Science.gov

Sample records for robot-driven gait orthosis

  1. Effects of orthosis on balance and gait in healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Myung-Joon; Choi, Yeong-Deok; Lee, Jung-Ho

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study evaluated the effects of an oral orthosis that can change body alignment on the balance ability and gait of healthy adults. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects of this study were 21 University students. A gait analyzer was used to analyze the subjects’ balance ability and gait quality. Two walking speeds were used: 2 km/h, a comfortable speed, and 4 km/h, a slightly faster walking speed. [Results] The step length, and base of gait at 2 km/h differed significantly after the intervention. The total step time and step length increased significantly after the intervention. Furthermore, the total base of gait decreased significantly after the intervention. The step times of the left lower limb at 4 km/h differed significantly after the intervention. [Conclusion] The oral orthosis tested positively affects the balance ability and gait of healthy adults. PMID:26180365

  2. Ergonomy of paraplegic patients working with a reciprocating gait orthosis.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, M; Canale, I; Felici, F; Macaluso, A; Marchettoni, P; Sproviero, E

    1995-08-01

    A reciprocating gait orthosis (RGO) is, among others, the most widely adopted device to restore the standing and walking capability of paraplegic patients. The aim of the present study was the evaluation of the energy demand (VO2), and cardiopulmonary load (HR and VE) imposed on the subject by different working tasks while sitting in a wheelchair or standing using a RGO. In addition, a comparison with the performance of normal subjects was also attempted. The RGO use allowed a dramatic improvement of patients' mobility and reach space in the workplace. A further advantage provided by the use of the RGO was represented by the increased mobility of the subjects with respect to the wheelchair confined situation. The energy demand and the cardiorespiratory load imposed on the subjects by the use of the RGO were not different from those observed both in the same subjects sitting in a wheelchair and in the controls. The energy demand slightly exceeded the values typical of light work and was, thus, compatible with the normal duration of a working day. On the other hand, the cardiac load corresponded to that typical of moderate activity, thus limiting the duration of the working task to 5-8 h. Based on the ergometry test, all of the working activities considered can be classified as aerobic activities, energy demand being under the ventilatory threshold. PMID:7478740

  3. Engineering evaluation of the energy-storing orthosis FES gait system.

    PubMed

    Kangude, Abhijit; Burgstahler, Brett; Durfee, William

    2010-01-01

    A system to restore walking in the vicinity of a wheelchair for people with paraplegia resulting from spinal cord injury is under development. The approach combines single channel surface electrical stimulation with an orthosis. The orthosis is spring loaded and contains a pneumatic system that stores energy during knee extension caused by quadriceps stimulation and transfers it to hip joint for hip extension. A laboratory version of the prototype of the gait system has been fabricated and engineering bench tests were performed. The paper presents the design of the wearable prototype and results of bench testing. PMID:21096941

  4. Gait mode recognition and control for a portable-powered ankle-foot orthosis.

    PubMed

    David Li, Yifan; Hsiao-Wecksler, Elizabeth T

    2013-06-01

    Ankle foot orthoses (AFOs) are widely used as assistive/rehabilitation devices to correct the gait of people with lower leg neuromuscular dysfunction and muscle weakness. We have developed a portable powered ankle-foot orthosis (PPAFO), which uses a pneumatic bi-directional rotary actuator powered by compressed CO2 to provide untethered dorsiflexor and plantarflexor assistance at the ankle joint. Since portability is a key to the success of the PPAFO as an assist device, it is critical to recognize and control for gait modes (i.e. level walking, stair ascent/descent). While manual mode switching is implemented in most powered orthotic/prosthetic device control algorithms, we propose an automatic gait mode recognition scheme by tracking the 3D position of the PPAFO from an inertial measurement unit (IMU). The control scheme was designed to match the torque profile of physiological gait data during different gait modes. Experimental results indicate that, with an optimized threshold, the controller was able to identify the position, orientation and gait mode in real time, and properly control the actuation. It was also illustrated that during stair descent, a mode-specific actuation control scheme could better restore gait kinematic and kinetic patterns, compared to using the level ground controller. PMID:24187192

  5. Comparison of spatiotemporal gait parameters with a spinal orthosis and without a spinal orthosis on level ground and stairs

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hyeon-Nam; Kim, Young Mi; Kim, Kyoung

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study attempted to examine the impact on the pattern of walking on both level ground and stairs after restricting the movement of the spine and the trunk of the body by using a spinal orthosis. [Subjects and Methods] Forty healthy males in their 20s were selected as the sample, which was randomly and evenly divided into two groups: (1) the WT group (with a thoracolumbosacral orthosis group) and (2) the WOT group (Without a thoracolumbosacral orthosis group). The spinal orthosis used in this study was a thoracolumbosacral orthosis called a plastic body jacket. [Results] In walking on level ground, step width showed a significant difference, but no statistically significant difference was found between the WT group and the WOT group with respect to the other variables. In walking on stairs, the double stance phase showed a statistically significant difference during stair descent in the WT group compared with the WOT group. [Conclusion] It was proven that wearing a TLSO increased walking stability in the case of walking on level ground and stairs. Hence, it is believed that proper use of a spinal orthosis can play an ancillary role in daily life and therapeutic interventions. PMID:27512285

  6. An experimental device for investigating the force and power requirements of a powered gait orthosis.

    PubMed

    Ruthenberg, B J; Wasylewski, N A; Beard, J E

    1997-04-01

    The Powered Gait Orthosis (PGO) is a powered exoskeleton developed as an experimental device to provide bipedal locomotion to individuals with physical impairment. The current prototype consists of a single degree of freedom (DOF) system for each leg, providing power and proper displacement required for bipedal locomotion. It is the goal of this research to obtain the forces that are present in the device while it is in normal operation. In addition, the time ratio of the hip function generator has been varied to determine the effect that different time ratios have on system forces and required user energy. The time ratio is the relationship between the time period that the thigh is in swing phase and when it is in support phase. Knowing the forces in the system and the optimal time ratio will allow for the design and construction of a feasible device for the rehabilitation and assistance of individuals who have lost the ability to walk. PMID:9108347

  7. Changes of Plantar Pressure and Gait Parameters in Children with Mild Cerebral Palsy Who Used a Customized External Strap Orthosis: A Crossover Study

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Wen-Dien; Chang, Nai-Jen; Lin, Hung-Yu; Lai, Ping-Tung

    2015-01-01

    Toe-in gait and crouch gait can make children with mild cerebral palsy fall and suffer improper balance during walking or ambulation training. A customized external strap orthosis for correcting leg alignment was used to resolve this problem. The purpose of this study was to research the immediate effects while wearing the customized external strap orthosis. Pressure platform was used to assess the plantar pressure through static and dynamic assessments and to record the changes in path of pressure trajectory. Motion image analysis system was used to record the gait parameters, which included gait speed, stride length, and cadence. The influence of both wearing and removing the orthosis on the dominant leg of children with mild cerebral palsy was analyzed. Nine children with mild cerebral palsy, who all had a dominant right leg, were recruited. After wearing the orthosis, all gait parameters improved, and foot motion changed in the stance phase of the gait cycle. The path of pressure trajectory closing to the midline was also observed during dynamic assessment. Changes in plantar pressure and path of pressure trajectory were observed and the orthosis device could provide immediate assistance to correct the leg alignment and improve the gait performance in children with mild cerebral palsy. PMID:26640796

  8. The influence of an ankle-foot orthosis on the spatiotemporal gait parameters and functional balance in chronic stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Bouchalová, Vendula; Houben, Els; Tancsik, Dorine; Schaekers, Lotte; Meuws, Leni; Feys, Peter

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Observational study investigating the influence of various ankle-foot orthoses on the spatiotemporal gait parameters and functional balance in chronic stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Fifteen chronic stroke patients participated in this study after providing informed consent. Two groups of patients were differentiated based on the Timed Up and Go Test. Patients were tested in three different conditions: with standard prefabricated ankle-foot orthosis (Maramed), with individualized ankle-foot orthosis (Y-tech), and without any ankle-foot orthrosis. Spatiotemporal gait parameters were obtained by walking on an instrumented walkway (GAITRite®) at usual and fastest speed. Balance was assessed with Timed Up and Go Test, Step Test, and Four Square Step Test. [Results] Maramed and Y-tech significantly improved the spatiotemporal parameters while walking at usual and maximal speed (single support time affected side; double support time affected side and step length unaffected side). The Y-tech in addition improved velocity and cadence. Among the balance tests, only the Timed Up and Go test showed improvements in favor of Maramed and Y-tech. [Conclusion] Patients benefited from wearing orthosis at both usual and maximal speed, irrespective of whether they wore Maramed or Y-tech. Only severe stroke patients benefited from wearing an orthoses compared to mild impaired group. PMID:27313385

  9. Brain Stimulation Paired with Novel Locomotor Training with Robotic Gait Orthosis in Chronic Stroke: a Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Danzl, Megan M.; Chelette, Kenneth C.; Lee, Kara; Lykins, Dana; Sawaki, Lumy

    2015-01-01

    Objectives 1) to investigate the feasibility of combining transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) to the lower extremity (LE) motor cortex with novel locomotor training to facilitate gait in subjects with chronic stroke and low ambulatory status, and 2) to obtain insight from study subjects and their caregivers to inform future trial design. Methods Double-blind, randomized controlled study with additional qualitative exploratory descriptive design. One-month follow-up.10 subjects with stroke were recruited and randomized to active tDCS or sham tDCS for 12 sessions. Both groups participated in identical locomotor training with a robotic gait orthosis (RGO) following each tDCS session. RGO training protocol was designed to harness cortical neuroplasticity. Data analysis included assessment of functional and participation outcome measures and qualitative thematic analysis. Results Eight subjects completed the study. Both groups demonstrated trends toward improvement, but the active tDCS group showed greater improvement than the sham group. Qualitative analyses indicate beneficial effects of this combined intervention. Conclusions It is feasible to combine tDCS targeting the LE motor cortex with our novel locomotor training. It appears that tDCS has the potential to enhance the effectiveness of gait training in chronic stroke. Insights from participants provide additional guidance in designing future trials. PMID:23949035

  10. Preliminary design of an energy storing orthosis for providing gait to people with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Boughner, Kyle J; Durfee, William K

    2014-01-01

    A new design is proposed for an energy storing orthosis (ESO) that restores walking to people with spinal cord injury by combining functional electrical stimulation of the quadriceps muscle with a mechanical brace that uses elastic elements to store and transfer energy between hip and knee joints. The new ESO is a variation of a previous design and uses constant force springs for energy storage. Based on the detailed design and on dynamic simulations, the concept has demonstrated preliminary technical feasibility. PMID:25570518

  11. Effect of heel pressure pad attached to ankle-foot orthosis on the energy conversion efficiency in post-stroke hemiplegic gait

    PubMed Central

    Kon, Keisuke; Hayakawa, Yasuyuki; Shimizu, Shingo; Tsuruga, Takeshi; Murahara, Shin; Haruna, Hirokazu; Ino, Takumi; Inagaki, Jun; Yamamoto, Sumiko

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to analyze the effect of heel pads in ankle-foot orthoses on dynamic motion aspects of gait in stroke patients from the viewpoint of energy conversion efficiency. [Subjects] Fourteen chronic stroke patients who were ambulatory and had lower extremity motor function categorized as Brunnstrom stage IV participated in the study. [Methods] A three-dimensional motion analysis system was used to assess the effect of heel pad intervention on dynamic motion gait parameters using a single-system A-B-A design. [Results] The results showed that a heel pad attached to the ankle-foot orthosis caused significant retention of the center-of-pressure at the heel during the heel rocker function and significant increase in the dorsiflexion moment and the height of the center of gravity. [Conclusion] The present study showed that a heel pad attached to the calcaneal region of an ankle-foot orthosis caused slight retention of the center-of-pressure at the heel during the heel rocker function along with center of gravity elevation in the stance phase and improved the energy conversion efficiency, especially on the non-paretic side. PMID:26157215

  12. Enhancing robotic gait training via augmented feedback.

    PubMed

    Patritti, Benjamin; Sicari, Monica; Deming, Lynn; Romaguera, Fernanda; Pelliccio, Marlena; Benedetti, Maria Grazia; Nimec, Donna; Bonato, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    Recent work has examined the feasibility of robotic-assisted gait training in pediatric patients, including children with cerebral palsy (CP). Herein we present a case series describing clinical outcomes in four children with CP who underwent gait training using a robotic driven gait orthosis (DGO) (Pediatric Lokomat©). Children had a diagnosis of spastic diplegia due to CP. They were paired based on functional abilities and observed gait characteristics. Two children had a GMFCS of III and showed excessive ankle plantarflexion during stance. The other two children had a GMFCS of II and displayed a crouch gait pattern. Each subject participated in a 6-week intervention of robotic-assisted gait training that involved three 30-minute sessions per week. Pre-and post-training evaluations were performed including clinical tests of standing and walking function, walking speed, and walking endurance. Clinical gait analysis was also performed using a motion capture system to assess changes in gait mechanics. All subjects showed an improvement in locomotor function. For lower functioning children, this may be mediated by improved trunk control. The use of augmented feedback was associated with larger. However, these results have to be considered with caution because of the limited sample size of the study. PMID:21097013

  13. Robotic-assisted gait training in neurological patients: who may benefit?

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Isabella; Meiner, Zeev

    2015-05-01

    Regaining one's ability to walk is of great importance for neurological patients and is a major goal of all rehabilitation programs. Gait training of severely affected patients after the neurological event is technically difficult because of their motor weakness and balance disturbances. An innovative locomotor training that incorporates high repetitions of task-oriented practice by the use of body weight-supported treadmill training (BWSTT) was developed to overcome these obstacles. To facilitate the delivery of BWSTT, a motorized robotic driven gait orthosis (robotic-assisted gait training-RAGT) was developed. Two types of robotic gait devices were developed, end-effector and exoskeleton devices. Several randomized controlled trials have been published regarding the usage of RAGT in patients after stroke, spinal cord injury (SCI), multiple sclerosis (MS) and other neurological diseases. According to these trials, the usage of RAGT in combination with conventional rehabilitation treatment has some additive beneficial effect on the ambulation abilities mainly in sub-acute stroke and sub-acute SCI patients. No difference was found between the two types of robotic gait devices. No sufficient data regarding an optimal protocol of RAGT is available, however a longer duration and a higher intensity of RAGT seem to have more beneficial effect on the final functional ambulation outcomes. Larger controlled studies are still required to determine the optimal timing and protocol design for the maximal efficacy and long-term outcome of RAGT in neurological patients. PMID:25724733

  14. Ankle-foot orthosis function in low-level myelomeningocele.

    PubMed

    Hullin, M G; Robb, J E; Loudon, I R

    1992-01-01

    Six children with low-level myelomeningocele underwent gait analysis. All showed excessive ankle dorsiflexion and knee flexion when walking barefoot. A rigid thermoplastic ankle-foot orthosis (AFO) improved gait by preventing ankle dorsiflexion and reducing knee flexion. Biomechanically, the AFO caused a reduction in external knee moment by aligning the knee with the ground reaction force. Small changes in the foot-shank angle of the orthosis had profound effects on knee mechanics. Knee hyperextension could be controlled by a rocker sole. Kinetic gait analysis permits understanding of the biomechanical effects of orthoses. PMID:1613099

  15. The Effects of Varying Ankle Foot Orthosis Stiffness on Gait in Children with Spastic Cerebral Palsy Who Walk with Excessive Knee Flexion

    PubMed Central

    Kerkum, Yvette L.; Buizer, Annemieke I.; van den Noort, Josien C.; Becher, Jules G.; Harlaar, Jaap; Brehm, Merel-Anne

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Rigid Ankle-Foot Orthoses (AFOs) are commonly prescribed to counteract excessive knee flexion during the stance phase of gait in children with cerebral palsy (CP). While rigid AFOs may normalize knee kinematics and kinetics effectively, it has the disadvantage of impeding push-off power. A spring-like AFO may enhance push-off power, which may come at the cost of reducing the knee flexion less effectively. Optimizing this trade-off between enhancing push-off power and normalizing knee flexion in stance is expected to maximize gait efficiency. This study investigated the effects of varying AFO stiffness on gait biomechanics and efficiency in children with CP who walk with excessive knee flexion in stance. Fifteen children with spastic CP (11 boys, 10±2 years) were prescribed with a ventral shell spring-hinged AFO (vAFO). The hinge was set into a rigid, or spring-like setting, using both a stiff and flexible performance. At baseline (i.e. shoes-only) and for each vAFO, a 3D-gait analysis and 6-minute walk test with breath-gas analysis were performed at comfortable speed. Lower limb joint kinematics and kinetics were calculated. From the 6-minute walk test, walking speed and the net energy cost were determined. A generalized estimation equation (p<0.05) was used to analyze the effects of different conditions. Compared to shoes-only, all vAFOs improved the knee angle and net moment similarly. Ankle power generation and work were preserved only by the spring-like vAFOs. All vAFOs decreased the net energy cost compared to shoes-only, but no differences were found between vAFOs, showing that the effects of spring-like vAFOs to promote push-off power did not lead to greater reductions in walking energy cost. These findings suggest that, in this specific group of children with spastic CP, the vAFO stiffness that maximizes gait efficiency is primarily determined by its effect on knee kinematics and kinetics rather than by its effect on push-off power. Trial

  16. An active foot lifter orthosis based on a PCPG algorithm.

    PubMed

    Duvinage, Matthieu; Jiménez-Fábian, René; Castermans, Thierry; Verlinden, Olivier; Dutoit, Thierry

    2011-01-01

    Central pattern generators (CPGs) are known to play an important role in the generation of rhythmic movements in gait, both in animals and humans. The comprehension of their underlying mechanism has led to the development of an important family of algorithms at the basis of autonomous walking robots. Recently, it has been shown that human gait could be modeled using a subclass of those algorithms, namely a Programmable Central Pattern Generator (PCPG). In this paper, we present a foot lifter orthosis driven by this algorithm. After a learning phase, the PCPG is able to generate adequate rhythmic gait patterns both for constant speeds and acceleration phases. Its output is used to drive the orthosis actuator during the swing phase, in order to help patients suffering from foot drop (the orthosis just follows the movement during the stance phase). The most interesting property of this algorithm is the possibility to generate a smooth output signal even during speed transitions. In practice, given that human gait is not perfectly periodic, the phase of this signal needs to be reset with actual movement. Therefore, two phase-resetting procedures were studied: one standard hard phase-resetting leading to discontinuities and one original soft phase-resetting allowing to recover the correct phase in a smooth way. The simulation results and complete design of the orthosis hardware and software are presented. PMID:22275540

  17. Locomotor adaptation to a powered ankle-foot orthosis depends on control method

    PubMed Central

    Cain, Stephen M; Gordon, Keith E; Ferris, Daniel P

    2007-01-01

    Background We studied human locomotor adaptation to powered ankle-foot orthoses with the intent of identifying differences between two different orthosis control methods. The first orthosis control method used a footswitch to provide bang-bang control (a kinematic control) and the second orthosis control method used a proportional myoelectric signal from the soleus (a physiological control). Both controllers activated an artificial pneumatic muscle providing plantar flexion torque. Methods Subjects walked on a treadmill for two thirty-minute sessions spaced three days apart under either footswitch control (n = 6) or myoelectric control (n = 6). We recorded lower limb electromyography (EMG), joint kinematics, and orthosis kinetics. We compared stance phase EMG amplitudes, correlation of joint angle patterns, and mechanical work performed by the powered orthosis between the two controllers over time. Results During steady state at the end of the second session, subjects using proportional myoelectric control had much lower soleus and gastrocnemius activation than the subjects using footswitch control. The substantial decrease in triceps surae recruitment allowed the proportional myoelectric control subjects to walk with ankle kinematics close to normal and reduce negative work performed by the orthosis. The footswitch control subjects walked with substantially perturbed ankle kinematics and performed more negative work with the orthosis. Conclusion These results provide evidence that the choice of orthosis control method can greatly alter how humans adapt to powered orthosis assistance during walking. Specifically, proportional myoelectric control results in larger reductions in muscle activation and gait kinematics more similar to normal compared to footswitch control. PMID:18154649

  18. Joint Contracture Orthosis (JCO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lunsford, Thomas R.; Parsons, Ken; Krouskop, Thomas; McGee, Kevin

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to develop an advanced orthosis which is effective in reducing upper and lower limb contractures in significantly less time than currently required with conventional methods. The team that developed the JCO consisted of an engineer, orthotist, therapist, and physician.

  19. How to improve walking, balance and social participation following stroke: a comparison of the long term effects of two walking aids--canes and an orthosis TheraTogs--on the recovery of gait following acute stroke. A study protocol for a multi-centre, single blind, randomised control trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Annually, some 9000 people in Switzerland suffer a first time stroke. Of these 60% are left with moderate to severe walking disability. Evidence shows that rehabilitation techniques which emphasise activity of the hemiplegic side increase ipsilesional cortical plasticity and improve functional outcomes. Canes are commonly used in gait rehabilitation although they significantly reduce hemiplegic muscle activity. We have shown that an orthosis "TheraTogs" (a corset with elasticated strapping) significantly increases hemiplegic muscle activity during gait. The aim of the present study is to investigate the long term effects on the recovery of gait, balance and social participation of gait rehabilitation with TheraTogs compared to gait rehabilitation with a cane following first time acute stroke. Methods/Design Multi-centre, single blind, randomised trial with 120 patients after first stroke. When subjects have reached Functional Ambulation Category 3 they will be randomly allocated into TheraTogs or cane group. TheraTogs will be applied to support hip extensor and abductor musculature according to a standardised procedure. Cane walking held at the level of the radial styloid of the sound wrist. Subjects will walk throughout the day with only the assigned walking aid. Standard therapy treatments and usual care will remain unchanged and documented. The intervention will continue for five weeks or until patients have reached Functional Ambulation category 5. Outcome measures will be assessed the day before begin of intervention, the day after completion, 3 months, 6 months and 2 years. Primary outcome: Timed "up and go" test, secondary outcomes: peak surface EMG of gluteus maximus and gluteus medius, activation patterns of hemiplegic leg musculature, temporo-spatial gait parameters, hemiplegic hip kinematics in the frontal and sagittal planes, dynamic balance, daily activity measured by accelerometry, Stroke Impact Scale. Significance levels will be 5% with 95

  20. Preliminary Evaluation of a Powered Lower Limb Orthosis to Aid Walking in Paraplegic Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Farris, Ryan J.; Quintero, Hugo A.; Goldfarb, Michael

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a powered lower-limb orthosis that is intended to provide gait assistance to spinal cord injured (SCI) individuals by providing assistive torques at both hip and knee joints. The orthosis has a mass of 12 kg and is capable of providing maximum joint torques of 40 Nm with hip and knee joint ranges of motion from 105° flexion to 30° extension and 105° flexion to 10° hyperextension, respectively. A custom distributed embedded system controls the orthosis with power being provided by a lithium polymer battery which provides power for one hour of continuous walking. In order to demonstrate the ability of the orthosis to assist walking, the orthosis was experimentally implemented on a paraplegic subject with a T10 complete injury. Data collected during walking indicates a high degree of step-to-step repeatability of hip and knee trajectories (as enforced by the orthosis) and an average walking speed of 0.8 km/hr. The electrical power required at each hip and knee joint during gait was approximately 25 and 27 W, respectively, contributing to the 117 W overall electrical power required by the device during walking. A video of walking corresponding to the aforementioned data is included in the supplemental material. PMID:21968791

  1. Control and Implementation of a Powered Lower Limb Orthosis to Aid Walking in Paraplegic Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Quintero, Hugo A.; Farris, Ryan J.; Goldfarb, Michael

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a powered lower-limb orthosis that is intended to provide gait assistance to spinal cord injured (SCI) individuals by providing assistive torques at both hip and knee joints, along with a user interface and control structure that enables control of the powered orthosis via upper-body influence. The orthosis and control structure was experimentally implemented on a paraplegic subject (T10 complete) in order to provide a preliminary characterization of its capability to provide basic walking. Data and video is presented from these initial trials, which indicates that the orthosis and controller are able to effectively provide walking within parallel bars at an average speed of 0.8 km/hr. PMID:22275679

  2. Design of a quasi-passive 3 DOFs ankle-foot wearable rehabilitation orthosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Zhu, Yanhe; Fan, Jizhuang; Zhao, Jie; Yu, Hongying

    2015-01-01

    Muscular rigidity and atrophy caused by long-term underactivity usually lead to foot drop, strephenopodia, foot extorsion or some other complications for the lower limb movement disorders or lower limb surgery sufferers. The ankle-foot orthosis can help patients conduct the right ankle motion mode training, inhibit spasm and prevent ankle complications. In this paper, a quasi-passive 3 DOFs ankle-foot wearable orthosis was designed on the basis of kinematics and dynamics analysis of the ankle joint. Ankle joint trajectory and dynamic characteristics similar to those of natural gait can be obtained by the combination of passive energy storage and additional power complement. In terms of function, the orthosis has shock absorption and low energy consumption. Given its excellent characteristics of comfortableness, lightweight, and anthropomorphic construction, the orthosis can be used in medical institutions for rehabilitation training or as a daily-walking auxiliary equipment for surgery sufferers. PMID:26406060

  3. Mechanical performance of artificial pneumatic muscles to power an ankle-foot orthosis.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Keith E; Sawicki, Gregory S; Ferris, Daniel P

    2006-01-01

    We developed a powered ankle-foot orthosis that uses artificial pneumatic muscles to produce active plantar flexor torque. The purpose of this study was to quantify the mechanical performance of the orthosis during human walking. Three subjects walked at a range of speeds wearing ankle-foot orthoses with either one or two artificial muscles working in parallel. The orthosis produced similar total peak plantar flexor torque and network across speeds independent of the number of muscles used. The orthosis generated approximately 57% of the peak ankle plantar flexor torque during stance and performed approximately 70% of the positive plantar flexor work done during normal walking. Artificial muscle bandwidth and force-length properties were the two primary factors limiting torque production. The lack of peak force and work differences between single and double muscle conditions can be explained by force-length properties. Subjects altered their ankle kinematics between conditions resulting in changes in artificial muscle length. In the double muscle condition greater plantar flexion yielded shorter artificial muscles lengths and decreased muscle forces. This finding emphasizes the importance of human testing in the design and development of robotic exoskeleton devices for assisting human movement. The results of this study outline the mechanical performance limitations of an ankle-foot orthosis powered by artificial pneumatic muscles. This orthosis could be valuable for gait rehabilitation and for studies investigating neuromechanical control of human walking. PMID:16023126

  4. Effect of Pneumatic Compressing Powered Orthosis in Stroke Patients: Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Sil; Sohn, Min Kyun; Kwak, Soo-Hyun; Choi, Jong Ho; Oh, Ji Sun

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of a knee-ankle-foot orthosis powered by artificial pneumatic muscles (PKAFO). Methods Twenty-three hemiplegic patients (age, 59.6±13.7 years) were assessed 19.7±36.6 months after brain lesion. The 10-m walking time was measured as a gait parameter while the individual walked on a treadmill. Walking speed (m/s), step cycle (cycle/s), and step length (m) were also measured on a treadmill with and without PKAFO, and before and after gait training. Clinical parameters measured before and after gait training included Korean version of Modified Bathel Index (K-MBI), manual muscle test (MMT), and Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) of hemiplegic ankle. Gait training comprised treadmill walking for 20 minutes, 5 days a week for 3 weeks at a comfortable speed. Results The 10-m walking time, walking speed, step length, and step cycle were significantly greater with PKAFO than without PKAFO, and after gait training (both p<0.05). K-MBI was improved after gait training (p<0.05), but MMT and MAS were not. Conclusion PKAFO may improve gait function in hemiplegic patients. It can be a useful orthosis for gait training in hemiplegic patients. PMID:25932419

  5. Long-term outcomes of a dynamic ankle-foot orthosis on gait characteristics of a service member with incomplete nerve injury to the lower extremity: a case report.

    PubMed

    Presuto, Melanie M; Stickley, Christopher D; Perlsweig, Katherine A; Kimura, Iris F; Antoine, Gerard M

    2013-07-01

    This case study reports a 5-year follow-up of a 32-year-old male service member who suffered polytrauma in 2007 following a Humvee rollover in Afghanistan. The service member's injured left lower extremity was salvaged, but severe damage to the lumbosacral plexus and significant injuries to the pelvis, hip, and femur resulted in near total paralysis and foot drop of the left lower limb. Two years of multiple substandard ankle-foot orthotic devices pushed him to investigate a dynamic ankle-foot orthotic (DAFO) with energy storing capability, which allowed him to remain on active duty and deploy for a second tour while wearing the device. The anecdotal improvements described by this service member prompted a biomechanical analysis of walking and running gait, comparing a shoes only condition to the DAFO. Results of gait analysis demonstrated an improvement in spatial-temporal parameters in both walking and running, improved sagittal angles and moments at the ankle, knee, and hip, greater ankle stability through decreased dorsiflexion excursion, and a marked increase in ankle power while running. Most notably, the service member credits this device for substantial improvement in quality of life including total cessation of pain medication and return to regular vigorous activity. PMID:23820369

  6. Comparison of three ankle-foot orthosis configurations for children with spastic hemiplegia.

    PubMed

    Buckon, C E; Thomas, S S; Jakobson-Huston, S; Sussman, M; Aiona, M

    2001-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of the hinged ankle-foot orthosis (HAFO), posterior leaf spring (PLS), and solid ankle-foot orthosis (SAFO), in preventing contracture, improving efficiency of gait, and enhancing performance of functional motor skills in 30 children (21 male, 9 female; mean age 9 years 4 months; age range 4 to 18 years,) with spastic hemiplegia. Following a 3-month baseline period of no ankle-foot orthosis (AFO) use, each AFO was worn for 3 months after which ankle range of motion, gait analysis, energy consumption, and functional motor skills were assessed. The HAFO and PLS increased passive ankle dorsiflexion and normalization of ankle rocker function during gait. Normalization of knee motion in stance was dependent upon the knee abnormality present and AFO configuration. The HAFO was the most effective in controlling knee hyperextension in stance, while PLS was the most effective in promoting knee extension in children with >10 degree knee flexion in stance. Energy efficiency was improved in 21 of the children, with 13 of these children demonstrating the greatest improvement in HAFO and PLS. Improvements in functional mobility were greatest in the HAFO and PLS. PMID:11409825

  7. Effects of a functional foot orthosis on the knee angle in the sagittal plane of college students in their 20s with flatfoot

    PubMed Central

    Park, KwangYong; Seo, KyoChul

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a functional foot orthosis on the knee angle in the sagittal plane of college students in their 20s who had flatfoot. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects of this study were 20 college students diagnosed as having flatfoot. The variations of their knee angle (Q-angle) in the sagittal plane during the stance phase were measured using the VICON Motion System (Vicon, Hansung, Korea) before and while wearing a foot orthosis. The experimental data were analyzed using SPSS 12.0 for Windows. [Results] The Q-angle in the test group during the stance phase showed statistically significant declines on the right and left sides while wearing the foot orthosis during the gait-phases of loading response and midstance. During initial contact, terminal stance, and preswing, the Q-angle also decreased on the right and left sides after wearing the foot orthosis, but the changes were not statistically significant. [Conclusion] The college students with flatfoot exhibited declines in the Q-angle in the sagittal plane while wearing a foot orthosis. In this regard, the application of active gait training using orthotic shoes for long hours is likely to help individuals with flatfoot to achieve normal gait. PMID:25995591

  8. 21 CFR 890.3490 - Truncal orthosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Truncal orthosis. 890.3490 Section 890.3490 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3490 Truncal orthosis....

  9. 21 CFR 890.3475 - Limb orthosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Limb orthosis. 890.3475 Section 890.3475 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3475 Limb orthosis. (a)...

  10. 21 CFR 890.3475 - Limb orthosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Limb orthosis. 890.3475 Section 890.3475 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3475 Limb orthosis. (a)...

  11. 21 CFR 890.3475 - Limb orthosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Limb orthosis. 890.3475 Section 890.3475 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3475 Limb orthosis. (a)...

  12. 21 CFR 890.3475 - Limb orthosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Limb orthosis. 890.3475 Section 890.3475 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3475 Limb orthosis. (a)...

  13. 21 CFR 890.3490 - Truncal orthosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Truncal orthosis. 890.3490 Section 890.3490 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3490 Truncal orthosis....

  14. 21 CFR 890.3490 - Truncal orthosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Truncal orthosis. 890.3490 Section 890.3490 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3490 Truncal orthosis....

  15. 21 CFR 890.3490 - Truncal orthosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Truncal orthosis. 890.3490 Section 890.3490 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3490 Truncal orthosis....

  16. 21 CFR 890.3475 - Limb orthosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Limb orthosis. 890.3475 Section 890.3475 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3475 Limb orthosis. (a)...

  17. 21 CFR 890.3490 - Truncal orthosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Truncal orthosis. 890.3490 Section 890.3490 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3490 Truncal orthosis....

  18. [Feasibility of the construction of a magnetorheological joint for a lower limb orthosis in valve configuration].

    PubMed

    Galván Duque-Gastélum, Carlos; Quiñones-Uriostegui, Ivett; Mendoza, Felipe; Rodríguez, Gerardo

    2014-07-01

    Ortheses are devices that assist in the function of the limbs, contributing with stability and support to the involved joints. KAFOs (knee-ankle-foot orthosis) are mainly indicated for people with muscular or neural diseases that affect the lower limbs. The actual designs of knee hinges for KAFOs compromise the stability and mobility of the limb. In this work, it was tested the feasibility of a design for a knee hinge for KAFO that should be able to modify its mechanical resistance depending on the gait phase. Orthotics biomechanical criteria and gait biomechanical requirements were considered. It was proposed an electromagnetic system in order to modify the hinge damping. In the future, the system will be interacting with a magnetorheological fluid (MR) which can change its rheological properties when a magnetic field is applied, thus, reaching different damping constants with the designed hinge. The diameter of the internal pipes required for the MR fluid to freely circulate within the orthosis was established. It was observed that the original design of the proposed orthotic hinge is feasible; however, some proposals are presented in order to achieve a better performance of the orthosis. PMID:25264797

  19. An evaluation of the posterior leaf spring orthosis using joint kinematics and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Ounpuu, S; Bell, K J; Davis, R B; DeLuca, P A

    1996-01-01

    The primary function of the posterior leaf spring orthosis (PLS) is to prevent excessive equinus or drop foot in swing. The name of the orthosis, posterior leaf "spring," suggests that it also mechanically augments push-off in stance. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of the PLS on ankle function by using computerized gait-analysis techniques. Multiple barefoot versus brace walks were compared in 31 children with cerebral palsy. Results indicate that the PLS reduces excessive equinus in swing and is sufficiently flexible to allow ankle dorsiflexion in midstance. In terminal stance, the peak power-generating capabilities of the ankle were reduced when the child was wearing the PLS. Energy results indicate that more mechanical energy was absorbed during midstance and less produced during terminal stance with the PLS. Therefore, the PLS improved ankle function but did not augment ankle function through storage and return of mechanical, or spring, energy. PMID:8728642

  20. [The experience in employing reciprocal gait orthoses].

    PubMed

    Radło, W; Miklaszewski, K; Gasińska, M; Michno, P

    1999-01-01

    The paper presents the experience of the authors in employing reciprocal gait orthoses in a group of 23 patients age 3-25 years (mean age 7.8 years). The orthoses were indicated in patients with flaccid paresis (17 children with myelodysplasia and 3 patients with traumatic paraplegia) and with arthrogryposis (3 patients). The follow-up period was 6 months to 5 years (mean 2.4 years). The authors discuss the principles of construction and operation of reciprocal gait orthoses and types of patients in whom they are recommended. The principles of learning walking and using the orthosis are also presented. PMID:10367535

  1. A quasi-passive compliant stance control Knee-Ankle-Foot Orthosis.

    PubMed

    Shamaei, Kamran; Napolitano, Paul C; Dollar, Aaron M

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, we present the design of a novel quasi-passive stance-control orthosis that implements a natural amount of knee compliance during the weight acceptance phase and potentially the entire stance phase of the gait, and allows for free motion during the rest of the gait. We explain that the unaffected knee behaves close to a linear torsional spring in stance and hypothesize that an assistive device that places a linear spring of appropriate stiffness in parallel with the knee can help restore the natural behavior of the joint in stance. We present the design of a friction-based latching mechanism and a control algorithm that engages the spring in parallel with the knee in stance and disengages it during the swing phase of gait, and explain how this module is implemented into a brace in order to create a novel class of compliant stance control orthosis. The device is quasi-passive in that a small actuator serves to lock and unlock the spring module, but the device otherwise requires no actuation and very little power, computation, and control to operate. PMID:24187288

  2. A portable powered ankle-foot orthosis for rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Shorter, K Alex; Kogler, Géza F; Loth, Eric; Durfee, William K; Hsiao-Wecksler, Elizabeth T

    2011-01-01

    Innovative technological advancements in the field of orthotics, such as portable powered orthotic systems, could create new treatment modalities to improve the functional out come of rehabilitation. In this article, we present a novel portable powered ankle-foot orthosis (PPAFO) to provide untethered assistance during gait. The PPAFO provides both plantar flexor and dorsiflexor torque assistance by way of a bidirectional pneumatic rotary actuator. The system uses a portable pneumatic power source (compressed carbon dioxide bottle) and embedded electronics to control the actuation of the foot. We collected pilot experimental data from one impaired and three nondisabled subjects to demonstrate design functionality. The impaired subject had bilateral impairment of the lower legs due to cauda equina syndrome. We found that data from nondisabled walkers demonstrated the PPAFO's capability to provide correctly timed plantar flexor and dorsiflexor assistance during gait. Reduced activation of the tibialis anterior during stance and swing was also seen during assisted nondisabled walking trials. An increase in the vertical ground reaction force during the second half of stance was present during assisted trials for the impaired subject. Data from nondisabled walkers demonstrated functionality, and data from an impaired walker demonstrated the ability to provide functional plantar flexor assistance. PMID:21674394

  3. Cerebral Palsy Gait, Clinical Importance

    PubMed Central

    TUGUI, Raluca Dana; ANTONESCU, Dinu

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cerebral palsy refers to a lesion on an immature brain, that determines permanent neurological disorders. Knowing the exact cause of the disease does not alter the treatment management. The etiology is 2-2.5/1000 births and the rate is constant in the last 40-50 years because advances in medical technologies have permitted the survival of smaller and premature new born children. Gait analysis has four directions: kinematics (represents body movements analysis without calculating the forces), kinetics (represents body moments and forces), energy consumption (measured by oximetry), and neuromuscular activity (measured by EMG). Gait analysis can observe specific deviations in a patient, allowing us to be more accurate in motor diagnoses and treatment solutions: surgery intervention, botulinum toxin injection, use of orthosis, physical kinetic therapy, oral medications, baclofen pump. PMID:24790675

  4. The Effect of Different Foot Orthosis Inverted Angles on Plantar Pressure in Children with Flexible Flatfeet

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyunkeun; Ahn, Soyoung; Song, Youngshin; Park, Insik

    2016-01-01

    Although orthotic modification using the inverted technique is available for the treatment of flatfoot, empirical evidence for the biomechanical effects of inverted-angle foot orthoses (FOs) is lacking. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of different FO inversion angles on plantar pressure during gait in children with flatfoot. Twenty-one children with flexible flatfeet (mean age 9.9 years) were enrolled in this study. The plantar pressures were measured for the rearfoot; medial and lateral midfoot; and medial, central, and lateral forefoot as participants walked on a treadmill while wearing shoes only and shoes with the following 3 orthotic conditions: (i) orthosis with no inverted angle, (ii) orthosis with a 15° inverted angle, and (iii) orthosis with a 30° inverted angle. A one-way repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) with the Bonferroni-adjusted post-hoc test was used to compare the mean values of each orthotic condition. Compared with the shoe only condition, the peak pressure decreased significantly under the medial forefoot and rearfoot with all FOs (p <0.05). However, no significant differences in the peak pressure under the medial forefoot and rearfoot were observed between the FOs. The peak pressure under the medial midfoot increased significantly with all FOs, and a maximal increase in the peak pressure was obtained with a 30° inverted angle orthosis. Furthermore, the contact area under the medial midfoot and rearfoot increased significantly with all FOs, compared with the shoe only condition (p <0.05). Again, no significant differences were observed between the FOs. For plantar pressure redistribution, a FO with a low inverted angle could be effective, accommodative, and convenient for children with flatfoot. PMID:27458719

  5. Functional orthosis post pectoralis muscle rupture.

    PubMed

    Moore, Jodi

    2015-01-01

    This author described her success at fabricating a chest compression orthosis for a patient who underwent repair of a pectoralis major muscle rupture. The repair occurred nine months prior to orthotic fabrication, but the patient continued to experience weakness and pain which limited motion. The design of the orthotic allowed him increased mobility and functional use. - Victoria Priganc, PhD, OTR, CHT, CLT, Practice Forum Editor. PMID:26043967

  6. Hardware Development and Locomotion Control Strategy for an Over-Ground Gait Trainer: NaTUre-Gaits

    PubMed Central

    Low, Kin Huat; Qu, Xingda; Lim, Hup Boon; Hoon, Kay Hiang

    2014-01-01

    Therapist-assisted body weight supported (TABWS) gait rehabilitation was introduced two decades ago. The benefit of TABWS in functional recovery of walking in spinal cord injury and stroke patients has been demonstrated and reported. However, shortage of therapists, labor-intensiveness, and short duration of training are some limitations of this approach. To overcome these deficiencies, robotic-assisted gait rehabilitation systems have been suggested. These systems have gained attentions from researchers and clinical practitioner in recent years. To achieve the same objective, an over-ground gait rehabilitation system, NaTUre-gaits, was developed at the Nanyang Technological University. The design was based on a clinical approach to provide four main features, which are pelvic motion, body weight support, over-ground walking experience, and lower limb assistance. These features can be achieved by three main modules of NaTUre-gaits: 1) pelvic assistance mechanism, mobile platform, and robotic orthosis. Predefined gait patterns are required for a robotic assisted system to follow. In this paper, the gait pattern planning for NaTUre-gaits was accomplished by an individual-specific gait pattern prediction model. The model generates gait patterns that resemble natural gait patterns of the targeted subjects. The features of NaTUre-gaits have been demonstrated by walking trials with several subjects. The trials have been evaluated by therapists and doctors. The results show that 10-m walking trial with a reduction in manpower. The task-specific repetitive training approach and natural walking gait patterns were also successfully achieved. PMID:27170876

  7. An efficient robotic tendon for gait assistance.

    PubMed

    Hollander, Kevin W; Ilg, Robert; Sugar, Thomas G; Herring, Donald

    2006-10-01

    A robotic tendon is a spring based, linear actuator in which the stiffness of the spring is crucial for its successful use in a lightweight, energy efficient, powered ankle orthosis. Like its human analog, the robotic tendon uses its inherent elastic nature to reduce both peak power and energy requirements for its motor. In the ideal example, peak power required of the motor for ankle gait is reduced from 250 W to just 77 W. In addition, ideal energy requirements are reduced from nearly 36 J to just 21 J. Using this approach, an initial prototype has provided 100% of the power and energy necessary for ankle gait in a compact 0.95 kg package, seven times less than an equivalent motor/gearbox system. PMID:16995768

  8. Overground robot assisted gait trainer for the treatment of drug-resistant freezing of gait in Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Pilleri, Manuela; Weis, Luca; Zabeo, Letizia; Koutsikos, Konstantinos; Biundo, Roberta; Facchini, Silvia; Rossi, Simonetta; Masiero, Stefano; Antonini, Angelo

    2015-08-15

    Freezing of Gait (FOG) is a frequent and disabling feature of Parkinson disease (PD). Gait rehabilitation assisted by electromechanical devices, such as training on treadmill associated with sensory cues or assisted by gait orthosis have been shown to improve FOG. Overground robot assisted gait training (RGT) has been recently tested in patients with PD with improvement of several gait parameters. We here evaluated the effectiveness of RGT on FOG severity and gait abnormalities in PD patients. Eighteen patients with FOG resistant to dopaminergic medications were treated with 15 sessions of RGT and underwent an extensive clinical evaluation before and after treatment. The main outcome measures were FOG questionnaire (FOGQ) global score and specific tasks for gait assessment, namely 10 meter walking test (10 MWT), Timed Up and Go test (TUG) and 360° narrow turns (360 NT). Balance was also evaluated through Fear of Falling Efficacy Scale (FFES), assessing self perceived stability and Berg Balance Scale (BBS), for objective examination. After treatment, FOGQ score was significantly reduced (P=0.023). We also found a significant reduction of time needed to complete TUG, 10 MWT, and 360 NT (P=0.009, 0.004 and 0.04, respectively). By contrast the number of steps and the number of freezing episodes recorded at each gait task did not change. FFES and BBS scores also improved, with positive repercussions on performance on daily activity and quality of life. Our results indicate that RGT is a useful strategy for the treatment of drug refractory FOG. PMID:26048047

  9. Effect of dynamic orthoses on gait: a retrospective control study in children with hemiplegia.

    PubMed

    Van Gestel, Leen; Molenaers, Guy; Huenaerts, Catherine; Seyler, Jos; Desloovere, Kaat

    2008-01-01

    Several positive influences of orthoses on gait in children with cerebral palsy have been documented, as well as some detrimental effects. Most importantly, push-off is decreased in orthoses, compromising a physiological third ankle rocker. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of three types of orthosis on gait in a homogeneous group of children. All orthoses aimed at improving push-off and normalizing the pathological plantarflexion-knee extension couple. Thirty-seven children (22 females, 15 males) with hemiplegia, aged 4 to 10 years (30 Gross Motor Function Classification System [GMFCS] Level I, six GMFCS Level II), walked barefoot and with orthoses being either Orteams (orthoses with the dorsal part containing 11 sleeves), posterior leafsprings (PLS), or Dual Carbon Fibre Spring ankle foot orthosis (AFOs; CFO: carbon fibre at the dorsal part of the orthosis). All orthoses were expected to prevent plantarflexion and allow dorsiflexion, thus improving first, second, and third rocker. The orthoses were compared through objective gait analysis, including 3D kinematics and kinetics. All orthoses successfully improved the gait pattern and only small differences were noted between the configurations of the different orthoses. The CFO, however, allowed a more physiological third ankle rocker compared with the Orteam/PLS. Although the PLS ensured the highest correction at the ankle around initial contact, the CFO created a significantly higher maximal hip flexion moment in stance. In general, the results of this study indicated a substantial functional flexibility of the CFO. PMID:18173633

  10. Understanding gait control in post-stroke: implications for management.

    PubMed

    Verma, Rajesh; Arya, Kamal Narayan; Sharma, Pawan; Garg, R K

    2012-01-01

    The role of the brain in post-stroke gait is not understood properly, although the ability to walk becomes impaired in more than 80% of post-stroke patients. Most, however, regain some ability to walk with either limited mobility or inefficient, asymmetrical or unsafe gait. Conventional intervention focuses on support of weak muscles or body part by use of foot orthosis and walking aids. This review provides an overview of available evidence of neuro-kinesiology & neurophysiology of normal and post-stroke gait. The role of the spinal cord has been explored, more in animals than humans. Mammalian locomotion is based on a rhythmic, "pacemaker" activity of the spinal stepping generators. Bipedal human locomotion is different from quadripedal animal locomotion. However, knowledge derived from the spinal cord investigation of animals, is being applied for management of human gait dysfunction. The potential role of the brain is now recognized in the independent activation of muscles during walking. The brain modifies the gait pattern during the complex demands of daily activities. Though the exact role of the motor cortex in control of gait is unclear, available evidence may be applied to gait rehabilitation of post-stroke patients. PMID:22196422

  11. Design of active orthoses for a robotic gait rehabilitation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villa-Parra, A. C.; Broche, L.; Delisle-Rodríguez, D.; Sagaró, R.; Bastos, T.; Frizera-Neto, A.

    2015-09-01

    An active orthosis (AO) is a robotic device that assists both human gait and rehabilitation therapy. This work proposes portable AOs, one for the knee joint and another for the ankle joint. Both AOs will be used to complete a robotic system that improves gait rehabilitation. The requirements for actuator selection, the biomechanical considerations during the AO design, the finite element method, and a control approach based on electroencephalographic and surface electromyographic signals are reviewed. This work contributes to the design of AOs for users with foot drop and knee flexion impairment. However, the potential of the proposed AOs to be part of a robotic gait rehabilitation system that improves the quality of life of stroke survivors requires further investigation.

  12. A small biomimetic quadruped robot driven by multistacked dielectric elastomer actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Canh Toan; Phung, Hoa; Dat Nguyen, Tien; Lee, Choonghan; Kim, Uikyum; Lee, Donghyouk; Moon, Hyungpil; Koo, Jachoon; Nam, Jae-do; Ryeol Choi, Hyouk

    2014-06-01

    A kind of dielectric elastomer (DE) material, called ‘synthetic elastomer’, has been developed based on acrylonitrile butadiene rubber (NBR) to be used as a dielectric elastomer actuator (DEA). By stacking single layers of synthetic elastomer, a linear actuator, called a multistacked actuator, is produced, and used by mechatronic and robotic systems to generate linear motion. In this paper, we demonstrate the application of the multistacked dielectric elastomer actuator in a biomimetic legged robot. A miniature robot driven by a biomimetic actuation system with four 2-DOF (two-degree-of-freedom) legged mechanisms is realized. Based on the experimental results, we evaluate the performance of the proposed robot and validate the feasibility of the multistacked actuator in a locomotion system as a replacement for conventional actuators.

  13. A pneumatic power harvesting ankle-foot orthosis to prevent foot-drop

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Robin; Hsiao-Wecksler, Elizabeth T; Loth, Eric; Kogler, Géza; Manwaring, Scott D; Tyson, Serena N; Shorter, K Alex; Gilmer, Joel N

    2009-01-01

    Background A self-contained, self-controlled, pneumatic power harvesting ankle-foot orthosis (PhAFO) to manage foot-drop was developed and tested. Foot-drop is due to a disruption of the motor control pathway and may occur in numerous pathologies such as stroke, spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis, and cerebral palsy. The objectives for the prototype PhAFO are to provide toe clearance during swing, permit free ankle motion during stance, and harvest the needed power with an underfoot bellow pump pressurized during the stance phase of walking. Methods The PhAFO was constructed from a two-part (tibia and foot) carbon composite structure with an articulating ankle joint. Ankle motion control was accomplished through a cam-follower locking mechanism actuated via a pneumatic circuit connected to the bellow pump and embedded in the foam sole. Biomechanical performance of the prototype orthosis was assessed during multiple trials of treadmill walking of an able-bodied control subject (n = 1). Motion capture and pressure measurements were used to investigate the effect of the PhAFO on lower limb joint behavior and the capacity of the bellow pump to repeatedly generate the required pneumatic pressure for toe clearance. Results Toe clearance during swing was successfully achieved during all trials; average clearance 44 ± 5 mm. Free ankle motion was observed during stance and plantarflexion was blocked during swing. In addition, the bellow component repeatedly generated an average of 169 kPa per step of pressure during ten minutes of walking. Conclusion This study demonstrated that fluid power could be harvested with a pneumatic circuit built into an AFO, and used to operate an actuated cam-lock mechanism that controls ankle-foot motion at specific periods of the gait cycle. PMID:19527526

  14. Acoustic Gaits: Gait Analysis With Footstep Sounds.

    PubMed

    Altaf, M Umair Bin; Butko, Taras; Juang, Biing-Hwang Fred

    2015-08-01

    We describe the acoustic gaits-the natural human gait quantitative characteristics derived from the sound of footsteps as the person walks normally. We introduce the acoustic gait profile, which is obtained from temporal signal analysis of sound of footsteps collected by microphones and illustrate some of the spatio-temporal gait parameters that can be extracted from the acoustic gait profile by using three temporal signal analysis methods-the squared energy estimate, Hilbert transform and Teager-Kaiser energy operator. Based on the statistical analysis of the parameter estimates, we show that the spatio-temporal parameters and gait characteristics obtained using the acoustic gait profile can consistently and reliably estimate a subset of clinical and biometric gait parameters currently in use for standardized gait assessments. We conclude that the Teager-Kaiser energy operator provides the most consistent gait parameter estimates showing the least variation across different sessions and zones. Acoustic gaits use an inexpensive set of microphones with a computing device as an accurate and unintrusive gait analysis system. This is in contrast to the expensive and intrusive systems currently used in laboratory gait analysis such as the force plates, pressure mats and wearable sensors, some of which may change the gait parameters that are being measured. PMID:25769144

  15. Dosimetric evaluation of intrafractional tumor motion by means of a robot driven phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Richter, Anne; Wilbert, Juergen; Flentje, Michael

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: The aim of the work was to investigate the influence of intrafractional tumor motion to the accumulated (absorbed) dose. The accumulated dose was determined by means of calculations and measurements with a robot driven motion phantom. Methods: Different motion scenarios and compensation techniques were realized in a phantom study to investigate the influence of motion on image acquisition, dose calculation, and dose measurement. The influence of motion on the accumulated dose was calculated by employing two methods (a model based and a voxel based method). Results: Tumor motion resulted in a blurring of steep dose gradients and a reduction of dose at the periphery of the target. A systematic variation of motion parameters allowed the determination of the main influence parameters on the accumulated dose. The key parameters with the greatest influence on dose were the mean amplitude and the pattern of motion. Investigations on necessary safety margins to compensate for dose reduction have shown that smaller safety margins are sufficient, if the developed concept with optimized margins (OPT concept) was used instead of the standard internal target volume (ITV) concept. Both calculation methods were a reasonable approximation of the measured dose with the voxel based method being in better agreement with the measurements. Conclusions: Further evaluation of available systems and algorithms for dose accumulation are needed to create guidelines for the verification of the accumulated dose.

  16. Therapeutic Experience on Stance Control Knee-Ankle-Foot Orthosis With Electromagnetically Controlled Knee Joint System in Poliomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung-Hwan; Ji, Sang-Goo; Jung, Kang-Jae

    2016-01-01

    A 54-year-old man with poliomyelitis had been using a conventional, passive knee-ankle-foot orthosis (KAFO) with a drop ring lock knee joint for about 40 years. A stance control KAFO (SCKAFO) with an electromagnetically controlled (E-MAG) knee joint system was prescribed. To correct his gait pattern, he also underwent rehabilitation therapy, which included muscle re-education, neuromuscular electrical stimulation, strengthening exercises for the lower extremities, and balance training twice a week for about 4 months. Both before and after rehabilitation, we conducted a gait analysis and assessed the physiological cost index in energy expended during walking in a locked-knee state and while he wore a SCKAFO with E-MAG. When compared with the pre-rehabilitation data, the velocity, step length, stride length, and knee kinematic data were improved after rehabilitation. Although the SCKAFO with E-MAG system facilitated the control of knee motion during ambulation, appropriate rehabilitative therapy was also needed to achieve a normal gait pattern. PMID:27152288

  17. Therapeutic Experience on Stance Control Knee-Ankle-Foot Orthosis With Electromagnetically Controlled Knee Joint System in Poliomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung-Hwan; Ji, Sang-Goo; Jung, Kang-Jae; Kim, Jae-Hyung

    2016-04-01

    A 54-year-old man with poliomyelitis had been using a conventional, passive knee-ankle-foot orthosis (KAFO) with a drop ring lock knee joint for about 40 years. A stance control KAFO (SCKAFO) with an electromagnetically controlled (E-MAG) knee joint system was prescribed. To correct his gait pattern, he also underwent rehabilitation therapy, which included muscle re-education, neuromuscular electrical stimulation, strengthening exercises for the lower extremities, and balance training twice a week for about 4 months. Both before and after rehabilitation, we conducted a gait analysis and assessed the physiological cost index in energy expended during walking in a locked-knee state and while he wore a SCKAFO with E-MAG. When compared with the pre-rehabilitation data, the velocity, step length, stride length, and knee kinematic data were improved after rehabilitation. Although the SCKAFO with E-MAG system facilitated the control of knee motion during ambulation, appropriate rehabilitative therapy was also needed to achieve a normal gait pattern. PMID:27152288

  18. A Comparative Study Between Total Contact Cast and Pressure-Relieving Ankle Foot Orthosis in Diabetic Neuropathic Foot Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Partha Pratim; Ray, Sayantan; Biswas, Dibakar; Baidya, Arjun; Bhattacharjee, Rana; Mukhopadhyay, Pradip; Ghosh, Sujoy; Mukhopadhyay, Satinath; Chowdhury, Subhankar

    2014-01-01

    Background: Off-loading of the ulcer area is extremely important for the healing of plantar ulcers. Off-loading with total contact cast (TCC) may be superior to other off-loading strategies studied so far, but practical limitations can dissuade clinicians from using this modality. This study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of TCC compared with that of a pressure-relieving ankle foot orthosis (PRAFO) in healing of diabetic neuropathic foot ulcers and their effect on gait parameters. Methods: Thirty adult diabetic patients attending the foot clinic with neuropathic plantar ulcers irrespective of sex, age, duration and type of diabetes were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 off-loading modalities (TCC and PRAFO). Main outcome measures were ulcer healing after 4 weeks of randomization and effect of each of the modalities on various gait parameters. Results: The percentage reduction of the ulcer surface area at 4 weeks from baseline was 75.75 ± 9.25 with TCC and 34.72 ± 13.07 with PRAFO, which was significantly different (P < .001). The results of this study however, showed that most of the gait parameters were better with PRAFO than with TCC. Conclusions: This study comprehensively evaluated the well known advantages and disadvantages of a removable (PRAFO) and a nonremovable device (TCC) in the treatment of diabetic neuropathic foot ulcer. Further studies are needed involving larger subjects and using 3D gait analysis to collect more accurate data on gait parameters and wound healing with different off-loading devices. PMID:25452635

  19. How can push-off be preserved during use of an ankle foot orthosis in children with hemiplegia? A prospective controlled study.

    PubMed

    Desloovere, Kaat; Molenaers, Guy; Van Gestel, Leen; Huenaerts, Catherine; Van Campenhout, Anja; Callewaert, Barbara; Van de Walle, Patricia; Seyler, J

    2006-10-01

    Several studies indicated that walking with an ankle foot orthosis (AFO) impaired third rocker. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of two types of orthoses, with similar goal settings, on gait, in a homogeneous group of children, using both barefoot and shoe walking as control conditions. Fifteen children with hemiplegia, aged between 4 and 10 years, received two types of individually tuned AFOs: common posterior leaf-spring (PLS) and Dual Carbon Fiber Spring AFO (CFO) (with carbon fibre at the dorsal part of the orthosis). Both orthoses were expected to prevent plantar flexion, thus improving first rocker, allowing dorsiflexion to improve second rocker, absorbing energy during second rocker, and returning it during the third rocker. The effect of the AFOs was studied using objective gait analysis, including 3D kinematics, and kinetics in four conditions: barefoot, shoes without AFO, and PLS and CFO combined with shoes. Several gait parameters significantly changed in shoe walking compared to barefoot walking (cadence, ankle ROM and velocity, knee shock absorption, and knee angle in swing). The CFO produced a significantly larger ankle ROM and ankle velocity during push-off, and an increased plantar flexion moment and power generation at pre-swing compared to the PLS (<0.01). The results of this study further support the findings of previous studies indicating that orthoses improve specific gait parameters compared to barefoot walking (velocity, step length, first and second ankle rocker, sagittal knee and hip ROM). However, compared to shoes, not all improvements were statistically significant. PMID:16934470

  20. 21 CFR 890.3610 - Rigid pneumatic structure orthosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Rigid pneumatic structure orthosis. 890.3610 Section 890.3610 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3610...

  1. 21 CFR 890.3610 - Rigid pneumatic structure orthosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Rigid pneumatic structure orthosis. 890.3610 Section 890.3610 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3610...

  2. 21 CFR 890.3610 - Rigid pneumatic structure orthosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Rigid pneumatic structure orthosis. 890.3610 Section 890.3610 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3610...

  3. 21 CFR 890.3610 - Rigid pneumatic structure orthosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... paraplegics walk. (b) Classification. Class III (premarket approval). (c) Date PMA or notice of completion of a PDP is required. A PMA or a notice of completion of a PDP is required to be filed with the Food... distribution before May 28, 1976. Any other rigid pneumatic structure orthosis shall have an approved PMA or...

  4. 21 CFR 890.3610 - Rigid pneumatic structure orthosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... paraplegics walk. (b) Classification. Class III (premarket approval). (c) Date PMA or notice of completion of a PDP is required. A PMA or a notice of completion of a PDP is required to be filed with the Food... distribution before May 28, 1976. Any other rigid pneumatic structure orthosis shall have an approved PMA or...

  5. Experimental Implementation of Underactuated Potential Energy Shaping on a Powered Ankle-Foot Orthosis

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Ge; Zhu, Hanqi; Elery, Toby; Li, Luwei; Gregg, Robert D.

    2016-01-01

    Traditional control methodologies of rehabilitation orthoses/exoskeletons aim at replicating normal kinematics and thus fall into the category of kinematic control. This control paradigm depends on pre-defined reference trajectories, which can be difficult to adjust between different locomotor tasks and human subjects. An alternative control category, kinetic control, enforces kinetic goals (e.g., torques or energy) instead of kinematic trajectories, which could provide a flexible learning environment for the user while freeing up therapists to make corrections. We propose that the theory of underactuated potential energy shaping, which falls into the category of kinetic control, could be used to generate virtual body-weight support for stroke gait rehabilitation. After deriving the nonlinear control law and simulating it on a human-like biped model, we implemented this controller on a powered ankle-foot orthosis that was designed specifically for testing torque control strategies. Experimental results with an able-bodied human subject demonstrate the feasibility of the control approach for both positive and negative virtual body-weight augmentation. PMID:27390625

  6. Effects of a dynamic orthosis in an individual with claw deformity.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Gudson G Q; de Macêdo, Marilu Pereira

    2015-01-01

    These authors describe their utilization of a dynamic orthosis to correct a strong claw deformity in a patient with a median and ulnar laceration. After 4 weeks of wearing the dynamic orthosis, these authors noted that the patient was able to actively extend all his fingers orthosis-free, with no evidence of claw.--Victoria Priganc, PhD, OTR, CHT, CLT, Practice Forum Editor. PMID:26190028

  7. A Powered Lower Limb Orthosis for Providing Legged Mobility in Paraplegic Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Quintero, Hugo A.; Farris, Ryan J.; Hartigan, Clare; Clesson, Ismari; Goldfarb, Michael

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents preliminary results on the development of a powered lower limb orthosis intended to provide legged mobility (with the use of a stability aid, such as forearm crutches) to paraplegic individuals. The orthosis contains electric motors at both hip and both knee joints, which in conjunction with ankle-foot orthoses, provides appropriate joint kinematics for legged locomotion. The paper describes the orthosis and the nature of the controller that enables the SCI patient to command the device, and presents data from preliminary trials that indicate the efficacy of the orthosis and controller in providing legged mobility. PMID:22707874

  8. The effect of frame rate on the ability of experienced gait analysts to identify characteristics of gait from closed circuit television footage.

    PubMed

    Birch, Ivan; Vernon, Wesley; Burrow, Gordon; Walker, Jeremy

    2014-03-01

    Forensic gait analysis is increasingly being used as part of criminal investigations. A major issue is the quality of the closed circuit television (CCTV) footage used, particularly the frame rate which can vary from 25 frames per second to one frame every 4s. To date, no study has investigated the effect of frame rate on forensic gait analysis. A single subject was fitted with an ankle foot orthosis and recorded walking at 25 frames per second. 3D motion data were also collected, providing an absolute assessment of the gait characteristics. The CCTV footage was then edited to produce a set of eight additional pieces of footage, at various frame rates. Practitioners with knowledge of forensic gait analysis were recruited and instructed to record their observations regarding the characteristics of the subject's gait from the footage. They were sequentially sent web links to the nine pieces of footage, lowest frame rate first, and a simple observation recording form, over a period of 8 months. A sample-based Pearson product-moment correlation analysis of the results demonstrated a significant positive relationship between frame rate and scores (r=0.868, p=0.002). The results of this study show that frame rate affects the ability of experienced practitioners to identify characteristics of gait captured on CCTV footage. Every effort should therefore be made to ensure that CCTV footage likely to be used in criminal proceedings is captured at as high a frame rate as possible. PMID:24630327

  9. Plastazote abduction orthosis in the management of neonatal hip instability.

    PubMed

    Eberle, Charles F

    2003-01-01

    Since 1987, 113 consecutive newborns with either Ortolani-positive or provocative-positive hip examinations in the newborn nursery have been treated with a Plastazote hip abduction orthosis when diagnosed and followed to determine if the method was safe, effective, and easy to use. Ortolani-positive hips often had bilateral abnormalities in the hip examination, were frequently associated with breech position, and were anatomically more dysplastic than those hips that were unstable by provocative testing. No patient developed ischemic necrosis during follow-up. Only two had additional treatment of their unstable hips. The rest had excellent results. Parents and caregivers found the device easy to use. The orthosis is recommended as the primary method for managing newborns with clinical instability to either the provocative or Ortolani test as being safe, effective, and easy to use across all skill levels. PMID:12960623

  10. Survey of Gait Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ling-Feng; Jia, Wei; Zhu, Yi-Hai

    Gait recognition, the process of identifying an individual by his /her walking style, is a relatively new research area. It has been receiving wide attention in the computer vision community. In this paper, a comprehensive survey of video based gait recognition approaches is presented. And the research challenges and future directions of the gait recognition are also discussed.

  11. A robotic gait training system integrating split-belt treadmill, footprint sensing and synchronous EEG recording for neuro-motor recovery.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi-Hung; Zhang, Bo; Liu, Quanquan; Hsu, Wei-Chun; Hsiao, Yu-Tsung; Su, Jui-Yiao; Kobayashi, Yo; Fujie, Masakatsu G

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a robotic gait training system for neuro-motor rehabilitation of hemiplegic stroke survivors. The system is composed of a treadmill consisting of two separated belts, footprint array sensor attached below each belt for gait data acquisition, and an electroencephalography (EEG) device for monitoring brain activities during gait training. The split belt treadmill allow physical therapists to set different treadmill belt velocities to modify physical workload of the patients during walking, thus being able to better improve the symmetry of gait phases between affected and unaffected (sound) legs in comparison with conventional treadmills where there is only one single belt. In contrast to in-shoe pressure sensors, the under-belt footprint sensor array designed in this study not only reduces the preparation complexity of gait training but also collects more gait data for motion analysis. Recorded EEG is segmented synchronously with gait-related events. The processed EEG data can be used for monitoring brain-activities during gait training, providing a neurological approach for motion assessment. One subject with simulated stroke using an ankle-foot orthosis participated in this study. Preliminary results indicate the feasibility of the proposed system to improve gait function and monitor neuro-motor recovery. PMID:26737065

  12. Creating a custom fabricated neoprene orthosis for optimal thumb positioning.

    PubMed

    Trujillo, Leonard G; Amini, Debbie

    2013-01-01

    Neoprene orthoses are used extensively in treating conditions of the hand when flexibility and support are sought. Devices such as these may be prefabricated from Neoprene alone or may include a thermoplastic or metal stay. Neoprene devices can also be custom fabricated by a practitioner in a time effective manner and at low cost. The custom fabricated orthosis described in this article is designed to support the thumb in a position of palmar abduction and opposition while maintaining CMC extension and an adequately open web space to prevent soft tissue contracture. PMID:23906412

  13. New Therapeutic Option for Drop Foot with the ActiGait Peroneal Nerve Stimulator--a Technical Note.

    PubMed

    Martin, K Daniel; Polanski, Witold; Schackert, Gabriele; Sobottka, Stephan B

    2015-12-01

    A drop foot occurs in up to 20% of stroke patients and leads to an increased risk of falls. Until recently, only a foot orthosis or surface stimulation was able to improve the gait of these patients. Recent studies have shown that direct peroneal nerve stimulation with an implantable 4-channel peroneal nerve stimulator (ActiGait) allows independent electrode adjustment and leads to better functional results and an improved quality of life. The application of this therapeutic option is restricted to patients with a drop foot attributable to a lesion of the first motor neuron caused by stroke, multiple sclerosis, or tumors. In this paper, we present the first technical note with possible pitfalls of the surgical procedure and the perioperative care after implantation of ActiGait drop foot stimulators in 50 patients. PMID:26164191

  14. SCRIPT passive orthosis: design and technical evaluation of the wrist and hand orthosis for rehabilitation training at home.

