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Sample records for robot telecontrol system

  1. Robot and robot system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behar, Alberto E. (Inventor); Marzwell, Neville I. (Inventor); Wall, Jonathan N. (Inventor); Poole, Michael D. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A robot and robot system that are capable of functioning in a zero-gravity environment are provided. The robot can include a body having a longitudinal axis and having a control unit and a power source. The robot can include a first leg pair including a first leg and a second leg. Each leg of the first leg pair can be pivotally attached to the body and constrained to pivot in a first leg pair plane that is substantially perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the body.

  2. Tandem mobile robot system

    DOEpatents

    Buttz, James H.; Shirey, David L.; Hayward, David R.

    2003-01-01

    A robotic vehicle system for terrain navigation mobility provides a way to climb stairs, cross crevices, and navigate across difficult terrain by coupling two or more mobile robots with a coupling device and controlling the robots cooperatively in tandem.

  3. Robotic system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambrose, Robert O. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A robot having a plurality of interconnected sections is disclosed. Each of the sections includes components which are moveable relative to components of an adjacent section. A plurality of electric motors are operably connected to at least two of said relatively moveable components to effect relative movement. A fitted, removable protective covering surrounds the sections to protect the robot.

  4. Multiple robot systems in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bejczy, Antal K.

    1987-01-01

    Viewgraphs from a presentation on multiple robot systems in space are included. Topics covered include categories of robots in space; scenarios of robot applications in space; some characteristics of robots in space; and some interesting problems and issues.

  5. Modularity in robotic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tesar, Delbert; Butler, Michael S.

    1989-01-01

    Most robotic systems today are designed one at a time, at a high cost of time and money. This wasteful approach has been necessary because the industry has not established a foundation for the continued evolution of intelligent machines. The next generation of robots will have to be generic, versatile machines capable of absorbing new technology rapidly and economically. This approach is demonstrated in the success of the personal computer, which can be upgraded or expanded with new software and hardware at virtually every level. Modularity is perceived as a major opportunity to reduce the 6 to 7 year design cycle time now required for new robotic manipulators, greatly increasing the breadth and speed of diffusion of robotic systems in manufacturing. Modularity and its crucial role in the next generation of intelligent machines are the focus of interest. The main advantages that modularity provides are examined; types of modules needed to create a generic robot are discussed. Structural modules designed by the robotics group at the University of Texas at Austin are examined to demonstrate the advantages of modular design.

  6. Robotics and remote systems applications

    SciTech Connect

    Rabold, D.E.

    1996-05-01

    This article is a review of numerous remote inspection techniques in use at the Savannah River (and other) facilities. These include: (1) reactor tank inspection robot, (2) californium waste removal robot, (3) fuel rod lubrication robot, (4) cesium source manipulation robot, (5) tank 13 survey and decontamination robots, (6) hot gang valve corridor decontamination and junction box removal robots, (7) lead removal from deionizer vessels robot, (8) HB line cleanup robot, (9) remote operation of a front end loader at WIPP, (10) remote overhead video extendible robot, (11) semi-intelligent mobile observing navigator, (12) remote camera systems in the SRS canyons, (13) cameras and borescope for the DWPF, (14) Hanford waste tank camera system, (15) in-tank precipitation camera system, (16) F-area retention basin pipe crawler, (17) waste tank wall crawler and annulus camera, (18) duct inspection, and (19) deionizer resin sampling.

  7. Industrial robot's vision systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iureva, Radda A.; Raskin, Evgeni O.; Komarov, Igor I.; Maltseva, Nadezhda K.; Fedosovsky, Michael E.

    2016-03-01

    Due to the improved economic situation in the high technology sectors, work on the creation of industrial robots and special mobile robotic systems are resumed. Despite this, the robotic control systems mostly remained unchanged. Hence one can see all advantages and disadvantages of these systems. This is due to lack of funds, which could greatly facilitate the work of the operator, and in some cases, completely replace it. The paper is concerned with the complex machine vision of robotic system for monitoring of underground pipelines, which collects and analyzes up to 90% of the necessary information. Vision Systems are used to identify obstacles to the process of movement on a trajectory to determine their origin, dimensions and character. The object is illuminated in a structured light, TV camera records projected structure. Distortions of the structure uniquely determine the shape of the object in view of the camera. The reference illumination is synchronized with the camera. The main parameters of the system are the basic distance between the generator and the lights and the camera parallax angle (the angle between the optical axes of the projection unit and camera).

  8. Basic Operational Robotics Instructional System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Todd, Brian Keith; Fischer, James; Falgout, Jane; Schweers, John

    2013-01-01

    The Basic Operational Robotics Instructional System (BORIS) is a six-degree-of-freedom rotational robotic manipulator system simulation used for training of fundamental robotics concepts, with in-line shoulder, offset elbow, and offset wrist. BORIS is used to provide generic robotics training to aerospace professionals including flight crews, flight controllers, and robotics instructors. It uses forward kinematic and inverse kinematic algorithms to simulate joint and end-effector motion, combined with a multibody dynamics model, moving-object contact model, and X-Windows based graphical user interfaces, coordinated in the Trick Simulation modeling environment. The motivation for development of BORIS was the need for a generic system for basic robotics training. Before BORIS, introductory robotics training was done with either the SRMS (Shuttle Remote Manipulator System) or SSRMS (Space Station Remote Manipulator System) simulations. The unique construction of each of these systems required some specialized training that distracted students from the ideas and goals of the basic robotics instruction.

  9. Robotic follow system and method

    SciTech Connect

    Bruemmer, David J; Anderson, Matthew O

    2007-05-01

    Robot platforms, methods, and computer media are disclosed. The robot platform includes perceptors, locomotors, and a system controller, which executes instructions for a robot to follow a target in its environment. The method includes receiving a target bearing and sensing whether the robot is blocked front. If the robot is blocked in front, then the robot's motion is adjusted to avoid the nearest obstacle in front. If the robot is not blocked in front, then the method senses whether the robot is blocked toward the target bearing and if so, sets the rotational direction opposite from the target bearing, and adjusts the rotational velocity and translational velocity. If the robot is not blocked toward the target bearing, then the rotational velocity is adjusted proportional to an angle of the target bearing and the translational velocity is adjusted proportional to a distance to the nearest obstacle in front.

  10. Robotic Waterjet System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    NASA needed a way to safely strip old paint and thermal protection material from reusable components from the Space Shuttle; to meet this requirement, Marshall Space Flight Center teamed with United Technologies' USBI Company and developed a stripping system based on hydroblasting. United Technology spun off a new company, Waterjet Systems, to commercialize and market the technology. The resulting ARMS (Automated Robotic Maintenance Systems), employ waterblasts at 55,000 pounds per square inch controlled by target-sensitive robots. The systems are used on aircraft and engine parts, and the newest application is on ships, where it not only strips but catches the ensuing wastewater. This innovation results in faster, cheaper stripping with less clean-up and reduced environmental impact.

  11. Multisensor robot navigation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persa, Stelian; Jonker, Pieter P.

    2002-02-01

    Almost all robot navigation systems work indoors. Outdoor robot navigation systems offer the potential for new application areas. The biggest single obstacle to building effective robot navigation systems is the lack of accurate wide-area sensors for trackers that report the locations and orientations of objects in an environment. Active (sensor-emitter) tracking technologies require powered-device installation, limiting their use to prepared areas that are relative free of natural or man-made interference sources. The hybrid tracker combines rate gyros and accelerometers with compass and tilt orientation sensor and DGPS system. Sensor distortions, delays and drift required compensation to achieve good results. The measurements from sensors are fused together to compensate for each other's limitations. Analysis and experimental results demonstrate the system effectiveness. The paper presents a field experiment for a low-cost strapdown-IMU (Inertial Measurement Unit)/DGPS combination, with data processing for the determination of 2-D components of position (trajectory), velocity and heading. In the present approach we have neglected earth rotation and gravity variations, because of the poor gyroscope sensitivities of our low-cost ISA (Inertial Sensor Assembly) and because of the relatively small area of the trajectory. The scope of this experiment was to test the feasibility of an integrated DGPS/IMU system of this type and to develop a field evaluation procedure for such a combination.

  12. Robotic systems in orthopaedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Lang, J E; Mannava, S; Floyd, A J; Goddard, M S; Smith, B P; Mofidi, A; Seyler, T M; Jinnah, R H

    2011-10-01

    Robots have been used in surgery since the late 1980s. Orthopaedic surgery began to incorporate robotic technology in 1992, with the introduction of ROBODOC, for the planning and performance of total hip replacement. The use of robotic systems has subsequently increased, with promising short-term radiological outcomes when compared with traditional orthopaedic procedures. Robotic systems can be classified into two categories: autonomous and haptic (or surgeon-guided). Passive surgery systems, which represent a third type of technology, have also been adopted recently by orthopaedic surgeons. While autonomous systems have fallen out of favour, tactile systems with technological improvements have become widely used. Specifically, the use of tactile and passive robotic systems in unicompartmental knee replacement (UKR) has addressed some of the historical mechanisms of failure of non-robotic UKR. These systems assist with increasing the accuracy of the alignment of the components and produce more consistent ligament balance. Short-term improvements in clinical and radiological outcomes have increased the popularity of robot-assisted UKR. Robot-assisted orthopaedic surgery has the potential for improving surgical outcomes. We discuss the different types of robotic systems available for use in orthopaedics and consider the indication, contraindications and limitations of these technologies. PMID:21969424

  13. Robot computer problem solving system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, J. D.; Merriam, E. W.

    1974-01-01

    The conceptual, experimental, and practical aspects of the development of a robot computer problem solving system were investigated. The distinctive characteristics were formulated of the approach taken in relation to various studies of cognition and robotics. Vehicle and eye control systems were structured, and the information to be generated by the visual system is defined.

  14. Robotic Welding and Inspection System

    SciTech Connect

    H. B. Smartt; D. P. Pace; E. D. Larsen; T. R. McJunkin; C. I. Nichol; D. E. Clark; K. L. Skinner; M. L. Clark; T. G. Kaser; C. R. Tolle

    2008-06-01

    This paper presents a robotic system for GTA welding of lids on cylindrical vessels. The system consists of an articulated robot arm, a rotating positioner, end effectors for welding, grinding, ultrasonic and eddy current inspection. Features include weld viewing cameras, modular software, and text-based procedural files for process and motion trajectories.

  15. Robot computer problem solving system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merriam, E. W.; Becker, J. D.

    1973-01-01

    A robot computer problem solving system which represents a robot exploration vehicle in a simulated Mars environment is described. The model exhibits changes and improvements made on a previously designed robot in a city environment. The Martian environment is modeled in Cartesian coordinates; objects are scattered about a plane; arbitrary restrictions on the robot's vision have been removed; and the robot's path contains arbitrary curves. New environmental features, particularly the visual occlusion of objects by other objects, were added to the model. Two different algorithms were developed for computing occlusion. Movement and vision capabilities of the robot were established in the Mars environment, using LISP/FORTRAN interface for computational efficiency. The graphical display program was redesigned to reflect the change to the Mars-like environment.

  16. Robot computer problem solving system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, J. D.; Merriam, E. W.

    1974-01-01

    The conceptual, experimental, and practical phases of developing a robot computer problem solving system are outlined. Robot intelligence, conversion of the programming language SAIL to run under the THNEX monitor, and the use of the network to run several cooperating jobs at different sites are discussed.

  17. Robot, computer problem solving system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, J. D.

    1972-01-01

    The development of a computer problem solving system is reported that considers physical problems faced by an artificial robot moving around in a complex environment. Fundamental interaction constraints with a real environment are simulated for the robot by visual scan and creation of an internal environmental model. The programming system used in constructing the problem solving system for the simulated robot and its simulated world environment is outlined together with the task that the system is capable of performing. A very general framework for understanding the relationship between an observed behavior and an adequate description of that behavior is included.

  18. Smart robots: a handbook of intelligent robotic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, V.D.

    1985-01-01

    Smart robots, designed to improve the quality and increase both the productivity and profitability of manufactured goods, are discussed in detail. Attention is focused on: (1) artificial intelligence for smart robots, (2) smart robot systems, (3) sensor-controlled robots, (4) machine vision systems, (5) robot manipulators, (6) locomotion, (7) natural languagae processing, (8) expert systems, and (9) computer integrated manufacturing. Photographs, charts and diagrams illustrate the systems covered. Areas of successful application to date include the automobile industry, textiles, forging, die casting and electronics. 110 references.

  19. Robotic System For Greenhouse Or Nursery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gill, Paul; Montgomery, Jim; Silver, John; Heffelfinger, Neil; Simonton, Ward; Pease, Jim

    1993-01-01

    Report presents additional information about robotic system described in "Robotic Gripper With Force Control And Optical Sensors" (MFS-28537). "Flexible Agricultural Robotics Manipulator System" (FARMS) serves as prototype of robotic systems intended to enhance productivities of agricultural assembly-line-type facilities in large commercial greenhouses and nurseries.

  20. Brachytherapy next generation: robotic systems.

    PubMed

    Popescu, Tiberiu; Kacsó, Alex Cristian; Pisla, Doina; Kacsó, Gabriel

    2015-12-01

    In a field dominated by external beam radiation therapy (EBRT), both the therapeutic and technical possibilities of brachytherapy (BT) are underrated, shadowed by protons and intensity modulated radiotherapy. Decreasing expertise and indications, as well as increasing lack of specific BT training for radiation therapy (RT) residents led to the real need of shortening its learning curve and making it more popular. Developing robotic BT devices can be a way to mitigate the above issues. There are many teams working at custom-made robotic BT platforms to perfect and overcome the limitations of the existing systems. This paper provides a picture of the current state-of-the-art in robotic assisted BT, as it also conveys the author's solution to the problem, a parallel robot that uses CT-guidance. PMID:26816510

  1. Brachytherapy next generation: robotic systems

    PubMed Central

    Popescu, Tiberiu; Kacsó, Alex Cristian; Pisla, Doina

    2015-01-01

    In a field dominated by external beam radiation therapy (EBRT), both the therapeutic and technical possibilities of brachytherapy (BT) are underrated, shadowed by protons and intensity modulated radiotherapy. Decreasing expertise and indications, as well as increasing lack of specific BT training for radiation therapy (RT) residents led to the real need of shortening its learning curve and making it more popular. Developing robotic BT devices can be a way to mitigate the above issues. There are many teams working at custom-made robotic BT platforms to perfect and overcome the limitations of the existing systems. This paper provides a picture of the current state-of-the-art in robotic assisted BT, as it also conveys the author's solution to the problem, a parallel robot that uses CT-guidance. PMID:26816510

  2. Tinning/Trimming Robot System

    SciTech Connect

    Fureigh, M.L.

    1993-02-01

    In a new surface mount assembly area at AlliedSignal Inc., Kansas City Division (KCD), a tinning/trimming robot system tins and trims the gold-plated leads of surface mount technology (SMT) transistors. The KCD-designed system uses a Unimation PUMA 260 robot, a General Production Devices SP-2000 solder pot; water-soluble Blackstone No. 2508 flux; and a Virtual Industries high-temperature, ESD-conductive, miniature suction cup. After the manual cleaning operation, the processed SMT transistors go to the QUADSTAR Automated Component Placement System for a Radar Logic Assembly. The benefits are reductions in the cost of nonconformance, worker fatigue, and standard hours.

  3. The Human-Robot Interaction Operating System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fong, Terrence; Kunz, Clayton; Hiatt, Laura M.; Bugajska, Magda

    2006-01-01

    In order for humans and robots to work effectively together, they need to be able to converse about abilities, goals and achievements. Thus, we are developing an interaction infrastructure called the "Human-Robot Interaction Operating System" (HRI/OS). The HRI/OS provides a structured software framework for building human-robot teams, supports a variety of user interfaces, enables humans and robots to engage in task-oriented dialogue, and facilitates integration of robots through an extensible API.

  4. A two wheeled robot control system

    SciTech Connect

    Boskovich, S.M.

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this project was to design, build and test a control system that controls two motors for a two wheeled robot. By implementing the control system, the robot will maintain a straight path under normal conditions. Without such a control system, the robot`s path would deviate from the specified direction. To implement the control system for the robot a two wheeled platform was built. Each wheel was interfaced to a microcontroller where the microcontroller performed a controlling routine stored in software. By implementing this design, the robot is able to correct for deviations.

  5. Robot, computer problem solving system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, J. D.; Merriam, E. W.

    1973-01-01

    The TENEX computer system, the ARPA network, and computer language design technology was applied to support the complex system programs. By combining the pragmatic and theoretical aspects of robot development, an approach is created which is grounded in realism, but which also has at its disposal the power that comes from looking at complex problems from an abstract analytical point of view.

  6. Execution monitoring for a mobile robot system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, David P.

    1990-01-01

    Due to sensor errors, uncertainty, incomplete knowledge, and a dynamic world, robot plans will not always be executed exactly as planned. This paper describes an implemented robot planning system that enhances the traditional sense-think-act cycle in ways that allow the robot system monitor its behavior and react in emergencies in real-time. A proposal on how robot systems can completely break away from the traditional three-step cycle is also made.

  7. Robotics/Automated Systems Technicians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doty, Charles R.

    Major resources exist that can be used to develop or upgrade programs in community colleges and technical institutes that educate robotics/automated systems technicians. The first category of resources is Economic, Social, and Education Issues. The Office of Technology Assessment (OTA) report, "Automation and the Workplace," presents analyses of…

  8. Automatic control system generation for robot design validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacon, James A. (Inventor); English, James D. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    The specification and drawings present a new method, system and software product for and apparatus for generating a robotic validation system for a robot design. The robotic validation system for the robot design of a robotic system is automatically generated by converting a robot design into a generic robotic description using a predetermined format, then generating a control system from the generic robotic description and finally updating robot design parameters of the robotic system with an analysis tool using both the generic robot description and the control system.

  9. Teleoperated robotic sorting system

    DOEpatents

    Roos, Charles E.; Sommer, Jr., Edward J.; Parrish, Robert H.; Russell, James R.

    2008-06-24

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for classifying materials utilizing a computerized touch sensitive screen or other computerized pointing device for operator identification and electronic marking of spatial coordinates of materials to be extracted. An operator positioned at a computerized touch sensitive screen views electronic images of the mixture of materials to be sorted as they are conveyed past a sensor array which transmits sequences of images of the mixture either directly or through a computer to the touch sensitive display screen. The operator manually "touches" objects displayed on the screen to be extracted from the mixture thereby registering the spatial coordinates of the objects within the computer. The computer then tracks the registered objects as they are conveyed and directs automated devices including mechanical means such as air jets, robotic arms, or other mechanical diverters to extract the registered objects.

  10. Teleoperated robotic sorting system

    SciTech Connect

    Roos, Charles E.; Sommer, Edward J.; Parrish, Robert H.; Russell, James R.

    2000-01-01

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for classifying materials utilizing a computerized touch sensitive screen or other computerized pointing device for operator identification and electronic marking of spatial coordinates of materials to be extracted. An operator positioned at a computerized touch sensitive screen views electronic images of the mixture of materials to be sorted as they are conveyed past a sensor array which transmits sequences of images of the mixture either directly or through a computer to the touch sensitive display screen. The operator manually "touches" objects displayed on the screen to be extracted from the mixture thereby registering the spatial coordinates of the objects within the computer. The computer then tracks the registered objects as they are conveyed and directs automated devices including mechanical means such as air jets, robotic arms, or other mechanical diverters to extract the registered objects.

  11. Communications Systems for Mobile Robotics

    SciTech Connect

    Futterman, J A; Pao, H

    2003-12-08

    Performance Confirmation is the activity by which the Yucca Mountain Project confirms that the engineered and natural containment barriers of this national nuclear waste repository are performing as predicted, so that an eventual decision to close the repository can be made. This activity involves systems that must be inspected and, in some cases, serviced by mobile robots. This paper discusses systems for underground mobile robot communications, including requirements, environments, options, issues, and down-select criteria. We reviewed a variety of systems, including Slotted Waveguide, Powerline Carrier, Leaky Feeder, Photonic Bandgap Fiber, Free-Space Optics, Millimeter Waves, Terahertz Systems, and RF Systems (including IEEE 802.11 a,b, and g, and Ultra-Wideband radio).

  12. Autonomous Systems, Robotics, and Computing Systems Capability Roadmap: NRC Dialogue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zornetzer, Steve; Gage, Douglas

    2005-01-01

    Contents include the following: Introduction. Process, Mission Drivers, Deliverables, and Interfaces. Autonomy. Crew-Centered and Remote Operations. Integrated Systems Health Management. Autonomous Vehicle Control. Autonomous Process Control. Robotics. Robotics for Solar System Exploration. Robotics for Lunar and Planetary Habitation. Robotics for In-Space Operations. Computing Systems. Conclusion.

  13. Modular Track System For Positioning Mobile Robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Jeff

    1995-01-01

    Conceptual system for positioning mobile robotic manipulators on large main structure includes modular tracks and ancillary structures assembled easily along with main structure. System, called "tracked robotic location system" (TROLS), originally intended for application to platforms in outer space, but TROLS concept might also prove useful on Earth; for example, to position robots in factories and warehouses. T-cross-section rail keeps mobile robot on track. Bar codes mark locations along track. Each robot equipped with bar-code-recognizing circuitry so it quickly finds way to assigned location.

  14. Robot motion tracking system with multiple views

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamano, Hiroshi; Saito, Hideo

    2001-10-01

    In such a space where human workers and industrial robots work together, it has become necessary to monitor a robot motion for the safety. For such robot surveillance, we propose a robot tracking system from multiple view images. In this system, we treat tracking robot movement problem as an estimation problem of each pose parameter through all frames. This tracking algorithm consists of four stages, image generating stage, estimation stage, parameter searching stage, and prediction stage. At the first stage, robot area of real image is extracted by background subtraction. Here, Yuv color system is used because of reducing the change of lighting condition. By calibrating extrinsic and intrinsic parameters of all cameras with Tsai's method, we can project 3D model of the robot onto each camera. In the next stage, correlation of the input image and projected model image is calculated, which is defined by the area of robots in real and 3D images. At third stage, the pose parameters of the robot are estimated by maximizing the correlation. For computational efficiency, a high dimensional pose parameter space is divided into many low dimensional sub-spaces in accordance with the predicted pose parameters in the previous flame. We apply the proposed system for pose estimation of 5-axis robot manipulator. The estimated pose parameters are successfully matched with the actual pose of the robots.

  15. A graphical, rule based robotic interface system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckee, James W.; Wolfsberger, John

    1988-01-01

    The ability of a human to take control of a robotic system is essential in any use of robots in space in order to handle unforeseen changes in the robot's work environment or scheduled tasks. But in cases in which the work environment is known, a human controlling a robot's every move by remote control is both time consuming and frustrating. A system is needed in which the user can give the robotic system commands to perform tasks but need not tell the system how. To be useful, this system should be able to plan and perform the tasks faster than a telerobotic system. The interface between the user and the robot system must be natural and meaningful to the user. A high level user interface program under development at the University of Alabama, Huntsville, is described. A graphical interface is proposed in which the user selects objects to be manipulated by selecting representations of the object on projections of a 3-D model of the work environment. The user may move in the work environment by changing the viewpoint of the projections. The interface uses a rule based program to transform user selection of items on a graphics display of the robot's work environment into commands for the robot. The program first determines if the desired task is possible given the abilities of the robot and any constraints on the object. If the task is possible, the program determines what movements the robot needs to make to perform the task. The movements are transformed into commands for the robot. The information defining the robot, the work environment, and how objects may be moved is stored in a set of data bases accessible to the program and displayable to the user.

  16. Assistant Personal Robot (APR): Conception and Application of a Tele-Operated Assisted Living Robot

    PubMed Central

    Clotet, Eduard; Martínez, Dani; Moreno, Javier; Tresanchez, Marcel; Palacín, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the technical description, mechanical design, electronic components, software implementation and possible applications of a tele-operated mobile robot designed as an assisted living tool. This robotic concept has been named Assistant Personal Robot (or APR for short) and has been designed as a remotely telecontrolled robotic platform built to provide social and assistive services to elderly people and those with impaired mobility. The APR features a fast high-mobility motion system adapted for tele-operation in plain indoor areas, which incorporates a high-priority collision avoidance procedure. This paper presents the mechanical architecture, electrical fundaments and software implementation required in order to develop the main functionalities of an assistive robot. The APR uses a tablet in order to implement the basic peer-to-peer videoconference and tele-operation control combined with a tactile graphic user interface. The paper also presents the development of some applications proposed in the framework of an assisted living robot. PMID:27136552

  17. Assistant Personal Robot (APR): Conception and Application of a Tele-Operated Assisted Living Robot.

    PubMed

    Clotet, Eduard; Martínez, Dani; Moreno, Javier; Tresanchez, Marcel; Palacín, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the technical description, mechanical design, electronic components, software implementation and possible applications of a tele-operated mobile robot designed as an assisted living tool. This robotic concept has been named Assistant Personal Robot (or APR for short) and has been designed as a remotely telecontrolled robotic platform built to provide social and assistive services to elderly people and those with impaired mobility. The APR features a fast high-mobility motion system adapted for tele-operation in plain indoor areas, which incorporates a high-priority collision avoidance procedure. This paper presents the mechanical architecture, electrical fundaments and software implementation required in order to develop the main functionalities of an assistive robot. The APR uses a tablet in order to implement the basic peer-to-peer videoconference and tele-operation control combined with a tactile graphic user interface. The paper also presents the development of some applications proposed in the framework of an assisted living robot. PMID:27136552

  18. Robotic system for glovebox size reduction

    SciTech Connect

    KWOK,KWAN S.; MCDONALD,MICHAEL J.

    2000-03-02

    The Intelligent Systems and Robotics Center (ISRC) at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is developing technologies for glovebox size reduction in the DOE nuclear complex. A study was performed for Kaiser-Hill (KH) at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) on the available technologies for size reducing the glovebox lines that require size reduction in place. Currently, the baseline approach to these glovebox lines is manual operations using conventional mechanical cutting methods. The study has been completed and resulted in a concept of the robotic system for in-situ size reduction. The concept makes use of commercially available robots that are used in the automotive industry. The commercially available industrial robots provide high reliability and availability that are required for environmental remediation in the DOE complex. Additionally, the costs of commercial robots are about one-fourth that of the custom made robots for environmental remediation. The reason for the lower costs and the higher reliability is that there are thousands of commercial robots made annually, whereas there are only a few custom robots made for environmental remediation every year. This paper will describe the engineering analysis approach used in the design of the robotic system for glovebox size reduction.

  19. Tandem robot control system and method for controlling mobile robots in tandem

    DOEpatents

    Hayward, David R.; Buttz, James H.; Shirey, David L.

    2002-01-01

    A control system for controlling mobile robots provides a way to control mobile robots, connected in tandem with coupling devices, to navigate across difficult terrain or in closed spaces. The mobile robots can be controlled cooperatively as a coupled system in linked mode or controlled individually as separate robots.

  20. Walking Robot Locomotion System Conception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignatova, D.; Abadjieva, E.; Abadjiev, V.; Vatzkitchev, Al.

    2014-09-01

    This work is a brief analysis on the application and perspective of using the walking robots in different areas in practice. The most common characteristics of walking four legs robots are presented here. The specific features of the applied actuators in walking mechanisms are also shown in the article. The experience of Institute of Mechanics - BAS is illustrated in creation of Spiroid and Helicon1 gears and their assembly in actuation of studied robots. Loading on joints reductors of robot legs is modelled, when the geometrical and the walking parameters of the studied robot are preliminary defined. The obtained results are purposed for designing the control of the loading of reductor type Helicon in the legs of the robot, when it is experimentally tested.

  1. ASBESTOS PIPE-INSULATION REMOVAL ROBOT SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2000-09-15

    This final topical report details the development, experimentation and field-testing activities for a robotic asbestos pipe-insulation removal robot system developed for use within the DOE's weapon complex as part of their ER and WM program, as well as in industrial abatement. The engineering development, regulatory compliance, cost-benefit and field-trial experiences gathered through this program are summarized.

  2. Regolith Advanced Surface Systems Operations Robot Excavator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Robert P.; Smith, Jonathan D.; Ebert, Thomas; Cox, Rachel; Rahmatian, Laila; Wood, James; Schuler, Jason; Nick, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    The Regolith Advanced Surface Systems Operations Robot (RASSOR) excavator robot is a teleoperated mobility platform with a space regolith excavation capability. This more compact, lightweight design (<50 kg) has counterrotating bucket drums, which results in a net-zero reaction horizontal force due to the self-cancellation of the symmetrical, equal but opposing, digging forces.

  3. Designing vision systems for robotic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Trivedi, M.M.

    1988-01-01

    Intelligent robotic systems utilize sensory information to perceive the nature of their work environment. Of the many sensor modalities, vision is recognized as one of the most important and cost-effective sensors utilized in practical systems. In this paper, we address the problem of designing vision systems to perform a variety of robotic inspection and manipulation tasks. We describe the nature and characteristics of the robotic task domain and discuss the computational hierarchy governing the process of scene interpretation. We also present a case study illustrating the design of a specific vision system developed for performing inspection and manipulation tasks associated with a control panel. 27 refs., 6 figs.

  4. Stereofluoroscopic image-guided robotic biopsy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Minyan; Liu, Hong; Tao, Gang; Fajardo, Laurie L.

    1999-07-01

    This paper presents the key techniques of a stereo- fluoroscopic image-guided robotic biopsy system: 3D position reconstruction, 3D path planning, path registration and robot trajectory control with safety considerations. This system automatically adjusts the needle inserting path according to a real-time 3D position error feedback. This system is particularly applicable to the soft tissue and organ biopsy, with advantages of increased accuracy, short completion time and minimum invasiveness to the patient. Simulation shows the safety and accuracy of this robotic biopsy system.

  5. Robotic guarded motion system and method

    SciTech Connect

    Bruemmer, David J.

    2010-02-23

    A robot platform includes perceptors, locomotors, and a system controller. The system controller executes instructions for repeating, on each iteration through an event timing loop, the acts of defining an event horizon, detecting a range to obstacles around the robot, and testing for an event horizon intrusion. Defining the event horizon includes determining a distance from the robot that is proportional to a current velocity of the robot and testing for the event horizon intrusion includes determining if any range to the obstacles is within the event horizon. Finally, on each iteration through the event timing loop, the method includes reducing the current velocity of the robot in proportion to a loop period of the event timing loop if the event horizon intrusion occurs.

  6. Augmented Robotics Dialog System for Enhancing Human–Robot Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Martín, Fernando; Castro-González, Aívaro; de Gorostiza Luengo, Francisco Javier Fernandez; Salichs, Miguel Ángel

    2015-01-01

    Augmented reality, augmented television and second screen are cutting edge technologies that provide end users extra and enhanced information related to certain events in real time. This enriched information helps users better understand such events, at the same time providing a more satisfactory experience. In the present paper, we apply this main idea to human–robot interaction (HRI), to how users and robots interchange information. The ultimate goal of this paper is to improve the quality of HRI, developing a new dialog manager system that incorporates enriched information from the semantic web. This work presents the augmented robotic dialog system (ARDS), which uses natural language understanding mechanisms to provide two features: (i) a non-grammar multimodal input (verbal and/or written) text; and (ii) a contextualization of the information conveyed in the interaction. This contextualization is achieved by information enrichment techniques that link the extracted information from the dialog with extra information about the world available in semantic knowledge bases. This enriched or contextualized information (information enrichment, semantic enhancement or contextualized information are used interchangeably in the rest of this paper) offers many possibilities in terms of HRI. For instance, it can enhance the robot's pro-activeness during a human–robot dialog (the enriched information can be used to propose new topics during the dialog, while ensuring a coherent interaction). Another possibility is to display additional multimedia content related to the enriched information on a visual device. This paper describes the ARDS and shows a proof of concept of its applications. PMID:26151202

  7. Augmented Robotics Dialog System for Enhancing Human-Robot Interaction.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Martín, Fernando; Castro-González, Aĺvaro; Luengo, Francisco Javier Fernandez de Gorostiza; Salichs, Miguel Ángel

    2015-01-01

    Augmented reality, augmented television and second screen are cutting edge technologies that provide end users extra and enhanced information related to certain events in real time. This enriched information helps users better understand such events, at the same time providing a more satisfactory experience. In the present paper, we apply this main idea to human-robot interaction (HRI), to how users and robots interchange information. The ultimate goal of this paper is to improve the quality of HRI, developing a new dialog manager system that incorporates enriched information from the semantic web. This work presents the augmented robotic dialog system (ARDS), which uses natural language understanding mechanisms to provide two features: (i) a non-grammar multimodal input (verbal and/or written) text; and (ii) a contextualization of the information conveyed in the interaction. This contextualization is achieved by information enrichment techniques that link the extracted information from the dialog with extra information about the world available in semantic knowledge bases. This enriched or contextualized information (information enrichment, semantic enhancement or contextualized information are used interchangeably in the rest of this paper) offers many possibilities in terms of HRI. For instance, it can enhance the robot's pro-activeness during a human-robot dialog (the enriched information can be used to propose new topics during the dialog, while ensuring a coherent interaction). Another possibility is to display additional multimedia content related to the enriched information on a visual device. This paper describes the ARDS and shows a proof of concept of its applications. PMID:26151202

  8. Automated retinal robotic laser system.

    PubMed

    Barrett, S F; Wright, C H; Jerath, M R; Lewis, R S; Dillard, B C; Rylander, H G; Welch, A J

    1995-01-01

    Researchers at the University of Texas and the USAF Academy have worked toward the development of a retinal robotic laser system. The overall goal of this ongoing project is to precisely place and control the depth of laser lesions for the treatment of various retinal diseases such as diabetic retinopathy and retinal tears. Separate low speed prototype subsystems have been developed to control lesion depth using lesion reflectance feedback parameters and lesion placement using retinal vessels as tracking landmarks. Both subsystems have been successfully demonstrated in vivo on pigmented rabbits using an argon continuous wave laser. Recent efforts have concentrated on combining the two subsystems into a single prototype capable of simultaneously controlling both lesion depth and placement. We have designated this combined system CALOSOS for Computer Aided Laser Optics System for Ophthalmic Surgery. Following the dual-use concept, this system is being adapted for clinical use as a retinal treatment system as well as a research tool for military laser-tissue interaction studies. PMID:7654990

  9. Knowledge representation system for assembly using robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, A.; Donath, M.

    1987-01-01

    Assembly robots combine the benefits of speed and accuracy with the capability of adaptation to changes in the work environment. However, an impediment to the use of robots is the complexity of the man-machine interface. This interface can be improved by providing a means of using a priori-knowledge and reasoning capabilities for controlling and monitoring the tasks performed by robots. Robots ought to be able to perform complex assembly tasks with the help of only supervisory guidance from human operators. For such supervisory quidance, it is important to express the commands in terms of the effects desired, rather than in terms of the motion the robot must undertake in order to achieve these effects. A suitable knowledge representation can facilitate the conversion of task level descriptions into explicit instructions to the robot. Such a system would use symbolic relationships describing the a priori information about the robot, its environment, and the tasks specified by the operator to generate the commands for the robot.

  10. ROBOSIM, a simulator for robotic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinman, Elaine M.; Fernandez, Ken; Cook, George E.

    1991-01-01

    ROBOSIM, a simulator for robotic systems, was developed by NASA to aid in the rapid prototyping of automation. ROBOSIM has allowed the development of improved robotic systems concepts for both earth-based and proposed on-orbit applications while significantly reducing development costs. In a cooperative effort with an area university, ROBOSIM was further developed for use in the classroom as a safe and cost-effective way of allowing students to study robotic systems. Students have used ROBOSIM to study existing robotic systems and systems which they have designed in the classroom. Since an advanced simulator/trainer of this type is beneficial not only to NASA projects and programs but industry and academia as well, NASA is in the process of developing this technology for wider public use. An update on the simulators's new application areas, the improvements made to the simulator's design, and current efforts to ensure the timely transfer of this technology are presented.

  11. Prototype Optical Correlator For Robotic Vision System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholl, Marija S.

    1993-01-01

    Known and unknown images fed in electronically at high speed. Optical correlator and associated electronic circuitry developed for vision system of robotic vehicle. System recognizes features of landscape by optical correlation between input image of scene viewed by video camera on robot and stored reference image. Optical configuration is Vander Lugt correlator, in which Fourier transform of scene formed in coherent light and spatially modulated by hologram of reference image to obtain correlation.

  12. Robotic Mounted Detection System: robotics for route clearance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchison, John; Klager, Gene; McCoy, Edward; Fite, David; Frederick, Brian

    2010-04-01

    Robotic Mounted Detection System (RMDS) is a government program to enable robotic control of a Husky route clearance vehicle with a mine detection sensor payload. The goal is for the operator to control the Husky and mine detection sensor from another vehicle. This program will provide the user with standard tele-operation control of the vehicle as well as semi-autonomous modes including cruise control, precision waypoint navigation with operator error correction and a visual mode allowing the operator to enter waypoints in the current video feed. The use of autonomy will be tailored to give the operator maximum control of the robotic vehicle's path while minimizing the effort required to maintain the desired route. Autonomous alterations of the path would conflict with the goal of route clearance, so waypoint navigation will allow the operator to supply offsets to counteract location errors. While following a waypoint path, the Husky will be capable of controlling its speed to maintain an operator specified distance from the control vehicle. Obstacle avoidance will be limited to protecting the mine detection sensor, leaving any decision to leave the path up to the operator. Video will be the primary navigational sensor feed to the operator, who will use an augmented steering wheel controller and computer display to control the Husky. A LADAR system will be used to detect obstacles that could damage the mine sensor and to maintain the optimal sensor orientation while the vehicle is moving. Practical issues and lessons learned during integration will be presented.

  13. Safety assessment of high consequence robotics system

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, D.G.; Atcitty, C.B.

    1996-08-01

    This paper outlines the use of a failure modes and effects analysis for the safety assessment of a robotic system being developed at Sandia National Laboratories. The robotic system, the weigh and leak check system, is to replace a manual process for weight and leakage of nuclear materials at the DOE Pantex facility. Failure modes and effects analyses were completed for the robotics process to ensure that safety goals for the systems have been met. Due to the flexible nature of the robot configuration, traditional failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) were not applicable. In addition, the primary focus of safety assessments of robotics systems has been the protection of personnel in the immediate area. In this application, the safety analysis must account for the sensitivities of the payload as well as traditional issues. A unique variation on the classical FMEA was developed that permits an organized and quite effective tool to be used to assure that safety was adequately considered during the development of the robotic system. The fundamental aspects of the approach are outlined in the paper.

  14. An automated miniature robotic vehicle inspection system

    SciTech Connect

    Dobie, Gordon; Summan, Rahul; MacLeod, Charles; Pierce, Gareth; Galbraith, Walter

    2014-02-18

    A novel, autonomous reconfigurable robotic inspection system for quantitative NDE mapping is presented. The system consists of a fleet of wireless (802.11g) miniature robotic vehicles, each approximately 175 × 125 × 85 mm with magnetic wheels that enable them to inspect industrial structures such as storage tanks, chimneys and large diameter pipe work. The robots carry one of a number of payloads including a two channel MFL sensor, a 5 MHz dry coupled UT thickness wheel probe and a machine vision camera that images the surface. The system creates an NDE map of the structure overlaying results onto a 3D model in real time. The authors provide an overview of the robot design, data fusion algorithms (positioning and NDE) and visualization software.

  15. Ubiquitous Robotic Technology for Smart Manufacturing System

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Liyu; Qiu, Qiang; Cao, Qixin

    2016-01-01

    As the manufacturing tasks become more individualized and more flexible, the machines in smart factory are required to do variable tasks collaboratively without reprogramming. This paper for the first time discusses the similarity between smart manufacturing systems and the ubiquitous robotic systems and makes an effort on deploying ubiquitous robotic technology to the smart factory. Specifically, a component based framework is proposed in order to enable the communication and cooperation of the heterogeneous robotic devices. Further, compared to the service robotic domain, the smart manufacturing systems are often in larger size. So a hierarchical planning method was implemented to improve the planning efficiency. A test bed of smart factory is developed. It demonstrates that the proposed framework is suitable for industrial domain, and the hierarchical planning method is able to solve large problems intractable with flat methods. PMID:27446206

  16. Ubiquitous Robotic Technology for Smart Manufacturing System.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenshan; Zhu, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Liyu; Qiu, Qiang; Cao, Qixin

    2016-01-01

    As the manufacturing tasks become more individualized and more flexible, the machines in smart factory are required to do variable tasks collaboratively without reprogramming. This paper for the first time discusses the similarity between smart manufacturing systems and the ubiquitous robotic systems and makes an effort on deploying ubiquitous robotic technology to the smart factory. Specifically, a component based framework is proposed in order to enable the communication and cooperation of the heterogeneous robotic devices. Further, compared to the service robotic domain, the smart manufacturing systems are often in larger size. So a hierarchical planning method was implemented to improve the planning efficiency. A test bed of smart factory is developed. It demonstrates that the proposed framework is suitable for industrial domain, and the hierarchical planning method is able to solve large problems intractable with flat methods. PMID:27446206

  17. A capaciflector-based robotic system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Charles C.; Uribe, Paulo F.

    1993-01-01

    This report presents preliminary results obtained from a research grant entitled 'Capaciflector-based Control and Imaging,' with Grant Number NAG 5-780, for the period between February 1, 1993 and August 1, 1993. This report deals with the development of a robotic system which is used to evaluate the feasibility of servicing and repairing the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) using robots. In particular, the task of opening the HST's toolbox is considered in this report. First the main components of the robotic system will be introduced. Then each component will be described in detail from low-level to high-level. Finally tasks that have been accomplished during the reporting period for the development of the robotic system will be presented. Listings of source codes for the accomplished tasks are given at the end of the report.

  18. An automated miniature robotic vehicle inspection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobie, Gordon; Summan, Rahul; MacLeod, Charles; Pierce, Gareth; Galbraith, Walter

    2014-02-01

    A novel, autonomous reconfigurable robotic inspection system for quantitative NDE mapping is presented. The system consists of a fleet of wireless (802.11g) miniature robotic vehicles, each approximately 175 × 125 × 85 mm with magnetic wheels that enable them to inspect industrial structures such as storage tanks, chimneys and large diameter pipe work. The robots carry one of a number of payloads including a two channel MFL sensor, a 5 MHz dry coupled UT thickness wheel probe and a machine vision camera that images the surface. The system creates an NDE map of the structure overlaying results onto a 3D model in real time. The authors provide an overview of the robot design, data fusion algorithms (positioning and NDE) and visualization software.

  19. Space environment robot vision system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, H. John; Eichhorn, William L.

    1990-01-01

    A prototype twin-camera stereo vision system for autonomous robots has been developed at Goddard Space Flight Center. Standard charge coupled device (CCD) imagers are interfaced with commercial frame buffers and direct memory access to a computer. The overlapping portions of the images are analyzed using photogrammetric techniques to obtain information about the position and orientation of objects in the scene. The camera head consists of two 510 x 492 x 8-bit CCD cameras mounted on individually adjustable mounts. The 16 mm efl lenses are designed for minimum geometric distortion. The cameras can be rotated in the pitch, roll, and yaw (pan angle) directions with respect to their optical axes. Calibration routines have been developed which automatically determine the lens focal lengths and pan angle between the two cameras. The calibration utilizes observations of a calibration structure with known geometry. Test results show the precision attainable is plus or minus 0.8 mm in range at 2 m distance using a camera separation of 171 mm. To demonstrate a task needed on Space Station Freedom, a target structure with a movable I beam was built. The camera head can autonomously direct actuators to dock the I-beam to another one so that they could be bolted together.

  20. Parametric uncertain identification of a robotic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angel, L.; Viola, J.; Hernández, C.

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents the parametric uncertainties identification of a robotic system of one degree of freedom. A MSC-ADAMS / MATLAB co-simulation model was built to simulate the uncertainties that affect the robotic system. For a desired trajectory, a set of dynamic models of the system was identified in presence of variations in the mass, length and friction of the system employing least squares method. Using the input-output linearization technique a linearized model plant was defined. Finally, the maximum multiplicative uncertainty of the system was modelled giving the controller desired design conditions to achieve a robust stability and performance of the closed loop system.

  1. Dual arm robotic system with sensory input

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ozguner, U.

    1987-01-01

    The need for dual arm robots in space station assembly and satellite maintainance is of increasing significance. Such robots will be in greater demand in the future when numerous tasks will be assigned to them to relieve the direct intervention of humans in space. Technological demands from these robots will be high. They will be expected to perform high speed tasks with a certain degree of autonomy. Various levels of sensing will have to be used in a sophisticated control scheme. Ongoing research in control, sensing and real-time software to produce a two-arm robotic system than can accomplish generic assembly tasks is discussed. The control hierarchy and the specific control approach are discussed. A decentralized implementation of model-reference adaptive control using Variable Structure controllers and the incorporation of tactile feedback is considered.

  2. Fault diagnostic system for a mobile robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikam, Umesh; Hall, Ernest L.

    1997-09-01

    This paper describes the development of a robot fault diagnosis system (RFDS). Though designed ostensibly for the University of Cincinnati's autonomous, unmanned, mobile robot for a national competition, it has the flexibility to be adapted for industrial applications as well. Using a top-down approach the robot is sub-divided into different functional units, such as the vision guidance system, the ultrasonic obstacle avoidance system, the steering mechanism, the speed control system, the braking system and the power unit. The techniques of potential failure mode and effects analysis (PFMEA) are used to analyze faults, their visible symptoms, and probable causes and remedies. The relationships obtained therefrom are mapped in a database framework. This is then coded in a user-friendly interactive Visual BasicTM program that guides the user to the likely cause(s) of failure through a question-answer format. A provision is made to ensure better accuracy of the system by incorporating historical data on failures as it becomes available. The RFDS thus provides a handy trouble-shooting tool that cuts down the time involved in diagnosing failures in the complex robot consisting of mechanical, electric, electronic and optical systems. This has been of great help in diagnosing failures and ensuring maximum performance from the robot during the contest in the face of pressure of the competition and the outdoor conditions.

  3. Towards a sustainable modular robot system for planetary exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, S. G. M.

    This thesis investigates multiple perspectives of developing an unmanned robotic system suited for planetary terrains. In this case, the unmanned system consists of unit-modular robots. This type of robot has potential to be developed and maintained as a sustainable multi-robot system while located far from direct human intervention. Some characteristics that make this possible are: the cooperation, communication and connectivity among the robot modules, flexibility of individual robot modules, capability of self-healing in the case of a failed module and the ability to generate multiple gaits by means of reconfiguration. To demonstrate the effects of high flexibility of an individual robot module, multiple modules of a four-degree-of-freedom unit-modular robot were developed. The robot was equipped with a novel connector mechanism that made self-healing possible. Also, design strategies included the use of series elastic actuators for better robot-terrain interaction. In addition, various locomotion gaits were generated and explored using the robot modules, which is essential for a modular robot system to achieve robustness and thus successfully navigate and function in a planetary environment. To investigate multi-robot task completion, a biomimetic cooperative load transportation algorithm was developed and simulated. Also, a liquid motion-inspired theory was developed consisting of a large number of robot modules. This can be used to traverse obstacles that inevitably occur in maneuvering over rough terrains such as in a planetary exploration. Keywords: Modular robot, cooperative robots, biomimetics, planetary exploration, sustainability.

  4. System for exchanging tools and end effectors on a robot

    DOEpatents

    Burry, D.B.; Williams, P.M.

    1991-02-19

    A system and method for exchanging tools and end effectors on a robot permits exchange during a programmed task. The exchange mechanism is located off the robot, thus reducing the mass of the robot arm and permitting smaller robots to perform designated tasks. A simple spring/collet mechanism mounted on the robot is used which permits the engagement and disengagement of the tool or end effector without the need for a rotational orientation of the tool to the end effector/collet interface. As the tool changing system is not located on the robot arm no umbilical cords are located on robot. 12 figures.

  5. System for exchanging tools and end effectors on a robot

    DOEpatents

    Burry, David B.; Williams, Paul M.

    1991-02-19

    A system and method for exchanging tools and end effectors on a robot permits exchange during a programmed task. The exchange mechanism is located off the robot, thus reducing the mass of the robot arm and permitting smaller robots to perform designated tasks. A simple spring/collet mechanism mounted on the robot is used which permits the engagement and disengagement of the tool or end effector without the need for a rotational orientation of the tool to the end effector/collet interface. As the tool changing system is not located on the robot arm no umbilical cords are located on robot.

  6. Robust tuning of robot control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minis, I.; Uebel, M.

    1992-01-01

    The computed torque control problem is examined for a robot arm with flexible, geared, joint drive systems which are typical in many industrial robots. The standard computed torque algorithm is not directly applicable to this class of manipulators because of the dynamics introduced by the joint drive system. The proposed approach to computed torque control combines a computed torque algorithm with torque controller at each joint. Three such control schemes are proposed. The first scheme uses the joint torque control system currently implemented on the robot arm and a novel form of the computed torque algorithm. The other two use the standard computed torque algorithm and a novel model following torque control system based on model following techniques. Standard tasks and performance indices are used to evaluate the performance of the controllers. Both numerical simulations and experiments are used in evaluation. The study shows that all three proposed systems lead to improved tracking performance over a conventional PD controller.

  7. System design for robot agent team

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Stuart H.; Nguyen, Hung M.

    2002-07-01

    Small air and ground physical agents (robots) will be ubiquitous on the battlefield of the 21st century, principally to lower the exposure to harm of our ground forces in urban and open terrain. Teams of small collaborating physical agents conducting tasks such as Reconnaissance, Surveillance, and Target Acquisition (RSTA), intelligence, chemical and biological agent detection, logistics, decoy, sentry, and communications relay will have advanced sensors, communications, and mobility characteristics. The Army Research Laboratory (ARL) is conducting research in sensor fusion, communications, and processing on small mobile robotic platforms principally in the urban environment in support of Military Operations in Urban Terrain (MOUT). This paper discusses on-going research at ARL that supports the development of multi-robot collaboration. Commercial ATRV-2 and Urban Robot platforms are being utilized along with advanced battlefield visualization tools and other tools to effectively command and control teams of collaborating physical agents and present the gathered information in a manner that is useful to the commander. The software architecture and the modular packaging designs will be the focus of the paper, which also consider mother ship concepts. Additionally, work that has been conducted with PM Soldier Systems to integrate robotic platforms (Robot Warrior) with the Land Warrior (LW) ensemble to create a Scout Warrior will be discussed.

  8. Developing stereo image based robot control system

    SciTech Connect

    Suprijadi,; Pambudi, I. R.; Woran, M.; Naa, C. F; Srigutomo, W.

    2015-04-16

    Application of image processing is developed in various field and purposes. In the last decade, image based system increase rapidly with the increasing of hardware and microprocessor performance. Many fields of science and technology were used this methods especially in medicine and instrumentation. New technique on stereovision to give a 3-dimension image or movie is very interesting, but not many applications in control system. Stereo image has pixel disparity information that is not existed in single image. In this research, we proposed a new method in wheel robot control system using stereovision. The result shows robot automatically moves based on stereovision captures.

  9. Petri net controllers for distributed robotic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lefebvre, D. R.; Saridis, George N.

    1992-01-01

    Petri nets are a well established modelling technique for analyzing parallel systems. When coupled with an event-driven operating system, Petri nets can provide an effective means for integrating and controlling the functions of distributed robotic applications. Recent work has shown that Petri net graphs can also serve as remarkably intuitive operator interfaces. In this paper, the advantages of using Petri nets as high-level controllers to coordinate robotic functions are outlined, the considerations for designing Petri net controllers are discussed, and simple Petri net structures for implementing an interface for operator supervision are presented. A detailed example is presented which illustrates these concepts for a sensor-based assembly application.

  10. Self maintenance robot system using physical information learning for mobile robot with visual sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiguchi, Naohiro; Tanaka, Takayuki; Kaneko, Shun'ichi

    2005-12-01

    We propose self-maintenance robot system as a method which realizes work for a long time without maintenance by the human workers. This system absorbs the change which occurs in robot's hardware by learning, and maintains working ability. We propose the two methods of learning changes in the physical information of the robot as methods which realizes the maintenance-free robot system. One is a method to learn robot's physical information based on the input and output information in the task practice from the no physical information of the robot by using a neural network which has a task common layer and a task independence layer. We use a neural network which has a task common layer and a task independence layer to learning. Other is a method to learn robot's physical information based on the difference in hoping action and actual action. In this report, we verify of these learning system by the computer simulation.

  11. A Novel Teaching System for Industrial Robots

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hsien-I; Lin, Yu-Hsiang

    2014-01-01

    The most important tool for controlling an industrial robotic arm is a teach pendant, which controls the robotic arm movement in work spaces and accomplishes teaching tasks. A good teaching tool should be easy to operate and can complete teaching tasks rapidly and effortlessly. In this study, a new teaching system is proposed for enabling users to operate robotic arms and accomplish teaching tasks easily. The proposed teaching system consists of the teach pen, optical markers on the pen, a motion capture system, and the pen tip estimation algorithm. With the marker positions captured by the motion capture system, the pose of the teach pen is accurately calculated by the pen tip algorithm and used to control the robot tool frame. In addition, Fitts' Law is adopted to verify the usefulness of this new system, and the results show that the system provides high accuracy, excellent operation performance, and a stable error rate. In addition, the system maintains superior performance, even when users work on platforms with different inclination angles. PMID:24681669

  12. A novel teaching system for industrial robots.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hsien-I; Lin, Yu-Hsiang

    2014-01-01

    The most important tool for controlling an industrial robotic arm is a teach pendant, which controls the robotic arm movement in work spaces and accomplishes teaching tasks. A good teaching tool should be easy to operate and can complete teaching tasks rapidly and effortlessly. In this study, a new teaching system is proposed for enabling users to operate robotic arms and accomplish teaching tasks easily. The proposed teaching system consists of the teach pen, optical markers on the pen, a motion capture system, and the pen tip estimation algorithm. With the marker positions captured by the motion capture system, the pose of the teach pen is accurately calculated by the pen tip algorithm and used to control the robot tool frame. In addition, Fitts' Law is adopted to verify the usefulness of this new system, and the results show that the system provides high accuracy, excellent operation performance, and a stable error rate. In addition, the system maintains superior performance, even when users work on platforms with different inclination angles. PMID:24681669

  13. Robotics virtual rail system and method

    DOEpatents

    Bruemmer, David J.; Few, Douglas A.; Walton, Miles C.

    2011-07-05

    A virtual track or rail system and method is described for execution by a robot. A user, through a user interface, generates a desired path comprised of at least one segment representative of the virtual track for the robot. Start and end points are assigned to the desired path and velocities are also associated with each of the at least one segment of the desired path. A waypoint file is generated including positions along the virtual track representing the desired path with the positions beginning from the start point to the end point including the velocities of each of the at least one segment. The waypoint file is sent to the robot for traversing along the virtual track.

  14. Intelligent safety systems for industrial robots

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, G.; Graham, J.

    1996-12-31

    A major factor which has limited the application of robots in industrial settings has been the lack of robust sensing and control algorithms for detection and prevention of collision which could harm a person and cause damage to an expensive robot. This paper discusses an approach for an industrial robot safety system that uses the combined technologies of neural networks and fuzzy logic to accomplish real-time sensor data fusion and decision making. A three level safety architecture is presented which consists of (1) the sensing level, (2) the integration level, and (3) the safety decision-making level. The integration level is implemented by a set of neural networks, and the decision-making of this architecture is that it requires little or no changes to existing code when new sensors are added.

  15. Research on Human-Robot Joint System for Lunar Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei

    The lunar exploration in China is in progress. In order to reduce human workload and costs, and conduct researches more effectively and efficiently, human-robot joint systems are necessary for lunar exploration. The concept of human-robot joint system for lunar exploration is studied in this paper. The possible collaborative ways between human and robots and the collaborative activities which can be conducted for lunar exploration are discussed. Moreover, the preliminary configuration of a human-robot joint system is presented.

  16. An expert system for automated robotic grasping

    SciTech Connect

    Stansfield, S.A.

