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Sample records for roma rinkeviiene saulius

  1. Roma as the Others

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doubek, David; Levínská, Marketa; Bittnerová, Dana

    2015-01-01

    While it is common to speak about "Roma culture" as a single entity, the questions posed by Roma culture are more complex. We are speaking about the general issues pertaining to various manifestations of this culture in the context of the Czech Republic. It must be stressed that under "Roma," we understand a family resemblance…

  2. School Adaptation of Roma Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerganov, Encho; Varbanova, Silvia; Kyuchukov, Hristo

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines the degree of school adaptation among Roma children who were included in a program for the desegregation of Roma schools in Bulgaria. More specifically, the program requires Roma children to attend mixed classes with Bulgarian students and Roma teacher assistants to work with them. The Bulgarian version of the Questionnaire on…

  3. [Roma populations and health].

    PubMed

    Jackson, Y; Tabin, J P; Hourton, G; Bodenmann, P

    2015-03-25

    The health status of the so-called "Roma" is usually much poorer than that of neighbouring non-Roma populations with a life expectancy gap of 5-15 years. This results from prolonged exposure to adverse determinants of health and to persistent exclusion from social and political arenas. Scientific and social research has only poorly addressed the health issues of Roma and evidences are scarce. Insufficient access to public services, including to health care and non optimal clinical practices are modifiable factors. If correctly addressed, this could contribute to reduce health disparities, including in Switzerland. PMID:26027205

  4. Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma is a non-profit institute dedicated to astrophysical research. It was founded in the early nineteenth century, and moved to its present residence, the ancient Villa Mellini, not far from St Peter's Cathedral, in 1935....

  5. Reclaiming Roma Students in Hungary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gruber, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    For most, being served in a restaurant, treated nicely at a job interview, smiled at in the street, or being able to work is nothing out of the ordinary. Sadly, it is not the case for many. Especially for those who are poor. Especially for those who have little education. Especially for those who are Roma (or in other words Gypsy) living in…

  6. Roma Pupils' Attitudes Towards Education--A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pecek, Mojca; Munda, Milanka

    2015-01-01

    When analysing the reasons behind the academic underachievement of Roma pupils, some teachers suggest that Roma people do not value education and that Roma children have negative attitudes towards school. With increasing frequency, Roma pupils from low socio-economic backgrounds are being researched and the research primarily adopts the…

  7. Beyond Inclusion: Reconsidering Policies, Curriculum, and Pedagogy for Roma Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miskovic, Maja; Curcic, Svjetlana

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the policies and politics of including European Roma students in mainstream educational systems within the context of two European Union (EU) policies: the Decade of Roma Inclusion (2005-2015) and EU National Roma Integration Strategies (2013-2020). Drawing on the scholarship about inclusion and its practical achievements,…

  8. Stigma and Roma Education Policy Reform in Slovakia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New, William

    2012-01-01

    This article addresses reform of Roma education in Slovakia against the backdrop of continued stigmatization of Roma students. Transnational NGOs and IGOs promote rights-based solutions leading to the fullest possible inclusion of Roma students in mainstream education. The Slovak state promotes educational policies that lead to the fullest…

  9. Campland: Racial Segregation of Roma in Italy. Country Reports Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cahn, Claude; Carlisle, Kathryn D.; Fregoli, Claudia; Kiuranov, Deyan; Petrova, Dimitrina

    This report addresses racial segregation and human rights abuses against Roma in Italy, focusing on: "Anti-Gypsyism in Italy"; "Roma in Italy: Racial Segregation"; "Abuses by Police and Judicial Authorities" (e.g., abusive raids and evictions, abusive use of firearms, torture and physical abuse, discriminatory targeting of Roma by police, theft by…

  10. Health and Roma People in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Ekmekçi, Perihan Elif

    2016-01-01

    Background: The research and published literature on Roma health in Turkey is much more limited than in other European countries. Among these, there are hardly any published literature focusing on the health status, health indicators and health behaviors. Aims: The aim of this research is to describe the perceptions of health-related concepts and access and the use of health services and social determinants of the health of Roma people in Turkey. Study Design: Descriptive qualitative survey. Methods: The participants were chosen by random sampling. The semi-structured interview topic guide was developed from sources such as advice from the Romani community leaders, published evidence and personal experience from previous work with Roma communities. Non-directive open-ended questions allowed the exploration of their health status, how they conceptualize health and disease, their level of awareness on the impact of social determinants of health, on their health status and the access and use of health services. The data analysis was based on grounded theory. Analysis proceeded in four steps: 1. Reading and examining the transcripts separately using open coding, 2. Extracting the key words and codes from the transcripts and sorting them into categories, 3. Re-reading the transcripts by using selective coding, and 4. Examining the categories derived from the open coding systematically and determining the concepts summarizing the material. Results: The survey results are compatible with the existing literature on Roma health and reveal that 1) there is a tight link between the lack of social determinants of health and the poor health status of Roma people 2) socioeconomic factors and cultural norms of the ethnic minority are suspicious factors 3) comparative and systematic research is needed to illuminate the actual health gaps and causal factors for them. Conclusion: The research proves that the need for comparative and systematic research in Turkey to determine the

  11. Health of Roma children in Vilnius and Ventspils.

    PubMed

    Kanapeckiene, Virginija; Valinteliene, Rolanda; Berzanskyte, Ausra; Kevalas, Rimantas; Supranowicz, Piotr

    2009-01-01

    According to the literature data, Roma health and living conditions in Central and Eastern Europe are poorer than of the rest of population. However, the more detailed information about Roma health is lacking. The aim of the study was to evaluate morbidity, health self-assessment, and prevalence of addictions among Roma children in Vilnius and Ventspils and to compare with health indicators of non-Roma children. PARTICIPANTS AND METHODS. A descriptive epidemiological study was carried out, anonymously questioning all volunteer Roma children - 59 in Vilnius (Lithuania) and 31 in Ventspils (Latvia) schools. Results were compared with identical study, carried out in five Vilnius schools (reference group, 640). RESULTS. The appliance rate of Roma children to doctor did not differ from reference group - half of all questioned children visited doctor 1-3 times during the last year. However, more Roma children (74.6% from Vilnius and 64.6% from Ventspils) considered their health as poor and very poor as compared to reference group (4.3%). The proportion of children indicating somatic symptoms often and very often did not differ statistically significantly among groups with exception of vomiting and nausea, which was most prevalent among Vilnius Roma and Ventspils Roma. The proportion of children indicating emotional symptoms often and very often differed significantly in all groups and was the biggest in Ventspils Roma group. The proportion of daily alcohol, drug users, and smokers was higher in Vilnius Roma and Ventspils Roma groups, although the differences among all three groups were not statistically significant. CONCLUSION. Although the morbidity of Vilnius Roma and Ventspils Roma groups did not differ from reference group, essential discrepancy was found in health self-assessment - more Roma children considered their health as poor and very poor. PMID:19289906

  12. The presence of health-risk behaviour in Roma family.

    PubMed

    Niksić, Dragana; Kurspahić-Mujcić, Amira

    2007-05-01

    Roma people in B&H are a marginalised population group. Their health condition; is considerably worse than the condition of other population groups. The health problems of Roma people correlate with inadequate living and dwelling conditions. Roma children are facing the impossibility of being health care beneficiaries, because their parents are unemployed. The objective of this survey was to examine the family surrounding of children in age up to 8 years, including the social conditions under which they live and the presence of health risk behaviour. The research presents a descriptive cross-section study. We interviewed 1100 non-Roma parents and children and 383 Roma parents and children (in the communities of domicile Roma people) in B&H Federation. The results obtained indicate that only 17,8 % of Roma parents are secondary-school leavers, while remaining percentage covers those with incomplete primary school or without education at all, against 63,6% of non-Roma parents who have secondary education. The parents consider themselves good providers for their children (59,3% of Roma parents and 75% of non-Roma parents often play with their children). The Roma parents seek for medical attention for their children only in the cases when urgent health problems occur, such as fever/increased body temperature (one-half of the interviewed parents) or diarrhoea (31,9%). Physical punishment of children occurs more frequently in Roma families (23,7% - this is only the top of an iceberg) then in non-Roma families (11,4%). The parents usually beat children by using their hands or punish them by flogging. The domestic violence is accepted amongst Roma people and it has most sever impact on children, who suffer emotionally and physically. In the future, it will be necessary to create the kind of family environment that would enable improvement of health condition and decrease the behaviour that endangers the health of children. PMID:17489751

  13. Origins, admixture and founder lineages in European Roma.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Cruz, Begoña; Mendizabal, Isabel; Harmant, Christine; de Pablo, Rosario; Ioana, Mihai; Angelicheva, Dora; Kouvatsi, Anastasia; Makukh, Halyna; Netea, Mihai G; Pamjav, Horolma; Zalán, Andrea; Tournev, Ivailo; Marushiakova, Elena; Popov, Vesselin; Bertranpetit, Jaume; Kalaydjieva, Luba; Quintana-Murci, Lluis; Comas, David

    2016-06-01

    The Roma, also known as 'Gypsies', represent the largest and the most widespread ethnic minority of Europe. There is increasing evidence, based on linguistic, anthropological and genetic data, to suggest that they originated from the Indian subcontinent, with subsequent bottlenecks and undetermined gene flow from/to hosting populations during their diaspora. Further support comes from the presence of Indian uniparentally inherited lineages, such as mitochondrial DNA M and Y-chromosome H haplogroups, in a significant number of Roma individuals. However, the limited resolution of most genetic studies so far, together with the restriction of the samples used, have prevented the detection of other non-Indian founder lineages that might have been present in the proto-Roma population. We performed a high-resolution study of the uniparental genomes of 753 Roma and 984 non-Roma hosting European individuals. Roma groups show lower genetic diversity and high heterogeneity compared with non-Roma samples as a result of lower effective population size and extensive drift, consistent with a series of bottlenecks during their diaspora. We found a set of founder lineages, present in the Roma and virtually absent in the non-Roma, for the maternal (H7, J1b3, J1c1, M18, M35b, M5a1, U3, and X2d) and paternal (I-P259, J-M92, and J-M67) genomes. This lineage classification allows us to identify extensive gene flow from non-Roma to Roma groups, whereas the opposite pattern, although not negligible, is substantially lower (up to 6.3%). Finally, the exact haplotype matching analysis of both uniparental lineages consistently points to a Northwestern origin of the proto-Roma population within the Indian subcontinent. PMID:26374132

  14. Roma Education on the Agenda of the European Union

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaroka, Livia

    2007-01-01

    The Roma community of Europe continues to face discrimination in a number of areas, notably education, employment, healthcare, and housing. In an increasingly knowledge-based economy, education provides one of the primary tools for escaping the cycle of poverty that traps many Roma families, and therefore it is one of the most pressing issues that…

  15. Situated Learning in Young Romanian Roma Successful Learning Biographies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nistor, Nicolae; Stanciu, Dorin; Vanea, Cornelia; Sasu, Virginia Maria; Dragota, Maria

    2014-01-01

    European Roma are often associated with social problems and conflicts due to poverty and low formal education. Nevertheless, Roma communities traditionally develop expertise in ethnically specific domains, probably by alternative, informal ways, such as situated learning in communities of practice. Although predictable, empirical evidence of…

  16. Institutional Racism? Roma Children, Local Community and School Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zachos, Dimitris

    2012-01-01

    This article tries to discuss the conditions Roma pupils face within the Greek educational system. In the first part, through a brief history of Roma groups in Greece followed by a short analysis of their legal status and leaving conditions, I attempt to present a critical approach in Romani Studies. Thereafter, using Institutional Racism as a…

  17. Reconstructing Roma History from Genome-Wide Data

    PubMed Central

    Moorjani, Priya; Patterson, Nick; Loh, Po-Ru; Lipson, Mark; Kisfali, Péter; Melegh, Bela I.; Bonin, Michael; Kádaši, Ľudevít; Rieß, Olaf; Berger, Bonnie; Reich, David; Melegh, Béla

    2013-01-01

    The Roma people, living throughout Europe and West Asia, are a diverse population linked by the Romani language and culture. Previous linguistic and genetic studies have suggested that the Roma migrated into Europe from South Asia about 1,000–1,500 years ago. Genetic inferences about Roma history have mostly focused on the Y chromosome and mitochondrial DNA. To explore what additional information can be learned from genome-wide data, we analyzed data from six Roma groups that we genotyped at hundreds of thousands of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We estimate that the Roma harbor about 80% West Eurasian ancestry–derived from a combination of European and South Asian sources–and that the date of admixture of South Asian and European ancestry was about 850 years before present. We provide evidence for Eastern Europe being a major source of European ancestry, and North-west India being a major source of the South Asian ancestry in the Roma. By computing allele sharing as a measure of linkage disequilibrium, we estimate that the migration of Roma out of the Indian subcontinent was accompanied by a severe founder event, which appears to have been followed by a major demographic expansion after the arrival in Europe. PMID:23516520

  18. Reconstructing Roma history from genome-wide data.

    PubMed

    Moorjani, Priya; Patterson, Nick; Loh, Po-Ru; Lipson, Mark; Kisfali, Péter; Melegh, Bela I; Bonin, Michael; Kádaši, Ludevít; Rieß, Olaf; Berger, Bonnie; Reich, David; Melegh, Béla

