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Sample records for rocket exhaust plumes

  1. Plasma Rocket With Hybrid Exhaust Plume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Franklin R.

    1987-01-01

    Proposed plasma rocket, described in report, generates hybrid exhaust plume comprising annular layer of relatively cool neutral gas around plasma core. Plasma and gas intermix, providing gradual radial transition between the two. Amount of gas injected adjusted to control propulsive efficiency; relatively cool gas boundary layer at surface of nozzle insulates nozzle from high plasma temperature.

  2. Particle Characterization in Rocket Exhaust Plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callen, E. Eugene, Jr.; Fisher, J. Scott

    1997-01-01

    A method to characterize particles in rocket exhaust plumes is developed. The particle velocity, size, and material composition are determined from crater characteristics resulting from impacts into aluminum and copper targets passed through the plume. The targets are mounted on a steel arm approximately 21 inches (53 cm) long which is rotated through the plume at sufficient velocity to prevent material failure resulting from thermal effects. A Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) with secondary x-ray detectors is used to determine the particle material, and a standard optical measurement microscope is used to determine the crater diameter and depth. The crater diameter and depth are used in turn, as inputs to a ballistics computer code to estimate the velocity and size of the particle. The target has a safe residence time in the plume of approximately 50 ms before reaching an unacceptably high temperature. The = must mach a velocity of 104 ft/s (32 m/s) before entering the plume to produce the design residence time of 20 ms. The arm is actuated by a torsion spring with a 5-inch (13 cm) outer diameter, 0.625-inch (16 mm wire diameter, and 11 coils. A prototype of the entire rocket exhaust particle impact characterization system (PICS) was constructed and statically tested.

  3. Infrared Imagery of Solid Rocket Exhaust Plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moran, Robert P.; Houston, Janice D.

    2011-01-01

    The Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test program consisted of a series of 18 solid rocket motor static firings, simulating the liftoff conditions of the Ares I five-segment Reusable Solid Rocket Motor Vehicle. Primary test objectives included acquiring acoustic and pressure data which will be used to validate analytical models for the prediction of Ares 1 liftoff acoustics and ignition overpressure environments. The test article consisted of a 5% scale Ares I vehicle and launch tower mounted on the Mobile Launch Pad. The testing also incorporated several Water Sound Suppression Systems. Infrared imagery was employed during the solid rocket testing to support the validation or improvement of analytical models, and identify corollaries between rocket plume size or shape and the accompanying measured level of noise suppression obtained by water sound suppression systems.

  4. Implementation of microwave transmissions for rocket exhaust plume diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutu, Nicholas George

    Rocket-launched vehicles produce a trail of exhaust that contains ions, free electrons, and soot. The exhaust plume increases the effective conductor length of the rocket. A conductor in the presence of an electric field (e.g. near the electric charge stored within a cloud) can channel an electric discharge. The electrical conductivity of the exhaust plume is related to its concentration of free electrons. The risk of a lightning strike in-flight is a function of both the conductivity of the body and its effective length. This paper presents an approach that relates the electron number density of the exhaust plume to its propagation constant. Estimated values of the collision frequency and electron number density generated from a numerical simulation of a rocket plume are used to guide the design of the experimental apparatus. Test par meters are identified for the apparatus designed to transmit a signal sweep form 4 GHz to 7 GHz through the exhaust plume of a J-class solid rocket motor. Measurements of the scattering parameters imply that the transmission does not penetrate the plume, but instead diffracts around it. The electron density 20 cm downstream from the nozzle exit is estimated to be between 2.7x1014 m--3 and 5.6x10 15 m--3.

  5. Environmental Effects of Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor Exhaust Plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, B.; Pergament, H. S.

    1976-01-01

    The deposition of NOx and HCl in the stratosphere from the space shuttle solid rocket motors (SRM) and exhaust plume is discussed. A detailed comparison between stratospheric deposition rates using the baseline SRM propellant and an alternate propellant, which replaces ammonium perchlorate by ammonium nitrate, shows the total NOx deposition rate to be approximately the same for each propellant. For both propellants the ratio of the deposition rates of NOx to total chlorine-containing species is negligibly small. Rocket exhaust ground cloud transport processes in the troposphere are also examined. A brief critique of the multilayer diffusion models (presently used for predicting pollutant deposition in the troposphere) is presented, and some detailed cloud rise calculations are compared with data for Titan 3C launches. The results show that, when launch time meteorological data are used as input, the model can reasonably predict measured cloud stabilization heights.

  6. First Passively-illuminated, High-resolution Polarimetric Images of Exhaust Plumes from Flying Rockets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyler, D.; Phenis, A.; Mudge, J.; Dank, J.; Tietjen, A.; Hand, D.

    We report video-rate imaging polarimetry observations of boosting rocket exhaust plumes obtained with the Lockheed Martin ATC Simultaneous Stokes Imaging Polarimeter (SSIP). The unique design of the SSIP, mounted to a tracking telescope, allowed us to acquire rocket plume imaging polarimetry over a period of minutes for each of three launches, observing the plume phenomenology at a variety of altitudes and aspect angles. Our data includes image polarimetry of solid and liquid rocket exhaust plumes and mixing of the two exhaust flow fields. We also present multi-spectral image data, showing for the first time distinct shock structures in the plumes at two wavelengths.

  7. Impact of rocket exhaust plumes on atmospheric composition and climate ― an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voigt, Ch.; Schumann, U.; Graf, K.; Gottschaldt, K.-D.

    2013-03-01

    Rockets are the only direct anthropogenic emission sources into the upper atmosphere. Gaseous rocket emissions include CO, N2, H2, H2O, and CO2, while solid rocket motors (SRM) additionally inject significant amounts of aluminum oxide (Al2O3) particles and gaseous chlorine species into the atmosphere. These emissions strongly perturb local atmospheric trace gas and aerosol distributions. Here, previous aircraft measurements in various rocket exhaust plumes including several large space shuttle launch vehicles are compiled. The observed changes of the lower stratospheric composition in the near field are summarized. The injection of chlorine species and particles into the stratosphere can lead to ozone loss in rocket exhaust plumes. Local observations are compared with global model simulations of the effects of rocket emissions on stratospheric ozone concentrations. Large uncertainties remain concerning individual ozone loss reaction rates and the impact of small-scale plume effects on global chemistry. Further, remote sensing data from satellite indicate that rocket exhaust plumes regionally increase iron and water vapor concentrations in the mesosphere potentially leading to the formation of mesospheric clouds at 80- to 90-kilometer altitude. These satellite observations are summarized and the rocket emission inventory is compared with other natural and anthropogenic sources to the stratosphere such as volcanism, meteoritic material, and aviation.

  8. Rocket exhaust plume impingement on the Voyager spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baerwald, R. K.

    1978-01-01

    In connection with the conduction of the long-duration Voyager missions to the outer planets and the sophisticated propulsion systems required, it was necessary to carry out an investigation to avoid exhaust plume impingement problems. The rarefied gas dynamics literature indicates that, for most engineering surfaces, the assumption of diffuse reemission and complete thermal accommodation is warranted in the free molecular flow regime. This assumption was applied to an analysis of a spacecraft plume impingement problem in the near-free molecular flow regime and yielded results to within a few percent of flight data. The importance of a correct treatment of the surface temperature was also demonstrated. Specular reflection, on the other hand, was shown to yield results which may be unconservative by a factor of 2 or 3. It is pointed out that one of the most difficult portions of an exhaust plume impingement analysis is the simulation of the impinged hardware. The geometry involved must be described as accurately and completely as possible.

  9. General Computer Program for Calculation of Radiation from Inhomogeneous, Nonisobaric, Nonisothermal Rocket Exhaust Plume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dash, M. J.; Huffaker, R. M.

    1968-01-01

    Computer program evaluates radiation from an axisymmetric gas body with water vapor, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and solid carbon particles as radiating constituents, and hydrogen as a nonradiating constituent. The program provides a convenient method of evaluating a great many problems of radiation from rocket exhaust plumes.

  10. Hydrazine engine plume contamination mapping. [measuring instruments for rocket exhaust from liquid propellant rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chirivella, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    Instrumentation for the measurement of plume exhaust specie deposition rates were developed and demonstrated. The instruments, two sets of quartz crystal microbalances, were designed for low temperature operation in the back flow and variable temperature operation in the core flow regions of an exhaust plume. These quartz crystal microbalances performed nominally, and measurements of exhaust specie deposition rates for 8400 number of pulses for a 0.1-lb monopropellant thruster are reported.

  11. Determination of Combustion Product Radicals in a Hydrocarbon Fueled Rocket Exhaust Plume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langford, Lester A.; Allgood, Daniel C.; Junell, Justin C.

    2007-01-01

    The identification of metallic effluent materials in a rocket engine exhaust plume indicates the health of the engine. Since 1989, emission spectroscopy of the plume of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) has been used for ground testing at NASA's Stennis Space Center (SSC). This technique allows the identification and quantification of alloys from the metallic elements observed in the plume. With the prospect of hydrocarbon-fueled rocket engines, such as Rocket Propellant 1 (RP-1) or methane (CH4) fueled engines being considered for use in future space flight systems, the contributions of intermediate or final combustion products resulting from the hydrocarbon fuels are of great interest. The effect of several diatomic molecular radicals, such as Carbon Dioxide , Carbon Monoxide, Molecular Carbon, Methylene Radical, Cyanide or Cyano Radical, and Nitric Oxide, needs to be identified and the effects of their band systems on the spectral region from 300 nm to 850 nm determined. Hydrocarbon-fueled rocket engines will play a prominent role in future space exploration programs. Although hydrogen fuel provides for higher engine performance, hydrocarbon fuels are denser, safer to handle, and less costly. For hydrocarbon-fueled engines using RP-1 or CH4 , the plume is different from a hydrogen fueled engine due to the presence of several other species, such as CO2, C2, CO, CH, CN, and NO, in the exhaust plume, in addition to the standard H2O and OH. These species occur as intermediate or final combustion products or as a result of mixing of the hot plume with the atmosphere. Exhaust plume emission spectroscopy has emerged as a comprehensive non-intrusive sensing technology which can be applied to a wide variety of engine performance conditions with a high degree of sensitivity and specificity. Stennis Space Center researchers have been in the forefront of advancing experimental techniques and developing theoretical approaches in order to bring this technology to a more mature stage.

  12. Species separation in rocket exhaust plumes and analytic plume flow models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koppenwallner, G.

    2001-08-01

    Species separation in the exhaust plume of control thrusters of satellites is of main importance for the contamination analysis. Contamination concerns mainly scientific instruments or sensitive surfaces.. In continuum fluid dynamics a multi- component gas mixture can be treated as mixture with mean properties and with a flow field independent composition. This basic feature of continuum flow ceases to be valid in the rarefied flow regimes. In this regime there are two main mechanism which cause a separation of species in the flow field. a. Strong velocity gradients or streamline curvature. Strong stream line curvatures with large centrifugal forces exist close to the nozzle throat of sonic free jets [Sherman] or at the nozzle lip. Heavy gas constituents will not be able to follow these strong stream line curvatures. b. Different thermal velocity or thermal diffusivity of heavy and light gas constituents The transition from continuum to free molecular plume expansion can approximately be described by the sudden freeze model of Bird. At the freezing point molecular collisions suddenly cease and the further expansion is given by the velocity vector of the individual molecules at this freezing point. As light molecules have a larger thermal speed c than the heavy ones their spreading potential is also higher. This mechanism will also produce an enrichment of the plume boundary with light molecules. The approaches to model species separation in exhaust plumes as result of the above mechanism will be reviewed. To gain more insight into the separation the following cases are analyzed in detail: [B ]The free molecular supersonic expansion from a freezing plane. ? The various analytic plume flow models and their capability to predict the lateral spreading at the plume boundary (e.g. Simmons, Boynton, Brook, DLR) ? DSMC test case calculations of single and two-species plumes with mass separation. (M. Ivanov, ITAM) Based on this analysis a new 3 region model for species separation in the far field of exhaust plumes has been derived. This model distinguishes: Region 1 Close to axis with composition conserved from nozzle exit. ??C+D?Sep in which the separation process is finished and which is populated by the low molecular mass constituents.

  13. Stratospheric plume dispersion: Measurements from STS and Titan solid rocket motor exhaust. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Beiting, E.J.

    1999-04-20

    Plume expansion was measured from nine Space Shuttle and Titan IV vehicles at altitudes of 18, 24, and 30 km in the stratosphere. The plume diameters were inferred from electronic images of polarized, near-infrared solar radiation scattered from the exhaust particles, and these diameters were found to increase linearly with time. The expansion rate was measured for as long as 50 min after the vehicle reached altitude. Measurements made simultaneously at multiple altitudes showed that the expansion rate increased with increasing altitude for six measurements made at Cape Canaveral but decreased between 24 and 30 km for the one measurement made at Vandenberg AFB. The average expansion rates for all measurements are 4.3 {+-} 1.0 m/s at 18 km, 6.8 {+-} 1.9 m/s at 24 km, and 8.7 {+-} 2.5 m/s at 30 km. Expansion rates varied from launch to launch by as much as a factor of 1.6 at 18 km, 2.2 at 24 km, and 2.7 at 30 km. No correlation between the expansion rate and wind speed or shear was evident. These data are compared to several models for diffusivity and are used to update a comprehensive particle model of solid rocket motor exhaust in the stratosphere. The expansion rates are required by models to calculate the spatial extent and temporal persistence of the local stratospheric ozone depletion cause by solid rocket exhaust.

  14. An experimental and computational study of moderately underexpanded rocket exhaust plumes in a co-flowing hypersonic free stream

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, N.; Buttsworth, D.; Jones, T.; Brescianini, C. |

    1995-09-01

    Rocket plume exhaust structures are aerodynamically and thermochemically very complex and the prediction of plume properties such as temperature, velocity, pressure, chemical species concentrations and turbulence properties is a formidable task as there are no definitive models for viscous and chemical effects. Contemporary computational techniques are still in their infancy and cannot yet reliably predict plume properties. Only through validation of computer codes using experimental data, can computational models be developed to the point where they can be confidently used as design and predictive tools. The motivation for this study was to acquire well defined data for rocket plumes at low altitude hypersonic flight conditions so that the above issues could be investigated.

  15. On-board Optical Spectrometry for Detection of Mixture Ratio and Eroded Materials in Rocket Engine Exhaust Plume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barkhoudarian, Sarkis; Kittinger, Scott

    2006-01-01

    Optical spectrometry can provide means to characterize rocket engine exhaust plume impurities due to eroded materials, as well as combustion mixture ratio without any interference with plume. Fiberoptic probes and cables were designed, fabricated and installed on Space Shuttle Main Engines (SSME), allowing monitoring of the plume spectra in real time with a Commercial of the Shelf (COTS) fiberoptic spectrometer, located in a test-stand control room. The probes and the cables survived the harsh engine environments for numerous hot-fire tests. When the plume was seeded with a nickel alloy powder, the spectrometer was able to successfully detect all the metallic and OH radical spectra from 300 to 800 nanometers.

  16. Space shuttle SRM plume expansion sensitivity analysis. [flow characteristics of exhaust gases from solid propellant rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. D.; Tevepaugh, J. A.; Penny, M. M.

    1975-01-01

    The exhaust plumes of the space shuttle solid rocket motors can have a significant effect on the base pressure and base drag of the shuttle vehicle. A parametric analysis was conducted to assess the sensitivity of the initial plume expansion angle of analytical solid rocket motor flow fields to various analytical input parameters and operating conditions. The results of the analysis are presented and conclusions reached regarding the sensitivity of the initial plume expansion angle to each parameter investigated. Operating conditions parametrically varied were chamber pressure, nozzle inlet angle, nozzle throat radius of curvature ratio and propellant particle loading. Empirical particle parameters investigated were mean size, local drag coefficient and local heat transfer coefficient. Sensitivity of the initial plume expansion angle to gas thermochemistry model and local drag coefficient model assumptions were determined.

  17. Modification of Roberts' Theory for Rocket Exhaust Plumes Eroding Lunar Soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metzger, Philip T.; Lane, John E.; Immer, Christopher D.

    2008-01-01

    In preparation for the Apollo program, Leonard Roberts developed a remarkable analytical theory that predicts the blowing of lunar soil and dust beneath a rocket exhaust plume. Roberts' assumed that the erosion rate is determined by the "excess shear stress" in the gas (the amount of shear stress greater than what causes grains to roll). The acceleration of particles to their final velocity in the gas consumed a portion of the shear stress. The erosion rate continues to increase until the excess shear stress is exactly consumed, thus determining the erosion rate. He calculated the largest and smallest particles that could be eroded based on forces at the particle scale, but the erosion rate equation assumes that only one particle size exists in the soil. He assumed that particle ejection angles are determined entirely by the shape of the terrain, which acts like a ballistic ramp, the particle aerodynamics being negligible. The predicted erosion rate and particle upper size limit appeared to be within an order of magnitude of small-scale terrestrial experiments, but could not be tested more quantitatively at the time. The lower particle size limit and ejection angle predictions were not tested.

  18. In-situ measurement of Cl2 and O3 in a stratospheric solid rocket motor exhaust plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, M. N.; Ballenthin, J. O.; Gosselin, R. B.; Meads, R. F.; Zittel, P. F.; Benbrook, J. R.; Sheldon, W. R.

    The concentration of Cl2 in the stratospheric exhaust plume of a Titan IV launch vehicle was measured with a neutral mass spectrometer carried on a WB-57F aircraft at 18.9 km altitude. Twenty nine minutes after a twilight Titan IV launch, the mean Cl2 concentration across an 8 km wide plume was 126 ± 44 ppbv, consistent with model predictions that a large fraction of the HCl in solid rocket motor exhaust is converted into Cl2 by afterburning reactions in the hot plume. Co-incident measurements with ultraviolet absorption photometers also carried on the aircraft show that ozone concentration in the plume was not different from ambient levels. This is consistent with model predictions that nighttime SRM launches will not cause transient ozone loss in the lower stratosphere. The measured Cl2 concentration equals 15% of the ambient ozone concentration suggesting that transient ozone reduction in SRM plume wakes can be expected after daytime launches when solar ultraviolet radiation will photolyze the exhaust plume Cl2.

  19. Modification of Roberts' Theory for Rocket Exhaust Plumes Eroding Lunar Soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metzger, Philip T.; Lane, John E.; Immer, Christopher D.

    2008-01-01

    Roberts' model of lunar soil erosion beneath a landing rocket has been updated in several ways to predict the effects of future lunar landings. The model predicts, among other things, the number of divots that would result on surrounding hardware due to the impact of high velocity particulates, the amount and depth of surface material removed, the volume of ejected soil, its velocity, and the distance the particles travel on the Moon. The results are compared against measured results from the Apollo program and predictions are made for mitigating the spray around a future lunar outpost.

  20. Laser Transmission Measurements of Soot Extinction Coefficients in the Exhaust Plume of the X-34 60k-lb Thrust Fastrac Rocket Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobson, C. C.; Eskridge, R. H.; Lee, M. H.

    2000-01-01

    A four-channel laser transmissometer has been used to probe the soot content of the exhaust plume of the X-34 60k-lb thrust Fastrac rocket engine at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. The transmission measurements were made at an axial location about equal 1.65 nozzle diameters from the exit plane and are interpreted in terms of homogeneous radial zones to yield extinction coefficients from 0.5-8.4 per meter. The corresponding soot mass density, spatially averaged over the plume cross section, is, for Rayleigh particles, approximately equal to 0.7 micrograms/cubic cm and alternative particle distributions are briefly considered. Absolute plume radiance at the laser wavelength (515 nm) is estimated from the data at approximately equal to 2.200 K equivalent blackbody temperature, and temporal correlations in emission from several spatial locations are noted.

  1. Laser Transmission Measurements of Soot Extinction Coefficients in the Exhaust Plume of the X-34 60K-lb Thrust Fastrac Rocket Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobson, C. C.; Eskridge, R. H.; Lee, M. H.

    2000-01-01

    A four-channel laser transmissometer has been used to probe the soot content of the exhaust plume of the X-34 60k-lb thrust Fastrac rocket engine at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. The transmission measurements were made at an axial location approximately equal 1.65 nozzle diameters from the exit plane and are interpreted in terms of homogeneous radial zones to yield extinction coefficients from 0.5-8.4 per meter. The corresponding soot mass density, spatially averaged over the plume cross section, is, for Rayleigh particles, approximately equal 0.7 microgram/cc, and alternative particle distributions are briefly considered. Absolute plume radiance at the laser wavelength (515 nm) is estimated from the data at approximately equal 2,200 K equivalent blackbody temperature, and temporal correlations in emission from several spatial locations are noted.

  2. Hybrid plume plasma rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Franklin R. (inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A technique for producing thrust by generating a hybrid plume plasma exhaust is disclosed. A plasma flow is generated and introduced into a nozzle which features one or more inlets positioned to direct a flow of neutral gas about the interior of the nozzle. When such a neutral gas flow is combined with the plasma flow within the nozzle, a hybrid plume is constructed including a flow of hot plasma along the center of the nozzle surrounded by a generally annular flow of neutral gas, with an annular transition region between the pure plasma and the neutral gas. The temperature of the outer gas layer is below that of the pure plasma and generally separates the pure plasma from the interior surfaces of the nozzle. The neutral gas flow both insulates the nozzle wall from the high temperatures of the plasma flow and adds to the mass flow rate of the hybrid exhaust. The rate of flow of neutral gas into the interior of the nozzle may be selectively adjusted to control the thrust and specific impulse of the device.

  3. Transmittance and Radiance Computations for Rocket Engine Plume Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tejwani, Gopal D.

    2003-01-01

    Emission and absorption characteristics of several atmospheric and combustion species have been studied and are presented with reference to rocket engine plume environments. The effects of clous, rain, and fog on plume radiance/transmittance has also been studied.Preliminary results for the radiance from the exhaust plume of the space shuttle main engine are shown and discussed.

  4. Rocket plume base heating methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reardon, John E.; Nelson, H. F.

    1994-04-01

    A review of radiative transport calculation methods for base heating is presented followed by a description of the current methodology for the Space Shuttle plume radiation predictions and improvements for the advanced solid rocket booster (ASRB). The calculation methods include empirical methods, the standardized infrared radiation model code, and the forward and reverse Monte Carlo methods. Current plume radiation methods include those used for the Space Shuttle main engines and the solid rocket booster (SRB). Methods being developed for the ASRB include changes in plume property prediction methodology and application of the reverse Monte Carlo method in predicting plume radiation models. Results of the prediction methods are compared with experimental measurements on the current SRB and on 1/6-scale motors using both SRB and ASRB propellants. Examples are also presented demonstrating the statistical results available with the reverse Monte Carlo method.

  5. Empirical Scaling Laws of Rocket Exhaust Cratering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donahue, Carly M.; Metzger, Philip T.; Immer, Christopher D.

    2005-01-01

    When launching or landing a space craft on the regolith of a terrestrial surface, special attention needs to be paid to the rocket exhaust cratering effects. If the effects are not controlled, the rocket cratering could damage the spacecraft or other surrounding hardware. The cratering effects of a rocket landing on a planet's surface are not understood well, especially for the lunar case with the plume expanding in vacuum. As a result, the blast effects cannot be estimated sufficiently using analytical theories. It is necessary to develop physics-based simulation tools in order to calculate mission-essential parameters. In this work we test out the scaling laws of the physics in regard to growth rate of the crater depth. This will provide the physical insight necessary to begin the physics-based modeling.

  6. The 21St JANNAF Exhaust Plume Technology Meeting. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gannaway, Mary T. (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    This volume, the first of three volumes, is a collection of 10 unclassified/unlimited papers which were presented at the 21st Joint Army-Navy-NASA-Air Force (JANNAF) Exhaust Plume Technology Subcommittee Meeting in conjunction with the Combustion Subcommittee and SPIRITS User Group Meeting held 19-21 October 1994 at the Lockheed Missiles and Space Company, Sunnyvale, California. Specific subjects discussed include behavior of aluminum and aluminum oxide in solid rocket plumes, exhaust plume flowfield characterization and plume phenomena at high altitudes.

  7. Enceladus's Plumes: A Rocket Analogy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNutt, R. L.; Perry, M. E.; Waite, J. H.; Fletcher, G.; Cravens, T. E.

    2009-12-01

    The plumes of Enceladus, and the source of the E-ring in the Saturnian system, easily rank as the major, significant, and unexpected discovery of the Cassini mission. While clearly the source of the E-ring,the nature of the sources and the energetics and dynamics of the plumes and underlying jets remains a subject of intensive study. Refinements of the observations suggest supersonic flow of the primary, water-vapor effluent. Such behavior implies a sonic critical point in the flow beginning from a heated reservoir of vapor, through a constriction, and out at supersonic speeds in the space above the plume/jet channels. Such geometry and thermal conditions mimic that of a de Laval nozzle, such as used in rocket engines for converting chemically heated combustion products into a directional flow. A chamber temperature of 180K suggests an outflow speed as high as 0.8 km/s. With a column density across a jet of ~3 x 1016 cm-2 (about twice that of the broad plume) and a jet width of ~10 km, the implied outflow of water molecules is ~3 x 1010 cm-3 x ?/4 (106 cm)2 x 18 amu x 1.66 x 10-27 amu/kg x 8 x 104 cm/s = ~60 kg/s in each constituent jet, of which eight were identified by the Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) during the occultation measurements of the plume region of Enceladus carried out on 24 October 2007.

  8. Detection of Metallic Compounds in Rocket Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Chris; Dunn, Dr. Robert

    1998-04-01

    Recent experiments using metal mixed in hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB) fuel grains in small hybrid rocket indicates ion detectors may be effective in detection of metallic compounds in rocket plumes. We wanted to ascertain the extent to which the presence of metallic compounds in rocket plumes could be detected using ion probes and Gaussian rings. Charges that collide with or pass near the intruding probe are detected. Gaussian rings, short insulated cylindrical Gaussian surfaces, enclose the plume without intruding into the plume. Charges in the plume are detected by currents they induce in the cylinder.

  9. Rocket Engine Plume Diagnostics at Stennis Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tejwani, Gopal D.; Langford, Lester A.; VanDyke, David B.; McVay, Gregory P.; Thurman, Charles C.

    2003-01-01

    The Stennis Space Center has been at the forefront of development and application of exhaust plume spectroscopy to rocket engine health monitoring since 1989. Various spectroscopic techniques, such as emission, absorption, FTIR, LIF, and CARS, have been considered for application at the engine test stands. By far the most successful technology h a been exhaust plume emission spectroscopy. In particular, its application to the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) ground test health monitoring has been invaluable in various engine testing and development activities at SSC since 1989. On several occasions, plume diagnostic methods have successfully detected a problem with one or more components of an engine long before any other sensor indicated a problem. More often, they provide corroboration for a failure mode, if any occurred during an engine test. This paper gives a brief overview of our instrumentation and computational systems for rocket engine plume diagnostics at SSC. Some examples of successful application of exhaust plume spectroscopy (emission as well as absorption) to the SSME testing are presented. Our on-going plume diagnostics technology development projects and future requirements are discussed.

  10. Exhaust Nozzle Plume and Shock Wave Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castner, Raymond S.; Elmiligui, Alaa; Cliff, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Fundamental research for sonic boom reduction is needed to quantify the interaction of shock waves generated from the aircraft wing or tail surfaces with the exhaust plume. Both the nozzle exhaust plume shape and the tail shock shape may be affected by an interaction that may alter the vehicle sonic boom signature. The plume and shock interaction was studied using Computational Fluid Dynamics simulation on two types of convergent-divergent nozzles and a simple wedge shock generator. The nozzle plume effects on the lower wedge compression region are evaluated for two- and three-dimensional nozzle plumes. Results show that the compression from the wedge deflects the nozzle plume and shocks form on the deflected lower plume boundary. The sonic boom pressure signature of the wedge is modified by the presence of the plume, and the computational predictions show significant (8 to 15 percent) changes in shock amplitude.

  11. Optical studies of rocket exhaust trails and artificial noctilucent clouds produced by Soyuz rocket launches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalin, P.; Perminov, V.; Pertsev, N.; Dubietis, A.; Zadorozhny, A.; Smirnov, A.; Mezentsev, A.; Frandsen, S.; Grønne, J.; Hansen, O.; Andersen, H.; McEachran, I.; McEwan, T.; Rowlands, J.; Meyerdierks, H.; Zalcik, M.; Connors, M.; Schofield, I.; Veselovsky, I.

    2013-07-01

    Detailed tracing of an exhaust plume from a rocket's initial trajectory is a scientifically and diagnostically useful technique. It can provide detailed information on the atmosphere's mean winds, wind shears, turbulent regime, and physical state over a wide altitude range from 50 to 200 km. We analyze Soyuz rocket exhaust plumes from Plesetsk on 21 May 2009 and 27 June 2011, which uncovered significantly different atmospheric states and underlying dynamics. The first case showed highly dynamical conditions in the mesosphere, characterized by vortex structures, wind shears, and small-scale turbulent eddies. The estimated turbulent energy dissipation rates ranged 330-460 mW kg-1. A characteristic balloon-shaped trail was observed at altitudes between 105 and 160 km, having rapid expansion rates of 500-800 m s-1 over the time period of 2 min which can be explained by complex gas dynamic processes in the rocket wake involving the collision of shock waves. In the second case, we show evidence that the rocket exhaust trail persisted without any changes during its motion from Plesetsk via Denmark to the UK for 9 h, indicating extremely stable atmospheric conditions. This case introduces a new state of the summer mesosphere—remarkably quiet conditions, probably never observed before. The rocket plumes studied, related to the initial rocket trajectory, are essentially twilight phenomena as seen from the ground using wideband spectrum cameras, that is, the Sun should be below the horizon by 6°. For the first time, we analyze the dynamics of rocket exhaust products at the initial trajectory in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere using detailed photographic imaging taken from the ground.

  12. Radiation from advanced solid rocket motor plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, Richard C.; Smith, Sheldon D.; Myruski, Brian L.

    1994-01-01

    The overall objective of this study was to develop an understanding of solid rocket motor (SRM) plumes in sufficient detail to accurately explain the majority of plume radiation test data. Improved flowfield and radiation analysis codes were developed to accurately and efficiently account for all the factors which effect radiation heating from rocket plumes. These codes were verified by comparing predicted plume behavior with measured NASA/MSFC ASRM test data. Upon conducting a thorough review of the current state-of-the-art of SRM plume flowfield and radiation prediction methodology and the pertinent data base, the following analyses were developed for future design use. The NOZZRAD code was developed for preliminary base heating design and Al2O3 particle optical property data evaluation using a generalized two-flux solution to the radiative transfer equation. The IDARAD code was developed for rapid evaluation of plume radiation effects using the spherical harmonics method of differential approximation to the radiative transfer equation. The FDNS CFD code with fully coupled Euler-Lagrange particle tracking was validated by comparison to predictions made with the industry standard RAMP code for SRM nozzle flowfield analysis. The FDNS code provides the ability to analyze not only rocket nozzle flow, but also axisymmetric and three-dimensional plume flowfields with state-of-the-art CFD methodology. Procedures for conducting meaningful thermo-vision camera studies were developed.

  13. Atmospheric scavenging of solid rocket exhaust effluents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fenton, D. L.; Purcell, R. Y.

    1978-01-01

    Solid propellant rocket exhaust was directly utilized to ascertain raindrop scavenging rates for hydrogen chloride. Two chambers were used to conduct the experiments; a large, rigid walled, spherical chamber stored the exhaust constituents, while the smaller chamber housing all the experiments was charged as required with rocket exhaust HCl. Surface uptake experiments demonstrated an HCl concentration dependence for distilled water. Sea water and brackish water HCl uptake was below the detection limit of the chlorine-ion analysis technique used. Plant life HCl uptake experiments were limited to corn and soybeans. Plant age effectively correlated the HCl uptake data. Metallic corrosion was not significant for single 20 minute exposures to the exhaust HCl under varying relative humidity. Characterization of the aluminum oxide particles substantiated the similarity between the constituents of the small scale rocket and the full size vehicles.

  14. DESIGN CRITERIA FOR ROCKET EXHAUST SCRUBBERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an engineering study and design of methods for scrubbing the exhaust of static-tested solid rockets. Pollutants of major concern were hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride gases. The best process for removing these gases was found to be a gas-atomize...

  15. Water Vapor Enhancements in an Athena II Rocket Plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, R. L.; Friedl, R. R.; Gandrud, B. W.

    2001-12-01

    One of the major goals of the Atmospheric Chemistry of Combustion Emissions Near the Tropopause (ACCENT) mission was to quantify rocket plume emissions and chemistry. On September 24, 1999, the NASA WB-57F aircraft intercepted an Athena II rocket plume multiple times in the lower stratosphere. Within the rocket plume, water vapor was enhanced two to four times above the background mixing ratio of 4.6 ppmv due to oxidation of the hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene rocket propellant. Particle concentrations were also enhanced in the rocket plume. In this talk, we will address the following questions: What is the emission index (EI) of water from an Athena II rocket? Can plume dilution be estimated? Does a significant fraction of water condense onto particles in the rocket plume?

  16. Range safety signal propagation through the SRM exhaust plume of the space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boynton, F. P.; Davies, A. R.; Rajasekhar, P. S.; Thompson, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    Theoretical predictions of plume interference for the space shuttle range safety system by solid rocket booster exhaust plumes are reported. The signal propagation was calculated using a split operator technique based upon the Fresnel-Kirchoff integral, using fast Fourier transforms to evaluate the convolution and treating the plume as a series of absorbing and phase-changing screens. Talanov's lens transformation was applied to reduce aliasing problems caused by ray divergence.

  17. Exhaust Plume Measurements of the VASIMR VX-200

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longmier, Benjamin; Bering, Edgar, III; Squire, Jared; Glover, Tim; Chang-Diaz, Franklin; Brukardt, Michael

    2008-11-01

    Recent progress is discussed in the development of an advanced RF electric propulsion concept: the Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR) VX-200 engine, a 200 kW flight-technology prototype. Results from high power Helicon only and Helicon with ICRH experiments are performed on the VX-200 using argon plasma. Recent measurements of axial plasma density and potential profiles, magnetic field-line shaping, charge exchange, and force measurements taken in the plume of the VX-200 exhaust are made within a new 125 cubic meter cryo-pumped vacuum chamber and are presented in the context of RF plasma thruster physics.

  18. An expert system for spectroscopic analysis of rocket engine plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reese, Greg; Valenti, Elizabeth; Alphonso, Keith; Holladay, Wendy

    1991-01-01

    The expert system described in this paper analyzes spectral emissions of rocket engine exhaust plumes and shows major promise for use in engine health diagnostics. Plume emission spectroscopy is an important tool for diagnosing engine anomalies, but it is time-consuming and requires highly skilled personnel. The expert system was created to alleviate such problems. The system accepts a spectral plot in the form of wavelength vs intensity pairs and finds the emission peaks in the spectrum, lists the elemental emitters present in the data and deduces the emitter that produced each peak. The system consists of a conventional language component and a commercially available inference engine that runs on an Apple Macintosh computer. The expert system has undergone limited preliminary testing. It detects elements well and significantly decreases analysis time.

  19. Effects of entrained water and strong turbulence on afterburning within solid rocket motor plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gomberg, R. I.; Wilmoth, R. G.

    1978-01-01

    During the first few seconds of the space shuttle trajectory, the solid rocket boosters will be in the proximity of the launch pad. Because of the launch pad structures and the surface of the earth, the turbulent mixing experienced by the exhaust gases will be greatly increased over that for the free flight situation. In addition, a system will be present, designed to protect the lifting vehicle from launch structure vibrations, which will inject quantities of liquid water into the hot plume. The effects of these two phenomena on the temperatures, chemical composition, and flow field present in the afterburning solid rocket motor exhaust plumes of the space shuttle were studied. Results are included from both a computational model of the afterburning and supporting measurements from Titan 3 exhaust plumes taken at Kennedy Space Center with infrared scanned radiometers.

  20. Equations for calculating orbiter surface erosion and breakage rates in IUS and SSUS SRM exhaust plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, S. W.

    1978-01-01

    Equations and coefficients for calculating the flux of solid particles in the exhaust plumes of the interim upper stage and SSUS solid rocket motors (SRM) are considered. Modifications required to account for the independent motions of the orbiter and the SRM, such as will result during an on-orbit SRM firing are described.

  1. Particle Size Distributions Measured in the Stratospheric Plumes of Three Rockets During the ACCENT Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedinmyer, C.; Brock, C. A.; Reeves, J. M.; Ross, M. N.; Schmid, O.; Toohey, D.; Wilson, J. C.

    2001-12-01

    The global impact of particles emitted by rocket engines on stratospheric ozone is not well understood, mainly due to the lack of comprehensive in situ measurements of the size distributions of these emitted particles. During the Atmospheric Chemistry of Combustion Emissions Near the Tropopause (ACCENT) missions in 1999, the NASA WB-57F aircraft carried the University of Denver N-MASS and FCAS instruments into the stratospheric plumes from three rockets. Size distributions of particles with diameters from 4 to approximately 2000 nm were calculated from the instrument measurements using numerical inversion techniques. The data have been averaged over 30-second intervals. The particle size distributions observed in all of the rocket plumes included a dominant mode near 60 nm diameter, probably composed of alumina particles. A smaller mode at approximately 25 nm, possibly composed of soot particles, was seen in only the plumes of rockets that used liquid oxygen and kerosene as a propellant. Aircraft exhaust emitted by the WB-57F was also sampled; the size distributions within these plumes are consistent with prior measurements in aircraft plumes. The size distributions for all rocket intercepts have been fitted to bimodal, lognormal distributions to provide input for global models of the stratosphere. Our data suggest that previous estimates of the solid rocket motor alumina size distributions may underestimate the alumina surface area emission index, and so underestimate the particle surface area available for heterogeneous chlorine activation reactions in the global stratosphere.

  2. Analysis of the measured effects of the principal exhaust effluents from solid rocket motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawbarn, R.; Kinslow, M.; Watson, D. J.

    1980-01-01

    The feasibility of conducting environmental chamber tests using a small rocket motor to study the physical processes which occur when the exhaust products from solid motors mix with the ambient atmosphere was investigated. Of particular interest was the interaction between hydrogen chloride, aluminum oxide, and water vapor. Several types of instruments for measuring HCl concentrations were evaluated. Under some conditions it was noted that acid aerosols were formed in the ground cloud. These droplets condensed on Al2O3 nuclei and were associated with the rocket exhaust cooling during the period of plume rise to stabilization. Outdoor firings of the solid rocket motors of a 6.4 percent scaled model of the space shuttle were monitored to study the interaction of the exhaust effluents with vegetation downwind of the test site. Data concerning aluminum oxide particles produced by solid rocket motors were evaluated.

  3. Stratospheric aircraft exhaust plume and wake chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miake-Lye, R. C.; Martinez-Sanchez, M.; Brown, R. C.; Kolb, C. E.; Worsnop, D. R.; Zahniser, M. S.; Robinson, G. N.; Rodriguez, J. M.; Ko, M. K. W.; Shia, R-L.

    1993-01-01

    Progress to date in an ongoing study to analyze and model emissions leaving a proposed High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) from when the exhaust gases leave the engine until they are deposited at atmospheric scales in the stratosphere is documented. A kinetic condensation model was implemented to predict heterogeneous condensation in the plume regime behind an HSCT flying in the lower stratosphere. Simulations were performed to illustrate the parametric dependence of contrail droplet growth on the exhaust condensation nuclei number density and size distribution. Model results indicate that the condensation of water vapor is strongly dependent on the number density of activated CN. Incorporation of estimates for dilution factors into a Lagrangian box model of the far-wake regime with scale-dependent diffusion indicates negligible decrease in ozone and enhancement of water concentrations of 6-13 times background, which decrease rapidly over 1-3 days. Radiative calculations indicate a net differential cooling rate of the plume about 3K/day at the beginning of the wake regime, with a total subsidence ranging between 0.4 and 1 km. Results from the Lagrangian plume model were used to estimate the effect of repeated superposition of aircraft plumes on the concentrations of water and NO(y) along a flight corridor. Results of laboratory studies of heterogeneous chemistry are also described. Kinetics of HCl, N2O5 and ClONO2 uptake on liquid sulfuric acid were measured as a function of composition and temperature. Refined measurements of the thermodynamics of nitric acid hydrates indicate that metastable dihydrate may play a role in the nucleation of more stable trihydrates PSC's.

  4. Solar rocket plume-mirror interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, S.T.; Chang, C.L.; Merkle, C.L.

    1991-01-01

    The extent to which the plume from a solar thermal rocket will impinge on the solar collector is studied by flow field analysis. Such interaction can adversely affect collector performance through fouling, excessive heat loading, or pressure loads that deform the delicate structures. The geometrical shape of the collector is such that only the flow from the nozzle boundary layer can reach it, but the thrust levels of interest lead to very viscous nozzle flows with thick boundary layers. Reasonable accuracy in solving these flows requires a fully coupled viscous-inviscid procedure. Results show that the fraction of the plume that hits the collector can be well estimated by continuum theory, but that transitional and rarefied phenomena will have some impact on how it is distributed over the surface. Initial results for one representative condition show that approx. 4 percent of the total flow in the jet makes its way to the collector. The pressures on the collector, however, remain quite low because of its distance from the engine. Additional work is needed to document the effect of thrust scaling and wall cooling on impingement.

  5. Solar rocket plume/mirror interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Sheng-Tao; Chang, Chau-Lyan; Merkle, Charles L.

    1991-01-01

    The extent to which the plume from a solar thermal rocket will impinge on the solar collector is studied by flow field analysis. Such interaction can adversely affect collector performance through fouling, excessive heat loading, or pressure loads that deform the delicate structures. The geometrical shape of the collector is such that only the flow from the nozzle boundary layer can reach it, but the thrust levels of interest lead to very viscous nozzle flows with thick boundary layers. Reasonable accuracy in solving these flows requires a fully coupled viscous-inviscid procedure. Results show that the fraction of the plume that hits the collector can be well estimated by continuum theory, but that transitional and rarefied phenomena will have some impact on how it is distributed over the surface. Initial results for one representative condition show that approx. 4 percent of the total flow in the jet makes its way to the collector. The pressures on the collector, however, remain quite low because of its distance from the engine. Additional work is needed to document the effect of thrust scaling and wall cooling on impingement.

  6. Assessment of analytical techniques for predicting solid propellant exhaust plumes and plume impingement environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tevepaugh, J. A.; Smith, S. D.; Penny, M. M.

    1977-01-01

    An analysis of experimental nozzle, exhaust plume, and exhaust plume impingement data is presented. The data were obtained for subscale solid propellant motors with propellant Al loadings of 2, 10 and 15% exhausting to simulated altitudes of 50,000, 100,000 and 112,000 ft. Analytical predictions were made using a fully coupled two-phase method of characteristics numerical solution and a technique for defining thermal and pressure environments experienced by bodies immersed in two-phase exhaust plumes.

  7. Rocket exhaust ground cloud/atmospheric interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, B.; Gould, R. K.

    1978-01-01

    An attempt to identify and minimize the uncertainties and potential inaccuracies of the NASA Multilayer Diffusion Model (MDM) is performed using data from selected Titan 3 launches. The study is based on detailed parametric calculations using the MDM code and a comparative study of several other diffusion models, the NASA measurements, and the MDM. The results are discussed and evaluated. In addition, the physical/chemical processes taking place during the rocket cloud rise are analyzed. The exhaust properties and the deluge water effects are evaluated. A time-dependent model for two aerosol coagulations is developed and documented. Calculations using this model for dry deposition during cloud rise are made. A simple model for calculating physical properties such as temperature and air mass entrainment during cloud rise is also developed and incorporated with the aerosol model.

  8. Ignition and Flame Stabilization of a Strut-Jet RBCC Combustor with Small Rocket Exhaust

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A Rocket Based Combined Cycle combustor model is tested at a ground direct connected rig to investigate the flame holding characteristics with a small rocket exhaust using liquid kerosene. The total temperature and the Mach number of the vitiated air flow, at exit of the nozzle are 1505 K and 2.6, respectively. The rocket base is embedded in a fuel injecting strut and mounted in the center of the combustor. The wall of the combustor is flush, without any reward step or cavity, so the strut-jet is used to make sure of the flame stabilization of the second combustion. Mass flow rate of the kerosene and oxygen injected into the rocket is set to be a small value, below 10% of the total fuel when the equivalence ratio of the second combustion is 1. The experiment has generated two different kinds of rocket exhaust: fuel rich and pure oxygen. Experiment result has shown that, with a relative small total mass flow rate of the rocket, the fuel rich rocket plume is not suitable for ignition and flame stabilization, while an oxygen plume condition is suitable. Then the paper conducts a series of experiments to investigate the combustion characteristics under this oxygen pilot method and found that the flame stabilization characteristics are different at different combustion modes. PMID:24578655

  9. Ignition and flame stabilization of a strut-jet RBCC combustor with small rocket exhaust.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jichao; Chang, Juntao; Bao, Wen

    2014-01-01

    A Rocket Based Combined Cycle combustor model is tested at a ground direct connected rig to investigate the flame holding characteristics with a small rocket exhaust using liquid kerosene. The total temperature and the Mach number of the vitiated air flow, at exit of the nozzle are 1505?K and 2.6, respectively. The rocket base is embedded in a fuel injecting strut and mounted in the center of the combustor. The wall of the combustor is flush, without any reward step or cavity, so the strut-jet is used to make sure of the flame stabilization of the second combustion. Mass flow rate of the kerosene and oxygen injected into the rocket is set to be a small value, below 10% of the total fuel when the equivalence ratio of the second combustion is 1. The experiment has generated two different kinds of rocket exhaust: fuel rich and pure oxygen. Experiment result has shown that, with a relative small total mass flow rate of the rocket, the fuel rich rocket plume is not suitable for ignition and flame stabilization, while an oxygen plume condition is suitable. Then the paper conducts a series of experiments to investigate the combustion characteristics under this oxygen pilot method and found that the flame stabilization characteristics are different at different combustion modes. PMID:24578655

  10. Non-equilibrium radiation from viscous chemically reacting two-phase exhaust plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penny, M. M.; Smith, S. D.; Mikatarian, R. R.; Ring, L. R.; Anderson, P. G.

    1976-01-01

    A knowledge of the structure of the rocket exhaust plumes is necessary to solve problems involving plume signatures, base heating, plume/surface interactions, etc. An algorithm is presented which treats the viscous flow of multiphase chemically reacting fluids in a two-dimensional or axisymmetric supersonic flow field. The gas-particle flow solution is fully coupled with the chemical kinetics calculated using an implicit scheme to calculate chemical production rates. Viscous effects include chemical species diffusion with the viscosity coefficient calculated using a two-equation turbulent kinetic energy model.

  11. Test data from small solid propellant rocket motor plume measurements (FA-21)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hair, L. M.; Somers, R. E.

    1976-01-01

    A program is described for obtaining a reliable, parametric set of measurements in the exhaust plumes of solid propellant rocket motors. Plume measurements included pressures, temperatures, forces, heat transfer rates, particle sampling, and high-speed movies. Approximately 210,000 digital data points and 15,000 movie frames were acquired. Measurements were made at points in the plumes via rake-mounted probes, and on the surface of a large plate impinged by the exhaust plume. Parametric variations were made in pressure altitude, propellant aluminum loading, impinged plate incidence angle and distance from nozzle exit to plate or rake. Reliability was incorporated by continual use of repeat runs. The test setup of the various hardware items is described along with an account of test procedures. Test results and data accuracy are discussed. Format of the data presentation is detailed. Complete data are included in the appendix.

  12. Applicability of empirical data currently used in predicting solid propellant exhaust plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tevepaugh, J. A.; Smith, S. D.; Penny, M. M.; Greenwood, T.; Roberts, B. B.

    1977-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental approaches to exhaust plume analysis are compared. A two-phase model is extended to include treatment of reacting gas chemistry, and thermodynamical modeling of the gaseous phase of the flow field is considered. The applicability of empirical data currently available to define particle drag coefficients, heat transfer coefficients, mean particle size, and particle size distributions is investigated. Experimental and analytical comparisons are presented for subscale solid rocket motors operating at three altitudes with attention to pitot total pressure and stagnation point heating rate measurements. The mathematical treatment input requirements are explained. The two-phase flow field solution adequately predicts gasdynamic properties in the inviscid portion of two-phase exhaust plumes. It is found that prediction of exhaust plume gas pressures requires an adequate model of flow field dynamics.

  13. Rocket Plume Scaling for Orion Wind Tunnel Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brauckmann, Gregory J.; Greathouse, James S.; White, Molly E.

    2011-01-01

    A wind tunnel test program was undertaken to assess the jet interaction effects caused by the various solid rocket motors used on the Orion Launch Abort Vehicle (LAV). These interactions of the external flowfield and the various rocket plumes can cause localized aerodynamic disturbances yielding significant and highly non-linear control amplifications and attenuations. This paper discusses the scaling methodologies used to model the flight plumes in the wind tunnel using cold air as the simulant gas. Comparisons of predicted flight, predicted wind tunnel, and measured wind tunnel forces-and-moments and plume flowfields are made to assess the effectiveness of the selected scaling methodologies.

  14. In-Situ Microphysical Measurements In Rocket Plumes With The Cloud And Aerosol Spectrometer (CAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kok, G.; Baumgardner, D.; Avallone, L.; Kalnajs, L.; Herman, R.; Ross, M.; Thompson, T.; Toohey, D.

    2005-12-01

    High resolution, single particle measurements have been made in rocket plumes using an optical particle spectrometer that measures diameters from 0.5 to 44 um. The Cloud and Aerosol Spectrometer (CAS) measures the light scattered in two directions from individual particles that pass through a focused, 680 nm laser beam and we derive the diameter, shape and composition from this information. The CAS was mounted on the NASA WB57-F aircraft as part of the Plume Ultrafast Measurements Acquisition (PUMA) project, an experiment funded by NSF and NASA to study the chemistry and microphysics of rocket plumes. Measurements were first made in a plume generated by an Atlas IIAS rocket in May, 2004 and again in July, 2005 in the plume formed from the exhaust of the solid state boosters used to launch the space shuttle Discovery into orbit. The microstructure of the two plumes and the characteristics of their particles were distinctly different. The two cases had similar maximum concentrations of 300 cm-3, but the space shuttle particles were on average larger and a greater percentage of them were irregular in shape. An analysis of the distance between particles suggests clustering because of the non-Poisson shape of the frequency distribution of inter-arrival times.

  15. Propulsion research on the hybrid plume rocket

    SciTech Connect

    Chang-Diaz, F.R. . Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center); Yang, T.F. . Plasma Fusion Center)

    1989-01-01

    This report discusses the construction of a tandem mirror plasma propulsion facility, the numerical modelling of the hybrid plume exhaust, and rf heating of the plasma. A preliminary experiment of the ICRH (Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating) heating of plasma ions was carried out. For 2.0 kW ECRH (Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating) power injected into the central cell and 10 kW ICRH power into the end cell, the results obtained from the probe in the central cell are: n{sub e} = 2.5 {times} 10{sup 16} m{sup {minus}3} and T{sub e} = 80 eV (928,000 K) in the central cell. The estimated values in the end cell are: n{sub I} = 1.25 {times} 10{sup 17} m{sup {minus}3} and T{sub I} = 500 eV (5,797,000 K). The power conversion efficiency was about 80%. The results from time dependent 3-D three fluid numerical modeling indicate that a boundary layer can be formed. The formation of this layer is strongly dependent on neutral jet geometry and injection angle. The ICRH heating of plasma was modeled numerically and power absorption efficiency is about 50%. Analytical analyses was done on slab geometry. 12 refs., 20 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Surface composition of solid-rocket exhausted aluminum oxide particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cofer, Wesley R., III; Winstead, Edward L.; Key, Lawrence E.

    1989-01-01

    Particulate samples of aluminum oxide were collected on Teflon filters from the exhaust plume of the Space Shuttle (STS-61A, October 30, 1985) over the altitude interval 4.6-7.6 km immediately after launch. These particles were analyzed using SEM, energy-dispersive X-ray analysis, electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis, X-ray fluorescent spectroscopy, and conventional wet-chemical techniques. The samples were 0.6-1.0 percent surface-chlorided (chlorided meaning predominantly aluminum chlorides and oxychlorides, possibly including other adsorbed forms of chloride) by weight. This level of chloriding is about one-third of the amount determined previously from laboratory-prepared alumina and surface site samples of solid-rocket-produced alumina (SRPA) after both had been exposed to moist HCl vapor at temperatures down to ambient. This level is equivalent to previous laboratory results with samples exposed to moist HCl at temperatures above the boiling point of water. It is suggested that the present lower chloriding levels, determined for samples from a 'dry' Shuttle exhaust cloud, underscore the importance of a liquid water/hydrochloric acid phase in governing the extent of surface chloriding of SRPA. The reduced chloriding is not trivial with respect to potential physical/chemical modification of the SRPA particle surfaces and their corresponding interaction with the atmosphere.

  17. Evaluation of the Effect of Exhausts from Liquid and Solid Rockets on Ozone Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamagiwa, Yoshiki; Ishimaki, Tetsuya

    This paper reports the analytical results of the influences of solid rocket and liquid rocket exhausts on ozone layer. It is worried about that the exhausts from solid propellant rockets cause the ozone depletion in the ozone layer. Some researchers try to develop the analytical model of ozone depletion by rocket exhausts to understand its physical phenomena and to find the effective design of rocket to minimize its effect. However, these models do not include the exhausts from liquid rocket although there are many cases to use solid rocket boosters with a liquid rocket at the same time in practical situations. We constructed combined analytical model include the solid rocket exhausts and liquid rocket exhausts to analyze their effects. From the analytical results, we find that the exhausts from liquid rocket suppress the ozone depletion by solid rocket exhausts.

  18. Combustion Model of Supersonic Rocket Exhausts in an Entrained Flow Enclosure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vu, Bruce; Oliveira, Justin

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the Computation Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model developed to simulate the supersonic rocket exhaust in an entrained flow cylinder. The model can be used to study the plume-induced environment due to static firing test of the Taurus II launch vehicle. The finite rate chemistry is used to model the combustion process involving rocket propellant (RP 1) and liquid oxidizer (LOX). A similar chemical reacting model is also used to simulate the mixing of rocket plume and ambient air. The model provides detailed information on the gas concentration and other flow parameters within the enclosed region thus allowing different operating scenarios to be examined in an efficient manner. It is shown that the real gas influence is significant and yields better agreement with the theory.

  19. Combustion Model of Supersonic Rocket Exhausts in an Entrained Flow Enclosure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vu, Bruce T.; Oliveira, Justin

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model developed to simulate the supersonic rocket exhaust in an entrained flow cylinder. The model can be used to study the plume-induced environment due to static firing tests of the Taurus-II launch vehicle. The finite-rate chemistry is used to model the combustion process involving rocket propellant (RP-1) and liquid oxidizer (LOX). A similar chemical reacting model is also used to simulate the mixing of rocket plume and ambient air. The model provides detailed information on the gas concentration and other flow parameters within the enclosed region, thus allowing different operating scenarios to be examined in an efficient manner. It is shown that the real gas influence is significant and yields better agreement with the theory.

  20. Rocket-Plume Spectroscopy Simulation for Hydrocarbon-Fueled Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tejwani, Gopal D.

    2010-01-01

    The UV-Vis spectroscopic system for plume diagnostics monitors rocket engine health by using several analytical tools developed at Stennis Space Center (SSC), including the rocket plume spectroscopy simulation code (RPSSC), to identify and quantify the alloys from the metallic elements observed in engine plumes. Because the hydrocarbon-fueled rocket engine is likely to contain C2, CO, CH, CN, and NO in addition to OH and H2O, the relevant electronic bands of these molecules in the spectral range of 300 to 850 nm in the RPSSC have been included. SSC incorporated several enhancements and modifications to the original line-by-line spectral simulation computer program implemented for plume spectral data analysis and quantification in 1994. These changes made the program applicable to the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) and the Diagnostic Testbed Facility Thruster (DTFT) exhaust plume spectral data. Modifications included updating the molecular and spectral parameters for OH, adding spectral parameter input files optimized for the 10 elements of interest in the spectral range from 320 to 430 nm and linking the output to graphing and analysis packages. Additionally, the ability to handle the non-uniform wavelength interval at which the spectral computations are made was added. This allowed a precise superposition of wavelengths at which the spectral measurements have been made with the wavelengths at which the spectral computations are done by using the line-by-line (LBL) code. To account for hydrocarbon combustion products in the plume, which might interfere with detection and quantification of metallic elements in the spectral region of 300 to 850 nm, the spectroscopic code has been enhanced to include the carbon-based combustion species of C2, CO, and CH. In addition, CN and NO have spectral bands in 300 to 850 nm and, while these molecules are not direct products of hydrocarbon-oxygen combustion systems, they can show up if nitrogen or a nitrogen compound is present as an impurity in the propellants and/or these can form in the boundary layer as a result of interaction of the hot plume with the atmosphere during the ground testing of engines. Ten additional electronic band systems of these five molecules have been included into the code. A comprehensive literature search was conducted to obtain the most accurate values for the molecular and the spectral parameters, including Franck-Cordon factors and electronic transition moments for all ten band systems. For each elemental transition in the RPSSC, six spectral parameters - Doppler broadened line width at half-height, pressure-broadened line width at half-height, electronic multiplicity of the upper state, electronic term energy of the upper state, Einstein transition probability coefficient, and the atomic line center - are required. Input files have been created for ten elements of Ni, Fe, Cr, Co, Cu, Ca, Mn, Al, Ag, and Pd, which retain only relatively moderate to strong transitions in 300 to 430 nm spectral range for each element. The number of transitions in the input files is 68 for Ni; 148 for Fe; 6 for Cr; 87 for Co; 1 for Ca; 3 for Mn; 2 each for Cu, Al, and Ag; and 11 for Pd.

  1. Numerical study on the influence of aluminum on infrared radiation signature of exhaust plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Ye, Qing-qing; Li, Shi-peng; Wang, Ning-fei

    2013-09-01

    The infrared radiation signature of exhaust plume from solid propellant rockets has been widely mentioned for its important realistic meaning. The content of aluminum powder in the propellants is a key factor that affects the infrared radiation signature of the plume. The related studies are mostly on the conical nozzles. In this paper, the influence of aluminum on the flow field of plume, temperature distribution, and the infrared radiation characteristics were numerically studied with an object of 3D quadrate nozzle. Firstly, the gas phase flow field and gas-solid multi phase flow filed of the exhaust plume were calculated using CFD method. The result indicates that the Al203 particles have significant effect on the flow field of plume. Secondly, the radiation transfer equation was solved by using a discrete coordinate method. The spectral radiation intensity from 1000-2400 cm-1 was obtained. To study the infrared radiation characteristics of exhaust plume, an exceptional quadrate nozzle was employed and much attention was paid to the influences of Al203 particles in solid propellants. The results could dedicate the design of the divert control motor in such hypervelocity interceptors or missiles, or be of certain meaning to the improvement of ingredients of solid propellants.

