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1

Infrared Imagery of Solid Rocket Exhaust Plumes  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test program consisted of a series of 18 solid rocket motor static firings, simulating the liftoff conditions of the Ares I five-segment Reusable Solid Rocket Motor Vehicle. Primary test objectives included acquiring acoustic and pressure data which will be used to validate analytical models for the prediction of Ares 1 liftoff acoustics and ignition overpressure environments. The test article consisted of a 5% scale Ares I vehicle and launch tower mounted on the Mobile Launch Pad. The testing also incorporated several Water Sound Suppression Systems. Infrared imagery was employed during the solid rocket testing to support the validation or improvement of analytical models, and identify corollaries between rocket plume size or shape and the accompanying measured level of noise suppression obtained by water sound suppression systems.

Moran, Robert P.; Houston, Janice D.

2011-01-01

2

Implementation of microwave transmissions for rocket exhaust plume diagnostics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Rocket-launched vehicles produce a trail of exhaust that contains ions, free electrons, and soot. The exhaust plume increases the effective conductor length of the rocket. A conductor in the presence of an electric field (e.g. near the electric charge stored within a cloud) can channel an electric discharge. The electrical conductivity of the exhaust plume is related to its concentration of free electrons. The risk of a lightning strike in-flight is a function of both the conductivity of the body and its effective length. This paper presents an approach that relates the electron number density of the exhaust plume to its propagation constant. Estimated values of the collision frequency and electron number density generated from a numerical simulation of a rocket plume are used to guide the design of the experimental apparatus. Test par meters are identified for the apparatus designed to transmit a signal sweep form 4 GHz to 7 GHz through the exhaust plume of a J-class solid rocket motor. Measurements of the scattering parameters imply that the transmission does not penetrate the plume, but instead diffracts around it. The electron density 20 cm downstream from the nozzle exit is estimated to be between 2.7x1014 m--3 and 5.6x10 15 m--3.

Coutu, Nicholas George

3

Zone radiometer measurements on a model rocket exhaust plume  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Radiometer for analytical prediction of rocket plume-to-booster thermal radiation and convective heating is described. Applications for engine combustion analysis, incineration, and pollution control by high temperature processing are discussed. Illustrations of equipment are included.

1972-01-01

4

Lidar measurement of TITAN IV rocket exhaust plumes at stratospheric heights  

Microsoft Academic Search

Concern exists over the impact of the emissions of large rockets powered by solid motors upon the ozone layer. A scanning lidar, operating at 532, 355 and 308 nm, has been developed to address this issue. We report the first lidar observations of the rocket exhaust plume in the stratosphere. Over 500 sets of lidar profiles were collected in three

Phan D. Dao; Jerry A. Gelbwachs; Robert Farley; Richard Garner; Philip Soletski; Gilbert Davidson

1996-01-01

5

Hydrazine engine plume contamination mapping. [measuring instruments for rocket exhaust from liquid propellant rocket engines  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Instrumentation for the measurement of plume exhaust specie deposition rates were developed and demonstrated. The instruments, two sets of quartz crystal microbalances, were designed for low temperature operation in the back flow and variable temperature operation in the core flow regions of an exhaust plume. These quartz crystal microbalances performed nominally, and measurements of exhaust specie deposition rates for 8400 number of pulses for a 0.1-lb monopropellant thruster are reported.

Chirivella, J. E.

1975-01-01

6

Determination of Combustion Product Radicals in a Hydrocarbon Fueled Rocket Exhaust Plume  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The identification of metallic effluent materials in a rocket engine exhaust plume indicates the health of the engine. Since 1989, emission spectroscopy of the plume of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) has been used for ground testing at NASA's Stennis Space Center (SSC). This technique allows the identification and quantification of alloys from the metallic elements observed in the plume. With the prospect of hydrocarbon-fueled rocket engines, such as Rocket Propellant 1 (RP-1) or methane (CH4) fueled engines being considered for use in future space flight systems, the contributions of intermediate or final combustion products resulting from the hydrocarbon fuels are of great interest. The effect of several diatomic molecular radicals, such as Carbon Dioxide , Carbon Monoxide, Molecular Carbon, Methylene Radical, Cyanide or Cyano Radical, and Nitric Oxide, needs to be identified and the effects of their band systems on the spectral region from 300 nm to 850 nm determined. Hydrocarbon-fueled rocket engines will play a prominent role in future space exploration programs. Although hydrogen fuel provides for higher engine performance, hydrocarbon fuels are denser, safer to handle, and less costly. For hydrocarbon-fueled engines using RP-1 or CH4 , the plume is different from a hydrogen fueled engine due to the presence of several other species, such as CO2, C2, CO, CH, CN, and NO, in the exhaust plume, in addition to the standard H2O and OH. These species occur as intermediate or final combustion products or as a result of mixing of the hot plume with the atmosphere. Exhaust plume emission spectroscopy has emerged as a comprehensive non-intrusive sensing technology which can be applied to a wide variety of engine performance conditions with a high degree of sensitivity and specificity. Stennis Space Center researchers have been in the forefront of advancing experimental techniques and developing theoretical approaches in order to bring this technology to a more mature stage.

Langford, Lester A.; Allgood, Daniel C.; Junell, Justin C.

2007-01-01

7

On-board Optical Spectrometry for Detection of Mixture Ratio and Eroded Materials in Rocket Engine Exhaust Plume  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Optical spectrometry can provide means to characterize rocket engine exhaust plume impurities due to eroded materials, as well as combustion mixture ratio without any interference with plume. Fiberoptic probes and cables were designed, fabricated and installed on Space Shuttle Main Engines (SSME), allowing monitoring of the plume spectra in real time with a Commercial of the Shelf (COTS) fiberoptic spectrometer, located in a test-stand control room. The probes and the cables survived the harsh engine environments for numerous hot-fire tests. When the plume was seeded with a nickel alloy powder, the spectrometer was able to successfully detect all the metallic and OH radical spectra from 300 to 800 nanometers.

Barkhoudarian, Sarkis; Kittinger, Scott

2006-01-01

8

Probe samples components of rocket engine exhaust  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Water-cooled, cantilevered probe samples the exhaust plume of rocket engines to recover particles for examination. The probe withstands the stresses of a rocket exhaust plume environment for a sufficient period to obtain a useful sample of the exhaust components.

Schumacher, P. E.

1965-01-01

9

Monte Carlo simulation of solid rocket exhaust plumes at high altitude  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The simulation of high altitude exhaust plumes from solid propellant rockets involves numerous complex physical processes which are not adequately understood. The work presented in this thesis aims at advancing the current state of modeling capabilities for these flows by better handling gas-solid interactions, particle rotation and shape effects, widely varying Knudsen number regimes, and radiation transport. First, using the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method as a basis, condensed-phase particles are incorporated into the simulation of a rarefied gas flow. An existing method for the determination of momentum and energy exchange rates between a locally free molecular gas and a solid sphere is extended to nonspherical or rotating particles, by accounting for two-way coupling between the particles and gas. A nonequilibrium crystallization model for liquid Al2O3 droplets is also presented. A new near-equilibrium flow scheme is introduced for efficient gas phase simulation, which is shown to be well suited for DSMC-continuum hybrid two phase flow simulation. A number of Monte Carlo methods have recently been proposed for the simulation of near-equilibrium flows in a manner similar to DSMC. Based on existing methods for the ellipsoidal statistical Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook (ES-BGK) model of the Boltzmann equation, improved procedures are developed to enforce momentum and energy conservation, and to allow for rotational-translational energy exchange in a diatomic gas. In addition, a Monte Carlo ray trace (MCRT) model is developed for plume radiation analysis. Emission, absorption and anisotropic scattering are considered for non-gray condensed phase particles in a flowfield of arbitrary optical thickness. To evaluate the overall performance of the proposed schemes, simulations are performed for a representative solid rocket plume flow. Limited comparisons are made between calculated UV radiance values and measured values from a flight experiment, and relatively good agreement is found. A series of parametric studies involving simulations of this same flow is used to evaluate the influence of physical processes and input parameters related to gas-particle interaction, particle radiation, and the presence of soot. Particle accommodation coefficients and absorption index values are found to significantly influence results, while effects of soot and Al2O3 particle rotation are shown to be negligible.

Burt, Jonathan Matthew

10

Modification of Roberts' Theory for Rocket Exhaust Plumes Eroding Lunar Soil  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In preparation for the Apollo program, Leonard Roberts developed a remarkable analytical theory that predicts the blowing of lunar soil and dust beneath a rocket exhaust plume. Roberts' assumed that the erosion rate is determined by the "excess shear stress" in the gas (the amount of shear stress greater than what causes grains to roll). The acceleration of particles to their final velocity in the gas consumed a portion of the shear stress. The erosion rate continues to increase until the excess shear stress is exactly consumed, thus determining the erosion rate. He calculated the largest and smallest particles that could be eroded based on forces at the particle scale, but the erosion rate equation assumes that only one particle size exists in the soil. He assumed that particle ejection angles are determined entirely by the shape of the terrain, which acts like a ballistic ramp, the particle aerodynamics being negligible. The predicted erosion rate and particle upper size limit appeared to be within an order of magnitude of small-scale terrestrial experiments, but could not be tested more quantitatively at the time. The lower particle size limit and ejection angle predictions were not tested.

Metzger, Philip T.; Lane, John E.; Immer, Christopher D.

2008-01-01

11

Ultraviolet Emission from Rocket Motor Plumes.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Atmospheric limitations on the spectral region of the ultraviolet appropriate for detection of emissions from rocket motor plumes are considered. Origins of ultraviolet emission as spectral continua, bands and lines from the rocket motor exhaust flow and ...

D. Kilpin

1994-01-01

12

Two-dimensional calculation of chemical species and electro-magnetic properties in rocket exhaust plume flow fields  

Microsoft Academic Search

A computational modeling technique and prediction method were presented. Additionally, a comprehensive computer code was programmed. The chemical reactions and radar attenuation that occur in rocket plumes can be predicted precisely by using this code. It is suitable to calculating the parameters of rocket plumes under a near complete-expansion condition using a smokeless (or smoke reduced) propellant. The calculation results

Ping Zhang; Jisong Cui; Qingyun Liu

1993-01-01

13

Modification of Roberts' Theory for Rocket Exhaust Plumes Eroding Lunar Soil  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Roberts' model of lunar soil erosion beneath a landing rocket has been updated in several ways to predict the effects of future lunar landings. The model predicts, among other things, the number of divots that would result on surrounding hardware due to the impact of high velocity particulates, the amount and depth of surface material removed, the volume of ejected soil, its velocity, and the distance the particles travel on the Moon. The results are compared against measured results from the Apollo program and predictions are made for mitigating the spray around a future lunar outpost.

Metzger, Philip T.; Lane, John E.; Immer, Christopher D.

2008-01-01

14

Laser Transmission Measurements of Soot Extinction Coefficients in the Exhaust Plume of the X-34 60k-lb Thrust Fastrac Rocket Engine  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A four-channel laser transmissometer has been used to probe the soot content of the exhaust plume of the X-34 60k-lb thrust Fastrac rocket engine at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. The transmission measurements were made at an axial location about equal 1.65 nozzle diameters from the exit plane and are interpreted in terms of homogeneous radial zones to yield extinction coefficients from 0.5-8.4 per meter. The corresponding soot mass density, spatially averaged over the plume cross section, is, for Rayleigh particles, approximately equal to 0.7 micrograms/cubic cm and alternative particle distributions are briefly considered. Absolute plume radiance at the laser wavelength (515 nm) is estimated from the data at approximately equal to 2.200 K equivalent blackbody temperature, and temporal correlations in emission from several spatial locations are noted.

Dobson, C. C.; Eskridge, R. H.; Lee, M. H.

2000-01-01

15

Laser Transmission Measurements of Soot Extinction Coefficients in the Exhaust Plume of the X-34 60K-lb Thrust Fastrac Rocket Engine  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A four-channel laser transmissometer has been used to probe the soot content of the exhaust plume of the X-34 60k-lb thrust Fastrac rocket engine at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. The transmission measurements were made at an axial location approximately equal 1.65 nozzle diameters from the exit plane and are interpreted in terms of homogeneous radial zones to yield extinction coefficients from 0.5-8.4 per meter. The corresponding soot mass density, spatially averaged over the plume cross section, is, for Rayleigh particles, approximately equal 0.7 microgram/cc, and alternative particle distributions are briefly considered. Absolute plume radiance at the laser wavelength (515 nm) is estimated from the data at approximately equal 2,200 K equivalent blackbody temperature, and temporal correlations in emission from several spatial locations are noted.

Dobson, C. C.; Eskridge, R. H.; Lee, M. H.

2000-01-01

16

Hybrid plume plasma rocket  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A technique for producing thrust by generating a hybrid plume plasma exhaust is disclosed. A plasma flow is generated and introduced into a nozzle which features one or more inlets positioned to direct a flow of neutral gas about the interior of the nozzle. When such a neutral gas flow is combined with the plasma flow within the nozzle, a hybrid plume is constructed including a flow of hot plasma along the center of the nozzle surrounded by a generally annular flow of neutral gas, with an annular transition region between the pure plasma and the neutral gas. The temperature of the outer gas layer is below that of the pure plasma and generally separates the pure plasma from the interior surfaces of the nozzle. The neutral gas flow both insulates the nozzle wall from the high temperatures of the plasma flow and adds to the mass flow rate of the hybrid exhaust. The rate of flow of neutral gas into the interior of the nozzle may be selectively adjusted to control the thrust and specific impulse of the device.

Chang, Franklin R. (inventor)

1989-01-01

17

Three-Dimensional Model of the Spectral Emissivity of Light Scattering Exhaust Plumes  

Microsoft Academic Search

A three-dimensional model of radiation of rocket exhaust plumes is given, which is based on the Monte Carlo simulation method. Two problems associated with the determination of spectral directional radiation of rocket exhaust plumes are treated, namely, the self-radiation of multiple plumes and the scattering of solar radiation incident on a single or multiple plume at an arbitrary angle by

S. T. Surzhikov

2004-01-01

18

Helicopter Escape and Personnel Survival System Exhaust Plume Impingement Study.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Design of the Helicopter Escape and Personnel Survival System for large helicopters requires that rocket exhaust plumes pass in close proximity to the helicopter body. In this report, an engineering analysis is performed to determine the severity of the p...

R. M. McCarten

1970-01-01

19

Extendable Rocket Motor Exhaust Nozzle.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The patent application relates to an extendable exhaust nozzle for rocket motors that can be deployed from a stored compact position to an extended position. The interior surface of the nozzle is provided with a thin layer of a nickel-titanium alloy that ...

J. N. Mason

1975-01-01

20

Characterization of the exhaust particulates in the ground cloud and high-altitude plume of large solid-propellant booster rockets  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The report is concerned with the characterization of Al2O3 particles in the atmosphere. These particles comprise one of the major combustion products of the rocket propellant employed in the Space Shuttle boosters. A ground cloud and stratospheric plume are considered. It is concluded that the typical residence times in the atmosphere are much longer than earlier estimates have indicated.

Strand, L. D.; Bowyer, J. M.; Varsi, G.; Laue, E. G.; Gauldin, R.

1980-01-01

21

Enceladus's Plumes: A Rocket Analogy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The plumes of Enceladus, and the source of the E-ring in the Saturnian system, easily rank as the major, significant, and unexpected discovery of the Cassini mission. While clearly the source of the E-ring,the nature of the sources and the energetics and dynamics of the plumes and underlying jets remains a subject of intensive study. Refinements of the observations suggest supersonic flow of the primary, water-vapor effluent. Such behavior implies a sonic critical point in the flow beginning from a heated reservoir of vapor, through a constriction, and out at supersonic speeds in the space above the plume/jet channels. Such geometry and thermal conditions mimic that of a de Laval nozzle, such as used in rocket engines for converting chemically heated combustion products into a directional flow. A chamber temperature of 180K suggests an outflow speed as high as 0.8 km/s. With a column density across a jet of ~3 x 1016 cm-2 (about twice that of the broad plume) and a jet width of ~10 km, the implied outflow of water molecules is ~3 x 1010 cm-3 x ?/4 (106 cm)2 x 18 amu x 1.66 x 10-27 amu/kg x 8 x 104 cm/s = ~60 kg/s in each constituent jet, of which eight were identified by the Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) during the occultation measurements of the plume region of Enceladus carried out on 24 October 2007.

McNutt, R. L.; Perry, M. E.; Waite, J. H.; Fletcher, G.; Cravens, T. E.

2009-12-01

22

Atmospheric Scavenging of Solid Rocket Exhaust Effluents.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Solid propellant rocket exhaust was directly utilized to ascertain raindrop scavenging rates for hydrogen chloride. Two chambers were used to conduct the experiments; a large, rigid walled, spherical chamber stored the exhaust constituents, while the smal...

D. L. Fenton R. Purcell

1978-01-01

23

Dual-Beam Multiple Wavelength Light Transmittance Measurement For Particle Sizing in Rocket Motor Plumes.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A multiple-wavelength light transmittance measurement system previously used in a laboratory environment to study particles in solid rocket propellant exhaust plumes was modified for use in the field, where high levels of vibration can degrade the accurac...

K. B. Taylor

1993-01-01

24

Analysis of radiative heating of a rocket plume base with the finite-volume method  

Microsoft Academic Search

The finite-volume method for radiation is applied to investigate a radiative heating of rocket base plane due to searchlight and plume emissions. The exhaust plume is assumed to absorb, emit and scatter the radiant energy isotropically, as well as anisotropically, while the medium between the plume boundary and the base plane is cold and nonparticipating. The scattering phase function is

Seung Wook Baek; Man Young Kim

1997-01-01

25

Optical studies of rocket exhaust trails and artificial noctilucent clouds produced by Soyuz rocket launches  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Detailed tracing of an exhaust plume from a rocket's initial trajectory is a scientifically and diagnostically useful technique. It can provide detailed information on the atmosphere's mean winds, wind shears, turbulent regime, and physical state over a wide altitude range from 50 to 200 km. We analyze Soyuz rocket exhaust plumes from Plesetsk on 21 May 2009 and 27 June 2011, which uncovered significantly different atmospheric states and underlying dynamics. The first case showed highly dynamical conditions in the mesosphere, characterized by vortex structures, wind shears, and small-scale turbulent eddies. The estimated turbulent energy dissipation rates ranged 330-460 mW kg-1. A characteristic balloon-shaped trail was observed at altitudes between 105 and 160 km, having rapid expansion rates of 500-800 m s-1 over the time period of 2 min which can be explained by complex gas dynamic processes in the rocket wake involving the collision of shock waves. In the second case, we show evidence that the rocket exhaust trail persisted without any changes during its motion from Plesetsk via Denmark to the UK for 9 h, indicating extremely stable atmospheric conditions. This case introduces a new state of the summer mesosphere—remarkably quiet conditions, probably never observed before. The rocket plumes studied, related to the initial rocket trajectory, are essentially twilight phenomena as seen from the ground using wideband spectrum cameras, that is, the Sun should be below the horizon by 6°. For the first time, we analyze the dynamics of rocket exhaust products at the initial trajectory in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere using detailed photographic imaging taken from the ground.

Dalin, P.; Perminov, V.; Pertsev, N.; Dubietis, A.; Zadorozhny, A.; Smirnov, A.; Mezentsev, A.; Frandsen, S.; Grønne, J.; Hansen, O.; Andersen, H.; McEachran, I.; McEwan, T.; Rowlands, J.; Meyerdierks, H.; Zalcik, M.; Connors, M.; Schofield, I.; Veselovsky, I.

2013-07-01

26

Exhaust Nozzle Plume and Shock Wave Interaction  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Fundamental research for sonic boom reduction is needed to quantify the interaction of shock waves generated from the aircraft wing or tail surfaces with the exhaust plume. Both the nozzle exhaust plume shape and the tail shock shape may be affected by an interaction that may alter the vehicle sonic boom signature. The plume and shock interaction was studied using Computational Fluid Dynamics simulation on two types of convergent-divergent nozzles and a simple wedge shock generator. The nozzle plume effects on the lower wedge compression region are evaluated for two- and three-dimensional nozzle plumes. Results show that the compression from the wedge deflects the nozzle plume and shocks form on the deflected lower plume boundary. The sonic boom pressure signature of the wedge is modified by the presence of the plume, and the computational predictions show significant (8 to 15 percent) changes in shock amplitude.

Castner, Raymond S.; Elmiligui, Alaa; Cliff, Susan

2013-01-01

27

Atmospheric scavenging of solid rocket exhaust effluents  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Solid propellant rocket exhaust was directly utilized to ascertain raindrop scavenging rates for hydrogen chloride. Two chambers were used to conduct the experiments; a large, rigid walled, spherical chamber stored the exhaust constituents, while the smaller chamber housing all the experiments was charged as required with rocket exhaust HCl. Surface uptake experiments demonstrated an HCl concentration dependence for distilled water. Sea water and brackish water HCl uptake was below the detection limit of the chlorine-ion analysis technique used. Plant life HCl uptake experiments were limited to corn and soybeans. Plant age effectively correlated the HCl uptake data. Metallic corrosion was not significant for single 20 minute exposures to the exhaust HCl under varying relative humidity. Characterization of the aluminum oxide particles substantiated the similarity between the constituents of the small scale rocket and the full size vehicles.

Fenton, D. L.; Purcell, R. Y.

1978-01-01

28

Rocket Plume Tomography of Combustion Species.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Interest in accurate detection and targeting of aggressor missiles has received considerable interest with the national priority of developing a missile defense system. Understanding the thermal signatures of the exhaust plumes of such missiles is key to ...

J. M. Kutrieb

2001-01-01

29

Local Effects of Solid Rocket Motor Exhaust on Stratospheric Ozone Concentrations.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Solid Rocket Motors (SRMs) power the initial flight of the Space Shuttle and Titan IV rocket. During those first two minutes after liftoff, the exhaust plumes from these motors emit large quantities of chlorine compounds and alumina particles into the atm...

B. K. George

1996-01-01

30

Radiation from advanced solid rocket motor plumes  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The overall objective of this study was to develop an understanding of solid rocket motor (SRM) plumes in sufficient detail to accurately explain the majority of plume radiation test data. Improved flowfield and radiation analysis codes were developed to accurately and efficiently account for all the factors which effect radiation heating from rocket plumes. These codes were verified by comparing predicted plume behavior with measured NASA/MSFC ASRM test data. Upon conducting a thorough review of the current state-of-the-art of SRM plume flowfield and radiation prediction methodology and the pertinent data base, the following analyses were developed for future design use. The NOZZRAD code was developed for preliminary base heating design and Al2O3 particle optical property data evaluation using a generalized two-flux solution to the radiative transfer equation. The IDARAD code was developed for rapid evaluation of plume radiation effects using the spherical harmonics method of differential approximation to the radiative transfer equation. The FDNS CFD code with fully coupled Euler-Lagrange particle tracking was validated by comparison to predictions made with the industry standard RAMP code for SRM nozzle flowfield analysis. The FDNS code provides the ability to analyze not only rocket nozzle flow, but also axisymmetric and three-dimensional plume flowfields with state-of-the-art CFD methodology. Procedures for conducting meaningful thermo-vision camera studies were developed.

Farmer, Richard C.; Smith, Sheldon D.; Myruski, Brian L.

1994-01-01

31

DESIGN CRITERIA FOR ROCKET EXHAUST SCRUBBERS  

EPA Science Inventory

The report gives results of an engineering study and design of methods for scrubbing the exhaust of static-tested solid rockets. Pollutants of major concern were hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride gases. The best process for removing these gases was found to be a gas-atomize...

32

An expert system for spectroscopic analysis of rocket engine plumes  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The expert system described in this paper analyzes spectral emissions of rocket engine exhaust plumes and shows major promise for use in engine health diagnostics. Plume emission spectroscopy is an important tool for diagnosing engine anomalies, but it is time-consuming and requires highly skilled personnel. The expert system was created to alleviate such problems. The system accepts a spectral plot in the form of wavelength vs intensity pairs and finds the emission peaks in the spectrum, lists the elemental emitters present in the data and deduces the emitter that produced each peak. The system consists of a conventional language component and a commercially available inference engine that runs on an Apple Macintosh computer. The expert system has undergone limited preliminary testing. It detects elements well and significantly decreases analysis time.

Reese, Greg; Valenti, Elizabeth; Alphonso, Keith; Holladay, Wendy

1991-01-01

33

Analysis of the measured effects of the principal exhaust effluents from solid rocket motors  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The feasibility of conducting environmental chamber tests using a small rocket motor to study the physical processes which occur when the exhaust products from solid motors mix with the ambient atmosphere was investigated. Of particular interest was the interaction between hydrogen chloride, aluminum oxide, and water vapor. Several types of instruments for measuring HCl concentrations were evaluated. Under some conditions it was noted that acid aerosols were formed in the ground cloud. These droplets condensed on Al2O3 nuclei and were associated with the rocket exhaust cooling during the period of plume rise to stabilization. Outdoor firings of the solid rocket motors of a 6.4 percent scaled model of the space shuttle were monitored to study the interaction of the exhaust effluents with vegetation downwind of the test site. Data concerning aluminum oxide particles produced by solid rocket motors were evaluated.

Dawbarn, R.; Kinslow, M.; Watson, D. J.

1980-01-01

34

Equations for calculating orbiter surface erosion and breakage rates in IUS and SSUS SRM exhaust plumes  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Equations and coefficients for calculating the flux of solid particles in the exhaust plumes of the interim upper stage and SSUS solid rocket motors (SRM) are considered. Modifications required to account for the independent motions of the orbiter and the SRM, such as will result during an on-orbit SRM firing are described.

Wilson, S. W.

1978-01-01

35

Spectrally resolved Rayleigh scattering diagnostic for hydrogen-oxygen rocket plume studies  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A Rayleigh scattering diagnostic has been developed to measure gas density, temperature, and velocity in the exhaust plume of 100 N thrust class hydrogen-oxygen rockets. The spectrum of argon-ion laser light scattered by the gas molecules in the plume (predominantly water vapor) is measured with a scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer. The gas density is determined from the total scattered power, the gas temperature from the spectral width, and the velocity from the shift in the peak of the spectrum from the frequency of the incident laser light. The diagnostic has been demonstrated in a rocket test cell and a discussion of results is given.

Seasholtz, R. G.; Zupanc, F. J.; Schneider, S. J.

1991-01-01

36

Stratospheric aircraft exhaust plume and wake chemistry  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Progress to date in an ongoing study to analyze and model emissions leaving a proposed High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) from when the exhaust gases leave the engine until they are deposited at atmospheric scales in the stratosphere is documented. A kinetic condensation model was implemented to predict heterogeneous condensation in the plume regime behind an HSCT flying in the lower stratosphere. Simulations were performed to illustrate the parametric dependence of contrail droplet growth on the exhaust condensation nuclei number density and size distribution. Model results indicate that the condensation of water vapor is strongly dependent on the number density of activated CN. Incorporation of estimates for dilution factors into a Lagrangian box model of the far-wake regime with scale-dependent diffusion indicates negligible decrease in ozone and enhancement of water concentrations of 6-13 times background, which decrease rapidly over 1-3 days. Radiative calculations indicate a net differential cooling rate of the plume about 3K/day at the beginning of the wake regime, with a total subsidence ranging between 0.4 and 1 km. Results from the Lagrangian plume model were used to estimate the effect of repeated superposition of aircraft plumes on the concentrations of water and NO(y) along a flight corridor. Results of laboratory studies of heterogeneous chemistry are also described. Kinetics of HCl, N2O5 and ClONO2 uptake on liquid sulfuric acid were measured as a function of composition and temperature. Refined measurements of the thermodynamics of nitric acid hydrates indicate that metastable dihydrate may play a role in the nucleation of more stable trihydrates PSC's.

Miake-Lye, R. C.; Martinez-Sanchez, M.; Brown, R. C.; Kolb, C. E.; Worsnop, D. R.; Zahniser, M. S.; Robinson, G. N.; Rodriguez, J. M.; Ko, M. K. W.; Shia, R-L.

1993-01-01

37

Rocket exhaust ground cloud/atmospheric interactions  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An attempt to identify and minimize the uncertainties and potential inaccuracies of the NASA Multilayer Diffusion Model (MDM) is performed using data from selected Titan 3 launches. The study is based on detailed parametric calculations using the MDM code and a comparative study of several other diffusion models, the NASA measurements, and the MDM. The results are discussed and evaluated. In addition, the physical/chemical processes taking place during the rocket cloud rise are analyzed. The exhaust properties and the deluge water effects are evaluated. A time-dependent model for two aerosol coagulations is developed and documented. Calculations using this model for dry deposition during cloud rise are made. A simple model for calculating physical properties such as temperature and air mass entrainment during cloud rise is also developed and incorporated with the aerosol model.

Hwang, B.; Gould, R. K.

1978-01-01

38

Assessment of analytical techniques for predicting solid propellant exhaust plumes and plume impingement environments  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An analysis of experimental nozzle, exhaust plume, and exhaust plume impingement data is presented. The data were obtained for subscale solid propellant motors with propellant Al loadings of 2, 10 and 15% exhausting to simulated altitudes of 50,000, 100,000 and 112,000 ft. Analytical predictions were made using a fully coupled two-phase method of characteristics numerical solution and a technique for defining thermal and pressure environments experienced by bodies immersed in two-phase exhaust plumes.

Tevepaugh, J. A.; Smith, S. D.; Penny, M. M.

1977-01-01

39

Solar rocket plume/mirror interactions  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The extent to which the plume from a solar thermal rocket will impinge on the solar collector is studied by flow field analysis. Such interaction can adversely affect collector performance through fouling, excessive heat loading, or pressure loads that deform the delicate structures. The geometrical shape of the collector is such that only the flow from the nozzle boundary layer can reach it, but the thrust levels of interest lead to very viscous nozzle flows with thick boundary layers. Reasonable accuracy in solving these flows requires a fully coupled viscous-inviscid procedure. Results show that the fraction of the plume that hits the collector can be well estimated by continuum theory, but that transitional and rarefied phenomena will have some impact on how it is distributed over the surface. Initial results for one representative condition show that approx. 4 percent of the total flow in the jet makes its way to the collector. The pressures on the collector, however, remain quite low because of its distance from the engine. Additional work is needed to document the effect of thrust scaling and wall cooling on impingement.

Yu, Sheng-Tao; Chang, Chau-Lyan; Merkle, Charles L.

1991-01-01

40

Exhaust gas composition measurement. [liquid monopropellant rocket engine performance tests  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The design, installation, checkout, and operation of an exhaust gas composition measurement system for collecting and analyzing the exhaust gas from a liquid monopropellant rocket engine are described. Design guidelines are given for the critical components of each portion of the system to provide an exhaust gas composition measurement which meets the performance criteria specified.

1979-01-01

41

Monopropellant thruster exhaust plume contamination measurements  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The potential spacecraft contaminants in the exhaust plume of a 0.89N monopropellant hydrazine thruster were measured in an ultrahigh quartz crystal microbalances located at angles of approximately 0 deg, + 15 deg and + or - 30 deg with respect to the nozzle centerline. The crystal temperatures were controlled such that the mass adhering to the crystal surface at temperatures of from 106 K to 256 K could be measured. Thruster duty cycles of 25 ms on/5 seconds off, 100 ms on/10 seconds off, and 200 ms on/20 seconds off were investigated. The change in contaminant production with thruster life was assessed by subjecting the thruster to a 100,000 pulse aging sequence and comparing the before and after contaminant deposition rates. The results of these tests are summarized, conclusions drawn, and recommendations given.

Baerwald, R. K.; Passamaneck, R. S.

1977-01-01

42

Rocket Plume Scaling for Orion Wind Tunnel Testing.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A wind tunnel test program was undertaken to assess the jet interaction effects caused by the various solid rocket motors used on the Orion Launch Abort Vehicle (LAV). These interactions of the external flowfield and the various rocket plumes can cause lo...

G. J. Brauckmann J. S. Greathouse M. E. White

2011-01-01

43

Combustion Model of Supersonic Rocket Exhausts in an Entrained Flow Enclosure  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper describes the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model developed to simulate the supersonic rocket exhaust in an entrained flow cylinder. The model can be used to study the plume-induced environment due to static firing tests of the Taurus-II launch vehicle. The finite-rate chemistry is used to model the combustion process involving rocket propellant (RP-1) and liquid oxidizer (LOX). A similar chemical reacting model is also used to simulate the mixing of rocket plume and ambient air. The model provides detailed information on the gas concentration and other flow parameters within the enclosed region, thus allowing different operating scenarios to be examined in an efficient manner. It is shown that the real gas influence is significant and yields better agreement with the theory.

Vu, Bruce T.; Oliveira, Justin

2011-01-01

44

Combustion Model of Supersonic Rocket Exhausts in an Entrained Flow Enclosure  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper describes the Computation Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model developed to simulate the supersonic rocket exhaust in an entrained flow cylinder. The model can be used to study the plume-induced environment due to static firing test of the Taurus II launch vehicle. The finite rate chemistry is used to model the combustion process involving rocket propellant (RP 1) and liquid oxidizer (LOX). A similar chemical reacting model is also used to simulate the mixing of rocket plume and ambient air. The model provides detailed information on the gas concentration and other flow parameters within the enclosed region thus allowing different operating scenarios to be examined in an efficient manner. It is shown that the real gas influence is significant and yields better agreement with the theory.

Vu, Bruce; Oliveira, Justin

2011-01-01

45

Plume dispersion of the exhaust from a cryogenic wind tunnel  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An analytical model was developed to predict the behavior of the plume exhausting from the cryogenic National Transonic Facility. Temperature, visibility, oxygen concentration, and flow characteristics of the plume are calculated for distance downwind of the stack exhaust. Negative buoyancy of the cold plume is included in the analysis. Compared to photographic observations, the model predicts the centerline trajectory of the plume fairly accurately, but underpredicts the extent of fogging. The diffusion coefficient is revised to bring the model into better agreement with observations.

Lassiter, William S.

1987-01-01

46

Rocket-Plume Spectroscopy Simulation for Hydrocarbon-Fueled Rocket Engines  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The UV-Vis spectroscopic system for plume diagnostics monitors rocket engine health by using several analytical tools developed at Stennis Space Center (SSC), including the rocket plume spectroscopy simulation code (RPSSC), to identify and quantify the alloys from the metallic elements observed in engine plumes. Because the hydrocarbon-fueled rocket engine is likely to contain C2, CO, CH, CN, and NO in addition to OH and H2O, the relevant electronic bands of these molecules in the spectral range of 300 to 850 nm in the RPSSC have been included. SSC incorporated several enhancements and modifications to the original line-by-line spectral simulation computer program implemented for plume spectral data analysis and quantification in 1994. These changes made the program applicable to the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) and the Diagnostic Testbed Facility Thruster (DTFT) exhaust plume spectral data. Modifications included updating the molecular and spectral parameters for OH, adding spectral parameter input files optimized for the 10 elements of interest in the spectral range from 320 to 430 nm and linking the output to graphing and analysis packages. Additionally, the ability to handle the non-uniform wavelength interval at which the spectral computations are made was added. This allowed a precise superposition of wavelengths at which the spectral measurements have been made with the wavelengths at which the spectral computations are done by using the line-by-line (LBL) code. To account for hydrocarbon combustion products in the plume, which might interfere with detection and quantification of metallic elements in the spectral region of 300 to 850 nm, the spectroscopic code has been enhanced to include the carbon-based combustion species of C2, CO, and CH. In addition, CN and NO have spectral bands in 300 to 850 nm and, while these molecules are not direct products of hydrocarbon-oxygen combustion systems, they can show up if nitrogen or a nitrogen compound is present as an impurity in the propellants and/or these can form in the boundary layer as a result of interaction of the hot plume with the atmosphere during the ground testing of engines. Ten additional electronic band systems of these five molecules have been included into the code. A comprehensive literature search was conducted to obtain the most accurate values for the molecular and the spectral parameters, including Franck-Cordon factors and electronic transition moments for all ten band systems. For each elemental transition in the RPSSC, six spectral parameters - Doppler broadened line width at half-height, pressure-broadened line width at half-height, electronic multiplicity of the upper state, electronic term energy of the upper state, Einstein transition probability coefficient, and the atomic line center - are required. Input files have been created for ten elements of Ni, Fe, Cr, Co, Cu, Ca, Mn, Al, Ag, and Pd, which retain only relatively moderate to strong transitions in 300 to 430 nm spectral range for each element. The number of transitions in the input files is 68 for Ni; 148 for Fe; 6 for Cr; 87 for Co; 1 for Ca; 3 for Mn; 2 each for Cu, Al, and Ag; and 11 for Pd.

Tejwani, Gopal D.

2010-01-01

47

Mechanisms of Exhaust Pollutants and Plume Formation in Continuous Combustion.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The investigation of exhaust pollutant and plume formation in continuous combustion is a combined analytical and experimental study of turbulent, backmixed combustion in gas turbines. Experiments are being conducted operating with premixed methane/air and...

G. S. Samuelsen R. E. Peck

1975-01-01

48

Rayleigh scattering in supersonic high-temperature exhaust plumes  

Microsoft Academic Search

A supersonic exhaust plume test rig and a Rayleigh scattering system were developed. Molecular number densities in the supersonic\\u000a high-temperature exhaust plume with and without an annular base flow were investigated. The physical meaning of the inferred\\u000a mean temperature from the number density measurement in turbulent flows is clarified. For both flows, the potential core extends\\u000a up to about six

L. Y. Jiang; J. P. Sislian

2002-01-01

49

Rocket plume flowfield characterization using laser Rayleigh scattering  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A Doppler-resolved laser Rayleigh scattering diagnostic was applied to a 111 N thrust, regenerative and fuel-film cooled, gaseous hydrogen/gaseous oxygen rocket engine. The axial and radial mean gas velocities were measured from the net Doppler shifts observed for two different scattering angles. Translational temperatures and number densities were estimated from the Doppler widths and scattered intensities, respectively, by assuming that water was the dominant scattering species in the exhaust. The experimental results are compared with theoretical predictions from a full Navier-Stokes code (RD/RPLUS) and the JANNAF Two-Dimensional Kinetics (TDK) and Standardized Plume Flowfield (SPF-II) codes. Discrepancies between the measured and predicted axial velocities, temperatures, and number densities are evident. Radial velocity measurements, however, show excellent agreement with predictions. The discrepancies are attributed primarily to inefficient mixing and combustion caused by the injection of excessive oxidizer along one side of the thrust chamber. Thrust and mass flow rate estimates obtained from the Rayleigh measurements show excellent agreement with the globally measured values.

Zupanc, Frank J.; Weiss, Jonathan M.

1992-01-01

50

Radiation\\/convection coupling in rocket motors and plumes  

Microsoft Academic Search

The three commonly used propellant systems - H2\\/O2, RP-1\\/O2, and solid propellants - primarily radiate as molecular emitters, non-scattering small particles, and scattering larger particles, respectively. Present technology has accepted the uncoupling of the radiation analysis from that of the flowfield. This approximation becomes increasingly inaccurate as one considers plumes, interior rocket chambers, and nuclear rocket propulsion devices. This study

R. C. Farmer; A. J. Saladino

1993-01-01

51

Environment hazard estimates. [rocket exhaust gas diffusion models  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Emission into the atmosphere of aerospace vehicle exhaust effluents and by-products is considered by using atmospheric diffusion models to calculate downwind concentrations and dosages from various engine and solid rocket booster (SRB) exhaust by-products. A major effort is being made to gather detailed data on the chemical reactions that take place between the exhaust effluents and the atmosphere. Basic diffusion estimation formulas consider normal exhaust releases, abnormal releases, leaks, and inadvertent spills. Cloud rise formulas for use in source identification are included and meteorological inputs covered.

Kaufman, J. W.; Stephens, J. B.; Hill, C. K.; Susko, M.

1973-01-01

52

Instrumentation for In-Flight SSME Rocket Engine Plume Spectroscopy  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper describes instrumentation that is under development for an in-flight demonstration of a plume spectroscopy system on the space shuttle main engine. The instrumentation consists of a nozzle mounted optical probe for observation of the plume, and a spectrometer for identification and quantification of plume content. This instrumentation, which is intended for use as a diagnostic tool to detect wear and incipient failure in rocket engines, will be validated by a hardware demonstration on the Technology Test Bed engine at the Marshall Space Flight Center.

Madzsar, George C.; Bickford, Randall L.; Duncan, David B.

1994-01-01

53

ASRM plume deflector analysis program. [advanced solid rocket motor  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper presents analytical conclusions resulting from subscale solid rocket motor tests and flowfield modeling for a plume deflector. Loads, flow characteristics, and corresponding material behavior were predicted or observed and will be used in final design of the deflector. The efforts resulted in quantifiable size reductions and lower cost material selections, which will significantly reduce the deflector cost while meeting performance requirements.

Dawson, Michael C.; Douglas, Freddie, III; Orlin, Peter A.

1992-01-01

54

The effects of the exhaust plume on the lightning triggering conditions for launch vehicles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Apollo 12 and Atlas Centaur 67 are two launch vehicles that have experienced triggered lightning strikes. Serious consequences resulted from the events; in the case of Atlas Centaur 67, the vehicle and the payload were lost. These events indicate that it is necessary to develop launch rules which would prevent such occurrences. In order to develop valid lightning related rules, it is necessary to understand the effects of the plume. Some have assumed that the plume can be treated as a perfect conductor, and have computed electric field enhancement factors on that basis. The authors have looked at the plume, and believe that these models are not correct, because they ignore the fluid motion of the conducting plates. The authors developed a model which includes this flow character. In this model, the external field is excluded from the plume as it would be for any good conductor, but, in addition, the charge must distribute so that the charge density is zero at some location in the exhaust. When this condition is included in the calculation of triggering enhancement factors, they can be two to three times larger than calculated by other methods which include a conductive plume but don't include the correct boundary conditions. Here, the authors review the relevant features of rocket exhausts for the triggered lightning problem, present an approach for including flowing conductive gases, and present preliminary calculations to demonstrate the effect that the plume has on enhancement factors.

Eriksen, Frederick J.; Rudolph, Terence H.; Perala, Rodney A.

1991-01-01

55

Wavelength-Agile Optical Sensor for Exhaust Plume and Cryogenic Fluid Interrogation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Two optical sensors developed in UW-Madison labs were evaluated for their potential to characterize rocket engine exhaust plumes and liquid oxygen (LOX) fluid properties. The plume sensor is based on wavelength-agile absorption spectroscopy A device called a chirped white pulse emitter (CWPE) is used to generate the wavelength agile light, scanning, for example, 1340 - 1560 nm every microsecond. Properties of the gases in the rocket plume (for example temperature and water mole fraction) can be monitored using these wavelength scans. We have performed preliminary tests in static gas cells, a laboratory GOX/GH2 thrust chamber, and a solid-fuel hybrid thrust chamber, and these initial tests demonstrate the potential of the CWPE for monitoring rocket plumes. The LOX sensor uses an alternative to wavelength agile sensing: two independent, fixed-wavelength lasers are combined into a single fiber. One laser is absorbed by LOX and the other not: by monitoring the differential transmission the LOX concentration in cryogenic feed lines can be inferred. The sensor was successful in interrogating static LOX pools in laboratory tests. Even in ice- and bubble-laden cryogenic fluids, LOX concentrations were measured to better than 1% with a 3 microsec time constant.

Sanders, Scott T.; Chiaverini, Martin J.; Gramer, Daniel J.

2004-01-01

56

Submillimeter-wave properties of thermospheric rocket plumes  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The problem of detecting rocket plumes at thermospheric altitudes with satellite-borne submillimeter-wave radiometers is examined theoretically. To estimate the sizes of plume signatures contrasted against a 250-K earth background or in self-emission against the cold sky, a computer program has been developed to predict plume brightness temperatures and optical depths of rotational lines of plume molecular constituents (e.g., H2O) as a function of distance from the nozzle. The methods employed in the computations are described in general terms, and examples are presented to indicate that detectable H2O signatures extending to several thousand nozzle diameters should exist at plume altitudes above 250 km.

Litvak, M. M.; Weiss, J. A.; Dionne, G. F.

1980-01-01

57

Stratospheric aluminum oxide. [possibly from solid-fuel rocket exhausts  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Balloons and U-2 aircraft were used to collect micrometer-sized stratospheric aerosols. It was discovered that for the past 6 years at least, aluminum oxide spheres have been the major stratospheric particulate in the size range from 3 to 8 micrometers. The most probable source of the spheres is the exhaust from solid-fuel rockets.