    PubMed

    Ates, Serdar; Lobo-Prat, Joan; Lammertse, Piet; van der Kooij, Herman; Stienen, Arno H A

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, a new hand and wrist exoskeleton design, the SCRIPT Passive Orthosis (SPO), for the rehabilitation after stroke is presented. The SPO is a wrist, hand, and finger orthosis that assists individuals after stroke that suffer from impairments caused by spasticity and abnormal synergies. These impairments are characterized in the wrist and hand by excessive involuntary flexion torques that make the hand unable to be used for many activities in daily life. The SPO can passively offset these undesired torques, but it cannot actively generate or control movements. The user needs to use voluntary muscle activation to perform movements and thus needs to have some residual muscle control to successfully use the SPO. The SPO offsets the excessive internal flexion by applying external extension torques to the joints of the wrist and fingers. The SPO physically interacts with the users using the forearm shell, the hand plate and the digit caps from the Saebo Flex, but is otherwise a completely novel design. It applies the external extension torques via passive leaf springs and elastic tension cords. The amount of this support can be adjusted to provide more or less offset force to wrist, finger, or thumb extension, manually. The SPO is equipped with sensors that can give a rough estimate of the joint rotations and applied torques, sufficient to make the orthosis interact with our interactive gaming environment. Integrated inertial and gyroscopic sensors provide limited information on the user's forearm posture. The first home-based patient experiences have already let to several issues being resolved, but have also made it clear that many improvement are still to be made. PMID:24187220

  15. Efficacy of stepwise application of orthosis and kinesiology tape for treating thumb metacarpophalangeal joint hyperextension injury

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sun-Min; Lee, Jung-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate on the effects of the stepwise application of orthosis and kinesiology tape on a patient with thumb metacarpophalangeal joint hyperextension injury. [Subject] The patient was a 43-year-old man with severe thumb MCP pain and extremely limited thumb movement. [Methods] Stepwise application of orthosis and kinesiology taping were performed for 3 weeks and 4 weeks, respectively. [Results] After stepwise treatment, the patient was able to power grip, precision pinch, turn a key, and hold a pen without pain. [Conclusion] Stepwise application of thumb orthosis and kinesiology tape is a safe and effective treatment for thumb MCP joint hyperextension injury. PMID:26355325

  16. Embracing additive manufacture: implications for foot and ankle orthosis design

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The design of foot and ankle orthoses is currently limited by the methods used to fabricate the devices, particularly in terms of geometric freedom and potential to include innovative new features. Additive manufacturing (AM) technologies, where objects are constructed via a series of sub-millimetre layers of a substrate material, may present the opportunity to overcome these limitations and allow novel devices to be produced that are highly personalised for the individual, both in terms of fit and functionality. Two novel devices, a foot orthosis (FO) designed to include adjustable elements to relieve pressure at the metatarsal heads, and an ankle foot orthosis (AFO) designed to have adjustable stiffness levels in the sagittal plane, were developed and fabricated using AM. The devices were then tested on a healthy participant to determine if the intended biomechanical modes of action were achieved. Results The adjustable, pressure relieving FO was found to be able to significantly reduce pressure under the targeted metatarsal heads. The AFO was shown to have distinct effects on ankle kinematics which could be varied by adjusting the stiffness level of the device. Conclusions The results presented here demonstrate the potential design freedom made available by AM, and suggest that it may allow novel personalised orthotic devices to be produced which are beyond the current state of the art. PMID:22642941

  17. Effects of Custom-Made Rigid Foot Orthosis on Pes Planus in Children Over 6 Years Old

    PubMed Central

    Bok, Soo-Kyung; Kim, Bong-Ok; Lim, Jun-Ho

    2014-01-01

    Objective To identify the effects of a custom-made rigid foot orthosis (RFO) in children over six years old with pes planus. Methods The medical records of 39 children (mean age, 10.3±4.09 years) diagnosed with pes planus, fitted with RFOs, and had who more than two consecutive radiological studies were reviewed. The resting calcaneal stance position (RCSP), anteroposterior talocalcaneal angle (APTCA), lateral talocalcaneal angle (LTTCA), the lateral talometatarsal angle (LTTMA), and calcaneal pitch (CP) of both feet were measured to evaluate foot alignment. After diagnosis, children were fitted with a pair of RFOs and recommended to walk with heel strike and reciprocal arm swing to normalize the gait pattern. A follow-up clinical evaluation with radiological measurements was performed after 12-18 months and after 24 months of RFO application. Post-hoc analysis was used to test for significant differences between the radiological indicators and RCSP. Results With RFOs, all radiological indicators changed in the corrective direction except LTTCA. RCSP and CP in the third measurement showed significant improvement in comparison with the second and baseline measurements. Additionally, APTCA and LTTMA revealed improvements at the third measurement versus the baseline measurements. Conclusion This study revealed that radiological indicators improved significantly after 24 months of RFO application. A prospective long-term controlled study with radiographical evaluation is necessary to confirm the therapeutic effects of RFOs and to determine the optimal duration of wear in children with pes planus. PMID:25024961

  18. Restoration of ankle movements with the ActiGait implantable drop foot stimulator: a safe and reliable treatment option for permanent central leg palsy.

    PubMed

    Martin, Klaus Daniel; Polanski, Witold Henryk; Schulz, Anne-Kathrin; Jöbges, Michael; Hoff, Hansjoerg; Schackert, Gabriele; Pinzer, Thomas; Sobottka, Stephan B

    2016-01-01

    OBJECT The ActiGait drop foot stimulator is a promising technique for restoration of lost ankle function by an implantable hybrid stimulation system. It allows ankle dorsiflexion by active peroneal nerve stimulation during the swing phase of gait. In this paper the authors report the outcome of the first prospective study on a large number of patients with stroke-related drop foot. METHODS Twenty-seven patients who experienced a stroke and with persisting spastic leg paresis received an implantable ActiGait drop foot stimulator for restoration of ankle movement after successful surface test stimulation. After 3 to 5 weeks, the stimulator was activated, and gait speed, gait endurance, and activation time of the system were evaluated and compared with preoperative gait tests. In addition, patient satisfaction was assessed using a questionnaire. RESULTS Postoperative gait speed significantly improved from 33.9 seconds per 20 meters to 17.9 seconds per 20 meters (p < 0.0001), gait endurance from 196 meters in 6 minutes to 401 meters in 6 minutes (p < 0.0001), and activation time from 20.5 seconds to 10.6 seconds on average (p < 0.0001). In 2 patients with nerve injury, surgical repositioning of the electrode cuff became necessary. One patient showed a delayed wound healing, and in another patient the system had to be removed because of a wound infection. Marked improvement in mobility, social participation, and quality of life was confirmed by 89% to 96% of patients. CONCLUSIONS The ActiGait implantable drop foot stimulator improves gait speed, endurance, and quality of life in patients with stroke-related drop foot. Regarding gait speed, the ActiGait system appears to be advantageous compared with foot orthosis or surface stimulation devices. Randomized trials with more patients and longer observation periods are needed to prove the long-term benefit of this device. PMID:26207599

  19. Animal Gaits and Symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubitsky, Martin

    2012-04-01

    Many gaits of four-legged animals are described by symmetry. For example, when a horse paces it moves both left legs in unison and then both right legs and so on. The motion is described by two symmetries: Interchange front and back legs, and swap left and right legs with a half-period phase shift. Biologists postulate the existence of a central pattern generator (CPG) in the neuronal system that sends periodic signals to the legs. CPGs can be thought of as electrical circuits that produce periodic signals and can be modeled by systems with symmetry. In this lecture we discuss animal gaits; use gait symmetries to construct a simplest CPG architecture that naturally produces quadrupedal gait rhythms; and make several testable predictions about gaits.

  20. Recognition using gait.

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Mark William

    2007-09-01

    Gait or an individual's manner of walking, is one approach for recognizing people at a distance. Studies in psychophysics and medicine indicate that humans can recognize people by their gait and have found twenty-four different components to gait that taken together make it a unique signature. Besides not requiring close sensor contact, gait also does not necessarily require a cooperative subject. Using video data of people walking in different scenarios and environmental conditions we develop and test an algorithm that uses shape and motion to identify people from their gait. The algorithm uses dynamic time warping to match stored templates against an unknown sequence of silhouettes extracted from a person walking. While results under similar constraints and conditions are very good, the algorithm quickly degrades with varying conditions such as surface and clothing.

  1. Design optimization of a magnetorheological brake in powered knee orthosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hao; Liao, Wei-Hsin

    2015-04-01

    Magneto-rheological (MR) fluids have been utilized in devices like orthoses and prostheses to generate controllable braking torque. In this paper, a flat shape rotary MR brake is designed for powered knee orthosis to provide adjustable resistance. Multiple disk structure with interior inner coil is adopted in the MR brake configuration. In order to increase the maximal magnetic flux, a novel internal structure design with smooth transition surface is proposed. Based on this design, a parameterized model of the MR brake is built for geometrical optimization. Multiple factors are considered in the optimization objective: braking torque, weight, and, particularly, average power consumption. The optimization is then performed with Finite Element Analysis (FEA), and the optimal design is obtained among the Pareto-optimal set considering the trade-offs in design objectives.

  2. Design of a portable hydraulic ankle-foot orthosis.

    PubMed

    Neubauer, Brett C; Nath, Jonathan; Durfee, William K

    2014-01-01

    Small-scale hydraulics is ideal for powered human assistive devices including powered ankle foot orthoses because a large torque can be generated with an actuator that is small and light. A portable hydraulic ankle foot orthosis has been designed and is undergoing preliminary prototyping and engineering bench test evaluation. The device provides 90 Nm of ankle torque and has an operating pressure of 138 bar (2,000 psi). The battery-operated hydraulic power supply weighs about 3 kg and is worn at the waist. The ankle component weighs about 1.2 Kg and connects to the power supply with two hoses. Performance simulation and preliminary bench testing suggests that the device could be useful in certain rehabilitation applications. PMID:25570175

  3. Experimental evaluation of a portable powered ankle-foot orthosis.

    PubMed

    Shorter, Kenneth A; Li, Yifan; Morris, Emily A; Kogler, Géza F; Hsiao-Wecksler, Elizabeth T

    2011-01-01

    Ankle-foot orthoses (AFOs) ameliorate the impact of impairments to the lower limb neuromuscular motor system that affect gait. Emerging technologies provide a vision for fully powered, untethered AFOs. The portable powered AFO (PPAFO) provides both plantarflexor and dorsiflexor torque assistance via a bi-directional pneumatic rotary actuator. The system uses a portable pneumatic power source (bottle of compressed CO(2)) and embedded electronics to control foot motion during level walking. Experimental data were collected to demonstrate functionality from two subjects with bilateral impairments to the lower legs. These data demonstrated the PPAFO's ability to provide functional assistance during gait. The stringent design requirements of light weight, small size, high efficiency and low noise make the creation of daily wear assist devices challenging; but once such devices appear, they will present new opportunities for clinical treatment of gait abnormalities. PMID:22254386

  4. Voluntary-Driven Elbow Orthosis with Speed-Controlled Tremor Suppression.

    PubMed

    Herrnstadt, Gil; Menon, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Robotic technology is gradually becoming commonplace in the medical sector and in the service of patients. Medical conditions that have benefited from significant technological development include stroke, for which rehabilitation with robotic devices is administered, and surgery assisted by robots. Robotic devices have also been proposed for assistance of movement disorders. Pathological tremor, among the most common movement disorders, is one such example. In practice, the dissemination and availability of tremor suppression robotic systems has been limited. Devices in the marketplace tend to either be non-ambulatory or to target specific functions, such as eating and drinking. We have developed a one degree-of-freedom (DOF) elbow orthosis that could be worn by an individual with tremor. A speed-controlled, voluntary-driven suppression approach is implemented with the orthosis. Typically tremor suppression methods estimate the tremor component of the signal and produce a canceling counterpart signal. The suggested approach instead estimates the voluntary component of the motion. A controller then actuates the orthosis based on the voluntary signal, while simultaneously rejecting the tremorous motion. In this work, we tested the suppressive orthosis using a one DOF robotic system that simulates the human arm. The suggested suppression approach does not require a model of the human arm. Moreover, the human input along with the orthosis forearm gravitational forces, of non-linear nature, are considered as part of the disturbance to the suppression system. Therefore, the suppression system can be modeled linearly. Nevertheless, the orthosis forearm gravitational forces can be compensated by the suppression system. The electromechanical design of the orthosis is presented, and data from an essential tremor patient is used as the human input. Velocity tracking results demonstrate an RMS error of 0.31 rad/s, and a power spectral density shows a reduction of the tremor

  5. Voluntary-Driven Elbow Orthosis with Speed-Controlled Tremor Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Herrnstadt, Gil; Menon, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Robotic technology is gradually becoming commonplace in the medical sector and in the service of patients. Medical conditions that have benefited from significant technological development include stroke, for which rehabilitation with robotic devices is administered, and surgery assisted by robots. Robotic devices have also been proposed for assistance of movement disorders. Pathological tremor, among the most common movement disorders, is one such example. In practice, the dissemination and availability of tremor suppression robotic systems has been limited. Devices in the marketplace tend to either be non-ambulatory or to target specific functions, such as eating and drinking. We have developed a one degree-of-freedom (DOF) elbow orthosis that could be worn by an individual with tremor. A speed-controlled, voluntary-driven suppression approach is implemented with the orthosis. Typically tremor suppression methods estimate the tremor component of the signal and produce a canceling counterpart signal. The suggested approach instead estimates the voluntary component of the motion. A controller then actuates the orthosis based on the voluntary signal, while simultaneously rejecting the tremorous motion. In this work, we tested the suppressive orthosis using a one DOF robotic system that simulates the human arm. The suggested suppression approach does not require a model of the human arm. Moreover, the human input along with the orthosis forearm gravitational forces, of non-linear nature, are considered as part of the disturbance to the suppression system. Therefore, the suppression system can be modeled linearly. Nevertheless, the orthosis forearm gravitational forces can be compensated by the suppression system. The electromechanical design of the orthosis is presented, and data from an essential tremor patient is used as the human input. Velocity tracking results demonstrate an RMS error of 0.31 rad/s, and a power spectral density shows a reduction of the tremor

  6. View Invariant Gait Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seely, Richard D.; Goffredo, Michela; Carter, John N.; Nixon, Mark S.

    Recognition by gait is of particular interest since it is the biometric that is available at the lowest resolution, or when other biometrics are (intentionally) obscured. Gait as a biometric has now shown increasing recognition capability. There are many approaches and these show that recognition can achieve excellent performance on current large databases. The majority of these approaches are planar 2D, largely since the early large databases featured subjects walking in a plane normal to the camera view. To extend deployment capability, we need viewpoint invariant gait biometrics. We describe approaches where viewpoint invariance is achieved by 3D approaches or in 2D. In the first group, the identification relies on parameters extracted from the 3D body deformation during walking. These methods use several video cameras and the 3D reconstruction is achieved after a camera calibration process. On the other hand, the 2D gait biometric approaches use a single camera, usually positioned perpendicular to the subject’s walking direction. Because in real surveillance scenarios a system that operates in an unconstrained environment is necessary, many of the recent gait analysis approaches are orientated toward view-invariant gait recognition.

  7. Gait analysis: clinical facts.

    PubMed

    Baker, Richard; Esquenazi, Alberto; Benedetti, Maria G; Desloovere, Kaat

    2016-08-01

    Gait analysis is a well-established tool for the quantitative assessment of gait disturbances providing functional diagnosis, assessment for treatment planning, and monitoring of disease progress. There is a large volume of literature on the research use of gait analysis, but evidence on its clinical routine use supports a favorable cost-benefit ratio in a limited number of conditions. Initially gait analysis was introduced to clinical practice to improve the management of children with cerebral palsy. However, there is good evidence to extend its use to patients with various upper motor neuron diseases, and to lower limb amputation. Thereby, the methodology for properly conducting and interpreting the exam is of paramount relevance. Appropriateness of gait analysis prescription and reliability of data obtained are required in the clinical environment. This paper provides an overview on guidelines for managing a clinical gait analysis service and on the principal clinical domains of its application: cerebral palsy, stroke, traumatic brain injury and lower limb amputation. PMID:27618499

  8. Gait Analysis Using Wearable Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Weijun; Liu, Tao; Zheng, Rencheng; Feng, Hutian

    2012-01-01

    Gait analysis using wearable sensors is an inexpensive, convenient, and efficient manner of providing useful information for multiple health-related applications. As a clinical tool applied in the rehabilitation and diagnosis of medical conditions and sport activities, gait analysis using wearable sensors shows great prospects. The current paper reviews available wearable sensors and ambulatory gait analysis methods based on the various wearable sensors. After an introduction of the gait phases, the principles and features of wearable sensors used in gait analysis are provided. The gait analysis methods based on wearable sensors is divided into gait kinematics, gait kinetics, and electromyography. Studies on the current methods are reviewed, and applications in sports, rehabilitation, and clinical diagnosis are summarized separately. With the development of sensor technology and the analysis method, gait analysis using wearable sensors is expected to play an increasingly important role in clinical applications. PMID:22438763

  9. Gait analysis using wearable sensors.

    PubMed

    Tao, Weijun; Liu, Tao; Zheng, Rencheng; Feng, Hutian

    2012-01-01

    Gait analysis using wearable sensors is an inexpensive, convenient, and efficient manner of providing useful information for multiple health-related applications. As a clinical tool applied in the rehabilitation and diagnosis of medical conditions and sport activities, gait analysis using wearable sensors shows great prospects. The current paper reviews available wearable sensors and ambulatory gait analysis methods based on the various wearable sensors. After an introduction of the gait phases, the principles and features of wearable sensors used in gait analysis are provided. The gait analysis methods based on wearable sensors is divided into gait kinematics, gait kinetics, and electromyography. Studies on the current methods are reviewed, and applications in sports, rehabilitation, and clinical diagnosis are summarized separately. With the development of sensor technology and the analysis method, gait analysis using wearable sensors is expected to play an increasingly important role in clinical applications. PMID:22438763

  10. Comparison of Extension Orthosis Versus Percutaneous Pinning of the Distal Interphalangeal Joint for Closed Mallet Injuries.

    PubMed

    Renfree, Kevin J; Odgers, Ryan A; Ivy, Cynthia C

    2016-05-01

    We compared a static extension orthosis with percutaneous pinning of the distal interphalangeal joint (DIPJ) for treatment of closed mallet injuries. After receiving counsel about treatment options, 44 patients (25 women and 19 men; mean age, 57 years) freely chose orthosis and 18 patients (5 women and 13 men; mean age, 51 years) chose pinning. Both the extension orthosis and the pin remained in place for 6 weeks; the pin then was removed, and the care in both groups was transitioned to nighttime orthosis use for an additional 6 weeks. The patients in the pin group were allowed to immediately resume unrestricted activity postoperatively. The mean follow-up was 32 months in the orthosis group and 19 months in the pin group. Final residual extensor lag was better in the pin group (5 vs 10 degrees, P = 0.048). Improvement between the groups was in favor of percutaneous pinning (36 vs 17 degrees, P = 0.001). No correlation was seen between time to treatment (≤14 vs >14 days from injury) and final extensor lag in either group (P = 0.85). The final mean DIPJ flexion was 53 degrees for orthosis and 46 degrees for pinning. Among the patients, 93% of the orthosis group and 100% of the pin group said that they would choose the same treatment again. Both groups had a mean of 5 hand therapy visits during treatment. Two complications occurred in the orthosis group (5%) and 3 (17%) occurred in the pin group. Extension orthotics and pinning are both well-tolerated, effective treatments of mallet injury. The techniques produce satisfactory correction of extensor lag and have high patient satisfaction. Pinning allows better correction of DIPJ extensor lag and results in a smaller degree of final extensor lag. Pinning is more expensive and may result in more DIPJ stiffness (ie, loss of active flexion), but it may be justified in certain patients (eg, medical professionals, food service workers) who would have difficulty working with an orthosis. PMID:25144418

  11. Evaluation of safety and reliability in an infant reciprocal walking orthosis.

    PubMed

    Miller, K; Woollam, P J; Jones, N; Poiner, R; Farmer, I R; Stallard, J

    2002-08-01

    In response to new demands for infant walking orthoses consideration was given to the development of a device for this category of patient. A specially developed hip joint with the required structural properties (Woollam et al., 2001) provided an opportunity for this development. Earlier structural assessment, and limited cyclic load testing of key elements of the orthosis (primarily the body brace), confirmed that a safe device for evaluation with patients could, theoretically, be produced. A provisional prototype was therefore designed and manufactured for initial structural testing of the complete infant orthosis (Stallard et al., 2001). Efficiency of walking is strongly influenced by the lateral rigidity of the orthosis. Monitoring the structural performance of the provisional infant design indicated it would equal or improve on the stiffness of that achieved in the adult specification. Additionally, relative strength was comparable with the adult version, which has proven to be safe and reliable in many years of routine prescription. This, together with the limited cyclic testing of the complete orthosis (Stallard et al., 2001), gave confidence that it was safe to proceed with controlled field evaluation of the infant design when supplied as a rehabilitation engineering device within the provisions of an ISO9001 and EN46001 QA System. This additional study of controlled patient use, and further representative cyclic load testing in parallel with the field evaluation, had established the long-term structural safety of the orthosis. Wider application is now to be introduced through completion of the EC (European Community) Medical Devices Directive formalities. PMID:12227452

  12. Scoliosis curve analysis with Milwaukee orthosis based on Open SIMM modeling

    PubMed Central

    Karimi, Mohammad; Kavyani, Mahsa

    2015-01-01

    Background: Scoliosis is a three-dimensional spinal deformity characterized by lateral curvature and rotational deformity of the spine. Various methods have been used to investigate the performance of the subjects during walking with an orthosis, but nobody study the biomechanics of orthotic use by understanding the length of the muscles and the force produced by them. Therefore, the aim of this research is to test the effect of the orthosis on the muscular force, tendon length during walking with and without orthosis. Materials and Methods: A 12-year-old scoliosis subject was recruited in this study. The forces produced by trunk musculature, joint reaction force, length of trunk musculature were some parameters selected in this study. Open SIMM and Visual 3D software were used to model the subject. Results: The results of this research showed that the length of erector spine muscles increased follow the use of orthosis. Moreover, the force produced by trunk muscles differed during walking with and without orthosis and also between right and left sides. Discussion: It seems that Open SIMM software can be used to predict the length of muscles, active-passive forces produced by muscles in scoliotic subjects. Therefore, it is recommended this research be done on more number of subjects. PMID:26288548

  13. Gait and its assessment in psychiatry

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Richard D.

    2010-01-01

    Gait reflects all levels of nervous system function. In psychiatry, gait disturbances reflecting cortical and subcortical dysfunction are often seen. Observing spontaneous gait, sometimes augmented by a few brief tests, can be highly informative. The authors briefly review the neuroanatomy of gait, review gait abnormalities seen in psychiatric and neurologic disorders, and describe the assessment of gait. PMID:20805918

  14. Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home About iChip Articles Directories Videos Resources Contact Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities Home » Article Categories » Exercise and Fitness Font Size: A A A A Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities Next Page The manner ...

  15. Surgical Therapy by Sandwich Transplantation using a Dermal Collagen-Elastin Matrix and Full Thickness Split Grafts and Gait Rehabilitation with Individualized Orthesis

    PubMed Central

    Wollina, Uwe; Heinig, Birgit

    2012-01-01

    Painful callosities of the feet (PCOF) are a rare complaint in children with severe impairment of mobility and quality of life. There is no medical treatment available. We investigated the usefulness of a recently developed combined transplant technique-the sandwich transplantation with dermal collagen-elastin template in this rare condition. A 14-year-old boy suffered from PCOF for several years without any improvement by topical therapy, dermabrasion, and oral retinoids. He was unable to walk normally and suffered from severe pain. We performed a complete deep excision of the hyperkeratotic plantar tissue in general anaesthesia in combination with sandwich transplantation in the same setting. Dry sheets of collagen-elastin matrix (1 mm thickness) were placed on the soft tissue defects and covered by full-thickness mesh graft transplants from the upper leg. An individualized orthosis was produced for gait rehabilitation. Two weeks after surgery the gait-related pain was reduced remarkably. Using the orthosis, the boy was able to walk pain-free even on staircase. Surgery of PCOF with sandwich transplantation and gait rehabilitation appears to be a promising strategy for this rare condition. PMID:23378711

  16. Surgical Therapy by Sandwich Transplantation using a Dermal Collagen-Elastin Matrix and Full Thickness Split Grafts and Gait Rehabilitation with Individualized Orthesis.

    PubMed

    Wollina, Uwe; Heinig, Birgit

    2012-10-01

    Painful callosities of the feet (PCOF) are a rare complaint in children with severe impairment of mobility and quality of life. There is no medical treatment available. We investigated the usefulness of a recently developed combined transplant technique-the sandwich transplantation with dermal collagen-elastin template in this rare condition. A 14-year-old boy suffered from PCOF for several years without any improvement by topical therapy, dermabrasion, and oral retinoids. He was unable to walk normally and suffered from severe pain. We performed a complete deep excision of the hyperkeratotic plantar tissue in general anaesthesia in combination with sandwich transplantation in the same setting. Dry sheets of collagen-elastin matrix (1 mm thickness) were placed on the soft tissue defects and covered by full-thickness mesh graft transplants from the upper leg. An individualized orthosis was produced for gait rehabilitation. Two weeks after surgery the gait-related pain was reduced remarkably. Using the orthosis, the boy was able to walk pain-free even on staircase. Surgery of PCOF with sandwich transplantation and gait rehabilitation appears to be a promising strategy for this rare condition. PMID:23378711

  17. Hybrid FES orthosis incorporating closed loop control and sensory feedback.

    PubMed

    Andrews, B J; Baxendale, R H; Barnett, R; Phillips, G F; Yamazaki, T; Paul, J P; Freeman, P A

    1988-04-01

    A hybrid functional electrical stimulation (FES) orthosis is described, comprising a rigid ankle-foot brace, a multi-channel FES stimulator with surface electrodes, body mounted sensors, a 'rule-based' controller and an electro-cutaneous display for supplementary sensory feedback. The mechanical brace provides stability, without FES activation of muscles, for standing postures normally adopted by patients. This avoids inducing muscle fatigue during prolonged upright activity. However, stability is conditional upon the position of the ground reaction vector (GRV) relative to the knee joint. The finite state FES controller reacts automatically to destabilizing shifts of the GRV by stimulating appropriate anti-gravity musculature to brace the leg. The FES system also features a control mode to initiate and terminate flexion of the leg during forward progression. A simple mode of supplementary sensory feedback was used during the laboratory standing tests to assist the patient in maintaining a set posture. Preliminary results of laboratory tests for two spinal cord injured subjects are presented. PMID:3361878

  18. Plagiocephaly and brachycephaly treatment with cranial orthosis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Schreen, Gerd; Matarazzo, Carolina Gomes

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT The number of cranial deformities has increased considerably since international efforts of pediatricians to recommend parents putting their babies to sleep in the supine position as a strategy to reduce sudden death syndrome of the newborn. On the one hand, this program has demonstrated very efficient results at reducing deaths and, on the other hand, such recommendation has increased the incidence of cranial asymmetries. In addition, infants are kept too long in one position, much of this due to abusive use of strollers, baby carriers, car seats, swings and other devices. Among resulting asymmetries, the most frequently found are plagiocephaly (parallelogram shaped skull, with posterior unilateral flattening with the opposite frontal area also flattened) and brachycephaly (occipital bilateral flattening). The present study is a case report of a patient with brachycephaly associated with deformational plagiocephaly treated with cranial orthosis. The same physician clinically evaluated the patient before and after treatment using photographic recording and a laser scanning device, which allows the accurate measurement of variables determining asymmetries. It became clear during treatment that there was significant improvement in cranial symmetry documented by decrease in the cephalic index, diagonal difference and volume gain in the quadrant that was flattened. The authors conclude that orthotic therapy is a safe and effective therapeutic modality for position cranial asymmetries. PMID:23579755

  19. The Effect of the Cervical Orthosis on Swallowing Physiology and Cervical Spine Motion During Swallowing.

    PubMed

    Mekata, Kojiro; Takigawa, Tomoyuki; Matsubayashi, Jun; Toda, Kazukiyo; Hasegawa, Yasuhiro; Ito, Yasuo

    2016-02-01

    Cervical orthosis is used to immobilize the neck in various disorders such as trauma and post-operation. However, it is still uncertain how cervical orthosis restricts the degree of movement of the cervical spine during swallowing and how they affect swallowing physiology. The purpose of this study was to evaluate these issues using the Philadelphia(®) Collar. We conducted videofluorography of swallowing in 39 healthy subjects (23 men, 16 women; mean age of 34.3 years) with and without cervical orthosis. To compare the two conditions regarding the cervical spine motion, we determined the angular and positional changes of the occipital bone (C0) and each cervical vertebra (C1-C7) from the oral phase to the pharyngeal phase. Similarly, to compare swallowing physiology, we assessed the start and end times and the durations of soft palate elevation, rapid hyoid anterosuperior movement, epiglottis inversion, closure of the laryngeal vestibule, and pharyngoesophageal segment (PES) opening. Finally, we compared the transit times of contrast agent in the two conditions. The respective extensions of C1, C2, and C3 were 0.31°, 0.07°, and 0.05° (mean) with cervical orthosis, and the respective flexions of C1, C2, and C3 were 0.98°, 1.42°, and 0.85° (mean) without. These results suggested that cervical orthosis restricted the flexion of C1-C3. Analysis of swallowing physiology revealed that the average durations of hyoid anterosuperior elevation, epiglottic inversion, and PES opening were prolonged by 0.09, 0.19, and 0.05 s, respectively. In conclusion, the cervical orthosis restricted the movement of the cervical spine during swallowing and changed swallowing physiology. PMID:26607160

  20. Context based gait recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazazian, Shermin; Gavrilova, Marina

    2012-06-01

    Gait recognition has recently become a popular topic in the field of biometrics. However, the main hurdle is the insufficient recognition rate in the presence of low quality samples. The main focus of this paper is to investigate how the performance of a gait recognition system can be improved using additional information about behavioral patterns of users and the context in which samples have been taken. The obtained results show combining the context information with biometric data improves the performance of the system at a very low cost. The amount of improvement depends on the distinctiveness of the behavioral patterns and the quality of the gait samples. Using the appropriate distinctive behavioral models it is possible to achieve a 100% recognition rate.

  1. Gait Retraining: Altering the Fingerprint of Gait.

    PubMed

    Davis, Irene S; Futrell, Erin

    2016-02-01

    In terms of running, there is evidence that links mechanics with injury. This evidence provides the justification for altering these mechanics. Increased hip adduction and vertical impact loading have been most commonly associated with injury. More work is needed in order to understand the optimal way to retrain gait patterns in runners. The human body has a considerable ability to adapt. To provide individuals with the ability to alter faulty movement patterns in ways that can reduce injury risk is a powerful tool. PMID:26616188

  2. The influence of an ankle foot orthosis on the percentage of weight loading during standing tasks in stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Sang-Hun; Lee, Myoung-Hyo; Kim, Kyoung-Don

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of an ankle foot orthosis on weight-bearing abilities of stroke patients by comparing weight loading during performance of tasks in various standing positions on the affected side. [Subjects and Methods] This study was performed with 16 stroke patients. To measure the weight loading value and percentage of weight loading in affected lower extremities, 5 standing tasks were performed with and without an ankle foot orthosis in random order. [Results] In the rising from a chair, maintaining a standing position, and forward weight shifting tasks, the affected lower extremities showed a significantly higher percentage of weight loading with an ankle foot orthosis. In the tasks requiring weight shifting to one leg, weight shifting to the lateral side showed the best weight-bearing ability with or without an ankle foot orthosis, followed by the forward and backward weight shifting, respectively. There were statistically significant correlations in all 5 tasks with or without an ankle foot orthosis. [Conclusion] An ankle foot orthosis improves the weight-bearing ability, especially when shifting weight forward, resulting in increased weight-bearing ability in activities of daily living tasks such as quiet standing and rising from a chair. The 5 tasks in this study would be a fine assessment tool under clinical conditions to investigate the postural stability of the affected side with or without application of an ankle foot orthosis. PMID:26504318

  3. Low-resolution gait recognition.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junping; Pu, Jian; Chen, Changyou; Fleischer, Rudolf

    2010-08-01

    Unlike other biometric authentication methods, gait recognition is noninvasive and effective from a distance. However, the performance of gait recognition will suffer in the low-resolution (LR) case. Furthermore, when gait sequences are projected onto a nonoptimal low-dimensional subspace to reduce the data complexity, the performance of gait recognition will also decline. To deal with these two issues, we propose a new algorithm called superresolution with manifold sampling and backprojection (SRMS), which learns the high-resolution (HR) counterparts of LR test images from a collection of HR/LR training gait image patch pairs. Then, we incorporate SRMS into a new algorithm called multilinear tensor-based learning without tuning parameters (MTP) for LR gait recognition. Our contributions include the following: 1) With manifold sampling, the redundancy of gait image patches is remarkably decreased; thus, the superresolution procedure is more efficient and reasonable. 2) Backprojection guarantees that the learned HR gait images and the corresponding LR gait images can be more consistent. 3) The optimal subspace dimension for dimension reduction is automatically determined without introducing extra parameters. 4) Theoretical analysis of the algorithm shows that MTP converges. Experiments on the USF human gait database and the CASIA gait database show the increased efficiency of the proposed algorithm, compared with previous algorithms. PMID:20199936

  4. Real-time gait event detection for transfemoral amputees during ramp ascending and descending.

    PubMed

    Maqbool, H F; Husman, M A B; Awad, M I; Abouhossein, A; Dehghani-Sanij, A A

    2015-01-01

    Events and phases detection of the human gait are vital for controlling prosthesis, orthosis and functional electrical stimulation (FES) systems. Wearable sensors are inexpensive, portable and have fast processing capability. They are frequently used to assess spatio-temporal, kinematic and kinetic parameters of the human gait which in turn provide more details about the human voluntary control and ampute-eprosthesis interaction. This paper presents a reliable real-time gait event detection algorithm based on simple heuristics approach, applicable to signals from tri-axial gyroscope for lower limb amputees during ramp ascending and descending. Experimental validation is done by comparing the results of gyroscope signal with footswitches. For healthy subjects, the mean difference between events detected by gyroscope and footswitches is 14 ms and 10.5 ms for initial contact (IC) whereas for toe off (TO) it is -5 ms and -25 ms for ramp up and down respectively. For transfemoral amputee, the error is slightly higher either due to the placement of footswitches underneath the foot or the lack of proper knee flexion and ankle plantarflexion/dorsiflexion during ramp up and down. Finally, repeatability tests showed promising results. PMID:26737364

  5. Does robot-assisted gait rehabilitation improve balance in stroke patients? A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Swinnen, Eva; Beckwée, David; Meeusen, Romain; Baeyens, Jean-Pierre; Kerckhofs, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to summarize the improvements in balance after robot-assisted gait training (RAGT) in stroke patients. Two databases were searched: PubMed and Web of Knowledge. The most important key words are "stroke," "RAGT," "balance," "Lokomat," and "gait trainer." Studies were included if stroke patients were involved in RAGT protocols, and balance was determined as an outcome measurement. The articles were checked for methodological quality by 2 reviewers (Cohen's κ = 0.72). Nine studies were included (7 true experimental and 2 pre-experimental studies; methodological quality score, 56%-81%). In total, 229 subacute or chronic stroke patients (70.5% male) were involved in RAGT (3 to 5 times per week, 3 to 10 weeks, 12 to 25 sessions). In 5 studies, the gait trainer was used; in 2, the Lokomat was used; in 1 study, a single-joint wearable knee orthosis was used; and in 1 study, the AutoAmbulator was used. Eight studies compared RAGT with other gait rehabilitation methods. Significant improvements (no to large effect sizes, Cohen's d = 0.01 to 3.01) in balance scores measured with the Berg Balance Scale, the Tinetti test, postural sway tests, and the Timed Up and Go test were found after RAGT. No significant differences in balance between the intervention and control groups were reported. RAGT can lead to improvements in balance in stroke patients; however, it is not clear whether the improvements are greater compared with those associated with other gait rehabilitation methods. Because a limited number of studies are available, more specific research (eg, randomized controlled trials with larger, specific populations) is necessary to draw stronger conclusions. PMID:24710969

  6. Gait and balance disorders.

    PubMed

    Masdeu, Joseph C

    2016-01-01

    This chapter focuses on one of the most common types of neurologic disorders: altered walking. Walking impairment often reflects disease of the neurologic structures mediating gait, balance or, most often, both. These structures are distributed along the neuraxis. For this reason, this chapter is introduced by a brief description of the neurobiologic underpinning of walking, stressing information that is critical for imaging, namely, the anatomic representation of gait and balance mechanisms. This background is essential not only in order to direct the relevant imaging tools to the regions more likely to be affected but also to interpret correctly imaging findings that may not be related to the walking deficit object of clinical study. The chapter closes with a discussion on how to image some of the most frequent etiologies causing gait or balance impairment. However, it focuses on syndromes not already discussed in other chapters of this volume, such as Parkinson's disease and other movement disorders, already discussed in Chapter 48, or cerebellar ataxia, in Chapter 23, in the previous volume. As regards vascular disease, the spastic hemiplegia most characteristic of brain disease needs little discussion, while the less well-understood effects of microvascular disease are extensively reviewed here, together with the imaging approach. PMID:27430451

  7. The effects of biomechanical foot orthoses on the gait patterns of patients with malalignment syndrome as determined by three dimensional gait analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soo-Hyun; Ahn, Sang-Ho; Jung, Gil-Su; Kim, Jin-Hyun; Cho, Yun-Woo

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The biomechanical effects of foot orthoses on malalignment syndrome have not been fully clarified. This experimental investigation was conducted to evaluate the effects of orthoses on the gait patterns of patients with malalignment syndrome. [Subjects and Methods] Ten patients with malalignment syndrome were recruited. For each participant, kinematic and kinetic data were collected under three test conditions: walking barefoot, walking with flat insoles in shoes, and walking with a biomechanical foot orthosis (BFO) in shoes. Gait patterns were analyzed using a motion analysis system. [Results] Spatiotemporal data showed the step and stride lengths when wearing shoes with flat insoles or BFO were significantly greater than when barefoot, and that the walking speed when wearing shoes with BFO was significantly faster than when walking barefoot or with shoes with flat insoles. Kinetic data, showed peak pelvic tilt and obliquity angle were significantly greater when wearing BFO in shoes than when barefoot, and that peak hip flexion/extension angle and peak knee flexion/extension and rotation angles were significantly greater when wearing BFO and flat insoles in shoes than when barefoot. [Conclusion] BFOs can correct pelvic asymmetry while walking. PMID:27190451

  8. Effects of gait training with rhythmic auditory stimulation on gait ability in stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Song, Gui-bin; Ryu, Hyo Jeong

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to compare the gait abilities and motor recovery abilities in stroke patients following overground gait training with or without rhythmic auditory stimulation. [Subjects and Methods] Forty patients with hemiplegia resulting from stroke were divided into a rhythmic auditory stimulation gait training group (n=20) and a gait training group (n=20). The rhythmic auditory simulation gait group and gait training group both performed gait training. Rhythmic auditory stimulation was added during gait training in the rhythmic auditory stimulation gait training group. The gait training was performed in 30 minute sessions, five times a week, for a total four weeks. [Results] Gate ability significantly improved in both groups, and the rhythmic auditory stimulation gait training group showed more significant increases in cadence, step length, and Dynamic Gait Index. [Conclusion] The results of this study showed that gait training with rhythmic auditory stimulation was more effective at improving gait ability. PMID:27313339

  9. Expressing gait-line symmetry in able-bodied gait

    PubMed Central

    Jeleń, Piotr; Wit, Andrzej; Dudziński, Krzysztof; Nolan, Lee

    2008-01-01

    Background Gait-lines, or the co-ordinates of the progression of the point of application of the vertical ground reaction force, are a commonly reported parameter in most in-sole measuring systems. However, little is known about what is considered a "normal" or "abnormal" gait-line pattern or level of asymmetry. Furthermore, no reference databases on healthy young populations are available for this parameter. Thus the aim of this study is to provide such reference data in order to allow this tool to be better used in gait analysis. Methods Vertical ground reaction force data during several continuous gait cycles were collected using a Computer Dyno Graphy in-sole system® for 77 healthy young able-bodied subjects. A curve (termed gait-line) was obtained from the co-ordinates of the progression of the point of application of the force. An Asymmetry Coefficient Curve (AsC) was calculated between the mean gait-lines for the left and right foot for each subject. AsC limits of ± 1.96 and 3 standard deviations (SD) from the mean were then calculated. Gait-line data from 5 individual subjects displaying pathological gait due to disorders relating to the discopathy of the lumbar spine (three with considerable plantarflexor weakness, two with considerable dorsiflexor weakness) were compared to the AsC results from the able-bodied group. Results The ± 1.96 SD limit suggested that non-pathological gait falls within 12–16% asymmetry for gait-lines. Those exhibiting pathological gait fell outside both the ± 1.96 and ± 3SD limits at several points during stance. The subjects exhibiting considerable plantarflexor weakness all fell outside the ± 1.96SD limit from 30–50% of foot length to toe-off while those exhibiting considerable dorsiflexor weakness fell outside the ± 1.96SD limit between initial contact to 25–40% of foot length, and then surpassed the ± 3SD limit after 55–80% of foot length. Conclusion This analysis of gait-line asymmetry provides a reference

  10. Biology of gait control

    PubMed Central

    Annweiler, C.; Verghese, J.; Fantino, B.; Herrmann, F.R.; Allali, G.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Adverse neuromuscular events have been described in case of low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) concentrations, suggesting that vitamin D may be involved in gait stability. The objective of this cross-sectional study was to examine the association between stride-to-stride variability of stride time (STV) and serum 25OHD concentration in adults aged 65 years and older. Methods: STV and 25OHD concentration were assessed in 411 community-dwelling older adults (mean age 70.4 ± 1.8 years, 57.9% women). The following established 25OHD thresholds were used: severe 25OHD insufficiency <10 ng/mL, moderate 10–30 ng/mL, and normal >30 ng/mL. Age, number of drugs used per day, use of psychoactive drugs, depressive symptoms, cognitive decline, history of falls, distance visual acuity, lower limb proprioception, center of mass (CoM) motion, and walking speed were considered as potential confounders. Results: A total of 16.6% (n = 68) of subjects had severe 25OHD insufficiency, 70.3% (n = 289) moderate insufficiency, and 13.1% (n = 54) normal concentrations. In the full adjusted and the stepwise backward linear regression models, high STV (worse performance) was associated with severe 25OHD insufficiency (p = 0.028 and p = 0.044, respectively), high CoM motion (p = 0.031 and p = 0.014, respectively), and low lower limb proprioception score (p = 0.017 and p = 0.008, respectively). The stepwise backward regression model also showed that high STV was associated with female gender (p = 0.041). Conclusions: Low serum 25OHD concentrations were associated with high STV reflecting a disturbed gait control. This association could be explained by a possible action of vitamin D on different components involved in gait control. PMID:21471466

  11. Contributions to the understanding of gait control.

    PubMed

    Simonsen, Erik Bruun

    2014-04-01

    foot to the ground with the heel first. Moreover, they have to increase flexion of the hip joint during the swing phase because the foot hangs in a plantar flexed position. It was shown that the ankle joint plantar flexor moment increased in the healthy leg and that the knee joint extensor moment increased significantly in both the affected and the healthy leg. The latter is most likely due to the patients trying to avoid an asymmetrical gait pattern. It is recommended to use an orthosis with drop-foot patients in order to keep the ankle joint dorsiflexed prior to touchdown, otherwise bone-on-bone forces in both knee joints will increase and probably lead to osteoarthritis. The hip joint moment varies less between individuals. However, both during walking and running an unexplained hip joint flexor moment is present during the last half of the stance phase. The moment appears to oppose the speed of progression and it has been suggested that it serves to balance the upper body. This was investigated in a group of healthy subjects who were asked to walk with their upper body in a reclined, inclined and normal position, respectively. It was shown that the hip joint flexor moment was similar in the reclined and the normal position but lower when walking in the inclined position and it can be concluded that the upper body is not balanced by hip joint flexor muscles but rather by accelerations of the pelvis and activity in abdominal and back muscles. These experiments also showed that the trailing leg is brought forward during the swing phase without activity in the flexor muscles about the hip joint. This was verified by the absence of EMG activity in the iliacus muscle measured by intramuscular wire electrodes. Instead the strong ligaments restricting hip joint extension are stretched during the first half of the swing phase thereby storing elastic energy, which is released during the last half of the stance phase and accelerating the leg into the swing phase. This is

  12. Low profile radial nerve palsy orthosis with radial and ulnar deviation.

    PubMed

    Peck, Jean; Ollason, Jennie

    2015-01-01

    Individuals who sustain damage to the radial nerve experience a significant loss in functional use of the hand. Traditional orthoses have been effective in providing assistance with wrist stabilization and finger/thumb MP extension. These authors adapted a low profile orthosis to provide the necessary support while allowing radial and ulnar deviation of the wrist, thus increasing functional use of the hand.--Victoria Priganc, PhD, OTR, CHT, CLT, Practice Forum Editor. PMID:26190027

  13. Effects of acceleration on gait measures in three horse gaits.

    PubMed

    Nauwelaerts, Sandra; Zarski, Lila; Aerts, Peter; Clayton, Hilary

    2015-05-01

    Animals switch gaits according to locomotor speed. In terrestrial locomotion, gaits have been defined according to footfall patterns or differences in center of mass (COM) motion, which characterizes mechanisms that are more general and more predictive than footfall patterns. This has generated different variables designed primarily to evaluate steady-speed locomotion, which is easier to standardize in laboratory conditions. However, in the ecology of an animal, steady-state conditions are rare and the ability to accelerate, decelerate and turn is essential. Currently, there are no data available that have tested whether COM variables can be used in accelerative or decelerative conditions. This study used a data set of kinematics and kinetics of horses using three gaits (walk, trot, canter) to evaluate the effects of acceleration (both positive and negative) on commonly used gait descriptors. The goal was to identify variables that distinguish between gaits both at steady state and during acceleration/deceleration. These variables will either be unaffected by acceleration or affected by it in a predictable way. Congruity, phase shift and COM velocity angle did not distinguish between gaits when the dataset included trials in unsteady conditions. Work (positive and negative) and energy recovery distinguished between gaits and showed a clear relationship with acceleration. Hodographs are interesting graphical representations to study COM mechanics, but they are descriptive rather than quantitative. Force angle, collision angle and collision fraction showed a U-shaped relationship with acceleration and seem promising tools for future research in unsteady conditions. PMID:25767145

  14. Computer simulation of the dynamics of a human arm and orthosis linkage mechanism.

    PubMed

    Buckley, M A; Johnson, G R

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the use of computer modelling and simulation during the design and development of a motorized upper limb orthotic system to be used to aid the dysfunctional human arm. The orthosis consisted of a three-degree-of-freedom shoulder module and a lower arm module providing movements at the elbow and wrist. Simulation software has been used to model the mechanism created by the connection of the orthosis and the arm. With this model it has been possible to analyse the kinematics and kinetics of both the arm and orthosis during a variety of dynamic loading conditions. In particular, the power requirements of the orthotic joints during the execution of specific tasks have been determined and these data have been used to specify the motors of a working prototype. The effect of misalignment between real and orthotic shoulder joints has also been investigated and a potentially hazardous situation has been highlighted prior to testing of the prototype by a volunteer in the laboratory. PMID:9427830

  15. A Critical Analysis of a Hand Orthosis Reverse Engineering and 3D Printing Process

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The possibility to realize highly customized orthoses is receiving boost thanks to the widespread diffusion of low-cost 3D printing technologies. However, rapid prototyping (RP) with 3D printers is only the final stage of patient personalized orthotics processes. A reverse engineering (RE) process is in fact essential before RP, to digitize the 3D anatomy of interest and to process the obtained surface with suitable modeling software, in order to produce the virtual solid model of the orthosis to be printed. In this paper, we focus on the specific and demanding case of the customized production of hand orthosis. We design and test the essential steps of the entire production process with particular emphasis on the accurate acquisition of the forearm geometry and on the subsequent production of a printable model of the orthosis. The choice of the various hardware and software tools (3D scanner, modeling software, and FDM printer) is aimed at the mitigation of the design and production costs while guaranteeing suitable levels of data accuracy, process efficiency, and design versatility. Eventually, the proposed method is critically analyzed so that the residual issues and critical aspects are highlighted in order to discuss possible alternative approaches and to derive insightful observations that could guide future research activities. PMID:27594781

  16. A Critical Analysis of a Hand Orthosis Reverse Engineering and 3D Printing Process.

    PubMed

    Baronio, Gabriele; Harran, Sami; Signoroni, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    The possibility to realize highly customized orthoses is receiving boost thanks to the widespread diffusion of low-cost 3D printing technologies. However, rapid prototyping (RP) with 3D printers is only the final stage of patient personalized orthotics processes. A reverse engineering (RE) process is in fact essential before RP, to digitize the 3D anatomy of interest and to process the obtained surface with suitable modeling software, in order to produce the virtual solid model of the orthosis to be printed. In this paper, we focus on the specific and demanding case of the customized production of hand orthosis. We design and test the essential steps of the entire production process with particular emphasis on the accurate acquisition of the forearm geometry and on the subsequent production of a printable model of the orthosis. The choice of the various hardware and software tools (3D scanner, modeling software, and FDM printer) is aimed at the mitigation of the design and production costs while guaranteeing suitable levels of data accuracy, process efficiency, and design versatility. Eventually, the proposed method is critically analyzed so that the residual issues and critical aspects are highlighted in order to discuss possible alternative approaches and to derive insightful observations that could guide future research activities. PMID:27594781

  17. An SSVEP BCI to control a hand orthosis for persons with tetraplegia.

    PubMed

    Ortner, Rupert; Allison, Brendan Z; Korisek, Gerd; Gaggl, Herbert; Pfurtscheller, Gert

    2011-02-01

    Brain-computer interface (BCI) systems allow people to send messages or commands without moving, and hence can provide an alternative communication and control channel for people with limited motor function. In this study, we demonstrate a BCI system for orthosis control. Our BCI was asynchronous, meaning that subjects could move the orthosis whenever they wanted, instead of pacing themselves to external cues. Seven subjects each performed two tasks with a BCI that relied on steady state visual evoked potentials (SSVEPs). Although none of the subjects had any training, six subjects showed good control with a positive predictive value (PPV) higher than 60%. The overall PPV for all subjects reached 78% ±10%. However, the false positive rate was high, and some subjects dislike the flickering lights required in SSVEP BCIs. In follow-up work, we hope to reduce both the false positive rate and the annoyance produced by flickering lights by hybridizing this BCI with a "brain switch," which could allow people to turn the SSVEP system on or off using a second type of brain activity when they do not wish to control the orthosis. We also hope to validate this approach with people with tetraplegia. PMID:20875978

  18. Experimental and computational analysis of composite ankle-foot orthosis.

    PubMed

    Zou, Dequan; He, Tao; Dailey, Michael; Smith, Kirk E; Silva, Matthew J; Sinacore, David R; Mueller, Michael J; Hastings, Mary K

    2014-01-01

    Carbon fiber (CF) ankle-foot orthoses (AFOs) can improve gait by increasing ankle plantar-flexor power and improving plantar-flexor ankle joint moment and energy efficiency compared with posterior leaf spring AFOs made of thermoplastic. However, fabricating a CF AFO to optimize the performance of the individual user may require multiple AFOs and expensive fabrication costs. Finite element analysis (FEA) models were developed to predict the mechanical behavior of AFOs in this study. Three AFOs, two made of CF composite material and one made of thermoplastic material, were fabricated and then mechanically tested to produce force-displacement data. The FEA models were validated by comparing model predictions with mechanical testing data performed under the same loading and boundary conditions. The actual mechanical testing demonstrated that CF performs better than thermoplastic. The simulation results showed that FEA models produced accurate predictions for both types of orthoses. The relative error of the energy return ratio predicted by the CF AFO FEA model developed in this study is less than 3%. We conclude that highly accurate FEA models will allow orthotists to improve CF AFO fabrication without wasting resources (time and money) on trial and error fabrications that are expensive and do not consistently improve AFO and user performance. PMID:25856154

  19. Influence of virtual reality soccer game on walking performance in robotic assisted gait training for children

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Virtual reality (VR) offers powerful therapy options within a functional, purposeful and motivating context. Several studies have shown that patients' motivation plays a crucial role in determining therapy outcome. However, few studies have demonstrated the potential of VR in pediatric rehabilitation. Therefore, we developed a VR-based soccer scenario, which provided interactive elements to engage patients during robotic assisted treadmill training (RAGT). The aim of this study was to compare the immediate effect of different supportive conditions (VR versus non-VR conditions) on motor output in patients and healthy control children during training with the driven gait orthosis Lokomat®. Methods A total of 18 children (ten patients with different neurological gait disorders, eight healthy controls) took part in this study. They were instructed to walk on the Lokomat in four different, randomly-presented conditions: (1) walk normally without supporting assistance, (2) with therapists' instructions to promote active participation, (3) with VR as a motivating tool to walk actively and (4) with the VR tool combined with therapists' instructions. The Lokomat gait orthosis is equipped with sensors at hip and knee joint to measure man-machine interaction forces. Additionally, subjects' acceptance of the RAGT with VR was assessed using a questionnaire. Results The mixed ANOVA revealed significant main effects for the factor CONDITIONS (p < 0.001) and a significant interaction CONDITIONS × GROUP (p = 0.01). Tests of between-subjects effects showed no significant main effect for the GROUP (p = 0.592). Active participation in patients and control children increased significantly when supported and motivated either by therapists' instructions or by a VR scenario compared with the baseline measurement "normal walking" (p < 0.001). Conclusions The VR scenario used here induces an immediate effect on motor output to a similar degree as the effect resulting from

  20. One- or Two-Legged Standing: What Is the More Suitable Protocol to Assess the Postural Effects of the Rigid Ankle Orthosis?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rougier, Patrice; Genthon, Nicolas; Gallois-Montbrun, Thibault; Brugiere, Steve; Bouvat, Eric

    2009-01-01

    To highlight the capacity of one- and two-legged standing protocols when assessing postural behavior induced by a rigid ankle orthosis, 14 healthy individuals stood upright barefoot and wore either an elastic stocking on the preferred leg or a rigid orthosis with or without additional taping in one- or two-legged (TL) conditions. Traditional…

  1. Orthosis reduces breast pain and mechanical forces through natural and augmented breast tissue in women lying prone

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Breast implant displacement or rupture can cause aesthetic problems and serious medical complications. Activities with prone positioning and loading of the anterior chest wall, such as massage, chiropractic or osteopathic therapies may increase the risk of implant failure and can also cause discomfort in women with natural breast tissue. Here we test the effectiveness of a newly developed orthosis on pain, mechanical pressure and displacement of breast tissue in women with cosmetic augmentation, post-mastectomy reconstruction, lactating or natural breast tissue. Methods Thirty-two females volunteers, aged 25–56 years with augmented, reconstructed, natural or lactating breast tissue and cup sizes B-F, participated in this open-label clinical trial. We measured pain perception, peak pressure, maximum force, and breast tissue displacement using different sizes of the orthosis compared to no orthosis. Different densities of the orthosis were also tested in a subgroup of women (n = 7). Pain perception was rated using a validated 11-point visual-analogue scale. Peak pressure and maximum force were assessed using a bilateral set of capacitance-pliance® sensor strips whilst participants were load bearing in a prone position, and breast displacement was measured by magnetic-resonance-imaging. Results The orthosis significantly reduced pain, breast displacement and mechanical pressures in women with natural and augmented breast tissue in prone position. Greater relief of pain and greater reduction in mechanical forces were found with increased size and density of the orthosis. Use of the orthosis improved overall comfort by 64-100%, lowered peak pressure by up to 85% and maximum force by up to 96%. Medio-lateral displacement of breast tissue was reduced by 16%, resulting in a 51% desirable increase of breast tissue height. Conclusion Our study demonstrated that the newly developed orthosis significantly reduced pain, mechanical pressure and breast tissue

  2. Sup-ER orthosis: an innovative treatment for infants with birth related brachial plexus injury.

    PubMed

    Durlacher, Kim M; Bellows, Doria; Verchere, Cynthia

    2014-01-01

    Impairments in active and passive range of upper extremity supination and shoulder external rotation are common sequelae for children with delayed recovery from birth related brachial plexus injury. Orthotic intervention may complement traditional treatment strategies commonly employed in the newborn period. These authors describe their custom fabricated orthosis designed to balance shoulder growth and muscular function, and improve prognosis of long term functional outcomes for children with birth related brachial plexus injury. - Victoria Priganc, PhD, OTR, CHT, CLT, Practice Forum Editor. PMID:25042285

  3. Powered orthosis and attachable power-assist device with Hydraulic Bilateral Servo System.

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, Kengo; Saito, Yukio; Oshima, Toru; Higashihara, Takanori

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses the developments and control strategies of exoskeleton-type robot systems for the application of an upper limb powered orthosis and an attachable power-assist device for care-givers. Hydraulic Bilateral Servo System, which consist of a computer controlled motor, parallel connected hydraulic actuators, position sensors, and pressure sensors, are installed in the system to derive the joint motion of the exoskeleton arm. The types of hydraulic component structure and the control strategy are discussed in relation to the design philosophy and target joints motions. PMID:24110321

  4. Gait analysis in forensic medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Peter K.; Simonsen, Erik B.; Lynnerup, Niels

    2007-01-01

    We have combined the basic human ability to recognize other individuals with functional anatomical and biomechanical knowledge, in order to analyze the gait of perpetrators as recorded on surveillance video. The perpetrators are then compared with similar analyses of suspects. At present we give a statement to the police as to whether the perpetrator has a characteristic gait pattern compared to normal gait, and if a suspect has a comparable gait pattern. We have found agreements such as: limping, varus instability in the knee at heel strike, larger lateral flexion of the spinal column to one side than the other, inverted ankle during stance, pronounced sagittal head-movements, and marked head-shoulder posture. Based on these characteristic features, we state whether suspect and perpetrator could have the same identity but it is not possible to positively identify the perpetrator. Nevertheless, we have been involved in several cases where the court has found that this type of gait analysis, especially combined with photogrammetry, was a valuable tool. The primary requisites are surveillance cameras recording with sufficient frequency, ideally about 15 Hz, which are positioned in frontal and preferably also in profile view.

  5. A Global Gait Asymmetry Index.

    PubMed

    Cabral, Silvia; Resende, Renan A; Clansey, Adam C; Deluzio, Kevin J; Selbie, W Scott; Veloso, António P

    2016-04-01

    High levels of gait asymmetry are associated with many pathologies. Our long-term goal is to improve gait symmetry through real-time biofeedback of a symmetry index. Symmetry is often reported as a single metric or a collective signature of multiple discrete measures. While this is useful for assessment, incorporating multiple feedback metrics presents too much information for most subjects to use as visual feedback for gait retraining. The aim of this article was to develop a global gait asymmetry (GGA) score that could be used as a biofeedback metric for gait retraining and to test the effectiveness of the GGA for classifying artificially-induced asymmetry. Eighteen participants (11 males; age 26.9 y [SD = 7.7]; height 1.8 m [SD = 0.1]; body mass 72.7 kg [SD = 8.9]) walked on a treadmill in 3 symmetry conditions, induced by wearing custom-made sandals: a symmetric condition (identical sandals) and 2 asymmetric conditions (different sandals). The GGA score was calculated, based on several joint angles, and compared between conditions. Significant differences were found among all conditions (P < .001), meaning that the GGA score is sensitive to different levels of asymmetry, and may be useful for rehabilitation and assessment. PMID:26502455

  6. [Gait disorders in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Amadori, K; Püllen, R; Steiner, T

    2014-06-01

    Gait disorders are one of the most common gerontoneurological symptoms. Falls that occasionally cause severe injuries are highly relevant consequences. A clinical neurological examination and inspectoral gait analysis are the core investigations of the diagnostic process, which yields hypotheses with respect to the impaired structures as well as to specific diagnostic measures. The supplemental motor assessment quantifies the resulting impairment of mobility and risk of falling with the help of well-established instruments. Characteristic of gait disorders in the elderly are the multifactorial causes which make the complete identification, correct prioritization and adequate treatment the biggest challenges. The therapeutic concept is multiprofessional and includes the causal treatment of underlying diseases, physiotherapeutic training programs, prescription of medical aids and nutritional interventions. Identification and modification of risk factors (including those that are iatrogenic) are of superior importance. PMID:24867798

  7. Gait Stability in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruijn, Sjoerd M.; Millard, Matthew; van Gestel, Leen; Meyns, Pieter; Jonkers, Ilse; Desloovere, Kaat

    2013-01-01

    Children with unilateral Cerebral Palsy (CP) have several gait impairments, amongst which impaired gait stability may be one. We tested whether a newly developed stability measure (the foot placement estimator, FPE) which does not require long data series, can be used to asses gait stability in typically developing (TD) children as well as…

  8. A mechanical energy analysis of gait initiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. A.; Verstraete, M. C.

    1999-01-01

    The analysis of gait initiation (the transient state between standing and walking) is an important diagnostic tool to study pathologic gait and to evaluate prosthetic devices. While past studies have quantified mechanical energy of the body during steady-state gait, to date no one has computed the mechanical energy of the body during gait initiation. In this study, gait initiation in seven normal male subjects was studied using a mechanical energy analysis to compute total body energy. The data showed three separate states: quiet standing, gait initiation, and steady-state gait. During gait initiation, the trends in the energy data for the individual segments were similar to those seen during steady-state gait (and in Winter DA, Quanbury AO, Reimer GD. Analysis of instantaneous energy of normal gait. J Biochem 1976;9:253-257), but diminished in amplitude. However, these amplitudes increased to those seen in steady-state during the gait initiation event (GIE), with the greatest increase occurring in the second step due to the push-off of the foundation leg. The baseline level of mechanical energy was due to the potential energy of the individual segments, while the cyclic nature of the data was indicative of the kinetic energy of the particular leg in swing phase during that step. The data presented showed differences in energy trends during gait initiation from those of steady state, thereby demonstrating the importance of this event in the study of locomotion.

  9. Thoraco-pelvic orthosis: a portable and removable bassinet for secure patient immobilization after primary bladder exstrophy closure.

    PubMed

    Castagnetti, Marco; Berrettini, Alfredo; Beniamin, Francesco; Rigamonti, Waifro

    2010-12-01

    A portable and removable thoraco-pelvic orthosis for patient immobilization after neonatal primary bladder exstrophy closure is described. The device is made of a polyethylene shell, moulded at 170°C, coated inside with a 5 mm pad of plastazote and works applying a constant gentle pressure on the hips. PMID:20857296

  10. The Influence of a Prefabricated Foot Orthosis on Lower Extremity Mechanics During Running in Individuals With Varying Dynamic Foot Motion.

    PubMed

    Almonroeder, Thomas G; Benson, Lauren C; O'Connor, Kristian M

    2016-09-01

    Study Design Controlled laboratory study, cross-sectional. Background Orthotic prescription is often based on the premise that the mechanical effects will be more prominent in individuals with greater calcaneal eversion. Objective To compare the effects of a prefabricated foot orthosis on lower extremity kinematics and kinetics between recreational athletes with high and low calcaneal eversion during running. Methods Thirty-one recreational athletes were included in this study. Three-dimensional kinematic and kinetic data were collected while running with and without a foot orthosis. Participants were grouped based on the degree of calcaneal eversion during the running trials relative to a standing trial (dynamic foot motion). The effects of the orthosis on the frontal and transverse plane angles and moments of the hip and knee were compared between the 10 participants with the greatest and least amount of dynamic foot motion. Results There were no significant interactions (group by orthotic condition) for any of the kinematic or kinetic variables of interest. Conclusion The effects of an orthosis on the mechanics of the hip and knee do not appear to be dependent on an individual's dynamic foot motion. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(9):749-755. Epub 5 Aug 2016. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.6253. PMID:27494054

  11. The smart Peano fluidic muscle: a low profile flexible orthosis actuator that feels pain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veale, Allan J.; Anderson, Iain A.; Xie, Shane Q.

    2015-03-01

    Robotic orthoses have the potential to provide effective rehabilitation while overcoming the availability and cost constraints of therapists. These orthoses must be characterized by the naturally safe, reliable, and controlled motion of a human therapist's muscles. Such characteristics are only possible in the natural kingdom through the pain sensing realized by the interaction of an intelligent nervous system and muscles' embedded sensing organs. McKibben fluidic muscles or pneumatic muscle actuators (PMAs) are a popular orthosis actuator because of their inherent compliance, high force, and muscle-like load-displacement characteristics. However, the circular cross-section of PMA increases their profile. PMA are also notoriously unreliable and difficult to control, lacking the intelligent pain sensing systems of their biological muscle counterparts. Here the Peano fluidic muscle, a new low profile yet high-force soft actuator is introduced. This muscle is smart, featuring bioinspired embedded pressure and soft capacitive strain sensors. Given this pressure and strain feedback, experimental validation shows that a lumped parameter model based on the muscle geometry and material parameters can be used to predict its force for quasistatic motion with an average error of 10 - 15N. Combining this with a force threshold pain sensing algorithm sets a precedent for flexible orthosis actuation that uses embedded sensors to prevent damage to the actuator and its environment.

  12. Design and evaluation of a hybrid passive and active gravity neutral orthosis (GNO).

    PubMed

    Koo, Benjamin; Montes, Jacqueline; Gamarnik, Viktor; Yeager, Keith; Marra, Jonathan; Dunaway, Sally; Montgomery, Megan; De Vivo, Darryl C; Strauss, Nancy; Konofagou, Elisa; Kaufmann, Petra; Morrison, Barclay

    2009-01-01

    Neuromuscular diseases (NMD), including Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) and Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD), result in progressive muscular weakness that often leaves patients functionally dependent on caregivers for many activities of daily living (ADL) such as eating, bathing, grooming (touching the face and head), reaching (grabbing for objects), and dressing. In severe cases, patients are unable to perform even the simplest of activities from exploring their 3D space to touching their own face. The ability to move and initiate age appropriate tasks, such as playing and exploration, are considered to be of vital importance to both their physical and cognitive development. Therefore, to improve quality of life and reduce dependence on caregivers in children and young adults with NMD, we designed, built and evaluated an assistive, active orthosis to support arm function. The goal of this project is the development and evaluation of a mechanical arm orthosis to both encourage and assist functional arm movement while providing the user a sense of independence and control over one's own body. PMID:19963513

  13. Impaired Foot Plantar Flexor Muscle Performance in Individuals With Plantar Heel Pain and Association With Foot Orthosis Use.

    PubMed

    McClinton, Shane; Collazo, Christopher; Vincent, Ebonie; Vardaxis, Vassilios

    2016-08-01

    Study Design Controlled laboratory study. Background Plantar heel pain is one of the most common foot and ankle conditions seen in clinical practice, and many individuals continue to have persisting or recurrent pain after treatment. Impaired foot plantar flexor muscle performance is a factor that may contribute to limited treatment success, but reliable methods to identify impairments in individuals with plantar heel pain are needed. In addition, foot orthoses are commonly used to treat this condition, but the implications of orthosis use on muscle performance have not been assessed. Objectives To assess ankle plantar flexor and toe flexor muscle performance in individuals with plantar heel pain using clinically feasible measures and to examine the relationship between muscle performance and duration of foot orthosis use. Methods The rocker-board plantar flexion test (RBPFT) and modified paper grip test for the great toe (mPGTGT) and lesser toes (mPGTLT) were used to assess foot plantar flexor muscle performance in 27 individuals with plantar heel pain and compared to 27 individuals without foot pain who were matched according to age, sex, and body mass. Pain ratings were obtained before and during testing, and self-reported duration of foot orthosis use was recorded. Results Compared to the control group, individuals with plantar heel pain demonstrated lower performance on the RBPFT (P = .001), the mPGTGT (P = .022), and the mPGTLT (P = .037). Longer duration of foot orthosis use was moderately correlated to lower performance on the RBPFT (r = -0.52, P = .02), the mPGTGT (r = -0.54, P = .01), and the mPGTLT (r = -0.43, P = .03). Conclusion Ankle plantar flexor and toe flexor muscle performance was impaired in individuals with plantar heel pain and associated with longer duration of self-reported foot orthosis use. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(8):681-688. Epub 3 Jul 2016. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.6482. PMID:27374013

  14. Gait characterization for osteoarthritis patients using wearable gait sensors (H-Gait systems).

    PubMed

    Tadano, Shigeru; Takeda, Ryo; Sasaki, Keita; Fujisawa, Tadashi; Tohyama, Harukazu

    2016-03-21

    The objective of this work was to investigate the possibilities of using the wearable sensors-based H-Gait system in an actual clinical trial and proposes new gait parameters for characterizing OA gait. Seven H-Gait sensors, consisting of tri-axial inertial sensors, were attached to seven lower limb body segments (pelvis, both thighs, both shanks and both feet). The acceleration and angular velocity data measured were used to estimate three-dimensional kinematic parameters of patients during level walking. Three new parameters were proposed to assess the severity of OA based on the characteristics of these joint center trajectories in addition to conventional gait spatio-temporal parameters. The experiment was conducted on ten subjects with knee OA. The kinematic results obtained (hip, knee and ankle joint angles, joint trajectory in the horizontal and sagittal planes) were compared with those from a reference healthy (control) group. As a result, the angle between the right and left knee trajectories along with that of the ankle joint trajectories were almost twice as large (21.3° vs. 11.6° and 14.9° vs. 7.8°) compared to those of the healthy subjects. In conclusion, it was found that the ankle joints during stance abduct less to avoid adduction at the knee as the severity of OA increases and lead to more acute angles (less parallel) between the right and left knee/ankle joints in the horizontal plane. This method was capable to provide quantitative information about the gait of OA patients and has the advantage to allow for out-of-laboratory monitoring. PMID:26947036

  15. An Efficient Gait Recognition with Backpack Removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Heesung; Hong, Sungjun; Kim, Euntai

    2009-12-01

    Gait-based human identification is a paradigm to recognize individuals using visual cues that characterize their walking motion. An important requirement for successful gait recognition is robustness to variations including different lighting conditions, poses, and walking speed. Deformation of the gait silhouette caused by objects carried by subjects also has a significant effect on the performance of gait recognition systems; a backpack is the most common of these objects. This paper proposes methods for eliminating the effect of a carried backpack for efficient gait recognition. We apply simple, recursive principal component analysis (PCA) reconstructions and error compensation to remove the backpack from the gait representation and then conduct gait recognition. Experiments performed with the CASIA database illustrate the performance of the proposed algorithm.

  16. Milestones in gait, balance, and falling.

    PubMed

    Nutt, John G; Horak, Fay B; Bloem, Bastiaan R

    2011-05-01

    Gait, balance, and falls have become increasingly common topics of published articles in the Movement Disorders journal since its launch in 1986. This growth represents an increasing awareness of the importance of mobility to patients' quality of life. New methods have become available that allow for accurate measurement of many aspects for gait and balance. This has led to new concepts of understanding gait and balance disorders. Neuroimaging has begun to reveal the neural circuitry underlying gait and balance. The physiology and pathophysiology of balance and gait are beginning to tease out the many processes involved in mobility and how they may be disrupted by disease processes. With these advances, the old therapeutic nihilism that characterized the clinician's approach to falls and gait disorders is disappearing, as innovative physiotherapy, exercise, drugs, and deep brain stimulation are being employed for gait and balance disorders. PMID:21626560

  17. Design and construction of custom-made neoprene thumb carpo-metacarpal orthosis with thermoplastic stabilization for first carpo-metacarpal joint osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Bani, Monireh Ahmadi; Arazpour, Mokhtar; Curran, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Individuals with first carpo-metacarpal (CMC) osteoarthritis (OA) often experience pain and difficulty with functional activities. Thus, designing orthotics to improve function and decrease pain is common practice. These therapists designed an orthosis using a combination of neoprene and thermoplastic materials to create a soft orthosis that provides support to the first CMC joint - Victoria Priganc, PhD, OTR, CHT, CLT. PMID:23523512

  18. Genetic feature selection for gait recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tafazzoli, Faezeh; Bebis, George; Louis, Sushil; Hussain, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    Many research studies have demonstrated that gait can serve as a useful biometric modality for human identification at a distance. Traditional gait recognition systems, however, have mostly been evaluated without explicitly considering the most relevant gait features, which might have compromised performance. We investigate the problem of selecting a subset of the most relevant gait features for improving gait recognition performance. This is achieved by discarding redundant and irrelevant gait features while preserving the most informative ones. Motivated by our previous work on feature subset selection using genetic algorithms (GAs), we propose using GAs to select an optimal subset of gait features. First, features are extracted using kernel principal component analysis (KPCA) on spatiotemporal projections of gait silhouettes. Then, GA is applied to select a subset of eigenvectors in KPCA space that best represents a subject's identity. Each gait pattern is then represented by projecting it only on the eigenvectors selected by the GA. To evaluate the effectiveness of the selected features, we have experimented with two different classifiers: k nearest-neighbor and Naïve Bayes classifier. We report considerable gait recognition performance improvements on the Georgia Tech and CASIA databases.