  2. Effects of thruster exhaust plume impingement on extended spacecraft appendages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathe, C. B.; Mukundan, R.

    1991-05-01

    The paper deals with a procedure for the estimation of the disturbance force and torque components acting on a spacecraft due to the impingement of exhaust plume of thrusters on extended appendages. Theoretical details related to the computation of plume parameters based on the thruster and propellant characteristics are outlined. The plume analysis can be used to arrive at optimal configuration of thrusters along with their orientation to provide maximum effective control thrust and torque for attitude and orbit control purpose.

  3. Instrumentation for In-Flight SSME Rocket Engine Plume Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madzsar, George C.; Bickford, Randall L.; Duncan, David B.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes instrumentation that is under development for an in-flight demonstration of a plume spectroscopy system on the space shuttle main engine. The instrumentation consists of a nozzle mounted optical probe for observation of the plume, and a spectrometer for identification and quantification of plume content. This instrumentation, which is intended for use as a diagnostic tool to detect wear and incipient failure in rocket engines, will be validated by a hardware demonstration on the Technology Test Bed engine at the Marshall Space Flight Center.

  4. Submillimeter-wave properties of thermospheric rocket plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litvak, M. M.; Weiss, J. A.; Dionne, G. F.

    1980-01-01

    The problem of detecting rocket plumes at thermospheric altitudes with satellite-borne submillimeter-wave radiometers is examined theoretically. To estimate the sizes of plume signatures contrasted against a 250-K earth background or in self-emission against the cold sky, a computer program has been developed to predict plume brightness temperatures and optical depths of rotational lines of plume molecular constituents (e.g., H2O) as a function of distance from the nozzle. The methods employed in the computations are described in general terms, and examples are presented to indicate that detectable H2O signatures extending to several thousand nozzle diameters should exist at plume altitudes above 250 km.

  5. The effects of the exhaust plume on the lightning triggering conditions for launch vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eriksen, Frederick J.; Rudolph, Terence H.; Perala, Rodney A.

    1991-01-01

    Apollo 12 and Atlas Centaur 67 are two launch vehicles that have experienced triggered lightning strikes. Serious consequences resulted from the events; in the case of Atlas Centaur 67, the vehicle and the payload were lost. These events indicate that it is necessary to develop launch rules which would prevent such occurrences. In order to develop valid lightning related rules, it is necessary to understand the effects of the plume. Some have assumed that the plume can be treated as a perfect conductor, and have computed electric field enhancement factors on that basis. The authors have looked at the plume, and believe that these models are not correct, because they ignore the fluid motion of the conducting plates. The authors developed a model which includes this flow character. In this model, the external field is excluded from the plume as it would be for any good conductor, but, in addition, the charge must distribute so that the charge density is zero at some location in the exhaust. When this condition is included in the calculation of triggering enhancement factors, they can be two to three times larger than calculated by other methods which include a conductive plume but don't include the correct boundary conditions. Here, the authors review the relevant features of rocket exhausts for the triggered lightning problem, present an approach for including flowing conductive gases, and present preliminary calculations to demonstrate the effect that the plume has on enhancement factors.

  6. Wavelength-Agile Optical Sensor for Exhaust Plume and Cryogenic Fluid Interrogation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Scott T.; Chiaverini, Martin J.; Gramer, Daniel J.

    2004-01-01

    Two optical sensors developed in UW-Madison labs were evaluated for their potential to characterize rocket engine exhaust plumes and liquid oxygen (LOX) fluid properties. The plume sensor is based on wavelength-agile absorption spectroscopy A device called a chirped white pulse emitter (CWPE) is used to generate the wavelength agile light, scanning, for example, 1340 - 1560 nm every microsecond. Properties of the gases in the rocket plume (for example temperature and water mole fraction) can be monitored using these wavelength scans. We have performed preliminary tests in static gas cells, a laboratory GOX/GH2 thrust chamber, and a solid-fuel hybrid thrust chamber, and these initial tests demonstrate the potential of the CWPE for monitoring rocket plumes. The LOX sensor uses an alternative to wavelength agile sensing: two independent, fixed-wavelength lasers are combined into a single fiber. One laser is absorbed by LOX and the other not: by monitoring the differential transmission the LOX concentration in cryogenic feed lines can be inferred. The sensor was successful in interrogating static LOX pools in laboratory tests. Even in ice- and bubble-laden cryogenic fluids, LOX concentrations were measured to better than 1% with a 3 microsec time constant.

  7. Measurements of Unexpected Ozone Loss in a Nighttime Space Shuttle Exhaust Plume: Implications for Geo-Engineering Projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avallone, L. M.; Kalnajs, L. E.; Toohey, D. W.; Ross, M. N.

    2008-12-01

    Measurements of ozone, carbon dioxide and particulate water were made in the nighttime exhaust plume of the Space Shuttle (STS-116) on 9 December 2006 as part of the PUMA/WAVE campaign (Plume Ultrafast Measurements Acquisition/WB-57F Ascent Video Experiment). The launch took place from Kennedy Space Center at 8:47 pm (local time) on a moonless night and the WB-57F aircraft penetrated the shuttle plume approximately 25 minutes after launch in the lowermost stratosphere. Ozone loss is not predicted to occur in a nighttime Space Shuttle plume since it has long been assumed that the main ozone loss mechanism associated with rocket emissions requires solar photolysis to drive several chlorine-based catalytic cycles. However, the nighttime in situ observations show an unexpected loss of ozone of approximately 250 ppb in the evolving exhaust plume, inconsistent with model predictions. We will present the observations of the shuttle exhaust plume composition and the results of photochemical models of the Space Shuttle plume. We will show that models constrained by known rocket emission kinetics, including afterburning, and reasonable plume dispersion rates, based on the CO2 observations, cannot explain the observed ozone loss. We will propose potential explanations for the lack of agreement between models and the observations, and will discuss the implications of these explanations for our understanding of the composition of rocket emissions. We will describe the potential consequences of the observed ozone loss for long-term damage to the stratospheric ozone layer should geo-engineering projects based on rocket launches be employed.

  8. NTS-spill test facility wind tunnel exhaust plume characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, R.; Goldwire, H.; Smith, D.; Rawlings, J.; Schaffer, T.; Robson, J.

    1994-07-01

    The exhaust plume of the NTS-STF wind tunnel has been characterized to demonstrate its suitability as a target for CALIOPE experiments. Smoke from grenades has been released in multiple quantities and at different positions inside the tunnel. The smoke plumes have been recorded on video tape. The wind velocity profile has also been determined with a moveable array of miniature vane anemometers. These measurements will be used to determine the vapor concentration pathlength as part of the ground truth.

  9. Rocket Exhaust Cratering: A Significant Challenge for Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metzger, Philip

    2005-01-01

    During the Apollo and Viking programs, NASA needed to know how the rocket exhaust would affect the soil on the Moon and Mars. A number of studies were done during the 50's through 70's, but little or no work has been done since then. Existing models are crude and significant theoretical questions still exist

  10. Atmospheric scavenging of hydrochloric acid. [from rocket exhaust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knutson, E. O.; Fenton, D. L.

    1975-01-01

    The scavenging of hydrogen chloride from a solid rocket exhaust cloud was investigated. Water drops were caused to fall through a confined exhaust cloud and then analyzed to determine the amount of HCl captured during fall. Bubblers were used to measure HCl concentration within the chamber. The measured chamber HCl concentration, together with the measured HCl deposition on the chamber walls, accounted for 81 to 94% of the theoretical HCl. It was found that the amount of HCl captured was approximately one-half of that predicted by the Frossling correlation. No effect of humidity was detected through a range of 69-98% R.H.. The scavenging of HCl from a solid rocket exhaust cloud was calculated using an idealized Kennedy Space Center rain cycle. Results indicate that this cycle would reduce the cloud HCl concentration to 20.6% if its value in the absence of rain.

  11. Effects of Rocket Exhaust on Lunar Soil Reflectance Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clegg, R. N.; Jolliff, B. L.; Robinson, M. S.; Hapke, B. W.; Plescia, J. B.

    2012-12-01

    The Apollo, Surveyor, and Luna spacecraft descent engine plumes affected the regolith at and surrounding their landing sites. Owing to the lack of rapid weathering processes on the Moon, surface alterations are still visible as photometric anomalies in Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) Narrow Angle Camera (NAC) images. These areas are interpreted as disturbance of the regolith by rocket exhaust during descent of the spacecraft, which we refer to as "blast zones" (BZs). The BZs consist of an area of lower reflectance (LR-BZ) compared to the surroundings that extends up to a few meters out from the landers, as well as a broader halo of higher reflectance (HR-BZ) that extends tens to hundreds of meters out from the landers. We use phase-ratio images for each landing site to determine the spatial extent of the disturbed regions and to quantify differences in reflectance and backscattering characteristics within the BZs compared to nearby undisturbed regolith. We also compare the reflectance changes and BZ dimensions at the Apollo sites with those at Luna and Surveyor sites. We seek to determine the effects of rocket exhaust in terms of erosion and particle redistribution, as well as the cause(s) of the reflectance variations, i.e., physical changes at the regolith surface. When approximated as an ellipse, the average Apollo BZ area is ~29,000 m2 (~175 ± 60 m by 200 ± 27 m) which is 10x larger than the average Luna BZ, and over 100x larger than the average Surveyor BZ. Moreover, BZ area scales roughly with lander mass (as a proxy for thrust). The LR-BZs are evident at the Apollo sites, especially where astronaut bioturbation has roughened the soil, leading to a 2-14% reduction in reflectance at ~30° phase. The LR-BZs at the Luna and Surveyor sites are less evident and may be mostly confined to the area below the landers. The average normalized reflectance in the HR-BZs for images with a 30° phase angle is 2-16% higher than in the undisturbed surrounding areas; this magnitude is the same, within uncertainty, for all sites, indicating a common process or combination of processes causing differences in reflectance properties of the regolith. Phase-ratio images and photometric data collected over a range of illumination geometries show that a greater separation in reflectance occurs between the HR-BZs and undisturbed areas with increasing phase angle and indicate that the HR-BZs are less backscattering than undisturbed areas. As working hypotheses, we consider the following possibilities to explain BZ reflectance phenomena: change in macroscopic roughness, microscopic modification of surface structure, redistribution of fines (excavation from LR-BZ and deposition in HR-BZ), change in compaction, contamination from fuel, and modification of maturity. The LR-BZ is affected by macroscopic disruption of the surface and increased shadowing. We infer that HR-BZ reflectance has been affected by scouring from particles entrained by exhaust gases with low-angle trajectories. Entrained particles with trajectories greater than a few degrees relative to horizontal travel well beyond the BZ boundary and do not contribute to BZ reflectance variations. Regolith particle interactions with surface soil within HR-BZs may destroy fine-scale surface structure (e.g., "fairy-castle") and decrease macroscopic roughness, contributing to a decrease in backscattering character within the HR-BZ.

  12. Simulation of UV atomic radiation for application in exhaust plume spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, T. L.; Powers, W. T.; Cooper, A. E.

    1993-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of exhaust plume spectral data has long been a goal of developers of advanced engine health monitoring systems which incorporate optical measurements of rocket exhaust constituents. Discussed herein is the status of present efforts to model and predict atomic radiation spectra and infer free-atom densities from emission/absorption measurements as part of the Optical Plume Anomaly Detection (OPAD) program at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). A brief examination of the mathematical formalism is provided in the context of predicting radiation from the Mach disk region of the SSME exhaust flow at nominal conditions during ground level testing at MSFC. Computational results are provided for Chromium and Copper at selected transitions which indicate a strong dependence upon broadening parameter values determining the absorption-emission line shape. Representative plots of recent spectral data from the Stennis Space Center (SSC) Diagnostic Test Facility (DTF) rocket engine are presented and compared to numerical results from the present self-absorbing model; a comprehensive quantitative analysis will be reported at a later date.

  13. Numerical Simulation of Rocket Exhaust Interaction with Lunar Soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liever, Peter; Tosh, Abhijit; Curtis, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    This technology development originated from the need to assess the debris threat resulting from soil material erosion induced by landing spacecraft rocket plume impingement on extraterrestrial planetary surfaces. The impact of soil debris was observed to be highly detrimental during NASA s Apollo lunar missions and will pose a threat for any future landings on the Moon, Mars, and other exploration targets. The innovation developed under this program provides a simulation tool that combines modeling of the diverse disciplines of rocket plume impingement gas dynamics, granular soil material liberation, and soil debris particle kinetics into one unified simulation system. The Unified Flow Solver (UFS) developed by CFDRC enabled the efficient, seamless simulation of mixed continuum and rarefied rocket plume flow utilizing a novel direct numerical simulation technique of the Boltzmann gas dynamics equation. The characteristics of the soil granular material response and modeling of the erosion and liberation processes were enabled through novel first principle-based granular mechanics models developed by the University of Florida specifically for the highly irregularly shaped and cohesive lunar regolith material. These tools were integrated into a unique simulation system that accounts for all relevant physics aspects: (1) Modeling of spacecraft rocket plume impingement flow under lunar vacuum environment resulting in a mixed continuum and rarefied flow; (2) Modeling of lunar soil characteristics to capture soil-specific effects of particle size and shape composition, soil layer cohesion and granular flow physics; and (3) Accurate tracking of soil-borne debris particles beginning with aerodynamically driven motion inside the plume to purely ballistic motion in lunar far field conditions. In the earlier project phase of this innovation, the capabilities of the UFS for mixed continuum and rarefied flow situations were validated and demonstrated for lunar lander rocket plume flow impingement under lunar vacuum conditions. Applications and improvements to the granular flow simulation tools contributed by the University of Florida were tested against Earth environment experimental results. Requirements for developing, validating, and demonstrating this solution environment were clearly identified, and an effective second phase execution plan was devised. In this phase, the physics models were refined and fully integrated into a production-oriented simulation tool set. Three-dimensional simulations of Apollo Lunar Excursion Module (LEM) and Altair landers (including full-scale lander geometry) established the practical applicability of the UFS simulation approach and its advanced performance level for large-scale realistic problems.

  14. Numerical simulation of the Space Shuttle Launch Vehicle flowfield with real gas solid rocket plume effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slotnick, J. P.; Kandula, M.; Buning, P. G.; Martin, F. W., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    A numerical simulation of the external ascent flowfield of the Space Shuttle Launch Vehicle (SSLV) was carried out at the freestream Mach number 1.25, the angle of attack -5.1 deg, and the flight Reynolds number 3.25 x 10 exp 6/ft. The simulation is an extension of the solution by Kandula et al. (1991) and incorporates variable gamma effects with a high fidelity grid appropriate for a flight Reynolds number flow solution. Three-dimensional SSLV steady-state simulations with either perfect-gas or variable-gamma-gas Redesigned-Solid-Rocket-Motor (RSRM) plumes are computed on a 14-grid overlapping body-conforming grid system, and the influence of the RSRM exhaust plumes on the SSLV component pressure distributions and integrated loads is examined.

  15. Ecological effects and environmental fate of solid rocket exhaust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nimmo, B.; Stout, I. J.; Mickus, J.; Vickers, D.; Madsen, B.

    1974-01-01

    Specific target processes were classified as to the chemical, chemical-physical, and biological reactions and toxic effects of solid rocket emissions within selected ecosystems at Kennedy Space Center. Exposure of Citris seedlings, English peas, and bush beans to SRM exhaust under laboratory conditions demonstrated reduced growth rates, but at very high concentrations. Field studies of natural plant populations in three diverse ecosystems failed to reveal any structural damage at the concentration levels tested. Background information on elemental composition of selected woody plants from two terrestrial ecosystems is reported. LD sub 50 for a native mouse (peromysous gossypinus) exposed to SRM exhaust was determined to be 50 ppm/g body weight. Results strongly indicate that other components of the SRM exhaust act synergically to enhance the toxic effects of HCl gas when inhaled. A brief summary is given regarding the work on SRM exhaust and its possible impact on hatchability of incubating bird eggs.

  16. Computational fluid dynamics and frequency-dependent finite-difference time-domain method coupling for the interaction between microwaves and plasma in rocket plumes

    SciTech Connect

    Kinefuchi, K.; Funaki, I.; Shimada, T.; Abe, T.

    2012-10-15

    Under certain conditions during rocket flights, ionized exhaust plumes from solid rocket motors may interfere with radio frequency transmissions. To understand the relevant physical processes involved in this phenomenon and establish a prediction process for in-flight attenuation levels, we attempted to measure microwave attenuation caused by rocket exhaust plumes in a sea-level static firing test for a full-scale solid propellant rocket motor. The microwave attenuation level was calculated by a coupling simulation of the inviscid-frozen-flow computational fluid dynamics of an exhaust plume and detailed analysis of microwave transmissions by applying a frequency-dependent finite-difference time-domain method with the Drude dispersion model. The calculated microwave attenuation level agreed well with the experimental results, except in the case of interference downstream the Mach disk in the exhaust plume. It was concluded that the coupling estimation method based on the physics of the frozen plasma flow with Drude dispersion would be suitable for actual flight conditions, although the mixing and afterburning in the plume should be considered depending on the flow condition.

  17. Computational fluid dynamics and frequency-dependent finite-difference time-domain method coupling for the interaction between microwaves and plasma in rocket plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinefuchi, K.; Funaki, I.; Shimada, T.; Abe, T.

    2012-10-01

    Under certain conditions during rocket flights, ionized exhaust plumes from solid rocket motors may interfere with radio frequency transmissions. To understand the relevant physical processes involved in this phenomenon and establish a prediction process for in-flight attenuation levels, we attempted to measure microwave attenuation caused by rocket exhaust plumes in a sea-level static firing test for a full-scale solid propellant rocket motor. The microwave attenuation level was calculated by a coupling simulation of the inviscid-frozen-flow computational fluid dynamics of an exhaust plume and detailed analysis of microwave transmissions by applying a frequency-dependent finite-difference time-domain method with the Drude dispersion model. The calculated microwave attenuation level agreed well with the experimental results, except in the case of interference downstream the Mach disk in the exhaust plume. It was concluded that the coupling estimation method based on the physics of the frozen plasma flow with Drude dispersion would be suitable for actual flight conditions, although the mixing and afterburning in the plume should be considered depending on the flow condition.

  18. Measurement and Characterization of Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor Plume Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, Jeremy; Hobbs, Chris; Plotkin, Ken; Pilkey, Debbie

    2009-01-01

    Lift-off acoustic environments generated by the future Ares I launch vehicle are assessed by the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) acoustics team using several prediction tools. This acoustic environment is directly caused by the Ares I First Stage booster, powered by the five-segment Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRMV). The RSRMV is a larger-thrust derivative design from the currently used Space Shuttle solid rocket motor, the Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM). Lift-off acoustics is an integral part of the composite launch vibration environment affecting the Ares launch vehicle and must be assessed to help generate hardware qualification levels and ensure structural integrity of the vehicle during launch and lift-off. Available prediction tools that use free field noise source spectrums as a starting point for generation of lift-off acoustic environments are described in the monograph NASA SP-8072: "Acoustic Loads Generated by the Propulsion System." This monograph uses a reference database for free field noise source spectrums which consist of subscale rocket motor firings, oriented in horizontal static configurations. The phrase "subscale" is appropriate, since the thrust levels of rockets in the reference database are orders of magnitude lower than the current design thrust for the Ares launch family. Thus, extrapolation is needed to extend the various reference curves to match Ares-scale acoustic levels. This extrapolation process yields a subsequent amount of uncertainty added upon the acoustic environment predictions. As the Ares launch vehicle design schedule progresses, it is important to take every opportunity to lower prediction uncertainty and subsequently increase prediction accuracy. Never before in NASA s history has plume acoustics been measured for large scale solid rocket motors. Approximately twice a year, the RSRM prime vendor, ATK Launch Systems, static fires an assembled RSRM motor in a horizontal configuration at their test facility in Utah. The remaining RSRM static firings will take place on elevated terrain, with the nozzle exit plume being mostly undeflected and the landscape allowing placement of microphones within direct line of sight to the exhaust plume. These measurements will help assess the current extrapolation process by direct comparison between subscale and full scale solid rocket motor data.

  19. Assessment of analytical techniques for predicting solid propellant exhaust plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tevepaugh, J. A.; Smith, S. D.; Penny, M. M.

    1977-01-01

    The calculation of solid propellant exhaust plume flow fields is addressed. Two major areas covered are: (1) the applicability of empirical data currently available to define particle drag coefficients, heat transfer coefficients, mean particle size and particle size distributions, and (2) thermochemical modeling of the gaseous phase of the flow field. Comparisons of experimentally measured and analytically predicted data are made. The experimental data were obtained for subscale solid propellant motors with aluminum loadings of 2, 10 and 15%. Analytical predictions were made using a fully coupled two-phase numerical solution. Data comparisons will be presented for radial distributions at plume axial stations of 5, 12, 16 and 20 diameters.

  20. ASRM subscale plume deflector testing. [advanced solid rocket motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglas, Freddie, III; Dawson, Michael C.; Orlin, Peter A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports the results of the scale model (1/22) testing of candidate refractory materials to be used as surface coatings for a solid rocket motor plume deflector structure. Five ROM tests were conducted to acquire data to support the selection, thickness determination, and placement of the materials. All data acquisition was achieved through nonintrusive methods. The tests demonstrated that little or no reductions in performance of the full-scale deflector would be experienced if the most economical materials were selected for construction.

  1. Summary of nozzle-exhaust plume flowfield analyses related to space shuttle applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penny, M. M.

    1975-01-01

    Exhaust plume shape simulation is studied, with the major effort directed toward computer program development and analytical support of various plume related problems associated with the space shuttle. Program development centered on (1) two-phase nozzle-exhaust plume flows, (2) plume impingement, and (3) support of exhaust plume simulation studies. Several studies were also conducted to provide full-scale data for defining exhaust plume simulation criteria. Model nozzles used in launch vehicle test were analyzed and compared to experimental calibration data.

  2. Detection of Metallic Compounds in Rocket Plumes Using Ion Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, Robert W.

    1998-01-01

    This grant experimentally verified that ion probes can consistently detect metallic compounds in a hybrid rocket plume. Two electrostatic detection methods were tested. The first method used an unbiased ion probe. It responded to collisions or near collisions with charged particulates. The amplitude of the response to metallic ions always exceeded that of the combustion products. The second device was a cylindrical Gaussian surface that surrounded, but did not touch, the plume. A charge imbalance in the plume induced a current in cylinder that was detected by a sensitive amplifier. The probe was more sensitive to metallic compounds than the cylinder. However, the Gaussian cylinder demonstrated sufficient sensitivity to warrant serious future consideration. Since the cylinder is nonintrusive, it is particularly attractive. Apparently, ions formed during combustion transfer to the metallic impurities. The formation of these metallic ions slows the ion recombination rate and helps preserve charges in the plume. The electrostatic detectors, in turn, respond to the charges carried by the metallic impurities.

  3. Studies of the exhaust products from solid propellant rocket motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawbarn, R.; Kinslow, M.

    1976-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the feasibility of conducting environmental chamber tests on the physical processes which occur when a solid rocket motor exhaust mixes with the ambient atmosphere. Of particular interest was the interaction between hydrogen chloride, aluminum oxide, and water vapor. The program consisted of three phases: (1) building a small rocket motor and using it to provide the exhaust species in a controlled environment; (2) evaluating instruments used to detect and measure HCl concentrations and if possible determining whether the HCl existed in the gaseous state or as an acid aerosol; (3) monitoring a series of 6.4-percent scale space shuttle motor tests and comparing the results to the environmental chamber studies. Eighteen firings were conducted in an environmental chamber with the initial ambient relative humidity set at values from 29 to 100 percent. Two additional firings were made in a large shed, and four were made on an open concrete apron. Six test firings at MSFC were monitored, and the ground level concentrations are reported. Evidence is presented which shows that the larger Al2O3 (5 to 50 micrometers) particles from the rocket motor can act as condensation nuclei. Under appropriate ambient conditions where there is sufficient water vapor this results in the formation of an acid aerosol. Droplets of this acid were detected both in the environmental chamber and in the scaled shuttle engine tests.

  4. Vortex wake and exhaust plume interaction, including ground effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, Ihab Gaber

    Computational modeling and studies of the near-field wake-vortex turbulent flows, far-field turbulent wake- vortex/exhaust-plume interaction for subsonic and High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) airplane, and wake- vortex/exhaust-plume interaction with the ground are carried out. The three-dimensional, compressible Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations are solved using the implicit, upwind, Roe-flux-differencing, finite-volume scheme. The turbulence models of Baldwin and Lomax, one-equation model of Spalart and Allmaras and two-equation shear stress transport model of Menter are implemented with the RANS solver for turbulent-flow modeling. For the near-field study, computations are carried out on a fine grid for a rectangular wing with a NACA-0012 airfoil section and a rounded tip. The focus of study is the tip-vortex development, the near-wake-vortex roll-up, and validation of the results with the available experimental data. For the far-field study, the computations of wake-vortex interaction with the exhaust-plume of a single engine of a medium-size subsonic aircraft in a holding condition and two engines of a HSCT in a cruise condition are carried out using an overlapping zonal method for several miles downstream. The overlapping zonal method has been carefully developed and investigated for accurate and efficient calculations of the far-field wake-vortex flow. The results of the subsonic flow are compared with those of a Parabolized Navier-Stokes (PNS) solver known as the UNIWAKE code. Next, the problem of wake-vortex/ground interaction is investigated. For the simulation of this problem, typical velocity profiles of a tip vortex with and without the exhaust-plume temperature profiles are used for inflow boundary conditions and the computations are carried out using the overlapping zonal method for long distances downstream. The effects of the exhaust-plume temperature on the vortex descent, ground boundary-layer separation, vortex rebound and vortex decay are studied and validated with the available experimental data. A parametric study, which covers the effects of atmospheric conditions such as axial wind, crosswind, wind shear, turbulence and, Reynolds number on vortex motion and dynamics near the ground, is also carried out.

  5. Analysis of plume backflow around a nozzle lip in a nuclear rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Chan H.; Kim, Suk C.; Stubbs, Robert M.; De Witt, Kenneth J.

    1993-01-01

    The structure of the flow around a nuclear thermal rocket nozzle lip has been investigated using the direct simulation Monte Carlo method. Special attention has been paid to the behavior of a small amount of harmful particles that may be present in the rocket exhaust gas. The harmful fission product particles are modeled by four inert gases whose molecular weights are in a range of 4 131. Atomic hydrogen, which exists in the flow due to the extremely high nuclear fuel temperature in the reactor, is also included. It is shown that the plume backflow is primarily determined by the thin subsonic fluid layer adjacent to the surface of the nozzle lip, and that the inflow boundary in the plume region has negligible effect on the backflow. It is also shown that a relatively large amount of the lighter species is scattered into the backflow region while the amount of the heavier species becomes negligible in this region due to extreme separation between the species. Results indicate that the backscattered molecules are very energetic and are fast-moving along the surface in the backflow region near the nozzle lip.

  6. Thermal radiation of heterogeneous combustion products in the model rocket engine plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmin, V. A.; Maratkanova, E. I.; Zagray, I. A.; Rukavishnikova, R. V.

    2015-05-01

    The work presents a method of complex investigation of thermal radiation emitted by heterogeneous combustion products in the model rocket engine plume. Realization of the method has allowed us to obtain full information on the results in all stages of calculations. Dependence of the optical properties (complex refractive index), the radiation characteristics (coefficients and cross sections) and emission characteristics (flux densities, emissivity factors) of the main determining factors and parameters was analyzed. It was found by the method of computational experiment that the presence of the gaseous phase in the combustion products causes a strongly marked selectivity of emission, due to which the use of gray approximation in the calculation of thermal radiation is unnecessary. The influence of the optical properties, mass fraction, the function of particle size distribution, and the temperature of combustion products on thermal radiation in the model rocket engine plume was investigated. The role of "spotlight" effect-increasing the amount of energy of emission exhaust combustion products due to scattering by condensate particles radiation from the combustion chamber-was established quantitatively.

  7. Hyper-spectral imaging of aircraft exhaust plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, Spencer; Bradley, Kenneth; Gross, Kevin; Perram, Glen; Marciniak, Michael

    2008-10-01

    An imaging Fourier-transform spectrometer has been used to determine low spatial resolution temperature and chemical species concentration distributions of aircraft jet engine exhaust plumes. An overview of the imaging Fourier transform spectrometer and the methodology of the project is presented. Results to date are shared and future work is discussed. Exhaust plume data from a Turbine Technologies, LTD, SR-30 turbojet engine at three engine settings was collected using a Telops Field-portable Imaging Radiometric Spectrometer Technology Mid-Wave Extended (FIRST-MWE). Although the plume exhibited high temporal frequency fluctuations, temporal averaging of hyper-spectral data-cubes produced steady-state distributions, which, when co-added and Fourier transformed, produced workable spectra. These spectra were then reduced using a simplified gaseous effluent model to fit forward-modeled spectra obtained from the Line-By-Line Radiative Transfer Model (LBLRTM) and the high-resolution transmission (HITRAN) molecular absorption database to determine approximate temperature and concentration distributions. It is theorized that further development of the physical model will produce better agreement between measured and modeled data.

  8. Development of a miniature solid propellant rocket motor for use in plume simulation studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baran, W. J.

    1974-01-01

    A miniature solid propellant rocket motor has been developed to be used in a program to determine those parameters which must be duplicated in a cold gas flow to produce aerodynamic effects on an experimental model similar to those produced by hot, particle-laden exhaust plumes. Phenomena encountered during the testing of the miniature solid propellant motors included erosive propellant burning caused by high flow velocities parallel to the propellant surface, regressive propellant burning as a result of exposed propellant edges, the deposition of aluminum oxide on the nozzle surfaces sufficient to cause aerodynamic nozzle throat geometry changes, and thermal erosion of the nozzle throat at high chamber pressures. A series of tests was conducted to establish the stability of the rocket chamber pressure and the repeatibility of test conditions. Data are presented which define the tests selected to represent the final test matrix. Qualitative observations are also presented concerning the phenomena experienced based on the results of a large number or rocket tests not directly applicable to the final test matrix.

  9. Plume flowfield analysis of the shuttle primary Reaction Control System (RCS) rocket engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hueser, J. E.; Brock, F. J.

    1990-01-01

    A solution was generated for the physical properties of the Shuttle RCS 4000 N (900 lb) rocket engine exhaust plume flowfield. The modeled exhaust gas consists of the five most abundant molecular species, H2, N2, H2O, CO, and CO2. The solution is for a bare RCS engine firing into a vacuum; the only additional hardware surface in the flowfield is a cylinder (=engine mount) which coincides with the nozzle lip outer corner at X = 0, extends to the flowfield outer boundary at X = -137 m and is coaxial with the negative symmetry axis. Continuum gas dynamic methods and the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method were combined in an iterative procedure to produce a selfconsistent solution. Continuum methods were used in the RCS nozzle and in the plume as far as the P = 0.03 breakdown contour; the DSMC method was used downstream of this continuum flow boundary. The DSMC flowfield extends beyond 100 m from the nozzle exit and thus the solution includes the farfield flow properties, but substantial information is developed on lip flow dynamics and thus results are also presented for the flow properties in the vicinity of the nozzle lip.

  10. Radiation/convection coupling in rocket motor and plume analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saladino, A. J.; Farmer, R. C.

    1993-01-01

    A method for describing radiation/convection coupling to a flow field analysis was developed for rocket motors and plumes. The three commonly used propellant systems (H2/O2, RP-1/O2, and solid propellants) radiate primarily as: molecular emitters, non-scattering small particles (soot), and scattering larger particles (Al2O3), respectively. For the required solution, the divergence of the radiation heat flux was included in the energy equation, and the local, volume averaged intensity was determined by a solution to the radiative transfer equation. A rigorous solution to this problem is intractable, therefore, solution methods which use the ordinary and improved differential approximation were developed. This radiation model was being incorporated into the FDNS code, a Navier-Stokes flowfield solver for multiphase, turbulent combusting flows.

  11. Interaction of the Cassini rocket plume with the magnetosphere of Saturn during Saturn orbit injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neubauer, F.

    2003-04-01

    The Cassini spacecraft will be injected into Saturn orbit on July 1, 2004 by a 97 minutes burn of its main rocket engine north of the rings of the planet. The exhaust plume generated at a rate of about 150 g/s produces a comet-like structure ahead of the spacecraft interacting with the extremely thin plasma of the Kronian magneto sphere. We have investigated the interaction of this cloud with the magnetosphere in the framework of the subalfvenic Alfven wing picture to assess the magnitude of the magnetic perturbation signal relative to the accuracy needed for the determina tion of Saturns multipole magnetic field. Although the results are (fortunately!) undra matic from the latter point of view ,the physics involved is quite interesting and exci ting. We shall estimate the magnetic field perturbation, its changing geometry and possible dynamic phenomena.

  12. Performance of reinforced polymer ablators exposed to a solid rocket motor exhaust. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, C.; Burgess, T.; Bowen, J.; Deloach, K.; Talmy, I.

    1992-10-01

    Summarized in this report is the effort by the Naval Surface Warfare Center Dahlgren Division (NSWCDD) and FMC Corporation (a launcher manufacturer) to identify new high performance ablators suitable for use on Navy guided missile launchers (GML) and ships' structures. The goal is to reduce ablator erosion by 25 to 50 percent compared to that of the existing ablators such as MXBE350 (rubbermodified phenolic containing glass fiber reinforcement). This reduction in erosion would significantly increase the number of new missiles with higher-thrust, longer burn rocket motors that can be launched prior to ablator refurbishment. In fact, there are a number of new Navy missiles being considered for development and introduction into existing GML: e.g., the Antisatellite Missile (ASM) and the Theater High-Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) Missile. The U.S. Navy experimentally evaluated the eight best fiber-reinforced, polymer composites from a possible field of 25 off-the-shelf ablators previously screened by FMC Corporation. They were tested by the Navy in highly aluminized solid rocket motor exhaust plumes to determine their ability to resist erosion and to insulate.... Ablator, Guided Missile Launchers, Erosion, Tactical missiles, Convective heating, Solid rocket motors, Aluminum oxide particles.

  13. Nuclear thermal rocket plume interactions with spacecraft. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mauk, B.H.; Gatsonis, N.A.; Buzby, J.; Yin, X.

    1997-05-01

    This is the first study that has treated the Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) effluent problem in its entirety, beginning with the reactor core, through the nozzle flow, to the plume backflow. The summary of major accomplishments is given below: (1) Determined the NTR effluents that include neutral, ionized and radioactive species, under typical NTR chamber conditions. Applied an NTR chamber chemistry model that includes conditions and used nozzle geometries and chamber conditions typical of NTR configurations. (2) Performed NTR nozzle flow simulations using a Navier-Stokes solver. We assumed frozen chemistry at the chamber conditions and used nozzle geometries and chamber conditions typical of NTR configurations. (3) Performed plume simulations using a Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) code with chemistry. In order to account for radioactive trace species that may be important for contamination purposes we developed a multi-weighted DSMC methodology. The domain in our simulations included large regions downstream and upstream of the exit. Inputs were taken from the Navier-Stokes solutions.

  14. Injection of Nuclear Rocket Engine Exhaust into Deep Unsaturated Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, C. A.; Decker, D.

    2008-05-01

    Nuclear rocket engine technology is being considered as a means of interplanetary vehicle propulsion for a manned mission to Mars. To achieve this, a test and development facility must be constructed to safely run nuclear engines. The testing of nuclear engines in the 1950's and 1960's was accomplished by exhausting the engine gases into the atmosphere, a practice that is no longer acceptable. Injection into deep unsaturated zones of radioactive exhaust gases and water vapor associated with the testing of nuclear rocket engines is being considered as a way of sequestering radionuclides from the environment. Numerical simulations were conducted to determine the ability of an unsaturated zone with the hydraulic properties of Frenchman Flat alluvium at the Nevada Test Site to contain gas-phase radionuclides. Gas and water vapor were injected for two hours at rates of 14.5 kg s-1 and 15 kg s-1, respectively, in an interval between 100 and 430 m below the land surface into alluvium with an intrinsic permeability of 10-11 m2 and porosity of 0.35. The results show that during a test of an engine, radionuclides with at least greater than 10-year half-lives may reach the land surface within several years after injection. Radionuclide transport is primarily controlled by the upward pressure gradient from the point of injection to the lower (atmospheric) pressure boundary condition at the land surface. Radionuclides with half-lives on the order of days should undergo enough decay prior to reaching the land surface. A cooling water vapor injected into the unsaturated zone simultaneously with the exhaust gas will condense within several meters of the injection point and drain downward toward the water table. However, the nearly horizontal hydraulic groundwater gradient present in several of the basins at NTS should limit lateral migration of radionuclides away from the vicinity of injection.

  15. Development and Validation of a Computational Model for Predicting the Behavior of Plumes from Large Solid Rocket Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, Jason E.; Black, David L.; Taylor, Casey L.

    2013-01-01

    Exhaust plumes from large solid rocket motors fired at ATK's Promontory test site carry particulates to high altitudes and typically produce deposits that fall on regions downwind of the test area. As populations and communities near the test facility grow, ATK has become increasingly concerned about the impact of motor testing on those surrounding communities. To assess the potential impact of motor testing on the community and to identify feasible mitigation strategies, it is essential to have a tool capable of predicting plume behavior downrange of the test stand. A software package, called PlumeTracker, has been developed and validated at ATK for this purpose. The code is a point model that offers a time-dependent, physics-based description of plume transport and precipitation. The code can utilize either measured or forecasted weather data to generate plume predictions. Next-Generation Radar (NEXRAD) data and field observations from twenty-three historical motor test fires at Promontory were collected to test the predictive capability of PlumeTracker. Model predictions for plume trajectories and deposition fields were found to correlate well with the collected dataset.

  16. Local and global effects on ozone from Titan rocket exhaust and deorbiting spacecraft debris

    SciTech Connect

    Connell, P.S.; Walton, J.J.; Penner, J.E.; O`Connor, C.

    1996-05-01

    Both the launching and deorbiting of spacecraft introduce foreign material directly into the stratosphere, a region of the atmosphere extending from around 12 to 50km above the earth`s surface. Launching of Titan and similar solid rocket motors adds to the stratospheric inorganic chlorine burden through emissions of HCl, atomic (Cl) and molecular (CL{sub 2}) directly into the stratosphere. Before the exhaust plume disperses, plume concentrations of these species are orders of magnitude above the background values (Denison et al, 1994). Dispersed through the stratosphere over the globe, however, the additional Cl burden is small compared to the background for currently envisioned launch frequencies. Inorganic chlorine is cleared from the atmosphere by wet deposition of HCl in rain after transport processes return air from the stratosphere to the troposphere, with an overall lifetime of a few years. After several year,a continuing fixed injection rate will produce a chlorine enhancement that reaches a steady state, balanced with loss via rainout. We report here on calculations in models in both two- and three dimensions that address three questions in rocket/spacecraft/stratospheric interactions. We have attempted to represent the early evolution (1-50 hours) of a vertical plume in the stratosphere with a Langrangian three- dimensional transport model driven by horizontal winds from a data- assimilating general circulation model. We have also conducted global calculations of the potential steady state effects of Cl injection from a specified rate of continuous launches in a current two- dimensional model of the stratosphere including all known important ozone production and loss processes. And, we have calculated the effect of increasing the steady state particulate surface area density in the stratosphere resulting from particle formation from satellite destruction on reentry.

  17. Rocket Exhaust Cratering: Lessons Learned from Viking and Apollo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metzger, Philip T.; Vu, Bruce T.

    2004-01-01

    During the Apollo and Viking programs NASA expended considerable effort to study the cratering of the regolith when a rocket launches or lands on it. That research ensured the success of those programs but also demonstrated that cratering will be a serious challenge for other mission scenarios. Unfortunately, because three decades have elapsed since NASA last performed a successful retro-rocket landing on a large planetary body - and ironically because Apollo and Viking were successful at minimizing the cratering effects - the space agency has a minimized sense of the seriousness of the issue. The most violent phase of a cratering event is when the static overpressure of the rocket exhaust exceeds the bearing capacity of the soil. This bearing capacity failure (BCF) punches a small and highly concave cup into the surface. The shape of the cup then redirects the supersonic jet - along with a large flux of high-velocity debris - directly toward the spacecraft. This has been observed in terrestrial experiments but never quantified analytically. The blast from such an event will be more than just quantitatively greater than the cratering that occurred in the Apollo and Viking programs. It will be qualitatively different, because BCF had been successfully avoided in all those missions. In fact, the Viking program undertook a significant research and development effort and redesigned the spacecraft specifically for the purpose of avoiding BCF [1]. (See Figure 1.) Because the Apollo and Viking spacecraft were successful at avoiding those cratering effects, it was unnecessary to understand them. As a result, the physics of a BCF-driven cratering event have never been well understood. This is a critical gap in our knowledge because BCF is unavoidable in the Martian environment with the large landers necessary for human exploration, and in Lunar landings it must also be addressed because it may occur depending upon the design specifics of the spacecraft and the weakening of the regolity by gas diffusion.

  18. Calculation of Free-Atom Fractions in Hydrocarbon-Fueled Rocket Engine Plume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verma, Satyajit

    2006-01-01

    Free atom fractions (Beta) of nine elements are calculated in the exhaust plume of CH4- oxygen and RP-1-oxygen fueled rocket engines using free energy minimization method. The Chemical Equilibrium and Applications (CEA) computer program developed by the Glenn Research Center, NASA is used for this purpose. Data on variation of Beta in both fuels as a function of temperature (1600 K - 3100 K) and oxygen to fuel ratios (1.75 to 2.25 by weight) is presented in both tabular and graphical forms. Recommendation is made for the Beta value for a tenth element, Palladium. The CEA computer code was also run to compare with experimentally determined Beta values reported in literature for some of these elements. A reasonable agreement, within a factor of three, between the calculated and reported values is observed. Values reported in this work will be used as a first approximation for pilot rocket engine testing studies at the Stennis Space Center for at least six elements Al, Ca, Cr, Cu, Fe and Ni - until experimental values are generated. The current estimates will be improved when more complete thermodynamic data on the remaining four elements Ag, Co, Mn and Pd are added to the database. A critique of the CEA code is also included.

  19. Effects of rocket exhaust products in the thermosphere and ionsphere

    SciTech Connect

    Zinn, J.; Sutherland, C.D.

    1980-02-01

    This paper reviews the current state of understanding of the problem of ionospheric F-layer depletions produced by chemical effects of the exhaust gases from large rockets, with particular emphasis on the Heavy Lift Launch Vehicles (HLLV) proposed for use in the construction of solar power satellites. The currently planned HLLV flight profile calls for main second-stage propulsion confined to altitudes below 124 km, and a brief orbit circularization maneuver at apogee. The second stage engines deposit 9 x 10/sup 31/ H/sub 2/O and H/sub 2/ molecules between 74 and 124 km. Model computations show that they diffuse gradually into the ionospheric F region, where they lead to weak but widespread and persistent depletions of ionization and continuous production of H atoms. The orbit circularization burn deposits 9 x 10/sup 29/ exhaust molecules at about 480-km altitude. These react rapidly with the F2 region 0/sup +/ ions, leading to a substantial (factor-of-three) reduction in plasma density, which extends over a 1000- by 2000-km region and persists for four to five hours. For purposes of computer model verification, a computation is included representing the Skylab I launch, for which observational data exist. The computations and data are compared, and the computer model is described.

  20. Effects of rocket exhaust products in the thermosphere and ionosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Zinn, J.; Sutherland, C.D.

    1980-01-01

    This paper reviews the current state of our understanding of the problem of ionospheric F-layer depletions produced by chemical effects of the exhaust gases from large rockets, with particular emphasis on the Heavy Lift Launch Vehicles (HLLV) proposed for use in the construction of solar power satellites. The second stage engines deposit 9 x 10/sup 31/ H/sub 2/O and H/sub 2/ molecules between 74 and 124 km. Model computations show that they diffuse gradually into the ionospheric F region, where they lead to weak but widespread and persistent depletions of ionization and continuous production of H atoms. The orbit circularization burn deposits 9 x 10/sup 29/ exhaust molecules at about 480-km altitude. These react rapidly with the F2 region O/sup +/ ions, leading to a substantial (factor-of-three) reduction in plasma density, which extends over a 1000- by 2000-km region and persists for four to five hours. For purposes of computer model verification, we include a computation representing the Skylab I launch, for which observational data exist. The computations and data are compared, and the computer model is described.

  1. Active chlorine and nitric oxide formation from chemical rocket plume afterburning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leone, D. M.; Turns, S. R.

    1994-01-01

    Chlorine and oxides of nitrogen (NO(x)) released into the atmosphere contribute to acid rain (ground level or low-altitude sources) and ozone depletion from the stratosphere (high-altitude sources). Rocket engines have the potential for forming or activating these pollutants in the rocket plume. For instance, H2/O2 rockets can produce thermal NO(x) in their plumes. Emphasis, in the past, has been placed on determining the impact of chlorine release on the stratosphere. To date, very little, if any, information is available to understand what contribution NO(x) emissions from ground-based engine testing and actual rocket launches have on the atmosphere. The goal of this work is to estimate the afterburning emissions from chemical rocket plumes and determine their local stratospheric impact. Our study focuses on the space shuttle rocket motors, which include both the solid rocket boosters (SRB's) and the liquid propellant main engines (SSME's). Rocket plume afterburning is modeled employing a one-dimensional model incorporating two chemical kinetic systems: chemical and thermal equilibria with overlayed nitric oxide chemical kinetics (semi equilibrium) and full finite-rate chemical kinetics. Additionally, the local atmospheric impact immediately following a launch is modeled as the emissions diffuse and chemically react in the stratosphere.

  2. Active chlorine and nitric oxide formation from chemical rocket plume afterburning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leone, D. M.; Turns, S. R.

    Chlorine and oxides of nitrogen (NO(x)) released into the atmosphere contribute to acid rain (ground level or low-altitude sources) and ozone depletion from the stratosphere (high-altitude sources). Rocket engines have the potential for forming or activating these pollutants in the rocket plume. For instance, H2/O2 rockets can produce thermal NO(x) in their plumes. Emphasis, in the past, has been placed on determining the impact of chlorine release on the stratosphere. To date, very little, if any, information is available to understand what contribution NO(x) emissions from ground-based engine testing and actual rocket launches have on the atmosphere. The goal of this work is to estimate the afterburning emissions from chemical rocket plumes and determine their local stratospheric impact. Our study focuses on the space shuttle rocket motors, which include both the solid rocket boosters (SRB's) and the liquid propellant main engines (SSME's). Rocket plume afterburning is modeled employing a one-dimensional model incorporating two chemical kinetic systems: chemical and thermal equilibria with overlayed nitric oxide chemical kinetics (semi equilibrium) and full finite-rate chemical kinetics. Additionally, the local atmospheric impact immediately following a launch is modeled as the emissions diffuse and chemically react in the stratosphere.

  3. Polar Mesospheric Clouds and Rocket Exhaust in the Arctic Middle Atmosphere: Lidar Observations and Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, R. L.; Deland, M. T.; Lieberman, R. S.; Walker, G. W.

    2010-12-01

    We report observations of polar mesospheric clouds (PMC) and rocket exhaust by ground-based lidar at Poker Flat Research Range (PFRR), Chatanika, Alaska (65°N, 147°W). The PMC observations have been made in late summer over several years in years when space shuttle launches both did and did not occur. The rocket exhaust observations have been made in late winter and spring on three nights when Black Brandt XII (two) and X (one) rockets were launched at PFRR. The PMCs are observed at altitudes between 80 and 86 km during visual displays. The rocket exhaust is observed at altitudes between 66 and 82 km, with the strongest echoes from the cloud at the higher altitudes. The aerosol backscatter ratios of the clouds and exhaust have magnitudes from 0.1 to 100. We consider the areal extent, seasonal evolution, and environmental conditions of the PMCs as observed by satellites (i.e., EOS-Aura/OMI, NOAA/SBUV, and EOS-Aura/MLS). We analyze the structure of the PMCs in different years in terms of current microphysical models and analyze the characteristics of the clouds in terms of the influence of space shuttle exhaust. We consider the formation of the rocket exhaust in terms of the combustion products of the rocket fuel and the environmental conditions measured by satellites (i.e., UARS/MLS). We compare and contrast the structure of the PMCs and rocket exhaust and discuss them as indicators of atmospheric conditions.

  4. Effect of contamination on the optical properties of transmitting and reflecting materials exposed to a MMH/N2O4 rocket exhaust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, R. L.; Spisz, E. W.; Jack, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    The changes are presented in spectral transmittance, and reflectance due to exposure of various optical materials to the exhaust plume of a 5-pound thrust bipropellant rocket. The engine was fired in a pulsed mode for a total exposure of 223.7 second. Spectral optical properties were measured in air before and after exposure to the exhaust plume in vacuum. The contaminating layer resulted in both absorption and scattering effects which caused changes as large as 30-50% for transmitting elements and 15% for mirrors in the near ultraviolet wavelengths. The changes in spectral properties of materials exposed to the exhaust plume for 44 and 223.7 seconds are compared and found to be similar.

  5. Atmospheric measurements of the physical evolution of aircraft exhaust plumes.

    PubMed

    Timko, M T; Fortner, E; Franklin, J; Yu, Z; Wong, H-W; Onasch, T B; Miake-Lye, R C; Herndon, S C

    2013-04-01

    Drawing from a series of field measurement activities including the Alternative Aviation Fuels Experiments (AAFEX1 and AAFEX2), we present experimental measurements of particle number, size, and composition-resolved mass that describe the physical and chemical evolution of aircraft exhaust plumes on the time scale of 5 s to 2-3 min. As the plume ages, the particle number emission index initially increases by a factor of 10-50, due to gas-to-particle formation of a nucleation/growth mode, and then begins to fall with increased aging. Increasing the fuel sulfur content causes the initial increase to occur more rapidly. The contribution of the nucleation/growth mode to the overall particle number density is most pronounced at idle power and decreases with increasing engine power. Increasing fuel sulfur content, but not fuel aromatic content causes the nucleation/growth mode to dominate the particle number emissions at higher powers than for a fuel with "normal" sulfur and aromatic content. Particle size measurements indicate that the observed particle number emissions trends are due to continuing gas-to-particle conversion and coagulation growth of the nucleation/growth mode particles, processes which simultaneously increase particle mass and reduce particle number density. Measurements of nucleation/growth mode mass are consistent with the interpretation of particle number and size data and suggest that engine exit plane measurements may underestimate the total particle mass by as much as a factor of between 5 and 10. PMID:23356965

  6. Infrared signature modelling of a rocket jet plume - comparison with flight measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rialland, V.; Guy, A.; Gueyffier, D.; Perez, P.; Roblin, A.; Smithson, T.

    2016-01-01

    The infrared signature modelling of rocket plumes is a challenging problem involving rocket geometry, propellant composition, combustion modelling, trajectory calculations, fluid mechanics, atmosphere modelling, calculation of gas and particles radiative properties and of radiative transfer through the atmosphere. This paper presents ONERA simulation tools chained together to achieve infrared signature prediction, and the comparison of the estimated and measured signatures of an in-flight rocket plume. We consider the case of a solid rocket motor with aluminized propellant, the Black Brant sounding rocket. The calculation case reproduces the conditions of an experimental rocket launch, performed at White Sands in 1997, for which we obtained high quality infrared signature data sets from DRDC Valcartier. The jet plume is calculated using an in-house CFD software called CEDRE. The plume infrared signature is then computed on the spectral interval 1900-5000 cm-1 with a step of 5 cm-1. The models and their hypotheses are presented and discussed. Then the resulting plume properties, radiance and spectra are detailed. Finally, the estimated infrared signature is compared with the spectral imaging measurements. The discrepancies are analyzed and discussed.

  7. Assessment of analytical and experimental techniques utilized in conducting plume technology tests 575 and 593. [exhaust flow simulation (wind tunnel tests) of scale model Space Shuttle Orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, L. R.; Sulyma, P. R.; Tevepaugh, J. A.; Penny, M. M.

    1976-01-01

    Since exhaust plumes affect vehicle base environment (pressure and heat loads) and the orbiter vehicle aerodynamic control surface effectiveness, an intensive program involving detailed analytical and experimental investigations of the exhaust plume/vehicle interaction was undertaken as a pertinent part of the overall space shuttle development program. The program, called the Plume Technology program, has as its objective the determination of the criteria for simulating rocket engine (in particular, space shuttle propulsion system) plume-induced aerodynamic effects in a wind tunnel environment. The comprehensive experimental program was conducted using test facilities at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center and Ames Research Center. A post-test examination of some of the experimental results obtained from NASA-MSFC's 14 x 14-inch trisonic wind tunnel is presented. A description is given of the test facility, simulant gas supply system, nozzle hardware, test procedure and test matrix. Analysis of exhaust plume flow fields and comparison of analytical and experimental exhaust plume data are presented.

  8. Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) analysis of axisymmetric plume and base flow of film/dump cooled rocket nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, P. K.; Warsi, S. A.

    1993-01-01

    Film/dump cooling a rocket nozzle with fuel rich gas, as in the National Launch System (NLS) Space Transportation Main Engine (STME), adds potential complexities for integrating the engine with the vehicle. The chief concern is that once the film coolant is exhausted from the nozzle, conditions may exist during flight for the fuel-rich film gases to be recirculated to the vehicle base region. The result could be significantly higher base temperatures than would be expected from a regeneratively cooled nozzle. CFD analyses were conduced to augment classical scaling techniques for vehicle base environments. The FDNS code with finite rate chemistry was used to simulate a single, axisymmetric STME plume and the NLS base area. Parallel calculations were made of the Saturn V S-1 C/F1 plume base area flows. The objective was to characterize the plume/freestream shear layer for both vehicles as inputs for scaling the S-C/F1 flight data to NLS/STME conditions. The code was validated on high speed flows with relevant physics. This paper contains the calculations for the NLS/STME plume for the baseline nozzle and a modified nozzle. The modified nozzle was intended to reduce the fuel available for recirculation to the vehicle base region. Plumes for both nozzles were calculated at 10kFT and 50kFT.

  9. The Emission and Chemistry of Reactive Nitrogen Species in the Plume of an Athena II Rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popp, P. J.; Gao, R. S.; Neuman, J. A.; Northway, M. J.; Holecek, J. C.; Fahey, D. W.; Wiedinmyer, C.; Brock, C. A.; Ridley, B. A.; Walega, J. G.; Grahek, F. E.; Wilson, J. C.; Reeves, J. M.; Toohey, D. W.; Avallone, L. M.; Thornton, B. F.; Gates, A. M.; Ross, M. N.; Zittel, P. F.

    2001-12-01

    In situ measurements of total reactive nitrogen (NOy), nitric acid (HNO3), and particles were conducted in the plume of an Athena II rocket launched from Vandenberg AFB on September 24, 1999. These measurements were obtained onboard the NASA WB-57F high-altitude research aircraft as part of the Atmospheric Chemistry of Combustion Emissions near the Tropopause (ACCENT) mission. The calculated NOy emission index, determined from measurements made during the first 3 of 6 plume intercepts, was 2.1\\pm1.0 g NO2/kg propellant, consistent with far-field rocket plume model calculations. Although nitric oxide (NO) is thought to be the primary NOy species formed in the Athena solid rocket motor (SRM) and by hot afterburning in the plume, measurements in the plume as soon as 4 minutes after emission indicate that HNO3 is the dominant NOy species. In the chlorine-rich plume, NO is converted to chlorine nitrate (ClONO2) which reacts with water on emitted alumina particles to form HNO3. The data suggest HNO3 remains absorbed on alumina particles. With the potential increase in launch vehicle traffic in the coming decades, accurate modeling of the global impact of current and future rocket fleets will require the use of emission indices validated by observations.

  10. Effects of rocket exhaust on lunar soil reflectance properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clegg, Ryan N.; Jolliff, Bradley L.; Robinson, Mark S.; Hapke, Bruce W.; Plescia, Jeffrey B.

    2014-01-01

    High-resolution images of the Surveyor, Luna, and Apollo landing sites obtained by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) Narrow Angle Camera (NAC) show regions around the landers where reflectivity of the surface was modified. We interpret the change in reflectance properties of these regions mainly as disturbance of the regolith by rocket exhaust during descent of the spacecraft and we refer to these areas herein as "blast zones" (BZs). The BZs consist of an area of lower reflectance (LR-BZ) compared to the surroundings that extends up to a few meters out from the landers, as well as a broader halo of higher reflectance (HR-BZ) that extends tens to hundreds of meters away from the landers. When approximated as an ellipse, the average Apollo BZ area is ˜29,000 m2 (˜175 ± 60 m by 200 ± 27 m) which is 10× larger than the average Luna BZ, and over 100× larger than the average Surveyor BZ. The LR-BZs are most evident at the Apollo sites, especially where astronaut activity disturbed the soil, leading to a 15-30% (relative to background undisturbed areas) reduction in reflectance at ˜30° phase angle. The LR-BZs at the Surveyor and Luna sites are less evident and are unresolvable with NAC images. The average reflectance in the HR-BZs as determined for 30° phase angle is 3-12% higher than in the undisturbed surrounding areas; this magnitude is the same, within uncertainty, for all sites, indicating a common process or combination of processes causing differences in reflectance properties of the regolith. Phase-ratio images and photometric data collected over a range of illumination geometries show that a greater separation in reflectance occurs between the HR-BZs and undisturbed areas at phase angles between 0° and 70° and indicates that the HR-BZs are less backscattering than undisturbed areas. The LR-BZs are affected by macroscopic disruption of the surface and astronaut activity (at the Apollo sites). For the HR-BZ areas, reflectance has likely been affected by scouring from particles entrained by exhaust gases with low-angle trajectories. Regolith particle interactions with surface soil within HR-BZs may destroy fine-scale surface structure (e.g., "fairy-castle") and decrease macroscopic roughness, contributing to a decrease in backscattering character within the HR-BZs and an increase in backscattering character within the LR-BZs. Redistribution of fine particles from the LR-BZ to the HR-BZ may have also contributed to the changed reflectance. Photometric modeling is consistent with one or a combination of these processes.

  11. Comparison of Rocket Performance using Exhaust Diffuser and Conventional Techniques for Altitude Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sivo, Joseph N.; Peters, Daniel J.

    1959-01-01

    A rocket engine with an exhaust-nozzle area ratio of 25 was operated at a constant chamber pressure of 600 pounds per square inch absolute over a range of oxidant-fuel ratios at an altitude pressure corresponding to approximately 47,000 feet. At this condition, the nozzle flow is slightly underexpanded as it leaves the nozzle. The altitude simulation was obtained first through the use of an exhaust diffuser coupled with the rocket engine and secondly, in an altitude test chamber where separate exhauster equipment provided the altitude pressure. A comparison of performance data from these two tests has established that a diffuser used with a rocket engine operating at near-design nozzle pressure ratio can be a valid means of obtaining altitude performance data for rocket engines.

