in the absence of any significant adverse effects. Further trials are ongoing in renal and non-small cell lung cancers. In preclinical studies, additional aptamers have been described against several cancer targets, such as tenascin-C, the transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription 3

  19. Sequence heterogeneity in the two 16S rRNA genes of Phormium yellow leaf phytoplasma.

    PubMed Central

    Liefting, L W; Andersen, M T; Beever, R E; Gardner, R C; Forster, R L

    1996-01-01

    Phormium yellow leaf (PYL) phytoplasma causes a lethal disease of the monocotyledon, New Zealand flax (Phormium tenax). The 16S rRNA genes of PYL phytoplasma were amplified from infected flax by PCR and cloned, and the nucleotide sequences were determined. DNA sequencing and Southern hybridization analysis of genomic DNA indicated the presence of two copies of the 16S rRNA gene. The two 16S rRNA genes exhibited sequence heterogeneity in 4 nucleotide positions and could be distinguished by the restriction enzymes BpmI and BsrI. This is the first record in which sequence heterogeneity in the 16S rRNA genes of a phytoplasma has been determined by sequence analysis. A phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that PYL phytoplasma is most closely related to the stolbur and German grapevine yellows phytoplasmas, which form the stolbur subgroup of the aster yellows group. This phylogenetic position of PYL phytoplasma was supported by 16S/23S spacer region sequence data. PMID:8795200

  20. Efficient Nucleic Acid Extraction and 16S rRNA Gene Sequencing for Bacterial Community Characterization.

    PubMed

    Anahtar, Melis N; Bowman, Brittany A; Kwon, Douglas S

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing appreciation for the role of microbial communities as critical modulators of human health and disease. High throughput sequencing technologies have allowed for the rapid and efficient characterization of bacterial communities using 16S rRNA gene sequencing from a variety of sources. Although readily available tools for 16S rRNA sequence analysis have standardized computational workflows, sample processing for DNA extraction remains a continued source of variability across studies. Here we describe an efficient, robust, and cost effective method for extracting nucleic acid from swabs. We also delineate downstream methods for 16S rRNA gene sequencing, including generation of sequencing libraries, data quality control, and sequence analysis. The workflow can accommodate multiple samples types, including stool and swabs collected from a variety of anatomical locations and host species. Additionally, recovered DNA and RNA can be separated and used for other applications, including whole genome sequencing or RNA-seq. The method described allows for a common processing approach for multiple sample types and accommodates downstream analysis of genomic, metagenomic and transcriptional information. PMID:27168460

  1. A method for accurate determination of terminal sequences of viral genomic RNA.

    PubMed

    Weng, Z; Xiong, Z

    1995-09-01

    A combination of ligation-anchored PCR and anchored cDNA cloning techniques were used to clone the termini of the saguaro cactus virus (SCV) RNA genome. The terminal sequences of the viral genome were subsequently determined from the clones. The 5' terminus was cloned by ligation-anchored PCR, whereas the 3' terminus was obtained by a technique we term anchored cDNA cloning. In anchored cDNA cloning, an anchor oligonucleotide was prepared by phosphorylation at the 5' end, followed by addition of a dideoxynucleotide at the 3' end to block the free hydroxyl group. The 5' end of the anchor was subsequently ligated to the 3' end of SCV RNA. The anchor-ligated, chimerical viral RNA was then reverse-transcribed into cDNA using a primer complementary to the anchor. The cDNA containing the complete 3'-terminal sequence was converted into ds-cDNA, cloned, and sequenced. Two restriction sites, one within the viral sequence and one within the primer sequence, were used to facilitate cloning. The combination of these techniques proved to be an easy and accurate way to determine the terminal sequences of SCV RNA genome and should be applicable to any other RNA molecules with unknown terminal sequences. PMID:9132274

  2. Efficient Nucleic Acid Extraction and 16S rRNA Gene Sequencing for Bacterial Community Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Anahtar, Melis N.; Bowman, Brittany A.; Kwon, Douglas S.

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing appreciation for the role of microbial communities as critical modulators of human health and disease. High throughput sequencing technologies have allowed for the rapid and efficient characterization of bacterial communities using 16S rRNA gene sequencing from a variety of sources. Although readily available tools for 16S rRNA sequence analysis have standardized computational workflows, sample processing for DNA extraction remains a continued source of variability across studies. Here we describe an efficient, robust, and cost effective method for extracting nucleic acid from swabs. We also delineate downstream methods for 16S rRNA gene sequencing, including generation of sequencing libraries, data quality control, and sequence analysis. The workflow can accommodate multiple samples types, including stool and swabs collected from a variety of anatomical locations and host species. Additionally, recovered DNA and RNA can be separated and used for other applications, including whole genome sequencing or RNA-seq. The method described allows for a common processing approach for multiple sample types and accommodates downstream analysis of genomic, metagenomic and transcriptional information. PMID:27168460

  3. A 5'-proximal RNA sequence of murine coronavirus as a potential initiation site for genomic-length mRNA transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, X; Lai, M M

    1996-01-01

    Coronavirus transcription is a discontinuous process, involving interactions between a trans-acting leader and the intergenic transcription initiation sequences. A 9-nucleotide (nt) sequence (UUUAUAAAC), which is located immediately downstream of the leader at the 5' terminus of the mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) genomic RNA, contains a sequence resembling the consensus intergenic sequence (UCUAAAC). It has been shown previously that the presence of the 9-nt sequence facilitates leader RNA switching and may enhance subgenomic mRNA transcription. It is unclear how the 9-nt sequence exerts these functions. In this study, we inserted the 9-nt sequence into a defective interfering (DI) RNA reporter system and demonstrated that mRNA transcription could be initiated from the 9-nt sequence almost as efficiently as from the intergenic sequence between genes 6 and 7. Sequence analysis of the mRNAs showed that the 9-nt sequence served as a site of fusion between the leaders and mRNA. The transcription initiation function of the 9-nt sequence could not be substituted by other 5'-terminal sequences. When the entire 5'-terminal sequence, including four copies of the UCUAA sequence plus the 9-nt sequence, was present, transcription could be initiated from any of the UCUAA copies or the 9-nt sequence, resulting in different copy numbers of the UCUAA sequence and the deletion of the 9-nt sequence in some mRNAs. All of these heterogeneous RNA species were also detected from the 5'-terminal region of the viral genomic-length RNA in MHV-infected cells. These results thus suggest tha the heterogeneity of the copy number of UCUAA sequences at the 5' end, the deletion of the 9-nt sequence in viral and DI RNAs, and the leader RNA switching are the results of transcriptional initiation from the 9-nt site. They also show that an mRNA species (mRNA 1) that lacks the 9-nt sequence can be synthesized during MHV infection. Therefore, MHV genomic RNA replication and mRNA 1 transcription may be

