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Sample records for rodent olfactory mucosa

  1. Histochemical study of the olfactory mucosae of the horse.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwang-Hyup; Park, Changnam; Bang, Hyojin; Ahn, Meejung; Moon, Changjong; Kim, Seungjoon; Shin, Taekyun

    2016-05-01

    The olfactory mucosae of the horse were examined by using histology and lectin histochemistry to characterize the carbohydrate sugar residues therein. Histological findings revealed that olfactory epithelium (OE) consisted of both olfactory marker protein (OMP)- and protein gene product (PGP) 9.5-positive receptor cells, supporting cells and basal cells with intervening secretory ducts from Bowman's glands. Mucus histochemistry showed that Bowman's gland acini contain periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) reagent-positive neutral mucins and alcian blue pH 2.5-positive mucosubstances. Lectin histochemistry revealed that a variety of carbohydrate sugar residues, including N-acetylglucosamine, mannose, galactose, N-acetylgalactosamine, fucose and complex type N-glycan groups, are present in the various cell types in the olfactory mucosa at varying levels. Collectively, this is the first descriptive study of horse olfactory mucosa to characterize carbohydrate sugar residues in the OE and Bowman's glands. PMID:27040092

  2. Olfactory Mucosa Tissue Based Biosensor for Bioelectronic Nose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qingjun; Ye, Weiwei; Yu, Hui; Hu, Ning; Cai, Hua; Wang, Ping

    2009-05-01

    Biological olfactory system can distinguish thousands of odors. In order to realize the biomimetic design of electronic nose on the principle of mammalian olfactory system, we have reported bioelectronic nose based on cultured olfactory cells. In this study, the electrical property of the tissue-semiconductor interface was analyzed by the volume conductor theory and the sheet conductor model. Olfactory mucosa tissue of rat was isolated and fixed on the surface of the light-addressable potentiometric sensor (LAPS), with the natural stations of the neuronal populations and functional receptor unit of the cilia well reserved. By the extracellular potentials of the olfactory receptor cells of the mucosa tissue monitored, both the simulation and the experimental results suggested that this tissue-semiconductor hybrid system was sensitive to odorants stimulation.

  3. Profiling of olfactory receptor gene expression in whole human olfactory mucosa.

    PubMed

    Verbeurgt, Christophe; Wilkin, Françoise; Tarabichi, Maxime; Gregoire, Françoise; Dumont, Jacques E; Chatelain, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Olfactory perception is mediated by a large array of olfactory receptor genes. The human genome contains 851 olfactory receptor gene loci. More than 50% of the loci are annotated as nonfunctional due to frame-disrupting mutations. Furthermore haplotypic missense alleles can be nonfunctional resulting from substitution of key amino acids governing protein folding or interactions with signal transduction components. Beyond their role in odor recognition, functional olfactory receptors are also required for a proper targeting of olfactory neuron axons to their corresponding glomeruli in the olfactory bulb. Therefore, we anticipate that profiling of olfactory receptor gene expression in whole human olfactory mucosa and analysis in the human population of their expression should provide an opportunity to select the frequently expressed and potentially functional olfactory receptors in view of a systematic deorphanization. To address this issue, we designed a TaqMan Low Density Array (Applied Biosystems), containing probes for 356 predicted human olfactory receptor loci to investigate their expression in whole human olfactory mucosa tissues from 26 individuals (13 women, 13 men; aged from 39 to 81 years, with an average of 67±11 years for women and 63±12 years for men). Total RNA isolation, DNase treatment, RNA integrity evaluation and reverse transcription were performed for these 26 samples. Then 384 targeted genes (including endogenous control genes and reference genes specifically expressed in olfactory epithelium for normalization purpose) were analyzed using the same real-time reverse transcription PCR platform. On average, the expression of 273 human olfactory receptor genes was observed in the 26 selected whole human olfactory mucosa analyzed, of which 90 were expressed in all 26 individuals. Most of the olfactory receptors deorphanized to date on the basis of sensitivity to known odorant molecules, which are described in the literature, were found in the

  4. Profiling of Olfactory Receptor Gene Expression in Whole Human Olfactory Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Tarabichi, Maxime; Gregoire, Françoise; Dumont, Jacques E.; Chatelain, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Olfactory perception is mediated by a large array of olfactory receptor genes. The human genome contains 851 olfactory receptor gene loci. More than 50% of the loci are annotated as nonfunctional due to frame-disrupting mutations. Furthermore haplotypic missense alleles can be nonfunctional resulting from substitution of key amino acids governing protein folding or interactions with signal transduction components. Beyond their role in odor recognition, functional olfactory receptors are also required for a proper targeting of olfactory neuron axons to their corresponding glomeruli in the olfactory bulb. Therefore, we anticipate that profiling of olfactory receptor gene expression in whole human olfactory mucosa and analysis in the human population of their expression should provide an opportunity to select the frequently expressed and potentially functional olfactory receptors in view of a systematic deorphanization. To address this issue, we designed a TaqMan Low Density Array (Applied Biosystems), containing probes for 356 predicted human olfactory receptor loci to investigate their expression in whole human olfactory mucosa tissues from 26 individuals (13 women, 13 men; aged from 39 to 81 years, with an average of 67±11 years for women and 63±12 years for men). Total RNA isolation, DNase treatment, RNA integrity evaluation and reverse transcription were performed for these 26 samples. Then 384 targeted genes (including endogenous control genes and reference genes specifically expressed in olfactory epithelium for normalization purpose) were analyzed using the same real-time reverse transcription PCR platform. On average, the expression of 273 human olfactory receptor genes was observed in the 26 selected whole human olfactory mucosa analyzed, of which 90 were expressed in all 26 individuals. Most of the olfactory receptors deorphanized to date on the basis of sensitivity to known odorant molecules, which are described in the literature, were found in the

  5. Method of expression of certain bacterial microflora mucosa olfactory area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avrunin, Oleg G.; Nosova, Yana V.; Shushlyapina, Natalia O.; Surtel, Wojciech; Burlibay, Aron; Zhassandykyzy, Maral

    2015-12-01

    The article is devoted to the actual problem - the development of new express diagnostic methods, based on which a doctor-otolaryngologist can quickly and efficiently determine a violation of smell. The work is based on the methods of processing and analysis of medical images and signals. We have also identified informative indicators of endoscopic image of the olfactory region of the nasal mucosa of the upper course.

  6. Engraftment and regenerative effects of bone marrow stromal cell transplantation on damaged rat olfactory mucosa.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Jang-Woo; Jo, Hyo Gyeong; Park, Sang Man; Ku, Cheol Hyo; Park, Dong-Joon

    2016-09-01

    To develop a new therapeutic method to treat olfactory deficits, we investigated the engraftment and regenerative effects of transplanted bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) on damaged rat olfactory mucosa. To induce olfactory nerve degeneration, one side of the olfactory mucosa of Sprague-Dawley rats was damaged via Triton X-100 irrigation. Phosphate-buffered saline containing syngeneic BMSCs was injected into the olfactory mucosa for transplantation. PKH fluorescent cell dye labeling of BMSCs was used to monitor the transplanted cells. After transplantation of BMSCs, the thickness and regeneration of olfactory mucosa were analyzed using hematoxylin-eosin (H&E) staining. S100 immunohistochemical staining was used to measure nerve sheath regeneration. The increase in NGF (nerve growth factor) level in the olfactory mucosa was measured by Western blot analysis. Transplanted bone marrow stromal cells were engrafted to the lamia propria of damaged mucosa. The mean time for normalization of thickness and morphological recovery of the olfactory mucosa was 4 weeks in the therapeutic group and 9 weeks in the control group. S100 immunoreactivity was higher on the BMSC-treated side than on the control side. During regeneration, the expression of NGF increased in the olfactory mucosa of the experimental group. Based on these results, BMSC transplantation accelerated regeneration of olfactory mucosa damaged by Triton X-100, and NGF may be essential to this regenerative process. PMID:26940801

  7. Olfactory sensations produced by high-energy photon irradiation of the olfactory receptor mucosa in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Sagar, S.M.; Thomas, R.J.; Loverock, L.T.; Spittle, M.F. )

    1991-04-01

    During irradiation of volumes that incorporate the olfactory system, a proportion of patients have complained of a pungent smell. A retrospective study was carried out to determine the prevalence of this side-effect. A questionnaire was sent to 40 patients whose treatment volumes included the olfactory region and also to a control group treated away from this region. The irradiated tumor volumes included the frontal lobe, whole brain, nasopharynx, pituitary fossa, and maxillary antrum. Of the 25 patients who replied, 60% experienced odorous symptoms during irradiation. They described the odor as unpleasant and consistent with ozone. Stimulation of olfactory receptors is considered to be caused by the radiochemical formation of ozone and free radicals in the mucus overlying the olfactory mucosa.

  8. Neuropeptide Y Enhances Olfactory Mucosa Responses to Odorant in Hungry Rats

    PubMed Central

    Negroni, Julia; Meunier, Nicolas; Monnerie, Régine; Salesse, Roland; Baly, Christine; Caillol, Monique; Congar, Patrice

    2012-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) plays an important role in regulating appetite and hunger in vertebrates. In the hypothalamus, NPY stimulates food intake under the control of the nutritional status. Previous studies have shown the presence of NPY and receptors in rodent olfactory system, and suggested a neuroproliferative role. Interestingly, NPY was also shown to directly modulate olfactory responses evoked by a food-related odorant in hungry axolotls. We have recently demonstrated that another nutritional cue, insulin, modulates the odorant responses of the rat olfactory mucosa (OM). Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the potential effect of NPY on rat OM responses to odorants, in relation to the animal's nutritional state. We measured the potential NPY modulation of OM responses to odorant, using electro-olfactogram (EOG) recordings, in fed and fasted adult rats. NPY application significantly and transiently increased EOG amplitudes in fasted but not in fed rats. The effects of specific NPY-receptor agonists were similarly quantified, showing that NPY operated mainly through Y1 receptors. These receptors appeared as heterogeneously expressed by olfactory neurons in the OM, and western blot analysis showed that they were overexpressed in fasted rats. These data provide the first evidence that NPY modulates the initial events of odorant detection in the rat OM. Because this modulation depends on the nutritional status of the animal, and is ascribed to NPY, the most potent orexigenic peptide in the central nervous system, it evidences a strong supplementary physiological link between olfaction and nutritional processes. PMID:23024812

  9. Cell migration in the developing rodent olfactory system.

    PubMed

    Huilgol, Dhananjay; Tole, Shubha

    2016-07-01

    The components of the nervous system are assembled in development by the process of cell migration. Although the principles of cell migration are conserved throughout the brain, different subsystems may predominantly utilize specific migratory mechanisms, or may display unusual features during migration. Examining these subsystems offers not only the potential for insights into the development of the system, but may also help in understanding disorders arising from aberrant cell migration. The olfactory system is an ancient sensory circuit that is essential for the survival and reproduction of a species. The organization of this circuit displays many evolutionarily conserved features in vertebrates, including molecular mechanisms and complex migratory pathways. In this review, we describe the elaborate migrations that populate each component of the olfactory system in rodents and compare them with those described in the well-studied neocortex. Understanding how the components of the olfactory system are assembled will not only shed light on the etiology of olfactory and sexual disorders, but will also offer insights into how conserved migratory mechanisms may have shaped the evolution of the brain. PMID:26994098

  10. Olfactory mucosa ultrastructure in the short-tailed shrews, Blarina brevicauda and Blarina carolinensis.

    PubMed

    Byrum, L J; Carson, K A; Rose, R K

    2001-12-01

    The olfactory mucosae of the northern short-tailed shrew, Blarina brevicauda, and the southern short-tailed shrew, Blarina carolinensis, were examined by light and electron microscopy. A well-developed olfactory epithelium was observed that included all of the cells necessary to provide for a sensitive olfactory system, suggesting that olfaction plays a major role in the behavior of these animals. There were no significant differences between the olfactory mucosae of these two species. The general features of the olfactory epithelium in these shrews were similar to those reported for several other macrosmatic mammals. A new type of supporting cell, called the light supporting cell, was observed in these shrews. The light supporting cell cytoplasm exhibited very little staining by light microscopy and had low electron density by transmission electron microscopy compared to that of the more common dark supporting cell. The light supporting cell had a convex apical surface with microvilli and lacked the large amounts of smooth endoplasmic reticulum (SER) typical of the apical cytoplasm of the dark supporting cell. In the lamina propria of the mucosa, the Bowman's glands consisted of two cell types, one with electron-lucent, alcian blue-positive granules, and the other with electron-dense PAS-positive granules. The cell with electron-lucent granules contained large amounts of SER and small clumps of rough ER. The cells with electron-dense granules had large amounts of RER and little SER. PMID:12221510

  11. Novel genes for potential ligand-binding proteins in subregions of the olfactory mucosa.

    PubMed Central

    Dear, T N; Boehm, T; Keverne, E B; Rabbitts, T H

    1991-01-01

    Odorant detection is specifically mediated via receptor neurons in the olfactory mucosa but is a complex process involving a number of different cell types producing proteins of differing function. We have used the technique of subtractive hybridization cDNA cloning to identify novel genes expressed exclusively in the olfactory mucosa which may play a role in olfaction. Ten distinct groups of cDNA clones were identified which corresponded to mRNA transcripts highly expressed in rat olfactory mucosa but undetectable in thymus, kidney, lung, brain, spleen and liver. Some of these clones identify substructures in the mucosal tissue for which no other probes are currently available. Others identify novel mRNA species in the Bowman's glands. The predicted proteins for three of these clones are homologous to proteins which bind to either lipopolysaccharides (RYA3 and RY2G5) or to polychlorinated biphenyls (RYD5). In addition, while RYA3 and RY2G5 are highly homologous, they appear to be expressed in different parts of the mucosal tissue. The sequence homologies and subanatomical location of expression suggest that these proteins might interact with odorants before or after specific recognition by odorant receptors. Therefore, the olfactory mucosa may possess diverse, functionally-distinct odorant-binding proteins which recognize and bind separate classes of odorants. Images PMID:1915264

  12. Canine olfactory ensheathing cells from the olfactory mucosa can be engineered to produce active chondroitinase ABC.

    PubMed

    Carwardine, Darren; Wong, Liang-Fong; Fawcett, James W; Muir, Elizabeth M; Granger, Nicolas

    2016-08-15

    A multitude of factors must be overcome following spinal cord injury (SCI) in order to achieve clinical improvement in patients. It is thought that by combining promising therapies these diverse factors could be combatted with the aim of producing an overall improvement in function. Chondroitin sulphate proteoglycans (CSPGs) present in the glial scar that forms following SCI present a significant block to axon regeneration. Digestion of CSPGs by chondroitinase ABC (ChABC) leads to axon regeneration, neuronal plasticity and functional improvement in preclinical models of SCI. However, the enzyme activity decays at body temperature within 24-72h, limiting the translational potential of ChABC as a therapy. Olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) have shown huge promise as a cell transplant therapy in SCI. Their beneficial effects have been demonstrated in multiple small animal SCI models as well as in naturally occurring SCI in canine patients. In the present study, we have genetically modified canine OECs from the mucosa to constitutively produce enzymatically active ChABC. We have developed a lentiviral vector that can deliver a mammalian modified version of the ChABC gene to mammalian cells, including OECs. Enzyme production was quantified using the Morgan-Elson assay that detects the breakdown products of CSPG digestion in cell supernatants. We confirmed our findings by immunolabelling cell supernatant samples using Western blotting. OECs normal cell function was unaffected by genetic modification as demonstrated by normal microscopic morphology and the presence of the low affinity neurotrophin receptor (p75(NGF)) following viral transduction. We have developed the means to allow production of active ChABC in combination with a promising cell transplant therapy for SCI repair. PMID:27423610

  13. Histological and lectin histochemical studies on the olfactory and respiratory mucosae of the sheep.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Dalia; Nakamuta, Nobuaki; Taniguchi, Kazumi; Yamamoto, Yoshio; Taniguchi, Kazuyuki

    2014-03-01

    The olfactory and respiratory mucosae of the Corriedale sheep were examined using lectin histochemistry in order to clarify the histochemical and glycohistochemical differences between these two tissues. The olfactory epithelium was stained with 13 lectins out of 21 lectins examined, while the respiratory epithelium was positive to 16 lectins. The free border of both of the olfactory and respiratory epithelia was stained with 12 lectins: Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), succinylated-wheat germ agglutinin (s-WGA), Lycopersicon esculentum lectin (LEL), Solanum tuberosum lectin (STL), Datura stramonium lectin (DSL), Soybean agglutinin (SBA), Bandeiraea simplicifolia lectin-I (BSL-I), Ricinus communis agglutinin-I (RCA-120), Erythrina cristagalli lectin (ECL), Concanavalin A (Con A), Phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin-E (PHA-E) and Phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin-L (PHA-L). The associated glands of the olfactory mucosa, Bowman's glands, were stained with 13 lectins. While both the goblet cells and mucous nasal glands were stained with 8 lectins; five of them (WGA, s-WGA, STL, Vicia villosa agglutinin (VVA) and ECL) were mutually positive among the Bowman's glands, mucous nasal glands and the goblet cells. These findings indicate that the glycohistochemical characteristics of the free borders of both olfactory and respiratory epithelia are similar to each other, suggesting that secretions from the Bowman's glands and those of the goblet cells and mucous nasal glands are partially exchanged between the surface of two epithelia to contribute the functions of the respiratory epithelium and the olfactory receptor cells, respectively. PMID:24200894

  14. Functional Evidence of Multidrug Resistance Transporters (MDR) in Rodent Olfactory Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Molinas, Adrien; Sicard, Gilles; Jakob, Ingrid

    2012-01-01

    Background P-glycoprotein (Pgp) and multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP1) are membrane transporter proteins which function as efflux pumps at cell membranes and are considered to exert a protective function against the entry of xenobiotics. While evidence for Pgp and MRP transporter activity is reported for olfactory tissue, their possible interaction and participation in the olfactory response has not been investigated. Principal Findings Functional activity of putative MDR transporters was assessed by means of the fluorometric calcein acetoxymethyl ester (calcein-AM) accumulation assay on acute rat and mouse olfactory tissue slices. Calcein-AM uptake was measured as fluorescence intensity changes in the presence of Pgp or MRP specific inhibitors. Epifluorescence microscopy measured time course analysis in the olfactory epithelium revealed significant inhibitor-dependent calcein uptake in the presence of each of the selected inhibitors. Furthermore, intracellular calcein accumulation in olfactory receptor neurons was also significantly increased in the presence of either one of the Pgp or MRP inhibitors. The presence of Pgp or MRP1 encoding genes in the olfactory mucosa of rat and mouse was confirmed by RT-PCR with appropriate pairs of species-specific primers. Both transporters were expressed in both newborn and adult olfactory mucosa of both species. To assess a possible involvement of MDR transporters in the olfactory response, we examined the electrophysiological response to odorants in the presence of the selected MDR inhibitors by recording electroolfactograms (EOG). In both animal species, MRPs inhibitors induced a marked reduction of the EOG magnitude, while Pgp inhibitors had only a minor or no measurable effect. Conclusions The findings suggest that both Pgp and MRP transporters are functional in the olfactory mucosa and in olfactory receptor neurons. Pgp and MRPs may be cellular constituents of olfactory receptor neurons and represent potential

  15. Translational potential of olfactory mucosa for the study of neuropsychiatric illness

    PubMed Central

    Borgmann-Winter, K; Willard, S L; Sinclair, D; Mirza, N; Turetsky, B; Berretta, S; Hahn, C-G

    2015-01-01

    The olfactory mucosa (OM) is a unique source of regenerative neural tissue that is readily obtainable from living human subjects and thus affords opportunities for the study of psychiatric illnesses. OM tissues can be used, either as ex vivo OM tissue or in vitro OM-derived neural cells, to explore parameters that have been difficult to assess in the brain of living individuals with psychiatric illness. As OM tissues are distinct from brain tissues, an understanding of the neurobiology of the OM is needed to relate findings in these tissues to those of the brain as well as to design and interpret ex vivo or in vitro OM studies. To that end, we discuss the molecular, cellular and functional characteristics of cell types within the olfactory mucosa, describe the organization of the OM and highlight its role in the olfactory neurocircuitry. In addition, we discuss various approaches to in vitro culture of OM-derived cells and their characterization, focusing on the extent to which they reflect the in vivo neurobiology of the OM. Finally, we review studies of ex vivo OM tissues and in vitro OM-derived cells from individuals with psychiatric, neurodegenerative and neurodevelopmental disorders. In particular, we discuss the concordance of this work with postmortem brain studies and highlight possible future approaches, which may offer distinct strengths in comparison to in vitro paradigms based on genomic reprogramming. PMID:25781226

  16. Changes in smell acuity induced by radiation exposure of the olfactory mucosa

    SciTech Connect

    Ophir, D.; Guterman, A.; Gross-Isseroff, R.

    1988-08-01

    The effects of ionizing radiation on smell acuity were assessed in 12 patients in whom the olfactory mucosa was exposed to radiation in the course of treatment for nasopharyngeal carcinoma or pituitary adenoma. Olfactory detection thresholds for two odorants (amyl acetate and eugenol) were determined before the start of radiation therapy, within a week of termination of therapy, and 1, 3, and 6 months later. The results show clearly that smell acuity is profoundly affected by therapeutic irradiation. Thresholds had increased in all 12 patients by the end of treatment and were still high one month later. Varying degrees of recovery were noted in most patients three to six months after cessation of treatment. The fate of the sense of smell deserves more attention when considering the disability caused by irradiation to certain head and neck tumors.

  17. Patient-derived olfactory mucosa for study of the non-neuronal contribution to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis pathology

    PubMed Central

    García-Escudero, Vega; Rosales, María; Muñoz, José Luis; Scola, Esteban; Medina, Javier; Khalique, Hena; Garaulet, Guillermo; Rodriguez, Antonio; Lim, Filip

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a degenerative motor neuron disease which currently has no cure. Research using rodent ALS models transgenic for mutant superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) has implicated that glial–neuronal interactions play a major role in the destruction of motor neurons, but the generality of this mechanism is not clear as SOD1 mutations only account for less than 2% of all ALS cases. Recently, this hypothesis was backed up by observation of similar effects using astrocytes derived from post-mortem spinal cord tissue of ALS patients which did not carry SOD1 mutations. However, such necropsy samples may not be easy to obtain and may not always yield viable cell cultures. Here, we have analysed olfactory mucosa (OM) cells, which can be easily isolated from living ALS patients. Disease-specific changes observed when ALS OM cells were co-cultured with human spinal cord neurons included decreased neuronal viability, aberrant neuronal morphology and altered glial inflammatory responses. Our results show the potential of OM cells as new cell models for ALS. PMID:25807871

  18. Applying Convolution-Based Processing Methods To A Dual-Channel, Large Array Artificial Olfactory Mucosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, J. E.; Che Harun, F. K.; Covington, J. A.; Gardner, J. W.

    2009-05-01

    Our understanding of the human olfactory system, particularly with respect to the phenomenon of nasal chromatography, has led us to develop a new generation of novel odour-sensitive instruments (or electronic noses). This novel instrument is in need of new approaches to data processing so that the information rich signals can be fully exploited; here, we apply a novel time-series based technique for processing such data. The dual-channel, large array artificial olfactory mucosa consists of 3 arrays of 300 sensors each. The sensors are divided into 24 groups, with each group made from a particular type of polymer. The first array is connected to the other two arrays by a pair of retentive columns. One channel is coated with Carbowax 20 M, and the other with OV-1. This configuration partly mimics the nasal chromatography effect, and partly augments it by utilizing not only polar (mucus layer) but also non-polar (artificial) coatings. Such a device presents several challenges to multi-variate data processing: a large, redundant dataset, spatio-temporal output, and small sample space. By applying a novel convolution approach to this problem, it has been demonstrated that these problems can be overcome. The artificial mucosa signals have been classified using a probabilistic neural network and gave an accuracy of 85%. Even better results should be possible through the selection of other sensors with lower correlation.

  19. Defence mechanisms of olfactory neuro-epithelium: mucosa regeneration, metabolising enzymes and transporters.

    PubMed

    Watelet, J B; Strolin-Benedetti, M; Whomsley, R

    2009-01-01

    The olfactory neuro-epithelium is highly sensitive to chemicals and its direct microbiological environment. It also plays a role as an interface between the airways and the nervous system, and so it has developed several defence instruments for rapid regeneration or for the detoxification of the immediate environment. This review illustrates three of these defence mechanisms: regeneration of the epithelium, local production of metabolising enzymes and xenobiotic transporters. Toxicants can inflict damage by a direct toxic response. Alternatively, they may require metabolic activation to produce the proximate toxicant. In addition to detoxifying inhaled and systemically derived xenobiotics, the local olfactory metabolism may fulfil multiple functions such as the modification of inhaled odorant, the modulation of endogenous signalling molecules and the protection of other tissues such as the CNS and lungs from inhaled toxicants. Finally, the permeability of nasal and olfactory mucosa is an important efficacy parameter for some anti-allergic drugs delivered by intranasal administration or inhalation. Efflux or update transporters expressed in these tissues may therefore significantly influence the pharmacokinetics of drugs administered topically. PMID:20084803

  20. Automated analyses of innate olfactory behaviors in rodents.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Qiang; Scott, Aaron; Scheerer, Hayley; Sapkota, Nirjal; Lee, Daniel K; Ma, Limei; Yu, C Ron

    2014-01-01

    Olfaction based behavioral experiments are important for the investigation of sensory coding, perception, decision making and memory formation. The predominant experimental paradigms employ forced choice operant assays, which require associative learning and reinforced training. Animal performance in these assays not only reflects odor perception but also the confidence in decision making and memory. In this study, we describe a versatile and automated setup, "Poking-Registered Olfactory Behavior Evaluation System" (PROBES), which can be adapted to perform multiple olfactory assays. In addition to forced choice assays, we employ this system to examine animal's innate ability for odor detection, discrimination and preference without elaborate training procedures. These assays provide quantitative measurements of odor discrimination and robust readouts of odor preference. Using PROBES, we find odor detection thresholds are at lower concentrations in naïve animals than those determined by forced choice assays. PROBES-based automated assays provide an efficient way of analyzing innate odor-triggered behaviors. PMID:24699673

  1. Automated Analyses of Innate Olfactory Behaviors in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Qiang; Scott, Aaron; Scheerer, Hayley; Sapkota, Nirjal; Lee, Daniel K.; Ma, Limei; Yu, C. Ron

    2014-01-01

    Olfaction based behavioral experiments are important for the investigation of sensory coding, perception, decision making and memory formation. The predominant experimental paradigms employ forced choice operant assays, which require associative learning and reinforced training. Animal performance in these assays not only reflects odor perception but also the confidence in decision making and memory. In this study, we describe a versatile and automated setup, “Poking-Registered Olfactory Behavior Evaluation System” (PROBES), which can be adapted to perform multiple olfactory assays. In addition to forced choice assays, we employ this system to examine animal’s innate ability for odor detection, discrimination and preference without elaborate training procedures. These assays provide quantitative measurements of odor discrimination and robust readouts of odor preference. Using PROBES, we find odor detection thresholds are at lower concentrations in naïve animals than those determined by forced choice assays. PROBES-based automated assays provide an efficient way of analyzing innate odor-triggered behaviors. PMID:24699673

  2. A Pilot Clinical Study of Olfactory Mucosa Autograft for Chronic Complete Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Iwatsuki, Koichi; Tajima, Fumihiro; Ohnishi, Yu-Ichiro; Nakamura, Takeshi; Ishihara, Masahiro; Hosomi, Koichi; Ninomiya, Koshi; Moriwaki, Takashi; Yoshimine, Toshiki

    2016-06-15

    Recent studies of spinal cord axon regeneration have reported good long-term results using various types of tissue scaffolds. Olfactory tissue allows autologous transplantation and can easily be obtained by a simple biopsy that is performed through the external nares. We performed a clinical pilot study of olfactory mucosa autograft (OMA) for chronic complete spinal cord injury in eight patients according to the procedure outlined by Lima et al. Our results showed no serious adverse events and improvement in both the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Impairment Scale (AIS) grade and ASIA motor score in five patients. The preoperative post-rehabilitation ASIA motor score improved from 50 in all cases to 52 in case 2, 60 in case 4, 52 in case 6, 55 in case 7, and 58 in case 8 at 96 weeks after OMA. The AIS improved from A to C in four cases and from B to C in one case. Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were also seen in one patient, reflecting conductivity in the central nervous system, including the corticospinal tract. The MEPs induced with transcranial magnetic stimulation allow objective assessment of the integrity of the motor circuitry comprising both the corticospinal tract and the peripheral motor nerves.We show the feasibility of OMA for chronic complete spinal cord injury. PMID:27053327

  3. A Pilot Clinical Study of Olfactory Mucosa Autograft for Chronic Complete Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    IWATSUKI, Koichi; TAJIMA, Fumihiro; OHNISHI, Yu-ichiro; NAKAMURA, Takeshi; ISHIHARA, Masahiro; HOSOMI, Koichi; NINOMIYA, Koshi; MORIWAKI, Takashi; YOSHIMINE, Toshiki

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies of spinal cord axon regeneration have reported good long-term results using various types of tissue scaffolds. Olfactory tissue allows autologous transplantation and can easily be obtained by a simple biopsy that is performed through the external nares. We performed a clinical pilot study of olfactory mucosa autograft (OMA) for chronic complete spinal cord injury in eight patients according to the procedure outlined by Lima et al. Our results showed no serious adverse events and improvement in both the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Impairment Scale (AIS) grade and ASIA motor score in five patients. The preoperative post-rehabilitation ASIA motor score improved from 50 in all cases to 52 in case 2, 60 in case 4, 52 in case 6, 55 in case 7, and 58 in case 8 at 96 weeks after OMA. The AIS improved from A to C in four cases and from B to C in one case. Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were also seen in one patient, reflecting conductivity in the central nervous system, including the corticospinal tract. The MEPs induced with transcranial magnetic stimulation allow objective assessment of the integrity of the motor circuitry comprising both the corticospinal tract and the peripheral motor nerves.We show the feasibility of OMA for chronic complete spinal cord injury. PMID:27053327

  4. An olfactory cocktail party: figure-ground segregation of odorants in rodents

    PubMed Central

    Rokni, Dan; Hemmelder, Vivian; Kapoor, Vikrant; Murthy, Venkatesh N.

    2014-01-01

    In odorant-rich environments, animals must be able to detect specific odorants of interest against variable backgrounds. However, several studies have suggested that both humans and rodents are very poor at analyzing the components of odorant mixtures, leading to the idea that olfaction is a synthetic sense in which mixtures are perceived holistically. We have developed a behavioral task to directly measure the ability of mice to perceive mixture components and found that mice can be easily trained to detect target odorants embedded in unpredictable and variable mixtures. We imaged the responses of olfactory bulb glomeruli to the individual odors used in the task in mice expressing the Ca++ indicator GCaMP3 in olfactory receptor neurons. By relating behavioral performance to the glomerular response patterns, we found that the difficulty of segregating the target from the background was strongly dependent on the extent of overlap between the representations of the target and the background odors by olfactory receptors. Our study indicates that the olfactory system has powerful analytic abilities that are constrained by the limits of combinatorial neural representation of odorants at the level of the olfactory receptors. PMID:25086608

  5. Ghrelin Enhances Olfactory Sensitivity and Exploratory Sniffing in Rodents and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Jenny; Mannea, Erica; Aime, Pascaline; Pfluger, Paul T.; Yi, Chun-Xia; Castaneda, Tamara R.; Davis, Harold W.; Ren, Xueying; Pixley, Sarah; Benoit, Stephen; Julliard, Karyne; Woods, Stephen C; Horvath, Tamas L.; Sleeman, Mark M.; D’Alessio, David; Obici, Silvana; Frank, Robert; Tschöp, Matthias H.

    2011-01-01

    Olfaction is an integral part of feeding providing predictive cues that anticipate ingestion. Although olfactory function is modulated by factors such as prolonged fasting, the underlying neural mechanisms remain poorly understood. We recently identified ghrelin receptors in olfactory circuits in the brain. We therefore investigated the role of the appetite-stimulating hormone ghrelin in olfactory processing in rodents and humans, testing the hypothesis that ghrelin lowers olfactory detection thresholds and enhances exploratory sniffing, both being related to food-seeking. In rats, intracerebroventricular ghrelin decreased odor detection thresholds and increased sniffing frequency. In humans, systemic ghrelin infusions significantly enhanced sniff magnitudes in response to both food and non-food odorants and air in comparison to control saline infusions but did not affect the pleasantness ratings of odors. This is consistent with a specific effect on odor detection and not the hedonic value of odors. Collectively, our findings indicate that ghrelin stimulates exploratory sniffing and increases olfactory sensitivity, presumably enhancing the ability to locate, identify and select foods. This novel role is consistent with ghrelin’s overall function as a signal amplifier at the molecular interface between environmental and nutritional cues and neuroendocrine circuits controlling energy homeostasis. PMID:21490225

  6. Secretome of Olfactory Mucosa Mesenchymal Stem Cell, a Multiple Potential Stem Cell.

    PubMed

    Ge, Lite; Jiang, Miao; Duan, Da; Wang, Zijun; Qi, Linyu; Teng, Xiaohua; Zhao, Zhenyu; Wang, Lei; Zhuo, Yi; Chen, Ping; He, Xijing; Lu, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Nasal olfactory mucosa mesenchymal stem cells (OM-MSCs) have the ability to promote regeneration in the nervous system in vivo. Moreover, with view to the potential for clinical application, OM-MSCs have the advantage of being easily accessible from patients and transplantable in an autologous manner, thus eliminating immune rejection and contentious ethical issues. So far, most studies have been focused on the role of OM-MSCs in central nervous system replacement. However, the secreted proteomics of OM-MSCs have not been reported yet. Here, proteins secreted by OM-MSCs cultured in serum-free conditions were separated on SDS-PAGE and identified by LC-MS/MS. As a result, a total of 274 secreted proteins were identified. These molecules are known to be important in neurotrophy, angiogenesis, cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis, and inflammation which were highly correlated with the repair of central nervous system. The proteomic profiling of the OM-MSCs secretome might provide new insights into their nature in the neural recovery. However, proteomic analysis for clinical biomarkers of OM-MSCs needs to be further studied. PMID:26949398

  7. Secretome of Olfactory Mucosa Mesenchymal Stem Cell, a Multiple Potential Stem Cell

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Lite; Duan, Da; Wang, Zijun; Qi, Linyu; Teng, Xiaohua; Zhao, Zhenyu; Wang, Lei; Zhuo, Yi; Chen, Ping; He, Xijing; Lu, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Nasal olfactory mucosa mesenchymal stem cells (OM-MSCs) have the ability to promote regeneration in the nervous system in vivo. Moreover, with view to the potential for clinical application, OM-MSCs have the advantage of being easily accessible from patients and transplantable in an autologous manner, thus eliminating immune rejection and contentious ethical issues. So far, most studies have been focused on the role of OM-MSCs in central nervous system replacement. However, the secreted proteomics of OM-MSCs have not been reported yet. Here, proteins secreted by OM-MSCs cultured in serum-free conditions were separated on SDS-PAGE and identified by LC-MS/MS. As a result, a total of 274 secreted proteins were identified. These molecules are known to be important in neurotrophy, angiogenesis, cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis, and inflammation which were highly correlated with the repair of central nervous system. The proteomic profiling of the OM-MSCs secretome might provide new insights into their nature in the neural recovery. However, proteomic analysis for clinical biomarkers of OM-MSCs needs to be further studied. PMID:26949398

  8. Amyloid-aβ Peptide in olfactory mucosa and mesenchymal stromal cells of mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Ayala-Grosso, Carlos A; Pieruzzini, Rosalinda; Diaz-Solano, Dylana; Wittig, Olga; Abrante, Ligia; Vargas, Leslie; Cardier, Jose

    2015-03-01

    Patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or Alzheimer's disease (AD) might develop olfactory dysfunction that correlates with progression of disease. Alteration of olfactory neuroepithelium associated with MCI may be useful as predictor of cognitive decline. Biomarkers with higher sensitivity and specificity would allow to understand the biological progression of the pathology in association with the clinical course of the disease. In this study, magnetic resonance images, apolipoprotein E (ApoE) load, Olfactory Connecticut test and Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) indices were obtained from noncognitive impaired (NCI), MCI and AD patients. We established a culture of patient-derived olfactory stromal cells from biopsies of olfactory mucosa (OM) to test whether biological properties of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are concurrent with MCI and AD psychophysical pathology. We determined the expression of amyloid Aβ peptides in the neuroepithelium of tissue sections from MCI and AD, as well as in cultured cells of OM. Reduced migration and proliferation of stromal (CD90(+) ) cells in MCI and AD with respect to NCI patients was determined. A higher proportion of anosmic MCI and AD cases were concurrent with the ApoE ε4 allele. In summary, dysmetabolism of amyloid was concurrent with migration and proliferation impairment of patient-derived stem cells. PMID:25040401

  9. Direct transport of inhaled xylene and its metabolites from the olfactory mucosa to the glomeruli of the olfactory bulbs

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, J.L.; Dahl, A.R.; Kracko, D.A.

    1994-11-01

    The olfactory epithelium is a unique tissue in that single receptor neurons have dendrites in contact with the external environment at the nasal airway, and axon terminals that penetrate the cribriform plate and synapse in the olfactory bulb. The Central Nervous System (CNS) is protected from systematically circulating toxicants by a blood-brain barrier primarily composed of tight junctions between endothelial cells in cerebral vessels and a high metabolic capacity within these cells. No such barrier has yet been defined to protect the CNS from inhaled toxicants. Because all inhalants do not seem to access the CNS directly, a nose-brain barrier seems plausible. The purpose of the work described here is to determine whether or not a nose-brain barrier exists and to define its components. Although such a barrier is likely to be multi-faceted, the present work focuses only on the importance of gross histologic and metabolic characteristics of the olfactory epithelium in olfactory transport.