    1990-05-10

    Many DOE sites and facilities will be environmentally remediated during the next several decades. A number of the restoration activities (decontamination and decommissioning of inactive nuclear facilities is an example) can only be carried out by remote means and will be manipulation-intensive tasks. Experience has shown that manipulation tasks are especially slow and fatiguing for the human operator of a remote manipulator. In this paper, we present a rule-based expert system for automated, dextrous robotic grasping. This system reasons about the features of an object to generate hand shaping and wrist orientation for a robot hand and arm. The system can be used in several different ways to lessen the demands on the human operator of a remote manipulation system --- either as a fully autonomous grasping system or one which generates grasping options for a human operator and which then automatically carries out the one selected. This paper examines these systems. 2 figs.

  17. Robots, systems, and methods for hazard evaluation and visualization

    DOEpatents

    Nielsen, Curtis W.; Bruemmer, David J.; Walton, Miles C.; Hartley, Robert S.; Gertman, David I.; Kinoshita, Robert A.; Whetten, Jonathan

    2013-01-15

    A robot includes a hazard sensor, a locomotor, and a system controller. The robot senses a hazard intensity at a location of the robot, moves to a new location in response to the hazard intensity, and autonomously repeats the sensing and moving to determine multiple hazard levels at multiple locations. The robot may also include a communicator to communicate the multiple hazard levels to a remote controller. The remote controller includes a communicator for sending user commands to the robot and receiving the hazard levels from the robot. A graphical user interface displays an environment map of the environment proximate the robot and a scale for indicating a hazard intensity. A hazard indicator corresponds to a robot position in the environment map and graphically indicates the hazard intensity at the robot position relative to the scale.

  18. Viewing and controlling a mobile robot with common Web technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colon, Eric; Baudoin, Yvan

    1998-08-01

    Despite enthusiastic researches all over the world, completely autonomous robots are yet today an utopia. But pure teleoperated Robotics System, as generally used in unknown or dangerous environment, have also their limitations and drawbacks. The introduction of a partial autonomy, where appropriate, could greatly enhance the performances of the man-machine systems. The interactive autonomy objective is to hide sophisticated systems behind simple interfaces and to transparently provide help to the user. These principles can be implemented to control a manipulation arm or a mobile vehicle. Telecontrol is generally associated with video images, nevertheless in specific applications or under special circumstances, the images have a poor quality, can be degraded when using the systems or are not available. This implies the introduction of a 3D model that can be used as stand alone or as augmented reality display. Existing internet technologies can be used for interfacing the real and the virtual worlds. VRML provides the 3D aspects, Java is the unifying language between different computer system, browsers and plug-ins are completing the team. Using these technologies we have developed a multi client/server application to remotely view and control a mobile robot. In this paper we give the description of this application and we provide a basic presentation of the tools.

  19. An expert system for automated robotic grasping

    SciTech Connect

    Stansfield, S.A. )

    1990-01-01

    Many US Department of Energy sites and facilities will be environmentally remediated during the next several decades. A number of the restoration activities (e.g., decontamination and decommissioning of inactive nuclear facilities) can only be carried out by remote means and will be manipulation-intensive tasks. Experience has shown that manipulation tasks are especially slow and fatiguing for the human operator of a remote manipulator. In this paper, the authors present a rule-based expert system for automated, dextrous robotic grasping. This system interprets the features of an object to generate hand shaping and wrist orientation for a robot hand and arm. The system can be used in several different ways to lessen the demands on the human operator of a remote manipulation system - either as a fully autonomous grasping system or one that generates grasping options for a human operator and then automatically carries out the selected option.

  20. Development Of A Vision Guided Robot System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torfeh-Isfahani, Mohammad; Yeung, Kim F.

    1987-10-01

    This paper presents the development of an intelligent vision guided system through the integration of a vision system into a robot. Systems like the one described in this paper are able to work alone. They can be used in many automated assembly operations. Such systems can do repetitive tasks more efficiently and accurately than human operators because of the immunity of machines to human factors such as boredom, fatigue, and stress. In order to better understand the capabilities of such systems, this paper will highlight what can be accomplished by such systems by detailing the development of such a system. This system is already built and functional.

  1. A hazard control system for robot manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Ruth Chiang; Rad, Adrian

    1991-01-01

    A robot for space applications will be required to complete a variety of tasks in an uncertain, harsh environment. This fact presents unusual and highly difficult challenges to ensuring the safety of astronauts and keeping the equipment they depend on from becoming damaged. The systematic approach being taken to control hazards that could result from introducing robotics technology in the space environment is described. First, system safety management and engineering principles, techniques, and requirements are discussed as they relate to Shuttle payload design and operation in general. The concepts of hazard, hazard category, and hazard control, as defined by the Shuttle payload safety requirements, is explained. Next, it is shown how these general safety management and engineering principles are being implemented on an actual project. An example is presented of a hazard control system for controlling one of the hazards identified for the Development Test Flight (DTF-1) of NASA's Flight Telerobotic Servicer, a teleoperated space robot. How these schemes can be applied to terrestrial robots is discussed as well. The same software monitoring and control approach will insure the safe operation of a slave manipulator under teleoperated or autonomous control in undersea, nuclear, or manufacturing applications where the manipulator is working in the vicinity of humans or critical hardware.

  2. Robotically assisted MRgFUS system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenne, Jürgen W.; Krafft, Axel J.; Maier, Florian; Rauschenberg, Jaane; Semmler, Wolfhard; Huber, Peter E.; Bock, Michael

    2010-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging guided focus ultrasound surgery (MRgFUS) is a highly precise method to ablate tissue non-invasively. The objective of this ongoing work is to establish an MRgFUS therapy unit consisting of a specially designed FUS applicator as an add-on to a commercial robotic assistance system originally designed for percutaneous needle interventions in whole-body MRI systems. The fully MR compatible robotic assistance system InnoMotion™ (Synthes Inc., West Chester, USA; formerly InnoMedic GmbH, Herxheim, Germany) offers six degrees of freedom. The developed add-on FUS treatment applicator features a fixed focus ultrasound transducer (f = 1.7 MHz; f' = 68 mm, NA = 0.44, elliptical shaped -6-dB-focus: 8.1 mm length; O/ = 1.1 mm) embedded in a water-filled flexible bellow. A Mylar® foil is used as acoustic window encompassed by a dedicated MRI loop coil. For FUS application, the therapy unit is directly connected to the head of the robotic system, and the treatment region is targeted from above. A newly in-house developed software tool allowed for complete remote control of the MRgFUS-robot system and online analysis of MRI thermometry data. The system's ability for therapeutic relevant focal spot scanning was tested in a closed-bore clinical 1.5 T MR scanner (Magnetom Symphony, Siemens AG, Erlangen, Germany) in animal experiments with pigs. The FUS therapy procedure was performed entirely under MRI guidance including initial therapy planning, online MR-thermometry, and final contrast enhanced imaging for lesion detection. In vivo trials proved the MRgFUS-robot system as highly MR compatible. MR-guided focal spot scanning experiments were performed and a well-defined pattern of thermal tissue lesions was created. A total in vivo positioning accuracy of the US focus better than 2 mm was estimated which is comparable to existing MRgFUS systems. The newly developed FUS-robotic system offers an accurate, highly flexible focus positioning. With its access

  3. Mobile robot on-board vision system

    SciTech Connect

    McClure, V.W.; Nai-Yung Chen.

    1993-06-15

    An automatic robot system is described comprising: an AGV transporting and transferring work piece, a control computer on board the AGV, a process machine for working on work pieces, a flexible robot arm with a gripper comprising two gripper fingers at one end of the arm, wherein the robot arm and gripper are controllable by the control computer for engaging a work piece, picking it up, and setting it down and releasing it at a commanded location, locating beacon means mounted on the process machine, wherein the locating beacon means are for locating on the process machine a place to pick up and set down work pieces, vision means, including a camera fixed in the coordinate system of the gripper means, attached to the robot arm near the gripper, such that the space between said gripper fingers lies within the vision field of said vision means, for detecting the locating beacon means, wherein the vision means provides the control computer visual information relating to the location of the locating beacon means, from which information the computer is able to calculate the pick up and set down place on the process machine, wherein said place for picking up and setting down work pieces on the process machine is a nest means and further serves the function of holding a work piece in place while it is worked on, the robot system further comprising nest beacon means located in the nest means detectable by the vision means for providing information to the control computer as to whether or not a work piece is present in the nest means.

  4. Navigation of robotic system using cricket motes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Yogendra J.; Baine, Nicholas A.; Rattan, Kuldip S.

    2011-06-01

    This paper presents a novel algorithm for self-mapping of the cricket motes that can be used for indoor navigation of autonomous robotic systems. The cricket system is a wireless sensor network that can provide indoor localization service to its user via acoustic ranging techniques. The behavior of the ultrasonic transducer on the cricket mote is studied and the regions where satisfactorily distance measurements can be obtained are recorded. Placing the motes in these regions results fine-grain mapping of the cricket motes. Trilateration is used to obtain a rigid coordinate system, but is insufficient if the network is to be used for navigation. A modified SLAM algorithm is applied to overcome the shortcomings of trilateration. Finally, the self-mapped cricket motes can be used for navigation of autonomous robotic systems in an indoor location.

  5. Zoom Vision System For Robotic Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Jeffrey L.; Hudyma, Russell M.

    1990-01-01

    Rugged zoom lens subsystem proposed for use in along-the-torch vision system of robotic welder. Enables system to adapt, via simple mechanical adjustments, to gas cups of different lengths, electrodes of different protrusions, and/or different distances between end of electrode and workpiece. Unnecessary to change optical components to accommodate changes in geometry. Easy to calibrate with respect to object in view. Provides variable focus and variable magnification.

  6. Design of a Robotic Welding System

    SciTech Connect

    H. B. Smartt; E.D. Larsen; D. P. Pace; R. J. Bitsoi; C. R. Tolle

    2006-08-01

    Canisters for long term storage or disposal of waste materials are normally closed by welding one or more lids to the top of the canister. This paper describes the development of a conceptual design of a control architecture for a robotic system for welding lids on canisters in a remote welding cell. This work extended over several years and included development of control systems for three machines.

  7. Intelligent Robotic Systems Study (IRSS), phase 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Under the Intelligent Robotics Systems Study (IRSS), a generalized robotic control architecture was developed for use with the ProtoFlight Manipulator Arm (PFMA). Based upon the NASREM system design concept, the controller built for the PFMA provides localized position based force control, teleoperation, and advanced path recording and playback capabilities. The PFMA has six computer controllable degrees of freedom (DOF) plus a 7th manually indexable DOF, making the manipulator a pseudo 7 DOF mechanism. Joints on the PFMA are driven via 7 pulse width modulated amplifiers. Digital control of the PFMA is implemented using a variety of single board computers. There were two major activities under the IRSS phase 4 study: (1) enhancement of the PFMA control system software functionality; and (2) evaluation of operating modes via a teleoperation performance study. These activities are described and results are given.

  8. Laboratory robotics systems at the Savannah River Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Dyches, G M; Burkett, S D

    1983-01-01

    Many analytical chemistry methods normally used at the Savannah River site require repetitive procedures and handling of radioactive and other hazardous solutions. Robotics is being investigated as a method of reducing personnel fatigue and radiation exposure and also increasing product quality. Several applications of various commercially available robot systems are discussed involving cold (nonradioactive) and hot (radioactive) sample preparations and glovebox waste removal. Problems encountered in robot programming, parts fixturing, design of special robot hands and other support equipment, glovebox operation, and operator-system interaction are discussed. A typical robot system cost analysis for one application is given.

  9. An intelligent robotic system based on a fuzzy approach

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuda, Toshio; Kubota, Naoyuki

    1999-09-01

    This paper deals with a fuzzy-based intelligent robotic system that requires various capabilities normally associated with intelligence. It acquires skills and knowledge through interaction with a dynamic environment. Recently, subsumption architectures, behavior-based artificial intelligence, and behavioral engineering for robotic systems have been discussed as new technologies for intelligent robotic systems. This paper proposes a robotic system with structured intelligence. The authors focus on a mobile robotic system with a fuzzy controller and propose a sensory network that allows the robot to perceive its environment. An evolutionary approach improves the robot's performance. Furthermore, the authors discuss the effectiveness of the proposed method through computer simulations of collision avoidance and path-planning problems.

  10. Robotics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waddell, Steve; Doty, Keith L.

    1999-01-01

    "Why Teach Robotics?" (Waddell) suggests that the United States lags behind Europe and Japan in use of robotics in industry and teaching. "Creating a Course in Mobile Robotics" (Doty) outlines course elements of the Intelligent Machines Design Lab. (SK)

  11. Fuzzy control system for a mobile robot

    SciTech Connect

    Hai Quan Dai; Dalton, G.R.; Tulenko, J. )

    1992-01-01

    Since the first fuzzy logic control system was proposed by Mamdani, many studies have been carried out on industrial process and real-time controls. The key problem for the application of fuzzy logic control is to find a suitable set of fuzzy control rules. Three common modes of deriving fuzzy control rules are often distinguished and mentioned: (1) expert experience and knowledge; (2) modeling operator control actions; and (3) modeling a process. In cases where an operator's skill is important, it is very useful to derive fuzzy control rules by modeling an operator's control actions. It is possible to model an operator's control behaviors in terms of fuzzy implications using the input-output data concerned with his/her control actions. The authors use the model obtained in this way as the basis for a fuzzy controller. The authors use a finite number of fuzzy or approximate control rules. To control a robot in a cluttered reactor environment, it is desirable to combine all the methods. In this paper, the authors describe a general algorithm for a mobile robot control system with fuzzy logic reasoning. They discuss the way that knowledge of fuzziness will be represented in this control system. They also describe a simulation program interface to the K2A Cybermation mobile robot to be used to demonstrate the control system.

  12. Study of robotics systems applications to the space station program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, J. C.

    1983-01-01

    Applications of robotics systems to potential uses of the Space Station as an assembly facility, and secondarily as a servicing facility, are considered. A typical robotics system mission is described along with the pertinent application guidelines and Space Station environmental assumptions utilized in developing the robotic task scenarios. A functional description of a supervised dual-robot space structure construction system is given, and four key areas of robotic technology are defined, described, and assessed. Alternate technologies for implementing the more routine space technology support subsystems that will be required to support the Space Station robotic systems in assembly and servicing tasks are briefly discussed. The environmental conditions impacting on the robotic configuration design and operation are reviewed.

  13. Autonomous Robot System for Sensor Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    David Bruemmer; Douglas Few; Frank Carney; Miles Walton; Heather Hunting; Ron Lujan

    2004-03-01

    This paper discusses an innovative application of new Markov localization techniques that combat the problem of odometry drift, allowing a novel control architecture developed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to be utilized within a sensor characterization facility developed at the Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) in Nevada. The new robotic capability provided by the INEEL will allow RSL to test and evaluate a wide variety of sensors including radiation detection systems, machine vision systems, and sensors that can detect and track heat sources (e.g. human bodies, machines, chemical plumes). By accurately moving a target at varying speeds along designated paths, the robotic solution allows the detection abilities of a wide variety of sensors to be recorded and analyzed.

  14. Stereoscopic Vision System For Robotic Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthies, Larry H.; Anderson, Charles H.

    1993-01-01

    Distances estimated from images by cross-correlation. Two-camera stereoscopic vision system with onboard processing of image data developed for use in guiding robotic vehicle semiautonomously. Combination of semiautonomous guidance and teleoperation useful in remote and/or hazardous operations, including clean-up of toxic wastes, exploration of dangerous terrain on Earth and other planets, and delivery of materials in factories where unexpected hazards or obstacles can arise.

  15. Network protocols for mobile robot systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gage, Douglas W.

    1998-01-01

    Communications and communications protocols will play an important role in mobile robot systems able to address real world applications. A poorly integrated 'stack' of communications protocols, or protocols which are poorly matched to the functional and performance characteristics of the underlying physical communications links, can greatly reduce the effectiveness of an otherwise well implemented robotic or networked sensors system. The proliferation of Internet-like networks in military as well as civilian domains has motivated research to address some of the performance limitations TCP suffers when using RF and other media with long bandwidth-delay, dynamic connectivity, and error-prone links. Beyond these performance issues, however, TCP is poorly matched to the requirements of mobile robot and other quasi-autonomous systems: it is oriented to providing a continuous data stream, rather than discrete messages, and the canonical 'socket' interface conceals short losses of communications connectivity, but simply gives up and forces the application layer software to deal with longer losses. For the multipurpose security and surveillance mission platform project, a software applique is being developed that will run on top of user datagram protocol to provide a reliable message-based transport service. In addition, a session layer protocol is planned to support the effective transfer of control of multiple platforms among multiple stations.

  16. Three-Dimensional Robotic Vision System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Thinh V.

    1989-01-01

    Stereoscopy and motion provide clues to outlines of objects. Digital image-processing system acts as "intelligent" automatic machine-vision system by processing views from stereoscopic television cameras into three-dimensional coordinates of moving object in view. Epipolar-line technique used to find corresponding points in stereoscopic views. Robotic vision system analyzes views from two television cameras to detect rigid three-dimensional objects and reconstruct numerically in terms of coordinates of corner points. Stereoscopy and effects of motion on two images complement each other in providing image-analyzing subsystem with clues to natures and locations of principal features.

  17. Cooperative Environment Scans Based on a Multi-Robot System

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Ji-Wook

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a cooperative environment scan system (CESS) using multiple robots, where each robot has low-cost range finders and low processing power. To organize and maintain the CESS, a base robot monitors the positions of the child robots, controls them, and builds a map of the unknown environment, while the child robots with low performance range finders provide obstacle information. Even though each child robot provides approximated and limited information of the obstacles, CESS replaces the single LRF, which has a high cost, because much of the information is acquired and accumulated by a number of the child robots. Moreover, the proposed CESS extends the measurement boundaries and detects obstacles hidden behind others. To show the performance of the proposed system and compare this with the numerical models of the commercialized 2D and 3D laser scanners, simulation results are included. PMID:25789491

  18. Key technology issues for space robotic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schappell, Roger T.

    1987-01-01

    Robotics has become a key technology consideration for the Space Station project to enable enhanced crew productivity and to maximize safety. There are many robotic functions currently being studied, including Space Station assembly, repair, and maintenance as well as satellite refurbishment, repair, and retrieval. Another area of concern is that of providing ground based experimenters with a natural interface that they might directly interact with their hardware onboard the Space Station or ancillary spacecraft. The state of the technology is such that the above functions are feasible; however, considerable development work is required for operation in this gravity-free vacuum environment. Furthermore, a program plan is evolving within NASA that will capitalize on recent government, university, and industrial robotics research and development (R and D) accomplishments. A brief summary is presented of the primary technology issues and physical examples are provided of the state of the technology for the initial operational capability (IOC) system as well as for the eventual final operational capability (FOC) Space Station.

  19. Multi-view coordinate system transformation based on robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Li-mei; Wang, Peng-qiang; Xi, Jiang-tao; Guo, Qing-hua; Tang, Huan; Li, Jing; Li, Xiao-jie; Zhu, Teng-da

    2015-11-01

    The registration of point cloud is important for large object measurement. A measurement method for coordinate system transformation based on robot is proposed in this paper. Firstly, for obtaining extrinsic parameters, the robot moves to three different positions to capture the images of three targets. Then the transformation matrix X between camera and tool center point (TCP) coordinate systems can be calculated by using the known parameters of robot and the extrinsic parameters, and finally the multi-view coordinate system can be transformed into robot coordinate system by the transformation matrix X. With the help of robot, the multi-view point cloud can be easily transformed into a unified coordinate system. By using robot, the measurement doesn't need any mark. Experimental results show that the method is effective.

  20. A Robot Based Automatic Paint Inspection System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, R. M.; Claridge, J. F.

    1988-06-01

    The final inspection of manufactured goods is a labour intensive activity. The use of human inspectors has a number of potential disadvantages; it can be expensive, the inspection standard applied is subjective and the inspection process can be slow compared with the production process. The use of automatic optical and electronic systems to perform the inspection task is now a growing practice but, in general, such systems have been applied to small components which are accurately presented. Recent advances in vision systems and robot control technology have made possible the installation of an automated paint inspection system at the Austin Rover Group's plant at Cowley, Oxford. The automatic inspection of painted car bodies is a particularly difficult problem, but one which has major benefits. The pass line of the car bodies is ill-determined, the surface to be inspected is of varying surface geometry and only a short time is available to inspect a large surface area. The benefits, however, are due to the consistent standard of inspection which should lead to lower levels of customer complaints and improved process feedback. The Austin Rover Group initiated the development of a system to fulfil this requirement. Three companies collaborated on the project; Austin Rover itself undertook the production line modifications required for body presentation, Sira Ltd developed the inspection cameras and signal processing system and Unimation (Europe) Ltd designed, supplied and programmed the robot system. Sira's development was supported by a grant from the Department of Trade and Industry.

  1. Intelligent manipulation technique for multi-branch robotic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Alexander Y. K.; Chen, Eugene Y. S.

    1990-01-01

    New analytical development in kinematics planning is reported. The INtelligent KInematics Planner (INKIP) consists of the kinematics spline theory and the adaptive logic annealing process. Also, a novel framework of robot learning mechanism is introduced. The FUzzy LOgic Self Organized Neural Networks (FULOSONN) integrates fuzzy logic in commands, control, searching, and reasoning, the embedded expert system for nominal robotics knowledge implementation, and the self organized neural networks for the dynamic knowledge evolutionary process. Progress on the mechanical construction of SRA Advanced Robotic System (SRAARS) and the real time robot vision system is also reported. A decision was made to incorporate the Local Area Network (LAN) technology in the overall communication system.

  2. A Modular Robotic System with Applications to Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hancher, Matthew D.; Hornby, Gregory S.

    2006-01-01

    Modular robotic systems offer potential advantages as versatile, fault-tolerant, cost-effective platforms for space exploration, but a sufficiently mature system is not yet available. We describe the possible applications of such a system, and present prototype hardware intended as a step in the right direction. We also present elements of an automated design and optimization framework aimed at making modular robots easier to design and use, and discuss the results of applying the system to a gait optimization problem. Finally, we discuss the potential near-term applications of modular robotics to terrestrial robotics research.

  3. A collision avoidance algorithm for the mobile robot and the robot manipulator in multi-robot system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jih, Yeung-Jaw Joe

    1991-08-01

    As the modern, highly automated factory becomes more and more complicated, the collision avoidance between robots and other obstacles in the work space becomes increasingly important as well. A local collision avoidance algorithm which was developed based on the general structure of the Artificial Potential Field Force along with the Strategy Force and the Pseudo Distance Function is presented. In this algorithm, a goal attracting force is defined in order to drive the robot from the starting position to the goal position. When the distance between a robot and obstacle becomes smaller than a pre-defined effective avoidance distance, an artificial repulsion force is generated as a function of the distance resulting in repulsion between the two closing objects. The commanding force (by combining goal attracting force and the repulsion force) drives the robot toward the goal position without colliding with other objects in the work space. Since the repulsion force, developed here, depends on the distance only, the complicated geometric function for the object model is less important in the algorithm used in this dissertation. The simplicity of this improved artificial force collision algorithm would make it possible to be used on a real-time basis within a time variant environment. Further improvement is realized by introducing a Strategy Force within the Artificial Force whenever a locking situation is detected. The Euclidean distance between the objects normally used in this algorithm is also replaced by a defined Pseudo Distance calculated by a Pseudo Distance Function. The Pseudo Distance Function uses basic geometric information between two objects to calculate the Pseudo Distance. The Pseudo Distance is always smaller than the true minimum distance. This greatly simplified robot collision avoidance algorithm is applicable not only on a two-dimensional mobile robot system but on a three-dimensional multi-robot system as well. Simulations are performed on both

  4. Robotic System for Transapical Aortic Valve Replacement with MRI Guidance

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming; Mazilu, Dumitru; Horvath, Keith A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports our work on developing a robotic surgical system for transapical beating heart aortic valve replacement (AVR) under interactive real-time magnetic resonance imaging (rtMRI) guidance. Our system integrates a real-time MRI system, a compound MRI robot, as well as an interface for the surgeon to plan the procedure and manipulate the robot. The compound robot consists of a positioning module and a valve delivery module. A 5-DOF Inno-motion positioning arm provides and maintains direct access to the native aortic valve. A newly developed 3-DOF robotic valve delivery module allows the surgeon to remotely control bioprosthetic valve delivery with MRI guidance. Preliminary evaluation of the parameters of the robotic system demonstrates it can provide sufficient capability to successfully assist the surgeon. PMID:18982639

  5. Aerial robotic data acquisition system

    SciTech Connect

    Hofstetter, K.J.; Hayes, D.W.; Pendergast, M.M.; Corban, J.E.

    1993-12-31

    A small, unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), equipped with sensors for physical and chemical measurements of remote environments, is described. A miniature helicopter airframe is used as a platform for sensor testing and development. The sensor output is integrated with the flight control system for real-time, interactive, data acquisition and analysis. Pre-programmed flight missions will be flown with several sensors to demonstrate the cost-effective surveillance capabilities of this new technology.

  6. Teleoperator and robotics system analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teoh, William

    1987-01-01

    The Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) was designed to operate as a remotely controlled space teleoperator. The design and implementation of OMM (a mathematical model of the OMV) are discussed. The State Vector Transformation Module (SVX), an interface between the OMV simulation model and the mobile base (TOM-B) of the flat floor simulation system is described. A summary of testing procedures and conclusions are presented together with the test data obtained.

  7. Control system of warehouse robots' position

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruev, Ivan A.; Lebedko, Eugene G.; Nikulin, Anton V.

    2015-05-01

    Development of robotic vehicles allowed to carry out massively introduction of their different spheres of activity. But often a necessary condition for the functioning of such systems is the presence of the control of their movement. The opto-electronic system control the spatial position of vehicles, such as mobile robots, describes in this paper. The system consists of reference marks installed on the vehicle and cameras for watching it. The paper presents a mathematical description of the system, the method of determining the coordinates of objects based on their photographic projections using the camcorder. The layout system was developed for testing algorithms having two cameras observe the movement of the layout of the vehicle, realized on the platform Rover 5 Chaisis. The reference mark, which consists of four LEDs, was fixed on the vehicle. The configuration of the LEDs has been presented in the form of vertices of the cube. In the course of the study was found that error does not exceed a value of 1 mm at the distance of 2 meters.

  8. An intelligent robotic aid system for human services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawamura, K.; Bagchi, S.; Iskarous, M.; Pack, R. T.; Saad, A.

    1994-01-01

    The long term goal of our research at the Intelligent Robotic Laboratory at Vanderbilt University is to develop advanced intelligent robotic aid systems for human services. As a first step toward our goal, the current thrusts of our R&D are centered on the development of an intelligent robotic aid called the ISAC (Intelligent Soft Arm Control). In this paper, we describe the overall system architecture and current activities in intelligent control, adaptive/interactive control and task learning.

  9. Robotic burnishing system for solid film lubricant coated parts

    SciTech Connect

    Fureigh, M.L.

    1986-05-01

    A robotic burnishing system in the Painting Department reduced the operation average standard hour content by 64% and maintains a good part-to-part quality level for a group of parts coated with solid film lubricant. Required to be safe and simple to operate, the system uses a small PUMA 260 robot to process coated axisymmetrical pieceparts. Special tooling and seven pairs of robotic fingers were designed and built to handle 24 different small pieceparts. Individual robotic programs were created for each part and stored on 5-1/4 in. floppy disks with backup copies in Numerical Control. The operators and the manufacturing department readily accepted the robotic system. Additional part geometries will be developed for robotic processing. 12 figs.

  10. Meeting the challenges of installing a mobile robotic system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decorte, Celeste

    1994-01-01

    The challenges of integrating a mobile robotic system into an application environment are many. Most problems inherent to installing the mobile robotic system fall into one of three categories: (1) the physical environment - location(s) where, and conditions under which, the mobile robotic system will work; (2) the technological environment - external equipment with which the mobile robotic system will interact; and (3) the human environment - personnel who will operate and interact with the mobile robotic system. The successful integration of a mobile robotic system into these three types of application environment requires more than a good pair of pliers. The tools for this job include: careful planning, accurate measurement data (as-built drawings), complete technical data of systems to be interfaced, sufficient time and attention of key personnel for training on how to operate and program the robot, on-site access during installation, and a thorough understanding and appreciation - by all concerned - of the mobile robotic system's role in the security mission at the site, as well as the machine's capabilities and limitations. Patience, luck, and a sense of humor are also useful tools to keep handy during a mobile robotic system installation. This paper will discuss some specific examples of problems in each of three categories, and explore approaches to solving these problems. The discussion will draw from the author's experience with on-site installations of mobile robotic systems in various applications. Most of the information discussed in this paper has come directly from knowledge learned during installations of Cybermotion's SR2 security robots. A large part of the discussion will apply to any vehicle with a drive system, collision avoidance, and navigation sensors, which is, of course, what makes a vehicle autonomous. And it is with these sensors and a drive system that the installer must become familiar in order to foresee potential trouble areas in the

  11. A robot-assisted orthopedic telesurgery system.

    PubMed

    Kong, M; Du, Z; Sun, L; Fu, L; Jia, Z; Wu, D

    2005-01-01

    A robot-assisted orthopedic telesurgery system, named HIT-RAOTS, has been developed according to Chinese conventional operation method. Its main function includes obtaining images with information of position and orientation of fracture, providing fracture information for doctors, assisting the doctors to complete the reposition of fracture and locking operation of intramedullary nail. In this system, a 6-dof force-reflecting master device, with a pantographic parallelogram mechanisms driven by harmonic DC servomotors, is used to control the slave manipulator movement and to translate the force from the operating room to the surgeon console; A slave robot system integrated a 6-dof force sensor, with a parallel manipulator actuated by six AC servomotors, is applied for the accurate repositioning; A virtual simulation system and human-machine interface are also developed. PI controller based on local network is used to realize the teleoperation. Only little irradiation is issued during the reposition. It can assist surgeons to perform bone-setting more safely by reducing irradiation damage to both surgeries and patients, more easily by releasing the surgeons from the heavy operation and more perfect by improving accuracy of reposition. PMID:17282120

  12. BOA: Pipe asbestos insulation removal robot system

    SciTech Connect

    Schempf, H.; Bares, J.; Schnorr, W.

    1995-12-31

    The BOA system is a mobile pipe-external robotic crawler used to remotely strip and bag asbestos-containing lagging and insulation materials (ACLIM) from various diameter pipes in (primarily) industrial installations. Steam and process lines within the DOE weapons complex warrant the use of a remote device due to the high labor costs and high level of radioactive contamination, making manual removal extremely costly and highly inefficient. Currently targeted facilities for demonstration and remediation are Fernald in Ohio and Oak Ridge in Tennessee.

  13. Overhead robot system for remote HEPA filter replacement

    SciTech Connect

    Wiesener, R.W.

    1988-01-01

    A high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter system for facility exhaust air filtraction of radioactive particles has been designed that utilizes a modified industrial gantry robot to remotely replace filter elements. The system filtration design capacity can be readily changed by increasing or decreasing the number of plenums, which only affects the cell length and robot bridge travel. The parallel flow plenum design incorporates remote HEPA filter housings, which are commercially available. Filter removal and replacement is accomplished with the robot under sequenced program control. A custom-designed robot control console, which interfaces with the standard gantry robot power center controller, minimizes operator training. Critical sequence steps are operator verified, using closed-circuit television (CCTV), before proceeding to the next programmed stop point. The robot can be operated in a teleoperator mode to perform unstructured maintenance tasks, such as replacing filter housing components and cell lights.

  14. Transformers: Shape-Changing Space Systems Built with Robotic Textiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoica, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    Prior approaches to transformer-like robots had only very limited success. They suffer from lack of reliability, ability to integrate large surfaces, and very modest change in overall shape. Robots can now be built from two-dimensional (2D) layers of robotic fabric. These transformers, a new kind of robotic space system, are dramatically different from current systems in at least two ways. First, the entire transformer is built from a single, thin sheet; a flexible layer of a robotic fabric (ro-fabric); or robotic textile (ro-textile). Second, the ro-textile layer is foldable to small volume and self-unfolding to adapt shape and function to mission phases.

  15. Development control systems takeover: subject robotic arm on the example anthropomorhic robot AR-601

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirazetdinov, R.; Devaev, V.; Zakirzyanova, G.

    2016-06-01

    It is proposed the formation software architecture of complex motion for robotic systems in the form of sets of behavior - patterns - similar to the motor reflexes of living organisms. To form patterns of behavior of the robot teh authors used a methodology of structural analysis of complex systems IDEF0, then developed types of elementary algorithms (patterns) that make up the dynamics of the anthropomorphic robot jump. The work is performed according to the Russian Government Program of Competitive Growth of Kazan Federal University.

  16. Digital redesign of the control system for the Robotics Research Corporation model K-1607 robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carroll, Robert L.

    1989-01-01

    The analog control system for positioning each link of the Robotics Research Corporation Model K-1607 robot manipulator was redesigned for computer control. In order to accomplish the redesign, a linearized model of the dynamic behavior of the robot was developed. The parameters of the model were determined by examination of the input-output data collected in closed-loop operation of the analog control system. The robot manipulator possesses seven degrees of freedom in its motion. The analog control system installed by the manufacturer of the robot attempts to control the positioning of each link without feedback from other links. Constraints on the design of a digital control system include: the robot cannot be disassembled for measurement of parameters; the digital control system must not include filtering operations if possible, because of lack of computer capability; and criteria of goodness of control system performing is lacking. The resulting design employs sampled-data position and velocity feedback. The criteria of the design permits the control system gain margin and phase margin, measured at the same frequencies, to be the same as that provided by the analog control system.

  17. Automatic rendezvous system testing at the Flight Robotics Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobbe, Patrick A.; Naumann, Charles B.

    1991-01-01

    The Flight Robotics Laboratory of MSFC provides sophisticated real time simulation capability in the study of human/system interactions of remote systems. This paper will describe the Flight Robotics Facility of NASA/MSFC, the hardware-in-the-loop simulation configuration, and test results.

  18. A multi-sensor system for robotics proximity operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheatham, J. B.; Wu, C. K.; Weiland, P. L.; Cleghorn, T. F.

    1988-01-01

    Robots without sensors can perform only simple repetitive tasks and cannot cope with unplanned events. A multi-sensor system is needed for a robot to locate a target, move into its neighborhood and perform operations in contact with the object. Systems that can be used for such tasks are described.

  19. A Segway RMP-based robotic transport system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Hoa G.; Kogut, Greg; Barua, Ripan; Burmeister, Aaron; Pezeshkian, Narek; Powell, Darren; Farrington, Nathan; Wimmer, Matt; Cicchetto, Brett; Heng, Chana; Ramirez, Velia

    2004-12-01

    In the area of logistics, there currently is a capability gap between the one-ton Army robotic Multifunction Utility/Logistics and Equipment (MULE) vehicle and a soldier"s backpack. The Unmanned Systems Branch at Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center (SPAWAR Systems Center, or SSC), San Diego, with the assistance of a group of interns from nearby High Tech High School, has demonstrated enabling technologies for a solution that fills this gap. A small robotic transport system has been developed based on the Segway Robotic Mobility Platform (RMP). We have demonstrated teleoperated control of this robotic transport system, and conducted two demonstrations of autonomous behaviors. Both demonstrations involved a robotic transporter following a human leader. In the first demonstration, the transporter used a vision system running a continuously adaptive mean-shift filter to track and follow a human. In the second demonstration, the separation between leader and follower was significantly increased using Global Positioning System (GPS) information. The track of the human leader, with a GPS unit in his backpack, was sent wirelessly to the transporter, also equipped with a GPS unit. The robotic transporter traced the path of the human leader by following these GPS breadcrumbs. We have additionally demonstrated a robotic medical patient transport capability by using the Segway RMP to power a mock-up of the Life Support for Trauma and Transport (LSTAT) patient care platform, on a standard NATO litter carrier. This paper describes the development of our demonstration robotic transport system and the various experiments conducted.

  20. Robot vision system programmed in Prolog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batchelor, Bruce G.; Hack, Ralf

    1995-10-01

    This is the latest in a series of publications which develop the theme of programming a machine vision system using the artificial intelligence language Prolog. The article states the long-term objective of the research program of which this work forms part. Many but not yet all of the goals laid out in this plan have already been achieved in an integrated system, which uses a multi-layer control hierarchy. The purpose of the present paper is to demonstrate that a system based upon a Prolog controller is capable of making complex decisions and operating a standard robot. The authors chose, as a vehicle for this exercise, the task of playing dominoes against a human opponent. This game was selected for this demonstration since it models a range of industrial assembly tasks, where parts are to be mated together. (For example, a 'daisy chain' of electronic equipment and the interconnecting cables/adapters may be likened to a chain of dominoes.)

  1. Concurrent algorithms for a mobile robot vision system

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, J.P.; Mann, R.C.

    1988-01-01

    The application of computer vision to mobile robots has generally been hampered by insufficient on-board computing power. The advent of VLSI-based general purpose concurrent multiprocessor systems promises to give mobile robots an increasing amount of on-board computing capability, and to allow computation intensive data analysis to be performed without high-bandwidth communication with a remote system. This paper describes the integration of robot vision algorithms on a 3-dimensional hypercube system on-board a mobile robot developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The vision system is interfaced to navigation and robot control software, enabling the robot to maneuver in a laboratory environment, to find a known object of interest and to recognize the object's status based on visual sensing. We first present the robot system architecture and the principles followed in the vision system implementation. We then provide some benchmark timings for low-level image processing routines, describe a concurrent algorithm with load balancing for the Hough transform, a new algorithm for binary component labeling, and an algorithm for the concurrent extraction of region features from labeled images. This system analyzes a scene in less than 5 seconds and has proven to be a valuable experimental tool for research in mobile autonomous robots. 9 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  2. Improved OTEC System for a Submarine Robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Yi; Jones, Jack; Valdez, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    An ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC), now undergoing development, is a less-massive, more-efficient means of exploiting the same basic principle as that of the proposed system described in "Alternative OTEC Scheme for a Submarine Robot" (NPO-43500), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 33, No. 1 (January 2009), page 50. The proposed system as described previously would be based on the thawing-expansion/freezing-contraction behavior of a wax or perhaps another suitable phase-change material (PCM). The power generated by the system would be used to recharge the batteries in a battery- powered unmanned underwater vehicle [UUV (essentially, a small exploratory submarine robot)] of a type that has been deployed in large numbers in research pertaining to global warming. A UUV of this type travels between the ocean surface and depths, measuring temperature and salinity. At one phase of its operational cycle, the previously proposed system would utilize the surface ocean temperature (which lies between 15 and 30 C over most of the Earth) to melt a PCM that has a melting/freezing temperature of about 10 C. At the opposite phase of its operational cycle, the system would utilize the lower ocean temperature at depth (e.g., between 4 and 7 C at a depth of 300 m) to freeze the PCM. The melting or freezing would cause the PCM to expand or contract, respectively, by about 9 volume percent. The PCM would be contained in tubes that would be capable of expanding and contracting with the PCM. The PCM-containing tubes would be immersed in a hydraulic fluid. The expansion and contraction would drive a flow of the hydraulic fluid against a piston that, in turn, would push a rack-and-pinion gear system to spin a generator to charge a battery.

  3. RASSOR - Regolith Advanced Surface Systems Operations Robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gill, Tracy R.; Mueller, Rob

    2015-01-01

    The Regolith Advanced Surface Systems Operations Robot (RASSOR) is a lightweight excavator for mining in reduced gravity. RASSOR addresses the need for a lightweight (<100 kg) robot that is able to overcome excavation reaction forces while operating in reduced gravity environments such as the moon or Mars. A nominal mission would send RASSOR to the moon to operate for five years delivering regolith feedstock to a separate chemical plant, which extracts oxygen from the regolith using H2 reduction methods. RASSOR would make 35 trips of 20 kg loads every 24 hours. With four RASSORs operating at one time, the mission would achieve 10 tonnes of oxygen per year (8 t for rocket propellant and 2 t for life support). Accessing craters in space environments may be extremely hard and harsh due to volatile resources - survival is challenging. New technologies and methods are required. RASSOR is a product of KSC Swamp Works which establishes rapid, innovative and cost effective exploration mission solutions by leveraging partnerships across NASA, industry and academia.

  4. Survey of Command Execution Systems for NASA Spacecraft and Robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verma, Vandi; Jonsson, Ari; Simmons, Reid; Estlin, Tara; Levinson, Rich

    2005-01-01

    NASA spacecraft and robots operate at long distances from Earth Command sequences generated manually, or by automated planners on Earth, must eventually be executed autonomously onboard the spacecraft or robot. Software systems that execute commands onboard are known variously as execution systems, virtual machines, or sequence engines. Every robotic system requires some sort of execution system, but the level of autonomy and type of control they are designed for varies greatly. This paper presents a survey of execution systems with a focus on systems relevant to NASA missions.

  5. Enabling Interoperable Space Robots With the Joint Technical Architecture for Robotic Systems (JTARS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, Arthur; Dubowsky, Steven; Quinn, Roger; Marzwell, Neville

    2005-01-01

    Robots that operate independently of one another will not be adequate to accomplish the future exploration tasks of long-distance autonomous navigation, habitat construction, resource discovery, and material handling. Such activities will require that systems widely share information, plan and divide complex tasks, share common resources, and physically cooperate to manipulate objects. Recognizing the need for interoperable robots to accomplish the new exploration initiative, NASA s Office of Exploration Systems Research & Technology recently funded the development of the Joint Technical Architecture for Robotic Systems (JTARS). JTARS charter is to identify the interface standards necessary to achieve interoperability among space robots. A JTARS working group (JTARS-WG) has been established comprising recognized leaders in the field of space robotics including representatives from seven NASA centers along with academia and private industry. The working group s early accomplishments include addressing key issues required for interoperability, defining which systems are within the project s scope, and framing the JTARS manuals around classes of robotic systems.

  6. Implementation of a robotic flexible assembly system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, Ronald C.

    1987-01-01

    As part of the Intelligent Task Automation program, a team developed enabling technologies for programmable, sensory controlled manipulation in unstructured environments. These technologies include 2-D/3-D vision sensing and understanding, force sensing and high speed force control, 2.5-D vision alignment and control, and multiple processor architectures. The subsequent design of a flexible, programmable, sensor controlled robotic assembly system for small electromechanical devices is described using these technologies and ongoing implementation and integration efforts. Using vision, the system picks parts dumped randomly in a tray. Using vision and force control, it performs high speed part mating, in-process monitoring/verification of expected results and autonomous recovery from some errors. It is programmed off line with semiautomatic action planning.

  7. Intelligent Robotic Systems Study (IRSS), phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Under the Intelligent Robotics System Study (IRSS) contract, a generalized robotic control architecture was developed for use with the ProtoFlight Manipulator Arm (PFMA). The controller built for the PFMA provides localized position based force control, teleoperation and advanced path recording and playback capabilities. Various hand controllers can be used with the system in conjunction with a synthetic time delay capability to provide a realistic test bed for typical satellite servicing tasks. The configuration of the IRSS system is illustrated and discussed. The PFMA has six computer controllable degrees of freedom (DOF) plus a seventh manually indexable DOF, making the manipulator a pseudo 7 DOF mechanism. Because the PFMA was not developed to operate in a gravity field, but rather in space, it is counter balanced at the shoulder, elbow and wrist and a spring counterbalance has been added near the wrist to provide additional support. Built with long slender intra-joint linkages, the PFMA has a workspace nearly 2 meters deep and possesses sufficient dexterity to perform numerous satellite servicing tasks. The manipulator is arranged in a shoulder-yaw, pitch, elbow-pitch, and wrist-pitch, yaw, roll configuration, with an indexable shoulder roll joint. Digital control of the PFMA is implemented using a variety of single board computers developed by Heurikon Corporation and other manufacturers. The IRSS controller is designed to be a multi-rate, multi-tasking system. Independent joint servos run at a 134 Hz rate and position based impedance control functions at 67 Hz. Autonomous path generation and hand controller inputs are processed at a 33 Hz.

  8. The JPL Serpentine Robot: A 12 DOF System for Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paljug, E.; Ohm, T.; Hayati, S.

    1995-01-01

    The Serpentine Robot is a prototype hyper-redundant (snake-like) manipulator system developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. It is designed to navigate and perform tasks in obstructed and constrained environments in which conventional 6 DOF manipulators cannot function. Described are the robot mechanical design, a joint assembly low level inverse kinematic algorithm, control development, and applications.

  9. A Fully Sensorized Cooperative Robotic System for Surgical Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Tovar-Arriaga, Saúl; Vargas, José Emilio; Ramos, Juan M.; Aceves, Marco A.; Gorrostieta, Efren; Kalender, Willi A.

    2012-01-01

    In this research a fully sensorized cooperative robot system for manipulation of needles is presented. The setup consists of a DLR/KUKA Light Weight Robot III especially designed for safe human/robot interaction, a FD-CT robot-driven angiographic C-arm system, and a navigation camera. Also, new control strategies for robot manipulation in the clinical environment are introduced. A method for fast calibration of the involved components and the preliminary accuracy tests of the whole possible errors chain are presented. Calibration of the robot with the navigation system has a residual error of 0.81 mm (rms) with a standard deviation of ±0.41 mm. The accuracy of the robotic system while targeting fixed points at different positions within the workspace is of 1.2 mm (rms) with a standard deviation of ±0.4 mm. After calibration, and due to close loop control, the absolute positioning accuracy was reduced to the navigation camera accuracy which is of 0.35 mm (rms). The implemented control allows the robot to compensate for small patient movements. PMID:23012551

  10. A modular real-time vision system for humanoid robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trifan, Alina L.; Neves, António J. R.; Lau, Nuno; Cunha, Bernardo

    2012-01-01

    Robotic vision is nowadays one of the most challenging branches of robotics. In the case of a humanoid robot, a robust vision system has to provide an accurate representation of the surrounding world and to cope with all the constraints imposed by the hardware architecture and the locomotion of the robot. Usually humanoid robots have low computational capabilities that limit the complexity of the developed algorithms. Moreover, their vision system should perform in real time, therefore a compromise between complexity and processing times has to be found. This paper presents a reliable implementation of a modular vision system for a humanoid robot to be used in color-coded environments. From image acquisition, to camera calibration and object detection, the system that we propose integrates all the functionalities needed for a humanoid robot to accurately perform given tasks in color-coded environments. The main contributions of this paper are the implementation details that allow the use of the vision system in real-time, even with low processing capabilities, the innovative self-calibration algorithm for the most important parameters of the camera and its modularity that allows its use with different robotic platforms. Experimental results have been obtained with a NAO robot produced by Aldebaran, which is currently the robotic platform used in the RoboCup Standard Platform League, as well as with a humanoid build using the Bioloid Expert Kit from Robotis. As practical examples, our vision system can be efficiently used in real time for the detection of the objects of interest for a soccer playing robot (ball, field lines and goals) as well as for navigating through a maze with the help of color-coded clues. In the worst case scenario, all the objects of interest in a soccer game, using a NAO robot, with a single core 500Mhz processor, are detected in less than 30ms. Our vision system also includes an algorithm for self-calibration of the camera parameters as well

  11. A macroscopic analytical model of collaboration in distributed robotic systems.

    PubMed

    Lerman, K; Galstyan, A; Martinoli, A; Ijspeert, A

    2001-01-01

    In this article, we present a macroscopic analytical model of collaboration in a group of reactive robots. The model consists of a series of coupled differential equations that describe the dynamics of group behavior. After presenting the general model, we analyze in detail a case study of collaboration, the stick-pulling experiment, studied experimentally and in simulation by Ijspeert et al. [Autonomous Robots, 11, 149-171]. The robots' task is to pull sticks out of their holes, and it can be successfully achieved only through the collaboration of two robots. There is no explicit communication or coordination between the robots. Unlike microscopic simulations (sensor-based or using a probabilistic numerical model), in which computational time scales with the robot group size, the macroscopic model is computationally efficient, because its solutions are independent of robot group size. Analysis reproduces several qualitative conclusions of Ijspeert et al.: namely, the different dynamical regimes for different values of the ratio of robots to sticks, the existence of optimal control parameters that maximize system performance as a function of group size, and the transition from superlinear to sublinear performance as the number of robots is increased. PMID:11911788

  12. ROBOSIM: An intelligent simulator for robotic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandez, Kenneth R.; Cook, George E.; Biegl, Csaba; Springfield, James F.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present an update of an intelligent robotics simulator package, ROBOSIM, first introduced at Technology 2000 in 1990. ROBOSIM is used for three-dimensional geometrical modeling of robot manipulators and various objects in their workspace, and for the simulation of action sequences performed by the manipulators. Geometric modeling of robot manipulators has an expanding area of interest because it can aid the design and usage of robots in a number of ways, including: design and testing of manipulators, robot action planning, on-line control of robot manipulators, telerobotic user interface, and training and education. NASA developed ROBOSIM between 1985-88 to facilitate the development of robotics, and used the package to develop robotics for welding, coating, and space operations. ROBOSIM has been further developed for academic use by its co-developer Vanderbilt University, and has been in both classroom and laboratory environments for teaching complex robotic concepts. Plans are being formulated to make ROBOSIM available to all U.S. engineering/engineering technology schools (over three hundred total with an estimated 10,000+ users per year).

  13. Computer guidance system for single-incision bimanual robotic surgery.

    PubMed

    Carbone, Marina; Turini, Giuseppe; Petroni, Gianluigi; Niccolini, Marta; Menciassi, Arianna; Ferrari, Mauro; Mosca, Franco; Ferrari, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    The evolution of surgical robotics is following the progress of developments in Minimally Invasive Surgery (MIS), which is moving towards Single-Incision Laparoscopic Surgery (SILS) procedures. The complexity of these techniques has favored the introduction of robotic surgical systems. New bimanual robots, which are completely inserted into the patient's body, have been proposed in order to enhance the surgical gesture in SILS procedures. However, the limited laparoscopic view and the focus on the end-effectors, together with the use of complex robotic devices inside the patient's abdomen, may lead to unexpected collisions, e.g., between the surrounding anatomical organs not involved in the intervention and the surgical robot. This paper describes a computer guidance system, based on patient-specific data, designed to provide intraoperative navigation and assistance in SILS robotic interventions. The navigator has been tested in simulations of some of the surgical tasks involved in a cholecystectomy, using a synthetic anthropomorphic mannequin. The results demonstrate the usability and efficacy of the navigation system, underlining the importance of avoiding unwanted collisions between the robot arms and critical organs. The proposed computer guidance software is able to integrate any bimanual surgical robot design. PMID:22687053

  14. Towards an automated checked baggage inspection system augmented with robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeDonato, Matthew P.; Dimitrov, Velin; Padır, Taskin

    2014-05-01

    We present a novel system for enhancing the efficiency and accuracy of checked baggage screening process at airports. The system requirements address the identification and retrieval of objects of interest that are prohibited in a checked luggage. The automated testbed is comprised of a Baxter research robot designed by Rethink Robotics for luggage and object manipulation, and a down-looking overhead RGB-D sensor for inspection and detection. We discuss an overview of current system implementations, areas of opportunity for improvements, robot system integration challenges, details of the proposed software architecture and experimental results from a case study for identifying various kinds of lighters in checked bags.

  15. Safety assessment of a robotic system handling nuclear material

    SciTech Connect

    Atcitty, C.B.; Robinson, D.G.

    1996-02-01

    This paper outlines the use of a Failure Modes and Effects Analysis for the safety assessment of a robotic system being developed at Sandia National Laboratories. The robotic system, The Weigh and Leak Check System, is to replace a manual process at the Department of Energy facility at Pantex by which nuclear material is inspected for weight and leakage. Failure Modes and Effects Analyses were completed for the robotics process to ensure that safety goals for the system had been meet. These analyses showed that the risks to people and the internal and external environment were acceptable.

  16. Calibration technology in application of robot-laser scanning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, YongJie; Yin, ShiBin; Zhu, JiGui

    2012-11-01

    A system composed of laser sensor and 6-DOF industrial robot is proposed to obtain complete three-dimensional (3-D) information of the object surface. Suitable for the different combining ways of laser sensor and robot, a new method to calibrate the position and pose between sensor and robot is presented. By using a standard sphere with known radius as a reference tool, the rotation and translation matrices between the laser sensor and robot are computed, respectively in two steps, so that many unstable factors introduced in conventional optimization methods can be avoided. The experimental results show that the accuracy of the proposed calibration method can be achieved up to 0.062 mm. The calibration method is also implemented into the automated robot scanning system to reconstruct a car door panel.

  17. Robotics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambrose, Robert O.

    2007-01-01

    Lunar robotic functions include: 1. Transport of crew and payloads on the surface of the moon; 2. Offloading payloads from a lunar lander; 3. Handling the deployment of surface systems; with 4. Human commanding of these functions from inside a lunar vehicle, habitat, or extravehicular (space walk), with Earth-based supervision. The systems that will perform these functions may not look like robots from science fiction. In fact, robotic functions may be automated trucks, cranes and winches. Use of this equipment prior to the crew s arrival or in the potentially long periods without crews on the surface, will require that these systems be computer controlled machines. The public release of NASA's Exploration plans at the 2nd Space Exploration Conference (Houston, December 2006) included a lunar outpost with as many as four unique mobility chassis designs. The sequence of lander offloading tasks involved as many as ten payloads, each with a unique set of geometry, mass and interface requirements. This plan was refined during a second phase study concluded in August 2007. Among the many improvements to the exploration plan were a reduction in the number of unique mobility chassis designs and a reduction in unique payload specifications. As the lunar surface system payloads have matured, so have the mobility and offloading functional requirements. While the architecture work continues, the community can expect to see functional requirements in the areas of surface mobility, surface handling, and human-systems interaction as follows: Surface Mobility 1. Transport crew on the lunar surface, accelerating construction tasks, expanding the crew s sphere of influence for scientific exploration, and providing a rapid return to an ascent module in an emergency. The crew transport can be with an un-pressurized rover, a small pressurized rover, or a larger mobile habitat. 2. Transport Extra-Vehicular Activity (EVA) equipment and construction payloads. 3. Transport habitats and

  18. A telepresence robot system realized by embedded object concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallius, Tero; Röning, Juha

    2006-10-01

    This paper presents the Embedded Object Concept (EOC) and a telepresence robot system which is a test case for the EOC. The EOC utilizes common object-oriented methods used in software by applying them to combined Lego-like software-hardware entities. These entities represent objects in object-oriented design methods, and they are the building blocks of embedded systems. The goal of the EOC is to make the designing embedded systems faster and easier. This concept enables people without comprehensive knowledge in electronics design to create new embedded systems, and for experts it shortens the design time of new embedded systems. We present the current status of a telepresence robot created with second-generation Atomi-objects, which is the name for our implementation of the embedded objects. The telepresence robot is a relatively complex test case for the EOC. The robot has been constructed using incremental device development, which is made possible by the architecture of the EOC. The robot contains video and audio exchange capability and a controlling system for driving with two wheels. The robot is built in two versions, the first consisting of a PC device and Atomi-objects, and the second consisting of only Atomi-objects. The robot is currently incomplete, but most of it has been successfully tested.

  19. System and method for seamless task-directed autonomy for robots

    DOEpatents

    Nielsen, Curtis; Bruemmer, David; Few, Douglas; Walton, Miles

    2012-09-18

    Systems, methods, and user interfaces are used for controlling a robot. An environment map and a robot designator are presented to a user. The user may place, move, and modify task designators on the environment map. The task designators indicate a position in the environment map and indicate a task for the robot to achieve. A control intermediary links task designators with robot instructions issued to the robot. The control intermediary analyzes a relative position between the task designators and the robot. The control intermediary uses the analysis to determine a task-oriented autonomy level for the robot and communicates target achievement information to the robot. The target achievement information may include instructions for directly guiding the robot if the task-oriented autonomy level indicates low robot initiative and may include instructions for directing the robot to determine a robot plan for achieving the task if the task-oriented autonomy level indicates high robot initiative.