  4. Adenovirus type 12-specific RNA sequences during productive infection of KB cells.

    PubMed Central

    Smiley, J R; Mak, S

    1976-01-01

    The complementary strands of adenovirus type 12 DNA were separated, and virus-specific RNA was analyzed by saturation hybridization in solution. Late during infection whole cell RNA hybridized to 75% of the light (1) strand and 15% of the heavy (H) strand, whereas cytoplasmic RNA hybridized to 65% of the 1 strand and 15% of the h strand. Late nuclear RNA hybridized to about 90% of the 1 strand and at least 36% of the h strand. Double-stranded RNA was isolated from infected cells late after infection, which annealed to greater than 30% of each of the two complementary DNA strands. Early whole cell RNA hybridized to 45 to 50% of the 1 strand and 15% of the h strand, whereas early cytoplasmic RNA hybridized to about 15% of each of the complementary strands. All early cytoplasmic sequences were present in the cytoplasm at late times. PMID:950688

  5. Complete sequence and gene organization of the Nosema heliothidis ribosomal RNA gene region.

    PubMed

    Dong, Shinan; Shen, Zhongyuan; Zhu, Feng; Tang, Xudong; Xu, Li

    2011-01-01

    By sequencing the entire ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene region of Nosema heliothidis isolated from cotton bollworm (Helicoverpa armigera), we showed that its gene organization is similar to the type species, Nosema bombycis: the 5'-large subunit rRNA (2,490 bp)-internal transcribed spacer (192 bp)-small subunit rRNA (1,232 bp)-intergenic spacer (274 bp)-5S rRNA (115 bp)-3'. We constructed two phylogenetic trees, analyzed phylogenetic relationships, examined rRNA organization of microsporidia, and compared the secondary structure of small subunit rRNA with closely related microsporidia. The latter two features may provide important information for the classification and phylogenetic analysis of microsporidia. PMID:21895841

  6. In vitro Selection and Interaction Studies of a DNA Aptamer Targeting Protein A

    PubMed Central

    Stoltenburg, Regina; Schubert, Thomas; Strehlitz, Beate

    2015-01-01

    A new DNA aptamer targeting Protein A is presented. The aptamer was selected by use of the FluMag-SELEX procedure. The SELEX technology (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment) is widely applied as an in vitro selection and amplification method to generate target-specific aptamers and exists in various modified variants. FluMag-SELEX is one of them and is characterized by the use of magnetic beads for target immobilization and fluorescently labeled oligonucleotides for monitoring the aptamer selection progress. Structural investigations and sequence truncation experiments of the selected aptamer for Protein A led to the conclusion, that a stem-loop structure at its 5’-end including the 5’-primer binding site is essential for aptamer-target binding. Extensive interaction analyses between aptamer and Protein A were performed by methods like surface plasmon resonance, MicroScale Thermophoresis and bead-based binding assays using fluorescence measurements. The binding of the aptamer to its target was thus investigated in assays with immobilization of one of the binding partners each, and with both binding partners in solution. Affinity constants were determined in the low micromolar to submicromolar range, increasing to the nanomolar range under the assumption of avidity. Protein A provides more than one binding site for the aptamer, which may overlap with the known binding sites for immunoglobulins. The aptamer binds specifically to both native and recombinant Protein A, but not to other immunoglobulin-binding proteins like Protein G and L. Cross specificity to other proteins was not found. The application of the aptamer is directed to Protein A detection or affinity purification. Moreover, whole cells of Staphylococcus aureus, presenting Protein A on the cell surface, could also be bound by the aptamer. PMID:26221730

  7. In vitro Selection and Interaction Studies of a DNA Aptamer Targeting Protein A.

    PubMed

    Stoltenburg, Regina; Schubert, Thomas; Strehlitz, Beate

    2015-01-01

    A new DNA aptamer targeting Protein A is presented. The aptamer was selected by use of the FluMag-SELEX procedure. The SELEX technology (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment) is widely applied as an in vitro selection and amplification method to generate target-specific aptamers and exists in various modified variants. FluMag-SELEX is one of them and is characterized by the use of magnetic beads for target immobilization and fluorescently labeled oligonucleotides for monitoring the aptamer selection progress. Structural investigations and sequence truncation experiments of the selected aptamer for Protein A led to the conclusion, that a stem-loop structure at its 5'-end including the 5'-primer binding site is essential for aptamer-target binding. Extensive interaction analyses between aptamer and Protein A were performed by methods like surface plasmon resonance, MicroScale Thermophoresis and bead-based binding assays using fluorescence measurements. The binding of the aptamer to its target was thus investigated in assays with immobilization of one of the binding partners each, and with both binding partners in solution. Affinity constants were determined in the low micromolar to submicromolar range, increasing to the nanomolar range under the assumption of avidity. Protein A provides more than one binding site for the aptamer, which may overlap with the known binding sites for immunoglobulins. The aptamer binds specifically to both native and recombinant Protein A, but not to other immunoglobulin-binding proteins like Protein G and L. Cross specificity to other proteins was not found. The application of the aptamer is directed to Protein A detection or affinity purification. Moreover, whole cells of Staphylococcus aureus, presenting Protein A on the cell surface, could also be bound by the aptamer. PMID:26221730

  8. Development of structure switching aptamer assay for detection of aflatoxin M1 in milk sample.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Atul; Catanante, Gaëlle; Hayat, Akhtar; Istamboulie, Georges; Ben Rejeb, Ines; Bhand, Sunil; Marty, Jean Louis

    2016-09-01

    The discovery of in-vitro systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) process has considerably broaden the utility of aptamer as bio-recognition element, providing the high binding affinity and specificity against the target analytes. Recent research has focused on the development of structure switching signaling aptamer assay, transducing the aptamer- target recognition event into an easily detectable signal. In this paper, we demonstrate the development of structure switching aptamer assay for determination of aflatoxin M1 (AFM1) employing the quenching-dequenching mechanism. Hybridization of fluorescein labelled anti-AFM1 aptamer (F-aptamer) with TAMRA labelled complementary sequences (Q-aptamer) brings the fluorophore and the quencher into close proximity, which results in maximum fluorescence quenching. On addition of AFM1, the target induced conformational formation of antiparallel G-quadruplex aptamer-AFM1 complex results in fluorescence recovery. Under optimized experimental conditions, the developed method showed the good linearity with limit of detection (LOD) at 5.0ngkg(-1) for AFM1. The specificity of the sensing platform was carefully investigated against aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) and ochratoxin A (OTA). The developed assay platform showed the high specificity towards AFM1. The practical application of the developed aptamer assay was verified for detection of AFM1 in spiked milk samples. Good recoveries were obtained in the range from 94.40% to 95.28% (n=3) from AFM1 spiked milk sample. PMID:27343575

  9. Characterization and phylogenetic relationships among microsporidia infecting silkworm, Bombyx mori, using inter simple sequence repeat (ISSR) and small subunit rRNA (SSU-rRNA) sequence analysis.