  19. Gait and balance disorders in older adults.

    PubMed

    Salzman, Brooke

    2010-07-01

    Gait and balance disorders are common in older adults and are a major cause of falls in this population. They are associated with increased morbidity and mortality, as well as reduced level of function. Common causes include arthritis and orthostatic hypotension; however, most gait and balance disorders involve multiple contributing factors. Most changes in gait are related to underlying medical conditions and should not be considered an inevitable consequence of aging. Physicians caring for older patients should ask at least annually about falls, and should ask about or examine for difficulties with gait and balance at least once. For older adults who report a fall, physicians should ask about difficulties with gait and balance, and should observe for any gait or balance dysfunctions. The Timed Up and Go test is a fast and reliable diagnostic tool. Persons who have difficulty or demonstrate unsteadiness performing the Timed Up and Go test require further assessment, usually with a physical therapist, to help elucidate gait impairments and related functional limitations. The most effective strategy for falls prevention involves a multifactorial evaluation followed by targeted interventions for identified contributing factors. Evidence on the effectiveness of interventions for gait and balance disorders is limited because of the lack of standardized outcome measures determining gait and balance abilities. However, effective options for patients with gait and balance disorders include exercise and physical therapy. PMID:20590073

  20. Human Gait Recognition Based on Multiview Gait Sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiaxi; Boulgouris, Nikolaos V.

    2008-12-01

    Most of the existing gait recognition methods rely on a single view, usually the side view, of the walking person. This paper investigates the case in which several views are available for gait recognition. It is shown that each view has unequal discrimination power and, therefore, should have unequal contribution in the recognition process. In order to exploit the availability of multiple views, several methods for the combination of the results that are obtained from the individual views are tested and evaluated. A novel approach for the combination of the results from several views is also proposed based on the relative importance of each view. The proposed approach generates superior results, compared to those obtained by using individual views or by using multiple views that are combined using other combination methods.

  1. Support vector machines for automated gait classification.

    PubMed

    Begg, Rezaul K; Palaniswami, Marimuthu; Owen, Brendan

    2005-05-01

    Ageing influences gait patterns causing constant threats to control of locomotor balance. Automated recognition of gait changes has many advantages including, early identification of at-risk gait and monitoring the progress of treatment outcomes. In this paper, we apply an artificial intelligence technique [support vector machines (SVM)] for the automatic recognition of young-old gait types from their respective gait-patterns. Minimum foot clearance (MFC) data of 30 young and 28 elderly participants were analyzed using a PEAK-2D motion analysis system during a 20-min continuous walk on a treadmill at self-selected walking speed. Gait features extracted from individual MFC histogram-plot and Poincaré-plot images were used to train the SVM. Cross-validation test results indicate that the generalization performance of the SVM was on average 83.3% (+/-2.9) to recognize young and elderly gait patterns, compared to a neural network's accuracy of 75.0+/-5.0%. A "hill-climbing" feature selection algorithm demonstrated that a small subset (3-5) of gait features extracted from MFC plots could differentiate the gait patterns with 90% accuracy. Performance of the gait classifier was evaluated using areas under the receiver operating characteristic plots. Improved performance of the classifier was evident when trained with reduced number of selected good features and with radial basis function kernel. These results suggest that SVMs can function as an efficient gait classifier for recognition of young and elderly gait patterns, and has the potential for wider applications in gait identification for falls-risk minimization in the elderly. PMID:15887532

  2. Biofeedback for robotic gait rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Lünenburger, Lars; Colombo, Gery; Riener, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Background Development and increasing acceptance of rehabilitation robots as well as advances in technology allow new forms of therapy for patients with neurological disorders. Robot-assisted gait therapy can increase the training duration and the intensity for the patients while reducing the physical strain for the therapist. Optimal training effects during gait therapy generally depend on appropriate feedback about performance. Compared to manual treadmill therapy, there is a loss of physical interaction between therapist and patient with robotic gait retraining. Thus, it is difficult for the therapist to assess the necessary feedback and instructions. The aim of this study was to define a biofeedback system for a gait training robot and test its usability in subjects without neurological disorders. Methods To provide an overview of biofeedback and motivation methods applied in gait rehabilitation, previous publications and results from our own research are reviewed. A biofeedback method is presented showing how a rehabilitation robot can assess the patients' performance and deliver augmented feedback. For validation, three subjects without neurological disorders walked in a rehabilitation robot for treadmill training. Several training parameters, such as body weight support and treadmill speed, were varied to assess the robustness of the biofeedback calculation to confounding factors. Results The biofeedback values correlated well with the different activity levels of the subjects. Changes in body weight support and treadmill velocity had a minor effect on the biofeedback values. The synchronization of the robot and the treadmill affected the biofeedback values describing the stance phase. Conclusion Robot-aided assessment and feedback can extend and improve robot-aided training devices. The presented method estimates the patients' gait performance with the use of the robot's existing sensors, and displays the resulting biofeedback values to the patients and

  3. Fuzzy-logic-based hybrid locomotion mode classification for an active pelvis orthosis: Preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Kebin; Parri, Andrea; Yan, Tingfang; Wang, Long; Munih, Marko; Vitiello, Nicola; Wang, Qining

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we present a fuzzy-logic-based hybrid locomotion mode classification method for an active pelvis orthosis. Locomotion information measured by the onboard hip joint angle sensors and the pressure insoles is used to classify five locomotion modes, including two static modes (sitting, standing still), and three dynamic modes (level-ground walking, ascending stairs, and descending stairs). The proposed method classifies these two kinds of modes first by monitoring the variation of the relative hip joint angle between the two legs within a specific period. Static states are then classified by the time-based absolute hip joint angle. As for dynamic modes, a fuzzy-logic based method is proposed for the classification. Preliminary experimental results with three able-bodied subjects achieve an off-line classification accuracy higher than 99.49%. PMID:26737144

  4. Arm Orthosis/Prosthesis Movement Control Based on Surface EMG Signal Extraction.

    PubMed

    Suberbiola, Aaron; Zulueta, Ekaitz; Lopez-Guede, Jose Manuel; Etxeberria-Agiriano, Ismael; Graña, Manuel

    2015-05-01

    This paper shows experimental results on electromyography (EMG)-based system control applied to motorized orthoses. Biceps and triceps EMG signals are captured through two biometrical sensors, which are then filtered and processed by an acquisition system. Finally an output/control signal is produced and sent to the actuators, which will then perform the actual movement, using algorithms based on autoregressive (AR) models and neural networks, among others. The research goal is to predict the desired movement of the lower arm through the analysis of EMG signals, so that the movement can be reproduced by an arm orthosis, powered by two linear actuators. In this experiment, best accuracy has achieved values up to 91%, using a fourth-order AR-model and 100ms block length. PMID:25851029

  5. Gait apraxia in communicating hydrocephalus.

    PubMed Central

    Estañol, B V

    1981-01-01

    Apraxia of gait in patients with communicating hydrocephalus appears in the context of a generalised motor disorder that includes defective righting reflexes, generalised increased tone to passive movements, grasp reflexes, difficulty with serial movements of the hands and defective smooth pursuit eye movements. The inability to walk does not appear to be due to a motor disorder but to release of proprioceptive supporting reactions. This mechanism is triggered by proprioceptive stimuli. PMID:7241157

  6. Human identification using temporal information preserving gait template.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen; Zhang, Junping; Wang, Liang; Pu, Jian; Yuan, Xiaoru

    2012-11-01

    Gait Energy Image (GEI) is an efficient template for human identification by gait. However, such a template loses temporal information in a gait sequence, which is critical to the performance of gait recognition. To address this issue, we develop a novel temporal template, named Chrono-Gait Image (CGI), in this paper. The proposed CGI template first extracts the contour in each gait frame, followed by encoding each of the gait contour images in the same gait sequence with a multichannel mapping function and compositing them to a single CGI. To make the templates robust to a complex surrounding environment, we also propose CGI-based real and synthetic temporal information preserving templates by using different gait periods and contour distortion techniques. Extensive experiments on three benchmark gait databases indicate that, compared with the recently published gait recognition approaches, our CGI-based temporal information preserving approach achieves competitive performance in gait recognition with robustness and efficiency. PMID:22201053

  7. Human-Robot Interaction: Does Robotic Guidance Force Affect Gait-Related Brain Dynamics during Robot-Assisted Treadmill Walking?

    PubMed Central

    Knaepen, Kristel; Mierau, Andreas; Swinnen, Eva; Fernandez Tellez, Helio; Michielsen, Marc; Kerckhofs, Eric; Lefeber, Dirk; Meeusen, Romain

    2015-01-01

    In order to determine optimal training parameters for robot-assisted treadmill walking, it is essential to understand how a robotic device interacts with its wearer, and thus, how parameter settings of the device affect locomotor control. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of different levels of guidance force during robot-assisted treadmill walking on cortical activity. Eighteen healthy subjects walked at 2 km.h-1 on a treadmill with and without assistance of the Lokomat robotic gait orthosis. Event-related spectral perturbations and changes in power spectral density were investigated during unassisted treadmill walking as well as during robot-assisted treadmill walking at 30%, 60% and 100% guidance force (with 0% body weight support). Clustering of independent components revealed three clusters of activity in the sensorimotor cortex during treadmill walking and robot-assisted treadmill walking in healthy subjects. These clusters demonstrated gait-related spectral modulations in the mu, beta and low gamma bands over the sensorimotor cortex related to specific phases of the gait cycle. Moreover, mu and beta rhythms were suppressed in the right primary sensory cortex during treadmill walking compared to robot-assisted treadmill walking with 100% guidance force, indicating significantly larger involvement of the sensorimotor area during treadmill walking compared to robot-assisted treadmill walking. Only marginal differences in the spectral power of the mu, beta and low gamma bands could be identified between robot-assisted treadmill walking with different levels of guidance force. From these results it can be concluded that a high level of guidance force (i.e., 100% guidance force) and thus a less active participation during locomotion should be avoided during robot-assisted treadmill walking. This will optimize the involvement of the sensorimotor cortex which is known to be crucial for motor learning. PMID:26485148

  8. Mixed gaits in small avian terrestrial locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Andrada, Emanuel; Haase, Daniel; Sutedja, Yefta; Nyakatura, John A.; M. Kilbourne, Brandon; Denzler, Joachim; Fischer, Martin S.; Blickhan, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    Scientists have historically categorized gaits discretely (e.g. regular gaits such as walking, running). However, previous results suggest that animals such as birds might mix or regularly or stochastically switch between gaits while maintaining a steady locomotor speed. Here, we combined a novel and completely automated large-scale study (over one million frames) on motions of the center of mass in several bird species (quail, oystercatcher, northern lapwing, pigeon, and avocet) with numerical simulations. The birds studied do not strictly prefer walking mechanics at lower speeds or running mechanics at higher speeds. Moreover, our results clearly display that the birds in our study employ mixed gaits (such as one step walking followed by one step using running mechanics) more often than walking and, surprisingly, maybe as often as grounded running. Using a bio-inspired model based on parameters obtained from real quails, we found two types of stable mixed gaits. In the first, both legs exhibit different gait mechanics, whereas in the second, legs gradually alternate from one gait mechanics into the other. Interestingly, mixed gaits parameters mostly overlap those of grounded running. Thus, perturbations or changes in the state induce a switch from grounded running to mixed gaits or vice versa. PMID:26333477

  9. Optics in gait analysis and anthropometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva Moreno, Alejandra Alicia

    2013-11-01

    Since antiquity, human gait has been studied to understand human movement, the kind of gait, in some cases, can cause musculoskeletal disorders or other health problems; in addition, also from antiquity, anthropometry has been important for the design of human items such as workspaces, tools, garments, among others. Nowadays, thanks to the development of optics and electronics, more accurate studies of gait and anthropometry can be developed. This work will describe the most important parameters for gait analysis, anthropometry and the optical systems used.

  10. Challenging Gait Conditions Predict 1-Year Decline in Gait Speed in Older Adults With Apparently Normal Gait

    PubMed Central

    Perera, Subashan; VanSwearingen, Jessie M.; Hile, Elizabeth S.; Wert, David M.; Studenski, Stephanie A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Mobility often is tested under a low challenge condition (ie, over a straight, uncluttered path), which often fails to identify early mobility difficulty. Tests of walking during challenging conditions may uncover mobility difficulty that is not identified with usual gait testing. Objective The purpose of this study was to determine whether gait during challenging conditions predicts decline in gait speed over 1 year in older people with apparently normal gait (ie, gait speed of ≥1.0 m/s). Design This was a prospective cohort study. Methods Seventy-one older adults (mean age=75.9 years) with a usual gait speed of ≥1.0 m/s participated. Gait was tested at baseline under 4 challenging conditions: (1) narrow walk (15 cm wide), (2) stepping over obstacles (15.24 cm [6 in] and 30.48 cm [12 in]), (3) simple walking while talking (WWT), and (4) complex WWT. Usual gait speed was recorded over a 4-m course at baseline and 1 year later. A 1-year change in gait speed was calculated, and participants were classified as declined (decreased ≥0.10 m/s, n=18), stable (changed <0.10 m/s, n=43), or improved (increased ≥0.10 m/s, n=10). Analysis of variance was used to compare challenging condition cost (usual − challenging condition gait speed difference) among the 3 groups. Results Participants who declined in the ensuing year had a greater narrow walk and obstacle walk cost than those who were stable or who improved in gait speed (narrow walk cost=0.43 versus 0.33 versus 0.22 m/s and obstacle walk cost=0.35 versus 0.26 versus 0.13 m/s). Simple and complex WWT cost did not differ among the groups. Limitations The participants who declined in gait speed over time walked the fastest, and those who improved walked the slowest at baseline; thus, the potential contribution of regression to the mean to the findings should not be overlooked. Conclusions In older adults with apparently normal gait, the assessment of gait during challenging conditions appears to uncover

  11. Efficacy of a trunk orthosis with joints providing resistive force on low-back load in elderly persons during static standing

    PubMed Central

    Katsuhira, Junji; Matsudaira, Ko; Yasui, Tadashi; Iijima, Shinno; Ito, Akihiro

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Postural alignment of elderly people becomes poor due to aging, possibly leading to low-back pain and spinal deformity. Although there are several interventions for treating these conditions, no previous study has reported the effectiveness of a spinal orthosis or lumbosacral orthosis (LSO) in healthy elderly people without specific spinal deformity. We therefore developed a trunk orthosis to decrease low-back muscle activity while training good postural alignment through resistive force provided by joints with springs (here, called the ORF, which stands for orthosis with joints providing resistive force) as a preventive method against abnormal posture and low-back pain in healthy elderly persons. Patients and methods Fifteen community-dwelling elderly men participated in this study. Participants stood freely for 10 seconds in a laboratory setting under three conditions: without an orthosis, with the ORF, and with an LSO. The Damen corset LSO was selected as it is frequently prescribed for patients with low-back pain. Postural alignment during static standing was recorded using a three-dimensional motion capture system employing infrared cameras. Two force plates were used to record center of pressure. Electromyograms were obtained for bilateral erector spinae (ES), left internal abdominal oblique, and right gluteus medius muscles. Results Pelvis forward tilt angle tended to increase while wearing the ORF and decrease while wearing the LSO, but these results were not significant compared to no orthosis. Thorax extension angle and thorax angle on pelvis coordinate system significantly increased while wearing the ORF compared to the other two conditions. ES activity significantly decreased while wearing the ORF compared to the other two conditions. Internal oblique activity was significantly smaller while wearing the LSO than with no orthosis. Center of pressure did not significantly differ among the conditions. Conclusion The ORF significantly improved trunk

  12. Comparison of Upright Gait with Supine Bungee-Cord Gait

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boda, Wanda L.; Hargens, Alan R.; Campbell, J. A.; Yang, C.; Holton, Emily M. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Running on a treadmill with bungee-cord resistance is currently used on the Russian space station MIR as a countermeasure for the loss of bone and muscular strength which occurs during spaceflight. However, it is unknown whether ground reaction force (GRF) at the feet using bungee-cord resistance is similar to that which occurs during upright walking and running on Earth. We hypothesized-that the DRAMs generated during upright walking and running are greater than the DRAMs generated during supine bungee-cord gait. Eleven healthy subjects walked (4.8 +/- 0.13 km/h, mean +/- SE) and ran (9.1 +/- 0.51 km/h) during upright and supine bungee-cord exercise on an active treadmill. Subjects exercised for 3 min in each condition using a resistance of 1 body weight calibrated during an initial, stationary standing position. Data were sampled at a frequency of 500Hz and the mean of 3 trials was analyzed for each condition. A repeated measures analysis of variance tested significance between the conditions. Peak DRAMs during upright walking were significantly greater (1084.9 +/- 111.4 N) than during supine bungee-cord walking (770.3 +/- 59.8 N; p less than 0.05). Peak GRFs were also significantly greater for upright running (1548.3 +/- 135.4 N) than for supine bungee-cord running (1099.5 +/- 158.46 N). Analysis of GRF curves indicated that forces decreased throughout the stance phase for bungee-cord gait but not during upright gait. These results indicate that bungee-cord exercise may not create sufficient loads at the feet to counteract the loss of bone and muscular strength that occurs during long-duration exposure to microgravity.

  13. Developing a portable gait cycle detection system using an inertial sensor and evaluating the accuracy of the gait cycle detection.

    PubMed

    Park, Min-Hwa; Kwak, Ki-Young; Kim, Dong-Wook

    2015-01-01

    Although researches had analyzed gait using small sensors, they analyzed only normal gaits. Thus, a research that can overcome the spatial limitations of the existing motion analyses and diagnose abnormal gaits for medical treatment is needed. Accordingly, this research developed the portable gait detection system that can detect gait using a gyroscope, and evaluated the accuracy of the system. The results showed an average recognition error rate of 1.7% for the normal and abnormal gaits, and confirmed that the gait cycle was detected with a high degree of accuracy. Using these characteristics, we could distinguish or diagnose, and treat, an abnormal gait. PMID:26409541

  14. A gait index may underestimate changes of gait: a comparison of the Movement Deviation Profile and the Gait Deviation Index.

    PubMed

    Barton, Gabor J; Hawken, Malcolm B; Holmes, Gill; Schwartz, Michael H

    2015-01-01

    The ability of the Movement Deviation Profile (MDP) and Gait Deviation Index (GDI) to detect gait changes was compared in a child with cerebral palsy who underwent game training. Conventional gait analysis showed that sagittal plane angles became mirrored about normality after training. Despite considerable gait changes, the GDI showed minimal change, while the MDP detected a difference equal to a shift between 10-9 on the Functional Assessment Questionnaire scale. Responses of the GDI and MDP were examined during a synthetic transition of the patient's curves from before intervention to a state mirrored about normality. The GDI showed a symmetric response on the two opposite sides of normality but the neural network based MDP gave an asymmetric response reflecting faithfully the unequal biomechanical consequences of joint angle changes. In conclusion, the MDP can detect altered gait even if the changes are missed by the GDI. PMID:23521124

  15. Gait Analysis by High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heck, Andre; van Dongen, Caroline

    2008-01-01

    Human walking is a complicated motion. Movement scientists have developed various research methods to study gait. This article describes how a high school student collected and analysed high quality gait data in much the same way that movement scientists do, via the recording and measurement of motions with a video analysis tool and via…

  16. Diabetic Foot Biomechanics and Gait Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Wrobel, James S.; Najafi, Bijan

    2010-01-01

    Background Diabetic foot complications represent significant morbidity and precede most of the lower extremity amputations performed. Peripheral neuropathy is a frequent complication of diabetes shown to affect gait. Glycosylation of soft tissues can also affect gait. The purpose of this review article is to highlight the changes in gait for persons with diabetes and highlight the effects of glycosylation on soft tissues at the foot–ground interface. Methods PubMed, the Cochrane Library, and EBSCOhost® on-line databases were searched for articles pertaining to diabetes and gait. Bibliographies from relevant manuscripts were also searched. Findings Patients with diabetes frequently exhibit a conservative gait strategy where there is slower walking speed, wider base of gait, and prolonged double support time. Glycosylation affects are observed in the lower extremities. Initially, skin thickness decreases and skin hardness increases; tendons thicken; muscles atrophy and exhibit activation delays; bones become less dense; joints have limited mobility; and fat pads are less thick, demonstrate fibrotic atrophy, migrate distally, and may be stiffer. Interpretation In conclusion, there do appear to be gait changes in patients with diabetes. These changes, coupled with local soft tissue changes from advanced glycosylated end products, also alter a patient’s gait, putting them at risk of foot ulceration. Better elucidation of these changes throughout the entire spectrum of diabetes disease can help design better treatments and potentially reduce the unnecessarily high prevalence of foot ulcers and amputation. PMID:20663446

  17. Average Gait Differential Image Based Human Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jinyan; Liu, Jiansheng

    2014-01-01

    The difference between adjacent frames of human walking contains useful information for human gait identification. Based on the previous idea a silhouettes difference based human gait recognition method named as average gait differential image (AGDI) is proposed in this paper. The AGDI is generated by the accumulation of the silhouettes difference between adjacent frames. The advantage of this method lies in that as a feature image it can preserve both the kinetic and static information of walking. Comparing to gait energy image (GEI), AGDI is more fit to representation the variation of silhouettes during walking. Two-dimensional principal component analysis (2DPCA) is used to extract features from the AGDI. Experiments on CASIA dataset show that AGDI has better identification and verification performance than GEI. Comparing to PCA, 2DPCA is a more efficient and less memory storage consumption feature extraction method in gait based recognition. PMID:24895648

  18. Gait Recognition Using Image Self-Similarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    BenAbdelkader, Chiraz; Cutler, Ross G.; Davis, Larry S.

    2004-12-01

    Gait is one of the few biometrics that can be measured at a distance, and is hence useful for passive surveillance as well as biometric applications. Gait recognition research is still at its infancy, however, and we have yet to solve the fundamental issue of finding gait features which at once have sufficient discrimination power and can be extracted robustly and accurately from low-resolution video. This paper describes a novel gait recognition technique based on the image self-similarity of a walking person. We contend that the similarity plot encodes a projection of gait dynamics. It is also correspondence-free, robust to segmentation noise, and works well with low-resolution video. The method is tested on multiple data sets of varying sizes and degrees of difficulty. Performance is best for fronto-parallel viewpoints, whereby a recognition rate of 98% is achieved for a data set of 6 people, and 70% for a data set of 54 people.

  19. Research on gait-based human identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Youguo

    Gait recognition refers to automatic identification of individual based on his/her style of walking. This paper proposes a gait recognition method based on Continuous Hidden Markov Model with Mixture of Gaussians(G-CHMM). First, we initialize a Gaussian mix model for training image sequence with K-means algorithm, then train the HMM parameters using a Baum-Welch algorithm. These gait feature sequences can be trained and obtain a Continuous HMM for every person, therefore, the 7 key frames and the obtained HMM can represent each person's gait sequence. Finally, the recognition is achieved by Front algorithm. The experiments made on CASIA gait databases obtain comparatively high correction identification ratio and comparatively strong robustness for variety of bodily angle.

  20. Development of an assistive motorized hip orthosis: kinematics analysis and mechanical design.

    PubMed

    Olivier, Jeremy; Bouri, Mohamed; Ortlieb, Amalric; Bleuler, Hannes; Clavel, Reymond

    2013-06-01

    With the increase of life expectancy, a higher number of elderly need assistance to maintain their mobility and their independance. The hip joint is crucial for walking and is problematic for a large number of aged people. In this paper we present a novel design of a motorized hip orthosis to assist elderly people while walking, stair climbing and during the sit-to-stand transistions. The kinematics was developed based on biomechanics considerations. To be able to achieve a large assistance rate, velocity and torques of the hip joint were studied from the literature. In order to fit with these requirements, an amplification mechanism inspired by excavators was developed and implemented. Comfort considerations were also taken into account and a custom interface was designed with the collaboration of a professional orthopaedic technician. First tests with the prototype showed that the workspace is sufficient for walking, for stair climbing as well as for sit-to-stand transitions. The assistance rate can go up to 30% for a 70 kg subject during walking at a cadence of 100 steps/min. The comfort is guaranteed despite the important weight (4.3 kg) of this first prototype. PMID:24187310

  1. Gait transitions in simulated reduced gravity.

    PubMed

    Ivanenko, Yuri P; Labini, Francesca Sylos; Cappellini, Germana; Macellari, Velio; McIntyre, Joseph; Lacquaniti, Francesco

    2011-03-01

    Gravity has a strong effect on gait and the speed of gait transitions. A gait has been defined as a pattern of locomotion that changes discontinuously at the transition to another gait. On Earth, during gradual speed changes, humans exhibit a sudden discontinuous switch from walking to running at a specific speed. To study the effects of altered gravity on both the stance and swing legs, we developed a novel unloading exoskeleton that allows a person to step in simulated reduced gravity by tilting the body relative to the vertical. Using different simulation techniques, we confirmed that at lower gravity levels the transition speed is slower (in accordance with the previously reported Froude number ∼0.5). Surprisingly, however, we found that at lower levels of simulated gravity the transition between walking and running was generally gradual, without any noticeable abrupt change in gait parameters. This was associated with a significant prolongation of the swing phase, whose duration became virtually equal to that of stance in the vicinity of the walk-run transition speed, and with a gradual shift from inverted-pendulum gait (walking) to bouncing gait (running). PMID:21212248

  2. Gait recognition based on Gabor wavelets and modified gait energy image for human identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Deng-Yuan; Lin, Ta-Wei; Hu, Wu-Chih; Cheng, Chih-Hsiang

    2013-10-01

    This paper proposes a method for recognizing human identity using gait features based on Gabor wavelets and modified gait energy images (GEIs). Identity recognition by gait generally involves gait representation, extraction, and classification. In this work, a modified GEI convolved with an ensemble of Gabor wavelets is proposed as a gait feature. Principal component analysis is then used to project the Gabor-wavelet-based gait features into a lower-dimension feature space for subsequent classification. Finally, support vector machine classifiers based on a radial basis function kernel are trained and utilized to recognize human identity. The major contributions of this paper are as follows: (1) the consideration of the shadow effect to yield a more complete segmentation of gait silhouettes; (2) the utilization of motion estimation to track people when walkers overlap; and (3) the derivation of modified GEIs to extract more useful gait information. Extensive performance evaluation shows a great improvement of recognition accuracy due to the use of shadow removal, motion estimation, and gait representation using the modified GEIs and Gabor wavelets.

  3. Control of a pneumatic power active lower-limb orthosis with filter-based iterative learning control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chia-En; Chen, Jian-Shiang

    2014-05-01

    A filter-based iterative learning control (FILC) scheme is developed in this paper, which consists in a proportional-derivative (PD) feedback controller and a feedforward filter. Moreover, based on two-dimensional system theory, the stability of the FILC system is proven. The design criteria for a wavelet transform filter (WTF) - chosen as the feedforward filter - and the PD feedback controller are also given. Finally, using a pneumatic power active lower-limb orthosis (PPALO) as the controlled plant, the wavelet-based iterative learning control (WILC) implementation and the orchestration of a trajectory tracking control simulation are given in detail and the overall tracking performance is validated.

  4. Canine hip extension range during gait.

    PubMed

    van der Walt, A M; Stewart, A V; Joubert, K E; Bekker, P

    2008-12-01

    Assessment of canine gait is frequently used by veterinary clinicians to establish the presence of orthopaedic pain. As up to 30% of canine orthopaedic conditions affect the pelvic limb, knowledge of pelvic limb biomechanics during gait is very important. Previous studies have investigated the biomechanics at the tarsus and stifle, but little information is available regarding hip motion during gait. The aim of this study was to determine the maximum hip extension range achieved during the stance phase of gait in normal canines. In addition, this study aimed to determine the difference between maximum passive hip extension and maximum hip extension during gait. Using a sample of 30 morphologically similar normal dogs, mean maximum passive hip extension was measured using a goniometer and mean maximum hip extension range during gait was determined videographically. Inter- and intra-assessor reliability studies performed at the start of the study showed that the measurement tools and techniques used in this study were valid and reliable. The goniometric data showed that mean maximum passive hip extension range was 162.44 degrees (+/-3.94) with no significant difference between the left and the right hind limbs. The videographic data showed that mean maximum hip extension range during gait was 119.9 degrees (+/-9.26) with no significant difference between the left and right hind limbs. The results of this study provided reference values for active and passive hip extension range and showed that the degree of hip extension range required for normal gait is significantly less than maximum passive hip extension range. PMID:19496317

  5. Toward understanding the limits of gait recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zongyi; Malave, Laura; Osuntogun, Adebola; Sudhakar, Preksha; Sarkar, Sudeep

    2004-08-01

    Most state of the art video-based gait recognition algorithms start from binary silhouettes. These silhouettes, defined as foreground regions, are usually detected by background subtraction methods, which results in holes or missed parts due to similarity of foreground and background color, and boundary errors due to video compression artifacts. Errors in low-level representation make it hard to understand the effect of certain conditions, such as surface and time, on gait recognition. In this paper, we present a part-level, manual silhouette database consisting of 71 subjects, over one gait cycle, with differences in surface, shoe-type, carrying condition, and time. We have a total of about 11,000 manual silhouette frames. The purpose of this manual silhouette database is twofold. First, this is a resource that we make available at http://www.GaitChallenge.org for use by the gait community to test and design better silhouette detection algorithms. These silhouettes can also be used to learn gait dynamics. Second, using the baseline gait recognition algorithm, which was specified along with the HumanID Gait Challenge problem, we show that performance from manual silhouettes is similar and only sometimes better than that from automated silhouettes detected by statistical background subtraction. Low performances when comparing sequences with differences in walking surfaces and time-variation are not fully explained by silhouette quality. We also study the recognition power in each body part and show that recognition based on just the legs is equal to that from the whole silhouette. There is also significant recognition power in the head and torso shape.

  6. Gait Partitioning Methods: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Taborri, Juri; Palermo, Eduardo; Rossi, Stefano; Cappa, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    In the last years, gait phase partitioning has come to be a challenging research topic due to its impact on several applications related to gait technologies. A variety of sensors can be used to feed algorithms for gait phase partitioning, mainly classifiable as wearable or non-wearable. Among wearable sensors, footswitches or foot pressure insoles are generally considered as the gold standard; however, to overcome some inherent limitations of the former, inertial measurement units have become popular in recent decades. Valuable results have been achieved also though electromyography, electroneurography, and ultrasonic sensors. Non-wearable sensors, such as opto-electronic systems along with force platforms, remain the most accurate system to perform gait analysis in an indoor environment. In the present paper we identify, select, and categorize the available methodologies for gait phase detection, analyzing advantages and disadvantages of each solution. Finally, we comparatively examine the obtainable gait phase granularities, the usable computational methodologies and the optimal sensor placements on the targeted body segments. PMID:26751449

  7. Gait Recognition Using Wearable Motion Recording Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gafurov, Davrondzhon; Snekkenes, Einar

    2009-12-01

    This paper presents an alternative approach, where gait is collected by the sensors attached to the person's body. Such wearable sensors record motion (e.g. acceleration) of the body parts during walking. The recorded motion signals are then investigated for person recognition purposes. We analyzed acceleration signals from the foot, hip, pocket and arm. Applying various methods, the best EER obtained for foot-, pocket-, arm- and hip- based user authentication were 5%, 7%, 10% and 13%, respectively. Furthermore, we present the results of our analysis on security assessment of gait. Studying gait-based user authentication (in case of hip motion) under three attack scenarios, we revealed that a minimal effort mimicking does not help to improve the acceptance chances of impostors. However, impostors who know their closest person in the database or the genders of the users can be a threat to gait-based authentication. We also provide some new insights toward the uniqueness of gait in case of foot motion. In particular, we revealed the following: a sideway motion of the foot provides the most discrimination, compared to an up-down or forward-backward directions; and different segments of the gait cycle provide different level of discrimination.

  8. In Vivo Gait Analysis During Bone Transport.

    PubMed

    Mora-Macías, J; Reina-Romo, E; Morgaz, J; Domínguez, J

    2015-09-01

    The load bearing characteristics of the intervened limb over time in vivo are important to know in distraction osteogenesis and bone healing for the characterization of the bone maturation process. Gait analyses were performed for a group of sheep in which bone transport was carried out. The ground reaction force was measured by means of a force platform, and the gait parameters (i.e., the peak, the mean vertical ground reaction force and the impulse) were calculated during the stance phase for each limb. The results showed that these gait parameters decreased in the intervened limb and interestingly increased in the other limbs due to the implantation of the fixator. Additionally, during the process, the gait parameters exponentially approached the values for healthy animals. Corresponding radiographies showed an increasing level of ossification in the callus. This study shows, as a preliminary approach to be confirmed with more experiments, that gait analysis could be used as an alternative method to control distraction osteogenesis or bone healing. For example, these analyses could determine the appropriate time to remove the fixator. Furthermore, gait analysis has advantages over other methods because it provides quantitative data and does not require instrumented fixators. PMID:25650097

  9. Gait Partitioning Methods: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Taborri, Juri; Palermo, Eduardo; Rossi, Stefano; Cappa, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    In the last years, gait phase partitioning has come to be a challenging research topic due to its impact on several applications related to gait technologies. A variety of sensors can be used to feed algorithms for gait phase partitioning, mainly classifiable as wearable or non-wearable. Among wearable sensors, footswitches or foot pressure insoles are generally considered as the gold standard; however, to overcome some inherent limitations of the former, inertial measurement units have become popular in recent decades. Valuable results have been achieved also though electromyography, electroneurography, and ultrasonic sensors. Non-wearable sensors, such as opto-electronic systems along with force platforms, remain the most accurate system to perform gait analysis in an indoor environment. In the present paper we identify, select, and categorize the available methodologies for gait phase detection, analyzing advantages and disadvantages of each solution. Finally, we comparatively examine the obtainable gait phase granularities, the usable computational methodologies and the optimal sensor placements on the targeted body segments. PMID:26751449

  10. The design of a five-degree-of-freedom powered orthosis for the upper limb.

    PubMed

    Johnson, G R; Carus, D A; Parrini, G; Scattareggia Marchese, S; Valeggi, R

    2001-01-01

    In response to the need for a sophisticated powered upper-limb orthosis for use by people with disabilities and/or limb weakness or injury, the MULOS (motorized upper-limb orthotic system) has been developed. This is a five-degree-of-freedom electrically powered device having three degrees of freedom at the shoulder, one at the elbow and one to provide pronation/supination. The shoulder mechanism consists of a serial linkage having an equivalent centre of rotation close to that of the anatomical shoulder; this is a self-contained module in which power transmission is provided by tensioned cables. The elbow and pronation/supination modules are also self-contained. The system has been designed to operate under three modes of control: 1. As an assistive robot attached directly to the arm to provide controlled movements for people with severe disability. In this case, it can be operated by a variety of control interfaces, including a specially designed five-degree-of-freedom joystick. 2. Continuous passive motion for the therapy of joints after injury. The trajectory of the joints is selected by 'walk-through' programming and can be replayed for a given number of cycles at a chosen speed. 3. As an exercise device to provide strengthening exercises for elderly people or those recovering from injury or surgery. This mode has not been fully implemented at this stage. In assistive mode, prototype testing has demonstrated that the system can provide the movements required for a range of simple tasks and, in continuous passive motion (CPM) mode, the programming system has been successfully implemented. Great attention has been paid to all aspects of safety. Future work is required to identify problems of operation, and to develop new control interfaces. PMID:11436270

  11. Gait dynamics in Parkinson's disease: Common and distinct behavior among stride length, gait variability, and fractal-like scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hausdorff, Jeffrey M.

    2009-06-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common, debilitating neurodegenerative disease. Gait disturbances are a frequent cause of disability and impairment for patients with PD. This article provides a brief introduction to PD and describes the gait changes typically seen in patients with this disease. A major focus of this report is an update on the study of the fractal properties of gait in PD, the relationship between this feature of gait and stride length and gait variability, and the effects of different experimental conditions on these three gait properties. Implications of these findings are also briefly described. This update highlights the idea that while stride length, gait variability, and fractal scaling of gait are all impaired in PD, distinct mechanisms likely contribute to and are responsible for the regulation of these disparate gait properties.

  12. Evaluating a novel cervical orthosis, the Sheffield Support Snood, in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/motor neuron disease with neck weakness.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Susan; Reed, Heath; Clarke, Zoë; Judge, Simon; Heron, Nicola; Mccarthy, Avril; Langley, Joe; Stanton, Andrew; Wells, Oliver; Squire, Gill; Quinn, Ann; Strong, Mark; Shaw, Pamela J; Mcdermott, Christopher J

    2016-01-01

    Current practice and guidelines recommend the use of neck orthoses for people with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) to compensate for neck weakness and to provide surrogate neck control. However, available options are frequently described by patients as restrictive and unsuitable and there was a need for a new device that addressed the needs of people with ALS. This project utilized a co-design process to develop a new neck orthosis that was more flexible yet supportive. Following development of a prototype device, a mixed methods cohort study was undertaken with patients and carers, in order to evaluate the new orthosis. Twenty-six patients were recruited to the study, with 20 of these completing all phases of data collection. Participants described the impact of neck weakness on their life and limitations of existing supports. Evaluation of the new orthosis identified key beneficial features: notably, increased support while providing a greater range of movement, flexibility of use, and improved appearance and comfort. In conclusion, the results of this evaluation highlight the value of this alternative option for people with ALS, and potentially other patient groups who require a neck orthosis. PMID:26915274

  13. Intra-individual gait pattern variability in specific situations: Implications for forensic gait analysis.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Oliver; Dillinger, Steffen; Marschall, Franz

    2016-07-01

    In this study, inter- and intra-individual gait pattern differences are examined in various gait situations by means of phase diagrams of the extremity angles (cyclograms). 8 test subjects walked along a walking distance of 6m under different conditions three times each: barefoot, wearing sneakers, wearing combat boots, after muscular fatigue, and wearing a full-face motorcycle helmet restricting vision. The joint angles of foot, knee, and hip were recorded in the sagittal plane. The coupling of movements was represented by time-adjusted cyclograms, and the inter- and intra-individual differences were captured by calculating the similarity between different gait patterns. Gait pattern variability was often greater between the defined test situations than between the individual test subjects. The results have been interpreted considering neurophysiological regulation mechanisms. Footwear, masking, and fatigue were interpreted as disturbance parameters, each being a cause for gait pattern variability and complicating the inference of identity of persons in video recordings. PMID:26990706

  14. Classification of Parkinson's Disease Gait Using Spatial-Temporal Gait Features.

    PubMed

    Wahid, Ferdous; Begg, Rezaul K; Hass, Chris J; Halgamuge, Saman; Ackland, David C

    2015-11-01

    Quantitative gait assessment is important in diagnosis and management of Parkinson's disease (PD); however, gait characteristics of a cohort are dispersed by patient physical properties including age, height, body mass, and gender, as well as walking speed, which may limit capacity to discern some pathological features. The aim of this study was twofold. First, to use a multiple regression normalization strategy that accounts for subject age, height, body mass, gender, and self-selected walking speed to identify differences in spatial-temporal gait features between PD patients and controls; and second, to evaluate the effectiveness of machine learning strategies in classifying PD gait after gait normalization. Spatial-temporal gait data during self-selected walking were obtained from 23 PD patients and 26 aged-matched controls. Data were normalized using standard dimensionless equations and multiple regression normalization. Machine learning strategies were then employed to classify PD gait using the raw gait data, data normalized using dimensionless equations, and data normalized using the multiple regression approach. After normalizing data using the dimensionless equations, only stride length, step length, and double support time were significantly different between PD patients and controls (p < 0.05); however, normalizing data using the multiple regression method revealed significant differences in stride length, cadence, stance time, and double support time. Random Forest resulted in a PD classification accuracy of 92.6% after normalizing gait data using the multiple regression approach, compared to 80.4% (support vector machine) and 86.2% (kernel Fisher discriminant) using raw data and data normalized using dimensionless equations, respectively. Our multiple regression normalization approach will assist in diagnosis and treatment of PD using spatial-temporal gait data. PMID:26551989

  15. A Validated Smartphone-Based Assessment of Gait and Gait Variability in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Robert J.; Ng, Yee Sien; Zhu, Shenggao; Tan, Dawn M.; Anderson, Boyd; Schlaug, Gottfried; Wang, Ye

    2015-01-01

    Background A well-established connection exists between increased gait variability and greater fall likelihood in Parkinson’s disease (PD); however, a portable, validated means of quantifying gait variability (and testing the efficacy of any intervention) remains lacking. Furthermore, although rhythmic auditory cueing continues to receive attention as a promising gait therapy for PD, its widespread delivery remains bottlenecked. The present paper describes a smartphone-based mobile application (“SmartMOVE”) to address both needs. Methods The accuracy of smartphone-based gait analysis (utilizing the smartphone’s built-in tri-axial accelerometer and gyroscope to calculate successive step times and step lengths) was validated against two heel contact–based measurement devices: heel-mounted footswitch sensors (to capture step times) and an instrumented pressure sensor mat (to capture step lengths). 12 PD patients and 12 age-matched healthy controls walked along a 26-m path during self-paced and metronome-cued conditions, with all three devices recording simultaneously. Results Four outcome measures of gait and gait variability were calculated. Mixed-factorial analysis of variance revealed several instances in which between-group differences (e.g., increased gait variability in PD patients relative to healthy controls) yielded medium-to-large effect sizes (eta-squared values), and cueing-mediated changes (e.g., decreased gait variability when PD patients walked with auditory cues) yielded small-to-medium effect sizes—while at the same time, device-related measurement error yielded small-to-negligible effect sizes. Conclusion These findings highlight specific opportunities for smartphone-based gait analysis to serve as an alternative to conventional gait analysis methods (e.g., footswitch systems or sensor-embedded walkways), particularly when those methods are cost-prohibitive, cumbersome, or inconvenient. PMID:26517720

  16. Gait Initiation in Children with Rett Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Isaias, Ioannis Ugo; Dipaola, Mariangela; Michi, Marlies; Marzegan, Alberto; Volkmann, Jens; Rodocanachi Roidi, Marina L.; Frigo, Carlo Albino; Cavallari, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Rett syndrome is an X-linked neurodevelopmental condition mainly characterized by loss of spoken language and a regression of purposeful hand use, with the development of distinctive hand stereotypies, and gait abnormalities. Gait initiation is the transition from quiet stance to steady-state condition of walking. The associated motor program seems to be centrally mediated and includes preparatory adjustments prior to any apparent voluntary movement of the lower limbs. Anticipatory postural adjustments contribute to postural stability and to create the propulsive forces necessary to reach steady-state gait at a predefined velocity and may be indicative of the effectiveness of the feedforward control of gait. In this study, we examined anticipatory postural adjustments associated with gait initiation in eleven girls with Rett syndrome and ten healthy subjects. Muscle activity (tibialis anterior and soleus muscles), ground reaction forces and body kinematic were recorded. Children with Rett syndrome showed a distinctive impairment in temporal organization of all phases of the anticipatory postural adjustments. The lack of appropriate temporal scaling resulted in a diminished impulse to move forward, documented by an impairment in several parameters describing the efficiency of gait start: length and velocity of the first step, magnitude and orientation of centre of pressure-centre of mass vector at the instant of (swing-)toe off. These findings were related to an abnormal muscular activation pattern mainly characterized by a disruption of the synergistic activity of antagonistic pairs of postural muscles. This study showed that girls with Rett syndrome lack accurate tuning of feedforward control of gait. PMID:24743294

  17. Modeling and simulation of normal and hemiparetic gait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luengas, Lely A.; Camargo, Esperanza; Sanchez, Giovanni

    2015-09-01

    Gait is the collective term for the two types of bipedal locomotion, walking and running. This paper is focused on walking. The analysis of human gait is of interest to many different disciplines, including biomechanics, human-movement science, rehabilitation and medicine in general. Here we present a new model that is capable of reproducing the properties of walking, normal and pathological. The aim of this paper is to establish the biomechanical principles that underlie human walking by using Lagrange method. The constraint forces of Rayleigh dissipation function, through which to consider the effect on the tissues in the gait, are included. Depending on the value of the factor present in the Rayleigh dissipation function, both normal and pathological gait can be simulated. First of all, we apply it in the normal gait and then in the permanent hemiparetic gait. Anthropometric data of adult person are used by simulation, and it is possible to use anthropometric data for children but is necessary to consider existing table of anthropometric data. Validation of these models includes simulations of passive dynamic gait that walk on level ground. The dynamic walking approach provides a new perspective of gait analysis, focusing on the kinematics and kinetics of gait. There have been studies and simulations to show normal human gait, but few of them have focused on abnormal, especially hemiparetic gait. Quantitative comparisons of the model predictions with gait measurements show that the model can reproduce the significant characteristics of normal gait.

  18. Dynamic stability and phase resetting during biped gait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Taishin; Kawa, Kazuyoshi; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Nakanishi, Masao; Yamasaki, Taiga

    2009-06-01

    Dynamic stability during periodic biped gait in humans and in a humanoid robot is considered. Here gait systems of human neuromusculoskeletal system and a humanoid are simply modeled while keeping their mechanical properties plausible. We prescribe periodic gait trajectories in terms of joint angles of the models as a function of time. The equations of motion of the models are then constrained by one of the prescribed gait trajectories to obtain types of periodically forced nonlinear dynamical systems. Simulated gait of the models may or may not fall down during gait, since the constraints are made only for joint angles of limbs but not for the motion of the body trunk. The equations of motion can exhibit a limit cycle solution (or an oscillatory solution that can be considered as a limit cycle practically) for each selected gait trajectory, if an initial condition is set appropriately. We analyze the stability of the limit cycle in terms of Poincaré maps and the basin of attraction of the limit cycle in order to examine how the stability depends on the prescribed trajectory. Moreover, the phase resetting of gait rhythm in response to external force perturbation is modeled. Since we always prescribe a gait trajectory in this study, reacting gait trajectories during the phase resetting are also prescribed. We show that an optimally prescribed reacting gait trajectory with an appropriate amount of the phase resetting can increase the gait stability. Neural mechanisms for generation and modulation of the gait trajectories are discussed.

  19. Dynamic stability and phase resetting during biped gait.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Taishin; Kawa, Kazuyoshi; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Nakanishi, Masao; Yamasaki, Taiga

    2009-06-01

    Dynamic stability during periodic biped gait in humans and in a humanoid robot is considered. Here gait systems of human neuromusculoskeletal system and a humanoid are simply modeled while keeping their mechanical properties plausible. We prescribe periodic gait trajectories in terms of joint angles of the models as a function of time. The equations of motion of the models are then constrained by one of the prescribed gait trajectories to obtain types of periodically forced nonlinear dynamical systems. Simulated gait of the models may or may not fall down during gait, since the constraints are made only for joint angles of limbs but not for the motion of the body trunk. The equations of motion can exhibit a limit cycle solution (or an oscillatory solution that can be considered as a limit cycle practically) for each selected gait trajectory, if an initial condition is set appropriately. We analyze the stability of the limit cycle in terms of Poincaré maps and the basin of attraction of the limit cycle in order to examine how the stability depends on the prescribed trajectory. Moreover, the phase resetting of gait rhythm in response to external force perturbation is modeled. Since we always prescribe a gait trajectory in this study, reacting gait trajectories during the phase resetting are also prescribed. We show that an optimally prescribed reacting gait trajectory with an appropriate amount of the phase resetting can increase the gait stability. Neural mechanisms for generation and modulation of the gait trajectories are discussed. PMID:19566263

  20. Gait synchronization in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jinzhou; Raizen, David M.; Bau, Haim H.

    2014-01-01

    Collective motion is observed in swarms of swimmers of various sizes, ranging from self-propelled nanoparticles to fish. The mechanisms that govern interactions among individuals are debated, and vary from one species to another. Although the interactions among relatively large animals, such as fish, are controlled by their nervous systems, the interactions among microorganisms, which lack nervous systems, are controlled through physical and chemical pathways. Little is known, however, regarding the mechanism of collective movements in microscopic organisms with nervous systems. To attempt to remedy this, we studied collective swimming behavior in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, a microorganism with a compact nervous system. We evaluated the contributions of hydrodynamic forces, contact forces, and mechanosensory input to the interactions among individuals. We devised an experiment to examine pair interactions as a function of the distance between the animals and observed that gait synchronization occurred only when the animals were in close proximity, independent of genes required for mechanosensation. Our measurements and simulations indicate that steric hindrance is the dominant factor responsible for motion synchronization in C. elegans, and that hydrodynamic interactions and genotype do not play a significant role. We infer that a similar mechanism may apply to other microscopic swimming organisms and self-propelled particles. PMID:24778261

  1. Neuroimaging of Freezing of Gait

    PubMed Central

    Fasano, Alfonso; Herman, Talia; Tessitore, Alessandro; Strafella, Antonio P.; Bohnen, Nicolaas I.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Functional brain imaging techniques appear ideally suited to explore the pathophysiology of freezing of gait (FOG). In the last two decades, techniques based on magnetic resonance or nuclear medicine imaging have found a number of structural changes and functional disconnections between subcortical and cortical regions of the locomotor network in patients with FOG. FOG seems to be related in part to disruptions in the “executive-attention” network along with regional tissue loss including the premotor area, inferior frontal gyrus, precentral gyrus, the parietal and occipital areas involved in visuospatial functions of the right hemisphere. Several subcortical structures have been also involved in the etiology of FOG, principally the caudate nucleus and the locomotor centers in the brainstem. Maladaptive neural compensation may present transiently in the presence of acute conflicting motor, cognitive or emotional stimulus processing, thus causing acute network overload and resulting in episodic impairment of stepping. In this review we will summarize the state of the art of neuroimaging research for FOG. We will also discuss the limitations of current approaches and delineate the next steps of neuroimaging research to unravel the pathophysiology of this mysterious motor phenomenon. PMID:25757831

  2. Gait rehabilitation machines based on programmable footplates

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Henning; Werner, Cordula; Bernhardt, Rolf; Hesse, Stefan; Krüger, Jörg

    2007-01-01

    Background Gait restoration is an integral part of rehabilitation of brain lesioned patients. Modern concepts favour a task-specific repetitive approach, i.e. who wants to regain walking has to walk, while tone-inhibiting and gait preparatory manoeuvres had dominated therapy before. Following the first mobilization out of the bed, the wheelchair-bound patient should have the possibility to practise complex gait cycles as soon as possible. Steps in this direction were treadmill training with partial body weight support and most recently gait machines enabling the repetitive training of even surface gait and even of stair climbing. Results With treadmill training harness-secured and partially relieved wheelchair-mobilised patients could practise up to 1000 steps per session for the first time. Controlled trials in stroke and SCI patients, however, failed to show a superior result when compared to walking exercise on the floor. Most likely explanation was the effort for the therapists, e.g. manually setting the paretic limbs during the swing phase resulting in a too little gait intensity. The next steps were gait machines, either consisting of a powered exoskeleton and a treadmill (Lokomat, AutoAmbulator) or an electromechanical solution with the harness secured patient placed on movable foot plates (Gait Trainer GT I). For the latter, a large multi-centre trial with 155 non-ambulatory stroke patients (DEGAS) revealed a superior gait ability and competence in basic activities of living in the experimental group. The HapticWalker continued the end effector concept of movable foot plates, now fully programmable and equipped with 6 DOF force sensors. This device for the first time enables training of arbitrary walking situations, hence not only the simulation of floor walking but also for example of stair climbing and perturbations. Conclusion Locomotor therapy is a fascinating new tool in rehabilitation, which is in line with modern principles of motor relearning

  3. Sporadic hyperekplexia presenting with an ataxic gait.

    PubMed

    Rouco, Idoia; Bilbao, Iker; Losada, Jose; Maestro, Iratxe; Zarranz, Juan Jose

    2014-02-01

    We describe a 62-year-old man with a sporadic form of hyperekplexia who presented with an unsteady gait, present since the age of 47. His clinical examination revealed an insecure broad-based gait and difficulty with tandem walking but no other abnormalities. For nearly a decade the patient was misdiagnosed with an idiopathic ataxia. A video electroencephalogram combined with an electromyogram during sudden auditory stimulus demonstrated an excessive startle response. An extensive work-up ruled out all the known causes of symptomatic hyperekplexia including anti-glycine receptor antibodies. Treatment with clonazepam markedly reduced the threshold and intensity of the startle response, enabling him to recover independence. Hyperekplexia is frequently associated with an awkward and hesitating gait, but these gait abnormalities might be confused with other causes of gait disorders if one is not aware of this disease. We report this patient to highlight that a correct diagnosis of hyperekplexia is crucial, because its treatment may change quality of life. PMID:24054400

  4. Gait stability in children with cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Bruijn, Sjoerd M.; Millard, Matthew; van Gestel, Leen; Meyns, Pieter; Jonkers, Ilse; Desloovere, Kaat

    2013-01-01

    Children with unilateral Cerebral Palsy (CP) have several gait impairments, amongst which impaired gait stability may be one. We tested whether a newly developed stability measure (the foot placement estimator, FPE) which does not require long data series, can be used to asses gait stability in typically developing (TD) children as well as children with CP. In doing so, we tested the FPE’s sensitivity to the assumptions needed to calculate this measure, as well as the ability of the FPE to detect differences in stability between children with CP and TD children, and differences in walking speed. Participants were asked to walk at two different speeds, while gait kinematics were recorded. From these data, the FPE, as well as the error that violations of assumptions of the FPE could have caused were calculated. The results showed that children with CP walked with marked instabilities in anterior-posterior and mediolateral directions. Furthermore, errors caused by violations of assumptions in calculation of FPE were only small (~1.5 cm), while effects of walking speed (~20 cm per m/s increase in walking speed) and group (~5cm) were much larger. These results suggest that the FPE may be used to quantify gait stability in TD children and children with CP. PMID:23500163

  5. Gait termination in individuals with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Roeing, Kathleen L; Wajda, Douglas A; Motl, Robert W; Sosnoff, Jacob J

    2015-09-01

    Despite the ubiquitous nature of gait impairment in multiple sclerosis (MS), there is limited information concerning the control of gait termination in individuals with MS. The purpose of this investigation was to examine planned gait termination in individuals with MS and healthy controls with and without cognitive distractors. Individuals with MS and age matched controls completed a series of gait termination tasks over a pressure sensitive walkway under non-distracting and cognitively distracting conditions. As expected the MS group had a lower velocity (89.9±33.3 cm/s) than controls (142.8±22.4 cm/s) and there was a significant reduction in velocity in both groups under the cognitive distracting conditions (MS: 73.9±30.7 cm/s; control: 120.0±25.9 cm/s). Although individuals with MS walked slower, there was no difference between groups in the rate a participant failed to stop at the target (i.e. failure rate). Overall failure rate had a 10-fold increase in the cognitively distracting condition across groups. Individuals with MS were more unstable during termination. Future research examining the neuromuscular mechanisms contributing to gait termination is warranted. PMID:26228021

  6. Development and Decline of Upright Gait Stability

    PubMed Central

    Iosa, Marco; Fusco, Augusto; Morone, Giovanni; Paolucci, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Upright gait is a peculiar characteristic of humans that requires the ability to manage upper body dynamic balance while walking, despite the perturbations that are generated by movements of the lower limbs. Most of the studies on upright gait stability have compared young adults and the elderly to determine the effects of aging. In other studies, the comparison was between healthy subjects and patients to examine specific pathologies. Fewer researches have also investigated the development of upright gait stability in children. This review discusses these studies in order to provide an overview of this relevant aspect of human locomotion. A clear trend from development to decline of upright gait stability has been depicted across the entire lifespan, from toddlers at first steps to elderly. In old individuals, even if healthy, the deterioration of skeletal muscle, combined with sensorial and cognitive performance, reduces the ability to maintain an upright trunk during walking, increasing the instability and the risk of falls. Further, the pathological causes of altered development or of a sudden loss of gait stability, as well as the environmental influence are investigated. The last part of this review is focused on the control of upper body accelerations during walking, a particularly interesting topic for the recent development of low-cost wearable accelerometers. PMID:24550829

  7. Scrunching: a novel escape gait in planarians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochet-Escartin, Olivier; Mickolajczyk, Keith J.; Collins, Eva-Maria S.

    2015-10-01

    The ability to escape a predator or other life-threatening situations is central to animal survival. Different species have evolved unique strategies under anatomical and environmental constraints. In this study, we describe a novel musculature-driven escape gait in planarians, ‘scrunching’, which is quantitatively different from other planarian gaits, such as gliding and peristalsis. We show that scrunching is a conserved gait among different flatworm species, underlying its importance as an escape mechanism. We further demonstrate that it can be induced by a variety of physical stimuli, including amputation, high temperature, electric shock and low pH. We discuss the functional basis for scrunching as the preferential gait when gliding is impaired due to a disruption of mucus production. Finally, we show that the key mechanical features of scrunching are adequately captured by a simple biomechanical model that is solely based on experimental data from traction force microscopy and tissue rheology without fit parameters. Together, our results form a complete description of this novel form of planarian locomotion. Because scrunching has distinct dynamics, this gait can serve as a robust behavioral readout for studies of motor neuron and muscular functions in planarians and in particular the restoration of these functions during regeneration.

  8. Scrunching: a novel escape gait in planarians.

    PubMed

    Cochet-Escartin, Olivier; Mickolajczyk, Keith J; Collins, Eva-Maria S

    2015-10-01

    The ability to escape a predator or other life-threatening situations is central to animal survival. Different species have evolved unique strategies under anatomical and environmental constraints. In this study, we describe a novel musculature-driven escape gait in planarians, 'scrunching', which is quantitatively different from other planarian gaits, such as gliding and peristalsis. We show that scrunching is a conserved gait among different flatworm species, underlying its importance as an escape mechanism. We further demonstrate that it can be induced by a variety of physical stimuli, including amputation, high temperature, electric shock and low pH. We discuss the functional basis for scrunching as the preferential gait when gliding is impaired due to a disruption of mucus production. Finally, we show that the key mechanical features of scrunching are adequately captured by a simple biomechanical model that is solely based on experimental data from traction force microscopy and tissue rheology without fit parameters. Together, our results form a complete description of this novel form of planarian locomotion. Because scrunching has distinct dynamics, this gait can serve as a robust behavioral readout for studies of motor neuron and muscular functions in planarians and in particular the restoration of these functions during regeneration. PMID:26356147

  9. Variability and similarity of gait as evaluated by joint angles: implications for forensic gait analysis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sylvia X M; Larsen, Peter K; Alkjær, Tine; Simonsen, Erik B; Lynnerup, Niels

    2014-03-01

    Closed-circuit television (CCTV) footage is used in criminal investigations to compare perpetrators with suspects. Usually, incomplete gait cycles are collected, making evidential gait analysis challenging. This study aimed to analyze the discriminatory power of joint angles throughout a gait cycle. Six sets from 12 men were collected. For each man, a variability range VR (mean ± 1SD) of a specific joint angle at a specific time point (a gait cycle was 100 time points) was calculated. In turn, each individual was compared with the 11 others, and whenever 1 of these 11 had a value within this individual’s VR, it counted as positive. By adding the positives throughout the gait cycle, we created simple bar graphs; tall bars indicated a small discriminatory power, short bars indicated a larger one. The highest discriminatory power was at time points 60–80 in the gait cycle. We show how our data can assess gait data from an actual case. PMID:24745080

  10. Human gait recognition based on compactness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Feng; Jiang, Jie; Zhang, Guangjun

    2008-10-01

    Gait recognition is new biological identity technology and widely researched in recent years for its many advantages compared with other biological identity technology. In this paper, we propose a simple but effective feature-compactness for gait recognition. First an improved background subtraction algorithm is used to obtain the silhouettes. Then the compactness is extracted from the images in the gait sequence as the feature vector. In the step of classification, DTW algorithm is adopted to adjust the feature vectors before classifying and two classifiers (NN and ENN) are used as classifiers. Because of the simple features which we choose, it consumes little time for recognition and the results turn out to be encouraging.

  11. Human Odometry Verifies the Symmetry Perspective on Bipedal Gaits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turvey, M. T.; Harrison, Steven J.; Frank, Till D.; Carello, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    Bipedal gaits have been classified on the basis of the group symmetry of the minimal network of identical differential equations (alias "cells") required to model them. Primary gaits are characterized by dihedral symmetry, whereas secondary gaits are characterized by a lower, cyclic symmetry. This fact was used in a test of human odometry. Results…

  12. Footwear Decreases Gait Asymmetry during Running

    PubMed Central

    Hoerzer, Stefan; Federolf, Peter A.; Maurer, Christian; Baltich, Jennifer; Nigg, Benno M.

    2015-01-01

    Previous research on elderly people has suggested that footwear may improve neuromuscular control of motion. If footwear does in fact improve neuromuscular control, then such an influence might already be present in young, healthy adults. A feature that is often used to assess neuromuscular control of motion is the level of gait asymmetry. The objectives of the study were (a) to develop a comprehensive asymmetry index (CAI) that is capable of detecting gait asymmetry changes caused by external boundary conditions such as footwear, and (b) to use the CAI to investigate whether footwear influences gait asymmetry during running in a healthy, young cohort. Kinematic and kinetic data were collected for both legs of 15 subjects performing five barefoot and five shod over-ground running trials. Thirty continuous gait variables including ground reaction forces and variables of the hip, knee, and ankle joints were computed for each leg. For each individual, the differences between the variables for the right and left leg were calculated. Using this data, a principal component analysis was conducted to obtain the CAI. This study had two main outcomes. First, a sensitivity analysis suggested that the CAI had an improved sensitivity for detecting changes in gait asymmetry caused by external boundary conditions. The CAI may, therefore, have important clinical applications such as monitoring the progress of neuromuscular diseases (e.g. stroke or cerebral palsy). Second, the mean CAI for shod running (131.2 ± 48.5; mean ± standard deviation) was significantly lower (p = 0.041) than the CAI for barefoot running (155.7 ± 39.5). This finding suggests that in healthy, young adults gait asymmetry is reduced when running in shoes compared to running barefoot, which may be a result of improved neuromuscular control caused by changes in the afferent sensory feedback. PMID:26488484

  13. Periodic gaits for the CMU ambler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahalingam, Swaminathan; Dwivedi, Suren N.

    1989-01-01

    The configuration of the Carnegie Mellon University Ambler, a six legged autonomous walking vehicle for exploring Mars, enables the recovery of a trailing leg past the leading leg to reduce the energy expenditure in terrain interactions. Gaits developed for this unprecedented configuration are described. A stability criterion was developed which ensures stability of the vehicle in the event of failure of any one of the supporting legs. Periodic gaits developed for the Ambler utilize the Ambler's unique abilities, and continuously satisfy the stability criterion.

  14. Gait recognition based on fusion features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Haizhen; Jiang, Jiafu; Chen, Xi

    2009-10-01

    Gait recognition and analysis is a promising biometrics technology finding applications in numerous sectors of our society. This paper proposes a new fusion algorithm where the static and dynamic features are fused to obtain optimal performance. The new fusion algorithm divides decision situations into two categories. The wavelet moment is used to describe the static features of gait sequence images, and the three widths of the body contour are used to describe the dynamic features. In addition, the Principal Component Analysis (PCA) for feature transformation of spatial templates is proposed. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm performs an encouraging recognition rate.

  15. The Effect of Various Dual Task Training Methods with Gait on the Balance and Gait of Patients with Chronic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    An, Ho-Jung; Kim, Jae-Ic; Kim, Yang-Rae; Lee, Kyoung-Bo; Kim, Dai-Joong; Yoo, Kyung-Tae; Choi, Jung-Hyun

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effects of various dual task gait training methods (motor dual task gait training, cognitive dual task gait training, and motor and cognitive dual task gait training) on the balance and gait abilities of chronic stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-three outpatients performed dual task gait training for 30 minutes per day, three times a week, for eight weeks from June to August, 2012. Balance ability was measured pre-and posttest using the stability test index, the weight distribution index, the functional reach test, the timed up and go test, and the four square step test. Gait ability was measured by the 10 m walk test and a 6 min walk test before and after the training. The paired t-test was used to compare measurements before and after training within each group, and ANOVA was used to compare measurements before and after training among the groups. [Results] Comparisons within each group indicated significant differences in all variables between before and after the training in all three groups. Comparison between the groups showed that the greatest improvements were seen in all tests, except for the timed up and go test, following motor and cognitive dual task gait training. [Conclusion] In a real walking environment, the motor and cognitive dual task gait training was more effective at improving the balance and gait abilities of chronic stroke patients than either the motor dual task gait training or the cognitive dual task gait training alone. PMID:25202199

  16. Analysis of Human Gait Radar Signal Using Reassigned WVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun

    Human gait is one of the biological features for human recognition. The key feature of gait can be acquired by analyzing the human echo signal to CW radar. Based on the data from the test CW gait radar, the methods for analyzing multi-component non-stationary signal are discussed in detail. The comparison among the application STFT, WVD, Pseudo-smoothed WVD and its improvements in gait signal are given, and the basic method for gait feature extraction based on time-frequency analysis is proposed. The results in this paper will be a well support for further research.

  17. Allometric control of human gait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, Lori Ann

    results suggest the need to change the interpretation of ``noise'' in such time series data. Suggesting the concept of how the gait data will be analyzed, with regards to treating strides as being random, may need to be rethought.

  18. A monocular marker-free gait measurement system.

    PubMed

    Courtney, Jane; de Paor, A M

    2010-08-01

    This paper presents a new, user-friendly, portable motion capture and gait analysis system for capturing and analyzing human gait, designed as a telemedicine tool to monitor remotely the progress of patients through treatment. The system requires minimal user input and simple single-camera filming (which can be acquired from a basic webcam) making it very accessible to nontechnical, nonclinical personnel. This system can allow gait studies to acquire a much larger data set and allow trained gait analysts to focus their skills on the interpretation phase of gait analysis. The design uses a novel motion capture method derived from spatiotemporal segmentation and model-based tracking. Testing is performed on four monocular, sagittal-view, sample gait videos. Results of modeling, tracking, and analysis stages are presented with standard gait graphs and parameters compared to manually acquired data. PMID:20144920

  19. Gait-Based Human Identification Using Appearance Matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kale, A.; Cuntoor, N.; Yegnanarayana, B.; Rajagopalan, A. N.; Chellappa, R.

    In this chapter, we present an appearance-based approach for recognizing human gait. Given the gait video of an individual, the images are binarized and the width of the outer contour of the silhouette of that individual is obtained for each image frame. Several gait features are derived from this basic width vector. Temporally ordered sequences of the feature vectors are then used to represent the gait of a person. While matching the feature templates for recognition, dynamic time-warping (DTW), which is a nonlinear time-normalization technique, is used to deal with naturally occurring changes in the walking speeds of individuals. The performance of the proposed method is tested on indoor as well as outdoor gait databases, and the efficacy of different gait features and their noise resilience is studied. The experiments also demonstrate the effect of change in the viewing angle and frame rate of data capture on the accuracy of gait recognition.

  20. Multilayer Joint Gait-Pose Manifolds for Human Gait Motion Modeling.

    PubMed

    Ding, Meng; Fan, Guolian

    2015-11-01

    We present new multilayer joint gait-pose manifolds (multilayer JGPMs) for complex human gait motion modeling, where three latent variables are defined jointly in a low-dimensional manifold to represent a variety of body configurations. Specifically, the pose variable (along the pose manifold) denotes a specific stage in a walking cycle; the gait variable (along the gait manifold) represents different walking styles; and the linear scale variable characterizes the maximum stride in a walking cycle. We discuss two kinds of topological priors for coupling the pose and gait manifolds, i.e., cylindrical and toroidal, to examine their effectiveness and suitability for motion modeling. We resort to a topologically-constrained Gaussian process (GP) latent variable model to learn the multilayer JGPMs where two new techniques are introduced to facilitate model learning under limited training data. First is training data diversification that creates a set of simulated motion data with different strides. Second is the topology-aware local learning to speed up model learning by taking advantage of the local topological structure. The experimental results on the Carnegie Mellon University motion capture data demonstrate the advantages of our proposed multilayer models over several existing GP-based motion models in terms of the overall performance of human gait motion modeling. PMID:25532201

  1. Intersegmental coordination of gait after hemorrhagic stroke.

    PubMed

    Chow, John W; Stokic, Dobrivoje S

    2015-01-01

    We compared gait using the planar law of intersegmental coordination between 14 hemorrhagic stroke subjects walking at a self-selected normal speed (56 ± 21 cm/s) and 15 age-matched healthy controls walking at a very slow speed (56 ± 19 cm/s). Sagittal plane elevation angles of the thigh, shank, and foot segments were submitted to principal component analysis. Additional outcome measures included the range of elevation angle and timing of peak elevation angle of the thigh, shank, and foot segments. The range of elevation angles at the shank and foot was significantly smaller in the paretic leg than non-paretic and control legs. Also, the peak elevation angle at the thigh occurred significantly later in the gait cycle in the paretic than control leg. Gait of both stroke and control subjects followed the planar law with the first two principal components explaining approximately 99% of the variance. However, the three-dimensional trajectory of elevation angles (gait loop) in stroke subjects deviated from the typical teardrop shape bilaterally, which was more exaggerated in the paretic leg. Compared to the non-paretic and control legs, the paretic leg showed significantly increased absolute loading of the thigh elevation angle and decreased absolute loadings of the shank and foot elevation angles on the first principal component, whereas the opposite was observed for the second principal component. Despite following the planar law, the gait of chronic stroke subjects is characterized by atypical timing of the thigh motion and disrupted intersegmental coordination of both legs. PMID:25224705

  2. Gait recognition based on Kinect sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Mohammed; Al-Jawad, Naseer; Sabir, Azhin T.

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents gait recognition based on human skeleton and trajectory of joint points captured by Microsoft Kinect sensor. In this paper Two sets of dynamic features are extracted during one gait cycle: the first is Horizontal Distance Features (HDF) that is based on the distances between (Ankles, knees, hands, shoulders), the second set is the Vertical Distance Features (VDF) that provide significant information of human gait extracted from the height to the ground of (hand, shoulder, and ankles) during one gait cycle. Extracting these two sets of feature are difficult and not accurate based on using traditional camera, therefore the Kinect sensor is used in this paper to determine the precise measurements. The two sets of feature are separately tested and then fused to create one feature vector. A database has been created in house to perform our experiments. This database consists of sixteen males and four females. For each individual, 10 videos have been recorded, each record includes in average two gait cycles. The Kinect sensor is used here to extract all the skeleton points, and these points are used to build up the feature vectors mentioned above. K-nearest neighbor is used as the classification method based on Cityblock distance function. Based on the experimental result the proposed method provides 56% as a recognition rate using HDF, while VDF provided 83.5% recognition accuracy. When fusing both of the HDF and VDF as one feature vector, the recognition rate increased to 92%, the experimental result shows that our method provides significant result compared to the existence methods.

