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Sample records for rocks reservoir bitterroot

  1. Evaluation of Management of Water Release for Painted Rocks Reservoir, Bitterroot River, Montana, 1984 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Lere, Mark E.

    1984-11-01

    Baseline fisheries and habitat data were gathered during 1983 and 1984 to evaluate the effectiveness of supplemental water releases from Painted Rocks Reservoir in improving the fisheries resource in the Bitterroot River. Discharge relationships among main stem gaging stations varied annually and seasonally. Flow relationships in the river were dependent upon rainfall events and the timing and duration of the irrigation season. Daily discharge monitored during the summers of 1983 and 1984 was greater than median values derived at the U.S.G.S. station near Darby. Supplemental water released from Painted Rocks Reservoir totaled 14,476 acre feet in 1983 and 13,958 acre feet in 1984. Approximately 63% of a 5.66 m{sup 3}/sec test release of supplemental water conducted during April, 1984 was lost to irrigation withdrawals and natural phenomena before passing Bell Crossing. A similar loss occurred during a 5.66 m{sup 3}/sec test release conducted in August, 1984. Daily maximum temperature monitored during 1984 in the Bitterroot River averaged 11.0, 12.5, 13.9 and 13.6 C at the Darby, Hamilton, Bell and McClay stations, respectively. Chemical parameters measured in the Bitterroot River were favorable to aquatic life. Population estimates conducted in the Fall, 1983 indicated densities of I+ and older rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) were significantly greater in a control section than in a dewatered section (p < 0.20). Numbers of I+ and older brown trout (Salmo trutta) were not significantly different between the control and dewatered sections (p > 0.20). Population and biomass estimates for trout in the control section were 631/km and 154.4 kg/km. In the dewatered section, population and biomass estimates for trout were 253/km and 122.8 kg/km. The growth increments of back-calculated length for rainbow trout averaged 75.6 mm in the control section and 66.9mm in the dewatered section. The growth increments of back-calculated length for brown trout averaged 79.5 mm in the

  2. Evaluation of Management of Water Releases for Painted Rocks Reservoir, Bitterroot River, Montana, 1983-1986, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Spoon, Ronald L.

    1987-06-01

    This study was initiated in July, 1983 to develop a water management plan for the release of water purchased from Painted Rocks Reservoir. Releases were designed to provide optimum benefits to the Bitterroot River fishery. Fisheries, habitat, and stream flow information was gathered to evaluate the effectiveness of these supplemental releases in improving trout populations in the Bitterroot River. The study was part of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Program and was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration. This report presents data collected from 1983 through 1986.

  3. Evaluation of Management of Water Releases for Painted Rocks Rexervoir, Bitterroot River, Montana, 1985 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Lere, Mark E.

    1985-12-01

    The Bitterroot River, located in western Montana, is an important and heavily used resource, providing water for agriculture and a source for diversified forms of recreation. Water shortages in the river, however, have been a persistent problem for both irrigators and recreational users. Five major diversions and numerous smaller canals remove substantial quantities of water from the river during the irrigation season. Historically, the river has been severely dewatered between the towns of Hamilton and Stevensville as a result of these withdrawals. Demands for irrigation water from the Bitterroot River have often conflicted with the instream flow needs for trout. Withdrawals of water can decrease suitable depths, velocities, substrates and cover utilized by trout (Stalnaker and Arnette 1976, Wesche 1976). Losses in habitat associated with dewatering have been shown to diminish the carrying capacities for trout populations (Nelson 1980). Additionally, dewatering of the Bitterroot River has forced irrigators to dike or channelize the streambed to obtain needed flows. These alterations reduce aquatic habitat and degrade channel stability. Odell (personal communication) found a substantial reduction in the total biomass of aquatic insects within a section of the Bitterroot River that had been bulldozed for irrigation purposes. The Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks (MDFWP) has submitted a proposal to the Northwest Power Planning Council for the purchase of 10,000 acre-feet (AF) of stored water in Painted Rocks Reservoir to augment low summer flows in the Bitterroot River. This supplemental water potentially would enhance the fishery in the river and reduce degradation of the channel due to diversion activities. The present study was undertaken to: (1) develop an implementable water management plan for supplemental releases from Painted Rocks Reservoir which would provide optimum benefits to the river: (2) gather fisheries and habitat information to

  4. Tertiary epizonal plutonic rocks of the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness, Idaho County, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Motzer, W.E.

    1996-01-01

    Geologic mapping in the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness identified approximately 731 kmS of epizonal plutonic granitic rocks within the Bitterroot lobe of the Idaho batholith. From north to south, the intrusions are the Rock Lake Creek stock and the Whistling Pig, Running Creek, Bad Luck and Painted Rocks plutons. The stock and plutons consist of medium- to coarse-grained biotite and hornblende-biotite syenorgranite to monzogranite and quartz syenite capped by fine-grained biotite leucogranite. These rocks are intruded by late-synplutonic leucogranite dikes and post plutonic porphyritic rhyolite to rhyodacite and basalt dikes. The medium-grained granitic rocks are high in SiO2, K2O, Na2O, Ga, Th, U, W and Zr, but low in Al7O3, CaO, MgO, Cr, Ni, Co and V. Most of the granites are peraluminous. Rare-earth element (REE) plots (rock sample/chondrite) show enrichment in light REE over heavy REE with strong EU depletions. K-Ar biotite radiometric age determinations for medium-grained granites in all of the plutons range from approximately 51 Ma (Whistling Pig pluton) to 43.7 Ma (Painted Rocks pluton). Petrogenetic studies suggest that the plutons were rapidly emplaced to within 3.0 km of the paleosurface. The types, textures and color of the rocks result from devolatilization of the crystallizing melt and very low-grade hydrothermal alteration. The fluorine-rich melts are the fractionated with accumulate residue; they are considered to be anorogenic (A-type) granites intruded into the center of a metamorphic core complex.

  5. Dispersivity as an oil reservoir rock characteristic

    SciTech Connect

    Menzie, D.E.; Dutta, S.

    1989-12-01

    The main objective of this research project is to establish dispersivity, {alpha}{sub d}, as an oil reservoir rock characteristic and to use this reservoir rock property to enhance crude oil recovery. A second objective is to compare the dispersion coefficient and the dispersivity of various reservoir rocks with other rock characteristics such as: porosity, permeability, capillary pressure, and relative permeability. The dispersivity of a rock was identified by measuring the physical mixing of two miscible fluids, one displacing the other in a porous medium. 119 refs., 27 figs., 12 tabs.

  6. Storage capacity in hot dry rock reservoirs

    DOEpatents

    Brown, D.W.

    1997-11-11

    A method is described for extracting thermal energy, in a cyclic manner, from geologic strata which may be termed hot dry rock. A reservoir comprised of hot fractured rock is established and water or other liquid is passed through the reservoir. The water is heated by the hot rock, recovered from the reservoir, cooled by extraction of heat by means of heat exchange apparatus on the surface, and then re-injected into the reservoir to be heated again. Water is added to the reservoir by means of an injection well and recovered from the reservoir by means of a production well. Water is continuously provided to the reservoir and continuously withdrawn from the reservoir at two different flow rates, a base rate and a peak rate. Increasing water flow from the base rate to the peak rate is accomplished by rapidly decreasing backpressure at the outlet of the production well in order to meet periodic needs for amounts of thermal energy greater than a baseload amount, such as to generate additional electric power to meet peak demands. The rate of flow of water provided to the hot dry rock reservoir is maintained at a value effective to prevent depletion of the liquid inventory of the reservoir. 4 figs.

  7. Storage capacity in hot dry rock reservoirs

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Donald W.

    1997-01-01

    A method of extracting thermal energy, in a cyclic manner, from geologic strata which may be termed hot dry rock. A reservoir comprised of hot fractured rock is established and water or other liquid is passed through the reservoir. The water is heated by the hot rock, recovered from the reservoir, cooled by extraction of heat by means of heat exchange apparatus on the surface, and then re-injected into the reservoir to be heated again. Water is added to the reservoir by means of an injection well and recovered from the reservoir by means of a production well. Water is continuously provided to the reservoir and continuously withdrawn from the reservoir at two different flow rates, a base rate and a peak rate. Increasing water flow from the base rate to the peak rate is accomplished by rapidly decreasing backpressure at the outlet of the production well in order to meet periodic needs for amounts of thermal energy greater than a baseload amount, such as to generate additional electric power to meet peak demands. The rate of flow of water provided to the hot dry rock reservoir is maintained at a value effective to prevent depletion of the liquid

  8. Adsorption of water vapor on reservoir rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    Progress is reported on: adsorption of water vapor on reservoir rocks; theoretical investigation of adsorption; estimation of adsorption parameters from transient experiments; transient adsorption experiment -- salinity and noncondensible gas effects; the physics of injection of water into, transport and storage of fluids within, and production of vapor from geothermal reservoirs; injection optimization at the Geysers Geothermal Field; a model to test multiwell data interpretation for heterogeneous reservoirs; earth tide effects on downhole pressure measurements; and a finite-difference model for free surface gravity drainage well test analysis.

  9. [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar thermochronology in the northern Bitterroot mylonite zone, Mt

    SciTech Connect

    House, M.A.; Hodges, K.V. . Dept. of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences)

    1993-04-01

    The extensional Bitterroot mylonite zone defines the eastern and southern border of the Bitterroot metamorphic core complex and is generally interpreted to be the major structure which accommodated unroofing of the metamorphic core. The most commonly cited evidence for the age of mylonitization are [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar ages for hornblend, muscovite, biotite, and potassium feldspar from the southern Bitterroot mylonite zone that indicate rapid cooling of the core rocks between 45.5 and 43.5 Ma. More recently, an [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar K-feldspar age of 46.4 [+-] 0.8 Ma for an undeformed rhyolite dike that cuts across the mylonitic fabric places a minimum age constraint on the southern part of the shear zone. The authors have obtained new [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar data for metapelitic rocks and amphibolites from the northeast border of the Bitterroot metamorphic core complex near an area where mylonitized granitoid rocks yielding 48--52 Ma U-Pb zircon crystallization ages constrain the maximum age of mylonitization. Isochran ages of 47.9 [+-] 0.9 and 49 [+-] 1 Ma for hornblende separated from deformed amphibolite pods in the northeast border zone are within analytical uncertainty of the younger mylonitized granitoid crystallization ages and indicate rapid post-crystallization cooling through temperatures of [approximately]780--800 K. They attribute this cooling to denudation related to shear zone development. Muscovite and biotite isochron ages from metapelitic rocks within the shear zone are significantly younger, between 42 and 44 Ms., and generally agree with mica ages obtained by Garmezy and Sutter for the southern part of the shear zone. However, all mica ages from the Bitterroot shear zone are younger than the minimum age of the shear zone deduced from the age of cross-cutting rhyolite dikes.

  10. Smoke in the Bitterroot Mountains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    By late August 2000, severe forest fires had been burning in Montana and Idaho for more than a month. As of Aug. 29, a total of 57 fires were burning in both states. The smoke from these fires is considered a health risk, especially for the very young and very old, and health advisory has been issued for those with respiratory problems who live in the area. This image from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) shows smoke in the Bitterroot Mountains on the morning of August 21, 2000. Even though forest fires normally taper off overnight, these blazes are burning so fiercely that opaque pillars of smoke are rising into the morning air. More smoke fills the low-lying valleys, with the mountains rising out of the smoke into clear air. In the full size image, note the irrigated fields and ancient basalt lava flows that line the Snake River Plain to the south of the fires. Image by Reto Stockli and the MODIS science team

  11. Summary geologic report on the Missoula/Bitterroot Drilling Project, Missoula/Bitterroot Basins, Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Abramiuk, I.N.

    1980-08-01

    The objective of the drilling project was to obtain information to assess the favorability of the Tertiary sedimentary units in the Missoula and Bitterroot Valleys for uranium potential. The group of Montana Tertiary basins, including the Missoula and Bitterroot Basins, has been assigned a speculative uranium potential of 46,557 tons of U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ at $100/lb by the 1980 National Uranium Resource Evaluation report. The seven drill holes, two in the Missoula Valley and five in the Bitterroot Valley, verified observations made during surface studies and provided additional information about the subsurface that was previously unknown. No uranium was found, although of the two localities the Bitterroot Valley is the more favorable. Three stratigraphic units were tentatively identified on the basis of lithology: pre-Renova clastic units, Renova Formation equivalents, and Sixmile Creek Formation equivalents. Of the three, the Renova Formation equivalents in the Bitterroot Valley appear to be the most favorable for possible uranium occurrences and the pre-Renova clastic units the least favorable.

  12. Seismic attenuation anisotropy in reservoir sedimentary rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Best, A.I.

    1994-12-31

    Seismic attenuation is a fundamental property of reservoir sedimentary rocks; it is strongly related to reservoir permeability. Knowledge of its variation with lithology, with burial depth, and with wave propagation direction is vital for understanding the attenuation mechanism. Given this information, realistic theoretical models may be constructed for predicting attenuation, and hence permeability, over a wide frequency range. Accurate ultrasonic attenuation measurements were made in the laboratory over a range of effective pressures on sandstone samples with different amounts of humic organic matter. The organic matter formed fine laminations along the bedding planes of the sandstones. The results show that the sandstones are highly attenuating at 5 MPa mainly because of the presence of grain contact microcracks giving rise to squirt flow; at 40 MPa, when most of the microcracks are closed, the clean sandstones are poorly attenuating, but the organic-rich sandstones remain highly attenuating. It is postulated that the compliant organic matter is responsible for causing squirt flow at high and at low pressures. The results also show that the maximum attenuation occurs when the particle motion of the propagating wave is perpendicular to the planes of the organic matter laminations. These results are consistent with the squirt flow theory of Akbar et al (1993) for compressional waves.

  13. Multiscale properties of unconventional reservoir rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodruff, W. F.

    A multidisciplinary study of unconventional reservoir rocks is presented, providing the theory, forward modeling and Bayesian inverse modeling approaches, and laboratory protocols to characterize clay-rich, low porosity and permeability shales and mudstones within an anisotropic framework. Several physical models characterizing oil and gas shales are developed across multiple length scales, ranging from microscale phenomena, e.g. the effect of the cation exchange capacity of reactive clay mineral surfaces on water adsorption isotherms, and the effects of infinitesimal porosity compaction on elastic and electrical properties, to meso-scale phenomena, e.g. the role of mineral foliations, tortuosity of conduction pathways and the effects of organic matter (kerogen and hydrocarbon fractions) on complex conductivity and their connections to intrinsic electrical anisotropy, as well as the macro-scale electrical and elastic properties including formulations for the complex conductivity tensor and undrained stiffness tensor within the context of effective stress and poroelasticity. Detailed laboratory protocols are described for sample preparation and measurement of these properties using spectral induced polarization (SIP) and ultrasonics for the anisotropic characterization of shales for both unjacketed samples under benchtop conditions and jacketed samples under differential loading. An ongoing study of the effects of kerogen maturation through hydrous pyrolysis on the complex conductivity is also provided in review. Experimental results are catalogued and presented for various unconventional formations in North America including the Haynesville, Bakken, and Woodford shales.

  14. Reservoir, seal, and source rock distribution in Essaouira Rift Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Ait Salem, A. )

    1994-07-01

    The Essaouira onshore basin is an important hydrocarbon generating basin, which is situated in western Morocco. There are seven oil and gas-with-condensate fields; six are from Jurassic reservoirs and one from a Triassic reservoir. As a segment of the Atlantic passive continental margin, the Essaouira basin was subjected to several post-Hercynian basin deformation phases, which resulted in distribution, in space and time, of reservoir, seal, and source rock. These basin deformations are synsedimentary infilling of major half grabens with continental red buds and evaporite associated with the rifting phase, emplacement of a thick postrifting Jurassic and Cretaceous sedimentary wedge during thermal subsidence, salt movements, and structural deformations in relation to the Atlas mergence. The widely extending lower Oxfordian shales are the only Jurassic shale beds penetrated and recognized as potential and mature source rocks. However, facies analysis and mapping suggested the presence of untested source rocks in Dogger marine shales and Triassic to Liassic lacustrine shales. Rocks with adequate reservoir characteristics were encountered in Triassic/Liassic fluvial sands, upper Liassic dolomites, and upper Oxfordian sandy dolomites. The seals are provided by Liassic salt for the lower reservoirs and Middle to Upper Jurassic anhydrite for the upper reservoirs. Recent exploration studies demonstrate that many prospective structure reserves remain untested.

  15. Imaging fluid/solid interactions in hydrocarbon reservoir rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Uwins, P.J.R.; Baker, J.C.; Mackinnon, I.D.R. . Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis)

    1993-08-01

    The environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) has been used to image liquid hydrocarbons in sandstones and oil shales. Additionally, the fluid sensitivity of selected clay minerals in hydrocarbon reservoirs was assessed via three case studies: HCl acid sensitivity of authigenic chlorite in sandstone reservoirs, freshwater sensitivity of authigenic illite/smectite in sandstone reservoir, and bleach sensitivity of a volcanic reservoir containing abundant secondary chlorite/corrensite. The results showed the suitability of using ESEM for imaging liquid hydrocarbon films in hydrocarbon reservoirs and the importance of simulating in situ fluid-rock interactions for hydrocarbon production programs. In each case, results of the ESEM studies greatly enhanced prediction of reservoir/borehole reactions and, in some cases, contradicted conventional wisdom regarding the outcome of potential engineering solutions.

  16. Imaging fluid/solid interactions in hydrocarbon reservoir rocks.

    PubMed

    Uwins, P J; Baker, J C; Mackinnon, I D

    1993-08-01

    The environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) has been used to image liquid hydrocarbons in sandstones and oil shales. Additionally, the fluid sensitivity of selected clay minerals in hydrocarbon reservoirs was assessed via three case studies: HCl acid sensitivity of authigenic chlorite in sandstone reservoirs, freshwater sensitivity of authigenic illite/smectite in sandstone reservoirs, and bleach sensitivity of a volcanic reservoir containing abundant secondary chlorite/corrensite. The results showed the suitability of using ESEM for imaging liquid hydrocarbon films in hydrocarbon reservoirs and the importance of simulating in situ fluid-rock interactions for hydrocarbon production programmes. In each case, results of the ESEM studies greatly enhanced prediction of reservoir/borehole reactions and, in some cases, contradicted conventional wisdom regarding the outcome of potential engineering solutions. PMID:8400441

  17. Hot dry rock fracture propagation and reservoir characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, H.; Fehler, M.; Robinson, B.; Tester, J.; Potter, R.; Birdsell, S.

    1988-01-01

    North America's largest hydraulic fracturing opeations have been conducted at Fenton hill, New mexico to creae hot dry rock geothermal reservoirs. Microearthquakes induced by these fracturing operations were measured with geophones. The large volume of rock over which the microearthquakes were distributed indicates a mechanism of hydraulic stimulation which is at odds with conventional fracturing theory, which predicts failure along a plane which is perpendicular to the least compressive earth stress. Shear slippage along pre-existing joints in the rock is more easily induced than conventional tensile failure, particularly when the difference between minimum and maximum earth stresses is large and the pre-existing joints are oriented at angles between 30 and 60)degree) to the principal earth stresses, and a low viscosity fluid like water is injected. Shear slippage results in local redistribution of stresses, which allows a branching, or dendritic, stimulation pattern to evolve, in agreement with the patterns of microearthquake locations. Field testing of HDR reservoirs at the Fenton Hill site shows that significant reservoir growth occurred as energy was extracted. Tracer, microseismic, and geochemical measurements provided the primary quantitative evidence for the increases in accessible reservoir volume and fractured rock surface area. These temporal increases indicate that augmentation of reservoir heat production capacity in hot dry rock system occurred. For future reservoir testing, Los Alamos is developing tracer techniques using reactive chemicals to track thermal fronts. Recent studies have focused on the kinetics of hydrolysis of derivatives of bromobenzene, which can be used in reservoirs as hot as 275)degree)C.

  18. Geophysical and transport properties of reservoir rocks. Summary annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, N.G.W.

    1990-04-29

    Definition of petrophysical properties, such as porosity, permeability and fluid saturation, on the scale of meters, is the key to planning and control of successful Enhanced Oil Recovery techniques for domestic reservoirs. Macroscopic transport properties in reservoir rocks depend critically upon processes at the pore level involving interactions between the pore topology and the physical and chemical properties of the rock minerals and interstitial fluids. Similar interactions at the pore level determine also the macroscopic electrical and seismic properties of reservoir rocks. The objective of this research is to understand, using analysis and experiment, how fluids in pores affect the geophysical and sport properties of reservoir rocks. The goal is to develop equations-relating seismic and electrical properties of rock to the porosity, permeability and fluid saturations so as to invert geophysical images for improved reservoir management. Results from seismic measurements performed so far in this study suggest that even subtle changes in fluid contacts and the in-situ state of effective stress can be detected using geophysical imaging techniques. The experiments using Wood`s metal and wax are revealing the topology and sport properties of the pore space in clastic sedimentary rocks. A deeper understanding of these properties is considered-to be the key to the recovery of much of the mobile oil left in domestic reservoirs and to the effective management of enhanced oil recovery techniques. The results of Wood`s metal percolation tests indicate that most of the permeability of Berea sandstone resides in the critical percolating paths and these paths occupy only a small fraction of the total porosity. This result may have important implications for flooding in terms of override and efficiency as a function of saturation.

  19. Tickborne Relapsing Fever, Bitterroot Valley, Montana, USA

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Joshua; Fischer, Robert J.; McCoy, Brandi N.; Raffel, Sandra J.

    2015-01-01

    In July 2013, a resident of the Bitterroot Valley in western Montana, USA, contracted tickborne relapsing fever caused by an infection with the spirochete Borrelia hermsii. The patient’s travel history and activities before onset of illness indicated a possible exposure on his residential property on the eastern side of the valley. An onsite investigation of the potential exposure site found the vector, Ornithodoros hermsi ticks, and 1 chipmunk infected with spirochetes, which on the basis of multilocus sequence typing were identical to the spirochete isolated from the patient. Field studies in other locations found additional serologic evidence and an infected tick that demonstrated a wider distribution of spirochetes circulating among the small mammal populations. Our study demonstrates that this area of Montana represents a previously unrecognized focus of relapsing fever and poses a risk for persons of acquiring this tickborne disease. PMID:25625502

  20. Strength measurements of The Geysers reservoir rock

    SciTech Connect

    Lockner, D.A.; Byerlee, J.D.

    1980-09-01

    Rock samples taken from two outcrops and cores from well bores at the Geysers geothermal field were tested at temperatures and pressures similar to those found in the field. Both intact cylinders and cylinders containing 30/sup 0/ sawcuts were deformed at confining pressures of 200 to 1000 bars, pore pressure of 30 bars, and temperatures of 150 to 250/sup 0/C. Constant strain rate tests gave a coefficient of friction of 0.68. Friction was independent of rock type, temperature and strain rate. Most cores taken from the producing zone were highly fractured. For this reason, intact samples were rarely 50% stronger than the frictional strength. At 500 bars confining pressure, P wave velocity of 6.2 km/sec was measured for a sample taken from an outcrop. Porosities and permeabilities were also measured.

  1. Using a hot dry rock geothermal reservoir for load following

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D.W.; Duteau, R.J.

    1995-01-01

    Field measurements and modeling have shown the potential for using a Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal reservoir for electric load following: either with Power-Peaking from a base-load operating condition, or for Pumped Storage of off-peak electric energy with a very significant thermal augmentation of the stored mechanical energy during periods of power production. For the base-load with power- peaking mode of operation, and HDR reservoir appears capable of producing over twice its nominal power output for short -- 2 to 4 hour -- periods of time. In this mode of operation, the reservoir normally would be produced under a high-backpressure condition with the HDR reservoir region near the production well highly inflated. Upon demand, the production backpressure would be sharply reduced, surging the production flow. The analytical tool used in these investigations has been the transient finite element model of the an HDR reservoir called GEOCRACK, which is being developed by Professor Dan Swenson and his students at Kansas State University. This discrete-element representation of a jointed rock mass has recently been validated for transient operations using the set of cyclic reservoir operating data obtained at the end of the LTFT.

  2. Improved characterization of reservoir behavior by integration of reservoir performances data and rock type distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, D.K.; Vessell, R.K.; Doublet, L.E.

    1997-08-01

    An integrated geological/petrophysical and reservoir engineering study was performed for a large, mature waterflood project (>250 wells, {approximately}80% water cut) at the North Robertson (Clear Fork) Unit, Gaines County, Texas. The primary goal of the study was to develop an integrated reservoir description for {open_quotes}targeted{close_quotes} (economic) 10-acre (4-hectare) infill drilling and future recovery operations in a low permeability, carbonate (dolomite) reservoir. Integration of the results from geological/petrophysical studies and reservoir performance analyses provide a rapid and effective method for developing a comprehensive reservoir description. This reservoir description can be used for reservoir flow simulation, performance prediction, infill targeting, waterflood management, and for optimizing well developments (patterns, completions, and stimulations). The following analyses were performed as part of this study: (1) Geological/petrophysical analyses: (core and well log data) - {open_quotes}Rock typing{close_quotes} based on qualitative and quantitative visualization of pore-scale features. Reservoir layering based on {open_quotes}rock typing {close_quotes} and hydraulic flow units. Development of a {open_quotes}core-log{close_quotes} model to estimate permeability using porosity and other properties derived from well logs. The core-log model is based on {open_quotes}rock types.{close_quotes} (2) Engineering analyses: (production and injection history, well tests) Material balance decline type curve analyses to estimate total reservoir volume, formation flow characteristics (flow capacity, skin factor, and fracture half-length), and indications of well/boundary interference. Estimated ultimate recovery analyses to yield movable oil (or injectable water) volumes, as well as indications of well and boundary interference.

  3. Rock characterization in reservoirs targeted for horizontal drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Skopec, R.A. )

    1993-12-01

    Achieving the maximum economic benefit from horizontal drilling requires thorough understanding of reservoir characteristics. The direct measurement of rock properties from oriented core is critical in horizontal-wellbore design. This paper outlines the measures and testing necessary to evaluate naturally fractured reservoirs effectively with field and laboratory technologies. Rock mechanical properties, fracture strike, and principal in-situ stress magnitudes and directions should be known before a horizontal wellbore is drilled. These data can then be used to maximize the intersection of natural fractures and to minimize the potential of borehole failure. In exploration wells, a vertical pilot hole must first be drilled. The zone of interest is cored, field tests are performed, laboratory testing is completed, and the reservoir is evaluated. With this information available, decisions can be made to optimize the borehole azimuth and well placement. The authors have used this approach to formation evaluation in several reservoirs where rock characterization is essential in the exploration and drilling program. 72 refs., 10 figs.

  4. Uncertainty quantification in fractured reservoir by considering geological deformation of reservoir and geomechanical accommodation of rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Y.; Jung, A.; Mukerji, T.

    2013-12-01

    Geological interpretations on structural deformation of a reservoir are uncertain. How the reservoir rocks have accommodated the deformational loading is also uncertain. The effects of these two on reservoir property modeling and uncertainty of reservoir responses is rarely investigated and used in reservoir forecasting. In this research, the effect of different scenarios on geological deformation history and modes of accommodation of rock deformation on reservoir flow response is investigated. To do that, we develop a geostatistical reservoir property modeling workflow which allows us to generate petrophysical properties (porosity & permeability) such that the properties are consistent with geological deformation. In this workflow, we restore the values of petrophysical properties from hard data into a restored condition using predefined transfer functions. We conduct geostatistical simulations to populate petrophysical properties using the restored property values in a restored grid. By using the inverse relation used to restore petrophysical values of hard data, we deform the simulated property values into a deformed grid with corresponding deformed values. Fracture sets are populated by considering both the populated petrophysical properties in a restored grid and the geomechanical condition derived from the deformation-restoration constraints. By using this workflow, we can compare and distinguish the effects of different modes of geological deformation on the uncertainty of reservoir flow responses. The uncertainty from different modes of accommodation is considered in the workflow by having different transfer relations when conducting restoration-deformation of the values of petrophysical properties. The proposed workflow is applied on a 3D synthetic fractured sandstone reservoir to see the impact on flow responses. Reservoir models from different scenario of deformation and the modes of accommodation for each deformation produce different characteristics on

  5. Characterizing flow in oil reservoir rock using SPH: absolute permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, David W.; Williams, John R.; Tilke, Peter; Leonardi, Christopher R.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, a three-dimensional smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulator for modeling grain scale fluid flow in porous rock is presented. The versatility of the SPH method has driven its use in increasingly complex areas of flow analysis, including flows related to permeable rock for both groundwater and petroleum reservoir research. While previous approaches to such problems using SPH have involved the use of idealized pore geometries (cylinder/sphere packs etc), in this paper we detail the characterization of flow in models with geometries taken from 3D X-ray microtomographic imaging of actual porous rock; specifically 25.12 % porosity dolomite. This particular rock type has been well characterized experimentally and described in the literature, thus providing a practical `real world' means of verification of SPH that will be key to its acceptance by industry as a viable alternative to traditional reservoir modeling tools. The true advantages of SPH are realized when adding the complexity of multiple fluid phases, however, the accuracy of SPH for single phase flow is, as yet, under developed in the literature and will be the primary focus of this paper. Flow in reservoir rock will typically occur in the range of low Reynolds numbers, making the enforcement of no-slip boundary conditions an important factor in simulation. To this end, we detail the development of a new, robust, and numerically efficient method for implementing no-slip boundary conditions in SPH that can handle the degree of complexity of boundary surfaces, characteristic of an actual permeable rock sample. A study of the effect of particle density is carried out and simulation results for absolute permeability are presented and compared to those from experimentation showing good agreement and validating the method for such applications.

  6. SEISMIC AND ROCK PHYSICS DIAGNOSTICS OF MULTISCALE RESERVOIR TEXTURES

    SciTech Connect

    Gary Mavko

    2003-10-01

    As part of our study on ''Relationships between seismic properties and rock microstructure'', we have (1) Studied relationships between velocity and permeability. (2) Used independent experimental methods to measure the elastic moduli of clay minerals as functions of pressure and saturation. (3) Applied different statistical methods for characterizing heterogeneity and textures from scanning acoustic microscope (SAM) images of shale microstructures. (4) Analyzed the directional dependence of velocity and attenuation in different reservoir rocks (5) Compared Vp measured under hydrostatic and non-hydrostatic stress conditions in sands. (6) Studied stratification as a source of intrinsic anisotropy in sediments using Vp and statistical methods for characterizing textures in sands.

  7. A new type of reservoir rock in volcaniclastic sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Vernik, L. )

    1990-06-01

    Development of pronounced secondary porosity and permeability, accompanied by dramatic changes in wave propagation velocity and other physical properties, in laumontite tuffs occurs in the oil fields of eastern Georgia, Soviet Union. These rocks originated during intense hydrothermal alterations of andesite tuffs and comprise local (few meters thick), commonly lens-shaped bodies. Hydrothermal alteration was lithologically and structurally controlled, resulting in the formation of specific reservoir rocks identifiable on geophysical logs and capable of producing oil and gas. The considerable relief of the in-situ stress within these bodies was estimated from differential velocity analysis using sonic-log and laboratory data. This stress relief, as well as borehole enlargements (accompanied by the development of zones of nonelastic deformation around the hole) tends to enhance near-well permeability and, hence, the productive potential of these uncommon and poorly studied reservoirs. 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. SEISMIC AND ROCK PHYSICS DIAGNOSTICS OF MULTISCALE RESERVOIR TEXTURES

    SciTech Connect

    Gary Mavko

    2004-08-01

    As part of our study on ''Relationships between seismic properties and rock microstructure'', we have continued our work on analyzing well logs and microstructural constraints on seismic signatures. We report results of three studies in this report. The first one deals with fractures and faults that provide the primary control on the underground fluid flow through low permeability massive carbonate rocks. Fault cores often represent lower transmissibility whereas the surrounding damaged rocks and main slip surfaces are high transmissibility elements. We determined the physical properties of fault rocks collected in and around the fault cores of large normal faults in central Italy. After studying the P- and S-wave velocity variation during cycles of confining pressure, we conclude that a rigid pore frame characterizes the fault gouge whereas the fractured limestone comprises pores with a larger aspect ratio. The second study was to characterize the seismic properties of brine as its temperature decreases from 25 C to -21 C. The purpose was to understand how the transmitted wave changes with the onset of freezing. The main practical reason for this experiment was to use partially frozen brine as an analogue for a mixture of methane hydrate and water present in the pore space of a gas hydrate reservoir. In the third study we analyzed variations in dynamic moduli in various carbonate reservoirs. The investigations include log and laboratory data from velocity, porosity, permeability, and attenuation measurements.

  9. Mining earth's heat: Development of hot dry rock geothermal reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Pettitt, R.A.; Becker, N.A.

    1983-07-01

    Geothermal energy is commonly considered to be available only in areas characterized by hot springs and geysers. However, the rock of the earth is hot at accessible depths everywhere, and this energy source is present beneath the surface in almost any location. The energy-extraction concept of the Hot Dry Rock (HDR) Geothermal Program as initially developed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory, is to ''mine'' this heat by creating a man-made reservoir in low-permeability, hot basement rock. This concept has been successfully proven at Fenton Hill in northern New Mexico by drilling two holes to a depth of approximately 3 km (10,000 ft) and a bottom temperature of 200/sup 0/C (392/sup 0/F), then connecting the boreholes with a large diameter, vertical hydraulic fracture. Water is circulated down one borehole, heated by the hot rock, and rises up the second borehole to the surface where the heat is extracted and the cooled water is reinjected into the underground circulation loop. This system has operated for a cumulative 416 days during engineering and reservoir testing. An energy equivalent of 3 to 5 MW(t) was produced without adverse environmental problems. During one test, a generator was installed in the circulation loop and produced 60 kw of electricity.

  10. Grain-rimming kaolinite in Permian Rotliegend reservoir rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldmann, Svenja; Gaupp, Reinhard

    2016-04-01

    Upper Rotliegend sediments of Permian age from the northeast Netherlands show moderate to good reservoir qualities. The predominant control is by the presence of authigenic grain-rimming kaolinite, which has a negative, but in some parts also a positive, effect on reservoir quality. To better understand the formation and distribution of grain-rimming kaolinite, reservoir rocks were studied in terms of composition and diagenetic processes. Petrographic evidence, summarized as a paragenetic sequence, is integrated with geochemical modeling results to identify early mesodiagenetic water-rock interactions under the participation of gases, i.e., CO2 and H2S, released from underlying Carboniferous source rocks. The sediments investigated were deposited at varying distance from the southern flank of the Southern Permian Basin. Sediments near the basin margin are mainly attributed to a fluvial environment and comprise medium to coarse-grained sandstones and conglomerates. There, vermicular kaolinite occurs with a lath-like structure. Distal to the basin margin, mainly in sandstones intercalated with fine-grained playa sediments, comparatively high amounts of grain-rimming kaolinite occur. There, the presence of this mineral has a significant influence on the rock properties and the reservoir quality. Geochemical modeling suggests that the formation of such kaolinites cannot be explained exclusively by in situ feldspar dissolution. The modeling results support evidence that kaolinite can be formed from precursor clay minerals under the presence of CO2-rich formation waters. Such clay minerals could be corrensite, smectite-chlorite mixed-layer minerals, or chlorite that is potentially present in Rotliegend sediments during early diagenesis. Furthermore, the geochemical modeling can reflect several mineral reactions that were identified from petrographic analysis such as the formation of illite and kaolinite at the expense of feldspar dissolution and consequent silica

  11. Anisotropic permeabilities evolution of reservoir rocks under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeremie, D.; Nicolas, G.; Alexandre, D.; Olga, V.

    2006-12-01

    The aim of our study is to measure, to model and to forecast the evolutions of porosity and permeability under anisotropic stresses representative of hydrocarbon reservoir conditions. Reservoir field exploitation induces a decrease of the pore pressure, hence modifying the effective stress-state at the reservoir scale. To optimize production and recovery rates of the reservoir it is of fundamental interest to understand all the physical and mechanical evolutions of the host-rock and their influence on transport properties. In the case of weakly consolidated reservoirs the variations of stresses are modest, yet they can induce significant porosity and permeability changes due to their high compressibility. In the case of deeply buried and consolidated reservoirs the stress variations might be pronounced enough to influence flow properties as well. Because of reservoir boundaries conditions, the fluid pressure drop influences essentially the vertical stress. The recovery rate is a function of horizontal permeability. In order to understand how the anisotropic stress-states induced during production may influence the transport properties experiments must be designed to measure simultaneously both horizontal and vertical permeabilities under deviatoric stresses. For this purpose we developed a specific triaxial cell operating in conditions representative of the field conditions. Preliminary results obtained with low permeability sandstones allowed a coupled observation of deformation and directional permeability evolution. Because of complex geometrical conditions the results required numerical interpretations. A finite-element inversion of our data allowed the determination of the complete permeability tensor. In addition the study aims on the identification of the microphysical mechanics that induce the pore scale microstructural evolution, which is ultimately responsible of the permeability decrease. For this purpose we used synthetic hot-pressed calcite

  12. Water in evolved lunar rocks: Evidence for multiple reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Katharine L.; Barnes, Jessica J.; Nagashima, Kazuhide; Thomen, Aurélien; Franchi, Ian A.; Huss, Gary R.; Anand, Mahesh; Taylor, G. Jeffrey

    2016-09-01

    We have measured the abundance and isotopic composition of water in apatites from several lunar rocks representing Potassium (K), Rare Earth Elements (REE), and Phosphorus (P) - KREEP - rich lithologies, including felsites, quartz monzodiorites (QMDs), a troctolite, and an alkali anorthosite. The H-isotope data from apatite provide evidence for multiple reservoirs in the lunar interior. Apatite measurements from some KREEP-rich intrusive rocks display moderately elevated δD signatures, while other samples show δD signatures similar to the range known for the terrestrial upper mantle. Apatite grains in Apollo 15 quartz monzodiorites have the lowest δD values measured from the Moon so far (as low as -749‰), and could potentially represent a D-depleted reservoir in the lunar interior that had not been identified until now. Apatite in all of these intrusive rocks contains <267 ppm H2O, which is relatively low compared to apatites from the majority of studied mare basalts (200 to >6500 ppm H2O). Complexities in partitioning of volatiles into apatite make this comparison uncertain, but measurements of residual glass in KREEP basalt fragments in breccia 15358 independently show that the KREEP basaltic magmas were low in water. The source of 15358 contained ∼10 ppm H2O, about an order of magnitude lower than the source of the Apollo 17 pyroclastic glass beads, suggesting potential variations in the distribution of water in the lunar interior.

  13. Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Reservoir Model Development at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Bruce A.; Birdsell, Stephen A.

    1989-03-21

    Discrete fracture and continuum models are being developed to simulate Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal reservoirs. The discrete fracture model is a two-dimensional steady state simulator of fluid flow and tracer transport in a fracture network which is generated from assumed statistical properties of the fractures. The model's strength lies in its ability to compute the steady state pressure drop and tracer response in a realistic network of interconnected fractures. The continuum approach models fracture behavior by treating permeability and porosity as functions of temperature and effective stress. With this model it is practical to model transient behavior as well as the coupled processes of fluid flow, heat transfer, and stress effects in a three-dimensional system. The model capabilities being developed will also have applications in conventional geothermal systems undergoing reinjection and in fractured geothermal reservoirs in general.

  14. Hot Dry Rock geothermal reservoir model development at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, B.A.; Birdsell, S.A.

    1989-01-01

    Discrete fracture and continuum models are being developed to simulate Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal reservoirs. The discrete fracture model is a two-dimensional steady state simulator of fluid flow and tracer transport in a fracture network which is generated from assumed statistical properties of the fractures. The model's strength lies in its ability to compute the steady state pressure drop and tracer response in a realistic network of interconnected fractures. The continuum approach models fracture behavior by treating permeability and porosity as functions of temperature and effective stress. With this model it is practical to model transient behavior as well as the coupled processes of fluid flow, heat transfer, and stress effects in a three-dimensional system. The model capabilities being developed will also have applications in conventional geothermal systems undergoing reinjection and in fractured geothermal reservoirs in general. 15 refs., 7 figs.

  15. Oxygen isotope geochemistry of The Geysers reservoir rocks, California

    SciTech Connect

    Gunderson, Richard P.; Moore, Joseph N.