    PubMed

    Rao, S Nageswara; Nath, B Surendra; Saratchandra, B

    2005-06-01

    This study is the first report on the genetic characterization and relationships among different microsporidia infecting the silkworm, Bombyx mori, using inter simple sequence repeat PCR (ISSR-PCR) analysis. Six different microsporidians were distinguished through molecular DNA typing using ISSR-PCR. Thus, ISSR-PCR analysis can be a powerful tool to detect polymorphisms and identify microsporidians, which are difficult to study with microscopy because of their extremely small size. Of the 100 ISSR primers tested, only 28 primers had reproducibility and high polymorphism (93%). A total of 24 ISSR primers produced 55 unique genetic markers, which could be used to differentiate the microsporidians from each other. Among the 28 SSRs tested, the most abundant were (CA)n, (GA)n, and (GT)n repeats. The degree of band sharing was used to evaluate genetic similarity between different microsporidian isolates and to construct a phylogenetic tree using Jaccard's similarity coefficient. The results indicate that the DNA profiles based on ISSR markers can be used as diagnostic tools to identify different microsporidia with considerable accuracy. In addition, the small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU-rRNA) sequence gene was amplified, cloned, and sequenced from each of the 6 microsporidian isolates. These sequences were compared with 20 other microsporidian SSU-rRNA sequences to develop a phylogenetic tree for the microsporidia isolated from the silkworms. This method was found to be useful in establishing the phylogenetic relationships among the different microsporidians isolated from silkworms. Of the 6 microsporidian isolates, NIK-1s revealed an SSU-rRNA gene sequence similar to Nosema bombycis, indicating that NIK-1s is similar to N. bombycis; the remaining 5 isolates, which differed from each other and from N. bombycis, were considered to be different variants belonging to the species N. bombycis. PMID:16121233

  10. Preparation and evaluation of polyethylenimine-functionalized carbon nanotubes tagged with 5TR1 aptamer for targeted delivery of Bcl-xL shRNA into breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Taghavi, Sahar; HashemNia, Azadeh; Mosaffa, Fatemeh; Askarian, Saeedeh; Abnous, Khalil; Ramezani, Mohammad

    2016-04-01

    In this study, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were covalently attached to poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and polyethylenimine (PEI) 10kDa, or its derivatives, to fabricate efficient carriers for gene delivery. PEI 10kDa was modified by alkylcarboxylation of its primary amines with a series of ω-bromo-alkylcarboxylic acids to provide a range of vectors with increased lipophilicity. PEI 10kDa or its alkylcarboxylate derivatives were conjugated to SWCNT-PEG to develop vectors possessing effective DNA condensation ability which can interact with cell membrane via both nano-needle mechanism and electrostatic interactions produced by SWCNT and PEI, respectively. The results demonstrated that SWCNT-PEG-PEI and SWCNT-PEG-derivatives of PEI could condense DNA into particle size less than 150nm with positive surface charges between 6.3-30.8mV. To improve the antitumor efficacy, we developed a targeted gene delivery system using a 5TR1 aptamer. The most efficient vector, which was prepared by attachment of SWCNT-PEG to modified PEI 10kDa with 10-bromodecanoic acid (10%), showed 8.5-10 folds enhancement in transfection activity at C/P ratio 6 as compared to the gold standard PEI 25kDa at C/P ratio of 0.8. We also showed that the selected polyplex could efficiently and selectively transfer plasmid shRNA to MUC1 positive cells. PMID:26731195

  11. Selection of HBsAg-Specific DNA Aptamers Based on Carboxylated Magnetic Nanoparticles and Their Application in the Rapid and Simple Detection of Hepatitis B Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Xi, Zhijiang; Huang, Rongrong; Li, Zhiyang; He, Nongyue; Wang, Ting; Su, Enben; Deng, Yan

    2015-06-01

    Aptamers are short single-stranded DNA or RNA oligonucleotides and can be selected from synthetic combinatorial libraries in vitro. They have a high binding affinity and specificity for their targets. Agarose gels, nitrocellulose membranes, and adsorptive microplates are often used as carriers to immobilize targets in the SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment) process, but the subsequent separation step is tedious and time-consuming. Therefore, we used magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) as carriers to immobilize the target, hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), which is convenient for fast magnetic separation. In this study, we first selected DNA aptamers against HBsAg by immobilizing HBsAg on the surface of carboxylated MNPs. The ssDNA library of each selection round was prepared by asymmetric PCR amplification for the next selection round. To obtain aptamer sequences, the final selected products were purified by gel electrophoresis, then cloned, and sequenced. DNA aptamers that specifically bind to HBsAg were successfully obtained after 13 selection rounds. The selected aptamers were used to construct a chemiluminescence aptasensor based on magnetic separation and immunoassay to detect HBsAg from pure protein or actual serum samples. There was a linear relationship between HBsAg concentration and chemiluminescent intensity in the range of 1-200 ng/mL. The aptasensor worked well even in the presence of interfering substances and was highly specific in the detection of HBsAg in serum samples, with a detection limit 0.1 ng/mL lower than the 0.5 ng/mL limit of an ELISA in use at the hospital. This aptasensor can contribute to better detection of hepatitis B virus infection. PMID:25970703

  12. Molecular Diagnosis of Actinomadura madurae Infection by 16S rRNA Deep Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    SenGupta, Dhruba J.; Hoogestraat, Daniel R.; Cummings, Lisa A.; Bryant, Bronwyn H.; Natividad, Catherine; Thielges, Stephanie; Monsaas, Peter W.; Chau, Mimosa; Barbee, Lindley A.; Rosenthal, Christopher; Cookson, Brad T.; Hoffman, Noah G.