    2013-01-01

    The Roma people, living throughout Europe and West Asia, are a diverse population linked by the Romani language and culture. Previous linguistic and genetic studies have suggested that the Roma migrated into Europe from South Asia about 1,000-1,500 years ago. Genetic inferences about Roma history have mostly focused on the Y chromosome and mitochondrial DNA. To explore what additional information can be learned from genome-wide data, we analyzed data from six Roma groups that we genotyped at hundreds of thousands of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We estimate that the Roma harbor about 80% West Eurasian ancestry-derived from a combination of European and South Asian sources-and that the date of admixture of South Asian and European ancestry was about 850 years before present. We provide evidence for Eastern Europe being a major source of European ancestry, and North-west India being a major source of the South Asian ancestry in the Roma. By computing allele sharing as a measure of linkage disequilibrium, we estimate that the migration of Roma out of the Indian subcontinent was accompanied by a severe founder event, which appears to have been followed by a major demographic expansion after the arrival in Europe. PMID:23516520

  19. Origins and divergence of the Roma (gypsies).

    PubMed

    Gresham, D; Morar, B; Underhill, P A; Passarino, G; Lin, A A; Wise, C; Angelicheva, D; Calafell, F; Oefner, P J; Shen, P; Tournev, I; de Pablo, R; Kuĉinskas, V; Perez-Lezaun, A; Marushiakova, E; Popov, V; Kalaydjieva, L

    2001-12-01

    The identification of a growing number of novel Mendelian disorders and private mutations in the Roma (Gypsies) points to their unique genetic heritage. Linguistic evidence suggests that they are of diverse Indian origins. Their social structure within Europe resembles that of the jatis of India, where the endogamous group, often defined by profession, is the primary unit. Genetic studies have reported dramatic differences in the frequencies of mutations and neutral polymorphisms in different Romani populations. However, these studies have not resolved ambiguities regarding the origins and relatedness of Romani populations. In this study, we examine the genetic structure of 14 well-defined Romani populations. Y-chromosome and mtDNA markers of different mutability were analyzed in a total of 275 individuals. Asian Y-chromosome haplogroup VI-68, defined by a mutation at the M82 locus, was present in all 14 populations and accounted for 44.8% of Romani Y chromosomes. Asian mtDNA-haplogroup M was also identified in all Romani populations and accounted for 26.5% of female lineages in the sample. Limited diversity within these two haplogroups, measured by the variation at eight short-tandem-repeat loci for the Y chromosome, and sequencing of the HVS1 for the mtDNA are consistent with a small group of founders splitting from a single ethnic population in the Indian subcontinent. Principal-components analysis and analysis of molecular variance indicate that genetic structure in extant endogamous Romani populations has been shaped by genetic drift and differential admixture and correlates with the migrational history of the Roma in Europe. By contrast, social organization and professional group divisions appear to be the product of a more recent restitution of the caste system of India. PMID:11704928

  20. Origins and Divergence of the Roma (Gypsies)

    PubMed Central

    Gresham, David; Morar, Bharti; Underhill, Peter A.; Passarino, Giuseppe; Lin, Alice A.; Wise, Cheryl; Angelicheva, Dora; Calafell, Francesc; Oefner, Peter J.; Shen, Peidong; Tournev, Ivailo; de Pablo, Rosario; Kuĉinskas, Vaidutis; Perez-Lezaun, Anna; Marushiakova, Elena; Popov, Vesselin; Kalaydjieva, Luba

    2001-01-01

    The identification of a growing number of novel Mendelian disorders and private mutations in the Roma (Gypsies) points to their unique genetic heritage. Linguistic evidence suggests that they are of diverse Indian origins. Their social structure within Europe resembles that of the jatis of India, where the endogamous group, often defined by profession, is the primary unit. Genetic studies have reported dramatic differences in the frequencies of mutations and neutral polymorphisms in different Romani populations. However, these studies have not resolved ambiguities regarding the origins and relatedness of Romani populations. In this study, we examine the genetic structure of 14 well-defined Romani populations. Y-chromosome and mtDNA markers of different mutability were analyzed in a total of 275 individuals. Asian Y-chromosome haplogroup VI-68, defined by a mutation at the M82 locus, was present in all 14 populations and accounted for 44.8% of Romani Y chromosomes. Asian mtDNA-haplogroup M was also identified in all Romani populations and accounted for 26.5% of female lineages in the sample. Limited diversity within these two haplogroups, measured by the variation at eight short-tandem-repeat loci for the Y chromosome, and sequencing of the HVS1 for the mtDNA are consistent with a small group of founders splitting from a single ethnic population in the Indian subcontinent. Principal-components analysis and analysis of molecular variance indicate that genetic structure in extant endogamous Romani populations has been shaped by genetic drift and differential admixture and correlates with the migrational history of the Roma in Europe. By contrast, social organization and professional group divisions appear to be the product of a more recent restitution of the caste system of India. PMID:11704928

  1. Affirmative Action in Romania's Higher Education: Roma Students' Perceived Meanings and Dilemmas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pantea, Maria-Carmen

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative paper explores Roma students' perceptions on the policy of assigning "special places" for Roma in Romania's universities. Findings suggest that Roma see themselves as occupying a precarious social space, concerned not as much to hide perceived merit violation but to handle (alleged) inadequacies given by their…

  2. Mutation History of the Roma/Gypsies

    PubMed Central

    Morar, Bharti; Gresham, David; Angelicheva, Dora; Tournev, Ivailo; Gooding, Rebecca; Guergueltcheva, Velina; Schmidt, Carolin; Abicht, Angela; Lochmüller, Hanns; Tordai, Attila; Kalmár, Lajos; Nagy, Melinda; Karcagi, Veronika; Jeanpierre, Marc; Herczegfalvi, Agnes; Beeson, David; Venkataraman, Viswanathan; Warwick Carter, Kim; Reeve, Jeff; de Pablo, Rosario; Kučinskas, Vaidutis; Kalaydjieva, Luba

    2004-01-01

    The 8–10 million European Roma/Gypsies are a founder population of common origins that has subsequently split into multiple socially divergent and geographically dispersed Gypsy groups. Unlike other founder populations, whose genealogy has been extensively documented, the demographic history of the Gypsies is not fully understood and, given the lack of written records, has to be inferred from current genetic data. In this study, we have used five disease loci harboring private Gypsy mutations to examine some missing historical parameters and current structure. We analyzed the frequency distribution of the five mutations in 832–1,363 unrelated controls, representing 14 Gypsy populations, and the diversification of chromosomal haplotypes in 501 members of affected families. Sharing of mutations and high carrier rates supported a strong founder effect, and the identity of the congenital myasthenia 1267delG mutation in Gypsy and Indian/Pakistani chromosomes provided the best evidence yet of the Indian origins of the Gypsies. However, dramatic differences in mutation frequencies and haplotype divergence and very limited haplotype sharing pointed to strong internal differentiation and characterized the Gypsies as a founder population comprising multiple subisolates. Using disease haplotype coalescence times at the different loci, we estimated that the entire Gypsy population was founded ∼32–40 generations ago, with secondary and tertiary founder events occurring ∼16–25 generations ago. The existence of multiple subisolates, with endogamy maintained to the present day, suggests a general approach to complex disorders in which initial gene mapping could be performed in large families from a single Gypsy group, whereas fine mapping would rely on the informed sampling of the divergent subisolates and searching for the shared genomic region that displays the strongest linkage disequilibrium with the disease. PMID:15322984

  3. Mutation history of the roma/gypsies.

    PubMed

    Morar, Bharti; Gresham, David; Angelicheva, Dora; Tournev, Ivailo; Gooding, Rebecca; Guergueltcheva, Velina; Schmidt, Carolin; Abicht, Angela; Lochmuller, Hanns; Tordai, Attila; Kalmar, Lajos; Nagy, Melinda; Karcagi, Veronika; Jeanpierre, Marc; Herczegfalvi, Agnes; Beeson, David; Venkataraman, Viswanathan; Warwick Carter, Kim; Reeve, Jeff; de Pablo, Rosario; Kucinskas, Vaidutis; Kalaydjieva, Luba

    2004-10-01

    The 8-10 million European Roma/Gypsies are a founder population of common origins that has subsequently split into multiple socially divergent and geographically dispersed Gypsy groups. Unlike other founder populations, whose genealogy has been extensively documented, the demographic history of the Gypsies is not fully understood and, given the lack of written records, has to be inferred from current genetic data. In this study, we have used five disease loci harboring private Gypsy mutations to examine some missing historical parameters and current structure. We analyzed the frequency distribution of the five mutations in 832-1,363 unrelated controls, representing 14 Gypsy populations, and the diversification of chromosomal haplotypes in 501 members of affected families. Sharing of mutations and high carrier rates supported a strong founder effect, and the identity of the congenital myasthenia 1267delG mutation in Gypsy and Indian/Pakistani chromosomes provided the best evidence yet of the Indian origins of the Gypsies. However, dramatic differences in mutation frequencies and haplotype divergence and very limited haplotype sharing pointed to strong internal differentiation and characterized the Gypsies as a founder population comprising multiple subisolates. Using disease haplotype coalescence times at the different loci, we estimated that the entire Gypsy population was founded approximately 32-40 generations ago, with secondary and tertiary founder events occurring approximately 16-25 generations ago. The existence of multiple subisolates, with endogamy maintained to the present day, suggests a general approach to complex disorders in which initial gene mapping could be performed in large families from a single Gypsy group, whereas fine mapping would rely on the informed sampling of the divergent subisolates and searching for the shared genomic region that displays the strongest linkage disequilibrium with the disease. PMID:15322984

  4. The role of the Vlax Roma in shaping the European Romani maternal genetic history.

    PubMed

    Salihović, Marijana Peričić; Barešić, Ana; Klarić, Irena Martinović; Cukrov, Slavena; Lauc, Lovorka Barać; Janićijević, Branka

    2011-10-01

    The Roma are comprised of many founder groups of common Indian origins but different socio-cultural characteristics. The Vlax Roma are one of the founder Roma populations characterized by a period of bondage in the historic Romanian principalities, and by the archaic Romanian language. Demographic history suggests different migration routes of Roma populations, especially after their arrival in Mesopotamia and the eastern boundary of the Byzantine Empire. Although various genetic studies of uniparental genetic markers showed a connection between Roma genetic legacy and their migration routes, precise sampling of Roma populations elucidates this relationship in more detail. In this study, we analyzed mitochondrial DNA of 384 Croatian Vlax Roma from two geographic locations in the context of 734 European Roma samples. Our results show that Roma migration routes are marked with two Near-Eastern haplogroups, X2 and U3, whose inverse proportional incidence clearly separates the Balkan and the Vlax Roma from other Roma populations that reached Europe as part of the first migration wave. Spatial and temporal characteristics of these haplogroups indicate a possibility of their admixture with Roma populations before arrival in Europe. Distribution of haplogroup M35 indicates that all Vlax Roma populations descend from one single founder population that might even reach back to the original ancestral Indian population. Founder effects followed by strict endogamy rules can be traced from India to contemporary small, local communities, as in the case of two Croatian Vlax Roma populations that show clear population differentiation despite similar origins and shared demographic history. PMID:21915846

  5. Roma Mediators in Europe: A New Council of Europe Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyuchukov, Hristo

    2012-01-01

    In several European countries the number of the Roma represents approximately 10% of the total population. Due to the global economic crisis, the rise of the far right in places like Hungary, and failed policies of the past, their present social and economic situation continues to become more vulnerable. Mediation is one of the measures used…

  6. Reconstructing the Indian Origin and Dispersal of the European Roma: A Maternal Genetic Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Mendizabal, Isabel; Valente, Cristina; Gusmão, Alfredo; Alves, Cíntia; Gomes, Verónica; Goios, Ana; Parson, Walther; Calafell, Francesc; Alvarez, Luis; Amorim, António; Gusmão, Leonor

    2011-01-01

    Previous genetic, anthropological and linguistic studies have shown that Roma (Gypsies) constitute a founder population dispersed throughout Europe whose origins might be traced to the Indian subcontinent. Linguistic and anthropological evidence point to Indo-Aryan ethnic groups from North-western India as the ancestral parental population of Roma. Recently, a strong genetic hint supporting this theory came from a study of a private mutation causing primary congenital glaucoma. In the present study, complete mitochondrial control sequences of Iberian Roma and previously published maternal lineages of other European Roma were analyzed in order to establish the genetic affinities among Roma groups, determine the degree of admixture with neighbouring populations, infer the migration routes followed since the first arrival to Europe, and survey the origin of Roma within the Indian subcontinent. Our results show that the maternal lineage composition in the Roma groups follows a pattern of different migration routes, with several founder effects, and low effective population sizes along their dispersal. Our data allowed the confirmation of a North/West migration route shared by Polish, Lithuanian and Iberian Roma. Additionally, eleven Roma founder lineages were identified and degrees of admixture with host populations were estimated. Finally, the comparison with an extensive database of Indian sequences allowed us to identify the Punjab state, in North-western India, as the putative ancestral homeland of the European Roma, in agreement with previous linguistic and anthropological studies. PMID:21264345

  7. Delinquent and Aggressive Behavior and Social Desirability Among Roma and Non-Roma Adolescents in Slovakia: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Kolarcik, Peter; Madarasova Geckova, Andrea; Reijneveld, Sijmen A; van Dijk, Jitse P