    1994-01-20

    Whole-rock oxygen isotopic compositions of Late Mesozoic graywacke, the dominant host rock at The Geysers, record evidence of a large liquid-dominated hydrothermal system that extended beyond the limits of the present steam reservoir. The graywackes show vertical and lateral isotopic variations that resulted from gradients in temperature, permeability, and fluid composition during this early liquid-dominated system. All of these effects are interpreted to have resulted from the emplacement of the granitic "felsite" intrusion 1-2 million years ago. The {delta}{sup 18}O values of the graywacke are strongly zoned around a northwest-southeast trending low located near the center of and similar in shape to the present steam system. Vertical isotopic gradients show a close relationship to the felsite intrusion. The {delta}{sup 18}O values of the graywacke decrease from approximately 15 per mil near the surface to 4-7 per mil 300 to 600 m above the intrusive contact. The {delta}{sup 18}O values then increase downward to 8-10 per mil at the felsite contact, thereafter remaining nearly constant within the intrusion itself. The large downward decrease in {delta}{sup 18}O values are interpreted to be controlled by variations in temperature during the intrusive event, ranging from 150{degree}C near the surface to about 425{degree}C near the intrusive contact. The upswing in {delta}{sup 18}O values near the intrusive contact appears to have been caused by lower rock permeability and/or heavier fluid isotopic composition there. Lateral variations in the isotopic distributions suggests that the effects of temperature were further modified by variations in rock permeability and/or fluid-isotopic composition. Time-integrated water:rock ratios are thought to have been highest within the central isotopic low where the greatest isotopic depletions are observed. We suggest that this region of the field was an area of high permeability within the main upflow zone of the liquid

  16. Characterization of CO2 reservoir rock in Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabbri, Stefano; Madonna, Claudio; Zappone, Alba

    2014-05-01

    Anthropogenic emissions of Carbon Dioxide (CO2) are one of the key drivers regarding global climate change (IPCC, 2007). Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage (CCS) is one valuable technology to mitigate current climate change with an immediate impact. The IPCC special report on CCS predicted a potential capture range of 4.7 to 37.5 Gt of CO2 by 2050. Among several countries, Switzerland has started to investigate its potential for CO2 storage (Chevalier et al., 2010) and is currently performing research on the characterization of the most promising reservoir/seal rocks for CO2 sequestration. For Switzerland, the most feasible option is to store CO2 in saline aquifers, sealed by impermeable formations. One aquifer of regional scale in the Swiss Molasse Basin is a carbonate sequence consisting of reworked shallow marine limestones and accumulations of shell fragments. The upper part of the formation presents the most promising permeability values and storage properties. The storage potential has been estimated of 706 Mt of CO2, based on the specific ranking scheme proposed by Chevalier et al. 2010. In this study, key parameters such as porosity, permeability and acoustic velocities in compressional and shear mode have been measured in laboratory at pressures and temperatures simulating in situ conditions. Reservoir rock samples have been investigated. Permeability has been estimated before and after CO2 injection in supercritical state. The simulation of typical reservoir conditions allows us to go one step further towards a significant evaluation of the reservoir's true capacities for CO2 sequestration. It seems of major importance to notice that the permeability crucially depends on confining pressure, temperature and pore pressure conditions of the sample. Especially at in situ conditions with CO2 being at supercritical state, a substantial loss in permeability have to be taken into consideration when it comes to the calculation of potential injection rates. The

  17. Seismic Characterization of Fractured Reservoirs - Rock Physics Analysis and Modeling of James Limestone Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sava, D. C.; Florez, J. M.; Mukerji, T.; Mavko, G.

    2002-12-01

    We present the rock physics analysis from well logs of the fractured James Limestone reservoir in the Neuville Field and also the results of our stochastic simulations of various seismic attributes for different models of fractures in the reservoir. Our goal is to determine the optimal combination of seismic attributes, and the uncertainty due to natural variability for delineating the gas filled fractured zones. Geological model based on the logs from horizontal wells suggests that the fractures are controlled by subseismic normal faults. These small faults can generate narrow zones with high fracture density. Between these fracture swarms, the background fracture density may correspond to regularly spaced, vertical joints. Therefore, for fracture modeling we consider both isotropic and anisotropic distributions of fractures. The isotropic distribution corresponds to the fracture swarms in the vicinity of faults, where the cracks are more or less randomly orientated, such as in brecciated zones. The anisotropic distribution corresponds to a single set of vertical joints that generates an azimuthally anisotropic medium with HTI symmetry. For each hypotheses of fracture distribution we stochastically model seismic interval and interface properties such as interval velocities, Poisson's Ratio, impedances, travel time, scattering attenuation, PP reflectivity as a function of angle of incidence and azimuth. The modeling shows that some of these attributes, such as Poisson's Ratio and P Impedance, are more sensitive to the presence of fractures than others. Rock physics analysis of the cross-dipole and FMI logs shows that the fractures are present especially in the clean limestone intervals, characterized by high velocity and small porosity. This observation can be used in fracture delineation from seismic measurements. In summary, rock physics fracture modeling and stochastic simulations for seismic attributes of James Lime reservoir provide a framework for delineating

  18. Reservoir Space Evolution of Volcanic Rocks in Deep Songliao Basin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, M.; Wu, X.; Zheng, M.; HU, J.; Wang, S.

    2015-12-01

    Recent years, large amount of natural gas has been discovered in volcanic rock of Lower Crataceous of Songliao basin. Volcanic reservoirs have become one of the important target reservoir types of eastern basin of China. In order to study the volcanic reservoirs, we need to know the main factors controlling the reservoir space. By careful obsercation on volcanic drilling core, casting thin sections and statistical analysis of petrophysical properties of volcanic reservoir in Songliao basin, it can be suggested that the igneous rock reservoir in Yingcheng formation of Lower Crataceous is composed of different rock types, such ad rohylite, rohylitic crystal tuff, autoclastic brecciation lava and so on. There are different reservoirs storage space in in various lithological igneous rocks, but they are mainly composed of primary stoma, secondary solution pores and fractures.The evolution of storage space can be divided into 3 stage: the pramary reservoir space,exogenic leaching process and burial diagenesis.During the evolution process, the reservoir space is effected by secondary minerals, tectonic movement and volcanic hydrothermal solution. The pore of volcanic reservoirs can be partially filled by secondary minerals, but also may be dissoluted by other chemical volcanic hydrothermal solution. Therefore, the favorable places for better-quality volcanic reservoirs are the near-crater facies of vocanic apparatus and dissolution zones on the high position of paleo-structures.

  19. Iron speciation and mineral characterization of upper Jurassic reservoir rocks in the Minhe Basin, NW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiangxian; Zheng, Guodong; Xu, Wang; Liang, Minliang; Fan, Qiaohui; Wu, Yingzhong; Ye, Conglin; Shozugawa, Katsumi; Matsuo, Motoyuki

    2016-12-01

    Six samples from a natural outcrop of reservoir rocks with oil seepage and two control samples from surrounding area in the Minhe Basin, northwestern China were selectively collected and analyzed for mineralogical composition as well as iron speciation using X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and Mössbauer spectroscopy, respectively. Iron species revealed that: (1) the oil-bearing reservoir rocks were changed by water-rock-oil interactions; (2) even in the same site, there was a different performance between sandstone and mudstone during the oil and gas infusion to the reservoirs; and (3) this was evidence indicating the selective channels of hydrocarbon migration. In addition, these studies showed that the iron speciation by Mössbauer spectroscopy could be useful for the study of oil and gas reservoirs, especially the processes of the water-rock interactions within petroleum reservoirs.

  20. Diagenesis and reservoir quality of Devonian reservoir rocks of Nevada, Blackburn, and Grant Canyon fields

    SciTech Connect

    Bereskin, S.R.; Little, T.M.; Lord, G.D.

    1989-03-01

    Devonian carbonate rocks of the Basin and Range province are largely responsible for the current enthusiastic search for petroleum in Nevada. Severely dolomitized Givetian and Frasnian rocks, given various formational names, contain numerous marine intertidal to sublittoral facies that are cyclically interbedded. Exploration complications can arise from physical and chemical diagenesis; however, recent advancements in petrology and petrophysics allow evaluation and behavior predictability of fractured reservoirs from the Blackburn 16 and Grant Canyon 4 wells. Complex diagenesis and deformation are common to the hydrocarbon-producing intervals and included numerous cementation, dissolution, and fracturing events. Abundant fractures are dominantly nonpenetrative, partially open types, and such closely spaced fractures resulted from two episodes represented by conjugate sets in each case. Dissolution porosity associated with leached Amphipora is also present. Silica, barite, and kaolinite are the most volumetrically important authigenic fracture-filling minerals. Fluorescence microscopy has revealed shallow burial diagenetic events that are masked by the more severe overprint of solution(.) brecciation of tectonically inspired diagenesis.

  1. Geology and geochronology of the southeast border of the Bitterroot dome: implications for the structural evolution of the mylonitic carapace

    SciTech Connect

    Garmezy, L.

    1983-01-01

    Geologic and geochronologic study of the southeast corner of the Bitterroot dome has delimited the evolution of the shallow-dipping mylonitic carapace that developed on the granitic rocks of the Bitterroot lobe of the Idaho Batholith. Reset hornblende from the zone of mylonitization, in conjunction with /sup 40/Ar//sup 39/Ar age spectra of hornblende, muscovite, biotite, and K-feldspar from non-mylonitic samples, indicates that mylonitization began approx.45.5 Ma ago at a depth of probably greater than 9 to 10 km, and continued for approx.2 Ma, during a period of rapid uplift of the dome (.1 to .3 cm/y). The process of mylonitization caused shear heating of as much as 200/sup 0/C above ambient conditions. With only two exceptions, detailed kinematic analyses of mylonitic fabric indicate eastward tectonic transport of the hanging wall throughout the 500-1000 m-thick mylonitic zone. The extensional origin of the mylonitic carapace is supported by the /sup 40/Ar//sup 39/Ar data that indicate a contemporaneity between mylonitization and regional Eocene volcanism and extension. The data show that mylonitization was not associated with either the development of thrust faults in the Sapphire tectonic block or initial intrusion and crystallization of the batholith.

  2. Sediment discharge in Rock Creek and the effect of sedimentation rate on the proposed Rock Creek Reservoir, northwestern Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Butler, D.L.

    1987-01-01

    Sediment data collected from 1976 to 1985 and stream discharge data collected from 1952 to 1980 at gaging station 09060500, Rock Creek near Toponas, Colorado, were used to determine total sediment discharge into the proposed Rock Creek Reservoir. Suspended sediment discharge and bedload discharge were related to stream discharge by using logarithmic regression relations. Mean annual suspended sediment discharge was estimated to be 309 tons/yr, and mean annual bedload discharge was estimated to be 428 tons/yr in Rock Creek at the Toponas gaging station for the 1953 through 1980 water years. The mean annual total sediment discharge into the proposed reservoir was estimated to be 768 tons/yr, which includes 10% addition to the suspended sediment discharge calculated for the Toponas gaging station to account for suspended sediment discharge from Horse Creek. This rate of mean annual total sediment discharge would decrease the long-term water storage capacity of the proposed reservoir by < 1% after 100 years. Suspended sediment discharge/unit-drainage-basin area at gaging station 09060550, Rock Creek at Crater, located about 5 mi downstream for the proposed reservoir site, was equivalent to suspended-sediment discharge/unit-drainage-basin area at the Toponas gaging station during 1985. Long-term sediment data collection at the Crater gaging station could be used for detecting changes in suspended sediment discharge in Rock Creek at the proposed reservoir site. (Author 's abstract)

  3. A rock-physical modeling method for carbonate reservoirs at seismic scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing-Ye; Chen, Xiao-Hong

    2013-03-01

    Strong heterogeneity and complex pore systems of carbonate reservoir rock make its rock physics model building and fluid substitution difficult and complex. However, rock physics models connect reservoir parameters with seismic parameters and fluid substitution is the most effective tool for reservoir prediction and quantitative characterization. On the basis of analyzing complex carbonate reservoir pore structures and heterogeneity at seismic scale, we use the gridding method to divide carbonate rock into homogeneous blocks with independent rock parameters and calculate the elastic moduli of dry rock units step by step using different rock physics models based on pore origin and structural feature. Then, the elastic moduli of rocks saturated with different fluids are obtained using fluid substitution based on different pore connectivity. Based on the calculated elastic moduli of rock units, the Hashin-Shtrikman-Walpole elastic boundary theory is adopted to calculate the carbonate elastic parameters at seismic scale. The calculation and analysis of carbonate models with different combinations of pore types demonstrate the effects of pore type on rock elastic parameters. The simulated result is consistent with our knowledge of real data.

  4. Hydro-mechanically coupled modelling of deep-seated rock slides in the surroundings of reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lechner, Heidrun; Preh, Alexander; Zangerl, Christian

    2016-04-01

    In order to enhance the understanding of the behaviour of deep-seated rock slides in the surroundings of large dam reservoirs, this study concentrates on failure mechanisms, deformation processes and the ability of self-stabilisation of rock slides influenced by reservoirs. Particular focus is put on internal rock mass deformations, progressive topographical slope changes due to reservoir impoundment and shear displacements along the basal shear zone in relation to its shear strength properties. In this study, a two-dimensional numerical rock slide model is designed by means of the Universal Distinct Element Code UDEC and investigated concerning different groundwater flow scenarios. These include: (i) a completely drained rock slide model, (ii) a model with fully saturated rock mass below an inclined groundwater table and (iii) a saturated groundwater model with a reservoir at the slope toe. Slope displacements initiate when the shear strength properties of the basal shear zone are at or below the critical parameters for the limit-equilibrium state and continue until a numerical equilibrium is reached due to deformation- and displacement-based geometrical changes. The study focuses on the influence of a reservoir at the toe of a rock slide and tries to evaluate the degree of displacement which is needed for a re-stabilisation in relation to the geometrical characteristics of the rock slide. Besides, challenges and limitations of applied distinct element methods to simulate large strain and displacements of deep-seated rock slides are discussed. The ongoing study will help to understand the deformation behaviour of deep-seated pre-existing rock slides in fractured rock mass during initial impounding and will be part of a hazard assessment for large reservoirs.

  5. Geometrical and hydrogeological impact on the behaviour of deep-seated rock slides during reservoir impoundment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lechner, Heidrun; Zangerl, Christian

    2015-04-01

    Given that there are still uncertainties regarding the deformation and failure mechanisms of deep-seated rock slides this study concentrates on key factors that influence the behaviour of rock slides in the surrounding of reservoirs. The focus is placed on the slope geometry, hydrogeology and kinematics. Based on numerous generic rock slide models the impacts of the (i) rock slide geometry, (ii) reservoir impoundment and level fluctuations, (iii) seepage and buoyancy forces and (iv) hydraulic conductivity of the rock slide mass and the basal shear zone are examined using limit equilibrium approaches. The geometry of many deep-seated rock slides in metamorphic rocks is often influenced by geological structures, e.g. fault zones, joints, foliation, bedding planes and others. With downslope displacement the rock slide undergoes a change in shape. Several observed rock slides in an advanced stage show a convex, bulge-like topography at the foot of the slope and a concave topography in the middle to upper part. Especially, the situation of the slope toe plays an important role for stability. A potentially critical situation can result from a partially submerged flat slope toe because the uplift due to water pressure destabilizes the rock slide. Furthermore, it is essential if the basal shear zone daylights at the foot of the slope or encounters alluvial or glacial deposits at the bottom of the valley, the latter having a buttressing effect. In this study generic rock slide models with a shear zone outcropping at the slope toe are established and systematically analysed using limit equilibrium calculations. Two different kinematic types are modelled: (i) a translational or planar and (ii) a rotational movement behaviour. Questions concerning the impact of buoyancy and pore pressure forces that develop during first time impoundment are of key interest. Given that an adverse effect on the rock slide stability is expected due to reservoir impoundment the extent of

  6. Stress-Induced Fracturing of Reservoir Rocks: Acoustic Monitoring and μCT Image Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Srutarshi; Stroisz, Anna M.; Fjær, Erling; Stenebråten, Jørn F.; Lund, Hans K.; Sønstebø, Eyvind F.

    2015-11-01

    Stress-induced fracturing in reservoir rocks is an important issue for the petroleum industry. While productivity can be enhanced by a controlled fracturing operation, it can trigger borehole instability problems by reactivating existing fractures/faults in a reservoir. However, safe fracturing can improve the quality of operations during CO2 storage, geothermal installation and gas production at and from the reservoir rocks. Therefore, understanding the fracturing behavior of different types of reservoir rocks is a basic need for planning field operations toward these activities. In our study, stress-induced fracturing of rock samples has been monitored by acoustic emission (AE) and post-experiment computer tomography (CT) scans. We have used hollow cylinder cores of sandstones and chalks, which are representatives of reservoir rocks. The fracture-triggering stress has been measured for different rocks and compared with theoretical estimates. The population of AE events shows the location of main fracture arms which is in a good agreement with post-test CT image analysis, and the fracture patterns inside the samples are visualized through 3D image reconstructions. The amplitudes and energies of acoustic events clearly indicate initiation and propagation of the main fractures. Time evolution of the radial strain measured in the fracturing tests will later be compared to model predictions of fracture size.

  7. Mechanical Behaviour of Reservoir Rock Under Brine Saturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Richa; Ranjith, P. G.; Choi, S. K.; Haque, A.; Yellishetty, Mohan; Hong, Li

    2013-01-01

    Acoustic emissions (AE) and stress-strain curve analysis are well accepted ways of analysing crack propagation and monitoring the various failure stages (such as crack closure, crack initiation level during rock failure under compression) of rocks and rock-like materials. This paper presents details and results of experimental investigations conducted for characterizing the brittle failure processes induced in a rock due to monocyclic uniaxial compression on loading of two types of sandstone core samples saturated in NaCl brines of varying concentration (0, 2, 5, 10 and 15 % NaCl by weight). The two types of sandstone samples were saturated under vacuum for more than 45 days with the respective pore fluid to allow them to interact with the rocks. It was observed that the uniaxial compressive strength and stress-strain behaviour of the rock specimens changed with increasing NaCl concentration in the saturating fluid. The acoustic emission patterns also varied considerably for increasing ionic strength of the saturating brines. These observations can be attributed to the deposition of NaCl crystals in the rock's pore spaces as well some minor geo-chemical interactions between the rock minerals and the brine. The AE pattern variations could also be partly related to the higher conductivity of the ionic strength of the high-NaCl concentration brine as it is able to transfer more acoustic energy from the cracks to the AE sensors.

  8. SEISMIC AND ROCK PHYSICS DIAGNOSTICS OF MULTISCALE RESERVOIR TEXTURES

    SciTech Connect

    Gary Mavko

    2003-06-30

    As part of our study on ''Relationships between seismic properties and rock microstructure'', we have studied (1) Effects of pore texture on porosity, permeability, and sonic velocity. We show how a relation can be found between porosity, permeability, and velocity by separating the formations of rocks with similar pore textures.

  9. Xenon NMR measurements of permeability and tortuosity in reservoir rocks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruopeng; Pavlin, Tina; Rosen, Matthew Scott; Mair, Ross William; Cory, David G; Walsworth, Ronald Lee

    2005-02-01

    In this work we present measurements of permeability, effective porosity and tortuosity on a variety of rock samples using NMR/MRI of thermal and laser-polarized gas. Permeability and effective porosity are measured simultaneously using MRI to monitor the inflow of laser-polarized xenon into the rock core. Tortuosity is determined from measurements of the time-dependent diffusion coefficient using thermal xenon in sealed samples. The initial results from a limited number of rocks indicate inverse correlations between tortuosity and both effective porosity and permeability. Further studies to widen the number of types of rocks studied may eventually aid in explaining the poorly understood connection between permeability and tortuosity of rock cores. PMID:15833638

  10. Use of ``rock-typing`` to characterize carbonate reservoir heterogeneity. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ikwuakor, K.C.

    1994-03-01

    The objective of the project was to apply techniques of ``rock-typing`` and quantitative formation evaluation to borehole measurements in order to identify reservoir and non-reservoir rock-types and their properties within the ``C`` zone of the Ordovician Red River carbonates in the northeast Montana and northwest North Dakota areas of the Williston Basin. Rock-typing discriminates rock units according to their pore-size distribution. Formation evaluation estimates porosities and pore fluid saturation. Rock-types were discriminated using crossplots involving three rock-typing criteria: (1) linear relationship between bulk density and porosity, (2) linear relationship between acoustic interval transit-time and porosity, and (3) linear relationship between acoustic interval transit-time and bulk density. Each rock-type was quantitatively characterized by the slopes and intercepts established for different crossplots involving the above variables, as well as porosities and fluid saturations associated with the rock-types. All the existing production was confirmed through quantitative formation evaluation. Highly porous dolomites and anhydritic dolomites contribute most of the production, and constitute the best reservoir rock-types. The results of this study can be applied in field development and in-fill drilling. Potential targets would be areas of porosity pinchouts and those areas where highly porous zones are downdip from non-porous and tight dolomites. Such areas are abundant. In order to model reservoirs for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) operations, a more localized (e.g. field scale) study, expanded to involve other rock-typing criteria, is necessary.

  11. Chemical water/rock interaction under reservoir condition

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, K.; Tanifuji, K.; Takahashi, H.; Wang, Y.; Yamasaki, N.; Nakatsuka, K.

    1995-01-26

    A simple model is proposed for water/rock interaction in rock fractures through which geothermal water flows. Water/rock interaction experiments were carried out at high temperature and pressure (200-350 C, 18 MPa) in order to obtain basic solubility and reaction rate data. Based on the experimental data, changes of idealized fracture apertures with time are calculated numerically. The results of the calculations show that the precipitation from water can lead to plugging of the fractures under certain conditions. Finally, the results are compared with the experimental data.

  12. X-ray microtomography application in pore space reservoir rock.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, M F S; Lima, I; Borghi, L; Lopes, R T

    2012-07-01

    Characterization of porosity in carbonate rocks is important in the oil and gas industry since a major hydrocarbons field is formed by this lithology and they have a complex media porous. In this context, this research presents a study of the pore space in limestones rocks by x-ray microtomography. Total porosity, type of porosity and pore size distribution were evaluated from 3D high resolution images. Results show that carbonate rocks has a complex pore space system with different pores types at the same facies. PMID:22264795

  13. SEISMIC AND ROCK PHYSICS DIAGNOSTICS OF MULTISCALE RESERVOIR TEXTURES

    SciTech Connect

    Gary Mavko

    2003-06-01

    As part of our study on ''Relationships between seismic properties and rock microstructure'', we have studied (1) Elastic properties of clay minerals using Pulse Transmission experiments. We show measurements of elastic moduli and strain in clay minerals.

  14. Simulation of irreversible rock compaction effects on geopressured reservoir response: Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Riney, T.D.

    1986-12-01

    A series of calculations are presented which quantitatively demonstrate the effects of nonlinear stress-deformation properties on the behavior of geopressured reservoirs. The range of stress-deformation parameters considered is based on information available from laboratory rock mechanics tests performed at the University of Texas at Austin and at Terra Tek, Inc. on cores recovered from geopressured wells. The effects of irreversible formation rock compaction, associated permeability reduction, and repetitive load/unload cycling are considered. The formation rock and geopressured brine properties are incorporated into an existing reservoir simulator using a bilinear model for the irreversible compaction process. Pressure drawdown and buildup testing of a well producing from the geopressured formation is simulated for a suite of calculations covering the range of formation parameters. The results are presented and discussed in terms of the inference (e.g., permeability and reservoir volume) that would be drawn from the simulated test data by an analyst using conventional methods.

  15. Mechanical rock properties, fracture propagation and permeability development in deep geothermal reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonie Philipp, Sonja; Reyer, Dorothea

    2010-05-01

    Deep geothermal reservoirs are rock units at depths greater than 400 m from which the internal heat can be extracted using water as a transport means in an economically efficient manner. In many geothermal reservoirs, fluid flow is largely, and may be almost entirely, controlled by the permeability of the fracture network. No flow, however, takes place along a particular fracture network unless the fractures are interconnected. For fluid flow to occur from one site to another there must be at least one interconnected cluster of fractures that links these sites, that is, the percolation threshold must be reached. In "hydrothermal systems", only the natural fracture system (extension and shear fractures) creates the rock or reservoir permeability that commonly exceeds the matrix permeability by far; in "petrothermal systems", by contrast, interconnected fracture systems are formed by creating hydraulic fractures and massive hydraulic stimulation of the existing fracture system in the host rock. Propagation (or termination, that is, arrest) of both natural extension and shear fractures as well as man-made hydraulic fractures is mainly controlled by the mechanical rock properties, particularly rock toughness, stiffness and strengths, of the host rock. Most reservoir rocks are heterogeneous and anisotropic, in particular they are layered. For many layered rocks, the mechanical properties, particularly their Young's moduli (stiffnesses), change between layers, that is, the rocks are mechanically layered. Mechanical layering may coincide with changes in grain size, mineral content, fracture frequencies, or facies. For example, in sedimentary rocks, stiff limestone or sandstone layers commonly alternate with soft shale layers. In geothermal reservoirs fracture termination is important because non-stratabound fractures, that is, fractures not affected by layering, are more likely to form an interconnected fracture network than stratabound fractures, confined to single rock

  16. Seismic monitoring of heavy oil reservoirs: Rock physics and finite element modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theune, Ulrich

    In the past decades, remote monitoring of subsurface processes has attracted increasing attention in geophysics. With repeated geophysical surveys one attempts to detect changes in the physical properties in the underground without directly accessing the earth. This technique has been proven to be very valuable for monitoring enhanced oil recovery programs. This thesis presents an modelling approach for the feasibility analysis for monitoring of a thermal enhanced oil recovery technique applied to heavy oil reservoirs in the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin. In order to produce heavy oil from shallow reservoirs thermal oil recovery techniques such as the Steam Assisted Gravity Drainage (SAGD) are often employed. As these techniques are expensive and technically challenging, early detection of operational problems is without doubt of great value. However, the feasibility of geophysical monitoring depends on many factors such as the changes in the rock physical properties of the target reservoir. In order to access the feasibility of seismic monitoring for heavy oil reservoirs, a fluid-substitutional rock physical study has been carried out to simulate the steam injection. The second modelling approach is based on a modified finite element algorithm to simulate the propagation of elastic waves in the earth, which has been developed independently in the framework of this thesis. The work summarized in this thesis shows a possibility to access the feasibility of seismic monitoring for heavy oil reservoirs through an extensive rock-physical study. Seismic monitoring is a useful tool in reservoir management decision process. However, the work reported here suggests that seismic monitoring of SAGD processes in the heavy oil reservoirs of the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin is only feasible in shallow, unconsolidated deposits. For deeper, but otherwise geological similar reservoirs, the SAGD does not create a sufficient change in the rock physical properties to be

  17. Adsorption of water vapor on reservoir rocks. First quarterly report, January--March 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    Progress is reported on: adsorption of water vapor on reservoir rocks; theoretical investigation of adsorption; estimation of adsorption parameters from transient experiments; transient adsorption experiment -- salinity and noncondensible gas effects; the physics of injection of water into, transport and storage of fluids within, and production of vapor from geothermal reservoirs; injection optimization at the Geysers Geothermal Field; a model to test multiwell data interpretation for heterogeneous reservoirs; earth tide effects on downhole pressure measurements; and a finite-difference model for free surface gravity drainage well test analysis.

  18. Anisotropic rock physics models for interpreting pore structures in carbonate reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Sheng-Jie; Shao, Yu; Chen, Xu-Qiang

    2016-03-01

    We developed an anisotropic effective theoretical model for modeling the elastic behavior of anisotropic carbonate reservoirs by combining the anisotropic self-consistent approximation and differential effective medium models. By analyzing the measured data from carbonate samples in the TL area, a carbonate pore-structure model for estimating the elastic parameters of carbonate rocks is proposed, which is a prerequisite in the analysis of carbonate reservoirs. A workflow for determining elastic properties of carbonate reservoirs is established in terms of the anisotropic effective theoretical model and the pore-structure model. We performed numerical experiments and compared the theoretical prediction and measured data. The result of the comparison suggests that the proposed anisotropic effective theoretical model can account for the relation between velocity and porosity in carbonate reservoirs. The model forms the basis for developing new tools for predicting and evaluating the properties of carbonate reservoirs.

  19. Rock-physics and seismic-inversion based reservoir characterization of the Haynesville Shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Meijuan; Spikes, Kyle T.

    2016-06-01

    Seismic reservoir characterization of unconventional gas shales is challenging due to their heterogeneity and anisotropy. Rock properties of unconventional gas shales such as porosity, pore-shape distribution, and composition are important for interpreting seismic data amplitude variations in order to locate optimal drilling locations. The presented seismic reservoir characterization procedure applied a grid-search algorithm to estimate the composition, pore-shape distribution, and porosity at the seismic scale from the seismically inverted impedances and a rock-physics model, using the Haynesville Shale as a case study. All the proposed rock properties affected the seismic velocities, and the combined effects of these rock properties on the seismic amplitude were investigated simultaneously. The P- and S-impedances correlated negatively with porosity, and the V P/V S correlated positively with clay fraction and negatively with the pore-shape distribution and quartz fraction. The reliability of these estimated rock properties at the seismic scale was verified through comparisons between two sets of elastic properties: one coming from inverted impedances, which were obtained from simultaneous inversion of prestack seismic data, and one derived from these estimated rock properties. The differences between the two sets of elastic properties were less than a few percent, verifying the feasibility of the presented seismic reservoir characterization.

  20. SEISMIC AND ROCK PHYSICS DIAGNOSTICS OF MULTISCALE RESERVOIR TEXTURES

    SciTech Connect

    Gary Mavko

    2003-06-30

    As part of our study on ''Relationships between seismic properties and rock microstructure'', we have studied (1) Methods for detection of stress-induced velocity anisotropy in sands. (2) We have initiated efforts for velocity upscaling to quantify long-wavelength and short-wavelength velocity behavior and the scale-dependent dispersion caused by sediment variability in different depositional environments.

  1. Controls on CO2 Mineralization in Volcanogenic Sandstone Reservoir Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S.; DePaolo, D. J.; Xu, T.; Voltolini, M.

    2013-12-01

    We proposed to use volcanogenic sandstones for CO2 sequestration. Such sandstones with a relatively high percentage of volcanic rock fragments (VRF) could be a promising target for CO2 sequestration in that they have a sufficient percentage of reactive minerals to allow substantial mineralization of injected scCO2, which provides the most secure form of CO2 storage, but can also be porous and permeable enough to allow injection at acceptable rates. Modeling results from reactive transport code TOUGHREACT show that as much as 80% CO2 mineralization could occur in 1000 years in rocks with 10-20% volcanic rock fragments and still allow sufficient injectivity so that ca. 1 megaton of CO2 can be injected per year per well. The key to estimating how much CO2 can be injected and mineralized is the relationship between permeability (or injectivity) and reactive mineral content. We have sampled examples of volcanogenic sandstones from Miocene Etchegoin Formation, central California to examine these relationships. Characterizations of these samples by SEM, XRF and XRD show that they are rich in reactive minerals with around 32% plagioclase, 10% clinopyroxene, 2% diopside, and 1% ilmenite. Porosities range from 10% to 20%, and permeabilities range from 10 mD to 1000 mD. Batch experiments are also in progress to obtain realistic reactivity estimates. Figure 1. Outcrop photo and photomicrograph showing volcanic mineralogy and abundant pore space from Miocene Etchegoin Formation, central California

  2. Chemical hydrofracturing of the Hot Dry Rock reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Yakovlev, Leonid

    1996-01-24

    The experimental study of the water-rock interaction shows that the secondary mineral assemblage depends on the water composition. For example, granite-pure water interaction produces zeolites (relatively low-dense, Mg-poor minerals), whereas seawater yields chlorites (high-dense, Mg-rich minerals). The reactions have volumetric effects from several % to 20 % in magnitude. Volume deformations in the heterogeneous matrix cause uneven mechanical strains. Reactions with the effect of about 0,1 vol.% may cause strains of the order of 100-1000 bars being enough for destruction of rocks. Signs and magnitudes of local volume changes depend on the mineral composition of the secondary assemblage. Hence, one can provide either healing or cracking of primary fractures, as desired, by changing the composition of water in the water-felsic rock system where some elements (Mg, Fe) are in lack. The techniques of "chemical hydrofracturing" looks promising as applied to a granite HDR massif. One can regulate the permeability of fractured flow paths by changing in concord the composition and pressure of the injected water. This approach should promote efficient extraction of the petrothermal energy.

  3. Numerical simulation of the electrical properties of shale gas reservoir rock based on digital core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Xin; Zou, Changchun; Li, Zhenhua; Meng, Xiaohong; Qi, Xinghua

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we study the electrical properties of shale gas reservoir rock by applying the finite element method to digital cores which are built based on an advanced Markov Chain Monte Carlo method and a combination workflow. Study shows that the shale gas reservoir rock has strong anisotropic electrical conductivity because the conductivity is significantly different in both horizontal and vertical directions. The Archie formula is not suitable for application in shale reservoirs. The formation resistivity decreases in two cases; namely (a) with the increase of clay mineral content and the cation exchange capacity of clay, and (b) with the increase of pyrite content. The formation resistivity is not sensitive to the solid organic matter but to the clay and gas in the pores.

  4. EVALUATION OF RESERVOIR ROCK AND WELL BORE CEMENT ALTERATION WITH SUPERCRITICAL CO2

    SciTech Connect

    William k. O'Connor; Gilbert E Rush

    2009-01-01

    An evaluation of the alteration of reservoir rock and well bore cement at their interface, under supercritical CO{sub 2} (SCCO{sub 2}), was conducted at the laboratory-scale using simulated brine solutions at down-hole conditions. These studies were intended to identify potential leakage pathways for injected CO{sub 2} due to degradation of the well bore. Two distinct test series were conducted on core samples of the Mt. Simon sandstone from the Illinois Basin, IL, and the Grand Ronde basalt from the Pasco Basin, WA. LaFarge Class H well bore cement was used for both series. Reservoir rock/cement cores were immersed within a CO{sub 2}-saturated brine for up to 2000 hours at 35 degrees C and 100 atm CO{sub 2}. Results suggest that the impact of SCCO{sub 2} injection is reservoir-specific, being highly dependent on the reservoir brine and rock type. Brine pH can be significantly altered by CO{sub 2} injection, which in turn can dramatically impact the dissolution characteristics of the reservoir rock. Finally, well bore cement alteration was identified, particularly for fresh cast cement allowed to cure at SCCO{sub 2} conditions. However, this alteration was generally limited to an outer rind of carbonate and Ca-depleted cement which appeared to protect the majority of the cement core from further attack. These studies indicate that at the cement-rock interface, the annular space may be filled by carbonate which could act as an effective barrier against further CO{sub 2} migration along the well bore.

  5. Geochemical simulations on CO2-fluid-rock interactions in EGS reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, F.; McPherson, B. J.; Lichtner, P. C.; Kaszuba, J. P.; Lo Re, C.; Karra, S.; Lu, C.; Xu, T.

    2012-12-01

    Supercritical CO2 has been suggested as a heat transmission fluid in Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) reservoirs to improve energy extraction. Understanding the geochemical processes of CO2-fluid-rock interactions in EGS reservoirs is significant important to investigate the performance of energy extraction with CO2 instead of water as a working fluid, carbon sequestration and risk assessment. The objectives of this study: (1) to calibrate and evaluate the kinetic rate constants and specific reactive surface areas of minerals based on the batch experimental data conducted by other researchers (collaborators Kaszuba and Lo Ré at the University of Wyoming); (2) to investigate the effects of CO2-fluid-rock geochemical interactions on the energy extraction efficiency, carbon sequestration, and risk assessment. A series of laboratory experiments were conducted (Lo Ré et al., 2012) to investigate the geochemical reactions among water, fractured granite rocks, and injected supercritical CO2 at elevated temperatures of 250 oC, and pressures of 250-450 bars. The batch simulations were firstly conducted to mimic the laboratory experiments with the calibration of mineral reactive surface areas using TOUGHREACT model and parameter estimation software (PEST). Then, we performed 2-D geochemical modeling to simulate the chemical interactions among CO2, fluids, and rocks at high temperatures and pressures of EGS reservoirs. We further investigated the effects of fluid-rock interactions on the energy extraction, carbon sequestration, and risk assessment with CO2 as a heat transmission fluid instead of water for EGS reservoirs. Results of carbonate mineral precipitations suggested that the CO2 as a working fluid instead of water was favorable for EGS reservoirs on the CO2 sequestration. Our simulations also suggested that the energy extraction could be enhanced using CO2 as the transmission fluid compared to water.

  6. SEISMIC AND ROCK PHYSICS DIAGNOSTICS OF MULTISCALE RESERVOIR TEXTURES

    SciTech Connect

    Gary Mavko

    2002-05-01

    As part of our study on ''Relationships between seismic properties and rock microstructure'', we have studied (1) How to quantify elastic properties of clay minerals using Atomic Force Acoustic Microscopy. We show how bulk modulus of clay can be measured using atomic force acoustic microscopy (AFAM) (2) We have successfully measured elastic properties of unconsolidated sediments in an effort to quantify attributes for detection of overpressures from seismic (3) We have initiated efforts for velocity upscaling to quantify long-wavelength and short-wavelength velocity behavior and the scale-dependent dispersion caused by sediment variability in different depositional environments.

  7. Paleozoic source and reservoir rocks in unbreached thrust ramp anticlines, Millard County, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Garrison, P.B.; Larsen, B.R. )

    1991-03-01

    Surface geology, source rock geochemistry, and seismic data indicate that substantial hydrocarbon reserves may occur beneath a regional detachment fault underlying Tule Valley and the Confusion Range in northern Millard County, west-central Utah. Paleozoic hydrocarbon source and reservoir rocks in Millard County are laterally equivalent to highly productive rocks in Railroad Valley, Nevada, oil fields. However, the volume of hydrocarbons trapped in thrust ramp duplex anticlines beneath a regional detachment fault is potentially much greater than that in established Nevada fields. The Devonian Guilmette Formation, which consists of interstratified brown, sucrosic dolomite and gray limestone, and the Mississippian Chainman Shale are exposed in the folded and thrusted Confusion Range. Regional geochemical analysis confirms that the Chainman Shale contains enough total organic carbon (TOC) to serve as an effective hydrocarbon source rock. Some surface samples exceed 3% TOC; average TOC is in excess of 1.5%. Thermal maturity of these source rock surface samples indicates that these rocks were subjected to deep burial during their geologic history and that they have generated the maximum amount of hydrocarbons. In addition, thermal maturity of these samples is consistent with hydrocarbon preservation at the 'floor' of the oil window and within the area of peak wet gas generation. Petrographic examination of potential reservoir facies in the Guilmette Formation confirms that liquid hydrocarbons were contained in porous, permeable dolomite. Petrographic examination of kerogen from these same facies also confirms the presence of solid bitumen (dead oil) in the surface samples.

  8. Fluid-Rock Interactions at the Interface between Reservoir Rock and Cap Rock: An Experimental Case Study Regarding Mineral Trapping at 54 and 200 C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wigand, M. O.; Carey, J. W.; Kaszuba, J. P.; Hollis, W. K.

    2006-12-01

    Geologic sequestration (underground storage) of carbon dioxide (CO2) is the most feasible approach to mitigating CO2-induced global warming while maintaining the current fossil fuel-based economy. Although simple in principle, effective implementation of geologic sequestration will require significant development of the scientific understanding of interactions among injected CO2 (as a supercritical fluid), brine, and the reservoir rock. This paper presents the results of flow-through experiments that simulated a rising plume of supercritical carbon dioxide (SCCO2) interacting at the interface between reservoir rock and cap rock in a brine- saturated aquifer. We performed two high pressure flow-through experiments using powdered limestone and illite-rich shale separated by a frit with a pore size of 10 μm. One experiment was performed under in-situ pressure (2880 psi) and temperature (54°C) conditions of a typical oil reservoir in the Permian Basin. To increase the kinetic rates of the mineral reactions we also performed an experiment at elevated temperatures (200°C) but using the same boundary conditions for other experimental parameters such as pressure, rock samples, fluids, injection rates, and time span. Both experiments were performed over 3263 hours. After the experiment eight disks of equal size representing different reaction zones were cut to investigate the progressive fluid-rock interaction of the reservoir and cap rock with the mixture of SCCO2 and brine. Additionally, fluid samples were frequently collected and their compositions were analyzed using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. At in-situ temperature conditions we determined an enrichment of B, Ba, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Li, Mg, Na, Ni, Rb, Si, Sr, Ti, Zn, and sulfate in the collected brines, whereas Mn and chloride concentrations were depleted in comparison with the starting composition. Ca and Al showed uneven behavior with changes in enrichment and depletion during the experiment. At 200

  9. Velocity dispersion: A tool for characterizing reservoir rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, R.L.; Seifert, D.

    1997-01-01

    Apparent discrepancies between velocity measurements made with different frequencies in a formation at the Gypsy test site are explained in terms of elastic scattering and intrinsic attenuation. The elastic scattering component of the dispersion (38%) in a marine interval above the Gypsy sandstone is estimated via simple models constructed from well log information. Any dispersion above the predicted value for elastic scattering in this interval is assigned to intrinsic attenuation (62%). Using the vertical measurements in the well, the marine interval directly above the Gypsy sandstone has an estimated intrinsic Q1 = 51 and an effective Q because of the scattering of Qsc = 85. The total Q of the combined mechanisms is 32. The dispersion of the vertical measurements through the heterogeneous sands and shales of the Gypsy formation can be explained using an intrinsic QI = 30 and neglecting the effects of scattering. The horizontal observations require a more detailed modeling effort to unravel the relative roles of path and volume effects, elastic scattering, attenuation, and intrinsic anisotropy. Thin layers barely resolvable on the sonic logs play a significant role in modifying the crosswell response. Potentially, the dispersion can be a key to mapping reservoir properties using crosswell and surface seismic data.

  10. A rock physics model for analysis of anisotropic parameters in a shale reservoir in Southwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Keran; Zhang, Feng; Chen, Shuangquan; Li, Xiangyang; Zhang, Hui

    2016-02-01

    A rock physics model is a very effective tool to describe the anisotropy and mechanical properties of rock from a seismology perspective. Compared to a conventional reservoir, modelling a shale reservoir requires us to face two main challenges in modelling: the existence of organic matter and strong anisotropy. We construct an anisotropic rock physics workflow for a typical shale reservoir in Southwest China, in which the organic matter is treated separately from other minerals by using a combination of anisotropic self-consistent approximation and the differential effective medium method. The standard deviation of the distribution function is used to model the degree of lamination of clay and kerogen. A double scan workflow is introduced to invert the probability of pore aspect ratio and lamination simultaneously, which can give us a better understanding of the shale formation. The anisotropic properties of target formation have been analysed based on the proposed model. Inverted Thomsen parameters, especially the sign of delta, are analysed in terms of the physical properties of rock physics modelling.

  11. Reservoir rock permeability prediction using support vector regression in an Iranian oil field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saffarzadeh, Sadegh; Shadizadeh, Seyed Reza

    2012-06-01

    Reservoir permeability is a critical parameter for the evaluation of hydrocarbon reservoirs. It is often measured in the laboratory from reservoir core samples or evaluated from well test data. The prediction of reservoir rock permeability utilizing well log data is important because the core analysis and well test data are usually only available from a few wells in a field and have high coring and laboratory analysis costs. Since most wells are logged, the common practice is to estimate permeability from logs using correlation equations developed from limited core data; however, these correlation formulae are not universally applicable. Recently, support vector machines (SVMs) have been proposed as a new intelligence technique for both regression and classification tasks. The theory has a strong mathematical foundation for dependence estimation and predictive learning from finite data sets. The ultimate test for any technique that bears the claim of permeability prediction from well log data is the accurate and verifiable prediction of permeability for wells where only the well log data are available. The main goal of this paper is to develop the SVM method to obtain reservoir rock permeability based on well log data.