  10. Human Olfactory Mucosa Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Promote Survival, Proliferation, and Differentiation of Human Hematopoietic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Solano, Dylana; Wittig, Olga; Ayala-Grosso, Carlos; Pieruzzini, Rosalinda

    2012-01-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) from the human olfactory mucosa (OM) are cells that have been proposed as a niche for neural progenitors. OM-MSCs share phenotypic and functional properties with bone marrow (BM) MSCs, which constitute fundamental components of the hematopoietic niche. In this work, we investigated whether human OM-MSCs may promote the survival, proliferation, and differentiation of human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). For this purpose, human bone marrow cells (BMCs) were co-cultured with OM-MSCs in the absence of exogenous cytokines. At different intervals, nonadherent cells (NACs) were harvested from BMC/OM-MSC co-cultures, and examined for the expression of blood cell markers by flow cytometry. OM-MSCs supported the survival (cell viability >90%) and proliferation of BMCs, after 54 days of co-culture. At 20 days of co-culture, flow cytometric and microscopic analyses showed a high percentage (73%) of cells expressing the pan-leukocyte marker CD45, and the presence of cells of myeloid origin, including polymorphonuclear leukocytes, monocytes, basophils, eosinophils, erythroid cells, and megakaryocytes. Likewise, T (CD3), B (CD19), and NK (CD56/CD16) cells were detected in the NAC fraction. Colony-forming unit–granulocyte/macrophage (CFU-GM) progenitors and CD34+ cells were found, at 43 days of co-culture. Reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) studies showed that OM-MSCs constitutively express early and late-acting hematopoietic cytokines (i.e., stem cell factor [SCF] and granulocyte- macrophage colony-stimulating factor [GM-CSF]). These results constitute the first evidence that OM-MSCs may provide an in vitro microenvironment for HSCs. The capacity of OM-MSCs to support the survival and differentiation of HSCs may be related with the capacity of OM-MSCs to produce hematopoietic cytokines. PMID:22471939

  11. Specificity and distribution of receptor cells in the olfactory mucosa of char (Salmo alpinus L.).

    PubMed

    Thommesen, G

    1982-05-01

    Olfactory receptor activity was studied in the char by two methods: (a) recording of the electro-olfactogram (EOG) with two electrodes simultaneously in the olfactory pit and (b) recordings from the olfactory bulb during olfactory stimulation and progressive removal of lamellae in the olfactory rosette. As stimuli were used methionine representing the amino acids and dilute char bile representing the bile salts. By cross-adaptation studies it was demonstrated that receptors sensitive to each of these two stimuli re functionally independent. The results show further that both types of receptors may be found on all lamellae, but differentially distributed within each lamella. Receptors sensitive to methionine are located closer to the raphe than receptors sensitive to bile. The spatial differentiation persists regardless of stimulus concentration. The results are discussed in relation to the projection and growth of primary nerve fibres into the olfactory bulb, and the existence of receptor cells with microvilli and with cilia. PMID:7136804

  12. In silico analysis of gene expression profiles in the olfactory mucosae of aging senescence-accelerated mice.

    PubMed

    Getchell, Thomas V; Peng, Xuejun; Green, C Paul; Stromberg, Arnold J; Chen, Kuey-Chu; Mattson, Mark P; Getchell, Marilyn L

    2004-08-01

    We utilized high-density Affymetrix oligonucleotide arrays to investigate gene expression in the olfactory mucosae of near age-matched aging senescence-accelerated mice (SAM). The senescence-prone (SAMP) strain has a significantly shorter lifespan than does the senescence-resistant (SAMR) strain. To analyze our data, we applied biostatistical methods that included a correlation analysis to evaluate sources of methodologic and biological variability; a two-sided t-test to identify a subpopulation of Present genes with a biologically relevant P-value <0.05; and a false discovery rate (FDR) analysis adjusted to a stringent 5% level that yielded 127 genes with a P-value of <0.001 that were differentially regulated in near age-matched SAMPs (SAMP-Os; 13.75 months) compared to SAMRs (SAMR-Os, 12.5 months). Volcano plots related the variability in the mean hybridization signals as determined by the two-sided t-test to fold changes in gene expression. The genes were categorized into the six functional groups used previously in gene profiling experiments to identify candidate genes that may be relevant for senescence at the genomic and cellular levels in the aging mouse brain (Lee et al. [2000] Nat Genet 25:294-297) and in the olfactory mucosa (Getchell et al. [2003] Ageing Res Rev 2:211-243), which serves several functions that include chemosensory detection, immune barrier function, xenobiotic metabolism, and neurogenesis. Because SAMR-Os and SAMP-Os have substantially different median lifespans, we related the rate constant alpha in the Gompertz equation on aging to intrinsic as opposed to environmental mechanisms of senescence based on our analysis of genes modulated during aging in the olfactory mucosa. PMID:15248299

  13. Chemical-modification studies on rat olfactory mucosa using a thiol-specific reagent and enzymatic iodination.

    PubMed

    Shirley, S; Polak, E; Dodd, G H

    1983-05-16

    1. A rat olfactory preparation, suitable for biochemical studies in vitro on olfactory mechanisms, is described. 2. The effects of the impermeant chemical modification reagents mersalyl (a thiol reagent) and enzymatic iodination, on the amplitude of the electroolfactogram (EOG) responses elicited from rat olfactory mucosa by pulses of odorant vapours was studied using 12 odorants differing widely in odour quality and molecular structure: amyl acetate, carvone, decanal, butylamine, cineole, citronellol, cresol, diacetyl, dimethylethyl-pyrazine, naphthalene, octanethiol and valeric acid. 3. Both reagents irreversibly reduced the EOG amplitude to all odorants to an extent dependent on the reagent concentration. Two subpopulations of animal preparations could be distinguished on the basis of the extent to which they survived the iodination whereas mersalyl appeared to sample a single population of preparations. 4. Small but statistically significant differences were observed between the responses of each odorant with each reagent but no simple correlation between either the molecular structure or odour quality of the odorants and the reagent effect is apparent for the case of mersalyl. With iodination the responses from the three flexible-aliphatic-chain odorants were reduced to a greater extent than the other odorants, all of which had a dissimilar molecular structure. 5. The ability of three odorants, amyl acetate, carvone and decanal, to protect the receptors for the odorants against chemical modification was investigated. The protecting odorants were applied directly to the mucosa as a dilute solution in Ringer's medium. No specific odorant protection effects were observed. 6. The results are discussed in relation to a model of the olfactory mechanism involving relatively non-specific receptor proteins. Each receptor type is envisaged as interacting weakly with a number of odorants and each odorant interacts with a number of receptors. PMID:6852009

  14. Organisation and tyrosine hydroxylase and calretinin immunoreactivity in the main olfactory bulb of paca (Cuniculus paca): a large caviomorph rodent.

    PubMed

    Sasahara, Tais Harumi de Castro; Leal, Leonardo Martins; Spillantini, Maria Grazia; Machado, Márcia Rita Fernandes

    2015-04-01

    The majority of neuroanatomical and chemical studies of the olfactory bulb have been performed in small rodents, such as rats and mice. Thus, this study aimed to describe the organisation and the chemical neuroanatomy of the main olfactory bulb (MOB) in paca, a large rodent belonging to the Hystricomorpha suborder and Caviomorpha infraorder. For this purpose, histological and immunohistochemical procedures were used to characterise the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and calretinin (CR) neuronal populations and their distribution. The paca MOB has eight layers: the olfactory nerve layer (ONL), the glomerular layer (GL), the external plexiform layer (EPL; subdivided into the inner and outer sublayers), the mitral cell layer (MCL), the internal plexiform layer (IPL), the granule cell layer (GCL), the periventricular layer and the ependymal layer. TH-ir neurons were found mostly in the GL, and moderate numbers of TH-ir neurons were scattered in the EPL. Numerous varicose fibres were distributed in the IPL and in the GCL. CR-ir neurons concentrated in the GL, around the base of the olfactory glomeruli. Most of the CR-ir neurons were located in the MCL, IPL and GCL. Some of the granule cells had an apical dendrite with a growth cone. The CR immunoreactivity was also observed in the ONL with olfactory nerves strongly immunostained. This study has shown that the MOB organisation in paca is consistent with the description in other mammals. The characterisation and distribution of the population of TH and CR in the MOB is not exclusively to this species. This large rodent shares common patterns to other caviomorph rodent, as guinea pig, and to the myomorph rodents, as mice, rats and hamsters. PMID:25622576

  15. Hierarchical deconstruction of mouse olfactory sensory neurons: from whole mucosa to single-cell RNA-seq

    PubMed Central

    Saraiva, Luis R.; Ibarra-Soria, Ximena; Khan, Mona; Omura, Masayo; Scialdone, Antonio; Mombaerts, Peter; Marioni, John C.; Logan, Darren W.

    2015-01-01

    The mouse olfactory mucosa is a complex chemosensory tissue composed of multiple cell types, neuronal and non-neuronal. We have here applied RNA-seq hierarchically, in three steps of decreasing cellular heterogeneity: starting with crude tissue samples dissected from the nose, proceeding to flow-cytometrically sorted pools of mature olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs), and finally arriving at single mature OSNs. We show that 98.9% of intact olfactory receptor (OR) genes are expressed in mature OSNs. We uncover a hitherto unknown bipartition among mature OSNs. We find that 19 of 21 single mature OSNs each express a single intact OR gene abundantly, consistent with the one neuron-one receptor rule. For the 9 single OSNs where the two alleles of the abundantly expressed OR gene exhibit single-nucleotide polymorphisms, we demonstrate that monoallelic expression of the abundantly expressed OR gene is extremely tight. The remaining two single mature OSNs lack OR gene expression but express Trpc2 and Gucy1b2. We establish these two cells as a neuronal cell type that is fundamentally distinct from canonical, OR-expressing OSNs and that is defined by the differential, higher expression of 55 genes. We propose this tiered experimental approach as a paradigm to unravel gene expression in other cellularly heterogeneous systems. PMID:26670777

  16. Smoking-associated squamous metaplasia in olfactory mucosa of patients with chronic rhinosinusitis.

    PubMed

    Yee, Karen K; Pribitkin, Edmund A; Cowart, Beverly J; Vainius, Aldona A; Klock, Christopher T; Rosen, David; Hahn, Chang-Gyu; Rawson, Nancy E

    2009-08-01

    Few studies have examined the induction of squamous metaplasia in human olfactory nasal tissue caused by tobacco use and the implications it may have for olfaction, particularly when there are pre-existing insults, such as chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). Quantitative histopathological analyses were performed on Alcian blue- and H&E-stained sections of nasal biopsies taken from the upper aspect of the middle turbinate of CRS patients. Chronic rhinosinusitis patients who were current smokers had a predominance of squamous metaplasia in the olfactory sensory epithelium, whereas CRS patients who were nonsmokers and were not exposed to secondhand cigarette smoke had a prevalence of goblet cell hyperplasia. In spite of this difference, the groups did not differ significantly in olfactory threshold sensitivity. The impact of primary cigarette smoke on olfaction and a possible role of squamous metaplasia in preserving olfactory neurogenesis are discussed. PMID:19487255

  17. Biotransformation enzymes in the rodent nasal mucosa: the value of a histochemical approach.

    PubMed Central

    Bogdanffy, M S

    1990-01-01

    An increasing number of chemicals have been identified as being toxic to the nasal mucosa of rats. While many chemicals exert their effects only after inhalation exposure, others are toxic following systemic administration, suggesting that factors other than direct deposition on the nasal mucosa may be important in mechanisms of nasal toxicity. The mucosal lining of the nasal cavity consists of a heterogeneous population of ciliated and nonciliated cells, secretory cells, sensory cells, and glandular and other cell types. For chemicals that are metabolized in the nasal mucosa, the balance between metabolic activation and detoxication within a cell type may be a key factor in determining whether that cell type will be a target for toxicity. Recent research in the area of xenobiotic metabolism in nasal mucosa has demonstrated the presence of many enzymes previously described in other tissues. In particular, carboxylesterase, aldehyde dehydrogenase, cytochromes P-450, epoxide hydrolase, and glutathione S-transferases have been localized by histochemical techniques. The distribution of these enzymes appears to be cell-type-specific and the presence of the enzyme may predispose particular cell types to enhanced susceptibility or resistance to chemical-induced injury. This paper reviews the distribution of these enzymes within the nasal mucosa in the context of their contribution to xenobiotic metabolism. The localization of the enzymes by histochemical techniques has provided important information on the potential mechanism of action of esters, aldehydes, and cytochrome P-450 substrates known to injure the nasal mucosa. Images PLATE 1. PLATE 2. PLATE 3. PMID:2200661

  18. [Regeneration of olfactory flagella and restoration of the electroolfactogram following application of triton X-100 to the olfactory mucosa of frogs].

    PubMed

    Bronshteín, A A; Minor, A V

    1977-01-01

    A short-tern (1-1.5 min.) irrigation of the olfactory mucose of the frog Rana temporaria with 0.1-0.15% Triton X-100 in Ringer's solution led to the destroying of olfactory flagella but did not damage the olfactory knob and its flagellar basal bodies. Simultaneously, the generator potential of the olfactory cells-elecroolfactogram (EOG)-disappears. The olfactory cells deprived of fragella were able to produce these organelles. This process begins 2 or 3 hours following theflagellum removal, proceeds in some stages and completes within 2 or 3 days. During the flagellum regeneration the ability of olfactory cells to generate EOG is seen to resotre. The data obtained confirm the presence of receptive sites on flagellar surface. PMID:302048

  19. Olfactory detection of caches containing wildland versus cultivated seeds by granivorous rodents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We conducted a study to examine the ability of rodents to detect caches made with wildland (native and non-native) and cultivated seeds at three locations in western Nevada with different vegetation types and rodent community structures. We established artificial caches containing either one of two...

  20. Mainstream cigarette smoke exposure alters cytochrome P4502G1 expression in F344 rat olfactory mucosa

    SciTech Connect

    Hotchkiss, J.A.; Nikula, K.J.; Lewis, J.L.; Finch, G.L.; Belinsky, S.A.; Dahl, A.R.

    1994-11-01

    Inhalation of mainstream cigarette smoke (MCS) by rats results in multifocal rhinitis, mucous hypersecretion, nasal epithelial hyperplasia and metaplasia, and focal olfactory mucosal atrophy. In humans, cigarette smoking causes long-term, dose-related alterations in olfactory function in both current and former smokers. An olfactory-specific cytochrome P450 has been identified in rabbits and rats. The presence of olfactory-specific P450s, as well as relatively high levels of other biotransformation enzymes, such as NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase and UDP-glucuronosyl transferase, in the olfactory neuroepithelium suggest that these enzyme systems may play a role in olfaction. This hypothesis is strengthened by the observation that, in rats, the temporal gene activation of P4502G1 coincides with the postnatal increase in the sensitivity of olfactory response to odorants. The purpose of this investigation was to examine the effect of MCS exposure on P4502G1 protein expression.

  1. Safety Profile, Feasibility and Early Clinical Outcome of Cotransplantation of Olfactory Mucosa and Bone Marrow Stem Cells in Chronic Spinal Cord Injury Patients

    PubMed Central

    Goni, Vijay G; Chhabra, Rajesh; Gupta, Ashok; Marwaha, Neelam; Dhillon, Mandeep S; Pebam, Sudesh; Gopinathan, Nirmal Raj

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Prospective case series. Purpose To study the safety and feasibility of cotransplantation of bone marrow stem cells and autologous olfactory mucosa in chronic spinal cord injury. Overview of Literature Stem cell therapies are a novel method in the attempt to restitute heavily damaged tissues. We discuss our experience with this modality in postspinal cord injury paraplegics. Methods The study includes 9 dorsal spine injury patients with American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Impairment Scale (AIS) A neurological impairment who underwent de-tethering of the spinal cord followed by cotransplantation with bone marrow stem cells and an olfactory mucosal graft. Participants were evaluated at the baseline and at 6 monthly intervals. Safety and tolerability were evaluated through the monitoring for adverse events and magnetic resonance imaging evaluation. Efficacy assessment was done through neurological and functional outcome measures. Results Surgery was tolerated well by all participants. No significant difference in the ASIA score was observed, although differences in the Functional Independence Measure and Modified Ashworth Scale were statistically significant. No significant complication was observed in any of our patients, except for neurogenic pain in one participant. The follow-up magnetic resonance imaging evaluation revealed an increase in the length of myelomalacia in seven participants. Conclusions The cotransplantation of bone marrow stem cells and olfactory mucosa is a safe, feasible and viable procedure in AIS A participants with thoracic level injuries, as assessed at the 24-month follow-up. No efficacy could be demonstrated. For application, further large-scale multicenter studies are needed. PMID:25187866

  2. The Origin, Development and Molecular Diversity of Rodent Olfactory Bulb Glutamatergic Neurons Distinguished by Expression of Transcription Factor NeuroD1

    PubMed Central

    Roybon, Laurent; Mastracci, Teresa L.; Li, Joyce; Stott, Simon R. W.; Leiter, Andrew B.; Sussel, Lori; Brundin, Patrik; Li, Jia-Yi

    2015-01-01

    Production of olfactory bulb neurons occurs continuously in the rodent brain. Little is known, however, about cellular diversity in the glutamatergic neuron subpopulation. In the central nervous system, the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor NeuroD1 (ND1) is commonly associated with glutamatergic neuron development. In this study, we utilized ND1 to identify the different subpopulations of olfactory bulb glutamategic neurons and their progenitors, both in the embryo and postnatally. Using knock-in mice, transgenic mice and retroviral transgene delivery, we demonstrate the existence of several different populations of glutamatergic olfactory bulb neurons, the progenitors of which are ND1+ and ND1- lineage-restricted, and are temporally and regionally separated. We show that the first olfactory bulb glutamatergic neurons produced – the mitral cells – can be divided into molecularly diverse subpopulations. Our findings illustrate the complexity of neuronal diversity in the olfactory bulb and that seemingly homogenous neuronal populations can consist of multiple subpopulations with unique molecular signatures of transcription factors and expressing neuronal subtype-specific markers. PMID:26030886

  3. Calcium buffering in rodent olfactory bulb granule cells and mitral cells.

    PubMed

    Egger, Veronica; Stroh, Olga

    2009-09-15

    In the mammalian olfactory bulb, axonless granule cells (GCs) mediate self- and lateral inhibitory interactions between mitral cells (MCs) via reciprocal dendrodendritic synapses. Calcium signals in the GC dendrites and reciprocal spines appear to decay unusually slowly, hence GC calcium handling might contribute to the known asynchronous release at this synapse. By recording fluorescence transients of different Ca(2+)-sensitive dyes at variable concentrations evoked by backpropagating action potentials (APs) and saturating AP trains we extrapolated Ca(2+) dynamics to conditions of zero added buffer for juvenile rat GC apical dendrites and spines and MC lateral dendrites. Resting [Ca(2+)] was at approximately 50 nM in both GC dendrites and spines. The average endogenous GC buffer capacities (kappa(E)) were within a range of 80-90 in the dendrites and 110-140 in the spines. The extrusion rate (gamma) was estimated as 570 s(-1) for dendrites and 870 s(-1) for spines and the decay time constant as approximately 200 ms for both. Single-current-evoked APs resulted in a [Ca(2+)] elevation of approximately 250 nM. Calcium handling in juvenile and adult mouse GCs appeared mostly similar. In MC lateral dendrites, we found AP-mediated [Ca(2+)] elevations of approximately 130 nM with a similar decay to that in GC dendrites, while kappa(E) and gamma were roughly 4-fold higher. In conclusion, the slow GC Ca(2+) dynamics are due mostly to sluggish Ca(2+) extrusion. Under physiological conditions this slow removal may well contribute to delayed release and also feed into other Ca(2+)-dependent mechanisms that foster asynchronous output from the reciprocal spine. PMID:19635818

  4. Shared and differential traits in the accessory olfactory bulb of caviomorph rodents with particular reference to the semiaquatic capybara

    PubMed Central

    Suárez, Rodrigo; Santibáñez, Rodrigo; Parra, Daniela; Coppi, Antonio A; Abrahão, Luciana M B; Sasahara, Tais H C; Mpodozis, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    The vomeronasal system is crucial for social and sexual communication in mammals. Two populations of vomeronasal sensory neurons, each expressing Gαi2 or Gαo proteins, send projections to glomeruli of the rostral or caudal accessory olfactory bulb, rAOB and cAOB, respectively. In rodents, the Gαi2- and Gαo-expressing vomeronasal pathways have shown differential responses to small/volatile vs. large/non-volatile semiochemicals, respectively. Moreover, early gene expression suggests predominant activation of rAOB and cAOB neurons in sexual vs. aggressive contexts, respectively. We recently described the AOB of Octodon degus, a semiarid-inhabiting diurnal caviomorph. Their AOB has a cell indentation between subdomains and the rAOB is twice the size of the cAOB. Moreover, their AOB receives innervation from the lateral aspect, contrasting with the medial innervation of all other mammals examined to date. Aiming to relate AOB anatomy with lifestyle, we performed a morphometric study on the AOB of the capybara, a semiaquatic caviomorph whose lifestyle differs remarkably from that of O. degus. Capybaras mate in water and scent-mark their surroundings with oily deposits, mostly for male–male communication. We found that, similar to O. degus, the AOB of capybaras shows a lateral innervation of the vomeronasal nerve, a cell indentation between subdomains and heterogeneous subdomains, but in contrast to O. degus the caudal portion is larger than the rostral one. We also observed that four other caviomorph species present a lateral AOB innervation and a cell indentation between AOB subdomains, suggesting that those traits could represent apomorphies of the group. We propose that although some AOB traits may be phylogenetically conserved in caviomorphs, ecological specializations may play an important role in shaping the AOB. PMID:21457258

  5. Nasal toxicity, carcinogenicity, and olfactory uptake of metals.

    PubMed

    Sunderman, F W

    2001-01-01

    Occupational exposures to inhalation of certain metal dusts or aerosols can cause loss of olfactory acuity, atrophy of the nasal mucosa, mucosal ulcers, perforated nasal septum, or sinonasal cancer. Anosmia and hyposmia have been observed in workers exposed to Ni- or Cd-containing dusts in alkaline battery factories, nickel refineries, and cadmium industries. Ulcers of the nasal mucosa and perforated nasal septum have been reported in workers exposed to Cr(VI) in chromate production and chrome plating, or to As(III) in arsenic smelters. Atrophy of the olfactory epithelium has been observed in rodents following inhalation of NiSO4 or alphaNi3S2. Cancers of the nose and nasal sinuses have been reported in workers exposed to Ni compounds in nickel refining, cutlery factories, and alkaline battery manufacture, or to Cr(VI) in chromate production and chrome plating. In animals, several metals (eg, Al, Cd, Co, Hg, Mn, Ni, Zn) have been shown to pass via olfactory receptor neurons from the nasal lumen through the cribriform plate to the olfactory bulb. Some metals (eg, Mn, Ni, Zn) can cross synapses in the olfactory bulb and migrate via secondary olfactory neurons to distant nuclei of the brain. After nasal instillation of a metal-containing solution, transport of the metal via olfactory axons can occur rapidly, within hours or a few days (eg, Mn), or slowly over days or weeks (eg, Ni). The olfactory bulb tends to accumulate certain metals (eg, Al, Bi, Cu, Mn, Zn) with greater avidity than other regions of the brain. The molecular mechanisms responsible for metal translocation in olfactory neurons and deposition in the olfactory bulb are unclear, but complexation by metal-binding molecules such as carnosine (beta-alanyl-L-histidine) may be involved. PMID:11314863

  6. Comparative miRNA-Based Fingerprinting Reveals Biological Differences in Human Olfactory Mucosa- and Bone-Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, Susan Louise; Johnstone, Steven Andrew; McGrath, Michael Anthony; Mallinson, David; Barnett, Susan Carol

    2016-05-10

    Previously we reported that nestin-positive human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) derived from the olfactory mucosa (OM) enhanced CNS myelination in vitro to a greater extent than bone-marrow-derived MSCs (BM-MSCs). miRNA-based fingerprinting revealed the two MSCs were 64% homologous, with 26 miRNAs differentially expressed. We focused on miR-146a-5p and miR-140-5p due to their reported role in the regulation of chemokine production and myelination. The lower expression of miR-140-5p in OM-MSCs correlated with higher secretion of CXCL12 compared with BM-MSCs. Addition of CXCL12 and its pharmacological inhibitors to neural co-cultures supported these data. Studies on related miR-146a-5p targets demonstrated that OM-MSCs had lower levels of Toll-like receptors and secreted less pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL-6, IL-8, and CCL2. OM-MSCs polarized microglia to an anti-inflammatory phenotype, illustrating potential differences in their inflammatory response. Nestin-positive OM-MSCs could therefore offer a cell transplantation alternative for CNS repair, should these biological behaviors be translated in vivo. PMID:27117785

  7. Effectiveness of intense, activity-based physical therapy for individuals with spinal cord injury in promoting motor and sensory recovery: Is olfactory mucosa autograft a factor?

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Cathy A.; Dension, Paula M.

    2013-01-01

    Background/objectives Rehabilitation for individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) is expanding to include intense, activity-based, out-patient physical therapy (PT). The study's primary purposes were to (i) examine the effectiveness of intense PT in promoting motor and sensory recovery in individuals with SCI and (ii) compare recovery for individuals who had an olfactory mucosa autograft (OMA) with individuals who did not have the OMA while both groups participated in the intense PT program. Methods Prospective, non-randomized, non-blinded, intervention study. Using the American Spinal Injury Association examination, motor and sensory scores for 23 (7 OMA, 6 matched control and 10 other) participants were recorded. Results Mean therapy dosage was 137.3 total hours. The participants’ total, upper and lower extremity motor scores improved significantly while sensory scores did not improve during the first 60 days and from initial to discharge examination. Incomplete SCI or paraplegia was associated with greater motor recovery. Five of 14 participants converted from motor-complete to motor-incomplete SCI. Individuals who had the OMA and participated in intense PT did not have greater sensory or greater magnitude or rate of motor recovery as compared with participants who had intense PT alone. Conclusion This study provides encouraging evidence as to the effectiveness of intense PT for individuals with SCI. Future research is needed to identify the optimal therapy dosage and specific therapeutic activities required to generate clinically meaningful recovery for individuals with SCI including those who elect to undergo a neural recovery/regenerative surgical procedure and those that elect intense therapy alone. PMID:23433335

  8. Steroid hormone modulation of olfactory processing in the context of socio-sexual behaviors in rodents and humans.

    PubMed

    Moffatt, Christopher A

    2003-10-01

    Primer pheromones and other chemosensory cues are important factors governing social interactions and reproductive physiology in many species of mammals. Responses to these chemosignals can vary substantially within and between individuals. This variability can stem, at least in part, from the modulating effects steroid and non-steroid hormones exert on olfactory processing. Such modulation frequently augments or facilitates the effects that prevailing social and environmental conditions have on the reproductive axis. The mechanisms underlying the hormonal regulation of responses to chemosensory cues are diverse. They are in part behavioral, achieved through the modulation of chemoinvestigative behaviors, and in part a product of the modulation of the intrinsic responsiveness of the main and accessory olfactory systems to conspecific, as well as other classes, of chemosignals. The behavioral and non-behavioral effects complement one another to ensure that mating and other reproductive processes are confined to reproductively favorable conditions. PMID:14572914

  9. Molecular and neuronal homology between the olfactory systems of zebrafish and mouse.

    PubMed

    Saraiva, Luis R; Ahuja, Gaurav; Ivandic, Ivan; Syed, Adnan S; Marioni, John C; Korsching, Sigrun I; Logan, Darren W

    2015-01-01

    Studies of the two major olfactory organs of rodents, the olfactory mucosa (OM) and the vomeronasal organ (VNO), unraveled the molecular basis of smell in vertebrates. However, some vertebrates lack a VNO. Here we generated and analyzed the olfactory transcriptome of the zebrafish and compared it to the olfactory transcriptomes of mouse to investigate the evolutionary and molecular relationship between single and dual olfactory systems. Our analyses revealed a high degree of molecular conservation, with orthologs of mouse olfactory cell-specific markers and all but one of their chemosensory receptor classes expressed in the single zebrafish olfactory organ. Zebrafish chemosensory receptor genes are expressed across a large dynamic range and their RNA abundance correlates positively with the number of neurons expressing that RNA. Thus we estimate the relative proportions of neuronal sub-types expressing different chemosensory receptors. Receptor repertoire size drives the absolute abundance of different classes of neurons, but we find similar underlying patterns in both species. Finally, we identified novel marker genes that characterize rare neuronal populations in both mouse and zebrafish. In sum, we find that the molecular and cellular mechanisms underpinning olfaction in teleosts and mammals are similar despite 430 million years of evolutionary divergence. PMID:26108469

  10. Molecular and neuronal homology between the olfactory systems of zebrafish and mouse

    PubMed Central

    Saraiva, Luis R.; Ahuja, Gaurav; Ivandic, Ivan; Syed, Adnan S.; Marioni, John C.; Korsching, Sigrun I.; Logan, Darren W.

    2015-01-01

    Studies of the two major olfactory organs of rodents, the olfactory mucosa (OM) and the vomeronasal organ (VNO), unraveled the molecular basis of smell in vertebrates. However, some vertebrates lack a VNO. Here we generated and analyzed the olfactory transcriptome of the zebrafish and compared it to the olfactory transcriptomes of mouse to investigate the evolutionary and molecular relationship between single and dual olfactory systems. Our analyses revealed a high degree of molecular conservation, with orthologs of mouse olfactory cell-specific markers and all but one of their chemosensory receptor classes expressed in the single zebrafish olfactory organ. Zebrafish chemosensory receptor genes are expressed across a large dynamic range and their RNA abundance correlates positively with the number of neurons expressing that RNA. Thus we estimate the relative proportions of neuronal sub-types expressing different chemosensory receptors. Receptor repertoire size drives the absolute abundance of different classes of neurons, but we find similar underlying patterns in both species. Finally, we identified novel marker genes that characterize rare neuronal populations in both mouse and zebrafish. In sum, we find that the molecular and cellular mechanisms underpinning olfaction in teleosts and mammals are similar despite 430 million years of evolutionary divergence. PMID:26108469

  11. Greater addition of neurons to the olfactory bulb than to the cerebral cortex of eulipotyphlans but not rodents, afrotherians or primates

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Pedro F. M.; Manger, Paul R.; Catania, Kenneth C.; Kaas, Jon H.; Herculano-Houzel, Suzana

    2014-01-01

    The olfactory bulb is an evolutionarily old structure that antedates the appearance of a six-layered mammalian cerebral cortex. As such, the neuronal scaling rules that apply to scaling the mass of the olfactory bulb as a function of its number of neurons might be shared across mammalian groups, as we have found to be the case for the ensemble of non-cortical, non-cerebellar brain structures. Alternatively, the neuronal scaling rules that apply to the olfactory bulb might be distinct in those mammals that rely heavily on olfaction. The group previously referred to as Insectivora includes small mammals, some of which are now placed in Afrotheria, a base group in mammalian radiation, and others in Eulipotyphla, a group derived later, at the base of Laurasiatheria. Here we show that the neuronal scaling rules that apply to building the olfactory bulb differ across eulipotyphlans and other mammals such that eulipotyphlans have more neurons concentrated in an olfactory bulb of similar size than afrotherians, glires and primates. Most strikingly, while the cerebral cortex gains neurons at a faster pace than the olfactory bulb in glires, and afrotherians follow this trend, it is the olfactory bulb that gains neurons at a faster pace than the cerebral cortex in eulipotyphlans, which contradicts the common view that the cerebral cortex is the fastest expanding structure in brain evolution. Our findings emphasize the importance of not using brain structure size as a proxy for numbers of neurons across mammalian orders, and are consistent with the notion that different selective pressures have acted upon the olfactory system of eulipotyphlans, glires and primates, with eulipotyphlans relying more on olfaction for their behavior than glires and primates. Surprisingly, however, the neuronal scaling rules for primates predict that the human olfactory bulb has as many neurons as the larger eulipotyphlan olfactory bulbs, which questions the classification of humans as microsmatic

  12. Olfactory sensitivity in mammalian species.

    PubMed

    Wackermannová, M; Pinc, L; Jebavý, L

    2016-07-18

    Olfaction enables most mammalian species to detect and discriminate vast numbers of chemical structures called odorants and pheromones. The perception of such chemical compounds is mediated via two major olfactory systems, the main olfactory system and the vomeronasal system, as well as minor systems, such as the septal organ and the Grueneberg ganglion. Distinct differences exist not only among species but also among individuals in terms of their olfactory sensitivity; however, little is known about the mechanisms that determine these differences. In research on the olfactory sensitivity of mammals, scientists thus depend in most cases on behavioral testing. In this article, we reviewed scientific studies performed on various mammalian species using different methodologies and target chemical substances. Human and non-human primates as well as rodents and dogs are the most frequently studied species. Olfactory threshold studies on other species do not exist with the exception of domestic pigs. Olfactory testing performed on seals, elephants, and bats focused more on discriminative abilities than on sensitivity. An overview of olfactory sensitivity studies as well as olfactory detection ability in most studied mammalian species is presented here, focusing on comparable olfactory detection thresholds. The basics of olfactory perception and olfactory sensitivity factors are also described. PMID:27070753

  13. Cytokines and olfactory bulb microglia in response to bacterial challenge in the compromised primary olfactory pathway

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The primary olfactory pathway is a potential route through which microorganisms from the periphery could potentially access the central nervous system. Our previous studies demonstrated that if the olfactory epithelium was damaged, bacteria administered into the nasal cavity induced nitric oxide production in olfactory ensheathing cells. This study investigates the cytokine profile of olfactory tissues as a consequence of bacterial challenge and establishes whether or not the bacteria are able to reach the olfactory bulb in the central nervous system. Methods The olfactory epithelium of C57BL/6 mice was damaged by unilateral Triton X-100 nasal washing, and Staphylococcus aureus was administered ipsilaterally 4 days later. Olfactory mucosa and bulb were harvested 6 h, 24 h and 5 days after inoculation and their cytokine profile compared to control tissues. The fate of S. aureus and the response of bulbar microglia were examined using fluorescence microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Results In the olfactory mucosa, administered S. aureus was present in supporting cells of the olfactory epithelium, and macrophages and olfactory nerve bundles in the lamina propria. Fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated S. aureus was observed within the olfactory mucosa and bulb 6 h after inoculation, but remained restricted to the peripheral layers up to 5 days later. At the 24-h time point, the level of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumour necrosis factor-α in the compromised olfactory tissues challenged with bacteria (12,466 ± 956 pg/ml and 552 ± 193 pg/ml, respectively) was significantly higher than that in compromised olfactory tissues alone (6,092 ± 1,403 pg/ml and 80 ± 2 pg/ml, respectively). Immunohistochemistry confirmed that IL-6 was present in several cell types including olfactory ensheathing cells and mitral cells of the olfactory bulb. Concurrently, there was a 4.4-, 4.5- and 2.8-fold increase in the density of i

  14. Generation and Characterization of a Cyp2f2-Null Mouse and Studies on the Role of CYP2F2 in Naphthalene-Induced Toxicity in the Lung and Nasal Olfactory MucosaS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lei; Wei, Yuan; Van Winkle, Laura; Zhang, Qing-Yu; Zhou, Xin; Hu, Jinping; Xie, Fang; Kluetzman, Kerri

    2011-01-01

    The CYP2F enzymes, abundantly expressed in the respiratory tract, are active toward many xenobiotic compounds, including naphthalene (NA). However, the precise roles of these enzymes in tissue-selective chemical toxicity have been difficult to resolve. A Cyp2f2-null mouse was generated in this study by disrupting the Cyp2f2 fourth exon. Homozygous Cyp2f2-null mice, which had no CYP2F2 expression and showed no changes in the expression of other P450 genes examined, were viable and fertile and had no in utero lethality or developmental deficits. The loss of CYP2F2 expression led to substantial decreases in the in vitro catalytic efficiency of microsomal NA epoxygenases in lung (up to ∼160-fold), liver (∼3-fold), and nasal olfactory mucosa (OM; up to ∼16-fold), and significant decreases in rates of systemic NA (300 mg/kg i.p.) clearance. The Cyp2f2-null mice were largely resistant to NA-induced cytotoxicity, when examined at 24 h after NA dosing (at 300 mg/kg i.p.), and to NA-induced depletion of total nonprotein sulfhydryl (NPSH), examined at 2 h after dosing, in the lungs. In contrast, the loss of CYP2F2 expression did not alleviate NA-induced NPSH depletion or tissue toxicity in the OM. Mouse CYP2F2 clearly plays an essential role in the bioactivation and toxicity of NA in the lung but not in the OM. The Cyp2f2-null mouse should be valuable for studies on the role of CYP2F2 in the metabolism and toxicity of numerous other xenobiotic compounds and for future production of a CYP2F1-humanized mouse. PMID:21730012

  15. Localization of Nav 1.7 in the normal and injured rodent olfactory system indicates a critical role in olfaction, pheromone sensing and immune function.

