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Sample records for rodentia cricetidae k1

  1. The puzzling character of repetitive DNA in Phodopus genomes (Cricetidae, Rodentia).

    PubMed

    Paço, Ana; Adega, Filomena; Meštrović, Nevenka; Plohl, Miroslav; Chaves, Raquel

    2015-09-01

    Three novel repetitive DNA sequences are described, presenting a similar heterochromatic chromosomal location in two hamster species: Phodopus roborovskii and Phodopus sungorus (Cricetidae, Rodentia). Namely, two species-specific repetitive sequences (PROsat from P. roborovskii and PSUchr1sat from P. sungorus) surrounding a third one (PsatDNA), that is shared by both hamster genomes. Fiber-FISH analyses revealed that PROsat intermingles with PsatDNA in P. roborovskii and PSUchr1sat intermingles with PsatDNA in P. sungorus. A model explaining the evolution of this intricate chromosomal distribution is proposed, which can explain better the evolution of these very derivative genomes (in comparison to the ancestral Muroidea). The most plausible evolutionary scenario seems to be the expansion of a number of repeats into other's domain, most probably resulting in its intermingling, followed by the subsequent spread of these complex repeats from a single chromosomal location to other chromosomes. Evidences of an association between repetitive sequences and the chromosome evolution process were observed, namely for PROsat. Most probably, the evolutionary breakpoints that shaped PRO and PSU chromosomes (pericentric inversions and fusions) occurred within the boundaries of PROsat blocks in the ancestor. The repeats high diversity at the heterochromatic regions of Phodopus chromosomes, together with its complex organization, suggests that these species are important models for evolutionary studies, namely in the investigation of a possible relationship between repetitive sequences and the occurrence of chromosomal rearrangements and consequently, in genome evolution. PMID:26281779

  2. The complete mitochondrial genome of Meriones meridianus (Rodentia: Cricetidae) and its phylogenetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Guangjie; Liao, Jicheng

    2016-07-01

    Meriones meridianus belongs to the genus Meriones in Gerbillinae. Total length of complete mitochondrial genome of M. meridianus is 16,376 bp and the heavy strand contains 32.8% A, 13.1% G, 25.3% C and 28.8% T. Sequences of protein-coding genes are 11,341 bp in length, accounting for 69.25%, approximately. Results of phylogenetic analysis shown that M. meridianus and Meriones unguiculatus were clustered in a single branch. This conclusion would be an important data for relevant studies about the genus Meriones, and mitochondrial genome would be an important supplement for the gene pool of Rodentia. It would play a pivotal role in researches about phylogeography and proteomics involving M. meridianus as well. PMID:26075483

  3. The complete mitochondrial genome of Meriones libycus (Rodentia: Cricetidae) and its phylogenetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Guangjie; Liao, Jicheng

    2016-07-01

    Meriones libycus belongs to the genus Meriones in Gerbillinae, its complete mitochondrial genome is 16,341 bp in length. The heavy strand contains 32.8% A, 13.1% G, 25.3% C, 28.8% T, protein-coding genes approximately accounting for 69.54%. Results of phylogenetic analysis showed that M. libycus and Meriones unguiculatus were clustered together, and it was consistent with that of primary morphological taxonomy. This study verifies the evolutionary status of M. libycus in Meriones at the molecular level. The mitochondrial genome would be a significant supplement for the gene pool of Rodentia and the conclusion of phylogenetic analysis could be an important molecular evidence for the classification of Gerbillinae. PMID:26017047

  4. Chromosomal evolution of Arvicolinae (Cricetidae, Rodentia). III. Karyotype relationships of ten Microtus species.

    PubMed

    Lemskaya, Natalia A; Romanenko, Svetlana A; Golenishchev, Feodor N; Rubtsova, Nadezhda V; Sablina, Olga V; Serdukova, Natalya A; O'Brien, Patricia C M; Fu, Beiyuan; Yiğit, Nuri; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A; Yang, Fengtang; Graphodatsky, Alexander S

    2010-06-01

    The genus Microtus consists of 65 extant species, making it one of the rodentia genera with the highest number of species. The extreme karyotype diversification in Microtus has made them an ideal species group for comparative cytogenetics and cytotaxonomy. Conventional comparative cytogenetic studies in Microtus have been based mainly on chromosomal banding patterns; the number of Microtus species examined by molecular cytogenetics-cross-species chromosome painting-is limited. In this study, we used whole chromosome painting probes of the field vole Microtus agrestis to detect regions of homology in the karyotypes of eight Microtus species. For almost all investigated species, species-specific associations of conserved chromosomal segments were revealed. Analysis of data obtained here and previously published data allowed us to propose that the ancestral Microtus species had a 2n = 54 karyotype, including two associations of field vole chromosomal segments (MAG 1/17 and 2/8). Further mapping of the chromosome rearrangements onto a molecular phylogenetic tree allows the reconstruction of a karyotype evolution pathway in the Microtus genus. PMID:20379801

  5. NEW SPECIES OF AROSTRILEPIS (EUCESTODA: HYMENOLEPIDIAE) IN MEMBERS OF CRICETIDAE AND GEOMYIDAE (RODENTIA) FROM THE WESTERN NEARCTIC

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Specimens originally identified as Arostrilepis horrida from the Nearctic are revised, contributing to the recognition of a complex of cryptic species distributed across the Holarctic region. Previously unrecognized species are described based on specimens in rodents of the families Cricetidae (Neot...

  6. Rediscovery and New Morphological Data on Two Hassalstrongylus (Nematoda: Heligmonellidae) Coparasitic in the Marsh Rat Holochilus chacarius (Rodentia: Cricetidae) from Argentina.

    PubMed

    Digiani, María Celina; Notarnicola, Juliana; Navone, Graciela T

    2015-10-01

    Two species of Hassalstrongylus Durette-Desset, 1971, coparasitic in Holochilus chacarius Thomas (Rodentia, Cricetidae) and not recorded since their original description in 1937, were newly found in their type host and locality. Hassalstrongylus mazzai (Freitas, Lent and Almeida, 1937) and Hassalstrongylus argentinus (Freitas, Lent and Almeida, 1937) were obtained from Ho. chacarius from 2 different populations: one from Salta Province (northwest Argentina) and another from Chaco Province (northeast Argentina). The species described as Heligmonoides mazzai Freitas, Lent and Almeida, 1937 had been transferred to Hassalstrongylus even though its synlophe had never been studied. We provide the first descriptions and illustrations of the synlophe of males and females of Hassalstrongylus mazzai and the female of H. argentinus and account for morphological and metrical variability. We confirm, through the study of the synlophe, the placement of Hassalstrongylus mazzai in the genus Hassalstrongylus and designate neotypes for the species because the type material deposited by the authors could not be found. Females of both species were morphologically very similar, and a principal components analysis (PCA) performed on some morphometrical characters showed that the body length, uterus length, and an unexpected character as the number of eggs were useful characters in the discrimination of both species. PMID:26193068

  7. A new species of Syphacia (Seuratoxyuris) (Nematoda: Oxyuridae) from Sooretamys angouya Fischer, 1814 (Rodentia: Cricetidae) in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Robles, María del Rosario; Panisse, Guillermo; Navone, Graciela Teresa

    2014-11-01

    Syphacia (Seuratoxyuris) hugoti n. sp. (Nematoda: Oxyuridae) is described from the cecum of Sooretamys angouya (Cricetidae: Sigmodontinae: Oryzomyini) captured in Formosa Province, Argentina. The diagnosis of the subgenus is emended, and the new species is separated from eight congeners by the distribution of submedian papillae and amphids, shape of the cephalic plate, presence of deirids, absence of cervical and lateral alae, length of the spicule, structure of the accessory hook of the gubernaculum and distance of excretory pore and vulva from the anterior extremity. The analysis suggests that S. (Se.) oryzomyos should be removed from Seuratoxyuris and redesignated as S. (Syphacia) oryzomyos n. comb. To date, of the species of Syphacia found in South and North American, 7 parasitize Oryzomyini rodents, of which two are distributed in Argentina. The present study constitutes the first record of the subgenus Seuratoxyuris from Argentina and the third record of a Syphacia species from rodents of the tribe Oryzomyini. PMID:24995650

  8. The Cricetidae (Rodentia, Mammalia) from the Ulantatal area (Inner Mongolia, China): New data concerning the evolution of Asian cricetids during the Oligocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes Rodrigues, Helder; Marivaux, Laurent; Vianey-Liaud, Monique

    2012-08-01

    The Oligocene fossil deposits of Ulantatal in Inner Mongolia show an amazing faunal richness, comparable to the highly diversified contemporaneous faunas from the Valley of Lakes in Central Mongolia. To date, only a few taxa have been described. The present study consists of the description of 13 species of cricetid rodents from seven localities ranging in age from the late Early Oligocene to the Late Oligocene epoch. Most of them are new and belong to Eucricetodontinae, the dominating cricetid group at Ulantatal. These taxa give new information regarding the evolution of the Cricetidae in Central and Eastern Asia during the Oligocene. Four new species, Eucricetodon jilantaiensis nov. sp., Eucricetodon bagus nov. sp., Bagacricetodon tongi nov. gen., nov. sp. and Plesiodipus wangae nov. sp., show noticeable evolutionary trends. These species display more derived dental characters than their European contemporaries, in which they are much more comparable to Miocene forms. This observation reinforces the assumed early diversification of cricetids in this part of Asia. A striking case of sympatric evolution is indicated by the similarity of size and dental morphology of two sibling species, Eucricetodon asiaticus and Eucricetodon jilantaiensis nov. sp. Other taxa such as Witenia yolua nov. sp., Pseudocricetops matthewi nov. gen., nov. sp. and a primitive Tachyoryctoidinae, are scarcely represented and present unusual morphologies. The Cricetidae from Ulantatal also provide evidence suggesting faunal exchanges between Asia and Europe through the Paratethyan pathway during the second half of the Paleogene.

  9. The complete mitochondrial genome of Allocricetulus eversmanni (Rodentia: Cricetidae).

    PubMed

    Luo, Guangjie; Liao, Jicheng

    2016-09-01

    Allocricetulus eversmanni is a unique species in the Allocricetulus, belonging to the Cricetinae group. Its complete mitochondrial genome was first obtained and the total length was 16,282 bp. Protein-coding genes approximately accounted for 69.6% of the complete genome. The heavy strand contained 30% A, 14.4% G, 27.9% C, 27.7% T. Compared with most other mammals, it had the same arrangement and similar length of vary genes or regions. The complete mitochondrial genome of A. eversmanni was conducive to more accurately locate its taxonomic status in Cricetinae and its evolutionary history. At the same time, it provided significant information about consummation of A. eversmanni gene pool. PMID:25765085

  10. Cytokine mRNA expression in Peromyscus yucatanicus (Rodentia: Cricetidae) infected by Leishmania (Leishmania) mexicana.

    PubMed

    Loria-Cervera, Elsy Nalleli; Sosa-Bibiano, Erika Ivett; Van Wynsberghe, Nicole Raymonde; Saldarriaga, Omar Abdul; Melby, Peter C; Andrade-Narvaez, Fernando Jose

    2016-07-01

    Peromyscus yucatanicus, the main reservoir of Leishmania (Leishmania) mexicana in the Yucatan peninsula of Mexico, reproduces clinical and histological pictures of LCL in human as well as subclinical infection. Thus, we used this rodent as a novel experimental model. In this work, we analyzed cytokine mRNA expression in P. yucatanicus infected with L. (L.) mexicana. Animals were inoculated with either 2.5×10(6) or 1×10(2) promastigotes and cytokine expressions were analyzed by real-time RT-PCR in skin at 4 and 12weeks post-infection (wpi). Independently of the parasite inoculum none of the infected rodents had clinical signs of LCL at 4wpi and all expressed high IFN-γ mRNA. All P. yucatanicus inoculated with 2.5×10(6) promastigotes developed signs of LCL at 12wpi while the mice inoculated with 1×10(2) remained subclinical. At that time, both IFN-γ and IL-10 were expressed in P. yucatanicus with clinical and subclinical infections. Expressions of TNF-α and IL-4 were significantly higher in clinical animals (2.5×10(6)) compared with subclinical ones (1×10(2)). High TGF-β expression was observed in P. yucatanicus with clinical signs when compared with healthy animals. Results suggested that the clinical course of L. (L.) mexicana infection in P. yucatanicus was associated with a specific local pattern of cytokine production at 12wpi. PMID:27155064

  11. Reservoir competence of Microtus pennsylvanicus (Rodentia: Cricetidae) for the Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Markowski, D.; Ginsberg, H.S.; Hyland, K.E.; Hu, R.

    1998-01-01

    The reservoir competence of the meadow vole, Microtus pennsylvanicus Ord, for the Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi Johnson, Schmid, Hyde, Steigerwalt & Brenner was established on Patience Island, RI. Meadow voles were collected from 5 locations throughout Rhode Island. At 4 of the field sites, M. pennsylvanicus represented only 4.0% (n = 141) of the animals captured. However, on Patience Island, M. pennsylvanicus was the sole small mammal collected (n = 48). Of the larval Ixodes scapularis Say obtained from the meadow voles on Patience Island, 62% (n = 78) was infected with B. burgdorferi. Meadow voles from all 5 locations were successfully infected with B. burgdorferi in the laboratory and were capable of passing the infection to xenodiagnostic I. scapularis larvae for 9 wk. We concluded that M. pennsylvanicus was physiologically capable of maintaining B. burgdorferi infection. However, in locations where Peromyscus leucopus (Rafinesque) is abundant, the role of M. pennsylvanicus as a primary reservoir for B. burgdorferi was reduced.

  12. [Revision of the Taxonomic Position of the Olkhon Mountain Vole (Rodentia, Cricetidae)].

    PubMed

    Bodrov, S Yu; Kostygov, A Yu; Rudneva, L V; Abramson, N I

    2016-01-01

    An analysis of the phylogenetic position of the Olkhon mountain vole (Alticolaolchonensis Litvinov 1960) using the sequences of four nuclear (BRCA, GHR, LCAT, and IRBP) and one mitochondrial (cyt. b) genes was undertaken. It was noted that, until recently, multiple studies of the systematic position of this vole had been based exclusively on morphological data, while the major taxonomic traits contained contradictory information regarding both the subgeneric status of this species and its genus. It was established that the molecular data and morphology data allow us to attribute the Lake Baikal vole unambiguously to the nominative subgenus Alticola instead of Aschizomys. PMID:27396178

  13. Chromosomal variation in Argentine populations of Akodon montensis Thomas, 1913 (Rodentia, Cricetidae, Sigmodontinae)

    PubMed Central

    Malleret, Matías Maximiliano; Labaroni, Carolina Alicia; García, Gabriela Verónica; Ferro, Juan Martín; Martí, Dardo Andrea; Lanzone, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The genus Akodon Meyen, 1833 is one of the most species-rich among sigmodontine rodents and has great chromosome variability. Akodon montensis has a relatively broad distribution in South America, and Argentine populations are located in the southernmost region of its range. Brazilian populations have important chromosomal variability, but cytogenetic data from Argentina are scarce. We performed a chromosome characterization of natural populations of Akodon montensis using conventional staining, C-banding, Ag-NORs and base-specific fluorochromes. A total of 31 specimens from five localities of Misiones Province, in Argentina, were analyzed. The 2n=24 chromosomes was the most frequently observed karyotype. However, five individuals presented 25 chromosomes due to a supernumerary B-chromosome; and one individual had 2n=26 due to one B plus a trisomy for chromosome 11. Additionally, two XY females and two variants of the X chromosomes were found. C-positive centromeric bands occurred in all chromosomes; additional C-bands were observed in some autosomes, the X, Y and B chromosomes. Ag-NORs were observed in five autosomes, and the B chromosome was frequently marked. Fluorochrome banding was similar among karyotypes of the analyzed populations. Comparisons of cytogenetic data among populations of Argentina and Brazil showed the presence of high intraspecific variability in Akodon montensis and some differences among regions. PMID:27186343

  14. Nitric oxide production by Peromyscus yucatanicus (Rodentia) infected with Leishmania (Leishmania) mexicana

    PubMed Central

    Loría-Cervera, Elsy Nalleli; Sosa-Bibiano, Erika Ivett; Villanueva-Lizama, Liliana Estefanía; Van Wynsberghe, Nicole Raymonde; Canto-Lara, Silvia Beatriz; Batún-Cutz, José Luis; Andrade-Narváez, Fernando José

    2013-01-01

    Peromyscus yucatanicus (Rodentia: Cricetidae) is a primary reservoir of Leishmania (Leishmania) mexicana (Kinetoplastida: Trypanosomatidae). Nitric oxide (NO) generally plays a crucial role in the containment and elimination of Leishmania. The aim of this study was to determine the amount of NO produced by P. yucatanicus infected with L. (L.) mexicana. Subclinical and clinical infections were established in P. yucatanicus through inoculation with 1 x 102 and 2.5 x 106 promastigotes, respectively. Peritoneal macrophages were cultured alone or co-cultured with lymphocytes with or without soluble Leishmania antigen. The level of NO production was determined using the Griess reaction. The amount of NO produced was significantly higher (p ≤ 0.0001) in co-cultured macrophages and lymphocytes than in macrophages cultured alone. No differences in NO production were found between P. yucatanicus with subclinical L. (L.) mexicana infections and animals with clinical infections. These results support the hypothesis that the immunological mechanisms of NO production in P. yucatanicus are similar to those described in mouse models of leishmaniasis and, despite NO production, P. yucatanicus is unable to clear the parasite infection. PMID:23579796

  15. SSCA1-K1

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2015-11-06

    SSCA1-K1 is a parallel implementation of kernel 1 of the SSCA1 benchmark suite released by the DARPA HPCS program. This kernel is able to run in parallel on a distributed shared memory system at extreme scales using OpenSHMEM.

  16. A new genus and species of chigger mite (Trombidiformes: Trombiculidae) from Loxodontomys pikumche (Rodentia: Cricetidae) in Chile.

    PubMed

    Fuente, María Carolina Silva-de La; Casanueva, María Eugenia; Salas, Lucila Moreno; González-Acuña, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The family Trombiculidae is one of the most diverse and cosmopolitan (Walter et al. 2009). In Chile, the family Trombiculidae is represented by six genera associated with reptiles: Eutrombicula Ewing; Microtrombicula Ewing; Paratrombicula Goff & Whitaker; Whartonacarus (Brennan & Jones); Diaguitacarus Stekolnikov & González-Acuña and Proschoengastia Vercammen-Grandjean and two genera associated with rodents Chilacarus Webb, Bennett & Loomis and Poliremotus Brennan & Goff (Stekolnikov & González-Acuña 2015). PMID:27394465

  17. The relationship of sex and ectoparasite infestation in the water rat Scapteromys aquaticus (Rodentia: Cricetidae) in La Plata, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Lareschi, Marcela

    2006-06-01

    I studied the relationship between sex and infestation with ectoparasites in the water rat Scapteromys aquaticus from La Plata river marshland, Argentina. The Relative Density's Index (RDI) for males was 3.90% (females 3.60%). A total of 2653 ectoparasites were collected on 33 male hosts, and 1945 on 31 females. Ectoparasite specific richness (S) and diversity (H) were S = 14, H = 1.17 on males, and S = 10, H = 1.52 on females. The similarity between male and female rodents according to their ectoparasites was 75.00%. Although no ectoparasite species showed significant mean abundance (MA) differences between host sexes (p < 0.05), and only Laelaps manguinhosi prevalence was significantly higher on male hosts (N = 2.01, p < 0.05) in this study, there are reasons to think that the sex of the water rat affects ectoparasite burden and specific richness. This information has epidemiological potential because the closely related Scapteromys tumidus is involved in the transmission of Rickettsia coronii, which causes Marsella fever in humans. PMID:18494333

  18. Shippingport, Kentucky, is the type locality for the white-footed mouse, Peromyscus leucopus (Rafinesque, 1818) (Mammalia: Rodentia: Cricetidae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Woodman, Neal

    2015-01-01

    The white-footed mouse, Musculus leucopus Rafinesque, 1818 (= Peromyscus leucopus), is a common small mammal that is widespread in the eastern and central United States. Its abundance in many habitats renders it ecologically important, and its status as a reservoir for hantavirus and Lyme disease gives the species medical and economic significance. The recognition of two cytotypes and up to 17 morphological subspecies of P. leucopus indicates considerable variation in the species, and to understand this variation, it is important that the nominate subspecies be adequately defined so as to act as a standard for comparison. Relevant to this standard for the white-footed mouse is its type locality, which has generally been accepted to be either the vague "pine barrens of Kentucky" or the mouth of the Ohio River. Newly assembled information regarding the life and travels of Constantine S. Rafinesque, the North American naturalist who described P. leucopus, establishes that Rafinesque observed this species in July 1818 while visiting Shippingport, Kentucky, which is now within the city limits of Louisville, Jefferson Co., Kentucky. Shippingport is therefore the actual type locality for this species.

  19. Analysis of meiotic chromosome structure and behavior in Robertsonian heterozygotes of Ellobius tancrei (Rodentia, Cricetidae): a case of monobrachial homology

    PubMed Central

    Matveevsky, Sergey; Bakloushinskaya, Irina; Tambovtseva, Valentina; Romanenko, Svetlana; Kolomiets, Oxana

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Synaptonemal complex (SC) chains were revealed in semisterile intraspecific F1 hybrids of Ellobius tancrei Blasius, 1884 (2n = 49, NF=56 and 2n=50, NF=56), heterozygous for Robertsonian (Rb) translocations. Chains were formed by Rb submetacentrics with monobrachial homology. Chromosome synapsis in spermatocytes of these hybrids was disturbed, apparently because of the problematic release of the chromosomes from the SC chains. These hybrids suffer from low fertility, and our data support the opinion that this is because a formation of Rb metacentrics with monobrachial homology within different races of the same species might be an initial event for the divergence of chromosomal forms. PMID:26752380

  20. New species of Arostrilepis (Eucestoda: Hymenolepididae) in members of Cricetidae and Geomyidae (Rodentia) from the western Nearctic.

    PubMed

    Makarikov, Arseny A; Gardner, Scott L; Hoberg, Eric P

    2012-06-01

    Abstract : Specimens originally identified as Arostrilepis horrida from the Nearctic are revised, contributing to the recognition of a complex of cryptic species distributed across the Holarctic region. Previously unrecognized species are described based on specimens in cricetid (Neotominae) and geomyid rodents. Arostrilepis mariettavogeae n. sp. in Peromyscus californicus from Monterey County, California and Arostrilepis schilleri n. sp. in Thomomys bulbivorus from Corvallis, Oregon are characterized. Consistent with recent studies defining diversity in the genus, form, size, and spination (pattern, shape, and size) of the cirrus are diagnostic; species are further distinguished by the relative position and length of the cirrus sac and arrangement of the testes. Species of Arostrilepis have not previously been described in rodents outside of the Arvicolinae or from localities in the Nearctic. These studies emphasize the need for routine deposition of archival specimens and information, from survey, ecological, and biogeographic studies, in museum collections to serve as self-correcting records for biodiversity at local, regional, and continental scales. PMID:22097959

  1. Pterygodermatites (Paucipectines) baiomydis n. sp. (Nematoda: Rictulariidae), a parasite of Baiomys taylori (Cricetidae)

    PubMed Central

    Lynggaard, Christina; García-Prieto, Luis; Guzmán-Cornejo, Carmen; Osorio-Sarabia, David

    2014-01-01

    Pterygodermatites (Paucipectines) baiomydis n. sp., an intestinal parasite of the northern pygmy mouse, Baiomys taylori (Cricetidae), collected in La Yerbabuena, Colima, Mexico, is described herein. Specimens were studied using light and scanning electronic microscopy. This is the 19th species of the subgenus Paucipectines described worldwide and the fourth collected in Mexico. It is differentiated from the remaining species in the subgenus by having 25 perioral denticles, arranged in a triangle (seven on each lateroventral margin, and eleven on the dorsal margin), and 10 pairs of caudal papillae. PMID:25375029

  2. The occurrence of Demodex spp. (Acari, Demodecidae) in the bank vole Myodes glareolus (Rodentia, Cricetidae) with data on its topographical preferences.

    PubMed

    Izdebska, Joanna N; Kozina, Paulina; Gólcz, Aleksandra

    2013-01-01

    An examination of 16 bank voles from Poland (Pomerania) revealed the presence of two species of the family Demodecidae (Acari, Prostigmata), specific to the host. Demodex buccalis Bukva, Vitovec et Vlcek, 1985 was noted only in one bank vole, where 18 specimens were found: the prevalence of infestation being 6.3%. D. glareoli Hirst, 1919 was observed in 75% of the examined bank voles, in which were on average 5.1 specimens. Additionally, mites of the both species exhibited topical specificity--representatives of D. buccalis were found in the tissues of the tongue and oral cavity of the host, while D. glareoli, being a species associated with hair follicles, was noted in skin specimens from different body areas, particularly the head area. Infestations with demodecids were not accompanied by disease symptoms. D. buccalis and D. glareoli are a new species for the fauna of Poland. PMID:24881283

  3. Morphometric analysis of the placenta in the New World mouse Necromys lasiurus (Rodentia, Cricetidae): a comparison of placental development in cricetids and murids

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Stereology is an established method to extrapolate three-dimensional quantities from two-dimensional images. It was applied to placentation in the mouse, but not yet for other rodents. Herein, we provide the first study on quantitative placental development in a sigmodontine rodent species with relatively similar gestational time. Placental structure was also compared to the mouse, in order to evaluate similarities and differences in developmental patterns at the end of gestation. Methods Fetal and placental tissues of Necromys lasiurus were collected and weighed at 3 different stages of gestation (early, mid and late gestation) for placental stereology. The total and relative volumes of placenta and of its main layers were investigated. Volume fractions of labyrinth components were quantified by the One Stop method in 31 placentae collected from different individuals, using the Mercator® software. Data generated at the end of gestation from N. lasiurus placentae were compared to those of Mus musculus domesticus obtained at the same stage. Results A significant increase in the total absolute volumes of the placenta and its main layers occurred from early to mid-gestation, followed by a reduction near term, with the labyrinth layer becoming the most prominent area. Moreover, at the end of gestation, the total volume of the mouse placenta was significantly increased compared to that of N. lasiurus although the proportions of the labyrinth layer and junctional zones were similar. Analysis of the volume fractions of the components in the labyrinth indicated a significant increase in fetal vessels and sinusoidal giant cells, a decrease in labyrinthine trophoblast whereas the proportion of maternal blood space remained stable in the course of gestation. On the other hand, in the mouse, volume fractions of fetal vessels and sinusoidal giant cells decreased whereas the volume fraction of labyrinthine trophoblast increased compared to N. lasiurus placenta. Conclusions Placental development differed between N. lasiurus and M. musculus domesticus. In particular, the low placental efficiency in N. lasiurus seemed to induce morphological optimization of fetomaternal exchanges. In conclusion, despite similar structural aspects of placentation in these species, the quantitative dynamics showed important differences. PMID:23433040

  4. A small, new gerbil-mouse Eligmodontia (Rodentia: Cricetidae) from dunes at the coasts and deserts of north-central Chile: molecular, chromosomic, and morphological analyses.

    PubMed

    Spotorno, Angel E; Zuleta, Carlos; Walker, Laura I; Manriquez, German; Valladares, Pablo; Marin, Juan C

    2013-01-01

    A small, new species of gerbil rodents of the genus Eligmodontia from the southwestern dunes of the Atacama Desert in northern Chile is described; the genus had not been reported for this western lowland region. Our description is based on cytogenetic and molecular data, as well as cranial and external morphology. In order to support this hypothesis, we studied 27 specimens captured in Playa Los Choros (Coquimbo) and Copiapó (Atacama), comparing them with samples of all the extant species of the genus. Nineteen individuals consistently showed 2N=50, FN=48, with telocentric chromosomes and G-bands identical to those of the geographically northeastern E. hirtipes; these two groups were geographically separated by E. puerulus (2N = 34, FN = 48). The phylogenetic analysis of 56 Eligmodontia cytochrome-b gene sequences yielded a maximum-likelihood phylogenetic tree where the new species formed a divergent and well-supported clade within the genus, which was also confirmed by unweighted parsimony, minimum evolution, and Bayesian analyses. The new species has K2P genetic distances of 12.8% from the geographically distant E. hirtipes, and 10.3% from E. puerulus. Axes 1 and 2 of Principal Component Analysis based on 12 body and skull measurements clearly separated the new species, the latter having a smaller head+body length (70.6 +/- 3.4 mm, n = 17) and lower weight (11.9 +/- 1.9 g, n = 20). We provide strong evidence to recognize a distinct new western lineage within Eligmodontia genus, Eligmodontia dunaris sp. nov., for which we give a complete taxonomic description and a hypothetical biogeographic scenario. The new species should be considered endangered, due to its level of endemism, its low population numbers (which can be occasionally increased after a blooming desert) and its fragile dry habitat patchily distributed near the Atacama Desert. PMID:25250459

  5. Differences in richness and composition of gastrointestinal parasites of small rodents (Cricetidae, Rodentia) in a continental and insular area of the Atlantic Forest in Santa Catarina state, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Kuhnen, V V; Graipel, M E; Pinto, C J C

    2012-08-01

    The first and only study on gastrointestinal parasites of wild rodents in the Island of Santa Catarina was done in 1987. The aim of this study was to identify intestinal parasites from wild rodents in Santo Amaro da Imperatriz and Santa Catariana Island, and to compare the richness and composition of the gastrointestinal parasite community of both areas. Rodents were captured with live traps, and feces were screened using the sedimentation method and optical microscopy. The following species of rodents were captured in the two areas: Akodon montensis, Euryoryzomys russatus, Oligoryzomys nigripes and Nectomys squamipes. In Santo Amaro da Impetratriz, prevalent parasites were: A. montensis (51%), E. russatus (62%), O. nigripes (53%) and N. squamipes (20%). From the Island of Santa Catarina the rodent prevalence rates were: A. montensis (43%), E. russatus (59%), O. nigripes (30%) and N. squamipes (33%) and the collected parasites were: Hymenolepis sp., Longistriata sp., Strongyloides sp., Hassalstrongylus sp., Syphacia sp., Trichomonas sp., Ancylostomidae, Trichuridae, Oxyuridae and Eucoccidiorida. The species richness (10.6 ± 0.7) of the endoparasite comunity in the area located on the continent was higher (p < 0.01) and different (p = 0.001) from that of the area located on the island (6.9 ± 0.5). PMID:22990827

  6. [Testosterone and Induced Humoral Immunity in Male Campbell Dwarf Hamsters (Phodopus campbelli, Thomas, 1905, Rodentia, Cricetidae): Experimental Manipulation of Testosterone Levels].

    PubMed

    Vasilieva, N Yu; Khrushchova, A M; Shekarova, N; Rogovin, K A

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we report the results of testosterone manipulation in the blood of male Campbell dwarf hamsters Phodopus campbelli Thomas, 1905 through castration, followed by testosterone treatment. Under these conditions, we studied antibody production rates in response to injection with sheep red blood cells (SRBC). It was shown that castration induced a dramatic decrease in blood testosterone but had no effect on the humoral response to SRBC. Males that received a testosterone compound with a long-lasting action (omnadren) exhibited a poor response to SRBC following re-exposure in the context of elevated testosterone compared to castrated males inoculated with an oil base of the drug. PMID:26349233

  7. [Polymorphism and Genetic Structure of Microtus maximowiczii (Schrenck, 1858) (Rodentia, Cricetidae) from the Middle Amur River Region as Inferred from Sequencing of the mtDNA Control Region].

    PubMed

    Sheremetyeva, I N; Kartavtseva, I V; Frisman, L V; Vasil'eva, T V; Adnagulova, A V

    2015-10-01

    The genetic variability of the mitochondrial DNA control region sequences was estimated for the Maximowicz's vole Microtus maximowiczii from the Middle Amur River region located between the confluence of Amur River with Ussuri River and Zeya River. The species as a whole was characterized by a high level of genetic variability. For each individual sample, low nucleotide diversity was observed, except for two samples in which a more than twofold increase in this index was revealed. The presence of the contact zone of two genetically distinct populations in the area between Bira and Bidzhan rivers is suggested. PMID:27169230

  8. Systematic studies of the genus Aegialomys Weksler, Percequillo and Voss, 2006 (Rodentia: Cricetidae: Sigmodontinae): Annotated catalogue of the types of the species-group taxa.

    PubMed

    Prado, Joyce Rodrigues Do; Percequillo, Alexandre Reis

    2016-01-01

    The genus Aegialomys was described to encompass the former Oryzomys xanthaeolus group, and includes nowadays two species: A. xanthaeolus and A. galapagoensis. Although not very confusing, the taxonomic history of the genus is long, comprising the description of five nominal taxa along the last 180 years: Mus galapagoensis Waterhouse, 1839; Oryzomys bauri Allen, 1892; Oryzomys xanthaeolus Thomas, 1894; Oryzomys  baroni Allen, 1897; and Oryzomys  xanthaeolus ica Osgood, 1944. Here we gathered and documented all available information about the type material of Aegialomys on which the species names were based, re-described their morphometric and morphological characters, commented their synonyms and taxonomic history, and compiled information about type localities. Additionally, we established a neotype for O. bauri in order to define the nominal taxon objectively. PMID:27470869

  9. Complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Marmota himalayana (Rodentia: Sciuridae) and phylogenetic analysis within Rodentia.

    PubMed

    Chao, Q J; Li, Y D; Geng, X X; Zhang, L; Dai, X; Zhang, X; Li, J; Zhang, H J

    2014-01-01

    This is the first report of a complete mitochondrial genome sequence from Himalayan marmot (Marmota himalayana, class Marmota). We determined the M. himalayana mitochondrial (mt) genome sequence by using long-PCR methods and a primer-walking sequencing strategy with genus-specific primers. The complete mt genome of M. himalayana was 16,443 bp in length and comprised 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes, 22 transfer RNA (tRNA) genes, and a typical control region (CR). Gene order and orientation were identical to those in mt genomes of most vertebrates. The heavy strand showed an overall A+T content of 63.49%. AT and GC skews for the mt genome of the M. himalayana were 0.012 and -0.300, respectively, indicating a nucleotide bias against T and G. The control region was 997 bp in size and displayed some unusual features, including absence of repeated motifs and two conserved sequence blocks (CSB2 and CSB3), which is consistent with observations from two other rodent species, Sciurus vulgaris and Myoxus glis. Phylogenetic analysis of complete mt DNA sequences without the control region including 30 taxa of Rodentia was performed with Maximum-Likelihood (ML) and Bayesian Inference (BI) methods and provided strong support for Sciurognathi polyphyly and Hystricognathi monophyly. This analysis also provided evidence that M. himalayana mt DNA was closely related to that from Sciurus vulgaris (Sciuridae) and was similar to mt DNA from Myoxus glis. PMID:24782088

  10. Acariform mites (Acariformes) - permanent symbionts of Hapalomys delacouri Thomas (Rodentia, Muridae) in Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Bochkov, Andre V.; Abramov, Alexei V.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Two new species of parasitic acariform mites (Acariformes) are described from the Delacour’s marmoset rat Hapalomys delacouri Thomas (Rodentia: Muridae) in Vietnam: Afrolistrophorus (Afrolistrophorus) hapalomys sp. n. (Listrophoridae) and Radfordia (Radfordia) mirabilis sp. n. (Myobiidae). Based on morphological evidences, we show that species of both mite genera associated with Hapalomys Blyth do not demonstrate clear phylogenetic links with respective congeners from rodents of the closest genus Chiropodomys Peters (Rodentia: Muridae). PMID:25561857

  11. Hurdles in low k1 mass production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yim, Donggyu; Yang, Hyunjo; Park, Chanha; Hong, Jongkyun; Choi, Jaeseung

    2005-05-01

    As the optical lithography pushes toward its theoretical resolution limit 0.25k1, the application of aggressive Resolution Enhancement Techniques (RETs) are required in order to ensure necessary resolution, sufficient process window, and reasonable MEEF in critical layers. When chip makers are adopting RETs in low k1 device, there are a lot of crucial factors to take into account in the development and mass production. Those hurdles are not only difficult to overcome but also highly risky to the company, which adopts low k1 mass production strategy. But, low k1 production strategy is very attractive to all chip makers, owing to improving production capacity and cost of ownership. So, low k1 technology has been investigated by many lithography engineers. Lots of materials have been introduced. Most of them are just in RnD level. In this study, low k1 mass production issues shall be introduced, mainly. The definition of low k1 in mass production shall be suggested. And, a lot of low_k1 issues shall be introduced, also. Most of them were investigated/experienced in RnD development stage and final mass production line. Low k1 mass production, is some what different from only RnD development.

