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Sample records for rock laboratory ch

  1. Laboratory Spectroscopy of CH(+) and Isotopic CH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, John C.; Drouin, Brian J.

    2006-01-01

    The A1II - X1(Epsilon) electronic band of the CH(+) ion has been used as a probe of the physical and dynamical conditions of the ISM for 65 years. In spite of being one of the first molecular species observed in the ISM and the very large number of subsequent observations with large derived column densities, the pure rotational spectra of CH+ has remained elusive in both the laboratory and in the ISM as well. We report the first laboratory measurement of the pure rotation of the CH(+) ion and discuss the detection of CH-13(+) in the ISM. Also reported are the somewhat unexpected chemical conditions that resulted in laboratory production.

  2. Developing a Virtual Rock Deformation Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, W.; Ougier-simonin, A.; Lisabeth, H. P.; Banker, J. S.

    2012-12-01

    Experimental rock physics plays an important role in advancing earthquake research. Despite its importance in geophysics, reservoir engineering, waste deposits and energy resources, most geology departments in U.S. universities don't have rock deformation facilities. A virtual deformation laboratory can serve as an efficient tool to help geology students naturally and internationally learn about rock deformation. Working with computer science engineers, we built a virtual deformation laboratory that aims at fostering user interaction to facilitate classroom and outreach teaching and learning. The virtual lab is built to center around a triaxial deformation apparatus in which laboratory measurements of mechanical and transport properties such as stress, axial and radial strains, acoustic emission activities, wave velocities, and permeability are demonstrated. A student user can create her avatar to enter the virtual lab. In the virtual lab, the avatar can browse and choose among various rock samples, determine the testing conditions (pressure, temperature, strain rate, loading paths), then operate the virtual deformation machine to observe how deformation changes physical properties of rocks. Actual experimental results on the mechanical, frictional, sonic, acoustic and transport properties of different rocks at different conditions are compiled. The data acquisition system in the virtual lab is linked to the complied experimental data. Structural and microstructural images of deformed rocks are up-loaded and linked to different deformation tests. The integration of the microstructural image and the deformation data allows the student to visualize how forces reshape the structure of the rock and change the physical properties. The virtual lab is built using the Game Engine. The geological background, outstanding questions related to the geological environment, and physical and mechanical concepts associated with the problem will be illustrated on the web portal. In

  3. Laboratory rock mechanics testing manual. Public draft

    SciTech Connect

    Shuri, F S; Cooper, J D; Hamill, M L

    1981-10-01

    Standardized laboratory rock mechanics testing procedures have been prepared for use in the National Terminal Waste Storage Program. The procedures emphasize equipment performance specifications, documentation and reporting, and Quality Assurance acceptance criteria. Sufficient theoretical background is included to allow the user to perform the necessary data reduction. These procedures incorporate existing standards when possible, otherwise they represent the current state-of-the-art. Maximum flexibility in equipment design has been incorporated to allow use of this manual by existing groups and to encourage future improvements.

  4. AeSPoe HARD ROCK LABORATORY

    SciTech Connect

    Svemar, C; Pettersson, S.; Hedman, T.

    2003-02-27

    Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (AEHRL) has been constructed in virgin bedrock as part of the development of a deep geological repository for spent nuclear fuel in Sweden, the role being to provide input to the performance assessment, to test engineered barrier systems and to develop and refine full scale methods and machines for construction and operation of the real repository. The AEHRL extends down to 460 m depth with access via both ramp and shaft. Work in the laboratory has been separated into 4 different stage goals: (1) Verification of site investigation methods. (2) Development of detailed investigation methodology. (3) Testing of models for description of the barrier function of the host rock. (4) Demonstration of technology for and function of important parts of the repository system Stage goals 1 and 2 were in focus during the period 1986-95 and are now completed. Stage goal 1 concerns investigations carried out from ground surface and stage goal 2 investigations carried out underground, in this case during excavation of the ramp. The present work is focused on the two operative stage goals 3 and 4. The activities on barrier function of the host rock comprises primarily in-situ tests with tracer migration in natural fractures and migration of actinides in small samples of rock or bentonite inside a chemical laboratory probe installed in a borehole. The data collected from the tests are used for model development and verification. The demonstration of technology includes studies of engineered barriers and comprises tests of copper stability, bentonite buffer, backfill, plugging and practical development of the main disposal sequences. Up today five full scale deposition holes with buffer and canister, and one full-scale test of backfill and plugging have been installed. The prototype for the deposition machine is in operation. The work is conducted in an international environment and altogether eight organizations from seven countries besides Sweden take

  5. Laboratory modeling of seismoelectric effects in rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besedina, Alina; Kocharyan, Gevorg

    2010-05-01

    It is well known that deformation of rock by seismic waves is accompanied by a complex of various electromagnetic effects of different physical natures. These phenomena are widely used in exploration geophysics and well tests, besides that these effects are of great interest in forecasting catastrophic events, such as rock bursts in mining operations. For adequate interpretation of experimental results it is necessary to understand the physical nature of the seismoelectric effect. Despite of a considerable amount of performed investigations, no general model of the phenomenon has been developed yet. The known sources of electric signals in rock are electrokinetic phenomena, piezoelectric phenomena, triboelectricity, contact electrification, induction phenomena and the effect of charged edge dislocation oscillations. One of the urgent questions is studying the relationships between form and amplitude of the seismic pulse and the electric signal. In this work an experimental investigation is presented of the process of electric signal origination in hard rock, which does not contain fluid in an explicit form. The constructed laboratory set-up allows to make experiments with compressional waves of a wide range of amplitudes and frequencies. It also allows to simulate both continuous media, and fractured rock. Marble, granite and a model material made of hyposulphite mixed with granite crumb were used in this research. Longitudinal waves of different intensities were initiated in the model by impacts of balls of different masses. The constructed one-dimensional model - the rod - provides conditions for formation and propagation of a plane wave as well as a noticeable delay of the arrival of the tension wave reflected from the free end of the rod. This permitted to sort out clearly the electric signals accompanying propagation of a longitudinal compressional wave and to find out the degree of correlation between the parameters of electric and mechanical signals. It is

  6. Rock physics at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    Rock physics refers to the study of static and dynamic chemical and physical properties of rocks and to phenomenological investigations of rocks reacting to man-made forces such as stress waves and fluid injection. A bibliography of rock physics references written by LASL staff members is given. Listing is by surname of first author. (RWR)

  7. Submillimeter laboratory identification of CH{sup +} and CH{sub 2}D{sup +}

    SciTech Connect

    Amano, T.

    2015-01-22

    Laboratory identification of two basic and important interstellar molecular ions is presented. The J = 1 - 0 rotational transition of {sup 12}CH{sup +} together with those of {sup 13}CH{sup +} and {sup 12}CD{sup +} was observed in the laboratory. The newly obtained frequencies were found to be different from those reported previously. Various experimental evidences firmly support the new measurements. In addition, the Zeeman effect and the spin-rotation hyperfine interaction enforce the laboratory identification with no ambiguity. Rotational lines of CH{sub 2}D{sup +} were observed in the submillimeter-wave region. This laboratory observation is consistent with a recent tentative identification of CH{sub 2}D{sup +} toward Ori IRc2.

  8. A Junior Year ChE Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paterson, W. R.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses features of experiments (conducted during 1980-81 in the University of Edinburgh's third-year chemical engineering laboratory) which might make them attractive for wider use. Experiments focus on convective mass and heat transfer, diffusion, heat transfer to a jet, and adiabatic batch reactors. (JN)

  9. Underground Research Laboratories for Crystalline Rock and Sedimentary Rock in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Shigeta, N.; Takeda, S.; Matsui, H.; Yamasaki, S.

    2003-02-27

    The Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) has started two off-site (generic) underground research laboratory (URL) projects, one for crystalline rock as a fractured media and the other for sedimentary rock as a porous media. This paper introduces an overview and current status of these projects.

  10. A Virtual Rock Physics Laboratory Through Visualized and Interactive Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanorio, T.; Di Bonito, C.; Clark, A. C.

    2014-12-01

    As new scientific challenges demand more comprehensive and multidisciplinary investigations, laboratory experiments are not expected to become simpler and/or faster. Experimental investigation is an indispensable element of scientific inquiry and must play a central role in the way current and future generations of scientist make decisions. To turn the complexity of laboratory work (and that of rocks!) into dexterity, engagement, and expanded learning opportunities, we are building an interactive, virtual laboratory reproducing in form and function the Stanford Rock Physics Laboratory, at Stanford University. The objective is to combine lectures on laboratory techniques and an online repository of visualized experiments consisting of interactive, 3-D renderings of equipment used to measure properties central to the study of rock physics (e.g., how to saturate rocks, how to measure porosity, permeability, and elastic wave velocity). We use a game creation system together with 3-D computer graphics, and a narrative voice to guide the user through the different phases of the experimental protocol. The main advantage gained in employing computer graphics over video footage is that students can virtually open the instrument, single out its components, and assemble it. Most importantly, it helps describe the processes occurring within the rock. These latter cannot be tracked while simply recording the physical experiment, but computer animation can efficiently illustrate what happens inside rock samples (e.g., describing acoustic waves, and/or fluid flow through a porous rock under pressure within an opaque core-holder - Figure 1). The repository of visualized experiments will complement lectures on laboratory techniques and constitute an on-line course offered through the EdX platform at Stanford. This will provide a virtual laboratory for anyone, anywhere to facilitate teaching/learning of introductory laboratory classes in Geophysics and expand the number of courses

  11. Research in the Mont Terri Rock laboratory: Quo vadis?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bossart, Paul; Thury, Marc

    During the past 10 years, the 12 Mont Terri partner organisations ANDRA, BGR, CRIEPI, ENRESA, FOWG (now SWISSTOPO), GRS, HSK, IRSN, JAEA, NAGRA, OBAYASHI and SCK-CEN have jointly carried out and financed a research programme in the Mont Terri Rock Laboratory. An important strategic question for the Mont Terri project is what type of new experiments should be carried out in the future. This question has been discussed among partner delegates, authorities, scientists, principal investigators and experiment delegates. All experiments at Mont Terri - past, ongoing and future - can be assigned to the following three categories: (1) process and mechanism understanding in undisturbed argillaceous formations, (2) experiments related to excavation- and repository-induced perturbations and (3) experiments related to repository performance during the operational and post-closure phases. In each of these three areas, there are still open questions and hence potential experiments to be carried out in the future. A selection of key issues and questions which have not, or have only partly been addressed so far and in which the project partners, but also the safety authorities and other research organisations may be interested, are presented in the following. The Mont Terri Rock Laboratory is positioned as a generic rock laboratory, where research and development is key: mainly developing methods for site characterisation of argillaceous formations, process understanding and demonstration of safety. Due to geological constraints, there will never be a site specific rock laboratory at Mont Terri. The added value for the 12 partners in terms of future experiments is threefold: (1) the Mont Terri project provides an international scientific platform of high reputation for research on radioactive waste disposal (= state-of-the-art research in argillaceous materials); (2) errors are explicitly allowed (= rock laboratory as a “playground” where experience is often gained through

  12. Muon tomography in the Mont Terri underground rock laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesparre, N.; Gibert, D.; Marteau, J.; Carlus, B.; Nussbaum, C.

    2012-04-01

    The Mont Terri underground rock laboratory (Switzerland) was excavated in a Mesozoic shale formation constituted by Opalinus clay. This impermeable formation presents suitable properties for hosting repository sites of radioactive waste. A muon telescope has been placed in this laboratory in October 2009 to establish the feasibility of the muon tomography and to test the sensor performance in a calm environment, where we are protected from atmospheric noisy particles. However, the presence of radon in the gallery as well as charged particles issued from the decay of gamma rays may create a background noise. This noise shift and smooths the signal inducing an under estimation of the rock density. The uncorrelated background has been measured by placing the planes of detection in anti-coincidence. This estimation is preponderant and has to be combined to the theoretical feasibility evaluation to determine the best experimental set-up to observe muon flux fluctuations due to density variations. The muon densitometry experience is here exposed with the estimation of its feasibility. The data acquired from different locations inside the underground laboratory are presented. They are compared to two models representing the layer above the laboratory corresponding to a minimum and a maximum muon flux expectation depending on the values of the rock density.

  13. Laboratory experiment of the rock anelastic strain recovery compliances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Lu; Wang, Lianjie

    2012-09-01

    Anelastic strain recovery (ASR) compliances are the important parameters for the ASR in situ stress measurement method to accurately evaluate the magnitude of the stress. The laboratory experiment of the creep and ASR processes for three types of rocks (sandstone, marble and granite) were performed. The tests were carried out at 50% of the uniaxial compressive strength (UCS). And the ASR compliances of the shear mode Jas(t), the volumetric mode Jav(t) and the ratio of Jas(t) and Jav(t) were obtained, respectively. The experimental result show that both the magnitude and increase rate of the ASR compliance greatly depend on the rock type, and the ratios of Jas(t) and Jav(t) trend to different constant values after enough elapsed time for each type of rock specimen.

  14. The instantaneous rate dependence in low temperature laboratory rock friction and rock deformation experiments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beeler, N.M.; Tullis, T.E.; Kronenberg, A.K.; Reinen, L.A.

    2007-01-01

    Earthquake occurrence probabilities that account for stress transfer and time-dependent failure depend on the product of the effective normal stress and a lab-derived dimensionless coefficient a. This coefficient describes the instantaneous dependence of fault strength on deformation rate, and determines the duration of precursory slip. Although an instantaneous rate dependence is observed for fracture, friction, crack growth, and low temperature plasticity in laboratory experiments, the physical origin of this effect during earthquake faulting is obscure. We examine this rate dependence in laboratory experiments on different rock types using a normalization scheme modified from one proposed by Tullis and Weeks [1987]. We compare the instantaneous rate dependence in rock friction with rate dependence measurements from higher temperature dislocation glide experiments. The same normalization scheme is used to compare rate dependence in friction to rock fracture and to low-temperature crack growth tests. For particular weak phyllosilicate minerals, the instantaneous friction rate dependence is consistent with dislocation glide. In intact rock failure tests, for each rock type considered, the instantaneous rate dependence is the same size as for friction, suggesting a common physical origin. During subcritical crack growth in strong quartzofeldspathic and carbonate rock where glide is not possible, the instantaneous rate dependence measured during failure or creep tests at high stress has long been thought to be due to crack growth; however, direct comparison between crack growth and friction tests shows poor agreement. The crack growth rate dependence appears to be higher than the rate dependence of friction and fracture by a factor of two to three for all rock types considered. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.

  15. Rock physics template from laboratory data for carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gegenhuber, Nina; Pupos, Judit

    2015-03-01

    Information about compressional and shear wave velocity or their ratio gives the possibility to interpret data concerning lithology and pore content, like the AVO analysis. Our data set (dolomite and limestone samples from Austria) is presented in a rock physics template, which is used as a tool for seismic interpretation for lithology and pore fluid characterization. In the rock physics template the ratio of compressional (vp) and shear wave (vs) velocity is plotted versus the acoustic impedance. Additionally presented are calculated model lines for the description and interpretation of the measured data. Used are the model by Kuster and Tosköz and the Hashin-Shtrikman bounds. Compressional and shear wave velocity on dry and brine saturated samples are determined in the laboratory. The rock physics template displays a clear separation between dry and saturated measured data. Additionally, the saturated measured data show a "shear weakening effect" that has been reported in the literature before by other researchers. The Kuster and Toksöz model is able to describe the measured data fairly well. However, different aspect ratios are needed to match the different vp and vs data for the different rock types. Additionally this model type could not describe our data in the rock physics template. The calculated Hashin-Shtrikman bounds for the rock physics template show good results for the saturated samples. The upper bound and the 75% and 50% of the upper bound can describe the measured data and can be used for an interpretation. For the dry measured data the correlations did not work sufficiently well.

  16. Frictional sliding in layered rock: laboratory-scale experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Buescher, B.J.; Perry, K.E. Jr.; Epstein, J.S.

    1996-09-01

    The work is part of the rock mechanics effort for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Program. The laboratory-scale experiments are intended to provide high quality data on the mechanical behavior of jointed structures that can be used to validate complex numerical models for rock-mass behavior. Frictional sliding between simulated rock joints was studied using phase shifting moire interferometry. A model, constructed from stacks of machined and sandblasted granite plates, contained a central hole bore normal to the place so that frictional slip would be induced between the plates near the hole under compressive loading. Results show a clear evolution of slip with increasing load. Since the rock was not cycled through loading- unloading, the quantitative differences between the three data sets are probably due to a ``wearing-in`` effect. The highly variable spatial frequency of the data is probably due to the large grain size of the granite and the stochastic frictional processes. An unusual feature of the evolution of slip with increasing load is that as the load gets larger, some plates seem to return to a null position. Figs, 6 refs.

  17. Prehistoric Rock Structures of the Idaho National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Brenda R Pace

    2007-04-01

    Over the past 13,500 years, human populations have lived in and productively utilized the natural resources offered by the cold desert environment of the northeastern Snake River Plain in eastern Idaho. Within an overall framework of hunting and gathering, groups relied on an intimate familiarity with the natural world and developed a variety of technologies to extract the resources that they needed to survive. Useful items were abundant and found everywhere on the landscape. Even the basaltic terrain and the rocks, themselves, were put to productive use. This paper presents a preliminary classification scheme for rock structures built on the Idaho National Laboratory landscape by prehistoric aboriginal populations, including discussions of the overall architecture of the structures, associated artifact assemblages, and topographic placement. Adopting an ecological perspective, the paper concludes with a discussion of the possible functions of these unique resources for the desert populations that once called the INL home.

  18. Seismic attenuation: Laboratory measurements in fluid saturated rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramaniyan, Shankar; Madonna, Claudio; Tisato, Nicola; Saenger, Erik; Quintal, Beatriz

    2014-05-01

    Seismic wave attenuation could be used as an indicator of reservoir fluids due to its dependence on rock and fluid properties. Over the past 30 years, many laboratory methodologies to study attenuation in rocks have been employed, such as ultrasonic (MHz), resonant bar (kHz) and forced oscillation methods in the low frequency range (0.01-100Hz) (Tisato & Madonna 2012; Madonna & Tisato 2013). Forced oscillation methods have gained prominence over time as the frequency range of measurements correspond to that of field seismic data acquired for oil/gas exploration. These experiments measure attenuation as the phase shift between the applied stress (sinusoidal) and measured strain. Since the magnitudes of measured phase shifts are quite low (Q-1 ~0.01-0.1) and the amplitudes of strain applied to the rock samples are of the order ~10-6 (i.e., similar orders of magnitude to seismic waves), it is challenging. A comparison of such forced oscillation setups will be presented to provide an overview of the various possibilities of design and implementation for future setups. In general, there is a lack of laboratory data and most of the published data are for sandstones. Currently, attenuation measurements are being carried out on carbonate and sandstone samples. We employ the Seismic Wave Attenuation Module (SWAM, Madonna & Tisato 2013) to measure seismic attenuation in these samples for different saturation degrees (90% and 100% water) and under three different confining pressures (5, 10 and 15MPa). Preliminary results from these investigations will be discussed. REFERENCES Madonna, C. & Tisato, N. 2013: A new seismic wave attenuation module to experimentally measure low-frequency attenuation in extensional mode. Geophysical Prospecting, doi: 10.1111/1365-2478.12015. Tisato, N. & Madonna, C. 2012: Attenuation at low seismic frequencies in partially saturated rocks: Measurements and description of a new apparatus. Journal of Applied Geophysics, 86, 44-53.

  19. Microwave applications to rock specimen drying in laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jihwan; Park, Hyeong-Dong

    2014-05-01

    Microwave heating is the process in which electromagnetic wave with 300 MHz - 300 GHz heats dielectric material. Although in the beginning microwave was mainly used in food industry to cook or heat the food, it soon became clear that microwave had a large potential for other applications. It was thus introduced in geological fields of investigation like mineral processing, oil sand and oil shale extraction, soil remediation, waste treatment. However, the drying techniques using microwave was rarely treated in geology field. According to the ISRM suggested methods, experimental rock specimens in laboratory test were dried in 105°C oven for a period of at least 24 hours. In this method, hot air transmits heats to material by means of thermal conduction, and the heat was transferred from the surface to the inside of the rock specimens. The thermal gradient and moisture gradient can deteriorate the specimens, and energy can be wasted in bulk heating the specimens. The aim of our study was to compare physical property, microstructural property, and energy efficiency between microwave drying method and conventional oven drying method, and to suggest new method for rock drying. Granite, basalt, and sandstone were selected as specimens and were made in cylinder shape with 54 mm diameter. To compare two different methods, one set of saturated specimens were dried in 105°C conventional oven and the other set of saturated specimens were dried in microwave oven. After dried, the specimens were cooled and saturated in 20°C water 48 hours. The saturation-drying were repeated 50 cycles, and the physical property and microstructural property were measured every 10 cycles. Absorption and elastic wave velocity were measured to investigate the change of physical property, and microscope image and X-ray computed tomography image were obtained to investigate the change of microstructural property of rock specimens. The electricity consumption of conventional oven and microwave oven

  20. ChemCam rock laser for Mars Science Laboratory "Curiosity"

    ScienceCinema

    Wiens, Roger

    2014-08-12

    Los Alamos has a long history of space-related instruments, tied primarily to its role in defense-related treaty verification. Space-based detectors have helped determine the differences between signals from lightning bolts and potential nuclear explosions. LANL-developed gamma-ray detection instruments first revealed the existence of what we now know as gamma-ray bursts, an exciting area of astrophysical research. And the use of LANL instruments on varied space missions continues with such products as the ChemCam rock laser for NASA, shown here. The Engineering Model of the ChemCam Mars Science Laboratory rover instrument arrived at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory on February 6, 2008. The Flight Model was shipped in August, 2010 for installation on the rover at JPL. ChemCam will use imaging and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) to determine rock and soil compositions on Mars, up to 9 meters from the rover. The engineering model is being integrated into the rover test bed for the development and testing of the rover software. The actual flight model components were concurrently assembled at Los Alamos and in Toulouse, France. The Mars Science Laboratory is scheduled to launch in 2011. Animations courtesy of JPL/NASA.

  1. ChemCam Rock Laser for the Mars Science Laboratory

    ScienceCinema

    LANL

    2009-09-01

    Los Alamos has a long history of space-related instr... Los Alamos has a long history of space-related instruments, tied primarily to its role in defense-related treaty verification. Space-based detectors have helped determine the differences between signals from lightning bolts and potential nuclear explosions. LANL-developed gamma-ray detection instruments first revealed the existence of what we now know as gamma-ray bursts, an exciting area of astrophysical research. And the use of LANL instruments on varied space missions continues with such products as the ChemCam rock laser for NASA, shown here. The Engineering Model of the ChemCam Mars Science Laboratory rover instrument arrived at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory on February 6, 2008. ChemCam will use imaging and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) to determine rock and soil compositions on Mars, up to 9 meters from the rover. The engineering model is being integrated into the rover test bed for the development and testing of the rover software. The actual flight model components are concurrently being assembled at Los Alamos and in Toulouse, France, and will be delivered to JPL in July. The Mars Science Laboratory is scheduled to launch in 2009. Animations courtesy of JPL/NASA.

  2. ChemCam Rock Laser for the Mars Science Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    LANL

    2008-03-24

    Los Alamos has a long history of space-related instr... Los Alamos has a long history of space-related instruments, tied primarily to its role in defense-related treaty verification. Space-based detectors have helped determine the differences between signals from lightning bolts and potential nuclear explosions. LANL-developed gamma-ray detection instruments first revealed the existence of what we now know as gamma-ray bursts, an exciting area of astrophysical research. And the use of LANL instruments on varied space missions continues with such products as the ChemCam rock laser for NASA, shown here. The Engineering Model of the ChemCam Mars Science Laboratory rover instrument arrived at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory on February 6, 2008. ChemCam will use imaging and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) to determine rock and soil compositions on Mars, up to 9 meters from the rover. The engineering model is being integrated into the rover test bed for the development and testing of the rover software. The actual flight model components are concurrently being assembled at Los Alamos and in Toulouse, France, and will be delivered to JPL in July. The Mars Science Laboratory is scheduled to launch in 2009. Animations courtesy of JPL/NASA.

  3. ChemCam rock laser for Mars Science Laboratory "Curiosity"

    SciTech Connect

    Wiens, Roger

    2010-09-03

    Los Alamos has a long history of space-related instruments, tied primarily to its role in defense-related treaty verification. Space-based detectors have helped determine the differences between signals from lightning bolts and potential nuclear explosions. LANL-developed gamma-ray detection instruments first revealed the existence of what we now know as gamma-ray bursts, an exciting area of astrophysical research. And the use of LANL instruments on varied space missions continues with such products as the ChemCam rock laser for NASA, shown here. The Engineering Model of the ChemCam Mars Science Laboratory rover instrument arrived at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory on February 6, 2008. The Flight Model was shipped in August, 2010 for installation on the rover at JPL. ChemCam will use imaging and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) to determine rock and soil compositions on Mars, up to 9 meters from the rover. The engineering model is being integrated into the rover test bed for the development and testing of the rover software. The actual flight model components were concurrently assembled at Los Alamos and in Toulouse, France. The Mars Science Laboratory is scheduled to launch in 2011. Animations courtesy of JPL/NASA.

  4. Rock fracture by ice segregation: linking laboratory modelling and rock slope erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murton, J.

    2009-04-01

    It has been unclear until recently if ice can fracture intact bedrock subject to natural freezing regimes, or whether it simply enlarges existing fractures or does both. This question is important, because if ice segregation in bedrock permafrost is widespread, then there may be considerable potential for significantly increased rock slope instability as ice-cemented discontinuities warm and active layers thicken. Laboratory modelling has now begun to elucidate the process of ice segregation in bedrock. Laboratory experiments indicate that moist, porous rock behaves remarkably like moist, frost-susceptible soil, with both substrates experiencing ice enrichment and fracture / fissuring of near-surface permafrost. It appears that significant concentrations of segregated ice are most likely in the transition zone between the active layer and the permafrost, as a result of downward migration of water in summer and upward advance of freezing at the beginning of the winter. Laboratory modelling indicates that given adequate water supply, ice segregation produces a zone of ice-bonded fractured bedrock immediately below the permafrost table. In general, the importance of ice segregation relative to in situ volume expansion increases with decreasing thermal gradients and increasing duration of freezing. Recent theoretical developments suggest that the maximum possible disjointing pressure is governed by the temperature depression below the bulk-melting point, even in the absence of large temperature gradients, and therefore slow ice segregation in bedrock may be possible at greater depths where the frozen permeability of rock limits the actual amount of heave produced. Thus, over long timescales, ice segregation may be highly significant in frozen steep bedrock slopes where the presence of ice-rich fractured bedrock may be critically important in releasing rock falls and rock slides during climate-induced warming and permafrost degradation. With recent climate warming

  5. Direct laboratory tensile testing of select yielding rock bolt systems

    SciTech Connect

    VandeKraats, J.D.; Watson, S.O.

    1996-08-01

    Yielding rock bolt support systems have been developed to accommodate ground movement in shifting ground such as in coal operations; in creeping ground such as salt, trona, and potash; and in swelling ground associated with some clays. These systems, designed to remain intact despite ground movement, should enhance mine safety and help contain costs in areas where rebolting of rigid non-yielding systems is typically required. Four such systems were tested in straight tensile pulls in the laboratory. They include the Slip Nut System from Dywidag Systems International USA, Inc., Ischebeck`s bolt mounted Titan Load Indicator, Rocky Mountain Bolt Company`s Yielding Cable Bolt, and a rock bolt installed variation of the yielding steel post developed by RE/SPEC Inc. The first two systems are currently marketed products and the latter two are prototype systems. Each system responds to load and displacement by yielding in an unique manner. All are designed to yield at predetermined loads. A description of each system and its yield function is provided. Each system was tested over its prescribed yield range in a test machine. At least five tests were performed on each system. Each system yielded and continued to provide support according to its design. Each shows promise for ground control use in shifting or creeping rock. This work helps to illustrate the comparative differences in performance between these specialized systems and the applications where they may be most useful.

  6. Laboratory and field testing of improved geothermal rock bits

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrickson, R.R.; Jones, A.H.; Winzenried, R.W.; Maish, A.B.

    1980-07-01

    The development and testing of 222 mm (8-3/4 inch) unsealed, insert type, medium hard formation, high-temperature bits are described. The new bits were fabricated by substituting improved materials in critical bit components. These materials were selected on bases of their high temperature properties, machinability, and heat treatment response. Program objectives required that both machining and heat treating could be accomplished with existing rock bit production equipment. Two types of experimental bits were subjected to laboratory air drilling tests at 250/sup 0/C (482/sup 0/F) in cast iron. These tests indicated field testing could be conducted without danger to the hole, and that bearing wear would be substantially reduced. Six additional experimental bits, and eight conventional bits were then subjected to air drilling a 240/sup 0/C (464/sup 0/F) in Francisan Graywacke at The Geysers, CA. The materials selected improved roller wear by 200%, friction-pin wear by 150%, and lug wear by 150%. Geysers drilling performances compared directly to conventional bits indicate that in-gage drilling life was increased by 70%. All bits at The Geysers are subjected to reaming out-of-gage hole prior to drilling. Under these conditions the experimental bits showed a 30% increase in usable hole over the conventional bits. These tests demonstrated a potential well cost reduction of 4 to 8%. Savings of 12% are considered possible with drilling procedures optimized for the experimental bits.

  7. Event triggered data acquisition in the Rock Mechanics Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, R.D.

    1993-03-01

    Increasing complexity of experiments coupled with limitations of the previously used computers required improvements in both hardware and software in the Rock Mechanics Laboratories. Increasing numbers of input channels and the need for better graphics could no longer be supplied by DATAVG, an existing software package for data acquisition and display written by D. J. Holcomb in 1983. After researching the market and trying several alternatives, no commercial program was found which met our needs. The previous version of DATAVG had the basic features needed but was tied to obsolete hardware. Memory limitations on the previously used PDP-11 made it impractical to upgrade the software further. With the advances in IBM compatible computers it is now desirable to use them as data recording platforms. With this information in mind, it was decided to write a new version of DATAVG which would take advantage of newer hardware. The new version had to support multiple graphic display windows and increased channel counts. It also had to be easier to use.

  8. The torsionally-excited CH{sub 3}-rocking band of CH{sub 3}OH - gateway to the OH bend?

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, R.M.

    1995-12-31

    Recently reported progress on the analysis of Fourier transform spectra of the O-18 and C-13 isotopomers of methanol has illuminated the torsion-rotation energy level structure of the in-plane CH{sub 3}-rocking and OH-bending modes. Extension of these insights to the parent CH{sub 3}OH isotopic species has permitted assignment of several subbands in the n=1 torsionally excited in-plane CH{sub 3}-rocking band of normal CH{sub 3}OH. The subband pattern is very similar to that of the C-13 species with a relatively small upward isotopic shift. One of the subbands identified is the K=2 subband of A torsional symmetry, which shows substantial asymmetry doubling. The splitting constants are very different in the ground and excited states, suggesting strong Fermi mixing between the n=1 CH{sub 3}-rocking state and the n=0 OH-bending state, as found previously for the O-18 and C-13 species. The Fermi mixing between modes is likely a principal reason that the low-resolution methanol spectrum shows no clear band structure in the region of the OH-bend but simply a broad, rather featureless peak which has been something of an enigma for a very long time. Analysis of the high-resolution CH{sub 3}OH spectrum in this region is also underway, and it is hoped that keys to the gateway will shortly be found in order to shine some light on the fertile spectroscopic pastures within.

  9. Laboratory measurements on reservoir rocks from The Geysers geothermal field

    SciTech Connect

    Boitnott, G.N.

    1995-01-26

    A suite of laboratory measurements have been conducted on Geysers metagraywacke and metashale recovered from a drilled depth of 2599 to 2602 meters in NEGU-17. The tests have been designed to constrain the mechanical and water-storage properties of the matrix material. Various measurements have been made at a variety of pressures and at varying degrees of saturation. Both compressional and shear velocities exhibit relatively little change with effective confining pressure. In all of the samples, water saturation causes an increase in the compressional velocity. In some samples, saturation results in a moderate decrease in shear velocity greater in magnitude than would be expected based on the slight increase in bulk density. It is found that the effect of saturation on the velocities can be quantitatively modeled through a modification of Biot-Gassmann theory to include weakening of the shear modulus with saturation. The decrease is attributed to chemo-mechanical weakening caused by the presence of water. The degree of frame weakening of the shear modulus is variable between samples, and appears correlated with petrographic features of the cores. Two related models are presented through which we can study the importance of saturation effects on field-scale velocity variations. The model results indicate that the saturation effects within the matrix are significant and may contribute to previously observed field anomalies. The results help to define ways in which we may be able to separate the effects of variations in rock properties, caused by phenomena such as degree of fracturing, from similar effects caused by variations in matrix saturation. The need for both compressional and shear velocity data in order to interpret field anomalies is illustrated through comparisons of model results with the field observations.

  10. Influence of Rock Fabric on Hydraulic Fracture Propagation: Laboratory Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanchits, S. A.; Desroches, J.; Burghardt, J.; Surdi, A.; Whitney, N.

    2014-12-01

    Massive hydraulic fracturing is required for commercial gas production from unconventional reservoirs. These reservoirs are often highly fractured and heterogeneous, which may cause significant fracture complexity and also arrest propagation of hydraulic fractures, leading to production decrease. One of the goals of our study was to investigate the influence of rock fabric features on near-wellbore fracture geometry and complexity. We performed a series of laboratory tests on Niobrara outcrop shale blocks with dimensions of 30 x 30 x 36 inches in a true-triaxial loading frame. Acoustic Emission (AE) technique was applied to monitor hydraulic fracture initiation and dynamics of fracture propagation. After the tests, the shape of the created hydraulic fracture was mapped by goniometry technique. To estimate fracture aperture, particles of different sizes were injected with fracturing fluid. In all tests, AE analysis indicated hydraulic fracture initiation prior to breakdown or the maximum of wellbore pressure. In most tests, AE analysis revealed asymmetrical hydraulic fracture shapes. Post-test analysis demonstrated good correspondence of AE results with the actual 3D shape of the fracture surface map. AE analysis confirmed that in some of these tests, the hydraulic fracture approached one face of the block before the maximum wellbore pressure had been reached. We have found that in such cases the propagation of hydraulic fracture in the opposite direction was arrested by the presence of mineralized interfaces. Mapping the distribution of injected particles confirmed the creation of a narrow-width aperture in the vicinity of pre-existing interfaces, restricting fracture conductivity. Based on the results of our study, we concluded that the presence of planes of weakness, such as mineralized natural fractures, can result in the arrest of hydraulic fracture propagation, or in poor fracture geometries with limited aperture, that in turn could lead to high net pressure

  11. Integrating the ChE Curriculum via a Recurring Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kubilius, Matthew B.; Tu, Raymond S.; Anderson, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    A recurring framework has been integrated throughout the curriculum via a Continuously Stirred Tank Reactor (CSTR) platform. This laboratory is introduced during the material and energy balance course, and subsequent courses can use these results when explaining more advanced concepts. Further, this laboratory gives students practical experience…

  12. A Novel Laboratory Course on Advanced ChE Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lauterbach, J.; White, S.; Liu, Z.; Bodner, G. M.; Delgass, W. N.

    1997-01-01

    Describes a novel approach to laboratory teaching that provides students with a learning environment which allows them to develop advanced experimental skills that are necessary for success in research and development environments. (DKM)

  13. Existing approaches to tight rock laboratory petrophysics: a critical review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konoshonkin, D. V.; Parnachev, S. V.

    2015-02-01

    A review of the existing methods for tight rock porosity, saturation, and permeability determination was performed taking into account that these methods should be applicable for Bazhenov formation evaluation. The following methods were considered: Archimedes mercury immersion; mercury displacement; caliper; helium pycnometry on crushed samples; nuclear magnetic resonance; modified retort method; modified Dean-Stark extraction; pulse decay method; and pressure decay test on crushed samples. The applicability of the pressure decay test on a crushed sample for Bazhenov formation evaluation is checked experimentally with the SMP-200 commercial permeameter. All the above listed methods were combined into five protocols for tight rock petrophysical evaluation. These protocols were analyzed and compared according to the following criteria: accuracy of the results; usage experience; time of measurements; easiness of interpretation; reliability and safety; price. The obtained results revealed that the most effective protocol is the one that includes pressure pulse on a core plug for permeability determination, He pycnometry and modified retort analysis on crushed samples for porosity and saturation determination. As there were cases when the proposed protocol was less effective vs. other protocols, a special scheme was suggested in order to choose the most effective protocol for tight rock petrophysical properties evaluation in definite conditions.

  14. Comparison of laboratory, in situ, and rock mass measurements of the hydraulic conductivity of metamorphic rock at the Savannah River Plant near Aiken, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Marine, I W

    1980-01-01

    In situ testing of exploratory wells in metamorphic rock indicates that two types of fracturing occur in the rock mass. Rock containing small openings that permit only extremely slow movement of water is termed virtually impermeable rock. Rock containing openings of sufficient size to permit transmission of water at a significantly faster rate is termed hydraulically transmissive rock. Laboratory methods are unsuitable for measuring hydraulic conductivity in hydraulically transmissive rock; however, for the virtually impermeable rock, values comparable to the in situ tests are obtained. The hydraulic conductivity of the rock mass over a large region is calculated by using the hydraulic gradient, porosity, and regional velocity. This velocity is determined by dividing the inferred travel distance by the age of water which is determined by the helium content of the water. This rock mass hydraulic conductivity value is between the values measured for the two types of fractures, but is closer to the measured value for the virtually impermeable rock. This relationship is attributed to the control of the regional flow rate by the virtually impermeable rock where the discrete fractures do not form a continuous open connection through the entire rock mass. Thus, laboratory methods of measuring permeability in metamorphic rock are of value if they are properly applied.

  15. Automated gas sampling system for laboratory analysis of CH4 and N2O

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Analyzing the flux of CH4 and N2O from soil is labor intensive when conventional hand injection techniques are utilized in gas chromatography. An automated gas sampling system was designed and assembled from a prototype developed at the National Soil Tilth Laboratory in Ames, Iowa. The sampler was e...

  16. The variation of the mechanical properties of rock on spatial scales from the laboratory to outcrop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gage, J.; Wang, H. F.; Fratta, D.; Maclaughlin, M.; Turner, A. L.; GEOX^TM

    2011-12-01

    We have installed a dense array of Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) strain and temperature sensors on the 4100'-level (1250 m) at the site of the former Homestake gold mine in Lead, SD. The sensor installation site is composed of the Precambrian Poorman formation that contains deformed and metamorphosed Precambrian sediments that is anisotropic including a well-developed foliation, quartz veins, and several joint sets. We have installed nine Micron Optics Inc. OS3600 tube gages. Four of these gages are mounted on the surface of the rock mass and attached to rock bolts that extend 2 m into the rock mass. The other five OS3600 sensors are embedded in drill holes into the rock mass. Additionally, we have developed a new method for measuring in situ strain and temperature in intact rock masses. Fiber optically instrumented rock strain and temperature strips (FROSTS) are 2 m-long strips of 304 stainless steel specially designed to measure temperature and both shortening and elongation in an intact rock mass. FROSTS have FBG strain and temperature sensors mounted on them at 30 cm interval and are grouted into a drill hole in a rock mass. In May 2011, we performed an active loading experiment that consisted of using two hydraulic rams to apply over 200 kN of force to the rock mass. Elastic strain was measured with the fiber optic sensor array. A one-dimensional Boussinesq solution calculates a Young's Modulus of 6.25 GPa for the rock mass. The laboratory-determined values for Young's Modulus in the Poorman formation vary between 49.6 and 94.5 GPa. The difference between the laboratory and field values can be attributed to the closing of fractures and microcracks in the rock mass making the rock mass more compliant than the smaller specimens used for the laboratory experiments. The results of the active loading experiment have implications for the up-scaling of rock mechanical properties between the laboratory and field scales.

  17. Laboratory detection of a new interstellar free radical CH2CN(2B1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saito, Shuji; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Irvine, W. M.; Ziurys, L. M.; Suzuki, Hiroko

    1988-01-01

    An asymmetric-top free radical CH2CN with a 2B1 ground state was detected by laboratory microwave spectroscopy. The radical was produced in a free-space absorption cell by a DC glow discharge in pure CH3CN gas. About 60 fine-structure components were observed for the N = 11-10 to 14-13 a-type rotational transitions in the frequency region of 220-260 GHz. Hyperfine resolved components for the N = 4-3 and 5-4 transitions were resolved in the 80 and 100 GHz regions, respectively. Molecular constants were determined and U100602 and U80484 from Sgr B2, and U40240 and U20120 from TMC-1 were assigned to the N = 5-4, 4-3, 2-1, and 1-0 transitions with K(-1) = 0 of the CH2CN radical.

  18. Geoengineering Research for a Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory in Sedimentary Rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauldon, M.

    2004-12-01

    A process to identify world-class research for a Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory (DUSEL) in the USA has been initiated by NSF. While allowing physicists to study, inter alia, dark matter and dark energy, this laboratory will create unprecedented opportunities for biologists to study deep life, geoscientists to study crustal processes and geoengineers to study the behavior of rock, fluids and underground cavities at depth, on time scales of decades. A substantial portion of the nation's future infrastructure is likely to be sited underground because of energy costs, urban crowding and vulnerability of critical surface facilities. Economic and safe development of subsurface space will require an improved ability to engineer the geologic environment. Because of the prevalence of sedimentary rock in the upper continental crust, much of this subterranean infrastructure will be hosted in sedimentary rock. Sedimentary rocks are fundamentally anisotropic due to lithology and bedding, and to discontinuities ranging from microcracks to faults. Fractures, faults and bedding planes create structural defects and hydraulic pathways over a wide range of scales. Through experimentation, observation and monitoring in a sedimentary rock DUSEL, in conjunction with high performance computational models and visualization tools, we will explore the mechanical and hydraulic characteristics of layered rock. DUSEL will permit long-term experiments on 100 m blocks of rock in situ, accessed via peripheral tunnels. Rock volumes will be loaded to failure and monitored for post-peak behavior. The response of large rock bodies to stress relief-driven, time-dependent strain will be monitored over decades. Large block experiments will be aimed at measurement of fluid flow and particle/colloid transport, in situ mining (incl. mining with microbes), remediation technologies, fracture enhancement for resource extraction and large scale long-term rock mass response to induced

  19. Laboratory measurement of orthogonally anisotropic and low permeability of a crystalline rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, M.; Takahashi, M.; Kaneko, K.

    2007-12-01

    Crystalline rocks such as granitic rocks are characteristic of anisotropic and low permeability. It is due to the distribution and connectivity of preexisting microcracks. In this study, hydraulic properties (hydraulic conductivity and specific storage) of granite was measured by transient pulse permeability test and then the relationship between the properties and microcrack distribution was analyzed based on stereology. The results showed that the hydraulic properties of the granite are strongly controlled by the geometry and distribution of microcracks. Laboratory measurements of hydraulic properties of low-permeability rocks need to be carefully conducted for precision. In general, transient pulse method suits low-permeability materials. Remarks on measuring hydraulic constants of rocks in laboratory are given and a modified analytical solution of the transient pulse method in consideration of the constituents of the test system are also introduced in the presentation. 3-D distribution of microcracks in crystalline rocks is difficult to be visualized even if micro-focus X-ray CT scanner is used. Therefore, the 3-D distribution of microcracks was reconstructed using microphotographs taken in three mutually perpendicular surfaces. Once the geometry and distribution of microcracks are estimated, the hydraulic conductivity tensor of the rock can be calculated.

  20. Rocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Alice

    This science unit is designed for limited- and non-English speaking students in a Chinese bilingual education program. The unit covers rock material, classification, characteristics of types of rocks, and rock cycles. It is written in Chinese and simple English. At the end of the unit there is a list of main terms in both English and Chinese, and…

  1. Laboratory measurements of seismic attenuation in partially saturated rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Samuel; Tisato, Nicola; Quintal, Beatriz; Holliger, Klaus

    2014-05-01

    Laboratory measurements of seismic attenuation and transient pore fluid pressure are performed on partially saturated Berea sandstone and synthetic borosilicate samples. Various degrees of water (liquid) and nitrogen (gas) saturation are considered. These measurements are carried out at room temperature and under confining pressures varying from ambient conditions up to 25 MPa. The cylindrical samples are 25 cm long and have a diameter of 7.6 cm. In the context of the experimental setup, the solid frames of both the Berea sandstone and the borosilicate samples can be considered homogenous, which in turn allows for isolating and exploring the effects of partial saturation on seismic attenuation. We employ the sub-resonance method, which is based on the application of a time-harmonic vertical stress to the top of the sample and the measurement of the thus resulting strain. For any given frequency, the attenuation is then inferred as the tangent of the phase shift between the applied stress and the observed strain. Using five equally spaced sensors along the central axis of the cylindrical sample, we measure the transient fluid pressure induced by the application of a step-function-type vertical stress to the top of the sample. Both the sensors and the sample are sealed off with the regard to the confining environment. Together with the numerical results from corresponding compressibility tests based on the quasi-static poroelastic equations, these transient fluid pressure measurements are then used to assist the interpretation of the seismic attenuation measurements.

  2. Infrared observations and laboratory simulations of interstellar CH_4_ and SO_2_.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boogert, A. C. A.; Schutte, W. A.; Helmich, F. P.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Wooden, D. H.

    1997-02-01

    Interstellar CH_4_ may consume a fair amount of the carbon budget in dense molecular clouds, but probably less than CO, CH_3_OH, and CO_2_. However, it can only be observed at wavelength regions in the infrared that are heavily affected by the earth atmosphere. With new space and airborne missions (e.g. ISO, SOFIA) in mind we have studied the near infrared absorption spectra of solid and gaseous CH_4_. We obtained laboratory spectra of the ν_4_ deformation mode (1302cm^-1^, 7.68μm) of solid CH_4_ in astrophysically relevant mixtures. We found that the peak position and width of this absorption band vary strongly as a function of molecular environment, compared to temperature and particle shape effects. Hence, observations of this feature will provide a powerful probe of the molecular composition of interstellar ices. Also the gas phase CH_4_ ro-vibrational spectrum of the same band has been calculated. Using observed physical conditions around the protostar W 33A, we show that unresolved gaseous CH_4_ lines are detectable (at the 2-5% level) at a resolution R>1000, when the column density N>=10^16^ cm^-2^. An astrophysically relevant molecule with a very strong transition in the same wavelength regime, is SO_2_. We studied the ν _3_ asymmetric stretching mode (1319 cm^-1^, 7.58 μm) of solid SO_2_ in several mixtures, revealing that the peak position, width and detailed profile of this band are very sensitive to the molecular environment. Besides probing the composition of ice mantles, observations of solid SO_2_ will provide important information on the sulfur budget locked up in grain mantles, which is currently poorly known. We compare the laboratory and calculated spectra of CH_4_ and SO_2_ with previously published ground based spectra and new airborne observations of young stellar objects in the 7-8μm region. W 33A, NGC 7538 : IRS1 and IRS9 show a feature near 7.68μm that is consistent with absorption by solid CH_4_ or the Q-branch of gaseous CH_4_. The

  3. Quantification of rock heterogeneities by structural geological field studies combined with laboratory analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyer, Dorothea; Afsar, Filiz; Philipp, Sonja

    2013-04-01

    Heterogeneous rock properties in terms of layering and complex infrastructure of fault zones are typical in sedimentary successions. The knowledge of in-situ mechanical rock properties is crucial for a better understanding of processes such as fracturing and fluid transport in fractured reservoirs. To estimate in situ rock properties at different depths it is important to understand how rocks from outcrops differ from rocks at depth, for example due to alteration and removal of the overburden load. We aim at quantifying these properties by performing structural geological field studies in outcrop analogues combined with laboratory analyses of outcrop samples and drill-cores. The field studies focus on 1) fault zone infrastructure and 2) host rock fracture systems in two different study areas with different lithologies, the North German and the Bristol Channel Basin. We analyse quantitatively the dimension, geometry, persistence and connectivity of fracture systems. The field studies are complemented by systematic sampling to obtain the parameters Young's modulus, compressive and tensile strengths and elastic strain energy (also referred to as destruction work) from which we estimate rock and fracture toughnesses. The results show that in rocks with distinctive layering fractures are often restricted to individual layers, that is, stratabound. The probability of arrest seems to depend on the stiffness contrast between two single layers as well as on the thickness of the softer layer. The results also show that there are clear differences between fault zones in the different lithologies in terms of damage zone thicknesses and fracture system parameters. The results of laboratory analyses show that the mechanical properties vary considerably and for many samples there are clear directional differences. That is, samples taken perpendicular to layering commonly have higher stiffnesses and strengths than those taken parallel to layering. We combine the results of

  4. The interactions of the bacterium Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34 with basalt rock, on Earth and in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byloos, Bo; Van Houdt, Rob; Leys, Natalie; Ilyin, Vyacheslav; Nicholson, Natasha; Childers, Delma; Cockell, Charles; Boon, Nico

    2016-07-01

    Microbe-mineral interactions have become of interest for space exploration as microorganisms can biomine elements from extra-terrestrial materials, which could be used as nutrients in a life support system. This research is aimed at identifying the molecular mechanisms behind the interaction of Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34 with basalt, a lunar-type rock, and determining the influence of space flight conditions on this interaction. Survival and physiology of CH34 was monitored, with and without basalt, in mineral water over several months by flow cytometry, plate counts, ICP-MS, microscopy and proteomics. To study the influence of space conditions, a flight experiment on board the Russian FOTON-M4 capsule was performed. The results obtained from from water survival experiments on ground showed that CH34 was able to survive in mineral water, in the absence and presence of basalt, for several months. The total cell concentration remained stable but the cultivable fraction dropped to 10%, indicating a transition to a more dormant state. In the presence of basalt, this transition was less pronounced and cultivability was enhanced. In addition, with basalt, CH34 attached to the rock surface and formed a biofilm. The space flight experiment indicated more viable and cultivable cells compared to the ground experiment, both in the absence and presence of basalt, indicating a positive effect of space flight on survival. Chemical analysis indicated that basalt leaches out elements which may contribute to a positive effect of basalt on survival. Basalt may thus enhance survival and viability of CH34 both in ground and space flight experimental conditions. This study hopefully can contribute to a better understanding of microbe-mineral interactions, opening the door to future applications, in space, and on Earth. Acknowledgments: This work is supported by the European Space Agency (ESA-PRODEX) and the Belgian Science Policy (Belspo) through the BIOROCK project. We thank Kai

  5. Recent high resolution laboratory determinations of line broadening and intensity parameters: PH3, CH3D, and CO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suarez, C. B.; Chackerian, C., Jr.; Valero, F. P. J.; Tarrago, G.

    1990-01-01

    Recent unpublished laboratory work on rovibrational line strengths and broadening coefficients which is of interest in the study of planetary atmospheres was reviewed. The molecules discussed are PH3, CH3D and CO2.

  6. Field and laboratory tests on risk of slope failure due to weathering of rock materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qureshi, M. U.; Towhata, I.; Yamada, S.; Aziz, M.

    2009-04-01

    Authors set out the challenge to explore the mechanism of rock weathering and its effects to the geotechnical hazards. Any natural or human induced disturbances to the natural slopes speed up their weathering process. So, exploration of both disturbed and undisturbed slopes is necessary for robust understanding. Various regions in Asia were explored to experience variety of environmental and climatic conditions. Field exploration on the thickness and in-situ mechanical property was carried out by performing seismic refraction surveys, dynamic cone penetration tests and Schmidt hammer tests at various sites in Japan and Pakistan. In laboratory change in mechanical property of soft rocks due to weathering has been observed and slake durability tests were conducted on various rocks. Field exploration indicated that the thickness of weathered layer is 1 meter or its roundabouts and having S-wave velocity of 200-300 m/s. Laboratory testing differentiated the slaking potential and mechanical property degradation of various rocks. Moreover sensible correlations had been observed in thickness calculated by seismic refraction or dynamic cone penetration in field. Slake durability index showed good correlation with Schmidt hammer hardness and mechanical property. A general agreement was also observed when strength and S-wave velocities from laboratory tests were compared with the field exploration. Authors believed that the study provides the useful information on the long term prediction and assessment of landslide risk.

  7. Real-time forecasting of sample failure in laboratory rock deformation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Andrew; Main, Ian; Atkinson, Malcolm; Filgueira, Rosa; Meredith, Philip; Boon, Steve

    2013-04-01

    The ability to accurately forecast catastrophic failure in rocks is likely to be a key component in reliable eruption forecasting models. The processes controlling the approach to failure produce highly non-linear behaviour, with a large stochastic component due to material heterogeneity. In the laboratory, mechanical, hydraulic, and rock physical properties are known to change in systematic ways prior to catastrophic failure. The effectiveness of such signals in real-time forecasting has never been tested before in a controlled laboratory setting; previous work has often been qualitative in nature, and subject to retrospective selection bias. Here we describe a collaborative experiment in real-time data assimilation to explore the limits of predictability of rock failure in a best-case scenario. Data are streamed from a remote rock deformation laboratory to a user-friendly portal, where several proposed physical/stochastic models can be analyzed in parallel in real time, using a variety of statistical fitting techniques, including least squares regression, maximum likelihood fitting, Markov-chain Monte-Carlo and Bayesian analysis. The results are posted and regularly updated on the web site prior to catastrophic failure, to ensure a true and verifiable prospective test of forecasting power.

  8. Reconstruction of multistage massive rock slope failure: Polymethodical approach in Lake Oeschinen (CH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, Sibylle; Gilli, Adrian; Anselmetti, Flavio S.; Hajdas, Irka

    2016-04-01

    Lateglacial and Holocene rock-slope failures occur often as multistage failures where paraglacial adjustment and stress adaptation are hypothesised to control stages of detachment. However, we have only limited datasets to reconstruct detailed stages of large multistage rock-slope failures, and still aim at improving our models in terms of geohazard assessment. Here we use lake sediments, well-established for paleoclimate and paleoseismological reconstruction, with a focus on the reconstruction of rock-slope failures. We present a unique inventory from Lake Oeschinen (Bernese Alps, Switzerland) covering about 2.4 kyrs of rock-slope failure history. The lake sediments have been analysed using sediment-core analysis, radiocarbon dating and seismic-to-core and core-to-core correlations, and these were linked to historical and meteorological records. The results imply that the lake is significantly younger than the ~9 kyrs old Kandersteg rock avalanche (Tinner et al., 2005) and shows multiple rock-slope failures, two of which could be C14-dated. Several events detached from the same area potentially initiated by prehistoric earthquakes (Monecke et al., 2006) and later from stress relaxation processes. The data imply unexpected short recurrence rates that can be related to certain detachment scarps and also help to understand the generation of a historical lake-outburst flood. Here we show how polymethodical analysis of lake sediments can help to decipher massive multistage rock-slope failure. References Monecke, K., Anselmetti, F.S., Becker, A., Schnellmann, M., Sturm, M., Giardini, D., 2006. Earthquake-induced deformation structures in lake deposits: A Late Pleistocene to Holocene paleoseismic record for Central Switzerland. Eclogae Geologicae Helvetiae, 99(3), 343-362. Tinner, W., Kaltenrieder, P., Soom, M., Zwahlen, P., Schmidhalter, M., Boschetti, A., Schlüchter, C., 2005. Der nacheiszeitliche Bergsturz im Kandertal (Schweiz): Alter und Auswirkungen auf die

  9. Ancient microbial activity recorded in fracture fillings from granitic rocks (Äspö Hard Rock Laboratory, Sweden).

    PubMed

    Heim, C; Lausmaa, J; Sjövall, P; Toporski, J; Dieing, T; Simon, K; Hansen, B T; Kronz, A; Arp, G; Reitner, J; Thiel, V

    2012-07-01

    Fracture minerals within the 1.8-Ga-old Äspö Diorite (Sweden) were investigated for fossil traces of subterranean microbial activity. To track the potential organic and inorganic biosignatures, an approach combining complementary analytical techniques of high lateral resolution was applied to drill core material obtained at -450 m depth in the Äspö Hard Rock Laboratory. This approach included polarization microscopy, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS), confocal Raman microscopy, electron microprobe (EMP) and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). The fracture mineral succession, consisting of fluorite and low-temperature calcite, showed a thin (20-100 μm), dark amorphous layer lining the boundary between the two phases. Microscopic investigations of the amorphous layer revealed corrosion marks and, in places, branched tubular structures within the fluorite. Geochemical analysis showed significant accumulations of Si, Al, Mg, Fe and the light rare earth elements (REE) in the amorphous layer. In the same area, ToF-SIMS imaging revealed abundant, partly functionalized organic moieties, for example, C(x)H(y)⁺, C(x)H(y)N⁺, C(x)H(y)O⁺. The presence of such functionalized organic compounds was corroborated by Raman imaging showing bands characteristic of C-C, C-N and C-O bonds. According to its organic nature and the abundance of relatively unstable N- and O- heterocompounds, the organic-rich amorphous layer is interpreted to represent the remains of a microbial biofilm that established much later than the initial cooling of the Precambrian host rock. Indeed, δ¹³C, δ¹⁸O and ⁸⁷Sr/⁸⁶Sr isotope data of the fracture minerals and the host rock point to an association with a fracture reactivation event in the most recent geological past. PMID:22506979

  10. Laboratory Detection and Analysis of Organic Compounds in Rocks Using HPLC and XRD Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dragoi, D.; Kanik, I.; Bar-Cohen, Y.; Sherrit, S.; Tsapin, A.; Kulleck, J.

    2004-01-01

    In this work we describe an analytical method for determining the presence of organic compounds in rocks, limestone, and other composite materials. Our preliminary laboratory experiments on different rocks/limestone show that the organic component in mineralogical matrices is a minor phase on order of hundreds of ppm and can be better detected using high precision liquid chromatography (HPLC). The matrix, which is the major phase, plays an important role in embedding and protecting the organic molecules from the harsh Martian environment. Some rocks bear significant amounts of amino acids therefore, it is possible to identify these phases using powder x-ray diffraction (XRD) by crystallizing the organic. The method of detection/analysis of organics, in particular amino acids, that have been associated with life will be shown in the next section.

  11. Laboratory detection of a new interstellar free radical CH2CN(2B1).

    PubMed

    Saito, S; Yamamoto, S; Irvine, W M; Ziurys, L M; Suzuki, H; Ohishi, M; Kaifu, N

    1988-11-15

    An asymmetric-top free radical CH2CN, which as a 2B1 ground state, was detected for the first time by laboratory microwave spectroscopy. The radical was produced in a free-space absorption cell by a DC glow discharge in pure CH3CN gas. About 60 fine-structure components were observed for the N = 11-10 to 14-13 a-type rotational transitions in the frequency region of 220-260 GHz, and many hyperfine resolved components for the N = 4-3 and 5-4 transitions in the 80 and 100 GHz regions, respectively. The molecular constants, including the rotational constants, centrifugal distortion constants, and spin-rotation coupling constants with centrifugal distortion correction terms were determined from the fine-structure resolved transitions, and the hyperfine coupling constants due to the hydrogen and nitrogen nuclei were obtained from the low-N transitions. As a result we assigned U100602 and U80484 from Sgr B2, and U40240 and U20120 from TMC-1, to the N = 5-4, 4-3, 2-1, and 1-0 transitions with K-1 = 0 of the CH2CN radical. PMID:11538464

  12. Pore-space alteration in source rock (shales) during hydrocarbons generation: laboratory experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giliazetdinova, D. R.; Korost, D. V.; Nadezhkin, D. V.