  12. Combining rock physics and sedimentology for seismic reservoir characterization of North Sea turbidite systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avseth, Per Age

    The petroleum industry is increasing its focus on the exploration of reservoirs in turbidite systems. However, these sedimentary environments are often characterized by very complex sand distributions. Hence, reservoir description based on conventional seismic and well-log interpretation may be very uncertain. There is a need to employ more quantitative seismic techniques to reveal reservoirs units in these complex systems from seismic amplitude data. In this study we focus on North Sea turbidite systems. Our goal is to improve the ability to use 3D seismic data to map reservoirs in these systems. A cross-disciplinary methodology for seismic reservoir characterization is presented that combines rock physics, sedimentology, and statistical techniques. We apply this methodology to two turbidite systems of Paleocene age located in the South Viking Graben of the North Sea. First, we investigate the relationship between sedimentary petrography and rock physics properties. Next, we define seismic scale sedimentary units, referred to as seismic lithofacies. These facies represent populations of data that have characteristic geologic and seismic properties. We establish a statistically representative training database by identifying seismic lithofacies from thin-sections, cores, and well-log data. This procedure is guided by diagnostic rock physics modeling. Based on the training data, we perform multivariate classification of data from several wells in the area. Next, we assess uncertainties in amplitude versus offset (AVO) response related to the inherent natural variability of each seismic lithofacies. We generate bivariate probability density functions (pdfs) of two AVO parameters for different facies combinations. By combining the bivariate pdfs estimated from well-logs with the AVO parameters estimated from seismic data, we use both quadratic discriminant analysis and Bayesian classification to predict lithofacies and pore fluids from seismic amplitudes. The final

  13. Advanced Characterization of Fractured Reservoirs in Carbonate Rocks: The Michigan Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, James R.; Harrison, William B.

    2000-10-24

    The main objective of this project is for a university-industry consortium to develop a comprehensive model for fracture carbonate reservoirs based on the ''data cube'' concept using the Michigan Basin as a prototype. This project combined traditional historical data with 2D and 3D seismic data as well as data from modern logging tools in a novel way to produce a new methodology for characterizing fractured reservoirs in carbonate rocks. Advanced visualization software was used to fuse the data and to image it on a variety of scales, ranging from basin-scale to well-scales.

  14. Advanced Characterization of Fractured Reservoirs in Carbonate Rocks: The Michigan Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, J.R.; Harrison, W.B.

    2001-01-22

    The main objective of this project is for a university-industry consortium to develop a comprehensive model for fracture carbonate reservoirs based on the ''data cube'' concept using the Michigan Basin as a prototype. This project combined traditional historical data with 2D and 3D seismic data as well as data from modern logging tools in a novel way to produce a new methodology for characterizing fractured reservoirs in carbonate rocks. Advanced visualization software was used to fuse the data and to image it on a variety of scales, ranging from basin-scale to well-scales.

  15. Multiporosity flow in fractured low-permeability rocks: Extension to shale hydrocarbon reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhlman, Kristopher L.; Malama, Bwalya; Heath, Jason E.

    2015-02-05

    We presented a multiporosity extension of classical double and triple-porosity fractured rock flow models for slightly compressible fluids. The multiporosity model is an adaptation of the multirate solute transport model of Haggerty and Gorelick (1995) to viscous flow in fractured rock reservoirs. It is a generalization of both pseudo steady state and transient interporosity flow double-porosity models. The model includes a fracture continuum and an overlapping distribution of multiple rock matrix continua, whose fracture-matrix exchange coefficients are specified through a discrete probability mass function. Semianalytical cylindrically symmetric solutions to the multiporosity mathematical model are developed using the Laplace transform to illustrate its behavior. Furthermore, the multiporosity model presented here is conceptually simple, yet flexible enough to simulate common conceptualizations of double and triple-porosity flow. This combination of generality and simplicity makes the multiporosity model a good choice for flow modelling in low-permeability fractured rocks.

  16. Multiporosity flow in fractured low-permeability rocks: Extension to shale hydrocarbon reservoirs

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kuhlman, Kristopher L.; Malama, Bwalya; Heath, Jason E.

    2015-02-05

    We presented a multiporosity extension of classical double and triple-porosity fractured rock flow models for slightly compressible fluids. The multiporosity model is an adaptation of the multirate solute transport model of Haggerty and Gorelick (1995) to viscous flow in fractured rock reservoirs. It is a generalization of both pseudo steady state and transient interporosity flow double-porosity models. The model includes a fracture continuum and an overlapping distribution of multiple rock matrix continua, whose fracture-matrix exchange coefficients are specified through a discrete probability mass function. Semianalytical cylindrically symmetric solutions to the multiporosity mathematical model are developed using the Laplace transform tomore » illustrate its behavior. Furthermore, the multiporosity model presented here is conceptually simple, yet flexible enough to simulate common conceptualizations of double and triple-porosity flow. This combination of generality and simplicity makes the multiporosity model a good choice for flow modelling in low-permeability fractured rocks.« less

  17. MULTI-ATTRIBUTE SEISMIC/ROCK PHYSICS APPROACH TO CHARACTERIZING FRACTURED RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect

    Gary Mavko

    2000-10-01

    This project consists of three key interrelated Phases, each focusing on the central issue of imaging and quantifying fractured reservoirs, through improved integration of the principles of rock physics, geology, and seismic wave propagation. This report summarizes the results of Phase I of the project. The key to successful development of low permeability reservoirs lies in reliably characterizing fractures. Fractures play a crucial role in controlling almost all of the fluid transport in tight reservoirs. Current seismic methods to characterize fractures depend on various anisotropic wave propagation signatures that can arise from aligned fractures. We are pursuing an integrated study that relates to high-resolution seismic images of natural fractures to the rock parameters that control the storage and mobility of fluids. Our goal is to go beyond the current state-of-the art to develop and demonstrate next generation methodologies for detecting and quantitatively characterizing fracture zones using seismic measurements. Our study incorporates 3 key elements: (1) Theoretical rock physics studies of the anisotropic viscoelastic signatures of fractured rocks, including up scaling analysis and rock-fluid interactions to define the factors relating fractures in the lab and in the field. (2) Modeling of optimal seismic attributes, including offset and azimuth dependence of travel time, amplitude, impedance and spectral signatures of anisotropic fractured rocks. We will quantify the information content of combinations of seismic attributes, and the impact of multi-attribute analyses in reducing uncertainty in fracture interpretations. (3) Integration and interpretation of seismic, well log, and laboratory data, incorporating field geologic fracture characterization and the theoretical results of items 1 and 2 above. The focal point for this project is the demonstration of these methodologies in the Marathon Oil Company Yates Field in West Texas.

  18. Compositional changes of reservoir rocks through the injection of supercritical CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherf, Ann-Kathrin; Schulz, Hans-Martin; Zetzl, Carsten; Smirnova, Irina; Andersen, Jenica; Vieth, Andrea

    2010-05-01

    The European project CO2SINK is the first project on the on-shore underground storage of carbon dioxide in Europe. CO2SINK is part of the ongoing efforts to understand the impact, problems, and likelihood of using deep saline aquifers for long term storage of CO2. In Ketzin (north-east Germany, 40 km west of Berlin) a saline sandstone aquifer of the younger Triassic (Stuttgart Formation) has been chosen as a reservoir for the long-term storage of carbon dioxide. Our monitoring focuses on the composition and mobility of the organic carbon pools within the saline aquifer and their changes due to the storage of carbon dioxide. Supercritical carbon dioxide is known as an excellent solvent of non- to moderately polar organic compounds, depending on temperature and pressure (Hawthorne, 1990). The extraction of organic matter (OM) from reservoir rock, using multiple extraction methods, allows insight into the composition of the OM and the biomarker inventory of the deep biosphere. The extraction of reservoir rock using supercritical CO2 may additionally simulate the impact of CO2 storage on the deep biosphere by the possible mobilisation of OM. We will present compound specific results from laboratory CO2 extraction experiments on reservoir rocks from the CO2 storage site in Ketzin, Germany. A total of five rock samples (silt and sandstones) from the injection well and two observation wells were applied to supercritical CO2 extraction. In the experimental setup, a supercritical fluid extractor is used to simulate the conditions within the saline aquifer. The results show distinct quantitative and qualitative differences in extraction yields between the rock samples. This may be due to differences in mineralogy and porosity (12 - 27%; Norden et al., 2007a, b, c), which seem to be extraction-controlling key factors. Furthermore, the results illustrate that the amount of extracted materials depends on the length of the time interval in which CO2 flows through the rock

  19. Laboratory measurements on reservoir rocks from The Geysers geothermal field

    SciTech Connect

    Boitnott, G.N.

    1995-01-26

    A suite of laboratory measurements have been conducted on Geysers metagraywacke and metashale recovered from a drilled depth of 2599 to 2602 meters in NEGU-17. The tests have been designed to constrain the mechanical and water-storage properties of the matrix material. Various measurements have been made at a variety of pressures and at varying degrees of saturation. Both compressional and shear velocities exhibit relatively little change with effective confining pressure. In all of the samples, water saturation causes an increase in the compressional velocity. In some samples, saturation results in a moderate decrease in shear velocity greater in magnitude than would be expected based on the slight increase in bulk density. It is found that the effect of saturation on the velocities can be quantitatively modeled through a modification of Biot-Gassmann theory to include weakening of the shear modulus with saturation. The decrease is attributed to chemo-mechanical weakening caused by the presence of water. The degree of frame weakening of the shear modulus is variable between samples, and appears correlated with petrographic features of the cores. Two related models are presented through which we can study the importance of saturation effects on field-scale velocity variations. The model results indicate that the saturation effects within the matrix are significant and may contribute to previously observed field anomalies. The results help to define ways in which we may be able to separate the effects of variations in rock properties, caused by phenomena such as degree of fracturing, from similar effects caused by variations in matrix saturation. The need for both compressional and shear velocity data in order to interpret field anomalies is illustrated through comparisons of model results with the field observations.

  20. Capillary Trapping of CO2 in Oil Reservoirs: Observations in a Mixed-Wet Carbonate Rock.

    PubMed

    Al-Menhali, Ali S; Krevor, Samuel

    2016-03-01

    Early deployment of carbon dioxide storage is likely to focus on injection into mature oil reservoirs, most of which occur in carbonate rock units. Observations and modeling have shown how capillary trapping leads to the immobilization of CO2 in saline aquifers, enhancing the security and capacity of storage. There are, however, no observations of trapping in rocks with a mixed-wet-state characteristic of hydrocarbon-bearing carbonate reservoirs. Here, we found that residual trapping of supercritical CO2 in a limestone altered to a mixed-wet state with oil was significantly less than trapping in the unaltered rock. In unaltered samples, the trapping of CO2 and N2 were indistinguishable, with a maximum residual saturation of 24%. After the alteration of the wetting state, the trapping of N2 was reduced, with a maximum residual saturation of 19%. The trapping of CO2 was reduced even further, with a maximum residual saturation of 15%. Best-fit Land-model constants shifted from C = 1.73 in the water-wet rock to C = 2.82 for N2 and C = 4.11 for the CO2 in the mixed-wet rock. The results indicate that plume migration will be less constrained by capillary trapping for CO2 storage projects using oil fields compared with those for saline aquifers. PMID:26812184

  1. Depositional setting and diagenetic evolution of some Tertiary unconventional reservoir rocks, Uinta Basin, Utah.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pitman, J.K.; Fouch, T.D.; Goldhaber, M.B.

    1982-01-01

    The Douglas Creek Member of the Tertiary Green River Formation underlies much of the Uinta basin, Utah, and contains large volumes of oil and gas trapped in a complex of fractured low-permeability sandstone reservoirs. In the SE part of the basin at Pariette Bench, the Eocene Douglas Creek Member is a thick sequence of fine- grained alluvial sandstone complexly intercalated with lacustrine claystone and carbonate rock. Sediments were deposited in a subsiding intermontane basin along the shallow fluctuating margin of ancient Lake Uinta. Although the Uinta basin has undergone postdepositional uplift and erosion, the deepest cored rocks at Pariette Bench have never been buried more than 3000m.-from Authors

  2. MULTIDISCIPLINARY IMAGING OF ROCK PROPERTIES IN CARBONATE RESERVOIRS FOR FLOW-UNIT TARGETING

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen C. Ruppel

    2004-07-20

    Our analysis and imaging of reservoir properties at the Fullerton Clear Fork field (Figure 1) is in its final stages. Major accomplishments during the past 6 months include: (1) characterization of facies and cyclicity in cores, (2) correlation of cycles and sequences using core-calibrated wireline logs, (3) calculation and modeling of wireline porosity, (4) analysis of new cores for conventional and special core analysis data, (5) construction of full-field reservoir model, and (6) revision of 3D seismic inversion of reservoir porosity and permeability. One activity has been eliminated from the originally proposed tasks. Task 3 (Characterization and Modeling of Rock Mechanics and Fractures) has been deleted because we have determined that fractures are not significant contributing in the reservoir under study. A second project extension has been asked for to extend the project until 7/31/04. Remaining project activities are: (1) interpretation and synthesis of fieldwide data, (2) preparation of 3D virtual reality demonstrations of reservoir model and attributes, (3) transfer of working data sets to the operator for reservoir implementation and decision-making, and (4) preparation and distribution of final reports.

  3. Experimental Long-term Investigations on Geothermal Reservoir Rock Properties at Simulated In-situ Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milsch, H.; Spangenberg, E.; Kulenkampff, J.; Schuldt, S.; Huenges, E.

    2006-12-01

    Sustainable energy production from geothermal reservoirs requires an exact knowledge of the hydrological aquifer rock properties as well as the processes that could potentially alter its productivity. The latter comprise both mechanical (e. g. fines migration) and chemical (fluid-rock interactions) effects. To perform controlled long-term investigations on the evolution of sedimentary rock transport properties at conditions pertinent to deep geothermal reservoirs two new permeameters have been set up at the GFZ- Potsdam. The apparatuses allow for a variety of continuous petrophysical measurements at a maximum temperature, lithostatic- and pore pressure of 200 ° C, 140 and 50 MPa, respectively. The permeability, ultra-sonic p- and s-wave velocities and the specific electric conductivity of the rock can be determined. In particular, the use of corrosion-resistant parts allows for experiments with highly saline formation pore fluids that can be sampled under pressure for further chemical analysis. The typical duration of an individual test is four to twelve weeks. Experiments are comparatively performed on two types of sandstones: a Lower Permian (Rotliegend) reservoir rock from Eberswalde, Germany and a pure Quartzite from Fontainebleau, France. In addition, two kinds of pore fluids are used: a low salinity brine (0.1 mol NaCl) and a synthetic Ca-Na-Cl formation fluid with a TDS- content of 250 g/l. In a first series the former fluid was used to petrophysically characterize both rocks as a function of temperature and effective pressure within the relevant range of up to 150 ° C and 75 MPa, respectively. I addition, in a continuous flow experiment the permeability and the specific electric conductivity of the reservoir sandstone were monitored as a function of time during six weeks at constant p-T-conditions. In an ongoing series similar continuous flow experiments are performed using the second, highly saline reservoir fluid. These tests are also complemented by p

  4. Rock-physics-based carbonate pore type characterization and reservoir permeability heterogeneity evaluation, Upper San Andres reservoir, Permian Basin, west Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Qifeng; Sun, Yuefeng; Sullivan, Charlotte

    2011-05-01

    In addition to mineral composition and pore fluid, pore type variations play an important role in affecting the complexity of velocity-porosity relationship and permeability heterogeneity of carbonate reservoirs. Without consideration of pore type diversity, most rock physics models applicable to clastic rocks for explaining the rock acoustic properties and reservoir parameters relationship may not work well for carbonate reservoirs. A frame flexibility factor ( γ) defined in a new carbonate rock physics model can quantify the effect of pore structure changes on seismic wave velocity and permeability heterogeneity in carbonate reservoirs. Our study of an Upper San Andres carbonate reservoir, Permian Basin, shows that for core samples of given porosity, the lower the frame flexibility factor ( γ), the higher the sonic wave velocity. For the studied reservoir, samples with frame flexibility factor ( γ) < 3.85 represent either visible vuggy pore space in a dolopackstone or intercrystalline pore space in dolowackstone. On the other hand, samples with frame flexibility factor ( γ) > 3.85 indicate either dominant interparticle pore space in dolopackstone or microcrack pore space in dolowackstone or dolomudstone. Using the frame flexibility factor ( γ), different porosity-impedance and porosity-permeability trends can be classified with clear geologic interpretation such as pore type and rock texture variations to improve porosity and permeability prediction accuracy. New porosity-permeability relations with γ classification help delineate permeability heterogeneity in the Upper San Andres reservoir, and could be useful for other similar carbonate reservoir studies. In addition, results from analysis of amplitude variation with offset (AVO) and impedance modeling indicate that by combining rock physics model and pre-stack seismic inversion, simultaneous estimation of porosity and frame flexibility factor ( γ) is quite feasible because of the strong influence of

  5. Quantitative model of vapor dominated geothermal reservoirs as heat pipes in fractured porous rock

    SciTech Connect

    Pruess, K.

    1985-03-01

    We present a numerical model of vapor-dominated reservoirs which is based on the well-known conceptual model of White, Muffler, and Truesdell. Computer simulations show that upon heat recharge at the base, a single phase liquid-dominated geothermal reservoir in fractured rock with low matrix permeability will evolve into a two-phase reservoir with B.P.D. (boiling point-for-depth) pressure and temperature profiles. A rather limited discharge event through cracks in the caprock, involving loss of only a few percent of fluids in place, is sufficient to set the system off to evolve a vapor-dominated state. The attributes of this state are discussed, and some features requiring further clarification are identified. 26 refs., 5 figs.

  6. The Relative Permeability of CO2 and Water in Sandstone Rocks at Reservoir Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krevor, S. C.; Pini, R.; Zuo, L.; Benson, S. M.

    2011-12-01

    A firm understanding of the multiphase flow properties of CO2 and water in porous media is essential to predicting the long-term fate of CO2 in geologic storage. Recently, pilot-scale and simulation based studies have highlighted the importance that properties of relative permeability, residual saturation, and rock heterogeneity will play in determining the long-term distribution of CO2 in the subsurface. There is a need for more observations to expand the current dataset of experimental work, as well as a discussion of these results in the context of the theory that is used in reservoir-scale predictions of subsurface flow. In this paper we present the results of an experimental investigation into the flow properties of CO2 and water in 4 distinct rock lithologies: a Berea sandstone and 3 reservoir rocks from formations into which CO2 injection is either currently taking place or is planned. Drainage and imbibition relative permeability and end-point saturations were measured using the steady-state method in a high pressure and temperature core-flooding apparatus with fluid distributions observed using X-ray CT. Absolute permeability, capillary pressure curves, and petrological studies were performed on each sample to fully characterize the rocks. The results are discussed in terms of their potential impact on basin-scale modeling of industrial CO2 injection projects. Theoretical explanations for generally low end-point CO2 relative permeabilities are discussed as well as its relevance for reservoir simulations. It is shown that small-scale heterogeneity plays an important role in both the overall saturations of CO2 in a rock as well as the saturation distribution within the rock. Clear evidence of heterogenous flow-properties are observed even in rocks of homogeneous rock lithology. Observations of residual CO2 saturation are discussed in the context of the long-term stability of CO2 injected in the subsurface. The experiments are compared with results reported

  7. Influences of salt structures on reservoir rocks in block L-2, Dutch continental shelf

    SciTech Connect

    Dronkert, H. ); Remmelts, G. )

    1993-09-01

    In the subsurface of the Netherlands Continental Shelf, thick layers of Zechstein salt have developed into salt domes and ridges that pierce through the overlying formations. To measure the range of lateral influence of the salt in these structures on the sandstone reservoir rocks of the Mesozoic sequence, a cementation model was developed. The target area, Block L-2, was chosen for the presence of salt domes, wells, and reservoir rocks. The L-2 case study has been performed on two Triassic sandstone intervals. The lower, Volpriehausen, sandstone showed halite cementation in one well, located within several 100 m from a salt dome. Four other wells, located more than 1.5 km from a salt structure, did not show any signs of halite cementation. Therefore, the lateral influence of salt domes on the surrounding reservoir rock is, in this case, limited to less than 1.5 km at 3-4 km depth. A slightly shallower Triassic sandstone (Detfurth) shows more frequent halite cementation. This cementation can be attributed to early seepage from overlying Rot salt brines.Triassic Rot salt is present above depletion areas of the Zechstein salt structures, and in such a way the seepage can be seen as an indirect influence of the salt structures.

  8. Roof-rock contamination of magma along the top of the reservoir for the Bishop Tuff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffield, Wendell A.; Ruiz, Joaquin; Webster, James D.

    1995-12-01

    The Bishop Tuff, a well known Quaternary high-silica rhyolite in east-central California, is widely considered the type example of a vertically and monotonically zoned pyroclastic deposit that represents zoning in the source magma reservoir, inverted during the process of pyroclastic emplacement. However, the deposit of plinian pumice, which forms the base of the Bishop Tuff and represents the initial 10% or so of all magma erupted during the event that produced the Bishop Tuff, contains features at odds with monotonie zoning for the reservoir. Relative to overlying ignimbrite, the plinian deposit contains a reversal in trace-element zoning. Moreover, the {87Sr }/{86Sr } is significantly higher than that in overlying ignimbrite (about 0.7084 vs 0.7064), and melt inclusions trapped in quartz phenocrysts exhibit notable variability of trace-element concentrations, even within a single host crystal (e.g., U: 10.77 to 8.91 ppm). These data have been previously interpreted as due to processes of chemical fractionation and evolution operating within a magma system closed to chemical interactions with its roof rocks. For example, the reversal in trace-element zoning has been explained by the first-erupted magma being erupted from somewhat below the top of a monotonically zoned reservoir. However, we submit that the reversed zoning and other above-noted features can be explained equally well as consequences of minor assimilation of roof rocks into a magma reservoir that was erupted from the top down. The basal part of the Bishop Tuff exhibits extreme concentrations and depletions of trace elements, relative to the average composition of crustal rocks. For example, the upward decrease of Sr in the Bishop magma reservoir (downward decrease in the ignimbrite) results in concentrations as low as 2-4 ppm. Because of the attendant 'chemical leverage', assimilation of < 1 wt.% of Sierra Nevada batholith rocks typical of the area could readily reverse an 'uncontaminated' Sr (and

  9. Organic geochemical characterization of reservoir rocks, cap rocks and formation fluids from the CO2 storage site at Ketzin, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherf, A.-K.; Morozova, D.; Wandrey, M.; Mangelsdorf, K.; Würdemann, H.; Vieth, A.

    2009-04-01

    The European project CO2SINK (CO2 Storage by Injection into a natural saline Aquifer at Ketzin) is the first project on the on-shore underground storage of carbon dioxide in Europe. Near the city Ketzin (north-east Germany) a geological formation of the younger Triassic (Stuttgart Formation) was chosen as reservoir for the long-term storage of the carbon dioxide. Within the scope of the Ketzin project we will analyse the organic matter in core rock and fluid samples to investigate the biogeochemical effects and changes on the geological formation caused by the injection of carbon dioxide. These investigations will help to evaluate the efficiency and reliability of the long-term storage of CO2 in such a geological system. Organic geochemical analyses will be performed on core rock samples drilled in 2007 at the Ketzin CO2 storage site in Germany. In total, three bore holes were constructed: one injection well and two observation wells. In addition to the molecular analysis of the microbial community we will investigate rock samples from different depths for total, dissolved and extractable organic carbon including lipid biomarkers, such as organic acids and intact polar lipids as well as the isotopic analysis of individual organic compounds. With the analysis of intact phospholipids (IPL) we will be able to further characterize the indigenous microbial community. Intact phospholipids are found in all living cells as membrane components (Zelles, 1999). Their interpretation is based on the premise that different microorganisms contain different phospholipids with ester- and/or ether-bound fatty acids (White et al., 1979) and thus, the distribution of IPLs and PLFAs (phospholipids fatty acid) can be applied to characterise and compare microbial communities. The data obtained from these analyses will provide valuable information on the active microorganisms as well as shifts in community composition. The characterization of the organic matter in the reservoir rock

  10. Preliminary evaluation of the second hot dry rock geothermal energy reservoir: results of phase 1, run segment 4

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, H.D.; Aamodt, R.L.; Albright, J.N.

    1980-05-01

    Results of the preliminary assessment of the second hot dry rock reservoir at the Fenton Hill field site are presented. This second reservoir was created by fracturing a deeper interval of granite rock located at a depth of 2.93 km (9620 ft) in the same wellbore pair used in the creation of the first reservoir; no additional redrilling was required. The new fracture system has a vertical extent of at least 320 m (1050 ft), suggesting that the combined heat-transfer area of the old and new fracture systems is 11 times that of the old system. The virgin rock temperature at the bottom of the deeper interval was 197/sup 0/C (386/sup 0/F). Water at a flow rate of 6 l/s (100 gpm) was circulated through the reservoir for a period of 23 days. Downhole measurements of the water temperature at the reservoir outlet, as well as temperatures inferred from geothermometry, showed that the thermal drawdown of the reservoir was negligible and preliminary estimates indicate that the minimum effective heat-transfer area of the new reservoir is 45,000 m/sup 2/ (480,000 ft/sup 2/), which is six times larger than the first reservoir. The following are presented: operational plan, reservoir geometry and flow paths, flow impedance, geochemistry, heat extraction, dye tracer flow distribution studies, and seismicity. (MHR)

  11. Roof-rock contamination of magma along the top of the reservoir for the Bishop Tuff

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duffield, W.A.; Ruiz, J.; Webster, J.D.

    1995-01-01

    The Bishop Tuff, a Quaternary high-silica rhyolite in east-central California, is widely considered the type example of a vertically and monotonically zoned pyroclastic deposit that represents zoning in the source magma reservoir, inverted during the process of pyroclastic emplacement. However, the deposit of plinian pumice, which forms the base of the Bishop Tuff and represents the initial 10% or so of all magma erupted during the event that produced the Bishop Tuff, contains features at odds with monotonic zoning for the reservoir. Relative to overlying ignimbrite, the plinian deposit contains a reversal in trace-element zoning. The data have been previously interpreted as due to processes of chemical fractionation and evolution operating within a magma system closed to chemical interactions with its roof rocks. However, it is suggested here that the reversed zoning and other above-noted features can be explained equally well as consequences of minor assimilation of roof rocks into a magma reservoir that was erupted from the top down. -from Authors

  12. Mining earth's heat: development of hot-dry-rock geothermal reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Pettitt, R.A.; Becker, N.M.

    1983-01-01

    The energy-extraction concept of the Hot Dry Rock (HDR) Geothermal Program, as initially developed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory, is to mine this heat by creating a man-made reservoir in low-permeability, hot basement rock. This concept has been successfully proven at Fenton Hill in northern New Mexico by drilling two holes to a depth of approximately 3 km (10,000 ft) and a bottom temperature of 200/sup 0/C (392/sup 0/F), then connecting the boreholes with a large-diametervertical hydraulic fracture. Water is circulated down one borehole, heated by the hot rock, and rises up the second borehole to the surface where the heat is extracted and the cooled water is reinjected into the underground circulation loop. This system has operated for a cumulative 416 days during engineering and reservoir testing. An energy equivalent of 3 to 5 MW(t) was produced without adverse environmental problems. During one test, a generator was installed in the circulation loop and produced 60 kW of electricity. A second-generation system, recently drilled to 4.5 km (15,000 ft) and temperatures of 320/sup 0/C (608/sup 0/F), entails creating multiple, parallel fractures between a pair of inclined boreholes. This system should produce 5 to 10 MW(e) for 20 years. Significant contributions to underground technology have been made through the development of the program.

  13. Wettability from Capillarity of CO2-Brine-Rock Systems at Reservoir Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Menhali, Ali; Niu, Ben; Krevor, Samuel

    2015-04-01

    The wettability of CO2-brine-rock systems will have a major impact on the management of carbon sequestration in subsurface geological formations. Recent contact angle measurement studies have reported sensitivity in wetting behaviour of this system to pressure, temperature and brine salinity. We report results of an investigation into the impact of reservoir conditions on wetting through direct observations of their impact on the capillary strength of the system. Eight capillary pressure characteristic curves were measured using CO2 and brine in a single fired Berea sandstone at pressures (5 to 20 MPa), temperatures (25 to 50 °C) and ionic strengths (0 to 5 M kg-1 NaCl) representative of subsurface reservoirs. A ninth measurement using an N2-water system provided a benchmark for capillarity with a strongly water wet system. The semi-dynamic capillary pressure core flooding technique was used with in situ saturation monitoring. In all cases, the capillarity of the system, scaled by the interfacial tension, were equivalent to the N2-water system within measurement uncertainty. Thus reservoir conditions did not have a significant impact on the capillary strength of the CO2-brine system through a variation in wetting. Two steady-state relative permeability measurements with CO2 and brine and one with N2 and brine similarly show little variation between conditions, consistent with the observation that the CO2-brine-sandstone system is strongly water wetting and invariant across a wide range of reservoir conditions.

  14. Depositional features and source and reservoir rocks of Tertiary age in northern part of South China Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S.

    1986-07-01

    The northern part of the South China Sea covers an area of about 400,000 km/sup 2/. Tertiary deposits more than 10,000 m in thickness are widely distributed there. The area has sedimentary rocks more than 1000 m thick covers more than 300,000 km/sup 2/. Five sedimentary basins have been established in this area: Beibu Bay, Yinggehai, Southeastern Qiong, Pearl River Mouth, and Southwestern Taiwann basins. The primary source and reservoir rocks for oil and gas prospects are of Tertiary age. Tertiary rocks underwent three stages of development, each forming a specific sedimentation system: (1) a system of fluviolacustrine deposits in rift depressions from the Paleocene to early Oligocene; (2) a system of semiclosed-sea deposits from the late Oligocene to early Miocene; and (3) a system of deltaic open-sea deposits from the middle Miocene to Pliocene. These three sedimentation systems resulted in three suites of source rocks, three suites of reservoir rocks, and three groups of independent oil pools, complete with source, reservoir, and cap rocks. The three suites of source rocks are as follows: (1) the Eocene Liushagang Formation in the Beibu Bay basin, which is believed to be the best source rock discovered in the area; (2) the Oligocene Zhuhai Formation in the Pearl River Mouth basin; and (3) the lower Miocene series in the Pearl River Mouth basin. The Eocene formation is probably the principal source rock of regional scale in the northern part of the South China Sea. The three suites of reservoir rocks are as follows: (1) the fluviolacustrine sandstone bodies in the Liushagang Formation; (2) the fluviolacustrine sand bodies and shallow-sea sandstone bodies in the Zhuhai Formation and Lingshu Formation; (3) the deltaic, littoral, and shallow-sea sand bodies and bioherms of Neogene age, with the middle Miocene sandstone reservoirs having the best physical properties.

  15. Influence of shape and skin of matrix-rock blocks on pressure transients in fractured reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    de Swaan, A.

    1986-01-01

    A formulation of pressure transients in terms of the intrinsic, or core, properties of the two media that compose the fractured reservoir, establishes the influence of these properties, and reciprocally, their corroboration from - the pressure-time relationship observed in well tests and interference tests. The following reservoir characteristics are analyzed: the area of fractures transverse to flow; the dimensions, shape and properties of rectangular parallelepiped matrix-rock blocks; and a permeability reduction in the blocks surface. A restatement of the so-called pseudo-steady state inter-media flow gives to parameters alfa and lambda in the theory of a previous study the physical meaning they lacked, and allows a direct determination of the blocks minimum dimension.

  16. Fracture Surface Area Effects on Fluid Extraction and the Electrical Resistivity of Geothermal Reservoir Rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, J J; Detwiler, R L; Ralph, W; Bonner, B

    2002-05-09

    Laboratory measurements of the electrical resistivity of fractured analogue geothermal reservoir rocks were performed to investigate the resistivity contrast caused by active boiling and to determine the effects of variable fracture dimensions and surface area on water extraction. Experiments were performed at confining pressures up to 10 h4Pa (100 bars) and temperatures to 170 C. Fractured samples show a larger resistivity change at the onset of boiling than intact samples. Monitoring the resistivity of fractured samples as they equilibrate to imposed pressure and temperature conditions provides an estimate of fluid migration into and out of the matrix. Measurements presented are an important step toward using field electrical methods to quantitatively search for fractures, infer saturation, and track fluid migration in geothermal reservoirs.

  17. Integrating sequence stratigraphy and rock-physics to interpret seismic amplitudes and predict reservoir quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Tanima

    This dissertation focuses on the link between seismic amplitudes and reservoir properties. Prediction of reservoir properties, such as sorting, sand/shale ratio, and cement-volume from seismic amplitudes improves by integrating knowledge from multiple disciplines. The key contribution of this dissertation is to improve the prediction of reservoir properties by integrating sequence stratigraphy and rock physics. Sequence stratigraphy has been successfully used for qualitative interpretation of seismic amplitudes to predict reservoir properties. Rock physics modeling allows quantitative interpretation of seismic amplitudes. However, often there is uncertainty about selecting geologically appropriate rock physics model and its input parameters, away from the wells. In the present dissertation, we exploit the predictive power of sequence stratigraphy to extract the spatial trends of sedimentological parameters that control seismic amplitudes. These spatial trends of sedimentological parameters can serve as valuable constraints in rock physics modeling, especially away from the wells. Consequently, rock physics modeling, integrated with the trends from sequence stratigraphy, become useful for interpreting observed seismic amplitudes away from the wells in terms of underlying sedimentological parameters. We illustrate this methodology using a comprehensive dataset from channelized turbidite systems, deposited in minibasin settings in the offshore Equatorial Guinea, West Africa. First, we present a practical recipe for using closed-form expressions of effective medium models to predict seismic velocities in unconsolidated sandstones. We use an effective medium model that combines perfectly rough and smooth grains (the extended Walton model), and use that model to derive coordination number, porosity, and pressure relations for P and S wave velocities from experimental data. Our recipe provides reasonable fits to other experimental and borehole data, and specifically

  18. Origin of dolostone reservoir rocks, Smackover Formation (Oxfordian), northeastern Gulf Coast, U. S. A

    SciTech Connect

    Prather, B.E. )

    1992-02-01

    Formation of regionally extensive dolostone reservoir rocks in the Smackover can be understood despite the possible effects of recrystallization. Geochemical and petrographic data suggest that dolomitization took place in (1) seawater-seepage, (2) reflux, (3) near-surface mixed-water, (4) shallow-burial mixed-water, and (5) deeper burial environments, which overlapped in time and space to form a platform-scale' dolostone body composed of a complex mixture of dolomites. Seawater-seepage and reflux dolomitization occurred in the near surface penecontemporaneously with deposition of the Smackover and overlying Haynesville Formations. Dolomitization by seawater seepage occurred within an oolite grainstone sill which separated an intraplatform salt basin from the open sea. Seawater flowed landward through the sill in response to evaporitic drawdown of brines in the isolated intraplatform basin. Isolation of the salt basin occurred during the Oxfordian when the shoreline retreated from the Conecuh embayment. Dolomite located at the top of the Smackover enriched in {sup 18}O suggests additional dolomitization by reflux of hypersaline brines. Reflux occurred as Buckner coastal sabkhas prograded over Smackover oolite grainstone shoreface deposits. Vugs lined with shallow-burial calcite and dolomite cements indicate flushing of the Smackover grainstone aquifer with fresh water. Freshwater intrusion probably occurred following sea level lowstands during the Late Jurassic and Early Cretaceous. Leaching in the proximal portion of the freshwater aquifer produced excellent limestone reservoir rocks in the updip Smackover. Dolomitization in the contemporaneous downdip mixed connate/freshwater zone formed dolostone reservoir rocks with depleted isotopic compositions consistent with a shallow-burial mixed-water origin.

  19. Origin of Dolostone reservoir rocks, smackover formation (Oxfordian), northeastern Gulf Coast, U. S. A

    SciTech Connect

    Prather, B.E. )

    1993-09-01

    Geochemical and petrographic data suggest that, despite the effects of recrystallization, formation of regionally extensive dolostone reservoir rocks in the Smackover Formation can be deciphered. These data indicate that dolomitization took place in (1) seawater seepage, (2) reflux, (3) near-surface mixed-water, (4) shallow-burial mixed-water, and (5) deeper burial environments, which overlapped in time and space to form a platform-scale dolostone body composed of a complex mixture of dolomites. Seawater-seepage and reflux dolomitization occurred in near-surface environments penecontemporaneous with deposition of the Smackover and overlying Haynesville formations. Dolomitization by seawater seepage occurred within an oolite grainstone sill that separated an intraplatform salt basin from the open Late Jurassic sea. Seawater flowed landward through the sill in the response to evaporitic drawdown of brines in the isolated intraplatform basin during a lowstand of Late Jurassic sea level. Dolomite enriched in [sup 18]O located at the top of the Smackover suggests additional dolomitization by reflux of hypersaline brines. Reflux occurred as Buckner coastal sabkhas prograded over Smackover oolite grainstone shoreface deposits. Vugs lined with shallow-burial calcite and dolomite cements indicate flushing of the Smackover grainstone aquifer with fresh water. Freshwater intrusion probably occurred along the Smackover's updip limit and subcrop following sea level lowstands during the Late Jurassic and Early Cretaceous. Leaching in the proximal part of the freshwater aquifer produced excellent-quality limestone reservoir rocks in the updip Smackover. Dolomitization in the contemporaneous downdip mixed connate/freshwater zone formed dolostone reservoir rocks with depleted isotopic compositions consistent with a shallow-burial mixed-water origin.

  20. Lithology and alteration mineralogy of reservoir rocks at Coso Geothermal Area, California

    SciTech Connect

    Lutz, S.J.; Moore, J.N.; Copp, J.F.

    1995-06-01

    Coso is one of several high-temperature geothermal systems associated with recent volcanic activity in the Basin and Range province. Chemical and fluid inclusion data demonstrate that production is from a narrow, asymmetric plume of thermal water that originates from a deep reservoir to the south and then flows laterally to the north. Geologic controls on the geometry of the upwelling plume were investigated using petrographic and analytical analyses of reservoir rock and vein material. The nature of the low-angle outflow zone and the overlying cap that prevents a surface expression of the geothermal system appears to be related to a combination of lithologic, structural and mineralogic factors. The position of the outflow plume is partially controlled by the distribution of fractured crystalline intrusives within foliated metamorphic rocks. Intrusive-metamorphic lithologic contacts are characterized by sericite-pyrite alteration and correlate with fluid entries in the wells. The base of a thick intrusive unit in several wells coincides with the 250{degrees}C isotherm based on fluid inclusion data. A smectite clay zone developed in the overlying metamorphic rock acts as a cap to the productive zone and inhibits vertical movement of the geothermal fluids above the main upwelling zone. The upwelling zone lies within a epidote-quartz veined, coarse-grained granite at depth in the southern portion of the field. The mineralogy of the clays varies systematically with depth and temperature. The distribution of fine-grained clay minerals with depth indicates that the smectite cap thickens dramatically from the north to the south, and overlies a strongly sericitized zone in the upwelling portion of the reservoir. Wairakite-chlorite-epidote-calcite-quartz veins at the contact with the deep granite record deposition from the hottest geothermal fluids (342{degrees}C) in the Coso field.

  1. Diffusion and spatially resolved NMR in Berea and Venezuelan oil reservoir rocks.

    PubMed

    Murgich, J; Corti, M; Pavesi, L; Voltini, F

    1992-01-01

    Conventional and spatially resolved proton NMR and relaxation measurements are used in order to study the molecular motions and the equilibrium and nonequilibrium diffusion of oils in Berea sandstone and Venezuelan reservoir rocks. In the water-saturated Berea a single line with T*2 congruent to 150 microseconds is observed, while the relaxation recovery is multiexponential. In an oil reservoir rock (Ful 13) a single narrow line is present while a distribution of relaxation rates is evidenced from the recovery plots. On the contrary, in the Ful 7 sample (extracted at a deeper depth in a different zone) two NMR components are present, with 3.5 and 30 KHz linewidths, and the recovery plot exhibits biexponential law. No echo signal could be reconstructed in the oil reservoir rocks. These findings can be related to the effects in the micropores, where motions at very low frequency can occur in a thin layer. From a comparison of the diffusion constant in water-saturated Berea, D congruent to 5*10(-6) cm2/sec, with the ones in model systems, the average size of the pores is estimated around 40 A. The density profiles at the equilibrium show uniform distribution of oils or of water, and the relaxation rates appear independent from the selected slice. The nonequilibrium diffusion was studied as a function of time in a Berea cylinder with z axis along H0, starting from a thin layer of oil at the base, and detecting the spin density profiles d(z,t) with slice-selection techniques. Simultaneously, the values of T1's were measured locally, and the distribution of the relaxation rates was observed to be present in any slice.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1461080

  2. Geochemical Modeling of CO2, Brine, and Reservoir Rock Interactions in the Knox Group, Western Kentucky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, J.; Parris, T. M.; Bowersox, J.; Harris, D. C.