  12. Epizootiology of Tacaribe Serocomplex Viruses (Arenaviridae) Associated with Neotomine Rodents (Cricetidae, Neotominae) in Southern California

    PubMed Central

    Milazzo, Mary Louise; Cajimat, Maria N. B.; Mauldin, Matthew R.; Bennett, Stephen G.; Hess, Barry D.; Rood, Michael P.; Conlan, Christopher A.; Nguyen, Kiet; Wekesa, J. Wakoli; Ramos, Ronald D.; Bradley, Robert D.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The objective of this study was to advance our knowledge of the epizootiology of Bear Canyon virus and other Tacaribe serocomplex viruses (Arenaviridae) associated with wild rodents in California. Antibody (immunoglobulin G [IgG]) to a Tacaribe serocomplex virus was found in 145 (3.6%) of 3977 neotomine rodents (Cricetidae: Neotominae) captured in six counties in southern California. The majority (122 or 84.1%) of the 145 antibody-positive rodents were big-eared woodrats (Neotoma macrotis) or California mice (Peromyscus californicus). The 23 other antibody-positive rodents included a white-throated woodrat (N. albigula), desert woodrat (N. lepida), Bryant's woodrats (N. bryanti), brush mice (P. boylii), cactus mice (P. eremicus), and deer mice (P. maniculatus). Analyses of viral nucleocapsid protein gene sequence data indicated that Bear Canyon virus is associated with N. macrotis and/or P. californicus in Santa Barbara County, Los Angeles County, Orange County, and western Riverside County. Together, analyses of field data and antibody prevalence data indicated that N. macrotis is the principal host of Bear Canyon virus. Last, the analyses of viral nucleocapsid protein gene sequence data suggested that the Tacaribe serocomplex virus associated with N. albigula and N. lepida in eastern Riverside County represents a novel species (tentatively named “Palo Verde virus”) in the genus Arenavirus. PMID:25700047

  13. Climatic niche conservatism and ecological opportunity in the explosive radiation of arvicoline rodents (Arvicolinae, Cricetidae).

    PubMed

    Lv, Xue; Xia, Lin; Ge, Deyan; Wu, Yongjie; Yang, Qisen

    2016-05-01

    Climatic niche conservatism shapes patterns of diversity in many taxonomic groups, while ecological opportunity (EO) can trigger rapid speciation that is less constrained by the amount of time a lineage has occupied a given habitat. These two processes are well studied, but limited research has considered their joint and relative roles in shaping diversity patterns. We characterized climatic and biogeographic variables for 102 species of arvicoline rodents (Arvicolinae, Cricetidae), testing the effects of climatic niche conservatism and EO on arvicoline diversification as lineages transitioned between biogeographic regions. We found that the amount of time a lineage has occupied a precipitation niche is positively correlated with diversity along a precipitation gradient, suggesting climatic niche conservatism. In contrast, shift in diversification rate explained diversity patterns along a temperature gradient. Our results suggest that an indirect relationship exists between temperature and diversification that is associated with EO as arvicoline rodents colonized warm Palearctic environments. Climatic niche conservatism alone did not fully explain diversity patterns under density-dependence, highlighting the additional importance of EO-related processes in promoting the explosive radiation in arvicoline rodents and shaping diversity pattern among biogeographic regions and along climatic gradients. PMID:27061935

  14. Epizootiology of Tacaribe serocomplex viruses (Arenaviridae) associated with neotomine rodents (Cricetidae, Neotominae) in southern California.

    PubMed

    Milazzo, Mary Louise; Cajimat, Maria N B; Mauldin, Matthew R; Bennett, Stephen G; Hess, Barry D; Rood, Michael P; Conlan, Christopher A; Nguyen, Kiet; Wekesa, J Wakoli; Ramos, Ronald D; Bradley, Robert D; Fulhorst, Charles F

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this study was to advance our knowledge of the epizootiology of Bear Canyon virus and other Tacaribe serocomplex viruses (Arenaviridae) associated with wild rodents in California. Antibody (immunoglobulin G [IgG]) to a Tacaribe serocomplex virus was found in 145 (3.6%) of 3977 neotomine rodents (Cricetidae: Neotominae) captured in six counties in southern California. The majority (122 or 84.1%) of the 145 antibody-positive rodents were big-eared woodrats (Neotoma macrotis) or California mice (Peromyscus californicus). The 23 other antibody-positive rodents included a white-throated woodrat (N. albigula), desert woodrat (N. lepida), Bryant's woodrats (N. bryanti), brush mice (P. boylii), cactus mice (P. eremicus), and deer mice (P. maniculatus). Analyses of viral nucleocapsid protein gene sequence data indicated that Bear Canyon virus is associated with N. macrotis and/or P. californicus in Santa Barbara County, Los Angeles County, Orange County, and western Riverside County. Together, analyses of field data and antibody prevalence data indicated that N. macrotis is the principal host of Bear Canyon virus. Last, the analyses of viral nucleocapsid protein gene sequence data suggested that the Tacaribe serocomplex virus associated with N. albigula and N. lepida in eastern Riverside County represents a novel species (tentatively named "Palo Verde virus") in the genus Arenavirus. PMID:25700047

  15. Productions of K_1(1400) and K_1(1270) in tau Decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bing An

    1996-05-01

    In an effective chiral theory of mesons the K_1(1400) meson field is expressed by an axial-vector current of quarks. Therefore, this meson can be produced in τ decay(τarrow K_1(1400) ν) at the three level. In order to test the expression of K_1(1400), the mass of this meson is calculated (m^2_K_1(1400)=g^2_a\\over g^2_ρ(m^2_ρ+ m^2_K^*(892))), where ga and g_ρ are determined explicitly. The partial widths of three decay channels(K1 arrow K^*π, Kρ, and Kω) are computed. Theoretical results are in good agreement with data. In the chiral limit, the coupling constant between K_1(1400) and W-boson is ga and the theoretical prediction of B( τarrow K_1(1400)ν) is 0.37% and the experiment value is 0.76^+0.40_-0.33%. There is no new parameter in all these calculations and the parameters are determined by other fits. In this effective chiral theory K_1(1270) meson field is expressed by a different quark operator and this field is not coupled to W-boson directly. Therefore, τarrow K_1(1270)ν is forbidden at the tree level. However, at one loop level this decay is allowed. Large NC expansion is a natural result of this effective theory. At the three level the amplitude of τarrow K_1(1400)ν is at O(N_C) and the amplitude of τarrow K_1(1270)ν is at O. Comparing to τarrow K_1(1400)ν the amplitude of τarrow K_1(1270)ν is suppressed by O(1/N_c).

  16. Cyclic interconversion of vitamin K1 and vitamin K1 2,3-epoxide in man.

    PubMed Central

    Bechtold, H; Trenk, D; Meinertz, T; Rowland, M; Jähnchen, E

    1983-01-01

    The disposition of a single intravenous bolus dose of 10 mg vitamin K1 and vitamin K1-2,3-epoxide were studied in two healthy subjects without and with 12 h pretreatment dose of phenprocoumon (0.4 mg/kg). For each compound administered alone the plasma concentration-time profile was adequately fitted by a biexponential equation, with an average terminal half-life of 2.0 and 1.15 h for the administered vitamin K and its 2,3-epoxide respectively. While vitamin K1 was measurable in plasma following administration of vitamin K1-2,3-epoxide, the epoxide was not detectable following administration of vitamin K1. Following pretreatment with phenprocoumon and after intravenous administration of vitamin K1, both the average half-life and area under the plasma concentration-time profile of vitamin K1 were marginally reduced to 1.5 h and 1.76 mg l-1 h respectively, while the plasma concentration of vitamin K1-2,3-epoxide was readily measurable and its half-life markedly prolonged to 14.7 h. Following pretreatment with phenprocoumon and after oral administration of vitamin K1-2,3-epoxide, no vitamin K1 was detectable in plasma and the half-life of the epoxide was 13.8 h. Based on area considerations the data suggest that either phenprocoumon does more than just inhibit the reduction of vitamin K1-2,3-epoxide to vitamin K1, or that the simple model describing the interconversion between vitamin K1 and its epoxide is inadequate. The same conclusion is drawn from the analysis of comparable data in dogs, obtained by Carlisle & Blaschke (1981). PMID:6661354

  17. Cutaneous reactions to vitamin K1 injections.

    PubMed

    Lemlich, G; Green, M; Phelps, R; Lebwohl, M; Don, P; Gordon, M

    1993-02-01

    Cutaneous reactions to vitamin K1 injections are reported infrequently. Most previously reported cases have been associated with liver disease, primarily alcoholic cirrhosis and viral hepatitis. Four new cases are reported. One patient had polycythemia vera and the Budd-Chiari syndrome, the second such report in the literature. The other three patients had no known hepatic disease. The reactions consisted of erythematous plaques at the injection site without progression to sclerodermatous plaques. Histopathologic examination in three cases showed spongiotic changes and mononuclear infiltrates typical of cutaneous reactions to vitamin K1. In one instance a neutrophilic infiltrate was associated with the reaction site. Our findings support the observation that liver disease is not a necessary condition for the occurrence of vitamin K1 hypersensitivity. PMID:8436655

  18. Neonatal plasma vitamin K1 levels following oral and intramuscular administration of vitamin K1.

    PubMed

    Gupta, J M; Salonikas, C; Naidoo, D

    1994-02-01

    Vitamin K1 levels were measured by high performance liquid chromatography in cord blood (n = 33) and at the age of 97-120 h after administration of 2 mg of vitamin K1 orally (n = 88) or 1 mg of vitamin K1 by im injection (n = 88). Vitamin K1 levels were less than 0.05 micrograms/l in cord blood. The mean (range), SEM, mode and median values (micrograms/l) for the infants given oral vitamin K1 were 17.99 (1-56), 1.25, 8 and 15.5 and those for the infants given im vitamin K1 15.83 (2-57), 1.01, 11 and 14, respectively. The t-test showed no significant difference in the mean values (p = 0.09) in the infants given oral or im vitamin K. PMID:8193487

  19. The complete mitochondrial genome of Ictidomys tridecemlineatus (Rodentia: Sciuridae).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Leping; Storey, Kenneth B; Yu, Dan-Na; Hu, Yizhong; Zhang, Jia-Yong

    2016-07-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of the thirteen-lined ground squirrel, Ictidomys tridecemlineatus (Rodentia: Sciuridae) was sequenced to analyze the gene arrangement. It is a circular molecule of 16,458 bp in length including 37 genes typically found in other squirrels. The AT content of the overall base composition is 63.7% and the length of the control region is 1016 bp with 63.0% AT content. In BI and ML phylogenetic trees, I. tridecemlineatus is a sister clade to the genus Cynomys, and Tamias sibiricus is a sister clade to (Marmota himalayana + (I. tridecemlineatus + (C. leucurus + C. ludovicianus))). Ratufinae is well supported as the basal clade of Sciuridae. The monophyly of the family Sciuridae and its subfamilies Callosciurinae, Xerinae and Sciurinae are well supported. PMID:26024127

  20. A Transitional Gundi (Rodentia: Ctenodactylidae) from the Miocene of Israel.

    PubMed

    López-Antoñanzas, Raquel; Gutkin, Vitaly; Rabinovich, Rivka; Calvo, Ran; Grossman, Aryeh

    2016-01-01

    We describe a new species of gundi (Rodentia: Ctenodactylidae: Ctenodactylinae), Sayimys negevensis, on the basis of cheek teeth from the Early Miocene of the Rotem Basin, southern Israel. The Rotem ctenodactylid differs from all known ctenodactylid species, including Sayimys intermedius, which was first described from the Middle Miocene of Saudi Arabia. Instead, it most resembles Sayimys baskini from the Early Miocene of Pakistan in characters of the m1-2 (e.g., the mesoflexid shorter than the metaflexid, the obliquely orientated hypolophid, and the presence of a strong posterolabial ledge) and the upper molars (e.g., the paraflexus that is longer than the metaflexus). However, morphological (e.g., presence of a well-developed paraflexus on unworn upper molars) and dimensional (regarding, in particular, the DP4 and M1 or M2) differences between the Rotem gundi and Sayimys baskini distinguish them and testify to the novelty and endemicity of the former. In its dental morphology, Sayimys negevensis sp. nov. shows a combination of both the ultimate apparition of key-characters and incipient features that would be maintained and strengthened in latter ctenodactylines. Thus, it is a pivotal species that bridges the gap between an array of primitive ctenodactylines and the most derived, Early Miocene and later, gundis. PMID:27049960

  1. A Transitional Gundi (Rodentia: Ctenodactylidae) from the Miocene of Israel

    PubMed Central

    López-Antoñanzas, Raquel; Gutkin, Vitaly; Rabinovich, Rivka; Calvo, Ran; Grossman, Aryeh

    2016-01-01

    We describe a new species of gundi (Rodentia: Ctenodactylidae: Ctenodactylinae), Sayimys negevensis, on the basis of cheek teeth from the Early Miocene of the Rotem Basin, southern Israel. The Rotem ctenodactylid differs from all known ctenodactylid species, including Sayimys intermedius, which was first described from the Middle Miocene of Saudi Arabia. Instead, it most resembles Sayimys baskini from the Early Miocene of Pakistan in characters of the m1-2 (e.g., the mesoflexid shorter than the metaflexid, the obliquely orientated hypolophid, and the presence of a strong posterolabial ledge) and the upper molars (e.g., the paraflexus that is longer than the metaflexus). However, morphological (e.g., presence of a well-developed paraflexus on unworn upper molars) and dimensional (regarding, in particular, the DP4 and M1 or M2) differences between the Rotem gundi and Sayimys baskini distinguish them and testify to the novelty and endemicity of the former. In its dental morphology, Sayimys negevensis sp. nov. shows a combination of both the ultimate apparition of key-characters and incipient features that would be maintained and strengthened in latter ctenodactylines. Thus, it is a pivotal species that bridges the gap between an array of primitive ctenodactylines and the most derived, Early Miocene and later, gundis. PMID:27049960

  2. The complete mitochondrial genomes of Cynomys leucurus and C. ludovicianus (Rodentia: Sciuridae).

    PubMed

    Li, Bingfei; Yu, Danna; Cheng, Hongyi; Storey, Kenneth B; Zhang, Jiayong

    2016-09-01

    The mitochondrial genomes of the white - tailed praire dog Cynomys leucurus and black-tailed prairie dog C. ludovicianus (Rodentia: Sciuridae) are circular molecules of 16,454 bp and 16,466 bp in length, respectively, containing 37 genes as in other Rodentia species. The A + T content of the overall base composition of the H-strand is 63.0% and 62.6% for C. leucurus and C. ludovicianus, respectively. The control region of the C. leucurus and C. ludovicianus mt genome is 1012 bp in length, and the A + T content of this region is 63.5% and 62.0%, respectively. Nucleotide sequence divergence of the mt genome (p distance) between C. leucurus and C. ludovicianus was 4.0%. PMID:25693710

  3. Vitamin K1 distribution following intravenous vitamin K1-fat emulsion administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xue; Mi, Yan-Ni; Wang, Fa; Zhang, Bing-Hua; Cao, Lei; Cao, Yong-Xiao

    2015-12-01

    This study investigated vitamin K1 (VK1 ) distribution following intravenous vitamin K1-fat emulsion (VK1 -FE) administration and compared it with that after VK1 injection. Rats were intravenously injected with VK1-FE or VK1 . The organ and tissue VK1 concentrations were determined using high-performance liquid chromatography method at 0.5, 2 and 4 h to determine distribution, equilibrium and elimination phases, respectively. In the VK1-FE group, the plasma, heart and spleen VK1 concentrations decreased over time. However, other organs like liver, lung, kidney, muscle and testis, reached peak VK1 concentrations at 2 h. In the VK1 injection group, the liver VK1 concentrations were significantly higher than those in other organs at the three time points. However, VK1 concentrations in the other organs peaked at 2 h. In addition, in VK1-FE group, the heart, spleen and lung VK1 concentrations were significantly higher than those in the VK1 injection group at the three time points, and the liver VK1 concentration was significantly higher than that in the VK1 injection group at 4 h. The VK1 amount was greatest in the liver compared with the other organs. Thus, the liver is the primary organ for VK1 distribution. The distribution of VK1 is more rapid when injected as VK1-FE than as VK1 . PMID:25967735

  4. Hymenolepis folkertsi n. sp. (Eucestoda: Hymenolepididae) in the oldfield mouse Peromyscus polionotus (Wagner) (Rodentia: Cricetidae: Neotominae) from the southeastern Nearctic with comments on tapeworm faunal diversity among deer mice.

    PubMed

    Makarikov, Arseny A; Nims, Todd N; Galbreath, Kurt E; Hoberg, Eric P

    2015-06-01

    A previously unrecognized species of hymenolepidid cestode attributable to Hymenolepis is described based on specimens in Peromyscus polionotus, oldfield mouse, from Georgia near the southeastern coast of continental North America. Specimens of Hymenolepis folkertsi n. sp. differ from those attributed to most other species in the genus by having testes arranged in a triangle and a scolex with a prominent rostrum-like protrusion. The newly recognized species is further distinguished by the relative position and length of the cirrus sac, shape of seminal receptacle, and relative size of external seminal vesicle and seminal receptacle. Hymenolepidid cestodes have sporadically been reported among the highly diverse assemblage of Peromyscus which includes 56 distinct species in the Nearctic. Although the host genus has a great temporal duration and is endemic to the Nearctic, current evidence suggests that tapeworm faunal diversity reflects relatively recent assembly through bouts of host switching among other cricetid, murid, and geomyid rodents in sympatry. PMID:25762188

  5. Description of Litomosoides ysoguazu n. sp. (Nematoda, Onchocercidae), a parasite of the tuft-toed rice rat Sooretamys angouya (Fischer) (Rodentia: Cricetidae), and a first record of L. esslingeri Bain, Petit & Berteaux, 1989 in Paraguay.

    PubMed

    Notarnicola, Juliana; de la Sancha, Noé Ulises

    2015-06-01

    Paraguay is a small landlocked country whose mammalian fauna is among the least studied in South America, as well as their parasites. As a result of a study of the effects of habitat fragmentation on small mammal biodiversity in eastern Paraguay, we have collected some parasites of cricetid rodents. Herein, we describe a new species of Litomosoides Chandler, 1931 parasitising the body cavity of the tuft-toed rice rat Sooretamys angouya (Fischer) and Litomosoides esslingeri Bain, Petit & Diagne, 1989 parasitising Oligoryzomys nigripes (Olfers), thus expanding its geographical distribution into Paraguay. Litomosoides ysoguazu n. sp. is characterised by the large size of the females (92.2-117.6 mm long) and by having buccal capsule with an anterior widening with rounded edges on the chitinous segment and a rounded widening at the base; male tail with a single pair of adcloacal papillae, three to five pairs of asymmetrical postcloacal papillae, and one or two unpaired papillae in the median ventral line; spicules corresponding to the "sigmodontis" species group; and microfilaria with a sheath stuck to the body and visible in the anterior extremity. We also describe a fourth-stage female larva. Oligoryzomys nigripes is a new host record of L. esslingeri; this enlarges the host record to eight species highlighting the low specificity of this species. PMID:25962465

  6. The spectrum of planetary nebula K 1-27

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henize, K. G.; Fairall, A. P.

    1981-01-01

    The spectrum of K 1-27 shows He II 4686 stronger than either H-beta or forbidden O III 4959. K 1-27 therefore appears to belong to the small group of old, very hot planetary nebulae which also includes NGC 246, NGC 4361, and Abell 36.

  7. Pseudoscleroderma secondary to phytomenadione (vitamin K1) injections: Texier's disease.

    PubMed

    Pang, B K; Munro, V; Kossard, S

    1996-02-01

    Cutaneous reactions to vitamin K1 (phytomenadione) are uncommon. They can present as acute eczematous reactions or late reactions that resemble localized scleroderma after vitamin K1 injections. A case is reported here of a patient who developed bilateral sclerodermoid plaques in a cowboy's holster pattern, which persisted for more than 10 years after subcutaneous vitamin K1 injections. Positive intradermal test with vitamin K1 that persisted as an erythematous indurated plaque at the test site for more than 5 months confirmed marked cutaneous hypersensitivity to vitamin K1 in this patient. Serial biopsies of the erythematous plaque at the test site showed transition from spongiotic eczematous features initially to inflammatory morphoea-like histology over a 5 month period. Possible pathogenic mechanisms for phytomenadione-induced pseudoscleroderma are discussed. PMID:8936071

  8. Placental transfer of vitamin K1 in preterm pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Kazzi, N J; Ilagan, N B; Liang, K C; Kazzi, G M; Grietsell, L A; Brans, Y W

    1990-03-01

    Seventy-eight women at earlier than 35 weeks' gestation with premature rupture of membranes and/or preterm labor were randomly assigned to receive either 10 mg vitamin K1 intramuscularly (IM) or no treatment. If delivery did not occur within 4 days, the dose of vitamin K1 was repeated. Women whose pregnancies continued beyond 8 days received 20 mg of vitamin K1 orally every day until the end of the 34th week or until delivery, whichever occurred earlier. The median maternal plasma vitamin K1 level was significantly higher in treated than in untreated subjects (11.592 versus 0.102 ng/mL; P less than .001). The median cord plasma levels were 0.024 ng/mL in the treated group and 0.010 ng/mL in the controls, a significant difference (P = .046). Median plasma vitamin K1 levels were comparable in mothers receiving the drug by the IM route only and by both the IM and oral routes (10.533 versus 11.928 ng/mL; P = .460). The infants of the latter group, however, had significantly higher median cord plasma levels (0.42 versus 0.017 ng/mL; P less than .001). There was no correlation between cord plasma vitamin K1 levels and gestational age or duration of maternal supplementation with vitamin K1. We conclude that, in preterm pregnancies, vitamin K1 crosses the placenta slowly and to a limited degree. PMID:2304704

  9. Lymphoid hyperplasia and lymphoma in KSHV K1 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Berkova, Zuzana; Wang, Shu; Sehgal, Lalit; Patel, Keyur Pravinchandra; Prakash, Om; Samaniego, Felipe

    2015-05-01

    Growing evidence supports the involvement of human herpervirus 8, Kaposi's sarcoma associated herpesvirus (KSHV), in the pathology of primary effusion lymphoma, multicentric Castleman's disease, and Kaposi's sarcoma, but the exact mechanism of KSHV contribution to the oncogenic process remains elusive. We studied transgenic mice expressing the ORF K1 of KSHV, whose position in the KSHV genome corresponds to known lymphoproliferative genes of other herpesviruses. K1 protein was previously shown to contain a constitutively active ITAM domain, involved in activation of Akt and pro-survival signaling, and to inhibit Fas-mediated apoptosis by interfering with binding of FasL. All this pointed to a possible role of K1 in the pathogenesis of KSHV-associated cancers. K1 transgenic mice (80-90%) developed lymphoid hyperplasia and splenomegaly at 8 and 10 months of age, 25% had confirmed diagnosis of lymphoma, and 50% developed abdominal and/or hepatic tumors by 18 months of age. Histological examination showed loss of splenic architecture and increased cellularity. Lymph nodes showed disrupted architecture with effaced follicles and other pathological changes, including signs of angiofollicular lymphoid hyperplasia. One of the livers showed signs of angiosarcoma. In summary, our histology results revealed pathological changes in K1 transgenic mice similar to lymphoma, Castleman's disease, and angiosarcoma, suggesting that K1 may contribute to the development of KSHV-associated cancers. PMID:25301266

  10. Development of Organometallic S6K1 Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant activation of S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) is found in many diseases, including diabetes, aging, and cancer. We developed ATP competitive organometallic kinase inhibitors, EM5 and FL772, which are inspired by the structure of the pan-kinase inhibitor staurosporine, to specifically inhibit S6K1 using a strategy previously used to target other kinases. Biochemical data demonstrate that EM5 and FL772 inhibit the kinase with IC50 value in the low nanomolar range at 100 μM ATP and that the more potent FL772 compound has a greater than 100-fold specificity over S6K2. The crystal structures of S6K1 bound to staurosporine, EM5, and FL772 reveal that the EM5 and FL772 inhibitors bind in the ATP binding pocket and make S6K1-specific contacts, resulting in changes to the p-loop, αC helix, and αD helix when compared to the staurosporine-bound structure. Cellular data reveal that FL772 is able to inhibit S6K phosphorylation in yeast cells. Together, these studies demonstrate that potent, selective, and cell permeable S6K1 inhibitors can be prepared and provide a scaffold for future development of S6K inhibitors with possible therapeutic applications. PMID:25356520

  11. K1K8: an Hp1404-derived antibacterial peptide.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhongjie; Liu, Gaomin; Meng, Lanxia; Yu, Weiwei; Xu, Xiaobo; Li, Wenxin; Wu, Yingliang; Cao, Zhijian

    2016-06-01

    As an alternative class of antimicrobial agents used to overcome drug-resistant infections, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have recently gained significant attention. In this study, we designed an improved antimicrobial peptide, K1K8, based on the molecular template of Hp1404. Compared to the wild-type Hp1404, K1K8 showed an improved antibacterial spectrum in vitro, a lower hemolytic activity, and an enhanced serum stability. Importantly, K1K8 also decreased methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacterial counts in the wounded region in a mouse skin infection model. Interestingly, K1K8 did not induce bacterial resistance or non-specific immune response reactions. Moreover, the peptide killed bacterial cells mainly by disrupting the bacterial membrane. In summary, K1K8 has the potential to be used as an improved anti-infection agent for topical use, which opens an avenue that potential anti-infection drugs may be designed and developed from the molecular templates of AMPs. PMID:26952110

  12. Enantiomers of warfarin and vitamin K1 metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Choonara, I A; Haynes, B P; Cholerton, S; Breckenridge, A M; Park, B K

    1986-01-01

    The effect of the individual enantiomers of warfarin at steady state (1 mg daily) was investigated in five healthy volunteers. Both enantiomers produced a significant increase in prothrombin time, but the increase with S warfarin (1.8 +/- 0.8 s, mean +/- s.d.) was greater than with R warfarin (1.0 +/- 0.3 s), despite lower steady state plasma concentrations of S warfarin, due to its more rapid clearance. Following the administration of vitamin K1, the maximum plasma concentration and area under the plasma concentration time curve values for the metabolite vitamin K1 2,3-epoxide were greater after S warfarin than after R warfarin. The greater anticoagulant potency of S warfarin is reflected by a greater degree of inhibition of vitamin K1 epoxide reductase. PMID:3567019

  13. Cutaneous allergic reaction to intramuscular vitamin K1.

    PubMed

    Wong, D A; Freeman, S

    1999-08-01

    A 40-year-old woman with no pre-existing hepatic disease developed a cutaneous allergic reaction to intramuscular vitamin K1. She received this medication prophylactically prior to surgery, developed severe localized, and subsequently generalized, dermatitis, beginning 5 days after administration of the Konakion Cremophor-EL form of vitamin K1 by intramuscular injection at four sites on her thighs. Investigation by patch and intradermal testing revealed delayed-type hypersensitivity to Konakion Cremophor-EL, Konakion Mixed Micelles and pure vitamin K1, but not Cremophor-EL vehicle alone. This case is unusual because the patient was also shown to be patch test positive to vitamin K3 sodium bisulfite. PMID:10439527

  14. Intestinal scavenger receptors are involved in vitamin K1 absorption.

    PubMed

    Goncalves, Aurélie; Margier, Marielle; Roi, Stéphanie; Collet, Xavier; Niot, Isabelle; Goupy, Pascale; Caris-Veyrat, Catherine; Reboul, Emmanuelle

    2014-10-31

    Vitamin K1 (phylloquinone) intestinal absorption is thought to be mediated by a carrier protein that still remains to be identified. Apical transport of vitamin K1 was examined using Caco-2 TC-7 cell monolayers as a model of human intestinal epithelium and in transfected HEK cells. Phylloquinone uptake was then measured ex vivo using mouse intestinal explants. Finally, vitamin K1 absorption was compared between wild-type mice and mice overexpressing scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI) in the intestine and mice deficient in cluster determinant 36 (CD36). Phylloquinone uptake by Caco-2 cells was saturable and was significantly impaired by co-incubation with α-tocopherol (and vice versa). Anti-human SR-BI antibodies and BLT1 (a chemical inhibitor of lipid transport via SR-BI) blocked up to 85% of vitamin K1 uptake. BLT1 also decreased phylloquinone apical efflux by ∼80%. Transfection of HEK cells with SR-BI and CD36 significantly enhanced vitamin K1 uptake, which was subsequently decreased by the addition of BLT1 or sulfo-N-succinimidyl oleate (CD36 inhibitor), respectively. Similar results were obtained in mouse intestinal explants. In vivo, the phylloquinone postprandial response was significantly higher, and the proximal intestine mucosa phylloquinone content 4 h after gavage was increased in mice overexpressing SR-BI compared with controls. Phylloquinone postprandial response was also significantly increased in CD36-deficient mice compared with wild-type mice, but their vitamin K1 intestinal content remained unchanged. Overall, the present data demonstrate for the first time that intestinal scavenger receptors participate in the absorption of dietary phylloquinone. PMID:25228690

  15. Intestinal Scavenger Receptors Are Involved in Vitamin K1 Absorption*

    PubMed Central

    Goncalves, Aurélie; Margier, Marielle; Roi, Stéphanie; Collet, Xavier; Niot, Isabelle; Goupy, Pascale; Caris-Veyrat, Catherine; Reboul, Emmanuelle

    2014-01-01

    Vitamin K1 (phylloquinone) intestinal absorption is thought to be mediated by a carrier protein that still remains to be identified. Apical transport of vitamin K1 was examined using Caco-2 TC-7 cell monolayers as a model of human intestinal epithelium and in transfected HEK cells. Phylloquinone uptake was then measured ex vivo using mouse intestinal explants. Finally, vitamin K1 absorption was compared between wild-type mice and mice overexpressing scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI) in the intestine and mice deficient in cluster determinant 36 (CD36). Phylloquinone uptake by Caco-2 cells was saturable and was significantly impaired by co-incubation with α-tocopherol (and vice versa). Anti-human SR-BI antibodies and BLT1 (a chemical inhibitor of lipid transport via SR-BI) blocked up to 85% of vitamin K1 uptake. BLT1 also decreased phylloquinone apical efflux by ∼80%. Transfection of HEK cells with SR-BI and CD36 significantly enhanced vitamin K1 uptake, which was subsequently decreased by the addition of BLT1 or sulfo-N-succinimidyl oleate (CD36 inhibitor), respectively. Similar results were obtained in mouse intestinal explants. In vivo, the phylloquinone postprandial response was significantly higher, and the proximal intestine mucosa phylloquinone content 4 h after gavage was increased in mice overexpressing SR-BI compared with controls. Phylloquinone postprandial response was also significantly increased in CD36-deficient mice compared with wild-type mice, but their vitamin K1 intestinal content remained unchanged. Overall, the present data demonstrate for the first time that intestinal scavenger receptors participate in the absorption of dietary phylloquinone. PMID:25228690

  16. Space Access for Small Satellites on the K-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faktor, L.

    Affordable access to space remains a major obstacle to realizing the increasing potential of small satellites systems. On a per kilogram basis, small launch vehicles are simply too expensive for the budgets of many small satellite programs. Opportunities for rideshare with larger payloads on larger launch vehicles are still rare, given the complications associated with coordinating delivery schedules and deployment orbits. Existing contractual mechanisms are also often inadequate to facilitate the launch of multiple payload customers on the same flight. Kistler Aerospace Corporation is committed to lowering the price and enhancing the availability of space access for small satellite programs through the fully-reusable K-1 launch vehicle. Kistler has been working with a number of entities, including Astrium Ltd., AeroAstro, and NASA, to develop innovative approaches to small satellite missions. The K-1 has been selected by NASA as a Flight Demonstration Vehicle for the Space Launch Initiative. NASA has purchased the flight results during the first four K-1 launches on the performance of 13 advanced launch vehicle technologies embedded in the K-1 vehicle. On K-1 flights #2-#4, opportunities exist for small satellites to rideshare to low-earth orbit for a low-launch price. Kistler's flight demonstration contract with NASA also includes options to fly Add-on Technology Experiment flights. Opportunities exist for rideshare payloads on these flights as well. Both commercial and government customers may take advantage of the rideshare pricing. Kistler is investigating the feasibility of flying dedicated, multiple small payload missions. Such a mission would launch multiple small payloads from a single customer or small payloads from different customers. The orbit would be selected to be compatible with the requirements of as many small payload customers as possible, and make use of reusable hardware, standard interfaces (such as the existing MPAS) and verification plans

  17. Phylogenetic analysis of Dipus sagitta and Euchoreutes naso (Rodentia: Dipodidae) based on the mitochondrial genomes.

    PubMed

    Luo, Guangjie; Liao, Jicheng

    2016-07-01

    Dipus sagitta and Euchoreutes naso are both monotypic genus, both of them belong to the family of Dipodidae, and E. naso is an Endangered species (EN) defined by the World Conservation Union. The length of its complete mitochondrial sequence of D. sagitta and E. naso is 16,664  bp and 16,705  bp, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis displayed that D. sagitta, Jaculus jaculus, and E. naso were classified into the same cluster. This result was consistent with that of primary morphological taxonomy. The mitochondrial genome of D. sagitta and E. naso would be a key supplement for the gene pool of Rodentia and the conclusion of phylogenetic analysis was an important molecular evidence for the taxonomic status of the two species. PMID:26029878

  18. Pseudoscleroderma secondary to phytonadione (vitamin K1) injections.

    PubMed

    Pujol, R M; Puig, L; Moreno, A; Pérez, M; de Moragas, J M

    1989-04-01

    Two patients showed symmetrical sclerodermoid (morphea-like) skin lesions at sites of intramuscular phytonadione (vitamin K1) injections. The lesions appeared one and two years after the injections. A dense sclerosis involving the reticular dermis and subcutaneous fat was observed on histologic examination of biopsy specimens. Local adverse reactions to phytonadione are reviewed. Possible causative mechanisms for phytonadione-induced pseudoscleroderma are discussed. PMID:2731442

  19. A new species of Reithrodontomys, subgenus Aporodon (Cricetidae: Neotominae), from the highlands of Costa Rica, with comments on Costa Rican and Panamanian Reithrodontomys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gardner, Alfred L.; Carleton, Michael D.