    2013-12-01

    Hydrocarbons (HC) are generated from solid organic matter (kerogen) due to thermocatalytic reactions. The rate of such reactions shows direct correlation with temperature and depends on the depth of source rock burial. Burial of sedimentary rock is also inevitably accompanied by its structural alteration owing to compaction, dehydration and re-crystallization. Processes of HC generation, primary migration and structural changes are inaccessible for direct observation in nature, but they can be studied in laboratory experiments. Experiment was carried out with a clayey-carbonate rock sample of the Domanik Horizon taken from boreholes drilled in the northeastern part of the south Tatar arch. The rock chosen fits the very essential requirements - high organic matter content and its low metamorphic grade. Our work aimed at laboratory modeling of HC generation in an undisturbed rock sample by its heating in nitrogen atmosphere based on a specified temperature regime and monitoring alterations in the pore space structure. Observations were carried out with a SkyScan-1172 X-ray microtomography scanner (resulting scan resolution of 1 μm). A cylinder, 44 mm in diameter, was prepared from the rock sample for the pyrolitic and microtomographic analyses. Scanning procedures were carried out in 5 runs. Temperature interval for each run had to match the most important stage of HC generation in the source rock, namely: (1) original structure; (2) 100-300°C - discharge of free and adsorbed HC and water; (3) 300-400°C - initial stage of HC formation owing to high-temperature pyrolysis of the solid organic matter and discharge of the chemically bound water; (4) 400-470°C - temperature interval fitting the most intense stage of HC formation; (5) 470-510°C - final stage of HC formation. Maximum sample heating in the experiment was determined as temperature of the onset of active decomposition of carbonates, i.e., in essence, irreversible metamorphism of the rock. Additional

  13. Experiments in a Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory (DUSEL) Hosted in Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burbey, T. J.; Kimballton, M. O.; Science Team

    2004-12-01

    Sedimentary-rock environments, particularly those dominated by carbonate rock, provide unique opportunities for geoscientists, geobiologists, and geophysicists, to perform revolutionary experiments aimed at answering fundamental science questions and satisfying our societal demands for resources and environmental stewardship. As part of the National Science Foundation's DUSEL initiative, the selected site should offer structurally and biologically diverse environments. At the same time, the site should offer host rock capable of providing safely engineered hallways and laboratories at depths as great as 2,200 m for numerous deep underground physics, engineering, and earth science experiments. An ideal sedimentary-rock environment offers the prospect of highly folded, thrusted, and fractured rocks that allow opportunities to study the 3-D behavior of thrusts that propagate parallel to bedding as well as those that ramp across bedding. Flow dynamics along and across deeply buried faults is poorly understood. Experiments will be developed at various scales to assess flow and transport processes to better quantify hydrogeological mechanisms influencing flow and possible aquifer compartmentalization. Seismic reflection images, vertical seismic profiles, and tomograms will provide details of the fault properties and geometry, which can be verified in-situ. Repeated overthrusted sequences provide opportunities for geobiologists to investigate how microbes in rocks of similar age are affected by differences in pressure, temperature, and depth. Carbonate rocks provide opportunities to study energy sources and adaptations for nutrient acquisition, reproduction, stability, survival, and repair under extreme conditions. Results from these investigations will permit comparisons with other foreland fold-thrust belts worldwide. Fossil fuels remain the world's main energy resource and the large majority of these are hosted in sedimentary rocks. Improved methods for reservoir

  14. Monitoring and Analysis of Transient Pore Water Pressures in Large Suspended Rock Slides near Poschiavo, CH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Palézieux, Larissa; Loew, Simon; Zwahlen, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Many mountain slopes in the Alps exhibit large compound rock slides or Deep Seated Gravitational Slope Deformations. Due to the basal rupture plane geometry and the cumulative displacement magnitude such landslide bodies are often strongly deformed, highly fractured and - at least locally - very permeable. This can lead to high infiltration rates and low phreatic groundwater tables. This is also the situation in the studied mountain slopes southwest of Poschiavo, where large suspended rockslides occur, with very little surface runoff at high elevations, and torrents developing only at the elevation of the basal rupture planes. Below the landslide toes, at altitudes below ca. 1700 m a.s.l., groundwater appears forming spring lines or distributed spring clusters. Within the scope of the design of a hydropower pump storage plant in the Poschiavo valley by Lagobianco SA (Repower AG), numerous cored and deep boreholes (of 50 to 300 m depth) have been drilled along the planned pressure tunnel alignement at elevations ranging from 963 to 2538 m a.s.l. in the years 2010 and 2012. In several boreholes Lugeon and transient pressure tests were executed and pore water pressure sensors installed in short monitoring sections at various depths. Most of these boreholes intersect deep rockslides in crystalline rocks and limestones, showing highly fragmented rock masses and cohesionless cataclastic shear zones of several tens of meters thickness. This study explores these borehole observations in landslides and adjacent stable slopes and links them to the general hydrologic and hydrogeologic framework. The analysis of the pore water pressure data shows significant variability in seasonal trends and short-term events (from snow melt and summer rain storms) and remarkable pressure differences over short horizontal and vertical distances. This reflects rock mass damage within landslide bodies and important sealing horizons at their base. Based on water balances, the estimated effective

  15. Diffusivity and porosity in rock matrix-laboratory methods using artificial and natural tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Valkiainen, M.; Olin, M.; Uusheimo, K.; Kumpulainen, H.; Lehikoinene, J.; Muurinen, A.

    1993-12-31

    The nature of diffusivity and porosity in crystalline rock was studied by electrical conductivity measurements, steady-state diffusion experiments, saturation-leaching of tracers with cylindrical rock samples and analysis of the concentrations of different elements from core samples or pore water near fractures. The phenomena of main interest were dead-end porosity, ion-exclusion, sorption, and the continuity of pore networks. The modelling of experimental results was based on a modified Fick`s second law for diffusion, which was solved either by analytical or numerical methods. The measured D{sub e} and {epsilon} were found to statistically follow an exponential presentation: Archie`s law. The existence of ion-exclusion for anions was confirmed. The connectivity of the pore network extended in the laboratory experiments at least six centimetres, in coarse of the pore network extended in the laboratory experiments at least six centimetres, in coarse-grained granite in nature several metres but in fine-grained rock samples of a uranium deposit the element mobilization effects could be seen only to the depth of 2-3 centimetres.

  16. Mont Terri Underground Rock Laboratory, Switzerland-Research Program And Key Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nussbaum, C. O.; Bossart, P. J.

    2012-12-01

    Argillaceous formations generally act as aquitards because of their low hydraulic conductivities. This property, together with the large retention capacity of clays for cationic contaminants and the potential for self-sealing, has brought clay formations into focus as potential host rocks for the geological disposal of radioactive waste. Excavated in the Opalinus Clay formation, the Mont Terri underground rock laboratory in the Jura Mountains of NW Switzerland is an important international test site for researching clay formations. Research is carried out in the underground facility, which is located adjacent to the security gallery of the Mont Terri motorway tunnel. Fifteen partners from European countries, USA, Canada and Japan participate in the project. The objectives of the research program are to analyze the hydrogeological, geochemical and rock mechanical properties of the Opalinus Clay, to determine the changes induced by the excavation of galleries and by heating of the rock formation, to test sealing and container emplacement techniques and to evaluate and improve suitable investigation techniques. For the safety of deep geological disposal, it is of key importance to understand the processes occurring in the undisturbed argillaceous environment, as well as the processes in a disturbed system, during the operation of the repository. The objectives are related to: 1. Understanding processes and mechanisms in undisturbed clays and 2. Experiments related to repository-induced perturbations. Experiments of the first group are dedicated to: i) Improvement of drilling and excavation technologies and sampling methods; ii) Estimation of hydrogeological, rock mechanical and geochemical parameters of the undisturbed Opalinus Clay. Upscaling of parameters from laboratory to in situ scale; iii) Geochemistry of porewater and natural gases; evolution of porewater over time scales; iv) Assessment of long-term hydraulic transients associated with erosion and thermal

  17. A versatile facility for laboratory studies of viscoelastic and poroelastic behaviour of rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Ian; Schijns, Heather; Schmitt, Douglas R.; Mu Junjie; Delmenico, Alison

    2011-06-15

    Novel laboratory equipment has been modified to allow both torsional and flexural oscillation measurements at sub-microstrain amplitudes, thereby providing seismic-frequency constraints on both the shear and compressional wave properties of cylindrical rock specimens within the linear regime. The new flexural mode capability has been tested on experimental assemblies containing fused silica control specimens. Close consistency between the experimental data and the results of numerical modelling with both finite-difference and finite-element methods demonstrates the viability of the new technique. The capability to perform such measurements under conditions of independently controlled confining and pore-fluid pressure, with emerging strategies for distinguishing between local (squirt) and global (specimen-wide) fluid flow, will have particular application to the study of frequency-dependent seismic properties expected of cracked and fluid-saturated rocks of the Earth's upper crust.

  18. A versatile facility for laboratory studies of viscoelastic and poroelastic behaviour of rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Ian; Schijns, Heather; Schmitt, Douglas R.; Mu, Junjie; Delmenico, Alison

    2011-06-01

    Novel laboratory equipment has been modified to allow both torsional and flexural oscillation measurements at sub-microstrain amplitudes, thereby providing seismic-frequency constraints on both the shear and compressional wave properties of cylindrical rock specimens within the linear regime. The new flexural mode capability has been tested on experimental assemblies containing fused silica control specimens. Close consistency between the experimental data and the results of numerical modelling with both finite-difference and finite-element methods demonstrates the viability of the new technique. The capability to perform such measurements under conditions of independently controlled confining and pore-fluid pressure, with emerging strategies for distinguishing between local (squirt) and global (specimen-wide) fluid flow, will have particular application to the study of frequency-dependent seismic properties expected of cracked and fluid-saturated rocks of the Earth's upper crust.

  19. A versatile facility for laboratory studies of viscoelastic and poroelastic behaviour of rocks.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Ian; Schijns, Heather; Schmitt, Douglas R; Mu, Junjie; Delmenico, Alison

    2011-06-01

    Novel laboratory equipment has been modified to allow both torsional and flexural oscillation measurements at sub-microstrain amplitudes, thereby providing seismic-frequency constraints on both the shear and compressional wave properties of cylindrical rock specimens within the linear regime. The new flexural mode capability has been tested on experimental assemblies containing fused silica control specimens. Close consistency between the experimental data and the results of numerical modelling with both finite-difference and finite-element methods demonstrates the viability of the new technique. The capability to perform such measurements under conditions of independently controlled confining and pore-fluid pressure, with emerging strategies for distinguishing between local (squirt) and global (specimen-wide) fluid flow, will have particular application to the study of frequency-dependent seismic properties expected of cracked and fluid-saturated rocks of the Earth's upper crust. PMID:21721712

  20. Numerical Simulation of Rock Fracturing under Laboratory True-Triaxial Stress Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghofrani Tabari, Mehdi; Hazzard, Jim; Young, R. Paul

    2016-04-01

    A True-triaxial test (TTT) also known as polyaxial test was carried out on saturated Fontainebleau sandstone to elevate our knowledge about the role of the intermediate principal stress on deformation, fracturing and failure patterns of the rock using acoustic emission (AE) monitoring. The induced AE activities were studied by location of the AE events and mapping them on the captured features in the post-mortem CT scan images of the failed sample. The time-lapse monitoring of the velocity structure and AE activity in the sample portrayed a deformational path which led to propagation of fractures and formation of failure patterns in the rock. Having these experimental results, we aimed at running a numerical model of our true-triaxial testing system using an Itasca software based on three-dimensional explicit finite-difference method called FLAC3D. The loads were applied at the end of each platen while the steel platens transferred the stress to the surface of the cubic specimen. In order to simulate the failure, randomly distributed strength demonstrated by Mohr-Columb failure criterion was implemented in the spatial elements of the model representing the random distribution of the micro-cracks. During the experiment, pseudo-boundary surfaces were formed along the minimum and intermediate principal stress axes in the rock due to non-uniform distribution of stress as a result of geometrical constraints including the corner effects and friction on the platen-rock surfaces. Both the real AE data as well as the numerical simulation verified that coalescence of micro-cracks mainly occurred around these pseudo-boundaries with highest stress gradients as well as highest velocity gradients in the rock specimen and formed curvi-planar fractures. The rock specimen strength and brittleness in the macro-scale was also obtained from the stress-strain curve which was consistent with the experimental laboratory measurements. Eventually, the failure of the rock specimen was

  1. Laboratory measurements of p-wave seismic Q on lunar and analog rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tittmann, B. R.; Nadler, H.; Richardson, J. M.; Ahlberg, L.

    1978-01-01

    The longitudinal-wave, internal friction quality factor (Qp) of out-gassed rock subjected to hydrostatic confining pressure was measured by a technique of aerodynamically shaping the sample ends to remove most of the air drag. Q values of about 1000 and 100 were obtained at 100 MPa and in laboratory air, respectively. The temperature dependence of Q in lunar rock 70215.85 and an analog of lunar basalt was investigated over the range -100 to 450 deg C. A systematic increase in Q was observed at 50 Hz, 5 kHz and 50 kHz. When the temperature was lowered to -100 deg C moderate decreases in Q were observed from 100 to 250 deg C, and high Q values were obtained at 450 deg C. The temperature and pressure dependences of Q suggest that high lunar seismic Q values imply a very dry crust to depths of at least 50 km. These results further indicate that elastic waves are damped in volatile-rich rock by an absorption mechanism which involves changes in the bonding, structure and coverage of the molecular, physisorbed and chemisorbed H2O at crack and grain boundaries.

  2. Double-porosity rock model and squirt flow in the laboratory frequency band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ba, Jing; Cao, Hong; Yao, Fengchang; Nie, Jianxin; Yang, Huizhu

    2008-12-01

    Biot theory research has been extended to the multi-scale heterogeneity in actual rocks. Focused on laboratory frequency bandwidth studies, we discuss the relationships between double-porosity and BISQ wave equations, analytically derive the degeneration method for double-porosity’s return to BISQ, and give three necessary conditions which the degeneration must satisfy. By introducing dynamic permeability and tortuosity theory, a full set of dynamic double-porosity wave equations are derived. A narrow band approximation is made to simplify the numerical simulation for dynamic double-porosity wavefields. Finally, the pseudo-spectral method is used for wave simulation within the laboratory frequency band (50 kHz). Numerical results have proved the feasibility for dynamic double-porosity’s description of squirt flow and the validity of the quasi-static approximation method.

  3. Analysis of the hydraulic data from the MI fracture zone at the Grimsel Rock Laboratory, Switzerland

    SciTech Connect

    Davey, A.; Karasaki, K.; Long, J.C.S.; Landsfeld, M.; Mensch, A.; Martel, S.J.

    1989-10-01

    One of the major problems in analyzing flow and transport in fractured rock is that the flow may be largely confined to a poorly connected network of fractures. In order to overcome some of this problem, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) has been developing a new type of fracture hydrology model called an equivalent discontinuum model. In this model the authors represent the discontinuous nature of the problem through flow on a partially filled lattice. A key component in constructing an equivalent discontinuum model from this lattice is removing some of the conductive elements such that the system is partially connected in the same manner as the fracture network. This is done through a statistical inverse technique called simulated annealing. The fracture network model is annealed by continually modifying a base model, or template such that the modified systems behave more and more like the observed system. In order to see how the simulated annealing algorithm works, the authors have developed a series of synthetic real cases. In these cases, the real system is completely known so that the results of annealing to steady state data can be evaluated absolutely. The effect of the starting configuration has been studied by varying the percent of conducting elements in the initial configuration. Results have shown that the final configurations converge to about the same percentage of conducting elements. An example using Nagra field data from the Migration Experiment (MI) at Grimsel Rock Laboratory in Switzerland is also analyzed. 24 refs., 33 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Laboratory study of CH4-N2 clathrate hydrates applied to Titan's surface conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nna Mvondo, D.; Tobie, G.; Le Menn, E.; Bollengier, O.; Grasset, O.

    2013-12-01

    It is proposed that clathrate hydrates may be present at the surface of Titan (Choukroun et al., 2013, 2010). At Titan's surface pressure, pure methane and ethane hydrate (as well as other guests) could exist in the sI structure and nitrogen hydrate as sII structure. The large reservoir of several guest compounds in Titan's atmosphere is expected to result in the formation of multicomponent (compound) clathrate hydrates, as sII or sH structures, stable relative to water ice on the surface of Titan, and with faster expected growth kinetics relative to pure hydrate (Osegovic et al., 2005). Compound hydrate could be a likely sink for many chemicals occurring on Titan's surface. We note that experimental studies on the formation and thermodynamics of the methane-water system, at low and high pressures applied to Titan have been carried out (Lunine and Stevenson; 1985; Choukroun et al., 2013, 2010 and references therein). However, laboratory work on mixing of methane with other compounds in the clathrate phase (ethane, N2, CO2, etc...) applied to Titan conditions (and other icy moons) has still to be addressed. In this context, we have studied the formation and spectral signatures of CH4-N2 clathrate hydrates at temperature and pressure conditions relevant for Titan's surface. Clathrate hydrates samples have been synthesized in an autoclave combined with a cooling system and a multi-gas mixer. Few ml of deionized water was introduced in the autoclave and pressurized with the N2 and CH4 gaseous species for a couple of days, at controlled low temperature and low pressure of the formation and stability of clathrate hydrates. Their formation has been monitored by gas chromatography. Their spectral characterization at low temperature was performed by infrared (FTIR) reflectance spectroscopy. Raman spectroscopy was also used to give constraints on the composition, structure and cage occupancy of the formed clathrates. Here we present the results obtained for different mixing

  5. E. coli RS2GFP Retention Mechanisms in Laboratory-Scale Fractured Rocks: A Statistical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, S. N.; Qu, J.; Dickson, S. E.

    2011-12-01

    With billions of gallons of groundwater being withdrawn every day in the US and Canada, it is imperative to understand the mechanisms which jeopardize this resource and the health of those who rely on it. Porous media aquifers have typically been considered to provide significant filtration of particulate matter (e.g. microorganisms), while the fractures in fractured rock aquifers and aquitards are considered to act as contaminant highways allowing a large fraction of pathogens to travel deep into an aquifer relatively quickly. Recent research results indicate that fractured rocks filter out more particulates than typically believed. The goal of the research presented here is to quantify the number of E. coli RS2GFP retained in a single, saturated, laboratory-scale fracture, and to relate the retention of E. coli RS2GFP to the aperture field characteristics and groundwater flow rate. To achieve this goal, physical experiments were conducted at the laboratory-scale to quantify the retention of E. coli RS2GFP through several single, saturated, dolomitic limestone fractures under a range of flow rates. These fractures were also cast with a transparent epoxy in order to visualize the transport mechanisms in the various different aperture fields. The E. coli RS2GFP is tagged with a green-fluorescent protein (GFP) that is used to obtain visualization data when excited by ultraviolet light. A series of experiments was conducted, each of which involved the release of a known number of E. coli RS2GFP at the upstream end of the fracture and measuring the effluent concentration profile. These experiments were conducted using both the natural rock and transparent cast of several different aperture fields, under a range of flow rates. The effects of different aperture field characteristics and flow rates on the retention of E. coli RS2GFP will be determined by conducting a statistical analysis of the retention data under different experimental conditions. The images captured

  6. Correlation of pre-earthquake electromagnetic signals with laboratory and field rock experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleier, T.; Dunson, C.; Alvarez, C.; Freund, F.; Dahlgren, R.

    2010-09-01

    Analysis of the 2007 M5.4 Alum Rock earthquake near San José California showed that magnetic pulsations were present in large numbers and with significant amplitudes during the 2 week period leading up the event. These pulsations were 1-30 s in duration, had unusual polarities (many with only positive or only negative polarities versus both polarities), and were different than other pulsations observed over 2 years of data in that the pulse sequence was sustained over a 2 week period prior to the quake, and then disappeared shortly after the quake. A search for the underlying physics process that might explain these pulses was was undertaken, and one theory (Freund, 2002) demonstrated that charge carriers were released when various types of rocks were stressed in a laboratory environment. It was also significant that the observed charge carrier generation was transient, and resulted in pulsating current patterns. In an attempt to determine if this phenomenon occurred outside of the laboratory environment, the authors scaled up the physics experiment from a relatively small rock sample in a dry laboratory setting, to a large 7 metric tonne boulder comprised of Yosemite granite. This boulder was located in a natural, humid (above ground) setting at Bass Lake, Ca. The boulder was instrumented with two Zonge Engineering, Model ANT4 induction type magnetometers, two Trifield Air Ion Counters, a surface charge detector, a geophone, a Bruker Model EM27 Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR) spectrometer with Sterling cycle cooler, and various temperature sensors. The boulder was stressed over about 8 h using expanding concrete (Bustartm), until it fractured into three major pieces. The recorded data showed surface charge build up, magnetic pulsations, impulsive air conductivity changes, and acoustical cues starting about 5 h before the boulder actually broke. These magnetic and air conductivity pulse signatures resembled both the laboratory rock stressing results and the 30

  7. Microstructure and porosity of Opalinus Clay at the Mont Terri rock laboratory (Switzerland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houben, M. E.; Laurich, B.; Desbois, G.; Urai, J. L.

    2012-04-01

    The Mont Terri rock laboratory (Canton Jura, Switzerland) is an international scientific platform of research on radioactive waste disposal in Opalinus Clay and results provide input for assessing the feasibility and safety of deep geological disposal of radioactive waste in argillaceous formations [1]. A main safety issue is to accurately investigate mass transport rates. To date several methods analyzed bulk permeability and porosity of Opalinus Clay. However, detailed quantitative investigation of microstructure and pore morphology is necessary to understand sealing capacity, coupled flow, capillary processes and associated deformation. To produce high quality cross-sections without microstructural damage that enable investigation of microstructure and porosity down the nm scale a combination of Broad Ion Beam (BIB) milling and SEM imaging has been used [2]. This method allowed direct imaging of the clay fabric and porosity on ca. 1 mm2 areas. The lateral variability of Opalinus Clay is low on the regional scale [1], whereas vertically the Opalinus Clay can be subdivided into six different lithological subfacies [3] based on variable silt layers, sandstone layers and siderite concretions present, where the end-members are the Shaly and Sandy facies. In this contribution microstructures and pore space in Opalinus Clay from the undisturbed Shaly and Sandy facies are studied and compared to disturbed samples from the "Main fault" within the Mont Terri rock laboratory. The Shaly facies in the lower half of the sequence constitutes of dark grey silty calcerous shales and argillaceous marls, whereas the Sandy facies comprises silty to sandy marls with sandstone lenses cemented with carbonate [3]. The qualitative mineralogical composition of all Opalinus Clay facies is similar, whereas the "Main Fault" shows calcite, celestite and pyrite veins. Although the overall microfabric differs per layer and per facies we observe low variability of microstructure and porosity in

  8. Calcite fracture fillings as indicators of paleohydrology at the Aspo Hard Rock Laboratory, Sweden

    SciTech Connect

    Wallin, B.; Peterman, Z.

    1995-12-01

    Isotopic compositions of carbon ({delta}{sup 13}C), oxygen ({delta}{sup 16}O) strontium ({delta}{sup 87}Sr) in calcite fracture fillings are being used to reconstruct the source and evolution of the groundwater at Aespoe and Laxemar, at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (AEHRL), south-eastern Sweden. These calcites precipitated from groundwater in the fractured crystalline rocks at some time in the past, and {delta}{sup 13}C, {delta}{sup 18}O and {delta}{sup 87}Sr values of the calcites reflect those of the source waters. The fracture fillings mark the pathways of past fluid movement so an understanding of their genesis is particularly important for understanding the paleohydrology in the area. The utility in applying the multiple-isotope approach to groundwater and fracture minerals derives from the fact that the different systems represent different processes. Studies of the groundwater chemistry suggest a very complicated history, however, the isotope data demonstrate that it is possible to postulate mixing of different groundwater members to explain the isotopic systematics of the calcite fracture fillings at Aespoe and Laxemar.

  9. Laboratory determination of mechanical properties of rocks from the Parcperdue geopressured/geothermal site

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, K.P.; Borschel, T.F.; Holland, M.T.; Schatz, J.F.; Bebout, D.G.; Bachman, A.L.

    1981-01-01

    The deformational behavior and fluid flow characteristics of rock samples obtained from DOW/DOE L.R. Sweezy No. 1 Test Well at the Parcperdue Geopressured/Geothermal Site have been investigated in the laboratory. Elastic moduli, compressibility, uniaxial compaction coefficient, strength, creep parameters, permeability, acoustic velocites (all at reservoir conditions) and changes in these quantities induced by simulated reservoir production have been obtained from tests on several sandstone and shale samples from different depths. Tests consisting of several hydrostatic and triaxial loading phases and pore pressure reduction were designed to provide measurements to be used for calculating several of the above mentioned parameters in a single test. Pore volume changes were measured during some phases of the tests.

  10. A transient laboratory method for determining the hydraulic properties of 'tight' rocks-I. Theory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hsieh, P.A.; Tracy, J.V.; Neuzil, C.E.; Bredehoeft, J.D.; Silliman, S.E.

    1981-01-01

    Transient pulse testing has been employed increasingly in the laboratory to measure the hydraulic properties of rock samples with low permeability. Several investigators have proposed a mathematical model in terms of an initial-boundary value problem to describe fluid flow in a transient pulse test. However, the solution of this problem has not been available. In analyzing data from the transient pulse test, previous investigators have either employed analytical solutions that are derived with the use of additional, restrictive assumptions, or have resorted to numerical methods. In Part I of this paper, a general, analytical solution for the transient pulse test is presented. This solution is graphically illustrated by plots of dimensionless variables for several cases of interest. The solution is shown to contain, as limiting cases, the more restrictive analytical solutions that the previous investigators have derived. A method of computing both the permeability and specific storage of the test sample from experimental data will be presented in Part II. ?? 1981.

  11. Paleohydrological mixing portions in one deep borehole at the Swedish Aspo Hard Rock Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Laaksoharju, M.; Sharman, C.

    1995-12-01

    A borehole 1700.5 m deep near the AESPOE Hard Rock Laboratory represents the deepest borehole drilled for the project. In order to establish the paleohydrological mixing portions in the present water, a mixing model was constructed using Principal Component Analysis. This multivariate method used both conservative and non-conservative tracers. The mixing model can describe how large portions of a particular type of water are needed in order to explain the chemical composition of the observed water. Six end-members were identified which are believed to represent waters that interact in different degrees in the sampling area. Mixing ratios were calculated for each end-member at various borehole depths. The multivariate calculation technique established the tracers of paleohydrological water in the borehole with greater resolution than univariate analysis.

  12. Minerals associated with biofilms occurring on exposed rock in a granitic underground research laboratory.

    PubMed

    Brown, D A; Kamineni, D C; Sawicki, J A; Beveridge, T J

    1994-09-01

    The concept of disposal of nuclear fuel waste in crystalline rock requires the effects of microbial action to be investigated. The Underground Research Laboratory excavated in a pluton of the Canadian Shield provides a unique opportunity to study these effects. Three biofilms kept moist by seepage through fractures in granitic rock faces of the Underground Research Laboratory have been examined. The biofilms contained a variety of gram-negative and gram-positive morphotypes held together by an organic extracellular matrix. Nutrient levels in the groundwater were low, but energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy has shown biogeochemical immobilization of several elements in the biofilms; some of these elements were concentrated from extremely dilute environmental concentrations, and all elements were chemically complexed together to form amorphous or crystalline fine-grained minerals. These were seen by transmission electron microscopy to be both associated with the surfaces of the bacteria and scattered throughout the extracellular matrix, suggesting their de novo development through bacterial surface-mediated nucleation. The biofilm consortia are thought to concentrate elements both by passive sorption and by energy metabolism. By Mössbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction, one of the biofilms showed that iron was both oxidized and precipitated as ferrihydrite or hematite aerobically and reduced and precipitated as siderite anaerobically. We believe that some Archean banded-iron formations could have been formed in a manner similar to this, as it would explain the deposition of hematite and siderite in close proximity. This biogeochemical development of minerals may also affect the transport of material in waste disposal sites. PMID:16349374

  13. Minerals Associated with Biofilms Occurring on Exposed Rock in a Granitic Underground Research Laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Brown, D. Ann; Kamineni, D. Choudari; Sawicki, Jerzy A.; Beveridge, Terry J.

    1994-01-01

    The concept of disposal of nuclear fuel waste in crystalline rock requires the effects of microbial action to be investigated. The Underground Research Laboratory excavated in a pluton of the Canadian Shield provides a unique opportunity to study these effects. Three biofilms kept moist by seepage through fractures in granitic rock faces of the Underground Research Laboratory have been examined. The biofilms contained a variety of gram-negative and gram-positive morphotypes held together by an organic extracellular matrix. Nutrient levels in the groundwater were low, but energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy has shown biogeochemical immobilization of several elements in the biofilms; some of these elements were concentrated from extremely dilute environmental concentrations, and all elements were chemically complexed together to form amorphous or crystalline fine-grained minerals. These were seen by transmission electron microscopy to be both associated with the surfaces of the bacteria and scattered throughout the extracellular matrix, suggesting their de novo development through bacterial surface-mediated nucleation. The biofilm consortia are thought to concentrate elements both by passive sorption and by energy metabolism. By Mössbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction, one of the biofilms showed that iron was both oxidized and precipitated as ferrihydrite or hematite aerobically and reduced and precipitated as siderite anaerobically. We believe that some Archean banded-iron formations could have been formed in a manner similar to this, as it would explain the deposition of hematite and siderite in close proximity. This biogeochemical development of minerals may also affect the transport of material in waste disposal sites. Images PMID:16349374

  14. Rock strength and fault rheology at the Nankai subduction zone: Insight from laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitajima, H.; Saffer, D. M.; Takahashi, M.; Otsubo, M.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the wide spectrum of fault slip behaviors observed in continental and subduction faults zones requires investigation of absolute fault strength and fault rheology that are controlled by in-situ stress, strain, pressure, temperature, and chemical conditions. Because the deformation mode and strength of porous rocks are dependent on porosity and effective stress, rapid reduction of sediment porosity from 60-70% to less than 5% should strongly affect deformation style in the shallow portion of subduction zones. Here, we present the results of laboratory experimental studies on modern clay-rich sediments subducting at the Nankai Trough and rocks from the exhumed Shimanto accretionary complex near the Nobeoka thrust, which is an ancient out-of-sequence-thrust, to constrain porosity, rock strength and fault rheology in the Nankai subduction zone. Based on uniaxial and triaxial experiments on mudstones, combined with seismic velocity data from geophysical surveys in the Nankai Trough, estimated porosity along the plate boundary decreases from ~40% at the trench, to ~5% at 50 km from the trench (~8 km depth). This porosity reduction is faster than that expected in a basinal environment, and can be attributed to the effects of horizontal tectonic loading. The phyllites and cataclasites (2-5% porosity) across the Nobeoka thrust fault deform brittlely with a peak strength of 80-90 MPa, followed by strain weakening to residual strengths of 40-60 MPa at effective pressure of 20 MPa and temperature of 250°C. At effective pressure of 120 MPa, on the other hand, they exhibit strain hardening and their strength at 10% strain reaches ~300 MPa. The extrapolation of a brittle-ductile transition for the Nankai mudstones as a function of porosity and confining stress is consistent with the behavior of the ancient prism samples, which serve as an analog for the mechanical behavior of rocks at seismogenic depth in the modern Nankai Trough. These results suggest that as the

  15. Cyclic pressurisation of lava dome rocks. Laboratory results and implications for lava dome monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dainty, M. L.; Smith, R.; Sammonds, P.; Meredith, P. G.

    2009-12-01

    Lava domes are frequently subjected to cyclic heating and pressurisation. These processes may weaken the dome rocks, leading to collapse of the lava dome or explosion and extrusion events caused by unplugging of the magma conduit. By subjecting lava dome rocks to cyclic loading and heating in the laboratory, we can investigate how these processes affect the elastic moduli and strength of the dome rocks. These elastic moduli are crucial parameters for determining how the deformation measured at a volcano relates to the pressurisation and stress. Recording acoustic emissions (AE) during these cyclic loading tests can reveal when the cracking and damage occurs and indicate expected patterns in seismicity during cyclic pressurisation of lava domes. For this laboratory investigation of cyclic loading and heating of lava dome rocks, samples with four different extrusion dates within the 2004-2008 eruption of Mount St Helens were used. This allowed us to also investigate how the mechanical properties of this lava dome changed with time. For each timed sample, four 62.5 mm long x 25 mm diameter cores were deformed in uniaxial compression. The first sample was simply loaded to failure at a constant rate, to obtain the strength and elastic moduli. Of the remaining three cores from each sample, one was slowly heated and cooled to 900°C and one to 600°C (and the other not heated). The three cores from each sample were then initially loaded to 40 MPa at a constant rate and then unloaded to 5 MPa. They were then sequentially reloaded and unloaded at the same rate with the peak stress in each cycle increased by 5 MPa until failure. For all samples, the core loaded to failure with no cycling was stronger than those subjected to cyclic loading. However, there was no weakening or reduction in elastic moduli seen for the samples subjected to a heating cycle before cyclic loading. The sample extruded in 2004 compared to the later ones from 2005 and 2006, was the weakest at 60 to 70

  16. Direct laboratory observation of fluid distribution and its influence on acoustic properties of patchy saturated rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, M.; Clennell, B.; Pervukhina, M.; Shulakova, V.; Mueller, T.; Gurevich, B.

    2009-04-01

    samples (38 mm in diameter, approximately 60 mm long) were dried in oven under reduced pressure. In dynamic saturation experiments, samples were jacketed in the experimental cell, made from transparent for X-radiation material (PMMA). Distillate water was injected into the sample from the one side. Fluid distribution in such "dynamic" experiment: both spatial and time dependant was measured using X-ray Computer Tomograph (CT) with resolution 0.2 x 0.2 x 1 mm3. Velocities (Vp, and Vs) at ultrasonic frequency of 1 MHz, were measured in the direction perpendicular to initial direction of the fluid flow injection. Sample saturation was estimated from the CT results. In "quasi static" experiments samples were saturated during long period of time (over 2 weeks) to achieve uniform distribution of liquid inside the sample. Saturation was determined by measurement of the weight of water fraction. All experiments were performed at laboratory environments at temperature 25 C. Ultrasonic velocities and fluid saturations were measured simultaneously during water injection into sandstone core samples. The experimental results obtained on low-permeability samples show that at low saturation values the velocity-saturation dependence can be described by the Gassmann-Wood relationship. However, with increasing saturation a sharp increase of P-wave velocity is observed, eventually approaching the Gassmann-Hill relationship. We connect the characteristics of the transition behavior of the velocity-saturation relationships to the increasing size of the patches inside the rock sample. In particular, we show that for relatively large fluid injection rate this transition occurs at smaller degrees of saturation as compared with high injection rate. We model the experimental data using the so-called White model (Toms 2007) that assumes fluid patch distribution as a periodic assemblage of concentric spheres. We can observe reasonable agreement between experimental results and theoretical

  17. Swedish-German actinide migration experiment at ASPO hard rock laboratory.

    PubMed

    Kienzler, B; Vejmelka, P; Römer, J; Fanghänel, E; Jansson, M; Eriksen, T E; Wikberg, P

    2003-03-01

    Within the scope of a bilateral cooperation between Svensk Kärnbränslehantering (SKB) and Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Institut für Nukleare Entsorgung (FZK-INE), an actinide migration experiment is currently being performed at the Aspö Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) in Sweden. This paper covers laboratory and in situ investigations on actinide migration in single-fractured granite core samples. For the in situ experiment, the CHEMLAB 2 probe developed by SKB was used. The experimental setup as well as the breakthrough of inert tracers and of the actinides Am, Np and Pu are presented. The breakthrough curves of inert tracers were analyzed to determine hydraulic properties of the fractured samples. Postmortem analyses of the solid samples were performed to characterize the flow path and the sorbed actinides. After cutting the cores, the abraded material was analyzed with respect to sorbed actinides. The slices were scanned optically to visualize the flow path. Effective volumes and inner surface areas were measured. In the experiments, only breakthrough of Np(V) was observed. In each experiment, the recovery of Np(V) was < or = 40%. Breakthrough of Am(III) and Pu(IV) as well as of Np(IV) was not observed. PMID:12598106

  18. Rock preference of planulae of jellyfish Aurelia aurita (Linnaeus 1758) for settlement in the laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Won Duk; Choi, Sung-Hwan; Han, Changhoon; Park, Won Gyu

    2014-06-01

    Planulae of Aurelia aurita were exposed to 11 types of rocks (basalt, gabbro, granite, rhyolite, sandstone, limestone, conglomerate, gneiss, quartzite, marble and schist) to examine their attachment preference among rock material and position. Numbers of attached polyps was the highest on marble and the least on limestone. Their preference with regard to settling position was the same among the rocks, showing the highest density of polyps on the underside (88.5%) compared to upper (23.6%) and perpendicular sides (10.3%) of rock. The results showed that while position preference is more important than rock property, higher numbers of polyps were observed in rocks with a medium surface hardness.

  19. Laboratory Detection of IZnCH_{3} (X^{1}A_{1}) : Further Evidence for Zinc Insertion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucchino, Matthew P.; Young, Justin P.; Sheridan, Phil M.; Ziurys, Lucy M.

    2013-06-01

    Millimeter-wave direct absorption techniques were used to record the pure rotational spectrum of IZnCH_{3} (X^{1}A_{1}). This species was produced by the reaction of zinc vapor with ICH_{3} in the presence of a DC discharge. Rotational transitions ranging from J = 109 {→} 108 to J = 122 {→} 121 were recorded for I^{64}ZnCH_{3} and I^{66}ZnCH_{3} in the frequency range of 250{-290} GHz. The Ka = 0{-4} components were measured for each transition, with the K-ladder structure and nuclear spin statistics indicative of a symmetric top. As with HZnCH_{3} (X^{1}A_{1}), the detection of IZnCH_{3} provides further evidence for a zinc insertion process.

  20. Laboratory and Remote Spectroscopy of Volcanic Rocks from Mauna Iki, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varriale, J. A.; Rogers, D.; Arnold, J. A.; Glotch, T. D.

    2012-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that remotely measured thermal infrared spectra of Hawaiian basalt flows are dominated by thin alteration coatings. The objectives of this work are to characterize the spectral properties of natural surfaces from flows of varying emplacement age as well as from flows of varying crystallinity and primary mineralogy to understand how duration of exposure and primary rock characteristics influence the alteration assemblages and their spectral properties. We have collected samples from the Mauna Iki-area lava flows that represent primary compositional variation across the flows, and that exhibit a range of alteration coatings. Samples were cataloged and prepared for spectral measurements. Mid-IR (5-50 μm) emissivity spectra and VNIR (~0.85-2.5 μm) reflectance spectra were collected. We also directly compared atmospherically corrected spectra from AVIRIS and ASTER at the sample locations to VNIR and mid-IR laboratory spectra, respectively. In most cases, a spectrally representative sample was collected, and the thin (10's of microns) alteration coatings dominate the spectral signatures of the remotely acquired data. Some sand samples were also collected. As expected, the sands are spectrally similar to fresh-cut rock surfaces in laboratory spectra, suggesting that remote measurements of sand could provide an indication of the unaltered surface mineralogy. However, remote-lab spectral comparisons showed that although widespread regions of sediment cover are apparent from the ground, the sand was not the spectrally dominant material in the regions where it was sampled and thus the primary mineralogy could not be identified remotely. Mid-IR spectra were modeled using a linear least-squares minimization routine to estimate modal abundances in fresh-cut and natural surfaces. The modeling identified key mineral groups within the composition of the altered and freshly cut surfaces; with basalt glass, olivine and plagioclase accounting for 59% of

  1. Rock Formation and Cosmic Radiation Exposure Ages in Gale Crater Mudstones from the Mars Science Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahaffy, Paul; Farley, Ken; Malespin, Charles; Gellert, Ralph; Grotzinger, John

    2014-05-01

    The quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) in the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) suite of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) has been utilized to secure abundances of 3He, 21Ne, 36Ar, and 40Ar thermally evolved from the mudstone in the stratified Yellowknife Bay formation in Gale Crater. As reported by Farley et al. [1] these measurements of cosmogenic and radiogenic noble gases together with Cl and K abundances measured by MSL's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer enable a K-Ar rock formation age of 4.21+0.35 Ga to be established as well as a surface exposure age to cosmic radiation of 78+30 Ma. Understanding surface exposures to cosmic radiation is relevant to the MSL search for organic compounds since even the limited set of studies carried out, to date, indicate that even 10's to 100's of millions of years of near surface (1-3 meter) exposure may transform a significant fraction of the organic compounds exposed to this radiation [2,3,4]. Transformation of potential biosignatures and even loss of molecular structural information in compounds that could point to exogenous or endogenous sources suggests a new paradigm in the search for near surface organics that incorporates a search for the most recently exposed outcrops through erosional processes. The K-Ar rock formation age determination shows promise for more precise in situ measurements that may help calibrate the martian cratering record that currently relies on extrapolation from the lunar record with its ground truth chronology with returned samples. We will discuss the protocol for the in situ noble gas measurements secured with SAM and ongoing studies to optimize these measurements using the SAM testbed. References: [1] Farley, K.A.M Science Magazine, 342, (2013). [2] G. Kminek et al., Earth Planet Sc Lett 245, 1 (2006). [3] Dartnell, L.R., Biogeosciences 4, 545 (2007). [4] Pavlov, A. A., et al. Geophys Res Lett 39, 13202 (2012).

  2. Laboratory tools to quantify biogenic dissolution of rocks and minerals: a model rock biofilm growing in percolation columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seiffert, Franz; Bandow, Nicole; Kalbe, Ute; Milke, Ralf; Gorbushina, Anna

    2016-04-01

    Sub-aerial biofilms (SAB) are ubiquitous, self-sufficient microbial ecosystems found on mineral surfaces at all altitudes and latitudes. SABs, which are the principal causes of weathering on exposed terrestrial surfaces, are characterised by patchy growth dominated by associations of algae, cyanobacteria, fungi and heterotrophic bacteria. A recently developed in vitro system to study colonisation of rocks exposed to air included two key SAB participants - the rock-inhabiting ascomycete Knufia petricola (CBS 123872) and the phototrophic cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme ATCC29133. Both partners are genetically tractable and we used them here to study weathering of granite, K-feldspar and plagioclase. Small fragments of the various rocks or minerals (1 to 6 mm) were packed into flow-through columns and incubated with 0.1% glucose and 10 µM thiamine-hydrochloride (90 µL.min-1) to compare weathering with and without biofilms. Dissolution of the minerals was followed by: analysing (i) the degradation products in the effluent from the columns via Inductively Coupled Plasma Spectroscopy and (ii) by studying polished sections of the incubated mineral fragment/grains using scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analyses. K. petricola/N. punctiforme stimulated release of Ca, Na, Mg and Mn. Analyses of the polished sections confirmed depletion of Ca, Na and K near the surface of the fragments. The abrupt decrease in Ca concentration observed in peripheral areas of plagioclase fragments favoured a dissolution-reprecipitation mechanism. Percolation columns in combination with a model biofilm can thus be used to study weathering in closed systems. Columns can easily be filled with different minerals and biofilms, the effluent as well as grains can be collected after long-term exposure under axenic conditions and easily analysed.

  3. Summary of hydrologic and physical properties of rock and soil materials, as analyzed by the hydrologic laboratory of the U.S. Geological Survey, 1948-60

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morris, D.A.; Johnson, A.I.

    1967-01-01

    The Hydrologic Laboratory was established in 1948 to serve as the central testing laboratory for the Water Resources Division of the U.S. Geological Survey. Since then, thousands of samples of rock and soil materials have been analyzed in the laboratory. Analytical data on samples from 42 States and for the period 1948-60 are summarized in this report. The data are presented in a form that allows easy comparison of the physical and hydrologic properties of many sedimentary, igneous, and metamorphic rock and soil materials. Sedimentary rocks--the principal water-bearing rocks analyzed--are discussed in detail.

  4. Fundamental Research on Percussion Drilling: Improved rock mechanics analysis, advanced simulation technology, and full-scale laboratory investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Michael S. Bruno

    2005-12-31

    This report summarizes the research efforts on the DOE supported research project Percussion Drilling (DE-FC26-03NT41999), which is to significantly advance the fundamental understandings of the physical mechanisms involved in combined percussion and rotary drilling, and thereby facilitate more efficient and lower cost drilling and exploration of hard-rock reservoirs. The project has been divided into multiple tasks: literature reviews, analytical and numerical modeling, full scale laboratory testing and model validation, and final report delivery. Literature reviews document the history, pros and cons, and rock failure physics of percussion drilling in oil and gas industries. Based on the current understandings, a conceptual drilling model is proposed for modeling efforts. Both analytical and numerical approaches are deployed to investigate drilling processes such as drillbit penetration with compression, rotation and percussion, rock response with stress propagation, damage accumulation and failure, and debris transportation inside the annulus after disintegrated from rock. For rock mechanics modeling, a dynamic numerical tool has been developed to describe rock damage and failure, including rock crushing by compressive bit load, rock fracturing by both shearing and tensile forces, and rock weakening by repetitive compression-tension loading. Besides multiple failure criteria, the tool also includes a damping algorithm to dissipate oscillation energy and a fatigue/damage algorithm to update rock properties during each impact. From the model, Rate of Penetration (ROP) and rock failure history can be estimated. For cuttings transport in annulus, a 3D numerical particle flowing model has been developed with aid of analytical approaches. The tool can simulate cuttings movement at particle scale under laminar or turbulent fluid flow conditions and evaluate the efficiency of cutting removal. To calibrate the modeling efforts, a series of full-scale fluid hammer

  5. Planning and Analysis of Fractured Rock Injection Tests in the Cerro Brillador Underground Laboratory, Northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairley, J. P., Jr.; Oyarzún L, R.; Villegas, G.

    2015-12-01

    Early theories of fluid migration in unsaturated fractured rock hypothesized that matrix suction would dominate flow up to the point of matrix saturation. However, experiments in underground laboratories such as the ESF (Yucca Mountain, NV) have demonstrated that liquid water can migrate significant distances through fractures in an unsaturated porous medium, suggesting limited interaction between fractures and unsaturated matrix blocks and potentially rapid transmission of recharge to the sat- urated zone. Determining the conditions under which this rapid recharge may take place is an important factor in understanding deep percolation processes in arid areas with thick unsaturated zones. As part of an on-going, Fondecyt-funded project (award 11150587) to study mountain block hydrological processes in arid regions, we are plan- ning a series of in-situ fracture flow injection tests in the Cerro Brillador/Mina Escuela, an underground laboratory and teaching facility belonging to the Universidad la Serena, Chile. Planning for the tests is based on an analytical model and curve-matching method, originally developed to evaluate data from injection tests at Yucca Mountain (Fairley, J.P., 2010, WRR 46:W08542), that uses a known rate of liquid injection to a fracture (for example, from a packed-off section of borehole) and the observed rate of seepage discharging from the fracture to estimate effective fracture aperture, matrix sorptivity, fracture/matrix flow partitioning, and the wetted fracture/matrix interac- tion area between the injection and recovery points. We briefly review the analytical approach and its application to test planning and analysis, and describe the proposed tests and their goals.

  6. Joint seismic, hydrogeological, and geomechanical investigations of a fracture zone in the Grimsel Rock Laboratory, Switzerland

    SciTech Connect

    Majer, E.L.; Myer, L.R.; Peterson, J.E. Jr.; Karasaki, K.; Long, J.C.S.; Martel, S.J. ); Bluemling, P.; Vomvoris, S. )

    1990-06-01

    This report is one of a series documenting the results of the Nagra-DOE Cooperative (NDC-I) research program in which the cooperating scientists explore the geological, geophysical, hydrological, geochemical, and structural effects anticipated from the use of a rock mass as a geologic repository for nuclear waste. From 1987 to 1989 the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and the Swiss Cooperative for the Storage of Nuclear Waste (Nagra) participated in an agreement to carryout experiments for understanding the effect of fractures in the storage and disposal of nuclear waste. As part of this joint work field and laboratory experiments were conducted at a controlled site in the Nagra underground Grimsel test site in Switzerland. The primary goal of these experiments in this fractured granite was to determine the fundamental nature of the propagation of seismic waves in fractured media, and to relate the seismological parameters to the hydrological parameters. The work is ultimately aimed at the characterization and monitoring of subsurface sites for the storage of nuclear waste. The seismic experiments utilizes high frequency (1000 to 10,000 Hertz) signals in a cross-hole configuration at scales of several tens of meters. Two-, three-, and four-sided tomographic images of the fractures and geologic structure were produced from over 60,000 raypaths through a 10 by 21 meter region bounded by two nearly horizontal boreholes and two tunnels. Intersecting this region was a dominant fracture zone which was the target of the investigations. In addition to these controlled seismic imaging experiments, laboratory work using core from this region were studied for the relation between fracture content, saturation, and seismic velocity and attenuation. In-situ geomechanical and hydrologic tests were carried out to determine the mechanical stiffness and conductivity of the fractures. 20 refs., 90 figs., 6 tabs.

  7. Anisotropy of electrical conductivity of the excavation damaged zone in the Mont Terri Underground Rock Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicollin, Florence; Gibert, Dominique; Lesparre, Nolwenn; Nussbaum, Christophe

    2010-04-01

    Electrical resistivity measurements were performed to characterize the anisotropy of electrical resistivity of the excavation damaged zone (EDZ) at the end-face of a gallery in the Opalinus clay of the Mont Terri Underground Rock Laboratory (URL). The data were acquired with a combination of square arrays in 18 zones on the gallery's face and in two series of four boreholes perpendicular to the face. Each data set is independently inverted using simulated annealing to recover the resistivity tensor. Both the stability and the non-uniqueness of the inverse problem are discussed with synthetic examples. The inversion of the data shows that the face is split in two domains separated by a tectonic fracture, with different resistivity values but with a common orientation. The direction of the maximum resistivity is found perpendicular to the bedding plane, and the direction of minimum resistivity is contained in the face's plane. These results show that the geo-electrical structure of the EDZ is controlled by a combination of effects due to tectonics, stratigraphy, and recent fracturing produced by the excavation of the gallery.

  8. Calculations of fluid-mineral equilibria in the Aspo Hard Rock Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Bruton, C.J.

    1995-05-01

    The purpose of this report is to evaluate the utility of the EQ3/6 geochemical codes in describing mineral-fluid equilibria in the low temperature (<25{degrees}C) systems at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL). Data on fluid chemistry and on fracture-filling mineralogy with depth were obtained from Smellie and Laaksoharju. Average temperatures in the HRL boreholes are generally less than 20{degrees}C. EQ3/6 was used to evaluate the extent to which equilibrium is achieved between minerals and fluids in these systems. Smellie and Laaksoharju used the PHREEQE geochemical modeling code to calculate saturation indices for fracture-lining minerals in boreholes KAS02, KAS03, KAS04 and KAS06 in order to ``support the presence or absence of the major fracture minerals``. They noted that only calcite and gypsum may be expected to attain equilibrium under the low temperature conditions Aespoe. However, they used closeness to equilibrium as an indicator of ``stable conditions, long bedrock residence/reaction times and slow to stagnant flow in the system.`` EQ3 was used to calculate mineral saturation indices for comparison, and EQ6 was used to try to predict the mineral assemblages coexisting with fluids.

  9. Modelling fault surface roughness and fault rocks thickness evolution with slip: calibration based on field and laboratory data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bistacchi, A.; Tisato, N.; Spagnuolo, E.; Nielsen, S. B.; Di Toro, G.

    2012-12-01

    deformation processes (e.g. frictional melting vs. cataclasis) and experimental conditions (unconfined vs. confined). Since the model is based on geometrical and volume-conservation considerations (and not on a particular deformation mechanism), we conclude that the surface roughness and fault-rock thickness after some slip is mostly determined by the initial roughness (measured over several orders of magnitude in wavelength), rather than the particular deformation process (cataclasis, melting, etc.) activated during faulting. Conveniently, since the model can be applied (under certain conditions) to surfaces which depart from self-affine roughness, the model parameters can be calibrated with laboratory experiments. If this conclusion will be confirmed by a larger dataset, the forward model proposed here will provide realistic fault roughness and fault rock thickness predictions to be used in the mechanics of earthquakes and faulting, oil and water exploration, and underground engineering projects.

  10. Laboratory rotational spectrum of singly 13C-substituted dimethyl ether up to 1.5 THz and interstellar detection of 13CH_3O12CH_3 - a fruitful interplay between laboratory work and inter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koerber, M.; Bisschop, S.; Endres, C.; Lewen, F.; Schlemmer, S.

    2011-05-01

    Dimethyl ether (CH_3OCH_3) is found in high abundance in star forming regions. However, the interstellar formation process of dimethyl ether still remains unclear up to now. In current gas-grain models gas-phase synthesis via self-methylation of methanol evaporating from grains is discussed in contrast to the surface reaction of CH_3 with successively hydrogenated CO (Garrod & Herbst 2006). An observational test for the formation mechanism has been proposed by Charnley et al. (2004) making use of the 13C fractionation into CO at low temperatures on grains: Comparing the 12C/13C ratio of molecules to the 12CO/13CO ratio allows to distinguish between formation from CO on cold grains and pure gas-phase formation routes. The isotopic ratio of species like dimethyl ether thus can be used as a tracer of the chemical evolution of the observed region. Due to its two methyl groups undergoing large amplitude motions and a relatively strong dipole moment of μ = 1.302 D it shows a strong and dense complex spectrum all over the terahertz region relevant for Herschel and ALMA observations. Accurate transition frequencies are needed to interpret the astronomical spectra. For the main isotopologue extensive data are now available (Endres et al. 2009). However, due to the greatly improved sensitivity of the new observatories isotopic species of abundant molecules like dimethyl ether are appearing in the spectra as well. In this work we present laboratory measurements of singly 13C-substituted dimethyl ether (13CH_3O12CH_3) up to 1.5 THz. More than 1700 transitions of 13CH_3O12CH_3 with rotational quantum numbers up to J = 53 and K = 25 have been analyzed. Based on the laboratory measurements singly 13C-substituted dimethyl ether has been detected for the first time in the spectrum of G327.3-0.6 (Bisschop et al. in prep.) and a preliminary value for the 12C/13C abundance ratio has been determined.

  11. Transport Properties of Carbonate and Sandstone Samples: Digital Rock Physics and Laboratory Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alabbad, A. A.; Dvorkin, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    achieved a match between the computed and measured permeability, although not as robust as for the electrical formation factor. Both the computational and laboratory results indicated that all samples were practically isotropic. This study is an example of using coarse resolution digital images to estimate the effective transport properties of rock.

  12. Brazilian Tests on Transversely Isotropic Rocks: Laboratory Testing and Numerical Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Xin; Konietzky, Heinz; Frühwirt, Thomas; Dan, Dinh Quoc

    2015-07-01

    The dominant anisotropy (foliation and bedding) of geological materials, especially of foliated metamorphic rocks such as slates, gneisses, phyllites or schists, and sedimentary rocks with bedding planes, leads to complex fracture mechanical behavior. A series of Brazilian tests on Mosel slate were conducted considering different foliation-loading angles. Fracture patterns and strength of samples were analyzed. In addition, the deformation process and failure behavior of the foliated rock samples during the Brazilian tests were simulated using the discrete element method. The influence of anisotropic strength parameters of weak planes was studied numerically. A diagram of failure mode distribution marked with typical failure fracture patterns for Brazilian tests of transverse isotropic rocks was developed, which results in better understanding of failure modes of Brazilian tests on foliated rocks and allows a more reliable interpretation of strength parameters. It reveals, how the microparameters influence the bearing capacity and failure modes of Brazilian tests for anisotropic rocks.

  13. An Aquatic Journey toward Aeolis Mons (Mount Sharp): Sedimentary Rock Evidence observed by Mars Science Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Sanjeev; Edgar, Lauren; Williams, Rebecca; Rubin, David; Yingst, Aileen; Lewis, Kevin; Kocurek, Gary; Anderson, Ryan; Dromart, Gilles; Edgett, Ken; Hardgrove, Craig; Kah, Linda; Mangold, Nicolas; Milliken, Ralph; Minitti, Michelle; Palucis, Marisa; Rice, Melissa; Stack, Katie; Sumner, Dawn; Williford, Ken

    2014-05-01

    Since leaving Yellowknife Bay (summer 2013), Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity has investigated a number of key outcrops as it traverses along the Rapid Transit Route toward the entry point to begin its investigations of the extensive rock outcrops at the base of Mount Sharp. Rover observations are characterizing the variability of lithologies and sedimentary facies along the traverse and establishing stratigraphic relationships with the aim of reconstructing depositional processes and palaeoenvironments. Here, we report on sedimentological and stratigraphic observations based on images from the Mastcam and MAHLI instruments at Shaler and the Darwin waypoint. The informally named Shaler outcrop, which forms part of the Glenelg member of the Yellowknife Bay formation [1] is remarkable for the preservation of a rich suite of sedimentary structures and architecture, and was investigated on sols 120-121 and 309-324. The outcrop forms a pebbly sandstone body that is ~0.7 m thick and extends for up to 20 m. Shaler is largely characterized by pebbly sandstone facies showing well-developed decimeter-scale trough cross-stratification. Bedding geometries indicate sub-critical angles of climb, resulting in preservation of only the lee slope deposits. The grain size, and the presence and scale of cross-stratification imply sediment transport and deposition by unidirectional currents in a fluvial sedimentary environment. Curiosity investigated the informally named Darwin waypoint between sols 390 and 401, making detailed Mastcam and MAHLI observations at two separate locations. The Darwin outcrop comprises light-toned sandstone beds separated by darker pebbly sandstones. MAHLI observations permit differentiation of distinct sedimentary facies. The Altar Mountain facies is a poorly sorted pebbly sandstone that is rich in fine pebbles. Pebbles are sub-angular to sub-rounded in shape and show no preferred orientation or fabric. Pebbles and sand grains show clast-to-clast contacts

  14. The "Key" Method of Identifying Igneous and Metamorphic Rocks in Introductory Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eves, Robert Leo; Davis, Larry Eugene

    1987-01-01

    Proposes that identification keys provide an orderly strategy for the identification of igneous and metamorphic rocks in an introductory geology course. Explains the format employed in the system and includes the actual key guides for both igneous and metamorphic rocks. (ML)

  15. Spectral Characteristics of Continuous Acoustic Emission (AE) Data from Laboratory Rock Deformation Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, J. William; Goodfellow, Sebastian; Reyes-Montes, Juan; Nasseri, Farzine; Young, R. Paul

    2016-04-01

    Continuous acoustic emission (AE) data recorded during rock deformation tests facilitates the monitoring of fracture initiation and propagation due to applied stress changes. Changes in the frequency and energy content of AE waveforms have been previously observed and were associated with microcrack coalescence and the induction or mobilisation of large fractures which are naturally associated with larger amplitude AE events and lower-frequency components. The shift from high to low dominant frequency components during the late stages of the deformation experiment, as the rate of AE events increases and the sample approaches failure, indicates a transition from the micro-cracking to macro-cracking regime, where large cracks generated result in material failure. The objective of this study is to extract information on the fracturing process from the acoustic records around sample failure, where the fast occurrence of AE events does not allow for identification of individual AE events and phase arrivals. Standard AE event processing techniques are not suitable for extracting this information at these stages. Instead the observed changes in the frequency content of the continuous record can be used to characterise and investigate the fracture process at the stage of microcrack coalescence and sample failure. To analyse and characterise these changes, a detailed non-linear and non-stationary time-frequency analysis of the continuous waveform data is required. Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) and Hilbert Spectral Analysis (HSA) are two of the techniques used in this paper to analyse the acoustic records which provide a high-resolution temporal frequency distribution of the data. In this paper we present the results from our analysis of continuous AE data recorded during a laboratory triaxial deformation experiment using the combined EMD and HSA method.

  16. Evaluation of stress and saturation effects on seismic velocity and electrical resistivity - laboratory testing of rock samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilhelm, Jan; Jirků, Jaroslav; Slavík, Lubomír; Bárta, Jaroslav

    2016-04-01

    Repository, located in a deep geological formation, is today considered the most suitable solution for disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste. The geological formations, in combination with an engineered barrier system, should ensure isolation of the waste from the environment for thousands of years. For long-term monitoring of such underground excavations special monitoring systems are developed. In our research we developed and tested monitoring system based on repeated ultrasonic time of flight measurement and electrical resistivity tomography (ERT). As a test site Bedřichov gallery in the northern Bohemia was selected. This underground gallery in granitic rock was excavated using Tunnel Boring Machine (TBM). The seismic high-frequency measurements are performed by pulse-transmission technique directly on the rock wall using one seismic source and three receivers in the distances of 1, 2 and 3 m. The ERT measurement is performed also on the rock wall using 48 electrodes. The spacing between electrodes is 20 centimeters. An analysis of relation of seismic velocity and electrical resistivity on water saturation and stress state of the granitic rock is necessary for the interpretation of both seismic monitoring and ERT. Laboratory seismic and resistivity measurements were performed. One series of experiments was based on uniaxial loading of dry and saturated granitic samples. The relation between stress state and ultrasonic wave velocities was tested separately for dry and saturated rock samples. Other experiments were focused on the relation between electrical resistivity of the rock sample and its saturation level. Rock samples with different porosities were tested. Acknowledgments: This work was partially supported by the Technology Agency of the Czech Republic, project No. TA 0302408

  17. Faults and fractures in Gallery 04 of the Mont Terri rock laboratory: characterization, simulation and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mourzenko, V.; Thovert, J.; Adler, P. M.; Nussbaum, C.; Pinettes, P.

    2010-12-01

    Claystone deposits are intensively studied, as potentially good candidates for the underground storage of various wastes, including nuclear wastes. The international Mont Terri research project started in 1996 in the security gallery of the Mont Terri motorway tunnel in Switzerland, in a Mesozoic argillaceous formation called the Opalinus Clay. This site has been the subject of many studies because it is very close to the ground surface and because its geological characteristics are similar to that of Bure. Many studies are related to the understanding of the processes controlling the Excavation Damage Zone (EDZ) development (such as 1). A recent review (2) surveys the properties of EDZ for four types of rocks including indurated and plastic clays. Our major objective was to analyse trace maps recorded in the gallery 04 and the EZ-G niche of the Mont Terri laboratory, and to develop a realistic reconstruction of the surrounding fracture field. Moreover, we wanted to test the possibility of analyzing and predicting properties of this fracture field such as percolation, permeability and electrical perturbations. The main geological features of the site are presented. The available trace maps are given as well as the way they are digitized and analyzed. The faults can be divided into two classes, namely pre-existing faults and EDZ fractures. A special emphasis is put on the 126 pre-existing faults. They were scanned along 10 scanlines on both walls of the gallery, yielding 1235 intersections. The spacings between successive intersections were found to be statistically independent, with a lognormal distribution. The EDZ fractures were also analysed. The cross correlation coefficients between the azimuth, depth, length and orientation of the traces were calculated; they were all found very low indicating that these quantities are statistically independent. The fracture density decreases exponentially as a function of the distance to the wall, with a characteristic

  18. Factors affecting the pore space transformation during hydrocarbon generation in source rock (shales): laboratory experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giliazetdinova, D. R.; Korost, D. V.

