Science.gov

Sample records for rolls size effects

  1. Effect of roll hot press temperature on crystallite size of PVDF film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartono, Ambran; Djamal, Mitra; Satira, Suparno; Bahar, Herman; Ramli, Sanjaya, Edi

    2014-03-01

    Fabrication PVDF films have been made using Hot Roll Press. Preparation of samples carried out for nine different temperatures. This condition is carried out to see the effect of Roll Hot Press temperature on the size of the crystallite of PVDF films. To obtain the diffraction pattern of sample characterization is performed using X-Ray Diffraction. Furthermore, from the diffraction pattern is obtained, the calculation to determine the crystallite size of the sample by using the Scherrer equation. From the experimental results and the calculation of crystallite sizes obtained for the samples with temperature 130 °C up to 170 °C respectively increased from 7.2 nm up to 20.54 nm. These results show that increasing temperatures will also increase the size of the crystallite of the sample. This happens because with the increasing temperature causes the higher the degree of crystallization of PVDF film sample is formed, so that the crystallite size also increases. This condition indicates that the specific volume or size of the crystals depends on the magnitude of the temperature as it has been studied by Nakagawa.

  2. Effect of roll hot press temperature on crystallite size of PVDF film

    SciTech Connect

    Hartono, Ambran Sanjaya, Edi; Djamal, Mitra; Satira, Suparno; Bahar, Herman; Ramli

    2014-03-24

    Fabrication PVDF films have been made using Hot Roll Press. Preparation of samples carried out for nine different temperatures. This condition is carried out to see the effect of Roll Hot Press temperature on the size of the crystallite of PVDF films. To obtain the diffraction pattern of sample characterization is performed using X-Ray Diffraction. Furthermore, from the diffraction pattern is obtained, the calculation to determine the crystallite size of the sample by using the Scherrer equation. From the experimental results and the calculation of crystallite sizes obtained for the samples with temperature 130 °C up to 170 °C respectively increased from 7.2 nm up to 20.54 nm. These results show that increasing temperatures will also increase the size of the crystallite of the sample. This happens because with the increasing temperature causes the higher the degree of crystallization of PVDF film sample is formed, so that the crystallite size also increases. This condition indicates that the specific volume or size of the crystals depends on the magnitude of the temperature as it has been studied by Nakagawa.

  3. Effect of carbide size, area, density on rolling-element fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chevalier, J. L.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1972-01-01

    A carbide parameter that can be used to predict rolling element fatigue life was developed.The parameter is based on a statistical life analysis and incorporates the total number of particles per unit area, particle size, and percent carbide area. These were determined from quantimet image analyzing computer examinations of random samples selected from eight lots of material previously tested in rolling fatigue. The carbide parameter is independent of chemical composition, heat treatment, and hardening mechanism of the materials investigated.

  4. Effects of wing position and fuselage size on the low-speed static rolling stability characteristics of a delta-wing model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Alex; Thomas, David T , Jr

    1955-01-01

    An investigation was made to determine the effects of wing position and fuselage size on the low-speed static and rolling stability characteristics of airplane models having a triangular wing and vertical tail surfaces. (author)

  5. Effect of Particle Size on the Mechanical Properties of Semi-Solid, Powder-Rolled AA7050 Strips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xia; Liu, Yunzhong

    2016-07-01

    The AA7050 alloy strips can be successfully prepared by semi-solid powder rolling. The effect and factors of particle size on the microstructure, relative density, and mechanical properties were discussed. The results show that coarse starting powders require less liquid to achieve high relative density, and the formed strips have lower elongation compared with that prepared with the fine starting powders. The strength is more related to defects, whereas elongation partially depends on the grain size. Additionally, the fracture mechanism of strips prepared with fine powders is the ductile fracture because many dimples are observed. For relative density, when the initial liquid fraction is lower than 10%, the difference of deformation degree is the main factor. When the liquid fraction is higher than 10-20%, premature solidification and more particle interfaces are the two main factors.

  6. Effect of Roll Material on Surface Quality of Rolled Aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qi

    The surface defects of aluminum alloys that have undergone hot rolling were studied. The effects of different roll materials, of the number of rolling passes and of lubrication on surface defects of hot rolled aluminum alloys were investigated by laboratory hot rolling. Two different aluminum alloys, Al-Mn and Al-Mg, were each rolled against three different steel alloy rolls, AISI 52100, AISI 440C and AISI D2. The results showed that different roll materials do affect the morphology of the mating aluminum alloy surface with apparent surface defects, which included magnesium and oxygen rich dark regions on both alloys. The carbide protrusions in 440C and D2 steel rolls are confirmed to be responsible for the dark, rich magnesium and oxygen regions on both the rolled Al-Mn and Al-Mg alloy surfaces. As the number of passes increases, Mg and O deposit in the form of patches and grain boundaries near the surface area.

  7. Effect of texture and grain size on the magnetic flux density and core loss of cold-rolled high silicon steel sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Jing; Yang, Ping; Mao, Weimin; Ye, Feng

    2015-11-01

    The effects of texture and grain size on the magnetic flux density and core loss (50-20 kHz) of 0.23 mm-thick cold-rolled high silicon steel sheets are investigated by means of electron back-scattered diffraction (EBSD), loss separation, and anisotropy parameter (ε) calculation. A model of the hysteresis loss coefficient kh considering average grain size and ε is established. The magnetic flux density at 800 A/m (B8) is closely related to the volume fraction of η-fiber-oriented grains, while the magnetic flux density at 5000 A/m (B50) is closely related to the volume fractions of γ- and λ-fiber-oriented grains in high silicon steel. The hysteresis loss of high silicon steel can be greatly reduced by increasing the grain size and optimizing the texture of the sheets. Although increases in frequencies decrease the effect of texture on core loss, the effect cannot be ignored. As annealing temperature and time increase, the relative difference in core loss between the rolling direction (RD) and the transverse direction (TD) is maintained at higher frequencies because of increases in grain size, decreases in γ texture, and maintenance of a strong η texture. Texture and grain size jointly affect the high-frequency core loss of high silicon steel.

  8. Process Design by FEM Simulation for Shape Ring Rolling of Large-Sized Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Y. S.; Lee, M. W.; Park, S. S.; Lee, I.; Moon, Y. H.

    2010-06-01

    Ring rolling process is usually used to fabricate large-sized ring, such as, tower flange for wind power electric generator. Many kinds of seamless ring are used in wind power electric generator and manufactured by ring rolling process. In general, final part is machined after forming with shape of plain square section. Since interests for near net shaping of seamless ring have been increased gradually because of green energy, it is necessary to develop the technology for shape ring rolling with respect to the market demands and cost. Therefore, we studied the process and die design for shape ring rolling of large sized ring over 3,500 mm out diameter by experiment and FEM simulation. Ring rolling process is very difficult to solve by FEM method because of equilibrium state and size effect, etc. Moreover, shape ring rolling is more difficult to solve the problem that two plastic deformation zones are different each other, that is main roll and conical roll. Also since conical roll has a shape, deformation velocity field is very much complex and the deformed section passed axial roll is different section and velocity field. The FE simulations are performed to analyze process variables affected in forming of profiled ring. Therefore, the main features of used FE model are: (1) it adopts a transient or unsteady state full ring mesh to model the deformation processes and shape development; (2) the mandrel and conical rolls are modeled using coupled heat-transfer elements; (3) the model involves the full process from blank through perform to final profiled ring. From these calculated results, we have proposed the mechanisms of various tools, such as mandrel and conical roll. The calculated results are compared experimental results. Calculated results can predict the tilting of profiled ring and then process variables to form large sized ring.

  9. Process Design by FEM Simulation for Shape Ring Rolling of Large-Sized Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y. S.; Lee, M. W.; Park, S. S.; Lee, I.; Moon, Y. H.

    2010-06-15

    Ring rolling process is usually used to fabricate large-sized ring, such as, tower flange for wind power electric generator. Many kinds of seamless ring are used in wind power electric generator and manufactured by ring rolling process. In general, final part is machined after forming with shape of plain square section. Since interests for near net shaping of seamless ring have been increased gradually because of green energy, it is necessary to develop the technology for shape ring rolling with respect to the market demands and cost. Therefore, we studied the process and die design for shape ring rolling of large sized ring over 3,500 mm out diameter by experiment and FEM simulation. Ring rolling process is very difficult to solve by FEM method because of equilibrium state and size effect, etc. Moreover, shape ring rolling is more difficult to solve the problem that two plastic deformation zones are different each other, that is main roll and conical roll. Also since conical roll has a shape, deformation velocity field is very much complex and the deformed section passed axial roll is different section and velocity field. The FE simulations are performed to analyze process variables affected in forming of profiled ring. Therefore, the main features of used FE model are: (1) it adopts a transient or unsteady state full ring mesh to model the deformation processes and shape development; (2) the mandrel and conical rolls are modeled using coupled heat-transfer elements; (3) the model involves the full process from blank through perform to final profiled ring. From these calculated results, we have proposed the mechanisms of various tools, such as mandrel and conical roll. The calculated results are compared experimental results. Calculated results can predict the tilting of profiled ring and then process variables to form large sized ring.

  10. Effect of field size, head motion, and rotational velocity on roll vection and illusory self-tilt in a tumbling room

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, R. S.; Howard, I. P.; Zacher, J. E.; Oman, C. M. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    The effect of field size, velocity, and visual fixation upon the perception of self-body rotation and tilt was examined in a rotating furnished room. Subjects sat in a stationary chair in the furnished room which could be rotated about the body roll axis. For full-field conditions, complete 360 degrees body rotation (tumbling) was the most common sensation (felt by 80% of subjects). Constant tilt or partial tumbling (less than 360 degrees rotation) occurred more frequently with a small field of view (20 deg). The number of subjects who experienced complete tumbling increased with increases in field of view and room velocity (for velocities between 15 and 30 degrees s-1). The speed of perceived self-rotation relative to room rotation also increased with increasing field of view.

  11. The effects of dry-rolled corn particle size on performance, carcass traits, and starch digestibility in feedlot finishing diets containing wet distiller's grains.

    PubMed

    Schwandt, E F; Wagner, J J; Engle, T E; Bartle, S J; Thomson, D U; Reinhardt, C D

    2016-03-01

    Crossbred yearling steers ( = 360; 395 ± 33.1 kg initial BW) were used to evaluate the effects of dry-rolled corn (DRC) particle size in diets containing 20% wet distiller's grains plus solubles on feedlot performance, carcass characteristics, and starch digestibility. Steers were used in a randomized complete block design and allocated to 36 pens (9 pens/treatment, with 10 animals/pen). Treatments were coarse DRC (4,882 μm), medium DRC (3,760 μm), fine DRC (2,359 μm), and steam-flaked corn (0.35 kg/L; SFC). Final BW and ADG were not affected by treatment ( > 0.05). Dry matter intake was greater and G:F was lower ( < 0.05) for steers fed DRC vs. steers fed SFC. There was a linear decrease ( < 0.05) in DMI in the final 5 wk on feed with decreasing DRC particle size. Fecal starch decreased (linear, < 0.01) as DRC particle size decreased. In situ starch disappearance was lower for DRC vs. SFC ( < 0.05) and linearly increased ( < 0.05) with decreasing particle size at 8 and 24 h. Reducing DRC particle size did not influence growth performance but increased starch digestion and influenced DMI of cattle on finishing diets. No differences ( > 0.10) were observed among treatments for any of the carcass traits measured. Results indicate improved ruminal starch digestibility, reduced fecal starch concentration, and reduced DMI with decreasing DRC particle size in feedlot diets containing 20% wet distiller's grains on a DM basis. PMID:27065280

  12. The Effects of Forming Parameters on Conical Ring Rolling Process

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Wen; Zhao, Guoqun; Guan, Yanjin

    2014-01-01

    The plastic penetration condition and biting-in condition of a radial conical ring rolling process with a closed die structure on the top and bottom of driven roll, simplified as RCRRCDS, were established. The reasonable value range of mandrel feed rate in rolling process was deduced. A coupled thermomechanical 3D FE model of RCRRCDS process was established. The changing laws of equivalent plastic strain (PEEQ) and temperature distributions with rolling time were investigated. The effects of ring's outer radius growth rate and rolls sizes on the uniformities of PEEQ and temperature distributions, average rolling force, and average rolling moment were studied. The results indicate that the PEEQ at the inner layer and outer layer of rolled ring are larger than that at the middle layer of ring; the temperatures at the “obtuse angle zone” of ring's cross-section are higher than those at “acute angle zone”; the temperature at the central part of ring is higher than that at the middle part of ring's outer surfaces. As the ring's outer radius growth rate increases at its reasonable value ranges, the uniformities of PEEQ and temperature distributions increase. Finally, the optimal values of the ring's outer radius growth rate and rolls sizes were obtained. PMID:25202716

  13. Particles size segregation and roll waves in dense granular flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viroulet, Sylvain; Baker, James; Kokelaar, Peter; Gray, Nico

    2015-11-01

    Geophysical granular flows, such as landslides, snow avalanches and pyroclastic flows commonly involve particles with different sizes which are prone to segregate during the flow. This particle-size segregation may lead to the formation of regions with different frictional properties which can have a feedback on the flow. This study aims to understand this effect in the context of bi-disperse roll waves in shallow granular free-surface flows. Experiments have been performed in a 3 meter long chute using several mixtures of spherical glass beads of diameter 75-150 and 400-600 microns flowing on a rough bed. These show that the waves propagate at constant speed that depends on the initial mixture composition. In addition, during their propagation, a higher concentration of large particles is localized at the front of the waves. A theoretical and numerical approach is presented using depth-averaged equations for the conservation of mass, momentum and depth-averaged small particle concentration. Results without frictional feedback are investigated and compared to those that include the enhanced frictional resistance to motion of the large grains.

  14. Aging Effect on Texture Evolution during Warm Rolling of ZK60 Alloys Fabricated by Twin-Roll Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Jae-Hyung; Chen, Hong-Mei; Choi, Shi-Hoon; Kim, Hyoung-Wook; Kang, Suk-Bong

    2010-10-01

    ZK60(Mg-Zn-Zr) alloys experience variation of precipitates during aging. The frequency and size of rod- and disk-shaped precipitates change with aging. The effect of aging on texture evolution during warm rolling of ZK60 was investigated. Some difference was found between the texture evolution of solution heat-treated (T4) and artificially aged (T6) samples. The Aged samples had more texture variations along the thickness direction than solution heat-treated samples. The intensities of basal fibers were lower during asymmetric rolling than during symmetric rolling, although the initial intensities increased during both rolling processes. The decrease in basal fibers by asymmetric rolling was clearer at a lower temperature of 448 K (175 °C) than at 498 K (225 °C).

  15. Effect of temper rolling on final shape defects in a V-section roll forming process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abvabi, Akbar; Rolfe, Bernard; Hodgson, Peter D.; Weiss, Matthias

    2013-12-01

    Roll forming is a continuous process in which a flat strip is shaped to the desired profile by sequential bending in a series of roll stands. Because of the large variety of applications of roll forming in the industry, Finite Element Analysis (FEA) is increasingly utilized for roll forming process design. Bending is the dominant deformation mode in roll forming. Sheet materials used in this process are generally temper rolled, roller- or tension- leveled. These processes introduce residual stresses into the material, and recent studies have shown that those affect the material behavior in bending. In this study a numerical model of the temper rolling (skin passing) process was used to determine a residual stress distribution in a dual phase, DP780, steel strip. A 5-stand roll forming process for the forming of a V-section was modeled, and the effect of various thickness reduction levels in the temper rolling process on the final shape defects was analyzed. The results show that a small thickness reduction in the temper rolling process decreases the maximum bow height but the final springback angle increases. It is also shown that reasonable model accuracy can be achieved by including the residual stress information due to temper rolling as initial condition in the numerical modeling of a roll forming process.

  16. Computational Analysis of Ares I Roll Control System Jet Interaction Effects on Rolling Moment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deere, Karen A.; Pao, S. Paul; Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.

    2011-01-01

    The computational flow solver USM3D was used to investigate the jet interaction effects from the roll control system on the rolling moment of the Ares I full protuberance configuration at wind tunnel Reynolds numbers. Solutions were computed at freestream Mach numbers from M = 0.5 to M = 5 at the angle of attack 0deg, at the angle of attack 3.5deg for a roll angle of 120deg, and at the angle of attack 7deg for roll angles of 120deg and 210deg. Results indicate that the RoCS housing provided a beneficial jet interaction effect on vehicle rolling moment for M > or = 0.9. Most of the components downstream of the roll control system housing contributed to jet interaction penalties on vehicle rolling moment.

  17. The Rolling Friction of Several Airplane Wheels and Tires and the Effect of Rolling Friction on Take-Off

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wetmore, J W

    1937-01-01

    This report presents the results of test made to determine the rolling friction of airplane wheels and tires under various conditions of wheel loading, tire inflation pressure, and ground surface. The effect of wheel-bearing type was also investigated. Six pairs of wheels and tires were tested including two sizes of each of the types designated as standard (high pressure), low pressure, and extra low pressure. The results of calculations intended to show the effect of variations in rolling friction on take-off are also presented.

  18. Effects of the microstructure of twin roll cast and hot rolled plates on the surface quality of presensitized plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yuan-Zhi; Zhang, Ya-Feng; Zhao, Chao-Qi; Zhou, Feng

    2014-09-01

    The effect of the microstructure of plates fabricated both in the traditional process, involving casting, hot rolling and cold rolling (HR), and in the novel twin roll casting + cold rolling (TRC) process on the surface quality of presensitized (PS) plates was analyzed by optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS). The formation of pores on the surface of the electrolyzed HR plate could be attributed to the presence of approximately 1-μm-sized large Al-Fe precipitates in the HR plate compared to the smaller precipitates in the TRC plate. Moreover, residual graphite lubricants used during the TRC process were entrapped on the surface of the TRC plate during the subsequent rolling process. The entrapped pollutants tended to further deteriorate the formation of pores on the surface of the TRC plate, and no residual carbon was detected on the surface of the HR plate. Furthermore, the surface quality of the TRC plate can be improved by surface cleaning before the cold rolling process, which could dramatically lower the residual graphite on the surface.

  19. Biophysical and chemical handles to control the size of DNA nanoparticles produced by rolling circle amplification.

    PubMed

    Lee, So Yeon; Kim, Kyoung-Ran; Bang, Duhee; Bae, Se Won; Kim, Hak Joong; Ahn, Dae-Ro

    2016-08-16

    Although rolling circle amplification (RCA) is an efficient method to produce DNA materials for biomedical applications, it does not yield nano-sized products suitable for intracellular delivery. We here provide the ways to control the size of RCA products and show a potential application of the size-controlled DNA nanoparticles. PMID:27464359

  20. Effect of roll-compaction and milling conditions on granules and tablet properties.

    PubMed

    Perez-Gandarillas, Lucia; Perez-Gago, Ana; Mazor, Alon; Kleinebudde, Peter; Lecoq, Olivier; Michrafy, Abderrahim

    2016-09-01

    Dry granulation is an agglomeration process used to produce size-enlarged particles (granules), improving the handling properties of powders such as flowability. In this process, powders are compacted using a roll press to produce ribbons, which are milled in granules used further in the tableting process. The granule and tablet properties are influenced by the existence of different designs of the roll compactors, milling systems and the interaction between process parameters and raw material properties. The main objective of this work was to investigate how different roll-compaction conditions and milling process parameters impact on ribbons, granules and tablet properties, highlighting the role of the sealing system (cheek plates and rimmed roll). In this context, two common excipients differing in their mechanical behaviour (MCC and mannitol) are used. The study is based on the analysis of granule size distribution together with the characterization of loss of compactability during die compaction. Results show that the tensile strength of tablets is lower when using granules than when the raw materials are compressed. Moreover, the plastic material (MCC) is more sensitive than the brittle one (mannitol). Regarding the roll-force, it is observed that the higher the roll force, the lower the tensile strength of tablets from granulated material is. These findings are in agreement with the literature. The comparison of sealing systems shows that the rimmed-roll system leads to slightly stronger tablets than the use of cheek plates. In addition, the use of the rimmed-roll system reduces the amount of fines, in particular when high roll force is applied. Overall, it can be concluded that roll-compaction effect is predominant over the milling effect on the production of fines but less significant on the tablet properties. This study points out that the balance between a good flowability by reducing the amount of fines and appropriate tablet strength is achieved with

  1. Particle size-segregation and roll waves in geophysical mass flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viroulet, Sylvain; Edwards, Andrew; Kokelaar, Peter; Gray, Nico

    2014-05-01

    Particle size-segregation in geophysical mass flows can have a profound feedback on their local mobility, leading to the formation of resistive bouldery flow fronts, which spontaneously degenerate into leveed channels [1,2] that constrain the flow and enhance run-out. By including particle segregation [3], a composition dependent frictional coupling can be incorporated into depth-averaged geophysical mass flow models to capture both levee formation and flow fingering [4]. However, the channel wavelengths are crucially dependent on the underlying rheology of the flow, which is a second order effect that is still not fully understood. In this paper we analyze a simpler, but closely related, mono-disperse flow in which the granular rheology plays a crucial part in the formation, growth and coarsening of roll waves. Two regimes have been found experimentally:- (i) a classical continuous roll wave regime, and (ii) a novel discrete roll wave regime where the troughs between the wave peaks become completely stationary. This latter behaviour has been observed in debris flows in Fully, Switzerland, and the Jiangjia Gully, China. Grain-size segregation and levee formation in geophysical mass flows, Johnson, C.G., Kokelaar, B.P., Iverson, R.M., Logan, M., LaHusen, R.G. & Gray, J.M.N.T. (2012) J. Geophys. Res. 117, F01032. Fine-grained linings of leveed channels facilitate runout of granular flows, Kokelaar, B.P., Graham, R.L., Gray, J.M.N.T. & Vallance, J.W. (2014) Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 385, 172-180. Large particle segregation, transport and accumulation in granular free-surface flows. Gray, J.M.N.T. & Kokelaar, B.P. (2010) J. Fluid Mech. 652, 105-137. Segregation-induced fingering instabilities in granular free surface flows, Woodhouse, M.J., Thornton, A.R., Johnson, C.G., Kokelaar, B.P. & Gray, J.M.N.T. (2012) J. Fluid Mech. 709, 543-580.

  2. Helicopter roll control effectiveness criteria program summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heffley, Robert K.; Bourne, Simon M.; Mnich, Marc A.

    1988-01-01

    A study of helicopter roll control effectiveness is summarized for the purpose of defining military helicopter handling qualities requirements. The study is based on an analysis of pilot-in-the-loop task performance of several basic maneuvers. This is extended by a series of piloted simulations using the NASA Ames Vertical Motion Simulator and selected flight data. The main results cover roll control power and short-term response characteristics. In general the handling qualities requirements recommended are set in conjunction with desired levels of flight task and maneuver response which can be directly observed in actual flight. An important aspect of this, however, is that vehicle handling qualities need to be set with regard to some quantitative aspect of mission performance. Specific examples of how this can be accomplished include a lateral unmask/remask maneuver in the presence of a threat and an air tracking maneuver which recognizes the kill probability enhancement connected with decreasing the range to the target. Conclusions and recommendations address not only the handling qualities recommendations, but also the general use of flight simulators and the dependence of mission performance on handling qualities.

  3. Effects of microalloying on hot-rolled and cold-rolled Q&P steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azevedo de Araujo, Ana Luiza

    austenite morphology from lath-like to blocky with increasing CT was observed. Hardness generally increased with decreasing CT, consistent with the increased fraction of harder phases in the microstructure. For the cold-rolled Q&P study, several combinations of quenching temperature (QT), partitioning temperature (PT), and partitioning time (t p) were examined using heat treatments in salt baths. Uniaxial tensile tests and RA measurements via x-ray diffraction (XRD) were performed for all alloys and heat treatment conditions. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) imaging and EBSD were conducted for a few select conditions. In terms of microstructure, Nb promoted an extensive refinement of the prior austenite grain size. Additions of V and Nb also seemed to affect the morphology of the microstructural constituents. It was observed that V generally increased austenite fractions at lower t p's, and the Nb-containing alloys had greater austenite fractions in most instances when compared to the Base alloy. Carbon content in austenite was usually increased or maintained with additions of Nb and V. In terms of mechanical properties, V slightly improved strength and elongation when compared to the Base alloy for most conditions. Niobium additions were somewhat more effective in improving ductility.

  4. Effects of False Tilt Cues on the Training of Manual Roll Control Skills

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaal, Peter M. T.; Popovici, Alexandru; Zavala, Melinda A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a transfer-of-training study performed in the NASA Ames Vertica lMotion Simulator. The purpose of the study was to investigate the effect of false tilt cues on training and transfer of training of manual roll control skills. Of specific interest were the skills needed to control unstable roll dynamics of a mid-size transport aircraft close to the stall point. Nineteen general aviation pilots trained on a roll control task with one of three motion conditions: no motion, roll motion only, or reduced coordinated roll motion. All pilots transferred to full coordinated roll motion in the transfer session. A novel multimodal pilot model identification technique was successfully applied to characterize how pilots' use of visual and motion cues changed over the course of training and after transfer. Pilots who trained with uncoordinated roll motion had significantly higher performance during training and after transfer, even though they experienced the false tilt cues. Furthermore, pilot control behavior significantly changed during the two sessions, as indicated by increasing visual and motion gains, and decreasing lead time constants. Pilots training without motion showed higher learning rates after transfer to the full coordinated roll motion case.

  5. The path of rolling elements in defective bearings: Observations, analysis and methods to estimate spall size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moazen Ahmadi, Alireza; Howard, Carl Q.; Petersen, Dick

    2016-03-01

    This paper describes the experimental investigation of the vibration signature generated by rolling elements entering and exiting a notch defect in the outer raceway of a bearing. The vibration responses of the bearing housing and the displacement between the raceways were measured and analyzed. These key features can be used to estimate the size of the defect and is demonstrated in this paper for a range of shaft speeds and bearing loads. It is shown that existing defect size estimation methods include assumptions that describe the path of the rolling elements in the defect zone leading to poor estimates of defect size. A new defect size estimation method is proposed and is shown to be accurate for estimating a range of notch defect geometries over a range of shaft speeds and applied loads.

  6. On Effect Size

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelley, Ken; Preacher, Kristopher J.

    2012-01-01

    The call for researchers to report and interpret effect sizes and their corresponding confidence intervals has never been stronger. However, there is confusion in the literature on the definition of effect size, and consequently the term is used inconsistently. We propose a definition for effect size, discuss 3 facets of effect size (dimension,…

  7. On effect size.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Ken; Preacher, Kristopher J

    2012-06-01

    The call for researchers to report and interpret effect sizes and their corresponding confidence intervals has never been stronger. However, there is confusion in the literature on the definition of effect size, and consequently the term is used inconsistently. We propose a definition for effect size, discuss 3 facets of effect size (dimension, measure/index, and value), outline 10 corollaries that follow from our definition, and review ideal qualities of effect sizes. Our definition of effect size is general and subsumes many existing definitions of effect size. We define effect size as a quantitative reflection of the magnitude of some phenomenon that is used for the purpose of addressing a question of interest. Our definition of effect size is purposely more inclusive than the way many have defined and conceptualized effect size, and it is unique with regard to linking effect size to a question of interest. Additionally, we review some important developments in the effect size literature and discuss the importance of accompanying an effect size with an interval estimate that acknowledges the uncertainty with which the population value of the effect size has been estimated. We hope that this article will facilitate discussion and improve the practice of reporting and interpreting effect sizes. PMID:22545595

  8. Analysis of the effects of wing interference on the tail contributions to the rolling derivatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michael, William H , Jr

    1952-01-01

    An analysis of the effects of wing interference on the tail contributions to the rolling stability derivatives of complete airplane configurations is made by calculating the angularity of the air stream at the vertical tail due to rolling and determining the resulting forces and moments. Some of the important factors which affect the resultant angularity on the vertical tail are wing aspect ratio and sweepback, vertical-tail span, and considerations associated with angle of attack and airplane geometry. Some calculated sidewash results for a limited range of plan forms and vertical-tail sizes are presented. Equations taking into account the sidewash results are given for determining the tail contributions to the rolling derivatives. Comparisons of estimated and experimental results indicate that a consideration of wing interference effects improves the estimated values of the tail contributions to the rolling derivatives and that fair agreement with available experimental data is obtained.

  9. The Influence of Grain Size on Twinning and Microstructure Refinement During Cold Rolling of Commercial-Purity Titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zherebtsov, S. V.; Dyakonov, G. S.; Salishchev, G. A.; Salem, A. A.; Semiatin, S. L.

    2016-08-01

    Microstructure evolution in commercial-purity titanium (CP Ti) with various initial grain sizes (1, 7, 15, and 30 μm) during plane-strain multipass rolling to a true thickness strain of 2.66 at 293 K (20 °C) was established. The degree of deformation twinning was found to be strongly dependent on grain size. Twinning was rare in the material with a grain size of 1 μm. For all grain sizes >15 μm, the occurrence of twinning reached a similar, maximum level. Concurrently, the propensity for twinning enhanced the kinetics of microstructure refinement particularly for the initially coarse-grain materials. Due to the extensive twinning-induced microstructure refinement, rolling of coarse-grain (15 μm) CP Ti to a true thickness strain of 2.66 resulted in the formation of an ultrafine microstructure with a grain/subgrain size of 200-300 nm, a value similar to that attained for the initially micrometer-scale microstructure. The effect of grain size on twinning in titanium was discussed in the context of a disclination model.

  10. Effects of preheating and cooling durations on roll-to-roll hot embossing.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seyoung; Son, Youngsu; Park, Heechang; Kim, Byungin; Yun, Dongwon

    2015-02-01

    In this study, we examined the sensitivity of embossed pattern depth to preheat supply and cooling and investigated how the pattern type and density affect the embossed depth. The main factors that affect embossed pattern qualities of roll-to-roll hot embossing, such as roller temperature, roller speed, and applied force, were determined using the response surface methodology. Eight conditions were then added to determine the time-dependent effects of heat transfer with custom-designed preheating and cooling systems. An extended preheat time for the polymethylmethacrylate substrate contributed to the significant change in the embossed depth, whereas the substrate-cooling did not exhibit a clear increasing or decreasing trend. Larger embossed depths were achieved in the horizontal patterns with lower density than in the vertical patterns, and the lower pattern densities showed greater embossed depths in most embossing conditions. We expect that this result will help to understand the effects of the pre- and posttreatment of roll-to-roll hot embossing by employing time duration factors of heat transfer, depending on the mold pattern type and density. PMID:25311866

  11. Dynamic Effect of Rolling Massage on Blood Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yan-Yan; Yi, Hou-Hui; Li, Hua-Bing; Fang, Hai-Ping

    2009-02-01

    The Chinese traditional medical massage has been used as a natural therapy to eliminate some diseases. Here, the effect of the rolling massage frequency to the blood flow in the blood vessels under the rolling massage manipulation is studied by the lattice Boltzmann simulation. The simulation results show that when the frequency is smaller than or comparable to the pulsatile frequency of the blood flow, the effect on the blood flux by the rolling massage is small. On the contrast, if the frequency is twice or more times of the pulsatile frequency of the blood flow, the blood flux is greatly enhanced and increases linearly with respect to the frequency. Similar behavior has also been observed on the shear stress on the blood vessel walls. The result is helpful for understanding that the rolling massage has the function of promoting the blood circulation and removing the blood stasis.

  12. Effect of Rolling Massage on the Vortex Flow in Blood Vessels with Lattice Boltzmann Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Hou Hui

    The rolling massage manipulation is a classic Chinese Medical Massage, which is a nature therapy in eliminating many diseases. Here, the effect of the rolling massage on the cavity flows in blood vessel under the rolling manipulation is studied by the lattice Boltzmann simulation. The simulation results show that the vortex flows are fully disturbed by the rolling massage. The flow behavior depends on the rolling velocity and the rolling depth. Rolling massage has a better effect on the flows in the cavity than that of the flows in a planar blood vessel. The result is helpful to understand the mechanism of the massage and develop the rolling techniques.