    2016-02-01

    Rates of aggression and delinquency are assumed to be higher among Roma and other minorities, but sound evidence of this is lacking. Our aim was to assess delinquent and aggressive behavior among Roma and non-Roma adolescents and the effects on ethnic differences of parental education and social desirability. We conducted a cross-sectional study among Roma from separated and segregated settlements in the eastern part of Slovakia (N = 330; Mage = 14.50; interview) and non-Roma adolescents (N = 722; Mage = 14.86; questionnaire). The effect of ethnicity on antisocial behaviors was analyzed using linear regression (crude) and adjusted for gender, parental education, and social desirability. Adjustment for social desirability diminished the ethnic differences in delinquency (B = 1.08; 95% confidence interval [CI] = [2.12, -0.04]), led to an increase in the differences in hostility (B = 2.43; 95% CI = [0.87, 3.99]), and led to the disappearance of differences in physical aggression (B = 0.45; 95% CI = [1.14, 2.07]). Parental education did not affect the associations in an important way. Our findings indicate that Roma are not that much different from non-Roma, in terms of antisocial behavior, which contradicts the general perception of Roma. Our findings should be confirmed in other settings. PMID:25381268

  8. Health Behaviors, Nutritional Status, and Anthropometric Parameters of Roma and Non-Roma Mothers and Their Infants in the Czech Republic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rambouskova, Jolana; Dlouhy, Pavel; Krizova, Eva; Prochazka, Bohumir; Hrncirova, Dana; Andel, M

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To compare maternal health behaviors, maternal nutritional status, and infant size at birth of Romas and non-Romas in the Czech Republic. Design: Maternal interviews and food frequency questionnaire, maternal blood samples, physical measurements of mothers and infants. Setting: Hospital, maternal/child care center; 2-4 days postpartum.…

  9. The Survival of Roma Minority Patients on Chronic Hemodialysis Therapy - A Romanian Multicenter Survey

    PubMed Central

    Stoian, Dana; Schiller, Oana; Timar, Romulus; Timar, Bogdan; Bob, Flaviu; Donciu, Mihaela Dora; Munteanu, Mircea; Mihaescu, Adelina; Covic, Adrian; Schiller, Adalbert

    2016-01-01

    Objective The Roma minority represents the largest ethnic group in Central and South-East European countries. Data regarding the mortality in Roma hemodialysis subjects are limited. We evaluated the 3 year mortality of ESRD Roma patients treated with hemodialysis (HD). Study Design and Setting Our prospective cohort study included 600 ESRD patients on HD therapy recruited from 7 HD centers, from the main geographical regions of Romania. The median age of the patients was 56 (19) years, 332 (55.3%) being males, 51 (8.5%) having Roma ethnicity. Results Roma ESRD patients initiate dialysis at a younger age, 47.8 years vs. 52.3 years (P = 0.017), present higher serum albumin (P = 0.013) and higher serum phosphate levels (P = 0.021). In the Roma group, the overall 3 year mortality was higher when compared to Caucasians (33.3% vs. 24.8%). The multivariate survival analysis revealed that being of Roma ethnicity is an independent risk factor for mortality (HR = 1.74; 95% CI = 1.04–2.91; P = 0.035). Conclusions Roma patients with ESRD initiate HD therapy at a younger age as compared to Caucasians. They have a higher 3 year mortality rate and are dying at a younger age. Roma ethnicity represents an independent risk factor for mortality in our cohort. PMID:27196564

  10. Inclusion, Integration or Perpetual Exclusion? A Critical Examination of the Decade of Roma Inclusion, 2005-2015

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curcic, Svjetlana; Miskovic, Maja; Plaut, Shayna; Ceobanu, Ciprian

    2014-01-01

    A total of 12 European countries with significant Roma populations are taking part in the Decade of Roma Inclusion, 2005-2015 (the Decade). Each of these countries developed a Decade Action Plan with the aim of eliminating the marginalization and discrimination of Roma in the areas of housing, health care, employment and education. Nonetheless, as…

  11. Roma Pupils' Identification with School in Slovenia and Serbia: Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macura-Milovanovic, Suncica; Munda, Milanka; Pecek, Mojca

    2013-01-01

    The research presented in this paper aims to challenge the belief held by some education professionals that Roma pupils do not value education. The research sample included groups of Roma pupils from two countries (Slovenia and Serbia) and from different socio-economic backgrounds. The results suggest that the majority of the pupils are aware of…

  12. A Study on the Mothers of Roma Children Who Are a Risk Group

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orçan, Maide; Çiçekler, Canan Yildiz; Ari, Ramazan

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to define Roma mothers' views regarding their children's education and their tendency towards crime. The study is based on an illustrative case study method. The participants of this study are mothers of Roma children between the ages of 4 and 6 who live in Konya, Turkey--more specifically in the Yenimahalle neighborhood in the…

  13. A Special Challenge for Europe: The Inclusion of Roma Children in Early Years Education and Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klaus, Sarah; Marsh, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    Provision of early childhood education and care (ECEC) for Roma children serves as a litmus test for the broader social inclusion agenda in Europe. The majority of Roma children and families live in substandard, often insecure and isolated housing and have limited access to quality health, social care and education services. There is a growing…

  14. International Policy and Roma Education in Europe: Essential Inputs or Centralized Distractions?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ram, Melanie H.

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the case of Roma inclusion in education as a study of the ways in which international policy can and cannot bring change at the local level. I first reflect on the numerous international organizations and initiatives to improve the educational outcomes of Roma, and to reduce segregation and other non-inclusionary practices.…

  15. How to Move from Power-Based to Dialogic Relations? Lessons from Roma Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melgar, Patricia; Larena, Rosa; Ruiz, Laura; Rammel, Stephanie

    2011-01-01

    In its growth strategy for the coming decade, the EU recognises the Roma as one of several groups especially affected by poverty and social vulnerability. So far, many efforts to reverse this social exclusion have failed; imposed solutions based on power relations have ignored Roma voices and suggestions from the community. As a result, the EU now…

  16. A Minority within a Minority? Social Justice for Traveller and Roma Children in ECEC

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Colette

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses recent policy developments in Europe regarding Roma and Traveller integration and Early Childhood Provision. After a long history of oppression, Roma issues have recently become prominent on the EU policy agenda. The article discusses how these relate to developments in other areas of policy: the European children's rights…

  17. Lessons for Life: Roma Children, Communal Practices, and the Global Marketplace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christianakis, Mary

    2010-01-01

    The Roma, also known as gypsies or "tsinganoi," are amongst the oldest ethnic minorities in Europe. Nonetheless, they have been one of the most universally marginalized groups across all of the European nations. Their marginalization is evident in how Roma children have been treated in schools. Until recently, most nations have only offered them a…

  18. Democratic Governance for Inclusion: A Case Study of a Greek Primary School Welcoming Roma Pupils

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noula, Ioanna; Cowan, Steven; Govaris, Christos

    2015-01-01

    The focus of this paper is how changes in school governance in one state primary school in a city in central Greece have resulted in a significant degree of inclusion for Roma children. This inclusivity runs counter to the disturbing occurrence of the social and ethnic segregation of a group of locally resident Roma children within schools. This…

  19. State of Impunity: Human Rights Abuse of Roma in Romania. Country Reports Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cahn, Claude; Petrova, Dimitrina

    This report documents civil violations and discriminatory actions against Roma in Romania, contending that, due to the Romanian government's inadequate efforts to bring perpetrators of anti-Romani crimes to justice and to eradicate discrimination against Roma, a climate of impunity surrounding anti-Romani actions has taken deep root. Chapter 1…

  20. Policies to improve the health and well-being of Roma people: the European experience.

    PubMed

    Fésüs, Gabriella; Östlin, Piroska; McKee, Martin; Ádány, Róza

    2012-04-01

    The Roma constitute the largest ethnic minority in the European Region. The many policy initiatives designed over the past two decades to tackle their adverse social conditions in Central and South Eastern Europe, where the Roma population is concentrated, have had limited success. This paper reviews what is being done to improve the health and social situation of Roma communities in the Region and identifies factors that may limit the effectiveness of these policy initiatives. Strong political commitment, measures to overcome prejudices against Roma, inter-sectoral policy coordination, adequate budgets, evidence-based policies, and Roma involvement can be identified as key preconditions for improved health outcomes and well-being. However, developing a sound evidence-based approach to Roma inclusion requires removing obstacles to the collection of reliable data and improving analytical and evaluation capacity. Health policies seeking to reduce health inequalities for Roma people need to be aligned with education, economic, labour market, housing, environmental and territorial development policies and form part of comprehensive policy frameworks allowing for effective integration. PMID:22217864

  1. Genetically determined neuromuscular disorders of some Roma families living in Hungary.

    PubMed

    Aranka, Laszlo; Peter, Mayer; Jeno, Kobor; Katalin, Racz; Gyula, Talosi; Emoke, Endreffy; Agnes, Herczegfalvi; Tibor, Hortobagyi; Laszlo, Tiszlavicz; Edit, Bereg; Marta, Katona; Janos, Szabo; Veronika, Karcagi

    2009-01-30

    The authors discuss the clinical and molecular genetic aspects of genetically determined neuromuscular disorders of some Roma families living in Hungary. Among the autosomal recessively inherited spinal muscular atrophic (SMA) group, 8 Caucasian children had the typical 7-8 exonal deletions of the SMA gene, but only 2 patients belonged to the Roma population. There was no difference in the molecular genetic findings among the Caucasian and the Roma SMA patients. All of them had 7-8 exonal deletions of the SMA gene. We wanted to call attention to the founder mutation of the Roma population in 7 patients suffering from congenital myasthenia (CMS) from 3 Roma families. The 1267G deletion for CMS was detected by molecular genetic method. Clinical onset was pubertal and relatively slow progression of specific and phenotypic features for this founder mutation of acetyl-cholin receptor epsylon gene. In 2 patients (sister and brother) the sarcoglycanopathy 2C type C283Q mutation was proven in one Roma family suffering from limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD). Two out of the three facioscapular-humeral dystrophy (FSHD) Roma families carried 21.8 kb and 18.5 kb alleles in FSHD A1 gene (D4S139). In one family together with prenatal diagnosis founder mutation in FSHD A1 gene was detected, according to the autosomal dominant (AD) inheritance. In (F2) prenatal diagnosis was carried out, 18.5 kb/18.5 kb homozygosity was proven in the fetus, so the pregnancy was interrupted. In the CMS, LGMD and FSHD Roma patients ancient typical Roma founder mutations were found. PMID:19248726

  2. Health impact assessment of Roma housing policies in Central and Eastern Europe: A comparative analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Molnar, Agnes; Adam, Balazs; Antova, Temenujka; Bosak, Lubos; Dimitrov, Plamen; Mileva, Hristina; Pekarcikova, Jarmila; Zurlyte, Ingrida; Gulis, Gabriel; Adany, Roza; Kosa, Karolina

    2012-02-15

    Marginalised Roma communities in European countries live in substandard housing conditions the improvement of which has been one of the major issues of the Decade of Roma Inclusion, the ongoing intergovernmental European Roma programme. The paper presents EU-funded health impact assessments of national Roma housing policies and programmes in 3 Central and Eastern European countries in light of the evaluation of a completed local project in a fourth CEE country so as to compare predicted effects to observed ones. Housing was predicted to have beneficial health effects by improving indoor and outdoor conditions, access to services, and socioeconomic conditions. Negative impacts were predicted only in terms of maintenance expenses and housing tenure. However, observed impacts of the completed local project did not fully support predictions especially in terms of social networks, satisfaction with housing and neighbourhood, and inhabitant safety. In order to improve the predictive value of HIA, more evidence should be produced by the careful evaluation of locally implemented housing projects. In addition, current evidence is in favour of planning Roma housing projects at the local rather than at the national level in alignment with the principle of subsidiarity. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Predictive validity of HIA of national Roma housing policies - in light of current evidence - is low. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Implemented housing projects should be comprehensively evaluated to improve reliability of HIA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Roma housing projects should be planned at the local rather than at the national level. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HIA should be used to plan Roma housing projects at the local level.

  3. ROMA: Representation and Quantification of Module Activity from Target Expression Data

    PubMed Central

    Martignetti, Loredana; Calzone, Laurence; Bonnet, Eric; Barillot, Emmanuel; Zinovyev, Andrei

    2016-01-01

    In many analyses of high-throughput data in systems biology, there is a need to quantify the activity of a set of genes in individual samples. A typical example is the case where it is necessary to estimate the activity of a transcription factor (which is often not directly measurable) from the expression of its target genes. We present here ROMA (Representation and quantification Of Module Activities) Java software, designed for fast and robust computation of the activity of gene sets (or modules) with coordinated expression. ROMA activity quantification is based on the simplest uni-factor linear model of gene regulation that approximates the expression data of a gene set by its first principal component. The proposed algorithm implements novel functionalities: it provides several method modifications for principal components computation, including weighted, robust and centered methods; it distinguishes overdispersed modules (based on the variance explained by the first principal component) and coordinated modules (based on the significance of the spectral gap); finally, it computes statistical significance of the estimated module overdispersion or coordination. ROMA can be applied in many contexts, from estimating differential activities of transcriptional factors to finding overdispersed pathways in single-cell transcriptomics data. We describe here the principles of ROMA providing several practical examples of its use. ROMA source code is available at https://github.com/sysbio-curie/Roma. PMID:26925094

  4. Healthier Lives for European Minority Groups: School and Health Care, Lessons from the Roma

    PubMed Central

    Flecha, Ainhoa

    2013-01-01

    On average, the Roma in Europe can expect to die 10 years earlier than the rest of the population, given the health conditions they experience. EU-funded research has informed on successful actions (SA) that when implemented among the Roma provide them new forms of educational participation which have a direct impact on improving their health status, regardless of their educational level. The findings from this research, unanimously endorsed by the European Parliament, have been included in several European Union recommendations and resolutions as part of the EU strategy on Roma inclusion. To analyze these SA, as well as the conditions that promote them and their impact on reducing health inequalities, communicative fieldwork has been conducted with Roma people from a deprived neighbourhood in the South of Spain, who are participating in the previously identified SA. The analysis reveals that these SA enable Roma people to reinforce and enrich specific strategies like improving family cohesion and strengthening their identity, which allow them to improve their overall health. These findings may inform public policies to improve the health condition of the Roma and other vulnerable groups, one goal of the Europe 2020 strategy for a healthier Europe. PMID:23887619

  5. Intergenerational transmission of ethnic identity and life satisfaction of Roma minority adolescents and their parents.