    2013-01-01

    Next-generation DNA sequencing can be used to catalog individual organisms within complex, polymicrobial specimens. Here, we utilized deep sequencing of 16S rRNA to implicate Actinomadura madurae as the cause of mycetoma in a diabetic patient when culture and conventional molecular methods were overwhelmed by overgrowth of other organisms. PMID:24108607

  13. Genome Sequence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Double-Stranded RNA Virus L-A-28

    PubMed Central

    Konovalovas, Aleksandras

    2016-01-01

    We cloned and sequenced the complete genome of the L-A-28 virus from the Saccharomyces cerevisiae K28 killer strain. This sequence completes the set of currently identified L-A helper viruses required for expression of double-stranded RNA-originated killer phenotypes in baking yeast. PMID:27313294

  14. Genome Sequence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Double-Stranded RNA Virus L-A-28.

    PubMed

    Konovalovas, Aleksandras; Serviené, Elena; Serva, Saulius

    2016-01-01

    We cloned and sequenced the complete genome of the L-A-28 virus from the Saccharomyces cerevisiae K28 killer strain. This sequence completes the set of currently identified L-A helper viruses required for expression of double-stranded RNA-originated killer phenotypes in baking yeast. PMID:27313294

  15. Differential DNA and RNA sequence discrimination by PNA having charged side chains.

    PubMed

    De Costa, N Tilani S; Heemstra, Jennifer M

    2014-05-15

    PNA sequences modified with charged side chains were evaluated for base-pairing sequence selectivity under physiological conditions. PNA having negatively charged aspartic acid side chains shows higher selectivity with RNA, while PNA having positively charged lysine side chains shows higher selectivity with DNA. These observations provide insight into the binding selectivity of modified PNA in antisense and antigene applications. PMID:24731279

  16. Draft Genome Sequences of Leviviridae RNA Phages EC and MB Recovered from San Francisco Wastewater

    PubMed Central

    DeRisi, Joseph L.

    2015-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequences of marine RNA phages EC and MB assembled from metagenomic sequencing of organisms in San Francisco wastewater. These phages showed moderate translated amino acid identity to other enterobacteria phages and appear to constitute novel members of the Leviviridae family. PMID:26112785

  17. Draft Genome Sequences of Leviviridae RNA Phages EC and MB Recovered from San Francisco Wastewater.

    PubMed

    Greninger, Alexander L; DeRisi, Joseph L

    2015-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequences of marine RNA phages EC and MB assembled from metagenomic sequencing of organisms in San Francisco wastewater. These phages showed moderate translated amino acid identity to other enterobacteria phages and appear to constitute novel members of the Leviviridae family. PMID:26112785

  18. Taxonomic Assessment of Rumen Microbiota Using Total RNA and Targeted Amplicon Sequencing Approaches.

    PubMed

    Li, Fuyong; Henderson, Gemma; Sun, Xu; Cox, Faith; Janssen, Peter H; Guan, Le Luo

    2016-01-01

    Taxonomic characterization of active gastrointestinal microbiota is essential to detect shifts in microbial communities and functions under various conditions. This study aimed to identify and quantify potentially active rumen microbiota using total RNA sequencing and to compare the outcomes of this approach with the widely used targeted RNA/DNA amplicon sequencing technique. Total RNA isolated from rumen digesta samples from five beef steers was subjected to Illumina paired-end sequencing (RNA-seq), and bacterial and archaeal amplicons of partial 16S rRNA/rDNA were subjected to 454 pyrosequencing (RNA/DNA Amplicon-seq). Taxonomic assessments of the RNA-seq, RNA Amplicon-seq, and DNA Amplicon-seq datasets were performed using a pipeline developed in house. The detected major microbial phylotypes were common among the three datasets, with seven bacterial phyla, fifteen bacterial families, and five archaeal taxa commonly identified across all datasets. There were also unique microbial taxa detected in each dataset. Elusimicrobia and Verrucomicrobia phyla; Desulfovibrionaceae, Elusimicrobiaceae, and Sphaerochaetaceae families; and Methanobrevibacter woesei were only detected in the RNA-Seq and RNA Amplicon-seq datasets, whereas Streptococcaceae was only detected in the DNA Amplicon-seq dataset. In addition, the relative abundances of four bacterial phyla, eight bacterial families and one archaeal taxon were different among the three datasets. This is the first study to compare the outcomes of rumen microbiota profiling between RNA-seq and RNA/DNA Amplicon-seq datasets. Our results illustrate the differences between these methods in characterizing microbiota both qualitatively and quantitatively for the same sample, and so caution must be exercised when comparing data. PMID:27446027

  19. Taxonomic Assessment of Rumen Microbiota Using Total RNA and Targeted Amplicon Sequencing Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fuyong; Henderson, Gemma; Sun, Xu; Cox, Faith; Janssen, Peter H.; Guan, Le Luo

    2016-01-01

    Taxonomic characterization of active gastrointestinal microbiota is essential to detect shifts in microbial communities and functions under various conditions. This study aimed to identify and quantify potentially active rumen microbiota using total RNA sequencing and to compare the outcomes of this approach with the widely used targeted RNA/DNA amplicon sequencing technique. Total RNA isolated from rumen digesta samples from five beef steers was subjected to Illumina paired-end sequencing (RNA-seq), and bacterial and archaeal amplicons of partial 16S rRNA/rDNA were subjected to 454 pyrosequencing (RNA/DNA Amplicon-seq). Taxonomic assessments of the RNA-seq, RNA Amplicon-seq, and DNA Amplicon-seq datasets were performed using a pipeline developed in house. The detected major microbial phylotypes were common among the three datasets, with seven bacterial phyla, fifteen bacterial families, and five archaeal taxa commonly identified across all datasets. There were also unique microbial taxa detected in each dataset. Elusimicrobia and Verrucomicrobia phyla; Desulfovibrionaceae, Elusimicrobiaceae, and Sphaerochaetaceae families; and Methanobrevibacter woesei were only detected in the RNA-Seq and RNA Amplicon-seq datasets, whereas Streptococcaceae was only detected in the DNA Amplicon-seq dataset. In addition, the relative abundances of four bacterial phyla, eight bacterial families and one archaeal taxon were different among the three datasets. This is the first study to compare the outcomes of rumen microbiota profiling between RNA-seq and RNA/DNA Amplicon-seq datasets. Our results illustrate the differences between these methods in characterizing microbiota both qualitatively and quantitatively for the same sample, and so caution must be exercised when comparing data. PMID:27446027

  20. Engineering new aptamer geometries for electrochemical aptamer-based sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Ryan J.; Plaxco, Kevin W.

    2009-05-01

    Electrochemical aptamer-based sensors (E-AB sensors) represent a promising new approach to the detection of small molecules. E-AB sensors comprise an aptamer that is attached at one end to an electrode surface. The distal end of the aptamer probed is modified with an electroactive redox marker for signal transduction. Herein we report on the optimization of a cocaine-detecting E-AB sensor via optimization of the geometry of the aptamer. We explore two new aptamer architectures, one in which we concatenate three cocaine aptamers into a poly-aptamer and a second in which we divide the cocaine aptamer into pieces connected via an unstructured, 60-thymine linker. Both of these structures are designed such that the reporting redox tag will be located farther from the electrode in the unfolded, target-free conformation. Consistent with this, we find that signal gains of these two constructs are two to three times higher than that of the original E-AB architecture. Likewise all three architectures are selective enough to deploy directly in complex sample matrices, such as undiluted whole blood, with all three sensors successfully detecting the presence of cocaine. The findings in this ongoing study should be of value in future efforts to optimize the signaling of electrochemical aptamer-based sensors.