    2009-01-01

    A new species of the rodent genus Reithrodontomys (Cricetidae: Neotominae) is described from Cerro Asuncion in the western Cordillera de Talamanca, Costa Rica. The long tail, elongate rostrum, bulbous braincase, and complex molars of the new species associate it with members of the subgenus Aporodon, tenuirostris species group. In its diminutive size and aspects of cranial shape, the new species (Reithrodontomys musseri, sp. nov.) most closely resembles R. microdon, a form known from highlands in Guatemala and Chiapas, Mexico. In the course of differentially diagnosing the new species, we necessarily reviewed the Costa Rican and Panamanian subspecies of R. mexicanus based on morphological comparisons, study of paratypes and vouchers used in recent molecular studies, and morphometric analyses. We recognize Reithrodontomys cherrii (Allen, 1891) and R. garichensis finders and Pearson, 1940, as valid species, and allocate R. mexicanus potrerograndei Goodwin, 1945, as a subjective synonym of R. brevirostris Goodwin, 1943. Critical review of museum specimens collected subsequent to Hooper's (1952) revision is needed and would do much to improve understanding of Reithrodontomys taxonomy and distribution in Middle America.

  20. [Vitamin K 1 concentration and vitamin K-dependent clotting factors in newborn infants after intramuscular and oral administration of vitamin K 1].

    PubMed

    Goldschmidt, B; Kisrákói, C; Téglás, E; Verbényi, M; Kovács, I

    1990-06-17

    Serum concentration of vitamin K1 and activity of vitamin-K-dependent factors II, VII, IX and X were determined before and after vitamin K1 administration in infants. The babies received vitamin K1 intramuscularly or orally. 12 hours after vitamin K1 treatment the mean concentration was increased in the groups receiving vitamin K1 intramusculary or orally, respectively. Serum level of vitamin K1 fell exponentially, the mean half life was about 30 hours in both groups. Activity of vitamin K-dependent clotting factors did not change significantly after intramuscular or oral vitamin K1 administration during the first four-five days of life. It was no direct correlation between the concentration of vitamin K1 and the activity of vitamin-K-dependent clotting factors. This study suggest that oral administration of vitamin K1 is as effective as the intramuscular route. PMID:2195426

  1. OPC-Lite for gridded designs at low k1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axelrad, V.; Smayling, M.; Tsujita, K.; Mikami, K.; Yaegashi, H.

    2014-09-01

    Highly regular gridded designs are generally seen as a key component for continued advances in lithographic resolution in a time of limited further progress in lithography hardware [1]. With a given process technology tool set, higher pattern density (lower k1) and quality are achieved using gridded design rules (GDR) in comparison to conventional 2D designs. GDR is necessary for designs with k1 approaching the theoretical limit ˜ 0.25. A highly effective implementation of GDR is the lines+cuts approach discussed in [4, 5, 8] and else- where. Excellent results at very advanced nodes are achieved by this double-patterning process, where lines are created first, then cuts are patterned on top as required by circuit connectivity. The regular structure of gridded designs offers the opportunity to use an optimized approach to Optical Proximity Correction (OPC), one taking full advantage of the design style to achieve best possible ac- curacy and speed and at the same time small mask file size and good manufacturability. In this work we describe our GDR-tailored OPC tool called OPC- Lite [6]. The OPC-Lite approach is discussed and compared to conventional 2D OPC. Sub-20nm silicon data are shown, validating predictive quality of our simulation and OPC techniques.

  2. Loop quantum cosmology of k=1 FRW models

    SciTech Connect

    Ashtekar, Abhay; Pawlowski, Tomasz; Singh, Parampreet; Vandersloot, Kevin

    2007-01-15

    The closed, k=1, FRW model coupled to a massless scalar field is investigated in the framework of loop quantum cosmology using analytical and numerical methods. As in the k=0 case, the scalar field can be again used as emergent time to construct the physical Hilbert space and introduce Dirac observables. The resulting framework is then used to address a major challenge of quantum cosmology: resolving the big-bang singularity while retaining agreement with general relativity at large scales. It is shown that the framework fulfills this task. In particular, for states which are semiclassical at some late time, the big bang is replaced by a quantum bounce and a recollapse occurs at the value of the scale factor predicted by classical general relativity. Thus, the 'difficulties' pointed out by Green and Unruh in the k=1 case do not arise in a more systematic treatment. As in k=0 models, quantum dynamics is deterministic across the deep Planck regime. However, because it also retains the classical recollapse, in contrast to the k=0 case one is now led to a cyclic model. Finally, we clarify some issues raised by Laguna's recent work addressed to computational physicists.

  3. Molecular systematics of dormice (Rodentia: Gliridae) and the radiation of Graphiurus in Africa.

    PubMed Central

    Montgelard, Claudine; Matthee, Conrad A; Robinson, Terence J

    2003-01-01

    The phylogenetic relationships among the Gliridae (order Rodentia) were assessed using 3430 nucleotides derived from three nuclear fragments (beta-spectrin non-erythrocytic 1, thyrotropin and lecithin cholesterol acyl transferase) and one mitochondrial gene (12S rRNA). We included 14 glirid species, representative of seven genera of the three recognized subfamilies (Graphiurinae, Glirinae and Leithiinae) in our analysis. The molecular data identified three evolutionary lineages that broadly correspond to the three extant subfamilies. However, the data suggest that the genus Muscardinus, previously regarded as falling within the Glirinae, should be included in the Leithiinae. Molecular dating using local molecular clocks and partitioned datasets allowed an estimate of the timing of cladogenesis within the glirids. Graphiurus probably diverged early in the group's evolution (40-50 Myr ago) and the three subfamilies diverged contemporaneously, probably in Europe. The radiation within Graphiurus is more recent, with the colonization of Africa by this lineage estimated at ca. 8-10 Myr ago. PMID:14561309

  4. Helminth fauna of the Siberian chipmunk, Tamias sibiricus Laxmann (Rodentia, Sciuridae) introduced in suburban French forests.

    PubMed

    Pisanu, Benoît; Jerusalem, Christelle; Huchery, Cindy; Marmet, Julie; Chapuis, Jean-Louis

    2007-05-01

    The spread of an immigrant host species can be influenced both by its specific helminth parasites that come along with it and by newly acquired infections from native fauna. The Siberian chipmunk, Tamias sibiricus Laxmann (Rodentia, Sciuridae), a northeastern Eurasiatic ground nesting Sciurid, has been introduced in France for less than three decades. Thirty individuals were collected from three suburban forests in the Ile-de-France Region between 2002 and 2006. Two intestinal nematode species dominated the helminth fauna: Brevistriata skrjabini [Prevalence, P, 99% C.I., 87% (64-97%); mean intensity, M.I., 99% C.I., 43 (28-78)] and Aonchotheca annulosa [P, 47% (25-69%); M.I., 35 (3-157)]. B. skrjabini is a direct life cycle nematode species of North Eurasiatic origin, with a restricted spectrum of phylogenetically related suitable hosts. This result indicates that B. skrjabini successfully settled and spread with founder pet chipmunks maintained in captivity and released in natura. Chipmunks acquired A. annulosa, a nematode species with a large spectrum of phylogenetically unrelated suitable host species, from local Muroid rodent species with similar behavior, life-history traits and habitats. Quantitative studies are needed to evaluate the potential for both B. skrjabini and A. annulosa to impede the spread of Tamias and for B. skrjabini to favor chipmunk colonization through detrimental effects upon native co-inhabiting host species. PMID:17149601

  5. Description of the karyotype of Rhagomys rufescens Thomas, 1886 (Rodentia, Sigmodontinae) from Southern Brazil Atlantic forest

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Rhagomys rufescens (Rodentia: Sigmodontinae) is an endemic species of the Atlantic forest from Southern and Southeastern Brazil. Some authors consider Rhagomys as part of the tribe Thomasomyini; but its phylogenetic relationships remain unclear. Chromosomal studies on eight specimens of Rhagomys rufescens revealed a diploid number of 2n = 36 and a number of autosome arms FN = 50. GTG, CBG and Ag-NOR banding and CMA3 /DAPI staining were performed on metaphase chromosomes. Eight biarmed and nine acrocentric pairs were found in the karyotype of this species. The X and Y chromosomes were both acrocentric. Most of the autosomes and the sex chromosomes showed positive C-bands in the pericentromeric region. The X chromosome showed an additional heterochromatic block in the proximal region of the long arm. Nucleolus organizer regions (NORs) were located in the pericentromeric region of three biarmed autosomes (pairs 4, 6 and 8) and in the telomeric region of the short arm of three acrocentrics (pairs 10, 12 and 17). CMA 3 /DAPI staining produced fluorescent signals in many autosomes, especially in pairs 4, 6, and 8. This study presents cytogenetic data of Rhagomys rufescens for the first time. PMID:21637420

  6. A new species of porcupine, genus Coendou (Rodentia: Erethizontidae) from the Atlantic forest of northeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Pontes, Antonio Rossano Mendes; Gadelha, José Ramon; Melo, Éverton R A; de Sá, Fabrício Bezerra; Loss, Ana Carolina; Caldara Junior, Vilacio; Costa, Leonora Pires; Leite, Yuri L R

    2013-01-01

    We report the discovery of a new species of Coendou (Rodentia, Erethizontidae), here designated Coendou speratus sp. nov. This small porcupine, locally known as coandumirim, is found in the Pernambuco Endemism Centre in the Atlantic coast of northeastern Brazil north of the São Francisco river, one of the most important known biodiversity hotspots. The geographic range of C. speratus overlaps with that of the larger, widespread C. prehensilis, but not with that of C. insidiosus from the southeastern Atlantic forest, nor with that of C. nycthemera, an eastern Amazonian species. Coendou speratus is a small-bodied, long-tailed species that appears to be completely spiny because it lacks long dorsal fur. The dorsal quills have conspicuously brownish red tips that contrast with the blackish dorsal background color. The new species is overall similar to C. nycthemera, but the dorsal body quills are typically tricolored in the former and bicolored in the latter. The new species is externally very distinct from C. insidiosus, especially because the latter has bicolored dorsal quills that are almost completely hidden beneath longer and homogeneous pale or dark hairs. PMID:26042302

  7. DNA extraction from bristles and quills of Chaetomys subspinosus (Rodentia: Erethizontidae) using a novel protocol.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, C G; Martinez, R A; Gaiotto, F A

    2007-01-01

    DNA extraction protocols are as varied as DNA sources. When it comes to endangered species, it is especially important to pay attention to all details that ensure the completion of the study goals and effectiveness in attaining useful data for conservation. Chaetomys subspinosus (Rodentia: Erethizontidae) is a secretive arboreal porcupine endemic to certain ecosystems of the Brazilian Atlantic Forest. A multidisciplinary study (including genetic data) was performed to create a management plan for the conservation of this species. Individuals from natural populations of the states of Bahia, Espírito Santo and Sergipe were sampled. To obtain a reliable and abundant amount of starting material, non-destructive methods were tested, extracting DNA from the bristles and quills that comprise most of this animal's hide. This method has also been innovative in adapting a DNA extraction protocol traditionally used for plants. Digestion using proteinase K was followed by protein precipitation with CTAB, a chloroform-isoamyl alcohol cleaning and DNA precipitation with isopropyl alcohol. This protocol supplies good-quality DNA for genetic analysis with molecular markers based on PCR. PMID:18050086

  8. Measurement of Branching Fractions of B0 Decays to K1(1270)+ pi- and K1(1400)+ pi-

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, Bernard; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, Antimo; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, Bjarne; Sun, L.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Cahn, Robert N.; Jacobsen, R.G.; /LBL, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /Consorzio Milano Ricerche /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Napoli Seconda U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /Banca di Roma /Frascati /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2008-08-04

    We present a measurement of the branching fraction of neutral B meson decaying to final states containing a K1 meson, i.e. K{sub 1}(1270) and K{sub 1}(1400), and a charged pion. The data, collected with the BABAR detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, represent 454 million B{bar B} pairs produced in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation. We measure the branching fraction {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K{sub 1}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) = (31.0 {+-} 2.7 {+-} 6.9) x 10{sup -6}, where the first error quoted is statistical and the second is systematic. In the framework of the K-matrix formalism used to describe these decays, we also set limits on the ratio of the production constants for the K{sub 1}(1270){sup +} and K{sub 1}(1400){sup +} mesons in B{sup 0} decays.

  9. Penguin-dominated B →ϕ K1(1270) and ϕ K1(1400 ) decays in the perturbative QCD approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xin; Zou, Zhi-Tian; Xiao, Zhen-Jun

    2014-11-01

    We investigate the C P -averaged branching ratios, the polarization fractions, the relative phases, and the C P -violating asymmetries of the penguin-dominated B →ϕ K1(1270 ) and ϕ K1(1400 ) decays in the perturbative QCD (pQCD) approach, where K1(1270 ) and K1(1400 ) are believed to be the mixtures of two distinct types of axial-vector K1 A(P1 3 ) and K1 B(P1 1 ) states with different behavior, however, their mixing angle θK1is still a hot and controversial topic presently. By numerical evaluations with two different mixing angles θK 1˜3 3∘ and 58° and phenomenological analysis, we find that: (i) the pQCD predictions for the branching ratio, the longitudinal polarization fraction and the direct C P violation of B±→ϕ K1(1270 )±decay with the smaller angle 33° are in good agreement with the currently available data; (ii) though the central values significantly exceed the available upper limit, both pQCD predictions of Br (B±→ϕ K1(1400 )±) with two different mixing angles are consistent with that obtained in QCD factorization and with the preliminary data in 2 σ errors. These results and other relevant predictions for the considered decays will be further tested by the LHCb and the forthcoming Super-B experiments; (iii) the weak annihilation contributions can play an important role in B →ϕ K1(1270 ) and ϕ K1(1400 ) decays; (d) these pQCD predictions combined with the future precision measurements can examine the reliability of the factorization approach employed here, but also explore the complicated QCD dynamics and mixing angle θK 1 of the axial-vector K1(1270 ) and K1(1400 ) system.

  10. Risk Analysis Methodology for Kistler's K-1 Reusable Launch Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birkeland, Paul W.

    2002-01-01

    industry to mature, a different approach to RLV risk analysis must be adopted. This paper will present such a methodology for Kistler's K-1 reusable launch vehicle. This paper will develop an approach to risk analysis that represents an amalgamation of the two approaches. This methodology provides flexibility to the launch industry that will enable the regulatory environment to more efficiently accommodate new technologies and approaches. It will also present a derivation of an appropriate assessment threshold that is the equivalent of the currently accepted 30-in-a-million casualty expectation.

  11. Postnatal ontogeny of limb proportions and functional indices in the subterranean rodent Ctenomys talarum (Rodentia: Ctenomyidae).

    PubMed

    Echeverría, Alejandra Isabel; Becerra, Federico; Vassallo, Aldo Iván

    2014-08-01

    Burrow construction in the subterranean Ctenomys talarum (Rodentia: Ctenomyidae) primarily occurs by scratch-digging. In this study, we compared the limbs of an ontogenetic series of C. talarum to identify variation in bony elements related to fossorial habits using a morphometrical and biomechanical approach. Diameters and functional lengths of long bones were measured and 10 functional indices were constructed. We found that limb proportions of C. talarum undergo significant changes throughout postnatal ontogeny, and no significant differences between sexes were observed. Five of six forelimb indices and two of four hindlimb indices showed differences between ages. According to discriminant analysis, the indices that contributed most to discrimination among age groups were robustness of the humerus and ulna, relative epicondylar width, crural and brachial indices, and index of fossorial ability (IFA). Particularly, pups could be differentiated from juveniles and adults by more robust humeri and ulnae, wider epicondyles, longer middle limb elements, and a proportionally shorter olecranon. Greater robustness indicated a possible compensation for lower bone stiffness while wider epicondyles may be associated to improved effective forces in those muscles that originate onto them, compensating the lower muscular development. The gradual increase in the IFA suggested a gradual enhancement in the scratch-digging performance due to an improvement in the mechanical advantage of forearm extensors. Middle limb indices were higher in pups than in juveniles-adults, reflecting relatively more gracile limbs in their middle segments, which is in accordance with their incipient fossorial ability. In sum, our results show that in C. talarum some scratch-digging adaptations are already present during early postnatal ontogeny, which suggests that they are prenatally shaped, and other traits develop progressively. The role of early digging behavior as a factor influencing on

  12. 26 CFR 1.1031(k)-1 - Treatment of deferred exchanges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Treatment of deferred exchanges. 1.1031(k)-1 Section 1.1031(k)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Common Nontaxable Exchanges § 1.1031(k)-1 Treatment of...

  13. 26 CFR 1.501(k)-1 - Communist-controlled organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Communist-controlled organizations. 1.501(k)-1 Section 1.501(k)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Exempt Organizations § 1.501(k)-1...

  14. 26 CFR 31.3402(k)-1 - Special rule for tips.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Special rule for tips. 31.3402(k)-1 Section 31.3402(k)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) EMPLOYMENT... Collection of Income Tax at Source § 31.3402(k)-1 Special rule for tips. (a) Withholding of income tax...

  15. 26 CFR 1.162(k)-1 - Disallowance of deduction for reacquisition payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... payments. 1.162(k)-1 Section 1.162(k)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... and Corporations § 1.162(k)-1 Disallowance of deduction for reacquisition payments. (a) In general... corporation to reacquire its stock from an ESOP that are used in a manner described in section...

  16. 26 CFR 1.1031(k)-1 - Treatment of deferred exchanges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Treatment of deferred exchanges. 1.1031(k)-1 Section 1.1031(k)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Common Nontaxable Exchanges § 1.1031(k)-1 Treatment...

  17. 26 CFR 1.1031(k)-1 - Treatment of deferred exchanges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Treatment of deferred exchanges. 1.1031(k)-1 Section 1.1031(k)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Common Nontaxable Exchanges § 1.1031(k)-1 Treatment...

  18. 26 CFR 1.501(k)-1 - Communist-controlled organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Communist-controlled organizations. 1.501(k)-1 Section 1.501(k)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Exempt Organizations § 1.501(k)-1...

  19. 26 CFR 1.162(k)-1 - Disallowance of deduction for reacquisition payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... payments. 1.162(k)-1 Section 1.162(k)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... and Corporations § 1.162(k)-1 Disallowance of deduction for reacquisition payments. (a) In general... corporation to reacquire its stock from an ESOP that are used in a manner described in section...

  20. 26 CFR 1.162(k)-1 - Disallowance of deduction for reacquisition payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... payments. 1.162(k)-1 Section 1.162(k)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... and Corporations § 1.162(k)-1 Disallowance of deduction for reacquisition payments. (a) In general... corporation to reacquire its stock from an ESOP that are used in a manner described in section...

  1. 26 CFR 1.501(k)-1 - Communist-controlled organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Communist-controlled organizations. 1.501(k)-1 Section 1.501(k)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Exempt Organizations § 1.501(k)-1...

  2. 26 CFR 1.501(k)-1 - Communist-controlled organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2014-04-01 2013-04-01 true Communist-controlled organizations. 1.501(k)-1 Section 1.501(k)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Exempt Organizations § 1.501(k)-1...

  3. 26 CFR 1.162(k)-1 - Disallowance of deduction for reacquisition payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... payments. 1.162(k)-1 Section 1.162(k)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... and Corporations § 1.162(k)-1 Disallowance of deduction for reacquisition payments. (a) In general... corporation to reacquire its stock from an ESOP that are used in a manner described in section...

  4. 26 CFR 1.501(k)-1 - Communist-controlled organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Communist-controlled organizations. 1.501(k)-1 Section 1.501(k)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Exempt Organizations § 1.501(k)-1...

  5. 26 CFR 31.3402(k)-1 - Special rule for tips.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Special rule for tips. 31.3402(k)-1 Section 31.3402(k)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) EMPLOYMENT... Collection of Income Tax at Source § 31.3402(k)-1 Special rule for tips. (a) Withholding of income tax...

  6. 26 CFR 1.162(k)-1 - Disallowance of deduction for reacquisition payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... payments. 1.162(k)-1 Section 1.162(k)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... and Corporations § 1.162(k)-1 Disallowance of deduction for reacquisition payments. (a) In general... corporation to reacquire its stock from an ESOP that are used in a manner described in section...

  7. 26 CFR 1.1031(k)-1 - Treatment of deferred exchanges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Treatment of deferred exchanges. 1.1031(k)-1 Section 1.1031(k)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Common Nontaxable Exchanges § 1.1031(k)-1 Treatment...

  8. 26 CFR 1.168(k)-1 - Additional first year depreciation deduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Additional first year depreciation deduction. 1.168(k)-1 Section 1.168(k)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Itemized Deductions for Individuals and Corporations § 1.168(k)-1 Additional first...

  9. 26 CFR 1.168(k)-1 - Additional first year depreciation deduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Additional first year depreciation deduction. 1.168(k)-1 Section 1.168(k)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Itemized Deductions for Individuals and Corporations § 1.168(k)-1 Additional first...

  10. 17 CFR 201.550 - Summary suspensions pursuant to Exchange Act Section 12(k)(1)(A).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... to Exchange Act Section 12(k)(1)(A). 201.550 Section 201.550 Commodity and Securities Exchanges... Suspensions § 201.550 Summary suspensions pursuant to Exchange Act Section 12(k)(1)(A). (a) Petition for termination of suspension. Any person adversely affected by a suspension pursuant to Section 12(k)(1)(A)...

  11. 17 CFR 201.550 - Summary suspensions pursuant to Exchange Act Section 12(k)(1)(A).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... to Exchange Act Section 12(k)(1)(A). 201.550 Section 201.550 Commodity and Securities Exchanges... Suspensions § 201.550 Summary suspensions pursuant to Exchange Act Section 12(k)(1)(A). (a) Petition for termination of suspension. Any person adversely affected by a suspension pursuant to Section 12(k)(1)(A)...

  12. 17 CFR 201.550 - Summary suspensions pursuant to Exchange Act Section 12(k)(1)(A).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... to Exchange Act Section 12(k)(1)(A). 201.550 Section 201.550 Commodity and Securities Exchanges... Suspensions § 201.550 Summary suspensions pursuant to Exchange Act Section 12(k)(1)(A). (a) Petition for termination of suspension. Any person adversely affected by a suspension pursuant to Section 12(k)(1)(A)...

  13. 17 CFR 201.550 - Summary suspensions pursuant to Exchange Act Section 12(k)(1)(A).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... to Exchange Act Section 12(k)(1)(A). 201.550 Section 201.550 Commodity and Securities Exchanges... Suspensions § 201.550 Summary suspensions pursuant to Exchange Act Section 12(k)(1)(A). (a) Petition for termination of suspension. Any person adversely affected by a suspension pursuant to Section 12(k)(1)(A)...

  14. First description of the nymph and larva of Dermacentor compactus Neumann, 1901 (Acari: Ixodidae), parasites of squirrels (Rodentia: Sciuridae) in southeast Asia.

    PubMed

    Apanaskevich, Dmitry A

    2016-05-01

    Recent reexamination of collection lots stored in the United States National Tick Collection revealed adult specimens of Dermacentor compactus Neumann, 1901 (Acari: Ixodidae) reared from field-collected nymphs, which allowed us to associate field-collected unidentified nymphs and larvae with this species. Nymphs of D. compactus can be easily distinguished from those of other congeneric species by the shape of the scutum and spiracular plate, the hypostome dentition, and the size of the spurs on the coxae. Larvae of this species can be distinguished by the shape and sculpture of the scutum, the shape of basis capituli, the absence of auriculae, and the size of the spurs on coxae II and III. Both nymphs and larvae feed mostly on various species of squirrels (Rodentia: Sciuridae). Considerably fewer nymphs and larvae were found on murid rodents (Rodentia: Muridae), domestic dogs (Carnivora: Canidae), and a snake (Squamata: Colubridae). PMID:27095664

  15. Quantitative relationship between capsular content and killing of K1-encapsulated Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Vermeulen, C; Cross, A; Byrne, W R; Zollinger, W

    1988-01-01

    Since there are conflicting reports in the literature on a possible relationship between the K1 capsular polysaccharide (CP) content of Escherichia coli and its susceptibility to killing, we reexamined this issue in a strain that had a smooth lipopolysaccharide (LPS) phenotype (E. coli O18:K1:H7 Bort) and in a strain with a deep rough LPS phenotype (E412, spontaneously agglutinable: K1:H-). When cell-associated K1 capsular content was greater than 90 micrograms of K1 polysaccharide per 10(10) CFU, neither strain was lysed by 20% normal human serum. In contrast, at equivalent but lower levels of K1 CP content, E412 but not strain Bort was lysed by normal human serum. Thus, LPS phenotype is an additional surface determinant that affects bacterial susceptibility to killing. Organisms obtained from very early log phase, when cell-associated K1 CP is greatest, were significantly more virulent for mice than were bacteria harvested in stationary phase, when cell-associated K1 polysaccharide is lowest. We conclude that (i) there is a threshold level of K1 CP needed to confer protection from lysis by serum, and this is usually exceeded under standard growth conditions; (ii) at a given level of K1 CP the LPS phenotype is an important determinant of bacterial killing; and (iii) the loss of capsule at low pH may be an additional mechanism by which hosts defend against invasive infection by K1-encapsulated E. coli. Images PMID:3047064

  16. P70S6K 1 regulation of angiogenesis through VEGF and HIF-1{alpha} expression

    SciTech Connect

    Bian, Chuan-Xiu; Shi, Zhumei; Meng, Qiao; Jiang, Yue; Liu, Ling-Zhi; Jiang, Bing-Hua

    2010-07-30

    Research highlights: {yields} P70S6K1 regulates VEGF expression; {yields} P70S6K1 induces transcriptional activation through HIF-1{alpha} binding site; {yields} P70S6K1 regulates HIF-1{alpha}, but not HIF-1{beta} protein expression; {yields} P70S6K1 mediates tumor growth and angiogenesis through HIF-1{alpha} and VEGF expression. -- Abstract: The 70 kDa ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (p70S6K1), a downstream target of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and ERK mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), is an important regulator of cell cycle progression, and cell proliferation. Recent studies indicated an important role of p70S6K1 in PTEN-negative and AKT-overexpressing tumors. However, the mechanism of p70S6K1 in tumor angiogenesis remains to be elucidated. In this study, we specifically inhibited p70S6K1 activity in ovarian cancer cells using vector-based small interfering RNA (siRNA) against p70S6K1. We found that knockdown of p70S6K1 significantly decreased VEGF protein expression and VEGF transcriptional activation through the HIF-1{alpha} binding site at its enhancer region. The expression of p70S6K1 siRNA specifically inhibited HIF-1{alpha}, but not HIF-1{beta} protein expression. We also found that p70S6K1 down-regulation inhibited ovarian tumor growth and angiogenesis, and decreased cell proliferation and levels of VEGF and HIF-1{alpha} expression in tumor tissues. Our results suggest that p70S6K1 is required for tumor growth and angiogenesis through HIF-1{alpha} and VEGF expression, providing a molecular mechanism of human ovarian cancer mediated by p70S6K1 signaling.

  17. Dental microwear in relation to changes in the direction of mastication during the evolution of Myodonta (Rodentia, Mammalia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, Cyril; Jaeger, Jean-Jacques; Michaux, Jacques; Viriot, Laurent

    2007-01-01

    Observations of dental microwear are used to analyse the correlation between changes in molar tooth crown morphology and the direction of masticatory movement during the evolution of Myodonta (Rodentia, Mammalia). The studied sample includes 36 specimens representing both superfamilies of Myodonta (Muroidea and Dipodoidea) spanning 16 dipodoid and 9 muroid species. Microscopic scratches on occlusal surfaces resulting from contact between opposite teeth during mastication are analysed. Using these features, we determine the direction of masticatory movements. Microwear patterns display diverse orientations among Dipodoidea: oblique in Sicistinae, Euchoreutinae and Zapodinae, propalinal in Dipodinae and intermediary in Allactaginae. Similarly, Muroidea exhibit the following orientations: oblique in Cricetinae and propalinal in Arvicolinae, Cricetomyinae, Gerbillinae and Murinae. These various chewing types illustrate different evolutionary grades within the superfamilies. Acquisition of the antero-posterior masticatory movement in Dipodoidea is related to flattening of the molar occlusal surface. However, in some muroid subfamilies, this direction of mastication is associated with low-crowned and cuspidate molars (Cricetomyinae, Murinae).

  18. The severe adverse reaction to vitamin k1 injection is anaphylactoid reaction but not anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Mi, Yan-Ni; Ping, Na-Na; Xiao, Xue; Zhu, Yan-Bing; Liu, Jing; Cao, Yong-Xiao

    2014-01-01

    The severe adverse reaction to vitamin K1 injection is always remarkable and is thought to result from anaphylaxis. Paradoxically, however, some patients administered vitamin K1 injection for the first time have adverse reactions. Using beagle dogs, the present study tested the hypothesis that the response to vitamin K1 is an anaphylactoid reaction. The results showed that serious anaphylaxis-like symptoms appeared in beagle dogs after the administration of vitamin K1 injection for the first time. The plasma histamine concentration increased, and blood pressure decreased sharply. After sensitization, dogs were challenged with vitamin K1 injection and displayed the same degree of symptoms as prior to sensitization. However, when the vitamin K1 injection-sensitized dogs were challenged with a vitamin K1-fat emulsion without solubilizers such asTween-80, the abnormal reactions did not occur. Furthermore, there was no significant change in the plasma immunoglobulin E concentration after vitamin K1 challenge. Following treatment with vitamin K1 injection, the release of histamine and β-hexosaminidase by rat basophilic leukemia-2H3 cells as well as the rate of apoptosis increased. The Tween-80 group displayed results similar to those observed following vitamin K1 injection in vivo. However, the dogs in the vitamin K1-fat emulsion group did not display any abnormal behavior or significant change in plasma histamine. Additionally, degranulation and apoptosis did not occur in rat basophilic leukemia-2H3 cells. Our results indicate that the adverse reaction induced by vitamin K1 injection is an anaphylactoid reaction, not anaphylaxis. Vitamin K1 injection induces the release of inflammatory factors via a non-IgE-mediated immune pathway, for which the trigger may be the solubilizer. PMID:24594861

  19. The Severe Adverse Reaction to Vitamin K1 Injection Is Anaphylactoid Reaction but Not Anaphylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Mi, Yan-Ni; Ping, Na-Na; Xiao, Xue; Zhu, Yan-Bing; Liu, Jing; Cao, Yong-Xiao

    2014-01-01

    The severe adverse reaction to vitamin K1 injection is always remarkable and is thought to result from anaphylaxis. Paradoxically, however, some patients administered vitamin K1 injection for the first time have adverse reactions. Using beagle dogs, the present study tested the hypothesis that the response to vitamin K1 is an anaphylactoid reaction. The results showed that serious anaphylaxis-like symptoms appeared in beagle dogs after the administration of vitamin K1 injection for the first time. The plasma histamine concentration increased, and blood pressure decreased sharply. After sensitization, dogs were challenged with vitamin K1 injection and displayed the same degree of symptoms as prior to sensitization. However, when the vitamin K1 injection-sensitized dogs were challenged with a vitamin K1-fat emulsion without solubilizers such asTween-80, the abnormal reactions did not occur. Furthermore, there was no significant change in the plasma immunoglobulin E concentration after vitamin K1 challenge. Following treatment with vitamin K1 injection, the release of histamine and β-hexosaminidase by rat basophilic leukemia-2H3 cells as well as the rate of apoptosis increased. The Tween-80 group displayed results similar to those observed following vitamin K1 injection in vivo. However, the dogs in the vitamin K1-fat emulsion group did not display any abnormal behavior or significant change in plasma histamine. Additionally, degranulation and apoptosis did not occur in rat basophilic leukemia-2H3 cells. Our results indicate that the adverse reaction induced by vitamin K1 injection is an anaphylactoid reaction, not anaphylaxis. Vitamin K1 injection induces the release of inflammatory factors via a non-IgE-mediated immune pathway, for which the trigger may be the solubilizer. PMID:24594861

  20. The K-1 reusable aerospace vehicle: managing to achieve low cost.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller (HM), George E.; Lepore, Debra Facktor

    2000-03-01

    Kistler Aerospace Corporation is developing the world's first privately funded, fully reusable aerospace vehicle, the K-1. This vehicle represents a new implementation of proven technologies, designed by an elite, experienced team of engineers and managers and implemented by the best manufacturing capability in the United States. Kistler Aerospace expects to begin commercial operations of the K-1 in 2000. Market researchers predict that during the next decade telecommunications satellite ventures will require launch services for over 1,400 payloads to LEO. This prediction greatly exceeds the current available industry capacity. The K-1 was designed primarily to meet this anticipated growth in demand. Significant progress has been made in constructing the K-1 vehicle fleet. The fully reusable K-1 vehicle is designed to lower the cost of access to space, increase launch reliability, and reduce lead-time-to-launch requirements. The K-1 will offer significant cost benefits and aircraft type reliability based on a proven flight record.