    PubMed

    Dimitrova, Radosveta; Ferrer-Wreder, Laura; Trost, Kari

    2015-12-01

    This study investigates intergeneration transmission of ethnic identity as a resource for life satisfaction of Roma adolescents and their parents. Historically, Roma represent the largest ethnic minority in Europe. They have been exposed to severe discrimination, social exclusion, and poverty. Therefore, identifying resources for their life satisfaction is theoretically and practically important. The present study included 1093 participants, of which there were 171 Roma adolescents (age: M = 14.96 years, SD = 1.85), 155 mothers (age: M = 36.16 years, SD = 5.77) and 123 fathers (age: M = 39.68 years, SD = 6.06). Further, a comparison group of 248 mainstream adolescents with their mothers (n = 221) and fathers (n = 175) was also included in the study. Adolescents and their parents provided data on ethnic identity (MEIM; Phinney, 1992) and life satisfaction (SWLS; Diener, Emmons, Larsen, & Griffin, 1985). Results indicated that Roma youth were lower on endorsement of ethnic identity and average on life satisfaction compared to their mainstream peers. A structural equation model showed that ethnic identity was a positive predictor of life satisfaction for both adolescents and their Roma parents. Furthermore, parents' ethnic identity was a predictor of adolescent life satisfaction. We concluded that for Roma youth and their parents, ethnic identity represents a salient source for life satisfaction and an intergenerational continuity of identity and life satisfaction exists. PMID:26547146

  6. Genetic structure and admixture between Bayash Roma from northwestern Croatia and general Croatian population: evidence from Bayesian clustering analysis.

    PubMed

    Novokmet, Natalija; Galov, Ana; Marjanović, Damir; Škaro, Vedrana; Projić, Petar; Lauc, Gordan; Primorac, Dragan; Rudan, Pavao

    2015-01-01

    The European Roma represent a transnational mosaic of minority population groups with different migration histories and contrasting experiences in their interactions with majority populations across the European continent. Although historical genetic contributions of European lineages to the Roma pool were investigated before, the extent of contemporary genetic admixture between Bayash Roma and non-Romani majority population remains elusive. The aim of this study was to assess the genetic structure of the Bayash Roma population from northwestern Croatia and the general Croatian population and to investigate the extent of admixture between them. A set of genetic data from two original studies (100 Bayash Roma from northwestern Croatia and 195 individuals from the general Croatian population) was analyzed by Bayesian clustering implemented in STRUCTURE software. By re-analyzing published data we intended to focus for the first time on genetic differentiation and structure and in doing so we clearly pointed to the importance of considering social phenomena in understanding genetic structuring. Our results demonstrated that two population clusters best explain the genetic structure, which is consistent with social exclusion of Roma and the demographic history of Bayash Roma who have settled in NW Croatia only about 150 years ago and mostly applied rules of endogamy. The presence of admixture was revealed, while the percentage of non-Croatian individuals in general Croatian population was approximately twofold higher than the percentage of non-Romani individuals in Roma population corroborating the presence of ethnomimicry in Roma. PMID:26244830

  7. Renegotiating Relations among Teacher, Community, and Students: A Case Study of Teaching Roma Students in a Second Chance Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoilescu, Dorian; Carapanait, Greta

    2011-01-01

    Prejudice and systematic discrimination have often been mentioned as major causes for the chronic underachievement of Roma students. In this paper we present a case study of a Romanian teacher involved in Second Chance, an educational program implemented in Romania in 2004 for the benefit of disadvantaged groups such as the Roma population. Since…

  8. Shaping the Right to Education for Roma Children: A Case Study of Present Practices in Ghent, Belgium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemelsoet, Elias

    2015-01-01

    Western European cities are increasingly confronted with Roma immigrants. Societal changes associated with this phenomenon create new challenges for schools. Using a case study, this article sheds light on present practices that shape the right to education for Roma children. Three principal success factors are distinguished: boundary-blurring…

  9. Culture and the School: The Degree of Educational Integration of Roma and Gypsies in the Peloponnese Region of Greece

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiprianos, Pandelis; Daskalaki, Ivi; Stamelos, Georgios B.

    2012-01-01

    This article examines the degree of integration of Roma and Gypsy children in formal education in the Peloponnese region of Greece. It is based on field research conducted by the University of Patras during the school year 2006/07 within the framework of the Greek Ministry of Education's "Integration of Roma children in school" programme, funded…

  10. The Consequences of Cumulative Discrimination: How Special Schooling Influences Employment and Wages of Roma in the Czech Republic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Higgins, Niall; Bruggemann, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Unequal labour market outcomes between Roma and non-Roma have typically been explained by either the low level of educational attainment on the one hand or labour marked discrimination on the other--or both. A number of studies have found that significant labour market inequalities persist even after the low levels of educational attainment…

  11. The diagnostic value of serum HE4 and CA-125 and ROMA index in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    WEI, SU; LI, HUI; ZHANG, BEI

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is a common malignancy of the female reproductive system. Tumor markers serve as tools in the diagnosis of the disease. The aim of the present study was to determine the diagnostic value of sera levels of carbohydrate antigen-125 (CA-125), human epididymis protein 4 (HE4) as well as the area under the curve of the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) and the risk of ovarian malignancy algorithm (ROMA) index in ovarian cancer. The sera were measured using an electrochemiluminescence immunoassay on 158 individuals (64 patients with ovarian cancer, 64 with ovarian benign tumor and 30 healthy individuals) between September 2013 and May 2015. The results showed that levels of HE4 and CA-125 in the sera of the ovarian benign tumor group as well as their ROMA index were significantly higher (P<0.05) than those of the ovarian benign tumor and control groups, regardless of pre- or postmenopausal status. However, the level of CA-125 was significantly higher (P<0.05) in the ovarian benign tumor group compared with the healthy group, while the level of HE4 was similar in the two groups. The sensitivity of the ROMA index was higher (P<0.01) with detection of HE4 and CA-125. In the ovarian cancer group, the areas under ROC curves of ROMA, HE4 and CA-125 were 0.994, 0.990 and 0.941, respectively. The specificity and positive predictive value of HE4 in the premenopausal ovarian cancer group reached 98.36 and 95%, respectively. In conclusion, the results showed that the serum level of HE4 and the ROMA index are important indicators in the diagnosis of ovarian cancer. However, in addition to HE4 and CA-125 detection, the ROMA index is extremely valuable in improving the diagnostic efficiency of ovarian cancer. PMID:27347403

  12. MARVELD2 (DFNB49) Mutations in the Hearing Impaired Central European Roma Population - Prevalence, Clinical Impact and the Common Origin

    PubMed Central

    Mátyás, Petra; Ficek, Andrej; Hučková, Miloslava; Sůrová, Martina; Šafka-Brožková, Dana; Anwar, Saima; Bene, Judit; Straka, Slavomír; Janicsek, Ingrid; Ahmed, Zubair M.; Seeman, Pavel; Melegh, Béla; Profant, Milan; Klimeš, Iwar; Riazuddin, Saima; Kádasi, Ľudevít; Gašperíková, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Background In the present study we aimed: 1) To establish the prevalence and clinical impact of DFNB49 mutations in deaf Roma from 2 Central European countries (Slovakia and Hungary), and 2) to analyze a possible common origin of the c.1331+2T>C mutation among Roma and Pakistani mutation carriers identified in the present and previous studies. Methods We sequenced 6 exons of the MARVELD2 gene in a group of 143 unrelated hearing impaired Slovak Roma patients. Simultaneously, we used RFLP to detect the c.1331+2T>C mutation in 85 Hungarian deaf Roma patients, control groups of 702 normal hearing Romanies from both countries and 375 hearing impaired Slovak Caucasians. We analyzed the haplotype using 21 SNPs spanning a 5.34Mb around the mutation c.1331+2T>C. Results One pathogenic mutation (c.1331+2T>C) was identified in 12 homozygous hearing impaired Roma patients. Allele frequency of this mutation was higher in Hungarian (10%) than in Slovak (3.85%) Roma patients. The identified common haplotype in Roma patients was defined by 18 SNP markers (3.89 Mb). Fourteen common SNPs were also shared among Pakistani and Roma homozygotes. Biallelic mutation carriers suffered from prelingual bilateral moderate to profound sensorineural hearing loss. Conclusions We demonstrate different frequencies of the c.1331+2T>C mutation in hearing impaired Romanies from 3 Central European countries. In addition, our results provide support for the hypothesis of a possible common ancestor of the Slovak, Hungarian and Czech Roma as well as Pakistani deaf patients. Testing for the c.1331+2T>C mutation may be recommended in GJB2 negative Roma cases with early-onset sensorineural hearing loss. PMID:25885414

  13. Carrier rates of four single-gene disorders in Croatian Bayash Roma.

    PubMed

    Barešić, Ana; Peričić Salihović, Marijana

    2014-02-01

    To assess how specific population history, different migration routes, isolation, and endogamy practices contributed to the distribution of several rare diseases found in specific Roma groups, we conducted a population-based research study of rare disease mutations in Croatian Vlax Roma. We tested a total of 427 subjects from Baranja and Međimurje for the presence of four mutations causing hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy type Lom (HMSNL), GM1 gangliosidosis (GM1), congenital cataracts, facial dysmorphism and neuropathy (CCFDN), and limb girdle muscle dystrophy type 2C (LGMD2C), using the RFLP-PCR method to estimate carrier frequencies. We identified a total of four individuals heterozygous for the mutation causing HMSNL in the Baranja population, with a carrier rate amounting to 1.5%. Carriers for other three mutations causing GM1, CCFDN, and LGMD2C were not found in our sample. The carrier rate for the HMSNL mutation in Baranja is lower than in other Vlax Roma groups. In addition, distinct differences in carrier rates between the Croatian Vlax groups point to different genetic history, despite their belonging to the same Roma migration category and subgroup. The difference in carrier rates is either the result of admixture or the reflection of a greater extent of genetic drift since recent founding, maintained by a high degree of endogamy. PMID:24180318

  14. Continuity or Rupture? Roma/Gypsy Communities in Rural and Urban Environments under Post-Socialism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruzicka, Michal

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the article is to contribute to existing research and debates on social change associated with the post-socialist transformation in Eastern and Central Europe. It does so by drawing attention to and examining the diversity of ways in which such change has been lived through and reflected upon by members of Roma (Gypsy) communities…

  15. Attitudes of Serbian and Slovenian Student Teachers towards Causes of Learning Underachievement amongst Roma Pupils

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macura-Milovanovic, Suncica; Pecek, Mojca

    2013-01-01

    The task of initial teacher education is to prepare student teachers (ST) to accept responsibility for improving the education of all pupils, including Roma pupils. Thus, knowledge of ST's attitudes regarding such pupils at the onset of initial teacher education is a key for the creation of teacher education programmes that challenge implicit…

  16. Carrier Rates of Four Single-Gene Disorders in Croatian Bayash Roma

    PubMed Central

    Barešić, Ana

    2014-01-01

    To assess how specific population history, different migration routes, isolation, and endogamy practices contributed to the distribution of several rare diseases found in specific Roma groups, we conducted a population-based research study of rare disease mutations in Croatian Vlax Roma. We tested a total of 427 subjects from Baranja and Međimurje for the presence of four mutations causing hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy type Lom (HMSNL), GM1 gangliosidosis (GM1), congenital cataracts, facial dysmorphism and neuropathy (CCFDN), and limb girdle muscle dystrophy type 2C (LGMD2C), using the RFLP-PCR method to estimate carrier frequencies. We identified a total of four individuals heterozygous for the mutation causing HMSNL in the Baranja population, with a carrier rate amounting to 1.5%. Carriers for other three mutations causing GM1, CCFDN, and LGMD2C were not found in our sample. The carrier rate for the HMSNL mutation in Baranja is lower than in other Vlax Roma groups. In addition, distinct differences in carrier rates between the Croatian Vlax groups point to different genetic history, despite their belonging to the same Roma migration category and subgroup. The difference in carrier rates is either the result of admixture or the reflection of a greater extent of genetic drift since recent founding, maintained by a high degree of endogamy. PMID:24180318

  17. Roma Education in Europe: In Support of the Discourse of Race

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miskovic, Maja

    2009-01-01

    This paper reviews the research findings and policies regarding the conditions and educational needs of the Roma population in Europe. It examines assumptions, possibilities, and setbacks of translating and appropriating US-American academic discourse on race into the debate across the continent. The central task for researchers, policy makers,…

  18. Cold plasma reduces Salmonella on sliced roma tomatoes: efficacy of air versus nitrogen

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A rapid, waterless, contact-free method of decontamination for tomatoes and tomato slices is of interest to processors and the food service industry. Cold plasma is a novel antimicrobial treatment for fresh and fresh-cut fruits and vegetables. Slices of Roma tomatoes were spot inoculated with three ...