  13. Medium-size power generation market now focus of Rolls-Royce

    SciTech Connect

    Mullins, P.

    1996-12-01

    John Rose, Rolls-Royce chief executive, explained that the focus in power generation would now be upon small- and medium-sized power applications up to 150MW using its ranges of aeroderivative gas turbines, small steam turbines and diesel engines. The company already has an established position in this area and expects to become more competitive as aeroderivative gas turbines like the marine WR21 and industrial Trent reach the market. A measure of Rolls-Royce`s broad capability in medium power generation can be seen in the company`s decision to build its own cogen power station to provide heat and power to its major aerospace manufacturing facilities at Derby in the U.K. Work has already started on preparing land adjoining the site and the 60 MW power station is scheduled to go on line in January 1998. The US$60 million project is being carried out by Derby Cogeneration, a joint venture between Rolls-Royce Power Ventures and National Power Cogen, a subsidiary of the U.K.`s largest electrical power generator. 5 figs.

  14. Effect of biomimetic coupling units' morphologies on rolling contact fatigue wear resistance of steel from machine tool rolling tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wanshi; Zhou, Hong; Sun, Liang; Wang, Chuanwei; Chen, Zhikai

    2014-04-01

    The rolling contact fatigue wear resistance plays an important role on ensuring machining precision of machine tool using rolling tracks. Bio-inspired wearable surfaces with the alternated hardness were prepared on the specimen of steel material from machine tool rolling tracks by biomimetic coupling laser remelting method to imitate biological coupling principle. The microstructures and micromorphologies of bionic units in different sizes were characterized by optical microscope. The specimens with bionic units in different sizes and distributions were tested for rolling contact fatigue wear resistance. Combining the finite element analysis and the results of wear tests, a discussion on rolling contact fatigue wear was had. The specimens with bionic units had better rolling contact fatigue wear resistance than the untreated one, while the specimens with bionic units in the alternative depth's distributions present a better rolling contact fatigue wear resistance than the ones with bionic units in the single depth's distribution. It attributed to the alternative distribution made further improvement on the dispersion of depth of stress concentration.

  15. Correlational effect size benchmarks.

    PubMed

    Bosco, Frank A; Aguinis, Herman; Singh, Kulraj; Field, James G; Pierce, Charles A

    2015-03-01

    Effect size information is essential for the scientific enterprise and plays an increasingly central role in the scientific process. We extracted 147,328 correlations and developed a hierarchical taxonomy of variables reported in Journal of Applied Psychology and Personnel Psychology from 1980 to 2010 to produce empirical effect size benchmarks at the omnibus level, for 20 common research domains, and for an even finer grained level of generality. Results indicate that the usual interpretation and classification of effect sizes as small, medium, and large bear almost no resemblance to findings in the field, because distributions of effect sizes exhibit tertile partitions at values approximately one-half to one-third those intuited by Cohen (1988). Our results offer information that can be used for research planning and design purposes, such as producing better informed non-nil hypotheses and estimating statistical power and planning sample size accordingly. We also offer information useful for understanding the relative importance of the effect sizes found in a particular study in relationship to others and which research domains have advanced more or less, given that larger effect sizes indicate a better understanding of a phenomenon. Also, our study offers information about research domains for which the investigation of moderating effects may be more fruitful and provide information that is likely to facilitate the implementation of Bayesian analysis. Finally, our study offers information that practitioners can use to evaluate the relative effectiveness of various types of interventions. PMID:25314367

  16. Mechanical properties and characteristics of nanometer-sized precipitates in hot-rolled low-carbon ferritic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao-pei; Zhao, Ai-min; Zhao, Zheng-zhi; Huang, Yao; Li, Liang; He, Qing

    2014-03-01

    The microstructures and properties of hot-rolled low-carbon ferritic steel have been investigated by optical microscopy, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and tensile tests after isothermal transformation from 600°C to 700°C for 60 min. It is found that the strength of the steel decreases with the increment of isothermal temperature, whereas the hole expansion ratio and the fraction of high-angle grain boundaries increase. A large amount of nanometer-sized carbides were homogeneously distributed throughout the material, and fine (Ti, Mo)C precipitates have a significant precipitation strengthening effect on the ferrite phase because of their high density. The nanometer-sized carbides have a lattice parameter of 0.411-0.431 nm. After isothermal transformation at 650°C for 60 min, the ferrite phase can be strengthened above 300 MPa by precipitation strengthening according to the Ashby-Orowan mechanism.

  17. Effects of surface removal on rolling-element fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaretsky, Erwin V.

    1987-01-01

    The Lundberg-Palmgren equation was modified to show the effect on rolling-element fatigue life of removing by grinding a portion of the stressed volume of the raceways of a rolling-element bearing. Results of this analysis show that depending on the amount of material removed, and depending on the initial running time of the bearing when material removal occurs, the 10-percent life of the reground bearings ranges from 74 to 100 percent of the 10-percent life of a brand new bearing. Three bearing types were selected for testing. A total of 250 bearings were reground. Of this matter, 30 bearings from each type were endurance tested to 1600 hr. No bearing failure occurred related to material removal. Two bearing failures occurred due to defective rolling elements and were typical of those which may occur in new bearings.

  18. Efficiency roll-off suppression in organic light-emitting diodes using size-tunable bimetallic bowtie nanoantennas at high current densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yukun; Yun, Feng; Huang, Yi; Wu, Zhaoxin; Li, Yufeng; Jiao, Bo; Feng, Lungang; Li, Sanfeng; Ding, Wen; Zhang, Ye

    2016-07-01

    Size-tunable bimetallic bowtie nanoantennas have been utilized to suppress the efficiency roll-off characteristics in organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) using both the numerical and experimental approaches. The resonant range can be widened by the strong dual-atomic couplings in bimetallic bowtie nanoantennas. Compared with the green OLED with conventional bowtie nanoantennas at a high current density of 800 mA/cm2, the measured efficiency roll-off ratio of the OLED with size-modulated bowtie nanoantennas is decreased from 53.2% to 41.8%, and the measured current efficiency is enhanced by 29.9%. When the size-modulated bowtie nanoantennas are utilized in blue phosphorescent OLEDs, the experimental roll-off ratio is suppressed from 43.6% to 25.9% at 250 mA/cm2, and the measured current efficiency is also enhanced significantly. It is proposed that the efficiency roll-off suppression is mainly related to the enhanced localized surface plasmon effect, which leads to a shorter radiative lifetime.

  19. Effect of deformation path on microstructure, microhardness and texture evolution of interstitial free steel fabricated by differential speed rolling

    SciTech Connect

    Hamad, Kotiba; Chung, Bong Kwon; Ko, Young Gun

    2014-08-15

    This paper reports the effect of the deformation path on the microstructure, microhardness, and texture evolution of interstitial free (IF) steel processed by differential speed rolling (DSR) method. For this purpose, total height reductions of 50% and 75% were imposed on the samples by a series of differential speed rolling operations with various height reductions per pass (deformation levels) ranging from 10 to 50% under a fixed roll speed ratio of 1:4 for the upper and lower rolls, respectively. Microstructural observations using transmission electron microscopy and electron backscattered diffraction measurements showed that the samples rolled at deformation level of 50% had the finest mean grain size (∼ 0.5 μm) compared to the other counterparts; also the samples rolled at deformation level of 50% showed a more uniform microstructure. Based on the microhardness measurements along the thickness direction of the deformed samples, gradual evolution of the microhardness value and its homogeneity was observed with the increase of the deformation level per pass. Texture analysis showed that, as the deformation level per pass increased, the fraction of alpha fiber and gamma fiber in the deformed samples increased. The textures obtained by the differential speed rolling process under the lubricated condition would be equivalent to those obtained by the conventional rolling. - Highlights: • Effect of DSR deformation path on microstructure of IF steel is significant. • IF steel rolled at deformation level of 50% has the ultrafine grains of ∼ 0.5 μm. • Rolling texture components are pronounced with increasing deformation level.

  20. A numerical study of the rolling friction between a microsphere and a substrate considering the adhesive effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuyan; Wang, Xiaoli; Li, Hanqing; Yang, Weixu

    2016-01-01

    A numerical model of the rolling friction between a microsphere and a substrate is established by introducing the adhesion hysteresis between the front and rear sides of the contact region into Zhang’s adhesive contact model. Effects of the size ratio which is defined as the sphere radius divided by the equilibrium separation, relative amount of adhesion hysteresis and Tabor parameter on the dimensionless maximum rolling friction torque in the case of zero normal force are inspected, and the quantitative relationship between the maximum rolling friction torque and the normal force is achieved. Results indicate that due to adhesion hysteresis at microscale, the dimensionless maximum rolling friction torque at zero normal force is not zero, which not only increases with decreasing size ratio, showing clear size effects, but also increases with increasing relative amount of adhesion hysteresis and Tabor parameter. In addition, the maximum rolling friction torque at microscale presents a sublinear relationship with the normal force, and the exponent of the normal force is influenced by the size ratio, relative amount of adhesion hysteresis and Tabor parameter, which are remarkably different from the superlinear relationship at macroscale.

  1. Effect of skin-pass rolling direction on magnetic properties of semiprocessed nonoriented electrical steel sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Kurosaki, Y.; Shimazu, T.; Shiozaki, M.

    1999-09-01

    Effect of skin-pass rolling direction on magnetic properties and directionality in semiprocessed nonoriented electrical steel sheets produced by skin-pass rolling process was studied. Skin-pass rolling direction greatly affects magnetic properties and directionality. By control of skin-pass rolling direction, the value of B{sub 50} in the required directions such as 0{degree}, 90{degree} and circumferential direction can be adjusted and the value of B{sub 50} is higher than that of the usual skin-pass rolling direction of 0{degree}. The textures of the steel sheets developed after batch annealing varied with the skin-pass rolling directions and this result indicates that the residual strain energy by skin-pass rolling varies with skin-pass rolling directions.

  2. Effect of Dynamic Rolling Oscillations on Twin Tail Buffet Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheta, Essam F.; Kandil, Osama A.

    1999-01-01

    The effect of dynamic rolling oscillations of delta-wing/twin-tail configuration on twin-tail buffet response is investigated. The computational model consists of a sharp-edged delta wing of aspect ratio one and swept-back flexible twin tail with taper ratio of 0.23. The configuration model is statically pitched at 30 deg. angle of attack and then forced to oscillate in roll around the symmetry axis at a constant amplitude of 4 deg. and reduced frequency of pi and 2(pi). The freestream Mach number and Reynolds number are 0.3 and 1.25 million, respectively. This multidisciplinary problem is solved using three sets of equations on a dynamic multi-block grid structure. The first set is the unsteady, full Navier-Stokes equations, the second set is the aeroelastic equations for coupled bending and torsion vibrations of the tails, and the third set is the grid-displacement equations. The configuration is investigated for inboard position of the twin tails which corresponds to a separation distance between the twin tails of 33% wing span. The computed results are compared with the results of stationary configuration, which previously have been validated using experimental data. The results conclusively showed that the rolling oscillations of the configuration have led to higher loads, higher deflections, and higher excitation peaks than those of the stationary configuration. Moreover, increasing the reduced frequency has led to higher loads and excitation peaks and lower bending and torsion deflections and acceleration.

  3. The effects of myofascial release with foam rolling on performance.

    PubMed

    Healey, Kellie C; Hatfield, Disa L; Blanpied, Peter; Dorfman, Leah R; Riebe, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    In the last decade, self-myofascial release has become an increasingly common modality to supplement traditional methods of massage, so a masseuse is not necessary. However, there are limited clinical data demonstrating the efficacy or mechanism of this treatment on athletic performance. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the use of myofascial rollers before athletic tests can enhance performance. Twenty-six (13 men and 13 women) healthy college-aged individuals (21.56 ± 2.04 years, 23.97 ± 3.98 body mass index, 20.57 ± 12.21 percent body fat) were recruited. The study design was a randomized crossover design in which subject performed a series of planking exercises or foam rolling exercises and then performed a series of athletic performance tests (vertical jump height and power, isometric force, and agility). Fatigue, soreness, and exertion were also measured. A 2 × 2 (trial × gender) analysis of variance with repeated measures and appropriate post hoc was used to analyze the data. There were no significant differences between foam rolling and planking for all 4 of the athletic tests. However, there was a significant difference between genders on all the athletic tests (p ≤ 0.001). As expected, there were significant increases from pre to post exercise during both trials for fatigue, soreness, and exertion (p ≤ 0.01). Postexercise fatigue after foam rolling was significantly less than after the subjects performed planking (p ≤ 0.05). The reduced feeling of fatigue may allow participants to extend acute workout time and volume, which can lead to chronic performance enhancements. However, foam rolling had no effect on performance. PMID:23588488

  4. Dispersive effects of transverse magnet displacements in rolled arc achromats

    SciTech Connect

    Fieguth, T.; Kheifets, S.; Murray, J.J.

    1986-09-22

    The effect of transverse displacements of combined function magnets is investigated where the disperion in not matched due to roll. This dispersion function is perturbed by displacement of combined function magnets either singly or coherently. In the latter case the effect of a systematic (or DC) offset of magnets is examined. This type of error can occur due to systematics in the placement or the readout of Beam Position Monitors or equivalently by correcting the orbit of a beam of the wrong momentum with respect to the Arc magnet excitation. 5 refs., 18 figs.

  5. Shape Memory Effects in TiNi-based Alloys Subjected to Electroplastic Rolling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potapova, A. A.; Resnina, N. N.; Stolyarov, V. V.

    2014-07-01

    One of the prospective methods for structure refinement is electroplastic rolling (EPR). The use of an electric current pulse during cold rolling enhances deformability (1.5-3 times for TiNi-based alloys). It was shown that EPR ( e > 1) with post-deformation annealing at 450-500 °C leads to nanostructure formation with a grain size of 60-120 nm. Also, EPR leads to an increase in functional properties of TiNi-based alloys. So, the recovery coefficient was revealed as being better than the undeformed alloy (90-96% for Ti49,2Ni50,8 and 75-80% for Ti50,0Ni50,0). In the Ti50,0Ni50,0 subjected to EPR up to strain 3.6 and subsequent annealing at 450 °C for 1 h, the superelasticity effect is found.

  6. Micrometer-sized ice particles for planetary-science experiments - I. Preparation, critical rolling friction force, and specific surface energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gundlach, B.; Kilias, S.; Beitz, E.; Blum, J.

    2011-08-01

    Coagulation models assume a higher sticking threshold for micrometer-sized ice particles than for micrometer-sized silicate particles. However, in contrast to silicates, laboratory investigations of the collision properties of micrometer-sized ice particles (in particular, of the most abundant H 2O-ice) have not been conducted yet. Thus, we used two different experimental methods to produce micrometer-sized H 2O-ice particles, i.e. by spraying H 2O droplets into liquid nitrogen and by spraying H 2O droplets into a cold nitrogen atmosphere. The mean particle radii of the ice particles produced with these experimental methods are (1.49 ± 0.79) μm and (1.45 ± 0.65) μm. Ice aggregates composed of the micrometer-sized ice particles are highly porous (volume filling factor: ϕ = 0.11 ± 0.01) or rather compact (volume filling factor: ϕ = 0.72 ± 0.04), depending on the method of production. Furthermore, the critical rolling friction force of FRoll, ice = (114.8 ± 23.8) × 10 -10 N was measured for micrometer-sized ice particles, which exceeds the critical rolling friction force of micrometer-sized SiO 2 particles (F=(12.1±3.6)×10-10N). This result implies that the adhesive bonding between micrometer-sized ice particles is stronger than the bonding strength between SiO 2 particles. An estimation of the specific surface energy of micrometer-sized ice particles, derived from the measured critical rolling friction forces and the surface energy of micrometer-sized SiO 2 particles, results in γice = 0.190 J m -2.

  7. A disposable, roll-to-roll hot-embossed inertial microfluidic device for size-based sorting of microbeads and cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao; Liedert, Christina; Liedert, Ralph; Papautsky, Ian

    2016-05-21

    Inertial microfluidics has been a highly active area of research in recent years for high-throughput focusing and sorting of synthetic and biological microparticles. However, existing inertial microfluidic devices always rely on microchannels with high-aspect-ratio geometries (channel width w < channel height h) and small cross-sections (w×h < 50 × 100 μm(2)). Such deep and small structures increase fabrication difficulty and can limit manufacturing by large-scale and high-throughput production approaches such as roll-to-roll (R2R) hot embossing. In this work, we present a novel inertial microfluidic device using only a simple and low-aspect-ratio (LAR) straight microchannel (w > h) to achieve size-based sorting of microparticles and cells. The simple LAR geometry of the device enables successful high-throughput fabrication using R2R hot embossing. With optimized flow conditions and channel dimensions, we demonstrate continuous sorting of a mixture of 15 μm and 10 μm diameter microbeads with >97% sorting efficiency using the low-cost and disposable R2R chip. We further demonstrate size-based sorting of bovine white blood cells, demonstrating the ability to process real cellular samples in our R2R chip. We envision that this R2R hot-embossed inertial microfluidic chip will serve as a powerful yet low-cost and disposable tool for size-based sorting of synthetic microparticles in industrial applications or cellular samples in cell biology research and clinical diagnostics. PMID:27050341

  8. Effect Sizes, Confidence Intervals, and Confidence Intervals for Effect Sizes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Bruce

    2007-01-01

    The present article provides a primer on (a) effect sizes, (b) confidence intervals, and (c) confidence intervals for effect sizes. Additionally, various admonitions for reformed statistical practice are presented. For example, a very important implication of the realization that there are dozens of effect size statistics is that "authors must…

  9. T Strip Properties Fabricated by Powder Rolling Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Jae-Keun; Lee, Chae-Hun; Kim, Jeoung-Han; Yeom, Jong-Taek; Park, Nho-Kwang

    In the present study, the characteristics of the Ti powders fabricated by Hydride-Dehydride (HDH) were analyzed in terms of particle shape, size and size distribution. Ti powders were subjected to roll compaction and their microstructure and green densities were evaluated in terms of particle size, powder morphology, roll gap and rolling speed. Effects of blending elements having different powder sizes on densification properties were analyzed. The strip thickness was proportional to the roll gap up to 0.9 mm and the density of titanium strip was decreased with the increase in roll gap. As the roll speed increased, the strip density and thickness were decreased by using -200 mesh Ti powder. However, the effect of rolling speed for -400 mesh Ti powder was not greater than that of -200 mesh powder. The highest density by 93% was achieved by using -400 mesh Ti powder at 0.1 mm roll gap, however edge cracks and alligator cracks were occurred.

  10. Rolling Shutter Effect aberration compensation in Digital Holographic Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monaldi, Andrea C.; Romero, Gladis G.; Cabrera, Carlos M.; Blanc, Adriana V.; Alanís, Elvio E.

    2016-05-01

    Due to the sequential-readout nature of most CMOS sensors, each row of the sensor array is exposed at a different time, resulting in the so-called rolling shutter effect that induces geometric distortion to the image if the video camera or the object moves during image acquisition. Particularly in digital holograms recording, while the sensor captures progressively each row of the hologram, interferometric fringes can oscillate due to external vibrations and/or noises even when the object under study remains motionless. The sensor records each hologram row in different instants of these disturbances. As a final effect, phase information is corrupted, distorting the reconstructed holograms quality. We present a fast and simple method for compensating this effect based on image processing tools. The method is exemplified by holograms of microscopic biological static objects. Results encourage incorporating CMOS sensors over CCD in Digital Holographic Microscopy due to a better resolution and less expensive benefits.

  11. The effect of mold materials on the overlay accuracy of a roll-to-roll imprinting system using UV LED illumination within a transparent mold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Sungwoo; Kook, YunHo; Kim, ChulHo; Yoo, SoonSung; Park, Kwon-Shik; Kim, Seok-min; Kang, Shinill

    2016-06-01

    Although several studies on the roll-to-roll (R2R) imprinting process have reported achieving flexible electronics, improving the alignment accuracy in the overlay process of R2R imprinting is recognized as the biggest problem for the commercialization of this technology. For an overlay technique with high alignment accuracy, it is essential to develop a roll mold with high positional accuracy. In this study, a method for fabricating a roll mold with high positional accuracy is proposed by wrapping a thin glass substrate flexible mold around the transparent roll base, because it can provide higher mechanical strength and thermal stability than a conventional polymer substrate. To confirm the usability of the proposed process, the prepared roll mold was used to fabricate a test pattern of thin-film transistor backplane for a rollable display. The positional and overlay accuracy of the roll mold with the proposed thin glass substrate flexible mold were compared with the roll mold with a conventional polymer substrate flexible mold. Large-area transparent flexible molds with a size of 470  ×  370 mm were fabricated by an ultraviolet (UV) imprinting process on thin glass and polyethylene terephthalate substrates, and these flexible molds were wrapped around a roll base of 125 mm radius through a precision alignment process. After an anti-adhesion treatment and the wrapping process, the roll mold with the polymer substrate showed a ~180 μm positional error, whereas the thin glass substrate showed a ~30 μm positional error. After the overlay process using the R2R imprinting system with the alignment system, an average overlay error of ~3 μm was obtained when the thin glass flexible wrapped roll mold was used, whereas a ~22 μm overlay error was obtained when the polymer substrate flexible wrapped roll mold was used.

  12. Observation and simulation of boundary layer coherent roll structures and their effect on pollution dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandeepan, B. S.; Rakesh, P. T.; Venkatesan, R.

    2013-02-01

    Coherent roll structures are often observed in the atmospheric boundary layer during strong wind shears and pre-convective situations. Data collected from in situ and remote observations at a coastal site under the presence of the rolls are analyzed which confirm the typical characteristic features coherent roll structures. A mesoscale simulation study with WRF shows that the structures could be simulated only when the spatial domain is configured in high resolution. The limiting criteria as an indicator of the rolls based on the stability parameter is investigated and found to fail as similarly pointed out by a few other researchers. The effect of rolls on the dispersion of a passive tracer plume is simulated by a Lagrangian particle dispersion model (FLEXPART). The plume is seen confined between two rolls for a significant downwind distance and shows alternative high and low areas of concentration.

  13. Effect of asymmetric hot rolling on texture, microstructure and magnetic properties in a non-grain oriented electrical steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S.; Butler, J.; Melzer, S.

    2014-11-01

    In this study, both asymmetric hot rolling (AHR) and conventional hot rolling (CHR) were carried out to study the effect of the hot rolling conditions on the evolution of the texture and microstructure in a non-grain oriented (NGO) steel. The microstructure and texture in the subsequent processing stages were characterised and related to the final magnetic properties. The results show that AHR, compared with CHR, tends to homogenise texture through thickness of the hot band strips. AHR results in a higher fraction of the θ-fibre ({0 0 1}) and a lower fraction of the γ-fibre ({1 1 1}) in the hot band strips, which are favourable features in relation to the magnetic properties of the strip. However, the favourable features observed in hot rolled AHR strips are eliminated after cold rolling and annealing. Contrarily, the required θ-fibre is decreased and the unwanted γ-fibre is intensified in the AHR sheet after cold rolling and their strength is maintained in the subsequent process steps. On the other hand, AHR does not produce a discernible change in the grain size in the hot band annealed strip and in the final annealed sheet, except that the magnetic anisotropy in the AHR is improved after skin pass and extra annealing as the result of the redistribution of the texture components within the θ-fibre, no significant improvement of the magnetic properties as a direct consequence of the application of asymmetric hot rolling has been observed under the current AHR experimental conditions.

  14. Effective sizes for subdivided populations

    SciTech Connect

    Chesser, R.K. Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA ); Rhodes, O.E. Jr.; Sugg, D.W.; Schnabel, A. )

    1993-12-01

    Many derivations of effective population sizes have been suggested in the literature; however, few account for the breeding structure and none can readily be expanded to subdivided populations. Breeding structures influence gene correlations through their effects on the number of breeding individuals of each sex, the mean number of progeny per female, and the variance in the number of progeny produced by males and females. Additionally, hierarchical structuring in a population is determined by the number of breeding groups and the migration rates of males and females among such groups. This study derives analytical solutions for effective sizes that can be applied to subdivided populations. Parameters that encapsulate breeding structure and subdivision are utilized to derive the traditional inbreeding and variance effective sizes. Also, it is shown that effective sizes can be determined for any hierarchical level of population structure for which gene correlations can accrue. Derivations of effective sizes for the accumulation of gene correlations within breeding groups (coancestral effective size) and among breeding groups (intergroup effective size) are given. The results converge to traditional single population measures when similar assumptions are applied. In particular, inbreeding and intergroup effective sizes are shown to be special cases of the coancestral effective size, and intergroup and variance effective sizes will be equal if the population census remains constant. Instantaneous solutions for effective size, at any time after gene correlation begins to accrue, are given in terms of traditional F statistics or transition equations. All effective sizes are shown to converge upon a common asymptotic value when breeding tactics and migration rates are constant. The asymptotic effective size can be expressed in terms of the fixation indices and the number of breeding groups; however, the rate of approach to the asymptote is dependent upon dispersal rates.

  15. Effects of Annealing Treatment Prior to Cold Rolling on the Edge Cracking Phenomenon of Ferritic Lightweight Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Seok Su; Lee, Byeong-Joo; Kwak, Jai-Hyun; Lee, Sunghak

    2014-08-01

    Effects of annealing treatment from 923 K to 1023 K (650 °C to 750 °C) prior to cold rolling on the edge cracking phenomenon of a ferritic lightweight steel were investigated. The edge cracking was severely found in the hot-rolled and 923 K (650 °C)-annealed steels after cold rolling, whereas it hardly occurred in the 1023 K (750 °C)-annealed steel. As the annealing temperature increased, lamellar κ-carbides were dissolved and coarsened, and most of the κ-carbides continuously formed along boundaries between ferrite and κ-carbide bands disappeared. Microstructural observation of the deformed region of tensile specimens revealed that the removal of band boundary κ-carbides reduced the difference in tensile elongation along the longitudinal direction (LD) and transverse direction (TD), which consequently led to the reduction in edge cracking. The 1023 K (750 °C)-annealed steel showed fine ferrite grain size, weak texture, and decomposed band structure after subsequent cold rolling and intercritical annealing, because κ-carbides actively worked as nucleation sites of ferrite and austenite. The present annealing treatment prior to cold rolling, which was originally adopted to prevent edge cracking, also beneficially modified the final microstructure of lightweight steel.

  16. Effects of rolling on the ductility of 80% tungsten heavy alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Lavender, C.A.; Gurwell, W.E.

    1992-11-01

    Relations between transverse tensile ductility and rolling and annealing schedules were investigated for solid-state sintered and annealed 80%W8%Ni-2%Fe heavy alloy rolled at 900C or 1150C with varying reductions between anneals at either 1150C or 1400C. Final anneals and a solution heat treatment were employed prior to tensile testing. Metallographic and fractographic analyses were performed to determine relations between microstructure and physical properties. Multiple 1400C intermediate anneals with a maximum 60% rolling reduction produced higher transverse tensile elongations than rolled with a higher final reduction, 86%. Tensile elongation differences were attributed to the recrystallized intra-particle W grain sizes achieved during the final anneal. Materials given a maximum of 60% reduction before final anneal had fewer intra-particle W grains and therefore higher ductilities. For materials rolled at 900C or 1150C, no differences in transverse tensile elongation were observed. 1150C intermediate anneals had consistently lower ductility. 900C rolling produced slightly higher elongations than 1150C rolling, but only when the material was annealed at 1455C. Tensile yield and ultimate strengths did not vary greatly with rolling and intermediate annealing conditions. The edge cracking correlated with observed lateral spread and the material softness.

  17. Effect of cold rolling on the precipitation behavior of {delta} phase in INCONEL 718

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, W.C.; Yao, M.; Chen, Z.L.

    1999-01-01

    Systematic research has been undertaken on the effect of cold rolling on the precipitation kinetics of {delta} phase in INCONEL 718. Above 910 C, cold rolling promotes the precipitation of {delta} phase. Below 910 C, the precipitation of {delta} phase is still preceded by the {gamma}{double_prime} precipitation in cold-rolled INCONEL 718. Cold rolling promotes not only the precipitation of {gamma}{double_prime} phase but also the {gamma}{double_prime} {r_arrow} {delta} transformation. The relationship between the weight percentage of {delta} phase and aging time follows the Avrami equation. Below 910 C, as cold rolling reduction and temperature increase, the time exponent (n) decreases, whereas the rate of {delta} precipitation increases. The apparent activation energy of {delta} precipitation varies in the range of 1113 to 577 kJ/mol for 25 to 65% cold-rolled INCONEL 718 and decreases as cold rolling reduction increases. Precipitation-time-temperature (PTT) diagrams have been determined for the four cold-rolled INCONEL 718. The noses of the PTT curves are located at about 910 C. These curves are shifted significantly to longer times as cold rolling reductions decrease.

  18. Bond rolling resistance and its effect on yielding of bonded granulates by DEM analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, M. J.; Yu, H. S.; Harris, D.

    2006-07-01

    A discrete element modelling of bonded granulates and investigation on the bond effect on their behaviour are very important to geomechanics. This paper presents a two-dimensional (2-D) discrete element theory for bonded granulates with bond rolling resistance and provides a numerical investigation into the effect of bond rolling resistance on the yielding of bonded granulates. The model consists of mechanical contact models and equations governing the motion of bonded particles. The key point of the theory is that the assumption in the original bond contact model previously proposed by the authors (55th CSCE-ASCE Conference, Hamilton, Ont., Canada, 2002; 313-320; J. Eng. Mech. (ASCE) 2005; 131(11):1209-1213) that bonded particles are in contact at discrete points, is here replaced by a more reliable assumption that bonded particles are in contact over a width. By making the idealization that the bond contact width is continuously distributed with the normal/tangential basic elements (BE) (each BE is composed of spring, dashpot, bond, slider or divider), we establish a bond rolling contact model together with bond normal/tangential contact models, and also relate the governing equations to local equilibrium. Only one physical parameter needs to be introduced in the theory in comparison to the original bond discrete element model. The model has been implemented into a 2-D distinct element method code, NS2D. Using the NS2D, a total of 86 1-D, constant stress ratio, and biaxial compressions tests have been carried out on the bonded granular samples of different densities, bonding strengths and rolling resistances. The numerical results show that: (i) the new theory predicts a larger internal friction angle, a larger yielding stress, more brittle behaviour and larger final broken contact ratio than the original bond model; (ii) the yielding stress increases nonlinearly with the increasing value of , and (iii) the first-yield curve (initiation of bond breakage), which

  19. Effect of the defect initial shape on the fatigue lifetime of a continuous casting machine roll

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasniy, Oleh P.; Lapusta, Yuri

    2016-08-01

    The article deals with the influence of the defect initial shape on the residual lifetime of a continuous casting machine roll made of 25Cr1MoV steel. Based on this approach, previously proposed by some authors, the growth of the surface fatigue crack was modeled in a roll under loading and temperature conditions that are close to operational ones, taking into account the statistical distribution of the C parameter of Paris' equation. Dependencies of the continuous casting machines roll fatigue lifetime on the initial defect shape and critical defect sizes are obtained.