Brownlee, D. E.; Tomandl, D.; Ferry, G. V.

1976-01-01

58

Atmospheric scavenging of hydrochloric acid. [from rocket exhaust  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The scavenging of hydrogen chloride from a solid rocket exhaust cloud was investigated. Water drops were caused to fall through a confined exhaust cloud and then analyzed to determine the amount of HCl captured during fall. Bubblers were used to measure HCl concentration within the chamber. The measured chamber HCl concentration, together with the measured HCl deposition on the chamber walls, accounted for 81 to 94% of the theoretical HCl. It was found that the amount of HCl captured was approximately one-half of that predicted by the Frossling correlation. No effect of humidity was detected through a range of 69-98% R.H.. The scavenging of HCl from a solid rocket exhaust cloud was calculated using an idealized Kennedy Space Center rain cycle. Results indicate that this cycle would reduce the cloud HCl concentration to 20.6% if its value in the absence of rain.

Knutson, E. O.; Fenton, D. L.

1975-01-01

59

Predicting engine parameters using the optic spectrum of the space shuttle main engine exhaust plume  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Optical Plume Anomaly Detection (OPAD) system is under development to predict engine anomalies and engine parameters of the Space Shuttle's Main Engine (SSME). The anomaly detection is based on abnormal metal concentrations in the optical spectrum of the rocket plume. Such abnormalities could be indicative of engine corrosion or other malfunctions. Here, we focus on the second task of the OPAD system, namely the prediction of engine parameters such as rated power level (RPL) and mixture ratio (MR). Because of the high dimensionality of the spectrum, we developed a linear algorithm to resolve the optical spectrum of the exhaust plume into a number of separate components, each with a different physical interpretation. These components are used to predict the metal concentrations and engine parameters for online support of ground-level testing of the SSME. Currently, these predictions are labor intensive and cannot be done online. We predict RPL using neural networks and give preliminary results.

Srivastava, Ashok N.; Buntine, Wray

1995-01-01

60

Vortex wake and exhaust plume interaction, including ground effect  

Microsoft Academic Search

Computational modeling and studies of the near-field wake-vortex turbulent flows, far-field turbulent wake- vortex\\/exhaust-plume interaction for subsonic and High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) airplane, and wake- vortex\\/exhaust-plume interaction with the ground are carried out. The three-dimensional, compressible Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations are solved using the implicit, upwind, Roe-flux-differencing, finite-volume scheme. The turbulence models of Baldwin and Lomax, one-equation model of

Ihab Gaber Adam

1998-01-01

61

Improvement of Rocket Engine Plume Analysis Techniques  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A nozzle plume flow field code was developed. The RAMP code which was chosen as the basic code is of modular construction and has the following capabilities: two phase with two phase transonic solution; a two phase, reacting gas (chemical equilibrium reaction kinetics), supersonic inviscid nozzle/plume solution; and is operational for inviscid solutions at both high and low altitudes. The following capabilities were added to the code: a direct interface with JANNAF SPF code; shock capturing finite difference numerical operator; two phase, equilibrium/frozen, boundary layer analysis; a variable oxidizer to fuel ratio transonic solution; an improved two phase transonic solution; and a two phase real gas semiempirical nozzle boundary layer expansion.

Smith, S. D.

1982-01-01

62

Numerical Simulation of Rocket Exhaust Interaction with Lunar Soil  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This technology development originated from the need to assess the debris threat resulting from soil material erosion induced by landing spacecraft rocket plume impingement on extraterrestrial planetary surfaces. The impact of soil debris was observed to be highly detrimental during NASA s Apollo lunar missions and will pose a threat for any future landings on the Moon, Mars, and other exploration targets. The innovation developed under this program provides a simulation tool that combines modeling of the diverse disciplines of rocket plume impingement gas dynamics, granular soil material liberation, and soil debris particle kinetics into one unified simulation system. The Unified Flow Solver (UFS) developed by CFDRC enabled the efficient, seamless simulation of mixed continuum and rarefied rocket plume flow utilizing a novel direct numerical simulation technique of the Boltzmann gas dynamics equation. The characteristics of the soil granular material response and modeling of the erosion and liberation processes were enabled through novel first principle-based granular mechanics models developed by the University of Florida specifically for the highly irregularly shaped and cohesive lunar regolith material. These tools were integrated into a unique simulation system that accounts for all relevant physics aspects: (1) Modeling of spacecraft rocket plume impingement flow under lunar vacuum environment resulting in a mixed continuum and rarefied flow; (2) Modeling of lunar soil characteristics to capture soil-specific effects of particle size and shape composition, soil layer cohesion and granular flow physics; and (3) Accurate tracking of soil-borne debris particles beginning with aerodynamically driven motion inside the plume to purely ballistic motion in lunar far field conditions. In the earlier project phase of this innovation, the capabilities of the UFS for mixed continuum and rarefied flow situations were validated and demonstrated for lunar lander rocket plume flow impingement under lunar vacuum conditions. Applications and improvements to the granular flow simulation tools contributed by the University of Florida were tested against Earth environment experimental results. Requirements for developing, validating, and demonstrating this solution environment were clearly identified, and an effective second phase execution plan was devised. In this phase, the physics models were refined and fully integrated into a production-oriented simulation tool set. Three-dimensional simulations of Apollo Lunar Excursion Module (LEM) and Altair landers (including full-scale lander geometry) established the practical applicability of the UFS simulation approach and its advanced performance level for large-scale realistic problems.

Liever, Peter; Tosh, Abhijit; Curtis, Jennifer

2012-01-01

63

Simulation of UV atomic radiation for application in exhaust plume spectrometry  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Quantitative analysis of exhaust plume spectral data has long been a goal of developers of advanced engine health monitoring systems which incorporate optical measurements of rocket exhaust constituents. Discussed herein is the status of present efforts to model and predict atomic radiation spectra and infer free-atom densities from emission/absorption measurements as part of the Optical Plume Anomaly Detection (OPAD) program at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). A brief examination of the mathematical formalism is provided in the context of predicting radiation from the Mach disk region of the SSME exhaust flow at nominal conditions during ground level testing at MSFC. Computational results are provided for Chromium and Copper at selected transitions which indicate a strong dependence upon broadening parameter values determining the absorption-emission line shape. Representative plots of recent spectral data from the Stennis Space Center (SSC) Diagnostic Test Facility (DTF) rocket engine are presented and compared to numerical results from the present self-absorbing model; a comprehensive quantitative analysis will be reported at a later date.

Wallace, T. L.; Powers, W. T.; Cooper, A. E.

1993-01-01

64

Computational fluid dynamics and frequency-dependent finite-difference time-domain method coupling for the interaction between microwaves and plasma in rocket plumes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Under certain conditions during rocket flights, ionized exhaust plumes from solid rocket motors may interfere with radio frequency transmissions. To understand the relevant physical processes involved in this phenomenon and establish a prediction process for in-flight attenuation levels, we attempted to measure microwave attenuation caused by rocket exhaust plumes in a sea-level static firing test for a full-scale solid propellant rocket motor. The microwave attenuation level was calculated by a coupling simulation of the inviscid-frozen-flow computational fluid dynamics of an exhaust plume and detailed analysis of microwave transmissions by applying a frequency-dependent finite-difference time-domain method with the Drude dispersion model. The calculated microwave attenuation level agreed well with the experimental results, except in the case of interference downstream the Mach disk in the exhaust plume. It was concluded that the coupling estimation method based on the physics of the frozen plasma flow with Drude dispersion would be suitable for actual flight conditions, although the mixing and afterburning in the plume should be considered depending on the flow condition.

Kinefuchi, K.; Funaki, I.; Shimada, T.; Abe, T.

2012-10-01

65

Measurement and Characterization of Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor Plume Acoustics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Lift-off acoustic environments generated by the future Ares I launch vehicle are assessed by the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) acoustics team using several prediction tools. This acoustic environment is directly caused by the Ares I First Stage booster, powered by the five-segment Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRMV). The RSRMV is a larger-thrust derivative design from the currently used Space Shuttle solid rocket motor, the Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM). Lift-off acoustics is an integral part of the composite launch vibration environment affecting the Ares launch vehicle and must be assessed to help generate hardware qualification levels and ensure structural integrity of the vehicle during launch and lift-off. Available prediction tools that use free field noise source spectrums as a starting point for generation of lift-off acoustic environments are described in the monograph NASA SP-8072: "Acoustic Loads Generated by the Propulsion System." This monograph uses a reference database for free field noise source spectrums which consist of subscale rocket motor firings, oriented in horizontal static configurations. The phrase "subscale" is appropriate, since the thrust levels of rockets in the reference database are orders of magnitude lower than the current design thrust for the Ares launch family. Thus, extrapolation is needed to extend the various reference curves to match Ares-scale acoustic levels. This extrapolation process yields a subsequent amount of uncertainty added upon the acoustic environment predictions. As the Ares launch vehicle design schedule progresses, it is important to take every opportunity to lower prediction uncertainty and subsequently increase prediction accuracy. Never before in NASA s history has plume acoustics been measured for large scale solid rocket motors. Approximately twice a year, the RSRM prime vendor, ATK Launch Systems, static fires an assembled RSRM motor in a horizontal configuration at their test facility in Utah. The remaining RSRM static firings will take place on elevated terrain, with the nozzle exit plume being mostly undeflected and the landscape allowing placement of microphones within direct line of sight to the exhaust plume. These measurements will help assess the current extrapolation process by direct comparison between subscale and full scale solid rocket motor data.

Kenny, Jeremy; Hobbs, Chris; Plotkin, Ken; Pilkey, Debbie

2009-01-01

66

Studies of the exhaust products from solid propellant rocket motors  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This study was undertaken to determine the feasibility of conducting environmental chamber tests on the physical processes which occur when a solid rocket motor exhaust mixes with the ambient atmosphere. Of particular interest was the interaction between hydrogen chloride, aluminum oxide, and water vapor. The program consisted of three phases: (1) building a small rocket motor and using it to provide the exhaust species in a controlled environment; (2) evaluating instruments used to detect and measure HCl concentrations and if possible determining whether the HCl existed in the gaseous state or as an acid aerosol; (3) monitoring a series of 6.4-percent scale space shuttle motor tests and comparing the results to the environmental chamber studies. Eighteen firings were conducted in an environmental chamber with the initial ambient relative humidity set at values from 29 to 100 percent. Two additional firings were made in a large shed, and four were made on an open concrete apron. Six test firings at MSFC were monitored, and the ground level concentrations are reported. Evidence is presented which shows that the larger Al2O3 (5 to 50 micrometers) particles from the rocket motor can act as condensation nuclei. Under appropriate ambient conditions where there is sufficient water vapor this results in the formation of an acid aerosol. Droplets of this acid were detected both in the environmental chamber and in the scaled shuttle engine tests.

Dawbarn, R.; Kinslow, M.

1976-01-01

67

Vortex wake and exhaust plume interaction, including ground effect  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Computational modeling and studies of the near-field wake-vortex turbulent flows, far-field turbulent wake- vortex/exhaust-plume interaction for subsonic and High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) airplane, and wake- vortex/exhaust-plume interaction with the ground are carried out. The three-dimensional, compressible Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations are solved using the implicit, upwind, Roe-flux-differencing, finite-volume scheme. The turbulence models of Baldwin and Lomax, one-equation model of Spalart and Allmaras and two-equation shear stress transport model of Menter are implemented with the RANS solver for turbulent-flow modeling. For the near-field study, computations are carried out on a fine grid for a rectangular wing with a NACA-0012 airfoil section and a rounded tip. The focus of study is the tip-vortex development, the near-wake-vortex roll-up, and validation of the results with the available experimental data. For the far-field study, the computations of wake-vortex interaction with the exhaust-plume of a single engine of a medium-size subsonic aircraft in a holding condition and two engines of a HSCT in a cruise condition are carried out using an overlapping zonal method for several miles downstream. The overlapping zonal method has been carefully developed and investigated for accurate and efficient calculations of the far-field wake-vortex flow. The results of the subsonic flow are compared with those of a Parabolized Navier-Stokes (PNS) solver known as the UNIWAKE code. Next, the problem of wake-vortex/ground interaction is investigated. For the simulation of this problem, typical velocity profiles of a tip vortex with and without the exhaust-plume temperature profiles are used for inflow boundary conditions and the computations are carried out using the overlapping zonal method for long distances downstream. The effects of the exhaust-plume temperature on the vortex descent, ground boundary-layer separation, vortex rebound and vortex decay are studied and validated with the available experimental data. A parametric study, which covers the effects of atmospheric conditions such as axial wind, crosswind, wind shear, turbulence and, Reynolds number on vortex motion and dynamics near the ground, is also carried out.

Adam, Ihab Gaber

68

Plume spectrometry for liquid rocket engine health monitoring  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An investigation of Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) testing failures identified optical events which appeared to be precursors of those failures. A program was therefore undertaken to detect plume trace phenomena characteristic of the engine and to design a monitoring system, responsive to excessive activity in the plume, capable of delivering a warning of an anomalous condition. By sensing the amount of extraneous material entrained in the plume and considering engine history, it may be possible to identify wearing of failing components in time for a safe shutdown and thus prevent a catastrophic event. To investigate the possibilities of safe shutdown and thus prevent a monitor to initiate the shutdown procedure, a large amount of plume data were taken from SSME firings using laboratory instrumentation. Those data were used to design a more specialized instrument dedicated to rocket plume diagnostics. The spectral wavelength range of the baseline data was about 220 nanometers (nm) to 15 micrometer with special attention given to visible and near UV. The data indicates that a satisfactory design will include a polychromator covering the range of 250 nM to 1000 nM, along with a continuous coverage spectrometer, each having a resolution of at least 5A degrees. The concurrent requirements for high resolution and broad coverage are normally at odds with one another in commercial instruments, therefore necessitating the development of special instrumentation. The design of a polychromator is reviewed herein, with a detailed discussion of the continuous coverage spectrometer delayed to a later forum. The program also requires the development of applications software providing detection, variable background discrimination, noise reduction, filtering, and decision making based on varying historical data.

Powers, William T.; Sherrell, F. G.; Bridges, J. H., III; Bratcher, T. W.

1988-01-01

69

Injection of Nuclear Rocket Engine Exhaust into Deep Unsaturated Zones  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Nuclear rocket engine technology is being considered as a means of interplanetary vehicle propulsion for a manned mission to Mars. To achieve this, a test and development facility must be constructed to safely run nuclear engines. The testing of nuclear engines in the 1950's and 1960's was accomplished by exhausting the engine gases into the atmosphere, a practice that is no longer acceptable. Injection into deep unsaturated zones of radioactive exhaust gases and water vapor associated with the testing of nuclear rocket engines is being considered as a way of sequestering radionuclides from the environment. Numerical simulations were conducted to determine the ability of an unsaturated zone with the hydraulic properties of Frenchman Flat alluvium at the Nevada Test Site to contain gas-phase radionuclides. Gas and water vapor were injected for two hours at rates of 14.5 kg s-1 and 15 kg s-1, respectively, in an interval between 100 and 430 m below the land surface into alluvium with an intrinsic permeability of 10-11 m2 and porosity of 0.35. The results show that during a test of an engine, radionuclides with at least greater than 10-year half-lives may reach the land surface within several years after injection. Radionuclide transport is primarily controlled by the upward pressure gradient from the point of injection to the lower (atmospheric) pressure boundary condition at the land surface. Radionuclides with half-lives on the order of days should undergo enough decay prior to reaching the land surface. A cooling water vapor injected into the unsaturated zone simultaneously with the exhaust gas will condense within several meters of the injection point and drain downward toward the water table. However, the nearly horizontal hydraulic groundwater gradient present in several of the basins at NTS should limit lateral migration of radionuclides away from the vicinity of injection.

Cooper, C. A.; Decker, D.

2008-05-01

70

3Dimensional Model of the Influences of Solid Rocket Exhausts with the Ozone Layer  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reports the analytical results of the influences of solid rocket exhausts on ozone layer. We developed the three dimensional analytical model and compared its analytical results of the interference between solid rocket exhausts and components in ozone layer with observation data. As a result of analysis, it was shown that almost all ozone was lost by the quick

Shinichi Takenaka; Yoshiki Yamagiwa

2004-01-01

71

Development of a miniature solid propellant rocket motor for use in plume simulation studies  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A miniature solid propellant rocket motor has been developed to be used in a program to determine those parameters which must be duplicated in a cold gas flow to produce aerodynamic effects on an experimental model similar to those produced by hot, particle-laden exhaust plumes. Phenomena encountered during the testing of the miniature solid propellant motors included erosive propellant burning caused by high flow velocities parallel to the propellant surface, regressive propellant burning as a result of exposed propellant edges, the deposition of aluminum oxide on the nozzle surfaces sufficient to cause aerodynamic nozzle throat geometry changes, and thermal erosion of the nozzle throat at high chamber pressures. A series of tests was conducted to establish the stability of the rocket chamber pressure and the repeatibility of test conditions. Data are presented which define the tests selected to represent the final test matrix. Qualitative observations are also presented concerning the phenomena experienced based on the results of a large number or rocket tests not directly applicable to the final test matrix.

Baran, W. J.

1974-01-01

72

Exhaust gas treatment in testing nuclear rocket engines  

SciTech Connect

With the exception of the last test series of the Rover program, Nuclear Furnace 1, test-reactor and rocket engine hydrogen gas exhaust generated during the Rover/NERVA program was released directly to the atmosphere, without removal of the associated fission products and other radioactive debris. Current rules for nuclear facilities (DOE Order 5480.6) are far more protective of the general environment; even with the remoteness of the Nevada Test Site, introduction of potentially hazardous quantities of radioactive waste into the atmosphere must be scrupulously avoided. The Rocketdyne treatment concept features a diffuser to provide altitude simulation and pressure recovery, a series of heat exchangers to gradually cool the exhaust gas stream to 100 K, and an activated charcoal bed for adsorption of inert gases. A hydrogen-gas fed ejector provides auxiliary pumping for startup and shutdown of the engine. Supplemental filtration to remove particulates and condensed phases may be added at appropriate locations in the system. The clean hydrogen may be exhausted to the atmosphere and flared, or the gas may be condensed and stored for reuse in testing. The latter approach totally isolates the working gas from the environment.

Zweig, H.R.; Fischler, S.; Wagner, W.R. (Rocketdyne Division, Rockwell International Corporation, 6633 Canoga Avenue, P.O. Box 7922, Canoga Park, California 91309-7922 (United States))

1993-01-15

73

Exhaust gas treatment in testing nuclear rocket engines  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

With the exception of the last test series of the Rover program, Nuclear Furnace 1, test-reactor and rocket engine hydrogen gas exhaust generated during the Rover/NERVA program was released directly to the atmosphere, without removal of the associated fission products and other radioactive debris. Current rules for nuclear facilities (DOE Order 5480.6) are far more protective of the general environment; even with the remoteness of the Nevada Test Site, introduction of potentially hazardous quantities of radioactive waste into the atmosphere must be scrupulously avoided. The Rocketdyne treatment concept features a diffuser to provide altitude simulation and pressure recovery, a series of heat exchangers to gradually cool the exhaust gas stream to 100 K, and an activated charcoal bed for adsorption of inert gases. A hydrogen-gas fed ejector provides auxiliary pumping for startup and shutdown of the engine. Supplemental filtration to remove particulates and condensed phases may be added at appropriate locations in the system. The clean hydrogen may be exhausted to the atmosphere and flared, or the gas may be condensed and stored for reuse in testing. The latter approach totally isolates the working gas from the environment.

Zweig, Herbert R.; Fischler, Stanley; Wagner, William R.

1993-01-01

74

Radiation/convection coupling in rocket motor and plume analysis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A method for describing radiation/convection coupling to a flow field analysis was developed for rocket motors and plumes. The three commonly used propellant systems (H2/O2, RP-1/O2, and solid propellants) radiate primarily as: molecular emitters, non-scattering small particles (soot), and scattering larger particles (Al2O3), respectively. For the required solution, the divergence of the radiation heat flux was included in the energy equation, and the local, volume averaged intensity was determined by a solution to the radiative transfer equation. A rigorous solution to this problem is intractable, therefore, solution methods which use the ordinary and improved differential approximation were developed. This radiation model was being incorporated into the FDNS code, a Navier-Stokes flowfield solver for multiphase, turbulent combusting flows.

Saladino, A. J.; Farmer, R. C.

1993-01-01

75

Rocket Exhaust Cratering: Lessons Learned from Viking and Apollo  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

During the Apollo and Viking programs NASA expended considerable effort to study the cratering of the regolith when a rocket launches or lands on it. That research ensured the success of those programs but also demonstrated that cratering will be a serious challenge for other mission scenarios. Unfortunately, because three decades have elapsed since NASA last performed a successful retro-rocket landing on a large planetary body - and ironically because Apollo and Viking were successful at minimizing the cratering effects - the space agency has a minimized sense of the seriousness of the issue. The most violent phase of a cratering event is when the static overpressure of the rocket exhaust exceeds the bearing capacity of the soil. This bearing capacity failure (BCF) punches a small and highly concave cup into the surface. The shape of the cup then redirects the supersonic jet - along with a large flux of high-velocity debris - directly toward the spacecraft. This has been observed in terrestrial experiments but never quantified analytically. The blast from such an event will be more than just quantitatively greater than the cratering that occurred in the Apollo and Viking programs. It will be qualitatively different, because BCF had been successfully avoided in all those missions. In fact, the Viking program undertook a significant research and development effort and redesigned the spacecraft specifically for the purpose of avoiding BCF [1]. (See Figure 1.) Because the Apollo and Viking spacecraft were successful at avoiding those cratering effects, it was unnecessary to understand them. As a result, the physics of a BCF-driven cratering event have never been well understood. This is a critical gap in our knowledge because BCF is unavoidable in the Martian environment with the large landers necessary for human exploration, and in Lunar landings it must also be addressed because it may occur depending upon the design specifics of the spacecraft and the weakening of the regolity by gas diffusion.

Metzger, Philip T.; Vu, Bruce T.

2004-01-01

76

Development and Validation of a Computational Model for Predicting the Behavior of Plumes from Large Solid Rocket Motors  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Exhaust plumes from large solid rocket motors fired at ATK's Promontory test site carry particulates to high altitudes and typically produce deposits that fall on regions downwind of the test area. As populations and communities near the test facility grow, ATK has become increasingly concerned about the impact of motor testing on those surrounding communities. To assess the potential impact of motor testing on the community and to identify feasible mitigation strategies, it is essential to have a tool capable of predicting plume behavior downrange of the test stand. A software package, called PlumeTracker, has been developed and validated at ATK for this purpose. The code is a point model that offers a time-dependent, physics-based description of plume transport and precipitation. The code can utilize either measured or forecasted weather data to generate plume predictions. Next-Generation Radar (NEXRAD) data and field observations from twenty-three historical motor test fires at Promontory were collected to test the predictive capability of PlumeTracker. Model predictions for plume trajectories and deposition fields were found to correlate well with the collected dataset.

Wells, Jason E.; Black, David L.; Taylor, Casey L.

2013-01-01

77

Effects of rocket exhaust products in the thermosphere and ionsphere  

SciTech Connect

This paper reviews the current state of understanding of the problem of ionospheric F-layer depletions produced by chemical effects of the exhaust gases from large rockets, with particular emphasis on the Heavy Lift Launch Vehicles (HLLV) proposed for use in the construction of solar power satellites. The currently planned HLLV flight profile calls for main second-stage propulsion confined to altitudes below 124 km, and a brief orbit circularization maneuver at apogee. The second stage engines deposit 9 x 10/sup 31/ H/sub 2/O and H/sub 2/ molecules between 74 and 124 km. Model computations show that they diffuse gradually into the ionospheric F region, where they lead to weak but widespread and persistent depletions of ionization and continuous production of H atoms. The orbit circularization burn deposits 9 x 10/sup 29/ exhaust molecules at about 480-km altitude. These react rapidly with the F2 region 0/sup +/ ions, leading to a substantial (factor-of-three) reduction in plasma density, which extends over a 1000- by 2000-km region and persists for four to five hours. For purposes of computer model verification, a computation is included representing the Skylab I launch, for which observational data exist. The computations and data are compared, and the computer model is described.

Zinn, J.; Sutherland, C.D.

1980-02-01

78

Laser optogalvanic spectroscopy of neon in a discharge plasma and modeling and analysis of rocket plume RF-line emissions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Optogalvanic Effect (OGE) of neon in a hollow cathode discharge lamp has been investigated both experimentally and theoretically. A tunable dye laser was tuned to several 1si -- 2pj neon transitions and the associated time--resolved optogalvanic (OG) spectral waveforms recorded corresponding to the DeltaJ = DeltaK = 0, +/-1 selection rules and modeled using a semi-empirical model. Decay rate constants, amplitudes and the instrumentation time constants were recorded following a good least-squares fit (between the experimental and the theoretical OG data) using the Monte Carlo technique and utilizing both the search and random walk methods. Dominant physical processes responsible for the optogalvanic effect have been analyzed, and the corresponding populations of the laser-excited level and collisional excited levels determined. The behavior of the optogalvanic signal waveform as a function of time, together with the decay rate constants as a function of the discharge current and the instrumentation time constant as a function of current have been studied in detail. The decay times of the OG signals and the population redistributions were also determined. Fairly linear relationships between the decay rate constant and the discharge current, as well as between the instrumental time constant and the discharge current, have been observed. The decay times and the electron collisional rate parameters of the 1s levels involved in the OG transitions have been obtained with accuracy. The excitation temperature of the discharge for neon transitions grouped with the same 1s level have been determined and found to be fairly constant for the neon transitions studied. The experimental optogalvanic effort in the visible region of the electromagnetic spectrum has been complemented by a computation-intensive modeling investigation of rocket plumes in the microwave region. Radio frequency lines of each of the plume species identified were archived utilizing the HITRAN and other databases (e.g. JPL/NASA and Cologne), together with other appropriate spectroscopic data. Hydrazine fuel was selected as the rocket propellant of choice and the plume codes were run by the JHU-APL research group. A representative monopropellant hydrazine plume has been determined to provide exhaust temperature, pressure, velocity, and species number density inputs for model development. A MATLAB code has been developed for computing broadside line-of-sight (LOS) intensities due to line emissions involving ammonia and other plume species. Initially, we assumed Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE) and included self-absorption contributions due to plume opacity, together with collisional and Doppler broadening, as well as the Doppler shift due to the plume radial velocity towards and away from a stationary detector. The recorded code output was MATLAB coded and an assortment of plume parameters computed, such as the volume emission rate, the absorption coefficient, optical depth and species radiance line-by-line. These parameters were computed both manually utilizing a spread sheet and then automated using the Matlab code. The volume emissions, along with other plume properties, were plotted as a function of the axial distance in the plume for several Radio Frequency (RF) transitions involving various significant plume species. Plume properties, such as the temperature, pressure, number density, and plume particulate speed emanating from the nozzle where analyzed and modeled as the plume drifts away from the rocket nozzle. Both the axial and radial distance dependences were investigated with respect to the various plume properties and parameters. Population distribution of the species (number density) dependence on the plume temperature was investigated and modeled line-by-line for each of the plume species studied at the nozzle exit plane and beyond. In addition, volume emission and absorption coefficients have been analyzed and modeled and solutions to the Radiative Transfer Equation (RTE) applied line-by-line and the radiance determined accurately in the micro

Ogungbemi, Kayode I.

79

Thermochemical ablation of materials from normal impingement of solid propellant rocket motor exhaust  

Microsoft Academic Search

The thermochemical response of three ablative materials was evaluated for protecting a plenum exhaust system from the environments due to the firings of two different solid propellant motors. The response of silica phenolic and two asbestos phenolic materials was studied for the cases of a single step (booster only) rocket motor and a two step (booster and sustainer) rocket motor

G. R. Moore; L. P. Anderson Jr.; C. H. Lewis; A. L. Murray

1978-01-01

80

Application of the Saha equation to high temperature (above 6000 K) rocket exhaust  

Microsoft Academic Search

A Saha equation-based calculation method is presented for fusion plasma-heated rocket exhausts in excess of the 6000 K to which the JANNAF tables extend. The method theoretically rederives the properties of the fusion rocket propellant, using electronic excitation levels, and uses FORTRAN to calculate equilibrium gas composition and species thermodynamic properties. The code considers a mixture of any two elements

R. Nachtrieb

1993-01-01

81

Effects of rocket exhaust on lunar soil reflectance properties  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

High-resolution images of the Surveyor, Luna, and Apollo landing sites obtained by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) Narrow Angle Camera (NAC) show regions around the landers where reflectivity of the surface was modified. We interpret the change in reflectance properties of these regions mainly as disturbance of the regolith by rocket exhaust during descent of the spacecraft and we refer to these areas herein as "blast zones" (BZs). The BZs consist of an area of lower reflectance (LR-BZ) compared to the surroundings that extends up to a few meters out from the landers, as well as a broader halo of higher reflectance (HR-BZ) that extends tens to hundreds of meters away from the landers. When approximated as an ellipse, the average Apollo BZ area is ˜29,000 m2 (˜175 ± 60 m by 200 ± 27 m) which is 10× larger than the average Luna BZ, and over 100× larger than the average Surveyor BZ. The LR-BZs are most evident at the Apollo sites, especially where astronaut activity disturbed the soil, leading to a 15-30% (relative to background undisturbed areas) reduction in reflectance at ˜30° phase angle. The LR-BZs at the Surveyor and Luna sites are less evident and are unresolvable with NAC images. The average reflectance in the HR-BZs as determined for 30° phase angle is 3-12% higher than in the undisturbed surrounding areas; this magnitude is the same, within uncertainty, for all sites, indicating a common process or combination of processes causing differences in reflectance properties of the regolith. Phase-ratio images and photometric data collected over a range of illumination geometries show that a greater separation in reflectance occurs between the HR-BZs and undisturbed areas at phase angles between 0° and 70° and indicates that the HR-BZs are less backscattering than undisturbed areas. The LR-BZs are affected by macroscopic disruption of the surface and astronaut activity (at the Apollo sites). For the HR-BZ areas, reflectance has likely been affected by scouring from particles entrained by exhaust gases with low-angle trajectories. Regolith particle interactions with surface soil within HR-BZs may destroy fine-scale surface structure (e.g., "fairy-castle") and decrease macroscopic roughness, contributing to a decrease in backscattering character within the HR-BZs and an increase in backscattering character within the LR-BZs. Redistribution of fine particles from the LR-BZ to the HR-BZ may have also contributed to the changed reflectance. Photometric modeling is consistent with one or a combination of these processes.

Clegg, Ryan N.; Jolliff, Bradley L.; Robinson, Mark S.; Hapke, Bruce W.; Plescia, Jeffrey B.

2014-01-01

82

Comparison of Rocket Performance using Exhaust Diffuser and Conventional Techniques for Altitude Simulation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A rocket engine with an exhaust-nozzle area ratio of 25 was operated at a constant chamber pressure of 600 pounds per square inch absolute over a range of oxidant-fuel ratios at an altitude pressure corresponding to approximately 47,000 feet. At this condition, the nozzle flow is slightly underexpanded as it leaves the nozzle. The altitude simulation was obtained first through the use of an exhaust diffuser coupled with the rocket engine and secondly, in an altitude test chamber where separate exhauster equipment provided the altitude pressure. A comparison of performance data from these two tests has established that a diffuser used with a rocket engine operating at near-design nozzle pressure ratio can be a valid means of obtaining altitude performance data for rocket engines.

Sivo, Joseph N.; Peters, Daniel J.

1959-01-01

83

ASRM radiation and flowfield prediction status. [Advanced Solid Rocket Motor plume radiation prediction  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Existing and proposed methods for the prediction of plume radiation are discussed in terms of their application to the NASA Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM) and Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) projects. Extrapolations of the Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) are discussed with respect to preliminary predictions of the primary and secondary radiation environments. The methodology for radiation and initial plume property predictions are set forth, including a new code for scattering media and independent secondary source models based on flight data. The Monte Carlo code employs a reverse-evaluation approach which traces rays back to their point of absorption in the plume. The SRM sea-level plume model is modified to account for the increased radiation in the ASRM plume due to the ASRM's propellant chemistry. The ASRM cycle-1 environment predictions are shown to identify a potential reason for the shutdown spike identified with pre-SRM staging.

Reardon, J. E.; Everson, J.; Smith, S. D.; Sulyma, P. R.

1991-01-01

84

Response of selected plant and insect species to simulated solid rocket exhaust mixtures and to exhaust components from solid rocket fuels  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The effects of solid rocket fuel (SRF) exhaust on selected plant and and insect species in the Merritt Island, Florida area was investigated in order to determine if the exhaust clouds generated by shuttle launches would adversely affect the native, plants of the Merritt Island Wildlife Refuge, the citrus production, or the beekeeping industry of the island. Conditions were simulated in greenhouse exposure chambers and field chambers constructed to model the ideal continuous stirred tank reactor. A plant exposure system was developed for dispensing and monitoring the two major chemicals in SRF exhaust, HCl and Al203, and for dispensing and monitoring SRF exhaust (controlled fuel burns). Plants native to Merritt Island, Florida were grown and used as test species. Dose-response relationships were determined for short term exposure of selected plant species to HCl, Al203, and mixtures of the two to SRF exhaust.

Heck, W. W.; Knott, W. M.; Stahel, E. P.; Ambrose, J. T.; Mccrimmon, J. N.; Engle, M.; Romanow, L. A.; Sawyer, A. G.; Tyson, J. D.

1980-01-01

85

Computational models for the viscous\\/inviscid analysis of jet aircraft exhaust plumes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Computational models which analyze viscous\\/inviscid flow processes in jet aircraft exhaust plumes are discussed. These models are component parts of an NASA-LaRC method for the prediction of nozzle afterbody drag. Inviscid\\/shock processes are analyzed by the SCIPAC code which is a compact version of a generalized shock capturing, inviscid plume code (SCIPPY). The SCIPAC code analyzes underexpanded jet exhaust gas

S. M. Dash; H. S. Pergament; R. D. Thorpe

1980-01-01

86

Development and application of a reverse Monte Carlo radiative transfer code for rocket plume base heating  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A reverse Monte Carlo radiative transfer code to predict rocket plume base heating is presented. In this technique rays representing the radiation propagation are traced backwards in time from the receiving surface to the point of emission in the plume. This increases the computational efficiency relative to the forward Monte Carlo technique when calculating the radiation reaching a specific point, as only the rays that strike the receiving point are considered.

Everson, John; Nelson, H. F.

1993-01-01

87

User's manual for the REEDM (Rocket Exhaust Effluent Diffusion Model) computer program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The REEDM computer program predicts concentrations, dosages, and depositions downwind from normal and abnormal launches of rocket vehicles at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. The atmospheric dispersion models, cloud-rise models, and other formulas used in the REEDM model are described mathematically Vehicle and source parameters, other pertinent physical properties of the rocket exhaust cloud, and meteorological layering techniques are presented as well as user's instructions for REEDM. Worked example problems are included.

Bjorklund, J. R.; Dumbauld, R. K.; Cheney, C. S.; Geary, H. V.

1982-01-01

88

Studies of exhaust products from solid propellant rocket motors fired in an environmental chamber  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Experiments are described in which it was attempted to define the state of HCl when rocket motors using ammonium perchlorate and powdered aluminum filler in the fuel system are fired under various relative humidity conditions. A small, variable load rocket motor was developed so that controlled quantities of exhaust products could be produced in an environmental chamber. A technique is described for distinguishing the difference between HCl existing as a gas or existing as an acid aerosol.

Dawbarn, R.; Kinslow, M.; Nutt, K. W.; Pender, C. W.

1974-01-01

89

Electrets used in measuring rocket exhaust effluents from the space shuttle's solid rocket booster during static test firing, DM-3  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The purpose of this experimental research was to compare Marshall Space Flight Center's electrets with Thiokol's fixed flow air samplers during the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster Demonstration Model-3 static test firing on October 19, 1978. The measurement of rocket exhaust effluents by Thiokol's samplers and MSFC's electrets indicated that the firing of the Solid Rocket Booster had no significant effect on the quality of the air sampled. The highest measurement by Thiokol's samplers was obtained at Plant 3 (site 11) approximately 8 km at a 113 degree heading from the static test stand. At sites 11, 12, and 5, Thiokol's fixed flow air samplers measured 0.0048, 0.00016, and 0.00012 mg/m3 of CI. Alongside the fixed flow measurements, the electret counts from X-ray spectroscopy were 685, 894, and 719 counts. After background corrections, the counts were 334, 543, and 368, or an average of 415 counts. An additional electred, E20, which was the only measurement device at a site approximately 20 km northeast from the test site where no power was available, obtained 901 counts. After background correction, the count was 550. Again this data indicate there was no measurement of significant rocket exhaust effluents at the test site.

Susko, M.

1979-01-01

90

Chance Encounter with a Stratospheric Kerosene Rocket Plume from Russia over California  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

During a routine ER-2 aircraft high-altitude test flight on April 18, 1997, an unusual aerosol cloud was detected at 20 km altitude near the California coast at about 370 degrees N latitude. Not visually observed by the ER-2 pilot, the cloud was characterized bv high concentration of soot and sulfate aerosol in a region over 100 km in horizontal extent indicating that the source of the plume was a large hydrocarbon fueled vehicle, most likely a launch vehicle powered only by rocket motors burning liquid oxygen and kerosene. Two Russian Soyuz rockets could conceivably have produced the plume. The first was launched from the Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan on April 6th; the second was launched from Plesetsk, Russia on April 9. Air parcel trajectory calculations and long-lived tracer gas concentrations in the cloud indicate that the Baikonur rocket launch is the most probable source of the plume. The parcel trajectory calculations do not unambiguously trace the transport of the Soyuz plume from Asia to North America, illustrating serious flaws in the point-to-point trajectory calculations. This chance encounter represents the only measurement of the stratospheric effects of emissions from a rocket powered exclusively with hydrocarbon fuel.

Newman, P. A.; Wilson, J. C.; Ross, M. N.; Brock, C.; Sheridan, P.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Lait, L. R.; Bui, T. P.; Loewenstein, M.

1999-01-01

91

Inexpensive photodiode arrays for use in rocket plume and hot source monitoring and diagnostics  

Microsoft Academic Search

The spectroscopic analysis of plume emissions is a non-intrusive method which has been used to check for fatigue and possible damage throughout the pumps and other mechanisms in a rocket motor or engine. These components are made of various alloys. Knowing the composition of the alloys and for which parts they are used, one can potentially determine from the emissions

Dallas Snider; Robert Shanks; Reagan Cole; M. Keith Hudson

2003-01-01

92

Composition and Combustion Characteristics of Condensed Exhaust from Boron-Containing Fuel-Rich Rocket Motors.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The objective of this work has been to characterize the nature of the primary exhaust from fuel-rich boron-containing (ca. 50%) rocket motors, and to study its combustion. Two formulations were studied, each at two pressures. Solid materials collected fro...

A. Macek J. M. Semple

1972-01-01

93

Recent Advances in Studies of Ionospheric Modification Using Rocket Exhaust (Invited)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Rocket exhaust interacts with the ionosphere to produce a wide range of disturbances. A ten second burn of the Orbital Maneuver Subsystem (OMS) engines on the Space Shuttle deposits over 1 Giga Joule of energy into the upper atmosphere. The exhaust vapors travel at speeds between 4.7 and 10.7 km/s coupling momentum into the ions by both collisions and charge exchange. Long-lived plasma irregularities are formed by the artificial hypersonic “neutral wind” passing through the ionosphere. Charge exchange between the fast neutrals and the ambient ions yields high-speed ion beams that excite electro-static plasma waves. Ground based radar has been used to detect both field aligned irregularities and electrostatic turbulence driven by the Space Shuttle OMS exhaust. Molecular ions produced by the charge exchange with molecules in the rocket exhaust recombine with a time scale of 10 minutes leaving a residual plasma depression. This ionospheric “hole” fills in by ambipolar diffusion leaving a depleted magnetic flux tube. This large scale reduction in Pedersen conductivity can provide a seed for plasma interchange instabilities. For instance, a rocket firing on the bottom side of the ionosphere near the equator can trigger a Rayleigh-Taylor instability that is naturally seen as equatorial Spread-F. The Naval Research Laboratory has been exploring these phenomena with dedicated burns of the Space Shuttle OMS engines and exhaust releases from rockets. The Shuttle Ionospheric Modification with Pulsed Localized Exhaust (SIMPLEX) series of experiments uses ground radars to probe the ionosphere affected by dedicated burns of the Space Shuttle OMS engines. Radars located at Millstone Hill, Massachusetts; Arecibo, Puerto Rico; Jicamarca, Peru; Kwajalein, Marshall Island; and Alice Springs, Australia have participated in the SIMPLEX program. A companion program called Shuttle Exhaust Ionospheric Turbulence Experiment has or will use satellites to fly through the turbulence ionosphere produced by Space Shuttle Exhaust. This program is employing the Air Force Research Laboratory C/NOFS and the Canadian CASSIOPE/EPoP satellites to make in situ measurements of Space Shuttle exhaust effects. Finally, NRL is conducting the Charged Aerosol Release Experiment which employs a solid rocket motor to modify the ionosphere using supersonic particulate injection and dusty plasma formation. Both the theoretic basis for these experiments and as summary of the experimental results will be presented.

Bernhardt, P. A.

2009-12-01

94

Measurement and Characterization of Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor Plume Acoustics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA's current models to predict lift-off acoustics for launch vehicles are currently being updated using several numerical and empirical inputs. One empirical input comes from free-field acoustic data measured at three Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) static firings. The measurements were collected by a joint collaboration between NASA - Marshall Space Flight Center, Wyle Labs, and ATK Launch Systems. For the first time NASA measured large-thrust solid rocket motor plume acoustics for evaluation of both noise sources and acoustic radiation properties. Over sixty acoustic free-field measurements were taken over the three static firings to support evaluation of acoustic radiation near the rocket plume, far-field acoustic radiation patterns, plume acoustic power efficiencies, and apparent noise source locations within the plume. At approximately 67 m off nozzle centerline and 70 m downstream of the nozzle exit plan, the measured overall sound pressure level of the RSRM was 155 dB. Peak overall levels in the far field were over 140 dB at 300 m and 50-deg off of the RSRM thrust centerline. The successful collaboration has yielded valuable data that are being implemented into NASA's lift-off acoustic models, which will then be used to update predictions for Ares I and Ares V liftoff acoustic environments.

Kenny, Robert Jeremy

2009-01-01

95

UV, VISIBLE, AND INFRARED SPECTRAL EMISSIONS IN HYBRID ROCKET PLUMES  

Microsoft Academic Search

A survey was made of the spectral emissions from a 2 x 10 inch labscale hybrid rocket motor system. The emissions in the Ultraviolet-Visible (300-750 nm), Near Infrared (750-1100 nm), and Mid Infrared (2-16 ?m) regions were studied. Baseline emissions were found to consist of the sodium and potassium atomic lines, present due to the use of silica phenolic insulators,

M. Keith Hudson; Robert B. Shanks; Dallas H. Snider; Diana M. Lindquist; Chris Luchini; Sterling Rooke

96

Axisymmetric computational fluid dynamics analysis of a film/dump-cooled rocket nozzle plume  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Prediction of convective base heating rates for a new launch vehicle presents significant challenges to analysts concerned with base environments. The present effort seeks to augment classical base heating scaling techniques via a detailed investigation of the exhaust plume shear layer of a single H2/O2 Space Transportation Main Engine (STME). Use of fuel-rich turbine exhaust to cool the STME nozzle presented concerns regarding potential recirculation of these gases to the base region with attendant increase in the base heating rate. A pressure-based full Navier-Stokes computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code with finite rate chemistry is used to predict plumes for vehicle altitudes of 10 kft and 50 kft. Levels of combustible species within the plume shear layers are calculated in order to assess assumptions made in the base heating analysis.

Tucker, P. K.; Warsi, S. A.

1993-01-01

97

Shuttle primary reaction control system engine exhaust plume contamination effects  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Space Shuttle proximity operations constitute an important part of the SSF induced external environment. The impingement of primary reaction control system (PRCS) engine plumes on SSF functional surfaces during docking or berthing and separation leads to concerns about molecular contamination and high speed particle impact. The Shuttle Plume Impingement flight Experiment (SPIE) was designed to provide a direct measure of both the molecular contamination and particle impact rates produced by Shuttle PRCS engines in the LEO environment. The measured permanent deposition produced by PRCS engine firings was less than that assumed in current SSF programatic assessments. Only two to three possible high velocity particle impact pits were observed on the RMS end effector hardware.