  1. Deciphering Gene Expression Program of MAP3K1 in Mouse Eyelid Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Chang; Chen, Jing; Meng, Qinghang; Carreira, Vinicius; Tam, Neville N. C.; Geh, Esmond; Karyala, Saikumar; Ho, Shuk-Mei; Zhou, Xiangtian; Medvedovic, Mario; Xia, Ying

    2012-01-01

    Embryonic eyelid closure involves forward movement and ultimate fusion of the upper and lower eyelids, an essential step of mammalian ocular surface development. Although its underlying mechanism of action is not fully understood, a functional mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 1 (MAP3K1) is required for eyelid closure. Here we investigate the molecular signatures of MAP3K1 in eyelid morphogenesis. At mouse gestational day E15.5, the developmental stage immediately prior to eyelid closure, MAP3K1 expression is predominant in the eyelid leading edge (LE) and the inner eyelid (IE) epithelium. We used Laser Capture Microdissection (LCM) to obtain highly enriched LE and IE cells from wild type and MAP3K1-deficient fetuses and analyzed genome-wide expression profiles. The gene expression data led to the identification of three distinct developmental features of MAP3K1. First, MAP3K1 modulated Wnt and Sonic hedgehog signals, actin reorganization, and proliferation only in LE but not in IE epithelium, illustrating the temporal-spatial specificity of MAP3K1 in embryogenesis. Second, MAP3K1 potentiated AP-2α expression and SRF and AP-1 activity, but its target genes were enriched for binding motifs of AP-2α and SRF, and not AP-1, suggesting the existence of novel MAP3K1-AP-2α/SRF modules in gene regulation. Third, MAP3K1 displayed variable effects on expression of lineage specific genes in the LE and IE epithelium, revealing potential roles of MAP3K1 in differentiation and lineage specification. Using LCM and expression array, our studies have uncovered novel molecular signatures of MAP3K1 in embryonic eyelid closure. PMID:23201579

  2. SphK1 promotes tumor cell migration and invasion in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Long, Jianting; Xie, Ying; Yin, Junmei; Lu, Wei; Fang, Shi

    2016-05-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancers worldwide. Sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1), which phosphorylates sphingosine to sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), is overexpressed in various types of cancers and may act as an oncogene in tumorigenesis. However, little is known about the role of SphK1 in CRC patients. We studied the expression of SphK1 in 85 cases of CRC tissues by immunohistochemistry, qRT-PCR, and western blot. We also evaluated the effect of SphK1 on cell proliferation and invasion by MTT and transwell invasion assay. SphK1 is overexpressed in CRC tissues and cell lines, and upregulation of SphK1 correlated significantly with the following parameters: lymph node metastasis, liver metastasis, and advanced TNM stage. SphK1 knockdown results in inhibition of cancer cell proliferation. Inhibition of CRC cell migration and invasion is also evident through reversal of EMT by increases in E-cadherin expression and decreases in vimentin expression. In conclusion, SphK1 is associated with the proliferation and invasiveness of CRC cells and the SphK1 gene may contribute to a novel therapeutic approach against CRC. PMID:26662312

  3. Plasmid Transfer of Plasminogen K1-5 Reduces Subcutaneous Hepatoma Growth by Affecting Inflammatory Factors

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Lea A.; Strassburg, Christian P.; Raskopf, Esther

    2014-01-01

    There is evidence that plasminogen K1-5 (PlgK1-5) directly affects tumour cells and inflammation. Therefore, we analysed if PlgK1-5 has immediate effects on hepatoma cells and inflammatory factors in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, effects of plasmid encoding PlgK1-5 (pK1-5) on Hepa129, Hepa1-6, and HuH7 cell viability, apoptosis, and proliferation as well as VEGF and TNF-alpha expression and STAT3-phosphorylation were investigated. In vivo, tumour growth, proliferation, vessel density, and effects on vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) expression were examined following treatment with pK1-5. In vivo, pK1-5 halved cell viability; cell death was increased by up to 15% compared to the corresponding controls. Proliferation was not affected. VEGF, TNF-alpha, and STAT3-phosphorylation were affected following treatment with pK1-5. In vivo, ten days after treatment initiation, pK1-5 reduced subcutaneous tumour growth by 32% and mitosis by up to 77% compared to the controls. Vessel density was reduced by 50%. TNF-alpha levels in tumour and liver tissue were increased, whereas VEGF levels in tumours and livers were reduced after pK1-5 treatment. Taken together, plasmid gene transfer of PlgK1-5 inhibits hepatoma (cell) growth not only by reducing vessel density but also by inducing apoptosis, inhibiting proliferation, and triggering inflammation. PMID:24895598

  4. Rapid Detection of K1 Hypervirulent Klebsiella pneumoniae by MALDI-TOF MS

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yonglu; Li, Jiaping; Gu, Danxia; Fang, Ying; Chan, Edward W.; Chen, Sheng; Zhang, Rong

    2015-01-01

    Hypervirulent strains of Klebsiella pneumoniae (hvKP) are genetic variants of K. pneumoniae which can cause life-threatening community-acquired infection in healthy individuals. Currently, methods for efficient differentiation between classic K. pneumoniae (cKP) and hvKP strains are not available, often causing delay in diagnosis and treatment of hvKP infections. To address this issue, we devised a Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) approach for rapid identification of K1 hvKP strains. Four standard algorithms, genetic algorithm (GA), support vector machine (SVM), supervised neural network (SNN), and quick classifier (QC), were tested for their power to differentiate between K1 and non-K1 strains, among which SVM was the most reliable algorithm. Analysis of the receiver operating characteristic curves of the interest peaks generated by the SVM model was found to confer highly accurate detection sensitivity and specificity, consistently producing distinguishable profiles for K1 hvKP and non-K1 strains. Of the 43 K. pneumoniae modeling strains tested by this approach, all were correctly identified as K1 hvKP and non-K1 capsule type. Of the 20 non-K1 and 17 K1 hvKP validation isolates, the accuracy of K1 hvKP and non-K1 identification was 94.1 and 90.0%, respectively, according to the SVM model. In summary, the MALDI-TOF MS approach can be applied alongside the conventional genotyping techniques to provide rapid and accurate diagnosis, and hence prompt treatment of infections caused by hvKP. PMID:26733976

  5. S6K1 controls pancreatic β cell size independently of intrauterine growth restriction.

    PubMed

    Um, Sung Hee; Sticker-Jantscheff, Melanie; Chau, Gia Cac; Vintersten, Kristina; Mueller, Matthias; Gangloff, Yann-Gael; Adams, Ralf H; Spetz, Jean-Francois; Elghazi, Lynda; Pfluger, Paul T; Pende, Mario; Bernal-Mizrachi, Ernesto; Tauler, Albert; Tschöp, Matthias H; Thomas, George; Kozma, Sara C

    2015-07-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a worldwide heath problem that is characterized by insulin resistance and the eventual loss of β cell function. As recent studies have shown that loss of ribosomal protein (RP) S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) increases systemic insulin sensitivity, S6K1 inhibitors are being pursued as potential agents for improving insulin resistance. Here we found that S6K1 deficiency in mice also leads to decreased β cell growth, intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), and impaired placental development. IUGR is a common complication of human pregnancy that limits the supply of oxygen and nutrients to the developing fetus, leading to diminished embryonic β cell growth and the onset of T2DM later in life. However, restoration of placental development and the rescue of IUGR by tetraploid embryo complementation did not restore β cell size or insulin levels in S6K1-/- embryos, suggesting that loss of S6K1 leads to an intrinsic β cell lesion. Consistent with this hypothesis, reexpression of S6K1 in β cells of S6K1-/- mice restored embryonic β cell size, insulin levels, glucose tolerance, and RPS6 phosphorylation, without rescuing IUGR. Together, these data suggest that a nutrient-mediated reduction in intrinsic β cell S6K1 signaling, rather than IUGR, during fetal development may underlie reduced β cell growth and eventual development of T2DM later in life. PMID:26075820

  6. S6K1 controls pancreatic β cell size independently of intrauterine growth restriction

    PubMed Central

    Um, Sung Hee; Sticker-Jantscheff, Melanie; Chau, Gia Cac; Vintersten, Kristina; Mueller, Matthias; Gangloff, Yann-Gael; Adams, Ralf H.; Spetz, Jean-Francois; Elghazi, Lynda; Pfluger, Paul T.; Pende, Mario; Bernal-Mizrachi, Ernesto; Tauler, Albert; Tschöp, Matthias H.; Thomas, George; Kozma, Sara C.

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a worldwide heath problem that is characterized by insulin resistance and the eventual loss of β cell function. As recent studies have shown that loss of ribosomal protein (RP) S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) increases systemic insulin sensitivity, S6K1 inhibitors are being pursued as potential agents for improving insulin resistance. Here we found that S6K1 deficiency in mice also leads to decreased β cell growth, intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), and impaired placental development. IUGR is a common complication of human pregnancy that limits the supply of oxygen and nutrients to the developing fetus, leading to diminished embryonic β cell growth and the onset of T2DM later in life. However, restoration of placental development and the rescue of IUGR by tetraploid embryo complementation did not restore β cell size or insulin levels in S6K1–/– embryos, suggesting that loss of S6K1 leads to an intrinsic β cell lesion. Consistent with this hypothesis, reexpression of S6K1 in β cells of S6K1–/– mice restored embryonic β cell size, insulin levels, glucose tolerance, and RPS6 phosphorylation, without rescuing IUGR. Together, these data suggest that a nutrient-mediated reduction in intrinsic β cell S6K1 signaling, rather than IUGR, during fetal development may underlie reduced β cell growth and eventual development of T2DM later in life. PMID:26075820

  7. 26 CFR 31.3402(k)-1 - Special rule for tips.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Special rule for tips. 31.3402(k)-1 Section 31.3402(k)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) EMPLOYMENT... under the Internal Revenue Code, W's wages are subject to withholding of a state income tax imposed...

  8. Simultaneous liquid-chromatographic determination of vitamin K1 and vitamin E in serum.

    PubMed

    Cham, B E; Roeser, H P; Kamst, T W

    1989-12-01

    We describe a high-performance liquid chromatographic procedure for the simultaneous measurement of vitamins K1 and E in human serum. Delipidated human serum (free of vitamins K1 and E) was used to make standard solutions of these vitamins, and cetyl naphthoate and alpha-tocopheryl acetate were the internal standards for vitamin K1 and vitamin E, respectively. A simple, novel separation method utilizing liquid-liquid partition chromatography was used as a preparative "clean-up" procedure. Cetyl naphthoate and vitamin K1 (after post-column reduction) were detected by fluorescence, alpha-tocopheryl acetate and vitamin E by ultraviolet absorption. Sensitivity (detection limit) of the assay was 30 pg for vitamin K1 and 5 ng for vitamin E per injection. The method is specific, precise, and more rapid than previously described procedures. Within- and between-assay CVs were 8.1% and 12.9%, respectively, for vitamin K1; 3.5% and 6.0%, respectively, for vitamin E. Analytical recoveries of vitamins K1 and E were 80% and 93%, respectively, from serum and from delipidated serum (standards). The average neonatal serum concentration of vitamin K1 was 83 ng/L, 2.5 mg/L for vitamin E; for normolipidemic adults, the values were 343 ng/L and 7.9 mg/L, respectively, and for hyperlipidemic adults, 541 ng/L and 11.1 mg/L, respectively. PMID:2591045

  9. Late onset haemorrhagic disease in premature infants who received intravenous vitamin K1.

    PubMed

    Loughnan, P M; McDougall, P N; Balvin, H; Doyle, L W; Smith, A L

    1996-06-01

    The clinical details are reported of two premature infants who developed late onset haemorrhagic disease after receiving their initial doses of vitamin K1 prophylaxis intravenously. Both reported infants had received two doses of intravenous vitamin K1, 0.1 mg, in the 1st week of life, and a further oral dose, 1.0 mg, at 4 weeks. Bleeding due to vitamin K deficiency occurred on days 74 and 84, respectively. Vitamin K deficiency bleeding is rare in low birthweight infants, probably because it has been routine practice to give such infants intramuscular vitamin K1. One of the reported infants had cytomegalovirus hepatitis, the other did not have liver disease. These findings could be explained if intramuscular vitamin K1 were to have a longer duration of effect than intravenous vitamin K1. This may be because intramuscular vitamin K1 acts as a depot preparation. The findings suggest that intravenous vitamin K1 is less effective than intramuscular for long-term prophylaxis against late onset haemorrhagic disease. Intravenous vitamin K1 should not be used for long-term prophylaxis in the prevention of late onset haemorrhagic disease. PMID:8827551

  10. 26 CFR 31.3402(k)-1 - Special rule for tips.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Special rule for tips. 31.3402(k)-1 Section 31.3402(k)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) EMPLOYMENT TAXES AND COLLECTION OF INCOME TAX AT SOURCE EMPLOYMENT TAXES AND COLLECTION OF INCOME TAX AT SOURCE Collection of Income Tax at Source §...

  11. 26 CFR 31.3402(k)-1 - Special rule for tips.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Special rule for tips. 31.3402(k)-1 Section 31.3402(k)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) EMPLOYMENT TAXES AND COLLECTION OF INCOME TAX AT SOURCE EMPLOYMENT TAXES AND COLLECTION OF INCOME TAX AT SOURCE Collection of Income Tax at Source §...

  12. Different metabolic profiles of K1 serotype and non-serotype K1 and K2 Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates in oral infection mice model.

    PubMed

    Chen, Nan; Wang, Lin-Lin; Xue, Juan; Ma, Xiang-Bo; Zhao, Sheng; Rong, Rui-Xue; Li, Hong-Quan; Ding, Liang; Zheng, Ming-Zhi; Chen, Ying-Ying; Duan, Fei; Shen, Yue-Liang

    2014-10-01

    K1 or K2 serotype Klebsiella pneumoniae isolate caused clinical pyogenic liver abscess (KLA) infection is prevalent in many areas. It has been identified that K1 or K2 serotype K. pneumoniae isolates caused KLA infection in mice by oral inoculation. In our study, K1 serotype K. pneumoniae isolate Kp1002 with hypermucoviscosity (HV)-positive phenotype caused KLA infection in C57BL/6 mice by oral inoculation. Simultaneously, non-serotype K1 and K2 isolate Kp1014 with HV-negative phenotype failed to cause KLA infection in the same manner. It seems that gastrointestinal tract translocation is the pathway by which K1 or K2 serotype K. pneumoniae caused KLA infection. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was used to further analyze metabolic profile changes in mice with KLA infection. Data showed that after Kp1002 or Kp1014 oral inoculation, serum Phosphatidylcholine (PC) and Lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) levels significantly changed in mice. Some PC and LPC molecules showed changes both in the Kp1002 KLA group and the Kp1014 no-KLA group compared with the control group. The level of 18:1/18:2-PC significantly changed in the Kp1002 KLA group compared with the control group, but showed no change between the Kp1014 no-KLA group and the control group. The level of 18:1/18:2-PC might have been particularly affected by KLA infection caused by K1 serotype K. pneumoniae Kp1002. It may be a potential biomarker for KLA infection. PMID:25173421

  13. S6K1 alternative splicing modulates its oncogenic activity and regulates mTORC1

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Hur, Vered; Denichenko, Polina; Siegfried, Zahava; Maimon, Avi; Krainer, Adrian; Davidson, Ben; Karni, Rotem

    2016-01-01

    Ribosomal S6 Kinase 1 (S6K1) is a major mTOR downstream signaling molecule which regulates cell size and translation efficiency. Here we report that short isoforms of S6K1 are over-produced in breast cancer cell lines and tumors. Overexpression of S6K1 short isoforms induces transformation of human breast epithelial cells. The long S6K1 variant (Iso-1) induced opposite effects: It inhibits Ras-induced transformation and tumor formation, while its knockdown or knockout induced transformation, suggesting that Iso-1 has a tumor suppressor activity. We further found that S6K1 short isoforms bind and activate mTORC1, elevating 4E-BP1 phosphorylation, cap-dependent translation and Mcl-1 protein levels. Both a phosphorylation-defective 4E-BP1 mutant and the mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin partially blocked the oncogenic effects of S6K1 short isoforms, suggesting that these are mediated by mTORC1 and 4E-BP1. Thus, alternative splicing of S6K1 acts as a molecular switch in breast cancer cells elevating oncogenic isoforms that activate mTORC1. PMID:23273915

  14. Wilfoside K1N isolated from Cynanchum wilfordii inhibits angiogenesis and tumor cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myoung Sook; Baek, Jin Hyen; Park, Jeong Ae; Hwang, Bang Yeon; Kim, Se Eun; Lee, Jung Joon; Kim, Kyu-Won

    2005-06-01

    Wilfoside K1N is a polyoxypregnane glycoside isolated from Cynanchum wilfordii (Asclepiadaceae). Polyoxypregnane glycosides are associated with cellular immunity and anti-tumor activity, and increase the cytotoxicity of many anti-cancer drugs showing multidrug resistant activity on tumor cells. In the present study, we investigated the anti-angiogenic and anti-invasive activities of wilfoside K1N. In in vivo Matrigel plug assay using C57BL/6 mice, wilfoside K1N strongly inhibited basic fibroblast growth factor-induced microvessel formation. Exposure of wilfoside K1N to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) suppressed in vitro tube formation at a concentration not affecting cell viability. Moreover, wilfoside K1N significantly reduced the proliferation of HUVEC and calf pulmonary artery endothelial cells. In addition, wilfoside K1N decreased in vitro invasion of HT1080 human fibrosarcoma cells, and the inhibition might be through down-regulation of activity as well as quantity of matrix metalloproteinase-9. Therefore, our present study suggests that wilfoside K1N may have a potential to have strong anti-angiogenic and anti-invasive activities both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:15870866

  15. B→K1π(K) decays in the perturbative QCD approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhi-Qing; Hou, Zhi-Wei; Yang, Yueling; Sun, Junfeng

    2014-10-01

    Within the framework of the perturbative QCD approach, we study the two-body charmless decays B→K1(1270)(K1(1400))π(K). We find the following results: (i) The decays B¯0→K1(1270)+π-, K1(1400)+π- are incompatible with the present experimental data. There exists a similar situation for the decays B¯0→a1(1260)+K-, b1(1235)+K-, which are usually considered that the nonperturbative contributions are needed to explain the data. But the difference is that the nonperturbative contributions seem to play opposite roles in these two groups of decays. (ii) The pure annihilation type decays B¯0→K1±(1270)K∓, K1±(1400)K∓ are good channels to test whether an approach can be used to calculate correctly the strength of the penguin-annihilation amplitudes. Their branching ratios are predicted at 10-7 order, which are larger than the QCDF results. (iii) The dependence of the direct CP-violating asymmetries of these decays on the mixing angle θK_1 are also considered.

  16. Capsular Polysaccharide Is Involved in NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation by Klebsiella pneumoniae Serotype K1

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Feng-Ling; Chiu, Hsiao-Wen; Chou, Ju-Ching; Dong, Wei-Chih; Lin, Chien-Nan; Lin, Chai-Yi; Wang, Jin-Town; Li, Lan-Hui; Chiu, Huan-Wen; Chiu, Yi-Chich

    2015-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae (strain 43816, K2 serotype) induces interleukin-1β (IL-1β) secretion, but neither the bacterial factor triggering the activation of these inflammasome-dependent responses nor whether they are mediated by NLRP3 or NLRC4 is known. In this study, we identified a capsular polysaccharide (K1-CPS) in K. pneumoniae (NTUH-K2044, K1 serotype), isolated from a primary pyogenic liver abscess (PLA K. pneumoniae), as the Klebsiella factor that induces IL-1β secretion in an NLRP3-, ASC-, and caspase-1-dependent manner in macrophages. K1-CPS induced NLRP3 inflammasome activation through reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation, and NF-κB activation. Inhibition of both the mitochondrial membrane permeability transition and mitochondrial ROS generation inhibited K1-CPS-mediated NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Furthermore, IL-1β secretion in macrophages infected with PLA K. pneumoniae was shown to depend on NLRP3 but also on NLRC4 and TLR4. In macrophages infected with a K1-CPS deficiency mutant, an lipopolysaccharide (LPS) deficiency mutant, or K1-CPS and LPS double mutants, IL-1β secretion levels were lower than those in cells infected with wild-type PLA K. pneumoniae. Our findings indicate that K1-CPS is one of the Klebsiella factors of PLA K. pneumoniae that induce IL-1β secretion through the NLRP3 inflammasome. PMID:26077758

  17. The PHD motif of Map3k1 activates cytokine-dependent MAPK signaling

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Ewen; Suddason, Tesha

    2015-01-01

    We generated a mutation in the gene encoding mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 1 (Map3k1) that results in a protein with an inactive plant homeodomain (PHD). Map3k1mPHD cells are defective in cytokine-mediated MAPK signaling. Protein array identified transforming growth factor (TGF-β)-activated kinase 1 binding protein 1 (Tab1) as a PHD substrate. The Map3k1 PHD transfers Lys63-linked poly-ubiquitin onto Tab1 to activate MAPKs. PMID:27308457

  18. Broadening diversity in the Arostrilepis horrida complex: Arostrilepis kontrimavichusi n. sp. (Cyclophyllidea: Hymenolepididae) in the western red-backed vole Myodes californicus (Merriam) (Cricetidae: Arvicolinae) from temperate latitudes of the Pacific Northwest, North America.

    PubMed

    Makarikov, Arseny A; Hoberg, Eric P

    2016-06-01

    Specimens originally identified provisionally as Hymenolepis horrida (Linstow, 1901) [later Arostrilepis horrida (Linstow, 1901)] in Myodes californicus (Merriam) from near the Pacific coastal zone of southern Oregon are revised. Specimens in western red-backed voles represent an undescribed species of Arostrilepis Mas Coma & Tenora, 1997, contributing to recognition and resolution of a broadening complex encompassing cryptic diversity for these hymenolepidid tapeworms distributed across the Holarctic region. Consistent with recent studies defining diversity in the genus, the form, dimensions, and spination (pattern, shape and size) of the cirrus are diagnostic. Among 12 nominal congeners, specimens of A. kontrimavichusi n. sp. are further distinguished by the relative position and length of the cirrus-sac, arrangement of the testes and relative size of the external seminal vesicle and seminal receptacle. Specimens from Oregon voles represent the fifth endemic hymenolepidid in this genus from the Nearctic. Host range for the North American assemblage of species includes Cricetidae (Arvicolinae and Neotominae), Heteromyidae, Geomyidae, and rarely Sciuridae. PMID:27221000

  19. Contribution of vitamin K1 to the electron spin polarization in spinach photosystem I

    SciTech Connect

    Rustandi, R.R.; Snyder, S.W.; Feezel, L.L.; Michalski, T.J.; Norris, J.R.; Thurnauer, M.C.; Biggins, J. )

    1990-09-04

    The electron spin polarized (ESP) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signal observed in spinach photosystem I (PSI) particles was examined in preparations depleted of vitamin K1 by solvent extraction and following biological reconstitution by the quinone. The ESP EPR signal was not detected in the solvent-extracted PSI sample but was restored upon reconstitution with either protonated or deuterated vitamin K1 under conditions that also restored electron transfer to the terminal PSI acceptors. Reconstitution using deuterated vitamin K1 resulted in a line narrowing of the ESP EPR signal, supporting the conclusion that the ESP EPR signals in the reconstituted samples arise from a radical pair consisting of the oxidized PSI primary donor, P700+, and reduced vitamin K1.

  20. The crosstalk of mTOR/S6K1 and Hedgehog pathways.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Ding, Qingqing; Yen, Chia-Jui; Xia, Weiya; Izzo, Julie G; Lang, Jing-Yu; Li, Chia-Wei; Hsu, Jennifer L; Miller, Stephanie A; Wang, Xuemei; Lee, Dung-Fang; Hsu, Jung-Mao; Huo, Longfei; Labaff, Adam M; Liu, Dongping; Huang, Tzu-Hsuan; Lai, Chien-Chen; Tsai, Fuu-Jen; Chang, Wei-Chao; Chen, Chung-Hsuan; Wu, Tsung-Teh; Buttar, Navtej S; Wang, Kenneth K; Wu, Yun; Wang, Huamin; Ajani, Jaffer; Hung, Mien-Chie

    2012-03-20

    Esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) is the most prevalent esophageal cancer type in the United States. The TNF-α/mTOR pathway is known to mediate the development of EAC. Additionally, aberrant activation of Gli1, downstream effector of the Hedgehog (HH) pathway, has been observed in EAC. In this study, we found that an activated mTOR/S6K1 pathway promotes Gli1 transcriptional activity and oncogenic function through S6K1-mediated Gli1 phosphorylation at Ser84, which releases Gli1 from its endogenous inhibitor, SuFu. Moreover, elimination of S6K1 activation by an mTOR pathway inhibitor enhances the killing effects of the HH pathway inhibitor. Together, our results established a crosstalk between the mTOR/S6K1 and HH pathways, which provides a mechanism for SMO-independent Gli1 activation and also a rationale for combination therapy for EAC. PMID:22439934

  1. The Crosstalk of mTOR/S6K1 and Hedgehog pathways

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Ding, Qingqing; Yen, Chia-Jui; Xia, Weiya; Izzo, Julie G.; Lang, Jing-Yu; Li, Chia-Wei; Hsu, Jennifer L.; Miller, Stephanie A.; Wang, Xuemei; Lee, Dung-Fang; Hsu, Jung-Mao; Huo, Longfei; LaBaff, Adam M.; Liu, Dong-Ping; Huang, Tzu-Hsuan; Lai, Chien-Chen; Tsai, Fuu-Jen; Chang, Wei-Chao; Chen, Chung-Hsuan; Wu, Tsung-Teh; Buttar, Navtej S.; Wang, Kenneth K.; Wu, Yun; Wang, Huamin; Ajani, Jaffer; Hung, Mien-Chie

    2012-01-01

    Summary Esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) is the most prevalent esophageal cancer type in the United States. TNFα/mTOR pathway is known to mediate the development of EAC. Additionally, aberrant activation of Gli1, downstream effector of hedgehog pathway, has been observed in EAC. In this study, we found that activated mTOR/S6K1 pathway promotes Gli1 transcriptional activity and oncogenic function through S6K1-mediated Gli1 phosphorylation at Ser84, which releases Gli1 from its endogenous inhibitor, SuFu. Moreover, elimination of S6K1 activation by mTOR pathway inhibitor enhances the killing effects of the hedgehog pathway inhibitor. Together, our results established a crosstalk between mTOR/S6K1 and the hedgehog pathways, which provides not only a mechanism for SMO-independent Gli1 activation but also a rationale for combination therapy for EAC. PMID:22439934

  2. Vitamin K1 antagonisation is not safe in high thromboembolic risk patients with over-anticoagulation.

    PubMed

    Champion, Sébastien; Cleophax, Cédric; Voicu, Sebastian; Sirol, Marc; Deye, Nicolas; J Baud, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of a fatal massive anterior acute myocardial infarction (AMI) after administration of vitamin K1 for over-anticoagulation following cardioembolism from mechanical mitroaortic valve prostheses associated with atrial fibrillation. PMID:24901290

  3. Lectin Complement Protein Collectin 11 (CL-K1) and Susceptibility to Urinary Schistosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Antony, Justin S.; Ojurongbe, Olusola; Kremsner, Peter G.; Velavan, Thirumalaisamy P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Urinary Schistosomiasis is a neglected tropical disease endemic in many sub Saharan -African countries. Collectin Kidney 1 (CL-K1, encoded by COLEC11 on chromosome 2p25.3), a member of the vertebrate C-type lectin super family, has recently been identified as pattern-recognition molecule (PRR) of the lectin complement pathway. CL-K1 is preferentially expressed in the kidneys, but also in other organs and it is considered to play a role in host defense to some infectious agents. Schistosome teguments are fucosylated and CL-K1 has, through its collagen-like domain, a high binding affinity to fucose. Methodology/Principal Findings We utilized a Nigerian study group consisting of 167 Schistosoma haematobium infected individuals and 186 matched healthy subjects, and investigated the contribution of CL-K1 deficiency and of COLEC11 polymorphisms to infection phenotype. Higher CL-K1 serum levels were associated with decreased risk of schistosome infection (Pcorr = 0.0004). CL-K1 serum levels were differentially distributed between the COLEC11 genotypes and haplotypes observed. The non-synonymous variant p.R216H was associated with the occurrence of schistosomiasis (OR = 0.44, 95%CI = 0.22–0.72, Pcorr = 0.0004). The reconstructed COLEC11*TCCA haplotypes were associated with higher CL-K1 serum levels (P = 0.002) and with decreased schistosomiasis (OR = 0.38, 95%CI = 0.23–0.63, Pcorr = 0.0001). Conclusions In agreement with findings from our earlier published study, our findings support the observation that CL-K1 and their functional variants may be host factors associated with protection in schistosomiasis and may be a useful marker for further investigations. PMID:25807310

  4. Antagonism of warfarin-induced hypoprothrombinemia with use of low-dose subcutaneous vitamin K1.

    PubMed

    Fetrow, C W; Overlock, T; Leff, L

    1997-08-01

    Historically, oral or intravenous doses of vitamin K1 for supratherapeutic anticoagulation have ranged from 10 mg to 50 mg. Intravenous administration of vitamin K1 carries a rare but serious risk. No data specifically confirm the use of low-dose subcutaneous vitamin K1 for warfarin induced hypoprothrombinemia. The aim of this study was twofold: 1) to test the general utility of recommendations put forth by the Third Conference of Antithrombotic Therapy, and 2) to test the reliability of the subcutaneous route for this treatment. Six patients with excessive international normalized ratios (INRs) and no intervention were compared with 12 patients with excessive INRs who were given low doses of subcutaneous vitamin K1. The rate of decline of the INR to 3 was statistically significantly greater in favor of the treatment group. The amount of time required to achieve an INR of 3 differed between the two groups by almost 1 complete day (23 hours) in favor of the treatment group. The average dose of subcutaneous vitamin K1 required to return a patient to an INR of 3 or less was 4.9 mg. A few participants required an additional dose of the same magnitude or less to return to an INR within the therapeutic range. This study provides sufficient evidence that subcutaneous vitamin K1 is an effective alternative to intravenous administration of vitamin K1 for warfarin-induced hypoprothrombinemia and permits administration in accordance with the current published recommendations for intravenous vitamin K1 administration in this scenario. PMID:9378848

  5. Intravenous versus subcutaneous vitamin K1 in reversing excessive oral anticoagulation.

    PubMed

    Nee, R; Doppenschmidt, D; Donovan, D J; Andrews, T C

    1999-01-15

    Our data suggest that compared with the subcutaneous route of administration, intravenous vitamin K1 results in a more prompt reduction in the international normalized ration. However, for most patients, subcutaneous vitamin K1 is an effective and safe alternative when used in conjunction with modification of subsequent warfarin dosing, because virtually all patients achieved a safe level of anticoagulation within 72 hours with this route of administration. PMID:10073841

  6. Vitamin K1 metabolism in relation to pharmacodynamic response in anticoagulated patients.

    PubMed Central

    Choonara, I A; Scott, A K; Haynes, B P; Cholerton, S; Breckenridge, A M; Park, B K

    1985-01-01

    The disposition of, and pharmacological response to, a single intravenous dose of vitamin K1 (10 mg) was studied in eleven patients on daily warfarin therapy. The pharmacokinetics of vitamin K1 in patients were similar to those reported previously in healthy volunteers, terminal half-life 1.7 h. All patients had been taking warfarin for at least 3 months. Steady state warfarin plasma concentrations ranged from 0.5 to 1.4 micrograms ml-1. Prothrombin complex activity ranged from 15 to 28.5%. There was considerable inter-individual variation in pharmacodynamic response as expressed by prothrombin complex activity (PCA) and Factor VII. The maximum values for PCA and Factor VII were reached at 24-96 h and 24-48 h, respectively, after the administration of vitamin K1. Vitamin K1 (10 mg) has a long duration of action (greater than 168 h) in terms of clotting factor synthesis in patients on steady state warfarin. All the patients on warfarin had measurable levels (CPmax 0.3-1.2 micrograms ml-1) of vitamin K1 2, 3-epoxide. There was a significant correlation between the pharmacodynamic response as expressed by change in % PCA and the AUC for vitamin K1 2,3-epoxide (P less than 0.05). PMID:4091996

  7. S6K1 regulates hematopoietic stem cell self-renewal and leukemia maintenance.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Joydeep; Kobayashi, Michihiro; Ramdas, Baskar; Chatterjee, Anindya; Ma, Peilin; Mali, Raghuveer Singh; Carlesso, Nadia; Liu, Yan; Plas, David R; Chan, Rebecca J; Kapur, Reuben

    2016-07-01

    Hyperactivation of the mTOR pathway impairs hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) functions and promotes leukemogenesis. mTORC1 and mTORC2 differentially control normal and leukemic stem cell functions. mTORC1 regulates p70 ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding (eIF4E-binding) protein 1 (4E-BP1), and mTORC2 modulates AKT activation. Given the extensive crosstalk that occurs between mTORC1 and mTORC2 signaling pathways, we assessed the role of the mTORC1 substrate S6K1 in the regulation of both normal HSC functions and in leukemogenesis driven by the mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) fusion oncogene MLL-AF9. We demonstrated that S6K1 deficiency impairs self-renewal of murine HSCs by reducing p21 expression. Loss of S6K1 also improved survival in mice transplanted with MLL-AF9-positive leukemic stem cells by modulating AKT and 4E-BP1 phosphorylation. Taken together, these results suggest that S6K1 acts through multiple targets of the mTOR pathway to promote self-renewal and leukemia progression. Given the recent interest in S6K1 as a potential therapeutic target in cancer, our results further support targeting this molecule as a potential strategy for treatment of myeloid malignancies. PMID:27294524

  8. The lipid kinase PIP5K1C regulates pain signaling and sensitization

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Brittany D.; Loo, Lipin; Street, Sarah E.; Ma, Anqi; Taylor-Blake, Bonnie; Stashko, Michael A.; Jin, Jian; Janzen, William P.; Frye, Stephen V.; Zylka, Mark J.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Numerous pain-producing (pronociceptive) receptors signal via phosphatidylinositol 4,5- bisphosphate (PIP2) hydrolysis. However, it is currently unknown which lipid kinases generate PIP2 in nociceptive dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons and if these kinases regulate pronociceptive receptor signaling. Here, we found that phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate 5 kinase type 1C (PIP5K1C) is expressed at higher levels than any other PIP5K and, based on experiments with Pip5k1c+/− mice, generates at least half of all PIP2 in DRG neurons. Additionally, Pip5k1c haploinsufficiency reduces pronociceptive receptor signaling and TRPV1 sensitization in DRG neurons as well as thermal and mechanical hypersensitivity in mouse models of chronic pain. We identified a novel small molecule inhibitor of PIP5K1C (UNC3230) in a high-throughput screen. UNC3230 lowered PIP2 levels in DRG neurons and attenuated hypersensitivity when administered intrathecally or into the hindpaw. Our studies reveal that PIP5K1C regulates PIP2- dependent nociceptive signaling and suggest that PIP5K1C is a novel therapeutic target for chronic pain. PMID:24853942

  9. Effective reversal of warfarin-induced excessive anticoagulation with low dose vitamin K1.

    PubMed

    Shetty, H G; Backhouse, G; Bentley, D P; Routledge, P A

    1992-01-23

    Reversal of the anticoagulant effect of warfarin in patients with no active haemorrhage can be achieved by administration of intravenous vitamin K1. Currently recommended doses of intravenous vitamin K1, for this purpose often result in subsequent difficulties in anticoagulation. We observed the response to low dose intravenous vitamin K1 in patients requiring reversal of anticoagulant therapy. Ten consecutive patients received 1 mg and 21 further patients received 0.5 mg of intravenous vitamin K1. In 50% of the patients who received 1 mg of vitamin K1 the INR (International Normalised Ratio) fell below 2 at 24 h whereas in patients who received 0.5 mg the INR fell below 5.5 in all subjects after 24 h and in none did it fall below 2.0. No patient had any thrombotic or haemorrhagic complications and no difficulty was encountered in re-establishing anticoagulant control after 24 h. We recommend 0.5 mg of vitamin K1 as an effective and convenient method of predictable and fine control of oral anticoagulant therapy. PMID:1615468

  10. "Cowboy's belt with revolver" scleroderma caused by vitamin K1 injections.

    PubMed

    Lembo, S; Megna, M; Balato, A; Balato, N

    2012-04-01

    Vitamin K1 (phytomenadione or phytonadione) is a fat soluble vitamin used to treat certain coagulation disorders. Intra muscular injection of vitamin K1 can occasionally be complicated by different types of skin reactions: erythematous plaques, urticarial rashes or scleroderma-like lesions at the injection site. We report the case of a 52-year-old man presenting with 2 symmetrical erythematous-infiltrated scleroderma-like plaques localized on the right and left lower trunk. To correct the coagulation deficiency with hypoprothrombinemia developed as a consequence of HCV+ hepatitis, the patient was on vitamin K1 therapy, administered by i.m. injection (10 mg Vitamin K1/1 ml) once a day for 2 weeks. Three months after treatment interruption, ivory indurated morphoeiform plaques developed at the injection sites, assuming the typical appearance of a "cowboy's belt with revolver". The scleroderma-like lesions persisted 2 years after vitamin K1 withdrawal. We report this case to highlight the possibility that vitamin K1 injections can occasionally be complicated by different types of skin reactions such as sclerodermatous plaques. Due to the delay in the onset, to the variable clinical picture, to the persistence after therapy interruption, this kind of lesions can represent a tricky diagnostic challenge and in spite of different treatments can endure for years. PMID:22481583

  11. Vitamin K1 attenuates bile duct ligation-induced liver fibrosis in rats.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Kun; Sun, Quan; Chen, Baian; Li, Shengli; Lu, Jing

    2014-06-01

    Vitamin K1 is used as a liver protection drug for cholestasis-induced liver fibrosis in China, but the mechanism of vitamin K1's action in liver fibrosis is unclear. In this study, a model of liver fibrosis was achieved via bile duct ligation in rats. The rats were then injected with vitamin K1, and the levels of serum aspartate aminotransferase, alanine transaminase, total bilirubin and the fibrotic grade score, collagen content, the expressions of α-smooth muscle actin (SMA) and cytokeratin 19 (CK19) were measured on day 28 after ligation. The levels of the biochemical parameters, fibrotic score and collagen content were significantly reduced by treatment with vitamin K1 in bile duct-ligated rats. In addition, α-SMA and CK19 expression was significantly reduced by vitamin K1 treatment in bile duct-ligated rats. These results suggested that vitamin K1 may attenuate liver fibrosis by inhibiting hepatic stellate cell activation in bile duct-ligated rats. PMID:24742111

  12. Trypanosoma (Megatrypanum) lainsoni n. sp. from Mesomys hispidus (Rodentia: Echimyidae) in Brazil: trypomastigotes described from experimentally infected laboratory mice.