    2014-12-01

    Oil and gas generation is a set of processes which taking place in the interior, the processes can't be observable in nature. In the process of dumping the source rock, organic matter is transformed into a complex of high-molecular compounds - precursors of oil and gas (kerogen). Entering of a source column for specific thermobaric conditions, triggers the formation of low molecular weight hydrocarbon compounds. Generation of sufficient quantities of hydrocarbons leads to the primary fluid migration within the source rock. For the experiment were selected mainly siliceous-carbonate composition rocks from Domanic horizon South-Tatar arch. The main aim of experiment was heating the rocks in the pyrolyzer to temperatures which correspond katagenes stages. For monitoring changes in the morphology of the pore space X-ray microtomography method was used. As a result, when was made a study of the composition of mineral and organic content of the rocks, as well as textural and structural features, have been identified that the majority of the rock samples within the selected collection are identical. However, characteristics such as organic content and texture of rocks are different. Thus, the experiment was divided into two parts: 1) the study of the influence of organic matter content on the morphology of the rock in the process of thermal effects; 2) study the effect of texture on the primary migration processes for the same values of organic matter. Also, an additional experiment was conducted to study the dynamics of changes in the structure of the pore space. At each stage of the experiment morphology of altered rocks characterized by the formation of new pores and channels connecting the primary voids. However, it was noted that the samples with a relatively low content of the organic matter had less changes in pore space morphology, in contrast to rocks with a high organic content. At the second stage of the research also revealed that the conversion of the pore

  19. Self-sealing barriers of clay/mineral mixtures The SB project at the Mont Terri Rock Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothfuchs, Tilmann; Jockwer, Norbert; Zhang, Chun-Liang

    Moderately compacted clay/mineral mixtures may represent a reasonable alternative to highly compacted bentonite buffers currently studied and considered in some concepts of underground repositories for high-level radioactive wastes. In contrast to highly compacted buffers clay/sand mixtures exhibit a high permeability to gas in the unsaturated state and a comparably low gas entry/break through pressure in the saturated state while providing an adequate self-sealing potential due to swelling of the clay minerals after water uptake from the host rock. By using optimized material mixtures, the evolution of high gas pressure in the repository near-field due to corrosion of the waste containers will be avoided and possible migration of radionuclides from the waste matrix in the liquid phase through the buffer will be diffusion controlled just like in the host rock. On basis of promising laboratory results gained in GRS’ geotechnical laboratory it was decided to test and demonstrate the sealing properties of clay/mineral mixtures under realistic in situ conditions at the Mont Terri Underground Rock Laboratory (MTRL). The paper presents details about the envisaged in situ experiments and material data obtained from laboratory investigations. First results of full-scale mock-up tests are presented as well. In addition, information is given about further laboratory investigations and scoping calculations that have been performed to analyze whether it would be possible to achieve and demonstrate the required sealing properties within the comparably short run time of the project. It has been found that clay/sand mixtures with clay contents between 35% and 50% are suitable for the envisaged in situ tests at the MTRL (and most likely also for adequate sealing of disposal rooms in repositories). The SB project is part of the Integrated Project ESDRED [ANDRA, 2005. www.esred.info] funded by the Commission of the European Commission.

  20. Effect of thermal shock on the decomposition of rocks under controlled laboratory conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasanin-Grubin, Milica; Vezmar, Tijuana; Kuhn, Nikolaus J.

    2013-04-01

    The major factor determining the rate of weathering of a given rock are the climatic conditions of the surrounding environment, most notably type and amount of precipitation and temperature. For the latter, average annual temperature and where applicable, the frequency of freezing and thawing are often considered to be relevant for weathering. The rate of temperature change is mostly ignored. However, a rapid change in temperature, referred to as thermal shock could have more severe consequences of rock deterioration then gradual heating and cooling of rocks is gradual. Thermal shock induces a stress of such a magnitude that the material is unable to adjust fast enough and so it breaks down. The aim of this study is to examine the importance of mechanical decomposition of rocks when treated with thermal shock by freezing. The rate of decomposition of rocks of various sizes was measured based on their weight loss. In addition, they were immersed in water after freezing and the electrical conductivity and pH of the water were measured as an index for thermal-shock induced micro-fracturing. Samples of three rock types were chosen for the experiment: limestone, tuffaceous rock and basalt. Samples were examined in two separate cycles: (i) 24h immersion in ultra-clean water followed by 24h drying at 30o and (ii) 24h immersion, 24h temperature shock by freezing at -20˚C and 6h thawing. Each cycle was repeated approximately 20 times. In each cycle three different sizes of rock were examined: <16mm, 16-8mm and 8-5mm. Limestone mass decreased for both cycles, although more distinctly after repeated thermal shocks. Furthermore, the rate of decay decreased with increasing rock size. Tuffaceous rock exposed to cycle (i) also showed a significant weight loss. Somewhat surprisingly, the mass of the tuffaceous rock exposed to thermal shock increased by about 13% in all sample size groups. It is possible that pore volume increased during experiment and that the rocks became

  1. Microbial Growth and Air Pollutants in the Corrosion of Carbonate Rocks: Results from Laboratory and Outdoor Experimental Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moroni, B.; Poli, G.; Pitzurra, L.

    2003-04-01

    Microorganisms and atmospheric pollution are primary causes of deterioration of materials exposed to open air. Due to the variety of chemical-mineralogical compositions and textures, stone represents a variegated substrate that interacts with environmental fluids and particulate, and is a selective environment for biological proliferation. Carbonate rocks, in particular, are highly exposed to environmental decay and extremely susceptible to acid attack caused by atmospheric pollutants and metabolic acid production. The aim of this work is to study the combined effect of microbial contamination and atmospheric pollutants in the weathering of carbonate rocks by means of laboratory and outdoor exposure tests. Laboratory experiments performed on carbonate rocks allowed evaluation of the influence of the gas mixture in the chemical modifications of the lithic substrate, and formulation of a kinetic model of sulphation. The obtained results suggest that nucleation alternates with growth as leading processes in the development of sulphation. In particular, nucleation of the reaction products is the leading process in the initial period of sulphation, which is characterized by a marked slowdown of the reaction progress, whereas growth of the products is the leading process in the subsequent period of resumption of sulphation. In situ experiments performed by exposing limestone specimens at two air monitoring stations in Perugia with different degrees of urban air pollution showed high levels of fungal colonization at early times and the presence of weathering products (i.e. gypsum) in the longer term. Results point to a combined effect of microbial colonization and atmospheric pollutants in promoting the weathering of stone through acid attack within the film of water present on the surface of the exposed material, and through the oxidation of metal sulphide particulate pollutant to sulphate. Laboratory tests assaying the extent of fungal colonization and/or chemical

  2. Modeling of laboratory experiments determining the chemico-osmotic, hydraulic and diffusion properties of sedimentary rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, M.; Hiratsuka, T.; Ito, K.

    2008-12-01

    -osmotic properties of clay-rich materials have been demonstrated in laboratory experiments. However, it remains inconclusive whether chemical osmosis can retain the pressure disequilibrium and so influence groundwater flow in a geologic time scale. Therefore, systematic research involving field-scale investigations of pressure and salinity distributions and experimental estimations of the chemico-osmotic, hydraulic and diffusive properties of formation media is required. This study focuses on the development of a laboratory experimental system and the analytical solutions to estimate the chemico-osmotic, hydraulic and diffusive properties of formation media. The experimental system consists of a flexible-wall permeameter cell that loads confining pressures, along with a closed fluid circuit to perform osmotic, hydraulic and diffusion experiments under background fluid pressures. This experimental design enables simulating underground conditions at the depths required for safety assessments of geological waste disposal. The effectiveness of the experimental system and the analytical solutions are demonstrated with a set of osmotic, hydraulic and diffusion experiments performed using sedimentary rocks.

  3. Chemical characteristics of the volcanic gases from Nyiragongo lava lake and the generation of CH 4-rich fluid inclusions in alkaline rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerlach, T. M.

    1980-10-01

    Methods used previously to remove compositional modifications from volcanic gas analyses for Mount Etna and Erta'Ale lava lake have bean employed to estimate the gas phase composition at Nyiragongo lava lake, based on samples obtained in 1959. H 2O data were not reported in 11 of the 13 original analyses. The restoration methods have been used to estimate the H 2O contents of the samples and to correct the analyses for atmospheric contamination, loss of sulfur and for pre- and pest-collection oxidation of H 2S, S 2, and H 2. The estimated gas compositions are relatively CO 2-rich, low in total sulfur and reduced. They contain approximately 35-50% CO 2 45-55% H 2O, 1-2% SO 2, 1-2% H 2., 2-3% CO, 1.5-2.5% H 2S, 0.5% S 2 and 0.1% COS over,he collection temperature range 102° to 960° C. The oxygen fugacities of the gases are consistently about half an order of magnitude below quartz-magnetite-fayalite. The low total sulfur content and resulting low atomic S/C of the Nyiragongo gases appear to be related to the relatively low fO 2 of the crystallizing lava. At temperatures above 800°C and pressures of 1-1.5 k bar, the Nyiragongo gas compositions resemble those observed in primary fluid inclusions believed to have formed at similar temperatures and pressures in nephelines of intrusive alkaline rocks. Cooling to 300°C, with fO 2 buffered by the rock, results in gas compositions very rich in CH 4 (50-70%) and resembling secondary fluid inclusions formed at 200-500°C in alkaline rocks. Below 600°C the gases become supersaturated in carbon as graphite. These inferences are corroborated by several reports of hydrocarbons in plutonic alkaline rocks, and by the presence of CH 4-rich waters in Lake Kivu — a lake on the flanks of Nyiragongo volcano.

  4. A laboratory apparatus for forced-oscillation experiments on partially saturated rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musialak, Jana; Renner, Jörg; Steeb, Holger

    2016-04-01

    Seismic wave attenuation in partially saturated reservoir rocks is influenced by the physical properties of the porous rock and of the inherent pore fluids, including their local saturation state. Therefore, wave attenuation, when studied over a range of frequencies, can be useful to obtain valuable information on the morphology of partially saturated rocks. Quantitative estimates for pore-fluid content and saturation degree as well as fracture density are crucial for a substantial characterization of geothermal reservoirs and monitoring of processes in subsurface fluid-rock systems. Reservoir rocks, such as sandstones, can show heterogeneities of various sizes, starting from micro-cracks on the grain or micrometer scale to faults with several kilometers in length. Solid and fluid heterogeneities may lead to a patch-wise saturation state on the mesoscopic scale, i.e. the characteristic length scale of the patches is much larger than the dominant grain or pore size. The length scales of heterogeneities affect the characteristics of seismic attenuation. Studying this effect is important for the interpretation of seismic data, as obtained for geothermal reservoirs. Thus, we developed a new experimental setup to measure the effective hydro-mechanical properties of partially and fully saturated rock samples under realistic reservoir stress states in the seismic frequency range. This forced-oscillation apparatus is suitable for cylindrical rock samples with a diameter of 30 mm and a length of 75 mm. It is composed of a high-pressure triaxial cell which permits multistep in- and outflow of two different pore fluids under in situ pressure conditions, and a dynamic excitation device. This preloaded piezoelectric actuator with DMS-position sensor can generate a sinusoidal axial displacement that subjects the triaxially loaded sample to an additional harmonic stress with a frequency up to 1 kHz. The applied force is measured externally as well as inside the triaxial cell by a

  5. In situ tracer tests to determine retention properties of a block scale fracture network in granitic rock at the Äspö Hard Rock Laboratory, Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Peter; Byegård, Johan; Tullborg, Eva-Lena; Doe, Thomas; Hermanson, Jan; Winberg, Anders

    2004-06-01

    Experiments were conducted at the Äspö Hard Rock Laboratory in order to improve the understanding of radionuclide retention properties of fractured crystalline bedrock in the 10-100 m scale (TRUE Block Scale Project, jointly funded by ANDRA, ENRESA, Nirex, JNC, Posiva and SKB). A series of tracer experiments were performed using sorbing tracers in three different flow paths. The different flow paths had Euclidian lengths of 14, 17 and 33 m, respectively, and one to three water conducting structures. Four tests were performed using different cocktails made up of radioactive sorbing tracers ( 22,24Na +, 42K +, 47Ca 2+, 85Sr 2+, 83,86Rb +, 131,133Ba 2+ and 134,137Cs +). For each tracer injection, the breakthrough of sorbing tracers was compared to the breakthrough of a conservative tracer, 82Br -, 131I -, HTO and 186ReO 4-, respectively. In the two longer flow paths, no breakthrough of 83Rb + and 137Cs + was observed after 8 months of pumping. Selected tracer tests were subject to basic modelling in which a one-dimensional (1D) advection-dispersion model, including surface sorption, and an unlimited matrix diffusion were used for the interpretation of the results. The results of the modelling indicated that there is a slightly higher mass transfer into a highly porous material in the block-scale experiment compared with in situ experiments performed over shorter distances and significantly higher than what would have been expected from laboratory data obtained from studies of the interactions in nonaltered intact rock.

  6. Comparing the Slaking of Clay-Bearing Rocks Under Laboratory Conditions to Slaking Under Natural Climatic Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, T. P.; Shakoor, A.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the laboratory slaking behavior of common clay-bearing rocks to their slaking behavior under natural climatic conditions observed during a 1-year experimental study. Five-cycle slake durability tests were performed in the laboratory on five claystones, five mudstones, five siltstones, and five shales. Twelve replicate specimens of each of these 20 rocks were also exposed to natural climatic conditions for 12 months. After each month of exposure, one replicate specimen of each rock was removed from natural exposure and its grain size distribution was determined. The results of laboratory tests and field experiment were compared in terms of 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, and 5th cycle slake durability indices (Id1, Id2, Id3, Id4, Id5), grain size distribution of slaked material, and disintegration ratio ( D R), where D R is the ratio of the area under the grain size distribution curve of slaked material for a given specimen to the total area encompassing all grain size distribution curves of the specimens tested. Correlations of Id1, Id2, Id3, Id4, and Id5 with D R values for laboratory specimens exhibit R 2 values of 0.87, 0.88, 0.83, 0.75, and 0.70, respectively. However, the relationship between Id2 and D R, determined after 1, 3, 6, and 12 months of natural exposure, becomes weaker with increasing time of exposure, with R 2 values of 0.65, 0.63, 0.63, and 0.25, respectively. The fifth-cycle slake durability index (Id5) for laboratory tested specimens shows a better correlation with D R values for naturally exposed specimens ( R 2 up to 0.80). A comparison of grain size distribution curves of slaked material for laboratory specimens, after the 2nd cycle slake durability test, with those of specimens exposed to natural climatic conditions shows that the laboratory test underestimates the field durability for claystones, and overestimates it for siltstones.

  7. An Infrared Laboratory for the Study of Planetary Materials (IRIS): First Results of Impact Rock Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morlok, A.; Ahmedi, M.; Hiesinger, H.

    2013-09-01

    We present the results of a study about the mid-infrared reflect ance properties of impact rocks from the zördlinger Ries impact crater. Spectra from separated components of suevite, melt glass, devitrified glass and matrix show a high degree of similarity, reflecting the high abundance of amorphous materials.

  8. Laboratory Evaluation of Damage Criteria and Creep Parameters of Tioga Dolomite and Rock Salt from Cavern Well No. 1

    SciTech Connect

    LEE, MOO Y.; EHGARTNER, BRIAN L.

    2002-04-01

    A suite of laboratory triaxial compression and triaxial steady-state creep tests provide quasi-static elastic constants and damage criteria for bedded rock salt and dolomite extracted from Cavern Well No.1 of the Tioga field in northern Pennsylvania. The elastic constants, quasi-static damage criteria, and creep parameters of host rocks provides information for evaluating a proposed cavern field for gas storage near Tioga, Pennsylvania. The Young's modulus of the dolomite was determined to be 6.4 ({+-}1.0) x 10{sup 6} psi, with a Poisson's ratio of 0.26 ({+-}0.04). The elastic Young's modulus was obtained from the slope of the unloading-reloading portion of the stress-strain plots as 7.8 ({+-}0.9) x 10{sup 6} psi. The damage criterion of the dolomite based on the peak load was determined to be J{sub 2}{sup 0.5} (psi) = 3113 + 0.34 I{sub 1} (psi) where I{sub 1} and J{sub 2} are first and second invariants respectively. Using the dilation limit as a threshold level for damage, the damage criterion was conservatively estimated as J{sub 2}{sup 0.5} (psi) = 2614 + 0.30 I{sub 1} (psi). The Young's modulus of the rock salt, which will host the storage cavern, was determined to be 2.4 ({+-}0.65) x 10{sup 6} psi, with a Poisson's ratio of 0.24 ({+-}0.07). The elastic Young's modulus was determined to be 5.0 ({+-}0.46) x 10{sup 6} psi. Unlike the dolomite specimens under triaxial compression, rock salt specimens did not show shear failure with peak axial load. Instead, most specimens showed distinct dilatancy as an indication of internal damage. Based on dilation limit, the damage criterion for the rock salt was estimated as J{sub 2}{sup 0.5} (psi) = 704 + 0.17 I{sub 1} (psi). In order to determine the time dependent deformation of the rock salt, we conducted five triaxial creep tests. The creep deformation of the Tioga rock salt was modeled based on the following three-parameter power law as {var_epsilon}{sub s} = 1.2 x 10{sup -17} {sigma}{sup 4.75} exp(-6161/T), where {var

  9. Active and passive seismic methods for characterization and monitoring of unstable rock masses: field surveys, laboratory tests and modeling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombero, Chiara; Baillet, Laurent; Comina, Cesare; Jongmans, Denis; Vinciguerra, Sergio

    2016-04-01

    Appropriate characterization and monitoring of potentially unstable rock masses may provide a better knowledge of the active processes and help to forecast the evolution to failure. Among the available geophysical methods, active seismic surveys are often suitable to infer the internal structure and the fracturing conditions of the unstable body. For monitoring purposes, although remote-sensing techniques and in-situ geotechnical measurements are successfully tested on landslides, they may not be suitable to early forecast sudden rapid rockslides. Passive seismic monitoring can help for this purpose. Detection, classification and localization of microseismic events within the prone-to-fall rock mass can provide information about the incipient failure of internal rock bridges. Acceleration to failure can be detected from an increasing microseismic event rate. The latter can be compared with meteorological data to understand the external factors controlling stability. On the other hand, seismic noise recorded on prone-to-fall rock slopes shows that the temporal variations in spectral content and correlation of ambient vibrations can be related to both reversible and irreversible changes within the rock mass. We present the results of the active and passive seismic data acquired at the potentially unstable granitic cliff of Madonna del Sasso (NW Italy). Down-hole tests, surface refraction and cross-hole tomography were carried out for the characterization of the fracturing state of the site. Field surveys were implemented with laboratory determination of physico-mechanical properties on rock samples and measurements of the ultrasonic pulse velocity. This multi-scale approach led to a lithological interpretation of the seismic velocity field obtained at the site and to a systematic correlation of the measured velocities with physical properties (density and porosity) and macroscopic features of the granitic cliff (fracturing, weathering and anisotropy). Continuous

  10. Beyond-laboratory-scale prediction for channeling flows through subsurface rock fractures with heterogeneous aperture distributions revealed by laboratory evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishibashi, Takuya; Watanabe, Noriaki; Hirano, Nobuo; Okamoto, Atsushi; Tsuchiya, Noriyoshi

    2015-01-01

    The present study evaluates aperture distributions and fluid flow characteristics for variously sized laboratory-scale granite fractures under confining stress. As a significant result of the laboratory investigation, the contact area in fracture plane was found to be virtually independent of scale. By combining this characteristic with the self-affine fractal nature of fracture surfaces, a novel method for predicting fracture aperture distributions beyond laboratory scale is developed. Validity of this method is revealed through reproduction of the results of laboratory investigation and the maximum aperture-fracture length relations, which are reported in the literature, for natural fractures. The present study finally predicts conceivable scale dependencies of fluid flows through joints (fractures without shear displacement) and faults (fractures with shear displacement). Both joint and fault aperture distributions are characterized by a scale-independent contact area, a scale-dependent geometric mean, and a scale-independent geometric standard deviation of aperture. The contact areas for joints and faults are approximately 60% and 40%. Changes in the geometric means of joint and fault apertures (µm), em, joint and em, fault, with fracture length (m), l, are approximated by em, joint = 1 × 102 l0.1 and em, fault = 1 × 103 l0.7, whereas the geometric standard deviations of both joint and fault apertures are approximately 3. Fluid flows through both joints and faults are characterized by formations of preferential flow paths (i.e., channeling flows) with scale-independent flow areas of approximately 10%, whereas the joint and fault permeabilities (m2), kjoint and kfault, are scale dependent and are approximated as kjoint = 1 × 10-12 l0.2 and kfault = 1 × 10-8 l1.1.

  11. Redrilling of well EE-3 at the Los Alamos National Laboratory HDR (Hot Dry Rock) project

    SciTech Connect

    Schillo, J.C.; Nicholson, R.W.; Hendron, R.H.; Thomson, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    The successful sidetracking of well EE-3 and the drilling of well EE-3A proved that with detailed planning and by adjusting techniques based on previous experience at Fenton Hill, drilling can be accomplished with reduced risk. The primary drilling problems associated with drilling of hot, crystalline basement rock, are (a) abrasiveness between the downhole tools and the formations and (b) a crooked wellbore path. These were essentially eliminated by a specially designed drilling fluid and careful pre-planning of the directional drilling operations. These improvements have taken much of the risk out of drilling at the Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock (HDR) Geothermal Test Site. The sidetracking of EE-3 and drilling of EE-3A were undertaken to complete the hydraulic connection between boreholes. Drilling through fractured regions indicated by the dense zones of microseismic activity increased the probability of success. EE-3 was sidetracked at 9373' and redrilled to a depth of 13,182'.

  12. Rock weathering by indigenous heterotrophic bacteria of Bacillus spp. at different temperature: a laboratory experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Štyriaková, I.; Štyriak, I.; Oberhänsli, H.

    2012-07-01

    The bio-weathering of basalt, granite and gneiss was experimentally investigated in this study. These rock-forming minerals weathered more rapidly via the ubiquitous psychrotrophic heterotrophic bacteria . With indigenous bacteria of Bacillus spp. from sediments of Lake Baikal, we traced the degradation process of silicate minerals to understand the weathering processes occurring at the change temperature in the subsurface environment with organic input. The bacteria mediated dissolution of minerals was monitored with solution and solid chemistry, X-ray analyses as well as microscopic techniques. We determined the impact of the bacteria on the mineral surface and leaching of K, Ca, Mg, Si, Fe, and Al from silicate minerals. In the samples the release of major structural elements of silicates was used as an overall indicator of silicate mineral degradation at 4°C and 18°C from five medium exchanges over 255 days of rock bioleaching. The increase of temperature importantly affected the efficiency of Fe extraction from granite and basalt as well as Si extraction from granite and gneiss. In comparison with elemental extraction order at 4°C, Ca was substituted first by Fe or Si. It is evident that temperature influences rock microbial weathering and results in a change of elements extraction.

  13. 3D Anisotropic Velocity Tomography of a Water Saturated Rock under True-Triaxial Stress in the Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghofrani Tabari, M.; Goodfellow, S. D.; Nasseri, M. B.; Young, R.

    2013-12-01

    A cubic specimen of water saturated Fontainebleau Sandstone is tested in the laboratory under true-triaxial loading where three different principal stresses are applied under drained conditions. Due to the loading arrangement, closure and opening of the pre-existing cracks in the rock, as well as creation and growth of the aligned cracks cause elliptical anisotropy and distributed heterogeneities. A Geophysical Imaging Cell equipped with an Acoustic Emission monitoring system is employed to image velocity structure of the sample during the experiment through repeated transducer to transducer non-destructive ultrasonic surveys. Apparent P-wave velocities along the rock body are calculated in different directions and shown in stereonet plots which demonstrate an overall anisotropy of the sample. The apparent velocities in the main three orthogonal cubic directions are used as raw data for building a mean spatial distribution model of anisotropy ratios. This approach is based on the concept of semi-principal axes in an elliptical anisotropic model and appointing two ratios between the three orthogonal velocities in each of the cubic grid cells. The spatial distribution model of anisotropy ratios are used to calculate the anisotropic ray-path segment matrix elements (Gij). These contain segment lengths of the ith ray in the jth cell in three dimensions where, length of each ray in each cell is computed for one principal direction based on the dip and strike of the ray and these lengths differ from the ones in an isotropic G Matrix. 3D strain of the squeezed rock and the consequent geometrical deformation is also included in the ray-path segment matrix. A Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) method is used for inversion from the data space of apparent velocities to the model space of P-wave propagation velocities in the three principal directions. Finally, spatial variation and temporal evolution of induced damages in the rock, representing uniformly distributed or

  14. Trace element anomaly in fault rock induced by coseismic hydrothermal reactions reproduced in laboratory friction experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanikawa, Wataru; Ishikawa, Tsuyoshi; Honda, Go; Hirono, Tetsuro; Tadai, Osamu

    2015-05-01

    Friction experiments at high velocities (0.1 to 0.4 m/s) at room temperature under high pore fluid pressures (2 or 5 MPa) and trace element analyses of the run products were carried out on simulated fault gouge derived from the Chelungpu fault, Taiwan. The friction coefficient decreased to ~0.1 during sliding, and the slip surface temperature reached 300°C by 6 m of slip displacement. The slip caused a small, but distinct decrease of Li in the deformed gouge when the slip surface temperature exceeded 300°C. The observed Li depletion agreed with calculated results, indicating that it resulted from a hydrothermal reaction at a high temperature produced by short-duration (up to 40 s) frictional heating. The geochemical data suggest a small fluid/rock ratio and low reaction temperature in the simulated fault, which is explained by higher normal stress or repeated earthquakes which elevated fluid-rock ratios in the natural fault.

  15. Laboratory measurements of reservoir rock from the Geysers geothermal field, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lockner, D.A.; Summers, R.; Moore, D.; Byerlee, J.D.

    1982-01-01

    Rock samples taken from two outcrops, as well as rare cores from three well bores at the Geysers geothermal field, California, were tested at temperatures and pressures similar to those found in the geothermal field. Both intact and 30?? sawcut cylinders were deformed at confining pressures of 200-1000 bars, pore pressure of 30 bars and temperatures of 150?? and 240??C. Thin-section and X-ray analysis revealed that some borehole samples had undergone extensive alteration and recrystallization. Constant strain rate tests of 10-4 and 10-6 per sec gave a coefficient of friction of 0.68. Due to the highly fractured nature of the rocks taken from the production zone, intact samples were rarely 50% stronger than the frictional strength. This result suggests that the Geysers reservoir can support shear stresses only as large as its frictional shear strength. Velocity of p-waves (6.2 km/sec) was measured on one sample. Acoustic emission and sliding on a sawcut were related to changes in pore pressure. b-values computed from the acoustic emissions generated during fluid injection were typically about 0.55. An unusually high b-value (approximately 1.3) observed during sudden injection of water into the sample may have been related to thermal cracking. ?? 1982.

  16. Melt-rock reaction in the asthenospheric mantle: Perspectives from laboratory dissolution experiments (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Y.; Wang, C.; Saper, L.; Dygert, N. J.; Xu, W.

    2013-12-01

    The primary motivation for melt-rock interaction in the mantle is chemical disequilibrium that arises when melt generated in the deep mantle percolates through the overlying mantle. This is a continuous process involving both thermal and chemical exchange between the melt and the solid matrix. It occurs in all major active tectonic regimes within the upper mantle and is responsible for a range of petrologic and geochemical observations. Factors that are important in controlling the kinetics of melt-rock interaction include temperature, pressure, and melt composition. The present study focuses on the effect of reacting melting composition, especially water and silica content, on reaction kinetics. In terms of melt composition, we can broadly divide melt-rock interaction into three groups: (1) reaction between peridotite and silica-undersaturated (anhydrous) melt; (2) reaction between peridotite and silica-saturated (anhydrous) melt; and (3) reaction between peridotite and hydrous melt. (1) is important to melt migration beneath mid-ocean ridges, (2) is relevant to magma genesis involving pyroxenite, and (3) is important to melt generation in the mantle wedge and back-arc basin. Reaction between peridotites and silica-undersaturated melts such as alkali basalt and MORB at moderate to low pressures can produce a melt-bearing dunite-harzburgite or dunite-harzburgite-lherzolite sequence. Reaction between peridotites and siliceous melts derived from melting of eclogite or garnet pyroxenite do not form dunite at moderate to high pressures (1-3.5 GPa and 1200-1550°C). Instead, they produce melt-bearing harzburgite at moderate pressure and opx-rich harzburgite or orthopyroxenite at high pressure. The opx is produced at the expense of olivine and the siliceous melt, which may hinder further reaction because of porosity reduction in these reactions. The rate of peridotite dissolution is considerably lower when the peridotite is subsolidus, and a high-porosity harzburgite or

  17. Analytical performance of a versatile laboratory microscopic X-ray fluorescence system for metal uptake studies on argillaceous rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gergely, Felicián; Osán, János; Szabó, B. Katalin; Török, Szabina

    2016-02-01

    Laboratory-scale microscopic X-ray fluorescence (micro-XRF) plays an increasingly important role in various fields where multielemental investigations of samples are indispensable. In case of geological samples, the reasonable detection limits (LOD) and spatial resolutions are necessary to identify the trace element content in microcrystalline level. The present study focuses on the analytical performance of a versatile laboratory-scale micro-XRF system with various options of X-ray sources and detectors to find the optimal experimental configuration in terms of sensitivities and LOD for selected elements in loaded petrographic thin sections. The method was tested for sorption studies involving thin sections prepared from cores of Boda Claystone Formation, which is a potential site for a high-level radioactive waste repository. Loaded ions in the sorption measurements were Cs(I) and Ni(II) chemically representing fission and corrosion products. Based on the collected elemental maps, the correlation between the elements representative of main rock components and the selected loaded ion was studied. For the elements of interest, Cs(I) and Ni(II) low-power iMOXS source with polycapillary and silicon drift detector was found to be the best configuration to reach the optimal LOD values. Laboratory micro-XRF was excellent to identify the responsible key minerals for the uptake of Cs(I). In case of nickel, careful corrections were needed because of the relatively high Ca content of the rock samples. The results were compared to synchrotron radiation micro-XRF.

  18. Effects of trace gas components in carbon capture and storage: geochemical experiments and simulation of laboratory-scale brine-rock-CO2-trace gas interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stadler, Susanne; Nowak, Thomas; Heeschen, Katja; Riße, Andreas; Ostertag-Henning, Christian

    2010-05-01

    In the research activities on geological storage of carbon dioxide many studies mainly focus on the impact of pure CO2 gas on the storage formations. However, flue gas streams of power plants not only contain CO2, but also number of trace gases such as O2, N2, Ar, NOX, SOX, CO, H2, H2S, COS and CH4. These trace gases may not only interact with pipeline material, but can also trigger short-term and long-term changes within the subsurface storage lithology. The chemical reactivity of each of these compounds has to be evaluated and their interactions with each other have to be understood, especially since some of them are far more reactive than CO2. Within the project COORAL (= CO2 Purity for Capture and Storage) we concentrate on geochemical investigations to determine reaction pathways and kinetics of different mineral phases typical for potential German storage formations as influenced by the presence of trace gases within the flue gas stream. Quantitative measurements of these reactions are relatively well described for pure CO2 systems but are so far not well described for multi-component mixtures. We combine laboratory experiments (batch and flow-through) with numerical simulations applying the geochemical simulators PHREEQC and ChemApp, which will be coupled to GeoSys/RockFlow for coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical-chemical (THMC) process simulations. Calculations and experiments are performed for temperatures up to 200°C and pressures up to 50 MPa. The aim of the study is to determine optimal maximum concentration levels of trace gases in flue gas streams to be used in geological CO2 storage.

  19. The rock abrasion record at Gale Crater: Mars Science Laboratory results from Bradbury Landing to Rocknest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridges, N. T.; Calef, F. J.; Hallet, B.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Lanza, N. L.; Le Mouélic, S.; Newman, C. E.; Blaney, D. L.; Pablo, M. A.; Kocurek, G. A.; Langevin, Y.; Lewis, K. W.; Mangold, N.; Maurice, S.; Meslin, P.-Y.; Pinet, P.; Renno, N. O.; Rice, M. S.; Richardson, M. E.; Sautter, V.; Sletten, R. S.; Wiens, R. C.; Yingst, R. A.

    2014-06-01

    Ventifacts, rocks abraded by wind-borne particles, are found in Gale Crater, Mars. In the eastward drive from "Bradbury Landing" to "Rocknest," they account for about half of the float and outcrop seen by Curiosity's cameras. Many are faceted and exhibit abrasion textures found at a range of scales, from submillimeter lineations to centimeter-scale facets, scallops, flutes, and grooves. The drive path geometry in the first 100 sols of the mission emphasized the identification of abrasion facets and textures formed by westerly flow. This upwind direction is inconsistent with predictions based on models and the orientation of regional dunes, suggesting that these ventifact features formed from very rare high-speed winds. The absence of active sand and evidence for deflation in the area indicates that most of the ventifacts are fossil features experiencing little abrasion today.

  20. The rock abrasion record at Gale Crater: Mars Science Laboratory results from Bradbury Landing to Rocknest

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bridges, N.T.; Calef, F.J., III; Hallett, B.W.; Herkenhoff, Kenneth E.; Lanza, N.L.; Le Mouélic, S.; Newman, C.E.; Blaney, D.L.; de Pablo, M.A.; Kocurek, G.A.; Langevin, Y.; Lewis, K.W.; Mangold, N.; Maurice, S.; Meslin, P.-Y.; Pinet, P.; Renno, N.O.; Rice, CM.S.; Richardson, M.E.; Sautter, V.; Sletten, R.S.; Wiens, R.C.; Yingst, R.A.

    2014-01-01

    Ventifacts, rocks abraded by wind-borne particles, are found in Gale Crater, Mars. In the eastward drive from “Bradbury Landing” to “Rocknest,” they account for about half of the float and outcrop seen by Curiosity's cameras. Many are faceted and exhibit abrasion textures found at a range of scales, from submillimeter lineations to centimeter-scale facets, scallops, flutes, and grooves. The drive path geometry in the first 100 sols of the mission emphasized the identification of abrasion facets and textures formed by westerly flow. This upwind direction is inconsistent with predictions based on models and the orientation of regional dunes, suggesting that these ventifact features formed from very rare high-speed winds. The absence of active sand and evidence for deflation in the area indicates that most of the ventifacts are fossil features experiencing little abrasion today.

  1. Prevention and Control of Antimicrobial Resistant Healthcare-Associated Infections: The Microbiology Laboratory Rocks!

    PubMed Central

    Simões, Alexandra S.; Couto, Isabel; Toscano, Cristina; Gonçalves, Elsa; Póvoa, Pedro; Viveiros, Miguel; Lapão, Luís V.

    2016-01-01

    In Europe, each year, more than four milion patients acquire a healthcare-associated infection (HAI) and almost 40 thousand die as a direct consequence of it. Regardless of many stategies to prevent and control HAIs, they remain an important cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide with a significant economic impact: a recent estimate places it at the ten billion dollars/year. The control of HAIs requires a prompt and efficient identification of the etiological agent and a rapid communication with the clinician. The Microbiology Laboratory has a significant role in the prevention and control of these infections and is a key element of any Infection Control Program. The work of the Microbiology Laboratory covers microbial isolation and identification, determination of antimicrobial susceptibility patterns, epidemiological surveillance and outbreak detection, education, and report of quality assured results. In this paper we address the role and importance of the Microbiology Laboratory in the prevention and control of HAI and in Antibiotic Stewardship Programs and how it can be leveraged when combined with the use of information systems. Additionally, we critically review some challenges that the Microbiology Laboratory has to deal with, including the selection of analytic methods and the proper use of communication channels with other healthcare services. PMID:27375577

  2. Physical properties and rock physics models of sediment containing natural and laboratory-formed methane gas hydrate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winters, W.J.; Pecher, I.A.; Waite, W.F.; Mason, D.H.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents results of shear strength and acoustic velocity (p-wave) measurements performed on: (1) samples containing natural gas hydrate from the Mallik 2L-38 well, Mackenzie Delta, Northwest Territories; (2) reconstituted Ottawa sand samples containing methane gas hydrate formed in the laboratory; and (3) ice-bearing sands. These measurements show that hydrate increases shear strength and p-wave velocity in natural and reconstituted samples. The proportion of this increase depends on (1) the amount and distribution of hydrate present, (2) differences, in sediment properties, and (3) differences in test conditions. Stress-strain curves from the Mallik samples suggest that natural gas hydrate does not cement sediment grains. However, stress-strain curves from the Ottawa sand (containing laboratory-formed gas hydrate) do imply cementation is present. Acoustically, rock physics modeling shows that gas hydrate does not cement grains of natural Mackenzie Delta sediment. Natural gas hydrates are best modeled as part of the sediment frame. This finding is in contrast with direct observations and results of Ottawa sand containing laboratory-formed hydrate, which was found to cement grains (Waite et al. 2004). It therefore appears that the microscopic distribution of gas hydrates in sediment, and hence the effect of gas hydrate on sediment physical properties, differs between natural deposits and laboratory-formed samples. This difference may possibly be caused by the location of water molecules that are available to form hydrate. Models that use laboratory-derived properties to predict behavior of natural gas hydrate must account for these differences.

  3. Calcite fracture fillings as indicators of paleohydrology at Laxemar at the Aspo Hard Rock Laboratory, southern Sweden

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wallin, B.; Peterman, Z.

    1999-01-01

    Isotopic compositions of C (??13C), O (??18O) and Sr (??87Sr) were determined for calcite fracture fillings in the crystalline rock penetrated by a 1.6 km drill hole at Laxemar, near the Aspo Hard Rock Laboratory (AHRL) in southern Sweden. These calcites precipitated from groundwater some time in the past, and their ??13C, ??18O and ??87Sr values reflect those of the source waters. The present-day groundwater system is hydrochemically stratified with highly saline water underlying more shallow brackish and fresh water. The origin of this stratified system is probably related to past glaciations although the ultimate origin of the deep, highly saline water is still problematical. None of the calcite fracture fillings sampled below 900 m could have precipitated from any of the present-day ground waters which in view of the glacial history of the region is not surprising. However, several shallow calcite fracture fillings are formed by precipitation from the present-day groundwater. Coupled variations in ??13C, ??18O and ??87Sr isotopes at depths in excess of 900 m suggest that these isotope systems in calcite are recording a time-dependent evolution of groundwater composition.

  4. Transport and attenuation of carboxylate-modified latex microspheres in fractured rock laboratory and field tracer tests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Becker, M.W.; Reimus, P.W.; Vilks, P.

    1999-01-01

    Understanding colloid transport in ground water is essential to assessing the migration of colloid-size contaminants, the facilitation of dissolved contaminant transport by colloids, in situ bioremediation, and the health risks of pathogen contamination in drinking water wells. Much has been learned through laboratory and field-scale colloid tracer tests, but progress has been hampered by a lack of consistent tracer testing methodology at different scales and fluid velocities. This paper presents laboratory and field tracer tests in fractured rock that use the same type of colloid tracer over an almost three orders-of-magnitude range in scale and fluid velocity. Fluorescently-dyed carboxylate-modified latex (CML) microspheres (0.19 to 0.98 ??m diameter) were used as tracers in (1) a naturally fractured tuff sample, (2) a large block of naturally fractured granite, (3) a fractured granite field site, and (4) another fractured granite/schist field site. In all cases, the mean transport time of the microspheres was shorter than the solutes, regardless of detection limit. In all but the smallest scale test, only a fraction of the injected microsphere mass was recovered, with the smaller microspheres being recovered to a greater extent than the larger microspheres. Using existing theory, we hypothesize that the observed microsphere early arrival was due to volume exclusion and attenuation was due to aggregation and/or settling during transport. In most tests, microspheres were detected using flow cytometry, which proved to be an excellent method of analysis. CML microspheres appear to be useful tracers for fractured rock in forced gradient and short-term natural gradient tests, but longer residence times may result in small microsphere recoveries.Understanding colloid transport in ground water is essential to assessing the migration of colloid-size contaminants, the facilitation of dissolved contaminant transport by colloids, in situ bioremediation, and the health risks

  5. Results of Laboratory Scale Fracture Tests on Rock/Cement Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Um, Wooyong; Jung, Hun Bok

    2012-06-01

    A number of pure cement and cement-basalt interface samples were subjected to a range of compressive loads to form internal fractures. X-ray microtomography was used to visualize the formation and growth of internal fractures in three dimensions as a function of compressive loads. This laboratory data will be incorporated into a geomechanics model to predict the risk of CO2 leakage through wellbores during geologic carbon storage.

  6. Exploratory simulations of multiphase effects in gas injection and ventilation tests in an underground rock laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Finsterle, S. . Versuchsanstalt fuer Wasserbau, Hydrologie und Glaciologie); Schlueter, E.; Pruess, K. )

    1990-06-01

    This report is one of a series documenting the results of the Nagra-DOE Cooperative (NDC-I) research program in which the cooperating scientists explore the geological, geophysical, hydrological, geochemical, and structural effects was sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) through the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) and the Swiss Nationale Genossenschaft fuer die Lagerung radioaktiver Abfaella (Nagra) and concluded in September 1989. 16 refs., 29 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. Laboratory Experiments of Silica Powder Lubrication Between Rock Faces at Coseismic Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, K.; Kavehpour, P.; Brodsky, E.

    2004-12-01

    One of the unresolved problems in earthquake mechanics is the physical process controlling friction on faults during the rupture of large earthquakes. Many studies suggest that coseismic friction is low even at great depths and several mechanisms have been introduced to explain these observations. In these experiments, we attempt to investigate the physics of mechanical lubrication between rock surfaces by using dry powder. To simulate rock friction, we utilize a tribo-rheometer where two novaculite disks, with 1-inch diameter and 5-micron surface roughness, are compressed together with a thin layer of 5-micron silica powder applied in between. The tribo-rheometer is a highly sensitive instrument that measures torque and normal force when a test substance is placed between the rotating plates. The measurements can be used to directly calculate the viscosity and the friction coefficient. These experiments investigate the velocity dependence of friction by rotating the top disk through velocities from 10-3 to 102 rad/sec while the normal stress is kept constant on the order of 104 Pa. The preliminary experiments show frictional regimes of boundary, mixed, and hydrodynamic lubrication; together known as the Stribeck curve. At high shear rates of >10 rad/sec, hydrodynamic lubrication occurs when fluid-like behavior of granular flow are responsible for the shear stress between the surfaces. In contrast, boundary lubrication has full asperity contact between the top and bottom surfaces during low shear rates of <0.01 rad/sec and shear stress arises from physical interactions. Between the two regimes above, the mixed lubrication is where there is a combination of surface asperity and powder lubricant interactions. From the data, we find the friction coefficient drops from a boundary lubrication value of ˜0.3 -- 0.4 to a mixed regime minimum of ˜0.2 -- 0.3 while transitioning to the hydrodynamic lubrication. The transition corresponds to a change from solid

  8. P-waves imaging of the FRI and BK zones at the Grimsel Rock Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Majer, E.L.; Peterson, J.E. Jr. ); Blueming, P.; Sattel, G. )

    1990-08-01

    This report is one of a series documenting the results of the Nagra-DOE Cooperative (NDC-I) research program in which the cooperating scientists explore the geological, geophysical, hydrological, geochemical, and structural effects anticipated from the use of a rock mass as a geological repository for nuclear waste. Tomographic imaging studies using a high frequency (10 Khz.) piezoelectric source and a three component receiver were carried out in two different regions of the underground Nagra Grimsel test facility in Switzerland. Both sites were in fractured granite, one being in a strongly foliated granite (FRI site), and the other being in a relatively homogeneous granite (BK zone). The object of the work was to determine if the seismic techniques could be useful in imaging the fracture zones and provide information on the hydrologic conditions. Both amplitude and velocity tomograms were obtained from the Data. The results indicate that the fracture zones strongly influenced the seismic wave propagation, thus imaging the fracture zones that were hydrologically important. 11 refs., 24 figs.

  9. Experimental investigations and geochemical modelling of site-specific fluid-fluid and fluid-rock interactions in underground storage of CO2/H2/CH4 mixtures: the H2STORE project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Lucia, Marco; Pilz, Peter

    2015-04-01

    work packages hosted at the German Research Centre for Geosciences (GFZ) focus on the fluid-fluid and fluid-rock interactions triggered by CO2, H2 and their mixtures. Laboratory experiments expose core samples to hydrogen and CO2/hydrogen mixtures under site-specific conditions (temperatures up to 200 °C and pressure up to 300 bar). The resulting qualitative and, whereas possible, quantitative data are expected to ameliorate the precision of predictive geochemical and reactive transport modelling, which is also performed within the project. The combination of experiments, chemical and mineralogical analyses and models is needed to improve the knowledge about: (1) solubility model and mixing rule for multicomponent gas mixtures in high saline formation fluids: no data are namely available in literature for H2-charged gas mixtures in the conditions expected in the potential sites; (2) chemical reactivity of different mineral assemblages and formation fluids in a broad spectrum of P-T conditions and composition of the stored gas mixtures; (3) thermodynamics and kinetics of relevant reactions involving mineral dissolution or precipitation. The resulting amelioration of site characterization and the overall enhancement in understanding the potential processes will benefit the operational reliability, the ecological tolerance, and the economic efficiency of future energy storing plants, crucial aspects for public acceptance and for industrial investors.

  10. Laboratory assessment of the use of borehole pressure transients to measure the permeability of fractured rock masses

    SciTech Connect

    Forster, C.B.; Gale, J.E.

    1980-09-01

    A laboratory program is described that was designed (1) to evaluate the degree of correlation between permeability values determined from steady-state and transient tests on the same samples and (2) to determine the effects of packer compliance on pressure pulse tests performed on low permeability rocks. The basic theory of pressure pulse testing is reviewed and modifications are proposed that may account for packer compliance effects. The laboratory set-up simulates a full-scale field situation using standard field packers in a 76 mm steel pipe. Cylindrical samples 5 cm in diameter and 11 cm long can be subjected to hydrostatic confining pressure up to 34 MPa and pore pressures up to 10 MPa. Using this equipment, transient pressure pulse tests and stead-state flow tests have been performed on (1) two samples of Berea sandstone having conductivities of 6.1 x 10/sup -5/ cm/sec and 2.4 x 10/sup -4/ cm/sec. and (2) one sample of Stripa granite containing a single fracture parallel to the core axis. Flow through the fracture varied from 1.0 to 0.05 cm/sup 3//min when the confining pressure varied from about 3 MPa to 14 MPa for pressure differentials of 0.14 MPa. Transient tests on the porous media samples consistently gave lower permeability values than steady-state tests on the same samples. All samples showed distinct compliance effects that increased with decreasing permeability. The laboratory results demonstrated that transient tests are very sensitive to minor leaks in the test assembly and to temperature variations as slight as +- 0.05/sup 0/C in the cavity fluid. Thus pressure-pulse borehole equipment must be carefully checked in full-scale test assemblies and must incorporate temperature measuring devices that can detect changes of +- 0.01/sup 0/C.

  11. The role of fluids in rock layering development: a pressure solution self-organized process revealed by laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gratier, Jean-Pierre; Noiriel, Catherine; Renard, Francois

    2015-04-01

    Natural deformation of rocks is often associated with stress-driven differentiation processes leading to irreversible transformations of their microstructures. The development mechanisms of such processes during diagenesis, tectonic, metamorphism or fault differentiation are poorly known as they are difficult to reproduce experimentally due to the very slow kinetics of stress-driven chemical processes. Here, we show that experimental compaction with development of differentiated layering, similar to what happens in natural deformation, can be obtained by indenter techniques in laboratory conditions. Samples of plaster mixed with clay and of diatomite loosely interbedded with volcanic dust were loaded in presence of their saturated aqueous solutions during several months at 40°C and 150°C, respectively. High-resolution X-ray microtomography and scanning electron microscopy observations show that the layering development is a pressure solution self-organized process. Stress-driven dissolution of the soluble minerals (either gypsum or silica) is initiated in the areas initially richer in insoluble minerals (clays or volcanic dust) because the kinetics of diffusive mass transfer along the soluble/insoluble mineral interfaces is much faster than along the healed boundaries of the soluble minerals. The passive concentration of insoluble minerals amplifies the localization of dissolution along some layers oriented perpendicular to the maximum compressive stress. Conversely, in the areas with initial low content in insoluble minerals and clustered soluble minerals, dissolution is slower. Consequently, these areas are less deformed, they host the re-deposition of the soluble species and they act as rigid objects that concentrate the dissolution near their boundaries thus amplifying the differentiation. A crucial parameter required for self-organized process of pressure solution is the presence of a fluid that is a good solvent of at least some of the rock-forming minerals

  12. Gelatins as rock analog in laboratory models: a rheological study and preliminary applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbi, F.; di Giuseppe, E.; Funiciello, F.; Ranalli, G.; Faccenna, C.

    2009-12-01

    A laboratory model is a simplified scaled representation of nature. Thereby, according to ‘similarity criteria’, both rheological and physical parameters involved in the modeling must be properly scaled to natural conditions. In this work we systematically investigated the rheological and physical properties of a wide range of gelatins as functions of their temperature, composition, concentration, ageing and strain rate, in both gel- (i.e. solid) and sol-state (i.e. solution). Our results show that the complex mechanical behavior of gelatins reproduces gradually the full range of rheological behavior from purely elastic to visco-elasto-brittle to purely viscous (nonlinear) rheology going from the gel- to the sol-state. The handiness of the manipulation of the gelatins’ microstructure by calibrating the setting parameters and their resulting rheological variability appear promising for the potential use of these analog materials to simulate crustal and lithospheric rheological behavior. In particular, we found that pig skin 2.5 wt.% at 10 °C has the required rheological properties for a suitable experimental set-up to model crustal deformations.

  13. Laboratory coda wave interferometry for the monitoring of rock property variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmittbuhl, Jean; Chaintreuil, Marie; Lengliné, Olivier; Griffiths, Luke; Heap, Mike; Baud, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    A significant effort is on-going in the community to continuously monitor deep geothermal reservoirs using ambient seismic noise tomography (e.g. Calo et al, 2013; Lehujeur et al, 2015). It is a method that determines the Green's function between a pair of receivers by correlating sufficiently long seismic noise records. Very small changes of the medium are accessible using this new monitoring technique (significantly smaller than those deduced from direct arrivals). In particular, very small variations of seismic velocities are shown to appear both in time and space during the stimulation of the reservoir. A central question is how to interpret these transient or lateral variations of the seismic velocities for a precise 4D tomography of the reservoir properties. In this study, we address the direct problem of monitoring small variations in seismic velocities when small variations in stress or temperature are slowly applied to the sample. We use a network of piezo-electric sensors on laboratory samples (sandstone and granite from Soultz-sous-Forêts core samples) to perform coda wave interferometry from the multiple scattering of well-controlled seismic pulses (Grêt et al, 2006). The data collected are estimates of the relative variation of travel time. We combine acoustic measurements and strain gauges to differentiate between travel time variations due to seismic velocity changes and those due to deformation effects. We expect this approach to provide useful information for large scale seismic tomography despite the significant difference of considered wavelengths.

  14. Laboratory hydraulic fracturing experiments in intact and pre-fractured rock

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zoback, M.D.; Rummel, F.; Jung, R.; Raleigh, C.B.

    1977-01-01

    Laboratory hydraulic fracturing experiments were conducted to investigate two factors which could influence the use of the hydrofrac technique for in-situ stress determinations; the possible dependence of the breakdown pressure upon the rate of borehole pressurization, and the influence of pre-existing cracks on the orientation of generated fractures. The experiments have shown that while the rate of borehole pressurization has a marked effect on breakdown pressures, the pressure at which hydraulic fractures initiate (and thus tensile strength) is independent of the rate of borehole pressurization when the effect of fluid penetration is negligible. Thus, the experiments indicate that use of breakdown pressures rather than fracture initiation pressures may lead to an erroneous estimate of tectonic stresses. A conceptual model is proposed to explain anomalously high breakdown pressures observed when fracturing with high viscosity fluids. In this model, initial fracture propagation is presumed to be stable due to large differences between the borehole pressure and that within the fracture. In samples which contained pre-existing fractures which were 'leaky' to water, we found it possible to generate hydraulic fractures oriented parallel to the direction of maximum compression if high viscosity drilling mud was used as the fracturing fluid. ?? 1977.

  15. Detection and cultivation of indigenous microorganisms in Mesozoic claystone core samples from the Opalinus Clay Formation (Mont Terri Rock Laboratory)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauclaire, L.; McKenzie, J. A.; Schwyn, B.; Bossart, P.

    Although microorganisms have been isolated from various deep-subsurface environments, the persistence of microbial activity in claystones buried to great depths and on geological time scales has been poorly studied. The presence of in-situ microbial life in the Opalinus Clay Formation (Mesozoic claystone, 170 million years old) at the Mont Terri Rock Laboratory, Canton Jura, Switzerland was investigated. Opalinus Clay is a host rock candidate for a radioactive waste repository. Particle tracer tests demonstrated the uncontaminated nature of the cored samples, showing their suitability for microbiological investigations. To determine whether microorganisms are a consistent and characteristic component of the Opalinus Clay Formation, two approaches were used: (i) the cultivation of indigenous micoorganisms focusing mainly on the cultivation of sulfate-reducing bacteria, and (ii) the direct detection of molecular biomarkers of bacteria. The goal of the first set of experiments was to assess the presence of cultivable microorganisms within the Opalinus Clay Formation. After few months of incubation, the number of cell ranged from 0.1 to 2 × 10 3 cells ml -1 media. The microorganisms were actively growing as confirmed by the observation of dividing cells, and detection of traces of sulfide. To avoid cultivation bias, quantification of molecular biomarkers (phospholipid fatty acids) was used to assess the presence of autochthonous microorganisms. These molecules are good indicators of the presence of living cells. The Opalinus Clay contained on average 64 ng of PLFA g -1 dry claystone. The detected microbial community comprises mainly Gram-negative anaerobic bacteria as indicated by the ratio of iso/anteiso phospholipids (about 2) and the detection of large amount of β-hydroxy substituted fatty acids. The PLFA composition reveals the presence of specific functional groups of microorganisms in particular sulfate-reducing bacteria ( Desulfovibrio, Desulfobulbus, and

  16. Seismic moment tensors of acoustic emissions recorded during laboratory rock deformation experiments: sensitivity to attenuation and anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stierle, Eva; Vavryčuk, Václav; Kwiatek, Grzegorz; Charalampidou, Elli-Maria; Bohnhoff, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Seismic moment tensors can provide information on the size and orientation of fractures producing acoustic emissions (AEs) and on the stress conditions in the sample. The moment tensor inversion of AEs is, however, a demanding procedure requiring carefully calibrated sensors and accurate knowledge of the velocity model. In field observations, the velocity model is usually isotropic and time independent. In laboratory experiments, the velocity is often anisotropic and time dependent and attenuation might be significant due to opening or closure of microcracks in the sample during loading. In this paper, we study the sensitivity of the moment tensor inversion to anisotropy of P-wave velocities and attenuation. We show that retrieved moment tensors critically depend on anisotropy and attenuation and their neglect can lead to misinterpretations of the source mechanisms. The accuracy of the inversion also depends on the fracturing mode of AEs: tensile events are more sensitive to P-wave anisotropy and attenuation than shear events. We show that geometry of faulting in anisotropic rocks should be studied using the source tensors, since the P- and T-axes of the moment tensors are affected by velocity anisotropy and deviate from the true orientation of faulting. The stronger the anisotropy is, the larger the deviations are. Finally, we prove that the moment tensor inversion applied to a large dataset of AEs can be utilized to provide information on the attenuation parameters of the rock sample. The method is capable of measuring anisotropic attenuation in the sample and allows for detection of dilatant cracking according to the stress regime.

  17. Laboratory ultrasonic and resistivity measurements on sedimentary rocks containing tetrahydrofuran hydrates

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, C.F.; Murphy, J.R.; Hermes, R.E.; Halleck, P.M.

    1984-01-01

    In this paper, we report laboratory ultrasonic and resistivity measurements on Berea Sandstone and Austin Chalk samples saturated with a stoichiometric mixture of tetrahydrofuran (THF) and water. We used THF as the guest species rather than methane or propane gas because THF can be mixed with water to form a solution containing the proper stoichiometric proportions of the THF and water. Neither methane nor propane is soluble in water. Because THF solutions form hydrates readily at atmospheric pressure, it is an excellent experimental analogue to natural gas hydrates. Hydrate formation increased the ultrasonic P-wave velocities from a room temperature value of 2.5 km/s to 4.5 km/s at -5/sup 0/C when the pores were nearly filled with hydrates. However, lowering the temperature below -5/sup 0/C did not appreciably change the velocity. In contrast, the electrical resistivity increased nearly two orders of magnitude upon hydrate formation and continued to increase more slowly as the temperature was further decreased. In all cases the resistivities were nearly frequency independent to 30 kHz and the loss tangents were high, always greater than 5. The dielectric loss showed a linear decrease with frequency suggesting that ionic conduction through a brine phase dominates at all frequencies, even when the pores are nearly filled with hydrates. We find that the resistivities are strongly a function of the dissolved salt content of the pore water. Pore water salinity also influenced the sonic velocity, but this effect is much smaller and only important near the hydrate formation temperature. 11 references, 9 figures.

  18. The Application of Coreless Inductors for Displacement Measurements in Laboratory Investigations of Rock Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurkowski, Janusz

    2014-12-01

    The paper presented the coreless inductive sensor, its construction and principle of operation. The impact of temperature on the outcome of a measurement performed with the inductor was discusses, together with the possibility of temperature compensation of the inductor's performance. Subsequently, the reasons for limited measurement accuracy and resolution were discussed, particularly under the variable pressure in the order of some hundreds MPa. Two types of such sensor were presented: a sensor for measuring linear strains, e.g. during compressibility measurements, and an sensor for measuring circumferential strains during triaxial compression tests. Additionally, the manners of fixing the sensor on rock samples were presented. Finally, some examples of the sensor application were shown, together with the results of measurements of deformations of rock samples - especially in cases when resistance gauges cannot be used, and the samples are subjected to a load in the uniaxial and triaxial system, under the hydrostatic pressure of up to 400 MPa and the normal one. W Pracowni Odkształceń Skał Instytutu Mechaniki Górotworu prowadzone są badania właściwości mechanicznych skał. Wymaga to precyzyjnego pomiaru odkształcenia, na ogół pod wysokim ciśnieniem hydrostatycznym, które symuluje warunki panujące w głębi górotworu. Ciśnienie hydrostatyczne (do 400MPa w aparacie GTA-10) i ograniczona do kilku milimetrów przestrzeń w komorze ciśnieniowej na zainstalowanie odpowiedniego przyrządu, a także spękania i kawerny w skałach powodują znaczne trudności pomiaru odkształcenia z wymaganą rozdzielczością (nawet 10-6). Stosowanie tensometrów elektrooporowych naklejanych wprost na próbkę często jest zawodne, gdyż ciśnienie wgniata ścieżkę rezystancyjną w nierówności próbki, powodując jej przerwanie, a co gorsze, fałszuje wyniki pomiaru. Wypełnianie szczelin lub kawern różnymi podkładami jak klej epoksydowy, gips, jest

  19. Rock Garden

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This false color composite image of the Rock Garden shows the rocks 'Shark' and 'Half Dome' at upper left and middle, respectively. Between these two large rocks is a smaller rock (about 0.20 m wide, 0.10 m high, and 6.33 m from the Lander) that was observed close-up with the Sojourner rover (see PIA00989).

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

  20. Laboratory Detection of ClZnCH3 (X1A1): Further Evidence for Zinc Insertion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucchino, Matthew; Ziurys, Lucy

    2014-06-01

    The pure rotational spectrum of methylzinc chloride, ClZnCH3 (X1A1), has been recorded in the gas phase using direct absorption spectroscopic techniques. ClZnCH3 was synthesized by the reaction of zinc vapor, generated in a Broida-type oven, with chloromethane in the presence of a DC discharge. Rotational transitions of the main isotopologue, 35Cl64ZnCH3, were measured in the frequency range of 260{-297} GHz. The presence of clear K-ladder structure (K = 0{-6}) indicates that the species is a symmetric top with C3V symmetry. ClZnCH3 appears to be formed by the oxidative addition of atomic zinc to chloromethane. Searches for the 37Cl, 66Zn, 13C, and D substituted isotopologues are currently in progress. The geometries of ClZnCH3 and IZnCH3 will be compared with reactivity trends for halogen-substituted organometallic reagents.

  1. Seismic tomography of the Excavation Damaged Zone of the Gallery 04 in the Mont Terri Rock Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicollin, F.; Gibert, D.; Bossart, P.; Nussbaum, Ch.; Guervilly, C.

    2008-01-01

    An endoscopic antenna is used to perform a seismic cross-hole tomography in the Excavation Damaged Zone (EDZ) of the new G04 gallery of the Mont Terri Underground Rock Laboratory (Switzerland) excavated in Opalinus clay. More than 800 seismic traces were recorded between two vertical boreholes by combining 22 source and 48 receiver locations. A vertical area of 1.2 × 3.4 m under the floor of the gallery is investigated with a high-resolution tomography. Data with a very good quality allow to determine the traveltimes and the amplitudes of a 40kHz source wavelet propagating between the two boreholes. The analysis of the traveltimes shows that the wave velocity is homogeneous but anisotropic with a minimum value of 2490 +/- 45ms-1 in the direction normal to the bedding and a maximum of 3330 +/- 90ms-1 parallel to the bedding. The amplitude of the first arrivals strongly varies depending on the source-receiver locations, and suggesting an heterogeneous distribution of the attenuation coefficient of the seismic waves. A Bayesian inversion provides likely models of attenuation that are compared with geological observations. The areas where fractures or cracks exist in the Opalinus clay appear as highly absorbing the seismic waves.

  2. High Resolution Laboratory FTIR Spectroscopy at Planetary and Astrophysical Temperatures: Temperature Dependence of 13CH4 Line Shapes Broadened by N2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Keeyoon; Mantz, A. M.; Brown, L. R.; Smith, M. A. H.; Devi, V. M.; Benner, D. C.; Crawford, T. J.