  19. Structural Dimensions of Roma School Desegregation Policies in Central and Eastern Europe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rostas, Iulius; Kostka, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    Scrutiny of the socio-economic exclusion of the Roma in Central and Eastern Europe has brought attention to the widespread practice of school segregation of Romani children who are automatically placed in classes for the mentally disabled or shunted into separate and inferior schools and classrooms. It is now widely recognised that such practices…

  20. The 5th edition of the Roma-BZCAT. A short presentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massaro, E.; Maselli, A.; Leto, C.; Marchegiani, P.; Perri, M.; Giommi, P.; Piranomonte, S.

    2015-05-01

    The 5th edition of the Roma-BZCAT Multifrequency Catalogue of Blazars is available in a printed version and online at the ASDC website (http://www.asdc.asi.it/bzcat); it is also in the NED database. It presents several relevant changes with respect to the past editions which are briefly described in this paper.

  1. Pedagogising Knowledge in Multigrade Roma Schools: Potentials and Tensions of Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karpati, Andrea; Molnar, Eva D.; Munkacsy, Katalin

    2014-01-01

    Low school achievement and frequent dropout of Hungarian Roma students from primary education is mostly an effect of inadequate curriculum content and teaching methodology. Between 2004 and 2011, the UNESCO affiliated Research Centre for Multimedia in Education at Eötvös Loránd University (ELTE University) in Budapest, Hungary coordinated a series…

  2. How to Make Sense of the Right to Education? Issues from the Case of Roma People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemelsoet, Elias

    2012-01-01

    In most cases, discussions on the right to education focus on the way access to education can be warranted for all and which aims should be pursued in rather abstract terms. This article approaches the topic starting from the case of Roma people. The particularity of their living circumstances raises the question what it is that we are aiming at…

  3. Recognising the Roma and Their Rights: An Analysis of Exclusion and Integration in the Education System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horvai, Anna

    2010-01-01

    This article draws from a small-scale qualitative study related to Roma integration in the Hungarian education system, from the perspective of academics and officials from leading civil society organisations. Based on semi-structured interviews and extensive analysis of the literature, the study identified and categorised key obstacles to Roma…

  4. "Otherness" as Threat: Social and Educational Exclusion of Roma People in Greece

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parthenis, Christos; Fragoulis, George

    2016-01-01

    This paper focuses on aspects of the social and educational exclusion that Roma people face in the Greek context. It argues that diversity has been constructed as a threat for the security, the social cohesion, and the well-being of western societies. Drawing from two case studies of primary schools conducted in a highly deprived suburb of Athens,…

  5. Traditional CVD risk factors and socio-economic deprivation in Roma minority population of Croatia.

    PubMed

    Zeljko, Hrvojka; Skarić-Jurić, Tatjana; Narancic, Nina Smolej; Salihović, Marijana Pericić; Klarić, Irena Martinović; Barbalić, Maja; Starcević, Boris; Lauc, Lovorka Barać; Janićijević, Branka

    2008-09-01

    Researches into health inequalities consistently show disadvantages in health status, morbidity and mortality for various ethnic minority groups. Current knowledge about prevention of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) mainly derives from studies carried out in populations of European origin while the evidences involving Roma population are scarce. Roma, an ethnic minority of northern Indian origin, live in many countries throughout the world and are well known for preserved traditions and resistance to assimilation. They are most often marginalized economically, spatially, politically and in terms of culture. In order to assess the health status and health-related lifestyle attributes, a multidisciplinary anthropological and epidemiological community-based study was carried out including a total of 423 members of the Bayash Roma minority population living in two regions of Croatia (144 men and 279 women, aged 18-84 yrs). Hypertension (HT) was found in 24.8% Bayash Roma (21.5% men and 26.5% women) using standard diagnostic criteria (i.e. BP > or = 140/90 mm Hg or taking antihypertensive therapy). The prevalence increases from 5.9% in the age group 18-34 yrs; 35.0% in the age group 35-64 yrs, and 51.4% in the age group 65+ yrs. The prevalence of hypertension in the Bayash Roma is almost half of the magnitude of what is usually reported for the general population of Croatia. It is also lower when compared with other European populations and this finding is not due to comparatively younger average age of the Bayash sample. The significant association of hypertension with age and BMI was confirmed in this study and the importance of non-traditional SES-related CVD risk factors was highlighted. Smoking is a part of traditional Roma life-style and with 70% of smokers almost the entire population is equally exposed to this risk factor in their family environment. Since homogenously distributed, this risk factor did not show to be a significant predictor of hypertension. The

  6. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Multifrequency catalogue of blazars, Roma-BZCAT (Massaro+, 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massaro, E.; Giommi, P.; Leto, C.; Marchegiani, P.; Maselli, A.; Perri, M.; Piranomonte, S.; Sclavi, S.

    2013-08-01

    The Roma-BZCAT is structured in two parts. Part 1, at present the only one available on-line, contains the lists of blazars, which are classified in three main groups, according to their spectral properties. Each blazar is identified by a three-letter code, where the first two are BZ for blazar and the third one specifies the type, followed by the truncated equatorial coordinates (J2000). The codes are defined in the "Note (G1)" below. (2 data files).

  7. CORA—a control program for the ROMA on-line alpha detection apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taut, Steffen; Hübener, S.

    2002-07-01

    This paper reports on the new control program CORA for the ROMA detection device. It was developed as part of the HITGAS apparatus for the study of seaborgium ( Z=106) as oxide hydroxide. CORA runs under Win9x and Win NT. It is object oriented, programmed with Borland C++ Builder. Its main features are high flexibility for various experiment modes, hardware independence to a large extent, and an easy-to-understand user interface.

  8. A primitive caprine from the Upper Vallesian of La Roma 2 (Alfambra, Teruel, Aragon, Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcalá, Luis; Morales, Jorge

    1997-06-01

    We describe a new caprine form from the Upper Vallesian of La Roma 2 (Teruel Basin, Aragon). Aragoral mudejar Gen.n., sp.n. is close to the primitive forms of the Hippotraginae-Caprinae group. It differs from Norbertia hellenica by its more primitive dentition, the greater separation between the bases of the horn cores, the decreased thickness of the frontal bone and the relatively smaller size of the horn cores.

  9. [Screening for hereditary neuromuscular disorders with molecular genetic methods in the Roma population of Hungary].

    PubMed

    Herczegfalvi, Agnes; Pikó, Henriett; Karcagi, Veronika

    2008-11-30

    Recent medical genetic research has identified a number of novel, or previously known, but rare conditions, caused by private founder mutations. The Finnish and Ashkenazi Jew populations provide the best examples for identifying genes in unique genetic disorders. In these populations, research efforts and high-level medical services resulted in intense improvements of medical care and in organization of population-based screening programs. Hereditary disorders of the Roma populations are known for a long time. The genetic background of these diseases has been established by extensive molecular genetic studies. The Romas represent 6% of the Hungarian population and live under extremely bad health conditions. Therefore, our aim was to map the incidence of the hereditary neuromuscular disorders among the Hungarian Roma population. Moreover, we intended to provide proper information, genetic counseling and possible prevention strategies for the families at risk, which should represent a primer task in public health. Because of our experience in neuromuscular disorders, we choose six, frequent, autosomal recessive disorders for these clinical and genetic studies: hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy type Lom (HMSNL), hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy type Russe (HMSNR), congenital cataracts facial dysmorphism syndrome (CCFDN), limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 2C (LGMD2C), congenital myasthenic syndrome (CMS) and spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). Following identification of the founder mutations, the possibility of prenatal diagnosis and carrier screening for family members will contribute to the decrease of the recurrence risk for these severe, mostly untreatable disorders. PMID:19070320

  10. VAiRoma: A Visual Analytics System for Making Sense of Places, Times, and Events in Roman History.

    PubMed

    Cho, Isaac; Dou, Wewnen; Wang, Derek Xiaoyu; Sauda, Eric; Ribarsky, William

    2016-01-01

    Learning and gaining knowledge of Roman history is an area of interest for students and citizens at large. This is an example of a subject with great sweep (with many interrelated sub-topics over, in this case, a 3,000 year history) that is hard to grasp by any individual and, in its full detail, is not available as a coherent story. In this paper, we propose a visual analytics approach to construct a data driven view of Roman history based on a large collection of Wikipedia articles. Extracting and enabling the discovery of useful knowledge on events, places, times, and their connections from large amounts of textual data has always been a challenging task. To this aim, we introduce VAiRoma, a visual analytics system that couples state-of-the-art text analysis methods with an intuitive visual interface to help users make sense of events, places, times, and more importantly, the relationships between them. VAiRoma goes beyond textual content exploration, as it permits users to compare, make connections, and externalize the findings all within the visual interface. As a result, VAiRoma allows users to learn and create new knowledge regarding Roman history in an informed way. We evaluated VAiRoma with 16 participants through a user study, with the task being to learn about roman piazzas through finding relevant articles and new relationships. Our study results showed that the VAiRoma system enables the participants to find more relevant articles and connections compared to Web searches and literature search conducted in a roman library. Subjective feedback on VAiRoma was also very positive. In addition, we ran two case studies that demonstrate how VAiRoma can be used for deeper analysis, permitting the rapid discovery and analysis of a small number of key documents even when the original collection contains hundreds of thousands of documents. PMID:26529701

  11. The Prodigies of The Albano Lake During Roman Age and Natural Hazard Assessment At Roma, Italy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funiciello, R.; Giordano, G.; de Rita, D.

    Roma is built just 20 km to the northwest of the Pleistocene Colli Albani volcano, but is believed not exposed to relevant natural hazards, except for the Tiber river flood- ings, and local amplification of seismic waves from distal earthquakes. This belief has generally induced modern historians and geologists to discard as SmythologicalT the & cedil;many references to natural prodigies that are reported by many Roman-age historians. Recent studies have demonstrated that the Albano maar, the youngest volcanic cen- tre of the Colli Albani volcano and presently filled by a 175 m deep lake, protracted its activity to the Holocene triggering several catastrophic lahar events, likely related to lake withdrawal, the deposits of which are exposed to the southwest of Roma and reach its periphery. This finding youngs the history of the volcano and makes it rele- vant to pre-historic settlements, which ScarefullyT avoided the Albano maar slopes up & cedil;to the Bronze age. What is still unknown, though, is whether the lake experienced such fluctuations and overspills during historic times. Several Roman authors such as Ti- tus Livius, Dionigi d'Alicarnasso, Plutarco, Germanico, and many others wrote about the then well known 398 BC prodigious event, when, during the war between Roma and the Etruscan city of Veio, the gods anger caused the sudden rise and overspill of the Albano lake, reported as unrelated to climatic events, and the destructive flooding of the countryside. After that event Romans actually built a tunnel-drain which still operates regulating the lake level at 293 m a.s.l., 70 m below the maar rim elevation. Should those chronicles be truthful, we can join the geologic observation of Holocene lahar deposits from lake withdrawal with historical lake withdrawals, reassessing the natural hazard for the city of Roma under a point of view never explored before. This paper carefully explores the historical credibility of the 398 BC lake overspill event and its

  12. Culture and the school: The degree of educational integration of Roma and Gypsies in the Peloponnese region of Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiprianos, Pandelis; Daskalaki, Ivi; Stamelos, Georgios B.

    2012-10-01

    This article examines the degree of integration of Roma and Gypsy children in formal education in the Peloponnese region of Greece. It is based on field research conducted by the University of Patras during the school year 2006/07 within the framework of the Greek Ministry of Education's "Integration of Roma children in school" programme, funded by the European Union. Despite governmental incentives for poor families to enrol their school-aged children, school attendance of Roma and Gypsy children was found to decline from primary year one to primary year six, with hardly any of them entering secondary school at all. Besides looking at school attendance figures and Roma and Gypsy children's proficiency in reading, writing and numeracy, this paper also considers gender, family composition, living conditions and economic situation, as well as culturally constructed perceptions of childhood and a person's life cycle. The aim of this article is to highlight the contradictions and ambiguities involved in the process of incorporating Roma and Gypsy children in formal education, and to evaluate their school performance and assess their academic choices.