    2011-12-01

    Regionally extensive dolostones and sandstones in the Cambrian-Ordovician Knox Group could provide commercial-scale CO2 storage capacity in the Illinois Basin of Kentucky, Illinois, and Indiana. This 1200 m thick interval of dolostone and less abundant quartz sandstone is a prospective sequestration target in the southern part of the Illinois Basin, where the Cambrian Mt. Simon Sandstone, a main sequestration target in the central part of the basin, is thin to absent, or deeply buried. The Kentucky Geological Survey (KGS) has successfully injected 690 tons of CO2 into the Knox Group through a 2477 m deep well (KGS #1 Blan well) at a test site in western Kentucky. To understand the long-term fate of CO2 stored in a saline reservoir in the Knox group, this study uses TOUGHREACT to model geochemical reactions among injected CO2, brine, and the reservoir rocks. Data collected in the KGS #1 Blan well, including rock cores, deep brine water samples, temperatures, and pressures, are the main data sources. A kinetic batch model is used first to simulate the impacts of dissolved CO2 on a mineral assemblage representing the Gunter Sandstone, a subgroup of the Knox Formation. The mineral assemblage consists of mainly quartz and dolomite with small amount of k-feldspar. The batch simulation results show precipitation of calcite, magnesite, illite, and quartz and dissolution of dolomite and k-feldspar. A 1-D radial reactive transport model is being constructed to simulate the injection test to evaluate the migration of the injected CO2, mineral dissolution and precipitation, and changes of porosity and permeability of formation rocks. The reactive model will be used to simulate hypothetical commercial scale injection scenarios to evaluate the long-term impacts of large scale CO2 injection on the Knox reservoir.

  3. The elusive Hadean enriched reservoir revealed by 142Nd deficits in Isua Archaean rocks.

    PubMed

    Rizo, Hanika; Boyet, Maud; Blichert-Toft, Janne; O'Neil, Jonathan; Rosing, Minik T; Paquette, Jean-Louis

    2012-11-01

    The first indisputable evidence for very early differentiation of the silicate Earth came from the extinct (146)Sm-(142)Nd chronometer. (142)Nd excesses measured in 3.7-billion-year (Gyr)-old rocks from Isua (southwest Greenland) relative to modern terrestrial samples imply their derivation from a depleted mantle formed in the Hadean eon (about 4,570-4,000 Gyr ago). As dictated by mass balance, the differentiation event responsible for the formation of the Isua early-depleted reservoir must also have formed a complementary enriched component. However, considerable efforts to find early-enriched mantle components in Isua have so far been unsuccessful. Here we show that the signature of the Hadean enriched reservoir, complementary to the depleted reservoir in Isua, is recorded in 3.4-Gyr-old mafic dykes intruding into the Early Archaean rocks. Five out of seven dykes carry (142)Nd deficits compared to the terrestrial Nd standard, with three samples yielding resolvable deficits down to -10.6 parts per million. The enriched component that we report here could have been a mantle reservoir that differentiated owing to the crystallization of a magma ocean, or could represent a mafic proto-crust that separated from the mantle more than 4.47 Gyr ago. Our results testify to the existence of an enriched component in the Hadean, and may suggest that the southwest Greenland mantle preserved early-formed heterogeneities until at least 3.4 Gyr ago. PMID:23128231

  4. Mobilization and Transport of Organic Compounds from Reservoir Rock and Caprock in Geological Carbon Sequestration Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Lirong; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Mitroshkov, Alexandre V.; Shewell, Jesse L.

    2014-05-06

    Supercritical CO2 (scCO2) is an excellent solvent for organic compounds, including benzene, toluene, ethyl-benzene, and xylene (BTEX), phenols, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Monitoring results from geological carbon sequestration (GCS) field tests has shown that organic compounds are mobilized following CO2 injection. Such results have raised concerns regarding the potential for groundwater contamination by toxic organic compounds mobilized during GCS. Knowledge of the mobilization mechanism of organic compounds and their transport and fate in the subsurface is essential for assessing risks associated with GCS. Extraction tests using scCO2 and methylene chloride (CH2Cl2) were conducted to study the mobilization of volatile organic compounds (VOCs, including BTEX), the PAH naphthalene, and n-alkanes (n-C20 – n-C30) by scCO2 from representative reservoir rock and caprock obtained from depleted oil reservoirs and coal from an enhanced coal-bed methane recovery site. More VOCs and naphthalene were extractable by scCO2 compared to the CH2Cl2 extractions, while scCO2 extractable alkane concentrations were much lower than concentrations extractable by CH2Cl2. In addition, dry scCO2 was found to extract more VOCs than water saturated scCO2, but water saturated scCO2 mobilized more naphthalene than dry scCO2. In sand column experiments, moisture content was found to have an important influence on the transport of the organic compounds. In dry sand columns the majority of the compounds were retained in the column except benzene and toluene. In wet sand columns the mobility of the BTEX was much higher than that of naphthalene. Based upon results determined for the reservoir rock, caprock, and coal samples studied here, the risk to aquifers from contamination by organic compounds appears to be relatively low; however, further work is necessary to fully evaluate risks from depleted oil reservoirs.

  5. Chip-off-the-old-rock: the study of reservoir-relevant geological processes with real-rock micromodels.

    PubMed

    Song, Wen; de Haas, Thomas W; Fadaei, Hossein; Sinton, David

    2014-11-21

    We present a real-rock micromodel approach whereby microfluidic channels are fabricated in a naturally occurring mineral substrate. The method is applied to quantify calcite dissolution which is relevant to oil/gas recovery, CO2 sequestration, and wastewater disposal in carbonate formations - ubiquitous worldwide. The key advantage of this method is the inclusion of both the relevant substrate chemistry (not possible with conventional microfluidics) and real-time pore-scale resolution (not possible with core samples). Here, microchannels are etched into a natural calcite crystal and sealed with a glass slide. The approach is applied to study acidified brine flow through a single channel and a two-dimensional micromodel. The single-channel case conforms roughly to a 1-D analytical description, with crystal orientation influencing the local dissolution rate an additional 25%. The two-dimensional experiments show highly flow-directed dissolution and associated positive feedback wherein acid preferentially invades high conductivity flow paths, resulting in higher dissolution rates ('wormholing'). These experiments demonstrate and validate the approach of microfabricating fluid structures within natural minerals for transport and geochemical studies. More broadly, real-rock microfluidics open the door to a vast array of lab-on-a-chip opportunities in geology, reservoir engineering, and earth sciences. PMID:25236399

  6. Fluid identification in tight sandstone reservoirs based on a new rock physics model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jianmeng; Wei, Xiaohan; Chen, Xuelian

    2016-08-01

    To identify pore fluids, we establish a new rock physics model named the tight sandstone dual-porosity model based on the Voigt–Reuss–Hill model, approximation for the Xu–White model and Gassmann’s equation to predict elastic wave velocities. The modeling test shows that predicted sonic velocities derived from this rock physics model match well with measured ones from logging data. In this context, elastic moduli can be derived from the model. By numerical study and characteristic analyzation of different elastic properties, a qualitative fluid identification method based on Poisson’s ratio and the S–L dual-factor method based on synthetic moduli is proposed. Case studies of these two new methods show the applicability in distinguishing among different fluids and different layers in tight sandstone reservoirs.

  7. Integrating geology, rock physics, and seismology for reservoir-quality prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florez-Nino, Juan-Mauricio

    This research focuses on the prediction of reservoir quality from seismic and well-log data, integrating concepts from geology and geophysics. The purpose has been to understand the geologic processes that control lateral variations in acoustic impedance and porosity. The work concentrates on the effect of rock texture and fractures on the elastic properties of sedimentary rocks. This work improves the understanding of the rock-physics depositional and diagenetic trends. The modified Hashin-Shtrikman lower bound can be used to distinguish between sorting and packing effects. It constitutes an upper bound for the sorting effect and a lower bound for the packing effect. Pressure solution is an alternative mechanism to reproduce the rock-physics diagenetic trend for high-porosity quartzose sands, using the Digby-Rutter model proposed here. The patterns that clastic sedimentary sequences present, in the rock-physics planes, agree with predictions from rock-physics models. Dispersed sand-clay mixtures predominate in fluvial deposits, whereas laminar mixtures predominate in mud-rich deep-water deposits. Scarcity of mixed lithofacies characterizes sand-rich deep-water deposits, whereas abundance of these lithofacies occurs in low-energy shallow marine deposits. The results demonstrate that the elastic properties of clastic mixed lithofacies strongly vary depending on the mixture's proportion and fabric, and rock-physics models can be used to predict these variations. The second part of this research deals with the use of outcrop information and seismic data to predict fracture distribution in the subsurface. This work documents a fundamental link between fracture hierarchies and sequence stratigraphy. Fracture spacing and dimensions of different fracture hierarchies are constrained by the thickness of the confining stratigraphic interval. It also documents examples of hierarchical shearing and progressive deformation, a concept that explains the evolution of faults and

  8. A geological reconnaissance across the Bitterroot Range and Clearwater Mountains in Montana and Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindgren, Waldemar

    1904-01-01

    This report describes, in a preliminary way, a belt of country extending westward from the Bitterroot Valley, across the dividing range and the rugged mountains of the Clearwater system, down to the fertile plateaus which border the canyon of Snake River. It thus presents a reconnaissance section from western Montana across northern Idaho, and deals chiefly with areas about which, thus far, little geological information has been available.

  9. Neocomian source and reservoir rocks in the western Brooks Range and Arctic Slope, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Mull, C.G.; Reifenstuhl, R.R.; Harris, E.E.; Crowder, R.K.

    1995-04-01

    Detailed (1:63,360) mapping of the Tingmerkpuk sandstone and associated rocks in the Misheguk Mountain and DeLong Mountains guadrangles of the western Brooks Range thrust belt documents potential hydrocarbon source and reservoir rocks in the northern foothills of the western Delong Mountains and adjacent Colville basin of northwest Alaska. Neocomian (?) to Albian micaceous shale, litharenite, and graywacke that overlies the Tingmerkpuk represents the onset of deposition of orogenic sediments derived from the Brooks Range to the south, and the merging of northern and southern sediment sources in the Colville basin. Both the proximal and distal Tingmerkpuk facies contain clay shale interbeds and overlie the Upper Jurassic to Neocomian Kingak Shale. Preliminary geochemical data show that in the thrust belt, these shales are thermally overmature (Ro 1.4-1.6), but are good source rocks with total organic content (TOC) that ranges from 1.2 to 1.8 percent. Shale in the overlying Brookian rocks is also thermally overmature (Ro 1.2-1.5 percent), but contains up to 1.8 percent TOC from a dominantly terrigenous source, and has generated gas. In outcrops at Surprise Creek, in the foothills north of the thrust belt, the Kingak (1.9 percent TOC) and underlying Triassic Shublik Formation (4.6 percent TOC) are excellent oil source rocks with thermal maturity close to peak oil generation stage (Ro0.75-0.9 percent). These rocks have lower thermal maturity values than expected for their stratigraphic position within the deeper parts of the Colville basin and indicate anomalous burial and uplift history in parts of the basin. Preliminary apatite fission-track (AFTA) data from the thrust belt indicate a stage of rapid uplift and cooling at about 53.61 Ma.

  10. Bathymetric maps and water-quality profiles of Table Rock and North Saluda Reservoirs, Greenville County, South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Jimmy M.; Journey, Celeste A.; Nagle, Doug D.; Lanier, Timothy H.

    2014-01-01

    Lakes and reservoirs are the water-supply source for many communities. As such, water-resource managers that oversee these water supplies require monitoring of the quantity and quality of the resource. Monitoring information can be used to assess the basic conditions within the reservoir and to establish a reliable estimate of storage capacity. In April and May 2013, a global navigation satellite system receiver and fathometer were used to collect bathymetric data, and an autonomous underwater vehicle was used to collect water-quality and bathymetric data at Table Rock Reservoir and North Saluda Reservoir in Greenville County, South Carolina. These bathymetric data were used to create a bathymetric contour map and stage-area and stage-volume relation tables for each reservoir. Additionally, statistical summaries of the water-quality data were used to provide a general description of water-quality conditions in the reservoirs.

  11. Impact of rock salt creep law choice on subsidence calculations for hydrocarbon reservoirs overlain by evaporite caprocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marketos, G.; Spiers, C. J.; Govers, R.

    2016-06-01

    Accurate forward modeling of surface subsidence above producing hydrocarbons reservoirs requires an understanding of the mechanisms determining how ground deformation and subsidence evolve. Here we focus entirely on rock salt, which overlies a large number of reservoirs worldwide, and specifically on the role of creep of rock salt caprocks in response to production-induced differential stresses. We start by discussing available rock salt creep flow laws. We then present the subsidence evolution above an axisymmetric finite element representation of a generic reservoir that extends over a few kilometers and explore the effects of rock salt flow law choice on the subsidence response. We find that if rock salt creep is linear, as appropriate for steady state flow by pressure solution, the subsidence response to any pressure reduction history contains two distinct components, one that leads to the subsidence bowl becoming narrower and deeper and one that leads to subsidence rebound and becomes dominant at later stages. This subsidence rebound becomes inhibited if rock salt deforms purely through steady state power law creep at low stresses. We also show that an approximate representation of transient creep leads to relatively small differences in subsidence predictions. Most importantly, the results confirm that rock salt flow must be modeled accurately if good subsidence predictions are required. However, in practice, large uncertainties exist in the creep behavior of rock salt, especially at low stresses. These are a consequence of the spatial variability of rock salt physical properties, which is practically impossible to constrain. A conclusion therefore is that modelers can only resort to calculating bounds for the subsidence evolution above producing rock salt-capped reservoirs.

  12. Permeability of intact and fractured rocks in Krafla geothermal reservoir, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggertsson, Gudjon; Lavallée, Yan; Markusson, Sigurdur

    2016-04-01

    The magmatic-hydrothermal system at Krafla Volcano, North-East Iceland, has been the source of an important geothermal fluids, exploited by Landsvirkjun National Power since 1977 to generate electricity (~60 MW). In the last decade, the energy was extracted from fluids of moderate temperature (200-300°C), but in order to satisfy the demand for sustainable, environmentally-safe energy, Landsvirkjun is aiming to source fluids in the super high-enthalpy hydrothermal system (400°-600°C and <220 bar). In relation to this, IDDP-1 was drilled in 2009. Drilling was terminated at a depth of 2100m when the drill string penetrated rhyolite magma. The rock around this rhyolite magma body shows great potential for production, as its temperatures are very high and it is located at shallow depth. Here, we present the results of mechanical and permeability tests carried out on the main lithologies forming the geothermal reservoir rock. During a field survey in fall 2015, and through information gathered from previous drilling exercises, five main rock types were identified and sampled to carry out this study: that is, basalts (10% to 60% porosity), hyaloclastites (35% to 45% porosity), obsidians (0,25% to 5% porosity), ignimbrites (13% to 18% porosity), and intrusive felsites and microgabbros (10% to 16% porosity). The only rock type not found in outcrops on the surface is the felsite and microgabbros which are thought to be directly above the rhyolite magma (~80m thick). The reason they can be found on the surface is that during the Mývatns-fires, an explosion creating the Víti crater and scattered these rocks around the area. For all these lithologies, the porosity was determined using helium pycnometry. On-going permeability measurements are made using a classic hydrostatic cell. To simulate the stress conditions extant in the hydrothermal field, we performed permeability measurements at a range of confining pressure (1 to 100 MPa), using a pore pressure differential of 0

  13. Temperature dependence of hydraulic properties of Upper Rhine Graben rocks at conditions modelling deep geothermal reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández Castañeda, Mariela Carolina; Renner, Joerg; Mueller, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    The evolution of reservoir rocks' hydraulic properties critically affects the operation and long term sustainability of geothermal and petroleum reservoirs. Mechanical and chemical effects modify the permeability and the storage capacity of a reservoir, whose time characteristics have remained poorly constrained up to now. The permeability (k) and specific storage capacity (s) of the rocks constituting the geothermal reservoir are important parameters controlling the extent of the space-time characteristics of the pressure drawdown (or buildup at the reinjection site). To study the evolution of permeability and specific storage capacity as a function of pressure, temperature, and time, we performed oscillatory pore pressure tests. Experiments were performed using samples collected at surface outcrops representing the lithological sequence of the Upper Rhine Graben reservoir in southern Germany, i.e. sandstone and limestone, as well as Padang granite, representing a homogeneous, crystalline reservoir rock. Experiments were run at temperatures between 20 and 200 ° C, confining pressures between 20 and 110 MPa, and a fixed fluid pressure of 10 MPa, modeling characteristic conditions of deep geothermal reservoirs. Intact samples of granite, limestone and sandstone yield permeability and specific storage capacity of about 10‑18, 10‑15, and 10‑14 m2, and 10‑10, 10‑11 and 10‑8 Pa‑1, respectively, with modest dependence on temperature and effective pressure. In addition, longitudinally fractured samples were prepared by simple splitting or cutting and grinding. Grinding was performed with sandpaper of different ISO grits designations (P100, P600, and P1200) to systematically vary the surfaces' roughness. Fractures cause an increase in room-temperature permeability up to 3 and 2 orders of magnitudes for samples of granite and limestone, respectively. Their pressure dependence corresponds to a reduction in permeability modulus by about one order of magnitude

  14. Relative permeability and trapping of CO2 and water in sandstone rocks at reservoir conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krevor, Samuel C. M.; Pini, Ronny; Zuo, Lin; Benson, Sally M.

    2012-02-01

    We report the results of an experimental investigation into the multiphase flow properties of CO2 and water in four distinct sandstone rocks: a Berea sandstone and three reservoir rocks from formations into which CO2 injection is either currently taking place or is planned. Drainage relative permeability and residual gas saturations were measured at 50°C and 9 MPa pore pressure using the steady state method in a horizontal core flooding apparatus with fluid distributions observed using x-ray computed tomography. Absolute permeability, capillary pressure curves, and petrological studies were performed on each sample. Relative permeability in the four samples is consistent with general characteristics of drainage in strongly water-wet rocks. Measurements in the Berea sample are also consistent with past measurements in Berea sandstones using both CO2/brine and oil/water fluid systems. Maximum observed saturations and permeabilities are limited by the capillary pressure that can be achieved in the experiment and do not represent endpoint values. It is likely that maximum saturations observed in other studies are limited in the same way and there is no indication that low endpoint relative permeabilities are a characteristic of the CO2/water system. Residual trapping in three of the rocks is consistent with trapping in strongly water-wet systems, and the results from the Berea sample are again consistent with observations in past studies. This confirms that residual trapping can play a major role in the immobilization of CO2 injected into the subsurface. In the Mt. Simon sandstone, a nonmonotonic relationship between initial and residual CO2 saturations is indicative of a rock that is mixed or intermediate wet, and further investigations should be performed to establish the wetting properties of illite-rich rocks. The combined results suggest that the petrophysical properties of the multiphase flow of CO2/water through siliciclastic rocks is for the most part typical

  15. Anisotropy of permeability of reservoir rocks over Miaoli area, NW Taiwan.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bo-Siang, Xiong; Loung-Yie, Tsai

    2013-04-01

    The amount of the CO2 has risen since the Industrial Evolution. In order to reduce the amount of CO2 in atmosphere, CO2 sequestration is considered to be the most effective way. In recent years, research about subsurface storage of CO2 into geological formations has increased rapidly. Assessment of storage capability is needed before selecting a site for sequestration. Porosity and permeability are important assessment factors for CO2 sequestration in reservoir rocks. In order to improve the assessment, reservoir rock properties are important and need to be evaluated in advance. Porosity of sandstone is controlled by texture and degree of cementation, whereas permeability is controlled by pore-throat size, pore types and connectivity of pore throat. Sandstones of Miocene to Pleistocene in Miaoli area, NW Taiwan, were collected in this study. YOKO2 porosity/permeability detector is used to measure their permeability perpendicular and parallel to bedding planes under 3 to 60MPa confining pressure with Helium as media. Optical microscope and scanning electron microscope (SEM) were then used to observe the mineral composition, lithology, texture and pore type of sandstones, so as to explore the influence of rock properties on porosity and anisotropy of permeability, as well as the storage potential for CO2 sequestration in the future. The experimental results show that most of the horizontal permeability exceeds the vertical permeability and the anisotropy increases with increasing confining pressure. Mineral composition of sandstones studied were mainly quartz and lithic with little feldspar content. The pore types were mainly primary pores and micropores in this study. The correlation between quantity of macropores and permeability were higher than total porosity and permeability, mainly due to total porosity contains micropores which contribute little to permeability.

  16. Orientation of minimum principal stress in the hot dry rock geothermal reservoir at Fenton Hill, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, K.L.

    1991-01-01

    The stress field at the source of microearthquakes in the interior of the hot dry rock geothermal reservoir at Fenton Hill appears to be different to the far field stress outside the reservoir. The stress field seems to be re-oriented prior to failure, during the course of processes that inflate the reservoir. The state of stress, both inside and outside, the hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal reservoir at Fenton Hill, is important in predicting the course of stress-dependent processes, and in transferring HDR technology developed at Fenton Hill, to sites, such as at Clearlake in California, where the stress field is expected to be substantially different. The state of stress at Fenton Hill is not well known because of limitations in stress measuring technology. It is necessary to use a variety of indirect methods and seek an estimate of the stress. 5 refs.

  17. Geologic controls on reservoir properties in gas-bearing middle and Upper Devonian rocks, southern Appalachian basin

    SciTech Connect

    Vessell, R.K.; Davies, D.K.

    1988-08-01

    Porosities and permeabilities have been measured for a wide range of nonfractured Devonian lithologies in 23 wells from southeastern Ohio, eastern Kentucky, West Virginia, and Virginia. These reservoir properties can be related directly to the geometry of the pore system. Pore geometry, in turn, is a function of rock lithology and mineralogy. Despite the lithologic complexity of the Devonian sequence, reservoir quality can be related to a small number of differing pore geometries.

  18. Research on anisotropy of shale oil reservoir based on rock physics model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhi-Qi; Liu, Cai; Liu, Xi-Wu; Dong, Ning; Liu, Yu-Wei

    2016-06-01

    Rock physics modeling is implemented for shales in the Luojia area of the Zhanhua topographic depression. In the rock physics model, the clay lamination parameter is introduced into the Backus averaging theory for the description of anisotropy related to the preferred alignment of clay particles, and the Chapman multi-scale fracture theory is used to calculate anisotropy relating to the fracture system. In accordance with geological features of shales in the study area, horizontal fractures are regarded as the dominant factor in the prediction of fracture density and anisotropy parameters for the inversion scheme. Results indicate that the horizontal fracture density obtained has good agreement with horizontal permeability measured from cores, and thus confirms the applicability of the proposed rock physics model and inversion method. Fracture density can thus be regarded as an indicator of reservoir permeability. In addition, the anisotropy parameter of the P-wave is higher than that of the S-wave due to the presence of horizontal fractures. Fracture density has an obvious positive correlation with P-wave anisotropy, and the clay content shows a positive correlation with S-wave anisotropy, which fully shows that fracture density has a negative correlation with clay and quartz contents and a positive relation with carbonate contents.

  19. Actualistic and Geochemical Modeling of Reservoir Rock, CO2 and Formation Fluid Interaction, Citronelle Oil Field, Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Weislogel, Amy

    2014-01-31

    This report includes description of the Citronelle field study area and the work carried out in the project to characterize the geology and composition of reservoir rock material and to collect an analyze the geochemical composition of produced fluid waters from the Citronelle field. Reservoir rock samples collected from well bore core were made into thin-sections and assessed for textural properties, including pore types and porosity distribution. Compositional framework grain modal data were collected via point-counting, and grain and cement mineralogy was assessed using SEM-EDS. Geochemistry of fluid samples is described and modeled using PHREEQC. Composition of rock and produced fluids were used as inputs for TOUGHREACT reactive transport modeling, which determined the rock-fluid system was in disequilibrium.

  20. Geochemical character and origin of oils in Ordovician reservoir rock, Illinois and Indiana, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Guthrie, J.M.; Pratt, L.M.

    1995-11-01

    Twenty-three oils produced from reservoirs within the Ordovician Galena Group (Trenton equivalent) and one oil from the Mississippian Ste. Genevieve Limestone in the Illinois and Indiana portions of the Illinois basin are characterized. Two end-member oil groups (1) and (2) and one intermediate group (1A) are identified using conventional carbon isotopic analysis of whole and fractionated oils, gas chromatography (GC) of saturated hydrocarbon fractions, isotope-ratio-monitoring gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (irm-GC/MS) of n-alkanes ranging from C{sub 15} to C{sub 25}, and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) of the aromatic hydrocarbon fractions. Group 1 is characterized by high odd-carbon predominance in mid-chain n-alkanes (C{sub 15}-C{sub 19}), low abundance Of C{sub 20+}, n-alkanes, and an absence of pristane and phytane. Group IA is characterized by slightly lower odd-carbon predominance of mid-chain n-alkanes, greater abundance of C{sub 20+} n-alkanes compared to group 1, and no pristane and phytane. Conventional correlations of oil to source rock based on carbon isotopic-type curves and hopane (m/z 191) and sterane (m/z 217) distributions are of limited use in distinguishing Ordovician-reservoired oil groups and determining their origin. Oil to source rock correlations using the distribution and carbon isotopic composition of n-alkanes and the m/z 133 chromatograms of n-alkylarenes show that groups 1 and 1A originated from strata of the Upper Ordovician Galena Group. Group 2 either originated solely from the Upper Ordovician Maquoketa Group or from a mixture of oils generated from the Maquoketa Group and the Galena Group. The Mississippian-reservoired oil most likely originated from the Devonian New Albany Group. The use of GC, irm-GC/MS, and GC/MS illustrates the value of integrated molecular and isotopic approaches for correlating oil groups with source rocks.

  1. Physical property characterization of a damage zone in granitic rock - Implications for geothermal reservoir properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenning, Quinn; Madonna, Claudio; Amann, Florian; Gischig, Valentin; Burg, Jean-Pierre

    2016-04-01

    Geothermal energy offers a viable alternative to mitigate greenhouse gas emitting energy production. A tradeoff between less expensive drilling costs and increased permeability at shallow depths versus increased heat production at deeper depths stipulates the economic energy potential of a given reservoir. From a geological perspective, successful retrieval of geothermal energy from the subsurface requires sufficient knowledge of the structural and stratigraphic relationship of the target formations, which govern the thermal conditions, physical properties, and fluid flow properties of reservoir rocks. In Switzerland, deep basement rocks (~5 km) with fluid conducting damage zones and enhanced fractured systems stimulated by hydraulic shearing are seen as a potential geothermal reservoir system. Damage zones, both natural and induced, provide permeability enhancement that is especially important for creating fluid conductivity where the matrix permeability is low. This study concentrates on characterizing the elastic and transport properties entering into a natural damage zone penetrated by a borehole at the Grimsel underground research laboratory. The borehole drilled from a cavern at 480 m below ground surface penetrates approximately 20 m of mostly intact Grimsel granodiorite before entering the first phyllosilicate-rich shear zone (~0.2 m thick). The borehole intersects a second shear zone at approximately 23.8m. Between the two shear zones the Grimsel granodiorite is heavily fractured. The minimum principle stress magnitude from in-situ measurements decreases along the borehole into the first shear zone. Two mutually perpendicular core samples of Grimsel granodiorite were taken every 0.1 m from 19.5 to 20.1 m to characterize the physical properties and anisotropy changes as a gradient away from the damage zone. Measurements of ultrasonic compressional (Vp) and shear (Vs) velocities at 1 MHz frequency are conducted at room temperature and hydrostatic pressures

  2. Geochemical changes in pore water and reservoir rock due to CO2 injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huq, Farhana; Blum, Philipp; Nowak, Marcus; Haderlein, Stefan; Grathwohl, Peter

    2010-05-01

    In response to current global warming, carbon capture and storage has been identified as one of the promising option. Thus, it can be an interim solution that is indeed a bridge to the future renewable energy without altering the present mode of energy consumption. Although large natural CO2 sinks are terrestrial eco-system and oceans, geological media or more specifically large sedimentary basins are now the most feasible options for carbon sequestration. At the study site, a former gas field (Altmark), which is located in the South of the Northeast German Basin, CO2 is planned to be injected into the reservoir with high pressure (> 50 bar) and temperature (125°C). Afterwards, CO2 dissolves into the pore water leading to acidification and follow up reactions such as dissolution/precipitation, which potentially change the porosity-permeability of the reservoir and the wetting properties of the mineral surfaces. The Altmark site was chosen due to its large storage capacity, well explored reservoir, high seal integrity due to the presence of massive salt layer (cap rock) and existing infrastructure required for enhanced gas recovery. The main objective of the current study is to quantify the CO2 trapping in aqueous solution under in situ reservoir condition. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate the geochemical changes in fluid composition due to dissolution of minerals under controlled laboratory conditions and to quantify the concentrations of complexing agents that might influence the concentration of total dissolved CO2 in aqueous solution over time. To observe these geochemical and hydraulic changes due to the injection of CO2, a closed system (batch system) technique is developed to study the influence of salinity, temperature, pressure and kinetics on mineral reactions. In addition to the closed system, a flow through (open) autoclave system was constructed. Water saturated sedimentary rock cores (e.g. from the Altmark site; 5cm long, 3cm diameter) are

  3. Geochemical relationships of petroleum in Mesozoic reservoirs to carbonate source rocks of Jurassic Smackover Formation, southwestern Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Claypool, G.E.; Mancini, E.A.

    1989-07-01

    Algal carbonate mudstones of the Jurassic Smackover Formation are the main source rocks for oil and condensate in Mesozoic reservoir rocks in southwestern Alabama. This interpretation is based on geochemical analyses of oils, condensates, and organic matter in selected samples of shale (Norphlet Formation, Haynesville Formation, Trinity Group, Tuscaloosa Group) and carbonate (Smackover Formation) rocks. Potential and probable oil source rocks are present in the Tuscaloosa Group and Smackover Formation, respectively. Extractable organic matter from Smackover carbonates has molecular and isotopic similarities to Jurassic oil. Although the Jurassic oils and condensates in southwestern Alabama have genetic similarities, they show significant compositional variations due to differences in thermal maturity and organic facies/lithofacies. Organic facies reflect different depositional conditions for source rocks in the various basins. The Mississippi Interior Salt basin was characterized by more continuous marine to hypersaline conditions, whereas the Manila and Conecuh embayments periodically had lower salnity and greater input of clastic debris and terrestrial organic matter. Petroleum and organic matter in Jurassic rocks of southwestern Alabama show a range of thermal transformations. The gas content of hydrocarbons in reservoirs increases with increasing depth and temperature. In some reservoirs where the temperature is above 266/degrees/F(130/degrees/C), gas-condensate is enriched in isotopically heavy sulfur, apparently derived from thermochemical reduction of Jurassic evaporite sulfate. This process also resulted in increase H/sub 2/S and CO in the gas, and depletion of saturated hydrocarbons in the condensate liquids.

  4. Internal structure of fault zones in geothermal reservoirs: Examples from palaeogeothermal fields and potential host rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonie Philipp, Sonja; Reyer, Dorothea; Meier, Silke; Bauer, Johanna F.; Afşar, Filiz

    2014-05-01

    Fault zones commonly have great effects on fluid transport in geothermal reservoirs. During fault slip all the pores and small fractures that meet with the slip plane become interconnected so that the inner part of the fault, the fault core, consisting of breccia or gouge, may suddenly develop a very high permeability. This is evidenced, for example by networks of mineral veins in deeply eroded fault zones in palaeogeothermal fields. Inactive faults, however, may have low permeabilities and even act as flow barriers. In natural and man-made geothermal reservoirs, the orientation of fault zones in relation to the current stress field and their internal structure needs be known as accurately as possible. One reason is that the activity of the fault zone depends on its angle to the principal stress directions. Another reason is that the outer part of a fault zone, the damage zone, comprises numerous fractures of various sizes. Here we present field examples of faults, and associated joints and mineral veins, in palaeogeothermal fields, and potential host rocks for man-made geothermal reservoirs, respectively. We studied several localities of different stratigraphies, lithologies and tectonic settings: (1) 58 fault zones in 22 outcrops from Upper Carboniferous to Upper Cretaceous in the Northwest German Basin (siliciclastic, carbonate and volcanic rocks); (2) 16 fault zones in 9 outcrops in Lower Permian to Middle Triassic (mainly sandstone, limestone and granite) in the Upper Rhine Graben; and (3) 74 fault zones in two coastal sections of Upper Triassic and Lower Jurassic age (mudstones and limestone-marl alternations) in the Bristol Channel Basin, UK. (1) and (2) are outcrop analogues of geothermal reservoir horizons, (3) represent palaeogeothermal fields with mineral veins. The field studies in the Northwest German Basin (1) show pronounced differences between normal-fault zones in carbonate and clastic rocks. In carbonate rocks clear damage zones occur that are

  5. Rock failure during massive hydraulic stimulation of the Baca location geothermal reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, C.; Keppler, H.; Albright, J.; Potter, R.

    1982-01-01

    The analyses of microearthquake signals occurring during hydraulic stimulation provide an estimate of the size and location of the fractures thus produced. Studies of microearthquakes occurring during two large (> 10/sup 3/m/sup 3/) hydraulic stimulations of the hydrothermal reservoir at the Baca Location in the Jemez Mountains of northeastern New Mexico are reported. Both stimulations consisted of water, viscosity enhancer, and proppant. The microearthquake event rate was low but variable throughout most of the treatment. Rock failure as indicated by the distribution of the microearthquakes' foci appeared restricted to a nearly vertical NE striking zone. This orientation is in good agreement with the local earth stresses inferred from geological considerations. The second stimulation which occurred in a neighboring well was similar to the first except for a larger injected volume. The lateral extent of the detected fracture system was 600 m in both stimulations.

  6. Sedimentation, zoning of reservoir rocks in W. Siberian basin oil fields

    SciTech Connect

    Kliger, J.A. )

    1994-02-07

    A line pattern of well cluster spacing was chosen in western Siberia because of taiga, marshes, etc., on the surface. The zoning of the oil pools within productive Upper Jurassic J[sub 3] intervals is complicated. This is why until the early 1990s almost each third well drilled in the Shaimsky region on the western edge of the West Siberian basin came up dry. The results of development drilling would be much better if one used some sedimentological relationships of zoning of the reservoir rocks within the oil fields. These natural phenomena are: Paleobasin bathymetry; Distances from the sources of the clastic material; and Proximity of the area of deposition. Using the diagram in this article, one can avoid drilling toward areas where the sandstone pinch out, area of argillization of sand-stones, or where the probability of their absence is high.

  7. Physical properties of rocks and aqueous fluids at conditions simulating near- and supercritical reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kummerow, Juliane; Raab, Siegfried

    2016-04-01

    The growing interest in exploiting supercritical geothermal reservoirs calls for a thorough identification and understanding of physico-chemical processes occuring in geological settings with a high heat flow. In reservoir engineering, electrical sounding methods are common geophysical exploration and monitoring tools. However, a realistic interpretation of field measurements is based on the knowledge of both, the physical properties of the rock and those of the interacting fluid at defined temperature and pressure conditions. Thus, laboratory studies at simulated in-situ conditions provide a link between the field data and the material properties in the depth. The physico-chemical properties of fluids change dramatically above the critical point, which is for pure water 374.21 °C and 221.2 bar. In supercritical fluids mass transfer and diffusion-controlled chemical reactions are enhanced and cause mineral alterations. Also, ion mobility and ion concentration are affected by the change of physical state. All this cause changes in the electrical resistivity of supercritical fluids and may have considerable effects on the porosity and hydraulic properties of the rocks they are in contact with. While there are some datasets available for physical and chemical properties of water and single component salt solutions above their critical points, there exist nearly no data for electrical properties of mixed brines, representing the composition of natural geothermal fluids. Also, the impact of fluid-rock interactions on the electrical properties of multicomponent fluids in a supercritical region is scarcely investigated. For a better understanding of fluid-driven processes in a near- and supercritical geological environment, in the framework of the EU-funded FP7 program IMAGE we have measured (1) the electrical resistivity of geothermal fluids and (2) physical properties of fluid saturated rock samples at simulated in-situ conditions. The permeability and electrical

  8. Acoustic and reservoir properties of microporous carbonate rocks: Implication of micrite particle size and morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regnet, J. B.; Robion, P.; David, C.; Fortin, J.; Brigaud, B.; Yven, B.

    2015-02-01

    This integrated study provides significant insight into parameters controlling the acoustic and reservoir properties of microporous limestones, improving the knowledge of the relationships among petrophysic and microstructural content. Petrophysical properties measured from laboratory and logging tools (porosity, permeability, electrical conductivity, and acoustic properties) have been coupled with thin section and scanning electron microscope observations on the EST205 borehole from the Oxfordian limestone aquifer of the eastern part of the Paris Basin. A major achievement is the establishment of the link between micrite microtexture types (particle morphology and nature of intercrystal contacts) and the physical response, introducing a new effective and interesting rock-typing approach for microporous reservoirs. Fluid-flow properties are enhanced by the progressive augmentation of intercrystalline microporosity and associated pore throat diameter, as the coalescence of micrite particles decreases. Concerning acoustic properties, the slow increase of P wave velocity can be seen as a reflection of crystal size and growing contact cementation leading to a more cohesive and stiffer micrite microtexture. By applying poroelasticity theory on our samples, we show that velocity dispersion can be a very useful tool for data discrimination in carbonates. This dispersion analysis highlights the presence of microcracks in the rocks, and their overall effect on acoustic and transport properties. The presence of microcracks is also confirmed with observations and permeability measurements under high confining pressure. Finally, a possible origin of high porous levels in neritic limestones is a mineralogical transformation of carbonates through freshwater-related diagenesis during subaerial exposure time. Finally, by applying poroelasticity theory on our samples, we show that velocity dispersion can be a very useful tool for data discrimination in carbonates.

  9. Thermal and Hydraulic Coupled Modeling of Hot Fractured Rock Geothermal Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, H.; Xing, H.; Wyborn, D.; Yin, C.; Mora, P.

    2006-12-01

    Geothermal energy manifests itself in spectacular fashion in many places on the earth's surface and has been widely recognized as a renewable green energy in the world. Several countries have started the related projects for developing the Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal system which has been renamed as Hot Fractured Rock (HFR) in Australia. Geodynamics Limited is developing a world-class, high-grade geothermal energy resource beneath the Cooper Basin in NE South Australia, where the measured surface heat flow is over 100mW/m2. It is thought to originate from the Big Lake Suite granites that are enriched in the heat-producing elements. The presence of highly radiogenic intrusive within 3-4 km of the surface generates extraordinarily high geothermal gradient regimes (>60ºC km-1, and the region is recognized as one of the hottest spots in the world outside volcanic centres. To help bringing the vision of HFR geothermal energy to reality, a 3D finite element based computational model and software for simulating such a multi-scale highly coupled thermo- hydro-mechanical geo-mechanical system on the parallel supercomputer are being developed based on our long tern and on-going related outcomes. This presentation will focus on the related outcomes on the thermo- hydro coupling module aiming to investigate thermal and fluid flow coupled process and their impact on the Cooper Basin HFR geothermal reservoir. The microseismicity monitoring data measured during the hydraulic stimulation process was used to estimate the related key input parameters for the further numerical investigation of the coupled thermal and fluid flow behaviours of Cooper Basin HFR geothermal reservoir. The above preliminary simulation results demonstrate the stability and usefulness of the algorithm and software.

  10. Permeability, electrical impedance, and acoustic velocities on reservoir rocks from the Geysers geothermal field

    SciTech Connect

    Boitnott, G.N.; Boyd, P.J.

    1996-01-24

    Previous measurements of acoustic velocities on NEGU- 17 cores indicate that saturation effects are significant enough to cause Vp/Vs anomalies observed in the field. In this study we report on the results of new measurements on core recently recovered from SB-15-D along with some additional measurements on the NEGU-17 cores. The measurements indicate correlations between mechanical, transport, and water storage properties of the matrix which may prove useful for reservoir assessment and management. The SB-15-D material is found to be similar to the NEGU-17 material in terms of acoustic velocities, being characterized by a notably weak pressure dependence on the velocities and a modest Vp/Vs signature of saturation. The effect of saturation on Vp/Vs appears to result in part from a chemo-mechanical weakening of the shear modulus due to the presence of water. Electrical properties of SB-15-D material are qualitatively similar to those of the NEGU-17 cores, although resistivities of SB-15-D cores are notably lower and dielectric permittivities higher than in their NEGU- 17 counterparts. While some limited correlations of measured properties with depth are noted, no clear change in character is observed within SB-15-D cores which can be associated with the proposed cap-rock/reservoir boundary.

  11. Laboratory measurements of reservoir rock from the Geysers geothermal field, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lockner, D.A.; Summers, R.; Moore, D.; Byerlee, J.D.

    1982-01-01

    Rock samples taken from two outcrops, as well as rare cores from three well bores at the Geysers geothermal field, California, were tested at temperatures and pressures similar to those found in the geothermal field. Both intact and 30?? sawcut cylinders were deformed at confining pressures of 200-1000 bars, pore pressure of 30 bars and temperatures of 150?? and 240??C. Thin-section and X-ray analysis revealed that some borehole samples had undergone extensive alteration and recrystallization. Constant strain rate tests of 10-4 and 10-6 per sec gave a coefficient of friction of 0.68. Due to the highly fractured nature of the rocks taken from the production zone, intact samples were rarely 50% stronger than the frictional strength. This result suggests that the Geysers reservoir can support shear stresses only as large as its frictional shear strength. Velocity of p-waves (6.2 km/sec) was measured on one sample. Acoustic emission and sliding on a sawcut were related to changes in pore pressure. b-values computed from the acoustic emissions generated during fluid injection were typically about 0.55. An unusually high b-value (approximately 1.3) observed during sudden injection of water into the sample may have been related to thermal cracking. ?? 1982.