    PubMed

    Naiff, Roberto Daibes; Barrett, Toby Vincent

    2013-01-01

    We report the detection, isolation and description of Trypanosoma (Megatrypanum) lainsoni n. sp. from a caviomorph rodent, Mesomys hispidus (Rodentia: Echimyidae), obtained in the Rio Negro region of the state of Amazonas, in northern Brazil. Laboratory-bred white mice (Mus musculus) and rats (Rattus rattus) were inoculated with large numbers of culture forms by intraperitoneal route, and trypomastigotes appeared in their blood 3-8 days post-inoculation. One single epimastigote was also found in Mus musculus. Similar attempts to infect Rattus norvegicus, hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus), the opossum Didelphis marsupialis, the anteater Tamandua tetradactyla and triatomine bugs were unsuccessful, following six months of observations and microscopic examinations of blood films and blood cultures. As we have found no previous record of a Trypanosoma (Megatrypanum) species naturally infecting a member of the family Echimyidae, or any other caviomorph rodent, we conclude that this is the first time such an infection has been reported. The new species is unusual in the subgenus for its infectivity to laboratory mice. PMID:24309069

  13. Dental microwear in relation to changes in the direction of mastication during the evolution of Myodonta (Rodentia, Mammalia).

    PubMed

    Charles, Cyril; Jaeger, Jean-Jacques; Michaux, Jacques; Viriot, Laurent

    2007-01-01

    Observations of dental microwear are used to analyse the correlation between changes in molar tooth crown morphology and the direction of masticatory movement during the evolution of Myodonta (Rodentia, Mammalia). The studied sample includes 36 specimens representing both superfamilies of Myodonta (Muroidea and Dipodoidea) spanning 16 dipodoid and 9 muroid species. Microscopic scratches on occlusal surfaces resulting from contact between opposite teeth during mastication are analysed. Using these features, we determine the direction of masticatory movements. Microwear patterns display diverse orientations among Dipodoidea: oblique in Sicistinae, Euchoreutinae and Zapodinae, propalinal in Dipodinae and intermediary in Allactaginae. Similarly, Muroidea exhibit the following orientations: oblique in Cricetinae and propalinal in Arvicolinae, Cricetomyinae, Gerbillinae and Murinae. These various chewing types illustrate different evolutionary grades within the superfamilies. Acquisition of the antero-posterior masticatory movement in Dipodoidea is related to flattening of the molar occlusal surface. However, in some muroid subfamilies, this direction of mastication is associated with low-crowned and cuspidate molars (Cricetomyinae, Murinae). PMID:17016685

  14. Meggittina numida n. sp. (Cyclophyllidea: Catenotaeniidae), a parasite of the Shaw's jird Meriones shawi (Duvernoy) (Rodentia: Gerbillinae) in Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Jrijer, Jamel; Neifar, Lassad

    2014-06-01

    Meggittina numida n. sp. (Cyclophyllidea: Catenotaeniidae: Skrjabinotaeniinae) is described from the small intestine of the Shaw's jird Meriones shawi (Duvernoy) (Rodentia, Muridae, Gerbillinae) trapped in central Tunisia. The new species can be distinguished from the four other members of Meggittina Lynsdale, 1953 by the high number of proglottids (8-25 vs max. 6) and by the elongated strobila (8.2-60 mm in length vs max. 5.6 mm). M numida n. sp. further differs from M. cricetomydis (Hockley, 1961) in the direction of gravid proglottids; from M. baeri Lynsdale, 1953 in having narrower and much longer strobila; from M. aegyptiaca (Wolfgang, 1956) in the greater number of testes and the larger cirrus-sac; and from M. gerbilli in the position of the genital pore. The diagnosis of Meggittina is amended in order to include the most specific features of M. numida n. sp. as follows: strobila consisting of a small scolex, wide neck and one to twenty-five proglottids. This is the first species of Meggittina described from Tunisia. The taxonomic relationships of Meggittina spp. are discussed in the light of the description of the new species. PMID:24832187

  15. Virtual endocasts of Eocene Paramys (Paramyinae): oldest endocranial record for Rodentia and early brain evolution in Euarchontoglires.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Ornella C; Amador-Mughal, Farrah; Silcox, Mary T

    2016-01-27

    Understanding the pattern of brain evolution in early rodents is central to reconstructing the ancestral condition for Glires, and for other members of Euarchontoglires including Primates. We describe the oldest virtual endocasts known for fossil rodents, which pertain to Paramys copei (Early Eocene) and Paramys delicatus (Middle Eocene). Both specimens of Paramys have larger olfactory bulbs and smaller paraflocculi relative to total endocranial volume than later occurring rodents, which may be primitive traits for Rodentia. The encephalization quotients (EQs) of Pa. copei and Pa. delicatus are higher than that of later occurring (Oligocene) Ischyromys typus, which contradicts the hypothesis that EQ increases through time in all mammalian orders. However, both species of Paramys have a lower relative neocortical surface area than later rodents, suggesting neocorticalization occurred through time in this Order, although to a lesser degree than in Primates. Paramys has a higher EQ but a lower neocortical ratio than any stem primate. This result contrasts with the idea that primates were always exceptional in their degree of overall encephalization and shows that relative brain size and neocortical surface area do not necessarily covary through time. As such, these data contradict assumptions made about the pattern of brain evolution in Euarchontoglires. PMID:26817776

  16. Trypanosoma (Megatrypanum) lainsoni n. sp. from Mesomys hispidus (Rodentia: Echimyidae) in Brazil: trypomastigotes described from experimentally infected laboratory mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We report the detection, isolation and description of Trypanosoma (Megatrypanum) lainsoni n. sp. from a caviomorph rodent, Mesomys hispidus (Rodentia: Echimyidae), obtained in the Rio Negro region of the state of Amazonas, in northern Brazil. Laboratory-bred white mice (Mus musculus) and rats (Rattus rattus) were inoculated with large numbers of culture forms by intraperitoneal route, and trypomastigotes appeared in their blood 3–8 days post-inoculation. One single epimastigote was also found in Mus musculus. Similar attempts to infect Rattus norvegicus, hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus), the opossum Didelphis marsupialis, the anteater Tamandua tetradactyla and triatomine bugs were unsuccessful, following six months of observations and microscopic examinations of blood films and blood cultures. As we have found no previous record of a Trypanosoma (Megatrypanum) species naturally infecting a member of the family Echimyidae, or any other caviomorph rodent, we conclude that this is the first time such an infection has been reported. The new species is unusual in the subgenus for its infectivity to laboratory mice. PMID:24309069

  17. Evolution of rRNA gene clusters and telomeric repeats during explosive genome repatterning in TATERILLUS X (Rodentia, Gerbillinae).

    PubMed

    Dobigny, G; Ozouf-Costaz, C; Bonillo, C; Volobouev, V

    2003-01-01

    A survey of 28S and 5S rRNA gene clusters, and telomeric repeats was performed using single and double FISH in the Taterillus genus (Rodentia, Muridae, Gerbillinae). Taterillus was previously demonstrated to have undergone a very recent and extensive chromosomal evolution. Our FISH results demonstrate that rRNA genes can vary in location and number irrespective of the phylogenetic relationships. Telomeric repeats were detected in pericentromeric and interstitial regions of several chromosomes, thus providing nonambiguous evolutionary footprints of Robertsonian and tandem translocation events. These footprints are discussed in reference to the molecular process of these karyotypical changes. Also, examples of colocation of rDNA clusters and telomeric repeats lend support to their possible involvement in nucleolus formation. Finally, the presence of rRNA genes, and the extensive amplification of telomeric repeats at specific loci within a double X-autosome translocated element which were not observed on the homologous Y1 and Y2, served as basis for an epigenomic hypothesis on X-autosome translocation viability in mammals. PMID:15004471

  18. Loss of MAP3K1 enhances proliferation and apoptosis during retinal development

    PubMed Central

    Mongan, Maureen; Wang, Jingcai; Liu, Hongshan; Fan, Yunxia; Jin, Chang; Kao, Winston Y.-W.; Xia, Ying

    2011-01-01

    Precise coordination of progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation is essential for proper organ morphogenesis and function during mammalian development. The mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 1 (MAP3K1) has a well-established role in anterior eyelid development, as Map3k1-knockout mice have defective embryonic eyelid closure and an `eye-open at birth' (EOB) phenotype. Here, we show that MAP3K1 is highly expressed in the posterior of the developing eye and is required for retina development. The MAP3K1-deficient mice exhibit increased proliferation and apoptosis, and Müller glial cell overproduction in the developing retinas. Consequently, the retinas of these mice show localized rosette-like arrangements in the outer nuclear layer, and develop abnormal vascularization, broken down retinal pigment epithelium, photoreceptor loss and early onset of retinal degeneration. Although the retinal defect is associated with increased cyclin D1 and CDK4/6 expression, and RB phosphorylation and E2F-target gene upregulation, it is independent of the EOB phenotype and of JNK. The retinal developmental defect still occurs in knockout mice that have undergone tarsorrhaphy, but is absent in compound mutant Map3k1+/ΔKDJnk1–/– and Map3k1+/ΔKDJnk+/–Jnk2+/– mice that have EOB and reduced JNK signaling. Our results unveil a novel role for MAP3K1 in which it crosstalks with the cell cycle regulatory pathways in the prevention of retina malformation and degeneration. PMID:21862560

  19. An investigation of the pharmacological response to vitamin K1 in the rabbit.

    PubMed Central

    Winn, M. J.; Cholerton, S.; Park, B. K.

    1988-01-01

    1. The relationship between pharmacological response and disposition of a dose of vitamin K1 (10 mgkg-1, i.v.) in normal rabbits and in rabbits treated with the coumarin anticoagulant brodifacoum, has been studied. 2. High performance liquid chromatography (h.p.l.c.) with electrochemical detection (EC) was used to determine concentrations of vitamin K1 in plasma, whole liver homogenate, and liver microsomes. 3. After intravenous administration of vitamin K1, plasma concentrations of the vitamin declined in a tri-exponential fashion. There were no differences between the two groups over the first 24 h of the experiment. However, between 24 h and the end of the study, plasma concentrations of vitamin K1 in the presence of brodifacoum were significantly (P less than or equal to 0.05) below those of vehicle-treated rabbits. 4. Seventy-two hours after administration of vitamin K1, plasma concentrations of the vitamin were not different from normal. 5. Three hours after administration of vitamin K1, the concentrations of the vitamin in whole liver were 46.6 +/- 4.3 micrograms g-1 in the presence of brodifacoum, and 32.8 +/- 6.4 micrograms g-1 in the absence of brodifacoum; and were significantly (P less than or equal to 0.05) greater than normal (127.7 +/- 44.3 ng g-1). Likewise, microsomal concentrations of vitamin K1 (4.00 +/- 2.38 micrograms mg-1 protein, and 2.65 +/- 1.01 micrograms mg-1 protein, in the presence and absence of brodifacoum, respectively) were significantly (P less than or equal to 0.01) greater than normal (16.0 +/- 3.5 ng mg-1 protein).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3207975

  20. Targeting SphK1 as a New Strategy against Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shida, Dai; Takabe, Kazuaki; Kapitonov, Dmitri; Milstien, Sheldon; Spiegel, Sarah

    2009-01-01

    Sphingolipid metabolites have emerged as critical players in a number of fundamental biological processes. Among them, sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) promotes cell survival and proliferation, in contrast to ceramide and sphingosine, which induce cell growth arrest and apoptosis. These sphingolipids with opposing functions are interconvertible inside cells, suggesting that a finely tuned balance between them can determine cell fate. Sphingosine kinases (SphKs), which catalyze the phosphorylation of sphingosine to S1P, are critical regulators of this balance. Of the two identified SphKs, sphingosine kinase type 1 (SphK1) has been shown to regulate various processes important for cancer progression and will be the focus of this review, since much less is known of biological functions of SphK2, especially in cancer. SphK1 is overexpressed in various types of cancers and upregulation of SphK1 has been associated with tumor angiogenesis and resistance to radiation and chemotherapy. Many growth factors, through their tyrosine kinase receptors (RTKs), stimulate SphK1 leading to a rapid increase in S1P. This S1P in turn can activate S1P receptors and their downstream signaling. Conversely, activation of S1P receptors can induce transactivation of various RTKs. Thus, SphK1 may play important roles in S1P receptor RTK amplification loops. Here we review the role of SphK1 in tumorigenesis, hormonal therapy, chemotherapy resistance, and as a prognostic marker. We will also review studies on the effects of SphK inhibitors in cells in vitro and in animals in vivo and in some clinical trials and highlight the potential of SphK1 as a new target for cancer therapeutics. PMID:18691013

  1. BRAF and MAP2K1 mutations in Langerhans cell histiocytosis: a study of 50 cases.

    PubMed

    Alayed, Khaled; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Patel, Keyur P; Zuo, Zhuang; Li, Shaoying; Verma, Shalini; Galbincea, John; Cason, R Craig; Luthra, Rajyalakshmi; Yin, C Cameron

    2016-06-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a proliferation of Langerhans cells, often associated with lymphocytes, eosinophils, macrophages, and giant cells. BRAF mutations, usually V600E, have been reported in 40%-70% of cases, and recently, MAP2K1 mutations have been reported in BRAF-negative cases. We assessed 50 cases of LCH for BRAF mutations and assessed a subset of cases for MAP2K1 mutations. The study group included 28 men and 22 women (median age, 36.5 years; range, 1-78 years). BRAF V600E mutation was detected in 8 (16%) cases including 3 (30%) skin, 2 (11%) bone, 1 (50%) colon, 1 (20%) lung, and 1 (33%) extradural, intracranial mass. MAP2K1 mutations were detected in 6 of 13 (46%) BRAF-negative cases including 2 (100%) lymph node, 2 (50%) bone, 1 (25%) skin, and 1 (100%) orbit. Patients with BRAF mutation were younger than patients with wild-type BRAF (median age, 28 versus 38 years; P = .026). The median age of MAP2K1-mutated patients was 34.5 years, similar to patients without MAP2K1 mutation (41 years; P = .368). In agreement with 2 recent studies, we showed a high frequency of MAP2K1 mutations in BRAF-negative LCH cases. Unlike other studies, the overall frequency of BRAF mutation in this cohort is substantially lower than what has been reported in pediatric patients, perhaps because most patients in this study were adults. Moreover, we showed a high concordance between mutational and immunohistochemical analysis for BRAF mutation. There was no statistically significant association between BRAF or MAP2K1 mutation and anatomic site, unifocal versus multifocal presentation, or clinical outcome. PMID:26980021

  2. Skeletal myocyte hypertrophy requires mTOR kinase activity and S6K1

    SciTech Connect

    Park, In-Hyun . E-mail: ihpark@uiuc.edu; Erbay, Ebru; Nuzzi, Paul; Chen Jie

    2005-09-10

    The protein kinase mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a central regulator of cell proliferation and growth, with the ribosomal subunit S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) as one of the key downstream signaling effectors. A critical role of mTOR signaling in skeletal muscle differentiation has been identified recently, and an unusual regulatory mechanism independent of mTOR kinase activity and S6K1 is revealed. An mTOR pathway has also been reported to regulate skeletal muscle hypertrophy, but the regulatory mechanism is not completely understood. Here, we report the investigation of mTOR's function in insulin growth factor I (IGF-I)-induced C2C12 myotube hypertrophy. Added at a later stage when rapamycin no longer had any effect on normal myocyte differentiation, rapamycin completely blocked myocyte hypertrophy as measured by myotube diameter. Importantly, a concerted increase of average myonuclei per myotube was observed in IGF-I-stimulated myotubes, which was also inhibited by rapamycin added at a time when it no longer affected normal differentiation. The mTOR protein level, its catalytic activity, its phosphorylation on Ser2448, and the activity of S6K1 were all found increased in IGF-I-stimulated myotubes compared to unstimulated myotubes. Using C2C12 cells stably expressing rapamycin-resistant forms of mTOR and S6K1, we provide genetic evidence for the requirement of mTOR and its downstream effector S6K1 in the regulation of myotube hypertrophy. Our results suggest distinct mTOR signaling mechanisms in different stages of skeletal muscle development: While mTOR regulates the initial myoblast differentiation in a kinase-independent and S6K1-independent manner, the hypertrophic function of mTOR requires its kinase activity and employs S6K1 as a downstream effector.

  3. Sam68 Regulates S6K1 Alternative Splicing during Adipogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jingwen

    2015-01-01

    The requirement for alternative splicing during adipogenesis is poorly understood. The Sam68 RNA binding protein is a known regulator of alternative splicing, and mice deficient for Sam68 exhibit adipogenesis defects due to defective mTOR signaling. Sam68 null preadipocytes were monitored for alternative splicing imbalances in components of the mTOR signaling pathway. Herein, we report that Sam68 regulates isoform expression of the ribosomal S6 kinase gene (Rps6kb1). Sam68-deficient adipocytes express Rps6kb1-002 and its encoded p31S6K1 protein, in contrast to wild-type adipocytes that do not express this isoform. Sam68 binds an RNA sequence encoded by Rps6kb1 intron 6 and prevents serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 1 (SRSF1)-mediated alternative splicing of Rps6kb1-002, as assessed by cross-linking and immunoprecipitation (CLIP) and minigene assays. Depletion of p31S6K1 with small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) partially restored adipogenesis of Sam68-deficient preadipocytes. The ectopic expression of p31S6K1 in wild-type 3T3-L1 cells resulted in adipogenesis differentiation defects, showing that p31S6K1 is an inhibitor of adipogenesis. Our findings indicate that Sam68 is required to prevent the expression of p31S6K1 in adipocytes for adipogenesis to occur. PMID:25776557

  4. Novel Model To Study Virulence Determinants of Escherichia coli K1

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Naveed Ahmed; Goldsworthy, Graham John

    2007-01-01

    It is shown here for the first time that locusts can be used as a model to study Escherichia coli K1 pathogenesis. E. coli K-12 strain HB101 has very low pathogenicity to locusts and does not invade the locust brain, whereas the injection of 2 × 106 E. coli K1 strain RS218 (O18:K1:H7) kills almost 100% of locusts within 72 h and invades the brain within 24 h of injection. Both mortality and invasion of the brain in locusts after injection of E. coli K1 require at least two of the known virulence determinants shown for mammals. Thus, deletion mutants that lack outer membrane protein A or cytotoxic necrotizing factor 1 have reduced abilities to kill locusts and to invade the locust brain compared to the parent E. coli K1. Interestingly, deletion mutants lacking FimH or the NeuDB gene cluster are still able to cause high mortality. It is argued that the likely existence of additional virulence determinants can be investigated in vivo by using this insect system. PMID:17875634

  5. Plasma concentrations after oral or intramuscular vitamin K1 in neonates.

    PubMed Central

    McNinch, A W; Upton, C; Samuels, M; Shearer, M J; McCarthy, P; Tripp, J H; L'E Orme, R

    1985-01-01

    One hundred and seven healthy, breast fed infants received 1 mg vitamin K1 either at birth (orally or intramuscularly) or with the first feed (orally). Venous blood samples collected in the next 24 hours were assayed for plasma vitamin K1. In babies given the vitamin orally at birth, the peak median concentration (73 ng/ml) occurred at four hours. By 24 hours median plasma concentrations had fallen to 23 ng/ml and 35 ng/ml in the groups fed vitamin K1 at birth or with the first feed, respectively; this difference was not, however, significant. Plasma concentrations after intramuscular injection exceeded those in the oral groups at all comparable times, with a peak median concentration of 1781 ng/ml at 12 hours falling to 444 ng/ml at 24 hours. Since median plasma vitamin K1 concentrations 24 hours after oral administration were some 100 times and 1000 times greater than previously estimated adult and newborn values respectively, this study supports giving vitamin K1 orally at birth to well, mature babies to protect against early haemorrhagic disease of the newborn. Further studies are needed to determine the optimum dose for protection over subsequent weeks. PMID:4051538

  6. Pharmacokinetics and tolerance of intravenous and intramuscular phylloquinone(vitamin K1) mixed micelles formulation

    PubMed Central

    SOEDIRMAN, J. R.; DE BRUIJN, E. A.; MAES, R. A. A.; HANCK, A.; GRÜTER, J.

    1996-01-01

    1The pharmacokinetics and tolerance of phylloquinone(vitamin K1) mixed micelles formulation (Konakion® MM) were evaluated, in normal human adult volunteers (n=30) using an open randomized crossover design protocol following a 10 mg intravenous or intramuscular injection. 2Blood samples were collected for up to 12 h after the intravenous and up to 72 h after the intramuscular injections and the phylloquinone(vitamin K1) levels determined by reversed phase h.p.l.c. with fluorometric detection after post-column electrochemical reduction. 3Konakion® MM was well tolerated after either route of administration. Pharmacokinetic analysis of plasma phylloquinone(vitamin K1) concentration vs time profiles revealed that in one-fifth of the subjects systemic availability of intramuscular phylloquinone(vitamin K1) was below 65%. 4Our data suggest that due to sustained, but irregular and unpredictable absorption of the phylloquinone(vitamin K1) from the depot site, the intramuscular route of Konakion® MM administration is not suitable and thus not recommended. 5Konakion® MM i.v. is indicated to be well tolerated and effective in antagonizing coumarin-type-anticoagulants like Marcoumar® PMID:8799516

  7. Pharmacokinetics and tolerance of intravenous and intramuscular phylloquinone (vitamin K1) mixed micelles formulation.

    PubMed

    Soedirman, J R; De Bruijn, E A; Maes, R A; Hanck, A; Grüter, J

    1996-06-01

    1. The pharmacokinetics and tolerance of phylloquinone(vitamin K1) mixed micelles formulation (Konakion MM) were evaluated, in normal human adult volunteers (n = 30) using an open randomized crossover design protocol following a 10 mg intravenous or intramuscular injection. 2. Blood samples were collected for up to 12 h after the intravenous and up to 72 h after the intramuscular injections and the phylloquinone(vitamin K1) levels determined by reversed phase h.p.l.c. with fluorometric detection after post-column electrochemical reduction. 3. Konakion MM was well tolerated after either route of administration. Pharmacokinetic analysis of plasma phylloquinone(vitamin K1) concentration vs time profiles revealed that in one-fifth of the subjects systemic availability of intramuscular phylloquinone (vitamin K1) was below 65%. 4. Our data suggest that due to sustained, but irregular and unpredictable absorption of the phylloquinone(vitamin K1) from the depot site, the intramuscular route of Konakion MM administration is not suitable and thus not recommended. 5. Konakion MM i.v. is indicated to be well tolerated and effective in antagonizing coumarin-type-anticoagulants like Marcoumar. PMID:8799516

  8. Determination of ultimate carbonaceous BOD and the specific rate constant (K1)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stamer, J.K.; Bennett, J.P.; McKenzie, Stuart W.

    1982-01-01

    Ultimate carbonaceous biochemical oxygen demand (BODu) and the specific rate constant (K1) at which the demand is exerted are important parameters in designing biological wastewater treatment plants and in assessing the impact of wastewater on receiving streams. An analytical method is presented which uses time-series concentrations of BOD, defined as the calculated sum of dissolved oxygen (DO) losses at each time of measurement, for determining BODu and K1. Time-series DO measurements are obtained from a water sample that is incubated in darkness at 20 degrees Celsius in the presence of nitrapyrin, a chemical nitrification inhibitor. Time-series concentrations of BOD that approximate first order kinetics can be analyzed graphically or mathematically to compute BODu and K1.

  9. Flow-injection fluorimetric determination of vitamin K(1) based on a photochemical reaction.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Ruiz, T; Martínez-Lozano, C; Tomás, V; Martín, J

    1999-08-23

    The sensitizing effect of vitamin K(1) on the photo-oxidation of glucose has been used for the determination of the vitamin. The hydrogen peroxide formed in the photochemical reaction reacts with Fe(II) to yield hydroxylradical and this radical is scavenged by benzoic acid to form the fluorescent hydroxybenzoic acids, which are analysed by fluorescence detection. This analytical scheme was adapted to a flow-injection system, which permits the determination of vitamin K(1) between 1x10(-6) and 1x10(-4) M with a throughput of 20 samples h(-1) and relative standard deviation between 0.2 and 1%. The applicability of the method was demonstrated by determining vitamin K(1) in pharmaceutical preparations and vegetables. PMID:18967693

  10. On size tripartite Ramsey numbers of P3 versus mK1,n

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lusiani, Anie; Baskoro, Edy Tri; Saputro, Suhadi Wido

    2016-02-01

    Let Kl×t be a complete, balanced, multipartite graph consisting of l partite sets and t vertices in each partite set. For simple graphs G and H, the size multipartite Ramsey number mj (G, H) is the smallest natural number t such that any arbitrary red-blue coloring on the edges of Kl×t contains a red G or a blue H as a subgraph. In particular, if j = 3 then m3(G, H) is called the size tripartite Ramsey number of G and H. In this paper, we determine the exact values of the size tripartite numbers m3(P3, mK1,n) for all integers m ≥ 1 and n ≥ 3, where P3 is a path of order 3 and mK1,n is a disjoint union of m copies of a star K1,n.

  11. Emergence of Carbapenem-Resistant Serotype K1 Hypervirulent Klebsiella pneumoniae Strains in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rong; Lin, Dachuan; Chan, Edward Wai-chi; Gu, Danxia

    2015-01-01

    We report the emergence of five carbapenem-resistant K1 hypervirulent Klebsiella pneumoniae (hvKP) strains which caused fatal infections in hospital patients in Zhejiang Province, China, upon entry through surgical wounds. Genotyping results revealed the existence of three genetically related strains which exhibited a new sequence type, ST1797, and revealed that all strains harbored the magA and wcaG virulence genes and a plasmid-borne blaKPC-2 gene. These findings indicate that K1 hvKP is simultaneously hypervirulent, multidrug resistant, and transmissible. PMID:26574010

  12. Final report of the APMP water flow key comparison: APMP.M.FF-K1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kwang-Bock; Chun, Sejong; Terao, Yoshiya; Thai, Nguyen Hong; Tsair Yang, Cheng; Tao, Meng; Gutkin, Mikhail B.

    2011-01-01

    The key comparison, APMP.M.FF-K1, was undertaken by APMP/TCFF, the Technical Committee for Fluid Flow (TCFF) under the Asia Pacific Metrology Program (APMP). One objective of the key comparison was to demonstrate the degree of equivalence among six participating laboratories (KRISS, NMIJ, VMI, CMS, NIM and VNIIM) in water flow rate metrology by comparing the results with the key comparison reference value (KCRV) determined from the CCM.FF-K1 key comparison. The other objective of this key comparison was to provide supporting evidence for the calibration and measurement capabilities (CMCs), which had been declared by the participating laboratories during this key comparison. The Transfer Standard Package (TSP) was a Coriolis mass flowmeter, which had been used in the CCM.FF-K1 key comparison. Because the K-factors in the APMP.M.FF-K1 key comparison were slightly lower than the K-factors of the CCM.FF-K1 key comparison due to long-term drifts of the TSP, a correction value D was introduced. The value of D was given by a weighted sum between two link laboratories (NMIJ and KRISS), which participated in both the CCM.FF-K1 and the APMP.M.FF-K1 key comparisons. By this correction, the K-factors were laid between 12.004 and 12.017 at either low (Re = 254 000) or high (Re = 561 000) flow rates. Most of the calibration data were within expected uncertainty bounds. However, some data showed undulations, which gave large fluctuations of the metering factor at Re = 561 000. Calculation of degrees of equivalence showed that all the participating laboratories had deviations between -0.009 and 0.007 pulses/kg from the CCM.FF-K1 KCRV at either the low or the high flow rates. In case of En calculation, all the participating laboratories showed values less than 1, indicating that the corrected K-factors of all the laboratories were equivalent with the KCRV at both Re = 254 000 and 561 000. When the corrected K-factors from two participating laboratories were compared, all the

  13. Cyclic sulfoxides-garlicnins K1, K2, and H1-extracted from Allium sativum.

    PubMed

    Nohara, Toshihiro; Fujiwara, Yukio; Komota, Yusuke; Kondo, Yoshihiko; Saku, Taiki; Yamaguchi, Koki; Komohara, Yoshihiro; Takeya, Motohiro

    2015-01-01

    Newly identified cyclic sulfoxides-garlicnins K1 (1), K2 (2), and H1 (3)-were isolated from the acetone extracts of the bulbs of garlic, Allium sativum. Garlicnin H1 (3) demonstrated potential to suppress tumor cell proliferation by regulating macrophage activation. The structures of garlicnins K1 and K2, 3,4-dimethyl-5-allyl-tetrahydrothiophen-2-one-S-oxides, and the structure of garlicnin H1, 3-carboxy-3-hydroxy-4-methyl-5-allylsulfoxide-tetrahydrothiophen-2-(ethane-1,2-diol)-S-oxide were characterized by spectroscopic analysis. PMID:25748782

  14. Influence of growth temperature of Escherichia coli on K1 capsular antigen production and resistance to opsonization.

    PubMed Central

    Bortolussi, R; Ferrieri, P; Quie, P G

    1983-01-01

    When Escherichia coli strains that produce K1 capsular polysaccharide antigen at 37 degrees C were grown at 22 degrees C, K1 antigen was not detected in the supernatant or washed-cell fraction of broth cultures. Significant amounts of K1 polysaccharide were detected only when the organism was grown at temperatures of 30 degrees C or higher. Rabbits immunized with an E. coli K1 strain (serotype O18ac:K1:H7) grown at 37 degrees C produced agglutinating antibody to somatic antigen and precipitating and agglutinating antibody to capsular K1 antigen; those immunized with this strain grown at 22 degrees C produced antibody to somatic antigen, but not to K1 antigen. Antibody to somatic antigen was markedly reduced by adsorption with the organism grown at 22 degrees C, while antibody to capsular antigen was not. E. coli K1 strains grown at 37 degrees C (K1 present) resisted phagocytosis and killing if they were opsonized solely by the alternative complement pathway (ACP) using magnesium ethylene glycol-bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N-tetraacetic acid-chelated serum. When these strains were grown at 22 degrees C (K1 absent), they were opsonized efficiently by the ACP (28 versus 94% killing, respectively; P less than 0.001). In addition, a non-K1 mutant of an E. coli K1 strain was opsonized efficiently by the ACP although its encapsulated K1 parent was not. Sensitivity of E. coli strains to the bactericidal activity of serum was observed in strains with and without K1 capsular antigen. These studies demonstrated that production of K1 polysaccharide antigen was regulated by environmental temperature and that K1 capsule plays an essential role in rendering the organism resistant to opsonization by the ACP. PMID:6341228

  15. 77 FR 64848 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Form 1120S, Schedule D, Schedule K-1, and Schedule M-3

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-23

    ... Internal Revenue Service Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Form 1120S, Schedule D, Schedule K-1, and... With Total Assets of $10 Million or More, and Schedule K-1 (Form 1120S), Shareholder's Share of Income... Losses and Built-in Gains, Schedule K-1 (Form 1120S), Shareholder's Share of Income, Credits,...

  16. 26 CFR 1.404(k)-1T - Questions and answers relating to the deductibility of certain dividend distributions. (Temporary)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... deductibility of certain dividend distributions. (Temporary) 1.404(k)-1T Section 1.404(k)-1T Internal Revenue... Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.404(k)-1T Questions and answers relating to the deductibility of certain dividend distributions. (Temporary) Q-1: What does section 404(k) provide? A-1:...

  17. 26 CFR 1.404(k)-1T - Questions and answers relating to the deductibility of certain dividend distributions. (Temporary)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... deductibility of certain dividend distributions. (Temporary) 1.404(k)-1T Section 1.404(k)-1T Internal Revenue... (CONTINUED) Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.404(k)-1T Questions and answers relating to the deductibility of certain dividend distributions. (Temporary) Q-1: What does section 404(k)...

  18. 26 CFR 1.404(k)-1T - Questions and answers relating to the deductibility of certain dividend distributions. (Temporary)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... deductibility of certain dividend distributions. (Temporary) 1.404(k)-1T Section 1.404(k)-1T Internal Revenue... (CONTINUED) Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.404(k)-1T Questions and answers relating to the deductibility of certain dividend distributions. (Temporary) Q-1: What does section 404(k)...

  19. 26 CFR 1.404(k)-1T - Questions and answers relating to the deductibility of certain dividend distributions. (Temporary)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... deductibility of certain dividend distributions. (Temporary) 1.404(k)-1T Section 1.404(k)-1T Internal Revenue... (CONTINUED) Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.404(k)-1T Questions and answers relating to the deductibility of certain dividend distributions. (Temporary) Q-1: What does section 404(k)...

  20. 26 CFR 1.404(k)-1T - Questions and answers relating to the deductibility of certain dividend distributions. (Temporary)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... deductibility of certain dividend distributions. (Temporary) 1.404(k)-1T Section 1.404(k)-1T Internal Revenue... (CONTINUED) Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.404(k)-1T Questions and answers relating to the deductibility of certain dividend distributions. (Temporary) Q-1: What does section 404(k)...

  1. 76 FR 7847 - Glenn A. Baxter, Application To Renew License for Amateur Radio Service Station K1MAN

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-11

    ... COMMISSION Glenn A. Baxter, Application To Renew License for Amateur Radio Service Station K1MAN AGENCY... renew the license for Amateur Radio Service Station K1MAN filed by Glenn A. Baxter should be granted.... Baxter for renewal of his license for Amateur Radio Station K1MAN should be granted. As discussed...

  2. Tick infestations of the eastern cottontail rabbit (Sylvilagus floridanus) and small rodentia in northwest Alabama and implications for disease transmission.

    PubMed

    Cooney, Joseph C; Burgdorfer, Willy; Painter, Martin K; Russell, Cynthia L

    2005-12-01

    Studies were conducted over a four-county area of northwest Alabama to determine the association of eastern cottontail rabbits with Dermacentor variabilis, the eastern United States vector of Rocky Mountain spotted fever. A secondary objective was to compare infestations of this tick on rabbits with infestations on commonly encountered rodent species as a means of determining the relative importance of each in the disease transmission cycle. These epidemiologic surveys were conducted in response to reported fatal cases of Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever in two counties of the study area. From 202 eastern cottontail rabbits, 3,956 ticks were collected. Of this total, 79.87% were Haemphysalis leporispalustris, 9.15% Amblyomma americanum, 8.22% Ixodes dentatus, and 2.76% D. variabilis. Only immature stages of D. variabilis were collected from cottontail rabbits. Ticks were collected on rabbits in all months except November, and only one specimen was taken in January. Based on the average number of ticks per host collected in each month, April was the peak month for D. variabilis and I. dentatus. High values for H. leporispalustris also occurred at this time, but even higher values occurred in October and December. The heaviest infestation of A. americanum occurred during the month ofAugust and coincides with the activity period for the larvae of this species. Two hundred sixty-nine of the smaller Rodentia, comprising 13 species, yielded 264 ticks, all D. variabilis, and all but two were immature stages. Five rodent species, Microtus ochragaster Orozomys palustris, Peromyscus gossypinus, Peromyscus leucopus, and Sigmodon hispidus accounted for 95.83% of the ticks collected, and appeared to be preferred hosts for D. variabilis; all five had higher infestation levels per host than did the eastern cottontail rabbit. Data on host relationships in association with seasonal activity are presented. PMID:16599149

  3. Catalog of type specimens of recent mammals: Rodentia (Sciuromorpha and Castorimorpha) in the National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisher, Robert D.; Ludwig, Craig A.