  1. Nucleotide sequence of an exceptionally long 5.8S ribosomal RNA from Crithidia fasciculata.

    PubMed

    Schnare, M N; Gray, M W

    1982-03-25

    In Crithidia fasciculata, a trypanosomatid protozoan, the large ribosomal subunit contains five small RNA species (e, f, g, i, j) in addition to 5S rRNA [Gray, M.W. (1981) Mol. Cell. Biol. 1, 347-357]. The complete primary sequence of species i is shown here to be pAACGUGUmCGCGAUGGAUGACUUGGCUUCCUAUCUCGUUGA ... AGAmACGCAGUAAAGUGCGAUAAGUGGUApsiCAAUUGmCAGAAUCAUUCAAUUACCGAAUCUUUGAACGAAACGG ... CGCAUGGGAGAAGCUCUUUUGAGUCAUCCCCGUGCAUGCCAUAUUCUCCAmGUGUCGAA(C)OH. This sequence establishes that species i is a 5.8S rRNA, despite its exceptional length (171-172 nucleotides). The extra nucleotides in C. fasciculata 5.8S rRNA are located in a region whose primary sequence and length are highly variable among 5.8S rRNAs, but which is capable of forming a stable hairpin loop structure (the "G+C-rich hairpin"). The sequence of C. fasciculata 5.8S rRNA is no more closely related to that of another protozoan, Acanthamoeba castellanii, than it is to representative 5.8S rRNA sequences from the other eukaryotic kingdoms, emphasizing the deep phylogenetic divisions that seem to exist within the Kingdom Protista. PMID:7079176

  2. Sequence characterization of 5S ribosomal RNA from eight gram positive procaryotes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woese, C. R.; Luehrsen, K. R.; Pribula, C. D.; Fox, G. E.

    1976-01-01

    Complete nucleotide sequences are presented for 5S rRNA from Bacillus subtilis, B. firmus, B. pasteurii, B. brevis, Lactobacillus brevis, and Streptococcus faecalis, and 5S rRNA oligonucleotide catalogs and partial sequence data are given for B. cereus and Sporosarcina ureae. These data demonstrate a striking consistency of 5S rRNA primary and secondary structure within a given bacterial grouping. An exception is B. brevis, in which the 5S rRNA sequence varies significantly from that of other bacilli in the tuned helix and the procaryotic loop. The localization of these variations suggests that B. brevis occupies an ecological niche that selects such changes. It is noted that this organism produces antibiotics which affect ribosome function.

  3. Self-Assembly of Measles Virus Nucleocapsid-like Particles: Kinetics and RNA Sequence Dependence.

    PubMed

    Milles, Sigrid; Jensen, Malene Ringkjøbing; Communie, Guillaume; Maurin, Damien; Schoehn, Guy; Ruigrok, Rob W H; Blackledge, Martin

    2016-08-01

    Measles virus RNA genomes are packaged into helical nucleocapsids (NCs), comprising thousands of nucleo-proteins (N) that bind the entire genome. N-RNA provides the template for replication and transcription by the viral polymerase and is a promising target for viral inhibition. Elucidation of mechanisms regulating this process has been severely hampered by the inability to controllably assemble NCs. Here, we demonstrate self-organization of N into NC-like particles in vitro upon addition of RNA, providing a simple and versatile tool for investigating assembly. Real-time NMR and fluorescence spectroscopy reveals biphasic assembly kinetics. Remarkably, assembly depends strongly on the RNA-sequence, with the genomic 5' end and poly-Adenine sequences assembling efficiently, while sequences such as poly-Uracil are incompetent for NC formation. This observation has important consequences for understanding the assembly process. PMID:27270664

  4. Acousto-microfluidics for screening of ssDNA aptamer

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jee-Woong; Lee, Su Jin; Ren, Shuo; Lee, Sangwook; Kim, Soyoun; Laurell, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a new screening method for obtaining a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) binding aptamer based on an acoustofluidic separation (acoustophoreis) technique. Since acoustophoresis provides simultaneous washing and separation in a continuous flow mode, we efficiently obtained a PSA binding aptamer that shows high affinity without any additional washing step, which is necessary in other screening methods. In addition, next-generation sequencing (NGS) was applied to accelerate the identification of the screened ssDNA pool, improving the selecting process of the aptamer candidate based on the frequency ranking of the sequences. After the 8th round of the acoustophoretic systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) and following sequence analysis with NGS, 7 PSA binding ssDNA aptamer-candidates were obtained and characterized with surface plasmon resonance (SPR) for affinity and specificity. As a result of the new SELEX method with PSA as the model target protein, the best PSA binding aptamer showed specific binding to PSA with a dissociation constant (Kd) of 0.7 nM. PMID:27272884

  5. Acousto-microfluidics for screening of ssDNA aptamer.

    PubMed

    Park, Jee-Woong; Lee, Su Jin; Ren, Shuo; Lee, Sangwook; Kim, Soyoun; Laurell, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a new screening method for obtaining a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) binding aptamer based on an acoustofluidic separation (acoustophoreis) technique. Since acoustophoresis provides simultaneous washing and separation in a continuous flow mode, we efficiently obtained a PSA binding aptamer that shows high affinity without any additional washing step, which is necessary in other screening methods. In addition, next-generation sequencing (NGS) was applied to accelerate the identification of the screened ssDNA pool, improving the selecting process of the aptamer candidate based on the frequency ranking of the sequences. After the 8(th) round of the acoustophoretic systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) and following sequence analysis with NGS, 7 PSA binding ssDNA aptamer-candidates were obtained and characterized with surface plasmon resonance (SPR) for affinity and specificity. As a result of the new SELEX method with PSA as the model target protein, the best PSA binding aptamer showed specific binding to PSA with a dissociation constant (Kd) of 0.7 nM. PMID:27272884

  6. Aptamers: The "evolution" of SELEX.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yi Xi; Kwon, Young Jik

    2016-08-15

    It has been more than two decades since the first aptamer molecule was discovered. Since then, aptamer molecules have gain much attention in the scientific field. This increasing traction can be attributed to their many desirable traits, such as 1) their potentials to bind a wide range of molecules, 2) their malleability, and 3) their low cost of production. These traits have made aptamer molecules an ideal platform to pursue in the realm of pharmaceuticals and bio-sensors. Despite the broad applications of aptamers, tedious procedure, high resource consumption, and limited nucleobase repertoire have hindered aptamer in application usage. To address these issues, new innovative methodologies, such as automation and single round SELEX, are being developed to improve the outcomes and rates in which aptamers are discovered. PMID:27109056