Koontz, Steve; Ehlers, Horst; Pedley, Mike; Cross, John; Hakes, Charles

1993-01-01

98

Ultrafine particle size distributions measured in aircraft exhaust plumes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fast-response measurements of particle size distributions were made for the first time in the near-field plume of a Boeing 737-300 aircraft burning fuel with fuel sulfur (S) contents (FSCs) of 56 and 2.6 ppmm, as well as in fresh and dissipating contrails from the same aircraft, using nine particle counters operating in parallel. Nonsoot particles were present in high concentrations,

Charles A. Brock; Franz Schröder; Bernd Kärcher; Andreas Petzold; Reinhold Busen; Markus Fiebig

2000-01-01

99

A nonintrusive method for the measurement of infrared characteristics from engine exhaust plume  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Nonintrusive measurements of infrared characteristics from engine exhaust plume are required for emission control or target tracking, due to the advantage of online measurement without affecting the exhaust plume. Conventional nonintrusive measurement techniques, e.g. the passive Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) absorption spectrometry, lack prior knowledge of backgrounds and consume time to measure the complete infrared characteristics. Hence, an improved but simple nonintrusive method is proposed. Accordingly, a prototype system with a Mid-wave infrared imager has been developed and tested for the measurement of vehicle engine exhaust plume. Subsequently, the time-variant effective transmittance and emissivity is determined. Compared to the passive FTIR absorption spectrometry, this method incorporates a known background into the measurement and is more adequate for recording the rapidly changing exhaust plume radiation. Therefore, the accurate value of the transmittance and emissivity can be obtained. Further analysis reveals that the imager could be replaced with a dispersive spectrometer, which makes it feasible to acquire the absolute transmittance and emissivity with respect to wavelength. Thus, the concentration of specific toxic gases could be calculated following the radiance inversion technique.

Xiao, Xizhong; Wang, Yueming; Miao, Bin; Lang, Junwei; Wang, Shengwei; Zhuang, Xiaoqiong; Zhou, Feng; Wang, Jianyu

2013-12-01

100

Computational Models for the Viscous/Inviscid Analysis of Jet Aircraft Exhaust Plumes.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Computational models which analyze viscous/inviscid flow processes in jet aircraft exhaust plumes are discussed. These models are component parts of an NASA-LaRC method for the prediction of nozzle afterbody drag. Inviscid/shock processes are analyzed by ...

S. M. Dash H. S. Pergament R. D. Thorpe

1980-01-01

101

Computational models for the analysis of three-dimensional internal and exhaust plume flowfields  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper describes computational procedures developed for the analysis of three-dimensional supersonic ducted flows and multinozzle exhaust plume flowfields. The models/codes embodying these procedures cater to a broad spectrum of geometric situations via the use of multiple reference plane grid networks in several coordinate systems. Shock capturing techniques are employed to trace the propagation and interaction of multiple shock surfaces while the plume interface, separating the exhaust and external flows, and the plume external shock are discretely analyzed. The computational grid within the reference planes follows the trace of streamlines to facilitate the incorporation of finite-rate chemistry and viscous computational capabilities. Exhaust gas properties consist of combustion products in chemical equilibrium. The computational accuracy of the models/codes is assessed via comparisons with exact solutions, results of other codes and experimental data. Results are presented for the flows in two-dimensional convergent and divergent ducts, expansive and compressive corner flows, flow in a rectangular nozzle and the plume flowfields for exhausts issuing out of single and multiple rectangular nozzles.

Dash, S. M.; Delguidice, P. D.

1977-01-01

102

Factors to Consider in Designing Aerosol Inlet Systems for Engine Exhaust Plume Sampling  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This document consists of viewgraphs of charts and diagrams of considerations to take when sampling the engine exhaust plume. It includes a chart that compares the emissions from various fuels, a diagram and charts of the various processes and conditions that influence the particulate size and concentration,

Anderson, Bruce

2004-01-01

103

Chance Encounter with a Stratospheric Kerosene Rocket Plume From Russia Over California  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A high-altitude aircraft flight on April 18, 1997 detected an enormous aerosol cloud at 20 km altitude near California (37 N). Not visually observed, the cloud had high concentrations of soot and sulfate aerosol, and was over 180 km in horizontal extent. The cloud was probably a large hydrocarbon fueled vehicle, most likely from rocket motors burning liquid oxygen and kerosene. One of two Russian Soyuz rockets could have produced the cloud: a launch from the Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan on April 6; or from Plesetsk, Russia on April 9. Parcel trajectories and long-lived trace gas concentrations suggest the Baikonur launch as the cloud source. Cloud trajectories do not trace the Soyuz plume from Asia to North America, illustrating the uncertainties of point-to-point trajectories. This cloud encounter is the only stratospheric measurement of a hydrocarbon fuel powered rocket.

Newman, P. A.; Wilson, J. C.; Ross, M. N.; Brock, C. A.; Sheridan, P. J.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Lait, L. R.; Bui, T. P.; Loewenstein, M.; Podolske, J. R.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

2000-01-01

104

Rocket exhaust effluent modeling for tropospheric air quality and environmental assessments  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The various techniques for diffusion predictions to support air quality predictions and environmental assessments for aerospace applications are discussed in terms of limitations imposed by atmospheric data. This affords an introduction to the rationale behind the selection of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Rocket Exhaust Effluent Diffusion (REED) program. The models utilized in the NASA/MSFC REED program are explained. This program is then evaluated in terms of some results from a joint MSFC/Langley Research Center/Kennedy Space Center Titan Exhaust Effluent Prediction and Monitoring Program.

Stephens, J. B.; Stewart, R. B.

1977-01-01

105

Passive ranging of dynamic rocket plumes using infrared and visible oxygen attenuation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Atmospheric oxygen absorption bands in observed spectra of boost phase missiles can be used to accurately estimate range from sensor to target. One method is to compare observed values of band averaged absorption to radiative transfer models. This is most effective using bands where there is a single absorbing species. This work compares spectral attenuation of two oxygen absorption bands in the near-infrared (NIR) and visible (Vis) spectrum, centered at 762 nm and 690 nm, to passively determine range. Spectra were observed from a static test of a full-scale solid rocket motor at a 900m range. The NIR O2 band provided range estimates accurate to within 3%, while the Vis O2 band had a range error of 15%. A Falcon 9 rocket launch at an initial range of 13km was also tracked and observed for 90 seconds after ignition. The NIR O2 band provided in-flight range estimates accurate to within 2% error for the first 30 seconds of tracked observation. The Vis O2 band also provided accurate range estimates with an error of approximately 4%. Rocket plumes are expected to be significantly brighter at longer wavelengths, but absorption in the NIR band is nearly ten times stronger than the Vis band, causing saturation at shorter path lengths. An atmospheric band is considered saturated when all the in-band frequencies emitted from the rocket plume are absorbed before reaching the sensor.

Vincent, R. Anthony; Hawks, Michael R.

2011-05-01

106

Remote measurement of the plume shape of aircraft exhausts at airports by passive FTIR spectrometry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Information about the interaction between the exhaust plume of an aircraft jet engine and ambient air is required for the application of small-scale chemistry-transport models to investigate airport air quality. This interaction is not well understood. In order to study the interaction, spatial information about the plume is required. FTIR emission spectroscopy may be applied to analyze the aircraft exhausts. In order to characterize the plumes spatially, a scanning imaging FTIR system (SIGIS) has been improved. SIGIS is comprised of an interferometer (Bruker OPAG), an azimuth-elevation-scanning mirror, a data acquisition and control system with digital signal processors (DSP), an infrared camera and a personal computer. With this instrumentation it is possible to visualise the plume and to obtain information about the temperature distribution within the plume. Measurements are performed at low spectral resolution, because the dynamic environment of these measurements limits the measurement time to about 2 minutes. Measurements of the plume shapes of an APU and of main engines were performed.

Schafer, Klaus; Jahn, Carsten; Utzig, Selina; Flores-Jardines, Edgar; Harig, Roland; Rusch, Peter

2004-11-01

107

Computational models for the viscous/inviscid analysis of jet aircraft exhaust plumes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Computational models which analyze viscous/inviscid flow processes in jet aircraft exhaust plumes are discussed. These models are component parts of an NASA-LaRC method for the prediction of nozzle afterbody drag. Inviscid/shock processes are analyzed by the SCIPAC code which is a compact version of a generalized shock capturing, inviscid plume code (SCIPPY). The SCIPAC code analyzes underexpanded jet exhaust gas mixtures with a self-contained thermodynamic package for hydrocarbon exhaust products and air. A detailed and automated treatment of the embedded subsonic zones behind Mach discs is provided in this analysis. Mixing processes along the plume interface are analyzed by two upgraded versions of an overlaid, turbulent mixing code (BOAT) developed previously for calculating nearfield jet entrainment. The BOATAC program is a frozen chemistry version of BOAT containing the aircraft thermodynamic package as SCIPAC; BOATAB is an afterburning version with a self-contained aircraft (hydrocarbon/air) finite-rate chemistry package. The coupling of viscous and inviscid flow processes is achieved by an overlaid procedure with interactive effects accounted for by a displacement thickness type correction to the inviscid plume interface.

Dash, S. M.; Pergament, H. S.; Thorpe, R. D.

1980-05-01

108

Exhausted Plume Flow Field Prediction Near the Afterbody of Hypersonic Flight Vehicles in High Altitudes  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A two-dimensional computer code to solve the Burnett equations has been developed which computes the flow interaction between an exhausted plume and hypersonic external flow near the afterbody of a flight vehicle. This Burnett-2D code extends the capability of Navier-Stokes solver (RPLUS2D code) to include high-order Burnett source terms and slip-wall conditions for velocity and temperature. Higher-order Burnett viscous stress and heat flux terms are discretized using central-differencing and treated as source terms. Blocking logic is adopted in order to overcome the difficulty of grid generation. The computation of exhaust plume flow field is divided into two steps. In the first step, the thruster nozzle exit conditions are computed which generates inflow conditions in the base area near the afterbody. Results demonstrated that at high altitudes, the computations of nozzle exit conditions must include the effects of base flow since significant expansion exists in the base region. In the second step, Burnett equations were solved for exhaust plume flow field near the afterbody. The free stream conditions are set at an altitude equal to 80km and the Mach number is equal to 5.0. The preliminary results show that the plume expansion, as altitude increases, will eventually cause upstream flow separation.

Chou, Lynn Chen; Mach, Kervyn D.; Deng, Zheng-Tao; Liaw, Goang-Shin

1995-01-01

109

Computational models for the viscous/inviscid analysis of jet aircraft exhaust plumes. [predicting afterbody drag  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Computational models which analyze viscous/inviscid flow processes in jet aircraft exhaust plumes are discussed. These models are component parts of an NASA-LaRC method for the prediction of nozzle afterbody drag. Inviscid/shock processes are analyzed by the SCIPAC code which is a compact version of a generalized shock capturing, inviscid plume code (SCIPPY). The SCIPAC code analyzes underexpanded jet exhaust gas mixtures with a self-contained thermodynamic package for hydrocarbon exhaust products and air. A detailed and automated treatment of the embedded subsonic zones behind Mach discs is provided in this analysis. Mixing processes along the plume interface are analyzed by two upgraded versions of an overlaid, turbulent mixing code (BOAT) developed previously for calculating nearfield jet entrainment. The BOATAC program is a frozen chemistry version of BOAT containing the aircraft thermodynamic package as SCIPAC; BOATAB is an afterburning version with a self-contained aircraft (hydrocarbon/air) finite-rate chemistry package. The coupling of viscous and inviscid flow processes is achieved by an overlaid procedure with interactive effects accounted for by a displacement thickness type correction to the inviscid plume interface.

Dash, S. M.; Pergament, H. S.; Thorpe, R. D.

1980-01-01

110

Electrets used to measure exhaust cloud effluents from Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) during demonstration model (DM-2) static test firing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Electrets were compared with fixed flow samplers during static test firing. The measurement of the rocket exhaust effluents by samplers and electrets indicated that the Solid Rocket Motor had no significant effect on the air quality in the area sampled. The results show that the electrets (a passive device which needs no power) can be used effectively alongside existing measuring devices (which need power). By placing electrets in areas where no power is available, measurements may be obtained. Consequently, it is a valuable complementary instrument in measuring rocket exhaust effluents in areas where other measuring devices may not be able to assess the contaminants.

Susko, M.

1978-01-01

111

The effect of exhaust plume/afterbody interaction on installed Scramjet performance  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Newly emerging aerospace technology points to the feasibility of sustained hypersonic flight. Designing a propulsion system capable of generating the necessary thrust is now the major obstacle. First-generation vehicles will be driven by air-breathing scramjet (supersonic combustion ramjet) engines. Because of engine size limitations, the exhaust gas leaving the nozzle will be highly underexpanded. Consequently, a significant amount of thrust and lift can be extracted by allowing the exhaust gases to expand along the underbody of the vehicle. Predicting how these forces influence overall vehicle thrust, lift, and moment is essential to a successful design. This work represents an important first step toward that objective. The UWIN code, an upwind, implicit Navier-Stokes computer program, has been applied to hypersonic exhaust plume/afterbody flow fields. The capability to solve entire vehicle geometries at hypersonic speeds, including an interacting exhaust plume, has been demonstrated for the first time. Comparison of the numerical results with available experimental data shows good agreement in all cases investigated. For moderately underexpanded jets, afterbody forces were found to vary linearly with the nozzle exit pressure, and increasing the exit pressure produced additional nose-down pitching moment. Coupling a species continuity equation to the UWIN code enabled calculations indicating that exhaust gases with low isentropic exponents (gamma) contribute larger afterbody forces than high-gamma exhaust gases. Moderately underexpanded jets, which remain attached to unswept afterbodies, underwent streamwise separation on upswept afterbodies. Highly underexpanded jets produced altogether different flow patterns, however. The highly underexpanded jet creates a strong plume shock, and the interaction of this shock with the afterbody was found to produce complicated patterns of crossflow separation. Finally, the effect of thrust vectoring on vehicle balance has been shown to alter dramatically the vehicle pitching moment.

Edwards, Thomas Alan

1988-01-01

112

Far-Field Turbulent Vortex-Wake/Exhaust Plume Interaction for Subsonic and HSCT Airplanes  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Computational study of the far-field turbulent vortex-wake/exhaust plume interaction for subsonic and high speed civil transport (HSCT) airplanes is carried out. The Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (NS) equations are solved using the implicit, upwind, Roe-flux-differencing, finite-volume scheme. The two-equation shear stress transport model of Menter is implemented with the NS solver for turbulent-flow calculation. For the far-field study, the computations of vortex-wake interaction with the exhaust plume of a single engine of a Boeing 727 wing in a holding condition and two engines of an HSCT in a cruise condition are carried out using overlapping zonal method for several miles downstream. These results are obtained using the computer code FTNS3D. The results of the subsonic flow of this code are compared with those of a parabolized NS solver known as the UNIWAKE code.

Kandil, Osama A.; Adam, Ihab; Wong, Tin-Chee

1996-01-01

113

Electrostatic Potential Generated by Rockets on Vehicles in Space.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Investigators have reported the existence of electric current in the exhaust plumes of rocket engines and have speculated that this current could generate a sufficiently high electrostatic potential on vehicles in space to interfere with or damage electro...

L. Aronowitz

1968-01-01

114

Exhaust Plume Effects on Sonic Boom for a Delta Wing and a Swept Wing-Body Model  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Supersonic travel is not allowed over populated areas due to the disturbance caused by the sonic boom. Research has been performed on sonic boom reduction and has included the contribution of the exhaust nozzle plume. Plume effect on sonic boom has progressed from the study of isolated nozzles to a study with four exhaust plumes integrated with a wing-body vehicle. This report provides a baseline analysis of the generic wing-body vehicle to demonstrate the effect of the nozzle exhaust on the near-field pressure profile. Reductions occurred in the peak-to-peak magnitude of the pressure profile for a swept wing-body vehicle. The exhaust plumes also had a favorable effect as the nozzles were moved outward along the wing-span.

Castner, Raymond; Lake, Troy

2012-01-01

115

An overview of in-flight plume diagnostics for rocket engines  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An overview and progress report of the work performed or sponsored by LeRC toward the development of in-flight plume spectroscopy technology for health and performance monitoring of liquid propellant rocket engines are presented. The primary objective of this effort is to develop technology that can be utilized on any flight engine. This technology will be validated by a hardware demonstration of a system capable of being retrofitted onto the Space Shuttle Main Engines for spectroscopic measurements during flight. The philosophy on system definition and status on the development of instrumentation, optics, and signal processing with respect to implementation on a flight engine are discussed.

Madzsar, G. C.; Bickford, R. L.; Duncan, D. B.

1992-01-01

116

Crew Launch Vehicle Mobile Launcher Solid Rocket Motor Plume Induced Environment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The plume-induced environment created by the Ares 1 first stage, five-segment reusable solid rocket motor (RSRMV) will impose high heating rates and impact pressures on Launch Complex 39. The extremes of these environments pose a potential threat to weaken or even cause structural components to fail if insufficiently designed. Therefore the ability to accurately predict these environments is critical to assist in specifying structural design requirements to insure overall structural integrity and flight safety. This paper presents the predicted thermal and pressure environments induced by the launch of the Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV) from Launch Complex (LC) 39. Once the environments are predicted, a follow-on thermal analysis is required to determine the surface temperature response and the degradation rate of the materials. An example of structures responding to the plume-induced environment will be provided.

Vu, Bruce T.; Sulyma, Peter

2008-01-01

117

Characterization of rocket propellant combustion products: Description of sampling and analysis methods for rocket exhaust characterization studies  

SciTech Connect

A systematic approach has been developed and experimentally validated for the sampling and chemical characterization of the rocket motor exhaust generated from the firing of scaled down test motors at the US Army's Signature Characterization Facility (ASCF) at Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Alabama. The overall strategy was to sample and analyze major exhaust constituents in near real time, while performing off-site analyses of samples collected for the determination of trace constituents of the particulate and vapor phases. Initial interference studies were performed using atmospheric pressure burns of 1 g quantities of propellants in small chambers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide were determined using non-dispersive infrared instrumentation. Hydrogen cyanide, hydrogen chloride, and ammonia determinations were made using ion selective electrode technology. Oxides of nitrogen were determined using chemiluminescence instrumentation. Airborne particulate mass concentration was determined using infrared forward scattering measurements and a tapered element oscillating microbalance, as well as conventional gravimetry. Particulate phase metals were determined by collection on Teflon membrane filters, followed by inductively coupled plasma and atomic absorption analysis. Particulate phase polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and nitro-PAH were collected using high volume sampling on a two stage filter. Target species were extracted, and quantified by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Vapor phase species were collected on multi-sorbent resin traps, and subjected to thermal desorption GC/MS for analysis. 11 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

Jenkins, R.A.

1990-06-07

118

Direct observation of Space Shuttle water vapour exhaust plumes by Odin/SMR  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Odin/SMR measurements of the strong 557 GHz emission line of water vapour allow the retrieval of this species even at altitudes in the upper mesosphere and lower thermosphere. Typically the signal-to-noise ratio is poor at altitudes above 100 km and averaging is required to get sensible results at these altitudes. However the extraordinary concentrations inside the Space Shuttle exhaust plumes allow the retrieval of single water profiles with good statistics also at altitudes above 100 km. Since the start of the Odin mission 2001 in total 60 plume signatures could be detected after 8 Space Shuttle launches, even if Odin/SMR measurements of the 557 GHz band are performed only with larger time intervals. Plumes signatures were observed between a half day to more than two days after the Space Shuttle launch, reaching as far as to 75°N. The plume peak values are typically observed between 95 km and 105 km with concentrations of a couple of ppmv, i.e. roughly a factor 50 was is normally observed. These values describe an average over ~400 km (length) x 4 km (width) x 4 km (height) at the tangent altitude, indicating that the concentrations in the plume peak region are much higher.

Lossow, S.; Urban, J.; Murtagh, D. P.; Eriksson, P.

2010-12-01

119

Modeling Macro- and Micro-Scale Turbulent Mixing and Chemistry in Engine Exhaust Plumes  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Simulation of turbulent mixing and chemical processes in the near-field plume and plume-vortex regimes has been successfully carried out recently using a reduced gas phase kinetics mechanism which substantially decreased the computational cost. A detailed mechanism including gas phase HOx, NOx, and SOx chemistry between the aircraft exhaust and the ambient air in near-field aircraft plumes is compiled. A reduced mechanism capturing the major chemical pathways is developed. Predictions by the reduced mechanism are found to be in good agreement with those by the detailed mechanism. With the reduced chemistry, the computer CPU time is saved by a factor of more than 3.5 for the near-field plume modeling. Distributions of major chemical species are obtained and analyzed. The computed sensitivities of major species with respect to reaction step are deduced for identification of the dominant gas phase kinetic reaction pathways in the jet plume. Both the near field plume and the plume-vortex regimes were investigated using advanced mixing models. In the near field, a stand-alone mixing model was used to investigate the impact of turbulent mixing on the micro- and macro-scale mixing processes using a reduced reaction kinetics model. The plume-vortex regime was simulated using a large-eddy simulation model. Vortex plume behind Boeing 737 and 747 aircraft was simulated along with relevant kinetics. Many features of the computed flow field show reasonable agreement with data. The entrainment of the engine plumes into the wing tip vortices and also the partial detrainment of the plume were numerically captured. The impact of fluid mechanics on the chemical processes was also studied. Results show that there are significant differences between spatial and temporal simulations especially in the predicted SO3 concentrations. This has important implications for the prediction of sulfuric acid aerosols in the wake and may partly explain the discrepancy between past numerical studies (that employed parabolic or temporal approximations) and the measured data. Finally to address the major uncertainty in the near-field plume modeling related to the plume processing of sulfur compounds and advanced model was developed to evaluate its impact on the chemical processes in the near wake. A comprehensive aerosol model is developed and it is coupled with chemical kinetics and the axisymmetric turbulent jet flow models. The integrated model is used to simulate microphysical processes in the near-field jet plume, including sulfuric acid and water binary homogeneous nucleation, coagulation, non-equilibrium heteromolecular condensation, and sulfur-induced soot activation. The formation and evolution of aerosols are computed and analyzed. The computed results show that a large number of ultra-fine (0.3--0.6 nm in radius) volatile HSO4 - HO embryos are generated in the near-field plume. These embryos further grow in size by self coagulation and condensation. Soot particles can be activated by both heterogeneous nucleation and scavenging of H2SO4-H2O aerosols. These activated soot particles can serve as water condensation nuclei for contrail formation. Conditions under which ice contrails can form behind aircrafts are studied. The sensitivities of the threshold temperature for contrail formation with respect to aircraft propulsion efficiency, relative humidity, and ambient pressure are evaluated. The computed aerosol properties for different extent of fuel sulfur conversion to S(VI) (SO3 and H2SO4) in engine are examined and the results are found to be sensitive to this conversion fraction.

Menon, Suresh

1998-01-01

120

Exhaust cloud rise and diffusion in the atmosphere  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Analytical approach develops physical-mathematical model of rocket engine exhaust cloud rise, growth, and diffusion. Analytic derivations and resultant model apply to hot exhaust cloud study or industrial stack plumes, making work results applicable to air pollution. Model formulations apply to all exhaust cloud types and various atmospheric conditions.

Chandler, M. W.; Chu, R. T.; Thayer, S. D.

1971-01-01

121

Rocket engine plume diagnostics using video digitization and image processing - Analysis of start-up  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Video digitization techniques have been developed to analyze the exhaust plume of the Space Shuttle Main Engine. Temporal averaging and a frame-by-frame analysis provide data used to evaluate the capabilities of image processing techniques for use as measurement tools. Capabilities include the determination of the necessary time requirement for the Mach disk to obtain a fully-developed state. Other results show the Mach disk tracks the nozzle for short time intervals, and that dominate frequencies exist for the nozzle and Mach disk movement.

Disimile, P. J.; Shoe, B.; Dhawan, A. P.

1991-01-01

122

Optical Emissions from the High Speed Rocket Exhaust Interaction with the Ionosphere  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An increasing number of space shuttle and rocket launches have inspired an investigation into the effects of vehicle exhaust on the earth's upper atmosphere. A controlled Charged Aerosol Release Experiment (CARE) will be carried out in September 2009 from Wallops Island, Virginia. The high speed exhaust from the Nihka motor on the rocket contains primarily Al2O3, H2O, CO, HCl, N2, CO2 and H2, would have an exit velocity of 2.8 km/s, and the exhaust would last for 18 seconds. The heavy particles are expected to form a charged dust layer in the lower thermosphere and the ionospheric E region. Sunlight scattered from the particulates will produce a bright optical display that can be observed with a ground spectrograph. In addition, the interactions of these molecular ions with the background ionospheric electrons are expected to also produce optical emissions in the range of 400-1000 nm. Observations from the CARE campaign were obtained using a ground based Visible/NIR spectrograph and the Millstone Hill ionospheric incoherent scatter radar located in Massachusetts. The chemical processes behind the expected emissions are compared with the observed optical emissions for both temporal and spatial scales. The spectral emissions observed with the spectrograph from the Wallops site are also compared to those observed at other ground based optical diagnostics sites. The temporal evolution of the emissions is correlated with that of the formation of the ionospheric layers as observed with the Millstone Hill radar. Finally, the significance of these results and future plans for more and enhanced observation techniques will be discussed.

Bhatt, A.; Bernhardt, P. A.; Erickson, P. J.; Lind, F. D.; Varney, R. H.; Kelley, M. C.

2009-12-01

123

First direct sulfuric acid detection in the exhaust plume of a jet aircraft in flight  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Sulfuric acid (SA) was for the first time directly detected in the exhaust plume of a jet aircraft in flight. The measurements were made by a novel aircraft-based VACA (Volatile Aerosol Component Analyzer) instrument of MPI-K Heidelberg while the research aircraft Falcon was chasing another research aircraft ATTAS. The VACA measures the total SA in the gas and in volatile submicron aerosol particles. During the chase the engines of the ATTAS alternatively burned sulfur-poor and sulfur-rich fuel. In the sulfur-rich plume very marked enhancements of total SA were observed of up to 1300 pptv which were closely correlated with ?CO2 and ?T and were far above the local ambient atmospheric background-level of typically 15-50 pptv. Our observations indicate a lower limit for the efficiency ? for fuel-sulfur conversion to SA of 0.34 %.

Curtius, J.; Sierau, B.; Arnold, F.; Baumann, R.; Busen, R.; Schulte, P.; Schumann, U.

124

First gaseous ion composition measurements in the exhaust plume of a jet aircraft in flight: Implications for gaseous sulfuric acid, aerosols, and chemiions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mass spectrometric composition measurements of gaseous negative ions have been made in the exhaust plume of a commercial jet aircraft (Airbus A310) in flight at altitudes around 10.4 km and at two plume ages around 3.0 and 3.6 s. Negative ions observed inside the exhaust plume are mostly NO3-(HNO3)m and HSO4-(HNO3)m with m<=2. Outside the plume in the ``background'' atmosphere

F. Arnold; K.-H. Wohlfrom; M. W. Klemm; J. Schneider; K. Gollinger; U. Schumann; R. Busen

1998-01-01

125

First gaseous ion composition measurements in the exhaust plume of a jet aircraft in flight: Implications for gaseous sulfuric acid, aerosols, and chemiions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mass spectrometric composition measurements of gaseous negative ions have been made in the exhaust plume of a commercial jet aircraft (Airbus A310) in flight at altitudes around 10.4 km and at two plume ages around 3.0 and 3.6 s. Negative ions observed inside the exhaust plume are mostly NO3?(HNO3)m and HSO4?(HNO3)m with m ?2. Outside the plume in the “background”

F. Arnold; K.-H. Wohlfrom; M. W. Klemm; J. Schneider; K. Gollinger; U. Schumann; R. Busen

1998-01-01

126

Method and apparatus for suppressing ignition overpressure in solid rocket propulsion systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The transient overpressure wave produced upon ignition of a solid rocket booster is suppressed by providing within the launch platform, a plurality of pipes and spray heads disposed around the periphery of the exhaust gas plume near its upper end and spraying water into the upper end of the plume during ignition. A large amount of water, preferably equivalent in mass of exhaust products being ejected, is sprayed into the plume in a direction generally perpendicular to plume flow.

Guest, S. H.; Jones, J. H. (inventors)

1982-01-01

127

Results of an investigation of jet plume effects on an 0.010-scale model (75-OTS) of the space shuttle integrated vehicle in the 9 x 7-foot leg of the NASA/Ames unitary wind tunnel (IA82B), volume 1. [an exhaust flow simulation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The base pressure environment was investigated for the first and second stage mated vehicle in a supersonic flow field from Mach 1.55 through 2.20 with simulated rocket engine exhaust plumes. The pressure environment was investigated for the orbiter at various vent port locations at these same freestream conditions. The Mach number environment around the base of the model with rocket plumes simulated was examined. Data were obtained at angles of attack from -4 deg through +4 deg at zero yaw, and at yaw angles from -4 deg through +4 deg at zero angle of attack, with rocket plume sizes varying from smaller than nominal to much greater than nominal. Failed orbiter engine data were also obtained. Elevon hinge moments and wing panel load data were obtained during all runs. Photographs of the tested configurations are shown.

Hawthorne, P. J.

1976-01-01

128

A field study of solid rocket exhaust impacts on the near-field environment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Large solid rocket motors release large quantities of hydrogen chloride and aluminum oxide exhaust during launch and testing. Measurements and analysis of the interaction of this material with the deluge water spray and other environmental factors in the near field (within 1 km of the launch or test site) are summarized. Measurements of mixed solid and liquid deposition (typically 2 normal HCl) following space shuttle launches and 6.4 percent scale model tests are described. Hydrogen chloride gas concentrations measured in the hours after the launch of STS 41D and STS 51A are reported. Concentrations of 9 ppm, which are above the 5 ppm exposure limits for workers, were detected an hour after STS 51A. A simplified model which explains the primary features of the gas concentration profiles is included.

Anderson, B. J.; Keller, Vernon W.

1990-01-01

129

Search of archived data sources for rocket exhaust-induced modifications of the ionosphere  

SciTech Connect

The emergence of the Satellite Power System (SPS) concept as a way of augmenting the dwindling energy sources available for commercial power usage involved such a large and unprecendented technological program that detailed assessment and feasibility studies were undertaken in an attempt to specify the true impact such a program would have. As part of the issues addressed, a comprehensive environmental impact study was initiated that involved an unprecedented scope of concerns ranging from ground-level noise and weather modifications to possible planetary-scale perturbations caused by SPS activity in distant Earth orbits. This report describes results of a study of an intermediate region of the Earth's environment (the ionosphere) where large-scale perturbations are caused by routine rocket activity. The SPS program calls for vast transportation demands into and out from the ionosphere (h approx. = 200 to 1000 km), and thus the well-known effect of chemical depletions of the ionosphere (so-called ionospheric holes) caused by rocket exhaust signaled a concern over the possible large-scale and long-term consequences of the induced effects.

Chacko, C.C.; Mendillo, M.

1980-09-01

130

Design of Experiments for Both Experimental and Analytical Study of Exhaust Plume Effects on Sonic Boom  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis has been performed to study the plume effects on sonic boom signature for isolated nozzle configurations. The objectives of these analyses were to provide comparison to past work using modern CFD analysis tools, to investigate the differences of high aspect ratio nozzles to circular (axisymmetric) nozzles, and to report the effects of under expanded nozzle operation on boom signature. CFD analysis was used to address the plume effects on sonic boom signature from a baseline exhaust nozzle. Nearfield pressure signatures were collected for nozzle pressure ratios (NPRs) between 6 and 10. A computer code was used to extrapolate these signatures to a ground-observed sonic boom N-wave. Trends show that there is a reduction in sonic boom N-wave signature as NPR is increased from 6 to 10. As low boom designs are developed and improved, there will be a need for understanding the interaction between the aircraft boat tail shocks and the exhaust nozzle plume. These CFD analyses will provide a baseline study for future analysis efforts. For further study, a design of experiments has been conducted to develop a hybrid method where both CFD and small scale wind tunnel testing will validate the observed trends. The CFD and testing will be used to screen a number of factors which are important to low boom propulsion integration, including boat tail angle, nozzle geometry, and the effect of spacing and stagger on nozzle pairs. To design the wind tunnel experiment, CFD was instrumental in developing a model which would provide adequate space to observe the nozzle and boat tail shock structure without interference from the wind tunnel walls.

Castner, Raymond S.

2009-01-01

131

A Collimated Retarding Potential Analyzer for the Study of Magnetoplasma Rocket Plumes  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A gridded retarding potential analyzer (RPA) has been developed to characterize the magnetized plasma exhaust of the 10 kW Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VX-10) experiment at NASA's Advanced Space Propulsion Laboratory. In this system, plasma is energized through coupling of radio frequency waves at the ion cyclotron resonance (ICR). The particles are subsequently accelerated in a magnetic nozzle to provide thrust. Downstream of the nozzle, the RPA's mounting assembly enables the detector to make complete axial and radial scans of the plasma. A multichannel collimator can be inserted into the RPA to remove ions with pitch angles greater than approximately 1 deg. A calculation of the general collimator transmission as a function over velocity space is presented, which shows the instrument's sensitivity in detecting changes in both the parallel and perpendicular components of the ion energy. Data from initial VX-10 ICRH experiments show evidence of ion heating.

Glover, T. W.; Chan, A. A.; Chang-Diaz, F. R.; Kittrell, C.

2003-01-01

132

Measurements of Unexpected Ozone Loss in a Nighttime Space Shuttle Exhaust Plume: Implications for Geo-Engineering Projects  

Microsoft Academic Search

Measurements of ozone, carbon dioxide and particulate water were made in the nighttime exhaust plume of the Space Shuttle (STS-116) on 9 December 2006 as part of the PUMA\\/WAVE campaign (Plume Ultrafast Measurements Acquisition\\/WB-57F Ascent Video Experiment). The launch took place from Kennedy Space Center at 8:47 pm (local time) on a moonless night and the WB-57F aircraft penetrated the

L. M. Avallone; L. E. Kalnajs; D. W. Toohey; M. N. Ross

2008-01-01

133

High temperature reformation of aluminum and chlorine compounds behind the Mach disk of a solid-fuel rocket exhaust  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Chemical reactions expected to occur among the constituents of solid-fuel rocket engine effluents in the hot region behind a Mach disk are analyzed theoretically. With the use of a rocket plume model that assumes the flow to be separated in the base region, and a chemical reaction scheme that includes evaporation of alumina and the associated reactions of 17 gas species, the reformation of the effluent is calculated. It is shown that AlClO and AlOH are produced in exchange for a corresponding reduction in the amounts of HCl and Al2O3. For the case of the space shuttle booster engines, up to 2% of the original mass of the rocket fuel can possibly be converted to these two new species and deposited in the atmosphere between the altitudes of 10 and 40 km. No adverse effects on the atmospheric environment are anticipated with the addition of these two new species.

Park, C.

1976-01-01

134

Analysis of Exhaust Plume Effects on Sonic Boom for a 59-Degree Wing Body Model  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Reducing or eliminating the operational restrictions of supersonic aircraft over populated areas has led to extensive research at NASA. Restrictions are due to the disturbance of the sonic boom, caused by the coalescence of shock waves formed off the aircraft. Recent work has been performed to reduce the magnitude of the sonic boom N-wave generated by airplane components with focus on shock waves caused by the exhaust nozzle plume. Previous Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analyses showed how the shock wave formed at the nozzle lip interacted with the nozzle boat-tail expansion wave. The nozzle lip shock moved with increasing nozzle pressure ratio (NPR) and reduced the nozzle boat-tail expansion. Lip shock movement caused a favorable change in the observed pressure signature. These results were applied to a simplified supersonic vehicle geometry with no inlets and no tail, in which the goal was to demonstrate how under-expanded nozzle operation reduced the sonic boom signature by twelve percent. A secondary goal was to demonstrate the use of the Cart3D inviscid code for off-body pressure signatures including the nozzle plume effect.

Castner, Raymond S.

2011-01-01

135

Exhaust Nozzle Plume Effects on Sonic Boom Test Results for Isolated Nozzles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Reducing or eliminating the operational restrictions of supersonic aircraft over populated areas has led to extensive research at NASA. Restrictions were due to the disturbance of the sonic boom, caused by the coalescence of shock waves formed off the aircraft. Recent work has been performed to reduce the magnitude of the sonic boom N-wave generated by airplane components with focus on shock waves caused by the exhaust nozzle plume. Previous Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis showed how the shock wave formed at the nozzle lip interacts with the nozzle boat-tail expansion wave. An experiment was conducted in the 1- by 1-ft Supersonic Wind Tunnel at the NASA Glenn Research Center to validate the computational study. Results demonstrated how the nozzle lip shock moved with increasing nozzle pressure ratio (NPR) and reduced the nozzle boat-tail expansion, causing a favorable change in the observed pressure signature. Experimental results were presented for comparison to the CFD results. The strong nozzle lip shock at high values of NPR intersected the nozzle boat-tail expansion and suppressed the expansion wave. Based on these results, it may be feasible to reduce the boat-tail expansion for a future supersonic aircraft with under-expanded nozzle exhaust flow by modifying nozzle pressure or nozzle divergent section geometry.

Castner, Raymond S.

2011-01-01

136

Experimental measurements of the ground cloud growth during the 11 February 1974, Titan-Centaur launch at Kennedy Space Center. [(measurement of rocket exhaust from rocket launching)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Titan-Centaur was launched from Kennedy Space Center on February 11, 1974 at 0948 eastern daylight time. Ground level effluent measurements were obtained from the solid rocket motors for comparison with NASA diffusion models for predicting effluent ground level concentrations and cloud behavior. The results obtained provide a basis for an evaluation of such key model inputs such as cloud rise rate, stabilization altitude, crosswind growth, volume expansion, and cloud trajectory. Ground level effluent measurements were limited because of changing meteorological conditions, incorrect instrument location, and operational problems. Based on the measurement results, operational changes are defined. Photographs of the ground exhaust clouds are shown. The chemical composition of the exhaust gases was analyzed and is given.

Stewart, R. B.; Sentell, R. J.; Gregory, G. L.

1976-01-01

137

Exhaust Nozzle Plume Effects on Sonic Boom Test Results for Vectored Nozzles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Reducing or eliminating the operational restrictions of supersonic aircraft over populated areas has led to extensive research at NASA. Restrictions were due to the disturbance of the sonic boom, caused by the coalescence of shock waves formed off the aircraft. Recent work has been performed to reduce the magnitude of the sonic boom N-wave generated by airplane components with a focus on shock waves caused by the exhaust nozzle plume. Previous Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis showed how the shock wave formed at the nozzle lip interacts with the nozzle boat-tail expansion wave. An experiment was conducted in the 1- by 1-foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel (SWT) at the NASA Glenn Research Center. Results show how the shock generated at the nozzle lip affects the near field pressure signature, and thereby the potential sonic boom contribution for a nozzle at vector angles from 3 to 8 . The experiment was based on the NASA F-15 nozzle used in the Lift and Nozzle Change Effects on Tail Shock experiment, which possessed a large external boat-tail angle. In this case, the large boat-tail angle caused a dramatic expansion, which dominated the near field pressure signature. The impact of nozzle vector angle and nozzle pressure ratio are summarized.

Castner, Raymond

2012-01-01

138

Spectroscopic studies of the exhaust plume of a quasi-steady MPD accelerator. Ph.D. Thesis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Spectroscopic and photographic investigations are reported that reveal a complex azimuthal species structure in the exhaust plume of a quasi-steady argon MPD accelerator. Over a wide range of operating conditions the injected argon remains collimated in discrete jets which are azimuthally in line with the six propellant injector orifices. The regions between these argon jets, including the central core of the exhaust flow, are occupied by impurities such as carbon, hydrogen and oxygen ablated from the Plexiglas back plate of the arc chamber. The features of this plume structure are found to be dependent on the arc current and mass flow rate. It is found that nearly half the observed velocity is attained in an acceleration region well downstream of the region of significant electromagnetic interaction. Recombination calculations show that the ionization energy is essentially frozen.

Bruckner, A. P.

1972-01-01

139

Apollo 12 Lunar Module exhaust plume impingement on Lunar Surveyor III  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Understanding plume impingement by retrorockets on the surface of the Moon is paramount for safe lunar outpost design in NASA's planned return to the Moon for the Constellation Program. Visual inspection, Scanning Electron Microscopy, and surface scanned topology have been used to investigate the damage to the Lunar Surveyor III spacecraft that was caused by the Apollo 12 Lunar Module's close proximity landing. Two parts of the Surveyor III craft returned by the Apollo 12 astronauts, Coupons 2050 and 2051, which faced the Apollo 12 landing site, show that a fine layer of lunar regolith coated the materials and was subsequently removed by the Apollo 12 Lunar Module landing rocket. The coupons were also pitted by the impact of larger soil particles with an average of 103 pits/cm 2. The average entry size of the pits was 83.7 ?m (major diameter) × 74.5 ?m (minor diameter) and the average estimated penetration depth was 88.4 ?m. Pitting in the surface of the coupons correlates to removal of lunar fines and is likely a signature of lunar material imparting localized momentum/energy sufficient to cause cracking of the paint. Comparison with the lunar soil particle size distribution and the optical density of blowing soil during lunar landings indicates that the Surveyor III spacecraft was not exposed to the direct spray of the landing Lunar Module, but instead experienced only the fringes of the spray of soil. Had Surveyor III been exposed to the direct spray, the damage would have been orders of magnitude higher.

Immer, Christopher; Metzger, Philip; Hintze, Paul E.; Nick, Andrew; Horan, Ryan

2011-02-01

140

Effect of the Constrictive Area Ratio on the Rocket Exhaust Flow-Field in the Launcher.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

There are a variety of military rockets which are launched from variable-area launch tubes. The change in cross section allows the rocket to be initially constrained after ignition, while momentum is gained. The flow of the high temperature and high press...

J. J. Bertin G. M. Garms E. S. Idar

1976-01-01

141

Sulfuric acid measurements in the exhaust plume of a jet aircraft in flight: Implications for the sulfuric acid formation efficiency  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Sulfuric acid concentrations were measured in the exhaust plume of a B737-300 aircraft in flight. The measurements were made onboard of the German research aircraft Falcon using the Volatile Aerosol Component Analyzer (VACA). The VACA measures total H2SO4, which is the sum of gaseous H2SO4 and aerosol H2SO4. Measurements took place at distances of 25-200 m behind the B737 corresponding to plume ages of about 0.1-1 seconds. The fuel sulfur content (FSC) of the fuel burned by the B737 engines was alternatively 2.6 and 56 mg sulfur per kilogram fuel (ppmm). H2SO4 concentrations measured in the plume for the 56 ppmm sulfur case were up to ~600 pptv. The average concentration of H2SO4 measured in the ambient atmosphere outside the aircraft plume was 88 pptv, the maximum ambient atmospheric H2SO4 was ~300 pptv. Average efficiencies ??CO2 = 3.3 +/- 1.8% and ??T = 2.9 +/- 1.6% for fuel sulfur conversion to sulfuric acid were inferred when relating the H2SO4 data to measurements of the plume tracers ?CO2 and ?T.

Curtius, J.; Arnold, F.; Schulte, P.

2002-04-01

142

Characterizing and overcoming spectral artifacts in imaging Fourier-transform spectroscopy of turbulent exhaust plumes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The midwave and shortwave infrared regions of the electromagnetic spectrum contain rich information enabling the characterization of hot, rapid events such as explosions, engine plumes, flares and other combustion events. High-speed sensors are required to analyze the content of such rapidly evolving targets. Cameras with high frame rates and non-imaging spectrometers with high data rates are typically used; however the information from these two types of instruments must be later fused to enable characterization of the transient targets. Imaging spectrometers have recently become commercially available for general scientific use, thus enabling simultaneous capture of both spatial and spectral information without co-registration issues. However, their use against rapidly-varying sources has traditionally been considered problematic, for even at moderate spatial and spectral resolutions the time to acquire a single spectrum can be long compared to the timescales associated with combustion events. This paper demonstrates that imaging Fourier-transform spectroscopy (IFTS) can successfully characterize the turbulent combustion exhaust from a turbojet engine. A Telops Hyper-Cam IFTS collected hyperspectral video from a Turbine Technologies SR-30 turbojet engine with a spectral resolution of ?? = 1/cm-1 on a 200×64 pixel sub-window at a rate of 0.3 Hz. Scene-change artifacts (SCAs) are present in the spectra; however, the stochastic fluctuations in source intensity translate into high-frequency "noise." Temporal averaging affords a significant reduction of the noise associated with SCAs. Emission from CO and CO2 are clearly recognized in the averaged spectra, and information about their temperature and relative concentrations is evident.