    2009-12-01

    We present engineering results obtained with a Michelson Interferometer (Bruker IFS-125HR) newly configured with a temperature stabilized cryogenic absorption cell that hangs from the top cover of the evacuated sample compartment. The cell has an optical path of 24.29 cm and a demonstrated temperature stability of better than 0.01 K at all temperatures between 300 K and 90 K. The cryogenic cell is mounted on the cold finger of a closed cycle helium refrigerator, and the temperatures are monitored with Si diode sensors. The wedged ZnSe cell windows are vacuum sealed with crushed indium gaskets. To test the system performance, we first recorded spectra of the ν4 band of 13CH4 broadened by nitrogen at 0.0056 cm-1 instrumental resolution (Resolving power = 232000) using a HgCdTe detector . The 13CH4+N2 mixture pressures ranged from 140 to 796 torr with the volume mixing ratios of 13CH4 varying between 0.003 to 0.01 at 296, 255, 225 and 180 K. Line shape parameters of the R(4) manifold at 1324 cm-1 (7.55 μm) were retrieved using the nonlinear least squares multispectrum technique, fitting all spectra simultaneously to determine the temperature dependences for the 13CH4 nitrogen broadening and shift coefficients. The analysis of the entire band from 1200 to 1400 cm-1 (8.33 to 7.14 μm) is currently underway to support remote sensing of Titan. This new spectroscopic capability at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory will enable future research in studies of planetary science and astrophysics. The research at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), California Institute of Technology, the College of William and Mary and Connecticut College was performed under contracts and grants with National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  3. Laboratory Visualization Experiments of Temperature-induced Fractures Around a Borehole (Cryogenic Fracturing) in Shale and Analogue Rock Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kneafsey, T. J.; Nakagawa, S.; Wu, Y. S.; Mukhopadhyay, S.

    2014-12-01

    In tight shales, hydraulic fracturing is the dominant method for improving reservoir permeability. However, injecting water-based liquids can induce formation damage and disposal problems, thus other techniques are being sought. One alternative to hydraulic fracturing is producing fractures thermally, using low-temperature fluids (cryogens). The primary consequence of thermal stimulation is that shrinkage fractures are produced around the borehole wall. Recently, cryogenic stimulation produced some promising results when the cryogen (typically liquid nitrogen and cold nitrogen gas) could be brought to reservoir depth. Numerical modeling also showed possible significant increases in gas production from a shale reservoir after cryogenic stimulation. However, geometry and the dynamic behavior of these thermally induced fractures under different stress regimes and rock anisotropy and heterogeneity is not yet well understood.Currently, we are conducting a series of laboratory thermal fracturing experiments on Mancos Shale and transparent glass blocks, by injecting liquid nitrogen under atmospheric pressure into room temperature blocks under various anisotropic stress states. The glass blocks allow clear optical visualization of fracture development and final fracturing patterns. For the shale blocks, X-ray CT is used to image both pre-existing and induced fractures. Also, the effect of borehole orientation with respect to the bedding planes and aligned preexisting fractures is examined. Our initial experiment on a uniaxially compressed glass block showed fracturing behavior which was distinctly different from conventional hydraulic fracturing. In addition to tensile fractures in the maximum principal stress directions, the thermal contraction by the cryogen induced (1) chaotic, spalling fractures around the borehole wall, and (2) a series of disk-shaped annular fractures perpendicular to the borehole. When applied to a horizontal borehole, the propagation plane of the

  4. Field-verification program (aquatic disposal): comparison of field and laboratory bioaccumulation of organic and inorganic contaminants from Black Rock Harbor dredged material. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lake, J.L.; Galloway, W.; Hoffman, G.; Nelson, W.; Scott, K.J.

    1988-05-01

    The utility of laboratory tests for predicting bioaccumulation of contaminants in the field was evaluated by comparing the identities, relative abundances, and quantities of organic and inorganic contaminants accumulated by organisms exposed to dredged material in both laboratory and field studies. The organisms used were Mytilus edulis (a filter-feeding bivalve) and Nephtys incisa (a benthic polychaete). These organisms were exposed in the laboratory and in the field to a contaminated dredged material from Black Rock Harbor (BRH), Connecticut. Both organisms had positive and negative attributes for these exposure studies. Mytilus edulis appeared to reach steady-state in laboratory-exposure studies. However, the determination of field-exposure concentrations was precluded due to limitations on obtaining an integrated water sample during the exposure period in the field. Nephtys incisa did not appear to reach steady-state in laboratory studies and, although field-exposure data (sediment concentrations) were obtained, the exposure zone for these organisms could not be determined. Estimates of field exposures were made using laboratory-derived exposure-residue relationships and residues from field-exposed organisms. These field-exposure estimates were compared with those estimated using exposure data from the field. A comparison of these estimates showed the same general trends in the exposure-residue relationships from the laboratory and the field and further supports the laboratory predictive approach.

  5. Laboratory measurements of Vp and Vs in a porosity-developed crustal rock: Experimental investigation into the effects of porosity at deep crustal pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Satoshi; Ishikawa, Masahiro; Arima, Makoto; Tatsumi, Yoshiyuki

    2016-05-01

    In order to evaluate the influence of porosity on the elastic properties of crustal rocks at deep crustal pressures, we performed laboratory measurements of compressional-wave (Vp) and shear-wave (Vs) velocities in a porosity-developed gabbro sample up to 1.0 GPa at room temperature. Based on the measured Vp and Vs data, we evaluated the changes in velocities, Vp/Vs, Poisson's ratio (σ), and total porosity of the rock as a function of pressure. Compared with the 'porosity-free' intrinsic elastic values of the gabbro sample, our results suggest that the development of porosity in crustal rocks lowers their Vp, Vs, Vp/Vs, and Poisson's ratio. Deviations (ΔVp, ΔVs, ΔVp/Vs, and Δσ) of the measured values from the intrinsic values are enhanced with increasing porosity. We evaluated the ΔVp from previous experimental study on the rocks of Tanzawa plutonic complex providing constraints on interpretation of the seismic velocity profiles of the Izu-Bonin-Mariana (IBM) arc and found a large negative ΔVp (up to - 22.7%) at lower pressures. The intrinsic velocity combined with the measured velocity data at in situ pressure conditions suggest that the ranges of Vp (6.0-6.5 km/s) in the middle crust of the IBM arc reflect the presence of considerable porosity and its closure in intermediate rocks and/or the change of composition from felsic to intermediate in mid-crustal rocks.

  6. A step towards temperature-referenced ERT: Laboratory-calibrated ERT of seasonal changes in permafrost rock walls at the Zugspitze (German/Austrian Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krautblatter, M.; Verleysdonk, S.; Flores-Orozco, A.; Kemna, A.

    2009-04-01

    High-resolution ERT with 127 electrodes and on average 1550 datum points was conducted in a 276 m long gallery along the permafrost-affected north face of the Zugspitze in 2800 m a.s.l. in Februray, May, June, July, August, September and October 2007. Inversion was performed in a 8400 finite element grid with adjusted boundary conditions. To receive quantitatively reliable ERT values, we fitted a smoothness-constrained Occam's inversion to an empirically measured normal-reciprocal error model. Water-saturated dolomised Wetterstein limestone was measured in the laboratory to freeze at 30 (±3) kohmm at -0.5 (±0.1) °C, independent of initial or refreezing paths. Resistivity of unfrozen limestones increases by less than 104 ohmm/°C. According to laboratory values, temperature referencing of ERT below -0.5 °C could be described by p [in kohmm] = 19 - 19.3 (±2.1) * t [in C°] with an R² of 0.99. A comparison of the absolute ERT plots and monthly changes is consistent with the temporal changes of air temperature and rock temperature data. Maximum resistivity changes (30 kohmm ≈ lab analogue +1.5°C warming) in depths up to 27 m occur coincidently to maximum measured cleftwater flow in May. Differences in snow coverage seem to dominate the general distribution of permafrost and the timing of thaw in the rock wall transect. Refreezing from the rock wall starts in September is apparent in both, resistivity changes and expansion of the high-resistivity body. Error-controlled inversion and temperature calibration in the laboratory present the first approach towards quantitative temperature-referenced ERT in permafrost rocks.

  7. Laboratory tests to study the influence of rock stress confinement on the performances of TBM discs in tunnels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Innaurato, N.; Oggeri, C.; Oreste, P.; Vinai, R.

    2011-06-01

    To clarify some aspects of rock destruction with a disc acting on a high confined tunnel face, a series of tests were carried out to examine fracture mechanisms under an indenter that simulates the tunnel boring machine (TBM) tool action, in the presence of an adjacent groove, when a state of stress (lateral confinement) is imposed on a rock sample. These tests proved the importance of carefully establishing the optimal distance of grooves produced by discs acting on a confined surface, and the value (as a mere order of magnitude) of the increase of the thrust to produce the initiation of chip formation, as long as the confinement pressure becomes greater.

  8. Permeability and continuous gradient temperature monitoring of volcanic rocks: new insights from borehole and laboratory analysis at the Campi Flegrei caldera (Southern Italy).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlino, Stefano; Piochi, Monica; Tramelli, Anna; Troise, Claudia; Mormone, Angela; Montanaro, Cristian; Scheu, Bettina; Klaus, Mayer; Somma, Renato; De Natale, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    The pilot borehole recently drilled in the eastern caldera of Campi Flegrei (Southern Italy), during the Campi Flegrei Deep Drill Project (CFDDP) (in the framework of the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program) allowed (i) estimating on-field permeability and coring the crustal rocks for laboratory experiments, and (ii) determining thermal gradient measurements down to ca. 500 m of depth. We report here a first comparative in situ and laboratory tests to evaluate the rock permeability in the very high volcanic risk caldera of Campi Flegrei, in which ground deformations likely occur as the persistent disturbance effect of fluid circulation in the shallower geothermal system. A large amount of petro-physical information derives from outcropping welded tuffs, cores and geophysical logs from previous AGIP's drillings, which are located in the central and western part of the caldera. We discuss the expected scale dependency of rock permeability results in relation with well-stratigraphy and core lithology, texture and mineralogy. The new acquired data improve the database related to physical property of Campi Flegrei rocks, allowing a better constrain for the various fluid-dynamical models performed in the tentative to understand (and forecast) the caldera behavior. We also present the first data on thermal gradient continuously measured through 0 - to 475 m of depth by a fiber optic sensor installed in the CFDDP pilot hole. As regards, we show that the obtained values of permeability, compared with those inferred from eastern sector of the caldera, can explain the different distribution of temperature at depth, as well as the variable amount of vapor phase in the shallow geothermal system. The measured temperatures are consistent with the distribution of volcanism in the last 15 ka.

  9. A comparative study of melt-rock reactions in the mantle: laboratory dissolution experiments and geological field observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tursack, E.; Liang, Y.

    2010-12-01

    Systematic variations in major and trace elements in dunite, harzburgite, and lherzolite samples within the mantle sections of ophiolites have been widely observed. Such compositional variations may be key attributes to understanding melting, melt transport, and melt-rock reaction processes in the mantle. In order to better understand melt-rock reactions in the mantle we conducted a series of dissolution experiments where a spinel lherzolite starting composition was juxtaposed against an alkali basalt in a graphite-lined molybdenum capsule. The charges were run at 1 GPa and 1300o C for 8-24 hrs, and then were slowly cooled to 1200o C and held at 1200o C and 1 GPa for 24 hours. This additional period of cooling promotes in situ crystallization of interstitial melts, allowing us to better characterize the mineral compositional trends produced and observed by melt-rock reactions. After the experimental runs, each charge was cut and polished such that the reactive boundary layer (RBL) and the melt were fully exposed for analysis. The lithological units of resulting RBL present depend on run duration. For a short duration run (8 hrs), we observed three distinct units: dunite, harzburgite, and lherzolite. For a long duration run (24 hrs) the reaction front reached the end of capsule and we observed only a dunite unit. In contrast to previous melt-rock reaction studies, dunite in the RBLs is cpx-bearing. The cpx observed in the dunites were produced by cooling rather than melt-rock reaction. The mineral components present in the RBL of the charges were analyzed for compositional variations and assessed for general melt-rock reaction trends. Starting at the melt-rock interface, we found that the Mg number systematically increases in the olivine of each charge to the end of the capsule. Similarly, TiO2 and Al2O3 both decrease in the cpx found in each charge, whereas TiO2 decreases and Cr number increases in the spinel. Independent field studies conducted on the Josephine

  10. Broadband Screening for Interstellar Species: Additional Laboratory Measurements and Interstellar Detection of Ethanimine (CH3CHNH) in Sgr B2(N) Using GBT PRIMOS Survey Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loomis, Ryan; Zaleski, D.; Steber, A.; Neill, J.; Muckle, M. T.; Harris, B. J.; Seifert, N.; Pate, B.; Lattanzi, V.; Martinez, O.; McCarthy, M. C.; Remijan, A. J.

    2013-01-01

    As the availability of publicly accessible spectral line surveys from radio astronomy increases, new approaches to the identification of molecules in the interstellar medium are possible. We have performed reaction product screening measurements using broadband rotational spectroscopy to identify potential matches in the laboratory and radio astronomy spectra. A broadband spectrum of an electrical discharge of CH3CN and H2S contained several matches to unidentified features in the GBT PRIMOS Survey1 of Sgr B2(N) that did not have molecular assignments in the radio astronomy spectral catalogs. These transitions have been assigned to the E- and Z-isomers of ethanimine (CH3CHNH). The rotational spectrum of the E- and Z-isomers of CH3CHNH have been reported at mm-wave frequencies in 1980 by Lovas et al.2 and then in 1981 by Brown et al.3 The analysis of the rotational spectra of these two isomers has been extended to the microwave frequency region to verify the assignments from the GBT PRIMOS Survey. Combined fits over the range of 8 to 130GHz consisting of data from Lovas et al., broadband CP-FTMW measurements, and cavity double resonance measurements are presented for both isomers. Evidence for the detection of both isomers in Sgr B2(N) is shown along with a discussion of the method of their detection and a brief analysis of possible formation routes. 1. GBT PRIMOS Survey, http://www.cv.nrao.edu aremijan/PRIMOS 2. F.J. Lovas, R.D. Suenram, D.R. Johnson, F.O. Clark, E. Tiemann, J. Chem. Phys., 72, 4964-4972, (1980). 3. R.D. Brown, P.D. Godfrey, D.A. Winkler, Chem. Phys., 59, 243-247, (1981).

  11. Laboratory tests of mafic, ultra-mafic, and sedimentary rock types for in-situ applications for carbon dioxide sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Rush, G.E.; O'Connor, William K.; Dahlin, David C.; Penner, Larry R.; Gerdemann, Stephen J.

    2004-01-01

    Recent tests conducted at the Albany Research Center have addressed the possibility of in-situ storage of carbon dioxide in geological formations, particularly in deep brackish to saline non-potable aquifers, and the formation of secondary carbonate minerals over time within these aquifers. Various rock types including Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG) drill core samples, blocks of ultra-mafic rock and sandstone were used. A solution formulated from aquifer data, a bicarbonate salt solution, and distilled water were tested. Pressure and temperature regimens were used to mimic existing in-situ conditions, higher temperatures were used to simulate longer time frames, and higher pressures were used to simulate enhanced oil recovery (EOR) pressure. Results are encouraging, indicating mineral dissolution with an increase of desirable ions (Ca, Fe2+, Mg) in solution that can form the carbonate minerals, calcite (CaCO3), siderite (FeCO3), and magnesite (MgCO3).

  12. Creep: long-term time-dependent rock deformation in a deep-sea laboratory in the ionian sea: a pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meredith, P.; Boon, S.; Vinciguerra, S.; Bowles, J.; Hughes, N.; Migneco, E.; Musumeci, M.; Piattelli, P.; Riccobene, G.; Vinciguerra, D.

    2003-04-01

    Time-dependent brittle rock deformation is of first-order importance for understanding the long-term behaviour of water saturated rocks in the Earth's upper crust. The traditional way of investigating this has been to carry out laboratory "brittle creep" experiments. Results have been interpreted involving three individual creep phases; primary (decelerating), secondary (constant strain rate or steady state) and tertiary (accelerating or unstable). The deformation may be distributed during the first two, but localizes onto a fault plane during phase three. However, it is difficult to distinguish between competing mechanisms and models given the lower limit of strain rates practicably achievable in the laboratory. The study reported here aims to address this problem directly by extending significantly the range of achievable strain rates through much longer-term experiments conducted in a deep-sea laboratory in the Ionian sea. The project takes advantage of a collaboration with the Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (LNS) of the Italian National Institute of Nuclear Physics (INFN), that is developing a deep-sea laboratory for a very large volume (1 km3) deep-sea detector of high-energy (>1019 eV) cosmic neutrinos (NEMO). A suitable deep-sea site has been identified, some 20km south-west of Catania in Sicily, with flat bathymetry at a depth of 2100m. The CREEP deformation apparatus is driven by an actuator that amplifies the ambient water pressure, while the confining pressure around the rock sample is provided by the ambient water pressure (>20MPa). Measurement transducers and a low-energy data acquisition system are sealed internally, with power provided for up to 6 months by an internal battery pack. The great advantage of operating in the deep sea in this way is that the system is simple; it is "passive", has few moving parts, and requires no maintenance. The apparatus is fixed approximately 10m above the seabed; held in place by a disposable concrete anchor and

  13. Toward "Reality-Based" Integrative Laboratories in ChE: Introducing Real-Time, Hands-On Troubleshooting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoare, Todd

    2015-01-01

    The implementation of troubleshooting within a pre-existing expository laboratory is described and evaluated. Student feedback indicated that troubleshooting activities are highly effective in providing a hands-on opportunity to exercise problem-solving skills and gain a better understanding of the whole process in addition to effectively…

  14. Seismic Absorption and Modulus Measurements in Porous Rocks Under Fluid and Gas Flow-Physical and Chemical Effects: a Laboratory Study

    SciTech Connect

    Harmut Spetzler

    2005-11-28

    This paper describes the culmination of a research project in which we investigated the complex modulus change in partially fluid saturated porous rocks. The investigation started with simple flow experiments over ''clean'' and ''contaminated'' surfaces, progressed to moduli measurements on partially filled single cracks, to measurements in ''clean'' and ''contaminated'' porous rocks and finally to a feasibility study in the field. For the experiments with the simple geometries we were able to measure fundamental physical properties such as contact angles of the meniscus and time dependent forces required to get the meniscus moving and to keep it moving at various velocities. From the data thus gathered we were able to interpret the complex elastic moduli data we measured in the partially saturated single cracks. While the geometry in real rocks is too complex to make precise calculations we determined that we had indeed identified the mechanisms responsible for the changes in the moduli we had measured. Thus encouraged by the laboratory studies we embarked on a field experiment in the desert of Arizona. The field site allowed for controlled irrigation. Instrumentation for fluid sampling and water penetration were already in place. The porous loosely consolidated rocks at the site were not ideal for finding the effects of the attenuation mechanism we had identified in the lab, but for logistic and cost constraint reasons we chose to field test the idea at that site. Tiltmeters and seismometers were installed and operated nearly continuously for almost 3 years. The field was irrigated with water in the fall of 2003 and with water containing a biosurfactant in the fall of 2004. We have indications that the biosurfactant irrigation has had a notable effect on the tilt data.

  15. Effects of Black Rock Harbor dredged material on the scope for growth of the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, after laboratory and field exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, W.G.; Phelps, D.K.; Galloway, W.B.; Rogerson, P.F.; Pruell, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    A study was conducted to investigate residue-effect relationships between tissue residue concentrations and the scope for growth of the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, after exposure in the laboratory and the field to dredged material from Black Rock Harbor (BRH), Bridgeport, Connecticut. A second objective included field verification of the laboratory results. Residue concentrations in mussels, particularly stable compounds such as polychlorinated biphenyls, were found to be closely related to exposure concentration. Scope for growth, clearance rates, and shell growth measurements were inversely related to BRH exposure and subsequent tissue residues, with concentration as low as 1.5 mg/L of BRH material causing negative biological effects. In the field, mussels were placed along a transect from the center of the disposal mound to a clean area distant from the disposal mound. Exposure estimates indicated that the maximum concentration BRH material occurred during the disposal operation, after which both exposure and tissue residue concentrations decreased dramatically. Of the measurements made at the four field stations during the course of the study, a reduction in the scope for growth of mussels, attributable to BRH material, was observed only once. The estimated concentration of BRH suspended material during that collection was very close to the lowest concentration affecting the scope for growth in the laboratory experiments. 33 refs., 30 figs., 17 tabs.

  16. Poohbear Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This image, taken by Sojourner's front right camera, was taken when the rover was next to Poohbear (rock at left) and Piglet (not seen) as it looked out toward Mermaid Dune. The textures differ from the foreground soil containing a sorted mix of small rocks, fines and clods, from the area a bit ahead of the rover where the surface is covered with a bright drift material. Soil experiments where the rover wheels dug in the soil revealed that the cloudy material exists underneath the drift.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

  17. Density and velocity relationships for digital sonic and density logs from coastal Washington and laboratory measurements of Olympic Peninsula mafic rocks and greywackes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brocher, Thomas M.; Christensen, Nikolas I.

    2001-01-01

    for each well log. We also present two-way traveltimes for 15 of the wells calculated from the sonic velocities. Average velocities and densities for the wells having both logs can be reasonably well related using a modified Gardner’s rule, with p=1825v1/4, where p is the density (in kg/m3) and v is the sonic velocity (in km/s). In contrast, a similar analysis of published well logs from Puget Lowland is best matched by a Gardner’s rule of p=1730v1/4, close to the p=1740v1/4 proposed by Gardner et al. (1974). Finally, we present laboratory measurements of compressional-wave velocity, shear-wave velocity, and density for 11 greywackes and 29 mafic rocks from the Olympic Peninsula and Puget Lowland. These units have significance for earthquake-hazard investigations in Puget Lowland as they dip eastward beneath the Lowland, forming the “bedrock” beneath much of the lowland. Average Vp/Vs ratios for the mafic rocks, mainly Crescent Formation volcanics, lie between 1.81 and 1.86. Average Vp/Vs ratios for the greywackes from the accretionary core complex in the Olympic Peninsula show greater scatter but lie between 1.77 and 1.88. Both the Olympic Peninsula mafic rocks and greywackes have lower shear-wave velocities than would be expected for a Poisson solid (Vp/Vs=1.732). Although the P-wave velocities and densities in the greywackes can be related by a Gardner’s rule of p=1720v1/4, close to the p=1740v1/4 proposed by Gardner et al. (1974), the velocities and densities of the mafic rocks are best related by a Gardner’s rule of p=1840v1/4. Thus, the density/velocity relations are similar for the Puget Lowland well logs and greywackes from the Olympic Peninsula. Density/velocity relations are similar for the Washington coastal well logs and mafic rocks from the Olympic Peninsula, but differ from those of the Puget Lowland well logs and greywackes from the Olympic Peninsula.

  18. Infrared absorption of gaseous CH2BrOO detected with a step-scan Fourier-transform absorption spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Hsuan; Lee, Yuan-Pern

    2014-10-28

    CH2BrOO radicals were produced upon irradiation, with an excimer laser at 248 nm, of a flowing mixture of CH2Br2 and O2. A step-scan Fourier-transform spectrometer coupled with a multipass absorption cell was employed to record temporally resolved infrared (IR) absorption spectra of reaction intermediates. Transient absorption with origins at 1276.1, 1088.3, 961.0, and 884.9 cm(-1) are assigned to ν4 (CH2-wagging), ν6 (O-O stretching), ν7 (CH2-rocking mixed with C-O stretching), and ν8 (C-O stretching mixed with CH2-rocking) modes of syn-CH2BrOO, respectively. The assignments were made according to the expected photochemistry and a comparison of observed vibrational wavenumbers, relative IR intensities, and rotational contours with those predicted with the B3LYP/aug-cc-pVTZ method. The rotational contours of ν7 and ν8 indicate that hot bands involving the torsional (ν12) mode are also present, with transitions 7(0)(1)12(v)(v) and 8(0)(1)12(v)(v), v = 1-10. The most intense band (ν4) of anti-CH2BrOO near 1277 cm(-1) might have a small contribution to the observed spectra. Our work provides information for directly probing gaseous CH2BrOO with IR spectroscopy, in either the atmosphere or laboratory experiments. PMID:25362294

  19. Laboratory Investigations of a Low-Swirl Injector with H2 and CH4 at Gas Turbine Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, R. K.; Littlejohn, D.; Strakey, P.A.; Sidwell, T.

    2008-03-05

    Laboratory experiments were conducted at gas turbine and atmospheric conditions (0.101 < P{sub 0} < 0.810 MPa, 298 < T{sub 0} < 580K, 18 < U{sub 0} < 60 m/s) to characterize the overall behaviors and emissions of the turbulent premixed flames produced by a low-swirl injector (LSI) for gas turbines. The objective was to investigate the effects of hydrogen on the combustion processes for the adaptation to gas turbines in an IGCC power plant. The experiments at high pressures and temperatures showed that the LSI can operate with 100% H{sub 2} at up to {phi} = 0.5 and has a slightly higher flashback tolerance than an idealized high-swirl design. With increasing H{sub 2} fuel concentration, the lifted LSI flame begins to shift closer to the exit and eventually attaches to the nozzle rim and assumes a different shape at 100% H{sub 2}. The STP experiments show the same phenomena. The analysis of velocity data from PIV shows that the stabilization mechanism of the LSI remains unchanged up to 60% H{sub 2}. The change in the flame position with increasing H{sub 2} concentration is attributed to the increase in the turbulent flame speed. The NO{sub x} emissions show a log linear dependency on the adiabatic flame temperature and the concentrations are similar to those obtained previously in a LSI prototype developed for natural gas. These results show that the LSI exhibits the same overall behaviors at STP and at gas turbine conditions. Such insight will be useful for scaling the LSI to operate at IGCC conditions.

  20. Our World: Lunar Rock

    NASA Video Gallery

    Learn about NASA'€™s Lunar Sample Laboratory Facility at Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. See how NASA protects these precious moon rocks brought to Earth by the Apollo astronauts. Explore t...

  1. Creep: Long-term Time-Dependent Rock Deformation in a Deep-sea Laboratory in the Ionian sea: a Pilot Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meredith, P. G.; Boon, S.; Vinciguerra, S.; Bowles, J.; NEMO Group,.

    2003-12-01

    Time-dependent brittle rock deformation is of first-order importance for understanding the long-term behavior of water saturated rocks in the Earth's upper crust. Interpretation of results from traditional laboratory brittle creep experiments have generally been in terms of three individual creep phases; primary (decelerating), secondary (constant strain rate or quasi-steady-state) and tertiary (accelerating or unstable). The deformation may be distributed during the first two, but localizes onto a fault plane during phase three. More recently, models have been proposed that explain the trimodal shape of creep curves in terms of the competition between a weakening mechanism and a strengthening mechanism, with the weakening mechanism eventually dominating and leading to localized failure. However, a major problem is that it is difficult to distinguish between these competing mechanisms and models given the lower limit of strain rates achievable in laboratory experiments over practicable time scales. This study aims to address that problem directly by extending significantly the range of achievable strain rates through much longer-term experiments conducted in a deep-sea laboratory in the Ionian sea. The project takes advantage of a collaboration with the NEMO Group-INFN, a consortium that is developing a large volume (1 km3) deep-sea detector for high-energy (>1019 eV) cosmic neutrinos. A suitable test site has been identified, some 20km north-east of Catania in Sicily, at a depth of 2100m. Within the CREEP deformation apparatus, confining pressure is provided by the ambient water pressure (>22MPa), and the constant axial stress is provided by an actuator that amplifies this pressure. Measurement transducers and a data acquisition system are sealed internally, with power provided for up to 6 months by an internal battery pack. The great advantage of operating in the deep sea in this way is that the system is essentially passive, has few moving parts, and requires no

  2. A Laboratory Shear Cell Used for Simulation of Shear Strength and Asperity Degradation of Rough Rock Fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asadi, M. S.; Rasouli, V.; Barla, G.

    2013-07-01

    Different failure modes during fracture shearing have been introduced including dilation, sliding, asperity cut-off and degradation. Several laboratory studies have reported the complexity of these failure modes during shear tests performed under either constant normal load (CNL) or constant normal stiffness (CNS) conditions. This paper is concerned with the mechanical behaviour of synthetic fractures during direct shear tests using a modified shear cell and related numerical simulation studies. The modifications made to an existing true triaxial stress cell (TTSC) in order to use it for performing shear tests under CNL conditions are presented. The large loading capacity and the use of accurate hydraulic pumps capable of applying a constant shear velocity are the main elements of this cell. Synthetic mortar specimens with different fracture surface geometries are tested to study the failure modes, including fracture sliding, asperity degradation, and to understand failure during shearing. A bonded particle model of the direct shear test with the PFC2D particle flow code is used to mimic the tests performed. The results of a number of tests are presented and compared with PFC2D simulations. The satisfactory results obtained both qualitatively and quantitatively are discussed.

  3. Acoustic and resistivity measurements on rock samples containing tetrahydrofuran hydrates: Laboratory analogues to natural gas hydrate deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, C.; Murphy, J.; Hermes, R.

    1986-12-01

    In this paper we report laboratory acoustic velocity and electrical resistivity measurements on Berea Sandstone and Austin Chalk samples saturated with a stoichiometric mixture of tetrahydrofuran (THF) and water. THF and water is an excellent experimental analogue to natural gas hydrates because THF solutions form hydrates similar to natural gas hydrates readily at atmospheric pressures. Hydrate formation in both the chalk and sandstone samples increased the acoustic P wave velocities by more than 80% when hydrates formed in the pore spaces; however, the velocities soon plateaued and further lowering the temperature did not appreciably increase the velocity. In contrast, the electrical resistivity increased nearly 2 orders of magnitude upon hydrate formation and continued to increase slowly as the temperature was decreased. In all cases resistivities were nearly frequency independent to 30 kHz, and the loss tangents were high, always greater than 5. The dielectric loss showed a linear decrease with frequency suggesting that ionic conduction through a brine phase dominates at all frequencies, even when the pores are nearly filled with hydrates. We find that resistivities were strongly a function of the dissolved salt content of the pore water. Pore water salinity also influenced the sonic velocity, but this effect is much smaller and only important near the hydrate formation temperature.

  4. GRAAL - Griggs-type Apparatus equipped with Acoustics in the Laboratory: a new instrument to explore the rheology of rocks at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubnel, A.; Champallier, R.; Precigout, J.; Pinquier, Y.; Ferrand, T. P.; Incel, S.; Hilairet, N.; Labrousse, L.; Renner, J.; Green, H. W., II; Stunitz, H.; Jolivet, L.

    2015-12-01

    Two new generation solid-medium Griggs-type apparatus have been set up at the Laboratoire de Géologie of ENS PARIS, and the Institut des Sciences de la Terre d'Orléans (ISTO). These new set-ups allow to perform controlled rock deformation experiments on large volume samples, up to 5 GPa and 1300°C. Careful pressure - stress calibration will be performed (using D-DIA and/or Paterson-type experiments as standards), strain-stress-pressure will be measured using modern techniques and state of the art salt assemblies. Focusing on rheology, the pressure vessel at ISTO has been designed in a goal of deforming large sample diameter (8 mm) at confining pressure of up to 3 GPa. Thanks to this large sample size, this new vessel will allow to explore the microstructures related to the deformation processes occurring at pressures of the deep lithosphere and in subduction zones. In this new apparatus, we moreover included a room below the pressure vessel in order to develop a basal load cell as close as possible to the sample. This new design, in progress, aims at significantly improving the accuracy of stress measurements in the Griggs-type apparatus. The ultimate goal is to set up a new technique able to routinely quantify the rheology of natural rocks between 0.5 and 5 GPa. Although fundamental to document the rheology of the lithosphere, such a technique is still missing in rock mechanics. Focusing on the evolution of physical and mechanical properties during mineral phase transformations, the vessel at ENS is equipped with continuous acoustic emission (AE) multi-sensor monitoring in order to "listen" to the sample during deformation. Indeed, these continuous recordings enable to detect regular AE like signals during dynamic crack propagation, as well as non-impulsive signals, which might be instrumental to identify laboratory analogs to non-volcanic tremor and low frequency earthquake signals. P and S elastic wave velocities will also be measured contemporaneously during

  5. On site measurements of the redox and carbonate system parameters in the low-permeability Opalinus Clay formation at the Mont Terri Rock Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, A. M. a.; Turrero, M. J.; Sánchez, D. M.; Yllera, A.; Melón, A. M.; Sánchez, M.; Peña, J.; Garralón, A.; Rivas, P.; Bossart, P.; Hernán, P.

    An in situ water sampling experiment was performed in the Opalinus Clay formation (Switzerland), with the aim of obtaining undisturbed pore water samples for its characterization. The study was made from a dedicated borehole, named BDI-B1, drilled in March 2002 in the DI niche of the Mont Terri Rock Laboratory, located at the north-western part of the formation, a few meters away of the underlying Jurensis Marl formation. Five water sampling campaigns have been completed, and on site measurements of the key parameters of the water, such as pH, Eh, Fe(II), S 2- and alkalinity, were performed under controlled conditions inside an anoxic glove box. The chemical composition of the seepage waters obtained from the borehole is Na-Cl type, with an ionic strength of about 0.4 M. The Cl concentrations fit the concentration profile of the Opalinus Clay pore water obtained in previous experiments from boreholes and squeezed water samples. The highest salinity is found in this zone of the Opalinus Clay, with around 12 g/L of chloride. A perturbation of the rock system was produced during the first stages of the experiment due to a packer failure. As a consequence, the borehole was exposed to air during the first phase of the experiment. The main perturbations induced were: (1) pyrite oxidation that caused an increase of sulphate, calcium, magnesium and bicarbonate content in the waters; and (2) the inflow of 3H-bearing water vapour that could penetrate the EDZ. This fresh water infiltration could have mixed with the original formation water, and tritium contents of up to 3.8 TU were measured in the first water sampling campaigns. Nevertheless, after some time the hydrogeochemical conditions of the formation were recovered, and the long-term instrumentation and monitoring of the borehole made possible to obtain different parameters of the formation. Successive water sampling campaigns show a tendency to the stabilization of the main parameters of the water, such as sulphate and

  6. Talking Rocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Dale; Corley, Brenda

    1987-01-01

    Discusses some of the ways that rocks can be used to enhance children's creativity and their interest in science. Suggests the creation of a dramatic production involving rocks. Includes basic information on sedimentary, igneous, and metamorphic rocks. (TW)

  7. Evaluation of 3-D turbula mixing coupled with focused subsampling as a method to obtain representative laboratory subsamples of rock and soil for analysis when performing the CARB 435 test protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, C.; Bailey, R.; Suess, T.

    2012-12-01

    Rock and samples submitted to asbestos testing laboratories for CARB 435 method analysis typically range from one pint (~1 kg) to five gallons (~40kg) in size with contained rock fragments as large as 3" in diameter. Extracting a representative test sample, which requires 8 sample preps containing ~3 mg per grain mount of ~200 mesh powder, is a non-trivial and poorly understood process. The CARB 435 test method calls for crushing and pulverizing of rock/soil samples, but gives no guidance as to how to extract a representative sample from the resulting powdered material, allowing for large errors due to poor lab subsampling protocols (too often a simple scoop off the top). This talk presents the results of a series of experiments which evaluate the efficacy and efficiency of 3-D turbula powder sample mixing coupled with focused multiple sampling thief extractions from the mixed powder to obtain representative subsamples for CARB 435 method analysis.

  8. Rock Garden Mosaic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This image mosaic of part of the 'Rock Garden' was taken by the Sojourner rover's left front camera on Sol 71 (September 14). The rock 'Shark' is at left center and 'Half Dome' is at right. Fine-scale textures on the rocks are clearly seen. Broken crust-like material is visible at bottom center.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

  9. Rock Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henn, Cynthia A.

    2004-01-01

    There are many interpretations for the symbols that are seen in rock art, but no decoding key has ever been discovered. This article describes one classroom's experiences with a lesson on rock art--making their rock art and developing their own personal symbols. This lesson allowed for creativity, while giving an opportunity for integration…

  10. Rock Finding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rommel-Esham, Katie; Constable, Susan D.

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors discuss a literature-based activity that helps students discover the importance of making detailed observations. In an inspiring children's classic book, "Everybody Needs a Rock" by Byrd Baylor (1974), the author invites readers to go "rock finding," laying out 10 rules for finding a "perfect" rock. In this way, the…

  11. Collecting Rocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Rachel M.

    One of a series of general interest publications on science topics, the booklet provides those interested in rock collecting with a nontechnical introduction to the subject. Following a section examining the nature and formation of igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks, the booklet gives suggestions for starting a rock collection and using…

  12. Development of a Laboratory Micron-Resolution X-ray Microprobe to Map Mineralogy and Trace Elements at PPM Sensitivity for Digital Rock, Magma, and Mining Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, W.; Lewis, S.; Stripe, B.; Chen, S.; Reynolds, D.; Spink, I.; Lyon, A.

    2015-12-01

    We are developing a patent-pending x-ray microprobe with substantially unprecedented performance attributes: <5 μm spot on the sample (with 1 μm targeted), large working distances of >2 cm, narrow spectral bandwidth, and large x-ray flux. The outstanding performance is enabled by: (1) a revolutionary new type of high flux x-ray source designed to be >10X brighter than the brightest rotating anode x-ray source available; (2) an axially symmetric x-ray mirror lens with large solid angle collection and high focusing efficiency; and (3) a detector configuration that enables the collection of 10X more x-rays than current microXRF designs. The sensitivity will be ppm-scale, far surpassing charged particle analysis (e.g. EPMA and SEM-EDS), and >1000X throughput over the leading micro-XRFs. Despite the introduction of a number of laboratory microXRF systems in the past decade, the state-of-the-art has been limited primarily by low resolution (~30 μm) and low throughput. This is substantially attributable to a combination of low x-ray source brightness and poor performance x-ray optics. Here we present our initial results in removing the x-ray source bottleneck, in which we use a novel x-ray source using Fine Anode Array Source Technology (Sigray FAAST™). When coupled with our proprietary high efficiency x-ray mirror lens, the throughput achieved is comparable to that of many synchrotron microXRF beamlines. Potential applications of the x-ray microprobe include high throughput mapping of mineralogy at high resolution, including trace elements, such as rare earth metals, and deposits (e.g. siderite, clays), with ppm sensitivity, providing information for properties such as permeability and elastic/mechanical properties, and to provide compositional information for Digital Rock. Additional applications include those in which the limited penetration of electrons limits achieving adequate statistics, such as determining the concentration of precious minerals in mine

  13. Cement degradation and the alteration of host rocks. Studies within the Grimsel Test Site Project.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soler, J. M.

    2009-04-01

    Cement is a major component of the engineered barrier system in proposed underground repositories for low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste. Cement grouting of highly-conductive fractures in the vicinity of such repositories is also planned. The interaction between the hyperalkaline solutions derived from the degradation of cement and the rocks hosting such repositories may change the physical and chemical properties of the host rocks. The HPF project (Hyperalkaline Plume in Fractured Rock; ANDRA-FR-, DOE-USA-, JAEA-JP-, NAGRA-CH-, POSIVA-FI-, SKB-SE-) studied the alteration of a fractured granite due to the circulation of a synthetic high-pH solution. A significant decrease in fracture permeability was observed both in the laboratory (core infiltration experiment; decimeter scale) and in the Grimsel Test Site (circulation along a fracture; meter scale), despite the relatively minor mineralogical alteration. Coupling of mineralogical alteration and permeability changes was incorporated into reactive transport modeling of the experiments. The hydration and degradation of cement are being explicitly incorporated into the new LCS (Long-Term Cement Studies; JAEA-JP-, NAGRA-CH-, NDA-GB-, POSIVA-FI-) project at Grimsel. New laboratory and field experiments including a cement source are being designed. Reactive transport modeling of the degradation of cement, causing the formation of hyperalkaline solutions and the alteration of the host rock, will be an essential part of the experiment.

  14. ERT of seasonal changes in steep permafrost rocks with laboratory-calibrated temperature-resistivity behavior, an incorporated resistance error model, and temperature validation (Zugspitze, German/Austrian Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krautblatter, M.; Verleysdonk, S.; Flores-Orozco, A.; Kemna, A.

    2008-12-01

    Rockwall instability at the Zugspitze North Face is evident due to the 3.5(±0.5)*108 m3 rockslide that occurred in 3700 B.P from the permafrost-affected Zugspitze (2962 m a.s.l.) North Face and was interpreted as a delayed permafrost response to the Holocene Climatic Optimum (Gude and Barsch, 2005; Jerz and Poschinger, 1995). Thawing of rock permafrost is a key promoting and triggering factor for rock instability, rock creep, and rockfalls. Rock instability in permafrost-affected bedrock is governed by shear stress, hydrostatic pressures, and friction along one or several planes of weaknesses in the rock mass. Friction along planes of weaknesses (without fine-grained cleft fillings) is susceptible to subzero temperature changes due to alterations in intact rock mass strength and ice-mechanical properties along planes of weaknesses. We argue that rock permafrost geophysical surveys have the potential to provide spatially resolved information on subzero temperatures that could serve as highly-important input for stability models. Here we present the first monthly ERT (electrical resistance tomography) results in steep permafrost rocks over the whole summer thaw period. Temperature-resistivity behavior of limestone from the study site was measured in the laboratory during repeated cycles of freezing at 0.2-0.4°C increments and exhibited a two-fold linear relationship divided by a freezing point at about -0.5°C. Field measurements were taken from February to October 2007 in a gallery close to the Zugspitze North Face at 2800 m a.s.l. and display thawing and refreezing behavior up to 30 m depth from the north face. We applied high-resolution, time-lapse 2D ERT with 140 electrodes and ca. 2000 resistance measurements per time frame. Local topographic settings and electrode positions were accommodated in an 8600 finite-element mesh with three different resolutions and varying boundary conditions according to the field setup. Resistivity images were computed using a

  15. Weathering of rock 'Ginger'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    One of the more unusual rocks at the site is Ginger, located southeast of the lander. Parts of it have the reddest color of any material in view, whereas its rounded lobes are gray and relatively unweathered. These color differences are brought out in the inset, enhanced at the upper right. In the false color image at the lower right, the shape of the visible-wavelength spectrum (related to the abundance of weathered ferric iron minerals) is indicated by the hue of the rocks. Blue indicates relatively unweathered rocks. Typical soils and drift, which are heavily weathered, are shown in green and flesh tones. The very red color in the creases in the rock surface correspond to a crust of ferric minerals. The origin of the rock is uncertain; the ferric crust may have grown underneath the rock, or it may cement pebbles together into a conglomerate. Ginger will be a target of future super-resolution studies to better constrain its origin.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

  16. Structural factors affecting pore space transformation during hydrocarbon generation in source rock (shales): laboratory experiments and X-ray microtomography/SEM study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giliazetdinova, Dina; Korost, Dmitry; Gerke, Kirill

    2015-04-01

    Oil and gas generation is a complex superposition of processes which take place in the interiors and are not readily observable in nature in human life time-frames. During burial of the source rocks organic matter is transformed into a mixture of high-molecular compounds - precursors of oil and gas (kerogen). Specific thermobaric conditions trigger formation of low molecular weight hydrocarbon compounds. Generation of sufficient quantities of hydrocarbons leads to the primary fluid migration. For series of our experiments we selected mainly siliceous-carbonate composition shale rocks from Domanic horizon of South-Tatar arch. Rock samples were heated in the pyrolyzer to temperatures closely corresponding to different catagenesis stages. X-ray microtomography method was used to monitor changes in the morphology of the pore space within studied shale rocks. By routine measurements we made sure that all samples (10 in total) had similar composition of organic and mineral phases. All samples in the collection were grouped according to initial structure and amount of organics and processed separately to: 1) study the influence of organic matter content on the changing morphology of the rock under thermal effects; 2) study the effect of initial structure on the primary migration processes for samples with similar organic matter content. An additional experiment was conducted to study the dynamics of changes in the structure of the pore space and prove the validity of our approach. At each stage of heating the morphology of altered rocks was characterized by formation of new pores and channels connecting primary voids. However, it was noted that the samples with a relatively low content of the organic matter had less changes in pore space morphology, in contrast to rocks with a high organic content. Second part of the study also revealed significant differences in resulting pore structures depending on initial structure of the unaltered rocks and connectivity of original

  17. Abiogenic methanogenesis in crystalline rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Lollar, B.S.; Frape, S.K. ); Weise, S.M. , Neuherberg ); Fritz, P. ); Macko, S.A. ); Welhan, J.A. )

    1993-12-01

    Isotopically anomalous CH[sub 4]-rich gas deposits are found in mining sites on both the Canadian and Fennoscandian shields. With [delta][sup 13]C[sub CH4] values from -22.4 to -48.5% and [delta]D[sub CH4] values from -133 to -372%, these methane deposits cannot be accounted for by conventional processes for bacterial or thermogenic methanogenesis. Compositionally the gases are similar to other CH[sub 4]-rich gas occurrences found in Canadian and Fennoscandian shield rocks. However, the isotopically anomalous gases of this study are characterized by unexpectedly high concentrations of H[sub 2] gas, ranging from several volume percent up to 30 vol%. The H[sub 2] gases are consistently depleted in the heavy isotope, with [delta]D[sub H[sub 2

  18. Laboratory measurement of temperature dependent 13C and D kinetic isotope effect in the reaction of CH4 oxidation by O(1D)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Linhan; Bui, Thinh Q.; Chen, Pin; Okumura, Mitchio

    2014-11-01

    Martian atmospheric methane (CH4) concentrations observed from satellite orbiter and Earth based telescopes have shown significant time and spatial variations. Recent MSL measurements observed very low methane concentrations (0.18 ± 0.67 ppbv). In order to reconcile these findings, a search of missing methane sinks is needed. In this study, we investigated the kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of methane oxidation reaction by O(1D) as a function of temperature, which will provide an important constraint to the loss of methane. The KIE of major methane isotopologues (13CH4 and 12CH3D) are measured as a function of temperature. The experiments were carried out by photolyzing a mixture of N2O, isotope enriched methane, and He at 193 nm in a temperature controlled cell between 155 K and 300 K. The N2O molecules were used as an O(1D) source, while He was used to collisionally quench translationally hot O(1D) radicals. The concentrations of all major methane isotopologues before and after photolysis were analyzed using a frequency stabilized cavity ringdown (FS-CRDS) spectrometer. The spectrometer employs coupling of two orthogonally polarized cw lasers into a ringdown cavity for simultaneous spectral measurements over the full wavelength range of 1.45 - 1.65 µm and is capable of measuring isotopes of methane of enriched samples to a very high precision (D < 0.03% and 13C < 0.01%). We measured for the first time the D-KIE and 13C-KIE at temperatures relative to the Martian conditions. Our measurements observed D-KIE(155 K) = 1.133(20), and 13C-KIE(115 K) = 1.149(22).

  19. 'Earhart' Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This false-color image taken by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows a rock informally named 'Earhart' on the lower slopes of 'Endurance Crater.' The rock was named after the pilot Amelia Earhart. Like 'Escher' and other rocks dotting the bottom of Endurance, scientists believe fractures in Earhart could have been formed by one of several processes. They may have been caused by the impact that created Endurance Crater, or they might have arisen when water leftover from the rock's formation dried up. A third possibility is that much later, after the rock was formed, and after the crater was created, the rock became wet once again, then dried up and developed cracks. Rover team members do not have plans to investigate Earhart in detail because it is located across potentially hazardous sandy terrain. This image was taken on sol 219 (Sept. 4) by the rover's panoramic camera, using its 750-, 530- and 430-nanometer filters.

  20. Three classes of Martian rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    In this portion of the 360-degree color gallery pan, looking to the northeast, the colors have been exaggerated to highlight the differences between rocks and soils. Visible are the downwind sides of rocks, not exposed to wind scouring like Barnacle Bill (which faces upwind). There is a close correspondence between the shapes and colors of the rocks. Three general classes of rocks are recognized: large rounded rocks with weathered coatings, small gray angular rocks lacking weathered coatings, and flat white rocks. The large rounded rocks in the distance, marked by the red arrows, are comparable to Yogi. Spectral properties show that these rocks have a highly weathered coating in addition to a distinctive shape. A second population of smaller, angular rocks (blue arrows) in the foreground have unweathered surfaces even on the downwind side, except where covered on their tops by drift. These are comparable to Barnacle Bill. They may have been emplaced at the site relatively recently, perhaps as ejecta from an impact crater, so they have not had time to weather as extensively as the larger older rocks. The third kind of rock (white arrows) is white and flat, and includes Scooby Doo in the foreground and a large deposit in the background called Baker's Bank. The age of the white rock relative to the other two classes is still being debated. One representative rock of each class (Yogi, Barnacle Bill, and Scooby Doo) has been measured by the rover.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

  1. Laboratory Carburization of Direct-Reduced Iron in CH4-H2-N2 Gas Mixtures, and Comparison with Industrial Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yining; Pistorius, P. Chris

    2016-06-01

    Iron ore pellets, reduced with hydrogen, were isothermally carburized in CH4-H2-N2 at 823 K, 923 K, and 1023 K (550 °C, 650 °C, and 750 °C). Temperature strongly affected the total carbon concentration after carburization; significant unbound carbon deposited at the highest temperature. For the range of sizes tested (10 to 12 mm), pellet size did not affect carburization. The variability between pellets was much smaller than for industrial pellets; inhomogeneous gas distribution likely affects carburization under large-scale industrial conditions.

  2. Science Rocks!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prestwich, Dorothy; Sumrall, Joseph; Chessin, Debby A.

    2010-01-01

    It all began one Monday morning. Raymond could not wait to come to large group. In his hand, he held a chunk of white granite he had found. "Look at my beautiful rock!" he cried. The rock was passed around and examined by each student. "I wonder how rocks are made?" wondered one student. "Where do they come from?" asked another. At this moment, a…

  3. Rock flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matveyev, S. N.

    1986-01-01

    Rock flows are defined as forms of spontaneous mass movements, commonly found in mountainous countries, which have been studied very little. The article considers formations known as rock rivers, rock flows, boulder flows, boulder stria, gravel flows, rock seas, and rubble seas. It describes their genesis as seen from their morphological characteristics and presents a classification of these forms. This classification is based on the difference in the genesis of the rubbly matter and characterizes these forms of mass movement according to their source, drainage, and deposit areas.

  4. Geoelectrical Classification of Gypsum Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guinea, Ander; Playà, Elisabet; Rivero, Lluís; Himi, Mahjoub; Bosch, Ricard

    2010-12-01

    Gypsum rocks are widely exploited in the world as industrial minerals. The purity of the gypsum rocks (percentage in gypsum mineral in the whole rock) is a critical factor to evaluate the potential exploitability of a gypsum deposit. It is considered than purities higher than 80% in gypsum are required to be economically profitable. Gypsum deposits have been studied with geoelectrical methods; a direct relationship between the electrical resistivity values of the gypsum rocks and its lithological composition has been established, with the presence of lutites being the main controlling factor in the geoelectrical response of the deposit. This phenomenon has been quantified in the present study, by means of a combination of theoretical calculations, laboratory measurements and field data acquisition. Direct modelling has been performed; the data have been inverted to obtain the mean electrical resistivity of the models. The laboratory measurements have been obtained from artificial gypsum-clay mixture pills, and the electrical resistivity has been measured using a simple electrical circuit with direct current power supply. Finally, electrical resistivity tomography data have been acquired in different evaporite Tertiary basins located in North East Spain; the selected gypsum deposits have different gypsum compositions. The geoelectrical response of gypsum rocks has been determined by comparing the resistivity values obtained from theoretical models, laboratory tests and field examples. A geoelectrical classification of gypsum rocks defining three types of gypsum rocks has been elaborated: (a) Pure Gypsum Rocks (>75% of gypsum content), (b) Transitional Gypsum Rocks (75-55%), and (c) Lutites and Gypsum-rich Lutites (<55%). From the economic point of view, the Pure Gypsum Rocks, displaying a resistivity value of >800 ohm.m, can be exploited as industrial rocks. The methodology used could be applied in other geoelectrical rock studies, given that this relationship

  5. 'Tetl' Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image, taken by the panoramic camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit during the rover's trek through the 'Columbia Hills' at 'Gusev Crater,' shows the horizontally layered rock dubbed 'Tetl.' Scientists hope to investigate this rock in more detail, aiming to determine whether the rock's layering is volcanic or sedimentary in origin. If for some reason this particular rock is not favorably positioned for grinding and examination by the toolbox of instruments on the rover's robotic arm, Spirit will be within short reach of another similar rock, dubbed 'Coba.' Spirit took this image on its 264th martian day, or sol (Sept. 29, 2004). This is a false-color composite image generated from the panoramic camera's 750-, 530-, and 430-nanometer filters.

  6. Diverse Rock Named Squash

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This image from the Sojourner rover's right front camera was taken on Sol 27. The Pathfinder lander is seen at middle left. The large rock at right, nicknamed 'Squash', exhibits a diversity of textures. It looks very similar to a conglomerate, a type of rock found on Earth that forms from sedimentary processes.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and managed the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

  7. Pollack Crater's White Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    has a higher spatial resolution that enables CRISM to see smaller exposures of these minerals, if they occur. If White Rock is an evaporative lacustrine or lake deposit, CRISM has the best chance of detecting telltale mineralogical signatures. The images above reveal what CRISM found.

    The top panel in the montage above shows the location of the CRISM image on a mosaic of Pollack Crater taken by the Mars Odyssey spacecraft's Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS). White Rock actually appears dark in the THEMIS mosaic due to a low daytime temperature, because its light color leads to less heating by the Sun. The middle-left image is an infrared, false color image that reveals White Rock's reddish hue. The middle-right image shows the signatures of different minerals that are present. CRISM found that White Rock is composed of accumulated dust perhaps with some fine-grained olivine (an igneous mineral), surrounded by basaltic sand containing olivine and dark-colored pyroxene. The lower two images were constructed by draping CRISM images over topography and exaggerating the vertical scale to better illustrate White Rock's topography. White Rock still appears not to contain evaporite, but instead to be composed of accumulated dust and sand.

    CRISM is one of six science instruments on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Led by The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, Md., the CRISM team includes expertise from universities, government agencies and small businesses in the United States and abroad. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter and the Mars Science Laboratory for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington. Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver, built the orbiter.

  8. Art Rocks with Rock Art!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bickett, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses rock art which was the very first "art." Rock art, such as the images created on the stone surfaces of the caves of Lascaux and Altimira, is the true origin of the canvas, paintbrush, and painting media. For there, within caverns deep in the earth, the first artists mixed animal fat, urine, and saliva with powdered minerals…

  9. Terby's Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    27 January 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows some of the light-toned, layered, sedimentary rock outcrops in northern Terby Crater. Terby is located along the north edge of Hellas Planitia. The sedimentary rocks might have been deposited in a greater, Hellas-filling sea -- or not. Today, the rocks are partly covered by dark-toned sediment and debris.

    Location near: 27.2oS, 285.3oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Summer

  10. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2006-08-15

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments

  11. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2004-10-01

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments

  12. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2004-12-01

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments

  13. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2007-09-20

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments

  14. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2007-02-15

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments

  15. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2006-06-20

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments

  16. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2007-08-15

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments

  17. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2006-09-15

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments

  18. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2007-06-15

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments

  19. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2006-12-20

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments

  20. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2005-01-15

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codesand corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments

  1. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2005-03-15

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments

  2. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2005-06-20

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments

  3. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2005-11-20

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments

  4. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2006-01-18

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments

  5. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2005-01-30

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments

  6. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2005-12-15

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments

  7. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2005-05-01

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments

  8. CH-TRU Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2005-10-15

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments

  9. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2005-08-15

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments

  10. Digital carbonate rock physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saenger, Erik H.; Vialle, Stephanie; Lebedev, Maxim; Uribe, David; Osorno, Maria; Duda, Mandy; Steeb, Holger

    2016-08-01

    Modern estimation of rock properties combines imaging with advanced numerical simulations, an approach known as digital rock physics (DRP). In this paper we suggest a specific segmentation procedure of X-ray micro-computed tomography data with two different resolutions in the µm range for two sets of carbonate rock samples. These carbonates were already characterized in detail in a previous laboratory study which we complement with nanoindentation experiments (for local elastic properties). In a first step a non-local mean filter is applied to the raw image data. We then apply different thresholds to identify pores and solid phases. Because of a non-neglectable amount of unresolved microporosity (micritic phase) we also define intermediate threshold values for distinct phases. Based on this segmentation we determine porosity-dependent values for effective P- and S-wave velocities as well as for the intrinsic permeability. For effective velocities we confirm an observed two-phase trend reported in another study using a different carbonate data set. As an upscaling approach we use this two-phase trend as an effective medium approach to estimate the porosity-dependent elastic properties of the micritic phase for the low-resolution images. The porosity measured in the laboratory is then used to predict the effective rock properties from the observed trends for a comparison with experimental data. The two-phase trend can be regarded as an upper bound for elastic properties; the use of the two-phase trend for low-resolution images led to a good estimate for a lower bound of effective elastic properties. Anisotropy is observed for some of the considered subvolumes, but seems to be insignificant for the analysed rocks at the DRP scale. Because of the complexity of carbonates we suggest using DRP as a complementary tool for rock characterization in addition to classical experimental methods.

  11. Characterizing water/rock interaction in simulated comet nuclei via calorimetry: Tool for in-situ science, laboratory analysis, and sample preservation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allton, Judith H.; Gooding, James L.

    1991-01-01

    Although results from the Giotto and Vega spacecraft flybys of comet P/Halley indicate a complex chemistry for both the ices and dust in the nucleus, carbonaceous chondrite meteorites are still regarded as useful analogs for the rocky components. Carbonaceous chondrites mixed with water enable simulation of water/rock interactions which may occur in cometary nuclei. Three general types of interactions can be expected between water and minerals at sub-freezing temperatures: heterogeneous nucleation of ice by insoluble minerals; adsorption of water vapor by hygroscopic phases; and freezing and melting point depression of liquid water sustained by soluble minerals. Two series of experiments were performed in a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) with homogenized powders of the following whole-rock meteorites and comparison samples: Allende (CV3), Murchison (CM2), Orgueil (CI), Holbrook (L6), and Pasamonte (eucrite) meteorites as well as on peridotite (PCC-1, USGS), saponite (Sap-Ca-1, CMS), montmorillonite (STx-1, CMS), and serpentine (Franciscan Formation, California). Results are briefly discussed.

  12. Soil and rock 'Yogi'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Several possible targets of study for rover Sojourner's Alpha Proton X-Ray Spectrometer (APXS) instrument are seen in this image, taken by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 2. The smaller rock at left has been dubbed 'Barnacle Bill,' while the larger rock at right, approximately 3-4 meters from the lander, is now nicknamed 'Yogi.' Barnacle Bill is scheduled to be the first object of study for the APXS. Portions of a petal and deflated airbag are also visible at lower right.

    Mars Pathfinder was developed and managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

  13. Velocity Structure of the Alpine Fault Zone, New Zealand: Laboratory and Log-Based Fault Rock Acoustic Properties at Elevated Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeppson, T.; Graham, J. L., II; Tobin, H. J.; Paris Cavailhes, J.; Celerier, B. P.; Doan, M. L.; Nitsch, O.; Massiot, C.

    2015-12-01

    The elastic properties of fault zone rocks at seismogenic depth play a key role in rupture nucleation, propagation, and damage associated with fault slip. In order to understand the seismic hazard posed by a fault we need to both measure these properties and understand how they govern that particular fault's behavior. The Alpine Fault is the principal component of the active transpressional plate boundary through the South Island of New Zealand. Rapid exhumation along the fault provides an opportunity to study near-surface rocks that have experienced similar histories to those currently deforming at mid-crustal depths. In this study, we examine the acoustic properties of the Alpine Fault in Deep Fault Drilling Project (DFDP)-1 drill core samples and borehole logs from the shallow fault zone, DFDP-2 borehole logs from the hanging wall, and outcrop samples from a number of field localities along the central Alpine Fault. P- and S-wave velocities were measured at ultrasonic frequencies on saturated 2.5 cm-diameter core plugs taken from DFDP-1 core and outcrops. Sampling focused on mylonites, cataclasites, and fault gouge from both the hanging and foot walls of the fault in order to provide a 1-D seismic velocity transect across the entire fault zone. Velocities were measured over a range of effective pressures between 1 and 68 MPa to determine the variation in acoustic properties with depth and pore pressure. When possible, samples were cut in three orthogonal directions and S-waves were measured in two polarization directions on all samples to constrain velocity anisotropy. XRD and petrographic characterization were used to examine how fault-related alteration and deformation change the composition and texture of the rock, and to elucidate how these changes affect the measured velocities. The ultrasonic velocities were compared to sonic logs from DFDP to examine the potential effects of frequency dispersion, brittle deformation, and temperature on the measured

  14. Seismic-frequency laboratory measurements of shear mode viscoelasticity in crustal rocks I: competition between cracking and plastic flow in thermally cycled Carrara marble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Cao; Jackson, Ian

    1996-03-01

    In the first phase of a seismic-frequency study of the viscoelasticity of cracked and fluid-saturated crustal rocks, forced torsional oscillation experiments have been conducted on specimens of Carrara marble subjected to multiple thermal cycles up to 560°C, under confining pressure of 50 MPa. The experimental results showed distinctly different behaviour of both the shear modulus and internal friction between the first and subsequent thermal cycles. A pronounced reduction in shear modulus ( G) observed during the first series of thermal cycles at temperature T < 300°C is attributed to thermal cracking. This large modulus deficit is recovered at higher temperatures, presumably through crack closure by plastic deformation processes that are also reflected in time dependence (over hours) of the shear modulus at temperatures above 300°C. Following the first excursion to 500°C, the shear modulus varies reproducibly with thermal cycling with a monotonic temperature dependence dominated by intrinsic (anharmonic) effects. It is inferred that thermal cracking in Carrara marble is suppressed by plastic flow following the first cycle to 500°C. The experimental results suggest that thermal history has strong effects on mechanical properties of calcite rock (Carrara marble) measured at relatively low temperatures. Internal friction or attenuation of Carrara marble is generally low and temperature-insensitive at low temperatures (< 400°C), but increases dramatically at 400-500°C. The frequency-dependence of internal friction at high temperatures (> 400°C), presumably due to dislocation relaxation, contrasts with frequency-independent Q-1 at lower temperatures. The relatively sudden onset of markedly frequency-dependence seismic wave attenuation might prove to be a useful diagnostic of temperature under crustal conditions.