  13. The cardiovascular risk factors of the Roma (Gypsies) people in Central-Eastern Europe: a review of the published literature

    PubMed Central

    Dobranici, M; Buzea, A; Popescu, R

    2012-01-01

    Background: Estimated number of the Roma people in central-eastern Europe cannot be precisely appreciated, but official data suggest that in the 2004 they were approximately 4.2 million. At this time, there are few available data about the health status of the Roma people, mostly assessing genetic and infectious diseases, which reflect poverty, overcrowding, and lack of education. There is even less data regarding non–communicable and chronic diseases, especially cardiovascular diseases. Methods: We searched the published literature on the cardiovascular risk factors in Roma people using PubMed from January 2000 to July 2011. The searching criteria were: (1) randomized, prospective observational, retrospective and meta-analysis; (2) adult patients with cardiac diseases or cardiovascular risk factors (3) data available for cardiovascular patients. Search terms included dyslipidemia, obesity, tobacco, hypertension, and diabetes mellitus. Results: Twenty-five studies were identified. Approximately 75% of them were related to just four countries: Slovakia, Croatia, Czech Republic, and Serbia. This paper is a review based on existing literature concerning classical risk factors in Roma people with emphasis on their ethnical features. Despite limited data, the results showed that this ethnicity has the incriminated risk factors more frequently than the majority and consequently a higher cardiovascular morbidity rate. Conclusions: Quantification of the cardiovascular risk factor and their implication in the shortening of life expectancy in Roma population was a provocation due to a paucity of reliable data. At this time, we should pay more attention on the Roma health issues and the cultural concerns that might affect them in the context of borderless Europe. PMID:23390466

  14. Quality of Life and Patient Satisfaction with Family Practice Care in a Roma Population with Chronic Conditions in Northeast Slovenia

    PubMed Central

    ZELKO, Erika; ŠVAB, Igor; ROTAR PAVLIČ, Danica

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) measures a patient’s subjective experience of his or her health status. We aimed to show how the presence of chronic diseases and satisfaction with family physicians (FPs) were associated with the HRQoL of a Roma population. Methods A cross-sectional study was carried out in May 2011 on a representative sample of 650 Roma living in Prekmurje, Slovenia. The EQ-5D questionnaire was used for measuring the HRQoL of the Roma. Demographical data, 12 groups of diseases diagnosed in the last 12 months and satisfaction with FPs were included in the questionnaire. Results The response rate was 88.3% 574), of which 56.4% were female, and the average age of the participants had a mean value of 40.2±12.7 years. The presence of cardiovascular problems with risk factors for them or presence of musculoskeletal disorders were strongly associated with the presence of pain (Cramer’s V = 0.40 and 0.46 respectively). There was a strong association between the presence of mental disorders and anxiety and depression (Cramer’s V = 0.58). The average satisfaction with the family physician was 3.9 (mean±1.10) on a five-point Likert scale. There was no significant association between HRQoL and satisfaction with the family physician. Conclusions Roma with chronic mental health problems had the lowest HRQoL in the Roma population. More attention should be paid to this subgroup of Roma in family medicine, and interventions should be provided. High satisfaction with their FPs is not associated with the observed quality of life variables.

  15. Environmental Equity through Negotiation: A Case Study on Urban Landfills and the Roma Community

    PubMed Central

    Petrescu-Mag, Ruxandra Mălina; Petrescu, Dacinia Crina; Oroian, Ioan Gheorghe; Safirescu, Ovidiu Călin; Bican-Brișan, Nicoleta

    2016-01-01

    The paper discusses the necessity to bring environmental equity within the Pata Rât Roma community in Northwest Romania, relying on the answers to three questions: “Does environmental equity exist in Pata Rât?”, “How can it be attained?”, and “To what extent can it be brought to the targeted people?” It was shown how a trio of factors tailors the destiny of Roma inhabitants: being a minority, their ethnicity, and the fact they are living on and off what society rejects and dumps—a landfill. The framing of the environmental equity concerns within a vision considering negotiation as the most adequate means to attain it is a novel approach. Further on, the results of the study can fuel win-win solutions in environmental equity. The information abstracted from a set of indicators, assessed through an evaluation matrix, represents a beneficial platform for future bottom-up decisions concerning landfill residents. Three action options were analyzed: on-site living opportunities—that resulted to be preferred, off-site living opportunities, and “Do nothing”. The analysis provides qualitative evidence that the evaluation of environmental equity is largely subjective, because of its complexity and specificity related to geographical, historical, cultural characteristics, and political interests. PMID:27314371

  16. Environmental Equity through Negotiation: A Case Study on Urban Landfills and the Roma Community.

    PubMed

    Petrescu-Mag, Ruxandra Mălina; Petrescu, Dacinia Crina; Oroian, Ioan Gheorghe; Safirescu, Ovidiu Călin; Bican-Brișan, Nicoleta

    2016-01-01

    The paper discusses the necessity to bring environmental equity within the Pata Rât Roma community in Northwest Romania, relying on the answers to three questions: "Does environmental equity exist in Pata Rât?", "How can it be attained?", and "To what extent can it be brought to the targeted people?" It was shown how a trio of factors tailors the destiny of Roma inhabitants: being a minority, their ethnicity, and the fact they are living on and off what society rejects and dumps-a landfill. The framing of the environmental equity concerns within a vision considering negotiation as the most adequate means to attain it is a novel approach. Further on, the results of the study can fuel win-win solutions in environmental equity. The information abstracted from a set of indicators, assessed through an evaluation matrix, represents a beneficial platform for future bottom-up decisions concerning landfill residents. Three action options were analyzed: on-site living opportunities-that resulted to be preferred, off-site living opportunities, and "Do nothing". The analysis provides qualitative evidence that the evaluation of environmental equity is largely subjective, because of its complexity and specificity related to geographical, historical, cultural characteristics, and political interests. PMID:27314371

  17. Teaching about the Genocide of the Roma and Sinti during the Holocaust: Chances and Challenges in Europe Today

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polak, Karen

    2013-01-01

    This article presents several projects, initiated during the first decade of the twenty-first century, that aim to make the history of the genocide of the Roma more known within the educational field. Some general challenges we face in teaching about the history of a group that is both the largest minority in Europe and, according to the European…

  18. Interethnic differences of cytochrome P450 gene polymorphisms may influence outcome of taxane therapy in Roma and Hungarian populations.

    PubMed

    Szalai, Renata; Ganczer, Alma; Magyari, Lili; Matyas, Petra; Bene, Judit; Melegh, Bela

    2015-12-01

    Taxanes are widely used microtubule-stabilizing chemotherapeutic agents in the treatment of cancers. Several cytochrome P450 gene variants have been proven to influence taxane metabolism and therapy. The purpose of this work was to determine the distribution of genetic variations of CYP1B1, CYP2C8 and CYP3A5 genes as the first report on taxane metabolizer cytochrome P450 gene polymorphisms in Roma and Hungarian populations. A total of 397 Roma and 412 Hungarian healthy subjects were genotyped for CYP1B1 c.4326C > G, CYP2C8 c.792C > G and CYP3A5 c.6986A > G variant alleles by PCR-RFLP assay and direct sequencing. We found significant differences in the frequencies of homozygous variant genotypes of CYP1B1 4326 GG (p = 0.002) and CYP3A5 6986 GG (p < 0.001) between Roma and Hungarian populations. Regarding minor allele frequencies, for CYP2C8 a significantly increased prevalence was found in 792G allele frequency in the Hungarian population compared to the Roma population (5.83% vs. 2.14%, p = 0.001). Our results can be used as possible predictive factors in population specific treatment algorithms to developing effective programs for a better outcome in patients treated with taxanes. PMID:26507668

  19. HIV and selected blood-borne and sexually transmitted infections in a predominantly Roma (Gypsy) neighbourhood in Budapest, Hungary

    PubMed Central

    Gyarmathy, V. Anna; Ujhelyi, Eszter; Neaigus, Alan

    2008-01-01

    We assessed the prevalence of HIV and selected blood-borne and sexually transmitted infections among a convenience sample of 64 residents of Dzsumbuj, a predominantly Roma (Gypsy) neighbourhood in Budapest, Hungary. No cases of HIV were detected, while the prevalence of Hepatitis B infection (anti-HBc) was 27% and syphilis prevalence was 2%. Romas (n=50) were significantly more likely than non-Romas (n=14) to have HAV antibodies (80% vs. 43%) and less likely to be HBV immunized (anti-HBs only; 6% vs. 29%). Current drug injectors (n=13) were more likely than non-injectors (n=51) to have antibodies against HAV (85% vs. 69%) and HCV (85% vs. 8%). While HIV has not been introduced in this population, risk conditions for a potentially explosive HIV epidemic are present. Health care policies should focus on expanding coverage for HAV and HBV immunizations, and access to HIV preventive services needs to be extended to marginalized, mostly minority populations, such as the Roma in Europe. PMID:18935777

  20. Influence of modified atmosphere and varying time in storage on the irradiation sensitivity of Salmonella on sliced roma tomatoes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella contamination of tomatoes is a recurrent food safety concern. Irradiation inactivates pathogens on fresh and fresh cut produce. However, the interaction of time in refrigerated storage and modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) may influence the response of pathogens to irradiation. Roma tom...

  1. Rapid health impact appraisal of eviction versus a housing project in a colony‐dwelling Roma community

    PubMed Central

    Kósa, Karolina; Molnár, Ágnes; McKee, Martin; Ádány, Róza

    2007-01-01

    Background During implementation of a community development project involving a severely disadvantaged Roma community, the community was threatened with eviction. Two scenarios, eviction with placement on the waiting list for social housing versus a replacement housing development, were identified and specified. A health impact assessment (HIA) was carried out to inform subsequent negotiations. Aims To assess the health effects of eviction in comparison with that of a housing project for a Roma community; to make recommendations on short‐term and long‐term benefits of the two scenarios in order to inform the local government; and to develop a demonstration HIA that can act as a model for other disadvantaged Roma populations. Method A prospective assessment, based on a broad model of health, was carried out to assess health effects of a housing project compared with eviction. By design, it ensured full involvement of members of the community, local decision makers and relevant stakeholders. Results and conclusion This HIA identified numerous positive and some probable negative health effects of a housing project. Despite the uncertainty around some of its predicted effects, the overall health benefit of a housing project clearly outweighed that of eviction. Although the immediate financial advantages of eviction for the municipal government are clear, this example provides further evidence to support the adoption of a statutory requirement to assess both economic and health outcomes. It also provides an example that other Roma communities can emulate. PMID:17933953

  2. Outbreak of a new measles B3 variant in the Roma/Sinti population with transmission in the nosocomial setting, Italy, November 2015 to April 2016.

    PubMed

    Filia, Antonietta; Amendola, Antonella; Faccini, Marino; Del Manso, Martina; Senatore, Sabrina; Bianchi, Silvia; Borrini, Bianca Maria; Ciampelli, Alessio; Tanzi, Elisabetta; Filipponi, Maria Teresa; Piccirilli, Giulia; Lazzarotto, Tiziana; Pascucci, Maria Grazia; Baggieri, Melissa; Magurano, Fabio

    2016-05-19

    A measles outbreak occurred from November 2015 to April 2016 in two northern Italian regions, affecting the Roma/Sinti ethnic population and nosocomial setting. Overall, 67 cases were reported. Median age of 43 cases in three Roma/Sinti camps was four years, nosocomial cases were mainly adults. The outbreak was caused by a new measles virus B3.1 variant. Immunisation resources and strategies should be directed at groups with gaps in vaccine coverage, e.g. Roma/Sinti and healthcare workers. PMID:27240004

  3. The emergence, structure and development of ethnic identity during childhood: the case of Roma identity.

    PubMed

    Pnevmatikos, Dimitris; Geka, Maria; Divane, Maria

    2010-12-01

    This study investigates the emergence, development and structure of ethnic identity during childhood. Forty Roma children living in Greece aged between 2.8 and 11.9 years answered questions about their awareness/recognition of four aspects of their ethnic identity-namely place of habitation, traditional costumes, the Roma language, and early betrothal of children-their identity and their sense of stability and constancy. The study also investigates how the children feel about the abandonment of those four aspects. The evidence from the current data supports the hypothesis that awareness of ethnic identity emerges before the age of 4. Moreover, this study offers direct empirical evidence of the multidimensionality of ethnic identity. A model of three concentric rings is proposed, extending from a core containing the most highly valued aspects of ethnic identity to the outer annulus that comprises the nonpermanent and nonstable aspects of ethnic identity. The aspects in each annulus differ in terms of the development of the sense of stability and constancy and the feelings associated with loss of the aspects in question. Even the youngest participants considered the aspects in the core to be stable and constant as well as emotionally charged; and even the 11-year-olds did not consider the aspects contained in the outer, more fluid annulus as stable and constant aspects of their ethnic identity. The development of an aspect is determined by what the majority of adults in a society, at a particular time in history, consider to be most important. PMID:22044083

  4. The KRAB Zinc Finger Protein Roma/Zfp157 Is a Critical Regulator of Cell-Cycle Progression and Genomic Stability

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Teresa L.F.; Guilbaud, Guillaume; Blow, J. Julian; Sale, Julian E.; Watson, Christine J.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Regulation of DNA replication and cell division is essential for tissue growth and maintenance of genomic integrity and is particularly important in tissues that undergo continuous regeneration such as mammary glands. We have previously shown that disruption of the KRAB-domain zinc finger protein Roma/Zfp157 results in hyperproliferation of mammary epithelial cells (MECs) during pregnancy. Here, we delineate the mechanism by which Roma engenders this phenotype. Ablation of Roma in MECs leads to unscheduled proliferation, replication stress, DNA damage, and genomic instability. Furthermore, mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) depleted for Roma exhibit downregulation of p21Cip1 and geminin and have accelerated replication fork velocities, which is accompanied by a high rate of mitotic errors and polyploidy. In contrast, overexpression of Roma in MECs halts cell-cycle progression, whereas siRNA-mediated p21Cip1 knockdown ameliorates, in part, this phenotype. Thus, Roma is an essential regulator of the cell cycle and is required to maintain genomic stability. PMID:27149840

  5. Ethnic Differences in the Association of Thrombophilic Polymorphisms with Obstetric Complications in Slovak and Roma (Gypsy) Populations

    PubMed Central

    Gabrikova, Dana; Pitonak, Jozef; Bernasovska, Jarmila; Macekova, Sona; Lohajova-Behulova, Regina

    2015-01-01

    Aims: Hereditary as well as acquired thrombophilia is associated with a higher incidence of severe obstetric complications such as preeclampsia, spontaneous pregnancy loss, placental abruption, and fetal growth retardation. The aim of our study was to examine the association of selected thrombophilic polymorphisms (factor V Leiden, MTHFR C677T, and MTHFR A1298C) with pregnancy complications in the Slovak majority population and the Roma (Gypsy) ethnic population. The study included 354 women; 120 patients and 105 controls from the Slovak majority population, 50 patients and 79 controls from the Slovak Roma population. Genotyping was performed by the real-time polymerase chain reaction method using TaqMan® MGB probes. Results: A statistically significant higher frequency of factor V Leiden (p=0.001, odds ratio [OR]=5.9) and MTHFR C677T polymorphism (p=0.011, OR=1.7) was observed in the Slovak majority patient group compared to the control group. The incidence of MTHFR A1298C polymorphism between patients and controls did not differ significantly. None of the three polymorphisms studied was in association with pregnancy complications in the group of Roma women. Conclusions: Our study has confirmed the variable distribution of selected thrombophilic polymorphisms in different ethnic groups as well as their various effects on the clinical phenotype. PMID:25549181

  6. Ethical issues in communication of diagnosis and end-of-life decision-making process in some of the Romanian Roma communities.