  12. Fluid-rock interactions in unconventional reservoirs during hydraulic fracturing: a geochemical investigation from the Powder River Basin, WY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herz-Thyhsen, R.; Kaszuba, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    Widespread use of hydraulic fracturing to stimulate resource production from unconventional reservoirs necessitates the development of a fundamental understanding for this process. Our research focuses on a synthesis of three sets of data to better understand geochemical and mineralogic aspects of the process of hydraulic fracturing, including laboratory experiments, field data, and geochemical modeling. Experiments examine fluid-rock interaction using rock samples from the Niobrara and Frontier Formations, two unconventional reservoirs within the Powder River Basin of NE Wyoming. Experiments react reservoir rocks with a representative hydraulic fracturing fluid for 28 days at 115°C and 350 bars. Fresh water and common chemicals, including HCl and petroleum distillates, used in hydraulic fracturing comprise the experimental fluid. Mineral reaction to the acidic fluid (pH ~2.35) causes immediate buffering, bringing fluid pH to near-neutral conditions after ~6 hours. Al initially spikes in the first 6 hours by ~10X, but returns to lower concentrations within 12 hours. Fe, Ba, Co, Mn, Sb, and Cr follow similar trends. Contemporaneously, Sr, Mo, Li, W, V, and Rb increase dramatically and remain at elevated levels. Changes in trace element concentrations correlate with clay alteration, calcite dissolution, and feldspar dissolution observed within reacted rock samples. Fluid samples are compared to produced-water chemistry from active wells in the field, enhancing our understanding of geochemical reactions occurring at depth. Lastly, produced fluid chemistry from both field samples and experiments are tethered together using preliminary geochemical models. These models predict calcite and feldspar reaction as well as new clay formation. This research ties together a limited population of produced water data with reservoir mineralogy to enhance fundamental understanding of fluid-rock interactions in unconventional reservoirs.

  13. Effect of Shear Slip on Fault Permeability in Shale Reservoir Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reece, J. S.; Zoback, M. D.; Kohli, A. H.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding flow along faults and fractures in shales is important for better understanding of hydraulic stimulation in unconventional reservoirs. For example, the re-activation of faults and fractures during hydraulic stimulation appears to be an important process contributing to reservoir permeability. In this study, we examine the effect of shear slip on fault permeability in shale reservoir rocks. We perform shear experiments in a triaxial apparatus on two types of samples: 1) a sample sawcut at 30° to the cylindrical axis and 2) a naturally broken sample. Both samples are from 3481 m (11422 ft) depth within the Haynesville reservoir containing 22 wt.% clay. First, we hydrostatically load the samples to a confining pressure of 15 MPa (2176 psi), followed by triaxial loading in which a constant axial displacement rate of 1 μm/s is applied for increments in axial displacement of initially 0.25 mm and later 1 mm. After each shear increment, we perform measurements of fault permeability at a constant mean pore pressure of 2.1 MPa (300 psi) using the steady state Darcy flow method. Boreholes drilled parallel to the cylindrical axis on either side of the shale sample allow pore fluid to access the fault plane. The coefficient of friction increases with shearing from 0.53 to 0.61 for the sawcut sample and from about 0.60 to 0.74 for the naturally broken sample. The sawcut sample indicates stable sliding behavior whereas small stick-slip events occur in the naturally broken sample. Upon shearing, fault permeability decreases by about 2.5 and 1.5 orders of magnitude within the first mm of shear displacement for the sawcut and naturally broken sample, respectively. Fault permeability of both samples continues to slowly decrease up to a maximum axial displacement of 4 mm and 2 mm, respectively. Laser scanning images before and after shearing show the formation of small striations in the direction of slip for the sawcut sample and the break-off of several grain

  14. The Reservoir Rock GeoBioCell: A Microfluidic Flowcell Developed for Controlled Experiments on Subsurface Microbe-Water-Rock Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, R.; Sanford, R. A.; Werth, C. J.; Fouke, B. W.

    2014-12-01

    A better understanding of subsurface microbe-water-rock interaction in the Earth's outer crust is of critical importance because it strongly influences the basic petro-physical properties of sedimentary rock. Over the past decade, miniaturized microfluidic flowcell prototypes of subsurface reservoir systems, usually called micromodels and named GeoBioCells herein, have been used to replace traditional column experiments. However, the inert pore structure in these micromodels does not contain the biogeochemical grain surface heterogeneities in actual subsurface rock reservoirs. In this study, we developed a next-generation microfluidic experimental test bed, herein called the Reservoir Rock GeoBioCell (RRGBC), in which an actual piece of subsurface reservoir rock is mounted within a microfluidic flowcell for experimentation. Siliciclastic sandstones core samples of an oil-bearing subsurface reservoir were obtained for construction of the RRGBC. Custom petrographic rock sections (0.5 mm thick) were prepared from these core samples impregnated with Super Glue adhesive. Acetone was then used to remove the Super Glue and physically separate thin sections from the glass slides. A PDMS mold (~3-4 mm thick) was prepared to hold the thin section between a microfluidic inlet and outlet channels. The thin section in PDMS mold was covered with a PDMS-coated glass coverslip to help provide a pressure seal for core thin section (Figure 1, left-top). Multi-photon laser confocal microscopy of the RRGBC showed pore connectivity to an imaging depth of ~400 μm within the thin section. The geochemical reactive sites were characterized using Raman Backscattering Microscopy, confirming the presence of reactive quartz. A fluorescent tracer test was conducted to identify micro-flow paths and solute breakthrough within the thin section (Figure 1). A multiphase flow experiment was performed to trap residual light oil in the thin section. A mixed-culture of oil-degrading biofilm was

  15. Dynamic reservoir characterization using 4D multicomponent seismic data and rock physics modeling at Delhi Field, Louisiana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvajal Meneses, Carla C.

    Pore pressure and CO2 saturation changes are important to detect and quantify for maximizing oil recovery in Delhi Field. Delhi Field is a enhanced oil recovery (EOR) project with active monitoring by 4D multicomponent seismic technologies. Dynamic rock physics modeling integrates the rich dataset of core, well logs, petrographic thin sections and facies providing a link between reservoir and elastic properties. The dynamic modeling in this high porosity sandstone reservoir shows that P-wave velocity is more sensitive to CO2 saturation while S-wave velocity is more sensitive to pore pressure changes. I use PP and PS seismic data to jointly invert for Vp=Vs ratio and acoustic impedance. This technique has the advantage of adding more information to the non-unique inversion problem. Combining the inversion results from the monitor surveys of June 2010 and August 2011 provides acoustic impedance and Vp=Vs percentage differences. The time-lapse inverted response enables dynamic characterization of the reservoir by fitting the predicted dynamic models (calibrated at the wells). Dynamic reservoir characterization adds value in this stratigraphic complex reservoir. The results indicate that reservoir heterogeneities and pore pressure gradients control the CO2 flow within the Paluxy reservoir. Injectors 148-2 and 140-1 showed CO2 is moving downdip following a distributary channel induced by differential pressure from an updip injector or a barrier caused by a heterogeneity in the reservoir. CO2 anomalies located above the Paluxy injector 148-2 indicates that CO2 is moving from the Paluxy up into the Tuscaloosa Formation. My work demonstrates that reservoir monitoring is necessary for reservoir management at Delhi Field.

  16. Carbonate petroleum reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Roehl, P.O.; Choquette, P.W.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents papers on the geology of petroleum deposits. Topics considered include diagenesis, porosity, dolomite reservoirs, deposition, reservoir rock, reefs, morphology, fracture-controlled production, Cenozoic reservoirs, Mesozoic reservoirs, and Paleozoic reservoirs.

  17. Hydrology of the Valley-fill and carbonate-rock reservoirs, Pahrump Valley, Nevada-California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Malmberg, Glenn T.

    1967-01-01

    This is the second appraisal of the water supply of Pahrump Valley, made 15 years after the first cooperative study. In the first report the average recharge was estimated to be 23,000 acre-feet per year, only 1,000 acre-feet more than the estimate made in this report. All this recharge was considered to be available for development. Because of the difficulty in salvaging the subsurface outflow from the deep carbonate-rock reservoir, this report concludes that the perennial yield may be only 25,000 acre-feet. In 1875, Bennetts and Manse Springs reportedly discharged a total of nearly 10,000 acre-feet of water from the valley-fill reservoir. After the construction of several flowing wells in 1910, the spring discharge began to decline. In the mid-1940's many irrigation wells were drilled, and large-capacity pumps were installed. During the 4-year period of this study (1959-62), the net pumping draft averaged about 25,000 acre-feet per year, or about twice the estimated yield. In 1962 Bennetts Spring was dry, and the discharge from Marse Spring was only 1,400 acre-feet. During the period February 1959-February 1962, pumping caused an estimated storage depletion of 45,000 acre-feet, or 15,000 acre-feet per year. If the overdraft is maintained, depletion of stored water will continue and pumping costs will increase. Water levels in the vicinity of the Pahrump, Manse, and Fowler Ranches declined more than ]0 feet in response to the pumping during this period, and they can be expected to continue to decline at ,the projected rate of more than 3 feet per year. The chemical quality of the pumped water has been satisfactory for irrigation and domestic use. Recycling of water pumped or irrigation, however, could result in deterioration of the water quality with time.

  18. Experimental investigation of reservoir rocks by spontaneous imbibition and mercury intrusion porosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Z.; Hu, Q.

    2013-12-01

    Spontaneous imbibition (SI), one of the important processes affecting hydrocarbon recovery from fractured reservoirs, is a capillary-force controlled process. The properties of displacing and displaced fluids, pore structure of porous media and their interactions are the main factors affecting the SI process. Many studies have been conducted to investigate these factors and among them scaling of SI is a widely used approach to predicting the oil/gas production behavior in the field based on laboratory imbibition tests. We have conducted SI experiments on different reservoir rocks, including Barnett shale (from different depths), dolomite and Indian sandstone. Because of the layered characteristic of Barnett shale, we also conducted imbibition experiments, with upward imbibition direction parallel or transverse to the shale bedding plane, to investigate its directional dependency. Two imbibing fluids, n-decane and water, were used during SI experiments to displace air, which is always treated as the non-wetting phase in the SI process. Mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) is a powerful tool of characterizing the pore-throat size distribution of porous media, and many important parameters (e.g. permeability and tortuosity) could be derived from MIP data. The median pore-throat diameter (D50), defined as the pore-throat diameter corresponding to 50% mercury saturation, is an important pore-structural parameter and has been used to predict permeability and tortuosity. Our results showed that Barnett shale (from different depths), dolomite and Indiana sandstone exhibited different SI behaviors. Wettability information was obtained by comparing scaled imbibition curves. Values of D50 obtained from MIP were also used to improve the existing scaling method. Low pore connectivity of Barnett shale was confirmed by both SI and MIP results.

  19. Hot-dry-rock geothermal-reservoir fracturing initial field operations - 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Rowley, J.C.; Pettitt, R.A.; Matsunaga, I.; Dreesen, D.S.; Nicholson, R.W.; Sinclair, A.R.

    1983-01-01

    Initial fracturing operations were conducted during 1982 to create a hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal reservoir at the Los Alamos Fenton Hill site. A preliminary work-over/cleaning operation in November to December 1981 had cleared the injection well, EE-2, and a detailed, comprehensive plan was prepared to accomplish the objectives of hydraulically connecting the injection and production wells. In January 1982, open-hole reservoir sections of both the production and injection wells were pressurized below the 9-5/8 in. casing. The injection well, EE-2, did not take fluid at 2200 psi, but the production well, EE-3, had a lost circulation zone and took water over a 240 ft zone immediately below the production casing. Subsequent field operations from May through December 14, 1982 involved ten major hydraulic injection and/or equipment tests. These ranged from 14,180 ft (4322 m) deep open-hole packer tests to installation of a cemented-in liner/PBR system. Injections of up to 1.3 x 10 gals. were performed in the injection well. Both wells were fractured in zones just below the production casings. Although several large volume injections were accomplished, hydraulic communication between wells was not achieved. Severe hardware problems were encountered due to temperature limitations, the high fracture gradient (breakdown and injection pressures), and the presence of CO/sub 2/ and H/sub 2/S during fracture back-flow and well venting. On-line and post-test analyses of seismic monitoring confirmed that fractures were created in each well that converged on, but did not intersect, the neighboring well.

  20. Geochemical Interaction of Middle Bakken Reservoir Rock and CO2 during CO2-Based Fracturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicot, J. P.; Lu, J.; Mickler, P. J.; Ribeiro, L. H.; Darvari, R.

    2015-12-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of geochemical interactions when CO2 is used to create the fractures necessary to produce hydrocarbons from low-permeability Middle Bakken sandstone. The primary objectives are to: (1) identify and understand the geochemical reactions related to CO2-based fracturing, and (2) assess potential changes of reservoir property. Three autoclave experiments were conducted at reservoir conditions exposing middle Bakken core fragments to supercritical CO2 (sc-CO2) only and to CO2-saturated synthetic brine. Ion-milled core samples were examined before and after the reaction experiments using scanning electron microscope, which enabled us to image the reaction surface in extreme details and unambiguously identify mineral dissolution and precipitation. The most significant changes in the reacted rock samples exposed to the CO2-saturated brine is dissolution of the carbonate minerals, particularly calcite which displays severely corrosion. Dolomite grains were corroded to a lesser degree. Quartz and feldspars remained intact and some pyrite framboids underwent slight dissolution. Additionally, small amount of calcite precipitation took place as indicated by numerous small calcite crystals formed at the reaction surface and in the pores. The aqueous solution composition changes confirm these petrographic observations with increase in Ca and Mg and associated minor elements and very slight increase in Fe and sulfate. When exposed to sc-CO2 only, changes observed include etching of calcite grain surface and precipitation of salt crystals (halite and anhydrite) due to evaporation of residual pore water into the sc-CO2 phase. Dolomite and feldspars remained intact and pyrite grains were slightly altered. Mercury intrusion capillary pressure tests on reacted and unreacted samples shows an increase in porosity when an aqueous phase is present but no overall porosity change caused by sc-CO2. It also suggests an increase in permeability

  1. MULTIDISCIPLINARY IMAGING OF ROCK PROPERTIES IN CARBONATE RESERVOIRS FOR FLOW-UNIT TARGETING

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen C. Ruppel

    2005-02-01

    Despite declining production rates, existing reservoirs in the US contain large quantities of remaining oil and gas that constitute a huge target for improved diagnosis and imaging of reservoir properties. The resource target is especially large in carbonate reservoirs, where conventional data and methodologies are normally insufficient to resolve critical scales of reservoir heterogeneity. The objectives of the research described in this report were to develop and test such methodologies for improved imaging, measurement, modeling, and prediction of reservoir properties in carbonate hydrocarbon reservoirs. The focus of the study is the Permian-age Fullerton Clear Fork reservoir of the Permian Basin of West Texas. This reservoir is an especially appropriate choice considering (a) the Permian Basin is the largest oil-bearing basin in the US, and (b) as a play, Clear Fork reservoirs have exhibited the lowest recovery efficiencies of all carbonate reservoirs in the Permian Basin.

  2. Evaluation of Microstructural Parameters of Reservoir Rocks of the Guarani Aquifer by Analysis of Images Obtained by X- Ray Microtomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, J. S.; Lima, F. A.; Vieira, S. F.; Reis, P. J.; Appoloni, C. R.

    2015-07-01

    Microstructural parameters evaluation of porous materials, such as, rocks reservoir (water, petroleum, gas...), it is of great importance for several knowledge areas. In this context, the X-ray microtomography (μ-CT) has been showing a technical one quite useful for the analysis of such rocks (sandstone, limestone and carbonate), object of great interest of the petroleum and water industries, because it facilitates the characterization of important parameters, among them, porosity, permeability, grains or pore size distribution. The X-ray microtomography is a non-destructive method, that besides already facilitating the reuse of the samples analyzed, it also supplies images 2-D and 3-D of the sample. In this work samples of reservoir rock of the Guarani aquifer will be analyzed, given by the company of perforation of wells artesian Blue Water, in the municipal district of Videira, Santa Catarina, Brazil. The acquisition of the microtomographys data of the reservoir rocks was accomplished in a Skyscan 1172 μ-CT scanner, installed in Applied Nuclear Physics Laboratory (LFNA) in the State University of Londrina (UEL), Paraná, Brazil. In this context, this work presents the microstructural characterization of reservoir rock sample of the Guarani aquifer, analyzed for two space resolutions, 2.8 μm and 4.8 μm, where determined average porosity was 28.5% and 21.9%, respectively. Besides, we also determined the pore size distribution for both resolutions. Two 3-D images were generated of this sample, one for each space resolution, in which it is possible to visualize the internal structure of the same ones.

  3. Hydraulic characterization of aquifers, reservoir rocks, and soils: A history of ideas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narasimhan, T. N.

    1998-01-01

    Estimation of the hydraulic properties of aquifers, petroleum reservoir rocks, and soil systems is a fundamental task in many branches of Earth sciences and engineering. The transient diffusion equation proposed by Fourier early in the 19th century for heat conduction in solids constitutes the basis for inverting hydraulic test data collected in the field to estimate the two basic parameters of interest, namely, hydraulic conductivity and hydraulic capacitance. Combining developments in fluid mechanics, heat conduction, and potential theory, the civil engineers of the 19th century, such as Darcy, Dupuit, and Forchheimer, solved many useful problems of steady state seepage of water. Interest soon shifted towards the understanding of the transient flow process. The turn of the century saw Buckingham establish the role of capillary potential in governing moisture movement in partially water-saturated soils. The 1920s saw remarkable developments in several branches of the Earth sciences; Terzaghi's analysis of deformation of watersaturated earth materials, the invention of the tensiometer by Willard Gardner, Meinzer's work on the compressibility of elastic aquifers, and the study of the mechanics of oil and gas reservoirs by Muskat and others. In the 1930s these led to a systematic analysis of pressure transients from aquifers and petroleum reservoirs through the work of Theis and Hurst. The response of a subsurface flow system to a hydraulic perturbation is governed by its geometric attributes as well as its material properties. In inverting field data to estimate hydraulic parameters, one makes the fundamental assumption that the flow geometry is known a priori. This approach has generally served us well in matters relating to resource development primarily concerned with forecasting fluid pressure declines. Over the past two decades, Earth scientists have become increasingly concerned with environmental contamination problems. The resolution of these problems

  4. The effect of long-term fluid-rock interactions on the mechanical properties of reservoir rock - a case study of the Werkendam natural CO2 analogue field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hangx, Suzanne; Bertier, Pieter; Bakker, Elisenda; Nover, Georg; Busch, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    Geological storage of CO2 is one of the most promising technologies to rapidly reduce anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide. During long-term geological storage of CO2, fluid-rock interactions, induced by the formation of carbonic acid, may affect the mineralogical composition of the reservoir rock. Commonly expected reactions include the dissolution of carbonate and/or sulphate cements, as well as the reaction of primary minerals (feldspars, clays, micas) to form new, secondary phases. In order to ensure storage integrity, it is important to understand the effect of such fluid-rock interactions on the mechanical behaviour of a CO2 storage complex. However, most of these reactions are very slow, which limits the ability to study coupled chemical-mechanical processes in the lab. A possible way to circumvent long reaction times is to investigate natural CO2 analogue fields, which experienced CO2-exposure for thousands of years. In this study, we looked at the Dutch Werkendam natural CO2 field and its unreacted counterpart (Röt Fringe Sandstone, Werkendam, the Netherlands). We focussed on CO2-induced mineralogical and porosity-permeability changes, and their effect on mechanical behaviour of intact rock. Overall, CO2-exposure did not lead to drastic mineralogical changes, though markedly different porosity-permeability relationships were found for the unreacted and exposed material. The limited extent of reaction was in part the result of bitumen coatings protecting specific mineral phases from reaction. In local, mm-sized zones displaying significant anhydrite dissolution, enhanced porosity was observed. For most of the reservoir the long-term mechanical behaviour after CO2-exposure could be described by the behaviour of the unreacted sandstone, while these more 'porous' zones were significantly weaker. Simple stress path calculations predict that reservoir failure due to depletion and injection is unlikely.

  5. Multi-Attribute Seismic/Rock Physics Approach to Characterizing Fractured Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Gary Mavko

    2004-11-30

    Most current seismic methods to seismically characterize fractures in tight reservoirs depend on a few anisotropic wave propagation signatures that can arise from aligned fractures. While seismic anisotropy can be a powerful fracture diagnostic, a number of situations can lessen its usefulness or introduce interpretation ambiguities. Fortunately, laboratory and theoretical work in rock physics indicates that a much broader spectrum of fracture seismic signatures can occur, including a decrease in P- and S-wave velocities, a change in Poisson's ratio, an increase in velocity dispersion and wave attenuation, as well as well as indirect images of structural features that can control fracture occurrence. The goal of this project was to demonstrate a practical interpretation and integration strategy for detecting and characterizing natural fractures in rocks. The approach was to exploit as many sources of information as possible, and to use the principles of rock physics as the link among seismic, geologic, and log data. Since no single seismic attribute is a reliable fracture indicator in all situations, the focus was to develop a quantitative scheme for integrating the diverse sources of information. The integrated study incorporated three key elements: The first element was establishing prior constraints on fracture occurrence, based on laboratory data, previous field observations, and geologic patterns of fracturing. The geologic aspects include analysis of the stratigraphic, structural, and tectonic environments of the field sites. Field observations and geomechanical analysis indicates that fractures tend to occur in the more brittle facies, for example, in tight sands and carbonates. In contrast, strain in shale is more likely to be accommodated by ductile flow. Hence, prior knowledge of bed thickness and facies architecture, calibrated to outcrops, are powerful constraints on the interpreted fracture distribution. Another important constraint is that fracturing

  6. Modelling kinetically controlled water-rock interactions during geothermal stimulation in typical poly-mineralic reservoir rocks from the Upper Rhine Graben, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuesters, Tim; Mueller, Thomas; Renner, Joerg

    2015-04-01

    A quantitative understanding of geochemically controlled reaction rates and their operating reaction mechanisms is crucial for the efficient exploration and exploitation of geothermal reservoirs. For example, the volume changes associated with dissolution and precipitation reactions potentially may affect the hydraulic properties of a reservoir during the production phase. The reactivity depends on a complex interaction of various parameters such as temperature, fluid flux and chemistry, mineral composition, reactive surface areas, etc. Most shallow geothermal reservoirs are constituted by highly permeable sedimentary rocks saturated by a fluid phase. The abundance of impermeable crystalline basement rocks (magmatic and metamorphic) increases with depth. Typically, hydraulic stimulation is necessary to create fluid pathways, i.e. the permeability of the rock is increased by the generation of new fractures and the reactivation of old fractures (Enhanced Geothermal Systems, EGS). Fresh, high energy surfaces are created by this treatment, constituting potential sites for intensive water-rock interactions. An increasing number of reactive transport models using equilibrium thermodynamic data shed considerable light on water-rock interactions. However, most models simplify the involved rocks to mono-mineralic phases and/or use rate data based on powder experiments with unnatural high reactive surface areas. In this study we present a new numerical model approach to quantify the geochemical evolution and its mechanical feedback during geothermal stimulation of typical poly-mineralic reservoir rocks at elevated temperatures (150-200 °C). Rock samples representative for geothermal energy producing sites (limestone, sandstone, volcanic tuff and granite) were collected at the Upper Rhine Graben (URG) in southern Germany, i.e. one of the high potential locations for geothermal energy production in Germany. Samples have been characterized petrographically with regard to phase

  7. CO2 Trapping in Reservoirs with Fluvial Architecture: Sensitivity to Heterogeneity and Hysteresis in Characteristic Relationships for Different Rock Types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gershenzon, N. I.; Ritzi, R. W., Jr.; Dominic, D. F.; Mehnert, E.; Okwen, R. T.

    2015-12-01

    Naum I. Gershenzona, Robert W. Ritzi Jr.a, David F. Dominica, Edward Mehnertb, and Roland T. OkwenbaDepartment of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Wright State University, 3640 Col. Glenn Hwy., Dayton, OH 45435, USAbIllinois State Geological Survey, Prairie Research Institute, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 615 East Peabody Drive, Champaign, IL 61820, USA A number of important candidate CO2 reservoirs exhibit sedimentary architecture reflecting fluvial deposition. Recent studies have led to new conceptual and quantitative models for sedimentary architecture in fluvial deposits over a range of scales that are relevant to CO2 injection and storage, led to new geocellular modelling approaches for representing this architecture, and led to new computational studies of CO2 plume dynamics during and after injection. The processes of CO2 trapping depend upon a complex system of non-linear and hysteretic characteristic relationships including how relative permeability and capillary pressure vary with brine and CO2 saturation. New computational studies of capillary trapping in conglomeratic reservoirs strongly suggest that representing small-scale (decimeter to meter) textural facies among different rock types, including their organization within a hierarchy of larger-scale stratification, representing differences in characteristic relationships between rock types, and representing hysteresis in characteristic curves can all be critical to understanding trapping processes. In this context, CO2trapping was evaluated in conglomeratic reservoirs with fluvial architecture including different rock types with different and hysteretic characteristic curves and with capillary pressure defined for each rock type using two different conventional approaches, i.e. Brooks-Corey and van Genuchten. The results show that in these reservoirs the capillary trapping rates are quite sensitive to differences between the Brooks-Corey and van Genuchten approaches, and that

  8. Hydrocarbon transfer pathways from Smackover source rocks to younger reservoir traps in the Monroe gas field, NE Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, R.K. )

    1993-09-01

    The Monroe gas field contained more than 7 tcf of gas in its virgin state. Much of the original gas reserves have been produced through wells penetrating the Upper Cretaceous Monroe Gas Rock Formation reservoir. Other secondary reservoirs in the field area are Eocene Wilcox, the Upper Cretaceous Arkadelphia, Nacatoch, Ozan, Lower Cretaceous, Hosston, Jurassic Schuler, and Smackover. As producing zones, these secondary producing zones reservoirs have contributed an insignificant amount gas to the field. The source of much of this gas appears to have been in the lower part of the Jurassic Smackover Formation. Maturation and migration of the hydrocarbons from a Smackover source into Upper Cretaceous traps was enhanced and helped by igneous activity, and wrench faults/unconformity conduits, respectively. are present in the pre-Paleocene section. Hydrocarbon transfer pathways appear to be more vertically direct in the Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous section than the complex pattern present in the Upper Cretaceous section.

  9. Post - sedimentation influence on filtration capacity reservoir rock properties (Pur-Tazov oil\\gas-bearing area)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaeva, E.; Stolbova, N.; Dolgaya, T.

    2015-11-01

    The processes of the second mineral formation (kaolinite, carbonates and micas) were identified during the post-sedimentation transformation studies in oil⪆s deposits. Besides, quartz regeneration, solid product destructive formation processes and hydrocarbon oxidation processes were -determined. Correlation analysis of the mineralogy and petrophysics data revealed the post-sedimentation influence factors on the reservoir properties of deposits. It should be noted that the second kaolinite composition increase results in water saturation and density decrease, porosity and, especially, permeability increase. Quartz regeneration and second mica formation deteriorate the reservoir properties or poorly influence them. The hydrocarbon decay and oxidation products, as well as secondary carbonate seal the void space, replace the soluble rock debris and sharply deteriorate the reservoir properties of oil andgas deposits.

  10. Chemistry and mineralogy of natural bitumens and heavy oils and their reservoir rocks from the United States, Canada, Trinidad and Tobago, and Venezuela

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hosterman, John W.; Meyer, R.F.; Palmer, C.A.; Doughten, M.W.; Anders, D.E.

    1990-01-01

    Twenty-one samples from natural bitumen and heavy oil deposits in seven States of the United States and six samples from outside the United States form the basis of this initial study. This Circular gives the mineral content of the reservoir rock, the trace-element distribution in the reservoir rock and hydrocarbons, and the composition of the heavy oil and natural bitumen. The reservoir rock and sediment residues from California contain more trace-element maximum amounts than any of the other rock samples. These relatively high concentrations of trace elements may be due, in part, to the low quartz content of the rock and to the presence of heulandite, cristobalite, siderite, and pyrite. The reservoir rock and sediment residues from Oklahoma contain more minimum amounts of trace elements than any of the other rock samples. This pattern probably results from the large amount of quartz in four of the samples and a large amount of calcite in the other sample. The maximum and minimum amounts of trace elements in the bitumen and heavy oil do not correlate with those in the reservoir rocks. The bitumen from Utah contains the greatest number of trace-element maxima, whereas there is no trend in the trace-element minima in the bitumen and heavy oil.

  11. Potential Impacts of Leakage from Black Rock Reservoir on the Hanford Site Unconfined Aquifer: Initial Hypothetical Simulations of Flow and Contaminant Transport - Errata

    SciTech Connect

    Freedman, Vicky L.

    2007-04-30

    Errata for report documenting initial scoping calculations investigating the potential impacts on the Hanford unconfined aquifer resulting from leakage from the proposed Black Rock Reservoir to the west. These calculations were performed for the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation.

  12. Transient groundwater observations and modelling at a rockslide in fractured rocks adjacent to a hydropower reservoir (Kaunertal valley, Austria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauhal, Thomas; Zangerl, Christian; Loew, Simon; Holzmann, Michael; Perzlmaier, Sebastian

    2015-04-01

    Positive pore water pressure within the fractured network of a rock slope reduces the effective stresses. This makes the knowledge of transient pore pressure magnitudes essential to evaluate time-dependent hydro-mechanically coupled rock slope processes. Slowly moving, deep-seated rockslides are a common type of gravitational mass movements in fractured metamorphic rocks. The hydrogeological conditions in rockslides adjacent to hydropower reservoirs are of major interest given that several case studies document the hydro-mechanical coupling between seasonal variations in the rockslide deformation behaviour and the filling and drawing down of the reservoir and/or seasonal variations of pore water pressure due to rainfall-events and snowmelt. Groundwater flow and pore pressure distributions in deep-seated rockslides, composed of fractured rocks, are usually only described by simplified conceptual models because of a lack of field measurements and difficulties in transient numerical modelling. The heterogeneous degree of disintegration of the sliding mass, soil-like deformation zones and the anisotropic fractured bedrock complicate the hydrogeological measurement, interpretation and analysis. In this study, detailed hydrogeological analyses of the Klasgarten rockslide at the Gepatsch reservoir (Kaunertal valley, Austria) are presented. A focus is set on the impact of reservoir level fluctuations, groundwater recharge along the slope and drainage by an exploring adit. The effect of various hydrogeological properties of the sliding mass, the deformation zone and the fractured bedrock on the groundwater fluctuations is discussed. Information on the groundwater flow regime, hydraulic relevant material properties and pore water pressure data are gained from borehole based investigations, a subhorizontal exploring adit and laboratory tests. Field observations are interpreted and validated on the basis of two dimensional finite element groundwater modelling. The transient

  13. Reservoir condition special core analyses and relative permeability measurements on Almond formation and Fontainebleu sandstone rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Maloney, D.

    1993-11-01

    This report describes the results from special core analyses and relative permeability measurements conducted on Almond formation and Fontainebleu sandstone plugs. Almond formation plug tests were performed to evaluate multiphase, steady-state,reservoir-condition relative permeability measurement techniques and to examine the effect of temperature on relative permeability characteristics. Some conclusions from this project are as follows: An increase in temperature appeared to cause an increase in brine relative permeability results for an Almond formation plug compared to room temperature results. The plug was tested using steady-state oil/brine methods. The oil was a low-viscosity, isoparaffinic refined oil. Fontainebleu sandstone rock and fluid flow characteristics were measured and are reported. Most of the relative permeability versus saturation results could be represented by one of two trends -- either a k{sub rx} versus S{sub x} or k{sub rx} versus Sy trend where x and y are fluid phases (gas, oil, or brine). An oil/surfactant-brine steady-state relative permeability test was performed to examine changes in oil/brine relative permeability characteristics from changes in fluid IFTS. It appeared that, while low interfacial tension increased the aqueous phase relative permeability, it had no effect on the oil relative permeability. The BOAST simulator was modified for coreflood simulation. The simulator was useful for examining effects of variations in relative permeability and capillary pressure functions. Coreflood production monitoring and separator interface level measurement techniques were developed using X-ray absorption, weight methods, and RF admittance technologies. The three types of separators should be useful for routine and specialized core analysis applications.

  14. Imaging techniques applied to the study of fluids in porous media. Scaling up in Class 1 reservoir type rock

    SciTech Connect

    Tomutsa, L.; Brinkmeyer, A.; Doughty, D.

    1993-04-01

    A synergistic rock characterization methodology has been developed. It derives reservoir engineering parameters from X-ray tomography (CT) scanning, computer assisted petrographic image analysis, minipermeameter measurements, and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMRI). This rock characterization methodology is used to investigate the effect of small-scale rock heterogeneity on oil distribution and recovery. It is also used to investigate the applicability of imaging technologies to the development of scaleup procedures from core plug to whole core, by comparing the results of detailed simulations with the images ofthe fluid distributions observed by CT scanning. By using the rock and fluid detailed data generated by imaging technology describe, one can verify directly, in the laboratory, various scaling up techniques. Asan example, realizations of rock properties statistically and spatially compatible with the observed values are generated by one of the various stochastic methods available (fuming bands) and are used as simulator input. The simulation results were compared with both the simulation results using the true rock properties and the fluid distributions observed by CT. Conclusions regarding the effect of the various permeability models on waterflood oil recovery were formulated.

  15. ADVANCED CHARACTERIZATION OF FRACTURED RESERVOIRS IN CARBONATE ROCKS: THE MICHIGAN BASIN

    SciTech Connect

    James R. Wood; William B. Harrison

    2002-12-01

    Michigan Basin, and it is crucial in developing reservoir quality rocks in some fields. Data on the occurrence of dolomite was extracted from driller's reports for all reported occurrences in Michigan, nearly 50 fields and over 500 wells. A digital database was developed containing the geographic location of all these wells (latitude-longitude) as well as the elevation of the first encounter of dolomite in the field/reservoir. Analysis shows that these dolomite occurrences are largely confined to the center of the basin, but with some exceptions, such as N. Adams Field. Further, some of the dolomite occurrences show a definite relationship to the fracture pattern described above, suggesting a genetic relationship that needs further work. Other accomplishments of this past reporting period include obtaining a complete land grid for the State of Michigan and further processing of the high and medium resolution DEM files. We also have measured new fluid inclusion data on dolomites from several fields that suggest that the dolomitization occurred at temperatures between 100 and 150 C. Finally, we have extracted the lithologic data for about 5000 wells and are in the process of integrating this data into the overall model for the Michigan Basin.

  16. Recreation Benefits of Instream Flow: Application to Montana's Big Hole and Bitterroot Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffield, John W.; Neher, Christopher J.; Brown, Thomas C.

    1992-09-01

    Allocation of water between instream uses such as recreation and consumptive uses such as irrigation is an important public policy issue in the western United States. One basis for identifying appropriate levels of instream flows is maximization of net economic benefits. A general framework for estimating the recreational value of instream flows was developed and applied to Montana's Big Hole and Bitterroot rivers. The paper also provides a synthesis of methods for interpreting covariate effects in dichotomous choice contingent valuation models. Precision of the estimates is examined through a simulation approach. The marginal recreational value of instream flow in these rivers is in the range of 50 per acre foot (1 acre foot equals 1233.5 m3) for recreation at low-flow levels plus 25 per acre foot for downstream hydroelectric generation. These values indicate that at some flow levels, gains may be achieved on the study rivers by reallocating water from consumptive to instream uses.

  17. Qualitative and quantitative changes in detrital reservoir rocks caused by CO2-brine-rock interactions during first injection phases (Utrillas sandstones, Northern Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrezueta, E.; Ordóñez-Casado, B.; Quintana, L.

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this article is to describe and interpret qualitative and quantitative changes at rock matrix scale of Lower-Upper Cretaceous sandstones exposed to supercritical (SC) CO2 and brine. The effects of experimental injection of SC CO2 during the first injection phases were studied at rock matrix scale, in a potential deep sedimentary reservoir in Northern Spain (Utrillas unit, at the base of the Cenozoic Duero Basin). Experimental wet CO2 injection was performed in a reactor chamber under realistic conditions of deep saline formations (P ≈ 78 bar, T ≈ 38 °C and 24 h exposure time). After the experiment, exposed and non-exposed equivalent sample sets were compared with the aim of assessing possible changes due to the effect of the CO2-brine exposure. Optical microscopy (OpM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) aided by optical image analysis (OIA) were used to compare the rock samples and get qualitative and quantitative information about mineralogy, texture and porous network distribution. Chemical analyses were performed to refine the mineralogical information and to obtain whole rock geochemical data. Brine composition was also analysed before and after the experiment. The results indicate an evolution of the pore network (porosity increase ≈ 2 %). Intergranular quartz matrix detachment and partial removal from the rock sample (due to CO2 input/release dragging) are the main processes that may explain the porosity increase. Primary mineralogy (≈ 95 % quartz) and rock texture (heterogeneous sand with interconnected framework of micro-channels) are important factors that seem to enhance textural/mineralogical changes in this heterogeneous system. The whole rock and brine chemical analyses after interaction with SC CO2-brine do not present important changes in the mineralogical, porosity and chemical configuration of the rock with respect to initial conditions, ruling out relevant precipitation or dissolution at these early stages. These results

  18. Insights on fluid-rock interaction evolution during deformation from fracture network geochemistry at reservoir-scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaudoin, Nicolas; Koehn, Daniel; Lacombe, Olivier; Bellahsen, Nicolas; Emmanuel, Laurent

    2015-04-01

    Fluid migration and fluid-rock interactions during deformation is a challenging problematic to picture. Numerous interplays, as between porosity-permeability creation and clogging, or evolution of the mechanical properties of rock, are key features when it comes to monitor reservoir evolution, or to better understand seismic cycle n the shallow crust. These phenomenoms are especially important in foreland basins, where various fluids can invade strata and efficiently react with limestones, altering their physical properties. Stable isotopes (O, C, Sr) measurements and fluid inclusion microthermometry of faults cement and veins cement lead to efficient reconstruction of the origin, temperature and migration pathways for fluids (i.e. fluid system) that precipitated during joints opening or faults activation. Such a toolbox can be used on a diffuse fracture network that testifies the local and/or regional deformation history experienced by the rock at reservoir-scale. This contribution underlines the advantages and limits of geochemical studies of diffuse fracture network at reservoir-scale by presenting results of fluid system reconstruction during deformation in folded structures from various thrust-belts, tectonic context and deformation history. We compare reconstructions of fluid-rock interaction evolution during post-deposition, post-burial growth of basement-involved folds in the Sevier-Laramide American Rocky Mountains foreland, a reconstruction of fluid-rock interaction evolution during syn-depostion shallow detachment folding in the Southern Pyrenean foreland, and a preliminary reconstruction of fluid-rock interactions in a post-deposition, post-burial development of a detachment fold in the Appenines. Beyond regional specification for the nature of fluids, a common behavior appears during deformation as in every fold, curvature-related joints (related either to folding or to foreland flexure) connected vertically the pre-existing stratified fluid system

  19. Exploration, Drilling and Development Operations in the Bottle Rock Area of the Geysers Steam Field, With New Geologic Insights and Models Defining Reservoir Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Hebein, Jeffrey J.

    1983-12-15

    MCR Geothermal Corporation pioneered successful exploratiory drilling the Bottle Rock area of the Geysers Steam Field in 1976. The wellfield is characterized by a deep reservoir with varied flowrates, temperatures, pressures, and stem chemistries being quite acceptable. More detailed reservoir engineering tests will follow as production commences.

  20. Fracture permeability and water-rock interaction in a shallow volcanic groundwater reservoir and the concern of its interaction with the deep geothermal reservoir of Mt. Amiata, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Felice, S.; Montanari, D.; Battaglia, S.; Bertini, G.; Gianelli, G.

    2014-09-01

    The study of core samples and in-hole data of a 545 m deep well drilled in Mt. Amiata extinct volcano allowed a better characterization of the shallow volcanic reservoir, which is exploited for domestic utilization. The new discovery is that: 1) the water table level is at a depth of 302 m b.g.l. (783 m a.s.l.), in agreement with recent magnetotelluric surveys, and in disagreement with previous hydrogeological models; 2) there is no evidence of present or past interaction with geothermal fluids, the alteration minerals being present only in fractures within the volcanic rocks and indicating fluids of low temperature and relatively low pH due to gas inlets in the volcanic reservoir; and 3) the volcanic reservoir is characterized by fracture permeability, as shown by the fracture system along the well. On the base of these new data the previous geological and hydrogeological models of Mt. Amiata should be revised. In particular, the hypothesis of a catastrophic lowering of the water table in a short time span is unlikely.

  1. Qualitative and quantitative changes in detrital reservoir rocks caused by CO2-brine-rock interactions during first injection phases (Utrillas sandstones, northern Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrezueta, E.; Ordóñez-Casado, B.; Quintana, L.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this article is to describe and interpret qualitative and quantitative changes at rock matrix scale of lower-upper Cretaceous sandstones exposed to supercritical (SC) CO2 and brine. The effects of experimental injection of CO2-rich brine during the first injection phases were studied at rock matrix scale, in a potential deep sedimentary reservoir in northern Spain (Utrillas unit, at the base of the Cenozoic Duero Basin).

    Experimental CO2-rich brine was exposed to sandstone in a reactor chamber under realistic conditions of deep saline formations (P ≈ 7.8 MPa, T ≈ 38 °C and 24 h exposure time). After the experiment, exposed and non-exposed equivalent sample sets were compared with the aim of assessing possible changes due to the effect of the CO2-rich brine exposure. Optical microscopy (OpM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) aided by optical image analysis (OIA) were used to compare the rock samples and get qualitative and quantitative information about mineralogy, texture and pore network distribution. Complementary chemical analyses were performed to refine the mineralogical information and to obtain whole rock geochemical data. Brine composition was also analyzed before and after the experiment.