  20. Visual perception system and method for a humanoid robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, James W. (Inventor); Mc Kay, Neil David (Inventor); Chelian, Suhas E. (Inventor); Linn, Douglas Martin (Inventor); Wampler, II, Charles W. (Inventor); Bridgwater, Lyndon (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A robotic system includes a humanoid robot with robotic joints each moveable using an actuator(s), and a distributed controller for controlling the movement of each of the robotic joints. The controller includes a visual perception module (VPM) for visually identifying and tracking an object in the field of view of the robot under threshold lighting conditions. The VPM includes optical devices for collecting an image of the object, a positional extraction device, and a host machine having an algorithm for processing the image and positional information. The algorithm visually identifies and tracks the object, and automatically adapts an exposure time of the optical devices to prevent feature data loss of the image under the threshold lighting conditions. A method of identifying and tracking the object includes collecting the image, extracting positional information of the object, and automatically adapting the exposure time to thereby prevent feature data loss of the image.

  1. Interactive robot control system and method of use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Adam M. (Inventor); Reiland, Matthew J. (Inventor); Abdallah, Muhammad E. (Inventor); Linn, Douglas Martin (Inventor); Platt, Robert (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A robotic system includes a robot having joints, actuators, and sensors, and a distributed controller. The controller includes command-level controller, embedded joint-level controllers each controlling a respective joint, and a joint coordination-level controller coordinating motion of the joints. A central data library (CDL) centralizes all control and feedback data, and a user interface displays a status of each joint, actuator, and sensor using the CDL. A parameterized action sequence has a hierarchy of linked events, and allows the control data to be modified in real time. A method of controlling the robot includes transmitting control data through the various levels of the controller, routing all control and feedback data to the CDL, and displaying status and operation of the robot using the CDL. The parameterized action sequences are generated for execution by the robot, and a hierarchy of linked events is created within the sequence.

  2. System Design and Locomotion of Superball, an Untethered Tensegrity Robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabelhaus, Andrew P.; Bruce, Jonathan; Caluwaerts, Ken; Manovi, Pavlo; Firoozi, Roya Fallah; Dobi, Sarah; Agogino, Alice M.; Sunspiral, Vytas

    2015-01-01

    The Spherical Underactuated Planetary Exploration Robot ball (SUPERball) is an ongoing project within NASA Ames Research Center's Intelligent Robotics Group and the Dynamic Tensegrity Robotics Lab (DTRL). The current SUPERball is the first full prototype of this tensegrity robot platform, eventually destined for space exploration missions. This work, building on prior published discussions of individual components, presents the fully-constructed robot. Various design improvements are discussed, as well as testing results of the sensors and actuators that illustrate system performance. Basic low-level motor position controls are implemented and validated against sensor data, which show SUPERball to be uniquely suited for highly dynamic state trajectory tracking. Finally, SUPERball is shown in a simple example of locomotion. This implementation of a basic motion primitive shows SUPERball in untethered control.

  3. Distributed Self-Organizing Intelligent Control For Dendritic Robotic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Alexander Y. K.

    1990-02-01

    A new control methodology is presented to effectively operate a robotic system with redundant degrees of freedom. The utilized Decomposed Optimization Technique (DOT) is part of the AISP (An Intelligent Spatial Planner) development. DOT considers the robotic system as several connected subsystems with locally distributed intelligence. Each subsystem has certain degrees of freedom to pursue local optimum state. The resulting parallel distributed processing architecture presents a flexible structure to accommodate sophisticated manipulators with higher level of difficulty. The employed robot dynamics model for each subsystem is generically simple such that the corresponded read-time control scheme can incorporate self-correction mechanism in parameter identification.

  4. A unified teleoperated-autonomous dual-arm robotic system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayati, Samad; Lee, Thomas S.; Tso, Kam Sing; Backes, Paul G.; Lloyd, John

    1991-01-01

    A description is given of complete robot control facility built as part of a NASA telerobotics program to develop a state-of-the-art robot control environment for performing experiments in the repair and assembly of spacelike hardware to gain practical knowledge of such work and to improve the associated technology. The basic architecture of the manipulator control subsystem is presented. The multiarm Robot Control C Library (RCCL), a key software component of the system, is described, along with its implementation on a Sun-4 computer. The system's simulation capability is also described, and the teleoperation and shared control features are explained.

  5. Intelligent Robotic Systems Study (IRSS), phase 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This phase of the Intelligent Robotic Systems Study (IRSS) examines some basic dynamics and control issues for a space manipulator attached to its worksite through a compliant base. One example of this scenario is depicted, which is a simplified, planar representation of the Flight Telerobotic Servicer (FTS) Development Test Flight 2 (DTF-2) experiment. The system consists of 4 major components: (1) dual FTS arms to perform dextrous tasks; (2) the main body to house power and electronics; (3) an Attachment Stabilization and Positioning Subsystem (ASPS) to provide coarse positioning and stabilization of the arms, and (4) the Worksite Attachment Mechanism (WAM) which anchors the system to its worksite, such as a Space Station truss node or Shuttle bay platform. The analysis is limited to the DTF-2 scenario. The goal is to understand the basic interaction dynamics between the arm, the positioner and/or stabilizer, and the worksite. The dynamics and controls simulation model are described. Analysis and simulation results are presented.

  6. An interactive Virtual Reality simulation system for robot control and operator training

    SciTech Connect

    Miner, N.E.; Stansfield, S.A.

    1993-11-01

    Robotic systems are often very complex and difficult to operate, especially as multiple robots are integrated to accomplish difficult tasks. In addition, training the operators of these complex robotic systems is time-consuming and costly. In this paper, a virtual reality based robotic control system is presented. The virtual reality system provides a means by which operators can operate, and be trained to operate, complex robotic systems in an intuitive, cost-effective way. Operator interaction with the robotic system is at a high, task-oriented, level. Continuous state monitoring prevents illegal robot actions and provides interactive feedback to the operator and real-time training for novice users.

  7. Systems and Algorithms for Automated Collaborative Observation Using Networked Robotic Cameras

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Yiliang

    2011-01-01

    The development of telerobotic systems has evolved from Single Operator Single Robot (SOSR) systems to Multiple Operator Multiple Robot (MOMR) systems. The relationship between human operators and robots follows the master-slave control architecture and the requests for controlling robot actuation are completely generated by human operators. …

  8. Automated sirulated distillation using an articulated laboratory robot system.

    PubMed

    Berry, W F; Giarrocco, V

    1994-01-01

    An automated method, based on the Hewlett-Packard ORCA (Optimized Robot for Chemical Analysis) system, for sample preparation and analysis of petroleum samples by simulated distillation (SIMDIS) is described. Results obtained for the robotically prepared samples show excellent agreement with those obtained from the same samples prepared manually. The application, based on ASTM method D 2887, is the foundation for a more fully automated system that can perform a variety of SIMDIS samples and methods. PMID:18924992

  9. Dynamic electronic institutions in agent oriented cloud robotic systems.

    PubMed

    Nagrath, Vineet; Morel, Olivier; Malik, Aamir; Saad, Naufal; Meriaudeau, Fabrice

    2015-01-01

    The dot-com bubble bursted in the year 2000 followed by a swift movement towards resource virtualization and cloud computing business model. Cloud computing emerged not as new form of computing or network technology but a mere remoulding of existing technologies to suit a new business model. Cloud robotics is understood as adaptation of cloud computing ideas for robotic applications. Current efforts in cloud robotics stress upon developing robots that utilize computing and service infrastructure of the cloud, without debating on the underlying business model. HTM5 is an OMG's MDA based Meta-model for agent oriented development of cloud robotic systems. The trade-view of HTM5 promotes peer-to-peer trade amongst software agents. HTM5 agents represent various cloud entities and implement their business logic on cloud interactions. Trade in a peer-to-peer cloud robotic system is based on relationships and contracts amongst several agent subsets. Electronic Institutions are associations of heterogeneous intelligent agents which interact with each other following predefined norms. In Dynamic Electronic Institutions, the process of formation, reformation and dissolution of institutions is automated leading to run time adaptations in groups of agents. DEIs in agent oriented cloud robotic ecosystems bring order and group intellect. This article presents DEI implementations through HTM5 methodology. PMID:25763310

  10. Lessons from risk assessment of countermine robotic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chappell, Isaac; Moses, Franklin L.; Aeillo, Matthew P.

    2011-05-01

    The U.S. Army's desire for increased standoff distances between Soldiers and disguised explosive threats has yielded a complex new technical challenge: augment existing small military robots with state-of-the-art detection and neutralization technology. The magnitude of the challenge is increased by the need for reliable autonomy that allows the robot to operate in different environments (e.g., complex and urban terrains, confined areas, and underground locations). This paper describes lessons learned during efforts in 2008-09 to identify and remediate risks of developing a countermine robot system. It also addresses issues that need attention to achieve total mission success. The work studied three phases of a robotic countermine system: move to a threat area, investigate that area with sensor(s), and neutralize detected threats. Each of these phases is essential, yet attention tends to focus on the third one. The focus of this paper is on risks and lessons pertaining to the first two. What was learned about moving a countermine robot to the area of expected threats? What is necessary for a robot to maneuver sensors and have the maximum probability of detection (Pd) of hazards while minimizing the false alarm rate (FAR)? This paper presents observations during demonstration and test events over the past 2 years. From those observations, lessons learned are summarized as a foundation for realizing a countermine robot and a path forward.

  11. A fault-tolerant intelligent robotic control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marzwell, Neville I.; Tso, Kam Sing

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the concept, design, and features of a fault-tolerant intelligent robotic control system being developed for space and commercial applications that require high dependability. The comprehensive strategy integrates system level hardware/software fault tolerance with task level handling of uncertainties and unexpected events for robotic control. The underlying architecture for system level fault tolerance is the distributed recovery block which protects against application software, system software, hardware, and network failures. Task level fault tolerance provisions are implemented in a knowledge-based system which utilizes advanced automation techniques such as rule-based and model-based reasoning to monitor, diagnose, and recover from unexpected events. The two level design provides tolerance of two or more faults occurring serially at any level of command, control, sensing, or actuation. The potential benefits of such a fault tolerant robotic control system include: (1) a minimized potential for damage to humans, the work site, and the robot itself; (2) continuous operation with a minimum of uncommanded motion in the presence of failures; and (3) more reliable autonomous operation providing increased efficiency in the execution of robotic tasks and decreased demand on human operators for controlling and monitoring the robotic servicing routines.

  12. Total Laparoscopic Hysterectomy Utilizing a Robotic Surgical System

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Keith H.; Daucher, James A.

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the use of a robotic surgical system for total laparoscopic hysterectomy. Methods: We report a series of laparoscopic hysterectomies performed using the da Vinci Robotic Surgical System. Participants were women eligible for hysterectomy by standard laparoscopy. Operative times and complications are reported. Results: We completed 10 total laparoscopic hysterectomies between November 2001 and December 2002 with the use of the da Vinci Robotic Surgical System. Operative results were similar to those of standard laparoscopic hysterectomy. Operative time varied from 2 hours 28 minutes to 4 hours 37 minutes. Blood loss varied from 25 mL to 350 mL. Uterine weights varied from 49 g to 227 g. A cystotomy occurred in a patient with a history of a prior cystotomy unrelated to the robotic system. Conclusion: Total laparoscopic hysterectomy is a complex surgical procedure requiring advanced laparoscopic skills. Tasks like lysis of adhesions, suturing, and knot tying were enhanced with the robotic surgical system, thus providing unique advantages over existing standard laparoscopy. Total laparoscopic hysterectomy can be performed using robotic surgical systems. PMID:15791963

  13. Material handling robot system for flow-through storage applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dill, James F.; Candiloro, Brian; Downer, James; Wiesman, Richard; Fallin, Larry; Smith, Ron

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the design, development and planned implementation of a system of mobile robots for use in flow through storage applications. The robots are being designed with on-board embedded controls so that they can perform their tasks as semi-autonomous workers distributed within a centrally controlled network. On the storage input side, boxes will be identified by bar-codes and placed into preassigned flow through bins. On the shipping side, orders will be forwarded to the robots from a central order processing station and boxes will be picked from designated storage bins following proper sequencing to permit direct loading into trucks for shipping. Because of the need to maintain high system availability, a distributed control strategy has been selected. When completed, the system will permit robots to be dynamically reassigned responsibilities if an individual unit fails. On-board health diagnostics and condition monitoring will be used to maintain high reliability of the units.

  14. Microfluidic-Based Robotic Sampling System for Radioactive Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Jack D. Law; Julia L. Tripp; Tara E. Smith; Veronica J. Rutledge; Troy G. Garn; John Svoboda; Larry Macaluso

    2014-02-01

    A novel microfluidic based robotic sampling system has been developed for sampling and analysis of liquid solutions in nuclear processes. This system couples the use of a microfluidic sample chip with a robotic system designed to allow remote, automated sampling of process solutions in-cell and facilitates direct coupling of the microfluidic sample chip with analytical instrumentation. This system provides the capability for near real time analysis, reduces analytical waste, and minimizes the potential for personnel exposure associated with traditional sampling methods. A prototype sampling system was designed, built and tested. System testing demonstrated operability of the microfluidic based sample system and identified system modifications to optimize performance.

  15. A teleoperation system to control the humanoid robot using an RGB-D sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelomentcev, E. E.; Aleksandrova, T. V.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a concept design of the work algorithm for a teleoperation control system of a humanoid robot. The humanoid robot control system needs to stabilize the robot in a vertical position in order to prevent the robot from falling. The process of design of the control system includes the design of position filter to detect the unstable positions. The application of such a control system enables to control the humanoid robot using motion capture technology.

  16. Automation and Robotics for Space-Based Systems, 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Robert L., II (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this in-house workshop was to assess the state-of-the-art of automation and robotics for space operations from an LaRC perspective and to identify areas of opportunity for future research. Over half of the presentations came from the Automation Technology Branch, covering telerobotic control, extravehicular activity (EVA) and intra-vehicular activity (IVA) robotics, hand controllers for teleoperation, sensors, neural networks, and automated structural assembly, all applied to space missions. Other talks covered the Remote Manipulator System (RMS) active damping augmentation, space crane work, modeling, simulation, and control of large, flexible space manipulators, and virtual passive controller designs for space robots.

  17. Mamdani Fuzzy System for Indoor Autonomous Mobile Robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, M. K. A. Ahamed; Rashid, Razif; Elamvazuthi, I.

    2011-06-01

    Several control algorithms for autonomous mobile robot navigation have been proposed in the literature. Recently, the employment of non-analytical methods of computing such as fuzzy logic, evolutionary computation, and neural networks has demonstrated the utility and potential of these paradigms for intelligent control of mobile robot navigation. In this paper, Mamdani fuzzy system for an autonomous mobile robot is developed. The paper begins with the discussion on the conventional controller and then followed by the description of fuzzy logic controller in detail.

  18. Robot and Human Surface Operations on Solar System Bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisbin, C. R.; Easter, R.; Rodriguez, G.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a comparison of robot and human surface operations on solar system bodies. The topics include: 1) Long Range Vision of Surface Scenarios; 2) Human and Robots Complement Each Other; 3) Respective Human and Robot Strengths; 4) Need More In-Depth Quantitative Analysis; 5) Projected Study Objectives; 6) Analysis Process Summary; 7) Mission Scenarios Decompose into Primitive Tasks; 7) Features of the Projected Analysis Approach; and 8) The "Getting There Effect" is a Major Consideration. This paper is in viewgraph form.

  19. Portable and attachable tele-echography robot system: FASTele.

    PubMed

    Ito, Keiichiro; Sugano, Shigeki; Iwata, Hiroyasu

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to propose portable and attachable tele-echography robot system: FASTele. Focused assessment with sonography for trauma (FAST) is important for patients who have shock by internal bleeding. However, the patient has little time, and transportation to a hospital may take too long. A system which enables FAST more quickly is required. Therefore, we aim to develop a tele-echography (FAST) robot system that can be used by a paramedic easily for shock patient in ambulance or at injury scene. To develop the system, portability and usability (for paramedic) are significant issues. We developed a tele-echography robot system which has 4-DOF. The robot is attached to each roughly FAST areas of patient body (body-based set up) and remotely fine-tuned position by a specialist in a hospital. The robot can control the posture of probe by curvature rails. The mechanism that maintains passively the contact force between the probe and patient's body surface by using springs enables the robot small and lightweight. Feasibility experiments of FAST are reported. PMID:21096306

  20. Acoustic imaging systems (for robotic object acquisition)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, J. M.; Martin, J. F.; Marsh, K. A.; Schoenwald, J. S.

    1985-03-01

    The long-term objective of the effort is to establish successful approaches for 3D acoustic imaging of dense solid objects in air to provide the information required for acquisition and manipulation of these objects by a robotic system. The objective of this first year's work was to achieve and demonstrate the determination of the external geometry (shape) of such objects with a fixed sparse array of sensors, without the aid of geometrical models or extensive training procedures. Conventional approaches for acoustic imaging fall into two basic categories. The first category is used exclusively for dense solid objects. It involves echo-ranging from a large number of sensor positions, achieved either through the use of a larger array of transducers or through extensive physical scanning of a small array. This approach determines the distance to specular reflection points from each sensor position; with suitable processing an image can be inferred. The second category uses the full acoustic waveforms to provide an image, but is strictly applicable only to weak inhomogeneities. The most familiar example is medical imaging of the soft tissue portions of the body where the range of acoustic impedance is relatively small.

  1. Cooperative crossing of traffic intersections in a distributed robot system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rausch, Alexander; Oswald, Norbert; Levi, Paul

    1995-09-01

    In traffic scenarios a distributed robot system has to cope with problems like resource sharing, distributed planning, distributed job scheduling, etc. While travelling along a street segment can be done autonomously by each robot, crossing of an intersection as a shared resource forces the robot to coordinate its actions with those of other robots e.g. by means of negotiations. We discuss the issue of cooperation on the design of a robot control architecture. Task and sensor specific cooperation between robots requires the robots' architectures to be interlinked at different hierarchical levels. Inside each level control cycles are running in parallel and provide fast reaction on events. Internal cooperation may occur between cycles of the same level. Altogether the architecture is matrix-shaped and contains abstract control cycles with a certain degree of autonomy. Based upon the internal structure of a cycle we consider the horizontal and vertical interconnection of cycles to form an individual architecture. Thereafter we examine the linkage of several agents and its influence on an interacting architecture. A prototypical implementation of a scenario, which combines aspects of active vision and cooperation, illustrates our approach. Two vision-guided vehicles are faced with line following, intersection recognition and negotiation.

  2. UXO detection, characterization, and remediation using intelligent robotic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amer, Saed; Shirkhodaie, Amir; Rababaah, Haroun

    2008-04-01

    An intelligent robotic system can be distinguished from other machines by its ability to sense, learn, and react to its environment despite various task uncertainties. One of the most powerful sensing modality for robotic system is vision as it enables the robot to see its environment, recognize objects around it and interact with objects to accomplish its task. This paper discusses vision enabling techniques that allows a robot to detect, characterize, classify, and discriminate UneXploded Ordnance (UXO) from clutters in unstructured environments. A soft-computing approach is proposed and validated via indoor and outdoor experiments to measure its performance efficiency and effectiveness in correctly detection and classifying UXO vs. XO and other clutter. The proposed technique has many potential applications for military, homeland security, law enforcement, and in particular, environment UXO remediation and clean-up operations.

  3. An Interactive Astronaut-Robot System with Gesture Control.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinguo; Luo, Yifan; Ju, Zhaojie

    2016-01-01

    Human-robot interaction (HRI) plays an important role in future planetary exploration mission, where astronauts with extravehicular activities (EVA) have to communicate with robot assistants by speech-type or gesture-type user interfaces embedded in their space suits. This paper presents an interactive astronaut-robot system integrating a data-glove with a space suit for the astronaut to use hand gestures to control a snake-like robot. Support vector machine (SVM) is employed to recognize hand gestures and particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm is used to optimize the parameters of SVM to further improve its recognition accuracy. Various hand gestures from American Sign Language (ASL) have been selected and used to test and validate the performance of the proposed system. PMID:27190503

  4. An Interactive Astronaut-Robot System with Gesture Control

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jinguo; Luo, Yifan; Ju, Zhaojie

    2016-01-01

    Human-robot interaction (HRI) plays an important role in future planetary exploration mission, where astronauts with extravehicular activities (EVA) have to communicate with robot assistants by speech-type or gesture-type user interfaces embedded in their space suits. This paper presents an interactive astronaut-robot system integrating a data-glove with a space suit for the astronaut to use hand gestures to control a snake-like robot. Support vector machine (SVM) is employed to recognize hand gestures and particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm is used to optimize the parameters of SVM to further improve its recognition accuracy. Various hand gestures from American Sign Language (ASL) have been selected and used to test and validate the performance of the proposed system. PMID:27190503

  5. NASA Center for Intelligent Robotic Systems for Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    NASA's program for the civilian exploration of space is a challenge to scientists and engineers to help maintain and further develop the United States' position of leadership in a focused sphere of space activity. Such an ambitious plan requires the contribution and further development of many scientific and technological fields. One research area essential for the success of these space exploration programs is Intelligent Robotic Systems. These systems represent a class of autonomous and semi-autonomous machines that can perform human-like functions with or without human interaction. They are fundamental for activities too hazardous for humans or too distant or complex for remote telemanipulation. To meet this challenge, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) has established an Engineering Research Center for Intelligent Robotic Systems for Space Exploration (CIRSSE). The Center was created with a five year $5.5 million grant from NASA submitted by a team of the Robotics and Automation Laboratories. The Robotics and Automation Laboratories of RPI are the result of the merger of the Robotics and Automation Laboratory of the Department of Electrical, Computer, and Systems Engineering (ECSE) and the Research Laboratory for Kinematics and Robotic Mechanisms of the Department of Mechanical Engineering, Aeronautical Engineering, and Mechanics (ME,AE,&M), in 1987. This report is an examination of the activities that are centered at CIRSSE.

  6. Upgrade of a GEP50 robot control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alounai, Ali T.; Gharsalli, Imed

    2000-03-01

    Recently the ASL at Tennessee Technological University was donated a GEP50 welder. The welding is done via off line point-to-point teaching. A state of the art robot was needed for research but because money was not available to purchase such an expensive item. It was therefore decided to upgrade the GEP50 control system to make the welder a multitasking robot. The robot has five degrees of freedom can be sufficient to pursue some research in robotics control. The problem was that the control system of the welder is limited to point-to-point control, using off-line teaching. To make the GEP50 a multitasking robot that can be controlled using different control strategies, the existing control system of the welder had to be replaced. The upgrade turned to be a low cost operation. This robot is currently in sue to test different advanced control strategies in the ASL. This work discusses all the steps and tasks undertaken during the upgrade operation. The hardware and software required or the upgrade are provided in this paper. The newly developed control system has been implemented and tested successfully.

  7. Audio-visual perception system for a humanoid robotic head.

    PubMed

    Viciana-Abad, Raquel; Marfil, Rebeca; Perez-Lorenzo, Jose M; Bandera, Juan P; Romero-Garces, Adrian; Reche-Lopez, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    One of the main issues within the field of social robotics is to endow robots with the ability to direct attention to people with whom they are interacting. Different approaches follow bio-inspired mechanisms, merging audio and visual cues to localize a person using multiple sensors. However, most of these fusion mechanisms have been used in fixed systems, such as those used in video-conference rooms, and thus, they may incur difficulties when constrained to the sensors with which a robot can be equipped. Besides, within the scope of interactive autonomous robots, there is a lack in terms of evaluating the benefits of audio-visual attention mechanisms, compared to only audio or visual approaches, in real scenarios. Most of the tests conducted have been within controlled environments, at short distances and/or with off-line performance measurements. With the goal of demonstrating the benefit of fusing sensory information with a Bayes inference for interactive robotics, this paper presents a system for localizing a person by processing visual and audio data. Moreover, the performance of this system is evaluated and compared via considering the technical limitations of unimodal systems. The experiments show the promise of the proposed approach for the proactive detection and tracking of speakers in a human-robot interactive framework. PMID:24878593

  8. Audio-Visual Perception System for a Humanoid Robotic Head

    PubMed Central

    Viciana-Abad, Raquel; Marfil, Rebeca; Perez-Lorenzo, Jose M.; Bandera, Juan P.; Romero-Garces, Adrian; Reche-Lopez, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    One of the main issues within the field of social robotics is to endow robots with the ability to direct attention to people with whom they are interacting. Different approaches follow bio-inspired mechanisms, merging audio and visual cues to localize a person using multiple sensors. However, most of these fusion mechanisms have been used in fixed systems, such as those used in video-conference rooms, and thus, they may incur difficulties when constrained to the sensors with which a robot can be equipped. Besides, within the scope of interactive autonomous robots, there is a lack in terms of evaluating the benefits of audio-visual attention mechanisms, compared to only audio or visual approaches, in real scenarios. Most of the tests conducted have been within controlled environments, at short distances and/or with off-line performance measurements. With the goal of demonstrating the benefit of fusing sensory information with a Bayes inference for interactive robotics, this paper presents a system for localizing a person by processing visual and audio data. Moreover, the performance of this system is evaluated and compared via considering the technical limitations of unimodal systems. The experiments show the promise of the proposed approach for the proactive detection and tracking of speakers in a human-robot interactive framework. PMID:24878593

  9. System design for safe robotic handling of nuclear materials

    SciTech Connect

    Drotning, W.; Wapman, W.; Fahrenholtz, J.; Kimberly, H.; Kuhlmann, J.

    1996-03-01

    Robotic systems are being developed by the Intelligent Systems and Robotics Center at Sandia National Laboratories to perform automated handling tasks with radioactive nuclear materials. These systems will reduce the occupational radiation exposure to workers by automating operations which are currently performed manually. Because the robotic systems will handle material that is both hazardous and valuable, the safety of the operations is of utmost importance; assurance must be given that personnel will not be harmed and that the materials and environment will be protected. These safety requirements are met by designing safety features into the system using a layered approach. Several levels of mechanical, electrical and software safety prevent unsafe conditions from generating a hazard, and bring the system to a safe state should an unexpected situation arise. The system safety features include the use of industrial robot standards, commercial robot systems, commercial and custom tooling, mechanical safety interlocks, advanced sensor systems, control and configuration checks, and redundant control schemes. The effectiveness of the safety features in satisfying the safety requirements is verified using a Failure Modes and Effects Analysis. This technique can point out areas of weakness in the safety design as well as areas where unnecessary redundancy may reduce the system reliability.

  10. Task Analysis and Descriptions of Required Job Competencies of Robotics/Automated Systems Technicians. Outlines for New Courses and Modules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hull, Daniel M.; Lovett, James E.

    The six new robotics and automated systems specialty courses developed by the Robotics/Automated Systems Technician (RAST) project are described in this publication. Course titles are Fundamentals of Robotics and Automated Systems, Automated Systems and Support Components, Controllers for Robots and Automated Systems, Robotics and Automated…

  11. A new method to evaluate human-robot system performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, G.; Weisbin, C. R.

    2003-01-01

    One of the key issues in space exploration is that of deciding what space tasks are best done with humans, with robots, or a suitable combination of each. In general, human and robot skills are complementary. Humans provide as yet unmatched capabilities to perceive, think, and act when faced with anomalies and unforeseen events, but there can be huge potential risks to human safety in getting these benefits. Robots provide complementary skills in being able to work in extremely risky environments, but their ability to perceive, think, and act by themselves is currently not error-free, although these capabilities are continually improving with the emergence of new technologies. Substantial past experience validates these generally qualitative notions. However, there is a need for more rigorously systematic evaluation of human and robot roles, in order to optimize the design and performance of human-robot system architectures using well-defined performance evaluation metrics. This article summarizes a new analytical method to conduct such quantitative evaluations. While the article focuses on evaluating human-robot systems, the method is generally applicable to a much broader class of systems whose performance needs to be evaluated.

  12. ROBODEXS: multi-robot deployment and extraction system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Jeremy P.; Mason, James R.; Patterson, Michael S.; Skalny, Matthew W.

    2012-06-01

    The importance of Unmanned Ground Vehicles (UGV's) in the Military's operations is continually increasing. All Military branches now rely on advanced robotic technologies to aid in their missions' operations. The integration of these technologies has not only enhanced capabilities, but has increased personnel safety by generating larger standoff distances. Currently most UGV's are deployed by an exposed dismounted Warfighter because the Military possess a limited capability to do so remotely and can only deploy a single UGV. This paper explains the conceptual development of a novel approach to remotely deploy and extract multiple robots from a single host platform. The Robotic Deployment & Extraction System (ROBODEXS) is a result of our development research to improve marsupial robotic deployment at safe standoff distances. The presented solution is modular and scalable, having the ability to deploy anywhere from two to twenty robots from a single deployment mechanism. For larger carrier platforms, multiple sets of ROBODEXS modules may be integrated for deployment and extraction of even greater numbers of robots. Such a system allows mass deployment and extraction from a single manned/unmanned vehicle, which is not currently possible with other deployment systems.

  13. A new method to evaluate human-robot system performance.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, G; Weisbin, C R

    2003-01-01

    One of the key issues in space exploration is that of deciding what space tasks are best done with humans, with robots, or a suitable combination of each. In general, human and robot skills are complementary. Humans provide as yet unmatched capabilities to perceive, think, and act when faced with anomalies and unforeseen events, but there can be huge potential risks to human safety in getting these benefits. Robots provide complementary skills in being able to work in extremely risky environments, but their ability to perceive, think, and act by themselves is currently not error-free, although these capabilities are continually improving with the emergence of new technologies. Substantial past experience validates these generally qualitative notions. However, there is a need for more rigorously systematic evaluation of human and robot roles, in order to optimize the design and performance of human-robot system architectures using well-defined performance evaluation metrics. This article summarizes a new analytical method to conduct such quantitative evaluations. While the article focuses on evaluating human-robot systems, the method is generally applicable to a much broader class of systems whose performance needs to be evaluated. PMID:12703512

  14. A Multimodal Emotion Detection System during Human-Robot Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Martín, Fernando; Malfaz, María; Sequeira, João; Gorostiza, Javier F.; Salichs, Miguel A.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a multimodal user-emotion detection system for social robots is presented. This system is intended to be used during human–robot interaction, and it is integrated as part of the overall interaction system of the robot: the Robotics Dialog System (RDS). Two modes are used to detect emotions: the voice and face expression analysis. In order to analyze the voice of the user, a new component has been developed: Gender and Emotion Voice Analysis (GEVA), which is written using the Chuck language. For emotion detection in facial expressions, the system, Gender and Emotion Facial Analysis (GEFA), has been also developed. This last system integrates two third-party solutions: Sophisticated High-speed Object Recognition Engine (SHORE) and Computer Expression Recognition Toolbox (CERT). Once these new components (GEVA and GEFA) give their results, a decision rule is applied in order to combine the information given by both of them. The result of this rule, the detected emotion, is integrated into the dialog system through communicative acts. Hence, each communicative act gives, among other things, the detected emotion of the user to the RDS so it can adapt its strategy in order to get a greater satisfaction degree during the human–robot dialog. Each of the new components, GEVA and GEFA, can also be used individually. Moreover, they are integrated with the robotic control platform ROS (Robot Operating System). Several experiments with real users were performed to determine the accuracy of each component and to set the final decision rule. The results obtained from applying this decision rule in these experiments show a high success rate in automatic user emotion recognition, improving the results given by the two information channels (audio and visual) separately. PMID:24240598

  15. Research of smart real-time robot navigation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmani, Budi; Harjoko, A.; Priyambodo, T. K.; Aprilianto, H.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper described how the humanoid robot measures its distance to the orange ball on green floor. We trained the robot camera (CMUcam5) to detect and track the block color of the orange ball. The block color also used to estimate the distance of the camera toward the ball by comparing its block color size when its in the end of field of view and when its near of the camera. Then, using the pythagoras equation we calculate the distance estimation between the whole humanoid robot toward the ball. The distance will be used to estimate how many step the robot must perform to approach the ball and doing another task like kick the ball. The result shows that our method can be used as one of smart navigation system using a camera as the only one sensor to perceive the information of environtment.

  16. Embedded object concept with a telepresence robot system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallius, Tero; Röning, Juha

    2005-10-01

    This paper presents the Embedded Object Concept (EOC) and a telepresence robot system which is a test case for the EOC. The EOC utilizes common object-oriented methods used in software by applying them to combined Lego-like software-hardware entities. These entities represent objects in object-oriented design methods, and they are the building blocks of embedded systems. The goal of the EOC is to make the designing of embedded systems faster and easier. This concept enables people without comprehensive knowledge in electronics design to create new embedded systems, and for experts it shortens the design time of new embedded systems. We present the current status of the EOC, including two generations of embedded objects named Atomi objects. The first generation of the Atomi objects has been tested with different applications, and found to be functional, but not optimal. The second generation aims to correct the issues found with the first generation, and it is being tested in a relatively complex test case. The test case is a telepresence robot consisting of a two wheeled human height robot and its computer counter part. The robot has been constructed using incremental device development, which is made possible by the architecture of the EOC. The robot contains video and audio exchange capability, and a controlling and balancing system for driving with two wheels. The robot is built in two versions, the first consisting of a PDA device and Atomi objects, and the second consisting of only Atomi objects. The robot is currently incomplete, but for the most part it has been successfully tested.

  17. Virtual Reality Robotic Operation Simulations Using MEMICA Haptic System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Y.; Mavroidis, C.; Bouzit, M.; Dolgin, B.; Harm, D. L.; Kopchok, G. E.; White, R.

    2000-01-01

    There is an increasing realization that some tasks can be performed significantly better by humans than robots but, due to associated hazards, distance, etc., only a robot can be employed. Telemedicine is one area where remotely controlled robots can have a major impact by providing urgent care at remote sites. In recent years, remotely controlled robotics has been greatly advanced. The robotic astronaut, "Robonaut," at NASA Johnson Space Center is one such example. Unfortunately, due to the unavailability of force and tactile feedback capability the operator must determine the required action using only visual feedback from the remote site, which limits the tasks that Robonaut can perform. There is a great need for dexterous, fast, accurate teleoperated robots with the operator?s ability to "feel" the environment at the robot's field. Recently, we conceived a haptic mechanism called MEMICA (Remote MEchanical MIrroring using Controlled stiffness and Actuators) that can enable the design of high dexterity, rapid response, and large workspace system. Our team is developing novel MEMICA gloves and virtual reality models to allow the simulation of telesurgery and other applications. The MEMICA gloves are designed to have a high dexterity, rapid response, and large workspace and intuitively mirror the conditions at a virtual site where a robot is simulating the presence of the human operator. The key components of MEMICA are miniature electrically controlled stiffness (ECS) elements and Electrically Controlled Force and Stiffness (ECFS) actuators that are based on the sue of Electro-Rheological Fluids (ERF). In this paper the design of the MEMICA system and initial experimental results are presented.

  18. SpRoUTS (Space Robot Universal Truss System): Reversible Robotic Assembly of Deployable Truss Structures of Reconfigurable Length

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenett, Benjamin; Cellucci, Daniel; Cheung, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Automatic deployment of structures has been a focus of much academic and industrial work on infrastructure applications and robotics in general. This paper presents a robotic truss assembler designed for space applications - the Space Robot Universal Truss System (SpRoUTS) - that reversibly assembles a truss from a feedstock of hinged andflat-packed components, by folding the sides of each component up and locking onto the assembled structure. We describe the design and implementation of the robot and show that the assembled truss compares favorably with prior truss deployment systems.

  19. System and method for exchanging tools and end effectors on a robot

    SciTech Connect

    Burry, D.B.; Williams, P.M.

    1990-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a system and method for exchanging tools and effectors on a robot permits exchange during a programmed task. The exchange mechanism is located off the robot, thus reducing the mass of the robot arm and permitting smaller robots to perform designated tasks. A simple spring/collet mechanism mounted on the robot is used which permits the engagement and disengagement of the tool or end effector without the need for a rotational orientation of the tool to the end effector/collet interface. As the tool changing system is not located on the robot arm no umbilical cords are located on robot.

  20. System and method for exchanging tools and end effectors on a robot

    SciTech Connect

    Burry, D.B.; Williams, P.M.

    1990-01-01

    This invention is comprised of a system and method for exchanging tools and effectors on a robot permits exchange during a programmed task. The exchange mechanism is located off the robot, thus reducing the mass of the robot arm and permitting smaller robots to perform designated tasks. A simple spring/collet mechanism mounted on the robot is used which permits the engagement and disengagement of the tool or end effector without the need for a rotational orientation of the tool to the end effector/collet interface. As the tool changing system is not located on the robot arm no umbilical cords are located on robot.

  1. Industrial robots and robotics

    SciTech Connect

    Kafrissen, S.; Stephens, M.

    1984-01-01

    This book discusses the study of robotics. It provides information of hardware, software, applications and economics. Eleven chapters examine the following: Minicomputers, Microcomputers, and Microprocessors; The Servo-Control System; The Activators; Robot Vision Systems; and Robot Workcell Environments. Twelve appendices supplement the data.

  2. Autonomous Robotic Refueling System (ARRS) for rapid aircraft turnaround

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, O. R.; Jackson, E.; Rueb, K.; Thompson, B.; Powell, K.

    An autonomous robotic refuelling system is being developed to achieve rapid aircraft turnaround, notably during combat operations. The proposed system includes a gantry positioner with sufficient reach to position a robotic arm that performs the refuelling tasks; a six degree of freedom manipulator equipped with a remote center of compliance, torque sensor, and a gripper that can handle standard tools; a computer vision system to locate and guide the refuelling nozzle, inspect the nozzle, and avoid collisions; and an operator interface with video and graphics display. The control system software will include components designed for trajectory planning and generation, collision detection, sensor interfacing, sensory processing, and human interfacing. The robotic system will be designed so that upgrading to perform additional tasks will be relatively straightforward.

  3. Safeguards and security considerations for automated and robotic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, S.E.; Jaeger, C.D.

    1994-09-01

    Within the reconfigured Nuclear Weapons Complex there will be a large number of automated and robotic (A&R) systems because of the many benefits derived from their use. To meet the overall security requirements of a facility, consideration must be given to those systems that handle and process nuclear material. Since automation and robotics is a relatively new technology, not widely applied to the Nuclear Weapons Complex, safeguards and security (S&S) issues related to these systems have not been extensively explored, and no guidance presently exists. The goal of this effort is to help integrate S&S into the design of future A&R systems. Towards this, the authors first examined existing A and R systems from a security perspective to identify areas of concern and possible solutions of these problems. They then were able to develop generalized S&S guidance and design considerations for automation and robotics.

  4. Task planning with uncertainty for robotic systems. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cao, Tiehua

    1993-01-01

    In a practical robotic system, it is important to represent and plan sequences of operations and to be able to choose an efficient sequence from them for a specific task. During the generation and execution of task plans, different kinds of uncertainty may occur and erroneous states need to be handled to ensure the efficiency and reliability of the system. An approach to task representation, planning, and error recovery for robotic systems is demonstrated. Our approach to task planning is based on an AND/OR net representation, which is then mapped to a Petri net representation of all feasible geometric states and associated feasibility criteria for net transitions. Task decomposition of robotic assembly plans based on this representation is performed on the Petri net for robotic assembly tasks, and the inheritance of properties of liveness, safeness, and reversibility at all levels of decomposition are explored. This approach provides a framework for robust execution of tasks through the properties of traceability and viability. Uncertainty in robotic systems are modeled by local fuzzy variables, fuzzy marking variables, and global fuzzy variables which are incorporated in fuzzy Petri nets. Analysis of properties and reasoning about uncertainty are investigated using fuzzy reasoning structures built into the net. Two applications of fuzzy Petri nets, robot task sequence planning and sensor-based error recovery, are explored. In the first application, the search space for feasible and complete task sequences with correct precedence relationships is reduced via the use of global fuzzy variables in reasoning about subgoals. In the second application, sensory verification operations are modeled by mutually exclusive transitions to reason about local and global fuzzy variables on-line and automatically select a retry or an alternative error recovery sequence when errors occur. Task sequencing and task execution with error recovery capability for one and multiple soft

  5. Proceedings of the ROBEXS '86: The second annual workshop on robotics and expert systems

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    This book presents papers given at a workshop on robots and expert systems. Topics include the following: Natural Language and Artificial Intelligence; Software engineering and expert systems; robots in space; artificial intelligence and the human interface; and Fuzzy Logic Systems.

  6. The Design, Planning and Control of Robotic Systems in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubowsky, Steven

    1996-01-01

    In the future, robotic systems will be expected to perform important tasks in space, in orbit and in planetary exploration. In orbit, current technology requires that tasks such as the repair, construction and maintenance of space stations and satellites be performed by astronaut Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA). Eliminating the need for astronaut EVA through the use of space manipulators would greatly reduce both mission costs and hazards to astronauts. In planetary exploration, cost and logistical considerations clearly make the use of autonomous and telerobotic systems also very attractive, even in cases where an astronaut explorer might be in the area. However, such applications introduce a number of technical problems not found in conventional earth-bound industrial robots. To design useful and practical systems to meet the needs of future space missions, substantial technical development is required, including in the areas of the design, control and planning. The objectives of this research program were to develop such design paradigms and control and planning algorithms to enable future space robotic systems to meet their proposed mission objectives. The underlying intellectual focus of the program is to construct a set of integrated design, planning and control techniques based on an understanding of the fundamental mechanics of space robotic systems. This work was to build upon the results obtained in our previous research in this area supported by NASA Langley Research Center in which we have made important contributions to the area of space robotics.

  7. Automation and robotics technology for intelligent mining systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welsh, Jeffrey H.

    1989-01-01

    The U.S. Bureau of Mines is approaching the problems of accidents and efficiency in the mining industry through the application of automation and robotics to mining systems. This technology can increase safety by removing workers from hazardous areas of the mines or from performing hazardous tasks. The short-term goal of the Automation and Robotics program is to develop technology that can be implemented in the form of an autonomous mining machine using current continuous mining machine equipment. In the longer term, the goal is to conduct research that will lead to new intelligent mining systems that capitalize on the capabilities of robotics. The Bureau of Mines Automation and Robotics program has been structured to produce the technology required for the short- and long-term goals. The short-term goal of application of automation and robotics to an existing mining machine, resulting in autonomous operation, is expected to be accomplished within five years. Key technology elements required for an autonomous continuous mining machine are well underway and include machine navigation systems, coal-rock interface detectors, machine condition monitoring, and intelligent computer systems. The Bureau of Mines program is described, including status of key technology elements for an autonomous continuous mining machine, the program schedule, and future work. Although the program is directed toward underground mining, much of the technology being developed may have applications for space systems or mining on the Moon or other planets.

  8. Method and System for Controlling a Dexterous Robot Execution Sequence Using State Classification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Adam M. (Inventor); Platt, Robert J., Jr. (Inventor); Quillin, Nathaniel (Inventor); Permenter, Frank Noble (Inventor); Pfeiffer, Joseph (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A robotic system includes a dexterous robot and a controller. The robot includes a plurality of robotic joints, actuators for moving the joints, and sensors for measuring a characteristic of the joints, and for transmitting the characteristics as sensor signals. The controller receives the sensor signals, and is configured for executing instructions from memory, classifying the sensor signals into distinct classes via the state classification module, monitoring a system state of the robot using the classes, and controlling the robot in the execution of alternative work tasks based on the system state. A method for controlling the robot in the above system includes receiving the signals via the controller, classifying the signals using the state classification module, monitoring the present system state of the robot using the classes, and controlling the robot in the execution of alternative work tasks based on the present system state.

  9. 3D vision system for intelligent milking robot automation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhloufi, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    In a milking robot, the correct localization and positioning of milking teat cups is of very high importance. The milking robots technology has not changed since a decade and is based primarily on laser profiles for teats approximate positions estimation. This technology has reached its limit and does not allow optimal positioning of the milking cups. Also, in the presence of occlusions, the milking robot fails to milk the cow. These problems, have economic consequences for producers and animal health (e.g. development of mastitis). To overcome the limitations of current robots, we have developed a new system based on 3D vision, capable of efficiently positioning the milking cups. A prototype of an intelligent robot system based on 3D vision for real-time positioning of a milking robot has been built and tested under various conditions on a synthetic udder model (in static and moving scenarios). Experimental tests, were performed using 3D Time-Of-Flight (TOF) and RGBD cameras. The proposed algorithms permit the online segmentation of teats by combing 2D and 3D visual information. The obtained results permit the teat 3D position computation. This information is then sent to the milking robot for teat cups positioning. The vision system has a real-time performance and monitors the optimal positioning of the cups even in the presence of motion. The obtained results, with both TOF and RGBD cameras, show the good performance of the proposed system. The best performance was obtained with RGBD cameras. This latter technology will be used in future real life experimental tests.

  10. Artificial endocrine controller for power management in robotic systems.

    PubMed

    Sauzé, Colin; Neal, Mark

    2013-12-01

    The robots that operate autonomously for extended periods in remote environments are often limited to gather only small amounts of power through photovoltaic solar panels. Such limited power budgets make power management critical to the success of the robot's mission. Artificial endocrine controllers, inspired by the mammalian endocrine system, have shown potential as a method for managing competing demands, gradually switching between behaviors, synchronizing behavior with external events, and maintaining a stable internal state of the robot. This paper reports the results obtained using these methods to manage power in an autonomous sailing robot. Artificial neural networks are used for sail and rudder control, while an artificial endocrine controller modulates the magnitude of actuator movements in response to battery or sunlight levels. Experiments are performed both in simulation and using a real robot. In simulation a 13-fold reduction in median power consumption is achieved; in the robot this is reduced to a twofold reduction because of the limitations of the simulation model. Additional simulations of a long term mission demonstrate the controller's ability to make gradual behavioral transitions and to synchronize behaviors with diurnal and seasonal changes in sunlight levels. PMID:24805216

  11. Brain, mind, body and society: autonomous system in robotics.

    PubMed

    Shimoda, Motomu

    2013-12-01

    In this paper I examine the issues related to the robot with mind. To create a robot with mind aims to recreate neuro function by engineering. The robot with mind is expected not only to process external information by the built-in program and behave accordingly, but also to gain the consciousness activity responding multiple conditions and flexible and interactive communication skills coping with unknown situation. That prospect is based on the development of artificial intelligence in which self-organizing and self-emergent functions have been available in recent years. To date, controllable aspects in robotics have been restricted to data making and programming of cognitive abilities, while consciousness activities and communication skills have been regarded as uncontrollable aspects due to their contingency and uncertainty. However, some researchers of robotics claim that every activity of the mind can be recreated by engineering and is therefore controllable. Based on the development of the cognitive abilities of children and the findings of neuroscience, researchers have attempted to produce the latest artificial intelligence with autonomous learning systems. I conclude that controllability is inconsistent with autonomy in the genuine sense and autonomous robots recreated by engineering cannot be autonomous partners of humans. PMID:24558734

  12. Sensor-guided parking system for a carlike robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Kaichum; Seneviratne, L. D.

    1998-07-01

    This paper presents an automated parking strategy for a car- like mobile robot. The study considers general parking manoeuvre cases for a rectangular robot, including parallel parking. The robot is constructed simulating a conventional car, which is subject to non-holonomic constraints and thus only has two degrees of freedom. The parking space is considered as rectangular, and detected by ultrasonic sensors mounted on the robot. A motion planning algorithm develops a collision-free path for parking, taking into account the non- holonomic constraints acting on the car-like robot. A research into general car maneuvers has been conducted and useful results have been achieved. The motion planning algorithm uses these results, combined with configuration space method, to produce a collision-free path for parallel parking, depending on the parking space detected. A control program in the form of a graphical user interface has been developed for users to operate the system with ease. The strategy is implemented on a modified B12 mobile robot. The strategy presented has the potential for application in automobiles.

  13. Markerless surgical robotic system for intracerebral hemorrhage surgery.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sangkyun; Cho, Hyunchul; Yoon, Siyeop; Park, Kyusic; Kim, Youngjun; Park, Sehyung; Kim, Laehyun; Lee, Deukhee

    2015-01-01

    Conventional intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) surgery uses a stereotactic frame to access an intracerebral hematoma. Using a stereotactic frame for ICH surgery requires a long preparation time. In order to resolve this problem, we propose a markerless surgical robotic system. This system uses weighted iterative closest point technology for surface registration, hand-eye calibration for needle insertion, and 3D surface scanning for registration. We need calibration to integrate the technologies: calibration of robot and needle coordinates and calibration of 3D surface scanning and needle coordinates. These calibrations are essential elements of the markerless surgical robotic system. This system has the advantages of being non-invasive, a short total operation time, and low radiation exposure compared to conventional ICH surgery. PMID:26737481

  14. Extracting depth by binocular stereo in a robot vision system

    SciTech Connect

    Marapane, S.B.; Trivedi, M.M.

    1988-01-01

    New generation of robotic systems will operate in complex, unstructured environments utilizing sophisticated sensory mechanisms. Vision and range will be two of the most important sensory modalities such a system will utilize to sense their operating environment. Measurement of depth is critical for the success of many robotic tasks such as: object recognition and location; obstacle avoidance and navigation; and object inspection. In this paper we consider the development of a binocular stereo technique for extracting depth information in a robot vision system for inspection and manipulation tasks. Ability to produce precise depth measurements over a wide range of distances and the passivity of the approach make binocular stereo techniques attractive and appropriate for range finding in a robotic environment. This paper describes work in progress towards the development of a region-based binocular stereo technique for a robot vision system designed for inspection and manipulation and presents preliminary experiments designed to evaluate performance of the approach. Results of these studies show promise for the region-based stereo matching approach. 16 refs., 1 fig.

  15. High level language-based robotic control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, Guillermo (Inventor); Kruetz, Kenneth K. (Inventor); Jain, Abhinandan (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    This invention is a robot control system based on a high level language implementing a spatial operator algebra. There are two high level languages included within the system. At the highest level, applications programs can be written in a robot-oriented applications language including broad operators such as MOVE and GRASP. The robot-oriented applications language statements are translated into statements in the spatial operator algebra language. Programming can also take place using the spatial operator algebra language. The statements in the spatial operator algebra language from either source are then translated into machine language statements for execution by a digital control computer. The system also includes the capability of executing the control code sequences in a simulation mode before actual execution to assure proper action at execution time. The robot's environment is checked as part of the process and dynamic reconfiguration is also possible. The languages and system allow the programming and control of multiple arms and the use of inward/outward spatial recursions in which every computational step can be related to a transformation from one point in the mechanical robot to another point to name two major advantages.

  16. High level language-based robotic control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, Guillermo (Inventor); Kreutz, Kenneth K. (Inventor); Jain, Abhinandan (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    This invention is a robot control system based on a high level language implementing a spatial operator algebra. There are two high level languages included within the system. At the highest level, applications programs can be written in a robot-oriented applications language including broad operators such as MOVE and GRASP. The robot-oriented applications language statements are translated into statements in the spatial operator algebra language. Programming can also take place using the spatial operator algebra language. The statements in the spatial operator algebra language from either source are then translated into machine language statements for execution by a digital control computer. The system also includes the capability of executing the control code sequences in a simulation mode before actual execution to assure proper action at execution time. The robot's environment is checked as part of the process and dynamic reconfiguration is also possible. The languages and system allow the programming and control of multiple arms and the use of inward/outward spatial recursions in which every computational step can be related to a transformation from one point in the mechanical robot to another point to name two major advantages.

  17. Robotic Mirror Therapy System for Functional Recovery of Hemiplegic Arms.

    PubMed

    Beom, Jaewon; Koh, Sukgyu; Nam, Hyung Seok; Kim, Wonshik; Kim, Yoonjae; Seo, Han Gil; Oh, Byung-Mo; Chung, Sun Gun; Kim, Sungwan

    2016-01-01

    Mirror therapy has been performed as effective occupational therapy in a clinical setting for functional recovery of a hemiplegic arm after stroke. It is conducted by eliciting an illusion through use of a mirror as if the hemiplegic arm is moving in real-time while moving the healthy arm. It can facilitate brain neuroplasticity through activation of the sensorimotor cortex. However, conventional mirror therapy has a critical limitation in that the hemiplegic arm is not actually moving. Thus, we developed a real-time 2-axis mirror robot system as a simple add-on module for conventional mirror therapy using a closed feedback mechanism, which enables real-time movement of the hemiplegic arm. We used 3 Attitude and Heading Reference System sensors, 2 brushless DC motors for elbow and wrist joints, and exoskeletal frames. In a feasibility study on 6 healthy subjects, robotic mirror therapy was safe and feasible. We further selected tasks useful for activities of daily living training through feedback from rehabilitation doctors. A chronic stroke patient showed improvement in the Fugl-Meyer assessment scale and elbow flexor spasticity after a 2-week application of the mirror robot system. Robotic mirror therapy may enhance proprioceptive input to the sensory cortex, which is considered to be important in neuroplasticity and functional recovery of hemiplegic arms. The mirror robot system presented herein can be easily developed and utilized effectively to advance occupational therapy. PMID:27583794

  18. Real time AI expert system for robotic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Follin, John F.

    1987-01-01

    A computer controlled multi-robot process cell to demonstrate advanced technologies for the demilitarization of obsolete chemical munitions was developed. The methods through which the vision system and other sensory inputs were used by the artificial intelligence to provide the information required to direct the robots to complete the desired task are discussed. The mechanisms that the expert system uses to solve problems (goals), the different rule data base, and the methods for adapting this control system to any device that can be controlled or programmed through a high level computer interface are discussed.

  19. Determinants of system transparency and its influence on trust in and reliance on unmanned robotic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ososky, Scott; Sanders, Tracy; Jentsch, Florian; Hancock, Peter; Chen, Jessie Y. C.

    2014-06-01

    Increasingly autonomous robotic systems are expected to play a vital role in aiding humans in complex and dangerous environments. It is unlikely, however, that such systems will be able to consistently operate with perfect reliability. Even less than 100% reliable systems can provide a significant benefit to humans, but this benefit will depend on a human operator's ability to understand a robot's behaviors and states. The notion of system transparency is examined as a vital aspect of robotic design, for maintaining humans' trust in and reliance on increasingly automated platforms. System transparency is described as the degree to which a system's action, or the intention of an action, is apparent to human operators and/or observers. While the physical designs of robotic systems have been demonstrated to greatly influence humans' impressions of robots, determinants of transparency between humans and robots are not solely robot-centric. Our approach considers transparency as emergent property of the human-robot system. In this paper, we present insights from our interdisciplinary efforts to improve the transparency of teams made up of humans and unmanned robots. These near-futuristic teams are those in which robot agents will autonomously collaborate with humans to achieve task goals. This paper demonstrates how factors such as human-robot communication and human mental models regarding robots impact a human's ability to recognize the actions or states of an automated system. Furthermore, we will discuss the implications of system transparency on other critical HRI factors such as situation awareness, operator workload, and perceptions of trust.

  20. Implementing real-time robotic systems using CHIMERA II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, David B.; Schmitz, Donald E.; Khosla, Pradeep K.

    1990-01-01

    A description is given of the CHIMERA II programming environment and operating system, which was developed for implementing real-time robotic systems. Sensor-based robotic systems contain both general- and special-purpose hardware, and thus the development of applications tends to be a time-consuming task. The CHIMERA II environment is designed to reduce the development time by providing a convenient software interface between the hardware and the user. CHIMERA II supports flexible hardware configurations which are based on one or more VME-backplanes. All communication across multiple processors is transparent to the user through an extensive set of interprocessor communication primitives. CHIMERA II also provides a high-performance real-time kernel which supports both deadline and highest-priority-first scheduling. The flexibility of CHIMERA II allows hierarchical models for robot control, such as NASREM, to be implemented with minimal programming time and effort.

  1. Automatic Tool Path Generation for Robot Integrated Surface Sculpturing System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jiang; Suzuki, Ryo; Tanaka, Tomohisa; Saito, Yoshio

    In this paper, a surface sculpturing system based on 8-axis robot is proposed, the CAD/CAM software and tool path generation algorithm for this sculpturing system are presented. The 8-axis robot is composed of a 6-axis manipulator and a 2-axis worktable, it carves block of polystyrene foams by heated cutting tools. Multi-DOF (Degree of Freedom) robot benefits from the faster fashion than traditional RP (Rapid Prototyping) methods and more flexibility than CNC machining. With its flexibility driven from an 8-axis configuration, as well as efficient custom-developed software for rough cutting and finish cutting, this surface sculpturing system can carve sculptured surface accurately and efficiently.