  20. Effective sizes for subdivided populations.

    PubMed

    Chesser, R K; Rhodes, O E; Sugg, D W; Schnabel, A

    1993-12-01

    Many derivations of effective population sizes have been suggested in the literature; however, few account for the breeding structure and none can readily be expanded to subdivided populations. Breeding structures influence gene correlations through their effects on the number of breeding individuals of each sex, the mean number of progeny per female, and the variance in the number of progeny produced by males and females. Additionally, hierarchical structuring in a population is determined by the number of breeding groups and the migration rates of males and females among such groups. This study derives analytical solutions for effective sizes that can be applied to subdivided populations. Parameters that encapsulate breeding structure and subdivision are utilized to derive the traditional inbreeding and variance effective sizes. Also, it is shown that effective sizes can be determined for any hierarchical level of population structure for which gene correlations can accrue. Derivations of effective sizes for the accumulation of gene correlations within breeding groups (coancestral effective size) and among breeding groups (intergroup effective size) are given. The results converge to traditional, single population measures when similar assumptions are applied. In particular, inbreeding and intergroup effective sizes are shown to be special cases of the coancestral effective size, and intergroup and variance effective sizes will be equal if the population census remains constant. Instantaneous solutions for effective sizes, at any time after gene correlation begins to accrue, are given in terms of traditional F statistics or transition equations. All effective sizes are shown to converge upon a common asymptotic value when breeding tactics and migration rates are constant. The asymptotic effective size can be expressed in terms of the fixation indices and the number of breeding groups; however, the rate of approach to the asymptote is dependent upon dispersal

  1. Effect of intermediate annealing on the microstructure and mechanical property of ZK60 magnesium alloy produced by twin roll casting and hot rolling

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Hongmei; Zang, Qianhao; Yu, Hui; Zhang, Jing; Jin, Yunxue

    2015-08-15

    Twin roll cast (designated as TRC in short) ZK60 magnesium alloy strip with 3.5 mm thickness was used in this paper. The TRC ZK60 strip was multi-pass rolled at different temperatures, intermediate annealing heat treatment was performed when the thickness of the strip changed from 3.5 mm to 1 mm, and then continued to be rolled until the thickness reached to 0.5 mm. The effect of intermediate annealing during rolling process on microstructure, texture and room temperature mechanical properties of TRC ZK60 strip was studied by using OM, TEM, XRD and electronic universal testing machine. The introduction of intermediate annealing can contribute to recrystallization in the ZK60 sheet which was greatly deformed, and help to reduce the stress concentration generated in the rolling process. Microstructure uniformity and mechanical properties of the ZK60 alloy sheet were also improved; in particular, the room temperature elongation was greatly improved. When the TRC ZK60 strip was rolled at 300 °C and 350 °C, the room temperature elongation of the rolled sheet with 0.5 mm thickness which was intermediate annealed during the rolling process was increased by 95% and 72% than that of no intermediate annealing, respectively. - Highlights: • Intermediate annealing was introduced during hot rolling process of twin roll cast ZK60 alloy. • Intermediate annealing can contribute to recrystallization and reduce the stress concentration in the deformed ZK60 sheet. • Microstructure uniformity and mechanical properties of the ZK60 sheet were improved, in particular, the room temperature elongation. • The elongation of the rolled ZK60 sheet after intermediate annealed was increased by 95% and 72% than that of no intermediate annealing.

  2. Effect of Shear Deformation on Closure of a Central Void in Thin-Strip Rolling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jong-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Central voids or voids at the middle layer are often found in thin strips produced by twin-roll casting. These strips are in general so thin that they are unable to take a required reduction in thickness to close the voids. In the present investigation, equal-speed rolling and differential-speed rolling were compared to assess the effect of differential speed on closure of the voids by the rigid-plastic finite-element analysis. As a result, shear deformation developed in differential-speed rolling was found to reduce the reduction in thickness required for void closure. An increase in speed ratio, length of deformation zone, or friction coefficient at the interface expedited the progress in void closure. However, as the speed ratio exceeded thickness ratio, a portion of rolling power was dissipated extensively by excessive slip at the interface. Moreover, tensile stress developed which would cause cracks in the strip.

  3. The Effect Of Roll-tensioning On Bandsaw Plate Vibration And Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Mote, C. D.

    1994-08-01

    Residual membrane stresses are purposely induced in wide bandsaw plates through a localized cold rolling procedure, known as roll-tensioning, to improve the cutting performance of the blade. Despite the critical importance of this practice to efficient cutting operation with a bandsaw, quantitative understanding of roll-tensioning on bandsaw cutting performance remains unresolved. In this paper, the effect of roll-tensioning on bandsaw plate free vibration and plate stability are discussed. The residual stresses induced by roll-tensioning can substantially increase or decrease the transverse and torsional natural frequencies (or stiffnesses) of the bandsaw plate depending on the locations of the rolling tracks, the roller load and the number of rolling repetitions on each track. With roll-tensioning that results in a substantial increase of torsional natural frequencies (or stiffnesses) and moderate decrease of transverse natural frequencies (or stiffnesses), the bandsaw plate can resist a larger normal edge (cutting) force prior to buckling. Improper tensioning that decreases substantially the transverse natural frequencies, or both the transverse and torsional natural frequencies, can reduce the normal edge force at buckling.

  4. Investigation at Low Speeds of the Effect of Aspect Ratio and Sweep on Rolling Stability Derivatives of Untapered Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Alex; Fisher, Lewis R

    1950-01-01

    A low-scale wind-tunnel investigation was conducted in rolling flow to determine the effects of aspect ratio and sweep (when varied independently) on the rolling stability derivatives for a series of untapered wings. The rolling-flow equipment of the Langley stability tunnel was used for the tests. The data of the investigation have been used to develop a method of accounting for the effects of the drag on the yawing moment due to rolling throughout the lift range.

  5. Effects of Hot Rolling on Low-Cycle Fatigue Properties of Zn-22 wt.% Al Alloy at Room Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, X. H.; Cao, Q. D.; Ma, S. J.; Han, S. H.; Tang, W.; Zhang, X. P.

    2016-06-01

    The effects of the reduction ratio (RR) on the low-cycle fatigue (LCF) properties of the Zn-22 wt.% Al (Zn-22Al) alloy were investigated. Various grain sizes from 0.68 to 1.13 μm were obtained by controlled RRs. Tensile and LCF tests were carried out at room temperature. Superplasticity and cyclic softening were observed. Strength and ductility of the rolled Zn-22Al alloy increased with the RR, owing to the decrease in its grain size. The RR did not affect the cyclic softening behavior of the alloy. The fatigue life of the alloy decreased with increasing strain amplitude, while the fatigue life first decreased and then increased with increasing RR. The longest fatigue life was observed for the alloy rolled at a RR of 60%. A bilinear Coffin-Manson relationship was observed to hold true for this alloy.

  6. Effects of rolling temperature and subsequent annealing on mechanical properties of ultrafine-grained Cu–Zn–Si alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiangkai; Yang, Xuyue; Chen, Wei; Qin, Jia; Fouse, Jiaping

    2015-08-15

    The effects of rolling temperature and subsequent annealing on mechanical properties of Cu–Zn–Si alloy were investigated by using X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscope, electron back scattered diffraction and tensile tests. The Cu–Zn–Si alloy has been processed at cryogenic temperature (approximately 77 K) and room temperature up to different rolling strains. It has been identified that the cryorolled Cu–Zn–Si alloy samples show a higher strength compared with those room temperature rolled samples. The improved strength of cryorolled samples is resulted from grain size effect and higher densities of dislocations and deformation twins. And subsequent annealing, as a post-heat treatment, enhanced the ductility. An obvious increase in uniform elongation appears when the volume fraction of static recrystallization grains exceeds 25%. The strength–ductility combination of the annealed cryorolled samples is superior to that of annealed room temperature rolled samples, owing to the finer grains, high fractions of high angle grain boundaries and twins. - Highlights: • An increase in hardness of Cu–Zn–Si alloy is noticed during annealing process. • Thermal stability is reduced in Cu–Zn–Si alloy by cryorolling. • An obvious enhancement in UE is noticed when fraction of SRX grains exceeds 25%. • A superior strength–ductility combination is achieved in the cryorolling samples.

  7. Effect of Rolling Bearing Refurbishment and Restoration on Bearing Life and Reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaretsky, Erwin V.; Branzai, Emanuel V.

    2005-01-01

    For nearly four decades it has been a practice in commercial and military aircraft application that rolling-element bearings removed at maintenance or overhaul be reworked and returned to service. The work presented extends previously reported bearing life analysis to consider the depth (Z(45)) to maximum shear stress (45) on stressed volume removal and the effect of replacing the rolling elements with a new set. A simple algebraic relationship was established to determine the L(10) life of bearing races subject to bearing rework. Depending on the extent of rework and based upon theoretical analysis, representative life factors (LF) for bearings subject to rework ranged from 0.87 to 0.99 the lives of new bearings. Based on bearing endurance data, 92 percent of the bearing sets that would be subject to rework would result in L(10) lives equaling and/or exceeding that predicted for new bearings with the remaining 8 percent having the potential to achieve the analytically predicted life of new bearings when one of the rings is replaced at rework.. The potential savings from bearing rework varies from 53 to 82 percent that of new bearings depending on the cost, size and complexity of the bearing.

  8. Effect of Heat Treatment on Microstructures and Mechanical Properties of Severe Plastically Deformed Hypo- and Hyper-Eutectoid Steels by Caliber Rolling Process.

    PubMed

    Yun, Shin-Cheon; Kim, Hyun-Jin; Bae, Chul-Min; Lee, Kee-Ahn

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated the effect of post-heat treatment on the microstructures and mechanical properties of severe plastically deformed hypo- and hyper-eutectoid steels that underwent a caliber rolling process. First, 28 passes of caliber rolling were performed on both the hypo-eutectoid steel with Fe-0.47% C (wt%) composition and the hyper-eutectoid steel with Fe-1.02%C (wt%) composition. Then, the caliber rolled materials underwent heat treatment at 500 degrees C for 1, 3, 5, 10, 30 and 60 minutes. The caliber rolled steel possessed a 300-400 nm-sized oval cementite structure created through elongating and segmentation regardless of the C composition. The observation of heat-treated microstructures showed that cementite structure became globular and ferrite size increased as heat treatment temperature increased. In the hardness measurement, the initial caliber rolled samples showed 372.8 Hv (hypoeutectoid) and 480.1 Hv (hyper-eutectoid). However, hardness dramatically decreased up to 10 min. heat treatments, and then showed a constant or small reduction with time. The yield strengths (compression) of caliber rolled hypo- and hypereutectoid steels obtained were 1097 MPa and 1426 MPa, respectively, and the yield strengths of the same steels after heat treatment (500 degrees C, 60 min.) were identified to be 868 MPa and 1316 MPa, respectively. PMID:27433697

  9. Effect of Packaging and Antioxidant Combinations on Physicochemical Properties of Irradiated Restructured Chicken Rolls

    PubMed Central

    Yim, Dong-Gyun; Ahn, Dong U.

    2015-01-01

    Effects of double packaging (combinational use of aerobic and vacuum conditions) and antioxidants on physicochemical properties in irradiated restructured chicken rolls were determined. Chicken breast treated with antioxidants (none, sesamol+a-tocopherol) was used to process restructured chicken breast rolls. The sliced rolls were vacuum, aerobic, or double packaged (vacuum for 7 d then aerobic for 3 d) and electron beam irradiated at 2.5 kGy. Color, 2-thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), oxidation reduction potentials (ORP), and volatile profiles of the samples were determined at 0 and 10 d. Irradiation made restructured chicken rolls redder (p<0.05), and the increased redness was more distinct in irradiated vacuum-packaged than irradiated aerobic or double packaged meats. TBARS values of antioxidant-treated double packaged rolls were lower than even nonirradiated vacuum-packaged meat, and those were distinct at 10 d (p<0.05). ORP and lipid oxidation values were lower in irradiated vacuum and double packaged samples than those in irradiated aerobic packaged ones at 0 d (p<0.05). Irradiation of restructured chicken rolls increased the amount of total volatiles. Considerable amounts of off-odor volatiles were reduced or not detected by double packaging and antioxidant treatment at 10 d. Therefore, the combined use of antioxidants and double packaging would be useful to reduce redness and control the oxidative quality changes of irradiated restructured chicken rolls. PMID:26761835

  10. Effect of Packaging and Antioxidant Combinations on Physicochemical Properties of Irradiated Restructured Chicken Rolls.

    PubMed

    Yim, Dong-Gyun; Ahn, Dong U; Nam, Ki-Chang

    2015-01-01

    Effects of double packaging (combinational use of aerobic and vacuum conditions) and antioxidants on physicochemical properties in irradiated restructured chicken rolls were determined. Chicken breast treated with antioxidants (none, sesamol+a-tocopherol) was used to process restructured chicken breast rolls. The sliced rolls were vacuum, aerobic, or double packaged (vacuum for 7 d then aerobic for 3 d) and electron beam irradiated at 2.5 kGy. Color, 2-thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), oxidation reduction potentials (ORP), and volatile profiles of the samples were determined at 0 and 10 d. Irradiation made restructured chicken rolls redder (p<0.05), and the increased redness was more distinct in irradiated vacuum-packaged than irradiated aerobic or double packaged meats. TBARS values of antioxidant-treated double packaged rolls were lower than even nonirradiated vacuum-packaged meat, and those were distinct at 10 d (p<0.05). ORP and lipid oxidation values were lower in irradiated vacuum and double packaged samples than those in irradiated aerobic packaged ones at 0 d (p<0.05). Irradiation of restructured chicken rolls increased the amount of total volatiles. Considerable amounts of off-odor volatiles were reduced or not detected by double packaging and antioxidant treatment at 10 d. Therefore, the combined use of antioxidants and double packaging would be useful to reduce redness and control the oxidative quality changes of irradiated restructured chicken rolls. PMID:26761835

  11. Aileron roll hysteresis effects on entry of space shuttle orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, R. W.

    1977-01-01

    Six-degree-of-freedom simulations of the space shuttle orbiter entry with control hysteresis were conducted on the NASA Langley Research Center interactive simulator known as the automatic reentry flight dynamics simulator. These simulations revealed that the vehicle can tolerate control hysteresis producing a + or - 50 percent change in the nominal aileron roll characteristics and an offset in the nominal characteristics equivalent to a + or - 5 deg aileron deflection with little increase in the reaction control system's fuel consumption.

  12. Vibrations on the Roll - MANA, a Roll Along Array Experiment to map Local Site Effects Across a Fault System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohrnberger, M.; Scherbaum, F.; Hinzen, K. G.; Reamer, S. K.; Weber, B.

    2001-12-01

    The effects of surficial geology on seismic motion (site effects) are considered one of the major controlling factors to the damage distribution during earthquakes. Qualitative and quantitative estimates of local site amplifications provide important information for the identification of potential high risk areas. In this context, the analysis of ambient vibrations is an attractive tool for the mapping of site conditions. It is a low-cost alternative to expensive active seismic experiments or geophysical well-logging and especially well suited for the use within urban areas. Within the MANA experiment we conducted ambient vibration measurements at roughly 100 sites in the Lower Rhine Embayment (NW-Germany) to test various aspects of site effect determination, especially the feasibility of a roll along technique. A total of 13 three-component seismometers (5s corner period) have been used in a linear array configuration (station distance ~100 m). At all times during the roll-along experiment at least 8 stations (mostly 10) were operating simultaneously, meanwhilst the other stations were moved from the rear to the front of the line and re-installed. Thus, a total progress of almost 10 km could be obtained within two days. The line stretched across the NW-SE striking Erft fault system, one of the major faults in the eastern part of the Lower Rhine Embayment. The thickness of cenozoic soft-sediments overlying the basement of paleozoic age increases at the individual branches of the fault in abrupt steps of uncertain magnitude from around 200 m in the east to almost 1000 m in the west. The results of single station horizontal to vertical spectral ratios (HVSR) along the line are presented as well as the spatial evolution of local dispersion curves obtained from a slantstack analysis (SSA). The spatial variation of features along the line in both the HVSR and SSA are discussed in terms of sedimentary thickness and modifications of the wavefield properties of the ambient

  13. Experimental and Numerical Study on the Effect of ZDDP Films on Sticking During Hot Rolling of Ferritic Stainless Steel Strip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Liang; Jiang, Zhengyi; Wei, Dongbin; Gong, Dianyao; Cheng, Xiawei; Zhao, Jingwei; Luo, Suzhen; Jiang, Laizhu

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of zinc dialkyl dithio phosphate (ZDDP) films on sticking during hot rolling of a ferritic stainless steel strip. The surface characterization and crack propagation of the oxide scale are very important for understanding the mechanism of the sticking. The high-temperature oxidation of one typical ferritic stainless was conducted at 1373 K (1100 °C) for understanding its microstructure and surface morphology. Hot-rolling tests of a ferritic stainless steel strip show that no obvious cracks among the oxide scale were observed with the application of ZDDP. A finite element method model was constructed with taking into consideration different crack size ratios among the oxide scale, surface profile, and ZDDP films. The simulation results show that the width of the crack tends to be reduced with the introduction of ZDDP films, which is beneficial for improving sticking.

  14. Planning sample sizes when effect sizes are uncertain: The power-calibrated effect size approach.

    PubMed

    McShane, Blakeley B; Böckenholt, Ulf

    2016-03-01

    Statistical power and thus the sample size required to achieve some desired level of power depend on the size of the effect of interest. However, effect sizes are seldom known exactly in psychological research. Instead, researchers often possess an estimate of an effect size as well as a measure of its uncertainty (e.g., a standard error or confidence interval). Previous proposals for planning sample sizes either ignore this uncertainty thereby resulting in sample sizes that are too small and thus power that is lower than the desired level or overstate the impact of this uncertainty thereby resulting in sample sizes that are too large and thus power that is higher than the desired level. We propose a power-calibrated effect size (PCES) approach to sample size planning that accounts for the uncertainty associated with an effect size estimate in a properly calibrated manner: sample sizes determined on the basis of the PCES are neither too small nor too large and thus provide the desired level of power. We derive the PCES for comparisons of independent and dependent means, comparisons of independent and dependent proportions, and tests of correlation coefficients. We also provide a tutorial on setting sample sizes for a replication study using data from prior studies and discuss an easy-to-use website and code that implement our PCES approach to sample size planning. PMID:26651984

  15. Effect of Rolling Temperature and Ultrafast Cooling Rate on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Steel Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Qibin; Liu, Zhenyu; Yang, Yu; Wang, Guodong

    2016-07-01

    Microstructure can vary significantly through thickness after ultrafast cooling of rolled steel plates, impacting their mechanical properties. This study examined the microstructure, microstructural banding at centerline, and mechanical properties through thickness for different ultrafast cooling conditions and rolling temperatures. One set of steels (UC1 and UC2) were ultrafast-cooled (UFC) at 40 K/s after finish rolling at 1223 K and 1193 K (950 °C and 910 °C), respectively, while the second set (LC) was cooled by laminar cooling at 17 K/s after finish rolling at 1238 K (965 °C). UFC produced microstructural variation through thickness; highly dislocated lath-type bainitic ferrite was formed near the surface, whereas the primary microstructure was acicular ferrite and irregular polygonal ferrite in the interior of UC1 and UC2 steels, respectively. However, UFC has the advantage of suppression of microstructural banding in centerline segregation regions. The ferrite grain size in both UFC-cooled steels was refined to ~5 μm, increasing strength and toughness. The optimum combination of properties was obtained in UC2 steel with appropriate low finish rolling temperature, being attributed to the distinct microstructure resulting from work-hardened austenite before UFC.

  16. The effect of the cube texture component on the earing behavior of rolled f. c. c. metals

    SciTech Connect

    Rollett, A.D.; Canova, G.R.; Kocks, U.F.

    1986-01-01

    An application of texture simulation to the formability of rolled f.c.c. sheet is described. Control of the earing behavior of such sheet is crucial to the efficient utilization of material. Cold-rolled f.c.c. metals characteristically give ears at 45/sup 0/ to the rolling direction but it is known that if a large cube component is present before the material is rolled, the severity of the earing is reduced. The cube component, (010)(001), by itself is known to give ears at 90/sup 0/ to the rolling direction and could thus balance a 45/sup 0/ earing tendency. The cube component is unstable to rolling deformation, however, and is generally not observed in heavily cold-rolled f.c.c. metals. Therefore, the challenge is to explain how a large cube component, present prior to rolling, can affect the earing behavior at large rolling reductions. Texture simulation shows that orientations near cube tend to rotate primarily about the rolling direction towards the Goss orientation, (110)(001). It has been established both experimentally and theoretically that all orientations between the cube and the Goss positions give 90/sup 0/ ears. Therefore, the effect of a prior cube component is due to the special behavior of orientations near cube under rolling deformation.

  17. Effect of superconducting solenoid model cores on spanwise iron magnet roll control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britcher, C. P.

    1985-01-01

    Compared with conventional ferromagnetic fuselage cores, superconducting solenoid cores appear to offer significant reductions in the projected cost of a large wind tunnel magnetic suspension and balance system. The provision of sufficient magnetic roll torque capability has been a long-standing problem with all magnetic suspension and balance systems; and the spanwise iron magnet scheme appears to be the most powerful system available. This scheme utilizes iron cores which are installed in the wings of the model. It was anticipated that the magnetization of these cores, and hence the roll torque generated, would be affected by the powerful external magnetic field of the superconducting solenoid. A preliminary study has been made of the effect of the superconducting solenoid fuselage model core concept on the spanwise iron magnet roll torque generation schemes. Computed data for one representative configuration indicate that reductions in available roll torque occur over a range of applied magnetic field levels. These results indicate that a 30-percent increase in roll electromagnet capacity over that previously determined will be required for a representative 8-foot wind tunnel magnetic suspension and balance system design.

  18. CROSS-DISCIPLINARY PHYSICS AND RELATED AREAS OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY: Effect of Rolling Massage on Particle Moving Behaviour in Blood Vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Hou-Hui; Fan, Li-Juan; Yang, Xiao-Feng; Chen, Yan-Yan

    2008-09-01

    The rolling massage manipulation is a classic Chinese massage, which is expected to eliminate many diseases. Here the effect of the rolling massage on the particle moving property in the blood vessels under the rolling massage manipulation is studied by the lattice Boltzmann simulation. The simulation results show that the particle moving behaviour depends on the rolling velocity, the distance between particle position and rolling position. The average values, including particle translational velocity and angular velocity, increase as the rolling velocity increases almost linearly. The result is helpful to understand the mechanism of the massage and develop the rolling techniques.

  19. Effect of carbide distribution on rolling-element fatigue life of AMS 5749

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, R. J.; Bamberger, E. N.

    1983-01-01

    Endurance tests with ball bearings made of corrosion resistant bearing steel which resulted in fatigue lives much lower than were predicted are discussed. Metallurgical analysis revealed an undesirable carbide distribution in the races. It was shown in accelerated fatigue tests in the RC rig that large, banded carbides can reduce rolling element fatigue life by a factor of approximately four. The early spalling failures on the bearing raceways are attributed to the large carbide size and banded distribution.

  20. Effect of tangential traction and roughness on crack initiation/propagation during rolling contact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soda, N.; Yamamoto, T.

    1980-01-01

    Rolling fatigue tests of 0.45 percent carbon steel rollers were carried out using a four roller type rolling contact fatigue tester. Tangential traction and surface roughness of the harder mating rollers were varied and their effect was studied. The results indicate that the fatigue life decreases when fraction is applied in the same direction as that of rolling. When the direction of fraction is reversed, the life increases over that obtained with zero traction. The roughness of harder mating roller also has a marked influence on life. The smoother the mating roller, the longer the life. Microscopic observation of specimens revealed that the initiation of cracks during the early stages of life is more strongly influenced by the surface roughness, while the propagation of these cracks in the latter stages is affected mainly by the tangential traction.

  1. Models for the Effects of G-seat Cuing on Roll-axis Tracking Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levison, W. H.; Mcmillan, G. R.; Martin, E. A.

    1984-01-01

    Including whole-body motion in a flight simulator improves performance for a variety of tasks requiring a pilot to compensate for the effects of unexpected disturbances. A possible mechanism for this improvement is that whole-body motion provides high derivative vehicle state information whic allows the pilot to generate more lead in responding to the external disturbances. During development of motion simulating algorithms for an advanced g-cuing system it was discovered that an algorithm based on aircraft roll acceleration producted little or no performance improvement. On the other hand, algorithms based on roll position or roll velocity produced performance equivalent to whole-body motion. The analysis and modeling conducted at both the sensory system and manual control performance levels to explain the above results are described.

  2. Roll tracking effects of G-vector tilt and various types of motion washout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jex, H. R.; Magdaleno, R. E.; Junker, A. M.

    1978-01-01

    In a dogfight scenario, the task was to follow the target's roll angle while suppressing gust disturbances. All subjects adopted the same behavioral strategies in following the target while suppressing the gusts, and the MFP-fitted math model response was generally within one data symbol width. The results include the following: (1) comparisons of full roll motion (both with and without the spurious gravity tilt cue) with the static case. These motion cues help suppress disturbances with little net effect on the visual performance. Tilt cues were clearly used by the pilots but gave only small improvement in tracking errors. (2) The optimum washout (in terms of performance close to real world, similar behavioral parameters, significant motion attenuation (60 percent), and acceptable motion fidelity) was the combined attenuation and first-order washout. (3) Various trends in parameters across the motion conditions were apparent, and are discussed with respect to a comprehensive model for predicting adaptation to various roll motion cues.

  3. An investigation of the effects of pitch-roll (de)-coupling on helicopter handling qualities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ockier, C. J.; Pausder, H. J.; Blanken, C. L.

    1995-01-01

    An investigation of the effects of pitch-roll coupling on helicopter handling qualities was performed by the US Army and DLR, using a NASA ground-based and a DLR inflight simulator. Over 90 different coupling configurations were evaluated using a roll-axis tracking task. The results show that although the current ADS-33C coupling criterion discriminates against those types of coupling typical of conventionally controlled helicopters, it not always suited for the prediction of handling qualities of helicopters with modern control systems. Based on the observation that high frequency inputs during tracking are used to alleviate coupling, a frequency domain pitch-roll coupling criterion that uses the average coupling ratio between the bandwidth and neutral stability frequency is formulated. This criterion provides a more comprehensive coverage with respect to the different types of coupling and shows excellent consistency.

  4. Effects of gamma and electron beam irradiation on the microbial quality of steamed tofu rolls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Qian; Gao, Meixu; Li, Shurong; Wang, Zhidong

    2013-01-01

    The effectiveness of two kinds of radiation processing, gamma and electron beam (ebeam) irradiation, for the inactivation of Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella enteritidis and Listeria innocua which were inoculated in pre-sterilised steamed tofu rolls was studied. The corresponding effects of both irradiation types on total bacterial counts (TBCs) in commercial steamed tofu rolls available in the market were also examined. The microbiological results demonstrated that gamma irradiation yielded D10 values of 0.20, 0.24 and 0.22 kGy for S. aureus, S. enteritidis and L. innocua, respectively. The respective D10 values for ebeam irradiation were 0.31, 0.35 and 0.27 kGy. Gamma and ebeam irradiation yielded D10 values of 0.48 and 0.43 kGy for total bacterial counts in commercial steamed tofu rolls, respectively. The results suggest that ebeam irradiation has similar effect on decreasing TBCs in steamed tofu rolls, and gamma irradiation is slightly more effective than ebeam irradiation in reducing the populations of pathogenic bacteria. The observed differences in D10-values between them might be due to the significant differences in dose rate applied, and radiation processing of soybean products to improve their microbial quality could be available for other sources of protein.

  5. Effects of multiple rolling cover crops on their termination, soil water and soil strength

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The impact of multiple rolling rye and mixture (rye, crimson clover and hairy vetch) using two rollers (straight bar, and two-stage) on termination rate, soil strength and soil moisture were evaluated in northern Alabama. In 2007 and 2008 growing seasons, both roller types effectively terminated rye...

  6. Effect of rolling motion on critical heat flux for subcooled flow boiling in vertical tube

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, J. S.; Park, I. U.; Park, M. Y.; Park, G. C.

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents defining characteristics of the critical heat flux (CHF) for the boiling of R-134a in vertical tube operation under rolling motion in marine reactor. It is important to predict CHF of marine reactor having the rolling motion in order to increase the safety of the reactor. Marine Reactor Moving Simulator (MARMS) tests are conducted to measure the critical heat flux using R-134a flowing upward in a uniformly heated vertical tube under rolling motion. MARMS was rotated by motor and mechanical power transmission gear. The CHF tests were performed in a 9.5 mm I.D. test section with heated length of 1 m. Mass fluxes range from 285 to 1300 kg m{sup -2}s{sup -1}, inlet subcooling from 3 to 38 deg. C and outlet pressures from 13 to 24 bar. Amplitudes of rolling range from 15 to 40 degrees and periods from 6 to 12 sec. To convert the test conditions of CHF test using R-134a in water, Katto's fluid-to-fluid modeling was used in present investigation. A CHF correlation is presented which accounts for the effects of pressure, mass flux, inlet subcooling and rolling angle over all conditions tested. Unlike existing transient CHF experiments, CHF ratio of certain mass flux and pressure are different in rolling motion. For the mass fluxes below 500 kg m{sup -2}s{sup -1} at 13, 16 (region of relative low mass flux), CHF ratio was decreased but was increased above that mass flux (region of relative high mass flux). Moreover, CHF tend to enhance in entire mass flux at 24 bar. (authors)

  7. Thermomechanical Behavior of Work Rolls During Warm Strip Rolling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalili, L.; Serajzadeh, S.; Koohbor, B.

    2012-12-01

    A mathematical model was developed to assess thermomechanical behavior of work rolls during warm rolling processes. A combined finite element analysis-slab method was first developed to determine thermal and mechanical responses of the strip being rolled under steady-state conditions, and then, the calculated roll pressure and temperature field were utilized as the governing boundary conditions for the thermomechanical problem of the work roll. Finally, the thermomechanical stresses within the work rolls were predicted by a thermoelastic finite element approach. The results of the model indicate that, in warm strip rolling, thermal and mechanical stresses developed in the work rolls are comparable, and thus, both thermal and mechanical aspects of the problem should be considered in such a problem. Besides, the model was shown to be capable of determining the effects of various rolling parameters on the thermomechanical behavior of the work rolls during warm rolling process.

  8. Effect of size on cracking of materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glucklick, J.

    1971-01-01

    Brittle behavior of large mild steel elements, glass plasticity, and fatigue specimen size sensitivity are manifestations of strain-energy size effect. Specimens physical size effect on material cracking initiation occurs according to flaw distribution statistics. Fracture size effect depends on stability or instability of crack propagation.

  9. Variation of effective roll number on MHD Rayleigh-Benard convection confined in a small-aspect ratio box

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasaka, Yuji; Yanagisawa, Takatoshi; Vogt, Tobias; Eckert, Sven

    2015-11-01

    MHD Rayleigh-Benard convection was studied experimentally using a box filled with liquid metal with five in aspect ratio and square horizontal cross section. Applying horizontal magnetic field organizes the convection motion into quasi-two dimensional rolls arranged parallel to the magnetic field. The number of rolls has tendency, decreases with increasing Rayleigh number Ra and increases with increasing Chandrasekhar number Q. To fit the box with relatively smaller aspect ratio, the convection rolls take regime transition accompanying variation of the roll number against variations of Ra and Q. We explored convection regimes in a ranges, 2 ×103 < Q <104 and 5 ×103 < Ra < 3 ×105 using ultrasonic velocity profiling that can capture time variations of instantaneous velocity profile. In a range Ra / Q ~ 10 , we found periodic flow reversals in which five rolls periodically change the direction of their circulation with gradual skew of rolls. We performed POD analysis on the spatio-temporal velocity distribution obtained by UVP and indicated that that the periodic flow reversals consist of periodic emergence of 4-rolls mode in dominant 5-rolls mode. POD analysis also provided evaluation of effective number of rolls as a more objective approach.

  10. Class-Size Effects in Secondary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krassel, Karl Fritjof; Heinesen, Eskil

    2014-01-01

    We analyze class-size effects on academic achievement in secondary school in Denmark exploiting an institutional setting where pupils cannot predict class size prior to enrollment, and where post-enrollment responses aimed at affecting realized class size are unlikely. We identify class-size effects combining a regression discontinuity design with…

  11. Effect of lubricant extreme pressure additives on rolling element fatigue life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, R. J.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1973-01-01

    The effects of surface active additives on rolling-element fatigue life were investigated with the five-ball fatigue tester at conditions where classical subsurface initiated rolling-element fatigue is the sole mode of failure. Test balls of AISI 52100, AISI M-50, and AISI 1018 were run with an acid-treated white oil containing either 2.5 percent sulfurized terpene, 1 percent didodecyl phosphite, or 5 percent chlorinated wax. In general, it was found that the influence of surface active additives was detrimental to rolling-element fatigue life. The chlorinated-wax additive significantly reduced fatigue life by a factor of 7. The base oil with the 2.5 percent sulfurized-terpene additive can reduce fatigue life by as much as 50 percent. No statistical change in fatigue life occurred with the base oil having the 1 percent didodecyl-phosphite additive. The additives used with the base oil did not change the ranking of the bearing steels where rolling-element fatigue life was of subsurface origin.