    PubMed

    Rupasinghe, Darshani B; Knapp, Oliver; Blomster, Linda V; Schmid, Annina B; Adams, David J; King, Glenn F; Ruitenberg, Marc J

    2012-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in the pore-forming α subunit of the voltage-gated sodium channel 1.7 (Nav 1.7) cause congenital indifference to pain and anosmia. We used immunohistochemical techniques to study Nav 1.7 localization in the rat olfactory system in order to better understand its role in olfaction. We confirm that Nav 1.7 is expressed on olfactory sensory axons and report its presence on vomeronasal axons, indicating an important role for Nav 1.7 in transmission of pheromonal cues. Following neuroepithelial injury, Nav 1.7 was transiently expressed by cells of monocytic lineage. These findings support an emerging role for Nav 1.7 in immune function. This sodium channel may provide an important pharmacological target for treatment of inflammatory injury and inflammatory pain syndromes. PMID:22622154

  16. The olfactory transcriptomes of mice.

    PubMed

    Ibarra-Soria, Ximena; Levitin, Maria O; Saraiva, Luis R; Logan, Darren W

    2014-09-01

    The olfactory (OR) and vomeronasal receptor (VR) repertoires are collectively encoded by 1700 genes and pseudogenes in the mouse genome. Most OR and VR genes were identified by comparative genomic techniques and therefore, in many of those cases, only their protein coding sequences are defined. Some also lack experimental support, due in part to the similarity between them and their monogenic, cell-specific expression in olfactory tissues. Here we use deep RNA sequencing, expression microarray and quantitative RT-PCR in both the vomeronasal organ and whole olfactory mucosa to quantify their full transcriptomes in multiple male and female mice. We find evidence of expression for all VR, and almost all OR genes that are annotated as functional in the reference genome, and use the data to generate over 1100 new, multi-exonic, significantly extended receptor gene annotations. We find that OR and VR genes are neither equally nor randomly expressed, but have reproducible distributions of abundance in both tissues. The olfactory transcriptomes are only minimally different between males and females, suggesting altered gene expression at the periphery is unlikely to underpin the striking sexual dimorphism in olfactory-mediated behavior. Finally, we present evidence that hundreds of novel, putatively protein-coding genes are expressed in these highly specialized olfactory tissues, and carry out a proof-of-principle validation. Taken together, these data provide a comprehensive, quantitative catalog of the genes that mediate olfactory perception and pheromone-evoked behavior at the periphery. PMID:25187969

  17. The Olfactory Transcriptomes of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ibarra-Soria, Ximena; Levitin, Maria O.; Saraiva, Luis R.; Logan, Darren W.

    2014-01-01

    The olfactory (OR) and vomeronasal receptor (VR) repertoires are collectively encoded by 1700 genes and pseudogenes in the mouse genome. Most OR and VR genes were identified by comparative genomic techniques and therefore, in many of those cases, only their protein coding sequences are defined. Some also lack experimental support, due in part to the similarity between them and their monogenic, cell-specific expression in olfactory tissues. Here we use deep RNA sequencing, expression microarray and quantitative RT-PCR in both the vomeronasal organ and whole olfactory mucosa to quantify their full transcriptomes in multiple male and female mice. We find evidence of expression for all VR, and almost all OR genes that are annotated as functional in the reference genome, and use the data to generate over 1100 new, multi-exonic, significantly extended receptor gene annotations. We find that OR and VR genes are neither equally nor randomly expressed, but have reproducible distributions of abundance in both tissues. The olfactory transcriptomes are only minimally different between males and females, suggesting altered gene expression at the periphery is unlikely to underpin the striking sexual dimorphism in olfactory-mediated behavior. Finally, we present evidence that hundreds of novel, putatively protein-coding genes are expressed in these highly specialized olfactory tissues, and carry out a proof-of-principle validation. Taken together, these data provide a comprehensive, quantitative catalog of the genes that mediate olfactory perception and pheromone-evoked behavior at the periphery. PMID:25187969

  18. Multispectral reflectance imaging of brain activation in rodents: methodological study of the differential path length estimations and first in vivo recordings in the rat olfactory bulb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renaud, Rémi; Martin, Claire; Gurden, Hirac; Pain, Frédéric

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic maps of relative changes in blood volume and oxygenation following brain activation are obtained using multispectral reflectance imaging. The technique relies on optical absorption modifications linked to hemodynamic changes. The relative variation of hemodynamic parameters can be quantified using the modified Beer-Lambert Law if changes in reflected light intensities are recorded at two wavelengths or more and the differential path length (DP) is known. The DP is the mean path length in tissues of backscattered photons and varies with wavelength. It is usually estimated using Monte Carlo simulations in simplified semi-infinite homogeneous geometries. Here we consider the use of multilayered models of the somatosensory cortex (SsC) and olfactory bulb (OB), which are common physiological models of brain activation. Simulations demonstrate that specific DP estimation is required for SsC and OB, specifically for wavelengths above 600 nm. They validate the hypothesis of a constant path length during activation and show the need for specific DP if imaging is performed in a thinned-skull preparation. The first multispectral reflectance imaging data recorded in vivo during OB activation are presented, and the influence of DP on the hemodynamic parameters and the pattern of oxymetric changes in the activated OB are discussed.

  19. Multispectral reflectance imaging of brain activation in rodents: methodological study of the differential path length estimations and first in vivo recordings in the rat olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Renaud, Rémi; Martin, Claire; Gurden, Hirac; Pain, Frédéric

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic maps of relative changes in blood volume and oxygenation following brain activation are obtained using multispectral reflectance imaging. The technique relies on optical absorption modifications linked to hemodynamic changes. The relative variation of hemodynamic parameters can be quantified using the modified Beer-Lambert Law if changes in reflected light intensities are recorded at two wavelengths or more and the differential path length (DP) is known. The DP is the mean path length in tissues of backscattered photons and varies with wavelength. It is usually estimated using Monte Carlo simulations in simplified semi-infinite homogeneous geometries. Here we consider the use of multilayered models of the somatosensory cortex (SsC) and olfactory bulb (OB), which are common physiological models of brain activation. Simulations demonstrate that specific DP estimation is required for SsC and OB, specifically for wavelengths above 600 nm. They validate the hypothesis of a constant path length during activation and show the need for specific DP if imaging is performed in a thinned-skull preparation. The first multispectral reflectance imaging data recorded in vivo during OB activation are presented, and the influence of DP on the hemodynamic parameters and the pattern of oxymetric changes in the activated OB are discussed. PMID:22352662

  20. Olfaction and olfactory-mediated behaviour in psychiatric disease models.

    PubMed

    Huckins, Laura M; Logan, Darren W; Sánchez-Andrade, Gabriela

    2013-10-01

    Rats and mice are the most widely used species for modelling psychiatric disease. Assessment of these rodent models typically involves the analysis of aberrant behaviour with behavioural interactions often being manipulated to generate the model. Rodents rely heavily on their excellent sense of smell and almost all their social interactions have a strong olfactory component. Therefore, experimental paradigms that exploit these olfactory-mediated behaviours are among the most robust available and are highly prevalent in psychiatric disease research. These include tests of aggression and maternal instinct, foraging, olfactory memory and habituation and the establishment of social hierarchies. An appreciation of the way that rodents regulate these behaviours in an ethological context can assist experimenters to generate better data from their models and to avoid common pitfalls. We describe some of the more commonly used behavioural paradigms from a rodent olfactory perspective and discuss their application in existing models of psychiatric disease. We introduce the four olfactory subsystems that integrate to mediate the behavioural responses and the types of sensory cue that promote them and discuss their control and practical implementation to improve experimental outcomes. In addition, because smell is critical for normal behaviour in rodents and yet olfactory dysfunction is often associated with neuropsychiatric disease, we introduce some tests for olfactory function that can be applied to rodent models of psychiatric disorders as part of behavioural analysis. PMID:23604803

  1. Detection of explosives by olfactory sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Corcelli, Angela; Lobasso, Simona; Lopalco, Patrizia; Dibattista, Michele; Araneda, Ricardo; Peterlin, Zita; Firestein, Stuart

    2010-03-15

    The response of olfactory sensory neurons to TNT and RDX as well as to some volatile organic compounds present in the vapors of antipersonnel landmines has been studied both in the pig and in the rat. GC/MS analyses of different plastic components of six different kinds of landmines were performed in order to identify the components of the "perfume" of mines. Studies on rat olfactory mucosa were carried out with electro-olfactogram and calcium imaging techniques, while changes in the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels following exposure to odorants and explosives were used as a criterion to evaluate the interaction of TNT and RDX with olfactory receptors in a preparation of isolated pig olfactory cilia. These studies indicate that chemical compounds associated with explosives and explosive devices can activate mammalian olfactory receptors. PMID:19913995

  2. Subarachnoid space of the CNS, nasal mucosa, and lymphatic system.

    PubMed

    Jackson, R T; Tigges, J; Arnold, W

    1979-04-01

    We have briefly reviewed the literature pertaining to the movement of tracer molecules and infectious organisms within the olfactory nerve. There is a body of evidence indicating that tracers placed in the CSF will quickly move via the olfactory nerve to the nasal mucosa and then to the cervical lymph nodes. Organic and inorganic tracer materials and organisms as diverse as viruses, a bacillus, and an amoeba, when placed in the nasal cavity, have been shown to move from the nasal mucosa via the olfactory nerve to the olfactory bulb and the CSF. We think that a portion of the data on tracer movement is due to incorporation of tracer materials and organisms into the axoplasm of the olfactory neurons with subsequent anterograde or retrograde axoplasmic transport. However, some of the movement of tracers may occur within the olfactory perineural space. This space may be continuous with a subarachnoid extension that surrounds the olfactory nerve as it penetrates the cribriform plate. To our knowledge, no one has yet followed the perineural space to determine if it is continuous from olfactory receptor to olfactory bulb. The consideration of this space and its role is the main reason for this review. PMID:85446

  3. Sex hormone binding globulin in the rat olfactory system.

    PubMed

    Ploss, V; Gebhart, V M; Dölz, W; Jirikowski, G F

    2014-05-01

    Ovarian steroids are known to act on the olfactory system. Their mode of action, however, is mostly unclear to date since nuclear receptors are lacking in sensory neurons. Here we used immunocytochemistry and RT-PCR to study expression and distribution of sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) in the rat olfactory system. Single sensory cells in the olfactory mucosa and their projections in the olfactory bulb showed specific SHBG immunostaining as determined by double immunofluorescence with olfactory marker protein OMP. Larger groups of SHBG stained sensory cells occurred in the vomeronasal organ (VNO). A portion of the olfactory glomeruli in the accessory olfactory bulb showed large networks of SHBG positive nerve fibres. Some of the mitral cells showed SHBG immune fluorescence. RT-PCR revealed SHBG encoding mRNA in the olfactory mucosa, in the VNO and in the olfactory bulbs indicating intrinsic expression of the binding globulin. The VNO and its related projections within the limbic system are known to be sensitive to gonadal steroid hormones. We conclude that SHBG may be of functional importance for rapid effects of olfactory steroids on limbic functions including the control of reproductive behaviours through pheromones. PMID:24681170

  4. Olfactory epithelium changes in germfree mice

    PubMed Central

    François, Adrien; Grebert, Denise; Rhimi, Moez; Mariadassou, Mahendra; Naudon, Laurent; Rabot, Sylvie; Meunier, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal epithelium development is dramatically impaired in germfree rodents, but the consequences of the absence of microbiota have been overlooked in other epithelia. In the present study, we present the first description of the bacterial communities associated with the olfactory epithelium and explored differences in olfactory epithelium characteristics between germfree and conventional, specific pathogen-free, mice. While the anatomy of the olfactory epithelium was not significantly different, we observed a thinner olfactory cilia layer along with a decreased cellular turn-over in germfree mice. Using electro-olfactogram, we recorded the responses of olfactory sensitive neuronal populations to various odorant stimulations. We observed a global increase in the amplitude of responses to odorants in germfree mice as well as altered responses kinetics. These changes were associated with a decreased transcription of most olfactory transduction actors and of olfactory xenobiotic metabolising enzymes. Overall, we present here the first evidence that the microbiota modulates the physiology of olfactory epithelium. As olfaction is a major sensory modality for most animal species, the microbiota may have an important impact on animal physiology and behaviour through olfaction alteration. PMID:27089944

  5. Expression of corticosteroid binding globulin in the rat olfactory system.

    PubMed

    Dölz, Wilfried; Eitner, Annett; Caldwell, Jack D; Jirikowski, Gustav F

    2013-05-01

    Glucocorticoids are known to act on the olfactory system although their mode of action is still unclear since nuclear glucocorticoid receptors are mostly absent in the olfactory mucosa. In this study we used immunocytochemistry, in situ hybridization, and RT-PCR to study the expression and distribution of corticosteroid binding globulin (CBG) in the rat olfactory system. Mucosal goblet cells could be immunostained for CBG. Nasal secretion contained measurable amounts of CBG suggesting that CBG is liberated. CBG immunoreactivity was localized in many of the basal cells of the olfactory mucosa, while mature sensory cells contained CBG only in processes as determined by double immunostaining with the olfactory marker protein OMP. This staining was most pronounced in the vomeronasal organ (VNO). The appearance of CBG in the non-sensory and sensory parts of the VNO and in nerve terminals in the accessory bulb indicated axonal transport. Portions of the periglomerular cells, the mitral cells and the tufted cells were also CBG positive. CBG encoding transcripts were confirmed by RT-PCR in homogenates of the olfactory mucosa and VNO. Olfactory CBG may be significant for uptake, accumulation and transport of glucocorticoids, including aerosolic cortisol. PMID:23141917

  6. Lesion of the Olfactory Epithelium Accelerates Prion Neuroinvasion and Disease Onset when Prion Replication Is Restricted to Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Crowell, Jenna; Wiley, James A.; Bessen, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    Natural prion diseases of ruminants are moderately contagious and while the gastrointestinal tract is the primary site of prion agent entry, other mucosae may be entry sites in a subset of infections. In the current study we examined prion neuroinvasion and disease induction following disruption of the olfactory epithelium in the nasal mucosa since this site contains environmentally exposed olfactory sensory neurons that project directly into the central nervous system. Here we provide evidence for accelerated prion neuroinvasion and clinical onset from the olfactory mucosa after disruption and regeneration of the olfactory epithelium and when prion replication is restricted to neurons. In transgenic mice with neuron restricted replication of prions, there was a reduction in survival when the olfactory epithelium was disrupted prior to intranasal inoculation and there was >25% decrease in the prion incubation period. In a second model, the neurotropic DY strain of transmissible mink encephalopathy was not pathogenic in hamsters by the nasal route, but 50% of animals exhibited brain infection and/or disease when the olfactory epithelium was disrupted prior to intranasal inoculation. A time course analysis of prion deposition in the brain following loss of the olfactory epithelium in models of neuron-restricted prion replication suggests that neuroinvasion from the olfactory mucosa is via the olfactory nerve or brain stem associated cranial nerves. We propose that induction of neurogenesis after damage to the olfactory epithelium can lead to prion infection of immature olfactory sensory neurons and accelerate prion spread to the brain. PMID:25822718

  7. Rodent Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Indian Journal of Adult Education, 1975

    1975-01-01

    Strategies for rodent control in crop fields, threshing yards, and rural residential areas are presented together with an operational plan for implementing a program for rodent control at the national level. Training personnel in rodent control procedures and procedures for educating the public in the necessity for control are covered. (EC)

  8. Photoperiod Mediated Changes in Olfactory Bulb Neurogenesis and Olfactory Behavior in Male White-Footed Mice (Peromyscus leucopus)

    PubMed Central

    Weil, Zachary M.; Nelson, Randy J.

    2012-01-01

    Brain plasticity, in relation to new adult mammalian neurons generated in the subgranular zone of the hippocampus, has been well described. However, the functional outcome of new adult olfactory neurons born in the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricles is not clearly defined, as manipulating neurogenesis through various methods has given inconsistent and conflicting results in lab mice. Several small rodent species, including Peromyscus leucopus, display seasonal (photoperiodic) brain plasticity in brain volume, hippocampal function, and hippocampus-dependent behaviors; plasticity in the olfactory system of photoperiodic rodents remains largely uninvestigated. We exposed adult male P. leucopus to long day lengths (LD) and short day lengths (SD) for 10 to 15 weeks and then examined olfactory bulb cell proliferation and survival using the thymidine analog BrdU, olfactory bulb granule cell morphology using Golgi-Cox staining, and behavioral investigation of same-sex conspecific urine. SD mice did not differ from LD counterparts in granular cell morphology of the dendrites or in dendritic spine density. Although there were no differences due to photoperiod in habituation to water odor, SD mice rapidly habituated to male urine, whereas LD mice did not. In addition, short day induced changes in olfactory behavior were associated with increased neurogenesis in the caudal plexiform and granule cell layers of the olfactory bulb, an area known to preferentially respond to water-soluble odorants. Taken together, these data demonstrate that photoperiod, without altering olfactory bulb neuronal morphology, alters olfactory bulb neurogenesis and olfactory behavior in Peromyscus leucopus. PMID:22912730

  9. Odorant Metabolism Catalyzed by Olfactory Mucosal Enzymes Influences Peripheral Olfactory Responses in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Thiebaud, Nicolas; Veloso Da Silva, Stéphanie; Jakob, Ingrid; Sicard, Gilles; Chevalier, Joëlle; Ménétrier, Franck; Berdeaux, Olivier; Artur, Yves; Heydel, Jean-Marie; Le Bon, Anne-Marie

    2013-01-01

    A large set of xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes (XMEs), such as the cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (CYPs), esterases and transferases, are highly expressed in mammalian olfactory mucosa (OM). These enzymes are known to catalyze the biotransformation of exogenous compounds to facilitate elimination. However, the functions of these enzymes in the olfactory epithelium are not clearly understood. In addition to protecting against inhaled toxic compounds, these enzymes could also metabolize odorant molecules, and thus modify their stimulating properties or inactivate them. In the present study, we investigated the in vitro biotransformation of odorant molecules in the rat OM and assessed the impact of this metabolism on peripheral olfactory responses. Rat OM was found to efficiently metabolize quinoline, coumarin and isoamyl acetate. Quinoline and coumarin are metabolized by CYPs whereas isoamyl acetate is hydrolyzed by carboxylesterases. Electro-olfactogram (EOG) recordings revealed that the hydroxylated metabolites derived from these odorants elicited lower olfactory response amplitudes than the parent molecules. We also observed that glucurono-conjugated derivatives induced no olfactory signal. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the local application of a CYP inhibitor on rat olfactory epithelium increased EOG responses elicited by quinoline and coumarin. Similarly, the application of a carboxylesterase inhibitor increased the EOG response elicited by isoamyl acetate. This increase in EOG amplitude provoked by XME inhibitors is likely due to enhanced olfactory sensory neuron activation in response to odorant accumulation. Taken together, these findings strongly suggest that biotransformation of odorant molecules by enzymes localized to the olfactory mucosa may change the odorant’s stimulating properties and may facilitate the clearance of odorants to avoid receptor saturation. PMID:23555703

  10. Mini-review: Making scent of the presence and local translation of odorant receptor mRNAs in olfactory axons

    PubMed Central

    Dubacq, Caroline; Fouquet, Coralie; Trembleau, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Rodents contain in their genome more than 1,000 functional odorant receptor genes, which are specifically expressed by the olfactory sensory neurons projecting from the olfactory epithelium to the olfactory bulb. Strong evidence for the presence and local translation of odorant receptor mRNAs in the axon of olfactory sensory neurons was obtained, but no function has been assigned to these axonal mRNAs yet. The aim of this review is to discuss the evidence for the presence and local translation of odorant receptor mRNAs in olfactory sensory axons, and to speculate on their possible function in the wiring of the mouse olfactory sensory projections. PMID:23959692

  11. Olfactory neuroblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, T.A.; McLean, P.; Juillard, G.J.; Parker, R.G.

    1989-06-15

    Fifteen patients with olfactory neuroblastoma were treated during the 17-year period of 1969 to 1986. Data was analyzed with respect to age at presentation, sex, presenting signs and symptoms, stage, and results of treatment. Age ranged from 4 to 67 years with the median age being 27 years. Median follow-up was 8 years. Local control was achieved in nine of nine patients or 100% with successful surgical resection, i.e., minimal residual disease, followed by postoperative radiation therapy (45 to 65 Gy) was employed. There were no distant failures when the primary site was controlled. Regional lymph node metastases were infrequent: only 13% (two of 15 patients) presented with positive nodes. Three of four patients treated initially with surgery alone had a local recurrence, two of which were successfully salvaged by combined therapy. There were four patients treated with radiation therapy alone: three had persistent disease after radiation therapy, and one patient was controlled with 65 Gy. Olfactory neuroblastoma has a propensity to recur locally when treated with surgery alone. The authors' experience suggests excellent local control can be achieved with surgery immediately followed by radiation therapy. Thus the authors recommend planned combined treatment for all resectable lesions.

  12. Anatomy, histochemistry, and immunohistochemistry of the olfactory subsystems in mice.

    PubMed

    Barrios, Arthur W; Núñez, Gonzalo; Sánchez Quinteiro, Pablo; Salazar, Ignacio

    2014-01-01

    The four regions of the murine nasal cavity featuring olfactory neurons were studied anatomically and by labeling with lectins and relevant antibodies with a view to establishing criteria for the identification of olfactory subsystems that are readily applicable to other mammals. In the main olfactory epithelium and the septal organ the olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) are embedded in quasi-stratified columnar epithelium; vomeronasal OSNs are embedded in epithelium lining the medial interior wall of the vomeronasal duct and do not make contact with the mucosa of the main nasal cavity; and in Grüneberg's ganglion a small isolated population of OSNs lies adjacent to, but not within, the epithelium. With the exception of Grüneberg's ganglion, all the tissues expressing olfactory marker protein (OMP) (the above four nasal territories, the vomeronasal and main olfactory nerves, and the main and accessory olfactory bulbs) are also labeled by Lycopersicum esculentum agglutinin, while Ulex europaeus agglutinin I labels all and only tissues expressing Gαi2 (the apical sensory neurons of the vomeronasal organ, their axons, and their glomerular destinations in the anterior accessory olfactory bulb). These staining patterns of UEA-I and LEA may facilitate the characterization of olfactory anatomy in other species. A 710-section atlas of the anatomy of the murine nasal cavity has been made available on line. PMID:25071468

  13. Olfactory lateralization in homing pigeons: initial orientation of birds receiving a unilateral olfactory input.

    PubMed

    Gagliardo, Anna; Pecchia, Tommaso; Savini, Maria; Odetti, Francesca; Ioalè, Paolo; Vallortigara, Giorgio

    2007-03-01

    It has been shown that homing pigeons (Columba livia) rely on olfactory cues to navigate from unfamiliar locations. In fact, the integrity of the olfactory system, from the olfactory mucosa to the piriform cortex, is required for pigeons to navigate over unfamiliar areas. Recently it has been shown that there is a functional asymmetry in the piriform cortex, with the left piriform cortex more involved in the use of the olfactory navigational map than the right piriform cortex. To investigate further the lateralization of the olfactory system in relation to navigational processes in carrier pigeons, we compared their homing performance after either their left or the right nostril was plugged. Contrary to our expectations, we observed an impairment in the initial orientation of the pigeons with their right nostril plugged. However, both groups released with one nostril plugged tended to be poorer than control pigeons in their homing performance. The observed asymmetry in favour of the right nostril might be due to projections from the olfactory bulbs to the contralateral globus pallidum, a structure involved in motor responses. PMID:17425577

  14. The nasal cavity of the sheep and its olfactory sensory epithelium.

    PubMed

    Barrios, Arthur William; Sanchez Quinteiro, Pablo; Salazar, Ignacio

    2014-12-01

    Macro and microdissection methods, conventional histology and immunohistochemical procedures were used to investigate the nasal cavity and turbinate complex in fetal and adult sheep, with special attention to the ethmoturbinates, the vestibular mucosa, and the septal mucosa posterior to the vomeronasal organ. The ectoturbinates, which are variable in number and size, emerge and develop later than the endoturbinates. The olfactory sensory epithelium is composed of basal cells, neurons, and sustentacular cells organized in strata, but numerous different types are distinguishable on the basis of their thickness and other properties; all variants are present on the more developed turbinates, endoturbinates II and III. Mature neurons and olfactory nerve bundles express olfactory marker protein. We found no structure with the characteristics that in mouse define the septal organ or the ganglion of Grüneberg. Our results thus suggest that in sheep olfactory sensory neurons are exclusively concentrated in the main olfactory epithelium and (to a lesser extent) in the vomeronasal organ. PMID:25213000

  15. Integrating temperature with odor processing in the olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Kludt, Eugen; Okom, Camille; Brinkmann, Alexander; Schild, Detlev

    2015-05-20

    Temperature perception has long been classified as a somesthetic function solely. However, in recent years several studies brought evidence that temperature perception also takes place in the olfactory system of rodents. Temperature has been described as an effective stimulus for sensory neurons of the Grueneberg ganglion located at the entrance of the nose. Here, we investigate whether a neuronal trace of temperature stimulation can be observed in the glomeruli and mitral cells of the olfactory bulb, using calcium imaging and fast line-scanning microscopy. We show in the Xenopus tadpole system that the γ-glomerulus, which receives input from olfactory neurons, is highly sensitive to temperature drops at the olfactory epithelium. We observed that thermo-induced activity in the γ-glomerulus is conveyed to the mitral cells innervating this specific neuropil. Surprisingly, a substantial number of thermosensitive mitral cells were also chemosensitive. Moreover, we report another unique feature of the γ-glomerulus: it receives ipsilateral and contralateral afferents. The latter fibers pass through the contralateral bulb, cross the anterior commissure, and then run to the ipsilateral olfactory bulb, where they target the γ-glomerulus. Temperature drops at the contralateral olfactory epithelium also induced responses in the γ-glomerulus and in mitral cells. Temperature thus appears to be a relevant physiological input to the Xenopus olfactory system. Each olfactory bulb integrates and codes temperature signals originating from receptor neurons of the ipsilateral and contralateral nasal cavities. Finally, temperature and chemical information is processed in shared cellular networks. PMID:25995474

  16. Cellular basis for the olfactory response to nicotine.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Bruce; Xu, Jiang; Audige, Valery; Lischka, Fritz W; Rawson, Nancy E

    2010-03-17

    Smokers regulate their smoking behavior on the basis of sensory stimuli independently of the pharmacological effects of nicotine (Rose J. E., et al. (1993) Pharmacol., Biochem. Behav.44 (4), 891-900). A better understanding of sensory mechanisms underlying smoking behavior may help to develop more effective smoking alternatives. Olfactory stimulation by nicotine makes up a considerable part of the flavor of tobacco smoke, yet our understanding of the cellular mechanisms responsible for olfactory detection of nicotine remains incomplete. We used biophysical methods to characterize the nicotine sensitivity and response mechanisms of neurons from olfactory epithelium. In view of substantial differences in the olfactory receptor repertoire between rodent and human (Mombaerts P. (1999) Annu. Rev. Neurosci.22, 487-509), we studied biopsied human olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs), cultured human olfactory cells (Gomez G., et al. (2000) J. Neurosci. Res.62 (5), 737-749), and rat olfactory neurons. Rat and human OSNs responded to S(-)-nicotine with a concentration dependent influx of calcium and activation of adenylate cyclase. Some rat OSNs displayed some stereoselectivity, with neurons responding to either enantiomer alone or to both. Freshly biopsied and primary cultured human olfactory neurons were less stereoselective. Nicotinic cholinergic antagonists had no effect on the responses of rat or human OSNs to nicotine. Patch clamp recording of rat OSNs revealed a nicotine-activated, calcium-sensitive nonspecific cation channel. These results indicate that nicotine activates a canonical olfactory receptor pathway rather than nicotinic cholinergic receptors on OSNs. Further, because the nicotine-sensitive mechanisms of rodents appear generally similar to those of humans, this animal model is an appropriate one for studies of nicotine sensation. PMID:22777075

  17. Cellular Basis for the Olfactory Response to Nicotine

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Smokers regulate their smoking behavior on the basis of sensory stimuli independently of the pharmacological effects of nicotine (RoseJ. E., et al. (1993) Pharmacol., Biochem. Behav.1 (3), 891−9008469698). A better understanding of sensory mechanisms underlying smoking behavior may help to develop more effective smoking alternatives. Olfactory stimulation by nicotine makes up a considerable part of the flavor of tobacco smoke, yet our understanding of the cellular mechanisms responsible for olfactory detection of nicotine remains incomplete. We used biophysical methods to characterize the nicotine sensitivity and response mechanisms of neurons from olfactory epithelium. In view of substantial differences in the olfactory receptor repertoire between rodent and human (MombaertsP. (1999) Annu. Rev. Neurosci.1, 487−50910202546), we studied biopsied human olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs), cultured human olfactory cells (GomezG., et al. (2000) J. Neurosci. Res.1 (3), 737−74911104513), and rat olfactory neurons. Rat and human OSNs responded to S(−)-nicotine with a concentration dependent influx of calcium and activation of adenylate cyclase. Some rat OSNs displayed some stereoselectivity, with neurons responding to either enantiomer alone or to both. Freshly biopsied and primary cultured human olfactory neurons were less stereoselective. Nicotinic cholinergic antagonists had no effect on the responses of rat or human OSNs to nicotine. Patch clamp recording of rat OSNs revealed a nicotine-activated, calcium-sensitive nonspecific cation channel. These results indicate that nicotine activates a canonical olfactory receptor pathway rather than nicotinic cholinergic receptors on OSNs. Further, because the nicotine-sensitive mechanisms of rodents appear generally similar to those of humans, this animal model is an appropriate one for studies of nicotine sensation. PMID:22777075

  18. Olfactory System Involvement in Natural Scrapie Disease ▿

    PubMed Central

    Corona, Cristiano; Porcario, Chiara; Martucci, Francesca; Iulini, Barbara; Manea, Barbara; Gallo, Marina; Palmitessa, Claudia; Maurella, Cristiana; Mazza, Maria; Pezzolato, Marzia; Acutis, Pierluigi; Casalone, Cristina

    2009-01-01

    The olfactory system (OS) is involved in many infectious and neurodegenerative diseases, both human and animal, and it has recently been investigated in regard to transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. Previous assessments of nasal mucosa infection by prions following intracerebral challenge suggested a potential centrifugal spread along the olfactory nerve fibers of the pathological prion protein (PrPSc). Whether the nasal cavity may be a route for centripetal prion infection to the brain has also been experimentally studied. With the present study, we wanted to determine whether prion deposition in the OS occurs also under field conditions and what type of anatomical localization PrPSc might display there. We report here on detection by different techniques of PrPSc in the nasal mucosa and in the OS-related brain areas of sheep affected by natural scrapie. PrPSc was detected in the perineurium of the olfactory nerve bundles in the medial nasal concha and in nasal-associated lymphoid tissue. Olfactory receptor neurons did not show PrPSc immunostaining. PrPSc deposition was found in the brain areas of olfactory fiber projection, chiefly in the olfactory bulb and the olfactory cortex. The prevalent PrPSc deposition patterns were subependymal, perivascular, and submeningeal. This finding, together with the discovery of an intense PrPSc immunostaining in the meningeal layer of the olfactory nerve perineurium, at the border with the subdural space extension surrounding the nerve rootlets, strongly suggests a probable role of cerebrospinal fluid in conveying prion infectivity to the nasal submucosa. PMID:19158242

  19. Olfactory and solitary chemosensory cells: two different chemosensory systems in the nasal cavity of the American alligator, Alligator mississippiensis

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Anne

    2007-01-01

    Background The nasal cavity of all vertebrates houses multiple chemosensors, either innervated by the Ist (olfactory) or the Vth (trigeminal) cranial nerve. Various types of receptor cells are present, either segregated in different compartments (e.g. in rodents) or mingled in one epithelium (e.g. fish). In addition, solitary chemosensory cells have been reported for several species. Alligators which seek their prey both above and under water have only one nasal compartment. Information about their olfactory epithelium is limited. Since alligators seem to detect both volatile and water-soluble odour cues, I tested whether different sensory cell types are present in the olfactory epithelium. Results Electron microscopy and immunocytochemistry were used to examine the sensory epithelium of the nasal cavity of the American alligator. Almost the entire nasal cavity is lined with olfactory (sensory) epithelium. Two types of olfactory sensory neurons are present. Both types bear cilia as well as microvilli at their apical endings and express the typical markers for olfactory neurons. The density of these olfactory neurons varies along the nasal cavity. In addition, solitary chemosensory cells innervated by trigeminal nerve fibres, are intermingled with olfactory sensory neurons. Solitary chemosensory cells express components of the PLC-transduction cascade found in solitary chemosensory cells in rodents. Conclusion The nasal cavity of the American alligator contains two different chemosensory systems incorporated in the same sensory epithelium: the olfactory system proper and solitary chemosensory cells. The olfactory system contains two morphological distinct types of ciliated olfactory receptor neurons. PMID:17683564

  20. Olfactory Receptor Patterning in a Higher Primate

    PubMed Central

    Horowitz, Lisa F.; Saraiva, Luis R.; Kuang, Donghui; Yoon, Kyoung-hye

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian olfactory system detects a plethora of environmental chemicals that are perceived as odors or stimulate instinctive behaviors. Studies using odorant receptor (OR) genes have provided insight into the molecular and organizational strategies underlying olfaction in mice. One important unanswered question, however, is whether these strategies are conserved in primates. To explore this question, we examined the macaque, a higher primate phylogenetically close to humans. Here we report that the organization of sensory inputs in the macaque nose resembles that in mouse in some respects, but not others. As in mouse, neurons with different ORs are interspersed in the macaque nose, and there are spatial zones that differ in their complement of ORs and extend axons to different domains in the olfactory bulb of the brain. However, whereas the mouse has multiple discrete band-like zones, the macaque appears to have only two broad zones. It is unclear whether the organization of OR inputs in a rodent/primate common ancestor degenerated in primates or, alternatively became more sophisticated in rodents. The mouse nose has an additional small family of chemosensory receptors, called trace amine-associated receptors (TAARs), which may detect social cues. Here we find that TAARs are also expressed in the macaque nose, suggesting that TAARs may also play a role in human olfactory perception. We further find that one human TAAR responds to rotten fish, suggesting a possible role as a sentinel to discourage ingestion of food harboring pathogenic microorganisms. PMID:25209267

  1. Olfactory receptor patterning in a higher primate.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, Lisa F; Saraiva, Luis R; Kuang, Donghui; Yoon, Kyoung-hye; Buck, Linda B

    2014-09-10

    The mammalian olfactory system detects a plethora of environmental chemicals that are perceived as odors or stimulate instinctive behaviors. Studies using odorant receptor (OR) genes have provided insight into the molecular and organizational strategies underlying olfaction in mice. One important unanswered question, however, is whether these strategies are conserved in primates. To explore this question, we examined the macaque, a higher primate phylogenetically close to humans. Here we report that the organization of sensory inputs in the macaque nose resembles that in mouse in some respects, but not others. As in mouse, neurons with different ORs are interspersed in the macaque nose, and there are spatial zones that differ in their complement of ORs and extend axons to different domains in the olfactory bulb of the brain. However, whereas the mouse has multiple discrete band-like zones, the macaque appears to have only two broad zones. It is unclear whether the organization of OR inputs in a rodent/primate common ancestor degenerated in primates or, alternatively became more sophisticated in rodents. The mouse nose has an additional small family of chemosensory receptors, called trace amine-associated receptors (TAARs), which may detect social cues. Here we find that TAARs are also expressed in the macaque nose, suggesting that TAARs may also play a role in human olfactory perception. We further find that one human TAAR responds to rotten fish, suggesting a possible role as a sentinel to discourage ingestion of food harboring pathogenic microorganisms. PMID:25209267

  2. Expression of CD36 by Olfactory Receptor Cells and Its Abundance on the Epithelial Surface in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tsuzuki, Satoshi; Matsumura, Shigenobu; Inoue, Kazuo; Iwanaga, Toshihiko; Masuda, Daisaku; Yamashita, Shizuya; Fushiki, Tohru

    2015-01-01

    CD36 is a transmembrane protein that is involved in the recognition of certain amphiphilic molecules such as polar lipids in various tissues and body fluids. So far, CD36 homologues in insects have been demonstrated to be present on the surface of olfactory dendrites and to participate in the perception of exogenous compounds. However, little is known about the relationship between CD36 and mammalian olfaction. Indeed, the detection of only CD36 mRNA in the mouse olfactory epithelium has been reported to date. In the present study, to provide potential pieces of evidence for the involvement of CD36 in mammalian olfactory perception, we extensively investigated the localisation of this protein in the mouse olfactory mucosa. In situ hybridisation analysis using antisense oligonucleotides to CD36 mRNA detected aggregated signals within the deeper epithelial layer of olfactory mucosa. The mRNA signals were also detected consistently in the superficial layer of the olfactory epithelium, which is occupied by supporting cells. Immunostaining with an anti-CD36 polyclonal antibody revealed that CD36 localises in the somata and dendrites of distinct olfactory receptor cells and that it occurs abundantly on the olfactory epithelial surface. However, immunoreactive CD36 was rarely detectable in the nerve bundles running in the lamina propria of olfactory mucosa, the axons forming the olfactory nerve layer in the outermost layer of the bulb and axon terminals in the glomeruli. We also obtained electron microscopic evidence for the association of CD36 protein with olfactory cilia. Altogether, we suggest that CD36 plays a role in the mammalian olfaction. In addition, signals for CD36 protein were also detected on or around the microvilli of olfactory supporting cells and the cilia of nasal respiratory epithelium, suggesting a role for this protein other than olfaction in the nasal cavity. PMID:26186589

  3. Olfactory bulb and retrobulbar regions in the hedgehog tenrec: organization and interconnections.

    PubMed

    Radtke-Schuller, S; Künzle, H

    2000-08-01

    The Madagascan lesser hedgehog tenrec (Echinops telfairi) is a terrestrial, nocturnal insectivore with a low encephalization index and a huge olfactory bulb. To gain insight into the organization and evolution of olfactory regions in placental mammals, the cytoarchitecture (Nissl), neurochemical attributes [zinc and acetylcholinesterase stain, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPh)-diaphorase, and calcium-binding proteins], and interconnections (injections of wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase and biotinylated dextran amine) of tenrec bulbar and retrobulbar regions were examined. The tenrec has a well-laminated main olfactory bulb, and modified (atypical) glomeruli are found that, to date, have been demonstrated only in murine rodents. Compared with the main olfactory bulb, the accessory bulb is relatively small, with clearly different staining characteristics, particularly with respect to NADPh-diaphorase, anticalbindin, and anticalretinin. External and central anterior olfactory nuclei also show characteristic cytoarchitectural and chemoarchitectural features. The medial olfactory peduncle seems to differ considerably from that in rodents. A small taenial structure can be separated from the hippocampal continuation. This taenia tecti presumably corresponds to the superior part of the tenia tecti in rodents, but no homologue of the rodent's prominent inferior taenia tecti could be found. The connections of bulbar and retrobulbar regions are similar to those seen in other mammals. Interbulbar projection systems connect the two olfactory bulbs through an external (topographic) and central (nontopographic) anterior nucleus; however, the topographic arrangement of the intrabulbar association system seems to differ from that seen in rodents. A reciprocity of direct olfactory bulb connections with the frontal (sulcal/orbital) cortex was found in the tenrec that has not been reported so far in other species. PMID:10880997

  4. [Action of hyperoxia on the total electrical activity of the olfactory epithelium of the frog].