  2. The navigation system of the JPL robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, A. M.

    1977-01-01

    The control structure of the JPL research robot and the operations of the navigation subsystem are discussed. The robot functions as a network of interacting concurrent processes distributed among several computers and coordinated by a central executive. The results of scene analysis are used to create a segmented terrain model in which surface regions are classified by traversibility. The model is used by a path planning algorithm, PATH, which uses tree search methods to find the optimal path to a goal. In PATH, the search space is defined dynamically as a consequence of node testing. Maze-solving and the use of an associative data base for context dependent node generation are also discussed. Execution of a planned path is accomplished by a feedback guidance process with automatic error recovery.

  3. Regolith Advanced Surface Systems Operations Robot (RASSOR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Robert P.; Smith, Jonathan D.; Cox, Rachel E.; Schuler, Jason M.; Ebert, Tom; Nick, Andrew J.

    2012-01-01

    Regolith is abundant on extra-terrestrial surfaces and is the source of many resources such as oxygen, hydrogen, titanium, aluminum, iron, silica and other valuable materials, which can be used to make rocket propellant, consumables for life support, radiation protection barrier shields, landing pads, blast protection berms, roads, habitats and other structures and devices. Recent data from the Moon also indicates that there are substantial deposits of water ice in permanently shadowed crater regions and possibly under an over burden of regolith. The key to being able to use this regolith and acquire the resources, is being able to manipulate it with robotic excavation and hauling machinery that can survive and operate in these very extreme extra-terrestrial surface environments. In addition, the reduced gravity on the Moon, Mars, comets and asteroids poses a significant challenge in that the necessary reaction force for digging cannot be provided by the robot's weight as is typically done on Earth. Space transportation is expensive and limited in capacity, so small, lightweight payloads are desirable, which means large traditional excavation machines are not a viable option. A novel, compact and lightweight excavation robot prototype for manipulating, excavating, acquiring, hauling and dumping regolith on extra-terrestrial surfaces has been developed and tested. Lessons learned and test results will be presented including digging in a variety of lunar regolith simulant conditions including frozen regolith mixed with water ice.

  4. Cooperative Three-Robot System for Traversing Steep Slopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stroupe, Ashley; Huntsberger, Terrance; Aghazarian, Hrand; Younse, Paulo; Garrett, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Teamed Robots for Exploration and Science in Steep Areas (TRESSA) is a system of three autonomous mobile robots that cooperate with each other to enable scientific exploration of steep terrain (slope angles up to 90 ). Originally intended for use in exploring steep slopes on Mars that are not accessible to lone wheeled robots (Mars Exploration Rovers), TRESSA and systems like TRESSA could also be used on Earth for performing rescues on steep slopes and for exploring steep slopes that are too remote or too dangerous to be explored by humans. TRESSA is modeled on safe human climbing of steep slopes, two key features of which are teamwork and safety tethers. Two of the autonomous robots, denoted Anchorbots, remain at the top of a slope; the third robot, denoted the Cliffbot, traverses the slope. The Cliffbot drives over the cliff edge supported by tethers, which are payed out from the Anchorbots (see figure). The Anchorbots autonomously control the tension in the tethers to counter the gravitational force on the Cliffbot. The tethers are payed out and reeled in as needed, keeping the body of the Cliffbot oriented approximately parallel to the local terrain surface and preventing wheel slip by controlling the speed of descent or ascent, thereby enabling the Cliffbot to drive freely up, down, or across the slope. Due to the interactive nature of the three-robot system, the robots must be very tightly coupled. To provide for this tight coupling, the TRESSA software architecture is built on a combination of (1) the multi-robot layered behavior-coordination architecture reported in "An Architecture for Controlling Multiple Robots" (NPO-30345), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 28, No. 10 (October 2004), page 65, and (2) the real-time control architecture reported in "Robot Electronics Architecture" (NPO-41784), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 32, No. 1 (January 2008), page 28. The combination architecture makes it possible to keep the three robots synchronized and coordinated, to use data

  5. On discrete control of nonlinear systems with applications to robotics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eslami, Mansour

    1989-01-01

    Much progress has been reported in the areas of modeling and control of nonlinear dynamic systems in a continuous-time framework. From implementation point of view, however, it is essential to study these nonlinear systems directly in a discrete setting that is amenable for interfacing with digital computers. But to develop discrete models and discrete controllers for a nonlinear system such as robot is a nontrivial task. Robot is also inherently a variable-inertia dynamic system involving additional complications. Not only the computer-oriented models of these systems must satisfy the usual requirements for such models, but these must also be compatible with the inherent capabilities of computers and must preserve the fundamental physical characteristics of continuous-time systems such as the conservation of energy and/or momentum. Preliminary issues regarding discrete systems in general and discrete models of a typical industrial robot that is developed with full consideration of the principle of conservation of energy are presented. Some research on the pertinent tactile information processing is reviewed. Finally, system control methods and how to integrate these issues in order to complete the task of discrete control of a robot manipulator are also reviewed.

  6. System For Research On Multiple-Arm Robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Backes, Paul G.; Hayati, Samad; Tso, Kam S.; Hayward, Vincent

    1991-01-01

    Kali system of computer programs and equipment provides environment for research on distributed programming and distributed control of coordinated-multiple-arm robots. Suitable for telerobotics research involving sensing and execution of low level tasks. Software and configuration of hardware designed flexible so system modified easily to test various concepts in control and programming of robots, including multiple-arm control, redundant-arm control, shared control, traded control, force control, force/position hybrid control, design and integration of sensors, teleoperation, task-space description and control, methods of adaptive control, control of flexible arms, and human factors.

  7. An infrared/video fusion system for military robotics

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, A.W.; Roberts, R.S.

    1997-08-05

    Sensory information is critical to the telerobotic operation of mobile robots. In particular, visual sensors are a key component of the sensor package on a robot engaged in urban military operations. Visual sensors provide the robot operator with a wealth of information including robot navigation and threat assessment. However, simple countermeasures such as darkness, smoke, or blinding by a laser, can easily neutralize visual sensors. In order to provide a robust visual sensing system, an infrared sensor is required to augment the primary visual sensor. An infrared sensor can acquire useful imagery in conditions that incapacitate a visual sensor. A simple approach to incorporating an infrared sensor into the visual sensing system is to display two images to the operator: side-by-side visual and infrared images. However, dual images might overwhelm the operator with information, and result in degraded robot performance. A better solution is to combine the visual and infrared images into a single image that maximizes scene information. Fusing visual and infrared images into a single image demands balancing the mixture of visual and infrared information. Humans are accustom to viewing and interpreting visual images. They are not accustom to viewing or interpreting infrared images. Hence, the infrared image must be used to enhance the visual image, not obfuscate it.

  8. Design of active orthoses for a robotic gait rehabilitation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villa-Parra, A. C.; Broche, L.; Delisle-Rodríguez, D.; Sagaró, R.; Bastos, T.; Frizera-Neto, A.

    2015-09-01

    An active orthosis (AO) is a robotic device that assists both human gait and rehabilitation therapy. This work proposes portable AOs, one for the knee joint and another for the ankle joint. Both AOs will be used to complete a robotic system that improves gait rehabilitation. The requirements for actuator selection, the biomechanical considerations during the AO design, the finite element method, and a control approach based on electroencephalographic and surface electromyographic signals are reviewed. This work contributes to the design of AOs for users with foot drop and knee flexion impairment. However, the potential of the proposed AOs to be part of a robotic gait rehabilitation system that improves the quality of life of stroke survivors requires further investigation.

  9. A Compact Modular Teleoperated Robotic System for Laparoscopic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Berkelman, Peter; Ma, Ji

    2011-01-01

    Compared with traditional open surgery, minimally invasive surgical procedures reduce patient trauma and recovery time, but the dexterity of the surgeon in laparoscopic surgery is reduced owing to the small incisions, long instruments and limited indirect visibility of the operative site inside the patient. Robotic surgical systems, teleoperated by surgeons from a master control console with joystick-type manipulation interfaces, have been commercially developed yet their adoption into standard practice may be limited owing to their size, complexity, cost and time-consuming setup, maintenance and sterilization procedures. The goal of our research is to improve the effectiveness of robot-assisted surgery by developing much smaller, simpler, modular, teleoperated robotic manipulator systems for minimally invasive surgery. PMID:21743765

  10. Robotic Materials Handling in Space: Mechanical Design of the Robot Operated Materials Processing System HitchHiker Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voellmer, George

    1997-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center has developed the Robot Operated Materials Processing System (ROMPS) that flew aboard STS-64 in September, 1994. The ROMPS robot transported pallets containing wafers of different materials from their storage racks to a furnace for thermal processing. A system of tapered guides and compliant springs was designed to deal with the potential misalignments. The robot and all the sample pallets were locked down for launch and landing. The design of the passive lockdown system, and the interplay between it and the alignment system are presented.

  11. Development of an advanced intelligent robot navigation system

    SciTech Connect

    Hai Quan Dai; Dalton, G.R.; Tulenko, J.; Crane, C.C. III )

    1992-01-01

    As part of the US Department of Energy's Robotics for Advanced Reactors Project, the authors are in the process of assembling an advanced intelligent robotic navigation and control system based on previous work performed on this project in the areas of computer control, database access, graphical interfaces, shared data and computations, computer vision for positions determination, and sonar-based computer navigation systems. The system will feature three levels of goals: (1) high-level system for management of lower level functions to achieve specific functional goals; (2) intermediate level of goals such as position determination, obstacle avoidance, and discovering unexpected objects; and (3) other supplementary low-level functions such as reading and recording sonar or video camera data. In its current phase, the Cybermotion K2A mobile robot is not equipped with an onboard computer system, which will be included in the final phase. By that time, the onboard system will play important roles in vision processing and in robotic control communication.

  12. Integrating sensorimotor systems in a robot model of cricket behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Barbara H.; Harrison, Reid R.

    2000-10-01

    The mechanisms by which animals manage sensorimotor integration and coordination of different behaviors can be investigated in robot models. In previous work the first author has build a robot that localizes sound based on close modeling of the auditory and neural system in the cricket. It is known that the cricket combines its response to sound with other sensorimotor activities such as an optomotor reflex and reactions to mechanical stimulation for the antennae and cerci. Behavioral evidence suggests some ways these behaviors may be integrated. We have tested the addition of an optomotor response, using an analog VLSI circuit developed by the second author, to the sound localizing behavior and have shown that it can, as in the cricket, improve the directness of the robot's path to sound. In particular it substantially improves behavior when the robot is subject to a motor disturbance. Our aim is to better understand how the insect brain functions in controlling complex combinations of behavior, with the hope that this will also suggest novel mechanisms for sensory integration on robots.

  13. Modular design of a miniaturized surgical robot system.

    PubMed

    Niggemeyer, Martin; Müller, Meiko; Niesche, Annegret; de la Fuente, Matías; Komadinic, Adrian; Radermacher, Klaus

    2012-08-01

    Currently, there are only a small number of robotic systems used in various surgical fields. As modified industrial robot systems have shown significant limitations in the past, specialized kinematic solutions have been proposed for specific surgical applications. The majority of these systems are designed for specific applications in only a limited number of cases. The acquisition and operating costs are high, hindering the dissemination and broad clinical application of such systems. To address this problem, a modular mini-robot system is proposed, which can be easily adapted to different application-specific requirements. Therefore, the requirements of different applications have been categorized and clustered to a standardized requirement profile. Next, a modular robot based on a hybrid kinematic module structure has been developed. This concept has been implemented and tested in in vitro studies for different applications, such as revision total hip replacement and unicondylar knee arthroplasty. User-orientated tests of the intraoperative handling, as well as accuracy tests, proved the feasibility of the concept. PMID:23104834

  14. Cognitive robotic system for learning of complex visual stimuli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potapov, A. S.; Rozhkov, A. S.

    2013-05-01

    The problem of learning of complex visual stimuli in cognitive robotics is considered. These stimuli should be selected on the base of rules supporting arbitrary comparisons of stimulus features with features of other salient objects (context). New perceptual knowledge representation based on the predicate logic is implemented to express such rules. Computable predicates are provided by low-level vision system. The rules are constructed using genetic algorithms on the base of a set of examples obtained by a robot during consequent trials. Dependence between the number of necessary trials and rule complexity is studied.

  15. Virtual Passive Controller for Robot Systems Using Joint Torque Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aldridge, Hal A.; Juang, Jer-Nan

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents a control method based on virtual passive dynamic control that will stabilize a robot manipulator using joint torque sensors and a simple joint model. The method does not require joint position or velocity feedback for stabilization. The proposed control method is stable in the sense of Lyaponov. The control method was implemented on several joints of a laboratory robot. The controller showed good stability robustness to system parameter error and to the exclusion of nonlinear dynamic effects on the joints. The controller enhanced position tracking performance and, in the absence of position control, dissipated joint energy.

  16. Robotic design for an automated uranium solution enrichment system

    SciTech Connect

    Horley, E.C.; Beugelsdijk, T.; Biddle, R.S.; Bronisz, L.E.; Hansen, W.J.; Li, T.K.; Sampson, T.E.; Walton, G.

    1990-01-01

    A method to automate solution enrichment analysis by gamma-ray spectroscopy is being developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Both passive and x-ray fluorescence (XRF) analyses will be remotely performed to determine the amounts of {sup 235}U and total uranium in sample containers. A commercial laboratory robot will be used to process up to 40 batch and 8 priority samples in an unattended mode. Samples will be read by a bar-code reader to determine measurement requirements, then assayed by either or both of the gamma-ray and XRF instruments. The robot will be responsible for moving the sample containers and operating all shield doors and shutters. In addition to reducing hardware complexity, this feature will also allow manual operation of the instruments if the robot fails. This automated system will reduce personnel radiation exposure and increase the reliability and repeatability of the measurements.

  17. Space station automation and robotics study. Operator-systems interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    This is the final report of a Space Station Automation and Robotics Planning Study, which was a joint project of the Boeing Aerospace Company, Boeing Commercial Airplane Company, and Boeing Computer Services Company. The study is in support of the Advanced Technology Advisory Committee established by NASA in accordance with a mandate by the U.S. Congress. Boeing support complements that provided to the NASA Contractor study team by four aerospace contractors, the Stanford Research Institute (SRI), and the California Space Institute. This study identifies automation and robotics (A&R) technologies that can be advanced by requirements levied by the Space Station Program. The methodology used in the study is to establish functional requirements for the operator system interface (OSI), establish the technologies needed to meet these requirements, and to forecast the availability of these technologies. The OSI would perform path planning, tracking and control, object recognition, fault detection and correction, and plan modifications in connection with extravehicular (EV) robot operations.

  18. Task path planning, scheduling and learning for free-ranging robot systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wakefield, G. Steve

    1987-01-01

    The development of robotics applications for space operations is often restricted by the limited movement available to guided robots. Free ranging robots can offer greater flexibility than physically guided robots in these applications. Presented here is an object oriented approach to path planning and task scheduling for free-ranging robots that allows the dynamic determination of paths based on the current environment. The system also provides task learning for repetitive jobs. This approach provides a basis for the design of free-ranging robot systems which are adaptable to various environments and tasks.

  19. Smart tissue anastomosis robot (STAR): a vision-guided robotics system for laparoscopic suturing.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Simon; Wu, Kyle L; Kim, Yonjae; Krieger, Axel; Kim, Peter C W

    2014-04-01

    This paper introduces the smart tissue anastomosis robot (STAR). Currently, the STAR is a proof-of-concept for a vision-guided robotic system featuring an actuated laparoscopic suturing tool capable of executing running sutures from image-based commands. The STAR tool is designed around a commercially available laparoscopic suturing tool that is attached to a custom-made motor stage and the STAR supervisory control architecture that enables a surgeon to select and track incisions and the placement of stitches. The STAR supervisory-control interface provides two modes: A manual mode that enables a surgeon to specify the placement of each stitch and an automatic mode that automatically computes equally-spaced stitches based on an incision contour. Our experiments on planar phantoms demonstrate that the STAR in either mode is more accurate, up to four times more consistent and five times faster than surgeons using state-of-the-art robotic surgical system, four times faster than surgeons using manual Endo360(°)®, and nine times faster than surgeons using manual laparoscopic tools. PMID:24658254

  20. Robotic system for the servicing of the orbiter thermal protection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, Todd; Bennett, Richard; Dowling, Kevin; Manouchehri, Davoud; Cooper, Eric; Cowan, Cregg

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the design and development of a mobile robotic system to process orbiter thermal protection system (TPS) tiles. This work was justified by a TPS automation study which identified tile rewaterproofing and visual inspection as excellent applications for robotic automation.

  1. System safety analysis of an autonomous mobile robot

    SciTech Connect

    Bartos, R.J.

    1994-08-01

    Analysis of the safety of operating and maintaining the Stored Waste Autonomous Mobile Inspector (SWAMI) II in a hazardous environment at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) was completed. The SWAMI II is a version of a commercial robot, the HelpMate{trademark} robot produced by the Transitions Research Corporation, which is being updated to incorporate the systems required for inspecting mixed toxic chemical and radioactive waste drums at the FEMP. It also has modified obstacle detection and collision avoidance subsystems. The robot will autonomously travel down the aisles in storage warehouses to record images of containers and collect other data which are transmitted to an inspector at a remote computer terminal. A previous study showed the SWAMI II has economic feasibility. The SWAMI II will more accurately locate radioactive contamination than human inspectors. This thesis includes a System Safety Hazard Analysis and a quantitative Fault Tree Analysis (FTA). The objectives of the analyses are to prevent potentially serious events and to derive a comprehensive set of safety requirements from which the safety of the SWAMI II and other autonomous mobile robots can be evaluated. The Computer-Aided Fault Tree Analysis (CAFTA{copyright}) software is utilized for the FTA. The FTA shows that more than 99% of the safety risk occurs during maintenance, and that when the derived safety requirements are implemented the rate of serious events is reduced to below one event per million operating hours. Training and procedures in SWAMI II operation and maintenance provide an added safety margin. This study will promote the safe use of the SWAMI II and other autonomous mobile robots in the emerging technology of mobile robotic inspection.

  2. Robotic system for remote maintenance of a pulsed nuclear reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Thunborg, S.

    1986-01-01

    Guidelines recently established for occupational radiation exposure specify that exposure should be as low as reasonably achievable. In conformance with these guidelines, SNL has developed a remote maintenance robot (RMR) system for use in the Sandia Pulse Reactor III (SPR III) facility. The RMR should reduce occupational radiation exposure by a factor of 4 and decrease reactor downtime. Other goals include developing a technology base for a more advanced pulse reactor and for the nuclear fuel cycle programs of the US Department of Energy and US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The RMR has five major subsystems: (a) a chain-driven cart to bring the system into the reactor room; (b) a Puma 560 robot to perform dextrous operations; (c) a programmable turntable to orient the robot to any of the reactor's four sides; (d) a programmable overhead hoist for lifting components weighing up to 400 lb onto or off of the reactor; and (e) a supervisory control console for the system operator. Figure 1 is a schematic diagram of the turntable, hoist, and robot system in position around the SPR III reactor.

  3. Mars Surveyor '98 MVACS Robotic Arm Control System Design Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonitz, Robert G.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the control system design concepts for the Mars Volatiles and Climate Surveyor (MVACS) Robotic Arm which supports the scientific investigations to be conducted as part of the Mars Surveyor '98 Lander project. Novel solutions are presented to some of the unique problems encountered in this demanding space application with its tight constraints on mass, power, volume, and computing power.

  4. An immune-inspired swarm aggregation algorithm for self-healing swarm robotic systems.

    PubMed

    Timmis, J; Ismail, A R; Bjerknes, J D; Winfield, A F T

    2016-08-01

    Swarm robotics is concerned with the decentralised coordination of multiple robots having only limited communication and interaction abilities. Although fault tolerance and robustness to individual robot failures have often been used to justify the use of swarm robotic systems, recent studies have shown that swarm robotic systems are susceptible to certain types of failure. In this paper we propose an approach to self-healing swarm robotic systems and take inspiration from the process of granuloma formation, a process of containment and repair found in the immune system. We use a case study of a swarm performing team work where previous works have demonstrated that partially failed robots have the most detrimental effect on overall swarm behaviour. We have developed an immune inspired approach that permits the recovery from certain failure modes during operation of the swarm, overcoming issues that effect swarm behaviour associated with partially failed robots. PMID:27178784

  5. Control system design for robotic underground storage tank inspection systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kiebel, G.R.

    1994-09-01

    Control and data acquisition systems for robotic inspection and surveillance systems used in nuclear waste applications must be capable, versatile, and adaptable to changing conditions. The nuclear waste remediation application is dynamic -- requirements change as public policy is constantly re-examined and refocused, and as technology in this area advances. Control and data acquisition systems must adapt to these changing conditions and be able to accommodate future missions, both predictable and unexpected. This paper describes the control and data acquisition system for the Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) System that is being developed for remote surveillance and inspection of underground storage tanks at the Hanford Site and other US Department of Energy (DOE) sites. It is a high-performance system which has been designed for future growth. The priority mission at the Hanford site is to retrieve the waste generated by 50 years of production from its present storage and process it for final disposal. The LDUA will help to gather information about the waste and the tanks it is stored in to better plan and execute the cleanup mission.

  6. Regolith Advanced Surface Systems Operations Robot (RASSOR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Robert P.; Cox, Rachel E.; Ebert, Tom; Smith, Jonathan D.; Schuler, Jason M.; Nick, Andrew J.

    Regolith is abundant on extra-terrestrial surfaces and is the source of many resources such as oxygen, hydrogen, titanium, aluminum, iron, silica and other valuable materials, which can be used to make rocket propellant, consumables for life support, radiation protection barrier shields, landing pads, blast protection berms, roads, habitats and other structures and devices. Recent data from the Moon also indicates that there are substantial deposits of water ice in permanently shadowed crater regions and possibly under an over burden of regolith. The key to being able to use this regolith and acquire the resources, is being able to manipulate it with robotic excavation and hauling machinery that can survive and operate in these very extreme extra-terrestrial surface environments.

  7. Regolith Advanced Surface Systems Operations Robot (RASSOR) Phase 2 and Smart Autonomous Sand-Swimming Excavator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandy, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The Regolith Advanced Surface Systems Operations Robot (RASSOR) Phase 2 is an excavation robot for mining regolith on a planet like Mars. The robot is programmed using the Robotic Operating System (ROS) and it also uses a physical simulation program called Gazebo. This internship focused on various functions of the program in order to make it a more professional and efficient robot. During the internship another project called the Smart Autonomous Sand-Swimming Excavator was worked on. This is a robot that is designed to dig through sand and extract sample material. The intern worked on programming the Sand-Swimming robot, and designing the electrical system to power and control the robot.

  8. A real-time robot arm collision detection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaffer, Clifford A.; Herb, Gregory M.

    1990-01-01

    A data structure and update algorithm are presented for a prototype real time collision detection safety system for a multi-robot environment. The data structure is a variant of the octree, which serves as a spatial index. An octree recursively decomposes 3-D space into eight equal cubic octants until each octant meets some decomposition criteria. The octree stores cylspheres (cylinders with spheres on each end) and rectangular solids as primitives (other primitives can easily be added as required). These primitives make up the two seven degrees-of-freedom robot arms and environment modeled by the system. Octree nodes containing more than a predetermined number N of primitives are decomposed. This rule keeps the octree small, as the entire environment for the application can be modeled using a few dozen primitives. As robot arms move, the octree is updated to reflect their changed positions. During most update cycles, any given primitive does not change which octree nodes it is in. Thus, modification to the octree is rarely required. Incidents in which one robot arm comes too close to another arm or an object are reported. Cycle time for interpreting current joint angles, updating the octree, and detecting/reporting imminent collisions averages 30 milliseconds on an Intel 80386 processor running at 20 MHz.

  9. Distributed cooperating processes in a mobile robot control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skillman, Thomas L., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    A mobile inspection robot has been proposed for the NASA Space Station. It will be a free flying autonomous vehicle that will leave a berthing unit to accomplish a variety of inspection tasks around the Space Station, and then return to its berth to recharge, refuel, and transfer information. The Flying Eye robot will receive voice communication to change its attitude, move at a constant velocity, and move to a predefined location along a self generated path. This mobile robot control system requires integration of traditional command and control techniques with a number of AI technologies. Speech recognition, natural language understanding, task and path planning, sensory abstraction and pattern recognition are all required for successful implementation. The interface between the traditional numeric control techniques and the symbolic processing to the AI technologies must be developed, and a distributed computing approach will be needed to meet the real time computing requirements. To study the integration of the elements of this project, a novel mobile robot control architecture and simulation based on the blackboard architecture was developed. The control system operation and structure is discussed.

  10. Development of Advanced Robotic Hand System for space application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Machida, Kazuo; Akita, Kenzo; Mikami, Tatsuo; Komada, Satoru

    1994-01-01

    The Advanced Robotic Hand System (ARH) is a precise telerobotics system with a semi dexterous hand for future space application. The ARH will be tested in space as one of the missions of the Engineering Tests Satellite 7 (ETS-7) which will be launched in 1997. The objectives of the ARH development are to evaluate the capability of a possible robot hand for precise and delicate tasks and to validate the related technologies implemented in the system. The ARH is designed to be controlled both from ground as a teleoperation and by locally autonomous control. This paper presents the overall system design and the functional capabilities of the ARH as well as its mission outline as the preliminary design has been completed.

  11. Automated site characterization for robotic sample acquisition systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholl, Marija S.; Eberlein, Susan; Yates, Gigi; Schumate, Michael S.; Majani, Eric; Anderson, Charles H.; Sloan, Jeffrey A.

    1991-01-01

    A mobile, semi-autonomous vehicle with multiple sensors and on-board intelligence is proposed for performing preliminary scientific investigations on extraterrestrial bodies prior to human exploration. Two technologies, a hybrid optical-digital computer system based on optical correlator technology and an image and instrument data analysis system, provide complementary capabilities which might be part of an instrument package for an intelligent robotic vehicle. The hybrid digital-optical vision system could perform real-time image classification tasks using an optical correlator with programmable matched filters under control of a digital microcomputer. The data analysis system would analyze visible and multiband imagery to extract mineral composition and textural information for geologic characterization. Together these technologies would support the site characterization needs of a robotic vehicle for both navigational and scientific purposes.

  12. Robotic control architecture development for automated nuclear material handling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Merrill, R.D.; Hurd, R.; Couture, S.; Wilhelmsen, K.

    1995-02-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is engaged in developing automated systems for handling materials for mixed waste treatment, nuclear pyrochemical processing, and weapon components disassembly. In support of these application areas there is an extensive robotic development program. This paper will describe the portion of this effort at LLNL devoted to control system architecture development, and review two applications currently being implemented which incorporate these technologies.

  13. Control of a free-flying robot manipulator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, H.; Cannon, R. H., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The goal of the research is to develop and test control strategies for a self-contained, free flying space robot. Such a robot would perform operations in space similar to those currently handled by astronauts during extravehicular activity (EVA). The focus of the work is to develop and carry out a program of research with a series of physical Satellite Robot Simulator Vehicles (SRSV's), two-dimensionally freely mobile laboratory models of autonomous free-flying space robots such as might perform extravehicular functions associated with operation of a space station or repair of orbiting satellites. The development of the SRSV and of some of the controller subsystems are discribed. The two-link arm was fitted to the SRSV base, and researchers explored the open-loop characteristics of the arm and thruster actuators. Work began on building the software foundation necessary for use of the on-board computer, as well as hardware and software for a local vision system for target identification and tracking.

  14. Portable robotic platform for handheld landmine detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, Herman; McMahill, Jeffrey

    2004-09-01

    To support the development of advanced algorithms for hand-held detectors, it is desirable to collect data with a specific sweep rate, height and spacing. In addition, it is also important that the position of each data point produced by the detector is known. Since it is impossible for a human operator to precisely control these sweep parameters, we have developed a semi-autonomous robotic data collection system. It is designed as a portable robot with a 2-axis manipulator that can be used to sweep any hand-held detector at a precise sweep rate, height, and spacing. It is also equipped with an interface to the hand-held detector, so it can log the output data during the sweeping motion. It also tags the output data with the position data from the on-board positioning system. As a result, we can construct an accurate 2-D or 3-D grid of the detector's output as a function of horizontal and vertical position of the detector. The manipulator is also equipped with force sensing capability that can be used to sense terrain height or collision. To increase deployment flexibility, all functions of the robot are controlled through a wireless communication link by a hand-held computer with a maximum operating distance of at least 100m. Through the hand-held computer, the operator can move the robot, and program its behavior using a script based motion sequencer. The robot has been deployed successfully on several data acquisition activities, and successfully produced high-resolution 2-D map of the buried targets.

  15. Development of a 1-m Robotic Telescope System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Wonyong; Mack, Peter; Lee, Chung-Uk; Park, Jang-Hyun; Jin, Ho; Kim, Seung-Lee; Kim, Ho-Il; Yuk, In-Soo; Lee, Woo-Baik; Bradstreet, Matthew

    2005-10-01

    Korea Astronomy & Space Science Institute (KASI) has installed a 1-m robotic telescope at Mt. Lemmon, AZ, in collaboration with a company, Astronomical Consultants & Equipment, Inc (ACE). The telescope system is totally designed to make fully robotic observations, and can be operated in both interactive and unattended robotic modes. The telescope is newly designed and manufactured regarding both mechanical and optical parts. The optical system is designed to collect 80% of the incident light within 0.''5 with an f/7.5 Ritchey-Chretien design. The telescope mount is an equatorial fork with a friction drive system, and it allows fully programmable tracking speeds with a typical range of 15'' s-1 and an accuracy of ±5''hr-1. The mount system includes an integral pointing model to correct for mechanical errors and misalignments, and an auto-guide unit is also available. To gather environmental information a weather station and an all sky camera are installed at the site. In this paper we introduce the system design and the performance of the mechanical and optical quality of the telescope system based on the results of test observations using some variable stars.

  16. An approach to software quality assurance for robotic inspection systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kiebel, G.R. )

    1993-01-01

    Software quality assurance (SQA) for robotic systems used in nuclear waste applications is vital to ensure that these systems operate safely and reliably and pose a minimum risk to the environment. This paper describes the approach to be taken for SQA for the control and data acquisition system for a robotic system that is being developed for remote surveillance and inspection of underground storage tanks (USTS) at the Hanford site under the sponsorship of the UST-Integrated Demonstration Program of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Technology Development (OTD). The robotic system is called the Light-Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) System. It has a multiaxis arm with a 2.74-M (9-ft) reach and 22.7-kg (50-1b) payload that is mounted on the end of a 13.7-m (45-ft) positioning mast. It is designed to enter a UST through an available 30.5-cm (12-in.) riser. A deployment vehicle carries the positioning equipment to insert the mast and arm into the riser and a containment enclosure to control contamination when the arm is in the tank or being transported from tank to tank. A set of interchangeable end effectors is carried on the end of the arm. These end effectors provide a wide range of observation and measurement functions, such as photographic and video inspection and recording, detailed surface mapping of the tank and surface of the waste, in situ chemical analysis of the waste, etc.

  17. Designing and implementing nervous system simulations on LEGO robots.

    PubMed

    Blustein, Daniel; Rosenthal, Nikolai; Ayers, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    We present a method to use the commercially available LEGO Mindstorms NXT robotics platform to test systems level neuroscience hypotheses. The first step of the method is to develop a nervous system simulation of specific reflexive behaviors of an appropriate model organism; here we use the American Lobster. Exteroceptive reflexes mediated by decussating (crossing) neural connections can explain an animal's taxis towards or away from a stimulus as described by Braitenberg and are particularly well suited for investigation using the NXT platform.(1) The nervous system simulation is programmed using LabVIEW software on the LEGO Mindstorms platform. Once the nervous system is tuned properly, behavioral experiments are run on the robot and on the animal under identical environmental conditions. By controlling the sensory milieu experienced by the specimens, differences in behavioral outputs can be observed. These differences may point to specific deficiencies in the nervous system model and serve to inform the iteration of the model for the particular behavior under study. This method allows for the experimental manipulation of electronic nervous systems and serves as a way to explore neuroscience hypotheses specifically regarding the neurophysiological basis of simple innate reflexive behaviors. The LEGO Mindstorms NXT kit provides an affordable and efficient platform on which to test preliminary biomimetic robot control schemes. The approach is also well suited for the high school classroom to serve as the foundation for a hands-on inquiry-based biorobotics curriculum. PMID:23728477

  18. Part identification in robotic assembly using vision system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balabantaray, Bunil Kumar; Biswal, Bibhuti Bhusan

    2013-12-01

    Machine vision system acts an important role in making robotic assembly system autonomous. Identification of the correct part is an important task which needs to be carefully done by a vision system to feed the robot with correct information for further processing. This process consists of many sub-processes wherein, the image capturing, digitizing and enhancing, etc. do account for reconstructive the part for subsequent operations. Interest point detection of the grabbed image, therefore, plays an important role in the entire image processing activity. Thus it needs to choose the correct tool for the process with respect to the given environment. In this paper analysis of three major corner detection algorithms is performed on the basis of their accuracy, speed and robustness to noise. The work is performed on the Matlab R2012a. An attempt has been made to find the best algorithm for the problem.

  19. A new wheel control system for the omnidirectional HERMIES-III robot

    SciTech Connect

    Reister, D.B.

    1991-04-01

    We have designed, built, and tested a new wheel control system for the HERMIES-III robot. HERMIES-III is a large mobile robot with omnidirectional steering that is designed for human scale experiments. During each cycle (at 20 Hz), the wheel control system moves the robot toward a goal and calculates the current position of the robot. The system has seven modes for moving to a goal and the goal may be changed during motion of the robot. 4 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  20. The Design, Planning and Control of Robotic Systems in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubowsky, Steven

    1996-01-01

    In the future, robotic systems will be expected to perform important tasks in space, in orbit and in planetary exploration. In orbit, current technology requires that tasks such as the repair, construction and maintenance of space stations and satellites be performed by astronaut Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA). Eliminating, the need for astronaut EVA through the use of space manipulators would greatly reduce both mission costs and hazards to astronauts. In planetary exploration, cost and logistical considerations clearly make the use of autonomous and telerobotic systems also very attractive, even in cases where an astronaut explorer might be in the area. However, such applications introduce a number of technical problems not found in conventional earth-bound industrial robots. To design useful and practical systems to meet the needs of future space missions, substantial technical development is required, including in the areas of the design, control and planning. The objectives of this research program were to develop such design paradigms and control and planning algorithms to enable future space robotic systems to meet their proposed mission objectives. The underlying intellectual focus of the program is to construct a set of integrated design, planning and control techniques based on an understanding of the fundamental mechanics of space robotic systems. This work was to build upon the results obtained in our previous research in this area supported by NASA Langley Research Center in which we have made important contributions to the area of space robotics. This program was proposed and accepted as a three year research program, a period of time necessary to make the type of fundamental developments to make a significant contributions to space robotics. Unfortunately, less than a year into the program it became clear that the NASA Langley Research Center would be forced by budgetary constraints to essentially leave this area of research. As a result, the total

  1. Trauma Pod: A Semi-Automated Robotic Surgery System

    SciTech Connect

    Noakes, Mark W; Garcia, Pablo; Rosen, Jacob; Kapoor, Chetan; Elbert, Greg

    2009-01-01

    The Trauma Pod (TP) vision is to develop a rapidly deployable robotic system to perform critical acute stabilization and/or surgical procedures autonomously or in a teleoperative mode on wounded soldiers in the battlefield who might otherwise die before treatment in a combat hospital can be provided. In the first phase of a project pursuing this vision, a robotic TP system was developed and its capability demonstrated by performing select surgical procedures on a patient phantom. The system demonstrates the feasibility of performing acute stabilization procedures with the patient being the only human in the surgical cell. The teleoperated surgical robot is supported by autonomous arms that carry out scrub-nurse and circulating-nurse functions. Tool change and supply delivery are performed automatically and at least as fast as those performed manually by nurses. The TP system also includes tomographic X-ray facility for patient diagnosis and 2-D fluoroscopic data to support interventions. The vast amount of clinical protocols generated in the TP system are recorded automatically. These capabilities form the basis for a more comprehensive acute diagnostic and management platform that will provide life-saving care in environments where surgical personnel are not present.

  2. Robotics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothschild, Lynn J.

    2012-01-01

    Earth's upper atmosphere is an extreme environment: dry, cold, and irradiated. It is unknown whether our aerobiosphere is limited to the transport of life, or there exist organisms that grow and reproduce while airborne (aerophiles); the microenvironments of suspended particles may harbor life at otherwise uninhabited altitudes[2]. The existence of aerophiles would significantly expand the range of planets considered candidates for life by, for example, including the cooler clouds of a hot Venus-like planet. The X project is an effort to engineer a robotic exploration and biosampling payload for a comprehensive survey of Earth's aerobiology. While many one-shot samples have been retrieved from above 15 km, their results are primarily qualitative; variations in method confound comparisons, leaving such major gaps in our knowledge of aerobiology as quantification of populations at different strata and relative species counts[1]. These challenges and X's preliminary solutions are explicated below. X's primary balloon payload is undergoing a series of calibrations before beginning flights in Spring 2012. A suborbital launch is currently planned for Summer 2012. A series of ground samples taken in Winter 2011 is being used to establish baseline counts and identify likely background contaminants.

  3. System Wide Joint Position Sensor Fault Tolerance in Robot Systems Using Cartesian Accelerometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aldridge, Hal A.; Juang, Jer-Nan

    1997-01-01

    Joint position sensors are necessary for most robot control systems. A single position sensor failure in a normal robot system can greatly degrade performance. This paper presents a method to obtain position information from Cartesian accelerometers without integration. Depending on the number and location of the accelerometers. the proposed system can tolerate the loss of multiple position sensors. A solution technique suitable for real-time implementation is presented. Simulations were conducted using 5 triaxial accelerometers to recover from the loss of up to 4 joint position sensors on a 7 degree of freedom robot moving in general three dimensional space. The simulations show good estimation performance using non-ideal accelerometer measurements.

  4. A reactive coordination scheme for a many-robot system.

    PubMed

    Evans, K S; Unsal, C; Bay, J S

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents a novel approach for coordinating a homogeneous system of mobile robots using implicit communication in the form of broadcasts. The broadcast-based coordination scheme was developed for the Army Ant swarm-a system of small, relatively inexpensive mobile robots that can accomplish complex tasks by cooperating as a team. The primary drawback, however, of the Army Ant system is that the absence of a central supervisor poses difficulty in the coordination and control of the agents. Our coordination scheme provides a global "group dynamic" that controls the actions of each robot using only local interactions. Coordination of the swarm is achieved with signals we call "heartbeats". Each agent broadcasts a unique heartbeat and responds to the collective behavior of all other heartbeats. We generate heartbeats with van der Pol oscillators. In this application, we use the known properties of coupled van der Pol oscillators to create predictable group behavior. Some of the properties and behaviors of coupled van der Pol oscillators are discussed in detail. We emphasize the use of this scheme to allow agents to simultaneously perform an action such as lifting, steering, or changing speed. The results of experiments performed on three actual heartbeat circuits are presented and the behavior of the realized system is compared to simulated results. We also demonstrate the application of the coordination scheme to global speed control. PMID:18255900

  5. Sensor abstractions to support many-robot systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gage, Douglas W.

    1993-05-01

    The rapid evolution of micromechanical fabrication techniques and other sensor, effector, and processing technologies will soon make it possible to employ large numbers of very inexpensive autonomous mobile robots with fairly limited sensor capabilities to perform real- world missions in the ground, air, space, and underwater environments. One approach to such a system is to realize desired emergent collective group behaviors with simple sensor-based reactive planners. The initial thrust of this effort has been to develop generic ensemble behaviors, such as blanket, barrier, and sweep coverage, and various deployment and recovery modes, which can address a broad spectrum of generic applications, both military and civilian. However, while different applications may require similar group behaviors, the sensor, information, and communications resources available to the participating individual robots may be very different. This paper outlines the many-robot approach to real-world problem solving and discusses the various roles that different types of sensors can play in such systems. Analysis and simulation results are presented to show how useful behavioral algorithms can be designed to make use of diverse information resources, and the area search problem is analyzed to derive both system measures of effectiveness and system design considerations.

  6. Sensor abstractions to support many-robot systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gage, Douglas W.

    1993-04-01

    The rapid evolution of micromechanical fabrication techniques and other sensor, effector, and processing technologies will soon make it possible to employ large numbers of very inexpensive autonomous mobile robots with fairly limited sensor capabilities to perform real-world missions in ground, air, space, and underwater environments. One approach to such a system is to realize desired emergent collective group behaviors with simple sensor-based reactive planners. The initial thrust of this effort has been to develop generic ensemble behaviors, such as blanket, barrier, and sweep coverage, and various deployment and recovery modes, which can address a broad spectrum of generic applications, both military and civilian. However, while different applications may require similar group behaviors, the sensor, information, and communications resources available to the participating individual robots may be very different. This paper outlines the many-robot approach to real-world problems solving and discusses the various roles that different types of sensors can play in such systems. Analysis and simulation results are presented to show how useful behavioral algorithms can be designed to make use of diverse information resources, and the area search problem is analyzed to derive both system measures of effectiveness and system design considerations.

  7. Automating the control of robotic systems in unstructured environments

    SciTech Connect

    Harrigan, R.W.

    1993-09-01

    The US Department Energy`s Office of Technology Development has sponsored the development of generic robotics technologies for application to a wide range of remote systems. Of primary interest is the development of technologies which enable faster, safer, and cheaper cleanup of hazardous waste sites than is possible using conventional human contact or remote manual approaches. The development of model-based sensor-directed robot control approaches supports these goals by developing modular control technologies which reduce the time and cost of development by allowing reuse of control system software. In addition, the use of computer models improves the safety of remote site cleanup by allowing automated errors detection and recovery while reducing the time for technology development.

  8. A real-time robot arm collision avoidance system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaffer, Clifford A.; Herb, Gregory M.

    1992-01-01

    A data structure and update algorithm are presented for a prototype real-time collision avoidance safety system simulating a multirobot workspace. The data structure is a variant of the octree, which serves as a spatial index. An octree recursively decomposes 3D space into eight equal cubic octants until each octant meets some decomposition criteria. The N-objects octree, which indexes a collection of 3D primitive solids is used. These primitives make up the two (seven-degrees-of-freedom) robot arms and workspace modeled by the system. As robot arms move, the octree is updated to reflect their changed positions. During most update cycles, any given primitive does not change which octree nodes it is in. Thus, modification to the octree is rarely required. Cycle time for interpreting current arm joint angles, updating the octree to reflect new positions, and detecting/reporting imminent collisions averages 30 ms on an Intel 80386 processor running at 20 MHz.

  9. Design of a distributed control system for a robotic mannequin

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, R.W.; Cheatham, R.L.; Hof, P.J.; Anderson, G.A.

    1987-02-01

    A robotic mannequin with thirty-eight degrees of movement freedom has been designed and is currently being developed by engineers at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The mannequin will be used to test the effectiveness of protective clothing in hazardous environments. By simulating human movements and positions, the mannequin will be able to test the effectiveness of protective clothing in a realistic, workplace environment. The accuracy afforded by the mannequin has not been possible to date without using human testers. In addition to this realistic environment, reproducible and standardized testing will be achieved by using the mannequin's programmed and repetitive test routines. During testing, special sensors will detect any penetration of the protective clothing by the hostile environment. The robotic mannequin's control system provides the control and monitoring functions necessary to allow coordinated movement of multiple joints and also controls the ancillary systems: breathing, perspiration, skin heating, sampling of chemical reagents, and test data recording.

  10. Systems and Methods of Coordination Control for Robot Manipulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Chu-Yin (Inventor); English, James (Inventor); Tardella, Neil (Inventor); Bacon, James (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Disclosed herein are systems and methods for controlling robotic apparatus having several movable elements or segments coupled by joints. At least one of the movable elements can include one or more mobile bases, while the others can form one or more manipulators. One of the movable elements can be treated as an end effector for which a certain motion is desired. The end effector may include a tool, for example, or represent a robotic hand (or a point thereon), or one or more of the one or more mobile bases. In accordance with the systems and methods disclosed herein, movement of the manipulator and the mobile base can be controlled and coordinated to effect a desired motion for the end effector. In many cases, the motion can include simultaneously moving the manipulator and the mobile base.

  11. Design of a flexible robotic arc welding system, task 3. Volume 1: System overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kline, Martin D.; Cagle, Larry; Frazier, Michael; Kilpatrick, Mark; Powers, Grady

    1993-09-01

    This report represents the 100 percent completion of the technical data package (TDP) for Task 3 of the Flexible Robotic Arc Welding System. The system design was developed to allow a diverse group of steel weldments to be fixtured, preheated, robotically arc welded manually inspected, repaired, and moved by an automatic guided vehicle throughout the welding system. The system is monitored and operated by a systems computer in a distributed control environment. The two welding robots are individually controlled by their own robotic controller but downloaded from the systems computer depending on the bar coded information that follows the fixtured weldment mounted on universal pallets. The report consists of three volumes of design specifications with a fourth volume of technical supporting information that will be supplied upon specific request only.

  12. Human Exploration Using Real-Time Robotic Operations (HERRO)- Crew Telerobotic Control Vehicle (CTCV) Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oleson, Steven R.; McGuire, Melissa L.; Burke, Laura; Chato, David; Fincannon, James; Landis, Geoff; Sandifer, Carl; Warner, Joe; Williams, Glenn; Colozza, Tony; Fittje, Jim; Martini, Mike; Packard, Tom; McCurdy, Dave; Gyekenyesi, John

    2010-01-01

    The HERRO concept allows real time investigation of planets and small bodies by sending astronauts to orbit these targets and telerobotically explore them using robotic systems. Several targets have been put forward by past studies including Mars, Venus, and near Earth asteroids. A conceptual design study was funded by the NASA Innovation Fund to explore what the HERRO concept and it's vehicles would look like and what technological challenges need to be met. This design study chose Mars as the target destination. In this way the HERRO studies can define the endpoint design concepts for an all-up telerobotic exploration of the number one target of interest Mars. This endpoint design will serve to help planners define combined precursor telerobotics science missions and technology development flights. A suggested set of these technologies and demonstrator missions is shown in Appendix B. The HERRO concept includes a crewed telerobotics orbit vehicle as well three Truck rovers, each supporting two teleoperated geologist robots Rockhounds (each truck/Rockhounds set is landed using a commercially launched aeroshell landing system.) Options include a sample ascent system teamed with an orbital telerobotic sample rendezvous and return spacecraft (S/C) (yet to be designed). Each truck rover would be landed in a science location with the ability to traverse a 100 km diameter area, carrying the Rockhounds to 100 m diameter science areas for several week science activities. The truck is not only responsible for transporting the Rockhounds to science areas, but also for relaying telecontrol and high-res communications to/from the Rockhound and powering/heating the Rockhound during the non-science times (including night-time). The Rockhounds take the place of human geologists by providing an agile robotic platform with real-time telerobotics control to the Rockhound from the crew telerobotics orbiter. The designs of the Truck rovers and Rockhounds will be described in other

  13. Robotic reactions: delay-induced patterns in autonomous vehicle systems.

    PubMed

    Orosz, Gábor; Moehlis, Jeff; Bullo, Francesco

    2010-02-01

    Fundamental design principles are presented for vehicle systems governed by autonomous cruise control devices. By analyzing the corresponding delay differential equations, it is shown that for any car-following model short-wavelength oscillations can appear due to robotic reaction times, and that there are tradeoffs between the time delay and the control gains. The analytical findings are demonstrated on an optimal velocity model using numerical continuation and numerical simulation. PMID:20365620

  14. Robotic reactions: Delay-induced patterns in autonomous vehicle systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orosz, Gábor; Moehlis, Jeff; Bullo, Francesco

    2010-02-01

    Fundamental design principles are presented for vehicle systems governed by autonomous cruise control devices. By analyzing the corresponding delay differential equations, it is shown that for any car-following model short-wavelength oscillations can appear due to robotic reaction times, and that there are tradeoffs between the time delay and the control gains. The analytical findings are demonstrated on an optimal velocity model using numerical continuation and numerical simulation.

  15. Joint Technical Architecture for Robotic Systems (JTARS)-Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, Arthur T.; Holloway, Sidney E., III

    2006-01-01

    This document represents the final report for the Joint Technical Architecture for Robotic Systems (JTARS) project, funded by the Office of Exploration as part of the Intramural Call for Proposals of 2005. The project was prematurely terminated, without review, as part of an agency-wide realignment towards the development of a Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) and meeting the near-term goals of lunar exploration.

  16. On the design of fault-tolerant robotic manipulator systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesar, Delbert

    1993-02-01

    Robotic systems are finding increasing use in space applications. Many of these devices are going to be operational on board the Space Station Freedom. Fault tolerance has been deemed necessary because of the criticality of the tasks and the inaccessibility of the systems to maintenance and repair. Design for fault tolerance in manipulator systems is an area within robotics that is without precedence in the literature. In this paper, we will attempt to lay down the foundations for such a technology. Design for fault tolerance demands new and special approaches to design, often at considerable variance from established design practices. These design aspects, together with reliability evaluation and modeling tools, are presented. Mechanical architectures that employ protective redundancies at many levels and have a modular architecture are then studied in detail. Once a mechanical architecture for fault tolerance has been derived, the chronological stages of operational fault tolerance are investigated. Failure detection, isolation, and estimation methods are surveyed, and such methods for robot sensors and actuators are derived. Failure recovery methods are also presented for each of the protective layers of redundancy. Failure recovery tactics often span all of the layers of a control hierarchy. Thus, a unified framework for decision-making and control, which orchestrates both the nominal redundancy management tasks and the failure management tasks, has been derived. The well-developed field of fault-tolerant computers is studied next, and some design principles relevant to the design of fault-tolerant robot controllers are abstracted. Conclusions are drawn, and a road map for the design of fault-tolerant manipulator systems is laid out with recommendations for a 10 DOF arm with dual actuators at each joint.

  17. Uniform task level definitions for robotic system performance comparisons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, Charles; Tesar, Delbert

    1989-01-01

    A series of ten task levels of increasing difficulty was compiled for use in comparative performance evaluations of available and future robotics technology. Each level has a breakdown of ten additional levels of difficulty to provide a layering of 100 levels. It is assumed that each level of task performance must be achieved by the system before it can be appropriately considered for the next level.

  18. Imaging components for a robotic casualty evaluation system.

    PubMed

    Wong, Kenneth H; Lob, Shih-Chung; Lin, Ching-Fang; Lasser, Bob; Mun, Seong K

    2009-01-01

    Combat medics have a vital role in the protection of wounded soldiers in the battlespace. However, their duties expose them to great risks. Furthermore, these medics are a limited resource and must be carefully tasked in order to provide maximum benefit to their units. For these reasons, we are applying the American GNC Corporation's (AGNC) Coremicro(R) Robotic System for autonomous evaluation of battlefield casualties. These robots are intended to navigate to a casualty, determine his/her overall health status, and perform limited diagnostic imaging in order to assess the presence of injuries that would prevent or complicate extraction. In this paper, we describe development work on some of the key components of the proposed robotic system, namely the overall concept of operations (ConOps) and initial testing of infrared and ultrasound imaging cameras. When fully deployed, this system will act as a medical force multiplier, enabling improved care of wounded soldiers and protecting the health and safety of military medical personnel. PMID:19964740

  19. Optimizing a mobile robot control system using GPU acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuck, Nat; McGuinness, Michael; Martin, Fred

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes our attempt to optimize a robot control program for the Intelligent Ground Vehicle Competition (IGVC) by running computationally intensive portions of the system on a commodity graphics processing unit (GPU). The IGVC Autonomous Challenge requires a control program that performs a number of different computationally intensive tasks ranging from computer vision to path planning. For the 2011 competition our Robot Operating System (ROS) based control system would not run comfortably on the multicore CPU on our custom robot platform. The process of profiling the ROS control program and selecting appropriate modules for porting to run on a GPU is described. A GPU-targeting compiler, Bacon, is used to speed up development and help optimize the ported modules. The impact of the ported modules on overall performance is discussed. We conclude that GPU optimization can free a significant amount of CPU resources with minimal effort for expensive user-written code, but that replacing heavily-optimized library functions is more difficult, and a much less efficient use of time.

  20. Graphical analysis of power systems for mobile robotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raade, Justin William

    The field of mobile robotics places stringent demands on the power system. Energetic autonomy, or the ability to function for a useful operation time independent of any tether, refueling, or recharging, is a driving force in a robot designed for a field application. The focus of this dissertation is the development of two graphical analysis tools, namely Ragone plots and optimal hybridization plots, for the design of human scale mobile robotic power systems. These tools contribute to the intuitive understanding of the performance of a power system and expand the toolbox of the design engineer. Ragone plots are useful for graphically comparing the merits of different power systems for a wide range of operation times. They plot the specific power versus the specific energy of a system on logarithmic scales. The driving equations in the creation of a Ragone plot are derived in terms of several important system parameters. Trends at extreme operation times (both very short and very long) are examined. Ragone plot analysis is applied to the design of several power systems for high-power human exoskeletons. Power systems examined include a monopropellant-powered free piston hydraulic pump, a gasoline-powered internal combustion engine with hydraulic actuators, and a fuel cell with electric actuators. Hybrid power systems consist of two or more distinct energy sources that are used together to meet a single load. They can often outperform non-hybrid power systems in low duty-cycle applications or those with widely varying load profiles and long operation times. Two types of energy sources are defined: engine-like and capacitive. The hybridization rules for different combinations of energy sources are derived using graphical plots of hybrid power system mass versus the primary system power. Optimal hybridization analysis is applied to several power systems for low-power human exoskeletons. Hybrid power systems examined include a fuel cell and a solar panel coupled with

  1. [Robotic and systems technology for advanced endoscopic procedures].

    PubMed

    Arezzo, A; Testa, T; Schurr, M O; Buess, G F; De Gregori, M

    2001-01-01

    The advent of endoscopic techniques changed surgery in many regards. This paper intends to describe an overview about technologies to facilitate endoscopic surgery. The systems described have been developed for the use in general surgery, but an easy application also in other fields of endoscopic surgery seems realistic. The introduction of system technology and robotic technology enables today to design a highly ergonomic solo-surgery platform. This consists of a system of devices for endoscopic surgery (HF, light source, etc...) with which the surgeon interacts directly, positioning systems for optic and instruments that the surgeon drives as the likes without assistance, and a chair to increase the comfort of the surgeon during surgery. The system of endoscopic devices named OREST (Dornier, München) designed already in 1992 opened the way to a number of systems available today that allow to the surgeon a direct control of the instrumentation. A considerable step ahead in endoscopic technology is the introduction of robotic technology to design assisting systems for solo-surgery and microsurgical instrument manipulators. Results of a number of experimental trials on combinations of different positioning devices are presented and commented. A further step in the employment of robotic technology is the design of "master-slave manipulators" to provide the surgeon with additional degrees of freedom of instrumentation. In 1996 a first prototype of an endoscopic manipulator system, named ARTEMIS, designed in cooperation with the Research Center in Karlsruhe, could be used in experimental applications. Clinical use of the system, however, will require further development of the arm mechanics and the control system. The combination with the implementation of telecommunication technology will open new frontiers, such as teleconsulting, teleassistance and telemanipulation. PMID:11865701

  2. Development of Pneumatic Robot Hand and Construction of Master-Slave System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujiuchi, Nobutaka; Koizumi, Takayuki; Nishino, Shinya; Komatsubara, Hiroyuki; Kudawara, Tatsuwo; Hirano, Masanori

    Recently, research and development has focused on robots that work in place of people. It is necessary for robots to perform the same flexible motions as people. Additionally, such robots need to incorporate high-level safety features in order not to injure people. For creation of such robots, we need to develop a robot hand that functions like a human hand. At the same time, this type of robot hand can be used as an artificial hand. Here, we present artificial muscle-type pneumatic actuators as the driving source of a robot hand that is both safe and flexible. Some development of robot hands using pneumatic actuators has already taken place. But, until now, when a pneumatic actuator is used, a big compressor is needed. So, the driving system also needs to be big; enlargement of the driving system is a major problem. Consequently, in this research, we develop a low-pressure, low-volume pneumatic actuator for driving a robot hand that works flexibly and safely on the assumption that it will be in contact with people. We develop a five-fingered robot hand with pneumatic actuators. And, we construct a master-slave system to enable the robot hand to perform the same operations as a human hand. We make a 1-link arm that has one degree of freedom using a pneumatic actuator, and construct a control system for the 1-link arm and verify its control performance.