  12. Response of selected plant and insect species to simulated solid rocket exhaust mixtures and to exhaust components from solid rocket fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heck, W. W.; Knott, W. M.; Stahel, E. P.; Ambrose, J. T.; Mccrimmon, J. N.; Engle, M.; Romanow, L. A.; Sawyer, A. G.; Tyson, J. D.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of solid rocket fuel (SRF) exhaust on selected plant and and insect species in the Merritt Island, Florida area was investigated in order to determine if the exhaust clouds generated by shuttle launches would adversely affect the native, plants of the Merritt Island Wildlife Refuge, the citrus production, or the beekeeping industry of the island. Conditions were simulated in greenhouse exposure chambers and field chambers constructed to model the ideal continuous stirred tank reactor. A plant exposure system was developed for dispensing and monitoring the two major chemicals in SRF exhaust, HCl and Al203, and for dispensing and monitoring SRF exhaust (controlled fuel burns). Plants native to Merritt Island, Florida were grown and used as test species. Dose-response relationships were determined for short term exposure of selected plant species to HCl, Al203, and mixtures of the two to SRF exhaust.

  13. Retro Rocket Motor Self-Penetrating Scheme for Heat Shield Exhaust Ports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marrese-Reading, Colleen; St.Vaughn, Josh; Zell, Peter; Hamm, Ken; Corliss, Jim; Gayle, Steve; Pain, Rob; Rooney, Dan; Ramos, Amadi; Lewis, Doug; Shepherd, Joe; Inaba, Kazuaki

    2009-01-01

    A preliminary scheme was developed for base-mounted solid-propellant retro rocket motors to self-penetrate the Orion Crew Module heat shield for configurations with the heat shield retained during landings on Earth. In this system the motors propel impactors into structural push plates, which in turn push through the heat shield ablator material. The push plates are sized such that the remaining port in the ablator material is large enough to provide adequate flow area for the motor exhaust plume. The push plate thickness is sized to assure structural integrity behind the ablative thermal protection material. The concept feasibility was demonstrated and the performance was characterized using a gas gun to launch representative impactors into heat shield targets with push plates. The tests were conducted using targets equipped with Fiberform(R) and PICA as the heat shield ablator material layer. The PICA penetration event times were estimated to be under 30 ms from the start of motor ignition. The mass of the system (not including motors) was estimated to be less than 2.3 kg (5 lbs) per motor. The configuration and demonstrations are discussed.

  14. Flow field description of the Space Shuttle Vernier reaction control system exhaust plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cerimele, Mary P.; Alred, John W.

    1987-01-01

    The flow field for the Vernier Reaction Control System (VRCS) jets of the Space Shuttle Orbiter has been calculated from the nozzle throat to the far-field region. The calculations involved the use of recently improved rocket engine nozzle/plume codes. The flow field is discussed, and a brief overview of the calculation techniques is presented. In addition, a proposed on-orbit plume measurement experiment, designed to improve future estimations of the Vernier flow field, is addressed.

  15. Chance Encounter with a Stratospheric Kerosene Rocket Plume from Russia over California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, P. A.; Wilson, J. C.; Ross, M. N.; Brock, C.; Sheridan, P.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Lait, L. R.; Bui, T. P.; Loewenstein, M.

    1999-01-01

    During a routine ER-2 aircraft high-altitude test flight on April 18, 1997, an unusual aerosol cloud was detected at 20 km altitude near the California coast at about 370 degrees N latitude. Not visually observed by the ER-2 pilot, the cloud was characterized bv high concentration of soot and sulfate aerosol in a region over 100 km in horizontal extent indicating that the source of the plume was a large hydrocarbon fueled vehicle, most likely a launch vehicle powered only by rocket motors burning liquid oxygen and kerosene. Two Russian Soyuz rockets could conceivably have produced the plume. The first was launched from the Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan on April 6th; the second was launched from Plesetsk, Russia on April 9. Air parcel trajectory calculations and long-lived tracer gas concentrations in the cloud indicate that the Baikonur rocket launch is the most probable source of the plume. The parcel trajectory calculations do not unambiguously trace the transport of the Soyuz plume from Asia to North America, illustrating serious flaws in the point-to-point trajectory calculations. This chance encounter represents the only measurement of the stratospheric effects of emissions from a rocket powered exclusively with hydrocarbon fuel.

  16. Model of lidar range-Doppler signatures of solid rocket fuel plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bankman, Isaac N.; Giles, John W.; Chan, Stephen C.; Reed, Robert A.

    2004-09-01

    The analysis of particles produced by solid rocket motor fuels relates to two types of studies: the effect of these particles on the Earth's ozone layer, and the dynamic flight behavior of solid fuel boosters used by the NASA Space Shuttle. Since laser backscatter depends on the particle size and concentration, a lidar system can be used to analyze the particle distributions inside a solid rocket plume in flight. We present an analytical model that simulates the lidar returns from solid rocket plumes including effects of beam profile, spot size, polarization and sensing geometry. The backscatter and extinction coefficients of alumina particles are computed with the T-matrix method that can address non-spherical particles. The outputs of the model include time-resolved return pulses and range-Doppler signatures. Presented examples illustrate the effects of sensing geometry.

  17. User's manual for the REEDM (Rocket Exhaust Effluent Diffusion Model) computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorklund, J. R.; Dumbauld, R. K.; Cheney, C. S.; Geary, H. V.

    1982-01-01

    The REEDM computer program predicts concentrations, dosages, and depositions downwind from normal and abnormal launches of rocket vehicles at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. The atmospheric dispersion models, cloud-rise models, and other formulas used in the REEDM model are described mathematically Vehicle and source parameters, other pertinent physical properties of the rocket exhaust cloud, and meteorological layering techniques are presented as well as user's instructions for REEDM. Worked example problems are included.

  18. Hot rocket plume experiment - Survey and conceptual design. [of rhenium-iridium bipropellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millard, Jerry M.; Luan, Taylor W.; Dowdy, Mack W.

    1992-01-01

    Attention is given to a space-borne engine plume experiment study to fly an experiment which will both verify and quantify the reduced contamination from advanced rhenium-iridium earth-storable bipropellant rockets (hot rockets) and provide a correlation between high-fidelity, in-space measurements and theoretical plume and surface contamination models. The experiment conceptual design is based on survey results from plume and contamination technologists throughout the U.S. With respect to shuttle use, cursory investigations validate Hitchhiker availability and adaptability, adequate remote manipulator system (RMS) articulation and dynamic capability, acceptable RMS attachment capability, adequate power and telemetry capability, and adequate flight altitude and attitude/orbital capability.

  19. Analyzing rocket plume spectral data with neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Whitaker, K.W.; Krishnakumar, K.S.; Benzing, D.A.

    1995-09-01

    The Optical Plume Anomaly Detection (OPAD) system is under development to provide early-warning failure detection in support of ground-level testing of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME). Failure detection is to be achieved through the acquisition of spectrally resolved plume emissions and subsequent identification of abnormal levels indicative of engine corrosion or component failure. Two computer codes (one linear and the other non-linear) are used by the OPAD system to iteratively determine specific element concentrations in the SSME plume, given emission intensity and wavelength information. Since this analysis is extremely labor intensive, a study was initiated to develop neural networks that would model the `inverse` of these computer codes. Optimally connected feed-forward networks with imperceptible prediction error have been developed for each element modeled by the linear code, SPECTRA4. Radial basis function networks were developed for the non-linear code, SPECTRA5, and predict combustion temperature in addition to element concentrations.

  20. Analyzing rocket plume spectral data with neural networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, Kevin W.; Krishnakumar, K. S.; Benzing, Daniel A.

    1995-01-01

    The Optical Plume Anomaly Detection (OPAD) system is under development to provide early-warning failure detection in support of ground-level testing of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME). Failure detection is to be achieved through the acquisition of spectrally resolved plume emissions and subsequent identification of abnormal levels indicative of engine corrosion or component failure. Two computer codes (one linear and the other non-linear) are used by the OPAD system to iteratively determine specific element concentrations in the SSME plume, given emission intensity and wavelength information. Since this analysis is extremely labor intensive, a study was initiated to develop neural networks that would model the 'inverse' of these computer codes. Optimally connected feed-forward networks with imperceptible prediction error have been developed for each element modeled by the linear code, SPECTRA4. Radial basis function networks were developed for the non-linear code, SPECTRA5, and predict combustion temperature in addition to element concentrations.

  1. Electrets used in measuring rocket exhaust effluents from the space shuttle's solid rocket booster during static test firing, DM-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Susko, M.

    1979-01-01

    The purpose of this experimental research was to compare Marshall Space Flight Center's electrets with Thiokol's fixed flow air samplers during the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster Demonstration Model-3 static test firing on October 19, 1978. The measurement of rocket exhaust effluents by Thiokol's samplers and MSFC's electrets indicated that the firing of the Solid Rocket Booster had no significant effect on the quality of the air sampled. The highest measurement by Thiokol's samplers was obtained at Plant 3 (site 11) approximately 8 km at a 113 degree heading from the static test stand. At sites 11, 12, and 5, Thiokol's fixed flow air samplers measured 0.0048, 0.00016, and 0.00012 mg/m3 of CI. Alongside the fixed flow measurements, the electret counts from X-ray spectroscopy were 685, 894, and 719 counts. After background corrections, the counts were 334, 543, and 368, or an average of 415 counts. An additional electred, E20, which was the only measurement device at a site approximately 20 km northeast from the test site where no power was available, obtained 901 counts. After background correction, the count was 550. Again this data indicate there was no measurement of significant rocket exhaust effluents at the test site.

  2. Measurement and Characterization of Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor Plume Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, Robert Jeremy

    2009-01-01

    NASA's current models to predict lift-off acoustics for launch vehicles are currently being updated using several numerical and empirical inputs. One empirical input comes from free-field acoustic data measured at three Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) static firings. The measurements were collected by a joint collaboration between NASA - Marshall Space Flight Center, Wyle Labs, and ATK Launch Systems. For the first time NASA measured large-thrust solid rocket motor plume acoustics for evaluation of both noise sources and acoustic radiation properties. Over sixty acoustic free-field measurements were taken over the three static firings to support evaluation of acoustic radiation near the rocket plume, far-field acoustic radiation patterns, plume acoustic power efficiencies, and apparent noise source locations within the plume. At approximately 67 m off nozzle centerline and 70 m downstream of the nozzle exit plan, the measured overall sound pressure level of the RSRM was 155 dB. Peak overall levels in the far field were over 140 dB at 300 m and 50-deg off of the RSRM thrust centerline. The successful collaboration has yielded valuable data that are being implemented into NASA's lift-off acoustic models, which will then be used to update predictions for Ares I and Ares V liftoff acoustic environments.

  3. Numerical modeling of the hybrid plume plasma rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, F. R.; Krueger, W. A.; Yang, T. F.

    1985-01-01

    This paper reports on ongoing research in the area of numerical simulations of hybrid plume dynamics, and describes the basic mechanisms for energy and particle transport. The solution approach assumes cylindrical geometry and includes a multiplicity of atomic reactions, as well as the presence of a strong magnetic field. The principal reactions are electron impact ionization, and resonant charge exchange between hot ions and cold neutrals. Radial particle and energy transport is mainly by diffusion. The present description includes a modified Bohm diffusion model for plasma in the core of the plume, and classical neutral particle diffusion in the cooler regions of the flow. Neutrals are allowed to 'free stream' in the low density regions, where the collision mean-free-path becomes comparable, or even larger than the characteristic dimensions of the system. A parameteric scan of the various regimes of interest has been completed and the most significant results are presented.

  4. Program listing for the REEDM (Rocket Exhaust Effluent Diffusion Model) computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorklund, J. R.; Dumbauld, R. K.; Cheney, C. S.; Geary, H. V.

    1982-01-01

    The program listing for the REEDM Computer Program is provided. A mathematical description of the atmospheric dispersion models, cloud-rise models, and other formulas used in the REEDM model; vehicle and source parameters, other pertinent physical properties of the rocket exhaust cloud and meteorological layering techniques; user's instructions for the REEDM computer program; and worked example problems are contained in NASA CR-3646.

  5. The role of HOx in super- and subsonic aircraft exhaust plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanisco, T. F.; Wennberg, P. O.; Cohen, R. C.; Anderson, J. G.; Fahey, D. W.; Keim, E. R.; Gao, R. S.; Wamsley, R. C.; Donnelly, S. G.; Del Negro, L. A.; Salawitch, R. J.; Kelly, K. K.; Proffitt, M. H.

    The generation of sulfuric acid aerosols in aircraft exhaust has emerged as a critical issue in determining the impact of supersonic aircraft on stratospheric ozone. It has long been held that the first step in the mechanism of aerosol formation is the oxidation of SO2 emitted from the engine by OH in the exhaust plume. We report in situ measurements of OH and HO2 in the exhaust plumes of a supersonic (Air France Concorde) and a subsonic (NASA ER-2) aircraft in the lower stratosphere. These measurements imply that reactions with OH are responsible for oxidizing only a small fraction of SO2 (2%), and thus cannot explain the large number of particles observed in the exhaust wake of the Concorde.

  6. The Role of HOx in Super-and Subsonic Aircraft Exhaust Plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanisco, T. F.; Wennberg, P. O.; Cohen, R. C.; Anderson, J. G.; Fahey, D. W.; Keim, E. R.; Gao, R. S.; Wamsley, R. C.; Donnelly, S. G.; DelNegro, L. A.

    1997-01-01

    The generation of sulfuric acid aerosols in aircraft exhaust has emerged as a critical issue in determining the impact of supersonic aircraft on stratospheric ozone. It has long been held that the first step in the mechanism of aerosol formation is the oxidation of SO2 emitted from the engine by OH in the exhaust plume. We report in situ measurements of OH and HO2 in the exhaust plumes of a supersonic (Air France Concorde) and a subsonic (NASA ER-2) aircraft in the lower stratosphere. These measurements imply that reactions with OH are responsible for oxidizing only a small fraction of SO2 (2%), and thus cannot explain the large number of particles observed in the exhaust wake of the Concorde.

  7. The Role of HO(x) in Super- and Subsonic Aircraft Exhaust Plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanisco, T. F.; Wennberg, P. O.; Cohen, R. C.; Anderson, J. G.; Fahey, D. W.; Keim, E. R.; Gao, R. S.; Wamsley, R. C.; Donnelly, S. G.; DelNegro, L. A.; Salawitch, R. J.; Kelly, K. K.; Proffitt, M. H.

    1997-01-01

    The generation of sulfuric acid aerosols in aircraft exhaust has emerged as a critical issue in determining the impact of supersonic aircraft on stratospheric ozone. It has long been held that the first step in the mechanism of aerosol formation is the oxidation of SO2 emitted from the engine by OH in the exhaust plume. We report in situ measurements of OH and HO2 in the exhaust plumes of a supersonic (Air France Concorde) and a subsonic (NASA ER-2) aircraft in the lower stratosphere. These measurements imply that reactions with OH are responsible for oxidizing only a small fraction of SO2 (2%), and thus cannot explain the large number of particles observed in the exhaust wake of the Concorde.

  8. The Role of HO(x) in Super- and Subsonic Aircraft Exhaust Plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanisco, T. F.; Wennberg, P. O.; Cohen, R. C.; Anderson, J. G.; Fahey, D. W.; Keim, E. R.; Gao, R. S.; Wamsley, R. C.; Donnelly, S. G.; DelNegro, L. A.; Salawitch, R. J.; Kelly, K. K.; Proffitt, M. H.

    1997-01-01

    The generation of sulfuric acid aerosols in aircraft exhaust has emerged as a critical issue in determining the impact of supersonic aircraft on stratospheric ozone. It has long been held that the first step in the mechanism of aerosol formation is the oxidation of SO2, emitted from the engine by OH in the exhaust plume. We report in situ measurements of OH and HO, in the exhaust plumes of a supersonic (Air France Concorde) and a subsonic (NASA ER-2) aircraft in the lower stratosphere. These measurements imply that reactions with OH are responsible for oxidizing only a small fraction of SO2 (2%), and thus cannot explain the large number of particles observed in the exhaust wake of the Concorde.

  9. A computer simulation of the afterburning processes occurring within solid rocket motor plumes in the troposphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gomberg, R. I.; Stewart, R. B.

    1976-01-01

    As part of a continuing study of the environmental effects of solid rocket motor (SRM) operations in the troposphere, a numerical model was used to simulate the afterburning processes occurring in solid rocket motor plumes and to predict the quantities of potentially harmful chemical species which are created. The calculations include the effects of finite-rate chemistry and turbulent mixing. It is found that the amount of NO produced is much less than the amount of HCl present in the plume, that chlorine will appear predominantly in the form of HCl although some molecular chlorine is present, and that combustion is complete as is evident from the predominance of carbon dioxide over carbon monoxide.

  10. Axisymmetric computational fluid dynamics analysis of a film/dump-cooled rocket nozzle plume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, P. K.; Warsi, S. A.

    1993-01-01

    Prediction of convective base heating rates for a new launch vehicle presents significant challenges to analysts concerned with base environments. The present effort seeks to augment classical base heating scaling techniques via a detailed investigation of the exhaust plume shear layer of a single H2/O2 Space Transportation Main Engine (STME). Use of fuel-rich turbine exhaust to cool the STME nozzle presented concerns regarding potential recirculation of these gases to the base region with attendant increase in the base heating rate. A pressure-based full Navier-Stokes computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code with finite rate chemistry is used to predict plumes for vehicle altitudes of 10 kft and 50 kft. Levels of combustible species within the plume shear layers are calculated in order to assess assumptions made in the base heating analysis.

  11. Recent Advances in Studies of Ionospheric Modification Using Rocket Exhaust (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhardt, P. A.

    2009-12-01

    Rocket exhaust interacts with the ionosphere to produce a wide range of disturbances. A ten second burn of the Orbital Maneuver Subsystem (OMS) engines on the Space Shuttle deposits over 1 Giga Joule of energy into the upper atmosphere. The exhaust vapors travel at speeds between 4.7 and 10.7 km/s coupling momentum into the ions by both collisions and charge exchange. Long-lived plasma irregularities are formed by the artificial hypersonic “neutral wind” passing through the ionosphere. Charge exchange between the fast neutrals and the ambient ions yields high-speed ion beams that excite electro-static plasma waves. Ground based radar has been used to detect both field aligned irregularities and electrostatic turbulence driven by the Space Shuttle OMS exhaust. Molecular ions produced by the charge exchange with molecules in the rocket exhaust recombine with a time scale of 10 minutes leaving a residual plasma depression. This ionospheric “hole” fills in by ambipolar diffusion leaving a depleted magnetic flux tube. This large scale reduction in Pedersen conductivity can provide a seed for plasma interchange instabilities. For instance, a rocket firing on the bottom side of the ionosphere near the equator can trigger a Rayleigh-Taylor instability that is naturally seen as equatorial Spread-F. The Naval Research Laboratory has been exploring these phenomena with dedicated burns of the Space Shuttle OMS engines and exhaust releases from rockets. The Shuttle Ionospheric Modification with Pulsed Localized Exhaust (SIMPLEX) series of experiments uses ground radars to probe the ionosphere affected by dedicated burns of the Space Shuttle OMS engines. Radars located at Millstone Hill, Massachusetts; Arecibo, Puerto Rico; Jicamarca, Peru; Kwajalein, Marshall Island; and Alice Springs, Australia have participated in the SIMPLEX program. A companion program called Shuttle Exhaust Ionospheric Turbulence Experiment has or will use satellites to fly through the turbulence ionosphere produced by Space Shuttle Exhaust. This program is employing the Air Force Research Laboratory C/NOFS and the Canadian CASSIOPE/EPoP satellites to make in situ measurements of Space Shuttle exhaust effects. Finally, NRL is conducting the Charged Aerosol Release Experiment which employs a solid rocket motor to modify the ionosphere using supersonic particulate injection and dusty plasma formation. Both the theoretic basis for these experiments and as summary of the experimental results will be presented.

  12. Chance Encounter with a Stratospheric Kerosene Rocket Plume From Russia Over California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, P. A.; Wilson, J. C.; Ross, M. N.; Brock, C. A.; Sheridan, P. J.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Lait, L. R.; Bui, T. P.; Loewenstein, M.; Podolske, J. R.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A high-altitude aircraft flight on April 18, 1997 detected an enormous aerosol cloud at 20 km altitude near California (37 N). Not visually observed, the cloud had high concentrations of soot and sulfate aerosol, and was over 180 km in horizontal extent. The cloud was probably a large hydrocarbon fueled vehicle, most likely from rocket motors burning liquid oxygen and kerosene. One of two Russian Soyuz rockets could have produced the cloud: a launch from the Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan on April 6; or from Plesetsk, Russia on April 9. Parcel trajectories and long-lived trace gas concentrations suggest the Baikonur launch as the cloud source. Cloud trajectories do not trace the Soyuz plume from Asia to North America, illustrating the uncertainties of point-to-point trajectories. This cloud encounter is the only stratospheric measurement of a hydrocarbon fuel powered rocket.

  13. Use of a Microphone Phased Array to Determine Noise Sources in a Rocket Plume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panda, J.; Mosher, R.

    2010-01-01

    A 70-element microphone phased array was used to identify noise sources in the plume of a solid rocket motor. An environment chamber was built and other precautions were taken to protect the sensitive condenser microphones from rain, thunderstorms and other environmental elements during prolonged stay in the outdoor test stand. A camera mounted at the center of the array was used to photograph the plume. In the first phase of the study the array was placed in an anechoic chamber for calibration, and validation of the indigenous Matlab(R) based beamform software. It was found that the "advanced" beamform methods, such as CLEAN-SC was partially successful in identifying speaker sources placed closer than the Rayleigh criteria. To participate in the field test all equipments were shipped to NASA Marshal Space Flight Center, where the elements of the array hardware were rebuilt around the test stand. The sensitive amplifiers and the data acquisition hardware were placed in a safe basement, and 100m long cables were used to connect the microphones, Kulites and the camera. The array chamber and the microphones were found to withstand the environmental elements as well as the shaking from the rocket plume generated noise. The beamform map was superimposed on a photo of the rocket plume to readily identify the source distribution. It was found that the plume made an exceptionally long, >30 diameter, noise source over a large frequency range. The shock pattern created spatial modulation of the noise source. Interestingly, the concrete pad of the horizontal test stand was found to be a good acoustic reflector: the beamform map showed two distinct source distributions- the plume and its reflection on the pad. The array was found to be most effective in the frequency range of 2kHz to 10kHz. As expected, the classical beamform method excessively smeared the noise sources at lower frequencies and produced excessive side-lobes at higher frequencies. The "advanced" beamform routine CLEAN-SC created a series of lumped sources which may be unphysical. We believe that the present effort is the first-ever attempt to directly measure noise source distribution in a rocket plume.

  14. Stratospheric aircraft exhaust plume and wake chemistry studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miake-Lye, R. C.; Martinez-Sanchez, M.; Brown, R. C.; Kolb, C. E.; Worsnop, D. R.; Zahniser, M. S.; Robinson, G. N.; Rodriguez, J. M.; Ko, M. K. W.; Shia, R-L.

    1992-01-01

    This report documents progress to date in an ongoing study to analyze and model emissions leaving a proposed High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) from when the exhaust gases leave the engine until they are deposited at atmospheric scales in the stratosphere. Estimates are given for the emissions, summarizing relevant earlier work (CIAP) and reviewing current propulsion research efforts. The chemical evolution and the mixing and vortical motion of the exhaust are analyzed to track the exhaust and its speciation as the emissions are mixed to atmospheric scales. The species tracked include those that could be heterogeneously reactive on the surfaces of the condensed solid water (ice) particles and on exhaust soot particle surfaces. Dispersion and reaction of chemical constituents in the far wake are studied with a Lagrangian air parcel model, in conjunction with a radiation code to calculate the net heating/cooling. Laboratory measurements of heterogeneous chemistry of aqueous sulfuric acid and nitric acid hydrates are also described. Results include the solubility of HCl in sulfuric acid which is a key parameter for modeling stratospheric processing. We also report initial results for condensation of nitric acid trihydrate from gas phase H2O and HNO3.

  15. Shuttle primary reaction control system engine exhaust plume contamination effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koontz, Steve; Ehlers, Horst; Pedley, Mike; Cross, John; Hakes, Charles

    1993-01-01

    Space Shuttle proximity operations constitute an important part of the SSF induced external environment. The impingement of primary reaction control system (PRCS) engine plumes on SSF functional surfaces during docking or berthing and separation leads to concerns about molecular contamination and high speed particle impact. The Shuttle Plume Impingement flight Experiment (SPIE) was designed to provide a direct measure of both the molecular contamination and particle impact rates produced by Shuttle PRCS engines in the LEO environment. The measured permanent deposition produced by PRCS engine firings was less than that assumed in current SSF programatic assessments. Only two to three possible high velocity particle impact pits were observed on the RMS end effector hardware.

  16. Nozzle installation effects on the noise from supersonic exhaust plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wlezien, R. W.

    1992-04-01

    The sensitivity of screech coupling in supersonic jets to nozzle installation geometry is explored as a function of nozzle shape, spacing, and orientation. The coupling phenomenon is shown to be a function of geometry for a variety of twin axisymmetric and rectangular nozzle configurations as well as for a single jet in proximity to a solid surface. Rapid plume merging or close proximity to a wall are shown to minimize the noise increment due to coupling. Twin impinging supersonic plumes experience more complex aeroacoustic interactions. The acoustic near field is dominated by screech and impingement tones, but the fuselage undersurface dynamic loads are primarily due to impingement of the unsteady upwash fountain flow on the fuselage undersurface.

  17. Passive ranging of dynamic rocket plumes using infrared and visible oxygen attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, R. Anthony; Hawks, Michael R.

    2011-05-01

    Atmospheric oxygen absorption bands in observed spectra of boost phase missiles can be used to accurately estimate range from sensor to target. One method is to compare observed values of band averaged absorption to radiative transfer models. This is most effective using bands where there is a single absorbing species. This work compares spectral attenuation of two oxygen absorption bands in the near-infrared (NIR) and visible (Vis) spectrum, centered at 762 nm and 690 nm, to passively determine range. Spectra were observed from a static test of a full-scale solid rocket motor at a 900m range. The NIR O2 band provided range estimates accurate to within 3%, while the Vis O2 band had a range error of 15%. A Falcon 9 rocket launch at an initial range of 13km was also tracked and observed for 90 seconds after ignition. The NIR O2 band provided in-flight range estimates accurate to within 2% error for the first 30 seconds of tracked observation. The Vis O2 band also provided accurate range estimates with an error of approximately 4%. Rocket plumes are expected to be significantly brighter at longer wavelengths, but absorption in the NIR band is nearly ten times stronger than the Vis band, causing saturation at shorter path lengths. An atmospheric band is considered saturated when all the in-band frequencies emitted from the rocket plume are absorbed before reaching the sensor.

  18. Computational models for the analysis of three-dimensional internal and exhaust plume flowfields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dash, S. M.; Delguidice, P. D.

    1977-01-01

    This paper describes computational procedures developed for the analysis of three-dimensional supersonic ducted flows and multinozzle exhaust plume flowfields. The models/codes embodying these procedures cater to a broad spectrum of geometric situations via the use of multiple reference plane grid networks in several coordinate systems. Shock capturing techniques are employed to trace the propagation and interaction of multiple shock surfaces while the plume interface, separating the exhaust and external flows, and the plume external shock are discretely analyzed. The computational grid within the reference planes follows the trace of streamlines to facilitate the incorporation of finite-rate chemistry and viscous computational capabilities. Exhaust gas properties consist of combustion products in chemical equilibrium. The computational accuracy of the models/codes is assessed via comparisons with exact solutions, results of other codes and experimental data. Results are presented for the flows in two-dimensional convergent and divergent ducts, expansive and compressive corner flows, flow in a rectangular nozzle and the plume flowfields for exhausts issuing out of single and multiple rectangular nozzles.

  19. The role of sulfur emission in volatile particle formation in jet aircraft exhaust plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kärcher, B.; Fahey, D. W.

    Recent in-situ emission measurements of the Concorde in the lower stratosphere point to a surprisingly efficient conversion of fuel sulfur to H2SO4 in the exhaust plume. By means of a comprehensive model, the formation and evolution of aerosol particles and precursors are calculated in the diluting aircraft wake. The results provide strong evidence that high levels of SO3 present in the nascent plume are required to explain the observations of large numbers of nanometer-sized aerosols. Limiting particle formation at emission to keep potential chemical effects on stratospheric ozone small will require control of the sulfur oxidation kinetics during fuel combustion. The similarities between super- and subsonic exhaust plumes suggest that the presence of SO3 in the latter will also be a key limiting factor in new aerosol production.

  20. The washout of combustion-generated hydrogen chloride. [rocket exhaust raindrop scavenging quantification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fenton, D. L.; Purcell, R. Y.; Hrdina, D.; Knutson, E. O.

    1980-01-01

    The coefficient for the washout from a rocket exhaust cloud of HCl generated by the combustion of an ammonium perchlorate-based solid rocket propellant such as that to be used for the Space Shuttle Booster is determined. A mathematical model of HCl scavenging by rain is developed taking into account rain droplet size, fall velocity and concentration under various rain conditions, partitioning of exhaust HCl between liquid and gaseous phases, the tendency of HCl to promote water vapor condensation and the concentration and size of droplets within the exhaust cloud. The washout coefficient is calculated as a function of total cloud water content, total HCl content at 100% relative humidity, condensation nuclei concentration and rain intensity. The model predictions are compared with experimental results obtained in scavenging tests with solid rocket exhaust and raindrops of different sizes, and the large reduction in washout coefficient at high relative humidities predicted by the model is not observed. A washout coefficient equal to 0.0000512 times the -0.176 power of the mass concentration of HCl times the 0.773 power of the rainfall intensity is obtained from the experimental data.

  1. A Transonic and Surpersonic Investigation of Jet Exhaust Plume Effects on the Afterbody and Base Pressures of a Body of Revolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, C. D.; Cooper, C. E., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    An experimental aerodynamic investigation was conducted to provide data for studies to determine the criteria for simulating rocket engine plume induced aerodynamic effects in the wind tunnel using a simulated gaseous plume. Model surface and base pressure data were obtained in the presence of both a simulated and a prototype gaseous plume for a matrix of plume properties to enable investigators to determine the parameters that correlate the simulated and prototype plume-induced data. The test program was conducted in the Marshall Space Flight Center's 14 x 14-inch trisonic wind tunnel using two models, the first being a strut mounted cone-ogive-cylinder model with a fineness ratio of 9. Model exterior pressures, model plenum chamber and nozzle performance data were obtained at Mach numbers of 0.9, 1.2, 1.46, and 3.48. The exhaust plume was generated by using air as the simulant gas, or Freon-14 (CF4) as the prototype gas, over a chamber pressure range from 0 to 2,000 psia and a total temperature range from 50 to 600 F.

  2. Remote measurement of the plume shape of aircraft exhausts at airports by passive FTIR spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schafer, Klaus; Jahn, Carsten; Utzig, Selina; Flores-Jardines, Edgar; Harig, Roland; Rusch, Peter

    2004-11-01

    Information about the interaction between the exhaust plume of an aircraft jet engine and ambient air is required for the application of small-scale chemistry-transport models to investigate airport air quality. This interaction is not well understood. In order to study the interaction, spatial information about the plume is required. FTIR emission spectroscopy may be applied to analyze the aircraft exhausts. In order to characterize the plumes spatially, a scanning imaging FTIR system (SIGIS) has been improved. SIGIS is comprised of an interferometer (Bruker OPAG), an azimuth-elevation-scanning mirror, a data acquisition and control system with digital signal processors (DSP), an infrared camera and a personal computer. With this instrumentation it is possible to visualise the plume and to obtain information about the temperature distribution within the plume. Measurements are performed at low spectral resolution, because the dynamic environment of these measurements limits the measurement time to about 2 minutes. Measurements of the plume shapes of an APU and of main engines were performed.

  3. Range safety signal attenuation by the Space Shuttle main engine exhaust plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearce, B. E.

    1983-01-01

    An analysis of attenuation of the range safety signal at 416.5 MHz observed after SRB separation and ending at hand over to Bermuda, during which transmission must pass through the LOX/H2 propelled main engine exhaust plumes, is summarized. Absorption by free electrons in the exhaust plume can account for the nearly constant magnitude of the observed attenuation during this period; it does not explain the short term transient increases that occur at one or more times during this portion of the flight. It is necessary to assume that a trace amount (about 0.5 ppm) of easily ionizable impurity must be present in the exhaust flow. Other mechanisms of attenuation, such as scattering by turbulent fluctuations of both free and bound electrons and absorption by water vapor, were examined but found to be inadequate to explain the observations.

  4. Cooled Ceramic Matrix Composite Panel Successfully Tested in Rocket Exhaust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckel, Andrew J.

    2001-01-01

    Actively cooled ceramic matrix composite (CMC) components are enabling or enhancing for a broad range of hypersonic and reusable launch vehicle propulsion systems. Teaming with other NASA centers, the Air Force, and industry, the Glenn Ceramics Branch has successfully tested multiple cooled CMC panel concepts in high-heat-flux, high-pressure, flowing rocket engine combustion gas environments. Sub-element components survived multiple cycles and the severe thermal gradients imposed by combustion gas temperatures in excess of 5500 F and cryogenic hydrogen or ambient temperature water internal coolants. These demonstrations are critical for the continued development of this class of materials, and the research is expected to continue with additional concepts and increasingly larger and more complex geometries being fabricated and tested in a broad range of engine operating conditions.

  5. The effects of an ion-thruster exhaust plume on S-band carrier transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackerknecht, W. E.; Stanton, P. H.

    1976-01-01

    The study reported here was undertaken (1) to develop models of the effects of an ion-thruster exhaust plume on S-band signals, and (2) to measure the effects. The results show that an S-band signal passing through an ion-thruster plume is reduced in amplitude and advanced in phase. The mathematical models gave reasonable estimates of the average signal attenuation and phase shift. Negligible fluctuations in the signal amplitude and phase were measured during steady-state thruster operation. However, large jumps in phase occurred when changes were made in the thruster operating state. This study confirms that the thruster plume can have a significant effect on S-band communication link performance; hence the plume effects must be considered in S-band link calculations when electric thrusters are used for spacecraft propulsion.

  6. Condensation of water vapor and carbon dioxide in the jet exhausts of rocket engines: 1. Heterogeneous condensation of combustion products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platov, Yu. V.; Semenov, A. I.; Filippov, B. V.

    2014-01-01

    Condensation of water vapor and carbon dioxide in the jet exhausts of rocket engines during last stages of Proton, Molniya, and Start launchers operating in the upper atmospheric with different types of fuels is considered. Particle heating is taken into account with emission of latent heat of condensation and energy loss due to radiation and heat exchange with combustion products. Using the solution of the heat balance and condensed particle mass equations, the temporal change in the temperature and thickness of the condensate layer is obtained. Practically, no condensation of water vapor and carbon dioxide in the jet exhaust of a Start launcher occurs. In plumes of Proton and Molniya launchers, the condensation of water vapor and carbon dioxide can start at distances of 120-170 m and 450-650 m from the engine nozzle, respectively. In the course of condensation, the thickness of the "water" layer on particles can exceed 100 Å, and the thickness of carbon dioxide can exceed 60 Å.

  7. Rocket exhaust effluent modeling for tropospheric air quality and environmental assessments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. B.; Stewart, R. B.

    1977-01-01

    The various techniques for diffusion predictions to support air quality predictions and environmental assessments for aerospace applications are discussed in terms of limitations imposed by atmospheric data. This affords an introduction to the rationale behind the selection of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Rocket Exhaust Effluent Diffusion (REED) program. The models utilized in the NASA/MSFC REED program are explained. This program is then evaluated in terms of some results from a joint MSFC/Langley Research Center/Kennedy Space Center Titan Exhaust Effluent Prediction and Monitoring Program.

  8. Computational models for the viscous/inviscid analysis of jet aircraft exhaust plumes. [predicting afterbody drag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dash, S. M.; Pergament, H. S.; Thorpe, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    Computational models which analyze viscous/inviscid flow processes in jet aircraft exhaust plumes are discussed. These models are component parts of an NASA-LaRC method for the prediction of nozzle afterbody drag. Inviscid/shock processes are analyzed by the SCIPAC code which is a compact version of a generalized shock capturing, inviscid plume code (SCIPPY). The SCIPAC code analyzes underexpanded jet exhaust gas mixtures with a self-contained thermodynamic package for hydrocarbon exhaust products and air. A detailed and automated treatment of the embedded subsonic zones behind Mach discs is provided in this analysis. Mixing processes along the plume interface are analyzed by two upgraded versions of an overlaid, turbulent mixing code (BOAT) developed previously for calculating nearfield jet entrainment. The BOATAC program is a frozen chemistry version of BOAT containing the aircraft thermodynamic package as SCIPAC; BOATAB is an afterburning version with a self-contained aircraft (hydrocarbon/air) finite-rate chemistry package. The coupling of viscous and inviscid flow processes is achieved by an overlaid procedure with interactive effects accounted for by a displacement thickness type correction to the inviscid plume interface.

  9. Computational models for the viscous/inviscid analysis of jet aircraft exhaust plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dash, S. M.; Pergament, H. S.; Thorpe, R. D.

    1980-05-01

    Computational models which analyze viscous/inviscid flow processes in jet aircraft exhaust plumes are discussed. These models are component parts of an NASA-LaRC method for the prediction of nozzle afterbody drag. Inviscid/shock processes are analyzed by the SCIPAC code which is a compact version of a generalized shock capturing, inviscid plume code (SCIPPY). The SCIPAC code analyzes underexpanded jet exhaust gas mixtures with a self-contained thermodynamic package for hydrocarbon exhaust products and air. A detailed and automated treatment of the embedded subsonic zones behind Mach discs is provided in this analysis. Mixing processes along the plume interface are analyzed by two upgraded versions of an overlaid, turbulent mixing code (BOAT) developed previously for calculating nearfield jet entrainment. The BOATAC program is a frozen chemistry version of BOAT containing the aircraft thermodynamic package as SCIPAC; BOATAB is an afterburning version with a self-contained aircraft (hydrocarbon/air) finite-rate chemistry package. The coupling of viscous and inviscid flow processes is achieved by an overlaid procedure with interactive effects accounted for by a displacement thickness type correction to the inviscid plume interface.

  10. Modification of the upper atmosphere with chemicals found in rocket exhaust

    SciTech Connect

    Bernhardt, P.A.; Zinn, J.; Mendillo, M.; Baumgardner, J.

    1982-01-01

    Rockets, burning above 200 km altitude, release exhaust vapors which react chemically with the plasma comprising the F-region ionosphere. The two major types of atmospheric modification produced by rocket exhaust are: (1) the formation of large scale ionospheric holes, and (2) the enhancement of the airglow emissions. The ionospheric holes are regions tens of kilometers in diameter where the plasma concentration can be reduced by a factor of ten or more. Plasma instabilities may produce irregularities at the edges of the holes. Communication and navigation systems relying on radio propagation through the modified ionosphere may be affected. Airglow enhancements are a result of excited neutral species being produced by chemical reactions between the rocket exhaust and the ionospheric plasma. For example, the 630 nm line from atomic oxygen may increase twenty-fold in intensity over the ambient level. This paper reviews experimental observations and theoretical treatments of ionospheric modification produced by gas releases in the upper atmosphere. Recent experimental measurements of the ionospheric modification by an ATLAS-F launch vehicle are presented. The plans for future experiments are discussed.

  11. Optical Measurements on Solid Specimens of Solid Rocket Motor Exhaust and Solid Rocket Motor Slag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, F. E., III

    1991-01-01

    Samples of aluminum slag were investigated to aid the Earth Science and Applications Division at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Alumina from space motor propellant exhaust and space motor propellant slag was examined as a component of space refuse. Thermal emittance and solar absorptivity measurements were taken to support their comparison with reflectance measurements derived from actual debris. To determine the similarity between the samples and space motor exhaust or space motor slag, emittance and absorbance results were correlated with an examination of specimen morphology.

  12. Exhaust plumes and their interaction with missile airframes - A new viewpoint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dash, S. M.; Sinha, N.

    1992-01-01

    The present, novel treatment of missile airframe-exhaust plume interactions emphasizes their simulation via a formal solution of the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RNS) equation and is accordingly able to address the simulation requirements of novel missiles with nonconventional/integrated propulsion systems. The method is made possible by implicit RNS codes with improved artificial dissipation models, generalized geometric capabilities, and improved two-equation turbulence models, as well as by such codes' recent incorporation of plume thermochemistry and multiphase flow effects.

  13. The effect of exhaust plume/afterbody interaction on installed Scramjet performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, Thomas Alan

    1988-01-01

    Newly emerging aerospace technology points to the feasibility of sustained hypersonic flight. Designing a propulsion system capable of generating the necessary thrust is now the major obstacle. First-generation vehicles will be driven by air-breathing scramjet (supersonic combustion ramjet) engines. Because of engine size limitations, the exhaust gas leaving the nozzle will be highly underexpanded. Consequently, a significant amount of thrust and lift can be extracted by allowing the exhaust gases to expand along the underbody of the vehicle. Predicting how these forces influence overall vehicle thrust, lift, and moment is essential to a successful design. This work represents an important first step toward that objective. The UWIN code, an upwind, implicit Navier-Stokes computer program, has been applied to hypersonic exhaust plume/afterbody flow fields. The capability to solve entire vehicle geometries at hypersonic speeds, including an interacting exhaust plume, has been demonstrated for the first time. Comparison of the numerical results with available experimental data shows good agreement in all cases investigated. For moderately underexpanded jets, afterbody forces were found to vary linearly with the nozzle exit pressure, and increasing the exit pressure produced additional nose-down pitching moment. Coupling a species continuity equation to the UWIN code enabled calculations indicating that exhaust gases with low isentropic exponents (gamma) contribute larger afterbody forces than high-gamma exhaust gases. Moderately underexpanded jets, which remain attached to unswept afterbodies, underwent streamwise separation on upswept afterbodies. Highly underexpanded jets produced altogether different flow patterns, however. The highly underexpanded jet creates a strong plume shock, and the interaction of this shock with the afterbody was found to produce complicated patterns of crossflow separation. Finally, the effect of thrust vectoring on vehicle balance has been shown to alter dramatically the vehicle pitching moment.

  14. Abatement of an aircraft exhaust plume using aerodynamic baffles.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Michael; Christie, Simon M; Graham, Angus; Garry, Kevin P; Velikov, Stefan; Poll, D Ian; Smith, Malcolm G; Mead, M Iqbal; Popoola, Olalekan A M; Stewart, Gregor B; Jones, Roderic L

    2013-03-01

    The exhaust jet from a departing commercial aircraft will eventually rise buoyantly away from the ground; given the high thrust/power (i.e., momentum/buoyancy) ratio of modern aero-engines, however, this is a slow process, perhaps requiring ∼ 1 min or more. Supported by theoretical and wind tunnel modeling, we have experimented with an array of aerodynamic baffles on the surface behind a set of turbofan engines of 124 kN thrust. Lidar and point sampler measurements show that, as long as the intervention takes place within the zone where the Coanda effect holds the jet to the surface (i.e., within about 70 m in this case), then quite modest surface-mounted baffles can rapidly lift the jet away from the ground. This is of potential benefit in abating both surface concentrations and jet blast downstream. There is also some modest acoustic benefit. By distributing the aerodynamic lift and drag across an array of baffles, each need only be a fraction of the height of a single blast fence. PMID:23343109

  15. Space shuttle exhaust plumes in the lower thermosphere: Advective transport and diffusive spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Michael H.; Lossow, Stefan; Siskind, David E.; Meier, R. R.; Randall, Cora E.; Russell, James M.; Urban, Jo; Murtagh, Donal

    2014-02-01

    The space shuttle main engine plume deposited between 100 and 115 km altitude is a valuable tracer for global-scale dynamical processes. Several studies have shown that this plume can reach the Arctic or Antarctic to form bursts of polar mesospheric clouds (PMCs) within a few days. The rapid transport of the shuttle plume is currently not reproduced by general circulation models and is not well understood. To help delineate the issues, we present the complete satellite datasets of shuttle plume observations by the Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry instrument and the Sub-Millimeter Radiometer instrument. From 2002 to 2011 these two instruments observed 27 shuttle plumes in over 600 limb scans of water vapor emission, from which we derive both advective meridional transport and diffusive spreading. Each plume is deposited at virtually the same place off the United States east coast so our results are relevant to northern mid-latitudes. We find that the advective transport for the first 6-18 h following deposition depends on the local time (LT) of launch: shuttle plumes deposited later in the day (~13-22 LT) typically move south whereas they otherwise typically move north. For these younger plumes rapid transport is most favorable for launches at 6 and 18 LT, when the displacement is 10° in latitude corresponding to an average wind speed of 30 m/s. For plumes between 18 and 30 h old some show average sustained meridional speeds of 30 m/s. For plumes between 30 and 54 h old the observations suggest a seasonal dependence to the meridional transport, peaking near the beginning of year at 24 m/s. The diffusive spreading of the plume superimposed on the transport is on average 23 m/s in 24 h. The plume observations show large variations in both meridional transport and diffusive spreading so that accurate modeling requires knowledge of the winds specific to each case. The combination of transport and spreading from the STS-118 plume in August 2007 formed bright PMCs between 75 and 85°N a day after launch. These are the highest latitude Arctic PMCs formed by shuttle exhaust reported to date.

  16. An overview of in-flight plume diagnostics for rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madzsar, G. C.; Bickford, R. L.; Duncan, D. B.

    1992-01-01

    An overview and progress report of the work performed or sponsored by LeRC toward the development of in-flight plume spectroscopy technology for health and performance monitoring of liquid propellant rocket engines are presented. The primary objective of this effort is to develop technology that can be utilized on any flight engine. This technology will be validated by a hardware demonstration of a system capable of being retrofitted onto the Space Shuttle Main Engines for spectroscopic measurements during flight. The philosophy on system definition and status on the development of instrumentation, optics, and signal processing with respect to implementation on a flight engine are discussed.

  17. Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor Plume Pressure and Heat Rate Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vonEckroth, Wulf; Struchen, Leah; Trovillion, Tom; Perez, Ravael; Nereolich, Shaun; Parlier, Chris

    2012-01-01

    The Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) Main Flame Deflector (MFD) at Launch Complex 39A was instrumented with sensors to measure heat rates, pressures, and temperatures on the last three Space Shuttle launches. Because the SRB plume is hot and erosive, a robust Tungsten Piston Calorimeter was developed to compliment the measurements made by off-the-shelf sensors. Witness materials were installed and their melting and erosion response to the Mach 2 / 4500 F / 4-second duration plume was observed. The data show that the specification document used for the design of the MFD thermal protection system over-predicted heat rates by a factor of 3 and under-predicted pressures by a factor of 2. These findings will be used to baseline NASA Computational Fluid Dynamics models and develop innovative MFD designs for the Space Launch System (SLS) before this vehicle becomes operational in 2017.

  18. Crew Launch Vehicle Mobile Launcher Solid Rocket Motor Plume Induced Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vu, Bruce T.; Sulyma, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The plume-induced environment created by the Ares 1 first stage, five-segment reusable solid rocket motor (RSRMV) will impose high heating rates and impact pressures on Launch Complex 39. The extremes of these environments pose a potential threat to weaken or even cause structural components to fail if insufficiently designed. Therefore the ability to accurately predict these environments is critical to assist in specifying structural design requirements to insure overall structural integrity and flight safety. This paper presents the predicted thermal and pressure environments induced by the launch of the Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV) from Launch Complex (LC) 39. Once the environments are predicted, a follow-on thermal analysis is required to determine the surface temperature response and the degradation rate of the materials. An example of structures responding to the plume-induced environment will be provided.

  19. Far-Field Turbulent Vortex-Wake/Exhaust Plume Interaction for Subsonic and HSCT Airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandil, Osama A.; Adam, Ihab; Wong, Tin-Chee

    1996-01-01

    Computational study of the far-field turbulent vortex-wake/exhaust plume interaction for subsonic and high speed civil transport (HSCT) airplanes is carried out. The Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (NS) equations are solved using the implicit, upwind, Roe-flux-differencing, finite-volume scheme. The two-equation shear stress transport model of Menter is implemented with the NS solver for turbulent-flow calculation. For the far-field study, the computations of vortex-wake interaction with the exhaust plume of a single engine of a Boeing 727 wing in a holding condition and two engines of an HSCT in a cruise condition are carried out using overlapping zonal method for several miles downstream. These results are obtained using the computer code FTNS3D. The results of the subsonic flow of this code are compared with those of a parabolized NS solver known as the UNIWAKE code.

  20. Some physical and thermodynamic properties of rocket exhaust clouds measured with infrared scanners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gomberg, R. I.; Kantsios, A. G.; Rosensteel, F. J.

    1977-01-01

    Measurements using infrared scanners were made of the radiation from exhaust clouds from liquid- and solid-propellant rocket boosters. Field measurements from four launches were discussed. These measurements were intended to explore the physical and thermodynamic properties of these exhaust clouds during their formation and subsequent dispersion. Information was obtained concerning the initial cloud's buoyancy, the stabilized cloud's shape and trajectory, the cloud volume as a function of time, and it's initial and stabilized temperatures. Differences in radiation intensities at various wavelengths from ambient and stabilized exhaust clouds were investigated as a method of distinguishing between the two types of clouds. The infrared remote sensing method used can be used at night when visible range cameras are inadequate. Infrared scanning techniques developed in this project can be applied directly to natural clouds, clouds containing certain radionuclides, or clouds of industrial pollution.

  1. Electrets used to measure exhaust cloud effluents from Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) during demonstration model (DM-2) static test firing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Susko, M.

    1978-01-01

    Electrets were compared with fixed flow samplers during static test firing. The measurement of the rocket exhaust effluents by samplers and electrets indicated that the Solid Rocket Motor had no significant effect on the air quality in the area sampled. The results show that the electrets (a passive device which needs no power) can be used effectively alongside existing measuring devices (which need power). By placing electrets in areas where no power is available, measurements may be obtained. Consequently, it is a valuable complementary instrument in measuring rocket exhaust effluents in areas where other measuring devices may not be able to assess the contaminants.

  2. Temperature, Pressure, and Infrared Image Survey of an Axisymmetric Heated Exhaust Plume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Edward L.; Mahan, J. Robert; Birckelbaw, Larry D.; Turk, Jeffrey A.; Wardwell, Douglas A.; Hange, Craig E.

    1996-01-01

    The focus of this research is to numerically predict an infrared image of a jet engine exhaust plume, given field variables such as temperature, pressure, and exhaust plume constituents as a function of spatial position within the plume, and to compare this predicted image directly with measured data. This work is motivated by the need to validate computational fluid dynamic (CFD) codes through infrared imaging. The technique of reducing the three-dimensional field variable domain to a two-dimensional infrared image invokes the use of an inverse Monte Carlo ray trace algorithm and an infrared band model for exhaust gases. This report describes an experiment in which the above-mentioned field variables were carefully measured. Results from this experiment, namely tables of measured temperature and pressure data, as well as measured infrared images, are given. The inverse Monte Carlo ray trace technique is described. Finally, experimentally obtained infrared images are directly compared to infrared images predicted from the measured field variables.

  3. Exhaust Plume Effects on Sonic Boom for a Delta Wing and a Swept Wing-Body Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castner, Raymond; Lake, Troy

    2012-01-01

    Supersonic travel is not allowed over populated areas due to the disturbance caused by the sonic boom. Research has been performed on sonic boom reduction and has included the contribution of the exhaust nozzle plume. Plume effect on sonic boom has progressed from the study of isolated nozzles to a study with four exhaust plumes integrated with a wing-body vehicle. This report provides a baseline analysis of the generic wing-body vehicle to demonstrate the effect of the nozzle exhaust on the near-field pressure profile. Reductions occurred in the peak-to-peak magnitude of the pressure profile for a swept wing-body vehicle. The exhaust plumes also had a favorable effect as the nozzles were moved outward along the wing-span.

  4. On-road measurement of particle emission in the exhaust plume of a diesel passenger car.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Rainer; Scheer, Volker; Casati, Roberto; Benter, Thorsten

    2003-09-15

    Particle size distributions were measured under real world dilution conditions in the exhaust plume of a diesel passenger car closely followed by a mobile laboratory on a high speed test track. Under carefully controlled conditions the exhaust plume was continuously sampled and analyzed inside the mobile laboratory. Exhaust particle size distribution data were recorded together with exhaust gas concentrations, i.e., CO, CO2, and NO(x), and compared to data obtained from the same vehicle tested on a chassis dynamometer. Good agreement was found for the soot mode particles which occurred at a geometric mean diameter of approximately 50 nm and a total particle emission rate of 10(14) particles km(-1). Using 350 ppm high sulfur fuel and the standard oxidation catalyst a bimodal size distribution with a nucleation mode at 10 nm was observed at car velocities of 100 km h(-1) and 120 km h(-1), respectively. Nucleation mode particles were only present if high sulfur fuel was used with the oxidation catalyst installed. This is in agreement with prior work that these particles are of semivolatile nature and originate from the nucleation of sulfates formed inside the catalyst. Temporal effects of the occurrence of nucleation mode particles during steady-state cruising and the dynamical behavior during acceleration and deceleration were investigated. PMID:14524437

  5. Real Time Diagnostics of Jet Engine Exhaust Plumes Using a Chirped QC Laser Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hay, K. G.; Duxbury, G.; Langford, N.

    2010-06-01

    Quantitative measurements of real-time variations of the chemical composition of a jet engine exhaust plume is demonstrated using a 4.86 μmn intra-pulse quantum cascade laser spectrometer. The measurements of the gas turbine exhaust were carried out in collaboration with John Black and Mark Johnson at Rolls Royce. The recording of five sets of averaged spectra a second has allowed us to follow the build up of the combustion products within the exhaust, and to demonstrate the large variation of the integrated absorption of these absorption lines with temperature. The absorption cross sections of the lines of both carbon monoxide and water increase with temperature, whereas those of the three main absorption lines of carbon dioxide decrease. At the steady state limit the absorption lines of carbon dioxide are barely visible, and the spectrum is dominated by absorption lines of carbon monoxide and water.

  6. Characterization of rocket propellant combustion products: Description of sampling and analysis methods for rocket exhaust characterization studies

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, R.A.

    1990-06-07

    A systematic approach has been developed and experimentally validated for the sampling and chemical characterization of the rocket motor exhaust generated from the firing of scaled down test motors at the US Army's Signature Characterization Facility (ASCF) at Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Alabama. The overall strategy was to sample and analyze major exhaust constituents in near real time, while performing off-site analyses of samples collected for the determination of trace constituents of the particulate and vapor phases. Initial interference studies were performed using atmospheric pressure burns of 1 g quantities of propellants in small chambers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide were determined using non-dispersive infrared instrumentation. Hydrogen cyanide, hydrogen chloride, and ammonia determinations were made using ion selective electrode technology. Oxides of nitrogen were determined using chemiluminescence instrumentation. Airborne particulate mass concentration was determined using infrared forward scattering measurements and a tapered element oscillating microbalance, as well as conventional gravimetry. Particulate phase metals were determined by collection on Teflon membrane filters, followed by inductively coupled plasma and atomic absorption analysis. Particulate phase polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and nitro-PAH were collected using high volume sampling on a two stage filter. Target species were extracted, and quantified by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Vapor phase species were collected on multi-sorbent resin traps, and subjected to thermal desorption GC/MS for analysis. 11 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  7. Plume particle collection and sizing from static firing of solid rocket motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sambamurthi, Jay K.

    1995-01-01

    A unique dart system has been designed and built at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center to collect aluminum oxide plume particles from the plumes of large scale solid rocket motors, such as the space shuttle RSRM. The capability of this system to collect clean samples from both the vertically fired MNASA (18.3% scaled version of the RSRM) motors and the horizontally fired RSRM motor has been demonstrated. The particle mass averaged diameters, d43, measured from the samples for the different motors, ranged from 8 to 11 mu m and were independent of the dart collection surface and the motor burn time. The measured results agreed well with those calculated using the industry standard Hermsen's correlation within the standard deviation of the correlation . For each of the samples analyzed from both MNASA and RSRM motors, the distribution of the cumulative mass fraction of the plume oxide particles as a function of the particle diameter was best described by a monomodal log-normal distribution with a standard deviation of 0.13 - 0.15. This distribution agreed well with the theoretical prediction by Salita using the OD3P code for the RSRM motor at the nozzle exit plane.

  8. Rocket engine plume diagnostics using video digitization and image processing - Analysis of start-up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Disimile, P. J.; Shoe, B.; Dhawan, A. P.

    1991-01-01

    Video digitization techniques have been developed to analyze the exhaust plume of the Space Shuttle Main Engine. Temporal averaging and a frame-by-frame analysis provide data used to evaluate the capabilities of image processing techniques for use as measurement tools. Capabilities include the determination of the necessary time requirement for the Mach disk to obtain a fully-developed state. Other results show the Mach disk tracks the nozzle for short time intervals, and that dominate frequencies exist for the nozzle and Mach disk movement.

  9. Hydrochloric acid aerosol and gaseous hydrogen chloride partitioning in a cloud contaminated by solid rocket exhaust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sebacher, D. I.; Bendura, R. J.; Wornom, D. E.

    1980-01-01

    Partitioning of hydrogen chloride between hydrochloric acid aerosol and gaseous HCl in the lower atmosphere was experimentally investigated in a solid rocket exhaust cloud diluted with humid ambient air. Airborne measurements were obtained of gaseous HCl, total HCl, relative humidity and temperature to evaluate the conditions under which aerosol formation occurs in the troposphere in the presence of hygroscopic HCl vapor. Equilibrium predictions of HCl aerosol formation accurately predict the measured HCl partitioning over a range of total HCl concentrations from 0.6 to 16 ppm.