    PubMed

    Dmitriev, V V; Tarasov, E K; Lukash, A I

    1984-03-01

    Olfactory mucosa of the frog was stimulated with odours of amylacetat , butanol, alcohol, naphthalene, acetic acid in air and oxygen media under normal and high oxygen pressure (0.2 MPa and 0.7 MPa). The electroolfactogram (EOG) amplitude was higher in oxygen due, probably, to the olfactory mucosa oxygen saturation on concentration gradient as well as to the activation of processes related to the EOG generation. 0.2 MPa pressure as well as 0.7 MPa pressure applied for 60 min decreased the EOG amplitude. PMID:6724040

  5. Rodent repellency

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeWitt, J.B.; Welch, J.F.; Bellack, E.

    1950-01-01

    In the course of studies involving more than 2,500 chemical repellents, it has been found that certain groups of- compounds containing nitrogen or sulfur are repellent to rats under the , test conditions and it appears probable that some of these compounds might be used for the protection of packaged goods against rodent attacks. Additional tests to determine optimum methods of application will be necessary before final evaluation of these compounds will be possible and extensive field trials will be required to establish the degree of protection which may be afforded by the use of these materials. Pending such final evaluation, it may be assumed that the results,to date offer a means of selecting the most promising types of'materials for further trial....On the basis of the test data, it appears that some amine derivative, such as a salt of some organic, acid, or a complex with trinitrobenzene or with a metallic salt of a dialkyl dithiocarbamic acid might offer promise of protection of packaging materials against rodent attacks....Protection might be obtained through the use of certain 'physical deterrents' such as plastics, waxes or drying oils.

  6. Results of examination of the nasal mucosa. [in Apollo 17 BIOCORE pocket mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, L. M.; Vogel, F. S.; Lloyd, B.; Benton, E. V.; Cruty, M. R.; Haymaker, W.; Leon, H. A.; Billingham, J.; Turnbill, C. E.; Teas, V.

    1975-01-01

    The olfactory epithelium, but not the nasal respiratory epithelium, of the four pocket mice (Perognathus longimembris) that survived their flight on Apollo XVII showed both diffuse alterations and numerous disseminated focal lesions. The olfactory mucosa of the mouse that died during flight was also affected, but to a minor degree insofar as could be determined. All this was in contrast to the normal appearance of the olfactory mucosa of the numerous control animals. A number of possible causes were considered: systemic or regional infection; inhaled particulate material (seed dust); by-products from the KO2 bed in aerosol or particulate form; gas contaminants originating in the flight package; volatile substances from the dead mouse; weightlessness; and cosmic ray particle radiation. Where feasible, studies were conducted in an effort to rule in or rule out some of these potentially causative factors. No definitive conclusions were reached as to the cause of the lesions in the flight mice.

  7. Olfactory Perceptual Learning Requires Action of Noradrenaline in the Olfactory Bulb: Comparison with Olfactory Associative Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vinera, Jennifer; Kermen, Florence; Sacquet, Joëlle; Didier, Anne; Mandairon, Nathalie; Richard, Marion

    2015-01-01

    Noradrenaline contributes to olfactory-guided behaviors but its role in olfactory learning during adulthood is poorly documented. We investigated its implication in olfactory associative and perceptual learning using local infusion of mixed a1-ß adrenergic receptor antagonist (labetalol) in the adult mouse olfactory bulb. We reported that…

  8. Posttraumatic olfactory dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Daniel H; Costanzo, Richard M

    2016-04-01

    Impairment of smell may occur following injury to any portion of the olfactory tract, from nasal cavity to brain. A thorough understanding of the anatomy and pathophysiology combined with comprehensively obtained history, physical exam, olfactory testing, and neuroimaging may help to identify the mechanism of dysfunction and suggest possible treatments. Although most olfactory deficits are neuronal mediated and therefore currently unable to be corrected, promising technology may provide novel treatment options for those most affected. Until that day, patient counseling with compensatory strategies and reassurance is essential for the maintenance of safety and QoL in this unique and challenging patient population. PMID:26441369

  9. The role of the olfactory recess in olfactory airflow.

    PubMed

    Eiting, Thomas P; Smith, Timothy D; Perot, J Blair; Dumont, Elizabeth R

    2014-05-15

    The olfactory recess - a blind pocket at the back of the nasal airway - is thought to play an important role in mammalian olfaction by sequestering air outside of the main airstream, thus giving odorants time to re-circulate. Several studies have shown that species with large olfactory recesses tend to have a well-developed sense of smell. However, no study has investigated how the size of the olfactory recess relates to air circulation near the olfactory epithelium. Here we used a computer model of the nasal cavity from a bat (Carollia perspicillata) to test the hypothesis that a larger olfactory recess improves olfactory airflow. We predicted that during inhalation, models with an enlarged olfactory recess would have slower rates of flow through the olfactory region (i.e. the olfactory recess plus airspace around the olfactory epithelium), while during exhalation these models would have little to no flow through the olfactory recess. To test these predictions, we experimentally modified the size of the olfactory recess while holding the rest of the morphology constant. During inhalation, we found that an enlarged olfactory recess resulted in lower rates of flow in the olfactory region. Upon exhalation, air flowed through the olfactory recess at a lower rate in the model with an enlarged olfactory recess. Taken together, these results indicate that an enlarged olfactory recess improves olfactory airflow during both inhalation and exhalation. These findings add to our growing understanding of how the morphology of the nasal cavity may relate to function in this understudied region of the skull. PMID:24577441

  10. Electroolfactogram (EOG) Recording in the Mouse Main Olfactory Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xuanmao; Xia, Zhengui; Storm, Daniel R.

    2016-01-01

    Olfactory sensory neurons in the main olfactory epithelium (MOE) are responsible for detecting odorants and EOG recording is a reliable approach to analyze the peripheral olfactory function. However, recently we revealed that rodent MOE can also detect the air pressure caused by airflow. The sensation of airflow pressure and odorants may function in synergy to facilitate odorant perception during sniffing. We have reported that the pressure-sensitive response in the MOE can also be assayed by EOG recording. Here we describe procedures for pressure-sensitive as well as odorant-stimulated EOG measurement in the mouse MOE. The major difference between the pressure-sensitive EOG response and the odorant-stimulated response was whether to use pure air puff or use an odorized air puff.

  11. Illustrated Review of the Ventral Striatum's Olfactory Tubercle.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Angeline; Wesson, Daniel W

    2016-09-01

    Modern neuroscience often relies upon artistic renderings to illustrate key aspects of anatomy. These renderings can be in 2 or even 3 dimensions. Three-dimensional renderings are especially helpful in conceptualizing highly complex aspects of neuroanatomy which otherwise are not visually apparent in 2 dimensions or even intact biological samples themselves. Here, we provide 3 dimensional renderings of the gross- and cellular-anatomy of the rodent olfactory tubercle. Based upon standing literature and detailed investigations into rat brain specimens, we created biologically inspired illustrations of the olfactory tubercle in 3 dimensions as well as its connectivity with olfactory bulb projection neurons, the piriform cortex association fiber system, and ventral pallidum medium spiny neurons. Together, we intend for these illustrations to serve as a resource to the neuroscience community in conceptualizing and discussing this highly complex and interconnected brain system with established roles in sensory processing and motivated behaviors. PMID:27340137

  12. Ionotropic Crustacean Olfactory Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Corey, Elizabeth A.; Bobkov, Yuriy; Ukhanov, Kirill; Ache, Barry W.

    2013-01-01

    The nature of the olfactory receptor in crustaceans, a major group of arthropods, has remained elusive. We report that spiny lobsters, Panulirus argus, express ionotropic receptors (IRs), the insect chemosensory variants of ionotropic glutamate receptors. Unlike insects IRs, which are expressed in a specific subset of olfactory cells, two lobster IR subunits are expressed in most, if not all, lobster olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs), as confirmed by antibody labeling and in situ hybridization. Ligand-specific ORN responses visualized by calcium imaging are consistent with a restricted expression pattern found for other potential subunits, suggesting that cell-specific expression of uncommon IR subunits determines the ligand sensitivity of individual cells. IRs are the only type of olfactory receptor that we have detected in spiny lobster olfactory tissue, suggesting that they likely mediate olfactory signaling. Given long-standing evidence for G protein-mediated signaling in activation of lobster ORNs, this finding raises the interesting specter that IRs act in concert with second messenger-mediated signaling. PMID:23573266

  13. Ionotropic crustacean olfactory receptors.

    PubMed

    Corey, Elizabeth A; Bobkov, Yuriy; Ukhanov, Kirill; Ache, Barry W

    2013-01-01

    The nature of the olfactory receptor in crustaceans, a major group of arthropods, has remained elusive. We report that spiny lobsters, Panulirus argus, express ionotropic receptors (IRs), the insect chemosensory variants of ionotropic glutamate receptors. Unlike insects IRs, which are expressed in a specific subset of olfactory cells, two lobster IR subunits are expressed in most, if not all, lobster olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs), as confirmed by antibody labeling and in situ hybridization. Ligand-specific ORN responses visualized by calcium imaging are consistent with a restricted expression pattern found for other potential subunits, suggesting that cell-specific expression of uncommon IR subunits determines the ligand sensitivity of individual cells. IRs are the only type of olfactory receptor that we have detected in spiny lobster olfactory tissue, suggesting that they likely mediate olfactory signaling. Given long-standing evidence for G protein-mediated signaling in activation of lobster ORNs, this finding raises the interesting specter that IRs act in concert with second messenger-mediated signaling. PMID:23573266

  14. Biomechanics of oral mucosa.

    PubMed

    Chen, Junning; Ahmad, Rohana; Li, Wei; Swain, Michael; Li, Qing

    2015-08-01

    The prevalence of prosthodontic treatment has been well recognized, and the need is continuously increasing with the ageing population. While the oral mucosa plays a critical role in the treatment outcome, the associated biomechanics is not yet fully understood. Using the literature available, this paper provides a critical review on four aspects of mucosal biomechanics, including static, dynamic, volumetric and interactive responses, which are interpreted by its elasticity, viscosity/permeability, apparent Poisson's ratio and friction coefficient, respectively. Both empirical studies and numerical models are analysed and compared to gain anatomical and physiological insights. Furthermore, the clinical applications of such biomechanical knowledge on the mucosa are explored to address some critical concerns, including stimuli for tissue remodelling (interstitial hydrostatic pressure), pressure-pain thresholds, tissue displaceability and residual bone resorption. Through this review, the state of the art in mucosal biomechanics and their clinical implications are discussed for future research interests, including clinical applications, computational modelling, design optimization and prosthetic fabrication. PMID:26224566

  15. Biomechanics of oral mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Junning; Ahmad, Rohana; Li, Wei; Swain, Michael; Li, Qing

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of prosthodontic treatment has been well recognized, and the need is continuously increasing with the ageing population. While the oral mucosa plays a critical role in the treatment outcome, the associated biomechanics is not yet fully understood. Using the literature available, this paper provides a critical review on four aspects of mucosal biomechanics, including static, dynamic, volumetric and interactive responses, which are interpreted by its elasticity, viscosity/permeability, apparent Poisson's ratio and friction coefficient, respectively. Both empirical studies and numerical models are analysed and compared to gain anatomical and physiological insights. Furthermore, the clinical applications of such biomechanical knowledge on the mucosa are explored to address some critical concerns, including stimuli for tissue remodelling (interstitial hydrostatic pressure), pressure–pain thresholds, tissue displaceability and residual bone resorption. Through this review, the state of the art in mucosal biomechanics and their clinical implications are discussed for future research interests, including clinical applications, computational modelling, design optimization and prosthetic fabrication. PMID:26224566

  16. Cigarette Smoke Delays Regeneration of the Olfactory Epithelium in Mice.

    PubMed

    Ueha, Rumi; Ueha, Satoshi; Sakamoto, Takashi; Kanaya, Kaori; Suzukawa, Keigo; Nishijima, Hironobu; Kikuta, Shu; Kondo, Kenji; Matsushima, Kouji; Yamasoba, Tatsuya

    2016-08-01

    The olfactory system is a unique part of the mammalian nervous system due to its capacity for neurogenesis and the replacement of degenerating receptor neurons. Cigarette smoking is a major cause of olfactory dysfunction. However, the mechanisms by which cigarette smoke impairs the regenerative olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) remain unclear. Here, we investigated the influence of cigarette smoke on ORN regeneration following methimazole-induced ORN injury. Administration of methimazole caused detachment of the olfactory epithelium from the basement membrane and induced olfactory dysfunction, thus enabling us to analyze the process of ORN regeneration. We found that intranasal administration of cigarette smoke solution (CSS) suppressed the recovery of ORNs and olfaction following ORN injury. Defective ORN recovery in CSS-treated mice was not associated with any change in the number of SOX2(+) ORN progenitor cells in the basal layer of the OE, but was associated with impaired recovery of GAP43(+) immature ORNs. In the nasal mucosa, mRNA expression levels of neurotrophic factors such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor, neurotrophin-3, neurotrophin-5, glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor, and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) were increased following OE injury, whereas CSS administration decreased the ORN injury-induced IGF-1 expression. Administration of recombinant human IGF-1 prevented the CSS-induced suppression of ORN recovery following injury. These results suggest that CSS impairs regeneration of ORNs by suppressing the development of immature ORNs from ORN progenitors, at least partly by reducing IGF-1 in the nasal mucosa. PMID:27003941

  17. From chemical neuroanatomy to an understanding of the olfactory system.

    PubMed

    Oboti, L; Peretto, P; Marchis, S De; Fasolo, A

    2011-01-01

    The olfactory system is the appropriate model for studying several aspects of neuronal physiology spanning from the developmental stage to neural network remodelling in the adult brain. Both the morphological and physiological understanding of this system were strongly supported by classical histochemistry. It is emblematic the case of the Olfactory Marker Protein (OMP) staining, the first, powerful marker for fully differentiated olfactory receptor neurons and a key tool to investigate the dynamic relations between peripheral sensory epithelia and central relay regions given its presence within olfactory fibers reaching the olfactory bulb (OB). Similarly, the use of thymidine analogues was able to show neurogenesis in an adult mammalian brain far before modern virus labelling and lipophilic tracers based methods. Nowadays, a wealth of new histochemical techniques combining cell and molecular biology approaches is available, giving stance to move from the analysis of the chemically identified circuitries to functional research. The study of adult neurogenesis is indeed one of the best explanatory examples of this statement. After defining the cell types involved and the basic physiology of this phenomenon in the OB plasticity, we can now analyze the role of neurogenesis in well testable behaviours related to socio-chemical communication in rodents. PMID:22297441

  18. From chemical neuroanatomy to an understanding of the olfactory system

    PubMed Central

    Oboti, L.; Peretto, P.; De Marchis, S.; Fasolo, A.

    2011-01-01

    The olfactory system of mammals is the appropriate model for studying several aspects of neuronal physiology spanning from the developmental stage to neural network remodelling in the adult brain. Both the morphological and physiological understanding of this system were strongly supported by classical histochemistry. It is emblematic the case of the Olfactory Marker Protein (OMP) staining, the first, powerful marker for fully differentiated olfactory receptor neurons and a key tool to investigate the dynamic relations between peripheral sensory epithelia and central relay regions given its presence within olfactory fibers reaching the olfactory bulb (OB). Similarly, the use of thymidine analogues was able to show neurogenesis in an adult mammalian brain far before modern virus labelling and lipophilic tracers based methods. Nowadays, a wealth of new histochemical techniques combining cell and molecular biology approaches is available, giving stance to move from the analysis of the chemically identified circuitries to functional research. The study of adult neurogenesis is indeed one of the best explanatory examples of this statement. After defining the cell types involved and the basic physiology of this phenomenon in the OB plasticity, we can now analyze the role of neurogenesis in well testable behaviours related to socio-chemical communication in rodents. PMID:22297441

  19. Properties and mechanisms of olfactory learning and memory

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Michelle T.; Peace, Shane T.; Cleland, Thomas A.

    2014-01-01

    Memories are dynamic physical phenomena with psychometric forms as well as characteristic timescales. Most of our understanding of the cellular mechanisms underlying the neurophysiology of memory, however, derives from one-trial learning paradigms that, while powerful, do not fully embody the gradual, representational, and statistical aspects of cumulative learning. The early olfactory system—particularly olfactory bulb—comprises a reasonably well-understood and experimentally accessible neuronal network with intrinsic plasticity that underlies both one-trial (adult aversive, neonatal) and cumulative (adult appetitive) odor learning. These olfactory circuits employ many of the same molecular and structural mechanisms of memory as, for example, hippocampal circuits following inhibitory avoidance conditioning, but the temporal sequences of post-conditioning molecular events are likely to differ owing to the need to incorporate new information from ongoing learning events into the evolving memory trace. Moreover, the shapes of acquired odor representations, and their gradual transformation over the course of cumulative learning, also can be directly measured, adding an additional representational dimension to the traditional metrics of memory strength and persistence. In this review, we describe some established molecular and structural mechanisms of memory with a focus on the timecourses of post-conditioning molecular processes. We describe the properties of odor learning intrinsic to the olfactory bulb and review the utility of the olfactory system of adult rodents as a memory system in which to study the cellular mechanisms of cumulative learning. PMID:25071492

  20. Early Olfactory Environment Influences Social Behaviour in Adult Octodon degus

    PubMed Central

    Márquez, Natalia; Martínez-Harms, Jaime; Vásquez, Rodrigo A.; Mpodozis, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the extent to which manipulation of early olfactory environment can influence social behaviours in the South American Hystricognath rodent Octodon degus. The early olfactory environment of newborn degus was manipulated by scenting all litter members with eucalyptol during the first month of life. The social behaviour of sexually mature animals (5–7 months old) towards conspecifics was then assessed using a y-maze to compare the response of control (naïve) and treated animals to two different olfactory configurations (experiment 1): (i) a non-familiarized conspecific impregnated with eucalyptol (eucalyptol arm) presented against (ii) a non-familiarized unscented conspecific (control arm). In addition, in dyadic encounters, we assessed the behaviour of control and eucalyptol treated animals towards a non-familiarized conspecific scented with eucalyptol (experiment 2). We found that control subjects explored and spent significantly less time in the eucalyptol arm, indicating neophobic behaviours towards the artificially scented conspecific. Treated subjects explored and spent similar time in both arms of the maze, showing the same interest for both olfactory stimuli presented. During dyadic encounters in experiment 2, an interaction effect between early experience and sex was observed. Control males escaped and avoided their scented partner more frequently than eucalyptol treated male subjects and than females. Both groups did not differ in the exploration of their scented partners, suggesting that avoidance within agonistic context does not relate to neophobic behaviours. Our results suggest that the exposure to eucalyptol during early ontogeny decreases evasive behaviours within an agonistic context as a result of olfactory learning. Altogether, these results indicate that olfactory cues learned in early ontogeny can influence olfactory-guided behaviours in adult degus. PMID:25671542

  1. Metabolic activation of phenacetin in rat nasal mucosa: dose-dependent binding to the glands of Bowman

    SciTech Connect

    Brittebo, E.B.

    1987-03-01

    The metabolism and binding of the analgetic drug (ring-/sup 3/H)phenacetin in the nasal mucosa were studied in vitro and in vivo in male Sprague-Dawley rats. As shown by whole-body and light microscopic autoradiography there was an irreversible binding of metabolites to the glands of Bowman in the olfactory mucosa after high but not after low doses of (/sup 3/H)phenacetin. In the other tissues, the distribution of radioactivity was not changed when the dose was increased. Autoradiography of (/sup 3/H)-acetaminophen showed no preferential uptake of radioactivity in the olfactory mucosa. At incubation of nasal septa with (/sup 3/H)phenacetin in vitro, a binding of metabolites to the glands of Bowman was observed indicating that the metabolism occurred in situ. In rats, glutathione (GSH) depleted by pretreatment with phorone, there was a binding to the glands of Bowman in the olfactory mucosa also after a trace dose of (/sup 3/H)phenacetin. Addition of GSH decreased the irreversible binding of (/sup 3/H)phenacetin metabolites that occurred in 9000 X g nasal mucosa supernatants incubated with (/sup 3/H)phenacetin. There was a moderate decrease in the level of nonprotein sulfhydryl groups, mainly GSH, in the olfactory mucosa after administration of 100-300 mg/kg phenacetin. Collectively, these data suggest that phenacetin is metabolized and subsequent to GSH depletion, bound preferentially in the glands of Bowman. The data also suggest that in situ metabolic activation and binding of phenacetin in the rat nasal mucosa at high doses may play a role in the pathogenesis of the nasal tumors induced by high doses of phenacetin in the rat.

  2. Acetylcholine and Olfactory Perceptual Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Donald A.; Fletcher, Max L.; Sullivan, Regina M.

    2004-01-01

    Olfactory perceptual learning is a relatively long-term, learned increase in perceptual acuity, and has been described in both humans and animals. Data from recent electrophysiological studies have indicated that olfactory perceptual learning may be correlated with changes in odorant receptive fields of neurons in the olfactory bulb and piriform…

  3. Adult Olfactory Bulb Neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lledo, Pierre-Marie; Valley, Matt

    2016-01-01

    Most organisms use their olfactory system to detect and analyze chemical cues from the external world to guide essential behaviors. From worms to vertebrates, chemicals are detected by odorant receptors expressed by olfactory sensory neurons, which in vertebrates send an axon to the primary processing center called the olfactory bulb (OB). Within the OB, sensory neurons form excitatory synapses with projection neurons and with inhibitory interneurons. Thus, because of complex synaptic interactions, the output of a given projection neuron is determined not only by the sensory input, but also by the activity of local inhibitory interneurons that are regenerated throughout life in the process of adult neurogenesis. Herein, we discuss how it is optimized and why. PMID:27235474

  4. Fibroblasts Isolated from Human Middle Turbinate Mucosa Cause Neural Progenitor Cells to Differentiate into Glial Lineage Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xingjia; Bolger, William E.; Anders, Juanita J.

    2013-01-01

    Transplantation of olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) is a potential therapy for repair of spinal cord injury (SCI). Autologous transplantation of OECs has been reported in clinical trials. However, it is still controversial whether purified OECs or olfactory mucosa containing OECs, fibroblasts and other cells should be used for transplantation. OECs and fibroblasts were isolated from olfactory mucosa of the middle turbinate from seven patients. The percentage of OECs with p75NTR+ and GFAP+ ranged from 9.2% to 73.2%. Fibroblasts were purified and co-cultured with normal human neural progenitors (NHNPs). Based on immunocytochemical labeling, NHNPs were induced into glial lineage cells when they were co-cultured with the mucosal fibroblasts. These results demonstrate that OECs can be isolated from the mucosa of the middle turbinate bone as well as from the dorsal nasal septum and superior turbinates, which are the typical sites for harvesting OECs. Transplantation of olfactory mucosa containing fibroblasts into the central nervous system (CNS) needs to be further investigated before translation to clinical application. PMID:24204706

  5. Expression and Localization of the Cell Adhesion Molecule SgIGSF during Regeneration of the Olfactory Epithelium in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tsukioka, Fusae; Wakayama, Tomohiko; Tsukatani, Toshiaki; Miwa, Takaki; Furukawa, Mitsuru; Iseki, Shoichi

    2007-01-01

    Spermatogenic immunoglobulin superfamily (SgIGSF) is a cell adhesion molecule originally discovered in mouse testis. SgIGSF is expressed not only in spermatogenic cells but also in lung and liver epithelial cells and in neurons and glia of the central and peripheral nervous systems. In the present study, we examined the expression and localization of SgIGSF in mouse olfactory epithelium before and after transection of the olfactory nerves, by RT-PCR, Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. In normal olfactory mucosa, SgIGSF showed 100 kDa in molecular weight, which was identical with that in the lung but different from that in the brain. SgIGSF was expressed on the membrane of all olfactory, sustentacular and basal cells, but more abundantly in the apical portions of the olfactory epithelium where the dendrites of olfactory cells are in contact with sustentacular cells. After olfactory nerve transection, mature olfactory cells disappeared in 4 days but were regenerated around 7–15 days by proliferation and differentiation of basal cells into mature olfactory cells through the step of immature olfactory cells. During this period, both the mRNA and protein for SgIGSF showed a transient increase, with peak levels at 7 days and 11 days, respectively, after the transection. Immunohistochemistry showed that the enriched immunoreactivity for SgIGSF at 7–11 days was localized primarily to the membrane of immature olfactory cells. These results suggested that, during regeneration of the olfactory epithelium, the adhesion molecule SgIGSF plays physiological roles in differentiation, migration, and maturation of immature olfactory cells. PMID:17576432

  6. Microdialysis pharmacokinetic study of scopolamine in plasma, olfactory bulb and vestibule after intranasal administration.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yan; Ying, Mingzhen; Xu, Shuai; Wang, Feng; Zou, Aifeng; Cao, Shilei; Jiang, Xinguo; Wang, Yajie

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the microdialysis pharmacokinetic of scopolamine in plasma, olfactory bulb and vestibule after intranasal administration. The pharmacokinetic study of subcutaneous and oral administration was also performed in rats. From the in vivo results, scopolamine intranasal administration can avoid hepatic first-pass effect. Tmax plasma samples after intranasal administration were significantly faster than oral administration and subcutaneous injection. The relative bioavailability of intranasal administrations was 51.8-70% when compared with subcutaneous injection. Moreover, one can see that in comparison with scopolamine subcutaneous administration, scopolamine intranasal gel and solutions can increased drug target index (DTI) with olfactory bulb 1.69 and 2.05, vestibule 1.80 and 2.15, respectively. The results indicated that scopolamine can be absorbed directly through the olfactory mucosa into the olfactory bulb, and then transported to various brain tissue after intranasal administration, with the characteristics of brain drug delivery. PMID:24865285

  7. Rodents And Other Gnawers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naturescope, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Presents information about rodents and lagomorphs, including definitions and the characteristics of these animals. Contains teaching activities such as "Habitats for Hoppers,""Cartoon Gnawers," and "The Great Rodent Expedition." Reproducible handouts for two of the activities are provided. (TW)

  8. Olfactory dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yong-Ming; Lu, Da; Liu, Li-Ping; Zhang, Hui-Hong; Zhou, Yu-Ying

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a common neurodegenerative disorder with the earliest clinical symptom of olfactory dysfunction, which is a potential clinical marker for AD severity and progression. However, many questions remain unanswered. This article reviews relevant research on olfactory dysfunction in AD and evaluates the predictive value of olfactory dysfunction for the epidemiological, pathophysiological, and clinical features of AD, as well as for the conversion of cognitive impairment to AD. We summarize problems of existing studies and provide a useful reference for further studies in AD olfactory dysfunction and for clinical applications of olfactory testing. PMID:27143888

  9. Mechanisms of neuronal chloride accumulation in intact mouse olfactory epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Nickell, William T; Kleene, Nancy K; Kleene, Steven J

    2007-01-01

    When olfactory receptor neurons respond to odours, a depolarizing Cl− efflux is a substantial part of the response. This requires that the resting neuron accumulate Cl− against an electrochemical gradient. In isolated olfactory receptor neurons, the Na+–K+–2Cl− cotransporter NKCC1 is essential for Cl− accumulation. However, in intact epithelium, a robust electrical olfactory response persists in mice lacking NKCC1. This response is largely due to a neuronal Cl− efflux. It thus appears that NKCC1 is an important part of a more complex system of Cl− accumulation. To identify the remaining transport proteins, we first screened by RT-PCR for 21 Cl− transporters in mouse nasal tissue containing olfactory mucosa. For most of the Cl− transporters, the presence of mRNA was demonstrated. We also investigated the effects of pharmacological block or genetic ablation of Cl− transporters on the olfactory field potential, the electroolfactogram (EOG). Mice lacking the common Cl−/HCO3− exchanger AE2 had normal EOGs. Block of NKCC cotransport with bumetanide reduced the EOG in epithelia from wild-type mice but had no effect in mice lacking NKCC1. Hydrochlorothiazide, a blocker of the Na+–Cl− cotransporter, had only a small effect. DIDS, a blocker of some KCC cotransporters and Cl−/HCO3− exchangers, reduced the EOG in epithelia from both wild-type and NKCC1 knockout mice. A combination of bumetanide and DIDS decreased the response more than either drug alone. However, no combination of drugs completely abolished the Cl− component of the response. These results support the involvement of both NKCC1 and one or more DIDS-sensitive transporters in Cl− accumulation in olfactory receptor neurons. PMID:17656441

  10. Mechanisms of neuronal chloride accumulation in intact mouse olfactory epithelium.

    PubMed

    Nickell, William T; Kleene, Nancy K; Kleene, Steven J

    2007-09-15

    When olfactory receptor neurons respond to odours, a depolarizing Cl(-) efflux is a substantial part of the response. This requires that the resting neuron accumulate Cl(-) against an electrochemical gradient. In isolated olfactory receptor neurons, the Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) cotransporter NKCC1 is essential for Cl(-) accumulation. However, in intact epithelium, a robust electrical olfactory response persists in mice lacking NKCC1. This response is largely due to a neuronal Cl(-) efflux. It thus appears that NKCC1 is an important part of a more complex system of Cl(-) accumulation. To identify the remaining transport proteins, we first screened by RT-PCR for 21 Cl(-) transporters in mouse nasal tissue containing olfactory mucosa. For most of the Cl(-) transporters, the presence of mRNA was demonstrated. We also investigated the effects of pharmacological block or genetic ablation of Cl(-) transporters on the olfactory field potential, the electroolfactogram (EOG). Mice lacking the common Cl(-)/HCO(3)(-) exchanger AE2 had normal EOGs. Block of NKCC cotransport with bumetanide reduced the EOG in epithelia from wild-type mice but had no effect in mice lacking NKCC1. Hydrochlorothiazide, a blocker of the Na(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter, had only a small effect. DIDS, a blocker of some KCC cotransporters and Cl(-)/HCO(3)(-) exchangers, reduced the EOG in epithelia from both wild-type and NKCC1 knockout mice. A combination of bumetanide and DIDS decreased the response more than either drug alone. However, no combination of drugs completely abolished the Cl(-) component of the response. These results support the involvement of both NKCC1 and one or more DIDS-sensitive transporters in Cl(-) accumulation in olfactory receptor neurons. PMID:17656441

  11. How much does nasal cavity morphology matter? Patterns and rates of olfactory airflow in phyllostomid bats.

    PubMed

    Eiting, Thomas P; Perot, J Blair; Dumont, Elizabeth R

    2015-02-01

    The morphology of the nasal cavity in mammals with a good sense of smell includes features that are thought to improve olfactory airflow, such as a dorsal conduit that delivers odours quickly to the olfactory mucosa, an enlarged olfactory recess at the back of the airway, and a clear separation of the olfactory and respiratory regions of the nose. The link between these features and having a good sense of smell has been established by functional examinations of a handful of distantly related mammalian species. In this paper, we provide the first detailed examination of olfactory airflow in a group of closely related species that nevertheless vary in their sense of smell. We study six species of phyllostomid bats that have different airway morphologies and foraging ecologies, which have been linked to differences in olfactory ability or reliance. We hypothesize that differences in morphology correlate with differences in the patterns and rates of airflow, which in turn are consistent with dietary differences. To compare species, we make qualitative and quantitative comparisons of the patterns and rates of airflow through the olfactory region during both inhalation and exhalation across the six species. Contrary to our expectations, we find no clear differences among species in either the patterns of airflow through the airway or in rates of flow through the olfactory region. By and large, olfactory airflow seems to be conserved across species, suggesting that morphological differences appear to be driven by other mechanical demands on the snout, such as breathing and feeding. Olfactory ability may depend on other aspects of the system, such as the neurobiological processing of odours that work within the existing morphology imposed by other functional demands on the nasal cavity. PMID:25520358

  12. How much does nasal cavity morphology matter? Patterns and rates of olfactory airflow in phyllostomid bats

    PubMed Central

    Eiting, Thomas P.; Perot, J. Blair; Dumont, Elizabeth R.

    2015-01-01

    The morphology of the nasal cavity in mammals with a good sense of smell includes features that are thought to improve olfactory airflow, such as a dorsal conduit that delivers odours quickly to the olfactory mucosa, an enlarged olfactory recess at the back of the airway, and a clear separation of the olfactory and respiratory regions of the nose. The link between these features and having a good sense of smell has been established by functional examinations of a handful of distantly related mammalian species. In this paper, we provide the first detailed examination of olfactory airflow in a group of closely related species that nevertheless vary in their sense of smell. We study six species of phyllostomid bats that have different airway morphologies and foraging ecologies, which have been linked to differences in olfactory ability or reliance. We hypothesize that differences in morphology correlate with differences in the patterns and rates of airflow, which in turn are consistent with dietary differences. To compare species, we make qualitative and quantitative comparisons of the patterns and rates of airflow through the olfactory region during both inhalation and exhalation across the six species. Contrary to our expectations, we find no clear differences among species in either the patterns of airflow through the airway or in rates of flow through the olfactory region. By and large, olfactory airflow seems to be conserved across species, suggesting that morphological differences appear to be driven by other mechanical demands on the snout, such as breathing and feeding. Olfactory ability may depend on other aspects of the system, such as the neurobiological processing of odours that work within the existing morphology imposed by other functional demands on the nasal cavity. PMID:25520358

  13. The Mouse Olfactory Peduncle

    PubMed Central

    Brunjes, Peter C; Kay, Rachel B; Arrivillaga, J. P

    2012-01-01

    The olfactory peduncle, the region connecting the olfactory bulb with the basal forebrain, contains several neural areas that have received relatively little attention. The present work includes studies that provide an overview of the region in the mouse. An analysis of cell soma size in pars principalis (pP) of the anterior olfactory nucleus (AON) revealed considerable differences in tissue organization between mice and rats. An unbiased stereological study of neuron number in the cell-dense regions of pars externa (pE) and pP of the AON of 3, 12 and 24 month-old mice indicated that pE has about 16,500 cells in 0.043 mm3and pP about 58,300 cells in 0.307 mm3. Quantitative Golgi studies of pyramidal neurons in pP suggested that mouse neurons are similar though smaller to those of the rat. An immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated that all peduncular regions (pE, pP, the dorsal peduncular cortex, ventral tenia tecta, and anterior olfactory tubercle and piriform cortex) have cells that express either calbindin, calretinin, parvalbumin, somatostatin, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, neuropeptide Y or cholecystokinin (antigens commonly co-expressed by subspecies of GABAergic neurons), though the relative numbers of each cell type differs between zones. Finally, an electron microscopic comparison of the organization of myelinated fibers in lateral olfactory tract in the anterior and posterior peduncle indicated that the region is less orderly in mice than in the rat. The results provide a caveat for investigators who generalize data between species as both similarities and differences between the laboratory mouse and rat were observed. PMID:21618219

  14. Existence of Gαi2-expressing axon terminals in the goat main olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Ohara, Hiromi; Okamura, Hiroaki; Ichikawa, Masumi; Mori, Yuji; Hagino-Yamagishi, Kimiko

    2013-01-31

    In rodents, Gα(i2)-expressing sensory neurons (SNs) that co-express vomeronasal receptor type 1 (V1R) are specifically found in the vomeronasal organ (VNO) and project their axons to the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB). In goats, however, Gα(i2)/V1R-expressing SNs exist in both the VNO and the olfactory epithelium. Thus, we examined whether the Gα(i2)-expressing axons functionally project to the main olfactory bulb (MOB). We analyzed the expression of Gα(i2) in the olfactory bulb and found small Gα(i2)-immunoreactive clusters in the MOB. The Gα(i2)-immunoreactive axons in these clusters made synaptic contacts with second-order neurons in the MOB. These results suggest that some Gα(i2)-expressing SNs functionally project their axons to the MOB in goats. PMID:22878538

  15. Rodent Research-1 Validation of Rodent Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Globus, Ruth; Beegle, Janet

    2013-01-01

    To achieve novel science objectives, validation of a rodent habitat on ISS will enable - In-flight analyses during long duration spaceflight- Use of genetically altered animals- Application of modern analytical techniques (e.g. genomics, proteomics, and metabolomics)

  16. A chemical-modification approach to the olfactory code. Studies with a thiol-specific reagent

    PubMed Central

    Menevse, Adnan; Dodd, George; Poynder, T. Michael

    1978-01-01

    The effects of thiol-specific reagents on the amplitude of the electro-olfactogram (E.O.G.) responses elicited from frog olfactory mucosa by pulses of odorant vapours was studied. The impermeant thiol-specific reagent mersalyl [(3-{[2-(carboxymethoxy)-benzoyl]amino}-2-methoxypropyl)hydroxymercury monosodium salt] brings about a rapid decrease in the E.O.G. signal obtained with the odorant pentyl acetate. The extent of the decrease is proportional to the concentration of the mersalyl applied and the effect of the reagent is partially but incompletely reversed by treatment of the labelled mucosa with dithiothreitol. The sites labelled by mersalyl can be protected by pretreating the mucosa with a dilute solution of the odorant pentyl acetate and leaving the solution in contact with the tissue after the addition of mersalyl. When the protecting odorant is washed out of the tissue, the original E.O.G. amplitude is regained. Pentyl acetate applied to the mucosa protected the E.O.G. response to vapour pulses of the following odorants from the effects of mersalyl: n-butyric acid, n-butyl acetate, phenylacetaldehyde and cineole (1,3,3-trimethyl-2-oxabicyclo[2.2.2]octane). The pentyl acetate applied to the mucosa failed to protect the E.O.G. response to vapour pulses of the following odorants from the effects of mersalyl: butan-1-ol, benzyl acetate, nitrobenzene, β-ionone and linalyl acetate. The significance of the differential protection effects for the odour-quality-coding mechanism in the olfactory primary neurons is discussed. It is suggested that the olfactory code at this level of the olfactory system may be elucidated by chemical-modification methods. PMID:311638

  17. Learning to smell danger: acquired associative representation of threat in the olfactory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wen

    2014-01-01

    Neuroscience research over the past few decades has reached a strong consensus that the amygdala plays a key role in emotion processing. However, many questions remain unanswered, especially concerning emotion perception. Based on mnemonic theories of olfactory perception and in light of the highly associative nature of olfactory cortical processing, here I propose a sensory cortical model of olfactory threat perception (i.e., sensory-cortex-based threat perception): the olfactory cortex stores threat codes as acquired associative representations (AARs) formed via aversive life experiences, thereby enabling encoding of threat cues during sensory processing. Rodent and human research in olfactory aversive conditioning was reviewed, indicating learning-induced plasticity in the amygdala and the olfactory piriform cortex. In addition, as aversive learning becomes consolidated in the amygdala, the associative olfactory (piriform) cortex may undergo (long-term) plastic changes, resulting in modified neural response patterns that underpin threat AARs. This proposal thus brings forward a sensory cortical pathway to threat processing (in addition to amygdala-based processes), potentially accounting for an alternative mechanism underlying the pathophysiology of anxiety and depression. PMID:24778610

  18. Learning to smell danger: acquired associative representation of threat in the olfactory cortex.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen

    2014-01-01

    Neuroscience research over the past few decades has reached a strong consensus that the amygdala plays a key role in emotion processing. However, many questions remain unanswered, especially concerning emotion perception. Based on mnemonic theories of olfactory perception and in light of the highly associative nature of olfactory cortical processing, here I propose a sensory cortical model of olfactory threat perception (i.e., sensory-cortex-based threat perception): the olfactory cortex stores threat codes as acquired associative representations (AARs) formed via aversive life experiences, thereby enabling encoding of threat cues during sensory processing. Rodent and human research in olfactory aversive conditioning was reviewed, indicating learning-induced plasticity in the amygdala and the olfactory piriform cortex. In addition, as aversive learning becomes consolidated in the amygdala, the associative olfactory (piriform) cortex may undergo (long-term) plastic changes, resulting in modified neural response patterns that underpin threat AARs. This proposal thus brings forward a sensory cortical pathway to threat processing (in addition to amygdala-based processes), potentially accounting for an alternative mechanism underlying the pathophysiology of anxiety and depression. PMID:24778610

  19. Acetylcholine and Olfactory Perceptual Learning

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Donald A.; Fletcher, Max L.; Sullivan, Regina M.