  7. A known expressed sequence tag, BM742401, is a potent lincRNA inhibiting cancer metastasis.

    PubMed

    Park, Seong-Min; Park, Sung-Joon; Kim, Hee-Jin; Kwon, Oh-Hyung; Kang, Tae-Wook; Sohn, Hyun-Ahm; Kim, Seon-Kyu; Moo Noh, Seung; Song, Kyu-Sang; Jang, Se-Jin; Sung Kim, Yong; Kim, Seon-Young

    2013-01-01

    Long intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs) have historically been ignored in cancer biology. However, thousands of lincRNAs have been identified in mammals using recently developed genomic tools, including microarray and high-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-seq). Several of the lincRNAs identified have been well characterized for their functions in carcinogenesis. Here we performed RNA-seq experiments comparing gastric cancer with normal tissues to find differentially expressed transcripts in intergenic regions. By analyzing our own RNA-seq and public microarray data, we identified 31 transcripts, including a known expressed sequence tag, BM742401. BM742401 was downregulated in cancer, and its downregulation was associated with poor survival in gastric cancer patients. Ectopic overexpression of BM742401 inhibited metastasis-related phenotypes and decreased the concentration of extracellular MMP9. These results suggest that BM742401 is a potential lincRNA marker and therapeutic target. PMID:23846333

  8. Complete nucleotide sequence of the genomic RNA of tobacco mosaic virus strain Cg.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, T; Komatani, H; Meshi, T; Naito, S; Ishikawa, M; Ohno, T

    1998-01-01

    Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV)-Cg is a crucifer-infecting tobamovirus that was isolated from field-grown garlic. We determined the complete nucleotide sequence of the genomic RNA of TMV-Cg. The genomic RNA of TMV-Cg consists of 6303 nucleotides and encodes four large open reading frames, organized basically in the same way as that of other tobamoviruses. The nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences are very similar to those of the other crucifer-infecting tobamoviruses that have been sequenced so far. PMID:9608662

  9. The RNA sequence context defines the mechanistic routes by which yeast arginyl-tRNA synthetase charges tRNA.

    PubMed

    Sissler, M; Giegé, R; Florentz, C

    1998-06-01

    Arginylation of tRNA transcripts by yeast arginyl-tRNA synthetase can be triggered by two alternate recognition sets in anticodon loops: C35 and U36 or G36 in tRNA(Arg) and C36 and G37 in tRNA(Asp) (Sissler M, Giegé R, Florentz C, 1996, EMBO J 15:5069-5076). Kinetic studies on tRNA variants were done to explore the mechanisms by which these sets are expressed. Although the synthetase interacts in a similar manner with tRNA(Arg) and tRNA(Asp), the details of the interaction patterns are idiosyncratic, especially in anticodon loops (Sissler M, Eriani G, Martin F, Giegé R, Florentz C, 1997, Nucleic Acids Res 25:4899-4906). Exchange of individual recognition elements between arginine and aspartate tRNA frameworks strongly blocks arginylation of the mutated tRNAs, whereas full exchange of the recognition sets leads to efficient arginine acceptance of the transplanted tRNAs. Unpredictably, the similar catalytic efficiencies of native and transplanted tRNAs originate from different k(cat) and Km combinations. A closer analysis reveals that efficient arginylation results from strong anticooperative effects between individual recognition elements. Nonrecognition nucleotides as well as the tRNA architecture are additional factors that tune efficiency. Altogether, arginyl-tRNA synthetase is able to utilize different context-dependent mechanistic routes to be activated. This confers biological advantages to the arginine aminoacylation system and sheds light on its evolutionary relationship with the aspartate system. PMID:9622124

  10. Identification of characteristic oligonucleotides in the bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA sequence dataset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Zhengdong; Willson, Richard C.; Fox, George E.

    2002-01-01

    MOTIVATION: The phylogenetic structure of the bacterial world has been intensively studied by comparing sequences of 16S ribosomal RNA (16S rRNA). This database of sequences is now widely used to design probes for the detection of specific bacteria or groups of bacteria one at a time. The success of such methods reflects the fact that there are local sequence segments that are highly characteristic of particular organisms or groups of organisms. It is not clear, however, the extent to which such signature sequences exist in the 16S rRNA dataset. A better understanding of the numbers and distribution of highly informative oligonucleotide sequences may facilitate the design of hybridization arrays that can characterize the phylogenetic position of an unknown organism or serve as the basis for the development of novel approaches for use in bacterial identification. RESULTS: A computer-based algorithm that characterizes the extent to which any individual oligonucleotide sequence in 16S rRNA is characteristic of any particular bacterial grouping was developed. A measure of signature quality, Q(s), was formulated and subsequently calculated for every individual oligonucleotide sequence in the size range of 5-11 nucleotides and for 15mers with reference to each cluster and subcluster in a 929 organism representative phylogenetic tree. Subsequently, the perfect signature sequences were compared to the full set of 7322 sequences to see how common false positives were. The work completed here establishes beyond any doubt that highly characteristic oligonucleotides exist in the bacterial 16S rRNA sequence dataset in large numbers. Over 16,000 15mers were identified that might be useful as signatures. Signature oligonucleotides are available for over 80% of the nodes in the representative tree.

  11. Diversity of host species and strains of Pneumocystis carinii is based on rRNA sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Shah, J S; Pieciak, W; Liu, J; Buharin, A; Lane, D J

    1996-01-01

    We have amplified by PCR Pneumocystis carinii cytoplasmic small-subunit rRNA (variously referred to as 16S-like or 18S-like rRNA) genes from DNA extracted from bronchoalveolar lavage and induced sputum specimens from patients positive for P. carinii and from infected ferret lung tissue. The amplification products were cloned into pUC18, and individual clones were sequenced. Comparison of the determined sequences with each other and with published rat and partial human P.carinii small-subunit rRNA gene sequences reveals that, although all P. carinii small-subunit rRNAs are closely related (approximately 96% identity), small-subunit rRNA genes isolated from different host species (human, rat, and ferret) exhibit distinctive patterns of sequence variation. Two types of sequences were isolated from the infected ferret lung tissue, one as a predominant species and the other as a minor species. There was 96% identity between the two types. In situ hybridization of the infected ferret lung tissue with oligonucleotide probes specific for each type revealed that there were two distinct strains of P. carinii present in the ferret lung tissue. Unlike the ferret P. carinii isolates, the small-subunit rRNA gene sequences from different human P. carinii isolates have greater than 99% identity and are distinct from all rat and ferret sequences so far inspected or reported in the literature. Southern blot hybridization analysis of PCR amplification products from several additional bronchoalveolar lavage or induced sputum specimens from P. carinii-infected patients, using a 32P-labeled oligonucleotide probe specific for human P. carinii, also suggests that all of the human P. carinii isolates are identical. These findings indicate that human P. carinii isolates may represent a distinct species of P. carinii distinguishable from rat and ferret P. carinii on the basis of characterization of small-subunit rRNA gene sequences. PMID:8770515

  12. The phylogenetic utility and functional constraint of microRNA flanking sequences

    PubMed Central

    Kenny, Nathan J.; Sin, Yung Wa; Hayward, Alexander; Paps, Jordi; Chu, Ka Hou; Hui, Jerome H. L.