  12. Effects of thermal treatment on the co-rolled U-Mo fuel foils

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis D. Keiser, Jr.; Tammy L. Trowbridge; Cynthia R. Breckenridge; Brady L. Mackowiak; Glenn A. Moore; Barry H. Rabin; Mitchell K. Meyer

    2014-11-01

    A monolithic fuel type is being developed to convert US high performance research and test reactors such as Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory from highly enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU). The interaction between the cladding and the U-Mo fuel meat during fuel fabrication and irradiation is known to have negative impacts on fuel performance, such as mechanical integrity and dimensional stability. In order to eliminate/minimize the direct interaction between cladding and fuel meat, a thin zirconium diffusion barrier was introduced between the cladding and U-Mo fuel meat through a co-rolling process. A complex interface between the zirconium and U-Mo was developed during the co-rolling process. A predictable interface between zirconium and U-Mo is critical to achieve good fuel performance since the interfaces can be the weakest link in the monolithic fuel system. A post co-rolling annealing treatment is expected to create a well-controlled interface between zirconium and U-Mo. A systematic study utilizing post co-rolling annealing treatment has been carried out. Based on microscopy results, the impacts of the annealing treatment on the interface between zirconium and U-Mo will be presented and an optima annealing treatment schedule will be suggested. The effects of the annealing treatment on the fuel performance will also be discussed.

  13. Recalibrated Equations for Determining Effect of Oil Filtration on Rolling Bearing Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Needelman, William M.; Zaretsky, Erwin V.

    2014-01-01

    In 1991, Needelman and Zaretsky presented a set of empirically derived equations for bearing fatigue life (adjustment) factors (LFs) as a function of oil filter ratings. These equations for life factors were incorporated into the reference book, "STLE Life Factors for Rolling Bearings." These equations were normalized (LF = 1) to a 10-micrometer filter rating at Beta(sub x) = 200 (normal cleanliness) as it was then defined. Over the past 20 years, these life factors based on oil filtration have been used in conjunction with ANSI/ABMA standards and bearing computer codes to predict rolling bearing life. Also, additional experimental studies have been made by other investigators into the relationship between rolling bearing life and the size, number, and type of particle contamination. During this time period filter ratings have also been revised and improved, and they now use particle counting calibrated to a new National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) reference material, NIST SRM 2806, 1997. This paper reviews the relevant bearing life studies and describes the new filter ratings. New filter ratings, Beta(sub x(c)) = 200 and Beta(sub x(c)) = 1000, are benchmarked to old filter ratings, Beta(sub x) = 200, and vice versa. Two separate sets of filter LF values were derived based on the new filter ratings for roller bearings and ball bearings, respectively. Filter LFs can be calculated for the new filter ratings.

  14. Effect of rolling on the high temperature tensile and stress-rupture properties of tungsten fiber-superalloy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrasek, D. W.

    1974-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the effects of mechanical working on the 1093 C tensile and stress-rupture strength of tungsten alloy/superalloy composites. Hot pressed composites containing either conventional tungsten lamp filament wire or tungsten-1% ThO2 wire and a nickel base alloy matrix were hot rolled at 1093 C. The hot pressed and rolled composite specimens were then tested in tension and stress-rupture at 1093 C. Rolling decreased the degree of fiber-matrix reaction as a function of time of exposure at 1093 C. The stress-rupture properties of the rolled composites were superior to hot pressed composites containing equivalent diameter fibers. Rolling did not appreciably affect the 1093 C ultimate tensile strength of the composites.

  15. Effect of rolling on the high temperature tensile and stress-rupture properties of tungsten fiber-superalloy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrasek, D. W.

    1974-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the effects of mechanical working on the 1093 C (2000 F) tensile and stress-rupture strength of tungsten alloy/superalloy composites. Hot pressed composites containing either conventional tungsten lamp filament wire or tungsten-1% ThO2 wire and a nickel base alloy matrix were hot rolled at 1093 C (2000 F). The hot pressed and rolled composite specimens were then tested in tension and stress-rupture at 1093 C (2000 F). Rolling decreased the degree of fiber-matrix reaction as a function of time of exposure at 1093 C (2000 F). The stress-rupture properties of the rolled composites were superior to hot pressed composites containing equivalent diameter fibers. Rolling did not appreciably affect the 1093 C (2000 F) ultimate tensile strength of the composites.

  16. Effect Sizes in Gifted Education Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gentry, Marcia; Peters, Scott J.

    2009-01-01

    Recent calls for reporting and interpreting effect sizes have been numerous, with the 5th edition of the "Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association" (2001) calling for the inclusion of effect sizes to interpret quantitative findings. Many top journals have required that effect sizes accompany claims of statistical significance.…

  17. Effective Population Sizes with Multiple Paternity

    PubMed Central

    Sugg, D. W.; Chesser, R. K.

    1994-01-01

    While the concept of effective population size is of obvious applicability to many questions in population genetics and conservation biology, its utility has suffered due to a lack of agreement among its various formulations. Often, mathematical formulations for effective sizes apply restrictive assumptions that limit their applicability. Herein, expressions for effective sizes of populations that account for mating tactics, biases in sex ratios, and differential dispersal rates (among other parameters) are developed. Of primary interest is the influence of multiple paternity on the maintenance of genetic variation in a population. In addition to the standard inbreeding and variance effective sizes, intragroup (coancestral) and intergroup effective sizes also are developed. Expressions for effective sizes are developed for the beginning of nonrandom gene exchanges (initial effective sizes), the transition of gene correlations (instantaneous effective sizes), and the steady-state (asymptotic effective size). Results indicate that systems of mating that incorporate more than one male mate per female increase all effective sizes above those expected from polygyny and monogamy. Instantaneous and asymptotic sizes can be expressed relative to the fixation indices. The parameters presented herein can be utilized in models of effective sizes for the study of evolutionary biology and conservation genetics. PMID:7982568

  18. Effect of Austenitizing Temperature on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Semi-High-Speed Steel Cold-Forged Rolls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qiong; Sun, Da-Le; Liu, Chang-Sheng

    2009-10-01

    The effect of austenitizing temperature on the microstructure and mechanical properties of semi-high-speed steel (S-HSS) cold-forged rolls was investigated. Low-temperature austenitizing below 1313 K induced carbide coarsening during subsequent tempering at 973 K due to the nucleation effect of undissolved M7C3. On the other hand, the heavy dissolution of M7C3 above 1353 K caused the fine carbide formation on lath and plate boundaries, which retarded the subgrain growth during tempering. The increase in strength with increasing austenitizing temperature was attributed to the fine carbide distribution and the high dislocation density. Furthermore, as the austenitizing temperature increased, the impact energy markedly reduced, due to the large prior austenite grain size and the high strength. Finally, based on the microstructure and mechanical properties, an optimal austenitizing temperature range between 1313 and 1333 K was determined.

  19. Cohort Size Effects and Migration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Franklin D.

    1983-01-01

    Explores whether changes in the size of cohorts entering the labor force affected the propensity within the U.S. labor force to migrate and socioeconomic circumstances of migrants at destination within 1965-76. Suggests that a significant reduction in the volume of migration among members of the baby boom cohort was the primary adjustment…

  20. Effect of rolling geometry on the mechanical properties, microstructure and recrystallization texture of Al-Mg-Si alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao-feng; Guo, Ming-xing; Cao, Ling-yong; Wang, Fei; Zhang, Ji-shan; Zhuang, Lin-zhong

    2015-07-01

    The effect of rolling geometry on mechanical properties, microstructure, and recrystallization texture of Al-Mg-Si alloys was studied by means of tensile tests, microstructural observations, and electron backscatter diffraction measurements. The results reveal that the elongation and the average plasticity strain ratio ( r) values of the T4P (pre-aging plus natural aging)-treated alloy sheet with a rolling geometry value between 1 and 3 are somewhat higher than those of the T4P-treated sheet with a rolling geometry value between 3 and 6. The deformation and recrystallization microstructures of the sheet with a rolling geometry value between 1 and 3 are more uniform than those of the sheet with a rolling geometry value between 3 and 6. The former also possesses somewhat higher surface quality. H {001}<110> and Goss {110}<001> orientations are the main recrystallization texture components for the former case, whereas the latter case only includes H{001}<110> orientation. Texture gradients are present in the two alloy sheets. Shear texture component F on the surface of the sheet with a rolling geometry value between 3 and 6 and its higher texture gradients have revealed that non-uniform deformation occurred during cold rolling. The effects of texture on the yield strength and r value were also discussed.

  1. Numerical study of strain-rate effect in cold rolls forming of steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falsafi, J.; Demirci, E.; Silberschmidt, V. V.

    2013-07-01

    Cold roll forming (CRF) is a well-known continuous manufacturing process, in which a flat strip is deformed by successive rotating pairs of tools, without changing the material thickness. In the past decades, to lessen the process-development efforts, finite-element simulations have been increasingly employed to improve the process design and predict the manufacturing-induced defects. One of the important aspects in design of the CRF process is consideration of resulting strains in the final product as the material passes through several complex forming stands. Sufficient knowledge of longitudinal strain in the workpiece is required to set various process parameters. Increasing a process speed in a roll forming operation can bring cost advantages, but the influence of the forming speed on the strain distribution should be explored. This study is focussed on a strain-rate effect in the CRF process of steel sheets. The strain-rate dependency of a plastic behaviour observed in most metals can affect the finished product's quality as well as process parameters. This paper investigates the influence of the strain rate on longitudinal strains induced in the roll forming operation by incorporating a phenomenological Johnson-Cook constitutive model, which allows studying the impact of the process speed on the output product. Taking advantage of 3D finite element analysis, a roll forming process was simulated using MCS.Marc, comprising a complete set of forming stations. Through the changing of the process speed, the strain rate impact on longitudinal peak strains and forming length was investigated. The results highlight the effect of the strain rate on edge thinning and subsequent undesirable distortions in the product.

  2. Effects of specimen width and rolling direction on the mechanical properties of beryllium copper alloy C17200

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, W. C.; Liu, Z. R.

    2015-12-01

    The objective of the research was to study the effects of specimen width and rolling direction of beryllium copper alloy, C17200, on the mechanical properties of yield strength and Young's modulus. The experimental results showed that the reduction of the specimen width from 12.5 mm to 2.5 mm did not affect the yield strength but reduced the Young's modulus by 4%. Also, the change of rolling direction affected both the yield strength and the Young's modulus. When the tension direction is parallel to the rolling direction, the maximum yield strength was obtained. The results can help predict the behavior of small-scale beryllium copper products more accurately.

  3. Analysis of Effect of Rolling Pull-Outs on Wing and Aileron Loads of a Fighter Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, Henry A.; Aiken, William S.

    1946-01-01

    An analysis was made to determine the effect of rolling pull-out maneuvers on the wing and aileron loads of a typical fighter airplane, the P-47B. The results obtained indicate that higher loads are imposed upon wings and ailerons because of the rolling pull-out maneuver, than would be obtained by application of the loading requirements to which the airplane was designed. An increase of 102 lb or 15 percent of wing weight would be required if the wing were designed for rolling pull-out maneuver. It was also determined that the requirements by which the aileron was originally designed were inadequate.

  4. Leukocyte Rolling on P-Selectin: A Three-Dimensional Numerical Study of the Effect of Cytoplasmic Viscosity

    PubMed Central

    Khismatullin, Damir B.; Truskey, George A.

    2012-01-01

    Rolling leukocytes deform and show a large area of contact with endothelium under physiological flow conditions. We studied the effect of cytoplasmic viscosity on leukocyte rolling using our three-dimensional numerical algorithm that treats leukocyte as a compound droplet in which the core phase (nucleus) and the shell phase (cytoplasm) are viscoelastic fluids. The algorithm includes the mechanical properties of the cell cortex by cortical tension and considers leukocyte microvilli that deform viscoelastically and form viscous tethers at supercritical force. Stochastic binding kinetics describes binding of adhesion molecules. The leukocyte cytoplasmic viscosity plays a critical role in leukocyte rolling on an adhesive substrate. High-viscosity cells are characterized by high mean rolling velocities, increased temporal fluctuations in the instantaneous velocity, and a high probability for detachment from the substrate. A decrease in the rolling velocity, drag, and torque with the formation of a large, flat contact area in low-viscosity cells leads to a dramatic decrease in the bond force and stable rolling. Using values of viscosity consistent with step aspiration studies of human neutrophils (5–30 Pa·s), our computational model predicts the velocities and shape changes of rolling leukocytes as observed in vitro and in vivo. PMID:22768931

  5. The effect of solid film lubricants on the stability of rolling element bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kannel, J. W.; Merriman, T. L.

    1987-01-01

    A technique has been developed for modeling solid films in rolling element bearings. For a given bearing geometry an effective viscosity can be calculated for a solid film as a function of the film shear modulus and ball-race friction coefficient. The calculated effective viscosity can subsequently be used as an input to a numerical model of cage motion and stability. Results from a sample calculation of effective viscosity and prediction of cage stability for a turbopump bearing are presented for films of molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) and polytetrafluoroethylene ()PTFE).

  6. Effect of Dynamic Rolling Oscillations on Twin-Tail Buffet Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SHETA, E. F.; KANDIL, O. A.

    2002-04-01

    The effect of dynamic rolling oscillations of delta-wing/twin-tail configuration model on twin-tail buffet response is investigated. The configuration model is statically pitched at a 30° angle of attack and then forced to oscillate in roll around the symmetry axis at a constant amplitude of 4° and reduced frequency of π and 2π . This multidisciplinary problem is solved using three sets of equations on a dynamic multi-block grid structure. The first set is the unsteady, full Navier-Stokes equations, the second set is the aeroelastic equations for coupled bending and torsion vibrations of the tails, and the third set is the grid-displacement equations. The results conclusively showed that the rolling oscillations of the configuration have led to higher loads, higher deflections, and higher excitation peaks than those of the stationary configuration. Moreover, increasing the reduced frequency has led to higher loads and excitation peaks and lower bending and torsion deflections and acceleration. The unsteady aerodynamic loads have never reached complete periodicity due to the irregular vibrations of the left and right tails.

  7. An investigation of the effects of pitch-roll (de)coupling on helicopter handling qualities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanken, C. L.; Pausder, H. J.; Ockier, C. J.

    1995-01-01

    An extensive investigation of the effects of pitch-roll coupling on helicopter handling qualities was performed by the U.S. Army and Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fur Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR), using a NASA ground-based and a DLR in-flight simulator. Over 90 different coupling configurations were evaluated using a high gain roll-axis tracking task. The results show that although the current ADS-33C coupling criterion discriminates against those types of coupling typical of conventionally controlled helicopters, it is not always suited for the prediction of handling qualities of helicopters with modern control systems. Based on the observation that high frequency inputs during tracking are used to alleviate coupling, a frequency domain pitch-roll coupling criterion that uses the average coupling ratio between the bandwidth and neutral stability frequency is formulated. This criterion provides a more comprehensive coverage with respect to the different types of coupling, shows excellent consistency, and has the additional benefit that compliance testing data are obtained from the bandwidth/phase delay tests, so that no additional flight testing is needed.

  8. The effects of cold rolling on the microstructural and spall response of 1100 aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, C. L.; Chen, C. Q.; Ramesh, K. T.; Dandekar, D. P.

    2013-09-01

    As received 1100-O aluminum was cold rolled (CR) to 30%, 70%, and 80% reduction, respectively, to study the effects of microstructural evolution on the spall response using plate impact experiments. Previous results show a sharp increase in pullback velocity for 1100-O aluminum with increase in peak shock stress between 4.0 and 8.3 GPa due to hardening, followed by a decrease for peak shock stresses up to 12.0 GPa possibly due to softening. This maximum was not observed for the 30% CR, which showed only an increase in pullback velocity over the shock stress range of 4.0-12.0 GPa due to hardening (net increase in dislocation density). For the 70% CR aluminum, no change was observed in the pullback velocity over the range tested (4.0-11.0 GPa) probably due to saturation in dislocation density. Similar observations were made for the 80% CR, that is, no change was observed in the spall response between 4.0 GPa and 11.0 GPa. However, variations were observed in the spall response for the 80% CR, and these variations are attributed to material inhomogeneity possibly caused by increased cold rolling beyond saturation. The results also show a significant increase in Hugoniot Elastic Limit with increase in percent cold rolling.

  9. Effects of Different Modes of Hot Cross-Rolling in 7010 Aluminum Alloy: Part I. Evolution of Microstructure and Texture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Chandan; Singh, A. K.; Mukhopadhyay, A. K.; Chattopadhyay, K.

    2013-06-01

    The current study describes the evolution of microstructure and texture in an Al-Zn-Mg-Cu-Zr-based 7010 aluminum alloy during different modes of hot cross-rolling. Processing of materials involves three different types of cross-rolling. The development of texture in the one-step cross-rolled specimen can be described by a typical β-fiber having the maximum intensity near Copper (Cu) component. However, for the multi-step cross-rolled specimens, the as-rolled texture is mainly characterized by a strong rotated-Brass (Bs) component and a very weak rotated-cube component. Subsequent heat treatment leads to sharpening of the major texture component ( i.e., rotated-Bs). Furthermore, the main texture components in all the specimens appear to be significantly rotated in a complex manner away from their ideal positions because of non-symmetric deformations in the two rolling directions. Detailed microstructural study indicates that dynamic recovery is the dominant restoration mechanism operating during the hot rolling. During subsequent heat treatment, static recovery dominates, while a combination of particle-stimulated nucleation (PSN) and strain-induced grain boundary migration (SIBM) causes partial recrystallization of the grain structure. The aforementioned restoration mechanisms play an important role in the development of texture components. The textural development in the current study could be attributed to the combined effects of (a) cross-rolling and inter-pass annealing that reduce the intensity of Cu component after each successive pass, (b) recrystallization resistance of Bs-oriented grains, (c) stability of Bs texture under cross-rolling, and (d) Zener pinning by Al3Zr dispersoids.

  10. Do Class Size Effects Differ across Grades?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nandrup, Anne Brink

    2016-01-01

    This paper contributes to the class size literature by analysing whether short-run class size effects are constant across grade levels in compulsory school. Results are based on administrative data on all pupils enrolled in Danish public schools. Identification is based on a government-imposed class size cap that creates exogenous variation in…

  11. Multi-field coupled numerical simulation of hot reversible rolling process of GCr15 steel rod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Sendong; Zhang, Liwen; Ruan, Jinhua; Mei, Hongyu; Zhen, Yu; Shi, Xinhua

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, based on rolling technology of hot reversible rolling mill, a multi-filed coupled finite element (FE) model of hot reversible rolling process of large dimension cross-section GCr15 steel rod is established. Thermal, mechanical and microstructural phenomena during the rolling process are coupled in the model. By employing grain growth experiment, double and single hit hot compression experiments, the austenite grain size growth mathematical model and recrystallization behavior mathematical models are determined. And a designed subprogram is coupled in the FE model. Actual hot reversible rolling process of GCr15 steel is simulated using the model and the distribution and evolution of different filed-variables, such as temperature, effective strain and austenite grain size are obtained. To verify the model predictions, hot rolling experiments are carried out and the temperature and microstructure of the rolling metal are compared with the predicted results. The comparison between the two sets of data shows a good agreement.

  12. Annealing effects on the microstructure and mechanical properties of hot-rolled 14Cr-ODS steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, R.; Zhang, T.; Ding, H. L.; Jiang, Y.; Wang, X. P.; Fang, Q. F.; Liu, C. S.

    2015-10-01

    The oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steels with nominal composition (weight percent) of Fe-14Cr-2W-0.5Ti-0.06Si-0.2V-0.1Mn-0.05Ta-0.03C-0.3Y2O3 were fabricated by sol-gel method, mechanical alloying, and hot isostatic pressing techniques. The evolution of microstructure and mechanical properties of the hot-rolled specimens with heat treatment was investigated. Tensile strength and hardness of hot-rolled ODS steel are significantly enhanced due to the formation of mechanical twins and high density dislocations. Uniformly dispersed oxide particles (10-40 nm) and fine-grained structure (200-400 nm) are responsible for the superior mechanical properties of the hot-rolled specimen annealed between 650 °C and 850 °C. With further increasing annealing temperature, the grain size of the hot-rolled specimens increases while the size of oxide particles decreases, which leads to lower strength and hardness but better ductility. The tensile strength and total elongation of samples in the rolling direction are higher than those in the transverse direction after the same treatments owing to the grain anisotropy induced by the large mechanical deformation.

  13. Fabrication of Li2TiO3 pebbles with small grain size via hydrothermal and improved dry-rolling methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wen; Zhou, Qilai; Xue, Lihong; Yan, Youwei

    2015-09-01

    Lithium titanate (Li2TiO3) ceramic pebbles were successfully fabricated by using hydrothermal and improved dry-rolling method. In the present work, ultra-fine Li2TiO3 powder of high reactivity was prepared via hydrothermal reaction, using anatase titania and lithium hydroxide as raw materials. The as-synthesized Li2TiO3 powder exhibits an average crystalline size as small as 100 nm. Improved dry-rolling method was employed to fabricate Li2TiO3 pebbles. The green pebbles can be well-sintered (81% T.D.) at a temperature as low as 850 °C for 3 h. The pebbles have good sphericity (1.08) and narrow diameter distribution (1.0-1.2 mm) with a crush load of 35 N. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) observations of pebbles showed that the ceramic grain size was below 1 μm and atomic emission spectrometer fitted with inductively coupled plasma (ICP-AES) results confirmed that atomic ratio of Li to Ti in the fabricated pebbles was 1.97.

  14. Mangrove propagule size and oil contamination effects: Does size matter?

    PubMed

    Naidoo, Gonasageran

    2016-09-15

    Three mangroves species with differential propagule size, Avicennia marina (2.5±0.3cm), Bruguiera gymnorrhiza (16±2cm) and Rhizophora mucronata (36±3cm), were subjected to oil contamination. In a series of glasshouse and field experiments, the sediment, propagules, leaves and stems were oiled and growth monitored. Oiling of the propagules, leaves, internodes or sediment reduced plant height, leaf number, leaf chlorophyll content index and induced growth abnormalities, leaf abscission and mortality, with effects being greatest in A. marina, intermediate in R. mucronata and least in B. gymnorrhiza. The results suggest that the greater susceptibility of A. marina to oil is due to early shedding of the protective pericarp and rapid root and shoot development after detachment from the parent tree and not to propagule size. After seedling emergence, micromorphological factors such as presence of trichomes, salt glands and thickness of protective barriers influence oil tolerance. PMID:27342901

  15. Hot rolling and annealing effects on the microstructure and mechanical properties of ODS austenitic steel fabricated by electron beam selective melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Rui; Ge, Wen-jun; Miao, Shu; Zhang, Tao; Wang, Xian-ping; Fang, Qian-feng

    2016-03-01

    The grain morphology, nano-oxide particles and mechanical properties of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS)-316L austenitic steel synthesized by electron beam selective melting (EBSM) technique with different post-working processes, were explored in this study. The ODS-316L austenitic steel with superfine nano-sized oxide particles of 30-40 nm exhibits good tensile strength (412 MPa) and large total elongation (about 51%) due to the pinning effect of uniform distributed oxide particles on dislocations. After hot rolling, the specimen exhibits a higher tensile strength of 482 MPa, but the elongation decreases to 31.8% owing to the introduction of high-density dislocations. The subsequent heat treatment eliminates the grain defects induced by hot rolling and increases the randomly orientated grains, which further improves the strength and ductility of EBSM ODS-316L steel.

  16. Hazards of explosives dusts: Particle size effects

    SciTech Connect

    Cashdollar, K L; Hertzberg, M; Green, G M

    1992-02-01

    At the request of the Department of Energy, the Bureau of Mines has investigated the hazards of military explosives dispersed as dust clouds in a 20-L test chamber. In this report, the effect of particle size for HMX, HNS, RDX, TATB, and TNT explosives dusts is studied in detail. The explosibility data for these dusts are also compared to those for pure fuel dusts. The data show that all of the sizes of the explosives dusts that were studied were capable of sustaining explosions as dust clouds dispersed in air. The finest sizes (<10 [mu]m) of explosives dusts were less reactive than the intermediate sizes (20 to 60 [mu]m); this is opposite to the particle size effect observed previously for the pure fuel dusts. At the largest sizes studied, the explosives dusts become somewhat less reactive as dispersed dust clouds. The six sizes of the HMX dust were also studied as dust clouds dispersed in nitrogen.

  17. Numerical investigation about the effect of increasing the number of forming passes on the quality of AHSS roll formed products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badr, Ossama Mamdouh; Rolfe, Bernard; Hodgson, Peter; Weiss, Matthias

    2013-12-01

    Over recent years, roll forming has gained an increasing interest for the manufacture of structural components made of Advanced High Strength Steel (AHSS) sheets. It is an incremental forming technique where the material is bent into the desired shape by feeding it through a number of roll forming stands. Springback is a major concern in forming of AHSS, and springback is lower in roll forming when compared to that in single step and multi-step bending. Some experimental studies suggest that this is may be due to the incremental nature of the roll forming process. In this study the effect of forming passes/steps on springback is numerically analyzed for DP 780 by means of FEA - Abaqus standard. The cyclic hardening characteristics of DP780 were determined by the pure bending test. The hardening model generated from bend data set was imported into Abaqus. The effect forming pattern on the springback was analyzed by forming a V-section shaped profile (15 mm forming radius). The numerical results show that there is a reduction in springback with increasing number of forming passes in the roll forming process, and that this may be the result of straining experienced by the sheet during the multi-step roll forming. This study seems to provide a greater insight into understanding the nature of springback with the forming passes and process design.

  18. Starvation effects on the hydrodynamic lubrication of rigid nonconformal contacts in combined rolling and normal motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosh, M. K.; Brewe, D. E.; Hamrock, B. J.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of inlet starvation on the hydrodynamic lubrication of lightly loaded rigid nonconformal contacts in combined rolling and normal motion is determined through a numerical solution of the Reynolds' equation for an isoviscous, incompressible lubricant. Starvation is effected by systematically reducing the fluid inlet level. The pressures are taken to be ambient at the inlet meniscus boundary and Reynolds' boundary condition is applied for film rupture in the exit region. Results are presented for the dynamic performance of the starved contacts in combined rolling and normal motion for both normal approach and separation. During normal approach the dynamic load ratio (i.e. ratio of dynamic to steady state load capacity) increases considerably with increase in the inlet starvation. The effect of starvation on the dynamic peak pressure ratio is relatively small. Further, it has been observed that with increasing starvation, film thickness effects become significant in the dynamic behavior of the nonconformal contacts. For significantly starved contacts the dynamic load ratio increases with increase in film thickness during normal approach and a similar reduction is observed during separation. A similar effect is noted for the dynamic peak pressure ratio.

  19. Starvation effects on the hydrodynamic lubrication of rigid nonconformal contacts in combined rolling and normal motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosh, M. K.; Hamrock, B. J.; Brewe, D. E.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of inlet starvation on the hydrodynamic lubrication of lightly loaded rigid nonconformal contacts in combined rolling and normal motion is determined through a numerical solution of the Reynolds' equation for an isoviscous, incompressible lubricant. Starvation is effected by systematically reducing the fluid inlet level. The pressures are taken to be ambient at the inlet meniscus boundary and Reynolds' boundary condition is applied for film rupture in the exit region. Results are presented for the dynamic performance of the starved contacts in combined rolling and normal motion for both normal approach and separation. During normal approach the dynamic load ratio (i.e. ratio of dynamic to steady state load capacity) increases considerably with increase in the inlet starvation. The effect of starvation on the dynamic peak pressure ratio is relatively small. Further, it has been observed that with increasing starvation, film thickness effects become significant in the dynamic behavior of the nonconformal contacts. For significantly starved contacts the dynamic load ratio increases with increase in film thickness during normal approach and a similar reduction is observed during separation. A similar effect is noted for the dynamic peak pressure ratio.

  20. Computing & Interpreting Effect Sizes in Educational Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Bruce

    2009-01-01

    The present article provides a primer on using effect sizes in research. A small heuristic data set is used in order to make the discussion concrete. Additionally, various admonitions for best practice in reporting and interpreting effect sizes are presented. Among these is the admonition to not use Cohen's benchmarks for "small," "medium," and…

  1. Effect of Fiber Orientation on Ball Failures Under Rolling-contact Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Robert H; Bear, H Robert; Carter, Thomas L

    1957-01-01

    The rolling-contact fatigue spin rig was used to test bails of a bearing steel at maximum Hertz stresses of 600,000 to 750,000 psi. The effect of fiber orientation was observed with the ball track restricted to passing directly over the poles, coincident with the equator, or randomly around the ball. The polar areas were found to be weaker in fatigue than the nonpolar areas. This resulted in a much greater portion of the failures occurring in the polar areas than would be expected from a homogeneous material. The early failures are discussed.

  2. Effects of annealing on texture evolution of cross shear rolled high-purity Al foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Liu, Y.; Song, X.; He, J.; Zuo, L.

    2015-04-01

    The effects of annealing on recrystallization texture of cross shear rolled high-purity Al foil were investigated by orientation distribution functions (ODFs) and electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD). The results show that the intermediate annealing is beneficial to the development of the cube texture. The cube texture can be promoted by annealing, and the critical annealing temperature is about 280 °C. The cubic orientation grains firstly nucleate, and then expand into other grains with a high growth speed, and large angle grain boundary ratio increases, finally can swallow up most of the original grains, which results in the cube texture

  3. Effects of Alloying Elements on Microstructure, Hardness, Wear Resistance, and Surface Roughness of Centrifugally Cast High-Speed Steel Rolls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Dae Jin; Sung, Hyo Kyung; Park, Joon Wook; Lee, Sunghak

    2009-11-01

    A study was made of the effects of carbon, tungsten, molybdenum, and vanadium on the wear resistance and surface roughness of five high-speed steel (HSS) rolls manufactured by the centrifugal casting method. High-temperature wear tests were conducted on these rolls to experimentally simulate the wear process during hot rolling. The HSS rolls contained a large amount (up to 25 vol pct) of carbides, such as MC, M2C, and M7C3 carbides formed in the tempered martensite matrix. The matrix consisted mainly of tempered lath martensite when the carbon content in the matrix was small, and contained a considerable amount of tempered plate martensite when the carbon content increased. The high-temperature wear test results indicated that the wear resistance and surface roughness of the rolls were enhanced when the amount of hard MC carbides formed inside solidification cells increased and their distribution was homogeneous. The best wear resistance and surface roughness were obtained from a roll in which a large amount of MC carbides were homogeneously distributed in the tempered lath martensite matrix. The appropriate contents of the carbon equivalent, tungsten equivalent, and vanadium were 2.0 to 2.3, 9 to 10, and 5 to 6 pct, respectively.

  4. Metal rolling - Asymmetrical rolling process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexa, V.; Raţiu, S.; Kiss, I.

    2016-02-01

    The development of theory and practice related to the asymmetric longitudinal rolling process is based on the general theory of metalworking by pressure and symmetric rolling theory, to which a large number of scientists brought their contribution. The rolling of metal materials was a serious problem throughout history, either economically or technically, because the plating technologies enabled the consumption of raw materials (scarce and expensive) to be reduced, while improving the mechanical properties. Knowing the force parameters related to asymmetric rolling leads to the optimization of energy and raw material consumption. This paper presents data on symmetric rolling process, in order to comparatively highlight the particularities of the asymmetric process.