    2007-01-01

    Olfactory perceptual learning is a relatively long-term, learned increase in perceptual acuity, and has been described in both humans and animals. Data from recent electrophysiological studies have indicated that olfactory perceptual learning may be correlated with changes in odorant receptive fields of neurons in the olfactory bulb and piriform cortex. These changes include enhanced representation of the molecular features of familiar odors by mitral cells in the olfactory bulb, and synthetic coding of multiple coincident odorant features into odor objects by cortical neurons. In this paper, data are reviewed that show the critical role of acetylcholine (Ach) in olfactory system function and plasticity, and cholinergic modulation of olfactory perceptual learning at both the behavioral and cortical level. PMID:14747514

  20. Simple and Computer-assisted Olfactory Testing for Mice.

    PubMed

    Brai, Emanuele; Alberi, Lavinia

    2015-01-01

    Olfaction is highly conserved among species and is required for reproduction and survival. In humans, olfaction is also one of the senses that is affected with aging and is a strong predictor of neurodegenerative diseases. Thus, olfaction testing is used as a non-invasive diagnostic method to detect neurological deficits early on. In order to understand the mechanisms underlying olfactory network susceptibility, olfactory research in rodents has gained momentum in the past decade. Here, we present a very simple, time efficient and reproducible olfactory testing method of innate odor perception and sensitivity in mice without the need of any prior food or water restriction. The tests are performed in a familiar environment to the mice, require only the scents and a 2 min session of odorant exposure. The analysis is performed, post-hoc, using computer-assisted commands on ImageJ and can be, therefore, carried out from start to end by one researcher. This protocol does not require any special hardware or setup and is indicated for any laboratory interested in testing olfactory perception and sensitivity. PMID:26131595

  1. Olfactory perceptual stability and discrimination.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Dylan C; Hofacer, Rylon D; Zaman, Ashiq R; Rennaker, Robert L; Wilson, Donald A

    2008-12-01

    No two roses smell exactly alike, but our brain accurately bundles these variations into a single percept 'rose'. We found that ensembles of rat olfactory bulb neurons decorrelate complex mixtures that vary by as little as a single missing component, whereas olfactory (piriform) cortical neural ensembles perform pattern completion in response to an absent component, essentially filling in the missing information and allowing perceptual stability. This piriform cortical ensemble activity predicts olfactory perception. PMID:18978781

  2. Attention and olfactory consciousness.

    PubMed

    Keller, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the relation between attention and consciousness is an important part of our understanding of consciousness. Attention, unlike consciousness, can be systematically manipulated in psychophysical experiments and a law-like relation between attention and consciousness is waiting to be discovered. Most attempts to discover the nature of this relation are focused on a special type of attention: spatial visual attention. In this review I want to introduce another type of attention to the discussion: attention to the olfactory modality. I will first clarify the position of attention to smells in a general taxonomy of attention. I will then review the mechanisms and neuroanatomy of attention and consciousness in the olfactory system before using the newly introduced system to provide evidence that attention is necessary for consciousness. PMID:22203813

  3. OLFACTORY TOXICITY RESULTING FROM DERMAL APPLICATION OF 2,6-DICHLOROBENZONITRILE (DICHLOBENIL) IN THE C57B1 MOUSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    2,6-Dichlorobenzonitrile (dichlobenil) is an herbicide which has previously been reported by other investigators to be toxic to the olfactory mucosa following intraperitoneal administration. The objective of this study was to determine whether a more occupationally-relevant route...

  4. Recent Trend in Development of Olfactory Displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagida, Yasuyuki

    An olfactory display is a device that generates scented air with desired concentration of aroma, and delivers it to the user's olfactory organ. In this article, the nature of olfaction is briefly described from the view point of how to configure olfactory displays. Next, component technologies to compose olfactory displays, i.e., making scents and delivering scents, are categorized. Several existing olfactory display systems are introduced to show the current status of research and development of olfactory displays.

  5. Gap junctions in olfactory neurons modulate olfactory sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background One of the fundamental questions in olfaction is whether olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) behave as independent entities within the olfactory epithelium. On the basis that mature ORNs express multiple connexins, I postulated that gap junctional communication modulates olfactory responses in the periphery and that disruption of gap junctions in ORNs reduces olfactory sensitivity. The data collected from characterizing connexin 43 (Cx43) dominant negative transgenic mice OlfDNCX, and from calcium imaging of wild type mice (WT) support my hypothesis. Results I generated OlfDNCX mice that express a dominant negative Cx43 protein, Cx43/β-gal, in mature ORNs to inactivate gap junctions and hemichannels composed of Cx43 or other structurally related connexins. Characterization of OlfDNCX revealed that Cx43/β-gal was exclusively expressed in areas where mature ORNs resided. Real time quantitative PCR indicated that cellular machineries of OlfDNCX were normal in comparison to WT. Electroolfactogram recordings showed decreased olfactory responses to octaldehyde, heptaldehyde and acetyl acetate in OlfDNCX compared to WT. Octaldehyde-elicited glomerular activity in the olfactory bulb, measured according to odor-elicited c-fos mRNA upregulation in juxtaglomerular cells, was confined to smaller areas of the glomerular layer in OlfDNCX compared to WT. In WT mice, octaldehyde sensitive neurons exhibited reduced response magnitudes after application of gap junction uncoupling reagents and the effects were specific to subsets of neurons. Conclusions My study has demonstrated that altered assembly of Cx43 or structurally related connexins in ORNs modulates olfactory responses and changes olfactory activation maps in the olfactory bulb. Furthermore, pharmacologically uncoupling of gap junctions reduces olfactory activity in subsets of ORNs. These data suggest that gap junctional communication or hemichannel activity plays a critical role in maintaining olfactory

  6. In vivo expression of adenovirus-mediated lacZ gene in murine nasal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Arimoto, Yukiko; Nagata, Hiroshi; Isegawa, Naohisa; Kumahara, Keiichiro; Isoyama, Kyoko; Konno, Akiyoshi; Shirasawa, Hiroshi

    2002-09-01

    Adenovirus is a good tool for transferring exogenous genes into various organs because the virus has a wide spectrum of infection. In this report, we demonstrate that a recombinant adenovirus, Ax1CAlacZ, can transfer an exogenous lacZ gene into murine nasal mucosa in vivo. The efficiency of the exogenous gene expression varied for different cell types and was improved by optimizing the method of administration. In the olfactory region, the olfactory epithelia, sustentacular cells and olfactory nerve efficiently expressed lacZ gene transferred by Ax1CAlacZ using either of two administration methods, dripping or injecting. In contrast, in the respiratory region, the respiratory epithelia but not the subepithelial tissues expressed lacZ gene transferred by Ax1CAlacZ, and the efficiency of the gene transfer, which was low when the virus was administered by nasal drops, was improved when the virus was administered by injection. Our study demonstrated that gene transfer mediated by adenovirus is more efficient in the olfactory epithelia than in the respiratory epithelia, and may be applicable to nasal or paranasal diseases such as olfactory epithelial disturbances. PMID:12403125

  7. Surface coatings of ZnO nanoparticles mitigate differentially a host of transcriptional, protein and signalling responses in primary human olfactory cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Inhaled nanoparticles have been reported in some instances to translocate from the nostril to the olfactory bulb in exposed rats. In close proximity to the olfactory bulb is the olfactory mucosa, within which resides a niche of multipotent cells. Cells isolated from this area may provide a relevant in vitro system to investigate potential effects of workplace exposure to inhaled zinc oxide nanoparticles. Methods Four types of commercially-available zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles, two coated and two uncoated, were examined for their effects on primary human cells cultured from the olfactory mucosa. Human olfactory neurosphere-derived (hONS) cells from healthy adult donors were analyzed for modulation of cytokine levels, activation of intracellular signalling pathways, changes in gene-expression patterns across the whole genome, and compromised cellular function over a 24 h period following exposure to the nanoparticles suspended in cell culture medium. Results ZnO nanoparticle toxicity in hONS cells was mediated through a battery of mechanisms largely related to cell stress, inflammatory response and apoptosis, but not activation of mechanisms that repair damaged DNA. Surface coatings on the ZnO nanoparticles mitigated these cellular responses to varying degrees. Conclusions The results indicate that care should be taken in the workplace to minimize generation of, and exposure to, aerosols of uncoated ZnO nanoparticles, given the adverse responses reported here using multipotent cells derived from the olfactory mucosa. PMID:24144420

  8. Both olfactory epithelial and vomeronasal inputs are essential for activation of the medial amygdala and preoptic neurons of male rats.

    PubMed

    Dhungel, S; Masaoka, M; Rai, D; Kondo, Y; Sakuma, Y

    2011-12-29

    Chemosensory inputs signaling volatile and nonvolatile molecules play a pivotal role in sexual and social behavior in rodents. We have demonstrated that olfactory preference in male rats, that is, attraction to receptive female odors, is regulated by the medial amygdala (MeA), the cortical amygdala (CoA), and the preoptic area (POA). In this paper, we investigated the involvement of two chemosensory organs, the olfactory epithelium (OE) and the vomeronasal organ (VNO), in olfactory preference and copulatory behavior in male rats. We found that olfactory preferences were impaired by zinc sulfate lesion of the OE but not surgical removal of the VNO. Copulatory behaviors, especially intromission frequency and ejaculation, were also suppressed by zinc sulfate treatment. Neuronal activation in the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB), the MeA, the CoA, and the POA was analyzed after stimulation by airborne odors or soiled bedding of estrous females using cFos immunohistochemistry. Although the OE and VNO belong to different neural systems, the main and accessory olfactory systems, respectively, both OE lesion and VNO removal almost equally suppressed the number of cFos-immunoreactive cells in those areas that regulate olfactory preference. These results suggest that signals received by the OE and VNO interact and converge in the early stage of olfactory processing, in the AOB and its targets, although they have distinct roles in the regulation of social behaviors. PMID:21983295

  9. Calcium and olfactory transduction.

    PubMed

    Winegar, B D; Rosick, E R; Schafer, R

    1988-01-01

    1. Inorganic cations, organic calcium antagonists, and calmodulin antagonists were applied to olfactory epithelia of frogs (Rana pipiens) while recording electroolfactogram (EOG) responses. 2. Inorganic cations inhibited EOGs in a rank order, reflecting their calcium channel blocking potency: La3+ greater than Zn2+ greater than Cd2+ greater than Al3+ greater than Ca2+ greater than Sr2+ greater than Co2+ greater than Ba2+ greater than Mg2+. Barium ion significantly enhanced EOGs immediately following application. 3. Diltiazem and verapamil produced dose-dependent EOG inhibition. 4. Calmodulin antagonists inhibited EOGs without correlation to their anti-calmodulin potency. PMID:2904344

  10. Early survival factor deprivation in the olfactory epithelium enhances activity-driven survival.

    PubMed

    François, Adrien; Laziz, Iman; Rimbaud, Stéphanie; Grebert, Denise; Durieux, Didier; Pajot-Augy, Edith; Meunier, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    The neuronal olfactory epithelium undergoes permanent renewal because of environmental aggression. This renewal is partly regulated by factors modulating the level of neuronal apoptosis. Among them, we had previously characterized endothelin as neuroprotective. In this study, we explored the effect of cell survival factor deprivation in the olfactory epithelium by intranasal delivery of endothelin receptors antagonists to rat pups. This treatment induced an overall increase of apoptosis in the olfactory epithelium. The responses to odorants recorded by electroolfactogram were decreased in treated animal, a result consistent with a loss of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs). However, the treated animal performed better in an olfactory orientation test based on maternal odor compared to non-treated littermates. This improved performance could be due to activity-dependent neuronal survival of OSNs in the context of increased apoptosis level. In order to demonstrate it, we odorized pups with octanal, a known ligand for the rI7 olfactory receptor (Olr226). We quantified the number of OSN expressing rI7 by RT-qPCR and whole mount in situ hybridization. While this number was reduced by the survival factor removal treatment, this reduction was abolished by the presence of its ligand. This improved survival was optimal for low concentration of odorant and was specific for rI7-expressing OSNs. Meanwhile, the number of rI7-expressing OSNs was not affected by the odorization in non-treated littermates; showing that the activity-dependant survival of OSNs did not affect the OSN population during the 10 days of odorization in control conditions. Overall, our study shows that when apoptosis is promoted in the olfactory mucosa, the activity-dependent neuronal plasticity allows faster tuning of the olfactory sensory neuron population toward detection of environmental odorants. PMID:24399931

  11. Early survival factor deprivation in the olfactory epithelium enhances activity-driven survival

    PubMed Central

    François, Adrien; Laziz, Iman; Rimbaud, Stéphanie; Grebert, Denise; Durieux, Didier; Pajot-Augy, Edith; Meunier, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    The neuronal olfactory epithelium undergoes permanent renewal because of environmental aggression. This renewal is partly regulated by factors modulating the level of neuronal apoptosis. Among them, we had previously characterized endothelin as neuroprotective. In this study, we explored the effect of cell survival factor deprivation in the olfactory epithelium by intranasal delivery of endothelin receptors antagonists to rat pups. This treatment induced an overall increase of apoptosis in the olfactory epithelium. The responses to odorants recorded by electroolfactogram were decreased in treated animal, a result consistent with a loss of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs). However, the treated animal performed better in an olfactory orientation test based on maternal odor compared to non-treated littermates. This improved performance could be due to activity-dependent neuronal survival of OSNs in the context of increased apoptosis level. In order to demonstrate it, we odorized pups with octanal, a known ligand for the rI7 olfactory receptor (Olr226). We quantified the number of OSN expressing rI7 by RT-qPCR and whole mount in situ hybridization. While this number was reduced by the survival factor removal treatment, this reduction was abolished by the presence of its ligand. This improved survival was optimal for low concentration of odorant and was specific for rI7-expressing OSNs. Meanwhile, the number of rI7-expressing OSNs was not affected by the odorization in non-treated littermates; showing that the activity-dependant survival of OSNs did not affect the OSN population during the 10 days of odorization in control conditions. Overall, our study shows that when apoptosis is promoted in the olfactory mucosa, the activity-dependent neuronal plasticity allows faster tuning of the olfactory sensory neuron population toward detection of environmental odorants. PMID:24399931

  12. Microvasculature of the Olfactory Organ in the Japanese Monkey (Macaca fuscata fuscata)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Shigenori; Schraufnagel, Dean E.

    2002-06-01

    Olfaction is an important and primitive sense. As its importance has changed with evolution, anatomic adjustments have occurred in its structure and vasculature. Primates are a family of vertebrates that have had to develop their visual system to adapt to the arboreal environment and have evolved from a macrosmatic to a microsmatic species as the optic system has enlarged. This has resulted in anatomic changes of a small but critical area at the base of the brain. This paper describes the three-dimensional vascular anatomy of the olfactory organ of the Japanese monkey (Macaca fuscata fuscata). This is best understood by dividing the organ into three parts: the olfactory tract, olfactory bulb, and olfactory nerves in the nasal mucosa. The bulb can be partitioned into an outer or cortical part and inner or medullary part. The vasculature and tissue were examined grossly and with light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy of vascular corrosion casts. The olfactory tract and bulb were supplied by an arteriole from the anterior cerebral artery on each side. The tract was supplied by capillaries running spirally with a coarse network. At the olfactory bulb, the arteriole ramified into the intracortical and medullary branches that formed capillary networks. The bulbar intracortical capillaries were divided into two layers with different densities and vascular patterns. The capillaries of the superficial layer had a ladder-like pattern. The branches that ran into the medulla of the olfactory bulb were more widely spaced. Twigs from the posterior ethmoidal artery ran along the nerve fiber and formed intra- and extrafascicular networks. Each region of the olfactory organ had characteristic three-dimensional vascular patterns that were related to their cellular architecture.

  13. Ultrastructural changes in the nasal mucosa of Fischer 344 rats and B6C3F1 mice following an acute exposure to methyl isocyanate

    SciTech Connect

    Uraih, L.C.; Talley, F.A.; Mitsumori, K.; Gupta, B.N.; Bucher, J.R.; Boorman, G.A.

    1987-06-01

    Male rats and male mice received a single 2-hr exposure to 0 (control), 10, or 30 ppm of methyl isocyanate and were sacrificed after 1, 3, 14, or 90 days to assess the ultrastructural changes in the nasal mucosa by transmission electron microscopy. One day after exposure to methyl isocyanate, there were widespread areas of necrosis and degeneration of the respiratory and olfactory epithelium of rats and mice in the 10 ppm and 30 ppm groups. Qualitatively the ultrastructural findings were similar for both exposure groups and species. Degeneration followed by rapid regeneration was observed for both respiratory and olfactory epithelia but was most striking for olfactory epithelium in the dorsal meatus. Three days after the exposure, the olfactory epithelium was two to three cell layers thick due to a loss of supporting cells, olfactory neurons, and basal cells. By 14 days after exposure, the olfactory epithelium was composed of a heterogeneous cell population three to five cell layers thick. At 90 days following exposure, the epithelium was of normal thickness (eight to ten cell layers), with normal architectural arrangement, and composed of well-differentiated cells that appeared similar to those of controls. There were several findings that suggested the epithelial cells of Bowman's glands were the progenitor for the regenerating supporting cells of the olfactory epithelium. This study demonstrated that the respiratory and olfactory epithelium is capable of complete structural regeneration after an acute destruction by methyl isocyanate.

  14. Chemotopic Odorant Coding in a Mammalian Olfactory System

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Brett A.; Leon, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Systematic mapping studies involving 365 odorant chemicals have shown that glomerular responses in the rat olfactory bulb are organized spatially in patterns that are related to the chemistry of the odorant stimuli. This organization involves the spatial clustering of principal responses to numerous odorants that share key aspects of chemistry such as functional groups, hydrocarbon structural elements, and/or overall molecular properties related to water solubility. In several of the clusters, responses shift progressively in position according to odorant carbon chain length. These response domains appear to be constructed from orderly projections of sensory neurons in the olfactory epithelium and may also involve chromatography across the nasal mucosa. The spatial clustering of glomerular responses may serve to “tune” the principal responses of bulbar projection neurons by way of inhibitory interneuronal networks, allowing the projection neurons to respond to a narrower range of stimuli than their associated sensory neurons. When glomerular activity patterns are viewed relative to the overall level of glomerular activation, the patterns accurately predict the perception of odor quality, thereby supporting the notion that spatial patterns of activity are the key factors underlying that aspect of the olfactory code. A critical analysis suggests that alternative coding mechanisms for odor quality, such as those based on temporal patterns of responses, enjoy little experimental support. PMID:17480025

  15. Nanoparticle transport across in vitro olfactory cell monolayers.

    PubMed

    Gartziandia, Oihane; Egusquiaguirre, Susana Patricia; Bianco, John; Pedraz, José Luis; Igartua, Manoli; Hernandez, Rosa Maria; Préat, Véronique; Beloqui, Ana

    2016-02-29

    Drug access to the CNS is hindered by the presence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), and the intranasal route has risen as a non-invasive route to transport drugs directly from nose-to-brain avoiding the BBB. In addition, nanoparticles (NPs) have been described as efficient shuttles for direct nose-to-brain delivery of drugs. Nevertheless, there are few studies describing NP nose-to-brain transport. Thus, the aim of this work was (i) to develop, characterize and validate in vitro olfactory cell monolayers and (ii) to study the transport of polymeric- and lipid-based NPs across these monolayers in order to estimate NP access into the brain using cell penetrating peptide (CPPs) moieties: Tat and Penetratin (Pen). All tested poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) and nanostructured lipid carrier (NLC) formulations were stable in transport buffer and biocompatible with the olfactory mucosa cells. Nevertheless, 0.7% of PLGA NPs was able to cross the olfactory cell monolayers, whereas 8% and 22% of NLC and chitosan-coated NLC (CS-NLC) were transported across them, respectively. Moreover, the incorporation of CPPs to NLC surface significantly increased their transport, reaching 46% of transported NPs. We conclude that CPP-CS-NLC represent a promising brain shuttle via nose-to-brain for drug delivery. PMID:26721725

  16. Vermilion Reconstruction with Genital Mucosa.

    PubMed

    Müller-Richter, Urs D A; Weyandt, Gerhard H; Woeckel, Achim; Kübler, Alexander C

    2016-05-01

    Functional and aesthetical reconstruction, especially of the upper lip after ablative tumor surgery, can be very challenging. The skin of the lip might be sufficiently reconstructed by transpositional flaps from the nasolabial or facial area. Large defects of the lip mucosa, including the vestibule, are even more challenging due to the fact that flaps from the inner lining of the oral cavity often lead to functional impairments. We present a case of multiple vermilion and skin resections of the upper lip. At the last step, we had to resect even the whole vermilion mucosa, including parts of the oral mucosa of the vestibule, leaving a bare orbicularis oris muscle. To reconstruct the mucosal layer, we used a mucosal graft from the labia minora and placed it on the compromised lip and the former transpositional flaps for the reconstructed skin of the upper lip with very good functional and aesthetic results. PMID:27579226

  17. Vermilion Reconstruction with Genital Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Weyandt, Gerhard H.; Woeckel, Achim; Kübler, Alexander C.

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Functional and aesthetical reconstruction, especially of the upper lip after ablative tumor surgery, can be very challenging. The skin of the lip might be sufficiently reconstructed by transpositional flaps from the nasolabial or facial area. Large defects of the lip mucosa, including the vestibule, are even more challenging due to the fact that flaps from the inner lining of the oral cavity often lead to functional impairments. We present a case of multiple vermilion and skin resections of the upper lip. At the last step, we had to resect even the whole vermilion mucosa, including parts of the oral mucosa of the vestibule, leaving a bare orbicularis oris muscle. To reconstruct the mucosal layer, we used a mucosal graft from the labia minora and placed it on the compromised lip and the former transpositional flaps for the reconstructed skin of the upper lip with very good functional and aesthetic results.

  18. Olfactory maps, circuits and computations.

    PubMed

    Giessel, Andrew J; Datta, Sandeep Robert

    2014-02-01

    Sensory information in the visual, auditory and somatosensory systems is organized topographically, with key sensory features ordered in space across neural sheets. Despite the existence of a spatially stereotyped map of odor identity within the olfactory bulb, it is unclear whether the higher olfactory cortex uses topography to organize information about smells. Here, we review recent work on the anatomy, microcircuitry and neuromodulation of two higher-order olfactory areas: the piriform cortex and the olfactory tubercle. The piriform is an archicortical region with an extensive local associational network that constructs representations of odor identity. The olfactory tubercle is an extension of the ventral striatum that may use reward-based learning rules to encode odor valence. We argue that in contrast to brain circuits for other sensory modalities, both the piriform and the olfactory tubercle largely discard any topography present in the bulb and instead use distributive afferent connectivity, local learning rules and input from neuromodulatory centers to build behaviorally relevant representations of olfactory stimuli. PMID:24492088

  19. Modeling and Simulations of Olfactory Drug Delivery with Passive and Active Controls of Nasally Inhaled Pharmaceutical Aerosols.

    PubMed

    Si, Xiuhua A; Xi, Jinxiang

    2016-01-01

    There are many advantages of direct nose-to-brain drug delivery in the treatment of neurological disorders. However, its application is limited by the extremely low delivery efficiency (< 1%) to the olfactory mucosa that directly connects the brain. It is crucial to develop novel techniques to deliver neurological medications more effectively to the olfactory region. The objective of this study is to develop a numerical platform to simulate and improve intranasal olfactory drug delivery. A coupled image-CFD method was presented that synthetized the image-based model development, quality meshing, fluid simulation, and magnetic particle tracking. With this method, performances of three intranasal delivery protocols were numerically assessed and compared. Influences of breathing maneuvers, magnet layout, magnetic field strength, drug release position, and particle size on the olfactory dosage were also numerically studied. From the simulations, we found that clinically significant olfactory dosage (up to 45%) were feasible using the combination of magnet layout and selective drug release. A 64 -fold higher delivery of dosage was predicted in the case with magnetophoretic guidance compared to the case without it. However, precise guidance of nasally inhaled aerosols to the olfactory region remains challenging due to the unstable nature of magnetophoresis, as well as the high sensitivity of olfactory dosage to patient-, device-, and particle-related factors. PMID:27285852

  20. A Circadian Clock in the Olfactory Bulb Anticipates Feeding during Food Anticipatory Activity

    PubMed Central

    Nolasco, Nahum; Juárez, Claudia; Morgado, Elvira; Meza, Enrique; Caba, Mario

    2012-01-01

    Rabbit pups ingest food, in this case milk, once a day with circadian periodicity and are a natural model of food anticipatory activity. During nursing, several sensory systems receive information about properties of the food, one of them being the olfactory system, which has received little attention in relation to synchronization by food. In addition, the olfactory bulb has a circadian pacemaker that exhibits rhythms independently of the suprachiasmatic nucleus, but the biological functions of these rhythms are largely unknown. In the present contribution, we hypothesized that circadian suckling of milk synchronizes rhythms in the olfactory bulb. To this aim we explored by immunohistochemistry, rhythms of FOS and PER1 proteins, as indicators of activation and reporter of oscillations, respectively, through a complete 24-h cycle in periglomerular, mitral and granular cell layers of both the main and the accessory olfactory bulb. Subjects were 7-day-old rabbit pups scheduled to nurse during the night (02∶00 h) or day (10∶00 h), and also fasted subjects, to explore the possible persistence of oscillations. In the three layers of the main olfactory bulb, FOS was high at time of nursing, then further increased 1.5 h afterward, and then decreased to increase again in advance of the next nursing bout. This pattern persisted, without the postprandial increase, in fasted subjects with a shift in subjects nursed at 02∶00. PER1 was increased 2–8 h after nursing and this increase persisted in most cell layers, with a shift, in fasted subjects. In the accessory olfactory bulb we only observed a consistent pattern of FOS expression in the mitral cell layer of nursed subjects, similar to that of the main olfactory bulb. We conclude that the main olfactory bulb is synchronized during milk ingestion, but during fasting its oscillations perhaps are modulated by the suprachiasmatic nucleus, as proposed for rodents. PMID:23094084

  1. Olfactory receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Gabriela; Simoes de Souza, Fabio Marques

    2016-01-01

    The guanine nucleotide protein (G protein)-coupled receptors (GPCRs) superfamily represents the largest class of membrane protein in the human genome. More than a half of all GPCRs are dedicated to interact with odorants and are termed odorant-receptors (ORs). Linda Buck and Richard Axel, the Nobel Prize laureates in physiology or medicine in 2004, first cloned and characterized the gene family that encode ORs, establishing the foundations to the understanding of the molecular basis for odor recognition. In the last decades, a lot of progress has been done to unravel the functioning of the sense of smell. This chapter gives a general overview of the topic of olfactory receptor signaling and reviews recent advances in this field. PMID:26928542

  2. Assessment of olfactory function.

    PubMed

    Hummel, Thomas; Welge-Lüessen, Antje

    2006-01-01

    Numerous techniques are available for the investigation of chemosensory functions in humans. They include psychophysical measures of chemosensory function, e.g. odor identification, odor discrimination, odor thresholds, odor memory, and retronasal perception of odors. In order to assess changes related to the patients' quality of life or effects of qualitative olfactory dysfunction, questionnaires are being used. Measures relying to a lesser degree on the subjects' cooperation are e.g. chemosensory event-related potentials, odor-induced changes of the EEG, the electroolfactogram, imaging techniques, or measures of respiration. In a clinical context, however, psychophysical techniques are most frequently used, e.g. tests for odor identification, and odor thresholds. Interpretation of results from these measures is frequently supported by the assessment of chemosensory event-related potentials. Other techniques await further standardization before they will become useful in a clinical context. PMID:16733334

  3. Olfactory bulb units - Activity correlated with inhalation cycles and odor quality.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macrides, F.; Chorover, S. L.

    1972-01-01

    Single olfactory bulb units were studied in two macrosmatic species of rodents under conditions intended to preserve the cyclical stimulation which normally accompanies nasal breathing. Patterns of unit activity related to the inhalation cycle were observed in all animals, often in the absence of specific stimuli, and could not be explained in simple mechanical terms. Distinctive changes in these patterns occurred in response to certain odors, and were generally independent of changes in the overall firing frequency. These findings indicate that a change in the overall firing frequency of unit discharges is neither a necessary nor sufficient measure of responsiveness to odors in the rodent olfactory bulb, and that stimulus-specific temporal distributions of unit firing may be involved in olfacto-endocrine activities.

  4. Inter-animal olfactory cues in operant drug discrimination procedures in rats.

    PubMed

    Extance, K; Goudie, A J

    1981-01-01

    Olfactory cues from prior subjects in operant chambers were shown to be an effective stimulus which rodents could use to direct lever selection in a typical operant drug discrimination (DD) paradigm. Such cues persisted for very long periods of time (16 h), and were deposited after very short (5 min) operant sessions. In extinction tests inter-animal olfactory cues exerted very strong stimulus control over lever selection. Furthermore, such cues were not specific to individual rodent subjects but were generalizable between subjects. Inter-animal cues directing level selection could be abolished by cleaning operant manipulanda with a 10% alcohol solution. Reanalysis of some DD data previously reported by one of the authors (Goudie 1977) indicated that this specific earlier study (and by implication perhaps other studies) might have been confounded by inter-animal cues. In a DD study with nicotine it was found that the drug cue was antagonized by mecamylamine for all subjects except those who had a reliable olfactory cue from prior subjects to direct lever selection (subjects who possessed both an olfactory and a drug cue to direct lever selection responded in a way suggesting that the exteroceptive olfactory cue controlled behaviour rather than the interoceptive drug cue). These findings indicate that inter-animal olfactory cues could be of considerable methodological significance in DD studies. The possible significance of such cues has not previously been reported upon in detail, and in reports of many DD studies there do not appear to be explicit indications that inter-animal cues have been adequately controlled. PMID:6789359

  5. The Magic Number 70 (Plus or Minus 20): Variables Determining Performance in the Rodent Odor Span Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    April, L. Brooke; Bruce, Katherine; Galizio, Mark

    2013-01-01

    The olfactory span task (OST) uses an incrementing non-matching to sample procedure such that the number of stimuli to remember increases during the session. The number of consecutive correct responses (span length) and percent correct as a function of the memory load have been viewed as defining rodent working memory capacity limitations in…

  6. Olfactory Ensheathing Cells Express α7 Integrin to Mediate Their Migration on Laminin.

    PubMed

    Ingram, Norianne T; Khankan, Rana R; Phelps, Patricia E

    2016-01-01

    The unique glia located in the olfactory system, called olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs), are implicated as an attractive choice for transplantation therapy following spinal cord injury because of their pro-regenerative characteristics. Adult OECs are thought to improve functional recovery and regeneration after injury by secreting neurotrophic factors and making cell-to-cell contacts with regenerating processes, but the mechanisms are not well understood. We show first that α7 integrin, a laminin receptor, is highly expressed at the protein level by OECs throughout the olfactory system, i.e., in the olfactory mucosa, olfactory nerve, and olfactory nerve layer of the olfactory bulb. Then we asked if OECs use the α7 integrin receptor directly to promote neurite outgrowth on permissive and neutral substrates, in vitro. We co-cultured α7+/+ and α7lacZ/lacZ postnatal cerebral cortical neurons with α7+/+ or α7lacZ/lacZ OECs and found that genotype did not effect the ability of OECs to enhance neurite outgrowth by direct contact. Loss of α7 integrin did however significantly decrease the motility of adult OECs in transwell experiments. Twice as many α7+/+ OECs migrated through laminin-coated transwells compared to α7+/+ OECs on poly-L-lysine (PLL). This is in contrast to α7lacZ/lacZ OECs, which showed no migratory preference for laminin substrate over PLL. These results demonstrate that OECs express α7 integrin, and that laminin and its α7 integrin receptor contribute to adult OEC migration in vitro and perhaps also in vivo. PMID:27078717

  7. Olfactory Ensheathing Cells Express α7 Integrin to Mediate Their Migration on Laminin

    PubMed Central

    Ingram, Norianne T.; Khankan, Rana R.; Phelps, Patricia E.

    2016-01-01

    The unique glia located in the olfactory system, called olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs), are implicated as an attractive choice for transplantation therapy following spinal cord injury because of their pro-regenerative characteristics. Adult OECs are thought to improve functional recovery and regeneration after injury by secreting neurotrophic factors and making cell-to-cell contacts with regenerating processes, but the mechanisms are not well understood. We show first that α7 integrin, a laminin receptor, is highly expressed at the protein level by OECs throughout the olfactory system, i.e., in the olfactory mucosa, olfactory nerve, and olfactory nerve layer of the olfactory bulb. Then we asked if OECs use the α7 integrin receptor directly to promote neurite outgrowth on permissive and neutral substrates, in vitro. We co-cultured α7+/+ and α7lacZ/lacZ postnatal cerebral cortical neurons with α7+/+ or α7lacZ/lacZ OECs and found that genotype did not effect the ability of OECs to enhance neurite outgrowth by direct contact. Loss of α7 integrin did however significantly decrease the motility of adult OECs in transwell experiments. Twice as many α7+/+ OECs migrated through laminin-coated transwells compared to α7+/+ OECs on poly-L-lysine (PLL). This is in contrast to α7lacZ/lacZ OECs, which showed no migratory preference for laminin substrate over PLL. These results demonstrate that OECs express α7 integrin, and that laminin and its α7 integrin receptor contribute to adult OEC migration in vitro and perhaps also in vivo. PMID:27078717

  8. [Olfactory sensory perception].

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Aler; Fresno, María Javiera; Santander, Hugo; Valenzuela, Saúl; Gutiérrez, Mario Felipe; Miralles, Rodolfo

    2011-03-01

    The five senses have had a fundamental importance for survival and socialization of human beings. From an evolutionary point of view the sense of smell is the oldest. This sense has a strong representation within the genome, allowing the existence of many types of receptors that allow us to capture multiple volatile odor producing molecules, sending electrical signals to higher centers to report the outside world. Several cortical areas are activated in the brain, which are interconnected to form an extensive and complex neural network, linking for example, areas involved with memory and emotions, thus giving this sense of perceptual richness. While the concept of flavor is largely related to the sense of taste, smell provides the necessary integration with the rest of the senses and higher functions. Fully understanding the sense of smell is relevant to health professionals. Knowing the characteristics of the receptors, the transduction processes and convergence of information in the higher centers involved, we can properly detect olfactory disorders in our patients. PMID:21879170

  9. Evolution of insect olfactory receptors

    PubMed Central

    Missbach, Christine; Dweck, Hany KM; Vogel, Heiko; Vilcinskas, Andreas; Stensmyr, Marcus C; Hansson, Bill S; Grosse-Wilde, Ewald

    2014-01-01

    The olfactory sense detects a plethora of behaviorally relevant odor molecules; gene families involved in olfaction exhibit high diversity in different animal phyla. Insects detect volatile molecules using olfactory (OR) or ionotropic receptors (IR) and in some cases gustatory receptors (GRs). While IRs are expressed in olfactory organs across Protostomia, ORs have been hypothesized to be an adaptation to a terrestrial insect lifestyle. We investigated the olfactory system of the primary wingless bristletail Lepismachilis y-signata (Archaeognatha), the firebrat Thermobia domestica (Zygentoma) and the neopteran leaf insect Phyllium siccifolium (Phasmatodea). ORs and the olfactory coreceptor (Orco) are with very high probability lacking in Lepismachilis; in Thermobia we have identified three Orco candidates, and in Phyllium a fully developed OR/Orco-based system. We suggest that ORs did not arise as an adaptation to a terrestrial lifestyle, but evolved later in insect evolution, with Orco being present before the appearance of ORs. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02115.001 PMID:24670956

  10. Colonisation and shedding of Lawsonia intracellularis in experimentally inoculated rodents and in wild rodents on pig farms.