  15. CO2, CO and CH4 measurements from the NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory's Tall Tower Greenhouse Gas Observing Network: instrumentation, uncertainty analysis and recommendations for future high-accuracy greenhouse gas monitoring efforts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, A. E.; Kofler, J. D.; Trudeau, M. E.; Williams, J. C.; Neff, D. H.; Masarie, K. A.; Chao, D. Y.; Kitzis, D. R.; Novelli, P. C.; Zhao, C. L.; Dlugokencky, E. J.; Lang, P. M.; Crotwell, M. J.; Fischer, M. L.; Parker, M. J.; Lee, J. T.; Baumann, D. D.; Desai, A. R.; Stanier, C. O.; de Wekker, S. F. J.; Wolfe, D. E.; Munger, J. W.; Tans, P. P.

    2013-02-01

    A robust in situ CO2 and CO analysis system has been developed and deployed at eight sites in the NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory's (ESRL) Tall Tower Greenhouse Gas Observing Network. The network uses very tall (> 300 m) television and radio transmitter towers that provide a convenient platform for mid-boundary layer trace gas sampling. Each analyzer has three sample inlets for profile sampling, and a complete vertical profile is obtained every 15 min. The instrument suite at one site has been augmented with a cavity ring-down spectrometer for measuring CO2 and CH4. The long-term stability of the systems in the field is typically better than 0.1 ppm for CO2, 6 ppb for CO, and 0.5 ppb for CH4, as determined from repeated standard gas measurements. The instrumentation is fully automated and includes sensors for measuring a variety of status parameters, such as temperatures, pressures and flow rates that are inputs for automated alerts and quality control algorithms. These algorithms provide detailed and time-dependent uncertainty estimates for all of the gases and could be adapted to other species or analysis systems. The design emphasizes use of off the shelf parts and modularity to facilitate network operations and ease of maintenance. The systems report high-quality data with > 93% uptime. Recurrent problems and limitations of the current system are discussed along with general recommendations for high accuracy trace-gas monitoring. The network is a key component of the North American Carbon Program and a useful model for future research-grade operational greenhouse gas monitoring efforts.

  16. CO2, CO, and CH4 measurements from tall towers in the NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory's Global Greenhouse Gas Reference Network: instrumentation, uncertainty analysis, and recommendations for future high-accuracy greenhouse gas monitoring efforts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, A. E.; Kofler, J. D.; Trudeau, M. E.; Williams, J. C.; Neff, D. H.; Masarie, K. A.; Chao, D. Y.; Kitzis, D. R.; Novelli, P. C.; Zhao, C. L.; Dlugokencky, E. J.; Lang, P. M.; Crotwell, M. J.; Fischer, M. L.; Parker, M. J.; Lee, J. T.; Baumann, D. D.; Desai, A. R.; Stanier, C. O.; De Wekker, S. F. J.; Wolfe, D. E.; Munger, J. W.; Tans, P. P.

    2014-02-01

    A reliable and precise in situ CO2 and CO analysis system has been developed and deployed at eight sites in the NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory's (ESRL) Global Greenhouse Gas Reference Network. The network uses very tall (> 300 m) television and radio transmitter towers that provide a convenient platform for mid-boundary-layer trace-gas sampling. Each analyzer has three sample inlets for profile sampling, and a complete vertical profile is obtained every 15 min. The instrument suite at one site has been augmented with a cavity ring-down spectrometer for measuring CO2 and CH4. The long-term stability of the systems in the field is typically better than 0.1 ppm for CO2, 6 ppb for CO, and 0.5 ppb for CH4, as determined from repeated standard gas measurements. The instrumentation is fully automated and includes sensors for measuring a variety of status parameters, such as temperatures, pressures, and flow rates, that are inputs for automated alerts and quality control algorithms. Detailed and time-dependent uncertainty estimates have been constructed for all of the gases, and the uncertainty framework could be readily adapted to other species or analysis systems. The design emphasizes use of off-the-shelf parts and modularity to facilitate network operations and ease of maintenance. The systems report high-quality data with > 93% uptime. Recurrent problems and limitations of the current system are discussed along with general recommendations for high-accuracy trace-gas monitoring. The network is a key component of the North American Carbon Program and a useful model for future research-grade operational greenhouse gas monitoring efforts.

  17. Pyroclastic Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahood, Gail A.

    Most of the advances in volcanology during the past 20 years have concerned the recognition, interpretation, and mode of emplacement of pyroclastic rocks. The literature on pyroclastic rocks is widely scattered, in part because the field draws from sedimentology, igneous petrology, physics, and fluid mechanics, and there have been few review papers on the topic. Fisher and Schmincke have done the discipline of volcanology and all field-oriented geologists a great service in assembling material from a wide range of sources in this comprehensive treatment of pyroclastic rocks. With its introduction to the petrology of magmas involved in explosive eruptions in chapter 2 and a complete treatment of magma rheology and the behavior of dissolved and exsolving magmatic volatiles in chapter 3, they lay sufficient groundwork that anyone with a rudimentary knowledge of geology can understand the book.

  18. Infrared absorption of gaseous CH{sub 2}BrOO detected with a step-scan Fourier-transform absorption spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Yu-Hsuan; Lee, Yuan-Pern

    2014-10-28

    CH{sub 2}BrOO radicals were produced upon irradiation, with an excimer laser at 248 nm, of a flowing mixture of CH{sub 2}Br{sub 2} and O{sub 2}. A step-scan Fourier-transform spectrometer coupled with a multipass absorption cell was employed to record temporally resolved infrared (IR) absorption spectra of reaction intermediates. Transient absorption with origins at 1276.1, 1088.3, 961.0, and 884.9 cm{sup −1} are assigned to ν{sub 4} (CH{sub 2}-wagging), ν{sub 6} (O–O stretching), ν{sub 7} (CH{sub 2}-rocking mixed with C–O stretching), and ν{sub 8} (C–O stretching mixed with CH{sub 2}-rocking) modes of syn-CH{sub 2}BrOO, respectively. The assignments were made according to the expected photochemistry and a comparison of observed vibrational wavenumbers, relative IR intensities, and rotational contours with those predicted with the B3LYP/aug-cc-pVTZ method. The rotational contours of ν{sub 7} and ν{sub 8} indicate that hot bands involving the torsional (ν{sub 12}) mode are also present, with transitions 7{sub 0}{sup 1}12{sub v}{sup v} and 8{sub 0}{sup 1}12{sub v}{sup v}, v = 1–10. The most intense band (ν{sub 4}) of anti-CH{sub 2}BrOO near 1277 cm{sup −1} might have a small contribution to the observed spectra. Our work provides information for directly probing gaseous CH{sub 2}BrOO with IR spectroscopy, in either the atmosphere or laboratory experiments.

  19. Comprehensive laboratory and field testing of cavity ring-down spectroscopy analyzers measuring H2O, CO2, CH4 and CO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yver Kwok, C.; Laurent, O.; Guemri, A.; Philippon, C.; Wastine, B.; Rella, C. W.; Vuillemin, C.; Truong, F.; Delmotte, M.; Kazan, V.; Darding, M.; Lebègue, B.; Kaiser, C.; Ramonet, M.

    2015-04-01

    To develop an accurate measurement network of greenhouse gases, instruments in the field need to be stable and precise and thus require infrequent calibrations and a low consumption of consumables. For about ten years, cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) analyzers have been available that meet these stringent requirements for precision and stability. Here, we present the results of tests of CRDS instruments in the laboratory (47 instruments) and in the field (15 instruments). The precision and stability of the measurements are studied. We demonstrate that, thanks to rigorous testing, newer models generally perform better than older models, especially in terms of reproducibility between instruments. In the field, we see the importance of individual diagnostics during the installation phase, and we show the value of calibration and target gases that assess the quality of the data. Finally, we formulate recommendations for use of these analyzers in the field.

  20. Comprehensive laboratory and field testing of cavity ring-down spectroscopy analyzers measuring H2O, CO2, CH4 and CO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yver Kwok, C.; Laurent, O.; Guemri, A.; Philippon, C.; Wastine, B.; Rella, C. W.; Vuillemin, C.; Truong, F.; Delmotte, M.; Kazan, V.; Darding, M.; Lebègue, B.; Kaiser, C.; Xueref-Rémy, I.; Ramonet, M.

    2015-09-01

    To develop an accurate measurement network of greenhouse gases, instruments in the field need to be stable and precise and thus require infrequent calibrations and a low consumption of consumables. For about 10 years, cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) analyzers have been available that meet these stringent requirements for precision and stability. Here, we present the results of tests of CRDS instruments in the laboratory (47 instruments) and in the field (15 instruments). The precision and stability of the measurements are studied. We demonstrate that, thanks to rigorous testing, newer models generally perform better than older models, especially in terms of reproducibility between instruments. In the field, we see the importance of individual diagnostics during the installation phase, and we show the value of calibration and target gases that assess the quality of the data. Finally, we formulate recommendations for use of these analyzers in the field.

  1. Hydraulic properties of rock units and chemical quality of water for INEL-1 : a 10,365-foot deep test hole drilled at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mann, L.J.

    1986-01-01

    A 10,365-ft deep test hole drilled at the INEL (Idaho National Engineering Laboratory) in southeastern Idaho provided hydraulic information for rock units underlying the Snake River Plain aquifer. Four aquifer tests showed that the hydraulic conductivity decreased with depth--from an average of 0.03 ft/day for the interval from 1,511 to 2,206 ft below land surface to an average of 0.002 ft/day for the interval from 4 ,210 to 10,365 ft. In contrast the hydraulic conductivity of the Snake River Plain aquifer ranges from 1 to 100 ft/day. The hydraulic head increased with depth; the head at depth was about 115 ft greater than that for the Snake River Plain aquifer. Water temperature in the test hole increased from 26 C at 600 ft below land surface to 146 C at 9,985 ft. The gradient was nearly linear and averaged about 1.3 C/100 ft of depth. Water from the Snake River Plain aquifer contained 381 mg/L of dissolved solids and had a calcium bicarbonate chemical composition. The dissolved solids concentration in underlying rock units ranged from 350 to 1,020 mg/L and the water had a sodium bicarbonate composition. Hydrologic data for the test hole suggest that the effective base of the Snake River Plain aquifer near the test hole is between 840 and 1,220 ft below land surface. The upward vertical movement of water into the Snake River Plain aquifer from underlying rock units could be on the order of 15,000 acre-ft/year at INEL. (Author 's abstract)

  2. Classic Rock

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beem, Edgar Allen

    2004-01-01

    While "early college" programs designed for high-school-age students are beginning to proliferate nationwide, a small New England school has been successfully educating teens for nearly four decades. In this article, the author features Simon's Rock, a small liberal arts college located in the Great Barrington, Massachusetts, that has been…

  3. The Law of Effective Stress for Rocks in Light of Results of Laboratory Experiments / Prawo Naprężeń Efektywnych Dla Skał W Świetle Wyników Badań Laboratoryjnych

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowakowski, Andrzej

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents the results of laboratory tests carried out in order to formulate effective stress law. The law was sought for two different cases: first - when rock was treated as a porous Biot medium (Biot, 1941; Nur & Byerlee, 1971) and second - when the law was formulated according to definition of Robin (1973) developed by Gustkiewicz (1990) and Nowakowski (2007). In the first case coefficents (4) and (5) of the Biot equation (3) were were determined on the basis of compressibility test, in the second one effective pressure equation (9) and effective pressure value (11) were found on the basis of results of so called individual triaxial compression test (see Kovari et al., 1983) according to the methodology given by Nowakowski (2007). On the basis of Biot coefficients set of values was found that volumetric strain of the pore space described by a coefficient (5) was not dependent on the type of pore fluid and the pore pressure of only, while in case of volumetric strain of total rock described by coefficient (4) both the structure and texture of rock were important. The individual triaxial compression test results showed that for tested rock an effective pressure equation was a linear function of pore pressure as (15). The so called Rebinder effect (Rehbinder & Lichtman, 1957) might cause, that the alpha; coefficient in equation (15) could assume values greater than one. This happened particularly in the case when the porous fluid was non-inert carbon dioxide. In case of inert pore fluid like kerosene the test results suggested that the a coefficient in equation (15) decreased while the differential strength limit was increasing. This might be caused by, so called, dillatancy strengthening (see Zoback & Byerlee, 1975). Another considered important parameter of the equation (15) was the value of the effective press p'The results showed that the value of this parameter was practically independend on the pore fluid type. This conclusion was contrary to

  4. Rock strength under confined shock conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Scholz, C.H.

    1982-10-01

    This report addresses the laboratory measurements of the static strength of rock needed to simulate the response of rock to an underground explosion. The approach is to identify the variables that affect the strength of rock and to discuss each effect in terms of the underlying processes that cause it. Most of the report is the result of a literature review, although some new analyses and concepts are presented. Attention is directed at three basic rock types: low porosity brittle rock such as granodiorite, high porosity brittle rock such as volcanic tuff, and a rock that may be ductile under the relevant conditions, salt. These three rock types are sufficiently different that somewhat different constitutive laws may have to be used to model their behavior.

  5. Mineral displacement and -dissolution processes and their relevance to rock porosity and permeability in Rotliegend sandstones of the Altmark natural gas field (central Germany) - results from CO2 laboratory batch experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pudlo, Dieter; Enzmann, Frieder; Heister, Katja; Werner, Lars; Ganzer, Leonhard; Reitenbach, Viktor; Henkel, Steven; Albrecht, Daniel; Gaupp, Reinhard

    2014-05-01

    The Rotliegend reservoir sandstones of the Altmark area (central Germany) comprise the second largest natural gas field of Europe. These sandstones were deposited on a playa-like continental platform with braided river systems, ephemeral lakes and aeolian dunes under semi-arid conditions. Some of the pristine, red coloured deposits suffered intensive late diagenetic alteration and are now preserved as bleached, high porous and permeable sandstones. To evaluate the relevance of distinct fluids and their fluid-rock alteration reactions on such bleaching processes we performed laboratory static batch experiments on the Altmark sandstones. These 4-6 week lasting runs were conducted with CO2 saturated synthetic brines under typical Altmark reservoir conditions (p= 20 MPa, T= 125°C). Thereby mineralogical, petrophysical and (hydro- and geo-) chemical rock features were maintained prior and after the experiments. Chemical data proved the dissolution of carbonate and sulphate minerals during the runs, whereas the variation in abundance of further elements was within the detection limit of analytical accuracy. However, FE-SEM investigations on used, evaporated brines reveal the presence of illite and chlorite minerals within a matrix of Ca-, Si-, Fe, Al-, Na- and S components (carbonate, anhydrite, albite and Fe-(hydr-) oxides ?). By porosity and relative permeability measurements an increase in both rock features was observed after the runs, indicating that mineral dissolution and/or (clay) fine migration/detachment occurred during the experiments. Mineral dissolution, especially of pore-filling cements (e.g. carbonate-, sulphate minerals) is also deduced by BET analysis, in determining the specific surface of the sandstones. The size of these reactive surfaces increased after the experiments, suggesting that after the dissolution of pore-filling cements, formerly armoured grain rimming clay cutans were exposed to potential migrating fluids. These findings are also

  6. Thz Spectroscopy of 12CH^+, 13CH^+, and 12CD^+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Shanshan; Drouin, Brian; Pearson, John; Amano, Takayoshi

    2015-06-01

    In 1937, Dunham detected a couple of unidentified lines in near-UV, and later Douglas and Herzberg identified them based on their laboratory observations to be low-J electronic transitions of CH^+. The electronic spectra, in particular the A^1Π-X^1σ^+ band, have been investigated extensively. On the other hand, the pure rotational transitions have not been studied so extensively. Only the lowest rotational transition, J=1-0, was observed in the laboratory for the normal species, 13CH^+, and CD^+. Based on the laboratory frequency, CH^+ was detected in star forming regions with the Hershel space observatory. Cernicharo et al identified pure rotational transitions from J=2-1 to J=6-5 in the far-infrared region in the ISO spectrum of the planetary nebula NGC 7027. The ISO spectra, however, were of low-resolution, so high-resolution spectroscopic observation is highly desirable. In this presentation, we have extended the measurements to higher-J lines up to 2 THz. For production of CH^+, an extended negative glow discharge in a gas mixture of CH_4 (˜ 0.5 mTorr) diluted in He (˜ 60 mTorr) was used. The optimum discharge current was about 15 mA and the axial magnetic filed to 160 Gauss was applied up. The discharge cell was cooled down to liquid nitrogen temperature. Several frequency multiplier chains, developed at JPL and purchased from Virginia Diodes, were used as THz radiation sources. New THz measurements are not only useful for providing better characterization of spectroscopic properties but also will serve as starting point for astronomical observations. T. Dunham, Publ. Astron. Soc. Pac., 49,~26 (1937) A. E. Douglas and G. Herzberg, Ap. J. 94,~381 (1941) T. Amano, Ap.J.Lett., 716, L1 (2010) T. Amano, J. Chem. Phys., 133, 244305 (2010) J. Cernicharo et al., Ap. J. Lett., 483, L65 (1997)

  7. Laboratory Method for Evaluating the Characteristics of Expansion Rock Bolts Subjected to Axial Tension / Laboratoryjna Metoda Badania Charakterystyk Kotew Rozprężnych Poddanych Rozciąganiu Osiowemu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korzeniowski, Waldemar; Skrzypkowski, Krzysztof; Herezy, Łukasz

    2015-03-01

    Rock bolts have long been used in Poland, above all in the ore mining. Worldwide experience (Australia, Chile, Canada, South Africa, Sweden, and USA) provides evidence of rock bolt supports being used for loads under both static and dynamic conditions. There are new construction designs dedicated to the more extreme operating conditions, particularly in mining but also in tunneling. Appreciating the role and significance of the rock bolt support and its use in Polish conditions amounting to millions of units per year, this article describes a new laboratory test facility which enables rock bolt testing under static load conditions. Measuring equipment used as well as the possibilities of the test facility were characterized. Tests were conducted on expansion rock bolt supports installed inside a block simulating rock mass with compression strength of 80 MPa, which was loaded statically as determined by taking account of the load in order to maintain the desired axial tension, which was statically burdened in accordance with determined program load taking into consideration the maintenance of set axial tension strength at specified time intervals until capacity was exceeded. As an experiment the stress-strain characteristics of the rock bolt support were removed showing detailed dependence between its geometrical parameters as well as actual rock bolt deformation and its percentage share in total displacement and deformation resulting from the deformation of the bolt support elements (washer, thread). Two characteristic exchange parts with varying intensity of deformation /displacement per unit were highlighted with an increase in axial force static rock bolt supports installed in the rock mass. Obudowa kotwowa jest już od dawna stosowana w Polsce, przede wszystkim w górnictwie rudnym. Światowe doświadczenia (Australia, Chile, Kanada, RPA, Szwecja,USA) świadczą o stosowaniu obudowy kotwowej zarówno w warunkach obciążeń o charakterze

  8. Two-wavelength single laser CH and CH(4) imaging in a lifted turbulent diffusion flame.

    PubMed

    Namazian, M; Schmitt, R L; Long, M B

    1988-09-01

    A new technique has been developed which allows simultaneous 2-D mapping of CH and CH 4 in a turbulent methane flame. A flashlamp-pumped dye laser using two back mirrors produces output at 431.5 and 444 nm simultaneously. The 431.5-nm line is used to excite the (0, 0) band of the A(2)Delta-X(2)Pi system of CH, and the fluorescence of the (0, 1) transition is observed at 489 nm. Coincidentally, the spontaneous Raman scattering from CH(4) also occurs near 489 nm for a 431.5-nm excitation. To separate the CH(4) and CH contributions, the 444-nm line is used to produce a spontaneous Raman signal from CH(4) that is spectrally separated from the CH fluorescence. Subtraction of the signals generated by the 431.5- and 444-nm wavelength beams yields separate measurements of CH(4) and CH. Raman-scattered light records the instantaneous distribution of the fuel, and simultaneously the CH fluorescence indicates the location of the flame zone. The resulting composite images provide important insight on the interrelationship between fuel-air mixing and subsequent combustion.M. Namazian is with Altex Technologies Corporation, 109 Via De Tesoros, Los Gatos, California 95030; R. L. Schmitt is with Sandia National Laboratories, Combustion Research Facility, Livermore, California 94550; and M. B. Long is with Yale University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, New Haven, Connecticut 06520. PMID:20539426

  9. Meridiani Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    16 September 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows the complex surfaces of some of the light- and intermediate-toned sedimentary rock exposed by erosion in eastern Sinus Meridiani. Similar rocks occur at the Mars Exploration Rover, Opportunity, site, but they are largely covered by windblown sand and granules. The dark feature with a rayed pattern is the product of a meteor impact.

    Location near: 0.8oN, 355.2oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Autumn

  10. Terby's Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    25 August 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows light-toned, layered, sedimentary rock outcrops in the crater, Terby. The crater is located on the north rim of Hellas Basin. If one could visit the rocks in Terby, one might learn from them whether they formed in a body of water. It is possible, for example, that Terby was a bay in a larger, Hellas-wide sea.

    Location near: 27.9oS, 285.7oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Winter

  11. White Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    14 November 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a portion of the famous 'White Rock' feature in Pollack Crater in the Sinus Sabaeus region of Mars. The light-toned rock is not really white, but its light tone caught the eye of Mars geologists as far back as 1972, when it was first spotted in images acquired by Mariner 9. The light-toned materials are probably the remains of a suite of layered sediments that once spread completely across the interior of Pollack Crater. Dark materials in this image include sand dunes and large ripples.

    Location near: 8.1oS, 335.1oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Southern Summer

  12. White Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 19 April 2002) The Science 'White Rock' is the unofficial name for this unusual landform which was first observed during the Mariner 9 mission in the early 1970's. As later analysis of additional data sets would show, White Rock is neither white nor dense rock. Its apparent brightness arises from the fact that the material surrounding it is so dark. Images from the Mars Global Surveyor MOC camera revealed dark sand dunes surrounding White Rock and on the floor of the troughs within it. Some of these dunes are just apparent in the THEMIS image. Although there was speculation that the material composing White Rock could be salts from an ancient dry lakebed, spectral data from the MGS TES instrument did not support this claim. Instead, the White Rock deposit may be the erosional remnant of a previously more continuous occurrence of air fall sediments, either volcanic ash or windblown dust. The THEMIS image offers new evidence for the idea that the original deposit covered a larger area. Approximately 10 kilometers to the southeast of the main deposit are some tiny knobs of similarly bright material preserved on the floor of a small crater. Given that the eolian erosion of the main White Rock deposit has produced isolated knobs at its edges, it is reasonable to suspect that the more distant outliers are the remnants of a once continuous deposit that stretched at least to this location. The fact that so little remains of the larger deposit suggests that the material is very easily eroded and simply blows away. The Story Fingers of hard, white rock seem to jut out like icy daggers across a moody Martian surface, but appearances can be deceiving. These bright, jagged features are neither white, nor icy, nor even hard and rocky! So what are they, and why are they so different from the surrounding terrain? Scientists know that you can't always trust what your eyes see alone. You have to use other kinds of science instruments to measure things that our eyes can

  13. In situ analysis of Mars soil and rocks samples with the SAM experiment: laboratory measurements supporting treatment and interpretation of the detection of organics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millan, M.; Szopa, C.; Buch, A.; Glavin, D.; Freissinet, C.; Coll, P.; Cabane, M.; Mahaffy, P.

    2015-10-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) experiment onboard the Curiosity rover detected numerous organic compounds when analyzing the solid samples collected on the way to Mount Sharp. But MTBSTFA, the chemical reactant for the chemical treatment of the refractory molecules present in the solid samples and present in cups of SAM,was shown to be unfortunately present in the Sample Manipulation System(SMS). During the sample analysis, this chemical species reacts with the organic and inorganic molecules present in the samples. This reaction leads to the production and subsequent detection of numerous MTBSTFA derivatives which makes the treatment and the interpretation of the SAM data complex. Moreover, for the first time on Mars, the wet chemistry method was used on a Cumberland sample to help the GC separation and the MS identification of non volatile compounds. To ensure the identification of the organic molecules and try to discriminate organics generated internally to SAM from those present in the samples analyzed, it is mandatory to perform laboratory experimental calibrations under martian operating conditions.

  14. Low-Temperature Hydrocarbon Photochemistry: CH3 + CH3 Recombination in Giant Planet Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Gregory P.; Huestis, David L.

    2002-01-01

    Planetary emissions of the methyl radical CH3 were observed for the first time in 1998 on Saturn and Neptune by the ISO (Infrared Space Observatory) mission satellite. CH3 is produced by VUV photolysis of CH4 and is the key photochemical intermediate leading complex organic molecules on the giant planets and moons. The CH3 emissions from Saturn were unexpectedly weak. A suggested remedy is to increase the rate of the recombination reaction CH3 + CH3 + H2 --> C2H6 + H2 at 140 K to a value at least 10 times that measured at room temperature in rare gases, but within the range of disagreeing theoretical expressions at low temperature. We are performing laboratory experiments at low temperature and very low pressure. The experiments are supported by RRKM theoretical modeling that is calibrated using the extensive combustion literature.

  15. Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    6 November 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows outcrops of sedimentary rocks in a crater located just north of the Sinus Meridiani region. Perhaps the crater was once the site of a martian lake.

    Location near: 2.9oN, 359.0oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Autumn

  16. Sojourner near the Rock Garden

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This image of the Sojourner rover was taken near the end of daytime operations on Sol 42. The rover is between the rocks 'Wedge' (left) and 'Flute Top' (right). Other rocks visible include 'Flat Top' (behind Flute Top) and those in the Rock Garden, at the top of the frame. The cylindrical object extending from the back end of Sojourner is the Alpha Proton X-Ray Spectrometer.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

  17. Thermal Inertia of Rocks and Rock Populations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golombek, M. P.; Jakosky, B. M.; Mellon, M. T.

    2001-01-01

    The effective thermal inertia of rock populations on Mars and Earth is derived from a model of effective inertia versus rock diameter. Results allow a parameterization of the effective rock inertia versus rock abundance and bulk and fine component inertia. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  18. Laboratory investigations of the effects of nitrification-induced acidification on Cr cycling in vadose zone material partially derived from ultramafic rocks.

    PubMed

    Mills, Christopher T; Goldhaber, Martin B

    2012-10-01

    Sacramento Valley (California, USA) soils and sediments have high concentrations of Cr(III) because they are partially derived from ultramafic material. Some Cr(III) is oxidized to more toxic and mobile Cr(VI) by soil Mn oxides. Valley soils typically have neutral to alkaline pH at which Cr(III) is highly immobile. Much of the valley is under cultivation and is both fertilized and irrigated. A series of laboratory incubation experiments were conducted to assess how cultivation might impact Cr cycling in shallow vadose zone material from the valley. The first experiments employed low (7.1 mmol N per kg soil) and high (35 mmol Nkg(-1)) concentrations of applied (NH(4))(2)SO(4). Initially, Cr(VI) concentrations were up to 45 and 60% greater than controls in low and high incubations, respectively. After microbially-mediated oxidation of all NH(4)(+), Cr(VI) concentrations dropped below control values. Increased nitrifying bacterial populations (estimated by measurement of phospholipid fatty acids) may have increased the Cr(VI) reduction capacity of the vadose zone material resulting in the observed decreases in Cr(VI). Another series of incubations employed vadose zone material from a different location to which low (45 meq kg(-1)) and high (128 meq kg(-1)) amounts of NH(4)Cl, KCl, and CaCl(2) were applied. All treatments, except high concentration KCl, resulted in mean soil Cr(VI) concentrations that were greater than the control. High concentrations of water-leachable Ba(2+) (mean 38 μmol kg(-1)) in this treatment may have limited Cr(VI) solubility. A final set of incubations were amended with low (7.1 mmol Nkg(-1)) and high (35 mmol Nkg(-1)) concentrations of commercial liquid ammonium polyphosphate (APP) fertilizer which contained high concentrations of Cr(III). Soil Cr(VI) in the low APP incubations increased to a concentration of 1.8 μmol kg(-1) (5× control) over 109 days suggesting that Cr(III) added with the APP fertilizer was more reactive than naturally

  19. Rock Driller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Thomas M.

    2001-01-01

    The next series of planetary exploration missions require a method of extracting rock and soil core samples. Therefore a prototype ultrasonic core driller (UTCD) was developed to meet the constraints of Small Bodies Exploration and Mars Sample Return Missions. The constraints in the design are size, weight, power, and axial loading. The ultrasonic transducer requires a relatively low axial load, which is one of the reasons this technology was chosen. The ultrasonic generator breadboard section can be contained within the 5x5x3 limits and weighs less than two pounds. Based on results attained the objectives for the first phase were achieved. A number of transducer probes were made and tested. One version only drills, and the other will actually provide a small core from a rock. Because of a more efficient transducer/probe, it will run at very low power (less than 5 Watts) and still drill/core. The prototype generator was built to allow for variation of all the performance-effecting elements of the transducer/probe/end effector, i.e., pulse, duty cycle, frequency, etc. The heart of the circuitry is what will be converted to a surface mounted board for the next phase, after all the parameters have been optimized and the microprocessor feedback can be installed.

  20. Detection of low-frequency lambda-doublet transitions of the free 12CH and 13CH radicals

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, M. C.; Mohamed, S.; Brown, J. M.; Thaddeus, P.

    2006-01-01

    By Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy, lambda-doubling transitions of 12CH and 13CH in the lowest rotational levels of the X2∏1/2 ground state have been directly detected, which has not been done previously. For both radicals, hyperfine-split lines have been measured to an accuracy of better than 1 ppm between 3 and 15 GHz, an improvement of at least 2 orders of magnitude over previous laboratory data. The measured frequencies have been combined with all previous data for CH and 13CH in the v = 0 level of the X2∏ electronic state to determine improved hyperfine parameters. The production of CH from various gases also has been studied and, with methanol, the yield of CH relative to OH. Astronomical studies of CH in higher rotational levels and 13CH can now be undertaken on the basis of the present work. PMID:16894169

  1. Analysis of Inflatable Rock Bolts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Charlie C.

    2016-01-01

    An inflatable bolt is integrated in the rock mass through the friction and mechanical interlock at the bolt-rock interface. The pullout resistance of the inflatable bolt is determined by the contact stress at the interface. The contact stress is composed of two parts, termed the primary and secondary contact stresses. The former refers to the stress established during bolt installation and the latter is mobilized when the bolt tends to slip in the borehole owing to the roughness of the borehole surface. The existing analysis of the inflatable rock bolt does not appropriately describe the interaction between the bolt and the rock since the influence of the folded tongue of the bolt on the stiffness of the bolt and the elastic rebound of the bolt tube in the end of bolt installation are ignored. The interaction of the inflatable bolt with the rock is thoroughly analysed by taking into account the elastic displacements of the rock mass and the bolt tube during and after bolt installation in this article. The study aims to reveal the influence of the bolt tongue on the contact stress and the different anchoring mechanisms of the bolt in hard and soft rocks. A new solution to the primary contact stress is derived, which is more realistic than the existing one in describing the interaction between the bolt and the rock. The mechanism of the secondary contact stress is also discussed from the point of view of the mechanical behaviour of the asperities on the borehole surface. The analytical solutions are in agreement with both the laboratory and field pullout test results. The analysis reveals that the primary contact stress decreases with the Young's modulus of the rock mass and increases with the borehole diameter and installation pump pressure. The primary contact stress can be easily established in soft and weak rock but is low or zero in hard and strong rock. In soft and weak rock, the primary contact stress is crucially important for the anchorage of the bolt, while

  2. Chemistry Rocks: Redox Chemistry as a Geologic Tool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Mary Sue

    2001-01-01

    Applies chemistry to earth science, uses rocks in chemistry laboratories, and teaches about transition metal chemistry, oxidation states, and oxidation-reduction reactions from firsthand experiences. (YDS)

  3. Yogi the rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Yogi, a rock taller than rover Sojourner, is the subject of this image, taken by the deployed Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. The soil in the foreground will be the location of multiple soil mechanics experiments performed by Sojourner's cleated wheels. Pathfinder scientists will be able to control the force inflicted on the soil beneath the rover's wheels, giving them insight into the soil's mechanical properties.

    The image was taken by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) after its deployment on Sol 3. Mars Pathfinder was developed and managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The IMP was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

  4. Technicians examine largest lunar rock sample collected

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Three Brown and Root/Northrop technicians in the Nonsterile Nitrogen Laboratory in the Lunar Receiving Laboratory (LRL) peer through glass at the much-discussed basketball size rock which Apollo 14 crewmen brought back from the Fra Mauro area of the Moon. They are, left to right, Linda Tyler, Nancy L. Trent and Sandra Richards (21244); Dr. Daniel Anderson, an aerospace technologist and test director in the LRL, looks at basketball size rock through a microscope (21245).

  5. Relevance of Computational Rock Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvorkin, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    The advent of computational rock physics has brought to light the often ignored question: How applicable are controlled-experiment data acquired at one scale to interpreting measurements obtained at a different scale? An answer is not to use a single data point or even a few data points but rather find a trend that links two or more rock properties to each other in a selected rock type. In the physical laboratory, these trends are generated by measuring a significant number of samples. In contrast, in the computational laboratory, these trends are hidden inside a very small digital sample and can be derived by subsampling it. Often, the internal heterogeneity of measurable properties inside a small sample mimics the large-scale heterogeneity, making the tend applicable in a range of scales. Computational rock physics is uniquely tooled for finding such trends: Although it is virtually impossible to subsample a physical sample and consistently conduct the same laboratory experiments on each of the subsamples, it is straightforward to accomplish this task in the computer.

  6. 19. ROOM 34 AT WEST END OF LABORATORY, THAT FORMERLY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. ROOM 34 AT WEST END OF LABORATORY, THAT FORMERLY HOUSED ROCK CUTTING EQUIPMENT. NOTE BLACKED OUT ORIGINAL WINDOW AT LEFT. - U.S. Geological Survey, Rock Magnetics Laboratory, 345 Middlefield Road, Menlo Park, San Mateo County, CA

  7. Characteristics of neutrons produced by muons in a standard rock

    SciTech Connect

    Malgin, A. S.

    2015-10-15

    Characteristics of cosmogenic neutrons, such as the yield, production rate, and flux, were determined for a standard rock. The dependences of these quantities on the standard-rock depth and on the average muon energy were obtained. These properties and dependences make it possible to estimate easy the muon-induced neutron background in underground laboratories for various chemical compositions of rock.

  8. A Rock Encyclopedia That Includes Rock Samples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laznicka, Peter

    1981-01-01

    Described is a rock encyclopedia combining rock sample sets and encyclopedic word and picture entries which can be used as a realistic information resource for independent study or as a part of a course. (JT)

  9. Martian sediments and sedimentary rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markun, C. D.

    1988-01-01

    Martian sediments and sedimentary rocks, clastic and nonclastic, should represent a high priority target in any future return-sample mission. The discovery of such materials and their subsequent analysis in terrestrial laboratories, would greatly increase the understanding of the Martian paleoclimate. The formation of Martian clastic sedimentary rocks, under either present, low-pressure, xeric conditions or a postulated, high-pressure, hydric environment, depends upon the existence of a supply of particles, various cementing agents and depositional basins. A very high resolution (mm-cm range) photographic reconnaissance of these areas would produce a quantum jump in the understanding of Martian geological history. Sampling would be confined to more horizontal (recent) surfaces. Exploration techniques are suggested for various hypothetical Martian sedimentary rocks.

  10. Infiltration Flow Path Distributions in Unsaturated Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokunaga, T. K.; Olson, K. R.; Wan, J.

    2004-12-01

    Spatial distributions of infiltration flow paths through rock formations are complex networks that determine flow velocities, control rates of natural geochemical reactions in the subsurface, as well as rates of contaminant transport to underlying groundwater. Despite these important consequences, distributions of infiltration paths and locally fast seepage rates through rocks are not well understood. Laboratory-based studies on fractured rocks cannot easily be conducted on systems large enough to include sufficient fracture network complexity, so that inferences of field-scale flux distributions cannot be reliably made. Field-based studies to date have permitted quantification of only a small fraction of the flow distribution, typically while imposing extremely high fluxes, and therefore have not allowed comprehensive delineation of flow distributions expected under natural recharge. Based on hydraulic scaling considerations, we hypothesize that unsaturated flow path distributions in rock deposits will be similar to those occurring in fractured rock formations under low overall infiltration rates. Talus rock deposits and mine waste rock piles control flow and transport into their respective underlying groundwaters. All of these reasons motivated infiltration experiments in rock packs. Experiments have been conducted on 4 different rock types and system scales ranging from 1 to 46 rock layers. Our experiments showed that infiltration through rocks conforms to no previously reported behavior in soils, and that flow paths do not progressively converge into fewer and fewer flow paths. Instead, a fundamentally different hydraulic structure develops, having an exponential (geometric) flux distribution, with the characteristic scale determined by the characteristic rock size. Although the phenomena are very different, the evolution of flow path distributions and local seepage rate distributions is predictable based on a statistical mechanical model for energy

  11. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes

    SciTech Connect

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2008-01-16

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments

  12. Sojourner Sits Near Rock Garden

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder Rover Sojourner is images by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder as it nears the rock 'Wedge.' Part of the Rock Garden is visible in the upper right of the image.

    Pathfinder, a low-cost Discovery mission, is the first of a new fleet of spacecraft that are planned to explore Mars over the next ten years. Mars Global Surveyor, already en route, arrives at Mars on September 11 to begin a two year orbital reconnaissance of the planet's composition, topography, and climate. Additional orbiters and landers will follow every 26 months.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

  13. Rollerjaw Rock Crusher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Gregory; Brown, Kyle; Fuerstenau, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    The rollerjaw rock crusher melds the concepts of jaw crushing and roll crushing long employed in the mining and rock-crushing industries. Rollerjaw rock crushers have been proposed for inclusion in geological exploration missions on Mars, where they would be used to pulverize rock samples into powders in the tens of micrometer particle size range required for analysis by scientific instruments.

  14. Interstellar CH, CH+ and abundance of atomic species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnacinski, P.; Krogulec, M.; Krelowski, J.

    2007-12-01

    The CH molecule is the only one molecule from the visual spectral range observed in two ionisation stages. The production of CH+ is commonly assigned to shock fronts, since the reaction C+ + H2 -> CH+ + H is endothermic. Moreover a velocity difference between the CH and CH+ spectral lines is often observed. We compare the CH/CH+ column densities with that of neutral and ionised atoms. The CH column density correlates better with neutral atoms, while column density of CH+ correlates better with ionised ones.

  15. Seismic and micromechanical studies of rock fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, R. Paul; Hazzard, James F.; Pettitt, Will S.

    2000-06-01

    “Earthquakes” occur as the result of stress redistribution on major fractures in the earth's crust and are also observed as scaled phenomena along grain boundaries and microcracks. Earthquake seismology has significantly contributed to our knowledge of fault processes, but our fundamental understanding of how micro-fractures progressively weaken rocks and how this contributes to macro-deformation processes is far from understood. Recent advances in particulate mechanics now mean fracture processes can be modelled dynamically to study the micromechanics of fracturing in rock. In addition, advances in recording and analysing very high frequency acoustic emissions (AE) allow for detailed examination of micro-cracking. The paper describes how particle models and AE monitoring techniques can be used in conjunction to test specific hypotheses about natural and induced rock fracture processes at the grain scale. Intermediate scale processes (between laboratory and field studies) are also studied by examining rock fracture in an underground research laboratory.

  16. Ice chemistry of acetaldehyde reveals competitive reactions in the first step of the Strecker synthesis of alanine: formation of HO-CH(CH3)-NH2 vs. HO-CH(CH3)-CN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fresneau, Aurélien; Danger, Grégoire; Rimola, Albert; Duvernay, Fabrice; Theulé, Patrice; Chiavassa, Thierry

    2015-08-01

    The understanding of compound formation in laboratory simulated astrophysical environments is an important challenge in obtaining information on the chemistry occurring in these environments. We here investigate by means of both laboratory experiments and quantum chemical calculations the ice-based reactivity of acetaldehyde (CH3CHO) with ammonia (NH3) and hydrogen cyanide (HCN) in excess of water (H2O) promoted by temperature. A priori, this study should give information on alanine (2HN-CH(CH3)-COOH) formation (the simplest chiral amino acid detected in meteorites), since these reactions concern the first steps of its formation through the Strecker synthesis. However, infrared spectroscopy, mass spectrometry with HC14N or HC15N isotopologues and B3LYP-D3 results converge to indicate that an H2O-dominated ice containing CH3CHO, NH3 and HCN not only leads to the formation of α-aminoethanol (2HN-CH(CH3)-OH, the product compound of the first step of the Strecker mechanism) and its related polymers (2HN-(CH(CH3)-O)n-H) due to reaction between CH3CHO and NH3, but also to the 2-hydroxypropionitrile (HO­-CH(CH3)-CN) and its related polymers (H-(O-CH(CH3))n-CN) from direct reaction between CH3CHO and HCN. The ratio between these two species depends on the initial NH3/HCN ratio in the ice. Formation of α-aminoethanol is favoured when the NH3 concentration is larger than HCN. We also show that the presence of water is essential for the formation of HO­-CH(CH3)-CN, contrarily to 2HN-CH(CH3)-OH whose formation also takes place in absence of H2O ice. As in astrophysical ices NH3 is more abundant than HCN, formation of α-aminoethanol should consequently be favoured compared to 2-hydroxypropionitrile, thus pointing out α-aminoethanol as a plausible intermediate species for alanine synthesis through the Strecker mechanism in astrophysical ices.

  17. Prominent rocks - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Many prominent rocks near the Sagan Memorial Station are featured in this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. Wedge is at lower left; Shark, Half-Dome, and Pumpkin are at center. Flat Top, about four inches high, is at lower right. The horizon in the distance is one to two kilometers away.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  18. Laboratory Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Christopher F.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

    2008-01-17

    This chapter summarizes the laboratory activities performed by PNNL’s Vadose Zone Characterization Project in support of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Program, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. The results of these studies are contained in numerous reports (Lindenmeier et al. 2002; Serne et al. 2002a, 2002b, 2002c, 2002d, 2002e; Lindenmeier et al. 2003; Serne et al. 2004a, 2004b; Brown et al. 2005, 2006a, 2007; Serne et al. 2007) and have generated much of the data reported in Chapter 22 (Geochemistry-Contaminant Movement), Appendix G (Geochemistry-Contaminant Movement), and Cantrell et al. (2007, SST WMA Geochemistry Data Package – in preparation). Sediment samples and characterization results from PNNL’s Vadose Zone Characterization Project are also shared with other science and technology (S&T) research projects, such as those summarized in Chapter 12 (Associated Science Activities).

  19. Rock Content Influence on Soil Hydraulic Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parajuli, K.; Sadeghi, M.; Jones, S. B.

    2015-12-01

    Soil hydraulic properties including the soil water retention curve (SWRC) and hydraulic conductivity function are important characteristics of soil affecting a variety of soil properties and processes. The hydraulic properties are commonly measured for seived soils (i.e. particles < 2 mm), but many natural soils include rock fragments of varying size that alter bulk hydraulic properties. Relatively few studies have addressed this important problem using physically-based concepts. Motivated by this knowledge gap, we set out to describe soil hydraulic properties using binary mixtures (i.e. rock fragment inclusions in a soil matrix) based on individual properties of the rock and soil. As a first step of this study, special attention was devoted to the SWRC, where the impact of rock content on the SWRC was quantified using laboratory experiments for six different mixing ratios of soil matrix and rock. The SWRC for each mixture was obtained from water mass and water potential measurements. The resulting data for the studied mixtures yielded a family of SWRC indicating how the SWRC of the mixture is related to that of the individual media, i.e., soil and rock. A consistent model was also developed to describe the hydraulic properties of the mixture as a function of the individual properties of the rock and soil matrix. Key words: Soil hydraulic properties, rock content, binary mixture, experimental data.

  20. Theory of wing rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, C.-H.; Lan, C. E.

    1985-01-01

    Wing rock is one type of lateral-directional instabilities at high angles of attack. To predict wing rock characteristics and to design airplanes to avoid wing rock, parameters affecting wing rock characteristics must be known. A new nonlinear aerodynamic model is developed to investigate the main aerodynamic nonlinearities causing wing rock. In the present theory, the Beecham-Titchener asymptotic method is used to derive expressions for the limit-cycle amplitude and frequency of wing rock from nonlinear flight dynamics equations. The resulting expressions are capable of explaining the existence of wing rock for all types of aircraft. Wing rock is developed by negative or weakly positive roll damping, and sustained by nonlinear aerodynamic roll damping. Good agreement between theoretical and experimental results is obtained.

  1. Rocks in Our Pockets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plummer, Donna; Kuhlman, Wilma

    2005-01-01

    To introduce students to rocks and their characteristics, teacher can begin rock units with the activities described in this article. Students need the ability to make simple observations using their senses and simple tools.

  2. The Rock Cycle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Raman J.; Bushee, Jonathan

    1977-01-01

    Presents a rock cycle diagram suitable for use at the secondary or introductory college levels which separates rocks formed on and below the surface, includes organic materials, and separates products from processes. (SL)

  3. Rocks and Minerals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naturescope, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Provides background information on rocks and minerals, including the unique characteristics of each. Teaching activities on rock-hunting and identification, mineral configurations, mystery minerals, and growing crystals are provided. Reproducible worksheets are included for two of the activities. (TW)

  4. Principles of rock deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Nicolas, A.

    1987-01-01

    This text focuses on the recent achievements in the analysis of rock deformation. It gives an analytical presentation of the essential structures in terms of kinetic and dynamic interpretation. The physical properties underlying the interpretation of rock structures are exposed in simple terms. Emphasized in the book are: the role of fluids in rock fracturing; the kinematic analysis of magnetic flow structures; the application of crystalline plasticity to the kinematic and dynamic analysis of the large deformation imprinted in many metamorphic rocks.

  5. My Pet Rock

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lark, Adam; Kramp, Robyne; Nurnberger-Haag, Julie

    2008-01-01

    Many teachers and students have experienced the classic pet rock experiment in conjunction with a geology unit. A teacher has students bring in a "pet" rock found outside of school, and the students run geologic tests on the rock. The tests include determining relative hardness using Mohs scale, checking for magnetization, and assessing luster.…

  6. 68. LITTLE ROCK AND PALMDALE IRRIGATION DISTRICT, LITTLE ROCK DAM: ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    68. LITTLE ROCK AND PALMDALE IRRIGATION DISTRICT, LITTLE ROCK DAM: STRESS SHEET, SHEET 4; MAY, 1918. Littlerock Water District files. - Little Rock Creek Dam, Little Rock Creek, Littlerock, Los Angeles County, CA

  7. Rock shape, restitution coefficients and rockfall trajectory modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glover, James; Christen, Marc; Bühler, Yves; Bartelt, Perry

    2014-05-01

    Restitution coefficients are used in rockfall trajectory modelling to describe the ratio between incident and rebound velocities during ground impact. They are central to the problem of rockfall hazard analysis as they link rock mass characteristics to terrain properties. Using laboratory experiments as a guide, we first show that restitution coefficients exhibit a wide range of scatter, although the material properties of the rock and ground are constant. This leads us to the conclusion that restitution coefficients are poor descriptors of rock-ground interaction. The primary problem is that "apparent" restitution coefficients are applied at the rock's centre-of-mass and do not account for rock shape. An accurate description of the rock-ground interaction requires the contact forces to be applied at the rock surface with consideration of the momentary rock position and spin. This leads to a variety of rock motions including bouncing, sliding, skipping and rolling. Depending on the impact configuration a wide range of motions is possible. This explains the large scatter of apparent restitution coefficients. We present a rockfall model based on newly developed hard-contact algorithms which includes the effects of rock shape and therefore is able to reproduce the results of different impact configurations. We simulate the laboratory experiments to show that it is possible to reproduce run-out and dispersion of different rock shapes using parameters obtained from independent tests. Although this is a step forward in rockfall trajectory modelling, the problem of parametersing real terrain remains.

  8. CH Packaging Operations Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2005-06-13

    This procedure provides instructions for assembling the CH Packaging Drum payload assembly, Standard Waste Box (SWB) assembly, Abnormal Operations and ICV and OCV Preshipment Leakage Rate Tests on the packaging seals, using a nondestructive Helium (He) Leak Test.

  9. Microcracks in lunar rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmons, G.

    1979-01-01

    Lunar samples contain abundant open microcracks that have closure characteristics completely unlike any shocked terrestrial rock; however, the microcracks present in the lunar rocks before the rocks reached the surface of the moon were likely similar to the microcracks in the shocked terrestrial rocks. Because the microcracks present in the lunar rocks in situ inside the moon were different, radically different, from the microcracks present today in returned lunar samples, any property that is sensitive to microcracks measured on the returned lunar samples is inappropriate for predicting that property as a function of depth in the moon. Therefore, many data that have been measured already on lunar samples simply do not apply to rocks in situ inside the moon. A plausible mechanism with which to account for the difference in microcrack characteristics of lunar samples on the surface of the moon and the microcrack characteristics of lunar rock in situ inside the moon is thermal cycling during residence on the moon's surface.

  10. Mechanical and acoustic properties of weakly cemented granular rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Nakagawa, S.; Myer, L.R.

    2001-05-09

    This paper presents the results of laboratory measurements on the mechanical and acoustic properties of weakly cemented granular rock. Artificial rock samples were fabricated by cementing sand and glass beads with sodium silicate binder. During uniaxial compression tests, the rock samples showed stress-strain behavior which was more similar to that of soils than competent rocks, exhibiting large permanent deformations with frictional slip. The mechanical behavior of the samples approached that of competent rocks as the amount of binder was increased. For very weak samples, acoustic waves propagating in these rocks showed very low velocities of less than 1000 m/sec for compressional waves. A borehole made within this weakly cemented rock exhibited a unique mode of failure that is called ''anti-KI mode fracture'' in this paper. The effect of cementation, grain type, and boundary conditions on this mode of failure was also examined experimentally.

  11. Computational methodology for ChIP-seq analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Hyunjin; Liu, Tao; Duan, Xikun; Zhang, Yong; Liu, X. Shirley

    2015-01-01

    Chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with massive parallel sequencing (ChIP-seq) is a powerful technology to identify the genome-wide locations of DNA binding proteins such as transcription factors or modified histones. As more and more experimental laboratories are adopting ChIP-seq to unravel the transcriptional and epigenetic regulatory mechanisms, computational analyses of ChIP-seq also become increasingly comprehensive and sophisticated. In this article, we review current computational methodology for ChIP-seq analysis, recommend useful algorithms and workflows, and introduce quality control measures at different analytical steps. We also discuss how ChIP-seq could be integrated with other types of genomic assays, such as gene expression profiling and genome-wide association studies, to provide a more comprehensive view of gene regulatory mechanisms in important physiological and pathological processes. PMID:25741452

  12. Rock Drilling Performance Evaluation by an Energy Dissipation Based Rock Brittleness Index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz, H.; Taheri, A.; Chanda, E. K.

    2016-08-01

    To reliably estimate drilling performance both tool-rock interaction laws along with a proper rock brittleness index are required to be implemented. In this study, the performance of a single polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC) cutter cutting and different drilling methods including PDC rotary drilling, roller-cone rotary drilling and percussive drilling were investigated. To investigate drilling performance by rock strength properties, laboratory PDC cutting tests were performed on different rocks to obtain cutting parameters. In addition, results of laboratory and field drilling on different rocks found elsewhere in literature were used. Laboratory and field cutting and drilling test results were coupled with values of a new rock brittleness index proposed herein and developed based on energy dissipation withdrawn from the complete stress-strain curve in uniaxial compression. To quantify cutting and drilling performance, the intrinsic specific energy in rotary-cutting action, i.e. the energy consumed in pure cutting action, and drilling penetration rate values in percussive action were used. The results show that the new energy-based brittleness index successfully describes the performance of different cutting and drilling methods and therefore is relevant to assess drilling performance for engineering applications.

  13. Sedimentary Rocks and Methane - Southwest Arabia Terra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Carlton C.; Oehler, Dorothy Z.; Venechuk, Elizabeth M.

    2006-01-01

    We propose to land the Mars Science Laboratory in southwest Arabia Terra to study two key aspects of martian history the extensive record of sedimentary rocks and the continuing release of methane. The results of this exploration will directly address the MSL Scientific Objectives regarding biological potential, geology and geochemistry, and past habitability.

  14. The origin of granites and related rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, Michael, (Edited By); Piccoli, Philip M.

    1995-01-01

    This Circular is a compilation of abstracts for posters and oral presentations given at the third Hutton symposium on the Origin of granites and related rocks. The symposium was co-sponsored by the Department of Geology, University of Maryland at College Park; the U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia; and the Department of Terrestrial Magnetism and Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington.

  15. An introduction to carbonate sediments and rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Scoffin, T.P.

    1986-01-01

    This book provides an approach to the study of carbonate sediments and sedimentary rocks. Topics covered include the following: nature and origins of common carbonate grains; processes of sedimentation; the growth and structure of coral reefs; distribution of modern marine carbonates; diagenesis; classification of limestone; facies models and sequences in ancient limestone; economic aspects; and field and laboratory techniques.

  16. A Sedimentary Rock Classification Scheme for Introductory Geology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Larry Eugene; Eves, Robert Leo

    1986-01-01

    Presents a classification scheme for identifying sedimentary rocks in introductory geology laboratories. The key consists of an ordered sequence of tests to perform and observations to make which then suggests a rock name or directs the student to additional tests and/or observations. (ML)

  17. 28. MODIFIED CHAIN SAW FOR CUTTING ROCK CORES; BRUNTON COMPASS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. MODIFIED CHAIN SAW FOR CUTTING ROCK CORES; BRUNTON COMPASS STAND FOR DETERMINING CORE'S FIELD ORIENTATION; INSECTICIDE DISPENSER MODIFIED TO LUBRICATE CORE DRILLING PROCESS. - U.S. Geological Survey, Rock Magnetics Laboratory, 345 Middlefield Road, Menlo Park, San Mateo County, CA

  18. The Rock Physics Handbook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mavko, Gary; Mukerji, Tapan; Dvorkin, Jack

    2003-10-01

    The Rock Physics Handbook conveniently brings together the theoretical and empirical relations that form the foundations of rock physics, with particular emphasis on seismic properties. It also includes commonly used models and relations for electrical and dielectric rock properties. Seventy-six articles concisely summarize a wide range of topics, including wave propagation, AVO-AVOZ, effective media, poroelasticity, pore fluid flow and diffusion. The book contains overviews of dispersion mechanisms, fluid substitution, and Vp-Vs relations. Useful empirical results on reservoir rocks and sediments, granular media, tables of mineral data, and an atlas of reservoir rock properties complete the text. This distillation of an otherwise scattered and eclectic mass of knowledge is presented in a form that can be immediately applied to solve real problems. Geophysics professionals, researchers and students as well as petroleum engineers, well log analysts, and environmental geoscientists will value The Rock Physics Handbook as a unique resource.

  19. Carbon kinetic isotope effect in the reaction of CH4 with Cl atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saueressig, G.; Bergamaschi, P.; Crowley, J. N.; Fischer, H.; Harris, G. W.

    1995-05-01

    The carbon kinetic isotope effect in the reaction between Cl and CH4 (KIE(sub Cl)) has been measured using tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy to determine (13)CH4/(12)CH4 ratios. Cl atoms were generated by the irradition of Cl2 in static mixtures of Cl2/CH4/N2 or Cl2/CH4/N2/O2. Both methods resulted in a (KIE(sub Cl)) of 1.066 +/- 0.002 at 297 K. The KIE(sub Cl) displayed a slight temperature dependence, increasing to 1.075 +/- 0.005 at 223 K. This result suggests a significant influence of the title reaction on the stratospheric CH4 isotopic composition and may help to resolve discrepancies between measurements of stratospheric (13)CH4/(12)CH4 profiles and laboratory measurements of KIE(sub OH).

  20. Friction of rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Byerlee, J.

    1978-01-01

    Experimental results in the published literature show that at low normal stress the shear stress required to slide one rock over another varies widely between experiments. This is because at low stress rock friction is strongly dependent on surface roughness. At high normal stress that effect is diminished and the friction is nearly independent of rock type. If the sliding surfaces are separated by gouge composed of Montmorillonite or vermiculite the friction can be very low. ?? 1978 Birkha??user Verlag.

  1. Bounce Rock Dimple

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This panoramic camera image shows the hole drilled by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's rock abrasion tool into the rock dubbed 'Bounce' on Sol 65 of the rover's journey. The tool drilled about 7 millimeters (0.3 inches) into the rock and generated small piles of 'tailings' or rock dust around the central hole, which is about 4.5 centimeters (1.7 inches) across. The image from sol 66 of the mission was acquired using the panoramic camera's 430 nanometer filter.

  2. Hungry for Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image from the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit hazard identification camera shows the rover's perspective just before its first post-egress drive on Mars. On Sunday, the 15th martian day, or sol, of Spirit's journey, engineers drove Spirit approximately 3 meters (10 feet) toward its first rock target, a football-sized, mountain-shaped rock called Adirondack (not pictured). In the foreground of this image are 'Sashimi' and 'Sushi' - two rocks that scientists considered investigating first. Ultimately, these rocks were not chosen because their rough and dusty surfaces are ill-suited for grinding.

  3. Opaque rock fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Abhijit, B.; Molinaroli, E.; Olsen, J.

    1987-05-01

    The authors describe a new, rare, but petrogenetically significant variety of rock fragments from Holocene detrital sediments. Approximately 50% of the opaque heavy mineral concentrates from Holocene siliciclastic sands are polymineralic-Fe-Ti oxide particles, i.e., they are opaque rock fragments. About 40% to 70% of these rock fragments show intergrowth of hm + il, mt + il, and mt + hm +/- il. Modal analysis of 23,282 opaque particles in 117 polished thin sections of granitic and metamorphic parent rocks and their daughter sands from semi-arid and humid climates show the following relative abundances. The data show that opaque rock fragments are more common in sands from igneous source rocks and that hm + il fragments are more durable. They assume that equilibrium conditions existed in parent rocks during the growth of these paired minerals, and that the Ti/Fe ratio did not change during oxidation of mt to hm. Geothermometric determinations using electron probe microanalysis of opaque rock fragments in sand samples from Lake Erie and the Adriatic Sea suggest that these rock fragments may have equilibrated at approximately 900/sup 0/ and 525/sup 0/C, respectively.

  4. Nickel-Catalyzed Aromatic C-H Functionalization.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Junichiro; Muto, Kei; Itami, Kenichiro

    2016-08-01

    Catalytic C-H functionalization using transition metals has received significant interest from organic chemists because it provides a new strategy to construct carbon-carbon bonds and carbon-heteroatom bonds in highly functionalized, complex molecules without pre-functionalization. Recently, inexpensive catalysts based on transition metals such as copper, iron, cobalt, and nickel have seen more use in the laboratory. This review describes recent progress in nickel-catalyzed aromatic C-H functionalization reactions classified by reaction types and reaction partners. Furthermore, some reaction mechanisms are described and cutting-edge syntheses of natural products and pharmaceuticals using nickel-catalyzed aromatic C-H functionalization are presented. PMID:27573407

  5. Rock Magnetism: Successes and Mysteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunlop, D. J.

    2011-12-01

    governs a rock's induced response to weak fields like the Earth's. In particular, the Hopkinson peak in susceptibility near the Curie temperature - a potential source of "missing magnetism" in the deep lithosphere - increases steadily over at least a decade of decreasing grain size in magnetite. Single-domain recorders, in addition to their strong and long-lasting memory, have the property of TRM additivity and independence. This makes possible the Thellier method of determining paleofield intensity, a much more demanding undertaking than tracking paleomagnetic field directions, in which the ancient magnetic moment is gradually replaced by a set of partial TRMs produced in a known laboratory field. Partial TRMs produced in nature by heating during deep burial are also additive and independent. The temperature at which these overprints are removed in the laboratory yields - after correction for the very different natural and laboratory heating times - the burial temperature. This is the basis of magnetic paleothermometry. The interplay of time and temperature in TRM when combined with thermal history models provides estimates of when the global magnetic field of a planet, e.g., Mars, was born and died. But the grand conclusions so important to geophysics rest ultimately on the fidelity of the microscopic recorders in rocks and here, despite many advances, our understanding is still a work in progress.

  6. Laboratory Investigations on Percussive Drilling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kivade, S. B.; Murthy, Ch. S. N.; Vardhan, Harsha

    2013-10-01

    The laboratory investigation was carried out on ten rock samples using pneumatic drill with drill bits of different diameters. In general, the process of drilling always produces sound. Sound is generated from the bit-rock interface regardless of the material of the bit used in drilling. The predicted sound level and penetration rate are a product of the drill power and the physical properties of the rocks penetrated. Rock samples were collected from the field and physical properties of the rocks were determined in the laboratory. The sound level and penetration rates were correlated with the rock properties. The compressive strength and abrasivity exhibit strong correlations with the sound level and penetration rate. It was concluded that, among the rock properties included in this study, the compressive strength and abrasivity values are the dominant ones affecting the penetration rate and sound level of percussive drills. Though ten rock samples have been covered in this study, detailed analysis of only one of them is presented.