  3. Comparison of Gait Aspects According to FES Stimulation Position Applied to Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mun, Byeong-mu; Kim, Tae-ho; Lee, Jin-hwan; Lim, Jin-youg; Seo, Dong-kwon; Lee, Dong-jin

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] This study sought to identify the gait aspects according to the FES stimulation position in stroke patients during gait training. [Subjects and Methods] To perform gait analysis, ten stroke patients were grouped based on 4 types of gait conditions: gait without FES stimulation (non-FES), gait with FES stimulation on the tibialis anterior (Ta), gait with FES stimulation on the tibialis anterior and quadriceps (TaQ), and gait with FES stimulation on the tibialis anterior and gluteus medius (TaGm). [Results] Based on repeated measures analysis of variance of measurements of gait aspects comprised of gait speed, gait cycle, and step length according to the FES stimulation position, the FES stimulation significantly affected gait aspects. [Conclusion] In conclusion, stimulating the tibialis anterior and quadriceps and stimulating the tibialis anterior and gluteus medius are much more effective than stimulating only the tibialis anterior during gait training in stroke patients using FES. PMID:24764634

  4. The comparison of Neoprene palumbo and Genu direxa stable orthosis effects on pain and activity of daily living in patients with patellofemoral syndrome: a randomized blinded clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemi, Mohammad Sadegh; Dehghan, Naser

    2015-01-01

    Background Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) is one of the most common disorders of the knee. Conservative approaches, as well as surgery, can decrease pain and the syndrome’s progress effectively. Objective The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of neoprene palumbo orthosis (NPO) and Genu direxa stable orthosis (GDSO) on pain and the activities of daily living (ADL). Methods Thirty patients (males, ages 18 to 40) participated in this randomized blinded clinical trial. All of them were diagnosed with patella femoral pain syndrome. The participants were divided randomly into two groups of 15, with one group using neoprene palumbo (intervention group) and the other group using Genu direxa stable orthoses (control group). Using the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), pain intensity and activities of daily living (ADL) and joint stiffness were analyzed before treatment and after three weeks of treatment. Data were analyzed using paired samples t-test and independent samples t-test. Results Both orthoses reduced the patients’ pain. Both group showed meaningful improvement in pain reduction and ADL increase after using orthosis in each group. In comparing the variables, no significant differences were found between pain severity and ADL (p = 0.592, p = 0.887). In both groups, the mean of pain severity was different before, during, and after using orthosis (p < 0.05). Conclusion The results of this study indicated that Neoprene palumbo and genudirexa stable orthoses improved the signs of patello femoral pain syndrome, including pain intensity and ADL. PMID:26516437

  5. Dart-Splint: An innovative orthosis that can be integrated into a scapho-lunate and palmar midcarpal instability re-education protocol.

    PubMed

    Braidotti, Federica; Atzei, Andrea; Fairplay, Tracy

    2015-01-01

    The Authors describe a novel hinged orthosis that permits selective midcarpal mobilization along the plane of the dart throwing motion. This orthotic device can be used to assist rehabilitation protocols aimed to limit radiocarpal joint mobility and scapho-lunate ligament overload and to accelerate wrist functional recovery after ligamentous injuries around the proximal carpal row. - VictoriaW. Priganc, PhD, OTR, CHT, CLT, Practice Forum Editor. PMID:26048064

  6. Restoration of Stance Phase Knee Flexion during Walking after Spinal Cord Injury using a Variable Impedance Orthosis

    PubMed Central

    Bulea, Thomas C.; Kobetic, Rudi; Triolo, Ronald. J.

    2013-01-01

    A hybrid neuroprosthesis (HNP) combines lower extremity bracing with functional neuromuscular stimulation (FNS) to restore walking function and enhance the efficiency of ambulation. This report details the development of a novel HNP containing a variable impedance knee mechanism (VIKM) capable of supporting the knee against collapse while allowing controlled stance phase knee flexion. The design of a closed loop, finite state controller for coordination of VIKM activity with FNS-driven gait is presented. The controller is verified in testing during able bodied gait. The improved functionality provided by this system has the potential to delay the onset of fatigue and to expand FNS driven gait to allow walking over uneven terrains and down stairs. PMID:22254383

  7. Kinematic Analysis Quantifies Gait Abnormalities Associated with Lameness in Broiler Chickens and Identifies Evolutionary Gait Differences

    PubMed Central

    Caplen, Gina; Hothersall, Becky; Murrell, Joanna C.; Nicol, Christine J.; Waterman-Pearson, Avril E.; Weeks, Claire A.; Colborne, G. Robert

    2012-01-01

    This is the first time that gait characteristics of broiler (meat) chickens have been compared with their progenitor, jungle fowl, and the first kinematic study to report a link between broiler gait parameters and defined lameness scores. A commercial motion-capturing system recorded three-dimensional temporospatial information during walking. The hypothesis was that the gait characteristics of non-lame broilers (n = 10) would be intermediate to those of lame broilers (n = 12) and jungle fowl (n = 10, tested at two ages: immature and adult). Data analysed using multi-level models, to define an extensive range of baseline gait parameters, revealed inter-group similarities and differences. Natural selection is likely to have made jungle fowl walking gait highly efficient. Modern broiler chickens possess an unbalanced body conformation due to intense genetic selection for additional breast muscle (pectoral hypertrophy) and whole body mass. Together with rapid growth, this promotes compensatory gait adaptations to minimise energy expenditure and triggers high lameness prevalence within commercial flocks; lameness creating further disruption to the gait cycle and being an important welfare issue. Clear differences were observed between the two lines (short stance phase, little double-support, low leg lift, and little back displacement in adult jungle fowl; much double-support, high leg lift, and substantial vertical back movement in sound broilers) presumably related to mass and body conformation. Similarities included stride length and duration. Additional modifications were also identified in lame broilers (short stride length and duration, substantial lateral back movement, reduced velocity) presumably linked to musculo-skeletal abnormalities. Reduced walking velocity suggests an attempt to minimise skeletal stress and/or discomfort, while a shorter stride length and time, together with longer stance and double-support phases, are associated with

  8. Tract-specific white matter microstructure and gait in humans.

    PubMed

    Verlinden, Vincentius J A; de Groot, Marius; Cremers, Lotte G M; van der Geest, Jos N; Hofman, Albert; Niessen, Wiro J; van der Lugt, Aad; Vernooij, Meike W; Ikram, M Arfan

    2016-07-01

    Gait is a complex sequence of movements, requiring cooperation of many brain areas, such as the motor cortex, somatosensory cortex, and cerebellum. However, it is unclear which connecting white matter tracts are essential for communication across brain areas to facilitate proper gait. Using diffusion tensor imaging, we investigated associations of microstructural organization in 14 brain white matter tracts with gait, among 2330 dementia- and stroke-free community-dwelling individuals. Gait was assessed by electronic walkway and summarized into Global Gait, and 7 gait domains. Higher white matter microstructure associated with higher Global Gait, Phases, Variability, Pace, and Turning. Microstructure in thalamic radiations, followed by association tracts and the forceps major, associated most strongly with gait. Hence, in community-dwelling individuals, higher white matter microstructure associated with better gait, including larger strides, more single support, less stride-to-stride variability, and less turning steps. Our findings suggest that intact thalamocortical communication, cortex-to-cortex communication, and interhemispheric visuospatial integration are most essential in human gait. PMID:27255826

  9. The Golden Ratio of Gait Harmony: Repetitive Proportions of Repetitive Gait Phases

    PubMed Central

    Iosa, Marco; Marchetti, Fabio; Morone, Giovanni; Caltagirone, Carlo; Paolucci, Stefano; Peppe, Antonella

    2013-01-01

    In nature, many physical and biological systems have structures showing harmonic properties. Some of them were found related to the irrational number ϕ known as the golden ratio that has important symmetric and harmonic properties. In this study, the spatiotemporal gait parameters of 25 healthy subjects were analyzed using a stereophotogrammetric system with 25 retroreflective markers located on their skin. The proportions of gait phases were compared with ϕ, the value of which is about 1.6180. The ratio between the entire gait cycle and stance phase resulted in 1.620 ± 0.058, that between stance and the swing phase was 1.629 ± 0.173, and that between swing and the double support phase was 1.684 ± 0.357. All these ratios did not differ significantly from each other (F = 0.870, P = 0.422, repeated measure analysis of variance) or from ϕ (P = 0.670, 0.820, 0.422, resp., t-tests). The repetitive gait phases of physiological walking were found in turn in repetitive proportions with each other, revealing an intrinsic harmonic structure. Harmony could be the key for facilitating the control of repetitive walking. Harmony is a powerful unifying factor between seemingly disparate fields of nature, including human gait. PMID:23862161

  10. Changes in Gait Variability From First Steps to Adulthood: Normative Data for the Gait Variability Index.

    PubMed

    Gouelle, Arnaud; Leroux, Julien; Bredin, Jonathan; Mégrot, Fabrice

    2016-01-01

    The process of learning to walk is ongoing throughout childhood. The Gait Variability Index (GVI; A. Gouelle et al., 2013) has been proposed to quantify the variability of spatiotemporal parameters (STP) during gait. The authors' aim was to evaluate the GVI and STP of healthy children and teenagers to (a) determine changes in the GVI with age and to derive normal values in children and (b) to evaluate the influence of STP on the GVI. A total of 140 typically developing children from 1 to 17 years old were categorized into 7 groups of 20 based on age. Spatiotemporal gait parameters were recorded using an electronic walkway. GVI increased and STP changed with age. In the children-teenagers group, the GVI was positively related to step length, speed, and negatively to cadence. Following normalization by lower limb length, correlations were no longer significant. In contrast, raw base of support was not correlated with the GVI but normalized base of support was. A multiple linear regression showed that only age had a direct impact on the GVI, indicating that gait continues to change after 6-7 years. These changes were only demonstrated by the GVI, highlighting its usefulness for the evaluation of gait in young populations. PMID:26392028

  11. A trial of making reference gait data for simple gait evaluation system with wireless inertial sensors.

    PubMed

    Karasawa, Yuta; Teruyama, Yuta; Watanabe, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Recently, the use of wearable inertial sensors have been widely studied in the field of human movement analysis. Our research group developed a wearable motion measurement system using the wireless inertial sensors for rehabilitation training and daily exercise. However, there are few reference data to evaluate motor function. In this paper, reference data of joint and inclination angles of lower limb and that of gait event timing for gait evaluation were made by measurement with 4 healthy subjects in their twenties. Average values of inclination and joint angles and gait event timings were similar to those seen in literature. These suggest that the averaged data obtained in this paper can be used as reference data. Then, gait data of a healthy subject in his thirties were compared with the reference data. Most of angles and all the gait event timings were considered to be standard of 20's. However, some angles of the healthy subject in his thirties were considered not to be the standard partly. These differences in evaluation were considered to depend on a level of similarity of movement to the reference data. It was expected to evaluate the level of similarity of movement from various parameters. PMID:24110465

  12. Neglected Alkaptonuric Patient Presenting with Steppage Gait

    PubMed Central

    Mirzashahi, Babak; Tafakhori, Abbas; Najafi, Arvin; Farzan, Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Even though intervertebral disc degeneration can be found in the natural course of alkaptonuria, detection of the disease by black disc color change in a patient without any other presentation of alkaptonuria is an exceptionally rare condition. We have reported a very rare case of alkaptonuria presented with low back pain and steppage gait in a 51-year-old male with a complaint of chronic low-back pain and steppage gait who was operated on for prolapsed lumbar disc herniation. Intraoperatively his lumbar disk was discovered to be black. The alkaptonuria diagnosis was considered after histopathological examination of the black disc material and elevated urinary concentration of homogentisic acid confirmed the diagnosis. To our knowledge, this presentation has not been reported previously in literature. PMID:27200402

  13. Locomotion gaits of a rotating cylinder pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Rees, Wim M.; Novati, Guido; Koumoutsakos, Petros; Mahadevan, L.

    2015-11-01

    Using 2D numerical simulations of the Navier-Stokes equations, we demonstrate that a simple pair of rotating cylinders can display a range of locomotion patterns of biological and engineering interest. Steadily counter-rotating the cylinders causes the pair to move akin to a vortex dipole for low rotation rates, but as the rotational velocity is increased the direction of motion reverses. Unsteady rotations lead to different locomotion gaits that resemble jellyfish (for in-phase rotations) and undulating swimmers (for out-of-phase rotations). The small number of parameters for this simple system allows us to systematically map the phase space of these gaits, and allows us to understand the underlying physical mechanisms using a minimal model with implications for biological locomotion and engineered analogs.

  14. Treatment of Gait Ignition Failure with Ropinirole

    PubMed Central

    Cohen-Oram, Alexis N.; Stewart, Jonathan T.; Bero, Kim; Hoffmann, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    Gait ignition failure (GIF) is a syndrome characterized by hesitation or inability to initiate gait from a static position. It may occur in a variety of conditions, including normal pressure hydrocephalus, subcortical vascular disease, parkinsonian syndromes and a variety of focal lesions. Previous information on the treatment of GIF has been primarily anecdotal, but there have been a few reports of response to dopamine agonists. We report a 63-year-old man with anoxic encephalopathy who developed GIF nine years after the initial anoxic insult. The patient’s GIF responded robustly, albeit transiently, to ropinirole. MRI was unrevealing, but a positron emission tomography scan showed hypometabolism in the deep frontal ACA/MCA watershed area; this may have disconnected the basal ganglia from the motor cortex and/or interrupted dopaminergic mesocortical transmission. Our understanding of the pathophysiology and the treatment of GIF remains limited, but there may be at least a limited therapeutic role for dopamine agonists. PMID:25360234

  15. Factored interval particle filtering for gait analysis.

    PubMed

    Saboune, Jamal; Rose, Cédric; Charpillet, François

    2007-01-01

    Commercial gait analysis systems rely on wearable sensors. The goal of this study is to develop a low cost marker less human motion capture tool. Our method is based on the estimation of 3d movements using video streams and the projection of a 3d human body model. Dynamic parameters only depend on human body movement constraints. No trained gait model is used which makes this approach generic. The 3d model is characterized by the angular positions of its articulations. The kinematic chain structure allows to factor the state vector representing the configuration of the model. We use a dynamic bayesian network and a modified particle filtering algorithm to estimate the most likely state configuration given an observation sequence. The modified algorithm takes advantage of the factorization of the state vector for efficiently weighting and resampling the particles. PMID:18002684

  16. Treatment of gait ignition failure with ropinirole.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Oram, Alexis N; Stewart, Jonathan T; Bero, Kim; Hoffmann, Michael W

    2014-10-01

    Gait ignition failure (GIF) is a syndrome characterized by hesitation or inability to initiate gait from a static position. It may occur in a variety of conditions, including normal pressure hydrocephalus, subcortical vascular disease, parkinsonian syndromes and a variety of focal lesions. Previous information on the treatment of GIF has been primarily anecdotal, but there have been a few reports of response to dopamine agonists. We report a 63-year-old man with anoxic encephalopathy who developed GIF nine years after the initial anoxic insult. The patient's GIF responded robustly, albeit transiently, to ropinirole. MRI was unrevealing, but a positron emission tomography scan showed hypometabolism in the deep frontal ACA/MCA watershed area; this may have disconnected the basal ganglia from the motor cortex and/or interrupted dopaminergic mesocortical transmission. Our understanding of the pathophysiology and the treatment of GIF remains limited, but there may be at least a limited therapeutic role for dopamine agonists. PMID:25360234

  17. Autonomous Evolution of Dynamic Gaits with Two Quadruped Robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornby, Gregory S.; Takamura, Seichi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Fujita, Masahiro

    2004-01-01

    A challenging task that must be accomplished for every legged robot is creating the walking and running behaviors needed for it to move. In this paper we describe our system for autonomously evolving dynamic gaits on two of Sony's quadruped robots. Our evolutionary algorithm runs on board the robot and uses the robot's sensors to compute the quality of a gait without assistance from the experimenter. First we show the evolution of a pace and trot gait on the OPEN-R prototype robot. With the fastest gait, the robot moves at over 10/min/min., which is more than forty body-lengths/min. While these first gaits are somewhat sensitive to the robot and environment in which they are evolved, we then show the evolution of robust dynamic gaits, one of which is used on the ERS-110, the first consumer version of AIBO.

  18. Experimentally Derived Kinetic Model for Sensor-Based Gait Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Ketema, Yohannes; Gebre-Egziabher, Demoz

    2016-01-01

    A method for estimating gait parameters (shank, thigh, and stance leg angles) from a single, in situ, scalar acceleration measurement is presented. A method for minimizing the impact of errors due to unpredictable variations in muscle actuation and acceleration measurement biases is developed. This is done by determining the most probable gait progression by minimization of a cost function that reflects the size of errors in the gait parameters. In addition, a model for gait patterns that takes into account their variations due to walking speed is introduced and used. The approach is tested on data collected from subjects in a gait study. The approach can estimate limb angles with errors less than 6 deg (one standard deviation) and, thus, is suitable for many envisioned gait monitoring applications in nonlaboratory settings. PMID:26593150

  19. Effects of conventional overground gait training and a gait trainer with partial body weight support on spatiotemporal gait parameters of patients after stroke

    PubMed Central

    Park, Byoung-Sun; Kim, Mee-Young; Lee, Lim-Kyu; Yang, Seung-Min; Lee, Won-Deok; Noh, Ji-Woong; Shin, Yong-Sub; Kim, Ju-Hyun; Lee, Jeong-Uk; Kwak, Taek-Yong; Lee, Tae-Hyun; Kim, Ju-Young; Kim, Junghwan

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to confirm the effects of both conventional overground gait training (CGT) and a gait trainer with partial body weight support (GTBWS) on spatiotemporal gait parameters of patients with hemiparesis following chronic stroke. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty stroke patients were alternately assigned to one of two treatment groups, and both groups underwent CGT and GTBWS. [Results] The functional ambulation classification on the affected side improved significantly in the CGT and GTBWS groups. Walking speed also improved significantly in both groups. [Conclusion] These results suggest that the GTBWS in company with CGT may be, in part, an effective method of gait training for restoring gait ability in patients after a stroke. PMID:26157272

  20. Gait patterns for crime fighting: statistical evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulovská, Kateřina; Bělašková, Silvie; Adámek, Milan

    2013-10-01

    The criminality is omnipresent during the human history. Modern technology brings novel opportunities for identification of a perpetrator. One of these opportunities is an analysis of video recordings, which may be taken during the crime itself or before/after the crime. The video analysis can be classed as identification analyses, respectively identification of a person via externals. The bipedal locomotion focuses on human movement on the basis of their anatomical-physiological features. Nowadays, the human gait is tested by many laboratories to learn whether the identification via bipedal locomotion is possible or not. The aim of our study is to use 2D components out of 3D data from the VICON Mocap system for deep statistical analyses. This paper introduces recent results of a fundamental study focused on various gait patterns during different conditions. The study contains data from 12 participants. Curves obtained from these measurements were sorted, averaged and statistically tested to estimate the stability and distinctiveness of this biometrics. Results show satisfactory distinctness of some chosen points, while some do not embody significant difference. However, results presented in this paper are of initial phase of further deeper and more exacting analyses of gait patterns under different conditions.

  1. Gait kinematic analysis evaluates hindlimb revascularization.

    PubMed

    Ríos, Amelia; Delgado, Alexandra; Escalante, Bruno; Santana, Jesús

    2011-01-01

    Peripheral arterial occlusive disease is described as vascular disorders associated with ischemia and may be the result of an obstructive vascular process or a lost revascularization response. We have shown that gait locomotion analysis by video filming represents an integrative model for the evaluation of mechanisms involved in the process of ischemia-induced revascularization. However, analysis by this method can be subjective and perception errors may be occurring. We present the optimization of a quantifiable, noninvasive, reproducible method that analyzes ankle kinematics in rats using a two-dimensional digital video system. Gait dynamics were filmed in hindlimb ischemic rats with a high speed digital video camera. Images were collected and analyzed at 125 frames per second. An algorithm using interactive data language (IDL) was devised to assess different parameters. In ischemic rats, stride time and knee joint angle remained altered 10 days post-surgery compared with sham animals. Gait kinematics were outlined in a highly reliable way by this computational analysis and corroborated the notion of hindlimb movement recovery associated with the revascularization process. PMID:22423574

  2. Gait Signal Analysis with Similarity Measure

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Seungsoo

    2014-01-01

    Human gait decision was carried out with the help of similarity measure design. Gait signal was selected through hardware implementation including all in one sensor, control unit, and notebook with connector. Each gait signal was considered as high dimensional data. Therefore, high dimensional data analysis was considered via heuristic technique such as the similarity measure. Each human pattern such as walking, sitting, standing, and stepping up was obtained through experiment. By the results of the analysis, we also identified the overlapped and nonoverlapped data relation, and similarity measure analysis was also illustrated, and comparison with conventional similarity measure was also carried out. Hence, nonoverlapped data similarity analysis provided the clue to solve the similarity of high dimensional data. Considered high dimensional data analysis was designed with consideration of neighborhood information. Proposed similarity measure was applied to identify the behavior patterns of different persons, and different behaviours of the same person. Obtained analysis can be extended to organize health monitoring system for specially elderly persons. PMID:25110724

  3. Gait correlation analysis based human identification.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinyan

    2014-01-01

    Human gait identification aims to identify people by a sequence of walking images. Comparing with fingerprint or iris based identification, the most important advantage of gait identification is that it can be done at a distance. In this paper, silhouette correlation analysis based human identification approach is proposed. By background subtracting algorithm, the moving silhouette figure can be extracted from the walking images sequence. Every pixel in the silhouette has three dimensions: horizontal axis (x), vertical axis (y), and temporal axis (t). By moving every pixel in the silhouette image along these three dimensions, we can get a new silhouette. The correlation result between the original silhouette and the new one can be used as the raw feature of human gait. Discrete Fourier transform is used to extract features from this correlation result. Then, these features are normalized to minimize the affection of noise. Primary component analysis method is used to reduce the features' dimensions. Experiment based on CASIA database shows that this method has an encouraging recognition performance. PMID:24592144

  4. Gait Recognition and Walking Exercise Intensity Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Bor-Shing; Liu, Yu-Ting; Yu, Chu; Jan, Gene Eu; Hsiao, Bo-Tang

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular patients consult doctors for advice regarding regular exercise, whereas obese patients must self-manage their weight. Because a system for permanently monitoring and tracking patients’ exercise intensities and workouts is necessary, a system for recognizing gait and estimating walking exercise intensity was proposed. For gait recognition analysis, αβ filters were used to improve the recognition of athletic attitude. Furthermore, empirical mode decomposition (EMD) was used to filter the noise of patients’ attitude to acquire the Fourier transform energy spectrum. Linear discriminant analysis was then applied to this energy spectrum for training and recognition. When the gait or motion was recognized, the walking exercise intensity was estimated. In addition, this study addressed the correlation between inertia and exercise intensity by using the residual function of the EMD and quadratic approximation to filter the effect of the baseline drift integral of the acceleration sensor. The increase in the determination coefficient of the regression equation from 0.55 to 0.81 proved that the accuracy of the method for estimating walking exercise intensity proposed by Kurihara was improved in this study. PMID:24714057

  5. Zernike moments features for shape-based gait recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Huanfeng; Qin, Lan; Liu, Jun; Chao, Jiang

    2011-12-01

    The paper proposes a new spatio-temporal gait representation, called cycles gait Zernike moments (CGZM), to characterize human walking properties for individual recognition. Firstly, Zernike moments as shape descriptors are used to characterize gait silhouette shape. Secondly, we generate CGZM from Zernike moments of silhouette sequences. Finally, the phase and magnitude coefficientsof CGZM are utilized to perform classification by the modified Hausdorff distance (MHD) classifier. Experimental results show that the proposed approach have an encouraging recognition performance.

  6. Enhanced data consistency of a portable gait measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hsien-I.; Chiang, Y. P.

    2013-11-01

    A gait measurement system is a useful tool for rehabilitation applications. Such a system is used to conduct gait experiments in large workplaces such as laboratories where gait measurement equipment can be permanently installed. However, a gait measurement system should be portable if it is to be used in clinics or community centers for aged people. In a portable gait measurement system, the workspace is limited and landmarks on a subject may not be visible to the cameras during experiments. Thus, we propose a virtual-marker function to obtain positions of unseen landmarks for maintaining data consistency. This work develops a portable clinical gait measurement system consisting of lightweight motion capture devices, force plates, and a walkway assembled from plywood boards. We evaluated the portable clinic gait system with 11 normal subjects in three consecutive days in a limited experimental space. Results of gait analysis based on the verification of within-day and between-day coefficients of multiple correlations show that the proposed portable gait system is reliable.

  7. Effect of external cueing on gait in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Delval, Arnaud; Krystkowiak, Pierre; Delliaux, Marie; Blatt, Jean-Louis; Derambure, Philippe; Destée, Alain; Defebvre, Luc

    2008-07-30

    In Huntington's disease (HD) patients, gait is characterized by a timing disorder with marked intraindividual variability in temporal gait parameters (caused by the presence of both hyperkinetic and hypokinetic features). We sought to determine the influence of use of a metronome on gait parameters in patients simultaneously performing motor or cognitive tasks that required attentional resources. The objective is to evaluate the influence of rhythmic cues on gait interference during self-regulated walking and a dual task paradigm in HD. Fifteen HD patients and 15 paired controls were asked to walk and simultaneously perform another motor task (carrying a tray with four full glasses) or a cognitive task (counting backwards). We evaluated the effect of a metronome (set at 100% and 120% of the subject's self-determined cadence) in three different task conditions (gait alone, gait + motor task, gait + cognitive task). The use of auditory cues during free gait and dual tasks did not improve kinematic parameters in HD patients, in contrast to the situation for control subjects (improvement in gait speed and cadence but not stride length when the metronome was set at 120% in all conditions). HD patients have difficulty in synchronizing their footsteps with a metronome, mainly due to attentional deficits. PMID:18512747

  8. Approach to the elderly patient with gait disturbance

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Summary The prevalence of gait disturbances and falls increases dramatically with age, but these problems are not universal in the elderly. They should trigger a systematic search for underlying disease states, many of which can be treated medically or surgically, or significantly ameliorated through provision of physical therapy focused on gait training and aids to ambulation, removal of safety hazards in the environment, and the elimination of polypharmacy. While cardiovascular, orthopedic, and rheumatologic diseases account for the majority of gait disturbances in the elderly, the aim here is to outline an approach to the diagnosis and treatment of a broad array of neurologic conditions causing gait disturbance in the elderly. PMID:23634361

  9. Reliability of gait in multiple sclerosis over 6 months.

    PubMed

    Sosnoff, Jacob J; Klaren, Rachel E; Pilutti, Lara A; Dlugonski, Deirdre; Motl, Robert W

    2015-03-01

    Gait impairment is ubiquitous in multiple sclerosis (MS) and is often characterized by alterations in spatiotemporal parameters of gait. There is limited information concerning reliability of spatiotemporal gait parameters over clinical timescales (e.g. 6 months). The current report provides novel evidence that gait parameters of 74 ambulatory persons with MS with mild-to-moderate disability are reliable over 6-months (ICC's for overall sample range from 0.56 to 0.91) in the absence of any intervention above and beyond standard care. Such data can inform clinical decision-making and power analyses for designing RCTs (i.e., sample size estimates) involving persons with MS. PMID:25772669

  10. Dynamic Principles of Gait and Their Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Donelan, J. Maxwell

    2010-01-01

    A healthy gait pattern depends on an array of biomechanical features, orchestrated by the central nervous system for economy and stability. Injuries and other pathologies can alter these features and result in substantial gait deficits, often with detrimental consequences for energy expenditure and balance. An understanding of the role of biomechanics in the generation of healthy gait, therefore, can provide insight into these deficits. This article examines the basic principles of gait from the standpoint of dynamic walking, an approach that combines an inverted pendulum model of the stance leg with a pendulum model of the swing leg and its impact with the ground. The heel-strike at the end of each step has dynamic effects that can contribute to a periodic gait and its passive stability. Biomechanics, therefore, can account for much of the gait pattern, with additional motor inputs that are important for improving economy and stability. The dynamic walking approach can predict the consequences of disruptions to normal biomechanics, and the associated observations can help explain some aspects of impaired gait. This article reviews the basic principles of dynamic walking and the associated experimental evidence for healthy gait and then considers how the principles may be applied to clinical gait pathologies. PMID:20023002

  11. Managing variability in the summary and comparison of gait data

    PubMed Central

    Chau, Tom; Young, Scott; Redekop, Sue

    2005-01-01

    Variability in quantitative gait data arises from many potential sources, including natural temporal dynamics of neuromotor control, pathologies of the neurological or musculoskeletal systems, the effects of aging, as well as variations in the external environment, assistive devices, instrumentation or data collection methodologies. In light of this variability, unidimensional, cycle-based gait variables such as stride period should be viewed as random variables and prototypical single-cycle kinematic or kinetic curves ought to be considered as random functions of time. Within this framework, we exemplify some practical solutions to a number of commonly encountered analytical challenges in dealing with gait variability. On the topic of univariate gait variables, robust estimation is proposed as a means of coping with contaminated gait data, and the summary of non-normally distributed gait data is demonstrated by way of empirical examples. On the summary of gait curves, we discuss methods to manage undesirable phase variation and non-robust spread estimates. To overcome the limitations of conventional comparisons among curve landmarks or parameters, we propose as a viable alternative, the combination of curve registration, robust estimation, and formal statistical testing of curves as coherent units. On the basis of these discussions, we provide heuristic guidelines for the summary of gait variables and the comparison of gait curves. PMID:16053523

  12. Enhanced data consistency of a portable gait measurement system.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hsien-I; Chiang, Y P

    2013-11-01

    A gait measurement system is a useful tool for rehabilitation applications. Such a system is used to conduct gait experiments in large workplaces such as laboratories where gait measurement equipment can be permanently installed. However, a gait measurement system should be portable if it is to be used in clinics or community centers for aged people. In a portable gait measurement system, the workspace is limited and landmarks on a subject may not be visible to the cameras during experiments. Thus, we propose a virtual-marker function to obtain positions of unseen landmarks for maintaining data consistency. This work develops a portable clinical gait measurement system consisting of lightweight motion capture devices, force plates, and a walkway assembled from plywood boards. We evaluated the portable clinic gait system with 11 normal subjects in three consecutive days in a limited experimental space. Results of gait analysis based on the verification of within-day and between-day coefficients of multiple correlations show that the proposed portable gait system is reliable. PMID:24289412

  13. Apolipoprotein E Genotype Linked to Spatial Gait Characteristics: Predictors of Cognitive Dual Task Gait Change

    PubMed Central

    MacAulay, Rebecca K.; Allaire, Ted; Brouillette, Robert; Foil, Heather; Bruce-Keller, Annadora J.; Keller, Jeffrey N.

    2016-01-01

    Background Developing measures to detect preclinical Alzheimer’s Disease is vital, as prodromal stage interventions may prove more efficacious in altering the disease’s trajectory. Gait changes may serve as a useful clinical heuristic that precedes cognitive decline. This study provides the first systematic investigation of gait characteristics relationship with relevant demographic, physical, genetic (Apolipoprotein E genotype), and health risk factors in non-demented older adults during a cognitive-load dual task walking condition. Methods The GAITRite system provided objective measurement of gait characteristics in APOE-e4 “carriers” (n = 75) and “non-carriers” (n = 224). Analyses examined stride length and step time gait characteristics during simple and dual-task (spelling five-letter words backwards) conditions in relation to demographic, physical, genetic, and health risk factors. Results Slower step time and shorter stride length associated with older age, greater health risk, and worse physical performance (ps < .05). Men and women differed in height, gait characteristics, health risk factors and global cognition (ps < .05). APOE-e4 associated with a higher likelihood of hypercholesterolemia and overall illness index scores (ps < .05). No genotype-sex interactions on gait were found. APOE-e4 was linked to shorter stride length and greater dual-task related disturbances in stride length. Conclusions Stride length has been linked to heightened fall risk, attention decrements and structural brain changes in older adults. Our results indicate that stride length is a useful behavioral marker of cognitive change that is associated with genetic risk for AD. Sex disparities in motor decline may be a function of health risk factors. PMID:27486898

  14. SSM-HPC: Front View Gait Recognition Using Spherical Space Model with Human Point Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Jegoon; Kamata, Sei-Ichiro; Ahrary, Alireza

    In this paper, we propose a novel gait recognition framework - Spherical Space Model with Human Point Clouds (SSM-HPC) to recognize front view of human gait. A new gait representation - Marching in Place (MIP) gait is also introduced which preserves the spatiotemporal characteristics of individual gait manner. In comparison with the previous studies on gait recognition which usually use human silhouette images from image sequences, this research applies three dimensional (3D) point clouds data of human body obtained from stereo camera. The proposed framework exhibits gait recognition rates superior to those of other gait recognition methods.

  15. Feature extraction via KPCA for classification of gait patterns.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianning; Wang, Jue; Liu, Li

    2007-06-01

    Automated recognition of gait pattern change is important in medical diagnostics as well as in the early identification of at-risk gait in the elderly. We evaluated the use of Kernel-based Principal Component Analysis (KPCA) to extract more gait features (i.e., to obtain more significant amounts of information about human movement) and thus to improve the classification of gait patterns. 3D gait data of 24 young and 24 elderly participants were acquired using an OPTOTRAK 3020 motion analysis system during normal walking, and a total of 36 gait spatio-temporal and kinematic variables were extracted from the recorded data. KPCA was used first for nonlinear feature extraction to then evaluate its effect on a subsequent classification in combination with learning algorithms such as support vector machines (SVMs). Cross-validation test results indicated that the proposed technique could allow spreading the information about the gait's kinematic structure into more nonlinear principal components, thus providing additional discriminatory information for the improvement of gait classification performance. The feature extraction ability of KPCA was affected slightly with different kernel functions as polynomial and radial basis function. The combination of KPCA and SVM could identify young-elderly gait patterns with 91% accuracy, resulting in a markedly improved performance compared to the combination of PCA and SVM. These results suggest that nonlinear feature extraction by KPCA improves the classification of young-elderly gait patterns, and holds considerable potential for future applications in direct dimensionality reduction and interpretation of multiple gait signals. PMID:17509708

  16. Design of an automated device to measure sagittal plane stiffness of an articulated ankle-foot orthosis.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Toshiki; Leung, Aaron K L; Akazawa, Yasushi; Naito, Hisashi; Tanaka, Masao; Hutchins, Stephen W

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to design a new automated stiffness measurement device which could perform a simultaneous measurement of both dorsi- and plantarflexion angles and the corresponding resistive torque around the rotational centre of an articulated ankle-foot orthosis (AAFO). This was achieved by controlling angular velocities and range of motion in the sagittal plane. The device consisted of a hydraulic servo fatigue testing machine, a torque meter, a potentiometer, a rotary plate and an upright supporter to enable an AAFO to be attached to the device via a surrogate shank. The accuracy of the device in reproducing the range of motion and angular velocity was within 4% and 1% respectively in the range of motion of 30° (15° plantarflexion to 15° dorsiflexion) at the angular velocity of 10°/s, while that in the measurement of AAFO torque was within 8% at the 0° position. The device should prove useful to assist an orthotist or a manufacturer to quantify the stiffness of an AAFO and inform its clinical use. PMID:20681928

  17. Quantitative Gait Measurement With Pulse-Doppler Radar for Passive In-Home Gait Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Skubic, Marjorie; Rantz, Marilyn; Cuddihy, Paul E.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a pulse-Doppler radar system for in-home gait assessment of older adults. A methodology has been developed to extract gait parameters including walking speed and step time using Doppler radar. The gait parameters have been validated with a Vicon motion capture system in the lab with 13 participants and 158 test runs. The study revealed that for an optimal step recognition and walking speed estimation, a dual radar set up with one radar placed at foot level and the other at torso level is necessary. An excellent absolute agreement with intraclass correlation coefficients of 0.97 was found for step time estimation with the foot level radar. For walking speed, although both radars show excellent consistency they all have a system offset compared to the ground truth due to walking direction with respect to the radar beam. The torso level radar has a better performance (9% offset on average) in the speed estimation compared to the foot level radar (13%–18% offset). Quantitative analysis has been performed to compute the angles causing the systematic error. These lab results demonstrate the capability of the system to be used as a daily gait assessment tool in home environments, useful for fall risk assessment and other health care applications. The system is currently being tested in an unstructured home environment. PMID:24771566

  18. Quantitative gait measurement with pulse-Doppler radar for passive in-home gait assessment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang; Skubic, Marjorie; Rantz, Marilyn; Cuddihy, Paul E

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we propose a pulse-Doppler radar system for in-home gait assessment of older adults. A methodology has been developed to extract gait parameters including walking speed and step time using Doppler radar. The gait parameters have been validated with a Vicon motion capture system in the lab with 13 participants and 158 test runs. The study revealed that for an optimal step recognition and walking speed estimation, a dual radar set up with one radar placed at foot level and the other at torso level is necessary. An excellent absolute agreement with intraclass correlation coefficients of 0.97 was found for step time estimation with the foot level radar. For walking speed, although both radars show excellent consistency they all have a system offset compared to the ground truth due to walking direction with respect to the radar beam. The torso level radar has a better performance (9% offset on average) in the speed estimation compared to the foot level radar (13%-18% offset). Quantitative analysis has been performed to compute the angles causing the systematic error. These lab results demonstrate the capability of the system to be used as a daily gait assessment tool in home environments, useful for fall risk assessment and other health care applications. The system is currently being tested in an unstructured home environment. PMID:24771566

  19. Instrumenting gait with an accelerometer: A system and algorithm examination

    PubMed Central

    Godfrey, A.; Del Din, S.; Barry, G.; Mathers, J.C.; Rochester, L.

    2015-01-01

    Gait is an important clinical assessment tool since changes in gait may reflect changes in general health. Measurement of gait is a complex process which has been restricted to the laboratory until relatively recently. The application of an inexpensive body worn sensor with appropriate gait algorithms (BWM) is an attractive alternative and offers the potential to assess gait in any setting. In this study we investigated the use of a low-cost BWM, compared to laboratory reference using a robust testing protocol in both younger and older adults. We observed that the BWM is a valid tool for estimating total step count and mean spatio-temporal gait characteristics however agreement for variability and asymmetry results was poor. We conducted a detailed investigation to explain the poor agreement between systems and determined it was due to inherent differences between the systems rather than inability of the sensor to measure the gait characteristics. The results highlight caution in the choice of reference system for validation studies. The BWM used in this study has the potential to gather longitudinal (real-world) spatio-temporal gait data that could be readily used in large lifestyle-based intervention studies, but further refinement of the algorithm(s) is required. PMID:25749552

  20. Factors Related to Gait Function in Post-stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Ki Hun; Lee, Joo Young; Lee, Kun Jae; Kang, Eun Kyoung

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] Gait function after a stroke is an important factor for determining a patient’s ability to independently perform activities of daily living (ADL). The objective of this study was to elucidate the factors associated with gait function in post-stroke patients. [Subjects] Thirty-nine stroke patients (16 females and 23 males; average age 67.82 ± 10.96 years; post-onset duration: 200.18 ± 27.14 days) participated in this study. [Methods] Their gait function, motor function (Manual Muscle Test [MMT] and Brünnstrom stage), level of cognition (Mini-Mental State Examination score [MMSE], and the Loewenstein Occupational Therapy Cognitive Assessment for the Geriatric Population [LOTCA-G]), and ADL (Korean modified Barthel index [K-MBI]) were assessed. [Results] The degree of gait function showed significant positive correlations with the following variables: MMT of the elbow, knee, ankle and wrist; Brünnstrom stage; MMSE; LOTCA-G subscores except motor praxis; K-MBI. Stepwise linear regression analysis revealed the Brünnstrom stage was the only explanatory variable closely associated with gait level. [Conclusion] Gait function of post-stroke patients was related to motor function, cognition, and ADL. In particular, there is a significant association between gait level and the Brünnstrom stages, reflecting the importance of monitoring the motor recovery of gait function in post-stroke patients. PMID:25540503

  1. Automated detection of gait initiation and termination using wearable sensors.

    PubMed

    Novak, Domen; Reberšek, Peter; De Rossi, Stefano Marco Maria; Donati, Marco; Podobnik, Janez; Beravs, Tadej; Lenzi, Tommaso; Vitiello, Nicola; Carrozza, Maria Chiara; Munih, Marko

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents algorithms for detection of gait initiation and termination using wearable inertial measurement units and pressure-sensitive insoles. Body joint angles, joint angular velocities, ground reaction force and center of plantar pressure of each foot are obtained from these sensors and input into supervised machine learning algorithms. The proposed initiation detection method recognizes two events: gait onset (an anticipatory movement preceding foot lifting) and toe-off. The termination detection algorithm segments gait into steps, measures the signals over a buffer at the beginning of each step, and determines whether this measurement belongs to the final step. The approach is validated with 10 subjects at two gait speeds, using within-subject and subject-independent cross-validation. Results show that gait initiation can be detected timely and accurately, with few errors in the case of within-subject cross-validation and overall good performance in subject-independent cross-validation. Gait termination can be predicted in over 80% of trials well before the subject comes to a complete stop. Results also show that the two sensor types are equivalent in predicting gait initiation while inertial measurement units are generally superior in predicting gait termination. Potential use of the algorithms is foreseen primarily with assistive devices such as prostheses and exoskeletons. PMID:23938085

  2. DRAG: a database for recognition and analasys of gait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuchi, Prem; Hiremagalur, Raghu Ram V.; Huang, Helen; Carhart, Michael; He, Jiping; Panchanathan, Sethuraman

    2003-11-01

    A novel approach is proposed for creating a standardized and comprehensive database for gait analysis. The field of gait analysis is gaining increasing attention for applications such as visual surveillance, human-computer interfaces, and gait recognition and rehabilitation. Numerous algorithms have been developed for analyzing and processing gait data; however, a standard database for their systematic evaluation does not exist. Instead, existing gait databases consist of subsets of kinematic, kinetic, and electromyographic activity recordings by different investigators, at separate laboratories, and under varying conditions. Thus, the existing databases are neither homogenous nor sufficiently populated to statistically validate the algorithms. In this paper, a methodology for creating a database is presented, which can be used as a common ground to test the performance of algorithms that rely upon external marker data, ground reaction loading data, and/or video images. The database consists of: (1) synchronized motion-capture data (3D marker data) obtained using external markers, (2) computed joint angles, and (3) ground reaction loading acquired with plantar pressure insoles. This database could be easily expanded to include synchronized video, which will facilitate further development of video-based algorithms for motion tracking. This eventually could lead to the realization of markerless gait tracking. Such a system would have extensive applications in gait recognition, as well as gait rehabilitation. The entire database (marker, angle, and force data) will be placed in the public domain, and made available for downloads over the World Wide Web.

  3. Inertial Sensor-Based Gait Recognition: A Review.

    PubMed

    Sprager, Sebastijan; Juric, Matjaz B

    2015-01-01

    With the recent development of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), inertial sensors have become widely used in the research of wearable gait analysis due to several factors, such as being easy-to-use and low-cost. Considering the fact that each individual has a unique way of walking, inertial sensors can be applied to the problem of gait recognition where assessed gait can be interpreted as a biometric trait. Thus, inertial sensor-based gait recognition has a great potential to play an important role in many security-related applications. Since inertial sensors are included in smart devices that are nowadays present at every step, inertial sensor-based gait recognition has become very attractive and emerging field of research that has provided many interesting discoveries recently. This paper provides a thorough and systematic review of current state-of-the-art in this field of research. Review procedure has revealed that the latest advanced inertial sensor-based gait recognition approaches are able to sufficiently recognise the users when relying on inertial data obtained during gait by single commercially available smart device in controlled circumstances, including fixed placement and small variations in gait. Furthermore, these approaches have also revealed considerable breakthrough by realistic use in uncontrolled circumstances, showing great potential for their further development and wide applicability. PMID:26340634

  4. Gait abnormalities, ADHD, and environmental exposure to nitrous oxide.

    PubMed

    Fluegge, Keith

    2016-08-30

    Papadopoulos et al. (2014) investigated gait profiles of children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder-combined type (ADHD-CT) compared to typical developing (TD) controls. The authors reported differences in the gait profile of ADHD-CT in the self-selected fast speed category. Additionally, others have proposed a maturational delay hypothesis in gait, demonstrating that gait variability decreases with age in ADHD children. It has been previously suggested that the cognitive impairment seen in conditions like ADHD may result from chronic, environmental exposure to the air pollutant, nitrous oxide (N2O). Exposure to N2O is thought to exert its antinociceptive properties by stimulating release of dynorphin peptides in the central nervous system which act upon kappa opioid receptors (KOR). Opioid-mediated gait abnormalities in ADHD are supported with evidence that prodynorphin mutations in mice lead to cytotoxic levels of dynorphin A (DYN A) and contribute to abnormal gait profiles and gradual loss of motor coordination. Interestingly, constitutive activity of the KOR receptor in rat brain has been recently shown to undergo maturational alterations, suggesting that while altered gait profiles in ADHD may be a function of the enhanced opioidergic activity attributable to chronic exposure to the environmental air pollutant, N2O, age-attenuated constitutive activity of KOR in brain may explain the normalization of these altered gait profiles in older ADHD subjects. PMID:27285951

  5. Inertial Sensor-Based Gait Recognition: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Sprager, Sebastijan; Juric, Matjaz B.

    2015-01-01

    With the recent development of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), inertial sensors have become widely used in the research of wearable gait analysis due to several factors, such as being easy-to-use and low-cost. Considering the fact that each individual has a unique way of walking, inertial sensors can be applied to the problem of gait recognition where assessed gait can be interpreted as a biometric trait. Thus, inertial sensor-based gait recognition has a great potential to play an important role in many security-related applications. Since inertial sensors are included in smart devices that are nowadays present at every step, inertial sensor-based gait recognition has become very attractive and emerging field of research that has provided many interesting discoveries recently. This paper provides a thorough and systematic review of current state-of-the-art in this field of research. Review procedure has revealed that the latest advanced inertial sensor-based gait recognition approaches are able to sufficiently recognise the users when relying on inertial data obtained during gait by single commercially available smart device in controlled circumstances, including fixed placement and small variations in gait. Furthermore, these approaches have also revealed considerable breakthrough by realistic use in uncontrolled circumstances, showing great potential for their further development and wide applicability. PMID:26340634

  6. Summary measures for clinical gait analysis: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Cimolin, Veronica; Galli, Manuela

    2014-04-01

    Instrumented 3D-gait analysis (3D-GA) is an important method used to obtain information that is crucial for establishing the level of functional limitation due to pathology, observing its evolution over time and evaluating rehabilitative intervention effects. However, a typical 3D-GA evaluation produces a vast amount of data, and despite its objectivity, its use is complicated, and the data interpretation is difficult. It is even more difficult to obtain an overview on patient cohorts for a comparison. Moreover, there is a growing awareness of the need for a concise index, specifically, a single measure of the 'quality' of a particular gait pattern. Several gait summary measures, which have been used in conjunction with 3D-GA, have been proposed to objectify clinical impression, quantify the degree of gait deviation from normal, stratify the severity of pathology, document the changes in gait patterns over time and evaluate interventions. PMID:24613461

  7. A Grassmann graph embedding framework for gait analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connie, Tee; Goh, Michael Kah Ong; Teoh, Andrew Beng Jin

    2014-12-01

    Gait recognition is important in a wide range of monitoring and surveillance applications. Gait information has often been used as evidence when other biometrics is indiscernible in the surveillance footage. Building on recent advances of the subspace-based approaches, we consider the problem of gait recognition on the Grassmann manifold. We show that by embedding the manifold into reproducing kernel Hilbert space and applying the mechanics of graph embedding on such manifold, significant performance improvement can be obtained. In this work, the gait recognition problem is studied in a unified way applicable for both supervised and unsupervised configurations. Sparse representation is further incorporated in the learning mechanism to adaptively harness the local structure of the data. Experiments demonstrate that the proposed method can tolerate variations in appearance for gait identification effectively.

  8. Gait Analysis Methods for Rodent Models of Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Brittany Y.; Kloefkorn, Heidi E.; Allen, Kyle D.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with osteoarthritis (OA) primarily seek treatment due to pain and disability, yet the primary endpoints for rodent OA models tend to be histological measures of joint destruction. The discrepancy between clinical and preclinical evaluations is problematic, given that radiographic evidence of OA in humans does not always correlate to the severity of patient-reported symptoms. Recent advances in behavioral analyses have provided new methods to evaluate disease sequelae in rodents. Of particular relevance to rodent OA models are methods to assess rodent gait. While obvious differences exist between quadrupedal and bipedal gait sequences, the gait abnormalities seen in humans and in rodent OA models reflect similar compensatory behaviors that protect an injured limb from loading. The purpose of this review is to describe these compensations and current methods used to assess rodent gait characteristics, while detailing important considerations for the selection of gait analysis methods in rodent OA models. PMID:25160712

  9. Gait dynamics in Parkinson’s disease: Common and distinct behavior among stride length, gait variability, and fractal-like scaling

    PubMed Central

    Hausdorff, Jeffrey M.

    2009-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a common, debilitating neurodegenerative disease. Gait disturbances are a frequent cause of disability and impairment for patients with PD. This article provides a brief introduction to PD and describes the gait changes typically seen in patients with this disease. A major focus of this report is an update on the study of the fractal properties of gait in PD, the relationship between this feature of gait and stride length and gait variability, and the effects of different experimental conditions on these three gait properties. Implications of these findings are also briefly described. This update highlights the idea that while stride length, gait variability, and fractal scaling of gait are all impaired in PD, distinct mechanisms likely contribute to and are responsible for the regulation of these disparate gait properties. PMID:19566273

  10. A synergetic model for human gait transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdolvahab, Mohammad

    2015-09-01

    Gait transitions have been considered as bifurcations between states (e.g. walking or running modes) of a nonlinear dynamical system. A top-down synergetic approach to model gait transitions has been adapted from Frank et al. (2009) and applied to two sets of empirical observations. In this approach, it is assumed that the amplitudes of the spatio-temporal modes of locomotion satisfy a generic form of evolution equations that are known to hold for animate and inanimate self-organizing systems. The presented experimental results focus on hysteresis in human walk-to-run and run-to-walk transitions on a treadmill as a function of treadmill inclination and acceleration, the rate at which speed was increased or decreased during experimental trials. The bi-stability in the synergetic model is assumed to account for the hysteretic transitions. Accordingly, the relevant parameters of the model were estimated from the empirical data and the model's efficacy in predicting the observed hysteresis effects was evaluated.

  11. Guiding task-oriented gait training after stroke or spinal cord injury by means of a biomechanical gait analysis.

    PubMed

    Nadeau, Sylvie; Duclos, Cyril; Bouyer, Laurent; Richards, Carol L

    2011-01-01

    To recover the ability to walk is one of the most important goals of persons recovering from a stroke or spinal cord injury (SCI). While a task-oriented approach to gait training is recommended, randomized controlled trials or meta-analyses comparing different methods of delivering training have failed in general to demonstrate the superiority of one approach over the other. The large variations in the mean outcome gait measures reported in these studies reflect, at least in part, the heterogeneity of the sensorimotor impairments underlying the gait disability as well as variations in the therapeutic response. The purpose of this chapter is to demonstrate that biomechanical gait analysis can reveal information pertinent to the selection of a task-oriented approach to enhance gait training as well as the therapeutic response that clinical evaluations alone cannot provide. We first briefly review locomotor impairments underlying the gait disability after stroke and SCI as well as the effects of selected technological task-oriented gait training interventions. We then give examples that demonstrate the use of gait analysis to pinpoint underlying impairments that can guide the choice of sensorimotor therapy and then immediately identify responders to the intervention. Such an individualized approach should promote therapeutic efficacy while leading over time to the identification of clinical indices to guide therapy when gait analysis is not feasible. Given the requirements of a gait analysis laboratory and the qualified personnel to capture and interpret the data, future studies will need to demonstrate the feasibility of the technological proposed approach and assess the costs and benefits for the health care system. PMID:21763525

  12. Effects of robot-assisted gait training on the balance and gait of chronic stroke patients: focus on dependent ambulators

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Duk Youn; Park, Si-Woon; Lee, Min Jin; Park, Dae Sung; Kim, Eun Joo

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to confirm the effect of robot-assisted gait training on the balance and gait ability of stroke patients who were dependent ambulators. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty stroke patients participated in this study. The participants were allocated to either group 1, which received robot-assisted gait training for 4 weeks followed by conventional physical therapy for 4 weeks, or group 2, which received the same treatments in the reverse order. Robot-assisted gait training was conducted for 30 min, 3 times a week for 4 weeks. The Berg Balance Scale, Modified Functional Reach Test, Functional Ambulation Category, Modified Ashworth Scale, Fugl-Meyer Assessment, Motricity Index, and Modified Barthel Index were assessed before and after treatment. To confirm the characteristics of patients who showed a significant increase in Berg Balance Scale after robot-assisted gait training as compared with physical therapy, subgroup analysis was conducted. [Results] Only lateral reaching and the Functional Ambulation Category were significantly increased following robot-assisted gait training. Subscale analyses identified 3 patient subgroups that responded well to robot-assisted gait training: a subgroup with hemiplegia, a subgroup in which the guidance force needed to be decreased to needed to be decreased to ≤45%, and a subgroup in which weight bearing was decreased to ≤21%. [Conclusion] The present study showed that robot-assisted gait training is not only effective in improving balance and gait performance but also improves trunk balance and motor skills required by high-severity stroke patients to perform activities daily living. Moreover, subscale analyses identified subgroups that responded well to robot-assisted gait training. PMID:26644642

  13. Effects of robot-assisted gait training on the balance and gait of chronic stroke patients: focus on dependent ambulators.

    PubMed

    Cho, Duk Youn; Park, Si-Woon; Lee, Min Jin; Park, Dae Sung; Kim, Eun Joo

    2015-10-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to confirm the effect of robot-assisted gait training on the balance and gait ability of stroke patients who were dependent ambulators. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty stroke patients participated in this study. The participants were allocated to either group 1, which received robot-assisted gait training for 4 weeks followed by conventional physical therapy for 4 weeks, or group 2, which received the same treatments in the reverse order. Robot-assisted gait training was conducted for 30 min, 3 times a week for 4 weeks. The Berg Balance Scale, Modified Functional Reach Test, Functional Ambulation Category, Modified Ashworth Scale, Fugl-Meyer Assessment, Motricity Index, and Modified Barthel Index were assessed before and after treatment. To confirm the characteristics of patients who showed a significant increase in Berg Balance Scale after robot-assisted gait training as compared with physical therapy, subgroup analysis was conducted. [Results] Only lateral reaching and the Functional Ambulation Category were significantly increased following robot-assisted gait training. Subscale analyses identified 3 patient subgroups that responded well to robot-assisted gait training: a subgroup with hemiplegia, a subgroup in which the guidance force needed to be decreased to needed to be decreased to ≤45%, and a subgroup in which weight bearing was decreased to ≤21%. [Conclusion] The present study showed that robot-assisted gait training is not only effective in improving balance and gait performance but also improves trunk balance and motor skills required by high-severity stroke patients to perform activities daily living. Moreover, subscale analyses identified subgroups that responded well to robot-assisted gait training. PMID:26644642

  14. Probabilistic Gait Classification in Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Bayesian Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Gestel, Leen; De Laet, Tinne; Di Lello, Enrico; Bruyninckx, Herman; Molenaers, Guy; Van Campenhout, Anja; Aertbelien, Erwin; Schwartz, Mike; Wambacq, Hans; De Cock, Paul; Desloovere, Kaat

    2011-01-01

    Three-dimensional gait analysis (3DGA) generates a wealth of highly variable data. Gait classifications help to reduce, simplify and interpret this vast amount of 3DGA data and thereby assist and facilitate clinical decision making in the treatment of CP. CP gait is often a mix of several clinically accepted distinct gait patterns. Therefore,…

  15. Gait Patterns in Hemiplegic Children with Cerebral Palsy: Comparison of Right and Left Hemiplegia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galli, Manuela; Cimolin, Veronica; Rigoldi, Chiara; Tenore, Nunzio; Albertini, Giorgio

    2010-01-01

    The aims of this study are to compare quantitatively the gait strategy of the right and left hemiplegic children with Cerebral Palsy (CP) using gait analysis. The gait strategy of 28 right hemiparetic CP (RHG) and 23 left hemiparetic CP (LHG) was compared using gait analysis (spatio-temporal and kinematic parameters) and considering the hemiplegic…

  16. Gait Patterns in Twins with Cerebral Palsy: Similarities and Development over Time after Multilevel Surgery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Drongelen, Stefan; Dreher, Thomas; Heitzmann, Daniel W. W.; Wolf, Sebastian I.

    2013-01-01

    To examine gait patterns and gait quality, 7 twins with cerebral palsy were measured preoperatively and after surgical intervention. The aim was to study differences and/or similarities in gait between twins, the influence of personal characteristics and birth conditions, and to describe the development of gait over time after single event…

  17. Role of attentional resources on gait performance in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Delval, Arnaud; Krystkowiak, Pierre; Delliaux, Marie; Dujardin, Kathy; Blatt, Jean-Louis; Destée, Alain; Derambure, Philippe; Defebvre, Luc

    2008-04-15

    Patients with Huntington's disease (HD) suffer from cognitive deficits with impaired executive functions, including limited attentional resources. We sought to use a dual-task paradigm to evaluate attentional demands and the ability of patients with HD to concentrate on two tasks simultaneously. We analyzed the interference effects of cognitive and motor tasks on walking in HD and the contribution of clinical symptoms to gait disturbances. Patients and controls were asked to perform either a motor task (carrying a tray with four glasses), a cognitive task (counting backwards), or no task at all while walking at their preferred speed. Kinematic spatial parameters, temporal parameters, and angular parameters related to gait were recorded in 15 patients and 15 controls by means of a videomotion analysis system. Gait instability was assessed using the stride-to-stride variability of the various gait parameters. For patients with HD, performing a concurrent cognitive task resulted in a lower gait speed (compared with free walking), with decreased cadence and stride length. However, this effect was not observed in controls. Performing a motor task did not change any kinematic gait parameters in either HD or control subjects. We found correlations between gait speed in the dual cognitive/walking task on one hand and the motor UHDRS score, cognitive status and executive function on the other. Patients with HD had greater difficulty walking while performing a concurrent cognitive task; the drain on attentional resources deteriorated walking performance. PMID:18175353

  18. Turtle mimetic soft robot with two swimming gaits.

    PubMed

    Song, Sung-Hyuk; Kim, Min-Soo; Rodrigue, Hugo; Lee, Jang-Yeob; Shim, Jae-Eul; Kim, Min-Cheol; Chu, Won-Shik; Ahn, Sung-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a biomimetic turtle flipper actuator consisting of a shape memory alloy composite structure for implementation in a turtle-inspired autonomous underwater vehicle. Based on the analysis of the Chelonia mydas, the flipper actuator was divided into three segments containing a scaffold structure fabricated using a 3D printer. According to the filament stacking sequence of the scaffold structure in the actuator, different actuating motions can be realized and three different types of scaffold structures were proposed to replicate the motion of the different segments of the flipper of the Chelonia mydas. This flipper actuator can mimic the continuous deformation of the forelimb of Chelonia mydas which could not be realized in previous motor based robot. This actuator can also produce two distinct motions that correspond to the two different swimming gaits of the Chelonia mydas, which are the routine and vigorous swimming gaits, by changing the applied current sequence of the SMA wires embedded in the flipper actuator. The generated thrust and the swimming efficiency in each swimming gait of the flipper actuator were measured and the results show that the vigorous gait has a higher thrust but a relatively lower swimming efficiency than the routine gait. The flipper actuator was implemented in a biomimetic turtle robot, and its average swimming speed in the routine and vigorous gaits were measured with the vigorous gait being capable of reaching a maximum speed of 11.5 mm s(-1). PMID:27145061

  19. Computational evaluation of load carriage effects on gait balance stability.

    PubMed

    Mummolo, Carlotta; Park, Sukyung; Mangialardi, Luigi; Kim, Joo H

    2016-08-01

    Evaluating the effects of load carriage on gait balance stability is important in various applications. However, their quantification has not been rigorously addressed in the current literature, partially due to the lack of relevant computational indices. The novel Dynamic Gait Measure (DGM) characterizes gait balance stability by quantifying the relative effects of inertia in terms of zero-moment point, ground projection of center of mass, and time-varying foot support region. In this study, the DGM is formulated in terms of the gait parameters that explicitly reflect the gait strategy of a given walking pattern and is used for computational evaluation of the distinct balance stability of loaded walking. The observed gait adaptations caused by load carriage (decreased single support duration, inertia effects, and step length) result in decreased DGM values (p < 0.0001), which indicate that loaded walking motions are more statically stable compared with the unloaded normal walking. Comparison of the DGM with other common gait stability indices (the maximum Floquet multiplier and the margin of stability) validates the unique characterization capability of the DGM, which is consistently informative of the presence of the added load. PMID:26691823

  20. Gait biometrics under spoofing attacks: an experimental investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadid, Abdenour; Ghahramani, Mohammad; Kellokumpu, Vili; Feng, Xiaoyi; Bustard, John; Nixon, Mark

    2015-11-01

    Gait is a relatively biometric modality which has a precious advantage over other modalities, such as iris and voice, in that it can be easily captured from a distance. Although it has recently become a topic of great interest in biometric research, there has been little investigation into gait spoofing attacks where a person tries to imitate the clothing or walking style of someone else. We recently analyzed for the first time the effects of spoofing attacks on silhouette-based gait biometric systems and showed that it was indeed possible to spoof gait biometric systems by clothing impersonation and the deliberate selection of a target that has a similar build to the attacker. To gain deeper insight into the performance of current gait biometric systems under spoofing attacks, we provide a thorough investigation on how clothing can be used to spoof a target and evaluate the performance of two state-of-the-art recognition methods on a gait spoofing database recorded at the University of Southampton. Furthermore, we describe and evaluate an initial solution coping with gait spoofing attacks. The obtained results are very promising and point out interesting findings which can be used for future investigations.

  1. The gait standard deviation, a single measure of kinematic variability.

    PubMed

    Sangeux, Morgan; Passmore, Elyse; Graham, H Kerr; Tirosh, Oren

    2016-05-01

    Measurement of gait kinematic variability provides relevant clinical information in certain conditions affecting the neuromotor control of movement. In this article, we present a measure of overall gait kinematic variability, GaitSD, based on combination of waveforms' standard deviation. The waveform standard deviation is the common numerator in established indices of variability such as Kadaba's coefficient of multiple correlation or Winter's waveform coefficient of variation. Gait data were collected on typically developing children aged 6-17 years. Large number of strides was captured for each child, average 45 (SD: 11) for kinematics and 19 (SD: 5) for kinetics. We used a bootstrap procedure to determine the precision of GaitSD as a function of the number of strides processed. We compared the within-subject, stride-to-stride, variability with the, between-subject, variability of the normative pattern. Finally, we investigated the correlation between age and gait kinematic, kinetic and spatio-temporal variability. In typically developing children, the relative precision of GaitSD was 10% as soon as 6 strides were captured. As a comparison, spatio-temporal parameters required 30 strides to reach the same relative precision. The ratio stride-to-stride divided by normative pattern variability was smaller in kinematic variables (the smallest for pelvic tilt, 28%) than in kinetic and spatio-temporal variables (the largest for normalised stride length, 95%). GaitSD had a strong, negative correlation with age. We show that gait consistency may stabilise only at, or after, skeletal maturity. PMID:27131201

  2. Observational gait assessment tools in paediatrics--a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Rathinam, Chandrasekar; Bateman, Andrew; Peirson, Janet; Skinner, Jane

    2014-06-01

    Instrumented gait analysis (IGA) is an expensive technique used to objectively detect gait abnormalities in children. Observational gait assessment is considered as a cost effective alternate for IGA in regular clinical practice. This article is aimed at systematically reviewing the available paediatric gait analysis tools and examines their reliability and validity compared to IGA. This review also examines the structure of these tools, their clinical use and limitations. Articles were searched from PubMed, CINHL, AMED, BNI, EMBASE, PEDro and Cochrane library from the earliest record on the database to December 2012. Hand searches were carried out in a few journals. Studies that examined children's gait using a structured assessment tool were included and analysed for their quality, reliability and validity. Pre-established criteria were used to judge the quality of methodology and reliability and validity. Five observational gait tools for children with Cerebral Palsy (CP) and one for children with Downs Syndrome were identified. Nine studies related to children with CP were enrolled for this review. None of the tools have accomplished the level of IGA's consistency. Edinburgh Visual Gait Score (EVGS) was found to have better reliability and validity than the other tools. Very limited studies were available for most of the gait assessment tools therefore their clinical use cannot be judged based on the existing evidence. EVGS was found to have better concurrent validity and reliability and it should be considered to assess CP gait in regular practice. Future work to investigate the use of low cost technology to improve observers' accuracy of EVGS is suggested. PMID:24798609

  3. Identification of muscle synergies associated with gait transition in humans

    PubMed Central

    Hagio, Shota; Fukuda, Mizuho; Kouzaki, Motoki

    2015-01-01

    There is no theoretical or empirical evidence to suggest how the central nervous system (CNS) controls a variety of muscles associated with gait transition between walking and running. Here, we examined the motor control during a gait transition based on muscle synergies, which modularly organize functionally similar muscles. To this end, the subjects walked or ran on a treadmill and performed a gait transition spontaneously as the treadmill speed increased or decreased (a changing speed condition) or voluntarily following an experimenter’s instruction at constant treadmill speed (a constant speed condition). Surface electromyograms (EMGs) were recorded from 11 lower limb muscles bilaterally. We then extracted the muscle weightings of synergies and their activation coefficients from the EMG data using non-negative matrix factorization. As a result, the gait transition was controlled by approximately 9 muscle synergies, which were common during a walking and running, and their activation profiles were changed before and after a gait transition. Near a gait transition, the peak activation phases of the synergies, which were composed of plantar flexor muscles, were shifted to an earlier phase at the walk-to-run transition, and vice versa. The shifts were gradual in the changing speed condition, but an abrupt change was observed in the constant speed condition. These results suggest that the CNS low-dimensionally regulate the activation profiles of the specific synergies based on afferent information (spontaneous gait transition) or by changing only the descending neural input to the muscle synergies (voluntary gait transition) to achieve a gait transition. PMID:25713525

  4. When Does A Gait Transition Occur During Human Locomotion?

    PubMed Central

    Hreljac, Alan; Imamura, Rodney T.; Escamilla, Rafael F.; Edwards, W. Brent

    2007-01-01

    When a treadmill accelerates continuously, the walk-run transition has generally been assumed to occur at the instant when a flight phase is first observed, while the run-walk transition has been assumed to occur at the instant of the first double support period. There is no theoretical or empirical evidence to suggest that gait transitions occur at the instant of these events, nor even whether transitions are abrupt events. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the gait transitions during human locomotion occur abruptly, and if so, to determine the instant during a stride at which a transition occurs. The time history of the vertical velocity of the hip (vhip) and the angular velocity of the ankle (ωankle) were compared between constant speed strides (walking or running) and strides at and near the walk-run and run-walk transitions to determine if and when the transition strides resemble the stride of the corresponding constant speed strides. For both the walk-run and run-walk transitions, the stride prior to the transition resembled the original gait pattern, while the stride following the transition resembled the new gait pattern. The transition stride, however, did not resemble either a walking or a running stride during either of the transition directions. It was concluded that gait transitions are initiated at about midstance of the transition stride, but the transition is not completed until after an adjustment period of between one step and one stride. Thus, gait transitions are not abrupt events during human locomotion. Key pointsGait transitions are not abrupt events.Initiation of a gait transitions occur at about midstance of the transition stride.Gait transitions are completed approximately at the next heelstrike of the ipsilateral foot.Time period between initiation and completion of transition does not resemble either a walk or a run. PMID:24149222

  5. Gait and menstrual cycle: ovulating women use sexier gaits and walk slowly ahead of men.

    PubMed

    Guéguen, Nicolas

    2012-04-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that women's physical appearance or sexual interest is different across the menstrual cycle. However, the nonverbal behavior of women toward men according to their menstrual cycle has not been previously explored. In this study, the gait of women walking ahead a male confederate was recorded with the help of a spy-camera. The amount of time that women spent walking was the first dependent variable whereas the extent to which the women were perceived to be sexually attractive by two judges was the second dependent variable. Comparisons were performed according to the women's ovulation phase measured with an LH salivary test. Near ovulation, it was found that women walked slower and their gait was subjectively rated as sexier. Such behaviors were interpreted as unconscious desires of women near ovulation to reinforce their attractiveness in order to attract more men and to increase their choice of a partner. PMID:22245227

  6. Gait variability and basal ganglia disorders: stride-to-stride variations of gait cycle timing in Parkinson's disease and Huntington's disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hausdorff, J. M.; Cudkowicz, M. E.; Firtion, R.; Wei, J. Y.; Goldberger, A. L.

    1998-01-01

    The basal ganglia are thought to play an important role in regulating motor programs involved in gait and in the fluidity and sequencing of movement. We postulated that the ability to maintain a steady gait, with low stride-to-stride variability of gait cycle timing and its subphases, would be diminished with both Parkinson's disease (PD) and Huntington's disease (HD). To test this hypothesis, we obtained quantitative measures of stride-to-stride variability of gait cycle timing in subjects with PD (n = 15), HD (n = 20), and disease-free controls (n = 16). All measures of gait variability were significantly increased in PD and HD. In subjects with PD and HD, gait variability measures were two and three times that observed in control subjects, respectively. The degree of gait variability correlated with disease severity. In contrast, gait speed was significantly lower in PD, but not in HD, and average gait cycle duration and the time spent in many subphases of the gait cycle were similar in control subjects, HD subjects, and PD subjects. These findings are consistent with a differential control of gait variability, speed, and average gait cycle timing that may have implications for understanding the role of the basal ganglia in locomotor control and for quantitatively assessing gait in clinical settings.

  7. Computer-assisted diagnosis of orthopedic gait disorders.

    PubMed

    Tracy, K B; Montague, E C; Gabriel, R P; Kent, B E

    1979-03-01

    A computer program was developed to help diagnose orthopedic gait disorders. Designing and implementing the program, as well as the program's method of operation are described. The main features of the program include: a knowledge base of facts about orthopedic gait, organized into premise-conclusion pairs; a goal-directed reasoning chain that causally relates the facts; and a symbolic structure that allows limited English discourse between the user and the computer. Results of the project indicate that the complex area of gait analysis does lend itself to diagnosis by computer and that this prototype has potential as an aid to physical therapists in the classroom and in the clinic. PMID:84393

  8. The effect of gait training with shoe inserts on the improvement of pain and gait in sacroiliac joint patients.

    PubMed

    Cho, Byung-Yun; Yoon, Jung-Gyu

    2015-08-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the current research was to identify how gait training with shoe inserts affects the pain and gait of sacroiliac joint dysfunction patients. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty subjects were randomly selected and assigned to be either the experimental group (gait training with shoe insert group) or control group. Each group consisted of 15 patients. Pain was measured by Visual Analogue Scale, and foot pressure in a standing position and during gait was measured with a Gateview AFA-50 system (Alpus, Seoul, Republic of Korea). A paired sample t-test was used to compare the pain and gait of the sacroiliac joint before and after the intervention. Correlation between pain and walking after gait training with shoe inserts was examined by Pearson test. The level of significance was set at α=0.05. [Results] It was found that application of the intervention to the experimental group resulted in a significant decrease in sacroiliac joint pain. It was also found that there was a significant correlation between Visual Analogue Scale score and dynamic asymmetric index (r= 0.796) and that there was a negative correlation between Visual Analogue Scale score and forefoot/rear foot peak pressure ratio (r=-0.728). [Conclusion] The results of our analysis lead us to conclude that the intervention with shoe inserts had a significant influence on the pain and gait of sacroiliac joint patients. PMID:26357428

  9. Proximal placement of lateral thigh skin markers reduces soft tissue artefact during normal gait using the Conventional Gait Model.