    PubMed

    Collins, A M; Fell, S; Pearson, H; Toribio, J-A

    2011-06-01

    Lawsonia intracellularis is an intracellular bacterium causing proliferative enteropathy in various animal species, and is considered an economically important pathogen of pigs. Rats and mice have been implicated as external vectors for a wide range of pig pathogens, including L. intracellularis. Previous studies have demonstrated L. intracellularis infection and proliferative enteropathy in rodents, but did not show the duration of shedding or the number of L. intracellularis shed by infected rodents, and therefore the infection risk that rodents pose to pigs. In this study, the number of L. intracellularis shed in the faeces and intestinal mucosa of wild rats trapped on pig farms was determined by a quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction assay. The prevalence of L. intracellularis in wild rats trapped on pig farms with endemic proliferative enteropathy (PE) was very high (≥ 70.6%), and large numbers of L. intracellularis were shed (10(10)/g of faeces) in a small proportion of wild rats. The duration of colonisation in laboratory rats and mice challenged with porcine isolates of L. intracellularis was also shown. Faecal shedding of L. intracellularis persisted for 14-21 days in rats and mice that were mildly affected with histological lesions of PE. The humoral immune response to L. intracellularis persisted for 40 days in both species. This study demonstrates that rodents may be an important reservoir of L. intracellularis on piggeries, and hence rodent control is important in disease eradication programs on pig farms. PMID:21349664

  11. Sniffing and Oxytocin: Effects on Olfactory Memories.

    PubMed

    Stoop, Ron

    2016-05-01

    In this issue of Neuron, Oettl et al. (2016) show how oxytocin can boost processing of olfactory information in female rats by a top-downregulation from the anterior olfactory nucleus onto the main olfactory bulb. As a result, interactions with juvenile conspecifics receive more attention and are longer memorized. PMID:27151635

  12. Olfactory morphology and physiology of elasmobranchs.

    PubMed

    Meredith, Tricia L; Kajiura, Stephen M

    2010-10-15

    Elasmobranch fishes are thought to possess greater olfactory sensitivities than teleost fishes due in part to the large amount of epithelial surface area that comprises their olfactory organs; however, direct evidence correlating the size of the olfactory organ to olfactory sensitivity is lacking. This study examined the olfactory morphology and physiology of five distantly related elasmobranch species. Specifically, we quantified the number of lamellae and lamellar surface area (as if it were a flat sheet, not considering secondary lamellae) that comprise their olfactory organs. We also calculated the olfactory thresholds and relative effectiveness of amino acid odorants for each species. The olfactory organs varied in both the number of lamellae and lamellar surface area, which may be related to their general habitat, but neither correlated with olfactory threshold. Thresholds to amino acid odorants, major olfactory stimuli of all fishes, ranged from 10⁻⁹·⁰ to 10⁻⁶·⁹ mol l⁻¹, which indicates that these elasmobranch species demonstrate comparable thresholds with teleosts. In addition, the relative effectiveness of amino acid stimuli to the olfactory organ of elasmobranchs is similar to that previously described in teleosts with neutral amino acids eliciting significantly greater responses than others. Collectively, these results indicate parallels in olfactory physiology between these two groups of fishes. PMID:20889825

  13. Olfactory dysfunction in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Li-Min; Yang, Li-Na; Zhang, Lin-Jie; Fu, Ying; Li, Ting; Qi, Yuan; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Da-Qi; Zhang, Ningnannan; Liu, Jingchun; Yang, Li

    2016-06-15

    Association of changes in olfactory-related structures with olfactory function in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) is not well understood. We used a T&T olfactometer test kit to evaluate olfactory function in 26 patients with MS and 26 age- and sex-matched healthy controls (HC). Then, Brain MRI were performed and olfactory-related structures were analyzed in these subjects. Olfactory detection and recognition threshold were significantly higher in the MS group, interestingly olfactory recognition threshold positively correlated with expanded disability status scale scores in these patients. Olfactory bulb (OB) volume reduced in patients with olfactory dysfunction (ODF). At the same time, reductions in gray matter (GM) volume were observed in the parahippocampal gyrus (PCG), amygdala, piriform cortex, and inferior frontal gyrus in patients with MS compared to HC. Atrophy of the PCG was more obvious in patients with ODF than patients without ODF and the PCG volume correlated with the olfactory recognition threshold, while no difference was found in fractional anisotropy values of tract-based spatial statistics analysis in the two groups. Olfactory function in patients with MS tends to become gradually more impaired with disability aggravation. Decreases in the volume of the OB and olfactory-related GM might provide valuable information about disease status in patients with MS with olfactory impairment. PMID:27206870

  14. Relative vascular permeability and vascularity across different regions of the rat nasal mucosa: implications for nasal physiology and drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Niyanta N.; Gautam, Mohan; Lochhead, Jeffrey J.; Wolak, Daniel J.; Ithapu, Vamsi; Singh, Vikas; Thorne, Robert G.

    2016-01-01

    Intranasal administration provides a non-invasive drug delivery route that has been proposed to target macromolecules either to the brain via direct extracellular cranial nerve-associated pathways or to the periphery via absorption into the systemic circulation. Delivering drugs to nasal regions that have lower vascular density and/or permeability may allow more drug to access the extracellular cranial nerve-associated pathways and therefore favor delivery to the brain. However, relative vascular permeabilities of the different nasal mucosal sites have not yet been reported. Here, we determined that the relative capillary permeability to hydrophilic macromolecule tracers is significantly greater in nasal respiratory regions than in olfactory regions. Mean capillary density in the nasal mucosa was also approximately 5-fold higher in nasal respiratory regions than in olfactory regions. Applying capillary pore theory and normalization to our permeability data yielded mean pore diameter estimates ranging from 13–17 nm for the nasal respiratory vasculature compared to <10 nm for the vasculature in olfactory regions. The results suggest lymphatic drainage for CNS immune responses may be favored in olfactory regions due to relatively lower clearance to the bloodstream. Lower blood clearance may also provide a reason to target the olfactory area for drug delivery to the brain. PMID:27558973

  15. Relative vascular permeability and vascularity across different regions of the rat nasal mucosa: implications for nasal physiology and drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Niyanta N; Gautam, Mohan; Lochhead, Jeffrey J; Wolak, Daniel J; Ithapu, Vamsi; Singh, Vikas; Thorne, Robert G

    2016-01-01

    Intranasal administration provides a non-invasive drug delivery route that has been proposed to target macromolecules either to the brain via direct extracellular cranial nerve-associated pathways or to the periphery via absorption into the systemic circulation. Delivering drugs to nasal regions that have lower vascular density and/or permeability may allow more drug to access the extracellular cranial nerve-associated pathways and therefore favor delivery to the brain. However, relative vascular permeabilities of the different nasal mucosal sites have not yet been reported. Here, we determined that the relative capillary permeability to hydrophilic macromolecule tracers is significantly greater in nasal respiratory regions than in olfactory regions. Mean capillary density in the nasal mucosa was also approximately 5-fold higher in nasal respiratory regions than in olfactory regions. Applying capillary pore theory and normalization to our permeability data yielded mean pore diameter estimates ranging from 13-17 nm for the nasal respiratory vasculature compared to <10 nm for the vasculature in olfactory regions. The results suggest lymphatic drainage for CNS immune responses may be favored in olfactory regions due to relatively lower clearance to the bloodstream. Lower blood clearance may also provide a reason to target the olfactory area for drug delivery to the brain. PMID:27558973

  16. Paraneoplastic syndromes in olfactory neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Gabrych, Anna; Czapiewski, Piotr; Sworczak, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Olfactory neuroblastoma (ONB) is a rare malignant neoplasm of sinonasal tract, derived from olfactory epithelium. Unilateral nasal obstruction, epistaxis, sinusitis, and headaches are common symptoms. Olfactory neuroblastoma shows neuroendocrine differentiation and similarly to other neuroendocrine tumors can produce several types of peptic substances and hormones. Excess production of these substances can be responsible for different types of endocrinological paraneoplastic syndromes (PNS). Moreover, besides endocrinological, in ONB may also occur neurological PNS, caused by immune cross-reactivity between tumor and normal host tissues in the nervous system. Paraneoplastic syndromes in ONB include: syndrome of inappropriate ADH secretion (SIADH), ectopic ACTH syndrome (EAS), humoral hypercalcemia of malignancy (HHM), hypertension due to catecholamine secretion by tumor, opsoclonus-myoclonus-ataxia (OMA) and paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration. Paraneoplastic syndromes in ONB tend to have atypical features, therefore diagnosis may be difficult. In this review, we described initial symptoms, patterns of presentation, treatment and outcome of paraneoplastic syndromes in ONB, reported in the literature. PMID:26199564

  17. Monoallelic Expression of Olfactory Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Monahan, Kevin; Lomvardas, Stavros

    2016-01-01

    The sense of smell collects vital information about the environment by detecting a multitude of chemical odorants. Breadth and sensitivity are provided by a huge number of chemosensory receptor proteins, including more than 1,400 olfactory receptors (ORs). Organizing the sensory information generated by these receptors so that it can be processed and evaluated by the central nervous system is a major challenge. This challenge is overcome by monogenic and monoallelic expression of OR genes. The single OR expressed by each olfactory sensory neuron determines the neuron’s odor sensitivity and the axonal connections it will make to downstream neurons in the olfactory bulb. The expression of a single OR per neuron is accomplished by coupling a slow chromatin-mediated activation process to a fast negative-feedback signal that prevents activation of additional ORs. Singular OR activation is likely orchestrated by a network of interchromosomal enhancer interactions and large-scale changes in nuclear architecture. PMID:26359778

  18. Rodent models of osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Sophocleous, Antonia; Idris, Aymen I

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this protocol is to provide a detailed description of male and female rodent models of osteoporosis. In addition to indications on the methods of performing the surgical procedures, the choice of reliable and safe anaesthetics is also described. Post-operative care, including analgesia administration for pain management, is also discussed. Ovariectomy in rodents is a procedure where ovaries are surgically excised. Hormonal changes resulting from ovary removal lead to an oestrogen-deprived state, which enhances bone remodelling, causes bone loss and increases bone fracture risk. Therefore, ovariectomy has been considered as the most common preclinical model for understanding the pathophysiology of menopause-associated events and for developing new treatment strategies for tackling post-menopausal osteoporosis. This protocol also provides a detailed description of orchidectomy, a model for androgen-deficient osteoporosis in rodents. Endocrine changes following testes removal lead to hypogonadism, which results in accelerated bone loss, increasing osteoporosis risk. Orchidectomised rodent models have been proposed to mimic male osteoporosis and therefore remain a valuable tool for understanding androgen deficiency in aged men. Although it would have been particularly difficult to assemble an internationally acceptable description of surgical procedures, here we have attempted to provide a comprehensive guide for best practice in performing ovariectomy and orchidectomy in laboratory rodents. Research scientists are reminded that they should follow their own institution's interpretation of such guidelines. Ultimately, however, all animal procedures must be overseen by the local Animal Welfare and Ethical Review Body and conducted under licences approved by a regulatory ethics committee. PMID:25852854

  19. Metabolism of tobacco-specific nitrosamines by cultured rat nasal mucosa

    SciTech Connect

    Brittebo, E.B.; Castonguay, A.; Furuya, K.; Hecht, S.S.

    1983-09-01

    The metabolism of two nasal carcinogens, N'-nitrosonornicotine (NNN) and 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK), was investigated using cultured nasal septa of F344 rats. The explants were cultured with 14C-labeled N-nitrosamines, and unbound metabolites present in the medium were quantitated by high-performance liquid chromatography. The results indicated that the mucosa of the nasal septum had a marked capacity to metabolize NNN and NNK to hydroxylated products which were released into the culture media. Extensive activation by alpha-carbon hydroxylation of NNN (preferentially 2'-carbon hydroxylation) and NNK was observed, whereas no deactivation by pyridine N-oxidation could be detected. Microautoradiographic studies of explants showed that binding of radioactivity occurred preferentially in the respiratory and olfactory epithelia and in the subepithelial glands of the nasal mucosa. The results suggest that reactive metabolites of NNN and NNK are formed within the target tissue rather than being transported from the liver to the nasal mucosa. The results also show that the culture of nasal septa can be used to ascertain the role of the nasal mucosa in the activation of nasal-specific carcinogens.

  20. Olfactory dysfunction in Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Yong-ming; Lu, Da; Liu, Li-ping; Zhang, Hui-hong; Zhou, Yu-ying

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a common neurodegenerative disorder with the earliest clinical symptom of olfactory dysfunction, which is a potential clinical marker for AD severity and progression. However, many questions remain unanswered. This article reviews relevant research on olfactory dysfunction in AD and evaluates the predictive value of olfactory dysfunction for the epidemiological, pathophysiological, and clinical features of AD, as well as for the conversion of cognitive impairment to AD. We summarize problems of existing studies and provide a useful reference for further studies in AD olfactory dysfunction and for clinical applications of olfactory testing. PMID:27143888

  1. Pigmented lesion of buccal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Bajpai, Manas; Kumar, Malay; Kumar, Manish; Agarwal, Deshant

    2014-01-01

    Pigmented lesions are commonly found in the mouth. Such lesions represent a variety of clinical entities, ranging from physiologic changes to manifestation of systemic illness and malignant neoplasm. Diagnosis of such lesions requires a proper case history, extraoral and intraoral examination, and, in some cases, biopsy, aspiration cytology, and laboratory investigations. Here we present a case of purple lesion on the buccal mucosa of a 34-year-old male patient which was provisionally diagnosed as mucocele but on the basis of histopathological picture it was finally diagnosed as angiofibroma, and we also discuss the clinical and histopathological differential diagnosis. PMID:25161669

  2. Pigmented Lesion of Buccal Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Bajpai, Manas; Kumar, Malay; Kumar, Manish; Agarwal, Deshant

    2014-01-01

    Pigmented lesions are commonly found in the mouth. Such lesions represent a variety of clinical entities, ranging from physiologic changes to manifestation of systemic illness and malignant neoplasm. Diagnosis of such lesions requires a proper case history, extraoral and intraoral examination, and, in some cases, biopsy, aspiration cytology, and laboratory investigations. Here we present a case of purple lesion on the buccal mucosa of a 34-year-old male patient which was provisionally diagnosed as mucocele but on the basis of histopathological picture it was finally diagnosed as angiofibroma, and we also discuss the clinical and histopathological differential diagnosis. PMID:25161669

  3. Olfactory exploration: State of the art.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, D T; Rumeau, C; Gallet, P; Jankowski, R

    2016-04-01

    Olfactory disorders are fairly common in the general population. Exploration, on the other hand, is seldom performed by ENT specialists, even in reference centers. There may be three reasons for this: this particular sensory modality may seem unimportant to patients and/or physicians; available treatments may be underestimated, although admittedly much yet remains to be done; and olfactory exploration is not covered by the national health insurance scheme in France. Advances in research in recent decades have shed light on olfactory system functioning. At the same time, several techniques have been developed to allow maximally objective olfactory assessment, as olfactory disorder is sometimes the first sign of neurodegenerative pathology. Moreover, objective olfactory assessment may be needed in a medico-legal context. The present paper updates the techniques currently available for olfactory exploration. PMID:26384780

  4. The olfactory receptor family album

    PubMed Central

    Crasto, Chiquito; Singer, Michael S; Shepherd, Gordon M

    2001-01-01

    Analysis of the human genome draft sequences has revealed a more complete portrait of the olfactory receptor gene repertoire in humans than was available previously. The new information provides a basis for deeper analysis of the functions of the receptors, and promises new insights into the evolutionary history of the family. PMID:11597337

  5. Olfactory adventures of elephantine pheromones.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, L E; Lazar, J; Greenwood, D R

    2003-02-01

    Understanding the linkage between behaviour of mammals in their natural environment and the molecular basis of their sensory modalities presents challenges to biologists. Our olfactory investigations that involve the largest extant land mammal, the elephant, offer some clues of how these events mesh in sequence. Proboscideans have developed a sophisticatedly organized society and they rank with primates and cetaceans with respect to cognitive abilities. Our studies of discrete, quantifiable pheromone-elicited behaviours demonstrate that Asian elephants utilize their olfactory senses during fundamental, life-strategy decisions, including mate choice, female bonding and male hierarchical sorting. How biologically relevant odorants traverse mucous interfaces to interact with cognate odorant receptors remains a basic question in vertebrate olfaction. We have partially tracked the molecular odour reception trail of behaviourally distinct pheromones, ( Z )-7-dodecenyl acetate and frontalin (1,5-dimethyl-6,8-dioxabicyclo[3.2.1]octane), using approaches developed for insect studies and taking advantage of the extensive, highly mucoidal olfactory and vomeronasal systems that permit detailed investigations of pheromone-binding proteins. We have combined studies of quantifiable responses and behaviours with biochemical and biophysical investigations of the properties of protein-ligand complexes, their sequential pathways and associated protein-ligand fluxes. In the delineation of these sequential integrations of behavioural, biochemical and molecular events, we have discovered novel spatial and temporal adaptations in both the main olfactory and vomeronasal systems. PMID:12546671

  6. Olfactory Classical Conditioning in Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Regina M.; Taborsky-Barba, Suzanne; Mendoza, Raffael; Itano, Alison; Leon, Michael; Cotman, Carl W.; Payne, Terrence F.; Lott, Ira

    2007-01-01

    One-day-old, awake infants underwent an olfactory classical conditioning procedure to assess associative learning within the olfactory system of newborns. Experimental infants received ten 30-second pairings of a novel olfactory conditioned stimulus (a citrus odor of neutral value) and tactile stimulation provided by stroking as the reinforcing unconditioned stimulus (a stimulus with positive properties). Control babies received only the odor, only the stroking, or the stroking followed by the odor presentation. The next day, all infants, in either the awake or sleep state, were given five 30-second presentations of the odor. Results were analyzed from video tapes scored by an observer unaware of the infants’ training condition. The results indicate that only those infants who received the forward pairings of the odor and stroking exhibited conditioned responding (head turning toward the odor) to the citrus odor. The performance of the conditioned response was not affected by the state of the baby during testing, because both awake and sleeping infants exhibited conditioned responses. Furthermore, the expression of the conditioned response was odor specific; a novel floral odor presented during testing did not elicit conditioned responses in the experimental babies. These results suggest that complex associative olfactory learning is seen in newborns within the first 48 hours of life. These baseline findings may serve as normative data against which observation from neonates at risk for neurological sequelae may be compared. PMID:2011429

  7. [Aerosol deposition in nasal passages of burrowing and ground rodents when breathing dust-laden air].

    PubMed

    Moshkin, M P; Petrovskiĭ, D V; Akulov, A E; Romashchenko, A V; Gerlinskaia, L A; Muchnaia, M I; Ganimedov, V L; Sadovskiĭ, A S; Savelov, A A; Koptiug, I V; Troitskiĭ, S Iu; Bukhtiiarov, V I; Kolchanov, N A; Sagdeev, R Z; Fomin, V M

    2014-01-01

    In subterranean rodents, which dig down the passages with frontal teeth, adaptation to the underground mode of life presumes forming of mechanisms that provide protection against inhaling dust particles of different size when digging. One of such mechanisms can be specific pattern of air flow organization in the nasal cavity. To test this assumption, comparative study of geometry and aerodynamics of nasal passages has been conducted with regard to typical representative of subterranean rodents, the mole vole, and a representative of ground rodents, the house mouse. Numerical modeling of air flows and deposition of micro- and nanoparticle aerosols indicates that sedimentation of model particles over the whole surface of nasal cavity is higher in mole vole than in house mouse. On the contrary, particles deposition on the surface of olfactory epithelium turns out to be substantially less in the burrowing rodent as compared to the ground one. Adaptive significance of the latter observation has been substantiated by experimental study on the uptake ofnanoparticles of hydrated manganese oxide MnO x (H2O)x and Mn ions from nasal cavity into brain. It has been shown with use of magnetic resonance tomography method that there is no difference between studied species with respect to intake of particles or ions by olfactory bulb when they are introduced intranasally. Meanwhile, when inhaling nanoparticle aerosol of MnCl2, deposition of Mn in mouse's olfactory bulbs surpasses markedly that in vole's bulbs. Thereby, the morphology of nasal passages as a factor determining the aerodynamics of upper respiratory tract ensures for burrowing rodents more efficient protection of both lungs and brain against inhaled aerosols than for ground ones. PMID:25771679

  8. Fear Extinction in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chun-hui; Knapska, Ewelina; Orsini, Caitlin A.; Rabinak, Christine A.; Zimmerman, Joshua M.; Maren, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Pavlovian conditioning paradigms have become important model systems for understanding the neuroscience of behavior. In particular, studies of the extinction of Pavlovian fear responses are yielding important information about the neural substrates of anxiety disorders in humans. These studies are germane to understanding the neural mechanisms underlying behavioral interventions that suppress fear, including exposure therapy. This chapter described detailed behavioral protocols for examining the nature and properties of fear extinction in laboratory rodents. PMID:19340814

  9. Microdialysis in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Zapata, Agustin; Chefer, Vladimir I.; Shippenberg, Toni S.

    2010-01-01

    Microdialysis is an in vivo sampling technique that permits the quantification of various substances (e.g., neurotransmitters, peptides, electrolytes) in blood and tissue. It is also used to infuse substances into the brain and spinal cord. This unit describes methods for the construction and stereotaxic implantation of microdialysis probes into discrete brain regions of the rat and mouse. Procedures for the conduct of conventional and quantitative microdialysis experiments in the awake and anesthetized rodent are also provided. PMID:19340813

  10. Angiotensinergic involvement in olfactory function

    SciTech Connect

    Speth, R.C.; Parker, J.L.; Wright, J.W.; Harding, J.W.

    1986-03-05

    The olfactory bulbs (OB) from Sprague-Dawley and Wistar-Kyoto rats were frozen and sectioned in a sagittal plane, 20 ..mu.. thick. Sections incubated with /sup 125/-Sar/sup 1/, Ile/sup 8/-AII indicated a high density of AII receptor binding sites in the external layers of the OB. Since the primary olfactory neurons synapse with the mitral cells in these layers, this suggests that AII may affect olfactory input to the OB. To test this hypothesis, male Sprague-Dawley rats, 9-12 weeks of age, n = 8, were administered 0.2 ml of 0.17 M ZnSO/sub 4/ into each nostril to lesion the primary olfactory neurons and their axon terminals in the OB. Rats treated with ZnSO/sub 4/ showed an impairment in their ability to find a buried food pellet, P = 0.041, Mann-Whitney test. Nine days post-treatment, the rats were sacrificed and AII receptors binding in homogenates of the OB was determined. There was a 23% increase (P < 0.05) in AII receptor density in the ZnSO/sub 4/ treated rat OB; it was correlated with the extent of the olfactory deficit, r/sub s/ = .91, Spearman Rank Order Test, P < .01. However, there was a 24% decrease in OB weight in the ZnSO/sub 4/ group, so the number of AII receptors per OB was unchanged. These data suggest that AII plays a role in olfaction. Localizing AII receptor changes within the OB by quantitative autoradiography will characterize the changes in AII receptor density caused by ZnSO/sub 4/.

  11. Olfactory abnormalities in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Desai, M; Agadi, J B; Karthik, N; Praveenkumar, S; Netto, A B

    2015-10-01

    We studied olfactory function in a cohort of 25 temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) patients and 25 healthy controls. Our objectives were to measure olfactory acuity in patients with right, left or bilateral TLE and compare them with age and sex matched controls, and to correlate olfactory acuity with duration of seizure, baseline seizure control and the number of drugs used. Olfactory impairment is common in neurological disorders and dysfunction of the temporo-limbic neural substrates involved in olfactory perception is noted in TLE. We measured olfactory acuity in 25 patients with TLE, nine with right, 10 with left and six with bilateral temporal lobe seizure activity, and compared them to the controls. Odor identification was assessed using the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT) which is a 40 item olfactory test used to diagnose olfactory deficits. Our results showed that patients with TLE exhibited significant impairment in UPSIT performance compared to the controls. There was no significant difference in scores between the right and left TLE patients. The severity of olfactory impairment did not correlate with the duration of seizures, baseline seizure control and number of drugs used. We concluded that significant olfactory impairment is seen in both right and left TLE patients, unrelated to the duration and baseline frequency of seizures or drugs used. PMID:26149406

  12. Olfactory Bulb Field Potentials and Respiration in Sleep-Wake States of Mice.

    PubMed

    Jessberger, Jakob; Zhong, Weiwei; Brankačk, Jurij; Draguhn, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that local field potentials (LFP) in the rodent olfactory bulb (OB) follow respiration. This respiration-related rhythm (RR) in OB depends on nasal air flow, indicating that it is conveyed by sensory inputs from the nasal epithelium. Recently RR was found outside the olfactory system, suggesting that it plays a role in organizing distributed network activity. It is therefore important to measure RR and to delineate it from endogenous electrical rhythms like theta which cover similar frequency bands in small rodents. In order to validate such measurements in freely behaving mice, we compared rhythmic LFP in the OB with two respiration-related biophysical parameters: whole-body plethysmography (PG) and nasal temperature (thermocouple; TC). During waking, all three signals reflected respiration with similar reliability. Peak power of RR in OB decreased with increasing respiration rate whereas power of PG increased. During NREM sleep, respiration-related TC signals disappeared and large amplitude slow waves frequently concealed RR in OB. In this situation, PG provided a reliable signal while breathing-related rhythms in TC and OB returned only during microarousals. In summary, local field potentials in the olfactory bulb do reliably reflect respiratory rhythm during wakefulness and REM sleep but not during NREM sleep. PMID:27247803

  13. Olfactory preference conditioning changes the reward value of reinforced and non-reinforced odors

    PubMed Central

    Torquet, Nicolas; Aimé, Pascaline; Messaoudi, Belkacem; Garcia, Samuel; Ey, Elodie; Gervais, Rémi; Julliard, A. Karyn; Ravel, Nadine

    2014-01-01

    Olfaction is determinant for the organization of rodent behavior. In a feeding context, rodents must quickly discriminate whether a nutrient can be ingested or whether it represents a potential danger to them. To understand the learning processes that support food choice, aversive olfactory learning and flavor appetitive learning have been extensively studied. In contrast, little is currently known about olfactory appetitive learning and its mechanisms. We designed a new paradigm to study conditioned olfactory preference in rats. After 8 days of exposure to a pair of odors (one paired with sucrose and the other with water), rats developed a strong and stable preference for the odor associated with the sucrose solution. A series of experiments were conducted to further analyze changes in reward value induced by this paradigm for both stimuli. As expected, the reward value of the reinforced odor changed positively. Interestingly, the reward value of the alternative odor decreased. This devaluation had an impact on further odor comparisons that the animal had to make. This result suggests that appetitive conditioning involving a comparison between two odors not only leads to a change in the reward value of the reinforced odor, but also induces a stable devaluation of the non-reinforced stimulus. PMID:25071486

  14. Olfactory Bulb Field Potentials and Respiration in Sleep-Wake States of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jessberger, Jakob; Zhong, Weiwei; Brankačk, Jurij; Draguhn, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that local field potentials (LFP) in the rodent olfactory bulb (OB) follow respiration. This respiration-related rhythm (RR) in OB depends on nasal air flow, indicating that it is conveyed by sensory inputs from the nasal epithelium. Recently RR was found outside the olfactory system, suggesting that it plays a role in organizing distributed network activity. It is therefore important to measure RR and to delineate it from endogenous electrical rhythms like theta which cover similar frequency bands in small rodents. In order to validate such measurements in freely behaving mice, we compared rhythmic LFP in the OB with two respiration-related biophysical parameters: whole-body plethysmography (PG) and nasal temperature (thermocouple; TC). During waking, all three signals reflected respiration with similar reliability. Peak power of RR in OB decreased with increasing respiration rate whereas power of PG increased. During NREM sleep, respiration-related TC signals disappeared and large amplitude slow waves frequently concealed RR in OB. In this situation, PG provided a reliable signal while breathing-related rhythms in TC and OB returned only during microarousals. In summary, local field potentials in the olfactory bulb do reliably reflect respiratory rhythm during wakefulness and REM sleep but not during NREM sleep. PMID:27247803

  15. A role for the androgen receptor in the sexual differentiation of the olfactory system in mice

    PubMed Central

    Bodo, Cristian

    2008-01-01

    Olfactory signals play a central role in the identification of a mating partner in rodents, and the behavioral response to these cues varies markedly between the sexes. As several other sexually dimorphic traits, this response is thought to differentiate as a result of exposure of the developing individual to gonadal steroids, but both the identity of the specific steroid signal and the neural structures targeted for differentiation on this particular case are largely unknown. The present review summarizes results obtained in our lab using genetic males affected by the testicular feminization syndrome (Tfm) as experimental model, and that led to the identification of a role for non-aromatized gonadal steroids acting through the androgen receptor (AR) in the differentiation of olfactory cues processing in mice. The existing literature about AR-mediated sexual differentiation of the CNS in animal models is discussed, along with potential targets for the action of non-aromatized gonadal steroids in either one of the subsystems that detect and process olfactory information in rodents. PMID:17915335

  16. Transneuronal regulation of neuronal specific gene expression in the mouse olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Ehrlich, M E; Grillo, M; Joh, T H; Margolis, F L; Baker, H

    1990-02-01

    Peripheral afferent denervation (deafferentation) of the rodent main olfactory bulb produces a marked decrease in tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) activity and immunoreactivity in a population of juxtaglomerular dopaminergic neurons. Preservation of activity and immunostaining for aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase implies that these cells do not die, but change phenotype. We now report that the steady-state level of TH mRNA markedly decreases in the adult mouse olfactory bulb in response to deafferentation. This reduction is permanent following intranasal irrigation with 0.17 M zinc sulphate (ZnSO4) but reversible following deafferentation produced by intranasal irrigation with 0.7% Triton X-100. The initial declines in TH activity, protein and mRNA of dopaminergic juxtaglomerular neurons observed after Triton X-100 treatment are all reversible as the steady-state level of TH mRNA gradually returns to control levels. Steady-state levels of mRNA for olfactory marker protein (OMP), a protein found in high concentrations in olfactory receptor neurons and their processes which innervate the olfactory bulb, were also monitored following deafferentation. Following treatment with either ZnSO4 or Triton X-100, the pattern of changes in steady-state levels of OMP mRNA was similar to that observed for TH. The steady-state level of PEP19 mRNA, a peptide previously localized to granule cells in the olfactory bulb, was not altered by deafferentation. These data indicate selective and parallel regulation of TH and OMP message and protein levels following deafferentation. PMID:1971084

  17. Organization of the main olfactory bulb of lesser hedgehog tenrecs.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Katsuko; Künzle, Heinz; Kosaka, Toshio

    2005-12-01

    Using a confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) and an electron microscope, we investigated the organization of the main olfactory bulb (MOB) of tenrecs, which were previously included into insectivores but now considered to be in a new order "Afrosoricida" in the superclade 'Afrotheria'. We confirmed that the overall structural organization of the tenrec MOB was similar to that of rodents: (1) the compartmental organization of glomeruli and two types of periglomerular cells we proposed as the common organizational principles were present; (2) there were characteristic dendrodendritic and axo-dendritic synapses in the glomerulus and external plexiform layer (EPL) and gap junctions in glomeruli; and (3) no nidi, particular synaptic regions reported only in laboratory musk shrew and mole MOBs, were encountered. However, instead of nidi, we often observed a few tangled olfactory nerves (ONs) with large irregular boutons in the glomerular-external plexiform layer border zone, with which dendrites of various displaced periglomerular cells were usually found to be intermingled. Electron microscopic (EM) examinations confirmed characteristic large mossy terminal-like ON terminals making asymmetrical synapses to presumed mitral/tufted cell and displaced periglomerular cell dendrites. In addition, gap junctions were also encountered between dendritic processes in these tiny particular regions, further showing their resemblance to glomeruli. PMID:16165240

  18. Olfactory Bulbectomy Leads to the Development of Epilepsy in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yifei; Pun, Raymund Y. K.; Peariso, Katrina; Holland, Katherine D.; Lian, Qingquan; Danzer, Steve C.

    2015-01-01

    There is a clear link between epilepsy and depression. Clinical data demonstrate a 30–35% lifetime prevalence of depression in patients with epilepsy, and patients diagnosed with depression have a three to sevenfold higher risk of developing epilepsy. Traditional epilepsy models partially replicate the clinical observations, with the demonstration of depressive traits in epileptic animals. Studies assessing pro-epileptogenic changes in models of depression, however, are more limited. Here, we examined whether a traditional rodent depression model—bilateral olfactory bulbectomy—predisposes the animals towards the development of epilepsy. Past studies have demonstrated increased neuronal excitability after bulbectomy, but continuous seizure monitoring had not been conducted. For the present study, we monitored control and bulbectomized animals by video-EEG 24/7 for approximately two weeks following the surgery to determine whether they develop spontaneous seizures. All seven bulbectomized mice exhibited seizures during the monitoring period. Seizures began about one week after surgery, and occurred in clusters with severity increasing over the monitoring period. These results suggest that olfactory bulbectomy could be a useful model of TBI-induced epilepsy, with advantages of relatively rapid seizure onset and a high number of individuals developing the disease. The model may also be useful for investigating the mechanisms underlying the bidirectional relationship between epilepsy and depression. PMID:26368332

  19. Olfactory dysfunction, olfactory bulb pathology and urban air pollution

    PubMed Central

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian; Franco-Lira, Maricela; Henríquez-Roldán, Carlos; Osnaya, Norma; González-Maciel, Angelica; Reynoso-Robles, Rafael; Villarreal-Calderon, Rafael; Herritt, Lou; Brooks, Diane; Keefe, Sheyla; Palacios-Moreno, Juan; Villarreal-Calderon, Rodolfo; Torres-Jardón, Ricardo; Medina-Cortina, Humberto; Delgado-Chávez, Ricardo; Aiello-Mora, Mario; Maronpot, Robert R.; Doty, Richard L

    2010-01-01

    Mexico City (MC) residents are exposed to severe air pollution and exhibit olfactory bulb inflammation. We compared the olfactory function of individuals living under conditions of extreme air pollution to that of controls from a relatively clean environment and explore associations between olfaction scores, apolipoprotein E (APOE) status, and pollution exposure. The olfactory bulbs (OBs) of 35 MC and 9 controls 20.8 ± 8.5 y were assessed by light and electron microscopy. The University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT) was administered to 62 MC / 25 controls 21.2 ±2.7 y. MC subjects had significantly lower UPSIT scores: 34.24 ± 0.42 versus controls 35.76 ± 0.40, p=0.03. Olfaction deficits were present in 35.5% MC and 12% of controls. MC APOE ε 4 carriers failed 2.4 ± 0.54 items in the 10-item smell identification scale from the UPSIT related to Alzheimer's disease, while APOE 2/3 and 3/3 subjects failed 1.36 ± 0.16 items, p = 0.01. MC residents exhibited OB endothelial hyperplasia, neuronal accumulation of particles (2/35), and immunoreactivity to beta amyloid βA42 (29/35) and/or α-synuclein (4/35) in neurons, glial cells and/or blood vessels. Ultrafine particles were present in OBs endothelial cytoplasm and basement membranes. Control OBs were unremarkable. Air pollution exposure is associated with olfactory dysfunction and OB pathology, APOE 4 may confer greater susceptibility to such abnormalities, and ultrafine particles could play a key role in the OB pathology. This study contributes to our understanding of the influences of air pollution on olfaction and its potential contribution to neurodegeneration. PMID:19297138

  20. Does iron deficiency anemia affect olfactory function?

    PubMed

    Dinc, Mehmet Emre; Dalgic, Abdullah; Ulusoy, Seckin; Dizdar, Denizhan; Develioglu, Omer; Topak, Murat

    2016-07-01

    Conclusion This study found a negative effect of IDA on olfactory function. IDA leads to a reduction in olfactory function, and decreases in hemoglobin levels result in further reduction in olfactory function. Objective This study examined the effects of iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) on olfactory function. Method The study enrolled 50 IDA patients and 50 healthy subjects. Olfactory function was evaluated using the Sniffin' Sticks olfactory test. The diagnosis of IDA was made according to World Health Organization (WHO) criteria. Results Patients with IDA had a significantly lower threshold, discrimination, and identification (TDI) value, and a lower threshold compared with the control group. However, there were no significant differences between the groups in terms of smell selectivity values. PMID:26963317

  1. [Olfactory dysfunction : Update on diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Kühn, M; Abolmaali, N; Smitka, M; Podlesek, D; Hummel, T

    2016-07-01

    Olfactory dysfunction is a common disorder, particularly in elderly people. From the etiologic point of view, we distinguish between sinunasal and non-sinunasal causes of dysosmia. As an important early symptom of neurodegenerative disease, dysosmia is particularly relevant in the diagnosis of Parkinson's or Alzheimer's disease. In addition to complete ENT examination and olfactory testing, e.g., with "Sniffin' Sticks", modern imaging procedures, e. g. MRI, are becoming more and more important for diagnostics, prognosis, and treatment decisions. Olfactory testing in children needs to be adapted to their shorter concentration span and limited range of known olfactory stimuli. Depending on the etiology, olfactory training, antiphlogistic measures, and surgical procedures are most promising. In cases of intracranial causes of dysosmia, neurosurgeons should know and respect anatomic structures of the olfactory signal pathway, not least for long-term prognosis. PMID:27364339

  2. Timberol® Inhibits TAAR5-Mediated Responses to Trimethylamine and Influences the Olfactory Threshold in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Wallrabenstein, Ivonne; Singer, Marco; Panten, Johannes; Hatt, Hanns; Gisselmann, Günter

    2015-01-01

    In mice, trace amine-associated receptors (TAARs) are interspersed in the olfactory epithelium and constitute a chemosensory subsystem that is highly specific for detecting volatile amines. Humans possess six putative functional TAAR genes. Human TAAR5 (hTAAR5) is highly expressed in the olfactory mucosa and was shown to be specifically activated by trimethylamine. In this study, we were challenged to uncover an effective blocker substance for trimethylamine-induced hTAAR5 activation. To monitor blocking effects, we recombinantly expressed hTAAR5 and employed a commonly used Cre-luciferase reporter gene assay. Among all tested potential blocker substances, Timberol®, an amber-woody fragrance, is able to inhibit the trimethylamine-induced hTAAR5 activation up to 96%. Moreover, human psychophysical data showed that the presence of Timberol® increases the olfactory detection threshold for the characteristic fishy odor of trimethylamine by almost one order of magnitude. In conclusion, our results show that among tested receptors Timberol® is a specific and potent antagonist for the hTAAR5-mediated response to trimethylamine in a heterologous system. Furthermore, our data concerning the observed shift of the olfactory detection threshold in vivo implicate that hTAAR5 or other receptors that may be inhibited by Timberol® could be involved in the high affinity olfactory perception of trimethylamine in humans. PMID:26684881

  3. Comparison of olfactory receptor (EOG) and bulbar (EEG) responses to amino acids in the catfish, Ictalurus punctatus.

    PubMed

    Byrd, R P; Caprio, J

    1982-10-01

    The olfactory bulb electroencephalogram (EEG) has been used as a method to imply receptor events12,13. However, experiments to correlate olfactory receptor and bulbar EEG activity in the same species of fish has not been performed. Reported here is the comparison between the simultaneously recorded receptor electroolfactogram (EOG) and the bulbar EEG in the channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus. With amino acid stimulation of the olfactory mucosa, both the EOG and EEG exhibited an initial phasic response followed by a tonic level maintained throughout the stimulus duration. The relative magnitude of the tonic EEG activity (tonic level/phasic response), however, was significantly less than that for the EOG. Both EOG and integrated EEG responses increased exponentially with logarithmic increase in stimulus concentration from threshold to 10(-3) M. Estimated electrophysiological thresholds for 5 amino acids tested determined by both recording methods did not differ significantly and averaged 10(-9.3) +/- 0.2 M for the EOG and 10(-9.1) +/- 0.2 M for the EEG. There was also a significant correlation between the order of relative effectiveness for 11 amino acids determined by EOG and EEG recordings. These results indicate that in the catfish the olfactory bulb EEG is an indicator of olfactory receptor activity. PMID:7139300

  4. Olfactory neuroepithelium transplanted onto the parietal cortex of rats: electroolfactogram in absence of connections with the host brain.