    The petrographic study of contiguous sandstone samples (more external area of sample blocks) before and after CO2-rich brine injection indicates an evolution of the pore network (porosity increase ≈ 2 %). It is probable that these measured pore changes could be due to intergranular quartz matrix detachment and partial removal from the rock sample, considering them as the early features produced by the CO2-rich brine. Nevertheless, the whole rock and brine chemical analyses after interaction with CO2-rich brine do not present important changes in the mineralogical and chemical configuration of the rock with respect to initial conditions, ruling out relevant precipitation or dissolution at these early

  2. Combining water-rock interaction experiments with reaction path and reactive transport modelling to predict reservoir rock evolution in an enhanced geothermal system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuesters, Tim; Mueller, Thomas; Renner, Joerg

    2016-04-01

    Reliably predicting the evolution of mechanical and chemical properties of reservoir rocks is crucial for efficient exploitation of enhanced geothermal systems (EGS). For example, dissolution and precipitation of individual rock forming minerals often result in significant volume changes, affecting the hydraulic rock properties and chemical composition of fluid and solid phases. Reactive transport models are typically used to evaluate and predict the effect of the internal feedback of these processes. However, a quantitative evaluation of chemo-mechanical interaction in polycrystalline environments is elusive due to poorly constrained kinetic data of complex mineral reactions. In addition, experimentally derived reaction rates are generally faster than reaction rates determined from natural systems, likely a consequence of the experimental design: a) determining the rate of a single process only, e.g. the dissolution of a mineral, and b) using powdered sample materials and thus providing an unrealistically high reaction surface and at the same time eliminating the restrictions on element transport faced in-situ for fairly dense rocks. In reality, multiple reactions are coupled during the alteration of a polymineralic rocks in the presence of a fluid and the rate determining process of the overall reactions is often difficult to identify. We present results of bulk rock-water interaction experiments quantifying alteration reactions between pure water and a granodiorite sample. The rock sample was chosen for its homogenous texture, small and uniform grain size (˜0.5 mm in diameter), and absence of pre-existing alteration features. The primary minerals are plagioclase (plg - 58 vol.%), quartz (qtz - 21 vol.%), K-feldspar (Kfs - 17 vol.%), biotite (bio - 3 vol.%) and white mica (wm - 1 vol.%). Three sets of batch experiments were conducted at 200 ° C to evaluate the effect of reactive surface area and different fluid path ways using (I) powders of the bulk rock with

  3. Geophysical and transport properties of reservoir rocks. Final report for task 4: Measurements and analysis of seismic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, N.G.W.

    1993-05-01

    The principal objective of research on the seismic properties of reservoir rocks is to develop a basic understanding of the effects of rock microstructure and its contained pore fluids on seismic velocities and attenuation. Ultimately, this knowledge would be used to extract reservoir properties information such as the porosity, permeability, clay content, fluid saturation, and fluid type from borehole, cross-borehole, and surface seismic measurements to improve the planning and control of oil and gas recovery. This thesis presents laboratory ultrasonic measurements for three granular materials and attempts to relate the microstructural properties and the properties of the pore fluids to P- and S-wave velocities and attenuation. These experimental results show that artificial porous materials with sintered grains and a sandstone with partially cemented grains exhibit complexities in P- and S-wave attenuation that cannot be adequately explained by existing micromechanical theories. It is likely that some of the complexity observed in the seismic attenuation is controlled by details of the rock microstructure, such as the grain contact area and grain shape, and by the arrangement of the grain packing. To examine these effects, a numerical method was developed for analyzing wave propagation in a grain packing. The method is based on a dynamic boundary integral equation and incorporates generalized stiffness boundary conditions between individual grains to account for viscous losses and grain contact scattering.

  4. Classification and quantification of pore shapes in sandstone reservoir rocks with 3-D X-ray micro-computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, M.; Halisch, M.; Müller, C.; Fernandes, C. P.

    2015-12-01

    Recent years have seen a growing interest in the characterization of the pore morphologies of reservoir rocks and how the spatial organization of pore traits affects the macro behaviour of rock-fluid systems. With the availability of 3-D high-resolution imaging (e.g. μ-CT), the detailed quantification of particle shapes has been facilitated by progress in computer science. Here, we show how the shapes of irregular rock particles (pores) can be classified and quantified based on binary 3-D images. The methodology requires the measurement of basic 3-D particle descriptors and a shape classification that involves the similarity of artificial objects, which is based on main pore network detachments and 3-D sample sizes. The results were validated for three sandstones (S1, S2 and S3) from distinct reservoirs, and most of the pore shapes were found to be plate- and cube-like. Furthermore, this study generalizes a practical way to correlate specific particle shapes, such as rods, blades, cuboids, plates and cubes, to characterize asymmetric particles of any material type with 3-D image analysis.

  5. Pore Fluid Effects on Shear Modulus in a Model of Heterogeneous Rocks, Reservoirs, and Granular Media

    SciTech Connect

    Berryman, J G

    2005-03-23

    To provide quantitative measures of the importance of fluid effects on shear waves in heterogeneous reservoirs, a model material called a ''random polycrystal of porous laminates'' is introduced. This model poroelastic material has constituent grains that are layered (or laminated), and each layer is an isotropic, microhomogeneous porous medium. All grains are composed of exactly the same porous constituents, and have the same relative volume fractions. The order of lamination is not important because the up-scaling method used to determine the transversely isotropic (hexagonal) properties of the grains is Backus averaging, which--for quasi-static or long-wavelength behavior--depends only on the volume fractions and layer properties. Grains are then jumbled together totally at random, filling all space, and producing an overall isotropic poroelastic medium. The poroelastic behavior of this medium is then analyzed using the Peselnick-Meister-Watt bounds (of Hashin-Shtrikman type). We study the dependence of the shear modulus on pore fluid properties and determine the range of behavior to be expected. In particular we compare and contrast these results to those anticipated from Gassmann's fluid substitution formulas, and to the predictions of Mavko and Jizba for very low porosity rocks with flat cracks. This approach also permits the study of arbitrary numbers of constituents, but for simplicity the numerical examples are restricted here to just two constituents. This restriction also permits the use of some special exact results available for computing the overall effective stress coefficient in any two-component porous medium. The bounds making use of polycrystalline microstructure are very tight. Results for the shear modulus demonstrate that the ratio of compliance differences R (i.e., shear compliance changes over bulk compliance changes when going from drained to undrained behavior, or vice versa) is usually nonzero and can take a wide range of values, both

  6. Pore facies analysis: incorporation of rock properties into pore geometry based classes in a Permo-Triassic carbonate reservoir in the Persian Gulf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimpour-Bonab, H.; Aliakbardoust, E.

    2014-06-01

    Pore facies analysis is a useful method for the classification of reservoir rocks according to pore geometry characteristics. The importance of this method is related to the dependence of the dynamic behaviour of the reservoir rock on the pore geometry. In this study, pore facies analysis was performed by the quantification and classification of the mercury injection capillary pressure (MICP) curves applying the multi-resolution graph-based clustering (MRGC) method. Each pore facies includes a limited variety of rock samples with different depositional fabrics and diagenetic histories, which are representative of one type of pore geometry. The present pore geometry is the result of the interaction between the primary rock fabric and its diagenetic overprint. Thus the variations in petrographic properties can be correlated with the pore geometry characteristics. Accordingly, the controlling parameters in the pore geometry characteristics were revealed by detailed petrographic analysis in each pore facies. The reservoir rock samples were then classified using the determined petrographic properties which control the pore system quality. This method is proposed for the classification of reservoir rocks in complicated carbonate reservoirs, in order to reduce the incompatibility of traditional facies analysis with pore system characteristics. The method is applicable where enough capillary pressure data is not available.

  7. Characterization of nanometer-scale porosity in reservoir carbonate rock by focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bera, Bijoyendra; Gunda, Naga Siva Kumar; Mitra, Sushanta K; Vick, Douglas

    2012-02-01

    Sedimentary carbonate rocks are one of the principal porous structures in natural reservoirs of hydrocarbons such as crude oil and natural gas. Efficient hydrocarbon recovery requires an understanding of the carbonate pore structure, but the nature of sedimentary carbonate rock formation and the toughness of the material make proper analysis difficult. In this study, a novel preparation method was used on a dolomitic carbonate sample, and selected regions were then serially sectioned and imaged by focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy. The resulting series of images were used to construct detailed three-dimensional representations of the microscopic pore spaces and analyze them quantitatively. We show for the first time the presence of nanometer-scale pores (50-300 nm) inside the solid dolomite matrix. We also show the degree of connectivity of these pores with micron-scale pores (2-5 μm) that were observed to further link with bulk pores outside the matrix. PMID:22214656

  8. Characterization of phosphorus leaching from phosphate waste rock in the Xiangxi River watershed, Three Gorges Reservoir, China.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Li-guo; Liang, Bing; Xue, Qiang; Yin, Cheng-wei

    2016-05-01

    Phosphate mining waste rocks dumped in the Xiangxi River (XXR) bay, which is the largest backwater zone of the Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR), are treated as Type I industry solid wastes by the Chinese government. To evaluate the potential pollution risk of phosphorus leaching from phosphate waste rocks, the phosphorus leaching behaviors of six phosphate waste rock samples with different weathering degrees under both neutral and acidic conditions were investigated using a series of column leaching experiments, following the Method 1314 standard of the US EPA. The results indicate that the phosphorus release mechanism is solubility-controlled. Phosphorus release from waste rocks increases as pH decreases. The phosphorus leaching concentration and cumulative phosphorus released in acidic leaching conditions were found to be one order of magnitude greater than that in neutral leaching conditions. In addition, the phosphorus was released faster during the period when environmental pH turned from weak alkalinity to slight acidity, with this accelerated release period appearing when L/S was in the range of 0.5-2.0 mL/g. In both neutral and acidic conditions, the average values of Total Phosphorus (TP), including orthophosphates, polyphosphates and organic phosphate, leaching concentration exceed the availability by regulatory (0.5 mg/L) in the whole L/S range, suggesting that the phosphate waste rocks stacked within the XXR watershed should be considered as Type II industry solid wastes. Therefore, the phosphate waste rocks deposited within the study area should be considered as phosphorus point pollution sources, which could threaten the adjacent surface-water environment. PMID:26901468

  9. Spiculitic chert reservoir rocks: Glick Field, Kiowa and Comanche Counties, Kansas

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.P.; Longman, M.W.

    1995-09-01

    Glick field, discovered in 1957, has produced more than 362 BCF of gas from Mississippian Osage chert commonly referred to as the {open_quotes}Chat{close_quotes}. Other {open_quotes}Chat{close_quotes} reservoirs in Kansas and Oklahoma produce mainly from mixed chert and dolomite beneath the pre-Pennsylvanian unconformity, but Glick field`s reservoir is dominated by spiculitic chert. Glick field is a stratigraphic trap with production ending where the spiculitic facies pinches out into tight limestone to the south and west. Updip, to the northeast, the productive spiculitic facies is truncated by the unconformity. Reworked chert conglomerates overlying the spiculitic reservoir at the unconformity also produce minor amounts of gas. The spiculitic chert forming the reservoir was deposited below wavebase and grades laterally into echinoderm and brachiopod-rich skeletal wackstones and lime mudstones. Even where completely silicified, these associated limestones are tight. They form the lateral seal in the field. Thus, the reservoir is an in situ oval-shaped complex of internally brecciated sponge mats and bioherms capped in part by chert conglomerate. The spiculitic chert contains up to 50% porosity in molds after sponge spicules, matrix micropores, and vugs coupled with fracture and breccia porosity. Distribution of the sponge bioherms which form the reservoir facies was partly controlled by a subtle change on the shallow Mississippian carbonate shelf from clean skeletal limestones southward into shaly (and probable more anoxic) carbonates known locally as the {open_quotes}Cowley Facies.{close_quotes} This lithologic boundary can be mapped across southern Kansas and provides a potential exploration tool that may help in finding other stratigraphically trapped spiculitic reservoirs in the area.

  10. The use of predictive lithostratigraphy to significantly improve the ability to forecast reservoir and source rocks? Final CRADA report.

    SciTech Connect

    Doctor, R. D.; Moore, T. L.; Energy Systems

    2010-06-29

    The purpose of this CRADA, which ended in 2003, was to make reservoir and source rock distribution significantly more predictable by quantifying the fundamental controls on stratigraphic heterogeneity. To do this, the relationships among insolation, climate, sediment supply, glacioeustasy, and reservoir and source rock occurrence were investigated in detail. Work current at the inception of the CRADA had uncovered previously unrecognized associations among these processes and properties that produce a phenomenon that, when properly analyzed, will make lithostratigraphic variability (including texture, porosity, and permeability) substantially more understandable. Computer climate simulations of selected time periods, compared with the global distribution of paleoclimatic indicators, documented spatial and temporal climate changes as a function of insolation and provided quantitative changes in runoff, lake level, and glacioeustasy. The effect of elevation and climate on sediment yield was assessed numerically by analyzing digital terrain and climate data. The phase relationships of climate, yield, and glacioeustatic cycles from the Gulf of Mexico and/or other sedimentary basins were assessed by using lacunarity, a statistical technique.

  11. A land-use and water-quality history of White Rock Lake Reservoir, Dallas, Texas, based on paleolimnological analyses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Platt, Bradbury J.; Van Metre, P.C.

    1997-01-01

    White Rock Lake reservoir in Dallas, Texas contains a 150-cm sediment record of silty clay that documents land-use changes since its construction in 1912. Pollen analysis corroborates historical evidence that between 1912 and 1950 the watershed was primarily agricultural. Land disturbance by plowing coupled with strong and variable spring precipitation caused large amounts of sediment to enter the lake during this period. Diatoms were not preserved at this time probably because of low productivity compared to diatom dissolution by warm, alkaline water prior to burial in the sediments. After 1956, the watershed became progressively urbanized. Erosion decreased, land stabilized, and pollen of riparian trees increased as the lake water became somewhat less turbid. By 1986 the sediment record indicates that diatom productivity had increased beyond rates of diatom destruction. Neither increased nutrients nor reduced pesticides can account for increased diatom productivity, but grain size studies imply that before 1986 diatoms were light limited by high levels of turbidity. This study documents how reservoirs may relate to land-use practices and how watershed management could extend reservoir life and improve water quality.

  12. Multidisciplinary Imaging of Rock Properties in Carbonate Reservoirs for Flow-Unit Targeting

    SciTech Connect

    Ruppel, Stephen C.

    2002-10-08

    During the period major accomplishments were in (1) characterization of facies and cyclicity in subsurface cores and in outcrop, (2) construction of a preliminary stratigraphic framework, (3) definition of rock fabrics, and (4) correlation of 3-D seismic data.

  13. Rocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Alice

    This science unit is designed for limited- and non-English speaking students in a Chinese bilingual education program. The unit covers rock material, classification, characteristics of types of rocks, and rock cycles. It is written in Chinese and simple English. At the end of the unit there is a list of main terms in both English and Chinese, and…

  14. MULTIDISCIPLINARY IMAGING OF ROCK PROPERTIES IN CARBONATE RESERVOIRS FOR FLOW-UNIT TARGETING

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen C. Ruppel

    2003-07-01

    Excellent progress continues to be made on most objectives and goals. Primary focus during the past 6 months has been (1) simulation of reservoir performance using the reservoir model constructed for the Phase 1 study area, (2) extension of core and log characterization activities to the Phase 2 study area, (3) development of an initial velocity-based inversion model from the 3-D seismic volume for porosity characterization, (4) continuation of quality-control analysis of wireline logs. Preliminary results of the study were presented at a technology-transfer workshop in May 2003 in Midland/Odessa Texas.

  15. Classification and quantification of pore shapes in sandstone reservoir rocks with 3-D X-ray micro-computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Mayka; Halisch, Matthias; Müller, Cornelia; Peres Fernandes, Celso

    2016-02-01

    Recent years have seen a growing interest in the characterization of the pore morphologies of reservoir rocks and how the spatial organization of pore traits affects the macro behavior of rock-fluid systems. With the availability of 3-D high-resolution imaging, such as x-ray micro-computed tomography (µ-CT), the detailed quantification of particle shapes has been facilitated by progress in computer science. Here, we show how the shapes of irregular rock particles (pores) can be classified and quantified based on binary 3-D images. The methodology requires the measurement of basic 3-D particle descriptors (length, width, and thickness) and a shape classification that involves the similarity of artificial objects, which is based on main pore network detachments and 3-D sample sizes. Two main pore components were identified from the analyzed volumes: pore networks and residual pore ganglia. A watershed algorithm was applied to preserve the pore morphology after separating the main pore networks, which is essential for the pore shape characterization. The results were validated for three sandstones (S1, S2, and S3) from distinct reservoirs, and most of the pore shapes were found to be plate- and cube-like, ranging from 39.49 to 50.94 % and from 58.80 to 45.18 % when the Feret caliper descriptor was investigated in a 10003 voxel volume. Furthermore, this study generalizes a practical way to correlate specific particle shapes, such as rods, blades, cuboids, plates, and cubes to characterize asymmetric particles of any material type with 3-D image analysis.

  16. Hydrothermal alteration and tectonic setting of intrusive rocks from East Brawley, Imperial Valley: an application of petrology to geothermal reservoir analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Keskinen, M.; Sternfeld, J.

    1982-01-01

    A geothermal well near East Brawley intersected a series of thin (3 to 35m) diabasic to dioritic intrusives. The petrology and chemistry of these meta-igneous rocks can provide insight into the thermal and fluid chemical characteristics of the reservoir and into the processes of magma generation at depth. A description of the rock types and their hydrothermal alteration is presented in order to increase the petrologic data base relating to this important facet of the geothermal potential of the Salton Trough and to provide a case study illustrating how detailed petrologic examination of well cuttings can provide important input in the construction of a geothermal reservoir model.

  17. Impact of 4-year CO2 injection on reservoir-rock integrity at the CO2 pilot site Ketzin (Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bock, S.; Förster, H.; Meier, A.; Pudlo, D.; Förster, A.; Gaupp, R.

    2013-12-01

    The CO2 Ketzin pilot site offers the possibility to study the short-term effects of injected CO2 on the mineralogy, geochemistry and porosity/permeability of siliciclastic reservoir rocks in a saline aquifer. Ketzin is located 30 kilometers west of Berlin in the Northeast German Basin, a sedimentary basin containing Paleozoic to Cenozoic sediments. The site is characterized by an anticlinal structure formed through halokinetic uprise of Permian salt. The reservoir in the Upper Triassic Stuttgart Formation, in which about 64,000 tons of CO2 are stored at depth of 630-700 m, is heterogeneous, comprising sandstones and siltstones. The Stuttgart Formation is overlain by a 200-m-thick caprock system of massive mudstones pertaining to the Upper Triassic Weser Formation and Arnstadt Formation. Argillaceous Tertiary sediments form an additional caprock in the shallow subsurface. Core material was recovered in 2007 for a baseline study and again in August 2012, almost four years after start of CO2 injection, to evaluate the fluid-rock reactions that took place. Preliminary results of an ongoing study, which focuses on petrographic-mineralogical and geochemical features, reveal negligible changes in bulk-rock composition almost in the range of the pristine natural heterogeneity of the reservoir. No significant dissolution or precipitation of minerals occurred implying that CO2 was trapped mainly structurally and residually as well as became dissolved in the formation brine. Additional studies concentrated on the fixation of CO2 by mineral trapping. Analytical work was focused on small-scale variations and reactions within and on the surface of minerals. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) supplied information about the alteration of Fe-rich grain coatings. This surface-sensitive method provides, beyond the quantitative analysis of certain elements, information on the valence state and quantity of iron. A weak tendency of transformation from hematite to goethite coatings

  18. Constraints on the formation of the Bitterroot Lobe of the Idaho Batholith, Idaho and Montana, from U-Pb zircon geochronology and feldspar Pb isotopic data

    SciTech Connect

    Toth, M.I.; Stacey, J.S.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on zircons from tonalite emplaced along the western periphery of the Bitterroot Lobe of the Idaho Batholith yield an almost concordant age of 94 {plus minus} 1.4 Ma; monozogranite and granodiorite plutons along the northern edge of the lobe yield ages of 75 to 71 ma. The volumetrically more dominant plutons in the central and western parts of the lobe were emplaced between 59 and 54 Ma. Upper intercept data, combined with Pb isotopic data from feldspars, confirm that the magmas of the Bitterroot Lobe were derived mainly from an early Proterozoic lower continental crust.

  19. Ichnofabric mapping and interpretation of Jurassic reservoir rocks of the Norwegian North Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Bockelie, J.F. )

    1991-06-01

    Recurrent sediment fabric and trace fossil associations in the Norwegian offshore Jurassic sequences have been interpreted by the ichnofabric concept. In the Sognefjord Formation (Oxfordian-Kimmeridgian) of the Troll Field five basic ichnofabrics were recognized and named after the dominant ichnogenus present, respectively: Helminthoida, Anconichnus, Palaeophycus, Ophiomorpha and Skolithos. These ichnofabrics developed in sediments deposited in marine environments ranging from quiescent offshore to high energy, shallow water nearshore situations. When sequence patterns of ichnofabrics were mapped within five chronostratigraphic reservoir zones of the Troll Field it was possible to recognize both how the frequency of a given ichnofabric may change in time in a restricted area or may change in its areal distribution in a restricted time interval. Such maps have been integrated with lithofacies maps and dip-meter studies in cored sequence to produce quantitative base maps for computerized reservoir models. The maps can also be used as a powerful tool for facies predictions.

  20. Gamma ray spectrometry logs as a hydrocarbon indicator for clastic reservoir rocks in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Al-Alfy, I M; Nabih, M A; Eysa, E A

    2013-03-01

    Petroleum oil is an important source for the energy in the world. The Gulf of Suez, Nile Delta and South Valley are important regions for studying hydrocarbon potential in Egypt. A thorium normalization technique was applied on the sandstone reservoirs in the three regions to determine the hydrocarbon potentialities zones using the three spectrometric radioactive gamma ray-logs (eU, eTh and K% logs). The conventional well logs (gamma-ray, deep resistivity, shallow resistivity, neutron, density and sonic logs) are analyzed to determine the net pay zones in these wells. Indices derived from thorium normalized spectral logs indicate the hydrocarbon zones in petroleum reservoirs. The results of this technique in the three regions (Gulf of Suez, Nile Delta and South Valley) are in agreement with the results of the conventional well log analyses by ratios of 82%, 78% and 71% respectively. PMID:23306160

  1. The fractal menger sponge and Sierpinski carpet as models for reservoir rock/pore systems: I. ; Theory and image analysis of Sierpinski carpets

    SciTech Connect

    Garrison, J.R., Jr.; Pearn, W.C.; von Rosenberg, D. W. )

    1992-01-01

    In this paper reservoir rock/pore systems are considered natural fractal objects and modeled as and compared to the regular fractal Menger Sponge and Sierpinski Carpet. The physical properties of a porous rock are, in part, controlled by the geometry of the pore system. The rate at which a fluid or electrical current can travel through the pore system of a rock is controlled by the path along which it must travel. This path is a subset of the overall geometry of the pore system. Reservoir rocks exhibit self-similarity over a range of length scales suggesting that fractal geometry offers a means of characterizing these complex objects. The overall geometry of a rock/pore system can be described, conveniently and concisely, in terms of effective fractal dimensions. The rock/pore system is modeled as the fractal Menger Sponge. A cross section through the rock/pore system, such as an image of a thin-section of a rock, is modeled as the fractal Sierpinski Carpet, which is equivalent to the face of the Menger Sponge.

  2. Hydrogeologic controls on induced seismicity in crystalline basement rocks due to fluid injection into basal reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yipeng; Person, Mark; Rupp, John; Ellett, Kevin; Celia, Michael A; Gable, Carl W; Bowen, Brenda; Evans, James; Bandilla, Karl; Mozley, Peter; Dewers, Thomas; Elliot, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    A series of Mb 3.8-5.5 induced seismic events in the midcontinent region, United States, resulted from injection of fluid either into a basal sedimentary reservoir with no underlying confining unit or directly into the underlying crystalline basement complex. The earthquakes probably occurred along faults that were likely critically stressed within the crystalline basement. These faults were located at a considerable distance (up to 10 km) from the injection wells and head increases at the hypocenters were likely relatively small (∼70-150 m). We present a suite of simulations that use a simple hydrogeologic-geomechanical model to assess what hydrogeologic conditions promote or deter induced seismic events within the crystalline basement across the midcontinent. The presence of a confining unit beneath the injection reservoir horizon had the single largest effect in preventing induced seismicity within the underlying crystalline basement. For a crystalline basement having a permeability of 2 × 10(-17)  m(2) and specific storage coefficient of 10(-7) /m, injection at a rate of 5455 m(3) /d into the basal aquifer with no underlying basal seal over 10 years resulted in probable brittle failure to depths of about 0.6 km below the injection reservoir. Including a permeable (kz  = 10(-13)  m(2) ) Precambrian normal fault, located 20 m from the injection well, increased the depth of the failure region below the reservoir to 3 km. For a large permeability contrast between a Precambrian thrust fault (10(-12)  m(2) ) and the surrounding crystalline basement (10(-18)  m(2) ), the failure region can extend laterally 10 km away from the injection well. PMID:23745958

  3. Hydrothermal origin of oil and gas reservoirs in basement rock of the South Vietnam continental shelf

    SciTech Connect

    Dmitriyevskiy, A.N.; Kireyev, F.A.; Bochko, R.A.; Fedorova, T.A. )

    1993-07-01

    Oil-saturated granites, with mineral parageneses typical of hydrothermal metasomatism and leaching haloes, have been found near faults in the crystalline basement of the South Vietnam continental shelf. The presence of native silver, barite, zincian copper, and iron chloride indicates a deep origin for the mineralizing fluids. Hydrothermally altered granites are a new possible type of reservoir and considerably broaden the possibilities of oil and gas exploration. 15 refs., 22 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Fluid sensitivity study of elastic parameters in low-medium porosity and permeability reservoir rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Fa-Gen; Zou, Chang-Chun; He, Tao; Shi, Ge; Qiu, Gen-Gen; Ren, Ke-Ying

    2010-03-01

    In this article, based on the acoustic measurements of core samples obtained from the low to medium porosity and permeability reservoirs in the WXS Depression, the densities and P and S wave velocities of these core samples were obtained. Then based on these data, a series of elastic parameters were computed. From the basic theory and previous pore fluid research results, we derived a new fluid identification factor (F). Using the relative variations, Ag/w and Ao/w, of the elastic parameters between gas and water saturated samples and between oil and water saturated samples, λρ, σ HSFIF, Kρ, λρ - 2µ ρ, and F as quantitative indicators, we evaluate the sensitivity of the different fluid identification factors to identify reservoir fluids and validate the effects by crossplots. These confirm that the new fluid identification factor (F) is more sensitive for distinguishing oil and water than the traditional method and is more favorable for fliud identification in low to medium porosity and permeability reservoirs.

  5. Integrated approach for quantification of fractured tight reservoir rocks: Porosity, permeability analyses and 3D fracture network characterisation on fractured dolomite samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voorn, Maarten; Barnhoorn, Auke; Exner, Ulrike; Baud, Patrick; Reuschlé, Thierry

    2015-04-01

    Fractured reservoir rocks make up an important part of the hydrocarbon reservoirs worldwide. A detailed analysis of fractures and fracture networks in reservoir rock samples is thus essential to determine the potential of these fractured reservoirs. However, common analyses on drill core and plug samples taken from such reservoirs (including hand specimen analysis, thin section analysis and laboratory porosity and permeability determination) suffer from various problems, such as having a limited resolution, providing only 2D and no internal structure information, being destructive on the samples and/or not being representative for full fracture networks. In this study, we therefore explore the use of an additional method - non-destructive 3D X-ray micro-Computed Tomography (μCT) - to obtain more information on such fractured samples. Seven plug-sized samples were selected from narrowly fractured rocks of the Hauptdolomit formation, taken from wellbores in the Vienna Basin, Austria. These samples span a range of different fault rocks in a fault zone interpretation, from damage zone to fault core. 3D μCT data is used to extract porosity, fracture aperture, fracture density and fracture orientations - in bulk as well as locally. The 3D analyses are complemented with thin sections made to provide some 2D information with a much higher detail than the μCT data. Finally, gas- and water permeability measurements under confining pressure provide an important link (at least in order of magnitude) of the µCT results towards more realistic reservoir conditions. Our results show that 3D μCT can be applied efficiently on plug-sized samples of naturally fractured rocks, and that several important parameters can be extracted. μCT can therefore be a useful addition to studies on such reservoir rocks, and provide valuable input for modelling and simulations. Also permeability experiments under confining pressure provide important additional insights. Combining these and other

  6. Water-quality trends in White Rock Creek Basin from 1912-1994 identified using sediment cores from White Rock Lake Reservoir, Dallas, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Metre, P.C.; Callender, E.

    1997-01-01

    Historical trends in selected water-quality variables from 1912 to 1994 in White Rock Creek Basin were identified by dated sediment cores from White Rock Lake. White Rock Lake is a 4.4-km2 reservoir filled in 1912 and located on the north side of Dallas, Texas, with a drainage area of 259 km2. Agriculture dominated land use in White Rock Creek Basin before about 1950. By 1990, 72% of the basin was urban. Sediment cores were dated using cesium-137 and core lithology. Major element concentrations changed, and sedimentation rates and percentage of clay-sized particles in sediments decreased beginning in about 1952 in response to the change in land use. Lead concentrations, normalized with respect to aluminum, were six times larger in sediment deposited in about 1978 than in pre-1952 sediment. Following the introduction of unleaded gasoline in the 1970s, normalized lead concentrations in sediment declined and stabilized at about two and one-half times the pre-1952 level. Normalized zinc and arsenic concentrations increased 66 and 76%, respectively, from before 1952 to 1994. No organochlorine compounds were detected in sediments deposited prior to about 1940. Concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) and DDE (a metabolite of DDT) increased rapidly beginning in the 1940s and peaked in the 1960s at 21 and 20 ??g kg-1, respectively, which is coincident with their peak use in the United States. Concentrations of both declined about an order of magnitude from the 1960s to the 1990s to 3.0 and 2.0 ??g kg-1, respectively. Chlordane and dieldrin concentrations increased during the 1970s and 1980s. The largest chlordane concentration was 8.0 ??g kg-1 and occurred in a sediment sample deposited in about 1990. The largest dieldrin concentration was 0.7 ??g kg-1 and occurred in the most recent sample deposited in the early 1990s. Agricultural use of chlordane and dieldrin was restricted in the 1970s; however, both were used as termiticides, and urban use of chlordane

  7. Reactive Transport Modeling of Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Injection Into Mafic Rock Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podgorney, R.; Hull, L.; Huang, H.; McLing, T.

    2007-12-01

    Technologies to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases and increase the sequestration of CO2 have received increasing attention since the development of the Kyoto protocol. One promising technology is the sequestration of CO2 in geologic formations. The suitability of a fractured basalt reservoir for CO2 sequestration is constrained by three broad categories of issues, which we refer to as physical, technical, and economic constraints. Physical constraints are beyond human control; thus, it is a requirement that a systematic method be developed by which a particular target reservoir may be evaluated to determine if it lies within the bounds required for safe and effective disposal. Technical constraints, on the other hand, are challenges to the ability to design, construct, and/or monitor a sequestration project as a result of limitations on our ability to determine the distribution of properties in the subsurface, our knowledge of the behavior of CO2 in the deep subsurface, and the current state of computational science and subsurface monitoring. Equally important are the heterogeneity of economic costs associated with sequestering CO2 at different sites and within different formations. The work presented here focuses on the technical aspects of CO2 injection, specifically examining reactive transport of CO2 in the subsurface in the vicinity of the injection well using the simulation code TOUGHREACT. Pressure distribution and propagation, kinetics of the geochemical reactions, and resultant changes in permeability/porosity are examined in order to evaluate injection scenarios that maximize the longevity of the injection well and sustainability of the reservoir.

  8. Tests of US rock salt for long-term stability of CAES reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Gehle, R.M.; Thoms, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    This is a report on laboratory tests to assess the effects of compressed air energy storage (CAES) on rock salt within the US. The project included a conventional laboratory test phase, with triaxial test machines, and a bench-scale test phase performed in salt mines in southern Louisiana. Limited numerical modeling also was performed to serve as a guide in selecting test layouts and for interpreting test data.

  9. Supercritical CO2 migration in a fractured rock at reservoir conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, J.; Kim, K.; Han, W.; Kim, T.; Kim, J.; Park, E.

    2012-12-01

    Suitable geological formations should guarantee a long-term safe and reliable storage of the injected supercritical CO2 (scCO2), and thus densely fractured natural reservoirs are reluctant to consider as a candidate formation. Nevertheless, fractures occur in nearly all geological settings and play a major role for fluid flow. A series of core flooding test were performed to investigate the effect of a fracture on supercritical CO2 migration under reservoir conditions. In the experiment, twin samples of Berea sandstone cores were employed which have 20 % porosity and 1.7×10-13 m2 permeability. One of the twin samples was cut through the center in the direction of longitudinal axis in order to induce a single artificial fracture. The other core represents the homogeneous core. During the test, the downstream pressure was maintained at 10 MPa, and the confining pressure was kept at 20 MPa. The temperature was set to be 40 degrees to reflect the 1 km subsurface environment. The CO2-flooding (drainage) tests with brine-saturated core were performed with different injection rates (q) for both the homogeneous and the fractured core. The scCO2 saturation was measured with linear X-ray scanner. While piston-like brine displacement was observed in homogeneous core with minor effects of gravity over-run, the fractured core showed scCO2 displacing brine at fracture zone instantaneously as the injection started. As the injected volume increased, more CO2 intruded the matrix zone. Injection rates lower than a critical value (3ml/min in our conditions) only allowed CO2 displace brine along fractured zone as the built up pressure did not overcome the entry pressure of the matrix zone. In case q = 5 ml/min, the pressure drop across the cores showed 6 kPa and 13 kPa for fractured and homogeneous core, respectively, revealing that fractured reservoir has advantage on injectivity. The storage capacity was estimated by calculating scCO2 mass stored in both the homogeneous and

  10. Hydrodynamic thickness of petroleum oil adsorbed layers in the pores of reservoir rocks.

    PubMed

    Alkafeef, Saad F; Algharaib, Meshal K; Alajmi, Abdullah F

    2006-06-01

    The hydrodynamic thickness delta of adsorbed petroleum (crude) oil layers into the pores of sandstone rocks, through which the liquid flows, has been studied by Poiseuille's flow law and the evolution of (electrical) streaming current. The adsorption of petroleum oil is accompanied by a numerical reduction in the (negative) surface potential of the pore walls, eventually stabilizing at a small positive potential, attributed to the oil macromolecules themselves. After increasing to around 30% of the pore radius, the adsorbed layer thickness delta stopped growing either with time or with concentrations of asphaltene in the flowing liquid. The adsorption thickness is confirmed with the blockage value of the rock pores' area determined by the combination of streaming current and streaming potential measurements. This behavior is attributed to the effect on the disjoining pressure across the adsorbed layer, as described by Derjaguin and Churaev, of which the polymolecular adsorption films lose their stability long before their thickness has approached the radius of the rock pore. PMID:16414057

  11. Characterization of rock for constraining reservoir scale tomography at the Geysers geothermal field

    SciTech Connect

    Boitnott, G.N.; Bonner, B.P.

    1994-01-20

    A suite of laboratory measurements are being conducted on Geysers graywacke recovered from a drilled depth of 2599 meters in NEGU-17. The tests are being conducted to characterize the effect of pressure and fluid saturation on the seismic properties of the graywacke matrix. The measurements indicate that the graywacke is an unusual rock in many respects. Both compressional and shear velocities exhibit relatively little change with pressure. Water saturation causes a slight increase in the compressional velocity, quantitatively consistent with predictions from the Biot-Gassmann equations. Shear velocity decreases with water saturation by an amount greater than that predicted by the Biot-Gassmann equations. This decrease is attributed to chemomechanical weakening caused by the presence of water. Measurements of Q, from torsion experiments on room dry samples at seismic frequencies indicate unusually high Q, (~500). Water saturation decreases the shear modulus by 12 percent, again indicative of chemomechanical weakening. Q, is lower for the water saturated condition, but still relatively high for rock at low stress. Results of ultrasonic pulse propagation experiments on partially saturated samples are typical of low porosity rocks, being characterized by a monotonic decrease in compressional and shear velocity with decrease in saturation. An increase in shear velocity and low frequency shear modulus after vacuum drying indicates the presence of chemo-mechanical weakening resulting from the presence of small amounts of water.

  12. Fluid focusing and breaching of low permeability layers in reacting and visco-elasto-plastically deforming reservoir rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Nina S. C.

    2013-04-01

    The on-going injection of one million tons per year of CO2 into the Utsira sand at Sleipner is used as an example for a highly successful CO2 storage operation. Even at Sleipner, however, we observe features that are not straightforward to explain and quantify with exiting models. One such feature is the so- called chimneys that show up in the time laps seismic images. They are zones of disturbed layering that cut nearly vertically through the interbedded thin shale layers in the reservoir sands, not unlink the frequently observed pipe structures due to fluid venting. These chimneys have been ascribed to artefacts in the data or pre-existing fractures or pipes, and these explanations are difficult to rule out. If we take the seismic interpretations at face value, however, then the data suggest that the intensity and extent of the chimneys changes through time. The extent and thickness of the observed plume supports that the injected CO2 is migrating through focused zones in the shales from the well at the bottom of the reservoir to the top layer immediately below the caprock much faster than predicted by Darcy flow through intact, low permeable shale layers. We developed a fully coupled numerical model for fluid flow through a reacting and deforming porous rock. Reactions may be upscaled to add a viscous component to the rheology, or be modelled explicitly. In laboratory experiments, viscous compaction has been shown to take place in typical reservoir rocks due to the high reactivity of CO2-rich brine. Other experimental studies show that unconsolidated sands, such as the Utsira sand, and clay-rich shales follow a visco-plastic flow law rather than behaving as purely poro-elastically. Hence, viisco-elasto-plastic deformation of the porous matrix is taken into account in our model and fluid focusing may occur due to non-linear couplings between porosity and permeability and viscosity. This phenomenon is known as a porosity wave. A non-linear viscous rheology (or

  13. Characterization of reservoir rocks and fluids by surface electromagnetic transient methods

    SciTech Connect

    Hoekstra, P.; Blohm, M.W. ); Stoyer, C.H. ); James, B.A. )

    1992-01-01

    The objectives of this research are to improve the interpretations of transient electromagnetic (TEM) measurements over two-dimensional subsurface structures. TEM is a surface electromagnetic method employed in fossil energy reservoir exploration and characterization. Electrical measurements find application in (i) assisting in fossil energy exploration mainly in areas where seismic methods yield inadequate data quality, such as volcanic covered terrain, permafrost areas, and the Rocky Mountain overthrust; (ii) mapping contacts between hydrocarbon and brines in shallow producing horizons, and (iii) in monitoring enhanced oil recovery processes which cause zones of lower resistivity. Accomplishments for this past year are presented for the following tasks: (1) site selection and acquisition of high density, 3-component TEM data set over test site; (2) finite element forward modeling; and (3) TEM 2-D subsurface imaging.

  14. Characterization of reservoir rocks and fluids by surface electromagnetic transient methods

    SciTech Connect

    Hoekstra, P.; Blohm, M.W.; Stoyer, C.H.; James, B.A.

    1992-07-17

    The objectives of this research were to improve the interpretations of transient electromagnetic (TEM) measurements over two-dimensional subsurface structures. TEM is a surface electromagnetic method employed in fossil energy reservoir exploration and characterization. Electrical measurements find application in (i) assisting in fossil energy exploration mainly in areas where seismic methods yield inadequate data quality, such as volcanic covered terrain, permafrost areas, and the Rocky Mountain Overthrust; (ii) mapping contacts between hydrocarbon and brines in shallow producing horizon, and (iii) in monitoring enhanced oil recovery processes which cause zones of lower resistivity. The work under this contract consisted of three tasks: (1) Selection of a test site and acquisition of a high density, 3-component data set over the test site; (2) development of finite element modeling algorithms for computing 3-D EM fields over 2-D EM fields over 2-D subsurface structures; and development of TEM 2-D subsurface imaging method. Accomplishments for this period are described.

  15. Special core analyses and relative permeability measurement on Almond formation reservoir rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Maloney, D.; Doggett, K.; Brinkmeyer, A.

    1993-02-01

    This report describes the results from special core analyses and relative permeability measurements conducted on samples of rock from the Almond Formation in Greater Green River Basin of southwestern Wyoming. The core was from Arch Unit Well 121 of Patrick Draw field. Samples were taken from the 4,950 to 4,965 ft depth interval. Thin section evaluation, X-ray diffraction, routine permeability and porosity, capillary pressure and wettability tests were performed to characterize the samples. Fluid flow capacity characteristics were measured during two-phase unsteady- and steady-state and three-phase steady-state relative permeability tests. Test results are presented in tables and graphs. Relative permeability results are compared with those of a 260-mD, fired Berea sandstone sample which was previously subjected to similar tests. Brine relative permeabilities were similar for the two samples, whereas oil and gas relative permeabilities for the Almond formation rock were higher at equivalent saturation conditions compared to Berea results. Most of the tests described in this report were conducted at 74[degrees]F laboratory temperature. Additional tests are planned at 150[degrees]F temperature. Equipment and procedural modifications to perform the elevated temperature tests are described.

  16. Special core analyses and relative permeability measurement on Almond formation reservoir rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Maloney, D.; Doggett, K.; Brinkmeyer, A.

    1993-02-01

    This report describes the results from special core analyses and relative permeability measurements conducted on samples of rock from the Almond Formation in Greater Green River Basin of southwestern Wyoming. The core was from Arch Unit Well 121 of Patrick Draw field. Samples were taken from the 4,950 to 4,965 ft depth interval. Thin section evaluation, X-ray diffraction, routine permeability and porosity, capillary pressure and wettability tests were performed to characterize the samples. Fluid flow capacity characteristics were measured during two-phase unsteady- and steady-state and three-phase steady-state relative permeability tests. Test results are presented in tables and graphs. Relative permeability results are compared with those of a 260-mD, fired Berea sandstone sample which was previously subjected to similar tests. Brine relative permeabilities were similar for the two samples, whereas oil and gas relative permeabilities for the Almond formation rock were higher at equivalent saturation conditions compared to Berea results. Most of the tests described in this report were conducted at 74{degrees}F laboratory temperature. Additional tests are planned at 150{degrees}F temperature. Equipment and procedural modifications to perform the elevated temperature tests are described.

  17. Adsorption characteristics of rocks from vapor-dominated geothermal reservoir at the Geysers, CA

    SciTech Connect

    Satik, Cengiz; Walters, Mark; Horne, Roland N.