    PubMed

    Roman, Gabriel; Enache, Angela; Pârvu, Andrada; Gramma, Rodica; Moisa, Ştefana Maria; Dumitraş, Silvia; Ioan, Beatrice

    2013-08-01

    Medical communication in Western-oriented countries is dominated by concepts of shared decision-making and patient autonomy. In interactions with Roma patients, these behavioral patterns rarely seem to be achieved because the culture and ethnicity have often been shown as barriers in establishing an effective and satisfying doctor-patient relationship. The study aims to explore the Roma's beliefs and experiences related to autonomy and decision-making process in the case of a disease with poor prognosis. Forty-eight Roma people from two Romanian counties participated in semi-structured interviews, conducted by a research team from the University of Medicine and Pharmacy of Iasi. Participants were recruited among the chronically ill patients and caregivers. The Roma community opposes informing the terminal patients about their condition, the "silence conspiracy" being widely practiced. The family fully undertakes the right of decision making, thus minimizing the patient's autonomy. We identified ethical dilemmas concerning autonomy, lack of patients' real decision-making power, and paternalistic attitudes exerted firstly by the family and, on demand, by the physician. Instead, the Roma patient benefits from a very active support network, being accompanied at the hospital by numerous relatives. The patient's right to make autonomous decisions promoted in the Western countries and stipulated by the Romanian law has diminished value in the Roma community. For the Roma, the understanding of dignity is not simply individual and personal, but it is closely related to their cultural particularities. Ignoring their cultural values could create conflicts between healthcare providers and community. PMID:22752639

  7. Differential effect of soil and environment on metabolic expression of turmeric (Curcuma longa cv. Roma).

    PubMed

    Sandeep, I S; Sanghamitra, Nayak; Sujata, Mohanty

    2015-06-01

    Curcuma longa (Zingiberaceae) is known for its uses in medicine, cosmetics, food flavouring and textile industries. The secondary metabolites of turmeric like essential oil, oleoresin and curcumin are important for its multipurpose uses. These traits of turmeric vary from place to place due to the influence of environment, soil and agro-climatic conditions. Here, we analyzed turmeric from different agroclimatic regions for influence of various factors on its growth and yield of important phytochemicals. A high curcumin yielding cultivar i.e., Roma was collected from high altitude research station, Koraput (HARS) and planted in nine agroclimatic regions of Odisha. Analysis of soil texture, pH, organic carbon, micro and macro nutrients were done from all the studied zones up to 2nd generation. Plants grown in their released station i.e., Eastern Ghat High Land showed 5% of curcumin and were taken as control. Plants grown in different agroclimatic zones showed a range of 1.4-5% of curcumin and 0.3-0.7% of rhizome essential oil and 0.3-1% of leaf essential oil content. Gas chromatography and mass spectra analysis showed tumerone and alpha phellandrene as the major compounds in all the zones with 10-20% variation. The present study will be immensely helpful for standardization and management of environmental and ecological factors for high phytochemical yield in turmeric plant. PMID:26155681

  8. Rank-Ordered Multifractal Analysis (ROMA) of Intermittent Dissipative Structures in Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C.; Chang, T.; Uritsky, V. M.

    2011-12-01

    Rank-Ordered Multifractal Analysis (ROMA) was introduced by Chang and Wu (2008) to describe the multifractal characteristic of intermittent events. The procedure provides a natural connection between the rank-ordered spectrum and the idea of one-parameter scaling for monofractals. This technique has successfully been applied to fluid turbulence, MHD turbulence simulations and turbulence data obtained in various space plasmas. In this paper, the technique is applied to an extended data set of extreme ultraviolet images of the solar corona provided by the extreme ultraviolet imaging telescope (EIT) on board the SOHO spacecraft. The data set was shown by Uritsky et al. (2007) to exhibit coexistence of self-organized criticality and intermittent turbulence. In this study, the SOHO EIT data set is shown to include two multifractal rank-ordered regimes, dependent on spatial scales, which may indicate different physical mechanisms of energy dissipation in the solar corona corresponding to meso- and supergranulation scales of the underlying photospheric network. This crossover behavior of the ranked-order regimes is similar to the characteristics observed by Tam et al. (2010) of the auroral zone electric-field fluctuations.

  9. ROMA (Rank-Ordered Multifractal Analysis) of Intermittency in Space Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C. C.; Chang, T.

    2014-12-01

    The hallmark of nonlinear complexity phenomena in plasmas as well as in all natural sciences is the appearance of intermittent fluctuating events. Such intermittent fluctuations are the results of the dynamic interactions of multiple coherent structures of varied sizes in stochastic media. We discuss here a unique procedure, the Rank-Ordered Multifractal Analysis (ROMA), that is both physically explicable and quantitatively accurate in deciphering the multifractal characteristics of intermittency. The generic character of the procedure provides a natural connection between the implicit spectrum based on parametric rank ordering and the one-parameter scaling idea of monofractals. Such an implicit multifractal spectrum has several advantages over the results obtainable using the conventional structure functions. Firstly, the utility of the spectrum is to fully collapse the unscaled PDFs. Secondly, the physical interpretation is clear. It indicates how intermittent the scaled fluctuations are once the spectrum is given. Thirdly, the determination of the values of the fractal nature of the grouped fluctuations is not affected by the statistics of other fluctuations that do not exhibit the same fractal characteristics. The method has been used to study results obtained from large-scale incompressible fluid simulations and large-scale MHD simulations as well as observations of the magnetic field fluctuations of the solar wind, the extreme ultraviolet emissions of the solar corona, and the broadband electric field fluctuations in the auroral zone. The method and some of these applications will be presented.

  10. Effect of Mahayavanala Roma Kshara and Dhanyaka Gokshura Ghrita in benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Vasava, Yogesh R; Bhuyan, Chaturbhuja; Rajagopala, Manjusha; Gupta, S K; Dudhamal, T S

    2010-07-01

    Vatastheela is a disease of Mutravahasrotasa, one among the 12 types of Mutraghata disorders elaborated by Sushruta in his seminal work, the Sushruta Samhita. Vatastheela, as described in Ayurveda, closely resembles benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) of modern medicine in its signs and symptoms. It is a senile disorder and chiefly affects individuals above the age of 40 years. The symptoms are those of bladder outflow obstruction, with increased frequency of micturition, dribbling, hesitancy, and the features of chronic urinary retention. Surgical management has been accepted as the standard management but is associated with many disadvantages as well as complications, which may not be acceptable at this age. Conservative management with modern medicines is also not free from side effects. So, in this age-group, there is a need for much safer alternative method of management. In this regard, many works have been carried out and shown that the Ayurvedic approach, using natural medicines, is a far better approach. We carried out a comparative study of Mahayavanala Roma Kshara (MRK) and Dhanyaka Gokshura Ghrita (DGG), which are the compounds prescribed for Mutraghata in Ayurvedic literature. The patients were randomly selected from the OPD and IPD of IPGT and RA hospital, Jamnagar, Gujarat, and divided into two groups. In first group, one (500 mg) capsule of MRK was given twice a day with lukewarm water for 45 days; in second group, 10 gm of DGG was given orally twice a day with lukewarm water for 45 days. DGG showed significantly greater relief in the subjective parameters as per International Prostate Symptoms Score (IPSS) than MRK. However, reduction in the size of the prostate and in the volume of the post-void residual urine was found much better in the MRK group. PMID:22131735

  11. Resource recovery from waste by Roma in the Balkans: A case study from Zavidovici (BiH).

    PubMed

    Vaccari, Mentore; Perteghella, Andrea

    2016-09-01

    Roma communities represent the main involved actors in the informal activities in the Balkan regions, especially because the state does not formally recognize them as formal inhabitants. The Roma community in Zavidovici, despite being resident since the beginning of the 20th century, is still considered a marginalized and vulnerable group. They are actively involved in and dependent on the informal solid waste sector. Waste collection is a 'family business', a kind of self-employment and the main source of income for households. Informal recyclers have a central role in the solid waste management system and they recover a significant amount of materials, especially iron, copper, brass, lead and exhausted batteries. Despite the negative fluctuations of the raw material prices, because of the international economic crisis, informal recyclers remain dependent on the waste recycling sector. They are crucial actors in the value chain of recyclables: though they cannot access the final buyers of recyclables, they provide more than 50% of the market to the middle dealers in the Zenica-Doboj Canton. This research activity consists of a deep socio-economic analysis of the informal recyclers' community living in Zavidovici city. In particular, this paper describes the composition and welfare status of informal recyclers' households, the role of informal recyclers in waste collection, the geographical coverage and the related pattern of waste picking, types, volumes and price fluctuations of recyclable materials, and the middle dealers involved in the informal recycling system. PMID:27305917

  12. Overrepresented Minorities in Special Education in the United States and Romania: Comparison between African-American and Roma Populations in Disability Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Gabriela

    2008-01-01

    This manuscript briefly examines minority participation within the school population that is eligible for special education services--namely, African Americans in the United States and the Roma population in Romania. A large percentage of students from both minorities come to school unprepared to learn and they remain behind because of the…

  13. An Exploration of Training and Support Issues For Those Working with Children, Young People and Families from Traveller, Irish Traveller, Gypsy, Roma and Show People Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Mark; Martin, Kerry; Haines, Ben; Kinder, Kay; Wilkin, Anne; Derrington, Chris

    2008-01-01

    Research has shown the extent of social exclusion among children and young people of Traveller, Irish Traveller, Gypsy, Roma and Showpeople (GRT) communities, in terms of education, health, and accommodation, and that many mainstream services have little experience of working effectively with these communities. The Every Child Matters (ECM) agenda…

  14. Supporting the Learning of Nomadic Communities across Transnational Contexts: Exploring Parallels in the Education of UK Roma Gypsies and Indigenous Australians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levinson, Martin; Hooley, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Deriving from the authors' respective ethnographic fieldwork (around two decades in each context), this position paper considers experiences of education across two communities: Gypsy/Roma in the UK and Indigenous in Australia. The article brings together understandings across these traditionally nomadic communities, with no shared history or…

  15. The Implications of "Naming" on Roma and "Sinti" Right to Education and Social Inclusion: An Ethnography of Education among a "Sinti" Family Network

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Setti, Federica

    2015-01-01

    Acknowledging the European political commitment to Roma education and the research in this field, my article deals with the experience of education of a"Sinti" "minority" (The terms "minority" and "majority" will be used in this article, according to the meaning that is given to them within Anthropology and…

  16. Influence of modified atmosphere and varying time in storage on the irradiation sensitivity of Salmonella on sliced roma tomatoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemira, Brendan A.; Boyd, Glenn

    2013-09-01

    Salmonella contamination of tomatoes is a recurrent food safety concern. Irradiation inactivates pathogens on fresh and fresh cut produce. However, the interaction of time in refrigerated storage and modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) may influence the response of pathogens to irradiation. Roma tomatoes were sliced and inoculated with a cocktail of outbreak strains of Salmonella. The inoculated tomatoes were packaged under one of four atmospheres: air, 10/90 O2/N2, 5/95 O2/N2 or 100% N2. The packages were kept in refrigerated storage (10 °C) for various times after inoculation, to simulate the potential time delay between packaging and irradiation treatment. Tomatoes were irradiated immediately (0 h), or after 24 or 48 h in storage. The surviving populations were recovered and enumerated. Irradiation effectively reduced Salmonella at all times. Estimated D10 value (the dose necessary for 1 log reduction) varied significantly among the combinations of time and MAP, ranging from 0.165-0.335 kGy. Tomatoes packaged in air, irradiated at 0 h, had a D10 of 0.165 kGy; all other combinations showed significantly higher D10. Reduced oxygen generally resulted in higher D10 values, with the highest D10 of 0.335 kGy obtained for 100% N2, 0 h. Time in storage pre-irradiation tended to increase D10 for air and 5/95 O2/N2, but not for 10/90 O2/N2 or 100% N2. These results suggest that time required for refrigerated holding of processed Roma tomatoes or shipment to an off-site irradiation service provider may alter the efficacy of irradiation if reduced oxygen MAP is used.