  5. Effective population size of korean populations.

    PubMed

    Park, Leeyoung

    2014-12-01

    Recently, new methods have been developed for estimating the current and recent changes in effective population sizes. Based on the methods, the effective population sizes of Korean populations were estimated using data from the Korean Association Resource (KARE) project. The overall changes in the population sizes of the total populations were similar to CHB (Han Chinese in Beijing, China) and JPT (Japanese in Tokyo, Japan) of the HapMap project. There were no differences in past changes in population sizes with a comparison between an urban area and a rural area. Age-dependent current and recent effective population sizes represent the modern history of Korean populations, including the effects of World War II, the Korean War, and urbanization. The oldest age group showed that the population growth of Koreans had already been substantial at least since the end of the 19th century. PMID:25705160

  6. Mean circulations of boundary-layer rolls in lake-effect snow storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristovich, David A. R.

    1993-03-01

    An observational study of the roll-average flow fields of boundary-layer rolls is presented. Data used for this purpose were collected by dual-Doppler radar and aircraft measurements taken over southern Lake Michigan during the 1983/1984 field operations of Project Lake Snow. The roll circulations agreed well with findings of past observational, numerical and theoretical studies, with cross-roll components roughly 10% of the convective internal boundary layer (CIBL)-mean wind speeds and weaker vertical components. Along-roll winds were systematically stronger in the rollupdraft regions than in the roll-downdraft regions, probably due to distortion of the along-roll wind profile by the rolls. Comparison of observed wind profiles to those required by roll formation mechanisms found by past numerical and theoretical studies suggested that the observed rolls were formed by the along-roll wind shear (Asai, 1970) or wind shear curvature (Kuettner, 1971) in the lowest 0.2 Z i, where Z i is the height of the top of the CIBL.

  7. Effects of rolling temperature on microstructure, texture, formability and magnetic properties in strip casting Fe-6.5 wt% Si non-oriented electrical steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hai-Tao; Li, Hao-Ze; Li, Hua-Long; Gao, Fei; Liu, Guo-Huai; Luo, Zhong-Han; Zhang, Feng-Quan; Chen, Sheng-Lin; Cao, Guang-Ming; Liu, Zhen-Yu; Wang, Guo-Dong

    2015-10-01

    Fe-6.5 wt% Si non-oriented electrical steel sheets with a thickness of 0.50 mm were produced by using a new processing route: strip casting followed by hot rolling, intermediate temperature (150-850 °C) rolling and final annealing. The present study focused on exploring the effects of rolling temperature varying from 150 to 850 °C on the microstructure and texture evolution, the formability and final magnetic properties. The microstructure and texture evolution at the various processing steps were investigated in detail by using OM, XRD, EBSD and TEM. It was found that the formability during rolling, the microstructure and texture before and after annealing and final magnetic properties highly depended on rolling temperature. The formability during rolling was gradually improved with increasing rolling temperature due to the slipping of dislocation. In particular, the rolling temperature dominated the formation of in-grain shear bands in the rolled microstructure, which played an important role in the development of final recrystallization microstructure and texture. In the case of lower temperature (150-450 °C) rolling, an inhomogeneous microstructure with a large amount of in-grain shear bands was formed in the rolled sheets, which finally resulted in a fine and inhomogeneous annealing microstructure dominated by mild λ-fiber texture composed of cube and {001}<210> components and α*-fiber texture concentrated on {115}<5-10 1> component. By contrast, in the case of higher temperature (650-850 °C) rolling, a relatively homogeneous microstructure without in-grain shear bands was formed instead in the rolled sheets, which finally led to a coarse and relatively homogeneous annealing microstructure characterized by strong α-fiber and γ-fiber texture. Accordingly, on the whole, both the magnetic induction (B8 and B50) and iron loss (P15/50 and P10/400) decreased with raising rolling temperature.

  8. Effect of annealing on properties of hot-rolled electrical copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loginov, Yu. N.; Demakov, S. L.; Ivanova, M. A.; Illarionov, A. G.; Karabanalov, M. S.; Stepatov, S. I.

    2015-04-01

    Experiments on the annealing of hot-rolled oxygen-containing copper in the temperature range of 300-700°C have been performed and the properties and the structure of the metal after this treatment have been investigated. The mechanical properties were studied by constructing tensile stress-strain curves and by determining the ultimate tensile strength, offset yield stress, percentage elongation, reduction of the area, hardness, and modulus of elasticity. The structural studies were performed using optical and electron microscopy. It has been established that the most substantial decrease after annealing at temperatures above 500°C is characteristic of the offset stress (by 62% for copper annealed at 600°C). The spheroidization of pores around the particles of copper oxides at the annealing temperature of 600°C has been revealed. It has been established that the annealing of the hot-rolled copper at temperatures of 500-600°C leads to an increase in the plastic properties of the metal due to the development of the mechanism of the spheroidization of pores and a decrease in the effect of stress concentrators.

  9. Are common language effect sizes easier to understand than traditional effect sizes?

    PubMed

    Brooks, Margaret E; Dalal, Dev K; Nolan, Kevin P

    2014-03-01

    Communicating the results of research to nonscientists presents many challenges. Among these challenges is communicating the effectiveness of an intervention in a way that people untrained in statistics can understand. Use of traditional effect size metrics (e.g., r, r²) has been criticized as being confusing to general audiences. In response, researchers have developed nontraditional effect size indicators (e.g., binomial effect size display, common language effect size indicator) with the goal of presenting information in a more understandable manner. The studies described here present the first empirical test of these claims of understandability. Results show that nontraditional effect size indicators are perceived as more understandable and useful than traditional indicators for communicating the effectiveness of an intervention. People also rated training programs as more effective and were willing to pay more for programs whose effectiveness was described using the nontraditional effect size metrics. PMID:24188393

  10. Effect of rolling in the intercritical region on the tensile properties of dual-phase steel

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, E.; Priestner, R.

    1998-12-01

    A steel containing 0.088 wt% C, 1.2 wt% Mn, and 0.78 wt% Cr was rolled at intercritical temperature (790 C) and quenched to produce dual-phase microstructure. Rolling caused anisotropic increase in tensile strength and little change in ductility. The results suggest that rolling increased strength by a combination of strengthening of the ferrite and an increase in the stress transferred to the martensite. Up to 20% rolling reduction strengthened the ferrite by work hardening, larger reductions then reduced the strength of ferrite, anisotropically, due to increased recovery. Subgrains in ferrite were observed after rolling in the intercritical region which can contribute to the ultimate strength of the rolled material.

  11. Effect of Strip Velocity on Pickling Rate of Hot-Rolled Steel in Hydrochloric Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, R. M.; Warning, C. J.

    1982-02-01

    The combined effect of strip velocity with other parameters on pickling rate of hot-rolled low-carbon steel in hydrochloric acid (HCl) solutions was determined. At temperatures from 150 to200°F(66 to 93°), the time required for pickling decreased substantially as strip velocity was increased from 0 to about 250 fpm (76 mpm); no further decrease in time resulted when velocities were increased to 800 fpm (244 mpm). Other pickling variables were studied with a velocity of 400 fpm (122 mpm). Pickling times decrease with increases in HCl concentrations, CHCl, and temperature, TF, according to prediction equations of the form log t = A + B log CHCl + D(459 + TF)-1. At 200°F, temper-mill scalebreaking decreased pickling times by about 5 sec; at lower temperatures, a larger magnitude effect was noted for one steel in the group tested.

  12. Rolling Reloaded

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Simon A.; Nieminen, John M.

    2008-01-01

    Not so long ago a new observation about rolling motion was described: for a rolling wheel, there is a set of points with instantaneous velocities directed at or away from the centre of the wheel; these points form a circle whose diameter connects the centre of the wheel to the wheel's point of contact with the ground (Sharma 1996 "Eur. J. Phys."…

  13. Effects of Recrystallization on Microstructure and Texture Evolution of Cold-Rolled Ti-6Al-4V Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Haitao; Dong, Peng; Zeng, Shangwu; Wu, Bo

    2016-05-01

    The effects of recrystallization during annealing process on microstructure and texture evolution of cold-rolled Ti-6Al-4V alloy plates were investigated. The plates after cold rolling with a thickness reduction of 5, 10, and 15% were annealed under different conditions of 750 °C for 1 h, 800 °C for 1 h, and 800 °C for 1.5 h, respectively. It was found out that the recrystallization temperature decreased with increasing rolling reduction due to higher storage energy, while the extension of annealing time caused grain growth. For the cold-rolled plate with a reduction of 10%, the resulting microstructure showed more equal-axis grains after annealing at 800 °C for 1 h, among different conditions. Moreover, the XRD results showed that the cold-rolled plate composed mainly of {0001} <10-10> basal texture, {10-11} <1-210> and {01-12} <10-10> pyramidal textures, and {01-10} <10-10> prismatic texture, and that the weak {10-11} <1-210> texture was transformed to components {01-12} <10-10> and {01-10} <10-10>, which were expected to improve formability. Electron back-scattered diffraction results ascertained that two mechanisms, i.e., recrystallization sites of preferred orientations and favorable grain growth both played important roles in static recrystallization.

  14. Effects of Recrystallization on Microstructure and Texture Evolution of Cold-Rolled Ti-6Al-4V Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Haitao; Dong, Peng; Zeng, Shangwu; Wu, Bo

    2016-04-01

    The effects of recrystallization during annealing process on microstructure and texture evolution of cold-rolled Ti-6Al-4V alloy plates were investigated. The plates after cold rolling with a thickness reduction of 5, 10, and 15% were annealed under different conditions of 750 °C for 1 h, 800 °C for 1 h, and 800 °C for 1.5 h, respectively. It was found out that the recrystallization temperature decreased with increasing rolling reduction due to higher storage energy, while the extension of annealing time caused grain growth. For the cold-rolled plate with a reduction of 10%, the resulting microstructure showed more equal-axis grains after annealing at 800 °C for 1 h, among different conditions. Moreover, the XRD results showed that the cold-rolled plate composed mainly of {0001} <10-10> basal texture, {10-11} <1-210> and {01-12} <10-10> pyramidal textures, and {01-10} <10-10> prismatic texture, and that the weak {10-11} <1-210> texture was transformed to components {01-12} <10-10> and {01-10} <10-10>, which were expected to improve formability. Electron back-scattered diffraction results ascertained that two mechanisms, i.e., recrystallization sites of preferred orientations and favorable grain growth both played important roles in static recrystallization.

  15. Statistical Aspects of Effect Size Estimation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedges, Larry V.

    When the results of a series of independent studies are combined, it is useful to quantitatively estimate the magnitude of the effects. Several methods for estimating effect size are compared in this paper. Glass' estimator and the uniformly minimum variance unbiased estimator are based on the ratio of the sample mean difference and the pooled…

  16. Size scale effect in cavitation erosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, P. V.; Rao, B. C.; Buckley, D. H.

    1982-01-01

    An overview and data analyses pertaining to cavitation erosion size scale effects are presented. The exponents n in the power law relationship are found to vary from 1.7 to 4.9 for venturi and rotating disk devices supporting the values reported in the literature. Suggestions for future studies were made to arrive at further true scale effects.

  17. Study the effect of surface texturing on the stress distribution of UHMWPE as a bearing material during rolling motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamari, J.; Ismail, R.; Anwar, I. B.; Saputra, E.; Tauviqirrahman, M.; Heide, E. V. D.

    2016-04-01

    Tribological properties of materials used in biomedical implants will critically affect the performance of the implant. Ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) material is popular due to its great properties. Surface texturing is one of the methods to minimize friction and wear. In this study, the effect of surface texturing on the stress distribution of UHMWPE as a bearing material has been investigated for rolling motion. The study was performed by finite element analysis. Several three-dimensional surfaces were created by varying its texture. The texture consists of several cylindrical cavities for certain separation. These surfaces were then rolled by a hard ball indenter. The stress distribution due to the rolling contact for each surface was analyzed. Results show that the surface demonstrates a higher stress distribution for the lower separation between the cylindrical cavities.

  18. The Effect of Indenter Ball Radius on the Static Load Capacity of the Superelastic 60NiTi for Rolling Element Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, Christopher; Moore, Lewis E.

    2014-01-01

    Static load capacity is a critical design parameter for rolling element bearings used in space mechanisms because of the potential for Brinell (surface dent) damage due to shock and vibration loading events during rocket launch. Brinell damage to bearing raceways can lead to torque variations (noise) and reduced bearing life. The growing use of ceramic rolling elements with high stiffness in hybrid bearings exacerbates the situation. A new family of hard yet resilient materials based upon nickel-titanium is emerging to address such bearing challenges. 60NiTi is a superelastic material that simultaneously exhibits high hardness and a relatively low elastic modulus (approx. 100 GPa) and has been shown to endure higher indentation loads than conventional and high performance steel. Indentation load capacity has been reported for relatively large (12.7 mm diameter) ceramic (Si3N4) indenter balls pressed against flat plates of 60NiTi. In order to develop damage load threshold criteria applicable to a wide range of bearing designs and sizes, the effects of indenter ball radius and the accuracy of interpolation of the Hertz contact stress relations for 60NiTi must be ascertained. In this paper, results of indentation tests involving ceramic balls ranging from 6.4 to 12.7 mm in diameter and highly polished 60NiTi flat plates are presented. When the resulting dent depth data for all the indenter ball sizes are normalized using the Hertz equations, the data (dent depth versus stress) are comparable. Thus when designing bearings made from 60NiTi, the Hertz stress relations can be applied with relative confidence over a range of rolling element sizes and internal geometries.

  19. The Effect of Indenter Ball Radius on the Static Load Capacity of the Superelastic 60NiTi for Rolling Element Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, Christopher; Moore, Lewis E.; Clifton, Joshua S.

    2014-01-01

    Static load capacity is a critical design parameter for rolling element bearings used in space mechanisms because of the potential for Brinell (surface dent) damage due to shock and vibration loading events during rocket launch. Brinell damage to bearing raceways can lead to torque variations (noise) and reduced bearing life. The growing use of ceramic rolling elements with high stiffness in hybrid bearings exacerbates the situation. A new family of hard yet resilient materials based upon nickel-titanium is emerging to address such bearing challenges. 60NiTi is a superelastic material that simultaneously exhibits high hardness and a relatively low elastic modulus (100GPa) and has been shown to endure higher indentation loads than conventional and high performance steel. Indentation load capacity has been reported for relatively large (12.7mm diameter) ceramic (Si3N4) indenter balls pressed against flat plates of 60NiTi. In order to develop damage load threshold criteria applicable to a wide range of bearing designs and sizes, the effects of indenter ball radius and the accuracy of interpolation of the Hertz contact stress relations for 60NiTi must be ascertained. In this paper, results of indentation tests involving ceramic balls ranging from 6.4 to 12.7mm in diameter and highly polished 60NiTi flat plates are presented. When the resulting dent depth data for all the indenter ball sizes are normalized using the Hertz equations, the data (dent depth vs. stress) are comparable. Thus when designing bearings made from 60NiTi, the Hertz stress relations can be applied with relative confidence over a range of rolling element sizes and internal geometries.

  20. The Effect of Indenter Ball Radius on the Static Load Capacity of the Superelastic 60NiTi for Rolling Element Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, Christopher; Moore, Lewis E., III; Clifton, Joshua S.

    2014-01-01

    Static load capacity is a critical design parameter for rolling element bearings used in space mechanisms because of the potential for Brinell (surface dent) damage due to shock and vibration loading events during rocket launch. Brinell damage to bearing raceways can lead to torque variations (noise) and reduced bearing life. The growing use of ceramic rolling elements with high stiffness in hybrid bearings exacerbates the situation. A new family of hard yet resilient materials based upon nickel-titanium is emerging to address such bearing challenges. 60NiTi is a superelastic material that simultaneously exhibits high hardness and a relatively low elastic modulus (approx. 100 GigaPascals) and has been shown to endure higher indentation loads than conventional and high performance steel. Indentation load capacity has been reported for relatively large (12.7 millimeters diameter) ceramic (Si3N4) indenter balls pressed against flat plates of 60NiTi. In order to develop damage load threshold criteria applicable to a wide range of bearing designs and sizes, the effects of indenter ball radius and the accuracy of interpolation of the Hertz contact stress relations for 60NiTi must be ascertained. In this paper, results of indentation tests involving ceramic balls ranging from 6.4 to 12.7 mm in diameter and highly polished 60NiTi flat plates are presented. When the resulting dent depth data for all the indenter ball sizes are normalized using the Hertz equations, the data (dent depth versus stress) are comparable. Thus when designing bearings made from 60NiTi, the Hertz stress relations can be applied with relative confidence over a range of rolling element sizes and internal geometries.

  1. The effect of torsional flexibility on the rolling characteristics at supersonic speeds of tapered unswept wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Warren A; Nelson, Robert L

    1950-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the effect of torsional flexibility on the rolling characteristics at supersonic speeds of tapered unswept wings with partial-span constant-percent-chord ailerons extending inboard from the wing tip. The geometric variables considered are aspect ratio, taper ratio, aileron span, and aileron chord. The shape of the wing-torsional-stiffness curve is assumed and the twisting moment is considered to result solely from the pressure distribution caused by aileron deflection, so that the necessity of using a successive-approximation method is avoided. Because of the complexity of the equations resulting from the analysis, numerical calculations from the equations are presented in a series of figures. A computational form is provided to be used in conjunction with these figures so that calculations can be made without reference to the analysis.

  2. Effect of wall thickness and material on flexural fatigue of hollow rolling elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bamberger, E. N.; Parker, R. J.

    1978-01-01

    Hollow cylindrical bars were tested in a rolling-contact fatigue tester to determine the effects of material and outside diameter to inside diameter (OD/ID) ratios on fatigue failure mode and subsequent failure propagation. The range of applied loads with OD/ID ratios of 2.0, 1.6, 1.4, and 1.2 resulted in maximum tangential tensile stresses ranging from 165 to 655 MPa at the bore surface. Flexural failures of the hollow test bars occurred when this bore stress was 490 MPa or greater with AISI 52100 hollow bars and 338 MPa or greater with AISI M-50 hollow bars. Good correlation was obtained in relating the failures of these hollow bars with flexural failures of drilled balls from full-scale bearing test published previously.

  3. Effects of cold rolling on the microstructure and mechanical properties of Fe-Ni-Mn-Mo-Ti-Cr maraging steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmudi, Abbas; Nedjad, Syamak Hossein; Behnam, Mir Masud Jabbari

    2011-10-01

    Effects of cold rolling on the microstructure and mechanical properties of Fe-Ni-Mn-Mo-Ti-Cr maraging steels were studied. To investigate the microstructure and mechanical properties, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, tensile test, and hardness test were used. The results show that the solution-annealing treatment in the cold-rolled steel redounds to the formation of submicrocrystalline Fe2(Mo, Ti) Laves phase particles, which are stable at high temperatures. These secondary Laves phase particles prevent from recrystallization at high temperatures and correspond to semi-brittle fracture in the subsequent aging treatment.

  4. Effects of rolling conditions on grain orientation and magnetic properties of thin-gauged 3% Si-Fe sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J.C.; Heo, N.H.; Chai, K.H.; Na, J.G.; Woo, J.S.; Kim, G.M.

    1998-04-03

    3% Si-Fe sheets are widely used as core material of large transformers, large rotating machines and pole transformers due to characteristic soft magnetic properties, where energy losses during magnetization are critically concerned. The magnetic characteristics in silicon iron arises from a preferred grain orientation, i.e. (110) [001] Goss texture which forms after cold rolling followed by secondary recrystallization. In this paper, effects of rolling direction on the grain orientation and magnetic properties of the thin-gauged 3% Si-Fe sheets are investigated.

  5. Effect of Vestibular Impairment on Cerebral Blood Flow Response to Dynamic Roll Tilt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serrador, J. M.; Black, F. O.; Schlgel, Todd T.; Lipsitz, L. A.; Wood, S. J.

    2008-01-01

    Change to upright posture results in reductions in cerebral perfusion pressure due to hydrostatic pressure changes related to gravity. Since vestibular organs, specifically the otoliths, provide information on position relative to gravity, vestibular inputs may assist in adaptation to the upright posture. The goal of this study was to examine the effect of direct vestibular stimulation on cerebral blood flow (CBF). To examine the role of otolith inputs we screened 165 subjects for vestibular function and classified subjects as either normal or impaired based on ocular torsion. Ocular torsion, an indication of otolith function, was assessed during sinusoidal roll tilt of 20 degrees at 0.01 Hz (100 sec per cycle). Subjects with torsion one SD below the mean were classified as impaired while subjects one SD above the mean were considered normal. During one session subjects were placed in a chair that was sinusoidally rotated 25 degrees in the roll plane at five frequencies: 0.25 & 0.125 Hz for 80 sec, 0.0625 Hz for 160 sec and 0.03125 Hz and 0.015625 Hz for 320 sec. During testing, CBF (transcranial Doppler), blood pressure (Finapres), and end tidal CO2 (Puritan Bennet) were measured continuously. Ocular torsion was assessed from infrared images of the eyes. All rotations were done in the dark with subjects fixated on a red LED directly at the center of rotation. In the normal group, dynamic tilt resulted in significant changes in both blood pressure and cerebral blood flow velocity that was related to the frequency of stimulus. In contrast the impaired group did not show similar patterns. As expected normal subjects demonstrated significant ocular torsion that was related to stimulus frequency while impaired subjects had minimal changes. These data suggest that vestibular inputs have direct effects on cerebral blood flow regulation during dynamic tilt. Supported by NASA.

  6. Discomfort of seated persons exposed to low frequency lateral and roll oscillation: effect of seat cushion.

    PubMed

    Beard, George F; Griffin, Michael J

    2014-11-01

    The discomfort caused by lateral oscillation, roll oscillation, and fully roll-compensated lateral oscillation has been investigated at frequencies between 0.25 and 1.0 Hz when sitting on a rigid seat and when sitting on a compliant cushion, both without a backrest. Judgements of vibration discomfort and the transmission of lateral and roll oscillation through the seat cushion were obtained with 20 subjects. Relative to the rigid seat, the cushion increased lateral acceleration and roll oscillation at the lower frequencies and also increased discomfort during lateral oscillation (at frequencies less than 0.63 Hz), roll oscillation (at frequencies less than 0.4 Hz), and fully roll-compensated lateral oscillation (at frequencies between 0.315 and 0.5 Hz). The root-sums-of-squares of the frequency-weighted lateral and roll acceleration at the seat surface predicted the greater vibration discomfort when sitting on the cushion. The frequency-dependence of the predicted discomfort may be improved by adjusting the frequency weighting for roll acceleration at frequencies between 0.25 and 1.0 Hz. PMID:24947003

  7. Understanding the effect size and its measures

    PubMed Central

    Ialongo, Cristiano

    2016-01-01

    The evidence based medicine paradigm demands scientific reliability, but modern research seems to overlook it sometimes. The power analysis represents a way to show the meaningfulness of findings, regardless to the emphasized aspect of statistical significance. Within this statistical framework, the estimation of the effect size represents a means to show the relevance of the evidences produced through research. In this regard, this paper presents and discusses the main procedures to estimate the size of an effect with respect to the specific statistical test used for hypothesis testing. Thus, this work can be seen as an introduction and a guide for the reader interested in the use of effect size estimation for its scientific endeavour. PMID:27346958

  8. Effect of Asymmetric Rolling on Plastic Anisotropy of Low Carbon Steels during Simple Shear Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Gracio, J. J.; Vincze, G.; Panigrahi, B. B.; Kim, H. J.; Barlat, F.; Rauch, E. F.; Yoon, J. W.

    2010-06-15

    Simple shear tests are performed on low carbon steel pre-deformed in conventional, asymmetric and orthogonal-asymmetric rolling. The simple-shear tests were carried out at 0 deg. , 45 deg. and 135 deg. with respect to the previous rolling direction. For a reduction ratio of 15%, a transient stagnation in the hardening rate is observed at reloading for all changes in strain path. The shear stress level, the hardening rate and extent of the plateau appear to be insensitive to the preliminary applied rolling conditions. After a reduction ratio of 50%, plastic instability was detected at reloading for all the changes of strain path and rolling conditions studied. A specific heat treatment was then designed allowing the material to become ductile after rolling while retaining the fine microstructure and therefore the high strength. Promising results were obtained essentially for 45 deg. shear tests.

  9. Effects of terminating cover crops with rolling/crimping and herbicides in a cotton no-till system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In fall of 2008, a field experiment was initiated in central Alabama to study the effects of rolling/crimping and different herbicides with different application rates on cover crops termination rates, cotton population and yield. Results from 2009 and 2010 growing seasons are presented. A roller/cr...

  10. Wobbly Strings: Calculating the Capture Rate of a Webcam Using the Rolling Shutter Effect in a Guitar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunnah, David

    2014-01-01

    In this paper I propose a method of calculating the time between line captures in a standard complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) webcam using the rolling shutter effect when filming a guitar. The exercise links the concepts of wavelength and frequency, while outlining the basic operation of a CMOS camera through vertical line capture.

  11. Wobbly strings: calculating the capture rate of a webcam using the rolling shutter effect in a guitar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunnah, David

    2014-07-01

    In this paper I propose a method of calculating the time between line captures in a standard complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) webcam using the rolling shutter effect when filming a guitar. The exercise links the concepts of wavelength and frequency, while outlining the basic operation of a CMOS camera through vertical line capture.

  12. Effects of warm temper rolling on microstructure, texture and magnetic properties of strip-casting 6.5 wt% Si electrical steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hao-Ze; Liu, Hai-Tao; Liu, Yi; Liu, Zhen-Yu; Cao, Guang-Ming; Luo, Zhong-Han; Zhang, Feng-Quan; Chen, Sheng-Lin; Lyu, Li; Wang, Guo-Dong

    2014-12-01

    6.5 wt% Si electrical steel thin sheets were produced by a processing route including strip casting, hot rolling, warm rolling, intermediate annealing, warm temper rolling and final annealing, in which the warm temper rolling reduction varied from 2.7% to 14.4%. A detailed study of the microstructural and textural evolutions through the whole processing route was carried out by optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction and electron backscattered diffraction analysis. The findings revealed that the final recrystallization microstructure, texture and magnetic properties relied heavily on the warm temper rolling reduction. As the warm temper rolling reduction increased from 2.7% to 14.4%, the finally recrystallized microstructures were more homogeneous and the average grain size was decreased. At the warm temper rolling reduction lower than 7.0%, the occurrence of the exaggeratedly large annealing grains which dominated the whole sheet thickness resulted in strong <001>//ND fiber, parallel α-fiber, <111>//ND fiber and many other strong hard-magnetization texture components. By contrast, at the warm temper rolling reduction higher than 7.0%, the recrystallization textures were characterized by weak <001>//ND fiber, parallel α-fiber, <111>//ND texture, together with fewer and weak hard-magnetization texture components. The mechanism responsible for the finally microstructural and textural changes was explained by strain induced boundary migration. As warm temper rolling reduction increased, the magnetic properties at high frequency were gradually improved due to smaller grain sizes and more desirable textures. The highest magnetic inductions of 1.383 T (B8), 1.484 T (B25) and 1.571 T (B50) in combination with the lowest iron losses at high frequencies of 19.11 W/Kg (W10/400) and 3.824 W/Kg (W2/1000) were obtained at 14.4% warm temper rolling reduction under the applied condition.

  13. Detecting past changes of effective population size

    PubMed Central

    Nikolic, Natacha; Chevalet, Claude

    2014-01-01

    Understanding and predicting population abundance is a major challenge confronting scientists. Several genetic models have been developed using microsatellite markers to estimate the present and ancestral effective population sizes. However, to get an overview on the evolution of population requires that past fluctuation of population size be traceable. To address the question, we developed a new model estimating the past changes of effective population size from microsatellite by resolving coalescence theory and using approximate likelihoods in a Monte Carlo Markov Chain approach. The efficiency of the model and its sensitivity to gene flow and to assumptions on the mutational process were checked using simulated data and analysis. The model was found especially useful to provide evidence of transient changes of population size in the past. The times at which some past demographic events cannot be detected because they are too ancient and the risk that gene flow may suggest the false detection of a bottleneck are discussed considering the distribution of coalescence times. The method was applied on real data sets from several Atlantic salmon populations. The method called VarEff (Variation of Effective size) was implemented in the R package VarEff and is made available at https://qgsp.jouy.inra.fr and at http://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/VarEff. PMID:25067949

  14. Effect of fiber fractions of prickly pear cactus (nopal) on quality and sensory properties of wheat bread rolls.

    PubMed

    Guevara-Arauza, Juan Carlos; Bárcenas, Diego Guadalupe; Ortega-Rivas, Enrique; Martínez, Jaime David Pérez; Hernández, Jaime Reyes; de Jesús Ornelas-Paz, José

    2015-05-01

    In this study the addition of total fiber (TF), insoluble fiber (IF), and soluble fiber (SF) from nopal to wheat flour used to make bread rolls was assessed. The rheological properties of dough as well as quality, texture, sensorial and physical characteristics of the crumb rolls produced were evaluated. The storage (23.50 MPa) and loss modulus (11.95 MPa) for SF-dough were the lowest indicating that a less visco-elastic behavior was obtained. Polarized light microscopy showed that a more homogeneous size and a better distribution of starch granules were developed into SF-dough. Crumb hardness (3.25-4.78 N) and chewiness (0.31-0.81 N) of SF-rolls were lower than the control experiment (3.99-5.81 N and 0.35-1.01 N respectively). Springiness for all treatments was constant (1.0) compared with the control (1.02-0.87) for 2 days of storage. The lowest cohesiveness values (0.24-014) were computed by IF treatment for a similar storage time. The specific crumb volume increased by 12.46, 9.03 and 1.10 % by the addition of SF, TF and IF respectively. The lowest rate of staling was shown by SF-rolls (0.199) and it was followed by TF (0.296), IF (0.381) and control (0.458) treatments. As a result, the highest scores on quality (9.3 out of 10) and sensorial attributes (from 8.9 up to 9.7) were assigned to SF-rolls. PMID:25892800

  15. GRCop-84 Rolling Parameter Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewenthal, William S.; Ellis, David L.

    2008-01-01

    This report is a section of the final report on the GRCop-84 task of the Constellation Program and incorporates the results obtained between October 2000 and September 2005, when the program ended. NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has developed a new copper alloy, GRCop-84 (Cu-8 at.% Cr-4 at.% Nb), for rocket engine main combustion chamber components that will improve rocket engine life and performance. This work examines the sensitivity of GRCop-84 mechanical properties to rolling parameters as a means to better define rolling parameters for commercial warm rolling. Experiment variables studied were total reduction, rolling temperature, rolling speed, and post rolling annealing heat treatment. The responses were tensile properties measured at 23 and 500 C, hardness, and creep at three stress-temperature combinations. Understanding these relationships will better define boundaries for a robust commercial warm rolling process. The four processing parameters were varied within limits consistent with typical commercial production processes. Testing revealed that the rolling-related variables selected have a minimal influence on tensile, hardness, and creep properties over the range of values tested. Annealing had the expected result of lowering room temperature hardness and strength while increasing room temperature elongations with 600 C (1112 F) having the most effect. These results indicate that the process conditions to warm roll plate and sheet for these variables can range over wide levels without negatively impacting mechanical properties. Incorporating broader process ranges in future rolling campaigns should lower commercial rolling costs through increased productivity.

  16. Introducing the Mean Absolute Deviation "Effect" Size

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorard, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    This paper revisits the use of effect sizes in the analysis of experimental and similar results, and reminds readers of the relative advantages of the mean absolute deviation as a measure of variation, as opposed to the more complex standard deviation. The mean absolute deviation is easier to use and understand, and more tolerant of extreme…

  17. Effect Sizes in Cluster-Randomized Designs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedges, Larry V.

    2007-01-01

    Multisite research designs involving cluster randomization are becoming increasingly important in educational and behavioral research. Researchers would like to compute effect size indexes based on the standardized mean difference to compare the results of cluster-randomized studies (and corresponding quasi-experiments) with other studies and to…

  18. Disruption effects on the beam size measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Raimondi, P.; Decker, F.J.; Chen, P.