  3. A Hybrid Robotic Control System Using Neuroblastoma Cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrández, J. M.; Lorente, V.; Cuadra, J. M.; Delapaz, F.; Álvarez-Sánchez, José Ramón; Fernández, E.

    The main objective of this work is to analyze the computing capabilities of human neuroblastoma cultured cells and to define connection schemes for controlling a robot behavior. Multielectrode Array (MEA) setups have been designed for direct culturing neural cells over silicon or glass substrates, providing the capability to stimulate and record simultaneously populations of neural cells. This paper describes the process of growing human neuroblastoma cells over MEA substrates and tries to modulate the natural physiologic responses of these cells by tetanic stimulation of the culture. We show that the large neuroblastoma networks developed in cultured MEAs are capable of learning: establishing numerous and dynamic connections, with modifiability induced by external stimuli and we propose an hybrid system for controlling a robot to avoid obstacles.

  4. Assessing system operation skills in robotic surgery trainees

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rajesh; Jog, Amod; Malpani, Anand; Vagvolgyi, Balazs; Yuh, David; Nguyen, Hiep; Hager, Gregory; Grace Chen, Chi Chiung

    2012-01-01

    Background With increased use of robotic surgery in specialties including urology, development of training methods has also intensified. However, current approaches lack the ability of discriminating operational and surgical skills. Methods An automated recording system was used to longitudinally (monthly) acquire instrument motion/telemetry and video and for 4 basic surgical skills -- suturing, manipulation, transection, and dissection. Statistical models were then developed to discriminate the human-machine skill differences between practicing expert surgeons and trainees. Results Data from 6 trainee and 2 experts was analyzed to validate the first ever statistical models of operational skills, and demonstrate classification with very high accuracy (91.7% for masters, and 88.2% for camera motion) and sensitivity. Conclusions We report on our longitudinal study aimed at tracking robotic surgery trainees to proficiency, and methods capable of objectively assessing operational and technical skills that would be used in assessing trainee progress at the participating institutions. PMID:22114003

  5. Intelligent automated control of robotic systems for environmental restoration

    SciTech Connect

    Harrigan, R.W.

    1992-07-01

    The US Department of Energy`s Office of Technology Development (OTD) has sponsored the development of the Generic Intelligent System Controller (GISC) for application to remote system control. Of primary interest to the OTD is the development of technologies which result in faster, safer, and cheaper cleanup of hazardous waste sites than possible using conventional approaches. The objective of the GISC development project is to support these goals by developing a modular robotics control approach which reduces the time and cost of development by allowing reuse of control system software and uses computer models to improve the safety of remote site cleanup while reducing the time and life cycle costs.

  6. Proposal of ROS-compliant FPGA component for low-power robotic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Rong; Quan, Lei; Cai, YouLin

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, robots are required to be autonomous and their robotic software are sophisticated. Robots have a problem of insufficient performance, since it cannot equip with a high-performance microprocessor due to battery-power operation. On the other hand, FPGA devices can accelerate specific functions in a robot system without increasing power consumption by implementing customized circuits. But it is difficult to introduce FPGA devices into a robot due to large development cost of an FPGA circuit compared to software. Therefore, in this study, we propose an FPGA component technology for an easy integration of an FPGA into robots, which is compliant with ROS (Robot Operating System). As a case study, we designed ROS-compliant FPGA component of image labeling using Xilinx Zynq platform. The developed ROS-component FPGA component performs 1.7 times faster compared to the ordinary ROS software component.

  7. Robotic influence in the conceptual design of mechanical systems in space and vice versa - A survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanger, George F.

    1988-01-01

    A survey of methods using robotic devices to construct structural elements in space is presented. Two approaches to robotic construction are considered: one in which the structural elements are designed using conventional aerospace techniques which tend to constrain the function aspects of robotics and one in which the structural elements are designed from the conceptual stage with built-in robotic features. Examples are presented of structural building concepts using robotics, including the construction of the SP-100 nuclear reactor power system, a multimirror large aperture IR space telescope concept, retrieval and repair in space, and the Flight Telerobotic Servicer.

  8. Automatic inspection of analog and digital meters in a robot vision system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trivedi, Mohan M.; Marapane, Suresh; Chen, Chuxin

    1988-01-01

    A critical limitation of most of the robots utilized in industrial environments arises due to their inability to utilize sensory feedback. This forces robot operation into totally preprogrammed or teleoperation modes. In order to endow the new generation of robots with higher levels of autonomy techniques for sensing of their work environments and for accurate and efficient analysis of the sensory data must be developed. In this paper detailed development of vision system modules for inspecting various types of meters, both analog and digital, encountered in a robotic inspection and manipulation tasks are described. These modules are tested using industrial robots having multisensory input capability.

  9. Telepresence system development for application to the control of remote robotic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crane, Carl D., III; Duffy, Joseph; Vora, Rajul; Chiang, Shih-Chien

    1989-01-01

    The recent developments of techniques which assist an operator in the control of remote robotic systems are described. In particular, applications are aimed at two specific scenarios: The control of remote robot manipulators; and motion planning for remote transporter vehicles. Common to both applications is the use of realistic computer graphics images which provide the operator with pertinent information. The specific system developments for several recently completed and ongoing telepresence research projects are described.

  10. A highly redundant robot system for inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Thomas S.; Ohms, Tim; Hayati, Samad

    1994-01-01

    The work on the serpentine inspection system at JPL is described. The configuration of the inspection system consists of 20 degrees of freedom in total. In particular, the design and development of the serpentine micromanipulator end-effector tool which has 12 degrees of freedom is described. The inspection system is used for application in JPL's Remote Surface Inspection project and as a research tool in redundant manipulator control.

  11. Agile robotic edge finishing system research

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, M.A.

    1995-07-01

    This paper describes a new project undertaken by Sandia National Laboratories to develop an agile, automated, high-precision edge finishing system. The project has a two-year duration and was initiated in October, 1994. This project involves re-designing and adding additional capabilities to an existing finishing workcell at Sandia; and developing intelligent methods for automating process definition and for controlling finishing processes. The resulting system will serve as a prototype for systems that will be deployed into highly flexible automated production lines. The production systems will be used to produce a wide variety of products with limited production quantities and quick turnaround requirements. The prototype system is designed to allow programming, process definition, fixture re-configuration, and process verification to be performed off-line for new products. CAD/CAM (Computer Aided Design/Computer Aided Manufacturing) models of the part will be used to assist with the automated process development and process control tasks. To achieve Sandia`s performance goals, the system will be employ advanced path planning, burr prediction expert systems, automated process definition, statistical process models in a process database, and a two-level control scheme using hybrid position-force control and fuzzy logic control. In this paper, we discuss the progress and the planned system development under this project.

  12. Piezoelectrically Actuated Robotic System for MRI-Guided Prostate Percutaneous Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Su, Hao; Shang, Weijian; Cole, Gregory; Li, Gang; Harrington, Kevin; Camilo, Alexander; Tokuda, Junichi; Tempany, Clare M.; Hata, Nobuhiko; Fischer, Gregory S.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a fully-actuated robotic system for percutaneous prostate therapy under continuously acquired live magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guidance. The system is composed of modular hardware and software to support the surgical workflow of intra-operative MRI-guided surgical procedures. We present the development of a 6-degree-of-freedom (DOF) needle placement robot for transperineal prostate interventions. The robot consists of a 3-DOF needle driver module and a 3-DOF Cartesian motion module. The needle driver provides needle cannula translation and rotation (2-DOF) and stylet translation (1-DOF). A custom robot controller consisting of multiple piezoelectric motor drivers provides precision closed-loop control of piezoelectric motors and enables simultaneous robot motion and MR imaging. The developed modular robot control interface software performs image-based registration, kinematics calculation, and exchanges robot commands and coordinates between the navigation software and the robot controller with a new implementation of the open network communication protocol OpenIGTLink. Comprehensive compatibility of the robot is evaluated inside a 3-Tesla MRI scanner using standard imaging sequences and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) loss is limited to 15%. The image deterioration due to the present and motion of robot demonstrates unobservable image interference. Twenty-five targeted needle placements inside gelatin phantoms utilizing an 18-gauge ceramic needle demonstrated 0.87 mm root mean square (RMS) error in 3D Euclidean distance based on MRI volume segmentation of the image-guided robotic needle placement procedure. PMID:26412962

  13. HOPIS: hybrid omnidirectional and perspective imaging system for mobile robots.

    PubMed

    Lin, Huei-Yung; Wang, Min-Liang

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present a framework for the hybrid omnidirectional and perspective robot vision system. Based on the hybrid imaging geometry, a generalized stereo approach is developed via the construction of virtual cameras. It is then used to rectify the hybrid image pair using the perspective projection model. The proposed method not only simplifies the computation of epipolar geometry for the hybrid imaging system, but also facilitates the stereo matching between the heterogeneous image formation. Experimental results for both the synthetic data and real scene images have demonstrated the feasibility of our approach. PMID:25192317

  14. HOPIS: Hybrid Omnidirectional and Perspective Imaging System for Mobile Robots

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Huei-Yung.; Wang, Min-Liang.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present a framework for the hybrid omnidirectional and perspective robot vision system. Based on the hybrid imaging geometry, a generalized stereo approach is developed via the construction of virtual cameras. It is then used to rectify the hybrid image pair using the perspective projection model. The proposed method not only simplifies the computation of epipolar geometry for the hybrid imaging system, but also facilitates the stereo matching between the heterogeneous image formation. Experimental results for both the synthetic data and real scene images have demonstrated the feasibility of our approach. PMID:25192317

  15. Control of free-flying space robot manipulator systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannon, Robert H., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    New control techniques for self contained, autonomous free flying space robots were developed and tested experimentally. Free flying robots are envisioned as a key element of any successful long term presence in space. These robots must be capable of performing the assembly, maintenance, and inspection, and repair tasks that currently require human extravehicular activity (EVA). A set of research projects were developed and carried out using lab models of satellite robots and a flexible manipulator. The second generation space robot models use air cushion vehicle (ACV) technology to simulate in 2-D the drag free, zero g conditions of space. The current work is divided into 5 major projects: Global Navigation and Control of a Free Floating Robot, Cooperative Manipulation from a Free Flying Robot, Multiple Robot Cooperation, Thrusterless Robotic Locomotion, and Dynamic Payload Manipulation. These projects are examined in detail.

  16. Control system software, simulation, and robotic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frisch, Harold P.

    1991-01-01

    All essential existing capabilities needed to create a man-machine interaction dynamics and performance (MMIDAP) capability are reviewed. The multibody system dynamics software program Order N DISCOS will be used for machine and musculo-skeletal dynamics modeling. The program JACK will be used for estimating and animating whole body human response to given loading situations and motion constraints. The basic elements of performance (BEP) task decomposition methodologies associated with the Human Performance Institute database will be used for performance assessment. Techniques for resolving the statically indeterminant muscular load sharing problem will be used for a detailed understanding of potential musculotendon or ligamentous fatigue, pain, discomfort, and trauma. The envisioned capacity is to be used for mechanical system design, human performance assessment, extrapolation of man/machine interaction test data, biomedical engineering, and soft prototyping within a concurrent engineering (CE) system.

  17. Towards intelligent robot-assisted rehabilitation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkana, Duygun Erol

    2010-07-01

    This article presents an intelligent control architecture that is used to monitor the task and safety issues to provide assessment of the progress and to alter the task parameters. Additionally, a verbal feedback recognition system is integrated inside the intelligent control architecture to incorporate patients' and therapists' feedback to make necessary modifications to impart effective therapy during the execution of the task in an automated manner. Hybrid system modelling technique is used to design the intelligent control architecture. Experimental results are presented to demonstrate the efficacy of the intelligent control architecture.

  18. Mathematical model for adaptive control system of ASEA robot at Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zia, Omar

    1989-01-01

    The dynamic properties and the mathematical model for the adaptive control of the robotic system presently under investigation at Robotic Application and Development Laboratory at Kennedy Space Center are discussed. NASA is currently investigating the use of robotic manipulators for mating and demating of fuel lines to the Space Shuttle Vehicle prior to launch. The Robotic system used as a testbed for this purpose is an ASEA IRB-90 industrial robot with adaptive control capabilities. The system was tested and it's performance with respect to stability was improved by using an analogue force controller. The objective of this research project is to determine the mathematical model of the system operating under force feedback control with varying dynamic internal perturbation in order to provide continuous stable operation under variable load conditions. A series of lumped parameter models are developed. The models include some effects of robot structural dynamics, sensor compliance, and workpiece dynamics.

  19. Life after Future Combat System: a family of ground robotic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knichel, David G.

    2010-04-01

    Until recently, the Army Future Combat System (FCS) was the future of Army ground robotics hallmarked by system of systems interoperability for manned and unmanned platforms. New missions, threats, and realities have caused the Army to restructure the Army Future Combat System, but still require unmanned systems interoperability without the FCS system of system interoperability architecture. The result is the Army material developer has no overarching unmanned ground vehicle (UGV) interoperability standards in place equal to the Army unmanned aircraft system (UAS) community. This paper will offer a Life After the FCS vision for an Army family of common ground robotics and payload standards with proposed IEEE, STANAG, SAE, and other standards to potentially achieve common ground robotics interoperability to support the Army and Army Maneuver Support Center of Excellence (MSCoE) Chemical, Engineer, and Military Police mission needs.

  20. Automatic method for synchronizing workpiece frames in twin-robot nondestructive testing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zongxing; Xu, Chunguang; Pan, Qinxue; Meng, Fanwu; Li, Xinliang

    2015-07-01

    The workpiece frames relative to each robot base frame should be known in advance for the proper operation of twin-robot nondestructive testing system. However, when two robots are separated from the workpieces, the twin robots cannot reach the same point to complete the process of workpiece frame positioning. Thus, a new method is proposed to solve the problem of coincidence between workpiece frames. Transformation between two robot base frames is initiated by measuring the coordinate values of three non-collinear calibration points. The relationship between the workpiece frame and that of the slave robot base frame is then determined according to the known transformation of two robot base frames, as well as the relationship between the workpiece frame and that of the master robot base frame. Only one robot is required to actually measure the coordinate values of the calibration points on the workpiece. This requirement is beneficial when one of the robots cannot reach and measure the calibration points. The coordinate values of the calibration points are derived by driving the robot hand to the points and recording the values of top center point(TCP) coordinates. The translation and rotation matrices relate either the two robot base frames or the workpiece and master robot. The coordinated are solved using the measured values of the calibration points according to the Cartesian transformation principle. An optimal method is developed based on exponential mapping of Lie algebra to ensure that the rotation matrix is orthogonal. Experimental results show that this method involves fewer steps, offers significant advantages in terms of operation and time-saving. A method used to synchronize workpiece frames in twin-robot system automatically is presented.

  1. Autonomous Systems and Robotics: 2000-2004

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This custom bibliography from the NASA Scientific and Technical Information Program lists a sampling of records found in the NASA Aeronautics and Space Database. The scope of this topic includes technologies to monitor, maintain, and where possible, repair complex space systems. This area of focus is one of the enabling technologies as defined by NASA s Report of the President s Commission on Implementation of United States Space Exploration Policy, published in June 2004.

  2. Robotic System for Precision Assembly of NIF Ignition Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Montesanti, R C; Seugling, R M; Klingmann, J L; Dzenitis, E G; Alger, E T; Miller, G L; Kent, R A; Castro, C; Reynolds, J L; Carrillo, M A

    2008-08-27

    This paper provides an overview of the design and testing of a robotic system developed for assembling the inertial confinement fusion ignition targets (depicted in Figures 1 and 2) that will be fielded on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser [1]. The system, referred to as the Final Assembly Machine and shown in Figure 3, consists of six groups of stacked axes that allow manipulating millimeter-sized components with submicron precision, integrated with an optical coordinate measuring machine (OCMM) that provides in-situ metrology. Nineteen motorized axes and ten manual axes are used to control the position and orientation of five objects that are predominantly assembled together in a cubic centimeter work zone. An operator-in-the-loop provides top-level control of the system, making it more similar to a surgical robot than to a programmed computer-controlled machine tool. The operator is provided visual feedback by the vision system of the OCMM, and tactile feedback by force and torque sensors embedded in the tooling that holds the major components being assembled. The vision system is augmented with auxiliary mirrors providing multiple viewing directions, and is used to guide the approach and alignment of the components, and to measure the relative position and orientation of the components. The force and torque sensors are used to guide the final approach, alignment, and mating of the components that are designed to slip-fit together, and to monitor that mating while adhesively bonding those components and attaching the target base.

  3. Managing and capturing the physics of robotic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werfel, Justin

    Algorithmic and other theoretical analyses of robotic systems often use a discretized or otherwise idealized framework, while the real world is continuous-valued and noisy. This disconnect can make theoretical work sometimes problematic to apply successfully to real-world systems. One approach to bridging the separation can be to design hardware to take advantage of simple physical effects mechanically, in order to guide elements into a desired set of discrete attracting states. As a result, the system behavior can effectively approximate a discretized formalism, so that proofs based on an idealization remain directly relevant, while control can be made simpler. It is important to note, conversely, that such an approach does not make a physical instantiation unnecessary nor a purely theoretical treatment sufficient. Experiments with hardware in practice always reveal physical effects not originally accounted for in simulation or analytic modeling, which lead to unanticipated results and require nontrivial modifications to control algorithms in order to achieve desired outcomes. I will discuss these points in the context of swarm robotic systems recently developed at the Self-Organizing Systems Research Group at Harvard.

  4. Cooperative system and method using mobile robots for testing a cooperative search controller

    DOEpatents

    Byrne, Raymond H.; Harrington, John J.; Eskridge, Steven E.; Hurtado, John E.

    2002-01-01

    A test system for testing a controller provides a way to use large numbers of miniature mobile robots to test a cooperative search controller in a test area, where each mobile robot has a sensor, a communication device, a processor, and a memory. A method of using a test system provides a way for testing a cooperative search controller using multiple robots sharing information and communicating over a communication network.

  5. A concurrent on-board vision system for a mobile robot

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, J.P.

    1988-01-01

    Robot vision algorithms have been implemented on an 8-node NCUBE-AT hypercube system onboard a mobile robot (HERMIES) developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Images are digitized using a faremgrabber mounted in a VME rack. Image processing and analysis are performed on the hypercube system. The vision system is integrated with robot navigation and control software, enabling the robot to find the front of a mockup control panel, move up to the panel, and read an analog meter. Among the concurrent algorithms used for image analysis are a new component labelign algorithm and a Hough transform algorithm with load balancing. 14 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Vision System Measures Motions of Robot and External Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talukder, Ashit; Matthies, Larry

    2008-01-01

    A prototype of an advanced robotic vision system both (1) measures its own motion with respect to a stationary background and (2) detects other moving objects and estimates their motions, all by use of visual cues. Like some prior robotic and other optoelectronic vision systems, this system is based partly on concepts of optical flow and visual odometry. Whereas prior optoelectronic visual-odometry systems have been limited to frame rates of no more than 1 Hz, a visual-odometry subsystem that is part of this system operates at a frame rate of 60 to 200 Hz, given optical-flow estimates. The overall system operates at an effective frame rate of 12 Hz. Moreover, unlike prior machine-vision systems for detecting motions of external objects, this system need not remain stationary: it can detect such motions while it is moving (even vibrating). The system includes a stereoscopic pair of cameras mounted on a moving robot. The outputs of the cameras are digitized, then processed to extract positions and velocities. The initial image-data-processing functions of this system are the same as those of some prior systems: Stereoscopy is used to compute three-dimensional (3D) positions for all pixels in the camera images. For each pixel of each image, optical flow between successive image frames is used to compute the two-dimensional (2D) apparent relative translational motion of the point transverse to the line of sight of the camera. The challenge in designing this system was to provide for utilization of the 3D information from stereoscopy in conjunction with the 2D information from optical flow to distinguish between motion of the camera pair and motions of external objects, compute the motion of the camera pair in all six degrees of translational and rotational freedom, and robustly estimate the motions of external objects, all in real time. To meet this challenge, the system is designed to perform the following image-data-processing functions: The visual-odometry subsystem

  7. Troubleshooting of an Electromechanical System (Westinghouse PLC Controlling a Pneumatic Robot). High-Technology Training Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, James D.

    This training module on the troubleshooting of an electromechanical system, The Westinghouse Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) controlling a pneumatic robot, is used for a troubleshooting unit in an electromechanical systems/robotics and automation systems course. In this unit, students locate and repair a defect in a PLC-operated machine. The…

  8. Task-oriented multi-robot learning in behavior-based systems

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, L.E.

    1996-12-31

    A large application domain for multi-robot teams involves task- oriented missions, in which potentially heterogeneous robots must solve several distinct tasks. Previous research addressing this problem in multi-robot systems has largely focused on issues of efficiency, while ignoring the real-world situated robot needs of fault tolerance` and adaptivity. This paper addresses this problem by developing an architecture called L-ALLIANCE that incorporates task- oriented action selection mechanisms into a behavior-based system, thus increasing the efficiency of robot team performance while maintaining the desirable characteristics of fault tolerance and adaptivity. We present our investigations of several competing control strategies and derive an approach that works well in a wide variety of multi-robot task-oriented mission scenarios. We provide a formal model of this technique to illustrate how it can be incorporated into any behavior-based system.

  9. BOA: Pipe-asbestos insulation removal robot system

    SciTech Connect

    Schempf, H.; Bares, J.; Schnorr, W.

    1995-10-01

    The BOA system is a mobile pipe-external robotic crawler used to remotely strip and bag asbestos-containing lagging and insulation materials (ACLIM) from various diameter pipes in (primarily) industrial installations. Steam and process lines within the DOE weapons complex warrant the use of a remote device due to the high labor costs and high level of radioactive contamination, making manual removal extremely costly and highly inefficient. Currently targeted facilities for demonstration and remediation are Fernald in Ohio and Oak Ridge in Tennessee.

  10. A novel sensor system for mobile robot using moire technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyunki; Cho, Hyungsuck

    2005-12-01

    Nowadays a major research issue of mobile robots is to develop a robust 3D environment sensing for navigation and task execution. To achieve this, a variety of techniques have been developed for the determination of the 3D scene geometric information such as stereo vision, laser structured light, laser range finder and so on. But these methods have many limitations. To overcome these limitations we introduce a new sensing algorithm, which is based on the moire technique and stereo vision. To verify the performance of this sensor system we conducted a series of simulation for various simple environments. The result shows the feasibility of successful perception with several environments.

  11. BOA: Asbestos Pipe-Insulation Abatement Robot System

    SciTech Connect

    Schempf, H.

    1996-06-01

    The BOA system is a mobile pipe-external robotic crawler used to remotely strip and bag asbestos-containing lagging and insulation materials (ACLIM) from various diameter pipes in (primarily) industrial installations. Steam and process lines within the DOE weapons complex warrant the use of a remote device due to the high labor costs and high level of radioactive contamination, making manual removal extremely costly and highly inefficient. Currently targeted facilities for demonstration and remediation are Fernald in Ohio and Oak Ridge in Tennessee.

  12. Intelligent systems and robotics for an evolutionary Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, Jon D.

    1987-01-01

    The Space Station will be a multipurpose space facility to acquire and exploit unique knowledge with a planned lifetime of greater than 20 years. It will include laboratories for science and manufacturing, provide a platform for earth and interplanetary observations, conduct satellite servicing, and serve as a transportation node for potential manned geosynchronous, lunar, and Mars missions. Environmental safety considerations and limited manpower resources require the extensive use of intelligent systems and flexible robotics on the Space Station. Design accommodations must be planned in advance to allow incorporation of these advancing technologies on the evolutionary Space Station.

  13. Autonomous, teleoperated, and shared control of robot systems

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.J.

    1994-12-31

    This paper illustrates how different modes of operation such as bilateral teleoperation, autonomous control, and shared control can be described and implemented using combinations of modules in the SMART robot control architecture. Telerobotics modes are characterized by different ``grids`` of SMART icons, where each icon represents a portion of run-time code that implements a passive control law. By placing strict requirements on the module`s input-output behavior and using scattering theory to develop a passive sampling technique, a flexible, expandable telerobot architecture is achieved. An automatic code generation tool for generating SMART systems is also described.

  14. The robot's eyes - Stereo vision system for automated scene analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, D. S.

    1977-01-01

    Attention is given to the robot stereo vision system which maintains the image produced by solid-state detector television cameras in a dynamic random access memory called RAPID. The imaging hardware consists of sensors (two solid-state image arrays using a charge injection technique), a video-rate analog-to-digital converter, the RAPID memory, and various types of computer-controlled displays, and preprocessing equipment (for reflexive actions, processing aids, and object detection). The software is aimed at locating objects and transversibility. An object-tracking algorithm is discussed and it is noted that tracking speed is in the 50-75 pixels/s range.

  15. From biological models to the evolution of robot control systems.

    PubMed

    Bullinaria, John A

    2003-10-15

    Attempts to formulate realistic models of the development of the human oculomotor control system have led to the conclusion that evolutionary factors play a crucial role. Moreover, even rather coarse simulations of the biological evolutionary processes result in adaptable control systems that are considerably more efficient than those designed by human researchers. In this paper I shall describe some of the aspects of these biological models that are likely to be useful for building robot control systems. In particular, I shall consider the evolution of appropriate innate starting points for learning/adaptation, patterns of learning rates that vary across different system components, learning rates that vary during the system's lifetime, and the relevance of individual differences across the evolved populations. PMID:14599313

  16. Decision support systems for robotic surgery and acute care

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazanzides, Peter

    2012-06-01

    Doctors must frequently make decisions during medical treatment, whether in an acute care facility, such as an Intensive Care Unit (ICU), or in an operating room. These decisions rely on a various information sources, such as the patient's medical history, preoperative images, and general medical knowledge. Decision support systems can assist by facilitating access to this information when and where it is needed. This paper presents some research eorts that address the integration of information with clinical practice. The example systems include a clinical decision support system (CDSS) for pediatric traumatic brain injury, an augmented reality head- mounted display for neurosurgery, and an augmented reality telerobotic system for minimally-invasive surgery. While these are dierent systems and applications, they share the common theme of providing information to support clinical decisions and actions, whether the actions are performed with the surgeon's own hands or with robotic assistance.

  17. Design Of An Intelligent Robotic System Organizer Via Expert System Tecniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Peter H.; Valavanis, Kimon P.

    1989-02-01

    Intelligent Robotic Systems are a special type of Intelligent Machines. When modeled based on Vle theory of Intelligent Controls, they are composed of three interactive levels, namely: organization, coordination, and execution, ordered according, to the ,Principle of Increasing, Intelligence with Decreasing Precl.sion. Expert System techniques, are used to design an Intelligent Robotic System Organizer with a dynamic Knowledge Base and an interactive Inference Engine. Task plans are formulated using, either or both of a Probabilistic Approach and Forward Chapling Methodology, depending on pertinent information associated with a spec;fic requested job. The Intelligent Robotic System, Organizer is implemented and tested on a prototype system operating in an uncertain environment. An evaluation of-the performance, of the prototype system is conducted based upon the probability of generating a successful task sequence versus the number of trials taken by the organizer.

  18. Robotic sampling system for an unmanned Mars mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chun, Wendell

    1989-01-01

    A major robotics opportunity for NASA will be the Mars Rover/Sample Return Mission which could be launched as early as the 1990s. The exploratory portion of this mission will include two autonomous subsystems: the rover vehicle and a sample handling system. The sample handling system is the key to the process of collecting Martian soils. This system could include a core drill, a general-purpose manipulator, tools, containers, a return canister, certification hardware and a labeling system. Integrated into a functional package, the sample handling system is analogous to a complex robotic workcell. Discussed here are the different components of the system, their interfaces, forseeable problem areas and many options based on the scientific goals of the mission. The various interfaces in the sample handling process (component to component and handling system to rover) will be a major engineering effort. Two critical evaluation criteria that will be imposed on the system are flexibility and reliability. It needs to be flexible enough to adapt to different scenarios and environments and acquire the most desirable specimens for return to Earth. Scientists may decide to change the distribution and ratio of core samples to rock samples in the canister. The long distance and duration of this planetary mission places a reliability burden on the hardware. The communication time delay between Earth and Mars minimizes operator interaction (teleoperation, supervisory modes) with the sample handler. An intelligent system will be required to plan the actions, make sample choices, interpret sensor inputs, and query unknown surroundings. A combination of autonomous functions and supervised movements will be integrated into the sample handling system.

  19. The use of automation and robotic systems to establish and maintain lunar base operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrosky, Lyman J.

    1992-01-01

    Robotic systems provide a means of performing many of the operations required to establish and maintain a lunar base. They form a synergistic system when properly used in concert with human activities. This paper discusses the various areas where robotics and automation may be used to enhance lunar base operations. Robots are particularly well suited for surface operations (exterior to the base habitat modules) because they can be designed to operate in the extreme temperatures and vacuum conditions of the Moon (or Mars). In this environment, the capabilities of semi-autonomous robots would surpass that of humans in all but the most complex tasks. Robotic surface operations include such activities as long range geological and mineralogical surveys with sample return, materials movement in and around the base, construction of radiation barriers around habitats, transfer of materials over large distances, and construction of outposts. Most of the above operations could be performed with minor modifications to a single basic robotic rover. Within the lunar base habitats there are a few areas where robotic operations would be preferable to human operations. Such areas include routine inspections for leakage in the habitat and its systems, underground transfer of materials between habitats, and replacement of consumables. In these and many other activities, robotic systems will greatly enhance lunar base operations. The robotic systems described in this paper are based on what is realistically achievable with relatively near term technology. A lunar base can be built and maintained if we are willing.

  20. Mechanical deployment system on aries an autonomous mobile robot

    SciTech Connect

    Rocheleau, D.N.

    1995-12-01

    ARIES (Autonomous Robotic Inspection Experimental System) is under development for the Department of Energy (DOE) to survey and inspect drums containing low-level radioactive waste stored in warehouses at DOE facilities. This paper focuses on the mechanical deployment system-referred to as the camera positioning system (CPS)-used in the project. The CPS is used for positioning four identical but separate camera packages consisting of vision cameras and other required sensors such as bar-code readers and light stripe projectors. The CPS is attached to the top of a mobile robot and consists of two mechanisms. The first is a lift mechanism composed of 5 interlocking rail-elements which starts from a retracted position and extends upward to simultaneously position 3 separate camera packages to inspect the top three drums of a column of four drums. The second is a parallelogram special case Grashof four-bar mechanism which is used for positioning a camera package on drums on the floor. Both mechanisms are the subject of this paper, where the lift mechanism is discussed in detail.

  1. Use of a multiprocessor for control of a robotic system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, C. A.; Wahawisan, W.

    1982-01-01

    In the case of complex industrial operations, the use of a multiprocessor for the control of a robotic system has a number of potential advantages over an employment of a single-processor design. In addition to the increased speed of parallel computation, multiprocessors can provide greater reliability. However, the control of a system with a multiprocessor is much more complicated, and requires resolution of a number of design criteria. The degree of coupling, the processor interconnection configuration, and the method of fault detection and correction are factors in the design of a multiprocessor which need to be considered for each particular application. In connection with the present investigation, a five-unit multiprocessor was built to experiment with the multiprocessor control of a robotic system. While the primary application of the multiprocessor involves the control of the Ohio State University (OSU) Hexapod, an 18-degree-of-freedom, motor-driven walking machine, the multiprocessor was designed to be versatile enough for a numbr of other uses.

  2. Contribution to the design of robotized tele-echography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essomba, T.; Laribi, M. A.; Gazeau, J. P.; Zeghloul, S.; Poisson, G.

    2012-06-01

    This paper introduces the design of a master-slave robotized system for tele-ultrasound application. The objective of these researches is to design the slave manipulator of this system and its control device (master part). The specification process of the architecture kinematic is based on the analysis of expert's gesture during ultrasound examinations. These studies have been carried out using a motion capture system. The medical gestures were analyzed in terms of ultrasound probe attitude and used in the definition of the kinematics specifications of the proposed manipulator. The Spherical Parallel Mechanism is selected because its characteristics meet the constraint requirements. The optimal synthesis of spherical parallel manipulators is performed using a realcoded Genetic Algorithm based method. Simulations on the actuator responses of the structure allowed us the validate it. In order to control this robot, we have also designed a haptic device that provides easiness to use as well as force feedback. Its orientation control strategy is based on a use of an adaptative kalman filter which efficiency was demonstrated during experimentations.

  3. Simulation study of the ROMPS robot control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Charles C.; Liu, HUI-I.

    1994-01-01

    This is a report presenting the progress of a research grant funded by NASA for work performed from June 1, 1993 to August 1, 1993. The report deals with the Robot Operated Material Processing System (ROMPS). It presents results of a computer simulation study conducted to investigate the performance of the control systems controlling the azimuth, elevation, and radial axes of the ROMPS and its gripper. Four study cases are conducted. The first case investigates the control of free motion of the three areas. In the second case, the compliant motion in the elevation axis with the wrist compliant device is studied in terms of position accuracy and impact forces. The third case focuses on the behavior of the control system in controlling the robot motion along the radial axis when pulling the pallet out of the rack. In the fourth case, the compliant motion of the gripper grasping a solid object under the effect of the gripper passive compliance is studied in terms of position accuracy and contact forces. For each of the above cases, a set of PIR gains will be selected to optimize the controller performance and computer simulation results will be presented and discussed.

  4. The real-time learning mechanism of the Scientific Research Associates Advanced Robotic System (SRAARS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Alexander Y.

    1990-01-01

    Scientific research associates advanced robotic system (SRAARS) is an intelligent robotic system which has autonomous learning capability in geometric reasoning. The system is equipped with one global intelligence center (GIC) and eight local intelligence centers (LICs). It controls mainly sixteen links with fourteen active joints, which constitute two articulated arms, an extensible lower body, a vision system with two CCD cameras and a mobile base. The on-board knowledge-based system supports the learning controller with model representations of both the robot and the working environment. By consecutive verifying and planning procedures, hypothesis-and-test routines and learning-by-analogy paradigm, the system would autonomously build up its own understanding of the relationship between itself (i.e., the robot) and the focused environment for the purposes of collision avoidance, motion analysis and object manipulation. The intelligence of SRAARS presents a valuable technical advantage to implement robotic systems for space exploration and space station operations.

  5. Cooperating mobile robots

    DOEpatents

    Harrington, John J.; Eskridge, Steven E.; Hurtado, John E.; Byrne, Raymond H.

    2004-02-03

    A miniature mobile robot provides a relatively inexpensive mobile robot. A mobile robot for searching an area provides a way for multiple mobile robots in cooperating teams. A robotic system with a team of mobile robots communicating information among each other provides a way to locate a source in cooperation. A mobile robot with a sensor, a communication system, and a processor, provides a way to execute a strategy for searching an area.

  6. Basic Robotics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullen, Frank

    This curriculum outline consists of instructional materials and information concerning resources for use in teaching a course in robotics. Addressed in the individual sections of the outline are the following topics: the nature of an industrial robot; the parts of an industrial robot (the manipulator, the power structure, and the control system);…

  7. A robotic inspection experimental system (ARIES) and BOA

    SciTech Connect

    1998-02-01

    ARIES consists of a 6-wheeled K3A mobile platform, a compact subturret, a sonar imaging system, a laser-based light detection and ranging (lidar) navigation beacon system, and a camera positioning system. It has a sonar imaging system used in navigation and collision avoidance and an automatic docking/charging system. Drum-referencing algorithms and camera-positioning algorithms have been included in the primitive instruction set for the robot. The robot`s navigation is based on Synchro-Drive, a patented design that utilizes concentric shafts to distribute drive and steering power to the six wheels simultaneously. ARIES uses a virtual path concept in which only a limited amount of information needs to be provided to the control computer in order to get the vehicle moving. The safety and health evaluation, during the human factors assessment, found several areas of concern including ergonomics, laser hazards, tripping hazards, fall-from-above and struck-by hazards, electrical hazards, and decontamination of the system. BOA is a self-propelled automated mini-enclosure, able to remove insulation from installed pipes, primarily of 4 inch nominal outside diameter. The system is designed for two operators: one oversees the abatement head operation from a distance of 10 or 15 feet using a pendant control and the other bags the debris at a cyclonic bagging station that is attached by a vacuum hose to the cutting head. Since the abatement head is its own enclosure, there may be no need for further enclosures to be built. The system wets and removes asbestos insulation automatically, cutting the debris into consistent chunks and moving the wave under a strong vacuum to a bagging machine. Prior to reaching the bagging operation, the material passes through a water separator which greatly reduces the weight of the debris and allows recirculation of water, after sufficient filtration. The safety and health evaluation, during the human factors assessment, focused on: noise, dust

  8. Database Design and Implementation of Game Management System for Rescue Robot Contest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamauchi, Hitoshi; Kojima, Atsuhiro; Koeda, Masanao

    The Rescue Robot Contest is one of the robot contests concerning lifesaving in urban disasters. In this contest, loads of rescue dummies simulating disaster victims, and contest progression status are presented to audiences, and team members operating robots. This presentation is important for both robot activity evaluation and production effect. For these purposes, a game management system for Rescue Robot Contest is originally constructed and operated. In this system, a database system is employed as base system. And this system's role is for both recording all data and events, and real-time processing for the presentation. In this paper, design and implementation of the tables and built-in functions of the database which is foundation of this system are presented. For real-time processing, embedded functions and trigger functions are implemented. These functions generate unique latest records into specific tables which stores only latest data for quick access.

  9. Virtual reality based support system for layout planning and programming of an industrial robotic work cell.

    PubMed

    Yap, Hwa Jen; Taha, Zahari; Dawal, Siti Zawiah Md; Chang, Siow-Wee

    2014-01-01

    Traditional robotic work cell design and programming are considered inefficient and outdated in current industrial and market demands. In this research, virtual reality (VR) technology is used to improve human-robot interface, whereby complicated commands or programming knowledge is not required. The proposed solution, known as VR-based Programming of a Robotic Work Cell (VR-Rocell), consists of two sub-programmes, which are VR-Robotic Work Cell Layout (VR-RoWL) and VR-based Robot Teaching System (VR-RoT). VR-RoWL is developed to assign the layout design for an industrial robotic work cell, whereby VR-RoT is developed to overcome safety issues and lack of trained personnel in robot programming. Simple and user-friendly interfaces are designed for inexperienced users to generate robot commands without damaging the robot or interrupting the production line. The user is able to attempt numerous times to attain an optimum solution. A case study is conducted in the Robotics Laboratory to assemble an electronics casing and it is found that the output models are compatible with commercial software without loss of information. Furthermore, the generated KUKA commands are workable when loaded into a commercial simulator. The operation of the actual robotic work cell shows that the errors may be due to the dynamics of the KUKA robot rather than the accuracy of the generated programme. Therefore, it is concluded that the virtual reality based solution approach can be implemented in an industrial robotic work cell. PMID:25360663

  10. Virtual Reality Based Support System for Layout Planning and Programming of an Industrial Robotic Work Cell

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Hwa Jen; Taha, Zahari; Md Dawal, Siti Zawiah; Chang, Siow-Wee

    2014-01-01

    Traditional robotic work cell design and programming are considered inefficient and outdated in current industrial and market demands. In this research, virtual reality (VR) technology is used to improve human-robot interface, whereby complicated commands or programming knowledge is not required. The proposed solution, known as VR-based Programming of a Robotic Work Cell (VR-Rocell), consists of two sub-programmes, which are VR-Robotic Work Cell Layout (VR-RoWL) and VR-based Robot Teaching System (VR-RoT). VR-RoWL is developed to assign the layout design for an industrial robotic work cell, whereby VR-RoT is developed to overcome safety issues and lack of trained personnel in robot programming. Simple and user-friendly interfaces are designed for inexperienced users to generate robot commands without damaging the robot or interrupting the production line. The user is able to attempt numerous times to attain an optimum solution. A case study is conducted in the Robotics Laboratory to assemble an electronics casing and it is found that the output models are compatible with commercial software without loss of information. Furthermore, the generated KUKA commands are workable when loaded into a commercial simulator. The operation of the actual robotic work cell shows that the errors may be due to the dynamics of the KUKA robot rather than the accuracy of the generated programme. Therefore, it is concluded that the virtual reality based solution approach can be implemented in an industrial robotic work cell. PMID:25360663

  11. School-based use of a robotic arm system by children with disabilities.

    PubMed

    Cook, Albert M; Bentz, Brenda; Harbottle, Norma; Lynch, Cheryl; Miller, Brad

    2005-12-01

    A robotic arm system was developed for use by children who had very severe motor disabilities and varying levels of cognitive and language skills. The children used the robot in a three-task sequence routine to dig objects from a tub of dry macaroni. The robotic system was used in the child's school for 12-15 sessions over a period of four weeks. Goal attainment scaling indicated improvement in all children in operational competence of the robot, and varying levels of gain in functional skill development with the robot and in carryover to the classroom from the robot experiments. Teacher interviews revealed gains in classroom participation, expressive language (vocalizations, symbolic communication), and a high degree of interest by the children in the robot tasks. The teachers also recommended that the robot should have more color, contrast and character, as well as generating sounds and/or music for student cues. They also felt that the robotic system accuracy should be increased so that teacher assistance is not necessary to complete the task. PMID:16425826

  12. A monocular leader-follower system for small mobile robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monnier, Camille S.; German, Stan; Ostapchenko, Andrey

    2012-06-01

    Current generation UGV control systems typically require operators to physically control a platform through teleoperation, even for simple tasks such as travelling from one location to another. While vision-based control technologies promise to significantly reduce the burden on UGV operators, most schemes rely on specialized sensing hardware, such as LIDAR or stereo cameras, or require additional operator-worn equipment or markers to differentiate the leader from nearby pedestrians. We present a system for robust leader-follower control of small UGVs using only a single monocular camera, which is ubiquitous on mobile platforms. The system allows a user to control a mobile robot by leading the way and issuing commands through arm/hand gestures, and differentiates between the leader and nearby pedestrians. The software achieves this by integrating efficient algorithms for pedestrian detection, online appearance learning, and kinematic tracking with a lightweight technique for camera-based gesture recognition.

  13. Modelling of cooperating robotized systems with the use of object-based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foit, K.; Gwiazda, A.; Banas, W.; Sekala, A.; Hryniewicz, P.

    2015-11-01

    Today's robotized manufacturing systems are characterized by high efficiency. The emphasis is placed mainly on the simultaneous work of machines. It could manifest in many ways, where the most spectacular one is the cooperation of several robots, during work on the same detail. What's more, recently a dual-arm robots are used that could mimic the manipulative skills of human hands. As a result, it is often hard to deal with the situation, when it is necessary not only to maintain sufficient precision, but also the coordination and proper sequence of movements of individual robots’ arms. The successful completion of this task depends on the individual robot control systems and their respective programmed, but also on the well-functioning communication between robot controllers. A major problem in case of cooperating robots is the possibility of collision between particular links of robots’ kinematic chains. This is not a simple case, because the manufacturers of robotic systems do not disclose the details of the control algorithms, then it is hard to determine such situation. Another problem with cooperation of robots is how to inform the other units about start or completion of part of the task, so that other robots can take further actions. This paper focuses on communication between cooperating robotic units, assuming that every robot is represented by object-based model. This problem requires developing a form of communication protocol that the objects can use for collecting the information about its environment. The approach presented in the paper is not limited to the robots and could be used in a wider range, for example during modelling of the complete workcell or production line.

  14. Framework and Method for Controlling a Robotic System Using a Distributed Computer Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Adam M. (Inventor); Barajas, Leandro G. (Inventor); Permenter, Frank Noble (Inventor); Strawser, Philip A. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A robotic system for performing an autonomous task includes a humanoid robot having a plurality of compliant robotic joints, actuators, and other integrated system devices that are controllable in response to control data from various control points, and having sensors for measuring feedback data at the control points. The system includes a multi-level distributed control framework (DCF) for controlling the integrated system components over multiple high-speed communication networks. The DCF has a plurality of first controllers each embedded in a respective one of the integrated system components, e.g., the robotic joints, a second controller coordinating the components via the first controllers, and a third controller for transmitting a signal commanding performance of the autonomous task to the second controller. The DCF virtually centralizes all of the control data and the feedback data in a single location to facilitate control of the robot across the multiple communication networks.

  15. A Robotic System for Actively Stiffening Flexible Manipulators

    PubMed Central

    Loschak, Paul M.; Burke, Stephen F.; Zumbro, Emiko; Forelli, Alexandra R.; Howe, Robert D.

    2015-01-01

    A system for actively changing the stiffness of a long, thin, flexible robotic manipulator has been designed for cardiologists to use in a range of diagnosis and treatment procedures. Low-stiffness manipulators, such as catheters, are ideal for steering through vasculature with low risk of tissue injury. However, such instruments are not well-suited for applying force to tissue. The proposed system solves this problem by using a series of bead-shaped vertebrae containing pull wires to actively change the stiffness of the catheter, similar to gooseneck surgical retractors. Individual wires steer the catheter to a desired location. All wires are then tensioned to create friction between each vertebra and prevent sliding, therefore resisting motion. While this design concept has been implemented manually in various settings for decades, fine robotic control of the friction and stiffness of the system relies on a thorough understanding of the friction properties between vertebral segments. We have developed an analytical model to understand the interactions between vertebrae and determine the relationships between system parameters and the overall stiffness of the catheter. Experiments validated the calculations from the model and the functionality of the system by applying known loads to the tip of the catheter and measuring the catheter displacement. The catheter stiffness was measured to range from 100 N/m to 800 N/m, which is sufficient for performing many surgical tasks on tissue. This system can be useful in minimally invasive procedures involving direct instrument contact with tissue by improving accuracy, safety, and work flow. PMID:26709364

  16. Sprint: The first flight demonstration of the external work system robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, Charles R.; Grimm, Keith

    1995-01-01

    The External Works Systems (EWS) 'X Program' is a new NASA initiative that will, in the next ten years, develop a new generation of space robots for active and participative support of zero g external operations. The robotic development will center on three areas: the assistant robot, the associate robot, and the surrogate robot that will support external vehicular activities (EVA) prior to and after, during, and instead of space-suited human external activities respectively. The EWS robotics program will be a combination of technology developments and flight demonstrations for operational proof of concept. The first EWS flight will be a flying camera called 'Sprint' that will seek to demonstrate operationally flexible, remote viewing capability for EVA operations, inspections, and contingencies for the space shuttle and space station. This paper describes the need for Sprint and its characteristics.

  17. The roles of humans and robots in exploring the solar system.

    PubMed

    Mendell, W W

    2004-07-01

    Historically, advocates of solar system exploration have disagreed over whether program goals could be entirely satisfied by robotic missions. Scientists tend to argue that robotic exploration is most cost-effective. However, the human space program has a great deal of support in the general public, thereby enabling the scientific element of exploration to be larger than it might be as a stand-alone activity. A comprehensive strategy of exploration needs a strong robotic component complementing and supporting human missions. Robots are needed for precursor missions, for crew support on planetary surfaces, and for probing dangerous environments. Robotic field assistants can provide mobility, access to scientific sites, data acquisition, visualization of the environment, precision operations, sample acquisition and analysis, and expertise to human explorers. As long as space exploration depends on public funds, space exploration must include an appropriate mix of human and robotic activity. PMID:15791731

  18. Evolving controllers for a homogeneous system of physical robots: structured cooperation with minimal sensors.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Matt; Smith, Lincoln; Mayley, Giles; Husbands, Phil

    2003-10-15

    We report on recent work in which we employed artificial evolution to design neural network controllers for small, homogeneous teams of mobile autonomous robots. The robots were evolved to perform a formation-movement task from random starting positions, equipped only with infrared sensors. The dual constraints of homogeneity and minimal sensors make this a non-trivial task. We describe the behaviour of a successful system in which robots adopt and maintain functionally distinct roles in order to achieve the task. We believe this to be the first example of the use of artificial evolution to design coordinated, cooperative behaviour for real robots. PMID:14599322

  19. A jellyfish-like swimming mini-robot actuated by an electromagnetic actuation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Youngho; Na, Sungyoung; Lee, Youngwoo; Cha, Kyoungrae; Ko, Seong Young; Park, Jongoh; Park, Sukho

    2012-05-01

    Among the various kinds of actuations for biomimetic robots, the electromagnetic actuation (EMA) method has been regarded as the one with the most potential. This paper proposes a jellyfish-like swimming mini-robot actuated by an EMA system in three-dimensional (3D) space. The jellyfish-like mini-robot has four flexible fins, each of which is equipped with a permanent magnet for electromagnetic actuation; the robot’s body is 17 mm long and 0.5 mm thick. Our EMA system was able to generate a uniform magnetic field in a desired direction in 3D space, which could bend the fins of the jellyfish-like mini-robot. Therefore, a cyclic change in the uniform magnetic field, in the EMA system, would synchronize the fluctuation of the fins and could generate a propulsion force for the robot, in the desired direction. In order to maximize the propulsion force of the jellyfish-like mini-robot, the waveform and frequency of the input current in the EMA system are optimized. Consequently, our jellyfish-like mini-robot was able to generate maximum propulsion force when a square waveform input current (13 A magnitude and 10 Hz frequency) was applied to the EMA system. Finally, the jellyfish-like mini-robot with the EMA system was able to perform various 3D swimming motions.

  20. A Web-Remote/Robotic/Scheduled Astronomical Data Acquisition System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denny, Robert

    2011-03-01

    Traditionally, remote/robotic observatory operating systems have been custom made for each observatory. While data reduction pipelines need to be tailored for each investigation, the data acquisition process (especially for stare-mode optical images) is often quite similar across investigations. Since 1999, DC-3 Dreams has focused on providing and supporting a remote/robotic observatory operating system which can be adapted to a wide variety of physical hardware and optics while achieving the highest practical observing efficiency and safe/secure web browser user controls. ACP Expert consists of three main subsystems: (1) a robotic list-driven data acquisition engine which controls all aspects of the observatory, (2) a constraint-driven dispatch scheduler with a long-term database of requests, and (3) a built-in "zero admin" web server and dynamic web pages which provide a remote capability for immediate execution and monitoring as well as entry and monitoring of dispatch-scheduled observing requests. No remote desktop login is necessary for observing, thus keeping the system safe and consistent. All routine operation is via the web browser. A wide variety of telescope mounts, CCD imagers, guiding sensors, filter selectors, focusers, instrument-package rotators, weather sensors, and dome control systems are supported via the ASCOM standardized device driver architecture. The system is most commonly employed on commercial 1-meter and smaller observatories used by universities and advanced amateurs for both science and art. One current project, the AAVSO Photometric All-Sky Survey (APASS), uses ACP Expert to acquire large volumes of data in dispatch-scheduled mode. In its first 18 months of operation (North then South), 40,307 sky images were acquired in 117 photometric nights, resulting in 12,107,135 stars detected two or more times. These stars had measures in 5 filters. The northern station covered 754 fields (6446 square degrees) at least twice, the southern

  1. A removable hybrid robot system for long bone fracture reduction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tianmiao; Li, Changsheng; Hu, Lei; Tang, Peifu; Zhang, Lihai; Du, Hailong; Luan, Sheng; Wang, Lifeng; Tan, Yiming; Peng, Cheng

    2014-01-01

    In traditional long bone fracture reduction surgery, there are some drawbacks such as low accuracy, high radiation for surgeons and a risk of infection. To overcome these disadvantages, a removable hybrid robot system is developed, which integrates a removable series-parallel mechanism with a motor-double cylinder (MDC) driven mode. This paper describes the mechanism in detail, analyses the principle and the method of the fracture reduction, presents the surgical procedure, and verifies the reduction accuracy by experiments with bone models. The results are shown as follows. The mean deviations of the axial displacement and lateral displacement are 1.60mm and 1.26 mm respectively. The standard deviations are 0.69 mm and 0.30 mm. The mean deviations of the side angle and turn inward are 2.06° and 2.22° respectively. The standard deviations are 0.50° and 0.99°. This minimally invasive robot features high accuracy and zero radiation for surgeons, and is able to conduct fracture reduction for long bones. PMID:24211933

  2. Versatile 360-deg panoramic optical system for autonomous robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, George G.; Feldman, Sidney; Beckstead, Jeffrey A.; Nordhauser, Sidney R.

    1999-01-01

    Autonomous mobile robots require wide angle vision for navigation and threat detection and analysis, best served with full panoramic vision. The panoramic optical element is a unique inexpensive first surface reflective aspheric convex cone. This cone can be sized and configured for any vertical FOV desired. The cone acts as a negative optical element generating a panoramic virtual image. When this virtual image is viewed through a standard camera lens it produces at the lenses focal pane a panoramic toroidal image with a translational linearity of > 99 percent. One of three image transducers can be used to convert the toroidal panoramic image to a video signal. Raster scanned CCDs, radially scanned Vidicons and linear CCD arrays on a mechanically rotated state, each have their own particular advantage. Field object distances can be determined in two ways. If the robot is moving the range can be calculated by the size change of a field object versus the distance traversed in a specific time interval. By vertically displacing the panoramic camera by several inches a quasibinocular system is created and the range determined by simple math. Ranging thus produces the third dimension.

  3. A CLIPS-based expert system for the evaluation and selection of robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nour, Mohamed A.; Offodile, Felix O.; Madey, Gregory R.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a prototype expert system for intelligent selection of robots for manufacturing operations. The paper first develops a comprehensive, three-stage process to model the robot selection problem. The decisions involved in this model easily lend themselves to an expert system application. A rule-based system, based on the selection model, is developed using the CLIPS expert system shell. Data about actual robots is used to test the performance of the prototype system. Further extensions to the rule-based system for data handling and interfacing capabilities are suggested.

  4. Vision-aided inertial navigation system for robotic mobile mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayoud, Fadi; Skaloud, Jan

    2008-04-01

    A mapping system by vision-aided inertial navigation was developed for areas where GNSS signals are unreachable. In this framework, a methodology on the integration of vision and inertial sensors is presented, analysed and tested. The system employs the method of “SLAM: Simultaneous Localisation And Mapping” where the only external input available to the system at the beginning of the mapping mission is a number of features with known coordinates. SLAM is a term used in the robotics community to describe the problem of mapping the environment and at the same time using this map to determine the location of the mapping device. Differing from the robotics approach, the presented development stems from the frameworks of photogrammetry and kinematic geodesy that are merged in two filters that run in parallel: the Least-Squares Adjustment (LSA) for features coordinates determination and the Kalman filter (KF) for navigation correction. To test this approach, a mapping system-prototype comprising two CCD cameras and one Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) is introduced. Conceptually, the outputs of the LSA photogrammetric resection are used as the external measurements for the KF that corrects the inertial navigation. The filtered position and orientation are subsequently employed in the photogrammetric intersection to map the surrounding features that are used as control points for the resection in the next epoch. We confirm empirically the dependency of navigation performance on the quality of the images and the number of tracked features, as well as on the geometry of the stereo-pair. Due to its autonomous nature, the SLAM's performance is further affected by the quality of IMU initialisation and the a-priory assumptions on error distribution. Using the example of the presented system we show that centimetre accuracy can be achieved in both navigation and mapping when the image geometry is optimal.

  5. The use of computer graphic simulation in the development of robotic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandez, K.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes the use of computer graphic simulation techniques to resolve critical design and operational issues for robotic systems. Use of this technology will result in greatly improved systems and reduced development costs. The major design issues in developing effective robotic systems are discussed and the use of ROBOSIM, a NASA developed simulation tool, to address these issues is presented. Three representative simulation case studies are reviewed: off-line programming of the robotic welding development cell for the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME); the integration of a sensor to control the robot used for removing the Thermal Protection System (TPS) from the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB); and the development of a teleoperator/robot mechanism for the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV).