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have recently risen to prominence as novel factors responsible for post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. miRNA genes have been posited as highly conserved in the clades in which they exist. Consequently, miRNAs have been used as rare genome change characters to estimate phylogeny by tracking their gain and loss. However, their short length (21–23 bp) has limited their perceived utility in sequenced-based phylogenetic inference. Here, using reference taxa with established phylogenetic relationships, we demonstrate that miRNA sequences are of high utility in quantitative, rather than in qualitative, phylogenetic analysis. The clear orthology among miRNA genes from different species makes it straightforward to identify and align these sequences from even fragmentary datasets. We also identify significant sequence conservation in the regions directly flanking miRNA genes, and show that this too is of utility in phylogenetic analysis, as well as highlighting conserved regions that will be of interest to other fields. Employing miRNA sequences from 12 sequenced drosophilid genomes, together with a Tribolium castaneum outgroup, we demonstrate that this approach is robust using Bayesian and maximum-likelihood methods. The utility of these characters is further demonstrated in the rhabditid nematodes and primates. As next-generation sequencing makes it more cost-effective to sequence genomes and small RNA libraries, this methodology provides an alternative data source for phylogenetic analysis. The approach allows rapid resolution of relationships between both closely related and rapidly evolving species, and provides an additional tool for investigation of relationships within the tree of life. PMID:25694624

  13. Deep Sequencing Analysis of Nucleolar Small RNAs: RNA Isolation and Library Preparation.

    PubMed

    Bai, Baoyan; Laiho, Marikki

    2016-01-01

    The nucleolus is a subcellular compartment with a key essential function in ribosome biogenesis. The nucleolus is rich in noncoding RNAs, mostly the ribosomal RNAs and small nucleolar RNAs. Surprisingly, also several miRNAs have been detected in the nucleolus, raising the question as to whether other small RNA species are present and functional in the nucleolus. We have developed a strategy for stepwise enrichment of nucleolar small RNAs from the total nucleolar RNA extracts and subsequent construction of nucleolar small RNA libraries which are suitable for deep sequencing. Our method successfully isolates the small RNA population from total RNAs and monitors the RNA quality in each step to ensure that small RNAs recovered represent the actual small RNA population in the nucleolus and not degradation products from larger RNAs. We have further applied this approach to characterize the distribution of small RNAs in different cellular compartments. PMID:27576723

  14. Next-generation sequencing of the porcine skeletal muscle transcriptome for computational prediction of microRNA gene targets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    MicroRNA are a class of small RNAs that regulate gene expression by inhibiting translation of protein encoding transcripts. Inhibition is exerted through targeting of a microRNA-protein complex by base-pairing of the microRNA sequence to cognate recognition sequences in the 3’ untranslated region (...

  15. Analyzing the microRNA Transcriptome in Plants Using Deep Sequencing Data

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaozeng; Li, Lei

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are 20- to 24-nucleotide endogenous small RNA molecules emerging as an important class of sequence-specific, trans-acting regulators for modulating gene expression at the post-transcription level. There has been a surge of interest in the past decade in identifying miRNAs and profiling their expression pattern using various experimental approaches. In particular, ultra-deep sampling of specifically prepared low-molecular-weight RNA libraries based on next-generation sequencing technologies has been used successfully in diverse species. The challenge now is to effectively deconvolute the complex sequencing data to provide comprehensive and reliable information on the miRNAs, miRNA precursors, and expression profile of miRNA genes. Here we review the recently developed computational tools and their applications in profiling the miRNA transcriptomes, with an emphasis on the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Highlighted is also progress and insight into miRNA biology derived from analyzing available deep sequencing data. PMID:24832228

  16. Systematic reconstruction of binding and stability landscapes of the fluorogenic aptamer spinach

    PubMed Central

    Ketterer, Simon; Fuchs, David; Weber, Wilfried; Meier, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Fluorogenic RNAs that are based on the complex formed by 3,5-difluoro-4-hydroxybenzylidene imidazolinone (DFHBI) derivatives and the RNA aptamer named Spinach were used to engineer a new generation of in vitro and in vivo sensors for bioanalytics. With the resolved crystal structure of the RNA/small molecule complex, the engineering map becomes available, but comprehensive information regarding the thermodynamic profile of the molecule is missing. Here, we reconstructed the full thermodynamic binding and stability landscapes between DFHBI and a truncated sequence of first-generation Spinach. For this purpose, we established a systematic screening procedure for single- and double-point mutations on a microfluidic large-scale integrated chip platform for 87-nt long RNAs. The thermodynamic profile with single base resolution was used to engineer an improved fluorogenic spinach generation via a directed rather than evolutional approach. PMID:26400180

  17. Systematic reconstruction of binding and stability landscapes of the fluorogenic aptamer spinach.

    PubMed

    Ketterer, Simon; Fuchs, David; Weber, Wilfried; Meier, Matthias

    2015-10-30

    Fluorogenic RNAs that are based on the complex formed by 3,5-difluoro-4-hydroxybenzylidene imidazolinone (DFHBI) derivatives and the RNA aptamer named Spinach were used to engineer a new generation of in vitro and in vivo sensors for bioanalytics. With the resolved crystal structure of the RNA/small molecule complex, the engineering map becomes available, but comprehensive information regarding the thermodynamic profile of the molecule is missing. Here, we reconstructed the full thermodynamic binding and stability landscapes between DFHBI and a truncated sequence of first-generation Spinach. For this purpose, we established a systematic screening procedure for single- and double-point mutations on a microfluidic large-scale integrated chip platform for 87-nt long RNAs. The thermodynamic profile with single base resolution was used to engineer an improved fluorogenic spinach generation via a directed rather than evolutional approach. PMID:26400180

  18. The novel organization and complete sequence of the ribosomal RNA gene of Nosema bombycis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei-Fone; Tsai, Shu-Jen; Lo, Chu-Fang; Soichi, Yamane; Wang, Chung-Hsiung