  7. Lander and Mini Matterhorn rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    One of the two forward cameras aboard the Sojourner rover took this image of the Sagan Memorial Station on Sol 26. The angular resolution of the camera is about three milliradians (.018 degrees) per pixel, which is why the image appears grainy. The field of view of each rover camera is about 127 degrees horizontally and 90 degrees vertically.

    Features seen on the lander include (from left to right): the Atmospheric Structure Instrument/Meteorology Package (ASI/MET) mast with windsocks; the low-gain antenna mast, the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on its mast at center; the disc-shaped high-gain antenna at right, and areas of deflated airbags. The dark circle on the lander body is a filtered vent that allowed air to escape during launch, and allowed the lander to repressurize upon landing. The high-gain antenna is pointed at Earth. The large rock Yogi, which Sojourner has approached and studied, as at the far right of the image. Mini Matterhorn is the large rock situated in front of the lander at left.

    The horizontal line at the center of the image is due to differences in light-metering for different portions of the image. The shadow of Sojourner and its antenna are visible at the lower section of the image. The antenna's shadow falls across a light-colored rock.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages and Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

  8. Airbag roll marks & displaced rocks and soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Looking southwest from the lander, soil disturbances indicating the spacecraft rolled through the landing site are visible. Arriving from the east, the lander, still encased in its protective airbags, rolled up a slight rise and then rolled back down to its final position. The inset at left shows displaced rocks near the rock 'Flat Top.' Dark patches of disturbed soil indicate where the rocks had originally rested Both insets show rocks that were pushed into the soil from the weight of the lander, visible from the areas of raised rims of dark, disturbed soil around several rocks. The south summit of Twin Peaks is in the background, while a lander petal, deflated airbag, and rear rover deployment ramp are in the foreground.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

  9. Session: Hard Rock Penetration

    SciTech Connect

    Tennyson, George P. Jr.; Dunn, James C.; Drumheller, Douglas S.; Glowka, David A.; Lysne, Peter

    1992-01-01

    This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of five presentations: ''Hard Rock Penetration - Summary'' by George P. Tennyson, Jr.; ''Overview - Hard Rock Penetration'' by James C. Dunn; ''An Overview of Acoustic Telemetry'' by Douglas S. Drumheller; ''Lost Circulation Technology Development Status'' by David A. Glowka; ''Downhole Memory-Logging Tools'' by Peter Lysne.

  10. Welcome to Rock Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varelas, Maria; Benhart, Jeaneen

    2004-01-01

    At the beginning of the school year, the authors, a first-grade teacher and a teacher educator, worked together to "spice up" the first-grade science curriculum. The teacher had taught the unit Rocks, Sand, and Soil several times, conducting hands-on explorations and using books to help students learn about properties of rocks, but she felt the…

  11. Rock Cycle Roulette.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Stan M.; Palmer, Courtney

    2000-01-01

    Introduces an activity on the rock cycle. Sets 11 stages representing the transitions of an earth material in the rock cycle. Builds six-sided die for each station, and students move to the stations depending on the rolling side of the die. Evaluates students by discussing several questions in the classroom. Provides instructional information for…

  12. Layered Rocks in Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    19 June 2004 Exposures of layered, sedimentary rock are common on Mars. From the rock outcrops examined by the Mars Exploration Rover, Opportunity, in Meridiani Planum to the sequence in Gale Crater's central mound that is twice the thickness of of the sedimentary rocks exposed by Arizona's Grand Canyon, Mars presents a world of sediment to study. This unusual example, imaged by the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC), shows eroded layer outcrops in a crater in Terra Tyrrhena near 15.4oS, 270.5oW. Sedimentary rocks provide a record of past climates and events. Perhaps someday the story told by the rocks in this image will be known via careful field work. The image covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and is illuminated by sunlight from the left.

  13. CH in stellar atmospheres: an extensive linelist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masseron, T.; Plez, B.; Van Eck, S.; Colin, R.; Daoutidis, I.; Godefroid, M.; Coheur, P.-F.; Bernath, P.; Jorissen, A.; Christlieb, N.

    2014-11-01

    The advent of high-resolution spectrographs and detailed stellar atmosphere modelling has strengthened the need for accurate molecular data. Carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars spectra are interesting objects with which to study transitions from the CH molecule. We combine programs for spectral analysis of molecules and stellar-radiative transfer codes to build an extensive CH linelist, including predissociation broadening as well as newly identified levels. We show examples of strong predissociation CH lines in CEMP stars, and we stress the important role played by the CH features in the Bond-Neff feature depressing the spectra of barium stars by as much as 0.2 mag in the λ = 3000-5500 Å range. Because of the extreme thermodynamic conditions prevailing in stellar atmospheres (compared to the laboratory), molecular transitions with high energy levels can be observed. Stellar spectra can thus be used to constrain and improve molecular data. Full Table 14 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/571/A47

  14. RKR Franck-Condon factors for blue and ultraviolet transitions of some molecules of astrophysical interest and some comments on the interstellar abundance of CH, CH+ and SiH+.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liszt, H. S.; Hayden Smith, W.

    1972-01-01

    RKR Franck-Condon factors for thirteen of the blue and ultraviolet transitions of AlF, AlO, BH, BD, CH, CD, CH(+), SiO and SiH(+) have been calculated. The interstellar abundances of CH, CH(+) and SiH(+) are discussed with regard to recent laboratory measurements, our Franck-Condon factors, and observations of the sun and the interstellar medium.

  15. Rock Moved by Mars Lander Arm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The robotic arm on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander slid a rock out of the way during the mission's 117th Martian day (Sept. 22, 2008) to gain access to soil that had been underneath the rock.The lander's Surface Stereo Imager took the two images for this stereo view later the same day, showing the rock, called 'Headless,' after the arm pushed it about 40 centimeters (16 inches) from its previous location.

    'The rock ended up exactly where we intended it to,' said Matt Robinson of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, robotic arm flight software lead for the Phoenix team.

    The arm had enlarged the trench near Headless two days earlier in preparation for sliding the rock into the trench. The trench was dug to about 3 centimeters (1.2 inches) deep. The ground surface between the rock's prior position and the lip of the trench had a slope of about 3 degrees downward toward the trench. Headless is about the size and shape of a VHS videotape.

    The Phoenix science team sought to move the rock in order to study the soil and the depth to subsurface ice underneath where the rock had been.

    This image was taken at about 12:30 p.m., local solar time on Mars. The view is to the north northeast of the lander.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by JPL, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development was by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  16. Our World: The Rock Cycle

    NASA Video Gallery

    Find out how rocks brought to Earth by the Apollo astronauts have helped NASA learn more about the rock cycle. Compare igneous, sedimentary and metamorphic rocks found on Earth to three types of ro...

  17. Correlation between Schmidt hardness and coefficient of restitution of rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, M. K.; Ahmad, M.; Singh, Rajesh; Singh, T. N.

    2015-04-01

    Rockfall, like landslide is the disaster that could cause loss of life and property. Exact rockfall trajectories depends upon, slope geometry, slope roughness, static and dynamic friction, rolling resistance, density of rocks as well as the restitution characteristics of rocks. In all these parameters, coefficients of restitution play a vital role to control the trajectories of the rockfall. In this article, an attempt has been made to calculate the coefficient of restitution using laboratory experiments that include dropping of balls of different rock types on the same rock type slabs as well as same type of rock balls on different types of rock slab. Schmidt hardness has been also calculated for both, balls and slabs. Using these experimental results, an effort has been made to establish the relation between coefficient of restitution (COR) and Schmidt hardness.

  18. Measurement of rock mass deformation with grouted coaxial antenna cables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowding, C. H.; Su, M. B.; O'Connor, K.

    1989-01-01

    Techniques presented herein show how reflected voltage pulses from coaxial antenna cable grouted in rock masses can be employed to quantify the type and magnitude of rock mass deformation. This measurement is similar to that obtained from a combined full profile extensometer (to measure local extension) and inclinometer (to measure local shearing). Rock mass movements deform the grouted cable, which locally changes cable capacitance and thereby the reflected wave form of the voltage pulse. Thus, by monitoring changes in these reflection signatures, it is possible to monitor rock mass deformation. This paper presents laboratory measurements necessary to quantitatively interpret the reflected voltage signatures. Cables were sheared and extended to correlate measured cable deformation with reflected voltage signals. Laboratory testing included development of grout mixtures with optimum properties for field installation and performance of a TDR (Time Domain Reflectometry) monitoring system. Finally, the interpretive techniques developed through laboratory measurements were applied to previously collected field data to extract hitherto unrealized information.

  19. Space Weathering of Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noble, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    Space weathering discussions have generally centered around soils but exposed rocks will also incur the effects of weathering. On the Moon, rocks make up only a very small percentage of the exposed surface and areas where rocks are exposed, like central peaks, are often among the least space weathered regions we find in remote sensing data. However, our studies of weathered Ap 17 rocks 76015 and 76237 show that significant amounts of weathering products can build up on rock surfaces. Because rocks have much longer surface lifetimes than an individual soil grain, and thus record a longer history of exposure, we can study these products to gain a deeper perspective on the weathering process and better assess the relative impo!1ance of various weathering components on the Moon. In contrast to the lunar case, on small asteroids, like Itokowa, rocks make up a large fraction of the exposed surface. Results from the Hayabusa spacecraft at Itokowa suggest that while the low gravity does not allow for the development of a mature regolith, weathering patinas can and do develop on rock surfaces, in fact, the rocky surfaces were seen to be darker and appear spectrally more weathered than regions with finer materials. To explore how weathering of asteroidal rocks may differ from lunar, a set of ordinary chondrite meteorites (H, L, and LL) which have been subjected to artificial space weathering by nanopulse laser were examined by TEM. NpFe(sup 0) bearing glasses were ubiquitous in both the naturally-weathered lunar and the artificially-weathered meteorite samples.

  20. Mechanical changes in thawing permafrost rocks and their influence on rock stability at the Zugspitze summit, Germany - a research concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamot, Philipp; Scandroglio, Riccardo; Krautblatter, Michael

    2015-04-01

    During the last century, alpine permafrost warmed up by 0.5 to 0.8 °C in the upper decameters. Its degradation can influence the stability of rock slopes in alpine environments. An increasing number of rockfalls and rockslides of all magnitudes are reported to originate from permafrost-affected rock faces which reveal massive ice at their detachment scarps after failure. Discontinuity patterns and their mechanical properties present a key control of rock slope stability. These fractures are considered to experience considerable mechanical changes during transition from frozen to unfrozen state: the shear resistance of rocks is reduced in terms of decreased critical fracture toughness of intact rock bridges and shear strength; compressive strength and tensile strength of the intact rock are reduced in the same way. The impact of rising rock temperature on rock-mechanical properties which control early stages of destabilization remains poorly understood. In this study we combine rock-mechanical testing in the laboratory with geotechnical, kinematic and geophysical monitoring at the Zugspitze summit, Germany, to investigate the influence of thawing rock on its rock-mechanical properties focusing on mechanisms of destabilization along discontinuities. Our investigations will contribute to a better rock-ice-mechanical process understanding of degrading permafrost rocks. To assess stability conditions at the Zugspitze summit we conduct field work at an unstable area of about 104 m3 of rock at the crest at 2885 m a.s.l. that is affected by degrading permafrost. This is indicated by a persistent ice filled cave with direct contact to the area of instability. Our preliminary work consists of i) continuous and discontinuous fracture displacement measurements since 2009 which reveal deformation rates of 0.06 to 1.7 cm/year, ii) electrical resistivity (ERT) and seismic refraction tomography (SRT) in the August of 2014 and iii) uniaxial compressive strength and tensile

  1. Dirty Rotten Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This false-color image taken by the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit shows a collection of rocks (upper right) at Gusev Crater that have captured the attention of scientists for their resemblance to rotting loaves of bread. The insides of the rocks appear to have been eroded, while their outer rinds remain more intact. These outer rinds are reminiscent of those found on rocks at Meridiani Planum's 'Eagle Crater.' This image was captured on sol 158 (June 13, 2004).

  2. Weird 'Endurance' Rock Ahead

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image taken by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows a bizarre, lumpy rock dubbed 'Wopmay' on the inner slopes of 'Endurance Crater.' Scientists say the rock's unusual texture is unlike any others observed so far at Meridiani Planum. Wopmay measures approximately 1 meter (3.3 feet) across. The image was taken by the rover's panoramic camera on sol 195 (Aug. 11, 2004). Opportunity will likely travel to this or a similar rock in coming sols for a closer look at the alien surface.

  3. Detached rock evaluation device

    DOEpatents

    Hanson, David R.

    1986-01-01

    A rock detachment evaluation device (10) having an energy transducer unit 1) for sensing vibrations imparted to a subject rock (172) for converting the sensed vibrations into electrical signals, a low band pass filter unit (12) for receiving the electrical signal and transmitting only a low frequency segment thereof, a high band pass filter unit (13) for receiving the electrical signals and for transmitting only a high frequency segment thereof, a comparison unit (14) for receiving the low frequency and high frequency signals and for determining the difference in power between the signals, and a display unit (16) for displaying indicia of the difference, which provides a quantitative measure of rock detachment.

  4. Terrestrial impact melt rocks and glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dressler, B. O.; Reimold, W. U.

    2001-12-01

    craters. Impact melt rocks form sheets, lenses, and dike-like bodies within or beneath allogenic fallback breccia deposits in the impact crater and possibly on crater terraces and flanks. Dikes of impact melt rocks also intrude the rocks of the crater floor. They commonly contain shock metamorphosed target rock and mineral fragments in various stages of assimilation and are glassy or fine- to coarse-grained. Chemically, they are strikingly homogeneous, but as with impact glasses, exemptions to this rule do exist. Large and thick melt bodies, such as the Sudbury Igneous Complex (SIC), are differentiated or may represent a combination of impact melt rocks sensu-strictu and impact-triggered, deep-crustal melts. A concerted, multidisciplinary approach to future research on impact melting and on other aspects of meteorite and comet impact is advocated. Impact models are models only and uncritical reliance on their validity will not lead to a better understanding of impact processes—especially of melting, excavation, and deposition of allogenic breccias and the spatial position of breccias in relation to sheets and lenses of melt rocks within the crater. Impact-triggered pressure-release melting of target rocks beneath the excavation cavity may be responsible for the existence of melt rocks beneath the impact melt rocks sensu-strictu. This controversial idea needs to be tested by a re-evaluation of existing data and models, be they based on field or laboratory research. Only a relatively small number of terrestrial impact structures has been investigated in sufficient detail as it relates to geological and geophysical mapping. In this review, we summarize observations made on impact melt rocks and impact glasses in a number of North American (Brent, Haughton, Manicouagan, New Quebec, Sudbury, Wanapitei, all in Canada), Asian (Popigai, Russia; Zhamanshin, Kazakhstan), two South African structures (Morokweng and Vredefort), the Henbury crater field of Australia, and one

  5. Reactions of CH3, CH3O, and CH3O2 radicals with O3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonaitis, R.; Heicklen, J.

    1975-01-01

    Ozone was photolyzed at 253.7 nm at 25 and -52 degrees in the presence of CH4 and O2 to measure the reactions of O3 with CH3, CH3O, and CH3O2. The O(1D) atoms produced in the primary photochemical act react with CH4 to give CH3 radicals which in turn can react with O2 to give CH3O2 and CH3O radicals. At very high O2 to O3 concentration ratios, the quantum yield of O3 disappearance approached 1.0, indicating that O3 reactions with CH3O2 and CH3O are slow. Upper limits to the rate coefficients at 25 degrees were computed. At lower values of the concentration ratio, chain decomposition of O3 occurred which could be explained by the reaction of O3 with CH3 radicals to produce CH2O, O2, and H atoms all the time. The two routes to these products are considered, and the preferred reaction channel is found.

  6. ROCK inhibition impedes macrophage polarity and functions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yianzhu; Tejpal, Neelam; You, Junping; Li, Xian C; Ghobrial, Rafik M; Kloc, Malgorzata

    2016-02-01

    Macrophages play an important role in immune responses including allograft rejection and they are one of the potential targets of anti-rejection therapies in organ transplantation. Macrophage alloreactivity relies on their phenotype/polarity, motility, phagocytosis and matrix degradation, which in turn depend on proper functioning of actin cytoskeleton and its regulators, the small GTPase RhoA and its downstream effector the Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK). Several laboratories showed that administration of ROCK inhibitor Y-27632 to the graft recipient inhibits chronic rejection or rodent cardiac allografts. Here we studied the effect of Y-27632 on mouse peritoneal macrophage structure, polarity and functions in in vitro assays. We show that Y-27632 inhibitor affects macrophage phenotype/polarity, phagocytosis, migration, and matrix degradation. These novel findings suggest that the impediment of macrophage structure and function via interference with the RhoA/ROCK pathway has a potential to be therapeutically effective in organ transplantation. PMID:26711331

  7. East Candor Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    24 September 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a thick, massive outcrop of light-toned rock exposed within eastern Candor Chasma, part of the vast Valles Marineris trough system. Dark, windblown sand has banked against the lower outcrop slopes. Outcrops such as this in the Valles Marineris chasms have been known since Mariner 9 images were obtained in 1972. However, the debate as to whether these represent sedimentary or igneous rocks has not been settled within the Mars science community. In either case, they have the physical properties of sedimentary rock (that is, they are formed of fine-grained materials), but some igneous rocks made up of volcanic ash may also exhibit these properties. This image is located near 7.8oS, 65.3oW, and covers an area approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) across. The scene is illuminated by sunlight from the lower left.

  8. Focus on the Rock.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shewell, John

    1994-01-01

    Describes historical accounts of the manipulation and importance of the Earth and its mineral resources. A foldout, "Out of the Rock," provides a collection of activities and information that helps make integration of the aforementioned concepts easy. (ZWH)

  9. Terby's Layered Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    14 March 2004 Layered rock outcrops are common all across Mars, and the Mars rover, Opportunity, has recently investigated some layered rocks in Meridiani Planum. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows layered sedimentary rocks in northern Terby Crater, located just north of the giant Hellas Basin near 27.5oS, 285.8oW. Hundreds of layers are exposed in a deposit several kilometers thick within Terby. A history of events that shaped the northern Hellas region is recorded in these rocks, just waiting for a person or robot to investigate. The picture covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) across. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the left.

  10. Ancient Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-469, 31 August 2003

    The terraced area in this Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image is an outcropping of ancient, sedimentary rock. It occurs in a crater in western Arabia Terra near 10.8oN, 4.5oW. Sedimentary rocks provide a record of past environments on Mars. Field work will likely be required to begin to get a good understanding of the nature of the record these rocks contain. Their generally uniform thickness and repeated character suggests that deposition of fine sediment in this crater was episodic, if not cyclic. These rocks might be indicators of an ancient lake, or they might have been deposited from grains settling out of an earlier, thicker, martian atmosphere. This image covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) across and is illuminated from the lower left.

  11. Tithonium Chasma's Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-565, 5 December 2003

    Exposures of light-toned, layered, sedimentary rocks are common in the deep troughs of the Valles Marineris system. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows an example from western Tithonium Chasma. The banding seen here is an eroded expression of layered rock. Sedimentary rocks can be composed of (1) the detritus of older, eroded and weathered rocks, (2) grains produced by explosive volcanism (tephra, also known as volcanic ash), or (3) minerals that were chemically precipitated out of a body of liquid such as water. These outcrops are located near 4.8oS, 89.7oW. The image covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and is illuminated from the lower left.

  12. Layered Rock Ahead

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Now that solar conjunction is over so that communication between Earth and Mars is no longer blocked by the Sun, NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit is continuing its trek through the 'Columbia Hills' in Gusev Crater. Straight ahead, in the foreground of this image, is a horizontally layered rock dubbed 'Tetl,' which scientists hope to investigate. Layering can be either volcanic or sedimentary in origin; researchers aim to determine which of these processes created this rock. If for some reason this particular rock is not favorably positioned for grinding and examination by the toolbox of instruments on the rover's robotic arm, Spirit will be within short reach of another similar rock, dubbed 'Coba,' just to the right, toward the middle of this image. Spirit took this image with its navigation camera on its 263rd martian day, or sol (Sept. 28, 2004).

  13. Broken Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    18 May 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows broken-up blocks of sedimentary rock in western Candor Chasma. There are several locations in western Candor that exhibit this pattern of broken rock. The manner in which these landforms were created is unknown; it is possible that there was a landslide or a meteoritic impact that broke up the materials. One attribute that is known: in some of these cases, it seems that the rock was broken and then buried by later sedimentary rocks, before later being exhumed so that they can be seen from orbit today.

    Location near: 6.9oS, 75.5oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Winter

  14. Rock in Its Elements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacCluskey, Thomas

    1969-01-01

    A discussion of the following musical elements of rock: rhythm, melody, harmony, and form. A impromptu analysis made at a session of the Youth Music Symposium, July 25, 1969. Remarks transcribed from tape. (Author/AP)

  15. Rock slope stability

    SciTech Connect

    Kliche, C.A.

    1999-07-01

    Whether you're involved in surface mine design, surface mine production, construction, education, or regulation, this is an important new book for your library. It describes the basic rock slope failure modes and methods of analysis--both kinematic and kinetic techniques. Chapters include geotechnical and geomechanical analysis techniques, hydrology, rock slope stabilization techniques, and geotechnical instrumentation and monitoring. Numerous examples, drawings and photos enhance the text.

  16. Petrology of metamorphic rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Suk, M.

    1983-01-01

    ''Petrology of Metamorphic Rocks'' reviews Central European opinions about the origin and formation of metamorphic rocks and their genetic systems, confronting the works of such distinguished European scientists as Rosenbusch, Becke, Niggli, Sander, Eskola, Barth and others with present-day knowledge and the results of Soviet and American investigations. The initial chapters discuss the processes that give rise to metamorphic rocks, and the main differences between regional metamorphism and other types of alterations, the emphasis being laid on the material characteristic of the processes of metamorphism, metasomatism and ultrametamorphism. Further chapters give a brief characterization of research methods, together with a detailed genetic classification based on the division of primary rocks into igneous rocks, sediments and ore materials. The effects of metamorphic alterations and those of the properties of the primary rocks are analyzed on the basis of examples taken chiefly from the Bohemian Massif, the West Carpathians, other parts of the European Variscides, from the crystalline Scandinavian Shelf in Norway and Finland, and from the Alps. Typical examples are documented by a number of charts, photographs and petrographical - particularly petrochemical - data.

  17. Thermoregulation in laboratory mammals and humans exposed to anticholinesterase agents.

    PubMed

    Gordon, C J

    1994-01-01

    The regulation of body temperature is one of many homeostatic functions affected by exposure to anticholinesterase (antiChE) pesticides, and related compounds. In the study of antiChE neurotoxicity, thermoregulatory variables are often used as sensitive physiological indices. Hence, a review on the thermoregulatory aspects of antiChE agents would be useful to researchers in a variety of fields. A reduction in body temperature is a commonly used indicator of antiChE poisoning in laboratory rodents. On the other hand, humans and some other species often shown an elevation in body temperature when exposed to antiChE agents. Hyperthermia has also been noted in animals treated with either low levels of antiChEs or during recovery from high doses of antiChEs. In this review, the literature dealing with the central and peripheral effects of cholinergic agonists and antagonists is reassessed because the thermoregulatory effects of antiChEs are thought to be linked to the activation of cholinergic pathways. This is followed by a thorough review of the studies reporting thermoregulatory responses in laboratory rodents and humans exposed to low and high doses of a variety of antiChE agents, including the organophosphate- (OP) and carbamate- (CB) based pesticides and related drugs. Attention is given to the possible mechanism of action of OPs on thermoregulation in the laboratory rodent including the involvement of behavioral and autonomic processes. The incidence of antiChE-induced hyperthermia (fever) in humans exposed to antiChEs is also addressed. Other topics of antiChE-induced thermoregulatory dysfunction discussed in this review include the role of exercise, heat, and cold stress, tolerance to antiChE agents, and genetic variability. Overall, the mechanism of antiChE-induced changes in body temperature cannot always be explained solely by the immediate consequences of ChE inhibition. PMID:7845326

  18. Modeling Transport of Viruses in Fractured Rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sleep, B. E.; Mondal, P. K.

    2011-12-01

    Fractured rock aquifers are frequently used for water supply for human consumption. In many instances the fractured rock aquifers are vulnerable to contamination by pathogens, including viruses, due to co-location of on-site septic systems, wastewater discharges, biosolids and agricultural activities. Approximately half of the illnesses associated with groundwater consumption in the Unites States have been attributed to viral contamination. A number of these cases have been related to transport of viruses from septic systems to drinking water wells. Despite the potential for rapid transport of viruses through rock fractures to drinking water wells, the understanding of virus transport in fractured rock is limited. In particular, the impacts of virus size, fracture aperture variability and roughness, matrix porosity, groundwater velocity, and geochemical conditions have not been well studied. In this study, a multidimensional model for virus transport in variable aperture fractures is presented. The model is applied to laboratory experiments on transport of virus-sized latex microspheres (0.02 and 0.2 microns) and bacteriophages (MS2 and PR772) in artificially fractured dolomite rocks. In these experiments significant impacts of particle size, fracture characteristics, groundwater velocity, and geochemistry were observed. Given the variability in aperture distribution and associated spatial variation in groundwater flow field, one-dimensional models were not suitable for a comprehensive evaluation of the mechanisms governing the microsphere and bacteriophage transport. Various relationships for virus retention (attachment and detachment) are evaluated to provide insight into the governing processes in virus transport in fractured rock. In addition, the role of virus size, fracture aperture variability, fracture roughness, fracture surface charge, matrix porosity, groundwater velocity, and ionic strength in virus transport are evaluated. Scale-up to the field is

  19. Weak Elastic Anisotropy in a Cracked Rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, W.; Wong, T.

    2006-12-01

    Crack and textural fabrics have significant control over the development of mechanical anisotropy in a rock. Bedding in sedimentary rocks, cleavage in slates, preferred orientation of anisotropic minerals and anisotropic distribution of microcracks can all contribute to elastic anisotropy. Using Kachanov's (1992, 1993) formulation we analyzed the effects of an axisymmetric system of microcracks on seismic anisotropy. The elastic behavior of such a cracked rock is transversely isotropic, and its seismic properties can be characterized by the three Thomsen parameters. In this study we calculated the parameters ɛ, δ and γ under dry and saturated conditions. We derived analytic expressions for the model proposed by Sayers & Kachanov (1995), which assumes that the contribution from the fourth rank crack density tensor is negligible. This model predicts that the elliptic anisotropy condition ɛ=δ is obeyed in a dry rock. Guided by microstructural observations we adopted a two-parameter axisymmetric distribution to characterize the crack density, which predicts that δ and γ in a fluid saturated rock are related to ɛ in a nonlinear manner. All three Thomsen parameters are sensitively dependent on the crack density difference. While our model shows basic agreement with some of the laboratory data on seismic anisotropy in saturated shale, there are discrepancies which suggest that the petrofabric associated with preferred orientation of clay minerals and elastic anisotropy of the rock matrix may have considerable influence which should not be neglected in model. Preliminary comparison with borehole log data suggests rock physics tests which may be useful for interpreting the shear wave anisotropy observations.

  20. Group for frozen soil and rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The American Society for Testing and Materials wants participants for D18.19, its new subcommittee on frozen soil and rock. The group will write standards for engineering practices in northern Canada, Alaska, and other areas where soil and rock are commonly in the frozen or recently thawed state. Three standards are currently under development: axial compressive load tests o n piles in frozen soils, laboratory rate of frost-heave tests, and laboratory creep testing of frozen soil.The next D18.19 meeting is June 26 in St. Louis, Mo. Scientists who want to work on the subcommittee should contact Bill Lovell, School of Civil Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47904, tel. 317-494- 5034; or Wendy Dyer, ASTM, 1916 Race Street, Philadelphia, PA 19103, tel. 215-299-5526.

  1. Coupled micro-scale magnetic and spectroscopic techniques to understand the petrogenesis of iron sulfides in sedimentary rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slotznick, S. P.; Webb, S. M.; Johnson, J. E.; Kirschvink, J. L.; Fischer, W. W.

    2013-12-01

    Paleomagnetism in sedimentary rocks containing iron sulfide mineral phases is challenging due to questions about the timing of formation, the potential for multiple-stages of iron sulfide growth, and their metastabilty in nature and in the laboratory. Bulk rock magnetic techniques have been developed and applied to identify and characterize ferromagnetic iron sulfides in a wide array of rock types from the geologic record (including some containing stable ChRM), but petrographic textural observations are required to inform the timing of their mineralization in any given sample. The solid-solution of pyrite/pyrrhotite/troilite and intimate intergrowth patterns of iron sulfides is difficult to untangle with standard light and electron microscopy. Here we report the development and application of a complementary set of techniques designed to inform and untangle the history and processes involved in the mineralization of sulfur-bearing minerals in sedimentary rocks. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of the S K-edge provides insight into the chemistry (such as valence state, electronic structure, type of neighbors) of sulfur-bearing solids. We used a new synchrotron-based X-ray microprobe developed at SSRL to measure, distinguish, and then image sulfur phases via multiple energy maps at micron scales. From these maps we can quantitatively differentiate a wide range of sulfur-bearing phases in polished thin sections, such as pyrrhotite, pyrite, and greigite, and ordinate them into a petrogenic scheme. At a similar scale, using SQUID microscopy allows us to identify and map the presence and field strength of ferromagnetic minerals within a sample. Combined with bulk rock magnetic techniques, these two micro-scale methods pair well to confirm textural observations, beyond those already noted using optical and scanning electron microscopy. Here we will present work from a study of middle Proterozoic age sedimentary rocks from the Belt Supergroup, MT. By collecting a wide array

  2. Plasma discharge in N2 + CH4 at low pressures: experimental results and applications to Titan.

    PubMed

    Thompson, W R; Henry, T J; Schwartz, J M; Khare, B N; Sagan, C

    1991-01-01

    We report the yields of gaseous hydrocarbons and nitriles produced in a continuous flow, low-dose, cold plasma discharge excited in a 10% CH4, 90% N2 atmosphere at 295 K and pressures p of 17 and 0.24 mbar, and use the results to compute expected abundances of minor constituents in Titan's atmosphere. These experiments are, by design, relevant to the atmospheric chemistry induced by cosmic rays in Titan's troposphere and (at the lower pressure) to chemistry initiated by Saturnian magnetospheric electrons and other charged particle sources which excite stratospheric aurorae. At p = 17 mbar, 59 gaseous species including 27 nitriles are detected in overall yield 4.0 (C + N) atoms incorporated into products per 100 eV (heV). At p = 0.24 mbar, 19 species are detected, including six nitriles and three other unidentified N-bearing compounds; the yield is 0.79 (C + N)/heV, a mild decrease with pressure. The types of molecules formed change more markedly, with high degrees of multiple bonding at 0.24 mbar prevailing over more H-saturated molecules at 17 mbar. The molecules and yields at 0.24 mbar bear a striking resemblance to the minor constituents found in Titan's atmosphere, all of which are abundant products in the laboratory experiment. Using the altitude-integrated flux of charged particle energy deposition at Titan, the laboratory yields at p = 0.24 mb, and a simple eddy mixing model, we compute absolute stratospheric column abundances and mole fractions. These are found to be in very good agreement with the Voyager IRIS observations. Except for the primarily photochemical products, C2H6 and C3H8, the match is much better than that obtained by photochemical-kinetic models, demonstrating that properly designed laboratory experiments are directly applicable to modeling radiation-chemical processes in planetary atmospheres. On the basis of this agreement we expect CH3-C triple bond N (ethanenitrile = acetonitrile) CH2=CH-CH=CH2 (1,3-butadiene), CH2=C=CH2 (1,2-propadiene

  3. Scaling and Universality in Rock Fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Davidsen, Joern; Stanchits, Sergei; Dresen, Georg

    2007-03-23

    We present a detailed statistical analysis of acoustic emission time series from laboratory rock fracture obtained from different experiments on different materials including acoustic emission controlled triaxial fracture and punch-through tests. In all considered cases, the waiting time distribution can be described by a unique scaling function indicating its universality. This scaling function is even indistinguishable from that for earthquakes suggesting its general validity for fracture processes independent of time, space, and magnitude scales.

  4. Ganges Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    24 May 2004 Mariner 9 images acquired in 1972 first revealed a large, light-toned, layered mound in Ganges Chasma, part of the vast Valles Marineris trough system. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a higher-resolution view of these rocks than was achieved by Mariner 9 or Viking, and higher than can be obtained by Mars Odyssey or Mars Express. The image, with a resolution of about 3.7 meters (12 feet) per pixel, shows eroded layered rock outcrops in Ganges Chasma. These rocks record a history of events that occurred either in Ganges Chasma, or in the rocks brought to the surface by the opening of Ganges Chasma. Either way, the story they might tell could be as fascinating and unprecedented as the story told by sedimentary rocks investigated this year in Meridiani Planum by the Opportunity Mars Exploration Rover ... no one knows. The image is located near 7.3oS, 48.8oW, and covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) across. The picture is illuminated by sunlight from the upper left.

  5. An interlaboratory study of potassium determination in rocks and minerals.

    PubMed

    Rice, T D

    1976-05-01

    Seven laboratories took part in this interlaboratory study which was part of an investigation of the flame-speetrometric determination of potassium in rocks and minerals suitable for potassium-argon age-measurement. Three of these laboratories determined potassium in the following five international reference rocks: tonalite T-1, basalt BCR-1, andesite AGV-1, granite G-2, and granodiorite GSP-1. The other five samples (with the number of laboratories analysing them in parentheses) were: a chlorite rock (7), an altered basic igneous rock (5), an altered basaltic andesite (5), a biotite (6) and a potassium feldspar (7). Details of sample preparation and methods of analysis are given; no laboratory used exactly the same method as any of the other six laboratories. Results have been examined by analysis of variance; larger relative between- and within-laboratory variations occurred for the two samples containing less than 0.1% potassium than for seven of the eight other (higher potassium) samples; between-laboratory variations for the basalt BCR-1 and, to a lesser extent, the andesite AGV-1, were high and of similar magnitude to those for the samples containing less than 0.1% potassium. The causes of any poor interlaboratory agreement in the present study are considered. PMID:18961875

  6. Experimentally determined rock-fluid interactions applicable to a natural hot dry rock geothermal system

    SciTech Connect

    Charles, R.W.; Holley, C.E. Jr.; Tester, J.W.; Blatz, L.A.; Grigsby, C.O.

    1980-02-01

    The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory is pursuing laboratory and field experiments in the development of the Hot Dry Rock concept of geothermal energy. The field program consists of experiments in a hydraulically fractured region of low permeability in which hot rock is intercepted by two wellbores. These experiments are designed to test reservoir engineering parameters such as: heat extraction rates, water loss rates, flow characteristics including impedance and buoyancy, seismic activity and fluid chemistry. Laboratory experiments have been designed to provide information on the mineral reactivity which may be encountered in the field program. Two experimental circulation systems have been built to study the rates of dissolution and alteration in dynamic flow. Solubility studies have been done in agitated systems. To date, pure minerals, samples of the granodiorite from the actual reservoir and Tijeras Canyon granite have been reacted with distilled water and various solutions of NaCl, NaOH, and Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/. The results of these experimental systems are compared to observations made in field experiments done in a hot dry rock reservoir at a depth of approximately 3 km with initial rock temperatures of 150 to 200/sup 0/C.

  7. First look at rock & soil properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The earliest survey of spectral properties of the rocks and soils surrounding Pathfinder was acquired as a narrow strip covering the region just beyond the where the rover made its egress from the lander. The wavelength filters used, all in the binocular camera's right eye, cover mainly visible wavelengths. These data reveal at least five kinds of rocks and soil in the immediate vicinity of the lander. All of the spectra are ratioed to the mean spectrum of bright red drift to highlight the differences. Different occurrences of drift (pink spectra) are closely similar. Most of the rocks (black spectra) have a dark gray color, and are both darker and less red than the drift, suggesting less weathering. Typical soils (green spectra) are intermediate in properties to the rocks and drift. Both these data and subsequent higher resolution images show that the typical soil consists of a mixture of drift and small dark gray particles resembling the rock. However, two other kinds of materials are significantly different from the rocks and drift. Pinkish or whitish pebbles and crusts on some of the rocks (blue spectra) are brighter in blue light and darker in near-infrared light than is the drift, and they lack the spectral characteristics closely associated with iron minerals. Dark red soils in the lee of several rocks are about as red as the drift, but consistently darker. The curvature in the spectrum at visible wavelengths suggests either more ferric iron minerals than in the drift or a larger particle size.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator. JPL is an operating division

  8. Faulted Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    27 June 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows some of the layered, sedimentary rock outcrops that occur in a crater located at 8oN, 7oW, in western Arabia Terra. Dark layers and dark sand have enhanced the contrast of this scene. In the upper half of the image, one can see numerous lines that off-set the layers. These lines are faults along which the rocks have broken and moved. The regularity of layer thickness and erosional expression are taken as evidence that the crater in which these rocks occur might once have been a lake. The image covers an area about 1.9 km (1.2 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  9. Ladon Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    6 June 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows light-toned, layered, sedimentary rocks exposed by the fluids that carved the Ladon Valles system in the Erythraeum region of Mars. These rocks are so ancient that their sediments were deposited, cemented to form rock, and then eroded by the water (or other liquid) that carved Ladon Valles, so far back in Martian history that such liquids could still flow on the planet's surface.

    Location near: 20.8oS, 30.0oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Spring

  10. Eos Chaos Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    11 January 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows light-toned, layered rock outcrops in Eos Chaos, located near the east end of the Valles Marineris trough system. The outcrops occur in the form of a distinct, circular butte (upper half of image) and a high slope (lower half of image). The rocks might be sedimentary rocks, similar to those found elsewhere exposed in the Valles Marineris system and the chaotic terrain to the east of the region.

    Location near: 12.9oS, 49.5oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Southern Summer

  11. West Candor Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    11 December 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows light-toned, layered, sedimentary rock exposures in western Candor Chasma, part of the vast Valles Marineris trough system. Most of west Candor's interior includes exposures of layered rock with very few superimposed impact craters. The rock may be very ancient, but the lack of craters suggests that the erosion of these materials is on-going.

    Location near: 6.3oS, 76.0oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Southern Summer

  12. Gale Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-439, 1 August 2003

    Gale Crater, located in the Aeolis region near 5.5oS, 222oW, contains a mound of layered sedimentary rock that stands higher than the rim of the crater. This giant mound suggests that the entire crater was not only once filled with sediment, it was also buried beneath sediment. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows some of the eroded remains of the sedimentary rock that once filled Gale Crater. The layers form terraces; wind has eroded the material to form the tapered, pointed yardang ridges seen here. The small circular feature in the lower right quarter of the picture is a mesa that was once a small meteor impact crater that was filled, buried, then exhumed from within the sedimentary rock layers exposed here. This image is illuminated from the left.

  13. Sedimentary Rock Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-348, 2 May 2003

    This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image acquired in March 2003 shows dozens of repeated layers of sedimentary rock in a western Arabia Terra crater at 8oN, 7oW. Wind has sculpted the layered forms into hills somewhat elongated toward the lower left (southwest). The dark patches at the bottom (south) end of the image are drifts of windblown sand. These sedimentary rocks might indicate that the crater was once the site of a lake--or they may result from deposition by wind in a completely dry, desert environment. Either way, these rocks have something important to say about the geologic history of Mars. The area shown is about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the left.

  14. Dipping Rock Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    23 May 2004 The central peak of Oudemans Crater, located at the edge of the Labyrinthus Noctis trough system, consists of steeply-dipping rock layers that were uplifted and tilted by the meteor impact that formed the crater. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows an example. The banded features are layers of light-toned, possibly sedimentary, rock that were brought to the surface and uplifted by the impact process that formed the crater and its central peak. Oudemans Crater's central peak serves as a means for probing the nature of rock that lies beneath the plains cut by the Labyrinthus Noctis troughs, which are part of the vast Valles Marineris system. This March 2004 picture is located near 10.2oS, 92.0oW. The image covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) across and is illuminated by sunlight from the upper left.

  15. Alkaline igneous rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Fitton, J.G.; Upton, B.G.J.

    1987-01-01

    In this volume, an international team of scientists provides an up-to-date overview of the nature, origin, and evolution of alkaline magmas. Particular attention is paid to carbonatites, lamprophyres, and lamproites which are rock suites of current interest not recently reviewed elsewhere. Recent work on the classical alkaline provinces of East Africa, South Greenland, and the Kola Peninsula is included together with reviews of other areas of alkaline magmatism in North and South America, East Greenland, Europe, West Africa, and the ocean basins. Other papers discuss the impact of experimental isotopic and geochemical studies of the petrogenesis of alkaline rocks. This book will be of interest to petrologists and geochemists studying alkaline igneous rocks, and to other earth scientists as a reference on the rapidly expanding field of igneous petrology.

  16. Theory of wing rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, C. H.; Lan, C. E.

    1984-01-01

    A theory is developed for predicting wing rock characteristics. From available data, it can be concluded that wing rock is triggered by flow asymmetries, developed by negative or weakly positive roll damping, and sustained by nonlinear aerodynamic roll damping. A new nonlinear aerodynamic model that includes all essential aerodynamic nonlinearities is developed. The Beecham-Titchener method is applied to obtain approximate analytic solutions for the amplitude and frequency of the limit cycle based on the three degree-of-freedom equations of motion. An iterative scheme is developed to calculate the average aerodynamic derivatives and dynamic characteristics at limit cycle conditions. Good agreement between theoretical and experimental results is obtained.

  17. Layered Rocks In Melas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    20 June 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC), image shows exposures of finely-bedded sedimentary rocks in western Melas Chasma, part of the vast Valles Marineris trough system. Rocks similar to these occur in neighboring west Candor Chasma, as well. The picture is located near 9.1oS, 74.5oW, and covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide. The scene is illuminated by sunlight from the left/upper left.

  18. Sedimentary Rock Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    27 January 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows layers of sedimentary rock in a crater in western Arabia Terra. Layered rock records the history of a place, but an orbiter image alone cannot tell the entire story. These materials record some past episodes of deposition of fine-grained material in an impact crater that is much larger than the image shown here. The picture is located near 3.4oN, 358.7oW, and covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi.) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  19. Rock Outcrops near Hellas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    7 October 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows light-toned, layered rock outcrops in a pitted and eroded region just northeast of Hellas Planitia. The light-toned materials are most likely sedimentary rocks deposited early in martian history (but long after the Hellas Basin formed by a giant asteroid or comet impact). The scene also includes a plethora of large dark-toned, windblown ripples. The image is located near 27.2oS, 280.7oW, and covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left.

  20. Sedimentary Rocks and Dunes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    25 November 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows buttes composed of light-toned, sedimentary rock exposed by erosion within a crater occurring immediately west of Schiaparelli Basin near 4.0oS, 347.9oW. Surrounding these buttes is a field of dark sand dunes and lighter-toned, very large windblown ripples. The sedimentary rocks might indicate that the crater interior was once the site of a lake. The image covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  1. Sedimentary Rock Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    29 July 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows knobs of remnant, wind-eroded, layered sedimentary rock that once completely covered the floor of a crater located west of the Sinus Meridiani region of Mars. Sedimentary rock outcrops are common throughout the Sinus Meridiani region and its surrounding cratered terrain.

    Location near: 2.2oN, 7.9oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Autumn

  2. Layered Rocks in Ritchey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    14 May 2004 This March 2004 Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows light- and dark-toned layered rock outcrops on the floor of Ritchey Crater, located near 28.9oS, 50.8oW. Some or all of these rocks may be sedimentary in origin. Erosion has left a couple of buttes standing on a more erosion-resistant plain. This picture covers an area approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) across and is illuminated by sunlight from the upper left.

  3. Remnant Layered Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    29 June 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a suite of small yardangs -- wind eroded hills -- on the plains immediately west of Meridiani Planum. These yardangs are the remains of layered, sedimentary rock that once covered this area. The few craters visible in this 3 km (1.9 mi) -wide scene are all exhumed from beneath the rocks that comprise the yardang hills. The image is located near 0.4oS, 7.2oW. Sunlight illuminates the picture from the lower left.

  4. Layered Rocks of Melas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    04 August 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows layered sedimentary rock outcrops exposed by erosion in southern Melas Chasma, one of the major Valles Marineris troughs. Such outcrops are common in southern Melas; they resemble the rock outcrops seen in some of the chaotic terrains and other Valles Marineris chasms. This image is located near 11.9oS, 74.6oW, and is about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  5. Longwave thermal infrared spectral variability in individual rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Balick, Lee K; Gillespie, Alan; French, Andrew; Danilina, Iryna

    2008-01-01

    A hyperspectral imaging spectrometer measuring in the longwave thermal infrared (7.6-11.6 {micro}m) with a spatial resolution less than 4 mm was used in the field to observe the variability of emissivity spectra within individual rocks. The rocks were obtained commercially, were on the order of 20 cm in size and were selected to have distinct spectral features: they include alabaster (gypsum), soapstone (steatite with talc), obsidian (volcanic glass), norite (plagioclase and orthopyroxene), and 'jasper' (silica with iron oxides). The advantages of using an imaging spectrometer to spectrally characterize these rocks are apparent. Large spectral variations were observed within individual rocks that may be attributed to roughness, surface geometry, and compositional variation. Non-imaging spectrometers would normally miss these variations as would small samples used in laboratory measurements, spatially averaged spectra can miss the optimum spectra for identification materials and spatially localized components of the rock can be obscured.

  6. Boring and Sealing Rock with Directed Energy Millimeter-Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woskov, P.; Einstein, H. H.; Oglesby, K.

    2015-12-01

    Millimeter-wave directed energy is being investigated to penetrate into deep crystalline basement rock formations to lower well costs and to melt rocks, metals, and other additives to seal wells for applications that include nuclear waste storage and geothermal energy. Laboratory tests have established that intense millimeter-wave (MMW) beams > 1 kW/cm2 can melt and/ or vaporize hard crystalline rocks. In principle this will make it possible to create open boreholes and a method to seal them with a glass/ceramic liner and plug formed from the original rock or with other materials. A 10 kW, 28 GHz commercial (CPI) gyrotron system with a launched beam diameter of about 32 mm was used to heat basalt, granite, limestone, and sandstone specimens to temperatures over 2500 °C to create melts and holes. A calibrated 137 GHz radiometer view, collinear with the heating beam, monitored real time peak rock temperature. A water load surrounding the rock test specimen primarily monitored unabsorbed power at 28 GHz. Power balance analysis of the laboratory observations shows that the temperature rise is limited by radiative heat loss, which would be expected to be trapped in a borehole. The analysis also indicates that the emissivity (absorption efficiency) in the radiated infrared range is lower than the emissivity at 28 GHz, giving the MMW frequency range an important advantage for rock melting. Strength tests on one granite type indicated that heating the rock initially weakens it, but with exposure to higher temperatures the resolidified black glassy product regains strength. Basalt was the easiest to melt and penetrate, if a melt leak path was provided, because of its low viscosity. Full beam holes up to about 50 mm diameter (diffraction increased beam size) were achieved through 30 mm thick basalt and granite specimens. Laboratory experiments to form a seal in an existing hole have also been carried out by melting rock and a simulated steel casing.

  7. Fault Rock Variation as a Function of Host Rock Lithology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagereng, A.; Diener, J.

    2013-12-01

    Fault rocks contain an integrated record of the slip history of a fault, and thereby reflect the deformation processes associated with fault slip. Within the Aus Granulite Terrane, Namibia, a number of Jurassic to Cretaceous age strike-slip faults cross-cut Precambrian high grade metamorphic rocks. These strike-slip faults were active at subgreenschist conditions and occur in a variety of host rock lithologies. Where the host rock contains significant amounts of hydrous minerals, representing granulites that have undergone retrogressive metamorphism, the fault rock is dominated by hydrothermal breccias. In anhydrous, foliated rocks interlayered with minor layers containing hydrous phyllosilicates, the fault rock is a cataclasite partially cemented by jasper and quartz. Where the host rock is an isotropic granitic rock the fault rock is predominantly a fine grained black fault rock. Cataclasites and breccias show evidence for multiple deformation events, whereas the fine grained black fault rocks appear to only record a single slip increment. The strike-slip faults observed all formed in the same general orientation and at a similar time, and it is unlikely that regional stress, strain rate, pressure and temperature varied between the different faults. We therefore conclude that the type of fault rock here depended on the host rock lithology, and that lithology alone accounts for why some faults developed a hydrothermal breccia, some cataclasite, and some a fine grained black fault rock. Consequently, based on the assumption that fault rocks reflect specific slip styles, lithology was also the main control on different fault slip styles in this area at the time of strike-slip fault activity. Whereas fine grained black fault rock is inferred to represent high stress events, hydrothermal breccia is rather related to events involving fluid pressure in excess of the least stress. Jasper-bearing cataclasites may represent faults that experienced dynamic weakening as seen

  8. Yogi the rock - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Yogi, a rock taller than rover Sojourner, is the subject of this image, taken in stereo by the deployed Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. The soil in the foreground has been the location of multiple soil mechanics experiments performed by Sojourner's cleated wheels. Pathfinder scientists were able to control the force inflicted on the soil beneath the rover's wheels, giving them insight into the soil's mechanical properties. The soil mechanics experiments were conducted after this image was taken.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  9. Computed barrier heights for H + CH2O yields CH3O yields CH2OH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, Stephen P.

    1993-01-01

    The barrier heights (including zero-point effects) for H + CH2O yields CH3O and CH3O yields CH2OH have been computed using complete active space self consistent field (CASSCF)/gradient calculations to define the stationary point geometries and harmonic frequencies and internally contracted configuration-interaction (CCI) to refine the energetics. The computed barrier heights are 5.6 kcal/mol and 30.1 kcal/mol, respectively. The former barrier height compares favorably to an experimental activation energy of 5.2 kcal/mol.

  10. Geomechanical rock properties of a basaltic volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Lauren; Kendrick, Jackie; Lavallée, Yan; Oommen, Thomas; Chigna, Gustavo

    2015-06-01

    In volcanic regions, reliable estimates of mechanical properties for specific volcanic events such as cyclic inflation-deflation cycles by magmatic intrusions, thermal stressing, and high temperatures are crucial for building accurate models of volcanic phenomena. This study focuses on the challenge of characterizing volcanic materials for the numerical analyses of such events. To do this, we evaluated the physical (porosity, permeability) and mechanical (strength) properties of basaltic rocks at Pacaya Volcano (Guatemala) through a variety of laboratory experiments, including: room temperature, high temperature (935 °C), and cyclically-loaded uniaxial compressive strength tests on as-collected and thermally-treated rock samples. Knowledge of the material response to such varied stressing conditions is necessary to analyze potential hazards at Pacaya, whose persistent activity has led to 13 evacuations of towns near the volcano since 1987. The rocks show a non-linear relationship between permeability and porosity, which relates to the importance of the crack network connecting the vesicles in these rocks. Here we show that strength not only decreases with porosity and permeability, but also with prolonged stressing (i.e., at lower strain rates) and upon cooling. Complimentary tests in which cyclic episodes of thermal or load stressing showed no systematic weakening of the material on the scale of our experiments. Most importantly, we show the extremely heterogeneous nature of volcanic edifices that arise from differences in porosity and permeability of the local lithologies, the limited lateral extent of lava flows, and the scars of previous collapse events. Input of these process-specific rock behaviors into slope stability and deformation models can change the resultant hazard analysis. We anticipate that an increased parameterization of rock properties will improve mitigation power.

  11. Rocking and Rolling Rattlebacks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Rod

    2013-01-01

    A rattleback is a well-known physics toy that has a preferred direction of rotation. If it is spun about a vertical axis in the "wrong" direction, it will slow down, start rocking from end to end, and then spin in the opposite (i.e. preferred) direction. Many articles have been written about rattlebacks. Some are highly mathematical and…

  12. Reducing Rock Climbing Risks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Attarian, Aram

    1998-01-01

    Provides checklists that can be used as risk-management tools to evaluate rock-climbing programs: developing goals, policies, and procedures; inspecting the climbing environment; maintaining and inspecting equipment; protecting participants; and managing staff (hiring, training, retraining, and evaluating) and campers (experience level, needs, and…

  13. Slippery Rock University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnhold, Robert W.

    2008-01-01

    Slippery Rock University (SRU), located in western Pennsylvania, is one of 14 state-owned institutions of higher education in Pennsylvania. The university has a rich tradition of providing professional preparation programs in special education, therapeutic recreation, physical education, and physical therapy for individuals with disabilities.…

  14. The River Rock School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gereaux, Teresa Thomas

    1999-01-01

    In the early 1920s, the small Appalachian community of Damascus, Virginia, used private subscriptions and volunteer labor to build a 15-classroom school made of rocks from a nearby river and chestnut wood from nearby forests. The school building's history, uses for various community activities, and current condition are described. (SV)

  15. Prestressed rock truss

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, S.F.

    1981-06-23

    A roof support system for mines in which prestressed rock trusses are bolted to the roof of the mine with roof bolts which each extend beyond the width of the mine gallery and the method of installing said trusses into position.

  16. Similar quartz crystallographic textures in rocks of continental earth's crust (by neutron diffraction data): I. Quartz textures in monomineral rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitin, A. N.; Ivankina, T. I.; Ullemeyer, K.; Vasin, R. N.

    2008-09-01

    Quartz crystallographic textures in different rocks have been investigated by neutron diffraction. Various types of crystallographic textures of quartz-bearing mineral associations in monomineral and multiphase rocks from a representative collection of samples have been revealed and classified. Experimental investigations have been performed on special neutron texture diffractometers designed at the Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics and mounted in the seventh channel of the IBR-2 reactor at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Dubna).

  17. Similar quartz crystallographic textures in rocks of continental earth's crust (by neutron diffraction data): I. Quartz textures in monomineral rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Nikitin, A. N. Ivankina, T. I.; Ullemeyer, K.; Vasin, R. N.

    2008-09-15

    Quartz crystallographic textures in different rocks have been investigated by neutron diffraction. Various types of crystallographic textures of quartz-bearing mineral associations in monomineral and multiphase rocks from a representative collection of samples have been revealed and classified. Experimental investigations have been performed on special neutron texture diffractometers designed at the Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics and mounted in the seventh channel of the IBR-2 reactor at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Dubna).

  18. Above- and belowground fluxes of CH4 from boreal shrubs and Scots pine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halmeenmäki, Elisa; Heinonsalo, Jussi; Santalahti, Minna; Putkinen, Anuliina; Fritze, Hannu; Pihlatie, Mari

    2016-04-01

    Boreal upland forests are considered as an important sink for the greenhouse gas methane (CH4) due to CH4 oxidizing microbes in the soil. However, recent evidence suggests that vegetation can act as a significant source of CH4. Also, preliminary measurements indicate occasional emissions of CH4 above the tree canopies of a boreal forest. Nevertheless, the sources and the mechanisms of the observed CH4 emissions are still mostly unknown. Furthermore, the majority of CH4 flux studies have been conducted with the soil chamber method, thus not considering the role of the vegetation itself. We conducted a laboratory experiment to study separately the above- and belowground CH4 fluxes of bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus), lingonberry (Vaccinium vitis-idaea), heather (Calluna vulgaris), and Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris), which were grown in microcosms. The above- and belowground fluxes of the plants were measured separately, and these fluxes were compared to fluxes of microcosms containing only humus soil. In addition to the flux measurements, we analysed the CH4 producing archaea (methanogens) and the CH4 consuming bacteria (methanotrophs) with the qPCR method to discover whether these microbes contribute to the CH4 exchange from the plant material and the soil. The results of the flux measurements indicate that the humus soil with roots of lingonberry, heather, and Scots pine consume CH4 compared to bare humus soil. Simultaneously, the shoots of heather and Scots pine emit small amounts of CH4. We did not find detectable amounts of methanogens from any of the samples, suggesting the produced CH4 could be of non-microbial origin, or produced by very small population of methanogens. Based on the first preliminary results, methanotrophs were present in all the studied plant species, and especially in high amounts in the rooted soils, thus implying that the methanotrophs could be responsible of the CH4 uptake in the root-soil systems.

  19. On the possible detection of CH3D on Titan and Uranus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lutz, B. L.; Maillard, J.-P.; Owen, T.; Brault, J.; De Bergh, C.

    1981-01-01

    The possible spectral detection of monodeuterated methane, CH3D, in the atmospheres of Titan and Uranus is reported. The detection was made on the basis of the identification of a new band centered near 6425 per cm in laboratory spectra of CH3D, which could possibly account for the strength of the methane absorption near 6400 per cm observed in the interferometric spectra of Titan and Uranus of Fink and Larson (1979). On the basis of measurements of the CH3D/CH4 natural abundance ratio and the estimated band strength of the 6425 per cm band, it is concluded that approximately 15% of the observed methane absorption is due to CH3D, rather than a pure temperature effect in CH4.

  20. Radio observations of the planets - The importance of laboratory measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Pater, Imke; Mitchell, David L.

    1993-01-01

    Laboratory data on the line broadening parameters of H2S gas under Uranian/Neptunian conditions, on the far wings of the H2S and NH3 line profiles, and on the dielectric properties of CH4-, NH3-, H2S-, and NH4SH-ice are needed to constrain elemental abundances and understand the dynamics and cloud physics in the atmospheres of the giant planets. Measurements of the absorption coefficient of gaseous H2SO4 at millimeter wavelengths are needed in order to obtain a better understanding of Venus' atmosphere. To determine wind velocity fields in Venus' and Mars' atmospheres, accurate measurements of the center frequencies of the CO lines are necessary. The absorption and scattering properties of lunar soils and/or terrestrial rock powders at frequencies from approximately 1 to 200 GHz, determined in laboratory experiments, would provide a valuable addition to existing data at 450 MHz, 35 GHz, and far infrared frequencies. These data would be used to analyze the microwave spectra of planetary surfaces. Such studies may be helpful in distinguishing the effects of radiative transfer from those of nonlinear heat conduction and internal heat sources.

  1. Teaching the Rock Cycle with Ease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bereki, Debra

    2000-01-01

    Describes a hands-on lesson for teaching high school students the concept of the rock cycle using sedimentary, metamorphic, and igneous rocks. Students use a rock cycle diagram to identify pairs of rocks. From the rock cycle, students explain on paper how their first rock became the second rock and vice versa. (PVD)

  2. Rocks of the Columbia Hills

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Squyres, S. W.; Arvidson, R. E.; Blaney, D.L.; Clark, B. C.; Crumpler, L.; Farrand, W. H.; Gorevan, S.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Hurowitz, J.; Kusack, A.; McSween, H.Y.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R.V.; Ruff, S.W.; Wang, A.; Yen, A.

    2006-01-01

    The Mars Exploration Rover Spirit has identified five distinct rock types in the Columbia Hills of Gusev crater. Clovis Class rock is a poorly sorted clastic rock that has undergone substantial aqueous alteration. We interpret it to be aqueously altered ejecta deposits formed by impacts into basaltic materials. Wishstone Class rock is also a poorly sorted clastic rock that has a distinctive chemical composition that is high in Ti and P and low in Cr. Wishstone Class rock may be pyroclastic or impact in origin. Peace Class rock is a sedimentary material composed of ultramafic sand grains cemented by significant quantities of Mg- and Ca-sulfates. Peace Class rock may have formed when water briefly saturated the ultramafic sands and evaporated to allow precipitation of the sulfates. Watchtower Class rocks are similar chemically to Wishstone Class rocks and have undergone widely varying degrees of near-isochemical aqueous alteration. They may also be ejecta deposits, formed by impacts into Wishstone-rich materials and altered by small amounts of water. Backstay Class rocks are basalt/trachybasalt lavas that were emplaced in the Columbia Hills after the other rock classes were, either as impact ejecta or by localized volcanic activity. The geologic record preserved in the rocks of the Columbia Hills reveals a period very early in Martian history in which volcanic materials were widespread, impact was a dominant process, and water was commonly present. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

  3. Vibrational effects on valence electron momentum distributions of CH{sub 2}F{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Noboru; Yamazaki, Masakazu; Takahashi, Masahiko

    2014-12-28

    We report an electron momentum spectroscopy study of vibrational effects on the electron momentum distributions for the outer valence orbitals of difluoromethane (CH{sub 2}F{sub 2}). The symmetric noncoplanar (e,2e) experiment has been performed at an incident electron energy of 1.2 keV. Furthermore, a theoretical calculation of the electron momentum distributions of the CH{sub 2}F{sub 2} molecule has been carried out with vibrational effects being involved. It is shown from comparisons between experiment and theory that it is essential to take into account influences of the CH{sub 2} asymmetric stretching and CH{sub 2} rocking vibrational modes for a proper understanding of the electron momentum distribution of the 2b{sub 1} orbital having the CH-bonding character. The results of CH{sub 2}F{sub 2}and additional theoretical calculations for (CH{sub 3}){sub 2}O and H{sub 2}CO molecules strongly suggest that vibrational effects on electron momentum distributions tend to be appreciable for non-total symmetry molecular orbitals delocalized over some equivalent CH-bond sites.

  4. Vibrational effects on valence electron momentum distributions of CH2F2.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Noboru; Yamazaki, Masakazu; Takahashi, Masahiko

    2014-12-28

    We report an electron momentum spectroscopy study of vibrational effects on the electron momentum distributions for the outer valence orbitals of difluoromethane (CH2F2). The symmetric noncoplanar (e,2e) experiment has been performed at an incident electron energy of 1.2 keV. Furthermore, a theoretical calculation of the electron momentum distributions of the CH2F2 molecule has been carried out with vibrational effects being involved. It is shown from comparisons between experiment and theory that it is essential to take into account influences of the CH2 asymmetric stretching and CH2 rocking vibrational modes for a proper understanding of the electron momentum distribution of the 2b1 orbital having the CH-bonding character. The results of CH2F2and additional theoretical calculations for (CH3)2O and H2CO molecules strongly suggest that vibrational effects on electron momentum distributions tend to be appreciable for non-total symmetry molecular orbitals delocalized over some equivalent CH-bond sites. PMID:25554158

  5. Fluorescence from excitation of CH4, CH3OH and CH3SH by extreme vacuum ultraviolet radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Guang; Suto, Masako; Lee, L. C.