Moore, Elizabeth A.; Gross, Kevin C.; Bowen, Spencer J.; Perram, Glen P.; Chamberland, Martin; Farley, Vincent; Gagnon, Jean-Philippe; Lagueux, Philippe; Villemaire, André

2009-05-01

143

PLUMES  

EPA Science Inventory

PLUMES INCLUDES TWO INITIAL DILUTION PLUME MODELS (RSB AND UM) AND A MODEL INTERFACE MANAGER FOR PREPARING COMMON INPUT AND RUNNING THE MODELS. TWO FARFIELD ALGORITHMS ARE AUTOMATICALLY INITIATED BEYOND THE ZONE OF INITIAL DILUTION. PLUMES ALSO INCORPORATES THE FLOW CLASSIFICAT...

144

Rockets  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students learn how and why engineers design satellites to benefit life on Earth, as well as explore motion, rockets and rocket motion. Through six lessons and 10 associated hands-on activities, students discover that the motion of all objectsâeverything from the flight of a rocket to the movement of a canoeâis governed by Newton's three laws of motion. This unit introduces students to the challenges of getting into space for the purpose of exploration. The ideas of thrust, weight and control are explored, helping students to fully understand what goes into the design of rockets and the value of understanding these scientific concepts. After learning how and why the experts make specific engineering choices, students also learn about the iterative engineering design process as they design and construct their own model rockets. Then students explore triangulation, a concept that is fundamental to the navigation of satellites and global positioning systems designed by engineers; by investigating these technologies, they learn how people can determine their positions and the locations of others.

Integrated Teaching And Learning Program

145

Plume mass flow and optical damage distributions for an MMH/N2O4 RCS thruster. [exhaust plume contamination of spacecraft components  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The data obtained from two recent experiments conducted in a continuing series of experiments at the Lewis Research Center into the contamination characteristics of a 5-pound thrust MMH/N2O4 engine are presented. The primary objectives of these experiments were to establish the angular distribution of condensible exhaust products within the plume and the corresponding optical damage angular distribution of transmitting optical elements attributable to this contaminant. The plume mass flow distribution was measured by five quartz crystal microbalances (QCM's) located at the engine axis evaluation. The fifth QCM was located above the engine and 15 deg behind the nozzle exit plane. The optical damage was determined by ex-situ transmittance measurements for the wavelength range from 0.2 to 0.6 microns on 2.54 cm diameter fused silica discs also located at engine centerline elevation. Both the mass deposition and optical damage angular distributions followed the expected trend of decreasing deposition and damage as the angle between sensor or sample and the nozzle axis increased. A simple plume gas flow equation predicted the deposition distribution reasonably well for angles of up to 55 degrees. The optical damage measurements also indicated significant effects at large angles.

Spisz, E. W.; Bowman, R. L.; Jack, J. R.

1973-01-01

146

Rocket plume spectrometry: A system permitting engine condition monitoring, as applied to the technology test bed engine  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The appearance of visible objects in the exhaust plume of space shuttle main engines (SSME) during test firings is discussed. A program was undertaken to attempt to identify anomalous material resulting from wear, normal or excessive, of internal parts, allowing time monitoring of engine condition or detection of failure precursors. Measurements were taken during test firings at Stennis Space Center and at the Santa Suzanna facility in California. The results indicated that a system having high spectral resolution, a fast time response, and a wide spectral range was required to meet all requirements, thus two special systems have been designed and built. One is the Optical Plume Anomaly Detector (OPAD). The other instrument, which is described in this report, is the superspectrometer, an optical multichannel analyzer having 8,192 channels covering the spectral band 250 to 1,000 nm.

Powers, W. T.

1989-01-01

147

Conditionally analyzed mean velocity and turbulence measurements in a plume-induced boundary layer separated flowfield  

Microsoft Academic Search

A supersonic plume-induced boundary layer separated (PIBLS) flowfield occurs when an underexpanded exhaust plume obstructs the flow around a rocket causing an oblique shock wave to form on the afterbody. The shock oscillates randomly in the streamwise direction causing an unsteady boundary layer separation that complicates prediction and measurement of PIBLS flowfields. This study provides the first turbulence measurements in

Carl Wayne Palko

1998-01-01

148

On the fast zonal transport of the STS-121 space shuttle exhaust plume in the lower thermosphere  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Meier et al. (2011) reported rapid eastward transport of the STS-121 space shuttle (launch: July 4, 2006) main engine plume in the lower thermosphere, observed in hydrogen Lyman ? images by the GUVI instrument onboard the TIMED satellite. In order to study the mechanism of the rapid zonal transport, diagnostic tracer calculations are performed using winds from the Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIME-GCM) simulation of July, 2006. It is found that the strong eastward jet at heights of 100-110 km, where the exhaust plume was deposited, results in a persistent eastward tracer motion with an average velocity of 45 m/s. This is generally consistent with, though faster than, the prevailing eastward shuttle plume movement with daily mean velocity of 30 m/s deduced from the STS-121 GUVI observation. The quasi-two-day wave (QTDW) was not included in the numerical simulation because it was found not to be large. Its absence, however, might be partially responsible for insufficient meridional transport to move the tracers away from the fast jet in the simulation. The current study and our model results from Yue and Liu (2010) explain two very different shuttle plume transport scenarios (STS-121 and STS-107 (launch: January 16, 2003), respectively): we conclude that lower thermospheric dynamics is sufficient to account for both very fast zonal motion (zonal jet in the case of STS-121) and very fast meridional motion to polar regions (large QTDW in the case of STS-107).

Yue, Jia; Liu, Han-Li; Meier, R. R.; Chang, Loren; Gu, Sheng-Yang; Russell, James, III

2013-03-01

149

Results of an investigation of jet plume effects on a 0.010-scale model (75-OTS) of the space shuttle integrated vehicle in the 8 x 7-foot leg of the NASA/Ames unitary wind tunnel (IA82C), volume 1. [(an exhaust flow simulation)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The primary test objective was to define the base pressure environment of the first and second stage mated vehicle in a supersonic flow field from Mach 2.60 through 3.50 with simulated rocket engine exhaust plumes. The secondary objective was to obtain the pressure environment of the Orbiter at various vent port locations at these same freestream conditions. Data were obtained at angles of attack from -4 deg through +4 deg at zero yaw, and at yaw angles from -4 deg through +4 deg at zero angle of attack, with rocket plume sizes varying from smaller than nominal to much greater than nominal. Failed Orbiter engine data were also obtained. Elevon hinge moments and wing panel load data were obtained during all runs. Photographs of test equipment and tested configurations are shown.

Hawthorne, P. J.

1976-01-01

150

The effects of an ion-thruster exhaust plume on S-band carrier transmission  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The magnitude of the effects of an ion thruster plume on S-band signals is measured. Modeling techniques are developed to predict the effects. Results show that the RF signal transmitted through an ion thruster plume is reduced in amplitude and shifted in phase. An increase in noise is also experienced.

Ackerknecht, W. E., III; Stanton, P. H.

1976-01-01

151

High altitude chemically reacting gas particle mixtures. Volume 2: Program manual for RAMP2. [rocket nozzle and orbital plume flow fields  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

All of the elements used in the Reacting and Multi-Phase (RAMP2) computer code are described in detail. The code can be used to model the dominant phenomena which affect the prediction of liquid and solid rocket nozzle and orbital plume flow fields.

Smith, S. D.

1984-01-01

152

Application of the Saha equation to high temperature (greater than or equal to) rocket exhaust  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using the Saha equations and spectroscopic constants, the computer program in this report calculates the species populations of diatomic molecules, neutrals, ions, and electrons in a plasma. The code considers the equilibrium of a two-element, chemically reacting plasma, by calculating the partition function for each species. By rederiving theoretically, as the JANAF tables do, the thermodynamic properties of a rocket

Robert T. Nachtrieb

1992-01-01

153

Direct active measurements of movements of lunar dust: Rocket exhausts and natural effects contaminating and cleansing Apollo hardware on the Moon in 1969  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dust is the Number 1 environmental hazard on the Moon, yet its movements and adhesive properties are little understood. Matchbox-sized, 270-gram Dust Detector Experiments (DDEs) measured contrasting effects triggered by rocket exhausts of Lunar Modules (LM) after deployment 17 m and 130 m from Apollo 11 and 12 LMs. Apollo 11 Lunar Seismometer was contaminated, overheated and terminated after 21

Brian O'Brien

2009-01-01

154

Adsorption and Chemical Reaction of Gaseous Mixtures of Hydrogen Chloride and Water on Aluminum Oxide and Application to Solid-Propellant Rocket Exhaust Clouds.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Hydrogen chloride (HCl) and aluminum oxide (Al2O3) are major exhaust products of solid rocket motors (SRM). Samples of calcination-produced alumina were exposed to continuously flowing mixtures of gaseous HCl/H2O in nitrogen. Transient sorption rates, as ...

G. L. Pellett W. R. Cofer

1978-01-01

155

Digital filtering of plume emission spectra  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Fourier transformation and digital filtering techniques were used to separate the superpositioned spectral phenomena observed in the exhaust plumes of liquid propellant rocket engines. Space shuttle main engine (SSME) spectral data were used to show that extraction of spectral lines in the spatial frequency domain does not introduce error, and extraction of the background continuum introduces only minimal error. Error introduced during band extraction could not be quantified due to poor spectrometer resolution. Based on the atomic and molecular species found in the SSME plume, it was determined that spectrometer resolution must be 0.03 nm for SSME plume spectral monitoring.

Madzsar, George C.

1990-01-01

156

Electrostatic Potential Generated by Rockets on Vehicles in Space  

Microsoft Academic Search

Investigators have reported the existence of electric current in the exhaust plumes of rocket engines and have speculated that this current could generate a sufficiently high electrostatic potential on vehicles in space to interfere with or damage electronic subsystems or instrumentation. This paper identifies the source of the observed current, calculates its magnitude as a function of the engine parameters,

Leonard Aronowitz

1968-01-01

157

Multiple dopant injection system for small rocket engines  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Diagnostics Test Facility (DTF) at NASA's Stennis Space Center (SSC) was designed and built to provide a standard rocket engine exhaust plume for use in the research and development of engine health monitoring instrumentation. A 1000 lb thrust class liquid oxygen (LOX)-gaseous hydrogen (GH2) fueled rocket engine is used as the subscale plume source to simulate the SSME during experimentation and instrument development. The ability of the DTF to provide efficient, and low cost test operations makes it uniquely suited for plume diagnostic experimentation. The most unique feature of the DTF is the Multiple Dopant Injection System (MDIS) that is used to seed the exhaust plume with the desired element or metal alloy. The dopant injection takes place at the fuel injector, yielding a very uniform and homogeneous distribution of the seeding material in the exhaust plume. The MDIS allows during a single test firing of the DTF, the seeding of the exhaust plume with up to three different dopants and also provides distilled water base lines between the dopants. A number of plume diagnostic-related experiments have already utilized the unique capabilities of the DTF.

Sakala, G. G.; Raines, N. G.

1992-07-01

158

Modeling of Heat Transfer and Ablation of Refractory Material Due to Rocket Plume Impingement  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

CR Tech's Thermal Desktop-SINDA/FLUINT software was used in the thermal analysis of a flame deflector design for Launch Complex 39B at Kennedy Space Center, Florida. The analysis of the flame deflector takes into account heat transfer due to plume impingement from expected vehicles to be launched at KSC. The heat flux from the plume was computed using computational fluid dynamics provided by Ames Research Center in Moffet Field, California. The results from the CFD solutions were mapped onto a 3-D Thermal Desktop model of the flame deflector using the boundary condition mapping capabilities in Thermal Desktop. The ablation subroutine in SINDA/FLUINT was then used to model the ablation of the refractory material.

Harris, Michael F.; Vu, Bruce T.

2012-01-01

159

Three-dimensional reconstruction method on the PDE exhaust plume flow flame temperature field  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pulse detonation engine (referred to as PDE) has many advantage about simple structure, high efficiency thermal [1] cycling etc. In the future, it can be widely used in unmanned aircraft, target drone, luring the plane, the imaginary target, target missiles, long-range missiles and other military targets. However, because the exhaust flame of PDE is complicated [2], non-uniform temperature distribution and

Zhimin Zhang; Xiong Wan; Ningning Luo; Shujing Li

2010-01-01

160

Wind Tunnel Model Design for the Study of Plume Effects on Sonic Boom for Isolated Exhaust Nozzles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A low cost test capability was developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center 1- by 1-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel (SWT), with a goal to reduce the disturbance caused by supersonic aircraft flight over populated areas. This work focused on the shock wave structure caused by the exhaust nozzle plume. Analysis and design was performed on a new rig to test exhaust nozzle plume effects on sonic boom signature. Test capability included a baseline nozzle test article and a wind tunnel model consisting of a strut, a nosecone and an upper plenum. Analysis was performed on the external and internal aerodynamic configuration, including the shock reflections from the wind tunnel walls caused by the presence of the model nosecone. This wind tunnel model was designed to operate from Mach 1.4 to Mach 3.0 with nozzle pressure ratios from 6 to 12 and altitudes from 30,000 ft (4.36 psia) to 50,000 ft (1.68 psia). The model design was based on a 1 in. outer diameter, was 9 in. in overall length, and was mounted in the wind tunnel on a 3/8 in. wide support strut. For test conditions at 50,000 ft the strut was built to supply 90 psia of pressure, and to achieve 20 psia at the nozzle inlet with a maximum nozzle pressure of 52 psia. Instrumentation was developed to measure nozzle pressure ratio, and an external static pressure probe was designed to survey near field static pressure profiles at one nozzle diameter above the rig centerline. Model layout placed test nozzles between two transparent sidewalls in the 1 1 SWT for Schlieren photography and comparison to CFD analysis.

Castner, Raynold S.

2010-01-01

161

Wind Tunnel Model Design for the Study of Plume Effects on Sonic Boom for Isolated Exhaust Nozzles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A low cost test capability was developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center 1- by 1-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel (SWT), with a goal to reduce the disturbance caused by supersonic aircraft flight over populated areas. This work focused on the shock wave structure caused by the exhaust nozzle plume. Analysis and design was performed on a new rig to test exhaust nozzle plume effects on sonic boom signature. Test capability included a baseline nozzle test article and a wind tunnel model consisting of a strut, a nose cone and an upper plenum. Analysis was performed on the external and internal aerodynamic configuration, including the shock reflections from the wind tunnel walls caused by the presence of the model nosecone. This wind tunnel model was designed to operate from Mach 1.4 to Mach 3.0 with nozzle pressure ratios from 6 to 12 and altitudes from 30,000 ft (4.36 psia) to 50,000 ft (1.68 psia). The model design was based on a 1 in. outer diameter, was 9 in. in overall length, and was mounted in the wind tunnel on a 3/8 in. wide support strut. For test conditions at 50,000 ft the strut was built to supply 90 psia of pressure, and to achieve 20 psia at the nozzle inlet with a maximum nozzle pressure of 52 psia. Instrumentation was developed to measure nozzle pressure ratio, and an external static pressure probe was designed to survey near field static pressure profiles at one nozzle diameter above the rig centerline. Model layout placed test nozzles between two transparent sidewalls in the 1x1 SWT for Schlieren photography and comparison to CFD analysis.

Castner, Raymond S.

2009-01-01

162

Comparison of the particle size distribution of heavy-duty diesel exhaust using a dilution tailpipe sampler and an in-plume sampler during on-road operation.  

PubMed

Originally constructed to develop gaseous emission factors for heavy-duty diesel trucks, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) On-Road Diesel Emissions Characterization Facility has been modified to incorporate particle measurement instrumentation. An electrical low-pressure impactor designed to continuously measure and record size distribution data was used to monitor the particle size distribution of heavy-duty diesel truck exhaust. For this study, which involved a high-mileage (900,000 mi) truck running at full load, samples were collected by two different methods. One sample was obtained directly from the exhaust stack using an adaptation of the University of Minnesota's air-ejector-based mini-dilution sampler. The second sample was pulled from the plume just above the enclosed trailer, at a point approximately 11 m from the exhaust discharge. Typical dilution ratios of about 300:1 were obtained for both the dilution and plume sampling systems. Hundreds of particle size distributions were obtained at each sampling location. These were compared both selectively and cumulatively to evaluate the performance of the dilution system in simulating real-world exhaust plumes. The data show that, in its current residence-time configuration, the dilution system imposes a statistically significant bias toward smaller particles, with substantially more nanoparticles being collected than from the plume sample. PMID:11002602

Brown, J E; Clayton, M J; Harris, D B; King, F G

2000-08-01

163

Recommended launch-hold criteria for protecting public health from hydrogen chloride (HC1) gas produced by rocket exhaust  

SciTech Connect

Solid-fuel rocket motors used by the United States Air Force (USAF) to launch missiles and spacecraft can produce ambient-air concentrations of hydrogen chloride (HCI) gas. The HCI gas is a reaction product exhausted from the rocket motor during normal launch or emitted as a result of a catastrophic abort destroying the launch vehicle. Depending on the concentration in ambient air, the HCI gas can be irritating or toxic to humans. The diagnostic and complex-terrain wind field and particle dispersion model used by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s (LLNL`s) Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) Program was applied to the launch of a Peacekeeper missile from Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB) in California. Results from this deterministic model revealed that under specific meteorological conditions, cloud passage from normal-launch and catastropic-abort situations can yield measureable ground-level air concentrations of HCI where the general public is located. To protect public health in the event of such cloud passage, scientifically defensible, emergency ambient-air concentration limits for HCI were developed and recommended to the USAF for use as launch-hold criteria. Such launch-hold criteria are used to postpone a launch unless the forecasted meteorological conditions favor the prediction of safe ground-level concentrations of HCl for the general public. The recommended concentration limits are a 2 ppM 1-h time-weighted average (TWA) concentration constrained by a 1-min 10-ppM average concentration. This recommended criteria is supported by human dose-response information, including data for sensitive humans (e.g., asthmatics), and the dose response exhibited experimentally by animal models with respiratory physiology or responses considered similar to humans.

Daniels, J.I.; Baskett, R.L.

1995-11-01

164

Prediction of space shuttle fluctuating pressure environments, including rocket plume effects  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Preliminary estimates of space shuttle fluctuating pressure environments have been made based on prediction techniques developed by Wyle Laboratories. Particular emphasis has been given to the transonic speed regime during launch of a parallel-burn space shuttle configuration. A baseline configuration consisting of a lightweight orbiter and monolithic SRB, together with a typical flight trajectory, have been used as models for the predictions. Critical fluctuating pressure environments are predicted at transonic Mach numbers. Comparisons between predicted environments and wind tunnel test results, in general, showed good agreement. Predicted one-third octave band spectra for the above environments were generally one of three types: (1) attached turbulent boundary layer spectra (typically high frequencies); (2) homogeneous separated flow and shock-free interference flow spectra (typically intermediate frequencies); and (3) shock-oscillation and shock-induced interference flow spectra (typically low frequencies). Predictions of plume induced separated flow environments were made. Only the SRB plumes are important, with fluctuating levels comparable to compression-corner induced separated flow shock oscillation.

Plotkin, K. J.; Robertson, J. E.

1973-01-01

165

Some environmental considerations relating to the interaction of the solid rocket motor exhaust with the atmosphere: Predicted chemical composition of exhaust species and predicted conditions for the formation of HCl aerosol  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The exhaust products of a solid rocket motor using as propellant 14% binder, 16% aluminum, and 70% (wt) ammonium perchlorate consist of hydrogen chloride, water, alumina, and other compounds. The equilibrium and some frozen compositions of the chemical species upon interaction with the atmosphere were computed. The conditions under which hydrogen chloride interacts with the water vapor in humid air to form an aerosol containing hydrochloric acid were computed for various weight ratios of air/exhaust products. These computations were also performed for the case of a combined SRM and hydrogen-oxygen rocket engine. Regimes of temperature and relative humidity where this aerosol is expected were identified. Within these regimes, the concentration of HCL in the aerosol and weight fraction of aerosol to gas phase were plotted. Hydrochloric acid aerosol formation was found to be particularly likely in cool humid weather.

Rhein, R. A.

1973-01-01

166

Process-Hardened, Multi-Analyte Sensor for Characterizing Rocket Plume Constituents  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A multi-analyte sensor was developed that enables simultaneous detection of rocket engine combustion-product molecules in a launch-vehicle ground test stand. The sensor was developed using a pin-printing method by incorporating multiple sensor elements on a single chip. It demonstrated accurate and sensitive detection of analytes such as carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, kerosene, isopropanol, and ethylene from a single measurement. The use of pin-printing technology enables high-volume fabrication of the sensor chip, which will ultimately eliminate the need for individual sensor calibration since many identical sensors are made in one batch. Tests were performed using a single-sensor chip attached to a fiber-optic bundle. The use of a fiber bundle allows placement of the opto-electronic readout device at a place remote from the test stand. The sensors are rugged for operation in harsh environments.

Goswami, Kisholoy

2011-01-01

167

Radiometric observations of the 752.033-GHz rotational absorption line of H2O from a laboratory jet. [simulation of rocket plumes  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

With the aid of a high-resolution two-stage heterodyne radiometer, spectral absorption measurements of the 752.033 GHz line of water vapor were carried out, using a blackbody continuum as a background radiation source for investigating the absorptive properties of the H2O content of high altitude rocket plumes. To simulate this physical situation in a laboratory environment, a small steam jet was operated within a large high-vacuum chamber, with the H2O jet plume traversing the radiometer line of sight. The experiments verified that this rotational line is optically thick, with excitation temperatures below 100 K, in the downstream part of the plume, as predicted by theoretical modelling.

Dionne, G. F.; Fitzgerald, J. F.; Chang, T.-S.; Fetterman, H. R.; Litvak, M. M.

1980-01-01

168

Low altitude plume impingement handbook  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Plume Impingement modeling is required whenever an object immersed in a rocket exhaust plume must survive or remain undamaged within specified limits, due to thermal and pressure environments induced by the plume. At high altitudes inviscid plume models, Monte Carlo techniques along with the Plume Impingement Program can be used to predict reasonably accurate environments since there are usually no strong flowfield/body interactions or atmospheric effects. However, at low altitudes there is plume-atmospheric mixing and potential large flowfield perturbations due to plume-structure interaction. If the impinged surface is large relative to the flowfield and the flowfield is supersonic, the shock near the surface can stand off the surface several exit radii. This results in an effective total pressure that is higher than that which exists in the free plume at the surface. Additionally, in two phase plumes, there can be strong particle-gas interaction in the flowfield immediately ahead of the surface. To date there have been three levels of sophistication that have been used for low altitude plume induced environment predictions. Level 1 calculations rely on empirical characterizations of the flowfield and relatively simple impingement modeling. An example of this technique is described by Piesik. A Level 2 approach consists of characterizing the viscous plume using the SPF/2 code or RAMP2/LAMP and using the Plume Impingement Program to predict the environments. A Level 3 analysis would consist of using a Navier-Stokes code such as the FDNS code to model the flowfield and structure during a single calculation. To date, Level 1 and Level 2 type analyses have been primarily used to perform environment calculations. The recent advances in CFD modeling and computer resources allow Level 2 type analysis to be used for final design studies. Following some background on low altitude impingement, Level 1, 2, and 3 type analysis will be described.

Smith, Sheldon D.

1991-01-01

169

Hydrocarbon-Fueled Rocket Plume Measurement Using Polarized UV Raman Spectroscopy  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The influence of pressure upon the signal strength and polarization properties of UV Raman signals has been investigated experimentally up to pressures of 165 psia (11 atm). No significant influence of pressure upon the Raman scattering cross section or depolarization ratio of the N2 Raman signal was found. The Raman scattering signal varied linearly with pressure for the 300 K N2 samples examined, thus showing no enhancement of cross section with increasing pressure. However at the highest pressures associated with rocket engine combustion, there could be an increase in the Raman scattering cross section, based upon others' previous work at higher pressures than those examined in this work. The influence of pressure upon thick fused silica windows, used in the NASA Modular Combustion Test Article, was also investigated. No change in the transmission characteristics of the windows occurred as the pressure difference across the windows increased from 0 psig up to 150 psig. A calibration was performed on the UV Raman system at Vanderbilt University, which is similar to the one at the NASA-Marshall Test Stand 115. The results of this calibration are described in the form of temperature-dependent functions, f(T)'s, that account for the increase in Raman scattering cross section with an increase in temperature and also account for the reduction in collected Raman signal if wavelength integration does not occur across the entire wavelength range of the Raman signal. These functions generally vary only by approximately 10% across their respective temperature ranges, except for the case Of CO2, where there is a factor of three difference in its f(T) from 300 K to 2500 K. However this trend for CO2 is consistent with the experimental work of others, and is expected based on the low characteristic vibrational temperature Of CO2. A time-averaged temperature measurement technique has been developed, using the same equipment as for the work mentioned above, that is based upon high-spectral resolution UV Raman scattering. This technique can provide temperature measurements for flows where pressure cannot be measured.

Wehrmeyer, Joseph A.

2002-01-01

170

Investigations of Rocket Engine Combustion Emissions During ACCENT  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The composition of rocket combustion emissions and the atmospheric processes that determine their stratospheric impacts are poorly understood. While present day rocket emissions do not significantly affect stratospheric chemistry, the potential for vigorous growth of the space transportation industry in coming decades suggests that rocket emissions and their stratospheric impacts should be better understood. A variety of in-situ measurements and modeling results were obtained during the Atmospheric Chemistry of Combustion Emissions Near the Tropopause (ACCENT) effort that will be used to evaluate the role of rocket exhaust in perturbing ozone chemistry in plume wakes and in the global stratosphere. We present a review of the ACCENT rocket emissions science objectives, summarize data obtained during the WB-57F plume wake sorties, and briefly discuss how the data will help resolve several outstanding questions regarding the impact of rocket emissions on the stratosphere. These include measurement of the emission indices for several important rocket engine combustion products and validation of plume wake chemistry models.

Ross, M. N.; Friedl, R. R.

2001-12-01

171

High altitude chemically reacting gas particle mixtures. Volume 3: Computer code user's and applications manual. [rocket nozzle and orbital plume flow fields  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A users manual for the RAMP2 computer code is provided. The RAMP2 code can be used to model the dominant phenomena which affect the prediction of liquid and solid rocket nozzle and orbital plume flow fields. The general structure and operation of RAMP2 are discussed. A user input/output guide for the modified TRAN72 computer code and the RAMP2F code is given. The application and use of the BLIMPJ module are considered. Sample problems involving the space shuttle main engine and motor are included.

Smith, S. D.

1984-01-01

172

Measurement of plasma parameters in the exhaust of a magnetoplasma rocket by gridded energy analyzer and emissive Langmuir probe  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The 10 kilowatt prototype of the Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR) engine, abbreviated as VX-10, is designed to eject plasma at exhaust velocities of tens of kilometers per second. In this device, energy is imparted to the plasma ions by two mechanisms: ion cyclotron resonant heating (ICRH), and acceleration in an ambipolar electric field. Measurements from two different electrostatic probes are combined to determine how much each mechanism contributes to the total ion energy. The first probe is a gridded retarding potential analyzer (RPA) that incorporates a multi-channel collimator to obtain precise measurement of the ion and electron parallel energy distributions. The second is an emissive Langmuir probe that measures the DC and RF components of the plasma potential. The plasma potential obtained from the emitting probe allows calculation of the parallel velocity distribution once the parallel energy distribution is obtained from the energy analyzer data. Biasing the RPA housing is shown to minimize the plasma perturbation, as monitored by an auxiliary probe. When this minimization is done, the RPA measurements become compatible with the emissive probe's measurement of plasma potential. The collimated RPA and emissive probe have been used to examine the effects of a double dual half-turn (DDHT) antenna encircling the plasma. When power at the ion cyclotron frequency is applied, changes are seen in the saturation current and mean ion energy of the collimated RPA characteristic. The evolution of these changes as the RPA is moved downstream from the antenna is interpreted as firm evidence of ion cyclotron heating, albeit at absorbed energies of less than 1 electronvolt per ion. The emissive probe shows that, within experimental error, all of the increased ion energy is accounted for by an increase in the plasma potential that occurs when the ICRF power is applied. The combined RPA and emissive probe data also show that there is a jet of flowing plasma in the VX-10 when operated with the helicon source alone but that the signal from this jet is overwhelmed by a rapidly growing stationary plasma within the first second of the discharge.

Glover, Timothy Ward

2002-01-01

173

Characterization of rocket propellant combustion products. Chemical characterization and computer modeling of the exhaust products from four propellant formulations: Final report, September 23, 1987--April 1, 1990  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of the work described in this report is four-fold: to (a) develop a standardized and experimentally validated approach to the sampling and chemical and physical characterization of the exhaust products of scaled-down rocket launch motors fired under experimentally controlled conditions at the Army`s Signature Characterization Facility (ASCF) at Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Alabama; (b) determine the composition of the exhaust produces; (c) assess the accuracy of a selected existing computer model for predicting the composition of major and minor chemical species; (d) recommended alternations to both the sampling and analysis strategy and the computer model in order to achieve greater congruence between chemical measurements and computer prediction. 34 refs., 2 figs., 35 tabs.

Jenkins, R.A.; Nestor, C.W.; Thompson, C.V.; Gayle, T.M.; Ma, C.Y.; Tomkins, B.A.; Moody, R.L.

1991-12-09

174

Flat Plate Heat Flux and Pressure Measurement in an MOL Scaled Thruster Plume at 400,000-Ft Altitude.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A 1-lb-thrust scaled Manned Orbiting Laboratory attitude control thruster was tested to determine the heat flux and pressure distribution on a flat plate resulting from the rocket exhaust plume impingement. The thruster distance was varied between 2.5 and...

D. W. Hill D. K. Smith

1969-01-01

175

Rocket motor exhaust products generated by the space shuttle vehicle during its launch phase (1976 design data)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The principal chemical species emitted and/or entrained by the rocket motors of the space shuttle vehicle during the launch phase of its trajectory are considered. Results are presented for two extreme trajectories, both of which were calculated in 1976.

Bowyer, J. M.

1977-01-01

176

Application of the SAHA equation to high temperature (greater than or equal to 6000 K) rocket exhaust  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using the SAHA equations and spectroscopic constants, the computer program calculates the species populations of diatomic molecules, neutrals, ions, and electrons in a plasma. The code considers the equilibrium of a two-element, chemically reacting plasma, by calculating the partition function for each species. By rederiving theoretically, as the JANNAF tables do, the thermodynamic properties of a rocket propellant, but using

Robert T. Nachtrieb

1993-01-01

177

Research in the use of electrets in measuring effluents from rocket exhaust of the space shuttle (6.4 percent scaled model) and Viking 1 launch  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Electrets used to detect the chemical composition of rocket exhaust effluents were investigated. The effectiveness of electrets was assessed while comparisons were made with hydrogen chloride measuring devices from chamber and field tests, and computed results from a multilayer diffusion model. The experimental data used were obtained from 18 static test firings, chamber tests, and the Viking 1 launch to Mars. Results show that electrets have multipollutant measuring capabilities, simplicity of deployment, and speed of assessment. The electrets compared favorably with other hydrogen chloride measuring devices. The summary of the measured data from the electrets and the hydrogen chloride detectors was within the upper and lower bounds of the computed hydrogen chloride concentrations from the multilayer diffusion model.

Susko, M.

1977-01-01

178

One-Dimensional Rocket Launch  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A simulation of a 1-d rocket launch from the Earth's surface with graph of position versus time. Rocket parameters may be varied by typing new values for the initial mass of the fuel and the exhaust velocity.

Christian, Wolfgang; Belloni, Mario

2006-01-12

179

Observation of stratospheric ozone depletion associated with Delta II rocket emissions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Ozone, chlorine monoxide, methane, and submicron particulate concentrations were measured in the stratospheric plume wake of a Delta II rocket powered by a combination of solid (NH4ClO4/Al) and liquid (LOX/kerosene) propulsion systems. We apply a simple kinetics model describing the main features of gas-phase chlorine reactions in solid propellant exhaust plumes to derive the abundance of total reactive chlorine in the plume and estimate the associated cumulative ozone loss. Measured ozone loss during two plume encounters (12 and 39 minutes after launch) exceeded the estimate by about a factor of about two. Insofar as only the most significant gas-phase chlorine reactions are included in the calculation, these results suggest that additional plume wake chemical processes or emissions other than reactive chlorine from the Delta II propulsion system affect ozone levels in the plume.

Ross, M. N.; Toohey, D. W.; Rawlins, W. T.; Richard, E. C.; Kelly, K. K.; Tuck, A. F.; Proffitt, M. H.; Hagen, D. E.; Hopkins, A. R.; Whitefield, P. D.; Benbrook, J. R.; Sheldon, W. R.

180

STS-31 Discovery, OV-103, rockets through low-lying clouds after KSC liftoff  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-31 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, rides above the firey glow of the solid rocket boosters (SRBs) and space shuttle main engines (SSMEs) and a long trail of exhaust as it heads toward Earth orbit. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Launch Complex (LC) Pad 39B is covered in an exhaust cloud moments after the liftoff of OV-103 at 8:33:51.0492 am (Eastern Daylight Time (EDT)). The exhaust plume pierces the low-lying clouds as OV-103 soars into the clear skies above. A nearby waterway appears in the foreground.

1990-01-01

181

Observation of rocket pollution with overhead sensors  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The objective of this thesis is to study the dispersal of rocket pollution through remote sensing techniques. Substantial research with remote sensors has been dedicated to observation of volcanic plumes, particulate dispersion, and aircraft contrails with less emphasis on observing rocket launches and the effects on the surrounding environment. This research focuses on observation of rocket exhaust constituents, particularly carbon soot, alumina, and water vapor. The sensors utilized in this thesis have unique capabilities that provide measurements that are likely capable of detecting the rocket exhaust constituents. Methodology and analysis included choosing an appropriate launch vehicle with obtainable launch data and various booster combinations of liquid propellant only or a combination of liquid and solid propellant, prioritizing the data based on launch time versus sensor passing, processing the data, and applying known constituent properties to the data sets where key areas of work in this endeavor. Results of this work demonstrate a unique capability in monitoring man-made pollution and the extent the pollution can spread to surrounding areas.

Fisher, Annette

182

COMPARISON OF THE PARTICLE SIZE DISTRIBUTION OF HEAVY-DUTY DIESEL EXHAUST USING A DILUTION TAIL-PIPE SAMPLER AND IN-PLUME SAMPLER DURING ON-ROAD OPERATION  

EPA Science Inventory

The paper compares the particle size distribution of heavy-duty diesel exhaust using a dilution tail-pipe sampler and an in-plume sampler during on-road operation. EPA's On-road Diesel Emissions Characterization Facility, modified to incorporate particle measurement instrumentat...

183

Direct active measurements of movements of lunar dust: Rocket exhausts and natural effects contaminating and cleansing Apollo hardware on the Moon in 1969  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Dust is the Number 1 environmental hazard on the Moon, yet its movements and adhesive properties are little understood. Matchbox-sized, 270-gram Dust Detector Experiments (DDEs) measured contrasting effects triggered by rocket exhausts of Lunar Modules (LM) after deployment 17 m and 130 m from Apollo 11 and 12 LMs. Apollo 11 Lunar Seismometer was contaminated, overheated and terminated after 21 days operation. Apollo 12 hardware was splashed with collateral lunar dust during deployment. DDE horizontal solar cell was cleansed of nominally 0.3 mg cm-2 dust by 80% promptly at LM ascent and totally within 7 minutes. A vertical cell facing East was half-cleaned promptly then totally over hundreds of hours. Each cell cooled slightly. For the first time lunar electrostatic adhesive forces on smooth silicon were directly measured by comparison with lunar gravity. Analyses imply this adhesive force weakens as solar angle of incidence decreases. If valid, future lunar astronauts may have greater problems with dust adhesion in the middle half of the day than faced by Apollo missions in early morning. A sunproof shed may provide dust-free working environments on the Moon. Low-cost laboratory tests with DDEs and simulated lunar dust can use DDE benchmark lunar data quickly, optimising theoretical modelling and planning of future lunar expeditions, human and robotic.

O'Brien, Brian

2009-05-01

184

Results of the NASA/MSFC FA-23 plume technology test program performed in the NASA/Ames unitary wind tunnels  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A 2.25% scale model of the space shuttle external tank and solid rocket boosters was tested in the NASA/Ames Unitary 11 x 11 foot transonic and 9 x 7 foot supersonic tunnels to obtain base pressure data with firing solid propellant exhaust plumes. Data system difficulties prevented the acquisition of any useful data in the 9 x 7 tunnel. However, 28 successful rocket test firings were made in the 11 x 11 tunnel, providing base pressure data at Mach numbers of 0.5, 0.9, 1.05, 1.2, and 1.3 and at plume pressure ratios ranging from 11 to 89.

Hendershot, K. C.

1977-01-01

185

Site Alteration Effects from Rocket Exhaust Impingement During a Simulated Viking Mars Landing. Part 2: Chemical and Biological Site Alteration  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Chemical and biological alteration of a Mars landing site was investigated experimentally and analytically. The experimental testing was conducted using a specially designed multiple nozzle configuration consisting of 18 small bell nozzles. The chemical test results indicate that an engine using standard hydrazine fuel will contaminate the landing site with ammonia (50-500ppm), nitrogen (5-50ppm), aniline (0.01-0.5ppm), hydrogen cyanide (0.01-0.5ppm), and water. A purified fuel, with impurities (mostly aniline) reduced by a factor of 50-100, limits the amount of hydrogen cyanide and aniline to below detectable limits for the Viking science investigations and leaves the amounts of ammonia, nitrogen, and water in the soil unchanged. The large amounts of ammonia trapped in the soil will make interpretation of the organic analysis investigation results more difficult. The biological tests indicate that the combined effects of plume gases, surface heating, surface erosion, and gas composition resulting from the retrorockets will not interfere with the Viking biology investigation.

Husted, R. R.; Smith, I. D.; Fennessey, P. V.

1977-01-01

186

Preliminary Analysis of the Effect of Flow Separation Due to Rocket Jet Pluming on Aircraft Dynamic Stability During Atmospheric Exit  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A theoretical investigation was conducted to determine the effects of body boundary-layer separation resulting from a highly underexpanded jet on the dynamic stability of a typical rocket aircraft during an atmospheric exit trajectory. The particular flight condition studied on a digital computer for five degrees of freedom was at Mach 6.0 and 150,000 feet. In view of the unknown character of the separated flow field, two estimates of the pressures in the separated region were made to calculate the unbalanced forces and moments. These estimates, based on limited fundamental zero-angle-of-attack studies and observations, are believed to cover what may be the actual case. In addition to a fixed control case, two simulated pilot control inputs were studied: rate-limited and instantaneous responses. The resulting-motions with and without boundary-layer separation were compared for various initial conditions. The lower of the assumed misalinement forces and moments led to a situation whereby a slowly damped motion could be satisfactorily controlled with rate-limited control input. The higher assumption led to larger amplitude, divergent motions when the same control rates were used. These motions were damped only when the instantaneous control responses were assumed.

Dryer, Murray; North, Warren J.

1959-01-01

187

Space Shuttle Plume Simulation Effect on Aerodynamics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Technology for simulating plumes in wind tunnel tests was not adequate to provide the required confidence in test data where plume induced aerodynamic effects might be significant. A broad research program was undertaken to correct the deficiency. Four tasks within the program are reported. Three of these tasks involve conducting experiments, related to three different aspects of the plume simulation problem: (1) base pressures; (2) lateral jet pressures; and (3) plume parameters. The fourth task involves collecting all of the base pressure test data generated during the program. Base pressures were measured on a classic cone ogive cylinder body as affected by the coaxial, high temperature exhaust plumes of a variety of solid propellant rockets. Valid data were obtained at supersonic freestream conditions but not at transonic. Pressure data related to lateral (separation) jets at M infinity = 4.5, for multiple clustered nozzles canted to the freestream and operating at high dynamic pressure ratios. All program goals were met although the model hardware was found to be large relative to the wind tunnel size so that operation was limited for some nozzle configurations.

Hair, L. M.

1978-01-01

188

On the transient nature of mantle plumes  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present new experiments focussing on the transient behaviour of thermal plumes. In a fluid heated from below, plumes develop once the hot thermal boundary layer (TBL) reaches a critical thickness (Howard, 1964). They rise through the fluid owing to their thermal buoyancy and comprise TBL material which empties itself into the plumes. As the TBL becomes exhausted, plumes start

Anne Davaille; Judith Vatteville

2005-01-01

189

Atmospheric scavenging exhaust  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Solid propellant rocket exhaust was directly utilized to ascertain raindrop scavenging rates for hydrogen chloride. The airborne HCl concentration varied from 0.2 to 10.0 ppm and the raindrop sizes tested included 0.55 mm, 1.1 mm, and 3.0 mm. Two chambers were used to conduct the experiments. A large, rigid walled, spherical chamber stored the exhaust constituents while the smaller chamber housing all the experiments was charged as required with rocket exhaust HCl. Surface uptake experiments demonstrated an HCl concentration dependence for distilled water. Sea water and brackish water HCl uptake was below the detection limit of the chlorine-ion analysis technique employed. Plant life HCl uptake experiments were limited to corn and soybeans. Plant age effectively correlated the HCl uptake data. Metallic corrosion was not significant for single 20 minute exposures to the exhaust HCl under varying relative humidity.

Fenton, D. L.; Purcell, R. Y.

1977-01-01

190

Position paper on the potential of inadvertent weather modification of the Florida Peninsula resulting from neutralization of space shuttle solid rocket booster exhaust clouds  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A concept of injecting compounds into the exhaust cloud was proposed to neutralize the acidic nature of the low-level stabilized ground cloud (SGC) was studied. The potential Inadvertent Weather Modification caused by exhaust cloud characteristics from three hours to seven days after launch was studied. Possible effects of the neutralized SGC in warm and cloud precipitation processes were discussed. Based on a detailed climatology of the Florida Peninsula, the risk for weather modification under a variety of weather situations was assessed.

Bollay, E.; Bosart, L.; Droessler, E.; Jiusto, J.; Lala, G. G.; Mohnen, V.; Schaefer, V.; Squires, P.

1979-01-01

191

Linear Spectral Analysis of Plume Emissions Using an Optical Matrix Processor  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Plume spectrometry provides a means to monitor the health of a burning rocket engine, and optical matrix processors provide a means to analyze the plume spectra in real time. By observing the spectrum of the exhaust plume of a rocket engine, researchers have detected anomalous behavior of the engine and have even determined the failure of some equipment before it would normally have been noticed. The spectrum of the plume is analyzed by isolating information in the spectrum about the various materials present to estimate what materials are being burned in the engine. Scientists at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) have implemented a high resolution spectrometer to discriminate the spectral peaks of the many species present in the plume. Researchers at the Stennis Space Center Demonstration Testbed Facility (DTF) have implemented a high resolution spectrometer observing a 1200-lb. thrust engine. At this facility, known concentrations of contaminants can be introduced into the burn, allowing for the confirmation of diagnostic algorithms. While the high resolution of the measured spectra has allowed greatly increased insight into the functioning of the engine, the large data flows generated limit the ability to perform real-time processing. The use of an optical matrix processor and the linear analysis technique described below may allow for the detailed real-time analysis of the engine's health. A small optical matrix processor can perform the required mathematical analysis both quicker and with less energy than a large electronic computer dedicated to the same spectral analysis routine.

Gary, C. K.

1992-01-01

192

Liquid Rocket Booster (LRB) for the Space Transportation System (STS) systems study. Appendix B: Liquid rocket booster acoustic and thermal environments  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The ascent thermal environment and propulsion acoustic sources for the Martin-Marietta Corporation designed Liquid Rocket Boosters (LRB) to be used with the Space Shuttle Orbiter and External Tank are described. Two designs were proposed: one using a pump-fed propulsion system and the other using a pressure-fed propulsion system. Both designs use LOX/RP-1 propellants, but differences in performance of the two propulsion systems produce significant differences in the proposed stage geometries, exhaust plumes, and resulting environments. The general characteristics of the two designs which are significant for environmental predictions are described. The methods of analysis and predictions for environments in acoustics, aerodynamic heating, and base heating (from exhaust plume effects) are also described. The acoustic section will compare the proposed exhaust plumes with the current SRB from the standpoint of acoustics and ignition overpressure. The sections on thermal environments will provide details of the LRB heating rates and indications of possible changes in the Orbiter and ET environments as a result of the change from SRBs to LRBs.