  10. Modeling Macro- and Micro-Scale Turbulent Mixing and Chemistry in Engine Exhaust Plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, Suresh

    1998-01-01

    Simulation of turbulent mixing and chemical processes in the near-field plume and plume-vortex regimes has been successfully carried out recently using a reduced gas phase kinetics mechanism which substantially decreased the computational cost. A detailed mechanism including gas phase HOx, NOx, and SOx chemistry between the aircraft exhaust and the ambient air in near-field aircraft plumes is compiled. A reduced mechanism capturing the major chemical pathways is developed. Predictions by the reduced mechanism are found to be in good agreement with those by the detailed mechanism. With the reduced chemistry, the computer CPU time is saved by a factor of more than 3.5 for the near-field plume modeling. Distributions of major chemical species are obtained and analyzed. The computed sensitivities of major species with respect to reaction step are deduced for identification of the dominant gas phase kinetic reaction pathways in the jet plume. Both the near field plume and the plume-vortex regimes were investigated using advanced mixing models. In the near field, a stand-alone mixing model was used to investigate the impact of turbulent mixing on the micro- and macro-scale mixing processes using a reduced reaction kinetics model. The plume-vortex regime was simulated using a large-eddy simulation model. Vortex plume behind Boeing 737 and 747 aircraft was simulated along with relevant kinetics. Many features of the computed flow field show reasonable agreement with data. The entrainment of the engine plumes into the wing tip vortices and also the partial detrainment of the plume were numerically captured. The impact of fluid mechanics on the chemical processes was also studied. Results show that there are significant differences between spatial and temporal simulations especially in the predicted SO3 concentrations. This has important implications for the prediction of sulfuric acid aerosols in the wake and may partly explain the discrepancy between past numerical studies (that employed parabolic or temporal approximations) and the measured data. Finally to address the major uncertainty in the near-field plume modeling related to the plume processing of sulfur compounds and advanced model was developed to evaluate its impact on the chemical processes in the near wake. A comprehensive aerosol model is developed and it is coupled with chemical kinetics and the axisymmetric turbulent jet flow models. The integrated model is used to simulate microphysical processes in the near-field jet plume, including sulfuric acid and water binary homogeneous nucleation, coagulation, non-equilibrium heteromolecular condensation, and sulfur-induced soot activation. The formation and evolution of aerosols are computed and analyzed. The computed results show that a large number of ultra-fine (0.3--0.6 nm in radius) volatile HSO4 - HO embryos are generated in the near-field plume. These embryos further grow in size by self coagulation and condensation. Soot particles can be activated by both heterogeneous nucleation and scavenging of H2SO4-H2O aerosols. These activated soot particles can serve as water condensation nuclei for contrail formation. Conditions under which ice contrails can form behind aircrafts are studied. The sensitivities of the threshold temperature for contrail formation with respect to aircraft propulsion efficiency, relative humidity, and ambient pressure are evaluated. The computed aerosol properties for different extent of fuel sulfur conversion to S(VI) (SO3 and H2SO4) in engine are examined and the results are found to be sensitive to this conversion fraction.

  11. Plume radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dirscherl, R.

    1993-06-01

    The electromagnetic radiation originating from the exhaust plume of tactical missile motors is of outstanding importance for military system designers. Both missile- and countermeasure engineer rely on the knowledge of plume radiation properties, be it for guidance/interference control or for passive detection of adversary missiles. To allow access to plume radiation properties, they are characterized with respect to the radiation producing mechanisms like afterburning, its chemical constituents, and reactions as well as particle radiation. A classification of plume spectral emissivity regions is given due to the constraints imposed by available sensor technology and atmospheric propagation windows. Additionally assessment methods are presented that allow a common and general grouping of rocket motor properties into various categories. These methods describe state of the art experimental evaluation techniques as well as calculation codes that are most commonly used by developers of NATO countries. Dominant aspects influencing plume radiation are discussed and a standardized test technique is proposed for the assessment of plume radiation properties that include prediction procedures. These recommendations on terminology and assessment methods should be common to all employers of plume radiation. Special emphasis is put on the omnipresent need for self-protection by the passive detection of plume radiation in the ultraviolet (UV) and infrared (IR) spectral band.

  12. Wedge Shock and Nozzle Exhaust Plume Interaction in a Supersonic Jet Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castner, Raymond; Zaman, Khairul; Fagan, Amy; Heath, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Fundamental research for sonic boom reduction is needed to quantify the interaction of shock waves generated from the aircraft wing or tail surfaces with the nozzle exhaust plume. Aft body shock waves that interact with the exhaust plume contribute to the near-field pressure signature of a vehicle. The plume and shock interaction was studied using computational fluid dynamics and compared with experimental data from a coaxial convergent-divergent nozzle flow in an open jet facility. A simple diamond-shaped wedge was used to generate the shock in the outer flow to study its impact on the inner jet flow. Results show that the compression from the wedge deflects the nozzle plume and shocks form on the opposite plume boundary. The sonic boom pressure signature of the nozzle exhaust plume was modified by the presence of the wedge. Both the experimental results and computational predictions show changes in plume deflection. XXXX he reduction of sonic boom overpressures of supersonic aircraft may enable high speed travel over populated areas. The impact of the sonic boom on populated areas is so large that the FAA has prohibited supersonic flight over land by civil aircraft in the United States. Most supersonic aircraft produce an N-wave pressure signature on the ground; a rise in pressure from the bow shock of the vehicle followed by an expansion to a negative pressure and then the return to atmospheric pressure. The bow and tail shocks create the "double boom" often heard on the ground. The aircraft pressure signature near the vehicle has multiple shocks and expansions that attenuate and coalesce to the N-wave form on the ground. Recent studies to develop aircraft with acceptable sonic boom noise include programs such as the Quiet Spike1 and the Shaped Sonic Boom Demonstrator (SSBD)2 that achieved reduced intensity of the forward portion of the pressure signature. Research was also done to reduce the contribution from aft components including the nozzle exhaust. One example was the work of Putnam3, who performed an experimental study of exhaust nozzles and the effects of the exhaust plume. Tests were performed in a 4-foot by 4-foot supersonic wind tunnel with pressure measurements taken one diameter away from the nozzle. Study of exhaust nozzle plume effect on sonic boom has progressed from analysis and testing of an isolated nozzle4,5, to slot nozzles6 and engine-wing-body models7,8. These studies demonstrated how the nozzle lip shock from an under-expanded nozzle plume could suppress the nozzle boat-tail expansion and reduce the trailing shock. One previous study has examined the exhaust nozzle shadowgraph image displays the interaction of the lip shock from both the inner nozzle and outer free jet, which caused a Mach disk and shock diamonds within the free jet flow. The inner nozzle flow is distinguishable from the outer free jet flow and the shear layer is clearly visible (Fig. 6a). Static pressure data (?P/P) were collected at one nozzle diameter above the centerline, at z=0.553 in., allowing analysis of the shock waves within the outer free jet flow field. Later in this report, data will be presented with a wedge placed below the inner nozzle simulating the shock wave generated by an aircraft wing or tail. The location at z=0.553 in. was used to assess the ability of the CFD codes to capture the interaction of the wedge shock after it had passed through the inner nozzle plume. The static pressure profile was characterized by a rise in pressure at x=8 in., 10.5 in., and 11.25 in., caused by the internal shock diamond structure, as shown in Fig. 6b. Total pressure was also measured at z=0.553 in. and the variation of total pressure within the shock diamond structure is shown in Fig. 6c. Uncertainty of the pressure measurements was +/- 0.15%, well within the symbols used to plot the results. The static pressure and total pressure measurements were repeated for the nozzle centerline, z=0 in., and show the strong shock and decay at x=8 in. where the flow from the inner nozzle formed a Mach disk (Fig. 6d and Fig. 6e). Finally, the total pressure across the exit of the nozzle was collected at a location of x=7.540 in., or 0.040 in. downstream of the lip. The exit flow profiles of the inner nozzle and the outer free jet are uniform, with some pressure loss exhibited in the core flow nozzle, see Fig. 6f.

  13. Exhaust plume and contamination characteristics of a bipropellant (MMH/N2O4) RCS thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spisz, E. W.; Bowman, R. L.; Jack, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    Results are presented for three recent tests in a series of thruster contamination experiments made in liquid helium-cooled environmental facility. The contaminating effects encountered on various materials, surfaces, and components, due to the exhaust products from a 5-pound thrust, bipropellant (MMH/N2O4) thruster are investigated. The angular distribution of plume effects around the periphery of the thruster established by transmittance changes of quartz samples over the wavelength range from 0.2 to 2.0 micrometer is studied, along with mass deposition rates at a specific location measured with a quartz crystal microbalance for three different experiments. Quadrupole mass spectrometer measurements of the exhaust products over the mass number range from 12 to 75; infrared transmittance measurements of contaminated samples for the wavelength range from 2.5 to 15 microns; and infrared transmittance measurements of residue from the thruster nozzle are also considered.

  14. Possible effect of the chlorine oxide dimer on transient ozone loss in rocket plumes. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, L.R.

    1994-03-15

    Understanding transient, local ozone holes that may be produced by solid rocket boosters in the stratosphere puts special demands on models. One must consider the time scales as well as the rates for all of the pertinent chemical reactions involved in the destruction of ozone. In this report, we show that consideration of the existence of the chlorine oxide dimer, Cl2O2, and consideration of the necessary time scale for ozone loss are essential for prediction of a transient ozone hole. We argue that photolysis of this species is the major source of atomic chlorine in the plume at 20 km, and the ClO + 0 reaction is the major source at 30 km, although both processes play a role at the higher altitude. Inclusion of the chlorine oxide dimer ozone destruction cycle, which has not been considered in any of the full-scale models to date, predicts substantial ozone destruction on a scale of about 12-km diameter at 20-km altitude and the ClO cycle produces a 49-km-diameter hole at 30-km altitude. This analysis also suggests that the size of the hole at 20 km may be highly variable since it is sensitive to the variable ozone-to-methane ratio at that altitude. Ozone, Rocket launch, Stratospheric, Chlorine.

  15. Dynamic Analysis of a Building Under Rocket Engine Plume Acoustic Load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qian, Z.; VanDyke, D.; Wright, S.; Redmond, M.

    2001-01-01

    Studies have been performed to develop finite-element modeling and simulation techniques to predict the dynamic structural response of Building 4010 to the acoustic load from the plume of high-thrust rocket motors. The building is the Test Control Center and general office space for the E-complex at Stennis Space Center. It is a large single span; light-structured building located approximately 1,000 feet from the E-1 test stand. A three-dimensional shell/beam combined model of the building was built using Pro/Engineer platform and imported into Pro/Mechanica for analysis. An Equivalent Shell technique was developed to simplify the highly complex building structure so that the calculation is more efficient and accurate. A deterministic approach was used for the dynamic analysis. A pre-stressed modal analysis was performed to simulate the weight stiffening of the structure, through which about 200 modes ranging from 0 to 35 Hz were identified. In an initial dynamic frequency analysis, the maximum response over the model was found. Then the complete 3-D distributions of the displacement, as well as the stresses, were calculated through a final frequency analysis. The results were compared to a strain gage and accelerometer recordings from rocket engine tests and showed reasonable agreement.

  16. On the prediction of concentration variations in a dispersing heavy-duty truck exhaust plume using k- ? turbulent closure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dong-Hee; Gautam, Mridul; Gera, Dinesh

    This work presents the computational fluid dynamic modeling of an exhaust plume dispersed from the exhaust pipe of a class-8 tractor truck powered by 330 hp Cummins M11 electronically controlled diesel engine. This effort utilizes an advanced CFD technique to accurately predict the variation of carbon dioxide concentration inside a turbulent plume using a k- ? eddy dissipation model. The simulation includes the "real-world" operation of a truck and its exhaust plume in a NASA, Langley aircraft testing wind tunnel, that had an effective volume of 226, 535 m 3 (8,000,000 ft 3). The predicted results show an excellent agreement with the experimentally measured values of CO 2 concentrations, dilution ratios, and the temperature variations inside the plume. A specific goal of this effort was to study the effect of recirculation region near the truck walls on dispersion of the plume. For this purpose, growth of the plume from the center of the exhaust pipe is also presented and discussed. This work also shows the benefits of CFD modeling in applications where dispersion correlations are not required a priori, instead the dispersion coefficients are calculated precisely by solving the turbulent kinetic energy and dissipation equations.

  17. A Collimated Retarding Potential Analyzer for the Study of Magnetoplasma Rocket Plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glover, T. W.; Chan, A. A.; Chang-Diaz, F. R.; Kittrell, C.

    2003-01-01

    A gridded retarding potential analyzer (RPA) has been developed to characterize the magnetized plasma exhaust of the 10 kW Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VX-10) experiment at NASA's Advanced Space Propulsion Laboratory. In this system, plasma is energized through coupling of radio frequency waves at the ion cyclotron resonance (ICR). The particles are subsequently accelerated in a magnetic nozzle to provide thrust. Downstream of the nozzle, the RPA's mounting assembly enables the detector to make complete axial and radial scans of the plasma. A multichannel collimator can be inserted into the RPA to remove ions with pitch angles greater than approximately 1 deg. A calculation of the general collimator transmission as a function over velocity space is presented, which shows the instrument's sensitivity in detecting changes in both the parallel and perpendicular components of the ion energy. Data from initial VX-10 ICRH experiments show evidence of ion heating.

  18. Analytic model for washout of HCl(g) from dispersing rocket exhaust clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, G. L.

    1981-01-01

    The potential is investigated that precipitation scavenging of HCl from large solid rocket exhaust clouds may result in unacceptably acidic rain in the Cape Canaveral, Florida, area before atmospheric dispersion reduces HCl concentrations to safe limits. Several analytic expressions for HCl(g) and HCl(g + aq) washout are derived; a geometric mean washout coefficient is recommended. A previous HCl washout model is refined and applied to a space shuttle case (70 t HCl exhausted up to 4 km) and eight Titan 3 (60 percent less exhaust) dispersion cases. The vertical column density (sigma) decays were deduced by application of a multilayer Gaussian diffusion model to seven standard meteorological regimes for overland advection. The Titan 3 decays of sigma and initial rain pH differed greatly among regimes; e.g., a range of 2 pH units was spanned at x 100 km downwind and t = 2 hr. Environmentally significant pH's .5 for infrequent exposures were shown possible at X = 50 km and t 5 hr for the two least dispersive Titan 3 cases. Representative examples of downwind rainwater pH and G(X) are analyzed. Factors affecting the validity of the results are discussed.

  19. Design of Experiments for Both Experimental and Analytical Study of Exhaust Plume Effects on Sonic Boom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castner, Raymond S.

    2009-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis has been performed to study the plume effects on sonic boom signature for isolated nozzle configurations. The objectives of these analyses were to provide comparison to past work using modern CFD analysis tools, to investigate the differences of high aspect ratio nozzles to circular (axisymmetric) nozzles, and to report the effects of under expanded nozzle operation on boom signature. CFD analysis was used to address the plume effects on sonic boom signature from a baseline exhaust nozzle. Nearfield pressure signatures were collected for nozzle pressure ratios (NPRs) between 6 and 10. A computer code was used to extrapolate these signatures to a ground-observed sonic boom N-wave. Trends show that there is a reduction in sonic boom N-wave signature as NPR is increased from 6 to 10. As low boom designs are developed and improved, there will be a need for understanding the interaction between the aircraft boat tail shocks and the exhaust nozzle plume. These CFD analyses will provide a baseline study for future analysis efforts. For further study, a design of experiments has been conducted to develop a hybrid method where both CFD and small scale wind tunnel testing will validate the observed trends. The CFD and testing will be used to screen a number of factors which are important to low boom propulsion integration, including boat tail angle, nozzle geometry, and the effect of spacing and stagger on nozzle pairs. To design the wind tunnel experiment, CFD was instrumental in developing a model which would provide adequate space to observe the nozzle and boat tail shock structure without interference from the wind tunnel walls.

  20. Results of an investigation of jet plume effects on an 0.010-scale model (75-OTS) of the space shuttle integrated vehicle in the 9 x 7-foot leg of the NASA/Ames unitary wind tunnel (IA82B), volume 1. [an exhaust flow simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawthorne, P. J.

    1976-01-01

    The base pressure environment was investigated for the first and second stage mated vehicle in a supersonic flow field from Mach 1.55 through 2.20 with simulated rocket engine exhaust plumes. The pressure environment was investigated for the orbiter at various vent port locations at these same freestream conditions. The Mach number environment around the base of the model with rocket plumes simulated was examined. Data were obtained at angles of attack from -4 deg through +4 deg at zero yaw, and at yaw angles from -4 deg through +4 deg at zero angle of attack, with rocket plume sizes varying from smaller than nominal to much greater than nominal. Failed orbiter engine data were also obtained. Elevon hinge moments and wing panel load data were obtained during all runs. Photographs of the tested configurations are shown.

  1. Effects of nozzle exit geometry and pressure ratio on plume shape for nozzles exhausting into quiescent air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scallion, William I.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of varying the exit geometry on the plume shapes of supersonic nozzles exhausting into quiescent air at several exit-to-ambient pressure ratios are given. Four nozzles having circular throat sections and circular, elliptical and oval exit cross sections were tested and the exit plume shapes are compared at the same exit-to-ambient pressure ratios. The resulting mass flows were calculated and are also presented.

  2. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) measurements in a rocket engine plume

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, D.R.; McKeown, D.; Porter, F.M.; Baker, C.A.; Astill, A.G.; Rawley, K.M. . Combustion Dept. Epsilon Research, Buckinghamshire Defence Research Agency, Fort Halstead, Kent )

    1993-07-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) measurements in the plume of a liquid-fueled rocket engine are compared with the results predicted by a mathematical model of the plume. At most positions, high signal success rates were obtained. Success rates were lower during initial runs, while the system was optimized for operation in the rocket environment, and on axis close to the nozzle where the probing laser beams were severely deflected by the plume. For each position studied, the spectra taken were fitted for temperature and a mean temperature and standard deviation calculated from the results. The mean temperatures were compared with predicted temperature values obtained from a marching procedure parabolic computer program. CARS spectra from water vapor in the plume were also recorded and fitted for temperature and concentration. Excellent agreement between theory and experiment was obtained. Results showed a strong positive correlation between water vapor concentration and temperature at each measurement position--some contributions to this may arise from similarities of the effects of temperature and concentration on spectral shape. However, shear layer mixing and entrainment of cold gas into the plume may significantly affect the composition and temperature of the plume gases. LIF was used to visualize the plume structure. Imaging of the flow field was performed by detecting sodium fluorescence, after the oxidant was seeded with sodium. Images were obtained without excessively high background levels and large fluctuations in the plume structure were observed. This is consistent with the observations from the CARS experiments.

  3. A field study of solid rocket exhaust impacts on the near-field environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, B. J.; Keller, Vernon W.

    1990-01-01

    Large solid rocket motors release large quantities of hydrogen chloride and aluminum oxide exhaust during launch and testing. Measurements and analysis of the interaction of this material with the deluge water spray and other environmental factors in the near field (within 1 km of the launch or test site) are summarized. Measurements of mixed solid and liquid deposition (typically 2 normal HCl) following space shuttle launches and 6.4 percent scale model tests are described. Hydrogen chloride gas concentrations measured in the hours after the launch of STS 41D and STS 51A are reported. Concentrations of 9 ppm, which are above the 5 ppm exposure limits for workers, were detected an hour after STS 51A. A simplified model which explains the primary features of the gas concentration profiles is included.

  4. Search of archived data sources for rocket exhaust-induced modifications of the ionosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Chacko, C.C.; Mendillo, M.

    1980-09-01

    The emergence of the Satellite Power System (SPS) concept as a way of augmenting the dwindling energy sources available for commercial power usage involved such a large and unprecendented technological program that detailed assessment and feasibility studies were undertaken in an attempt to specify the true impact such a program would have. As part of the issues addressed, a comprehensive environmental impact study was initiated that involved an unprecedented scope of concerns ranging from ground-level noise and weather modifications to possible planetary-scale perturbations caused by SPS activity in distant Earth orbits. This report describes results of a study of an intermediate region of the Earth's environment (the ionosphere) where large-scale perturbations are caused by routine rocket activity. The SPS program calls for vast transportation demands into and out from the ionosphere (h approx. = 200 to 1000 km), and thus the well-known effect of chemical depletions of the ionosphere (so-called ionospheric holes) caused by rocket exhaust signaled a concern over the possible large-scale and long-term consequences of the induced effects.

  5. Ionospheric effects of rocket exhaust products (HEAO-C, Skylab and SPS-HLLV)

    SciTech Connect

    Zinn, J; Sutherland, D; Stone, S N; Duncan, L M; Behnke, R

    1980-10-01

    This paper reviews the current state of our understanding of the problem of ionospheric F-layer depletions produced by chemical effects of the exhaust gases from large rockets, with particular emphasis on the Heavy Lift Launch Vehicles (HLLV) proposed for use in the construction of solar power satellites. The currently planned HLLV flight profile calls for main second-stage propulsion confined to altitudes below 124 km, and a brief orbit-circularization maneuver at apogee. The second-stage engines deposit 9 x 10/sup 31/ H/sub 2/O and H/sub 2/ molecules between 56 and 124 km. Model computations show that they diffuse gradually into the ionospheric F region, where they lead to weak but widespread and persistent depletions of ionization and continuous production of H atoms. The orbit-circularization burn deposits 9 x 10/sup 29/ exhaust molecules at about 480-km altitude. These react rapidly with the F2 region 0/sup +/ ions, leading to a substantial (factor-of-three) reduction in plasma density, which extends over a 1000- by 2000-km region and persists for four to five hours. Also described are experimental airglow and incoherent-scatter radar measurements performed in conjunction with the 1979 launch of satellite HEAO-C, together with prelaunch and post-launch computations of the ionospheric effects. Several improvements in the model have been driven by the experimental observations. The computer model is described in some detail.

  6. Condensation of water vapor and carbon dioxide in the jet exhausts of rocket engines: 1. Model calculation of the physical conditions in a jet exhaust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platov, Yu. V.; Alpatov, V. V.; Klyushnikov, V. Yu.

    2014-01-01

    Model calculations have been performed for the temperature and pressure of combustion products in the jet exhaust of rocket engines of last stages of Proton, Molniya, and Start launchers operating in the upper atmosphere at altitudes above 120 km. It has been shown that the condensation of water vapor and carbon dioxide can begin at distances of 100-150 and 450-650 m away from the engine nozzle, respectively.

  7. Effect of aircraft exhaust sulfur emissions on near field plume aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, R. C.; Miake-Lye, R. C.; Anderson, M. R.; Kolb, C. E.

    A two dimensional, axisymmetric flowfield model with coupled gas phase oxidation kinetics and aerosol nucleation and growth dynamics is used to evaluate the effect of fuel sulfur oxidation in the Concorde engine on the formation and growth of volatile H2SO4/H2O aerosols in the near field plume. Rased on estimated exit plane sulfur speciation, results are shown for between 2% and 20% conversion of the fuel sulfur to S(VI) (SO3 and H2SO4) in engine. The primary motivation is to provide estimates for the changes in the number density and surface area density of sulfuric acid aerosols due to sulfur oxidation in the engine. This analysis indicates the need for experimental measurements of sulfur emissions at the exhaust exit, in addition to soot properties, to fully assess the atmospheric impact of aircraft emissions.

  8. Observation of the exhaust plume from the space shuttle main engines using the microwave limb sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pumphrey, H. C.; Lambert, A.; Livesey, N. J.

    2011-01-01

    A space shuttle launch deposits 700 tonnes of water in the atmosphere. Some of this water is released into the upper mesosphere and lower thermosphere where it may be directly detected by a limb sounding satellite instrument. We report measurements of water vapour plumes from shuttle launches made by the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on the Aura satellite. Approximately 50%-65% of shuttle launches are detected by MLS. The signal appears at a similar level across the upper 10 km of the MLS limb scan, suggesting that the bulk of the observed water is above the top of the scan. Only a small fraction at best of smaller launches (Ariane 5, Proton) are detected. We conclude that the sensitivity of MLS is only just great enough to detect a shuttle sized launch, but that a suitably designed instrument of the same general type could detect the exhausts from a large proportion of heavy-lift launches.

  9. Observation of the exhaust plume from the space shuttle main engine using the Microwave Limb Sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pumphrey, H. C.; Lambert, A.; Livesey, N. J.

    2010-08-01

    A space shuttle launch deposits 700 t of water in the atmosphere. Some of this water is released into the upper mesosphere and lower thermosphere where it may be directly detected by a limb sounding satellite instrument. We report measurements of water vapour plumes from shuttle launches made by the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on the Aura satellite. Approximately 50% of shuttle launches are detected by MLS. The signal appears at a similar level across the upper 10 km of the MLS limb scan, suggesting that the bulk of the observed water is above the top of the scan. Only a small fraction at best of smaller launches (Ariane, Proton) are detected. We conclude that the sensitivity of MLS is only just great enough to detect a shuttle sized launch, but that a suitably designed instrument of the same general type could detect the exhausts from a large proportion of heavy-lift launches.

  10. Space shuttle vehicle rocket plume impingement study for separation analysis. Tasks 2 and 3: Definition and preliminary plume impingement analysis for the MSC booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wojciechowski, C. J.; Penny, M. M.; Prozan, R. J.

    1970-01-01

    The results are presented of a space shuttle plume impingement study for the Manned Spacecraft Center configuration. This study was conducted as two tasks which were to (1) define the orbiter main stage engine exhaust plume flow field, and (2) define the plume impingement heating, force and resulting moment environments on the booster during the staging maneuver. To adequately define these environments during the staging maneuver and allow for deviation from the nominal separation trajectory, a multitude of relative orbiter/booster positions are analyzed which map the region that contains the separation trajectories. The data presented can be used to determine a separation trajectory which will result in acceptable impingement heating rates, forces, and the resulting moments. The data, presented in graphical form, include the effect of roll, pitch and yaw maneuvers for the booster. Quasi-steady state analysis methods were used with the orbiter engine operating at full thrust. To obtain partial thrust results, simple ratio equations are presented.

  11. A feasibility study and mission analysis for the Hybrid Plume Plasma Rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Daniel J.; Micci, Michael M.

    1990-01-01

    The Hybrid Plume Plasma Rocket (HPPR) is a high power electric propulsion concept which is being developed at the MIT Plasma Fusion Center. This paper presents a theoretical overview of the concept as well as the results and conclusions of an independent study which has been conducted to identify and categorize those technologies which require significant development before the HPPR can be considered a viable electric propulsion device. It has been determined that the technologies which require the most development are high power radio-frequency and microwave generation for space applications and the associated power processing units, low mass superconducting magnets, a reliable, long duration, multi-megawatt space nuclear power source, and long term storage of liquid hydrogen propellant. In addition to this, a mission analysis of a one-way transfer from low earth orbit (LEO) to Mars indicates that a constant acceleration thrust profile, which can be obtained using the HPPR, results in faster trip times and greater payload capacities than those afforded by more conventional constant thrust profiles.

  12. Theoretical and Experimental Investigation of Lunar and Martian Regolith Simulant Dynamic Response to Rocket Plume Impingement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandenburg, John; Behringer, Robert; Clarke, Abraham

    2009-11-01

    An investigation of rocket plume impingement on the regolith of the Moon and Mars is being conducted both theoretically and experimentally. Experimental results (1)and data from the Apollo landings inspired a theoretical model at ORBITEC : the ABL (Ablating Boundary Layer) model that assumes that regolith erosion and entrainment occurs in the thin boundary layer. The resulting crater streamlines itself with curve formed by extremization of the Lagrangian : L = (Z')^2+ Z^2 where Z(r) and Z(r)' are a depth variable and its radial derivative respectively. The actual depth profile z (r) in this model is derived from the formula z=Log ( 1+ Z/Zo) where Zo is a constant. For light soils the model reduces to z˜ Z/Zo and cantenary profiles result, exponential density profiles (2) give conoidal craters. (1) Experimental tests of the ABL model performed at Duke have shown good agreement. Further theoretical modeling and experimental data will be presented. (1) Metzger P., Lane, J., Immer C. and Clements, S. '6^th International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnicla Engineeering , Arlinton VA August 11-16, 2008. (2) Bresson L. M., Moran C. J., and Assoline, S. Soil Sci. Soc. of Am. Jou, 2004, vol. 68, 4, pp. 1169-1176.

  13. Coupled turbulence and aerosol dynamics modeling of vehicle exhaust plumes using the CTAG model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan Jason; Zhang, K. Max

    2012-11-01

    This paper presents the development and evaluation of an environmental turbulent reacting flow model, the Comprehensive Turbulent Aerosol Dynamics and Gas Chemistry (CTAG) model. CTAG is designed to simulate transport and transformation of multiple air pollutants, e.g., from emission sources to ambient background. For the on-road and near-road applications, CTAG explicitly couples the major turbulent mixing processes, i.e., vehicle-induced turbulence (VIT), road-induced turbulence (RIT) and atmospheric boundary layer turbulence with gas-phase chemistry and aerosol dynamics. CTAG's transport model is referred to as CFD-VIT-RIT. This paper presents the evaluation of the CTAG model in simulating the dynamics of individual plumes in the “tailpipe-to-road” stage, i.e., VIT behind a moving van and aerosol dynamics in the wake of a diesel car by comparing the modeling results against the respective field measurements. Combined with sensitivity studies, we analyze the relative roles of VIT, sulfuric acid induced nucleation, condensation of organic compounds and presence of soot-mode particles in capturing the dynamics of exhaust plumes as well as their implications in vehicle emission controls.

  14. Analysis of Exhaust Plume Effects on Sonic Boom for a 59-Degree Wing Body Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castner, Raymond S.

    2011-01-01

    Reducing or eliminating the operational restrictions of supersonic aircraft over populated areas has led to extensive research at NASA. Restrictions are due to the disturbance of the sonic boom, caused by the coalescence of shock waves formed off the aircraft. Recent work has been performed to reduce the magnitude of the sonic boom N-wave generated by airplane components with focus on shock waves caused by the exhaust nozzle plume. Previous Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analyses showed how the shock wave formed at the nozzle lip interacted with the nozzle boat-tail expansion wave. The nozzle lip shock moved with increasing nozzle pressure ratio (NPR) and reduced the nozzle boat-tail expansion. Lip shock movement caused a favorable change in the observed pressure signature. These results were applied to a simplified supersonic vehicle geometry with no inlets and no tail, in which the goal was to demonstrate how under-expanded nozzle operation reduced the sonic boom signature by twelve percent. A secondary goal was to demonstrate the use of the Cart3D inviscid code for off-body pressure signatures including the nozzle plume effect.

  15. Exhaust Nozzle Plume Effects on Sonic Boom Test Results for Isolated Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castner, Raymond S.

    2011-01-01

    Reducing or eliminating the operational restrictions of supersonic aircraft over populated areas has led to extensive research at NASA. Restrictions were due to the disturbance of the sonic boom, caused by the coalescence of shock waves formed off the aircraft. Recent work has been performed to reduce the magnitude of the sonic boom N-wave generated by airplane components with focus on shock waves caused by the exhaust nozzle plume. Previous Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis showed how the shock wave formed at the nozzle lip interacts with the nozzle boat-tail expansion wave. An experiment was conducted in the 1- by 1-ft Supersonic Wind Tunnel at the NASA Glenn Research Center to validate the computational study. Results demonstrated how the nozzle lip shock moved with increasing nozzle pressure ratio (NPR) and reduced the nozzle boat-tail expansion, causing a favorable change in the observed pressure signature. Experimental results were presented for comparison to the CFD results. The strong nozzle lip shock at high values of NPR intersected the nozzle boat-tail expansion and suppressed the expansion wave. Based on these results, it may be feasible to reduce the boat-tail expansion for a future supersonic aircraft with under-expanded nozzle exhaust flow by modifying nozzle pressure or nozzle divergent section geometry.

  16. Verification of large-scale rapid transport in the lower thermosphere: Tracking the exhaust plume of STS-107 from launch to the Antarctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niciejewski, R.; Skinner, W.; Cooper, M.; Marshall, A.; Meier, R. R.; Stevens, M. H.; Ortland, D.; Wu, Q.

    2011-05-01

    New analysis of the Doppler shift of O2 airglow spectra recorded by the TIMED Doppler Interferometer (TIDI) and the High Resolution Doppler Imager (HRDI) have provided conclusive evidence that the shuttle main engine exhaust plume generated in the lower thermosphere by the launch of STS-107 and imaged by the Global Ultraviolet Imager (GUVI) instrument on TIMED was transported to the Antarctic in ˜80 h, supporting a key inference from the initial study by Stevens et al. (2005). These new results were aided by improved knowledge of the effects of instrumental and satellite artifacts imposed on the Doppler spectra. STS-107 launched on 16 January 2003, and the neutral wind near its launch trajectory and nearby volume was sampled within minutes by TIDI. These initial observations suggested that the northernmost end of the shuttle's exhaust plume would move northeast and that the southern end would move southeast, motions that were identified in imagery acquired during the next orbit of TIMED. The direction and magnitude of plume motion inferred from GUVI images obtained 12, 26, and 50 h after launch were again confirmed by TIDI and HRDI. The appearance of the plume over the Antarctic ˜80 h after launch, inferred from earlier work by the appearance of iron ablated from the shuttle's main engines, was consistent with neutral winds measured by the satellite Doppler instruments over the Antarctic. The transport of the plume from the coast of Florida to the Antarctic was aided by the favorable phase and strong amplitude of a 2 day planetary wave of wave number three in the southern hemisphere on 18 January 2003. The existence of the 2 day wave was deduced from zonally averaged and combined TIDI and HRDI neutral wind observations. We conclude that the existence of strong and sustained winds in the MLT, significantly greater than expected from empirical and theoretical models, is indisputable and provides compelling evidence supporting the global-scale nature of thermospheric winds with magnitude greater than 100 m/s observed by Larsen (2002) from 40 years of sounding rocket chemical release experiments.

  17. Application of a Gaussian multilayer diffusion model to characterize dispersion of vertical HCl column density in rocket exhaust clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, G. L.; Staton, W. L.

    1981-01-01

    Solid rocket exhaust cloud dispersion cases, based on seven meteorological regimes for overland advection in the Cape Canaveral, Florida, area, are examined for launch vehicle environmental impacts. They include a space shuttle case and all seven meteorological cases for the Titan 3, which exhausts 60% less HC1. The C(HC1) decays are also compared with recent in cloud peak HC1 data from eight Titan 3 launches. It is stipulated that while good overall agreement provides validation of the model, its limitations are considerable and a dynamics model is needed to handle local convective situations.

  18. Ionospheric effects of rocket exhaust products: Skylab and HEAO-C

    SciTech Connect

    Zinn, J.; Sutherland, C.D.; Duncan, L.M.; Stone, S.N.

    1981-01-01

    This paper is about ionospheric F-layer depletions produced by chemical reactions with exhaust gases from large rockets. It describes a 2-dimensional computer model of the ionosphere, and it compares model results with experimental data on the structure and variability of the natural ionosphere, as well as data on ionospheric holes produced by the launches of Skylab (May, 1973) and HEAO-C (September, 1979). It also describes measurements made in conjunction with the HEAO-C launch. The computer model includes an approximate representation of thermospheric tidal winds and E fields in addition to vertical motions associated with diurnal changes in temperature. The computed ionospheric structure is sensitive to all the above. For a small number of cases, results are compared of computations of the normal diurnal variations of ionospheric structure with incoherent scatter and total electron content data. Computations of ionospheric depletions from the Skylab and HEAO-C launches are in satisfactory agreement with the observations. The winds appear to be essential for interpretation of the Skylab results.

  19. Experimental research in the use of electrets in measuring effluents from rocket exhaust and a review of standard air quality measuring devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Susko, M.

    1976-01-01

    Seven standard types of measuring devices used to obtain the chemical composition of rocket exhaust effluents were discussed. The electrets, a new measuring device, are investigated and compared with established measuring techniques. The preliminary results obtained show that electrets have multipollutant measuring capabilities, simplicity of deployment, speed of assessment or analysis, and may be an important and valuable tool in measuring pollutants from space vehicle rocket exhaust.

  20. Box and Gaussian plume models of the exhaust composition evolution of subsonic transport aircraft in- and out of the flight corridor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karol, I. L.; Ozolin, Y. E.; Rozanov, E. V.

    1997-01-01

    A box and a Gaussian plume model including gas-phase photochemistry and with plume dispersion parameters estimated from the few available plume observations are proposed and used for evaluation of photochemical transformations of exhausts from a single subsonic transport aircraft. The effects of concentration inhomogeneities in the plume cross section on the photochemical sources and sinks in the plume are analyzed for various groups of compounds. The influence of these inhomogeneities on the rate and on the mass of ambient air entrainment into the plume are studied also by comparing the box and the Gaussian plume model simulations during the first hours of their life''. Due to the enterance of HOx and NOx from ambient air into the plume with rates varying from the wind shear and turbulence conditions, the rate of emitted NOx oxidation in the plume is dependent on these and also on the background concentration levels of HOx and NOx.

  1. PLUMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    PLUMES INCLUDES TWO INITIAL DILUTION PLUME MODELS (RSB AND UM) AND A MODEL INTERFACE MANAGER FOR PREPARING COMMON INPUT AND RUNNING THE MODELS. TWO FARFIELD ALGORITHMS ARE AUTOMATICALLY INITIATED BEYOND THE ZONE OF INITIAL DILUTION. PLUMES ALSO INCORPORATES THE FLOW CLASSIFICAT...

  2. Exhaust Nozzle Plume Effects on Sonic Boom Test Results for Vectored Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castner, Raymond

    2012-01-01

    Reducing or eliminating the operational restrictions of supersonic aircraft over populated areas has led to extensive research at NASA. Restrictions were due to the disturbance of the sonic boom, caused by the coalescence of shock waves formed off the aircraft. Recent work has been performed to reduce the magnitude of the sonic boom N-wave generated by airplane components with a focus on shock waves caused by the exhaust nozzle plume. Previous Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis showed how the shock wave formed at the nozzle lip interacts with the nozzle boat-tail expansion wave. An experiment was conducted in the 1- by 1-foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel (SWT) at the NASA Glenn Research Center. Results show how the shock generated at the nozzle lip affects the near field pressure signature, and thereby the potential sonic boom contribution for a nozzle at vector angles from 3 to 8 . The experiment was based on the NASA F-15 nozzle used in the Lift and Nozzle Change Effects on Tail Shock experiment, which possessed a large external boat-tail angle. In this case, the large boat-tail angle caused a dramatic expansion, which dominated the near field pressure signature. The impact of nozzle vector angle and nozzle pressure ratio are summarized.

  3. Experimental measurements of the ground cloud growth during the 11 February 1974, Titan-Centaur launch at Kennedy Space Center. [(measurement of rocket exhaust from rocket launching)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, R. B.; Sentell, R. J.; Gregory, G. L.

    1976-01-01

    The Titan-Centaur was launched from Kennedy Space Center on February 11, 1974 at 0948 eastern daylight time. Ground level effluent measurements were obtained from the solid rocket motors for comparison with NASA diffusion models for predicting effluent ground level concentrations and cloud behavior. The results obtained provide a basis for an evaluation of such key model inputs such as cloud rise rate, stabilization altitude, crosswind growth, volume expansion, and cloud trajectory. Ground level effluent measurements were limited because of changing meteorological conditions, incorrect instrument location, and operational problems. Based on the measurement results, operational changes are defined. Photographs of the ground exhaust clouds are shown. The chemical composition of the exhaust gases was analyzed and is given.

  4. Spectroscopic studies of the exhaust plume of a quasi-steady MPD accelerator. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruckner, A. P.

    1972-01-01

    Spectroscopic and photographic investigations are reported that reveal a complex azimuthal species structure in the exhaust plume of a quasi-steady argon MPD accelerator. Over a wide range of operating conditions the injected argon remains collimated in discrete jets which are azimuthally in line with the six propellant injector orifices. The regions between these argon jets, including the central core of the exhaust flow, are occupied by impurities such as carbon, hydrogen and oxygen ablated from the Plexiglas back plate of the arc chamber. The features of this plume structure are found to be dependent on the arc current and mass flow rate. It is found that nearly half the observed velocity is attained in an acceleration region well downstream of the region of significant electromagnetic interaction. Recombination calculations show that the ionization energy is essentially frozen.

  5. Apollo 12 Lunar Module exhaust plume impingement on Lunar Surveyor III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Immer, Christopher; Metzger, Philip; Hintze, Paul E.; Nick, Andrew; Horan, Ryan

    2011-02-01

    Understanding plume impingement by retrorockets on the surface of the Moon is paramount for safe lunar outpost design in NASA's planned return to the Moon for the Constellation Program. Visual inspection, Scanning Electron Microscopy, and surface scanned topology have been used to investigate the damage to the Lunar Surveyor III spacecraft that was caused by the Apollo 12 Lunar Module's close proximity landing. Two parts of the Surveyor III craft returned by the Apollo 12 astronauts, Coupons 2050 and 2051, which faced the Apollo 12 landing site, show that a fine layer of lunar regolith coated the materials and was subsequently removed by the Apollo 12 Lunar Module landing rocket. The coupons were also pitted by the impact of larger soil particles with an average of 103 pits/cm 2. The average entry size of the pits was 83.7 ?m (major diameter) × 74.5 ?m (minor diameter) and the average estimated penetration depth was 88.4 ?m. Pitting in the surface of the coupons correlates to removal of lunar fines and is likely a signature of lunar material imparting localized momentum/energy sufficient to cause cracking of the paint. Comparison with the lunar soil particle size distribution and the optical density of blowing soil during lunar landings indicates that the Surveyor III spacecraft was not exposed to the direct spray of the landing Lunar Module, but instead experienced only the fringes of the spray of soil. Had Surveyor III been exposed to the direct spray, the damage would have been orders of magnitude higher.

  6. Validation of Methods to Predict Vibration of a Panel in the Near Field of a Hot Supersonic Rocket Plume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bremner, P. G.; Blelloch, P. A.; Hutchings, A.; Shah, P.; Streett, C. L.; Larsen, C. E.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the measurement and analysis of surface fluctuating pressure level (FPL) data and vibration data from a plume impingement aero-acoustic and vibration (PIAAV) test to validate NASA s physics-based modeling methods for prediction of panel vibration in the near field of a hot supersonic rocket plume. For this test - reported more fully in a companion paper by Osterholt & Knox at 26th Aerospace Testing Seminar, 2011 - the flexible panel was located 2.4 nozzle diameters from the plume centerline and 4.3 nozzle diameters downstream from the nozzle exit. The FPL loading is analyzed in terms of its auto spectrum, its cross spectrum, its spatial correlation parameters and its statistical properties. The panel vibration data is used to estimate the in-situ damping under plume FPL loading conditions and to validate both finite element analysis (FEA) and statistical energy analysis (SEA) methods for prediction of panel response. An assessment is also made of the effects of non-linearity in the panel elasticity.

  7. Measurements of HONO, NO, NOy and SO2 in aircraft exhaust plumes at cruise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurkat, T.; Voigt, C.; Arnold, F.; Schlager, H.; Kleffmann, J.; Aufmhoff, H.; Schäuble, D.; Schaefer, M.; Schumann, U.

    2011-05-01

    Measurements of gaseous nitrogen and sulfur oxide emissions in young aircraft exhaust plumes give insight into chemical oxidation processes inside aircraft engines. Particularly, the OH-induced formation of nitrous acid (HONO) from nitrogen oxide (NO) and sulfuric acid (H2SO4) from sulfur dioxide (SO2) inside the turbine which is highly uncertain, need detailed analysis to address the climate impact of aviation. We report on airborne in situ measurements at cruise altitudes of HONO, NO, NOy, and SO2 in 9 wakes of 8 different types of modern jet airliners, including for the first time also an A380. Measurements of HONO and SO2 were made with an ITCIMS (Ion Trap Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer) using a new ion-reaction scheme involving SF5- reagent ions. The measured molar ratios HONO/NO and HONO/NOy with averages of 0.038 ± 0.010 and 0.027 ± 0.005 were found to decrease systematically with increasing NOx emission-index (EI NOx). We calculate an average EI HONO of 0.31 ± 0.12 g NO2 kg-1. Using reliable measurements of HONO and NOy, which are less adhesive than H2SO4 to the inlet walls, we derive the OH-induced conversion fraction of fuel sulfur to sulfuric acid $\\varepsilon$ with an average of 2.2 ± 0.5 %. $\\varepsilon$ also tends to decrease with increasing EI NOx, consistent with earlier model simulations. The lowest HONO/NO, HONO/NOy and $\\varepsilon$ was observed for the largest passenger aircraft A380.

  8. Plume mass flow and optical damage distributions for an MMH/N2O4 RCS thruster. [exhaust plume contamination of spacecraft components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spisz, E. W.; Bowman, R. L.; Jack, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    The data obtained from two recent experiments conducted in a continuing series of experiments at the Lewis Research Center into the contamination characteristics of a 5-pound thrust MMH/N2O4 engine are presented. The primary objectives of these experiments were to establish the angular distribution of condensible exhaust products within the plume and the corresponding optical damage angular distribution of transmitting optical elements attributable to this contaminant. The plume mass flow distribution was measured by five quartz crystal microbalances (QCM's) located at the engine axis evaluation. The fifth QCM was located above the engine and 15 deg behind the nozzle exit plane. The optical damage was determined by ex-situ transmittance measurements for the wavelength range from 0.2 to 0.6 microns on 2.54 cm diameter fused silica discs also located at engine centerline elevation. Both the mass deposition and optical damage angular distributions followed the expected trend of decreasing deposition and damage as the angle between sensor or sample and the nozzle axis increased. A simple plume gas flow equation predicted the deposition distribution reasonably well for angles of up to 55 degrees. The optical damage measurements also indicated significant effects at large angles.

  9. High altitude chemically reacting gas particle mixtures. Volume 2: Program manual for RAMP2. [rocket nozzle and orbital plume flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. D.

    1984-01-01

    All of the elements used in the Reacting and Multi-Phase (RAMP2) computer code are described in detail. The code can be used to model the dominant phenomena which affect the prediction of liquid and solid rocket nozzle and orbital plume flow fields.

  10. On the fast zonal transport of the STS-121 space shuttle exhaust plume in the lower thermosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Jia; Liu, Han-Li; Meier, R. R.; Chang, Loren; Gu, Sheng-Yang; Russell, James, III

    2013-03-01

    Meier et al. (2011) reported rapid eastward transport of the STS-121 space shuttle (launch: July 4, 2006) main engine plume in the lower thermosphere, observed in hydrogen Lyman ? images by the GUVI instrument onboard the TIMED satellite. In order to study the mechanism of the rapid zonal transport, diagnostic tracer calculations are performed using winds from the Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIME-GCM) simulation of July, 2006. It is found that the strong eastward jet at heights of 100-110 km, where the exhaust plume was deposited, results in a persistent eastward tracer motion with an average velocity of 45 m/s. This is generally consistent with, though faster than, the prevailing eastward shuttle plume movement with daily mean velocity of 30 m/s deduced from the STS-121 GUVI observation. The quasi-two-day wave (QTDW) was not included in the numerical simulation because it was found not to be large. Its absence, however, might be partially responsible for insufficient meridional transport to move the tracers away from the fast jet in the simulation. The current study and our model results from Yue and Liu (2010) explain two very different shuttle plume transport scenarios (STS-121 and STS-107 (launch: January 16, 2003), respectively): we conclude that lower thermospheric dynamics is sufficient to account for both very fast zonal motion (zonal jet in the case of STS-121) and very fast meridional motion to polar regions (large QTDW in the case of STS-107).

  11. The investigation of man-made modifications of the ionosphere. [effects of detonations and rocket exhaust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernhardt, P. A.; Darosa, A. V.; Price, K. M.

    1980-01-01

    Topics covered include: (1) the application of ionosphere modifications models to the simulation of results obtained when rocket-borne explosives were detonated in the ionosphere; (2) the problem of hypersonic vapor releases from orbiting vehicles; (3) measuring the electron content reduction resulting from the firing of a Centaur rocket in the ionosphere; and (4) the preliminary design of the critical frequency tracker which displays the value of electron concentration at the peak of the F 2 region, in real time.

  12. Phenomenology of soil erosion due to rocket exhaust on the Moon and the Mauna Kea lunar test site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, Philip T.; Smith, Jacob; Lane, John E.

    2011-06-01

    The soil-blowing phenomena observed in the Apollo lunar missions have not previously been described in the literature in sufficient detail to elucidate the physical processes and to support the development of physics-based modeling of the plume effects. In part, this is because previous laboratory experiments have used overly simplistic model soils that fail to produce many of the phenomena seen in lunar landings, some of which therefore went unrecognized. Here, the Apollo descent videos, terrain photography, and ascent videos are interpreted with the assistance of field experiments using a more complex regolith. Rocket thruster firings were performed upon the tephra of a lunar test site on Mauna Kea in Hawaii. This tephra possesses embedded rocks, large fractions of gravel and dust, some cohesion, and natural geological lamination. This produced more realistic plume phenomenology. The relevant phenomena include the relationship of dust liberation with overall soil erosion rate, terrain bed forms created by the plume, dust tails associated with the exhumation and blowing of rocks, bed load transport, the removal of discrete layers of soil hypothesized to be the stratigraphic units corresponding to impact events, the total mass of ejected soil during a landing, and the brightening of the regolith around the landing site. This analysis provides insight into the erosion processes and nature of the regolith. This paper also synthesizes theory, experiment, simulation, and observational data to produce a clearer picture of the physical processes of lunar soil erosion.

  13. Results of an investigation of jet plume effects on a 0.010-scale model (75-OTS) of the space shuttle integrated vehicle in the 8 x 7-foot leg of the NASA/Ames unitary wind tunnel (IA82C), volume 1. [(an exhaust flow simulation)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawthorne, P. J.

    1976-01-01

    The primary test objective was to define the base pressure environment of the first and second stage mated vehicle in a supersonic flow field from Mach 2.60 through 3.50 with simulated rocket engine exhaust plumes. The secondary objective was to obtain the pressure environment of the Orbiter at various vent port locations at these same freestream conditions. Data were obtained at angles of attack from -4 deg through +4 deg at zero yaw, and at yaw angles from -4 deg through +4 deg at zero angle of attack, with rocket plume sizes varying from smaller than nominal to much greater than nominal. Failed Orbiter engine data were also obtained. Elevon hinge moments and wing panel load data were obtained during all runs. Photographs of test equipment and tested configurations are shown.

  14. Constraining the heterogeneous loss of O3 on soot particles with observations in jet engine exhaust plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, R. S.; Kärcher, B.; Keim, E. R.; Fahey, D. W.

    In situ measurements in the engine exhaust of a Concorde supersonic aircraft in the lower stratosphere are used to constrain heterogeneous reaction rates on soot particles in a plume model. Upper limit values are obtained for the product of the reactive uptake coefficients of O3 and NO2 and the mean surface area of individual soot particles using the model and the well-established O3-N2O correlation in the lower stratosphere. The low reactivity value obtained for O3 implies that soot reactions cannot account for ozone trends in the lower stratosphere.

  15. Dilution and aerosol dynamics within a diesel car exhaust plume—CFD simulations of on-road measurement conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhrner, U.; von Löwis, S.; Vehkamäki, H.; Wehner, B.; Bräsel, S.; Hermann, M.; Stratmann, F.; Kulmala, M.; Wiedensohler, A.

    Vehicle particle emissions are studied extensively because of their health effects, contribution to ambient PM levels and possible impact on climate. The aim of this work was to obtain a better understanding of secondary particle formation and growth in a diluting vehicle exhaust plume using 3-d information of simulations together with measurements. Detailed coupled computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and aerosol dynamics simulations have been conducted for H 2SO 4-H 2O and soot particles based on measurements within a vehicle exhaust plume under real conditions on public roads. Turbulent diffusion of soot and nucleation particles is responsible for the measured decrease of number concentrations within the diesel car exhaust plume and decreases coagulation rates. Particle size distribution measurements at 0.45 and 0.9 m distance to the tailpipe indicate a consistent soot mode (particle diameter Dp˜50 nm) at variable operating conditions. Soot mode number concentrations reached up to 10 13 m -3 depending on operating conditions and mixing. For nucleation particles the simulations showed a strong sensitivity to the spatial dilution pattern, related cooling and exhaust H 2SO 4(g). The highest simulated nucleation rates were about 0.05-0.1 m from the axis of the plume. The simulated particle number concentration pattern is in approximate accordance with measured concentrations, along the jet centreline and 0.45 and 0.9 m from the tailpipe. Although the test car was run with ultralow sulphur fuel, high nucleation particle ( Dp?15 nm) concentrations (>10 13 m -3) were measured under driving conditions of strong acceleration or the combination of high vehicle speed (>140 km h -1) and high engine rotational speed (>3800 revolutions per minute (rpm)). Strong mixing and cooling caused rapid nucleation immediately behind the tailpipe, so that the highest particle number concentrations were recorded at a distance, x=0.45 m behind the tailpipe. The simulated growth of H 2SO 4-H 2O nucleation particles was unrealistically low compared with measurements. The possible role of low and semi-volatile organic components on the growth processes is discussed. Simulations for simplified H 2SO 4-H 2O-octane-gasoil aerosol resulted in sufficient growth of nucleation particles.

  16. A computer program for thermal radiation from gaseous rocket exhuast plumes (GASRAD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reardon, J. E.; Lee, Y. C.

    1979-01-01

    A computer code is presented for predicting incident thermal radiation from defined plume gas properties in either axisymmetric or cylindrical coordinate systems. The radiation model is a statistical band model for exponential line strength distribution with Lorentz/Doppler line shapes for 5 gaseous species (H2O, CO2, CO, HCl and HF) and an appoximate (non-scattering) treatment of carbon particles. The Curtis-Godson approximation is used for inhomogeneous gases, but a subroutine is available for using Young's intuitive derivative method for H2O with Lorentz line shape and exponentially-tailed-inverse line strength distribution. The geometry model provides integration over a hemisphere with up to 6 individually oriented identical axisymmetric plumes, a single 3-D plume, Shading surfaces may be used in any of 7 shapes, and a conical limit may be defined for the plume to set individual line-of-signt limits. Intermediate coordinate systems may specified to simplify input of plumes and shading surfaces.

  17. Rocket noise - A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McInerny, S. A.

    1990-10-01

    This paper reviews what is known about far-field rocket noise from the controlled studies of the late 1950s and 1960s and from launch data. The peak dimensionless frequency, the dependence of overall sound power on exhaust parameters, and the directivity of the overall sound power of rockets are compared to those of subsonic jets and turbo-jets. The location of the dominant sound source in the rocket exhaust plume and the mean flow velocity in this region are discussed and shown to provide a qualitative explanation for the low peak Strouhal number, fD(e)/V(e), and large angle of maximum directivity. Lastly, two empirical prediction methods are compared with data from launches of a Titan family vehicle (two, solid rocket motors of 5.7 x 10 to the 6th N thrust each) and the Saturn V (five, liquid oxygen/rocket propellant engines of 6.7 x 10 to the 6th N thrust, each). The agreement is favorable. In contrast, these methods appear to overpredict the far-field sound pressure levels generated by the Space Shuttle.

  18. Modeling of Heat Transfer and Ablation of Refractory Material Due to Rocket Plume Impingement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Michael F.; Vu, Bruce T.

    2012-01-01

    CR Tech's Thermal Desktop-SINDA/FLUINT software was used in the thermal analysis of a flame deflector design for Launch Complex 39B at Kennedy Space Center, Florida. The analysis of the flame deflector takes into account heat transfer due to plume impingement from expected vehicles to be launched at KSC. The heat flux from the plume was computed using computational fluid dynamics provided by Ames Research Center in Moffet Field, California. The results from the CFD solutions were mapped onto a 3-D Thermal Desktop model of the flame deflector using the boundary condition mapping capabilities in Thermal Desktop. The ablation subroutine in SINDA/FLUINT was then used to model the ablation of the refractory material.

  19. Digital filtering of plume emission spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madzsar, George C.

    1990-01-01

    Fourier transformation and digital filtering techniques were used to separate the superpositioned spectral phenomena observed in the exhaust plumes of liquid propellant rocket engines. Space shuttle main engine (SSME) spectral data were used to show that extraction of spectral lines in the spatial frequency domain does not introduce error, and extraction of the background continuum introduces only minimal error. Error introduced during band extraction could not be quantified due to poor spectrometer resolution. Based on the atomic and molecular species found in the SSME plume, it was determined that spectrometer resolution must be 0.03 nm for SSME plume spectral monitoring.

  20. The chemistry and diffusion of aircraft exhausts in the lower stratosphere during the first few hours after fly-by. [with attention to ozone depletion by SST exhaust plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilst, G. R.

    1974-01-01

    An analysis of the hydrogen-nitrogen-oxygen reaction systems in the lower stratosphere as they are initially perturbed by individual aircraft engine exhaust plumes was conducted in order to determine whether any significant chemical reactions occur, either among exhaust chemical species, or between these species and the environmental ozone, while the exhaust products are confined to intact plume segments at relatively high concentrations. The joint effects of diffusive mixing and chemical kinetics on the reactions were also studied, using the techniques of second-order closure diffusion/chemistry models. The focus of the study was on the larger problem of the potential depletion of ozone by supersonic transport aircraft exhaust materials emitted into the lower stratosphere.

  1. One Dimensional Analysis Model of a Condensing Spray Chamber Including Rocket Exhaust Using SINDA/FLUINT and CEA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakowski, Barbara; Edwards, Daryl; Dickens, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Modeling droplet condensation via CFD codes can be very tedious, time consuming, and inaccurate. CFD codes may be tedious and time consuming in terms of using Lagrangian particle tracking approaches or particle sizing bins. Also since many codes ignore conduction through the droplet and or the degradating effect of heat and mass transfer if noncondensible species are present, the solutions may be inaccurate. The modeling of a condensing spray chamber where the significant size of the water droplets and the time and distance these droplets take to fall, can make the effect of droplet conduction a physical factor that needs to be considered in the model. Furthermore the presence of even a relatively small amount of noncondensible has been shown to reduce the amount of condensation [Ref 1]. It is desirable then to create a modeling tool that addresses these issues. The path taken to create such a tool is illustrated. The application of this tool and subsequent results are based on the spray chamber in the Spacecraft Propulsion Research Facility (B2) located at NASA's Plum Brook Station that tested an RL-10 engine. The platform upon which the condensation physics is modeled is SINDAFLUINT. The use of SINDAFLUINT enables the ability to model various aspects of the entire testing facility, including the rocket exhaust duct flow and heat transfer to the exhaust duct wall. The ejector pumping system of the spray chamber is also easily implemented via SINDAFLUINT. The goal is to create a transient one dimensional flow and heat transfer model beginning at the rocket, continuing through the condensing spray chamber, and finally ending with the ejector pumping system. However the model of the condensing spray chamber may be run independently of the rocket and ejector systems detail, with only appropriate mass flow boundary conditions placed at the entrance and exit of the condensing spray chamber model. The model of the condensing spray chamber takes into account droplet conduction as well as the degrading effect of mass and heat transfer due to the presence of noncondensibles. The one dimension model of the condensing spray chamber makes no presupposition on the pressure profile within the chamber, allowing the implemented droplet physics of heat and mass transfer coupled to the SINDAFLUINT solver to determine a transient pressure profile of the condensing spray chamber. Model results compare well to the RL-10 engine pressure test data.

  2. One Dimensional Analysis Model of a Condensing Spray Chamber Including Rocket Exhaust Using SINDA/FLUINT and CEA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakowski, Barbara A.; Edwards, Daryl; Dickens, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Modeling droplet condensation via CFD codes can be very tedious, time consuming, and inaccurate. CFD codes may be tedious and time consuming in terms of using Lagrangian particle tracking approaches or particle sizing bins. Also since many codes ignore conduction through the droplet and or the degradating effect of heat and mass transfer if noncondensible species are present, the solutions may be inaccurate. The modeling of a condensing spray chamber where the significant size of the water droplets and the time and distance these droplets take to fall, can make the effect of droplet conduction a physical factor that needs to be considered in the model. Furthermore the presence of even a relatively small amount of noncondensible has been shown to reduce the amount of condensation. It is desirable then to create a modeling tool that addresses these issues. The path taken to create such a tool is illustrated. The application of this tool and subsequent results are based on the spray chamber in the Spacecraft Propulsion Research Facility (B2) located at NASA's Plum Brook Station that tested an RL-10 engine. The platform upon which the condensation physics is modeled is SINDAFLUINT. The use of SINDAFLUINT enables the ability to model various aspects of the entire testing facility, including the rocket exhaust duct flow and heat transfer to the exhaust duct wall. The ejector pumping system of the spray chamber is also easily implemented via SINDAFLUINT. The goal is to create a transient one dimensional flow and heat transfer model beginning at the rocket, continuing through the condensing spray chamber, and finally ending with the ejector pumping system. However the model of the condensing spray chamber may be run independently of the rocket and ejector systems detail, with only appropriate mass flow boundary conditions placed at the entrance and exit of the condensing spray chamber model. The model of the condensing spray chamber takes into account droplet conduction as well as the degrading effect of mass and heat transfer due to the presence of noncondensibles. The one dimension model of the condensing spray chamber makes no presupposition on the pressure profile within the chamber, allowing the implemented droplet physics of heat and mass transfer coupled to the SINDAFLUINT solver to determine a transient pressure profile of the condensing spray chamber. Model results compare well to the RL-10 engine pressure test data.