    1995-06-01

    At the SLC Final Focus with higher currents and smaller beam sizes, the disruption parameter D{sub y} is close to one and so the pinch effect should produce a luminosity enhancement. Since a flat beam-beam function is fit to deflection scan data to measure the beam size, disruption can affect the measurement. Here the authors discuss the quantitative effects of disruption for typical SLC beam parameters. With 3.5 10{sup 10} particles per pulse, bunch length of 0.8 mm and beam sizes of 2.1 {mu}m horizontally and 0.55 {mu}m vertically, the measured vertical size can be as much as 25% bigger than the real one. Furthermore during the collision the spot size actually decrease, producing an enhancement factor H{sub D} of about 1.25. This would yield to a true luminosity which is 1.6 times that which is estimated from the beam-beam deflection fit.

  19. Microstructure and Texture Evolution During Symmetric and Asymmetric Rolling of a Martensitic Ti-6Al-4V Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Qi; Hodgson, Peter D.; Beladi, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    In the current study, the effect of deformation mode ( i.e., symmetric vs asymmetric rolling) on the extent of grain refinement and texture development in Ti-6Al-4V was examined through warm rolling of a martensitic starting microstructure. During rolling, the initial martensitic lath structure was progressively fragmented, primarily through continuous dynamic recrystallization. This eventually led to an ultrafine-grained (UFG) microstructure composed of equiaxed grains with a mean size of 180 to 230 nm, mostly surrounded by high-angle grain boundaries. Depending on the rolling reduction and deformation mode (symmetric and asymmetric), the rolled specimens displayed different layer morphologies throughout the specimen thickness: a fully UFG surface layer, a partial UFG transition layer, and a partially fragmented lath interior layer. Due to a higher level of effective strain and continuous rotation of the principle axis, asymmetric rolling resulted in a greater extent of grain refinement compared with symmetric rolling at a given thermomechanical condition. A bulk UFG structure was successfully obtained using 70 pct asymmetric rolling. In addition, the rolling texture exhibited various characteristics throughout the thickness due to a different combination of shear and compressive strains. Principally, the basal texture component was displaced from the normal toward rolling direction during asymmetric rolling, differing from the symmetric rolling textures.

  20. Investigations of initiation spot size effects

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, Steven A; Akinci, Adrian A; Leichty, Gary; Schaffer, Timothy; Murphy, Michael J; Munger, Alan; Thomas, Keith A

    2010-01-01

    As explosive components become smaller, a greater understanding of the effect of initiation spot size on detonation becomes increasingly critical. A series of tests of the effect of initiation spot size will be described. A series of DOI (direct optical initiation) detonators with initiation spots sizes from {approx}50 um to 1000um have been tested to determine laser parameters for threshold firing of low density PETN pressings. Results will be compared with theoretical predictions. Outputs of the initiation source (DOI ablation) have been characterized by a suite of diagnostics including PDV and schlieren imaging. Outputs of complete detonators have been characterized using PDV, streak, and/or schlieren imaging. At present, we have not found the expected change in the threshold energy to spot size relationship for DOI type detonators found in similar earlier for projectiles, slappers and EBWs. New detonators designs (Type C) are currently being tested that will allow the determination of the threshold for spot sizes from 250 um to 105um, where we hope to see change in the threshold vs. spot size relationship. Also, one test of an extremely small diameter spot size (50um) has resulted in preliminary NoGo only results even at energy densities as much as 8 times the energy density of the threshold results presented here. This gives preliminary evidence that 50um spot may be beyond the critical initiation diameter. The constant threshold energy to spot size relationship in the data to date does however still give some insight into the initiation mechanism of DOI detonators. If the DOI initiation mechanism were a 1D mechanism similar to a slapper or a flyer impact, the expected inflection point in the graph would have been between 300um and 500um diameter spot size, within the range of the data presented here. The lack of that inflection point indicates that the DOI initiation mechanism is more likely a 2D mechanism similar to a sphere or rod projectile. We expect to

  1. (Finite) statistical size effects on compressive strength.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Jérôme; Girard, Lucas; Gimbert, Florent; Amitrano, David; Vandembroucq, Damien

    2014-04-29

    The larger structures are, the lower their mechanical strength. Already discussed by Leonardo da Vinci and Edmé Mariotte several centuries ago, size effects on strength remain of crucial importance in modern engineering for the elaboration of safety regulations in structural design or the extrapolation of laboratory results to geophysical field scales. Under tensile loading, statistical size effects are traditionally modeled with a weakest-link approach. One of its prominent results is a prediction of vanishing strength at large scales that can be quantified in the framework of extreme value statistics. Despite a frequent use outside its range of validity, this approach remains the dominant tool in the field of statistical size effects. Here we focus on compressive failure, which concerns a wide range of geophysical and geotechnical situations. We show on historical and recent experimental data that weakest-link predictions are not obeyed. In particular, the mechanical strength saturates at a nonzero value toward large scales. Accounting explicitly for the elastic interactions between defects during the damage process, we build a formal analogy of compressive failure with the depinning transition of an elastic manifold. This critical transition interpretation naturally entails finite-size scaling laws for the mean strength and its associated variability. Theoretical predictions are in remarkable agreement with measurements reported for various materials such as rocks, ice, coal, or concrete. This formalism, which can also be extended to the flowing instability of granular media under multiaxial compression, has important practical consequences for future design rules. PMID:24733930

  2. (Finite) statistical size effects on compressive strength

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Jérôme; Girard, Lucas; Gimbert, Florent; Amitrano, David; Vandembroucq, Damien

    2014-01-01

    The larger structures are, the lower their mechanical strength. Already discussed by Leonardo da Vinci and Edmé Mariotte several centuries ago, size effects on strength remain of crucial importance in modern engineering for the elaboration of safety regulations in structural design or the extrapolation of laboratory results to geophysical field scales. Under tensile loading, statistical size effects are traditionally modeled with a weakest-link approach. One of its prominent results is a prediction of vanishing strength at large scales that can be quantified in the framework of extreme value statistics. Despite a frequent use outside its range of validity, this approach remains the dominant tool in the field of statistical size effects. Here we focus on compressive failure, which concerns a wide range of geophysical and geotechnical situations. We show on historical and recent experimental data that weakest-link predictions are not obeyed. In particular, the mechanical strength saturates at a nonzero value toward large scales. Accounting explicitly for the elastic interactions between defects during the damage process, we build a formal analogy of compressive failure with the depinning transition of an elastic manifold. This critical transition interpretation naturally entails finite-size scaling laws for the mean strength and its associated variability. Theoretical predictions are in remarkable agreement with measurements reported for various materials such as rocks, ice, coal, or concrete. This formalism, which can also be extended to the flowing instability of granular media under multiaxial compression, has important practical consequences for future design rules. PMID:24733930

  3. The effects of closed loop tracking on a subjective tilt threshold in the roll axis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roark, M.; Junker, A. M.

    1978-01-01

    The indifference thresholds for the perception of tilt in the roll axis were experimentally determined in a moving base simulator under three tracking task difficulties. The threshold level determined in this experiment is approximately 5 to 7 degrees (.lg).

  4. Mixed convective/dynamic roll vortices and their effects on initial wind and temperature profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haack, Tracy; Shirer, Hampton N.

    1991-01-01

    The onset and development of both dynamically and convectively forced boundary layer rolls are studied with linear and nonlinear analyses of a truncated spectral model of shallow Boussinesq flow. Emphasis is given here on the energetics of the dominant roll modes, on the magnitudes of the roll-induced modifications of the initial basic state wind and temperature profiles, and on the sensitivity of the linear stability results to the use of modified profiles as basic states. It is demonstrated that the roll circulations can produce substantial changes to the cross-roll component of the initial wind profile and that significant changes in orientation angle estimates can result from use of a roll-modified profile in the stability analysis. These results demonstrate that roll contributions must be removed from observed background wind profiles before using them to investigate the mechanisms underlying actual secondary flows in the boundary layer. The model is developed quite generally to accept arbitrary basic state wind profiles as dynamic forcing. An Ekman profile is chosen here merely to provide a means for easy comparison with other theoretical boundary layer studies; the ultimate application of the model is to study observed boundary layer profiles. Results of the analytic stability analysis are validated by comparing them with results from a larger linear model. For an appropriate Ekman depth, a complete set of transition curves is given in forcing parameter space for roll modes driven both thermally and dynamically. Preferred orientation angles, horizontal wavelengths and propagation frequencies, as well as energetics and wind profile modifications, are all shown to agree rather well with results from studies on Ekman layers as well as with studies on near-neutral and convective atmospheric boundary layers.

  5. Effects of Particulate Debris Morphology on the Rolling Wear Behavior of All-Steel and Si(Sub 3)N(Sub 4)-Steel Bearing Element Couples

    SciTech Connect

    Adair, J.H.; Mecholsky, J.J., Jr.; Mitchell, D.J.

    1999-01-25

    Rolling contact fatigue experiments were performed on all-steel and hybrid Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}-M50 steel rolling bearing systems using particulate contaminated lubricants. The particulate contaminants used were glycothermally synthesized {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} platelets or Arizona test dust. The effects of contaminant composition and morphology on rolling contact fatigue and wear behavior were explored. The effects of bearing element material properties on fatigue and wear behavior were also examined. Rolling wear behavior is related to bearing component material configuration and the type of particulate contaminant present in the lubricant. Component and particulate material properties such as hardness and elastic modulus are observed to affect rolling wear behavior. Wear mechanisms such as contact stress fatigue, indenting, cutting and plowing are observed.

  6. Scuffing Characteristics of High-Load Rolling/Sliding Contacts Operating in Liquid Oxygen: Effects of Materials and Surface Roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, L.; Hall, P. B.; Thom, R.

    1996-01-01

    This research reports on an experimental study of the effects of materials and surface roughness on the scuffing characteristics of rolling/sliding contacts cooled and lubricated with liquid oxygen. Experiments were carried out under heavy loading with a Hertzian pressure in the range of 2.0 GPa to 3.0 GPa and with a high rolling velocity of up to 48 m/s. For contacts between AISI 440 C stainless-steel elements, the results showed that the scuffing behavior of the system was fairly consistent under a wide range of rolling velocity. Scuffing commenced at a small slide-to-roll ratio of around 0.02, and the scuffing behavior of the contact was not sensitive to surface roughness for the test-sample RMS roughness ranging from 0.02 microns to 0.10 microns. For contacts between 440 C and Si3N4 elements, on the other hand, the scuffing behavior of the system was not very consistent and somewhat unpredictable. The results were sensitive to surface roughness particularly that of the Si3N4 test sample. With well polished test samples, consistent results were obtained; the level of traction was lower than that with a 440 C toroid and scuffing did not take place up to a slide-to-roll ratio of near 0.03. The results strongly suggest that significant hydrodynamic effect can be generated by liquid oxygen under heavy loading and high velocity conditions. The results also suggest that the hydrodynamic action is likely generated by the conventional viscous mechanism as it can be largely destroyed by a narrow circumferential surface scratch running through the central region of the contact.

  7. Size segregation in the Brazil nut effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soterroni, Aline C.; Ramos, Fernando M.

    2013-10-01

    Granular materials are ubiquitous in nature and in our daily lives, and used in many industrial processes. Depending on the physical conditions that they are subjected, granular materials may present unusual behavior, combining properties of solids, liquids or gases, and displaying interesting and diversified phenomena. In this work we numerically simulated a granular system in order to investigate the phenomena of size segregation in the Brazil Nut Effect. Our simulations indicate that the phenomenon of size segregation results from the combined effect of two different mechanisms: buoyancy and convection. Increasing the vibration amplitude, the behavior of the system becomes less periodic and more turbulent, with evidence of deterministic chaos in the dynamics of the large particle.

  8. A different type of indentation size effect

    SciTech Connect

    Shim, Sang Hoon; Bei, Hongbin; George, Easo P; Pharr, George Mathews

    2008-01-01

    Pop-in during nanoindentation, which indicates the onset of dislocation plasticity, was systematically investigated in annealed and pre-strained single crystals of nickel using spherical indenters with different tip radii. As the indenter radius and pre-strain decrease, the maximum shear stresses determined from the pop-in loads increase. This represents a new type of indentation size effect (ISE), based not on the measured hardness as in conventional ISE, but on the stress needed to initiate dislocation plasticity.

  9. Effect of rolling technologies on the properties of Pb-0.06wt%Ca-1.2wt%Sn alloy anodes during copper electrowinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jian; Chen, Bu-ming; Hang, Hui; Guo, Zhong-cheng; Wang, Shuai

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this work was to study the effect of different rolling technologies on the properties of Pb-0.06wt%Ca-1.2wt%Sn anodes during copper electrowinning and to determine the relationship between the properties of the anodes and rolling techniques during copper electrowinning. The anode process was investigated via anodic polarization curves, cyclic voltammetry curves, electrochemical impedance spectra, and corrosion tests. The microscopic morphology and phase composition of the anodic oxide layers were observed by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction, respectively. Observable variations in the electrocatalytic activity and reaction kinetics of anodes during electrowinning indicated that the electrochemical behavior of the anodes was strongly affected by the rolling technology. An increase in the rolling number tended to decrease the oxygen evolution overpotential and the corrosion rate of the anodes. These trends are contrary to that of the apparent exchange current density. Furthermore, the intensities of diffraction peaks associated with PbO, PbOx, and α-PbO2 tended to increase with increasing rolling number. In addition, the rolled anodes exhibited a more uniform microstructure. Compared with one-way rolled anodes, the eight-time cross rolled anodes exhibited better electrocatalytic activity and improved corrosion resistance.

  10. Investigation of the effects of bandwidth and time delay on helicopter roll-axis handling qualities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pausder, Heinz-Juergen; Blanken, Chris L.

    1993-01-01

    Several years of cooperative research conducted under the U.S./German Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) in helicopter flight control has recently resulted in a successful handling qualities study. The focus of this cooperative research has been the effects on handling qualities due to time delays in combination with a high bandwidth vehicle. The jointly performed study included the use of U.S. ground-based simulation and German in-flight simulation facilities. The NASA-Ames Vertical Motion Simulator (VMS) was used to develop a high bandwidth slalom tracking task which took into consideration the constraints of the facilities. The VMS was also used to define a range of the test parameters and to perform initial handling qualities evaluations. The flight tests were conducted using DLR's variable-stability BO 105 S3 Advanced Technology Testing Helicopter System (ATTHeS). Configurations included a rate command and an attitude command response system with added time delays up to 160 milliseconds over the baseline and bandwidth values between 1.5 and 4.5 rad/sec. Sixty-six evaluations were performed in about 25 hours of flight time during ten days of testing. The results indicate a need to more tightly constrain the allowable roll axis phase delay for the Level 1 and Level 2 requirements in the U.S. Army's specification for helicopter handling qualities, ADS-33C.

  11. Investigation of the effects of bandwidth and time delay on helicopter roll-axis handling qualities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanken, Chris L.; Pausder, Heinz-Jurgen

    1994-01-01

    Several years of cooperative research conducted under the U.S./German Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) in helicopter aeromechanics have recently resulted in a successful handling qualities study. The focus of this cooperative research has been the effect of time delays in a high bandwidth vehicle on handling qualities. The jointly performed study included the use of U.S. ground-based simulation and German in-flight simulation facilities. The NASA-Ames Vertical Motion Simulator (VMS) was used to develop a high bandwidth slalom tracking task which took into consideration the constraints of the facilities. The VMS was used to define a range of the test parameters and to perform initial handling qualities evaluations. The flight tests were conducted using DLR's variable-stability BO 105 S3 Advanced Technology Testing Helicopter System (ATTHeS). Configurations included a rate command and an attitude command response system with added time delays of up to 160 milliseconds over the baseline and band width values between 1.5 and 4.5 rad/sec. Sixty-six evaluations were performed in about 25 hours of flight time during ten days of testing. The results indicate a need to more tightly constrain the allowable roll axis phase delay for the Level 1 and Level 2 requirements in the U.S. Army's specification for helicopter handling qualities Aeronautical Design Standard (ADS)-33C.

  12. Investigation of the effects of bandwidth and time delay on helicopter roll-axis handling qualities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pausder, Heinz-Juergen; Blanken, Chris L.

    1992-01-01

    Several years of cooperative research conducted under the U.S./German Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) in helicopter flight control has recently resulted in a successful handling qualities study. The focus of this cooperative research has been the effects on handling qualities due to time delays in combination with a high bandwidth vehicle. The jointly performed study included the use of U.S. ground-based simulation and German in-flight simulation facilities. The NASA-Ames Vertical Motion Simulator (VMS) was used to develop a high bandwidth slalom tracking task which took into consideration the constraints of the facilities. The VMS was also used to define a range of the test parameters and to perform initial handling qualities evaluations. The flight tests were conducted using DLR's variable-stability BO 105 S3 Advanced Technology Testing Helicopter System (ATTHeS). Configurations included a rate command and an attitude command response system with added time delays up to 160 milliseconds over the baseline and bandwidth values between 1.5 and 4.5 rad/sec. Sixty-six evaluations were performed in about 25 hr of flight time during 10 days of testing. The results indicate a need to more tightly constrain the allowable roll axis phase delay for the Level 1 and Level 2 requirements in the U.S. Army's specification for helicopter handling qualities, ADS-33C.

  13. The Relationship between Sample Sizes and Effect Sizes in Systematic Reviews in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slavin, Robert; Smith, Dewi

    2009-01-01

    Research in fields other than education has found that studies with small sample sizes tend to have larger effect sizes than those with large samples. This article examines the relationship between sample size and effect size in education. It analyzes data from 185 studies of elementary and secondary mathematics programs that met the standards of…

  14. Comparison of wing-span averaging effects on lift, rolling moment, and bending moment for two span load distributions and for two turbulence representations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lichtenstein, J. H.

    1978-01-01

    An analytical method of computing the averaging effect of wing-span size on the loading of a wing induced by random turbulence was adapted for use on a digital electronic computer. The turbulence input was assumed to have a Dryden power spectral density. The computations were made for lift, rolling moment, and bending moment for two span load distributions, rectangular and elliptic. Data are presented to show the wing-span averaging effect for wing-span ratios encompassing current airplane sizes. The rectangular wing-span loading showed a slightly greater averaging effect than did the elliptic loading. In the frequency range most bothersome to airplane passengers, the wing-span averaging effect can reduce the normal lift load, and thus the acceleration, by about 7 percent for a typical medium-sized transport. Some calculations were made to evaluate the effect of using a Von Karman turbulence representation. These results showed that using the Von Karman representation generally resulted in a span averaging effect about 3 percent larger.

  15. Roller compaction of hydrophilic extended release tablets-combined effects of processing variables and drug/matrix former particle size.

    PubMed

    Heiman, Johanna; Tajarobi, Farhad; Gururajan, Bindhumadhavan; Juppo, Anne; Abrahmsén-Alami, Susanna

    2015-04-01

    The present study shows that roller compaction (RC) can successfully be used as a granulation method to prepare hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC)-based extended release matrix tablets containing a high drug load, both for materials deforming mainly by fragmentation (paracetamol) as for those having mainly plastic deformation (ibuprofen). The combined effect of RC process variables and composition on the manufacturability of HPMC tablets was investigated. Standard wet granulation grade HPMC was compared with a larger particle size direct compressible HPMC grade. Higher roll pressure was found to result in larger paracetamol granules and narrower granule particle size distributions, especially for formulations containing smaller size HPMC. However, for ibuprofen, no clear effect of roll pressure was observed. High roll pressure also resulted in denser ribbon and less bypass fines during RC. Loss of compactibility was observed for granules compared to powder blends, which was found to be related to differences in granule porosity and morphology. Using the large-sized HPMC grade did in some cases result in lower tensile strength tablets but had the advantage to improve the powder flow into the roller compactor. This work also indicates that when the HPMC level lies near the percolation threshold, significant changes can occur in the drug release rate due to changes in other factors (raw material characteristics and processing). PMID:25273028

  16. Effect of severe plastic deformation on the specific heat and magnetic properties of cold rolled Gd sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taskaev, S.; Skokov, K.; Khovaylo, V.; Buchelnikov, V.; Pellenen, A.; Karpenkov, D.; Ulyanov, M.; Bataev, D.; Usenko, A.; Lyange, M.; Gutfleisch, O.

    2015-03-01

    We report on specific heat and magnetic properties of thin Gd sheets obtained by means of a cold rolling technique. At temperatures well below Curie temperature TC, the cold rolling has a minor impact on the specific heat Cp. However, a well defined λ-type anomaly of Cp seen in the vicinity of TC in a polycrystalline Gd sample is markedly suppressed in the severely deformed samples. Depression of the λ peak is due to a large decrease of magnetization that presumably originates in a local magnetic anisotropy induced by the severe plastic deformation. Results of calculation of magnetocaloric effect from the Cp and magnetization data indicate that the magnetocaloric effect gradually decreases as the degree of plastic deformation increases. This trend is further confirmed by the direct measurements of the adiabatic temperature change ΔTad.

  17. SPECIFIC AND CROSS-OVER EFFECTS OF FOAM ROLLING ON ANKLE DORSIFLEXION RANGE OF MOTION

    PubMed Central

    Beardsley, Chris

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Flexibility is an important physical quality. Self-myofascial release (SMFR) methods such as foam rolling (FR) increase flexibility acutely but how long such increases in range of motion (ROM) last is unclear. Static stretching (SS) also increases flexibility acutely and produces a cross-over effect to contralateral limbs. FR may also produce a cross-over effect to contralateral limbs but this has not yet been identified. Purpose To explore the potential cross-over effect of SMFR by investigating the effects of a FR treatment on the ipsilateral limb of 3 bouts of 30 seconds on changes in ipsilateral and contralateral ankle DF ROM and to assess the time-course of those effects up to 20 minutes post-treatment. Methods A within- and between-subject design was carried out in a convenience sample of 26 subjects, allocated into FR (n=13) and control (CON, n=13) groups. Ankle DF ROM was recorded at baseline with the in-line weight-bearing lunge test for both ipsilateral and contralateral legs and at 0, 5, 10, 15, 20 minutes following either a two-minute seated rest (CON) or 3 3 30 seconds of FR of the plantar flexors of the dominant leg (FR). Repeated measures ANOVA was used to examine differences in ankle DF ROM. Results No significant between-group effect was seen following the intervention. However, a significant within-group effect (p<0.05) in the FR group was seen between baseline and all post-treatment time-points (0, 5, 10, 15 and 20 minutes). Significant within-group effects (p<0.05) were also seen in the ipsilateral leg between baseline and at all post-treatment time-points, and in the contralateral leg up to 10 minutes post-treatment, indicating the presence of a cross-over effect. Conclusions FR improves ankle DF ROM for at least 20 minutes in the ipsilateral limb and up to 10 minutes in the contralateral limb, indicating that FR produces a cross-over effect into the contralateral limb. The mechanism producing these cross-over effects is

  18. Size effects in lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu-Rong, Yao; Ya-Xia, Yin; Yu-Gao, Guo

    2016-01-01

    Size-related properties of novel lithium battery materials, arising from kinetics, thermodynamics, and newly discovered lithium storage mechanisms, are reviewed. Complementary experimental and computational investigations of the use of the size effects to modify electrodes and electrolytes for lithium ion batteries are enumerated and discussed together. Size differences in the materials in lithium ion batteries lead to a variety of exciting phenomena. Smaller-particle materials with highly connective interfaces and reduced diffusion paths exhibit higher rate performance than the corresponding bulk materials. The thermodynamics is also changed by the higher surface energy of smaller particles, affecting, for example, secondary surface reactions, lattice parameter, voltage, and the phase transformation mechanism. Newly discovered lithium storage mechanisms that result in superior storage capacity are also briefly highlighted. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51225204 and 21303222), the Shandong Taishan Scholarship, China, the Ministry of Science and Technology, China (Grant No. 2012CB932900), and the Strategic Priority Research Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. XDA09010000).

  19. Finite sample size effects in transformation kinetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, M. C.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of finite sample size on the kinetic law of phase transformations is considered. The case where the second phase develops by a nucleation and growth mechanism is treated under the assumption of isothermal conditions and constant and uniform nucleation rate. It is demonstrated that for spherical particle growth, a thin sample transformation formula given previously is an approximate version of a more general transformation law. The thin sample approximation is shown to be reliable when a certain dimensionless thickness is small. The latter quantity, rather than the actual sample thickness, determines when the usual law of transformation kinetics valid for bulk (large dimension) samples must be modified.

  20. Effect of viscosity on rolling-element fatigue life at cryogenic temperature with fluorinated ether lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietrich, M. W.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1975-01-01

    Rolling-element fatigue tests were conducted with 12.7-mm-(1/2-in.-) diameter AISI 52100 steel balls in the NASA five-ball fatigue tester, with a maximum hertz stress of 5500 mN/m2 (800 000 psi), a shaft speed of 4750 rpm, lubricant temperature of 200 K (360 R), a contact angle of 20 deg, using four fluorinated ether lubricants of varying viscosities. No statistically significant differences in rolling-element fatigue life occurred using the four viscosity levels. Elastohydrodynamic calculations indicate that values of the lubricant film parameter were approximately 2 or greater.

  1. Tumor size and effectiveness of electrochemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Mali, Barbara; Miklavcic, Damijan; Campana, Luca G.; Cemazar, Maja; Sersa, Gregor; Snoj, Marko; Jarm, Tomaz

    2013-01-01

    Background Electrochemotherapy (ECT) is an effective and safe method for local treatment of tumors. However, relatively large variability in effectiveness of ECT has been observed, which likely results from different treatment conditions and tumor characteristics. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between tumor size and effectiveness of a single-session ECT. Materials and methods A systematic search of various bibliographic databases was performed and nine studies eligible for this study were extracted. Different statistical methods including meta-analysis were applied to analyze the data. Results The results of analysis based on data from 1466 tumors of any histotype show significantly lower effectiveness of ECT on tumors with maximal diameter equal to or larger than 3 cm (complete response (CR) of 33.3%, objective response (OR) of 68.2%) in comparison to smaller tumors (CR% of 59.5%, OR% of 85.7%). The results of meta-analysis indicated that ECT performed on tumors smaller than 3 cm statistically significantly increases the probability of CR by 31.0% and OR by 24.9% on average in comparison to larger tumors. The analysis of raw data about the size and response of tumors showed statistically significant decrease in effectiveness of ECT progressively with increasing tumor diameter. The biggest drop in CR% was detected at tumor diameters as small as 2 cm. Conclusions The standard operating procedures for ECT should be reexamined and refined for the treatment of large tumors. We propose that future clinical trials should include accurate ECT treatment planning and/or multiple ECT cycles, besides a prolonged observation for tumor response evaluation. PMID:23450195

  2. Effects of axial, transverse, and oblique sample motion in FD OCT in systems with global or rolling shutter line detector.

    PubMed

    Walther, Julia; Krüger, Alexander; Cuevas, Maximiliano; Koch, Edmund

    2008-11-01

    This study deals with effects on the interference signal caused by axial, transverse, and oblique motion in spectrometer-based Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography (FD OCT). Two different systems are compared-one with a global shutter line detector and the other with a rolling shutter. We present theoretical and experimental investigations of motion artifacts. Regarding axial motion, fringe washout is observed in both systems, and an additional Doppler frequency shift is seen in the system using a rolling shutter. In addition, both systems show the same SNR decrease as a result of a transversely and obliquely moving sample. The possibility of flow measurement by using the decrease in signal power was demonstrated by imaging 1% Intralipid emulsion flowing through a glass capillary. This research provides an understanding of the SNR degradation caused by sample motion and demonstrates the importance of fast data acquisition in medical imaging. PMID:18978858

  3. Effect of Microstructure and Texture on Anisotropy and Mechanical Properties of SAE 970X Steel Under Hot Rolling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoumi, Mohammad; Mohtadi-Bonab, M. A.; de Abreu, Hamilton Ferreira Gomes

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents the effect of microstructure and crystallographic texture by developed in hot rolling and different post-treatments on anisotropic and mechanical properties of SAE 970X steel. The experimental results showed that the hot-rolled sample followed by quenching and consequent tempering at 700 °C led to a significant improvement in anisotropic and mechanical properties. This happened due to the reduction in the number of grains oriented with {001} planes parallel to normal direction. Also, the formation of new strain-free and recrystallized grains associated with {111}//ND and {110}//ND directions improved the mechanical properties. These grains corresponded to the close-packed planes in BCC structure as well.

  4. Effect of Microstructure and Texture on Anisotropy and Mechanical Properties of SAE 970X Steel Under Hot Rolling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoumi, Mohammad; Mohtadi-Bonab, M. A.; de Abreu, Hamilton Ferreira Gomes

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents the effect of microstructure and crystallographic texture by developed in hot rolling and different post-treatments on anisotropic and mechanical properties of SAE 970X steel. The experimental results showed that the hot-rolled sample followed by quenching and consequent tempering at 700 °C led to a significant improvement in anisotropic and mechanical properties. This happened due to the reduction in the number of grains oriented with {001} planes parallel to normal direction. Also, the formation of new strain-free and recrystallized grains associated with {111}//ND and {110}//ND directions improved the mechanical properties. These grains corresponded to the close-packed planes in BCC structure as well.

  5. Effect of length of Handley Page tip slots on the lateral-stability factor, damping in roll

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weick, Fred E; Wenzinger, Carl J

    1932-01-01

    Tests have been made in the NACA 7 by 10 foot wind tunnel on a Clark Y wing model equipped with various lengths of Handley Page slots extending inward from the wing tips. The slot lengths tested ranged from 20 to 100 per cent of the semi span. The effect of slot lengths on damping in roll was determined by means of both free-autorotation and forced-rotation test. In addition, the maximum lift coefficient was found with each slot length. The optimum length of slot for satisfactory damping in roll over a large range of angles of attack was found to be slightly over 50 per cent of the semispan for the form of slot tested.

  6. The effect of tooling design parameters on web-warping in the flexible roll forming of UHSS

    SciTech Connect

    Jiao, Jingsi; Weiss, Matthias; Rolfe, Bernard; Mendiguren, Joseba; Galdos, Lander

    2013-12-16

    To reduce weight and improve passenger safety there is an increased need in the automotive industry to use Ultra High Strength Steels (UHSS) for structural and crash components. However, the application of UHSS is restricted by their limited formability and the difficulty of forming them in conventional processes. An alternative method of manufacturing structural auto body parts from UHSS is the flexible roll forming process which can accommodate materials with high strength and limited ductility in the production of complex and weight-optimised components. However, one major concern in the flexible roll forming is web-warping, which is the height deviation of the profile web area. This paper investigates, using a numerical model, the effect on web-warping with respect to various forming methods. The results demonstrate that different forming methods lead to different amount of web-warping in terms of forming the product with identical geometry.

  7. Effects of Coupled Rolling and Pitching Oscillations on Transonic Shock-Induced Vortex-Breakdown Flow of a Delta Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandil, Osama A.; Menzies, Margaret A.

    1996-01-01

    Unsteady, transonic vortex-breakdown flow over a 65 deg. sharp edged, cropped-delta wing of zero thickness undergoing forced coupled pitching and rolling oscillations is investigated computationally. The initial condition of the flow is characterized by a transverse terminating shock which induces of the leading edge vortex cores to breakdown. The computational investigation uses the time-accurate solution of the laminar, unsteady, compressible, full Navier-Stokes equations with the implicit, upwind, Roe flux-difference splitting, finite-volume scheme. The main focus is to analyze the effects of coupled motion on the wing response and vortex-breakdown flow by varying oscillation frequency and phase angle while keeping the maximum pitch and roll amplitude equal.