1989-01-01

193

High-altitude plume computer code development  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The flowfield codes that have been developed to predict rocket motor plumes at high altitude were used to predict plume properties for the RCS motor which show reasonable agreement with experimental data. A systematic technique was established for the calculation of high altitude plumes. The communication of data between the computer codes was standardized. It is recommended that these outlined procedures be more completed, documented and updated as the plume methodology is applied to the varied problems of plume flow and plume impingement encountered by space station design and operation.

Audeh, B. J.; Murphy, J. E.

1985-01-01

194

Underexpanded Supersonic Plume Surface Interactions: Applications for Spacecraft Landings on Planetary Bodies  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Numerical and experimental investigations of both far-field and near-field supersonic steady jet interactions with a flat surface at various atmospheric pressures are presented in this paper. These studies were done in assessing the landing hazards of both the NASA Mars Science Laboratory and Phoenix Mars spacecrafts. Temporal and spatial ground pressure measurements in conjunction with numerical solutions at altitudes of approx.35 nozzle exit diameters and jet expansion ratios (e) between 0.02 and 100 are used. Data from steady nitrogen jets are compared to both pulsed jets and rocket exhaust plumes at Mach approx.5. Due to engine cycling, overpressures and the plate shock dynamics are different between pulsed and steady supersonic impinging jets. In contrast to highly over-expanded (e <1) and underexpanded exhaust plumes, results show that there is a relative ground pressure load maximum for moderately underexpanded (e approx.2-5) jets which demonstrate a long collimated plume shock structure. For plumes with e much >5 (lunar atmospheric regime), the ground pressure is minimal due to the development of a highly expansive shock structure. We show this is dependent on the stability of the plate shock, the length of the supersonic core and plume decay due to shear layer instability which are all a function of the jet expansion ratio. Asymmetry and large gradients in the spatial ground pressure profile and large transient overpressures are predominantly linked to the dynamics of the plate shock. More importantly, this study shows that thruster plumes exhausting into martian environments possess the largest surface pressure loads and can occur at high spacecraft altitudes in contrast to the jet interactions at terrestrial and lunar atmospheres. Theoretical and analytical results also show that subscale supersonic cold gas jets adequately simulate the flow field and loads due to rocket plume impingement provided important scaling parameters are in agreement. These studies indicate the critical importance of testing and modeling plume-surface interactions for descent and ascent of spacecraft and launch vehicles.

Mehta, M.; Sengupta, A.; Renno, N. O.; Norman, J. W.; Gulick, D. S.

2011-01-01

195

Congreve Rockets  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The British fired Congreve rockets against the United States in the War of 1812. As a result Francis Scott Key coined the phrase the 'rocket's red glare.' Congreve had used a 16-foot guide stick to help stabilize his rocket. William Hale, another British inventor, invented the stickless rocket in 1846. The U.S. Army used the Hale rocket more than 100 years ago in the war with Mexico. Rockets were also used to a limited extent by both sides in the American Civil War.

2004-01-01

196

Altitude-Compensating Nozzle (ACN) Project: Planning for Dual-Bell Rocket Nozzle Flight Testing on the NASA F-15B  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

For more than a half-century, several types of altitude-compensating nozzles have been proposed and analyzed, but very few have been adequately tested in a relevant flight environment. One type of altitude-compensating nozzle is the dual-bell rocket nozzle, which was first introduced into literature in 1949. Although the dual-bell rocket nozzle has been thoroughly studied, this nozzle has still not been tested in a relevant flight environment. This poster presents the top-level rationale and preliminary plans for conducting flight research with the dual-bell rocket nozzle, while exhausting the plume into the freestream flow field at various altitudes. The primary objective is to gain a greater understanding of the nozzle plume sensitivity to freestream flight effects, which will also include detailed measurements of the plume mode transition within the nozzle. To accomplish this goal, the NASA F-15B is proposed as the testbed for advancing the technology readiness level of this greatly-needed capability. All proposed tests include the quantitative performance analysis of the dual-bell rocket nozzle as compared with the conventional-bell nozzle.

Jones, Daniel S.; Bui, Trong T.; Ruf, Joseph H.

2013-01-01

197

Safe testing nuclear rockets economically  

SciTech Connect

Several studies over the past few decades have recognized the need for advanced propulsion to explore the solar system. As early as the 1960s, Werner Von Braun and others recognized the need for a nuclear rocket for sending humans to Mars. The great distances, the intense radiation levels, and the physiological response to zero-gravity all supported the concept of using a nuclear rocket to decrease mission time. These same needs have been recognized in later studies, especially in the Space Exploration Initiative in 1989. One of the key questions that has arisen in later studies, however, is the ability to test a nuclear rocket engine in the current societal environment. Unlike the RoverMERVA programs in the 1960s, the rocket exhaust can no longer be vented to the open atmosphere. As a consequence, previous studies have examined the feasibility of building a large-scale version of the Nuclear Furnace Scrubber that was demonstrated in 1971. We have investigated an alternative that would deposit the rocket exhaust along with any entrained fission products directly into the ground. The Subsurface Active Filtering of Exhaust, or SAFE, concept would allow variable sized engines to be tested for long times at a modest expense. A system overview, results of preliminary calculations, and cost estimates of proof of concept demonstrations are presented. The results indicate that a nuclear rocket could be tested at the Nevada Test Site for under $20 M.

Howe, S. D. (Steven D.); Travis, B. J. (Bryan J.); Zerkle, D. K. (David K.)

2002-01-01

198

Rocket Engine Jet Blast Attenuation in Water.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The investigation was conducted to determine the feasibility of launching missiles and superboosters from overwater sites. Information is needed to predict the depth of liquid-propellant rocket engine exhaust gas penetration into water. Methods will be re...

G. W. Leese

1967-01-01

199

Torpedo Rockets  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

All through the 13th to the 15th Centuries there were reports of many rocket experiments. For example, Joanes de Fontana of Italy designed a surface-rurning, rocket-powered torpedo for setting enemy ships on fire

2004-01-01

200

Ionospheric modification by rocket effluents. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report describes experimental and theoretical studies related to ionospheric disturbances produced by rocket exhaust vapors. The purpose of our research was to estimate the ionospheric effects of the rocket launches which will be required to place the Satellite Power System (SPS) in operation. During the past year, we have developed computational tools for numerical simulation of ionospheric changes produced by the injection of rocket exhaust vapors. The theoretical work has dealt with (1) the limitations imposed by condensation phenomena in rocket exhaust; (2) complete modeling of the ionospheric depletion process including neutral gas dynamics, plasma physics, chemistry and thermal processes; and (3) the influence of the modified ionosphere on radio wave propagation. We are also reporting on electron content measurements made during the launch of HEAO-C on Sept. 20, 1979. We conclude by suggesting future experiments and areas for future research.

Bernhardt, P.A.; Price, K.M.; da Rosa, A.V.

1980-06-01

201

Ignition and Performance Tests of Rocket-Based Combined Cycle Propulsion System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The ground testing of a Rocket Based Combined Cycle engine implementing the Simultaneous Mixing and Combustion scheme was performed at the direct-connect facility of Purdue University's High Pressure Laboratory. The fuel-rich exhaust of a JP-8/H2O2 thruster was mixed with compressed, metered air in a constant area, axisymmetric duct. The thruster was similar in design and function to that which will be used in the flight test series of Dryden's Ducted-Rocket Experiment. The determination of duct ignition limits was made based on the variation of secondary air flow rates and primary thruster equivalence ratios. Thrust augmentation and improvements in specific impulse were studied along with the pressure and temperature profiles of the duct to study mixing lengths and thermal choking. The occurrence of ignition was favored by lower rocket equivalence ratios. However, among ignition cases, better thrust and specific impulse performance were seen with higher equivalence ratios owing to the increased fuel available for combustion. Thrust and specific impulse improvements by factors of 1.2 to 1.7 were seen. The static pressure and temperature profiles allowed regions of mixing and heat addition to be identified. The mixing lengths were found to be shorter at lower rocket equivalence ratios. Total pressure measurements allowed plume-based calculation of thrust, which agreed with load-cell measured values to within 6.5-8.0%. The corresponding Mach Number profile indicated the flow was not thermally choked for the highest duct static pressure case.

Anderson, William E.

2005-01-01

202

Air admixture to exhaust jets  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The problem of thrust increase by air admixture to exhaust jets of rockets, turbojet, ram- and pulse-jet engines is investigated theoretically. The optimum ratio of mixing chamber pressure to ambient pressure and speed range for thrust increase due to air admixture is determined for each type of jet engine.

Sanger, Eugen

1953-01-01

203

Gasoline Vehicle Exhaust Particle Sampling Study.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The University of Minnesota collaborated with the Paul Scherrer Institute, the University of Wisconsin (UWI) and Ricardo, Inc to physically and chemically characterize the exhaust plume from recruited gasoline spark ignition (SI) vehicles. The project obj...

A. Kasper D. Zarling D. B. Kittelson H. Burtscher J. J. Schauer J. P. Johnson U. Baltensperger W. F. Watts

2003-01-01

204

Rocket Principles  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

On this site from the NASA Glenn Research Center Learning Technologies Project, the science and history of rocketry is explained. Visitors will find out how rocket principles illustrate Newton's Laws of Motion. There is a second page of this site, Practical Rocketry, which discusses the workings of rockets, including propellants, engine thrust control, stability and control systems, and mass.

2008-07-29

205

Lazy plumes  

Microsoft Academic Search

We examine the dynamics of turbulent lazy plumes rising from horizontal area sources and from vertically distributed line sources into a quiescent environment of uniform density. First, we consider plumes with internal buoyancy flux gain and, secondly, plumes from horizontal area sources that have significant momentum flux deficits. We re-cast the conservation equations of Morton et al. (1956) for a

G. R. Hunt; N. B. Kaye

2005-01-01

206

Predicted rocket and shuttle effects on stratospheric ozone  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The major chemical effluents of either solid- or liquid-fueled rockets that can potentially perturb stratospheric ozone include chlorine compounds (HCl), nitrogen compounds (NO(x)), and hydrogen compounds (H2 and H2O). Radicals (Cl, ClO, H, OH, HO2, NO, and NO2) formed directly or indirectly from rocket exhaust can cause the catalytic destruction of ozone. Other exhaust compounds that could presumably lead to ozone destruction either by direct reaction with ozone or by providing a surface for heterogeneous processes include the particulates Al2O3, ice, and soot. These topics are discussed in terms of the possible effects of rocket exhausts on stratospheric ozone.

Harwood, Robert S.; Karol, Igor L.; Jackman, Charles H.; Qiu, Lian-Xiong; Prather, Michael J.; Pyle, John A.

1991-01-01

207

Space shuttle plume simulation application. Results and math model. [Ames unitary plan wind tunnel test  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Pressure and gauge wind tunnel data from a transonic test of a 0.02 scale model of the space shuttle launch vehicle was analyzed to define the aerodynamic influence of the main propulsion system and solid rocket booster plumes during the transonic portion of ascent flight. Air was used as a simulant gas to develop the model exhaust plumes. A math model of the plume induced aerodynamic characteristics was developed for a range of Mach numbers to match the forebody aerodynamic math model. The base aerodynamic characteristics are presented in terms of forces and moments versus attitude. Total vehicle base and forebody aerodynamic characteristics are presented in terms of aerodynamic coefficients for Mach number from 0.6 to 1.4 Element and component base and forebody aerodynamic characteristics are presented for Mach numbers of 0.6, 1.05, 1.1, 1.25 and 1.4. The forebody data is available at Mach 1.55. Tolerances for all plume induced aerodynamic characteristics are developed in terms of a math model.

Boyle, W.; Conine, B.

1978-01-01

208

Exhaust recirculation  

Microsoft Academic Search

An exhaust gas recirculation system for the reduction of nitrogen oxide emissions from internal combustion engine exhaust is described that is uncomplicated by moving parts, thus avoiding problems associated with prior-art recirculation systems. The system also results in preheating and improved mixing of the fuel-air mixture in the inlet header. A recycling duct receives the exhaust gases at a restricted

Waitzmann

1974-01-01

209

Exhaust recirculation  

Microsoft Academic Search

An exhaust gas recirculation system for the reduction of nitrogen oxides in automobile exhaust is described that provides for the reduction of recirculation during engine idling without the prior-art complexities of moving parts. The system also achieves preheating and improved mixing and carburetion of the fuel-air mixture in the inlet header. Exhaust gases are recycled by means of a swirl

Sarto

1974-01-01

210

Rain scavenging of solid rocket exhaust clouds  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An explicit model for cloud microphysics was developed for application to the problem of co-condensation/vaporization of HCl and H2O in the presence of Al2O3 particulate nuclei. Validity of the explicit model relative to the implicit model, which has been customarily applied to atmospheric cloud studies, was demonstrated by parallel computations of H2O condensation upon (NH4)2 SO4 nuclei. A mesoscale predictive model designed to account for the impact of wet processes on atmospheric dynamics is also under development. Input data specifying the equilibrium state of HC1 and H2O vapors in contact with aqueous HC1 solutions were found to be limited, particularly in respect to temperature range.

Dingle, A. N.

1978-01-01

211

Rocket Engines  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This video from SpaceTEC National Aerospace Technical Education Center explains the theory of rocket engines using Newton's third law of motion. This five minute video is one of the aerospace certification readiness courses.

2011-07-27

212

Stomp Rocket  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, learners build rockets and shoot them into the air by stomping on the plastic bottle launchers. Use this activity to demonstrate air pressure, projectile motion, Newton's Laws of Motion, and vectors.

Workshop, Fresno C.

2012-01-01

213

Rocket Launchers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, learners work with an adult to build a rocket and launcher out of a plastic 2-liter bottle, flexible plastic hose, plastic tubing, toilet paper tube, and duct tape. Use this stomp rocket activity to demonstrate that air is something, comprised of molecules that, when acted upon, have the power to move things. This activity guide includes an extension activity and related activity for younger learners.

Museum, Chicago C.

2010-01-01

214

Methylhydrazinium nitrate. [rocket plume deposit chemistry  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Methylhydrazinium nitrate was synthesized by the reaction of dilute nitric acid with methylhydrazine in water and in methanol. The white needles formed are extremely hygroscopic and melt at 37.5-40.5 C. The IR spectrum differs from that reported elsewhere. The mass spectrum exhibited no parent peak at 109 m/z, and thermogravimetric analysis indicated that the compound decomposed slowly at 63-103 C to give ammonium and methylammonium nitrate. The density is near 1.55 g/cu cm.

Lawton, E. A.; Moran, C. M.

1983-01-01

215

Lunar Soil Erosion Physics for Landing Rockets on the Moon  

Microsoft Academic Search

For future lunar operations, the low ejection angle and high velocity of blowing lunar soil particles by rocket exhaust are concerns for instruments deployed on the Moon and for the historic Apollo sites.

R. N. Clegg; P. T. Metzger; S. Huff; L. B. Roberson

2011-01-01

216

Measurements of Particulates in Solid Propellant Rocket Motors.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

An investigation has been conducted to develop techniques for obtaining quantitative data that can be used to relate solid rocket propellant composition and operating environment to the behavior of solid particulates within the grain port and exhaust nozz...

A. Kertadidjaja K. G. Horton M. G. Keith R. K. Harris T. D. Edwards

1987-01-01

217

60. Historic plan of Building 202 exhaust scrubber, June 18, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

60. Historic plan of Building 202 exhaust scrubber, June 18, 1955. NASA GRC drawing no. CD-101261. (On file at NASA Glenn Research Center). - Rocket Engine Testing Facility, GRC Building No. 202, NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

218

Four-Nozzle Benchmark Wind Tunnel Model USA Code Solutions for Simulation of Multiple Rocket Base Flow Recirculation at 145,000 Feet Altitude  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Multiple rocket exhaust plume interactions at high altitudes can produce base flow recirculation with attendant alteration of the base pressure coefficient and increased base heating. A search for a good wind tunnel benchmark problem to check grid clustering technique and turbulence modeling turned up the experiment done at AEDC in 1961 by Goethert and Matz on a 4.25-in. diameter domed missile base model with four rocket nozzles. This wind tunnel model with varied external bleed air flow for the base flow wake produced measured p/p(sub ref) at the center of the base as high as 3.3 due to plume flow recirculation back onto the base. At that time in 1961, relatively inexpensive experimentation with air at gamma = 1.4 and nozzle A(sub e)/A of 10.6 and theta(sub n) = 7.55 deg with P(sub c) = 155 psia simulated a LO2/LH2 rocket exhaust plume with gamma = 1.20, A(sub e)/A of 78 and P(sub c) about 1,000 psia. An array of base pressure taps on the aft dome gave a clear measurement of the plume recirculation effects at p(infinity) = 4.76 psfa corresponding to 145,000 ft altitude. Our CFD computations of the flow field with direct comparison of computed-versus-measured base pressure distribution (across the dome) provide detailed information on velocities and particle traces as well eddy viscosity in the base and nozzle region. The solution was obtained using a six-zone mesh with 284,000 grid points for one quadrant taking advantage of symmetry. Results are compared using a zero-equation algebraic and a one-equation pointwise R(sub t) turbulence model (work in progress). Good agreement with the experimental pressure data was obtained with both; and this benchmark showed the importance of: (1) proper grid clustering and (2) proper choice of turbulence modeling for rocket plume problems/recirculation at high altitude.

Dougherty, N. S.; Johnson, S. L.

1993-01-01

219

Supplemental final environmental impact statement for advanced solid rocket motor testing at Stennis Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Since the Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) and Record of Decision on the FEIS describing the potential impacts to human health and the environment associated with the program, three factors have caused NASA to initiate additional studies regarding these issues. These factors are: (1) The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) agreed to use the same comprehensive procedures to identify and delineate wetlands; (2) EPA has given NASA further guidance on how best to simulate the exhaust plume from the Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM) testing through computer modeling, enabling more realistic analysis of emission impacts; and (3) public concerns have been raised concerning short and long term impacts on human health and the environment from ASRM testing.

1990-01-01

220

Space shuttle exhaust cloud properties  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A data base describing the properties of the exhaust cloud produced by the launch of the Space Transportation System and the acidic fallout observed after each of the first four launches was assembled from a series of ground and aircraft based measurements made during the launches of STS 2, 3, and 4. Additional data were obtained from ground-based measurements during firings of the 6.4 percent model of the Solid Rocket Booster at the Marshall Center. Analysis indicates that the acidic fallout is produced by atomization of the deluge water spray by the rocket exhaust on the pad followed by rapid scavening of hydrogen chloride gas aluminum oxide particles from the Solid Rocket Boosters. The atomized spray is carried aloft by updrafts created by the hot exhaust and deposited down wind. Aircraft measurements in the STS-3 ground cloud showed an insignificant number of ice nuclei. Although no measurements were made in the column cloud, the possibility of inadvertent weather modification caused by the interaction of ice nuclei with natural clouds appears remote.

Anderson, B. J.; Keller, V. W.

1983-01-01

221

Analysis of a Nuclear Enhanced Airbreathing Rocket for Earth to Orbit Applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The proposed engine concept is the Nuclear Enhanced Airbreathing Rocket (NEAR). The NEAR concept uses a fission reactor to thermally heat a propellant in a rocket plenum. The rocket is shrouded, thus the exhaust mixes with ingested air to provide additional thermal energy through combustion. The combusted flow is then expanded through a nozzle to provide thrust.

Adams, Robert B.; Landrum, D. Brian; Brown, Norman (Technical Monitor)

2001-01-01

222

Rubberband Rockets  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This fun and simple activity is a rubberband rocket design challenge! Learners will explore how tail fins can help to stabilize a flying object, while also exploring potential and kinetic energy. The activity, which can be used alone or as part of a visit to COSI, is located on page 10 of COSI's Force and Motion Teacher Guide.

Cosi

2009-01-01

223

Rocket Lab  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This activity is lab based competition. The students engineer a 2-litter rocket to have the maximum hang time. After the initial launch, the students are given an opportunity to re-engineer to produce a better time. The activity finishes with a lab write-up.

224

Balloon Rocket  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Experiment with force and pressure by building a balloon rocket. When launched, the balloon will run a track wherever you place the string. All you need is a balloon, clothespin, a straw, some tape, and some string, then get ready for take off!

Minnesota, Science M.

1995-01-01

225

Analytical modeling of nonradial expansion plumes  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The 'Modified Simons' model presented allows the nonradial nature of axisymmetric rocket and thruster plume flowfields having a large exit Mach number and/or a large nozzle exit half-angle to be successfully predicted. The model is applied to monatomic and polyatomic gas (N, Ar, tetrafluoromethane) expansions; the nonradial density decay observed experimentally is successfully predicted.

Boyd, Iain D.

1990-01-01

226

Raman Scattering Measurements of Molecular Hydrogen in AN Arcjet Thruster Plume  

Microsoft Academic Search

Arcjet thrusters are electrically powered rockets that offer higher exhaust velocities than conventional chemical rockets. There is a desire to increase both the thermal efficiency and exhaust velocity of current designs and to develop higher thrust versions. Such improvements will depend partly on a better understanding of the plasma and gas dynamic processes occurring in the arcjet nozzle. Measurements of

Douglas Robert Beattie

1995-01-01

227

Atomic hydrogen rocket engine  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A rocket using atomic hydrogen propellant is discussed. An essential feature of the proposed engine is that the atomic hydrogen fuel is used as it is produced, thus eliminating the necessity of storage. The atomic hydrogen flows into a combustion chamber and recombines, producing high velocity molecular hydrogen which flows out an exhaust port. Standard thermodynamics, kinetic theory and wall recombination cross-sections are used to predict a thrust of approximately 1.4 N for a RF hydrogen flow rate of 4 x 10 to the 22nd/sec. Specific impulses are nominally from 1000 to 2000 sec. It is predicted that thrusts on the order of one Newton and specific impulses of up to 2200 sec are attainable with nominal RF discharge fluxes on the order of 10 to the 22nd atoms/sec; further refinements will probably not alter these predictions by more than a factor of two.

Etters, R. D.; Flurchick, K.

1981-01-01

228

Jet engine exhaust chemiion measurements  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have made mass spectrometric measurements of negative chemiions (CI) in the exhaust of a jet engine on the ground. The measurements took place at plume ages between 6.6 and 19ms at low- and high-fuel sulfur content (FSC). Total negative CI-number densities reached up to 1.4·107cm-3 corresponding to an emission index for negative CI of 3×1015 CI per kg fuel.

F. ARNOLD; Th. Stilp; R. Busen; U. Schumann

1998-01-01

229

Rocket Pinwheel  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is an activity about motion, power, air and Newtonâs Third Law of Motion, which states that for every action there is an equal and opposite reaction. Learners will harness the power of thrust forces to build a rocket pinwheel. They will do this by making a pinwheel with a balloon, straw and pin. Thrust causes the balloon to spin around in a circular motion.

Center, Reuben H.

1999-01-01

230

Contamination Control and Plume Assessment of Low-Energy Thrusters.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Potential contamination of a spacecraft cryogenic surface by a xenon (Xe) ion generator was evaluated. The analysis involves the description of the plume exhausted from the generator with its relative component fluxes on the spacecraft surfaces, and verif...

J. J. Scialdone

1993-01-01

231

Tvashtar's Plume  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This dramatic image of Io was taken by the Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) on New Horizons at 11:04 Universal Time on February 28, 2007, just about 5 hours after the spacecraft's closest approach to Jupiter. The distance to Io was 2.5 million kilometers (1.5 million miles) and the image is centered at 85 degrees west longitude. At this distance, one LORRI pixel subtends 12 kilometers (7.4 miles) on Io.

This processed image provides the best view yet of the enormous 290-kilometer (180-mile) high plume from the volcano Tvashtar, in the 11 o'clock direction near Io's north pole. The plume was first seen by the Hubble Space Telescope two weeks ago and then by New Horizons on February 26; this image is clearer than the February 26 image because Io was closer to the spacecraft, the plume was more backlit by the Sun, and a longer exposure time (75 milliseconds versus 20 milliseconds) was used. Io's dayside was deliberately overexposed in this picture to image the faint plumes, and the long exposure also provided an excellent view of Io's night side, illuminated by Jupiter. The remarkable filamentary structure in the Tvashtar plume is similar to details glimpsed faintly in 1979 Voyager images of a similar plume produced by Io's volcano Pele. However, no previous image by any spacecraft has shown these mysterious structures so clearly.

The image also shows the much smaller symmetrical fountain of the plume, about 60 kilometers (or 40 miles) high, from the Prometheus volcano in the 9 o'clock direction. The top of a third volcanic plume, from the volcano Masubi, erupts high enough to catch the setting Sun on the night side near the bottom of the image, appearing as an irregular bright patch against Io's Jupiter-lit surface. Several Everest-sized mountains are highlighted by the setting Sun along the terminator, the line between day and night.

This is the last of a handful of LORRI images that New Horizons is sending 'home' during its busy close encounter with Jupiter -- hundreds of images and other data are being taken and stored onboard. The rest of the images will be returned to Earth over the coming weeks and months as the spacecraft speeds along to Pluto.

2007-01-01

232

Radiative forcing caused by rocket engine emissions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Space transportation plays an important and growing role in Earth's economic system. Rockets uniquely emit gases and particles directly into the middle and upper atmosphere where exhaust from hundreds of launches accumulates, changing atmospheric radiation patterns. The instantaneous radiative forcing (RF) caused by major rocket engine emissions CO2, H2O, black carbon (BC), and Al2O3 (alumina) is estimated. Rocket CO2 and H2O emissions do not produce significant RF. BC and alumina emissions, under some scenarios, have the potential to produce significant RF. Absorption of solar flux by BC is likely the main RF source from rocket launches. In a new finding, alumina particles, previously thought to cool the Earth by scattering solar flux back to space, absorb outgoing terrestrial longwave radiation, resulting in net positive RF. With the caveat that BC and alumina microphysics are poorly constrained, we find that the present-day RF from rocket launches equals 16 ± 8 mW m-2. The relative contributions from BC, alumina, and H2O are 70%, 28%, and 2%. respectively. The pace of rocket launches is predicted to grow and space transport RF could become comparable to global aviation RF in coming decades. Improved understanding of rocket emission RF requires more sophisticated modeling and improved data describing particle microphysics.

Ross, Martin N.; Sheaffer, Patti M.

2014-04-01

233

Plume detachment from a magnetic nozzle  

SciTech Connect

High-powered electric propulsion thrusters utilizing a magnetized plasma require that plasma exhaust detach from the applied magnetic field in order to produce thrust. This paper presents experimental results demonstrating that a sufficiently energetic and flowing plasma can indeed detach from a magnetic nozzle. Microwave interferometer and probe measurements provide plume density, electron temperature, and ion flux measurements in the nozzle region. Measurements of ion flux show a low-beta plasma plume which follows applied magnetic field lines until the plasma kinetic pressure reaches the magnetic pressure and a high-beta plume expanding ballistically afterward. Several magnetic configurations were tested including a reversed field nozzle configuration. Despite the dramatic change in magnetic field profile, the reversed field configuration yielded little measurable change in plume trajectory, demonstrating the plume is detached. Numerical simulations yield density profiles in agreement with the experimental results.

Deline, Christopher A. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Bengtson, Roger D.; Breizman, Boris N.; Tushentsov, Mikhail R. [Institute for Fusion Studies, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Jones, Jonathan E.; Chavers, D. Greg; Dobson, Chris C. [Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Alabama 35805 (United States); Schuettpelz, Branwen M. [University of Alabama at Huntsville, Huntsville, Alabama 35899 (United States)

2009-03-15

234

Isotopic mapping of groundwater perchlorate plumes.  

PubMed

Analyses of stable isotope ratios of chlorine and oxygen in perchlorate can, in some cases, be used for mapping and source identification of groundwater perchlorate plumes. This is demonstrated here for large, intersecting perchlorate plumes in groundwater from a region having extensive groundwater perchlorate contamination and a large population dependent on groundwater resources. The region contains both synthetic perchlorate derived from rocket fuel manufacturing and testing activities and agricultural perchlorate derived predominantly from imported Chilean (Atacama) nitrate fertilizer, along with a likely component of indigenous natural background perchlorate from local wet and dry atmospheric deposition. Most samples within each plume reflect either a predominantly synthetic or a predominantly agricultural perchlorate source and there is apparently a minor contribution from the indigenous natural background perchlorate. The existence of isotopically distinct perchlorate plumes in this area is consistent with other lines of evidence, including groundwater levels and flow paths as well as the historical land use and areal distribution of potential perchlorate sources. PMID:21352209

Sturchio, Neil C; Hoaglund, John R; Marroquin, Roy J; Beloso, Abelardo D; Heraty, Linnea J; Bortz, Sarah E; Patterson, Thomas L

2012-01-01

235

Effect of Thruster Pulse Length on Thruster-Exhaust Damage of S13G White Thermal Control Coatings.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Rocket exhaust products which strike thermal control surfaces cause changes in solar absorptance (Alpha Sub s) and thermal emittance (Epsilon) of these surfaces. A study was made of the effect of rocket pulse duration on exhaust damage to S13G white coati...

R. D. Sommers C. A. Raquet

1973-01-01

236

Langmuir probe surveys of an arcjet exhaust  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Electrostatic (Langmuir) probes of both spherical and cylindrical geometry have been used to obtain electron number density and temperature in the exhaust of a laboratory arcjet. The arcjet thruster operated on nitrogen and hydrogen mixtures to simulate fully decomposed hydrazine in a vacuum environment with background pressures less than 0.05 Pa. The exhaust appears to be only slightly ionized (less than 1 percent) with local plasma potentials near facility ground. The current-voltage characteristics of the probes indicate a Maxwellian temperature distribution. Plume data are presented as a function of arcjet operating conditions and also position in the exhaust.

Zana, Lynnette M.

1987-01-01

237

The plume impingement test program at AEDC utilizing the S-2 ullage motors (November 1973), section 1  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Proposed experiments for analyzing rocket plumes are reported. Two groups of experiments were studied: (1) those that would help define some of the parameters that characterize the plume and (2) those that would enable evaluation of some of the contamination effects of the plume environment on various items of interest. The items investigated, the purpose of the investigation, are given in tabular form.

1976-01-01

238

An experimental study of jet exhaust simulation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Afterbody drag predictions for jet aircraft are usually made experimentally with the jet exhaust flow simulated. The physical gas properties of the fluid used for the model jet exhaust can affect the accuracy of simulation of the airplane's jet exhaust plume. The effect of the accuracy of this simulation on afterbody drag was investigated by wind-tunnel tests with single engine model. In addition to unheated air as the exhaust gas, the decomposition products of three different concentrations of hydrogen peroxide were utilized. The air jet simulation consistently resulted in higher boattail drag than hydrogen peroxide simulation. The differences in drag for the various exhaust gases are attributed to different plume shapes and entrainment properties of the gases. The largest differences in drag due to exhaust gas properties were obtained for the combination of high transonic Mach numbers and high boattail angles. For these conditions, the current data indicate that the use of air to simulate a nonafterburning turbojet exhaust can result in an increase in afterbody amounting to 20 percent of the nonafterburning turbojet value.

Compton, W. B., III

1975-01-01

239

Mixing and reaction processes in rocket based combined cycle and conventional rocket engines  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Raman spectroscopy was used to make species measurements in two rocket engines. An airbreathing rocket, the rocket based combined cycle (RBCC) engine, and a conventional rocket were investigated. A supersonic rocket plume mixing with subsonic coflowing air characterizes the ejector mode of the RBCC engine. The mixing length required for the air and plume to become homogenous is a critical dimension. For the conventional rocket experiments, a gaseous oxygen/gaseous hydrogen single-element shear coaxial injector was used. Three chamber Mach number conditions, 0.1, 0.2 and 0.3, were chosen to assess the effect of Mach number on mixing. The flow within the chamber was entirely subsonic. For the RBCC experiments, vertical Raman line measurements were made at multiple axial locations downstream from the rocket nozzle plane. Species profiles assessed the mixing progress between the supersonic plume and subsonic air. For the conventional rocket, Raman line measurements were made downstream from the injector face. The goal was to evaluate the effect of increased chamber Mach number on injector mixing/reaction. For both engines, quantitative and qualitative information was collected for computational fluid dynamics (CFD development. The RBCC experiments were conducted for three distinct geometries. The primary flow path was a diffuse and afterburner design with a direct-connect air supply. A sea-level static (SLS) version and a thermally choked variant were also tested. The experimental results show that mixing length increases with additional coflow air in the DAB geometry. Operation of variable rocket mixture ratios at identical air flow rates did not significantly affect the mixing length. The thermally choked variant had a longer mixing length compared to the DAB geometry, and the SLS modification had a shorter mixing length due to a reduced air flow. The conventional rocket studies focused on the effect of chamber Mach number on primary injector mixing. Chamber Mach number was set at 0.1, 0.2 and 0.3, and Raman species measurements were made at three axial locations within the chamber. The experimental results clearly showed an increase in mixing with increased chamber Mach number. Data are presented in radial mole fraction profiles and mixture fraction pdf plots for a quantitative assessment of the mixing. Radial dimension plots in time-averaged form are provided for comparison with previous experimental work at a very low chamber Mach number.

Lehman, Matthew Kurt

240

Gas Emission Measurements from the RD 180 Rocket Engine  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Science Laboratory operated by GB Tech was tasked by the Environmental Office at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to collect rocket plume samples and to measure gaseous components and airborne particulates from the hot test firings of the Atlas III/RD 180 test article at MSFC. This data will be used to validate plume prediction codes and to assess environmental air quality issues.

Ross, H. R.

2001-01-01

241

Crater Formation Due to Lunar Plume Impingement  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Thruster plume impingement on a surface comprised of small, loose particles may cause blast ejecta to be spread over a large area and possibly cause damage to the vehicle. For this reason it is important to study the effects of plume impingement and crater formation on surfaces like those found on the moon. Lunar soil, also known as regolith, is made up of fine granular particles on the order of 100 microns.i Whenever a vehicle lifts-off from such a surface, the exhaust plume from the main engine will cause the formation of a crater. This crater formation may cause laterally ejected mass to be deflected and possibly damage the vehicle. This study is a first attempt at analyzing the dynamics of crater formation due to thruster exhaust plume impingement during liftoff from the moon. Though soil erosion on the lunar surface is not considered, this study aims at examining the evolution of the shear stress along the lunar surface as the engine fires. The location of the regions of high shear stress will determine where the crater begins to form and will lend insight into how big the crater will be. This information will help determine the probability that something will strike the vehicle. The final sections of this report discuss a novel method for studying this problem that uses a volume of fluid (VOF)ii method to track the movement of both the exhaust plume and the eroding surface.

Marsell, Brandon

2011-01-01

242

Challenger Rocket Booster  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

At about 76 seconds, fragments of the Orbiter can be seen tumbling against a background of fire, smoke and vaporized propellants from the External Tank. The left Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) flys rampant, still thrusting. The reddish-brown cloud envelops the disintergrating Orbiter. The color is indicative of the nitrogen tetroxide oxidizer propellant in the Orbiter Reaction Control System. On January 28, 1986 frigid overnight temperatures caused normally pliable rubber O-ring seals and putty that are designed to seal and establish joint integrity between the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) joint segments, to become hard and non- flexible. At the instant of SRB ignition, tremendous stresses and pressures occur within the SRB casing and especially at the joint attachment points. The failure of the O-rings and putty to 'seat' properly at motor ignition, caused hot exhaust gases to blow by the seals and putty. During Challenger's ascent, this hot gas 'blow by' ultimately cut a swath completely through the steel booster casing; and like a welder's torch, began cutting into the External Tank (ET). It is believed that the ET was compromised in several locations starting in the aft at the initial point where SRB joint failure occured. The ET hydrogen tank is believed to have been breached first, with continuous rapid incremental failure of both the ET and SRB. The chain reaction of events occurring in milliseconds culminated in a massive explosion. The orbiter Challenger was instantly ejected by the blast and went askew into the supersonic air flow. These aerodynamic forces caused structural shattering and complete destruction of the orbiter. Though it was concluded that the G-forces experienced during orbiter ejection and break-up were survivable, impact with the ocean surface was not. Tragically, all seven crewmembers perished.

1986-01-01

243

Plume Busters  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Environmental and earth science students seldom have an opportunity to apply what they learn in class to the solution of real-world problems. With NSF support we have developed the prototype Plume Busters software, in which students take on the role of an environmental consultant. Following a pipeline spill, the environmental consultant is hired by the pipeline owner to locate the resulting plume created by the spill and remediate the contaminated aquifer at minimum monetary and time cost. The contamination must be removed from the aquifer before it reaches the river and eventually a downstream public water supply. The software consists of an interactive Java application and accompanying HTML linked pages. The application simulates movement of a plume from a pipeline break through a shallow alluvial aquifer towards the river. The accompanying web pages establish the simulated contamination scenario and provide students with background material on ground-water flow and transport principles. To make the role-play more realistic, the student must consider cost and time when making decisions about siting observation wells and wells for the pump-and-treat remediation system.

Macfarlane, Allen

244

Investigation of plume induced separation on a full-size missile at supersonic velocities  

Microsoft Academic Search

A large amount of data to determine plume effects have been obtained from various simulation techniques. To provide data for evaluating the adequacy of these simulations, a test utilizing a rocket sled to measure surface pressures on a full-size, live, high thrust rocket at Mach number up to Moo 1.6. Selected portions of the data are presented to show Mach

T. A. Martin

1980-01-01

245

Exhausting Science  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The fume hood: You know what it is, but have you ever used it? And if a safety issue arose, would you know what to do? Unfortunately, fume hoods are frequently included in a science room just for show. Little thought is often given to how they should be used or maintained. It is important for science teachers to understand and regularly inspect fume hoods in their classrooms and laboratories. In this article, the author discusses a few considerations for design, inspection, use, and maintenance of fume hoods in a science lab and classroom. Read on for an "exhaustive" look at this safety device!

Mandt, Douglas

2009-01-01

246

Effects of rocket engines on laser during lunar landing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the Chinese moon exploration project “ChangE-3”, the laser telemeter and lidar are important equipments on the lunar landing vehicle. A low-thrust vernier rocket engine works during the soft landing, whose plume may influence on the laser equipments. An experiment has first been accomplished to evaluate the influence of the plume on the propagation characteristics of infrared laser under the vacuum condition. Combination with our theoretical analysis has given an appropriate assessment of the plume's effects on the infrared laser hence providing a valuable basis for the design of lunar landing systems.

Wan, Xiong; Shu, Rong; Huang, Genghua

2013-11-01

247

Performance prediction of a ducted rocket combustor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The ducted rocket is a supersonic flight propulsion system that takes the exhaust from a solid fuel gas generator, mixes it with air, and burns it to produce thrust. To develop such systems, the use of numerical models based on Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is increasingly popular, but their application to reacting flow requires specific attention and validation. Through a careful examination of the governing equations and experimental measurements, a CFD-based method was developed to predict the performance of a ducted rocket combustor. It uses an equilibrium-chemistry Probability Density Function (PDF) combustion model, with a gaseous and a separate stream of 75 nm diameter carbon spheres to represent the fuel. After extensive validation with water tunnel and direct-connect combustion experiments over a wide range of geometries and test conditions, this CFD-based method was able to predict, within a good degree of accuracy, the combustion efficiency of a ducted rocket combustor.

Stowe, Robert

2001-07-01

248

Liquid rocket engine nozzles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The nozzle is a major component of a rocket engine, having a significant influence on the overall engine performance and representing a large fraction of the engine structure. The design of the nozzle consists of solving simultaneously two different problems: the definition of the shape of the wall that forms the expansion surface, and the delineation of the nozzle structure and hydraulic system. This monography addresses both of these problems. The shape of the wall is considered from immediately upstream of the throat to the nozzle exit for both bell and annular (or plug) nozzles. Important aspects of the methods used to generate nozzle wall shapes are covered for maximum-performance shapes and for nozzle contours based on criteria other than performance. The discussion of structure and hydraulics covers problem areas of regeneratively cooled tube-wall nozzles and extensions; it treats also nozzle extensions cooled by turbine exhaust gas, ablation-cooled extensions, and radiation-cooled extensions. The techniques that best enable the designer to develop the nozzle structure with as little difficulty as possible and at the lowest cost consistent with minimum weight and specified performance are described.

1976-01-01

249

An analytical approach for the prediction of gamma-to-alpha phase transformation of aluminum oxide (Al2O3) particles in the Space Shuttle ASRM and RSRM exhausts  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The analytical approach developed here utilizes the flow-field output from industry standard nozzle and plume codes as input into a particle phase conversion code which predicts the amount of gamma-to-alpha conversion in SRM exhausts. Sixty different cases were considered which varied such parameters as particle size, degree of undercooling, motor type, and altitude. On-centerline calculations were made for both the ASRM and RSRM at an altitude of 100,000 feet with particle sizes varying from 3.5 to 9.1 micron radius and undercooling varying from 0 to 20 percent. Additional calculations were made for the ASRM at 100,000 feet off centerline and at an altitude of 60,000 feet on centerline. The results indicate that significant amounts of metastable alumina will be present in ASRM and RSRM exhausts. Though not significant to motor performance, this may be important in such issues as environmental effects of rocket exhausts, plume radiative heating predictions, and particle size determination by laser scattering.

Oliver, S. M.; Moylan, B. E.

1992-01-01

250

Film Canister Rocket  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, learners construct and launch rockets using simple materials and their understanding of chemical reactions. Learners can experiment by modifying their rocket designs (shapes) or "fuel packets" (baking soda).

Boston, Wgbh

2002-01-01

251

Action-Reaction! Rocket  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students construct a rocket from a balloon propelled along a guide string. They use this model to learn about Newton's three laws of motion, examining the effect of different forces on the motion of the rocket.

Integrated Teaching And Learning Program

252

American Rocket Society  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In addition to Dr. Robert Goddard's pioneering work, American experimentation in rocketry prior to World War II grew, primarily in technical societies. This is an early rocket motor designed and developed by the American Rocket Society in 1932.

2004-01-01

253

Rocket and Space Technology  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site, created by author Robert Braeuning, features material on orbital mechanics, propulsion, rocket hardware, space centers and missions. It includes definitions of important terms and black-and-white diagrams. The page also features information on rocket propellants, rocket propulsion, orbital mechanics, spacecraft systems, vehicle specifications, launch vehicles, manned space flights, planetary spacecraft, and lunar spacecraft. A glossary and discussion forum are also provided. This is a nice resource for a overview of all things involving rockets or other space technologies.

Braeuning, Robert

2009-05-04

254

Slurried Propellant Rocket Motor.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The patent relates to slurried rocket propellants and a spinning rocket motor wherein the propellants have viscosities which enable them to form central cores when spun in spinning rocket motors. The motor has a diaphragm-like base plate which assists in ...

R. F. Vetter J. P. Diebold G. F. Sieg H. W. Gerrish H. H. Payne

1977-01-01

255

Peenemunde Rocket Team Reunion  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Peenemunde Rocket Team reunited on the steps of Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) Headquarter Building 4200 for a reunion. The Peenemunde Rocket team were first assembled in Germany prior to World War II. They came to the United States at the end of the War and became the nucleus of the United States Army's rocket program.

1987-01-01

256

Pop Rocket Variables  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a lesson about the concept of variables in relation to launching pop rockets. Learners will work in teams to test a single variable involved in launching a rocket and learn the variables involved with constructing and launching a water rocket. This is activity 1 of 7 in Dynamic Design: Launch and Propulsion.

257

Exhaust emission control apparatus  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes an exhaust control apparatus for muffling noise and treating odors and pollutants, including solid particulate and gases in the exhaust of an internal combustion engine. It comprises an exhaust inlet tube for receiving the exhaust generated by an internal combustion engine; a cyclone barrier concentrically surrounding the exhaust inlet tube, a ring cavity between the cyclone tube and exhaust inlet tube defining a cyclone chamber in which the exhaust is treated; means for directing the exhaust from the exhaust inlet tube into the cyclone chamber; electrode means having small openings through which the exhaust passes to enter the cyclone chamber, the electrode means generating electrostatic forces which charge the solid particulate in the exhaust, ionize air and generate ozone in the cyclone chamber near the electrode; means for injecting air into the cyclone chamber causing centrifugal flow of the air and the exhausted within the cyclone chamber and increasing a dwell time of the exhaust within the cyclone chamber.