  3. Multiple dopant injection system for small rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakala, G. G.; Raines, N. G.

    1992-01-01

    The Diagnostics Test Facility (DTF) at NASA's Stennis Space Center (SSC) was designed and built to provide a standard rocket engine exhaust plume for use in the research and development of engine health monitoring instrumentation. A 1000 lb thrust class liquid oxygen (LOX)-gaseous hydrogen (GH2) fueled rocket engine is used as the subscale plume source to simulate the SSME during experimentation and instrument development. The ability of the DTF to provide efficient, and low cost test operations makes it uniquely suited for plume diagnostic experimentation. The most unique feature of the DTF is the Multiple Dopant Injection System (MDIS) that is used to seed the exhaust plume with the desired element or metal alloy. The dopant injection takes place at the fuel injector, yielding a very uniform and homogeneous distribution of the seeding material in the exhaust plume. The MDIS allows during a single test firing of the DTF, the seeding of the exhaust plume with up to three different dopants and also provides distilled water base lines between the dopants. A number of plume diagnostic-related experiments have already utilized the unique capabilities of the DTF.

  4. Plasma-gas interaction studies in a hybrid-plume plasma rocket. Annual report, 1 September 1986-30 August 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Chang-Diaz, F.R.; Yang, T.F.

    1987-09-30

    This report discusses the progress in the fluid modeling of a hybrid-plume plasma rocket and the heating of plasma in a tandem-mirror device. In the theoretical area, three tasks were accomplished: 1) a major advance has been made in the development of a numerical method for solving the time-dependent fluid equations for both ions and electrons in the plasma; 2) a mathematical model was formulated for studying the radio-frequency heating of the hot plasma in cylindrical geometry; and 3) an analysis on the performance characteristics of the hybrid plume rocket was carried out. Under funding of the instrumentation program, component fabrication is in progress. The coils have been delivered.

  5. Prediction of space shuttle fluctuating pressure environments, including rocket plume effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plotkin, K. J.; Robertson, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    Preliminary estimates of space shuttle fluctuating pressure environments have been made based on prediction techniques developed by Wyle Laboratories. Particular emphasis has been given to the transonic speed regime during launch of a parallel-burn space shuttle configuration. A baseline configuration consisting of a lightweight orbiter and monolithic SRB, together with a typical flight trajectory, have been used as models for the predictions. Critical fluctuating pressure environments are predicted at transonic Mach numbers. Comparisons between predicted environments and wind tunnel test results, in general, showed good agreement. Predicted one-third octave band spectra for the above environments were generally one of three types: (1) attached turbulent boundary layer spectra (typically high frequencies); (2) homogeneous separated flow and shock-free interference flow spectra (typically intermediate frequencies); and (3) shock-oscillation and shock-induced interference flow spectra (typically low frequencies). Predictions of plume induced separated flow environments were made. Only the SRB plumes are important, with fluctuating levels comparable to compression-corner induced separated flow shock oscillation.

  6. Process-Hardened, Multi-Analyte Sensor for Characterizing Rocket Plume Constituents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goswami, Kisholoy

    2011-01-01

    A multi-analyte sensor was developed that enables simultaneous detection of rocket engine combustion-product molecules in a launch-vehicle ground test stand. The sensor was developed using a pin-printing method by incorporating multiple sensor elements on a single chip. It demonstrated accurate and sensitive detection of analytes such as carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, kerosene, isopropanol, and ethylene from a single measurement. The use of pin-printing technology enables high-volume fabrication of the sensor chip, which will ultimately eliminate the need for individual sensor calibration since many identical sensors are made in one batch. Tests were performed using a single-sensor chip attached to a fiber-optic bundle. The use of a fiber bundle allows placement of the opto-electronic readout device at a place remote from the test stand. The sensors are rugged for operation in harsh environments.

  7. High altitude chemically reacting gas particle mixtures. Volume 1: A theoretical analysis and development of the numerical solution. [rocket nozzle and orbital plume flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. D.

    1984-01-01

    The overall contractual effort and the theory and numerical solution for the Reacting and Multi-Phase (RAMP2) computer code are described. The code can be used to model the dominant phenomena which affect the prediction of liquid and solid rocket nozzle and orbital plume flow fields. Fundamental equations for steady flow of reacting gas-particle mixtures, method of characteristics, mesh point construction, and numerical integration of the conservation equations are considered herein.

  8. Equations of motion for the variable mass flow-variable exhaust velocity rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tempelman, W. H.

    1972-01-01

    An equation of motion for a one dimensional rocket is derived as a function of the mass flow rate into the acceleration chamber and the velocity distribution along the chamber, thereby including the transient flow changes in the chamber. The derivation of the mass density requires the introduction of the special time coordinate. The equation of motion is derived from both classical force and momentum approaches and is shown to be consistent with the standard equation expressed in terms of flow parameters at the exit to the acceleration chamber.

  9. Wind Tunnel Model Design for the Study of Plume Effects on Sonic Boom for Isolated Exhaust Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castner, Raynold S.

    2010-01-01

    A low cost test capability was developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center 1- by 1-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel (SWT), with a goal to reduce the disturbance caused by supersonic aircraft flight over populated areas. This work focused on the shock wave structure caused by the exhaust nozzle plume. Analysis and design was performed on a new rig to test exhaust nozzle plume effects on sonic boom signature. Test capability included a baseline nozzle test article and a wind tunnel model consisting of a strut, a nosecone and an upper plenum. Analysis was performed on the external and internal aerodynamic configuration, including the shock reflections from the wind tunnel walls caused by the presence of the model nosecone. This wind tunnel model was designed to operate from Mach 1.4 to Mach 3.0 with nozzle pressure ratios from 6 to 12 and altitudes from 30,000 ft (4.36 psia) to 50,000 ft (1.68 psia). The model design was based on a 1 in. outer diameter, was 9 in. in overall length, and was mounted in the wind tunnel on a 3/8 in. wide support strut. For test conditions at 50,000 ft the strut was built to supply 90 psia of pressure, and to achieve 20 psia at the nozzle inlet with a maximum nozzle pressure of 52 psia. Instrumentation was developed to measure nozzle pressure ratio, and an external static pressure probe was designed to survey near field static pressure profiles at one nozzle diameter above the rig centerline. Model layout placed test nozzles between two transparent sidewalls in the 1 1 SWT for Schlieren photography and comparison to CFD analysis.

  10. Wind Tunnel Model Design for the Study of Plume Effects on Sonic Boom for Isolated Exhaust Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castner, Raymond S.

    2009-01-01

    A low cost test capability was developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center 1- by 1-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel (SWT), with a goal to reduce the disturbance caused by supersonic aircraft flight over populated areas. This work focused on the shock wave structure caused by the exhaust nozzle plume. Analysis and design was performed on a new rig to test exhaust nozzle plume effects on sonic boom signature. Test capability included a baseline nozzle test article and a wind tunnel model consisting of a strut, a nose cone and an upper plenum. Analysis was performed on the external and internal aerodynamic configuration, including the shock reflections from the wind tunnel walls caused by the presence of the model nosecone. This wind tunnel model was designed to operate from Mach 1.4 to Mach 3.0 with nozzle pressure ratios from 6 to 12 and altitudes from 30,000 ft (4.36 psia) to 50,000 ft (1.68 psia). The model design was based on a 1 in. outer diameter, was 9 in. in overall length, and was mounted in the wind tunnel on a 3/8 in. wide support strut. For test conditions at 50,000 ft the strut was built to supply 90 psia of pressure, and to achieve 20 psia at the nozzle inlet with a maximum nozzle pressure of 52 psia. Instrumentation was developed to measure nozzle pressure ratio, and an external static pressure probe was designed to survey near field static pressure profiles at one nozzle diameter above the rig centerline. Model layout placed test nozzles between two transparent sidewalls in the 1x1 SWT for Schlieren photography and comparison to CFD analysis.

  11. Plasma-gas interactions studies in a hybrid plume plasma rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, F. R.; Krueger, W. A.; Yang, T. F.; Fisher, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    Plasma-gas interaction was investigated and the basic mechanisms for energy and particle transport. The solution approach assumes cylindrical geometry and includes a multiplicity of atomic reactions, and the presence of a strong magnetic field is described. The principal reactions are electron and ion impact ionization, and charge exchange between hot ions and cold neutrals. Radial particle and energy transport is mainly by diffusion. A modified Bohm diffusion model for plasma in the core of the plume, and classical neutral particle diffusion in the cooler regions of the flow are presented. Neutrals are allowed to free stream in the low density regions, where the collision mean-free-path becomes comparable, or even larger than the characteristic dimensions of the system.

  12. Ionospheric shock waves triggered by rockets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, C. H.; Lin, J. T.; Chen, C. H.; Liu, J. Y.; Sun, Y. Y.; Kakinami, Y.; Matsumura, M.; Chen, W. H.; Liu, H.; Rau, R. J.

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents a two-dimensional structure of the shock wave signatures in ionospheric electron density resulting from a rocket transit using the rate of change of the total electron content (TEC) derived from ground-based GPS receivers around Japan and Taiwan for the first time. From the TEC maps constructed for the 2009 North Korea (NK) Taepodong-2 and 2013 South Korea (SK) Korea Space Launch Vehicle-II (KSLV-II) rocket launches, features of the V-shaped shock wave fronts in TEC perturbations are prominently seen. These fronts, with periods of 100-600 s, produced by the propulsive blasts of the rockets appear immediately and then propagate perpendicularly outward from the rocket trajectory with supersonic velocities between 800-1200 m s-1 for both events. Additionally, clear rocket exhaust depletions of TECs are seen along the trajectory and are deflected by the background thermospheric neutral wind. Twenty minutes after the rocket transits, delayed electron density perturbation waves propagating along the bow wave direction appear with phase velocities of 800-1200 m s-1. According to their propagation character, these delayed waves may be generated by rocket exhaust plumes at earlier rocket locations at lower altitudes.

  13. Velocity and temperature characteristics of two-stream, coplanar jet exhaust plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Glahn, U.; Goodykoontz, J.; Wasserbauer, C.

    1984-01-01

    The subsonic jet exhaust velocity and temperature characteristics of model scale, two stream coplanar nozzles were obtained experimentally. The data obtained included the effects of fan to primary stream velocity and temperature ratios on the jet axial and radial flow characteristics. Empirical parameters were developed to correlate the measured data. The resultant equations were shown to be extensions of a previously published single stream jet velocity and temperature correlation.

  14. Three-dimensional reconstruction method on the PDE exhaust plume flow flame temperature field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhimin; Wan, Xiong; Luo, Ningning; Li, Shujing

    2010-10-01

    Pulse detonation engine (referred to as PDE) has many advantage about simple structure, high efficiency thermal [1] cycling etc. In the future, it can be widely used in unmanned aircraft, target drone, luring the plane, the imaginary target, target missiles, long-range missiles and other military targets. However, because the exhaust flame of PDE is complicated [2], non-uniform temperature distribution and mutation in real time, its 3-D temperature distribution is difficult to be measured by normal way. As a result, PDE is used in the military project need to face many difficulties and challenges. In order to analyze and improve the working performance of PDE, deep research on the detonation combustion process is necessary. However, its performance characteristic which is in non-steady-state, as well as high temperature, high pressure, transient combustion characteristics put forward high demands about the flow field parameters measurement. In this paper, the PDE exhaust flames temperature field is reconstructed based on the theory of radiation thermometry [3] and Emission Spectral Tomography (referred to as EST) [4~6] which is one branch of Optical CT. It can monitor the detonation wave temperature distribution out of the exhaust flames at different moments, it also provides authentication for the numerical simulation which directs towards PDE work performance, and then it provides the basis for improving the structure of PDE.

  15. Approach to SSME health monitoring. III - Exhaust plume emission spectroscopy: Recent results and detailed analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tejwani, Gopal D.; Van Dyke, David B.; Bircher, Felix E.

    1993-01-01

    Spectral data for two recent A-1 test firings, 901-717 and 901-718, obtained from an Optical Multichannel Analyzer and an Optical Plume Anomaly Detector, are presented. The spectral data encompasses the database of SSME critical components and materials and the spectral database for the SSME related elements and materials. Relatively strong and continuous emissions from Cr and Fe atomic transitions were observed starting at engine start plus 494 s and persisting until the engine shut off at engine start plus 520 s. These emissions are considered to be emanated from the SSME material AISI 440C, which is traced to high pressure turbopump bearings.

  16. Radiometric observations of the 752.033-GHz rotational absorption line of H2O from a laboratory jet. [simulation of rocket plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dionne, G. F.; Fitzgerald, J. F.; Chang, T.-S.; Fetterman, H. R.; Litvak, M. M.

    1980-01-01

    With the aid of a high-resolution two-stage heterodyne radiometer, spectral absorption measurements of the 752.033 GHz line of water vapor were carried out, using a blackbody continuum as a background radiation source for investigating the absorptive properties of the H2O content of high altitude rocket plumes. To simulate this physical situation in a laboratory environment, a small steam jet was operated within a large high-vacuum chamber, with the H2O jet plume traversing the radiometer line of sight. The experiments verified that this rotational line is optically thick, with excitation temperatures below 100 K, in the downstream part of the plume, as predicted by theoretical modelling.

  17. Recommended launch-hold criteria for protecting public health from hydrogen chloride (HC1) gas produced by rocket exhaust

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, J.I.; Baskett, R.L.

    1995-11-01

    Solid-fuel rocket motors used by the United States Air Force (USAF) to launch missiles and spacecraft can produce ambient-air concentrations of hydrogen chloride (HCI) gas. The HCI gas is a reaction product exhausted from the rocket motor during normal launch or emitted as a result of a catastrophic abort destroying the launch vehicle. Depending on the concentration in ambient air, the HCI gas can be irritating or toxic to humans. The diagnostic and complex-terrain wind field and particle dispersion model used by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s (LLNL`s) Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) Program was applied to the launch of a Peacekeeper missile from Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB) in California. Results from this deterministic model revealed that under specific meteorological conditions, cloud passage from normal-launch and catastropic-abort situations can yield measureable ground-level air concentrations of HCI where the general public is located. To protect public health in the event of such cloud passage, scientifically defensible, emergency ambient-air concentration limits for HCI were developed and recommended to the USAF for use as launch-hold criteria. Such launch-hold criteria are used to postpone a launch unless the forecasted meteorological conditions favor the prediction of safe ground-level concentrations of HCl for the general public. The recommended concentration limits are a 2 ppM 1-h time-weighted average (TWA) concentration constrained by a 1-min 10-ppM average concentration. This recommended criteria is supported by human dose-response information, including data for sensitive humans (e.g., asthmatics), and the dose response exhibited experimentally by animal models with respiratory physiology or responses considered similar to humans.

  18. HCl in rocket exhaust clouds - Atmospheric dispersion, acid aerosol characteristics, and acid rain deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, G. L.; Sebacher, D. I.; Bendura, R. J.; Wornom, D. E.

    1983-01-01

    Both measurements and model calculations of the temporal dispersion of peak HCl (g + aq) concentration in Titan III exhaust clouds are found to be well characterized by one-term power-law decay expressions. The respective coefficients and decay exponents, however, are found to vary widely with meteorology. The HCl (g), HCl (g + aq), dewpoint, and temperature-pressure-altitude data for Titan III exhaust clouds are consistent with accurately calculated HCl/H2O vapor-liquid compositions for a model quasi-equilibrated flat surface aqueous aerosol. Some cloud evolution characteristics are also defined. Rapid and extensive condensation of aqueous acid clearly occurs during the first three min of cloud rise. Condensation is found to be intensified by the initial entrainment of relatively moist ambient air from lower levels, that is, from levels below eventual cloud stabilization. It is pointed out that if subsequent dilution air at stabilization altitude is significantly drier, a state of maximum condensation soon occurs, followed by an aerosol evaporation phase.

  19. Characteristics of aerosol particles and trace gases in ship exhaust plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drewnick, F.; Diesch, J.; Borrmann, S.

    2011-12-01

    Gaseous and particulate matter from marine vessels gain increasing attention due to their significant contribution to the anthropogenic burden of the atmosphere, implying the change of the atmospheric composition and the impact on local and regional air quality and climate (Eyring et al., 2010). As ship emissions significantly affect air quality of onshore regions, this study deals with various aspects of gas and particulate plumes from marine traffic measured near the Elbe river mouth in northern Germany. In addition to a detailed investigation of the chemical and physical particle properties from different types of commercial marine vessels, we will focus on the chemistry of ship plumes and their changes while undergoing atmospheric processing. Measurements of the ambient aerosol, various trace gases and meteorological parameters using a mobile laboratory (MoLa) were performed on the banks of the Lower Elbe which is passed on average, daily by 30 ocean-going vessels reaching the port of Hamburg, the second largest freight port of Europe. During 5 days of sampling from April 25-30, 2011 170 commercial marine vessels were probed at a distance of about 1.5-2 km with high temporal resolution. Mass concentrations in PM1, PM2.5 and PM10 and number as well as PAH and black carbon (BC) concentrations in PM1 were measured; size distribution instruments covered the size range from 6 nm up to 32 μm. The chemical composition of the non-refractory aerosol in the submicron range was measured by means of an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (Aerodyne HR-ToF-AMS). Gas phase species analyzers monitored various trace gas concentrations in the air and a weather station provided meteorological parameters. Additionally, a wide spectrum of ship information for each vessel including speed, size, vessel type, fuel type, gross tonnage and engine power was recorded via Automatic Identification System (AIS) broadcasts. Although commercial marine vessels powered by diesel engines consume high-sulfur fuel, the chemical submicron aerosol fraction is mainly composed of hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA) species. These include PAHs that are adsorbed onto the high number of ultrafine particles. Nevertheless, the chemical composition, typical particle sizes as well as emitted gaseous components vary substantially dependent on the engine or ship type, engine operation condition and fuel mixture. This results in cargo vessels compared to tankers, passenger ships and river boats being the largest polluters influencing the Elbe shipping lane areas by high amounts of NOx, SO2, CO2, PAH, BC and ultrafine particulate matter. The tropospheric ozone chemistry in this area is also substantially affected particularly due to the increasing number of Elbe-passing ships. As onshore regions can be influenced by aged shipping plumes, trajectory pathways and transportation times were examined. As a consequence of the plumes' aging, variations of the organic fraction of the mass spectral fingerprints were found. Eyring, V. et al. (2010), Atmospheric Environment, 44, 4735-4771.

  20. Some environmental considerations relating to the interaction of the solid rocket motor exhaust with the atmosphere: Predicted chemical composition of exhaust species and predicted conditions for the formation of HCl aerosol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhein, R. A.

    1973-01-01

    The exhaust products of a solid rocket motor using as propellant 14% binder, 16% aluminum, and 70% (wt) ammonium perchlorate consist of hydrogen chloride, water, alumina, and other compounds. The equilibrium and some frozen compositions of the chemical species upon interaction with the atmosphere were computed. The conditions under which hydrogen chloride interacts with the water vapor in humid air to form an aerosol containing hydrochloric acid were computed for various weight ratios of air/exhaust products. These computations were also performed for the case of a combined SRM and hydrogen-oxygen rocket engine. Regimes of temperature and relative humidity where this aerosol is expected were identified. Within these regimes, the concentration of HCL in the aerosol and weight fraction of aerosol to gas phase were plotted. Hydrochloric acid aerosol formation was found to be particularly likely in cool humid weather.

  1. Hydrocarbon-Fueled Rocket Plume Measurement Using Polarized UV Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wehrmeyer, Joseph A.

    2002-01-01

    The influence of pressure upon the signal strength and polarization properties of UV Raman signals has been investigated experimentally up to pressures of 165 psia (11 atm). No significant influence of pressure upon the Raman scattering cross section or depolarization ratio of the N2 Raman signal was found. The Raman scattering signal varied linearly with pressure for the 300 K N2 samples examined, thus showing no enhancement of cross section with increasing pressure. However at the highest pressures associated with rocket engine combustion, there could be an increase in the Raman scattering cross section, based upon others' previous work at higher pressures than those examined in this work. The influence of pressure upon thick fused silica windows, used in the NASA Modular Combustion Test Article, was also investigated. No change in the transmission characteristics of the windows occurred as the pressure difference across the windows increased from 0 psig up to 150 psig. A calibration was performed on the UV Raman system at Vanderbilt University, which is similar to the one at the NASA-Marshall Test Stand 115. The results of this calibration are described in the form of temperature-dependent functions, f(T)'s, that account for the increase in Raman scattering cross section with an increase in temperature and also account for the reduction in collected Raman signal if wavelength integration does not occur across the entire wavelength range of the Raman signal. These functions generally vary only by approximately 10% across their respective temperature ranges, except for the case Of CO2, where there is a factor of three difference in its f(T) from 300 K to 2500 K. However this trend for CO2 is consistent with the experimental work of others, and is expected based on the low characteristic vibrational temperature Of CO2. A time-averaged temperature measurement technique has been developed, using the same equipment as for the work mentioned above, that is based upon high-spectral resolution UV Raman scattering. This technique can provide temperature measurements for flows where pressure cannot be measured.

  2. Low altitude plume impingement handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Sheldon D.

    1991-01-01

    Plume Impingement modeling is required whenever an object immersed in a rocket exhaust plume must survive or remain undamaged within specified limits, due to thermal and pressure environments induced by the plume. At high altitudes inviscid plume models, Monte Carlo techniques along with the Plume Impingement Program can be used to predict reasonably accurate environments since there are usually no strong flowfield/body interactions or atmospheric effects. However, at low altitudes there is plume-atmospheric mixing and potential large flowfield perturbations due to plume-structure interaction. If the impinged surface is large relative to the flowfield and the flowfield is supersonic, the shock near the surface can stand off the surface several exit radii. This results in an effective total pressure that is higher than that which exists in the free plume at the surface. Additionally, in two phase plumes, there can be strong particle-gas interaction in the flowfield immediately ahead of the surface. To date there have been three levels of sophistication that have been used for low altitude plume induced environment predictions. Level 1 calculations rely on empirical characterizations of the flowfield and relatively simple impingement modeling. An example of this technique is described by Piesik. A Level 2 approach consists of characterizing the viscous plume using the SPF/2 code or RAMP2/LAMP and using the Plume Impingement Program to predict the environments. A Level 3 analysis would consist of using a Navier-Stokes code such as the FDNS code to model the flowfield and structure during a single calculation. To date, Level 1 and Level 2 type analyses have been primarily used to perform environment calculations. The recent advances in CFD modeling and computer resources allow Level 2 type analysis to be used for final design studies. Following some background on low altitude impingement, Level 1, 2, and 3 type analysis will be described.

  3. Space Shuttle Plume and Plume Impingement Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tevepaugh, J. A.; Penny, M. M.

    1977-01-01

    The extent of the influence of the propulsion system exhaust plumes on the vehicle performance and control characteristics is a complex function of vehicle geometry, propulsion system geometry, engine operating conditions and vehicle flight trajectory were investigated. Analytical support of the plume technology test program was directed at the two latter problem areas: (1) definition of the full-scale exhaust plume characteristics, (2) application of appropriate similarity parameters; and (3) analysis of wind tunnel test data. Verification of the two-phase plume and plume impingement models was directed toward the definition of the full-scale exhaust plume characteristics and the separation motor impingement problem.

  4. High altitude chemically reacting gas particle mixtures. Volume 3: Computer code user's and applications manual. [rocket nozzle and orbital plume flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. D.

    1984-01-01

    A users manual for the RAMP2 computer code is provided. The RAMP2 code can be used to model the dominant phenomena which affect the prediction of liquid and solid rocket nozzle and orbital plume flow fields. The general structure and operation of RAMP2 are discussed. A user input/output guide for the modified TRAN72 computer code and the RAMP2F code is given. The application and use of the BLIMPJ module are considered. Sample problems involving the space shuttle main engine and motor are included.

  5. Exhaust Trail of STS-51-L

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    On January 28, 1986, the Space Shuttle Challenger and her seven-member crew were lost when a ruptured O-ring in the right Solid Rocket Booster caused an explosion soon after launch. This photograph, taken a few seconds after the accident, shows the Space Shuttle Main Engines and Solid Rocket Booster exhaust plumes entwined around a ball of gas from the External Tank. Because shuttle launches had become almost routine after fifty successful missions, those watching the shuttle launch in person and on television found the sight of the explosion especially shocking and difficult to believe until NASA confirmed the accident.

  6. Exhaust Effluent Diffusion Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorklund, J. R.; Dumbauld, R. K.; Cheney, C. S.; Geary, H. V.

    1985-01-01

    Rocket Exhaust Effluent Diffusion Model (REEDM) predicts concentrations, dosages, and depositions downwind from normal and abnormal launches of rocket vehicles at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. REEDM written in FORTRAN IV for interactive execution.

  7. Measurement of plasma parameters in the exhaust of a magnetoplasma rocket by gridded energy analyzer and emissive Langmuir probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glover, Timothy Ward

    2002-01-01

    The 10 kilowatt prototype of the Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR) engine, abbreviated as VX-10, is designed to eject plasma at exhaust velocities of tens of kilometers per second. In this device, energy is imparted to the plasma ions by two mechanisms: ion cyclotron resonant heating (ICRH), and acceleration in an ambipolar electric field. Measurements from two different electrostatic probes are combined to determine how much each mechanism contributes to the total ion energy. The first probe is a gridded retarding potential analyzer (RPA) that incorporates a multi-channel collimator to obtain precise measurement of the ion and electron parallel energy distributions. The second is an emissive Langmuir probe that measures the DC and RF components of the plasma potential. The plasma potential obtained from the emitting probe allows calculation of the parallel velocity distribution once the parallel energy distribution is obtained from the energy analyzer data. Biasing the RPA housing is shown to minimize the plasma perturbation, as monitored by an auxiliary probe. When this minimization is done, the RPA measurements become compatible with the emissive probe's measurement of plasma potential. The collimated RPA and emissive probe have been used to examine the effects of a double dual half-turn (DDHT) antenna encircling the plasma. When power at the ion cyclotron frequency is applied, changes are seen in the saturation current and mean ion energy of the collimated RPA characteristic. The evolution of these changes as the RPA is moved downstream from the antenna is interpreted as firm evidence of ion cyclotron heating, albeit at absorbed energies of less than 1 electronvolt per ion. The emissive probe shows that, within experimental error, all of the increased ion energy is accounted for by an increase in the plasma potential that occurs when the ICRF power is applied. The combined RPA and emissive probe data also show that there is a jet of flowing plasma in the VX-10 when operated with the helicon source alone but that the signal from this jet is overwhelmed by a rapidly growing stationary plasma within the first second of the discharge.

  8. Characterization of rocket propellant combustion products. Chemical characterization and computer modeling of the exhaust products from four propellant formulations: Final report, September 23, 1987--April 1, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, R.A.; Nestor, C.W.; Thompson, C.V.; Gayle, T.M.; Ma, C.Y.; Tomkins, B.A.; Moody, R.L.

    1991-12-09

    The overall objective of the work described in this report is four-fold: to (a) develop a standardized and experimentally validated approach to the sampling and chemical and physical characterization of the exhaust products of scaled-down rocket launch motors fired under experimentally controlled conditions at the Army`s Signature Characterization Facility (ASCF) at Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Alabama; (b) determine the composition of the exhaust produces; (c) assess the accuracy of a selected existing computer model for predicting the composition of major and minor chemical species; (d) recommended alternations to both the sampling and analysis strategy and the computer model in order to achieve greater congruence between chemical measurements and computer prediction. 34 refs., 2 figs., 35 tabs.

  9. Navier-Stokes computations with finite-rate chemistry for LO2/LH2 rocket engine plume flow studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dougherty, N. Sam; Liu, Baw-Lin

    1991-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics methods have been developed and applied to Space Shuttle Main Engine LO2/LH2 plume flow simulation/analysis of airloading and convective base heating effects on the vehicle at high flight velocities and altitudes. New methods are described which were applied to the simulation of a Return-to-Launch-Site abort where the vehicle would fly briefly at negative angles of attack into its own plume. A simplified two-perfect-gases-mixing approach is used where one gas is the plume and the other is air at 180-deg and 135-deg flight angle of attack. Related research has resulted in real gas multiple-plume interaction methods with finite-rate chemistry described herein which are applied to the same high-altitude-flight conditions of 0 deg angle of attack. Continuing research plans are to study Orbiter wake/plume flows at several Mach numbers and altitudes during ascent and then to merge this model with the Shuttle 'nose-to-tail' aerodynamic and SRB plume models for an overall 'nose-to-plume' capability. These new methods are also applicable to future launch vehicles using clustered-engine LO2/LH2 propulsion.

  10. Another Look at Rocket Thrust

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hester, Brooke; Burris, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Rocket propulsion is often introduced as an example of Newton's third law. The rocket exerts a force on the exhaust gas being ejected; the gas exerts an equal and opposite force--the thrust--on the rocket. Equivalently, in the absence of a net external force, the total momentum of the system, rocket plus ejected gas, remains constant. The law of…

  11. Another Look at Rocket Thrust

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hester, Brooke; Burris, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Rocket propulsion is often introduced as an example of Newton's third law. The rocket exerts a force on the exhaust gas being ejected; the gas exerts an equal and opposite force--the thrust--on the rocket. Equivalently, in the absence of a net external force, the total momentum of the system, rocket plus ejected gas, remains constant. The law of…

  12. Rocket motor exhaust products generated by the space shuttle vehicle during its launch phase (1976 design data)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowyer, J. M.

    1977-01-01

    The principal chemical species emitted and/or entrained by the rocket motors of the space shuttle vehicle during the launch phase of its trajectory are considered. Results are presented for two extreme trajectories, both of which were calculated in 1976.

  13. Payload dose rate from direct beam radiation and exhaust gas fission products. [for nuclear engine for rocket vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capo, M. A.; Mickle, R.

    1975-01-01

    A study was made to determine the dose rate at the payload position in the NERVA System (1) due to direct beam radiation and (2) due to the possible effect of fission products contained in the exhaust gases for various amounts of hydrogen propellant in the tank. Results indicate that the gamma radiation is more significant than the neutron flux. Under different assumptions the gamma contribution from the exhaust gases was 10 to 25 percent of total gamma flux.

  14. Parametric studies with an atmospheric diffusion model that assesses toxic fuel hazards due to the ground clouds generated by rocket launches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, R. B.; Grose, W. L.

    1975-01-01

    Parametric studies were made with a multilayer atmospheric diffusion model to place quantitative limits on the uncertainty of predicting ground-level toxic rocket-fuel concentrations. Exhaust distributions in the ground cloud, cloud stabilized geometry, atmospheric coefficients, the effects of exhaust plume afterburning of carbon monoxide CO, assumed surface mixing-layer division in the model, and model sensitivity to different meteorological regimes were studied. Large-scale differences in ground-level predictions are quantitatively described. Cloud alongwind growth for several meteorological conditions is shown to be in error because of incorrect application of previous diffusion theory. In addition, rocket-plume calculations indicate that almost all of the rocket-motor carbon monoxide is afterburned to carbon dioxide CO2, thus reducing toxic hazards due to CO. The afterburning is also shown to have a significant effect on cloud stabilization height and on ground-level concentrations of exhaust products.

  15. Research in the use of electrets in measuring effluents from rocket exhaust of the space shuttle (6.4 percent scaled model) and Viking 1 launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Susko, M.

    1977-01-01

    Electrets used to detect the chemical composition of rocket exhaust effluents were investigated. The effectiveness of electrets was assessed while comparisons were made with hydrogen chloride measuring devices from chamber and field tests, and computed results from a multilayer diffusion model. The experimental data used were obtained from 18 static test firings, chamber tests, and the Viking 1 launch to Mars. Results show that electrets have multipollutant measuring capabilities, simplicity of deployment, and speed of assessment. The electrets compared favorably with other hydrogen chloride measuring devices. The summary of the measured data from the electrets and the hydrogen chloride detectors was within the upper and lower bounds of the computed hydrogen chloride concentrations from the multilayer diffusion model.

  16. A tandem mirror plasma source for hybrid plume plasma studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, T. F.; Chang, F. R.; Miller, R. H.; Wenzel, K. W.; Krueger, W. A.

    1985-01-01

    A tandem mirror device to be considered as a hot plasma source for the hybrid plume rocket concept is discussed. The hot plamsa from this device is injected into an exhaust duct, which will interact with an annular hypersonic layer of neutral gas. The device can be used to study the dynamics of the hybrid plume, and to verify the numerical predictions obtained with computer codes. The basic system design is also geared towards low weight and compactness, and high power density at the exhaust. The basic structure of the device consists of four major subsystems: (1) an electric power supply; (2) a low temperature, high density plasma gun, such as a stream gun, an MPD source or gas cell; (3) a power booster in the form of a tandem mirror machine; and (4) an exhaust nozzle arrangement. The configuration of the tandem mirror section is shown.

  17. Investigation of jet exhaust and local Mach number effects on the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) base pressures (fa19)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Love, D. A.

    1978-01-01

    Two single nozzles with flare angles of 10 and 20 degrees were tested at Mach numbers of 0.5, 0.9, 1.2, 1.46, 1.96 and 3.48 in the presence of gaseous plumes. An attempt was made to determine the local Mach number above the flare by utilizing a pitot probe. This objective was only partially satisfied because the 20 degree flare separated the flow ahead of the flare for Mach numbers of 0.5 to 1.96. An accurate local Mach number could not be determined because of the separated flow. To meet the objective of a data base as a function of freestream Mach number, model surface and base pressures were obtained in the presence of gaseous plumes for a matrix of chamber pressures and temperatures at Mach numbers of 0.5, 0.9, 1.2, 1.46, 1.96 and 3.48.

  18. Plume interference with space shuttle range safety signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boynton, F. P.; Rajaseknar, P. S.

    1979-01-01

    The computational procedure for signal propagation in the presence of an exhaust plume is presented. Comparisons with well-known analytic diffraction solutions indicate that accuracy suffers when mesh spacing is inadequate to resolve the first unobstructed Fresnel zone at the plume edge. Revisions to the procedure to improve its accuracy without requiring very large arrays are discussed. Comparisons to field measurements during a shuttle solid rocket motor (SRM) test firing suggest that the plume is sharper edged than one would expect on the basis of time averaged electron density calculations. The effects, both of revisions to the computational procedure and of allowing for a sharper plume edge, are to raise the signal level near tail aspect. The attenuation levels then predicted are still high enough to be of concern near SRM burnout for northerly launches of the space shuttle.

  19. Site alteration effects from rocket exhaust impingment during a simulated Viking Mars landing. Part 1: Nozzle development and physical site alternation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romine, G. L.; Reisert, T. D.; Gliozzi, J.

    1973-01-01

    A potential interference problem for the Viking '75 scientific investigation of the Martian surface resulting from retrorocket exhaust plume impingement of the surface was investigated experimentally and analytically. It was discovered that the conventional bell nozzle originally planned for the Viking Lander retrorockets would produce an unacceptably large amount of physical disturbance to the landing site. An experimental program was subsequently undertaken to find and/or develop a nozzle configuration which would significantly reduce the site alteration. A multiple nozzle configuration, consisting of 18 small bell nozzles, was shown to produce a level of disturbance that was considered by the Viking Lander Science Teams to be acceptable on the basis of results from full-scale tests on simulated Martian soils.

  20. Observation of rocket pollution with overhead sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Annette

    2011-12-01

    The objective of this thesis is to study the dispersal of rocket pollution through remote sensing techniques. Substantial research with remote sensors has been dedicated to observation of volcanic plumes, particulate dispersion, and aircraft contrails with less emphasis on observing rocket launches and the effects on the surrounding environment. This research focuses on observation of rocket exhaust constituents, particularly carbon soot, alumina, and water vapor. The sensors utilized in this thesis have unique capabilities that provide measurements that are likely capable of detecting the rocket exhaust constituents. Methodology and analysis included choosing an appropriate launch vehicle with obtainable launch data and various booster combinations of liquid propellant only or a combination of liquid and solid propellant, prioritizing the data based on launch time versus sensor passing, processing the data, and applying known constituent properties to the data sets where key areas of work in this endeavor. Results of this work demonstrate a unique capability in monitoring man-made pollution and the extent the pollution can spread to surrounding areas.

  1. COMPARISON OF THE PARTICLE SIZE DISTRIBUTION OF HEAVY-DUTY DIESEL EXHAUST USING A DILUTION TAIL-PIPE SAMPLER AND IN-PLUME SAMPLER DURING ON-ROAD OPERATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper compares the particle size distribution of heavy-duty diesel exhaust using a dilution tail-pipe sampler and an in-plume sampler during on-road operation. EPA's On-road Diesel Emissions Characterization Facility, modified to incorporate particle measurement instrumentat...

  2. Ablative Rocket Deflector Testing and Computational Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allgood, Daniel C.; Lott, Jeffrey W.; Raines, Nickey

    2010-01-01

    A deflector risk mitigation program was recently conducted at the NASA Stennis Space Center. The primary objective was to develop a database that characterizes the behavior of industry-grade refractory materials subjected to rocket plume impingement conditions commonly experienced on static test stands. The program consisted of short and long duration engine tests where the supersonic exhaust flow from the engine impinged on an ablative panel. Quasi time-dependent erosion depths and patterns generated by the plume impingement were recorded for a variety of different ablative materials. The erosion behavior was found to be highly dependent on the material s composition and corresponding thermal properties. For example, in the case of the HP CAST 93Z ablative material, the erosion rate actually decreased under continued thermal heating conditions due to the formation of a low thermal conductivity "crystallization" layer. The "crystallization" layer produced near the surface of the material provided an effective insulation from the hot rocket exhaust plume. To gain further insight into the complex interaction of the plume with the ablative deflector, computational fluid dynamic modeling was performed in parallel to the ablative panel testing. The results from the current study demonstrated that locally high heating occurred due to shock reflections. These localized regions of shock-induced heat flux resulted in non-uniform erosion of the ablative panels. In turn, it was observed that the non-uniform erosion exacerbated the localized shock heating causing eventual plume separation and reversed flow for long duration tests under certain conditions. Overall, the flow simulations compared very well with the available experimental data obtained during this project.

  3. An analytical analysis of the dispersion predictions for effluents from the Saturn 5 and Scout-Algol 3 rocket exhausts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. B.; Susko, M.; Kaufman, J. W.; Hill, C. K.

    1973-01-01

    Predictions of the spatial concentration mapping of the potentially toxic constituents of the exhaust effluents from a launch of a Saturn 5 and of a Scout-Algol 3 vehicle utilizing the NASA/MSFC Multilayer Diffusion Program are provided. In the case of the Saturn 5, special attention was given to the concentration fields of carbon monoxide with a correlation of carbon dioxide concentrations. The Scout-Algol 3 provided an example of the centerline concentrations of hydrogen chloride, carbon monoxide, and alumina under typical meteorological conditions. While these results define the specific environmental impact of these two launches under the meteorological conditions existing during launches, they also provide a basis for the empirical monitoring of the constituents of the exhaust effluents of these vehicles.

  4. Results of the NASA/MSFC FA-23 plume technology test program performed in the NASA/Ames unitary wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendershot, K. C.

    1977-01-01

    A 2.25% scale model of the space shuttle external tank and solid rocket boosters was tested in the NASA/Ames Unitary 11 x 11 foot transonic and 9 x 7 foot supersonic tunnels to obtain base pressure data with firing solid propellant exhaust plumes. Data system difficulties prevented the acquisition of any useful data in the 9 x 7 tunnel. However, 28 successful rocket test firings were made in the 11 x 11 tunnel, providing base pressure data at Mach numbers of 0.5, 0.9, 1.05, 1.2, and 1.3 and at plume pressure ratios ranging from 11 to 89.

  5. Surface chloride salt formation on Space Shuttle exhaust alumina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cofer, W. R., III; Pellett, G. L.; Sebacher, D. I.; Wakelyn, N. T.

    1984-01-01

    Aluminum oxide samples from the exhaust of Space Shuttle launches STS-1, STS-4, STS-5, and STS-6 were collected from surfaces on or around the launch pad complex and chemically analyzed. The results indicate that the particulate solid-propellant rocket motor (SRM) alumina was heavily chlorided. Concentrations of water-soluble aluminum (III) ion were large, suggesting that the surface of the SRM alumina particles was rendered soluble by prior reactions with HCl and H2O in the SRM exhaust cloud. These results suggest that Space Shuttle exhaust alumina particles are good sites for nucleation and condensation of atmospheric water. Laboratory experiments conducted at 220 C suggest that partial surface chloriding of alumina may occur in hot Space Shuttle exhaust plumes.

  6. Laboratory studies of the stratospheric effects of rocket exhaust. Final technical report, 1 Jan 1996--31 December 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Molina, M.J.; Haider, M.; Mantz, Y.; Gutzwiller, L.; Molina, L.T.

    1998-12-01

    The most important chlorine activation reaction that takes place in the stratosphere is the heterogeneous reaction of chlorine nitrate with hydrogen chloride to produce molecular chlorine and nitric acid. The reaction is catalytic, promoted by surfaces that are not themselves affected by the reaction. This process was investigated in the laboratory. The reaction probability was found to have a value of about 0.02 on glass, on laboratory alumina, and on alumina particles emitted by solid rocket motors. The reaction probability on ice surfaces has a value larger than 0.2 and a negligible value on halocarbon wax or Teflon surfaces. The measurements were carried out under reactant partial pressure, temperature and humidity conditions covering those that are encountered in the mid-latitude lower stratosphere. The reaction mechanism appears do be determined by the water layers adsorbed on the solid surface. Measurements of the amount of water taken up by alumina surfaces were also carried out; the results indicate that under stratospheric conditions several water layers will indeed cover the alumina surfaces.

  7. Quick Access Rocket Exhaust Rig Testing of Coated GRCop-84 Sheets Used to Aid Coating Selection for Reusable Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, Sai V.; Robinson, Raymond C.; Ghosn, Louis J.

    2005-01-01

    The design of the next generation of reusable launch vehicles calls for using GRCop-84 copper alloy liners based on a composition1 invented at the NASA Glenn Research Center: Cu-8(at.%)Cr-4%Nb. Many of the properties of this alloy have been shown to be far superior to those of other conventional copper alloys, such as NARloy-Z. Despite this considerable advantage, it is expected that GRCop-84 will suffer from some type of environmental degradation depending on the type of rocket fuel utilized. In a liquid hydrogen (LH2), liquid oxygen (LO2) booster engine, copper alloys undergo repeated cycles of oxidation of the copper matrix and subsequent reduction of the copper oxide, a process termed "blanching". Blanching results in increased surface roughness and poor heat-transfer capabilities, local hot spots, decreased engine performance, and premature failure of the liner material. This environmental degradation coupled with the effects of thermomechanical stresses, creep, and high thermal gradients can distort the cooling channel severely, ultimately leading to its failure.

  8. Reusable rocket engine optical condition monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyett, L.; Maram, J.; Barkhoudarian, S.; Reinert, J.

    1987-01-01

    Plume emission spectrometry and optical leak detection are described as two new applications of optical techniques to reusable rocket engine condition monitoring. Plume spectrometry has been used with laboratory flames and reusable rocket engines to characterize both the nominal combustion spectra and anomalous spectra of contaminants burning in these plumes. Holographic interferometry has been used to identify leaks and quantify leak rates from reusable rocket engine joints and welds.

  9. Ground and Space-Based Measurement of Rocket Engine Burns in the Ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernhardt, P. A.; Ballenthin, J. O.; Baumgardner, J. L.; Bhatt, A.; Boyd, I. D.; Burt, J. M.; Caton, R. G.; Coster, A.; Erickson, P. J.; Huba, J. D.; Earle, G. D.; Kaplan, C. R.; Foster, J. C.; Groves, K. M.; Haaser, R. A.; Heelis, R. A.; Hunton, D. E.; Hysell, D. L.; Klenzing, J. H.; Larsen, M. F.; Lind, F. D.; Pedersen, T. R.; Pfaff, R. F.; Stoneback, R. A.; Roddy, P. A.; Rodriguez, S. P.; San Antonio, G. S.; Schuck, P. W.; Siefring, C. L.; Selcher, C. A.; Smith, S. M.; Talaat, E. R.; Thomason, J. F.; Tsunoda, R. T.; Varney, R. H.

    2013-01-01

    On-orbit firings of both liquid and solid rocket motors provide localized disturbances to the plasma in the upper atmosphere. Large amounts of energy are deposited to ionosphere in the form of expanding exhaust vapors which change the composition and flow velocity. Charge exchange between the neutral exhaust molecules and the background ions (mainly O+) yields energetic ion beams. The rapidly moving pickup ions excite plasma instabilities and yield optical emissions after dissociative recombination with ambient electrons. Line-of-sight techniques for remote measurements rocket burn effects include direct observation of plume optical emissions with ground and satellite cameras, and plume scatter with UHF and higher frequency radars. Long range detection with HF radars is possible if the burns occur in the dense part of the ionosphere. The exhaust vapors initiate plasma turbulence in the ionosphere that can scatter HF radar waves launched from ground transmitters. Solid rocket motors provide particulates that become charged in the ionosphere and may excite dusty plasma instabilities. Hypersonic exhaust flow impacting the ionospheric plasma launches a low-frequency, electromagnetic pulse that is detectable using satellites with electric field booms. If the exhaust cloud itself passes over a satellite, in situ detectors measure increased ion-acoustic wave turbulence, enhanced neutral and plasma densities, elevated ion temperatures, and magnetic field perturbations. All of these techniques can be used for long range observations of plumes in the ionosphere. To demonstrate such long range measurements, several experiments were conducted by the Naval Research Laboratory including the Charged Aerosol Release Experiment, the Shuttle Ionospheric Modification with Pulsed Localized Exhaust experiments, and the Shuttle Exhaust Ionospheric Turbulence Experiments.

  10. Direct active measurements of movements of lunar dust: Rocket exhausts and natural effects contaminating and cleansing Apollo hardware on the Moon in 1969

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Brian

    2009-05-01

    Dust is the Number 1 environmental hazard on the Moon, yet its movements and adhesive properties are little understood. Matchbox-sized, 270-gram Dust Detector Experiments (DDEs) measured contrasting effects triggered by rocket exhausts of Lunar Modules (LM) after deployment 17 m and 130 m from Apollo 11 and 12 LMs. Apollo 11 Lunar Seismometer was contaminated, overheated and terminated after 21 days operation. Apollo 12 hardware was splashed with collateral lunar dust during deployment. DDE horizontal solar cell was cleansed of nominally 0.3 mg cm-2 dust by 80% promptly at LM ascent and totally within 7 minutes. A vertical cell facing East was half-cleaned promptly then totally over hundreds of hours. Each cell cooled slightly. For the first time lunar electrostatic adhesive forces on smooth silicon were directly measured by comparison with lunar gravity. Analyses imply this adhesive force weakens as solar angle of incidence decreases. If valid, future lunar astronauts may have greater problems with dust adhesion in the middle half of the day than faced by Apollo missions in early morning. A sunproof shed may provide dust-free working environments on the Moon. Low-cost laboratory tests with DDEs and simulated lunar dust can use DDE benchmark lunar data quickly, optimising theoretical modelling and planning of future lunar expeditions, human and robotic.

  11. Adsorption and chemical reaction of gaseous mixtures of hydrogen chloride and water on aluminum oxide and application to solid-propellant rocket exhaust clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cofer, W. R., III; Pellett, G. L.

    1978-01-01

    Hydrogen chloride (HCl) and aluminum oxide (Al2O3) are major exhaust products of solid rocket motors (SRM). Samples of calcination-produced alumina were exposed to continuously flowing mixtures of gaseous HCl/H2O in nitrogen. Transient sorption rates, as well as maximum sorptive capacities, were found to be largely controlled by specific surface area for samples of alpha, theta, and gamma alumina. Sorption rates for small samples were characterized linearly with an empirical relationship that accounted for specific area and logarithmic time. Chemisorption occurred on all aluminas studied and appeared to form from the sorption of about a 2/5 HCl-to-H2O mole ratio. The chemisorbed phase was predominantly water soluble, yielding chloride/aluminum III ion mole ratios of about 3.3/1 suggestive of dissolved surface chlorides and/or oxychlorides. Isopiestic experiments in hydrochloric acid indicated that dissolution of alumina led to an increase in water-vapor pressure. Dissolution in aqueous SRM acid aerosol droplets, therefore, might be expected to promote evaporation.

  12. Site Alteration Effects from Rocket Exhaust Impingement During a Simulated Viking Mars Landing. Part 2: Chemical and Biological Site Alteration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Husted, R. R.; Smith, I. D.; Fennessey, P. V.

    1977-01-01

    Chemical and biological alteration of a Mars landing site was investigated experimentally and analytically. The experimental testing was conducted using a specially designed multiple nozzle configuration consisting of 18 small bell nozzles. The chemical test results indicate that an engine using standard hydrazine fuel will contaminate the landing site with ammonia (50-500ppm), nitrogen (5-50ppm), aniline (0.01-0.5ppm), hydrogen cyanide (0.01-0.5ppm), and water. A purified fuel, with impurities (mostly aniline) reduced by a factor of 50-100, limits the amount of hydrogen cyanide and aniline to below detectable limits for the Viking science investigations and leaves the amounts of ammonia, nitrogen, and water in the soil unchanged. The large amounts of ammonia trapped in the soil will make interpretation of the organic analysis investigation results more difficult. The biological tests indicate that the combined effects of plume gases, surface heating, surface erosion, and gas composition resulting from the retrorockets will not interfere with the Viking biology investigation.

  13. Space Shuttle Plume Simulation Effect on Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hair, L. M.

    1978-01-01

    Technology for simulating plumes in wind tunnel tests was not adequate to provide the required confidence in test data where plume induced aerodynamic effects might be significant. A broad research program was undertaken to correct the deficiency. Four tasks within the program are reported. Three of these tasks involve conducting experiments, related to three different aspects of the plume simulation problem: (1) base pressures; (2) lateral jet pressures; and (3) plume parameters. The fourth task involves collecting all of the base pressure test data generated during the program. Base pressures were measured on a classic cone ogive cylinder body as affected by the coaxial, high temperature exhaust plumes of a variety of solid propellant rockets. Valid data were obtained at supersonic freestream conditions but not at transonic. Pressure data related to lateral (separation) jets at M infinity = 4.5, for multiple clustered nozzles canted to the freestream and operating at high dynamic pressure ratios. All program goals were met although the model hardware was found to be large relative to the wind tunnel size so that operation was limited for some nozzle configurations.

  14. Rocket Engine Clustering and Vehicle Integration as Influenced by Base Thermal Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopson, George D.; McAnelly, William B.

    1966-01-01

    Clustered rocket engines create severe thermal environments in the base of rocket vehicle stages. Boosters burning hydrocarbon fuels experience severe radiant heating early in flight; as the plumes interact at higher altitudes, convective heating becomes significant. For hydrogen-fueled upper stages radiation is not important, but convective heating is severe during the entire stage operation. Predicted and measured heating rates are discussed. The base region thermal environments of stages with clustered engines present a variety of engine/vehicle interaction problems. Components and structures in the base region, including the rocket engines, cannot survive radiant and convective heating from engine exhausts without such remedies as protective insulation, shielding, air-scooping, and proper disposal of the fuel-rich turbine exhaust gases. Different thermal protection concepts evolve for booster and upper stages due to the differences in ground test and flight environments. Solutions to the engine/vehicle interaction and design integration problems are described.

  15. Pressure Loads Produced on a Flat-Plate Wing By Rocket Jets Exhausting in a Spanwise Direction Below the Wing and Perpendicular to a Free-Stream Flow of Mach Number 2.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falanga, Ralph A.; Janos, Joseph J.

    1961-01-01

    An investigation at a Reynolds number per foot of 14.4 x 10(exp 6) was made to determine the pressure loads produced on a flat-plate wing by rocket jets exhausting in a spanwise direction beneath the wing and perpendicular to a free-stream flow of Mach number 2.0. The ranges of the variables involved were (1) nozzle types - one sonic (jet Mach number of 1.00), two supersonic (jet Mach numbers of 1.74 and 3.04),. and one two-dimensional supersonic (jet Mach number of 1.71); (2) vertical nozzle positions beneath the wing of 4, 8 and 12 nozzle-throat diameters; and (3) ratios of rocket-chamber total pressure to free- stream static pressure from 0 to 130. The incremental normal force due to jet interference on the wing varied from one to two times the rocket thrust and generally decreased as the pressure ratio increased. The chordwise coordinate of the incremental-normal-force center of pressure remained upstream of the nozzle center line for the nozzle positions and pressure ratios of the investigation. The chordwise coordinate approached zero as the jet vertical distance beneath the wing increased. In the spanwise direction there was little change due to varying rocket-jet position and pressure ratio. Some boundary-layer flow separation on the wing was observed for the rocket jets close to the wing and at the higher pressure ratios. The magnitude of the chordwise and spanwise pressure distributions due to jet interference was greatest for rocket jets close to the wing and decreased as the jet was displaced farther from the wing. The design procedure for the rockets used is given in the appendix.

  16. Scaled Rocket Testing in Hypersonic Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dufrene, Aaron; MacLean, Matthew; Carr, Zakary; Parker, Ron; Holden, Michael; Mehta, Manish

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) uses four clustered liquid rocket engines along with two solid rocket boosters. The interaction between all six rocket exhaust plumes will produce a complex and severe thermal environment in the base of the vehicle. This work focuses on a recent 2% scale, hot-fire SLS base heating test. These base heating tests are short-duration tests executed with chamber pressures near the full-scale values with gaseous hydrogen/oxygen engines and RSRMV analogous solid propellant motors. The LENS II shock tunnel/Ludwieg tube tunnel was used at or near flight duplicated conditions up to Mach 5. Model development was strongly based on the Space Shuttle base heating tests with several improvements including doubling of the maximum chamber pressures and duplication of freestream conditions. Detailed base heating results are outside of the scope of the current work, rather test methodology and techniques are presented along with broader applicability toward scaled rocket testing in supersonic and hypersonic flow.

  17. Towards Understanding the Fluid Dynamic Phenomenon of Interest to Rocket Base Heating: A Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatapathy, E.; Park, C.; Palmer, G.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The significance of the base heating problem for rockets during ascent is due to the complex interaction between the rocket nozzle plumes and the external-flow which can change the flow characteristics in the base region dramatically. At lower altitudes the external-flow merges with the plume-flow, without the formation of a large separated flow region, and the cooler external-flow promotes convective cooling of the base wall. Under these conditions the majority of the base heating is due to radiative heating from the shock heated plume gases. At higher altitudes, however, the process of base heating is not so straightforward. The plume and the base flow expands dramatically and separated flow regions occur in the base area. Hot exhaust gases from the rocket nozzle will be entrained into the separated flow regions and produce a convective component to the base wall heating. Further, if the rocket exhaust-gas contains soot, the soot can increase the emission from the gas and dramatically increase the wall absorption coefficient for radiative heating if it is deposited on the walls . In addition, if the rocket exhaust gas is fuel rich, the fuel can bum in the separated flow regions and further increase the base heating. The base burning phenomenon, and the increased base heating caused by it at higher altitudes, have been observed for the Space Shuttle and Saturn Rocket. Under these conditions, the total heating is significantly higher than the heating without separated flow in the base region, and the increase in heating is directly attributable to the fluid dynamic complexity of the base region. Realistic simulation of the base heating requires that the calculated flow environment reproduce the fluid dynamic flow features accurately. Thus, it will be necessary to introduce into the CFD codes the capability for the flow to respond to the complex vehicle geometry, the effect of turbulence, the ability to accurately reproduce the plume shock/shear layer structures and capture such phenomenon as shock induced base separation and base-burning phenomenon. A survey of experimental, theoretical and computational work that details the fluid dynamics of the base flow environment will be presented in the proposed paper. CFD simulations of rocket base flows using standard CFD codes such as OVERFLOW or GASP will be explored to capture these phenomenon accurately. Merits and limitations of these codes for base flow environment predictions will be explored.

  18. Nozzle exit exhaust products from space shuttle boost vehicle (November 1973 design)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Principal exhaust species emitted at various altitudes for two trajectories of the space shuttle vehicle are presented. The exhaust composition is given for the nozzle exit plane on the basis of equilibrium chemistry. Afterburning of excess H, H2, and CO in the plume is accounted for. Species considered include HCl and Al2O3, which have been recognized as environmentally significant, as well as others such as H2O (produced by both the solid rocket motor and the orbiter main engine) which, although innocuous, may participate in subsequent chemical reactions in the atmosphere.

  19. Thermal imaging of afterburning plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajdari, E.; Gutmark, E.; Parr, T. P.; Wilson, K. J.; Schadow, K. C.

    1989-01-01

    Afterburning and nonafterburning exhaust plumes were studied experimentally for underexpanded sonic and supersonic conical circular nozzles. The plume structure was visualized using thermal imaging camera and regular photography. IR emission by the plume is mainly dependent on the presence of afterburning. Temperature and reducing power of the exhaust gases, in addition to the nozzle configuration, determine the structure of the plume core, the location where the afterburning is initiated, its size and intensity. Comparison between single shot and average thermal images of the plume show that afterburning is a highly turbulent combustion process.

  20. Delta 2 Explosion Plume Analysis Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Randolph J.

    2000-01-01

    A Delta II rocket exploded seconds after liftoff from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) on 17 January 1997. The cloud produced by the explosion provided an opportunity to evaluate the models which are used to track potentially toxic dispersing plumes and clouds at CCAFS. The primary goal of this project was to conduct a case study of the dispersing cloud and the models used to predict the dispersion resulting from the explosion. The case study was conducted by comparing mesoscale and dispersion model results with available meteorological and plume observations. This study was funded by KSC under Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) option hours. The models used in the study are part of the Eastern Range Dispersion Assessment System (ERDAS) and include the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS), HYbrid Particle And Concentration Transport (HYPACT), and Rocket Exhaust Effluent Dispersion Model (REEDM). The primary observations used for explosion cloud verification of the study were from the National Weather Service's Weather Surveillance Radar 1988-Doppler (WSR-88D). Radar reflectivity measurements of the resulting cloud provided good estimates of the location and dimensions of the cloud over a four-hour period after the explosion. The results indicated that RAMS and HYPACT models performed reasonably well. Future upgrades to ERDAS are recommended.