  6. The use of computer graphic simulation in the development of robotic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandez, Ken

    1988-01-01

    The use of computer graphic simulation techniques to resolve critical design and operational issues for robotic systems is described. Use of this technology will result in greatly improved systems and reduced development costs. The major design issues in developing effective robotic systems are discussed and the use of ROBOSIM, a NASA developed simulation tool, to address these issues is presented. Three representative simulation case studies are reviewed: off-line programming of the robotic welding development cell for the Space Shuttle Main Engine; the integration of a sensor to control the robot used for removing the Thermal Protection System from the Solid Rocket Booster; and the development of a teleoperator/robot mechanism for the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle.

  7. The use of computer graphic simulation in the development of robotic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandez, Ken

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes the use of computer graphic simulation techniques to resolve critical design and operational issues for robotic systems. Use of this technology will result in greatly improved systems and reduced development costs. The major design issues in developing effective robotic systems are discussed and the use of ROBOSIM, a NASA developed simulation tool, to address these issues is presented. Three representative simulation case studies are reviewed: off-line programming of the robotic welding development cell for the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME); the integration of a sensor to control the robot used for removing the Thermal Protection System (TPS) from the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB); and the development of a teleoperator/robot mechanism for the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV).

  8. Advances in Robotic, Human, and Autonomous Systems for Missions of Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, Anthony R.; Briggs, Geoffrey A.; Glass, Brian J.; Pedersen, Liam; Kortenkamp, David M.; Wettergreen, David S.; Nourbakhsh, I.; Clancy, Daniel J.; Zornetzer, Steven (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Space exploration missions are evolving toward more complex architectures involving more capable robotic systems, new levels of human and robotic interaction, and increasingly autonomous systems. How this evolving mix of advanced capabilities will be utilized in the design of new missions is a subject of much current interest. Cost and risk constraints also play a key role in the development of new missions, resulting in a complex interplay of a broad range of factors in the mission development and planning of new missions. This paper will discuss how human, robotic, and autonomous systems could be used in advanced space exploration missions. In particular, a recently completed survey of the state of the art and the potential future of robotic systems, as well as new experiments utilizing human and robotic approaches will be described. Finally, there will be a discussion of how best to utilize these various approaches for meeting space exploration goals.

  9. Space-time modeling using environmental constraints in a mobile robot system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slack, Marc G.

    1990-01-01

    Grid-based models of a robot's local environment have been used by many researchers building mobile robot control systems. The attraction of grid-based models is their clear parallel between the internal model and the external world. However, the discrete nature of such representations does not match well with the continuous nature of actions and usually serves to limit the abilities of the robot. This work describes a spatial modeling system that extracts information from a grid-based representation to form a symbolic representation of the robot's local environment. The approach makes a separation between the representation provided by the sensing system and the representation used by the action system. Separation allows asynchronous operation between sensing and action in a mobile robot, as well as the generation of a more continuous representation upon which to base actions.

  10. A direct methanol fuel cell system to power a humanoid robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joh, Han-Ik; Ha, Tae Jung; Hwang, Sang Youp; Kim, Jong-Ho; Chae, Seung-Hoon; Cho, Jae Hyung; Prabhuram, Joghee; Kim, Soo-Kil; Lim, Tae-Hoon; Cho, Baek-Kyu; Oh, Jun-Ho; Moon, Sang Heup; Ha, Heung Yong

    In this study, a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) system, which is the first of its kind, has been developed to power a humanoid robot. The DMFC system consists of a stack, a balance of plant (BOP), a power management unit (PMU), and a back-up battery. The stack has 42 unit cells and is able to produce about 400 W at 19.3 V. The robot is 125 cm tall, weighs 56 kg, and consumes 210 W during normal operation. The robot is integrated with the DMFC system that powers the robot in a stable manner for more than 2 h. The power consumption by the robot during various motions is studied, and load sharing between the fuel cell and the back-up battery is also observed. The loss of methanol feed due to crossover and evaporation amounts to 32.0% and the efficiency of the DMFC system in terms of net electric power is 22.0%.

  11. A database/knowledge structure for a robotics vision system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dearholt, D. W.; Gonzales, N. N.

    1987-01-01

    Desirable properties of robotics vision database systems are given, and structures which possess properties appropriate for some aspects of such database systems are examined. Included in the structures discussed is a family of networks in which link membership is determined by measures of proximity between pairs of the entities stored in the database. This type of network is shown to have properties which guarantee that the search for a matching feature vector is monotonic. That is, the database can be searched with no backtracking, if there is a feature vector in the database which matches the feature vector of the external entity which is to be identified. The construction of the database is discussed, and the search procedure is presented. A section on the support provided by the database for description of the decision-making processes and the search path is also included.

  12. Virtual reality robotic telesurgery simulations using MEMICA haptic system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Mavroidis, Constantinos; Bouzit, Mourad; Dolgin, Benjamin; Harm, Deborah L.; Kopchok, George E.; White, Rodney

    2001-01-01

    The authors conceived a haptic mechanism called MEMICA (Remote Mechanical Mirroring using Controlled stiffness and Actuators) that can enable the design of high dexterity, rapid response, and large workspace haptic system. The development of a novel MEMICA gloves and virtual reality models are being explored to allow simulation of telesurgery and other applications. The MEMICA gloves are being designed to provide intuitive mirroring of the conditions at a virtual site where a robot simulates the presence of a human operator. The key components of MEMICA are miniature electrically controlled stiffness (ECS) elements and electrically controlled force and stiffness (ECFS) actuators that are based on the use of Electro-Rheological Fluids (ERF. In this paper the design of the MEMICA system and initial experimental results are presented.

  13. Robotic System for MRI-Guided Stereotactic Neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gang; Cole, Gregory A.; Shang, Weijian; Harrington, Kevin; Camilo, Alex; Pilitsis, Julie G.; Fischer, Gregory S.

    2015-01-01

    Stereotaxy is a neurosurgical technique that can take several hours to reach a specific target, typically utilizing a mechanical frame and guided by preoperative imaging. An error in any one of the numerous steps or deviations of the target anatomy from the preoperative plan such as brain shift (up to 20 mm), may affect the targeting accuracy and thus the treatment effectiveness. Moreover, because the procedure is typically performed through a small burr hole opening in the skull that prevents tissue visualization, the intervention is basically “blind” for the operator with limited means of intraoperative confirmation that may result in reduced accuracy and safety. The presented system is intended to address the clinical needs for enhanced efficiency, accuracy, and safety of image-guided stereotactic neurosurgery for Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) lead placement. The work describes a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided, robotically actuated stereotactic neural intervention system for deep brain stimulation procedure, which offers the potential of reducing procedure duration while improving targeting accuracy and enhancing safety. This is achieved through simultaneous robotic manipulation of the instrument and interactively updated in situ MRI guidance that enables visualization of the anatomy and interventional instrument. During simultaneous actuation and imaging, the system has demonstrated less than 15% signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) variation and less than 0.20% geometric distortion artifact without affecting the imaging usability to visualize and guide the procedure. Optical tracking and MRI phantom experiments streamline the clinical workflow of the prototype system, corroborating targeting accuracy with 3-axis root mean square error 1.38 ± 0.45 mm in tip position and 2.03 ± 0.58° in insertion angle. PMID:25376035

  14. BOA: Asbestos pipe insulation removal robot system. Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Schempf, H.; Bares, J.E.

    1995-02-01

    The project described in this report targets the development of a mechanized system for safe, cost-efficient and automated abatement of asbestos containing materials used as pipe insulation. Based on several key design criteria and site visits, a proof-of-concept prototype robot system, dubbed BOA, was designed and built, which automatically strips the lagging and insulation from the pipes, and encapsulates them under complete vacuum operation. The system can operate on straight runs of piping in horizontal or vertical orientations. Currently we are limited to four-inch diameter piping without obstacles as well as a somewhat laborious emplacement and removal procedure -- restrictions to be alleviated through continued development. BOA removed asbestos at a rate of 4-5 ft./h compared to 3 ft./h for manual removal of asbestos with a 3-person crew. The containment and vacuum system on BOA was able to achieve the regulatory requirement for airborne fiber emissions of 0.01 fibers/ccm/ 8-hr. shift. This program consists of two phases. The first phase was completed and a demonstration was given to a review panel, consisting of DOE headquarters and site representatives as well as commercial abatement industry representatives. Based on the technical and programmatic recommendations drafted, presented and discussed during the review meeting, a new plan for the Phase II effort of this project was developed. Phase 11 will consist of a 26-month effort, with an up-front 4-month site-, market-, cost/benefit and regulatory study before the next BOA robot (14 months) is built, and then deployed and demonstrated (3 months) at a DOE site (such as Fernald or Oak Ridge) by the beginning of FY`97.

  15. A novel scanning system using an industrial robot and the workspace measurement and positioning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ziyue; Zhu, Jigui; Yang, Linghui; Lin, Jiarui

    2015-10-01

    The present scanning system consists of an industrial robot and a line-structured laser sensor which uses the industrial robot as a position instrument to guarantee the accuracy. However, the absolute accuracy of an industrial robot is relatively poor compared with the good repeatability in the manufacturing industry. This paper proposes a novel method using the workspace measurement and positioning system (wMPS) to remedy the lack of accuracy of the industrial robot. In order to guarantee the positioning accuracy of the system, the wMPS which is a laser-based measurement technology designed for large-volume metrology applications is brought in. Benefitting from the wMPS, this system can measure different cell-areas by the line-structured laser sensor and fuse the measurement data of different cell-areas by using the wMPS accurately. The system calibration which is the procedure to acquire and optimize the structure parameters of the scanning system is also stated in detail in this paper. In order to verify the feasibility of the system for scanning the large free-form surface, an experiment is designed to scan the internal surface of the door of a car-body in white. The final results show that the measurement data of the whole measuring areas have been jointed perfectly and there is no mismatch in the figure especially in the hole measuring areas. This experiment has verified the rationality of the system scheme, the correctness and effectiveness of the relevant methods.

  16. TRICCS: A proposed teleoperator/robot integrated command and control system for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Will, R. W.

    1985-01-01

    Robotic systems will play an increasingly important role in space operations. An integrated command and control system based on the requirements of space-related applications and incorporating features necessary for the evolution of advanced goal-directed robotic systems is described. These features include: interaction with a world model or domain knowledge base, sensor feedback, multiple-arm capability and concurrent operations. The system makes maximum use of manual interaction at all levels for debug, monitoring, and operational reliability. It is shown that the robotic command and control system may most advantageously be implemented as packages and tasks in Ada.

  17. Complete low-cost implementation of a teleoperated control system for a humanoid robot.

    PubMed

    Cela, Andrés; Yebes, J Javier; Arroyo, Roberto; Bergasa, Luis M; Barea, Rafael; López, Elena

    2013-01-01

    Humanoid robotics is a field of a great research interest nowadays. This work implements a low-cost teleoperated system to control a humanoid robot, as a first step for further development and study of human motion and walking. A human suit is built, consisting of 8 sensors, 6 resistive linear potentiometers on the lower extremities and 2 digital accelerometers for the arms. The goal is to replicate the suit movements in a small humanoid robot. The data from the sensors is wirelessly transmitted via two ZigBee RF configurable modules installed on each device: the robot and the suit. Replicating the suit movements requires a robot stability control module to prevent falling down while executing different actions involving knees flexion. This is carried out via a feedback control system with an accelerometer placed on the robot's back. The measurement from this sensor is filtered using Kalman. In addition, a two input fuzzy algorithm controlling five servo motors regulates the robot balance. The humanoid robot is controlled by a medium capacity processor and a low computational cost is achieved for executing the different algorithms. Both hardware and software of the system are based on open platforms. The successful experiments carried out validate the implementation of the proposed teleoperated system. PMID:23348029

  18. An Aerial–Ground Robotic System for Navigation and Obstacle Mapping in Large Outdoor Areas

    PubMed Central

    Garzón, Mario; Valente, João; Zapata, David; Barrientos, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    There are many outdoor robotic applications where a robot must reach a goal position or explore an area without previous knowledge of the environment around it. Additionally, other applications (like path planning) require the use of known maps or previous information of the environment. This work presents a system composed by a terrestrial and an aerial robot that cooperate and share sensor information in order to address those requirements. The ground robot is able to navigate in an unknown large environment aided by visual feedback from a camera on board the aerial robot. At the same time, the obstacles are mapped in real-time by putting together the information from the camera and the positioning system of the ground robot. A set of experiments were carried out with the purpose of verifying the system applicability. The experiments were performed in a simulation environment and outdoor with a medium-sized ground robot and a mini quad-rotor. The proposed robotic system shows outstanding results in simultaneous navigation and mapping applications in large outdoor environments. PMID:23337332

  19. Complete Low-Cost Implementation of a Teleoperated Control System for a Humanoid Robot

    PubMed Central

    Cela, Andrés; Yebes, J. Javier; Arroyo, Roberto; Bergasa, Luis M.; Barea, Rafael; López, Elena

    2013-01-01

    Humanoid robotics is a field of a great research interest nowadays. This work implements a low-cost teleoperated system to control a humanoid robot, as a first step for further development and study of human motion and walking. A human suit is built, consisting of 8 sensors, 6 resistive linear potentiometers on the lower extremities and 2 digital accelerometers for the arms. The goal is to replicate the suit movements in a small humanoid robot. The data from the sensors is wirelessly transmitted via two ZigBee RF configurable modules installed on each device: the robot and the suit. Replicating the suit movements requires a robot stability control module to prevent falling down while executing different actions involving knees flexion. This is carried out via a feedback control system with an accelerometer placed on the robot's back. The measurement from this sensor is filtered using Kalman. In addition, a two input fuzzy algorithm controlling five servo motors regulates the robot balance. The humanoid robot is controlled by a medium capacity processor and a low computational cost is achieved for executing the different algorithms. Both hardware and software of the system are based on open platforms. The successful experiments carried out validate the implementation of the proposed teleoperated system. PMID:23348029

  20. An aerial–ground robotic system for navigation and obstacle mapping in large outdoor areas.

    PubMed

    Garzón, Mario; Valente, João; Zapata, David; Barrientos, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    There are many outdoor robotic applications where a robot must reach a goal position or explore an area without previous knowledge of the environment around it. Additionally, other applications (like path planning) require the use of known maps or previous information of the environment. This work presents a system composed by a terrestrial and an aerial robot that cooperate and share sensor information in order to address those requirements. The ground robot is able to navigate in an unknown large environment aided by visual feedback from a camera on board the aerial robot. At the same time, the obstacles are mapped in real-time by putting together the information from the camera and the positioning system of the ground robot. A set of experiments were carried out with the purpose of verifying the system applicability. The experiments were performed in a simulation environment and outdoor with a medium-sized ground robot and a mini quad-rotor. The proposed robotic system shows outstanding results in simultaneous navigation and mapping applications in large outdoor environments. PMID:23337332

  1. MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING COMPATIBLE ROBOTIC SYSTEM FOR FULLY AUTOMATED BRACHYTHERAPY SEED PLACEMENT

    PubMed Central

    Muntener, Michael; Patriciu, Alexandru; Petrisor, Doru; Mazilu, Dumitru; Bagga, Herman; Kavoussi, Louis; Cleary, Kevin; Stoianovici, Dan

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To introduce the development of the first magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-compatible robotic system capable of automated brachytherapy seed placement. Methods An MRI-compatible robotic system was conceptualized and manufactured. The entire robot was built of nonmagnetic and dielectric materials. The key technology of the system is a unique pneumatic motor that was specifically developed for this application. Various preclinical experiments were performed to test the robot for precision and imager compatibility. Results The robot was fully operational within all closed-bore MRI scanners. Compatibility tests in scanners of up to 7 Tesla field intensity showed no interference of the robot with the imager. Precision tests in tissue mockups yielded a mean seed placement error of 0.72 ± 0.36 mm. Conclusions The robotic system is fully MRI compatible. The new technology allows for automated and highly accurate operation within MRI scanners and does not deteriorate the MRI quality. We believe that this robot may become a useful instrument for image-guided prostate interventions. PMID:17169653

  2. Robotics and Science Literacy: Thinking Skills, Science Process Skills and Systems Understanding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Florence R.

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a study of the relationship of robotics activity to the use of science literacy skills and the development of systems understanding in middle school students. Twenty-six 11-12-year-olds (22 males and 4 females) attending an intensive robotics course offered at a summer camp for academically advanced students…

  3. Drive Control System for Pipeline Crawl Robot Based on CAN Bus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H. J.; Gao, B. T.; Zhang, X. H.; Deng2, Z. Q.

    2006-10-01

    Drive control system plays important roles in pipeline robot. In order to inspect the flaw and corrosion of seabed crude oil pipeline, an original mobile pipeline robot with crawler drive unit, power and monitor unit, central control unit, and ultrasonic wave inspection device is developed. The CAN bus connects these different function units and presents a reliable information channel. Considering the limited space, a compact hardware system is designed based on an ARM processor with two CAN controllers. With made-to-order CAN protocol for the crawl robot, an intelligent drive control system is developed. The implementation of the crawl robot demonstrates that the presented drive control scheme can meet the motion control requirements of the underwater pipeline crawl robot.

  4. RCTS: A flexible environment for sensor integration and control of robot systems; the distributed processing approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allard, R.; Mack, B.; Bayoumi, M. M.

    1989-01-01

    Most robot systems lack a suitable hardware and software environment for the efficient research of new control and sensing schemes. Typically, engineers and researchers need to be experts in control, sensing, programming, communication and robotics in order to implement, integrate and test new ideas in a robot system. In order to reduce this time, the Robot Controller Test Station (RCTS) has been developed. It uses a modular hardware and software architecture allowing easy physical and functional reconfiguration of a robot. This is accomplished by emphasizing four major design goals: flexibility, portability, ease of use, and ease of modification. An enhanced distributed processing version of RCTS is described. It features an expanded and more flexible communication system design. Distributed processing results in the availability of more local computing power and retains the low cost of microprocessors. A large number of possible communication, control and sensing schemes can therefore be easily introduced and tested, using the same basic software structure.

  5. Building and Programming a Smart Robotic System for Distinguishing Objects Based on their Shape and Colour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharari, T. M.

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents a robotic system designed for holding and placing objects based on their colour and shape. The presented robot is given a complete set of instructions of positions and orientation angles for each manipulation motion. The main feature in this paper is that the developed robot used a combination of vision and motion systems for holding and placing the work-objects, mounted on the flat work-plane, based on their shapes and colors. This combination improves the flexibility of manipulation which may help eliminate the use of some expensive manipulation tasks in a variety of industrial applications. The robotic system presented in this paper is designed as an educational robot that possesses the ability for holding-and-placing operations with limited load. To process the various instructions for holding and placing the work objects, a main control unit - Manipulation Control Unit (MCU) is used as well as a slave unit that performed the actual instructions from the MCU.

  6. Low-cost backpack-portable robot system for mine and UXO detection and identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Carl V.; Arabian, Adam K.

    2002-08-01

    The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) has developed a prototype backpack-portable robot system for mine and unexploded ordnance (UXO) detection and identification. The robot system is compact, lightweight and is estimated to be inexpensive to construct. The robot has been designed with an inexpensive, highly accurate, wide bandwidth time-domain electromagnetic induction (EMI) sensor for the detection and identification of metal components in mines and UXO. The robot can be configured for autonomous or person-in-the-loop control. The robot system can be configured with additional light-weight and low-cost mine and UXO sensors such as ground penetrating radar (GPR) and chemical explosive detectors.

  7. A Study on Robot-Human System with Consideration of Individual Preferences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jindai, Mitsuru; Shibata, Satoru; Yamamoto, Tomonori; Watanabe, Tomio

    In this study, we propose an object-handing robot system with a multimodal human-machine interface which is composed of speech recognition and image processing units. Using this multimodal human-machine interface, the cooperator can order the object-handing robot system using voice commands and hand gestures. In this robot system, the motion parameters of the robot, which are maximum velocity, velocity profile peak and handing position, can be adjusted by the voice commands or the hand gestures in order to realize the most appropriate motion of the robot. Furthermore, the cooperator can order the handing of objects using voice commands along with hand gestures. In these voice commands, the cooperator can use adverbs. This permits the cooperator to realize efficient adjustments, because the adjustment value of each motion parameters is determined by adverbs. In particular, adjustment values corresponding to adverbs are estimated by fuzzy inference in order to take into consideration the ambiguities of human speech.

  8. BOA: Pipe-asbestos insulation removal robot system

    SciTech Connect

    Schempf, H.; Bares, J.; Mutschler, E.

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes the BOA system, a mobile pipe-external crawler used to remotely strip and bag (possibly contaminated) asbestos-containing lagging and insulation materials (ACLIM) from various diameter pipes in (primarily) industrial installations across the DOE weapons complex. The mechanical removal of ACLIM is very cost-effective due to the relatively low productivity and high cost involved in human removal scenarios. BOA, a mechanical system capable of removing most forms of lagging (paper, plaster, aluminum sheet, clamps, screws and chicken-wire), and insulation (paper, tar, asbestos fiber, mag-block) uses a circular cutter and compression paddles to cut and strip the insulation off the pipe through compression, while a HEPA-filter and encapsulant system maintain a certifiable vacuum and moisture content inside the system and on the pipe, respectively. The crawler system has been built and is currently undergoing testing. Key design parameters and performance parameters are developed and used in performance testing. Since the current system is a testbed, we also discuss future enhancements and outline two deployment scenarios (robotic and manual) for the final system to be designed and completed by the end of FY `95. An on-site demonstration is currently planned for Fernald in Ohio and Oak Ridge in Tennessee.

  9. Flexible coordinate measurement system based on robot for industries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yin; Yang, Xue-you; Liu, Chang-jie; Ye, Sheng-hua

    2010-10-01

    The flexible coordinate measurement system based on robot which is applicable to multi-model vehicle is designed to meet the needs of online measurement for current mainstream mixed body-in-white(BIW) production line. The moderate precision, good flexibility and no blind angle are the benefits of this measurement system. According to the measurement system, a monocular structured light vision sensor has been designed, which can measure not only edges, but also planes, apertures and other features. And a effective way to fast on-site calibration of the whole system using the laser tracker has also been proposed, which achieves the unity of various coordinate systems in industrial fields. The experimental results show satisfactory precision of +/-0.30mm of this measurement system, which is sufficient for the needs of online measurement for body-in-white(BIW) in the auto production line. The system achieves real-time detection and monitoring of the whole process of the car body's manufacture, and provides a complete data support in purpose of overcoming the manufacturing error immediately and accurately and improving the manufacturing precision.

  10. Demonstrating Robotic Autonomy in NASA's Intelligent Systems Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Robert; Smith, Ben; Estlin, Tara; Pedersen, Liam

    2004-01-01

    This paper will provide an overview of NASA's investments in autonomy during the past five years within the Intelligent Systems Project, with particular attention paid to investments that have resulted in mission infusion of autonomy technology, in particular, into the recent Mars Exploration Rover (MER) mission. The content of the paper will be divided into two primary topic areas: a technical overview of the component technologies developed under the program, and a programmatic overview of the history and organization of the NASA IS project itself, with a focus on describing the program elements related to autonomy and intelligent robotics. The paper will also provide an overview of the September 2004 autonomy demonstrations, including a discussion of objectives, organization, and preliminary results (to the extent they are available before the submission deadline).

  11. A cognitive operating system (COGNOSYS) for JPL's robot, phase 1 report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathur, F. P.

    1972-01-01

    The most important software requirement for any robot development is the COGNitive Operating SYStem (COGNOSYS). This report describes the Stanford University Artificial Intelligence Laboratory's hand eye software system from the point of view of developing a cognitive operating system for JPL's robot. In this, the Phase 1 of the JPL robot COGNOSYS task the installation of a SAIL compiler and a FAIL assembler on Caltech's PDP-10 have been accomplished and guidelines have been prepared for the implementation of a Stanford University type hand eye software system on JPL-Caltech's computing facility. The alternatives offered by using RAND-USC's PDP-10 Tenex operating sytem are also considered.

  12. A methodology to assess performance of human-robotic systems in achievement of collective tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Ayanna M.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we present a methodology to assess system performance of human-robotic systems in achievement of collective tasks such as habitat construction, geological sampling, and space exploration.

  13. An intelligent hybrid behavior coordination system for an autonomous mobile robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Chaomin; Krishnan, Mohan; Paulik, Mark; Fallouh, Samer

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, development of a low-cost PID controller with an intelligent behavior coordination system for an autonomous mobile robot is described that is equipped with IR sensors, ultrasonic sensors, regulator, and RC filters on the robot platform based on HCS12 microcontroller and embedded systems. A novel hybrid PID controller and behavior coordination system is developed for wall-following navigation and obstacle avoidance of an autonomous mobile robot. Adaptive control used in this robot is a hybrid PID algorithm associated with template and behavior coordination models. Software development contains motor control, behavior coordination intelligent system and sensor fusion. In addition, the module-based programming technique is adopted to improve the efficiency of integrating the hybrid PID and template as well as behavior coordination model algorithms. The hybrid model is developed to synthesize PID control algorithms, template and behavior coordination technique for wall-following navigation with obstacle avoidance systems. The motor control, obstacle avoidance, and wall-following navigation algorithms are developed to propel and steer the autonomous mobile robot. Experiments validate how this PID controller and behavior coordination system directs an autonomous mobile robot to perform wall-following navigation with obstacle avoidance. Hardware configuration and module-based technique are described in this paper. Experimental results demonstrate that the robot is successfully capable of being guided by the hybrid PID controller and behavior coordination system for wall-following navigation with obstacle avoidance.

  14. Use of robotic systems for radiochemical sample changing and for analytical sample preparation

    SciTech Connect

    Delmastro, J.R.; Hartenstein, S.D.; Wade, M.A.

    1989-05-15

    Two uses of the Perkin-Elmer (PE) robotic system will be presented. In the first, a PE robot functions as an automatic sample changer for up to five low energy photon spectrometry (LEPS) detectors operated with a Nuclear Data ND 6700 system. The entire system, including the robot, is controlled by an IBM PC-AT using software written in compiled BASIC. Problems associated with the development of the system and modifications to the robot will be presented. In the second, an evaluation study was performed to assess the abilities of the PE robotic system for performing complex analytical sample preparation procedures. For this study, a robotic system based upon the PE robot and auxiliary devices was constructed and programmed to perform the preparation of final product samples (UO{sub 3}) for accountability and impurity specification analyses. These procedures require sample dissolution, dilution, and liquid-liquid extraction steps. The results of an in-depth evaluation of all system components will be presented.

  15. Control of free-flying space robot manipulator systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannon, Robert H., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Control techniques for self-contained, autonomous free-flying space robots are being tested and developed. Free-flying space robots are envisioned as a key element of any successful long term presence in space. These robots must be capable of performing the assembly, maintenance, and inspection, and repair tasks that currently require astronaut extra-vehicular activity (EVA). Use of robots will provide economic savings as well as improved astronaut safety by reducing and in many cases, eliminating the need for human EVA. The focus of the work is to develop and carry out a set of research projects using laboratory models of satellite robots. These devices use air-cushion-vehicle (ACV) technology to simulate in two dimensions the drag-free, zero-g conditions of space. Current work is divided into six major projects or research areas. Fixed-base cooperative manipulation work represents our initial entry into multiple arm cooperation and high-level control with a sophisticated user interface. The floating-base cooperative manipulation project strives to transfer some of the technologies developed in the fixed-base work onto a floating base. The global control and navigation experiment seeks to demonstrate simultaneous control of the robot manipulators and the robot base position so that tasks can be accomplished while the base is undergoing a controlled motion. The multiple-vehicle cooperation project's goal is to demonstrate multiple free-floating robots working in teams to carry out tasks too difficult or complex for a single robot to perform. The Location Enhancement Arm Push-off (LEAP) activity's goal is to provide a viable alternative to expendable gas thrusters for vehicle propulsion wherein the robot uses its manipulators to throw itself from place to place. Because the successful execution of the LEAP technique requires an accurate model of the robot and payload mass properties, it was deemed an attractive testbed for adaptive control technology.

  16. Pilot clinical application of an adaptive robotic system for young children with autism

    PubMed Central

    Bekele, Esubalew; Crittendon, Julie A; Swanson, Amy; Sarkar, Nilanjan; Warren, Zachary E

    2013-01-01

    It has been argued that clinical applications of advanced technology may hold promise for addressing impairments associated with autism spectrum disorders. This pilot feasibility study evaluated the application of a novel adaptive robot-mediated system capable of both administering and automatically adjusting joint attention prompts to a small group of preschool children with autism spectrum disorders (n = 6) and a control group (n = 6). Children in both groups spent more time looking at the humanoid robot and were able to achieve a high level of accuracy across trials. However, across groups, children required higher levels of prompting to successfully orient within robot-administered trials. The results highlight both the potential benefits of closed-loop adaptive robotic systems as well as current limitations of existing humanoid-robotic platforms. PMID:24104517

  17. Research and development at ORNL/CESAR towards cooperating robotic systems for hazardous environments

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, R.C.; Fujimura, K.; Unseren, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    One of the frontiers in intelligent machine research is the understanding of how constructive cooperation among multiple autonomous agents can be effected. The effort at the Center for Engineering Systems Advanced Research (CESAR)at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) focuses on two problem areas: (1) cooperation by multiple mobile robots in dynamic, incompletely known environments; and (2) cooperating robotic manipulators. Particular emphasis is placed on experimental evaluation of research and developments using the CESAR robot system testbeds, including three mobile robots, and a seven-axis, kinematically redundant mobile manipulator. This paper summarizes initial results of research addressing the decoupling of position and force control for two manipulators holding a common object, and the path planning for multiple robots in a common workspace. 15 refs., 3 figs.

  18. Pilot clinical application of an adaptive robotic system for young children with autism.

    PubMed

    Bekele, Esubalew; Crittendon, Julie A; Swanson, Amy; Sarkar, Nilanjan; Warren, Zachary E

    2014-07-01

    It has been argued that clinical applications of advanced technology may hold promise for addressing impairments associated with autism spectrum disorders. This pilot feasibility study evaluated the application of a novel adaptive robot-mediated system capable of both administering and automatically adjusting joint attention prompts to a small group of preschool children with autism spectrum disorders (n = 6) and a control group (n = 6). Children in both groups spent more time looking at the humanoid robot and were able to achieve a high level of accuracy across trials. However, across groups, children required higher levels of prompting to successfully orient within robot-administered trials. The results highlight both the potential benefits of closed-loop adaptive robotic systems as well as current limitations of existing humanoid-robotic platforms. PMID:24104517

  19. Research and development at ORNL/CESAR towards cooperating robotic systems for hazardous environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mann, R. C.; Fujimura, K.; Unseren, M. A.

    1992-01-01

    One of the frontiers in intelligent machine research is the understanding of how constructive cooperation among multiple autonomous agents can be effected. The effort at the Center for Engineering Systems Advanced Research (CESAR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) focuses on two problem areas: (1) cooperation by multiple mobile robots in dynamic, incompletely known environments; and (2) cooperating robotic manipulators. Particular emphasis is placed on experimental evaluation of research and developments using the CESAR robot system testbeds, including three mobile robots, and a seven-axis, kinematically redundant mobile manipulator. This paper summarizes initial results of research addressing the decoupling of position and force control for two manipulators holding a common object, and the path planning for multiple robots in a common workspace.

  20. Development of sensor augmented robotic weld systems for aerospace propulsion system fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, C. S.; Gangl, K. J.

    1986-01-01

    In order to meet stringent performance goals for power and reuseability, the Space Shuttle Main Engine was designed with many complex, difficult welded joints that provide maximum strength and minimum weight. To this end, the SSME requires 370 meters of welded joints. Automation of some welds has improved welding productivity significantly over manual welding. Application has previously been limited by accessibility constraints, requirements for complex process control, low production volumes, high part variability, and stringent quality requirements. Development of robots for welding in this application requires that a unique set of constraints be addressed. This paper shows how robotic welding can enhance production of aerospace components by addressing their specific requirements. A development program at the Marshall Space Flight Center combining industrial robots with state-of-the-art sensor systems and computer simulation is providing technology for the automation of welds in Space Shuttle Main Engine production.

  1. Ground Simulation of an Autonomous Satellite Rendezvous and Tracking System Using Dual Robotic Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trube, Matthew J.; Hyslop, Andrew M.; Carignan, Craig R.; Easley, Joseph W.

    2012-01-01

    A hardware-in-the-loop ground system was developed for simulating a robotic servicer spacecraft tracking a target satellite at short range. A relative navigation sensor package "Argon" is mounted on the end-effector of a Fanuc 430 manipulator, which functions as the base platform of the robotic spacecraft servicer. Machine vision algorithms estimate the pose of the target spacecraft, mounted on a Rotopod R-2000 platform, relay the solution to a simulation of the servicer spacecraft running in "Freespace", which performs guidance, navigation and control functions, integrates dynamics, and issues motion commands to a Fanuc platform controller so that it tracks the simulated servicer spacecraft. Results will be reviewed for several satellite motion scenarios at different ranges. Key words: robotics, satellite, servicing, guidance, navigation, tracking, control, docking.

  2. Validation of a robotic balance system for investigations in the control of human standing balance.

    PubMed

    Luu, Billy L; Huryn, Thomas P; Van der Loos, H F Machiel; Croft, Elizabeth A; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien

    2011-08-01

    Previous studies have shown that human body sway during standing approximates the mechanics of an inverted pendulum pivoted at the ankle joints. In this study, a robotic balance system incorporating a Stewart platform base was developed to provide a new technique to investigate the neural mechanisms involved in standing balance. The robotic system, programmed with the mechanics of an inverted pendulum, controlled the motion of the body in response to a change in applied ankle torque. The ability of the robotic system to replicate the load properties of standing was validated by comparing the load stiffness generated when subjects balanced their own body to the robot's mechanical load programmed with a low (concentrated-mass model) or high (distributed-mass model) inertia. The results show that static load stiffness was not significantly (p > 0.05) different for standing and the robotic system. Dynamic load stiffness for the robotic system increased with the frequency of sway, as predicted by the mechanics of an inverted pendulum, with the higher inertia being accurately matched to the load properties of the human body. This robotic balance system accurately replicated the physical model of standing and represents a useful tool to simulate the dynamics of a standing person. PMID:21511567

  3. Optimization of Power Utilization in Multimobile Robot Foraging Behavior Inspired by Honeybees System

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Faisul Arif; Ramli, Abd Rahman; Samsudin, Khairulmizam; Hashim, Shaiful Jahari

    2014-01-01

    Deploying large numbers of mobile robots which can interact with each other produces swarm intelligent behavior. However, mobile robots are normally running with finite energy resource, supplied from finite battery. The limitation of energy resource required human intervention for recharging the batteries. The sharing information among the mobile robots would be one of the potentials to overcome the limitation on previously recharging system. A new approach is proposed based on integrated intelligent system inspired by foraging of honeybees applied to multimobile robot scenario. This integrated approach caters for both working and foraging stages for known/unknown power station locations. Swarm mobile robot inspired by honeybee is simulated to explore and identify the power station for battery recharging. The mobile robots will share the location information of the power station with each other. The result showed that mobile robots consume less energy and less time when they are cooperating with each other for foraging process. The optimizing of foraging behavior would result in the mobile robots spending more time to do real work. PMID:24949491

  4. Optimization of power utilization in multimobile robot foraging behavior inspired by honeybees system.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Faisul Arif; Ramli, Abd Rahman; Samsudin, Khairulmizam; Hashim, Shaiful Jahari

    2014-01-01

    Deploying large numbers of mobile robots which can interact with each other produces swarm intelligent behavior. However, mobile robots are normally running with finite energy resource, supplied from finite battery. The limitation of energy resource required human intervention for recharging the batteries. The sharing information among the mobile robots would be one of the potentials to overcome the limitation on previously recharging system. A new approach is proposed based on integrated intelligent system inspired by foraging of honeybees applied to multimobile robot scenario. This integrated approach caters for both working and foraging stages for known/unknown power station locations. Swarm mobile robot inspired by honeybee is simulated to explore and identify the power station for battery recharging. The mobile robots will share the location information of the power station with each other. The result showed that mobile robots consume less energy and less time when they are cooperating with each other for foraging process. The optimizing of foraging behavior would result in the mobile robots spending more time to do real work. PMID:24949491

  5. FIELD APPLICATIONS OF ROBOTIC SYSTEMS IN HAZARDOUS WASTE SITE OPERATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The cleanup of hazardous waste sites is a challenging and complex field that offers numerous opportunities for the application of robotic technology. he contamination problem, long in the making, will take decades to resolve. ur ingenuity in developing robotic tools to assist in ...

  6. A cognitive robotic system based on the Soar cognitive architecture for mobile robot navigation, search, and mapping missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanford, Scott D.

    Most unmanned vehicles used for civilian and military applications are remotely operated or are designed for specific applications. As these vehicles are used to perform more difficult missions or a larger number of missions in remote environments, there will be a great need for these vehicles to behave intelligently and autonomously. Cognitive architectures, computer programs that define mechanisms that are important for modeling and generating domain-independent intelligent behavior, have the potential for generating intelligent and autonomous behavior in unmanned vehicles. The research described in this presentation explored the use of the Soar cognitive architecture for cognitive robotics. The Cognitive Robotic System (CRS) has been developed to integrate software systems for motor control and sensor processing with Soar for unmanned vehicle control. The CRS has been tested using two mobile robot missions: outdoor navigation and search in an indoor environment. The use of the CRS for the outdoor navigation mission demonstrated that a Soar agent could autonomously navigate to a specified location while avoiding obstacles, including cul-de-sacs, with only a minimal amount of knowledge about the environment. While most systems use information from maps or long-range perceptual capabilities to avoid cul-de-sacs, a Soar agent in the CRS was able to recognize when a simple approach to avoiding obstacles was unsuccessful and switch to a different strategy for avoiding complex obstacles. During the indoor search mission, the CRS autonomously and intelligently searches a building for an object of interest and common intersection types. While searching the building, the Soar agent builds a topological map of the environment using information about the intersections the CRS detects. The agent uses this topological model (along with Soar's reasoning, planning, and learning mechanisms) to make intelligent decisions about how to effectively search the building. Once the

  7. Control of a free-flying robot manipulator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, H.

    1986-01-01

    The development of and test control strategies for self-contained, autonomous free flying space robots are discussed. Such a robot would perform operations in space similar to those currently handled by astronauts during extravehicular activity (EVA). Use of robots should reduce the expense and danger attending EVA both by providing assistance to astronauts and in many cases by eliminating altogether the need for human EVA, thus greatly enhancing the scope and flexibility of space assembly and repair activities. The focus of the work is to develop and carry out a program of research with a series of physical Satellite Robot Simulator Vehicles (SRSV's), two-dimensionally freely mobile laboratory models of autonomous free-flying space robots such as might perform extravehicular functions associated with operation of a space station or repair of orbiting satellites. It is planned, in a later phase, to extend the research to three dimensions by carrying out experiments in the Space Shuttle cargo bay.

  8. Assistance System for Disabled People: A Robot Controlled by Blinking and Wireless Link

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Val, Lara; Jiménez, María I.; Alonso, Alonso; de La Rosa, Ramón; Izquierdo, Alberto; Carrera, Albano

    Disabled people already profit from a lot of technical assistance that improves their quality of life. This article presents a system which will allow interaction between a physically disabled person and his environment. This system is controlled by voluntary muscular movements, particularly those of face muscles. These movements will be translated into machine-understandable instructions, and they will be sent by means of a wireless link to a mobile robot that will execute them. Robot includes a video camera, in order to show the user the environment of the route that the robot follows. This system gives a greater personal autonomy to people with reduced mobility.

  9. Object oriented design of the Liverpool Telescope Robotic Control System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, Stephen N.; Steele, Iain A.

    2002-12-01

    In the traditional, manned observatory, an astronomer must continually be weighing together many factors during the course of an observing run in order to make an appropriate decision on the course of action at that time. Weather conditions may force suspension of the observing program to protect the telescope, later to be resumed when conditions improve. Power outages may force controlled shutdown of computers and other hardware. Changes in sky condition may require on-the-fly changes to the scheduled program. For the Liverpool Telescope (LT), the Robotic Control System (RCS) is designed to act as a replacement for the duty astronomer. The system is required to be robust, reliable and adaptable e.g. to future instrument configurations and varying operational objectives. Consequently, object-oriented techniques which promote modularity and code re-use have been employed throughout the design of this system to facilitate maintainance and future upgrading. This paper describes the task management architecture (TMA) - a configurable, pattern based object model defining the cognitive functionality of the RCS, the environment monitoring architecture (EMA) - a configurable, rule-based decision making paradigm and the use of our proprietary Java message system (JMS) communications architecture to control the telescope and associated instrumentation.

  10. Calibration algorithm in robotic remanufacturing measurement system based on 3D laser scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, C. D.; Zhu, S.; Li, C.; Liang, Y. Y.

    2009-07-01

    In robotic remanufacturing measurement system, the 3D laser scanner is arranged by the robot and the object scanned is mounted on a turntable. This paper deals with the algorithm of calibrating the relationship between the scanner coordinate and the robot Tool0, and furthermore locating the center axis of the turntable. The data of Tool0 can be directly obtained denoting its relationship with the robot base coordinate. So, the coordinate transformation problems are effectively solved and the measuring data which relative to the robot base coordinate could be congruously saved. This paper detailed explains the basic algorithm theory, computing method and the result data analysis, and etc. The calibration algorithm is deduced under the orthogonal coordinate.

  11. Vision-based semi-autonomous outdoor robot system to reduce soldier workload

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Al; Rodgers, Michael H.

    2001-09-01

    Sensors and computational capability have not reached the point to enable small robots to navigate autonomously in unconstrained outdoor environments at tactically useful speeds. This problem is greatly reduced, however, if a soldier can lead the robot through terrain that he knows it can traverse. An application of this concept is a small pack-mule robot that follows a foot soldier over outdoor terrain. The solder would be responsible to avoid situations beyond the robot's limitations when encountered. Having learned the route, the robot could autonomously retrace the path carrying supplies and munitions. This would greatly reduce the soldier's workload under normal conditions. This paper presents a description of a developmental robot sensor system using low-cost commercial 3D vision and inertial sensors to address this application. The robot moves at fast walking speed and requires only short-range perception to accomplish its task. 3D-feature information is recorded on a composite route map that the robot uses to negotiate its local environment and retrace the path taught by the soldier leader.

  12. A vision-based self-calibration method for robotic visual inspection systems.

    PubMed

    Yin, Shibin; Ren, Yongjie; Zhu, Jigui; Yang, Shourui; Ye, Shenghua

    2013-01-01

    A vision-based robot self-calibration method is proposed in this paper to evaluate the kinematic parameter errors of a robot using a visual sensor mounted on its end-effector. This approach could be performed in the industrial field without external, expensive apparatus or an elaborate setup. A robot Tool Center Point (TCP) is defined in the structural model of a line-structured laser sensor, and aligned to a reference point fixed in the robot workspace. A mathematical model is established to formulate the misalignment errors with kinematic parameter errors and TCP position errors. Based on the fixed point constraints, the kinematic parameter errors and TCP position errors are identified with an iterative algorithm. Compared to the conventional methods, this proposed method eliminates the need for a robot-based-frame and hand-to-eye calibrations, shortens the error propagation chain, and makes the calibration process more accurate and convenient. A validation experiment is performed on an ABB IRB2400 robot. An optimal configuration on the number and distribution of fixed points in the robot workspace is obtained based on the experimental results. Comparative experiments reveal that there is a significant improvement of the measuring accuracy of the robotic visual inspection system. PMID:24300597

  13. A Vision-Based Self-Calibration Method for Robotic Visual Inspection Systems

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Shibin; Ren, Yongjie; Zhu, Jigui; Yang, Shourui; Ye, Shenghua

    2013-01-01

    A vision-based robot self-calibration method is proposed in this paper to evaluate the kinematic parameter errors of a robot using a visual sensor mounted on its end-effector. This approach could be performed in the industrial field without external, expensive apparatus or an elaborate setup. A robot Tool Center Point (TCP) is defined in the structural model of a line-structured laser sensor, and aligned to a reference point fixed in the robot workspace. A mathematical model is established to formulate the misalignment errors with kinematic parameter errors and TCP position errors. Based on the fixed point constraints, the kinematic parameter errors and TCP position errors are identified with an iterative algorithm. Compared to the conventional methods, this proposed method eliminates the need for a robot-based-frame and hand-to-eye calibrations, shortens the error propagation chain, and makes the calibration process more accurate and convenient. A validation experiment is performed on an ABB IRB2400 robot. An optimal configuration on the number and distribution of fixed points in the robot workspace is obtained based on the experimental results. Comparative experiments reveal that there is a significant improvement of the measuring accuracy of the robotic visual inspection system. PMID:24300597

  14. Percutaneous inner-ear access via an image-guided industrial robot system

    PubMed Central

    Baron, S; Eilers, H; Munske, B; Toennies, JL; Balachandran, R; Labadie, RF; Ortmaier, T; Webster, RJ

    2014-01-01

    Image-guided robots have been widely used for bone shaping and percutaneous access to interventional sites. However, due to high-accuracy requirements and proximity to sensitive nerves and brain tissues, the adoption of robots in inner-ear surgery has been slower. In this paper the authors present their recent work towards developing two image-guided industrial robot systems for accessing challenging inner-ear targets. Features of the systems include optical tracking of the robot base and tool relative to the patient and Kalman filter-based data fusion of redundant sensory information (from encoders and optical tracking systems) for enhanced patient safety. The approach enables control of differential robot positions rather than absolute positions, permitting simplified calibration procedures and reducing the reliance of the system on robot calibration in order to ensure overall accuracy. Lastly, the authors present the results of two phantom validation experiments simulating the use of image-guided robots in inner-ear surgeries such as cochlear implantation and petrous apex access. PMID:20718268

  15. Interventional robotic systems: Applications and technology state-of-the-art

    PubMed Central

    CLEARY, KEVIN; MELZER, ANDREAS; WATSON, VANCE; KRONREIF, GERNOT; STOIANOVICI, DAN

    2011-01-01

    Many different robotic systems have been developed for invasive medical procedures. In this article we will focus on robotic systems for image-guided interventions such as biopsy of suspicious lesions, interstitial tumor treatment, or needle placement for spinal blocks and neurolysis. Medical robotics is a young and evolving field and the ultimate role of these systems has yet to be determined. This paper presents four interventional robotics systems designed to work with MRI, CT, fluoroscopy, and ultrasound imaging devices. The details of each system are given along with any phantom, animal, or human trials. The systems include the AcuBot for active needle insertion under CT or fluoroscopy, the B-Rob systems for needle placement using CT or ultrasound, the INNOMOTION for MRI and CT interventions, and the MRBot for MRI procedures. Following these descriptions, the technology issues of image compatibility, registration, patient movement and respiration, force feedback, and control mode are briefly discussed. It is our belief that robotic systems will be an important part of future interventions, but more research and clinical trials are needed. The possibility of performing new clinical procedures that the human cannot achieve remains an ultimate goal for medical robotics. Engineers and physicians should work together to create and validate these systems for the benefits of patients everywhere. PMID:16754193

  16. Development of a task-level robot programming and simulation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, H.; Kawamura, K.; Narayanan, S.; Zhang, G.; Franke, H.; Ozkan, M.; Arima, H.; Liu, H.

    1987-01-01

    An ongoing project in developing a Task-Level Robot Programming and Simulation System (TARPS) is discussed. The objective of this approach is to design a generic TARPS that can be used in a variety of applications. Many robotic applications require off-line programming, and a TARPS is very useful in such applications. Task level programming is object centered in that the user specifies tasks to be performed instead of robot paths. Graphics simulation provides greater flexibility and also avoids costly machine setup and possible damage. A TARPS has three major modules: world model, task planner and task simulator. The system architecture, design issues and some preliminary results are given.

  17. A study of the Perkin-Elmer laboratory robotic system for analytical sample preparation

    SciTech Connect

    Hartenstein, S.D.; Delmastro, J.R.

    1988-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the abilities of a Perkin-Elmer (PE) robotic system in performing complex analytical sample preparation procedures. Until this time, reports have been written describing the physical capabilities of the robotic arm marketed by PE and the use of this arm in a pick-and-place application at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). Since the robotic arm is only capable of handling and transporting objects, the ability of the PE system is dependent upon the performance capabilities of the auxiliary devices marketed with the arm. 2 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Research on acquisition of 3D information using eye-in-hand robot system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Bo; Wang, Pengfei

    2001-09-01

    In this paper, a PUMA562 robot, a micro CCD camera and an image acquisition card, along with IBM/PC 586 host computer, formed eye-in-hand visual servoing experimental system of an intelligent space robot. A novel robot visual servo control method is adopted, based on FMF neural network. Computer simulation and many experiments of object tracking with the capture of floating object were carried out in this eye-in- hand visual servoing system. It is an important reference to further research in the future.

  19. 3D vision upgrade kit for the TALON robot system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodenhamer, Andrew; Pettijohn, Bradley; Pezzaniti, J. Larry; Edmondson, Richard; Vaden, Justin; Hyatt, Brian; Morris, James; Chenault, David; Tchon, Joe; Barnidge, Tracy; Kaufman, Seth; Kingston, David; Newell, Scott

    2010-02-01

    In September 2009 the Fort Leonard Wood Field Element of the US Army Research Laboratory - Human Research and Engineering Directorate, in conjunction with Polaris Sensor Technologies and Concurrent Technologies Corporation, evaluated the objective performance benefits of Polaris' 3D vision upgrade kit for the TALON small unmanned ground vehicle (SUGV). This upgrade kit is a field-upgradable set of two stereo-cameras and a flat panel display, using only standard hardware, data and electrical connections existing on the TALON robot. Using both the 3D vision system and a standard 2D camera and display, ten active-duty Army Soldiers completed seven scenarios designed to be representative of missions performed by military SUGV operators. Mission time savings (6.5% to 32%) were found for six of the seven scenarios when using the 3D vision system. Operators were not only able to complete tasks quicker but, for six of seven scenarios, made fewer mistakes in their task execution. Subjective Soldier feedback was overwhelmingly in support of pursuing 3D vision systems, such as the one evaluated, for fielding to combat units.

  20. A new active visual system for humanoid robots.

    PubMed

    Xu, De; Li, You Fu; Tan, Min; Shen, Yang

    2008-04-01

    In this paper, a new active visual system is developed, which is based on bionic vision and is insensitive to the property of the cameras. The system consists of a mechanical platform and two cameras. The mechanical platform has two degrees of freedom of motion in pitch and yaw, which is equivalent to the neck of a humanoid robot. The cameras are mounted on the platform. The directions of the optical axes of the two cameras can be simultaneously adjusted in opposite directions. With these motions, the object's images can be located at the centers of the image planes of the two cameras. The object's position is determined with the geometry information of the visual system. A more general model for active visual positioning using two cameras without a neck is also investigated. The position of an object can be computed via the active motions. The presented model is less sensitive to the intrinsic parameters of cameras, which promises more flexibility in many applications such as visual tracking with changeable focusing. Experimental results verify the effectiveness of the proposed methods. PMID:18348917

  1. Requirements and applications for robotic servicing of military space systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ledford, Otto C., Jr.; Bennett, Rodney G.

    1992-01-01

    The utility of on-orbit servicing of spacecraft has been demonstrated by NASA several times using shuttle-based astronaut EVA. There has been interest in utilizing on-orbit servicing for military space systems as well. This interest has been driven by the increasing reliance of all branches of the military upon space-based assets, the growing numbers, complexity, and cost of those assets, and a desire to normalize support policies for space-based operations. Many military satellites are placed in orbits which are unduly hostile for astronaut operations and/or cannot be reached by the shuttle. In addition, some of the projected tasks may involve hazardous operations. This has led to a focus on robotic systems, instead of astronauts, for the basis of projected servicing systems. This paper describes studies and activities which will hopefully lead to on-orbit servicing being one of the tools available to military space systems designers and operators. The utility of various forms of servicing has been evaluated for present and projected systems, critical technologies have been identified, and strategies for the development and insertion of this technology into operational systems have been developed. Many of the projected plans have been adversely affected by budgetary restrictions and evolving architectures, but the fundamental benefits and requirements are well understood. A method of introducing servicing capabilities in a manner which has a low impact on the system designer and does not require the prior development of an expensive infrastructure is discussed. This can potentially lead to an evolutionary implementation of the full technology.

  2. Automated tracking and grasping of a moving object with a robotic hand-eye system

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, P.K.; Timcenko, A.; Yoshimi, B.; Michelman, P. . Dept. of Computer Science)

    1993-04-01

    Most robotic grasping tasks assume a stationary or fixed object. In this paper, the authors explore the requirements for tracking and grasping a moving object. The focus of the work is to achieve a high level of interaction between a real-time vision system capable of tracking moving objects in 3-D and a robot arm with gripper that can be used to pick up a moving object. There is an interest in exploring the interplay of hand--eye coordination for dynamic grasping takes such as grasping of parts on a moving conveyor system, assembly of articulated parts, or for grasping from a mobile robotic system. Coordination between an organisms sensing modalities and motor control system is a hallmark of intelligent behavior, and they are pursuing the goal of building an integrated sensing and actuation system that can operate in dynamic as opposed to static environments. The system they have built addresses three distinct problems in robotic hand--eye coordination for grasping moving objects: fast computation of 3-D motion parameters from vision, predictive control of a moving robotic arm to track a moving object, and interception and grasping. The system is able to operate at approximately human arm movement rates, and experimental results in which a moving model train is tracked is presented, stably grasped, and picked up by the system. The algorithms they have developed that relate sensing to actuation are quite general and applicable to a variety of complex robotic tasks that require visual feedback for arm and hand control.

  3. Intelligent robots and computer vision

    SciTech Connect

    Casasent, D.P.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference which examined artificial intelligence and image processing in relation to robotics. Topics considered at the conference included feature extraction and pattern recognition for computer vision, image processing for intelligent robotics, robot sensors, image understanding and artificial intelligence, optical processing techniques in robotic applications, robot languages and programming, processor architectures for computer vision, mobile robots, multisensor fusion, three-dimensional modeling and recognition, intelligent robots applications, and intelligent robot systems.

  4. A remote telepresence robotic system for inspection and maintenance of a nuclear power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Crane, C.D. III; Tulenko, J.S.

    1993-02-01

    Progress in reported in the areas of environmental hardening; database/world modeling; man-machine interface; development of the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR) maintenance inspection robot design; and Articulated Transporter/Manipulator System (ATMS) development.

  5. Person-like intelligent systems architectures for robotic shared control and automated operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, Jon D.; Aucoin, Paschal J., Jr.; Ossorio, Peter G.

    1992-01-01

    An approach to rendering robotic systems as 'personlike' as possible to achieve needed capabilities is outlined. Human characteristics such as knowledge, motivation, know-how, performance, achievement and individual differences corresponding to propensities and abilities can be supplied, within limits, with computing software and hardware to robotic systems provided with sufficiently rich sensory configurations. Pushing these limits is the developmental path for more and more personlike robotic systems. The portions of the Person Concept that appear to be most directly relevant to this effort are described in the following topics: reality concepts (the state-of-affairs system and descriptive formats, behavior as intentional action, individual persons (person characteristics), social patterns of behavior (social practices), and boundary conditions (status maxims). Personlike robotic themes and considerations for a technical development plan are also discussed.

  6. On the development of a reactive sensor-based robotic system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hexmoor, Henry H.; Underwood, William E., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Flexible robotic systems for space applications need to use local information to guide their action in uncertain environments where the state of the environment and even the goals may change. They have to be tolerant of unexpected events and robust enough to carry their task to completion. Tactical goals should be modified while maintaining strategic goals. Furthermore, reactive robotic systems need to have a broader view of their environments than sensory-based systems. An architecture and a theory of representation extending the basic cycles of action and perception are described. This scheme allows for dynamic description of the environment and determining purposive and timely action. Applications of this scheme for assembly and repair tasks using a Universal Machine Intelligence RTX robot are being explored, but the ideas are extendable to other domains. The nature of reactivity for sensor-based robotic systems and implementation issues encountered in developing a prototype are discussed.