    PubMed

    Cockcroft, John; Louw, Quinette; Baker, Richard

    2016-11-01

    A primary source of measurement error in gait analysis is soft-tissue artefact. Hip and knee angle measurements, regularly used in clinical decision-making, are particularly prone to pervasive soft tissue on the femur. However, despite several studies of thigh marker artefact it remains unclear how lateral thigh marker height affects results using variants of the Conventional Gait Model. We compared Vicon Plug-in Gait hip and knee angle estimates during gait using a proximal and distal thigh marker placement for ten healthy subjects. Knee axes were estimated by optimizing thigh rotation offsets to minimize knee varus-valgus range during gait. Relative to the distal marker, the proximal marker produced 37% less varus-valgus range and 50% less hip rotation range (p < 0.001), suggesting that it produced less soft-tissue artefact in knee axis estimates. The thigh markers also produced different secondary effects on the knee centre estimate. Using whole gait cycle optimization, the distal marker showed greater minimum and maximum knee flexion (by 6° and 2° respectively) resulting in a 4° reduction in range. Mid-stance optimization reduced distal marker knee flexion by 5° throughout, but proximal marker results were negligibly affected. Based on an analysis of the Plug-in Gait knee axis definition, we show that the proximal marker reduced sensitivity to soft-tissue artefact by decreasing collinearity between the points defining the femoral frontal plane and reducing anteroposterior movement between the knee and thigh markers. This study suggests that a proximal thigh marker may be preferable when performing gait analysis using the Plug-in Gait model. PMID:26929983

  10. On using gait in forensic biometrics.

    PubMed

    Bouchrika, Imed; Goffredo, Michaela; Carter, John; Nixon, Mark

    2011-07-01

    Given the continuing advances in gait biometrics, it appears prudent to investigate the translation of these techniques for forensic use. We address the question as to the confidence that might be given between any two such measurements. We use the locations of ankle, knee, and hip to derive a measure of the match between walking subjects in image sequences. The Instantaneous Posture Match algorithm, using Harr templates, kinematics, and anthropomorphic knowledge is used to determine their location. This is demonstrated using real CCTV recorded at Gatwick International Airport, laboratory images from the multiview CASIA-B data set, and an example of real scene of crime video. To access the measurement confidence, we study the mean intra- and inter-match scores as a function of database size. These measures converge to constant and separate values, indicating that the match measure derived from individual comparisons is considerably smaller than the average match measure from a population. PMID:21554307

  11. Fractal and Multifractal Analysis of Human Gait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz-Diosdado, A.; del Río Correa, J. L.; Angulo-Brown, F.

    2003-09-01

    We carried out a fractal and multifractal analysis of human gait time series of young and old individuals, and adults with three illnesses that affect the march: The Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases and the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We obtained cumulative plots of events, the correlation function, the Hurst exponent and the Higuchi's fractal dimension of these time series and found that these fractal markers could be a factor to characterize the march, since we obtained different values of these quantities for youths and adults and they are different also for healthy and ill persons and the most anomalous values belong to ill persons. In other physiological signals there is complexity lost related with the age and the illness, in the case of the march the opposite occurs. The multifractal analysis could be also a useful tool to understand the dynamics of these and other complex systems.

  12. Understanding the complexity of human gait dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scafetta, Nicola; Marchi, Damiano; West, Bruce J.

    2009-06-01

    Time series of human gait stride intervals exhibit fractal and multifractal properties under several conditions. Records from subjects walking at normal, slow, and fast pace speed are analyzed to determine changes in the fractal scalings as a function of the stress condition of the system. Records from subjects with different age from children to elderly and patients suffering from neurodegenerative disease are analyzed to determine changes in the fractal scalings as a function of the physical maturation or degeneration of the system. A supercentral pattern generator model is presented to simulate the above two properties that are typically found in dynamical network performance: that is, how a dynamical network responds to stress and to evolution.

  13. Differences in gait velocity and trunk acceleration during semicircular turning gait with and without bag in females of very advanced age

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Sun-Shil; Yoo, Won-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Gait velocity and trunk acceleration during semicircular turning gait with and without carrying a hand-held bag were compared in females of very advanced age. [Subjects and Methods] Ten female volunteers of very advanced age who could walk independently were recruited for this study. Gait velocity and trunk acceleration were measured using an accelerometer during semicircular turning gait with and without carrying a hand-held bag. [Results] Gait velocity during semicircular turning gait was greater with the bag than without the bag. [Conclusions] Trunk stability during semicircular turning gait was higher when the subjects carried a bag. Additional arm load could be considered during gait training in females of very advanced age.

  14. Evidence for a common process in gait initiation and stepping on to a new level to reach gait velocity.

    PubMed

    Gélat, Thierry; Pellec, Armande Le; Brenière, Yvon

    2006-04-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the adaptability of the gait initiation process when confronted with stepping on (SO) to a new level. Eight young adults performed gait initiation at two different speed conditions in a level walking (LW) situation and in a SO situation aimed at walking on an elevated (16 cm) level surface. As in a previous study using a single step, we found in SO a contradiction between the characteristics of anticipatory postural adjustments (APA) and gait velocity, i.e. the peak of anteroposterior velocity of the body's centre of gravity (CG) reached at the end of the first step. In normal and fast gaits, gait velocity was similar in both situations, whereas the duration and amplitude of the APA were smaller in SO than in LW. The reduction of APA in SO allowed the forward velocity of CG at the time of foot contact of the stepping limb to be lower than in LW. This is explained by the fact that the majority of body lift, beginning at this time, required a greater increase in forward velocity than in LW. Thus, with lower APA in SO, the gait velocity could be similar in both situations. From LW to SO, the spatio-temporal patterns in the forward velocity of CG varied within characteristic phases of the movement, but in a predictable way as gait velocity changed. These results gave evidence of an adaptation of the gait initiation process for the new constraints, despite the contradiction between APA and gait velocity. The spatio-temporal parameters of the anticipation phase in SO were pre-set according to the new requirements of the task: reaching gait velocity with a body lift. Furthermore, the time for reaching gait velocity was independent of both the amplitude of this velocity and the situation. This expressed the capacity of the subjects to use in SO the same optimal conditions to reach gait velocity as in LW, i.e. essentially in a ballistic manner. PMID:16328272

  15. Low Power Shoe Integrated Intelligent Wireless Gait Measurement System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahab, Y.; Mazalan, M.; Bakar, N. A.; Anuar, A. F.; Zainol, M. Z.; Hamzah, F.

    2014-04-01

    Gait analysis measurement is a method to assess and identify gait events and the measurements of dynamic, motion and pressure parameters involving the lowest part of the body. This significant analysis is widely used in sports, rehabilitation as well as other health diagnostic towards improving the quality of life. This paper presents a new system empowered by Inertia Measurement Unit (IMU), ultrasonic sensors, piezoceramic sensors array, XBee wireless modules and Arduino processing unit. This research focuses on the design and development of a low power ultra-portable shoe integrated wireless intelligent gait measurement using MEMS and recent microelectronic devices for foot clearance, orientation, error correction, gait events and pressure measurement system. It is developed to be cheap, low power, wireless, real time and suitable for real life in-door and out-door environment.

  16. Interpolation function for approximating knee joint behavior in human gait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toth-Taşcǎu, Mirela; Pater, Flavius; Stoia, Dan Ioan

    2013-10-01

    Starting from the importance of analyzing the kinematic data of the lower limb in gait movement, especially the angular variation of the knee joint, the paper propose an approximation function that can be used for processing the correlation among a multitude of knee cycles. The approximation of the raw knee data was done by Lagrange polynomial interpolation on a signal acquired using Zebris Gait Analysis System. The signal used in approximation belongs to a typical subject extracted from a lot of ten investigated subjects, but the function domain of definition belongs to the entire group. The study of the knee joint kinematics plays an important role in understanding the kinematics of the gait, this articulation having the largest range of motion in whole joints, in gait. The study does not propose to find an approximation function for the adduction-abduction movement of the knee, this being considered a residual movement comparing to the flexion-extension.

  17. Gait analysis using a shoe-integrated wireless sensor system.

    PubMed

    Bamberg, Stacy J Morris; Benbasat, Ari Y; Scarborough, Donna Moxley; Krebs, David E; Paradiso, Joseph A

    2008-07-01

    We describe a wireless wearable system that was developed to provide quantitative gait analysis outside the confines of the traditional motion laboratory. The sensor suite includes three orthogonal accelerometers, three orthogonal gyroscopes, four force sensors, two bidirectional bend sensors, two dynamic pressure sensors, as well as electric field height sensors. The "GaitShoe" was built to be worn in any shoe, without interfering with gait and was designed to collect data unobtrusively, in any environment, and over long periods. The calibrated sensor outputs were analyzed and validated with results obtained simultaneously from the Massachusetts General Hospital, Biomotion Laboratory. The GaitShoe proved highly capable of detecting heel-strike and toe-off, as well as estimating foot orientation and position, inter alia. PMID:18632321

  18. Gait recognition under carrying condition: a static dynamic fusion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Guan; Li, Chang-Tsun; Hu, Yongjian

    2012-06-01

    When an individual carries an object, such as a briefcase, conventional gait recognition algorithms based on average silhouette/Gait Energy Image (GEI) do not always perform well as the object carried may have the potential of being mistakenly regarded as a part of the human body. To solve such a problem, in this paper, instead of directly applying GEI to represent the gait information, we propose a novel dynamic feature template for classification. Based on this extracted dynamic information and some static feature templates (i.e., head part and trunk part), we cast gait recognition on the large USF (University of South Florida) database by adopting a static/dynamic fusion strategy. For the experiments involving carrying condition covariate, significant improvements are achieved when compared with other classic algorithms.

  19. Scientists Zero in On Brain Area Linked to 'Parkinson's Gait'

    MedlinePlus

    ... Scientists Zero in on Brain Area Linked to 'Parkinson's Gait' Discovery could lead to new treatments for ... play a role in walking difficulties that afflict Parkinson's disease patients, new research suggests. The prefrontal cortex ...

  20. Gait Using Pneumatic Brace for End-Stage Knee Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Kapadia, Bhaveen H; Cherian, Jeffrey Jai; Starr, Roland; Chughtai, Morad; Mont, Michael A; Harwin, Steven F; Bhave, Anil

    2016-04-01

    More than 20 million individuals in the United States are affected by knee osteoarthritis (OA), which can lead to altered biomechanics and excessive joint loading. The use of an unloader pneumatic brace with extension assist has been proposed as a nonoperative treatment modality that may improve gait mechanics and correct knee malalignment. We assessed the following parameters in patients who have knee OA treated with and without a brace: (1) changes in temporospatial parameters in gait; (2) knee range of motion, knee extension at heel strike, and foot placement; (3) knee joint moments and impulse; and (4) changes in dynamic stiffness and rate of change of knee flexion during midstance to terminal stance. This 2:1 prospective, randomized, single-blinded trial evaluated 36 patients (24 brace and 12 matching). OA knee patients were randomized to receive either a pneumatic unloader brace or a standard nonoperative treatment regimen as the matching cohort for a 3-month period. They underwent evaluation of gait parameters using a three-dimensional gait analysis system at their initial appointment and at 3 months follow-up. All the testing, pre- and postbracing were performed without wearing the brace to examine for retained effects. Treatment with the brace led to significant improvements versus standard treatment in various gait parameters. Patients in the brace group had improvements in walking speed, knee extension at heel strike, total range of motion, knee joint forces, and rate of knee flexion from midstance to terminal stance when compared with the matching cohort. Knee OA patients who used a pneumatic unloader brace for 3 months for at least 3 hours per day had significant improvements various gait parameters when compared with a standard nonoperative therapy cohort. Braced patients demonstrated gait-modifying affects when not wearing the brace. These results are encouraging and suggest that this device represents a promising treatment modality for knee OA that

  1. [Gait disorders in Parkinson's disease: and pathophysiological approaches].

    PubMed

    Moreau, C; Cantiniaux, S; Delval, A; Defebvre, L; Azulay, J-P

    2010-02-01

    Gait disorders and axial symptoms are the main therapeutic challenges in advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). Gait disorders in PD are characterized by spatial and temporal dysfunction. Gait hypokinesia is the first to appear and is responsible for the decrease in velocity. A good sensitivity to the levodopa is well established. Morris et al. [Morris ME, Iansek R, Matyas TA, Summers JJ. Ability to modulate walking cadence remains intact in Parkinson's disease. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 1994a;57(12):1532-4; Morris ME, Iansek R, Matyas TA, Summers JJ. The pathogenesis of gait hypokinesia in Parkinson's disease. Brain 1994b;117(Pt. 5):1169-81; Morris ME, Iansek R, Matyas TA, Summers JJ. Stride length regulation in Parkinson's disease. Brain 1996;119:551-68] demonstrated that the ability to modulate walking cadence remains intact in PD, and could correspond to a compensatory mechanism. More advanced disease stages of the disease are characterized by abnormal temporal parameters (such as stride length variability, stride time variability and cadence elevation) which are unresponsive to levodopa therapy and may be correlated with the occurrence of falls and freezing of gait (FOG). Lastly, postural instability also results in falls and is poorly responsive to levodopa. A link between gait impairment and frontal disorders has recently been suggested. After a few years of evolution, paradoxical episodic phenomena are described: festination ("hastening gait" with rapid small, short steps) and FOG (involuntary and sudden cessation of gait). Both symptoms are often incapacitating for PD patients, because of their resultant loss of independence and their poor response to levodopa therapy. Kinematical studies of FOG revealed a decrease in velocity, stride length and an exponential increase in cadence, prior to a FOG episode. New approaches (functional MRI, wavelets...) should offer new perspectives concerning these disabling symptoms. PMID:19616816

  2. Gait-based person recognition using arbitrary view transformation model.

    PubMed

    Muramatsu, Daigo; Shiraishi, Akira; Makihara, Yasushi; Uddin, Md Zasim; Yagi, Yasushi

    2015-01-01

    Gait recognition is a useful biometric trait for person authentication because it is usable even with low image resolution. One challenge is robustness to a view change (cross-view matching); view transformation models (VTMs) have been proposed to solve this. The VTMs work well if the target views are the same as their discrete training views. However, the gait traits are observed from an arbitrary view in a real situation. Thus, the target views may not coincide with discrete training views, resulting in recognition accuracy degradation. We propose an arbitrary VTM (AVTM) that accurately matches a pair of gait traits from an arbitrary view. To realize an AVTM, we first construct 3D gait volume sequences of training subjects, disjoint from the test subjects in the target scene. We then generate 2D gait silhouette sequences of the training subjects by projecting the 3D gait volume sequences onto the same views as the target views, and train the AVTM with gait features extracted from the 2D sequences. In addition, we extend our AVTM by incorporating a part-dependent view selection scheme (AVTM_PdVS), which divides the gait feature into several parts, and sets part-dependent destination views for transformation. Because appropriate destination views may differ for different body parts, the part-dependent destination view selection can suppress transformation errors, leading to increased recognition accuracy. Experiments using data sets collected in different settings show that the AVTM improves the accuracy of cross-view matching and that the AVTM_PdVS further improves the accuracy in many cases, in particular, verification scenarios. PMID:25423652

  3. A Multiple Regression Approach to Normalization of Spatiotemporal Gait Features.

    PubMed

    Wahid, Ferdous; Begg, Rezaul; Lythgo, Noel; Hass, Chris J; Halgamuge, Saman; Ackland, David C

    2016-04-01

    Normalization of gait data is performed to reduce the effects of intersubject variations due to physical characteristics. This study reports a multiple regression normalization approach for spatiotemporal gait data that takes into account intersubject variations in self-selected walking speed and physical properties including age, height, body mass, and sex. Spatiotemporal gait data including stride length, cadence, stance time, double support time, and stride time were obtained from healthy subjects including 782 children, 71 adults, 29 elderly subjects, and 28 elderly Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. Data were normalized using standard dimensionless equations, a detrending method, and a multiple regression approach. After normalization using dimensionless equations and the detrending method, weak to moderate correlations between walking speed, physical properties, and spatiotemporal gait features were observed (0.01 < |r| < 0.88), whereas normalization using the multiple regression method reduced these correlations to weak values (|r| <0.29). Data normalization using dimensionless equations and detrending resulted in significant differences in stride length and double support time of PD patients; however the multiple regression approach revealed significant differences in these features as well as in cadence, stance time, and stride time. The proposed multiple regression normalization may be useful in machine learning, gait classification, and clinical evaluation of pathological gait patterns. PMID:26426798

  4. Temporal and spatial organization of gait-related electrocortical potentials.

    PubMed

    Knaepen, Kristel; Mierau, Andreas; Tellez, Helio Fernandez; Lefeber, Dirk; Meeusen, Romain

    2015-07-10

    To advance gait rehabilitation research it is of great importance to understand the supraspinal control of walking. In this study, the temporal and spatial characteristics of averaged electrocortical activity during treadmill walking in healthy subjects was assessed. Electroencephalography data were recorded from 32 scalp locations, averaged across trials, and related to phases of the gait cycle based on the detection of left heel strike. A characteristic temporal pattern of positive and negative potentials, similar to movement-related cortical potentials, and related to the gait cycle was observed over the cortical leg representation area. Source localization analysis revealed that mainly the primary somatosensory, somatosensory association, primary motor and cingulate cortex were activated during walking. The negative peaks of the gait-related cortical potential were associated with activity predominantly in the cingulate and prefrontal cortex, while the primary motor, primary somatosensory and somatosensory association cortex were mainly active during the positive peaks. This study identified gait-related cortical potentials during walking. The results indicate a widely distributed cortical network involved in gait control. PMID:26003448

  5. Kinematic gait patterns in healthy runners: A hierarchical cluster analysis.

    PubMed

    Phinyomark, Angkoon; Osis, Sean; Hettinga, Blayne A; Ferber, Reed

    2015-11-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated distinct clusters of gait patterns in both healthy and pathological groups, suggesting that different movement strategies may be represented. However, these studies have used discrete time point variables and usually focused on only one specific joint and plane of motion. Therefore, the first purpose of this study was to determine if running gait patterns for healthy subjects could be classified into homogeneous subgroups using three-dimensional kinematic data from the ankle, knee, and hip joints. The second purpose was to identify differences in joint kinematics between these groups. The third purpose was to investigate the practical implications of clustering healthy subjects by comparing these kinematics with runners experiencing patellofemoral pain (PFP). A principal component analysis (PCA) was used to reduce the dimensionality of the entire gait waveform data and then a hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) determined group sets of similar gait patterns and homogeneous clusters. The results show two distinct running gait patterns were found with the main between-group differences occurring in frontal and sagittal plane knee angles (P<0.001), independent of age, height, weight, and running speed. When these two groups were compared to PFP runners, one cluster exhibited greater while the other exhibited reduced peak knee abduction angles (P<0.05). The variability observed in running patterns across this sample could be the result of different gait strategies. These results suggest care must be taken when selecting samples of subjects in order to investigate the pathomechanics of injured runners. PMID:26456422

  6. Loci impacting polymorphic gait in the Tennessee Walking Horse.

    PubMed

    Staiger, E A; Abri, M A; Silva, C A S; Brooks, S A

    2016-04-01

    Following domestication, man selected the horse primarily for the purpose of transportation rather than consumption; this selective strategy created divergent traits for locomotion. At intermediate speeds, beyond the flat walk, the horse can perform a range of diagonal and lateral 2-beat or 4-beat gait patterns. The Tennessee Walking Horse (TWH) is the only U.S. breed able to perform an even-timed 4-beat gait (the "running-walk") at intermediate speeds; however, within the breed, there is remaining variation in gait type. To investigate the contribution of genetics to this unique trait, blood or hair samples for DNA and gait information were collected from 129 TWH and genotyping was performed at approximately 60,000 loci using the Illumina Equine SNP70 beadchip at GeneSeek Inc. (Lincoln, NE). Case-control association tests identified suggestive regions for gait type on equine chromosome (ECA) 19 (-value of 1.50 × 10 after 1 million permutations; PLINK version 1.07). Haplotype analysis identified 2 significant haplotypes on ECA19 and ECA11 (-values of 3.7 × 10 and 3.92 × 10, respectively). Genes within these suggestive regions play roles in developmental processes and biological regulation, indicating there may be variant differences in the neurobiology and regulation of horses with a polymorphic gait. PMID:27135997

  7. Gait Planning and Stability Control of a Quadruped Robot

    PubMed Central

    Li, Junmin; Wang, Jinge; Yang, Simon X.; Zhou, Kedong; Tang, Huijuan

    2016-01-01

    In order to realize smooth gait planning and stability control of a quadruped robot, a new controller algorithm based on CPG-ZMP (central pattern generator-zero moment point) is put forward in this paper. To generate smooth gait and shorten the adjusting time of the model oscillation system, a new CPG model controller and its gait switching strategy based on Wilson-Cowan model are presented in the paper. The control signals of knee-hip joints are obtained by the improved multi-DOF reduced order control theory. To realize stability control, the adaptive speed adjustment and gait switch are completed by the real-time computing of ZMP. Experiment results show that the quadruped robot's gaits are efficiently generated and the gait switch is smooth in the CPG control algorithm. Meanwhile, the stability of robot's movement is improved greatly with the CPG-ZMP algorithm. The algorithm in this paper has good practicability, which lays a foundation for the production of the robot prototype. PMID:27143959

  8. Gait analysis and cerebral volumes in Down's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rigoldi, C; Galli, M; Condoluci, C; Carducci, F; Onorati, P; Albertini, G

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to look for a relationship between cerebral volumes computed using a voxel-based morphometry algorithm and walking patterns in individuals with Down's syndrome (DS), in order to investigate the origin of the motor problems in these subjects with a view to developing appropriate rehabilitation programmes. Nine children with DS underwent a gait analysis (GA) protocol that used a 3D motion analysis system, force plates and a video system, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Analysis of GA graphs allowed a series of parameters to be defined and computed in order to quantify gait patterns. By combining some of the parameters it was possible to obtain a 3D description of gait in terms of distance from normal values. Finally, the results of cerebral volume analysis were compared with the gait patterns found. A strong relationship emerged between cerebellar vermis volume reduction and quality of gait and also between grey matter volume reduction of some cerebral areas and asymmetrical gait. An evaluation of high-level motor deficits, reflected in a lack or partial lack of proximal functions, is important in order to define a correct rehabilitation programme. PMID:20018142

  9. FreeWalker: a smart insole for longitudinal gait analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Baitong; Rajput, Kuldeep Singh; Tam, Wing-Kin; Tung, Anthony K H; Yang, Zhi

    2015-08-01

    Gait analysis is an important diagnostic measure to investigate the pattern of walking. Traditional gait analysis is generally carried out in a gait lab, with equipped force and body tracking sensors, which needs a trained medical professional to interpret the results. This procedure is tedious, expensive, and unreliable and makes it difficult to track the progress across multiple visits. In this paper, we present a smart insole called FreeWalker, which provides quantitative gait analysis outside the confinement of traditional lab, at low- cost. The insole consists of eight pressure sensors and two motion tracking sensors, i.e. 3-axis accelerometer and 3-axis gyroscope. This enables measurement of under-foot pressure distribution and motion sequences in real-time. The insole is enabled with onboard SD card as well as wireless data transmission, which help in continuous gait-cycle analysis. The data is then sent to a gateway, for analysis and interpretation of data, using a user interface where gait features are graphically displayed. We also present validation result of a subject's left foot, who was asked to perform a specific task. Experiment results show that we could achieve a data-sampling rate of over 1 KHz, transmitting data up to a distance of 20 meter and maintain a battery life of around 24 hours. Taking advantage of these features, FreeWalker can be used in various applications, like medical diagnosis, rehabilitation, sports and entertainment. PMID:26737102

  10. Validity of the Kinect for Gait Assessment: A Focused Review.

    PubMed

    Springer, Shmuel; Yogev Seligmann, Galit

    2016-01-01

    Gait analysis may enhance clinical practice. However, its use is limited due to the need for expensive equipment which is not always available in clinical settings. Recent evidence suggests that Microsoft Kinect may provide a low cost gait analysis method. The purpose of this report is to critically evaluate the literature describing the concurrent validity of using the Kinect as a gait analysis instrument. An online search of PubMed, CINAHL, and ProQuest databases was performed. Included were studies in which walking was assessed with the Kinect and another gold standard device, and consisted of at least one numerical finding of spatiotemporal or kinematic measures. Our search identified 366 papers, from which 12 relevant studies were retrieved. The results demonstrate that the Kinect is valid only for some spatiotemporal gait parameters. Although the kinematic parameters measured by the Kinect followed the trend of the joint trajectories, they showed poor validity and large errors. In conclusion, the Kinect may have the potential to be used as a tool for measuring spatiotemporal aspects of gait, yet standardized methods should be established, and future examinations with both healthy subjects and clinical participants are required in order to integrate the Kinect as a clinical gait analysis tool. PMID:26861323

  11. Validity of the Kinect for Gait Assessment: A Focused Review

    PubMed Central

    Springer, Shmuel; Yogev Seligmann, Galit

    2016-01-01

    Gait analysis may enhance clinical practice. However, its use is limited due to the need for expensive equipment which is not always available in clinical settings. Recent evidence suggests that Microsoft Kinect may provide a low cost gait analysis method. The purpose of this report is to critically evaluate the literature describing the concurrent validity of using the Kinect as a gait analysis instrument. An online search of PubMed, CINAHL, and ProQuest databases was performed. Included were studies in which walking was assessed with the Kinect and another gold standard device, and consisted of at least one numerical finding of spatiotemporal or kinematic measures. Our search identified 366 papers, from which 12 relevant studies were retrieved. The results demonstrate that the Kinect is valid only for some spatiotemporal gait parameters. Although the kinematic parameters measured by the Kinect followed the trend of the joint trajectories, they showed poor validity and large errors. In conclusion, the Kinect may have the potential to be used as a tool for measuring spatiotemporal aspects of gait, yet standardized methods should be established, and future examinations with both healthy subjects and clinical participants are required in order to integrate the Kinect as a clinical gait analysis tool. PMID:26861323

  12. Automatic identification of gait events using an instrumented sock

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Textile-based transducers are an emerging technology in which piezo-resistive properties of materials are used to measure an applied strain. By incorporating these sensors into a sock, this technology offers the potential to detect critical events during the stance phase of the gait cycle. This could prove useful in several applications, such as functional electrical stimulation (FES) systems to assist gait. Methods We investigated the output of a knitted resistive strain sensor during walking and sought to determine the degree of similarity between the sensor output and the ankle angle in the sagittal plane. In addition, we investigated whether it would be possible to predict three key gait events, heel strike, heel lift and toe off, with a relatively straight-forward algorithm. This worked by predicting gait events to occur at fixed time offsets from specific peaks in the sensor signal. Results Our results showed that, for all subjects, the sensor output exhibited the same general characteristics as the ankle joint angle. However, there were large between-subjects differences in the degree of similarity between the two curves. Despite this variability, it was possible to accurately predict gait events using a simple algorithm. This algorithm displayed high levels of trial-to-trial repeatability. Conclusions This study demonstrates the potential of using textile-based transducers in future devices that provide active gait assistance. PMID:21619570

  13. Gait Deviations in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Kindregan, Deirdre; Gallagher, Louise; Gormley, John

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, it has become clear that children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) have difficulty with gross motor function and coordination, factors which influence gait. Knowledge of gait abnormalities may be useful for assessment and treatment planning. This paper reviews the literature assessing gait deviations in children with ASD. Five online databases were searched using keywords “gait” and “autism,” and 11 studies were found which examined gait in childhood ASD. Children with ASD tend to augment their walking stability with a reduced stride length, increased step width and therefore wider base of support, and increased time in the stance phase. Children with ASD have reduced range of motion at the ankle and knee during gait, with increased hip flexion. Decreased peak hip flexor and ankle plantar flexor moments in children with ASD may imply weakness around these joints, which is further exhibited by a reduction in ground reaction forces at toe-off in children with ASD. Children with ASD have altered gait patterns to healthy controls, widened base of support, and reduced range of motion. Several studies refer to cerebellar and basal ganglia involvement as the patterns described suggest alterations in those areas of the brain. Further research should compare children with ASD to other clinical groups to improve assessment and treatment planning. PMID:25922766

  14. A reinforcement learning approach to gait training improves retention

    PubMed Central

    Hasson, Christopher J.; Manczurowsky, Julia; Yen, Sheng-Che

    2015-01-01

    Many gait training programs are based on supervised learning principles: an individual is guided towards a desired gait pattern with directional error feedback. While this results in rapid adaptation, improvements quickly disappear. This study tested the hypothesis that a reinforcement learning approach improves retention and transfer of a new gait pattern. The results of a pilot study and larger experiment are presented. Healthy subjects were randomly assigned to either a supervised group, who received explicit instructions and directional error feedback while they learned a new gait pattern on a treadmill, or a reinforcement group, who was only shown whether they were close to or far from the desired gait. Subjects practiced for 10 min, followed by immediate and overnight retention and over-ground transfer tests. The pilot study showed that subjects could learn a new gait pattern under a reinforcement learning paradigm. The larger experiment, which had twice as many subjects (16 in each group) showed that the reinforcement group had better overnight retention than the supervised group (a 32% vs. 120% error increase, respectively), but there were no differences for over-ground transfer. These results suggest that encouraging participants to find rewarding actions through self-guided exploration is beneficial for retention. PMID:26379524

  15. User Identification Using Gait Patterns on UbiFloorII

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Jaeseok

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a system of identifying individuals by their gait patterns. We take into account various distinguishable features that can be extracted from a user’s gait and then divide them into two classes: walking pattern and stepping pattern. The conditions we assume are that our target environments are domestic areas, the number of users is smaller than 10, and all users ambulate with bare feet considering the everyday lifestyle of the Korean home. Under these conditions, we have developed a system that identifies individuals’ gait patterns using our biometric sensor, UbiFloorII. We have created UbiFloorII to collect walking samples and created software modules to extract the user’s gait pattern. To identify the users based on the gait patterns extracted from walking samples over UbiFloorII, we have deployed multilayer perceptron network, a feedforward artificial neural network model. The results show that both walking pattern and stepping pattern extracted from users’ gait over the UbiFloorII are distinguishable enough to identify the users and that fusing two classifiers at the matching score level improves the recognition accuracy. Therefore, our proposed system may provide unobtrusive and automatic user identification methods in ubiquitous computing environments, particularly in domestic areas. PMID:22163758

  16. Gait Planning and Stability Control of a Quadruped Robot.

    PubMed

    Li, Junmin; Wang, Jinge; Yang, Simon X; Zhou, Kedong; Tang, Huijuan

    2016-01-01

    In order to realize smooth gait planning and stability control of a quadruped robot, a new controller algorithm based on CPG-ZMP (central pattern generator-zero moment point) is put forward in this paper. To generate smooth gait and shorten the adjusting time of the model oscillation system, a new CPG model controller and its gait switching strategy based on Wilson-Cowan model are presented in the paper. The control signals of knee-hip joints are obtained by the improved multi-DOF reduced order control theory. To realize stability control, the adaptive speed adjustment and gait switch are completed by the real-time computing of ZMP. Experiment results show that the quadruped robot's gaits are efficiently generated and the gait switch is smooth in the CPG control algorithm. Meanwhile, the stability of robot's movement is improved greatly with the CPG-ZMP algorithm. The algorithm in this paper has good practicability, which lays a foundation for the production of the robot prototype. PMID:27143959

  17. Predictors of Gait Speed in Patients after Hip Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Craik, Rebecca L.; Lopopolo, Rosalie; Tomlinson, James D.; Brenneman, Susan K.

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: Following hip fracture, patients demonstrate greatly reduced walking speeds 1 year later compared with age-matched elders. The purpose of our study was to examine the factors that relate to gait speed in patients after hip fracture. Methods: Forty-two men and women (mean age 79 ± 7.5 years) who sustained a hip fracture participated in this study. Linear regression analysis was used to determine a statistical model that best predicted gait speed, the dependent variable. Gait speed was measured with a computerized gait mat. The independent variables were age, sex, height, weight, time post-fracture, medications, mental status, depression, balance confidence, Medical Outcome Studies, Short Form (SF-36), balance, and lower extremity isometric force. All subjects were discharged from physical therapy services, and measurements were taken, on average, 17 weeks post-fracture. Results: Using stepwise regression, 72% of the variance in gait speed was explained by summed lower extremity strength normalized by body weight, general health (SF-36), and balance confidence (Activities-specific Balance Confidence Scale). Conclusions: Impairments (summed lower extremity strength) and risk factors (perception of general health and balance confidence) are important predictors of gait speed in elders after hip fracture. PMID:20145738

  18. Hysteresis in the metachronal-tripod gait transition of insects: A modeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiki, Soichiro; Aoi, Shinya; Funato, Tetsuro; Tomita, Nozomi; Senda, Kei; Tsuchiya, Kazuo

    2013-07-01

    Locomotion in biological systems involves various gaits, and hysteresis appears when the gaits change in accordance with the locomotion speed. That is, the gaits vary at different locomotion speeds depending on the direction of speed change. Although hysteresis is a typical characteristic of nonlinear dynamic systems, the underlying mechanism for the hysteresis in gait transitions remains largely unclear. In this study, we construct a neuromechanical model of an insect and investigate the dynamic characteristics of its gait and gait transition. The simulation results show that our insect model produces metachronal and tripod gaits depending on the locomotion speed through dynamic interactions among the body mechanical system, the nervous system, and the environment in a self-organized manner. They also show that it undergoes the metachronal-tripod gait transition with hysteresis by changing the locomotion speed. We examined the hysteresis mechanism in the metachronal-tripod gait transition of insects from a dynamic viewpoint.

  19. Preliminary study on verifying the detection of gait intention based on knee joint anterior displacement of gait slopes.

    PubMed

    Yu, Changho; Kang, Seung Rok; Yang, Giltae; Hong, Chul Un; Lee, Hyung Jong; Oh, Do Young; Kwon, Tae Kyu

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the feasibility of the Infrared (IR) sensor-based walking aids for detecting the gait intention. To compensate for the defects of Force Sensing Resistors (FSRs) or force sensors, such as the velocity control problem on gait slopes, we used IR sensors to investigate knee joint anterior displacement in order to recognize the gait intention. We also measure leg muscle activities and foot pressure, in order to verify our investigation. We placed two IR sensors on the rollator center to sense left and right leg walking intentions. We took EMG signals of four leg muscles, and analyzed them. Foot pressure analysis parameters were the measured force and mean pressure. We conducted experiments on twenty young healthy adults. The results show that knee joint anterior displacement increases according to gait slope and velocity. We confirm similar results of knee joint anterior displacement through the IR sensors. PMID:26406052

  20. Novel characterization of gait impairments in people with multiple sclerosis by means of the gait profile score.

    PubMed

    Pau, Massimiliano; Coghe, Giancarlo; Atzeni, Claudia; Corona, Federica; Pilloni, Giuseppina; Marrosu, Maria Giovanna; Cocco, Eleonora; Galli, Manuela

    2014-10-15

    The assessment of gait abnormalities in individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS) represents a key factor in evaluating the effectiveness of rehabilitation treatments. Despite the availability of sophisticated equipment to objectively evaluate the kinematic aspects of gait, there are still some difficulties in processing the large and complex amount of data they produce in the daily clinical routine. On the basis of the above-mentioned considerations we propose a novel characterization of gait kinematics in individuals with MS, based on a single measure (gait profile score, GPS) obtained from a quantitative three-dimensional analysis of gait performed using an opto-electronic system. We also investigated the correlation between GPS and the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) values. Thirty-four patients suffering from relapsing-remitting MS (13 female, 21 male, mean age 46.7 years) with an EDSS score of ≤6 underwent a gait analysis from which the GPS index was calculated. Their results were compared with those of a control group of healthy age- and gender-matched subjects. The GPS of individuals with MS was found significantly higher with respect to controls (9.12° vs. 5.67°, p<0.001) as the result of kinematic differences in gait patterns referring to pelvic tilt and rotation, hip flexion-extension and rotation, knee flexion-extension and ankle dorsi- and plantar-flexion. A moderate correlation was also found between the EDSS score of the participants and their GPS values (r = 0.63, p < 0.001). The GPS index thus appears suitable to represent gait deviations from physiological patterns in individuals affected by MS and potentially useful in assessing the outcomes related both to rehabilitation programs and pharmacologic/physical therapies. PMID:25073571

  1. Gait analysis and the cumulative gait index (CGI): Translational tools to assess impairments exhibited by rats with olivocerebellar ataxia.

    PubMed

    Lambert, C S; Philpot, R M; Engberg, M E; Johns, B E; Kim, S H; Wecker, L

    2014-11-01

    Deviations from 'normal' locomotion exhibited by humans and laboratory animals may be determined using automated systems that capture both temporal and spatial gait parameters. Although many measures generated by these systems are unrelated and independent, some may be related and dependent, representing redundant assessments of function. To investigate this possibility, a treadmill-based system was used to capture gait parameters from normal and ataxic rats, and a multivariate analysis was conducted to determine deviations from normal. Rats were trained on the treadmill at two speeds, and gait parameters were generated prior to and following lesions of the olivocerebellar pathway. Control (non-lesioned) animals exhibited stable hindlimb gait parameters across assessments at each speed. Lesioned animals exhibited alterations in multiple hindlimb gait parameters, characterized by significant increases in stride frequency, braking duration, stance width, step angle, and paw angle and decreases in stride, stance, swing and propulsion durations, stride length and paw area. A principal component analysis of initial hindlimb measures indicated three uncorrelated factors mediating performance, termed Rhythmicity, Thrust and Contact. Deviation in the performance of each animal from the group mean was determined for each factor and values summed to yield the cumulative gait index (CGI), a single value reflecting variation within the group. The CGI for lesioned animals increased 2.3-fold relative to unlesioned animals. This study characterizes gait alterations in laboratory rats rendered ataxic by destruction of the climbing fiber pathway innervating Purkinje cells and demonstrates that a single index can be used to describe overall gait impairments. PMID:25116252

  2. Gait in thoracolumbar/lumbar adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: effect of surgery on gait mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Mahaudens, Philippe; Detrembleur, C; Mousny, M; Banse, X

    2010-07-01

    For patients whose scoliosis progresses, surgery remains the ultimate way to correct and stabilise the deformity while maintaining as many mobile spinal segments as possible. In thoracolumbar/lumbar adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS), the spinal fusion has to be extended to the lumbar spine. The use of anterior spinal fusion (ASF) instead of the classic posterior fusion (PSF) may preserve more distal spinal levels in attempt to limit the consequences of surgery on trunk mobility. The effects of surgery on body shape, pain and the decompensation phenomenon have all been well evaluated. Very few studies have addressed the effect of ASF or PSF on basic activities, such as walking. Before any treatment, AIS patients already have reduced pelvis, hip and shoulder motion when walking at a normal speed compared with adolescents without scoliosis (control group). Additionally, they have longer contraction time of the lumbar and pelvic muscles leading to an excessive energy cost and reduced muscle efficiency. In addition, if these changes are associated with spinal stiffness, spinal fusion could further negatively affect this pre-surgical inefficient walk. The goals of this study were (a) to compare pre- and 1-year post-surgery conditions in order to assess the effects of spinal arthrodesis on gait parameters and (b) to compare the anterior versus the posterior surgical approaches. Nineteen young females with thoracolumbar/lumbar AIS were assessed by radiological and clinical examination and by conventional gait analysis before surgery and at almost 12 months after surgery. Seven subjects underwent surgery using ASF and 12 using PSF. Three-dimensional gait analysis was performed on a motor-driven treadmill at spontaneous self-selected speed to record kinematic, electromyographic (EMG), mechanical and energetic measurements synchronously. Although it was expected that the instrumentation would modify the characteristics of normal walking, this study showed that surgery

  3. Gait in thoracolumbar/lumbar adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: effect of surgery on gait mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Detrembleur, C.; Mousny, M.; Banse, X.

    2010-01-01

    For patients whose scoliosis progresses, surgery remains the ultimate way to correct and stabilise the deformity while maintaining as many mobile spinal segments as possible. In thoracolumbar/lumbar adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS), the spinal fusion has to be extended to the lumbar spine. The use of anterior spinal fusion (ASF) instead of the classic posterior fusion (PSF) may preserve more distal spinal levels in attempt to limit the consequences of surgery on trunk mobility. The effects of surgery on body shape, pain and the decompensation phenomenon have all been well evaluated. Very few studies have addressed the effect of ASF or PSF on basic activities, such as walking. Before any treatment, AIS patients already have reduced pelvis, hip and shoulder motion when walking at a normal speed compared with adolescents without scoliosis (control group). Additionally, they have longer contraction time of the lumbar and pelvic muscles leading to an excessive energy cost and reduced muscle efficiency. In addition, if these changes are associated with spinal stiffness, spinal fusion could further negatively affect this pre-surgical inefficient walk. The goals of this study were (a) to compare pre- and 1-year post-surgery conditions in order to assess the effects of spinal arthrodesis on gait parameters and (b) to compare the anterior versus the posterior surgical approaches. Nineteen young females with thoracolumbar/lumbar AIS were assessed by radiological and clinical examination and by conventional gait analysis before surgery and at almost 12 months after surgery. Seven subjects underwent surgery using ASF and 12 using PSF. Three-dimensional gait analysis was performed on a motor-driven treadmill at spontaneous self-selected speed to record kinematic, electromyographic (EMG), mechanical and energetic measurements synchronously. Although it was expected that the instrumentation would modify the characteristics of normal walking, this study showed that surgery

  4. Development of the RT-GAIT, a Real-Time feedback device to improve Gait of individuals with stroke.

    PubMed

    Hegde, Nagaraj; Fulk, George D; Sazonov, Edward S

    2015-08-01

    Regaining the ability to walk is a major rehabilitation goal after a stroke. Recent research suggests that, in people with stroke, task-oriented and intensive rehabilitation strategies can drive cortical reorganization and increase activity levels. This paper describes development and pilot testing of a novel wearable device for Real-Time Gait and Activity Improving Telerehabilitation (RT-GAIT), designed for use with such rehabilitation strategies. The RT-GAIT provides auditory or tactile feedback to the individual wearing the platform. The feedback is based on the amount of time spent in stance phase on each foot, as measured by the pressure sensors embedded into the insoles. The system was initially bench-validated using sensor signals collected in a previous study. Next, a clinical case study was conducted with one post-stroke individual. The results of the case study suggest that the RT-GAIT device can potentially improve the gait parameters. Mean difference in stance times between the healthy limb and paretic limb was improved by 48% and the standard deviation for the same was improved by 87.5%, between baseline measurements and the measurements taken after the treatment with the RT-GAIT. PMID:26737592

  5. Extraction of human gait signatures: an inverse kinematic approach using Groebner basis theory applied to gait cycle analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barki, Anum; Kendricks, Kimberly; Tuttle, Ronald F.; Bunker, David J.; Borel, Christoph C.

    2013-05-01

    This research highlights the results obtained from applying the method of inverse kinematics, using Groebner basis theory, to the human gait cycle to extract and identify lower extremity gait signatures. The increased threat from suicide bombers and the force protection issues of today have motivated a team at Air Force Institute of Technology (AFIT) to research pattern recognition in the human gait cycle. The purpose of this research is to identify gait signatures of human subjects and distinguish between subjects carrying a load to those subjects without a load. These signatures were investigated via a model of the lower extremities based on motion capture observations, in particular, foot placement and the joint angles for subjects affected by carrying extra load on the body. The human gait cycle was captured and analyzed using a developed toolkit consisting of an inverse kinematic motion model of the lower extremity and a graphical user interface. Hip, knee, and ankle angles were analyzed to identify gait angle variance and range of motion. Female subjects exhibited the most knee angle variance and produced a proportional correlation between knee flexion and load carriage.

  6. Effects of obesity and chronic low back pain on gait

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Obesity is often associated with low back pain (LBP). Despite empirical evidence that LBP induces gait abnormalities, there is a lack of quantitative analysis of the combined effect of obesity and LBP on gait. The aim of our study was to quantify the gait pattern of obese subjects with and without LBP and normal-mass controls by using Gait Analysis (GA), in order to investigate the cumulative effects of obesity and LBP on gait. Methods Eight obese females with chronic LBP (OLG; age: 40.5 ± 10.1 years; BMI: 42.39 ± 5.47 Kg/m2), 10 obese females (OG; age: 33.6 ± 5.2 years; BMI: 39.26 ± 2.39 Kg/m2) and 10 healthy female subjects (CG; age: 33.4 ± 9.6 years; BMI: 22.8 ± 3.2 Kg/m2), were enrolled in this study and assessed with video recording and GA. Results and Discussion OLG showed longer stance duration and shorter step length when compared to OG and CG. They also had a low pelvis and hip ROM on the frontal plane, a low knee flexion in the swing phase and knee range of motion, a low dorsiflexion in stance and swing as compared to OG. No statistically significant differences were found in ankle power generation at push-off between OLG and OG, which appeared lower if compared to CG. At hip level, both OLG and OG exhibited high power generation levels during stance, with OLG showing the highest values. Conclusions Our results demonstrated that the association of obesity and LBP affects more the gait pattern than obesity alone. OLG were in fact characterised by an altered knee and ankle strategy during gait as compared to OG and CG. These elements may help optimizing rehabilitation planning and treatment in these patients. PMID:21943156

  7. Two-dimensional PCA-based human gait identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jinyan; Wu, Rongteng

    2012-11-01

    It is very necessary to recognize person through visual surveillance automatically for public security reason. Human gait based identification focus on recognizing human by his walking video automatically using computer vision and image processing approaches. As a potential biometric measure, human gait identification has attracted more and more researchers. Current human gait identification methods can be divided into two categories: model-based methods and motion-based methods. In this paper a two-Dimensional Principal Component Analysis and temporal-space analysis based human gait identification method is proposed. Using background estimation and image subtraction we can get a binary images sequence from the surveillance video. By comparing the difference of two adjacent images in the gait images sequence, we can get a difference binary images sequence. Every binary difference image indicates the body moving mode during a person walking. We use the following steps to extract the temporal-space features from the difference binary images sequence: Projecting one difference image to Y axis or X axis we can get two vectors. Project every difference image in the difference binary images sequence to Y axis or X axis difference binary images sequence we can get two matrixes. These two matrixes indicate the styles of one walking. Then Two-Dimensional Principal Component Analysis(2DPCA) is used to transform these two matrixes to two vectors while at the same time keep the maximum separability. Finally the similarity of two human gait images is calculated by the Euclidean distance of the two vectors. The performance of our methods is illustrated using the CASIA Gait Database.

  8. Gait control and executive dysfunction in early schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Lallart, Elise; Jouvent, Roland; Herrmann, François R; Perez-Diaz, Fernando; Lallart, Xavier; Beauchet, Olivier; Allali, Gilles

    2014-04-01

    Dysexecutive functioning, which is described as an enduring core feature of schizophrenia, has been associated with gait disorders. However, few studies have reported gait disorders in schizophrenia patients. The objective of this study was to examine the association between executive dysfunction and gait performance in recent-onset schizophrenia patients using the dual task paradigm. Thirty-two subjects participated to the study: 17 with recent-onset schizophrenia and 15 healthy age-matched controls. Executive functions were evaluated using the Frontal Assessment Battery, Stroop and Trail-Making tests. Mean values and coefficients of variation (CV) of the temporal gait parameters while single tasking (just walking) and while dual tasking (walking and forward counting, walking and backward counting, walking and verbal fluency) were measured using the SMTEC(®)-footswitch system. We focused on the CV of stride time as this measure has been shown to be the most representative parameter of higher gait control. A strong effect of the stride time was found in the group factor for the verbal fluency dual-task when compared to controls (Cohen's d mean = 1.28 and CV = 1.05). The effect was lower in the other dual tasks, and insignificant in the single task of walking. This study shows that patients exhibit higher stride-to-stride variability while dual tasking than controls. It also shows a stronger impact of verbal fluency on gait regularity compared to the other dual tasks revealing a relationship between the executive dysfunction and gait modification. Those results are in line with the idea that schizophrenia implies not only cognitive but also motor functioning and coordination impairment. PMID:24201834

  9. The mental representation of the human gait in young and older adults

    PubMed Central

    Stöckel, Tino; Jacksteit, Robert; Behrens, Martin; Skripitz, Ralf; Bader, Rainer; Mau-Moeller, Anett

    2015-01-01

    The link between mental representation (MREP) structures and motor performance has been evidenced for a great variety of movement skills, but not for the human gait. Therefore the present study sought to investigate the cognitive memory structures underlying the human gait in young and older adults. In a first experiment, gait parameters at comfortable gait speed (OptoGait) were compared with gait-specific MREPs (structural dimensional analysis of MREP; SDA-M) in 36 young adults. Participants were divided into a slow- and fast-walking group. The proven relationship between gait speed and executive functions such as working memory led to the hypothesis that gait pattern and MREP differ between slow- and fast-walking adults. In a second experiment, gait performance and MREPs were compared between 24 young (27.9 years) and 24 elderly (60.1 years) participants. As age-related declines in gait performance occur from the seventh decade of life onward, we hypothesized that gait parameters would not be affected until the age of 60 years accompanied by unchanged MREP. Data of experiment one revealed that gait parameters and MREPs differed significantly between slow and fast walkers. Notably, eleven previously incurred musculoskeletal injuries were documented for the slow walkers but only two injuries and one disorder for fast walkers. Experiment two revealed no age-related differences in gait parameters or MREPs between healthy young and older adults. In conclusion, the differences in gait parameters associated with lower comfortable gait speeds are reflected by differences in MREPs, whereby SDA-M data indicate that the single limb support phase may serve as a critical functional period. These differences probably resulted from previously incurred musculoskeletal injuries. Our data further indicate that the human gait and its MREP are stable until the age of 60. SDA-M may be considered as a valuable clinical tool for diagnosis of gait abnormalities and monitoring of

  10. Laboratory review: the role of gait analysis in seniors' mobility and fall prevention.

    PubMed

    Bridenbaugh, Stephanie A; Kressig, Reto W

    2011-01-01

    Walking is a complex motor task generally performed automatically by healthy adults. Yet, by the elderly, walking is often no longer performed automatically. Older adults require more attention for motor control while walking than younger adults. Falls, often with serious consequences, can be the result. Gait impairments are one of the biggest risk factors for falls. Several studies have identified changes in certain gait parameters as independent predictors of fall risk. Such gait changes are often too discrete to be detected by clinical observation alone. At the Basel Mobility Center, we employ the GAITRite electronic walkway system for spatial-temporal gait analysis. Although we have a large range of indications for gait analyses and several areas of clinical research, our focus is on the association between gait and cognition. Gait analysis with walking as a single-task condition alone is often insufficient to reveal underlying gait disorders present during normal, everyday activities. We use a dual-task paradigm, walking while simultaneously performing a second cognitive task, to assess the effects of divided attention on motor performance and gait control. Objective quantification of such clinically relevant gait changes is necessary to determine fall risk. Early detection of gait disorders and fall risk permits early intervention and, in the best-case scenario, fall prevention. We and others have shown that rhythmic movement training such as Jaques-Dalcroze eurhythmics, tai chi and social dancing can improve gait regularity and automaticity, thus increasing gait safety and reducing fall risk. PMID:20980732

  11. Gait Alterations During Constant Pace Treadmill Racewalking.

    PubMed

    Hanley, Brian

    2015-08-01

    Racewalking is an Olympic event requiring great endurance, and racewalkers often use treadmills in training because of the benefits of having a flat unchanging surface where pace judgment can be learned and because inclement weather can be avoided. The effects of fatigue associated with racewalking on a treadmill have not been studied and could be informative with regard to the maintenance of legal technique. The aim of this study was to measure key gait variables during a physically demanding treadmill racewalk. Fourteen international racewalkers completed 10 km on an instrumented treadmill at a pace equivalent to 103% of their recent best time. Spatiotemporal and ground reaction force data were recorded at 4 distances. High-speed videography data were simultaneously recorded to analyze changes in knee angle between the early and late stages. Increases in step length and corresponding decreases in cadence were found, although the small changes were not considered meaningful. There was also a small increase in flight time and a small decrease in push-off force. There were no other significant changes for any other variables (including knee angles). The increase in flight time might be important given that racewalkers are not permitted a visible loss of contact and suggests that fatiguing sessions on a treadmill can lead to the adoption of nonlegal technique. However, this disadvantage of treadmill training can be negated if the coach scrutinizes athletes throughout the session, and overall the consistent technique used is of benefit with regard to learning correct form and pacing ability. PMID:25647657

  12. Positive force feedback in bouncing gaits?

    PubMed Central

    Geyer, Hartmut; Seyfarth, Andre; Blickhan, Reinhard

    2003-01-01

    During bouncing gaits (running, hopping, trotting), passive compliant structures (e.g. tendons, ligaments) store and release part of the stride energy. Here, active muscles must provide the required force to withstand the developing tendon strain and to compensate for the inevitable energy losses. This requires an appropriate control of muscle activation. In this study, for hopping, the potential involvement of afferent information from muscle receptors (muscle spindles, Golgi tendon organs) is investigated using a two-segment leg model with one extensor muscle. It is found that: (i) positive feedbacks of muscle-fibre length and muscle force can result in periodic bouncing; (ii) positive force feedback (F+) stabilizes bouncing patterns within a large range of stride energies (maximum hopping height of 16.3 cm, almost twofold higher than the length feedback); and (iii) when employing this reflex scheme, for moderate hopping heights (up to 8.8 cm), an overall elastic leg behaviour is predicted (hopping frequency of 1.4-3 Hz, leg stiffness of 9-27 kN m(-1)). Furthermore, F+ could stabilize running. It is suggested that, during the stance phase of bouncing tasks, the reflex-generated motor control based on feedbacks might be an efficient and reliable alternative to central motor commands. PMID:14561282

  13. Quantification of gait in dystonic Gunn rats.

    PubMed

    Chaniary, Kunal D; Baron, Mark S; Rice, Ann C; Wetzel, Paul A; Ramakrishnan, Viswanathan; Shapiro, Steven M

    2009-06-15

    Spontaneously jaundiced Gunn rats exposed to sulfadimethoxine develop bilirubin encephalopathy (kernicterus) with hearing loss and dystonia, closely resembling the human syndrome. We recently characterized the electromyographic activity in this animal model supporting our clinical impression of dystonia. The objective of this study was to develop a simple, non-invasive method to quantify the motor deficits in dystonic rodents. On postnatal day 16, Gunn rats were treated with 100mg/kg of sulfadimethoxine or saline. On postnatal day 31, the ventral view of the animals was videotaped while the animals walked inside a Plexiglas chamber. Individual video frames were reviewed and specific gait parameters including hindlimb spread, step length ratio variability, stance/swing ratio and walking speed were compared between dystonic and non-dystonic jaundiced and non-jaundiced littermates. Data analysis demonstrated statistically significant increases in hindlimb spread and step length ratio variability and decreases in walking speed in dystonic animals as compared to controls. This study demonstrates a valuable technique to objectively characterize dystonia in Gunn rats, which could have wide use for other experimental movement disorders as well. PMID:19464517

  14. Combined robotic-aided gait training and 3D gait analysis provide objective treatment and assessment of gait in children and adolescents with Acquired Hemiplegia.

    PubMed

    Molteni, Erika; Beretta, Elena; Altomonte, Daniele; Formica, Francesca; Strazzer, Sandra

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of a fully objective rehabilitative and assessment process of the gait abilities in children suffering from Acquired Hemiplegia (AH), we studied the combined employment of robotic-aided gait training (RAGT) and 3D-Gait Analysis (GA). A group of 12 patients with AH underwent 20 sessions of RAGT in addition to traditional manual physical therapy (PT). All the patients were evaluated before and after the training by using the Gross Motor Function Measures (GMFM), the Functional Assessment Questionnaire (FAQ), and the 6 Minutes Walk Test. They also received GA before and after RAGT+PT. Finally, results were compared with those obtained from a control group of 3 AH children who underwent PT only. After the training, the GMFM and FAQ showed significant improvement in patients receiving RAGT+PT. GA highlighted significant improvement in stance symmetry and step length of the affected limb. Moreover, pelvic tilt increased, and hip kinematics on the sagittal plane revealed statistically significant increase in the range of motion during the hip flex-extension. Our data suggest that the combined program RAGT+PT induces improvements in functional activities and gait pattern in children with AH, and it demonstrates that the combined employment of RAGT and 3D-GA ensures a fully objective rehabilitative program. PMID:26737310

  15. Quality of Life and Gait in Elderly Group

    PubMed Central

    Taguchi, Carlos Kazuo; Teixeira, Jacqueline Pitanga; Alves, Lucas Vieira; Oliveira, Priscila Feliciano; Raposo, Oscar Felipe Falcão

    2015-01-01

    Introduction  The process of aging could lead to seniors being more prone to falls, which affects their quality of life. Objective  The objective of this study is to investigate the relationship between quality of life and gait in the elderly. Methods  We used World Health Organization Quality of Life-Brief (WHOQOL-Brief) Brazilian version and the Dynamic Gait Index to assess fifty-six volunteers from the northeast of Brazil. Ages ranged from 60 to 85 years. Results  The Dynamic Gait Index, which indicates the probability of falls, resulted in 36.3% of the sample presenting abnormal results. There was correlation between domain 2 (psychological) and domain 4 (environment) with domain 1(Physical) and domain 3 (Social); a negative correlation between age and Domain 2; correlation between Question 1 (How would you rate your quality of life?) and domains 1, 2, and 4 and no correlation between questions 1 and 2 (How satisfied are you with your health?). Question 2 was correlated with all of the domains. There was negative association between question 1 and falls, and a slight correlation between the Dynamic Gait Index scores and Question 1. Conclusion  The self-perception of the study group about their quality of life was either good or very good, even though a considerable percentage of individuals had suffered falls or reported gait disturbances.

  16. A comparative collision-based analysis of human gait

    PubMed Central

    Lee, David V.; Comanescu, Tudor N.; Butcher, Michael T.; Bertram, John E. A.

    2013-01-01

    This study compares human walking and running, and places them within the context of other mammalian gaits. We use a collision-based approach to analyse the fundamental dynamics of the centre of mass (CoM) according to three angles derived from the instantaneous force and velocity vectors. These dimensionless angles permit comparisons across gait, species and size. The collision angle Φ, which is equivalent to the dimensionless mechanical cost of transport CoTmech, is found to be three times greater during running than walking of humans. This threefold difference is consistent with previous studies of walking versus trotting of quadrupeds, albeit tends to be greater in the gaits of humans and hopping bipeds than in quadrupeds. Plotting the collision angle Φ together with the angles of the CoM force vector Θ and velocity vector Λ results in the functional grouping of bipedal and quadrupedal gaits according to their CoM dynamics—walking, galloping and ambling are distinguished as separate gaits that employ collision reduction, whereas trotting, running and hopping employ little collision reduction and represent more of a continuum that is influenced by dimensionless speed. Comparable with quadrupedal mammals, collision fraction (the ratio of actual to potential collision) is 0.51 during walking and 0.89 during running, indicating substantial collision reduction during walking, but not running, of humans. PMID:24089334

  17. Why we should study gait initiation in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Delval, A; Tard, C; Defebvre, L

    2014-01-01

    The gait initiation process is of particular interest in Parkinson's disease because it combines motor and cognitive components of movement preparation (referred to as anticipatory postural adjustments) and movement execution (the step by itself). Moreover, gait initiation in Parkinson's disease is often affected by motor blocks (a subtype of the "freezing of gait" phenomenon). Gait initiation disturbances in Parkinson's disease include delayed release of anticipatory postural adjustments, hypokinetic anticipatory postural adjustments (reduced scaling) and bradykinetic anticipatory postural adjustments (abnormal timing). The most extreme form is freezing of gait with sometimes the absence of anticipatory postural adjustments. Other phenomena can be also described in some freezing patients (such as multiple anticipatory postural adjustments, described clinically as "knee trembling"). The fact that emotion, attention, external triggers and dopaminergic drugs can all modify this motor program suggests the existence of a complex pathophysiological mechanism that involves not only locomotor networks but also cortical areas and the basal ganglia system. Abnormal coupling between standing posture and anticipatory postural adjustments and between the latter and step execution appears to be a crucial part of the pathophysiological mechanism. Although external cueing appears to be of interest, few studies have provided evidence of the efficacy of various rehabilitation methods in routine care. PMID:24502907

  18. [Development of a robotic walking simulator for gait rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Schmidt, H; Sorowka, D; Hesse, S; Bernhardt, R

    2003-10-01

    Restoration of gait is a major concern of rehabilitation after stroke or spinal cord injury. Modern concepts of motor learning favour a task-specific repetitive approach, i.e. "whoever wants to learn to walk again must walk." However, the physical demands this places on the therapist, is a limiting factor in the clinical routine setting. This article describes a robotic walking simulator for gait training that enables wheelchair-bound subjects to freely carry out repetitive practicing of an individually adapted gait pattern under simulation of the manual guidance of an experienced therapist. The technical principle applied makes use of programmable footplates with permanent foot/machine contact in combination with compliance control. The solution chosen comprises a planar parallel-serial hybrid kinematic system with three degrees of freedom that moves the feet in the sagittal plane. Gait analysis while floor walking and stair climbing, clinical practicability and safety aspects were the basis for the design. A variable compliance control enables man-machine interaction, ranging from purely position controlled movement to full compliance during swing phase above a virtual ground profile. In full compliance mode the robotic walking simulator behaves like a haptic device. The concept presented offers new prospects for individualized gait rehabilitation. PMID:14606269

  19. How robust is human gait to muscle weakness?

    PubMed Central

    van der Krogt, Marjolein M.; Delp, Scott L.; Schwartz, Michael H.

    2015-01-01

    Humans have a remarkable capacity to perform complex movements requiring agility, timing, and strength. Disuse, aging, and disease can lead to a loss of muscle strength, which frequently limits the performance of motor tasks. It is unknown, however, how much weakness can be tolerated before normal daily activities become impaired. This study examines the extent to which lower limb muscles can be weakened before normal walking is affected. We developed muscle-driven simulations of normal walking and then progressively weakened all major muscle groups, one at the time and simultaneously, to evaluate how much weakness could be tolerated before execution of normal gait became impossible. We further examined the compensations that arose as a result of weakening muscles. Our simulations revealed that normal walking is remarkably robust to weakness of some muscles but sensitive to weakness of others. Gait appears most robust to weakness of hip and knee extensors, which can tolerate weakness well and without a substantial increase in muscle stress. In contrast, gait is most sensitive to weakness of plantarflexors, hip abductors, and hip flexors. Weakness of individual muscles results in increased activation of the weak muscle, and in compensatory activation of other muscles. These compensations are generally inefficient, and generate unbalanced joint moments that require compensatory activation in yet other muscles. As a result, total muscle activation increases with weakness as does the cost of walking. By clarifying which muscles are critical to maintaining normal gait, our results provide important insights for developing therapies to prevent or improve gait pathology. PMID:22386624

  20. Muscle Activation during Gait in Children with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Ropars, Juliette; Lempereur, Mathieu; Vuillerot, Carole; Tiffreau, Vincent; Peudenier, Sylviane; Cuisset, Jean-Marie; Pereon, Yann; Leboeuf, Fabien; Delporte, Ludovic; Delpierre, Yannick; Gross, Raphaël; Brochard, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to investigate changes in muscle activity during gait in children with Duchenne muscular Dystrophy (DMD). Dynamic surface electromyography recordings (EMGs) of 16 children with DMD and pathological gait were compared with those of 15 control children. The activity of the rectus femoris (RF), vastus lateralis (VL), medial hamstrings (HS), tibialis anterior (TA) and gastrocnemius soleus (GAS) muscles was recorded and analysed quantitatively and qualitatively. The overall muscle activity in the children with DMD was significantly different from that of the control group. Percentage activation amplitudes of RF, HS and TA were greater throughout the gait cycle in the children with DMD and the timing of GAS activity differed from the control children. Significantly greater muscle coactivation was found in the children with DMD. There were no significant differences between sides. Since the motor command is normal in DMD, the hyper-activity and co-contractions likely compensate for gait instability and muscle weakness, however may have negative consequences on the muscles and may increase the energy cost of gait. Simple rehabilitative strategies such as targeted physical therapies may improve stability and thus the pattern of muscle activity. PMID:27622734

  1. Dynamic markers of altered gait rhythm in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hausdorff, J. M.; Lertratanakul, A.; Cudkowicz, M. E.; Peterson, A. L.; Kaliton, D.; Goldberger, A. L.

    2000-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a disorder marked by loss of motoneurons. We hypothesized that subjects with ALS would have an altered gait rhythm, with an increase in both the magnitude of the stride-to-stride fluctuations and perturbations in the fluctuation dynamics. To test for this locomotor instability, we quantitatively compared the gait rhythm of subjects with ALS with that of normal controls and with that of subjects with Parkinson's disease (PD) and Huntington's disease (HD), pathologies of the basal ganglia. Subjects walked for 5 min at their usual pace wearing an ankle-worn recorder that enabled determination of the duration of each stride and of stride-to-stride fluctuations. We found that the gait of patients with ALS is less steady and more temporally disorganized compared with that of healthy controls. In addition, advanced ALS, HD, and PD were associated with certain common, as well as apparently distinct, features of altered stride dynamics. Thus stride-to-stride control of gait rhythm is apparently compromised with ALS. Moreover, a matrix of markers based on gait dynamics may be useful in characterizing certain pathologies of motor control and, possibly, in quantitatively monitoring disease progression and evaluating therapeutic interventions.

  2. Robust Gait-Based Person Identification against Walking Speed Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aqmar, Muhammad Rasyid; Shinoda, Koichi; Furui, Sadaoki

    Variations in walking speed have a strong impact on gait-based person identification. We propose a method that is robust against walking-speed variations. It is based on a combination of cubic higher-order local auto-correlation (CHLAC), gait silhouette-based principal component analysis (GSP), and a statistical framework using hidden Markov models (HMMs). The CHLAC features capture the within-phase spatio-temporal characteristics of each individual, the GSP features retain more shape/phase information for better gait sequence alignment, and the HMMs classify the ID of each gait even when walking speed changes nonlinearly. We compared the performance of our method with other conventional methods using five different databases, SOTON, USF-NIST, CMU-MoBo, TokyoTech A and TokyoTech B. The proposed method was equal to or better than the others when the speed did not change greatly, and it was significantly better when the speed varied across and within a gait sequence.