    2012-01-01

    The type collection of Recent mammals in the Division of Mammals, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, contains 843 specimens bearing names of 820 species group taxa of Rodentia (Sciuromorpha and Castorimorpha) as of July 2011. This catalog presents a list of these holdings, which comprise 798 holotypes, 14 lectotypes, seven syntypes (30 specimens), and one neotype. In addition, we include three holotypes and 10 specimens that are part of syntype series that should be in the collection but cannot be found and three syntypes that were originally in this collection but are now known to be in other collections. One specimen that no longer has name-bearing status is included for the record. Forty-one of the names are new since the last type catalog. One new lectotype is designated. Suborders and families are listed as in Wilson and Reeder. Within families, currently recognized genera are arranged alphabetically. Within each currently recognized genus, accounts are arranged alphabetically by original published name. Information in each account includes original name and abbreviated citation thereto, current name if other than original, citation for first use of current name combination for the taxon (or new name combination if used herein for the first time), type designation, U.S. National Museum catalog number(s), preparation, age and sex, type locality, date of collection and name of collector, collector’s original number, and comments or additional information as appropriate. Digital photographs of each specimen serve as a condition report and will be linked to each electronic specimen record.

  4. Early Indicators of Learning Disabilities Using the Brigance K & 1 Screen for Kindergarten and First Grade.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trout, Ann

    The purpose of this study was to determine if there were differences between learning disabled and nonlearning disabled students in skill areas and total scores on the Brigance K & 1 Screen for Kindergarten and First Grade. The study investigated whether students with learning disabilities would show significant weaknesses in language-based skill…

  5. Expression of GluK1c underlies the developmental switch in presynaptic kainate receptor function

    PubMed Central

    Vesikansa, Aino; Sakha, Prasanna; Kuja-Panula, Juha; Molchanova, Svetlana; Rivera, Claudio; Huttunen, Henri J.; Rauvala, Heikki; Taira, Tomi; Lauri, Sari E.

    2012-01-01

    Kainate-type glutamate receptors (KARs) regulate synaptic transmission and neuronal excitability via multiple mechanisms, depending on their subunit composition. Presynaptic KARs tonically depress glutamatergic transmission during restricted period of synapse development; however, the molecular basis behind this effect is unknown. Here, we show that the developmental and cell-type specific expression pattern of a KAR subunit splice variant, GluK1c, corresponds to the immature-type KAR activity in the hippocampus. GluK1c localizes to dendritic contact sites at distal axons, the distal targeting being promoted by heteromerization with the subunit GluK4. Presynaptic expression of GluK1c strongly suppresses glutamatergic transmission in cell-pairs in vitro and mimics the immature-type KAR activity at CA3-CA1 synapses in vivo, at a developmental stage when the endogenous expression is already downregulated. These data support a central role for GluK1c in mediating tonic inhibition of glutamate release and the consequent effects on excitability and activity-dependent fine-tuning of the developing hippocampal circuitry. PMID:22413061

  6. Expression of GluK1c underlies the developmental switch in presynaptic kainate receptor function.

    PubMed

    Vesikansa, Aino; Sakha, Prasanna; Kuja-Panula, Juha; Molchanova, Svetlana; Rivera, Claudio; Huttunen, Henri J; Rauvala, Heikki; Taira, Tomi; Lauri, Sari E

    2012-01-01

    Kainate-type glutamate receptors (KARs) regulate synaptic transmission and neuronal excitability via multiple mechanisms, depending on their subunit composition. Presynaptic KARs tonically depress glutamatergic transmission during restricted period of synapse development; however, the molecular basis behind this effect is unknown. Here, we show that the developmental and cell-type specific expression pattern of a KAR subunit splice variant, GluK1c, corresponds to the immature-type KAR activity in the hippocampus. GluK1c localizes to dendritic contact sites at distal axons, the distal targeting being promoted by heteromerization with the subunit GluK4. Presynaptic expression of GluK1c strongly suppresses glutamatergic transmission in cell-pairs in vitro and mimics the immature-type KAR activity at CA3-CA1 synapses in vivo, at a developmental stage when the endogenous expression is already downregulated. These data support a central role for GluK1c in mediating tonic inhibition of glutamate release and the consequent effects on excitability and activity-dependent fine-tuning of the developing hippocampal circuitry. PMID:22413061

  7. Exploring the Relationship between Literacy Coaching and Student Reading Achievement in Grades K-1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elish-Piper, Laurie; L'Allier, Susan K.

    2010-01-01

    This study explored the relationship between literacy coaching and student reading achievement in grades K-1 in a school district that received a Reading First grant. The study analyzed how literacy coaches spent their time and explored the relationship between the amount and content of coaching and student reading achievement at the teacher level…

  8. easyCBM® Reading Criterion Related Validity Evidence: Grades K-1. Technical Report #1309

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lai, Cheng-Fei; Alonzo, Julie; Tindal, Gerald

    2013-01-01

    In this technical report, we present the results of a study to gather criterion-related evidence for Grade K-1 easyCBM® reading measures. We used correlations to examine the relation between the easyCBM® measures and other published measures with known reliability and validity evidence, including the Dynamic Indicators of Basic Early Literacy…

  9. S6K1ing to ResTOR Adipogenesis with Polycomb.

    PubMed

    Juan, Aster H; Sartorelli, Vittorio

    2016-05-01

    Signal-directed chromatin recruitment of mammalian Polycomb complexes is a fundamental component of epigenetic regulation. In this issue, Yi et al. (2016) reveal how mTORC1 activation deploys the ribosomal serine/threonine kinase S6K1 and Polycomb proteins at genomic regulatory regions to repress expression of anti-adipogenic developmental regulators. PMID:27153531

  10. Tegra K1 Embedded Supercomputer - Potential Possibilities for Application in High Energy Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prilutsky, O. F.; Evlanov, E. N.; Shlyk, A. F.

    Possible applications of new CUDA-enabled systems-on-chip (SoCs) Tegra K1 and Tegra X1 in high-energy astrophysics are discussed in this paper. Hardware and software aspects of general purpose computing on graphics processing units (GPGPU) are briefly reviewed. An influence of space radiation effects on processors and a mitigation of its consequences are discussed.

  11. The Greatest Educational Change America Has Ever Seen. [Teaching Guide]. Grades K-1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United States Mint (Dept. of Treasury), Washington, DC.

    This teaching guide for grades K-1 focuses on the 1999-2000 United States Mint 50 State Quarters Program, which includes new quarter designs for the following states: Delaware, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Georgia, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Maryland, South Carolina, New Hampshire, and Virginia. The guide includes six lesson plans that fit easily…

  12. The Greatest Educational Change America Has Ever Seen, 2002: Lesson Plans for Grades K-1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United States Mint (Dept. of Treasury), Washington, DC.

    This teacher's guide on the 50 state quarters emitted by the United States Mint includes 6 "teacher-friendly" lesson plans that fit easily into the curriculum of grades K-1; reproducible student worksheets that coincide with each lesson; "fun" state facts and information on the new quarter designs; and USA map template with state outlines. These…

  13. The Greatest Educational Change America Has Ever Seen, 2001: Lesson Plans for Grades K-1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United States Mint (Dept. of Treasury), Washington, DC.

    This teacher's guide about the 50 state quarters produced by the United States Mint includes 6 lesson plans that fit easily into the social studies curriculum for grades K-1. The lesson plans include reproducible student work pages that coincide with each lesson; state facts and information about the new 2001 state quarter designs (New York, North…

  14. Energy: Multidisciplinary Activities for the Classroom. Top Hit Energy Lesson Plans, K-1, 2-6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Energy Foundation, Salt Lake City, UT.

    This six-volume set of multidisciplinary instructional materials developed by the National Energy Foundation (NEF) presents energy activities for grades K-1, 2-6. The instructional materials are teacher-developed, teacher-tested, and multi-disciplinary. The lesson plans and activities are organized around seven goal areas of a NEF developed…

  15. Antinociceptive effects of MSVIII-19, a functional antagonist of the GluK1 kainate receptor.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Chang-Shen; Lash-Van Wyhe, Leanne; Sasaki, Makoto; Sakai, Ryuichi; Swanson, Geoffrey T; Gereau, Robert W

    2011-05-01

    The ionotropic glutamate receptor subunit, GluK1 (GluR5), is expressed in many regions of the nervous system related to sensory transmission. Recently, a selective ligand for the GluK1 receptor, MSVIII-19 (8,9-dideoxy-neodysiherbaine), was synthesized as a derivative of dysiherbaine, a toxin isolated from the marine sponge Lendenfeldia chondrodes. MSVIII-19 potently desensitizes GluK1 receptors without channel activation, rendering it useful as a functional antagonist. Given the high selectivity for GluK1 and the proposed role for this glutamate receptor in nociception, we sought to test the analgesic potential of MSVIII-19 in a series of models of inflammatory, neuropathic, and visceral pain in mice. MSVIII-19 delivered intrathecally dose-dependently reduced formalin-induced spontaneous behaviors and reduced thermal hypersensitivity 3 hours after formalin injection and 24 hours after complete Freund's adjuvant-induced inflammation, but had no effect on mechanical sensitivity in the same models. Intrathecal MSVIII-19 significantly reduced both thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical hypersensitivity in the chronic constriction injury model of neuropathic pain, but had no effect in the acetic acid model of visceral pain. Peripheral administration of MSVIII-19 had no analgesic efficacy in any of these models. Finally, intrathecal MSVIII-19 did not alter responses in Tail-flick tests or performance on the accelerating RotaRod. These data suggest that spinal administration of MSVIII-19 reverses hypersensitivity in several models of pain in mice, supporting the clinical potential of GluK1 antagonists for the management of pain. PMID:21324591

  16. Neuropathogenic Escherichia coli K1 does not exhibit proteolytic activities to exert its pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Proteases are well-known virulence factors that promote survival, pathogenesis and immune evasion of many pathogens. Several lines of evidence suggest that the blood–brain barrier permeability is a prerequisite in microbial invasion of the central nervous system. Because proteases are frequently associated with vascular permeability by targeting junctional proteins, here it is hypothesized that neuropathogenic Escherichia coli K1 exhibit proteolytic activities to exert its pathogenicity. Methods Zymographic assays were performed using collagen and gelatin as substrates. The lysates of whole E. coli K1 strain E44, or E. coli K-12 strain HB101 were tested for proteolytic activities. The conditioned media were prepared by incubating bacteria in RPMI-1640 in the presence or absence of serum. The cell-free supernatants were collected and tested for proteases in zymography as mentioned above. Additionally, proteolytic degradation of host immune factors was determined by co-incubating conditioned media with albumin/immunoglobulins using protease assays. Results When collagen or gelatin were used as substrates in zymographic assays, neither whole bacteria nor conditioned media exhibited proteolytic activities. The conditioned media of neuropathogenic E. coli K1 strain E44, or E. coli K-12 strain HB101 did not affect degradation of albumin and immunoglobulins using protease assays. Conclusions Neither zymographic assays nor protease assays detected proteolytic activities in either the whole bacteria or conditioned media of E. coli K1 strain E44 and E. coli K-12 strain HB101. These findings suggest that host cell monolayer disruptions and immune evasion strategies are likely independent of proteolytic activities of neuropathogenic E. coli K1. PMID:23634997

  17. Effect of vitamin K1 on glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficient neonatal erythrocytes in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, M.; Waisman, D.; Mazor, D.; Hammerman, C.; Bader, D.; Abrahamov, A.; Meyerstein, N.

    1998-01-01

    AIM—To determine whether vitamin K1, which is routinely administered to neonates, could act as an exogenous oxidising agent and be partly responsible for haemolysis in glucose-6-phosphat-dehydrogenase (G-6-PD).
METHODS—G-6-PD deficient (n=7) and control (n=10) umbilical cord blood red blood cells were incubated in vitro with a vitamin K1 preparation (Konakion). Two concentrations of Vitamin K1 were used, both higher than that of expected serum concentrations, following routine injection of 1 mg vitamin K1. Concentrations of reduced glutathione (GSH) and methaemoglobin, indicators of oxidative red blood cell damage, were determined before and after incubation, and the mean percentage change from baseline calculated.
RESULTS—Values (mean (SD)) for GSH, at baseline, and after incubation with vitamin K1 at concentrations of 44 and 444 µM, respectively, and percentage change from baseline (mean (SD)) were 1.97 + 0.31µmol/g haemoglobin, 1.89 ± 0.44 µmol/g (-4.3 ± 13.1%), and 1.69± 0.41 µmol/g (-14.5 ±9.3%) for the G-6-PD deficient red blood cells, and 2.27 ± 0.31 µmol/g haemoglobin, 2.09 ± 0.56 µmol/g (−7.2 ± 23.2%), and 2.12 ± 0.38 µmol/g (−6.0 + 14.1%) for the control cells. For methaemoglobin (percentage of total haemoglobin), the corresponding values were 2.01± 0.53%, 1.93 ± 0.37% (−0.6± 17.4%) and 2.06 ± 0.43% (5.7 ± 14.2%) for the G-6-PD deficient red blood cells, and 1.56 ± 0.74%, 1.70 ± 0.78% (12.7 ± 21.9%), and 1.78 ± 0.71% (20.6 ± 26.8%) for the control red blood cells. None of the corresponding percentage changes from baseline was significantly different when G-6-PD deficient and control red blood cells were compared.
CONCLUSIONS—These findings suggest that G-6-PD deficient red blood cells are not at increased risk of oxidative damage from vitamin K1.

 PMID:10194997

  18. Cortical GluK1 kainate receptors modulate scratching in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Descalzi, Giannina; Chen, Tao; Koga, Kohei; Li, Xiang-Yao; Yamada, Kaori; Zhuo, Min

    2013-09-01

    Recent investigations into the mechanisms mediating itch transmission have focused on spinal mechanisms, whereas few studies have investigated the role of the cerebral cortex in itch-related behaviors. Human imaging studies show that several cortical regions are active in correspondence with itch, including the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). We present here evidence of cortical modulation of pruritogen-induced scratching behavior. We combine pharmacological, genetic, and electrophysiological approaches to show that cortical GluK1-containing kainate (KA) receptors are involved in scratching induced by histamine and non-histamine-dependent itching stimuli. We further show that scratching corresponds with enhanced excitatory transmission in the ACC through KA receptor modulation of inhibitory circuitry. In addition, we found that inhibiting GluK1-containing KA receptors in the ACC also reduced behavioral nociceptive responses induced by formalin. Our results reveal a new role of the cortex in pruritogen-induced scratching. PMID:23786569

  19. Particle motion in generalized Dirac's monopoles of dimension 2k + 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Zhanqiang

    2016-08-01

    By using Meng's idea in his generalization of the classical MICZ-Kepler problem, we obtained the equations of motion of a charged particle in the field of generalized Dirac monopole in odd dimensional Euclidean spaces. The main result is that for every particle trajectory r : I → ℝ2k+1∖{0}, there is a 2-dimensional cone with vertex at the origin on which r is a geodesic.

  20. Superconducting properties of K1-xNaxFe2As2 under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinenko, V.; Schottenhamel, W.; Wolter, A. U. B.; Efremov, D. V.; Drechsler, S.-L.; Aswartham, S.; Kumar, M.; Wurmehl, S.; Roslova, M.; Morozov, I. V.; Holzapfel, B.; Büchner, B.; Ahrens, E.; Troyanov, S. I.; Köhler, S.; Gati, E.; Knöner, S.; Hoang, N. H.; Lang, M.; Ricci, F.; Profeta, G.

    2014-09-01

    The effects of hydrostatic pressure and partial Na substitution on the normal-state properties and the superconducting transition temperature (Tc) of K1-xNaxFe2As2 single crystals were investigated. It was found that a partial Na substitution leads to a deviation from the standard T2 Fermi-liquid behavior in the temperature dependence of the normal-state resistivity. It was demonstrated that non-Fermi-liquid like behavior of the resistivity for K1-xNaxFe2As2 and some KFe2As2 samples can be explained by a disorder effect in the multiband system with rather different quasiparticle effective masses. Concerning the superconducting state our data support the presence of a shallow minimum around 2 GPa in the pressure dependence of Tc for stoichiometric KFe2As2. The analysis of Tc in K1-xNaxFe2As2 at pressures below 1.5 GPa showed that the reduction of Tc with Na substitution follows the Abrikosov-Gor'kov law with the critical temperature Tc0 of the clean system (without pair breaking), which linearly depends on the pressure. Our observations also suggest that Tc of K1-xNaxFe2As2 is nearly independent of the lattice compression produced by the Na substitution. Further, we theoretically analyzed the behavior of the band structure under pressure within the generalized gradient approximation (GGA). A qualitative agreement between the calculated and the recently measured—in de Haas-van Alphen experiments [T. Terashima et al., Phys. Rev. B 89, 134520 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevB.89.134520]—pressure dependencies of the Fermi-surface cross sections has been found. These calculations also indicate that the observed minimum around 2 GPa in the pressure dependence of Tc may occur without a change of the pairing symmetry.

  1. Final report on RMO Vickers key comparison COOMET M.H-K1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslanyan, E.; Menelao, F.; Herrmann, K.; Aslanyan, A.; Pivovarov, V.; Galat, E.; Dovzhenko, Y.; Zhamanbalin, M.

    2013-01-01

    This report describes a COOMET key comparison on Vickers hardness scales involving five National Metrology Institutes: PTB (Germany), BelGIM (Belarus), NSC IM (Ukraine), KazInMetr (Kazakhstan) and VNIIFTRI (Russia). The pilot laboratory was VNIIFTRI, and PTB acted as the linking institute to key comparisons CCM.H-K1.b and CCM.H-K1.c conducted for the Vickers hardness scales HV1 and HV30, respectively. The comparison was also conducted for the HV5 Vickers hardness scale, since this scale is most frequently used in practice in Russia and CIS countries that work according to GOST standards. In the key comparison, two sets of hardness reference blocks for the Vickers hardness scales HV1, HV5 and HV30 consisting each of three hardness reference blocks with hardness levels of 450 HV and 750 HV were used. The measurement results and uncertainty assessments for HV1 and HV30 hardness scales, as announced by BelGIM, NSC IM, KazInMetr and VNIIFTRI, are in good agreement with the key comparison reference values of CCM.H-K1.b and CCM.H-K1.c. The comparison results for the HV5 hardness scale are viewed as additional information, since up to today no CCM key comparisons on this scale have yet been carried out. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  2. KEY COMPARISON: Report on bilateral comparison COOMET.AUV.A-K1.1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedtke, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    A bilateral comparison of primary standards for sound in air, COOMET.AUV.A-K1.1 was conducted in 2004 between the DNDI (Ukraine) and the PTB (Germany) with PTB acting as the linking laboratory to the previous COOMET.AUV.A-K1 comparison. A similar protocol was followed, and although measurements were made at 23 acoustic frequencies, the results were analysed in terms of degrees of equivalence only at the recommended frequencies of the CCAUV.A-K1 comparison so that the appropriate links could be made. The results were approved by CCAUV in October 2008 are in agreement with all the linked results within the uncertainties. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCAUV, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA).

  3. Dynamic bonds and polar ejection force distribution explain kinetochore oscillations in PtK1 cells

    PubMed Central

    He, Bin; Shen, Muyao; Wan, Xiaohu; Roscioli, Emanuele; Bowden, Brent

    2013-01-01

    Duplicated mitotic chromosomes aligned at the metaphase plate maintain dynamic attachments to spindle microtubules via their kinetochores, and multiple motor and nonmotor proteins cooperate to regulate their behavior. Depending on the system, sister chromatids may display either of two distinct behaviors, namely (1) the presence or (2) the absence of oscillations about the metaphase plate. Significantly, in PtK1 cells, in which chromosome behavior appears to be dependent on the position along the metaphase plate, both types of behavior are observed within the same spindle, but how and why these distinct behaviors are manifested is unclear. Here, we developed a new quantitative model to describe metaphase chromosome dynamics via kinetochore–microtubule interactions mediated by nonmotor viscoelastic linkages. Our model reproduces all the key features of metaphase sister kinetochore dynamics in PtK1 cells and suggests that differences in the distribution of polar ejection forces at the periphery and in the middle of PtK1 cell spindles underlie the observed dichotomy of chromosome behavior. PMID:23671311

  4. Plasma superwarfarin levels and vitamin K1 treatment in dogs with anticoagulant rodenticide poisoning.

    PubMed

    Robben, J H; Kuijpers, E A; Mout, H C

    1998-01-01

    The plasma concentration, plasma half-life (t1/2), and mean residence time (MRT) of rodenticide anticoagulants were determined in 21 dogs in which a preliminary diagnosis of anticoagulant rodenticide poisoning had been made. Brodifacoum, difethialone, and difenacoum were detected by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) in the plasma of 13, 3, and 2 dogs, respectively. At presentation the plasma concentration ranged from below the detection limit (10 ng/L) to 851 ng/L. Toxin could not be detected in 3 dogs, despite these animals showing characteristic coagulation disturbances and a positive response to therapy with vitamin K1. In 7 dogs the estimated t1/2 of brodifacoum ranged from 0.9 to 4.7 (median 2.4) days with a MRT of 1.9 to 3.7 (median 2.8) days. In 2 dogs the individual t1/2 of difethialone was 2.2 and 3.2 days and the MRT was 2.3 and 2.8 days, respectively. Two dogs died during emergency treatment. Treatment in the remaining 19 dogs consisted of the administration of vitamin K1 and supportive therapy. The dose of vitamin K1 was reduced in a stepwise manner as long as the prothrombin time remained within physiological limits. The variation in initial plasma concentrations of the anticoagulants combined with the results of treatment support the idea that an individual therapeutic approach is warranted. PMID:9477532

  5. Volatile Composition of Comet C/2012 K1 (PanSTARRS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Nathan; Gibb, Erika; Bonev, Boncho P.; DiSanti, Michael A.; Villanueva, Geronimo L.; Paganini, Lucas; Mumma, Michael J.

    2015-11-01

    On 2014 May 22 and 24 we characterized the volatile composition of the dynamically new Oort Cloud comet C/2012 K1 (PanSTARRS) using the long-slit, high resolution (λ/Δλ ≈ 25,000) infared echelle spectrograph (NIRSPEC) at the 10m Keck 2 telescope on Maunakea, HI. We detected fluorescent emission from six primary species (H2O, HCN, CH4, C2H6, CH3OH, and CO) and prompt emission from one product species (OH* - a directory proxy for H­2O). Upper limits were derived for C2H2 and H2CO. We report rotational temperatures, production rates, and mixing ratios (relative to water). Based on the inventory of comets characterized to date, mixing ratios of trace gases in C/2012 K1 (PanSTARRS) are about normal - CH3OH and C2H6 are slightly enriched, CO, CH4, HCN, and H2CO are average, and C­2H2 is depleted. I will discuss C/2012 K1 (PanSTARRS) in the context of an emerging taxonomy for comets based on volatile composition.This work is supported through the NASA Missouri Space Grant Consortium and the National Science Foundation (NSF 1211362), the NASA Astrobiology Institute through a grant to the Goddard Center for Astrobiology (811073.02.12.03.91), and the NASA Planetary Astronomy Program (811073.02.03.03.43).

  6. Compilation of a provisional UK database for the phylloquinone (vitamin K1) content of foods.

    PubMed

    Bolton-Smith, C; Price, R J; Fenton, S T; Harrington, D J; Shearer, M J

    2000-04-01

    This paper reports the compilation of a food composition database for phylloquinone (vitamin K1) derived from the direct analysis of foods, recipe calculation and the assignment of values based on food similarities. All the basic and other food items used in these calculations had been analysed by HPLC and about 170 of the items had been obtained and assayed in the UK. Recipe calculations took account of the cooking method and changes in water and fat content. Currently, approximately 1501 food items with Royal Society of Chemistry/Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food food codes have been allocated a vitamin K1 value, and a further 282 new recipe codes are included in the database. Representative values from each food group are reported together with an indication of the potential variation. Detailed examples of some recipe calculations are included, and also the impact of changing the type of fat in recipes. Vitamin K1 is associated with, and most abundant in, photosynthetic tissues of plants. Accordingly, the highest concentrations (3000-6000 micrograms/kg) are found in dark-green leafy vegetables and herbs, such as kale, parsley, spinach and green cabbage. Intermediate concentrations (1000-2000 micrograms/kg) are found in plants with paler leaves such as white cabbage and lettuce or in green, non-leafy vegetables such as broccoli and brussel sprouts. Fats and oils contain variable amounts of vitamin K1 with the highest concentrations (300-1300 micrograms/kg) in soyabean, rapeseed and olive oils and the margarines based on them. Other foods such as dairy products, meat dishes and cereal-based foods (bread, biscuits, cakes, desserts etc.), although not in themselves particularly rich in vitamin K1 (< 200 micrograms/kg), may contribute significantly to intakes when consumption of green vegetables is poor. Within the scope of this present study, it has not been possible to address issues such as inter-sample variability, losses during storage or the

  7. PDGF induces SphK1 expression via Egr-1 to promote pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Sysol, Justin R; Natarajan, Viswanathan; Machado, Roberto F

    2016-06-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a progressive, life-threatening disease for which there is currently no curative treatment available. Pathologic changes in this disease involve remodeling of the pulmonary vasculature, including marked proliferation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs). Recently, the bioactive lipid sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) and its activating kinase, sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1), have been shown to be upregulated in PAH and promote PASMC proliferation. The mechanisms regulating the transcriptional upregulation of SphK1 in PASMCs are unknown. In this study, we investigated the role of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), a PAH-relevant stimuli associated with enhanced PASMC proliferation, on SphK1 expression regulation. In human PASMCs (hPASMCs), PDGF significantly increased SphK1 mRNA and protein expression and induced cell proliferation. Selective inhibition of SphK1 attenuated PDGF-induced hPASMC proliferation. In silico promoter analysis for SphK1 identified several binding sites for early growth response protein 1 (Egr-1), a PDGF-associated transcription factor. Luciferase assays demonstrated that PDGF activates the SphK1 promoter in hPASMCs, and truncation of the 5'-promoter reduced PDGF-induced SphK1 expression. Stimulation of hPASMCs with PDGF induced Egr-1 protein expression, and direct binding of Egr-1 to the SphK1 promoter was confirmed by chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis. Inhibition of ERK signaling prevented induction of Egr-1 by PDGF. Silencing of Egr-1 attenuated PDGF-induced SphK1 expression and hPASMC proliferation. These studies demonstrate that SphK1 is regulated by PDGF in hPASMCs via the transcription factor Egr-1, promoting cell proliferation. This novel mechanism of SphK1 regulation may be a therapeutic target in pulmonary vascular remodeling in PAH. PMID:27099350

  8. Suprafamilial relationships among Rodentia and the phylogenetic effect of removing fast-evolving nucleotides in mitochondrial, exon and intron fragments

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    (Castoridae + Geomyoidea). The second suprafamilial clustering identified a novel association between the Sciuromorpha (Gliridae + (Sciuridae + Aplodontidae)) and the Hystricomorpha (Ctenodactylidae + Hystricognathi) which together represents the earliest dichotomy among Rodentia. Molecular time estimates using a relaxed Bayesian molecular clock dates the appearance of the five suborders nearly contemporaniously at the KT boundary and this is congruent with suggestions of an early explosion of rodent diversity. Based on these newly proposed phylogenetic relationships, the evolution of the zygomasseteric pattern that has been used for a long time in rodent systematics is evaluated. PMID:19036132

  9. Antisolar-type surface differential rotation of the K1-giant sigma Geminorum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovari, Zsolt; Künstler, Andreas; Vida, Krisztián; Kriskovics, Levente; Carroll, Thorsten; Strassmeier, Klaus

    2015-08-01

    Spot migration pattern is analysed to derive surface differential rotation on the active K1-giant component of the long-period RS CVn-type binary system σ Gem. From a set of high-resolution spectra taken with STELLA-I SES in 2006/07, three subsequent Doppler images were obtained using our advanced surface reconstruction code iMap. The time-evolution of the spotted surface suggests antisolar-type differential rotation with α of -0.04 shear parameter, in quite an agreement with preceding results.

  10. Aging in K1-xLixTaO3: A Domain Growth Interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberici-Kious, F.; Bouchaud, J. P.; Cugliandolo, L. F.; Doussineau, P.; Levelut, A.

    1998-11-01

    The aging behavior of the ac susceptibility of randomly substituted K1-xLixTaO3 crystals reveals marked differences with spin glasses in that cooling rate effects are very important. The response to temperature steps (including temperature cycles) was carefully studied. A model based on thermally activated domain growth accounts for all the experimental results, provided one allows for a large distribution of pinning energies, in such a way that ``slow'' and ``fast'' domains coexist. Interesting similarities with deeply supercooled liquids are underlined.

  11. Photocurrents in the polar phase of K1-xLixTaO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camagni, P.; Galinetto, P.; Giulotto, E.; Samoggia, G.; Sangalli, P.

    Experiments on photoconductivity and thermally stimulated currents were performed on Li-doped KTaO3 single crystals. The large enhancement of conductivity, caused by UV excitation at low temperature was found to correlate with a subsequent release of trapped charge between 30 and 40 K. No corresponding release was shown by pure KTaO3, consistently with a very low yield of photoconduction. It is concluded that the presence of hole traps, with the consequent quenching of electron-hole recombination, is at the origin of the photoconductive response of K1-xLixTaO3.

  12. The K1.8BR spectrometer system at J-PARC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agari, Keizo; Ajimura, Shuhei; Beer, George; Bhang, Hyoungchan; Bragadireanu, Mario; Buehler, Paul; Busso, Luigi; Cargnelli, Michael; Choi, Seonho; Curceanu, Catalina; Enomoto, Shun; Faso, Diego; Fujioka, Hiroyuki; Fujiwara, Yuya; Fukuda, Tomokazu; Guaraldo, Carlo; Hashimoto, Tadashi; Hayano, Ryugo S.; Hiraiwa, Toshihiko; Hirose, Erina; Ieiri, Masaharu; Iio, Masami; Iliescu, Mihai; Inoue, Kentaro; Ishiguro, Yosuke; Ishikawa, Takashi; Ishimoto, Shigeru; Ishiwatari, Tomoichi; Itahashi, Kenta; Iwai, Masaaki; Iwasaki, Masahiko; Kakiguchi, Yutaka; Katoh, Yohji; Kawasaki, Shingo; Kienle, Paul; Kou, Hiroshi; Ma, Yue; Marton, Johann; Matsuda, Yasuyuki; Minakawa, Michifumi; Mizoi, Yutaka; Morra, Ombretta; Muto, Ryotaro; Nagae, Tomofumi; Naruki, Megumi; Noumi, Hiroyuki; Ohnishi, Hiroaki; Okada, Shinji; Outa, Haruhiko; Piscicchia, Kristian; Lener, Marco Poli; Vidal, Antonio Romero; Sada, Yuta; Sakaguchi, Atsushi; Sakuma, Fuminori; Sato, Masaharu; Sato, Yoshinori; Sawada, Shin'ya; Scordo, Alessandro; Sekimoto, Michiko; Shi, Hexi; Shirakabe, Yoshihisa; Sirghi, Diana; Sirghi, Florin; Suzuki, Ken; Suzuki, Shoji; Suzuki, Takatoshi; Suzuki, Yoshihiro; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Tanaka, Kazuhiro; Tanaka, Nobuaki; Tatsuno, Hideyuki; Tokuda, Makoto; Tomono, Dai; Toyoda, Akihisa; Tsukada, Kyo; Doce, Oton Vazquez; Watanabe, Hiroaki; Widmann, Eberhard; Wünschek, Barbara K.; Yamanoi, Yutaka; Yamazaki, Toshimitsu; Yim, Heejoong; Zmeskal, Johann

    2012-11-01

    A new spectrometer system has been designed and constructed at the secondary beam line K1.8BR in the hadron hall of J-PARC to investigate bar {K} N interactions and bar {K}-nuclear bound systems. The spectrometer consists of a high precision beam line spectrometer, a liquid 3He/4He/D2 target system, a cylindrical detector system that surrounds the target to detect the decay particles from the target region, and a neutron time-of-flight counter array located ˜15 m downstream of the target position. Details of the design, construction, and performance of the detector components are described.

  13. Unexpected roles of plastoglobules (plastid lipid droplets) in vitamin K1 and E metabolism.

    PubMed

    Spicher, Livia; Kessler, Felix

    2015-06-01

    Tocopherol (vitamin E) and phylloquinone (vitamin K1) are lipid-soluble antioxidants that can only be synthesized by photosynthetic organisms. These compounds function primarily at the thylakoid membrane but are also present in chloroplast lipid droplets, also known as plastoglobules (PG). Depending on environmental conditions and stage of plant development, changes in the content, number and size of PG occur. PG are directly connected to the thylakoid membrane via the outer lipid leaflet. Apart from storage, PG are active in metabolism and likely trafficking of diverse lipid species. This review presents recent advances on how plastoglobules are implicated in the biosynthesis and metabolism of vitamin E and K. PMID:26037391

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of Thermus scotoductus Strain K1, Isolated from a Geothermal Spring in Karvachar, Nagorno Karabakh.

    PubMed

    Saghatelyan, Ani; Poghosyan, Lianna; Panosyan, Hovik; Birkeland, Nils-Kåre

    2015-01-01

    The 2,379,636-bp draft genome sequence of Thermus scotoductus strain K1, isolated from geothermal spring outlet located in the Karvachar region in Nagorno Karabakh is presented. Strain K1 shares about 80% genome sequence similarity with T. scotoductus strain SA-01, recovered from a deep gold mine in South Africa. PMID:26564055

  15. 40 CFR Table K-1 to Subpart K of... - Electric Arc Furnace (EAF) CH4 Emission Factors

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Electric Arc Furnace (EAF) CH4.... 98, Subpt. K, Table K-1 Table K-1 to Subpart K of Part 98—Electric Arc Furnace (EAF) CH4 Emission... charging intermittently every minute. b Temperature measured in off-gas channel downstream of the...

  16. 40 CFR Table K-1 to Subpart K of... - Electric Arc Furnace (EAF) CH4 Emission Factors

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Electric Arc Furnace (EAF) CH4.... 98, Subpt. K, Table K-1 Table K-1 to Subpart K of Part 98—Electric Arc Furnace (EAF) CH4 Emission... charging intermittently every minute. b Temperature measured in off-gas channel downstream of the...

  17. 40 CFR Table K-1 to Subpart K of... - Electric Arc Furnace (EAF) CH4 Emission Factors

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Electric Arc Furnace (EAF) CH4.... 98, Subpt. K, Table K-1 Table K-1 to Subpart K of Part 98—Electric Arc Furnace (EAF) CH4 Emission... charging intermittently every minute. b Temperature measured in off-gas channel downstream of the...

  18. 40 CFR Table K-1 to Subpart K of... - Electric Arc Furnace (EAF) CH4 Emission Factors

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Electric Arc Furnace (EAF) CH4.... 98, Subpt. K, Table K-1 Table K-1 to Subpart K of Part 98—Electric Arc Furnace (EAF) CH4 Emission... charging intermittently every minute. b Temperature measured in off-gas channel downstream of the...

  19. 26 CFR 1.6050K-1 - Returns relating to sales or exchanges of certain partnership interests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... certain partnership interests. 1.6050K-1 Section 1.6050K-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... Returns relating to sales or exchanges of certain partnership interests. (a) Partnership return required—(1) In general. Except as otherwise provided in this paragraph (a), a partnership shall make...