    1990-01-01

    The photoabsorption and fluorescence cross sections of CH4, CH3OH, and CH3SH were measured in the wavelength regions of 52-106, 48-106, and 48-106 nm, respectively. The fluorescence spectra were dispersed to identify the emitting species. Emissions from the excited species of H(asterisk) and CH(asterisk) are commonly observed for all three molecules. Emission from the excited CH2(asterisk) is observed from CH4, OH(asterisk) from CH3OH and CS(asterisk) from CH3SH. The photoexcitation processes that may produce the observed emission bands are discussed.

  6. Third Order Elastic Coefficients of Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, K.

    2006-12-01

    We present a methodology to determine third order elastic (TOE) coefficients of rock from velocity measurements at different hydrostatic stress level. TOE coefficients help us to obtain a quantitative measure of the variation of velocity with stress. It is one of the most general ways to parameterize the stress sensitivity of rocks. We usually determine the isotropic TOE coefficients from measurements of all the independent stiffness elements under non-hydrostatic stress. However, for initially isotropic or weakly anisotropic rocks, most of the laboratory experiments are carried out under hydrostatic stress. In that case, the measurements of P- and S-wave velocities at different hydrostatic pressure alone are not enough to invert for the isotropic TOE parameters. In this underdetermined situation, more information about the rock microstructure causing the non-linearity is required to predict seismic velocities at any arbitrary stress state. Our workflow is based on the model of Mavko et al. (1995) to compute stress-induced anisotropy. This model assumes that the cause of elastic nonlinearity is the presence of compliant crack-like pore. The pressure dependence of generalized compliances is mainly governed by normal tractions resolved across cracks. This assumption allows one to map the pressure dependence from hydrostatic stress to any state of stress. Applying the model of Mavko et al. (1995), we obtain the full stiffness tensor at different non-hydrostatic stress levels from the usual Vp and Vs measurements. Changes in elastic stiffness elements from a reference state of stress are then used to invert for the TOE coefficients, C111, C112 and C123 using the third order stress- strain relations. This method allows us to compute the TOE elements using hydrostatic measurements of an initially isotropic rock. We show an application of the workflow with laboratory measurements of P- and S-wave velocities under varying hydrostatic stress. This enables us to express

  7. Seismic anisotropy due to preferred mineral orientation observed in shallow crustal rocks in southern Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brocher, T.M.; Christensen, N.I.

    1990-01-01

    Laboratory velocity measurements and structural field relations explain the observation of a significant seismic anisotropy within highly foliated rocks in southern Alaska. The orientation of the principal compressive stress indicates that this anisotropy is not related to extensive dilatancy, but can be satisfactorily explained by the foliation of the metasedimentary rocks. Laboratory measurements indicate a significant anisotropy within these rocks even at pressures well above those thought to close microcracks. These observations document that anisotropy related to preferred mineral orientation may be widespread in continental rocks. Thus, pervasive foliation can play a more important role in causing anisotropy than dilatancy, and inferences of principal stress orientations solely from anisotropy may be erroneous. -Author

  8. Rotational excitation of CH4 by He atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanga, B. H.; Stancil, P. C.

    2008-10-01

    Quantum close-coupling and coupled-state approximation scattering calculations for rotational energy transfer of rotationally excited CH4 due to collisions with He are presented for collision energies between 10-7 and 3000 cm-1 using the MP4 potential of Calderoni et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 121, 8261 (2004)]. State-to-state cross sections and rate coefficients from selected initial rotational states of CH4 in symmetries A, E, and F are studied from the ultra-cold to the thermal regime. Comparison of the cross sections with available theoretical results and experimental data show good agreement. Applications to astrophysics and cold laboratory environments are briefly addressed.

  9. Improved Shock Tube Measurement of the CH4 + Ar = CH3 + H + Ar Rate Constant using UV Cavity-Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy of CH3.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shengkai; Davidson, David F; Hanson, Ronald K

    2016-07-21

    We report an improved measurement for the rate constant of methane dissociation in argon (CH4 + Ar = CH3 + H + Ar) behind reflected shock waves. The experiment was conducted using a sub-parts per million sensitivity CH3 diagnostic recently developed in our laboratory based on ultraviolet cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy. The high sensitivity of this diagnostic allowed for measurements of quantitatively resolved CH3 time histories during the initial stage of CH4 pyrolysis, where the reaction system is clean and free from influences of secondary reactions and temperature change. This high sensitivity also allowed extension of our measurement range to much lower temperatures (<1500 K). The current-reflected shock measurements were performed at temperatures between 1487 and 1866 K and pressures near 1.7 atm, resulting in the following Arrhenius rate constant expression for the title reaction: k(1.7 atm) = 3.7 × 10(16) exp(-42 200 K/T) cm(3)/mol·s, with a 2σ uncertainty factor of 1.25. The current data are in good consensus with various theoretical and review studies, but at the low temperature end they suggest a slightly higher (up to 35%) rate constant compared to these previous results. A re-evaluation of previous and current experimental data in the falloff region was also performed, yielding updated expressions for both the low-pressure limit and the high-pressure limit rate constants and improved agreement with all existing data. PMID:27380878

  10. Impact loads of falling rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerber, W.

    2009-04-01

    Depending on the chosen protection system the planning engineer has to proceed differently. If the impact energies stay below 3'000 - 5'000 kJ solutions using flexible protection systems are recommended in many cases being the most efficient solution. Since 2001, such systems are type tested in Switzerland. The results are published on the internet (www.umwelt-schweiz.ch/typenpruefung). Therefore, the engineers can concentrate on the design of the anchorage and do not need to consider the brake down process of the falling rock because its details including the acting forces within the barrier are given. This is different to the design of rockfall protection earth dams. Here, the evidence of the structural safety is the major task and questions like the following ones have to be answered: What magnitude are the forces that have to be carried for a certain kinetic energy? How are the forces influenced by mass or impact velocity? What is the influence of the soil properties such as strength, density and friction angle? How deep does the rock penetrate? Previous research on the impact loads on the cushion layer of protection galleries were performed by EPFL in the mid-nineties and led to a Swiss Guideline (ASTRA/SBB 1998) to calculate an equivalent static load for the structure underneath. This approach also delivers a function to predict the penetration depth. This contribution now checks whether above approach can also be used to design earth dams or how it can be modified. For that, the results of previous experiments performed by different institutions were analysed and, if possible, compared to the guideline. This could confirm above mentioned function to predict the penetration depth. In addition, an experimental series with different bodies (800 kg, 4000 kg) falling from different heights (2 - 15 m) on differently conditioned soils were performed. Measurements were taken through accelerometers attached to the blocks and measuring the vertical deceleration. The

  11. Lithologic mapping of silicate rocks using TIMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillespie, A. R.

    1986-01-01

    Common rock-forming minerals have thermal infrared spectral features that are measured in the laboratory to infer composition. An airborne Daedalus scanner (TIMS) that collects six channels of thermal infrared radiance data (8 to 12 microns), may be used to measure these same features for rock identification. Previously, false-color composite pictures made from channels 1, 3, and 5 and emittance spectra for small areas on these images were used to make lithologic maps. Central wavelength, standard deviation, and amplitude of normal curves regressed on the emittance spectra are related to compositional information for crystalline igneous silicate rocks. As expected, the central wavelength varies systematically with silica content and with modal quartz content. Standard deviation is less sensitive to compositional changes, but large values may result from mixed admixture of vegetation. Compression of the six TIMS channels to three image channels made from the regressed parameters may be effective in improving geologic mapping from TIMS data, and these synthetic images may form a basis for the remote assessment of rock composition.

  12. Rock melting technology and geothermal drilling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowley, J. C.

    1974-01-01

    National awareness of the potential future shortages in energy resources has heightened interest in exploration and utilization of a variety of geothermal energy (GTE) reservoirs. The status of conventional drilling of GTE wells is reviewed briefly and problem areas which lead to higher drilling costs are identified and R and D directions toward solution are suggested. In the immediate future, an expanded program of drilling in GTE formations can benefit from improvements in drilling equipment and technology normally associated with oil or gas wells. Over a longer time period, the new rock-melting drill bits being developed as a part of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory's Subterrene Program offer new solutions to a number of problems which frequently hamper GTE drilling, including the most basic problem - high temperature. Two of the most favorable characteristics of rock-melting penetrators are their ability to operate effectively in hot rock and produce glass linings around the hole as an integral part of the drilling process. The technical advantages to be gained by use of rock-melting penetrators are discussed in relation to the basic needs for GTE wells.

  13. Joint Commission on rock properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A joint commission on Rock Properties for Petroleum Engineers (RPPE) has been established by the International Society of Rock Mechanics and the Society of Petroleum Engineers to set up data banks on the properties of sedimentary rocks encountered during drilling. Computer-based data banks of complete rock properties will be organized for sandstones (GRESA), shales (ARSHA) and carbonates (CARCA). The commission hopes to access data sources from members of the commission, private companies and the public domain.

  14. Microwave assisted hard rock cutting

    DOEpatents

    Lindroth, David P.; Morrell, Roger J.; Blair, James R.

    1991-01-01

    An apparatus for the sequential fracturing and cutting of subsurface volume of hard rock (102) in the strata (101) of a mining environment (100) by subjecting the volume of rock to a beam (25) of microwave energy to fracture the subsurface volume of rock by differential expansion; and , then bringing the cutting edge (52) of a piece of conventional mining machinery (50) into contact with the fractured rock (102).

  15. Realistic Expectations for Rock Identification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westerback, Mary Elizabeth; Azer, Nazmy

    1991-01-01

    Presents a rock classification scheme for use by beginning students. The scheme is based on rock textures (glassy, crystalline, clastic, and organic framework) and observable structures (vesicles and graded bedding). Discusses problems in other rock classification schemes which may produce confusion, misidentification, and anxiety. (10 references)…

  16. A look at carbonate rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Bowsher, A.I. )

    1994-03-01

    Important ore deposits are found in carbonate rocks, and large volumes of oil and gas are also produced from carbonate rocks on a worldwide basis. Reservoir types and productive capability are most often related to rock type and the facies to which the rock belongs. Broad new understanding of carbonate rocks came with the publication of Classification of Carbonate Rocks-A Symposium (AAPG Memoir 1, 1962). The principal parameters of carbonate rocks are (1) chemical composition, (2) grade size, (3) sorting and packing, (4) identification of grains in the rock, (5) cement, (6) color, (7) alteration of recrystallization, and (8) porosity. Original porosity in carbonate rocks relates to kind and packing of original particles. Secondary porosity is reduced by infilling that usually relates to some particles, or is enhanced because some types of grains are dissolved. Carbonate sediments are organic detritus. The range of solubility of organic detritus is very large. Fossils present in the carbonates are clues as to the source of the detritus in the rock. Additional research is needed in faunal relations of facies and of rock types. Ore recovery, well completion, and EOR are more successful when the parameters of carbonate rocks are extensively studied. A simplified approach to carbonate description is discussed.

  17. CARCINOGENICITY OF BLACK ROCK HARBOR SEDIMENT TO THE EASTERN OYSTER AND TROPHIC TRANSFER OF BLACK ROCK HARBOR CARCINOGENS FROM THE BLUE MUSSEL TO THE WINTER FLOUNDER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) developed neoplastic disorders when experimentally exposed both in the laboratory and field to chemically contaminated sediment from Black Rock Harbor (BRH), Bridgeport, Connecticut. eoplasia was observed in oysters after 30 and 60 days ...

  18. Sedimentary Rock Outcrops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    16 August 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows eroded layered rock outcrops in a crater north of Meridiani Planum near 2.7oN, 359.1oW. The dozens and dozens of sedimentary rock layers of repeated thickness and similar physical properties at this location suggest that they may have been deposited in a lacustrine (lake) setting. The crater in which these layers occur may once have been completely filled and buried, as is the case for many craters in the Sinus Meridiani region. This image covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) across; sunlight illuminates the scene from the left.

  19. Sedimentary Rock Near Coprates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-420, 13 July 2003

    This mosaic of two Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) narrow angle camera images, one from 2001, the other from 2003, shows light-toned, layered, sedimentary rock outcrops exposed on the floor of a trough that parallels Coprates Chasma in the Valles Marineris system. Layered rocks form the pages from which the history of a place can be read. It may be many years before the story is read, but or now at least we know where one of the books of martian history is found. This picture is located near 15.2oS, 60.1oW. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the left.

  20. Schiaparelli's Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    9 October 2004 Schiaparelli Basin is a large, 470 kilometer (292 miles) impact crater located east of Sinus Meridiani. The basin might once have been the site of a large lake--that is, if the sedimentary rocks exposed on its northwestern floor were deposited in water. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a 1.5 meter per pixel (5 ft per pixel) view of some of the light-toned, finely-bedded sedimentary rocks in northwestern Schiaparelli. The image is located near 1.0oS, 346.0oW, and covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the left.

  1. Gale Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    15 April 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows outcroppings of layered, sedimentary rock in eastern Gale Crater. North-central Gale Crater is the site of a mound that is more than several kilometers thick and largely composed of sedimentary rocks that record a complex history of deposition and erosion. At one time, Gale Crater might have been completely filled and buried beneath the martian surface.

    Location near: 4.9oS, 221.6oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Winter

  2. Poroelasticity of rock

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H.F.

    1992-03-01

    The research program is an experimental study of static and dynamic poroelastic behavior of rocks. Measurements of Skempton's coefficient and undrained Poisson's ratio together with drained bulk modulus and shear modulus will provide a complete set of the four poroelastic moduli. Stress coupling to fluid flow in fractured rock can occur also through changes of fracture permeability due to fracture compressibility. Numerical models that include this effect will be compared with standard double porosity models of fluid extraction from oil reservoirs. Wave velocity and attenuation measurements will be made from seismic to ultrasonic frequencies to establish a phenomenological model of the effects of permeability, porosity and saturation for seismic exploration of oil and gas and for seismic characterization of an aquifer for environmental restoration and waste remediation.

  3. Coseismic damage and softening of fault rocks at seismogenic depths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, W. Ashley; Mitchell, Thomas M.; Renner, Jörg; Di Toro, Giulio

    2012-11-01

    Elastic stiffness, a critical property for stress-orientation, propagation of earthquake ruptures and associated seismic waves, and the capability of crustal rocks to store strain energy, is expected to be highly variable throughout the seismic cycle due to complex sequences of damage and healing. Post-seismic healing and exhumation-related alteration render it impossible to assess how well rock stiffness as measured in the laboratory on samples collected from fault zones represents in situ, coseismic rock stiffness at seismogenic depths. Here we estimate the in situ, coseismic stiffness of fault rocks from the pseudotachylyte-bearing Gole Larghe Fault Zone (Italian Southern Alps), using aspect ratio measurements of pseudotachylyte injection veins and numerical simulations. Aspect ratios of injection veins cutting across tonalite and cataclasite exhibit a maximum vein aperture positively correlating with vein length. To model vein opening, fault and injection veins are assumed to be filled with pressurized melt. Consistent with recent results from studies of melt lubrication we assume that the magnitude of the melt pressure is in equilibrium with the fault-normal stress and the fault vein approximately maintains constant thickness during slip. The numerical simulations of injection vein opening due to pressurized frictional melt indicate that the average in situ coseismic stiffness of the wall rocks is 5-50 times smaller than the stiffness obtained from laboratory measurements on the same rocks in their present-day state. The disagreement between laboratory measurements and simulations brings into question the appropriateness of using laboratory-derived values for rock stiffness to model coseismic processes at depth.

  4. Terby Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    27 December 2003 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows layered sedimentary rock outcrops in Terby Crater, located near 27.7oS, 285.4oW. The layered sediments in Terby are several kilometers thick, attesting to a long history of deposition in this ancient basin. The picture covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left.

  5. Eroded Sedimentary Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-372, 26 May 2003

    This high resolution Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows eroded, layered sedimentary rock exposures in an unnamed western Arabia Terra crater at 8oN, 7oW. The dark material is windblown sand; much of the erosion of these layers may have also been caused by wind. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the left.

  6. Ripples and Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    26 February 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows light-toned sedimentary rock outcrops and large dark-toned, windblown ripples in Aram Chaos.

    Location near: 3.0oN, 20.9oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Northern Summer

  7. Iani Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    23 February 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows light-toned sedimentary rocks exposed by erosion in the Iani Chaos region of Mars.

    Location near: 4.2oS, 18.7oW Image width: 1 km (0.6 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Winter

  8. Melas Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    17 July 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows layered, sedimentary rock outcrops in southwestern Melas Chasma, one of the troughs of the vast Valles Marineris system. Sunlight illuminates this scene from the upper left; it is located near 9.8oS, 76.0oW, and covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide.

  9. Soil Rock Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    A redesigned version of a soil/rock analyzer developed by Martin Marietta under a Langley Research Center contract is being marketed by Aurora Tech, Inc. Known as the Aurora ATX-100, it has self-contained power, an oscilloscope, a liquid crystal readout, and a multichannel spectrum analyzer. It measures energy emissions to determine what elements in what percentages a sample contains. It is lightweight and may be used for mineral exploration, pollution monitoring, etc.

  10. Session: Hot Dry Rock

    SciTech Connect

    Tennyson, George P. Jr.; Duchane, David V.; Ponden, Raymond F.; Brown, Donald W.

    1992-01-01

    This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of four presentations: ''Hot Dry Rock - Summary'' by George P. Tennyson, Jr.; ''HDR Opportunities and Challenges Beyond the Long Term Flow Test'' by David V. Duchane; ''Start-Up Operations at the Fenton Hill HDR Pilot Plant'' by Raymond F. Ponden; and ''Update on the Long-Term Flow Testing Program'' by Donald W. Brown.

  11. Rate Constant for the Reaction CH3 + CH3 Yields C2H6 at T = 155 K and Model Calculation of the CH3 Abundance in the Atmospheres of Saturn and Neptune

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cody, Regina J.; Romani, Paul N.; Nesbitt, Fred L.; Iannone, Mark A.; Tardy, Dwight C.; Stief, Louis J.

    2003-01-01

    The column abundances of CH3 observed by the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) satellite on Saturn and Neptune were lower than predicted by atmospheric photochemical models, especially for Saturn. It has been suggested that the models underestimated the loss of CH3 due to poor knowledge of the rate constant k of the CH3 + CH3 self-reaction at the low temperatures and pressures of these atmospheres. Motivated by this suggestion, we undertook a combined experimental and photochemical modeling study of the CH3 + CH3 reaction and its role in determining planetary CH3 abundances. In a discharge flow-mass spectrometer system, k was measured at T = 155 K and three pressures of He. The results in units of cu cm/molecule/s are k(0.6 Torr) = 6.82 x 10(exp -11), k(1.0 Torr) = 6.98 x 10(exp -11), and k(1.5 Torr) = 6.91 x 10(exp -11). Analytical expressions for k were derived that (1) are consistent with the present laboratory data at T = 155 K, our previous data at T = 202 K and 298 K, and those of other studies in He at T = 296-298 K and (2) have some theoretical basis to provide justification for extrapolation. The derived analytical expressions were then used in atmospheric photochemical models for both Saturn and Neptune. These model results reduced the disparity with observations of Saturn, but not with observations of Neptune. However, the disparity for Neptune is much smaller. The solution to the remaining excess CH3 prediction in the models relative to the ISO observations lies, to a large extent, elsewhere in the CH3 photochemistry or transport, not in the CH3 + CH3 rate.

  12. Salty Martian Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    These plots, or spectra, show that a rock dubbed 'McKittrick' near the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's landing site at Meridiani Planum, Mars, has higher concentrations of sulfur and bromine than a nearby patch of soil nicknamed 'Tarmac.' These data were taken by Opportunity's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer, which produces a spectrum, or fingerprint, of chemicals in martian rocks and soil. The instrument contains a radioisotope, curium-244, that bombards a designated area with alpha particles and X-rays, causing a cascade of reflective fluorescent X-rays. The energies of these fluorescent X-rays are unique to each atom in the periodic table, allowing scientists to determine a target's chemical composition.

    Both 'Tarmac' and 'McKittrick' are located within the small crater where Opportunity landed. The full spectra are expressed as X-ray intensity (logarithmic scale) versus energy. When comparing two spectra, the relative intensities at a given energy are proportional to the elemental concentrations, however these proportionality factors can be complex. To be precise, scientists extensively calibrate the instrument using well-analyzed geochemical standards.

    Both the alpha particle X-ray spectrometer and the rock abrasion tool are located on the rover's instrument deployment device, or arm.

  13. Rock Mechanical Properties from Logs Petrophysics : Concepts and Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaillot, Philippe; Crawford, Brian; Alramahi, Bashar; Karner, Steve

    2010-05-01

    The objective of the "geomechanics from logs" (GML) research project is to develop model-driven predictive software for determining rock mechanical properties (specifically rock strength, compressibility and fracability) from other, more easily measured, rock properties (e.g. lithology, porosity, clay volume, velocity) routinely derived from nuclear, resistivity and acoustic logging tools. To this end, geomechanics from logs seeks to increase fundamental understanding of the primary geologic controls on rock mechanical properties and to translate this new insight into novel predictive tools. In detail, GML predictors rely on (i) the generation of relational rock mechanical properties databases incorporating QC'd core-based laboratory measurements (both in-house and high-precision published data); (ii) the use of established rock physics models (e.g. friable sand, contact cement models) to investigate theoretical relationships between geologic processes, reservoir environment, rock microstructure and elastic, bulk and transport petrophysical attributes/properties; (iii) the subdivision of database rocks into generic lithotypes (e.g. sand, shaly sand, sandy shale, shale) with common petrophysical attributes/properties; (iv) the use of multivariate statistics to generate lithotype-dependent empirical predictive relationships between mechanical properties and log-derived petrophysical attributes/properties; (v) the estimation of uncertainties associated with predictive function parameters; (vi) the application and validation of mechanical properties predictive tools to well-documented case studies (e.g. sand strength for perforation stability, rock compressibility for reservoir simulation) to test overall performance and quantify uncertainty in predictions. This paper presents the results of various rock strength, rock compressibility and rock fracability case studies conducted in wells of different stratigraphic age and depositional environment. Overall, GML (i

  14. A Phased Array Approach to Rock Blasting

    SciTech Connect

    Leslie Gertsch; Jason Baird

    2006-07-01

    A series of laboratory-scale simultaneous two-hole shots was performed in a rock simulant (mortar) to record the shock wave interference patterns produced in the material. The purpose of the project as a whole was to evaluate the usefulness of phased array techniques of blast design, using new high-precision delay technology. Despite high-speed photography, however, we were unable to detect the passage of the shock waves through the samples to determine how well they matched the expected interaction geometry. The follow-up mine-scale tests were therefore not conducted. Nevertheless, pattern analysis of the vectors that would be formed by positive interference of the shockwaves from multiple charges in an ideal continuous, homogeneous, isotropic medium indicate the potential for powerful control of blast design, given precise characterization of the target rock mass.

  15. Kingma awarded Mineral and Rock Physics Award

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Mineral and Rock Physics Award was presented to Kathleen J. Kingma at the 1993 AGU Fall Meeting. The annual award, given by the AGU Committee on Mineral and Rock Physics, recognizes an undergraduate or graduate student who exhibits unusual promise, as indicated by a letter of support and a published work.Kingma received the award for her work in the area of pressure-induced amorphization of minerals. In this work, she combined in situ high-pressure diamond-anvil cell techniques with high-resolution transmission electron microscopy of quenched material to investigate the microstructural effects associated with these pressure-induced transitions in quartz. The letters of nomination attributed her success to the way in which “she combines extraordinary abilities in the laboratory, where she is a tireless and meticulous worker, with a thorough knowledge of mineralogy.”

  16. Rock pushing and sampling under rocks on Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, H.J.; Liebes, S., Jr.; Crouch, D.S.; Clark, L.V.

    1978-01-01

    Viking Lander 2 acquired samples on Mars from beneath two rocks, where living organisms and organic molecules would be protected from ultraviolet radiation. Selection of rocks to be moved was based on scientific and engineering considerations, including rock size, rock shape, burial depth, and location in a sample field. Rock locations and topography were established using the computerized interactive video-stereophotogrammetric system and plotted on vertical profiles and in plan view. Sampler commands were developed and tested on Earth using a full-size lander and surface mock-up. The use of power by the sampler motor correlates with rock movements, which were by plowing, skidding, and rolling. Provenance of the samples was determined by measurements and interpretation of pictures and positions of the sampler arm. Analytical results demonstrate that the samples were, in fact, from beneath the rocks. Results from the Gas Chromatograph-Mass Spectrometer of the Molecular Analysis experiment and the Gas Exchange instrument of the Biology experiment indicate that more adsorbed(?) water occurs in samples under rocks than in samples exposed to the sun. This is consistent with terrestrial arid environments, where more moisture occurs in near-surface soil un- der rocks than in surrounding soil because the net heat flow is toward the soil beneath the rock and the rock cap inhibits evaporation. Inorganic analyses show that samples of soil from under the rocks have significantly less iron than soil exposed to the sun. The scientific significance of analyses of samples under the rocks is only partly evaluated, but some facts are clear. Detectable quantities of martian organic molecules were not found in the sample from under a rock by the Molecular Analysis experiment. The Biology experiments did not find definitive evidence for Earth-like living organisms in their sample. Significant amounts of adsorbed water may be present in the martian regolith. The response of the soil

  17. The rock melting approach to drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Cort, G.E.; Goff, S.J.; Rowley, J.C.; Neudecker, J.W. Jr.; Dreesen, D.S.; Winchester, W.

    1993-09-01

    During the early and mid-1970`s the Los Alamos National Laboratory demonstrated practical applications of drilling and coring using an electrically-heated graphite, tungsten, or molybdenum penetrator that melts a hole as it is slowly pushed through the rock or soil. The molten material consolidates into a rugged glass lining that prevents hole collapse; minimizes the potential for cross-flow, lost circulation, or the release of hazardous materials without casing operations; and produces no cuttings in porous or low density (<1.7 g/cc) formations. Because there are no drilling fluids required, the rock melting approach reduces waste handling, treatment and disposal. Drilling by rock melting has been demonstrated to depths up to 30 m in caliche, clay, alluvium, cobbles, sand, basalt, granite, and other materials. Penetrating large cobbles without debris removal was achieved by thermal stress fracturing and lateral extrusion of portions of the rock melt into the resulting cracks. Both horizontal and vertical holes in a variety of diameters were drilled in these materials using modular, self-contained field units that operate in remote areas. Because the penetrator does not need to rotate, steering by several simple approaches is considered quite feasible. Melting is ideal for obtaining core samples in alluvium and other poorly consolidated soils since the formed-in-place glass liner stabilizes the hole, encapsulates volatile or hazardous material, and recovers an undisturbed core. Because of the relatively low thermal conductivity of rock and soil materials, the heat-affected zone beyond the melt layer is very small, <1 inch thick. Los Alamos has begun to update the technology and this paper will report on the current status of applications and designs for improved drills.

  18. Grinding into Soft, Powdery Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This hole in a rock dubbed 'Clovis' is the deepest hole drilled so far in any rock on Mars. NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit captured this view with its microscopic imager on martian sol 217 (Aug. 12, 2004) after drilling 8.9 millimeters (0.35 inch) into the rock with its rock abrasion tool. The view is a mosaic of four frames taken by the microscopic imager. The hole is 4.5 centimeters (1.8 inches) in diameter. Clovis is key to a developing story about environmental change on Mars, not only because it is among the softest rocks encountered so far in Gusev Crater, but also because it contains mineral alterations that extend relatively deep beneath its surface. In fact, as evidenced by its fairly crumbly texture, it is possibly the most highly altered volcanic rock ever studied on Mars.

    Scientific analysis shows that the rock contains higher levels of the elements sulfur, chlorine, and bromine than are normally encountered in basaltic rocks, such as a rock dubbed 'Humphrey' that Spirit encountered two months after arriving on Mars. Humphrey showed elevated levels of sulfur, chlorine, and bromine only in the outermost 2 millimeters (less than 0.1 inch) of its surface. Clovis shows elevated levels of the same elements along with the associated softness of the rock within a borehole that is 4 times as deep. Scientists hope to compare Clovis to other, less-altered rocks in the vicinity to assess what sort of water-based processes altered the rock. Hypotheses include transport of sulfur, chlorine, and bromine in water vapor in volcanic gases; hydrothermal circulation (flow of volcanically heated water through rock); or saturation in a briny soup containing the same elements.

    In this image, very fine-grained material from the rock has clumped together by electrostatic attraction and fallen into the borehole. NASA/JPL/Cornell/USGS

  19. Constitutive relationships for elastic deformation of clay rock: Data Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H.H.; Rutqvist, J.; Birkholzer, J.T.

    2011-04-15

    Geological repositories have been considered a feasible option worldwide for storing high-level nuclear waste. Clay rock is one of the rock types under consideration for such purposes, because of its favorable features to prevent radionuclide transport from the repository. Coupled hydromechanical processes have an important impact on the performance of a clay repository, and establishing constitutive relationships for modeling such processes are essential. In this study, we propose several constitutive relationships for elastic deformation in indurated clay rocks based on three recently developed concepts. First, when applying Hooke's law in clay rocks, true strain (rock volume change divided by the current rock volume), rather than engineering strain (rock volume change divided by unstressed rock volume), should be used, except when the degree of deformation is very small. In the latter case, the two strains will be practically identical. Second, because of its inherent heterogeneity, clay rock can be divided into two parts, a hard part and a soft part, with the hard part subject to a relatively small degree of deformation compared with the soft part. Third, for swelling rock like clay, effective stress needs to be generalized to include an additional term resulting from the swelling process. To evaluate our theoretical development, we analyze uniaxial test data for core samples of Opalinus clay and laboratory measurements of single fractures within macro-cracked Callovo-Oxfordian argillite samples subject to both confinement and water reduced swelling. The results from this evaluation indicate that our constitutive relationships can adequately represent the data and explain the related observations.

  20. Engineered CH2 domains (nanoantibodies).

    PubMed

    Dimitrov, Dimiter S

    2009-01-01

    Currently, almost all FDA approved therapeutic antibodies (except ReoPro, Lucentis and Cimzia which are Fabs), and the vast majority of those in clinical trials are full-size antibodies mostly in IgG1 format of about 150 kDa size. A fundamental problem for such large molecules is their poor penetration into tissues (e.g., solid tumors) and poor or absent binding to regions on the surface of some molecules (e.g., on the HIV envelope glycoprotein) which are fully accessible only by molecules of smaller size. Therefore, much work especially during the last decade has been aimed at developing novel scaffolds of much smaller size and high stability. Here I briefly describe a proposition to use the immunoglobulin (Ig) constant CH2 domain (CH3 for IgE and IgM) as a scaffold. CH2 is critical for the Ig effector functions. Isolated CH2 is stable monomer in contrast to all other constant domains and most of the variable domains. CH2 and engineered CH2 domains with improved stability can be used as scaffolds for construction of libraries containing diverse binders to various antigens. Such binders based on a CH2 scaffold could also confer some effector functions. Because the CH2 domains are the smallest independently folded antibody domains that can be engineered to contain simultaneously antigen-binding sites and binding sites mediating effector and stability functions, and to distinguish them from domain antibodies which are used to denote engineered VH or VL domains or nanobodies which are used to denote camelid VHH, I termed them nanoantibodies (nAbs). PMID:20046570

  1. Rock Pore Structure as Main Reason of Rock Deterioration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ondrášik, Martin; Kopecký, Miloslav

    2014-03-01

    Crashed or dimensional rocks have been used as natural construction material, decoration stone or as material for artistic sculptures. Especially old historical towns not only in Slovakia have had experiences with use of stones for construction purposes for centuries. The whole buildings were made from dimensional stone, like sandstone, limestone or rhyolite. Pavements were made especially from basalt, andesite, rhyolite or granite. Also the most common modern construction material - concrete includes large amounts of crashed rock, especially limestone, dolostone and andesite. However, rock as any other material if exposed to exogenous processes starts to deteriorate. Especially mechanical weathering can be very intensive if rock with unsuitable rock properties is used. For long it had been believed that repeated freezing and thawing in relation to high absorption is the main reason of the rock deterioration. In Slovakia for many years the high water absorption was set as exclusion criterion for use of rocks and stones in building industry. Only after 1989 the absorption was accepted as merely informational rock property and not exclusion. The reason of the change was not the understanding of the relationship between the porosity and rock deterioration, but more or less good experiences with some high porous rocks used in constructions exposed to severe weather conditions and proving a lack of relationship between rock freeze-thaw resistivity and water absorption. Results of the recent worldwide research suggest that understanding a resistivity of rocks against deterioration is hidden not in the absorption but in the structure of rock pores in relation to thermodynamic properties of pore water and tensile strength of rocks and rock minerals. Also this article presents some results of research on rock deterioration and pore structure performed on 88 rock samples. The results divide the rocks tested into two groups - group N in which the pore water does not freeze

  2. Cooperative investigation of precision and accuracy: In chemical analysis of silicate rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schlecht, W.G.

    1951-01-01

    This is the preliminary report of the first extensive program ever organized to study the analysis of igneous rocks, a study sponsored by the United States Geological Survey, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the Geophysical Laboratory of the Carnegie Institution of Washington. Large samples of two typical igneous rocks, a granite and a diabase, were carefully prepared and divided. Small samples (about 70 grams) of each were sent to 25 rock-analysis laboratories throughout the world; analyses of one or both samples were reported by 34 analysts in these laboratories. The results, which showed rather large discrepancies, are presented in histograms. The great discordance in results reflects the present unsatisfactory state of rock analysis. It is hoped that the ultimate establishment of standard samples and procedures will contribute to the improvement of quality of analyses. The two rock samples have also been thoroughly studied spectrographically and petrographically. Detailed reports of all the studies will be published.

  3. New Rock Abrasivity Test Method for Tool Life Assessments on Hard Rock Tunnel Boring: The Rolling Indentation Abrasion Test (RIAT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macias, F. J.; Dahl, F.; Bruland, A.

    2016-05-01

    The tunnel boring machine (TBM) method has become widely used and is currently an important presence within the tunnelling industry. Large investments and high geological risk are involved using TBMs, and disc cutter consumption has a great influence on performance and cost, especially in hard rock conditions. Furthermore, reliable cutter life assessments facilitate the control of risk as well as avoiding delays and budget overruns. Since abrasive wear is the most common process affecting cutter consumption, good laboratory tests for rock abrasivity assessments are needed. A new abrasivity test method by rolling disc named Rolling Indentation Abrasion Test (RIAT) has been developed. The goal of the new test design and procedure is to reproduce wear behaviour on hard rock tunnel boring in a more realistic way than the traditionally used methods. Wear by rolling contact on intact rock samples is introduced and several rock types, covering a wide rock abrasiveness range, have been tested by RIAT. The RIAT procedure indicates a great ability of the testing method to assess abrasive wear on rolling discs. In addition and to evaluate the newly developed RIAT test method, a comprehensive laboratory testing programme including the most commonly used abrasivity test methods and the mineral composition were carried out. Relationships between the achieved results from conventional testing and RIAT results have been analysed.

  4. Laboratory Tests

    MedlinePlus

    Laboratory tests check a sample of your blood, urine, or body tissues. A technician or your doctor ... compare your results to results from previous tests. Laboratory tests are often part of a routine checkup ...

  5. Physical and chemical weathering. [of Martian surface and rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gooding, James L.; Arvidson, Raymond E.; Zolotov, Mikhail IU.

    1992-01-01

    Physical and chemical weathering processes that might be important on Mars are reviewed, and the limited observations, including relevant Viking results and laboratory simulations, are summarized. Physical weathering may have included rock splitting through growth of ice, salt or secondary silicate crystals in voids. Chemical weathering probably involved reactions of minerals with water, oxygen, and carbon dioxide, although predicted products vary sensitively with the abundance and physical form postulated for the water. On the basis of kinetics data for hydration of rock glass on earth, the fate of weathering-rind formation on glass-bearing Martian volcanic rocks is tentatively estimated to have been on the order of 0.1 to 4.5 cm/Gyr; lower rates would be expected for crystalline rocks.

  6. Rock mechanics for hard rock nuclear waste repositories

    SciTech Connect

    Heuze, F.E.

    1981-09-01

    The mined geologic burial of high level nuclear waste is now the favored option for disposal. The US National Waste Terminal Storage Program designed to achieve this disposal includes an extensive rock mechanics component related to the design of the wastes repositories. The plan currently considers five candidate rock types. This paper deals with the three hard rocks among them: basalt, granite, and tuff. Their behavior is governed by geological discontinuities. Salt and shale, which exhibit behavior closer to that of a continuum, are not considered here. This paper discusses both the generic rock mechanics R and D, which are required for repository design, as well as examples of projects related to hard rock waste storage. The examples include programs in basalt (Hanford/Washington), in granitic rocks (Climax/Nevada Test Site, Idaho Springs/Colorado, Pinawa/Canada, Oracle/Arizona, and Stripa/Sweden), and in tuff (Nevada Test Site).

  7. Evolution of Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veizer, J.; MacKenzie, F. T.

    2003-12-01

    For almost a century, it has been recognized that the present-day thickness and areal extent of Phanerozoic sedimentary strata increase progressively with decreasing geologic age. This pattern has been interpreted either as reflecting an increase in the rate of sedimentation toward the present (Barrell, 1917; Schuchert, 1931; Ronov, 1976) or as resulting from better preservation of the younger part of the geologic record ( Gilluly, 1949; Gregor, 1968; Garrels and Mackenzie, 1971a; Veizer and Jansen, 1979, 1985).Study of the rocks themselves led to similarly opposing conclusions. The observed secular (=age) variations in relative proportions of lithological types and in chemistry of sedimentary rocks (Daly, 1909; Vinogradov et al., 1952; Nanz, 1953; Engel, 1963; Strakhov, 1964, 1969; Ronov, 1964, 1982) were mostly given an evolutionary interpretation. An opposing, uniformitarian, approach was proposed by Garrels and Mackenzie (1971a). For most isotopes, the consensus favors deviations from the present-day steady state as the likely cause of secular trends.This chapter attempts to show that recycling and evolution are not opposing, but complementary, concepts. It will concentrate on the lithological and chemical attributes of sediments, but not deal with the evolution of sedimentary mineral deposits (Veizer et al., 1989) and of life ( Sepkoski, 1989), both well amenable to the outlined conceptual treatment. The chapter relies heavily on Veizer (1988a) for the sections dealing with general recycling concepts, on Veizer (2003) for the discussion of isotopic evolution of seawater, and on Morse and Mackenzie (1990) and Mackenzie and Morse (1992) for discussion of carbonate rock recycling and environmental attributes.

  8. Catastrophic rupture of lunar rocks - A Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoerz, F.; Schneider, E.; Gault, D. E.; Hartung, J. B.; Brownlee, D. E.

    1975-01-01

    A computer model based on Monte Carlo techniques was developed to simulate the destruction of lunar rocks by 'catastrophic rupture' due to meteoroid impact. Energies necessary to accomplish catastrophic rupture were derived from laboratory experiments. A crater-production rate derived from lunar rocks was utilized to calculate absolute time scales. Calculated median survival times for crystalline lunar rocks are 1.9, 4.6, 10.3, and 22 m.y. for rock masses of 10, 100, 1000, and 10,000 g, respectively. Corresponding times of 6, 14.5, 32, and 68 million years are required before the probability of destruction reaches 0.99. These results are consistent with absolute exposure ages measured on returned rocks. Some results also substantiate previous conclusions that the catastrophic-rupture process is significantly more effective in obliterating lunar rocks than mass wasting by single-particle abrasion. The view is also corroborated that most rocks presently on the lunar surface either are exhumed from the regolith or are fragments of much larger boulders rather than primary ejecta excavated from pristine bedrock.

  9. New Mechanisms of rock-bit wear in geothermal wells

    SciTech Connect

    Macini, Paolo

    1996-01-24

    This paper presents recent results of an investigation on failure mode and wear of rock-bits used to drill geothermal wells located in the area of Larderello (Italy). A new wear mechanism, conceived from drilling records and dull bit evaluation analysis, has been identified and a particular configuration of rock-bit has been developed and tested in order to reduce drilling costs. The role of high Bottom Hole Temperature (BHT) on rock-bit performances seems not yet very well understood: so far, only drillability and formation abrasiveness are generally considered to account for poor drilling performances. In this paper, the detrimental effects of high BHT on sealing and reservoir system of Friction Bearing Rock-bits (FBR) have been investigated, and a new bearing wear pattern for FBR's run in high BHT holes has been identified and further verified via laboratory inspections on dull bits. A novel interpretation of flat worn cutting structure has been derived from the above wear pattern, suggesting the design of a particular bit configuration. Test bits, designed in the light of the above criteria, have been prepared and field tested successfully. The paper reports the results of these tests, which yielded a new rock-bit application, today considered as a standad practice in Italian geothermal fields. This application suggests that the correct evaluation of rock-bit wear can help to improve the overall drilling performances and to minimize drilling problems through a better interpretation of the relationships amongst rock-bits, formation properties and downhole temperature.

  10. Laboratory Course on Drift Chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Ferreira, Ix-B.; García-Herrera, J.; Villaseñor, L.

    2006-09-01

    Drift chambers play an important role in particle physics experiments as tracking detectors. We started this laboratory course with a brief review of the theoretical background and then moved on to the the experimental setup which consisted of a single-sided, single-cell drift chamber. We also used a plastic scintillator paddle, standard P-10 gas mixture (90% Ar, 10% CH4) and a collimated 90Sr source. During the laboratory session the students performend measurements of the following quantities: a) drift velocities and their variations as function of the drift field; b) gas gains and c) diffusion of electrons as they drifted in the gas.

  11. Rocking and Rolling Rattlebacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Rod

    2013-12-01

    A rattleback is a well-known physics toy that has a preferred direction of rotation. If it is spun about a vertical axis in the "wrong" direction, it will slow down, start rocking from end to end, and then spin in the opposite (i.e. preferred) direction. Many articles have been written about rattlebacks. Some are highly mathematical , 2 and others are purely descriptive. It is surprising that there is still no simple physical explanation. By that, I mean an explanation that can be given to a high school student and one that does not involve an obscure set of complicated equations.

  12. Sedimentary Rocks in Ganges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    13 November 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows portions of two massifs composed of light-toned, sedimentary rock in Ganges Chasma, part of the Valles Marineris trough system. On the steeper slopes in this vista, dry talus shed from the outcrop has formed a series of dark fans. Surrounded by dark, windblown sand, these landforms are located near 8.6oS, 46.8oW. The image covers an area approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) across and sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left.

  13. Aram Chaos Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    8 September 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows outcrops of light-toned, sedimentary rock among darker-toned mesas in Aram Chaos. Dark, windblown megaripples -- large ripples -- are also present at this location.

    Location near: 3.0oN, 21.6oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Autumn

  14. Sedimentary Rocks in Melas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a butte and several other landforms eroded into light-toned, layered, sedimentary rock in southern Melas Chasma. Melas is part of the vast Valles Marineris trough system.

    Location near: 11.8oS, 74.6oW Image width: 3.0 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Southern Spring

  15. Sedimentary Rock in Candor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    11 February 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows dozens of light- and a few dark-toned sedimentary rock layers exposed by faulting and erosion in western Candor Chasma, part of the vast Valles Marineris trough system.

    Location near: 6.5oS, 77.0oW Image width: 3.0 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Autumn

  16. Ganges Rocks and Sand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    17 January 2004 The top half of this Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows wind-eroded remnants of sedimentary rock outcrops in Ganges Chasma, one of the troughs of the Valles Marineris system. The lower half shows a thick accumulation of dark, windblown sand. The image covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and is illuminated by sunlight from the upper left. These features are located near 7.6oS, 49.4oW.

  17. Melas Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    28 August 2004 Light-toned, layered, sedimentary rock outcrops are common within the vast martian Valles Marineris trough system. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a recent example from southern Melas Chasma at 1.5 m/pixel (5 ft/pixel) resolution. The image is located near 11.3oS, 73.9oW, and covers an area about 1.8 km (1.1 mi) across. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left.

  18. From stones to rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortier, Marie-Astrid; Jean-Leroux, Kathleen; Cirio, Raymond

    2013-04-01

    With the Aquila earthquake in 2009, earthquake prediction is more and more necessary nowadays, and people are waiting for even more accurate data. Earthquake accuracy has increased in recent times mainly thanks to the understanding of how oceanic expansion works and significant development of numerical seismic prediction models. Despite the improvements, the location and the magnitude can't be as accurate as citizen and authorities would like. The basis of anticipating earthquakes requires the understanding of: - The composition of the earth, - The structure of the earth, - The relations and movements between the different parts of the surface of the earth. In order to answer these questions, the Alps are an interesting field for students. This study combines natural curiosity about understanding the predictable part of natural hazard in geology and scientific skills on site: observing and drawing landscape, choosing and reading a representative core drilling, replacing the facts chronologically and considering the age, the length of time and the strength needed. This experience requires students to have an approach of time and space radically different than the one they can consider in a classroom. It also limits their imagination, in a positive way, because they realize that prediction is based on real data and some of former theories have become present paradigms thanks to geologists. On each location the analyzed data include landscape, core drilling and the relation established between them by students. The data is used by the students to understand the meaning, so that the history of the formation of the rocks tells by the rocks can be explained. Until this year, the CBGA's perspective regarding the study of the Alps ground allowed students to build the story of the creation and disappearance of the ocean, which was a concept required by French educational authorities. But not long ago, the authorities changed their scientific expectations. To meet the

  19. Restoration and PDS Archive of Apollo Lunar Rock Sample Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, P. A.; Todd, N. S.; Lofgren, G. E.; Stefanov, W. L.; Runco, S. K.; LaBasse, D.; Gaddis, L. R.

    2011-01-01

    In 2008, scientists at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) Lunar Sample Laboratory and Image Science & Analysis Laboratory (under the auspices of the Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science Directorate or ARES) began work on a 4-year project to digitize the original film negatives of Apollo Lunar Rock Sample photographs. These rock samples together with lunar regolith and core samples were collected as part of the lander missions for Apollos 11, 12, 14, 15, 16 and 17. The original film negatives are stored at JSC under cryogenic conditions. This effort is data restoration in the truest sense. The images represent the only record available to scientists which allows them to view the rock samples when making a sample request. As the negatives are being scanned, they are also being formatted and documented for permanent archive in the NASA Planetary Data System (PDS) archive. The ARES group is working collaboratively with the Imaging Node of the PDS on the archiving.

  20. Seismic properties of fine rock powders in lunar conditions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, B. W.

    1973-01-01

    Seismic properties of fine rock powders in near lunar surface conditions have been measured in the laboratory, and they correspond well with those obtained for the near lunar surface. The laboratory values of Q range from 40 to 330 with corresponding wave velocities below 100 m/sec. Many of the results obtained are shown to be understandable in terms of current theories of the elastic and plastic properties of fine rock powders in a variety of temperature and pressure conditions. This enables some estimate to be made of the changes in Q and wave velocity with depth in the moon, on the supposition that fine rock powder continues downward as an abundant constituent.

  1. Microscopic Study of Rocks and Minerals in Introductory Geology Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Raman J.

    1983-01-01

    Suggests that introductory geology students, who are mostly nonmajors, would benefit if more laboratory time and the necessary microscopic examination were allowed as part of work on rocks/minerals. Indicates that students need to be taught value/necessity of paying attention to details while gathering data or making observations to make…

  2. Columbia River Channel Improvement Project Rock Removal Blasting: Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, Thomas J.; Johnson, Gary E.

    2010-01-29

    This document provides a monitoring plan to evaluate take as outlined in the National Marine Fisheries Service 2002 Biological Opinion for underwater blasting to remove rock from the navigation channel for the Columbia River Channel Improvement Project. The plan was prepared by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Portland District.

  3. Acquisition and preparation of specimens of rock for large-scale testing

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, D.J.

    1981-02-01

    The techniques used for acquisition and preparation of large specimens of rock for laboratory testing depend upon the location of the specimen, the type of rock and the equipment available at the sampling site. Examples are presented to illustrate sampling and preparation techniques used for two large cylindrical samples of granitic material, one pervasively fractured and one containing a single fracture.

  4. Schiaparelli Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-403, 26 June 2003

    Some of the most important high resolution imaging results of the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) experiment center on discoveries about the presence and nature of the sedimentary rock record on Mars. This old meteor impact crater in northwestern Schiaparelli Basin exhibits a spectacular view of layered, sedimentary rock. The 2.3 kilometer (1.4 miles) wide crater may have once been completely filled with sediment; the material was later eroded to its present form. Dozens of layers of similar thickness and physical properties are now expressed in a wedding cake-like stack in the middle of the crater. Sunlight illuminating the scene from the left shows that the circle, or mesa top, at the middle of the crater stands higher than the other stair-stepped layers. The uniform physical properties and bedding of these layers might indicate that they were originally deposited in a lake (it is possible that the crater was at the bottom of a much larger lake, filling Schiaparelli Basin); alternatively, the layers were deposited by settling out of the atmosphere in a dry environment. This picture was acquired on June 3, 2003, and is located near 0.9oS, 346.2oW.

  5. A smart rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pressel, Phil

    2014-12-01

    This project was to design and build a protective weapon for a group of associations that believed in aliens and UFO's. They collected enough contributions from societies and individuals to be able to sponsor and totally fund the design, fabrication and testing of this equipment. The location of this facility is classified. It also eventually was redesigned by the Quartus Engineering Company for use at a major amusement park as a "shoot at targets facility." The challenge of this project was to design a "smart rock," namely an infrared bullet (the size of a gallon can of paint) that could be shot from the ground to intercept a UFO or any incoming suspicious item heading towards the earth. Some of the challenges to design this weapon were to feed cryogenic helium at 5 degrees Kelvin from an inair environment through a unique rotary coupling and air-vacuum seal while spinning the bullet at 1500 rpm and maintain its dynamic stability (wobble) about its spin axis to less than 10 micro-radians (2 arc seconds) while it operated in a vacuum. Precision optics monitored the dynamic motion of the "smart rock."

  6. Rock Properties Model

    SciTech Connect

    C. Lum

    2004-09-16

    The purpose of this model report is to document the Rock Properties Model version 3.1 with regard to input data, model methods, assumptions, uncertainties and limitations of model results, and qualification status of the model. The report also documents the differences between the current and previous versions and validation of the model. The rock properties model provides mean matrix and lithophysae porosity, and the cross-correlated mean bulk density as direct input to the ''Saturated Zone Flow and Transport Model Abstraction'', MDL-NBS-HS-000021, REV 02 (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170042]). The constraints, caveats, and limitations associated with this model are discussed in Section 6.6 and 8.2. Model validation accomplished by corroboration with data not cited as direct input is discussed in Section 7. The revision of this model report was performed as part of activities being conducted under the ''Technical Work Plan for: The Integrated Site Model, Revision 05'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169635]). The purpose of this revision is to bring the report up to current procedural requirements and address the Regulatory Integration Team evaluation comments. The work plan describes the scope, objectives, tasks, methodology, and procedures for this process.

  7. Fossils, rocks, and time

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edwards, Lucy E.; Pojeta, John

    1999-01-01

    We study our Earth for many reasons: to find water to drink or oil to run our cars or coal to heat our homes, to know where to expect earthquakes or landslides or floods, and to try to understand our natural surroundings. Earth is constantly changing--nothing on its surface is truly permanent. Rocks that are now on top of a mountain may once have been at the bottom of the sea. Thus, to understand the world we live on, we must add the dimension of time. We must study Earth's history. When we talk about recorded history, time is measured in years, centuries, and tens of centuries. When we talk about Earth history, time is measured in millions and billions of years. Time is an everyday part of our lives. We keep track of time with a marvelous invention, the calendar, which is based on the movements of Earth in space. One spin of Earth on its axis is a day, and one trip around the Sun is a year. The modern calendar is a great achievement, developed over many thousands of years as theory and technology improved. People who study Earth's history also use a type of calendar, called the geologic time scale. It looks very different from the familiar calendar. In some ways, it is more like a book, and the rocks are its pages. Some of the pages are torn or missing, and the pages are not numbered, but geology gives us the tools to help us read this book.

  8. Fossils, rocks, and time

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edwards, Lucy E.; Pojeta, John, Jr.

    1993-01-01

    We study out Earth for many reasons: to find water to drink or oil to run our cars or coal to heat our homes, to know where to expect earthquakes or landslides or floods, and to try to understand our natural surroundings. Earth is constantly changing--nothing on its surface is truly permanent. Rocks that are not on top of a mountain may once have been on the bottom of the sea. Thus, to understand the world we live on, we must add the dimension of time. We must study Earth's history. When we talk about recorded history, time is measured in years, centuries, and tens of centuries. When we talk about Earth history, time is measured in millions and billions of years. Time is an everyday part of our lives. We keep track of time with a marvelous invention, the calendar, which is based on the movements of the Earth in space. One spin of Earth on its axis is a day, and one trip around the sun is a year. The modern calendar is a great achievement, developed over many thousands of years as theory and technology improved. People who study Earth's history also use a type of calendar, called the geologic time scale. It looks very different from the familiar calendar. In some ways, it is more like a book, and the rocks are its pages. Some of the pages are torn or missing, and the pages are not numbered, but geology gives us the tools to help us read this book.

  9. Towards a mechanical failure model for degrading permafrost rock slopes representing changes in rock toughness and infill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamot, Philipp; Krautblatter, Michael; Scandroglio, Riccardo

    2016-04-01

    The climate-induced degradation of permafrost in mountain areas can reduce the stability of rock slopes. An increasing number of rockfalls and rockslides originate from permafrost-affected rock faces. Discontinuity patterns and their geometrical and mechanical properties play a decisive role in controlling rock slope stability. Under thawing conditions the shear resistance of rock reduces due to lower friction along rock-rock contacts, decreasing fracture toughness of rock-ice contacts, diminishing fracture toughness of cohesive rock bridges and altered creep or fracture of the ice itself. Compressive strength is reduced by 20 to 50 % and tensile strength decreases by 15 to 70 % when intact saturated rock thaws (KRAUTBLATTER ET AL. 2013). Elevated water pressures in fractures can lead to reduced effective normal stresses and thus to lower shear strengths of fractures. However, the impact of degrading permafrost on the mechanical properties of intact or fractured rock still remains poorly understood. In this study, we develop a new approach for modeling the influence of degrading permafrost on the stability of high mountain rock slopes. Hereby, we focus on the effect of rock- and ice-mechanical changes along striking discontinuities onto the whole rock slope. We aim at contributing to a better rock-ice mechanical process understanding of degrading permafrost rocks. For parametrisation and subsequent calibration of our model, we chose a test site (2885 m a.s.l.) close by the Zugspitze summit in Germany. It reveals i) a potential rockslide at the south face involving 10E4m³ of rock and ii) permafrost occurrence due to ice-filled caves and fractures. Here we combine kinematic, geotechnical and thermal monitoring in the field with rock-mechanical laboratory tests and a 2D numerical failure modeling. Up to date, the following results underline the potential effects of thawing rock and fracture infill on the stability of steep rock slopes in theory and praxis: i. ERT and

  10. 'They of the Great Rocks'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This approximate true color image taken by the panoramic camera onboard the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit shows 'Adirondack,' the rover's first target rock. Spirit traversed the sandy martian terrain at Gusev Crater to arrive in front of the football-sized rock on Sunday, Jan. 18, 2004, just three days after it successfully rolled off the lander. The rock was selected as Spirit's first target because its dust-free, flat surface is ideally suited for grinding. Clean surfaces also are better for examining a rock's top coating. Scientists named the angular rock after the Adirondack mountain range in New York. The word Adirondack is Native American and means 'They of the great rocks.'

  11. CH4/CO2 ratios indicate highly efficient methane oxidation by a pumice landfill cover-soil.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Chris; Walcroft, Adrian S; Deslippe, Julie; Tate, Kevin R

    2013-02-01

    Landfills that generate too little biogas for economic energy recovery can potentially offset methane (CH(4)) emissions through biological oxidation by methanotrophic bacteria in cover soils. This study reports on the CH(4) oxidation efficiency of a 10-year old landfill cap comprising a volcanic pumice soil. Surface CH(4) and CO(2) fluxes were measured using field chambers during three sampling intervals over winter and summer. Methane fluxes were temporally and spatially variable (-0.36 to 3044 mgCH(4)m(-2)h(-1)); but were at least 15 times lower than typical literature CH(4) fluxes reported for older landfills in 45 of the 46 chambers tested. Exposure of soil from this landfill cover to variable CH(4) fluxes in laboratory microcosms revealed a very strong correlation between CH(4) oxidation efficiency and CH(4)/CO(2) ratios, confirming the utility of this relationship for approximating CH(4) oxidation efficiency. CH(4)/CO(2) ratios were applied to gas concentrations from the surface flux chambers and indicated a mean CH(4) oxidation efficiency of 72%. To examine CH(4) oxidation with soil depth, we collected 10 soil depth profiles at random locations across the landfill. Seven profiles exhibited CH(4) removal rates of 70-100% at depths <60 cm, supporting the high oxidation rates observed in the chambers. Based on a conservative 70% CH(4) oxidation efficiency occurring at the site, this cover soil is clearly offsetting far greater CH(4) quantities than the 10% default value currently adopted by the IPCC. PMID:23186636

  12. Infrared identification of the Criegee intermediates syn- and anti-CH3CHOO, and their distinct conformation-dependent reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hui-Yu; Huang, Yu-Hsuan; Wang, Xiaohong; Bowman, Joel M.; Nishimura, Yoshifumi; Witek, Henryk A.; Lee, Yuan-Pern

    2015-01-01

    The Criegee intermediates are carbonyl oxides that play critical roles in ozonolysis of alkenes in the atmosphere. So far, the mid-infrared spectrum of only the simplest Criegee intermediate CH2OO has been reported. Methyl substitution of CH2OO produces two conformers of CH3CHOO and consequently complicates the infrared spectrum. Here we report the transient infrared spectrum of syn- and anti-CH3CHOO, produced from CH3CHI + O2 in a flow reactor, using a step-scan Fourier-transform spectrometer. Guided and supported by high-level full-dimensional quantum calculations, rotational contours of the four observed bands are simulated successfully and provide definitive identification of both conformers. Furthermore, anti-CH3CHOO shows a reactivity greater than syn-CH3CHOO towards NO/NO2; at the later period of reaction, the spectrum can be simulated with only syn-CH3CHOO. Without NO/NO2, anti-CH3CHOO also decays much faster than syn-CH3CHOO. The direct infrared detection of syn- and anti-CH3CHOO should prove useful for field measurements and laboratory investigations of the Criegee mechanism. PMID:25959902

  13. Infrared identification of the Criegee intermediates syn- and anti-CH3CHOO, and their distinct conformation-dependent reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hui-Yu; Huang, Yu-Hsuan; Wang, Xiaohong; Bowman, Joel M.; Nishimura, Yoshifumi; Witek, Henryk A.; Lee, Yuan-Pern

    2015-05-01

    The Criegee intermediates are carbonyl oxides that play critical roles in ozonolysis of alkenes in the atmosphere. So far, the mid-infrared spectrum of only the simplest Criegee intermediate CH2OO has been reported. Methyl substitution of CH2OO produces two conformers of CH3CHOO and consequently complicates the infrared spectrum. Here we report the transient infrared spectrum of syn- and anti-CH3CHOO, produced from CH3CHI + O2 in a flow reactor, using a step-scan Fourier-transform spectrometer. Guided and supported by high-level full-dimensional quantum calculations, rotational contours of the four observed bands are simulated successfully and provide definitive identification of both conformers. Furthermore, anti-CH3CHOO shows a reactivity greater than syn-CH3CHOO towards NO/NO2; at the later period of reaction, the spectrum can be simulated with only syn-CH3CHOO. Without NO/NO2, anti-CH3CHOO also decays much faster than syn-CH3CHOO. The direct infrared detection of syn- and anti-CH3CHOO should prove useful for field measurements and laboratory investigations of the Criegee mechanism.

  14. The Submillimeter Spectrum of CH_3CH_2CN in its Ground Vibrational State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brauer, Carolyn S.; Pearson, John C.; Drouin, Brian J.; Yu, Shanshan

    2009-06-01

    Propionitrile (CH_3CH_2CN) is routinely observed with large column densities and at surprisingly high temperatures in hot core sources. The development of new, more sensitive observatories such as Herschel, ALMA and SOFIA have made it important to extend the laboratory data for propionitrile to coincide with the capabilities of the new instruments. In the present work, the laboratory measurements of the rotational spectrum of propionitrile have been extended to 1.6 THz. A global analysis of 4606 ground state transitions, which includes 2159 newly assigned transitions, has been fit to within experimental error to J=138, K=45, using both Watson A-reduced and Watson S-reduced Hamiltonians. The newly assigned transitions are primarily b-type, high K and very high J asymmetry split ^aR-branch transitions. The derived constants show a decided advantage of the Watson S-reduction in the analysis of this near-prolate (κ=0.96) asymmetric top. The spectrum and molecular constants will be presented. footnote

  15. Building The Bell Rock Lighthouse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shallcross, David C.

    2005-01-01

    Ever since the first mariners sailed off the east coast of Scotland the Bell Rock has claimed many vessels and countless lives. Also known as the Inch Cape Rocks they lie 18 km off the coast at Arbroath. Located near the mouth of the Firth of Forth and its important shipping ports these dangerous rocks cover an area some 440 m long and 90 m wide.…

  16. [Hearing disorders and rock music].