  3. Secure and Privacy Enhanced Gait Authentication on Smart Phone

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Deokjai

    2014-01-01

    Smart environments established by the development of mobile technology have brought vast benefits to human being. However, authentication mechanisms on portable smart devices, particularly conventional biometric based approaches, still remain security and privacy concerns. These traditional systems are mostly based on pattern recognition and machine learning algorithms, wherein original biometric templates or extracted features are stored under unconcealed form for performing matching with a new biometric sample in the authentication phase. In this paper, we propose a novel gait based authentication using biometric cryptosystem to enhance the system security and user privacy on the smart phone. Extracted gait features are merely used to biometrically encrypt a cryptographic key which is acted as the authentication factor. Gait signals are acquired by using an inertial sensor named accelerometer in the mobile device and error correcting codes are adopted to deal with the natural variation of gait measurements. We evaluate our proposed system on a dataset consisting of gait samples of 34 volunteers. We achieved the lowest false acceptance rate (FAR) and false rejection rate (FRR) of 3.92% and 11.76%, respectively, in terms of key length of 50 bits. PMID:24955403

  4. Gait alterations can reduce the risk of edge loading.

    PubMed

    Wesseling, Mariska; Meyer, Christophe; De Groote, Friedl; Corten, Kristoff; Simon, Jean-Pierre; Desloovere, Kaat; Jonkers, Ilse

    2016-06-01

    Following metal-on-metal hip arthroplasty, edge loading (i.e., loading near the edge of a prosthesis cup) can increase wear and lead to early revision. The position and coverage angle of the prosthesis cup influence the risk of edge loading. This study investigates the effect of altered gait patterns, more specific hip, and pelvis kinematics, on the orientation of hip contact force and the consequent risk of antero-superior edge loading using muscle driven simulations of gait. With a cup orientation of 25° anteversion and 50° inclination and a coverage angle of 168°, many gait patterns presented risk of edge loading. Specifically at terminal double support, 189 out of 405 gait patterns indicated a risk of edge loading. At this time instant, the high hip contact forces and the proximity of the hip contact force to the edge of the cup indicated the likelihood of the occurrence of edge loading. Although the cup position contributed most to edge loading, altering kinematics considerably influenced the risk of edge loading. Increased hip abduction, resulting in decreasing hip contact force magnitude, and decreased hip extension, resulting in decreased risk on edge loading, are gait strategies that could prevent edge loading. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1069-1076, 2016. PMID:26632197

  5. Secure and privacy enhanced gait authentication on smart phone.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Thang; Choi, Deokjai

    2014-01-01

    Smart environments established by the development of mobile technology have brought vast benefits to human being. However, authentication mechanisms on portable smart devices, particularly conventional biometric based approaches, still remain security and privacy concerns. These traditional systems are mostly based on pattern recognition and machine learning algorithms, wherein original biometric templates or extracted features are stored under unconcealed form for performing matching with a new biometric sample in the authentication phase. In this paper, we propose a novel gait based authentication using biometric cryptosystem to enhance the system security and user privacy on the smart phone. Extracted gait features are merely used to biometrically encrypt a cryptographic key which is acted as the authentication factor. Gait signals are acquired by using an inertial sensor named accelerometer in the mobile device and error correcting codes are adopted to deal with the natural variation of gait measurements. We evaluate our proposed system on a dataset consisting of gait samples of 34 volunteers. We achieved the lowest false acceptance rate (FAR) and false rejection rate (FRR) of 3.92% and 11.76%, respectively, in terms of key length of 50 bits. PMID:24955403

  6. Rhythmic auditory stimulation in gait training for Parkinson's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Thaut, M H; McIntosh, G C; Rice, R R; Miller, R A; Rathbun, J; Brault, J M

    1996-03-01

    Rhythmic auditory stimulation (RAS) was used as a pacemaker during a 3-week home-based gait-training program for Parkinson's disease (PD) patients (n = 15). Electromyogram (EMG) patterns and stride parameters were assessed before and after the test without RAS to evaluate changes in gait patterns. Data were compared with those of two control groups (n = 11), who either did not participate in any gait training or who participated in an internally self-paced training program. RAS consisted of audiotapes with metronome-pulse patterns embedded into the on/off beat structure of rhythmically accentuated instrumental music. Patients who trained with RAS significantly (p < 0.05) improved their gait velocity by 25%, stride length by 12%, and step cadence by 10% more than self-paced subjects who improved their velocity by 7% and no-training subjects whose velocity decreased by 7%. In the RAS-group, timing of EMG patterns changed significantly (p < 0.05) in the anterior tibialis and vastus lateralis muscles. Evidence for rhythmic entrainment of gait patterns was shown by the ability of the RAS group to reproduce the speed of the last training tape within a 2% margin of error without RAS. PMID:8684391

  7. A comparative collision-based analysis of human gait.

    PubMed

    Lee, David V; Comanescu, Tudor N; Butcher, Michael T; Bertram, John E A

    2013-11-22

    This study compares human walking and running, and places them within the context of other mammalian gaits. We use a collision-based approach to analyse the fundamental dynamics of the centre of mass (CoM) according to three angles derived from the instantaneous force and velocity vectors. These dimensionless angles permit comparisons across gait, species and size. The collision angle Φ, which is equivalent to the dimensionless mechanical cost of transport CoTmech, is found to be three times greater during running than walking of humans. This threefold difference is consistent with previous studies of walking versus trotting of quadrupeds, albeit tends to be greater in the gaits of humans and hopping bipeds than in quadrupeds. Plotting the collision angle Φ together with the angles of the CoM force vector Θ and velocity vector Λ results in the functional grouping of bipedal and quadrupedal gaits according to their CoM dynamics-walking, galloping and ambling are distinguished as separate gaits that employ collision reduction, whereas trotting, running and hopping employ little collision reduction and represent more of a continuum that is influenced by dimensionless speed. Comparable with quadrupedal mammals, collision fraction (the ratio of actual to potential collision) is 0.51 during walking and 0.89 during running, indicating substantial collision reduction during walking, but not running, of humans. PMID:24089334

  8. Knee muscle strength in multiple sclerosis: relationship with gait characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Güner, Senem; Hagharı, Sema; Inanıcı, Fatma; Alsancak, Serap; Aytekın, Gokhan

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the relationship between isokinetic knee muscle strength and kinematic, kinetic and spatiotemporal gait parameters of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-nine MS patients (mean age 31.5±6.5) were investigated in this study. The isokinetic knee muscle strength and gait parameters of MS patients with moderate and severe disability, as determined by the expanded disability status scale (EDSS): EDSS=1–4.5 (n=22, moderate disability) and EDSS>4.5 (n=7, severe disability) were measured. [Results] Isokinetic knee muscle strength, kinematic, kinetic and spatiotemporal gait parameters differed between moderate (EDSS=1–4.5, n=22) and severe disability (EDSS>4.5, n=7). The correlation between each of gait speed, stride length, total range of knee joint movement and the four strength parameters (minimum and maximum quadriceps and hamstring muscle strengths) were significant for the MS group as a whole. Within subgroups, the correlation between minimum hamstring strength and total range of knee movement was significant only in group EDSS>4.5; minimum hamstring correlated with peak knee extensor moment in group EDSS=1–4.5, but at a reduced level of significance. [Conclusion] The present study revealed significant correlations between gait characteristics and isokinetic strength parameters of the quadriceps and hamstring muscles. Our study suggests that rehabilitation protocols for MS patients should include a critical strength training programme particularly for the hamstring and quadriceps muscles. PMID:25931736

  9. Gait characteristic analysis and identification based on the iPhone's accelerometer and gyrometer.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bing; Wang, Yang; Banda, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    Gait identification is a valuable approach to identify humans at a distance. In this paper, gait characteristics are analyzed based on an iPhone's accelerometer and gyrometer,and a new approach is proposed for gait identification. Specifically, gait datasets are collected by the triaxial accelerometer and gyrometer embedded in an iPhone. Then, the datasets are processed to extract gait characteristic parameters which include gait frequency, symmetry coefficient, dynamic range and similarity coefficient of characteristic curves. Finally, a weighted voting scheme dependent upon the gait characteristic parameters is proposed forgait identification. Four experiments are implemented to validate the proposed scheme. The attitude and acceleration solutions are verified by simulation. Then the gait characteristics are analyzed by comparing two sets of actual data, and the performance of the weighted voting identification scheme is verified by 40 datasets of 10 subjects. PMID:25222034

  10. Effect of Interpersonal Interaction on Festinating Gait Rehabilitation in Patients with Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Uchitomi, Hirotaka; Ogawa, Ken-ichiro; Orimo, Satoshi; Wada, Yoshiaki; Miyake, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Although human walking gait rhythms are generated by native individual gait dynamics, these gait dynamics change during interactions between humans. A typical phenomenon is synchronization of gait rhythms during cooperative walking. Our previous research revealed that fluctuation characteristics in stride interval of subjects with Parkinson’s disease changed from random to 1/f fluctuation as fractal characteristics during cooperative walking with the gait assist system Walk-Mate, which emulates a human interaction using interactive rhythmic cues. Moreover, gait dynamics were relearned through Walk-Mate gait training. However, the system’s clinical efficacy was unclear because the previous studies did not focus on specific gait rhythm disorder symptoms. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the effect of Walk-Mate on festinating gait among subjects with Parkinson’s disease. Three within-subject experimental conditions were used: (1) preinteraction condition, (2) interaction condition, and (3) postinteraction condition. The only difference between conditions was the interactive rhythmic cues generated by Walk-Mate. Because subjects with festinating gait gradually and involuntarily decreased their stride interval, the regression slope of stride interval as an index of severity of preinteraction festinating gait was elevated. The regression slope in the interaction condition was more gradual than during the preinteraction condition, indicating that the interactive rhythmic cues contributed to relieving festinating gait and stabilizing gait dynamics. Moreover, the gradual regression slope was carried over to the postinteraction condition, indicating that subjects with festinating gait have the potential to relearn stable gait dynamics. These results suggest that disordered gait dynamics are clinically restored through interactive rhythmic cues and that Walk-Mate may have the potential to assist therapists in more effective rehabilitation. Trial Registration

  11. Perception of gait patterns that deviate from normal and symmetric biped locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Handžić, Ismet; Reed, Kyle B.

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the range of gait patterns that are perceived as healthy and human-like with the goal of understanding how much asymmetry is allowable in a gait pattern before other people start to notice a gait impairment. Specifically, this study explores if certain abnormal walking patterns can be dismissed as unimpaired or not uncanny. Altering gait biomechanics is generally done in the fields of prosthetics and rehabilitation, however the perception of gait is often neglected. Although a certain gait can be functional, it may not be considered as normal by observers. On the other hand, an abnormally perceived gait may be more practical or necessary in some situations, such as limping after an injury or stroke and when wearing a prosthesis. This research will help to find the balance between the form and function of gait. Gait patterns are synthetically created using a passive dynamic walker (PDW) model that allows gait patterns to be systematically changed without the confounding influence from human sensorimotor feedback during walking. This standardized method allows the perception of specific changes in gait to be studied. The PDW model was used to produce walking patterns that showed a degree of abnormality in gait cadence, knee height, step length, and swing time created by changing the foot roll-over-shape, knee damping, knee location, and leg masses. The gait patterns were shown to participants who rated them according to separate scales of impairment and uncanniness. The results indicate that some pathological and asymmetric gait patterns are perceived as unimpaired and normal. Step time and step length asymmetries less than 5%, small knee location differences, and gait cadence changes of 25% do not result in a change in perception. The results also show that the parameters of a pathologically or uncanny perceived gait can be beneficially altered by increasing other independent parameters, in some sense masking the initial pathology. PMID:25774144

  12. Criteria for dynamic similarity in bouncing gaits.

    PubMed

    Bullimore, Sharon R; Donelan, J Maxwell

    2008-01-21

    Animals of different sizes tend to move in a dynamically similar manner when travelling at speeds corresponding to equal values of a dimensionless parameter (DP) called the Froude number. Consequently, the Froude number has been widely used for defining equivalent speeds and predicting speeds of locomotion by extinct species and on other planets. However, experiments using simulated reduced gravity have demonstrated that equality of the Froude number does not guarantee dynamic similarity. This has cast doubt upon the usefulness of the Froude number in locomotion research. Here we use dimensional analysis of the planar spring-mass model, combined with Buckingham's Pi-Theorem, to demonstrate that four DPs must be equal for dynamic similarity in bouncing gaits such as trotting, hopping and bipedal running. This can be reduced to three DPs by applying the constraint of maintaining a constant average speed of locomotion. Sensitivity analysis indicates that all of these DPs are important for predicting dynamic similarity. We show that the reason humans do not run in a dynamically similar manner at equal Froude number in different levels of simulated reduced gravity is that dimensionless leg stiffness decreases as gravity increases. The reason that the Froude number can predict dynamic similarity in Earth gravity is that dimensionless leg stiffness and dimensionless vertical landing speed are both independent of size. In conclusion, although equal Froude number is not sufficient for dynamic similarity, it is a necessary condition. Therefore, to detect fundamental differences in locomotion, animals of different sizes should be compared at equal Froude number, so that they can be as close to dynamic similarity as possible. More generally, the concept of dynamic similarity provides a powerful framework within which similarities and differences in locomotion can be interpreted. PMID:17983630

  13. Inhibition, Executive Function, and Freezing of Gait

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Rajal G.; Klein, Krystal A.; Nomura, Mariko; Fleming, Michael; Mancini, Martina; Giladi, Nir; Nutt, John G.; Horak, Fay B.

    2014-01-01

    Background Studies suggest that freezing of gait (FoG) in people with Parkinson’s disease (PD) is associated with declines in executive function (EF). However, EF is multi-faceted, including three dissociable components: inhibiting prepotent responses, switching between task sets, and updating working memory. Objective This study investigated which aspect of EF is most strongly associated with FoG in PD. Method Three groups were studied: adults with PD (with and without FoG) and age-matched, healthy adults. All participants completed a battery of cognitive tasks previously shown to discriminate among the three EF components. Participants also completed a turning-in-place task that was scored for FoG by neurologists blind to subjects’ self-reported FoG. Results Compared to both other groups, participants with FoG showed significant performance deficits in tasks associated with inhibitory control, even after accounting for differences in disease severity, but no significant deficits in task-switching or updating working memory. Surprisingly, the strongest effect was an intermittent tendency of participants with FoG to hesitate, and thus miss the response window, on go trials in the Go-Nogo task. The FoG group also made slower responses in the conflict condition of the Stroop task. Physician-rated FoG scores were correlated both with failures to respond on go trials and with failures to inhibit responses on nogo trials in the Go-Nogo task. Conclusion These results suggest that FoG is associated with a specific inability to appropriately engage and release inhibition, rather than with a general executive deficit. PMID:24496099

  14. Accuracy and repeatability of two methods of gait analysis - GaitRite™ und Mobility Lab™ - in subjects with cerebellar ataxia.

    PubMed

    Schmitz-Hübsch, Tanja; Brandt, Alexander U; Pfueller, Caspar; Zange, Leonora; Seidel, Adrian; Kühn, Andrea A; Paul, Friedemann; Minnerop, Martina; Doss, Sarah

    2016-07-01

    Instrumental gait analysis is increasingly recognized as a useful tool for the evaluation of movement disorders. The various assessment devices available to date have mostly been evaluated in healthy populations only. We aimed to explore whether reliability and validity seen in healthy subjects can also be assumed in subjects with cerebellar ataxic gait. Gait was recorded simultaneously with two devices - a sensor-embedded walkway and an inertial sensor based system - to explore test accuracy in two groups of subjects: one with mild to moderate cerebellar ataxia due to a subtype of autosomal-dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disorder (SCA14), the other were healthy subjects matched for age and height (CTR). Test precision was assessed by retest within session for each device. In conclusion, accuracy and repeatability of gait measurements were not compromised by ataxic gait disorder. The accuracy of spatial measures was speed-dependent and a direct comparison of stride length from both devices will be most reliably made at comfortable speed. Measures of stride variability had low agreement between methods in CTR and at retest in both groups. However, the marked increase of stride variability in ataxia outweighs the observed amount of imprecision. PMID:27289221

  15. A multichannel PWM telemetry system for kinematic gait analysis.

    PubMed

    Harris, G F; Jeutter, D C; Bergner, B C; Matesi, D V; Pelc, N J

    1987-12-01

    A multichannel biotelemetry system using pulse-width modulation-frequency modulation (PWM-FM) is described in detail for laboratory construction. Its application in a kinematic gait-analysis system is demonstrated, employing minimally encumbering electrogoniometry and foot-contact switches. The triaxial electrogoniometers sense rotational joint motion, and four foot-switches under the sole of each foot provide information on placement and temporal contact. Signals from the multiple sensors are amplified, encoded by pulse-width modulation, and transmitted at an FM radio frequency of 107 MHz. Received data are decoded and then sampled by a minicomputer for analysis. Results from a comparative study of kinematic gait in five normal subjects and five children with cerebral palsy demonstrate system effectiveness in providing quantitative data and various intrasubject and intersubject gait differences. Factors reviewed in the analysis include swing and stance times; cadence; hip-joint motion in sagittal, coronal, and transverse planes; and sequence of foot placement. PMID:3431495

  16. Gait energy efficiency in children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Sarah; Tucker, Carole A; Lee, Samuel C K

    2006-01-01

    Children with cerebral palsy (CP) expend up to three times the energy required for ambulation as compared to typically developed children of the same age. Measuring the metabolic energy required to execute a task is an intuitively appealing way to quantify task efficiency. Task energy demand is often quantified through pulmonary tests that measure oxygen consumption. Although providing an accepted measure of energy demand, these tests are technically demanding and staff intensive. For this reason, we sought a measure of gait efficiency based on spatiotemporal and kinematic parameters that would be reflective of the energy cost during ambulation in children with cerebral palsy. Gait data from 18 subjects with CP over 30 separate data collection sessions was used. Statistical analysis showed oxygen cost highly correlates to several kinematic variables, most notably, pelvic tilt, walking speed, landing angle and the biomechanical efficiency quotient (BEQ). The results of the work support the development of a computational model that would capture gait energy efficiency. PMID:17946881

  17. How does the treadmill affect gait in Parkinson's disease?

    PubMed

    Bello, Olalla; Fernandez-Del-Olmo, Miguel

    2012-02-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is clinically characterized by symptoms of akinesia, rigidity, and resting tremor, which are related to a dopaminergic deficiency of the nigrostriatal pathway. Disorders of gait are common symptoms of PD that affect the quality of life in these patients. One of the main focuses of physical rehabilitation in PD is to improve the gait deficits in the patients. In the last decade, a small number of studies have investigated the use of the treadmill for the rehabilitation of gait in PD patients. Although, the results of these studies are promising, the mechanisms underlying the therapeutic effect of the treadmill in PD are still largely unknown. This paper reviews 10 years of investigation of treadmill training in PD, focusing on the possible mechanisms involved in the therapeutic effect of the treadmill. Understanding these mechanisms may improve the prescription and design of physical therapy programs for PD patients. PMID:21762092

  18. A wearable walking monitoring system for gait analysis.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Tsung-Han; Tsai, An-Chih; Chang, Cha-Wei; Ho, Ka-Hou; Hsu, Wei-Li; Lin, Ta-Te

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, both hardware and software design to develop a wearable walking monitoring system for gait analysis are presented. For hardware, the mechanism proposed is adaptive to different individuals to wear, and the portability of the design makes it easy to perform outdoor experiments. Four force sensors and two angle displacement sensors were used to measure plantar force distribution and the angles of hip and knee joints. For software design, a novel algorithm was developed to detect different gait phases and the four gait periods during the stance phase. Furthermore, the center of ground contact force was calculated based on the relationships of the force sensors. The results were compared with the VICON motion capture system and a force plate for validation. Experiments showed the behavior of the joint angles are similar to VICON system, and the average error in foot strike time is less than 90 ms. PMID:23367484

  19. Active Shape Model-Based Gait Recognition Using Infrared Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Daehee; Lee, Seungwon; Paik, Joonki

    We present a gait recognition system using infra-red (IR) images. Since an IR camera is not affected by the intensity of illumination, it is able to provide constant recognition performance regardless of the amount of illumination. Model-based object tracking algorithms enable robust tracking with partial occlusions or dynamic illumination. However, this algorithm often fails in tracking objects if strong edge exists near the object. Replacement of the input image by an IR image guarantees robust object region extraction because background edges do not affect the IR image. In conclusion, the proposed gait recognition algorithm improves accuracy in object extraction by using IR images and the improvements finally increase the recognition rate of gaits.

  20. Gait variability in people with neurological disorders: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Moon, Yaejin; Sung, JongHun; An, Ruopeng; Hernandez, Manuel E; Sosnoff, Jacob J

    2016-06-01

    There has been growing evidence showing gait variability provides unique information about gait characteristics in neurological disorders. This study systemically reviewed and quantitatively synthesized (via meta-analysis) existing evidence on gait variability in various neurological diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), cerebellar ataxia (CA), Huntington's disease (HD), multiple sclerosis (MS), and Parkinson's disease (PD). Keyword search were conducted in PubMed, Web of science, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, and Cochrane Library. Meta-analysis was performed to estimate the pooled effect size for gait variability for each neurological group. Meta-regression was performed to compare gait variability across multiple groups with neurological diseases. Gait variability of 777 patients with AD, ALS, CA, HD, MS, or PD participating in 25 studies was included in meta-analysis. All pathological groups had increased amount of gait variability and loss of fractal structure of gait dynamics compared to healthy controls, and gait variability differentiated distinctive neurological conditions. The HD groups had the highest alterations in gait variability among all pathological groups, whereas the PD, AD and MS groups had the lowest. Interventions that aim to improve gait function in patients with neurological disorders should consider the heterogeneous relationship between gait variability and neurological conditions. PMID:27023045

  1. A Review of Balance and Gait Capacities in Relation to Falls in Persons with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enkelaar, Lotte; Smulders, Ellen; van Schrojenstein Lantman-de Valk, Henny; Geurts, Alexander C. H.; Weerdesteyn, Vivian

    2012-01-01

    Limitations in mobility are common in persons with intellectual disabilities (ID). As balance and gait capacities are key aspects of mobility, the prevalence of balance and gait problems is also expected to be high in this population. The objective of this study was to critically review the available literature on balance and gait characteristics…

  2. Gait pattern differences between children with mild scoliosis and children with unilateral cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Domagalska-Szopa, Małgorzata; Szopa, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of asymmetrical body posture alone, i.e., the effects seen in children with mild scoliosis, vs. the effects of body posture control impairment, i.e., those seen in children with unilateral cerebral palsy on gait patterns. Three-dimensional instrumented gait analysis (3DGA) was conducted in 45 children with hemiplegia and 51 children with mild scoliosis. All the children were able to walk without assistance devices. A set of 35 selected spatiotemporal gait and kinematics parameters were evaluated when subjects walked on a treadmill. A cluster analysis revealed 3 different gait patterns: a scoliotic gait pattern and 2 different hemiplegic gait patterns. The results showed that the discrepancy in gait patterns was not simply a lower limb kinematic deviation in the sagittal plane, as expected. Additional altered kinematics, such as pelvic misorientation in the coronal plane in both the stance and swing phases and inadequate stance phase hip ad/abduction, which resulted from postural pattern features, were distinguished between the 3 gait patterns. Our study provides evidence for a strong correlation between postural and gait patterns in children with unilateral cerebral palsy. Information on differences in gait patterns may be used to improve the guidelines for early therapy for children with hemiplegia before abnormal gait patterns are fully established. The gait pathology characteristic of scoliotic children is a potential new direction for treating scoliosis that complements the standard posture and walking control therapy exercises with the use of biofeedback. PMID:25089908

  3. Subtle gait changes in patients with REM Behavior Disorder

    PubMed Central

    McDade, Eric M; Boot, Brendon P.; Christianson, Teresa JH; Pankratz, V. Shane; Boeve, Bradley F; Ferman, Tanis J.; Bieniek, Kevin; Hollman, John H; Roberts, Rosebud O; Mielke, Michelle M; Knopman, David S.; Petersen, Ronald C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Many people with REM sleep behavior disorder have an underlying synucleinopathy, the most common of which is Lewy body disease. Identifying additional abnormal clinical features may help in identifying those at greater risk of evolving to a more severe syndrome. As gait disorders are common in the synucleinopathies, early abnormalities in gait in those with REM sleep behavior disorder could help in identifying those at increased risk of developing overt parkinsonism and/or cognitive impairment. Methods We identified 42 probable REM sleep behavior disorder subjects and 492 controls using the Mayo Sleep Questionnaire and assessed gait velocity, cadence and stride dynamics with an automated gait analysis system. Results Cases and controls were similar in age (79.9 ± 4.7 & 80.1 ± 4.7, p= 0.74), UPDRS score (3.3 ± 5.5 & 1.9 ± 4.1, p=0.21) and Mini-Mental State Examination scores (27.2 ± 1.9 & 27.7 ± 1.6, p=0.10). A diagnosis of probable REM sleep behavior disorder was associated with decreased velocity (−7.9 cm/sec, 95%CI −13.8 to −2.0, p<0.01), cadence (−4.4 steps/min, 95%CI −7.6 to −1.3, p<0.01), and significantly increased double limb support variability (30%, 95%CI 6 – 60, p=0.01), greater stride time variability (29%, 95%CI 2 – 63, p=0.03) and swing time variability (46%, 95%CI 15 – 84, p<0.01). Conclusions Probable REM sleep behavior disorder is associated with subtle gait changes prior to overt clinical parkinsonism. Diagnosis of probable REM sleep behavior disorder supplemented by gait analysis may help as a screening tool for disorders of α-synuclein. PMID:24130124

  4. Gait characteristics following Achilles tendon elongation: the foot rocker perspective.

    PubMed

    Bober, Tadeusz; Dziuba, Alicja; Kobel-Buys, Krystyna; Kulig, Kornelia

    2008-01-01

    The action of three functional rockers, namely the heel, ankle and forefoot rocker, assist the progression of the leg over the supporting foot. The purpose of this case series was to analyze the occurrence of foot rockers during gait in three children with cerebral palsy (CP) who had undergone the tendo-Achilles lengthening (TAL), procedure followed by a clinic- or home-based intervention and in one child with CP without history of surgery. Self-selected gait was video-recorded in a laboratory during six testing sessions at half-year intervals rendering a 3 year period of observation. One child had pre- and post-surgical gait data and the other two had post surgical data only. Sagittal plane knee angular velocity, as well as foot to ground positions, and foot rocker occurrence were analyzed. In a child with history of CP, and without history of surgery, mean angular velocities of the 1st, 2nd and 3rd foot rocker were 3.7, 0.57 and 6.67 rad/s, respectively, and the step length and cadence were normal. In children who underwent TAL the 1st and 2nd rocker was absent, as the initial contact of the foot with the ground was either with foot-flat or forefoot. The mean velocity of the 3rd rocker in children who underwent TAL was lower by approximately 50-80% than that of the nonsurgical case. Furthermore, the characteristic pattern of the knee joint to foot-floor position during gait was not observed in these cases. Foot rocker analysis identified children with abnormal gait characteristics. Following surgery these gait characteristics remained abnormal. PMID:18634352

  5. Effect of Rhythmic Auditory Stimulation on Hemiplegic Gait Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Yoon-Kyum; Chong, Hyun Ju

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of our study was to investigate the effect of gait training with rhythmic auditory stimulation (RAS) on both kinematic and temporospatial gait patterns in patients with hemiplegia. Materials and Methods Eighteen hemiplegic patients diagnosed with either cerebral palsy or stroke participated in this study. All participants underwent the 4-week gait training with RAS. The treatment was performed for 30 minutes per each session, three sessions per week. RAS was provided with rhythmic beats using a chord progression on a keyboard. Kinematic and temporospatial data were collected and analyzed using a three-dimensional motion analysis system. Results Gait training with RAS significantly improved both proximal and distal joint kinematic patterns in hip adduction, knee flexion, and ankle plantar flexion, enhancing the gait deviation index (GDI) as well as ameliorating temporal asymmetry of the stance and swing phases in patients with hemiplegia. Stroke patients with previous walking experience demonstrated significant kinematic improvement in knee flexion in mid-swing and ankle dorsiflexion in terminal stance. Among stroke patients, subacute patients showed a significantly increased GDI score compared with chronic patients. In addition, household ambulators showed a significant effect on reducing anterior tilt of the pelvis with an enhanced GDI score, while community ambulators significantly increased knee flexion in mid-swing phase and ankle dorsiflexion in terminal stance phase. Conclusion Gait training with RAS has beneficial effects on both kinematic and temporospatial patterns in patients with hemiplegia, providing not only clinical implications of locomotor rehabilitation with goal-oriented external feedback using RAS but also differential effects according to ambulatory function. PMID:26446657

  6. Gait planning for a quadruped robot with one faulty actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xianbao; Gao, Feng; Qi, Chenkun; Tian, Xinghua

    2015-01-01

    Fault tolerance is essential for quadruped robots when they work in remote areas or hazardous environments. Many fault-tolerant gaits planning method proposed in the past decade constrained more degrees of freedom(DOFs) of a robot than necessary. Thus a novel method to realize the fault-tolerant walking is proposed. The mobility of the robot is analyzed first by using the screw theory. The result shows that the translation of the center of body(CoB) can be kept with one faulty actuator if the rotations of the body are controlled. Thus the DOFs of the robot body are divided into two parts: the translation of the CoB and the rotation of the body. The kinematic model of the whole robot is built, the algorithm is developed to actively control the body orientations at the velocity level so that the planned CoB trajectory can be realized in spite of the constraint of the faulty actuator. This gait has a similar generation sequence with the normal gait and can be applied to the robot at any position. Simulations and experiments of the fault-tolerant gait with one faulty actuator are carried out. The CoB errors and the body rotation angles are measured. Comparing to the traditional fault-tolerant gait they can be reduced by at least 50%. A fault-tolerant gait planning algorithm is presented, which not only realizes the walking of a quadruped robot with a faulty actuator, but also efficiently improves the walking performances by taking full advantage of the remaining operational actuators according to the results of the simulations and experiments.

  7. Gait speed and related factors in Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Paker, Nurdan; Bugdayci, Derya; Goksenoglu, Goksen; Demircioğlu, Demet Tekdöş; Kesiktas, Nur; Ince, Nurhan

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between gait speed and various factors in ambulatory patients with idiopathic Parkinson’s disease. [Subjects] Fifty ambulatory patients with idiopathic Parkinson’s disease who were admitted to an outpatient clinic were included in this cross-sectional study. [Methods] The Hoehn and Yahr Scale was used for measurement of the disease severity. Gait speed was measured by the 10-Meter Walk Test. Mobility status was assessed by Timed Up and Go Test. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale was used for evaluation of emotional state. Cognitive status was examined with the Mini-Mental State Examination. The Downton Index was used for fall risk assessment. Balance was evaluated with the Berg Balance Scale. Comorbidity was measured with the Cumulative Illness Rating Scale. The 36-Item Short Form Health Survey was completed for measurement of quality of life. [Results] The mean age was 66.7 (47–83) years. Twenty-eight (56%) patients were men. Gait speed was correlated positively with height, male gender, Mini-Mental Examination score, Berg Balance Scale score and physical summary scores of the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey. On the other hand, there was a negative correlation between gait speed and age, disease severity, TUG time, Downton Index, fear of falling, previous falls and the anxiety and depression scores of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. There was no correlation between gait speed and comorbidity. [Conclusion] The factors related with the slower gait speed are, elder age, clinically advanced disease, poor mobility, fear of falling, falling history, higher falling risk, and mood disorder. PMID:26834330

  8. Gait post-stroke: Pathophysiology and rehabilitation strategies.

    PubMed

    Beyaert, C; Vasa, R; Frykberg, G E

    2015-11-01

    We reviewed neural control and biomechanical description of gait in both non-disabled and post-stroke subjects. In addition, we reviewed most of the gait rehabilitation strategies currently in use or in development and observed their principles in relation to recent pathophysiology of post-stroke gait. In both non-disabled and post-stroke subjects, motor control is organized on a task-oriented basis using a common set of a few muscle modules to simultaneously achieve body support, balance control, and forward progression during gait. Hemiparesis following stroke is due to disruption of descending neural pathways, usually with no direct lesion of the brainstem and cerebellar structures involved in motor automatic processes. Post-stroke, improvements of motor activities including standing and locomotion are variable but are typically characterized by a common postural behaviour which involves the unaffected side more for body support and balance control, likely in response to initial muscle weakness of the affected side. Various rehabilitation strategies are regularly used or in development, targeting muscle activity, postural and gait tasks, using more or less high-technology equipment. Reduced walking speed often improves with time and with various rehabilitation strategies, but asymmetric postural behaviour during standing and walking is often reinforced, maintained, or only transitorily decreased. This asymmetric compensatory postural behaviour appears to be robust, driven by support and balance tasks maintaining the predominant use of the unaffected side over the initially impaired affected side. Based on these elements, stroke rehabilitation including affected muscle strengthening and often stretching would first need to correct the postural asymmetric pattern by exploiting postural automatic processes in various particular motor tasks secondarily beneficial to gait. PMID:26547547

  9. Automatic enrollment for gait-based person re-identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortells, Javier; Martín-Félez, Raúl; Mollineda, Ramón A.

    2015-02-01

    Automatic enrollment involves a critical decision-making process within people re-identification context. However, this process has been traditionally undervalued. This paper studies the problem of automatic person enrollment from a realistic perspective relying on gait analysis. Experiments simulating random flows of people with considerable appearance variations between different observations of a person have been conducted, modeling both short- and longterm scenarios. Promising results based on ROC analysis show that automatically enrolling people by their gait is affordable with high success rates.

  10. Critical Appraisal of Evidence for Improving Gait Speed in People with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background: Research has not yet compared the treatment effects of dalfampridine with traditional rehabilitation of gait impairments in multiple sclerosis (MS). The purpose of this review was to critically appraise the evidence for dalfampridine and gait training for increasing gait speed in people with MS. Methods: A systematic search of the research literature was conducted. Consideration was given to only randomized controlled trials (RCTs), systematic reviews, and meta-analyses. For selection of gait training studies, only studies involving task-specific gait training interventions and measuring treatment effects on gait speed were considered. Results: Treatment effects on gait speed were extracted from four studies examining the efficacy of dalfampridine and six gait training RCTs. Overall mean increase in gait speed with dalfampridine was 0.07 m/s (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.04–0.09 m/s) compared to 0.06 m/s (95% CI, 0.02–0.10 m/s) for gait training. Among dalfampridine responders (38% of participants in RCTs), the mean increase in gait speed was 0.16 m/s (95% CI, 0.13–0.18 m/s). Mean increases for individual gait training interventions ranged from 0.01 to 0.39 m/s; however, CIs were wide due to small sample sizes. Conclusions: Current evidence is insufficient to conclude whether dalfampridine or gait training is superior for improving gait speed in people with MS. These findings should be viewed cautiously due to differences in study populations and small sample sizes in gait training studies. Both treatment approaches provide only short-lived improvements. Head-to-head comparison trials and studies combining both treatment modalities are needed. PMID:27252597

  11. Ambulatory Gait Behavior in Patients With Dementia: A Comparison With Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Yoneyama, Mitsuru; Mitoma, Hiroshi; Sanjo, Nobuo; Higuma, Maya; Terashi, Hiroo; Yokota, Takanori

    2016-08-01

    Accelerometry-based gait analysis is a promising approach in obtaining insightful information on the gait characteristics of patients with neurological disorders such as dementia and Parkinson's disease (PD). In order to improve its practical use outside the laboratory or hospital, it is required to design new metrics capable of quantifying ambulatory gait and their extraction procedures from long-term acceleration data. This paper presents a gait analysis method developed for such a purpose. Our system is based on a single trunk-mounted accelerometer and analytical algorithm for the assessment of gait behavior that may be context dependent. The algorithm consists of the detection of gait peaks from acceleration data and the analysis of multimodal patterns in the relationship between gait cycle and vertical gait acceleration. A set of six new measures can be obtained by applying the algorithm to a 24-h motion signal. To examine the performance and utility of our method, we recorded acceleration data from 13 healthy, 26 PD, and 26 mild cognitive impairment or dementia subjects. Each patient group was further classified into two, comprising 13 members each, according to the severity of the disease, and the gait behavior of the five groups was compared. We found that the normal, PD, and MCI/dementia groups show characteristic walking patterns which can be distinguished from one another by the developed gait measure set. We also examined conventional parameters such as gait acceleration, gait cycle, and gait variability, but failed to reproduce the distinct differences among the five groups. These findings suggest that the proposed gait analysis may be useful in capturing disease-specific gait features in a community setting. PMID:26372429

  12. Altering length and velocity feedback during a neuro-musculoskeletal simulation of normal gait contributes to hemiparetic gait characteristics

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Spasticity is an important complication after stroke, especially in the anti-gravity muscles, i.e. lower limb extensors. However the contribution of hyperexcitable muscle spindle reflex loops to gait impairments after stroke is often disputed. In this study a neuro-musculoskeletal model was developed to investigate the contribution of an increased length and velocity feedback and altered reflex modulation patterns to hemiparetic gait deficits. Methods A musculoskeletal model was extended with a muscle spindle model providing real-time length and velocity feedback of gastrocnemius, soleus, vasti and rectus femoris during a forward dynamic simulation (neural control model). By using a healthy subject’s base muscle excitations, in combination with increased feedback gains and altered reflex modulation patterns, the effect on kinematics was simulated. A foot-ground contact model was added to account for the interaction effect between the changed kinematics and the ground. The qualitative effect i.e. the directional effect and the specific gait phases where the effect is present, on the joint kinematics was then compared with hemiparetic gait deviations reported in the literature. Results Our results show that increased feedback in combination with altered reflex modulation patterns of soleus, vasti and rectus femoris muscle can contribute to excessive ankle plantarflexion/inadequate dorsiflexion, knee hyperextension/inadequate flexion and increased hip extension/inadequate flexion during dedicated gait cycle phases. Increased feedback of gastrocnemius can also contribute to excessive plantarflexion/inadequate dorsiflexion, however in combination with excessive knee and hip flexion. Increased length/velocity feedback can therefore contribute to two types of gait deviations, which are both in accordance with previously reported gait deviations in hemiparetic patients. Furthermore altered modulation patterns, in particular the reduced suppression of the

  13. Relationship between elevated plantar pressure of toes and forefoot and gait features in diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Amemiya, Ayumi; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Oe, Makoto; Takehara, Kimie; Yamada, Amika; Ohashi, Yumiko; Ueki, Kohjiro; Kadowaki, Takashi; Mori, Taketoshi; Sanada, Hiromi

    2013-01-01

    This cross-sectional observational study is to reveal what kind of gait feature is relevant to elevated segment and its plantar pressure for prevention of diabetic foot ulcers. In 57 diabetic patients, the relationship between elevated plantar pressure and gait features was analyzed. To conduct this investigation, a simultaneous measurement system of plantar pressure and gait features was constructed. Plantar pressure distribution was measured by F-scan with customized footwear, and gait features were mainly measured using wireless motion sensors attached to the sacrum and feet. Several gait features of small rolling during the mid-stance phase were relevant to the elevated plantar pressure. PMID:24110767

  14. Gait Strategy in Patients with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Hypermobility Type: A Kinematic and Kinetic Evaluation Using 3D Gait Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galli, Manuela; Cimolin, Veronica; Rigoldi, Chiara; Castori, Marco; Celletti, Claudia; Albertini, Giorgio; Camerota, Filippo

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify the gait patterns of adults with joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (JHS/EDS-HT) hypermobility type, using Gait Analysis. We quantified the gait strategy in 12 JHS/EDS-HT adults individuals (age: 43.08 + 6.78 years) compared to 20 healthy controls (age: 37.23 plus or minus 8.91 years), in…

  15. Numerical and experimental investigation of the structural behavior of a carbon fiber reinforced ankle-foot orthosis.

    PubMed

    Stier, Bertram; Simon, Jaan-Willem; Reese, Stefanie

    2015-05-01

    Ankle-foot orthoses (AFOs) are designed to enhance the gait function of individuals with motor impairments. Recent AFOs are often made of laminated composites due to their high stiffness and low density. Since the performance of AFO is primarily influenced by their structural stiffness, the investigation of the mechanical response is very important for the design. The aim of this paper is to present a three dimensional multi-scale structural analysis methodology to speed up the design process of AFO. The multi-scale modeling procedure was applied such that the intrinsic micro-structure of the fiber reinforced laminates could be taken into account. In particular, representative volume elements were used on the micro-scale, where fiber and matrix were treated separately, and on the textile scale of the woven structure. For the validation of this methodology, experimental data were generated using digital image correlation (DIC) measurements. Finally, the structural behavior of the whole AFO was predicted numerically for a specific loading scenario and compared with experimental results. It was shown that the proposed numerical multi-scale scheme is well suited for the prediction of the structural behavior of AFOs, validated by the comparison of local strain fields as well as the global force-displacement curves. PMID:25765189

  16. Complexity of human gait pattern at different ages assessed using multiscale entropy: From development to decline.

    PubMed

    Bisi, M C; Stagni, R

    2016-06-01

    Multiscale entropy (MSE) has been applied in biomechanics to evaluate gait stability during human gait and was found to be a promising method for evaluating fall risk in elderly and/or pathologic subjects. The hypothesis of this work is that gait complexity is a relevant parameter of gait development during life, decreasing from immature to mature gait and then increasing again during old age. In order to verify this hypothesis, MSE was applied on trunk acceleration data collected during gait of subjects of different ages: toddlers at the onset of walking, pre-scholar and scholar children, adolescents, young adults, adults and elderlies. MSE was estimated by calculating sample entropy (SEN) on raw unfiltered data of L5 acceleration along the three axes, using values of τ ranging from 1 to 6. In addition, other performance parameters (cadence, stride time variability and harmonic ratio) were evaluated. The results followed the hypothesized trend when MSE was applied on the vertical and/or anteroposterior axis of trunk acceleration: an age effect was found and adult SEN values were significantly different from children ones. From young adults to elderlies a slight increase in SEN values was shown although not statistically significant. While performance gait parameters showed adolescent gait similar to the one of adults, SEN highlighted that their gait maturation is not complete yet. In conclusion, present results suggest that the complexity of gait, evaluated on the sagittal plane, can be used as a characterizing parameter of the maturation of gait control. PMID:27264400

  17. Increased gait unsteadiness in community-dwelling elderly fallers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hausdorff, J. M.; Edelberg, H. K.; Mitchell, S. L.; Goldberger, A. L.; Wei, J. Y.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that quantitative measures of gait unsteadiness are increased in community-dwelling elderly fallers. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective, case-control study. SETTING: General community. PARTICIPANTS: Thirty-five community-dwelling elderly subjects older than 70 years of age who were capable of ambulating independently for 6 minutes were categorized as fallers (age, 82.2 +/- 4.9 yrs [mean +/- SD]; n = 18) and nonfallers (age, 76.5 +/- 4.0 yrs; n = 17) based on history; 22 young (age, 24.6 +/- 1.9 yrs), healthy subjects also participated as a second reference group. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Stride-to-stride variability (standard deviation and coefficient of variation) of stride time, stance time, swing time, and percent stance time measured during a 6-minute walk. RESULTS: All measures of gait variability were significantly greater in the elderly fallers compared with both the elderly nonfallers and the young subjects (p < .0002). In contrast, walking speed of the elderly fallers was similar to that of the nonfallers. There were little or no differences in the variability measures of the elderly nonfallers compared with the young subjects. CONCLUSIONS: Stride-to-stride temporal variations of gait are relatively unchanged in community-dwelling elderly nonfallers, but are significantly increased in elderly fallers. Quantitative measurement of gait unsteadiness may be useful in assessing fall risk in the elderly.

  18. Prevention of Potential Falls of Elderly Healthy Women: Gait Asymmetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seo, Jung-suk; Kim, Sukwon

    2014-01-01

    The study attempted to see if exercise training would alleviate gait asymmetry between nondominant and dominant legs, thus, eliminate the likelihood of slips. The present study provided 18 older adults exercise training for eight weeks and evaluated kinematics and ground reaction forces (GRFs) in both legs. Participants were randomly assigned to…

  19. Extraction of social information from gait in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Peterman, J. S.; Christensen, A.; Giese, M. A.; Park, S.

    2015-01-01

    Background The human face and body are rich sources of socio-emotional cues. Accurate recognition of these cues is central to adaptive social functioning. Past studies indicate that individuals with schizophrenia (SZ) show deficits in the perception of emotion from facial cues but the contribution of bodily cues to social perception in schizophrenia is undetermined. The present study examined the detection of social cues from human gait patterns presented by computer-generated volumetric walking figures. Method A total of 22 SZ and 20 age-matched healthy control participants (CO) viewed 1 s movies of a ‘digital’ walker’s gait and subsequently made a forced-choice decision on the emotional state (angry or happy) or the gender of the walker presented at three intensity levels. Overall sensitivity to the social cues and bias were computed. For SZ, symptom severity was assessed. Results SZ were less sensitive than CO on both emotion and gender discrimination, regardless of intensity. While impaired overall, greater signal intensity did improve performance of SZ. Neither group differed in their response bias in either condition. The discrimination sensitivity of SZ was unrelated to their social functioning or symptoms but a bias toward perceiving gait as happy was associated with better social functioning. Conclusions These results suggest that SZ are impaired in extracting social information from gait but SZ benefited from increased signal intensity of social cues. Inaccurate perception of social cues in others may hinder adequate preparation for social interactions. PMID:23806273

  20. Gait recognition using spatio-temporal silhouette-based features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabir, Azhin; Al-jawad, Naseer; Jassim, Sabah

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents a new algorithm for human gait recognition based on Spatio-temporal body biometric features using wavelet transforms. The proposed algorithm extracts the Gait cycle depending on the width of boundary box from a sequence of Silhouette images. Gait recognition is based on feature level fusion of three feature vectors: the gait spatio-temporal feature represented by the distances between (feet, knees, hands, shoulders, and height); binary difference between consecutive frames of the silhouette for each leg detected separately based on hamming distance; a vector of statistical parameters captured from the wavelet low frequency domain. The fused feature vector is subjected to dimension reduction using linear discriminate analysis. The Nearest Neighbour with a certain threshold used for classification. The threshold is obtained by experiment from a set of data captured from the CASIA database. We shall demonstrate that our method provides a non-traditional identification based on certain threshold to classify the outsider members as non-classified members.

  1. Comparison of gait of young women and elderly women.

    PubMed

    Hageman, P A; Blanke, D J

    1986-09-01

    The purpose of our study was to describe and compare free-speed gait patterns of healthy young women with healthy elderly women. The evaluation was completed with high-speed cinematography using synchronized front and side views of 26 healthy volunteers. One group was composed of 13 subjects 20 to 35 years of age, and the other group was composed of 13 subjects 60 to 84 years of age. Each subject participated in one test session consisting of three filmed trials of free-speed ambulation down a 14-m walkway. The processed film was analyzed for 10 gait characteristics. Differences in gait characteristics between the two groups were examined using a correlated t test (p less than .01). The elderly women demonstrated significantly smaller values of step length, stride length, ankle range of motion, pelvic obliquity, and velocity when compared with the younger women. The results of our study suggest that the physical therapist should not establish similar expectations for young women and elderly women during gait rehabilitation. PMID:3749270

  2. Muscle length and lengthening velocity in voluntary crouch gait.

    PubMed

    van der Krogt, Marjolein M; Doorenbosch, Caroline A M; Harlaar, Jaap

    2007-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore how origin-insertion length and lengthening velocity of hamstring and psoas muscle change as a result of crouch gait. The second purpose was to study the effect of changes in walking speed, in crouch, on muscle lengths and velocities. Eight healthy female subjects walked on a treadmill both normally and in crouch. In the crouch condition, subjects walked at three different walking speeds. 3D kinematic data were collected and muscle lengths and velocities were calculated using musculoskeletal modeling. It was found that voluntary walking in crouch resulted in shorter psoas length compared to normal, but not in shorter hamstrings length. Moreover, crouch gait did not result in slower muscle lengthening velocities compared to normal gait. These results do not support the role of hamstrings shortness or spasticity in causing crouch gait. Decreasing walking speed clearly reduced muscle lengths and lengthening velocities. Therefore, patients with short or spastic muscles are more likely to respond by walking slower than by walking in crouch. Also, differences in walking speed should be avoided as a confounding factor when comparing patient groups with controls. PMID:17208000

  3. Reflex Control of Robotic Gait Using Human Walking Data

    PubMed Central

    Macleod, Catherine A.; Meng, Lin; Conway, Bernard A.; Porr, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    Control of human walking is not thoroughly understood, which has implications in developing suitable strategies for the retraining of a functional gait following neurological injuries such as spinal cord injury (SCI). Bipedal robots allow us to investigate simple elements of the complex nervous system to quantify their contribution to motor control. RunBot is a bipedal robot which operates through reflexes without using central pattern generators or trajectory planning algorithms. Ground contact information from the feet is used to activate motors in the legs, generating a gait cycle visually similar to that of humans. Rather than developing a more complicated biologically realistic neural system to control the robot's stepping, we have instead further simplified our model by measuring the correlation between heel contact and leg muscle activity (EMG) in human subjects during walking and from this data created filter functions transferring the sensory data into motor actions. Adaptive filtering was used to identify the unknown transfer functions which translate the contact information into muscle activation signals. Our results show a causal relationship between ground contact information from the heel and EMG, which allows us to create a minimal, linear, analogue control system for controlling walking. The derived transfer functions were applied to RunBot II as a proof of concept. The gait cycle produced was stable and controlled, which is a positive indication that the transfer functions have potential for use in the control of assistive devices for the retraining of an efficient and effective gait with potential applications in SCI rehabilitation. PMID:25347544

  4. HSF1-deficiency affects gait coordination and cerebellar calbindin levels.

    PubMed

    Ingenwerth, Marc; Estrada, Veronica; Stahr, Anna; Müller, Hans Werner; von Gall, Charlotte

    2016-09-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) play an important role in cell homeostasis and protect against cell damage. They were previously identified as key players in different ataxia models. HSF1 is the main transcription factor for HSP activation. HSF1-deficient mice (HSF1-/-) are known to have deficiencies in motor control test. However, little is known about effects of HSF1-deficiency on locomotor, especially gait, coordination. Therefore, we compared HSF-deficient (HSF1-/-) mice and wildtype littermates using an automated gait analysis system for objective assessment of gait coordination. We found significant changes in gait parameters of HSF1-/- mice reminiscent of cerebellar ataxia. Immunohistochemical analyses of a cerebellum revealed co-localization of HSF1 and calbindin in Purkinje cells. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis of a potential interconnection between HSF1 and calbindin in Purkinje cells. Calbindin levels were analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively by immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting, respectively. While quantitative PCR revealed no differences in calbindin mRNA levels between HSF1+/+ and HSF1-/- mice, calbindin protein levels, however, were significantly decreased in a cerebellum of HSF1-/- mice. A pathway analysis supports the hypothesis of an interconnection between HSF1 and calbindin. In summary, the targeted deletion of HSF1 results in changes of locomotor function associated with changes in cerebellar calbindin protein levels. These findings suggest a role of HSF1 in regular Purkinje cell calcium homeostasis. PMID:27173427

  5. The effect of upper limb casting on gait pattern.

    PubMed

    Dreyfuss, Daniel; Elbaz, Avi; Mor, Amit; Segal, Ganit; Calif, Edward

    2016-06-01

    Casting of the arm may interfere with normal walking patterns because of additional load of the cast or prevention of arm swing. This study aimed to determine the effect of applying various casts on temporospatial walking parameters, including gait velocity and cadence, step length, and single limb support. A computerized gait system was used to assess these variables for 23 healthy individuals in four walking modes: normal walking, with a cast above the elbow and a sling, and with a cast below the elbow, with and without a sling. Thirteen participants had their dominant hand casted and 10 had their nondominant hand casted. On average, casted participants took significantly smaller steps with the leg on the casted side and spent less time supported on the casted side. The least changes were noted with the arm in a cast below the elbow and no sling, and the greatest changes were noted with the arm in a cast above the elbow and in a sling. This difference was heightened when the dominant hand was casted and lessened when the nondominant hand was casted. No differences were found in walking velocity or cadence between the walking modes. Casting of the upper limb has significant effects on gait, which should be taken into consideration, especially in individuals with previous gait abnormalities. PMID:26855024

  6. Modelling gait transition in two-legged animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, Carla M. A.; Santos, Alexandra P.

    2011-12-01

    The study of locomotor patterns has been a major research goal in the last decades. Understanding how intralimb and interlimb coordination works out so well in animals' locomotion is a hard and challenging task. Many models have been proposed to model animal's rhythms. These models have also been applied to the control of rhythmic movements of adaptive legged robots, namely biped, quadruped and other designs. In this paper we study gait transition in a central pattern generator (CPG) model for bipeds, the 4-cells model. This model is proposed by Golubitsky, Stewart, Buono and Collins and is studied further by Pinto and Golubitsky. We briefly resume the work done by Pinto and Golubitsky. We compute numerically gait transition in the 4-cells CPG model for bipeds. We use Morris-Lecar equations and Wilson-Cowan equations as the internal dynamics for each cell. We also consider two types of coupling between the cells: diffusive and synaptic. We obtain secondary gaits by bifurcation of primary gaits, by varying the coupling strengths. Nevertheless, some bifurcating branches could not be obtained, emphasizing the fact that despite analytically those bifurcations exist, finding them is a hard task and requires variation of other parameters of the equations. We note that the type of coupling did not influence the results.

  7. Foot placement control and gait instability among people with stroke

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Jesse C.; Kautz, Steven A.

    2016-01-01

    Gait instability is a common problem following stroke, as evidenced by increases in fall risk and fear of falling. However, the mechanism underlying gait instability is currently unclear. We recently found that young, healthy humans use a consistent gait stabilization strategy of actively controlling their mediolateral foot placement based on the concurrent mechanical state of the stance limb. In the present work, we tested whether people with stroke (n = 16) and age-matched controls (n = 19) used this neuromechanical strategy. Specifically, we used multiple linear regressions to test whether (1) swing phase gluteus medius (GM) activity was influenced by the simultaneous state of the stance limb and (2) mediolateral foot placement location was influenced by swing phase GM activity and the mechanical state of the swing limb at the start of the step. We found that both age-matched controls and people with stroke classified as having a low fall risk (Dynamic Gait Index [DGI] score >19) essentially used the stabilization strategy previously described in young controls. In contrast, this strategy was disrupted for people with stroke classified as higher fall risk (DGI

  8. Gait Development during Lifespan in Subjects with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rigoldi, Chiara; Galli, Manuela; Albertini, Giorgio

    2011-01-01

    In this work we studied and evaluated the effects of aging in a group of individuals with Down syndrome, using gait analysis as tool of investigation. 32 individuals suffering from Down syndrome (DS) were enrolled in this study as group of pathological participants. The control group (CG) was composed by 36 healthy subjects (10 children, 15…

  9. Use of gait parameters of persons in video surveillance systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geradts, Zeno J.; Merlijn, Menno; de Groot, Gert; Bijhold, Jurrien

    2002-07-01

    The gait parameters of eleven subjects were evaluated to provide data for recognition purposes of subjects. Video images of these subjects were acquired in frontal, transversal, and sagittal (a plane parallel to the median of the body) view. The subjects walked by at their usual walking speed. The measured parameters were hip, knee and ankle joint angle and their time averaged values, thigh, foot and trunk angle, step length and width, cycle time and walking speed. Correlation coefficients within and between subjects for the hip, knee and ankle rotation pattern in the sagittal aspect and for the trunk rotation pattern in the transversal aspect were almost similar. (were similar or were almost identical) This implies that the intra and inter individual variance were equal. Therefore, these gait parameters could not distinguish between subjects. A simple ANOVA with a follow-up test was used to detect significant differences for the mean hip, knee and ankle joint angle, thigh angle, step length, step width, walking speed, cycle time and foot angle. The number of significant differences between subjects defined the usefulness of the gait parameter. The parameter with the most significant difference between subjects was the foot angle (64 % - 73 % of the maximal attainable significant differences), followed by the time average hip joint angle (58 %) and the step length (45 %). The other parameters scored less than 25 %, which is poor for recognition purposes. The use of gait for identification purposes it not yet possible based on this research.

  10. A time-frequency classifier for human gait recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobasseri, Bijan G.; Amin, Moeness G.

    2009-05-01

    Radar has established itself as an effective all-weather, day or night sensor. Radar signals can penetrate walls and provide information on moving targets. Recently, radar has been used as an effective biometric sensor for classification of gait. The return from a coherent radar system contains a frequency offset in the carrier frequency, known as the Doppler Effect. The movements of arms and legs give rise to micro Doppler which can be clearly detailed in the time-frequency domain using traditional or modern time-frequency signal representation. In this paper we propose a gait classifier based on subspace learning using principal components analysis(PCA). The training set consists of feature vectors defined as either time or frequency snapshots taken from the spectrogram of radar backscatter. We show that gait signature is captured effectively in feature vectors. Feature vectors are then used in training a minimum distance classifier based on Mahalanobis distance metric. Results show that gait classification with high accuracy and short observation window is achievable using the proposed classifier.

  11. Freezing of Gait in Parkinsonism and its Potential Drug Treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li-Li; Canning, S Duff; Wang, Xiao-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Freezing of gait (FOG) is a heterogeneous symptom. Studies of treatment for FOG are scarce. Levodopa and monoamine oxidase inhibitors (rasagiline and selegiline) have shown effective improvement for FOG. Other drugs, such as L-threo-3, 4-dihydroxyphenylserine, amantadine, and botulinum toxin have exhibited some beneficial effects. The present review summarizes the potential drug treatment for FOG in Parkinsonism. PMID:26635194

  12. Energy expenditure during gait in patients with mucopolysaccharidosis

    PubMed Central

    Matos, Marcos Almeida; Prado, André; Schenkel, Gustavo; Barreto, Rosa; Acosta, Angelina Xavier

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to evaluate energy expenditure in gait by mucopolysaccharidosis affected patients by means of a simple and adequate to the clinical environment methodology. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was carried out comparing energy expenditure during gait in 19 patients suffering from mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS Group) with 19 asymptomatic control individuals (Control Group). Energy expenditure was measured in calories (cal) using a Polar telemetric watch (model FT7) during a 50 meter walk. Variables such as age, weight, height, body mass index (BMI), initial hart rate, final hart rate, and walking time, were recorded. RESULTS: MPS Group showed a mean energy expenditure during gait of 2.84 cal (±1,01), versus 1.42 cal (±0,51), 100% higher than the Control Group; MPS also presented increased initial hart rate (22% higher), final hart rate (13% higher) and walking time (13% higher). CONCLUSIONS: Energy expenditure during gait in MPS patients was two times higher than control individuals; the methodology used showed to be a promising alternative, also adequate to the standard clinical environment. Level of Evidence III, Cross-sectional Comparative Study. PMID:24453654

  13. High-resolution Doppler model of the human gait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geisheimer, Jonathan L.; Greneker, Eugene F., III; Marshall, William S.

    2002-07-01

    A high resolution Doppler model of the walking human was developed for analyzing the continuous wave (CW) radar gait signature. Data for twenty subjects were collected simultaneously using an infrared motion capture system along with a two channel 10.525 GHz CW radar. The motion capture system recorded three-dimensional coordinates of infrared markers placed on the body. These body marker coordinates were used as inputs to create the theoretical Doppler output using a model constructed in MATLAB. The outputs of the model are the simulated Doppler signals due to each of the major limbs and the thorax. An estimated radar cross section for each part of the body was assigned using the Lund & Browder chart of estimated body surface area. The resultant Doppler model was then compared with the actual recorded Doppler gait signature in the frequency domain using the spectrogram. Comparison of the two sets of data has revealed several identifiable biomechanical features in the radar gait signature due to leg and body motion. The result of the research shows that a wealth of information can be unlocked from the radar gait signature, which may be useful in security and biometric applications.

  14. Effect of walking speed on gait sub phase durations.

    PubMed

    Hebenstreit, Felix; Leibold, Andreas; Krinner, Sebastian; Welsch, Götz; Lochmann, Matthias; Eskofier, Bjoern M

    2015-10-01

    Gait phase durations are important spatiotemporal parameters in different contexts such as discrimination between healthy and pathological gait and monitoring of treatment outcomes after interventions. Although gait phases strongly depend on walking speed, the influence of different speeds has rarely been investigated in literature. In this work, we examined the durations of the stance sub phases and the swing phase for 12 different walking speeds ranging from 0.6 to 1.7 m/s in 21 healthy subjects using infrared cinematography and an instrumented treadmill. We separated the stance phase into loading response, mid stance, terminal stance and pre-swing phase and we performed regression modeling of all phase durations with speed to determine general trends. With an increasing speed of 0.1m/s, stance duration decreased while swing duration increased by 0.3%. All distinct stance sub phases changed significantly with speed. These findings suggest the importance of including all distinct gait sub phases in spatiotemporal analyses, especially when different walking speeds are involved. PMID:26256534

  15. Early presentation of gait impairment in Wolfram Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Classically characterized by early onset insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, deafness, diabetes insipidus, and neurological abnormalities, Wolfram syndrome (WFS) is also associated with atypical brainstem and cerebellar findings in the first decade of life. As such, we hypothesized that gait differences between individuals with WFS and typically developing (TD) individuals may be detectable across the course of the disease. Methods Gait was assessed for 13 individuals with WFS (min 6.4 yrs, max 25.8 yrs) and 29 age-matched, typically developing individuals (min 5.6 yrs, max 28.5 yrs) using a GAITRite ® walkway system. Velocity, cadence, step length, base of support and double support time were compared between groups. Results Across all tasks, individuals with WFS walked slower (p = 0.03), took shorter (p ≤ 0.001) and wider (p ≤ 0.001) steps and spent a greater proportion of the gait cycle in double support (p = 0.03) compared to TD individuals. Cadence did not differ between groups (p = 0.62). Across all tasks, age was significantly correlated with cadence and double support time in the TD group but only double support time was correlated with age in the WFS group and only during preferred pace forward (rs= 0.564, p = 0.045) and dual task forward walking (rs= 0.720, p = 0.006) tasks. Individuals with WFS also had a greater number of missteps during tandem walking (p ≤ 0.001). Within the WFS group, spatiotemporal measures of gait did not correlate with measures of visual acuity. Balance measures negatively correlated with normalized gait velocity during fast forward walking (rs = −0.59, p = 0.03) and percent of gait cycle in double support during backward walking (rs = −0.64, p = 0.03). Conclusions Quantifiable gait impairments can be detected in individuals with WFS earlier than previous clinical observations suggested. These impairments are not fully accounted for by the visual or balance deficits associated with WFS

  16. Freezing of Gait in Parkinson's Disease: An Overload Problem?

    PubMed

    Beck, Eric N; Ehgoetz Martens, Kaylena A; Almeida, Quincy J

    2015-01-01

    Freezing of gait (FOG) is arguably the most severe symptom associated with Parkinson's disease (PD), and often occurs while performing dual tasks or approaching narrowed and cluttered spaces. While it is well known that visual cues alleviate FOG, it is not clear if this effect may be the result of cognitive or sensorimotor mechanisms. Nevertheless, the role of vision may be a critical link that might allow us to disentangle this question. Gaze behaviour has yet to be carefully investigated while freezers approach narrow spaces, thus the overall objective of this study was to explore the interaction between cognitive and sensory-perceptual influences on FOG. In experiment #1, if cognitive load is the underlying factor leading to FOG, then one might expect that a dual-task would elicit FOG episodes even in the presence of visual cues, since the load on attention would interfere with utilization of visual cues. Alternatively, if visual cues alleviate gait despite performance of a dual-task, then it may be more probable that sensory mechanisms are at play. In compliment to this, the aim of experiment#2 was to further challenge the sensory systems, by removing vision of the lower-limbs and thereby forcing participants to rely on other forms of sensory feedback rather than vision while walking toward the narrow space. Spatiotemporal aspects of gait, percentage of gaze fixation frequency and duration, as well as skin conductance levels were measured in freezers and non-freezers across both experiments. Results from experiment#1 indicated that although freezers and non-freezers both walked with worse gait while performing the dual-task, in freezers, gait was relieved by visual cues regardless of whether the cognitive demands of the dual-task were present. At baseline and while dual-tasking, freezers demonstrated a gaze behaviour that neglected the doorway and instead focused primarily on the pathway, a strategy that non-freezers adopted only when performing the dual

  17. Additional weight load increases freezing of gait episodes in Parkinson's disease; an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Mensink, Senja H G; Nonnekes, Jorik; van Bon, Geert; Snijders, Anke H; Duysens, Jacques; Weerdesteyn, Vivian; Bloem, Bastiaan R; Oude Nijhuis, Lars B

    2014-05-01

    Freezing of gait is an episodic gait disorder,characterized by the inability to generate effective forward stepping movements. The pathophysiology underlying freezing of gait remains insufficiently understood, and this hampers the development of better treatment strategies.Preliminary evidence suggests that impaired force control during walking may contribute to freezing episodes, with difficulty to unload the swing leg and initiate the swing phase. Here, we used external loading to manipulate force control and to investigate its influence on freezing of gait.Twelve Parkinson's disease patients with freezing of gait performed three contrasting tasks: (1) loaded gait while wearing a belt fortified with lead weights; (2) weight supported gait using a parachute harness connected to a rigid metal cable running above the gait trajectory; and (3)normal gait. Gait tasks were used to provoke freezing episodes, including rapid 360° turns. Freezing episodes were quantified using blinded, videotaped clinical assessment. Furthermore, ground reaction forces and body kinematics were recorded. Loading significantly increased the mean number of freezing episodes per trial compared to the normal gait condition (P<0.05), but the effect of weight support was not consistent. Loading particularly increased the number of freezing episodes during rapid short steps. Step length was significantly smaller during loaded gait compared to normal gait (P<0.05), but changes in anticipatory postural adjustments were not different.Our results may point to impaired force control playing a key role in freezing of gait. Future studies should further investigate the mechanism, i.e., the contribution of deficient load feedback, and evaluate which forms of weight support might offer treatment opportunities. PMID:24658705

  18. Footwear and Foam Surface Alter Gait Initiation of Typical Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Marcus Fraga; Sacco, Isabel de Camargo Neves; Nora, Fernanda Grazielle da Silva Azevedo; Rosenbaum, Dieter; Lobo da Costa, Paula Hentschel

    2015-01-01

    Gait initiation is the task commonly used to investigate the anticipatory postural adjustments necessary to begin a new gait cycle from the standing position. In this study, we analyzed whether and how foot-floor interface characteristics influence the gait initiation process. For this purpose, 25 undergraduate students were evaluated while performing a gait initiation task in three experimental conditions: barefoot on a hard surface (barefoot condition), barefoot on a soft surface (foam condition), and shod on a hard surface (shod condition). Two force plates were used to acquire ground reaction forces and moments for each foot separately. A statistical parametric mapping (SPM) analysis was performed in COP time series. We compared the anterior-posterior (AP) and medial-lateral (ML) resultant center of pressure (COP) paths and average velocities, the force peaks under the right and left foot, and the COP integral x force impulse for three different phases: the anticipatory postural adjustment (APA) phase (Phase 1), the swing-foot unloading phase (Phase 2), and the support-foot unloading phase (Phase 3). In Phase 1, significantly smaller ML COP paths and velocities were found for the shod condition compared to the barefoot and foam conditions. Significantly smaller ML COP paths were also found in Phase 2 for the shod condition compared to the barefoot and foam conditions. In Phase 3, increased AP COP velocities were found for the shod condition compared to the barefoot and foam conditions. SPM analysis revealed significant differences for vector COP time series in the shod condition compared to the barefoot and foam conditions. The foam condition limited the impulse-generating capacity of COP shift and produced smaller ML force peaks, resulting in limitations to body-weight transfer from the swing to the support foot. The results suggest that footwear and a soft surface affect COP and impose certain features of gait initiation, especially in the ML direction of

  19. Silhouette extraction from human gait images sequence using cosegmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jinyan; Zhang, Yi

    2012-11-01

    Gait based human identification is very useful for automatic person recognize through visual surveillance and has attracted more and more researchers. A key step in gait based human identification is to extract human silhouette from images sequence. Current silhouette extraction methods are mainly based on simple color subtraction. These methods have a very poor performance when the color of some body parts is similar to the background. In this paper a cosegmentation based human silhouette extraction method is proposed. Cosegmentation is typically defined as the task of jointly segmenting "something similar" in a given set of images. We can divide the human gait images sequence into several step cycles and every step cycle consist of 10-15 frames. The frames in human gait images sequence have following similarity: every frame is similar to the next or previous frame; every frame is similar to the corresponding frame in the next or previous step cycle; every pixel can find similar pixel in other frames. The progress of cosegmentation based human silhouette extraction can be described as follows: Initially only points which have high contrast to background are used as foreground kernel points, the points in the background are used as background kernel points, then points similar to foreground points will be added to foreground points set and the points similar to background points will be added to background points set. The definition of the similarity consider the context of the point. Experimental result shows that our method has a better performance comparing to traditional human silhouette extraction methods. Keywords: Human gait

  20. Sensory feedback plays a significant role in generating walking gait and in gait transition in salamanders: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Harischandra, Nalin; Knuesel, Jeremie; Kozlov, Alexander; Bicanski, Andrej; Cabelguen, Jean-Marie; Ijspeert, Auke; Ekeberg, Orjan

    2011-01-01

    Here, we investigate the role of sensory feedback in gait generation and transition by using a three-dimensional, neuro-musculo-mechanical model of a salamander with realistic physical parameters. Activation of limb and axial muscles were driven by neural output patterns obtained from a central pattern generator (CPG) which is composed of simulated spiking neurons with adaptation. The CPG consists of a body-CPG and four limb-CPGs that are interconnected via synapses both ipsilaterally and contralaterally. We use the model both with and without sensory modulation and four different combinations of ipsilateral and contralateral coupling between the limb-CPGs. We found that the proprioceptive sensory inputs are essential in obtaining a coordinated lateral sequence walking gait (walking). The sensory feedback includes the signals coming from the stretch receptor like intraspinal neurons located in the girdle regions and the limb stretch receptors residing in the hip and scapula regions of the salamander. On the other hand, walking trot gait (trotting) is more under central (CPG) influence compared to that of the peripheral or sensory feedback. We found that the gait transition from walking to trotting can be induced by increased activity of the descending drive coming from the mesencephalic locomotor region and is helped by the sensory inputs at the hip and scapula regions detecting the late stance phase. More neurophysiological experiments are required to identify the precise type of mechanoreceptors in the salamander and the neural mechanisms mediating the sensory modulation. PMID:22069388

  1. A longitudinal study on dual-tasking effects on gait: cognitive change predicts gait variance in the elderly.

    PubMed

    MacAulay, Rebecca K; Brouillette, Robert M; Foil, Heather C; Bruce-Keller, Annadora J; Keller, Jeffrey N

    2014-01-01

    Neuropsychological abilities have found to explain a large proportion of variance in objective measures of walking gait that predict both dementia and falling within the elderly. However, to this date there has been little research on the interplay between changes in these neuropsychological processes and walking gait overtime. To our knowledge, the present study is the first to investigate intra-individual changes in neurocognitive test performance and gait step time at two-time points across a one-year span. Neuropsychological test scores from 440 elderly individuals deemed cognitively normal at Year One were analyzed via repeated measures t-tests to assess for decline in cognitive performance at Year Two. 34 of these 440 individuals neuropsychological test performance significantly declined at Year Two; whereas the "non-decliners" displayed improved memory, working memory, attention/processing speed test performance. Neuropsychological test scores were also submitted to factor analysis at both time points for data reduction purposes and to assess the factor stability overtime. Results at Year One yielded a three-factor solution: Language/Memory, Executive Attention/Processing Speed, and Working Memory. Year Two's test scores also generated a three-factor solution (Working Memory, Language/Executive Attention/Processing Speed, and Memory). Notably, language measures loaded on Executive Attention/Processing Speed rather than on the Memory factor at Year Two. Hierarchal multiple regression revealed that both Executive Attention/Processing Speed and sex significantly predicted variance in dual task step time at both time points. Remarkably, in the "decliners", the magnitude of the contribution of the neuropsychological characteristics to gait variance significantly increased at Year Two. In summary, this study provides longitudinal evidence of the dynamic relationship between intra-individual cognitive change and its influence on dual task gait step time. These

  2. Chronic joint pain in the lower body is associated with gait differences independent from radiographic osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    de Kruijf, Marjolein; Verlinden, Vincentius J A; Huygen, Frank J P M; Hofman, Albert; van der Geest, Jos N; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita M A; Ikram, M Arfan; van Meurs, Joyce B J

    2015-09-01

    Gait is an important indicator of health. Chronic lower body pain may impair gait and lead to morbidity and mortality. We investigated the associations between lower body pain and gait in community-dwelling individuals, independent from osteoarthritis (OA). This population based cohort study included 2304 Rotterdam Study participants who underwent electronic walkway gait assessment. Thirty different variables resulting from gait assessment were summarized into seven gait domains using principle components analysis: i.e. Rhythm, Variability, Phases, Pace, Tandem, Turning, and Base of Support. Chronic lower body pain was assessed using pain drawings. OA was defined as a Kellgren & Lawrence score of 2 or higher on radiographs of the hip and/or knee. Linear regression analysis was used to study associations. Participants with chronic pain in the leg and hip, had lower Rhythm, Phases, and Pace, independent from OA. Additionally, we found unilateral pain to associate with larger gait asymmetry. No associations were found between chronic pain and the other gait domains, including gait variability. However, within individuals with hip pain, gait variability was higher in individuals with radiographic OA compared to those without OA. This is the first population based study showing chronic lower body pain associates with gait differences independent from OA. Participants with pain were found to walk with slower and smaller steps, longer double support and more asymmetry. Proper care and treatment of chronic pain could be a way of reducing gait problems and thereby fall risk and associated mortality. In addition, gait assessment may help identifying individuals with OA from those having pain due to other causes. PMID:26210905

  3. Gait in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: Is gait pattern differently affected in spinal and bulbar onset of the disease during dual task walking?