  1. Ship plume modelling in EOSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Iersel, M.; Mack, A.; Degache, M. A. C.; van Eijk, A. M. J.

    2014-10-01

    The EOSTAR model aims at assessing the performance of electro-optical (EO) sensors deployed in a maritime surface scenario, by providing operational performance measures (such as detection ranges) and synthetic images. The target library of EOSTAR includes larger surface vessels, for which the exhaust plume may constitute a significant signature element in the thermal wavelength bands. The main steps of the methodology to include thermal signatures of exhaust plumes in EOSTAR are discussed, and illustrative examples demonstrate the impact of the ship's superstructure, the plume exit conditions, and the environment on the plume behavior and signature.

  2. ICOARE: Impacts on Climate and Ozone from Aircraft and Rocket Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toohey, D. W.; Ross, M.

    2009-12-01

    This presentation will provide an overview of an Earth Venture proposal for a series of in situ measurements in the exhaust plumes of aircraft and rockets with the following objectives: to obtain information that is critical for reducing the uncertainties in assessments (e.g., WMO and IPCC) of the impacts of aviation and aerospace activities on regional and global climate; to assess the viability of a climate engineering scheme that employs injection of reflective particles into the lower stratosphere; and to initiate the development of an operational modeling tool that can be used by the aviation and aerospace industries to guide design of new transporation systems that minimize the impact on Earth’s climate. The ICOARE mission will deploy instruments to measure water vapor, ice water content, tracers, reactive species, particles, and radiation fields on a high-altitude aircraft to characterize the variability of water vapor in aircraft and rocket contrails, determine accurate emission indices for initialization of plume-wake and regional scale models, investigate the microphysical properties of cirrus particles in and out of aircraft corridors, and examine the light scattering properties of contrail ice crystals and small alumina particles. Focused campaigns will be timed to occur around the launch schedules of a variety of rocket types in order to characterize the range of emissions from the current launch suite. There will be special emphasis on characterizing the emissions from rockets employing new propellants, in particular those that may produce soot and nitrogen oxides. Observations in aircraft exhaust, and examinations of cirrus cloud properties and persistent contrails, will occur on flights that are not dedicated to studies of rockets (e.g., test, transit, and rocket-scrub flights). ICOARE will offer a unique opportunities for training students and postdoctorates, especially those from underrepresented groups, in areas of project management, logistics, instrument development, data acquisition and analysis, and education and outreach.

  3. Atmospheric scavenging exhaust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fenton, D. L.; Purcell, R. Y.

    1977-01-01

    Solid propellant rocket exhaust was directly utilized to ascertain raindrop scavenging rates for hydrogen chloride. The airborne HCl concentration varied from 0.2 to 10.0 ppm and the raindrop sizes tested included 0.55 mm, 1.1 mm, and 3.0 mm. Two chambers were used to conduct the experiments. A large, rigid walled, spherical chamber stored the exhaust constituents while the smaller chamber housing all the experiments was charged as required with rocket exhaust HCl. Surface uptake experiments demonstrated an HCl concentration dependence for distilled water. Sea water and brackish water HCl uptake was below the detection limit of the chlorine-ion analysis technique employed. Plant life HCl uptake experiments were limited to corn and soybeans. Plant age effectively correlated the HCl uptake data. Metallic corrosion was not significant for single 20 minute exposures to the exhaust HCl under varying relative humidity.

  4. Position paper on the potential of inadvertent weather modification of the Florida Peninsula resulting from neutralization of space shuttle solid rocket booster exhaust clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bollay, E.; Bosart, L.; Droessler, E.; Jiusto, J.; Lala, G. G.; Mohnen, V.; Schaefer, V.; Squires, P.

    1979-01-01

    A concept of injecting compounds into the exhaust cloud was proposed to neutralize the acidic nature of the low-level stabilized ground cloud (SGC) was studied. The potential Inadvertent Weather Modification caused by exhaust cloud characteristics from three hours to seven days after launch was studied. Possible effects of the neutralized SGC in warm and cloud precipitation processes were discussed. Based on a detailed climatology of the Florida Peninsula, the risk for weather modification under a variety of weather situations was assessed.

  5. Overview of NASA GRCs Green Propellant Infusion Mission Thruster Testing and Plume Diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deans, Matthew C.; Reed, Brian D.; Yim, John T.; Arrington, Lynn A.; Williams, George J.; Kojima, Jun J.; McLean, Christopher H.

    2014-01-01

    The Green Propellant Infusion Mission (GPIM) is sponsored by NASA's Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) Technology Demonstration Mission (TDM) office. The goal of GPIM is to advance the technology readiness level of a green propulsion system, specifically, one using the monopropellant, AF-M315E, by demonstrating ground handling, spacecraft processing, and on-orbit operations. One of the risks identified for GPIM is potential contamination of sensitive spacecraft surfaces from the effluents in the plumes of AF-M315E thrusters. NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is conducting activities to characterize the effects of AF-M315E plume impingement and deposition. GRC has established individual plume models of the 22-N and 1-N thrusters that will be used on the GPIM spacecraft. The models describe the pressure, temperature, density, Mach number, and species concentration of the AF-M315E thruster exhaust plumes. The models are being used to assess the impingement effects of the AF-M315E thrusters on the GPIM spacecraft. The model simulations will be correlated with plume measurement data from Laboratory and Engineering Model 22-N, AF-M315E thrusters. The thrusters will be tested in a small rocket, altitude facility at NASA GRC. The GRC thruster testing will be conducted at duty cycles representatives of the planned GPIM maneuvers. A suite of laser-based diagnostics, including Raman spectroscopy, Rayleigh spectroscopy, Schlieren imaging, and physical probes will be used to acquire plume measurements of AFM315E thrusters. Plume data will include temperature, velocity, relative density, and species concentration. The plume measurement data will be compared to the corresponding simulations of the plume model. The GRC effort will establish a data set of AF-M315E plume measurements and a plume model that can be used for future AF-M315E applications.

  6. Exhaust Simulation Testing of a Hypersonic Airbreathing Model at Transonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huebner, Lawrence D.; Witte, David W.; Andrews, Earl H., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    An experimental study was performed to examine jet-effects for an airframe-integrated, scramjet-rocket combined-cycle vehicle configuration at transonic test conditions. This investigation was performed by testing an existing exhaust simulation wind tunnel model, known as Model 5B, in the NASA Langley 16-Ft. Transonic Tunnel. Tests were conducted at freestream Mach numbers from 0.7 to 1.2, at angles of attack from 2 to +14 degrees, and at up to seven nozzle static pressure ratio values for a set of horizontal-tail and body-flap deflections. The model aftbody, horizontal tails, and body flaps were extensively pressure instrumented to provide an understanding of jet-effects and control-surface/plume interactions, as well as for the development of analytical methodologies and calibration of computational fluid dynamic codes to predict this type of flow phenomenon. At all transonic test conditions examined, the exhaust flow at the exit of the internal nozzle was over-expanded, generating an exhaust plume that turned toward the aftbody. Pressure contour plots for the aftbody of Model 5B are presented for freestream transonic Mach numbers of 0.70, 0.95, and 1.20. These pressure data, along with shadowgraph images, indicated the impingement of an internal plume shock and at least one reflected shock onto the aftbody for all transonic conditions tested. These results also provided evidence of the highly three-dimensional nature of the aftbody exhaust flowfield. Parametric testing showed that angle-of-attack, static nozzle pressure ratio, and freestream Mach number all affected the exhaust-plume size, exhaust-flowfield shock structure, and the aftbody-pressure distribution, with Mach number having the largest effect. Integration of the aftbody pressure data showed large variations in the pitching moment throughout the transonic regime.

  7. Liquid Rocket Booster (LRB) for the Space Transportation System (STS) systems study. Appendix B: Liquid rocket booster acoustic and thermal environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The ascent thermal environment and propulsion acoustic sources for the Martin-Marietta Corporation designed Liquid Rocket Boosters (LRB) to be used with the Space Shuttle Orbiter and External Tank are described. Two designs were proposed: one using a pump-fed propulsion system and the other using a pressure-fed propulsion system. Both designs use LOX/RP-1 propellants, but differences in performance of the two propulsion systems produce significant differences in the proposed stage geometries, exhaust plumes, and resulting environments. The general characteristics of the two designs which are significant for environmental predictions are described. The methods of analysis and predictions for environments in acoustics, aerodynamic heating, and base heating (from exhaust plume effects) are also described. The acoustic section will compare the proposed exhaust plumes with the current SRB from the standpoint of acoustics and ignition overpressure. The sections on thermal environments will provide details of the LRB heating rates and indications of possible changes in the Orbiter and ET environments as a result of the change from SRBs to LRBs.

  8. Liquid Booster Module (LBM) plume flowfield model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. D.

    1981-01-01

    A complete definition of the LBM plume is important for many Shuttle design criteria. The exhaust plume shape has a significant effect on the vehicle base pressure. The LBM definition is also important to the Shuttle base heating, aerodynamics and the influence of the exhaust plume on the launch stand and environment. For these reasons a knowledge of the LBM plume characteristics is necessary. A definition of the sea level LBM plume as well as at several points along the Shuttle trajectory to LBM, burnout is presented.

  9. Ionospheric hole made by the 2012 North Korean rocket observed with a dense GNSS array in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakashima, Yuki; Heki, Kosuke

    2014-07-01

    A dense array of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) receivers is useful to study ionospheric disturbances. Here we report observations by a Japanese GNSS array of an ionospheric hole, i.e., localized electron depletion, made by water vapor molecules in the exhaust plume of the second-stage engine of the Unha-3 rocket launched from North Korea, on 12 December 2012. The Russian GNSS was used for the first time to observe such an ionospheric hole. The hole emerged ~6 min after the launch above the middle of the Yellow Sea, and its size and depth suggest that the Unha-3 is slightly less powerful than the 2009 Taepodong-2 missile, also from North Korea. Smaller-scale electron depletion signatures appeared ~10 min after the launch above the southern East China Sea, which is possibly caused by the exhaust plume of the third-stage engine.

  10. Plume Impingement on a Dusty Lunar Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, A. B.; Goldstein, D. B.; Varghese, P. L.; Trafton, L. M.

    2011-05-01

    A loosely coupled continuum-DSMC solver is used to simulate the interaction between the exhaust from a rocket engine with the lunar surface. This problem is of particular interest because the high velocity dust spray can damage nearby structures. The flow field is challenging to simulate because continuum assumptions are no longer valid in the far field, while in the near field DSMC becomes impractical because of the high collision rate. In the current work the high density core of the rocket plume is modeled with NASA's continuum flow solver, DPLR [1]. Since the two solvers are loosely coupled, i.e. one-way coupling from the DPLR to the DSMC regimes, the interface between the two solvers is placed in the supersonic region above the surface shock. At the lunar surface, a boundary layer develops and the shear stress causes dust grains to slide and eventually enter the flow field. Robert's theory of dust entrainment [2,3] is used to predict how much dust is lofted into the flow field by the near surface flow conditions. In Robert's original theory the interaction between entrained dust grains and the gas was neglected and the particles were assumed to follow ballistic trajectories. In our current model, the dust grains are coupled with the DSMC gas model. Both the dust trajectories and the flow fields are computed for various hovering altitudes and dust grain sizes. Comparisons are made to Robert's original predictions and Apollo photogrammetry [4].

  11. Underexpanded Supersonic Plume Surface Interactions: Applications for Spacecraft Landings on Planetary Bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, M.; Sengupta, A.; Renno, N. O.; Norman, J. W.; Gulick, D. S.

    2011-01-01

    Numerical and experimental investigations of both far-field and near-field supersonic steady jet interactions with a flat surface at various atmospheric pressures are presented in this paper. These studies were done in assessing the landing hazards of both the NASA Mars Science Laboratory and Phoenix Mars spacecrafts. Temporal and spatial ground pressure measurements in conjunction with numerical solutions at altitudes of approx.35 nozzle exit diameters and jet expansion ratios (e) between 0.02 and 100 are used. Data from steady nitrogen jets are compared to both pulsed jets and rocket exhaust plumes at Mach approx.5. Due to engine cycling, overpressures and the plate shock dynamics are different between pulsed and steady supersonic impinging jets. In contrast to highly over-expanded (e <1) and underexpanded exhaust plumes, results show that there is a relative ground pressure load maximum for moderately underexpanded (e approx.2-5) jets which demonstrate a long collimated plume shock structure. For plumes with e much >5 (lunar atmospheric regime), the ground pressure is minimal due to the development of a highly expansive shock structure. We show this is dependent on the stability of the plate shock, the length of the supersonic core and plume decay due to shear layer instability which are all a function of the jet expansion ratio. Asymmetry and large gradients in the spatial ground pressure profile and large transient overpressures are predominantly linked to the dynamics of the plate shock. More importantly, this study shows that thruster plumes exhausting into martian environments possess the largest surface pressure loads and can occur at high spacecraft altitudes in contrast to the jet interactions at terrestrial and lunar atmospheres. Theoretical and analytical results also show that subscale supersonic cold gas jets adequately simulate the flow field and loads due to rocket plume impingement provided important scaling parameters are in agreement. These studies indicate the critical importance of testing and modeling plume-surface interactions for descent and ascent of spacecraft and launch vehicles.

  12. Chemical rocket propulsion and the environment

    SciTech Connect

    Mcdonald, A.J. )

    1992-03-01

    Results are presented from the examination by the Chemical Rocket Propulsion and the Environment Workshop conducted by AIAA in June 1991 of the impact of rocket launches and ground testing on the earth's environment. The major conclusions of this workshop were: (1) at projected rocket launch rates, neither the liquid- nor the solid-rocket motors will significantly impact stratospheric ozone; (2) there is no global acid rain problem associated with rocket exhaust; and (3) the local launch site and static test site acidification is a minor problem and can be managed.

  13. Congreve Rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The British fired Congreve rockets against the United States in the War of 1812. As a result Francis Scott Key coined the phrase the 'rocket's red glare.' Congreve had used a 16-foot guide stick to help stabilize his rocket. William Hale, another British inventor, invented the stickless rocket in 1846. The U.S. Army used the Hale rocket more than 100 years ago in the war with Mexico. Rockets were also used to a limited extent by both sides in the American Civil War.

  14. Safe testing nuclear rockets economically

    SciTech Connect

    Howe, S. D.; Travis, B. J.; Zerkle, D. K.

    2002-01-01

    Several studies over the past few decades have recognized the need for advanced propulsion to explore the solar system. As early as the 1960s, Werner Von Braun and others recognized the need for a nuclear rocket for sending humans to Mars. The great distances, the intense radiation levels, and the physiological response to zero-gravity all supported the concept of using a nuclear rocket to decrease mission time. These same needs have been recognized in later studies, especially in the Space Exploration Initiative in 1989. One of the key questions that has arisen in later studies, however, is the ability to test a nuclear rocket engine in the current societal environment. Unlike the RoverMERVA programs in the 1960s, the rocket exhaust can no longer be vented to the open atmosphere. As a consequence, previous studies have examined the feasibility of building a large-scale version of the Nuclear Furnace Scrubber that was demonstrated in 1971. We have investigated an alternative that would deposit the rocket exhaust along with any entrained fission products directly into the ground. The Subsurface Active Filtering of Exhaust, or SAFE, concept would allow variable sized engines to be tested for long times at a modest expense. A system overview, results of preliminary calculations, and cost estimates of proof of concept demonstrations are presented. The results indicate that a nuclear rocket could be tested at the Nevada Test Site for under $20 M.

  15. Altitude-Compensating Nozzle (ACN) Project: Planning for Dual-Bell Rocket Nozzle Flight Testing on the NASA F-15B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Daniel S.; Bui, Trong T.; Ruf, Joseph H.

    2013-01-01

    For more than a half-century, several types of altitude-compensating nozzles have been proposed and analyzed, but very few have been adequately tested in a relevant flight environment. One type of altitude-compensating nozzle is the dual-bell rocket nozzle, which was first introduced into literature in 1949. Although the dual-bell rocket nozzle has been thoroughly studied, this nozzle has still not been tested in a relevant flight environment. This poster presents the top-level rationale and preliminary plans for conducting flight research with the dual-bell rocket nozzle, while exhausting the plume into the freestream flow field at various altitudes. The primary objective is to gain a greater understanding of the nozzle plume sensitivity to freestream flight effects, which will also include detailed measurements of the plume mode transition within the nozzle. To accomplish this goal, the NASA F-15B is proposed as the testbed for advancing the technology readiness level of this greatly-needed capability. All proposed tests include the quantitative performance analysis of the dual-bell rocket nozzle as compared with the conventional-bell nozzle.

  16. Rocket Flight.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Evera, Bill; Sterling, Donna R.

    2002-01-01

    Describes an activity for designing, building, and launching rockets that provides students with an intrinsically motivating and real-life application of what could have been classroom-only concepts. Includes rocket design guidelines and a sample grading rubric. (KHR)

  17. Supersonic Rocket Thruster Flow Predicted by Numerical Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davoudzadeh, Farhad

    2004-01-01

    Despite efforts in the search for alternative means of energy, combustion still remains the key source. Most propulsion systems primarily use combustion for their needed thrust. Associated with these propulsion systems are the high-velocity hot exhaust gases produced as the byproducts of combustion. These exhaust products often apply uneven high temperature and pressure over the surfaces of the appended structures exposed to them. If the applied pressure and temperature exceed the design criteria of the surfaces of these structures, they will not be able to protect the underlying structures, resulting in the failure of the vehicle mission. An understanding of the flow field associated with hot exhaust jets and the interactions of these jets with the structures in their path is critical not only from the design point of view but for the validation of the materials and manufacturing processes involved in constructing the materials from which the structures in the path of these jets are made. The hot exhaust gases often flow at supersonic speeds, and as a result, various incident and reflected shock features are present. These shock structures induce abrupt changes in the pressure and temperature distribution that need to be considered. In addition, the jet flow creates a gaseous plume that can easily be traced from large distances. To study the flow field associated with the supersonic gases induced by a rocket engine, its interaction with the surrounding surfaces, and its effects on the strength and durability of the materials exposed to it, NASA Glenn Research Center s Combustion Branch teamed with the Ceramics Branch to provide testing and analytical support. The experimental work included the full range of heat flux environments that the rocket engine can produce over a flat specimen. Chamber pressures were varied from 130 to 500 psia and oxidizer-to-fuel ratios (o/f) were varied from 1.3 to 7.5.

  18. Velocity measurement in rocket exhaust and general aerodynamic flows by photolysis of H2O and laser induced fluorescence of OH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boedeker, Laurence R.

    1992-01-01

    A 'tagging' approach in which the photolysis of H2O by an excimer laser creates a zone of enhanced OH concentration, while a second, pulsed-UV laser detects tagged-zone convection via time-delayed excitation of OH fluorescence, depends on the photodissociation process and the kinetics of OH decay (relative to velocity). For application to the fuel-rich, high supersonic Mach number exhaust flow of the SSME, the detection of OH is being accomplished with either a pulsed narrowband UV dye laser or a tunable XeCl excimer laser for excitation of an OH 0-0 band transition, while the two-photon photolysis of H2O is conducted by focusing an injection-locked KrF excimer laser into the flow.

  19. Prediction of Acoustic Environments from Horizontal Rocket Firings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giacomoni, Clothilde

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, advances in research and engineering have led to more powerful launch vehicles which can reach areas of space not yet explored. These more powerful vehicles yield acoustic environments potentially destructive to the vehicle or surrounding structures. Therefore, it has become increasingly important to be able to predict the acoustic environments created by these vehicles in order to avoid structural and/or competent failure. The current industry standard technique for predicting launch-induced acoustic environments was developed by Eldred in the early 1970's and is published in NASA SP-80721. Recent work2 has shown Eldred's technique to be inaccurate for current state-of-the-art launch vehicles. Due to the high cost of full-scale and even sub-scale rocket experiments, very little rocket noise data is available. Furthermore, much of the work thought to be applicable to rocket noise has been done with heated jets. Tam3,4 has done an extensive amount of research on jets of different nozzle exit shape, diameter, velocity, and temperature. Though the values of these parameters, especially exit velocity and temperature, are often very low compared to these values in rockets, a lot can be learned about rocket noise from jet noise literature. The turbulent nature of jet and rocket exhausts is quite similar. Both exhausts contain turbulent structures of varying scale-termed the fine and large scale turbulence by Tam. The finescale turbulence is due to small eddies from the jet plume interacting with the ambient atmosphere. According to Tam et al., the noise radiated by this envelope of small-scale turbulence is statistically isotropic. Hence, one would expect the noise from the small scale turbulence of the jet to be nearly omni-directional. The coherent nature of the large-scale turbulence results in interference of the noise radiated from different spatial locations within the jet. This interference-whether it is constructive or destructive-results in highly directional noise radiation. Tam3 has proposed a model to predict the acoustic environment due to jets and while it works extremely well for jets, it was found to be inappropriate for rockets8. A model to predict the acoustic environment due to a launch vehicle in the far-field which incorporates concepts from both Eldred and Tam was created. This was done using five sets of horizontally fired rocket data, obtained between 2008 and 2012. Three of these rockets use solid propellant and two use liquid propellant. Through scaling analysis, it is shown that liquid and solid rocket motors exhibit similar spectra at similar amplitudes. This model is accurate for these five data sets within 5 dB of the measured data for receiver angles of 30deg to 160deg (with respect to the downstream exhaust centerline). The model uses the following vehicle parameters: nozzle exit diameter and velocity, radial distance from source to receiver, receiver angle, mass flow rate, and acoustic efficiency.

  20. The production of nitric oxide in the troposphere as a result of solid-rocket-motor afterburning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, R. B.; Gomberg, R. I.

    1976-01-01

    As part of an ongoing assessment of the environmental effects of solid-rocket-motor operations in the troposphere, estimates were made of the nitric oxide produced in the troposphere by the space shuttle and Titan 3-C boosters. Calculations were made with the low-altitude plume computer program and included the effects of coupled finite-rate chemistry and turbulent mixing. A recent measurement of nitric oxide taken in the effluent cloud of a Titan 3-C booster is compared with calculations made with this computer code. The various chemical reactions of the exhaust gases are listed in tabular form.

  1. Experimental/Analytical Characterization of the RBCC Rocket-Ejector Mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruf, J. H.; Lehman, M.; Pal, S.; Santoro, R. J.

    2000-01-01

    The experimental/analytical research work described here addresses the rocket-ejector mode (Mach 0-2 operational range) of the RBCC engine. The experimental phase of the program includes studying the mixing and combustion characteristics of the rocket-ejector system utilizing state-of-the-art diagnostic techniques. A two-dimensional variable geometry rocket-ejector system with enhanced optical access was utilized as the experimental platform. The goals of the experimental phase of the research being conducted at Penn State are to: (a) systematically increase the range of rocket-ejector understanding over a wide range of flow/geometry parameters and (b) provide a comprehensive data base for evaluating and anchoring CFD codes. Concurrent with the experimental activities, a CFD code benchmarking effort at Marshall Space Flight Center is also being used to further investigate the RBCC rocket-ejector mode. Experiments involving the single rocket based optically-accessible rocket-ejector system have been conducted for Diffusion and Afterburning (DAB) as well as Simultaneous Mixing and Combustion configurations. For the DAB configuration, air is introduced (direct-connect) or ejected (sea-level static) into a constant area mixer section with a centrally located gaseous oxygen (GO2)/gaseous hydrogen (GH2) rocket combustor. The downstream flowpath for this configuration includes a diffuser, an afterburner and a final converging nozzle. For the SMC configuration, the rocket is centrally located in a slightly divergent duct. For all tested configurations, global measurements of the axial pressure and heat transfer profiles as well as the overall engine thrust were made. Detailed measurements include major species concentration (H2 O2 N2 and H2O) profiles at various mixer locations made using Raman spectroscopy. Complementary CFD calculations of the flowfield at the experimental conditions also provide additional information on the physics of the problem. These calculations are being conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center to benchmark the FDNS code for RBCC engine operations for such configurations. The primary fluid physics of interests are the mixing and interaction of the rocket plume and secondary flow, subsequent combustion of the fuel rich rocket exhaust with the secondary flow and combustion of the injected afterburner flow. The CFD results are compared to static pressure along the RBCC duct walls, Raman Spectroscopy specie distribution data at several axial locations, net engine thrust and entrained air for the SLS cases. The CFD results compare reasonably well with the experimental results.

  2. POD Analysis of Jet-Plume/Afterbody-Wake Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Nathan E.; Seiner, John M.; Jansen, Bernard J.; Gui, Lichuan; Sockwell, Shuan; Joachim, Matthew

    2009-11-01

    The understanding of the flow physics in the base region of a powered rocket is one of the keys to designing the next generation of reusable launchers. The base flow features affect the aerodynamics and the heat loading at the base of the vehicle. Recent efforts at the National Center for Physical Acoustics at the University of Mississippi have refurbished two models for studying jet-plume/afterbody-wake interactions in the NCPA's 1-foot Tri-Sonic Wind Tunnel Facility. Both models have a 2.5 inch outer diameter with a nominally 0.5 inch diameter centered exhaust nozzle. One of the models is capable of being powered with gaseous H2 and O2 to study the base flow in a fully combusting senario. The second model uses hi-pressure air to drive the exhaust providing an unheated representative flow field. This unheated model was used to acquire PIV data of the base flow. Subsequently, a POD analysis was performed to provide a first look at the large-scale structures present for the interaction between an axisymmetric jet and an axisymmetric afterbody wake. PIV and Schlieren data are presented for a single jet-exhaust to free-stream flow velocity along with the POD analysis of the base flow field.

  3. Ionospheric modification by rocket effluents. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bernhardt, P.A.; Price, K.M.; da Rosa, A.V.

    1980-06-01

    This report describes experimental and theoretical studies related to ionospheric disturbances produced by rocket exhaust vapors. The purpose of our research was to estimate the ionospheric effects of the rocket launches which will be required to place the Satellite Power System (SPS) in operation. During the past year, we have developed computational tools for numerical simulation of ionospheric changes produced by the injection of rocket exhaust vapors. The theoretical work has dealt with (1) the limitations imposed by condensation phenomena in rocket exhaust; (2) complete modeling of the ionospheric depletion process including neutral gas dynamics, plasma physics, chemistry and thermal processes; and (3) the influence of the modified ionosphere on radio wave propagation. We are also reporting on electron content measurements made during the launch of HEAO-C on Sept. 20, 1979. We conclude by suggesting future experiments and areas for future research.

  4. Ignition and Performance Tests of Rocket-Based Combined Cycle Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, William E.

    2005-01-01

    The ground testing of a Rocket Based Combined Cycle engine implementing the Simultaneous Mixing and Combustion scheme was performed at the direct-connect facility of Purdue University's High Pressure Laboratory. The fuel-rich exhaust of a JP-8/H2O2 thruster was mixed with compressed, metered air in a constant area, axisymmetric duct. The thruster was similar in design and function to that which will be used in the flight test series of Dryden's Ducted-Rocket Experiment. The determination of duct ignition limits was made based on the variation of secondary air flow rates and primary thruster equivalence ratios. Thrust augmentation and improvements in specific impulse were studied along with the pressure and temperature profiles of the duct to study mixing lengths and thermal choking. The occurrence of ignition was favored by lower rocket equivalence ratios. However, among ignition cases, better thrust and specific impulse performance were seen with higher equivalence ratios owing to the increased fuel available for combustion. Thrust and specific impulse improvements by factors of 1.2 to 1.7 were seen. The static pressure and temperature profiles allowed regions of mixing and heat addition to be identified. The mixing lengths were found to be shorter at lower rocket equivalence ratios. Total pressure measurements allowed plume-based calculation of thrust, which agreed with load-cell measured values to within 6.5-8.0%. The corresponding Mach Number profile indicated the flow was not thermally choked for the highest duct static pressure case.

  5. Solid rocket booster thermal radiation model, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, G. H.; Lee, A. L.

    1976-01-01

    A solid rocket booster (SRB) thermal radiation model, capable of defining the influence of the plume flowfield structure on the magnitude and distribution of thermal radiation leaving the plume, was prepared and documented. Radiant heating rates may be calculated for a single SRB plume or for the dual SRB plumes astride the space shuttle. The plumes may be gimbaled in the yaw and pitch planes. Space shuttle surface geometries are simulated with combinations of quadric surfaces. The effect of surface shading is included. The computer program also has the capability to calculate view factors between the SRB plumes and space shuttle surfaces as well as surface-to-surface view factors.

  6. Air admixture to exhaust jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanger, Eugen

    1953-01-01

    The problem of thrust increase by air admixture to exhaust jets of rockets, turbojet, ram- and pulse-jet engines is investigated theoretically. The optimum ratio of mixing chamber pressure to ambient pressure and speed range for thrust increase due to air admixture is determined for each type of jet engine.

  7. The Ultraviolet Plume Instrument (UVPI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horan, D. M.

    1993-01-01

    The Ultraviolet Plume Instrument (UVPI) was launched aboard the Low-power Atmospheric Compensation Experiment (LACE) satellite on 14 Feb. 1990. Both the spacecraft and the UVPI were sponsored by the Directed Energy Office of the Strategic Defense Initiative Organization. The mission of the UVPI was to obtain radiometrically calibrated images of rocket plumes at high altitude and background image data of the Earth, Earth's limb, and celestial objects in the near- and middle-UV wave bands. The UVPI was designed for nighttime observations, i.e., to acquire and track relatively bright objects against a dark background.

  8. Experimentation in the low-density plume of a simulated electrothermal thruster for computer code validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meissner, Dana L.

    1993-01-01

    Pressures and flow angles are measured in the plume of a 20 deg half-angle, conical nozzle in vacuum with Pitot tubes and conical probes. The area of measurement in the plume ranges from the nozzle exit plane to 480 mm axially downstream and from the plume centerline to 60 mm radially. The nozzle has an exit-to-throat area ratio of 100:1 and a throat diameter of 3.2 mm. The nozzle flow exhausts to a vacuum of order 10(exp -2) Pa to simulate a resistojet (an electrothermal rocket of less than 1 N of thrust) operating in space. Experimental data are given for flows of nitrogen at 55 and 68 mg/s, stagnation temperatures between 695 and 921 K, and stagnation pressures ranging from 5600 to 7100 Pa. Data are also given for argon at a rate of 68 mg/s, a stagnation temperature of 648 K, and stagnation pressures of 4500, 4750, and 4770 Pa. Measurements in the nitrogen plume are compared with computational results from a direct-simulation Monte Carlo method.

  9. Space shuttle plume simulation application. Results and math model. [Ames unitary plan wind tunnel test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, W.; Conine, B.

    1978-01-01

    Pressure and gauge wind tunnel data from a transonic test of a 0.02 scale model of the space shuttle launch vehicle was analyzed to define the aerodynamic influence of the main propulsion system and solid rocket booster plumes during the transonic portion of ascent flight. Air was used as a simulant gas to develop the model exhaust plumes. A math model of the plume induced aerodynamic characteristics was developed for a range of Mach numbers to match the forebody aerodynamic math model. The base aerodynamic characteristics are presented in terms of forces and moments versus attitude. Total vehicle base and forebody aerodynamic characteristics are presented in terms of aerodynamic coefficients for Mach number from 0.6 to 1.4 Element and component base and forebody aerodynamic characteristics are presented for Mach numbers of 0.6, 1.05, 1.1, 1.25 and 1.4. The forebody data is available at Mach 1.55. Tolerances for all plume induced aerodynamic characteristics are developed in terms of a math model.

  10. Helping HAN for hybrid rockets

    SciTech Connect

    Ramohalli, K.; Dowler, W.

    1995-01-01

    Hydroxyl amine nitrate (HAN) is a powerful oxidizer for hybrid rocket flight motors. Miscible with water up to 95% by mass, it also has high density and has been extensively characterized for materials compatibility, safety, transportation, storage and handling. Before any serious attempt to use the proposed oxidizer in hybrids, though, the usual performance figures must first be obtained. The simplest are time-independent, equilibrium rocket performance numbers that include chamber temperature, temperature at the nozzle throat, and key species in the exhaust. These numbers must be followed by several other important performance evaluation, including burning rates, pressure dependence, susceptibility to instabilities and temperature sensitivity.

  11. Predicted rocket and shuttle effects on stratospheric ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harwood, Robert S.; Karol, Igor L.; Jackman, Charles H.; Qiu, Lian-Xiong; Prather, Michael J.; Pyle, John A.

    1991-01-01

    The major chemical effluents of either solid- or liquid-fueled rockets that can potentially perturb stratospheric ozone include chlorine compounds (HCl), nitrogen compounds (NO(x)), and hydrogen compounds (H2 and H2O). Radicals (Cl, ClO, H, OH, HO2, NO, and NO2) formed directly or indirectly from rocket exhaust can cause the catalytic destruction of ozone. Other exhaust compounds that could presumably lead to ozone destruction either by direct reaction with ozone or by providing a surface for heterogeneous processes include the particulates Al2O3, ice, and soot. These topics are discussed in terms of the possible effects of rocket exhausts on stratospheric ozone.

  12. Rockets Away!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaahaaina, Nancy

    1997-01-01

    Describes a project that involved a rocket-design competition where students played the roles of McDonnell Douglas employees competing for NASA contracts. Provides a real world experience involving deadlines, design and performance specifications, and budgets. (JRH)

  13. Measuring Fluctuating Pressure Levels and Vibration Response in a Jet Plume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osterholt, Douglas J.; Knox, Douglas M.

    2011-01-01

    The characterization of loads due to solid rocket motor plume impingement allows for moreaccurate analyses of components subjected to such an environment. Typically, test verification of predicted loads due to these conditions is widely overlooked or unsuccessful. ATA Engineering, Inc., performed testing during a solid rocket motor firing to obtain acceleration and pressure responses in the hydrodynamic field surrounding the jet plume. The test environment necessitated a robust design to facilitate measurements being made in close proximity to the jet plume. This paper presents the process of designing a test fixture and an instrumentation package that could withstand the solid rocket plume environment and protect the required instrumentation.

  14. Rain scavenging of solid rocket exhaust clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dingle, A. N.

    1978-01-01

    An explicit model for cloud microphysics was developed for application to the problem of co-condensation/vaporization of HCl and H2O in the presence of Al2O3 particulate nuclei. Validity of the explicit model relative to the implicit model, which has been customarily applied to atmospheric cloud studies, was demonstrated by parallel computations of H2O condensation upon (NH4)2 SO4 nuclei. A mesoscale predictive model designed to account for the impact of wet processes on atmospheric dynamics is also under development. Input data specifying the equilibrium state of HC1 and H2O vapors in contact with aqueous HC1 solutions were found to be limited, particularly in respect to temperature range.

  15. Air-Powered Rockets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Charley; Raynovic, Jim

    This document describes methods for designing and building two types of rockets--rockets from paper and rockets from bottles. Devices used for measuring the heights that the rockets obtain are also discussed. (KHR)

  16. A smoke producing rocket motor for atmospheric wind profiling

    SciTech Connect

    Grubelich, M.C. ); Rowland, J. . Applied Physics Lab.)

    1991-01-01

    A composite propellant was developed to produce a dense plume from a rocket motor. The development of this propellant combined the smoke producing capabilities of a smoke generator with a rocket motor, thereby integrating the separate systems into one unit. A rocket motor was designed for use with this propellant to produce a high density particulate plume. This plume could then be used to determine the wind profile in the atmosphere by using a light detection and ranging system. Additionally, this smoke producing propellant could be used for rapid screening or identification. The burn rate characteristics of the propellant were measured and static firings of rocket motors were conducted to determine the performance of the propellant. The results of these tests will be presented as well as theoretical performance predictions of a flight vehicle.

  17. A smoke producing rocket motor for atmospheric wind profiling

    SciTech Connect

    Grubelich, M.C.; Rowland, J.

    1991-12-31

    A composite propellant was developed to produce a dense plume from a rocket motor. The development of this propellant combined the smoke producing capabilities of a smoke generator with a rocket motor, thereby integrating the separate systems into one unit. A rocket motor was designed for use with this propellant to produce a high density particulate plume. This plume could then be used to determine the wind profile in the atmosphere by using a light detection and ranging system. Additionally, this smoke producing propellant could be used for rapid screening or identification. The burn rate characteristics of the propellant were measured and static firings of rocket motors were conducted to determine the performance of the propellant. The results of these tests will be presented as well as theoretical performance predictions of a flight vehicle.

  18. Vertical Landing Aerodynamics of Reusable Rocket Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nonaka, Satoshi; Nishida, Hiroyuki; Kato, Hiroyuki; Ogawa, Hiroyuki; Inatani, Yoshifumi

    The aerodynamic characteristics of a vertical landing rocket are affected by its engine plume in the landing phase. The influences of interaction of the engine plume with the freestream around the vehicle on the aerodynamic characteristics are studied experimentally aiming to realize safe landing of the vertical landing rocket. The aerodynamic forces and surface pressure distributions are measured using a scaled model of a reusable rocket vehicle in low-speed wind tunnels. The flow field around the vehicle model is visualized using the particle image velocimetry (PIV) method. Results show that the aerodynamic characteristics, such as the drag force and pitching moment, are strongly affected by the change in the base pressure distributions and reattachment of a separation flow around the vehicle.

  19. Four-nozzle benchmark wind tunnel model USA code solutions for simulation of multiple rocket base flow recirculation at 145,000 feet altitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dougherty, N. S.; Johnson, S. L.

    1993-07-01

    Multiple rocket exhaust plume interactions at high altitudes can produce base flow recirculation with attendant alteration of the base pressure coefficient and increased base heating. A search for a good wind tunnel benchmark problem to check grid clustering technique and turbulence modeling turned up the experiment done at AEDC in 1961 by Goethert and Matz on a 4.25-in. diameter domed missile base model with four rocket nozzles. This wind tunnel model with varied external bleed air flow for the base flow wake produced measured p/p(sub ref) at the center of the base as high as 3.3 due to plume flow recirculation back onto the base. At that time in 1961, relatively inexpensive experimentation with air at gamma = 1.4 and nozzle A(sub e)/A of 10.6 and theta(sub n) = 7.55 deg with P(sub c) = 155 psia simulated a LO2/LH2 rocket exhaust plume with gamma = 1.20, A(sub e)/A of 78 and P(sub c) about 1,000 psia. An array of base pressure taps on the aft dome gave a clear measurement of the plume recirculation effects at p(infinity) = 4.76 psfa corresponding to 145,000 ft altitude. Our CFD computations of the flow field with direct comparison of computed-versus-measured base pressure distribution (across the dome) provide detailed information on velocities and particle traces as well eddy viscosity in the base and nozzle region. The solution was obtained using a six-zone mesh with 284,000 grid points for one quadrant taking advantage of symmetry. Results are compared using a zero-equation algebraic and a one-equation pointwise R(sub t) turbulence model (work in progress). Good agreement with the experimental pressure data was obtained with both; and this benchmark showed the importance of: (1) proper grid clustering and (2) proper choice of turbulence modeling for rocket plume problems/recirculation at high altitude.

  20. Four-Nozzle Benchmark Wind Tunnel Model USA Code Solutions for Simulation of Multiple Rocket Base Flow Recirculation at 145,000 Feet Altitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dougherty, N. S.; Johnson, S. L.

    1993-01-01

    Multiple rocket exhaust plume interactions at high altitudes can produce base flow recirculation with attendant alteration of the base pressure coefficient and increased base heating. A search for a good wind tunnel benchmark problem to check grid clustering technique and turbulence modeling turned up the experiment done at AEDC in 1961 by Goethert and Matz on a 4.25-in. diameter domed missile base model with four rocket nozzles. This wind tunnel model with varied external bleed air flow for the base flow wake produced measured p/p(sub ref) at the center of the base as high as 3.3 due to plume flow recirculation back onto the base. At that time in 1961, relatively inexpensive experimentation with air at gamma = 1.4 and nozzle A(sub e)/A of 10.6 and theta(sub n) = 7.55 deg with P(sub c) = 155 psia simulated a LO2/LH2 rocket exhaust plume with gamma = 1.20, A(sub e)/A of 78 and P(sub c) about 1,000 psia. An array of base pressure taps on the aft dome gave a clear measurement of the plume recirculation effects at p(infinity) = 4.76 psfa corresponding to 145,000 ft altitude. Our CFD computations of the flow field with direct comparison of computed-versus-measured base pressure distribution (across the dome) provide detailed information on velocities and particle traces as well eddy viscosity in the base and nozzle region. The solution was obtained using a six-zone mesh with 284,000 grid points for one quadrant taking advantage of symmetry. Results are compared using a zero-equation algebraic and a one-equation pointwise R(sub t) turbulence model (work in progress). Good agreement with the experimental pressure data was obtained with both; and this benchmark showed the importance of: (1) proper grid clustering and (2) proper choice of turbulence modeling for rocket plume problems/recirculation at high altitude.

  1. 11. Building 202 exhaust scrubber stack, looking northwest from location ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Building 202 exhaust scrubber stack, looking northwest from location west of shop wing of Building 202. - Rocket Engine Testing Facility, GRC Building No. 202, NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  2. 10. Building 202 exhaust scrubber and stack, looking southeast from ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Building 202 exhaust scrubber and stack, looking southeast from bank of branch of Abram Creek. - Rocket Engine Testing Facility, GRC Building No. 202, NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  3. 60. Historic plan of Building 202 exhaust scrubber, June 18, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    60. Historic plan of Building 202 exhaust scrubber, June 18, 1955. NASA GRC drawing no. CD-101261. (On file at NASA Glenn Research Center). - Rocket Engine Testing Facility, GRC Building No. 202, NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  4. Analysis of a Nuclear Enhanced Airbreathing Rocket for Earth to Orbit Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Robert B.; Landrum, D. Brian; Brown, Norman (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The proposed engine concept is the Nuclear Enhanced Airbreathing Rocket (NEAR). The NEAR concept uses a fission reactor to thermally heat a propellant in a rocket plenum. The rocket is shrouded, thus the exhaust mixes with ingested air to provide additional thermal energy through combustion. The combusted flow is then expanded through a nozzle to provide thrust.

  5. Cratering Soil by Impinging Jets of Gas, with Application to Landing Rockets on Planetary Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metzger, Philip T.; Vu, B. T.; Taylor, D. E.; Kromann, M. J.; Fuchs, M.; Yutko, B.; Dokos, A.; Immer, Christopher D.; Lane, J. E.; Dunkel, Michael B.; Donahue, Carly M.; Latta, R. C., III

    2007-01-01

    Several physical mechanisms are involved in excavating granular materials beneath a vertical jet of gas. These occur, for example, beneath the exhaust plume of a rocket landing on the soil of the Moon or Mars. A series of experiments and simulations have been performed to provide a detailed view of the complex gas/soil interactions. Measurements have also been taken from the Apollo lunar landing videos and from photographs of the resulting terrain, and these help to demonstrate how the interactions extrapolate into the lunar environment. It is important to understand these processes at a fundamental level to support the ongoing design of higher-fidelity numerical simulations and larger-scale experiments. These are needed to enable future lunar exploration wherein multiple hardware assets will be placed on the Moon within short distances of one another. The high-velocity spray of soil from landing spacecraft must be accurately predicted and controlled lest it erosively damage the surrounding hardware.

  6. Supplemental final environmental impact statement for advanced solid rocket motor testing at Stennis Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Since the Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) and Record of Decision on the FEIS describing the potential impacts to human health and the environment associated with the program, three factors have caused NASA to initiate additional studies regarding these issues. These factors are: (1) The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) agreed to use the same comprehensive procedures to identify and delineate wetlands; (2) EPA has given NASA further guidance on how best to simulate the exhaust plume from the Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM) testing through computer modeling, enabling more realistic analysis of emission impacts; and (3) public concerns have been raised concerning short and long term impacts on human health and the environment from ASRM testing.

  7. UV missile-plume signature model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roblin, Antoine; Baudoux, Pierre E.; Chervet, Patrick

    2002-08-01

    A new 3D radiative code is used to solve the radiative transfer equation in the UV spectral domain for a nonequilibrium and axisymmetric media such as a rocket plume composed of hot reactive gases and metallic oxide particles like alumina. Calculations take into account the dominant chemiluminescence radiation mechanism and multiple scattering effects produced by alumina particles. Plume radiative properties are studied by using a simple cylindrical media of finite length, deduced from different aerothermochemical real rocket plume afterburning zones. Assumed a log-normal size distribution of alumina particles, optical properties are calculated by using Mie theory. Due to large uncertainties of particles properties, systematic tests have been performed in order to evaluate the influence of the different input data (refractive index, particle mean geometric radius) upon the radiance field. These computations will help us to define the set of parameters which need to be known accurately in order to compare computations with radiance measurements obtained during field experiments.

  8. Space shuttle exhaust cloud properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, B. J.; Keller, V. W.

    1983-01-01

    A data base describing the properties of the exhaust cloud produced by the launch of the Space Transportation System and the acidic fallout observed after each of the first four launches was assembled from a series of ground and aircraft based measurements made during the launches of STS 2, 3, and 4. Additional data were obtained from ground-based measurements during firings of the 6.4 percent model of the Solid Rocket Booster at the Marshall Center. Analysis indicates that the acidic fallout is produced by atomization of the deluge water spray by the rocket exhaust on the pad followed by rapid scavening of hydrogen chloride gas aluminum oxide particles from the Solid Rocket Boosters. The atomized spray is carried aloft by updrafts created by the hot exhaust and deposited down wind. Aircraft measurements in the STS-3 ground cloud showed an insignificant number of ice nuclei. Although no measurements were made in the column cloud, the possibility of inadvertent weather modification caused by the interaction of ice nuclei with natural clouds appears remote.

  9. Tvashtar's Plume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    This dramatic image of Io was taken by the Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) on New Horizons at 11:04 Universal Time on February 28, 2007, just about 5 hours after the spacecraft's closest approach to Jupiter. The distance to Io was 2.5 million kilometers (1.5 million miles) and the image is centered at 85 degrees west longitude. At this distance, one LORRI pixel subtends 12 kilometers (7.4 miles) on Io.

    This processed image provides the best view yet of the enormous 290-kilometer (180-mile) high plume from the volcano Tvashtar, in the 11 o'clock direction near Io's north pole. The plume was first seen by the Hubble Space Telescope two weeks ago and then by New Horizons on February 26; this image is clearer than the February 26 image because Io was closer to the spacecraft, the plume was more backlit by the Sun, and a longer exposure time (75 milliseconds versus 20 milliseconds) was used. Io's dayside was deliberately overexposed in this picture to image the faint plumes, and the long exposure also provided an excellent view of Io's night side, illuminated by Jupiter. The remarkable filamentary structure in the Tvashtar plume is similar to details glimpsed faintly in 1979 Voyager images of a similar plume produced by Io's volcano Pele. However, no previous image by any spacecraft has shown these mysterious structures so clearly.

    The image also shows the much smaller symmetrical fountain of the plume, about 60 kilometers (or 40 miles) high, from the Prometheus volcano in the 9 o'clock direction. The top of a third volcanic plume, from the volcano Masubi, erupts high enough to catch the setting Sun on the night side near the bottom of the image, appearing as an irregular bright patch against Io's Jupiter-lit surface. Several Everest-sized mountains are highlighted by the setting Sun along the terminator, the line between day and night.

    This is the last of a handful of LORRI images that New Horizons is sending 'home' during its busy close encounter with Jupiter -- hundreds of images and other data are being taken and stored onboard. The rest of the images will be returned to Earth over the coming weeks and months as the spacecraft speeds along to Pluto.

  10. Atomic hydrogen rocket engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etters, R. D.; Flurchick, K.

    1981-01-01

    A rocket using atomic hydrogen propellant is discussed. An essential feature of the proposed engine is that the atomic hydrogen fuel is used as it is produced, thus eliminating the necessity of storage. The atomic hydrogen flows into a combustion chamber and recombines, producing high velocity molecular hydrogen which flows out an exhaust port. Standard thermodynamics, kinetic theory and wall recombination cross-sections are used to predict a thrust of approximately 1.4 N for a RF hydrogen flow rate of 4 x 10 to the 22nd/sec. Specific impulses are nominally from 1000 to 2000 sec. It is predicted that thrusts on the order of one Newton and specific impulses of up to 2200 sec are attainable with nominal RF discharge fluxes on the order of 10 to the 22nd atoms/sec; further refinements will probably not alter these predictions by more than a factor of two.

  11. Supersonic-combustion rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, R. J.; Franciscus, L. C. (inventors)

    1973-01-01

    A supersonic combustion rocket is provided in which a small rocket motor is substituted for heavy turbo pumps in a conventional rocket engine. The substitution results in a substantial reduction in rocket engine weight. The flame emanating from the small rocket motor can act to ignite non-hypergolic fuels.

  12. Plasma Diagnostics Development for Advanced Rocket Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glover, Timothy; Kittrell, Carter; Chan, Anthony; Chang-Diaz, Franklin

    2000-10-01

    The VASIMR (Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket) engine is a next-generation rocket engine under development at the Johnson Space Center's Advanced Space Propulsion Laboratory. With an exhaust velocity up to 50 times that of chemical rocket engines such as the Space Shuttle Main Engine, the VASIMR concept promises fast, efficient interplanetary flight. Rice University has participated in VASIMR research since 1996 and at present is developing two new diagnostic probes: a retarding potential analyzer to measure the velocity of ions in the rocket's exhaust, and a moveable optical probe to examine the spectrum of the rocket's helicon plasma source. In support of the probe development, a test facility is under construction at Rice, consisting of a small electric rocket engine firing into a 2-m vacuum chamber. This engine, the MPD (magnetoplasmadynamic) thruster, dates from the 1960's and provides a well-characterized source plasma for testing of the probes under development. We present details of the ion energy analyzer and the facility under construction at Rice.

  13. Preliminary study of a hydrogen peroxide rocket for use in moving source jet noise tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plencner, R. M.

    1977-01-01

    A preliminary investigation was made of using a hydrogen peroxide rocket to obtain pure moving source jet noise data. The thermodynamic cycle of the rocket was analyzed. It was found that the thermodynamic exhaust properties of the rocket could be made to match those of typical advanced commercial supersonic transport engines. The rocket thruster was then considered in combination with a streamlined ground car for moving source jet noise experiments. When a nonthrottlable hydrogen peroxide rocket was used to accelerate the vehicle, propellant masses and/or acceleration distances became too large. However, when a throttlable rocket or an auxiliary system was used to accelerate the vehicle, reasonable propellant masses could be obtained.

  14. ASRM subscale plume deflector testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, Freddie, III; Dawson, Michael C.; Orlin, Peter A.

    1992-07-01

    This paper reports the results of the scale model (1/22) testing of candidate refractory materials to be used as surface coatings for a solid rocket motor plume deflector structure. Five ROM tests were conducted to acquire data to support the selection, thickness determination, and placement of the materials. All data acquisition was achieved through nonintrusive methods. The tests demonstrated that little or no reductions in performance of the full-scale deflector would be experienced if the most economical materials were selected for construction.

  15. Plume detachment from a magnetic nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deline, Christopher A.; Bengtson, Roger D.; Breizman, Boris N.; Tushentsov, Mikhail R.; Jones, Jonathan E.; Chavers, D. Greg; Dobson, Chris C.; Schuettpelz, Branwen M.

    2009-03-01

    High-powered electric propulsion thrusters utilizing a magnetized plasma require that plasma exhaust detach from the applied magnetic field in order to produce thrust. This paper presents experimental results demonstrating that a sufficiently energetic and flowing plasma can indeed detach from a magnetic nozzle. Microwave interferometer and probe measurements provide plume density, electron temperature, and ion flux measurements in the nozzle region. Measurements of ion flux show a low-beta plasma plume which follows applied magnetic field lines until the plasma kinetic pressure reaches the magnetic pressure and a high-beta plume expanding ballistically afterward. Several magnetic configurations were tested including a reversed field nozzle configuration. Despite the dramatic change in magnetic field profile, the reversed field configuration yielded little measurable change in plume trajectory, demonstrating the plume is detached. Numerical simulations yield density profiles in agreement with the experimental results.

  16. Computer model predictions of the local effects of large, solid-fuel rocket motors on stratospheric ozone. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Zittel, P.F.

    1994-09-10

    The solid-fuel rocket motors of large space launch vehicles release gases and particles that may significantly affect stratospheric ozone densities along the vehicle's path. In this study, standard rocket nozzle and flowfield computer codes have been used to characterize the exhaust gases and particles through the afterburning region of the solid-fuel motors of the Titan IV launch vehicle. The models predict that a large fraction of the HCl gas exhausted by the motors is converted to Cl and Cl2 in the plume afterburning region. Estimates of the subsequent chemistry suggest that on expansion into the ambient daytime stratosphere, the highly reactive chlorine may significantly deplete ozone in a cylinder around the vehicle track that ranges from 1 to 5 km in diameter over the altitude range of 15 to 40 km. The initial ozone depletion is estimated to occur on a time scale of less than 1 hour. After the initial effects, the dominant chemistry of the problem changes, and new models are needed to follow the further expansion, or closure, of the ozone hole on a longer time scale.

  17. Devising rocket power for smaller engines

    SciTech Connect

    Burruss, R.

    1996-04-01

    Compact, high-power engines that burn fuel and oxygen could be made by winding copper tubing in a helix around boiler sections. With more than 1,000 horsepower per pound of engine weight, liquid-fueled rockets have the highest specific power of any engines designed for sustained operation. Yet those engines generally run for about only 1,000 seconds--nowhere near the sustained operation time for lower-power automotive and aircraft engines of more than 1,000 hours. In theory, at least, a fuel/oxygen rocket can be built that combines the best of both classes: high specific power (from perhaps two to 10 times that of a gas turbine) and a 1,000-hour service life. Such an engine would almost certainly be possible if the rocket`s exhaust gases could be simultaneously cooled and expanded by mixing water with the rocket`s exhaust and boiling it before it reaches the turbine. The technology itself is not new. variations of these rocket-turbine-type engines, for example, powered torpedoes during World War I. Some 30 years later, German V-2 rockets used fuel pumps, driven by the reaction of hydrogen peroxide with hydrocarbon fuels, to produce high-pressure steam that was directed against a turbine. Alternatively, fuel/oxygen combustion could produce steam to drive a piston engine. Either way, the challenge remains to construct a compact, long-service-life, high-specific-power boiler that burns fuel and oxygen. The new type of engine could be derived from recent research on electric vehicles (EVs).

  18. 40 CFR Appendix Vi to Part 266 - Stack Plume Rise

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Stack Plume Rise VI Appendix VI to Part 266 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED... FACILITIES Pt. 266, App. VI Appendix VI to Part 266—Stack Plume Rise Flow rate (m3/s) Exhaust Temperature...

  19. 40 CFR Appendix Vi to Part 266 - Stack Plume Rise

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Stack Plume Rise VI Appendix VI to Part 266 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED... FACILITIES Pt. 266, App. VI Appendix VI to Part 266—Stack Plume Rise Flow rate (m3/s) Exhaust Temperature...

  20. 40 CFR Appendix Vi to Part 266 - Stack Plume Rise

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Stack Plume Rise VI Appendix VI to Part 266 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED... FACILITIES Pt. 266, App. VI Appendix VI to Part 266—Stack Plume Rise Flow rate (m3/s) Exhaust Temperature...

  1. 40 CFR Appendix Vi to Part 266 - Stack Plume Rise

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Stack Plume Rise VI Appendix VI to Part 266 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED... FACILITIES Pt. 266, App. VI Appendix VI to Part 266—Stack Plume Rise Flow rate (m3/s) Exhaust Temperature...

  2. 40 CFR Appendix Vi to Part 266 - Stack Plume Rise

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Stack Plume Rise VI Appendix VI to Part 266 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED... FACILITIES Pt. 266, App. VI Appendix VI to Part 266—Stack Plume Rise Flow rate (m3/s) Exhaust Temperature...

  3. Hybrid rocket propulsion for sounding rocket applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A discussion of the H-225K hybrid rocket motor, produced by the American Rocket Company, is given. The H-225K motor is presented in terms of the following topics: (1) hybrid rocket fundamentals; (2) hybrid characteristics; and (3) hybrid advantages.

  4. Hybrid Rocket Propulsion for Sounding Rocket Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    A discussion of the H-225K hybrid rocket motor, produced by the American Rocket Company, is given. The H-225K motor is presented in terms of the following topics: (1) hybrid rocket fundamentals; (2) hybrid characteristics; and (3) hybrid advantages.

  5. Crater Formation Due to Lunar Plume Impingement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsell, Brandon

    2011-01-01

    Thruster plume impingement on a surface comprised of small, loose particles may cause blast ejecta to be spread over a large area and possibly cause damage to the vehicle. For this reason it is important to study the effects of plume impingement and crater formation on surfaces like those found on the moon. Lunar soil, also known as regolith, is made up of fine granular particles on the order of 100 microns.i Whenever a vehicle lifts-off from such a surface, the exhaust plume from the main engine will cause the formation of a crater. This crater formation may cause laterally ejected mass to be deflected and possibly damage the vehicle. This study is a first attempt at analyzing the dynamics of crater formation due to thruster exhaust plume impingement during liftoff from the moon. Though soil erosion on the lunar surface is not considered, this study aims at examining the evolution of the shear stress along the lunar surface as the engine fires. The location of the regions of high shear stress will determine where the crater begins to form and will lend insight into how big the crater will be. This information will help determine the probability that something will strike the vehicle. The final sections of this report discuss a novel method for studying this problem that uses a volume of fluid (VOF)ii method to track the movement of both the exhaust plume and the eroding surface.

  6. Skylon Aerodynamics and SABRE Plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Unmeel; Afosmis, Michael; Bowles, Jeffrey; Pandya, Shishir

    2015-01-01

    An independent partial assessment is provided of the technical viability of the Skylon aerospace plane concept, developed by Reaction Engines Limited (REL). The objectives are to verify REL's engineering estimates of airframe aerodynamics during powered flight and to assess the impact of Synergetic Air-Breathing Rocket Engine (SABRE) plumes on the aft fuselage. Pressure lift and drag coefficients derived from simulations conducted with Euler equations for unpowered flight compare very well with those REL computed with engineering methods. The REL coefficients for powered flight are increasingly less acceptable as the freestream Mach number is increased beyond 8.5, because the engineering estimates did not account for the increasing favorable (in terms of drag and lift coefficients) effect of underexpanded rocket engine plumes on the aft fuselage. At Mach numbers greater than 8.5, the thermal environment around the aft fuselage is a known unknown-a potential design and/or performance risk issue. The adverse effects of shock waves on the aft fuselage and plumeinduced flow separation are other potential risks. The development of an operational reusable launcher from the Skylon concept necessitates the judicious use of a combination of engineering methods, advanced methods based on required physics or analytical fidelity, test data, and independent assessments.

  7. Gas Emission Measurements from the RD 180 Rocket Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, H. R.

    2001-01-01

    The Science Laboratory operated by GB Tech was tasked by the Environmental Office at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to collect rocket plume samples and to measure gaseous components and airborne particulates from the hot test firings of the Atlas III/RD 180 test article at MSFC. This data will be used to validate plume prediction codes and to assess environmental air quality issues.