    PubMed

    Amemori, T; Soukup, T; Bures

    1987-05-01

    A technique, allowing continuous electrophysiological monitoring of the functional properties of transplanted olfactory neuroepithelium is described. Viability of isolated parts of nasal mucosa obtained from adult rats was tested in vitro. Pieces of olfactory neuroepithelium (2 X 2 mm) were transplanted onto the exposed parietal cortex of adult rats and protected by plastic wells covered with a transparent lid. At one-week intervals the lid was removed and the transplanted epithelium was tested for electrical responses to amyl acetate vapours. Reliable electroolfactograms appeared 3 weeks after transplantation and could be elicited in 60% of transplants (n = 15) during the subsequent 6 weeks but disappeared later. Morphological control at the conclusion of the experiment showed that the transplant consisted of pieces of epithelium forming vesicular or semivesicular structures but not containing olfactory sensory neurons and not connected with the host brain. It is concluded that the method allows recording responses of the transplanted neuroepithelium to olfactory stimuli but does not yield a sufficiently stable preparation for establishing ectopic olfactory input to the brain. PMID:3610502

  5. Newborn Interneurons in the Accessory Olfactory Bulb Promote Mate Recognition in Female Mice

    PubMed Central

    Oboti, Livio; Schellino, Roberta; Giachino, Claudio; Chamero, Pablo; Pyrski, Martina; Leinders-Zufall, Trese; Zufall, Frank; Fasolo, Aldo; Peretto, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    In the olfactory bulb of adult rodents, local interneurons are constantly replaced by immature precursors derived from the subventricular zone. Whether any olfactory sensory process specifically relies on this cell renewal remains largely unclear. By using the well known model of mating-induced imprinting to avoid pregnancy block, which requires accessory olfactory bulb (AOB) function, we demonstrate that this olfactory memory formation critically depends on the presence of newborn granule neurons in this brain region. We show that, in adult female mice, exposure to the male urine compounds involved in mate recognition increases the number of new granule cells surviving in the AOB. This process is modulated by male signals sensed through the vomeronasal organ and, in turn, changes the activity of the downstream amygdaloid and hypothalamic nuclei involved in the pregnancy block response. Chemical depletion of newly generated bulbar interneurons causes strong impairment in mate recognition, thus resulting in a high pregnancy failure rate to familiar mating male odors. Taken together, our results indicate that adult neurogenesis is essential for specific brain functions such as persistent odor learning and mate recognition. PMID:21994486

  6. Evaluation of the toxicity of zinc in the rat olfactory neuronal cell line, Odora.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, H; Amlal, H; Genter, M B

    2015-03-01

    Zinc (Zn) has long been touted as a panacea for common cold. Recently, there has been some controversy over whether an intranasal (IN) zinc gluconate gel, purported to fight colds, causes anosmia, or loss of the sense of smell, in humans. Previous evidence has shown that IN zinc sulfate (ZnSO4) solutions can cause anosmia in humans as well as significant damage to the olfactory epithelium in rodents. Using an in vitro olfactory neuron model (the rat Odora cell line), we tested the hypothesis that Zn toxicity was caused by inhibition of the hydrogen voltage-gated channel 1(HVCN1), leading to acidosis and apoptotic cell death. Following studies to characterize the toxicity of zinc gluconate and ZnSO4, Odora cells were grown on coverslips and loaded with 2',7'-bis-(2-carboxyethyl)-5-(and-6)-carboxyfluorescein acetoxymethyl ester to measure intracellular pH in the presence and absence of Zn salts. While we found that HVCN1 is not functional in Odora cells, we found that olfactory neurons in vitro maintain their intracellular pH through a sodium/proton exchanger, specifically the sodium proton antiporter 1. ZnSO4, at nontoxic levels, had no impact on intracellular pH after acute exposure or after 24 h of incubation with the cells. In conclusion, Zn toxicity is not mediated through an acidification of intracellular pH in olfactory neurons in vitro. PMID:24980442

  7. Selective Viral Transduction of Adult-born Olfactory Neurons for Chronic in vivo Optogenetic Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Lepousez, Gabriel; Alonso, Mariana; Wagner, Sebastian; Gallarda, Benjamin W.; Lledo, Pierre-Marie

    2011-01-01

    Local interneurons are continuously regenerated in the olfactory bulb of adult rodents1-3. In this process, called adult neurogenesis, neural stem cells in the walls of the lateral ventricle give rise to neuroblasts that migrate for several millimeters along the rostral migratory stream (RMS) to reach and incorporate into the olfactory bulb. To study the different steps and the impact of adult-born neuron integration into preexisting olfactory circuits, it is necessary to selectively label and manipulate the activity of this specific population of neurons. The recent development of optogenetic technologies offers the opportunity to use light to precisely activate this specific cohort of neurons without affecting surrounding neurons4,5. Here, we present a series of procedures to virally express Channelrhodopsin2(ChR2)-YFP in a temporally restricted cohort of neuroblasts in the RMS before they reach the olfactory bulb and become adult-born neurons. In addition, we show how to implant and calibrate a miniature LED for chronic in vivo stimulation of ChR2-expressing neurons. PMID:22231709

  8. Reliable sex and strain discrimination in the mouse vomeronasal organ and accessory olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Tolokh, Illya I; Fu, Xiaoyan; Holy, Timothy E

    2013-08-21

    Animals modulate their courtship and territorial behaviors in response to olfactory cues produced by other animals. In rodents, detecting these cues is the primary role of the accessory olfactory system (AOS). We sought to systematically investigate the natural stimulus coding logic and robustness in neurons of the first two stages of accessory olfactory processing, the vomeronasal organ (VNO) and accessory olfactory bulb (AOB). We show that firing rate responses of just a few well-chosen mouse VNO or AOB neurons can be used to reliably encode both sex and strain of other mice from cues contained in urine. Additionally, we show that this population code can generalize to new concentrations of stimuli and appears to represent stimulus identity in terms of diverging paths in coding space. Together, the results indicate that firing rate code on the temporal order of seconds is sufficient for accurate classification of pheromonal patterns at different concentrations and may be used by AOS neural circuitry to discriminate among naturally occurring urine stimuli. PMID:23966710

  9. Increased olfactory search costs change foraging behaviour in an alien mustelid: a precursor to prey switching?

    PubMed

    Price, Catherine J; Banks, Peter B

    2016-09-01

    If generalist predators are to hunt efficiently, they must track the changing costs and benefits of multiple prey types. Decisions to switch from hunting preferred prey to alternate prey have been assumed to be driven by decreasing availability of preferred prey, with less regard for accessibility of alternate prey. Olfactory cues from prey provide information about prey availability and its location, and are exploited by many predators to reduce search costs. We show that stoats Mustela erminea, an alien olfactory predator in New Zealand, are sensitive to the search costs of hunting both their preferred rodent prey (mice) and a less desirable alternate prey (locust). We manipulated search costs for stoats using a novel form of olfactory camouflage of both prey, and found that stoats altered their foraging strategy depending on whether mice were camouflaged or conspicuous, but only when locusts were also camouflaged. Stoats gave up foraging four times more often when both prey were camouflaged, compared to when mice were conspicuous and locusts camouflaged. There were no differences in the foraging strategies used to hunt camouflaged or conspicuous mice when locusts were easy to find. Consequently, camouflaged mice survived longer than conspicuous mice when locusts were hard to find, but not when locusts were easy to find. Our results demonstrate that predators can integrate search costs from multiple prey types when making foraging decisions. Manipulating olfactory search costs to alter foraging strategies offers new methods for understanding the factors that foreshadow prey switching. PMID:27230396

  10. Role of Centrifugal Projections to the Olfactory Bulb in Olfactory Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiselycznyk, Carly L.; Zhang, Steven; Linster, Christine

    2006-01-01

    While there is evidence that feedback projections from cortical and neuromodulatory structures to the olfactory bulb are crucial for maintaining the oscillatory dynamics of olfactory bulb processing, it is not clear how changes in dynamics are related to odor perception. Using electrical lesions of the olfactory peduncle, sparing output from the…

  11. Olfactory neuroblastoma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    USLU, GONCA HANEDAN; CANYILMAZ, EMINE; ZENGIN, AHMET YASAR; MUNGAN, SEVDEGUL; YONEY, ADNAN; BAHADIR, OSMAN; GOCMEZ, HUSEYIN

    2015-01-01

    Olfactory neuroblastoma (ON) is a rare type of malignant neoplasm originating from the olfactory neuroepithelial cells of the nasal cavity. ON is also known as esthesioneuroblastoma or neuroendocrine carcinoma. The malignancy accounts for <3% of tumors originating in the nasal cavity. Through the nasal cavity, ON may infiltrate the sinuses, the orbit and the cranium. The tumor is characterized by a pattern of slow growth and local recurrences. Treatment options are surgical excision or surgery combined with a radiotherapy (RT) and/or chemotherapy combination treatment. The present study reports the case of a 69-year-old patient with a mass in the nasal cavity who was treated by combined surgical excision and RT. The literature for ON and the treatment of the tumor are also discussed. PMID:26788185

  12. Reflections on Rodent Implantation.

    PubMed

    Cha, Jeeyeon M; Dey, Sudhansu K

    2015-01-01

    Embryo implantation is a complex process involving endocrine, paracrine, autocrine, and juxtacrine modulators that span cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. The quality of implantation is predictive for pregnancy success. Earlier observational studies formed the basis for genetic and molecular approaches that ensued with emerging technological advances. However, the precise sequence and details of the molecular interactions involved have yet to be defined. This review reflects briefly on aspects of our current understanding of rodent implantation as a tribute to Roger Short's lifelong contributions to the field of reproductive physiology. PMID:26450495

  13. [Subjective assessment of olfactory function].

    PubMed

    Evren, Cenk; Yiğit, Volkan Bilge; Çınar, Fikret

    2015-01-01

    Of the five senses, the sense of smell is the most complex and unique in structure and organization. As diagnostic and therapeutic modalities are often underdeveloped, the sense of smell has been inadequately studied. Olfactory disorders may result from benign pathologies such as sinusitis as well as several diseases including Parkinson's disease, temporal lobe epilepsy, schizophrenia and Alzheimer disease. In this article, we aim to instruct the otorhinolaryngology specialists and residents regarding the tests which measure odor subjectively. PMID:25934410

  14. [Olfactory disorders – history, classification and implications].

    PubMed

    Welge-Lüssen, Antje

    2016-01-01

    Smell disorders are common and can be found in 3 – 5 % of the population under 65 years. With growing age these numbers increase up to 50 % and more. Qualitative disorders which cannot be measured are differentiated from quantitative disorders. Self-assessment of olfactory function is rather poor therefore olfactory testing is mandatory in cases of patients complaining about an olfactory disorder. Olfactory screening smell tests are available for orientation, however, for detailed testing or in cases of a pathological screening test an extensive psychophysical olfactory test battery such as the Sniffin' Sticks Test battery should be used. According to the result of the test battery olfactory function can be qualified as norm, hyp- or anosmic. Additionally, in cases of medicolegal questions, olfactory evoked potentials can be recorded. Smell disorders are classified according to the history, clinical and endoscopic examination of the nose. Imaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computertomography may contribute to classify the disorder. Sinunasal olfactory disorders are considered to be the most common ones. If the etiology remains unclear a neurological examination has to be performed in order to rule out a concomitant neurodegenerative disease. Olfactory disorders in the elderly might have to be considered as a sign of a reduced regeneration capacity in general being depicted in an increase in overall mortality in affected subjects. PMID:27132644

  15. Human olfactory receptor responses to odorants

    PubMed Central

    Mainland, Joel D; Li, Yun R; Zhou, Ting; Liu, Wen Ling L; Matsunami, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    Although the human olfactory system is capable of discriminating a vast number of odors, we do not currently understand what chemical features are encoded by olfactory receptors. In large part this is due to a paucity of data in a search space covering the interactions of hundreds of receptors with billions of odorous molecules. Of the approximately 400 intact human odorant receptors, only 10% have a published ligand. Here we used a heterologous luciferase assay to screen 73 odorants against a clone library of 511 human olfactory receptors. This dataset will allow other researchers to interrogate the combinatorial nature of olfactory coding. PMID:25977809

  16. Sleep and olfactory cortical plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Dylan C.; Wilson, Donald A.

    2014-01-01

    In many systems, sleep plays a vital role in memory consolidation and synaptic homeostasis. These processes together help store information of biological significance and reset synaptic circuits to facilitate acquisition of information in the future. In this review, we describe recent evidence of sleep-dependent changes in olfactory system structure and function which contribute to odor memory and perception. During slow-wave sleep, the piriform cortex becomes hypo-responsive to odor stimulation and instead displays sharp-wave activity similar to that observed within the hippocampal formation. Furthermore, the functional connectivity between the piriform cortex and other cortical and limbic regions is enhanced during slow-wave sleep compared to waking. This combination of conditions may allow odor memory consolidation to occur during a state of reduced external interference and facilitate association of odor memories with stored hedonic and contextual cues. Evidence consistent with sleep-dependent odor replay within olfactory cortical circuits is presented. These data suggest that both the strength and precision of odor memories is sleep-dependent. The work further emphasizes the critical role of synaptic plasticity and memory in not only odor memory but also basic odor perception. The work also suggests a possible link between sleep disturbances that are frequently co-morbid with a wide range of pathologies including Alzheimer’s disease, schizophrenia and depression and the known olfactory impairments associated with those disorders. PMID:24795585

  17. Adult Born Olfactory Bulb Dopaminergic Interneurons: Molecular Determinants and Experience-Dependent Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Bonzano, Sara; Bovetti, Serena; Gendusa, Claudio; Peretto, Paolo; De Marchis, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    The olfactory bulb (OB) is a highly plastic brain region involved in the early processing of olfactory information. A remarkably feature of the OB circuits in rodents is the constitutive integration of new neurons that takes place during adulthood. Newborn cells in the adult OB are mostly inhibitory interneurons belonging to chemically, morphologically and functionally heterogeneous types. Although there is general agreement that adult neurogenesis in the OB plays a key role in sensory information processing and olfaction-related plasticity, the contribution of each interneuron subtype to such functions is far to be elucidated. Here, we focus on the dopaminergic (DA) interneurons: we highlight recent findings about their morphological features and then describe the molecular factors required for the specification/differentiation and maintenance of the DA phenotype in adult born neurons. We also discuss dynamic changes of the DA interneuron population related to age, environmental stimuli and lesions, and their possible functional implications. PMID:27199651

  18. Adult Born Olfactory Bulb Dopaminergic Interneurons: Molecular Determinants and Experience-Dependent Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Bonzano, Sara; Bovetti, Serena; Gendusa, Claudio; Peretto, Paolo; De Marchis, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    The olfactory bulb (OB) is a highly plastic brain region involved in the early processing of olfactory information. A remarkably feature of the OB circuits in rodents is the constitutive integration of new neurons that takes place during adulthood. Newborn cells in the adult OB are mostly inhibitory interneurons belonging to chemically, morphologically and functionally heterogeneous types. Although there is general agreement that adult neurogenesis in the OB plays a key role in sensory information processing and olfaction-related plasticity, the contribution of each interneuron subtype to such functions is far to be elucidated. Here, we focus on the dopaminergic (DA) interneurons: we highlight recent findings about their morphological features and then describe the molecular factors required for the specification/differentiation and maintenance of the DA phenotype in adult born neurons. We also discuss dynamic changes of the DA interneuron population related to age, environmental stimuli and lesions, and their possible functional implications. PMID:27199651

  19. Effects of experimentally necessary changes in husbandry on olfactory memory: Chronic food restriction and social isolation.

    PubMed

    Manella, Laura; Woldeyohannes, Leuk; McMahon, Devon; Linster, Christiane

    2016-03-01

    Changes to typical procedures in animal husbandry are often necessary to accommodate the needs of behavioral experiments. Two common changes in husbandry for rodents are light chronic food restriction (to motivate animals in reward-association tasks) and social isolation (to accommodate individual feeding schedules or need to reduce interactions because of implants for example). Each of these intervention individually has been shown to modulate behavioral state and with it performance in behavioral tasks. We here systematically test how social isolation and light chronic food restriction modulate olfactory memory in rats. Our results show a strong modulation of olfactory memory after both types of husbandry interventions. These results suggest that common changes in animal husbandry promote distinct and relevant changes in animal behavior. PMID:26655783

  20. Precancerous lesions of oral mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Yardimci, Gurkan; Kutlubay, Zekayi; Engin, Burhan; Tuzun, Yalcin

    2014-01-01

    Precancerous lesions of oral mucosa, known as potentially malignant disorders in recent years, are consists of a group of diseases, which should be diagnosed in the early stage. Oral leukoplakia, oral submucous fibrosis, and oral erythroplakia are the most common oral mucosal diseases that have a very high malignant transformation rate. Oral lichen planus is one of the potentially malignant disorders that may be seen in six different subtypes including papular, reticular, plaque-like, atrophic, erosive, and bullous type, clinically. Atrophic and erosive subtypes have the greater increased malignant transformation risk compared to another subtypes. Although there are various etiological studies, the etiology of almost all these diseases is not fully understood. Geographically, etiologic factors may vary. The most frequently reported possible factors are tobacco use, alcohol drinking, chewing of betel quid containing areca nut, and solar rays. Early diagnosis is very important and can be lifesaving, because in late stages, they may be progressed to severe dysplasia and even carcinoma in situ and/or squamous cell carcinoma. For most diseases, treatment results are not satisfactory in spite of miscellaneous therapies. While at the forefront of surgical intervention, topical and systemic treatment alternatives such as corticosteroids, calcineurin inhibitors, and retinoids are widely used. PMID:25516862

  1. Amyloid Beta Inhibits Olfactory Bulb Activity and the Ability to Smell

    PubMed Central

    Peña-Ortega, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Early olfactory dysfunction has been consistently reported in both Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and in transgenic mice that reproduce some features of this disease. In AD transgenic mice, alteration in olfaction has been associated with increased levels of soluble amyloid beta protein (Aβ) as well as with alterations in the oscillatory network activity recorded in the olfactory bulb (OB) and in the piriform cortex. However, since AD is a multifactorial disease and transgenic mice suffer a variety of adaptive changes, it is still unknown if soluble Aβ, by itself, is responsible for OB dysfunction both at electrophysiological and behavioral levels. Thus, here we tested whether or not Aβ directly affects OB network activity in vitro in slices obtained from mice and rats and if it affects olfactory ability in these rodents. Our results show that Aβ decreases, in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, the network activity of OB slices at clinically relevant concentrations (low nM) and in a reversible manner. Moreover, we found that intrabulbar injection of Aβ decreases the olfactory ability of rodents two weeks after application, an effect that is not related to alterations in motor performance or motivation to seek food and that correlates with the presence of Aβ deposits. Our results indicate that Aβ disrupts, at clinically relevant concentrations, the network activity of the OB in vitro and can trigger a disruption in olfaction. These findings open the possibility of exploring the cellular mechanisms involved in early pathological AD as an approach to reduce or halt its progress. PMID:24086624

  2. Exotic models may offer unique opportunities to decipher specific scientific question: the case of Xenopus olfactory system.

    PubMed

    Gascuel, Jean; Amano, Tosikazu

    2013-09-01

    The fact that olfactory systems are highly conserved in all animal species from insects to mammals allow the generalization of findings from one species to another. Most of our knowledge about the anatomy and physiology of the olfactory system comes from data obtained in a very limited number of biological models such as rodents, Zebrafish, Drosophila, and a worm, Caenorhabditis elegans. These models have proved useful to answer most questions in the field of olfaction, and thus concentrating on these few models appear to be a pragmatic strategy. However, the diversity of the organization and physiology of the olfactory system amongst phyla appear to be greater than generally assumed and the four models alone may not be sufficient to address all the questions arising from the study of olfaction. In this article, we will illustrate the idea that we should take advantage of biological diversity to address specific scientific questions and will show that the Xenopus olfactory system is a very good model to investigate: first, olfaction in aerial versus aquatic conditions and second, mechanisms underlying postnatal reorganization of the olfactory system especially those controlled by tyroxine hormone. PMID:23904180

  3. Olfactory Receptor Neuron Dysfunction in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Turetsky, Bruce I; Hahn, Chang-Gyu; Arnold, Steven E; Moberg, Paul J

    2012-01-01

    Olfactory impairments are a common feature of schizophrenia. Impairments in odor detection and odor identification are present early in the course of illness and among those at risk for the disorder. These behavioral impairments have been linked to both physiological and anatomical abnormalities in the neural substrates subserving olfaction, including relatively peripheral elements of the olfactory system. The location of olfactory receptor neurons in the nasal epithelium allows noninvasive access to these neurons in living subjects. This offers a unique opportunity to directly assess neuronal integrity in vivo in patients. The peripheral olfactory receptor neuron response to odor stimulation was assessed in 21 schizophrenia patients and 18 healthy comparison subjects. The electroolfactogram, representing the electrical depolarization of the olfactory receptor neurons, was recording following stimulation with different doses and durations of hydrogen sulfide, a pure olfactory nerve stimulant. Schizophrenia patients had abnormally large depolarization responses following odor stimulation, independent of clinical symptomatology, antipsychotic medication dosage or smoking history. Although the precise pathophysiological mechanism is unknown, this olfactory receptor neuron abnormality is consistent with several lines of evidence suggesting altered proliferation or maturation of olfactory receptor neuron cell lineages in schizophrenia. It is also consistent with emerging evidence of disruptions of cyclic AMP-mediated intracellular signaling mechanisms, and may be a marker of these disruptions. It unambiguously demonstrates that neurophysiological disturbances in schizophrenia are not limited to cortical and subcortical structures, but rather include even the most peripheral sensory neurons. PMID:18754006

  4. Olfactory receptor neuron dysfunction in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Turetsky, Bruce I; Hahn, Chang-Gyu; Arnold, Steven E; Moberg, Paul J

    2009-02-01

    Olfactory impairments are a common feature of schizophrenia. Impairments in odor detection and odor identification are present early in the course of illness and among those at risk for the disorder. These behavioral impairments have been linked to both physiological and anatomical abnormalities in the neural substrates subserving olfaction, including relatively peripheral elements of the olfactory system. The location of olfactory receptor neurons in the nasal epithelium allows noninvasive access to these neurons in living subjects. This offers a unique opportunity to directly assess neuronal integrity in vivo in patients. The peripheral olfactory receptor neuron response to odor stimulation was assessed in 21 schizophrenia patients and 18 healthy comparison subjects. The electroolfactogram, representing the electrical depolarization of the olfactory receptor neurons, was recording following stimulation with different doses and durations of hydrogen sulfide, a pure olfactory nerve stimulant. Schizophrenia patients had abnormally large depolarization responses following odor stimulation, independent of clinical symptomatology, antipsychotic medication dosage or smoking history. Although the precise pathophysiological mechanism is unknown, this olfactory receptor neuron abnormality is consistent with several lines of evidence suggesting altered proliferation or maturation of olfactory receptor neuron cell lineages in schizophrenia. It is also consistent with emerging evidence of disruptions of cyclic AMP-mediated intracellular signaling mechanisms, and may be a marker of these disruptions. It unambiguously demonstrates that neurophysiological disturbances in schizophrenia are not limited to cortical and subcortical structures, but rather include even the most peripheral sensory neurons. PMID:18754006

  5. [Vesiculobullous lesions of the oral mucosa].

    PubMed

    Spijkervet, F K; Vissink, A; Raghoebar, G M; van der Waal, I

    2001-06-01

    In general practice, the dentist can be confronted with a vesiculobullous lesion of the oral mucosa. In many cases the lesion can be classified as recurrent herpes labialis, but many other causes can induce a vesiculobullous lesion of the oral mucosa and perioral skin as well. This article gives an overview of the various vesiculous and bullous lesions of the oral mucous membranes. Special attention is given to the possible causes and their treatment. PMID:11441714

  6. Autofluorescence spectroscopy of oral mucosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumdar, S. K.; Uppal, A.; Gupta, P. K.

    1998-06-01

    We report the results of an in-vitro study on autofluorescence from pathologically characterized normal and malignant squamous tissues from the oral cavity. The study involved biopsy samples from 47 patients with oral cancer of which 11 patients had cancer of tongue, 17 of buccal mucosa and 19 of alveolus. The results of excitation and emission spectroscopy at several wavelengths (280 nm less than or equal to (lambda) exless than or equal to 460 nm; 340 nm less than or equal to (lambda) em less than or equal to 520 nm) showed that at (lambda) ex equals 337 nm and 400 nm the mean value for the spectrally integrated fluorescence intensity [(Sigma) (lambda ) IF((lambda) )] from the normal tissue sites was about a factor of 2 larger than that from the malignant tissue sites. At other excitation wavelengths the difference in (Sigma) (lambda ) IF((lambda) ) was not statistically significant. Similarly, for (lambda) em equals 390 nm and 460 nm, the intensity of the 340 nm band of the excitation spectra from normal tissues was observed to be a factor of 2 larger than that from malignant tissues. Analysis of these results suggests that NADH concentration is higher in normal oral tissues compared to the malignant. This contrasts with our earlier observation of an reduced NADH concentration in normal sites of breast tissues vis a vis malignant sites. For the 337 nm excited emission spectra a 10-variable MVLR score (using (Sigma) (lambda ) IF((lambda) ) and normalized intensities at nine wavelengths as input parameters) provided a sensitivity and specificity of 95.7% and 93.1% over the sample size investigated.

  7. Neurogenetics of Aggressive Behavior – Studies in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Aki; Miczek, Klaus A.

    2014-01-01

    Aggressive behavior is observed in many animal species, such as insects, fish, lizards, frogs, and most mammals including humans. This wide range of conservation underscores the importance of aggressive behavior in the animals’ survival and fitness, and the likely heritability of this behavior. Although typical patterns of aggressive behavior differ between species, there are several concordances in the neurobiology of aggression among rodents, primates, and humans. Studies with rodent models may eventually help us to understand the neurogenetic architecture of aggression in humans. However, it is important to recognize the difference between the ecological and ethological significance of aggressive behavior (species-typical aggression) and maladaptive violence (escalated aggression) when applying the findings of aggression research using animal models to human or veterinary medicine. Well-studied rodent models for aggressive behavior in the laboratory setting include the mouse (Mus musculus), rat (Rattus norvegicus), hamster (Mesocricetus auratus), and prairie vole (Microtus ochrogaster). The neural circuits of rodent aggression have been gradually elucidated by several techniques e.g. immunohistochemistry of immediate-early gene (c-Fos) expression, intracranial drug microinjection, in vivo microdialysis, and optogenetics techniques. Also, evidence accumulated from the analysis of gene-knockout mice shows the involvement of several genes in aggression. Here we review the brain circuits that have been implicated in aggression, such as the hypothalamus, prefrontal cortex (PFC), dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), nucleus accumbens (NAc), and olfactory system. We then discuss the roles of glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), major inhibitory and excitatory amino acids in the brain, as well as their receptors, in controlling aggressive behavior, focusing mainly on recent findings. At the end of this chapter, we discuss how genes can be identified that underlie

  8. Olfactory Neuroblastoma: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Olmo, Heather R; Stokes, Steven Marc; Foss, Robert D

    2016-06-01

    A 43-year-old female presented with persistent nasal congestion with intermittent epistaxis without resolution for the preceding 5 years. Clinical examination revealed a large pink rubbery mass, medial to the middle turbinate in the right nasal cavity extending to the choana. Radiographic images demonstrated a heterogeneously enhancing lobular soft tissue mass filling the right nasal cavity, causing lateral bowing of the right medial orbital wall and extending posteriorly to the right anterior ethmoid sinus. The clinical, radiographic, histologic, and immunohistochemical features of olfactory neuroblastoma are discussed. PMID:26316323

  9. An olfactory subsystem that detects carbon disulfide and mediates food-related social learning

    PubMed Central

    Munger, Steven D.; Leinders-Zufall, Trese; McDougall, Lisa M.; Cockerham, Renee E.; Schmid, Andreas; Wandernoth, Petra; Wennemuth, Gunther; Biel, Martin; Zufall, Frank; Kelliher, Kevin R.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Olfactory signals influence social interactions in a variety of species [1, 2]. In mammals, pheromones and other social cues can promote mating or aggression behaviors, can communicate information about social hierarchies, genetic identity and health status, and can contribute to associative learning [1–5]. However, the molecular, cellular and neural mechanisms underlying many olfactory-mediated social interactions remain poorly understood. Here, we report that a specialized olfactory subsystem that includes olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) expressing the receptor guanylyl cyclase GC-D, the cyclic nucleotide-gated channel subunit CNGA3 and the carbonic anhydrase isoform CAII (GC-D+ OSNs) [6–11] is required for the acquisition of socially transmitted food preferences (STFPs) in mice. Using electrophysiological recordings from gene-targeted mice, we show that GC-D+ OSNs are highly sensitive to the volatile semiochemical carbon disulfide (CS2), a component of rodent breath and a known social signal mediating the acquisition of STFPs [12–14]. Responses to sub-micromolar concentrations of CS2 in the main olfactory epithelium or in identified GC-D+ OSNs are absent in mice lacking CNGA3 or CAII and drastically reduced in mice lacking GC-D. Mice in which GC-D+ OSN transduction mechanisms have been disrupted fail to acquire STFPs from either live or surrogate demonstrator mice and do not exhibit neuronal activation of the ventral subiculum of the hippocampus, a brain region implicated in STFP retrieval [15]. Our findings indicate that GC-D+ OSNs detect chemosignals that facilitate food-related social interactions. PMID:20637621

  10. 21 CFR 874.1600 - Olfactory test device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 874.1600 Olfactory test device. (a) Identification. An olfactory test device is used to determine whether an olfactory loss is present. The device... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Olfactory test device. 874.1600 Section...

  11. 21 CFR 874.1600 - Olfactory test device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 874.1600 Olfactory test device. (a) Identification. An olfactory test device is used to determine whether an olfactory loss is present. The device... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Olfactory test device. 874.1600 Section...

  12. A Closer Look at Acid-Base Olfactory Titrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neppel, Kerry; Oliver-Hoyo, Maria T.; Queen, Connie; Reed, Nicole

    2005-01-01

    Olfactory titrations using raw onions and eugenol as acid-base indicators are reported. An in-depth investigation on olfactory titrations is presented to include requirements for potential olfactory indicators and protocols for using garlic, onions, and vanillin as acid-base olfactory indicators are tested.

  13. Neuromodulation of Olfactory Sensitivity in the Peripheral Olfactory Organs of the American Cockroach, Periplaneta americana

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Je Won; Kim, Jin-Hee; Pfeiffer, Rita; Ahn, Young-Joon; Page, Terry L.; Kwon, Hyung Wook

    2013-01-01

    Olfactory sensitivity exhibits daily fluctuations. Several studies have suggested that the olfactory system in insects is modulated by both biogenic amines and neuropeptides. However, molecular and neural mechanisms underlying olfactory modulation in the periphery remain unclear since neuronal circuits regulating olfactory sensitivity have not been identified. Here, we investigated the structure and function of these signaling pathways in the peripheral olfactory system of the American cockroach, Periplaneta americana, utilizing in situ hybridization, qRT-PCR, and electrophysiological approaches. We showed that tachykinin was co-localized with the octopamine receptor in antennal neurons located near the antennal nerves. In addition, the tachykinin receptor was found to be expressed in most of the olfactory receptor neurons in antennae. Functionally, the effects of direct injection of tachykinin peptides, dsRNAs of tachykinin, tachykinin receptors, and octopamine receptors provided further support for the view that both octopamine and tachykinin modulate olfactory sensitivity. Taken together, these findings demonstrated that octopamine and tachykinin in antennal neurons are olfactory regulators in the periphery. We propose here the hypothesis that octopamine released from neurons in the brain regulates the release of tachykinin from the octopamine receptor neurons in antennae, which in turn modulates the olfactory sensitivity of olfactory receptor neurons, which house tachykinin receptors. PMID:24244739

  14. Preliminary Modeling and Simulation Study on Olfactory Cell Sensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jun; Yang, Wei; Chen, Peihua; Liu, Qingjun; Wang, Ping

    2009-05-01

    This paper introduced olfactory sensory neuron's whole-cell model with a concrete voltage-gated ionic channels and simulation. Though there are many models in olfactory sensory neuron and olfactory bulb, it remains uncertain how they express the logic of olfactory information processing. In this article, the olfactory neural network model is also introduced. This model specifies the connections among neural ensembles of the olfactory system. The simulation results of the neural network model are consistent with the observed olfactory biological characteristics such as 1/f-type power spectrum and oscillations.

  15. Preliminary Modeling and Simulation Study on Olfactory Cell Sensation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Jun; Chen Peihua; Liu Qingjun; Wang Ping; Yang Wei

    2009-05-23

    This paper introduced olfactory sensory neuron's whole-cell model with a concrete voltage-gated ionic channels and simulation. Though there are many models in olfactory sensory neuron and olfactory bulb, it remains uncertain how they express the logic of olfactory information processing. In this article, the olfactory neural network model is also introduced. This model specifies the connections among neural ensembles of the olfactory system. The simulation results of the neural network model are consistent with the observed olfactory biological characteristics such as 1/f-type power spectrum and oscillations.