    1996-01-24

    This paper reports on a continuing experimental effort to characterize the adsorption behavior of rocks from The Geysers steam field in California. We show adsorption results obtained for 36 rock samples. All of the adsorption isotherms plotted on the same graph exhibit an envelope of isotherms. The minimum and the maximum values of the slope (or rate of adsorption) and of the magnitude within this envelope of isotherms belonged to the UOC-1 (felsite) and NCPA B-5 (serpentine) samples. The values of surface area and porosity, and pore size distribution for 19 of the samples indicated a very weak correlation with adsorption. An interpretation of the pore size distributions and the liquid saturation isotherms suggests that the change in the slope and the magnitude of the adsorption isotherms within the envelope is controlled primarily by the physical adsorption mechanism instead of capillary condensation. Grain-size and framework grain to matrix ratio are found to be insufficient to characterize this adsorption behavior. An accurate identification of the mineralogy of the samples will be essential to complete this analysis.

  18. Final Report: Development of a Chemical Model to Predict the Interactions between Supercritical CO2, Fluid and Rock in EGS Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    McPherson, Brian J.; Pan, Feng

    2014-09-24

    This report summarizes development of a coupled-process reservoir model for simulating enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) that utilize supercritical carbon dioxide as a working fluid. Specifically, the project team developed an advanced chemical kinetic model for evaluating important processes in EGS reservoirs, such as mineral precipitation and dissolution at elevated temperature and pressure, and for evaluating potential impacts on EGS surface facilities by related chemical processes. We assembled a new database for better-calibrated simulation of water/brine/ rock/CO2 interactions in EGS reservoirs. This database utilizes existing kinetic and other chemical data, and we updated those data to reflect corrections for elevated temperature and pressure conditions of EGS reservoirs.

  19. Time-dependent deformation of gas shales - role of rock framework versus reservoir fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hol, Sander; Zoback, Mark

    2013-04-01

    Hydraulic fracturing operations are generally performed to achieve a fast, drastic increase of permeability and production rates. Although modeling of the underlying short-term mechanical response has proven successful via conventional geomechanical approaches, predicting long-term behavior is still challenging as the formation interacts physically and chemically with the fluids present in-situ. Recent experimental work has shown that shale samples subjected to a change in effective stress deform in a time-dependent manner ("creep"). Although the magnitude and nature of this behavior is strongly related to the composition and texture of the sample, also the choice of fluid used in the experiments affects the total strain response - strongly adsorbing fluids result in more, recoverable creep. The processes underlying time-dependent deformation of shales under in-situ stresses, and the long-term impact on reservoir performance, are at present poorly understood. In this contribution, we report triaxial mechanical tests, and theoretical/thermodynamic modeling work with the aim to identify and describe the main mechanisms that control time-dependent deformation of gas shales. In particular, we focus on the role of the shale solid framework versus the type and pressure of the present pore fluid. Our experiments were mainly performed on Eagle Ford Shale samples. The samples were subjected to cycles of loading and unloading, first in the dry state, and then again after equilibrating them with (adsorbing) CO2 and (non-adsorbing) He at fluid pressures of 4 MPa. Stresses were chosen close to those persisting under in-situ conditions. The results of our tests demonstrate that likely two main types of deformation mechanisms operate that relate to a) the presence of microfractures as a dominating feature in the solid framework of the shale, and b) the adsorbing potential of fluids present in the nanoscale voids of the shale. To explain the role of adsorption in the observed

  20. Discrimination of reservoir dolostone within tight limestone using rock physics modeling and pre-stack parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, G.; Lee, B.; Lee, G.

    2013-12-01

    Dolostones may be differentiated from limestones based on various pre-stack seismic parameters as they are denser and faster. However, because the seismic properties of a rock are affected strongly by porosity, porous dolostones may not be significantly denser and faster than limestones. We computed various pre-stack parameters (P-impedance, S-impedance, Vp/Vs, Poisson's ratio, Lamé constants) for tight limestones using the Vp and density logs from a well that penetrated Jurassic carbonate and the Vs log, constructed from the empirical relationships of Vp and Vs. The pre-stack parameters of dolostones with 1% - 40% porosity were estimated based on the bulk and shear moduli and bulk densities computed from the formulas proposed by various workers, including Gassmann equations. Crossplots of the pre-stack parameters show that the Lamé constants (λ, μ) are most effective in differentiating dolostones from limestones. In particular, the λρ -μρ vs. μρ crossplot shows a clear-cut separation of the porous dolostones and tight limestones; the porous dolostones plot exclusively to the left of the λρ -μρ of about 25 GPa.

  1. Grain-Scale Deformation in a Weakly-Cemented Analogue Reservoir Rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiGiovanni, A. A.; Fredrich, J. T.

    2001-12-01

    High-resolution field-emission scanning electron microscopy was performed to elucidate the micromechanics of compaction in Castlegate sandstone deformed in the laboratory under triaxial compression loading conditions. The microscopy reveals that compaction of this weakly-cemented sandstone proceeds in two phases: an initial stage of porosity decrease that is accomplished by breakage of grain contacts and grain rotation, and a second stage of further porosity reduction that is accommodated by intense grain breakage and rotation. This compaction sequence contrasts with that observed by other workers in more strongly indurated rocks such as Berea sandstone, where grain fragmentation coincides with the onset of inelastic compaction. Quantitative stereological measurements corroborate the decrease in intergrain spacing and increase in grain boundary contact area that the microstructural observations suggest occur during the first stage of compaction. In the second stage of compaction, image analysis further reveals a five-fold increase in the surface area per unit volume resulting from extensive microfracturing that occurs with a preferred orientation parallel to the primary loading axis. Acoustic emission (AE) detection and location measured during the experiment correlate with the microscopic observations in that rotation and breakage of grain contacts in the first compaction stage is marked by diffuse AE events whereas the regions of intense grain breakage and subsequent compaction are indicated by intensely concentrated AE. High-resolution (1.7 and 3.3 micron) synchrotron computed microtomography experiments performed on millimeter sized cores at the GSECARS beamline at the Advanced Photon are also analyzed and compared with the data obtained from the high-resolution scanning electron microscopy. This work was performed at Sandia National Laboratories funded by the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  2. The Impacts of Rock Composition and Properties on the Ability to Stimulate Production of Ultra-Low Permeability Oil and Gas Reservoirs Through Hydraulic Fracturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoback, M. D.; Sone, H.; Kohli, A. H.; Heller, R. J.

    2014-12-01

    In this talk, we present the results of several research projects investigating how rock properties, natural fractures and the state of stress affect the success of hydraulic fracturing operations during stimulation of shale gas and tight oil reservoirs. First, through laboratory measurements on samples of the Barnett, Eagle Ford, Haynesville and Horn River shales, we discuss pore structure, adsorption and permeability as well as the importance of clay content on the viscoplastic behavior of shale formations. Second, we present several lines of evidence that indicates that the principal way in which hydraulic fracturing stimulates production from shale gas reservoirs is by inducing slow slip on pre-existing fractures and faults, which are not detected by conventional microseismic monitoring, Finally, we discuss how hydraulic fracturing can be optimized in response to variations of rock properties.

  3. ADVANCED CHARACTERIZATION OF FRACTURED RESERVOIRS IN CARBONATE ROCKS: THE MICHIGAN BASIN

    SciTech Connect

    James R. Wood; William B. Harrison

    2001-04-01

    Among the accomplishments of this past reporting period are obtaining a complete landgrid for the State of Michigan and the digital processing of the high and medium resolution DEM files. We can now extract lineations from the DEMs automatically using machine algorithms. One tentative result that may be very significant is that we may be seeing manifestations of buried structures in the DEM data. We are looking at a set of extracted lineations in the northern lower peninsula that appear to follow the trend of the pinnacle reefs (Silurian) which had relief approaching 300 feet but are now buried to greater than 3000 feet. We have also extracted the dolomite alteration data from all fields and can show that this is mainly confined to the basin center. It may be related to the paleo-rift suggested by the paleomagnetic and gravity data. As reported last time, the acquisition of a 3D seismic dataset over Stoney Point Field from Marathon Oil Company, is complete and attention is being devoted to incorporating the data into the project database and utilizing it. The surface lineation study is focusing on Stoney Point Field using the high-resolution DEM data and plotting of subsurface formation top data for the main reservoir, the Trenton (Ordovician) Formation. The fault pattern at Stoney Point is well documented by Marathon and we are looking for any manifestations on the surface. The main project database is now about as complete as it will be for this project. The main goals have been met, although the scanning of the paper records will have to continue beyond the scheduled end of the project due to the sheer number of records and the increased donations of data from companies as word spread of the project. One of the unanticipated benefits of the project has been the cooperation of gas and oil companies that are or were active in the Michigan Basin in donating material to the project. Both Michigan Tech and Western Michigan continue to receive donations at an

  4. Effect of Salinity on Effective CO2 Permeability in Reservoir Rock Determined by Pressure Transient Methods: an Experimental Study on Hawkesbury Sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathnaweera, T. D.; Ranjith, P. G.; Perera, M. S. A.

    2015-09-01

    The determination of effective carbon dioxide (CO2) permeability in reservoir rock and its variation is of great interest in the process of CO2 sequestration in deep saline aquifers, as CO2 sequestration-induced permeability alternations appear to create major problems during the CO2 injection process. The main objective of this study is to investigate the effect of salinity on the effective CO2 permeability of reservoir rock under different injection pressures. A series of high-pressure tri-axial experiments was, therefore, performed to investigate the effect of salinity on effective CO2 permeability in Hawkesbury sandstone under various brine concentrations. The selected brine concentrations were 0, 10, 20, and 30 % sodium chloride (NaCl) by weight and the experiments were conducted for a range of CO2 injection pressures (2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12 MPa) at a constant confinement of 20 MPa and a temperature of 35 °C, respectively. According to the results, the degree of salinity of the aquifer's pore fluid plays a vital role in the effective CO2 permeability variation which occurs with CO2 injection, and the effective permeability decreases with increasing salinity in the range of 0-30 % of NaCl. Interestingly, in dry reservoir rock samples, the phase transition of the injection of CO2 from gas to super-critical condition caused a sudden reduction of CO2 permeability, related to the slip flow effect which occurs in gas CO2. Transfer into vapor or super-critical CO2 causes this slip flow to be largely reduced, reducing the reservoir permeability for CO2 movement in dry reservoir rock samples. However, this behavior was not observed for water- and brine-saturated samples, and an increasing trend of effective CO2 permeability was observed with increasing injection pressure. A detailed chemical analysis was then conducted to understand the physical phenomenon causing the salinity effect on effective CO2 permeability using scanning electron microscopy analyses. Such

  5. Well-log signatures of alluvial-lacustrine reservoirs and source rocks, Lagoa-Feia Formations, Lower Cretaceous, Campos Basin, offshore Brazil

    SciTech Connect

    Abrahao, D.; Warme, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    The Campos basin is situated in offshore southeastern Brazil. The Lagoa Feia is the basal formation in the stratigraphic sequence of the basin, and was deposited during rifting in an evolving complex of lakes of different sizes and chemical characteristics, overlying and closely associated with rift volcanism. The stratigraphic sequence is dominated by lacustrine limestones and shales (some of them organic-rich), and volcaniclastic conglomerates deposited on alluvial fans. The sequence is capped by marine evaporites. In the Lagoa Feia Formation, complex lithologies make reservoirs and source rocks unsuitable for conventional well-log interpretation. To solve this problem, cores were studied and the observed characteristics related to log responses. The results have been extended through the entire basin for other wells where those facies were not cored. The reservoir facies in the Lagoa Feia Formation are restricted to levels of pure pelecypod shells (''coquinas''). Resistivity, sonic, neutron, density, and gamma-ray logs were used in this work to show how petrophysical properties are derived for the unconventional reservoirs existing in this formation. The same suite of logs was used to develop methods to define geochemical characteristics where source rock data are sparse in the organic-rich lacustrine shales of the Lagoa Feia Formation. These shales are the main source rocks for all the oil discovered to date in the Campos basin.

  6. Carbon dioxide-brine-rock interactions in a carbonate reservoir capped by shale: Experimental insights regarding the evolution of trace metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcon, Virginia; Kaszuba, John P.

    2015-11-01

    Trace metal behavior provides important information regarding fluid-rock interactions in CO2-charged water-rock systems and constrains potential environmental impacts. Hydrothermal experiments evaluated mechanisms of release, evolution, and subsequent scavenging of trace metals at 160 °C and 25 MPa. Experiments were designed to simulate two theoretical locations within a CO2-charged reservoir: (1) at the contact between a shale caprock and carbonate reservoir and (2) deeper within a carbonate reservoir, away from the shale. CO2 injection into brine (ionic strength = 3.3 mol/kg) decreased the pH by 1-2 units; concomitant mineral dissolution elevated Ba, Co, Cu, Pb, and V concentrations in the brine at both simulated locations within the reservoir. Additionally, Fe, Ni, and Zn concentrations increased in the mixed shale-carbonate experiment; Ba and Cd concentrations increased in the carbonate-only experiment. However, concentrations of Fe, Ba, Cr, and Pb in the mixed shale-carbonate experiment and Cr, Pb, V, and Zn within the carbonate-only experiment subsequently decreased as a result of precipitation of sulfides (Fe and Co sulfides), oxides, and clays. At the conclusion of the experiments, Fe, Pb, and Cr exceeded U.S. Environmental Protection Agency maximum contaminant limits in both experiments. In addition, zinc exceeded the limits at the simulated shale-carbonate contact and Ba, Cu, and Cd exceeded the limits in the simulated carbonate reservoir. Experimentally observed trends of decreasing Fe and Pb concentrations suggest these trace metals become less of an environmental concern as CO2-water-rock reactions evolve with time. The shale caprock plays an active role in trace metal evolution. The shale is a large source of metals, but also provides metal sinks such as primary clays, secondary smectites, and other silicates that are not found deeper within the carbonate reservoir, away from the shale. This potential mechanism of self-healing mitigates, but does not

  7. Is there any impact of CO2 injection on sandstone reservoir rocks? - Insights from a field experiment at the CO2-storage site of Ketzin (Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bock, Susanne; Pudlo, Dieter; Meier, Angela; Förster, Hans-Jürgen; Förster, Andrea; Gaupp, Reinhard

    2013-04-01

    The importance and viability of Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) is an issue of intense discussion both in the science community and the public society. The effects of CO2 on formation fluids, minerals, and perspective reservoir rocks have been investigated by several laboratory experiments, but studies on the long-term CO2-impregnation of rocks are sparse. With the installation of a pilot CO2-injection site at Ketzin, near to the German capital of Berlin, the impact of CO2 on reservoir sandstones is investigated at field scale. Ketzin is located on the top of an anticline structure, which belongs to a double anticline formed during several episodes of halokinetic uprise of Permian salt. The storage reservoir belongs to the Stuttgart Formation (Keuper, Upper Triassic) and consists of two main sedimentary facies types. Channel sandstones (CH) formed by meandering river systems are considered as most perspective reservoir rocks for CO2 storage. For storage considerations the second type of facies, characterized by overbank fine (OF) siltstones, is less important. These sediments exhibit only low porosity and permeability. During field operation of four years about 61,000 tons of almost pure CO2 were injected. This contribution presents preliminary results of an ongoing study of petrographic-mineralogical and geochemical features of rocks which suffered CO2 attack during this period of time. Due to the high porosity and permeability, which promote gas-brine-rock interactions, analytical investigations were focused on the reservoir sandstones of the CH facies. In general such reactions will strongly affect reservoir quality. These processes are mainly controlled by fluid and rock chemistry and associated pH- and Eh-conditions. On one side, the precipitation of mineral phases (esp. pore-filling cements) can induce porosity and permeability deterioration, which will retard further fluid flow and an expansion of the CO2 plume. On the other side, due to the dissolution of

  8. Extent and effect of fault-controlled CO2 alteration on reservoir and seal rocks and implications for geomechanical failure at Crystal Geyser, Green River, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Major, J. R.; Eichhubl, P.; Dewers, T. A.

    2013-12-01

    A structural diagenesis approach involving the coupled chemical and mechanical properties of reservoir and seal rocks is necessary for assessing the short and long term security of sequestered CO2. Current numerical models used to model subsurface CO2 reservoirs do not account for such processes, and typically these use only linear-elastic geomechanical properties, ignoring failure parameters such as fracture toughness. In addition, numerical models normally lack constraints on long-term, geologic time scales. Study of fossil and active CO2 seeps found at Little Grand Wash and Salt Wash fault systems near Green River, Utah are invaluable to assess long-term storage and leakage behavior in natural systems. Observations from the site and geomechanical testing also indicate that fracture systems play a crucial role in leakage, and the extent of fracturing and CO2-related alteration extends from tens to over one-hundred meters. Failure parameters of reservoir and seal rocks under variable environmental conditions, such as fracture toughness should also be quantified as they likely play a role in fracturing and leakage. Subcritical fracture growth may also be involved. Transects across the Little Grand Wash fault show distinct mineralogical and isotopic trends related to alteration by CO2-rich fluids. Calcite is the dominant precipitated mineral, both in reservoir (sandstone) and seal (siltstone & mudrock) lithologies. Precipitated calcite is isotopically distinct and observed in bulk rock isotopic trends. Fracture toughness testing using the short rod method indicates that CO2-related alteration of rocks exposed at the field site has weakened one reservoir lithology by half (0.57 versus 0.27 MPa√m). A full suite of lithologies are being tested and compared with the double torsion test method under ambient air conditions. These same samples are also being tested in environmental conditions more like those encountered in a CO2 sequestration scenario. These data can and

  9. Petrophysical examination of CO₂-brine-rock interactions-results of the first stage of long-term experiments in the potential Zaosie Anticline reservoir (central Poland) for CO₂ storage.

    PubMed

    Tarkowski, Radosław; Wdowin, Magdalena; Manecki, Maciej

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the study was determination of experiment-induced alterations and changes in the properties of reservoir rocks and sealing rocks sampled from potential reservoir for CO₂. In the experiment, rocks submerged in brine in specially constructed reactors were subjected to CO₂ pressure of 6 MPa for 20 months at room temperature. Samples of Lower Jurassic reservoir rocks and sealing rocks (sandstones, claystones, and mudstones) from the Zaosie Anticline (central Poland) were analysed for their petrophysical properties (specific surface area, porosity, pore size and distribution) before and after the experiment. Comparison of the ionic composition the brines before and after the experiment demonstrated an increase in total dissolved solids as well as the concentration of sulphates and calcium ions. This indicates partial dissolution of the rock matrix and the cements. As a result of the reaction, the properties of reservoir rocks did not changed significantly and should not affect the process of CO₂ storage. In the case of the sealing rocks, however, the porosity, the framework density, as well as the average capillary and threshold diameter increased. Also, the pore distribution in the pore space changed in favour of larger pores. The reasons for these changes could not be explained by petrographic characteristics and should be thoroughly investigated. PMID:25519873

  10. Fracture corridors as seal-bypass systems in siliciclastic reservoir-cap rock successions: Field-based insights from the Jurassic Entrada Formation (SE Utah, USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogata, Kei; Senger, Kim; Braathen, Alvar; Tveranger, Jan

    2014-09-01

    Closely spaced, sub-parallel fracture networks contained within localized tabular zones that are fracture corridors may compromise top seal integrity and form pathways for vertical fluid flow between reservoirs at different stratigraphic levels. This geometry is exemplified by fracture corridors found in outcrops of the Jurassic Entrada Formation in Utah (USA). These fracture corridors exhibit discolored (bleached) zones, interpreted as evidence of ancient fracture-enhanced circulation of reducing fluids within an exhumed siliciclastic reservoir-cap rock succession. Extensive structural and stratigraphic mapping and logging provided fracture data for analysis with respect to their occurrence and relationships to larger faults and folds. Three types of fracture corridors, representing end-members of a continuum of possibly interrelated structures were identified: 1) fault damage zone including segment relays; 2) fault-tip process zone; and 3) fold-related crestal-zone fracture corridors. The three types exhibit intrinsic orientations and patterns, which in sum define a local- to regional network of inferred vertical and lateral, high-permeability conduits. The results from our analysis may provide improved basis for the evaluation of trap integrity and flow paths across the reservoir-cap rock interface, applicable to both CO2 storage operations and the hydrocarbon industry.

  11. Reservoir rock integrity of the Ketzin pilot storage site (Germany) during long-term CO2-exposure experiments - Mineralogical, petrophysical and geochemical modeling results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, S.; Liebscher, A.; Zemke, K.; De Lucia, M.; Ketzin Team

    2012-04-01

    In order to investigate CO2-brine-rock interactions occurring at the Ketzin pilot storage site, core samples of the siliciclastic reservoir rock were exposed to pure CO2 and synthetic reservoir brine at simulated in-situ P-T conditions of 5 MPa and 40 °C. Autoclaves were opened and rock and fluid samples taken after 15, 21, 24 and 40 months, respectively. The samples were analysed for mineralogical and chemical composition and compared to baseline data of untreated samples. XRD data with Rietveld refinement show decreasing weight percentages for analcime, chlorite, hematite and illite. While plagioclase as well as K-feldspar both do not reveal a coherent trend over time, quartz exhibits increasing weight percentages in the same interval. On freshly broken rock fragments corrosion textures were found on plagioclase, K-feldspar and anhydrite surfaces of CO2-treated samples. BSE images of the respective samples indicate (intensified) alterations of feldspar minerals. EMPA data display a change in plagioclase composition from intermediate to sodium-rich and albite endmember compositions during CO2 exposure. Compared to the synthetic brine used for the experiments, sodium, magnesium and chloride concentrations increased slightly, while potassium, calcium and sulfate concentrations significantly increased. Potassium and calcium even exceed reservoir brine concentration levels. Experimental observations were reproduced using the reactive geochemical modeling code Phreeqc-2. The mineralogical and geochemical measurements imply preferred dissolution of calcium out of plagioclase next to dissolution of K-feldspar and anhydrite. Petrophysical data show tendentially increasing porosities and permeabilities that also suggest mineral dissolution during the experiments. Due to the heterogeneous character of the Stuttgart Formation it is often difficult to distinguish between natural, lithostratigraphic variability and CO2-related changes. Assuming thermodynamic equilibrium

  12. Influence of tectonic terranes adjacent to Precambrian Wyoming province of petroleum source and reservoir rock stratigraphy in northern Rocky Mountain region

    SciTech Connect

    Tonnsen, J.J.

    1984-07-01

    The perimeter of the Archean Precambrian Wyoming province can be generally defined. A Proterozoic suture belt separates the province from the Archean Superior province to the east. The western margin of the Precambrian rocks lies under the western Overthrust belt, but the Precambrian province extends at least as far west as southwest Montana and southeast Idaho. The province is bounded on the north and south by more regionally extensive Proterozoic mobile belts. In the northern belt, Archean rocks have been remobilized by Proterozoic tectonic events, but the southern belt does not appear to contain rocks as old as Archean. The tectonic response of these Precambrian terranes to cratonic and continental margin vertical and horizontal forces has exerted a profound influence on Phanerozoic sedimentation and stratigraphic facies distributions. Petroleum source rock and reservoir rock stratigraphy of the Northern Rocky Mountain region has been correlated with this structural history. In particular, the Devonian, Permian, and Jurassic sedimentation patterns can be shown to have been influenced by articulation among the different terranes comprising the ancient substructure. Depositional patterns in the Chester-Morrow carbonate and clastic sequence in the Central Montana trough are also related to this substructure. Further, a correlation between these tectonic terranes and the localization of regional hydrocarbon accumulations has been observed and has been useful in basin analyses for exploration planning.

  13. Water-rock interaction processes in the Triassic sandstone and the granitic basement of the Rhine Graben: Geochemical investigation of a geothermal reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aquilina, L.; Pauwels, H.; Genter, A.; Fouillac, C.

    1997-10-01

    Saline fluids have been collected in the Rhine Graben over the last two decades, both from the Triassic sandstone aquifer and the granitic basement down to a depth of 3500m. Their salinities and location are compared in order to distinguish the respective influences of temperature and host-rock mineralogy in the water-rock interaction processes. The comparison shows that sulphates in the sedimentary formations were dissolved by the fluids, which also led to Br enrichment. Mica dissolution has strongly increased the Rb and Cs contents, which then provide an indication of the degree of water-rock interaction. The Sr isotopic ratios are used to compare the fluids with the granite minerals. Two relationships are revealed for the fluids in the sandstone and the granite, one related to widespread mica dissolution, which could have affected both the Buntsandstein and the granite, and the other to subsequent plagioclase dissolution, which is observed only in the granite. Computations showed that 12.5g of mica and 1.658 of plagioclase per liter of fluid have been dissolved. The nature of these two relationships suggests two different evolutions for the fluids and the individualization of the two reservoirs during the graben's history. The cation concentrations are mainly controlled by temperature, and are independent of the type of host rock. Equilibrium with the rock mainly caused Ca and K concentration variations, which has induced clear CaK and Ca-δ 18O, K-δ 18O correlations. Geothermometric computations indicate that with increasing depth, the cations, the silica and the δ 18O(SO 4) geothermometers evolve towards a value close to 230δC. This demonstrates the existence of a hot reservoir in the granite of the graben, at a depth estimated at 4.5-5 km.

  14. Water-rock interaction processes in the Triassic sandstone and the granitic basement of the Rhine Graben: Geochemical investigation of a geothermal reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Aquilina, L.; Pauwels, H.; Genter, A.; Fouillac, C.

    1997-10-01

    Saline fluids have been collected in the Rhine Graben over the last two decades, both from the Triassic sandstone aquifer and the granitic basement down to a depth of 3500m. Their salinities and location are compared in order to distinguish the respective influences of temperature and host-rock mineralogy in the water-rock interaction processes. The comparison shows that sulphates in the sedimentary formations were dissolved by the fluids, which also led to Br enrichment. Mica dissolution has strongly increased the Rb and Cs contents, which then provide an indication of the degree of water-rock interaction. The Sr isotopic ratios are used to compare the fluids with the granite minerals. Two relationships are revealed for the fluids in the sandstone and the granite, one related to widespread mica dissolution, which could have affected both the Buntsandstein and the granite, and the other to subsequent plagioclase dissolution, which is observed only in the granite. Computations showed that 12.5g of mica and 1.65g of plagioclase per liter of fluid have been dissolved. The nature of these two relationships suggests two different evolutions for the fluids and the individualization of the two reservoirs during the graben`s history. The cation concentrations are mainly controlled by temperature, and are independent of the type of host rock. Equilibrium with the rock mainly caused Ca and K concentration variations, which has induced clear Ca-K and Ca-{delta}{sup 18}O, K-{delta}{sup 18}O correlations. Geothermometric computations indicate that with increasing depth, the cations, the silica and the {delta}{sup 18}O (SO{sub 4}) geothermometers evolve towards a value close to 230{degrees}C. This demonstrates the existence of a hot reservoir in the granite of the graben, at a depth estimated at 4.5-5 km. 59 refs., 11 figs., 6 tabs.

  15. Velocity measurements in reservoir rock samples from a limestone unit using various pore fluids, and integration with well logs and seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purcell, Christopher C.

    One of the most promising methods proposed to mitigate excess global CO2 is carbon sequestration, a process in which CO2 is pressurized and injected into geologic formations. A technical challenge surrounding the geologic sequestration of CO2 is tracking the movement of the fluids pumped underground. Monitoring, verification and accounting activities related to CO2 storage are important for assuring that sequestered CO2 does not escape to the surface. Tracking this carbon dioxide can be considerably aided by reflection seismic-based detection methods. This thesis employs lab scale velocity measurements of core samples, under in situ reservoir pressure and temperature conditions, combined with multiple 3D reflection seismic surveys, to effectively track the movements of CO2 after injection. The National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) of the United States Department of Energy began to participate in research of an enhanced oil recovery project including the injection of CO2 deep into a reservoir structure, repeat reflection seismic surveys, collection of well logs, and rock physics analysis of sample core material. Our study is concentrated on a small area of this field around the injection site. At this site, hydrocarbons were previously moved via water injection. We obtained ultrasonic elastic wave velocity measurements that were conducted under several different saturation scenarios, including CO2 saturated samples, so a quantification of the conditions in different parts of the reservoir could be determined. This approach can help to characterize what is taking place inside the reservoir. Core-scale velocity measurements under in situ conditions allow us to predict changes in future well log or seismic surveys. The large amounts of CO2 accumulated over the past four decades in this reservoir give us a real world example of how an EOR site matures. Combining core scale, well log scale, and seismic scale measurements allows a better understanding of the

  16. Rock Physics Interpretation of P-Wave Q and Velocity Structure, Geology, Fluids and Fractures at the Southeast Portion of The Geysers Geothermal Reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Berge, P; Hutchings, L; Wagoner, J; Kasameyer, P

    2001-04-06

    We examine how quantitative rock physics models, such as effective medium theories, can improve the interpretation of seismic parameters and material and fluid properties at The Geysers. We use effective medium theories to estimate effects of fractures on velocities for The Geysers rocks. We compare theoretical velocity estimates to laboratory measurements from the literature and our seismic velocity values from 1992 earthquake data. We approximate the reservoir as being homogeneous in mineral composition, with a constant density of fractures whose total void ratio is reduced by lithostatic pressure. Thus, we expect low velocities near the surface, increasing with depth up to the values observed in the lab on intact samples, 5.5 - 5.7 km/sec. We use a one-dimensional inversion of P-waves to obtain an ''expected'' P-wave velocity (Vp) and attenuation (Qp) relation as a function of depth for The Geysers rocks. We then use a three-dimensional Vp and Qp inversion to find anomalous zones within the reservoir. We find portions with ''high'' Vp and Qp, high Vp and low Qp, and low Vp and low Qp. We interpret the regions with high Vp and Qp to be relatively less fractured, and the regions with low Vp and Qp to be significantly fractured. The high V and Q anomaly is centered on the zone of greatest pressure drop, and is mostly within the shallowest part of the felsite. The anomalous zones within the greywacke reservoir are on either side of the felsite, in areas of more moderate pressure depletion. More work is required to interpret the significance of these observations.

  17. Experimental study on rock-water interaction due to CO2 injection under in-situ P-T condition of the Altmark gas reservoir, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huq, F.; Blum, P.; Nowak, M.; Haderlein, S.; Grathwohl, P.

    2012-04-01

    CO2 sequestration in depleted gas reservoir is an economically feasible option to mitigate global warming. The Altmark gas reservoir, located in the western part of the northeast German basin, was selected for enhanced gas recovery (EGR) by injecting CO2. Under reservoir conditions (50 bars and 125°C), the injected CO2 has very high solubility leading to subsequent dissolution and precipitation of minerals of the surrounding rock matrix. Therefore, the main objective of the current study is to investigate the geochemical changes in fluid composition due to dissolution of minerals under controlled laboratory conditions. Dry sandstone sample from the Altmark reservoir was mounted in an autoclave system and flushed by a pre-equilibrated mixture of water saturated with CO2 at a constant flow rate at 50 bars and 125°C. The experiment was conducted for 100 hours during which fluid samples were collected at regular intervals and analyzed by Ion Chromatography (IC) and Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-OES). pH was also measured in partially de-gassed samples. Fluid analysis showed an increased concentration of Ca and SO4 at the beginning of the reaction time indicating the early dissolution of anhydrite. However, the Ca/SO4 molar ratio (>1) proved the dissolution of both calcite and anhydrite. The source of Na and K could be the dissolution of feldspars (albite and K-feldspar). Low concentrations of these two elements reflect the lower solubility and slow dissolution kinetics of feldspar minerals. Moreover, trace amounts of Mn, Mg, Zn, Cu and Fe might be derived from the dissolution of trace minerals in the sandstone. Besides, thermodynamic calculations of mineral saturation indices enabled an evaluation of the CO2-water-rock interactions and highlighted the dissolution of the Ca-bearing minerals in the studied solution.

  18. Chemical, mineralogical and molecular biological characterization of the rocks and fluids from a natural gas storage deep reservoir as a baseline for the effects of geological hydrogen storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozova, Daria; Kasina, Monika; Weigt, Jennifer; Merten, Dirk; Pudlo, Dieter; Würdemann, Hilke

    2014-05-01

    Planned transition to renewable energy production from nuclear and CO2-emitting power generation brings the necessity for large scale energy storage capacities. One possibility to store excessive energy produced is to transfer it to chemical forms like hydrogen which can be subsequently injected and stored in subsurface porous rock formations like depleted gas reservoirs and presently used gas storage sites. In order to investigate the feasibility of the hydrogen storage in the subsurface, the collaborative project H2STORE ("hydrogen to store") was initiated. In the scope of this project, potential reactions between microorganism, fluids and rocks induced by hydrogen injection are studied. For the long-term experiments, fluids of natural gas storage are incubated together with rock cores in the high pressure vessels under 40 bar pressure and 40° C temperature with an atmosphere containing 5.8% He as a tracer gas, 3.9% H2 and 90.3% N2. The reservoir is located at a depth of about 2 000 m, and is characterized by a salinity of 88.9 g l-1 NaCl and a temperature of 80° C and therefore represents an extreme environment for microbial life. First geochemical analyses showed a relatively high TOC content of the fluids (about 120 mg l-1) that were also rich in sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium and iron. Remarkable amounts of heavy metals like zinc and strontium were also detected. XRD analyses of the reservoir sandstones revealed the major components: quartz, plagioclase, K-feldspar, anhydrite and analcime. The sandstones were intercalated by mudstones, consisting of quartz, plagioclase, K-feldspar, analcime, chlorite, mica and carbonates. Genetic profiling of amplified 16S rRNA genes was applied to characterize the microbial community composition by PCR-SSCP (PCR-Single-Strand-Conformation Polymorphism) and DGGE (Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis). First results indicate the presence of microorganisms belonging to the phylotypes alfa-, beta- and gamma

  19. Effects of fault-controlled CO2 alteration on mineralogical and geomechanical properties of reservoir and seal rocks, Crystal Geyser, Green River, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Major, J. R.; Eichhubl, P.; Urquhart, A.; Dewers, T. A.

    2012-12-01

    An understanding of the coupled chemical and mechanical properties of reservoir and seal units undergoing CO2 injection is critical for modeling reservoir behavior in response to the introduction of CO2. The implementation of CO2 sequestration as a mitigation strategy for climate change requires extensive risk assessment that relies heavily on computer models of subsurface reservoirs. Numerical models are fundamentally limited by the quality and validity of their input parameters. Existing models generally lack constraints on diagenesis, failing to account for the coupled geochemical or geomechanical processes that affect reservoir and seal unit properties during and after CO2 injection. For example, carbonate dissolution or precipitation after injection of CO2 into subsurface brines may significantly alter the geomechanical properties of reservoir and seal units and thus lead to solution-enhancement or self-sealing of fractures. Acidified brines may erode and breach sealing units. In addition, subcritical fracture growth enhanced by the presence of CO2 could ultimately compromise the integrity of sealing units, or enhance permeability and porosity of the reservoir itself. Such unknown responses to the introduction of CO2 can be addressed by laboratory and field-based observations and measurements. Studies of natural analogs like Crystal Geyser, Utah are thus a critical part of CO2 sequestration research. The Little Grand Wash and Salt Wash fault systems near Green River, Utah, host many fossil and active CO2 seeps, including Crystal Geyser, serving as a faulted anticline CO2 reservoir analog. The site has been extensively studied for sequestration and reservoir applications, but less attention has been paid to the diagenetic and geomechanical aspects of the fault zone. XRD analysis of reservoir and sealing rocks collected along transects across the Little Grand Wash Fault reveal mineralogical trends in the Summerville Fm (a siltstone seal unit) with calcite and

  20. Pore Characterization of Shale Rock and Shale Interaction with Fluids at Reservoir Pressure-Temperature Conditions Using Small-Angle Neutron Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, M.; Hjelm, R.; Watkins, E.; Xu, H.; Pawar, R.

    2015-12-01

    Oil/gas produced from unconventional reservoirs has become strategically important for the US domestic energy independence. In unconventional realm, hydrocarbons are generated and stored in nanopores media ranging from a few to hundreds of nanometers. Fundamental knowledge of coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical-chemical (THMC) processes that control fluid flow and propagation within nano-pore confinement is critical for maximizing unconventional oil/gas production. The size and confinement of the nanometer pores creates many complex rock-fluid interface interactions. It is imperative to promote innovative experimental studies to decipher physical and chemical processes at the nanopore scale that govern hydrocarbon generation and mass transport of hydrocarbon mixtures in tight shale and other low permeability formations at reservoir pressure-temperature conditions. We have carried out laboratory investigations exploring quantitative relationship between pore characteristics of the Wolfcamp shale from Western Texas and the shale interaction with fluids at reservoir P-T conditions using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). We have performed SANS measurements of the shale rock in single fluid (e.g., H2O and D2O) and multifluid (CH4/(30% H2O+70% D2O)) systems at various pressures up to 20000 psi and temperature up to 150 oF. Figure 1 shows our SANS data at different pressures with H2O as the pressure medium. Our data analysis using IRENA software suggests that the principal changes of pore volume in the shale occurred on smaller than 50 nm pores and pressure at 5000 psi (Figure 2). Our results also suggest that with increasing P, more water flows into pores; with decreasing P, water is retained in the pores.

  1. Carbonate/clay-mineral relationships and the origin of protodolomite in L-2 and L-3 carbonate reservoir rocks of the Bombay high field, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gundu Rao, C.

    1981-07-01

    This paper consists of two parts. The first deals with carbonate/clay-mineral relationships and the second with the origin of protodolomite in L-2 and L-3 carbonate reservoir rocks of the Bombay High Oil Field, India. Six carbonate/clay-mineral assemblages, viz. (1) calcite-protodolomite-chlorite-kaolinite, (2) calcite-protodolomite-montmorillonite-kaolinite, (3) calcite-montmorillonite-kaolinite, (4) calcite-protodolomite-montmorillonite, (5) calcite-protodolomite-vermiculite, and (6) calcite-montmorillonite-chlorite-kaolinite are recognized among the L-2 and L-3 carbonate reservoir rocks of the offshore Bombay High Oil Field, India. These form disequilibrium assemblages on a Al 2O 3 (kaolinite), CaO (calcite) and MgO (magnesite) facies diagram. Therefore, the clay minerals are terrigenous in origin and have at least contributed the magnesium needed for the formation of protodolomite. The protodolomite seen in L-2 and L-3 rocks is limpid, water-clear, non-zoned, and inclusion-free with an average grain diameter of 7-10 μm and on the X-ray chart shows a consistent (104) peak between 2.93 Å to 2.90 Å ' d' spacing, reading 30-40 mole% MgCO 3 solid solution in calcite. By comparison with other types of dolomite, viz (1) replacement, (2) evaporite, (3) sabkha, and (4) schizohaline, the present protodolomite seems to be of biogenic origin and in all probability appears to be a new form of dolomite to be reported from an ancient subsurface carbonate formation.

  2. Modeling brine-rock interactions in an enhanced geothermal systemdeep fractured reservoir at Soultz-Sous-Forets (France): a joint approachusing two geochemical codes: frachem and toughreact

    SciTech Connect

    Andre, Laurent; Spycher, Nicolas; Xu, Tianfu; Vuataz,Francois-D.; Pruess, Karsten.

    2006-12-31

    The modeling of coupled thermal, hydrological, and chemical (THC) processes in geothermal systems is complicated by reservoir conditions such as high temperatures, elevated pressures and sometimes the high salinity of the formation fluid. Coupled THC models have been developed and applied to the study of enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) to forecast the long-term evolution of reservoir properties and to determine how fluid circulation within a fractured reservoir can modify its rock properties. In this study, two simulators, FRACHEM and TOUGHREACT, specifically developed to investigate EGS, were applied to model the same geothermal reservoir and to forecast reservoir evolution using their respective thermodynamic and kinetic input data. First, we report the specifics of each of these two codes regarding the calculation of activity coefficients, equilibrium constants and mineral reaction rates. Comparisons of simulation results are then made for a Soultz-type geothermal fluid (ionic strength {approx}1.8 molal), with a recent (unreleased) version of TOUGHREACT using either an extended Debye-Hueckel or Pitzer model for calculating activity coefficients, and FRACHEM using the Pitzer model as well. Despite somewhat different calculation approaches and methodologies, we observe a reasonably good agreement for most of the investigated factors. Differences in the calculation schemes typically produce less difference in model outputs than differences in input thermodynamic and kinetic data, with model results being particularly sensitive to differences in ion-interaction parameters for activity coefficient models. Differences in input thermodynamic equilibrium constants, activity coefficients, and kinetics data yield differences in calculated pH and in predicted mineral precipitation behavior and reservoir-porosity evolution. When numerically cooling a Soultz-type geothermal fluid from 200 C (initially equilibrated with calcite at pH 4.9) to 20 C and suppressing mineral

  3. Variations of the petrophysical properties of rocks with increasing hydrocarbons content and their implications at larger scale: insights from the Majella reservoir (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trippetta, Fabio; Ruggieri, Roberta; Lipparini, Lorenzo

    2016-04-01

    Crustal processes such as deformations or faulting are strictly related to the petrophysical properties of involved rocks. These properties depend on mineral composition, fabric, pores and any secondary features such as cracks or infilling material that may have been introduced during the whole diagenetic and tectonic history of the rock. In this work we investigate the role of hydrocarbons (HC) in changing the petrophysical properties of rock by merging laboratory experiments, well data and static models focusing on the carbonate-bearing Majella reservoir. This reservoir represent an interesting analogue for the several oil fields discovered in the subsurface in the region, allowing a comparison of a wide range of geological and geophysical data at different scale. The investigated lithology is made of high porosity ramp calcarenites, structurally slightly affected by a superimposed fracture system and displaced by few major normal faults, with some minor strike-slip movements. Sets of rock specimens were selected in the field and in particular two groups were investigated: 1. clean rocks (without oil) and 2. HC bearing rocks (with different saturations). For both groups, density, porosity, P and S wave velocity, permeability and elastic moduli measurements at increasing confining pressure were conducted on cylindrical specimens at the HP-HT Laboratory of the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV) in Rome, Italy. For clean samples at ambient pressure, laboratory porosity varies from 10 % up to 26 % and P wave velocity (Vp) spans from 4,1 km/s to 4,9 km/s and a very good correlation between Vp, Vs and porosity is observed. The P wave velocity at 100 MPa of confining pressure, ranges between 4,5 km/s and 5,2 km/s with a pressure independent Vp/Vs ratio of about 1,9. The presence of HC within the samples affects both Vp and Vs. In particular velocities increase with the presence of hydrocarbons proportionally respect to the amount of the filled

  4. Experimental investigation of geochemical and mineralogical effects of CO2 sequestration on flow characteristics of reservoir rock in deep saline aquifers.