    2004-05-01

    We present here for the first time the complete DNA sequence data (4301bp) of the ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene of the microsporidian type species, Nosema bombycis. Sequences for the large subunit gene (LSUrRNA: 2497bp, GenBank Accession No. ), the internal transcribed spacer (ITS: 179bp, GenBank Accession No. ), the small subunit gene (SSUrRNA: 1232bp), intergenic spacer (IGS: 279bp), and 5S region (114bp) are also given, and the secondary structure of the large subunit is discussed. The organization of the N. bombycis rRNA gene is LSUrRNA-ITS-SSUrRNA-IGS-5S. This novel arrangement, in which the LSU is 5' of the SSU, is the reverse of the organizational sequence (i.e., SSU-ITS-LSU) found in all previously reported microsporidian rRNAs, including Nosema apis. This unique character in the type species may have taxonomic implications for the members of the genus Nosema. PMID:15050536

  19. StarScan: a web server for scanning small RNA targets from degradome sequencing data

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shun; Li, Jun-Hao; Wu, Jie; Zhou, Ke-Ren; Zhou, Hui; Yang, Jian-Hua; Qu, Liang-Hu

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs), including microRNAs, PIWI-interacting RNAs and small interfering RNAs, play important gene regulatory roles in animals and plants by pairing to the protein-coding and non-coding transcripts. However, computationally assigning these various sRNAs to their regulatory target genes remains technically challenging. Recently, a high-throughput degradome sequencing method was applied to identify biologically relevant sRNA cleavage sites. In this study, an integrated web-based tool, StarScan (sRNA target Scan), was developed for scanning sRNA targets using degradome sequencing data from 20 species. Given a sRNA sequence from plants or animals, our web server performs an ultrafast and exhaustive search for potential sRNA–target interactions in annotated and unannotated genomic regions. The interactions between small RNAs and target transcripts were further evaluated using a novel tool, alignScore. A novel tool, degradomeBinomTest, was developed to quantify the abundance of degradome fragments located at the 9–11th nucleotide from the sRNA 5′ end. This is the first web server for discovering potential sRNA-mediated RNA cleavage events in plants and animals, which affords mechanistic insights into the regulatory roles of sRNAs. The StarScan web server is available at http://mirlab.sysu.edu.cn/starscan/. PMID:25990732

  20. MicroRNA transcriptome in the newborn mouse ovaries determined by massive parallel sequencing.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Hyo Won; Morin, Ryan D; Zhao, Han; Harris, Ronald A; Coarfa, Cristian; Chen, Zi-Jiang; Milosavljevic, Aleksandar; Marra, Marco A; Rajkovic, Aleksandar

    2010-07-01

    Small non-coding RNAs, such as microRNAs (miRNAs), are involved in diverse biological processes including organ development and tissue differentiation. Global disruption of miRNA biogenesis in Dicer knockout mice disrupts early embryogenesis and primordial germ cell formation. However, the role of miRNAs in early folliculogenesis is poorly understood. In order to identify a full transcriptome set of small RNAs expressed in the newborn (NB) ovary, we extracted small RNA fraction from mouse NB ovary tissues and subjected it to massive parallel sequencing using the Genome Analyzer from Illumina. Massive sequencing produced 4 655 992 reads of 33 bp each representing a total of 154 Mbp of sequence data. The Pash alignment algorithm mapped 50.13% of the reads to the mouse genome. Sequence reads were clustered based on overlapping mapping coordinates and intersected with known miRNAs, small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs), piwi-interacting RNA (piRNA) clusters and repetitive genomic regions; 25.2% of the reads mapped to known miRNAs, 25.5% to genomic repeats, 3.5% to piRNAs and 0.18% to snoRNAs. Three hundred and ninety-eight known miRNA species were among the sequenced small RNAs, and 118 isomiR sequences that are not in the miRBase database. Let-7 family was the most abundantly expressed miRNA, and mmu-mir-672, mmu-mir-322, mmu-mir-503 and mmu-mir-465 families are the most abundant X-linked miRNA detected. X-linked mmu-mir-503, mmu-mir-672 and mmu-mir-465 family showed preferential expression in testes and ovaries. We also identified four novel miRNAs that are preferentially expressed in gonads. Gonadal selective miRNAs may play important roles in ovarian development, folliculogenesis and female fertility. PMID:20215419

  1. Sequence requirements for localization and packaging of Ty3 retroelement RNA

    PubMed Central

    Clemens, Kristina; Bilanchone, Virginia; Beliakova-Bethell, Nadejda; Larsen, Liza S.Z.; Nguyen, Kim; Sandmeyer, Suzanne

    2012-01-01

    Retroviruses and retrotransposons package genomic RNA into virus-like particles (VLPs) in a poorly understood process. Expression of the budding yeast retrotransposon Ty3 results in the formation of cytoplasmic Ty3 VLP assembly foci comprised of Ty3 RNA and proteins, and cellular factors associated with RNA processing body (PB) components, which modulate translation and effect nonsense-mediated decay (NMD). A series of Ty3 RNA variants were tested to understand the effects of read-through translation via programmed frameshifting on RNA localization and packaging into VLPs, and to identify the roles of coding and non-coding sequences in those processes. These experiments showed that a low level of read-through translation of the downstream open reading frame (as opposed to no translation or translation without frameshifting) is important for localization of full-length Ty3 RNA to foci. Ty3 RNA variants associated with PB components via independent determinants in the native Ty3 untranslated regions (UTRs) and in GAG3-POL3 sequences flanked by UTRs adapted from non-Ty3 transcripts. However, despite localization, RNAs containing GAG3-POL3 but lacking Ty3 UTRs were not packaged efficiently. Surprisingly, sequences within Ty3 UTRs, which bind the initiator tRNAMet proposed to provide the dimerization interface, were not required for packaging of full-length Ty3 RNA into VLPs. In summary, our results demonstrate that Gag3 is sufficient and required for localization and packaging of RNAs containing Ty3 UTRs and support a role for POL3 sequences, translation of which is attenuated by programmed frameshifting, in both localization and packaging of the Ty3 full-length gRNA. PMID:23073180

  2. R3D-2-MSA: the RNA 3D structure-to-multiple sequence alignment server.

    PubMed

    Cannone, Jamie J; Sweeney, Blake A; Petrov, Anton I; Gutell, Robin R; Zirbel, Craig L; Leontis, Neocles

    2015-07-01

    The RNA 3D Structure-to-Multiple Sequence Alignment Server (R3D-2-MSA) is a new web service that seamlessly links RNA three-dimensional (3D) structures to high-quality RNA multiple sequence alignments (MSAs) from diverse biological sources. In this first release, R3D-2-MSA provides manual and programmatic