  16. The human olfactory receptor repertoire

    PubMed Central

    Zozulya, Sergey; Echeverri, Fernando; Nguyen, Trieu

    2001-01-01

    Background The mammalian olfactory apparatus is able to recognize and distinguish thousands of structurally diverse volatile chemicals. This chemosensory function is mediated by a very large family of seven-transmembrane olfactory (odorant) receptors encoded by approximately 1,000 genes, the majority of which are believed to be pseudogenes in humans. Results The strategy of our sequence database mining for full-length, functional candidate odorant receptor genes was based on the high overall sequence similarity and presence of a number of conserved sequence motifs in all known mammalian odorant receptors as well as the absence of introns in their coding sequences. We report here the identification and physical cloning of 347 putative human full-length odorant receptor genes. Comparative sequence analysis of the predicted gene products allowed us to identify and define a number of consensus sequence motifs and structural features of this vast family of receptors. A new nomenclature for human odorant receptors based on their chromosomal localization and phylogenetic analysis is proposed. We believe that these sequences represent the essentially complete repertoire of functional human odorant receptors. Conclusions The identification and cloning of all functional human odorant receptor genes is an important initial step in understanding receptor-ligand specificity and combinatorial encoding of odorant stimuli in human olfaction. PMID:11423007

  17. Genomic Landscape of Colorectal Mucosa and Adenomas.

    PubMed

    Borras, Ester; San Lucas, F Anthony; Chang, Kyle; Zhou, Ruoji; Masand, Gita; Fowler, Jerry; Mork, Maureen E; You, Y Nancy; Taggart, Melissa W; McAllister, Florencia; Jones, David A; Davies, Gareth E; Edelmann, Winfried; Ehli, Erik A; Lynch, Patrick M; Hawk, Ernest T; Capella, Gabriel; Scheet, Paul; Vilar, Eduardo

    2016-06-01

    The molecular basis of the adenoma-to-carcinoma transition has been deduced using comparative analysis of genetic alterations observed through the sequential steps of intestinal carcinogenesis. However, comprehensive genomic analyses of adenomas and at-risk mucosa are still lacking. Therefore, our aim was to characterize the genomic landscape of colonic at-risk mucosa and adenomas. We analyzed the mutation profile and copy number changes of 25 adenomas and adjacent mucosa from 12 familial adenomatous polyposis patients using whole-exome sequencing and validated allelic imbalances (AI) in 37 adenomas using SNP arrays. We assessed for evidence of clonality and performed estimations on the proportions of driver and passenger mutations using a systems biology approach. Adenomas had lower mutational rates than did colorectal cancers and showed recurrent alterations in known cancer driver genes (APC, KRAS, FBXW7, TCF7L2) and AIs in chromosomes 5, 7, and 13. Moreover, 80% of adenomas had somatic alterations in WNT pathway genes. Adenomas displayed evidence of multiclonality similar to stage I carcinomas. Strong correlations between mutational rate and patient age were observed in at-risk mucosa and adenomas. Our data indicate that at least 23% of somatic mutations are present in at-risk mucosa prior to adenoma initiation. The genomic profiles of at-risk mucosa and adenomas illustrate the evolution from normal tissue to carcinoma via greater resolution of molecular changes at the inflection point of premalignant lesions. Furthermore, substantial genomic variation exists in at-risk mucosa before adenoma formation, and deregulation of the WNT pathway is required to foster carcinogenesis. Cancer Prev Res; 9(6); 417-27. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27221540

  18. Human olfactory lateralization requires trigeminal activation.

    PubMed

    Croy, Ilona; Schulz, Max; Blumrich, Anna; Hummel, Cornelia; Gerber, Johannes; Hummel, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    Rats are able to lateralize odors. This ability involves specialized neurons in the orbitofrontal cortex which are able to process the left, right and bilateral presentation of stimuli. However, it is not clear whether this function is preserved in humans. Humans are in general not able to differentiate whether a selective olfactory stimulant has been applied to the left or right nostril; however exceptions have been reported. Following a screening of 152 individuals with an olfactory lateralization test, we identified 19 who could lateralize odors above chance level. 15 of these "lateralizers" underwent olfactory fMRI scanning in a block design and were compared to 15 controls matched for age and sex distribution. As a result, both groups showed comparable activation of olfactory eloquent brain areas. However, subjects with lateralization ability had a significantly enhanced activation of cerebral trigeminal processing areas (somatosensory cortex, intraparietal sulcus). In contrast to controls, lateralizers furthermore exhibited no suppression in the area of the trigeminal principal sensory nucleus. An exploratory study with an olfactory change detection paradigm furthermore showed that lateralizers oriented faster towards changes in the olfactory environment. Taken together, our study suggests that the trigeminal system is activated to a higher degree by the odorous stimuli in the group of "lateralizers". We conclude that humans are not able to lateralize odors based on the olfactory input alone, but vary in the degree to which the trigeminal system is recruited. PMID:24825502

  19. Neuropeptide Y in the olfactory microvillar cells.

    PubMed

    Montani, Giorgia; Tonelli, Simone; Elsaesser, Rebecca; Paysan, Jacques; Tirindelli, Roberto

    2006-07-01

    This paper examines a possible role of microvillar cells in coordinating cell death and regeneration of olfactory epithelial neurons. The olfactory neuroepithelium of mammals is a highly dynamic organ. Olfactory neurons periodically degenerate by apoptosis and as a consequence of chemical or physical damage. To compensate for this loss of cells, the olfactory epithelium maintains a lifelong ability to regenerate from a pool of resident multipotent stem cells. To assure functional continuity and histological integrity of the olfactory epithelium over a period of many decades, apoptosis and regeneration require to be precisely coordinated. Among the factors that have been implicated in mediating this regulation is the neuropeptide Y (NPY). Knockout mice that lack functional expression of this neurogenic peptide show defects in embryonic development of the olfactory epithelium and in its ability to regenerate in the adult. Here we show that, in postnatal olfactory epithelia, NPY is exclusively expressed by a specific population of microvillar cells. We previously characterized these cells as a novel type of putative chemosensory cells, which are provided with a phosphatidyl-inositol-mediated signal transduction cascade. Our findings allow for the first time to suggest that microvillar cells are involved in connecting apoptosis to neuronal regeneration by stimulus-induced release of NPY. PMID:16800866

  20. [Odor sensing system and olfactory display].

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Takamichi

    2014-01-01

    In this review, an odor sensing system and an olfactory display are introduced into people in pharmacy. An odor sensing system consists of an array of sensors with partially overlapping specificities and pattern recognition technique. One of examples of odor sensing systems is a halitosis sensor which quantifies the mixture composition of three volatile sulfide compounds. A halitosis sensor was realized using a preconcentrator to raise sensitivity and an electrochemical sensor array to suppress the influence of humidity. Partial least squares (PLS) method was used to quantify the mixture composition. The experiment reveals that the sufficient accuracy was obtained. Moreover, the olfactory display, which present scents to human noses, is explained. A multi-component olfactory display enables the presentation of a variety of smells. The two types of multi-component olfactory display are described. The first one uses many solenoid valves with high speed switching. The valve ON frequency determines the concentration of the corresponding odor component. The latter one consists of miniaturized liquid pumps and a surface acoustic wave (SAW) atomizer. It enables the wearable olfactory display without smell persistence. Finally, the application of the olfactory display is demonstrated. Virtual ice cream shop with scents was made as a content of interactive art. People can enjoy harmony among vision, audition and olfaction. In conclusion, both odor sensing system and olfactory display can contribute to the field of human health care. PMID:24584010

  1. Olfactory deposition of inhaled nanoparticles in humans

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Guilherme J. M.; Schroeter, Jeffry D.; Kimbell, Julia S.

    2016-01-01

    Context Inhaled nanoparticles can migrate to the brain via the olfactory bulb, as demonstrated in experiments in several animal species. This route of exposure may be the mechanism behind the correlation between air pollution and human neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. Objectives This manuscript aims to (1) estimate the dose of inhaled nanoparticles that deposit in the human olfactory epithelium during nasal breathing at rest and (2) compare the olfactory dose in humans with our earlier dose estimates for rats. Materials and methods An anatomically-accurate model of the human nasal cavity was developed based on computed tomography scans. The deposition of 1–100 nm particles in the whole nasal cavity and its olfactory region were estimated via computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. Our CFD methods were validated by comparing our numerical predictions for whole-nose deposition with experimental data and previous CFD studies in the literature. Results In humans, olfactory dose of inhaled nanoparticles is highest for 1–2 nm particles with approximately 1% of inhaled particles depositing in the olfactory region. As particle size grows to 100 nm, olfactory deposition decreases to 0.01% of inhaled particles. Discussion and conclusion Our results suggest that the percentage of inhaled particles that deposit in the olfactory region is lower in humans than in rats. However, olfactory dose per unit surface area is estimated to be higher in humans due to their larger minute volume. These dose estimates are important for risk assessment and dose-response studies investigating the neurotoxicity of inhaled nanoparticles. PMID:26194036

  2. Neuronal organization of olfactory bulb circuits

    PubMed Central

    Nagayama, Shin; Homma, Ryota; Imamura, Fumiaki

    2014-01-01

    Olfactory sensory neurons extend their axons solely to the olfactory bulb, which is dedicated to odor information processing. The olfactory bulb is divided into multiple layers, with different types of neurons found in each of the layers. Therefore, neurons in the olfactory bulb have conventionally been categorized based on the layers in which their cell bodies are found; namely, juxtaglomerular cells in the glomerular layer, tufted cells in the external plexiform layer, mitral cells in the mitral cell layer, and granule cells in the granule cell layer. More recently, numerous studies have revealed the heterogeneous nature of each of these cell types, allowing them to be further divided into subclasses based on differences in morphological, molecular, and electrophysiological properties. In addition, technical developments and advances have resulted in an increasing number of studies regarding cell types other than the conventionally categorized ones described above, including short-axon cells and adult-generated interneurons. Thus, the expanding diversity of cells in the olfactory bulb is now being acknowledged. However, our current understanding of olfactory bulb neuronal circuits is mostly based on the conventional and simplest classification of cell types. Few studies have taken neuronal diversity into account for understanding the function of the neuronal circuits in this region of the brain. This oversight may contribute to the roadblocks in developing more precise and accurate models of olfactory neuronal networks. The purpose of this review is therefore to discuss the expanse of existing work on neuronal diversity in the olfactory bulb up to this point, so as to provide an overall picture of the olfactory bulb circuit. PMID:25232305

  3. Invasive rodent eradication on islands.

    PubMed

    Howald, Gregg; Donlan, C Josh; Galván, Juan Pablo; Russell, James C; Parkes, John; Samaniego, Araceli; Wang, Yiwei; Veitch, Dick; Genovesi, Piero; Pascal, Michel; Saunders, Alan; Tershy, Bernie

    2007-10-01

    Invasive mammals are the greatest threat to island biodiversity and invasive rodents are likely responsible for the greatest number of extinctions and ecosystem changes. Techniques for eradicating rodents from islands were developed over 2 decades ago. Since that time there has been a significant development and application of this conservation tool. We reviewed the literature on invasive rodent eradications to assess its current state and identify actions to make it more effective. Worldwide, 332 successful rodent eradications have been undertaken; we identified 35 failed eradications and 20 campaigns of unknown result. Invasive rodents have been eradicated from 284 islands (47,628 ha). With the exception of two small islands, rodenticides were used in all eradication campaigns. Brodifacoum was used in 71% of campaigns and 91% of the total area treated. The most frequent rodenticide distribution methods (from most to least) are bait stations, hand broadcasting, and aerial broadcasting. Nevertheless, campaigns using aerial broadcast made up 76% of the total area treated. Mortality of native vertebrates due to nontarget poisoning has been documented, but affected species quickly recover to pre-eradication population levels or higher. A variety of methods have been developed to mitigate nontarget impacts, and applied research can further aid in minimizing impacts. Land managers should routinely remove invasive rodents from islands <100 ha that lack vertebrates susceptible to nontarget poisoning. For larger islands and those that require nontarget mitigation, expert consultation and greater planning effort are needed. With the exception of house mice (Mus musculus), island size may no longer be the limiting factor for rodent eradications; rather, social acceptance and funding may be the main challenges. To be successful, large-scale rodent campaigns should be integrated with programs to improve the livelihoods of residents, island biosecurity, and reinvasion response

  4. Carnosinase activity of human gastrointestinal mucosa.

    PubMed Central

    Sadikali, F; Darwish, R; Watson, W C

    1975-01-01

    Carnosinase, the dipeptidase which hydrolyses carnosine and other histidine-containing dipeptides, was assayed in mucosal tissues of the human and of the rat gut. Kinetic properties of the intestinal enzyme were found to be similar to carnosinase of other animal tissues. Little or no activity was detected in human gastric or colonic mucosa, and the levels were lower in duodenal than jejunal mucosa. The distribution of carnosinase is similar to that of the disaccharidases. Mean carnosinase activity was 8-8 units/g weight in 15 patients with histologically normal mucosa compared with 5-7 units in five with villous atrophy. The enzyme levels increased with histological improvement of the mucosa in patients with coeliac disease on a gluten-free diet. Tolerance curves for carnosine and its constitutent amino acids showed malabsorption of the dipeptide in a patient with carnosinase deficiency. It is concluded that the intestinal mucosa has much less hydrolase activity for carnosine than for glycylglycine and other dipeptidases, and the relatively slow hydrolysis appears to be the rate-limiting step in the total absorptive process. PMID:1237444

  5. Unraveling Cajal's view of the olfactory system

    PubMed Central

    Figueres-Oñate, María; Gutiérrez, Yolanda; López-Mascaraque, Laura

    2014-01-01

    The olfactory system has a highly regular organization of interconnected synaptic circuits from the periphery. It is therefore an excellent model for understanding general principles about how the brain processes information. Cajal revealed the basic cell types and their interconnections at the end of the XIX century. Since his original descriptions, the observation and analysis of the olfactory system and its components represents a major topic in neuroscience studies, providing important insights into the neural mechanisms. In this review, we will highlight the importance of Cajal contributions and his legacy to the actual knowledge of the olfactory system. PMID:25071462

  6. Rectal mucosa in cows' milk allergy.

    PubMed Central

    Iyngkaran, N; Yadav, M; Boey, C G

    1989-01-01

    Eleven infants who were suspected clinically of having cows' milk protein sensitive enteropathy were fed with a protein hydrolysate formula for six to eight weeks, after which they had jejunal and rectal biopsies taken before and 24 hours after challenge with cows' milk protein. When challenged six infants (group 1) developed clinical symptoms and five did not (group 2). In group 1 the lesions developed in both the jejunal mucosa (four infants at 24 hours and one at three days), and the rectal mucosa, and the injury was associated with depletion of alkaline phosphatase activity. Infants in group 2 were normal. It seems that rectal injury that develops as a direct consequence of oral challenge with the protein in reactive infants may be used as one of the measurements to confirm the diagnosis of cows' milk protein sensitive enteropathy. Moreover, ingestion of such food proteins may injure the distal colonic mucosa without affecting the proximal small gut in some infants. PMID:2817945

  7. Radiation tolerance of the vaginal mucosa

    SciTech Connect

    Hintz, b.L.; Kagan, A.R.; Chan, P.; Gilbert, H.A.; Nussbaum, H.; Rao, A.R.; Wollin, M.

    1980-06-01

    Sixteen patients with cancer of the vagina that were controlled locally for a minimum of eighteen months after teletherpay (T) or brachytherapy (B) or both (T and B), were analyzed for radiation tolerance of the vaginal mucosa. The site of vaginal necrosis did not always coincide with the site of the tumor. The posterior wall appeared more vulnerable than the anterior or lateral walls. For the distal vaginal mucosa, necrosis requiring surgical intervention occurred following combined T and B, if summated rad exceeded9800. The upper vagina tolerated higher dosages. No patient surgery for upper vaginal necrosis even though summated (T and B) dosage up to 14,000 rad was applied. Placing radioactive needles on the surface of the vaginal cylinder with or without interstitial perincal needles should be avoided. Further accumulation of data is needed to define these vaginal mucosa tolerance limits more closely.

  8. Contextual olfactory learning in cockroaches.

    PubMed

    Sato, Chihiro; Matsumoto, Yukihisa; Sakura, Midori; Mizunami, Makoto

    2006-04-01

    We investigated the capability of context-dependent olfactory learning in cockroaches. One group of cockroaches received training to associate peppermint odor (conditioning stimulus) with sucrose solution (appetitive unconditioned stimulus) and vanilla odor with saline solution under illumination and to associate peppermint with aversive unconditioned stimulus and vanilla with appetitive unconditioned stimulus in the dark. Another group received training with the opposite stimulus arrangement. Before training, both groups exhibited preference for vanilla over peppermint. After training, the former group preferred peppermint over vanilla under illumination but preferred vanilla over peppermint in the dark, and the latter group exhibited the opposite odor preference. We conclude that cockroaches are capable of disambiguating the meaning of conditioning stimuli according to visual context. PMID:16543825

  9. Dual processing of sulfated steroids in the olfactory system of an anuran amphibian

    PubMed Central

    Sansone, Alfredo; Hassenklöver, Thomas; Offner, Thomas; Fu, Xiaoyan; Holy, Timothy E.; Manzini, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Chemical communication is widespread in amphibians, but if compared to later diverging tetrapods the available functional data is limited. The existing information on the vomeronasal system of anurans is particularly sparse. Amphibians represent a transitional stage in the evolution of the olfactory system. Most species have anatomically separated main and vomeronasal systems, but recent studies have shown that in anurans their molecular separation is still underway. Sulfated steroids function as migratory pheromones in lamprey and have recently been identified as natural vomeronasal stimuli in rodents. Here we identified sulfated steroids as the first known class of vomeronasal stimuli in the amphibian Xenopus laevis. We show that sulfated steroids are detected and concurrently processed by the two distinct olfactory subsystems of larval Xenopus laevis, the main olfactory system and the vomeronasal system. Our data revealed a similar but partially different processing of steroid-induced responses in the two systems. Differences of detection thresholds suggest that the two information channels are not just redundant, but rather signal different information. Furthermore, we found that larval and adult animals excrete multiple sulfated compounds with physical properties consistent with sulfated steroids. Breeding tadpole and frog water including these compounds activated a large subset of sensory neurons that also responded to synthetic steroids, showing that sulfated steroids are likely to convey intraspecific information. Our findings indicate that sulfated steroids are conserved vomeronasal stimuli functioning in phylogenetically distant classes of tetrapods living in aquatic and terrestrial habitats. PMID:26441543

  10. Olfactory system gamma oscillations: the physiological dissection of a cognitive neural system

    PubMed Central

    Rojas-Líbano, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Oscillatory phenomena have been a focus of dynamical systems research since the time of the classical studies on the pendulum by Galileo. Fast cortical oscillations also have a long and storied history in neurophysiology, and olfactory oscillations have led the way with a depth of explanation not present in the literature of most other cortical systems. From the earliest studies of odor-evoked oscillations by Adrian, many reports have focused on mechanisms and functional associations of these oscillations, in particular for the so-called gamma oscillations. As a result, much information is now available regarding the biophysical mechanisms that underlie the oscillations in the mammalian olfactory system. Recent studies have expanded on these and addressed functionality directly in mammals and in the analogous insect system. Sub-bands within the rodent gamma oscillatory band associated with specific behavioral and cognitive states have also been identified. All this makes oscillatory neuronal networks a unique interdisciplinary platform from which to study neurocognitive and dynamical phenomena in intact, freely behaving animals. We present here a summary of what has been learned about the functional role and mechanisms of gamma oscillations in the olfactory system as a guide for similar studies in other cortical systems. PMID:19003484

  11. Significance of sniffing pattern during the acquisition of an olfactory discrimination task.

    PubMed

    Lefèvre, Laura; Courtiol, Emmanuelle; Garcia, Samuel; Thévenet, Marc; Messaoudi, Belkacem; Buonviso, Nathalie

    2016-10-01

    Active sampling of olfactory environment consists of sniffing in rodents. The importance of sniffing dynamics is well established at the neuronal and behavioral levels. Patterns of sniffing have been shown to be modulated by the physicochemical properties of odorants, particularly concentration and sorption. Sniffing is also heavily impacted by higher processing related to the behavioral context, emotion and attentional demand. However, how the pattern of sniffing evolves over the course of learning of an experimental olfactory conditioning is still poorly understood. We tested this question by monitoring sniffing activity, using a whole-body plethysmograph, on rats performing a two-alternative choice odor discrimination task. We followed sniff variations at different learning stages (naïve, well-trained, expert). We found that during the acquisition of an odor discrimination task, rats acquired a global sniffing pattern, independent of the odor pair used. This pattern consists of a longer sampling duration, a higher sniffing frequency, and a larger amplitude. In parallel, subtle differences of sniffing between the two odors of a pair were also observed. This sniffing behavior was not only associated with a better and faster acquisition of the discrimination task but was also transferred to other odor sets and refined after a long-term pause so as to reduce the sampling duration and maintain a specific sniffing frequency. Our results provide additional arguments that sniffing is a complex sensorimotor act that is strongly affected by olfactory learning. PMID:27343936

  12. Methods to measure olfactory behavior in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Junhui; Wang, Wenbin; Pan, Yung-Wei; Lu, Song; Xia, Zhengui

    2015-01-01

    Mice rely on the sense of olfaction to detect food sources, recognize social and mating partners, and avoid predators. Many behaviors of mice including learning and memory, social interaction, fear, and anxiety are closely associated with their function of olfaction, and behavior tasks designed to evaluate those brain functions may use odors as cues. Accurate assessment of olfaction is not only essential for the study of olfactory system but also critical for proper interpretation of various mouse behaviors especially learning and memory, emotionality and affect, and sociality. Here we describe a series of behavior experiments that offer multidimensional and quantitative assessments for mouse’s olfactory function, including olfactory habituation, discrimination, odor preference, odor detection sensitivity, and olfactory memory, to both social and nonsocial odors. PMID:25645244

  13. The Pig Olfactory Brain: A Primer.

    PubMed

    Brunjes, Peter C; Feldman, Sanford; Osterberg, Stephen K

    2016-06-01

    Despite the fact that pigs are reputed to have excellent olfactory abilities, few studies have examined regions of the pig brain involved in the sense of smell. The present study provides an overview of the olfactory bulb, anterior olfactory nucleus, and piriform cortex of adult pigs using several approaches. Nissl, myelin, and Golgi stains were used to produce a general overview of the organization of the regions and confocal microscopy was employed to examine 1) projection neurons, 2) GABAergic local circuit neurons that express somatostatin, parvalbumin, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, or calretinin, 3) neuromodulatory fibers (cholinergic and serotonergic), and 4) glia (astrocytes and microglia). The findings revealed that pig olfactory structures are quite large, highly organized and follow the general patterns observed in mammals. PMID:26936231

  14. Modeling Olfactory Bulb Evolution through Primate Phylogeny

    PubMed Central

    Heritage, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Adaptive characterizations of primates have usually included a reduction in olfactory sensitivity. However, this inference of derivation and directionality assumes an ancestral state of olfaction, usually by comparison to a group of extant non-primate mammals. Thus, the accuracy of the inference depends on the assumed ancestral state. Here I present a phylogenetic model of continuous trait evolution that reconstructs olfactory bulb volumes for ancestral nodes of primates and mammal outgroups. Parent-daughter comparisons suggest that, relative to the ancestral euarchontan, the crown-primate node is plesiomorphic and that derived reduction in olfactory sensitivity is an attribute of the haplorhine lineage. The model also suggests a derived increase in olfactory sensitivity at the strepsirrhine node. This oppositional diversification of the strepsirrhine and haplorhine lineages from an intermediate and non-derived ancestor is inconsistent with a characterization of graded reduction through primate evolution. PMID:25426851

  15. Serotonin modulation of moth central olfactory neurons.

    PubMed

    Kloppenburg, Peter; Mercer, Alison R

    2008-01-01

    In the tobacco hornworm, Manduca sexta, 5-hydroxytryptamine (5HT) acting at the level of the antennal lobes contributes significantly to changing the moth's responsiveness to olfactory stimuli. 5HT targets K(+) conductances in the cells, increasing the excitability of central olfactory neurons and their responsiveness to olfactory cues. Effects of 5HT modulation are apparent not only at the single cell level, but also in the activity patterns of populations of neurons that convey olfactory information from antennal lobes to higher centers of the brain. Evidence suggests that 5HT-induced changes in activity within neural circuits of the antennal lobes might also drive structural plasticity, providing the basis for longer-term changes in antennal lobe function. PMID:18067443

  16. Comparison of clinical tests of olfactory function.

    PubMed

    Reden, J; Draf, C; Frank, R A; Hummel, T

    2016-04-01

    To assess olfactory function, various measures are used in clinical routine. In this study, the Sniff Magnitude Test (SMT), a test considering the sniff response to an odor, was applied to patients with olfactory dysfunction (n = 49) and to a control group without subjective olfaction disorder (n = 21). For comparison, the validated "Sniffin' Sticks" test battery, a psychophysical olfactory test consisting of tests for phenyl ethyl alcohol odor threshold, odor discrimination, and odor identification was performed. Analyses indicated that the SMT showed significant differences between patients and controls (p = 0.003). Furthermore, results from the SMT and the "Sniffin' Sticks" correlated significantly (p < 0.001). In conclusion, the SMT appears to be a useful addition to the battery of available clinical tests to assess olfactory function. PMID:26050222

  17. The Pig Olfactory Brain: A Primer

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Sanford; Osterberg, Stephen K.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the fact that pigs are reputed to have excellent olfactory abilities, few studies have examined regions of the pig brain involved in the sense of smell. The present study provides an overview of the olfactory bulb, anterior olfactory nucleus, and piriform cortex of adult pigs using several approaches. Nissl, myelin, and Golgi stains were used to produce a general overview of the organization of the regions and confocal microscopy was employed to examine 1) projection neurons, 2) GABAergic local circuit neurons that express somatostatin, parvalbumin, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, or calretinin, 3) neuromodulatory fibers (cholinergic and serotonergic), and 4) glia (astrocytes and microglia). The findings revealed that pig olfactory structures are quite large, highly organized and follow the general patterns observed in mammals. PMID:26936231

  18. Anatomical Mapping and Density of Merkel Cells in Skin and Mucosae of the Dog.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Gustavo A; Rodríguez, Francisco; Quesada, Óscar; Herráez, Pedro; Fernández, Antonio; Espinosa-de-Los-Monteros, Antonio

    2016-09-01

    Merkel cells (MCs) are specialized cutaneous receptor cells involved with tactile sense. Although the distribution of MCs has been extensively studied in humans and rodents, their precise distribution and density throughout skin in the dog has not previously been determined. Knowledge of their distribution could facilitate understanding of their functions. By using of immunohistochemistry, density, and anatomical mapping of the MCs population in the dog skin was determined. Assessment of the MCs innervation was also achieved. Different patterns were noted in epidermis, hair follicles, or mucosa, including variable-sized clusters, linear or horse-shaped arrangements, and scattered and individualized cells. MCs revealed great variations in density and distribution over the body surface, with the highest numbers in oral mucosa and facial skin. There was no correlation of MCs density with age, sex, type of breed, coat type or pigmentation. Between 41 and 65% of MCs in hairy and glabrous skin and 8-18% of MCs in oral mucosa were in intimate contact with intraepithelial axon terminals. These findings indicate that canine MCs are numerous in sensory receptive areas and may be associated with the tactile sense in the dog. The present article enhances the knowledge of the skin structure in this species. Anat Rec, 299:1157-1164, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27341526

  19. Olfactory bulb encoding during learning under anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Nicol, Alister U.; Sanchez-Andrade, Gabriela; Collado, Paloma; Segonds-Pichon, Anne; Kendrick, Keith M.

    2014-01-01

    Neural plasticity changes within the olfactory bulb are important for olfactory learning, although how neural encoding changes support new associations with specific odors and whether they can be investigated under anesthesia, remain unclear. Using the social transmission of food preference olfactory learning paradigm in mice in conjunction with in vivo microdialysis sampling we have shown firstly that a learned preference for a scented food odor smelled on the breath of a demonstrator animal occurs under isofluorane anesthesia. Furthermore, subsequent exposure to this cued odor under anesthesia promotes the same pattern of increased release of glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the olfactory bulb as previously found in conscious animals following olfactory learning, and evoked GABA release was positively correlated with the amount of scented food eaten. In a second experiment, multiarray (24 electrodes) electrophysiological recordings were made from olfactory bulb mitral cells under isofluorane anesthesia before, during and after a novel scented food odor was paired with carbon disulfide. Results showed significant increases in overall firing frequency to the cued-odor during and after learning and decreases in response to an uncued odor. Analysis of patterns of changes in individual neurons revealed that a substantial proportion (>50%) of them significantly changed their response profiles during and after learning with most of those previously inhibited becoming excited. A large number of cells exhibiting no response to the odors prior to learning were either excited or inhibited afterwards. With the uncued odor many previously responsive cells became unresponsive or inhibited. Learning associated changes only occurred in the posterior part of the olfactory bulb. Thus olfactory learning under anesthesia promotes extensive, but spatially distinct, changes in mitral cell networks to both cued and uncued odors as well as in evoked glutamate and GABA

  20. Protein kinase C sensitizes olfactory adenylate cyclase.

    PubMed

    Frings, S

    1993-02-01

    Effects of neurotransmitters on cAMP-mediated signal transduction in frog olfactory receptor cells (ORCs) were studied using in situ spike recordings and radioimmunoassays. Carbachol, applied to the mucosal side of olfactory epithelium, amplified the electrical response of ORCs to cAMP-generating odorants, but did not affect unstimulated cells. A similar augmentation of odorant response was observed in the presence of phorbol dibutyrate (PDBu), an activator of protein kinase C (PKC). The electrical response to forskolin, an activator of adenylate cyclase (AC), was also enhanced by PDBu, and it was attenuated by the PKC inhibitor Goe 6983. Forskolin-induced accumulation of cAMP in olfactory tissue was potentiated by carbachol, serotonin, and PDBu to a similar extent. Potentiation was completely suppressed by the PKC inhibitors Goe 6983, staurosporine, and polymyxin B, suggesting that the sensitivity of olfactory AC to stimulation by odorants and forskolin was increased by PKC. Experiments with deciliated olfactory tissue indicated that sensitization of AC was restricted to sensory cilia of ORCs. To study the effects of cell Ca2+ on these mechanisms, the intracellular Ca2+ concentration of olfactory tissue was either increased by ionomycin or decreased by BAPTA/AM. Increasing cell Ca2+ had two effects on cAMP production: (a) the basal cAMP production was enhanced by a mechanism sensitive to inhibitors of calmodulin; and (b) similar to phorbol ester, cell Ca2+ caused sensitization of AC to stimulation by forskolin, an effect sensitive to Goe 6983. Decreasing cell Ca2+ below basal levels rendered AC unresponsive to stimulation by forskolin. These data suggest that a crosstalk mechanism is functional in frog ORCs, linking the sensitivity of AC to the activity of PKC. At increased activity of PKC, olfactory AC becomes more responsive to stimulation by odorants, forskolin, and cell Ca2+. Neurotransmitters appear to use this crosstalk mechanism to regulate olfactory

  1. Cortical feedback control of olfactory bulb circuits.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Alison M; Sturgill, James F; Poo, Cindy; Isaacson, Jeffry S

    2012-12-20

    Olfactory cortex pyramidal cells integrate sensory input from olfactory bulb mitral and tufted (M/T) cells and project axons back to the bulb. However, the impact of cortical feedback projections on olfactory bulb circuits is unclear. Here, we selectively express channelrhodopsin-2 in olfactory cortex pyramidal cells and show that cortical feedback projections excite diverse populations of bulb interneurons. Activation of cortical fibers directly excites GABAergic granule cells, which in turn inhibit M/T cells. However, we show that cortical inputs preferentially target short axon cells that drive feedforward inhibition of granule cells. In vivo, activation of olfactory cortex that only weakly affects spontaneous M/T cell firing strongly gates odor-evoked M/T cell responses: cortical activity suppresses odor-evoked excitation and enhances odor-evoked inhibition. Together, these results indicate that although cortical projections have diverse actions on olfactory bulb microcircuits, the net effect of cortical feedback on M/T cells is an amplification of odor-evoked inhibition. PMID:23259951

  2. Long-term recording of olfactory and vomeronasal stimulant-induced waves from the turtle main olfactory bulb and accessory olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Kashiwayanagi, M; Taniguchi, M; Shoji, T; Kurihara, K

    1997-08-01

    Recording of stimulant-induced waves (bulbar responses) from the main olfactory bulb is a useful tool for measuring quantitative stable olfactory responses. There is a good relationship between the olfactory bulbar response, olfactory nerve response and electroolfactogram (EOG), suggesting that the bulbar response reflects events in receptor cells. The modern whole-cell recording technique offers direct information on olfactory transduction in single cells, but it requires long experimental periods and many animals. On the other hand, analysis of bulbar responses provides useful information and requires the use of few animals. For example, we found that cAMP-increasing and IP3-increasing odorants were not distinctly received by the turtle olfactory organ by measuring olfactory bulbar responses and analyzed with a multidimensional scaling from about 60 animals. However, to record similar odor responses from isolated turtle olfactory neurons, at least 200 animals would be necessary. Bulbar responses are recorded with electrodes implanted into or located on the main olfactory bulb. When electrodes are located on the olfactory bulb surface, it is possible to record stable responses over a period of 3 days. These methods were applied successfully to the accessory olfactory bulb. In this paper, we describe the protocols used for recording of the stimulant-induced waves from the main and accessory olfactory bulb. PMID:9385067

  3. Bioengineered vocal fold mucosa for voice restoration.

    PubMed

    Ling, Changying; Li, Qiyao; Brown, Matthew E; Kishimoto, Yo; Toya, Yutaka; Devine, Erin E; Choi, Kyeong-Ok; Nishimoto, Kohei; Norman, Ian G; Tsegyal, Tenzin; Jiang, Jack J; Burlingham, William J; Gunasekaran, Sundaram; Smith, Lloyd M; Frey, Brian L; Welham, Nathan V

    2015-11-18

    Patients with voice impairment caused by advanced vocal fold (VF) fibrosis or tissue loss have few treatment options. A transplantable, bioengineered VF mucosa would address the individual and societal costs of voice-related communication loss. Such a tissue must be biomechanically capable of aerodynamic-to-acoustic energy transfer and high-frequency vibration and physiologically capable of maintaining a barrier against the airway lumen. We isolated primary human VF fibroblasts and epithelial cells and cocultured them under organotypic conditions. The resulting engineered mucosae showed morphologic features of native tissue, proteome-level evidence of mucosal morphogenesis and emerging extracellular matrix complexity, and rudimentary barrier function in vitro. When grafted into canine larynges ex vivo, the mucosae generated vibratory behavior and acoustic output that were indistinguishable from those of native VF tissue. When grafted into humanized mice in vivo, the mucosae survived and were well tolerated by the human adaptive immune system. This tissue engineering approach has the potential to restore voice function in patients with otherwise untreatable VF mucosal disease. PMID:26582902

  4. Desmoplastic Melanocytic Nevus of Oral Mucosa.

    PubMed

    Damm, Douglas D; Fowler, Craig B; Schmidt, David P

    2016-09-01

    The desmoplastic melanocytic nevus is an uncommon variant that easily may be confused with a fibrohistiocytic neoplasm or a desmoplastic melanoma. It is believed that the following report describes the first known example of a desmoplastic melanocytic nevus arising in the oral mucosa. The histopathologic and immunohistochemical features that allow separation from other microscopically similar pathoses are stressed. PMID:26747459

  5. Olfactory Fear Conditioning Induces Field Potential Potentiation in Rat Olfactory Cortex and Amygdala

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Messaoudi, Belkacem; Granjon, Lionel; Mouly, Anne-Marie; Sevelinges, Yannick; Gervais, Remi

    2004-01-01

    The widely used Pavlovian fear-conditioning paradigms used for studying the neurobiology of learning and memory have mainly used auditory cues as conditioned stimuli (CS). The present work assessed the neural network involved in olfactory fear conditioning, using olfactory bulb stimulation-induced field potential signal (EFP) as a marker of…

  6. Effects of handedness on olfactory event-related potentials in a simple olfactory task.

    PubMed

    Gottschlich, Marie; Hummel, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to re-investigate the influence of handedness on simple olfactory tasks to further clarify the role of handedness in chemical senses. Similar to language and other sensory systems, effects of handedness should be expected. Young, healthy subjects participated in this study, including 24 left-handers and 24 right-handers, with no indication of any major nasal or health problems. The two groups did not differ in terms of sex and age (14 women and 10 men in each group). They had a mean age of 24.0 years. Olfactory event-related potentials were recorded after left or right olfactory stimulation with the rose-like odor phenyl ethyl alcohol (PEA) or the smell of rotten eggs (hydrogen sulfide, H2S). Results suggested that handedness has no major influence on amplitude or latency of olfactory event-related potentials when it comes to simple olfactory tasks. PMID:26030037

  7. Olfactory signals and the MHC: a review and a case study in Lemur catta.

    PubMed

    Knapp, Leslie A; Robson, Julie; Waterhouse, John S

    2006-06-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is the most polymorphic genetic system known in vertebrates. Decades of research demonstrate that it plays a critical role in immune response and disease resistance. It has also been suggested that MHC genes influence social behavior and reproductive phenomena. Studies in laboratory mice and rats report that kin recognition and mate choice are influenced by olfactory cues determined at least in part by an individual's MHC genes. This issue has stimulated intense but controversial research. However, work in this field has only been carried out in rodents and humans. Thus far, no study has directly investigated the relationship between olfactory cues and MHC genotype in nonhuman primates. Furthermore, other genetic loci, including those linked to the MHC, have not been ruled out as the primary influence on odor profiles. To explore the relationship between individual odor profiles and MHC alleles, we are studying ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta). These animals are an ideal model species because they are extremely scent-oriented and their behaviors suggest that olfactory signals form an important part of their intra- and intergroup communication systems. Individual odor profiles from tail and scent gland samples were generated for six males using gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS). MHC genotypes were identified using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). The GC-MS analyses demonstrated a difference between profiles obtained from tail and scent gland samples. Although our sample size is relatively small and statistical significance could not be obtained, our analyses suggest a relationship between MHC and concentrations of volatile compounds. While these results are preliminary, they support the need for further studies of the MHC and olfactory signals in lemurs and other primates. PMID:16715507

  8. Optical detection of (pre-)malignant lesions of the oral mucosa: autofluorescence characteristics of healthy mucosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Veld, Diana C. G.; Witjes, Max; Roodenburg, Jan L.; Star, Willem M.; Sterenborg, Hericus J. C. M.

    2001-10-01

    Previous clinical results demonstrate the potential of in vivo autofluorescence spectroscopy for early detection of (pre-)malignant lesions of the oral mucosa. For reliable diagnosis, it is necessary to study autofluorescence spectra of healthy mucosa first. We measured excitation-emission maps in healthy subjects and subjects with a history of cancer in the head -neck region. Our results show that different anatomical locations produce distinct autofluorescence spectra. Influences of, among others, smoking and drinking habits require further investigation.

  9. Inhibition of Inflammation-Associated Olfactory Loss by Etanercept in an Inducible Olfactory Inflammation Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Yong Gi; Lane, Andrew P.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the effect of a soluble human tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) receptor blocker (Etanercept) on an inducible olfactory inflammation (IOI) mouse model Study Design An in vivo study using a transgenic mouse model Setting Research laboratory Subjects and Methods To study the impact of chronic inflammation on the olfactory system, a transgenic mouse model of chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS)-associated olfactory loss was utilized (IOI mouse), expressing TNF-α in a temporally-controlled fashion specifically within the olfactory epithelium. In one group of mice (n=4), Etanercept was injected intraperitoneally (100 µg/dose, 3 times/week) concurrent with a 2-week period of TNF-α expression. A second group of mice (n=2) underwent induction of TNF-α expression for 8 weeks, with Etanercept treatment administered during the final 2 weeks of inflammation. Olfactory function was assayed by elecro-olfactogram (EOG), and olfactory tissue was processed for histology and immunohistochemical staining. Each group was compared with equal number of control group. Results Compared to non-treated IOI mice, Etanercept -treated IOI mice showed significantly improved EOG responses after 2 weeks (p<0.001). After 8 weeks of induced inflammation, there was massive loss of olfactory epithelium and no EOG response in non-treated IOI mice. However, in Etanercept - treated mice, regeneration of olfactory epithelium was observed. Conclusion Concomitant administration of Etanercept in IOI mice results in interruption of TNF-α-induced olfactory loss and induction of neuroepithelial regeneration. This demonstrates that Etanercept has potential utility as a tool for elucidating the role of TNF-α in other olfactory inflammation models. PMID:26932943

  10. An Olfactory Indicator for Acid-Base Titrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flair, Mark N.; Setzer, William N.

    1990-01-01

    The use of an olfactory acid-base indicator in titrations for visually impaired students is discussed. Potential olfactory indicators include eugenol, thymol, vanillin, and thiophenol. Titrations performed with each indicator with eugenol proved to be successful. (KR)