  8. Size effects in thermal conduction by phonons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Philip B.

    2014-08-01

    Heat transport in nanoscale systems is both hard to measure microscopically, and hard to interpret. Ballistic and diffusive heat flow coexist, adding confusion. This paper looks at a very simple case: a nanoscale crystal repeated periodically. This is a popular model for simulation of bulk heat transport using classical molecular dynamics (MD), and is related to transient thermal grating experiments. Nanoscale effects are seen in perhaps their simplest form. The model is solved by an extension of standard quasiparticle gas theory of bulk solids. Both structure and heat flow are constrained by periodic boundary conditions. Diffusive transport is fully included, while ballistic transport by phonons of a long mean free path is diminished in a specific way. Heat current J (x) and temperature gradient ∇T (x') have a nonlocal relationship, via κ (x-x'), over a distance |x-x'| determined by phonon mean free paths. In MD modeling of bulk conductivity, finite computer resources limit system size. Long mean free paths, comparable to the scale of heating and cooling, cause undesired finite-size effects that have to be removed by extrapolation. The present model allows this extrapolation to be quantified. Calculations based on the Peierls-Boltzmann equation, using a generalized Debye model, show that extrapolation involves fractional powers of 1/L. It is also argued that heating and cooling should be distributed sinusoidally [ė∝cos(2πx/L)] to improve convergence of numerics.

  9. Coupled Rolling and Pitching Oscillation Effects on Transonic Shock-Induced Vortex-Breakdown Flow of a Delta Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandil, Osama A.; Menzies, Margaret A.

    1996-01-01

    Unsteady, transonic vortex dominated flow over a 65 deg. sharp edged, cropped-delta wing of zero thickness undergoing forced coupled pitching and rolling oscillations is investigated computationally. The wing mean angle of attack is 20 deg. and the free stream Mach number and Reynolds number are 0.85 and 3.23 x 10(exp 6), respectively. The initial condition of the flow is characterized by a transverse terminating shock and vortex breakdown of the leading edge vortex cores. The computational investigation uses the time-accurate solution of the laminar, unsteady, compressible, full Navier-Stokes equations with the implicit, upwind, Roe flux-difference splitting, finite volume scheme. The main focus is to analyze the effects of coupled motion on the wing response and vortex breakdown flow by varying oscillation frequency and phase angle while the maximum pitch and roll amplitude is kept constant at 4.0 deg. Four cases demonstrate the following: simultaneous motion at a frequency of 1(pi), motion with a 90 deg. phase lead in pitch, motion with a rolling frequency of twice the pitching frequency, and simultaneous motion at a frequency of 2(pi). Comparisons with single mode motion at these frequencies complete this study and illustrate the effects of coupling the oscillations.

  10. Effect of hot rolling conditions on the microstructure and mechanical properties of Fe-C-Mn-Si multiphase steels

    SciTech Connect

    Koh, H.J.; Lee, S.K.; Choi, S.J.; Kwon, S.J.; Kim, N.J.; Park, S.H.

    1998-02-03

    There is a growing need for the high strength steels with high formability for many applications. Using the concept of transformation induced plasticity (TRIP) observed in austenitic steels, one can obtain the combination of high strength and high formability. However, these austenitic steels require a fairly large amount of alloying elements which impose several practical problems for their widespread applications. On the other hand, it has been shown that the dual phase steels possess the relatively good combination of strength and formability due to their characteristic microstructure. The major microstructural constituents of dual phase steels are soft ferrite and hard martensite/bainite with small amount of retained austenite. In recent years, the beneficial effect of retained austenite on the mechanical properties of dual phase steels have been re-recognized and accordingly, there have been several investigations on developing the so-called TRIP-aided dual phase steels having increased amount of retained austenite in the microstructure. Most investigations on these TRIP-aided dual phase steels have been concentrated on the effects of heat treatment conditions and alloying elements such as Si, Mn, C and P on the microstructure and mechanical properties of cold rolled sheet steels. There have also been a few studies on developing such steels by hot rolling, and the emphases of these studies are placed mostly on increasing the amount of retained austenite. However, the microstructure of these hot rolled steels is far from optimum, consisting of large packets of hard second phase particles. The main objective of the present study is to modify the microstructure of this class of steels by varying the hot rolling conditions. The steel used in the present study is Fe-0.2C-2Si-1.5Mn.

  11. Effect of feeding rolled flaxseed on milk fatty acid profiles and reproductive performance of dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Bork, N R; Schroeder, J W; Lardy, G P; Vonnahme, K A; Bauer, M L; Buchanan, D S; Shaver, R D; Fricke, P M

    2010-11-01

    The objectives were to study the effects of feeding rolled flaxseed (FLX) to early-lactation dairy cows on milk yield, milk components, and milk fatty acid profiles as well as on measures of cow reproduction. Lactating Holstein cows, on 3 commercial dairies, were fed either an early-lactation ration (CON) or a ration that was similar in protein, energy, and fat content but that included FLX (0.85 kg of DM/cow per day). Within each dairy, cows were allocated alternately to breeding pens upon leaving the fresh pen (approximately 10 ± 5 d postpartum). Pens (n = 4 to 5 pens/dairy) were randomized to treatment (n = 2 to 3 pens/treatment per dairy). Pen (CON, n = 6; FLX, n = 7) was considered the experimental unit and data were analyzed as a split plot with pen as the whole-plot error term. Cows fed FLX had greater (P ≤ 0.06) proportions of cis-9, trans-11 C18:2, C18:3n-3, and C20:0 fatty acids in milk fat and a lesser (P = 0.03) proportion of C20:3n-6 fatty acid when compared with cows fed the CON diet. Treatment did not affect (P ≥ 0.24) milk yield, milk protein, protein yield, milk fat, or milk fat yield. No interactions (P ≥ 0.52) were found between treatment and season of the year or parity, or between treatment and days open, pregnancies per AI at first or second service, or pregnancy loss. In conclusion, feeding FLX at 0.85 kg/cow per day (DM basis) altered the fatty acid profile of milk, but milk yield, milk composition, and reproductive performance of dairy cows were not affected. PMID:20622184

  12. Discomfort of seated persons exposed to low frequency lateral and roll oscillation: Effect of backrest height.

    PubMed

    Beard, George F; Griffin, Michael J

    2016-05-01

    Backrests influence the comfort of seated people. With 21 subjects sitting with three backrest heights (no backrest, short backrest, high backrest) discomfort caused by lateral, roll, and fully roll-compensated lateral oscillation was investigated at frequencies between 0.25 and 1.0 Hz. With lateral oscillation, the short backrest reduced discomfort at frequencies less than 0.63 Hz and the high backrest reduced discomfort at frequencies less than 1.0 Hz. With roll oscillation, the high backrest reduced discomfort at frequencies less than 0.63 Hz, but increased discomfort at 1.0 Hz. With fully roll-compensated lateral oscillation, the short backrest reduced discomfort at 0.4 Hz and the high backrest reduced discomfort at 0.5 and 0.63 Hz. As predicted by current standards, a backrest can increase discomfort caused by high frequencies of vibration. However, a backrest can reduce discomfort caused by low frequencies, with the benefit depending on the frequency and direction of oscillation and backrest height. PMID:26851464

  13. Effect of carburized layer on rolling contact fatigue of 52100 ball bearing steel

    SciTech Connect

    Kotkowski, K.; Cegielski, H.; Przylecki, Z.

    1995-12-31

    Results of investigations of rolling contact fatigue life of 52100 ball bearing steel for two groups of specimens, carburized and non-carburized, are presented in the paper. A carburized layer improves the contact fatigue life ten times, when L{sub 10} lives are compared, or improves the fatigue strength by {approximately}18%, when load capacities are compared.

  14. Optimal Context Size in Elementary Schools: Disentangling the Effects of Class Size and School Size

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ready, Douglas D.; Lee, Valerie E.

    2007-01-01

    Young children's learning--and how their learning is distributed by social background--may be influenced by the structural and organizational properties of their school. This study focuses on one important structural dimension of these educational contexts: "size." This study differs from extant studies linking size to student outcomes in four…

  15. Crash Simulation of Roll Formed Parts by Damage Modelling Taking Into Account Preforming Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Till, Edwin T.; Hackl, Benjamin; Schauer, Hermann

    2011-08-01

    Complex phase steels of strength levels up to 1200 MPa are suitable to roll forming. These may be applied in automotive structures for enhancing the crashworthiness, e. g. as stiffeners in doors. Even though the strain hardening of the material is low there is considerable bending formability. However ductility decreases with the strength level. Higher strength requires more focus to the structural integrity of the part during the process planning stage and with respect to the crash behavior. Nowadays numerical simulation is used as a process design tool for roll-forming in a production environment. The assessment of the stability of a roll forming process is quite challenging for AHSS grades. There are two objectives of the present work. First to provide a reliable assessment tool to the roll forming analyst for failure prediction. Second to establish simulation procedures in order to predict the part's behavior in crash applications taking into account damage and failure. Today adequate ductile fracture models are available which can be used in forming and crash applications. These continuum models are based on failure strain curves or surfaces which depend on the stress triaxiality (e. g. Crach or GISSMO) and may additionally include the Lode angle (extended Mohr Coulomb or extended GISSMO model). A challenging task is to obtain the respective failure strain curves. In the paper the procedure is described in detail how these failure strain curves are obtained using small scale tests within voestalpine Stahl, notch tensile-, bulge and shear tests. It is shown that capturing the surface strains is not sufficient for obtaining reliable material failure parameters. The simulation tool for roll-forming at the site of voestalpine Krems is Copra® FEA RF, which is a 3D continuum finite element solver based on MSC.Marc. The simulation environment for crash applications is LS-DYNA. Shell elements are used for this type of analyses. A major task is to provide results of

  16. Effective plasmonic mode-size converter.

    PubMed

    Park, Hae-Ryeong; Park, Jong-Moon; Kim, Min-su; Ju, Jung Jin; Son, Jung-Han; Lee, Myung-Hyun

    2011-10-24

    Plasmonic mode-size converters (PMSCs) for long-range surface plasmon polaritons (LR-SPPs) at the wavelength of 1.55 μm are presented. The PMSC is composed of an insulator-metal-insulator waveguide (IMI-W), a laterally tapered insulator-metal-insulator-metal-insulator waveguide (LT-IMIMI-W), and an IMIMI-W in series. The mode-intensity sizes of the LR-SPPs for the IMI-W and the IMIMI-W were not only calculated using a finite element method but were also experimentally measured. The propagation losses of the IMI-W and the IMIMI-W as well as the coupling losses between them were analyzed by the cut-back method to investigate the effect of LT-IMIMI-Ws. By using the PMSC with a ~27 ° angled LT-IMIMI-W, the coupling loss between a polarization-maintaining fiber and a 3 μm-wide IMIMI-W was reduced by ~3.4 dB. Moreover, the resulting mode-intensity in the output of the PMSC was squeezed to ~35% of the mode-intensity in the input IMI-W. The PMSC may be potentially useful for bridging micro- to nano-plasmonic integrated circuits. PMID:22109009

  17. Representing the effect of crystallographic texture on the anisotropic performance behavior of rolled aluminum plate

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.P.; Barton, N.R.

    2000-01-01

    Rolled aluminum alloys are known to be anisotropic due to their processing histories. This paper focuses on measuring and modeling monotonic and cyclic strength anisotropies as well as the associated anisotropy of the elastic/elastic-plastic transition of a commercially-available rolled plate product. Monotonic tension tests were conducted on specimens in the rolling plane of 25.4 mm thick AA 7075-T6 plate taken at various angles to the rolling direction (RD). Fully-reversed tension/compression cyclic experiments were also conducted. As expected, the authors found significant anisotropy in the back-extrapolated yield strength. They also found that the character of the elastic/elastic-plastic transition (knee of the curve) to be dependent on the orientation of the loading axis. The tests performed in RD and TD (transverse direction) had relatively sharp transitions compared to the test data from other orientations. They found the cyclic response of the material to reflect the monotonic anisotropy. The material response reached cyclic stability in 10 cycles or less with very little cyclic hardening or softening observed. For this reason, they focused their modeling effort on predicting the monotonic response. Reckoning that the primary source of anisotropy in the rolled plate is the processing-induced crystallographic texture, they employed the experimentally-measured texture of the undeformed plate material in continuum slip polycrystal plasticity model simulations of the monotonic experiments. Three types of simulations were conducted, upper and lower bound analyses and a finite element calculation that associates an element with each crystal in the aggregate. They found that all three analyses predicted anisotropy of the back-extrapolated yield strength and post-yield behavior with varying degrees of success in correlating the experimental data.

  18. Estimation of stiffening effect of shaft and housing material outside projected area of a rolling element bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, C. M.

    1977-01-01

    In the analysis of distortions occurring in rolling-element bearings, it is common to neglect the stiffening effect of shafting outside the bearing region. The magnitude of such an effect will be dependent primarily on the bearing width-to-bore ratio, the shaft geometry, and the location of the bearing on the shaft. An estimate is given of the stiffening effect for a wide range of these variables. In addition, brief consideration is given to the parallel situation existing at the outer ring housing.

  19. Effects of Cold Rolling and Strain-Induced Martensite Formation in a SAF 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breda, Marco; Brunelli, Katya; Grazzi, Francesco; Scherillo, Antonella; Calliari, Irene

    2015-02-01

    Duplex stainless steels (DSSs) are biphasic steels having a ferritic-austenitic microstructure that allows them to combine good mechanical and corrosion-resistance properties. However, these steels are sensitive to microstructural modifications, such as ferrite decomposition at high temperatures and the possibility of strain-induced martensite (SIM) formation from cold-worked austenite, which can significantly alter their interesting features. In the present work, the effects of cold rolling on the developed microstructural features in a cold-rolled SAF 2205 DSS and the onset of martensitic transformation are discussed. The material was deformed at room temperature from 3 to 85 pct thickness reduction, and several characterization techniques (scanning and transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, hardness measurements, and time-of-flight-neutron diffraction) were employed in order to fully describe the microstructural behavior of the steel. Despite the low stacking fault energy of DSS austenite, which contributed to SIM formation, the steel was found to be more stable than other stainless steel grades, such as AISI 304L. Rolling textures were similar to those pertaining to single-phase materials, but the presence of the biphasic (Duplex) microstructure imposed deformation constraints that affected the developed microstructural features, owing to phases interactions. Moreover, even if an intensification of the strain field in austenite was revealed, retarded SIM transformation kinetics and lower martensite amounts with respect to AISI 304L were observed.

  20. Influence of motion coupling and nonlinear effects on parametric roll for a floating production storage and offloading platform.

    PubMed

    Greco, M; Lugni, C; Faltinsen, O M

    2015-01-28

    Occurrence and features of parametric roll (PR) on a weather-vaning floating production storage and offloading (FPSO) platform with a turret single-point mooring-line system are examined. The main focus is on the relevance of motions coupling and nonlinear effects on this phenomenon and on more general unstable conditions as well as on the occurrence and severity of water on deck. This work was motivated by recent experiments on an FPSO model without mooring systems highlighting the occurrence of parametric resonance owing to roll-yaw coupling. A three-dimensional numerical hybrid potential-flow seakeeping solver was able to capture this behaviour. The same method, extended to include the mooring lines, is adopted here to investigate the platform behaviour for different incident wavelengths, steepnesses, headings, locations of the turret and pretensions. From the results, sway and yaw tend to destabilize the system, also bringing chaotic features. The sway-roll-yaw coupling widens the existence region of PR resonance and increases PR severity; it also results in a larger amount of shipped water, especially at smaller wavelength-to-ship length ratio and larger steepness. The chaotic features are excited when a sufficiently large yaw amplitude is reached. Consistently, a simplified stability analysis showed the relevance of nonlinear-restoring coefficients, first those connected with the sway-yaw coupling then those associated with the roll-yaw coupling, both destabilizing. From the stability analysis, the system is unstable for all longitudinal locations of the turret and pre-tensions examined, but the instability weakens as the turret is moved forward, and the pre-tension is increased. The use of a suitable dynamic-positioning system can control the horizontal motions, avoiding the instability. PMID:25512590

  1. Effective Size of Populations under Selection

    PubMed Central

    Santiago, E.; Caballero, A.

    1995-01-01

    Equations to approximate the effective size (N(e)) of populations under continued selection are obtained that include the possibility of partial full-sib mating and other systems such as assortative mating. The general equation for the case of equal number of sexes and constant number of breeding individuals (N) is N(e) = 4N/[2(1 - α(I)) + (S(k)(2) + 4Q(2)C(2)) (1 + α(I) + 2α(O))], where S(k)(2) is the variance of family size due to sampling without selection, C(2) is the variance of selective advantages among families (the squared coefficient of variation of the expected number of offspring per family), α(I) is the deviation from Hardy-Weinberg proportions, α(O) is the correlation between genes of male and female parents, and Q(2) is the term accounting for the cumulative effect of selection on an inherited trait. This is obtained as Q = 2/[2 - G(1 + r)], where G is the remaining proportion of genetic variance in selected individuals and r is the correlation of the expected selective values of male and female parents. The method is also extended to the general case of different numbers of male and female parents. The predictive value of the formulae is tested under a model of truncation selection with the infinitesimal model of gene effects, where C(2) and G are a function of the selection intensity, the heritability and the intraclass correlation of sibs. Under random mating r = α(I) = -1/(N - 1) and α(O) = 0. Under partial full-sib mating with an average proportion β of full-sib matings per generation, r & β and α(O) & α(I) & β/ (4 - 3β). The prediction equation is compared to other approximations based on the long-term contributions of ancestors to descendants. Finally, based on the approach followed, a system of mating (compensatory mating) is proposed to reduce rates of inbreeding without loss of response in selection programs in which selected individuals from the largest families are mated to those from the smallest families. PMID:7713405

  2. Carbide factor predicts rolling-element bearing fatigue life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chevalier, J. L.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1973-01-01

    Analysis was made to determine correlation between number and size of carbide particles and rolling-element fatigue. Correlation was established, and carbide factor was derived that can be used to predict fatigue life more effectively than such variables as heat treatment, chemical composition, and hardening mechanism.

  3. Decoding mobile-phone image sensor rolling shutter effect for visible light communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Optical wireless communication (OWC) using visible lights, also known as visible light communication (VLC), has attracted significant attention recently. As the traditional OWC and VLC receivers (Rxs) are based on PIN photo-diode or avalanche photo-diode, deploying the complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) image sensor as the VLC Rx is attractive since nowadays nearly every person has a smart phone with embedded CMOS image sensor. However, deploying the CMOS image sensor as the VLC Rx is challenging. In this work, we propose and demonstrate two simple contrast ratio (CR) enhancement schemes to improve the contrast of the rolling shutter pattern. Then we describe their processing algorithms one by one. The experimental results show that both the proposed CR enhancement schemes can significantly mitigate the high-intensity fluctuations of the rolling shutter pattern and improve the bit-error-rate performance.

  4. Strong crystal size effect on deformation twinning.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qian; Shan, Zhi-Wei; Li, Ju; Huang, Xiaoxu; Xiao, Lin; Sun, Jun; Ma, Evan

    2010-01-21

    Deformation twinning in crystals is a highly coherent inelastic shearing process that controls the mechanical behaviour of many materials, but its origin and spatio-temporal features are shrouded in mystery. Using micro-compression and in situ nano-compression experiments, here we find that the stress required for deformation twinning increases drastically with decreasing sample size of a titanium alloy single crystal, until the sample size is reduced to one micrometre, below which the deformation twinning is entirely replaced by less correlated, ordinary dislocation plasticity. Accompanying the transition in deformation mechanism, the maximum flow stress of the submicrometre-sized pillars was observed to saturate at a value close to titanium's ideal strength. We develop a 'stimulated slip' model to explain the strong size dependence of deformation twinning. The sample size in transition is relatively large and easily accessible in experiments, making our understanding of size dependence relevant for applications. PMID:20090749

  5. Rolling Bearing Vibrations—The Effects of Surface Waviness and Radial Internal Clearance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harsha, S. P.

    This paper presents the nonlinear dynamic analysis of a balanced rotor supported by roller bearings. The mathematical formulation accounted for tangential motions of rolling elements as well as inner and outer races with the sources of non-linearity such as Hertzian contact force and radial internal clearance resulting transition from no-contact to contact state between rolling elements and the races. In the formulation the contacts between the rolling elements and the races are considered as nonlinear springs, whose stiffnesses are obtained by using Hertzian elastic contact deformation theory. The implicit type numerical integration technique Newmark-β with Newton-Raphson method is used to solve the nonlinear differential equations iteratively. The results show the appearance of instability and chaos in the dynamic response as the speed of the rotor-bearing system is changed. Period doubling and mechanism of intermittency have been observed, which lead to chaos. The appearance of regions of periodic, subharmonic and chaotic behavior is seen to be strongly dependent on these imperfections. Poincarè maps, phase plots and frequency spectra are used to elucidate and to illustrate the diversity of the system behavior.

  6. Effect of starvation on film thickness and traction under elastohydrodynamic rolling and sliding conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wedeven, L. D.

    1975-01-01

    Traction measurements under starved elastohydrodynamic conditions were obtained for a point-contact geometry. Simultaneous measurements of the film thickness and the location of the inlet lubricant boundary were made. Optical interferometry was used to measure film thickness. The thickness of a starved film for combined rolling and sliding conditions varies with the location of the inlet boundary in the same way as previously found for pure rolling conditions. When the fluid velocity distribution is calculated in the inlet region by a Reynolds lubrication analysis, backflow is seen to occur over a portion of the inlet region. Backflow is essential for the establishment of a flooded condition. The location of certain fluid velocity conditions within the inlet region, as suggested in the literature, does not adequately describe the onset of starvation. For the same slide-roll ratio a starved film was observed to possess greater traction than a flooded film. Traction measurements under starved conditions were also compared with those under flooded conditions for equivalent shear rates in the Hertzian region. When the shear rates within the Hertzian region were low and the film was severely starved, the measured tractions were lower than expected. This may be due to large shear stresses developed by the large pressure gradients that are generated in the inlet region when it is severely starved.

  7. Effect of Silicon Nitride Balls and Rollers on Rolling Bearing Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaretsky, Erwin V.; Vlcek, Brian L.; Hendricks, Robert C.

    2005-01-01

    Three decades have passed since the introduction of silicon nitride rollers and balls into conventional rolling-element bearings. For a given applied load, the contact (Hertz) stress in a hybrid bearing will be higher than an all-steel rolling-element bearing. The silicon nitride rolling-element life as well as the lives of the steel races were used to determine the resultant bearing life of both hybrid and all-steel bearings. Life factors were determined and reported for hybrid bearings. Under nominal operating speeds, the resultant calculated lives of the deep-groove, angular-contact, and cylindrical roller hybrid bearings with races made of post-1960 bearing steel increased by factors of 3.7, 3.2, and 5.5, respectively, from those calculated using the Lundberg-Palmgren equations. An all-steel bearing under the same load will have a longer life than the equivalent hybrid bearing under the same conditions. Under these conditions, hybrid bearings are predicted to have a lower fatigue life than all-steel bearings by 58 percent for deep-groove bearings, 41 percent for angular-contact bearings, and 28 percent for cylindrical roller bearings.

  8. Common Language Effect Size for Multiple Treatment Comparisons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Xiaofeng Steven

    2015-01-01

    Researchers who need to explain treatment effects to laypeople can translate Cohen's effect size (standardized mean difference) to a common language effect size--a probability of a random observation from one population being larger than a random observation from the other population. This common language effect size can be extended to represent…

  9. The portion size effect on food intake is robust to contextual size information.

    PubMed

    Reily, Natalie M; Vartanian, Lenny R

    2016-10-01

    Larger portion sizes have consistently been shown to lead to greater food intake. However, studies of the portion size effect typically provided participants with a single portion of food at a time without any objective information about the size of the portion, and hence failed to consider the potential significance of contextual size information. In order to investigate whether contextual size information moderates the portion size effect, participants were served small or large portions of pasta for lunch in the presence or absence of contextual size information. Study 1 found that the portion size effect on food intake was robust to contextual size information. Study 2 replicated this finding in an online paradigm, showing that contextual size information also had no influence on prospective intake, even when participants chose the portion size they preferred. Both studies also showed that participants' perceptions of how much was appropriate to eat mediated the effect of portion size on intake. A practical implication of our findings is that modifying consumption norms may be an effective way to promote healthier consumer food decisions. PMID:27311378

  10. CONTROL FOR ROLLING MILL

    DOEpatents

    Shuck, A.B.; Shaw, W.C.

    1961-06-20

    A plutonium-rolling apparatus is patented that has two sets of feed rolls, shaping rolls between the feed rolls, and grippers beyond the feed rolls, which ready a workpiece for a new pass through the shaping rolls by angularly shifting the workpiece about its axis or transversely moving it on a line parallel to the axes of the shaping rolls. Actuation of each gripper for gripping or releasing the workpiece is produced by the relative positions assumed by the feed rolls adjacent to the gripper as the workpiece enters or leaves the feed rolls.

  11. Effective-surface-energy approach for size effects in ferroics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jin; Tagantsev, Alexander K.; Setter, Nava

    2015-03-01

    We present a simple approach enabling analytical treatments of size effects in ferroelectric samples of complicated shapes for the cases where long-range depolarizing effects are not involved. The key element of the approach is the presentation of the energy of the system as the sum of the bulk and effective surface energy (like in the classical nucleation problem), while the latter is expressed as a function of the bulk value of the order parameter. The effective surface energy is calculated in terms of the Kretschmer-Binder framework. The size-driven shift of TC in the ferroelectric thin films with in-plane polarization and the nanowires with axial polarization is studied using the proposed approach and the results are compared with those exact. In the limit of large extrapolation length, the approach reproduces the exact results (analytical and numerical). For short extrapolation lengths, it can provide a good approximation to the exact results for the case of second-order phase transitions. For ferroelectrics with the first-order phase transition having the maximal correlation length smaller than the extrapolation length (a common situation in perovskites), the approach provides as well an appropriate description of the size effect on the transition temperature. The proposed approach can be used for the description of the size effect not only in ferroelectrics, but in other ferroics as well.

  12. Effects of plate size and food diameter on children’s perception of entree portion size

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Visual cues associated with portion size are thought to account for intake-promoting effects on children’s eating, but little is known about the visual cues to which young children attend in evaluating portion size. Developmental theory indicates that young children’s perception of size focuses on ...

  13. Roll Casting of Al-25%Si

    SciTech Connect

    Haga, Toshio; Harada, Hideto; Watari, Hisaki

    2011-05-04

    Strip casting of Al-25%Si strip was tried using an unequal diameter twin roll caster. The diameter of the lower roll (large roll) was 1000 mm and the diameter of the upper roll (small roll) was 250 mm. Roll material was mild steel. The sound strip could be cast at the speeds ranging from 8 m/min to 12 m/min. The strip did not stick to the roll without the parting material. The primary Si, which existed at centre area of the thickness direction, was larger than that which existed at other area. The size of the primary Si was smaller than 0.2 mm. Eutectic Si was smaller 5 {mu}m. The as-cast strip was ranging from 2 mm to 3 mm thick and its width was 100 mm. The as-cast strip could be hot rolled down to 1 mm. The hot rolled strip was cold rolled. The primary Si became smaller and the pore occurred around the primary Si after the rolling.

  14. When Effect Sizes Disagree: The Case of "r" and "d"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrath, Robert E.; Meyer, Gregory J.

    2006-01-01

    The increased use of effect sizes in single studies and meta-analyses raises new questions about statistical inference. Choice of an effect-size index can have a substantial impact on the interpretation of findings. The authors demonstrate the issue by focusing on two popular effect-size measures, the correlation coefficient and the…

  15. Reporting and Discussing Effect Size: Still the Road Less Traveled?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMillan, James H.; Foley, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    This study shows the extent to which effect size is reported and discussed in four major journals. A series of judgments about different aspects of effect size were conducted for 417 articles from four journals. Results suggest that while the reporting of simple effect size indices is more prevalent, substantive discussions of the meaning of…

  16. How to Estimate and Interpret Various Effect Sizes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vacha-Haase, Tammi; Thompson, Bruce

    2004-01-01

    The present article presents a tutorial on how to estimate and interpret various effect sizes. The 5th edition of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (2001) described the failure to report effect sizes as a "defect" (p. 5), and 23 journals have published author guidelines requiring effect size reporting. Although…

  17. Effect of hot-rolling and cooling rate on microstructure and high-temperature strength in 9CrODS steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, XCH.; Ukai, S.; Miyata, R.; Oono, N.; Hayashi, S.; Leng, B.; Ohtsuka, S.; Kaito, T.

    2013-09-01

    The 9CrODS steel specimens were prepared by different processing with hot-rolling and different cooling rate. The hardness and high-temperature tensile properties were measured. Microstructure was analyzed by means of EBSD inverse pole figure and kernel average miss-orientation angles. The hot-rolled and then air-cooled specimen has the highest tensile strength. The furnace-cooled specimen also has better tensile strength at 700 °C than air-cooled specimen at normalized condition. The high-temperature strength of 9CrODS steel is significantly improved with increasing grain size that can be induced by hot-rolling or furnace-slow cooling, where the localized grain boundary deformation can be suppressed.

  18. Crystallographic Reconstruction Study of the Effects of Finish Rolling Temperature on the Variant Selection During Bainite Transformation in C-Mn High-Strength Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernier, Nicolas; Bracke, Lieven; Malet, Loïc; Godet, Stéphane

    2014-12-01

    The effect of finish rolling temperature on the austenite-( γ) to-bainite ( α) phase transformation is quantitatively investigated in high-strength C-Mn steels using an alternative crystallographic γ reconstruction procedure, which can be directly applied to experimental electron backscatter diffraction mappings. In particular, the current study aims to clarify the respective contributions of the γ conditioning during the hot rolling and the variant selection during the phase transformation to the inherited texture. The results confirm that the sample finish rolled at the lowest temperature [1102 K (829 °C)] exhibits the sharpest transformation texture. It is shown that this sharp texture is exclusively due to a strong variant selection from parent brass {110}, S {213} and Goss {110}<001> grains, whereas the variant selection from the copper {112} grains is insensitive to the finish rolling temperature. In addition, a statistical variant selection analysis proves that the habit planes of the selected variants do not systematically correspond to the predicted active γ slip planes using the Taylor model. In contrast, a correlation between the Bain group to which the selected variants belong and the finish rolling temperature is clearly revealed, regardless of the parent orientation. These results are discussed in terms of polygranular accommodation mechanisms, especially in view of the observed development in the hot-rolled samples of high-angle grain boundaries with misorientation axes between <111> γ and <110> γ.

  19. Crystallographic Reconstruction Study of the Effects of Finish Rolling Temperature on the Variant Selection During Bainite Transformation in C-Mn High-Strength Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernier, Nicolas; Bracke, Lieven; Malet, Loïc; Godet, Stéphane

    2014-09-01

    The effect of finish rolling temperature on the austenite-(γ) to-bainite (α) phase transformation is quantitatively investigated in high-strength C-Mn steels using an alternative crystallographic γ reconstruction procedure, which can be directly applied to experimental electron backscatter diffraction mappings. In particular, the current study aims to clarify the respective contributions of the γ conditioning during the hot rolling and the variant selection during the phase transformation to the inherited texture. The results confirm that the sample finish rolled at the lowest temperature [1102 K (829 °C)] exhibits the sharpest transformation texture. It is shown that this sharp texture is exclusively due to a strong variant selection from parent brass {110} < {1bar{1}2} > , S {213} < {bar{3}bar{6}4} > and Goss {110}<001> grains, whereas the variant selection from the copper {112} < {bar{1}bar{1}1} > grains is insensitive to the finish rolling temperature. In addition, a statistical variant selection analysis proves that the habit planes of the selected variants do not systematically correspond to the predicted active γ slip planes using the Taylor model. In contrast, a correlation between the Bain group to which the selected variants belong and the finish rolling temperature is clearly revealed, regardless of the parent orientation. These results are discussed in terms of polygranular accommodation mechanisms, especially in view of the observed development in the hot-rolled samples of high-angle grain boundaries with misorientation axes between <111>γ and <110>γ.