    PubMed

    Radovanović, Sasa; Milićev, Milena; Perić, Stojan; Basta, Ivana; Kostić, Vladimir; Stević, Zorica

    2014-12-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is characterized by weakness, fatigue, loss of balance and coordination. The purpose of the study was to examine gait in ALS patients. Gait was compared in ALS with spinal and bulbar onset, while performing dual mental and motor tasks. Dual-task walking was performed by 27 ALS patients, 13 with spinal- and 14 with bulbar-onset disease. Twenty-nine healthy subjects were used as a control group. The subjects performed a basic, simple walking task, dual-motor task, dual-mental task, and combined motor and mental tasks. Results showed that dual-task paradigm has an effect on gait in ALS patients. Gait was differently affected in spinal and bulbar onset of ALS by some of the given tasks. Mental tasks had a larger effect than motor tasks in all gait parameters. In conclusion, both ALS forms have impaired gait in dual tasks. Simple walk in patients with spinal onset shows higher variability of certain gait parameters compared to bulbar-onset patients and controls. Differences in gait could also indicate postural instability and possible falls in complex walking situations. PMID:24918304

  4. Applications of markerless motion capture in gait recognition.

    PubMed

    Sandau, Martin

    2016-03-01

    This thesis is based on four manuscripts where two of them were accepted and two were submitted to peer-reviewed journals. The experimental work behind the thesis was conducted at the Institute of Neuroscience and Pharmacology, University of Copenhagen. The purpose of the studies was to explore the variability of human gait and to conduct new methods for precise estimation of the kinematic parameters applied in forensic gait analysis. The gait studies were conducted in a custom built gait laboratory designed to obtain optimal conditions for markerless motion analysis. The set-up consisted of eight synchronised cameras located in the corners of the laboratory, which were connected to a single computer. The captured images were processed with stereovision-based algorithms to provide accurate 3D reconstructions of the participants. The 3D reconstructions of the participants were obtained during normal walking and the kinematics were extracted with manual and automatic methods. The kinematic results from the automatic approach were compared to marker-based motion capture to validate the precision. The results showed that the proposed markerless motion capture method had a precision comparable to marker-based methods in the frontal plane and the sagittal plane. Similar markerless motion capture methods could therefore provide the basis for reliable gait recognition based on kinematic parameters. The manual annotations were compared to the actual anthropometric measurements obtained from MRI scans and the intra- and inter-observer variability was also quantified to observe the associated effect on recognition. The results showed not only that the kinematics in the lower extremities were important but also that the kinematics in the shoulders had a high discriminatory power. Likewise, the shank length was also highly discriminatory, which has not been previously reported. However, it is important that the same expert performs all annotations, as the inter

  5. Gait variables of patients after lower extremity burn injuries.

    PubMed

    Silverberg, R; Lombardo, G; Gorga, D; Nagler, W; Himel, H; Yurt, R

    2000-01-01

    Functional ambulation is an expected outcome of physical therapy after burn injuries on the lower extremities. The purpose of this study was to document temporal and spatial gait parameters of adult patients with the use of the GAITRite system (CIR Systems Inc, Clifton, NJ) after the patients were burned on their lower extremities and to compare these results with previous data reported for normal subjects. Twenty-five adults with lower extremity burns (19 men and 6 women; mean age, 35.6+/-8.3 years) were evaluated within 5 days of discharge from an acute care facility. The GAITRite system, which consists of an electronic walkway that contains 6 sensor pads encapsulated in a rolled-up carpet, was used to collect temporal and spatial variables. The patients walked at their preferred rate of ambulation and completed 2 passes; the 2 passes were then averaged by the software to determine the patients' gait parameters. A 2-tailed t test was used for comparison of the mean values for the patients and the previously published data. The results indicated that for both men and women, cycle time and base of support were significantly higher (P < or = .01) in the patients with burn injuries than in normal subjects. For men, all of the remaining parameters were significantly lower (P < or = .01) in the patients with burns except stride length, which was not significantly different (P > .05). For women, stance time as a percentage of the gait cycle and cadence, velocity, step length, and stride length, were all significantly lower (P < or = .01) in the patients with burn injuries, whereas double support as a percentage of the gait cycle was not significantly different (P > .05) between the 2 groups. These results indicate that immediately after an acute care hospitalization, patients with lower extremity burns have significantly different gait patterns than gender-and age-matched normal subjects. Future studies are necessary to determine whether these impairments in gait limit

  6. A Pelvic Implant Orthosis in Rodents, for Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation, and for Brain Machine Interface Research: Construction, Surgical Implantation and Validation

    PubMed Central

    Udoekwere, Ubong Ime; Oza, Chintan S.; Giszter, Simon F.

    2014-01-01

    Background Rodents are important model systems used to explore Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) and rehabilitation, and Brain Machine Interfaces. We present a new method to provide mechanical interaction for BMI and rehabilitation in rat models of SCI. New Method We present the design and implantation procedures for a pelvic orthosis that allows direct force application to the skeleton in brain machine interface and robot rehabilitation applications in rodents. We detail the materials, construction, machining, surgery and validation of the device. Results We describe the statistical validation of the implant procedures by comparing stepping parameters of 8 rats prior to and after implantation and surgical recovery. An ANOVA showed no effects of the implantation on stepping. Paired tests in the individual rats also showed no effect in 7/8 rats and minor effects in the last rat, within the group's variance. Comparison with Existing Methods Our method allows interaction with rats at the pelvis without any perturbation of normal stepping in the intact rat. The method bypasses slings, and cuffs, avoiding cuff or slings squeezing the abdomen, or other altered sensory feedback. Our implant osseointegrates, and thus allows an efficient high bandwidth mechanical coupling to a robot. The implants support quadrupedal training and are readily integrated into either treadmill or overground contexts. Conclusions Our novel device and procedures support a range of novel experimental designs and motor tests for rehabilitative and augmentation devices in intact and SCI model rats, with the advantage of allowing direct force application at the pelvic bones. PMID:24269175

  7. Confronting Hip Resurfacing and Big Femoral Head Replacement Gait Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Karampinas, Panagiotis K.; Evangelopoulos, Dimitrios S.; Vlamis, John; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Korres, Dimitrios S.

    2014-01-01

    Improved hip kinematics and bone preservation have been reported after resurfacing total hip replacement (THRS). On the other hand, hip kinematics with standard total hip replacement (THR) is optimized with large diameter femoral heads (BFH-THR). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the functional outcomes of THRS and BFH-THR and correlate these results to bone preservation or the large femoral heads. Thirty-one patients were included in the study. Gait speed, postural balance, proprioception and overall performance. Our results demonstrated a non-statistically significant improvement in gait, postural balance and proprioception in the THRS confronting to BFH-THR group. THRS provide identical outcomes to traditional BFH-THR. The THRS choice as bone preserving procedure in younger patients is still to be evaluated. PMID:24744841

  8. Effect of firefighters' personal protective equipment on gait.

    PubMed

    Park, Huiju; Kim, Seonyoung; Morris, Kristen; Moukperian, Melissa; Moon, Youngjin; Stull, Jeffrey

    2015-05-01

    The biomechanical experiment with eight male and four female firefighters demonstrates that the effect of adding essential equipment: turnout ensemble, self-contained breathing apparatus, and boots (leather and rubber boots), significantly restricts foot pronation. This finding is supported by a decrease in anterior-posterior and medial-lateral excursion of center of plantar pressure (COP) trajectory during walking. The accumulation of this equipment decreases COP velocity and increases foot-ground contact time and stride time, indicating increased gait instability. An increase in the flexing resistance of the boots is the major contributor to restricted foot pronation and gait instability as evidenced by the greater decrease in excursion of COP in leather boots (greater flexing resistance) than in rubber boots (lower resistance). The leather boots also shows the greatest increase in foot contact time and stride time. These negative impacts can increase musculoskeletal injuries in unfavorable fire ground environments. PMID:25683530

  9. Gait Event Detection during Stair Walking Using a Rate Gyroscope

    PubMed Central

    Formento, Paola Catalfamo; Acevedo, Ruben; Ghoussayni, Salim; Ewins, David

    2014-01-01

    Gyroscopes have been proposed as sensors for ambulatory gait analysis and functional electrical stimulation systems. These applications often require detection of the initial contact (IC) of the foot with the floor and/or final contact or foot off (FO) from the floor during outdoor walking. Previous investigations have reported the use of a single gyroscope placed on the shank for detection of IC and FO on level ground and incline walking. This paper describes the evaluation of a gyroscope placed on the shank for determination of IC and FO in subjects ascending and descending a set of stairs. Performance was compared with a reference pressure measurement system. The absolute mean difference between the gyroscope and the reference was less than 45 ms for IC and better than 135 ms for FO for both activities. Detection success was over 93%. These results provide preliminary evidence supporting the use of a gyroscope for gait event detection when walking up and down stairs. PMID:24651724

  10. The Dercum-Muybridge Collaboration and the Study of Pathologic Gaits Using Sequential Photography.

    PubMed

    Lanska, Douglas J

    2016-01-01

    In the late 1870s and 1880s, prior to the development of movie cameras or projectors, English-American photographer Eadweard Muybridge (1830-1904) photographed sequential images of people and animals in motion, using arrays of sequentially triggered single-image cameras. In 1885, Philadelphia neurologist Francis Dercum (1856-1931) collaborated with Muybridge at the University of Pennsylvania to photograph sequential images of patients with various neurological disorders involving abnormal movements, and particularly various gait disorders, including both the sensory ataxic gait of tabes dorsalis and various spastic gaits. Dercum used tracings of sequential photographic images to plot trajectories of limbs as a way to characterize and distinguish pathologic gaits. The Dercum-Muybridge collaboration produced the first motion-picture sequences of neurological gait disorders ever filmed. These sequences and the trajectory-based studies that derived from them were a milestone in studies of pathologic gaits. PMID:26684421

  11. Class Energy Image analysis for video sensor-based gait recognition: a review.

    PubMed

    Lv, Zhuowen; Xing, Xianglei; Wang, Kejun; Guan, Donghai

    2015-01-01

    Gait is a unique perceptible biometric feature at larger distances, and the gait representation approach plays a key role in a video sensor-based gait recognition system. Class Energy Image is one of the most important gait representation methods based on appearance, which has received lots of attentions. In this paper, we reviewed the expressions and meanings of various Class Energy Image approaches, and analyzed the information in the Class Energy Images. Furthermore, the effectiveness and robustness of these approaches were compared on the benchmark gait databases. We outlined the research challenges and provided promising future directions for the field. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first review that focuses on Class Energy Image. It can provide a useful reference in the literature of video sensor-based gait representation approach. PMID:25574935

  12. Class Energy Image Analysis for Video Sensor-Based Gait Recognition: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Zhuowen; Xing, Xianglei; Wang, Kejun; Guan, Donghai

    2015-01-01

    Gait is a unique perceptible biometric feature at larger distances, and the gait representation approach plays a key role in a video sensor-based gait recognition system. Class Energy Image is one of the most important gait representation methods based on appearance, which has received lots of attentions. In this paper, we reviewed the expressions and meanings of various Class Energy Image approaches, and analyzed the information in the Class Energy Images. Furthermore, the effectiveness and robustness of these approaches were compared on the benchmark gait databases. We outlined the research challenges and provided promising future directions for the field. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first review that focuses on Class Energy Image. It can provide a useful reference in the literature of video sensor-based gait representation approach. PMID:25574935

  13. Continuous real-world gait monitoring in community-based older adults.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Lorcan; Doyle, Julie; Smith, Erin; Inomata, Akihiro; Bond, Rodd

    2015-08-01

    This paper describes the collection of real-world gait data in a cohort of 7 community living older adults, who have fallen at least once in the previous year, while they live in a smart apartment for four days. It describes the approach used to collect various gait metrics, from inertial sensors placed on the lower shanks, where gait bouts can be contextualised by smart home data. Results from this study are presented with a brief discussion into the smart-home based contextualisation of outliers in the gait data. Future work will investigate the normative ranges of various gait metrics, and how such real-world gait data may be integrated into clinical practice. PMID:26737101

  14. Multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis of human gait diseases

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Srimonti; Ghosh, Dipak; Chatterjee, Sucharita

    2013-01-01

    In this paper multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MFDFA) is used to study the human gait time series for normal and diseased sets. It is observed that long range correlation is primarily responsible for the origin of multifractality. The study reveals that the degree of multifractality is more for normal set compared to diseased set. However, the method fails to distinguish between the two diseased sets. PMID:24109454

  15. Gait parameters associated with hallux valgus: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hallux valgus (HV) has been linked to functional disability and increased falls risk in older adults. However, specific gait alterations in individuals with HV are unclear. This systematic review investigated gait parameters associated with HV in otherwise healthy adults. Methods Electronic databases (Medline, Embase, CINAHL) were searched to October 2011, including cross-sectional studies with clearly defined HV and non-HV comparison groups. Two investigators independently rated studies for methodological quality. Effect sizes (95% confidence intervals (CI)) were calculated as standardized mean differences (SMD) for continuous data and risk ratios (RR) for dichotomous data. Results Nine studies included a total of 589 participants. Three plantar pressure studies reported increased hallux loading (SMD 0.56 to 1.78) and medial forefoot loading (SMD 0.62 to 1.21), while one study found reduced first metatarsal loading (SMD −0.61, CI −1.19 to −0.03) in HV participants. HV participants demonstrated less ankle and rearfoot motion during terminal stance (SMD −0.81 to −0.63) and increased intrinsic muscle activity (RR 1.6, 1.1 to 2.2). Most studies reported no differences in spatio-temporal parameters; however, one study found reduced speed (SMD −0.73, -1.25 to −0.20), step length (SMD −0.66 to −0.59) and less stable gait patterns (SMD −0.86 to −0.78) in older adults with HV. Conclusions HV impacts on particular gait parameters, and further understanding of potentially modifiable factors is important for prevention and management of HV. Cause and effect relationships cannot be inferred from cross-sectional studies, thus prospective studies are warranted to elucidate the relationship between HV and functional disability. PMID:23497584

  16. Effect of increased pushoff during gait on hip joint forces.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Cara L; Garibay, Erin J

    2015-01-01

    Anterior acetabular labral tears and anterior hip pain may result from high anteriorly directed forces from the femur on the acetabulum. While providing more pushoff is known to decrease sagittal plane hip moments, it is unknown if this gait modification also decreases hip joint forces. The purpose of this study was to determine if increasing pushoff decreases hip joint forces. Nine healthy subjects walked on an instrumented force treadmill at 1.25 m/s under two walking conditions. For the natural condition, subjects were instructed to walk as they normally would. For the increased pushoff condition, subjects were instructed to "push more with your foot when you walk". We collected motion data of markers placed on the subjects' trunk and lower extremities to capture trunk and leg kinematics and ground reaction force data to determine joint moments. Data were processed in Visual3D to produce the inverse kinematics and model scaling files. In OpenSim, the generic gait model (Gait2392) was scaled to the subject, and hip joint forces were calculated for the femur on the acetabulum after computing the muscle activations necessary to reproduce the experimental data. The instruction to "push more with your foot when you walk" reduced the maximum hip flexion and extension moment compared to the natural condition. The average reduction in the hip joint forces were 12.5%, 3.2% and 9.6% in the anterior, superior and medial directions respectively and 2.3% for the net resultant force. Increasing pushoff may be an effective gait modification for people with anterior hip pain. PMID:25468661

  17. Effect of increased pushoff during gait on hip joint forces

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Cara L.; Garibay, Erin J.

    2014-01-01

    Anterior acetabular labral tears and anterior hip pain may result from high anteriorly directed forces from the femur on the acetabulum. While providing more pushoff is known to decrease sagittal plane hip moments, it is unknown if this gait modification also decreases hip joint forces. The purpose of this study was to determine if increasing pushoff decreases hip joint forces. Nine healthy subjects walked on an instrumented force treadmill at 1.25 m/s under two walking conditions. For the natural condition, subjects were instructed to walk as they normally would. For the increased pushoff condition, subjects were instructed to “push more with your foot when you walk”. We collected motion data of markers placed on the subjects’ trunk and lower extremities to capture trunk and leg kinematics and ground reaction force data to determine joint moments. Data were processed in Visual 3D to produce the inverse kinematics and model scaling files. In OpenSim, the generic gait model (Gait2392) was scaled to the subject, and hip joint forces were calculated for the femur on the acetabulum after computing the muscle activations necessary to reproduce the experimental data. The instruction to “push more with your foot when you walk” reduced the maximum hip flexion and extension moment compared to the natural condition. The average reduction in the hip joint forces was 12.5%, 3.2% and 9.6% in the anterior, superior and medial directions respectively and 2.3% for the net resultant force. Increasing pushoff may be an effective gait modification for people with anterior hip pain. PMID:25468661

  18. Stability and Harmony of Gait in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iosa, Marco; Marro, Tiziana; Paolucci, Stefano; Morelli, Daniela

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to quantitatively assess the stability and harmony of gait in children with cerebral palsy. Seventeen children with spastic hemiplegia due to cerebral palsy (5.0 [plus or minus] 2.3 years old) who were able to walk autonomously and seventeen age-matched children with typical development (5.7 [plus or minus] 2.5 years old,…

  19. A real-time auditory feedback system for retraining gait.

    PubMed

    Maulucci, Ruth A; Eckhouse, Richard H

    2011-01-01

    Stroke is the third leading cause of death in the United States and the principal cause of major long-term disability, incurring substantial distress as well as medical cost. Abnormal and inefficient gait patterns are widespread in survivors of stroke, yet gait is a major determinant of independent living. It is not surprising, therefore, that improvement of walking function is the most commonly stated priority of the survivors. Although many such individuals achieve the goal of walking, the caliber of their walking performance often limits endurance and quality of life. The ultimate goal of the research presented here is to use real-time auditory feedback to retrain gait in patients with chronic stroke. The strategy is to convert the motion of the foot into an auditory signal, and then use this auditory signal as feedback to inform the subject of the existence as well as the magnitude of error during walking. The initial stage of the project is described in this paper. The design and implementation of the new feedback method for lower limb training is explained. The question of whether the patient is physically capable of handling such training is explored. PMID:22255509

  20. How does visuospatial attention modulate motor preparation during gait initiation?

    PubMed

    Tard, Céline; Dujardin, Kathy; Girard, Amandine; Debaughrien, Marion; Derambure, Philippe; Defebvre, Luc; Delval, Arnaud

    2016-01-01

    Gait initiation is an automatized motor program that is preceded by anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs). These adjustments create the propulsive forces required to reach the steady-state gait at the end of the first step and can be studied by the displacement of the centre of pressure. The objective of this study was to demonstrate that APAs can be modulated by visuospatial attentional processes prior to motor execution. An adaptation of the Posner paradigm was used to assess attention during step initiation. Twelve healthy subjects performed a gait initiation task under three conditions: a no-cue condition (the control experiment), a double-cue condition (alerting attention) and a single-cue condition (orienting attention). The kinetic and kinematic parameters of the APAs and step initiation were recorded. The time to step initiation was significantly shorter in the alerting condition than in the control condition. This effect was associated with the earlier occurrence of APAs. Orienting condition also had an effect and was associated with the modulation of APA errors (defined as a contralateral shift of the CoP on the cue side before corrective shifting to the target side). Behavioural measurements (such as postural preparation of step initiation) may reflect the interaction between attention and locomotion. Our results show that the different components of attention each have a specific influence on step initiation parameters. PMID:26358126

  1. Gait Patterns of Quadrupeds and Natural Vibration Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurita, Yutaka; Matsumura, Yuichi; Kanda, Shinichi; Kinugasa, Hironao

    Quadruped animals switch gait patterns with speed for energy-effective movement. This is similar to the phenomenon that excited natural vibration modes switch with vibration frequency in a multi-degree-of-freedom system. Therefore, in this paper, it is assumed that quadruped animals move by using the natural vibration of their own musculoskeletal systems. In the simplest rigid-body-link model consisting of one body and four legs, there are natural vibration modes similar to the gait patterns (trot, pace, and gallop) of quadruped animals. However, all the natural frequencies in the model exist near the natural frequency of the free leg and are accordingly different from the walking frequencies of actual quadruped animals. When a scapula and a pelvis are added to the rigid-body-link model on the basis of observations of quadruped motion, the natural frequency of the gallop mode used at high speed increases greatly and approaches the walking frequency. If the body characteristics of a horse are applied to the rigid-body-link model with leg joints, the natural vibration modes of the model are close to the gait patterns of the horse.

  2. Side by side treadmill walking with intentionally desynchronized gait.

    PubMed

    Nessler, Jeff A; McMillan, David; Schoulten, Michael; Shallow, Teresa; Stewart, Brianna; De Leone, Charles

    2013-08-01

    Humans demonstrate an innate desire to synchronize stepping when walking side by side. This behavior requires modification of each person's gait, which may increase for pairings with very different walking patterns. The purpose of this study was to compare locomotor behavior for conditions in which partners exhibited similar and substantially different walking patterns. Twenty-six unimpaired subjects walked on a motorized treadmill at their preferred walking speed for three trials: by themselves (SOLO), next to someone on an adjacent treadmill (PAIRED), and next to someone who purposely avoided synchronization by altering stride times and/or lengths (DeSYNC). Means, coefficients of variance, approximate entropy (ApEn), rate of autocorrelation decay (α), and estimates of maximal Lyapunov exponents (λ*) were calculated for several dependent variables taken from sagittal plane kinematic data. Few differences in behavior were noted when the PAIRED condition was compared to the SOLO condition. However, the DeSYNC condition resulted in several alterations in ApEn, α, and λ*. These results suggest that greater differences in walking pattern between partners will facilitate greater modification to an individual's gait. Additional study of side by side walking may hold implications for understanding the control of gait in humans and may have application in a clinical setting. PMID:23001358

  3. Transitions between three swimming gaits in Paramecium escape.

    PubMed

    Hamel, Amandine; Fisch, Cathy; Combettes, Laurent; Dupuis-Williams, Pascale; Baroud, Charles N

    2011-05-01

    Paramecium and other protists are able to swim at velocities reaching several times their body size per second by beating their cilia in an organized fashion. The cilia beat in an asymmetric stroke, which breaks the time reversal symmetry of small scale flows. Here we show that Paramecium uses three different swimming gaits to escape from an aggression, applied in the form of a focused laser heating. For a weak aggression, normal swimming is sufficient and produces a steady swimming velocity. As the heating amplitude is increased, a higher acceleration and faster swimming are achieved through synchronized beating of the cilia, which begin by producing oscillating swimming velocities and later give way to the usual gait. Finally, escape from a life-threatening aggression is achieved by a "jumping" gait, which does not rely on the cilia but is achieved through the explosive release of a group of trichocysts in the direction of the hot spot. Measurements through high-speed video explain the role of trichocysts in defending against aggressions while showing unexpected transitions in the swimming of microorganisms. These measurements also demonstrate that Paramecium optimizes its escape pattern by taking advantage of its inertia. PMID:21464291

  4. Quantifying Parkinson's disease progression by simulating gait patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cárdenas, Luisa; Martínez, Fabio; Atehortúa, Angélica; Romero, Eduardo

    2015-12-01

    Modern rehabilitation protocols of most neurodegenerative diseases, in particular the Parkinson Disease, rely on a clinical analysis of gait patterns. Currently, such analysis is highly dependent on both the examiner expertise and the type of evaluation. Development of evaluation methods with objective measures is then crucial. Physical models arise as a powerful alternative to quantify movement patterns and to emulate the progression and performance of specific treatments. This work introduces a novel quantification of the Parkinson disease progression using a physical model that accurately represents the main gait biomarker, the body Center of Gravity (CoG). The model tracks the whole gait cycle by a coupled double inverted pendulum that emulates the leg swinging for the single support phase and by a damper-spring System (SDP) that recreates both legs in contact with the ground for the double phase. The patterns generated by the proposed model are compared with actual ones learned from 24 subjects in stages 2,3, and 4. The evaluation performed demonstrates a better performance of the proposed model when compared with a baseline model(SP) composed of a coupled double pendulum and a mass-spring system. The Frechet distance measured differences between model estimations and real trajectories, showing for stages 2, 3 and 4 distances of 0.137, 0.155, 0.38 for the baseline and 0.07, 0.09, 0.29 for the proposed method.

  5. Gaze stabilization and gait performance in vestibular dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Whitney, Susan L.; Marchetti, Gregory F.; Pritcher, Miranda; Furman, Joseph M.

    2016-01-01

    Background The gaze stability test (GST) quantifies the ability of a person to recognize a target projected on a personal computer monitor during active head movement. Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine if there was a relationship between clinical measures of walking performance and the GST in patients with vestibular disorders and in healthy subjects. We hypothesized that impairment of the ability to keep objects in focus during active head movement would be correlated with walking performance. Subjects Twenty older asymptomatic adults acted as controls and 12 patients with either unilateral or bilateral vestibular disease participated. Methods The GST quantifies the maximum velocity that a person can move their head in the pitch and yaw planes while retaining the ability to read an optotype that is momentarily projected onto a computer screen. Subjects were scored while performing the Dynamic Gait Index (DGI) and the Timed “Up & Go” (TUG) tests. Results Walking performance on the DGI and TUG were significantly associated with GST results in subjects with vestibular disorders, but not in control subjects. Abnormalities of gait could be identified by GST cutoff values of 658 s_1 in the pitch plane and 638 s_1 in the yaw plane. Discussion/conclusion In older subjects with vestibular disorders, gaze stability, as assessed by the GST, is associated with reduced test scores on measures of gait performance. PMID:18815040

  6. Sex differences in whole body gait kinematics at preferred speeds.

    PubMed

    Bruening, Dustin A; Frimenko, Rebecca E; Goodyear, Chuck D; Bowden, David R; Fullenkamp, Adam M

    2015-02-01

    Studies on human perception have identified pelvis and torso motion as key discriminators between male and female gaits. However, while most observers would advocate that men and women walk differently, consistent findings and explanations of sex differences in gait kinematics across modern empirical studies are rare. In the present study we evaluated sex differences in whole body gait kinematics from a large sample of subjects (55 men, 36 women) walking at self selected speeds. We analyzed the data through comparisons of discrete metrics and whole curve analyses. Results showed that in the frontal plane, women walked with greater pelvic obliquity than men, but exhibited a more stable torso and head. Women had greater transverse plane pelvis and torso rotation as well as greater arm swing. Additional sex differences were noted at the hip and ankle. These kinematic results are in line with anectdotal observations and qualitative studies. In order to understand these observations and substantiate some of the explanations previously set forth in the biomechanics literature, we also explored possible reasons for dynamic sex effects, and suggested applications that may benefit from their consideration. PMID:25548119

  7. Quantifying prosthetic gait deviation using simple outcome measures

    PubMed Central

    Kark, Lauren; Odell, Ross; McIntosh, Andrew S; Simmons, Anne

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To develop a subset of simple outcome measures to quantify prosthetic gait deviation without needing three-dimensional gait analysis (3DGA). METHODS: Eight unilateral, transfemoral amputees and 12 unilateral, transtibial amputees were recruited. Twenty-eight able-bodied controls were recruited. All participants underwent 3DGA, the timed-up-and-go test and the six-minute walk test (6MWT). The lower-limb amputees also completed the Prosthesis Evaluation Questionnaire. Results from 3DGA were summarised using the gait deviation index (GDI), which was subsequently regressed, using stepwise regression, against the other measures. RESULTS: Step-length (SL), self-selected walking speed (SSWS) and the distance walked during the 6MWT (6MWD) were significantly correlated with GDI. The 6MWD was the strongest, single predictor of the GDI, followed by SL and SSWS. The predictive ability of the regression equations were improved following inclusion of self-report data related to mobility and prosthetic utility. CONCLUSION: This study offers a practicable alternative to quantifying kinematic deviation without the need to conduct complete 3DGA. PMID:27335814

  8. Gait recovery pattern of unilateral lower limb amputees during rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Baker, P A; Hewison, S R

    1990-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the rate at which gait recovery as measured by temporal distance factors (velocity and symmetry) occurs in unilateral lower limb amputees. A microcomputer foot switch system was used to record the gait patterns of twenty subjects, mean age 65.1 years. The initial measurement was taken when the subject was capable of walking 6 metres with an interim prosthesis within the parallel bars. The patient sample as a whole was analyzed and subjects were further divided into four groups, depending on ambulatory aid required at discharge. Group A, n = 3 used no aid, Group B, n = 5 used a single stick, Group C, n = 6 used 2 single sticks and Group D, n = 5 required frames. A one way analysis of variance (F = 4.55, p = 0.02) showed a significant difference between the Groups, (A and D, B and D, C and D). The major velocity increase occurs within the first 30 days of the gait training programme. Overall about 55% increase in velocity can be expected within the first fifteen day period followed by an additional 30% between days 15-30. A moderately strong correlation (r = 0.78) was found between initial and discharge velocity. The correlation between initial and discharge symmetry was weaker (r = 0.50). PMID:2235305

  9. Comparison of gait of young men and elderly men.

    PubMed

    Blanke, D J; Hageman, P A

    1989-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe and compare the free-speed gait characteristics of healthy young men with those of healthy elderly men. Data collection consisted of high-speed cinematography resulting in synchronized front and side views of 24 healthy male volunteers, 12 between 20 and 32 years of age and 12 between 60 and 74 years of age. Young men were recruited to match the elderly men on the basis of right-leg length. Each subject participated in three filmed trials of free-speed ambulation down a 14-m walkway. The processed film was analyzed for eight gait characteristics. Differences in characteristics between the two groups were examined using a correlated t test (p less than .01). No significant differences were observed between the groups for step and stride length, velocity, ankle range of motion, vertical and horizontal excursions of the center of gravity, and pelvic obliquity; however, the younger men demonstrated a significantly larger stride width than the elderly men (p less than .01). The results suggest that the two populations of healthy adult men have similar gait characteristics. PMID:2913584

  10. Feature selection gait-based gender classification under different circumstances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabir, Azhin; Al-Jawad, Naseer; Jassim, Sabah

    2014-05-01

    This paper proposes a gender classification based on human gait features and investigates the problem of two variations: clothing (wearing coats) and carrying bag condition as addition to the normal gait sequence. The feature vectors in the proposed system are constructed after applying wavelet transform. Three different sets of feature are proposed in this method. First, Spatio-temporal distance that is dealing with the distance of different parts of the human body (like feet, knees, hand, Human Height and shoulder) during one gait cycle. The second and third feature sets are constructed from approximation and non-approximation coefficient of human body respectively. To extract these two sets of feature we divided the human body into two parts, upper and lower body part, based on the golden ratio proportion. In this paper, we have adopted a statistical method for constructing the feature vector from the above sets. The dimension of the constructed feature vector is reduced based on the Fisher score as a feature selection method to optimize their discriminating significance. Finally k-Nearest Neighbor is applied as a classification method. Experimental results demonstrate that our approach is providing more realistic scenario and relatively better performance compared with the existing approaches.

  11. View Transformation Model Incorporating Quality Measures for Cross-View Gait Recognition.

    PubMed

    Muramatsu, Daigo; Makihara, Yasushi; Yagi, Yasushi

    2016-07-01

    Cross-view gait recognition authenticates a person using a pair of gait image sequences with different observation views. View difference causes degradation of gait recognition accuracy, and so several solutions have been proposed to suppress this degradation. One useful solution is to apply a view transformation model (VTM) that encodes a joint subspace of multiview gait features trained with auxiliary data from multiple training subjects, who are different from test subjects (recognition targets). In the VTM framework, a gait feature with a destination view is generated from that with a source view by estimating a vector on the trained joint subspace, and gait features with the same destination view are compared for recognition. Although this framework improves recognition accuracy as a whole, the fit of the VTM depends on a given gait feature pair, and causes an inhomogeneously biased dissimilarity score. Because it is well known that normalization of such inhomogeneously biased scores improves recognition accuracy in general, we therefore propose a VTM incorporating a score normalization framework with quality measures that encode the degree of the bias. From a pair of gait features, we calculate two quality measures, and use them to calculate the posterior probability that both gait features originate from the same subjects together with the biased dissimilarity score. The proposed method was evaluated against two gait datasets, a large population gait dataset of over-ground walking (course dataset) and a treadmill gait dataset. The experimental results show that incorporating the quality measures contributes to accuracy improvement in many cross-view settings. PMID:26259209

  12. Effect of dual task type on gait and dynamic stability during stair negotiation at different inclinations.

    PubMed

    Madehkhaksar, Forough; Egges, Arjan

    2016-01-01

    Stair gait is a common daily activity with great potential risk for falls. Stairs have varying inclinations and people may perform other tasks concurrently with stair gait. This study investigated dual-task interference in the context of complex gait tasks, such as stair gait at different inclinations, a topic about which little is understood. We examined how secondary cognitive and manual tasks interfere with stair gait when a person concurrently performed tasks at different levels of complexity. Gait kinematic data and secondary task performance measures were obtained from fifteen healthy young males while ascending and descending a four-step staircase at three inclinations (17.7°, 29.4°, and 41.5°) as well as level walking. They performed a cognitive task, 'backward digit recall', a manual task, 'carrying a cup of water' and a combination of the two tasks. Gait performance and dynamic stability were assessed by gait speed and whole body center of mass (COM) range of motion in the medial-lateral direction, respectively. No significant effect of the gait task on the cognitive task performance was observed. In contrast, stair walking adversely affected the performance of the manual task compared to level walking. Overall, more difficult postural and secondary tasks resulted in a decrease in gait speed and variation in COM displacement within normal range. Results suggest that COM displacement and gait alterations might be adopted to enhance the stability, and optimize the secondary task performance while walking under challenging circumstances. Our findings are useful for balance and gait evaluation, and for future falls prediction. PMID:26410477

  13. Effects of walking speed on asymmetry and bilateral coordination of gait

    PubMed Central

    Plotnik, Meir; Bartsch, Ronny P.; Zeev, Aviva; Giladi, Nir; Hausdorff, Jeffery M.

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms regulating the bilateral coordination of gait in humans are largely unknown. Our objective was to study how bilateral coordination changes as a result of gait speed modifications during over ground walking. 15 young adults wore force sensitive insoles that measured vertical forces used to determine the timing of the gait cycle events under three walking conditions (i.e., usual-walking, fast and slow). Ground reaction force impact (GRFI) associated with heel-strikes was also quantified, representing the potential contribution of sensory feedback to the regulation of gait. Gait asymmetry (GA) was quantified based on the differences between right and left swing times and the bilateral coordination of gait was assessed using the phase coordination index (PCI), a metric that quantifies the consistency and accuracy of the anti-phase stepping pattern. GA was preserved in the three different gait speeds. PCI was higher (reduced coordination) in the slow gait condition, compared to usual-walking (3.51% vs. 2.47%, respectively, p=0.002), but was not significantly affected in the fast condition. GRFI values were lower in the slow walking as compared to usual-walking and higher in the fast walking condition (p<0.001). Stepwise regression revealed that slowed gait related changes in PCI were not associated with the slowed gait related changes in GRFI. The present findings suggest that left-right anti-phase stepping is similar in normal and fast walking, but altered during slowed walking. This behavior might reflect a relative increase in attention resources required to regulate a slow gait speed, consistent with the possibility that cortical function and supraspinal input influences the bilateral coordination of gait. PMID:23680424

  14. Evaluation of thermal formation and air ventilation inside footwear during gait: The role of gait and fitting.

    PubMed

    Shimazaki, Yasuhiro; Matsutani, Toshiki; Satsumoto, Yayoi

    2016-07-01

    Comfort is an important concept in footwear design. The microclimate inside footwear contributes to the perception of thermal comfort. To investigate the effect of ventilation on microclimate formation inside footwear, experiments with subjects were conducted at four gait speeds with three different footwear sizes. Skin temperature, metabolism, and body mass were measured at approximately 25 °C and 50% relative humidity, with no solar radiation and a calm wind. The footwear occupancy and ventilation rate were also estimated, with the latter determined using the tracer gas method. The experimental results revealed that foot movement, metabolism, evaporation, radiation, convection, and ventilation were the main factors influencing the energy balance for temperature formation on the surface of the foot. The cooling effect of ventilation on the arch temperature was observed during gait. The significance of the amount of air space and ventilation on the improvement in the thermal comfort of footwear was clarified. PMID:26611985

  15. Estimation of temporal gait parameters using Bayesian models on acceleration signals.

    PubMed

    López-Nava, I H; Muñoz-Meléndez, A; Pérez Sanpablo, A I; Alessi Montero, A; Quiñones Urióstegui, I; Núñez Carrera, L

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a system capable of performing calculation of temporal gait parameters using two low-cost wireless accelerometers and artificial intelligence-based techniques as part of a larger research project for conducting human gait analysis. Ten healthy subjects of different ages participated in this study and performed controlled walking tests. Two wireless accelerometers were placed on their ankles. Raw acceleration signals were processed in order to obtain gait patterns from characteristic peaks related to steps. A Bayesian model was implemented to classify the characteristic peaks into steps or nonsteps. The acceleration signals were segmented based on gait events, such as heel strike and toe-off, of actual steps. Temporal gait parameters, such as cadence, ambulation time, step time, gait cycle time, stance and swing phase time, simple and double support time, were estimated from segmented acceleration signals. Gait data-sets were divided into two groups of ages to test Bayesian models in order to classify the characteristic peaks. The mean error obtained from calculating the temporal gait parameters was 4.6%. Bayesian models are useful techniques that can be applied to classification of gait data of subjects at different ages with promising results. PMID:25876180

  16. Gait Variability in Older Adults: Observational Rating Validated by Comparison With a Computerized Walkway Gold Standard

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wen-Ni Wennie; VanSwearingen, Jessie M; Brach, Jennifer S

    2008-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Gait variability has been measured with computerized technology–intensive techniques, which are not practical in clinical settings. The purpose of this study was to validate an observational rating of gait variability for routine clinical practice. Subjects: Community-dwelling older adults aged 65 years and older (n=46; mean age=81.2 years, SD=6.8 years, range=66–91 years) participated in this study. Methods: The standard deviation of stance time (stance time variability) derived from gait characteristics recorded by use of a computerized walkway was used as the gold standard for gait variability. The validity of the diagnostic test evaluated in this study (an observational rating of gait variability) was determined by comparison with the quantitative measure of stance time variability. Results: Six validity indexes were defined for the observational rating of gait variability: sensitivity=81%; specificity=53%; positive predictive value=65%; negative predictive value=71%; positive likelihood ratio=1.72; and negative likelihood ratio=0.36. Discussion and Conclusion: An observational rating of gait variability was validated by comparison with stance time variability derived from a computerized walkway. The concurrent validity of the 2 methods of determining gait variability provides support for the use of the observational rating as an alternative measure of gait variability for the purpose of identifying older adults at risk for mobility disability in clinical settings. PMID:18719005

  17. Repeatability of gait analysis for measuring knee osteoarthritis pain in patients with severe chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Asay, Jessica L; Boyer, Katherine A; Andriacchi, Thomas P

    2013-07-01

    Gait measures are receiving increased attention in the evaluation of patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Yet, there remains a need to assess variability of gait analysis in patients with knee osteoarthritis over time and how pain affects variation in these gait parameters. The purpose of this study was to determine if important gait parameters, such as the knee adduction moment, knee flexion moment, peak vertical ground reaction force, and speed, were repeatable in patients with mild-to-moderate knee OA over a trial period of 12 weeks. Six patients were enrolled in this cross-over study design after meeting strict inclusion criteria. Gait tests were conducted three times at 4 week intervals and once after the placebo arm of a randomized treatment sequence; each gait test followed a 2-week period of receiving a placebo for a pain modifying drug. Repeatability for each gait variable was found using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) with a two-way random model. This study found that the knee adduction moment was repeatable throughout the four gait tests. However, normalized peak vertical ground reaction force and knee flexion moment were not as repeatable, varying with pain. This suggests that these gait outcomes could offer a more objective way to measure a patient's level of pain. PMID:23508626

  18. Statistical method for prediction of gait kinematics with Gaussian process regression.

    PubMed

    Yun, Youngmok; Kim, Hyun-Chul; Shin, Sung Yul; Lee, Junwon; Deshpande, Ashish D; Kim, Changhwan

    2014-01-01

    We propose a novel methodology for predicting human gait pattern kinematics based on a statistical and stochastic approach using a method called Gaussian process regression (GPR). We selected 14 body parameters that significantly affect the gait pattern and 14 joint motions that represent gait kinematics. The body parameter and gait kinematics data were recorded from 113 subjects by anthropometric measurements and a motion capture system. We generated a regression model with GPR for gait pattern prediction and built a stochastic function mapping from body parameters to gait kinematics based on the database and GPR, and validated the model with a cross validation method. The function can not only produce trajectories for the joint motions associated with gait kinematics, but can also estimate the associated uncertainties. Our approach results in a novel, low-cost and subject-specific method for predicting gait kinematics with only the subject's body parameters as the necessary input, and also enables a comprehensive understanding of the correlation and uncertainty between body parameters and gait kinematics. PMID:24211221

  19. Identification of mouse gaits using a novel force-sensing exercise wheel

    PubMed Central

    Cullingford, Lottie; Usherwood, James R.

    2015-01-01

    The gaits that animals use can provide information on neurological and musculoskeletal disorders, as well as the biomechanics of locomotion. Mice are a common research model in many fields; however, there is no consensus in the literature on how (and if) mouse gaits vary with speed. One of the challenges in studying mouse gaits is that mice tend to run intermittently on treadmills or overground; this paper attempts to overcome this issue with a novel exercise wheel that measures vertical ground reaction forces. Unlike previous instrumented wheels, this wheel is able to measure forces continuously and can therefore record data from consecutive strides. By concatenating the maximum limb force at each time point, a force trace can be constructed to quantify and identify gaits. The wheel was three dimensionally printed, allowing the design to be shared with other researchers. The kinematic parameters measured by the wheel were evaluated using high-speed video. Gaits were classified using a metric called “3S” (stride signal symmetry), which quantifies the half wave symmetry of the force trace peaks. Although mice are capable of using both symmetric and asymmetric gaits throughout their speed range, the continuum of gaits can be divided into regions based on the frequency of symmetric and asymmetric gaits; these divisions are further supported by the fact that mice run less frequently at speeds near the boundaries between regions. The boundary speeds correspond to gait transition speeds predicted by the hypothesis that mice move in a dynamically similar fashion to other legged animals. PMID:26139220

  20. An Ambulatory Method of Identifying Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstructed Gait Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Matthew R.; Delahunt, Eamonn; Sweeney, Kevin T.; Caulfield, Brian

    2014-01-01

    The use of inertial sensors to characterize pathological gait has traditionally been based on the calculation of temporal and spatial gait variables from inertial sensor data. This approach has proved successful in the identification of gait deviations in populations where substantial differences from normal gait patterns exist; such as in Parkinsonian gait. However, it is not currently clear if this approach could identify more subtle gait deviations, such as those associated with musculoskeletal injury. This study investigates whether additional analysis of inertial sensor data, based on quantification of gyroscope features of interest, would provide further discriminant capability in this regard. The tested cohort consisted of a group of anterior cruciate ligament reconstructed (ACL-R) females and a group of non-injured female controls, each performed ten walking trials. Gait performance was measured simultaneously using inertial sensors and an optoelectronic marker based system. The ACL-R group displayed kinematic and kinetic deviations from the control group, but no temporal or spatial deviations. This study demonstrates that quantification of gyroscope features can successfully identify changes associated with ACL-R gait, which was not possible using spatial or temporal variables. This finding may also have a role in other clinical applications where small gait deviations exist. PMID:24451464

  1. Detection of spatio-temporal gait parameters by using wearable motion sensors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seon-Woo; Mase, Kenji; Kogure, Kiyoshi

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a method to detect the spatio-temporal parameters of gait by using wearable motion sensors with a gyro, accelerometer, and magnetic sensor. The detected gait parameters are as follows: stance (ST), double support (DS), and gait cycle (GC) time as temporal parameters, and the stride length (SL) as spatial parameter. Four motion sensors are attached on both thighs and shanks of users, and the sensor data are collected in a portable PC. The temporal parameters are estimated by finding walking events, and then the stride length is calculated with two gait models. The estimated parameters are compared to those obtained from a motion capture system (VICON system). PMID:17281844

  2. Feasibility of a Hybrid-FES System for Gait Restoration in Paraplegics

    PubMed Central

    Quintero, Hugo A.; Farris, Ryan J.; Goldfarb, Michael; Durfee, William K.

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes a new configuration for a hybrid-FES gait restoration system, and presents a combination of simulation and experiment that support the feasibility of the proposed approach. Gait simulation results are presented that indicate the majority of load bearing and the majority of power for gait is provided by the legs (i.e., quadriceps muscle stimulation). Based on these simulations, experiments on healthy subjects indicate that the gait restoration approach should be capable of providing long periods of locomotion unimpeded by quadriceps muscle fatigue. PMID:21096305

  3. Feasibility of a hybrid-FES system for gait restoration in paraplegics.

    PubMed

    Quintero, Hugo A; Farris, Ryan J; Durfee, William K; Goldfarb, Michael

    2010-01-01

    This paper proposes a new configuration for a hybrid-FES gait restoration system, and presents a combination of simulation and experiment that support the feasibility of the proposed approach. Gait simulation results are presented that indicate the majority of load bearing and the majority of power for gait is provided by the legs (i.e., quadriceps muscle stimulation). Based on these simulations, experiments on healthy subjects indicate that the gait restoration approach should be capable of providing long periods of locomotion unimpeded by quadriceps muscle fatigue. PMID:21096305

  4. The effects of ankle joint taping on gait and balance ability of healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Myoung-Kwon; Cha, Hyun-Gyu

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effects of the application of elastic taping over the ankle joints of healthy subjects on their gait, balance ability, and muscle strength. [Subjects] Fifty healthy subjects with no orthopedic history of the ankle joint were selected and elastic taping was applied to their ankle joints. [Methods] Before and after application of the elastic taping, gait and balance ability of the subjects were evaluated. [Results] After the taping application, gait velocity significantly increased and there were significant differences in all variables of balance ability. [Conclusion] Application of elastic taping aimed at improving stability of the ankle joint had a positive effect on gait speed and balance ability. PMID:26504323

  5. Changes in gait patterns with rhythmic auditory stimulation in adults with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo Ji; Kwak, Eunmi Emily; Park, Eun Sook; Lee, Don Shin; Kim, Ki Jung; Song, Joo Eun; Cho, Sung-Rae

    2011-01-01

    The objective is to evaluate the changes in gait patterns with rhythmic auditory stimulation (RAS) in adults with cerebral palsy (CP). Fourteen CP with bilateral spasticity participated in this study. A repeated-measures analysis of gait was performed in the presence and absence of RAS. Thirty healthy controls were also recruited. Each subject walked 10 m at their comfortable walking speed. Temporospatial data and kinematic parameters of gait were analyzed without RAS and with RAS. RAS was provided using a combination of a metronome beat set to the individual's cadence and rhythmic cueing from a live keyboard playing. Kinematic parameters, gait deviation index (GDI) as a measure of overall gait pathology, and asymmetry of temporospatial data were assessed. Gait analysis revealed that anterior tilt of pelvis and hip flexion during a gait cycle was significantly changed with RAS (p < 0.05), whereas there were no statistical differences in knee, ankle, and foot kinematic parameters. Additionally, the GDI exhibited a modest, but a statistically significant, improvement with RAS (p < 0.05). Based on ambulatory status, household ambulators showed that side-to-side asymmetry of step length as well as the GDI was significantly attenuated with RAS (p < 0.05). Walking with RAS resulted in kinematic changes of the pelvic and hip movement in spastic CP. Especially, the application of RAS immediately ameliorated overall gait pathology as well as temporospatial asymmetry in household ambulators. Therefore, RAS may be one of the therapeutic tools for gait training in adults with CP. PMID:22142756

  6. Gait in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: kinematics and electromyographic analysis.

    PubMed

    Mahaudens, P; Banse, X; Mousny, M; Detrembleur, C

    2009-04-01

    Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) is a progressive growth disease that affects spinal anatomy, mobility, and left-right trunk symmetry. Consequently, AIS can modify human locomotion. Very few studies have investigated a simple activity like walking in a cohort of well-defined untreated patients with scoliosis. The first goal of this study is to evaluate the effects of scoliosis and scoliosis severity on kinematic and electromyographic (EMG) gait variables compared to an able-bodied population. The second goal is to look for any asymmetry in these parameters during walking. Thirteen healthy girls and 41 females with untreated AIS, with left thoracolumbar or lumbar primary structural curves were assessed. AIS patients were divided into three clinical subgroups (group 1 < 20 degrees, group 2 between 20 and 40 degrees, and group 3 > 40 degrees). Gait analysis included synchronous bilateral kinematic and EMG measurements. The subjects walked on a treadmill at 4 km/h (comfortable speed). The tridimensional (3D) shoulder, pelvis, and lower limb motions were measured using 22 reflective markers tracked by four infrared cameras. The EMG timing activity was measured using bipolar surface electrodes on quadratus lumborum, erector spinae, gluteus medius, rectus femoris, semitendinosus, tibialis anterior, and gastrocnemius muscles. Statistical comparisons (ANOVA) were performed across groups and sides for kinematic and EMG parameters. The step length was reduced in AIS compared to normal subjects (7% less). Frontal shoulder, pelvis, and hip motion and transversal hip motion were reduced in scoliosis patients (respectively, 21, 27, 28, and 22% less). The EMG recording during walking showed that the quadratus lumborum, erector spinae, gluteus medius, and semitendinosus muscles contracted during a longer part of the stride in scoliotic patients (46% of the stride) compared with normal subjects (35% of the stride). There was no significant difference between scoliosis groups 1

  7. Height estimations based on eye measurements throughout a gait cycle.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sylvia X M; Larsen, Peter K; Alkjær, Tine; Juul-Kristensen, Birgit; Simonsen, Erik B; Lynnerup, Niels

    2014-03-01

    Anthropometric measurements (e.g. the height to the head, nose tip, eyes or shoulders) of a perpetrator based on video material may be used in criminal cases. However, several height measurements may be difficult to assess as the perpetrators may be disguised by clothes or headwear. The eye height (EH) measurement, on the other hand, is less prone to concealment. The purpose of the present study was to investigate: (1) how the eye height varies during the gait cycle, and (2) how the eye height changes with head position. The eyes were plotted manually in APAS for 16 test subjects during a complete gait cycle. The influence of head tilt on the EH was investigated in 20 healthy men. Markers were attached to the face and the subjects were instructed to stand relaxed, tilt their head to the right, to the left, forward and backward. The marker data for the right eye were used to calculate the EH. The respective deviation and SD from the relaxed standing EH and the EH in the Frankfurt plane, left tilted, right tilted, forward tilted and backward tilted, in addition to the corresponding head tilt angles were calculated. There was no correlation between the height of the subject and the maximum vertical displacement of the EH throughout the gait cycle nor between height of the subjects and the variation of the EH throughout the gait cycle. The average maximum vertical displacement for the test subject group was 4.76 cm (± 1.56 cm). The average EH was lower when the subjects were standing in the relaxed position than in the Frankfurt plane. The average EH was higher in the relaxed position than when the subjects tilted their heads, except when they tilted their heads backwards. The subjects had a slightly larger range of motion to the right than to the left, which was not significant. The results of this study provide a range for eye height estimates and may be readily implemented in forensic case work. It can be used as a reference in height estimates in cases with height

  8. Are gait variability and stability measures influenced by directional changes?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Many gait variability and stability measures have been proposed in the literature, with the aim to quantify gait impairment, degree of neuro-motor control and balance disorders in healthy and pathological subjects. These measures are often obtained from lower trunk acceleration data, typically acquired during rectilinear gait, but relevant experimental protocols and data processing techniques lack in standardization. Since directional changes represent an essential aspect of gait, the assessment of their influence on such measures is essential for standardization. In addition, their investigation is needed to evaluate the applicability of these measures in laboratory trials and in daily life activity analysis. A further methodological aspect to be standardized concerns the assessment of the sampling frequency, which could affect stability measures. The aim of the present study was hence to assess if gait variability and stability measures are affected by directional changes, and to evaluate the influence of sampling frequency of trunk acceleration data on the results. Methods Fifty-one healthy young adults performed a 6-minute walk test along a 30 m straight pathway, turning by 180 deg at each end of the pathway. Nine variability and stability measures (Standard deviation, Coefficient of variation, Poincaré plots, maximum Floquet multipliers, short-term Lyapunov exponents, Recurrence quantification analysis, Multiscale entropy, Harmonic ratio and Index of harmonicity) were calculated on stride duration and trunk acceleration data (acquired at 100 Hz and 200 Hz) coming from straight walking windows and from windows including both straight walking and the directional change. Results Harmonic ratio was the only measure that resulted to be affected by directional changes and sampling frequency, decreasing with the presence of a directional change task. HR was affected in the AP and V directions for the 200 Hz, but only in AP direction for the 100 Hz group

  9. Development of an Inflight Countermeasure to Mitigate Postflight Gait Dysfunction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomberg, J. J.; Mulavara, A. P.; Peters, B. T.; Cohen, H. S.; Richards, J. T.; Miller, C. A.; Brady, R.; Warren, L. E.

    2005-01-01

    Following spaceflight crewmembers experience gait and postural instabilities due to inflight adaptive alterations in sensorimotor function. These changes can pose a risk to crew safety if nominal or emergency vehicle egress is required immediately following long-duration spaceflight. At present, no operational countermeasure is available to mitigate postflight locomotor disturbances. Therefore, the goal of this study is to develop an inflight training regimen that facilitates the recovery of locomotor function after long-duration spaceflight. The countermeasure we are developing is based on the concept of variable practice. During this type of training the subject gains experience producing the appropriate adaptive motor behavior under a variety of sensory conditions and response constraints. This countermeasure is built around current ISS treadmill exercise activities. Crewmembers will conduct their nominal inflight treadmill exercise while being exposed to variations in visual flow patterns. These variations will challenge the postural and locomotor systems repeatedly, thereby promoting adaptive reorganization in locomotor behavior. As a result of this training a subject learns to solve a class of motor problems, rather than a specific motor solution to one problem, Le., the subject learns response generalizability or the ability to "learn to learn" under a variety of environmental constraints. We anticipate that this training will accelerate recovery of postural and locomotor function during readaptation to gravitational environments following spaceflight facilitating neural adaptation to unit (Earth) and partial (Mars) gravity after long-duration spaceflight. The study calls for one group of subjects to perform the inflight treadmill training regimen while a control group of subjects performs only the nominal exercise procedures. Locomotor function in both groups is assessed before and after spaceflight using two tests of gait function: The Integrated Treadmill

  10. DEVELOPMENT OF AN INFLIGHT COUNTERMEASURE TO MITIGATE POSTFLIGHT GAIT DYSFUNCTION

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomberg, J. J.; Mulavara, A. P.; Cohen, H. S.; Richards, J. T.; Miller, C. A.

    2005-01-01

    Following spaceflight crewmembers experience gait and postural instabilities due to inflight adaptive alterations in sensorimotor function. These changes can pose a risk to crew safety if nominal or emergency vehicle egress is required immediately following long-duration spaceflight. At present, no operational countermeasure is available to mitigate postflight locomotor disturbances. Therefore, the goal of this study is to develop an inflight training regimen that facilitates the recovery of locomotor function after long-duration spaceflight. The countermeasure we are developing is based on the concept of variable practice. During this type of training the subject gains experience producing the appropriate adaptive motor behavior under a variety of sensory conditions and response constraints. This countermeasure is built around current ISS treadmill exercise activities. Crewmembers will conduct their nominal inflight treadmill exercise while being exposed to variations in visual flow patterns. These variations will challenge the postural and locomotor systems repeatedly, thereby promoting adaptive reorganization in locomotor behavior. As a result of this training a subject learns to solve a class of motor problems, rather than a specific motor solution to one problem, Le., the subject learns response generalizability or the ability to "learn to learn" under a variety of environmental constraints. We anticipate that this training will accelerate recovery of postural and locomotor function during readaptation to gravitational environments following spaceflight facilitating neural adaptation to unit (Earth) and partial (Mars) gravity after long-duration spaceflight. The study calls for one group of subjects to perform the inflight treadmill training regimen while a control group of subjects performs only the nominal exercise procedures. Locomotor function in both groups is assessed before and after spaceflight using two tests of gait function: The Integrated Treadmill

  11. New evidence for gait abnormalities among Parkinson's disease patients who suffer from freezing of gait: insights using a body-fixed sensor worn for 3 days.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Aner; Herman, Talia; Giladi, Nir; Hausdorff, Jeffrey M

    2015-03-01

    Previous studies conducted in laboratory settings suggest that the gait pattern in between freezing of gait (FOG) episodes is abnormal among patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) who suffer from FOG (i.e., "freezers"), compared to those who do not (i.e., "non-freezers"). We evaluated whether long-term recordings also reveal gait alterations in freezers and if these features were related to freezing severity and its impact on daily function. 72 patients with PD wore a 3-D accelerometer for 3 days. Acceleration-derived gait features included quantity (e.g., the amount of walking) and quality measures (e.g., gait variability). The New FOG-Questionnaire evaluated the subject's perceptions of FOG severity and its impact. Age, gender, and disease duration were similar (p > 0.19) in the 28 freezers and 44 non-freezers. Walking quantity was similar in the two groups, while freezers walked with higher gait variability (i.e., larger anterior-posterior power spectral density width; p = 0.003) and lower gait consistency (i.e., lower vertical stride regularity; p = 0.007). Group differences were observed when comparing the typical (i.e., median), best, and worst performance among the multiple walking bouts measured. Vertical and medio-lateral gait consistency were associated with the impact of FOG on daily living (r < -0.39, p < 0.044). The present findings demonstrate that freezers have altered gait variability and consistency during spontaneous community ambulation, even during optimal performance, and that these measures are associated with the impact of FOG on daily function. Long-term recordings may provide new insights into PD and augment the monitoring of FOG and its response to therapy. PMID:25069586

  12. A Longitudinal Study on Dual-Tasking Effects on Gait: Cognitive Change Predicts Gait Variance in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    MacAulay, Rebecca K.; Brouillette, Robert M.; Foil, Heather C.; Bruce-Keller, Annadora J.; Keller, Jeffrey N.

    2014-01-01

    Neuropsychological abilities have found to explain a large proportion of variance in objective measures of walking gait that predict both dementia and falling within the elderly. However, to this date there has been little research on the interplay between changes in these neuropsychological processes and walking gait overtime. To our knowledge, the present study is the first to investigate intra-individual changes in neurocognitive test performance and gait step time at two-time points across a one-year span. Neuropsychological test scores from 440 elderly individuals deemed cognitively normal at Year One were analyzed via repeated measures t-tests to assess for decline in cognitive performance at Year Two. 34 of these 440 individuals neuropsychological test performance significantly declined at Year Two; whereas the “non-decliners” displayed improved memory, working memory, attention/processing speed test performance. Neuropsychological test scores were also submitted to factor analysis at both time points for data reduction purposes and to assess the factor stability overtime. Results at Year One yielded a three-factor solution: Language/Memory, Executive Attention/Processing Speed, and Working Memory. Year Two's test scores also generated a three-factor solution (Working Memory, Language/Executive Attention/Processing Speed, and Memory). Notably, language measures loaded on Executive Attention/Processing Speed rather than on the Memory factor at Year Two. Hierarchal multiple regression revealed that both Executive Attention/Processing Speed and sex significantly predicted variance in dual task step time at both time points. Remarkably, in the “decliners”, the magnitude of the contribution of the neuropsychological characteristics to gait variance significantly increased at Year Two. In summary, this study provides longitudinal evidence of the dynamic relationship between intra-individual cognitive change and its influence on dual task gait step time

  13. Gait parameter control timing with dynamic manual contact or visual cues.

    PubMed

    Rabin, Ely; Shi, Peter; Werner, William

    2016-06-01

    We investigated the timing of gait parameter changes (stride length, peak toe velocity, and double-, single-support, and complete step duration) to control gait speed. Eleven healthy participants adjusted their gait speed on a treadmill to maintain a constant distance between them and a fore-aft oscillating cue (a place on a conveyor belt surface). The experimental design balanced conditions of cue modality (vision: eyes-open; manual contact: eyes-closed while touching the cue); treadmill speed (0.2, 0.4, 0.85, and 1.3 m/s); and cue motion (none, ±10 cm at 0.09, 0.11, and 0.18 Hz). Correlation analyses revealed a number of temporal relationships between gait parameters and cue speed. The results suggest that neural control ranged from feedforward to feedback. Specifically, step length preceded cue velocity during double-support duration suggesting anticipatory control. Peak toe velocity nearly coincided with its most-correlated cue velocity during single-support duration. The toe-off concluding step and double-support durations followed their most-correlated cue velocity, suggesting feedback control. Cue-tracking accuracy and cue velocity correlations with timing parameters were higher with the manual contact cue than visual cue. The cue/gait timing relationships generalized across cue modalities, albeit with greater delays of step-cycle events relative to manual contact cue velocity. We conclude that individual kinematic parameters of gait are controlled to achieve a desired velocity at different specific times during the gait cycle. The overall timing pattern of instantaneous cue velocities associated with different gait parameters is conserved across cues that afford different performance accuracies. This timing pattern may be temporally shifted to optimize control. Different cue/gait parameter latencies in our nonadaptation paradigm provide general-case evidence of the independent control of gait parameters previously demonstrated in gait adaptation paradigms

  14. Quantitative measurement of Parkinsonian gait from walking in monocular image sequences using a centroid tracking algorithm.

    PubMed

    Lin, Sheng-Huang; Chen, Shih-Wei; Lo, Yu-Chun; Lai, Hsin-Yi; Yang, Chich-Haung; Chen, Shin-Yuan; Chang, Yuan-Jen; Chen, Chin-Hsing; Huang, Wen-Tzeng; Jaw, Fu-Shan; Chen, You-Yin; Tsang, Siny; Liao, Lun-De

    2016-03-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease of the central nervous system that results from the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Abnormal gait begins in the early stage and becomes severe as the disease progresses; therefore, the assessment of gait becomes an important issue in evaluating the progression of PD and the effectiveness of treatment. To provide a clinically useful gait assessment in environments with budget and space limitations, such as a small clinic or home, we propose and develop a portable method utilizing the monocular image sequences of walking to track and analyze a Parkinsonian gait pattern. In addition, a centroid tracking algorithm is developed and used here to enhance the method of quantifying kinematic gait parameters of PD in different states. Twelve healthy subjects and twelve mild patients with PD participate in this study. This method requires one digital video camera and subjects with two joint markers attached on the fibula head and the lateral malleolus of the leg. All subjects walk with a natural pace in front of a video camera during the trials. Results of our study demonstrate the stride length and walking velocity significantly decrease in PD without drug compared to PD with drug in both proposed method and simultaneous gait assessment performed by GAITRite(®) system. In gait initiation, step length and swing velocity also decrease in PD without drug compared to both PD with drug and controls. Our results showed high correlation in gait parameters between the two methods and prove the reliability of the proposed method. With the proposed method, quantitative measurement and analysis of Parkinsonian gait could be inexpensive to implement, portable within a small clinic or home, easy to administer, and simple to interpret. Although this study is assessed Parkinsonian gait, the proposed method has the potential to help clinicians and researchers assess the gait of patients with other

  15. Laboratory in a box: wearable sensors and its advantages for gait analysis.

    PubMed

    Najafi, Bijan; Khan, Tahir; Wrobel, James

    2011-01-01

    Until recently, many gait studies explored potential gait alteration due to various disorders in the gait lab and using camera based systems and force platforms. However, these strategies may not replicate normal outdoor walking. Using this equipment, it is more difficult to measure the variability of walking which is important for maintaining balance and responding to different walking challenges. Additionally, subjects may mask their problem or exaggerate it when they are walking in a short walking distance offered by laboratory based-technology. This study overviews some of the key advantages of wearable technology compared to laboratory-based instrument. Additionally, it explored gait patterns over ample distance of walking compared to walking distance restricted to a gait laboratory environment. Walking patterns of ten healthy young subjects were examined using a wearable sensor technology in a random order over a distance of 7 m, 14 m, and 20 m. Results suggest that participants walk significantly faster by increasing walking distance on average by 15% and 3% when walking distance was increased respectively from 7 m to 14 and from 14 m to 20 m (p<0.05). Interestingly despite a high test-retest reliability for averaged gait parameters (ICC>0.89), the test-retest reliability for gait variability was only acceptable during 20 m walking distance (ICC<0.3 for 7 m and 14 m v. ICC=0.65 for 20 m). Taken together, our findings indicate that for valid and reliable assessment of gait parameters, gait should be performed over ample walking distances. Body worn sensor technology facilitates assessing gait outside of a gait laboratory, over ample walking distance, different footwear condition, different walking surface, and in environment where mimics better true environment where the subject is active in. PMID:22255829

  16. Orthosis-Shaped Sandals Are as Efficacious as In-Shoe Orthoses and Better than Flat Sandals for Plantar Heel Pain: A Randomized Control Trial

    PubMed Central

    Vicenzino, Bill; McPoil, Thomas G.; Stephenson, Aoife; Paul, Sanjoy K.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate efficacy of a contoured sandal being marketed for plantar heel pain with comparison to a flat flip-flop and contoured in-shoe insert/orthosis. Method 150 volunteers aged 50 (SD: 12) years with plantar heel pain (>4 weeks) were enrolled after responding to advertisements and eligibility determined by telephone and at first visit. Participants were randomly allocated to receive commercially available contoured sandals (n = 49), flat flip-flops (n = 50) or over the counter, pre-fabricated full-length foot orthotics (n = 51). Primary outcomes were a 15-point Global Rating of Change scale (GROC: 1 = a very great deal worse, 15 = a very great deal better), 13 to 15 representing an improvement and the 20-item Lower Extremity Function Scale (LEFS) on which participants rate 20 common weight bearing activities and activities of daily living on a 5-point scale (0 = extreme difficulty, 4 = no difficulty). Secondary outcomes were worst level of heel pain in the preceding week, and the foot and ankle ability measure. Outcomes were collected blind to allocation. Analyses were done on an intention to treat basis with 12 weeks being the primary outcome time of interest. Results The contoured sandal was 68% more likely to report improvement in terms of GROC compared to flat flip-flop. On the LEFS the contoured sandal was 61% more likely than flat flip-flop to report improvement. The secondary outcomes in the main reflected the primary outcomes, and there were no differences between contoured sandal and shoe insert. Conclusions and Relevance Physicians can have confidence in supporting a patient's decision to wear contoured sandals or in-shoe orthoses as one of the first and simple strategies to manage their heel pain. Trial Registration The Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12612000463875 PMID:26669302

  17. The transverse Vulpius gastrocsoleus recession for equinus gait in children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Tinney, A; Thomason, P; Sangeux, M; Khot, A; Graham, H K

    2015-04-01

    We report the results of Vulpius transverse gastrocsoleus recession for equinus gait in 26 children with cerebral palsy (CP), using the Gait Profile Score (GPS), Gait Variable Scores (GVS) and movement analysis profile. All children had an equinus deformity on physical examination and equinus gait on three-dimensional gait analysis prior to surgery. The pre-operative and post-operative GPS and GVS were statistically analysed. There were 20 boys and 6 girls in the study cohort with a mean age at surgery of 9.2 years (5.1 to 17.7) and 11.5 years (7.3 to 20.8) at follow-up. Of the 26 children, 14 had spastic diplegia and 12 spastic hemiplegia. Gait function improved for the cohort, confirmed by a decrease in mean GPS from 13.4° pre-operatively to 9.0° final review (p < 0.001). The change was 2.8 times the minimal clinically important difference (MCID). Thus the improvements in gait were both clinically and statistically significant. The transverse gastrocsoleus recession described by Vulpius is an effective procedure for equinus gait in selected children with CP, when there is a fixed contracture of the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles. PMID:25820899

  18. Symmetry Analysis of Gait between Left and Right Limb Using Cross-Fuzzy Entropy

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Qiang; Gao, Qingwei; Lu, Yixiang; Zhang, Dexiang

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is the investigation of gait symmetry problem by using cross-fuzzy entropy (C-FuzzyEn), which is a recently proposed cross entropy that has many merits as compared to the frequently used cross sample entropy (C-SampleEn). First, we used several simulation signals to test its performance regarding the relative consistency and dependence on data length. Second, the gait time series of the left and right stride interval were used to calculate the C-FuzzyEn values for gait symmetry analysis. Besides the statistical analysis, we also realized a support vector machine (SVM) classifier to perform the classification of normal and abnormal gaits. The gait dataset consists of 15 patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and 16 control (CO) subjects. The results show that the C-FuzzyEn values of the PD patients' gait are significantly higher than that of the CO subjects with a p value of less than 10−5, and the best classification performance evaluated by a leave-one-out (LOO) cross-validation method is an accuracy of 96.77%. Such encouraging results imply that the C-FuzzyEn-based gait symmetry measure appears as a suitable tool for analyzing abnormal gaits. PMID:27034706

  19. Heritability and Genome-Wide Association Analyses of Human Gait Suggest Contribution of Common Variants.

    PubMed

    Adams, Hieab H H; Verlinden, Vincentius J A; Callisaya, Michele L; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Hofman, Albert; Thomson, Russell; Uitterlinden, André G; Vernooij, Meike W; van der Geest, Jos N; Srikanth, Velandai; Ikram, M Arfan

    2016-06-01

    Human gait is a complex neurological and musculoskeletal function, of which the genetic basis remains largely unknown. To determine the influence of common genetic variants on gait parameters, we studied 2,946 participants of the Rotterdam Study, a population-based cohort of unrelated elderly individuals. We assessed 30 gait parameters using an electronic walkway, which yielded seven independent gait domains after principal component analysis. Genotypes of participants were imputed to the 1,000 Genomes reference panel for generating genetic relationship matrices to estimate heritability of gait parameters, and for subsequent genome-wide association scans (GWASs) to identify specific variants. Gait domains with the highest age- and sex-adjusted heritability were Variability (h (2) = 61%), Rhythm (37%), and Tandem (32%). For other gait domains, heritability estimates attenuated after adjustment for height and weight. Genome-wide association scans identified a variant on 1p22.3 that was significantly associated with single support time, a variable from the Rhythm domain (rs72953990; N = 2,946; β [SE] = 0.0069 (0.0012), p = 2.30×10(-8)). This variant did not replicate in an independent sample (N = 362; p = .78). In conclusion, human gait has highly heritable components that are explained by common genetic variation, which are partly attributed to height and weight. Collaborative efforts are needed to identify robust single variant associations for the heritable parameters. PMID:26219847

  20. Characterizing freezing of gait in Parkinson's disease: models of an episodic phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Nieuwboer, Alice; Giladi, Nir

    2013-09-15

    Freezing of gait (FOG) is a very disabling and common gait disorder in Parkinson's disease (PD). The first aim of this article was to provide a methodological and critical review of the most common research approach to understand FOG, ie, comparing the behavior of freezers with that of non-freezers. The review demonstrates that studies often fall short in clearly defining the freezer\

  1. Carmen Martín Gaite and the Writing of History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herzberger, David K.