Eng, J.W.

1991-09-24

258

Environmentally compatible solid rocket propellants  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Hercules' clean propellant development research is exploring three major types of clean propellant: (1) chloride-free formulations (no chlorine containing ingredients), being developed on the Clean Propellant Development and Demonstration (CPDD) contract sponsored by Phillips Laboratory, Edwards Air Force Base, CA; (2) low HCl scavenged formulations (HCl-scavenger added to propellant oxidized with ammonium perchlorate (AP)); and (3) low HCl formulations oxidized with a combination of AN and AP (with or without an HCl scavenger) to provide a significant reduction (relative to current solid rocket boosters) in exhaust HCl. These propellants provide performance approaching that of current systems, with less than 2 percent HCl in the exhaust, a significant reduction (greater than or equal to 70 percent) in exhaust HCl levels. Excellent processing, safety, and mechanical properties were achieved using only readily available, low cost ingredients. Two formulations, a sodium nitrate (NaNO3) scavenged HTPB and a chloride-free hydroxy terminated polyether (HTPE) propellant, were characterized for ballistic, mechanical, and rheological properties. In addition, the hazards properties were demonstrated to provide two families of class 1.3, 'zero-card' propellants. Further characterization is planned which includes demonstration of ballistic tailorability in subscale (one to 70 pound) motors over the range of burn rates required for retrofit into current Hercules space booster designs (Titan 4 SRMU and Delta 2 GEM).

Jacox, James L.; Bradford, Daniel J.

1995-01-01

259

Sounding rockets in Antarctica  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Sounding rockets are versatile tools for scientists studying the atmospheric region which is located above balloon altitudes but below orbital satellite altitudes. Three NASA Nike-Tomahawk sounding rockets were launched from Siple Station in Antarctica in an upper atmosphere physics experiment in the austral summer of 1980-81. The 110 kg payloads were carried to 200 km apogee altitudes in a coordinated project with Arcas rocket payloads and instrumented balloons. This Siple Station Expedition demonstrated the feasibility of launching large, near 1,000 kg, rocket systems from research stations in Antarctica. The remoteness of research stations in Antarctica and the severe environment are major considerations in planning rocket launching expeditions.

Alford, G. C.; Cooper, G. W.; Peterson, N. E.

1982-01-01

260

Analysis on Impulse Characteristics of PDRE with Exhaust Measurements  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The exhaust characteristics related to impulse was investigated in a pulse detonation rocket engine (PDRE) by tunable diode laser absorption sensing system. The instantaneous parameters of temperature, velocity and pressure were obtained for exhaust at engine exit. Analysis on impulse characteristics based on control volume of the PDRE was conducted for a single operation circle with experimental results. It was concluded that the impulse (3.26 N·s) achieved by exhaust measurements was in agreement with that (3.09 N·s) by a load cell. The impulse caused by exhaust momentum experienced an extremely sharp ascending, a steep rising and a slow increment in sequence. The exhausts during the sharp ascending and steep rising were under expansion with high mass weighted average temperature (>1266 K), so there was a possible promotion for exhausts utilizing.

Hu, Hong-bo; Weng, Chun-sheng; Lv, Xiao-jing; Li, Ning

2014-06-01

261

Research Status of the Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research in the VASIMR approach to high-power rocket propulsion has continued since 1980. The system consists of a three-stage asymmetric magnetic mirror, featuring a hybrid magnetic nozzle. Plasma is injected, heated and subsequently exhausted to provide modulated thrust and specific impulse at constant power. Plasma injector studies initially involve a modified Lorentz Force Accelerator. Other injector concepts, including helicons and

F. R. Chang-Diaz

1997-01-01

262

Subduction disfigured mantle plumes: Plumes that are not plumes?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

"Hotspot" volcanism is generally attributed to upwelling of anomalously warm mantle plumes, the intra-plate Hawaiian island chain and its simple age progression serving as an archetypal example. However, interactions of such plumes with plate margins, and in particular with subduction zones, is likely to have been a common occurrence and leads to more complicated geological records. Here we present results from a series of complementary, three-dimensional numerical and laboratory experiments that examine the dynamic interaction between negatively buoyant subducting slabs and positively buoyant mantle plumes. Slab-driven flow is shown to significantly influence the evolution and morphology of nearby plumes, which leads to a range of deformation regimes of the plume head and conduit. The success or failure of an ascending plume head to reach the lithosphere depends on the combination of plume buoyancy and position within the subduction system, where the mantle flow owing to downdip and rollback components of slab motion entrain plume material both vertically and laterally. Plumes rising within the sub-slab region tend to be suppressed by the surrounding flow field, while wedge-side plumes experience a slight enhancement before ultimately being entrained by subduction. Hotspot motion is more complex than that expected at intraplate settings and is primarily controlled by position alone. Regimes include severely deflected conduits as well as retrograde (corkscrew) motion from rollback-driven flow, often with weak and variable age-progression. The interaction styles and surface manifestations of plumes can be predicted from these models, and the results have important implications for potential hotspot evolution near convergent margins.

Druken, K. A.; Stegman, D. R.; Kincaid, C. R.; Griffiths, R. W.

2012-12-01

263

Engineers demonstrate the pocket rocket  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Part of Stennis Space Center's mission with its traveling exhibits is to educate the younger generation on how propulsion systems work. A popular tool is the 'pocket rocket,' which demonstrates how a hybrid rocket works. A hybrid rocket is a cross breed between a solid fuel rocket and a liquid fuel rocket.

1995-01-01

264

Engineers demonstrate the pocket rocket  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Part of Stennis Space Center's mission with its traveling exhibits is to educate the younger generation on how propulsion systems work. A popular tool is the 'pocket rocket,' which demonstrates how a hybrid rocket works. A hybrid rocket is a cross breed between a solid fuel rocket and a liquid fuel rocket.

1996-01-01

265

Baking Soda and Vinegar Rockets  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rocket experiments demonstrating conservation of momentum will never fail to generate enthusiasm in undergraduate physics laboratories. In this paper, we describe tests on rockets from two vendors1,2 that combine baking soda and vinegar for propulsion. The experiment compared two analytical approximations for the maximum rocket height to the experimentally measured rocket height. Baking soda and vinegar rockets present fewer safety

James R. Claycomb; Christopher Zachary; Quoc Tran

2009-01-01

266

63. Historic detail drawing of inlet duct cone on exhaust ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

63. Historic detail drawing of inlet duct cone on exhaust scrubber at building 202, June 18, 1955. NASA GRC drawing no. CD-101266. (On file at NASA Glenn Research Center). - Rocket Engine Testing Facility, GRC Building No. 202, NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

267

27. Historic view of Building 202 exhaust scrubber stack, July ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

27. Historic view of Building 202 exhaust scrubber stack, July 31, 1957. On file at NASA Plumbrook Research Center, Sandusky, Ohio. NASA GRC photo number C-45650. - Rocket Engine Testing Facility, GRC Building No. 202, NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

268

28. Historic view of Building 202 exhaust scrubber stack, detail, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

28. Historic view of Building 202 exhaust scrubber stack, detail, July 31, 1957. On file at NASA Plumbrook Research Center, Sandusky, Ohio. NASA GRC photo number C-45648. - Rocket Engine Testing Facility, GRC Building No. 202, NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

269

61. Historic elevation and section drawing of Building 202 exhaust ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

61. Historic elevation and section drawing of Building 202 exhaust scrubber, July 18, 1955. NASA GRC drawing no. CD-101263. (On file at NASA Glenn Research Center). - Rocket Engine Testing Facility, GRC Building No. 202, NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

270

Regenerable diesel exhaust filter  

Microsoft Academic Search

An exhaust gas filter assembly is described for removing particulates from the exhaust gas of an engine, comprising, in combination: a housing having an inlet pipe and an outlet pipe and defining an exhaust gas flow path between the inlet pipe and the outlet pipe, the inlet pipe being coupled to the engine to receive exhaust gas therefrom and the

Adiletta

1993-01-01

271

ASTRID rocket flight test  

Microsoft Academic Search

On February 4, 1994, we successfully flight tested the ASTRID rocket from Vandenberg Air Force Base. The technology for this rocket originated in the Brilliant Pebbles program and represents a five-year development effort. This rocket demonstrated how our new pumped-propulsion technology-which reduced the total effective engine mass by more than one half and cut the tank mass to one fifth

J. C. Whitehead; L. C. Pittenger; N. J. Colella

1994-01-01

272

Rocket Wind Tunnel  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, learners evaluate the potential performance of air rockets placed inside a wind tunnel. Learners measure the rocket's resistance to the flow of air in the tunnel and use the data to construct better rockets. The wind tunnel is prepared by the educator before the activity, but can be built by learners with adult supervision. This lesson plan includes instructions on how to build and use a wind tunnel, extensions, and sample data sheets.

Nasa

2012-05-15

273

Soda Straw Rockets  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This activity is about rocket shape and performance. Learners will test a rocket model and predict its motion. They will launch their rocket multiple times, make observations and record the distance it traveled. They will have the opportunity to answer a research question by collecting and analyzing data related to finding out the best nose cone length and predicting the motion of their model rockets. The lesson models the engineering design process using the 5E instructional model and includes teacher notes, vocabulary, student journal and reading.

274

Small Rocket Research and Technology.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Small chemical rockets are used on nearly all space missions. The small rocket program provides propulsion technology for civil and government space systems. Small rocket concepts are developed for systems which encompass reaction control for launch and o...

S. Schneider J. Biaglow

1993-01-01

275

Environment effects from SRB exhaust effluents: Technique development and preliminary assessment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Techniques to determine the environmental effects from the space shuttle SRB (Solid Rocket Booster) exhaust effluents are used to perform a preliminary climatological assessment. The exhaust effluent chemistry study was performed and the exhaust effluent species were determined. A reasonable exhaust particle size distribution is constructed for use in nozzle analyses and for the deposition model. The preliminary assessment is used to identify problems that are associated with the full-scale assessment; therefore, these preliminary air quality results are used with caution in drawing conclusion regarding the environmental effects of the space shuttle exhaust effluents.

Goldford, A. I.; Adelfang, S. I.; Hickey, J. S.; Smith, S. R.; Welty, R. P.; White, G. L.

1977-01-01

276

Secondary stream and excitation effects on two-dimensional nozzle plume characteristics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In order to design two-dimensional nozzle/ejector systems for future high performance aircraft, the basic engine exhaust plume velocity and temperature decay as effected by the secondary stream (ejector) and decay augmentation means must be assessed. Included in the assessment of the plume decay characteristics are the effects of nozzle aspect ratio and nozzle/ejector flow conditions. Nozzle/ejector plume decay can be enhanced by suitable excitation of the plume shear layers. Correlation of these factors are developed in a manner similar to those previously developed for conic and dual-flow nozzle plumes.

Vonglahn, Uwe H.

1987-01-01

277

Secondary stream and excitation effects on two-dimensional nozzle plume characteristics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In order to design two-dimensional nozzle/ejector systems for future high performance aircraft, the basic engine exhaust plume velocity and temperature decay as effected by the secondary stream (ejector) and decay augmentation means must be assessed. Included in the assessment of the plume decay characteristics are the effects of nozzle aspect ratio and nozzle/ejector flow conditions. Nozzle/ejector plume decay can be enhanced by suitable excitation of the plume shear layers. Correlations of these factors are developed in a manner similar to those previously developed for conic and dual-flow nozzle plumes.

Von Glahn, Uwe H.

1987-01-01

278

Development of a 12-Thrust Chamber Kerosene /Oxygen Primary Rocket Sub-System for an Early (1964) Air-Augmented Rocket Ground-Test System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Airbreathing/Rocket combined-cycle, and specifically rocket-based combined- cycle (RBCC), propulsion systems, typically employ an internal engine flow-path installed primary rocket subsystem. To achieve acceptably short mixing lengths in effecting the "air augmentation" process, a large rocket-exhaust/air interfacial mixing surface is needed. This leads, in some engine design concepts, to a "cluster" of small rocket units, suitably arrayed in the flowpath. To support an early (1964) subscale ground-test of a specific RBCC concept, such a 12-rocket cluster was developed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The small primary rockets used in the cluster assembly were modified versions of an existing small kerosene/oxygen water-cooled rocket engine unit routinely tested at MSFC. Following individual thrust-chamber tests and overall subsystem qualification testing, the cluster assembly was installed at the U. S. Air Force's Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC) for RBCC systems testing. (The results of the special air-augmented rocket testing are not covered here.) While this project was eventually successfully completed, a number of hardware integration problems were met, leading to catastrophic thrust chamber failures. The principal "lessons learned" in conducting this early primary rocket subsystem experimental effort are documented here as a basic knowledge-base contribution for the benefit of today's RBCC research and development community.

Pryor, D.; Hyde, E. H.; Escher, W. J. D.

1999-01-01

279

Automated and Manual Rocket Crater Measurement Software  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An update has been performed to software designed to do very rapid automated measurements of craters created in sandy substrates by rocket exhaust on liftoff. The previous software was optimized for pristine lab geometry and lighting conditions. This software has been enhanced to include a section for manual measurements of crater parameters; namely, crater depth, crater full width at half max, and estimated crater volume. The tools provide a very rapid method to measure these manual parameters to ease the burden of analyzing large data sets. This software allows for rapid quantization of the rocket crater parameters where automated methods may not work. The progress of spreadsheet data is continuously saved so that data is never lost, and data can be copied to clipboards and pasted to other software for analysis. The volume estimation of a crater is based on the central max depth axis line, and the polygonal shape of the crater is integrated around that axis.

Metzger, Philip; Immer, Christopher

2012-01-01

280

Sounding rocket lessons learned  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Programmatic, applicatory, developmental, and operational aspects of sounding rocket utilization for materials processing studies are discussed. Lessons learned through the experience of 10 sounding rocket missions are described. Particular attention is given to missions from the SPAR, Consort, and Joust programs. Successful experiments on Consort include the study of polymer membranes and resins, biological processes, demixing of immiscible liquids, and electrodeposition.

Wessling, Francis C.; Maybee, George W.

1991-01-01

281

Tea Bag Rocket  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, create a mini rocket out of a tea bag. Use this activity to explore convection and heat. Compare different brands of tea bags to see which bags work best as rockets. This activity guide includes a step-by-step instructional video. Safety note: this activity requires an open flame; adult supervision required.

Center, Saint L.

2013-01-30

282

Steerable Extraction Rocket.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The patent application relates to a steerable rocket motor for towing a load or extracting an aircrew member from a disabled aircraft, regardless of aircraft attitude or altitude. The rocket motor is formed from a hollow cylindrical thin walled casing con...

R. B. Dillinger J. W. Stone

1976-01-01

283

Alka-Seltzer Rockets  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This activity is about rocket propulsion. Learners will use use baking soda and vinegar to propel an object across the floor and understand how real rockets propel themselves in space. This activity should be carried out with adult supervision. This is activity 21 of 25 from Mars Activities.

284

Pop! Rocket Launcher  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, learners construct a simple air pressure launcher for paper rockets. Learners stomp or jump on an empty 2-liter bottle and force the air inside through connected plastic pipes to propel a paper rocket. The launching activity should be done in an open space like a gymnasium or cafeteria or can be conducted outside on a calm day.

Shearer, Deborah A.; Gregory L. Vogt, Ed D.

2013-01-30

285

Model Rockets and Microchips.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Points out the instructional applications and program possibilities of a unit on model rocketry. Describes the ways that microcomputers can assist in model rocket design and in problem calculations. Provides a descriptive listing of model rocket software for the Apple II microcomputer. (ML)

Fitzsimmons, Charles P.

1986-01-01

286

Rockets -- Part II.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

If two rockets are identical except that one engine burns in one-tenth the time of the other (total impulse and initial fuel mass of the two engines being the same), which rocket will rise higher? Why? The answer to this question (part 1 response in v20 n6, p410, Sep 1982) is provided. (Author/JN)

Leitner, Alfred

1982-01-01

287

Rocket Motor Charging Experiments.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A study of the effect of rocket engines on electrostatic charge accumulation was made. Experiments were conducted to measure short-circuit charging current and open-circuit voltage produced by 5-inch solid-fuel rocket motors during static firings at sea l...

E. F. Vance J. E. Nanevicz

1966-01-01

288

Exhaust support system  

SciTech Connect

An exhaust support system is described for a midship engine rear wheel drive-type vehicle having a transversely mounted engine, which consists of: a first cylindrical exhaust device having an inlet opening at a first longitudinal end thereof and an outlet opening at a second longitudinal end thereof and a horizontal longitudinal centerline running therethrough; a first exhaust pipe having an inlet opening and an outlet opening, the inlet opening communicating with the engine and the outlet opening communicating with the first cylindrical exhaust device; a second cylindrical exhaust device having an inlet opening at a first longitudinal end thereof and an outlet opening at a second longitudinal end thereof, the second cylindrical exhaust device having a horizontal longitudinal centerline running therethrough and being provided in a substantially parallel relationship with the centerline of the first exhaust device, and the first cylindrical exhaust device is located alongside of the second exhaust device such that the longitudinal centerlines of the first and second exhaust devices are located in substantially adjacent horizontal planes; a second exhaust pipe communicating the outlet opening of the first exhaust device with the inlet opening of the second exhaust device; and a bracket means for securing the first exhaust pipe to the second exhaust device, the bracket means being made of at least one sheet of metal, the at least one sheet of metal being secured to an extending perpendicularly between an outer peripheral flange of the first exhaust pipe and an outer peripheral portion of the second exhaust device, the at least one sheet of metal having a substantially flat surface which is substantially perpendicular to the horizontal longitudinal centerlines of the first and the second exhaust devices.

Teshima, H.

1986-06-24

289

Scientific debate: Mantle plumes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

After a preliminary discussion of hotspots (emphasizing the generic term melting anomalies), the mantle plume hypothesis, and alternative hypotheses, students are assigned roles for a debate on the mantle plume controversy. Students conduct an in-class debate, presenting arguments from opposite sides of the plume debate. After the debate students write a reflection paper on their perspective on the debate.

Jordan, Brennan

290

Investigation of solid plume simulation criteria to produce flight plume effects on multibody configuration in wind tunnel tests  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An investigation to determine the sensitivity of the space shuttle base and forebody aerodynamics to the size and shape of various solid plume simulators was conducted. Families of cones of varying angle and base diameter, at various axial positions behind a Space Shuttle launch vehicle model, were wind tunnel tested. This parametric evaluation yielded base pressure and force coefficient data which indicated that solid plume simulators are an inexpensive, quick method of approximating the effect of engine exhaust plumes on the base and forebody aerodynamics of future, complex multibody launch vehicles.

Frost, A. L.; Dill, C. C.

1986-01-01

291

Space shuttle plume/simulation application  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An analysis of pressure and strain-gage data from space shuttle wind tunnel test IA119 and IA138 was performed to define the influence on aerodynamic characteristics resulting from the main propulsion system and solid rocket booster plumes. Aerodynamic characteristics of each of the elements, the components and total vehicle of the space shuttle vehicle during ascent flight was considered. Pressure data were obtained over the aft portions of the space shuttle wind tunnel model in addition to wing and elevon gage data.

Boyle, W.; Conine, B.; Bell, G.

1979-01-01

292

Improved Simulation Model of the Ionospheric Hole Causedby Rocket Effluents  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper reports results of an improved model of “ionospheric hole” caused by rocket exhaust injected into the F-region. We have investigated a practical “ionospheric hole” model by which a proper strategy of rocket launch can be examined from a view point of protection of the Earth’s environment. The analytical results of preceding models were published about 8 years ago. The model well included the trajectory of launch rocket and could evaluate the effect of rocket exhaust on the Earth’s environment for various trajectories. The analytical results, however, didn’t quantitatively agree with the observation data very well. The new model includes the effects of the exhaust velocity of effluents and the neutral wind that preceding model didn’t take into account, and the boundary conditions and parameters are improved. The analytical results by this improved model well agree with the observation data for Skylab I and HEAO C launching experiments not only qualitatively but also quantitatively.

Honda, Toshiki; Yamagiwa, Yoshiki

293

Oxidation Behavior of Copper Alloy Candidates for Rocket Engine Applications (Technical Poster)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A rocket engine's combustion chamber is lined with material that is highly conductive to heat in order to dissipate the huge thermal load (evident in a white-hot exhaust plume). Because of its thermal conductivity copper is the best choice of liner material. However, the mechanical properties of pure copper are inadequate to withstand the high stresses, hence, copper alloys are needed in this application. But copper and its alloys are prone to oxidation and related damage, especially "blanching" (an oxidation-reduction mode of degradation). The space shuttle main engine combustion chamber is lined with a Cu-Ag-Zr alloy, "NARloy-Z", which exhibits blanching. A superior liner is being sought for the next generation of RLVs (Reusable Launch Vehicles) It should have improved mechanical properties and higher resistance to oxidation and blanching, but without substantial penalty in thermal conductivity. GRCop84, a Cu-8Cr-4Nb alloy (Cr2Nb in Cu matrix), developed by NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) and Case Western Reserve University, is a prime contender for RLV liner material. In this study, the oxidation resistance of GRCop-84 and other related/candidate copper alloys are investigated and compared

Ogbuji, Linus U. J.; Humphrey, Donald H.; Barrett, Charles A.; Greenbauer-Seng, Leslie (Technical Monitor); Gray, Hugh R. (Technical Monitor)

2002-01-01

294

Size and critical supersaturation for condensation of jet engine exhaust particles  

Microsoft Academic Search

In situ measurements of jet engine exhaust from a Sabreliner were made by instruments on board the NCAR Electra during a brief period of coordinated flying. Particle size distribution and critical supersaturation spectra were monitored before, during, and after the encounter with the jet exhaust plume by a condensation nucleus counter, an active scattering aerosol spectrometer probe (ASASP), and a

Marc Pitchford; James G. Hudson; John Hallett

1991-01-01

295

Indians Repulse British With Rocket  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

During the early introduction of rockets to Europe, they were used only as weapons. Enemy troops in India repulsed the British with rockets. Later, in Britain, Sir William Congreve developed a rocket that could fire to about 9,000 feet. The British fired Congreve rockets against the United States in the War of 1812.

2004-01-01

296

Characterization of rocket propellant combustion products  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of the work described in this report is four-fold: to (a) develop a standardized and experimentally validated approach to the sampling and chemical and physical characterization of the exhaust products of scaled-down rocket launch motors fired under experimentally controlled conditions at the Army's Signature Characterization Facility (ASCF) at Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Alabama; (b) determine the composition of the exhaust produces; (c) assess the accuracy of a selected existing computer model for predicting the composition of major and minor chemical species; (d) recommended alternations to both the sampling and analysis strategy and the computer model in order to achieve greater congruence between chemical measurements and computer prediction. 34 refs., 2 figs., 35 tabs.

Jenkins, R.A.; Nestor, C.W.; Thompson, C.V.; Gayle, T.M.; Ma, C.Y.; Tomkins, B.A.; Moody, R.L.

1991-12-09

297

Baking Soda and Vinegar Rockets  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Rocket experiments demonstrating conservation of momentum will never fail to generate enthusiasm in undergraduate physics laboratories. In this paper, we describe tests on rockets from two vendors1,2 that combine baking soda and vinegar for propulsion. The experiment compared two analytical approximations for the maximum rocket height to the experimentally measured rocket height. Baking soda and vinegar rockets present fewer safety concerns and require a smaller launch area than rapid combustion chemical rockets. Both kits were of nearly identical design, costing ~$20. The rockets required roughly 30 minutes of assembly time consisting of mostly taping the soft plastic fuselage to the Styrofoam nose cone.

Claycomb, James R.; Zachary, Christopher; Tran, Quoc

2009-02-01

298

Effects of the Phoenix Lander descent thruster plume on the Martian surface  

Microsoft Academic Search

The exhaust plume of Phoenix's hydrazine monopropellant pulsed descent thrusters will impact the surface of Mars during its descent and landing phase in the northern polar region. Experimental and computational studies have been performed to characterize the chemical compounds in the thruster exhausts. No undecomposed hydrazine is observed above the instrument detection limit of 0.2%. Forty-five percent ammonia is measured

D. H. Plemmons; M. Mehta; B. C. Clark; S. P. Kounaves; L. L. Peach; N. O. Renno; L. Tamppari; S. M. M. Young

2008-01-01

299

ASTRID rocket flight test  

SciTech Connect

On February 4, 1994, we successfully flight tested the ASTRID rocket from Vandenberg Air Force Base. The technology for this rocket originated in the Brilliant Pebbles program and represents a five-year development effort. This rocket demonstrated how our new pumped-propulsion technology-which reduced the total effective engine mass by more than one half and cut the tank mass to one fifth previous requirements-would perform in atmospheric flight. This demonstration paves the way for potential cost-effective uses of the new propulsion system in commercial aerospace vehicles, exploration of the planets, and defense applications.

Whitehead, J.C.; Pittenger, L.C.; Colella, N.J.

1994-07-01

300

Rocket and Space Technology  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Orbital mechanics, propulsion, rocket hardware, space centers and missions are among the topics featured on Robert A. Braeunig's Rocket and space Technology page. Braeunig is a civil engineer whose hobby is learning about space flight. This page is well-researched, and all sources are credited. The text disseminates relatively simple explanations of the mechanics of rocket flight and includes definitions of important terms and black-and-white diagrams. Sample problems, tables, and formulas make the site useful to secondary educators and students. The science and mathematics behind everything from building a spacecraft to launching it are covered in this instructional site.

Braeunig, Robert A.

2001-01-01

301

Investigation of plume induced separation on a full-size missile at supersonic velocities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A large amount of data to determine plume effects have been obtained from various simulation techniques. To provide data for evaluating the adequacy of these simulations, a test utilizing a rocket sled to measure surface pressures on a full-size, live, high thrust rocket at Mach number up to Moo 1.6. Selected portions of the data are presented to show Mach number and thrust level effects.

Martin, T. A.

1980-06-01

302

Investigation of the Rocket Induced Flow Field in a Rectangular Duct  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Rocket-Based Combined Cycle (RBCC) concepts attempt to improve the performance of launch vehicles at all points in the launch trajectory and make highly reusable launch vehicles a reality. The Aerojet Strutjet RBCC concept consists of a variable geometry duct with internal, vertical struts that functions in ducted rocket, ramjet, scramjet, and pure rocket modes. These struts have rocket and turbine exhaust nozzles imbedded within them. The rocket flows create an ejector effect with the ingested air at subsonic flight velocities. In ramjet and scramjet modes, the fuel rich nozzle flows react with the ingested air producing an afterburner effect. Under a NASA Marshall Space Flight Center contract, the UAH Propulsion Research Center (PRC) has designed and built a Strutjet simulation facility. A scale model of a single strut has been built and is undergoing cold-flow testing to investigate the mixing of the rocket and turbine exhausts with the ingested air. A complementary experimental program is also underway to examine the induced flow-field generated by rocket nozzles confined in a rectangular duct. Characterizing the induced flow behavior is critical to understanding and optimizing the performance of future Strutjet-based RBCC propulsion systems. The proposed paper will present results from the rocket induced flow investigation.

Landrum, D. Brian; Lambert, James; Thames, Mignon; Hawk, Clark

1999-01-01

303

The History of Rockets.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the origins and development of rockets mainly from the perspective of warfare. Includes some early enthusiasts, such as Congreve, Tsiolkovosky, Goddard, and Oberth. Describes developments from World War II, and during satellite development. (YP)

Newby, J. C.

1988-01-01

304

Antares Rocket Lifts Off!  

NASA Video Gallery

NASA commercial space partner Orbital Sciences Corp. of Dulles, Va., launched its Cygnus cargo spacecraft aboard its Antares rocket at 10:58 a.m. EDT Wednesday from the Mid-Atlantic Regional Spacep...

305

Rocket Sled Testing.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Data on parameters, such as linear acceleration sustained for periods ot time, velocity, and aerodynamic effects of the type not attainable in the laboratory are often obtained from rocket sled tests. To accomplish these objectives, the Materiel Test Proc...

1968-01-01

306

Robust Rocket Engine Concept  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The potential for a revolutionary step in the durability of reusable rocket engines is made possible by the combination of several emerging technologies. The recent creation and analytical demonstration of life extending (or damage mitigating) control technology enables rapid rocket engine transients with minimum fatigue and creep damage. This technology has been further enhanced by the formulation of very simple but conservative continuum damage models. These new ideas when combined with recent advances in multidisciplinary optimization provide the potential for a large (revolutionary) step in reusable rocket engine durability. This concept has been named the robust rocket engine concept (RREC) and is the basic contribution of this paper. The concept also includes consideration of design innovations to minimize critical point damage.

Lorenzo, Carl F.

1995-01-01

307

Rocket Motor Microphone Investigation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

At ATK's facility in Utah, large full-scale solid rocket motors are tested. The largest is a five-segment version of the reusable solid rocket motor, which is for use on the Ares I launch vehicle. As a continuous improvement project, ATK and BYU investigated the use of microphones on these static tests, the vibration and temperature to which the instruments are subjected, and in particular the use of vent tubes and the effects these vents have at low frequencies.

Pilkey, Debbie; Herrera, Eric; Gee, Kent L.; Giraud, Jerom H.; Young, Devin J.

2010-01-01

308

Rocket Launch Probability  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This applet is designed to teach an application of probability. This Java applet works by simulating a situation where a three stage rocket is about to be launched. In order for a successful launch to occur all three stages of the rocket must successfully pass their pre-takeoff tests. By default, each stage has a 50% chance of success, however, this can be altered by dragging the bar next to each stage.

Exner, Nicholas

2009-01-13

309

Action-Reaction Rocket!  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Learners construct a rocket from a balloon propelled along a guide string. They use this model to learn about Newton's three laws of motion, examining the effect of different forces on the motion of the rocket. This activity can be combined with other activities to create a larger lesson. Resource contains vocabulary definitions and suggestions for assessment, extensions, and scaling for different levels of learners.

Duren, Sabre; Heavner, Ben; Zarske, Malinda S.; Carlson, Denise

2004-01-01

310

Rocket Engine Oscillation Diagnostics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Rocket engine oscillating data can reveal many physical phenomena ranging from unsteady flow and acoustics to rotordynamics and structural dynamics. Because of this, engine diagnostics based on oscillation data should employ both signal analysis and physical modeling. This paper describes an approach to rocket engine oscillation diagnostics, types of problems encountered, and example problems solved. Determination of design guidelines and environments (or loads) from oscillating phenomena is required during initial stages of rocket engine design, while the additional tasks of health monitoring, incipient failure detection, and anomaly diagnostics occur during engine development and operation. Oscillations in rocket engines are typically related to flow driven acoustics, flow excited structures, or rotational forces. Additional sources of oscillatory energy are combustion and cavitation. Included in the example problems is a sampling of signal analysis tools employed in diagnostics. The rocket engine hardware includes combustion devices, valves, turbopumps, and ducts. Simple models of an oscillating fluid system or structure can be constructed to estimate pertinent dynamic parameters governing the unsteady behavior of engine systems or components. In the example problems it is shown that simple physical modeling when combined with signal analysis can be successfully employed to diagnose complex rocket engine oscillatory phenomena.

Nesman, Tom; Turner, James E. (Technical Monitor)

2002-01-01

311

The elusive mantle plume  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Mantle plumes are hypothetical hot, narrow mantle upwellings that are often invoked to explain hotspot volcanism with unusual geophysical and geochemical characteristics. The mantle plume is a well-established geological structure in computer modeling and laboratory experiments but an undisputed seismic detection of one has yet to be made. Vertically continuous low shear velocity anomalies in the upper mantle, expected for plumes, are present beneath the Afar, Bowie, Easter, Hawaii, Iceland, Louisville, McDonald, and Samoa hotspots but not beneath the other 29 hotspots in Sleep's 1990 catalog. Whether and how plumes form remain fundamental multi-disciplinary research questions. Should they exist, detection of whole-mantle plumes will depend on deployments of dense (50-100 km station spacing), wide-aperture (>1000 km) seismic networks to maximize model resolution in the transition zone and uppermost lower mantle since plume impingement upon the 660-km phase transition leaves a unique seismic imprint.

Ritsema, Jeroen; Allen, Richard M.

2003-02-01

312

Highlights of Transient Plume Impingement Model Validation and Applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper describes highlights of an ongoing validation effort conducted to assess the viability of applying a set of analytic point source transient free molecule equations to model behavior ranging from molecular effusion to rocket plumes. The validation effort includes encouraging comparisons to both steady and transient studies involving experimental data and direct simulation Monte Carlo results. Finally, this model is applied to describe features of two exotic transient scenarios involving NASA Goddard Space Flight Center satellite programs.

Woronowicz, Michael

2011-01-01

313

Volcanic Plume Measurements with UAV (Invited)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Volatiles in magmas are the driving force of volcanic eruptions and quantification of volcanic gas flux and composition is important for the volcano monitoring. Recently we developed a portable gas sensor system (Multi-GAS) to quantify the volcanic gas composition by measuring volcanic plumes and obtained volcanic gas compositions of actively degassing volcanoes. As the Multi-GAS measures variation of volcanic gas component concentrations in the pumped air (volcanic plume), we need to bring the apparatus into the volcanic plume. Commonly the observer brings the apparatus to the summit crater by himself but such measurements are not possible under conditions of high risk of volcanic eruption or difficulty to approach the summit due to topography etc. In order to overcome these difficulties, volcanic plume measurements were performed by using manned and unmanned aerial vehicles. The volcanic plume measurements by manned aerial vehicles, however, are also not possible under high risk of eruption. The strict regulation against the modification of the aircraft, such as installing sampling pipes, also causes difficulty due to the high cost. Application of the UAVs for the volcanic plume measurements has a big advantage to avoid these problems. The Multi-GAS consists of IR-CO2 and H2O gas analyzer, SO2-H2O chemical sensors and H2 semiconductor sensor and the total weight ranges 3-6 kg including batteries. The necessary conditions of the UAV for the volcanic plumes measurements with the Multi-GAS are the payloads larger than 3 kg, maximum altitude larger than the plume height and installation of the sampling pipe without contamination of the exhaust gases, as the exhaust gases contain high concentrations of H2, SO2 and CO2. Up to now, three different types of UAVs were applied for the measurements; Kite-plane (Sky Remote) at Miyakejima operated by JMA, Unmanned airplane (Air Photo Service) at Shinomoedake, Kirishima volcano, and Unmanned helicopter (Yamaha) at Sakurajima volcano operated by ERI, Tokyo University. In all cases, we could estimated volcanic gas compositions, such as CO2/SO2 ratios, but also found out that it is necessary to improve the techniques to avoid the contamination of the exhaust gases and to approach more concentrated part of the plume. It was also revealed that the aerial measurements have an advantage of the stable background. The error of the volcanic gas composition estimates are largely due to the large fluctuation of the atmospheric H2O and CO2 concentrations near the ground. The stable atmospheric background obtained by the UAV measurements enables accurate estimate of the volcanic gas compositions. One of the most successful measurements was that on May 18, 2011 at Shinomoedake, Kirishima volcano during repeating Vulcanian eruption stage. The major component composition was obtained as H2O=97, CO2=1.5, SO2=0.2, H2S=0.24, H2=0.006 mol%; the high CO2 contents suggests relatively deep source of the magma degassing and the apparent equilibrium temperature obtained as 400°C indicates that the gas was cooled during ascent to the surface. The volcanic plume measurement with UAV will become an important tool for the volcano monitoring that provides important information to understand eruption processes.

Shinohara, H.; Kaneko, T.; Ohminato, T.

2013-12-01

314

SRB Environment Evaluation and Analysis. Volume 3: ASRB Plume Induced Environments  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Contract NAS8-37891 was expanded in late 1989 to initiate analysis of Shuttle plume induced environments as a result of the substitution of the Advanced Solid Rocket Booster (ASRB) for the Redesigned Solid Rocket Booster (RSRB). To support this analysis, REMTECH became involved in subscale and full-scale solid rocket motor test programs which further expanded the scope of work. Later contract modifications included additional tasks to produce initial design cycle environments and to specify development flight instrumentation. Volume 3 of the final report describes these analyses and contains a summary of reports resulting from various studies.

Bender, R. L.; Brown, J. R.; Reardon, J. E.; Everson, J.; Coons, L. W.; Stuckey, C. I.; Fulton, M. S.

1991-01-01

315

Augmentation of Rocket Propulsion: Physical Limits  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Rocket propulsion is not ideal when the propellant is not ejected at a unique velocity in an inertial frame. An ideal velocity distribution requires that the exhaust velocity vary linearly with the velocity of the vehicle in an inertial frame. It also requires that the velocity distribution variance as a thermodynamic quantity be minimized. A rocket vehicle with an inert propellant is not optimal, because it does not take advantage of the propellant mass for energy storage. Nor is it logical to provide another energy storage device in order to realize variable exhaust velocity, because it would have to be partly unfilled at the beginning of the mission. Performance is enhanced by pushing on the surrounding because it increases the reaction mass and decreases the reaction jet velocity. This decreases the fraction of the energy taken away by the propellant and increases the share taken by the payload. For an optimal model with the propellant used as fuel, the augmentation realized by pushing on air is greatest for vehicles with a low initial/final mass ratio. For a typical vehicle in the Earth's atmosphere, the augmentation is seen mainly at altitudes below about 80 km. When drag is taken into account, there is a well-defined optimum size for the air intake. Pushing on air has the potential to increase the performance of rockets which pass through the atmosphere. This is apart from benefits derived from "air breathing", or using the oxygen in the atmosphere to reduce the mass of an on-board oxidizer. Because of the potential of these measures, it is vital to model these effects more carefully and explore technology that may realize their advantages.

Taylor, Charles R.

1996-01-01

316

COOLING TOWER PLUME MODEL  

EPA Science Inventory

A review of recently reported cooling tower plume models yields none that is universally accepted. The entrainment and drag mechanisms and the effect of moisture on the plume trajectory are phenomena which are treated differently by various investigators. In order to better under...

317

A generalization of the rocket formula and its application to advanced space propulsion systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A generalized rocket formula is derived from a first principles approach. The resulting expression of the thrust is applied to advanced space propulsion systems and a possible link between the asymptotic propellant velocity and the velocity at thruster exit is given. An estimation of the thrust modification due to spacecraft-plume interactions is also considered.

Nasi, L.; Raimbault, J.-L.

2011-01-01

318

Laser Rayleigh and Raman diagnostics for small hydrogen/oxygen rockets  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Localized velocity, temperature, and species concentration measurements in rocket flow fields are needed to evaluate predictive computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes and identify causes of poor rocket performance. Velocity, temperature, and total number density information have been successfully extracted from spectrally resolved Rayleigh scattering in the plume of small hydrogen/oxygen rockets. Light from a narrow band laser is scattered from the moving molecules with a Doppler shifted frequency. Two components of the velocity can be extracted by observing the scattered light from two directions. Thermal broadening of the scattered light provides a measure of the temperature, while the integrated scattering intensity is proportional to the number density. Spontaneous Raman scattering has been used to measure temperature and species concentration in similar plumes. Light from a dye laser is scattered by molecules in the rocket plume. Raman spectra scattered from major species are resolved by observing the inelastically scattered light with linear array mounted to a spectrometer. Temperature and oxygen concentrations have been extracted by fitting a model function to the measured Raman spectrum. Results of measurements on small rockets mounted inside a high altitude chamber using both diagnostic techniques are reported.

Degroot, Wilhelmus A.; Zupanc, Frank J.

1993-01-01

319

Stealth plumes on Io  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We suggest that Io's eruptive activity may include a class of previously undetected SO2 geysers. The thermodynamic models for the eruptive plumes discovered by Voyager involve low to moderate entropy SO2 eruptions. The resulting plumes are a mixture of solid and gas which emerge from the vent and follow essentially ballistic trajectories. We show that intrusion of silicate magma into buried SO2 deposits can create the required conditions for high entropy eruptions which proceed entirely in the vapor phase. These purely gaseous plumes would have been invisible to Voyager's instruments. Hence, we call them “stealth” plumes. Such eruptions could explain the “patchy” SO2 atmosphere inferred from recent UV and microwave spectral observations. The magma intrusion rate required to support the required gas production for these plumes is a negligible fraction of estimated global magma intrusion rates.

Johnson, Torrence V.; Matson, Dennis L.; Blaney, Diana L.; Veeder, Glenn J.; Davies, Ashley

320

The Optimal Bottle Rocket Lauch  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a computer and outdoor lab based activity in which students design two bottle rockets that are designed to reach maximum height. Students will calculate maximum height and terminal velocity for each rocket launched.

Menzies, Margaret

321

Artillery and Rockets (Selected Chapters).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Chapter 7 discusses different classes of rockets, trajectories and the kinds of propellants used. Chapter 8 deals with the advantages and disadvantages of Rocket and Tube artillery. Antitank missiles are discussed with a brief history of their use in past...

V. A. Baranyuk

1970-01-01

322

Identification of Exhaust Species from the Combustion of Lm and Lmh Fuels.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This is the first quarterly report of a twelve-month research program being conducted to study the metastable chemical species produced in boron fueled rocket plumes. Experiments using boron slurried in kerosene and boron powder have been performed. The r...

W. H. McLain R. E. Knight R. W. Evans

1967-01-01

323

Validation of scramjet exhaust simulation technique at Mach 6  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Current design philosophy for hydrogen-fueled, scramjet-powered hypersonic aircraft results in configurations with strong couplings between the engine plume and vehicle aerodynamics. The experimental verification of the scramjet exhaust simulation is described. The scramjet exhaust was reproduced for the Mach 6 flight condition by the detonation tube simulator. The exhaust flow pressure profiles, and to a large extent the heat transfer rate profiles, were then duplicated by cool gas mixtures of Argon and Freon 13B1 or Freon 12. The results of these experiments indicate that a cool gas simulation of the hot scramjet exhaust is a viable simulation technique except for phenomena which are dependent on the wall temperature relative to flow temperature.

Hopkins, H. B.; Konopka, W.; Leng, J.

1979-01-01

324

Jupiter Rocket Engine  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Engine for the Jupiter rocket. The Jupiter vehicle was a direct derivative of the Redstone. The Army Ballistic Missile Agency (ABMA) at Redstone Arsenal, Alabama, continued Jupiter development into a successful intermediate ballistic missile, even though the Department of Defense directed its operational development to the Air Force. ABMA maintained a role in Jupiter RD, including high-altitude launches that added to ABMA's understanding of rocket vehicle operations in the near-Earth space environment. It was knowledge that paid handsome dividends later.

2004-01-01

325

Rocket Me into Space  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

One of the exciting challenges for engineers is the idea of exploration. This lesson looks more closely at Spaceman Rohan, Spacewoman Tess, their daughter Maya, and their challenges with getting to space, setting up satellites, and exploring uncharted waters via a canoe. This lesson reinforces rockets as a vehicle that helps us explore outside the Earth's atmosphere (that is, to move without air) by using the principles of Newton's third law of motion. Also, the ideas of thrust, control and weight â all principles that engineers deal with when building a rocket â are introduced.

Integrated Teaching And Learning Program

326

The application of structural reliability techniques to plume impingement loading of the Space Station Freedom Photovoltaic Array  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new aerospace application of structural reliability techniques is presented, where the applied forces depend on many probabilistic variables. This application is the plume impingement loading of the Space Station Freedom Photovoltaic Arrays. When the space shuttle berths with Space Station Freedom it must brake and maneuver towards the berthing point using its primary jets. The jet exhaust, or plume,

Isam S. Yunis; Kelly S. Carney

1993-01-01

327

Rocket center Peenemuende - Personal memories  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A brief history of Peenemuende, the rocket center where Von Braun and his team developed the A-4 (V-2) rocket under German Army auspices, and the Air Force developed the V-1 (buzz bomb), wire-guided bombs, and rocket planes, is presented. Emphasis is placed on the expansion of operations beginning in 1942.