    PubMed

    Lindhardt, Bjarne Orskov

    2008-12-15

    Only few studies have investigated the frequency of hearing disorders in rock musicians. Performing rock music is apparently associated with a hearing loss in a fraction of musicians. Tinnitus and hyperacusis are more common among rock musicians than among the background population. It seems as if some sort of resistance against further hearing loss is developed over time. The use of ear protection devices have not been studied systematically but appears to be associated with diminished hearing loss. PMID:19128557

  17. Data of rock analyses-VI. Bibliography and index of rock analyses in the periodical and serial literature of Scotland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Woodland, M.V.

    1959-01-01

    While Hutton fortified his convictions by constant appeals to the rocks themselves, his disciple Hall tested their truth in the laboratory. It is the boast of Scotland to have led the way in the application of chemical and physical experiment to the elucidation of geological history. Archibald Geikie, 1882. ?? 1959.

  18. Flow and Transport Through Unsaturated Fractured Rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Daniel D.; Nicholson, Thomas J.; Rasmussen, Todd C.

    This monograph is an update and revision of the first edition, Geophysical Monograph 42, on ground-water flow and transport through unsaturated, fractured rock, published by AGU in 1987. The first edition evolved from a special symposium held during the American Geophysical Union fall meetings in San Francisco in December 1986. Invited and contributed papers at that AGU session, as well as panel presentations, focused on conceptualizing, measuring and modeling flow and transport through unsaturated fractured rock. As noted in the preface to the first edition, "the expanded interest in the topic (water flow and contaminant transport through unsaturated fractured rock) was initiated when the U.S. Geological Survey proposed that deep unsaturated zones in arid regions be considered in the site selection for the first high-level, commercially generated radioactive waste repository." Much of the research reported in that first edition was motivated by the U.S. Department of Energy's program to investigate Yucca Mountain at the Nevada Test Site as a possible geologic repository for commercially generated, high-level radioactive waste. As noted in the overview paper of the first edition, "characterization methods and modeling are in their developmental stage with the greatest lack of knowledge being the interaction between fracture and matrix flow and transport properties." Although the first edition of this monograph reflected the state-of-the science, laboratory and field experimental programs were novel and limited and, in general, followed from the principles and methods developed in the soil science community.

  19. Gage for measuring displacements in rock samples

    DOEpatents

    Holcomb, David J.; McNamee, Michael J.

    1986-01-01

    A gage for measuring diametral displacement within a rock sample for use in a rock mechanics laboratory and in the field, comprises a support ring housing a linear variable differential transformer, a mounting screw, and a leaf spring. The mounting screw is adjustable and defines a first point of contact with the rock sample. The leaf spring has opposite ends fixed to the inner periphery of the mounting ring. An intermediate portion of the leaf spring projecting radially inward from the ring is formed with a dimple defining a second point of contact with the sample. The first and second points of contact are diametrically opposed to each other. The LVDT is mounted in the ring with its axis parallel to the line of measurement and its core rod received in the dimple of the leaf spring. Any change in the length of the line between the first and second support points is directly communicated to the LVDT. The leaf spring is rigid to completely support lateral forces so that the LVDT is free of all load for improved precision.

  20. Gage for measuring displacements in rock samples

    DOEpatents

    Holcomb, D.J.; McNamee, M.J.

    1985-07-18

    A gage for measuring diametral displacement within a rock sample for use in a rock mechanics laboratory and in the field, comprises a support ring housing a linear variable differential transformer (LVDT), a mounting screw, and a leaf spring. The mounting screw is adjustable and defines a first point of contact with the rock sample. The leaf spring has opposite ends fixed to the inner periphery of the mounting ring. An intermediate portion of the leaf spring projecting radially inward from the ring is formed with a dimple defining a second point of contact with the sample. The first and second points of contact are diametrically opposed to each other. The LVDT is mounted in the ring with its axis parallel to the line of measurement and its core rod received in the dimple of the leaf spring. Any change in the length of the line between the first and second support points is directly communicated to the LVDT. The leaf spring is rigid to completely support lateral forces so that the LVDT is free of all load for improved precision.

  1. Petrology of the igneous rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccallum, I. S.

    1987-01-01

    Papers published during the 1983-1986 period on the petrology and geochemistry of igneous rocks are discussed, with emphasis on tectonic environment. Consideration is given to oceanic rocks, subdivided into divergent margin suites (mid-ocean ridge basalts, ridge-related seamounts, and back-arc basin basalts) and intraplate suites (oceanic island basalts and nonridge seamounts), and to igneous rocks formed at convergent margins (island arc and continental arc suites), subdivided into volcanic associations and plutonic associations. Other rock groups discussed include continental flood basalts, layered mafic intrusions, continental alkalic associations, komatiites, ophiolites, ash-flow tuffs, anorthosites, and mantle xenoliths.

  2. Electromagnetic emissions during rock blasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Keefe, S. G.; Thiel, D. V.

    1991-05-01

    Radio emissions during quarry blasting have been recorded in the audio frequency band. Three distinct mechanisms are suggested to explain the observed results; rock fracture at the time of the explosion, charged rocks discharging on impact with the pit floor and micro-fracture of the remaining rock wall due to pressure adjustment of the bench behind the blast. The last mechanism was evident by a train of discrete impulses recorded for up to one minute after the blast. It is assumed that during this time the rock behind the blast was subjected to a significant change in pressure. This may be related to ELF observations during earthquakes.

  3. Ready to Rock and Roll

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image from the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit hazard-identification camera shows the rover's perspective just before its first post-egress drive on Mars. On Sunday, the 15th martian day, or sol, of Spirit's journey, engineers drove Spirit approximately 3 meters (10 feet)toward its first rock target, a football-sized, mountain-shaped rock called Adirondack (not pictured). In the foreground of this image are 'Sashimi' and 'Sushi' - two rocks that scientists considered investigating first. Ultimately, these rocks were not chosen because their rough and dusty surfaces are ill-suited for grinding.

  4. Corrosion of rock anchors in US coal mines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bylapudi, Gopi

    The mining industry is a major consumer of rock bolts in the United States. Due to the high humidity in the underground mining environment, the rock bolts corrode and loose their load bearing capacity which in turn reduces the life expectancy of the ground support and, thus, creates operational difficulties and number of safety concerns[1]. Research on rock anchor corrosion has not been adequately extensive in the past and the effects of several factors in the mine atmosphere and waters are not clearly understood. One of the probable reasons for this lack of research may be attributed to the time required for gathering meaningful data that makes the study of corrosion quite challenging. In this particular work underground water samples from different mines in the Illinois coal basin were collected and the major chemical content was analyzed and used for the laboratory testing. The corrosion performance of the different commercial rock anchors was investigated by techniques such as laboratory immersion tests in five different corrosion chambers, and potentiodynamic polarization tests in simulated ground waters based on the Illinois coal basin. The experiments were conducted with simulate underground mining conditions (corrosive). The tensile strengths were measured for the selected rock anchors taken every 3 months from the salt spray corrosion chambers maintained at different pH values and temperatures. The corrosion potential (Ecorr ), corrosion current (Icorr) and the corresponding corrosion rates (CR) of the selected commercial rock bolts: #5, #6, #6 epoxy coated and #7 forged head rebar steels, #6 and #7 threaded head rebar steels were measured at the solution pH values of 5 and 8 at room temperature. The open circuit potential (OCP) values of the different rock anchors were recorded in 3 selected underground coal mines (A, B & C) in the Illinois coal basin and the data compared with the laboratory electrochemical tests for analyzing the life of the rock

  5. Pooh Bear rock and Mermaid Dune

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    One of the two forward cameras aboard Sojourner imaged this area of Martian terrain on Sol 26. The large rock dubbed 'Pooh Bear' is at far left, and stands between four and five inches high. Mermaid Dune is the smooth area stretching horizontally across the top quarter of the image. The Alpha Proton X-Ray Spectrometer (APXS) instrument aboard Sojourner will be deployed on Mermaid Dune, and the rover will later use its cleated wheels to dig into it.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages and Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

  6. Rock.XML - Towards a library of rock physics models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Erling Hugo; Hauge, Ragnar; Ulvmoen, Marit; Johansen, Tor Arne; Drottning, Åsmund

    2016-08-01

    Rock physics modelling provides tools for correlating physical properties of rocks and their constituents to the geophysical observations we measure on a larger scale. Many different theoretical and empirical models exist, to cover the range of different types of rocks. However, upon reviewing these, we see that they are all built around a few main concepts. Based on this observation, we propose a format for digitally storing the specifications for rock physics models which we have named Rock.XML. It does not only contain data about the various constituents, but also the theories and how they are used to combine these building blocks to make a representative model for a particular rock. The format is based on the Extensible Markup Language XML, making it flexible enough to handle complex models as well as scalable towards extending it with new theories and models. This technology has great advantages as far as documenting and exchanging models in an unambiguous way between people and between software. Rock.XML can become a platform for creating a library of rock physics models; making them more accessible to everyone.

  7. Apollo rocks, fines and soil cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allton, J.; Bevill, T.

    Apollo rocks and soils not only established basic lunar properties and ground truth for global remote sensing, they also provided important lessons for planetary protection (Adv. Space Res ., 1998, v. 22, no. 3 pp. 373-382). The six Apollo missions returned 2196 samples weighing 381.7 kg, comprised of rocks, fines, soil cores and 2 gas samples. By examining which samples were allocated for scientific investigations, information was obtained on usefulness of sampling strategy, sampling devices and containers, sample types and diversity, and on size of sample needed by various disciplines. Diversity was increased by using rakes to gather small rocks on the Moon and by removing fragments >1 mm from soils by sieving in the laboratory. Breccias and soil cores are diverse internally. Per unit weight these samples were more often allocated for research. Apollo investigators became adept at wringing information from very small sample sizes. By pushing the analytical limits, the main concern was adequate size for representative sampling. Typical allocations for trace element analyses were 750 mg for rocks, 300 mg for fines and 70 mg for core subsamples. Age-dating and isotope systematics allocations were typically 1 g for rocks and fines, but only 10% of that amount for core depth subsamples. Historically, allocations for organics and microbiology were 4 g (10% for cores). Modern allocations for biomarker detection are 100mg. Other disciplines supported have been cosmogenic nuclides, rock and soil petrology, sedimentary volatiles, reflectance, magnetics, and biohazard studies . Highly applicable to future sample return missions was the Apollo experience with organic contamination, estimated to be from 1 to 5 ng/g sample for Apollo 11 (Simonheit &Flory, 1970; Apollo 11, 12 &13 Organic contamination Monitoring History, U.C. Berkeley; Burlingame et al., 1970, Apollo 11 LSC , pp. 1779-1792). Eleven sources of contaminants, of which 7 are applicable to robotic missions, were

  8. The origin, source, and cycling of methane in deep crystalline rock biosphere

    PubMed Central

    Kietäväinen, Riikka; Purkamo, Lotta

    2015-01-01

    The emerging interest in using stable bedrock formations for industrial purposes, e.g., nuclear waste disposal, has increased the need for understanding microbiological and geochemical processes in deep crystalline rock environments, including the carbon cycle. Considering the origin and evolution of life on Earth, these environments may also serve as windows to the past. Various geological, chemical, and biological processes can influence the deep carbon cycle. Conditions of CH4 formation, available substrates and time scales can be drastically different from surface environments. This paper reviews the origin, source, and cycling of methane in deep terrestrial crystalline bedrock with an emphasis on microbiology. In addition to potential formation pathways of CH4, microbial consumption of CH4 is also discussed. Recent studies on the origin of CH4 in continental bedrock environments have shown that the traditional separation of biotic and abiotic CH4 by the isotopic composition can be misleading in substrate-limited environments, such as the deep crystalline bedrock. Despite of similarities between Precambrian continental sites in Fennoscandia, South Africa and North America, where deep methane cycling has been studied, common physicochemical properties which could explain the variation in the amount of CH4 and presence or absence of CH4 cycling microbes were not found. However, based on their preferred carbon metabolism, methanogenic microbes appeared to have similar spatial distribution among the different sites. PMID:26236303

  9. The origin, source, and cycling of methane in deep crystalline rock biosphere.

    PubMed

    Kietäväinen, Riikka; Purkamo, Lotta

    2015-01-01

    The emerging interest in using stable bedrock formations for industrial purposes, e.g., nuclear waste disposal, has increased the need for understanding microbiological and geochemical processes in deep crystalline rock environments, including the carbon cycle. Considering the origin and evolution of life on Earth, these environments may also serve as windows to the past. Various geological, chemical, and biological processes can influence the deep carbon cycle. Conditions of CH4 formation, available substrates and time scales can be drastically different from surface environments. This paper reviews the origin, source, and cycling of methane in deep terrestrial crystalline bedrock with an emphasis on microbiology. In addition to potential formation pathways of CH4, microbial consumption of CH4 is also discussed. Recent studies on the origin of CH4 in continental bedrock environments have shown that the traditional separation of biotic and abiotic CH4 by the isotopic composition can be misleading in substrate-limited environments, such as the deep crystalline bedrock. Despite of similarities between Precambrian continental sites in Fennoscandia, South Africa and North America, where deep methane cycling has been studied, common physicochemical properties which could explain the variation in the amount of CH4 and presence or absence of CH4 cycling microbes were not found. However, based on their preferred carbon metabolism, methanogenic microbes appeared to have similar spatial distribution among the different sites. PMID:26236303

  10. Electrochemistry of lunar rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindstrom, D. J.; Haskin, L. A.

    1979-01-01

    Electrolysis of silicate melts has been shown to be an effective means of producing metals from common silicate materials. No fluxing agents need be added to the melts. From solution in melts of diopside (CaMgSi2O6) composition, the elements Si, Ti, Ni, and Fe have been reduced to their metallic states. Platinum is a satisfactory anode material, but other cathode materials are needed. Electrolysis of compositional analogs of lunar rocks initially produces iron metal at the cathode and oxygen gas at the anode. Utilizing mainly heat and electricity which are readily available from sunlight, direct electrolysis is capable of producing useful metals from common feedstocks without the need for expendable chemicals. This simple process and the products obtained from it deserve further study for use in materials processing in space.

  11. Light-toned Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    1 January 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a scene reminiscent of some of the Mars Exploration Rover (MER-B), Opportunity, images of terrain in the vicinity of Erebus Crater -- a substrate of light-toned rock, broken into polygonal forms, overlain by large, dark-toned, ripple-like drifts. However, this scene is many hundreds of kilometers away from Meridiani Planum -- it lies on the floor of an old impact crater near the northwest rim of the giant Hellas Basin.

    Location near: 21.0oS, 312.0oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Summer

  12. Meridiani Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-545, 15 November 2003

    Northern Sinus Meridiani is a region of vast exposures of layered, sedimentary rock. Buried within these layers are many filled impact craters. Erosion has re-exposed several formerly-buried craters in this Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image. Arrows 1 and 2 indicate craters that are still emerging from beneath layered material; arrow 3 indicates a crater that has been fully re-exposed. This image is located near 5.1oN, 2.7oW. The area shown is about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and illuminated from the left/upper left.

  13. Celebrated Moon Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martel, L. M. V.

    2009-12-01

    The Need for Lunar Samples and Simulants: Where Engineering and Science Meet sums up one of the sessions attracting attention at the annual meeting of the Lunar Exploration Analysis Group (LEAG), held November 16-19, 2009 in Houston, Texas. Speakers addressed the question of how the Apollo lunar samples can be used to facilitate NASA's return to the Moon while preserving the collection for scientific investigation. Here is a summary of the LEAG presentations of Dr. Gary Lofgren, Lunar Curator at the NASA Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas, and Dr. Meenakshi (Mini) Wadhwa, Professor at Arizona State University and Chair of NASA's advisory committee called CAPTEM (Curation and Analysis Planning Team for Extraterrestrial Materials). Lofgren gave a status report of the collection of rocks and regolith returned to Earth by the Apollo astronauts from six different landing sites on the Moon in 1969-1972. Wadhwa explained the role of CAPTEM in lunar sample allocation.

  14. Robotic Rock Classification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hebert, Martial

    1999-01-01

    This report describes a three-month research program undertook jointly by the Robotics Institute at Carnegie Mellon University and Ames Research Center as part of the Ames' Joint Research Initiative (JRI.) The work was conducted at the Ames Research Center by Mr. Liam Pedersen, a graduate student in the CMU Ph.D. program in Robotics under the supervision Dr. Ted Roush at the Space Science Division of the Ames Research Center from May 15 1999 to August 15, 1999. Dr. Martial Hebert is Mr. Pedersen's research adviser at CMU and is Principal Investigator of this Grant. The goal of this project is to investigate and implement methods suitable for a robotic rover to autonomously identify rocks and minerals in its vicinity, and to statistically characterize the local geological environment. Although primary sensors for these tasks are a reflection spectrometer and color camera, the goal is to create a framework under which data from multiple sensors, and multiple readings on the same object, can be combined in a principled manner. Furthermore, it is envisioned that knowledge of the local area, either a priori or gathered by the robot, will be used to improve classification accuracy. The key results obtained during this project are: The continuation of the development of a rock classifier; development of theoretical statistical methods; development of methods for evaluating and selecting sensors; and experimentation with data mining techniques on the Ames spectral library. The results of this work are being applied at CMU, in particular in the context of the Winter 99 Antarctica expedition in which the classification techniques will be used on the Nomad robot. Conversely, the software developed based on those techniques will continue to be made available to NASA Ames and the data collected from the Nomad experiments will also be made available.

  15. Multispectral rock-type separation and classification.

    SciTech Connect

    Moya, Mary M.; Fogler, Robert Joseph; Paskaleva, Biliana; Hayat, Majeed M.

    2004-06-01

    This paper explores the possibility of separating and classifying remotely-sensed multispectral data from rocks and minerals onto seven geological rock-type groups. These groups are extracted from the general categories of metamorphic, igneous and sedimentary rocks. The study is performed under ideal conditions for which the data is generated according to laboratory hyperspectral data for the members, which are, in turn, passed through the Multi-spectral Thermal Imager (MTI) filters yielding 15 bands. The main challenge in separability is the small size of the training data sets, which initially did not permit direct application of Bayesian decision theory. To enable Bayseian classification, the original training data is linearly perturbed with the addition minerals, vegetation, soil, water and other valid impurities. As a result, the size of the training data is significantly increased and accurate estimates of the covariance matrices are achieved. In addition, a set of reduced (five) linearly-extracted canonical features that are optimal in providing the most important information about the data is determined. An alternative nonlinear feature-selection method is also employed based on spectral indices comprising a small subset of all possible ratios between bands. By applying three optimization strategies, combinations of two and three ratios are found that provide reliable separability and classification between all seven groups according to the Bhattacharyya distance. To set a benchmark to which the MTI capability in rock classification can be compared, an optimization strategy is performed for the selection of optimal multispectral filters, other than the MTI filters, and an improvement in classification is predicted.

  16. Laboratory Microcomputing

    PubMed Central

    York, William B.

    1984-01-01

    Microcomputers will play a major role in the laboratory, not only in the calculation and interpretation of clinical test data, but also will have an increasing place of importance in the management of laboratory resources in the face of the transition from revenue generating to the cost center era. We will give you a glimpse of what can be accomplished with the management data already collected by many laboratories today when the data are processed into meaningful reports.

  17. Laboratory Building.

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera, Joshua M.

    2015-03-01

    This report is an analysis of the means of egress and life safety requirements for the laboratory building. The building is located at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in Albuquerque, NM. The report includes a prescriptive-based analysis as well as a performance-based analysis. Following the analysis are appendices which contain maps of the laboratory building used throughout the analysis. The top of all the maps is assumed to be north.

  18. ChILD Family Education

    PubMed Central

    Gettys, Ann; Hagood, James S.

    2010-01-01

    The Children's Interstitial Lung Disease (chILD) Foundation and chILD Research Cooperative identified a need for accurate and understandable chILD-related information for families. As a result, collaboration with the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) Pediatric Pulmonary Center (PPC) produced “Get Up And Go With chILD!,” a comprehensive, chILD-specific family education resource. Families and clinicians from multiple backgrounds and perspectives submitted content suggestions and copies of currently used family education and health management materials. Families provided information about the helpful and unhelpful information they had received in the past, the information they wished they had received, and their educational preferences. The resultant booklet is comprehensive, containing the education topics identified as critical for inclusion by families and clinicians, and is written at a seventh grade reading level. Available both in print and online, the online version contains live links to interactive Web sites, support groups, teaching videos, and downloadable forms and tools. If health education is to be understandable, useable, efficient, cost-effective, and of superior quality, if it is to improve people's lives by facilitating a change in their attitudes, beliefs, knowledge, skill levels, and behavior, an interdisciplinary, family-centered approach is crucial. This is resource intensive, but the initial costs of producing materials in this manner far outweigh the potential costs of poorly developed and delivered health education. Through an iterative, well-coordinated, collaborative process between families and clinicians from a variety of backgrounds and perspectives, “Get Up And Go With chILD!” exemplified this approach. PMID:22332033

  19. Proceedings of the scientific visit on crystalline rock repository development.

    SciTech Connect

    Mariner, Paul E.; Hardin, Ernest L.; Miksova, Jitka

    2013-02-01

    A scientific visit on Crystalline Rock Repository Development was held in the Czech Republic on September 24-27, 2012. The visit was hosted by the Czech Radioactive Waste Repository Authority (RAWRA), co-hosted by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and supported by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The purpose of the visit was to promote technical information exchange between participants from countries engaged in the investigation and exploration of crystalline rock for the eventual construction of nuclear waste repositories. The visit was designed especially for participants of countries that have recently commenced (or recommenced) national repository programmes in crystalline host rock formations. Discussion topics included repository programme development, site screening and selection, site characterization, disposal concepts in crystalline host rock, regulatory frameworks, and safety assessment methodology. Interest was surveyed in establishing a %E2%80%9Cclub,%E2%80%9D the mission of which would be to identify and address the various technical challenges that confront the disposal of radioactive waste in crystalline rock environments. The idea of a second scientific visit to be held one year later in another host country received popular support. The visit concluded with a trip to the countryside south of Prague where participants were treated to a tour of the laboratory and underground facilities of the Josef Regional Underground Research Centre.

  20. Analysis of compressive fracture in rock using statistical techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, S.C.

    1994-12-01

    Fracture of rock in compression is analyzed using a field-theory model, and the processes of crack coalescence and fracture formation and the effect of grain-scale heterogeneities on macroscopic behavior of rock are studied. The model is based on observations of fracture in laboratory compression tests, and incorporates assumptions developed using fracture mechanics analysis of rock fracture. The model represents grains as discrete sites, and uses superposition of continuum and crack-interaction stresses to create cracks at these sites. The sites are also used to introduce local heterogeneity. Clusters of cracked sites can be analyzed using percolation theory. Stress-strain curves for simulated uniaxial tests were analyzed by studying the location of cracked sites, and partitioning of strain energy for selected intervals. Results show that the model implicitly predicts both development of shear-type fracture surfaces and a strength-vs-size relation that are similar to those observed for real rocks. Results of a parameter-sensitivity analysis indicate that heterogeneity in the local stresses, attributed to the shape and loading of individual grains, has a first-order effect on strength, and that increasing local stress heterogeneity lowers compressive strength following an inverse power law. Peak strength decreased with increasing lattice size and decreasing mean site strength, and was independent of site-strength distribution. A model for rock fracture based on a nearest-neighbor algorithm for stress redistribution is also presented and used to simulate laboratory compression tests, with promising results.

  1. Skin Depth of Electromagnetic Wave through Fractal Crustal Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahara, Kazutaka; Muto, Jun; Nagahama, Hiroyuki

    Skin depth of electromagnetic (EM) wave depends on frequency of EM wave ν and electrical properties of rocks and minerals. Previous studies have theoretically assumed that the skin depth Lα(ν) can be expressed as a function of frequency ν by Lα(ν) ∝ ν -φ and φ = 1 at high frequency or φ = 1/2 at low frequency. Based on fractal theory of rocks, we point out that the frequency exponent φ reflects internal fractal structures (i.e., occupancy, distribution and connectivity) of dielectric/conductive matrices of rocks such as pores, cracks, grain boundaries, inclusions and various fluids. Laboratory measurements of dielectric constant and conductivity of granite and previous studies on various rocks as a function of frequency show that φ is an exponent ranging from 1/4 to 1. By extrapolation of the skin depth by laboratory measurements at a given frequency into at other frequencies, the skin depth with variation in φ becomes longer or shorter than that by previous studies. Moreover, at a given frequency, the skin depth decreases with increasing a fractal dimension of fracture systems (decreasing φ). Thus, the skin depth of EM wave through the crust for detecting seismo-EM radiations and through rock salt domes for detecting ultra-high energy neutrinos depends on fractal structures of dielectric/conductive matrices in heterogeneous crust.

  2. Roles of chemically inequivalent N(CH3)4 ions in phase transition temperatures in [N(CH3)4]2CoCl4 by single-crystal NMR and MAS NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Ae Ran

    2014-06-01

    The temperature dependences of the 1H and 13C spin-lattice relaxation time in the laboratory frame, T1, and in the rotating frame, T1ρ, in [N(CH3)4]2CoCl4 were measured by static nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR. In the ferroelastic phase, 1H T1ρ underwent molecular motion according to the Bloembergen-Purcell-Pound theory. Two inequivalent ions, a-N(CH3)4 and b-N(CH3)4, were identified by 13C cross polarization (CP)/MAS NMR. On the basis of the 13C NMR results, the existence of two chemically inequivalent a-N(CH3)4 and b-N(CH3)4 ions in the ferroelectric phase and the existence of the ferroelastic twin structure of the N(CH3)4 ions in the ferroelastic phase were discussed.

  3. The Rock Climbing Teaching Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kudlas, John

    The product of 10 years of rock climbing instruction, this guide provides material from which an instructor can teach basic climbing concepts and safety skills as well as conduct a safe, enjoyable rock climbing class in a high school setting. It is designed for an instructor with limited experience in climbing; however, the need for teacher…

  4. Bakhtin's Dialogics and Rock Lyrics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Jeff Parker

    Rock music is ideological both implicitly (in its intrinsic valuing of change, and resistance to authority, for instance), and explicitly (in political records from activist artists such as John Lennon and U2). The texts of the rock genre offer rhetorical experiences. A dialogic conception may help scholars to account for and describe the…

  5. 'Mister Badger' Pushing Mars Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Viking's soil sampler collector arm successfully pushed a rock on the surface of Mars during the afternoon of Friday, October 8. The irregular-shaped rock was pushed several inches by the Lander's collector arm, which displaced the rock to the left of its original position, leaving it cocked slightly upward. Photographs and other information verified the successful rock push. Photo at left shows the soil sampler's collector head pushing against the rock, named 'Mister Badger' by flight controllers. Photo at right shows the displaced rock and the depression whence it came. Part of the soil displacement was caused by the collector s backhoe. A soil sample will be taken from the site Monday night, October 11. It will then be delivered to Viking s organic chemistry instrument for a series of analyses during the next few weeks. The sample is being sought from beneath a rock because scientists believe that, if there are life forms on Mars, they may seek rocks as shelter from the Sun s intense ultraviolet radiation.

  6. Further Reflections on Little Rock

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Danielle S.

    2007-01-01

    The famous photo of Hazel Bryan jeering at Elizabeth Eckford as a mob helped drive Elizabeth from Central High School in Little Rock, Arkansas, on September 4, 1957, compels meditation on the nature of democratic politics. This scene is commemorative of the Little Rock events where school segregation was rampant. The author believes that the photo…

  7. Rockin' around the Rock Cycle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frack, Susan; Blanchard, Scott Alan

    2005-01-01

    In this activity students will simulate how sedimentary rocks can be changed into metamorphic rocks by intense pressure. The materials needed are two small pieces of white bread, one piece of wheat bread, and one piece of a dark bread (such as pumpernickel or dark rye) per student, two pieces of waxed paper, scissors, a ruler, and heavy books.…

  8. Small-Town Rock Trade

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robarge, Thomas J.

    1977-01-01

    Describes an eighth grade rock exchange project in which small groups of students researched, then wrote letters to schools throughout the United States requesting samples of local rocks and minerals. Provides experience in use of the atlas and letter writing. (CS)

  9. Rock Segmentation through Edge Regrouping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burl, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Rockster is an algorithm that automatically identifies the locations and boundaries of rocks imaged by the rover hazard cameras (hazcams), navigation cameras (navcams), or panoramic cameras (pancams). The software uses edge detection and edge regrouping to identify closed contours that separate the rocks from the background.

  10. Laboratory Spectroscopy of Planetary Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, L.; Orton, G.

    2007-08-01

    An international team of laboratory spectroscopists are working in concert to support remote sensing of planetary atmospheres and Titan. An overview of high resolution laboratory investigations will be presented for spectral bands from the rotational wavelengths into the near infrared. The studies include measurements and theoretical analyses of the line positions, intensities and/or broadening coefficients needed to improve the spectroscopic databases required for planetary applications. The molecular studies include water (H2O) broadened by carbon dioxide in the far- and mid- infrared; positions, intensities, broadening and line mixing of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the near-IR; broadening and line mixing of methane in the mid- and near-IR; frequencies of methyl cyanide (CH3CN) in the rotational region and line positions, intensities and nitrogen broadening of methyl cyanide in the low fundamental bands; global theoretical modeling of the phosphine (PH3) parameters; and frequencies of acetaldehyde (CH3CHO), methylamine (CH3NH2) and deuterated acetylene (HCCD, DCCD) in the rotational region.

  11. Laboratory Spectroscopy of Planetary Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, L.; Drouin, B.; Miller, C.; Pearson, J.; Orton, G.; Toth, R.; Benner, C.; Devi, M.; Blake, T.; Masiello, T.; Sams, R.; Butler, R.; Champion, J.; Chelin, P.; Dehayem, A.; Kleiner, I.; Orphal, J.; Sagui, L.; Gamache, R.; Humphrey, C.; Liu, W.; Predoi

    An international team of laboratory spectroscopists are working in concert to support remote sensing of planetary atmospheres and Titan. An overview of high resolution laboratory investigations will be presented for spectral bands from the rotational wavelengths into the near infrared. The studies include measurements and theoretical analyses of the line positions, intensities and/or broadening coefficients needed to improve the spectroscopic databases required for planetary applications. The molecular studies include water (H2O) broadened by carbon dioxide in the far- and mid-infrared; positions, intensities, broadening and line mixing of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the near-IR; broadening and line mixing of methane in the mid- and near-IR; frequencies of methyl cyanide (CH3CN) in the rotational region and line positions, intensities and nitrogen broadening of methyl cyanide in the low fundamental bands; global theoretical modeling of the phosphine (PH3) parameters; and frequencies of acetaldehyde (CH3CHO), methylamine (CH3NH2) and deuterated acetylene (HCCD, DCCD) in the rotational region.

  12. Microbial mechanisms to reduce the uncertainties in the CH4 emissions from global rice fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamaljit, K.; Tian, H.; Ren, W.; Yang, J.

    2013-12-01

    In terrestrial ecosystems, methane (CH4) uptake or emission represents the net balance between activities of different microbial organisms including anaerobic Methanogens that produce CH4 and Methanotrophs which oxidize CH4 in the aerobic environments. In this way, anaerobic soil environments such as rice fields are major source of terrestrial CH4 emissions. However, large uncertainties in the CH4 emission estimates have been reported from rice fields. The bottom-up and top-down methods showed a wide range of CH4 emissions estimations ranging from 25 to 300 Tg yr-1 from rice fields. The major reason for uncertainties in the CH4 emissions includes the water management that alters the balance of Methanogens and Methanotrophs in the rice fields. Two kinds of water management practices are followed including continuous flooding (CF) which refers to the continuous submergence as well as alternate wetting and drying (AWD) in which the rice fields are drained for several days during the growing season. The AWD provides aeration stress on Methanogens resulting in lower CH4 emissions than CF water management followed in the rice fields. A single aeration during growing season may significantly reduce the CH4 emission from the rice fields. Currently, most of the models structures assume that Methanogens become active once the soil moisture content is raised to saturation. However, several laboratory scale studies have indicated that following aeration the Methanogens don't become fully functional immediately even if the soil moisture content is raised to saturation. In this study, we integrated the aeration stress mechanisms on the Methanogens in the Dynamic Land Ecosystem Model (DLEM). The improved version of DLEM was used to conduct uncertainty analysis on global CH4 emission estimation following CF and AWD water management in the rice fields. Results of this study have shown that inclusion of the aeration stress mechanism on Methanogens in the modeling framework has

  13. Paleomagnetism and rock-magnetism of basaltic basement rocks from IODP Site C0012, Shikoku Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, H.; Yamamoto, Y.; Lin, W.; Ishizuka, O.; Zhao, X.; Wu, H.; Torii, M.; Kitamura, Y.; Kanamatsu, T.

    2013-12-01

    The IODP Expeditions (Exps.) 322 & 333 penetrated sediments-basement boundary and recovered successive cores at Site C0012 situated on a topographic high named Kashinosaki Knoll, Shikoku Basin. The collected basement samples are composed of alternating beds of pillow basalts and hyaroclastite and were retrieved by rotary core barrel drilling system. Paleomagnetic measurements on basaltic basement rocks from Site C0012 show that the stable magnetization has reversed polarity. Rock magnetic experiments were conducted to understand the magnetic minerals contributing to the primary magnetization. Thermomagnetic curves during heating in air shows a hump around 500°C which cannot be seen for the curve in vacuum, Ar or He atmosphere. This can be interpreted as a result of oxidation of the magnetic mineral. The results in air, vacuum, Ar and He show maximum curvatures at 326°C, 332°C, 328°C and 303°C, which might show a Curie temperature of the natural magnetic mineral (titanomaghemite). The peaks at around 402°C, 392°C and 424°C in vacuum, Ar and He might correspond to break down (decomposition) of magnetic minerals (titanomaghemite) by heating. A hump at 493°C for the heating curve in He could not be resolved enough in the heating curve up to 527°C. This might be a result of the multiple heatings and heating rates, which suggest the progressive production of titanomagnetite (from titanomaghemite) and subsequent hematite production (reduction in magnetization intensity). Low-temperature magnetic measurements were also conducted and will be interpreted together with Curie temperatures. Paleomagnetic measurements were conducted on samples from Exps. 322&333 to understand the polarity of magnetization, paleolatitude and tectonic rotation. Paleomagnetic samples suffer from drilling induced remanent magnetization (DIRM), however, alternating field demagnetization at 10 mT was enough to remove DIRM to extract characteristic remanent magnetization (ChRM). Paleomagnetic

  14. Diffusive flux and pore anisotropy in sedimentary rocks.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, C E; Towne, R M; Lazouskaya, V; Bishop, M E; Dong, H

    2012-04-01

    Diffusion of dissolved contaminants into or from bedrock matrices can have a substantial impact on both the extent and longevity of dissolved contaminant plumes. For layered rocks, bedding orientation can have a significant impact on diffusion. A series of laboratory experiments was performed on minimally disturbed bedrock cores to measure the diffusive flux both parallel and normal to mineral bedding of four different anisotropic sedimentary rocks. Measured effective diffusion coefficients ranged from 4.9×10(-8) to 6.5×10(-7)cm(2)/s. Effective diffusion coefficients differed by as great as 10-folds when comparing diffusion normal versus parallel to bedding. Differences in the effective diffusion coefficients corresponded to differences in the "apparent" porosity in the orientation of diffusion (determined by determining the fraction of pore cross-sectional area measured using scanning electron microscopy), with the difference in apparent porosity between normal and parallel bedding orientations differing by greater than 2-folds for two of the rocks studied. Existing empirical models failed to provide accurate predictions of the effective diffusion coefficient in either bedding orientation for all four rock types studied, indicating that substantial uncertainty exists when attempting to predict diffusive flux through sedimentary rocks containing mineral bedding. A modified model based on the apparent porosity of the rocks provided a reasonable prediction of the experimental diffusion data. PMID:22326688

  15. Prevention of sulfide oxidation in sulfide-rich waste rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyström, Elsa; Alakangas, Lena

    2015-04-01

    The ability to reduce sulfide oxidation in waste rock after mine closure is a widely researched area, but to reduce and/or inhibit the oxidation during operation is less common. Sulfide-rich (ca 30 % sulfur) waste rock, partially oxidized, was leached during unsaturated laboratory condition. Trace elements such as As and Sb were relatively high in the waste rock while other sulfide-associated elements such as Cu, Pb and Zn were low compared to common sulfide-rich waste rock. Leaching of unsaturated waste rock lowered the pH, from around six down to two, resulting in continuously increasing element concentrations during the leaching period of 272 days. The concentrations of As (65 mg/L), Cu (6.9 mg/L), Sb (1.2 mg/L), Zn (149 mg/L) and S (43 g/L) were strongly elevated at the end of the leaching period. Different alkaline industrial residues such as slag, lime kiln dust and cement kiln dust were added as solid or as liquid to the waste rock in an attempt to inhibit sulfide oxidation through neo-formed phases on sulfide surfaces in order to decrease the mobility of metals and metalloids over longer time scale. This will result in a lower cost and efforts of measures after mine closure. Results from the experiments will be presented.

  16. Mars Science Laboratory at Sunset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    December 2, 2003

    Sunset on Mars catches NASA's Mars Science Laboratory in the foreground in this artist's concept. The mission is under development for launch in 2009 and a precision landing on Mars in 2010.

    Once on the ground, the Mars Science Laboratory would analyze dozens of samples scooped up from the soil and cored from rocks as it explores with greater range than any previous Mars rover. It would investigate the past or present ability of Mars to support life. NASA is considering nuclear energy for powering the rover to give it a long operating lifespan.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., is managing development of the Mars Smart Laboratory for the NASA Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C.

  17. Mars Science Laboratory at Canyon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    December 2, 2003

    NASA's Mars Science Laboratory travels near a canyon on Mars in this artist's concept. The mission is under development for launch in 2009 and a precision landing on Mars in 2010.

    Once on the ground, the Mars Science Laboratory would analyze dozens of samples scooped up from the soil and cored from rocks as it explores with greater range than any previous Mars rover. It would investigate the past or present ability of Mars to support life. NASA is considering nuclear energy for powering the rover to give it a long operating lifespan.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., is managing development of the Mars Smart Laboratory for the NASA Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C.

  18. Rock and Soil Types at Pathfinder Landing Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Type areas of rocks and soils. (A) Dark rock type and bright soil type: Shown is the dark rock Barnacle Bill. Reflectance spectra typical of fresh basalt and APXS spectra indicating more silica-rich basaltic andesite compositions characterize this type. These rocks are typically the small boulders and intermediate-sized cobbles at the Pathfinder site. The bright soil type is very common and in this case comprises Barnacle Bill's wind tail and much of the surround soil area. This soil has a high reflectance and a strongly reddened spectrum indicative of oxidized ferric minerals. (B) Bright rock type: Shown is the bright rock Wedge. Reflectance spectra typical of weathered basalt and APXS spectra indicating basaltic compositions characterize this type. These rocks are typically larger than 1 meter in diameter and many display morphologies indicating flood deposition. (C) Pink rock type: Shown is the pink rock Scooby Doo. APXS and reflectance spectra indicate a composition and optical characteristics similar to the drift soil. However, the morphology of the pink rock type indicates a cemented or rocklike structure. This material may be a chemically cemented hardpan that underlies much of the Pathfinder site. (D) Dark soil type: The dark soil type is typically found on the windward sides of rocks or in rock-free areas like Photometry Flats (shown here) where the bright soil has been striped away by aeolian action or in open areas. Other locations include the Mermaid Dune. (E) Disturbed soil type: The darkening of disturbed soil relative to its parent material, bright soil, as a result of changes in soil texture and compaction caused by movement of the rover and retraction of the lander airbag. (F) Lamb-like soil type: This soil type shows reflectance and spectral characteristics intermediate between the bright and dark soils. Its distinguishing feature is a weak spectral absorption near 900 nanometers not seen in either the bright or dark soils.

    NOTE: original

  19. Geo-Engineering Evaluation of Rock Masses for Crushed Rock and Cut Stones in Khartoum State, Sudan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kheirelseed, E. E.; Ming, T. H.; Abdalla, S. B.

    The purpose of this study is to find artificial coarse aggregates and cut stones around Khartoum. To meat the objectives of the study, data from both field and laboratory are collected. The field data includes geological investigations based on different methods and samples collection, whereas the laboratory tests consists of specific gravity, water absorption, impact value, crushing value, Los Angeles abrasion, soundness tests. The field and laboratory results were weighed and compiled together to reveal the engineering performance of the different rock masses in term of cut stone and crushed aggregates. The results show that most of the examined rock masses are suitable for crushing, building and dressed stones. For decorative slabs only foliated granite and syenite masses can be used.

  20. Resonant Column Apparatus Tests on Intact and Jointed Rock Specimens with Numerical Modelling Validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perino, A.; Barla, G.

    2015-01-01

    The determination of rock mass dynamic parameters including the influence of joints/discontinuities on wave propagation is of interest for solving problems in geophysics, rock protective engineering, rock dynamics and earthquake engineering. This topic is covered in this paper by means of laboratory tests on intact and jointed rock specimens performed with the resonant column apparatus (RCA). Attention is dedicated to the determination, with this equipment, generally used for testing soils, of the shear modulus at small strain and the damping ratio of intact and jointed rock specimens. A correction procedure based on the RCA tests performed on aluminium specimens is described. The results of the tests performed are analysed in detail. Three-dimensional distinct element method modelling is used to evaluate the applicability of the RCA and the correctness of the laboratory tests performed. A comparison with the results obtained using the scattering matrix method is also presented.

  1. Quantifying (12/13)CH(4) migration and fate following sub-surface release to an agricultural soil.

    PubMed

    Shaw, G; Atkinson, B; Meredith, W; Snape, C; Steven, M; Hoch, A; Lever, D

    2014-07-01

    Following gas generation in a Geological Disposal Facility (GDF), (14)C-containing gases could migrate through the geosphere, eventually diffusing into soils at the Earth's surface. This paper reports summary results from laboratory and field experiments to obtain information on the probable rates of a) diffusive transport and b) oxidation of (12/13)CH(4) (as a surrogate for (14)CH4) in a typical agricultural soil in the UK. Rates of CH(4) oxidation were generally low in the field and undisturbed soil columns, though a re-packed column of homogenised topsoil oxidised ambient atmospheric CH(4) 20× faster than an undisturbed soil column. In contrast to low observed rates of CH(4) oxidation, the effective diffusion of CH(4) through the soil was rapid. Isotopically labelled CH(4) injected at a depth of 45 cm in the field diffused to the surface and exited the soil over a time period ranging from 8 to 24 h. The rate of CH(4) diffusion through the soil was increased by the presence of ryegrass roots which increased soil porosity and decreased water content. δ(13)C values for laboratory column soils after labelled CH(4) injection experiments showed no sign of residual (13)C, despite the extremely high δ(13)C values of the injected (12/13)CH(4). If laboratory observations are confirmed by measurements in field samples it can be concluded that the majority of (14)CH(4) from a GDF which enters a soil with low methanotrophic activity will be lost to the free atmosphere after diffusing rapidly through the soil column. PMID:23958331

  2. Tracer tomography (in) rocks!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somogyvári, Márk; Jalali, Mohammadreza; Jimenez Parras, Santos; Bayer, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Physical behavior of fractured aquifers is rigorously controlled by the presence of interconnected conductive fractures, as they represent the main pathways for flow and transport. Ideally, they are simulated as a discrete fracture network (DFN) in a model to capture the role of fracture system geometry, i.e. fracture length, height, and width (aperture/transmissivity). Such network may be constrained by prior geological information or direct data resources such as field mapping, borehole logging and geophysics. With the many geometric features, however, calibration of a DFN to measured data is challenging. This is especially the case when spatial properties of a fracture network need to be calibrated to flow and transport data. One way to increase the insight in a fractured rock is by combining the information from multiple field tests. In this study, a tomographic configuration that combines multiple tracer tests is suggested. These tests are conducted from a borehole with different injection levels that act as sources. In a downgradient borehole, the tracer is recorded at different levels or receivers, in order to maximize insight in the spatial heterogeneity of the rock. As tracer here we chose heat, and temperature breakthrough curves are recorded. The recorded tracer data is inverted using a novel stochastic trans-dimensional Markov Chain Monte Carlo procedure. An initial DFN solution is generated and sequentially modified given available geological information, such as expected fracture density, orientation, length distribution, spacing and persistency. During this sequential modification, the DFN evolves in a trans-dimensional inversion space through adding and/or deleting fracture segments. This stochastic inversion algorithm requires a large number of thousands of model runs to converge, and thus using a fast and robust forward model is essential to keep the calculation efficient. To reach this goal, an upwind coupled finite difference method is employed

  3. SAPHYR: the Swiss Atlas of PHYsical properties of Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenning, Q. C.; Zappone, A. S.; Kissling, E.

    2015-12-01

    The Swiss Atlas of PHYsical properties of Rocks (SAPHYR) is a multi-year project, aiming to compile a comprehensive data set on physical properties of rocks exposed in Switzerland and surrounding areas. The ultimate goal of SAPHYR is to make these data accessible to an open and wide public, such as industrial, engineering, land and resource planning companies, as well as academic institutions. Since the early sixties worldwide geophysicists, petrologists, and engineers, focused their work on laboratory measurements of rocks physical properties, and their relations with microstructures, mineralogical compositions and other rock parameters, in the effort to constrain the geological interpretation of geophysical surveys. In combination with efforts to investigate deep structure of the continental crust by controlled source seismology, laboratories capable to reproduce pressure and temperature conditions to depth of 50km and more collected measurements of various parameters on a wide variety of rock types. In recent years, the increasing interest on non-traditional energy supply, (deep geothermal energy, shale gas) and CO2 storage renovated the interests in physical characterization of the deep underground. The idea to organize those laboratory data into a geographically referenced database (GIS) is supported by the Swiss Commission for Geophysics. The data refer to density and porosity, seismic, magnetic, thermal properties, permeability and electrical properties. An effort has been placed on collecting samples and measuring the physical properties of lithologies that are poorly documented in literature. The phase of laboratory measurements is still in progress. At present SAPHYR focuses towards developing a 3-D physical properties model of the Swiss subsurface, using the structure of the exposed geology, boreholes data and seismic surveys, combined with lab determined pressure and temperature derivatives. An early version of the final product is presented here.

  4. Natural evidence for rapid abiogenic hydrothermal generation of CH 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiebig, Jens; Woodland, Alan B.; Spangenberg, Jorge; Oschmann, Wolfgang

    2007-06-01

    Although recent hydrothermal experiments imply that abiogenic methane (CH 4) generation from hydrothermal reduction of CO 2 can occur, evidence from natural systems was still lacking. Based on the chemical and isotopic equilibrium signatures of low-temperature fumarolic gas discharges, we are able to provide hard evidence for its natural occurrence, namely in three subduction-related bi-phase hydrothermal systems of the Mediterranean, whose temperatures range from 260 to 470 °C. The attainment of equilibrium and the time spans of recent volcanic dormancy allowed us to calculate minimum rates for chemical and isotopic equilibration. These are significantly higher than those previously reported and might be due to the presence of a saturated water vapor phase in the investigated systems. The fact that nature provides conditions enabling relatively fast production of hydrocarbons from CO 2 strongly supports the concerns that were recently raised from laboratory experiments. These address the use of the carbon isotope composition of reduced carbon in Archean sediments as a tracer of early life and the occurrence of CH 4 on extraterrestrial planets as a bioindicator. In view of the potential role of abiogenic CH 4 as a precursor of life, we also present an estimate of abiogenic hydrothermal CH 4 fluxes throughout the Archean. It is not expected that these fluxes exceeded 80 Mt/yr during the past 4.0 Ga. This, however, would have been enough to facilitate HCN production on the prebiotic Earth.

  5. Rock Moved by Mars Lander Arm, Stereo View

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The robotic arm on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander slid a rock out of the way during the mission's 117th Martian day (Sept. 22, 2008) to gain access to soil that had been underneath the rock.The lander's Surface Stereo Imager took the two images for this stereo view later the same day, showing the rock, called 'Headless,' after the arm pushed it about 40 centimeters (16 inches) from its previous location.

    'The rock ended up exactly where we intended it to,' said Matt Robinson of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, robotic arm flight software lead for the Phoenix team.

    The arm had enlarged the trench near Headless two days earlier in preparation for sliding the rock into the trench. The trench was dug to about 3 centimeters (1.2 inches) deep. The ground surface between the rock's prior position and the lip of the trench had a slope of about 3 degrees downward toward the trench. Headless is about the size and shape of a VHS videotape.

    The Phoenix science team sought to move the rock in order to study the soil and the depth to subsurface ice underneath where the rock had been.

    This left-eye and right-eye images for this stereo view were taken at about 12:30 p.m., local solar time on Mars. The scene appears three-dimensional when seen through blue-red glasses.The view is to the north northeast of the lander.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by JPL, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development was by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  6. Design of Rock Slope Reinforcement: An Himalayan Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Gaurav; Latha, Gali Madhavi

    2016-06-01

    The stability analysis of the two abutment slopes of a railway bridge proposed at about 359 m above the ground level, crossing a river and connecting two hill faces in the Himalayas, India, is presented. The bridge is located in a zone of high seismic activity. The rock slopes are composed of a heavily jointed rock mass and the spacing, dip and dip direction of joint sets are varying at different locations. Geological mapping was carried out to characterize all discontinuities present along the slopes. Laboratory and field investigations were conducted to assess the geotechnical properties of the intact rock, rock mass and joint infill. Stability analyses of these rock slopes were carried out using numerical programmes. Loads from the foundations resting on the slopes and seismic accelerations estimated from site-specific ground response analysis were considered. The proposed slope profile with several berms between successive foundations was simulated in the numerical model. An equivalent continuum approach with Hoek and Brown failure criterion was initially used in a finite element model to assess the global stability of the slope abutments. In the second stage, finite element analysis of rock slopes with all joint sets with their orientations, spacing and properties explicitly incorporated into the numerical model was taken up using continuum with joints approach. It was observed that the continuum with joints approach was able to capture the local failures in some of the slope sections, which were verified using wedge failure analysis and stereographic projections. Based on the slope deformations and failure patterns observed from the numerical analyses, rock anchors were designed to achieve the target factors of safety against failure while keeping the deformations within the permissible limits. Detailed design of rock anchors and comparison of the stability of slopes with and without reinforcement are presented.

  7. Types of rocks exposed at the Viking landing sites

    SciTech Connect

    Guinness, E.; Arvidson, R.; Dale-Bannister, M.; Slavney, S.

    1985-01-01

    Spectral estimates derived from Viking Lander multispectral images have been used to investigate the types of rocks exposed at both landing sites, and to infer whether the rocks are primary igneous rocks or weathering products. These analyses should aid interpretations of spectra to be returned from the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer on the upcoming Mars Observer Mission. A series of gray surfaces on the Landers were used to check the accuracy of the camera preflight calibrations. Results indicate that the pre-flight calibrations for the three color channels are probably correct for all cameras but camera 2 on Lander 1. The calibration for the infrared channels appears to have changed, although the cause is not known. For this paper, only the color channels were used to derive data for rocks. Rocks at both sites exhibit a variety of reflectance values. For example, reflectance estimates for two rocks in the blue (0.4-0.5 microns), green (0.5-0.6 microns), and red (0.6-0.75 microns) channels are 0.16, 0.23, and 0.33 and 0.12, 0.19, 0.37 at a phase angle of 20 degrees. These values have been compared with laboratory reflectance spectra of analog materials and telescopic spectra of Mars, both convolved to the Lander bandpasses. Lander values for some rocks are similar to earth based observations of martian dark regions and with certain mafic igneous rocks thinly coated with amorphous ferric-oxide rich weathering products. These results are consistent with previous interpretations.

  8. Shotgun cartridge rock breaker

    DOEpatents

    Ruzzi, Peter L.; Morrell, Roger J.

    1995-01-01

    A rock breaker uses shotgun cartridges or other firearm ammunition as the explosive charge at the bottom of a drilled borehole. The breaker includes a heavy steel rod or bar, a gun with a firing chamber for the ammunition which screws onto the rod, a long firing pin running through a central passage in the rod, and a firing trigger mechanism at the external end of the bar which strikes the firing pin to fire the cartridge within the borehole. A tubular sleeve surround the main body of the rod and includes slits the end to allow it to expand. The rod has a conical taper at the internal end against which the end of the sleeve expands when the sleeve is forced along the rod toward the taper by a nut threaded onto the external end of the rod. As the sleeve end expands, it pushes against the borehole and holds the explosive gasses within, and also prevents the breaker from flying out of the borehole. The trigger mechanism includes a hammer with a slot and a hole for accepting a drawbar or drawpin which, when pulled by a long cord, allows the cartridge to be fired from a remote location.

  9. Fracturing of rocks by ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlahou, Ioanna; Grae Worster, M.

    2009-11-01

    Frost damage, caused by the freezing of water-saturated media, affects plant roots, pavements and the foundations of buildings, and is a major erosional force in rocks. The process has been studied extensively in the case of soils, and mechanisms such as the formation of ice lenses have been identified. Here, we consider the freezing of water in a three-dimensional cavity in a water-saturated, porous, elastic rock. Initially, the expansion of water as it freezes causes flow away from the solidification front, into the porous rock. The Darcy flow in the porous medium controls the pressure field and therefore the freezing temperature. At later times, disjoining thermomolecular forces create a pre-melted film of water between the ice and the rock and cause flow of pore water from the surrounding rock into the cavity. We find that the disjoining forces between the ice and the rock have the dominant effect, so we focus on those later times when the cavity is ice-filled. We solve the coupled set of integro-differential equations governing the elastic stress in the rock and the flow through its pores to determine the evolution of the shape and extent of the ice-filled cavity.

  10. Source rock potential in Pakistan

    SciTech Connect

    Raza, H.A. )

    1991-03-01

    Pakistan contains two sedimentary basins: Indus in the east and Balochistan in the west. The Indus basin has received sediments from precambrian until Recent, albeit with breaks. It has been producing hydrocarbons since 1914 from three main producing regions, namely, the Potwar, Sulaisman, and Kirthar. In the Potwar, oil has been discovered in Cambrian, Permian, Jurassic, and Tertiary rocks. Potential source rocks are identified in Infra-Cambrian, Permian, Paleocene, and Eocene successions, but Paleocene/Eocene Patala Formation seems to be the main source of most of the oil. In the Sulaiman, gas has been found in Cretaceous and Tertiary; condensate in Cretaceous rocks. Potential source rocks are indicated in Cretaceous, Paleocene, and Eocene successions. The Sembar Formation of Early Cretaceous age appears to be the source of gas. In the Kirthar, oil and gas have been discovered in Cretaceous and gas has been discovered in paleocene and Eocene rocks. Potential source rocks are identified in Kirthar and Ghazij formations of Eocene age in the western part. However, in the easter oil- and gas-producing Badin platform area, Union Texas has recognized the Sembar Formation of Early Cretaceous age as the only source of Cretaceous oil and gas. The Balochistan basin is part of an Early Tertiary arc-trench system. The basin is inadequately explored, and there is no oil or gas discovery so far. However, potential source rocks have been identified in Eocene, Oligocene, Miocene, and Pliocene successions based on geochemical analysis of surface samples. Mud volcanoes are present.

  11. A computational characterization of boron-oxygen multiple bonding in HN=CH-CH=CH-NH-BO.

    PubMed

    Larkin, Joseph D; Bhat, Krishna L; Markham, George D; James, Tony D; Brooks, Bernard R; Bock, Charles W

    2008-09-11

    Structures, relative energies, and bonding characteristics for various conformers of 3-imino-N-(oxoboryl)prop-1-en-1-amine, HN=CH-CH=CH-NH-BO, and the corresponding borocycle (-HN=CH-CH=CH-NH-B-)O are discussed using results from second-order Møller-Plesset (MP2) perturbation theory with the Dunning-Woon correlation-consistent cc-pVDZ, aug-cc-pVDZ, and cc-pVTZ basis sets. These MP2 results are compared to those from computationally efficient density functional theory (DFT) calculations using the LDA, PBE, TPSS, BLYP, B3LYP, BVP86, OLYP, O3LYP, and PBE1PBE functionals in conjunction with the economical Pople-type 6-311++G(d,p) basis set to evaluate the suitability of these DFT/6-311++G(d,p) levels for use with larger boron-containing systems. The effects of an aqueous environment were incorporated into the calculations using COSMO methodology. The calculated boron-oxygen bond lengths, orbital compositions, and bond orders in all the (acyclic) HN=CH-CH=CH-NH-BO conformers were consistent with the presence of a boron-oxygen triple bond, similar to that found in H-BO and H2N-BO. The (-HN=CH-CH=CH-NH-B-)O borocycle is predicted to be planar (C2v symmetry), and it is approximately 30 kcal/mol lower in energy than any of the (acyclic) HN=CH-CH=CH-NH-BO conformers; the boron-oxygen bond in this borocycle has significant double bond character, a bonding scheme for which there has been only one experimental structure reported in the literature (Vidovic, D. ; et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2005, 127, 4566- 4569). PMID:18707068

  12. Rock Dusting Leaves 'Mickey Mouse' Mark

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image taken by the navigation camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit shows the rock dubbed 'Humphrey' and the circular areas on the rock that were wiped off by the rover. The rover used a brush on its rock abrasion tool to clean these spots before examining them with its miniature thermal emission spectrometer. Later, the rover drilled into the rock with its rock abrasion tool, exposing fresh rock underneath.

  13. How Efficient is a Laboratory Burner in Heating Water?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jansen, Michael P.

    1997-01-01

    Describes an experiment in which chemistry students determine the efficiency of a laboratory burner used to heat water. The reaction is assumed to be the complete combustion of methane, CH4. The experiment is appropriate for secondary school chemistry students familiar with heats of reaction and simple calorimetry. Contains pre-laboratory and…

  14. Properties of Flow Zones in Fractured Rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salve, R.

    2004-12-01

    indicate that refinements in the understanding of flow and transport in fractured, welded rock may be realized through additional field investigations conducted at spatial scales of tens of meters. This work was supported by the Director, Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management, U.S. Department of Energy, through Memorandum Purchase Order EA9013MC5X between Bechtel SAIC Company, LLC, and the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab). The support is provided to Berkeley Lab through the U.S. Department of Energy Contract No. DE-AC03-76SF00098.

  15. Approaching Rock Target No. 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 3-D stereo anaglyph image was taken by the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit front hazard-identification camera after the rover's first post-egress drive on Mars Sunday. Engineers drove the rover approximately 3 meters (10 feet) from the Columbia Memorial Station toward the first rock target, seen in the foreground. The football-sized rock was dubbed Adirondack because of its mountain-shaped appearance. Scientists plan to use instruments at the end of the rover's robotic arm to examine the rock and understand how it formed.

  16. Multiverso: Rock'n'Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caballero, J. A.

    2012-05-01

    In the last few years, there have been several projects involving astronomy and classical music. But have a rock band ever appeared at a science conference or an astronomer at a rock concert? We present a project, Multiverso, in which we mix rock and astronomy, together with poetry and video art (Caballero, 2010). The project started in late 2009 and has already reached tens of thousands people in Spain through the release of an album, several concert-talks, television, radio, newspapers and the internet.

  17. Dynamics of rock varnish formation

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, R. Jr.; Reneau, S.L.; Guthrie, G.D. Jr.; Bish, D.L.; Harrington, C.D.

    1991-01-01

    Our studies of rock varnish from the southwestern United States suggest that the Mn-phase in rock varnish has neither the chemistry nor the crystal structure of birnessite. Rather, the Mn-rich phase is non-crystalline and contains Ba, Ca, Fe, Al, and P. Unknowns concerning the formation of this non-crystalline Mn phase must be resolved before researchers are able to define chemical parameters of rock varnish formation based upon conditions of formation of the Mn phase. 6 refs., 9 figs.

  18. Space Weathering of Lunar Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noble, S. K.; Keller, L. P.; Christoffersen, R.; Rahman, Z.

    2012-01-01

    All materials exposed at the lunar surface undergo space weathering processes. On the Moon, boulders make up only a small percentage of the exposed surface, and areas where such rocks are exposed, like central peaks, are often among the least space weathered regions identified from remote sensing data. Yet space weathered surfaces (patina) are relatively common on returned rock samples, some of which directly sample the surface of larger boulders. Because, as witness plates to lunar space weathering, rocks and boulders experience longer exposure times compared to lunar soil grains, they allow us to develop a deeper perspective on the relative importance of various weathering processes as a function of time.

  19. Laboratory Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Medical Devices Products and Medical Procedures In Vitro Diagnostics Lab Tests Laboratory Tests Share Tweet Linkedin ... Approved Home and Lab Tests Find All In Vitro Diagnostic Products and Decision Summaries Since November 2003 ...

  20. Secondary graphitization in mantle-derived rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Pasteris, J.D.

    1988-09-01

    The assemblage magnesite + graphite +/- CH/sub 4/ has been identified by laser Raman microprobe spectroscopy in fluid inclusions in olivine grains in the Kao kimberlite and the Duluth Complex troctolite. In both cases, the assemblage (essentially Eggler's EMOG oxygen-fugacity buffer) is believed to arise from secondary reactions rather than from primary igneous processes. The known stability field in P-T-f/sub O/sub 2// space of the EMOG buffer, coupled with some other petrologic constraints imposed by the host rocks, indicates in both cases that the carbon-bearing assemblage was precipitated at low pressures and temperatures (less than or equal to 2 kbar, less than or equal to 550/sup 0/C) at oxygen fugacities within about 1 log (f/sub O/sub 2//) unit below the fayalite-magnetite-quartz (FMQ) buffer. The laser Raman microprobe provides compositional and structural data on the coexisting phases (including carbon) that further constrain the stability field of the natural assemblages.