    2015-01-01

    In this brief article, David Herzberger begins by describing how, with the help of Juan Benet as her interlocutor in 1966, renowned Spanish author Carmen Martín Gaite found her historiographic voice. Herzberger goes on to examine how this relates to Martín Gaite's legacy in historiography and her understanding of the Franco regime and the Spanish…

  2. A Portable Gait Asymmetry Rehabilitation System for Individuals with Stroke Using a Vibrotactile Feedback

    PubMed Central

    Afzal, Muhammad Raheel; Oh, Min-Kyun; Lee, Chang-Hee; Park, Young Sook; Yoon, Jungwon

    2015-01-01

    Gait asymmetry caused by hemiparesis results in reduced gait efficiency and reduced activity levels. In this paper, a portable rehabilitation device is proposed that can serve as a tool in diagnosing gait abnormalities in individuals with stroke and has the capability of providing vibration feedback to help compensate for the asymmetric gait. Force-sensitive resistor (FSR) based insoles are used to detect ground contact and estimate stance time. A controller (Arduino) provides different vibration feedback based on the gait phase measurement. It also allows wireless interaction with a personal computer (PC) workstation using the XBee transceiver module, featuring data logging capabilities for subsequent analysis. Walking trials conducted with healthy young subjects allowed us to observe that the system can influence abnormality in the gait. The results of trials showed that a vibration cue based on temporal information was more effective than intensity information. With clinical experiments conducted for individuals with stroke, significant improvement in gait symmetry was observed with minimal disturbance caused to the balance and gait speed as an effect of the biofeedback. Future studies of the long-term rehabilitation effects of the proposed system and further improvements to the system will result in an inexpensive, easy-to-use, and effective rehabilitation device. PMID:26161398

  3. Dynamic splinting for runner's toe: a case report with gait analysis.

    PubMed

    John, Mathew M; Willis, F Buck; Portillo, Alberto

    2009-01-01

    We present a case report of runner's hallux limitus and the effect of dynamic splinting in reducing contracture as measured by gait analysis. After 4 months of treatment with dynamic splinting, the patient regained 45 degrees in active range of motion, and the gait analysis showed significant and beneficial changes. PMID:19605933

  4. The effect of pharmacological treatment on gait biomechanics in peripheral arterial disease patients

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Pharmacological treatment has been advocated as a first line therapy for Peripheral Arterial Disease (PAD) patients suffering from intermittent claudication. Previous studies document the ability of pharmacological treatment to increase walking distances. However, the effect of pharmacological treatment on gait biomechanics in PAD patients has not been objectively evaluated as is common with other gait abnormalities. Methods Sixteen patients were prescribed an FDA approved drug (Pentoxifylline or Cilostazol) for the treatment of symptomatic PAD. Patients underwent baseline gait testing prior to medication use which consisted of acquisition of ground reaction forces and kinematics while walking in a pain free state. After three months of treatment, patients underwent repeat gait testing. Results Patients with symptomatic PAD had significant gait abnormalities at baseline during pain free walking as compared to healthy controls. However, pharmacological treatment did not produce any identifiable alterations on the biomechanics of gait of the PAD patients as revealed by the statistical comparisons performed between pre and post-treatment and between post-treatment and the healthy controls. Conclusions Pharmacological treatment did not result in statistically significant improvements in the gait biomechanics of patients with symptomatic PAD. Future studies will need to further explore different cohorts of patients that have shown to improve significantly their claudication distances and/or their muscle fiber morphology with the use of pharmacological treatment and determine if this is associated with an improvement in gait biomechanics. Using these methods we may distinguish the patients who benefit from pharmacotherapy and those who do not. PMID:20529284

  5. Analysis of Parallel and Transverse Visual Cues on the Gait of Individuals with Idiopathic Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Melo Roiz, Roberta; Azevedo Cacho, Enio Walker; Cliquet, Alberto, Jr.; Barasnevicius Quagliato, Elizabeth Maria Aparecida

    2011-01-01

    Idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD) has been defined as a chronic progressive neurological disorder with characteristics that generate changes in gait pattern. Several studies have reported that appropriate external influences, such as visual or auditory cues may improve the gait pattern of patients with IPD. Therefore, the objective of this…

  6. A Portable Gait Asymmetry Rehabilitation System for Individuals with Stroke Using a Vibrotactile Feedback.

    PubMed

    Afzal, Muhammad Raheel; Oh, Min-Kyun; Lee, Chang-Hee; Park, Young Sook; Yoon, Jungwon

    2015-01-01

    Gait asymmetry caused by hemiparesis results in reduced gait efficiency and reduced activity levels. In this paper, a portable rehabilitation device is proposed that can serve as a tool in diagnosing gait abnormalities in individuals with stroke and has the capability of providing vibration feedback to help compensate for the asymmetric gait. Force-sensitive resistor (FSR) based insoles are used to detect ground contact and estimate stance time. A controller (Arduino) provides different vibration feedback based on the gait phase measurement. It also allows wireless interaction with a personal computer (PC) workstation using the XBee transceiver module, featuring data logging capabilities for subsequent analysis. Walking trials conducted with healthy young subjects allowed us to observe that the system can influence abnormality in the gait. The results of trials showed that a vibration cue based on temporal information was more effective than intensity information. With clinical experiments conducted for individuals with stroke, significant improvement in gait symmetry was observed with minimal disturbance caused to the balance and gait speed as an effect of the biofeedback. Future studies of the long-term rehabilitation effects of the proposed system and further improvements to the system will result in an inexpensive, easy-to-use, and effective rehabilitation device. PMID:26161398

  7. Effect of load carriage on gait due to firefighting air bottle configuration.

    PubMed

    Park, Kiwon; Hur, Pilwon; Rosengren, Karl S; Horn, Gavin P; Hsiao-Wecksler, Elizabeth T

    2010-07-01

    The air bottle configuration (mass and size) used with a firefighter's self-contained breathing apparatus may affect functional gait performance and slip/trip/fall risk, contributing to one of the most common and costly fire ground injuries to this population. To examine the potential effect of bottle mass and size on firefighter gait performance, four 30-min air bottle configurations were tested. To quantify biomechanical gait performance, kinetic and kinematic gait data were collected on 24 male firefighters while walking at normal and fast speeds during three conditions (no obstacle, 10 cm or 30 cm stationary obstacle). Bottle mass, obstacle height and walking speed - but not bottle size - were found to significantly impact gait parameters. Ten subjects (42%) contacted the taller obstacle while wearing heavier bottles, suggesting greater risk for tripping. Heavier bottles also resulted in larger forces by the trailing leg in both the anterior-posterior and vertical directions, suggesting greater risk for slipping. These results suggest that increased bottle weight may result in a decrease in gait performance and an increase in fall risk. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: Occupations, such as firefighting, often require use of a self-contained breathing apparatus that includes a pressurised air bottle. No systematic assessment has investigated how modest changes in load carriage due to bottle configuration (mass and size) might affect gait behaviour, especially when crossing obstacles. Bottle mass, but not size, was found to decrease gait performance and increase fall risk. PMID:20582769

  8. Clinical gait analysis: comparing explicit state duration HMMs using a reference-based index.

    PubMed

    Karg, Michelle; Seiberl, Wolfgang; Kreuzpointner, Florian; Haas, Johannes-Peter; Kulic, Dana

    2015-03-01

    In clinical gait analysis, the gait of a patient is recorded with optical motion capture and compared with a healthy reference group. High-dimensional gait datasets are difficult to interpret; machine learning can provide guidance regarding the most relevant gait phases and joint angles for visual analysis and quantify the difference between healthy and pathological gait. We propose an explicit state duration hidden Markov model (HMM) modeling the timeseries data of a subject or a group and the use of a reference-based measure that compares the most likely observations in each state. Based on this stochastic framework, the similarity between healthy and pathological gait can be quantified for each state, each joint angle, and each subject. This concept also includes an overall gait index useful for group comparison or the assessment of an individual's gait. For visualization, joint angle timeseries can be generated from the explicit state duration HMM. The accuracy of the explicit state duration HMM and the performance of the reference-based measures are evaluated on a dataset including strides of healthy subjects and patients suffering from arthritis. PMID:25343762

  9. Coactivation of Lower Limb Muscles during Gait in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Boudarham, Julien; Hameau, Sophie; Zory, Raphael; Hardy, Alexandre; Bensmail, Djamel; Roche, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Background Coactivation of agonist and antagonist lower limb muscles during gait stiffens joints and ensures stability. In patients with multiple sclerosis, coactivation of lower limb muscles might be a compensatory mechanism to cope with impairments of balance and gait. Objective The aim of this study was to assess coactivation of agonist and antagonist muscles at the knee and ankle joints during gait in patients with multiple sclerosis, and to evaluate the relationship between muscle coactivation and disability, gait performance, dynamic ankle strength measured during gait, and postural stability. Methods The magnitude and duration of coactivation of agonist-antagonist muscle pairs at the knee and ankle were determined for both lower limbs (more and less-affected) in 14 patients with multiple sclerosis and 11 healthy subjects walking at a spontaneous speed, using 3D-gait analysis. Results In the patient group, coactivation was increased in the knee muscles during single support (proximal strategy) and in the ankle muscles during double support (distal strategy). The magnitude of coactivation was highest in the patients with the slowest gait, the greatest motor impairment and the most instability. Conclusion Increased muscle coactivation is likely a compensatory mechanism to limit the number of degrees of freedom during gait in patients with multiple sclerosis, particularly when postural stability is impaired. PMID:27336442

  10. The relationship between motor recovery and gait velocity during dual tasks in patients with chronic stroke.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyoung Bo; Kim, Jang Hwan; Lee, Kang Sung

    2015-04-01

    [Purpose] The aims of this study were to identify the relationship between motor recovery and gait velocity during dual tasks in patients with chronic stroke and determine automatic gait ability following stroke. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-three outpatients and twelve healthy subjects participated in a cross-sectional assessment. Community ambulation was assessed using a self-administered questionnaire. Outcome measures included the Motricity index, Berg Balance Scale, and gait speed under three conditions (self-paced ambulation for 10 m, ambulation while performing dual cognitive tasks, and ambulation while performing dual manual tasks). Gait automaticity was calculated. [Results] No significant differences were observed for muscle strength or balance between the limited community ambulation and the community ambulation groups. However, a significant difference in gait velocity was observed between the groups under the three conditions. In particular, a significant difference was detected only in the limited community ambulation group depending on the level of motor function recovery during cognitive and manual dual task ambulation. Additionally, we revealed that the community ambulation group had a lower level of gait automaticity compared with that in the normal group. [Conclusion] Our results show the influence of motor recovery on the change in gait velocity depending on the task if a patient is limitedly ambulatory. We revealed that community ambulators did not have a sufficient level of gait automaticity. PMID:25995582

  11. The relationship between motor recovery and gait velocity during dual tasks in patients with chronic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyoung Bo; Kim, Jang Hwan; Lee, Kang Sung

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aims of this study were to identify the relationship between motor recovery and gait velocity during dual tasks in patients with chronic stroke and determine automatic gait ability following stroke. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-three outpatients and twelve healthy subjects participated in a cross-sectional assessment. Community ambulation was assessed using a self-administered questionnaire. Outcome measures included the Motricity index, Berg Balance Scale, and gait speed under three conditions (self-paced ambulation for 10 m, ambulation while performing dual cognitive tasks, and ambulation while performing dual manual tasks). Gait automaticity was calculated. [Results] No significant differences were observed for muscle strength or balance between the limited community ambulation and the community ambulation groups. However, a significant difference in gait velocity was observed between the groups under the three conditions. In particular, a significant difference was detected only in the limited community ambulation group depending on the level of motor function recovery during cognitive and manual dual task ambulation. Additionally, we revealed that the community ambulation group had a lower level of gait automaticity compared with that in the normal group. [Conclusion] Our results show the influence of motor recovery on the change in gait velocity depending on the task if a patient is limitedly ambulatory. We revealed that community ambulators did not have a sufficient level of gait automaticity. PMID:25995582

  12. Gait Characteristics over the Course of a Race in Recreational Marathon Competitors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertram, John E. A.; Prebeau-Menezes, Leif; Szarko, Matthew J.

    2013-01-01

    We analyzed gait and function of the supporting limb in participants of a marathon race at three stages: prerace, midrace (18 km), and near the end of the race (36 km). We confirmed that the most successful runners were able to maintain running speed for the duration of the race with little change in speed or gait. Speed slowed progressively…

  13. Relative importance of gait vs. joint positioning on hip contact forces after total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Foucher, Kharma C; Hurwitz, Debra E; Wimmer, Markus A

    2009-12-01

    Implant loosening is a common indication for total hip replacement (THR) revision. High contact forces and implant twisting moments are thought to be associated with implant loosening. Relationships between joint positioning and hip forces, or outcomes, have been investigated through in vivo and in vitro modalities. Relationships between hip forces and gait are less understood, despite repeated findings that gait following a THR does not fully return to normal. We tested the hypothesis that gait parameters would be better predictors of implant force (peak contact forces and peak twisting moment during walking) than joint positioning parameters. Subjects underwent gait analysis, hip force modeling, and measurement of clinical radiographs 1 year after successful THR surgery. Gait parameters were consistently more influential in determining hip forces. Alone, gait explained as much as 67% of the variation in force, compared to a maximum of 33% by joint geometry. Combinations of gait and joint positioning parameters together explained up to 86% of the variation in hip force parameters. Results suggest that gait may provide a valuable postoperatively modifiable target to improve hip loads and potentially reduce the risk for implant loosening. PMID:19514072

  14. Footing and gait of pigs on different concrete surfaces.

    PubMed

    Applegate, A L; Curtis, S E; Groppel, J L; McFarlane, J M; Widowski, T M

    1988-02-01

    Because pigs frequently lose their footing and slip, it is important to understand slipping and its relation to different floor surfaces. An experiment was conducted to evaluate the gait and footing of young pigs walking on concrete floor surfaces having known friction characteristics and to determine critical skid resistance values in terms of the fitness of a concrete surface for flooring in pig quarters. Barrows were cinematographed with a high-speed 16-mm camera as they walked on various surfaces, and gait and footing were subsequently analyzed in motion studies. The six concrete floor test pads with different surface treatments (fine and coarse sand, fine and coarse broom, wood float and steel trowel) were evaluated for friction coefficient (skid resistance value) using a British pendulum tester both before and after pig tests. Leg angle, pastern angle and time variables were not related with average skid resistance value of the different floors. However, slip variables during a stride's stance phase per se were well related to surface-treatment differences in average skid resistance. Thus, the average skid resistance value generated by the British pendulum tester yielded one piece of objective information useful in assessing the fitness of concrete surfaces for floors in pig quarters. All the surfaces except the steel trowel surface had average skid resistance value of greater than 65 British pendulum number, and they all reduced a pig's chance of slipping relative to the steel trowel (less than 60 British pendulum number). The front leg was a more sensitive indicator than the rear of a floor's effect on the pig's gait and footing. PMID:3372379

  15. Long term gait outcomes of surgically treated idiopathic toe walkers.

    PubMed

    McMulkin, Mark L; Gordon, Andi B; Tompkins, Bryan J; Caskey, Paul M; Baird, Glen O

    2016-02-01

    Toe walking is a common gait deviation which in the absence of a known cause is termed idiopathic toe walking. Surgical treatment in the presence of a triceps surae contracture includes tendo-Achilles or gastrocnemius/soleus recession and has been shown to be effective in improving kinematic outcomes at a one year follow up. The purpose of this study was to assess longer term kinematic and kinetic outcomes of children with idiopathic toe walking treated surgically for gastrocnemius/soleus contractures. Eight subjects with a diagnosis of idiopathic toe walking who had surgical lengthening of the gastrocnemius/soleus and had previous motion analysis laboratory studies pre-operative and 1 year post-operative, returned for a motion analysis laboratory study greater than 5 years since surgery. Subjects completed lower extremity physical exam and 3-D computerized kinematics and kinetics. Significant improvements for mean pelvic tilt, peak dorsiflexion in stance and swing, and overall kinematics index at 1 year post-operative were maintained at 5 years post-operative. Kinetic variables of ankle moment and power were improved at 1 year and 5 years post-operative. On physical exam, dorsiflexion with knee extended was tighter from 1 to 5 year follow-up which did not correspond to the functional changes of gait. Idiopathic toe walkers who were treated surgically for triceps surae contractures showed significant improvements in key kinematic and kinetic gait analysis variables at 1 year post-operative that were maintained at 5 years post-operative. Overall, subjects were satisfied with outcomes of the surgery, unrestricted in activities, and reported minimal pain. PMID:27004661

  16. Linear variability of gait according to socioeconomic status in elderly

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the linear variability of comfortable gait according to socioeconomic status in community-dwelling elderly. Method: For this cross-sectional observational study 63 self- functioning elderly were categorized according to the socioeconomic level on medium-low (n= 33, age 69.0 ± 5.0 years) and medium-high (n= 30, age 71.0 ± 6.0 years). Each participant was asked to perform comfortable gait speed for 3 min on an 40 meters elliptical circuit, recording in video five strides which were transformed into frames, determining the minimum foot clearance, maximum foot clearance and stride length. The intra-group linear variability was calculated by the coefficient of variation in percent. Results: The trajectory parameters variability is not different according to socioeconomic status with a 30% (range= 15-55%) for the minimum foot clearance and 6% (range= 3-8%) in maximum foot clearance. Meanwhile, the stride length consistently was more variable in the medium-low socioeconomic status for the overall sample (p= 0.004), female (p= 0.041) and male gender (p= 0.007), with values near 4% ​​(range = 2.5-5.0%) in the medium-low and 2% (range = 1.5-3.5%) in the medium-high. Conclusions: The intra-group linear variability is consistently higher and within reference parameters for stride length during comfortable gait for elderly belonging to medium-low socioeconomic status. This might be indicative of greater complexity and consequent motor adaptability. PMID:27546931

  17. Gait posture estimation using wearable acceleration and gyro sensors.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Ryo; Tadano, Shigeru; Natorigawa, Akiko; Todoh, Masahiro; Yoshinari, Satoshi

    2009-11-13

    A method for gait analysis using wearable acceleration sensors and gyro sensors is proposed in this work. The volunteers wore sensor units that included a tri-axis acceleration sensor and three single axis gyro sensors. The angular velocity data measured by the gyro sensors were used to estimate the translational acceleration in the gait analysis. The translational acceleration was then subtracted from the acceleration sensor measurements to obtain the gravitational acceleration, giving the orientation of the lower limb segments. Segment orientation along with body measurements were used to obtain the positions of hip, knee, and ankle joints to create stick figure models of the volunteers. This method can measure the three-dimensional positions of joint centers of the hip, knee, and ankle during movement. Experiments were carried out on the normal gait of three healthy volunteers. As a result, the flexion-extension (F-E) and the adduction-abduction (A-A) joint angles of the hips and the flexion-extension (F-E) joint angles of the knees were calculated and compared with a camera motion capture system. The correlation coefficients were above 0.88 for the hip F-E, higher than 0.72 for the hip A-A, better than 0.92 for the knee F-E. A moving stick figure model of each volunteer was created to visually confirm the walking posture. Further, the knee and ankle joint trajectories in the horizontal plane showed that the left and right legs were bilaterally symmetric. PMID:19682694

  18. Gait analysis using gravitational acceleration measured by wearable sensors.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Ryo; Tadano, Shigeru; Todoh, Masahiro; Morikawa, Manabu; Nakayasu, Minoru; Yoshinari, Satoshi

    2009-02-01

    A novel method for measuring human gait posture using wearable sensor units is proposed. The sensor units consist of a tri-axial acceleration sensor and three gyro sensors aligned on three axes. The acceleration and angular velocity during walking were measured with seven sensor units worn on the abdomen and the lower limb segments (both thighs, shanks and feet). The three-dimensional positions of each joint are calculated from each segment length and joint angle. Joint angle can be estimated mechanically from the gravitational acceleration along the anterior axis of the segment. However, the acceleration data during walking includes three major components; translational acceleration, gravitational acceleration and external noise. Therefore, an optimization analysis was represented to separate only the gravitational acceleration from the acceleration data. Because the cyclic patterns of acceleration data can be found during constant walking, a FFT analysis was applied to obtain some characteristic frequencies in it. A pattern of gravitational acceleration was assumed using some parts of these characteristic frequencies. Every joint position was calculated from the pattern under the condition of physiological motion range of each joint. An optimized pattern of the gravitational acceleration was selected as a solution of an inverse problem. Gaits of three healthy volunteers were measured by walking for 20s on a flat floor. As a result, the acceleration data of every segment was measured simultaneously. The characteristic three-dimensional walking could be shown by the expression using a stick figure model. In addition, the trajectories of the knee joint in the horizontal plane could be checked by visual imaging on a PC. Therefore, this method provides important quantitive information for gait diagnosis. PMID:19121522

  19. Extraction of Stride Events From Gait Accelerometry During Treadmill Walking

    PubMed Central

    Lowry, Kristin A.; Bellanca, Jennica; Perera, Subashan; Redfern, Mark S.; Brach, Jennifer S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: evaluating stride events can be valuable for understanding the changes in walking due to aging and neurological diseases. However, creating the time series necessary for this analysis can be cumbersome. In particular, finding heel contact and toe-off events which define the gait cycles accurately are difficult. Method: we proposed a method to extract stride cycle events from tri-axial accelerometry signals. We validated our method via data collected from 14 healthy controls, 10 participants with Parkinson’s disease, and 11 participants with peripheral neuropathy. All participants walked at self-selected comfortable and reduced speeds on a computer-controlled treadmill. Gait accelerometry signals were captured via a tri-axial accelerometer positioned over the L3 segment of the lumbar spine. Motion capture data were also collected and served as the comparison method. Results: our analysis of the accelerometry data showed that the proposed methodology was able to accurately extract heel and toe-contact events from both feet. We used t-tests, analysis of variance (ANOVA) and mixed models to summarize results and make comparisons. Mean gait cycle intervals were the same as those derived from motion capture, and cycle-to-cycle variability measures were within 1.5%. Subject group differences could be similarly identified using measures with the two methods. Conclusions: a simple tri-axial acceleromter accompanied by a signal processing algorithm can be used to capture stride events. Clinical impact: the proposed algorithm enables the assessment of stride events during treadmill walking, and is the first step toward the assessment of stride events using tri-axial accelerometers in real-life settings. PMID:27088063

  20. The effects of a suspended-load backpack on gait.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xu; Hsiang, Simon M; Mirka, Gary A

    2009-01-01

    A suspended-load backpack is a device that is designed to capture the mechanical energy created as a suspended backpack load oscillates vertically on the back during gait. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the effect of a suspended-load backpack system on selected temporal and kinetics parameters describing gait. Nine male participants carried a suspended-load backpack as they walked on an instrumented treadmill with varied levels of load (no backpack, 22.5 kg, and 29.3 kg) and walking speed (1.16 m/s, 1.43 m/s, 1.70 m/s). As the participants performed this treadmill task, ground reaction forces were collected from an instrumented treadmill system. From these data, temporal variables (cycle time, single support time, and double support time) and kinetic variables (normalized weight acceptance force, normalized push-off force, and normalized mid-stance force) were derived. The results showed that the response of the temporal variables were consistent with previous studies of conventional (i.e. stable load) backpacks. The response of the normalized push-off force, however, showed that increasing walking speed significantly (p<0.05) decreased the magnitude of this force, a result contrary to the literature concerning conventional backpacks where this force has been shown to significantly increase. Further evaluation revealed that this reduction in force was the result of a phase shift between the movement of the carried load and the movement of the torso. This suggests that the motion of the load in a suspended-load backpack influences the gait biomechanics and should be considered as this technology advances. PMID:18693016

  1. Factors related to gait and balance deficits in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Al-Momani, Murad; Al-Momani, Fidaa; Alghadir, Ahmad H; Alharethy, Sami; Gabr, Sami A

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of physical, mental, and cognitive disabilities on gait and balance deficits among nursing home residents with different diseases in Jordan and also to find the risk of fall associated with or without these diseases. Methods A sample of 221 nursing home residents aged 18–100 years in Jordan was recruited for this study. All participants were assessed using the Arabic versions of the Tinetti assessment battery (TAB) for gait and balance, mini–mental state examination, and disability of arm, shoulder, and hand assessment test. Results A total of 221 nursing home residents were included in this study. Different chronic diseases were medically reported in this study. Psychiatric disorders (45.7%) were shown to be the most prevalent disease seen among the participants, followed by hypertension and diabetes mellitus affecting 33.5% and 23.5% of the participants, respectively. However, the least prevalent diseases were stroke (17.2%), joint inflammation (17.2%), and arthritis (9.0%). Based on TAB scores, the participants were classified into three groups: high risk of falls (≤18; n=116), moderate risk of falls (19–23; n=25), and low risk of falls (≥24; n=80). The correlation between physical activity and mental health problems with risks of falls was reported in all participants. The data showed that participants with over 50% upper extremity disability, stroke, heart disease, arthritis, joint diseases, diabetes, and hypertension recorded higher risks of falls as measured by TAB test compared to those with low and moderate TAB scores. Also, impairment in cognitive abilities and psychiatric disorders was shown to be associated with gait and balance problems, with a higher risk of falls in 47.5% and 46.1% of the residents, respectively. Conclusion This study revealed a significant impact of upper limb disability, stroke, heart disease, arthritis, joint diseases, diabetes, and hypertension as well as

  2. Designing auditory cues for Parkinson's disease gait rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Cancela, Jorge; Moreno, Eugenio M; Arredondo, Maria T; Bonato, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Recent works have proved that Parkinson's disease (PD) patients can be largely benefit by performing rehabilitation exercises based on audio cueing and music therapy. Specially, gait can benefit from repetitive sessions of exercises using auditory cues. Nevertheless, all the experiments are based on the use of a metronome as auditory stimuli. Within this work, Human-Computer Interaction methodologies have been used to design new cues that could benefit the long-term engagement of PD patients in these repetitive routines. The study has been also extended to commercial music and musical pieces by analyzing features and characteristics that could benefit the engagement of PD patients to rehabilitation tasks. PMID:25571327

  3. Variations In Gait Patterns Of Runners: Relationship To Anthropometric Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adelsberg, S.; Tauber, C.; Au, J.; Pugh, J.

    1983-07-01

    High-speed computerized motion analysis was used to assess the running parameters of a group of runners. Anthropometric measurements were taken on the group of runners in an effort to provide possible correlations between running style, speed, and anthropometry. The most consistent correlation was between speed and stride length. Femur length and stride length was only highly correlated for the runners at the fastest speeds. The faster runners also had a gait pattern characterized by significantly lower ground contact time than that of the slower runners. Of prime importance in running is behavior of the body during float phase, and mediated by anthropometry and the biomechanical characteristics of the stance phase.

  4. Gait Kinematic Analysis in Water Using Wearable Inertial Magnetic Sensors.

    PubMed

    Fantozzi, Silvia; Giovanardi, Andrea; Borra, Davide; Gatta, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    Walking is one of the fundamental motor tasks executed during aquatic therapy. Previous kinematics analyses conducted using waterproofed video cameras were limited to the sagittal plane and to only one or two consecutive steps. Furthermore, the set-up and post-processing are time-consuming and thus do not allow a prompt assessment of the correct execution of the movements during the aquatic session therapy. The aim of the present study was to estimate the 3D joint kinematics of the lower limbs and thorax-pelvis joints in sagittal and frontal planes during underwater walking using wearable inertial and magnetic sensors. Eleven healthy adults were measured during walking both in shallow water and in dry-land conditions. Eight wearable inertial and magnetic sensors were inserted in waterproofed boxes and fixed to the body segments by means of elastic modular bands. A validated protocol (Outwalk) was used. Gait cycles were automatically segmented and selected if relevant intraclass correlation coefficients values were higher than 0.75. A total of 704 gait cycles for the lower limb joints were normalized in time and averaged to obtain the mean cycle of each joint, among participants. The mean speed in water was 40% lower than that of the dry-land condition. Longer stride duration and shorter stride distance were found in the underwater walking. In the sagittal plane, the knee was more flexed (≈ 23°) and the ankle more dorsiflexed (≈ 9°) at heel strike, and the hip was more flexed at toe-off (≈ 13°) in water than on land. On the frontal plane in the underwater walking, smoother joint angle patterns were observed for thorax-pelvis and hip, and ankle was more inversed at toe-off (≈ 7°) and showed a more inversed mean value (≈ 7°). The results were mainly explained by the effect of the speed in the water as supported by the linear mixed models analysis performed. Thus, it seemed that the combination of speed and environment triggered modifications in the

  5. Gait Kinematic Analysis in Water Using Wearable Inertial Magnetic Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Fantozzi, Silvia; Giovanardi, Andrea; Borra, Davide; Gatta, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    Walking is one of the fundamental motor tasks executed during aquatic therapy. Previous kinematics analyses conducted using waterproofed video cameras were limited to the sagittal plane and to only one or two consecutive steps. Furthermore, the set-up and post-processing are time-consuming and thus do not allow a prompt assessment of the correct execution of the movements during the aquatic session therapy. The aim of the present study was to estimate the 3D joint kinematics of the lower limbs and thorax-pelvis joints in sagittal and frontal planes during underwater walking using wearable inertial and magnetic sensors. Eleven healthy adults were measured during walking both in shallow water and in dry-land conditions. Eight wearable inertial and magnetic sensors were inserted in waterproofed boxes and fixed to the body segments by means of elastic modular bands. A validated protocol (Outwalk) was used. Gait cycles were automatically segmented and selected if relevant intraclass correlation coefficients values were higher than 0.75. A total of 704 gait cycles for the lower limb joints were normalized in time and averaged to obtain the mean cycle of each joint, among participants. The mean speed in water was 40% lower than that of the dry-land condition. Longer stride duration and shorter stride distance were found in the underwater walking. In the sagittal plane, the knee was more flexed (≈ 23°) and the ankle more dorsiflexed (≈ 9°) at heel strike, and the hip was more flexed at toe-off (≈ 13°) in water than on land. On the frontal plane in the underwater walking, smoother joint angle patterns were observed for thorax-pelvis and hip, and ankle was more inversed at toe-off (≈ 7°) and showed a more inversed mean value (≈ 7°). The results were mainly explained by the effect of the speed in the water as supported by the linear mixed models analysis performed. Thus, it seemed that the combination of speed and environment triggered modifications in the

  6. Technique and Observation of Angular Gait Patterns in Running

    PubMed Central

    Sykes, K.

    1975-01-01

    A technique for the biomechanical analysis of running is described with specific reference to the angular displacement patterns of the lower limb. From high speed cine film recording profile views of the running gait, the Thigh, Knee and Ankle angles are measured during one complete cycle. Results are presented in the form of vector-space diagrams, namely Thigh-Knee angle and Knee-Ankle angle cyclograms. The diagrams are interpreted and some experimental observations are presented and discussed. The technique provides a useful research tool and a very good `teaching asset' for biomechanical studies of movement.

  7. Chronic stroke survivors achieve comparable outcomes following virtual task specific repetitive training guided by a wearable robotic orthosis (UL-EXO7) and actual task specific repetitive training guided by a physical therapist.

    PubMed

    Byl, Nancy N; Abrams, Gary M; Pitsch, Erica; Fedulow, Irina; Kim, Hyunchul; Simkins, Matt; Nagarajan, Srikantan; Rosen, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    Survivors post stroke commonly have upper limb impairments. Patients can drive neural reorganization, brain recovery and return of function with task specific repetitive training (TSRT). Fifteen community independent stroke survivors (25-75 years, >6 months post stroke, Upper Limb Fugl Meyer [ULFM] scores 16-39) participated in this randomized feasibility study to compare outcomes of upper limb TSRT guided by a robotic orthosis (bilateral or unilateral) or a physical therapist. After 6 weeks of training (18 h), across all subjects, there were significant improvements in depression, flexibility, strength, tone, pain and voluntary movement (ULFM) (p < 0.05; effect sizes 0.49-3.53). Each training group significantly improved ULFM scores and range of motion without significant group differences. Virtual or actual TSRT performed with a robotic orthosis or a physical therapist significantly reduced arm impairments around the shoulder and elbow without significant gains in fine motor hand control, activities of daily living or independence. PMID:23911077

  8. Influence of velocity on variability in gait kinematics: implications for recognition in forensic science.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sylvia X M; Larsen, Peter K; Alkjaer, Tine; Lynnerup, Niels; Simonsen, Erik B

    2014-09-01

    Closed circuit television (CCTV) footage is often available from crime scenes and may be used to compare perpetrators with suspects. Usually, the footage comprises incomplete gait cycles at different velocities, making gait pattern identification from crimes difficult. This study investigated the concurrence of joint angles throughout a gait cycle at three different velocities (3.0, 4.5, 6.0 km/h). Six datasets at each velocity were collected from 16 men. A variability range VR throughout the gait cycle at each velocity for each joint angle for each person was calculated. The joint angles at each velocity were compared pairwise, and whenever this showed values within the VR of this velocity, the case was positive. By adding the positives throughout the gait cycle, phases with high and low concurrences were located; peak concurrence was observed at mid-stance phase. Striving for the same velocity for the suspect and perpetrator is recommended. PMID:24684582

  9. The correlation between muscle activity of the quadriceps and balance and gait in stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dae Jung; Park, Seung Kyu; Uhm, Yo Han; Park, Sam Heon; Chun, Dong Whan; Kim, Je Ho

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the correlation between quadriceps muscle activity and balance and gait in stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Fifty-five stroke patients (30 males 25 females; mean age 58.7 years; stroke duration 4.82 months; Korean mini-mental state examination score 26.4) participated in this study. MP100 surface electromyography, BioRescue, and LUKOtronic were used to measure the quadriceps muscle activity, balance, and gait, respectively. [Results] There was a significant correlation between quadriceps muscle activity (vastus lateralis % reference voluntary contraction, vastus medialis % reference voluntary contraction) and balance (limits of stability) and gait (gait velocity) but there was none between vastus lateralis % reference voluntary contraction, vastus medialis % reference voluntary contraction. [Conclusion] An increase in quadriceps muscle activity will improve balance and gait ability. To improve function in stroke patients, training is needed to strengthen the quadriceps muscles.

  10. [Real-time Gait Training System with Embedded Functional Electrical Stimulation].

    PubMed

    Gu, Linyan; Ruan, Zhaomin; Jia, Guifeng; Xla, Jing; Qiu, Lijian; Wu, Changwang; Jin, Xiaoqing; Ning, Gangmin

    2015-07-01

    To solve the problem that mostly gait analysis is independent from the treatment, this work proposes a system that integrates the functions of gait training and assessment for foot drop treatment. The system uses a set of sensors to collect gait parameters and designes multi-mode functional electrical stimulators as actuator. Body area network technology is introduced to coordinate the data communication and execution of the sensors and stimulators, synchronize the gait analysis and foot drop treatment. Bluetooth 4.0 is applied to low the power consumption of the system. The system realizes the synchronization of treatment and gait analysis. It is able to acquire and analyze the dynamic parameters of ankle, knee and hip in real-time, and treat patients by guiding functional electrical stimulation delivery to the specific body locations of patients. PMID:26665943

  11. A simple rule for quadrupedal gait generation determined by leg loading feedback: a modeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuoka, Yasuhiro; Habu, Yasushi; Fukui, Takahiro

    2015-02-01

    We discovered a specific rule for generating typical quadrupedal gaits (the order of the movement of four legs) through a simulated quadrupedal locomotion, in which unprogrammed gaits (diagonal/lateral sequence walks, left/right-lead canters, and left/right-lead transverse gallops) spontaneously emerged because of leg loading feedbacks to the CPGs hard-wired to produce a default trot. Additionally, all gaits transitioned according to speed, as seen in animals. We have therefore hypothesized that various gaits derive from a trot because of posture control through leg loading feedback. The body tilt on the two support legs of each diagonal pair during trotting was classified into three types (level, tilted up, or tilted down) according to speed. The load difference between the two legs led to the phase difference between their CPGs via the loading feedbacks, resulting in nine gaits (32: three tilts to the power of two diagonal pairs) including the aforementioned.

  12. Gait Disorder in a Cohort of Patients With Mild and Moderate Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Castrillo, A; Olmos, L M García; Rodríguez, F; Duarte, J

    2016-05-01

    Gait disturbance results in an increase in the risk of falls in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). The falls are events that might be related to an increase in the number of fractures, loss of mobility, being bedridden, early institutionalization, and increased use of medication. Therefore, the reduction in the number of falls is important for the maintenance of the functional independence of the patients as well as for the prevention of sequelae resulting from those events. Alterations in the gait occur very frequently in AD, and the gait disturbance occurs relatively early in the course of the disease. This study has important implications for public health and clinical practice. This study and previous studies have reported that abnormal gait predicts greater risk of falls, dementia, institutionalization, and death. The high prevalence and incidence of abnormal gait and its association with multiple adverse outcomes in older adults require urgent attention. Our results allow us to identify the risk factors. PMID:26395024

  13. An Ambulatory System for Gait Monitoring Based on Wireless Sensorized Insoles

    PubMed Central

    González, Iván; Fontecha, Jesús; Hervás, Ramón; Bravo, José

    2015-01-01

    A new gait phase detection system for continuous monitoring based on wireless sensorized insoles is presented. The system can be used in gait analysis mobile applications, and it is designed for real-time demarcation of gait phases. The system employs pressure sensors to assess the force exerted by each foot during walking. A fuzzy rule-based inference algorithm is implemented on a smartphone and used to detect each of the gait phases based on the sensor signals. Additionally, to provide a solution that is insensitive to perturbations caused by non-walking activities, a probabilistic classifier is employed to discriminate walking forward from other low-level activities, such as turning, walking backwards, lateral walking, etc. The combination of these two algorithms constitutes the first approach towards a continuous gait assessment system, by means of the avoidance of non-walking influences. PMID:26184199

  14. A simple rule for quadrupedal gait generation determined by leg loading feedback: a modeling study

    PubMed Central

    Fukuoka, Yasuhiro; Habu, Yasushi; Fukui, Takahiro

    2015-01-01

    We discovered a specific rule for generating typical quadrupedal gaits (the order of the movement of four legs) through a simulated quadrupedal locomotion, in which unprogrammed gaits (diagonal/lateral sequence walks, left/right-lead canters, and left/right-lead transverse gallops) spontaneously emerged because of leg loading feedbacks to the CPGs hard-wired to produce a default trot. Additionally, all gaits transitioned according to speed, as seen in animals. We have therefore hypothesized that various gaits derive from a trot because of posture control through leg loading feedback. The body tilt on the two support legs of each diagonal pair during trotting was classified into three types (level, tilted up, or tilted down) according to speed. The load difference between the two legs led to the phase difference between their CPGs via the loading feedbacks, resulting in nine gaits (32: three tilts to the power of two diagonal pairs) including the aforementioned. PMID:25639661

  15. An Ambulatory System for Gait Monitoring Based on Wireless Sensorized Insoles.

    PubMed

    González, Iván; Fontecha, Jesús; Hervás, Ramón; Bravo, José

    2015-01-01

    A new gait phase detection system for continuous monitoring based on wireless sensorized insoles is presented. The system can be used in gait analysis mobile applications, and it is designed for real-time demarcation of gait phases. The system employs pressure sensors to assess the force exerted by each foot during walking. A fuzzy rule-based inference algorithm is implemented on a smartphone and used to detect each of the gait phases based on the sensor signals. Additionally, to provide a solution that is insensitive to perturbations caused by non-walking activities, a probabilistic classifier is employed to discriminate walking forward from other low-level activities, such as turning, walking backwards, lateral walking, etc. The combination of these two algorithms constitutes the first approach towards a continuous gait assessment system, by means of the avoidance of non-walking influences. PMID:26184199

  16. A simple rule for quadrupedal gait generation determined by leg loading feedback: a modeling study.

    PubMed

    Fukuoka, Yasuhiro; Habu, Yasushi; Fukui, Takahiro

    2015-01-01

    We discovered a specific rule for generating typical quadrupedal gaits (the order of the movement of four legs) through a simulated quadrupedal locomotion, in which unprogrammed gaits (diagonal/lateral sequence walks, left/right-lead canters, and left/right-lead transverse gallops) spontaneously emerged because of leg loading feedbacks to the CPGs hard-wired to produce a default trot. Additionally, all gaits transitioned according to speed, as seen in animals. We have therefore hypothesized that various gaits derive from a trot because of posture control through leg loading feedback. The body tilt on the two support legs of each diagonal pair during trotting was classified into three types (level, tilted up, or tilted down) according to speed. The load difference between the two legs led to the phase difference between their CPGs via the loading feedbacks, resulting in nine gaits (3(2): three tilts to the power of two diagonal pairs) including the aforementioned. PMID:25639661

  17. Changes in the gait characteristics caused by external load, ground slope and velocity variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrozowski, Jerzy; Awrejcewicz, Jan

    2011-05-01

    The complexity of the human gait manifests itself by lots of parameters that can evoke different changes in the walking manner. They can be divided into two groups: inherent, like anthropometric features or peculiar psychomotor type, and those related to the external conditions. The aim of the paper is to analyze the influence of three parameters, i.e. external load, ground slope and gait velocity, on the locomotion characteristics and the gait stability. Within the framework of investigations for different values of the mentioned parameters a film registration of the trajectories of selected kinematic nodes during some gait cycles has been carried out. The obtained data was a subject of numerical calculation aimed at extracting the essential properties of the principal gait characteristics.

  18. Gait in Very Preterm School-Aged Children in Dual-Task Paradigms

    PubMed Central

    Hagmann-von Arx, Priska; Manicolo, Olivia; Perkinson-Gloor, Nadine; Weber, Peter; Grob, Alexander; Lemola, Sakari

    2015-01-01

    Objective The control of gait requires executive and attentional functions. As preterm children show executive and attentional deficits compared to full-term children, performing concurrent tasks that impose additional cognitive load may lead to poorer walking performance in preterm compared to full-term children. Knowledge regarding gait in preterm children after early childhood is scarce. We examined straight walking and if it is more affected in very preterm than in full-term children in dual-task paradigms. Study design Twenty preterm children with very low birth-weight (≤ 1500 g), 24 preterm children with birth-weight > 1500 g, and 44 full-term children, born between 2001 and 2006, were investigated. Gait was assessed using an electronic walkway system (GAITRite) while walking without a concurrent task (single-task) and while performing one concurrent (dual-task) or two concurrent (triple-task) tasks. Spatio-temporal gait parameters (gait velocity, cadence, stride length, single support time, double support time), normalized gait parameters (normalized velocity, normalized cadence, normalized stride length) and gait variability parameters (stride velocity variability, stride length variability) were analyzed. Results In dual- and triple-task conditions children showed decreased gait velocity, cadence, stride length, as well as increased single support time, double support time and gait variability compared to single-task walking. Further, results showed systematic decreases in stride velocity variability from preterm children with very low birth weight (≤ 1500 g) to preterm children with birth weight > 1500 g to full-term children. There were no significant interactions between walking conditions and prematurity status. Conclusions Dual and triple tasking affects gait of preterm and full-term children, confirming previous results that walking requires executive and attentional functions. Birth-weight dependent systematic changes in stride velocity

  19. Effects of Substrate Size and Orientation on Quadrupedal Gait Kinematics in Mouse Lemurs (Microcebus murinus).

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Liza J; Kemp, Addison D; Young, Jesse W

    2016-06-01

    As the smallest living primate, the mouse lemur is a suitable model for reconstructing the locomotor mechanisms by which primate ancestors might have responded to the challenges of an arboreal environment. In this study, we tested the effects of substrate diameter and orientation on quadrupedal gait kinematics in mouse lemurs (Microcebus murinus). Mouse lemurs highly preferred asymmetrical to symmetrical gaits as they moved across a flat board and poles of three diameters (2.5, 1.0, and 0.5 cm), set at horizontal, 30° inclined, and 30° declined orientations. During symmetrical gaits, mouse lemurs used diagonal sequence walking and ambling gaits on the same substrates and at the same duty factors for which some similarly sized nonprimate mammals use lateral sequence gaits, suggesting that reliance on diagonal sequence walking in primates may not be explicitly a response to body size relative to substrate diameter. When using asymmetrical gaits, kinematic adjustments to small diameter and/or nonhorizontal substrates included a preference for transverse gallops over other gaits, the avoidance of whole-body suspensions, increases in limb contact duration, and increases in the time interval between the landing of trailing and leading limbs. All of these adjustments are consistent with increasing locomotor stability by dampening center of mass movements and reducing the forces imparted to the substrate. Like mouse lemurs, small-bodied ancestral primates likely used symmetrical gaits occasionally, but more frequently used asymmetrical gaits that were adjusted in response to challenging substrates. Therefore, asymmetrical gait dynamics should be incorporated into hypotheses addressing early primate locomotor evolution. PMID:27222465

  20. Analysis of dual-task elderly gait in fallers and non-fallers using wearable sensors.

    PubMed

    Howcroft, Jennifer; Kofman, Jonathan; Lemaire, Edward D; McIlroy, William E

    2016-05-01

    Dual-task (DT) gait involves walking while simultaneously performing an attention-demanding task and can be used to identify impaired gait or executive function in older adults. Advancment is needed in techniques that quantify the influence of dual tasking to improve predictive and diagnostic potential. This study investigated the viability of wearable sensor measures to identify DT gait changes in older adults and distinguish between elderly fallers and non-fallers. A convenience sample of 100 older individuals (75.5±6.7 years; 76 non-fallers, 24 fallers based on 6 month retrospective fall occurrence) walked 7.62m under single-task (ST) and DT conditions while wearing pressure-sensing insoles and tri-axial accelerometers at the head, pelvis, and left and right shanks. Differences between ST and DT gait were identified for temporal measures, acceleration descriptive statistics, Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) quartiles, ratio of even to odd harmonics, center of pressure (CoP) stance path coefficient of variation, and deviations to expected CoP stance path. Increased posterior CoP stance path deviations, increased coefficient of variation, decreased FFT quartiles, and decreased ratio of even to odd harmonics suggested increased DT gait variability. Decreased gait velocity and decreased acceleration standard deviations (SD) at the pelvis and shanks could represent compensatory gait strategies that maintain stability. Differences in acceleration between fallers and non-fallers in head posterior SD and pelvis AP ratio of even to odd harmonics during ST, and pelvis vertical maximum Lyapunov exponent during DT gait were identified. Wearable-sensor-based DT gait assessments could be used in point-of-care environments to identify gait deficits. PMID:26994786

  1. Quadrupedal gaits in hexapod animals - inter-leg coordination in free-walking adult stick insects.

    PubMed

    Grabowska, Martyna; Godlewska, Elzbieta; Schmidt, Joachim; Daun-Gruhn, Silvia

    2012-12-15

    The analysis of inter-leg coordination in insect walking is generally a study of six-legged locomotion. For decades, the stick insect Carausius morosus has been instrumental for unravelling the rules and mechanisms that control leg coordination in hexapeds. We analysed inter-leg coordination in C. morosus that freely walked on straight paths on plane surfaces with different slopes. Consecutive 1.7 s sections were assigned inter-leg coordination patterns (which we call gaits) based on footfall patterns. Regular gaits, i.e. wave, tetrapod or tripod gaits, occurred in different proportions depending on surface slopes. Tetrapod gaits were observed most frequently, wave gaits only occurred on 90 deg inclining slopes and tripod gaits occurred most often on 15 deg declining slopes, i.e. in 40% of the sections. Depending on the slope, 36-66% of the sections were assigned irregular gaits. Irregular gaits were mostly due to multiple stepping by the front legs, which is perhaps probing behaviour, not phase coupled to the middle legs' cycles. In irregular gaits, middle leg and hindleg coordination was regular, related to quadrupedal walk and wave gaits. Apparently, front legs uncouple from and couple to the walking system without compromising middle leg and hindleg coordination. In front leg amputees, the remaining legs were strictly coordinated. In hindleg and middle leg amputees, the front legs continued multiple stepping. The coordination of middle leg amputees was maladapted, with front legs and hindlegs performing multiple steps or ipsilateral legs being in simultaneous swing. Thus, afferent information from middle legs might be necessary for a regular hindleg stepping pattern. PMID:22972892

  2. Spatiotemporal Characteristics of Freezing of Gait in Patients After Hypoxic-Ischemic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Seo Yeon; Lee, Sang Chul; Kim, Yong Wook

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The objective of this study was to investigate spatiotemporal characteristics with gait variability in patients with freezing of gait (FOG) after hypoxic-ischemic brain injury (HIBI). Eleven patients showing FOG after HIBI and 15 normal controls were consecutively enrolled. We performed gait analysis using a computerized gait system (VICON MX-T10 Motion Analysis System) and compared spatiotemporal characteristics and gait variability in both groups. Additionally, we performed correlation analysis to identify the gait parameters associated with severity of freezing, which we measured based on unified Parkinson disease Rating Scale subscore. Spatiotemporal characteristic of FOG patients showed increased stance time and double support phase and decreased swing time, single support phase, stride length, step length, and gait velocity compared with normal controls (P < 0.05). Besides baseline spatiotemporal characteristics, step time asymmetry and step length asymmetry were significantly increased in HIBI patients with FOG (P < 0.05). The coefficient of variation, which reflects the variability of each parameter, demonstrated increased cadence, stride time, swing time, single support phase, stride length, step length, and gait velocity variability in HIBI patients with FOG compared with normal controls (P < 0.05). Correlation analysis between FOG severity and spatiotemporal parameters revealed gait velocity, step length, and single support phase to be spatiotemporal parameters related to FOG severity (P < 0.05). Our findings suggest that bilateral gait coordination deterioration plays a considerable role for pathophysiology of FOG in HIBI patients. Additional studies with a larger number of subjects are needed to further investigate the neural mechanism of FOG after HIBI. PMID:27175696

  3. Gait and Functional Mobility Deficits in Fragile X-Associated Tremor/Ataxia Syndrome.

    PubMed

    O'Keefe, Joan A; Robertson-Dick, Erin E; Hall, Deborah A; Berry-Kravis, Elizabeth

    2016-08-01

    Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) results from a "premutation" (PM) size CGG repeat expansion in the fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) gene. Cerebellar gait ataxia is the primary feature in some FXTAS patients causing progressive disability. However, no studies have quantitatively characterized gait and mobility deficits in FXTAS. We performed quantitative gait and mobility analysis in seven FMR1 PM carriers with FXTAS and ataxia, six PM carriers without FXTAS, and 18 age-matched controls. We studied four independent gait domains, trunk range of motion (ROM), and movement transitions using an instrumented Timed Up and Go (i-TUG). We correlated these outcome measures with FMR1 molecular variables and clinical severity scales. PM carriers with FXTAS were globally impaired in every gait performance domain except trunk ROM compared to controls. These included total i-TUG duration, stride velocity, gait cycle time, cadence, double-limb support and swing phase times, turn duration, step time before turn, and turn-to-sit duration, and increased gait variability on several measures. Carriers without FXTAS did not differ from controls on any parameters, but double-limb support time was close to significance. Balance and disability scales correlated with multiple gait and movement transition parameters, while the FXTAS Rating Scale did not. This is the first study to quantitatively examine gait and movement transitions in FXTAS patients. Gait characteristics were consistent with those from previous cohorts with cerebellar ataxia. Sensitive measures like the i-TUG may help determine efficacy of interventions, characterize disease progression, and provide early markers of disease in FXTAS. PMID:26298472

  4. Independent Influence of Gait Speed and Step Length on Stability and Fall Risk

    PubMed Central

    Espy, D. D.; Yang, F.; Bhatt, T.; Pai, Y.-C.

    2010-01-01

    With aging, individuals' gaits become slower and their steps shorter; both are thought to improve stability against balance threats. Recent studies have shown that shorter step lengths, which bring the center of mass (COM) closer to the leading foot, improve stability against slip-related falls. However, a slower gait, hence lower COM velocity, does the opposite. Due to the inherent coupling of step length and speed in spontaneous gait, the extent to which the benefit of shorter steps can offset the slower speed is unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate, through decoupling, the independent effects of gait speed and step length on gait stability and the likelihood of slip-induced falls. Fifty-seven young adults walked at one of three target gait patterns, two of equal speed and two of equal step length; at a later trial, they encountered an unannounced slip. The results supported our hypotheses that faster gait as well as shorter steps each ameliorates fall risk when a slip is encountered. This appeared to be attributable to the maintenance of stability from slip initiation to liftoff of the recovery foot during the slip. Successful decoupling of gait speed from step length reveals for the first time that, although slow gait in itself leads to instability and falls (a one-standard-deviation decrease in gait speed increases the odds of fall by 4 fold), this effect is offset by the related decrease in step length (the same one-standard-deviation decrease in step length lowers fall risk by 6 times). PMID:20655750

  5. Clinical factors associated with a conservative gait pattern in older male veterans with diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Wrobel, James S; Crews, Ryan T; Connolly, John E

    2009-01-01

    Background Patients with diabetes and peripheral neuropathy are at higher risk for falls. People with diabetes sometimes adopt a more conservative gait pattern with decreased walking speed, widened base, and increased double support time. The purpose of this study was to use a multivariate approach to describe this conservative gait pattern. Methods Male veterans (mean age = 67 years; SD = 9.8; range 37–86) with diabetes (n = 152) participated in this study from July 2000 to May 2001 at the Veterans Affairs Medical Center, White River Junction, VT. Various demographic, clinical, static mobility, and plantar pressure measures were collected. Conservative gait pattern was defined by visual gait analysis as failure to demonstrate a heel-to-toe gait during the propulsive phase of gait. Results Patients with the conservative gait pattern had lower walking speed and decreased stride length compared to normal gait. (0.68 m/s v. 0.91 m/s, p < 0.001; 1.04 m v. 1.24 m, p < 0.001) Age, monofilament insensitivity, and Romberg's sign were significantly higher; and ankle dorsiflexion was significantly lower in the conservative gait pattern group. In the multivariate analysis, walking speed, age, ankle dorsiflexion, and callus were retained in the final model describing 36% of the variance. With the inclusion of ankle dorsiflexion in the model, monofilament insensitivity was no longer an independent predictor. Conclusion Our multivariate investigation of conservative gait in diabetes patients suggests that walking speed, advanced age, limited ankle dorsiflexion, and callus describe this condition more so than clinical measures of neuropathy. PMID:19389247

  6. The association between intersegmental coordination in the lower limb and gait speed in elderly females.

    PubMed

    Ogaya, Shinya; Iwata, Akira; Higuchi, Yumi; Fuchioka, Satoshi

    2016-07-01

    Human multi-segmental motion is a complex task requiring motor coordination. Uncoordinated motor control may contribute to the decline in mobility; however, it is unknown whether the age-related decline in intersegmental coordination relates to the decline in gait performance. The aim of this study was to clarify the association between intersegmental coordination and gait speed in elderly females. Gait measurements were performed in 91 community-dwelling elderly females over 60 years old. Foot, shank, and thigh sagittal motions were assessed. Intersegmental coordination was analyzed using the mean value of the continuous relative phase (mCRP) during four phases of the gait cycle to investigate phase differences in foot-shank and shank-thigh motions during a normal gait. The results showed that foot-shank mCRP at late stance had negative correlations with gait speed (r=-0.53) and cadence (r=-0.54) and a positive correlation with age (r=0.25). In contrast, shank-thigh mCRP at late stance had positive correlations with gait speed (r=0.37) and cadence (r=0.56). Moreover, partial correlation, controlling age, height, and weight, revealed that foot-shank mCRP at late stance had negative correlations with gait speed (r=-0.52) and cadence (r=-0.54). Shank-thigh mCRP at late stance had a positive correlation with gait speed (r=0.28) and cadence (r=0.51). These findings imply that the foot-shank and shank-thigh coordination patterns at late stance relate to gait speed, and uncoordinated lower limb motion is believed to be associated with the age-related decline in cadence. PMID:27477700

  7. Automatic detection of temporal gait parameters in poststroke individuals.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Meyer, Paulo; Fulk, George D; Sazonov, Edward S

    2011-07-01

    Approximately one-third of people who recover from a stroke require some form of assistance to walk. Repetitive task-oriented rehabilitation interventions have been shown to improve motor control and function in people with stroke. Our long-term goal is to design and test an intensive task-oriented intervention that will utilize the two primary components of constrained-induced movement therapy: massed, task-oriented training and behavioral methods to increase use of the affected limb in the real world. The technological component of the intervention is based on a wearable footwear-based sensor system that monitors relative activity levels, functional utilization, and gait parameters of affected and unaffected lower extremities. The purpose of this study is to describe a methodology to automatically identify temporal gait parameters of poststroke individuals to be used in assessment of functional utilization of the affected lower extremity as a part of behavior enhancing feedback. An algorithm accounting for intersubject variability is capable of achieving estimation error in the range of 2.6-18.6% producing comparable results for healthy and poststroke subjects. The proposed methodology is based on inexpensive and user-friendly technology that will enable research and clinical applications for rehabilitation of people who have experienced a stroke. PMID:21317087

  8. Non-Invasive Gait Monitoring in a Ubiquitous Computing House

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Yuji; Motooka, Nobuhisa; Siio, Itiro; Tsukada, Koji; Kambara, Keisuke

    Computers become smaller and cheaper from day to day, and the utilization, as daily life equipments, is now becoming ubiquitous. Therefore, it's essential to discuss the development of applications, as well as the installation of ubiquitous computing technologies into our daily living environments. Based on this idea, in order to investigate how ubiquitous computing can be used in the most efficient way, an experimental house, Ocha House, has been constructed in the campus of Ochanomizu university in 2009. In this study, we described the feature of the design of the experimental house and proposed a non-invasive gait monitoring technique as a healthcare application. Specifically, five wireless accelerometers were fixed on the floor of the house, and the floor vibration was measured when the subject walked along the accelerometers. As a result, the floor acceleration intensity was found to surge at the ground contact, and the gait cycle could be detected. By combining the simple acceleration sensors and the housing structures, human motion monitoring would become less invasive.

  9. Interlimb coordination, gait, and neural control of quadrupedalism in chimpanzees.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, L J; Anapol, F C; Jungers, W L

    1997-02-01

    Interlimb coordination is directly relevant to the understanding of the neural control of locomotion, but few studies addressing this topic for nonhuman primates are available, and no data exist for any hominoid other than humans. As a follow-up to Jungers and Anapol's ([1985] Am. J. Phys. Anthropol. 67:89-97) analysis on a lemur and talapoin monkey, we describe here the patterns of interlimb coordination in two chimpanzees as revealed by electromyography. Like the lemur and talapoin monkey, ipsilateral limb coupling in chimpanzees is characterized by variability about preferred modes within individual gaits. During symmetrical gaits, limb coupling patterns in the chimpanzee are also influenced by kinematic differences in hindlimb placement ("overstriding"). These observations reflect the neurological constraints placed on locomotion but also emphasize the overall flexibility of locomotor neural mechanisms. Interlimb coordination patterns are also species-specific, exhibiting significant differences among primate taxa and between primates and cats. Interspecific differences may be suggestive of phylogenetic divergence in the basic mechanisms for neural control of locomotion, but do not preclude morphological explanations for observed differences in interlimb coordination across species. PMID:9066899

  10. Simulation of human gait using computed torque control.

    PubMed

    Unver, N F; Tümer, S T; Ozgören, M K

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a method for the mathematical modeling of both the single and double support phases of the human gait. The governing equations are obtained by considering the linkage model to be in a floating state and the foot-ground interaction is imposed in the form of geometric constraints. Two stages for the single support phase and one stage for the double support phase are considered, each described by a different foot-ground constraint. Feedback controller functioning according to the computed torque control method is used to achieve the normal gait described by the hip and ankle trajectories. Weighted least square optimization is used to solve the redundancy of control torques during the double support phase. The geometric simulation indicates that the imposed trajectories can be realized by the proposed model with some deviations in joint motions. The control strategy is tested by artificially perturbing the trajectories. The corrective actions are able to resume the desired pattern within half cycle, but with control torque magnitudes considerably away from reasonable limits. This is attributed to the insufficiency of the planar kinematic model and the assumption that the joint torques are unbounded. PMID:10942991

  11. Gait patterns in children with Developmental Coordination Disorder.

    PubMed

    Wilmut, K; Du, W; Barnett, A L

    2016-06-01

    Previous research has shown that adults with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) show increased variability of foot placement measures and movement of the centre of mass (CoM) while walking. The current study considered the gait patterns of young and older children with DCD. Fourteen young children with DCD (7-12 years), 15 older children with DCD (12-17 years) and 29 age- and gender-matched typically developing children took part. Children were asked to walk up and down a flat 10-m-long pathway for 1 min, while the movement of their feet and trunk was recorded using motion analysis. The gait pattern of children with DCD was characterised by wider steps, elevated variability in the time spent in double support and stride time and greater medio-lateral velocity and acceleration compared to their peers. An elevated variability in medio-lateral acceleration was also seen in the young but not the older children with DCD. In addition, the young children showed a greater variability in velocity and acceleration in all three directions compared to the older children. The data suggest that the high incidence of trips and falls seen in children with DCD may be due to differences in the control of the CoM. PMID:26879769

  12. Substrate attributes determine gait in a terrestrial gastropod.

    PubMed

    McKee, Amberle; Voltzow, Janice; Pernet, Bruno

    2013-02-01

    Some terrestrial gastropods are able to move using two gaits: adhesive crawling, where the entire foot is separated from the substrate only by a thin layer of mucus and the snail leaves a continuous mucus trail; and loping, where regions of the foot arch above the substrate and the snail leaves a discontinuous mucus trail. Loping has been interpreted as a means of rapidly escaping predators. We found that the pulmonate Cornu aspersum moved using adhesive crawling on dry acrylic or glass substrates, but loped on dry concrete or wood. Loping snails did not move more rapidly than snails using adhesive crawling. Snails moving on concrete secreted a greater volume of pedal mucus per area of trail than those moving on acrylic; locomotion on concrete thus requires greater expenditure of mucus than does locomotion on acrylic. Because loping snails deposit a smaller area of mucus per distance traveled than do snails using adhesive crawling, loping may conserve mucus when moving on porous, absorbent substrates. Members of several other terrestrial pulmonate taxa can also lope on concrete, suggesting that this plasticity in gait is widespread among terrestrial snails. PMID:23493509

  13. Motion Controlled Gait Enhancing Mobile Shoe for Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Handzic, Ismet; Vasudevan, Erin V.; Reed, Kyle B.

    2011-01-01

    Walking on a split-belt treadmill, which has two belts that can be run at different speeds, has been shown to improve walking patterns post-stroke. However, these improvements are only temporarily retained once individuals transition to walking over ground. We hypothesize that longer-lasting effects would be observed if the training occurred during natural walking over ground, as opposed to on a treadmill. In order to study such long-term effects, we have developed a mobile and portable device which can simulate the same gait altering movements experienced on a split-belt treadmill. The new motion controlled gait enhancing mobile shoe improves upon the previous version’s drawbacks. This version of the GEMS has motion that is continuous, smooth, and regulated with on-board electronics. A vital component of this new design is the Archimedean spiral wheel shape that redirects the wearer’s downward force into a horizontal backward motion. The design is passive and does not utilize any motors. Its motion is regulated only by a small magnetic particle brake. Further experimentation is needed to evaluate the long-term after-effects. PMID:22275620

  14. Design and Pilot Study of a Gait Enhancing Mobile Shoe

    PubMed Central

    Handzic, Ismet; Barno, Eileen M.; Vasudevan, Erin V.; Reed, Kyle B.

    2013-01-01

    Hemiparesis is a frequent and disabling consequence of stroke and can lead to asymmetric and inefficient walking patterns. Training on a split-belt treadmill, which has two separate treads driving each leg at a different speed, can correct such asymmetries post-stroke. However, the effects of split-belt treadmill training only partially transfer to everyday walking over ground and extended training sessions are required to achieve long-lasting effects. Our aim is to develop an alternative device, the Gait Enhancing Mobile Shoe (GEMS), that mimics the actions of the split-belt treadmill, but can be used during overground walking and in one’s own home, thus enabling long-term training. The GEMS does not require any external power and is completely passive; all necessary forces are redirected from the natural forces present during walking. Three healthy subjects walked on the shoes for twenty minutes during which one GEMS generated a backward motion and the other GEMS generated a forward motion. Our preliminary experiments suggest that wearing the GEMS did cause subjects to modify coordination between the legs and these changes persisted when subjects returned to normal over-ground walking. The largest effects were observed in measures of temporal coordination (e.g., duration of double-support). These results suggest that the GEMS is capable of altering overground walking coordination in healthy controls and could potentially be used to correct gait asymmetries post-stroke. PMID:24371521

  15. Context focused older adult mobility and gait assessment.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Kenneth; Reginatto, Brenda; Patterson, Matthew R; Power, Dermot; Komaba, Yusuke; Maeda, Kazuho; Inomata, Akihiro; Caulfield, Brian

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents an initial overview of insights gained into how older adults mobilize in the home and community, based on data from inertial sensors which were worn by study participants over a 7-day period. The addition of a wearable camera provided additional contextual information which can be used to assess mobility and understand the factors that influence it in the free living environment. Seven days of data collected from a group of older adults who had experienced one or more falls in the previous six months was compared to that of a control group with no history of falling. Results showed that both groups spent relatively little time walking in challenging environmental conditions, and that the fallers spent significantly less time walking under regular conditions (no effect on gait) and outdoors. Analysis of gait metrics showed that the fallers were slightly slower in general, and more noticeable differences were observed when the participants were regrouped according to mobility levels determined from baseline assessments using traditional methods. PMID:26737889

  16. Metatarsal Loading During Gait-A Musculoskeletal Analysis.

    PubMed

    Al-Munajjed, Amir A; Bischoff, Jeffrey E; Dharia, Mehul A; Telfer, Scott; Woodburn, James; Carbes, Sylvain

    2016-03-01

    Detailed knowledge of the loading conditions within the human body is essential for the development and optimization of treatments for disorders and injuries of the musculoskeletal system. While loads in the major joints of the lower limb have been the subject of extensive study, relatively little is known about the forces applied to the individual bones of the foot. The objective of this study was to use a detailed musculoskeletal model to compute the loads applied to the metatarsal bones during gait across several healthy subjects. Motion-captured gait trials and computed tomography (CT) foot scans from four healthy subjects were used as the inputs to inverse dynamic simulations that allowed the computation of loads at the metatarsal joints. Low loads in the metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joint were predicted before terminal stance, however, increased to an average peak of 1.9 times body weight (BW) before toe-off in the first metatarsal. At the first tarsometatarsal (TMT) joint, loads of up to 1.0 times BW were seen during the early part of stance, reflecting tension in the ligaments and muscles. These loads subsequently increased to an average peak of 3.0 times BW. Loads in the first ray were higher compared to rays 2-5. The joints were primarily loaded in the longitudinal direction of the bone. PMID:26719905

  17. Biomechanical parameters of gait among transtibial amputees: a review.

    PubMed

    Soares, Alex Sandra Oliveira de Cerqueira; Yamaguti, Edward Yuji; Mochizuki, Luis; Amadio, Alberto Carlos; Serrão, Júlio Cerca

    2009-09-01

    Rehabilitation for lower-limb amputees needs to focus on restoration of daily functions and independent locomotion. As gait is reestablished, reorganization of the motor pattern takes place in order to optimize the functions of the locomotor system. Biomechanics is a field of study that enables understanding of this reorganization. From such knowledge, appropriate strategies for recovering the autonomy of the means of locomotion can be established. Thus, this paper had the aim of reviewing the current status of the biomechanics of locomotion among unilateral transtibial amputees. To achieve this aim, papers written in English or Portuguese and published up to 2005 were selected from the Cochrane Library, PubMed, Scientific Electronic Library Online (SciELO), Literatura Latino-Americana e do Caribe em Ciências da Saúde (Lilacs) and Dedalus databases. In cases of transtibial amputation, the absence of plantar flexors negatively affects locomotion. Increased absorption and energy generation by the muscles that control the hip joint of the amputated leg can be considered to be the main compensatory strategy developed by unilateral transtibial amputees during gait. Factors associated with the characteristics of the amputation, prosthesis and experimental protocol used directly influence the results. PMID:20169280

  18. Gait and speed selection in slender inertial swimmers

    PubMed Central

    Gazzola, Mattia; Argentina, Médéric; Mahadevan, L.

    2015-01-01

    Inertial swimmers use flexural movements to push water and generate thrust. We quantify this dynamical process for a slender body in a fluid by accounting for passive elasticity and hydrodynamics and active muscular force generation and proprioception. Our coupled elastohydrodynamic model takes the form of a nonlinear eigenvalue problem for the swimming speed and locomotion gait. The solution of this problem shows that swimmers use quantized resonant interactions with the fluid environment to enhance speed and efficiency. Thus, a fish is like an optimized diode that converts a prescribed alternating transverse motion to forward motion. Our results also allow for a broad comparative view of swimming locomotion and provide a mechanistic basis for the empirical relation linking the swimmer’s speed U, length L, and tail beat frequency f, given by U/L∼f [Bainbridge R (1958) J Exp Biol 35:109–133]. Furthermore, we show that a simple form of proprioceptive sensory feedback, wherein local muscle activation is function of body curvature, suffices to drive elastic instabilities associated with thrust production and leads to a spontaneous swimming gait without the need for a central pattern generator. Taken together, our results provide a simple mechanistic view of swimming consistent with natural observations and suggest ways to engineer artificial swimmers for optimal performance. PMID:25770221

  19. Feasible Stability Region in the Frontal Plane During Human Gait

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Feng; Espy, Debbie; Pai, Yi-Chung

    2010-01-01

    The inability to adequately control the motion of the center of mass (COM) in the frontal plane may result in a loss of balance causing a sideways fall during human gait. The primary purposes of this study were (1) to derive the feasible stability region (FSR) in the mediolateral direction, and (2) to compare the FSR with the COM motion state taken from 193 trials among 39 young subjects at liftoff during walking at different speeds. The lower boundary of the FSR was derived, at a given initial COM location, as the minimum rightward COM velocity, at liftoff of the left foot, required to bring the COM into the base of support (BOS), i.e. the right (stance) foot, as the COM velocity diminishes. The upper boundary was derived as the maximum rightward COM velocity, beyond which the left foot must land to the right of the right foot (BOS) in order to prevent a fall. We established a 2-link human model and employed dynamic optimization to estimate these threshold values for velocity. For a range of initial COM positions, simulated annealing algorithm was used to search for the threshold velocity values. Our study quantified the extent to which mediolateral balance can still be maintained without resorting to a crossover step (the left foot lands to the right of the BOS) for balance recovery The derived FSR is in good agreement with our gait experimental results. PMID:19760504

  20. Controlled locomotion of robots driven by a vibrating surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umbanhowar, Paul; Lynch, Kevin M.

    Robots typically derive their powers of movement from onboard actuators and power sources, but other scenarios are possible where the external environment provides part or all of the necessary forcing and control. I will discuss details of a system where the ``robots'' are just planar solid objects and the requisite driving forces originate from frictional sliding-interactions with a periodically oscillated and nominally horizontal surface. For the robots to move, the temporal symmetry of the frictional forces must be broken, which is achieved here by modulating the normal force using vertical acceleration of the surface. Independent of the initial conditions and vibration waveform, a sliding locomotor reaches a unique velocity limit cycle at a given position. Its resulting motion can be described in terms of velocity fields which specify the robot's cycle-averaged velocity as a function of position. Velocity fields with non-zero spatial divergence can be generated by combining translational and rotational surface motions; this allows the simultaneous and open-loop collection, dispersal, and transport of multiple robots. Fields and field sequences can simultaneously move multiple robots between arbitrary positions and, potentially, along arbitrary trajectories. Supported by NSF CMMI #0700537.