    PubMed

    Rathnaweera, T D; Ranjith, P G; Perera, M S A

    2016-01-01

    Interactions between injected CO2, brine, and rock during CO2 sequestration in deep saline aquifers alter their natural hydro-mechanical properties, affecting the safety, and efficiency of the sequestration process. This study aims to identify such interaction-induced mineralogical changes in aquifers, and in particular their impact on the reservoir rock's flow characteristics. Sandstone samples were first exposed for 1.5 years to a mixture of brine and super-critical CO2 (scCO2), then tested to determine their altered geochemical and mineralogical properties. Changes caused uniquely by CO2 were identified by comparison with samples exposed over a similar period to either plain brine or brine saturated with N2. The results show that long-term reaction with CO2 causes a significant pH drop in the saline pore fluid, clearly due to carbonic acid (as dissolved CO2) in the brine. Free H(+) ions released into the pore fluid alter the mineralogical structure of the rock formation, through the dissolution of minerals such as calcite, siderite, barite, and quartz. Long-term CO2 injection also creates a significant CO2 drying-out effect and crystals of salt (NaCl) precipitate in the system, further changing the pore structure. Such mineralogical alterations significantly affect the saline aquifer's permeability, with important practical consequences for the sequestration process. PMID:26785912

  5. Establishing the Relationship between Fracture-Related Dolomite and Primary Rock Fabric on the Distribution of Reservoirs in the Michigan Basin

    SciTech Connect

    G. Michael Grammer

    2006-09-30

    This topical report covers the year 2 of the subject 3-year grant, evaluating the relationship between fracture-related dolomite and dolomite constrained by primary rock fabric in the 3 most prolific reservoir intervals in the Michigan Basin (Ordovician Trenton-Black River Formations; Silurian Niagara Group; and the Devonian Dundee Formation). The characterization of select dolomite reservoirs has been the major focus of our efforts in Phase II/Year 2. Fields have been prioritized based upon the availability of rock data for interpretation of depositional environments, fracture density and distribution as well as thin section, geochemical, and petrophysical analyses. Structural mapping and log analysis in the Dundee (Devonian) and Trenton/Black River (Ordovician) suggest a close spatial relationship among gross dolomite distribution and regional-scale, wrench fault related NW-SE and NE-SW structural trends. A high temperature origin for much of the dolomite in the 3 studied intervals (based upon initial fluid inclusion homogenization temperatures and stable isotopic analyses,) coupled with persistent association of this dolomite in reservoirs coincident with wrench fault-related features, is strong evidence for these reservoirs being influenced by hydrothermal dolomitization. For the Niagaran (Silurian), a comprehensive high resolution sequence stratigraphic framework has been developed for a pinnacle reef in the northern reef trend where we had 100% core coverage throughout the reef section. Major findings to date are that facies types, when analyzed at a detailed level, have direct links to reservoir porosity and permeability in these dolomites. This pattern is consistent with our original hypothesis of primary facies control on dolomitization and resulting reservoir quality at some level. The identification of distinct and predictable vertical stacking patterns within a hierarchical sequence and cycle framework provides a high degree of confidence at this point

  6. Uranium-thorium series radionuclides in brines and reservoir rocks from two deep geothermal boreholes in the Salton Sea Geothermal Field, southeastern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zukin, Jeffrey G.; Hammond, Douglas E.; Teh-Lung, Ku; Elders, Wilfred A.

    1987-10-01

    minutes, indicating the potential for rapid removal of reactive isotopes fom brines. The brine is greatly enriched in 226Ra (2-3 dpm/g, about 10 4-10 5 times that of its parent 230Th), while reservoir rocks are about 10% deficient in 226Ra relative to 230Th. Material balance calculations for 2 226Ra and 18O suggest that brines reside in the reservoir for 10 2-10 3 years, that the SSGF formed 10,000-40,000 years B.P., and that porosity cannot be more than 20%.

  7. Ductile shear zones can induce hydraulically over-pressured fractures in deep hot-dry rock reservoirs: a new target for geothermal exploration?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrank, C. E.; Karrech, A.; Regenauer-Lieb, K.

    2014-12-01

    It is notoriously difficult to create and maintain permeability in deep hot-dry rock (HDR) geothermal reservoirs with engineering strategies. However, we predict that long-lived, slowly deforming HDR reservoirs likely contain hydraulically conductive, over-pressured fracture systems, provided that (a) the underlying lower crust and/or mantle are not entirely depleted of fluids and (b) the fracture system has not been drained into highly permeable overlying rocks. Such fracture systems could be targeted for the extraction of geothermal energy. Our prediction hinges on the notion that polycrystalline creep through matter transfer by a liquid phase (dissolution-precipitation creep) is a widespread mechanism for extracting fluids from the lower crust and mantle. Such processes - where creep cavities form during the slow, high-temperature deformation of crystalline solids, e.g., ceramics, metals, and rocks - entail the formation of (intergranular) fluid-assisted creep fractures. They constitute micron-scale voids formed along grain boundaries due to incompatibilities arising from diffusion or dislocation creep. Field and laboratory evidence suggest that the process leading to creep fractures may generate a dynamic permeability in the ductile crust, thus extracting fluids from this domain. We employed an elasto-visco-plastic material model that simulates creep fractures with continuum damage mechanics to model the slow contraction of high-heat-producing granites overlain by sedimentary rocks in 2D. The models suggest that deformation always leads to the initiation of a horizontal creep-damage front in the lower crust. This front propagates upwards towards the brittle-ductile transition (BDT) during protracted deformation where it collapses into highly damaged brittle-ductile shear zones. If the BDT is sufficiently shallow or finite strain sufficiently large, these shear zones trigger brittle faults emerging from their tips, which connect to the sub-horizontal damage

  8. Oil biodegradation by Bacillus strains isolated from the rock of an oil reservoir located in a deep-water production basin in Brazil.

    PubMed

    da Cunha, Claudia Duarte; Rosado, Alexandre S; Sebastián, Gina V; Seldin, Lucy; von der Weid, Irene

    2006-12-01

    Sixteen spore forming Gram-positive bacteria were isolated from the rock of an oil reservoir located in a deep-water production basin in Brazil. These strains were identified as belonging to the genus Bacillus using classical biochemical techniques and API 50CH kits, and their identity was confirmed by sequencing of part of the 16S rRNA gene. All strains were tested for oil degradation ability in microplates using Arabian Light and Marlin oils and only seven strains showed positive results in both kinds of oils. They were also able to grow in the presence of carbazole, n-hexadecane and polyalphaolefin (PAO), but not in toluene, as the only carbon sources. The production of key enzymes involved with aromatic hydrocarbons biodegradation process by Bacillus strains (catechol 1,2-dioxygenase and catechol 2,3-dioxygenase) was verified spectrophotometrically by detection of cis,cis-muconic acid and 2-hydroxymuconic semialdehyde, and results indicated that the ortho ring cleavage pathway is preferential. Furthermore, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products were obtained when the DNA of seven Bacillus strains were screened for the presence of catabolic genes encoding alkane monooxygenase, catechol 1,2-dioxygenase, and/or catechol 2,3-dioxygenase. This is the first study on Bacillus strains isolated from an oil reservoir in Brazil. PMID:16896598

  9. Experimental Investigation on the Influence of High Pressure and High Temperature on the Mechanical Properties of Deep Reservoir Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Peng; Mishra, Brijes; Heasley, Keith A.

    2015-11-01

    Deep and ultra-deep resources extraction has resulted in the challenge of drilling into high-pressure, high-temperature (HPHT) environments. Drilling challenges at such extreme conditions prompted NETL to develop a specialized ultra-deep drilling simulator (UDS) for investigating drill behavior in such conditions. Using the UDS apparatus, complex laboratory tests were performed on Carthage marble (Warsaw limestone) and Crab Orchard sandstone, which represent the rocks in the basins of the Tuscaloosa trend in southern Louisiana and the Arbuckle play in Oklahoma and North Texas. Additionally, numerical models of the UDS were developed for performing parametric analyses that would be impossible with the UDS alone. Subsequently, it was found that the input properties for these two rock types at such extreme pressure and temperature conditions were unavailable. Therefore, a suite of unconfined compressive strength, indirect tensile strength, and triaxial compression tests ( σ 1 > σ 2 = σ 3) were performed on Carthage marble and Crab Orchard sandstone for investigating their behavior in HPHT environments. The HPHT experiments were performed at confining pressures ranging from atmospheric to 200 MPa, and with temperatures ranging from 25 to 180 °C. The influences of confining pressure and temperature on the mechanical properties of two rocks were investigated.

  10. Reservoirs III carbonates

    SciTech Connect

    Beaumont, E.A.; Foster, N.H.

    1988-01-01

    This text is part of a three volume set on petroleum and natural gas reservoir rocks. This volume deals with carbonate rocks and their properties as they relate to oil and gas production. Papers deal specifically with depositional environments, diagenesis, and chemical and physical properties of the rock.

  11. Experimental investigation of geochemical and mineralogical effects of CO2 sequestration on flow characteristics of reservoir rock in deep saline aquifers

    PubMed Central

    Rathnaweera, T. D.; Ranjith, P. G.; Perera, M. S. A.

    2016-01-01

    Interactions between injected CO2, brine, and rock during CO2 sequestration in deep saline aquifers alter their natural hydro-mechanical properties, affecting the safety, and efficiency of the sequestration process. This study aims to identify such interaction-induced mineralogical changes in aquifers, and in particular their impact on the reservoir rock’s flow characteristics. Sandstone samples were first exposed for 1.5 years to a mixture of brine and super-critical CO2 (scCO2), then tested to determine their altered geochemical and mineralogical properties. Changes caused uniquely by CO2 were identified by comparison with samples exposed over a similar period to either plain brine or brine saturated with N2. The results show that long-term reaction with CO2 causes a significant pH drop in the saline pore fluid, clearly due to carbonic acid (as dissolved CO2) in the brine. Free H+ ions released into the pore fluid alter the mineralogical structure of the rock formation, through the dissolution of minerals such as calcite, siderite, barite, and quartz. Long-term CO2 injection also creates a significant CO2 drying-out effect and crystals of salt (NaCl) precipitate in the system, further changing the pore structure. Such mineralogical alterations significantly affect the saline aquifer’s permeability, with important practical consequences for the sequestration process. PMID:26785912

  12. Analysing petrophysical parameters of reservoir rock from the Ketzin pilot site (Germany) during long-term CO2-exposure experiments under thermodynamic conditions relevant for the geological storage of CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemke, K.; Fischer, S.; Liebscher, A.; Ketzin Team

    2012-04-01

    In the present study, 7 reservoir core samples from observation well Ktzi 202 at the Ketzin pilot storage site (Germany) were experimentally exposed to pure CO2 and synthetic reservoir brine at simulated reservoir conditions of 5.5 MPa and 40°C. Reservoir rocks are immature arcosic to litharenitic sandstones of the Upper Triassic Stuttgart Formation. After 15, 21, 24, and 40 months, respectively, autoclaves were opened and rock samples were taken for petrophysical characterisation and mineralogical and microbial analyses. Brine samples were analysed with respect to organic and inorganic components. Porosity and pore radii distribution have been investigated before and after the experiments by NMR relaxation and mercury injection. NMR measurements on brine-saturated rock core plugs potentially yield valuable information on the porous structure of the rock core. The distribution of NMR-T2 values (CPMG) reflects pore sizes within the rock core. NMR pore size is a derivative of the ratio pore surface to pore volume. The pore size derived by mercury injection is an area-equivalent diameter of throats connecting the pore system. Both methods produce petrophysical parameters required for calculating storage capacity and hydraulic properties (e.g. injectivity). Measured porosity data of the experimentally treated samples together with data from additional, untreated core samples from the Ketzin wells were also compared with results from wireline porosity determinations in the wells. Based on the NMR measurements, the permeability was calculated with standard parameters for sandstones after Timur-Coates. Mercury injection data was used to calculate sandstone permeabilities after Swanson (1981) and to furthermore determine the threshold pressure. NMR and mercury injection data generally indicate increased porosities and a shift to larger pore sizes during the first months. This suggests mineral dissolution during the experiments in agreement with the observed chemical

  13. Major element, REE, and Pb, Nd and Sr isotopic geochemistry of Cenozoic volcanic rocks of eastern China: implications for their origin from suboceanic-type mantle reservoirs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Basu, A.R.; Wang, Junwen; Huang, Wankang; Xie, Guanghong; Tatsumoto, M.

    1991-01-01

    Major- and rare-earth-element (REE) concentrations and UThPb, SmNd, and RbSr isotope systematics are reported for Cenozoic volcanic rocks from northeastern and eastern China. These volcanic rocks, characteristically lacking the calc-alkaline suite of orogenic belts, were emplaced in a rift system which formed in response to the subduction of the western Pacific plate beneath the eastern Asiatic continental margin. The rocks sampled range from basanite and alkali olivine basalt, through olivine tholeiite and quartz tholeiite, to potassic basalts, alkali trachytes, pantellerite, and limburgite. These rock suites represent the volcanic centers of Datong, Hanobar, Kuandian, Changbaishan and Wudalianchi in northeastern China, and Mingxi in the Fujian Province of eastern China. The major-element and REE geochemistry is characteristic of each volcanic suite broadly evolving through cogenetic magmatic processes. Some of the outstanding features of the isotopic correlation arrays are as follows: (1) NdSr shows an anticorrelation within the field of ocean island basalts, extending from the MORB end-member to an enriched, time-averaged high Rb Sr and Nd Sr end-member (EM1), (2) SrPb also shows an anticorrelation, similar to that of Hawaiian and walvis Ridge basalts, (3) NdPb shows a positive correlation, and (4) the 207Pb 204Pb vs 206Pb 204Pb plot shows linear arrays parallel to the general trend (NHRL) for MORB on both sides of the geochron, although in the 208Pb 204Pb vs 206Pb 204Pb plot the linear array is significantly displaced above the NHRL in a pattern similar to that of the oceanic island basalts that show the Dupal signatures. In all isotope correlation patterns, the data arrays define two different mantle components-a MORB-like component and an enriched mantle component. The isotopic data presented here clearly demonstrate the existence of Dupal compositions in the sources of the continental volcanic rocks of eastern China. We suggest that the subcontinental mantle

  14. Effects of mineral composition and pore structure in HC potential of reservoir rocks in the Western Foothill Belt, Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, J. M.; Tsai, L. Y.

    2014-12-01

    The exploration of unconventional gas resource achieved a successful breakthrough in USA due to the innovation of hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling since 1995. The production of shale gas dramatically changed the energy structure and released the demand of fossil fuel in USA. Many studies about the unconventional oil-gas resource were performed worldwide especially in China, which provide very useful characterization for unconventional gas reservoirs. Since Taiwan has a strong energy demand and still highly relied on imported fossil fuel, the development of unconventional gas resource needs to be concerned. Therefore, the objective of this study is to evaluate the potential of unconventional oil-gas in Taiwan. In this study, we examine mineral composition and pore structure of Miocene oil-gas bearing strata from the Western Foothill Belt in Taiwan. Sandstone samples were collected from Cholan Fm, Yutengpin ss, Kuantaoshan ss, Shangfuchi ss, Tungkeng Fm, Guanyinshang ss and Peiliao Fm; whereas shale samples were collected from Chinshui sh and Talu sh, as well as outcropped coal sample from Nanchung Fm. The porosity, permeability, TOC, thermal maturity, and mineral composition of samples are examined after a series of geochemical experiments. Finally, after comparing the data with their gas sorption capacity, the reservoir with the strongest potential in unconventional gas resource can be identified.

  15. Magnetotelluric survey for exploration of a volcanic-rock reservoir in the Yurihara oil and gas field, Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Mitsuhata, Yuji; Matsuo, Koichi; Minegishi, Masato

    1999-03-01

    The Yurihara oil and gas field is located on the southern edge of Akita Prefecture, northeastern Japan. In this area, drilling, surface geological surveys and many seismic surveys have been used to investigate the geological structure. Wells drilled into the Nishikurosawa Basalt Group (NBG) of Miocene age found oil and gas reservoirs at depths of 1.5--2 km. Oil and gas are now being produced commercially and further exploration is required in the surrounding areas. However, since the neighboring areas are covered with young volcanic products from the Chokai volcano, and have a rough topography, the subsurface distribution of the NBG must be investigated using other methods in addition to seismic reflection. According to the well data, the resistivity of the NBG is comparatively higher than that of the overlying sedimentary formations, and therefore the magnetotelluric (MT) method is expected to be useful for the estimation of the distribution of the NBG. An MT survey was conducted along three survey lines in this area. Each line trended east-west, perpendicular to the regional geological strike, and was composed of about 25 measurement sites. Induction vectors evaluated from the magnetic field show that this area has a two-dimensional structure. The evaluated resistivity sections are in agreement with the log data. In conclusion, the authors were able to detect resistive layers (the NBG) below conductive layers. The results indicate that the NBG becomes gradually less resistive from north to south. In the center of the northern line, an uplifted resistive area is interpreted as corresponding to the reservoir. By comparison with a seismic section, the authors prove the effectiveness of the integration of seismic and MT surveys for the investigation of the morphology and internal structure of the NBG. On other survey lines, the resistive uplifted zones are interpreted as possible prospective areas.

  16. A direct method for determining complete positive and negative capillary pressure curves for reservoir rock using the centrifuge

    SciTech Connect

    Spinler, E.A.; Baldwin, B.A.

    1997-08-01

    A method is being developed for direct experimental determination of capillary pressure curves from saturation distributions produced during centrifuging fluids in a rock plug. A free water level is positioned along the length of the plugs to enable simultaneous determination of both positive and negative capillary pressures. Octadecane as the oil phase is solidified by temperature reduction while centrifuging to prevent fluid redistribution upon removal from the centrifuge. The water saturation is then measured via magnetic resonance imaging. The saturation profile within the plug and the calculation of pressures for each point of the saturation profile allows for a complete capillary pressure curve to be determined from one experiment. Centrifuging under oil with a free water level into a 100 percent water saturated plug results in the development of a primary drainage capillary pressure curve. Centrifuging similarly at an initial water saturation in the plug results in the development of an imbibition capillary pressure curve. Examples of these measurements are presented for Berea sandstone and chalk rocks.

  17. Analysis of reservoir heterogeneities due to shallowing-upward cycles in carbonate rocks of the Pennsylvanian Wahoo Limestone of Northeastern Alaska. Annual report, October 1990--September 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Watts, K.

    1992-09-01

    The primary objective of this project is to develop an integrated database to characterize reservoir heterogeneities resulting from numerous small-scale shallowing-upward cycles (parasequences) comprising the carboniferous Pennsylvanian Wahoo Limestone. The Wahoo Limestone is the upper formation of an extensive carbonate platform sequence of the Carboniferous Lisburne Group which is widely exposed in the Brooks Range and is a widespread hydrocarbon reservoir unit in the subsurface of the North Slope of Alaska. A principal goal is to determine lateral and vertical variations in the complex mosaic of carbonate facies comprising the Wahoo Limestone. This report presents the preliminary results of research accomplished by a team of specialists in carbonate petrology, biostratigraphy, and diagenesis during the 1990--1991 fiscal year.It includes a summary of regional geological framework studies, a discussion conodont analyses, an overview of diagenetic studies, a brief description of progress in computerized database development, and appendices containing some of the new data on petrographic analyses, conodont analyses, and locality and sample information. Our correlation scheme, which uses cyclic stratigraphy, biostratigraphy, and cement stratigraphy, will allow interpretation of the depositional history and paleogeographic evolution of the region. We have developed predictive facies models and will make paleogeographic maps to illustrate different stages in the history of the Wahoo carbonate ramp. Our detailed analyses of the Wahoo Limestone will provide a basis for interpreting correlative rocks in the adjacent subsurface of the coastal plain of ANWR, a potential hydrocarbon lease-sale area. In a broader sense, our work will provide an excellent generic example of carbonate shallowing-upward cycles which typify carbonate sediments.

  18. Analysis of reservoir heterogeneities due to shallowing-upward cycles in carbonate rocks of the Pennsylvanian Wahoo Limestone of Northeastern Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Watts, K.

    1992-09-01

    The primary objective of this project is to develop an integrated database to characterize reservoir heterogeneities resulting from numerous small-scale shallowing-upward cycles (parasequences) comprising the carboniferous Pennsylvanian Wahoo Limestone. The Wahoo Limestone is the upper formation of an extensive carbonate platform sequence of the Carboniferous Lisburne Group which is widely exposed in the Brooks Range and is a widespread hydrocarbon reservoir unit in the subsurface of the North Slope of Alaska. A principal goal is to determine lateral and vertical variations in the complex mosaic of carbonate facies comprising the Wahoo Limestone. This report presents the preliminary results of research accomplished by a team of specialists in carbonate petrology, biostratigraphy, and diagenesis during the 1990--1991 fiscal year.It includes a summary of regional geological framework studies, a discussion conodont analyses, an overview of diagenetic studies, a brief description of progress in computerized database development, and appendices containing some of the new data on petrographic analyses, conodont analyses, and locality and sample information. Our correlation scheme, which uses cyclic stratigraphy, biostratigraphy, and cement stratigraphy, will allow interpretation of the depositional history and paleogeographic evolution of the region. We have developed predictive facies models and will make paleogeographic maps to illustrate different stages in the history of the Wahoo carbonate ramp. Our detailed analyses of the Wahoo Limestone will provide a basis for interpreting correlative rocks in the adjacent subsurface of the coastal plain of ANWR, a potential hydrocarbon lease-sale area. In a broader sense, our work will provide an excellent generic example of carbonate shallowing-upward cycles which typify carbonate sediments.

  19. The dolomitized{open_quotes}O{close_quotes} Limestone in the Barinas basin: A hydrocarbon reservoir in carbonate rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Aquino, R.; Boujana, M.

    1996-08-01

    The {open_quotes}O{close_quotes} Limestone Member, top of Escandalosa Formation of a Lower to Upper Cretaceous age, is an interval of about 70 feet thick. It represents a coastal facies of caitonate platform; dominated by carbonates of calcarenitic lithologies intercalated with some sandy, glauconitic, calcareous bodies and thin bioturbated shaly intervals. Detailed studies carried out in five cores yield to a new approach and subdivision within this interval based on diagnostic erosive surfaces that may be interpreted as sequence boundaries. Based on sedimentology, trace fossil assemblages and diagenetic events, the milieu of sedimentation varies from foreshore to offshore. Porous dolomite levels occur within the {open_quotes}O{close_quotes} Limestone. This porosity is of intergranular, moldic and vuggy types. Some microfractures are also observed. Subaerial karstification is an alternative hypothesis that can explain the origin of the localized dolomitized vuggy reservoirs. The following sequence of events is suggested: (1) Sedimentation followed by bioturbation, then lithification with a probable replacement of aragonite by calcite, (2) Early dolomitization undergoing the {open_quotes}mixing{close_quote} or {open_quotes}Dorag {close_quotes} Model, (3) Dedolomitization and dissolution generating a moldic porosity enhanced the vuggy forms. This stage may have been influenced by karst processes, (4) Burial diagenesis accompanied by stylolitization and fracturation with pressure-solution effects, and (5) Some levels increase their porosity because of partial dolomitization; in others the vuggy porosity is totally infilled with sparry calcite.

  20. Borehole and Caprock integrity - Pre-Failure Permeability Response to Stress Change of Storage Domain Rocks (Caprocks, Barriers to Fluid Flow, and Reservoir) Caused by CO2 Injection: an Experimental and Analytical Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armitage, P. J.; Faulkner, D. R.; Worden, R. H.

    2011-12-01

    Field trials into CO2 sequestration are currently being undertaken at the In Salah gas field, Algeria. As a part of a wider project, we are experimentally investigating the geomechanical and geochemical effects of CO2 sequestration on storage domain rocks. Detailed experimental studies of the development of permeability in storage domain rocks during reactive fluid flow are essential to understand borehole and caprock integrity on short term timescales during injection of CO2. The experiments are needed to help constrain larger-scale models that predict bulk fluid flow within the storage system. It has been demonstrated from experiments and modeling that accumulation of microfractures under differential stress before rock failure occurs systematically and leads to enhanced porosity, permeability and fracture surface area. (Mitchell and Faulkner, 2008). Changes in stress affecting storage domain rocks can occur on short-term, production timescales from drilling the boreholes and from injection of CO2. Increasing pore fluid pressure will reduce the effective stress, bringing the rocks closer to failure and potentially increasing permeability. Creation of boreholes for injection will change the stress field and lead to greater differential stresses, bringing the rocks closer to failure and potentially increasing permeability beyond that of the far field stress state. These stress changes will affect fluid flow properties of storage domain rocks, which in turn may facilitate CO2 migration and escape from the intended structure. We present results from direct experimental evaluation of permeability evolution for these stress changes on samples of low porosity rock from the In Salah CO2 storage site, representing a barrier to fluid flow, and samples of a sandstone representing a porous reservoir rock. Pre-failure stress changes associated with CO2 injection leads to increased rock permeability for intact rock, by up to 2 orders of magnitude in these samples.

  1. Fractured reservoirs in clastic rocks: Differences between a basement-cored structure and a detached fold belt

    SciTech Connect

    Engelder, T.; Gross, M.R.; Younes, A.

    1996-08-01

    The Elk Basin anticline, Wyoming-Montana, has an order of magnitude more structural relief than structures of the Appalachian Plateau, New York. Despite its structural relief the Elk Basin anticline shows very little macroscopic evidence for layer-parallel shortening vs. more than 10% for the subtle Appalachian Plateau folds. Elk Basin anticline is a passive drape fold extending over a tongue of basement punching up into the sedimentary cover. On the other extreme, the detached fold belt of the Appalachian Plateau remained in compression during most, if not all, of the Alleghanian layer-parallel shortening event. The joint pattern in Elk Basin is dominated by fold-parallel sets. The joint pattern in the Appalachian Plateau is dominated by fold-perpendicular sets. These two joint patterns are consistent with states of stress that suppress layer-parallel shortening in the former case and favor it in the latter case. Curvy cross joints are unambiguous records of the change in stress field orientation. Such structures in the clastic rocks of Elk Basin indicate a 10{degrees} to 15{degrees} clockwise reorientation of the stress field during later stages of fold development. The early to synfolding propagation of fold-parallel joints is indicated by their attitude normal to bedding on both limbs of the Elk Basin anticline. Fold-parallel joints are also rotated during strike-slip motion on later, vertical faults cutting subperpendicular to the anticlinal axis. Finally, the fracture spacing index for fold-parallel joints in various formations at Elk Basin is less than for cross fold joints of the Appalachian Plateau.

  2. Micro-CT imaging of reservoir condition CO2 during multi-phase flow in natural rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrew, M. G.; Bijeljic, B.; Menke, H. P.; Blunt, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    Micron-resolution X-ray microtomography has allowed researchers to examine the processes controlling fluid flow behaviour at the pore scale, offering the promise of a transformation in our understanding of flow and transport in porous media. Until recently wettability has only been directly accessible in extremely simplified systems. A new method is presented for the measurement of the contact angle and capillary pressure of multiple immiscible fluids at the pore scale at reservoir conditions in the scCO2-brine-carbonate system. Contact angle is found by resampling the micro-CT data onto planes orthogonal to the contact lines, allowing for vectors to be traced along the grain surface and the scCO2 - brine interface. A distribution of contact angles ranging from 35o to 55o is observed. This distribution can be understood as the result of contact angle hysteresis and surface heterogeneity on a range of length scales. Ganglion capillary pressure for each ganglion was found by measuring the curvature of the CO2-brine interface, while the pore structure was parameterised using distance maps of the pore-space. The formation of the residual clusters by snap-off was examined by comparing the ganglion capillary pressure to local pore topography. The capillary pressure was found to be inversely proportional to the radius of the largest restriction (throat) surrounding the ganglion, which validates the imbibition mechanisms used in pore-network modelling. The potential mobilization of residual ganglia was assessed using a new formulation of both the capillary and Bond numbers, rigorously based on a balance of pore-scale forces, with the majority of ganglia remobilized at Ncmacro around 1. By the use of synchrotron tomography it is possible to create high quality 4D images of dynamic processes involving the flow of multiple fluid phases. We show how the drainage process take place as a series of discreet Haines jumps. Two different types of Haines jumps were seen, one where CO

  3. Inversion of multicomponent seismic data and rock-physics intepretation for evaluating lithology, fracture and fluid distribution in heterogeneous anisotropic reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Ilya Tsvankin; Kenneth L. Larner

    2004-11-17

    Within the framework of this collaborative project with the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Stanford University, the Colorado School of Mines (CSM) group developed and implemented a new efficient approach to the inversion and processing of multicomponent, multiazimuth seismic data in anisotropic media. To avoid serious difficulties in the processing of mode-converted (PS) waves, we devised a methodology for transforming recorded PP- and PS-wavefields into the corresponding SS-wave reflection data that can be processed by velocity-analysis algorithms designed for pure (unconverted) modes. It should be emphasized that this procedure does not require knowledge of the velocity model and can be applied to data from arbitrarily anisotropic, heterogeneous media. The azimuthally varying reflection moveouts of the PP-waves and constructed SS-waves are then combined in anisotropic stacking-velocity tomography to estimate the velocity field in the depth domain. As illustrated by the case studies discussed in the report, migration of the multicomponent data with the obtained anisotropic velocity model yields a crisp image of the reservoir that is vastly superior to that produced by conventional methods. The scope of this research essentially amounts to building the foundation of 3D multicomponent, anisotropic seismology. We have also worked with the LLNL and Stanford groups on relating the anisotropic parameters obtained from seismic data to stress, lithology, and fluid distribution using a generalized theoretical treatment of fractured, poroelastic rocks.

  4. Fissured Rocks and Water Reservoirs in Eastern Thessaly Mountain Range, Greece (Olympus, Ossa, Maurovouni and Pelion): The Role of Tectonic Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papanikolaou, I.; Migiros, G.; Stamatis, G.; Yoxas, G.

    2009-04-01

    The storage capacity of fractured hard rocks is lower than porous media and karst formations, though they can yield groundwater of sufficiently good quality for drinking purposes and may host important water resources, even if they are often of low permeability. In particular, for countries like Greece, where water needs for the local population and the tourist industry are excessive and waterfall limited, these reservoirs are of strategic importance. The mountain Range in Eastern Thessaly comprises an extensive nappe of metamorphic rocks, consisting of schists, gneisses, involving partly some ophiolithic rocks and marble intercalations. The thickness of the nappe exceeds 600 m in Ossa, whereas in the area of Pelion is estimated up to 3.000 m. This nappe rests on top of the Autochthonous Olympus- Ossa unit, which forms a massive Mesozoic carbonate sequence. Extensive fieldwork data supported by the analysis of the physical and chemical properties of a large number of springs and combined by the study of the geological structure both local and regional, resulted in important outcomes regarding the fissured rocks permeability, water flow and springs distribution. Schists are characterized by heterogeneity regarding their permeability features. They are divided into hard-rocks where quartz, epidote and amphiboles prevail, displaying higher permeability and soft-rocks where clay minerals prevail, exhibiting low permeability features, because the presence of clay blocks the fissures and prevent any infiltration process. The marbles are of high permeability, but are of limited extent. A few springs are located in marbles, but the vast majority of the springs are associated to the hard-rock schists, are scattered and characterized by high seasonal discharges. In the area of Ossa in particular, the most important reservoirs exist at the bordering zones of the metamorphic and the post-alpine formations due to the enrichment of the sedimentary post-alpine formations. In the

  5. Potential Impacts of Leakage from Black Rock Reservoir on the Hanford Site Unconfined Aquifer: Initial Hypothetical Simulations of Flow and Contaminant Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Freedman, Vicky L.

    2007-03-09

    Initial scoping calculations of the unconfined aquifer at the Hanford Site were carried out for the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (USBR) to investi¬gate the potential impacts on the Hanford unconfined aquifer that would result from leakage from the proposed Black Rock Reservoir to the west. Although impacts on groundwater flow and contaminant transport were quantified based on numerical simulation results, the investigation represented a quali¬tative assessment of the potential lateral recharge that could result in adverse effects on the aquifer. Because the magnitude of the potential leakage is unknown, hypothetical bounding calculations were performed. When a quantitative analysis of the magnitude of the potential recharge from Black Rock Reservoir is obtained, the hydrologic impacts analysis will be revisited. The analysis presented in this report represent initial bounding calculations. A maximum lateral recharge (i.e., upland flux) was determined in the first part of this study by executing steady-state flow simulations that raised the water table no higher than the elevation attained in the Central Plateau during the Hanford operational period. This metric was selected because it assumed a maximum remobilization of contaminants that existed under previous fully saturated conditions. Three steady-state flow fields were then used to analyze impacts to transient contaminant transport: a maximum recharge (27,000 acre-ft/yr), a no additional flux (365 acre-ft/yr), and an intermediate recharge case (16,000 acre-ft/yr). The transport behavior of four radionuclides was assessed for a 300 year simula¬tion period with the three flow fields. The four radionuclides are current contaminants of concern (COCs) in the Central Plateau and include tritium, iodine-129, technetium-99, and uranium-238. Transient flow and transport simulations were used to establish hypothetical concentration distributions in the subsurface. Using the simulated concentration distributions in 2005

  6. Multidecadal trends in burn severity and patch size in the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness Area, 1900-2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, A.; Morgan, P.; Smith, A. M.; Hudak, A. T.; Hicke, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    How the proportion of area burned severely has changed over time is critical to understanding trends in the ecological effects of fire, but most assessments over large areas are limited to 30 years of satellite data. Little is known about multidecadal trends in burn severity, patch size, and implications for species diversity. Our objective was to analyze the change in proportion of area burned severely and patch size across 346,304 ha in the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness Area in Idaho and Montana, USA. We used 30-meter fire perimeters and burn severity classes inferred from 1984-2007 satellite imagery from the Monitoring Trends in Burn Severity project and 1900-2000 aerial photography. We also analyzed the effect of patch size on species diversity of understory vegetation from field data collected from 20 sites burned in 2000, a year of widespread fires in the region. Fires occurred in 38 out of the 107 years in the record; 13 of these in the early period (1900-1934), 4 in the middle (1935-1974), and 21 in the late (1975-2007). Although 78% (270,918 ha) burned at least once and 48% (131,198) of the area burned severely with >70% tree mortality, there was no trend in total area burned severely through time (n=38, Spearman's Rank Correlation r = -0.14, p = 0.39), nor in proportion of area burned severely through time (n=38, Spearman's Rank Correlation r = -00.27, p = 0.09). Median patch size decreased through time (n= 38, Spearman's Rank Correlation r = -0.73 and p<0.01) and the number of high severity patches increased (n = 38, Spearman's Rank Correlation r = 0.35 and p = 0.02). Median perimeter-to-area ratio of high severity patches increased (n = 38, Spearman's Rank Sum Test r = 0.79 and p <.01); the greater perimeter-to-area ratio and shorter distance to the unburned edge through time is not an artifact of satellite data as patch size inferred from aerial photography 1900-2000 decreased (n= 31, Spearman's Rank, r = -0.42 and p <0.01), but did not for satellite

  7. The magnetic fabric of fault rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferre, Eric

    2015-04-01

    The magnetic fabric of rocks generally informs about principal strain directions and strain magnitude. The main prerequisites for such fabrics to be deemed meaningful is to be carried by a sufficiently large number of grains and for the grains to be uniformly distributed throughout the volume of deformed rock. Clearly these conditions tend not to be met in fault rocks which is the main reason why magnetic fabrics are typically applied to materials that have undergone continuous and plastic strain, such as magmatic rocks. New advances in our understanding of magnetic fabrics now allow to expand their application to discontinuous, brittle strain and consequently to track deformation in fault rocks. Here we present a review of three case studies exemplifying the applications of the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) in fault rocks. 1. The Bitterroot shear zone in Montana shows spectacular quartzofeldspathic C-S mylonites from Montana. These rocks, deformed in conditions ranging from high-temperature magmatic to cataclastic constitute an excellent example to monitor the variations of the magnetic fabric (principal axes, degree of anisotropy, shape parameter) in a context in which the kinematic directions remain constant while temperature decreases. 2. The carbonate ultracataclasites from the Heart Mountain detachment in Wyoming represent a case of catastrophic, large-scale slide approaching seismic velocities. While the dominant deformation mechanism is cataclastic flow, synkinematic breakdown of pyrrhotite and recrystallization into magnetite results in surprisingly consistent AMS fabrics. 3. The pseudotachylytes of the Dora Maira Massif in Italy display coherent AMS fabrics that are oblique with respect to the seismic slip plane. The combination of fabrics in the host-rock and pseudotachylyte veins provides a full kinematic solution (slip plane, slip direction, slip sense) for a single seismic event. While the magnetic fabric of fault rocks has received far

  8. Data requirements and acquisition for reservoir characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, S.; Chang, Ming Ming; Tham, Min.

    1993-03-01

    This report outlines the types of data, data sources and measurement tools required for effective reservoir characterization, the data required for specific enhanced oil recovery (EOR) processes, and a discussion on the determination of the optimum data density for reservoir characterization and reservoir modeling. The two basic sources of data for reservoir characterization are data from the specific reservoir and data from analog reservoirs, outcrops, and modern environments. Reservoir data can be divided into three broad categories: (1) rock properties (the container) and (2) fluid properties (the contents) and (3)interaction between reservoir rock and fluid. Both static and dynamic measurements are required.

  9. Investigation of the relationship between CO2 reservoir rock property change and the surface roughness change originating from the supercritical CO2-sandstone-groundwater geochemical reaction at CO2 sequestration condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Minhee; Wang, Sookyun; Kim, Seyoon; Park, Jinyoung

    2015-04-01

    Lab scale experiments were performed to investigate the property changes of sandstone slabs and cores, resulting from the scCO2-rock-groundwater reaction for 180 days under CO2 sequestration conditions (100 bar and 50 °C). The geochemical reactions, including the surface roughness change of minerals in the slab, resulted from the dissolution and the secondary mineral precipitation for the sandstone reservoir of the Gyeongsang basin, Korea were reproduced in laboratory scale experiments and the relationship between the geochemical reaction and the physical rock property change was derived, for the consideration of successful subsurface CO2 sequestration. The use of the surface roughness value (SRrms) change rate and the physical property change rate to quantify scCO2-rock-groundwater reaction is the novel approach on the study area for CO2 sequestration in the subsurface. From the results of SPM (Scanning Probe Microscope) analyses, the SRrms for each sandstone slab was calculated at different reaction time. The average SRrms increased more than 3.5 times during early 90 days reaction and it continued to be steady after 90 days, suggesting that the surface weathering process of sandstone occurred in the early reaction time after CO2 injection into the subsurface reservoir. The average porosity of sandstone cores increased by 8.8 % and the average density decreased by 0.5 % during 90 days reaction and these values slightly changed after 90 days. The average P and S wave velocities of sandstone cores also decreased by 10 % during 90 days reaction. The trend of physical rock property change during the geochemical reaction showed in a logarithmic manner and it was also correlated to the logarithmic increase in SRrms, suggesting that the physical property change of reservoir rocks originated from scCO2 injection directly comes from the geochemical reaction process. Results suggested that the long-term estimation of the physical property change for reservoir rocks in CO2

  10. Interaction Between CO2-Rich Sulfate Solutions and Carbonate Reservoir Rocks from Atmospheric to Supercritical CO2 Conditions: Experiments and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cama, J.; Garcia-Rios, M.; Luquot, L.; Soler Matamala, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    A test site for CO2 geological storage is situated in Hontomín (Spain) with a reservoir rock that is mainly composed of limestone. During and after CO2 injection, the resulting CO2-rich acid brine gives rise to the dissolution of carbonate minerals (calcite and dolomite) and gypsum (or anhydrite at depth) may precipitate since the reservoir brine contains sulfate. Experiments using columns filled with crushed limestone or dolostone were conducted under different P-pCO2 conditions (atmospheric: 1-10-3.5 bar; subcritical: 10-10 bar; and supercritical: 150-34 bar), T (25, 40 and 60 ºC) and input solution compositions (gypsum-undersaturated and gypsum-equilibrated solutions). We evaluated the effect of these parameters on the coupled reactions of calcite/dolomite dissolution and gypsum/anhydrite precipitation. The CrunchFlow and PhreeqC (v.3) numerical codes were used to perform reactive transport simulations of the experiments. Under the P-pCO2-T conditions, the volume of precipitated gypsum was smaller than the volume of dissolved carbonate minerals, yielding an increase in porosity (Δporosity up to ≈ 4%). A decrease in T favored limestone dissolution regardless of pCO2 owing to increasing undersaturation with decreasing temperature. However, gypsum precipitation was favored at high T and under atmospheric pCO2 conditions but not at high T and under 10 bar of pCO2 conditions. The increase in limestone dissolution with pCO2 was directly attributed to pH, which was more acidic at higher pCO2. Increasing pCO2, carbonate dissolution occurred along the column whereas it was localized in the very inlet under atmospheric conditions. This was due to the buffer capacity of the carbonic acid, which maintains pH at around 5 and keeps the solution undersaturated with respect to calcite and dolomite along the column. 1D reactive transport simulations reproduced the experimental data (carbonate dissolution and gypsum precipitation for different P-pCO2-T conditions). Drawing