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of Thermus scotoductus Strain K1, Isolated from a Geothermal Spring in Karvachar, Nagorno Karabakh

    PubMed Central

    Saghatelyan, Ani; Poghosyan, Lianna

    2015-01-01

    The 2,379,636-bp draft genome sequence of Thermus scotoductus strain K1, isolated from geothermal spring outlet located in the Karvachar region in Nagorno Karabakh is presented. Strain K1 shares about 80% genome sequence similarity with T. scotoductus strain SA-01, recovered from a deep gold mine in South Africa. PMID:26564055

  1. Neto auxiliary proteins control both the trafficking and biophysical properties of the kainate receptor GluK1

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Nengyin; Shi, Yun S; Lomash, Richa Madan; Roche, Katherine W; Nicoll, Roger A

    2015-01-01

    Kainate receptors (KARs) are a subfamily of glutamate receptors mediating excitatory synaptic transmission and Neto proteins are recently identified auxiliary subunits for KARs. However, the roles of Neto proteins in the synaptic trafficking of KAR GluK1 are poorly understood. Here, using the hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neuron as a null background system we find that surface expression of GluK1 receptor itself is very limited and is not targeted to excitatory synapses. Both Neto1 and Neto2 profoundly increase GluK1 surface expression and also drive GluK1 to synapses. However, the regulation GluK1 synaptic targeting by Neto proteins is independent of their role in promoting surface trafficking. Interestingly, GluK1 is excluded from synapses expressing AMPA receptors and is selectively incorporated into silent synapses. Neto2, but not Neto1, slows GluK1 deactivation, whereas Neto1 speeds GluK1 desensitization and Neto2 slows desensitization. These results establish critical roles for Neto auxiliary subunits controlling KARs properties and synaptic incorporation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11682.001 PMID:26720915

  2. KEY COMPARISON: COOMET.M.V-K1 key intercomparison of liquid viscosity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domostroeva, N. G.; Chunovkina, A. G.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the results of the first COOMET key comparison in which four national metrology institutes (NMIs) took part. Three samples of Newtonian liquids with nominal kinematic viscosities of 30 mm2/s, 100 mm2/s and 1000 mm2/s at 20 °C were used to determine the degrees of equivalence of the national standards of Belarus, Ukraine and Bulgaria to the standards of NMIs that took part in the KC CIPM (CCM.V-K1). The results of the evaluation of data obtained for all liquids used in the comparison were compared with the reference values (KCRV), obtained in the first key comparison CIPM (CCM.V-K1). Main text. To reach the main text of this Paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA).

  3. Shallow levels and photoconductivity in K1-xLixTaO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galinetto, P.; Giulotto, E.; Sangalli, P.; Camagni, P.; Samoggia, G.

    1999-11-01

    We present the results of experiments performed on K1-xLixTaO3 as well as on Nb-doped and nominally pure KTaO3 single crystals, in which we compared observations of thermally stimulated currents and photoconductivity. In the Li-doped compounds, the large enhancement of conductivity caused by ultraviolet excitation at low temperature was found to correlate with the filling of shallow trapping centres, giving intense charge release below 30-40 K. No sign of a corresponding release was shown by pure or Nb-doped KTaO3, consistently with a very low yield of photocurrent which one observes in these cases. The depth of the trapping levels in K1-xLixTaO3 crystals was found to be between 50 and 70 meV. On the basis of past models and recent calculations, these levels can be identified with hole traps, originating from the perturbation of O2- states at the top of the valence band. They are a plausible source of enhanced photoconductivity, via the quenching of electron-hole recombination.

  4. The application criterion of model-based optical proximity correction in a low k1 process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Doo-Youl; Kim, In-Sung; Jung, Sung-Gon; Jung, Myoung-Ho; Park, Joo-On; Oh, Seok-Hwan; Woo, Sang-Gyun; Cho, Han-Ku; Moon, Joo-Tae

    2005-05-01

    As k1 factor approaches the theoretical limit, optical proximity correction (OPC) treatments necessary to maintain dimensional tolerances involve increasingly complex correction shapes. This translates to more detailed, or larger mask pattern databases. Moreover, development of exposure tools lags behind the shrinkage of device. This may result in dwindling of process margin in lighographic process despite using all possible resolution enhancement techniques (RETs). Although model-based OPC may lose its effectiveness in case of narrower photolithographic process margin, model-based OPC is recognized as a robust tool to cope with the diversity of layout. By the way, in case of narrower photolithographic process margin, model-based OPC lose its effectiveness. To enhance the usefulness of the OPC, we need to overcome many obstacles. It is supposed that the original layout be designed friendly to lithography to enhance the process margin using aggressive RETs, and is amended by model-based OPC to suppress the proximity effect. But, some constraints are found during an OPC procedure. Ultimately, unless the original lithgraphy friendly layout (LFL) is corrected in terms of pitches and shapes, the lithography process is out of process window as well as makes pattern fidelity poor. This paper emphasizes that the application of model-based OPC requires a particular and unique layout configuration to preserve the process margin in the low k1 process.

  5. Observation and polarization measurements of B+/- -->phiK1 +/- and B +/- -->phiK2 *+/-.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Bona, M; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prencipe, E; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Garra Tico, J; Grauges, E; Lopez, L; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Cahn, R N; Jacobsen, R G; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Osipenkov, I L; Ronan, M T; Tackmann, K; Tanabe, T; Hawkes, C M; Soni, N; Watson, A T; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Barrett, M; Khan, A; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Shen, B C; Vitug, G M; Yasin, Z; Zhang, L; Sharma, V; Campagnari, C; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Wang, L; Wilson, M G; Winstrom, L O; Cheng, C H; Doll, D A; Echenard, B; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Karbach, M; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Kobel, M J; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Playfer, S; Watson, J E; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Santoro, V; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Nash, J A; Panduro Vazquez, W; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Lae, C K; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Béquilleux, J; D'Orazio, A; Davier, M; Firmino da Costa, J; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Lepeltier, V; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Pruvot, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Burke, J P; Chavez, C A; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Clarke, C K; George, K A; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Sigamani, M; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Paramesvaran, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Alwyn, K E; Bailey, D S; Barlow, R J; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Dallapiccola, C; Li, X; Salvati, E; Saremi, S; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, G; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; LoSecco, J M; Wang, W F; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Sekula, S J; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Castelli, G; Gagliardi, N; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; del Amo Sanchez, P; Ben-Haim, E; Briand, H; Calderini, G; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Prendki, J; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Carpinelli, M; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Biesiada, J; Lopes Pegna, D; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Anulli, F; Baracchini, E; Cavoto, G; del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Roethel, W; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Escalier, M; Esteve, L; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Benitez, J F; Cenci, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Gabareen, A M; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kaminski, J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Lindquist, B; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; Neal, H; Nelson, S; O'Grady, C P; Ofte, I; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; West, C A; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Ziegler, V; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Miyashita, T S; Petersen, B A; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Zain, S B; Spanier, S M; Wogsland, B J; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Drummond, B W; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Bianchi, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Milanes, D A; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Choi, H H F; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Lewczuk, M J; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Gershon, T J; Harrison, P F; Ilic, J; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Vuosalo, C O; Wu, S L

    2008-10-17

    With the full BABAR data sample of 465 x 10(6) B(over)B pairs, we observe the decays B+/- -->phiK_(1)(1270) +/- and B +/- -->phiK*_(2)(1430)+/-. We measure the branching fractions (6.1+/-1.6+/-1.1) x 10(-6) and (8.4+/-1.8+/-1.0) x 10(-6) and the fractions of longitudinal polarization 0.46 (+0.12+0.06) _(-0.13-0.07) and 0.80(+0.09)_(-0.10)+/-0.03, respectively. We also report on the B+/- -->phiK*_(0)(1430)+/- decay branching fraction of (7.0+/-1.3+/-0.9) x 10(-6) and several parameters sensitive to CP violation and interference in the above three decays. Upper limits are placed on the B+/- decay rates to final states with phi and K_1(1400)+/-, K*(1410)+/-, K2(1770)+/-, or K_2(1820)+/-. Understanding the observed polarization pattern requires amplitude contributions from an uncertain source. PMID:18999657

  6. Bending Elasticity Modulus of Giant Vesicles Composed of Aeropyrum Pernix K1 Archaeal Lipid

    PubMed Central

    Genova, Julia; Poklar Ulrih, Nataša; Kralj-Iglič, Veronika; Iglič, Aleš; Bivas, Isak

    2015-01-01

    Thermally induced shape fluctuations were used to study elastic properties of giant vesicles composed of archaeal lipids C25,25-archetidyl (glucosyl) inositol and C25,25-archetidylinositol isolated from lyophilised Aeropyrum pernix K1 cells. Giant vesicles were created by electroformation in pure water environment. Stroboscopic illumination using a xenon flash lamp was implemented to remove the blur effect due to the finite integration time of the camera and to obtain an instant picture of the fluctuating vesicle shape. The mean weighted value of the bending elasticity modulus kc of the archaeal membrane determined from the measurements meeting the entire set of qualification criteria was (1.89 ± 0.18) × 10−19 J, which is similar to the values obtained for a membrane composed of the eukaryotic phospholipids SOPC (1.88 ± 0.17) × 10−19 J and POPC (2.00 ± 0.21) × 10−19 J. We conclude that membranes composed of archaeal lipids isolated from Aeropyrum pernix K1 cells have similar elastic properties as membranes composed of eukaryotic lipids. This fact, together with the importance of the elastic properties for the normal circulation through blood system, provides further evidence in favor of expectations that archaeal lipids could be appropriate for the design of drug delivery systems. PMID:25821933

  7. Aqueous extract of dioscorea opposita thunb. normalizes the hypertension in 2K1C hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Dioscorea opposita Thunb. (Huai Shan Yao, DOT), a common staple food in China, has been used for more than 2000 years in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) to treat different systemic diseases including hypertension. The objective of this study was to investigate the possible antihypertensive effects of the aqueous extract of (DOT) in renovascular hypertensive rats as well as the mechanism in reducing blood pressure. Methods The two-kidney one-clip (2K1C) Goldblatt model of renovascular hypertension was used in Wistar rats. Rats with captopril, low-dose DOT and high-dose DOT treated 2K1C groups for 6 weeks. The blood pressure, cardiac mass index (heart weight/body weight), plasma level of angiotensin-II (Ang-II), endothelin-1(ET-1), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and malondialdehyde (MDA) were evaluated. Results DOT significantly reduced mean systolic and diastolic blood pressure after treatment. DOT also significantly increased plasma SOD activity but decreased plasma MDA concentration. Renal function was improved with captopril and DOT. DOT reduced plasma Ang-II activity and plasma ET concentration. They couldalso significantly reduce the left ventricular hypertrophy and cardiac mass index. Conclusions Our results suggest that DOT may have an antihypertensive effect on hypertension by inhibit ET-converting enzyme and antioxidant activity, which warrant further exploration. PMID:24447776

  8. Cytoprotective effect of resveratrol diastereomers in CHO-K1 cells exposed to beauvericin.

    PubMed

    Mallebrera, B; Brandolini, V; Font, G; Ruiz, M J

    2015-06-01

    Beauvericin (BEA) causes cytotoxicity, lipid peroxidation and reactive oxygen species in CHO-K1 cells. Resveratrol (RSV) is a polyphenol with multiple biological properties, including antioxidant effects. RSV has two forms: trans and cis. The aims of this study were to determine the cytoprotective effect of trans-RSV and diastereomers mixtures (50:50 trans/cis-RSV and 70:30 trans/cis-RSV) incubated alone and in combination with BEA in ovarian (CHO-K1) cells. The results demonstrated that cell viability increases (from 9% to 77%) when they were exposed to low concentration of RSV. Moreover, when the cells were pre-treated with RSV and then exposed to BEA, a cytoprotective effect (from 25% to 76%) and a ROS production diminution (from 27% to 92%) were observed, with respect to cells exposed to BEA without previous RSV exposure. RSV pre-treatment decreased the MDA levels (from 15% to 37%) when it is compared with cells exposed only to BEA. Therefore, it can be concluded that RSV could reduce the toxicological risk produced by BEA when they are in combination. PMID:25843362

  9. Adverse events associated with vitamin K1: results of a worldwide postmarketing surveillance programme.

    PubMed

    Pereira, S P; Williams, R

    1998-05-01

    We compared adverse events associated with a conventional vitamin K(1) preparation, Konakion, with a new mixed micellar formulation, Konakion MM. Data were obtained worldwide from spontaneous reports, clinical trials and postmarketing surveillance. During the period 1974 to July 1995, an estimated 635 million adults and 728 million children were prescribed Konakion or Konakion MM. Of the 404 adverse events in 286 subjects reported, 387 (96%) were associated with Konakion. Konakion MM accounted for 4% (n=17) of the reported adverse events, and 5% of total sales figures. Thirteen of the 17 adverse events (76%) reported for Konakion MM were minor injection site reactions. Overall, 120 of the adverse events were serious, of which 117 (98%) were associated with Konakion. Eighty-five probable anaphylactoid reactions (of which six were fatal) were reported for conventional Konakion, compared with one non-fatal anaphylactoid reaction for Konakion MM. During the last 12 months of postmarketing surveillance, there were 14 serious adverse events reported in an estimated 21 million individuals treated with Konakion, but none in the 13 million who received Konakion MM. These results suggest that the Cremophor EL-solubilized preparations of vitamin K(1) have a higher profile of adverse events, including anaphylactoid reactions, than the newer mixed micellar preparation, Konakion MM. PMID:15073995

  10. Bending elasticity modulus of giant vesicles composed of aeropyrum pernix k1 archaeal lipid.

    PubMed

    Genova, Julia; Ulrih, Nataša Poklar; Kralj-Iglič, Veronika; Iglič, Aleš; Bivas, Isak

    2015-01-01

    Thermally induced shape fluctuations were used to study elastic properties of giant vesicles composed of archaeal lipids C25,25-archetidyl (glucosyl) inositol and C25,25-archetidylinositol isolated from lyophilised Aeropyrum pernix K1 cells. Giant vesicles were created by electroformation in pure water environment. Stroboscopic illumination using a xenon flash lamp was implemented to remove the blur effect due to the finite integration time of the camera and to obtain an instant picture of the fluctuating vesicle shape. The mean weighted value of the bending elasticity modulus kc of the archaeal membrane determined from the measurements meeting the entire set of qualification criteria was (1.89 ± 0.18) × 10-19 J, which is similar to the values obtained for a membrane composed of the eukaryotic phospholipids SOPC (1.88 ± 0.17) × 10-19 J and POPC (2.00 ± 0.21) ´ 10-19 J. We conclude that membranes composed of archaeal lipids isolated from Aeropyrum pernix K1 cells have similar elastic properties as membranes composed of eukaryotic lipids. This fact, together with the importance of the elastic properties for the normal circulation through blood system, provides further evidence in favor of expectations that archaeal lipids could be appropriate for the design of drug delivery systems. PMID:25821933

  11. ArF solutions for low-k1 back-end imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiaux, Vincent; Montgomery, Patrick K.; Vandenberghe, Geert; Monnoyer, Philippe; Ronse, Kurt G.; Conley, Will; Litt, Lloyd C.; Lucas, Kevin; Finders, Jo; Socha, Robert; Van Den Broeke, Douglas J.

    2003-06-01

    The requirements stated in the ITRS roadmap for back-end-of-line imaging of current and future technology nodes are very aggressive. Therefore, it is likely that high NA in combination with enhancement techniques will be necessary for the imaging of contacts and trenches, pushing optical lithography into the low-k1 regime. In this paper, we focus more specifically on imaging solutions for contact holes beyond the 90 nm node using high NA ArF lithography, as this is currently seen as one of the major challenges in optical lithography. We investigate the performance of various existing enhancement techniques in order to provide contact holes imaging solutions in a k1 range from 0.35 to 0.45, using the ASML PAS5500/1100 0.75NA ArF scanner installed at IMEC. For various resolution enhancement techniques (RET), the proof of concept has been demonstrated in literature. In this paper, we propose an experimental one-to-one comparison of these RET"s with fixed CD target, exposure tool, lithographic process, and metrology. A single exposure through pitch (dense through isolated) printing solution is preferred and is the largest challenge. The common approach using a 6% attenuated phase-shifted mask (attPSM) with a conventional illumination fails. The advantages and drawbacks of other techniques are discussed. High transmission (17%) attenuated phase shift, potentially beneficial for part of the pitch range, requires conflicting trade-offs when looking for a single exposure through pitch solution. More promising results are obtained combining a BIM or a 6% attPSM with assist slots and off-axis illumination, yielding a depth of focus (DOF) at 8% exposure latitude (EL) greater than 0.31 μm from 200 nm pitch through isolated. Chromeless phase lithography (CPL) is also discussed with promising results obtained at the densest pitch. At a 0.4 k1, an experimental extrapolation to 0.85NA demonstrates that a pitch of 180 nm can be resolved with 0.4 μm DOF at 8% EL. For all of these

  12. Photoluminescence processes in k-1xLixTaO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camagni, P.; Galinetto, P.; Giulotto, E.; Samoggia, G.; Sangalli, P.

    A study of blue-green photoluminescence of K1-xLixTaO3 single crystals, under UV irradiation, was performed in the range 15-20 K. It was shown that the emission is strongly enhanced and thermally more stable with respect to pure KTaO3, up to ˜40 K. Above this point the yield of emission decreases abruptly with an Arrhenius-like behaviour controlled by an activation energy of 70-100 meV. After low temperature excitation, a thermoluminescence spectrally very similar to PL and giving rise to a glow peak around 30K is also observed. Correlations with recent results on photoconductivity and thermally stimulated currents are illustrated. An argument in favour of close-pair recombinations between Ta4+ and O- centers is proposed.

  13. Phase Diagram and Quantum Order by Disorder in the Kitaev K1-K2 Honeycomb Magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousochatzakis, Ioannis; Reuther, Johannes; Thomale, Ronny; Rachel, Stephan; Perkins, N. B.

    2015-10-01

    We show that the topological Kitaev spin liquid on the honeycomb lattice is extremely fragile against the second-neighbor Kitaev coupling K2, which has recently been shown to be the dominant perturbation away from the nearest-neighbor model in iridate Na2 IrO3 , and may also play a role in α -RuCl3 and Li2 IrO3 . This coupling naturally explains the zigzag ordering (without introducing unrealistically large longer-range Heisenberg exchange terms) and the special entanglement between real and spin space observed recently in Na2 IrO3 . Moreover, the minimal K1-K2 model that we present here holds the unique property that the classical and quantum phase diagrams and their respective order-by-disorder mechanisms are qualitatively different due to the fundamentally different symmetries of the classical and quantum counterparts.

  14. PYK2 via S6K1 regulates the function of androgen receptors and the growth of prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Yu-Hsuan; Huang, Yu-Ting; Hung, Chia-Yu; Kuo, Tzu-Chien; Luo, Fuh-Jinn; Yuan, Ta-Chun

    2016-08-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) is a steroid hormone receptor that functions as a transcription factor for regulating cell growth and survival. Aberrant AR function becomes a risk factor for promoting the progression of prostate cancer (PCa). In this study, we examined the roles of proline-rich tyrosine kinase 2 (PYK2) and ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) in regulating AR expression and activity and growth properties in PCa cells. Compared with normal prostate tissues, PCa tumors exhibited high levels of PYK2 and S6K1 expression. Furthermore, the expression levels of PYK2 and S6K1 were significantly correlated with nuclear AR expression in PCa tissues. We further found the association between PYK2, S6K1, and AR in their protein expression and phosphorylation levels among normal prostate PZ-HPV-7 cells and prostate cancer LNCaP and 22Rv1 cells. Overexpression of the wild-type PYK2 in PZ-HPV-7 and LNCaP cells promoted AR and S6K1 expression and phosphorylation as well as enhanced cell growth. In contrast, expression of the mutated PYK2 or knockdown of PYK2 expression in LNCaP or 22Rv1 cells caused reduced expression or phosphorylation of AR and S6K1 as well as retarded cell growth. Under an androgen-deprived condition, PYK2-promoted AR expression and phosphorylation and PSA production in LNCaP cells can be abolished by knocking down S6K1 expression. In summary, our data suggested that PYK2 via S6K1 activation modulated AR function and growth properties in PCa cells. Thus, PYK2 and S6K1 may potentially serve as therapeutic targets for PCa treatment. PMID:27492635

  15. Homologous desensitization of human histamine H₃ receptors expressed in CHO-K1 cells.

    PubMed

    Osorio-Espinoza, Angélica; Escamilla-Sánchez, Juan; Aquino-Jarquin, Guillermo; Arias-Montaño, José-Antonio

    2014-02-01

    Histamine H₃ receptors (H₃Rs) modulate the function of the nervous system at the pre- and post-synaptic levels. In this work we aimed to determine whether, as other G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), H₃Rs desensitize in response to agonist exposure. By using CHO-K1 cells stably transfected with the human H₃R (hH3R) we show that functional responses (inhibition of forskolin-induced cAMP accumulation in intact cells and stimulation of [(35)S]-GTPγS binding to cell membranes) were markedly reduced after agonist exposure. For cAMP accumulation assays the effect was significant at 60 min with a maximum at 90 min. Agonist exposure resulted in decreased binding sites for the radioligand [(3)H]-N-methyl-histamine ([(3)H]-NMHA) to intact cells and modified the sub-cellular distribution of H₃Rs, as detected by sucrose density gradients and [(3)H]-NMHA binding to cell membranes, suggesting receptor internalization. The reduction in the inhibition of forskolin-stimulated cAMP formation observed after agonist pre-incubation was prevented by incubation in hypertonic medium or in ice-cold medium. Agonist-induced loss in binding sites was also prevented by hypertonic medium or incubation at 4 °C, but not by filipin III, indicating clathrin-dependent endocytosis. Immunodetection showed that CHO-K1 cells express GPCR kinases (GRKs) 2/3, and both the GRK general inhibitor ZnCl₂ and a small interfering RNA against GRK-2 reduced receptor desensitization. Taken together these results indicate that hH₃Rs experience homologous desensitization upon prolonged exposure to agonists, and that this process involves the action of GRK-2 and internalization via clathrin-coated vesicles. PMID:24161268

  16. Accelerated solvent extraction of vitamin K1 in medical foods in conjunction with matrix solid-phase dispersion.

    PubMed

    Chase, G W; Thompson, B

    2000-01-01

    An extraction technique is described for vitamin K1 in medical foods, using accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) in conjunction with matrix solid-phase dispersion (MSPD). The medical food sample is treated as it would be with MSPD extraction, followed by ASE for a hands-free automated extraction. The vitamin K1 in the ASE extract is then quantitated by reversed-phase liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection. The chromatography specifications are identical to those in previous work that used MSPD only, with a limit of detection of 6.6 pg and a limit of quantitation of 22 pg on column. Recoveries, which were determined for an analyte-fortified zero control reference material for medical foods, averaged 97.6% (n = 25) for vitamin K1. The method provides a rapid, automatic, specific, and easily controlled assay for vitamin K1 in fortified medical foods with minimal solvent usage. PMID:10772179

  17. 75 FR 42831 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Form 1065, Schedule C, Schedule D, Schedule K-1...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-22

    ... Items), Schedule L (Balance Sheets per Books), Schedule M-1 (Reconciliation of Income (Loss) per Books.... (Schedule K-1), Balance Sheets per Books (Schedule L), Reconciliation of Income (Loss) per Books With...

  18. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 1 (MAP3K1) integrates developmental signals for eyelid closure

    PubMed Central

    Geh, Esmond; Meng, Qinghang; Mongan, Maureen; Wang, Jingcai; Takatori, Atsushi; Zheng, Yi; Puga, Alvaro; Lang, Richard A.; Xia, Ying

    2011-01-01

    Developmental eyelid closure is an evolutionarily conserved morphogenetic event requiring proliferation, differentiation, cytoskeleton reorganization, and migration of epithelial cells at the tip of the developing eyelid. Many signaling events take place during eyelid closure, but how the signals converge to regulate the morphogenetic process remains an open and intriguing question. Here we show that mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 1 (MAP3K1) highly expressed in the developing eyelid epithelium, forms with c-Jun, a regulatory axis that orchestrates morphogenesis by integrating two different networks of eyelid closure signals. A TGF-α/EGFR-RhoA module initiates one of these networks by inducing c-Jun expression which, in a phosphorylation-independent manner, binds to the Map3k1 promoter and causes an increase in MAP3K1 expression. RhoA knockout in the ocular surface epithelium disturbs this network by decreasing MAP3K1 expression, and causes delayed eyelid closure in Map3k1 hemizygotes. The second network is initiated by the enzymatic activity of MAP3K1, which phosphorylates and activates a JNK-c-Jun module, leading to AP-1 transactivation and induction of its downstream genes, such as Pai-1. MAP3K1 inactivation reduces AP-1 activity and PAI-1 expression both in cells and developing eyelids. MAP3K1 is therefore the nexus of an intracrine regulatory loop connecting the TGF-α/EGFR/RhoA-c-Jun and JNK-c-Jun-AP-1 pathways in developmental eyelid closure. PMID:21969564

  19. Molecular characterization and expression profile of MAP2K1ip1/MP1 gene from tiger shrimp, Penaeus monodon.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lishi; Liu, Xianjun; Huang, Jianhua; Yang, Qibin; Qiu, Lihua; Liu, Wenjing; Jiang, Shigui

    2012-05-01

    MAPK kinase 1 interacting protein 1 (MAP2K1ip1) is an important scaffold proteins of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway that form an active signaling module and enhance the specificity and spatiality of MAPK signaling. In the present study, we identified and characterized a MAP2K1ip1 cDNA from tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon (designated as PmMAP2K1ip1). The open reading frame of PmMAP2K1ip1 is 372 bp encoding 123 amino-acid residues with a MAPK interaction domain. The predicted PmMAP2Kip1 protein is 13.6 KDa with the theoretical isoelectric point of 6.3. PmMAP2K1ip1 shared the highest amino acid with Nasonia vitripennis and Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, at 48% and 47.5%, respectively. Phylogenic analysis shows PmMAP2Kip1 is clustering with SpMAP2Kip1, and close to the group of MAP2Kip1s from insect. Furthermore, semiquantitative RT-PCR revealed PmMAP2Kip1 is widely distributed in most examined tissues except nerve, and high expressed in ovary, hemocyte, intestines and hepatopancreas. Meanwhile, PmMAP2k1ip1 is expressed ubiquitously during larval and sex gland development, and keep a high level at the initial development stage. Quantitative real time RT-PCR revealed PmMAP2K1ip1 were up-regulated by lipopolysaccharide and peptidoglycan (PGN) in haemocyte. These data reveal MAP2K1ip1 is a multifunction protein that involved development and immune response. It is benefit to characterize other MAPK signal genes and elucidate the molecular regulation mechanism of MAPK signaling in tiger shrimp. PMID:22209950

  20. Inhibition of Intracellular Transport of B Cell Antigen Receptor Complexes by Kaposi's Sarcoma–Associated Herpesvirus K1

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bok-Soo; Alvarez, Xavier; Ishido, Satoshi; Lackner, Andrew A.; Jung, Jae U.

    2000-01-01

    The B cell antigen receptor (BCR) is a large complex that consists of a disulfide-linked tetramer of two transmembrane heavy (μ) chains and two light (λ or κ) chains in association with a heterodimer of Igα and Igβ. Kaposi's sarcoma–associated herpesvirus (KSHV) encodes a transforming protein called K1, which has structural and functional similarity to Igα and Igβ. We demonstrate that K1 downregulates the expression of BCR complexes on the surface. The NH2-terminal region of K1 specifically interacts with the μ chains of BCR complexes, and this interaction retains BCR complexes in the endoplasmic reticulum, preventing their intracellular transport to the cell surface. Thus, KSHV K1 resembles Igα and Igβ in its ability to induce signaling and to interact with μ chains of the BCR. However, unlike Igα and Igβ, which interact with μ chains to direct BCR complexes to the cell surface, K1 interacts with μ chains to block the intracellular transport of BCR complexes to the cell surface. These results demonstrate a unique feature of the K1 transforming protein, which may confer virus-infected cells with a long-term survival advantage. PMID:10880522

  1. Structure Function Studies of Vaccinia Virus Host Range Protein K1 Reveal a Novel Functional Surface for Ankyrin Repeat Proteins▿

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yongchao; Meng, Xiangzhi; Xiang, Yan; Deng, Junpeng

    2010-01-01

    Poxvirus host tropism at the cellular level is regulated by virus-encoded host range proteins acting downstream of virus entry. The functioning mechanisms of most host range proteins are unclear, but many contain multiple ankyrin (ANK) repeats, a motif that is known for ligand interaction through a concave surface. We report here the crystal structure of one of the ANK repeat-containing host range proteins, the vaccinia virus K1 protein. The structure, at a resolution of 2.3 Å, showed that K1 consists entirely of ANK repeats, including seven complete ones and two incomplete ones, one each at the N and C terminus. Interestingly, Phe82 and Ser83, which were previously shown to be critical for K1's function, are solvent exposed and located on a convex surface, opposite the consensus ANK interaction surface. The importance of this convex surface was further supported by our additional mutagenesis studies. We found that K1's host range function was negatively affected by substitution of either Asn51 or Cys47 and completely abolished by substitution of both residues. Cys47 and Asn51 are also exposed on the convex surface, spatially adjacent to Phe82 and Ser83. Altogether, our data showed that K1 residues on a continuous convex ANK repeat surface are critical for the host range function, suggesting that K1 functions through ligand interaction and does so with a novel ANK interaction surface. PMID:20089642

  2. Structure Function Studies of Vaccinia Virus Host Range Protein K1 Reveal a Novel Functional Surface for Ankyrin Repeat Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yongchao; Meng, Xiangzhi; Xiang, Yan; Deng, Junpeng

    2010-06-15

    Poxvirus host tropism at the cellular level is regulated by virus-encoded host range proteins acting downstream of virus entry. The functioning mechanisms of most host range proteins are unclear, but many contain multiple ankyrin (ANK) repeats, a motif that is known for ligand interaction through a concave surface. We report here the crystal structure of one of the ANK repeat-containing host range proteins, the vaccinia virus K1 protein. The structure, at a resolution of 2.3 {angstrom}, showed that K1 consists entirely of ANK repeats, including seven complete ones and two incomplete ones, one each at the N and C terminus. Interestingly, Phe82 and Ser83, which were previously shown to be critical for K1's function, are solvent exposed and located on a convex surface, opposite the consensus ANK interaction surface. The importance of this convex surface was further supported by our additional mutagenesis studies. We found that K1's host range function was negatively affected by substitution of either Asn51 or Cys47 and completely abolished by substitution of both residues. Cys47 and Asn51 are also exposed on the convex surface, spatially adjacent to Phe82 and Ser83. Altogether, our data showed that K1 residues on a continuous convex ANK repeat surface are critical for the host range function, suggesting that K1 functions through ligand interaction and does so with a novel ANK interaction surface.

  3. Suppression of Angiogenesis and Tumor Growth by the Inhibitor K1-5 Generated by Plasmin-Mediated Proteolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Renhai; Wu, Hua-Lin; Veitonmaki, Niina; Linden, Philip; Farnebo, Jacob; Shi, Guey-Yueh; Cao, Yihai

    1999-05-01

    Proteolytic enzymes are involved in generation of a number of endogenous angiogenesis inhibitors. Previously, we reported that angiostatin, a potent angiogenesis inhibitor, is a protcolytic fragment containing the first four kringle modules of plasminogen. In this report, we demonstrate that urokinase-activated plasmin can process plasminogen to release an angiogenesis inhibitor, K1-5 (protease-activated kringles 1-5). K1-5 inhibits endothelial-cell proliferation with a half-maximal concentration of approximately 50 pM. This inhibitory effect is endothelial-cell-specific and appears to be at least approximately 50-fold greater than that of angiostatin. A synergistic efficacy of endothelial inhibition was observed when angiostatin and kringle 5 (K5) were coincubated with capillary endothelial cells. The synergistic effect is comparable to that produced by K1-5 alone. Systemic treatment of mice with K1-5 at a low dose significantly blocked the fibroblast growth factor-induced corneal neovascularization, whereas angiostatin had no effect at the same dose. K1-5 also suppressed angiogenesis in chicken embryos. Systemic administration of K1-5 at a low dose at which angiostatin was ineffective significantly suppressed the growth of a murine T241 fibrosarcoma in mice. The antitumor effect correlates with the reduced neovascularization. These findings suggest that the plasmin-mediated proteolysis may be involved in the negative switch of angiogenesis.

  4. Pharmacokinetics and safety of a new solution of vitamin K1(20) in children with cholestasis.

    PubMed

    Amédée-Manesme, O; Lambert, W E; Alagille, D; De Leenheer, A P

    1992-02-01

    In cholestatic diseases, the absorption of fat-soluble compounds, including vitamin K1(20), is low and periodic administration of vitamin K1(20) is often necessary. Due to the low absorption of vitamin K1(20) from the Konakion formulation, late hemorrhagic disease of the newborn also occurs especially after oral vitamin K1(20) prophylaxis with Konakion. We investigated the pharmacokinetics and the safety of a new formulation of vitamin K1(20) in a mixed micelles (MM) solution. Compared to the old formulation (Konakion) using Cremophor EL as a solubilizer, the higher vitamin K1(20) levels (as measured by HPLC) in serum obtained after oral administration of the MM formulation clearly demonstrate a superiority of this new formulation. Additionally, the elimination of Cremophor EL as well as of propylene glycol from the formulation avoids possible adverse effects associated with intravenous or intramuscular administration. Furthermore, in most cases, the discomfort of parenteral injections can be overcome by simple oral administration even in children with severe cholestasis. PMID:1593370

  5. Vitamin K1 exerts antiproliferative effects and induces apoptosis in three differently graded human colon cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Orlando, Antonella; Linsalata, Michele; Tutino, Valeria; D'Attoma, Benedetta; Notarnicola, Maria; Russo, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin K1 has been demonstrated as having anticancer potentiality mainly in liver cancer cells. Beyond the reported mechanisms of cancer inhibition (cell cycle arrest and induction of apoptosis), a possible control by vitamin K1 on molecules affecting cell growth could be hypothesized. In the literature, few (if any) data are available on its antitumor effects on colon cancer cells. Therefore, the aims of the study were to investigate in three differently graded human colon cancer cell lines (Caco-2, HT-29, and SW480) the effects of increasing concentrations of vitamin K1 (from 10 μM to 200 μM) administered up to 72 h on (1) cell proliferation, (2) apoptosis with the possible involvement of the MAPK pathway, and (3) polyamine biosynthesis. Vitamin K1 treatment caused a significant antiproliferative effect and induced apoptosis in all the cell lines, with the involvement of the MAPK pathway. A concomitant and significant decrease in the polyamine biosynthesis occurred. This is the first study demonstrating a significant polyamine decrease in addition to the antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects following vitamin K1 administration to colon cancer cell lines. Therapeutically, combinations of vitamin K1 with polyamine inhibitors and/or analogues may represent a suitable option for chemoprevention and/or treatment in future strategies for colorectal cancer management. PMID:26075224

  6. Vitamin K1 Exerts Antiproliferative Effects and Induces Apoptosis in Three Differently Graded Human Colon Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Orlando, Antonella; Linsalata, Michele; Tutino, Valeria; D'Attoma, Benedetta; Notarnicola, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin K1 has been demonstrated as having anticancer potentiality mainly in liver cancer cells. Beyond the reported mechanisms of cancer inhibition (cell cycle arrest and induction of apoptosis), a possible control by vitamin K1 on molecules affecting cell growth could be hypothesized. In the literature, few (if any) data are available on its antitumor effects on colon cancer cells. Therefore, the aims of the study were to investigate in three differently graded human colon cancer cell lines (Caco-2, HT-29, and SW480) the effects of increasing concentrations of vitamin K1 (from 10 μM to 200 μM) administered up to 72 h on (1) cell proliferation, (2) apoptosis with the possible involvement of the MAPK pathway, and (3) polyamine biosynthesis. Vitamin K1 treatment caused a significant antiproliferative effect and induced apoptosis in all the cell lines, with the involvement of the MAPK pathway. A concomitant and significant decrease in the polyamine biosynthesis occurred. This is the first study demonstrating a significant polyamine decrease in addition to the antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects following vitamin K1 administration to colon cancer cell lines. Therapeutically, combinations of vitamin K1 with polyamine inhibitors and/or analogues may represent a suitable option for chemoprevention and/or treatment in future strategies for colorectal cancer management. PMID:26075224

  7. How to obtain accurate resist simulations in very low-k1 era?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiou, Tsann-Bim; Park, Chan-Ha; Choi, Jae-Seung; Min, Young-Hong; Hansen, Steve; Tseng, Shih-En; Chen, Alek C.; Yim, Donggyu

    2006-03-01

    A procedure for calibrating a resist model iteratively adjusts appropriate parameters until the simulations of the model match the experimental data. The tunable parameters may include the shape of the illuminator, the geometry and transmittance/phase of the mask, light source and scanner-related parameters that affect imaging quality, resist process control and most importantly the physical/chemical factors in the resist model. The resist model can be accurately calibrated by measuring critical dimensions (CD) of a focus-exposure matrix (FEM) and the technique has been demonstrated to be very successful in predicting lithographic performance. However, resist model calibration is more challenging in the low k1 (<0.3) regime because numerous uncertainties, such as mask and resist CD metrology errors, are becoming too large to be ignored. This study demonstrates a resist model calibration procedure for a 0.29 k1 process using a 6% halftone mask containing 2D brickwall patterns. The influence of different scanning electron microscopes (SEM) and their wafer metrology signal analysis algorithms on the accuracy of the resist model is evaluated. As an example of the metrology issue of the resist pattern, the treatment of a sidewall angle is demonstrated for the resist line ends where the contrast is relatively low. Additionally, the mask optical proximity correction (OPC) and corner rounding are considered in the calibration procedure that is based on captured SEM images. Accordingly, the average root-mean-square (RMS) error, which is the difference between simulated and experimental CDs, can be improved by considering the metrological issues. Moreover, a weighting method and a measured CD tolerance are proposed to handle the different CD variations of the various edge points of the wafer resist pattern. After the weighting method is implemented and the CD selection criteria applied, the RMS error can be further suppressed. Therefore, the resist CD and process window can

  8. SOFIA Infrared Spectrophotometry of Comet C/2012 K1 (Pan-STARRS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodward, Charles E.; Kelley, Michael S. P.; Harker, David E.; Ryan, Erin L.; Wooden, Diane H.; Sitko, Michael L.; Russell, Ray W.; Reach, William T.; de Pater, Imke; Kolokolova, Ludmilla; Gehrz, Robert D.