Dannenberg, Konrad; Stuhlinger, Ernst

1993-01-01

328

Baking Soda and Vinegar Rockets  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Rocket experiments demonstrating conservation of momentum will never fail to generate enthusiasm in undergraduate physics laboratories. In this paper, we describe tests on rockets from two vendors that combine baking soda and vinegar for propulsion. The experiment compared two analytical approximations for the maximum rocket height to the…

Claycomb, James R.; Zachary, Christopher; Tran, Quoc

2009-01-01

329

Small rocket research and technology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Small chemical rockets are used on nearly all space missions. The small rocket program provides propulsion technology for civil and government space systems. Small rocket concepts are developed for systems which encompass reaction control for launch and orbit transfer systems, as well as on-board propulsion for large space systems and earth orbit and planetary spacecraft. Major roles for on-board propulsion

Steven Schneider; James Biaglow

1993-01-01

330

Duplex tab exhaust nozzle  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An exhaust nozzle includes a conical duct terminating in an annular outlet. A row of vortex generating duplex tabs are mounted in the outlet. The tabs have compound radial and circumferential aft inclination inside the outlet for generating streamwise vortices for attenuating exhaust noise while reducing performance loss.

Gutmark, Ephraim Jeff (Inventor); Martens, Steven (nmn) (Inventor)

2012-01-01

331

Insulated exhaust cover  

Microsoft Academic Search

This patent describes a device for insulating one or more pipes in the exhaust system of an internal combustion engine. It comprises: a layer of insulating material circumscribingly engaging the outer surface of the exhaust pipe, a flexible metal sleeve defining an elongated passageway having a diameter, a means for retaining the insulating material and the metal sleeve in stationary

1992-01-01

332

Diesel engine exhaust oxidizer  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a diesel engine exhaust oxidizing device. It comprises: an enclosure having an inlet for receiving diesel engine exhaust, a main flow path through the enclosure to an outlet of the enclosure, a by-ass through the enclosure, and a microprocessor control means.

Kammel, R.A.

1992-06-16

333

Automobile exhaust gas cleaner  

SciTech Connect

A cleaner for exhaust gas is described comprising: first and second perforated baffle means supported in respective first and second housings, the first housing having an exhaust gas inlet, the second housing having an exhaust gas outlet, and the first housing being situated below the second housing and connected thereto to permit the flow of exhaust gas upwardly from the first housing to the second housing, means for spraying cleaning liquid onto the first perforated baffle means and for permitting the gas to permeate therethrough and then to flow downwardly around means for deflecting the gas before moving upwardly to the second housing, the sprayed liquid falling downwardly into sump means for receiving the sprayed liquid, means for spraying cleaning liquid onto the second perforated baffle means and for permitting the gas to permeate therethrough, the sprayed liquid falling downwardly into the sump means, and means for filtering pollutants from the exhaust gas.

Pickering, J.J.

1989-04-18

334

Variable Thrust Rocket Engine.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The reaction engine includes a throttling assembly for simultaneously varying the propellant and exhaust areas, so that the combustion chamber is constant for all degrees of throttling; which has a simplified propellant injection system for complete contr...

F. R. Hickerson

1964-01-01

335

Solid Rocket Motor Test  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Shown is a test of the TEM-13 Solid Rocket Motor in support of the Ares/CLV first stage at ATK, Utah . Constellation/Ares project. This image is extracted from a high definition video file and is the highest resolution available.

2008-01-01

336

Solid Rocket Motor Test  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Shown is a test of the TEM-13 Solid Rocket Motor in support of the Ares/CLV first stage at ATK, Utah . Constellaton/Ares project. This image is extracted from a high definition video file and is the highest resolution available.

2008-01-01

337

Solid Rocket Motor Test  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Shown is a test of the TEM-13 solid rocket motor at the ATK test facility in Utah in support of the Ares/CLV first stage. This image is extracted from high definition video and is the highest resolution available.

2008-01-01

338

Water Rocket Launch  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, learners explore rocketry and the principals of space flight. Learners work in teams with adult supervision and construct and launch a rocket from a soda bottle and everyday materials powered by an air pump. Learners observe their own achievements and challenges, as well as those of other teams, complete a reflection sheet, and present their experiences to the class.

Ieee

2014-04-08

339

This "Is" Rocket Science!  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Using model rockets to teach physics can be an effective way to engage students in learning. In this paper, we present a curriculum developed in response to an expressed need for helping high school students review physics equations in preparation for a state-mandated exam. This required a mode of teaching that was more advanced and analytical…

Keith, Wayne; Martin, Cynthia; Veltkamp, Pamela

2013-01-01

340

Sounding rocket development program  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is pointed out that in a consideration of Brazilian space activities two different phases can be distinguished. The first phase involves research and development work related to sounding rockets. The second phase is concerned with attitude control in the system. The first phase began in 1965 with the design and construction of the Sonda I system. The Sonda I

J. Boscov

1982-01-01

341

Dr. Goddard Transports Rocket  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Dr. Robert H. Goddard tows his rocket to the launching tower behind a Model A Ford truck, 15 miles northwest of Roswell, New Mexico. 1930- 1932. Dr. Goddard has been recognized as the 'Father of American Rocketry' and as one of three pioneers in the theoretical exploration of space. Robert Hutchings Goddard was born in Worcester, Massachusetts, on October 15, 1882. He was a theoretical scientist as well as a practical engineer. His dream was the conquest of the upper atmosphere and ultimately space through the use of rocket propulsion. Dr. Goddard, who died in 1945, was probably as responsible for the dawning of the Space Age as the Wright Brothers were for the begining of the Air Age. Yet his work attracted little serious attention during his lifetime. When the United States began to prepare for the conquest of space in the 1950's, American rocket scientists began to recognize the debt owed to the New England professor. They discovered that it was virtually impossible to construct a rocket or launch a satellite without acknowledging the work of Dr. Goddard. This great legacy was covered by more than 200 patents, many of which were issued after his death.

1974-01-01

342

Liquid Rocket Engine Testing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Comprehensive Liquid Rocket Engine testing is essential to risk reduction for Space Flight. Test capability represents significant national investments in expertise and infrastructure. Historical experience underpins current test capabilities. Test facilities continually seek proactive alignment with national space development goals and objectives including government and commercial sectors.

Rahman, Shamim

2005-01-01

343

Water Rocket Launch  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, learners explore rocketry and the principals of space flight. Learners work in teams with adult supervision and construct and launch a rocket from a soda bottle and everyday materials powered by an air pump. Learners observe their own achievements and challenges, as well as those of other teams, complete a reflection sheet, and present their experiences to the class.

Ieee

2014-06-18

344

Thiokol Solid Rocket Motors  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper presents viewgraphs on thiokol solid rocket motors. The topics include: 1) Communications; 2) Military and government intelligence; 3) Positioning satellites; 4) Remote sensing; 5) Space burial; 6) Science; 7) Space manufacturing; 8) Advertising; 9) Space rescue space debris management; 10) Space tourism; 11) Space settlements; 12) Hazardous waste disposal; 13) Extraterrestrial resources; 14) Fast package delivery; and 15) Space utilities.

Graves, S. R.

2000-01-01

345

Liquid rocket engine turbines  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Criteria for the design and development of turbines for rocket engines to meet specific performance, and installation requirements are summarized. The total design problem, and design elements are identified, and the current technology pertaining to these elements is described. Recommended practices for achieving a successful design are included.

1974-01-01

346

Gaseous Nuclear Rocket.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The nuclear rocket for extraterrestrial flight is in the form of a gaseous nuclear reactor. One or more streams of a working fluid are introduced concentrically adjacent to a gaseous fissile material in a heating chamber or cell. Introduction of a working...

F. E. Rom

1965-01-01

347

This Is Rocket Science!  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Using model rockets to teach physics can be an effective way to engage students in learning. In this paper, we present a curriculum developed in response to an expressed need for helping high school students review physics equations in preparation for a state-mandated exam. This required a mode of teaching that was more advanced and analytical than that offered by Estes Industries,1 but more basic than the analysis of Nelson et al.2,3 In particular, drag is neglected until the very end of the exercise, which allows the concept of conservation of energy to be shown when predicting the rocket's flight. Also, the variable mass of the rocket motor is assumed to decrease linearly during the flight (while the propulsion charge and recovery delay charge are burning) and handled simplistically by using an average mass value. These changes greatly simplify the equations needed to predict the times and heights at various stages of flight, making it more useful as a review of basic physics. Details about model rocket motors, range safety, and other supplemental information may be found online at Apogee Components4 and the National Association of Rocketry.5

Keith, Wayne; Martin, Cynthia; Veltkamp, Pamela

2013-09-01

348

Liquid rocket valve assemblies  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The design and operating characteristics of valve assemblies used in liquid propellant rocket engines are discussed. The subjects considered are as follows: (1) valve selection parameters, (2) major design aspects, (3) design integration of valve subassemblies, and (4) assembly of components and functional tests. Information is provided on engine, stage, and spacecraft checkout procedures.

1973-01-01

349

Liquid rocket valve components  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A monograph on valves for use with liquid rocket propellant engines is presented. The configurations of the various types of valves are described and illustrated. Design criteria and recommended practices for the various valves are explained. Tables of data are included to show the chief features of valve components in use on operational vehicles.

1973-01-01

350

Solid rocket motors  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Structural requirements, materials and, especially, processing are critical issues that will pace the introduction of new types of solid rocket motors. Designers must recognize and understand the drivers associated with each of the following considerations: (1) cost; (2) energy density; (3) long term storage with use on demand; (4) reliability; (5) safety of processing and handling; (6) operability; and (7) environmental acceptance.

Carpenter, Ronn L.

1993-01-01

351

Rocket Combustion Chamber Coating  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A coating with the ability to protect (1) the inside wall (i.e., lining) of a rocket engine combustion chamber and (2) parts of other apparatuses that utilize or are exposed to combustive or high temperature environments. The novelty of this invention lies in the manner a protective coating is embedded into the lining.

Holmes, Richard R. (Inventor); McKechnie, Timothy N. (Inventor)

2001-01-01

352

Electric field and radio frequency measurements for rocket engine health monitoring applications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Electric-field (EF) and radio-frequency (RF) emissions generated in the exhaust plumes of the diagnostic testbed facility thruster (DTFT) and the SSME are examined briefly for potential applications to plume diagnostics and engine health monitoring. Hypothetically, anomalous engine conditions could produce measurable changes in any characteristic EF and RF spectral signatures identifiable with a 'healthly' plumes. Tests to determine the presence of EF and RF emissions in the DTFT and SSME exhaust plumes were conducted. EF and RF emissions were detected using state-of-the-art sensors. Analysis of limited data sets show some apparent consistencies in spectral signatures. Significant emissions increases were detected during controlled tests using dopants injected into the DTFT.

Valenti, Elizabeth L.

1992-10-01

353

Electric field and radio frequency measurements for rocket engine health monitoring applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Electric-field (EF) and radio-frequency (RF) emissions generated in the exhaust plumes of the diagnostic testbed facility thruster (DTFT) and the SSME are examined briefly for potential applications to plume diagnostics and engine health monitoring. Hypothetically, anomalous engine conditions could produce measurable changes in any characteristic EF and RF spectral signatures identifiable with a 'healthly' plumes. Tests to determine the presence of EF and RF emissions in the DTFT and SSME exhaust plumes were conducted. EF and RF emissions were detected using state-of-the-art sensors. Analysis of limited data sets show some apparent consistencies in spectral signatures. Significant emissions increases were detected during controlled tests using dopants injected into the DTFT.

Valenti, Elizabeth L.

1992-01-01

354

Rockets using Liquid Oxygen  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

It is my task to discuss rocket propulsion using liquid oxygen and my treatment must be highly condensed for the ideas and experiments pertaining to this classic type of rocket are so numerous that one could occupy a whole morning with a detailed presentation. First, with regard to oxygen itself as compared with competing oxygen carriers, it is known that the liquid state of oxygen, in spite of the low boiling point, is more advantageous than the gaseous form of oxygen in pressure tanks, therefore only liquid oxygen need be compared with the oxygen carriers. The advantages of liquid oxygen are absolute purity and unlimited availability at relatively small cost in energy. The disadvantages are those arising from the impossibility of absolute isolation from heat; consequently, allowance must always be made for a certain degree of vaporization and only vented vessels can be used for storage and transportation. This necessity alone eliminates many fields of application, for example, at the front lines. In addition, liquid oxygen has a lower specific weight than other oxygen carriers, therefore many accessories become relatively larger and heavier in the case of an oxygen rocket, for example, the supply tanks and the pumps. The advantages thus become effective only in those cases where definitely scheduled operation and a large ground organization are possible and when the flight requires a great concentration of energy relative to weight. With the aim of brevity, a diagram of an oxygen rocket will be presented and the problem of various component parts that receive particularly thorough investigation in this classic case but which are also often applicable to other rocket types will be referred to.

Busemann, Adolf

1947-01-01

355

Methane Plumes on Mars  

NASA Video Gallery

Spectrometer instruments attached to several telescopes detect plumes of methane emitted from Mars during its summer and spring seasons. High levels of methane are indicated by warmer colors. The m...

356

Rocket center Peenemünde — Personal memories  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Von Braun built his first rockets as a young teenager. At 14, he started making plans for rockets for human travel to the Moon and Mars. The German Army began a rocket program in 1929. Two years later, Colonel (later General) Becker contacted von Braun who experimented with rockets in Berlin, gave him a contract in 1932, and, jointly with the Air Force, in 1936 built the rocket center Peenemünde where von Braun and his team developed the A-4 (V-2) rocket under Army auspices, while the Air Force developed the V-1 (buzz bomb), wire-guided bombs, and rocket planes. Albert Speer, impressed by the work of the rocketeers, allowed a modest growth of the Peenemünde project; this brought Dannenberg to the von Braun team in 1940. Hitler did not believe in rockets; he ignored the A-4 project until 1942 when he began to support it, expecting that it could turn the fortunes of war for him. He drastically increased the Peenemünde work force and allowed the transfer of soldiers from the front to Peenemünde; that was when Stuhlinger, in 1943, came to Peenemünde as a Pfc.-Ph.D. Later that year, Himmler wrenched the authority over A-4 production out of the Army's hands, put it under his command, and forced production of the immature rocket at Mittelwerk, and its military deployment against targets in France, Belgium, and England. Throughout the development of the A-4 rocket, von Braun was the undisputed leader of the project. Although still immature by the end of the war, the A-4 had proceeded to a status which made it the first successful long-range precision rocket, the prototype for a large number of military rockets built by numerous nations after the war, and for space rockets that launched satellites and traveled to the Moon and the planets.

Dannenberg, Konrad; Stuhlinger, Ernst

357

Evaluation of Geopolymer Concrete for Rocket Test Facility Flame Deflectors  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The current paper presents results from a combined research effort by Louisiana Tech University (LTU) and NASA Stennis Space Center (SSC) to develop a new alumina-silicate based cementitious binder capable of acting as a high performance refractory material with low heat ablation rate and high early mechanical strength. Such a binder would represent a significant contribution to NASA's efforts to develop a new generation of refractory 'hot face' liners for liquid or solid rocket plume environments. This project was developed as a continuation of on-going collaborations between LTU and SSC, where test sections of a formulation of high temperature geopolymer binder were cast in the floor and walls of Test Stand E-1 Cell 3, an active rocket engine test stand flame trench. Additionally, geopolymer concrete panels were tested using the NASA-SSC Diagnostic Test Facility (DTF) thruster, where supersonic plume environments were generated on a 1ft wide x 2ft long x 6 inch deep refractory panel. The DTF operates on LOX/GH2 propellants producing a nominal thrust of 1,200 lbf and the combustion chamber conditions are Pc=625psig, O/F=6.0. Data collected included high speed video of plume/panel area and surface profiles (depth) of the test panels measured on a 1-inch by 1-inch giving localized erosion rates during the test. Louisiana Tech conducted a microstructure analysis of the geopolymer binder after the testing program to identify phase changes in the material.

Allgood, Daniel C.; Montes, Carlos; Islam, Rashedul; Allouche, Erez

2014-01-01

358

Sulfur plumes off Namibia  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Sulfur plumes rising up from the bottom of the ocean floor produce colorful swirls in the waters off the coast of Namibia in southern Africa. The plumes come from the breakdown of marine plant matter by anaerobic bacteria that do not need oxygen to live. This image was acquired by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Terra satellite on April 24, 2002 Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

2002-01-01

359

Electrification of volcanic plumes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Volcanic lightning, perhaps the most spectacular consequence of the electrification of volcanic plumes, has been implicated in the origin of life on Earth, and may also exist in other planetary atmospheres. Recent years have seen volcanic lightning detection used as part of a portfolio of developing techniques to monitor volcanic eruptions. Remote sensing measurement techniques have been used to monitor volcanic lightning, but surface observations of the atmospheric electric Potential Gradient (PG) and the charge carried on volcanic ash also show that many volcanic plumes, whilst not sufficiently electrified to produce lightning, have detectable electrification exceeding that of their surrounding environment. Electrification has only been observed associated with ash-rich explosive plumes, but there is little evidence that the composition of the ash is critical to its occurrence. Different conceptual theories for charge generation and separation in volcanic plumes have been developed to explain the disparate observations obtained, but the ash fragmentation mechanism appears to be a key parameter. It is unclear which mechanisms or combinations of electrification mechanisms dominate in different circumstances. Electrostatic forces play an important role in modulating the dry fall-out of ash from a volcanic plume. Beyond the local electrification of plumes, the higher stratospheric particle concentrations following a large explosive eruption may affect the global atmospheric electrical circuit. It is possible that this might present another, if minor, way by which large volcanic eruptions affect global climate. The direct hazard of volcanic lightning to communities is generally low compared to other aspects of volcanic activity.

Mather, T. A.; Harrison, R. G.

2006-07-01

360

Titan Plumes Revisited  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

At the time of the Voyager 1 close encounter with Titan, enhancements of density and sharp decreases of electron temperature were observed by the PLS instrument. A few smaller plumes were identified inside and outside Titan orbit and their displacements correlated with variations in solar wind dynamic pressure observed by Voyager PLS one and two corotation periods earlier. At the time, two conflicting interpretations of this phenomenon were proposed. In one interpretation (Eviatar et al., JGR, 87, 8091, 1982, the enhancements were regarded as plumes drawn out of the ionosphere of Titan by the corotation electric field. The secondary enhancements were taken to be old plumes that had been wrapped around Saturn, had begun to decay and to merge into the magnetosphere environment. An alternative interpretation, proposed by Goertz (GRL, 1983, 10, 455), viewed them as blobs of plasmas detached by flute or Kelvin-Helmholtz instability from the central body of Saturn plasma in the inner magnetosphere. The Voyager PLS instrument was unable to make a firm composition determination which would have resolved the question. In this study, we use Cassini/CAPS data to identify plumes and blobs of plasma and classify them by source by means of composition and temperature. We find that all three types of plasma bodies, primary plumes, secondary wrapped around plumes and sloughed off blobs exist in the Titan-dominated region of the magnetosphere.

Eviatar, A.; Goldstein, R.; Young, D. T.; Arridge, C. S.; Coates, A. J.; Sittler, E. C.; Thomsen, M. F.; Wilson, R. J.

2008-12-01

361

Electrification of volcanic plumes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a review of our current understanding of the electrification of volcanic plumes on Earth and discuss the possible implications both in terms of the volcanic monitoring, early Earth evolution and planetary exploration. Volcanic lightning is perhaps the most spectacular consequence of the electrification of volcanic plumes. Recent years have seen volcanic lightning detection used as part of a portfolio of developing techniques to monitor volcanic eruptions. Remote sensing measurement techniques have been used to monitor volcanic lightning, but surface observations of the atmospheric electric Potential Gradient (PG) and the charge carried on volcanic ash also show that many volcanic plumes, whilst not sufficiently electrified to produce lightning, have detectable electrification exceeding that of their surrounding environment. Electrification has only been observed associated with ash-rich explosive plumes, but there is little evidence that the composition of the ash is critical to its occurrence. Different conceptual theories for charge generation and separation in volcanic plumes have been developed to explain the disparate observations obtained, but the ash fragmentation mechanism appears to be a key parameter. It is unclear which mechanisms or combinations of electrification mechanisms dominate in different circumstances. Electrostatic forces play an important role in modulating the dry fall-out of ash from a volcanic plume. Beyond the local electrification of plumes, the higher stratospheric particle concentrations following a large explosive eruption may affect the global atmospheric electrical circuit. It is possible that this might present another, if minor, way by which large volcanic eruptions affect global climate. Volcanic lightning has been implicated in a number of ways in the origin of life on Earth, and may also exist in other planetary atmospheres where measurements of its occurrence might give clues about the nature of volcanism on other planets. The direct hazard of volcanic lightning to communities on Earth is generally low compared to other aspects of volcanic activity.

Mather, T. A.; Harrison, R. G.

362

Laser rocket system analysis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The laser rocket systems investigated in this study were for orbital transportation using space-based, ground-based and airborne laser transmitters. The propulsion unit of these systems utilizes a continuous wave (CW) laser beam focused into a thrust chamber which initiates a plasma in the hydrogen propellant, thus heating the propellant and providing thrust through a suitably designed nozzle and expansion skirt. The specific impulse is limited only by the ability to adequately cool the thruster and the amount of laser energy entering the engine. The results of the study showed that, with advanced technology, laser rocket systems with either a space- or ground-based laser transmitter could reduce the national budget allocated to space transportation by 10 to 345 billion dollars over a 10-year life cycle when compared to advanced chemical propulsion systems (LO2-LH2) of equal capability. The variation in savings depends upon the projected mission model.

Jones, W. S.; Forsyth, J. B.; Skratt, J. P.

1979-01-01

363

Advanced rocket propulsion  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Existing NASA research contracts are supporting development of advanced reinforced polymer and metal matrix composites for use in liquid rocket engines of the future. Advanced rocket propulsion concepts, such as modular platelet engines, dual-fuel dual-expander engines, and variable mixture ratio engines, require advanced materials and structures to reduce overall vehicle weight as well as address specific propulsion system problems related to elevated operating temperatures, new engine components, and unique operating processes. High performance propulsion systems with improved manufacturability and maintainability are needed for single stage to orbit vehicles and other high performance mission applications. One way to satisfy these needs is to develop a small engine which can be clustered in modules to provide required levels of total thrust. This approach should reduce development schedule and cost requirements by lowering hardware lead times and permitting the use of existing test facilities. Modular engines should also reduce operational costs associated with maintenance and parts inventories.

Obrien, Charles J.

1993-02-01

364

Meteorological Rocket Network Archives  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Meteorological Rocket Network (MRN) has provided synoptic observation of middle atmospheric (25-60 km) wind and temperature structure for more than two decades since its initiation in 1959. More than 35,000 small meteorological rockets have been deployed into the stratospheric circulation (SC) from more than 30 stations scattered over the earth, with current accumulation rates of roughly 1000 soundings per year. Archives of this MRN development have been assembled at the University of Texas at El Paso, and this permanent repository for past and future MRN data and artifacts will be dedicated on February 2, 1982. All atmospheric scientists are welcome to contribute to, take part in dedication of, and make use of all information contained in these archives.

Webb, Willis L.

365

Hybrid rocket performance  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A hybrid rocket is a system consisting of a solid fuel grain and a gaseous or liquid oxidizer. Figure 1 shows three popular hybrid propulsion cycles that are under current consideration. NASA MSFC has teamed with industry to test two hybrid propulsion systems that will allow scaling to motors of potential interest for Titan and Atlas systems, as well as encompassing the range of interest for SEI lunar ascent stages and National Launch System Cargo Transfer Vehicle (NLS CTV) and NLS deorbit systems. Hybrid systems also offer advantages as moderate-cost, environmentally acceptable propulsion system. The objective of this work was to recommend a performance prediction methodology for hybrid rocket motors. The scope included completion of: a literature review, a general methodology, and a simplified performance model.

Frederick, Robert A., Jr.

1992-01-01

366

Rocket launch probability  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This applet can be used to observe how probability of outcomes for a multistage event determines the final result. The applet simulates the launch of a three-stage rocket that requires all three stages to pass tests before takeoff. The student can vary the probability of passing at each stage from 0 to 100 percent. The applet reports the overall success rate as a percent and the cumulative number of successful and failed launches. Copyright 2005 Eisenhower National Clearinghouse

Exner, Nicholas

1999-01-01

367

Microfabricated Liquid Rocket Motors  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Under NASA Glenn Research Center sponsorship, MIT has developed the concept of micromachined, bipropellant, liquid rocket engines. This is potentially a breakthrough technology changing the cost-performance tradeoffs for small propulsion systems, enabling new applications, and redefining the meaning of the term low-cost-access-to-space. With this NASA support, a liquid-cooled, gaseous propellant version of the thrust chamber and nozzle was designed, built, and tested as a first step. DARPA is currently funding MIT to demonstrate turbopumps and controls. The work performed herein was the second year of a proposed three-year effort to develop the technology and demonstrate very high power density, regeneratively cooled, liquid bipropellant rocket engine thrust chamber and nozzles. When combined with the DARPA turbopumps and controls, this work would enable the design and demonstration of a complete rocket propulsion system. The original MIT-NASA concept used liquid oxygen-ethanol propellants. The military applications important to DARPA imply that storable liquid propellants are needed. Thus, MIT examined various storable propellant combinations including N2O4 and hydrazine, and H2O2 and various hydrocarbons. The latter are preferred since they do not have the toxicity of N2O4 and hydrazine. In reflection of the newfound interest in H2O2, it is once again in production and available commercially. A critical issue for the microrocket engine concept is cooling of the walls in a regenerative design. This is even more important at microscale than for large engines due to cube-square scaling considerations. Furthermore, the coolant behavior of rocket propellants has not been characterized at microscale. Therefore, MIT designed and constructed an apparatus expressly for this purpose. The report details measurements of two candidate microrocket fuels, JP-7 and JP-10.

Epstein, Alan H.; Joppin, C.; Kerrebrock, J. L.; Schneider, Steven J. (Technical Monitor)

2003-01-01

368

EPDM rocket motor insulation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A novel and improved EPDM formulation for a solid propellant rocket motor is described wherein hexadiene EPDM monomer components are replaced by alkylidene norbornene components, and, with appropriate adjustment of curing and other additives, functionally required rheological and physical characteristics are achieved with the desired compatibility with any one of a plurality of solid filler materials, e.g., powder silica, carbon fibers or aramid fibers, and with appropriate adhesion and extended storage or shelf-life characteristics.

Guillot, David G. (Inventor); Harvey, Albert R. (Inventor)

2008-01-01

369

EPDM rocket motor insulation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A novel and improved EPDM formulation for a solid propellant rocket motor is described wherein hexadiene EPDM monomer components are replaced by alkylidene norbornene components and with appropriate adjustment of curing and other additives functionally-required rheological and physical characteristics are achieved with the desired compatibility with any one of a plurality of solid filler materials, e.g. powder silica, carbon fibers or aramid fibers, and with appropriate adhesion and extended storage or shelf life characteristics.

Guillot, David G. (Inventor); Harvey, Albert R. (Inventor)

2003-01-01

370

EPDM rocket motor insulation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A novel and improved EPDM formulation for a solid propellant rocket motor is described wherein hexadiene EPDM monomer components are replaced by alkylidene norbornene components, and, with appropriate adjustment of curing and other additives, functionally required rheological and physical characteristics are achieved with the desired compatibility with any one of a plurality of solid filler materials, e.g., powder silica, carbon fibers or aramid fibers, and with appropriate adhesion and extended storage or shelf-life characteristics.

Guillot, David G. (Inventor); Harvey, Albert R. (Inventor)

2004-01-01

371

Photothermal Laser Deflection, an Innovative Technique to Measure Particles in Exhausts.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Photothermal Laser Deflection (PLD) is an analytical technique to measure in real-time the mass concentration of particles and gaseous exhaust pollutants in a variety of combustion devices (e.g., gas turbine engines and rockets). PLD uses a pump laser to ...

C. F. Hess

1993-01-01

372

Simulation of low-density nozzle plumes in non-zero ambient pressures  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The direct simulation Monte-Carlo (DSMC) method was applied to the analysis of low-density nitrogen plumes exhausting from a small converging-diverging nozzle into finite ambient pressures. Two cases were considered that simulated actual test conditions in a vacuum facility. The numerical simulations readily captured the complicated flow structure of the overexpanded plumes adjusting to the finite ambient pressures, including Mach disks and barrel shaped shocks. The numerical simulations compared well to experimental data of Rothe.

Chung, Chan-Hong; Dewitt, Kenneth J.; Stubbs, Robert M.; Penko, Paul F.

1994-01-01

373

Cylindrical Langmuir probe measurements in an ion thruster plume  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary form only given. Cylindrical Langmuir probe measurements have been made in the exhaust plume of a 15 cm diameter three-grid ion thruster. Xenon gas was used as a propellant. The experiments were performed in a large vacuum chamber with background pressure values of 2×10-4 Torr and 3×10-6 Torr. A 250 um diameter tungsten probe 2.78 mm long was used

V. V. Semak; D. Keefer

1995-01-01

374

Martian Atmospheric Plumes: Behavior, Detectability and Plume Tracing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We will present our recent work simulating neutrally buoyant plumes in the martian atmosphere. This work is primarily directed at understanding the behavior of discrete plumes of biogenic tracer gases, and thus increasing our understanding of their detectability (both from orbit and from in situ measurements), and finally how to use the plumes to identify their precise source locations. We have modeled the detailed behavior of martian atmospheric plumes using MarsWRF for the atmospheric dynamics and SCIPUFF (a terrestrial state of the art plume modeling code that we have modified to represent martian conditions) for the plume dynamics. This combination of tools allows us to accurately simulate plumes not only from a regional scale from which an orbital observing platform would witness the plume, but also from an in situ perspective, with the instantaneous concentration variations that a turbulent flow would present to a point sampler in situ instrument. Our initial work has focused on the detectability of discrete plumes from an orbital perspective and we will present those results for a variety of notional orbital trace gas detection instruments. We have also begun simulating the behavior of the plumes from the perspective of a sampler on a rover within the martian atmospheric boundary layer. The detectability of plumes within the boundary layer has a very strong dependence on the atmospheric stability, with plume concentrations increasing by a factor of 10-1000 during nighttime when compared to daytime. In the equatorial regions of the planet where we have simulated plumes, the diurnal tidal “clocking” of the winds is strongly evident in the plume trail, which similarly “clocks” around its source. This behavior, combined with the strong diurnal concentration variations suggests that a rover hunting a plume source would be well suited to approach it from a particular azimuth (downwind at night) to maximize detectability of the plume and the ability to trace the plume to its precise source.

Banfield, Don; Mischna, M.; Sykes, R.; Dissly, R.

2013-10-01

375

Magellan Aerodynamic Characteristics During the Termination Experiment Including Thruster Plume-Free Stream Interaction  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Results are presented on the aerodynamic characteristics of the Magellan spacecraft during the October 1994 Termination Experiment, including the effects of the thruster engine exhaust plumes upon the molecular free stream around the spacecraft and upon the aerodynamics coefficients. As Magellan passed through the Venusian atmosphere, the solar arrays were turned in opposite directions relative to the free stream creating a torque on the spacecraft. The spacecraft control system was programmed to counter the effects of this torque with attitude control engines to maintain an inertially fixed attitude. The orientation and reaction engine telemetry returned from Magellan are used to create a model of the aerodynamic torques. Geometric models of the Magellan spacecraft are analyzed with the aid of both free molecular and Direct Simulation Monte Carlo codes. The simulated aerodynamic torques determined are compared to the measured torques. The Direct Simulation Monte Carlo method is also used to model the attitude engine exhaust plumes, the free stream disturbance caused by these plumes, and the resulting torques acting on the spacecraft compared to no-exhaust plume cases. The effect of the exhaust plumes was found to be sufficiently large that thrust reversal is possible.

Cestero, Francisco J.; Tolson, Robert H.

1998-01-01

376

Dual-fuel, dual-mode rocket engine  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The invention relates to a dual fuel, dual mode rocket engine designed to improve the performance of earth-to-orbit vehicles. For any vehicle that operates from the earth's surface to earth orbit, it is advantageous to use two different fuels during its ascent. A high density impulse fuel, such as kerosene, is most efficient during the first half of the trajectory. A high specific impulse fuel, such as hydrogen, is most efficient during the second half of the trajectory. The invention allows both fuels to be used with a single rocket engine. It does so by adding a minimum number of state-of-the-art components to baseline single made rocket engines, and is therefore relatively easy to develop for near term applications. The novelty of this invention resides in the mixing of fuels before exhaust nozzle cooling. This allows all of the engine fuel to cool the exhaust nozzle, and allows the ratio of fuels used throughout the flight depend solely on performance requirements, not cooling requirements.

Martin, James A. (inventor)

1989-01-01

377

Liquid Rocket Engine Testing Overview  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Contents include the following: Objectives and motivation for testing. Technology, Research and Development Test and Evaluation (RDT&E), evolutionary. Representative Liquid Rocket Engine (LRE) test compaigns. Apollo, shuttle, Expandable Launch Vehicles (ELV) propulsion. Overview of test facilities for liquid rocket engines. Boost, upper stage (sea-level and altitude). Statistics (historical) of Liquid Rocket Engine Testing. LOX/LH, LOX/RP, other development. Test project enablers: engineering tools, operations, processes, infrastructure.

Rahman, Shamim

2005-01-01

378

Contamination control and plume assessment of low-energy thrusters  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Potential contamination of a spacecraft cryogenic surface by a xenon (Xe) ion generator was evaluated. The analysis involves the description of the plume exhausted from the generator with its relative component fluxes on the spacecraft surfaces, and verification of the conditions for condensation, adsorption, and sputtering at those locations. The data describing the plume fluxes and their effects on surfaces were obtained from two sources: the tests carried out with the Xe generator in a small vacuum chamber to indicate deposits and sputter on monitor slides; and the extensive tests with a mercury (Hg) ion thruster in a large vacuum chamber. The Hg thruster tests provided data on the neutrals, on low-energy ion fluxes, on high-energy ion fluxes, and on sputtered materials at several locations within the plume.

Scialdone, John J.

1993-05-01

379

Contamination control and plume assessment of low-energy thrusters  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Potential contamination of a spacecraft cryogenic surface by a xenon (Xe) ion generator was evaluated. The analysis involves the description of the plume exhausted from the generator with its relative component fluxes on the spacecraft surfaces, and verification of the conditions for condensation, adsorption, and sputtering at those locations. The data describing the plume fluxes and their effects on surfaces were obtained from two sources: the tests carried out with the Xe generator in a small vacuum chamber to indicate deposits and sputter on monitor slides; and the extensive tests with a mercury (Hg) ion thruster in a large vacuum chamber. The Hg thruster tests provided data on the neutrals, on low-energy ion fluxes, on high-energy ion fluxes, and on sputtered materials at several locations within the plume.

Scialdone, John J.

1993-01-01

380

ISS Update: VASIMR Plasma Rocket  

NASA Video Gallery

NASA Public Affairs Officer Dan Huot interviews Ken Bollweg, VASIMR Project Manager, about VASIMR (Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket), recent testing progress and future applications. ...

381

German scientific sounding rocket program  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The German scientific sounding rocket program covers four disciplines: astronomy, aeronomy, magnetosphere, material science. In each of these disciplines there are ongoing projects (e.g., INTERZODIAK, STRAFAM, MAP-WINE, CAESAR, TEXUS). The scientific and technical aspects of these projects will be described. Emphasis will be given to some late technical achievements of DFVLR's Mobile Rocket Base (MORABA) giving support to most of the rocket campaigns. DFVLR-PT is authorized to act as management agency in order to perform and to coordinate German space activities of which the sounding rocket program forms a small part. A brief description of the organization will be given.

Roehrig, O.

382

Exhaust gas recirculator  

SciTech Connect

An exhaust gas recirculator for an internal combustion engine having an exhaust pipe, an intake manifold and a carburetor throttle valve. The exhaust gas recirculator comprises an egr passage which makes the exhaust pipe communicate with the intake manifold, an egr controlling valve and an egr valve respectively arranged in the upper and lower portions of the egr passage. The egr valve operates in association with the carburetor throttle valve for metering the flow of egr gas. The egr controlling valve is separated by a diaphragm into an egr gas chamber communicating with the egr passage between the egr controlling valve and the egr valve and a negative pressure chamber communicating with the intake manifold. The negative pressure chamber contains a compression spring, and the diaphragm is connected with a valve member through a rod upon which is disposed a stopper to serve as a different seal in place of the valve member to close off the exhaust gas passage, which valve member and stopper are constructed to be opened and closed by pressure difference between the egr gas chamber and the negative pressure chamber and by elastic force of the compression spring. The egr controlling valve functions to control the pressure difference around the egr valve to be constant.

Suda, K.

1983-01-04

383

Optimum rocket propulsion for energy-limited transfer  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In order to effect large-scale return of extraterrestrial resources to Earth orbit, it is desirable to optimize the propulsion system to maximize the mass of payload returned per unit energy expended. This optimization problem is different from the conventional rocket propulsion optimization. A rocket propulsion system consists of an energy source plus reaction mass. In a conventional chemical rocket, the energy source and the reaction mass are the same. For the transportation system required, however, the best system performance is achieved if the reaction mass used is from a locally available source. In general, the energy source and the reaction mass will be separate. One such rocket system is the nuclear thermal rocket, in which the energy source is a reactor and the reaction mass a fluid which is heated by the reactor and exhausted. Another energy-limited rocket system is the hydrogen/oxygen rocket where H2/O2 fuel is produced by electrolysis of water using a solar array or a nuclear reactor. The problem is to choose the optimum specific impulse (or equivalently exhaust velocity) to minimize the amount of energy required to produce a given mission delta-v in the payload. The somewhat surprising result is that the optimum specific impulse is not the maximum possible value, but is proportional to the mission delta-v. In general terms, at the beginning of the mission it is optimum to use a very low specific impulse and expend a lot of reaction mass, since this is the most energy efficient way to transfer momentum. However, as the mission progresses, it becomes important to minimize the amount of reaction mass expelled, since energy is wasted moving the reaction mass. Thus, the optimum specific impulse will increase with the mission delta-v. Optimum I(sub sp) is derived for maximum payload return per energy expended for both the case of fixed and variable I(sub sp) engines. Sample missions analyzed include return of water payloads from the moons of Mars and of Saturn.

Zuppero, Anthony; Landis, Geoffrey A.

1991-01-01

384

Mixing in plume conduits  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The radial model of plume conduits (Hauri et al., 1996; Bryce et al., 2005) predicts that vertical concentric sheaths of variable compositions control the geochemical properties of volcanoes overriding hotspots. A variant of this model was proposed by Eisele et al. (2003) and Abouchami et al. (2005), who described a plume conduit as composed of long filaments representing heterogeneities present in the lower mantle and sheared during upwelling by radial velocity gradients. These two groups of models share their emphasis on the dominantly lateral character of heterogeneities. Blichert-Toft et al. (2003) pointed out that the vertical component of heterogeneities should not be neglected and considered an alternative extreme model of plug flow. Here we re-examine the basic physics of flow and show that vertical heterogeneity `trains' should be dominant. We first consider an axi-symmetric plume with homogeneous rheological properties assuming that temperature is decreasing and therefore viscosity increasing radially outwards. The physics of the flow in such a plume was described by Olson et al. (1993) and its geometry is known as poloidal. In the core of the conduit, the flow rate is maximum (high temperature, high buoyancy, low viscosity) and the rate of shear is minimum (the velocity gradient vanishes in the center), and therefore the vertical stretching of heterogeneities is minimal. Because of the temperature-dependent viscosity, the flow rate drops rapidly at some distance from the core: this is where the velocity gradient is maximum. Along this apparent discontinuity, the rate of shear is maximum, but the flow rate is much smaller than in the core. The trade-off between shear and flow rate requires that plume flow is dominated by the core of the conduit, which transports deep-seated heterogeneities with little shear, whereas the sheared, geochemically heterogeneous outer layers lag behind. We then considered the effect of objects in the plume conduit with different rheologies such as bodies of pyroxenite. Hard nuggets add a strong toroidal component to the velocity field because the flow lines wrap around the petrological obstacles. Such a component is known to be critical to mixing behavior. The nuggets also enhance flow instabilities because viscous drag exerts a lift effect on heterogeneities, which then wobble in the flow field. However paradoxical, the petrological heterogeneity of the plume source promotes vigorous mixing within the plume conduit, which is consistent with the long-term isotopic homogeneity observed in Hawaiian volcanoes at the shield stage. We thus reiterate Blichert-Toft et al.'s (2003) statement that long-wavelength vertical heterogeneity trains dominate the geochemical variability of hotspot volcanoes.

Bichert-Toft, J.; Albarede, F.

2006-12-01

385

Io Pele plume  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Voyager 1 took this narrow-angle camera image on 5 March 1979 from a distance of 450,000 kilometers. At this geometry, the camera looks straight down through a volcanic plume at one of Io's most active volcanos, Pele. The large heart-shaped feature is the region where Pele's plume falls to the surface. At the center of the 'heart' is the small dark fissure that is the source of the eruption. The Voyager Project is managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for NASA's Office of Space Science.

2000-01-01

386

Diesel engine exhaust emissions  

SciTech Connect

According to the results of tests carried out on monorail diesel engines in the Federal Republic of Germany, nitrogen oxides, rather than carbon monoxide, are the most dangerous components of exhaust emissions, and require larger volumes of air to dilute them. The harmful gas concentrations which are measured and the maximum permissible concentrations of the gases exhausted by diesel engines determine the necessary amounts of air by which the fumes are diluted. Opinions on maximum permissible values, especially in the case of nitrogen oxides, and the methods used for determining the amount of air necessary for dilution, vary from country to country. In general, though, only diesel engines which produce extremely small amounts of harmful gases should be used underground. If a diesel engine draws in air containing methane, the concentration of harmful gases emitted in the exhaust fumes varies according to methane content, engine speed, and engine load.

Not Available

1980-01-01

387

Navier-Stokes analysis of helicopter plume flowfield for infrared calculations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The flowfield of the exhaust plume of a helicopter in hover mode was simulated using VSAERO, a potential panel code, to obtain boundary condition and rotor downwash, and Full Navier-Stokes code to obtain plume-flow parameters (velocity, pressure, temperature, and species). A 3D interpolation code was developed to transform the computed data into a Cartesian grid for input to a 3D plume radiation code. Results of this analysis are presented in terms of contours of flow parameters in several 3D planes.

Saheli, Fari; Pitts, Julie

1992-02-01

388

Exhaust gas recirculation system  

SciTech Connect

An engine exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system is provided in which a sonic flow EGR valve is moved to open positions to establish a different constant rate of flow at each open position of the EGR valve in response to air pressure acting on a servo means secured to the valve, the air pressure force being controlled by changes in a control vacuum opposing the air pressure force and modified by an air bleed device as a function of changes in engine exhaust gas backpressure levels, to provide an EGR valve movement that varies essentially in proportion to changes in engine air flow.

Rachedi, S.H.

1983-08-30

389

Catalytic Microtube Rocket Igniter  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Devices that generate both high energy and high temperature are required to ignite reliably the propellant mixtures in combustion chambers like those present in rockets and other combustion systems. This catalytic microtube rocket igniter generates these conditions with a small, catalysis-based torch. While traditional spark plug systems can require anywhere from 50 W to multiple kW of power in different applications, this system has demonstrated ignition at less than 25 W. Reactants are fed to the igniter from the same tanks that feed the reactants to the rest of the rocket or combustion system. While this specific igniter was originally designed for liquid methane and liquid oxygen rockets, it can be easily operated with gaseous propellants or modified for hydrogen use in commercial combustion devices. For the present cryogenic propellant rocket case, the main propellant tanks liquid oxygen and liquid methane, respectively are regulated and split into different systems for the individual stages of the rocket and igniter. As the catalyst requires a gas phase for reaction, either the stored boil-off of the tanks can be used directly or one stream each of fuel and oxidizer can go through a heat exchanger/vaporizer that turns the liquid propellants into a gaseous form. For commercial applications, where the reactants are stored as gases, the system is simplified. The resulting gas-phase streams of fuel and oxidizer are then further divided for the individual components of the igniter. One stream each of the fuel and oxidizer is introduced to a mixing bottle/apparatus where they are mixed to a fuel-rich composition with an O/F mass-based mixture ratio of under 1.0. This premixed flow then feeds into the catalytic microtube device. The total flow is on the order of 0.01 g/s. The microtube device is composed of a pair of sub-millimeter diameter platinum tubes connected only at the outlet so that the two outlet flows are parallel to each other. The tubes are each approximately 10 cm long and are heated via direct electric resistive heating. This heating brings the gasses to their minimum required ignition temperature, which is lower than the auto-thermal ignition temperature, and causes the onset of both surface and gas phase ignition producing hot temperatures and a highly reacting flame. The combustion products from the catalytic tubes, which are below the melting point of platinum, are injected into the center of another combustion stage, called the primary augmenter. The reactants for this combustion stage come from the same source but the flows of non-premixed methane and oxygen gas are split off to a secondary mixing apparatus and can be mixed in a near-stoichiometric to highly lean mixture ratio. The primary augmenter is a component that has channels venting this mixed gas to impinge on each other in the center of the augmenter, perpendicular to the flow from the catalyst. The total crosssectional area of these channels is on a similar order as that of the catalyst. The augmenter has internal channels that act as a manifold to distribute equally the gas to the inward-venting channels. This stage creates a stable flame kernel as its flows, which are on the order of 0.01 g/s, are ignited by the combustion products of the catalyst. This stage is designed to produce combustion products in the flame kernel that exceed the autothermal ignition temperature of oxygen and methane.