  8. Langmuir probe surveys of an arcjet exhaust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zana, Lynnette M.

    1987-01-01

    Electrostatic (Langmuir) probes of both spherical and cylindrical geometry have been used to obtain electron number density and temperature in the exhaust of a laboratory arcjet. The arcjet thruster operated on nitrogen and hydrogen mixtures to simulate fully decomposed hydrazine in a vacuum environment with background pressures less than 0.05 Pa. The exhaust appears to be only slightly ionized (less than 1 percent) with local plasma potentials near facility ground. The current-voltage characteristics of the probes indicate a Maxwellian temperature distribution. Plume data are presented as a function of arcjet operating conditions and also position in the exhaust.

  9. Magnetic Detachment and Plume Control in Escaping Magnetized Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    P. F. Schmit and N. J. Fisch

    2008-11-05

    The model of two-fluid, axisymmetric, ambipolar magnetized plasma detachment from thruster guide fields is extended to include plasmas with non-zero injection angular velocity profiles. Certain plasma injection angular velocity profiles are shown to narrow the plasma plume, thereby increasing exhaust efficiency. As an example, we consider a magnetic guide field arising from a simple current ring and demonstrate plasma injection schemes that more than double the fraction of useful exhaust aperture area, more than halve the exhaust plume angle, and enhance magnetized plasma detachment.

  10. Exhaust skimming

    SciTech Connect

    Bull, J.E.

    1982-02-09

    An exhaust gas treatment system and method, primarily for a motor vehicle having an internal combustion engine is disclosed. An expansion chamber is connected in a straight line to a first straight line portion of an exhaust conduit from the engine, with a second portion of the exhaust conduit extending in a straight line from the expansion chamber. The expansion chamber has a cross-sectional area 110% to 200% as large as the cross-sectional area of the exhaust conduit. First and second series of openings are provided in the expansion chamber substantially 180 degrees apart along the circumference of the expansion chamber, with the expansion chamber being mounted so that a plane containing the first and second series of openings is generally vertical. Pick-off conduits return carbon monoxide, hydrocarbon gases, and water vapors separated through the openings of the expansion chamber to the engine, the returning gases being filtered to at least remove the excess liquid therein. The excess liquid is vaporized, and the vapor is returned to the intake manifold of the engine, along with the hydrocarbon and/or carbon monoxide gases, which have a relative humidity of 60 to 100% wind return.

  11. Challenger Rocket Booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    At about 76 seconds, fragments of the Orbiter can be seen tumbling against a background of fire, smoke and vaporized propellants from the External Tank. The left Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) flys rampant, still thrusting. The reddish-brown cloud envelops the disintergrating Orbiter. The color is indicative of the nitrogen tetroxide oxidizer propellant in the Orbiter Reaction Control System. On January 28, 1986 frigid overnight temperatures caused normally pliable rubber O-ring seals and putty that are designed to seal and establish joint integrity between the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) joint segments, to become hard and non- flexible. At the instant of SRB ignition, tremendous stresses and pressures occur within the SRB casing and especially at the joint attachment points. The failure of the O-rings and putty to 'seat' properly at motor ignition, caused hot exhaust gases to blow by the seals and putty. During Challenger's ascent, this hot gas 'blow by' ultimately cut a swath completely through the steel booster casing; and like a welder's torch, began cutting into the External Tank (ET). It is believed that the ET was compromised in several locations starting in the aft at the initial point where SRB joint failure occured. The ET hydrogen tank is believed to have been breached first, with continuous rapid incremental failure of both the ET and SRB. The chain reaction of events occurring in milliseconds culminated in a massive explosion. The orbiter Challenger was instantly ejected by the blast and went askew into the supersonic air flow. These aerodynamic forces caused structural shattering and complete destruction of the orbiter. Though it was concluded that the G-forces experienced during orbiter ejection and break-up were survivable, impact with the ocean surface was not. Tragically, all seven crewmembers perished.

  12. Ozone depletion caused by NO and H2O emissions from hydrazine-fueled rockets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, M. N.; Danilin, M. Y.; Weisenstein, D. K.; Ko, M. K. W.

    2004-11-01

    Rockets using unsymmetrical dimethyl hydrazine (N(CH3)2NH2) and dinitrogen tetroxide (N2O4) propellants account for about one third of all stratospheric rocket engine emissions, comparable to the solid-fueled rocket emissions. We use plume and global atmosphere models to provide the first estimate of the local and global ozone depletion caused by NO and H2O emissions from the Proton rocket, the largest hydrazine-fueled launcher in use. NO and H2O emission indices are assumed to be 20 and 350 g/kg (propellant), respectively. Predicted maximum ozone loss in the plume of the Proton rocket is 21% at 44 km altitude. Plume ozone loss at 20 km equals 8% just after launch and steadily declines to 2% by model sunset. Predicted steady state global ozone loss from ten Proton launches annually is 1.2 × 10-4%, with nearly all of the loss due to the NO component of the emission. Normalized by stratospheric propellant consumption, the global ozone depletion efficiency of the Proton is approximately 66-90 times less than that of solid-fueled rockets. In situ Proton plume measurements are required to validate assumed emission indices and to assess the role of rocket emissions not considered in these calculations. Such future studies would help to establish a formalism to evaluate the relative ozone depletion caused by different rocket engines using different propellants.

  13. PHYSICAL AND NUMERICAL MODELING OF ASD EXHAUST DISPERSION AROUND HOUSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses the use of a wind tunnel to physically model the dispersion of exhaust plumes from active soil depressurization (ASD) radon mitigation systems in houses. he testing studied the effects of exhaust location (grade level vs. above the eave), as house height, roo...

  14. A detailed numerical simulation of a liquid-propellant rocket engine ground test experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lankford, D. W.; Simmons, M. A.; Heikkinen, B. D.

    1992-07-01

    A computational simulation of a Liquid Rocket Engine (LRE) ground test experiment was performed using two modeling approaches. The results of the models were compared with selected data to assess the validity of state-of-the-art computational tools for predicting the flowfield and radiative transfer in complex flow environments. The data used for comparison consisted of in-band station radiation measurements obtained in the near-field portion of the plume exhaust. The test article was a subscale LRE with an afterbody, resulting in a large base region. The flight conditions were such that afterburning regions were observed in the plume flowfield. A conventional standard modeling approach underpredicted the extent of afterburning and the associated radiation levels. These results were attributed to the absence of the base flow region which is not accounted for in this model. To assess the effects of the base region a Navier-Stokes model was applied. The results of this calculation indicate that the base recirculation effects are dominant features in the immediate expansion region and resulted in a much improved comparison. However, the downstream in-band station radiation data remained underpredicted by this model.

  15. The 1991 version of the plume impingement computer program. Volume 2: User's input guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bender, Robert L.; Somers, Richard E.; Prendergast, Maurice J.; Clayton, Joseph P.; Smith, Sheldon D.

    1991-01-01

    The Plume Impingement Program (PLIMP) is a computer code used to predict impact pressures, forces, moments, heating rates, and contamination on surfaces due to direct impingement flowfields. Typically, it has been used to analyze the effects of rocket exhaust plumes on nearby structures from ground level to the vacuum of space. The program normally uses flowfields generated by the MOC, RAMP2, SPF/2, or SFPGEN computer programs. It is capable of analyzing gaseous and gas/particle flows. A number of simple subshapes are available to model the surfaces of any structure. The original PLIMP program has been modified many times of the last 20 years. The theoretical bases for the referenced major changes, and additional undocumented changes and enhancements since 1988 are summarized in volume 1 of this report. This volume is the User's Input Guide and should be substituted for all previous guides when running the latest version of the program. This version can operate on VAX and UNIX machines with NCAR graphics ability.

  16. Potential Climate and Ozone Impacts From Hybrid Rocket Engine Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, M.

    2009-12-01

    Hybrid rocket engines that use N2O as an oxidizer and a solid hydrocarbon (such as rubber) as a fuel are relatively new. Little is known about the composition of such hybrid engine emissions. General principles and visual inspection of hybrid plumes suggest significant soot and possibly NO emissions. Understanding hybrid rocket emissions is important because of the possibility that a fleet of hybrid powered suborbital rockets will be flying on the order of 1000 flights per year by 2020. The annual stratospheric emission for these rockets would be about 10 kilotons, equal to present day solid rocket motor (SRM) emissions. We present a preliminary analysis of the magnitude of (1) the radiative forcing from soot emissions and (2) the ozone depletion from soot and NO emissions associated with such a fleet of suborbital hybrid rockets. Because the details of the composition of hybrid emissions are unknown, it is not clear if the ozone depletion caused by these hybrid rockets would be more or less than the ozone depletion from SRMs. We also consider the climate implications associated with the N2O production and use requirements for hybrid rockets. Finally, we identify the most important data collection and modeling needs that are required to reliably assess the complete range of environmental impacts of a fleet of hybrid rockets.

  17. Validation of scramjet exhaust simulation technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, H. B.; Konopka, W.; Leng, J.

    1976-01-01

    Scramjet/airframe integration design philosophy for hypersonic aircraft results in configurations having lower aft surfaces that serve as exhaust nozzles. There is a strong coupling between the exhaust plume and the aerodynamics of the vehicle, making accurate simulation of the engine exhaust mandatory. The experimental verification of the simulation procedure is described. The detonation tube simulator was used to produce an exact simulation of the scramjet exhaust for a Mach 8 flight condition. The pressure distributions produced by the exact exhaust flow were then duplicated by a cool mixture Argon and Freon 13B1. Such a substitute gas mixture validated by the detonation tube technique could be used in conventional wind tunnel tests. The results presented show the substitute gas simulation technique to be valid for shockless expansions.

  18. STS-98 Emits Plume of Smoke

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This awesome image depicts the full moon, sunset launch of the Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis STS-98 mission on February 7, 2001 at 6:13 p.m. eastern time. The large white plume is the pillar of smoke and stream left behind by the solid rocket boosters. The very bright dot that exists above the plume is the flame still visible at the base of the rocket boosters. The top of the plume is being directly illuminated by sunlight whereas the bottom portion lies within the Earth's shadow. The bright orb in the lower right-hand corner of the image is the full sunlit face of the moon which has already risen above the eastern horizon. The dark cone-shaped feature extending downward towards the moon is the smoke plume shadow, known as the Bugeron Effect (common during sunrise and sunset launches). The Earth, Moon, and Sun were naturally in alignment causing the shadow to appear to end at the moon. (Photo courtesy Patrick McCracken, NASA Headquarters)

  19. Contact diagnostics of combustion products of rocket engines, their units, and systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, N. N.; Ivanov, A. N.

    2013-12-01

    This article is devoted to a new block-module device used in the diagnostics of condensed combustion products of rocket engines during research and development with liquid-propellant rocket engines (Glushko NPO Energomash; engines RD-171, RD-180, and RD-191) and solid-propellant rocket motors. Soot samplings from the supersonic high-temperature jet of a high-power liquid-propellant rocket engine were taken by the given device for the first time in practice for closed-exhaust lines. A large quantity of significant results was also obtained during a combustion investigation of solid propellants within solid-propellant rocket motors.

  20. Modelling of thruster plume induced erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alred, John; Boeder, Paul; Mikatarian, Ron; Pankop, Courtney; Schmidl, William

    2003-09-01

    One source of external induced contamination on the International Space Station (ISS) is thruster plume exhausts. The contamination from these plumes onto ISS sensitive surfaces is due to liquid drops of unreacted or partially reacted propellants. However, the drag acceleration of these particles (drops) from the exhaust gases produces high velocity (~km/s) drops that will mechanically damage surfaces in the exhaust. Previous space flight experiments on the Space Shuttle Orbiter which studied thruster plume induced contamination also demonstrated the pitting nature of these particles. The External Contamination/Plasma Team of the Boeing ISS Program Office in Houston has developed an approach to modeling the mechanical erosion on surfaces due to the impact of particles in thruster plumes. This approach melds damage simulation data from a smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) code from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) into Boeing's own contamination computer tool (NASAN-II). The Boeing team has conducted several analyses simulating bipropellant thruster droplets impacting ISS sensitive surfaces. Computational results of various thrusters firing onto the ISS, at different build-stages, were completed and show a concern for particular solar array orientations during attitude control firings. Mitigation techniques for minimizing the erosion effects have also been determined and are presented.

  1. Effects of rocket engines on laser during lunar landing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Xiong; Shu, Rong; Huang, Genghua

    2013-11-01

    In the Chinese moon exploration project “ChangE-3”, the laser telemeter and lidar are important equipments on the lunar landing vehicle. A low-thrust vernier rocket engine works during the soft landing, whose plume may influence on the laser equipments. An experiment has first been accomplished to evaluate the influence of the plume on the propagation characteristics of infrared laser under the vacuum condition. Combination with our theoretical analysis has given an appropriate assessment of the plume's effects on the infrared laser hence providing a valuable basis for the design of lunar landing systems.

  2. Program Computes Sound Pressures at Rocket Launches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogg, Gary; Heyman, Roy; White, Michael; Edquist, Karl

    2005-01-01

    Launch Vehicle External Sound Pressure is a computer program that predicts the ignition overpressure and the acoustic pressure on the surfaces and in the vicinity of a rocket and launch pad during launch. The program generates a graphical user interface (GUI) that gathers input data from the user. These data include the critical dimensions of the rocket and of any launch-pad structures that may act as acoustic reflectors, the size and shape of the exhaust duct or flame deflector, and geometrical and operational parameters of the rocket engine. For the ignition-overpressure calculations, histories of the chamber pressure and mass flow rate also are required. Once the GUI has gathered the input data, it feeds them to ignition-overpressure and launch-acoustics routines, which are based on several approximate mathematical models of distributed sources, transmission, and reflection of acoustic waves. The output of the program includes ignition overpressures and acoustic pressures at specified locations.

  3. Liquid rocket engine nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The nozzle is a major component of a rocket engine, having a significant influence on the overall engine performance and representing a large fraction of the engine structure. The design of the nozzle consists of solving simultaneously two different problems: the definition of the shape of the wall that forms the expansion surface, and the delineation of the nozzle structure and hydraulic system. This monography addresses both of these problems. The shape of the wall is considered from immediately upstream of the throat to the nozzle exit for both bell and annular (or plug) nozzles. Important aspects of the methods used to generate nozzle wall shapes are covered for maximum-performance shapes and for nozzle contours based on criteria other than performance. The discussion of structure and hydraulics covers problem areas of regeneratively cooled tube-wall nozzles and extensions; it treats also nozzle extensions cooled by turbine exhaust gas, ablation-cooled extensions, and radiation-cooled extensions. The techniques that best enable the designer to develop the nozzle structure with as little difficulty as possible and at the lowest cost consistent with minimum weight and specified performance are described.

  4. ASSESSMENT OF PLUME DIVING

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation presents an assessment of plume diving. Observations included: vertical plume delineation at East Patchogue, NY showed BTEX and MTBE plumes sinking on either side of a gravel pit; Lake Druid TCE plume sank beneath unlined drainage ditch; and aquifer recharge/dis...

  5. Dragonfly directional sensor versus rocket-propelled grenades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geary, Joseph; Blackwell, Lisa

    2015-02-01

    The Dragonfly directional sensor was deployed at the Army's Yuma Proving Grounds for preliminary field tests against rocket-propelled grenades. This wide-field (nonimaging) sensor's purpose was to angularly locate the latter's launch plume. These tests successfully demonstrated proof-of-concept.

  6. American Rocket Society

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    In addition to Dr. Robert Goddard's pioneering work, American experimentation in rocketry prior to World War II grew, primarily in technical societies. This is an early rocket motor designed and developed by the American Rocket Society in 1932.

  7. Solid propellant exhausted aluminum oxide and hydrogen chloride - Environmental considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cofer, W. R., III; Winstead, E. L.; Purgold, G. C.; Edahl, R. A.

    1993-01-01

    Measurements of gaseous hydrogen chloride (HCl) and particulate aluminum oxide (Al2O3) were made during penetrations of five Space Shuttle exhaust clouds and one static ground test firing of a shuttle booster. Instrumented aircraft were used to penetrate exhaust clouds and to measure and/or collect samples of exhaust for subsequent analyses. The focus was on the primary solid rocket motor exhaust products, HCl and Al2O3, from the Space Shuttle's solid boosters. Time-dependent behavior of HCl was determined for the exhaust clouds. Composition, morphology, surface chemistry, and particle size distributions were determined for the exhausted Al2O3. Results determined for the exhaust cloud from the static test firing were complicated by having large amounts of entrained alkaline ground debris (soil) in the lofted cloud. The entrained debris may have contributed to neutralization of in-cloud HCl.

  8. Hybrid Rocket Motor Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    A 10,000-pound thrust hybrid rocket motor is tested at Stennis Space Center's E-1 test facility. A hybrid rocket motor is a cross between a solid rocket and a liquid-fueled engine. It uses environmentally safe solid fuel and liquid oxygen.

  9. Pulse Detonation Rocket MHD Power Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, Ron J.; Cook, Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A pulse detonation research engine (MSFC (Marshall Space Flight Center) Model PDRE (Pulse Detonation Rocket Engine) G-2) has been developed for the purpose of examining integrated propulsion and magnetohydrodynamic power generation applications. The engine is based on a rectangular cross-section tube coupled to a converging-diverging nozzle, which is in turn attached to a segmented Faraday channel. As part of the shakedown testing activity, the pressure wave was interrogated along the length of the engine while running on hydrogen/oxygen propellants. Rapid transition to detonation wave propagation was insured through the use of a short Schelkin spiral near the head of the engine. The measured detonation wave velocities were in excess of 2500 m/s in agreement with the theoretical C-J velocity. The engine was first tested in a straight tube configuration without a nozzle, and the time resolved thrust was measured simultaneously with the head-end pressure. Similar measurements were made with the converging-diverging nozzle attached. The time correlation of the thrust and head-end pressure data was found to be excellent. The major purpose of the converging-diverging nozzle was to configure the engine for driving an MHD generator for the direct production of electrical power. Additional tests were therefore necessary in which seed (cesium-hydroxide dissolved in methanol) was directly injected into the engine as a spray. The exhaust plume was then interrogated with a microwave interferometer in an attempt to characterize the plasma conditions, and emission spectroscopy measurements were also acquired. Data reduction efforts indicate that the plasma exhaust is very highly ionized, although there is some uncertainty at this time as to the relative abundance of negative OH ions. The emission spectroscopy data provided some indication of the species in the exhaust as well as a measurement of temperature. A 24-electrode-pair segmented Faraday channel and 0.6 Tesla permanent magnet assembly were then installed on Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC's) rectangular channel pulse detonation research engine. Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) electrical power extraction experiments were carried out for a range of load impedances in which cesium hydroxide seed (dissolved in methanol) was sprayed into the gaseous oxygen/hydrogen propellants. Positive power extraction was obtained, but preliminary analysis of the data indicated that the plasma electrical conductivity is lower than anticipated and the near-electrode voltage drop is not negligible. It is believed that the electrical conductivity is reduced due to a large population of negative OH ions. This occurs because OH has a strong affinity for capturing free electrons. The effect of near-electrode voltage drop is associated with the high surface-to-volume ratio of the channel (1-inch by 1-inch cross-section) where surface effects play a dominant role. As usual for MHD devices, higher performance will require larger scale devices. Overall, the gathered data is extremely valuable from the standpoint of understanding plasma behavior and for developing empirical scaling laws.

  10. Environmentally compatible solid rocket propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacox, James L.; Bradford, Daniel J.

    1995-01-01

    Hercules' clean propellant development research is exploring three major types of clean propellant: (1) chloride-free formulations (no chlorine containing ingredients), being developed on the Clean Propellant Development and Demonstration (CPDD) contract sponsored by Phillips Laboratory, Edwards Air Force Base, CA; (2) low HCl scavenged formulations (HCl-scavenger added to propellant oxidized with ammonium perchlorate (AP)); and (3) low HCl formulations oxidized with a combination of AN and AP (with or without an HCl scavenger) to provide a significant reduction (relative to current solid rocket boosters) in exhaust HCl. These propellants provide performance approaching that of current systems, with less than 2 percent HCl in the exhaust, a significant reduction (greater than or equal to 70 percent) in exhaust HCl levels. Excellent processing, safety, and mechanical properties were achieved using only readily available, low cost ingredients. Two formulations, a sodium nitrate (NaNO3) scavenged HTPB and a chloride-free hydroxy terminated polyether (HTPE) propellant, were characterized for ballistic, mechanical, and rheological properties. In addition, the hazards properties were demonstrated to provide two families of class 1.3, 'zero-card' propellants. Further characterization is planned which includes demonstration of ballistic tailorability in subscale (one to 70 pound) motors over the range of burn rates required for retrofit into current Hercules space booster designs (Titan 4 SRMU and Delta 2 GEM).

  11. Sounding rockets in Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alford, G. C.; Cooper, G. W.; Peterson, N. E.

    1982-01-01

    Sounding rockets are versatile tools for scientists studying the atmospheric region which is located above balloon altitudes but below orbital satellite altitudes. Three NASA Nike-Tomahawk sounding rockets were launched from Siple Station in Antarctica in an upper atmosphere physics experiment in the austral summer of 1980-81. The 110 kg payloads were carried to 200 km apogee altitudes in a coordinated project with Arcas rocket payloads and instrumented balloons. This Siple Station Expedition demonstrated the feasibility of launching large, near 1,000 kg, rocket systems from research stations in Antarctica. The remoteness of research stations in Antarctica and the severe environment are major considerations in planning rocket launching expeditions.

  12. Rockets for spin recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whipple, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    The potential effectiveness of rockets as an auxiliary means for an aircraft to effect recovery from spins was investigated. The advances in rocket technology produced by the space effort suggested that currently available systems might obviate many of the problems encountered in earlier rocket systems. A modern fighter configuration known to exhibit a flat spin mode was selected. An analytical study was made of the thrust requirements for a rocket spin recovery system for the subject configuration. These results were then applied to a preliminary systems study of rocket components appropriate to the problem. Subsequent spin tunnel tests were run to evaluate the analytical results.

  13. Sounding rockets in Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alford, G. C.; Cooper, G. W.; Peterson, N. E.

    Sounding rockets are versatile tools for scientists studying the atmospheric region which is located above balloon altitudes but below orbital satellite altitudes. Three NASA Nike-Tomahawk sounding rockets were launched from Siple Station in Antarctica in an upper atmosphere physics experiment in the austral summer of 1980-81. The 110 kg payloads were carried to 200 km apogee altitudes in a coordinated project with Arcas rocket payloads and instrumented balloons. This Siple Station Expedition demonstrated the feasibility of launching large, near 1,000 kg, rocket systems from research stations in Antarctica. The remoteness of research stations in Antarctica and the severe environment are major considerations in planning rocket launching expeditions.

  14. Monitoring thermal impact resulting from solid rocket motor test operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Bruce A.; Thurman, Charles; Carr, Hugh V.

    1990-01-01

    The use of remote sensing is discussed with respect to determining the thermal conditions and the immediate environmental effects of large-scale rocket propulsion tests. Data acquired during a test firing of a solid rocket motor are presented including thermal data and surface temperatures from before, during, and after the firing. Thermal impact directly behind the nozzle is assessed, temperature values within the plume are determined, and data are generated for use in an environmental monitoring system which can analyze and forecast impact. The airborne multispectral scanner and thermocouples behind the solid rocket motor discerned that radiant temperatures are higher than predictions indicate and that the testing affects 34 acres of ground. The results are of use in determining the design and area required for developing testing facilities for rocket motors.

  15. Plume detachment from a magnetized plasma thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bengtson, Roger

    2012-10-01

    High-powered electric propulsion thrusters utilizing a magnetized plasma require that plasma exhaust detach from the onboard magnetic coils in order to produce thrust. We present experimental and theoretical results demonstrating that a sufficiently powerful plasma flow does indeed detach from a magnetic nozzle. Measurements of ion flux show a low-beta plasma plume which follows applied magnetic field until the magnetic pressure falls below the plasma energy density. The plasma flow becomes super-Alfvenic at that point and it continues ballistically downstream. Several magnetic configurations were tested including a reversed field nozzle configuration. Despite the dramatic change in magnetic field profile, the reversed field configuration yielded little measurable change in plume trajectory, demonstrating the plume is detached. Numerical simulations yield density profiles in agreement with the experimental results.

  16. Fossil plume head beneath the Arabian lithosphere?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Mordechai; Hofmann, Albrecht W.

    1992-12-01

    Phanerozoic alkali basalts from Israel, which have erupted over the past 200 Ma, have isotopic compositions similar to PREMA ("prevalent mantle") with narrow ranges of initial ? Nd(T) = +3.9-+5.9; 87Sr/ 86Sr(T)= 0.70292-0.70334; 206Pb/ 204Pb(T)= 18.88-19.99; 207Pb/ 204Pb(T)= 15.58-15.70; and 208Pb/ 204Pb(T)= 38.42-39.57. Their Nb/U(43 ± 9) and Ce/Pb(26 ± 6) ratios are identical to those of normal oceanic basalts, demonstrating that the basalts are essentially free of crustal contamination. Overall, the basalts are chemically and isotopically indistinguishable from many ordinary plume basalts, but no plume track can be identified. We propose that these and other, similar, magmas from the Arabian plate originated from a "fossilized" head of a mantle plume, which was unable to penetrate the continental lithosphere and was therefore trapped and stored beneath it. The plume head was emplaced some time between the late Proterozoic crust formation and the initiation of the Phanerozoic magmatic cycles. Basalts from rift environments in other continental localities show similar geochemistry to that of the Arabian basalts and their sources may also represent fossil plume heads trapped below the continents. We suggest that plume heads are, in general, characterized by the PREMA isotopic mantle signature, because the original plume sources (which may have HIMU or EM-type composition) have been diluted by overlying mantle material, which has been entrained by the plume heads during ascent. On the Arabian plate, rifting and thinning of the lithosphere caused partial melting of the stored plume, which led to periodic volcanism. In the late Cenozoic, the lithosphere broke up and the Red Sea opened. N-MORB tholeiites are now erupting in the central trough of the Red Sea, where the lithosphere has moved apart and the fossil plume has been exhausted, whereas E-MORBs are erupting in the northern and southern troughs, still tapping the plume reservoir. Fossil plumes, which are temporarily trapped at the base of the lithosphere, may explain why the uppermost mantle normally appears enriched when it is sampled by continental rift zones but depleted when it is sampled by MORB.

  17. Engineers demonstrate the pocket rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Part of Stennis Space Center's mission with its traveling exhibits is to educate the younger generation on how propulsion systems work. A popular tool is the 'pocket rocket,' which demonstrates how a hybrid rocket works. A hybrid rocket is a cross breed between a solid fuel rocket and a liquid fuel rocket.

  18. Engineers demonstrate the pocket rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Part of Stennis Space Center's mission with its traveling exhibits is to educate the younger generation on how propulsion systems work. A popular tool is the 'pocket rocket,' which demonstrates how a hybrid rocket works. A hybrid rocket is a cross breed between a solid fuel rocket and a liquid fuel rocket.

  19. Imaging Fourier transform spectrometry of chemical plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, Kenneth C.; Gross, Kevin C.; Perram, Glen P.

    2009-05-01

    A midwave infrared (MWIR) imaging Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS), the Telops FIRST-MWE (Field-portable Imaging Radiometric Spectrometer Technology - Midwave Extended) has been utilized for the standoff detection and characterization of chemical plumes. Successful collection and analysis of MWIR hyperspectral imagery of jet engine exhaust has allowed us to produce spatial profiles of both temperature and chemical constituent concentrations of exhaust plumes. Successful characterization of this high temperature combustion event has led to the collection and analysis of hyperspectral imagery of lower temperature emissions from industrial smokestacks. This paper presents MWIR data from remote collection of hyperspectral imagery of methyl salicilate (MeS), a chemical warfare agent simulant, during the Chemical Biological Distributed Early Warning System (CBDEWS) test at Dugway Proving Grounds, UT in 2008. The data did not contain spectral lines associated with emission of MeS. However, a few broad spectral features were present in the background-subtracted plume spectra. Further analysis will be required to assign these features, and determine the utility of MWIR hyperspectral imagery for analysis of chemical warfare agent plumes.

  20. Rocket effluent: Its ice nucleation activity and related properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parungo, F. P.; Allee, P. A.

    1978-01-01

    To investigate the possibility of inadvertent weather modification from rocket effluent, aerosol samples were collected from an instrumented aircraft subsequent to the Voyager 1 and 2 launches. The aerosol's morphology, concentration, and size distribution were examined with an electron microscope. The elemental compositions of individual particles were analyzed with an X-ray energy spectrometer. Ice nucleus concentration was measured with a thermal diffusion chamber. The particles' physical and chemical properties were related to their ice nucleation activity. A laboratory experiment on rocket propellant exhaust was conducted under controlled conditions. Both laboratory and field experimental results indicated that rocket propellant exhaust can produce active ice nuclei and modify local weather in suitable meteorological conditions.

  1. The effects of solid rocket motor effluents on selected surfaces and solid particle size, distribution, and composition for simulated shuttle booster separation motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jex, D. W.; Linton, R. C.; Russell, W. M.; Trenkle, J. J.; Wilkes, D. R.

    1976-01-01

    A series of three tests was conducted using solid rocket propellants to determine the effects a solid rocket plume would have on thermal protective surfaces (TPS). The surfaces tested were those which are baselined for the shuttle vehicle. The propellants used were to simulate the separation solid rocket motors (SSRM) that separate the solid rocket boosters (SRB) from the shuttle launch vehicle. Data cover: (1) the optical effects of the plume environment on spacecraft related surfaces, and (2) the solid particle size, distribution, and composition at TPS sample locations.

  2. A plume spectroscopy system for flight applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Makel, D. B.; Petersen, T. V.; Duncan, D. B.; Madzsar, G. C.

    1993-01-01

    An operational plume spectroscopy system will be an important element of any rocket engine health management system (HMS). The flight capable FPI spectrometer will enable prognosis and response to incipient rocket engine failures as well as diagnosis of wear and degradation for on-condition maintenance. Spectrometer application to development programs, such as the Space Lifter, NASP, and SSTO, will reduce program risks, allow better adherence to schedules and save money by reducing or eliminating redesign and test costs. The diagnostic capability of a proven, calibrated spectrometer will enhance post-burn certification of high value, reusable engines, such as the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME), where life and reliability are key cost drivers. This paper describes a prototype FPI spectrometer for demonstration and validation testing on NASA's Technology Test Bed Engine (TTBE) at Marshall Space Flight Center. The TTBE test unit is designed with flight prototype optics and a commercial off-the-shelf data processing system.

  3. Rocket astronomy - an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, H.

    The history of rocket astronomy is retold, with emphasis on solar investigations. The use of captured V-2 rockets after World War II was followed by the Aerobee, which exceeded the V-2's altitude and was more reliable. The V-2 has made first-generation investigations in X-ray and UV photometry, which was followed by studies of the solar cycle X-ray variablity, the X-ray corona, and solar flares. Nike rockets played an important role in these investigations. The role of rockets in galactic X-ray astronomy is briefly described.

  4. Acid droplet generation in SRM exhaust clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dingle, A. N.

    1983-01-01

    A free energy analysis is applied to the co-condensation/evaporation of H2O and HCl vapors on wettable particles in open air in order to model droplet nucleation in solid rocket motor (SRM) exhaust clouds. Formulations are defined for the free energy change, the drop radius, the saturation ratio, the total number of molecules, and the mean molecular radius in solution, as well as the molecular volume and the concentration range. The free energy release in the phase transition for the AL2O3 nuclei in the SRM exhaust is examined as a function of the HCl molefraction and nucleating particle radius, based on Titan III launch exhaust cloud conditions 90 sec after ignition. The most efficient droplet growth is determined to occur at an HCl molefraction of 0.082 and a particle radius of 0.0000013 cm, i.e. a molality of 5.355.

  5. Dust Plume off Mauritania

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    A thick plume of dust blew off the coast of Mauritania in western Africa on October 2, 2007. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Aqua satellite observed the dust plume as it headed toward the southwest over the Atlantic Ocean. In this image, the dust varies in color from nearly white to medium tan. The dust plume is easier to see over the dark background of the ocean, but the plume stretches across the land surface to the east, as well. The dust plume's structure is clearest along the coastline, where relatively clear air pockets separate distinct puffs of dust. West of that, individual pillows of dust push together to form a more homogeneous plume. Near its southwest tip, the plume takes on yet another shape, with stripes of pale dust fanning out toward the northwest. Occasional tiny white clouds dot the sky overhead, but skies are otherwise clear.

  6. Modeling Europa's dust plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Southworth, B. S.; Kempf, S.; Schmidt, J.

    2015-12-01

    The discovery of Jupiter's moon Europa maintaining a probably sporadic water vapor plume constitutes a huge scientific opportunity for NASA's upcoming mission to this Galilean moon. Measuring properties of material emerging from interior sources offers a unique chance to understand conditions at Europa's subsurface ocean. Exploiting results obtained for the Enceladus plume, we simulate possible Europa plume configurations, analyze particle number density and surface deposition results, and estimate the expected flux of ice grains on a spacecraft. Due to Europa's high escape speed, observing an active plume will require low-altitude flybys, preferably at altitudes of 5-100 km. At higher altitudes a plume may escape detection. Our simulations provide an extensive library documenting the possible structure of Europa dust plumes, which can be quickly refined as more data on Europa dust plumes are collected.

  7. The large motor plume/material impingement test program at AEDC utilizing the four selected propellants from the small motor tests at MSFC (July, August, and September 1974), section 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Efforts made to determine the vulnerability of Orbiter and ET materials located at various positions within exhaust plumes from test SSRM's using four different propellant formulations are discussed. Data also cover the effect on TPS materials from a single SSRM plume and dual SSRM plumes, and definitions of test SSRM plume environment at material specimen locations.

  8. 28. Historic view of Building 202 exhaust scrubber stack, detail, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. Historic view of Building 202 exhaust scrubber stack, detail, July 31, 1957. On file at NASA Plumbrook Research Center, Sandusky, Ohio. NASA GRC photo number C-45648. - Rocket Engine Testing Facility, GRC Building No. 202, NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  9. 61. Historic elevation and section drawing of Building 202 exhaust ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    61. Historic elevation and section drawing of Building 202 exhaust scrubber, July 18, 1955. NASA GRC drawing no. CD-101263. (On file at NASA Glenn Research Center). - Rocket Engine Testing Facility, GRC Building No. 202, NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  10. 27. Historic view of Building 202 exhaust scrubber stack, July ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. Historic view of Building 202 exhaust scrubber stack, July 31, 1957. On file at NASA Plumbrook Research Center, Sandusky, Ohio. NASA GRC photo number C-45650. - Rocket Engine Testing Facility, GRC Building No. 202, NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  11. 63. Historic detail drawing of inlet duct cone on exhaust ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    63. Historic detail drawing of inlet duct cone on exhaust scrubber at building 202, June 18, 1955. NASA GRC drawing no. CD-101266. (On file at NASA Glenn Research Center). - Rocket Engine Testing Facility, GRC Building No. 202, NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  12. Investigation of solid plume simulation criteria to produce flight plume effects on multibody configuration in wind tunnel tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, A. L.; Dill, C. C.

    1986-01-01

    An investigation to determine the sensitivity of the space shuttle base and forebody aerodynamics to the size and shape of various solid plume simulators was conducted. Families of cones of varying angle and base diameter, at various axial positions behind a Space Shuttle launch vehicle model, were wind tunnel tested. This parametric evaluation yielded base pressure and force coefficient data which indicated that solid plume simulators are an inexpensive, quick method of approximating the effect of engine exhaust plumes on the base and forebody aerodynamics of future, complex multibody launch vehicles.

  13. Simulation of wake vortex radiometric detection via jet exhaust proxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, Taumi S.

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes an analysis of the potential of an airborne hyperspectral imaging IR instrument to infer wake vortices via turbine jet exhaust as a proxy. The goal was to determine the requirements for an imaging spectrometer or radiometer to effectively detect the exhaust plume, and by inference, the location of the wake vortices. The effort examines the gas spectroscopy of the various major constituents of turbine jet exhaust and their contributions to the modeled detectable radiance. Initially, a theoretical analysis of wake vortex proxy detection by thermal radiation was realized in a series of simulations. The first stage used the SLAB plume model to simulate turbine jet exhaust plume characteristics, including exhaust gas transport dynamics and concentrations. The second stage used these plume characteristics as input to the Line By Line Radiative Transfer Model (LBLRTM) to simulate responses from both an imaging IR hyperspectral spectrometer or radiometer. These numerical simulations generated thermal imagery that was compared with previously reported wake vortex temperature data. This research is a continuation of an effort to specify the requirements for an imaging IR spectrometer or radiometer to make wake vortex measurements. Results of the two-stage simulation will be reported, including instrument specifications for wake vortex thermal detection. These results will be compared with previously reported results for IR imaging spectrometer performance.

  14. Simulation of Wake Vortex Radiometric Detection via Jet Exhaust Proxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, Taumi S.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes an analysis of the potential of an airborne hyperspectral imaging IR instrument to infer wake vortices via turbine jet exhaust as a proxy. The goal was to determine the requirements for an imaging spectrometer or radiometer to effectively detect the exhaust plume, and by inference, the location of the wake vortices. The effort examines the gas spectroscopy of the various major constituents of turbine jet exhaust and their contributions to the modeled detectable radiance. Initially, a theoretical analysis of wake vortex proxy detection by thermal radiation was realized in a series of simulations. The first stage used the SLAB plume model to simulate turbine jet exhaust plume characteristics, including exhaust gas transport dynamics and concentrations. The second stage used these plume characteristics as input to the Line By Line Radiative Transfer Model (LBLRTM) to simulate responses from both an imaging IR hyperspectral spectrometer or radiometer. These numerical simulations generated thermal imagery that was compared with previously reported wake vortex temperature data. This research is a continuation of an effort to specify the requirements for an imaging IR spectrometer or radiometer to make wake vortex measurements. Results of the two-stage simulation will be reported, including instrument specifications for wake vortex thermal detection. These results will be compared with previously reported results for IR imaging spectrometer performance.

  15. Development of a 12-Thrust Chamber Kerosene /Oxygen Primary Rocket Sub-System for an Early (1964) Air-Augmented Rocket Ground-Test System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pryor, D.; Hyde, E. H.; Escher, W. J. D.

    1999-01-01

    Airbreathing/Rocket combined-cycle, and specifically rocket-based combined- cycle (RBCC), propulsion systems, typically employ an internal engine flow-path installed primary rocket subsystem. To achieve acceptably short mixing lengths in effecting the "air augmentation" process, a large rocket-exhaust/air interfacial mixing surface is needed. This leads, in some engine design concepts, to a "cluster" of small rocket units, suitably arrayed in the flowpath. To support an early (1964) subscale ground-test of a specific RBCC concept, such a 12-rocket cluster was developed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The small primary rockets used in the cluster assembly were modified versions of an existing small kerosene/oxygen water-cooled rocket engine unit routinely tested at MSFC. Following individual thrust-chamber tests and overall subsystem qualification testing, the cluster assembly was installed at the U. S. Air Force's Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC) for RBCC systems testing. (The results of the special air-augmented rocket testing are not covered here.) While this project was eventually successfully completed, a number of hardware integration problems were met, leading to catastrophic thrust chamber failures. The principal "lessons learned" in conducting this early primary rocket subsystem experimental effort are documented here as a basic knowledge-base contribution for the benefit of today's RBCC research and development community.

  16. The Rocket Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winemiller, Jake; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Describes an extra credit science project in which students compete to see who can build the most efficient water rocket out of a two-liter pop bottle. Provides instructions on how to build a demonstration rocket and launching pad. (MDH)

  17. Life Saving Rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    By 1870, American and British inventors had found other ways to use rockets. For example, the Congreve rocket was capable of carrying a line over 1,000 feet to a stranded ship. In 1914, an estimated 1,000 lives were saved by this technique.

  18. Model Rockets and Microchips.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzsimmons, Charles P.

    1986-01-01

    Points out the instructional applications and program possibilities of a unit on model rocketry. Describes the ways that microcomputers can assist in model rocket design and in problem calculations. Provides a descriptive listing of model rocket software for the Apple II microcomputer. (ML)

  19. Nuclear thermal rockets using indigenous Martian propellants

    SciTech Connect

    Zubrin, R.M.

    1989-01-01

    This paper considers a novel concept for a Martian descent and ascent vehicle, called NIMF (for nuclear rocket using indigenous Martian fuel), the propulsion for which will be provided by a nuclear thermal reactor which will heat an indigenous Martian propellant gas to form a high-thrust rocket exhaust. The performance of each of the candidate Martian propellants, which include CO2, H2O, CH4, N2, CO, and Ar, is assessed, and the methods of propellant acquisition are examined. Attention is also given to the issues of chemical compatibility between candidate propellants and reactor fuel and cladding materials, and the potential of winged Mars supersonic aircraft driven by this type of engine. It is shown that, by utilizing the nuclear landing craft in combination with a hydrogen-fueled nuclear thermal interplanetary vehicle and a heavy lift booster, it is possible to achieve a manned Mars mission in one launch. 6 refs.

  20. Automated and Manual Rocket Crater Measurement Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metzger, Philip; Immer, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    An update has been performed to software designed to do very rapid automated measurements of craters created in sandy substrates by rocket exhaust on liftoff. The previous software was optimized for pristine lab geometry and lighting conditions. This software has been enhanced to include a section for manual measurements of crater parameters; namely, crater depth, crater full width at half max, and estimated crater volume. The tools provide a very rapid method to measure these manual parameters to ease the burden of analyzing large data sets. This software allows for rapid quantization of the rocket crater parameters where automated methods may not work. The progress of spreadsheet data is continuously saved so that data is never lost, and data can be copied to clipboards and pasted to other software for analysis. The volume estimation of a crater is based on the central max depth axis line, and the polygonal shape of the crater is integrated around that axis.

  1. Environment effects from SRB exhaust effluents: Technique development and preliminary assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldford, A. I.; Adelfang, S. I.; Hickey, J. S.; Smith, S. R.; Welty, R. P.; White, G. L.

    1977-01-01

    Techniques to determine the environmental effects from the space shuttle SRB (Solid Rocket Booster) exhaust effluents are used to perform a preliminary climatological assessment. The exhaust effluent chemistry study was performed and the exhaust effluent species were determined. A reasonable exhaust particle size distribution is constructed for use in nozzle analyses and for the deposition model. The preliminary assessment is used to identify problems that are associated with the full-scale assessment; therefore, these preliminary air quality results are used with caution in drawing conclusion regarding the environmental effects of the space shuttle exhaust effluents.

  2. Solid Rocket Motor Backflow Analysis For CONTOUR Mishap Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woronowicz, Michael

    2005-05-01

    A procedure developed for free molecule modeling of plume backflow from a STAR™ 30BP solid rocket motor is presented for work performed in support of the Comet Nucleus Tour spacecraft mishap investigation. Good general agreement is established with DSMC flowfield results, with interesting deviations developing as the plume backflow approaches the spacecraft surfaces closely, providing insights regarding characteristics of the surface Knudsen layer. Also, investigation of related free expansion results indicate significant discrepancies exist between the rarefied techniques and the continuum results from which their starting surfaces were created. The nature of these differences suggests that convective fluxes to CONTOUR may have been much higher than the rarefied analyses indicated.

  3. An Ejector Air Intake Design Method for a Novel Rocket-Based Combined-Cycle Rocket Nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waung, Timothy S.

    Rocket-based combined-cycle (RBCC) vehicles have the potential to reduce launch costs through the use of several different air breathing engine cycles, which reduce fuel consumption. The rocket-ejector cycle, in which air is entrained into an ejector section by the rocket exhaust, is used at flight speeds below Mach 2. This thesis develops a design method for an air intake geometry around a novel RBCC rocket nozzle design for the rocket-ejector engine cycle. This design method consists of a geometry creation step in which a three-dimensional intake geometry is generated, and a simple flow analysis step which predicts the air intake mass flow rate. The air intake geometry is created using the rocket nozzle geometry and eight primary input parameters. The input parameters are selected to give the user significant control over the air intake shape. The flow analysis step uses an inviscid panel method and an integral boundary layer method to estimate the air mass flow rate through the intake geometry. Intake mass flow rate is used as a performance metric since it directly affects the amount of thrust a rocket-ejector can produce. The design method results for the air intake operating at several different points along the subsonic portion of the Ariane 4 flight profile are found to under predict mass flow rate by up to 8.6% when compared to three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics simulations for the same air intake.

  4. Monitoring Engine Vibrations And Spectrum Of Exhaust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Carol L.; Randall, Michael R.; Reinert, John W.

    1991-01-01

    Real-time computation of intensities of peaks in visible-light emission spectrum of exhaust combined with real-time spectrum analysis of vibrations into developmental monitoring technique providing up-to-the-second information on conditions of critical bearings in engine. Conceived to monitor conditions of bearings in turbopump suppling oxygen to Space Shuttle main engine, based on observations that both vibrations in bearings and intensities of visible light emitted at specific wavelengths by exhaust plume of engine indicate wear and incipient failure of bearings. Applicable to monitoring "health" of other machinery via spectra of vibrations and electromagnetic emissions from exhausts. Concept related to one described in "Monitoring Bearing Vibrations For Signs Of Damage", (MFS-29734).

  5. Quantification of Plume-Soil Interaction and Excavation Due to the Sky Crane Descent Stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vizcaino, Jeffrey; Mehta, Manish

    2015-01-01

    The quantification of the particulate erosion that occurs as a result of a rocket exhaust plume impinging on soil during extraterrestrial landings is critical for future robotic and human lander mission design. The aerodynamic environment that results from the reflected plumes results in dust lifting, site alteration and saltation, all of which create a potentially erosive and contaminant heavy environment for the lander vehicle and any surrounding structures. The Mars Science Lab (MSL), weighing nearly one metric ton, required higher levels of thrust from its retro propulsive systems and an entirely new descent system to minimize these effects. In this work we seek to quantify plume soil interaction and its resultant soil erosion caused by the MSL's Sky Crane descent stage engines by performing three dimensional digital terrain and elevation mapping of the Curiosity rover's landing site. Analysis of plume soil interaction altitude and time was performed by detailed examination of the Mars Descent Imager (MARDI) still frames and reconstructed inertial measurement unit (IMU) sensor data. Results show initial plume soil interaction from the Sky Crane's eight engines began at ground elevations greater than 60 meters and more than 25 seconds before the rovers' touchdown event. During this time, viscous shear erosion (VSE) was dominant typically resulting in dusting of the surface with flow propagating nearly parallel to the surface. As the vehicle descended and decreased to four powered engines plume-plume and plume soil interaction increased the overall erosion rate at the surface. Visibility was greatly reduced at a height of roughly 20 meters above the surface and fell to zero ground visibility shortly after. The deployment phase of the Sky Crane descent stage hovering at nearly six meters above the surface showed the greatest amount of erosion with several large particles of soil being kicked up, recirculated, and impacting the bottom of the rover chassis. Image data obtained from MSL's navigation camera (NAVCAM) pairs on Sols 002, 003, and 016 were used to virtually recreate local surface topography and features around the rover by means of stereoscopic depth mapping. Images taken simultaneously by the left and right navigation cameras located on the rover's mast assembly spaced 42 centimeters were used to generate a three dimensional depth map from flat, two dimensional images of the same feature at slightly different angles. Image calibration with physical hardware on the rover and known terrain features were used to provide scaling information that accurately sizes features and regions of interest within the images. Digital terrain mapping analysis performed in this work describe the crater geometry (shape, radius, and depth), eroded volume, volumetric erosion rate, and estimated mass erosion rate of the Hepburn, Sleepy Dragon, Burnside, and Goulburn craters. Crater depths ranged from five to ten centimeters deep influencing an area as wide as two meters in some cases. The craters formed were highly asymmetrical and generally oblong primarily due to the underlying bedrock formations underneath the surface. Comparison with ground tests performed at the NASA AMES Planetary Aeolian Laboratory (PAL) by Mehta showed good agreement with volumetric erosion rates and crater sizes of large particle soil simulants, providing validation to Earth based ground tests of Martian regolith.

  6. Ablative Material Testing at Lewis Rocket Lab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The increasing demand for a low-cost, reliable way to launch commercial payloads to low- Earth orbit has led to the need for inexpensive, expendable propulsion systems for new launch vehicles. This, in turn, has renewed interest in less complex, uncooled rocket engines that have combustion chambers and exhaust nozzles fabricated from ablative materials. A number of aerospace propulsion system manufacturers have utilized NASA Lewis Research Center's test facilities with a high degree of success to evaluate candidate materials for application to new propulsion devices.

  7. Oxidation Behavior of Copper Alloy Candidates for Rocket Engine Applications (Technical Poster)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogbuji, Linus U. J.; Humphrey, Donald H.; Barrett, Charles A.; Greenbauer-Seng, Leslie (Technical Monitor); Gray, Hugh R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A rocket engine's combustion chamber is lined with material that is highly conductive to heat in order to dissipate the huge thermal load (evident in a white-hot exhaust plume). Because of its thermal conductivity copper is the best choice of liner material. However, the mechanical properties of pure copper are inadequate to withstand the high stresses, hence, copper alloys are needed in this application. But copper and its alloys are prone to oxidation and related damage, especially "blanching" (an oxidation-reduction mode of degradation). The space shuttle main engine combustion chamber is lined with a Cu-Ag-Zr alloy, "NARloy-Z", which exhibits blanching. A superior liner is being sought for the next generation of RLVs (Reusable Launch Vehicles) It should have improved mechanical properties and higher resistance to oxidation and blanching, but without substantial penalty in thermal conductivity. GRCop84, a Cu-8Cr-4Nb alloy (Cr2Nb in Cu matrix), developed by NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) and Case Western Reserve University, is a prime contender for RLV liner material. In this study, the oxidation resistance of GRCop-84 and other related/candidate copper alloys are investigated and compared

  8. Indians Repulse British With Rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    During the early introduction of rockets to Europe, they were used only as weapons. Enemy troops in India repulsed the British with rockets. Later, in Britain, Sir William Congreve developed a rocket that could fire to about 9,000 feet. The British fired Congreve rockets against the United States in the War of 1812.

  9. Baking Soda and Vinegar Rockets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claycomb, James R.; Zachary, Christopher; Tran, Quoc

    2009-02-01

    Rocket experiments demonstrating conservation of momentum will never fail to generate enthusiasm in undergraduate physics laboratories. In this paper, we describe tests on rockets from two vendors1,2 that combine baking soda and vinegar for propulsion. The experiment compared two analytical approximations for the maximum rocket height to the experimentally measured rocket height. Baking soda and vinegar rockets present fewer safety concerns and require a smaller launch area than rapid combustion chemical rockets. Both kits were of nearly identical design, costing ˜20. The rockets required roughly 30 minutes of assembly time consisting of mostly taping the soft plastic fuselage to the Styrofoam nose cone.

  10. Characterization of rocket propellant combustion products

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, R.A.; Nestor, C.W.; Thompson, C.V.; Gayle, T.M.; Ma, C.Y.; Tomkins, B.A.; Moody, R.L.

    1991-12-09

    The overall objective of the work described in this report is four-fold: to (a) develop a standardized and experimentally validated approach to the sampling and chemical and physical characterization of the exhaust products of scaled-down rocket launch motors fired under experimentally controlled conditions at the Army's Signature Characterization Facility (ASCF) at Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Alabama; (b) determine the composition of the exhaust produces; (c) assess the accuracy of a selected existing computer model for predicting the composition of major and minor chemical species; (d) recommended alternations to both the sampling and analysis strategy and the computer model in order to achieve greater congruence between chemical measurements and computer prediction. 34 refs., 2 figs., 35 tabs.

  11. ASTRID rocket flight test

    SciTech Connect

    Whitehead, J.C.; Pittenger, L.C.; Colella, N.J.

    1994-07-01

    On February 4, 1994, we successfully flight tested the ASTRID rocket from Vandenberg Air Force Base. The technology for this rocket originated in the Brilliant Pebbles program and represents a five-year development effort. This rocket demonstrated how our new pumped-propulsion technology-which reduced the total effective engine mass by more than one half and cut the tank mass to one fifth previous requirements-would perform in atmospheric flight. This demonstration paves the way for potential cost-effective uses of the new propulsion system in commercial aerospace vehicles, exploration of the planets, and defense applications.

  12. GPS Sounding Rocket Developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bull, Barton

    1999-01-01

    Sounding rockets are suborbital launch vehicles capable of carrying scientific payloads several hundred miles in altitude. These missions return a variety of scientific data including; chemical makeup and physical processes taking place in the atmosphere, natural radiation surrounding the Earth, data on the Sun, stars, galaxies and many other phenomena. In addition, sounding rockets provide a reasonably economical means of conducting engineering tests for instruments and devices used on satellites and other spacecraft prior to their use in more expensive activities. This paper addresses the NASA Wallops Island history of GPS Sounding Rocket experience since 1994 and the development of highly accurate and useful system.

  13. Numerical simulation of helicopter engine plume in forward flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimanlig, Arsenio C. B.; Vandam, Cornelis P.; Duque, Earl P. N.

    1994-01-01

    Flowfields around helicopters contain complex flow features such as large separated flow regions, vortices, shear layers, blown and suction surfaces and an inherently unsteady flow imposed by the rotor system. Another complicated feature of helicopters is their infrared signature. Typically, the aircraft's exhaust plume interacts with the rotor downwash, the fuselage's complicated flowfield, and the fuselage itself giving each aircraft a unique IR signature at given flight conditions. The goal of this project was to compute the flow about a realistic helicopter fuselage including the interaction of the engine air intakes and exhaust plume. The computations solve the Think-Layer Navier Stokes equations using overset type grids and in particular use the OVERFLOW code by Buning of NASA Ames. During this three month effort, an existing grid system of the Comanche Helicopter was to be modified to include the engine inlet and the hot engine exhaust. The engine exhaust was to be modeled as hot air exhaust. However, considerable changes in the fuselage geometry required a complete regriding of the surface and volume grids. The engine plume computations have been delayed to future efforts. The results of the current work consists of a complete regeneration of the surface and volume grids of the most recent Comanche fuselage along with a flowfield computation.

  14. Highlights of Transient Plume Impingement Model Validation and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woronowicz, Michael

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes highlights of an ongoing validation effort conducted to assess the viability of applying a set of analytic point source transient free molecule equations to model behavior ranging from molecular effusion to rocket plumes. The validation effort includes encouraging comparisons to both steady and transient studies involving experimental data and direct simulation Monte Carlo results. Finally, this model is applied to describe features of two exotic transient scenarios involving NASA Goddard Space Flight Center satellite programs.

  15. Volcanic Plume Measurements with UAV (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinohara, H.; Kaneko, T.; Ohminato, T.

    2013-12-01

    Volatiles in magmas are the driving force of volcanic eruptions and quantification of volcanic gas flux and composition is important for the volcano monitoring. Recently we developed a portable gas sensor system (Multi-GAS) to quantify the volcanic gas composition by measuring volcanic plumes and obtained volcanic gas compositions of actively degassing volcanoes. As the Multi-GAS measures variation of volcanic gas component concentrations in the pumped air (volcanic plume), we need to bring the apparatus into the volcanic plume. Commonly the observer brings the apparatus to the summit crater by himself but such measurements are not possible under conditions of high risk of volcanic eruption or difficulty to approach the summit due to topography etc. In order to overcome these difficulties, volcanic plume measurements were performed by using manned and unmanned aerial vehicles. The volcanic plume measurements by manned aerial vehicles, however, are also not possible under high risk of eruption. The strict regulation against the modification of the aircraft, such as installing sampling pipes, also causes difficulty due to the high cost. Application of the UAVs for the volcanic plume measurements has a big advantage to avoid these problems. The Multi-GAS consists of IR-CO2 and H2O gas analyzer, SO2-H2O chemical sensors and H2 semiconductor sensor and the total weight ranges 3-6 kg including batteries. The necessary conditions of the UAV for the volcanic plumes measurements with the Multi-GAS are the payloads larger than 3 kg, maximum altitude larger than the plume height and installation of the sampling pipe without contamination of the exhaust gases, as the exhaust gases contain high concentrations of H2, SO2 and CO2. Up to now, three different types of UAVs were applied for the measurements; Kite-plane (Sky Remote) at Miyakejima operated by JMA, Unmanned airplane (Air Photo Service) at Shinomoedake, Kirishima volcano, and Unmanned helicopter (Yamaha) at Sakurajima volcano operated by ERI, Tokyo University. In all cases, we could estimated volcanic gas compositions, such as CO2/SO2 ratios, but also found out that it is necessary to improve the techniques to avoid the contamination of the exhaust gases and to approach more concentrated part of the plume. It was also revealed that the aerial measurements have an advantage of the stable background. The error of the volcanic gas composition estimates are largely due to the large fluctuation of the atmospheric H2O and CO2 concentrations near the ground. The stable atmospheric background obtained by the UAV measurements enables accurate estimate of the volcanic gas compositions. One of the most successful measurements was that on May 18, 2011 at Shinomoedake, Kirishima volcano during repeating Vulcanian eruption stage. The major component composition was obtained as H2O=97, CO2=1.5, SO2=0.2, H2S=0.24, H2=0.006 mol%; the high CO2 contents suggests relatively deep source of the magma degassing and the apparent equilibrium temperature obtained as 400°C indicates that the gas was cooled during ascent to the surface. The volcanic plume measurement with UAV will become an important tool for the volcano monitoring that provides important information to understand eruption processes.

  16. COOLING TOWER PLUME MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    A review of recently reported cooling tower plume models yields none that is universally accepted. The entrainment and drag mechanisms and the effect of moisture on the plume trajectory are phenomena which are treated differently by various investigators. In order to better under...

  17. Rocketing into Adaptive Inquiry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farenga, Stephen J.; Joyce, Beverly A.; Dowling, Thomas W.

    2002-01-01

    Defines adaptive inquiry and argues for employing this method which allows lessons to be shaped in response to student needs. Illustrates this idea by detailing an activity in which teams of students build rockets. (DDR)

  18. Rocket engine numerical simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidian, Ken

    1993-01-01

    The topics are presented in view graph form and include the following: a definition of the rocket engine numerical simulator (RENS); objectives; justification; approach; potential applications; potential users; RENS work flowchart; RENS prototype; and conclusions.

  19. Hybrid Rocket Motor Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Stennis Space Center conducts a test on a hybrid rocket motor fed by a liquid oxygen turbopump. The test occurred at the E-1 test facility. The test was believed to be the first of its kind in the world.

  20. Russian Rocket Engine Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    NASA engineers successfully tested a Russian-built rocket engine on November 4, 1998 at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Advanced Engine Test Facility, which had been used for testing the Saturn V F-1 engines and Space Shuttle Main engines. The MSFC was under a Space Act Agreement with Lockheed Martin Astronautics of Denver to provide a series of test firings of the Atlas III propulsion system configured with the Russian-designed RD-180 engine. The tests were designed to measure the performance of the Atlas III propulsion system, which included avionics and propellant tanks and lines, and how these components interacted with the RD-180 engine. The RD-180 is powered by kerosene and liquid oxygen, the same fuel mix used in Saturn rockets. The RD-180, the most powerful rocket engine tested at the MSFC since Saturn rocket tests in the 1960s, generated 860,000 pounds of thrust.