    2015-08-01

    We present pre-perihelion infrared 8–31 μm spectrophotometric and imaging observations of comet C/2012 K1 (Pan-STARRS), a dynamically new Oort Cloud comet, conducted with NASA's Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy facility (+FORCAST) in 2014 June. As a “new” comet (first inner solar system passage), the coma grain population may be extremely pristine, unencumbered by a rime and insufficiently irradiated by the Sun to carbonize its surface organics. The comet exhibited a weak 10 μm silicate feature ≃1.18 ± 0.03 above the underlying best-fit 215.32 ± 0.95 K continuum blackbody. Thermal modeling of the observed spectral energy distribution indicates that the coma grains are fractally solid with a porosity factor D = 3 and the peak in the grain size distribution, apeak = 0.6 μm, large. The sub-micron coma grains are dominated by amorphous carbon, with a silicate-to-carbon ratio of {0.80}-0.20+0.25. The silicate crystalline mass fraction is {0.20}-0.10+0.30, similar to with other dynamically new comets exhibiting weak 10 μm silicate features. The bolometric dust albedo of the coma dust is 0.14 ± 0.01 at a phase angle of 34.°76, and the average dust production rate, corrected to zero phase, at the epoch of our observations was Afρ ≃ 5340 cm.

  9. Dielectric relaxation and resonance in relaxor ferroelectric K1-xLixTaO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattnaik, R. K.; Toulouse, J.

    1999-09-01

    Polar regions are shown to mediate a strong coupling between polarization and strain in the paraelectric phase of the mixed ferroelectric K1-xLixTaO3 (KLT) and KTa1-xNbxO3 resulting in a field-induced piezoelectric response. The coupling is shown to result in a resonance in the dielectric spectrum of the crystals. In KLT, polar nanoregions can reorient via 180° (π relaxation) or 90° (π/2 relaxation) rotations. While the π relaxation is of no consequence, the π/2 relaxation has a strong influence on the overall character of the resonance. In addition to providing a mechanism for loss and degradation of the quality factor, this relaxation alters the character of the resonance as the two cross. Experimental results from dielectric spectroscopy above and below this crossover are presented and discussed. A simple theoretical Debye model involving the electrostrictive polarization-strain coupling is presented and the calculated spectrum is shown to reproduce the experimental spectrum. The parameters derived from the model are discussed. Most significantly, the electrostrictive coefficient of KLT is found to be 100 times larger than that of BaTiO3, and is due to the presence of polar nanoregions.

  10. Polar clusters in impurity-doped quantum paraelectric K1-xLixTaO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geneste, Grégory; Kiat, Jean-Michel; Yokota, Hiroko; Uesu, Yoshiaki; Porcher, Florence

    2010-04-01

    From density-functional calculations, we show that large off-center motions (≈1.0Å) of Li impurities in the KTaO3 matrix (studied at 3.7% concentration) create very anisotropic polar clusters oriented along the Li off-center dipole. The polarization induced by Li in the matrix decreases very sharply in the lateral directions so that polar clusters are only ≈ two lattice constants thick (one-dimensional or needlelike clusters). The polarization in such polar regions is mainly constituted by the displacements in the (highly polarizable) matrix rather than by the impurity itself. These results suggest that Li-doped potassium tantalate (3.7% concentration) is not ferroelectric at low temperature and rather behaves as a relaxor. These small polar zones around Li correlate at TB to form larger polar nanoregions, in which the matrix remains however nonpolar. This is confirmed by a low temperature neutron-diffraction analysis showing that the KTaO3 matrix remains paraelectric. Li-doped KTaO3 is an order-disorder system with a very deep local potential felt by the Li impurities (≈-200meV) . The energy barrier for Li hopping is estimated at 80-90 meV. An analytic expression for this local potential is provided, as well as a simple model describing the energetics of K1-xLixTaO3 .

  11. Plasma disposition of vitamin K1 in relation to anticoagulant poisoning.

    PubMed Central

    Park, B K; Scott, A K; Wilson, A C; Haynes, B P; Breckenridge, A M

    1984-01-01

    The disposition of vitamin K1, after intravenous (10 mg) and oral doses (10 mg and 50 mg) was studied in six healthy male subjects. After intravenous administration, the plasma concentration-time profile was adequately fitted with an average terminal half-life of 1.7 h. After oral administration (10 mg and 50 mg) the availability of vitamin K showed marked inter-individual variation (10-63%). With the higher dose intra-individual variation was also observed. Experiments in brodifacoum-anticoagulated rabbits demonstrate that the duration of action of a pharmacological dose (10 mg/kg) is short (9 h) and that high plasma concentrations (ca 1 microgram/ml) of the vitamin are required to drive clotting factor synthesis during maximum coumarin anticoagulation. Taken collectively, these data indicate that the short duration of action of vitamin K, frequently observed in cases of coumarin poisoning, is a consequence of requirements for high vitamin K concentrations and rapid clearance of the vitamin. PMID:6508974

  12. Enhancement in xylose utilization using Kluyveromyces marxianus NIRE-K1 through evolutionary adaptation approach.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Nilesh Kumar; Behera, Shuvashish; Arora, Richa; Kumar, Sachin

    2016-05-01

    The evolutionary adaptation was carried out on the thermotolerant yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus NIRE-K1 at 45 °C up to 60 batches to enhance its xylose utilization capability. The adapted strain showed higher specific growth rate and 3-fold xylose uptake rate and short lag phase as compared to the native strain. During aerobic growth adapted yeast showed 2.81-fold higher xylose utilization than that of native. In anaerobic batch fermentation, adapted yeast utilized about 91% of xylose in 72 h and produced 2.88 and 18.75 g l⁻¹ of ethanol and xylitol, respectively, which were 5.11 and 5.71-fold higher than that of native. Ethanol yield, xylitol yield and specific sugar consumption rate obtained by the adapted cells were found to be 1.57, 1.65 and 4.84-fold higher than that of native yeast, respectively. Aforesaid results suggested that the evolutionary adaptation will be a very effective strategy in the near future for economic lignocellulosic ethanol production. PMID:26886223

  13. Cytotoxic effects induced by patulin, sterigmatocystin and beauvericin on CHO-K1 cells.

    PubMed

    Zouaoui, Nidhal; Mallebrera, Beatriz; Berrada, Houda; Abid-Essefi, Salwa; Bacha, Hassen; Ruiz, Maria-Jose

    2016-03-01

    Mycotoxins are produced by different genera of fungi; mainly Aspergillus, Penicillium and Fusarium. The natural co-occurrence of beauvericin (BEA), patulin (PAT) and sterigmatocystin (STE) has been proved in feed and food commodities. This study investigates the cytotoxicity of individual and combined mycotoxins BEA, PAT and STE. The cytotoxicity on immortalized ovarian cells (CHO-K1) was evaluated using the MTT assay. After 24, 48 and 72 h, the IC50 values were 2.9 μM for PAT and ranged from 10.7 to 2.2 μM and from 25.0 to 12.5 μM for BEA and STE, respectively. Cytotoxic interactions were assayed by the isobologram method, which provides a combination index (CI) value as a quantitative measure of the three mycotoxin interaction's degree. Binary and tertiary combinations showed a dose dependent effect. At low fraction affected, mycotoxin combinations were synergetic; whereas, at higher fraction affected, the combinations showed additive effect. Our results indicate that the co-occurrence of low concentrations of mycotoxin in food may increase their toxic effects. PMID:26802678

  14. Scanner performance predictor and optimizer in further low-k1 lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoyama, Hajime; Nakashima, Toshiharu; Ogata, Taro; Kudo, Shintaro; Kita, Naonori; Ikeda, Junji; Matsui, Ryota; Yamamoto, Hajime; Sukegawa, Ayako; Makino, Katsushi; Murayama, Masayuki; Masaki, Kazuo; Matsuyama, Tomoyuki

    2014-03-01

    Due to the importance of errors in lithography scanners, masks, and computational lithography in low-k1 lithography, application software is used to simultaneously reduce them. We have developed "Masters" application software, which is all-inclusive term of critical dimension uniformity (CDU), optical proximity effect (OPE), overlay (OVL), lens control (LNS), tool maintenance (MNT) and source optimization for wide process window (SO), for compensation of the issues on imaging and overlay. In this paper, we describe the more accurate and comprehensive solution of OPE-Master, LNS-Master and SO-Master with functions of analysis, prediction and optimization. Since OPE-Master employed a rigorous simulation, a root cause of error in OPE matching was found out. From the analysis, we had developed an additional knob and evaluated a proof-of- concept for the improvement. Influence of thermal issues on projection optics is evaluated with a heating prediction, and an optimization with scanner knobs on an optimized source taken into account mask 3D effect for obtaining usable process window. Furthermore, we discuss a possibility of correction for reticle expansion by heating comparing calculation and measurement.

  15. Mechanisms underlying the biphasic effect of vitamin K1 (phylloquinone) on arterial blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Tirapelli, Carlos R; Resstel, Leonardo B M; de Oliveira, Ana M; Corrêa, Fernando M A

    2008-07-01

    Phylloquinone (vitamin K(1), VK(1)) is widely used therapeutically and intravenous administration of this quinone can induce hypotension. We aimed to investigate the mechanisms underlying the effects induced by VK(1) on arterial blood pressure. With this purpose a catheter was inserted into the abdominal aorta of male Wistar rats for blood pressure and heart rate recording. Bolus intravenous injection of VK(1) (0.5-20 mgkg(-1)) produced a transient increase in blood pressure followed by a fall. Both the pressor and depressor response induced by VK(1) were dose-dependent. On the other hand, intravenous injection of VK(1) did not alter heart rate. The nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 10 and 20 mgkg(-1)) reduced both the increase and decrease in blood pressure induced by VK(1) (5 mgkg(-1)). On the other hand, indometacin (10 mg kg(-1)), a non-selective cyclooxygenase inhibitor, did not alter the increase in mean arterial pressure (MAP) induced by VK(1). However, VK(1)-induced fall in MAP was significantly attenuated by indometacin. We concluded that VK(1) induces a dose-dependent effect on blood pressure that consists of an acute increase followed by a more sustained decrease in MAP. The hypotension induced by VK(1) involves the activation of the nitric oxide (NO) pathway and the release of vasodilator prostanoid(s). PMID:18549675

  16. Role of F225 in O-phosphoserine sulfhydrylase from Aeropyrum pernix K1.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Emi; Kunimoto, Kohei; Kawai, Yoshito; Kataoka, Misumi; Ishikawa, Kazuhiko; Nakamura, Takashi

    2016-09-01

    O-Phosphoserine sulfhydrylase (OPSS) synthesizes cysteine from O-phospho-L-serine (OPS) and sulfide. We have determined the three-dimensional structures of OPSS from hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix K1 (ApOPSS) in complex with aminoacrylate intermediate (AA) formed from pyridoxal 5'-phosphate with OPS or in complex with cysteine and compared them with that of ApOPSS. We found an orientational change of F225 at the active-site entrance and constructed an F225A mutant to examine its activities and AA stability and clarify the role of F225 in ApOPSS. The OPS and O-acetyl-L-serine (OAS) sulfhydrylase activities of the F225A mutant decreased by 4.2- and 15-fold compared to those of the wild-type (wt) ApOPSS, respectively. The ability of OPS and OAS to form AA also decreased by 12- and 27-fold, respectively. AA was less stable in the F225A mutant than in the wt ApOPSS. Simulated docking showed that leaving groups, such as phosphate and acetate, were oriented to the inside of the active site in the F225A mutant, whereas they were oriented to the entrance in the wt ApOPSS. These results suggest that F225 in ApOPSS plays important roles in maintaining the hydrophobic environment of AA from solvent water and in controlling the orientation of leaving groups. PMID:27377295

  17. Topical vitamin K1 promotes repair of full thickness wound in rat

    PubMed Central

    Hemmati, Ali Asghar; Houshmand, Gholamreza; Ghorbanzadeh, Behnam; Nemati, Mohammad; Behmanesh, Mohammad Amin

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Application of vitamin K to the skin has been used for suppression of pigmentation and resolution of bruising. However, in rats, no study was reported on its effect regarding wound healing. Thus, the present study was designed to examine the healing effects of creams prepared from vitamin K1 on full-thickness wound in rats. Materials and Methods: For inducing full-thickness wound in rats, the excisional wound model was used. Five groups consisting of 8 rats each were used. Vitamin K cream (1% and 2%, w/w) was prepared in eucerin base and applied on the wound once a day until complete healing had occurred. Healing was defined by decreased wound margin (wound contraction), re-epithelialization, tensile strength and hydroxyproline content. Histopathological examination was also done. Results: The effects produced by the topical vitamin K showed significant (P < 0.01) healing when compared with control group in parameters such as wound contraction, epithelialization period, hydroxyproline content and tensile strength. Histopathological studies also showed improvement with vitamin K. Conclusions: Topical vitamin K demonstrates wound healing potential in full-thickness wound model. PMID:25097279

  18. A Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome-wide mutant screen for altered sensitivity to K1 killer toxin.

    PubMed Central

    Pagé, Nicolas; Gérard-Vincent, Manon; Ménard, Patrice; Beaulieu, Maude; Azuma, Masayuki; Dijkgraaf, Gerrit J P; Li, Huijuan; Marcoux, José; Nguyen, Thuy; Dowse, Tim; Sdicu, Anne-Marie; Bussey, Howard

    2003-01-01

    Using the set of Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants individually deleted for 5718 yeast genes, we screened for altered sensitivity to the antifungal protein, K1 killer toxin, that binds to a cell wall beta-glucan receptor and subsequently forms lethal pores in the plasma membrane. Mutations in 268 genes, including 42 in genes of unknown function, had a phenotype, often mild, with 186 showing resistance and 82 hypersensitivity compared to wild type. Only 15 of these genes were previously known to cause a toxin phenotype when mutated. Mutants for 144 genes were analyzed for alkali-soluble beta-glucan levels; 63 showed alterations. Further, mutants for 118 genes with altered toxin sensitivity were screened for SDS, hygromycin B, and calcofluor white sensitivity as indicators of cell surface defects; 88 showed some additional defect. There is a markedly nonrandom functional distribution of the mutants. Many genes affect specific areas of cellular activity, including cell wall glucan and mannoprotein synthesis, secretory pathway trafficking, lipid and sterol biosynthesis, and cell surface signal transduction, and offer new insights into these processes and their integration. PMID:12663529

  19. Body Shape and Life Style of the Extinct Balearic Dormouse Hypnomys (Rodentia, Gliridae): New Evidence from the Study of Associated Skeletons

    PubMed Central

    Bover, Pere; Alcover, Josep A.; Michaux, Jacques J.; Hautier, Lionel; Hutterer, Rainer

    2010-01-01

    Hypnomys is a genus of Gliridae (Rodentia) that occurred in the Balearic Islands until Late Holocene. Recent finding of a complete skeleton of the chronospecies H. morpheus (Late Pleistocene-Early Holocene) and two articulated skeletons of H. cf. onicensis (Late Pliocene) allowed the inference of body size and the calculation of several postcranial indexes. We also performed a Factorial Discriminant Analysis (FDA) in order to evaluate locomotory behaviour and body shape of the taxa. Using allometric models based on skull and tooth measurements, we calculated a body weight between 173 and 284 g for H. morpheus, and direct measurements of articulated skeletons yielded a Head and Body Length (HBL) of 179 mm and a Total Body Length of 295 mm for this species. In addition to the generally higher robustness of postcranial bones already recorded by previous authors, H. morpheus, similar to Canariomys tamarani, another extinct island species, displayed elongated zygopodium bones of the limbs and a wider distal humerus and femur than in an extant related taxon, Eliomys quercinus. Indexes indicated that Hypnomys was more terrestrial and had greater fossorial abilities than E. quercinus. This was also corroborated by a Discriminant Analysis, although no clear additional inference of locomotory abilities could be calculated. PMID:21209820

  20. Catalog of type specimens of recent mammals: Rodentia (Myomorpha, Anomaluromorpha, and Hystricomorpha) in the National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisher, Robert D.; Ludwig, Craig A.

    2014-01-01

    The type collection of Recent mammals in the Division of Mammals, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, contains 945 specimens bearing names of 931 species-group taxa of Rodentia (Myomorpha, Anomaluromorpha, and Hystricomorpha) as of August 2013. This catalog presents an annotated list of these holdings comprised of 905 holotypes, 16 lectotypes, 8 syntypes (48 specimens), and 2 neotypes. In addition, we include 44 specimens that are part of syntype series that should be in the collection but cannot be found or are now known to be in other collections. One hundred and ten of the names are new since the last type catalog covering these suborders A lectotype for Mus peruvianus Peale, 1848, is newly designated herein. Nine specimens previously reported were subsequently sent to the vertebrate paleontology collection and are not included here. Suborders and families are ordered as in Carleton and Musser; within families, currently recognized genera are arranged alphabetically; within each currently recognized genus, accounts are arranged alphabetically by original published name. Information in each account includes original name and abbreviated citation thereto, current name if other than original, citation for first use of current name combination for the taxon (or new name combination if used herein for the first time), type designation, U.S. National Museum catalog number(s), preparation, age and sex, date of collection and collector, original collector number, type locality, and remarks as appropriate. Digital photographs of each specimen will serve as a condition report and will be attached to each electronic specimen record.

  1. Catalog of type specimens of recent mammals: orders Didelphimorpha through Chiroptera (Excluding Rodentia) in the National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisher, Robert D.; Ludwig, Craig A.

    2015-01-01

    The type collection of Recent Mammals in the Division of Mammals, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, contains 820 specimens bearing names of 809 species-group taxa of Didelphimorphia through Chiroptera, excluding Rodentia, as of June 2014. This catalog presents an annotated list of these holdings comprised of 788 holotypes, 26 lectotypes, 11 syntypes (22 specimens), and 4 neotypes. Included are several specimens that should be in the collection but cannot be found or are now known to be in other collections. One hundred and twenty-seven of the names are new since the last type catalog covering these orders, Poole and Schantz (1942). Five specimens reported in Poole and Schantz (1942) were subsequently sent to the Vertebrate Paleontology collection and are not included here. Orders and families are ordered as in Wilson and Reeder (2005); within families, currently recognized genera are arranged alphabetically; within each currently recognized genus, accounts are arranged alphabetically by original published name. Information in each account includes original name and abbreviated citation thereto, current name if other than original, citation for first use of current name combination for the taxon (or new name combination if used herein for the first time), type designation, U.S. National Museum catalog number(s), preparation, age and sex, date of collection and collector, original collector number, type locality, and remarks as appropriate. Digital photographs of each specimen will serve as a condition report and will be attached to each electronic specimen record.

  2. Analysis of gamasid mites (Acari: Mesostigmata) associated with the Asian house rat, Rattus tanezumi (Rodentia: Muridae) in Yunnan Province, southwest China.

    PubMed

    Huang, Li-Qin; Guo, Xian-Guo; Speakman, John R; Dong, Wen-Ge

    2013-05-01

    During a survey lasting from 1990 to 2008, we captured 4,113 Asian house rats, Rattus tanezumi Temminck 1844 (Rodentia: Muridae) from 28 counties of Yunnan Province in southwestern China. From these rats, a total of 19,304 gamasid mites (Acari: Mesostigmata) were collected and identified as comprising 50 different species. The species diversity of gamasid mites from this single rat species is higher than that reported previously from multiple hosts within a given geographical region. Of the 50 mite species, 31 species belonged to ectoparasites and 19 species belonged to free-living mites. The species diversity of the mites from rats trapped outdoors was much higher than from rats trapped indoors. The parameter K from the negative binomial distribution was used to measure the spatial distribution patterns of the dominant mite species and revealed that all the mites had an aggregated distribution among the rat hosts. Most mite species showed a predominantly female-biased population structure with many more females than males. PMID:23471780

  3. Role of CD14 in Responses to Clinical Isolates of Escherichia coli: Effects of K1 Capsule Expression▿

    PubMed Central

    Metkar, Shalaka; Awasthi, Shanjana; Denamur, Erick; Kim, Kwang Sik; Gangloff, Sophie C.; Teichberg, Saul; Haziot, Alain; Silver, Jack; Goyert, Sanna M.

    2007-01-01

    Severe bacterial infections leading to sepsis or septic shock can be induced by bacteria that utilize different factors to drive pathogenicity and/or virulence, leading to disease in the host. One major factor expressed by all clinical isolates of gram-negative bacteria is lipopolysaccharide (LPS); a second factor expressed by some Escherichia coli strains is a K1 polysaccharide capsule. To determine the role of the CD14 LPS receptor in the pathogenic effects of naturally occurring E. coli, the responses of CD14−/− and CD14+/+ mice to three different isolates of E. coli obtained from sepsis patients were compared; two isolates express both smooth LPS and the K1 antigen, while the third isolate expresses only LPS and is negative for K1. An additional K1-positive isolate obtained from a newborn with meningitis and a K1-negative isogenic mutant of this strain were also used for these studies. CD14−/− mice were resistant to the lethal effects of the K1-negative isolates. This resistance was accompanied by significantly lower levels of systemic tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in these mice than in CD14+/+ mice, enhanced clearance of the bacteria, and significantly fewer additional gross symptoms. In contrast, CD14−/− mice were as sensitive as CD14+/+ mice to the lethal effects of the K1-positive isolates, even though they had significantly lower levels of TNF-α and IL-6 than CD14+/+ mice. These studies show that different bacterial isolates can use distinctly different mechanisms to cause disease and suggest that new, nonantibiotic therapeutics need to be directed against multiple targets. PMID:17709409

  4. Chronic rapamycin treatment or lack of S6K1 does not reduce ribosome activity in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Garelick, Michael G; MacKay, Vivian L; Yanagida, Aya; Academia, Emmeline C; Schreiber, Katherine H; Ladiges, Warren C; Kennedy, Brian K

    2013-01-01

    Reducing activity of the mTORC1/S6K1 pathway has been shown to extend lifespan in both vertebrate and invertebrate models. For instance, both pharmacological inhibition of mTORC1 with the drug rapamycin or S6K1 knockout extends lifespan in mice. Since studies with invertebrate models suggest that reducing translational activity can increase lifespan, we reasoned that the benefits of decreased mTORC1 or S6K1 activity might be due, at least in part, to a reduction of general translational activity. Here, we report that mice given a single dose of rapamycin have reduced translational activity, while mice receiving multiple injections of rapamycin over 4 weeks show no difference in translational activity compared with vehicle-injected controls. Furthermore, mice lacking S6K1 have no difference in global translational activity compared with wild-type littermates as measured by the percentage of ribosomes that are active in multiple tissues. Translational activity is reduced in S6K1-knockout mice following single injection of rapamycin, demonstrating that rapamycin’s effects on translation can occur independently of S6K1. Taken together, these data suggest that benefits of chronic rapamycin treatment or lack of S6K1 are dissociable from potential benefits of reduced translational activity, instead pointing to a model whereby changes in translation of specific subsets of mRNAs and/or translation-independent effects of reduced mTOR signaling underlie the longevity benefits. PMID:23839034

  5. Final report on the EURAMET.PR-K1.a-2009 comparison of spectral irradiance 250 nm—2500 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, Teresa; Servantes, William; Woolliams, Emma; Sperfeld, Peter; Simionescu, Mihai; Blattner, Peter; Källberg, Stefan; Khlevnoy, Boris; Dekker, Paul

    2015-01-01

    This report gives the results of the EURAMET.PR-K1.a-2009 comparison of spectral irradiance over the wavelength range 250 nm—2500 nm. Seven laboratories took part, including the pilot. In general the results are consistent, with a few exceptions as explained in the report. The EURAMET.PR-K1.a key comparison detailed in this report was carried out to establish the degrees of equivalence for the participating European laboratories with respect to the Key Comparison Reference Value (KCRV) of the CCPR-K1.a key comparison. The EURAMET.PR-K1.a key comparison was piloted by the National Physical Laboratory (NPL), who also acted as pilot for the CCPR-K1.a key comparison; a further linkage to the KCRV of the CCPR-K1.a key comparison was provided through the participation of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in both comparisons. The other participants were: National Institute of Metrology of Romania (INM-RO), Federal Office of Metrology (METAS), VSL Dutch Metrology Institute (VSL), SP Technical Research Institute of Sweden (SP) and All Russian Institute for Optical and Physical Measurements (VNIIOFI). Measurements were made by each laboratory at 44 designated wavelengths, or a subset of these wavelengths. The link laboratories made measurements at all 44 wavelengths. For the purposes of analysis each wavelength has been treated independently, as for the CCPR K1.a comparison. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCPR, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  6. Development of a liposome-based formulation for vitamin K1 nebulization on the skin.

    PubMed

    Campani, Virginia; Marchese, Dario; Pitaro, Maria Teresa; Pitaro, Michele; Grieco, Paolo; De Rosa, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Vitamin K1 (VK1) is a very lipophilic and photosensitive molecule contained in some vegetables. Recently, the use of VK1 on the skin has been proposed for different pharmaceutical or cosmeceutical applications. In this study, an innovative strategy for the administration of VK1 on the skin was proposed. In particular, to overcome the drawbacks associated with a VK1-containing fatty ointment available on the market, an aqueous formulation suitable to be administered by nebulization was developed. The use of liposomes encapsulating VK1 enabled issues due to the lipophilicity of VK1 to be overcome. Thus, different liposomal formulations, with different VK1 concentrations, were prepared and characterized in terms of size, zeta potential, VK1 encapsulation into liposomes, and stability of the formulations during storage. After a first phase of screening, the selected formulation was tested by a portable device for nebulization. No alteration of the vesicle characteristics following the liposome supply through the nebulizer was found. Finally, permeation studies were carried out on pig-excised skin in Franz cells and the newly developed formulation was compared to a marketed VK1-containing ointment. In this test, an enhanced VK1 accumulation into the skin was found when using nebulized liposomes. In conclusion, in order to administer VK1 on the skin, the newly developed formulation could be a valid alternative to the products available on the market today. In particular, the use of liposomes could facilitate the multiple administrations per day by aerosol, but also increase, compared to a semi-solid preparation, the accumulation of VK1 into the epidermis and dermis. PMID:24748792

  7. Development of a liposome-based formulation for vitamin K1 nebulization on the skin

    PubMed Central

    Campani, Virginia; Marchese, Dario; Pitaro, Maria Teresa; Pitaro, Michele; Grieco, Paolo; De Rosa, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Vitamin K1 (VK1) is a very lipophilic and photosensitive molecule contained in some vegetables. Recently, the use of VK1 on the skin has been proposed for different pharmaceutical or cosmeceutical applications. In this study, an innovative strategy for the administration of VK1 on the skin was proposed. In particular, to overcome the drawbacks associated with a VK1-containing fatty ointment available on the market, an aqueous formulation suitable to be administered by nebulization was developed. The use of liposomes encapsulating VK1 enabled issues due to the lipophilicity of VK1 to be overcome. Thus, different liposomal formulations, with different VK1 concentrations, were prepared and characterized in terms of size, zeta potential, VK1 encapsulation into liposomes, and stability of the formulations during storage. After a first phase of screening, the selected formulation was tested by a portable device for nebulization. No alteration of the vesicle characteristics following the liposome supply through the nebulizer was found. Finally, permeation studies were carried out on pig-excised skin in Franz cells and the newly developed formulation was compared to a marketed VK1-containing ointment. In this test, an enhanced VK1 accumulation into the skin was found when using nebulized liposomes. In conclusion, in order to administer VK1 on the skin, the newly developed formulation could be a valid alternative to the products available on the market today. In particular, the use of liposomes could facilitate the multiple administrations per day by aerosol, but also increase, compared to a semi-solid preparation, the accumulation of VK1 into the epidermis and dermis. PMID:24748792

  8. Genotoxic effects of environmental estrogen-like compounds in CHO-K1 cells.

    PubMed

    Tayama, Sumiko; Nakagawa, Yoshio; Tayama, Kuniaki

    2008-01-01

    Some environmental estrogen-like compounds, such as bisphenol A (BPA), 4-nonylphenol (NP), 4-octylphenol (OP), propyl p-hydroxybenzoate (P-PHBA), and butyl p-hydroxybenzoate (B-PHBA), synthetic estrogen, diethylstilbestrol (DES), and natural estrogen, 17beta-estradiol (E2), were studied for their genotoxicity in CHO-K1 cells using sister-chromatid exchange (SCE), chromosome aberration (CA), and DNA strand break (comet) assays. Six of the chemicals, excluding E2, caused DNA migration in the comet assay and induced SCEs at one or more of the highest doses. Among the chemicals, OP produced an especially high incidence of SCEs. Structural CA was induced by five of the chemicals, excluding OP and NP, and BPA, E2, and DES also induced aneuploid cells. E2 and DES particularly increased the rate of polyploidy at high doses. The incidence of colchicine-mitosis-like (c-mitotic) figures suggesting spindle disrupting effects was also detected with five of the chemicals, excluding OP and NP, and six of the chemicals, excluding E2, caused endoreduplication (ERD), a form of nuclear polyploidization induced by block of cell cycle at G2 phase, at one or more high doses. Our present results suggest that OP and NP cause repairable DNA damage, including SCEs, and do not result in CA, while the damage caused by DES, BPA, P-PHBA, and B-PHBA results in the induction of CAs together with SCEs probably because of imperfect repair. We are unable to explain the observation that the DNA damage caused by E2 resulted in CA induction but not DNA migration or SCE induction, except for speculating that the DNA damage is different from that caused by DES and the estrogen-like chemicals. Our findings also suggest that E2, DES and BPA have aneuploidogenic properties, and that the former two of chemicals also are polyploidy-inducing agents. PMID:17913570

  9. Process window monitoring: an emerging requirement for efficient low-k1 lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiua, S. S.; Chu, Yao-Chang; Hsieh, J. C.; Mo, Wang Pen; Wu, C. M.; Teng, Thomas; Slessor, Mike D.

    2003-06-01

    There are practical challenges associated with manufacturing implementation of optical photolithography at aggressive design rules. As k1 factors decrease, lithographic focus-exposure process windows have collapsed from a comfortable several-micron depth of focus (DOF) at the 1um technology node, to a challenging to 0.3-to-0.4um at the 0.13um node. As a consequence, the monitoring, management, and control of lithography tool process windows are increasingly important to efficient semiconductor manufacturing. A standard method to deduce lithography-tool process window position and size is based on data from a focus-exposure matrix (FEM) wafer. Unfortunately, the data transfer, analysis, and fab-wide reporting of best focus and other important tool parameters can require a large amount of engineering time and effort, effectively making it impossible in a large-scale production-fab environment. In this work, we present results obtained with a new automated CD-SEM system used to monitor the 0.15um and 0.13um tools and processes in TSMC Fab 6 (70k wafer starts per month). To enable daily FEM-based tool monitoring in this high-volume production fab, these systems provide full "hands-off" automation of data analysis and web-based reporting of best focus, best energy, DOF, image tilt and other significant performance parameters and metrics for each cell. Using these systems, we demonstrate detection of fluctuations in single-tool best focus as small as approximately 20nm using an FEM with focus steps of 200nm. This capability is then used to detect and diagnose process window drifts in single exposure tools as well as mismatches in best focus between multiple exposure tools of several hundred nanometers. The monitoring and reduction of these lithography process window variations have allowed us to increase the performance and efficiency of our advanced lithography manufacturing lines.

  10. Solutions with precise prediction for thermal aberration error in low-k1 immersion lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuhara, Kazuya; Mimotogi, Akiko; Kono, Takuya; Aoyama, Hajime; Ogata, Taro; Kita, Naonori; Matsuyama, Tomoyuki

    2013-04-01

    Thermal aberration becomes a serious problem in the production of semiconductors for which low-k1 immersion lithography with a strong off-axis illumination, such as dipole setting, is used. The illumination setting localizes energy of the light in the projection lens, bringing about localized temperature rise. The temperature change varies lens refractive index and thus generates aberrations. The phenomenon is called thermal aberration. For realizing manufacturability of fine patterns with high productivity, thermal aberration control is important. Since heating areas in the projection lens are determined by source shape and distribution of diffracted light by a mask, the diffracted pupilgram convolving illumination source shape with diffraction distribution can be calculated using mask layout data for the thermal aberration prediction. Thermal aberration is calculated as a function of accumulated irradiation power. We have evaluated the thermal aberration computational prediction and control technology "Thermal Aberration Optimizer" (ThAO) on a Nikon immersion system. The thermal aberration prediction consists of two steps. The first step is prediction of the diffraction map on the projection pupil. The second step is computing thermal aberration from the diffraction map using a lens thermal model and an aberration correction function. We performed a verification test for ThAO using a mask of 1x-nm memory and strong off-axis illumination. We clarified the current performance of thermal aberration prediction, and also confirmed that the impacts of thermal aberration of NSR-S621D on CD and overlay for our 1x-nm memory pattern are very small. Accurate thermal aberration prediction with ThAO will enable thermal aberration risk-free lithography for semiconductor chip production.