  7. Application of symbolic computation to the analysis of mechanical systems, including robot arms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussain, M. A.; Noble, B.

    1984-01-01

    This paper illustrates the application of symbolic computation in connection with three aspects of mechanical systems: (1) The derivation of dynamical equations by Lagrangian methods; (2) The analysis and synthesis of kinematic mechanisms; and (3) A robot manipulator arm.

  8. Job planning and execution monitoring for a human-robot symbiotic system

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, L.E.

    1989-11-01

    The human-robot symbiosis concept has the fundamental objective of bridging the gap between fully human-controlled and fully autonomous systems to achieve true human-robot cooperative control and intelligence. Such a system would allow improved speed, accuracy, and efficiency of task execution, while retaining the human in the loop for innovative reasoning and decision-making. Earlier research has resulted in the development of a robotic system architecture facilitating the symbiotic integration of teleoperative and automated modes of task execution. This architecture reflects a unique blend of many disciplines of artificial intelligence into a working system, including job or mission planning, dynamic task allocation, human-robot communication, automated monitoring, and machine learning. This report focuses on two elements of this architecture: the Job Planner and the Automated Monitor. 17 refs., 7 figs.

  9. Vision System To Identify Car Body Types For Spray Painting Robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uartlam, Peter; Neilson, Geoff

    1984-02-01

    The automation of car body spray booth operations employing paint spraying robots generally requires the robots to execute one of a number of defined routines according to the car body type. A vision system is described which identifies a car body type by its shape and provides an identity code to the robot controller thus enabling the correct routine to be executed. The vision system consists of a low cost linescan camera, a flucrescens light source and a microprocessor image analyser and is an example of a cost effective, reliable, industrially engineered robot vision system for a demanding production environment. Extension of the system with additional cameras will increase the application to the other automatic operations on a car assembly line where it becomes essential to reliably differentiate between up to 40 vatiations of body types.

  10. Development of an unmanned agricultural robotics system for measuring crop conditions for precision aerial application

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An Unmanned Agricultural Robotics System (UARS) is acquired, rebuilt with desired hardware, and operated in both classrooms and field. The UARS includes crop height sensor, crop canopy analyzer, normalized difference vegetative index (NDVI) sensor, multispectral camera, and hyperspectral radiometer...

  11. Performance of a Motion Tracking System During Cyberknife Robotic Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Cavedon, Carlo; Francescon, Paolo; Cora, Stefania; Moschini, Giuliano; Rossi, Paolo

    2009-03-10

    Cyberknife (Accuracy Inc., Ca) is a robotic radio-surgery system that includes a compact 6 MV linac delivering up to 800 cGy per minute, and an automate arm to aim at any part of the body from any angle. An essential tool is the guidance system based on x-ray imaging cameras located on supports around the patient. A Cyberknife system has been operational at the Vicenza (Italy) Hospital for years and is mainly employed for treating benign and malignant tumors, and Arterior-Venous Malformations. In radiation therapy, delivery of high doses to targets that move with respiration is challenging because of possible spatial inaccuracies. The purpose of this work was to estimate the accuracy of the prediction algorithm used to compensate for system latency in a real-time respiratory tracking system. We have analyzed respiratory signals of 30 patients who had lung or liver Cyberknife treatments. The 'Synchrony'(Accuracy Inc.) motion tracking system we use is based on the correlation between the position of LED markers, detected in real time, and the position of internal markers, sampled through x-ray imaging. The position of the external LED signals, though read in real time, must be predicted to compensate for a few hundred ms time lag in the feedback loop that redirects the beam to the current target position. The respiratory signals were described by employing their frequency power spectrum, as recently proposed by other authors. Prediction errors above 1.5 mm, lasting for periods longer than 5 seconds were observed for irregular breathers. These episodes correlate to the presence of a bimodal distribution in the power spectral density, and of very low frequencies contribution. A more refined approach would include a personalized choice of the prediction algorithm based on the very first minutes of treatment. Patient training aimed at reducing breathing irregularities might also result in improved spatial accuracy.

  12. Performance of a Motion Tracking System During Cyberknife Robotic Radiosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavedon, Carlo; Francescon, Paolo; Cora, Stefania; Moschini, Giuliano; Rossi, Paolo

    2009-03-01

    Cyberknife (Accuracy Inc., Ca) is a robotic radio-surgery system that includes a compact 6 MV linac delivering up to 800 cGy per minute, and an automate arm to aim at any part of the body from any angle. An essential tool is the guidance system based on x-ray imaging cameras located on supports around the patient. A Cyberknife system has been operational at the Vicenza (Italy) Hospital for years and is mainly employed for treating benign and malignant tumors, and Arterior-Venous Malformations. In radiation therapy, delivery of high doses to targets that move with respiration is challenging because of possible spatial inaccuracies. The purpose of this work was to estimate the accuracy of the prediction algorithm used to compensate for system latency in a real-time respiratory tracking system. We have analyzed respiratory signals of 30 patients who had lung or liver Cyberknife treatments. The "Synchrony" (Accuracy Inc.) motion tracking system we use is based on the correlation between the position of LED markers, detected in real time, and the position of internal markers, sampled through x-ray imaging. The position of the external LED signals, though read in real time, must be predicted to compensate for a few hundred ms time lag in the feedback loop that redirects the beam to the current target position. The respiratory signals were described by employing their frequency power spectrum, as recently proposed by other authors. Prediction errors above 1.5 mm, lasting for periods longer than 5 seconds were observed for irregular breathers. These episodes correlate to the presence of a bimodal distribution in the power spectral density, and of very low frequencies contribution. A more refined approach would include a personalized choice of the prediction algorithm based on the very first minutes of treatment. Patient training aimed at reducing breathing irregularities might also result in improved spatial accuracy.

  13. Flexible mobile robot system for smart optical pipe inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampfer, Wolfram; Bartzke, Ralf; Ziehl, Wolfgang

    1998-03-01

    Damages of pipes can be inspected and graded by TV technology available on the market. Remotely controlled vehicles carry a TV-camera through pipes. Thus, depending on the experience and the capability of the operator, diagnosis failures can not be avoided. The classification of damages requires the knowledge of the exact geometrical dimensions of the damages such as width and depth of cracks, fractures and defect connections. Within the framework of a joint R&D project a sensor based pipe inspection system named RODIAS has been developed with two partners from industry and research institute. It consists of a remotely controlled mobile robot which carries intelligent sensors for on-line sewerage inspection purpose. The sensor is based on a 3D-optical sensor and a laser distance sensor. The laser distance sensor is integrated in the optical system of the camera and can measure the distance between camera and object. The angle of view can be determined from the position of the pan and tilt unit. With coordinate transformations it is possible to calculate the spatial coordinates for every point of the video image. So the geometry of an object can be described exactly. The company Optimess has developed TriScan32, a special software for pipe condition classification. The user can start complex measurements of profiles, pipe displacements or crack widths simply by pressing a push-button. The measuring results are stored together with other data like verbal damage descriptions and digitized images in a data base.

  14. Development and demonstration of a teleoperated modular robot system

    SciTech Connect

    Tosunoglu, S.; Tesar, D.

    1992-12-18

    This collection of bi-monthly progress reports on the DOE/NE Robotics Program presents information on significant accomplishments, reports and major correspondence issued, important meetings, and major problems associated with the program.

  15. Robotic Arm and Rover Actuator Systems for Mars Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, L.; Brawn, D.; Noon, D.

    1999-01-01

    Missions such as the Sojourner Rover, the Robotic Arm for Mars Polar Lander, and the 2003 Mars Rover, Athena, use numerous actuators that must operate reliably in extreme environments for long periods of time.

  16. Robot arm system for automatic satellite capture and berthing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishida, Shinichiro; Toriu, Hidetoshi; Hayashi, Masato; Kubo, Tomoaki; Miyata, Makoto

    1994-01-01

    Load control is one of the most important technologies for capturing and berthing free flying satellites by a space robot arm because free flying satellites have different motion rates. The performance of active compliance control techniques depend on the location of the force sensor and the arm's structural compliance. A compliance control technique for the robot arm's structural elasticity and a consideration for an end-effector appropriate for it are presented in this paper.

  17. Control of free-flying space robot manipulator systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannon, Robert H., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    To accelerate the development of multi-armed, free-flying satellite manipulators, a fixed-base cooperative manipulation facility is being developed. The work performed on multiple arm cooperation on a free-flying robot is summarized. Research is also summarized on global navigation and control of free-flying space robots. The Locomotion Enhancement via Arm Pushoff (LEAP) approach is described and progress to date is presented.

  18. A neural network-based exploratory learning and motor planning system for co-robots.

    PubMed

    Galbraith, Byron V; Guenther, Frank H; Versace, Massimiliano

    2015-01-01

    Collaborative robots, or co-robots, are semi-autonomous robotic agents designed to work alongside humans in shared workspaces. To be effective, co-robots require the ability to respond and adapt to dynamic scenarios encountered in natural environments. One way to achieve this is through exploratory learning, or "learning by doing," an unsupervised method in which co-robots are able to build an internal model for motor planning and coordination based on real-time sensory inputs. In this paper, we present an adaptive neural network-based system for co-robot control that employs exploratory learning to achieve the coordinated motor planning needed to navigate toward, reach for, and grasp distant objects. To validate this system we used the 11-degrees-of-freedom RoPro Calliope mobile robot. Through motor babbling of its wheels and arm, the Calliope learned how to relate visual and proprioceptive information to achieve hand-eye-body coordination. By continually evaluating sensory inputs and externally provided goal directives, the Calliope was then able to autonomously select the appropriate wheel and joint velocities needed to perform its assigned task, such as following a moving target or retrieving an indicated object. PMID:26257640

  19. A neural network-based exploratory learning and motor planning system for co-robots

    PubMed Central

    Galbraith, Byron V.; Guenther, Frank H.; Versace, Massimiliano

    2015-01-01

    Collaborative robots, or co-robots, are semi-autonomous robotic agents designed to work alongside humans in shared workspaces. To be effective, co-robots require the ability to respond and adapt to dynamic scenarios encountered in natural environments. One way to achieve this is through exploratory learning, or “learning by doing,” an unsupervised method in which co-robots are able to build an internal model for motor planning and coordination based on real-time sensory inputs. In this paper, we present an adaptive neural network-based system for co-robot control that employs exploratory learning to achieve the coordinated motor planning needed to navigate toward, reach for, and grasp distant objects. To validate this system we used the 11-degrees-of-freedom RoPro Calliope mobile robot. Through motor babbling of its wheels and arm, the Calliope learned how to relate visual and proprioceptive information to achieve hand-eye-body coordination. By continually evaluating sensory inputs and externally provided goal directives, the Calliope was then able to autonomously select the appropriate wheel and joint velocities needed to perform its assigned task, such as following a moving target or retrieving an indicated object. PMID:26257640

  20. User needs, benefits, and integration of robotic systems in a space station laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodd, W. R.; Badgley, M. B.; Konkel, C. R.

    1989-01-01

    The methodology, results and conclusions of all tasks of the User Needs, Benefits, and Integration Study (UNBIS) of Robotic Systems in a Space Station Laboratory are summarized. Study goals included the determination of user requirements for robotics within the Space Station, United States Laboratory. In Task 1, three experiments were selected to determine user needs and to allow detailed investigation of microgravity requirements. In Task 2, a NASTRAN analysis of Space Station response to robotic disturbances, and acceleration measurement of a standard industrial robot (Intelledex Model 660) resulted in selection of two ranges of microgravity manipulation: Level 1 (10-3 to 10-5 G at greater than 1 Hz) and Level 2 (less than equal 10-6 G at 0.1 Hz). This task included an evaluation of microstepping methods for controlling stepper motors and concluded that an industrial robot actuator can perform milli-G motion without modification. Relative merits of end-effectors and manipulators were studied in Task 3 in order to determine their ability to perform a range of tasks related to the three microgravity experiments. An Effectivity Rating was established for evaluating these robotic system capabilities. Preliminary interface requirements for an orbital flight demonstration were determined in Task 4. Task 5 assessed the impact of robotics.

  1. R-MASTIF: robotic mobile autonomous system for threat interrogation and object fetch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Aveek; Thakur, Dinesh; Keller, James; Kuthirummal, Sujit; Kira, Zsolt; Pivtoraiko, Mihail

    2013-01-01

    Autonomous robotic "fetch" operation, where a robot is shown a novel object and then asked to locate it in the field, re- trieve it and bring it back to the human operator, is a challenging problem that is of interest to the military. The CANINE competition presented a forum for several research teams to tackle this challenge using state of the art in robotics technol- ogy. The SRI-UPenn team fielded a modified Segway RMP 200 robot with multiple cameras and lidars. We implemented a unique computer vision based approach for textureless colored object training and detection to robustly locate previ- ously unseen objects out to 15 meters on moderately flat terrain. We integrated SRI's state of the art Visual Odometry for GPS-denied localization on our robot platform. We also designed a unique scooping mechanism which allowed retrieval of up to basketball sized objects with a reciprocating four-bar linkage mechanism. Further, all software, including a novel target localization and exploration algorithm was developed using ROS (Robot Operating System) which is open source and well adopted by the robotics community. We present a description of the system, our key technical contributions and experimental results.

  2. Robotic system for i.v. antineoplastic drug preparation: description and preliminary evaluation under simulated conditions.

    PubMed

    Cote, D D; Torchia, M G

    1989-11-01

    A robotic system for preparing doses of i.v. antineoplastic drugs is described, and measurements made with the system are compared for accuracy and reproducibility with those made by pharmacists and technicians. System hardware consists of a robotic arm, a 16-bit microcomputer, a bar-code reader, a voice synthesizer, and an electronic balance. The software includes a menu-driven main program, executable files for each robotic activity, and an interface to allow control to pass between the program and the files. The program has routines for matching the software to the hardware; for entering information about the patient, the name of the drug ordered, and the dose; for checking the dose; for selecting the number and size of the vials to be used; for specifying the manipulations of the robotic arm; for printing labels; and for maintaining records. The robot fills an order by getting and placing a vial, inserting a needle into it and withdrawing the drug, weighing the vial, agitating the container to dissolve its contents, reading a bar code, placing a syringe in a syringe manipulator, and getting an i.v. container and injecting the drug into it. Detection of any errors by a series of self-checks arrests execution of an order. No significant differences in accuracy and precision were found between the robotic system and humans performing the same tasks under simulated conditions. The robotic system required less time than humans and eliminated the possibility of direct human contact with the i.v. admixture. Under simulated conditions, a robotic system developed to assist in the preparation of i.v. antineoplastic drugs was as accurate as a manual system and was more time efficient. PMID:2589345

  3. Development and Field Testing of the FootFall Planning System for the ATHLETE Robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    SunSpiral, Vytas; Wheeler, D. W.; Chavez-Clementa, Daniel; Mittman, David

    2011-01-01

    The FootFall Planning System is a ground-based planning and decision support system designed to facilitate the control of walking activities for the ATHLETE (All-Terrain Hex-Limbed Extra-Terrestrial Explorer) family of robots. ATHLETE was developed at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and is a large six-legged robot designed to serve multiple roles during manned and unmanned missions to the Moon; its roles include transportation, construction and exploration. Over the four years from 2006 through 2010 the FootFall Planning System was developed and adapted to two generations of the ATHLETE robots and tested at two analog field sites (the Human Robotic Systems Project's Integrated Field Test at Moses Lake, Washington, June 2008, and the Desert Research and Technology Studies (D-RATS), held at Black Point Lava Flow in Arizona, September 2010). Having 42 degrees of kinematic freedom, standing to a maximum height of just over 4 meters, and having a payload capacity of 450 kg in Earth gravity, the current version of the ATHLETE robot is a uniquely complex system. A central challenge to this work was the compliance of the high-DOF (Degree Of Freedom) robot, especially the compliance of the wheels, which affected many aspects of statically-stable walking. This paper will review the history of the development of the FootFall system, sharing design decisions, field test experiences, and the lessons learned concerning compliance and self-awareness.

  4. An Adaptive Home-Use Robotic Rehabilitation System for the Upper Body.

    PubMed

    Dowling, Ariel V; Barzilay, Ouriel; Lombrozo, Yuval; Wolf, Alon

    2014-01-01

    Robotic rehabilitation systems have been developed to treat musculoskeletal conditions, but limited availability prevents most patients from using them. The objective of this paper was to create a home-use robotic rehabilitation system. Data were obtained in real time from a Microsoft [Formula: see text] and a wireless surface electromyograph system. Results from the [Formula: see text] sensor were compared to a standard motion capture system. A subject completed visual follow exercise tasks in a 3-D visual environment. Data from two training exercises were used to generate a neural network, which was then used to simulate the subject's individual performance. The subjects completed both the exercise task output from the neural network (custom), and the unmodified task (standard). In addition, a wearable arm robot prototype was built. Basic system identification was completed, and a control algorithm for the robot based on pressure control was designed and tested. The subjects had greater root-mean-square error for position and velocity variables during the custom exercise tasks. These results suggest that the custom task was difficult to complete, possibly because the neural network was unconstrained. Finally, the robot prototype was able to mimic changes in a subject's elbow angle in real time, demonstrating the feasibility of the robotic rehabilitation system. PMID:27170877

  5. A networked modular hardware and software system for MRI-guided robotic prostate interventions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Hao; Shang, Weijian; Harrington, Kevin; Camilo, Alex; Cole, Gregory; Tokuda, Junichi; Hata, Nobuhiko; Tempany, Clare; Fischer, Gregory S.

    2012-02-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides high resolution multi-parametric imaging, large soft tissue contrast, and interactive image updates making it an ideal modality for diagnosing prostate cancer and guiding surgical tools. Despite a substantial armamentarium of apparatuses and systems has been developed to assist surgical diagnosis and therapy for MRI-guided procedures over last decade, the unified method to develop high fidelity robotic systems in terms of accuracy, dynamic performance, size, robustness and modularity, to work inside close-bore MRI scanner still remains a challenge. In this work, we develop and evaluate an integrated modular hardware and software system to support the surgical workflow of intra-operative MRI, with percutaneous prostate intervention as an illustrative case. Specifically, the distinct apparatuses and methods include: 1) a robot controller system for precision closed loop control of piezoelectric motors, 2) a robot control interface software that connects the 3D Slicer navigation software and the robot controller to exchange robot commands and coordinates using the OpenIGTLink open network communication protocol, and 3) MRI scan plane alignment to the planned path and imaging of the needle as it is inserted into the target location. A preliminary experiment with ex-vivo phantom validates the system workflow, MRI-compatibility and shows that the robotic system has a better than 0.01mm positioning accuracy.

  6. Infrared Sensor System for Mobile-Robot Positioning in Intelligent Spaces

    PubMed Central

    Gorostiza, Ernesto Martín; Galilea, José Luis Lázaro; Meca, Franciso Javier Meca; Monzú, David Salido; Zapata, Felipe Espinosa; Puerto, Luis Pallarés

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this work was to position a Mobile Robot in an Intelligent Space, and this paper presents a sensorial system for measuring differential phase-shifts in a sinusoidally modulated infrared signal transmitted from the robot. Differential distances were obtained from these phase-shifts, and the position of the robot was estimated by hyperbolic trilateration. Due to the extremely severe trade-off between SNR, angle (coverage) and real-time response, a very accurate design and device selection was required to achieve good precision with wide coverage and acceptable robot speed. An I/Q demodulator was used to measure phases with one-stage synchronous demodulation to DC. A complete set of results from real measurements, both for distance and position estimations, is provided to demonstrate the validity of the system proposed, comparing it with other similar indoor positioning systems. PMID:22163907

  7. The design and realization of a sort of robot vision measure system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Yong-jie; Zhu, Ji-gui; Yang, Xue-you; Ye, Sheng-hua

    2006-06-01

    The robot vision measure system based on stereovision is a very meaningful research realm within the engineering application. In this system, the industry robot is the movable carrier of the stereovision sensor, not only extending the work space of the sensor, but also reserving the characteristics of vision measure technology such as non-contact, quickness, etc. Controlling the pose of the robot in space, the stereovision sensor can arrive at the given point to collect the image signal of the given point one by one, and then obtain the 3D coordinate data after computing the image data. The method based on the technique of binocular stereovision sensor, which uses two transit instruments and one precision drone to carry out the whole calibration, is presented. At the same time, the measurement program of the robot and the computer was written in different program language. In the end, the system was tested carefully, and the feasibility was proved simultaneously.

  8. Infrared sensor system for mobile-robot positioning in intelligent spaces.

    PubMed

    Gorostiza, Ernesto Martín; Galilea, José Luis Lázaro; Meca, Franciso Javier Meca; Monzú, David Salido; Zapata, Felipe Espinosa; Puerto, Luis Pallarés

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this work was to position a Mobile Robot in an Intelligent Space, and this paper presents a sensorial system for measuring differential phase-shifts in a sinusoidally modulated infrared signal transmitted from the robot. Differential distances were obtained from these phase-shifts, and the position of the robot was estimated by hyperbolic trilateration. Due to the extremely severe trade-off between SNR, angle (coverage) and real-time response, a very accurate design and device selection was required to achieve good precision with wide coverage and acceptable robot speed. An I/Q demodulator was used to measure phases with one-stage synchronous demodulation to DC. A complete set of results from real measurements, both for distance and position estimations, is provided to demonstrate the validity of the system proposed, comparing it with other similar indoor positioning systems. PMID:22163907

  9. A performance analysis method for distributed real-time robotic systems: A case study of remote teleoperation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lefebvre, D. R.; Sanderson, A. C.

    1994-01-01

    Robot coordination and control systems for remote teleoperation applications are by necessity implemented on distributed computers. Modeling and performance analysis of these distributed robotic systems is difficult, but important for economic system design. Performance analysis methods originally developed for conventional distributed computer systems are often unsatisfactory for evaluating real-time systems. The paper introduces a formal model of distributed robotic control systems; and a performance analysis method, based on scheduling theory, which can handle concurrent hard-real-time response specifications. Use of the method is illustrated by a case of remote teleoperation which assesses the effect of communication delays and the allocation of robot control functions on control system hardware requirements.

  10. Welding Robot and Remote Handling System for the Yucca Mountain Waste Package Closure System

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, M.E.; Holt, T.E.; LaValle, D.R.; Pace, D.P.; Croft, K.M.; Shelton-Davis, C.V.

    2008-07-01

    In preparation for the license application and construction of a repository for housing the nation's spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste in Yucca Mountain, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been charged with preparing a mock-up of a full-scale prototype system for sealing the waste packages (WP). Three critical pieces of the closure room include two PaR Systems TR4350 Telerobotic Manipulators and a PaR Systems XR100 Remote Handling System (RHS). The TR4350 Manipulators are 6-axis programmable robots that will be used to weld the WP lids and purge port cap as well as conduct nondestructive examinations. The XR100 Remote Handling System is a 4-axis programmable robot that will be used to transport the WP lids and process tools to the WP for operations and remove equipment for maintenance. The welding and RHS robots will be controlled using separate PaR 5/21 CIMROC Controllers capable of complex motion control tasks. A tele-operated PaR 4350 Manipulator will also be provided with the XR100 Remote Handling System. It will be used for maintenance and associated activities within the closure room. (authors)

  11. Application of autonomous robotized systems for the collection of nearshore topographic changing and hydrodynamic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyakov, Vladimir; Makarov, Vladimir; Zezyulin, Denis; Kurkin, Andrey; Pelinovsky, Efim

    2015-04-01

    Hazardous phenomena in the coastal zone lead to the topographic changing which are difficulty inspected by traditional methods. It is why those autonomous robots are used for collection of nearshore topographic and hydrodynamic measurements. The robot RTS-Hanna is well-known (Wubbold, F., Hentschel, M., Vousdoukas, M., and Wagner, B. Application of an autonomous robot for the collection of nearshore topographic and hydrodynamic measurements. Coastal Engineering Proceedings, 2012, vol. 33, Paper 53). We describe here several constructions of mobile systems developed in Laboratory "Transported Machines and Transported Complexes", Nizhny Novgorod State Technical University. They can be used in the field surveys and monitoring of wave regimes nearshore.

  12. An adaptive localization system for outdoor/indoor navigation for autonomous robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacis, E. B.; Sights, B.; Ahuja, G.; Kogut, G.; Everett, H. R.

    2006-05-01

    Many envisioned applications of mobile robotic systems require the robot to navigate in complex urban environments. This need is particularly critical if the robot is to perform as part of a synergistic team with human forces in military operations. Historically, the development of autonomous navigation for mobile robots has targeted either outdoor or indoor scenarios, but not both, which is not how humans operate. This paper describes efforts to fuse component technologies into a complete navigation system, allowing a robot to seamlessly transition between outdoor and indoor environments. Under the Joint Robotics Program's Technology Transfer project, empirical evaluations of various localization approaches were conducted to assess their maturity levels and performance metrics in different exterior/interior settings. The methodologies compared include Markov localization, global positioning system, Kalman filtering, and fuzzy-logic. Characterization of these technologies highlighted their best features, which were then fused into an adaptive solution. A description of the final integrated system is discussed, including a presentation of the design, experimental results, and a formal demonstration to attendees of the Unmanned Systems Capabilities Conference II in San Diego in December 2005.

  13. Hazard analysis of EUCLIDIAN: an image-guided robotic brachytherapy system.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yida; Podder, Tarun; Buzurovic, Ivan; Yan, Kaiguo; Ng, Wan Sing; Yu, Yan

    2007-01-01

    Robotic assistance can help clinicians to improve the flexibility of needle insertion and accuracy of seed deposition. However, the robotic platform is a safety critical system for its automated operational mode. Thus, it is important to perform Hazard Identification & Safety Insurance Control (HISIC) for securing the safety of a medical robotic system. In this paper, we have performed HISIC for our robotic platform, called Endo-Uro Computer Lattice for Intratumoral Delivery, Implementation, and Ablation with Nanosensing (ECLIDIAN). The definition and requirements of the system are described by Unified Modeling Language (UML). Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA) are executed for the principles of HISIC, such as hazard identification, safety insurance control, safety critical limit, monitoring and control. FMEA combined with UML can also be implemented to ensure reliability of the human operation. On the basis of safety control index and fuzzy mathematics, safety effective value is outlined to assess the validity of safety insurance control for robotic system. The above principles and methods are feasible and effective for hazard analysis during the development of the robotic system. PMID:18002189

  14. Design of multifunction anti-terrorism robotic system based on police dog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Bo; Liu, Suju; Xu, Jun; Li, Dongjie

    2007-11-01

    Aimed at some typical constraints of police dogs and robots used in the areas of reconnaissance and counterterrorism currently, the multifunction anti-terrorism robotic system based on police dog has been introduced. The system is made up of two parts: portable commanding device and police dog robotic system. The portable commanding device consists of power supply module, microprocessor module, LCD display module, wireless data receiving and dispatching module and commanding module, which implements the remote control to the police dogs and takes real time monitor to the video and images. The police dog robotic system consists of microprocessor module, micro video module, wireless data transmission module, power supply module and offence weapon module, which real time collects and transmits video and image data of the counter-terrorism sites, and gives military attack based on commands. The system combines police dogs' biological intelligence with micro robot. Not only does it avoid the complexity of general anti-terrorism robots' mechanical structure and the control algorithm, but it also widens the working scope of police dog, which meets the requirements of anti-terrorism in the new era.

  15. Design and Application of The Painting Material Supply System of The Painting Robot for Steel Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyawaki, Kunio; Hisayasu, Azuma; Mori, Tsunehito; Miyazaki, Tatsuo; Nakashima, Yoshio

    With the increase of painting works and the decrease of skilled workers, the demand for robot painting of the large-scale steel product is rapidly increasing. But there are many technical problems in the development of the painting robot for this use. The collision between a robot and a work-piece is one of the most important problems, because the robot operates in a small space of a work-piece. Above all, the collision of the painting material supply hose with painted film on a work-piece is very serious. To avoid the hose collision, we propose an in-line type of paint supply mechanism using swivel joints. The key point in this system is the sealing performance and its durability, and we propose the piping system with compliance to strengthen the sealing performance. In this paper, the design method of this system is discussed on the basis of the analysis of the fluctuatinal elastic deformation of a O-ring in the swivel joint. We produced a prototype of the painting robot with the in-line system designed by this method. Application of this robot to the painting of ship-hull block is also discussed. Results from this application show the effectiveness of the in-line system.

  16. Personlike intelligent systems architectures for robotic shared control and automated operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, Jon D.; Aucoin, Paschal J., Jr.; Ossorio, Peter G.

    1992-11-01

    There are many types of tasks in space where operations with robotics can play a significant role, including: (1) Tasks that are dangerous, boring, fatiguing for persons [extravehicular activity (EVA) crewmembers]; (2) Tasks where a division of labor between EVA crewmembers and robotic equipment is desirable. Current notions involve a succession of robotic capabilities: (1) Teleoperations (where the robotic system is controlled remotely to the level of maneuvers); (2) Telerobotics [where the robotic system can carry out a set of maneuvers on its own, with full-time monitoring from an EVA or intravehicular activity (IVA) crewmember]; (3) Supervised autonomy (with control and monitoring functions on the part of persons provided on a less intense basis) with occasional traded control or shared control. Of these, only the first can be considered state of the art for space applications. In considering how to achieve shared control and autonomous capability, there is a tendency to invoke terms like `cognition,' `perception,' `learning,' etc., thereby constituting wish lists of `what is needed.' By way of contrast, the thrust of this paper is to outline an approach whereby robotic systems become as `person-like' as possible to achieve needed capabilities. This approach makes use of formulations in the Person Concept, pioneered by one of the present authors, Dr. Peter G. Ossorio. These include: (1) The state of affairs (SA) system; (2) The intentional action (IA) system.

  17. 3-dimensional telepresence system for a robotic environment

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Matthew O.; McKay, Mark D.

    2000-01-01

    A telepresence system includes a camera pair remotely controlled by a control module affixed to an operator. The camera pair provides for three dimensional viewing and the control module, affixed to the operator, affords hands-free operation of the camera pair. In one embodiment, the control module is affixed to the head of the operator and an initial position is established. A triangulating device is provided to track the head movement of the operator relative to the initial position. A processor module receives input from the triangulating device to determine where the operator has moved relative to the initial position and moves the camera pair in response thereto. The movement of the camera pair is predetermined by a software map having a plurality of operation zones. Each zone therein corresponds to unique camera movement parameters such as speed of movement. Speed parameters include constant speed, or increasing or decreasing. Other parameters include pan, tilt, slide, raise or lowering of the cameras. Other user interface devices are provided to improve the three dimensional control capabilities of an operator in a local operating environment. Such other devices include a pair of visual display glasses, a microphone and a remote actuator. The pair of visual display glasses are provided to facilitate three dimensional viewing, hence depth perception. The microphone affords hands-free camera movement by utilizing voice commands. The actuator allows the operator to remotely control various robotic mechanisms in the remote operating environment.

  18. Application of robotics in nuclear facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, J S; Fisher, J J

    1986-01-01

    Industrial robots and other robotic systems have been successfully applied at the Savannah River nuclear site. These applications, new robotic systems presently under development, general techniques for the employment of robots in nuclear facilities, and future systems are discussed.

  19. Performance characterization of precision micro robot using a machine vision system over the Internet for guaranteed positioning accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Yongjin; Chiou, Richard; Rauniar, Shreepud; Sosa, Horacio

    2005-11-01

    There is a missing link between a virtual development environment (e.g., a CAD/CAM driven offline robotic programming) and production requirements of the actual robotic workcell. Simulated robot path planning and generation of pick-and-place coordinate points will not exactly coincide with the robot performance due to lack of consideration in variations in individual robot repeatability and thermal expansion of robot linkages. This is especially important when robots are controlled and programmed remotely (e.g., through Internet or Ethernet) since remote users have no physical contact with robotic systems. Using the current technology in Internet-based manufacturing that is limited to a web camera for live image transfer has been a significant challenge for the robot task performance. Consequently, the calibration and accuracy quantification of robot critical to precision assembly have to be performed on-site and the verification of robot positioning accuracy cannot be ascertained remotely. In worst case, the remote users have to assume the robot performance envelope provided by the manufacturers, which may causes a potentially serious hazard for system crash and damage to the parts and robot arms. Currently, there is no reliable methodology for remotely calibrating the robot performance. The objective of this research is, therefore, to advance the current state-of-the-art in Internet-based control and monitoring technology, with a specific aim in the accuracy calibration of micro precision robotic system for the development of a novel methodology utilizing Ethernet-based smart image sensors and other advanced precision sensory control network.

  20. System for robot-assisted real-time laparoscopic ultrasound elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billings, Seth; Deshmukh, Nishikant; Kang, Hyun Jae; Taylor, Russell; Boctor, Emad M.

    2012-02-01

    Surgical robots provide many advantages for surgery, including minimal invasiveness, precise motion, high dexterity, and crisp stereovision. One limitation of current robotic procedures, compared to open surgery, is the loss of haptic information for such purposes as palpation, which can be very important in minimally invasive tumor resection. Numerous studies have reported the use of real-time ultrasound elastography, in conjunction with conventional B-mode ultrasound, to differentiate malignant from benign lesions. Several groups (including our own) have reported integration of ultrasound with the da Vinci robot, and ultrasound elastography is a very promising image guidance method for robotassisted procedures that will further enable the role of robots in interventions where precise knowledge of sub-surface anatomical features is crucial. We present a novel robot-assisted real-time ultrasound elastography system for minimally invasive robot-assisted interventions. Our system combines a da Vinci surgical robot with a non-clinical experimental software interface, a robotically articulated laparoscopic ultrasound probe, and our GPU-based elastography system. Elasticity and B-mode ultrasound images are displayed as picture-in-picture overlays in the da Vinci console. Our system minimizes dependence on human performance factors by incorporating computer-assisted motion control that automatically generates the tissue palpation required for elastography imaging, while leaving high-level control in the hands of the user. In addition to ensuring consistent strain imaging, the elastography assistance mode avoids the cognitive burden of tedious manual palpation. Preliminary tests of the system with an elasticity phantom demonstrate the ability to differentiate simulated lesions of varied stiffness and to clearly delineate lesion boundaries.

  1. Predictive Model for Temperature-Induced Deformation of Robot Mechanical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poonyapak, Pranchalee

    The positioning accuracy and repeatability of a robot are critical for many industrial applications. Drift in repeatability can occur with changes in environmental and internal conditions, such as those seen with temperature-induced deformation. Thermal instability causes dimensional deformation, and a warm-up cycle is typically required to bring the robot to a thermally stable working condition. The elimination of warm-up cycles will ultimately enhance the positioning accuracy of the robots, their productivity, and reduce unnecessary energy consumption. The main objective of this research was to develop a robot controller algorithm that would provide, a priori, compensation for temperature-induced deformation associated with warm-up in robot mechanical systems. The research started at the fundamental stage of gaining insight into the thermal behaviour and corresponding temperature-induced deformation of simplified, i.e., one-dimensional, robot mechanical systems consisting of slender links and heat sources. The systems were studied using concomitant experimental, numerical and analytical models to provide cross-checking of the results. For the experimental model, the deformation was measured by tracking the drift of a laser diode spot across a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera chip. A non-contact measurement system consisting of an infrared camera, a CCD camera and a laser diode was developed to provide high accuracy measurement for the deformation. The numerical model was generated with a coupled thermal-mechanical finite element analysis incorporating thermal effects due to conduction and convection. The models were tested with the analytical model that was further extended using a finite difference technique. Once the three models showed excellent agreement, it was possible to develop a controller algorithm. Deformations predicted by the finite difference model were used as input for a validation experiment of the compensation algorithm. Results of the

  2. Simulation of a dead reckoning embedded system security patrol robot for deployment inside structures and buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tickle, Andrew J.; Meng, Yan; Smith, Jeremy S.

    2010-10-01

    Dead Reckoning (DR) is the process of estimating a robot's current position based upon a previously determined position, and advancing that position based upon known speed and direction over time. It is therefore a simple way for an autonomous mobile robot to navigation within a known environment such as a building where measurements have been taken and a predetermined route planned based upon which doors (or areas) the robot would have enough force to enter. Discussed here is the design of a DR navigation system in Altera's DSP Builder graphical design process. The wheel circumference to the step size of stepper motor used to drive the robot are related and so this ratio can be easily changed to easily accommodate changes to the physical design of a robot with minimal changes to the software. The robot calculates its position in relation to the DR map by means of the number of revolutions of the wheels via odometry, in this situation there is no assumed wheel slippage that would induce an accumulative error in the system overtime. The navigation works by using a series of counters, each corresponding to a measurement taken from the environment, and are controlled by a master counter to trigger the correct counter at the appropriate time given the position of robot in the DR map. Each counter has extra safeguards built into them on their enables and outputs to ensure they only count at the correct time and to avoid clashes within the system. The accuracy of the navigation is discussed after the virtual route is plotted in MATLAB as a visual record in addition to how feedback loops, identification of known objects (such as fire safety doors that it would navigate through), and visual object avoidance could later be added to augment the system. The advantages of such a system are that it has the potential to upload different DR maps so that the end robot for can be used in new environments easily.

  3. Formalization, implementation, and modeling of institutional controllers for distributed robotic systems.

    PubMed

    Pereira, José N; Silva, Porfírio; Lima, Pedro U; Martinoli, Alcherio

    2014-01-01

    The work described is part of a long term program of introducing institutional robotics, a novel framework for the coordination of robot teams that stems from institutional economics concepts. Under the framework, institutions are cumulative sets of persistent artificial modifications made to the environment or to the internal mechanisms of a subset of agents, thought to be functional for the collective order. In this article we introduce a formal model of institutional controllers based on Petri nets. We define executable Petri nets-an extension of Petri nets that takes into account robot actions and sensing-to design, program, and execute institutional controllers. We use a generalized stochastic Petri net view of the robot team controlled by the institutional controllers to model and analyze the stochastic performance of the resulting distributed robotic system. The ability of our formalism to replicate results obtained using other approaches is assessed through realistic simulations of up to 40 e-puck robots. In particular, we model a robot swarm and its institutional controller with the goal of maintaining wireless connectivity, and successfully compare our model predictions and simulation results with previously reported results, obtained by using finite state automaton models and controllers. PMID:23373975

  4. Evolution of Signaling in a Multi-Robot System: Categorization and Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ampatzis, Christos; Tuci, Elio; Trianni, Vito; Dorigo, Marco

    We use Evolutionary Robotics to design robot controllers in which decision-making mechanisms to switch from solitary to social behavior are integrated with the mechanisms that underpin the sensory-motor repertoire of the robots. In particular, we study the evolution of behavioral and communicative skills in a categorization task. The individual decision-making structures are based on the integration over time of sensory information. The mechanisms for switching from solitary to social behavior and the ways in which the robots can affect each other's behavior are not predetermined by the experimenter, but are aspects of our model designed by artificial evolution. Our results show that evolved robots manage to cooperate and collectively discriminate between different environments by developing a simple communication protocol based on sound signaling. Communication emerges in the absence of explicit selective pressure coded in the fitness function. The evolution of communication is neither trivial nor obvious; for a meaningful signaling system to evolve, evolution must produce both appropriate signals and appropriate reactions to signals. The use of communication proves to be adaptive for the group, even if, in principle, non-cooperating robots can be equally successful with cooperating robots.

  5. Are You Talking to Me? Dialogue Systems Supporting Mixed Teams of Humans and Robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowding, John; Clancey, William J.; Graham, Jeffrey

    2006-01-01

    This position paper describes an approach to building spoken dialogue systems for environments containing multiple human speakers and hearers, and multiple robotic speakers and hearers. We address the issue, for robotic hearers, of whether the speech they hear is intended for them, or more likely to be intended for some other hearer. We will describe data collected during a series of experiments involving teams of multiple human and robots (and other software participants), and some preliminary results for distinguishing robot-directed speech from human-directed speech. The domain of these experiments is Mars-analogue planetary exploration. These Mars-analogue field studies involve two subjects in simulated planetary space suits doing geological exploration with the help of 1-2 robots, supporting software agents, a habitat communicator and links to a remote science team. The two subjects are performing a task (geological exploration) which requires them to speak with each other while also speaking with their assistants. The technique used here is to use a probabilistic context-free grammar language model in the speech recognizer that is trained on prior robot-directed speech. Intuitively, the recognizer will give higher confidence to an utterance if it is similar to utterances that have been directed to the robot in the past.

  6. Robotics research

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, M.; Paul, R.

    1984-01-01

    Organized around a view of robotics as ''the intelligent connection of perception to action,'' the fifty-three contributions collected in this book present leading current research in one of the fastest moving fields of artificial intelligence. Readings Include: Hand-Eye Coordination in Rope Handling; 3-D Balance Using 2-D algorithms. A Model Driven Visual Inspection Module: Stereo Vision: Complexity and Constraints; Interpretation of Contact Geometers from Force Measurement; The Utah MIT Dextrous Hand: Work in Progress; Hierarchical Nonlinear Control for Robots; VAL-11; A Robot Programming Language and Control System; Technological Barriers in Robotics: A Perspective from Industry.

  7. Systems integration for the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Robotics Applications Development Laboratory (RADL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, V. Leon; Nordeen, Ross

    1988-01-01

    A laboratory for developing robotics technology for hazardous and repetitive Shuttle and payload processing activities is discussed. An overview of the computer hardware and software responsible for integrating the laboratory systems is given. The center's anthropomorphic robot is placed on a track allowing it to be moved to different stations. Various aspects of the laboratory equipment are described, including industrial robot arm control, smart systems integration, the supervisory computer, programmable process controller, real-time tracking controller, image processing hardware, and control display graphics. Topics of research include: automated loading and unloading of hypergolics for space vehicles and payloads; the use of mobile robotics for security, fire fighting, and hazardous spill operations; nondestructive testing for SRB joint and seal verification; Shuttle Orbiter radiator damage inspection; and Orbiter contour measurements. The possibility of expanding the laboratory in the future is examined.

  8. Mobile robot based electrostatic spray system for controlling pests on cotton plants in Iraq

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Mamury, M.; Manivannan, N.; Al-Raweshidy, H.; Balachandran, W.

    2015-10-01

    A mobile robot based electrostatic spray system was developed to combat pest infestation on cotton plants in Iraq. The system consists of a charged spray nozzle, a CCD camera, a mobile robot (vehicle and arm) and Arduino microcontroller. Arduino microcontroller is used to control the spray nozzle and the robot. Matlab is used to process the image from the CCD camera and to generate the appropriate control signals to the robot and the spray nozzle. COMSOL multi-physics FEM software was used to design the induction electrodes to achieve maximum charge transfer onto the fan spray liquid film resulting in achieving the desired charge/mass ratio of the spray. The charged spray nozzle was operated on short duration pulsed spray mode. Image analysis was employed to investigate the spray deposition on improvised insect targets on an artificial plant.

  9. Mobile robot self-localization system using single webcam distance measurement technology in indoor environments.

    PubMed

    Li, I-Hsum; Chen, Ming-Chang; Wang, Wei-Yen; Su, Shun-Feng; Lai, To-Wen

    2014-01-01

    A single-webcam distance measurement technique for indoor robot localization is proposed in this paper. The proposed localization technique uses webcams that are available in an existing surveillance environment. The developed image-based distance measurement system (IBDMS) and parallel lines distance measurement system (PLDMS) have two merits. Firstly, only one webcam is required for estimating the distance. Secondly, the set-up of IBDMS and PLDMS is easy, which only one known-dimension rectangle pattern is needed, i.e., a ground tile. Some common and simple image processing techniques, i.e., background subtraction are used to capture the robot in real time. Thus, for the purposes of indoor robot localization, the proposed method does not need to use expensive high-resolution webcams and complicated pattern recognition methods but just few simple estimating formulas. From the experimental results, the proposed robot localization method is reliable and effective in an indoor environment. PMID:24473282

  10. Mobile Robot Self-Localization System Using Single Webcam Distance Measurement Technology in Indoor Environments

    PubMed Central

    Li, I-Hsum; Chen, Ming-Chang; Wang, Wei-Yen; Su, Shun-Feng; Lai, To-Wen

    2014-01-01

    A single-webcam distance measurement technique for indoor robot localization is proposed in this paper. The proposed localization technique uses webcams that are available in an existing surveillance environment. The developed image-based distance measurement system (IBDMS) and parallel lines distance measurement system (PLDMS) have two merits. Firstly, only one webcam is required for estimating the distance. Secondly, the set-up of IBDMS and PLDMS is easy, which only one known-dimension rectangle pattern is needed, i.e., a ground tile. Some common and simple image processing techniques, i.e., background subtraction are used to capture the robot in real time. Thus, for the purposes of indoor robot localization, the proposed method does not need to use expensive high-resolution webcams and complicated pattern recognition methods but just few simple estimating formulas. From the experimental results, the proposed robot localization method is reliable and effective in an indoor environment. PMID:24473282

  11. The use of Fuzzy expert system in robots decision-making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamaseb, Mehdi; Jafari, Shahram; Montaseri, Farshid; Dadgar, Masoud

    2014-07-01

    The main issue that is investigated in this paper, is a method for decision making of mobile robots in different conditions for this purpose, we have used expert system. In this way, that the conditions of the robot are analyzed by on expert person a special issue (like following a ball) using knowledge base and suitable decisions will be mode. Then, using this information fuzzy rules well be built, and using its rules, robots decisions can be implemented like an expert person. In this study, we have used delta3d base for implementing expert systems and CLIPS and also we have used NAO for simulation rcssserver3d robot and 3d football simulation have been used for implementing operation program.

  12. An architectural approach to create self organizing control systems for practical autonomous robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greiner, Helen

    1991-01-01

    For practical industrial applications, the development of trainable robots is an important and immediate objective. Therefore, the developing of flexible intelligence directly applicable to training is emphasized. It is generally agreed upon by the AI community that the fusion of expert systems, neural networks, and conventionally programmed modules (e.g., a trajectory generator) is promising in the quest for autonomous robotic intelligence. Autonomous robot development is hindered by integration and architectural problems. Some obstacles towards the construction of more general robot control systems are as follows: (1) Growth problem; (2) Software generation; (3) Interaction with environment; (4) Reliability; and (5) Resource limitation. Neural networks can be successfully applied to some of these problems. However, current implementations of neural networks are hampered by the resource limitation problem and must be trained extensively to produce computationally accurate output. A generalization of conventional neural nets is proposed, and an architecture is offered in an attempt to address the above problems.

  13. Embedded diagnostic, prognostic, and health management system and method for a humanoid robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barajas, Leandro G. (Inventor); Sanders, Adam M (Inventor); Reiland, Matthew J (Inventor); Strawser, Philip A (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A robotic system includes a humanoid robot with multiple compliant joints, each moveable using one or more of the actuators, and having sensors for measuring control and feedback data. A distributed controller controls the joints and other integrated system components over multiple high-speed communication networks. Diagnostic, prognostic, and health management (DPHM) modules are embedded within the robot at the various control levels. Each DPHM module measures, controls, and records DPHM data for the respective control level/connected device in a location that is accessible over the networks or via an external device. A method of controlling the robot includes embedding a plurality of the DPHM modules within multiple control levels of the distributed controller, using the DPHM modules to measure DPHM data within each of the control levels, and recording the DPHM data in a location that is accessible over at least one of the high-speed communication networks.

  14. Robotics in a controlled, ecological life support system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, Gaines E.; Krom, Kimberly J.

    1993-01-01

    Controlled, Ecological Life Support Systems (CELSS) that utilize plants to provide food, water and oxygen could consume considerable amounts of labor unless crop production, recovery and processing are automated. Robotic manipulators equipped with special end-effectors and programmed to perform the sensing and materials handling tasks would minimize the amount of astronaut labor required. The Human Rated Test Facility (HRTF) planned for Johnson Space Center could discover and demonstrate techniques of crop production which can be reliably integrated with machinery to minimize labor requirements. Before the physical components (shelves, lighting fixtures, etc.) can be selected, a systems analysis must be performed to determine which alternative processes should be followed and how the materials handling tasks should be automated. Given that the current procedures used to grow crops in a CELSS may not be the best methods to automate, then what are the alternatives? How may plants be grown, harvested, processed for food, and the inedible components recycled? What commercial technologies current exist? What research efforts are underway to develop new technologies which might satisfy the need for automation in a CELSS? The answers to these questions should prove enlightening and provide some of the information necessary to perform the systems analysis. The planting, culturing, gathering, threshing and separation, food processing, and recovery of inedible portions of wheat were studied. The basic biological and materials handling processes of each task are defined and discussed. Current practices at Johnson Space Center and other NASA centers are described and compared to common production practices in the plant production industry. Technologies currently being researched which might be applicable are identified and illustrated. Finally, based on this knowledge, several scenarios are proposed for automating the tasks for wheat.

  15. Design and real-time control of a robotic system for fracture manipulation.

    PubMed

    Dagnino, G; Georgilas, I; Tarassoli, P; Atkins, R; Dogramadzi, S

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents the design, development and control of a new robotic system for fracture manipulation. The objective is to improve the precision, ergonomics and safety of the traditional surgical procedure to treat joint fractures. The achievements toward this direction are here reported and include the design, the real-time control architecture and the evaluation of a new robotic manipulator system. The robotic manipulator is a 6-DOF parallel robot with the struts developed as linear actuators. The control architecture is also described here. The high-level controller implements a host-target structure composed by a host computer (PC), a real-time controller, and an FPGA. A graphical user interface was designed allowing the surgeon to comfortably automate and monitor the robotic system. The real-time controller guarantees the determinism of the control algorithms adding an extra level of safety for the robotic automation. The system's positioning accuracy and repeatability have been demonstrated showing a maximum positioning RMSE of 1.18 ± 1.14mm (translations) and 1.85 ± 1.54° (rotations). PMID:26737383

  16. Convergent method of and apparatus for distributed control of robotic systems using fuzzy logic

    SciTech Connect

    Feddema, John T.; Driessen, Brian J.; Kwok, Kwan S.

    2002-01-01

    A decentralized fuzzy logic control system for one vehicle or for multiple robotic vehicles provides a way to control each vehicle to converge on a goal without collisions between vehicles or collisions with other obstacles, in the presence of noisy input measurements and a limited amount of compute-power and memory on board each robotic vehicle. The fuzzy controller demonstrates improved robustness to noise relative to an exact controller.

  17. Economic justification of robotic systems using graphical simulation as a tool

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, P.C.

    1995-01-01

    This paper outlines the simulation and analysis approach taken to address radiation dose reduction using robotic automation from the operational and economic standpoints for the DOE Civilian Radioactive Waste Management system and for the transuranic wave loading facilities within the DOE complex. Simulations of the robotic operations using validated software are described. These simulations provide through-put, capital and operating costs for an economic benefit-cost analysis. Benefit-cost analysis results are also presented.

  18. Robotic systems for the high level waste tank farm replacement project at INEL

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, A.; White, D.; Thompson, B.; Christensen, M.

    1993-06-01

    Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company (WINCO) is specifying and designing a new high level waste tank farm at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The farm consists of four underground storage tanks, which replace the existing tanks. The new facility includes provisions for remote operations. One of the planned remote operations is robotic inspection of the tank from the interior and exterior. This paper describes the process used to design the robotic system for the inspection tasks.

  19. Evolutionary Design of a Robotic Material Defect Detection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballard, Gary; Howsman, Tom; Craft, Mike; ONeil, Daniel; Steincamp, Jim; Howell, Joe T. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    During the post-flight inspection of SSME engines, several inaccessible regions must be disassembled to inspect for defects such as cracks, scratches, gouges, etc. An improvement to the inspection process would be the design and development of very small robots capable of penetrating these inaccessible regions and detecting the defects. The goal of this research was to utilize an evolutionary design approach for the robotic detection of these types of defects. A simulation and visualization tool was developed prior to receiving the hardware as a development test bed. A small, commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) robot was selected from several candidates as the proof of concept robot. The basic approach to detect the defects was to utilize Cadmium Sulfide (CdS) sensors to detect changes in contrast of an illuminated surface. A neural network, optimally designed utilizing a genetic algorithm, was employed to detect the presence of the defects (cracks). By utilization of the COTS robot and US sensors, the research successfully demonstrated that an evolutionarily designed neural network can detect the presence of surface defects.

  20. Communal learning within a distributed robotic control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Digney, Bruce L.

    2001-09-01

    It is accepted that the ability to learn and adapt is key to prosperity and survival in both individuals and societies. The same is true of populations of robots. Those robots within a population that are able to learn will outperform, survive longer and perhaps exploit their non-learning co- workers. This paper describes the ongoing results of Communal Learning in the Cognitive Colonies Project (CMU/Robotics and DRES), funded jointly by DARPA ITO- Software for Distributed Robotics and DRDC-DRES. Discussed will be how communal learning fits into the free market architecture for distributed control. Techniques for representing experiences, learned behaviors, maps and computational resources as commodities within the market economy will be presented. Once in a commodity structure, the cycle of speculate, act, receive profits or sustain losses and then learn of the market economy. This allows successful control strategies to emerge and the individuals who discovered them to become established as successful. This paper will discuss: learning to predict costs and make better deals, learning transition confidences, learning causes of death, learning with robot sacrifice and learning model parameters.

  1. The PAKY, HERMES, AESOP, ZEUS, and da Vinci robotic systems.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyung L; Schulam, Peter

    2004-11-01

    In 1965 Gordon Moore, cofounder of Intel Corporation, made his famous observation now known as Moore's law. He predicted that computing capacity will double every 18 to 24 months. Since then, Moore's law has held true; the number of transistors per integrated computer circuit has doubled every couple of years. This relentless advance in computer technology ensures future advances in robotic technology. The ultimate goal of robotics is to allow surgeons to perform difficult procedures with a level of precision and improved clinical outcomes not possible by conventional methods. Robotics has the potential to enable surgeons with various levels of surgical skill to achieve a uniform outcome. As long as urologists continue to embrace technological advances and incorporate beneficial technology into their practice, the outlook for patients remains bright. PMID:15474593

  2. Dynamical Behavior of Multi-Robot Systems Using Lattice Gas Automata

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron, S.M.; Robinett, R.; Stantz, K.M.; Trahan, M.W.; Wagner, J.S.

    1999-03-11

    Recent attention has been given to the deployment of an adaptable sensor array realized by multi-robotic systems. Our group has been studying the collective behavior of autonomous, multi-agent systems and their applications in the area of remote-sensing and emerging threats. To accomplish such tasks, an interdisciplinary research effort at Sandia National Laboratories are conducting tests in the fields of sensor technology, robotics, and multi-robotic and multi-agents architectures. Our goal is to coordinate a constellation of point sensors that optimizes spatial coverage and multivariate signal analysis using unmanned robotic vehicles (e.g., RATLERs, Robotic All-ten-sin Lunar Exploration Rover-class vehicles). Overall design methodology is to evolve complex collective behaviors realized through simple interaction (kinetic) physics and artificial intelligence to enable real-time operational responses to emerging threats. This paper focuses on our recent work understanding the dynamics of many-body systems using the physics-based hydrodynamic model of lattice gas automata. Three design features are investigated. One, for single-speed robots, a hexagonal nearest-neighbor interaction topology is necessary to preserve standard hydrodynamic flow. Two, adaptability, defined by the swarm's deformation rate, can be controlled through the hydrodynamic viscosity term, which, in turn, is defined by the local robotic interaction rules. Three, due to the inherent non-linearity of the dynamical equations describing large ensembles, development of stability criteria ensuring convergence to equilibrium states is developed by scaling information flow rates relative to a swarm's hydrodynamic flow rate. An initial test case simulates a swarm of twenty-five robots that maneuvers past an obstacle while following a moving target. A genetic algorithm optimizes applied nearest-neighbor forces in each of five spatial regions distributed over the simulation domain. Armed with knowledge, the

  3. Robotic Surgery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The Automated Endoscopic System for Optimal Positioning, or AESOP, was developed by Computer Motion, Inc. under a SBIR contract from the Jet Propulsion Lab. AESOP is a robotic endoscopic positioning system used to control the motion of a camera during endoscopic surgery. The camera, which is mounted at the end of a robotic arm, previously had to be held in place by the surgical staff. With AESOP the robotic arm can make more precise and consistent movements. AESOP is also voice controlled by the surgeon. It is hoped that this technology can be used in space repair missions which require precision beyond human dexterity. A new generation of the same technology entitled the ZEUS Robotic Surgical System can make endoscopic procedures even more successful. ZEUS allows the surgeon control various instruments in its robotic arms, allowing for the precision the procedure requires.