  20. Size Effect on Magnesium Alloy Castings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhenming; Wang, Qigui; Luo, Alan A.; Zhang, Peng; Peng, Liming

    2016-06-01

    The effect of grain size on tensile and fatigue properties has been investigated in cast Mg alloys of Mg-2.98Nd-0.19Zn (1530 μm) and Mg-2.99Nd-0.2Zn-0.51Zr (41 μm). The difference between RB and push-pull fatigue testing was also evaluated in both alloys. The NZ30K05-T6 alloy shows much better tensile strengths (increased by 246 pct in YS and 159 pct in UTS) and fatigue strength (improved by ~80 pct) in comparison with NZ30-T6 alloy. RB fatigue testing results in higher fatigue strength compared with push-pull fatigue testing, mainly due to the stress/strain gradient in the RB specimen cross section. The material with coarse grains could be hardened more in the cyclic loading condition than in the monotonic loading condition, corresponding to the lower σ f and the higher σ f/ σ b or σ f/ σ 0.2 ratio compared to the materials with fine grains. The fatigue crack initiation sites and failure mechanism are mainly determined by the applied stress/strain amplitude. In LCF, fatigue failure mainly originates from the PSBs within the surface or subsurface grains of the samples. In HCF, cyclic deformation and damage irreversibly caused by environment-assisted cyclic slip is the crucial factor to influence the fatigue crack. The Coffin-Manson law and Basquin equation, and the developed MSF models and fatigue strength models can be used to predict fatigue lives and fatigue strengths of cast magnesium alloys.

  1. Size Effect on Magnesium Alloy Castings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhenming; Wang, Qigui; Luo, Alan A.; Zhang, Peng; Peng, Liming

    2016-03-01

    The effect of grain size on tensile and fatigue properties has been investigated in cast Mg alloys of Mg-2.98Nd-0.19Zn (1530 μm) and Mg-2.99Nd-0.2Zn-0.51Zr (41 μm). The difference between RB and push-pull fatigue testing was also evaluated in both alloys. The NZ30K05-T6 alloy shows much better tensile strengths (increased by 246 pct in YS and 159 pct in UTS) and fatigue strength (improved by ~80 pct) in comparison with NZ30-T6 alloy. RB fatigue testing results in higher fatigue strength compared with push-pull fatigue testing, mainly due to the stress/strain gradient in the RB specimen cross section. The material with coarse grains could be hardened more in the cyclic loading condition than in the monotonic loading condition, corresponding to the lower σ f and the higher σ f/σ b or σ f/σ 0.2 ratio compared to the materials with fine grains. The fatigue crack initiation sites and failure mechanism are mainly determined by the applied stress/strain amplitude. In LCF, fatigue failure mainly originates from the PSBs within the surface or subsurface grains of the samples. In HCF, cyclic deformation and damage irreversibly caused by environment-assisted cyclic slip is the crucial factor to influence the fatigue crack. The Coffin-Manson law and Basquin equation, and the developed MSF models and fatigue strength models can be used to predict fatigue lives and fatigue strengths of cast magnesium alloys.

  2. Effects of Rolling and Cooling Conditions on Microstructure and Tensile and Charpy Impact Properties of Ultra-Low-Carbon High-Strength Bainitic Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Hyo Kyung; Shin, Sang Yong; Hwang, Byoungchul; Lee, Chang Gil; Kim, Nack J.; Lee, Sunghak

    2011-07-01

    Six ultra-low-carbon high-strength bainitic steel plates were fabricated by controlling rolling and cooling conditions, and effects of bainitic microstructure on tensile and Charpy impact properties were investigated. The microstructural evolution was more critically affected by start cooling temperature and cooling rate than by finish rolling temperature. Bainitic microstructures such as granular bainites (GBs) and bainitic ferrites (BFs) were well developed as the start cooling temperature decreased or the cooling rate increased. When the steels cooled from 973 K or 873 K (700 °C or 600 °C) were compared under the same cooling rate of 10 K/s (10 °C/s), the steels cooled from 973 K (700 °C) consisted mainly of coarse GBs, while the steels cooled from 873 K (600 °C) contained a considerable amount of BFs having high strength, thereby resulting in the higher strength but the lower ductility and upper shelf energy (USE). When the steels cooled from 673 K (400 °C) at a cooling rate of 10 K/s (10 °C/s) or 0.1 K/s (0.1 °C/s) were compared under the same start cooling temperature of 873 K (600 °C), the fast cooled specimens were composed mainly of coarse GBs or BFs, while the slowly cooled specimens were composed mainly of acicular ferrites (AFs). Since AFs had small effective grain size and contained secondary phases finely distributed at grain boundaries, the slowly cooled specimens had a good combination of strength, ductility, and USE, together with very low energy transition temperature (ETT).

  3. Size effects of effective Young's modulus for periodic cellular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Gaoming; Zhang, Weihong

    2009-08-01

    With the wide demands of cellular materials applications in aerospace and civil engineering, research effort sacrificed for this type of materials attains nowadays a higher level than ever before. This paper is focused on the prediction methods of effective Young’s modulus for periodical cellular materials. Based on comprehensive studies of the existing homogenization method (HM), the G-A meso-mechanics method (G-A MMM) and the stretching energy method (SEM) that are unable to reflect the size effect, we propose the bending energy method (BEM) for the first time, and a comparative study of these four methods is further made to show the generality and the capability of capturing the size effect of the BEM method. Meanwhile, the underlying characteristics of each method and their relations are clarified. To do this, the detailed finite element computing and existing experimental results of hexagonal honeycombs from the literature are adopted as the standard of comparison for the above four methods. Stretch and bending models of periodical cellular materials are taken into account, respectively for the comparison of stretch and flexural displacements resulting from the above methods. We conclude that the BEM has the strong ability of both predicting the effective Young’s modulus and revealing the size effect. Such a method is also able to predict well the variations of structural displacements in terms of the cell size under stretching and bending loads including the non-monotonous variations for the hexagonal cell. On the contrary, other three methods can only predict the limited results whenever the cell size tends to be infinitely small.

  4. Rolling magnets down a conductive hill: Revisiting a classic demonstration of the effects of eddy currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomasel, Fernando G.; Marconi, Mario C.

    2012-09-01

    We re-examine the case of rare-earth magnets rolling down an inclined plane, presenting an approach to conducting quantitative investigations that results in high-quality experimental data connecting simple experiments to a handful of important applications of eddy currents. These include not only magnetic braking but also the characterization of conductive materials, measurement of the thickness of dielectric coatings, and nondestructive evaluation of conductive objects. The simplicity of the proposed experimental setups, which include the use of widely available smart phones to record video that can be post-processed with free software, makes these experiments appealing to high school and college physics students.

  5. Application of Motion Induced Remote-Field Eddy-Current effect to online inspection and quality examination of rolling metallic strips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yushi; Udpa, Satish; Lord, William; Udpa, Lalita; Ouyang, Tianhe

    2001-04-01

    The Motion Induced Remote-Field Eddy-Current (MIRFEC) effect was first observed in 1994. The effect was first exploited for detecting pipeline stress corrosion cracks as a part of a research project sponsored by the U.S. Department of Transportation. This paper presents a new application of the MIRFEC effect for online inspection of rolling metallic strips. Currently, rolled metallic strips and sheets are inspected off-line, which is costly, time consuming and not ideal for quality control. A well-designed online diagnostic and control system for metal rolling process may be able to reduce cost, improve quality, and hence enhance competitiveness of the product. The overall objective of this paper is to demonstrate the feasibility of a new nondestructive measurement system for on-line diagnostics and control of metallic rolling process using the MIRFEC effect. The system can be used to monitor, in real time, metallic strips/sheets for possible anomalies, inclusions, voids, bubbles, lamination, as well as variations in its magnetic and other properties. The potential advantages of the MIRFEC system include simplicity, robustness, low cost, high reliability, quick and accurate signal classification and characterization. Such systems can be used for real-time process control, or off-line data analysis. The technique also allows operation at high temperatures, tolerates large lift-off and vibration, and high rolling speed. Results of finite element modeling of the MIRFEC effect and experimental measurement data obtained from a prototype system are presented.

  6. Causality in Statistical Power: Isomorphic Properties of Measurement, Research Design, Effect Size, and Sample Size.

    PubMed

    Heidel, R Eric

    2016-01-01

    Statistical power is the ability to detect a significant effect, given that the effect actually exists in a population. Like most statistical concepts, statistical power tends to induce cognitive dissonance in hepatology researchers. However, planning for statistical power by an a priori sample size calculation is of paramount importance when designing a research study. There are five specific empirical components that make up an a priori sample size calculation: the scale of measurement of the outcome, the research design, the magnitude of the effect size, the variance of the effect size, and the sample size. A framework grounded in the phenomenon of isomorphism, or interdependencies amongst different constructs with similar forms, will be presented to understand the isomorphic effects of decisions made on each of the five aforementioned components of statistical power. PMID:27073717

  7. Causality in Statistical Power: Isomorphic Properties of Measurement, Research Design, Effect Size, and Sample Size

    PubMed Central

    Heidel, R. Eric

    2016-01-01

    Statistical power is the ability to detect a significant effect, given that the effect actually exists in a population. Like most statistical concepts, statistical power tends to induce cognitive dissonance in hepatology researchers. However, planning for statistical power by an a priori sample size calculation is of paramount importance when designing a research study. There are five specific empirical components that make up an a priori sample size calculation: the scale of measurement of the outcome, the research design, the magnitude of the effect size, the variance of the effect size, and the sample size. A framework grounded in the phenomenon of isomorphism, or interdependencies amongst different constructs with similar forms, will be presented to understand the isomorphic effects of decisions made on each of the five aforementioned components of statistical power. PMID:27073717

  8. Wind tunnel analysis of the aerodynamic loads on rolling stock over railway embankments: the effect of shelter windbreaks.

    PubMed

    Avila-Sanchez, Sergio; Pindado, Santiago; Lopez-Garcia, Oscar; Sanz-Andres, Angel

    2014-01-01

    Wind-flow pattern over embankments involves an overexposure of the rolling stock travelling on them to wind loads. Windbreaks are a common solution for changing the flow characteristic in order to decrease unwanted effects induced by the presence of cross-wind. The shelter effectiveness of a set of windbreaks placed over a railway twin-track embankment is experimentally analysed. A set of two-dimensional wind tunnel tests are undertaken and results corresponding to pressure tap measurements over a section of a typical high-speed train are herein presented. The results indicate that even small-height windbreaks provide sheltering effects to the vehicles. Also, eaves located at the windbreak tips seem to improve their sheltering effect. PMID:25544954

  9. Wind Tunnel Analysis of the Aerodynamic Loads on Rolling Stock over Railway Embankments: The Effect of Shelter Windbreaks

    PubMed Central

    Avila-Sanchez, Sergio; Lopez-Garcia, Oscar; Sanz-Andres, Angel

    2014-01-01

    Wind-flow pattern over embankments involves an overexposure of the rolling stock travelling on them to wind loads. Windbreaks are a common solution for changing the flow characteristic in order to decrease unwanted effects induced by the presence of cross-wind. The shelter effectiveness of a set of windbreaks placed over a railway twin-track embankment is experimentally analysed. A set of two-dimensional wind tunnel tests are undertaken and results corresponding to pressure tap measurements over a section of a typical high-speed train are herein presented. The results indicate that even small-height windbreaks provide sheltering effects to the vehicles. Also, eaves located at the windbreak tips seem to improve their sheltering effect. PMID:25544954

  10. Cohort Size Effects on Earnings: Differences by College Major.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berger, Mark C.

    1988-01-01

    Examines effects of cohort size on starting salaries of college graduates from different areas of study. Increases in the size of graduating classes relative to the population depress their starting salaries relative to other workers. Smallest negative cohort size effects are found for engineering and business graduates, while the largest are…

  11. Interpreting and Reporting Effect Sizes in Research Investigations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tapia, Martha; Marsh, George E., II

    Since 1994, the American Psychological Association (APA) has advocated the inclusion of effect size indices in reporting research to elucidate the statistical significance of studies based on sample size. In 2001, the fifth edition of the APA "Publication Manual" stressed the importance of including an index of effect size to clarify research…

  12. Biofuel Manufacturing from Woody Biomass: Effects of Sieve Size Used in Biomass Size Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Meng; Song, Xiaoxu; Deines, T. W.; Pei, Z. J.; Wang, Donghai

    2012-01-01

    Size reduction is the first step for manufacturing biofuels from woody biomass. It is usually performed using milling machines and the particle size is controlled by the size of the sieve installed on a milling machine. There are reported studies about the effects of sieve size on energy consumption in milling of woody biomass. These studies show that energy consumption increased dramatically as sieve size became smaller. However, in these studies, the sugar yield (proportional to biofuel yield) in hydrolysis of the milled woody biomass was not measured. The lack of comprehensive studies about the effects of sieve size on energy consumption in biomass milling and sugar yield in hydrolysis process makes it difficult to decide which sieve size should be selected in order to minimize the energy consumption in size reduction and maximize the sugar yield in hydrolysis. The purpose of this paper is to fill this gap in the literature. In this paper, knife milling of poplar wood was conducted using sieves of three sizes (1, 2, and 4 mm). Results show that, as sieve size increased, energy consumption in knife milling decreased and sugar yield in hydrolysis increased in the tested range of particle sizes. PMID:22665985

  13. Text detection: effect of size and eccentricity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kao, Chien-Hui; Chen, Chien-Chung

    2011-03-01

    The issue of reading on electronic devices is getting important as the popularity of mobile devices, such as cell phones or PDAs, increases. In this study, we used the spatial summation paradigm to measure the spatial constraints for text detection. Four types of stimuli (real characters, non-characters, Jiagu and scrambled lines) were used in the experiments. All characters we used had two components in a left-right configuration. A non-character was constructed by swapping the left and right components of a real character in position to render it unpronounceable. The Jiagu characters were ancient texts and have the same left-right configuration as the modern Chinese characters, but contain no familiar components. Thus, the non-characters keep the components while destroy the spatial configuration between them and the Jaigu characters have no familiar component while keep the spatial configuration intact. The detection thresholds for the same stimulus size and the same eccentricity were the same for all types of stimuli. When the text-size is small, the detection threshold of a character decreased with the increase in its size, with a slope of -1/2 on log-log coordinates, up to a critical size at all eccentricities and for all stimulus types. The sensitivity for all types of stimuli was increased from peripheral to central vision. In conclusion, the detectability is based on local feature analysis regardless of character types. The cortical magnification, E2, is 0.82 degree visual angle. With this information, we can estimate the detectability of a character by its size and eccentricity.

  14. Size effects in the elasticity and viscoelasticity of bone.

    PubMed

    Buechner, P M; Lakes, R S

    2003-04-01

    Size effects of large magnitude are observed in the torsional shear modulus and damping of bovine plexiform bone. Damping increases and stiffness decreases with specimen size over all sizes studied. Measurements were conducted in torsion using a laser-based micromechanics apparatus capable of viscoelastic studies over a range of frequencies up to 100 kHz, upon samples of various size, with no parasitic friction or other errors that could mimic any size effect. Torsional tan delta at 1 Hz varies by about a factor of five over the size range 2.8-6.2 mm thick, and is more dependent on specimen thickness at 1 Hz than it is at higher frequency. The size effects are attributed to compliance and viscoelasticity of the interfaces between laminae. These laminae must be substantially stiffer than whole bone. Observed size effects are likely to play a role in understanding scaling laws of bones in living organisms. PMID:14586697

  15. Effect size estimates: current use, calculations, and interpretation.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Catherine O; Morris, Peter E; Richler, Jennifer J

    2012-02-01

    The Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (American Psychological Association, 2001, American Psychological Association, 2010) calls for the reporting of effect sizes and their confidence intervals. Estimates of effect size are useful for determining the practical or theoretical importance of an effect, the relative contributions of factors, and the power of an analysis. We surveyed articles published in 2009 and 2010 in the Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, noting the statistical analyses reported and the associated reporting of effect size estimates. Effect sizes were reported for fewer than half of the analyses; no article reported a confidence interval for an effect size. The most often reported analysis was analysis of variance, and almost half of these reports were not accompanied by effect sizes. Partial η2 was the most commonly reported effect size estimate for analysis of variance. For t tests, 2/3 of the articles did not report an associated effect size estimate; Cohen's d was the most often reported. We provide a straightforward guide to understanding, selecting, calculating, and interpreting effect sizes for many types of data and to methods for calculating effect size confidence intervals and power analysis. PMID:21823805

  16. Effects of Different Modes of Hot Cross-Rolling in 7010 Aluminum Alloy: Part II. Mechanical Properties Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Chandan; Singh, A. K.; Mukhopadhyay, A. K.; Chattopadhyay, K.

    2013-06-01

    The influence of microstructure and texture developed by different modes of hot cross-rolling on in-plane anisotropy ( A IP) of yield strength, work hardening behavior, and anisotropy of Knoop hardness (KHN) yield locus has been investigated. The A IP and work hardening behavior are evaluated by tensile testing at 0 deg, 45 deg, and 90 deg to the rolling direction, while yield loci have been generated by directional KHN measurements. It has been observed that specimens especially in the peak-aged temper, in spite of having a strong, rotated Brass texture, show low A IP. The results are discussed on the basis of Schmid factor analyses in conjunction with microstructural features, namely grain morphology and precipitation effects. For the specimen having a single-component texture, the yield strength variation as a function of orientation can be rationalized by the Schmid factor analysis of a perfectly textured material behaving as a quasi-single crystal. The work hardening behavior is significantly affected by the presence of solute in the matrix and the state of precipitation rather than texture, while yield loci derived from KHN measurements reiterate the low anisotropy of the materials. Theoretic yield loci calculated from the texture data using the visco-plastic self-consistent model and Hill's anisotropic equation are compared with that obtained experimentally.

  17. Effects of interface roughness on the annealing behaviour of laminated Ti-Al composite deformed by hot rolling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Y.; Fan, G. H.; Yu, T.; Hansen, N.; Geng, L.; Huang, X.

    2015-08-01

    A laminated Ti-Al composite has been fabricated by hot compaction and hot rolling of alternate layers of commercial purity Ti and Al sheets with a thickness of 200 μm. The hot compaction temperature was 500°C and in a following step the composite has been reduced 50% in thickness by hot rolling. The fully consolidated composite has been annealed at 300°C and 500°C for different length of time. As a result of the differences in crystal structure and mechanical properties between Ti and Al protrusions and retrusions formed at the interface. A heterogeneous interface has thereby been created. The heterogeneity affected the recovery kinetics of the aluminium phase which at 300°C was faster near the interface than in the middle of the Al layer. This effect of a heterogeneous interface is of relevance when optimizing the thermomechanical processing of the composite to obtain high strength and formability for application.

  18. Effects of cold rolling deformation on microstructure, hardness, and creep behavior of high nitrogen austenitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shi-Cheng; Sun, Gui-Xun; Jiang, Zhong-Hao; Ji, Chang-Tao; Liu, Jia-An; Lian, Jian-She

    2014-02-01

    Effects of cold rolling deformation on the microstructure, hardness, and creep behavior of high nitrogen austenitic stainless steel (HNASS) are investigated. Microstructure characterization shows that 70% cold rolling deformation results in significant refinement of the microstructure of this steel, with its average twin thickness reducing from 6.4 μm to 14 nm. Nanoindentation tests at different strain rates demonstrate that the hardness of the steel with nano-scale twins (nt-HNASS) is about 2 times as high as that of steel with micro-scale twins (mt-HNASS). The hardness of nt-HNASS exhibits a pronounced strain rate dependence with a strain rate sensitivity (m value) of 0.0319, which is far higher than that of mt-HNASS (m = 0.0029). nt-HNASS shows more significant load plateaus and a higher creep rate than mt-HNASS. Analysis reveals that higher hardness and larger m value of nt-HNASS arise from stronger strain hardening role, which is caused by the higher storage rate of dislocations and the interactions between dislocations and high density twins. The more significant load plateaus and higher creep rates of nt-HNASS are due to the rapid relaxation of the dislocation structures generated during loading.

  19. Effect of tempering on microstructure and mechanical properties of cast iron rolls laser alloyed with C-B-W-Cr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, R.; Sun, G. F.; Chen, K. K.; Tong, Y. Q.

    2014-08-01

    Laser alloyed layer with C-B-W-Cr powders on high-Ni-Cr infinite chilled cast iron roll was tempered at 500 °C for 60 mins and cooled to room temperature in the furnace. Optical scanning microscopy and X-ray diffractometer were used to investigate the microstructure and phases of the layer. A microhardness tester and wear tester were used to test the microhardness distribution, friction and wear behavior. Ferrite was formed in the tempered layer. Metastable carbides changed to stoichiometric carbides after tempering. FWHM (full width at half maximum) of the first primary peak was decreased by tempering. Microhardness decreased by 44%. Friction coefficient of the tempered layer exhibited gentle increase and a stable value of 0.6 was achieved for both the tempered layer and substrate. Relative wear resistance of the tempered layer was 1.11 times that of the tempered roll substrate. Mechanism of the effect of tempering on microstructure, FWHM, microhardness and wear properties were discussed.

  20. Vortical and nonlinear effects in the roll motion of a 2-D body in the free surface investigated by SPH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olmez, O.; Ozbulut, M.; Yildiz, M.; Goren, O.

    2016-06-01

    The present study investigates the vortical and nonlinear effects in the roll motion of a 2-D body with square cross-sections by using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH). A 2-D rigid body with square cross-section is taken into account for the benchmark study and subjected to the oscillatory roll motion with a given angular frequency. The governing equations are continuity equation and Euler's equation with artificial viscosity term. Weakly Compressible SPH (WCSPH) scheme is employed for the discretization of the governing equations. Velocities of the fluid particles are updated by means of XSPH+Artificial Particle Displacement (VXSPH+APD) algorithm. In this method only the free surface fluid particles are subjected to VXSPH algorithm while the APD algorithm is employed for the fully populated flow regions. The hybrid usage of numerical treatment keeps free surface particles together by creating an artificial surface tension on the free surface. VXSPH+APD is a proven numerical treatment to provide the most accurate results for this type of free surface flows (Ozbulut et al. 2014). The results of the present study are compared with those of the experimental studies as well as with those of the numerical methods obtained from the current literature.

  1. Effectiveness of the Size Matters Handwriting Program.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, Beth; Rai, Gillian; Murray, Tammy; Brusilovskiy, Eugene

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of the research was to study changes in handwriting legibility among kindergarten, first- and second-grade students in response to the Size Matters curricular-based handwriting program. A two-group pre-post-test design was implemented at two public schools with half of the classrooms assigned to receive the Size Matters program and the other continuing to receive standard instruction. All participants completed two standardized handwriting measures at pre-test and after 40 instructional sessions were completed with the classes receiving the handwriting program. Results identified significant changes in legibility in the handwriting intervention group for all three grades when compared with the standard instruction group. The results of this study support the use of a curricular-embedded handwriting program and provide the foundation for future research examining the impact of handwriting legibility on learning outcomes. PMID:26460474

  2. The pack size effect: Influence on consumer perceptions of portion sizes.

    PubMed

    Hieke, Sophie; Palascha, Aikaterini; Jola, Corinne; Wills, Josephine; Raats, Monique M

    2016-01-01

    Larger portions as well as larger packs can lead to larger prospective consumption estimates, larger servings and increased consumption, described as 'portion-size effects' and 'pack size effects'. Although related, the effects of pack sizes on portion estimates have received less attention. While it is not possible to generalize consumer behaviour across cultures, external cues taken from pack size may affect us all. We thus examined whether pack sizes influence portion size estimates across cultures, leading to a general 'pack size effect'. We compared portion size estimates based on digital presentations of different product pack sizes of solid and liquid products. The study with 13,177 participants across six European countries consisted of three parts. Parts 1 and 2 asked participants to indicate the number of portions present in a combined photographic and text-based description of different pack sizes. The estimated portion size was calculated as the quotient of the content weight or volume of the food presented and the number of stated portions. In Part 3, participants stated the number of food items that make up a portion when presented with packs of food containing either a small or a large number of items. The estimated portion size was calculated as the item weight times the item number. For all three parts and across all countries, we found that participants' portion estimates were based on larger portions for larger packs compared to smaller packs (Part 1 and 2) as well as more items to make up a portion (Part 3); hence, portions were stated to be larger in all cases. Considering that the larger estimated portions are likely to be consumed, there are implications for energy intake and weight status. PMID:26419373

  3. Hall-Petch effect: Another manifestation of size effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuan; Dunstan, David; Bushby, Andy

    In the 1950s, Hall and Petch first established a quantitative relationship, expressed by the famous Hall-Petch equation: σd =σ0 +kHP/√{ d} There is a very large body of experimental data in the literature reinforcing this dependence in a very wide range of metals. Recently, we presented some of the classic data sets which have been considered to confirm the Hall-Petch equation and showed they are equally well consistent with the equation ɛel (d) =ɛ0 +kln/(d) d Eq. 2 is based on critical thickness theory. Fitting to Eq.1 with the exponent 0.5 replaced by the free fitting parameter x, the confidence interval for the exponent is 0.5 size of each study. The normalised kHP are widely scattered. However, the lower bound of the scatter shows a clear dependence on grain size. The Hall-Petch dependence of the strength on grain size, if it obeys Eq.2, is another manifestation of the size effect.

  4. Preventing the pack size effect: exploring the effectiveness of pictorial and non-pictorial serving size recommendations.

    PubMed

    Versluis, Iris; Papies, Esther K; Marchiori, David

    2015-04-01

    People eat more from large than from small packs, which is known as the pack size effect. We hypothesized that providing a serving size recommendation would reduce the influence of the pack size on consumption and would thus diminish the pack size effect. Moreover, we hypothesized that a pictorial serving size recommendation, displaying food amounts visually, would be more effective than a non-pictorial recommendation that communicates the recommended amount in grams only. We tested these hypotheses in two online experiments (N = 317 and N = 324) and in one lab experiment (N = 89). In the online experiments, participants were shown a small or a large pack of unhealthy snacks, with or without a serving size recommendation. The main outcome measure was expected consumption. Replicating the pack size effect in an online setting, we found that participants expected to consume more food from large than from small packs. Furthermore, the pack size effect was considerably stronger for men than for women. Importantly, when including portion size preferences as a covariate, the pictorial serving size recommendation significantly reduced expected consumption, especially when placed on a large pack, as hypothesized. The non-pictorial serving size recommendation had no effect. In the lab experiment, students received a large bag of M&M's which did or did not contain the pictorial serving size recommendation. We again included general portion size preferences as a covariate. The serving size recommendation significantly lowered the amount of M&M's that participants served themselves, but only when participants reported to have noticed the serving size recommendation. We conclude that providing a pictorial serving size recommendation can be an effective intervention strategy to reduce the pack size effect, if it attracts sufficient attention. PMID:25528692

  5. Effects of extreme pressure additive chemistry on rolling element bearing surface durability

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Ryan D.; Nixon, H. P.; Darragh, Craig V.; Howe, Jane Y; Coffey, Dorothy W

    2007-01-01

    Lubricant additives have been known to affect rolling element bearing surface durability for many years. Tapered roller bearings were used in fatigue testing of lubricants formulated with gear oil type additive systems. These systems have sulfur- and phosphoruscontaining compounds used for gear protection as well as bearing lubrication. Several variations of a commercially available base additive formulation were tested having modified sulfur components. The variations represent a range of ''active'' extreme pressure (EP) chemistries. The bearing fatigue test results were compared with respect to EP formulation and test conditions. Inner ring near-surface material in selected test bearings was evaluated on two scales: the micrometer scale using optical metallography and the nanometer scale using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Focused-ion beam (FIB) techniques were used for TEM specimen preparation. Imaging and chemical analysis of the bearing samples revealed near-surface material and tribofilm characteristics. These results are discussed with respect to the relative fatigue lives.

  6. Numerical modeling and experimental study of motion-induced remote field current effect and its applications to online inspection and quality examination of rolling metallic strips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yushi; Udpa, Satish S.; Lord, William; Udpa, Lalita; Ouyang, Tianhe

    2000-06-01

    Currently, rolled metallic strips and sheets are inspected off-line, which is costly, time consuming and not ideal for quality control. A well designed online diagnostic and control system for metal rolling process may largely reduce cost, improve quality, and hence enhance competitiveness of the product. The overall objective of this paper is to study a new nondestructive measurement system for on-line diagnostics and control of metallic rolling process using motion-induced remote-field eddy-current (MIRFEC) effect. The system can be used to monitor in real time the rolled metallic strips/sheets for possible anomalies, inclusions, voids, bubbles, lamination, as well as measuring variations of its properties. The potential advantages of the MIRFEC system include simplicity, robustness, low cost, high reliability, quick and accurate signal classification and characterization that can used for real-time process control, or off-line data analysis. The technique also allows operation at high temperature, large lift-off and vibration, and high rolling speed. Results of finite element modeling of the MIRFEC effect and experimental measurement data obtained from a prototype system are presented.

  7. Effects of Two-Stage Cold Rolling Schedule on Microstructure and Texture Evolution of Strip Casting Grain-Oriented Silicon Steel with Extra-Low Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Hong-Yu; Liu, Hai-Tao; Liu, Wen-Qiang; Wang, Yin-Ping; Liu, Zhen-Yu; Wang, Guo-Dong

    2016-04-01

    A 0.27 mm-thick grain-oriented silicon steel sheet with extra-low carbon was successfully produced by a novel processing route including strip casting, normalizing, two-stage cold rolling with an intermediate annealing, primary annealing, and secondary recrystallization annealing. The evolutions of microstructure and texture along the whole processing route were investigated with a special emphasis on the effects of two-stage cold rolling schedule. It was found that Goss orientation originated in the first cold rolling due to shear banding and relatively strong Goss texture evolved through the whole thickness after intermediate annealing. This is significantly different from the results in conventional process in which the origin of Goss texture is in the hot rolling stage and Goss texture only develops below the sheet surface. Besides, it was found that cold rolling schedule had significant influences on microstructure homogeneity, evolution of λ-fiber texture in primary annealed state and, thus, on secondary recrystallization. In case of appropriate cold rolling schedule, a homogeneous microstructure with Goss texture, relatively strong γ-fiber texture and medium α-fiber texture was observed in the primary annealed strip. Although Goss texture in primary annealed state was much weaker than that in two-stage route in conventional process, a perfect secondary recrystallization microstructure was produced and the magnetic induction B8 was as high as 1.85 T. By contrast, when the cold rolling schedule was inappropriate, the primary annealed strips exhibited inhomogeneous microstructure, together with weak γ-fiber texture, medium α-fiber and λ-fiber texture. Finally, the sheets showed incomplete secondary recrystallization microstructure in which a large number of fine grains still existed.

  8. Influence of roll and solution treatment processing on shape memory effect of Fe-14Mn-5Si-9Cr-5Ni alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Li, C.L.; Jin, Z.H.

    1998-10-01

    The shape memory effect was studied in an Fe-14Mn-5Si-9Cr-5Ni alloy rerolled at 1123 K after hot rolling at 1423 K, followed by solution treatment at different temperatures. It was found that the alloy exhibits a maximum degree of shape recovery in a bending test and a complete recovery tensile strain of 2.2% in samples that were solution heated at 973 K for 600 s and then quenched in water. The rerolled processing at 1123 K after hot rolling at 1423 K and the microstructure under solution treatment state are important for obtaining a good shape memory effect in the alloy.

  9. Super-size me: Portion size effects on young children's eating

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Large portions of energy-dense foods are believed to favor obesity-promoting eating behaviors in young children. The following review presents evidence on food portion size effects on children's eating behavior and eating regulation, with comparison of findings to adult studies of portion size. Indi...

  10. Sample Size Calculations for Precise Interval Estimation of the Eta-Squared Effect Size

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shieh, Gwowen

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of variance is one of the most frequently used statistical analyses in the behavioral, educational, and social sciences, and special attention has been paid to the selection and use of an appropriate effect size measure of association in analysis of variance. This article presents the sample size procedures for precise interval estimation…