Schneider, Steven J.; Deans, Matthew C.

2011-01-01

390

Atmospheric diffusion predictions for the exhaust effluents from the launch of a Titan 3C, December 13, 1973  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Results for the predictions with the NASA/MSFC Multilayer Diffusion Model for the dispersive transport of the Titan 3C rocket exhaust effluents for the 1857 EST launch on December 13, 1973, from the Eastern Test Range at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station are presented. An atmospheric assessment is made in support of the joint Marshall Space Flight Center, Langley Research Center, and Kennedy Space Center rocket exhaust prediction and measurement program. The predictions are primarily intended to define a monitoring grid and for a postflight assessment of the field measurements in order to improve diffusion prediction techniques.

Stephens, J. B. (editor)

1974-01-01

391

Rocket + Science = Dialogue  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

It's a cliche that rocket engineers and space scientists don t see eye-to-eye. That goes double for rocket engineers working on human spaceflight and scientists working on space telescopes and planetary probes. They work fundamentally different problems but often feel that they are competing for the same pot of money. Put the two groups together for a weekend, and the results could be unscientific or perhaps combustible. Fortunately, that wasn't the case when NASA put heavy lift launch vehicle designers together with astronomers and planetary scientists for two weekend workshops in 2008. The goal was to bring the top people from both groups together to see how the mass and volume capabilities of NASA's Ares V heavy lift launch vehicle could benefit the science community. Ares V is part of NASA's Constellation Program for resuming human exploration beyond low Earth orbit, starting with missions to the Moon. In the current mission scenario, Ares V launches a lunar lander into Earth orbit. A smaller Ares I rocket launches the Orion crew vehicle with up to four astronauts. Orion docks with the lander, attached to the Ares V Earth departure stage. The stage fires its engine to send the mated spacecraft to the Moon. Standing 360 feet high and weighing 7.4 million pounds, NASA's new heavy lifter will be bigger than the 1960s-era Saturn V. It can launch almost 60 percent more payload to translunar insertion together with the Ares I and 35 percent more mass to low Earth orbit than the Saturn V. This super-sized capability is, in short, designed to send more people to more places to do more things than the six Apollo missions.

Morris,Bruce; Sullivan, Greg; Burkey, Martin

2010-01-01

392

High Density Liquid Rocket Boosters for the Space Shuttle  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The use of high density hydrogen peroxide/kerosene liquid rocket boosters (LRB) for the Space Shuttle is investigated as a replacement for the existing solid rocket boosters (SRB). It is shown that hydrogen peroxide/kerosene outperforms both solids, LOX/Kero, and LOX/LH2 as a general booster propellant due to its high density and moderate exhaust speed. With the same propellant mass and size as that of the current SRB's, computer simulations indicate that payload mass can be increased by a third from 24,950 kg to 33,140 kg for a 28.45°, 203.7 km circular orbit. Recovery of the boosters is performed at sea.

Pietrobon, S. S.

393

General purpose rocket furnace  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A multipurpose furnace for space vehicles used for material processing experiments in an outer space environment is described. The furnace contains three separate cavities designed to process samples of the widest possible range of materials and thermal requirements. Each cavity contains three heating elements capable of independent function under the direction of an automatic and programmable control system. A heat removable mechanism is also provided for each cavity which operates in conjunction with the control system for establishing an isothermally heated cavity or a wide range of thermal gradients and cool down rates. A monitoring system compatible with the rocket telemetry provides furnace performance and sample growth rate data throughout the processing cycle.

Aldrich, B. R.; Whitt, W. D. (inventors)

1979-01-01

394

Rocket Noise Prediction Program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A comprehensive, automated, and user-friendly software program was developed to predict the noise and ignition over-pressure environment generated during the launch of a rocket. The software allows for interactive modification of various parameters affecting the generated noise environment. Predictions can be made for different launch scenarios and a variety of vehicle and launch mount configurations. Moreover, predictions can be made for both near-field and far-field locations on the ground and any position on the vehicle. Multiple engine and fuel combinations can be addressed, and duct geometry can be incorporated efficiently. Applications in structural design are addressed.

Margasahayam, Ravi; Caimi, Raoul

1999-01-01

395

SlideRocket  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

As this is a New Year, there will be a need for new presentations. SlideRocket makes pesky presentation troubles go away, as you can access PowerPoint presentations from any locations, collaborate with colleagues around the world, and also integrate dynamic data, charts, and graphs quite seamlessly. Some of the more advanced features are only available via the pay versions of the product, but the free version is easy and engaging. This version is compatible with all operating systems, including Linux.

396

PLUME and research sotware  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The PLUME open platform (https://www.projet-plume.org) has as first goal to share competences and to value the knowledge of software experts within the French higher education and research communities. The project proposes in its platform the access to more than 380 index cards describing useful and economic software for this community, with open access to everybody. The second goal of PLUME focuses on to improve the visibility of software produced by research laboratories within the higher education and research communities. The "development-ESR" index cards briefly describe the main features of the software, including references to research publications associated to it. The platform counts more than 300 cards describing research software, where 89 cards have an English version. In this talk we describe the theme classification and the taxonomy of the index cards and the evolution with new themes added to the project. We will also focus on the organisation of PLUME as an open project and its interests in the promotion of free/open source software from and for research, contributing to the creation of a community of shared knowledge.

Baudin, Veronique; Gomez-Diaz, Teresa

2013-04-01

397

Enceladus' Water Vapour Plumes  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A viewgraph presentation on the discovery of Enceladus water vapor plumes is shown. Conservative modeling of this water vapor is also presented and also shows that Enceladus is the source of most of the water required to supply the neutrals in Saturn's system and resupply the E-ring against losses.

Hansen, Candice J.; Esposito, L.; Colwell, J.; Hendrix, A.; Matson, Dennis; Parkinson, C.; Pryor, W.; Shemansky, D.; Stewart, I.; Tew, J.; Yung, Y.

2006-01-01

398

Evaluation of Visible Plumes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Developed for presentation at the 12th Conference on Methods in Air Pollution and Industrial Hygiene Studies, University of Southern California, April, 1971, this outline discusses plumes with contaminants that are visible to the naked eye. Information covers: (1) history of air pollution control regulations, (2) need for methods of evaluating…

Brennan, Thomas

399

Double Diffusive Plumes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Sour gas flares attempt to dispose of deadly H2S gas through combustion. What does not burn rises as a buoyant plume. But the gas is heavier than air at room temperature, so as the rising gas cools eventually it becomes negatively buoyant and descends back to the ground. Ultimately, our intent is to predict the concentrations of the gas at ground level in realistic atmospheric conditions. As a first step towards this goal we have performed laboratory experiments examining the structure of a steady state plume of hot and salty water that rises buoyantly near the source and descends as a fountain after it has cooled sufficiently. We call this a double-diffusive plume because its evolution is dictated by the different (turbulent) diffusivities of heat and salt. A temperature and conductivity probe measures both the salinity and temperature along the centreline of the plume. The supposed axisymmetric structure of the salinity concentration as it changes with height is determined by light-attenuation methods. To help interpret the results, a theory has been successfully adapted from the work of Bloomfield and Kerr (2000), who developed coupled equations describing the structure of fountains. Introducing a new empirical parameter for the relative rates of turbulent heat and salt diffusion, the predictions are found to agree favourably with experimental results.

Sutherland, Bruce; Lee, Brace

2008-11-01

400

COLD WEATHER PLUME STUDY  

EPA Science Inventory

While many studies of power plant plume transport and transformation have been performed during the summer, few studies of these processes during the winter have been carried out. Accordingly, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Electric Power Research Institute join...

401

Otrag rocket experiments in Africa  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

West German rocket manufacturers are testing their products in Zaire. Hundreds of pipes (12 m x 80 cm) are bundled together inside the test missiles, which are fired into Zaire's prairie. The reactions of neighboring nations, as well as leading countries of the world, are presented concerning the rocket tests.

1978-01-01

402

Air-Breathing Rocket Engines  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This photograph depicts an air-breathing rocket engine prototype in the test bay at the General Applied Science Lab facility in Ronkonkoma, New York. Air-breathing engines, known as rocket based, combined-cycle engines, get their initial take-off power from specially designed rockets, called air-augmented rockets, that boost performance about 15 percent over conventional rockets. When the vehicle's velocity reaches twice the speed of sound, the rockets are turned off and the engine relies totally on oxygen in the atmosphere to burn hydrogen fuel, as opposed to a rocket that must carry its own oxygen, thus reducing weight and flight costs. Once the vehicle has accelerated to about 10 times the speed of sound, the engine converts to a conventional rocket-powered system to propel the craft into orbit or sustain it to suborbital flight speed. NASA's Advanced Space Transportation Program at Marshall Space Flight Center, along with several industry partners and collegiate forces, is developing this technology to make space transportation affordable for everyone from business travelers to tourists. The goal is to reduce launch costs from today's price tag of $10,000 per pound to only hundreds of dollars per pound. NASA's series of hypersonic flight demonstrators currently include three air-breathing vehicles: the X-43A, X-43B and X-43C.

1998-01-01

403

Miniature solid propellant rocket motor.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A miniature solid-propellant rocket motor has been developed to impart a specific motion to an object deployed in space. This rocket motor effectively eliminated the need for a cold-gas thruster system or mechanical spin-up system. A low-energy igniter, a...

M. C. Grubelich M. Hagan E. Mulligan

1997-01-01

404

Constant Thrust Hybrid Rocket Motor.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The constant thrust hybrid rocket motor of this invention is capable of providing operation for at least 50 seconds over a wide temperature range and with minimal variation in chamber pressure. The constant thrust hybrid rocket motor of this invention inc...

A. L. Holzman

1981-01-01

405

German scientific sounding rocket program  

Microsoft Academic Search

The German scientific sounding rocket program covers four disciplines: astronomy, aeronomy, magnetosphere, material science. In each of these disciplines there are ongoing projects (e.g., INTERZODIAK, STRAFAM, MAP-WINE, CAESAR, TEXUS). The scientific and technical aspects of these projects will be described. Emphasis will be given to some late technical achievements of DFVLR's Mobile Rocket Base (MORABA) giving support to most of

O. Roehrig

1982-01-01

406

Handheld Water Bottle Rocket & Launcher  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, learners build handheld rockets and launchers out of PVC pipes and plastic bottles. Use this activity to demonstrate acceleration, air pressure, and Newton's Laws of Motion. Note: a PVC cutter, side cutters, PVC cement glue and other tools are required to build this project. Safety note: These rockets should only be launched in large, open, outdoor areas.

Workshop, Fresno C.

2012-01-01

407

Determination of alloy content from plume spectral measurements  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The mathematical derivation for a method to determine the identities and amounts of alloys present in a flame where numerous alloys may be present is described. This method is applicable if the total number of elemental species from all alloys that may be in the flame is greater than or equal to the total number of alloys. Arranging the atomic spectral line emission equations for the elemental species as a series of simultaneous equations enables solution for identity and amount of the alloy present in the flame. This technique is intended for identification and quantification of alloy content in the plume of a rocket engine. Spectroscopic measurements reveal the atomic species entrained in the plume. Identification of eroding alloys may lead to the identification of the eroding component.

Madzsar, George C.

1991-01-01

408

Reusable sounding-rocket design  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As a result of the reduction of budgets for flights, the ideas of reusability and cost-effectiveness in launch vehicles are becoming more and more important. One class of rockets, in particular the sounding rockets operating in a less demanding environment, has many potentials for many more flights. By augmenting the basic rocket configuration with wings, landing gear, flight controls and guidance systems, the vehicle can be made to glide and land back at the launch site or at a specific recovery site. In this paper, the design of such a reusable rocket is presented. This design can be extended and adapted to larger vehicles, thus attaining higher altitudes required in some of the applications of sounding rockets.

Woo, Dick L. Y.; Martin, James A.

1995-03-01

409

An experimental investigation of an arcjet thruster exhaust using Langmuir probes. M.S. Thesis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Electrostatic (Langmuir) probes of both spherical and cylindrical geometry have been used to obtain electron number density and temperature in the exhaust of a laboratory arcjet. The arcjet thruster operated on nitrogen and hydrogen mixtures to simulate fully decomposed hydrazine in a vacuum environment with background pressures less than 5 x 10 to the -2 Pa. The exhaust appears to be only slightly ionized (less than 1 percent) with local plasma potentials near facility ground. The current-voltage characteristics of the probes indicate a Maxwellian temperature distribution. Plume data are presented as a function of arcjet operating condition and also position in the exhaust.

Carney, Lynnette M.

1988-01-01

410

Rhenium Rocket Manufacturing Technology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NASA Lewis Research Center's On-Board Propulsion Branch has a research and technology program to develop high-temperature (2200 C), iridium-coated rhenium rocket chamber materials for radiation-cooled rockets in satellite propulsion systems. Although successful material demonstrations have gained much industry interest, acceptance of the technology has been hindered by a lack of demonstrated joining technologies and a sparse materials property data base. To alleviate these concerns, we fabricated rhenium to C-103 alloy joints by three methods: explosive bonding, diffusion bonding, and brazing. The joints were tested by simulating their incorporation into a structure by welding and by simulating high-temperature operation. Test results show that the shear strength of the joints degrades with welding and elevated temperature operation but that it is adequate for the application. Rhenium is known to form brittle intermetallics with a number of elements, and this phenomena is suspected to cause the strength degradation. Further bonding tests with a tantalum diffusion barrier between the rhenium and C-103 is planned to prevent the formation of brittle intermetallics.

1997-01-01

411

Mars Rocket Propulsion System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A report discusses the methane and carbon monoxide/LOX (McLOx) rocket for ascent from Mars as well as other critical space propulsion tasks. The system offers a specific impulse over 370 s roughly 50 s higher than existing space-storable bio-propellants. Current Mars in-situ propellant production (ISPP) technologies produce impure methane and carbon monoxide in various combinations. While separation and purification of methane fuel is possible, it adds complexity to the propellant production process and discards an otherwise useful fuel product. The McLOx makes such complex and wasteful processes unnecessary by burning the methane/CO mixtures produced by the Mars ISPP systems without the need for further refinement. Despite the decrease in rocket-specific impulse caused by the CO admixture, the improvement offered by concomitant increased propellant density can provide a net improvement in stage performance. One advantage is the increase of the total amount of propellant produced, but with a decrease in mass and complexity of the required ISPP plant. Methane/CO fuel mixtures also may be produced by reprocessing the organic wastes of a Moon base or a space station, making McLOx engines key for a human Lunar initiative or the International Space Station (ISS) program. Because McLOx propellant components store at a common temperature, very lightweight and compact common bulkhead tanks can be employed, improving overall stage performance further.

Zubrin, Robert; Harber, Dan; Nabors, Sammy

2008-01-01

412

The concept of a nuclear-laser rocket engine  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A concept for an hybrid nuclear-laser rocket engine is described. The use of a solar-pumped laser is proposed to resolve temperature limitations in the combustion chamber. The propulsive mass, normally heated in the active zone to 1000-2500 K, can be ultimately heated by laser energy to 20,000-30000 K, increasing the exhaust velocity of the propulsive mass. This would lead to a significant reduction in fuel mass requirement. A scenario for application of the system in Earth-Mars flight is described.

Osadchi, V. N.; Yudo, O. A.

1994-06-01

413

Facility for cold flow testing of solid rocket motor models  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new cold flow test facility was designed and constructed at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center for the purpose of characterizing the flow field in the port and nozzle of solid propellant rocket motors (SRM's). A National Advisory Committee was established to include representatives from industry, government agencies, and universities to guide the establishment of design and instrumentation requirements for the new facility. This facility design includes the basic components of air storage tanks, heater, submicron filter, quiet control valve, venturi, model inlet plenum chamber, solid rocket motor (SRM) model, exhaust diffuser, and exhaust silencer. The facility was designed to accommodate a wide range of motor types and sizes from small tactical motors to large space launch boosters. This facility has the unique capability of testing ten percent scale models of large boosters such as the new Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM), at full scale motor Reynolds numbers. Previous investigators have established the validity of studying basic features of solid rocket motor development programs include the acquisition of data to (1) directly evaluate and optimize the design configuration of the propellant grain, insulation, and nozzle; and (2) provide data for validation of the computational fluid dynamics, (CFD), analysis codes and the performance analysis codes. A facility checkout model was designed, constructed, and utilized to evaluate the performance characteristics of the new facility. This model consists of a cylindrical chamber and converging/diverging nozzle with appropriate manifolding to connect it to the facility air supply. It was designed using chamber and nozzle dimensions to simulate the flow in a 10 percent scale model of the ASRM. The checkout model was recently tested over the entire range of facility flow conditions which include flow rates from 9.07 to 145 kg/sec (20 to 320 Ibm/sec) and supply pressure from 5.17 x 10 exp 5 to 8.27 x 10 exp 6 Pa. The performance of the self-pumping exhaust diffuser was verified down to exhaust pressures of 1.379 x 10 exp 4 Pa. The facility was successfully operated over the entire range of design pressures and flowrates and is available for national use by industry and government agencies requiring facilities capable of testing SRM cold flow models to support development programs or resolve problems arising on operational flight systems.

Bacchus, D. L.; Hill, O. E.; Whitesides, R. Harold

1992-02-01

414

Parametric studies of exhaust smoke–superstructure interaction on a naval ship using CFD  

Microsoft Academic Search

The prediction of flow path of exhaust plume from the ship funnels is extremely complicated since the phenomenon is affected by a large number of parameters like wind velocity and direction, level of turbulence, geometry of the structures on ship’s deck, efflux velocity of smoke etc. To complicate the matters, the entire turbulent flow field is subject to abrupt changes

P. R. Kulkarni; S. N. Singh; V. Seshadri

2007-01-01

415

Volatile Nanoparticle Formation and Growth within a Diluting Diesel Car Exhaust  

Microsoft Academic Search

A major source of particle number emissions is road traffic. However, scientific knowledge concerning secondary particle formation and growth of ultrafine particles within vehicle exhaust plumes is still very limited. Volatile nanoparticle formation and subsequent growth conditions were analyzed here to gain a better understanding of “real-world” dilution conditions. Coupled computational fluid dynamics and aerosol microphysics models together with measured

Ulrich Uhrner; Michael Zallinger; Sibylle von Löwis; Hanna Vehkamäki; Birgit Wehner; Frank Stratmann; Alfred Wiedensohler

2011-01-01

416

Simple vacuum pump exhaust filter  

Microsoft Academic Search

A simple vacuum pump exhaust filter based upon an automotive air cleaner has been constructed and tested. The major virtues of the filter system are ease of coupling to an external exhaust and the availability of filter elements.

Richard A. Forman; Harvey D. Kratz

1984-01-01

417

Flow fields of low pressure vent exhausts  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The flow field produced by low pressure gas vents are described based on experimental data obtained from tests in a large vacuum chamber. The gas density, pressure, and flux at any location in the flow field are calculated based on the vent plume description and the knowledge of the flow rate and velocity of the venting gas. The same parameters and the column densities along a specified line of sight traversing the plume are also obtained and shown by a computer generated graphical representation. The fields obtained with a radically scanning Pitot probe within the exhausting gas are described by a power of the cosine function, the mass rate, and the distance from the exit port. The field measurements were made for gas at pressures ranging from 2 to 50 torr venting from pipe fittings with diameters to 3/16 to 1-1/2 inches I.D. (4.76 to 38.1 mm). The N2 mass flow rates ranged from 2E-4 to 3.7E-1 g/s.

Scialdone, John J.

1990-01-01

418

Flow fields of low pressure vent exhausts  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The flow field produced by low pressure gas vents are described based on experimental data obtained from tests in a large vacuum chamber. The gas density, pressure, and flux at any location in the flow field are calculated based on the vent plume description and the knowledge of the flow rate and velocity of the venting gas. The same parameters and the column densities along a specified line of sight traversing the plume are also obtained and shown by a computer-generated graphical representation. The fields obtained with a radially scanning Pitot probe within the exhausting gas are described by a power of the cosine function, the mass rate and the distance from the exit port. The field measurements were made for gas at pressures ranging from 2 to 50 torr venting from pipe fittings with diameters of 3/16 inch to 1-1/2 inches I.D. (4.76 mm to 38.1 mm). The N(2) mass flow rates ranged from 2E-4 to 3.7E-1 g/s.

Scialdone, John J.

1989-01-01

419

Predicting ground level impacts of solid rocket motor testing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Beginning in August of 1988 and continuing until the present, NASA at Stennis Space Center, Mississippi has conducted environmental monitoring of selected static test firings of the solid rocket motor used on the Space Shuttle. The purpose of the study was to assess the modeling protocol adapted for use in predicting plume behavior for the Advanced Solid Rocket Motor that is to be tested in Mississippi beginning in the mid-1990's. Both motors use an aluminum/ammonium perchlorate fuel that produces HCl and Al2O3 particulates as the major combustion products of concern. A combination of COMBUS.sr and PRISE.sr subroutines and the INPUFF model are used to predict the centerline stabilization height, the maximum concentration of HCl and Al2O3 at ground level, and distance to maximum concentration. Ground studies were conducted to evaluate the ability of the model to make these predictions. The modeling protocol was found to be conservative in the prediction of plume stabilization height and in the concentrations of the two emission products predicted.

Douglas, Willard L.; Eagan, Ellen E.; Kennedy, Carolyn D.; Mccaleb, Rebecca C.

1993-01-01

420

Analysis of rocket beacon transmissions for computerized reconstruction of ionospheric densities  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Three methods are described to obtain ionospheric electron densities from transionospheric, rocket-beacon TEC data. First, when the line-of-sight from a ground receiver to the rocket beacon is tangent to the flight trajectory, the electron concentration can be obtained by differentiating the TEC with respect to the distance to the rocket. A similar method may be used to obtain the electron-density profile if the layer is horizontally stratified. Second, TEC data obtained during chemical release experiments may be interpreted with the aid of physical models of the disturbed ionosphere to yield spatial maps of the modified regions. Third, computerized tomography (CT) can be used to analyze TEC data obtained along a chain of ground-based receivers aligned along the plane of the rocket trajectory. CT analysis of TEC data is used to reconstruct a 2D image of a simulated equatorial plume. TEC data is computed for a linear chain of nine receivers with adjacent spacings of either 100 or 200 km. The simulation data are analyzed to provide an F region reconstruction on a grid with 15 x 15 km pixels. Ionospheric rocket tomography may also be applied to rocket-assisted measurements of amplitude and phase scintillations and airglow intensities.

Bernhardt, P. A.; Huba, J. D.; Chaturvedi, P. K.; Fulford, J. A.; Forsyth, P. A.; Anderson, D. N.; Zalesak, S. T.

1993-01-01

421

Multiphysics simulations of rocket engine combustion  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recently, the hybrid rocket propulsion has become attractive to the research community and has developed the trend to become an alternative to the conventional liquid and solid rockets. The hybrid rocket is a combination of both the solid and liquid systems with half of the plumbing of the liquid rocket but retaining its operational flexibility and avoiding the explosive nature

Yen-Sen Chen; T. H. Chou; B. R. Gu; J. S. Wu; Bill Wu; Y. Y. Lian; Luke Yang

2011-01-01

422

Computational study of variable area ejector rocket flowfields  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Access to space has always been a scientific priority for countries which can afford the prohibitive costs associated with launch. However, the large scale exploitation of space by the business community will require the cost of placing payloads into orbit be dramatically reduced for space to become a truly profitable commodity. To this end, this work focuses on a next generation propulsive technology called the Rocket Based Combined Cycle (RBCC) engine in which rocket, ejector, ramjet, and scramjet cycles operate within the same engine environment. Using an in house numerical code solving the axisymmetric version of the Favre averaged Navier Stokes equations (including the Wilcox ko turbulence model with dilatational dissipation) a systematic study of various ejector designs within an RBCC engine is undertaken. It is shown that by using a central rocket placed along the axisymmetric axis in combination with an annular rocket placed along the outer wall of the ejector, one can obtain compression ratios of approximately 2.5 for the case where both the entrained air and rocket exhaust mass flows are equal. Further, it is shown that constricting the exit area, and the manner in which this constriction is performed, has a significant positive impact on the compression ratio. For a decrease in area of 25% a purely conical ejector can increase the compression ratio by an additional 23% compared to an equal length unconstricted ejector. The use of a more sharply angled conical section followed by a cylindrical section to maintain equivalent ejector lengths can further increase the compression ratio by 5--7% for a total increase of approximately 30%.

Etele, Jason

423

Three dimensional measurements of engine plumes with four-channel single spectral tomography  

Microsoft Academic Search

The design and improvement of an aeroengine rely on the analysis of the combustion process in the combustion chamber to a certain extent. It is difficult to investigate the combustion inside the chamber directly due to its obturation and invisibility, however, the physical distribution of exhaust plumes outside the chamber can be measured by various means and provide the information

Xiong Wan; Zhimin Zhang; Biyan Leng; Xiaoming Deng

2010-01-01

424

Contrail formation and impacts on aerosol properties in aircraft plumes: Effects of fuel sulfur content  

Microsoft Academic Search

The formation and evolution of fine particles and ice contrails in an aircraft exhaust plume containing varying amounts of fuel sulfur have been simulated using an advanced aerosol microphysics model. The ``core'' sulfate and soot particles are tracked during the contrail formation and dissipation phases. When ion electrostatic effects are incorporated into the microphysics, sulfuric acid vapor emitted by high-sulfur-content

Fangqun Yu; Richard P. Turco

1998-01-01

425

Diesel exhaust aftertreatment 1996  

SciTech Connect

The papers in this volume deal in the main with the two most common forms of aftertreatment technology. The first is the trap oxidizer, which is a system for trapping and filtering the particulate matter from the exhaust gas and periodically removing it by thermal oxidation. This process is commonly known as regeneration. The second is the diesel oxidation catalyst. Similar in many ways to the flow through a converter in passenger cars, it oxidizes the soluble organic fraction of the diesel exhaust as well as gaseous hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide. This catalyst is being used in production volumes in heavy duty trucks in the US beginning in 1994. Several papers in this volume deal with the development experience of this converter application. There also is included a series of papers by trap and filter manufacturers dealing with improved materials, making their devices more durable. Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

NONE

1996-09-01

426

Hotspots: Mantle Thermal Plumes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This article discusses the idea of 'hot spot' volcanoes, those not associated with plate tectonic boundaries, but rather with relatively stationary sources of heat energy (thermal plumes) in the mantle. Topics include the development of the theory by Canadian geophysicist J. Tuzo Wilson; the mechanics of volcanism over a hot spot as seen in the Hawaiian Islands; ancient Hawaiian observations of the ages of their islands; and the distribution of other hot spots around the world.

427

Dr. Robert H. Goddard and His Rocket  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Goddard rocket with four rocket motors. This rocket attained an altitude of 200 feet in a flight, November 1936, at Roswell, New Mexico. From 1930 to 1941, Dr. Goddard made substantial progress in the development of progressively larger rockets which attained altitudes of 2400 meters, and refined his equipment for guidance and control, his techniques of welding, and his insulation, pumps, and other associated equipment. In many respects, Dr. Goddard laid the essential foundations of practical rocket technology

2004-01-01

428

World Data Center A (rockets and satellites) catalogue of data. Volume 1, part A: Sounding rockets  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A cumulative listing of all scientifically successful rockets that have been identified from various sources is presented. The listing starts with the V-2 rocket launched on 7 March 1947 and contains all rockets identified up to 31 December 1971.

1972-01-01

429

Particle size, number, composition and velocity from solid rocket motors  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The damage potentials to the space shuttle orbiter caused by the high velocity particles contained in the exhaust plume of an upper stage is discussed. In particular, the particle size distribution and composition, the velocity of the particles and the expected contribution from shuttle launched upper stages are addressed. Particle size estimates based on historical data are compapred with those derived from upper stage motor performance testing. The particle velocities as determined by the best available plume computational technique are presented. The shuttle is scheduled to launch approximately 135 upper-stages over its lifetime looking at the currently scheduled flights and averaging over a yearly basis yields the contribution of particulates from the uper-stages. On the average, 91,645 llbs of Al2O3 will be ejected on each launch. The analysis to determine how much of this 91,645 lbs will remain in orbit or the decay rate is yet to be accomplished.

Roberts, B. B.

1985-01-01

430

Pulsejet, Jet and Rocket Engines.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This book discusses the problems encountered in the theory, design and research of pulsejets, ramjets, and rocket engines; the basic consideration for the numerical analysis and development of these engines are given; a detailed analysis of the elementary...

S. Wojcicki

1967-01-01

431

NASA's Advanced Solid Rocket Motor.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM) will not only bring increased safety, reliability and performance for the Space Shuttle Booster, it will enhance overall Shuttle safety by effectively eliminating 174 failure points in the Space Shuttle Main Engine t...

R. E. Mitchell

1993-01-01

432

Small Solid Rocket Motor Test  

NASA Video Gallery

It was three-two-one to brilliant fire as NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center tested a small solid rocket motor designed to mimic NASA's Space Launch System booster. The Mar. 14 test provides a qui...

433

Volcanic eruption plumes on Io  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The nine eruption plumes observed by Voyager 1 are discussed. The plumes range in height from about 60 to over 300 km with corresponding ejection velocities of about 0.5 to 1.0 km/s. Plume sources are located on level plains rather than topographic highs and consist of either fissures or calderas. Except for Ple, the brightness distribution monotonically decreases from the core to the top of the plume. Numerous surface deposits similar to those associated with active plumes probably mark the sites of recent eruptions. The distribution of active and recent eruptions appears to be concentrated in the equatorial regions. This suggests that the depositional rate is greater and the surface age younger in the equatorial regions, possibly accounting for the active eruptions suggests that sulfur volcanism rather than silicate volcanism is the most likely driving mechanism for the eruption plumes.

Strom, R. G.; Schneider, N. M.

1982-01-01

434

Solid rocket motor internal insulation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Internal insulation in a solid rocket motor is defined as a layer of heat barrier material placed between the internal surface of the case propellant. The primary purpose is to prevent the case from reaching temperatures that endanger its structural integrity. Secondary functions of the insulation are listed and guidelines for avoiding critical problems in the development of internal insulation for rocket motors are presented.

Twichell, S. E. (editor); Keller, R. B., Jr.

1976-01-01

435

Seismic Imaging of Mantle Plumes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The mantle plume hypothesis was proposed thirty years ago by Jason Morgan to explain hotspot volcanoes such as Hawaii. A thermal diapir (or plume) rises from the thermal boundary layer at the base of the mantle and produces a chain of volcanoes as a plate moves on top of it. The idea is very attractive, but direct evidence for actual plumes is weak, and many questions remain unanswered. With the great improvement of seismic imagery in the past ten years, new prospects have arisen. Mantle plumes are expected to be rather narrow, and their detection by seismic techniques requires specific developments as well as dedicated field experiments. Regional travel-time tomography has provided good evidence for plumes in the upper mantle beneath a few hotspots (Yellowstone, Massif Central, Iceland). Beneath Hawaii and Iceland, the plume can be detected in the transition zone because it deflects the seismic discontinuities at 410 and 660 km depths. In the lower mantle, plumes are very difficult to detect, so specific methods have been worked out for this purpose. There are hints of a plume beneath the weak Bowie hotspot, as well as intriguing observations for Hawaii. Beneath Iceland, high-resolution tomography has just revealed a wide and meandering plume-like structure extending from the core-mantle boundary up to the surface. Among the many phenomena that seem to take place in the lowermost mantle (or D''), there are also signs there of the presence of plumes. In this article I review the main results obtained so far from these studies and discuss their implications for plume dynamics. Seismic imaging of mantle plumes is still in its infancy but should soon become a turbulent teenager.

Nataf, Henri-Claude

436

A catalogue of deep mantle plumes: New results from finite-frequency tomography  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

New finite-frequency tomographic images of S-wave velocity confirm the existence of deep mantle plumes below a large number of known hot spots. We compare S-anomaly images with an updated P-anomaly model. Deep mantle plumes are present beneath Ascension, Azores, Canary, Cape Verde, Cook Island, Crozet, Easter, Kerguelen, Hawaii, Samoa, and Tahiti. Afar, Atlantic Ridge, Bouvet(Shona), Cocos/Keeling, Louisville, and Reunion are shown to originate at least below the upper mantle if not much deeper. Plumes that reach only to midmantle are present beneath Bowie, Hainan, Eastern Australia, and Juan Fernandez; these plumes may have tails too thin to observe in the lowermost mantle, but the images are also consistent with an interpretation as "dying plumes" that have exhausted their source region. In the tomographic images, only the Eifel and Seychelles plumes are unambiguously confined to the upper mantle. Starting plumes are visible in the lowermost mantle beneath South of Java, East of Solomon, and in the Coral Sea. All imaged plumes are wide and fail to show plumeheads, suggesting a very weakly temperature-dependent viscosity for lower mantle minerals, and/or compositional variations. The S-wave velocity images show several minor differences with respect to the earlier P-wave results, including plume conduits that extend down to the core-mantle boundary beneath Cape Verde, Cook Island, and Kerguelen. A more substantial disagreement between P-wave and S-wave images reopens the question on the depth extent of the Iceland plume. We suggest that a pulsating behavior of the plume may explain the shape of the conduit beneath Iceland.

Montelli, R.; Nolet, G.; Dahlen, F. A.; Masters, G.

2006-11-01

437

Effect of gaseous and solid simulated jet plumes on an 040A space shuttle launch configuration at m=1.6 to 2.2  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The effect of plume-induced flow separation and aspiration effects due to operation of both orbiter and the solid rocket motors on a 0.019-scale model of the launch configuration of the Space Shuttle Vehicle is determined. Longitudinal and lateral-directional stability data were obtained at Mach numbers of 1.6, 2.0, and 2.2 with and without the engines operating. The plumes exiting from the engines were simulated by a cold-gas jet supplied by an auxiliary 200-atm air supply system and solid-body plume simulators. The aerodynamic effects produced by these two simulation procedures are compared. The parameters most significantly affected by the jet plumes are pitching moment, elevon control effectiveness, axial force, and orbiter wing loads. The solid rocket motor (SRM) plumes have the largest effect on the aerodynamic characteristics. The effect of the orbiter plumes in combination with the SRM plumes is also significant. Variations in the nozzle design parameters and configuration changes can reduce the jet plume-induced aerodynamic effects.

Dods, J. B., Jr.; Brownson, J. J.; Kassner, D. L.; Blackwell, K. L.; Decker, J. P.; Roberts, B. B.

1974-01-01

438

Characteristics of an electron-beam rocket pellet accelerator  

SciTech Connect

A proof-of-principle (POP) electron-beam pellet accelerator has been developed and used for accelerating hydrogen and deuterium pellets. An intact hydrogen pellet was accelerated to a speed of 460 m/s by an electron beam of 13.5 keV. 0.3 A, and 2 ms. The maximum speed is limited by the acceleration path length (0.4 m) and pellet integrity. Experimental data have been collected for several hundred hydrogen pellets, which were accelerated by electron beams with parameters of voltage up to 16 kV, current up to 0.4 A, and pulse length up to 10 ms. Preliminary results reveal that the measured burn velocity increases roughly with the square of the beam voltage, as the theoretical model predicts. The final pellet velocity is proportional to the exhaust velocity, which increases with the beam power. To reach the high exhaust velocity needed for accelerating pellets to >1000 m/s, a new electron gun, with its cathode indirectly heated by a graphite heater and an electron beam, is being developed to increase beam current and power. A rocket casing or shell around the pellet has been designed and developed to increase pellet strength and improve the electron-rocket coupling efficiency. We present the characteristics of this pellet accelerator, including new improvements. 13 refs., 6 figs.

Tsai, C.C.; Foster, C.A.; Milora, S.L.; Schechter, D.E.

1991-01-01

439

Enceladus Plume Composition (Invited)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Cassini-Huygens Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer (Cassini INMS) has obtained valuable data on the composition and structure of the Enceladus plume on several flybys of the Cassini spacecraft: E3, E5, E7, E14, E17, and E18. Flybys E3, and E5 had flyby velocities of 16.6 and 17.7 km per second, respectively, due to the large inclination of the Cassini orbit plane with respect to the Saturn ecliptic plane, while flybys E7, E14, E17, and E18 performed a prograde equatorial flyby of Enceladus below the southern pole with flyby velocities of 7 to 8 km per second. The plume composition observed by the ion neutral mass spectrometer at the various flyby velocities was strongly dependent on the flyby velocity. In particular decreases in the water to molecular hydrogen density and the carbon dioxide to carbon monoxide ratios were observed as the flyby speed increased. We have investigated these changes using collisional models that can determine the effects of molecules and micron-sized ice grains as they impact the titanium surface of the closed ion source of the instrument. At flyby velocities above 16 km per second the subsequent release of titanium vapor induces chemical changes in the incoming gas. At all velocities some molecular fragmentation is possible. Using these model results we examine the velocity-induced changes during the various flybys. We find that water molecules can be converted to molecular hydrogen by chemi-absorption of the water onto the titanium vapor thus creating titanium oxide. However, changes induced in carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide cannot be explained by this process, but are likely due to molecular fragmentation of organic macromolecules. Organic macromolecules (dust grains) or organic macromolecules as condensation nuclei for ice grains can be dissociated by impact on the titanium surface and observed as molecular fragments in the mass spectra from the plume during high velocity flybys. These processes have important implications for the previously reported composition of the Enceladus plume, which are presented in this paper.

Waite, J. H.; Brockwell, T.; Magee, B.; Walker, J.; Chocron, S.; Lewis, W. S.; McKinnon, W. B.

2013-12-01

440

Plasmaspheric plumes: CRRES observations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

CRRES plasma wave receiver density data were used to study the distribution and properties of dense plasmaspheric-like plasma observed outside the plasmapause. Our study indicates that outer plasmaspheric structure, often called plasmaspheric plumes, blobs, or detached plasma regions exist at all local times under all levels of geomagnetic activity. Of the 549 CRRES orbits that had at least one clearly defined plasmapause, 201 (or 36.6%) had plasmaspheric-like density structures at higher L shells than the plasmapause. Most of the occurrence of plasmaspheric-like plasma observed by CRRES was in the noon-to-dusk sector and was observed following moderate geomagnetic activity.

Howard, J.; Moldwin, M. B.; Sanny, J.; Rassoul, H. K.; Anderson, R. R.

2003-12-01

441

Midwave infrared imaging Fourier transform spectrometry of combustion plumes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A midwave infrared (MWIR) imaging Fourier transform spectrometer (IFTS) was used to successfully capture and analyze hyperspectral imagery of combustion plumes. Jet engine exhaust data from a small turbojet engine burning diesel fuel at a low rate of 300 cm3/min was collected at 1 cm -1 resolution from a side-plume vantage point on a 200x64 pixel window at a range of 11.2 meters. Spectral features of H2O, CO, and CO2 were present, and showed spatial variability within the plume structure. An array of thermocouple probes was positioned within the plume to aid in temperature analysis. A single-temperature plume model was implemented to obtain spatially-varying temperatures and plume concentrations. Model-fitted temperatures of 811 +/- 1.5 K and 543 +/- 1.6 K were obtained from plume regions in close proximity to thermocouple probes measuring temperatures of 719 K and 522 K, respectively. Industrial smokestack plume data from a coal-burning stack collected at 0.25 cm-1 resolution at a range of 600 meters featured strong emission from NO, CO, CO2, SO 2, and HCl in the spectral region 1800-3000 cm-1. A simplified radiative transfer model was employed to derive temperature and concentrations for clustered regions of the 128x64 pixel scene, with corresponding statistical error bounds. The hottest region (closest to stack centerline) was 401 +/- 0.36 K, compared to an in-stack measurement of 406 K, and model-derived concentration values of NO, CO2, and SO2 were 140 +/- 1 ppmV, 110,400 +/- 950 ppmV, and 382 +/- 4 ppmV compared to in-stack measurements of 120 ppmV (NOx), 94,000 ppmV, and 382 ppmV, respectively. In-stack measurements of CO and HCl were not provided by the stack operator, but model-derived values of 19 +/- 0.2 ppmV and 111 +/- 1 ppmV are reported near stack centerline. A deployment to Dugway Proving Grounds, UT to collect hyperspectral imagery of chemical and biological threat agent simulants resulted in weak spectral signatures from several species. Plume detection of methyl salicilate was achieved from both a stack release and explosive detonation, although spectral identification was not accomplished due to weak signal strength.

Bradley, Kenneth C.

442

Deuterium microbomb rocket propulsion  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Large scale manned space flight within the solar system is still confronted with the solution of two problems: (1) A propulsion system to transport large payloads with short transit times between different planetary orbits. (2) A cost effective lifting of large payloads into earth orbit. For the solution of the first problem a deuterium fusion bomb propulsion system is proposed where a thermonuclear detonation wave is ignited in a small cylindrical assembly of deuterium with a gigavolt-multimegaampere proton beam, drawn from the magnetically insulated spacecraft acting in the ultrahigh vacuum of space as a gigavolt capacitor. For the solution of the second problem, the ignition is done by argon ion lasers driven by high explosives, with the lasers destroyed in the fusion explosion and becoming part of the exhaust.

Winterberg, F.

2010-01-01

443

EUVS Sounding Rocket Payload  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

During the first half of this year (CY 1996), the EUVS project began preparations of the EUVS payload for the upcoming NASA sounding rocket flight 36.148CL, slated for launch on July 26, 1996 to observe and record a high-resolution (approx. 2 A FWHM) EUV spectrum of the planet Venus. These preparations were designed to improve the spectral resolution and sensitivity performance of the EUVS payload as well as prepare the payload for this upcoming mission. The following is a list of the EUVS project activities that have taken place since the beginning of this CY: (1) Applied a fresh, new SiC optical coating to our existing 2400 groove/mm grating to boost its reflectivity; (2) modified the Ranicon science detector to boost its detective quantum efficiency with the addition of a repeller grid; (3) constructed a new entrance slit plane to achieve 2 A FWHM spectral resolution; (4) prepared and held the Payload Initiation Conference (PIC) with the assigned NASA support team from Wallops Island for the upcoming 36.148CL flight (PIC held on March 8, 1996; see Attachment A); (5) began wavelength calibration activities of EUVS in the laboratory; (6) made arrangements for travel to WSMR to begin integration activities in preparation for the July 1996 launch; (7) paper detailing our previous EUVS Venus mission (NASA flight 36.117CL) published in Icarus (see Attachment B); and (8) continued data analysis of the previous EUVS mission 36.137CL (Spica occultation flight).

Stern, Alan S.

1996-01-01

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Improved hybrid rocket fuel  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

McDonnell Douglas Aerospace, as part of its Independent R&D, has initiated development of a clean burning, high performance hybrid fuel for consideration as an alternative to the solid rocket thrust augmentation currently utilized by American space launch systems including Atlas, Delta, Pegasus, Space Shuttle, and Titan. It could also be used in single stage to orbit or as the only propulsion system in a new launch vehicle. Compared to solid propellants based on aluminum and ammonium perchlorate, this fuel is more environmentally benign in that it totally eliminates hydrogen chloride and aluminum oxide by products, producing only water, hydrogen, nitrogen, carbon oxides, and trace amounts of nitrogen oxides. Compared to other hybrid fuel formulations under development, this fuel is cheaper, denser, and faster burning. The specific impulse of this fuel is comparable to other hybrid fuels and is between that of solids and liquids. The fuel also requires less oxygen than similar hybrid fuels to produce maximum specific impulse, thus reducing oxygen delivery system requirements.

Dean, David L.

1995-01-01