  4. Information-driven self-organization: the dynamical system approach to autonomous robot behavior.

    PubMed

    Ay, Nihat; Bernigau, Holger; Der, Ralf; Prokopenko, Mikhail

    2012-09-01

    In recent years, information theory has come into the focus of researchers interested in the sensorimotor dynamics of both robots and living beings. One root for these approaches is the idea that living beings are information processing systems and that the optimization of these processes should be an evolutionary advantage. Apart from these more fundamental questions, there is much interest recently in the question how a robot can be equipped with an internal drive for innovation or curiosity that may serve as a drive for an open-ended, self-determined development of the robot. The success of these approaches depends essentially on the choice of a convenient measure for the information. This article studies in some detail the use of the predictive information (PI), also called excess entropy or effective measure complexity, of the sensorimotor process. The PI of a process quantifies the total information of past experience that can be used for predicting future events. However, the application of information theoretic measures in robotics mostly is restricted to the case of a finite, discrete state-action space. This article aims at applying the PI in the dynamical systems approach to robot control. We study linear systems as a first step and derive exact results for the PI together with explicit learning rules for the parameters of the controller. Interestingly, these learning rules are of Hebbian nature and local in the sense that the synaptic update is given by the product of activities available directly at the pertinent synaptic ports. The general findings are exemplified by a number of case studies. In particular, in a two-dimensional system, designed at mimicking embodied systems with latent oscillatory locomotion patterns, it is shown that maximizing the PI means to recognize and amplify the latent modes of the robotic system. This and many other examples show that the learning rules derived from the maximum PI principle are a versatile tool for the self

  5. Control of free-flying space robot manipulator systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannon, Robert H., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The focus of the work is to develop and perform a set of research projects using laboratory models of satellite robots. These devices use air cushion technology to simulate in two dimensions the drag-free, zero-g conditions of space. Five research areas are examined: cooperative manipulation on a fixed base; cooperative manipulation on a free-floating base; global navigation and control of a free-floating robot; an alternative transport mode call Locomotion Enhancement via Arm Push-Off (LEAP), and adaptive control of LEAP.

  6. Coordinates calibration method in a robotic remanufacturing measurement system based on linear laser scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, C. D.; Zhu, S.; Li, C.; Liang, Y. Y.

    2009-07-01

    In robotic remanufacturing measurement system, the 3D laser scanner is arranged by the robot and the object scanned is mounted on a turntable. This paper deals with the method of calibrating the relationship between the scanner coordinate and the robot Tool0 and furthermore locating the center axis of the turntable. The data of Tool0 can be directly obtained denoting its relationship with the robot base coordinate. So, the new methods of coordinate's transformation are effectively developed. Moreover some motivated experiments and optimized programs are designed for realizing process stabilization and reliability. This paper detailed explains the basic algorithm theory, practical operation instructions, the experiment data analysis, and etc. Theory deduction and experiments show the new methods are reasonable and efficient.

  7. Supervised and Dynamic Neuro-Fuzzy Systems to Classify Physiological Responses in Robot-Assisted Neurorehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Almonacid, Miguel; Cano-Izquierdo, José M.; Sabater-Navarro, José M.; Fernández, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the application of an Adaptive Resonance Theory (ART) based on neural networks combined with Fuzzy Logic systems to classify physiological reactions of subjects performing robot-assisted rehabilitation therapies. First, the theoretical background of a neuro-fuzzy classifier called S-dFasArt is presented. Then, the methodology and experimental protocols to perform a robot-assisted neurorehabilitation task are described. Our results show that the combination of the dynamic nature of S-dFasArt classifier with a supervisory module are very robust and suggest that this methodology could be very useful to take into account emotional states in robot-assisted environments and help to enhance and better understand human-robot interactions. PMID:26001214

  8. Supervised and dynamic neuro-fuzzy systems to classify physiological responses in robot-assisted neurorehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Lledó, Luis D; Badesa, Francisco J; Almonacid, Miguel; Cano-Izquierdo, José M; Sabater-Navarro, José M; Fernández, Eduardo; Garcia-Aracil, Nicolás

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the application of an Adaptive Resonance Theory (ART) based on neural networks combined with Fuzzy Logic systems to classify physiological reactions of subjects performing robot-assisted rehabilitation therapies. First, the theoretical background of a neuro-fuzzy classifier called S-dFasArt is presented. Then, the methodology and experimental protocols to perform a robot-assisted neurorehabilitation task are described. Our results show that the combination of the dynamic nature of S-dFasArt classifier with a supervisory module are very robust and suggest that this methodology could be very useful to take into account emotional states in robot-assisted environments and help to enhance and better understand human-robot interactions. PMID:26001214

  9. Kinematics and dynamics of robotic systems with multiple closed loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chang-De

    The kinematics and dynamics of robotic systems with multiple closed loops, such as Stewart platforms, walking machines, and hybrid manipulators, are studied. In the study of kinematics, focus is on the closed-form solutions of the forward position analysis of different parallel systems. A closed-form solution means that the solution is expressed as a polynomial in one variable. If the order of the polynomial is less than or equal to four, the solution has analytical closed-form. First, the conditions of obtaining analytical closed-form solutions are studied. For a Stewart platform, the condition is found to be that one rotational degree of freedom of the output link is decoupled from the other five. Based on this condition, a class of Stewart platforms which has analytical closed-form solution is formulated. Conditions of analytical closed-form solution for other parallel systems are also studied. Closed-form solutions of forward kinematics for walking machines and multi-fingered grippers are then studied. For a parallel system with three three-degree-of-freedom subchains, there are 84 possible ways to select six independent joints among nine joints. These 84 ways can be classified into three categories: Category 3:3:0, Category 3:2:1, and Category 2:2:2. It is shown that the first category has no solutions; the solutions of the second category have analytical closed-form; and the solutions of the last category are higher order polynomials. The study is then extended to a nearly general Stewart platform. The solution is a 20th order polynomial and the Stewart platform has a maximum of 40 possible configurations. Also, the study is extended to a new class of hybrid manipulators which consists of two serially connected parallel mechanisms. In the study of dynamics, a computationally efficient method for inverse dynamics of manipulators based on the virtual work principle is developed. Although this method is comparable with the recursive Newton-Euler method for

  10. A mobile robot system for ground servicing operations on the space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowling, K.; Bennett, R.; Blackwell, M.; Graham, T.; Gatrall, S.; O'Toole, R.; Schempf, H.

    1992-01-01

    A mobile system for space shuttle servicing, the Tessellator, has been configured, designed and is currently being built and integrated. Robot tasks include chemical injection and inspection of the shuttle's thermal protection system. This paper outlines tasks, rationale, and facility requirements for the development of this system. A detailed look at the mobile system and manipulator follow with a look at mechanics, electronics, and software. Salient features of the mobile robot include omnidirectionality, high reach, high stiffness and accuracy with safety and self-reliance integral to all aspects of the design. The robot system is shown to meet task, facility, and NASA requirements in its design resulting in unprecedented specifications for a mobile-manipulation system.

  11. Joint Robotics Program (JRP)-supported efforts at the Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center, San Diego

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Hoa G.; Everett, H. R.

    2006-05-01

    The Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center, San Diego (SSC San Diego) is conducting a number of robotic research, development, evaluation, fielding, and combat-support missions and projects in support of Joint Robotics Program (JRP) goals. These include: Man-Portable Robotic System, Unmanned Surface Vessel, Automatically Deployed Communication Relays, Autonomous UAV Mission System, Robotic Systems Pool, Family of Integrated Rapid Response Equipment, and the Technology Transfer project. This paper summarizes the recent accomplishments and current status of these efforts, many of which are individually presented in more detail elsewhere at this conference.

  12. User needs, benefits and integration of robotic systems in a space station laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farnell, K. E.; Richard, J. A.; Ploge, E.; Badgley, M. B.; Konkel, C. R.; Dodd, W. R.

    1989-01-01

    The methodology, results and conclusions of the User Needs, Benefits, and Integration Study (UNBIS) of Robotic Systems in the Space Station Microgravity and Materials Processing Facility are summarized. Study goals include the determination of user requirements for robotics within the Space Station, United States Laboratory. Three experiments were selected to determine user needs and to allow detailed investigation of microgravity requirements. A NASTRAN analysis of Space Station response to robotic disturbances, and acceleration measurement of a standard industrial robot (Intelledex Model 660) resulted in selection of two ranges of low gravity manipulation: Level 1 (10-3 to 10-5 G at greater than 1 Hz.) and Level 2 (less than = 10-6 G at 0.1 Hz). This included an evaluation of microstepping methods for controlling stepper motors and concluded that an industrial robot actuator can perform milli-G motion without modification. Relative merits of end-effectors and manipulators were studied in order to determine their ability to perform a range of tasks related to the three low gravity experiments. An Effectivity Rating was established for evaluating these robotic system capabilities. Preliminary interface requirements were determined such that definition of requirements for an orbital flight demonstration experiment may be established.

  13. Remote wave measurements using autonomous mobile robotic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurkin, Andrey; Zeziulin, Denis; Makarov, Vladimir; Belyakov, Vladimir; Tyugin, Dmitry; Pelinovsky, Efim

    2016-04-01

    The project covers the development of a technology for monitoring and forecasting the state of the coastal zone environment using radar equipment transported by autonomous mobile robotic systems (AMRS). Sought-after areas of application are the eastern and northern coasts of Russia, where continuous collection of information on topographic changes of the coastal zone and carrying out hydrodynamic measurements in inaccessible to human environment are needed. The intensity of the reflection of waves, received by radar surveillance, is directly related to the height of the waves. Mathematical models and algorithms for processing experimental data (signal selection, spectral analysis, wavelet analysis), recalculation of landwash from data on heights of waves far from the shore, determination of the threshold values of heights of waves far from the shore have been developed. There has been developed the program complex for functioning of the experimental prototype of AMRS, comprising the following modules: data loading module, reporting module, module of georeferencing, data analysis module, monitoring module, hardware control module, graphical user interface. Further work will be connected with carrying out tests of manufactured experimental prototype in conditions of selected routes coastline of Sakhalin Island. Conducting field tests will allow to reveal the shortcomings of development and to identify ways of optimization of the structure and functioning algorithms of AMRS, as well as functioning the measuring equipment. The presented results have been obtained in Nizhny Novgorod State Technical University n.a. R. Alekseev in the framework of the Federal Target Program «Research and development on priority directions of scientific-technological complex of Russia for 2014 - 2020 years» (agreement № 14.574.21.0089 (unique identifier of agreement - RFMEFI57414X0089)).

  14. A preliminary cyber-physical security assessment of the Robot Operating System (ROS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClean, Jarrod; Stull, Christopher; Farrar, Charles; Mascareñas, David

    2013-05-01

    Over the course of the last few years, the Robot Operating System (ROS) has become a highly popular software framework for robotics research. ROS has a very active developer community and is widely used for robotics research in both academia and government labs. The prevalence and modularity of ROS cause many people to ask the question: "What prevents ROS from being used in commercial or government applications?" One of the main problems that is preventing this increased use of ROS in these applications is the question of characterizing its security (or lack thereof). In the summer of 2012, a crowd sourced cyber-physical security contest was launched at the cyber security conference DEF CON 20 to begin the process of characterizing the security of ROS. A small-scale, car-like robot was configured as a cyber-physical security "honeypot" running ROS. DEFFCON-20 attendees were invited to find exploits and vulnerabilities in the robot while network traffic was collected. The results of this experiment provided some interesting insights and opened up many security questions pertaining to deployed robotic systems. The Federal Aviation Administration is tasked with opening up the civil airspace to commercial drones by September 2015 and driverless cars are already legal for research purposes in a number of states. Given the integration of these robotic devices into our daily lives, the authors pose the following question: "What security exploits can a motivated person with little-to-no experience in cyber security execute, given the wide availability of free cyber security penetration testing tools such as Metasploit?" This research focuses on applying common, low-cost, low-overhead, cyber-attacks on a robot featuring ROS. This work documents the effectiveness of those attacks.

  15. Robotic and Navigation Systems in Orthopaedic Surgery: How Much Do Our Patients Understand?

    PubMed Central

    Benjamin-Laing, Harry; Douglas, Stephen L; Haddad, Fares S

    2014-01-01

    Background Technology in orthopaedic surgery has become more widespread in the past 20 years, with emerging evidence of its benefits in arthroplasty. Although patients are aware of benefits of conventional joint replacement, little is known on patients' knowledge of the prevalence, benefits or drawbacks of surgery involving navigation or robotic systems. Methods In an outpatient arthroplasty clinic, 100 consecutive patients were approached and given questionnaires to assess their knowledge of navigation and robotics in orthopaedic surgery. Participation in the survey was voluntary. Results Ninety-eight patients volunteered to participate in the survey, mean age 56.2 years (range, 19 to 88 years; 52 female, 46 male). Forty percent of patients thought more than 30% of National Health Service (NHS) orthopaedic operations involved navigation or robotics; 80% believed this was the same level or less than the private sector. One-third believed most of an operation could be performed independently by a robotic/navigation system. Amongst perceived benefits of navigation/robotic surgery was more accurate surgery (47%), quicker surgery (50%), and making the surgeon's job easier (52%). Sixty-nine percent believed navigation/robotics was more expensive and 20% believed it held no benefit against conventional surgery, with only 9% believing it led to longer surgery. Almost 50% would not mind at least some of their operation being performed with use of robotics/navigation. Conclusions Although few patients were familiar with this new technology, there appeared to be a strong consensus it was quicker and more accurate than conventional surgery. Many patients appear to believe navigation and robotics in orthopaedic surgery is largely the preserve of the private sector. This study demonstrates public knowledge of such new technologies is limited and a need to inform patients of the relative merits and drawbacks of such surgery prior to their more widespread implementation. PMID

  16. A Robotics Systems Design Need: A Design Standard to Provide the Systems Focus that is Required for Longterm Exploration Efforts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dischinger, H. Charles., Jr.; Mullins, Jeffrey B.

    2005-01-01

    The United States is entering a new period of human exploration of the inner Solar System, and robotic human helpers will be partners in that effort. In order to support integration of these new worker robots into existing and new human systems, a new design standard should be developed, to be called the Robot-Systems Integration Standard (RSIS). It will address the requirements for and constraints upon robotic collaborators with humans. These workers are subject to the same functional constraints as humans of work, reach, and visibility/situational awareness envelopes, and they will deal with the same maintenance and communication interfaces. Thus, the RSIS will be created by discipline experts with the same sort of perspective on these and other interface concerns as human engineers.

  17. Enabling technologies for robot assisted ultrasound tomography: system setup and calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aalamifar, Fereshteh; Khurana, Rishabh; Cheng, Alexis; Taylor, Russell H.; Iordachita, Iulian; Boctor, Emad M.

    2014-04-01

    In this study, we are proposing a robot-assisted ultrasound tomography system that can offer soft tissue tomographic imaging and deeper or faster scan of the anatomy. This system consists of a robot-held ultrasound probe that tracks the position of another freehand probe, trying to align with it. One of the major challenges is achieving proper alignment of the two ultrasound probes. To enable proper alignment, two ultrasound calibrations and one hand-eye calibration are required. However, the system functionality and design is such that the ultrasound calibrations have become a challenge. In this paper, after providing an overview of the proposed robotic ultrasound tomography system, we focus on the calibrations problem. The results of the calibrations show a point reconstruction precision of a few millimeters for the current prototype, and the two images have at least 50% overlap visually; confirming the feasibility of such a system relying on accurate probe alignments.

  18. BOA: Asbestos pipe-insulation removal robot system, Phase 2. Topical report, January--June 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Schempf, H.; Bares, J.E.

    1995-06-01

    This report explored the regulatory impact and cost-benefit of a robotic thermal asbestos pipe-insulation removal system over the current manual abatement work practice. The authors are currently in the second phase of a two-phase program to develop a robotic asbestos abatement system, comprised of a ground-based support system (including vacuum, fluid delivery, computing/electronics/power, and other subsystems) and several on-pipe removal units, each sized to handle pipes within a given diameter range. The intent of this study was to (i) aid in developing design and operational criteria for the overall system to maximize cost-efficiency, and (ii) to determine the commercial potential of a robotic pipe-insulation abatement system.

  19. Design framework of a teleoperating system for a magnetically levitated robot with force feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuda, Naoaki; Kato, Norihiko; Nomura, Yoshihiko; Matsui, Hirokazu

    2002-02-01

    Precise works and manipulating micro objects are tough jobs for operators both mentally and physically. To execute these jobs smoothly without feeling wrongness, use of master-slave system is preferable because position and force are able to be scaled up and down as well under the system. In this study we develop a master-slave system where the size of a slave robot is very small and the slave robot is levitated by magnetic forces. In distinction from ordinary master- slave systems, the levitated robot does not get any other contact forces from outside. Thus we introduce a method using an impedance model for constructing the master-slave system. We confirmed the effectiveness of the positioning control algorithm through experiments.

  20. A robotic system for automation of logistics functions on the Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, J. C.; Purves, R. B.; Hosier, R. N.; Krein, B. A.

    1988-01-01

    Spacecraft inventory management is currently performed by the crew and as systems become more complex, increased crew time will be required to perform routine logistics activities. If future spacecraft are to function effectively as research labs and production facilities, the efficient use of crew time as a limited resource for performing mission functions must be employed. The use of automation and robotics technology, such as automated warehouse and materials handling functions, can free the crew from many logistics tasks and provide more efficient use of crew time. Design criteria for a Space Station Automated Logistics Inventory Management System is focused on through the design and demonstration of a mobile two armed terrestrial robot. The system functionally represents a 0 gravity automated inventory management system and the problems associated with operating in such an environment. Features of the system include automated storage and retrieval, item recognition, two armed robotic manipulation, and software control of all inventory item transitions and queries.

  1. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Robotic Processing System Program Automation Systems, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobbs, M. E.

    1991-01-01

    Topics related to robot operated materials processing in space (RoMPS) are presented in view graph form. Some of the areas covered include: (1) mission requirements; (2) automation management system; (3) Space Transportation System (STS) Hitchhicker Payload; (4) Spacecraft Command Language (SCL) scripts; (5) SCL software components; (6) RoMPS EasyLab Command & Variable summary for rack stations and annealer module; (7) support electronics assembly; (8) SCL uplink packet definition; (9) SC-4 EasyLab System Memory Map; (10) Servo Axis Control Logic Suppliers; and (11) annealing oven control subsystem.

  2. Modeling and dynamic performance evaluation of target capture in robotic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Koevecses, J.; Cleghorn, W.L.; Fenton, R.G.

    2000-04-01

    In this paper, a dynamic system consisting of a robot manipulator and a target is analyzed. The target is considered in a general way as a dynamic subsystem having finite mass and moments of inertia (e.g., a rigid body or a second robot). The situation investigated is when the robot establishes interaction with the target in such a way that it intercepts and captures a reference element of the target. The analysis of target capture is divided into three phases in terms of time: the precapture, free motion (finite motion); the transition from free to constrained motion in the vicinity of interception and capture (impulsive motion); and the postcapture, constrained motion (finite motion). The greatest attention is paid to the analysis of the phase of transition, the impulsive motion, and dynamics of the system. Based on the use of impulsive constraints and the Jourdainian formulation of analytical dynamics, a novel approach is proposed for the dynamic modeling of target capture by a robot manipulator. The proposed approach is suitable to handle both finite and impulsive motions in a common analytical framework. Based on the dynamic model developed and using a geometric representation of the system's dynamics, a detailed analysis and a performance evaluation framework are presented for the phase of transition. Both rigid and structurally flexible models of robots are considered. For the performance evaluation analyses, two main concepts are proposed and corresponding performance measures are derived. These tools may be used in the analysis, design, and control of time-varying robotic systems. The dynamic system of a three-link robot arm capturing a rigid body is used to illustrate the material presented.

  3. Heterogeneous Multi-Robot System for Mapping Environmental Variables of Greenhouses

    PubMed Central

    Roldán, Juan Jesús; Garcia-Aunon, Pablo; Garzón, Mario; de León, Jorge; del Cerro, Jaime; Barrientos, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The productivity of greenhouses highly depends on the environmental conditions of crops, such as temperature and humidity. The control and monitoring might need large sensor networks, and as a consequence, mobile sensory systems might be a more suitable solution. This paper describes the application of a heterogeneous robot team to monitor environmental variables of greenhouses. The multi-robot system includes both ground and aerial vehicles, looking to provide flexibility and improve performance. The multi-robot sensory system measures the temperature, humidity, luminosity and carbon dioxide concentration in the ground and at different heights. Nevertheless, these measurements can be complemented with other ones (e.g., the concentration of various gases or images of crops) without a considerable effort. Additionally, this work addresses some relevant challenges of multi-robot sensory systems, such as the mission planning and task allocation, the guidance, navigation and control of robots in greenhouses and the coordination among ground and aerial vehicles. This work has an eminently practical approach, and therefore, the system has been extensively tested both in simulations and field experiments. PMID:27376297

  4. The anthropomorphic brain: the mirror neuron system responds to human and robotic actions.

    PubMed

    Gazzola, V; Rizzolatti, G; Wicker, B; Keysers, C

    2007-05-01

    In humans and monkeys the mirror neuron system transforms seen actions into our inner representation of these actions. Here we asked if this system responds also if we see an industrial robot perform similar actions. We localised the motor areas involved in the execution of hand actions, presented the same subjects blocks of movies of humans or robots perform a variety of actions. The mirror system was activated strongly by the sight of both human and robotic actions, with no significant differences between these two agents. Finally we observed that seeing a robot perform a single action repeatedly within a block failed to activate the mirror system. This latter finding suggests that previous studies may have failed to find mirror activations to robotic actions because of the repetitiveness of the presented actions. Our findings suggest that the mirror neuron system could contribute to the understanding of a wider range of actions than previously assumed, and that the goal of an action might be more important for mirror activations than the way in which the action is performed. PMID:17395490

  5. Validation of a six degree-of-freedom robotic system for hip in vitro biomechanical testing.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, Mary T; Rasmussen, Matthew T; Lee Turnbull, Travis; Trindade, Christiano A C; LaPrade, Robert F; Philippon, Marc J; Wijdicks, Coen A

    2015-11-26

    Currently, there exists a need for a more thorough understanding of native hip joint kinematics to improve the understanding of pathological conditions, injury mechanisms, and surgical interventions. A biomechanical testing system able to accomplish multiple degree-of-freedom (DOF) movements is required to study the complex articulation of the hip joint. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to assess the repeatability and comparative accuracy of a 6 DOF robotic system as a testing platform for range of motion in vitro hip biomechanical analysis. Intact human cadaveric pelvises, complete with full femurs, were prepared, and a coordinate measuring machine collected measurements of pertinent femoral and pelvic bony landmarks used to define the anatomic hip axes. Passive flexion/extension path and simulated clinical exam kinematics were recorded using a 6 DOF robotic system. The results of this study demonstrate that the 6 DOF robotic system was able to identify hip passive paths in a highly repeatable manner (median RMS error of <0.1mm and <0.4°), and the robotically simulated clinical exams were consistent and repeatable (rotational RMS error ≤0.8°) in determining hip ranges of motion. Thus, a 6 DOF robotic system is a valuable and effective tool for range of motion in vitro hip biomechanical analysis. PMID:26537889

  6. Heterogeneous Multi-Robot System for Mapping Environmental Variables of Greenhouses.

    PubMed

    Roldán, Juan Jesús; Garcia-Aunon, Pablo; Garzón, Mario; de León, Jorge; Del Cerro, Jaime; Barrientos, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The productivity of greenhouses highly depends on the environmental conditions of crops, such as temperature and humidity. The control and monitoring might need large sensor networks, and as a consequence, mobile sensory systems might be a more suitable solution. This paper describes the application of a heterogeneous robot team to monitor environmental variables of greenhouses. The multi-robot system includes both ground and aerial vehicles, looking to provide flexibility and improve performance. The multi-robot sensory system measures the temperature, humidity, luminosity and carbon dioxide concentration in the ground and at different heights. Nevertheless, these measurements can be complemented with other ones (e.g., the concentration of various gases or images of crops) without a considerable effort. Additionally, this work addresses some relevant challenges of multi-robot sensory systems, such as the mission planning and task allocation, the guidance, navigation and control of robots in greenhouses and the coordination among ground and aerial vehicles. This work has an eminently practical approach, and therefore, the system has been extensively tested both in simulations and field experiments. PMID:27376297

  7. Intelligent robots and computer vision

    SciTech Connect

    Casasent, D.P.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on artificial intelligence and robot vision. Topics considered at the conference included pattern recognition, image processing for intelligent robotics, three-dimensional vision (depth and motion), vision modeling and shape estimation, spatial reasoning, the symbolic processing visual information, robotic sensors and applications, intelligent control architectures for robot systems, robot languages and programming, human-machine interfaces, robotics applications, and architectures of robotics.

  8. An Intelligent Space for Mobile Robot Localization Using a Multi-Camera System

    PubMed Central

    Rampinelli, Mariana.; Covre, Vitor Buback.; de Queiroz, Felippe Mendonça.; Vassallo, Raquel Frizera.; Bastos-Filho, Teodiano Freire.; Mazo, Manuel.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes an intelligent space, whose objective is to localize and control robots or robotic wheelchairs to help people. Such an intelligent space has 11 cameras distributed in two laboratories and a corridor. The cameras are fixed in the environment, and image capturing is done synchronously. The system was programmed as a client/server with TCP/IP connections, and a communication protocol was defined. The client coordinates the activities inside the intelligent space, and the servers provide the information needed for that. Once the cameras are used for localization, they have to be properly calibrated. Therefore, a calibration method for a multi-camera network is also proposed in this paper. A robot is used to move a calibration pattern throughout the field of view of the cameras. Then, the captured images and the robot odometry are used for calibration. As a result, the proposed algorithm provides a solution for multi-camera calibration and robot localization at the same time. The intelligent space and the calibration method were evaluated under different scenarios using computer simulations and real experiments. The results demonstrate the proper functioning of the intelligent space and validate the multi-camera calibration method, which also improves robot localization. PMID:25196009

  9. An intelligent space for mobile robot localization using a multi-camera system.

    PubMed

    Rampinelli, Mariana; Covre, Vitor Buback; de Queiroz, Felippe Mendonça; Vassallo, Raquel Frizera; Bastos-Filho, Teodiano Freire; Mazo, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes an intelligent space, whose objective is to localize and control robots or robotic wheelchairs to help people. Such an intelligent space has 11 cameras distributed in two laboratories and a corridor. The cameras are fixed in the environment, and image capturing is done synchronously. The system was programmed as a client/server with TCP/IP connections, and a communication protocol was defined. The client coordinates the activities inside the intelligent space, and the servers provide the information needed for that. Once the cameras are used for localization, they have to be properly calibrated. Therefore, a calibration method for a multi-camera network is also proposed in this paper. A robot is used to move a calibration pattern throughout the field of view of the cameras. Then, the captured images and the robot odometry are used for calibration. As a result, the proposed algorithm provides a solution for multi-camera calibration and robot localization at the same time. The intelligent space and the calibration method were evaluated under different scenarios using computer simulations and real experiments. The results demonstrate the proper functioning of the intelligent space and validate the multi-camera calibration method, which also improves robot localization. PMID:25196009

  10. Measurement of the robot motor capability of a robot motor system: a Fitts's-law-inspired approach.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hsien-I; Lee, C S George

    2013-01-01

    Robot motor capability is a crucial factor for a robot, because it affects how accurately and rapidly a robot can perform a motion to accomplish a task constrained by spatial and temporal conditions. In this paper, we propose and derive a pseudo-index of motor performance (pIp) to characterize robot motor capability with robot kinematics, dynamics and control taken into consideration. The proposed pIp provides a quantitative measure for a robot with revolute joints, which is inspired from an index of performance in Fitts's law of human skills. Computer simulations and experiments on a PUMA 560 industrial robot were conducted to validate the proposed pIp for performing a motion accurately and rapidly. PMID:23820745

  11. Using Robots and Contract Learning to Teach Cyber-Physical Systems to Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crenshaw, T. L. A.

    2013-01-01

    Cyber-physical systems are a genre of networked real-time systems that monitor and control the physical world. Examples include unmanned aerial vehicles and industrial robotics. The experts who develop these complex systems are retiring much faster than universities are graduating engineering majors. As a result, it is important for undergraduates…

  12. Construction typification as the tool for optimizing the functioning of a robotized manufacturing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwiazda, A.; Banas, W.; Sekala, A.; Foit, K.; Hryniewicz, P.; Kost, G.

    2015-11-01

    : simple models of technological equipment, conveyors models, models of the obstacles and like that. Using these elements it could be formed various production spaces (robotized workcells), in which it is possible to virtually track the operation of an industrial robot arm modelled in the system.

  13. An Integrated Fault Tolerant Robotic Controller System for High Reliability and Safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marzwell, Neville I.; Tso, Kam S.; Hecht, Myron

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the concepts and features of a fault-tolerant intelligent robotic control system being developed for applications that require high dependability (reliability, availability, and safety). The system consists of two major elements: a fault-tolerant controller and an operator workstation. The fault-tolerant controller uses a strategy which allows for detection and recovery of hardware, operating system, and application software failures.The fault-tolerant controller can be used by itself in a wide variety of applications in industry, process control, and communications. The controller in combination with the operator workstation can be applied to robotic applications such as spaceborne extravehicular activities, hazardous materials handling, inspection and maintenance of high value items (e.g., space vehicles, reactor internals, or aircraft), medicine, and other tasks where a robot system failure poses a significant risk to life or property.

  14. A robotic system to conduct radiation and contamination surveys on nuclear waste transport casks

    SciTech Connect

    Harrigan, R.W.; Sanders, T.L.

    1990-06-01

    The feasibility of performing, numerous spent fuel cask operations using fully integrated robotic systems is under evaluation. Using existing technology, operational and descriptive software and hardware in the form of robotic end effectors are being designed in conjunction with interfacing cask components. A robotic radiation and contamination survey system has been developed and used on mock-up cask hardware to evaluate the impact of such fully automated operations on cask design features and productivity. Based on experience gained from the survey system, numerous health physics operations can be reliably performed with little human intervention using a fully automated system. Such operations can also significantly reduce time requirements for cask-receiving operations. 7 refs., 51 figs., 6 tabs.

  15. A Car Transportation System in Cooperation by Multiple Mobile Robots for Each Wheel: iCART II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashiwazaki, Koshi; Yonezawa, Naoaki; Kosuge, Kazuhiro; Sugahara, Yusuke; Hirata, Yasuhisa; Endo, Mitsuru; Kanbayashi, Takashi; Shinozuka, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Koki; Ono, Yuki

    The authors proposed a car transportation system, iCART (intelligent Cooperative Autonomous Robot Transporters), for automation of mechanical parking systems by two mobile robots. However, it was difficult to downsize the mobile robot because the length of it requires at least the wheelbase of a car. This paper proposes a new car transportation system, iCART II (iCART - type II), based on “a-robot-for-a-wheel” concept. A prototype system, MRWheel (a Mobile Robot for a Wheel), is designed and downsized less than half the conventional robot. First, a method for lifting up a wheel by MRWheel is described. In general, it is very difficult for mobile robots such as MRWheel to move to desired positions without motion errors caused by slipping, etc. Therefore, we propose a follower's motion error estimation algorithm based on the internal force applied to each follower by extending a conventional leader-follower type decentralized control algorithm for cooperative object transportation. The proposed algorithm enables followers to estimate their motion errors and enables the robots to transport a car to a desired position. In addition, we analyze and prove the stability and convergence of the resultant system with the proposed algorithm. In order to extract only the internal force from the force applied to each robot, we also propose a model-based external force compensation method. Finally, proposed methods are applied to the car transportation system, the experimental results confirm their validity.

  16. To err is robotic, to tolerate immunological: fault detection in multirobot systems.

    PubMed

    Tarapore, Danesh; Lima, Pedro U; Carneiro, Jorge; Christensen, Anders Lyhne

    2015-01-01

    Fault detection and fault tolerance represent two of the most important and largely unsolved issues in the field of multirobot systems (MRS). Efficient, long-term operation requires an accurate, timely detection, and accommodation of abnormally behaving robots. Most existing approaches to fault-tolerance prescribe a characterization of normal robot behaviours, and train a model to recognize these behaviours. Behaviours unrecognized by the model are consequently labelled abnormal or faulty. MRS employing these models do not transition well to scenarios involving temporal variations in behaviour (e.g., online learning of new behaviours, or in response to environment perturbations). The vertebrate immune system is a complex distributed system capable of learning to tolerate the organism's tissues even when they change during puberty or metamorphosis, and to mount specific responses to invading pathogens, all without the need of a genetically hardwired characterization of normality. We present a generic abnormality detection approach based on a model of the adaptive immune system, and evaluate the approach in a swarm of robots. Our results reveal the robust detection of abnormal robots simulating common electro-mechanical and software faults, irrespective of temporal changes in swarm behaviour. Abnormality detection is shown to be scalable in terms of the number of robots in the swarm, and in terms of the size of the behaviour classification space. PMID:25642825

  17. DOE Robotic and Remote Systems Assistance to the Government of Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Derek Wadsworth; Victor Walker

    2013-02-01

    At the request of the Government of Japan, DOE did a complex wide survey of available remotely operated and robotic systems to assist in the initial assessment of the damage to the Fukushima Daiichi reactors following an earthquake and subsequent tsunami. As a result several radiation hardened cameras and a Talon robot were identified as systems that could immediately assist in the effort and were subsequently sent to Japan. These systems were transferred to the Government of Japan and used to map radiation levels surrounding the damaged facilities. This report describes the equipment, its use, data collected, and lessons learned from the experience.

  18. An integrated system for planning, navigation and robotic assistance for skull base surgery

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Tian; Baird, Clint; Jallo, George; Hayes, Kathryn; Nakajima, Nobuyuki; Hata, Nobuhiko; Kazanzides, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Background We developed an image-guided robot system to provide mechanical assistance for skull base drilling, which is performed to gain access for some neurosurgical interventions, such as tumour resection. The motivation for introducing this robot was to improve safety by preventing the surgeon from accidentally damaging critical neurovascular structures during the drilling procedure. Methods We integrated a Stealthstation® navigation system, a NeuroMate® robotic arm with a six-degree-of-freedom force sensor, and the 3D Slicer visualization software to allow the robotic arm to be used in a navigated, cooperatively-controlled fashion by the surgeon. We employed virtual fixtures to constrain the motion of the robot-held cutting tool, so that it remained in the safe zone that was defined on a preoperative CT scan. Results We performed experiments on both foam skull and cadaver heads. The results for foam blocks cut using different registrations yielded an average placement error of 0.6 mm and an average dimensional error of 0.6 mm. We drilled the posterior porus acusticus in three cadaver heads and concluded that the robot-assisted procedure is clinically feasible and provides some ergonomic benefits, such as stabilizing the drill. We obtained postoperative CT scans of the cadaver heads to assess the accuracy and found that some bone outside the virtual fixture boundary was cut. The typical overcut was 1–2 mm, with a maximum overcut of about 3 mm. Conclusions The image-guided cooperatively-controlled robot system can improve the safety and ergonomics of skull base drilling by stabilizing the drill and enforcing virtual fixtures to protect critical neurovascular structures. The next step is to improve the accuracy so that the overcut can be reduced to a more clinically acceptable value of about 1 mm. PMID:18803337

  19. Study on Sensor Design Technique for Real-Time Robotic Welding Tracking System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C. J.; Li, Y. B.; Zhu, J. G.; Ye, S. H.

    2006-10-01

    Based on visual measurement techniques, the real-time robotic welding tracking system achieves real-time adjustment for robotic welding according to the position and shape changes of a workpiece. In system design, the sensor design technique is so important that its performance directly affects the precision and stability of the tracking system. Through initiative visual measurement technology, a camera unit for real-time sampling is built with multiple-strip structured light and a high-performance CMOS image sensor including 1.3 million pixels; to realize real-time data process and transmission, an image process unit is built with FPGA and DSP. Experiments show that the precision of this sensor reaches 0.3mm, and band rate comes up to 10Mbps, which effectively improves robot welding quality.With the development of advanced manufacturing technology, it becomes an inexorable trend to realize the automatic, flexible and intelligent welding product manufacture. With the advantage of interchangeability and reliability, robotic welding can boost productivity, improve work condition, stabilize and guarantee weld quality, and realize welding automation of the short run products [1]. At present, robotic welding has already become the application trend of automatic welding technology. Traditional welding robots are play-back ones, which cannot adapt environment and weld distortion. Especially in the more and more extensive arc-welding course, the deficiency and limitation of play-back welding technology becomes more prominent because of changeable welding condition. It becomes one of the key technology influencing the development of modern robotic welding technology to eliminate or decrease uncertain influence on quality of welding such as changing welding condition etc [2]. Based on visual measuring principle, this text adopts active visual measuring technology, cooperated with high-speed image process and transmission technology to structure a tracking sensor, to realize

  20. Image-Based Visual Servoing for Robotic Systems: A Nonlinear Lyapunov-Based Control Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, Warren

    2004-06-01

    There is significant motivation to provide robotic systems with improved autonomy as a means to significantly accelerate deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) operations while also reducing the associated costs, removing human operators from hazardous environments, and reducing the required burden and skill of human operators. To achieve improved autonomy, this project focused on the basic science challenges leading to the development of visual servo controllers. The challenge in developing these controllers is that a camera provides 2-dimensional image information about the 3-dimensional Euclidean-space through a perspective (range dependent) projection that can be corrupted by uncertainty in the camera calibration matrix and by disturbances such as nonlinear radial distortion. Disturbances in this relationship (i.e., corruption in the sensor information) propagate erroneous information to the feedback controller of the robot, leading to potentially unpredictable task execution. This research project focused on the development of a visual servo control methodology that targets compensating for disturbances in the camera model (i.e., camera calibration and the recovery of range information) as a means to achieve predictable response by the robotic system operating in unstructured environments. The fundamental idea is to use nonlinear Lyapunov-based techniques along with photogrammetry methods to overcome the complex control issues and alleviate many of the restrictive assumptions that impact current robotic applications. The outcome of this control methodology is a plug-and-play visual servoing control module that can be utilized in conjunction with current technology such as feature recognition and extraction to enable robotic systems with the capabilities of increased accuracy, autonomy, and robustness, with a larger field of view (and hence a larger workspace). The developed methodology has been reported in numerous peer-reviewed publications and the

  1. Yucca Mountain Waste Package Closure System Robotic Welding and Inspection System

    SciTech Connect

    C. I. Nichol; D. P. Pace; E. D. Larsen; T. R. McJunkin; D. E. Clark; M. L. Clark; K. L. Skinner; A. D. Watkins; H. B. Smartt

    2011-10-01

    The Waste Package Closure System (WPCS), for the closure of radioactive waste in canisters for permanent storage of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level waste in the Yucca Mountain Repository was designed, fabricated, and successfully demonstrated at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). This article focuses on the robotic hardware and tools necessary to remotely weld and inspect the closure lid welds. The system was operated remotely and designed for use in a radiation field, due to the SNF contained in the waste packages being closed.

  2. Human-rating Automated and Robotic Systems - (How HAL Can Work Safely with Astronauts)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baroff, Lynn; Dischinger, Charlie; Fitts, David

    2009-01-01

    Long duration human space missions, as planned in the Vision for Space Exploration, will not be possible without applying unprecedented levels of automation to support the human endeavors. The automated and robotic systems must carry the load of routine housekeeping for the new generation of explorers, as well as assist their exploration science and engineering work with new precision. Fortunately, the state of automated and robotic systems is sophisticated and sturdy enough to do this work - but the systems themselves have never been human-rated as all other NASA physical systems used in human space flight have. Our intent in this paper is to provide perspective on requirements and architecture for the interfaces and interactions between human beings and the astonishing array of automated systems; and the approach we believe necessary to create human-rated systems and implement them in the space program. We will explain our proposed standard structure for automation and robotic systems, and the process by which we will develop and implement that standard as an addition to NASA s Human Rating requirements. Our work here is based on real experience with both human system and robotic system designs; for surface operations as well as for in-flight monitoring and control; and on the necessities we have discovered for human-systems integration in NASA's Constellation program. We hope this will be an invitation to dialog and to consideration of a new issue facing new generations of explorers and their outfitters.

  3. Modified Denavit-Hartenberg parameters for better location of joint axis systems in robot arms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, L. K.

    1986-01-01

    The Denavit-Hartenberg parameters define the relative location of successive joint axis systems in a robot arm. A recent justifiable criticism is that one of these parameters becomes extremely large when two successive joints have near-parallel rotational axes. Geometrically, this parameter then locates a joint axis system at an excessive distance from the robot arm and, computationally, leads to an ill-conditioned transformation matrix. In this paper, a simple modification (which results from constraining a transverse vector between successive joint rotational axes to be normal to one of the rotational axes, instead of both) overcomes this criticism and favorably locates the joint axis system. An example is given for near-parallel rotational axes of the elbow and shoulder joints in a robot arm. The regular and modified parameters are extracted by an algebraic method with simulated measurement data. Unlike the modified parameters, extracted values of the regular parameters are very sensitive to measurement accuracy.

  4. A hardware investigation of robotic SPECT for functional and molecular imaging onboard radiation therapy systems

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Susu; Bowsher, James; Tough, MengHeng; Cheng, Lin; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To construct a robotic SPECT system and to demonstrate its capability to image a thorax phantom on a radiation therapy flat-top couch, as a step toward onboard functional and molecular imaging in radiation therapy. Methods: A robotic SPECT imaging system was constructed utilizing a gamma camera detector (Digirad 2020tc) and a robot (KUKA KR150 L110 robot). An imaging study was performed with a phantom (PET CT PhantomTM), which includes five spheres of 10, 13, 17, 22, and 28 mm diameters. The phantom was placed on a flat-top couch. SPECT projections were acquired either with a parallel-hole collimator or a single-pinhole collimator, both without background in the phantom and with background at 1/10th the sphere activity concentration. The imaging trajectories of parallel-hole and pinhole collimated detectors spanned 180° and 228°, respectively. The pinhole detector viewed an off-centered spherical common volume which encompassed the 28 and 22 mm spheres. The common volume for parallel-hole system was centered at the phantom which encompassed all five spheres in the phantom. The maneuverability of the robotic system was tested by navigating the detector to trace the phantom and flat-top table while avoiding collision and maintaining the closest possible proximity to the common volume. The robot base and tool coordinates were used for image reconstruction. Results: The robotic SPECT system was able to maneuver parallel-hole and pinhole collimated SPECT detectors in close proximity to the phantom, minimizing impact of the flat-top couch on detector radius of rotation. Without background, all five spheres were visible in the reconstructed parallel-hole image, while four spheres, all except the smallest one, were visible in the reconstructed pinhole image. With background, three spheres of 17, 22, and 28 mm diameters were readily observed with the parallel-hole imaging, and the targeted spheres (22 and 28 mm diameters) were readily observed in the pinhole

  5. A hardware investigation of robotic SPECT for functional and molecular imaging onboard radiation therapy systems

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Susu Tough, MengHeng; Bowsher, James; Yin, Fang-Fang; Cheng, Lin

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To construct a robotic SPECT system and to demonstrate its capability to image a thorax phantom on a radiation therapy flat-top couch, as a step toward onboard functional and molecular imaging in radiation therapy. Methods: A robotic SPECT imaging system was constructed utilizing a gamma camera detector (Digirad 2020tc) and a robot (KUKA KR150 L110 robot). An imaging study was performed with a phantom (PET CT Phantom{sup TM}), which includes five spheres of 10, 13, 17, 22, and 28 mm diameters. The phantom was placed on a flat-top couch. SPECT projections were acquired either with a parallel-hole collimator or a single-pinhole collimator, both without background in the phantom and with background at 1/10th the sphere activity concentration. The imaging trajectories of parallel-hole and pinhole collimated detectors spanned 180° and 228°, respectively. The pinhole detector viewed an off-centered spherical common volume which encompassed the 28 and 22 mm spheres. The common volume for parallel-hole system was centered at the phantom which encompassed all five spheres in the phantom. The maneuverability of the robotic system was tested by navigating the detector to trace the phantom and flat-top table while avoiding collision and maintaining the closest possible proximity to the common volume. The robot base and tool coordinates were used for image reconstruction. Results: The robotic SPECT system was able to maneuver parallel-hole and pinhole collimated SPECT detectors in close proximity to the phantom, minimizing impact of the flat-top couch on detector radius of rotation. Without background, all five spheres were visible in the reconstructed parallel-hole image, while four spheres, all except the smallest one, were visible in the reconstructed pinhole image. With background, three spheres of 17, 22, and 28 mm diameters were readily observed with the parallel-hole imaging, and the targeted spheres (22 and 28 mm diameters) were readily observed in the

  6. A hardware/software environment to support R D in intelligent machines and mobile robotic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, R.C.

    1990-01-01

    The Center for Engineering Systems Advanced Research (CESAR) serves as a focal point at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for basic and applied research in intelligent machines. R D at CESAR addresses issues related to autonomous systems, unstructured (i.e. incompletely known) operational environments, and multiple performing agents. Two mobile robot prototypes (HERMIES-IIB and HERMIES-III) are being used to test new developments in several robot component technologies. This paper briefly introduces the computing environment at CESAR which includes three hypercube concurrent computers (two on-board the mobile robots), a graphics workstation, VAX, and multiple VME-based systems (several on-board the mobile robots). The current software environment at CESAR is intended to satisfy several goals, e.g.: code portability, re-usability in different experimental scenarios, modularity, concurrent computer hardware transparent to applications programmer, future support for multiple mobile robots, support human-machine interface modules, and support for integration of software from other, geographically disparate laboratories with different hardware set-ups. 6 refs., 1 fig.

  7. A user-friendly automated port placement planning system for laparoscopic robotic surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, Luis G.; Azimian, Hamidreza; Enquobahrie, Andinet

    2014-03-01

    Laparoscopic surgery is a minimally invasive surgical approach in which surgical instruments are passed through ports placed at small incisions. This approach can benefit patients by reducing recovery times and scars. Surgeons have gained greater dexterity, accuracy, and vision through adoption of robotic surgical systems. However, in some cases a preselected set of ports cannot be accommodated by the robot; the robot's arms may cause collisions during the procedure, or the surgical targets may not be reachable through the selected ports. In this case, the surgeon must either make more incisions for more ports, or even abandon the laparoscopic approach entirely. To assist in this, we are building an easytouse system which, given a surgical task and preoperative medical images of the patient, will recommend a suitable port placement plan for the robotic surgery. This work bears two main contributions: 1) a high level user interface that assists the surgeon in operating the complicated underlying planning algorithm; and 2) an interface to assist the surgical team in implementation of the recommended plan in the operating room. We believe that such an automated port placement system would reduce setup time for robotic surgery and reduce the morbidity to patients caused by unsuitable surgical port placement.

  8. The use of computer graphic simulation in the development of on-orbit tele-robotic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandez, Ken; Hinman, Elaine

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes the use of computer graphic simulation techniques to resolve critical design and operational issues for robotic systems used for on-orbit operations. These issues are robot motion control, robot path-planning/verification, and robot dynamics. The major design issues in developing effective telerobotic systems are discussed, and the use of ROBOSIM, a NASA-developed computer graphic simulation tool, to address these issues is presented. Simulation plans for the Space Station and the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle are presented and discussed.

  9. Development and Evaluation of a Registration Methodology for Information-Guided Precision Robotic Laser Neurosurgery System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Ryoichi; Hara, Mikiko; Omori, Shigeru; Uematsu, Miyuki; Umezu, Mitsuo; Muragaki, Yoshihiro; Iseki, Hiroshi

    To establish safe, precise, and minimally invasive surgery, Computer Aided Surgery (CAS) systems, such as intra-operative imaging and navigation system to detect the location of the target of therapy, and surgical robot system, are very powerful tools. There is strong need to combine these CAS systems for fusion of advanced diagnosis and treatment technologies. In this paper, we introduce our new method to register the intraoperative imaging information, robotic surgery system, and patient using surgical navigation system. Using our Open-MRI navigation system and laser surgery system for neurosurgery, we can make registration between these system and patient precisely. The experimental result shows that the error on the registration between image data and the laser surgery system is low enough to fulfill the requirement of laser surgery system in the use of high-resolution image data. This system realizes the safe, precise and minimally invasive neurosurgery by the combination of intra-operative diagnosis and advanced therapeutic device.

  10. Robotic Vision for Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    Vision system for robotic welder looks at weld along axis of welding electrode. Gives robot view of most of weld area, including yet-unwelded joint, weld pool, and completed weld bead. Protected within welding-torch body, lens and fiber bundle give robot closeup view of weld in progress. Relayed to video camera on robot manipulator frame, weld image provides data for automatic control of robot motion and welding parameters.

  11. An Adaptive Home-Use Robotic Rehabilitation System for the Upper Body

    PubMed Central

    Barzilay, Ouriel; Lombrozo, Yuval; Wolf, Alon

    2014-01-01

    Robotic rehabilitation systems have been developed to treat musculoskeletal conditions, but limited availability prevents most patients from using them. The objective of this paper was to create a home-use robotic rehabilitation system. Data were obtained in real time from a Microsoft \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}${\\rm Kinect}^{\\rm TM}$ \\end{document} and a wireless surface electromyograph system. Results from the \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}${\\rm Kinect}^{\\rm TM}$ \\end{document} sensor were compared to a standard motion capture system. A subject completed visual follow exercise tasks in a 3-D visual environment. Data from two training exercises were used to generate a neural network, which was then used to simulate the subject's individual performance. The subjects completed both the exercise task output from the neural network (custom), and the unmodified task (standard). In addition, a wearable arm robot prototype was built. Basic system identification was completed, and a control algorithm for the robot based on pressure control was designed and tested. The subjects had greater root-mean-square error for position and velocity variables during the custom exercise tasks. These results suggest that the custom task was difficult to complete, possibly because the neural network was unconstrained. Finally, the robot prototype was able to mimic changes in a subject's elbow angle in real time, demonstrating the feasibility of the robotic rehabilitation system. PMID:27170877

  12. Assembly, Tuning, and Transfer of Action Systems in Infants and Robots

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berthouze, Luc; Goldfield, Eugene C.

    2008-01-01

    This paper seeks to foster a discussion on whether experiments with robots can inform theory in infant motor development and specifically (1) how the interactions among the parts of a system, including the nervous and musculoskeletal systems and the forces acting on the body, induce organizational changes in the whole, and (2) how exploratory…

  13. Dynamics and control for Constrained Multibody Systems modeled with Maggi's equation: Application to Differential Mobile Robots Partll

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amengonu, Yawo H.; Kakad, Yogendra P.

    2014-07-01

    Quasivelocity techniques were applied to derive the dynamics of a Differential Wheeled Mobile Robot (DWMR) in the companion paper. The present paper formulates a control system design for trajectory tracking of this class of robots. The method develops a feedback linearization technique for the nonlinear system using dynamic extension algorithm. The effectiveness of the nonlinear controller is illustrated with simulation example.

  14. Improving social odometry robot networks with distributed reputation systems for collaborative purposes.

    PubMed

    Fraga, David; Gutiérrez, Alvaro; Vallejo, Juan Carlos; Campo, Alexandre; Bankovic, Zorana

    2011-01-01

    The improvement of odometry systems in collaborative robotics remains an important challenge for several applications. Social odometry is a social technique which confers the robots the possibility to learn from the others. This paper analyzes social odometry and proposes and follows a methodology to improve its behavior based on cooperative reputation systems. We also provide a reference implementation that allows us to compare the performance of the proposed solution in highly dynamic environments with the performance of standard social odometry techniques. Simulation results quantitatively show the benefits of this collaborative approach that allows us to achieve better performances than social odometry. PMID:22247671

  15. Shared robotic system: automated pipette calibration and pipette tip filter assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Addison, J.H. Jr.; Dyches, G.M.

    1985-01-01

    At the Savannah River Laboratory a Zymate Laboratory Automation System has been developed to perform two completely independent tasks within one work cell. One operation is the precise calibration of pipettes; the other is the assembly of a filter in a pipette tip. Since neither task requires full robot time, the shared system is an economical means of robotizing both processes. These are tedious, repetitive, time consuming tasks; and human operators fail to yield constant results. Automation insures a repeatable process which increases product quality.

  16. Evaluation of automated decisionmaking methodologies and development of an integrated robotic system simulation, appendix B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haley, D. C.; Almand, B. J.; Thomas, M. M.; Krauze, L. D.; Gremban, K. D.; Sanborn, J. C.; Kelly, J. H.; Depkovich, T. M.

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of the Robotics Simulation (ROBSIM) program is to provide a broad range of computer capabilities to assist in the design, verification, simulation, and study of robotic systems. ROBSIM is programmed in FORTRAN 77 and implemented on a VAX 11/750 computer using the VMS operating system. This programmer's guide describes the ROBSIM implementation and program logic flow, and the functions and structures of the different subroutines. With this manual and the in-code documentation, and experienced programmer can incorporate additional routines and modify existing ones to add desired capabilities.

  17. Improving Social Odometry Robot Networks with Distributed Reputation Systems for Collaborative Purposes

    PubMed Central

    Fraga, David; Gutiérrez, Álvaro; Vallejo, Juan Carlos; Campo, Alexandre; Bankovic, Zorana

    2011-01-01

    The improvement of odometry systems in collaborative robotics remains an important challenge for several applications. Social odometry is a social technique which confers the robots the possibility to learn from the others. This paper analyzes social odometry and proposes and follows a methodology to improve its behavior based on cooperative reputation systems. We also provide a reference implementation that allows us to compare the performance of the proposed solution in highly dynamic environments with the performance of standard social odometry techniques. Simulation results quantitatively show the benefits of this collaborative approach that allows us to achieve better performances than social odometry. PMID:22247671

  18. Dynamics, control and sensor issues pertinent to robotic hands for the EVA retriever system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclauchlan, Robert A.

    1987-01-01

    Basic dynamics, sensor, control, and related artificial intelligence issues pertinent to smart robotic hands for the Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) Retriever system are summarized and discussed. These smart hands are to be used as end effectors on arms attached to manned maneuvering units (MMU). The Retriever robotic systems comprised of MMU, arm and smart hands, are being developed to aid crewmen in the performance of routine EVA tasks including tool and object retrieval. The ultimate goal is to enhance the effectiveness of EVA crewmen.

  19. Multiagent Modeling and Simulation in Human-Robot Mission Operations Work System Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sierhuis, Maarten; Clancey, William J.; Sims, Michael H.; Shafto, Michael (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes a collaborative multiagent modeling and simulation approach for designing work systems. The Brahms environment is used to model mission operations for a semi-autonomous robot mission to the Moon at the work practice level. It shows the impact of human-decision making on the activities and energy consumption of a robot. A collaborative work systems design methodology is described that allows informal models, created with users and stakeholders, to be used as input to the development of formal computational models.

  20. Nonlinear robust controller design for multi-robot systems with unknown payloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, Y. D.; Anderson, J. N.; Homaifar, A.; Lai, H. Y.

    1992-01-01

    This work is concerned with the control problem of a multi-robot system handling a payload with unknown mass properties. Force constraints at the grasp points are considered. Robust control schemes are proposed that cope with the model uncertainty and achieve asymptotic path tracking. To deal with the force constraints, a strategy for optimally sharing the task is suggested. This strategy basically consists of two steps. The first detects the robots that need help and the second arranges that help. It is shown that the overall system is not only robust to uncertain payload parameters, but also satisfies the force constraints.