  1. Robust Rocket Engine Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzo, Carl F.

    1995-01-01

    The potential for a revolutionary step in the durability of reusable rocket engines is made possible by the combination of several emerging technologies. The recent creation and analytical demonstration of life extending (or damage mitigating) control technology enables rapid rocket engine transients with minimum fatigue and creep damage. This technology has been further enhanced by the formulation of very simple but conservative continuum damage models. These new ideas when combined with recent advances in multidisciplinary optimization provide the potential for a large (revolutionary) step in reusable rocket engine durability. This concept has been named the robust rocket engine concept (RREC) and is the basic contribution of this paper. The concept also includes consideration of design innovations to minimize critical point damage.

  2. Stealth Plumes on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, T. V.; Matson, Dennis L.; Blaney, Diana L.; Veeder, Glenn J.; Davies, Ashley

    1995-01-01

    We suggest that Io's eruptive activity may include a class of previously undetected SO2 geysers. The thermodynamic models for the eruptive plumes discovered by Voyager 'involve low to moderate entropy SO2 eruptions. The resulting plumes are a mixture of solid and gas which emerge from the vent and follow essentially ballistic trajectories. We show that intrusion of silicate magma into buried SO2 deposits can create the required conditions for high entropy eruptions which proceed entirely in the vapor phase. These purely gaseous plumes would have been invisible to Voyager's instruments. Hence, we call them "stealth" plumes. Such eruptions could explain the "patchy" SO2 atmosphere inferred from recent UV and micro-wave spectral observations. The magma intrusion rate required to support the required gas production for these plumes is a negligible fraction of estimated global magma intrusion rates.

  3. Rocket Motor Microphone Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilkey, Debbie; Herrera, Eric; Gee, Kent L.; Giraud, Jerom H.; Young, Devin J.

    2010-01-01

    At ATK's facility in Utah, large full-scale solid rocket motors are tested. The largest is a five-segment version of the reusable solid rocket motor, which is for use on the Ares I launch vehicle. As a continuous improvement project, ATK and BYU investigated the use of microphones on these static tests, the vibration and temperature to which the instruments are subjected, and in particular the use of vent tubes and the effects these vents have at low frequencies.

  4. GPS Sounding Rocket Developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bull, Barton

    1999-01-01

    Sounding rockets are suborbital launch vehicles capable of carrying scientific payloads several hundred miles in altitude. These missions return a variety of scientific data including; chemical makeup and physical processes taking place In the atmosphere, natural radiation surrounding the Earth, data on the Sun, stars, galaxies and many other phenomena. In addition, sounding rockets provide a reasonably economical means of conducting engineering tests for instruments and devices used on satellites and other spacecraft prior to their use in more expensive activities. The NASA Sounding Rocket Program is managed by personnel from Goddard Space Flight Center Wallops Flight Facility (GSFC/WFF) in Virginia. Typically around thirty of these rockets are launched each year, either from established ranges at Wallops Island, Virginia, Poker Flat Research Range, Alaska; White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico or from Canada, Norway and Sweden. Many times launches are conducted from temporary launch ranges in remote parts of the world requi6ng considerable expense to transport and operate tracking radars. An inverse differential GPS system has been developed for Sounding Rocket. This paper addresses the NASA Wallops Island history of GPS Sounding Rocket experience since 1994 and the development of a high accurate and useful system.

  5. Rocket Engine Oscillation Diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesman, Tom; Turner, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Rocket engine oscillating data can reveal many physical phenomena ranging from unsteady flow and acoustics to rotordynamics and structural dynamics. Because of this, engine diagnostics based on oscillation data should employ both signal analysis and physical modeling. This paper describes an approach to rocket engine oscillation diagnostics, types of problems encountered, and example problems solved. Determination of design guidelines and environments (or loads) from oscillating phenomena is required during initial stages of rocket engine design, while the additional tasks of health monitoring, incipient failure detection, and anomaly diagnostics occur during engine development and operation. Oscillations in rocket engines are typically related to flow driven acoustics, flow excited structures, or rotational forces. Additional sources of oscillatory energy are combustion and cavitation. Included in the example problems is a sampling of signal analysis tools employed in diagnostics. The rocket engine hardware includes combustion devices, valves, turbopumps, and ducts. Simple models of an oscillating fluid system or structure can be constructed to estimate pertinent dynamic parameters governing the unsteady behavior of engine systems or components. In the example problems it is shown that simple physical modeling when combined with signal analysis can be successfully employed to diagnose complex rocket engine oscillatory phenomena.

  6. Exhaust gas recirculation control

    SciTech Connect

    Stoltman, D.D.

    1983-08-23

    In an internal combustion engine, recirculation of exhaust gases is controlled to maintain the control pressure in a zone of the recirculation passage proportional to a reference pressure and thus to provide exhaust gas recirculation as a proportion of induction air flow. A duty cycle modulated valve controls an exhaust backpressure port and an atmospheric pressure port to create the reference pressure, whereby the proportion of exhaust gases recirculated is established by the duty cycle and is independent of the induction air flow.

  7. Apollo video photogrammetry estimation of plume impingement effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Immer, Christopher; Lane, John; Metzger, Philip; Clements, Sandra

    2011-07-01

    Future missions to the Moon may require numerous landings at the same site. Since the top few centimeters are loosely packed regolith, plume impingement from the Lander ejects the granular material at high velocities. Much work is needed to understand the physics of plume impingement during landing to protect hardware surrounding the landing sites. While mostly qualitative in nature, the Apollo Lunar Module landing videos can provide a wealth of quantitative information using modern photogrammetry techniques. The authors have used the digitized videos to quantify plume impingement effects of the landing exhaust on the lunar surface. The dust ejection angle from the plume is estimated at 1°-3°. The lofted particle density is estimated at 10 8-10 13 particles/m 3. Additionally, evidence for ejection of large 10-15 cm sized objects and a dependence of ejection angle on thrust are presented. Further work is ongoing to continue quantitative analysis of the landing videos.

  8. Solar Coronal Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poletto, Giannina

    2015-12-01

    Polar plumes are thin long ray-like structures that project beyond the limb of the Sun polar regions, maintaining their identity over distances of several solar radii. Plumes have been first observed in white-light (WL) images of the Sun, but, with the advent of the space era, they have been identified also in X-ray and UV wavelengths (XUV) and, possibly, even in in situ data. This review traces the history of plumes, from the time they have been first imaged, to the complex means by which nowadays we attempt to reconstruct their 3-D structure. Spectroscopic techniques allowed us also to infer the physical parameters of plumes and estimate their electron and kinetic temperatures and their densities. However, perhaps the most interesting problem we need to solve is the role they cover in the solar wind origin and acceleration: Does the solar wind emanate from plumes or from the ambient coronal hole wherein they are embedded? Do plumes have a role in solar wind acceleration and mass loading? Answers to these questions are still somewhat ambiguous and theoretical modeling does not provide definite answers either. Recent data, with an unprecedented high spatial and temporal resolution, provide new information on the fine structure of plumes, their temporal evolution and relationship with other transient phenomena that may shed further light on these elusive features.

  9. Identification of Noise Sources During Rocket Engine Test Firings and a Rocket Launch Using a Microphone Phased-Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panda, Jayanta; Mosher, Robert N.; Porter, Barry J.

    2013-01-01

    A 70 microphone, 10-foot by 10-foot, microphone phased array was built for use in the harsh environment of rocket launches. The array was setup at NASA Wallops launch pad 0A during a static test firing of Orbital Sciences' Antares engines, and again during the first launch of the Antares vehicle. It was placed 400 feet away from the pad, and was hoisted on a scissor lift 40 feet above ground. The data sets provided unprecedented insight into rocket noise sources. The duct exit was found to be the primary source during the static test firing; the large amount of water injected beneath the nozzle exit and inside the plume duct quenched all other sources. The maps of the noise sources during launch were found to be time-dependent. As the engines came to full power and became louder, the primary source switched from the duct inlet to the duct exit. Further elevation of the vehicle caused spilling of the hot plume, resulting in a distributed noise map covering most of the pad. As the entire plume emerged from the duct, and the ondeck water system came to full power, the plume itself became the loudest noise source. These maps of the noise sources provide vital insight for optimization of sound suppression systems for future Antares launches.

  10. Prometheus: Io's wandering plume.

    PubMed

    Kieffer, S W; Lopes-Gautier, R; McEwen, A; Smythe, W; Keszthelyi, L; Carlson, R

    2000-05-19

    Unlike any volcanic behavior ever observed on Earth, the plume from Prometheus on Io has wandered 75 to 95 kilometers west over the last 20 years since it was first discovered by Voyager and more recently observed by Galileo. Despite the source motion, the geometric and optical properties of the plume have remained constant. We propose that this can be explained by vaporization of a sulfur dioxide and/or sulfur "snowfield" over which a lava flow is moving. Eruption of a boundary-layer slurry through a rootless conduit with sonic conditions at the intake of the melted snow can account for the constancy of plume properties. PMID:10817989

  11. Augmentation of Rocket Propulsion: Physical Limits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Charles R.

    1996-01-01

    Rocket propulsion is not ideal when the propellant is not ejected at a unique velocity in an inertial frame. An ideal velocity distribution requires that the exhaust velocity vary linearly with the velocity of the vehicle in an inertial frame. It also requires that the velocity distribution variance as a thermodynamic quantity be minimized. A rocket vehicle with an inert propellant is not optimal, because it does not take advantage of the propellant mass for energy storage. Nor is it logical to provide another energy storage device in order to realize variable exhaust velocity, because it would have to be partly unfilled at the beginning of the mission. Performance is enhanced by pushing on the surrounding because it increases the reaction mass and decreases the reaction jet velocity. This decreases the fraction of the energy taken away by the propellant and increases the share taken by the payload. For an optimal model with the propellant used as fuel, the augmentation realized by pushing on air is greatest for vehicles with a low initial/final mass ratio. For a typical vehicle in the Earth's atmosphere, the augmentation is seen mainly at altitudes below about 80 km. When drag is taken into account, there is a well-defined optimum size for the air intake. Pushing on air has the potential to increase the performance of rockets which pass through the atmosphere. This is apart from benefits derived from "air breathing", or using the oxygen in the atmosphere to reduce the mass of an on-board oxidizer. Because of the potential of these measures, it is vital to model these effects more carefully and explore technology that may realize their advantages.

  12. The Green Propellant Infusion Mission Thruster Performance Testing for Plume Diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deans, Matthew C.; Reed, Brian D.; Arrington, Lynn A.; Williams, George J.; Kojima, Jun J.; Kinzbach, McKenzie I.; McLean, Christopher H.

    2014-01-01

    The Green Propellant Infusion Mission (GPIM) is sponsored by NASA's Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) Technology Demonstration Mission (TDM) office. The goal of GPIM is to advance the technology readiness level of a green propulsion system, specifically, one using the monopropellant, AF-M315E, by demonstrating ground handling, spacecraft processing, and on-orbit operations. One of the risks identified for GPIM is potential contamination of sensitive spacecraft surfaces from the effluents in the plumes of AF-M315E thrusters. NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is conducting activities to characterize the effects of AF-M315E plume impingement and deposition. GRC has established individual plume models of the 22-N and 1-N thrusters that will be used on the GPIM spacecraft. The model simulations will be correlated with plume measurement data from Laboratory and Engineering Model 22-N, AF-M315E thrusters. The thrusters are currently being tested in a small rocket, altitude facility at NASA GRC. A suite of diagnostics, including Raman spectroscopy, Rayleigh spectroscopy, and Schlieren imaging are being used to acquire plume measurements of AF-M315E thrusters. Plume data will include temperature, velocity, relative density, and species concentration. The plume measurement data will be compared to the corresponding simulations of the plume model. The GRC effort will establish a data set of AF-M315E plume measurements and a plume model that can be used for future AF-M315E applications.

  13. Two stage turbine for rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veres, Joseph P.

    1993-01-01

    The aerodynamic design and rig test evaluation of a small counter-rotating turbine system is described. The advanced turbine airfoils were designed and tested by Pratt & Whitney. The technology represented by this turbine is being developed for a turbopump to be used in an advanced upper stage rocket engine. The advanced engine will use a hydrogen expander cycle and achieve high performance through efficient combustion of hydrogen/oxygen propellants, high combustion pressure, and high area ratio exhaust nozzle expansion. Engine performance goals require that the turbopump drive turbines achieve high efficiency at low gas flow rates. The low mass flow rates and high operating pressures result in very small airfoil heights and diameters. The high efficiency and small size requirements present a challenging turbine design problem. The shrouded axial turbine blades are 50 percent reaction with a maximum thickness to chord ratio near 1. At 6 deg from the tangential direction, the nozzle and blade exit flow angles are well below the traditional design minimum limits. The blade turning angle of 160 deg also exceeds the maximum limits used in traditional turbine designs.

  14. Two stage turbine for rockets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veres, Joseph P.

    1993-11-01

    The aerodynamic design and rig test evaluation of a small counter-rotating turbine system is described. The advanced turbine airfoils were designed and tested by Pratt & Whitney. The technology represented by this turbine is being developed for a turbopump to be used in an advanced upper stage rocket engine. The advanced engine will use a hydrogen expander cycle and achieve high performance through efficient combustion of hydrogen/oxygen propellants, high combustion pressure, and high area ratio exhaust nozzle expansion. Engine performance goals require that the turbopump drive turbines achieve high efficiency at low gas flow rates. The low mass flow rates and high operating pressures result in very small airfoil heights and diameters. The high efficiency and small size requirements present a challenging turbine design problem. The shrouded axial turbine blades are 50 percent reaction with a maximum thickness to chord ratio near 1. At 6 deg from the tangential direction, the nozzle and blade exit flow angles are well below the traditional design minimum limits. The blade turning angle of 160 deg also exceeds the maximum limits used in traditional turbine designs.

  15. ROCKET PORT CLOSURE

    DOEpatents

    Mattingly, J.T.

    1963-02-12

    This invention provides a simple pressure-actuated closure whereby windowless observation ports are opened to the atmosphere at preselected altitudes. The closure comprises a disk which seals a windowless observation port in rocket hull. An evacuated instrument compartment is affixed to the rocket hull adjacent the inner surface of the disk, while the outer disk surface is exposed to the atmosphere through which the rocket is traveling. The pressure differential between the evacuated instrument compartment and the relatively high pressure external atmosphere forces the disk against the edge of the observation port, thereby effecting a tight seai. The instrument compartment is evacuated to a pressure equal to the atmospheric pressure existing at the altitude at which it is desiretl that the closure should open. When the rocket reaches this preselected altitude, the inwardly directed atmospheric force on the disk is just equaled by the residual air pressure force within the instrument compartment. Consequently, the closure disk falls away and uncovers the open observation port. The separation of the disk from the rocket hull actuates a switch which energizes the mechanism of a detecting instrument disposed within the instrument compartment. (AE C)

  16. Microphysical properties of the Shuttle exhaust cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, V. W.; Anderson, B. J.

    1983-01-01

    A data base describing the properties of the exhaust cloud produced by the launch of the STS has been developed based on data from a series of ground and aircraft based measurements made during the launches of STS 2, 3, and 4. Aircraft observations were performed during the STS-3 launch with a NOAA WP-3D Orion hurricane research aircraft which contained instrumentation for cloud condensation nucleus and ice nucleus counting, Aitken particle counting, and pH determination. Ground observations were conducted at 50 different sites, as well as in the direct exhaust from the solid rocket booster flame trench at all three launches. The data is analyzed in order to determine any possible adverse impacts of the exhaust products on human health and/or the environment. Analyses of the exhaust cloud measurements indicate that in the case of the ground cloud where plenty of large water drops are present and considerable scavenging and fallout of aerosol takes place, possible adverse impacts of the remaining aerosols (CCN and IN) on natural precipitation processes which may occur in the launch area hours after the launch are remote. However, it is determined that under certain atmospheric conditions there could be short term adverse effects on visibility.

  17. CHLORINATED SOLVENT PLUME CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    This lecture will cover recent success in controlling and assessing the treatment of shallow ground water plumes of chlorinated solvents, other halogenated organic compounds, and methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE).

  18. New MISR Plume Data

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-08-06

    ... (MISR) project announce the release of an updated interface to the "MISR Plume Height Climatology Project" web site and the ... These new Projects Areas have been added to the website: North America, 2001 North America, 2003 North America, ...

  19. General view of the Solid Rocket Booster's (SRB) Solid Rocket ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General view of the Solid Rocket Booster's (SRB) Solid Rocket Motor Segments in the Surge Building of the Rotation Processing and Surge Facility at Kennedy Space Center awaiting transfer to the Vehicle Assembly Building and subsequent mounting and assembly on the Mobile Launch Platform. - Space Transportation System, Solid Rocket Boosters, Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  20. Marine exhaust manifold and elbow

    SciTech Connect

    Lindstedt, D.H.

    1992-05-05

    This patent describes a marine propulsion system having an internal combustion engine exhausted through a water jacketed exhaust assembly. This patent describes improvement in a manifold portion having intake exhaust passages receiving engine exhaust; an elbow portion extending upwardly from the manifold portion and having transfer exhaust passages extending from the intake exhaust passages and communicating through a bend with a discharge exhaust passage, wherein exhaust flows upwardly from the manifold portion into the elbow portion and around the bend to the discharge exhaust passage; water jacket means around the intake exhaust passages and the transfer exhaust passages and directing water along the exterior of the intake exhaust passages and the transfer exhaust passages, wherein water flows upwardly along the manifold portion to the elbow portion and then upwardly and around the bend and then to the end of the discharge exhaust passage to mix with exhaust thereat; wall supports between the water jacket means and the elbow portion.

  1. Sulfur plumes off Namibia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Sulfur plumes rising up from the bottom of the ocean floor produce colorful swirls in the waters off the coast of Namibia in southern Africa. The plumes come from the breakdown of marine plant matter by anaerobic bacteria that do not need oxygen to live. This image was acquired by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Terra satellite on April 24, 2002 Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  2. Enceladus' water vapor plume.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Candice J; Esposito, L; Stewart, A I F; Colwell, J; Hendrix, A; Pryor, W; Shemansky, D; West, R

    2006-03-10

    The Cassini spacecraft flew close to Saturn's small moon Enceladus three times in 2005. Cassini's UltraViolet Imaging Spectrograph observed stellar occultations on two flybys and confirmed the existence, composition, and regionally confined nature of a water vapor plume in the south polar region of Enceladus. This plume provides an adequate amount of water to resupply losses from Saturn's E ring and to be the dominant source of the neutral OH and atomic oxygen that fill the Saturnian system. PMID:16527971

  3. Rockets in World War I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    World War I enlisted rockets once again for military purposes. French pilots rigged rockets to the wing struts of their airplanes and aimed them at enemy observation balloons filled with highly inflammable hydrogen.

  4. Laser Rayleigh and Raman Diagnostics for Small Hydrogen/oxygen Rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degroot, Wilhelmus A.; Zupanc, Frank J.

    1993-01-01

    Localized velocity, temperature, and species concentration measurements in rocket flow fields are needed to evaluate predictive computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes and identify causes of poor rocket performance. Velocity, temperature, and total number density information have been successfully extracted from spectrally resolved Rayleigh scattering in the plume of small hydrogen/oxygen rockets. Light from a narrow band laser is scattered from the moving molecules with a Doppler shifted frequency. Two components of the velocity can be extracted by observing the scattered light from two directions. Thermal broadening of the scattered light provides a measure of the temperature, while the integrated scattering intensity is proportional to the number density. Spontaneous Raman scattering has been used to measure temperature and species concentration in similar plumes. Light from a dye laser is scattered by molecules in the rocket plume. Raman spectra scattered from major species are resolved by observing the inelastically scattered light with linear array mounted to a spectrometer. Temperature and oxygen concentrations have been extracted by fitting a model function to the measured Raman spectrum. Results of measurements on small rockets mounted inside a high altitude chamber using both diagnostic techniques are reported.

  5. Rocket motor aeroacoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegde, U. G.; Strahle, W. C.

    1983-10-01

    Vibration problems in solid propellant rocket motors are investigated. A class of interior flows modelled to simulate flow conditions inside rocket motor cavities is considered. Turbulence generated pressure fluctuations are shown to consist of two components - acoustic and hydrodynamics. The Bernoulli enthalpy theory of aeroacoustics is employed to extract acoustic pressure spectra from experimentally obtained turbulence data and acoustic impedance values at flow boundaries. The effects of turbulence intensities, sidewall acoustic impedance, axial mass blowing distribution, length to diameter ratio of the cavity and different mass flux on the acoustic pressure level are investigated. Typical pressure levels, under rocket motor conditions, are calculated using the A/B model of propellant response. Estimates of the hydrodynamic component of the pressure fluctuation are provided for the case of fully developed turbulent pipe flow terminated by a choked nozzle.

  6. Modeling Europa's Dust Plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Southworth, B.; Schmidt, J.; Horanyi, M.; Kempf, S.

    2014-12-01

    The discovery of Europa maintaining a probably periodic water plume located at its south polar terrain constitutes a huge scientific opportunity for an upcoming mission to this Galilean moon. Measuring the properties of material emerging from interior sources offers an unique scientific opportunity to understand the conditions at Europa's subsurface ocean. Remarkably, the water column density of 1020 m-2 for the Europa plume is similar to the density of Enceladus' water plume of (0.9 +- 0.23)1020m-2. This finding strongly suggests that Europa's plume, similar to Enceladus, also contains a few mass percent of water ice particles which are formed by (i) nucleation within the vapor streaming through fractures in Europa's ice crust and (ii) by mantle growth on shock-frozen droplets on the interface of the moon's subsurface ocean. We adjusted the Enceladus plume model by Schmidt et al. (2008) to the conditions at Europa and derive the size-dependent speed distribution of the emerging ice particles.We furthermore derived the 3-dimensional structure of the ice particle plume and computed the snowfall pattern of the ice particles on Europa's surface.

  7. Advanced liquid rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Steven J.

    1992-01-01

    A program to substitute iridium coated rhenium for silicide coated niobium in thrust chamber fabrications is reviewed. The life limiting phenomena in each of these material systems is also reviewed. Coating cracking and spalling is not a problem with iridium-coated rhenium as in silicide-coated niobium. Use of the new material system enables an 800 K increase in thruster operating temperature from around 1700 K for niobium to 2500 K for rhenium. Specific impulse iridium-coated rhenium rockets is nominally 20 seconds higher than comparable niobium rockets in the 22 N class and nominally 10 seconds higher in the 440 N class.

  8. Solid Rocket Booster Separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This Quick Time movie shows the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) separation from the external tank (ET). After separation, the boosters fall to the ocean from which they are retrieved and refurbished for reuse. The Shuttle's SRB's and solid rocket motors (SRM's) are the largest ever built and the first designed for refurbishment and reuse. Standing nearly 150-feet high, the twin boosters provide the majority of thrust for the first two minutes of flight, about 5.8 million pounds. That is equivalent to 44 million horsepower, or the combined power of 400,000 subcompact cars.

  9. Jupiter Rocket Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Engine for the Jupiter rocket. The Jupiter vehicle was a direct derivative of the Redstone. The Army Ballistic Missile Agency (ABMA) at Redstone Arsenal, Alabama, continued Jupiter development into a successful intermediate ballistic missile, even though the Department of Defense directed its operational development to the Air Force. ABMA maintained a role in Jupiter RD, including high-altitude launches that added to ABMA's understanding of rocket vehicle operations in the near-Earth space environment. It was knowledge that paid handsome dividends later.

  10. Solid Rocket Boosters Separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    This view, taken by a motion picture tracking camera for the STS-3 mission, shows both left and right solid rocket boosters (SRB's) at the moment of separation from the external tank (ET). After impact to the ocean, they were retrieved and refurbished for reuse. The Shuttle's SRB's and solid rocket motors (SRM's) are the largest ever built and the first designed for refurbishment and reuse. Standing nearly 150-feet high, the twin boosters provide the majority of thrust for the first two minutes of flight, about 5.8 million pounds. That is equivalent to 44 million horsepower, or the combined power of 400,000 subcompact cars.

  11. Rocket center Peenemuende - Personal memories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dannenberg, Konrad; Stuhlinger, Ernst

    1993-01-01

    A brief history of Peenemuende, the rocket center where Von Braun and his team developed the A-4 (V-2) rocket under German Army auspices, and the Air Force developed the V-1 (buzz bomb), wire-guided bombs, and rocket planes, is presented. Emphasis is placed on the expansion of operations beginning in 1942.

  12. Baking Soda and Vinegar Rockets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claycomb, James R.; Zachary, Christopher; Tran, Quoc

    2009-01-01

    Rocket experiments demonstrating conservation of momentum will never fail to generate enthusiasm in undergraduate physics laboratories. In this paper, we describe tests on rockets from two vendors that combine baking soda and vinegar for propulsion. The experiment compared two analytical approximations for the maximum rocket height to the…

  13. Baking Soda and Vinegar Rockets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claycomb, James R.; Zachary, Christopher; Tran, Quoc

    2009-01-01

    Rocket experiments demonstrating conservation of momentum will never fail to generate enthusiasm in undergraduate physics laboratories. In this paper, we describe tests on rockets from two vendors that combine baking soda and vinegar for propulsion. The experiment compared two analytical approximations for the maximum rocket height to the…

  14. Overview of rocket engine control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzo, Carl F.; Musgrave, Jeffrey L.

    1991-01-01

    The issues of Chemical Rocket Engine Control are broadly covered. The basic feedback information and control variables used in expendable and reusable rocket engines, such as Space Shuttle Main Engine, are discussed. The deficiencies of current approaches are considered and a brief introduction to Intelligent Control Systems for rocket engines (and vehicles) is presented.

  15. Comparison of ACCENT 2000 Shuttle Plume Data with SIMPLE Model Predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaminathan, P. K.; Taylor, J. C.; Ross, M. N.; Zittel, P. F.; Lloyd, S. A.

    2001-12-01

    The JHU/APL Stratospheric IMpact of PLume Effluents (SIMPLE)model was employed to analyze the trace species in situ composition data collected during the ACCENT 2000 intercepts of the space shuttle Space Transportation Launch System (STS) rocket plume as a function of time and radial location within the cold plume. The SIMPLE model is initialized using predictions for species depositions calculated using an afterburning model based on standard TDK/SPP nozzle and SPF plume flowfield codes with an expanded chemical kinetic scheme. The time dependent ambient stratospheric chemistry is fully coupled to the plume species evolution whose transport is based on empirically derived diffusion. Model/data comparisons are encouraging through capturing observed local ozone recovery times as well as overall morphology of chlorine chemistry.

  16. Exhaust gas purification device

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, H.; Hibi, T.; Sayo, S.; Sugiura, Y.; Ueda, K.

    1980-02-19

    The exhaust gas purification device includes an exhaust manifold , a purification cylinder connected with the exhaust manifold through a first honey-comb shaped catalyst, and a second honeycomb shaped catalyst positioned at the rear portion of the purification cylinder. Each catalyst is supported by steel wool rings including coarse and dense portions of steel wool. The purification device further includes a secondary air supplying arrangement.

  17. Infrared Signature Modeling and Analysis of Aircraft Plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Arvind G.

    2011-09-01

    In recent years, the survivability of an aircraft has been put to task more than ever before. One of the main reasons is the increase in the usage of Infrared (IR) guided Anti-Aircraft Missiles, especially due to the availability of Man Portable Air Defence System (MANPADS) with some terrorist groups. Thus, aircraft IR signatures are gaining more importance as compared to their radar, visual, acoustic, or any other signatures. The exhaust plume ejected from the aircraft is one of the important sources of IR signature in military aircraft that use low bypass turbofan engines for propulsion. The focus of the present work is modelling of spectral IR radiation emission from the exhaust jet of a typical military aircraft and to evaluate the aircraft susceptibility in terms of the aircraft lock-on range due to its plume emission, for a simple case against a typical Surface to Air Missile (SAM). The IR signature due to the aircraft plume is examined in a holistic manner. A comprehensive methodology of computing IR signatures and its affect on aircraft lock-on range is elaborated. Commercial CFD software has been used to predict the plume thermo-physical properties and subsequently an in-house developed code was used for evaluating the IR radiation emitted by the plume. The LOWTRAN code has been used for modeling the atmospheric IR characteristics. The results obtained from these models are in reasonable agreement with some available experimental data. The analysis carried out in this paper succinctly brings out the intricacy of the radiation emitted by various gaseous species in the plume and the role of atmospheric IR transmissivity in dictating the plume IR signature as perceived by an IR guided SAM.

  18. Rapid Mars transits with exhaust-modulated plasma propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang-Diaz, Franklin R.; Braden, Ellen; Johnson, Ivan; Hsu, Michael M.; Yang, Tien Fang

    1995-01-01

    The operational characteristics of the Exhaust-Modulated Plasma Rocket are described. Four basic human and robotic mission scenarios to Mars are analyzed using numerical optimization techniques at variable specific impulse and constant power. The device is well suited for 'split-sprint' missions, allowing fast, one-way low-payload human transits of 90 to 104 days, as well as slower, 180-day, high-payload robotic precursor flights. Abort capabilities, essential for human missions, are also explored.

  19. Rocket Auroral Correlator Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaBelle, James

    2003-01-01

    Dartmouth College provided a multi-channel high- and low- frequency wave receivers, including active sensors on deployable booms, to the Rocket Auroral Correlator Experiment launched from Poker Flat, Alaska, in January 2002. College also performed preliminary analysis of the data. Details are outlined in chronological order.

  20. This Is Rocket Science!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keith, Wayne; Martin, Cynthia; Veltkamp, Pamela

    2013-09-01

    Using model rockets to teach physics can be an effective way to engage students in learning. In this paper, we present a curriculum developed in response to an expressed need for helping high school students review physics equations in preparation for a state-mandated exam. This required a mode of teaching that was more advanced and analytical than that offered by Estes Industries, but more basic than the analysis of Nelson et al. In particular, drag is neglected until the very end of the exercise, which allows the concept of conservation of energy to be shown when predicting the rocket's flight. Also, the variable mass of the rocket motor is assumed to decrease linearly during the flight (while the propulsion charge and recovery delay charge are burning) and handled simplistically by using an average mass value. These changes greatly simplify the equations needed to predict the times and heights at various stages of flight, making it more useful as a review of basic physics. Details about model rocket motors, range safety, and other supplemental information may be found online at Apogee Components4 and the National Association of Rocketry.5

  1. Solid rocket motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Ronn L.

    1993-02-01

    Structural requirements, materials and, especially, processing are critical issues that will pace the introduction of new types of solid rocket motors. Designers must recognize and understand the drivers associated with each of the following considerations: (1) cost; (2) energy density; (3) long term storage with use on demand; (4) reliability; (5) safety of processing and handling; (6) operability; and (7) environmental acceptance.

  2. Hybrid rocket instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greiner, B.; Frederick, R. A., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The paper provides a brief review of theoretical and experimental studies concerned with hybrid rocket instability. The instabilities discussed include atomization and mixing instabilities, chuffing instabilities, pressure coupled combustion instabilities, and vortex shedding. It is emphasized that the future use of hybrid motor systems as viable design alternatives will depend on a better understanding of hybrid instability.

  3. This "Is" Rocket Science!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keith, Wayne; Martin, Cynthia; Veltkamp, Pamela

    2013-01-01

    Using model rockets to teach physics can be an effective way to engage students in learning. In this paper, we present a curriculum developed in response to an expressed need for helping high school students review physics equations in preparation for a state-mandated exam. This required a mode of teaching that was more advanced and analytical…

  4. Tsiolkovsky Rocket Designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    By the end of the 19th Century, a Russian theorist, Konstantian Tsiolkovsky, was examining the fundamental scientific theories behind rocketry. He made some pioneering studies in liquid chemical rocket concepts and recommended liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen as the optimum propellants. In the 1920's, Tsiolkovsky analyzed and mathematically formulated the technique for staged vehicles to reach escape velocities from Earth.

  5. The Relativistic Rocket

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antippa, Adel F.

    2009-01-01

    We solve the problem of the relativistic rocket by making use of the relation between Lorentzian and Galilean velocities, as well as the laws of superposition of successive collinear Lorentz boosts in the limit of infinitesimal boosts. The solution is conceptually simple, and technically straightforward, and provides an example of a powerful…

  6. This "Is" Rocket Science!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keith, Wayne; Martin, Cynthia; Veltkamp, Pamela

    2013-01-01

    Using model rockets to teach physics can be an effective way to engage students in learning. In this paper, we present a curriculum developed in response to an expressed need for helping high school students review physics equations in preparation for a state-mandated exam. This required a mode of teaching that was more advanced and analytical…

  7. Liquid Rocket Engine Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahman, Shamim

    2005-01-01

    Comprehensive Liquid Rocket Engine testing is essential to risk reduction for Space Flight. Test capability represents significant national investments in expertise and infrastructure. Historical experience underpins current test capabilities. Test facilities continually seek proactive alignment with national space development goals and objectives including government and commercial sectors.

  8. Liquid rocket engine turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Criteria for the design and development of turbines for rocket engines to meet specific performance, and installation requirements are summarized. The total design problem, and design elements are identified, and the current technology pertaining to these elements is described. Recommended practices for achieving a successful design are included.

  9. Water Rocket Workout.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esler, William K.; Sanford, Daniel

    1989-01-01

    Water rockets are used to present Newton's three laws of motion to high school physics students. Described is an outdoor activity which uses four students per group. Provides a launch data sheet to record height, angle of elevation, amount of water used, and launch number. (MVL)

  10. Truman Receives Rocket Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1961-01-01

    On November 3, 1961 former President Harry S. Truman visited the newly opened NASA Headquarters, Washington D.C. Accompanied by former NASA Administrator James E. Webb, he was presented with a collection of rocket models for his Presidential Library in Independence, Missouri.

  11. Thiokol Solid Rocket Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, S. R.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents viewgraphs on thiokol solid rocket motors. The topics include: 1) Communications; 2) Military and government intelligence; 3) Positioning satellites; 4) Remote sensing; 5) Space burial; 6) Science; 7) Space manufacturing; 8) Advertising; 9) Space rescue space debris management; 10) Space tourism; 11) Space settlements; 12) Hazardous waste disposal; 13) Extraterrestrial resources; 14) Fast package delivery; and 15) Space utilities.

  12. Russian Rocket Engine Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    NASA engineers successfully tested a Russian-built rocket engine on November 4, 1998 at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Advanced Engine Test Facility, which had been used for testing the Saturn V F-1 engines and Space Shuttle Main engines. The MSFC was under a Space Act Agreement with Lockheed Martin Astronautics of Denver to provide a series of test firings of the Atlas III propulsion system configured with the Russian-designed RD-180 engine. The tests were designed to measure the performance of the Atlas III propulsion system, which included avionics and propellant tanks and lines, and how these components interacted with the RD-180 engine. The RD-180 is powered by kerosene and liquid oxygen, the same fuel mix used in Saturn rockets. The RD-180, the most powerful rocket engine tested at the MSFC since Saturn rocket tests in the 1960s, generated 860,000 pounds of thrust. The test was the first test ever anywhere outside Russia of a Russian designed and built engine.

  13. Dr. Goddard Transports Rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Dr. Robert H. Goddard tows his rocket to the launching tower behind a Model A Ford truck, 15 miles northwest of Roswell, New Mexico. 1930- 1932. Dr. Goddard has been recognized as the 'Father of American Rocketry' and as one of three pioneers in the theoretical exploration of space. Robert Hutchings Goddard was born in Worcester, Massachusetts, on October 15, 1882. He was a theoretical scientist as well as a practical engineer. His dream was the conquest of the upper atmosphere and ultimately space through the use of rocket propulsion. Dr. Goddard, who died in 1945, was probably as responsible for the dawning of the Space Age as the Wright Brothers were for the begining of the Air Age. Yet his work attracted little serious attention during his lifetime. When the United States began to prepare for the conquest of space in the 1950's, American rocket scientists began to recognize the debt owed to the New England professor. They discovered that it was virtually impossible to construct a rocket or launch a satellite without acknowledging the work of Dr. Goddard. This great legacy was covered by more than 200 patents, many of which were issued after his death.

  14. Solid Rocket Motor Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Shown is a test of the TEM-13 solid rocket motor at the ATK test facility in Utah in support of the Ares/CLV first stage. This image is extracted from high definition video and is the highest resolution available.

  15. Solid Rocket Motor Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Shown is a test of the TEM-13 Solid Rocket Motor in support of the Ares/CLV first stage at ATK, Utah . Constellation/Ares project. This image is extracted from a high definition video file and is the highest resolution available.

  16. Solid Rocket Motor Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Shown is a test of the TEM-13 Solid Rocket Motor in support of the Ares/CLV first stage at ATK, Utah . Constellaton/Ares project. This image is extracted from a high definition video file and is the highest resolution available.

  17. Liquid rocket valve assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The design and operating characteristics of valve assemblies used in liquid propellant rocket engines are discussed. The subjects considered are as follows: (1) valve selection parameters, (2) major design aspects, (3) design integration of valve subassemblies, and (4) assembly of components and functional tests. Information is provided on engine, stage, and spacecraft checkout procedures.

  18. Liquid rocket valve components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A monograph on valves for use with liquid rocket propellant engines is presented. The configurations of the various types of valves are described and illustrated. Design criteria and recommended practices for the various valves are explained. Tables of data are included to show the chief features of valve components in use on operational vehicles.

  19. A Brilliant Plume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) on New Horizons captured another dramatic picture of Jupiter's moon Io and its volcanic plumes, 19 hours after the spacecraft's closest approach to Jupiter on Feb. 28, 2007. LORRI took this 75 millisecond exposure at 0035 Universal Time on March 1, 2007, when Io was 2.3 million kilometers (1.4 million miles) from the spacecraft.

    Io's dayside is deliberately overexposed to bring out faint details in the plumes and on the moon's night side. The continuing eruption of the volcano Tvashtar, at the 1 o'clock position, produces an enormous plume roughly 330 kilometers (200 miles) high, which is illuminated both by sunlight and 'Jupiter light.'

    The shadow of Io, cast by the Sun, slices across the plume. The plume is quite asymmetrical and has a complicated wispy texture, for reasons that are still mysterious. At the heart of the eruption incandescent lava, seen here as a brilliant point of light, is reminding scientists of the fire fountains spotted by the Galileo Jupiter orbiter at Tvashtar in 1999.

    The sunlit plume faintly illuminates the surface underneath. 'New Horizons and Io continue to astonish us with these unprecedented views of the solar system's most geologically active body' says John Spencer, deputy leader of the New Horizons Jupiter Encounter Science Team and an Io expert from Southwest Research Institute.

    Because this image shows the side of Io that faces away from Jupiter, the large planet does not illuminate the moon's night side except for an extremely thin crescent outlining the edge of the disk at lower right. Another plume, likely from the volcano Masubi, is illuminated by Jupiter just above this lower right edge. A third and much fainter plume, barely visible at the 2 o'clock position, could be the first plume seen from the volcano Zal Patera.

    As in other New Horizons images of Io, mountains catch the setting Sun just beyond the terminator (the line dividing day and night). The most prominent, seen as a bright vertical line, is the edge of a plateau about 4.5 kilometers (15,000 feet) high, similar in altitude to the Colorado Rockies. Io itself has a diameter of 3,630 kilometers (about 2,250 miles).

    The image is centered at Io coordinates 4 degrees S, 165 degrees W. It has been processed to reduce contrast, in order to show details over the full 1000-to-1 brightness range of the original data.

  20. Gasdynamic approach to small plumes computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genkin, L.; Baer, M.; Falcovitz, J.

    1993-07-01

    The semi-inverse marching characteristics scheme SIMA was extended to treat rotational flows; it is applied to computation of free plumes, starting out from non-uniform nozzle exit flow that reflects substantial viscous effects. For lack of measurements of exit flow in small nozzles, the exit plane flow is approximated by introducing a Power Law Interpolation (PLI) between the exit plane center and lip values. Exit plane flow variables thus approximated, are Mach number, pressure, flow angle and stagnation temperature. This choice is guided by gasdynamic considerations of exhaust flow from small nozzles into vacuum. The PLI is adjusted so as to obtain a match between computations and measurements at intermediate range from the nozzle. Computed plumes were found to be in good agreement with five different sets of small plume experiments. Comparative computations were performed using two alternate methods: the Boynton-Simons point-source approximation, and SIMA computation that started out from a uniform exit flow. It is demonstrated that for small nozzles having an exit flow dominated by viscous effects, the combined SIMA/PLI computational method is reasonably accurate and is dearly superior to either of the two alternate methods.

  1. Gasdynamic approach to small plumes computation

    SciTech Connect

    Genkin, L.; Baer, M.; Falcovitz, J. Technion - Israel Inst. of Technology, Haifa )

    1993-01-01

    The semi-inverse marching characteristics scheme SIMA was extended to treat rotational flows; it is applied to computation of free plumes, starting out from non-uniform nozzle exit flow that reflects substantial viscous effects. For lack of measurements of exit flow in small nozzles, the exit plane flow is approximated by introducing a Power Law Interpolation (PLI) between the exit plane center and lip values. Exit plane flow variables thus approximated, are Mach number, pressure, flow angle and stagnation temperature. This choice is guided by gasdynamic considerations of exhaust flow from small nozzles into vacuum. The PLI is adjusted so as to obtain a match between computations and measurements at intermediate range from the nozzle. Computed plumes were found to be in good agreement with five different sets of small plume experiments. Comparative computations were performed using two alternate methods: the Boynton-Simons point-source approximation, and SIMA computation that started out from a uniform exit flow. It is demonstrated that for small nozzles having an exit flow dominated by viscous effects, the combined SIMA/PLI computational method is reasonably accurate and is dearly superior to either of the two alternate methods. 14 refs.

  2. Validation of scramjet exhaust simulation technique at Mach 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, H. B.; Konopka, W.; Leng, J.

    1979-01-01

    Current design philosophy for hydrogen-fueled, scramjet-powered hypersonic aircraft results in configurations with strong couplings between the engine plume and vehicle aerodynamics. The experimental verification of the scramjet exhaust simulation is described. The scramjet exhaust was reproduced for the Mach 6 flight condition by the detonation tube simulator. The exhaust flow pressure profiles, and to a large extent the heat transfer rate profiles, were then duplicated by cool gas mixtures of Argon and Freon 13B1 or Freon 12. The results of these experiments indicate that a cool gas simulation of the hot scramjet exhaust is a viable simulation technique except for phenomena which are dependent on the wall temperature relative to flow temperature.

  3. Rockets using Liquid Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Busemann, Adolf

    1947-01-01

    It is my task to discuss rocket propulsion using liquid oxygen and my treatment must be highly condensed for the ideas and experiments pertaining to this classic type of rocket are so numerous that one could occupy a whole morning with a detailed presentation. First, with regard to oxygen itself as compared with competing oxygen carriers, it is known that the liquid state of oxygen, in spite of the low boiling point, is more advantageous than the gaseous form of oxygen in pressure tanks, therefore only liquid oxygen need be compared with the oxygen carriers. The advantages of liquid oxygen are absolute purity and unlimited availability at relatively small cost in energy. The disadvantages are those arising from the impossibility of absolute isolation from heat; consequently, allowance must always be made for a certain degree of vaporization and only vented vessels can be used for storage and transportation. This necessity alone eliminates many fields of application, for example, at the front lines. In addition, liquid oxygen has a lower specific weight than other oxygen carriers, therefore many accessories become relatively larger and heavier in the case of an oxygen rocket, for example, the supply tanks and the pumps. The advantages thus become effective only in those cases where definitely scheduled operation and a large ground organization are possible and when the flight requires a great concentration of energy relative to weight. With the aim of brevity, a diagram of an oxygen rocket will be presented and the problem of various component parts that receive particularly thorough investigation in this classic case but which are also often applicable to other rocket types will be referred to.

  4. Rocket center Peenemünde — Personal memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dannenberg, Konrad; Stuhlinger, Ernst

    Von Braun built his first rockets as a young teenager. At 14, he started making plans for rockets for human travel to the Moon and Mars. The German Army began a rocket program in 1929. Two years later, Colonel (later General) Becker contacted von Braun who experimented with rockets in Berlin, gave him a contract in 1932, and, jointly with the Air Force, in 1936 built the rocket center Peenemünde where von Braun and his team developed the A-4 (V-2) rocket under Army auspices, while the Air Force developed the V-1 (buzz bomb), wire-guided bombs, and rocket planes. Albert Speer, impressed by the work of the rocketeers, allowed a modest growth of the Peenemünde project; this brought Dannenberg to the von Braun team in 1940. Hitler did not believe in rockets; he ignored the A-4 project until 1942 when he began to support it, expecting that it could turn the fortunes of war for him. He drastically increased the Peenemünde work force and allowed the transfer of soldiers from the front to Peenemünde; that was when Stuhlinger, in 1943, came to Peenemünde as a Pfc.-Ph.D. Later that year, Himmler wrenched the authority over A-4 production out of the Army's hands, put it under his command, and forced production of the immature rocket at Mittelwerk, and its military deployment against targets in France, Belgium, and England. Throughout the development of the A-4 rocket, von Braun was the undisputed leader of the project. Although still immature by the end of the war, the A-4 had proceeded to a status which made it the first successful long-range precision rocket, the prototype for a large number of military rockets built by numerous nations after the war, and for space rockets that launched satellites and traveled to the Moon and the planets.

  5. Diesel engine exhaust oxidizer

    SciTech Connect

    Kammel, R.A.

    1992-06-16

    This patent describes a diesel engine exhaust oxidizing device. It comprises: an enclosure having an inlet for receiving diesel engine exhaust, a main flow path through the enclosure to an outlet of the enclosure, a by-ass through the enclosure, and a microprocessor control means.

  6. Duplex tab exhaust nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutmark, Ephraim Jeff (Inventor); Martens, Steven (nmn) (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An exhaust nozzle includes a conical duct terminating in an annular outlet. A row of vortex generating duplex tabs are mounted in the outlet. The tabs have compound radial and circumferential aft inclination inside the outlet for generating streamwise vortices for attenuating exhaust noise while reducing performance loss.

  7. Electric field and radio frequency measurements for rocket engine health monitoring applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valenti, Elizabeth L.

    1992-01-01

    Electric-field (EF) and radio-frequency (RF) emissions generated in the exhaust plumes of the diagnostic testbed facility thruster (DTFT) and the SSME are examined briefly for potential applications to plume diagnostics and engine health monitoring. Hypothetically, anomalous engine conditions could produce measurable changes in any characteristic EF and RF spectral signatures identifiable with a 'healthly' plumes. Tests to determine the presence of EF and RF emissions in the DTFT and SSME exhaust plumes were conducted. EF and RF emissions were detected using state-of-the-art sensors. Analysis of limited data sets show some apparent consistencies in spectral signatures. Significant emissions increases were detected during controlled tests using dopants injected into the DTFT.

  8. Evaluation of Geopolymer Concrete for Rocket Test Facility Flame Deflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allgood, Daniel C.; Montes, Carlos; Islam, Rashedul; Allouche, Erez

    2014-01-01

    The current paper presents results from a combined research effort by Louisiana Tech University (LTU) and NASA Stennis Space Center (SSC) to develop a new alumina-silicate based cementitious binder capable of acting as a high performance refractory material with low heat ablation rate and high early mechanical strength. Such a binder would represent a significant contribution to NASA's efforts to develop a new generation of refractory 'hot face' liners for liquid or solid rocket plume environments. This project was developed as a continuation of on-going collaborations between LTU and SSC, where test sections of a formulation of high temperature geopolymer binder were cast in the floor and walls of Test Stand E-1 Cell 3, an active rocket engine test stand flame trench. Additionally, geopolymer concrete panels were tested using the NASA-SSC Diagnostic Test Facility (DTF) thruster, where supersonic plume environments were generated on a 1ft wide x 2ft long x 6 inch deep refractory panel. The DTF operates on LOX/GH2 propellants producing a nominal thrust of 1,200 lbf and the combustion chamber conditions are Pc=625psig, O/F=6.0. Data collected included high speed video of plume/panel area and surface profiles (depth) of the test panels measured on a 1-inch by 1-inch giving localized erosion rates during the test. Louisiana Tech conducted a microstructure analysis of the geopolymer binder after the testing program to identify phase changes in the material.

  9. Exhaust purification apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Shinzawa, M.; Ushimura, S.

    1987-05-05

    An exhaust purification apparatus is described for use in an internal combustion engine having an exhaust conduit through which exhaust particles are discharged together with exhaust gas to the atmosphere. Included is an outer shell having an inlet connected to the exhaust conduit and an outlet connected to the atmosphere. The outer shell contains a trap element and a regenerative burner located upstream of the trap element, the regenerative burner comprising: a cylindrical hollow member fixed to the liner and extending within a combustion chamber to define an evaporation chamber, a glow plug for igniting the mixture supplied into the evaporated chamber when actuated; and a control unit responsive to a regeneration requirement for actuating the glow plug and supplying an air-fuel mixture into the evaporation chamber through the mixture conduit.

  10. Density and optical properties of SPARCS plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, W. A.; Kumer, J. B.; Cooper, C. E., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Propellant gases emitted by attitude control systems such as SPARCS (Solar Pointing Aerobee Rocket Control System) and possible interference with experiments aboard the payloads are discussed. The optical properties of seven actual and potential gases emitted by propellant systems (CF4, N2H4, NH3, N2, CO2, Ar, and He) are presented. A compilation of absorption coefficients from 1 Angstrom to 50 microns and a summary of fluorescent spectra and efficiencies are provided. Since Freon-14 (CF4) is of primary importance to SPARCS, an experimental search for the fluorescent spectrum of CF4 was performed by exciting the gas with 920 Angstrom UV photons. The result was compared with an electron impact induced spectrum of CF4, and conclusions drawn about the nature of the radiating species. A detailed study of the CF4 flow fields and plume densities for typical SPARCS controlled payloads was made using gas dynamic codes which included the effects of vehicle shading and condensation. The importance of the optical properties of CF4 plumes was investigated and it is concluded that absorption is negligible but fluoresence may be significant in some cases.

  11. Simulation of Low-density Nozzle Plumes in Non-zero Ambient Pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Chan-Hong; Dewitt, Kenneth J.; Stubbs, Robert M.; Penko, Paul F.

    1994-01-01

    The direct simulation Monte-Carlo (DSMC) method was applied to the analysis of low-density nitrogen plumes exhausting from a small converging-diverging nozzle into finite ambient pressures. Two cases were considered that simulated actual test conditions in a vacuum facility. The numerical simulations readily captured the complicated flow structure of the overexpanded plumes adjusting to the finite ambient pressures, including Mach disks and barrel shaped shocks. The numerical simulations compared well to experimental data of Rothe.

  12. Particulate exhaust emissions from an experimental combustor. [gas turbine engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norgren, C. T.; Ingebo, R. D.

    1975-01-01

    The concentration of dry particulates (carbon) in the exhaust of an experimental gas turbine combustor was measured at simulated takeoff operating conditions and correlated with the standard smoke-number measurement. Carbon was determined quantitatively from a sample collected on a fiberglass filter by converting the carbon in the smoke sample to carbon dioxide and then measuring the volume of carbon dioxide formed by gas chromatography. At a smoke of 25 (threshold of visibility of the smoke plume for large turbojets) the carbon concentration was 2.8 mg carbon/cu m exhaust gas, which is equivalent to an emission index of 0.17 g carbon/kg fuel.

  13. Contamination control and plume assessment of low-energy thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scialdone, John J.

    1993-01-01

    Potential contamination of a spacecraft cryogenic surface by a xenon (Xe) ion generator was evaluated. The analysis involves the description of the plume exhausted from the generator with its relative component fluxes on the spacecraft surfaces, and verification of the conditions for condensation, adsorption, and sputtering at those locations. The data describing the plume fluxes and their effects on surfaces were obtained from two sources: the tests carried out with the Xe generator in a small vacuum chamber to indicate deposits and sputter on monitor slides; and the extensive tests with a mercury (Hg) ion thruster in a large vacuum chamber. The Hg thruster tests provided data on the neutrals, on low-energy ion fluxes, on high-energy ion fluxes, and on sputtered materials at several locations within the plume.

  14. Hydrostatic Modeling of Buoyant Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroman, A.; Dewar, W. K.; Wienders, N.; Deremble, B.

    2014-12-01

    The Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico has led to increased interest in understanding point source convection dynamics. Most of the existing oil plume models use a Lagrangian based approach, which computes integral measures such as plume centerline trajectory and plume radius. However, this approach doesn't account for feedbacks of the buoyant plume on the ambient environment. Instead, we employ an Eulerian based approach to acquire a better understanding of the dynamics of buoyant plumes. We have performed a series of hydrostatic modeling simulations using the MITgcm. Our results show that there is a dynamical response caused by the presence of the buoyant plume, in that there is a modification of the background flow. We find that the buoyant plume becomes baroclinically unstable and sheds eddies at the neutral buoyancy layer. We also explore different scenarios to determine the effect of the buoyancy source and the temperature stratification on the evolution of buoyant plumes.

  15. ISRO's solid rocket motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagappa, R.; Kurup, M. R.; Muthunayagam, A. E.

    1989-08-01

    Solid rocket motors have been the mainstay of ISRO's sounding rockets and the first generation satellite launch vehicles. For the new launch vehicle under development also, the solid rocket motors contribute significantly to the vehicle's total propulsive power. The rocket motors in use and under development have been developed for a variety of applications and range in size from 30 mm dia employing 450 g of solid propellant—employed for providing a spin to the apogee motors—to the giant 2.8 m dia motor employing nearly 130 tonnes of solid propellant. The initial development, undertaken in 1967 was of small calibre motor of 75 mm dia using a double base charge. The development was essentially to understand the technological elements. Extruded aluminium tubes were used as a rocket motor casing. The fore and aft closures were machined from aluminium rods. The grain was a seven-pointed star with an enlargement of the port at the aft end and was charged into the chamber using a polyester resin system. The nozzle was a metallic heat sink type with graphite throat insert. The motor was ignited with a black powder charge and fired for 2.0 s. Subsequent to this, further developmental activities were undertaken using PVC plastisol based propellants. A class of sounding rockets ranging from 125 to 560 mm calibre were realized. These rocket motors employed improved designs and had delivered lsp ranging from 2060 to 2256 Ns/kg. Case bonding could not be adopted due to the higher cure temperatures of the plastisol propellants but improvements were made in the grain charging techniques and in the design of the igniters and the nozzle. Ablative nozzles based on asbestos phenolic and silica phenolic with graphite inserts were used. For the larger calibre rocket motors, the lsp could be improved by metallic additives. In the early 1970s designs were evolved for larger and more efficient motors. A series of 4 motors for the country's first satellite launch vehicle SLV-3 were developed. The first and second stages of 1 and 0.8 m dia respectively used low carbon steel casing and PBAN propellant. The first stage used segmented construction with a total propellant weight of 8600 kg. The second stage employed about 3 tonnes of the same propellant. The third and fourth stages were of GFRP construction and employed respectively 1100 and 275 kg of CTPB type propellants. Nozzle expansion ratios upto 30 were employed and delivered vacuum lsp of 2766 Ns/kg realized. The fourth stage motor was subsequently used as the apogee motor for orbit injection of India's first geosynchronous satellite—APPLE. All these motors have been flight proven a number of times. Further design improvements have been incorporated and these motors continue to be in use. Starting in 1984 design for a large booster was undertaken. This booster employs a nominal propellant weight of 125 tonne in a 2.8 m dia casing. The motor is expected to be qualified for flight test in 1989. Side by side a high performance motor housing nearly 7 tonnes of propellant in composite casing of 2 m dia and having flex nozzle control system is also under development for upper stage application. Details of the development of the motors, their leading specifications and performance are described.

  16. Laser rocket system analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. S.; Forsyth, J. B.; Skratt, J. P.

    1979-01-01

    The laser rocket systems investigated in this study were for orbital transportation using space-based, ground-based and airborne laser transmitters. The propulsion unit of these systems utilizes a continuous wave (CW) laser beam focused into a thrust chamber which initiates a plasma in the hydrogen propellant, thus heating the propellant and providing thrust through a suitably designed nozzle and expansion skirt. The specific impulse is limited only by the ability to adequately cool the thruster and the amount of laser energy entering the engine. The results of the study showed that, with advanced technology, laser rocket systems with either a space- or ground-based laser transmitter could reduce the national budget allocated to space transportation by 10 to 345 billion dollars over a 10-year life cycle when compared to advanced chemical propulsion systems (LO2-LH2) of equal capability. The variation in savings depends upon the projected mission model.

  17. Hybrid rocket performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederick, Robert A., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    A hybrid rocket is a system consisting of a solid fuel grain and a gaseous or liquid oxidizer. Figure 1 shows three popular hybrid propulsion cycles that are under current consideration. NASA MSFC has teamed with industry to test two hybrid propulsion systems that will allow scaling to motors of potential interest for Titan and Atlas systems, as well as encompassing the range of interest for SEI lunar ascent stages and National Launch System Cargo Transfer Vehicle (NLS CTV) and NLS deorbit systems. Hybrid systems also offer advantages as moderate-cost, environmentally acceptable propulsion system. The objective of this work was to recommend a performance prediction methodology for hybrid rocket motors. The scope included completion of: a literature review, a general methodology, and a simplified performance model.

  18. Advanced rocket propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, Charles J.

    1993-01-01

    Existing NASA research contracts are supporting development of advanced reinforced polymer and metal matrix composites for use in liquid rocket engines of the future. Advanced rocket propulsion concepts, such as modular platelet engines, dual-fuel dual-expander engines, and variable mixture ratio engines, require advanced materials and structures to reduce overall vehicle weight as well as address specific propulsion system problems related to elevated operating temperatures, new engine components, and unique operating processes. High performance propulsion systems with improved manufacturability and maintainability are needed for single stage to orbit vehicles and other high performance mission applications. One way to satisfy these needs is to develop a small engine which can be clustered in modules to provide required levels of total thrust. This approach should reduce development schedule and cost requirements by lowering hardware lead times and permitting the use of existing test facilities. Modular engines should also reduce operational costs associated with maintenance and parts inventories.

  19. Two-Dimensional Motions of Rockets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kang, Yoonhwan; Bae, Saebyok

    2007-01-01

    We analyse the two-dimensional motions of the rockets for various types of rocket thrusts, the air friction and the gravitation by using a suitable representation of the rocket equation and the numerical calculation. The slope shapes of the rocket trajectories are discussed for the three types of rocket engines. Unlike the projectile motions, the…

  20. Two-Dimensional Motions of Rockets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kang, Yoonhwan; Bae, Saebyok

    2007-01-01

    We analyse the two-dimensional motions of the rockets for various types of rocket thrusts, the air friction and the gravitation by using a suitable representation of the rocket equation and the numerical calculation. The slope shapes of the rocket trajectories are discussed for the three types of rocket engines. Unlike the projectile motions, the…