  17. Founder p.Arg 446* mutation in the PDHX gene explains over half of cases with congenital lactic acidosis in Roma children.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Ivan S; Azmanov, Dimitar N; Ivanova, Mariya B; Chamova, Teodora; Pacheva, Ilyana H; Panova, Margarita V; Song, Sharon; Morar, Bharti; Yordanova, Ralitsa V; Galabova, Fani K; Sotkova, Iglika G; Linev, Alexandar J; Bitchev, Stoyan; Shearwood, Anne-Marie J; Kancheva, Dalia; Gabrikova, Dana; Karcagi, Veronika; Guergueltcheva, Velina; Geneva, Ina E; Bozhinova, Veneta; Stoyanova, Vili K; Kremensky, Ivo; Jordanova, Albena; Savov, Aleksey; Horvath, Rita; Brown, Matthew A; Tournev, Ivailo; Filipovska, Aleksandra; Kalaydjieva, Luba

    2014-01-01

    Investigation of 31 of Roma patients with congenital lactic acidosis (CLA) from Bulgaria identified homozygosity for the R446* mutation in the PDHX gene as the most common cause of the disorder in this ethnic group. It accounted for around 60% of patients in the study and over 25% of all CLA cases referred to the National Genetic Laboratory in Bulgaria. The detection of a homozygous patient from Hungary and carriers among population controls from Romania and Slovakia suggests a wide spread of the mutation in the European Roma population. The clinical phenotype of the twenty R446* homozygotes was relatively homogeneous, with lactic acidosis crisis in the first days or months of life as the most common initial presentation (15/20 patients) and delayed psychomotor development and/or seizures in infancy as the leading manifestations in a smaller group (5/20 patients). The subsequent clinical picture was dominated by impaired physical growth and a very consistent pattern of static cerebral palsy-like encephalopathy with spasticity and severe to profound mental retardation seen in over 80% of cases. Most patients had a positive family history. We propose testing for the R446* mutation in PDHX as a rapid first screening in Roma infants with metabolic acidosis. It will facilitate and accelerate diagnosis in a large proportion of cases, allow early rehabilitation to alleviate the chronic clinical course, and prevent further affected births in high-risk families. PMID:25087164

  18. High-Risk Sexual Behavior, HIV/STD Prevalence, and Risk Predictors in the Social Networks of Young Roma (Gypsy) Men in Bulgaria

    PubMed Central

    Amirkhanian, Yuri A.; Kelly, Jeffrey A.; Kabakchieva, Elena; Antonova, Radostina; Vassileva, Sylvia; DiFranceisco, Wayne J.; McAuliffe, Timothy L.; Vassilev, Boyan; Petrova, Elena; Khoursine, Roman A.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Roma (Gypsies), the largest and most disadvantaged ethnic minority group in Europe, are believed to be vulnerable to HIV/AIDS. This study’s aim was to examine HIV risk in 6 Roma male sociocentric networks (n=405 men) in Bulgaria. Methods Participants were interviewed concerning their risk practices and tested for HIV/STDs. Results High-risk sexual behaviors were common. Over 57% of men had multiple sexual partners in the past 3 months. Over one-third of men reported both male and female partners in the past year. Condom use was low. Greater levels of sexual risk were associated with lower intentions and self-efficacy for using condoms, drug use, having male partners, knowing HIV-positive persons, and having higher AIDS knowledge but no prior HIV testing. Two men had HIV infection, 3.7% gonorrhea, and 5.2% chlamydia. Discussion HIV prevention interventions directed toward high-risk social networks of Roma are needed before HIV infection becomes more widely established. PMID:22370730

  19. Evaluation of HE4, CA-125, Risk of Ovarian Malignancy Algorithm (ROMA) and Risk of Malignancy Index (RMI) in the Preoperative Assessment of Patients with Adnexal Mass

    PubMed Central

    Al Musalhi, Khawla; Al Kindi, Manal; Al Aisary, Faiza; Ramadhan, Fatma; Al Rawahi, Thuraya; Al Hatali, Khalsa; Mula-Abed, Waad-Allah

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the validity and compare the performance of cancer antigen-125 (CA-125), human epididymis protein 4 (HE4), the risk of malignancy index (RMI), and the risk of ovarian malignancy algorithm (ROMA) in the diagnosis of ovarian cancer in patients with ovarian lesions discovered during their preoperative work-up investigations. Methods This prospective, cross-sectional study looked at patients who attended the gynecology department at the Royal Hospital, Muscat, from 1 March 2014 to 30 April 2015, for the evaluation of an ovarian lesion. The inclusion criteria included women who underwent surgical intervention and who had a preoperative pelvic ultrasound with laboratory investigation for CA-125 and HE4. The study validated the diagnostic performance of CA-125, RMI, HE4, and ROMA using histopathological diagnosis as the gold standard. Results The study population had a total of 213 cases of various types of benign (77%) and malignant (23%) ovarian tumors. CA-125 showed the highest sensitivity (79%) when looking at the total patient population. When divided by age, the sensitivity was 67% in premenopausal women. In postmenopausal women, CA-125 had lower sensitivity (89%) compared to RMI, HE4, and ROMA (93% each). A high specificity of 90% was found for HE4 in the total patient population, 93% in premenopausal women and 75% in postmenopausal women. CA-125 had the highest specificity (79%) in postmenopausal women. Both CA-125 and RMI were frequently elevated in benign gynecological conditions particularly in endometriosis when compared to HE4 and ROMA. We also studied modifications of the optimal cut-offs for the four parameters. Both CA-125 and RMI showed a significant increase in their specificity if the cut-off was increased to ≥ 60 U/mL for CA-125 and to ≥ 250 for RMI. For HE4, we noted an improvement in its specificity in postmenopausal women when its cut-off was increased to140 pmol/L. Conclusions HE4 and ROMA showed a very high specificity

  20. Geohazards Monitoring in Roma from InSAR and In Situ Data: Outcomes of the PanGeo Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comerci, Valerio; Vittori, Eutizio; Cipolloni, Carlo; Di Manna, Pio; Guerrieri, Luca; Nisio, Stefania; Succhiarelli, Claudio; Ciuffreda, Maria; Bertoletti, Erika

    2015-11-01

    Within the PanGeo project (financed by the European Commission under the 7th Framework Program), the Geological Survey of Italy ( ISPRA) and the Urban Planning Department of the City of Roma developed a geodatabase and map of the geological hazards for the territory of Roma, integrating remotely sensed data (PSInSAR—Permanent Scatterer Interferometry Synthetic Aperture Radar) and in situ geological information. Numerous thematic layers, maps and inventories of hazards (e.g., landslides, sinkholes, cavities), geological and hydrogeological data added to historical and recent urbanization information were compared to the permanent scatterer (PS) data from the European Remote Sensing satellites (ERS-1/2, 1992-2000) and ENVISAT (2002-2005) descending scenes, in order to produce a ground stability layer (GSL). Based on the PS data, most of the territory appears stable (almost 70 % of PS velocities are within ±1 mm/year). About 14 % of the PSs show positive line-of-sight (LOS) velocities (measured along the LOS of the satellite) between 1 and 3 mm/year and more than 2 % exceed 3 mm/year; more than 11 % of PSs show negative LOS velocities between -1 and -3 mm/year, while about 3 % exceed -3 mm/year (with tens of the PSs showing velocities over -20 mm/year). The GSL is comprised of polygons or multi-polygons (multipart polygons grouping individual polygons under a single identifier geohazard) enclosing areas where geohazards have been pointed out by PS data and/or in situ surveys (observed instabilities), and by polygons enclosing areas potentially affected by geohazards, based on the available knowledge of the territory (potential instabilities). In Roma's GSL, 18 multi-polygons (covering ca. 600 km2) related to observed instabilities have been outlined, where ground movements could be detected through InSAR data or where landslides and sinkholes are known to have occurred. Other 13 multi-polygons (covering nearly 900 km2) concern areas where the potential occurrence

  1. [Indicators of statin use as a model for qualitative evaluation of chronic disease management in the Local Health Unit Roma B].

    PubMed

    Ciaralli, Fabrizio; Summaria, Francesco; Mustilli, Marina; Vasselli, Loredana; D'Urso, Antonio; Degrassi, Flori

    2010-01-01

    In chronic diseases the adherence and persistence to therapeutic treatments are often lower than guidelines said. This leads to a worse therapeutic effect of the treatments and to a misuse in healthcare costs. Our study evaluates the impact of a pharmacoutilization analysis model, derived from the administrative database of the Local Health Unit Roma B. In particularly we calculate some indicators of adherence, persistence, occasional treatment and switch in patients on statins secondary prevention treatment (patients discharged from Hospital with Acute Myocardial Infarction diagnosis). The model that we developed would be successfully used in the cost-effective analysis of other drugs. PMID:21132042

  2. Application of rank-ordered multifractal analysis (ROMA) to intermittent fluctuations in 3D turbulent flows, 2D MHD simulation and solar wind data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C.; Chang, T.

    2010-12-01

    A new method in describing the multifractal characteristics of intermittent events was introduced by Cheng and Wu [Chang T. and Wu C.C., Physical Rev, E77, 045401(R), 2008]. The procedure provides a natural connection between the rank-ordered spectrum and the idea of one-parameter scaling for monofractals. This technique has been demonstrated using results obtained from a 2D MHD simulation. It has also been successfully applied to in-situ solar wind observations [Chang T., Wu, C.C. and Podesta, J., AIP Conf Proc. 1039, 75, 2008], and the broadband electric field oscillations from the auroral zone [Tam, S.W.Y. et al., Physical Rev, E81, 036414, 2010]. We take the next step in this procedure. By using the ROMA spectra and the scaled probability distribution functions (PDFs), raw PDFs can be calculated, which can be compared directly with PDFs from observations or simulation results. In addition to 2D MHD simulation results and in-situ solar wind observation, we show clearly using the ROMA analysis the multifractal character of the 3D fluid simulation data obtained from the JHU turbulence database cluster at http://turbulence.pha.jhu.edu. In particular, we show the scaling of the non-symmetrical PDF for the parallel-velocity fluctuations of this 3D fluid data.

  3. Trapped between Tradition and Transition – Anthropological and Epidemiological Cross-sectional Study of Bayash Roma in Croatia

    PubMed Central

    Škarić-Jurić, Tatjana; Martinović Klarić, Irena; Smolej Narančić, Nina; Drmić, Stipe; Peričić Salihović, Marijana; Barać Lauc, Lovorka; Miličić, Jasna; Barabalić, Maja; Zajc, Matea; Janićijević, Branka

    2007-01-01

    Aim To assess the key characteristics related to living conditions and health in the Bayash Roma population in Baranja and Međimurje regions of Croatia and identify possible demographic and socio-economic sources of variance in self-reported health and reproductive profile. Methods The study comprised a total of 266 adult Bayash individuals from Baranja and 164 from Međimurje (aged 41.3 ± 15.1 years). Data on ethno-historical and demographic background, self-identity, life and hygiene conditions, education, employment, health insurance, and health (dietary and smoking habits, reproductive characteristics, diagnosed and undiagnosed health problems, use of medications). were obtained through interviews. Bivariate and multivariate methods were used in statistical analyses. Results The reported migratory pattern demonstrated that 88.8% of the examinees were born in the region of residence, which showed that the Bayash population was autochthonous and sedentary one. Financially, the Bayash primarily relayed on social welfare support allowance (84%) and child allowance (47%), while merely 2% were permanently and 23% occasionally employed. The proportion of the Bayash who had never attended school amounted to 33.3% (19.3% men and 60.9% women). The access to public water supply system was available to 52.5% of examinees, whereas only 1.7% had public sewage system, and 23.4% had private septic tanks. The most commonly reported health problems were frequent headaches (20.3%), stomach pain (16.3%), anxiety or insomnia (13.1%), hypertension (9.3%), and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (8.6%). The logistic regression identified level of education (odds ratio [OR], 0.77; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.63-0.94) and access to health insurance (OR, 4.32; 95% CI, 1.46-12.77) as socio-economic/life-style factors playing a significant role in the occurrence of COPD. Conclusion Our results indicate poor inclusion of the Bayash in the essential social service sectors

  4. Approaches to Working with Children, Young People and Families for Traveller, Irish Traveller, Gypsy, Roma and Show People Communities. A Literature Review Report for the Children's Workforce Development Council

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Mark; Martin, Kerry

    2008-01-01

    The Children's Workforce Development Council (CWDC) commissioned this literature review as the first part of a project exploring issues around and approaches to working with Travellers, Irish Travellers, Gypsies, Roma and Showpeople, and the support, training and other programs available to staff involved. The project is intended to contribute to…

  5. Salmonella population rebound and its prevention on spray washed and non-washed jalapeño peppers and roma tomatoes in humid storage.

    PubMed

    Pao, Steven; Long, Wilbert; Kim, Chyer; Rafie, A Reza

    2012-04-01

    The potential of Salmonella population to rebound on non-washed and washed roma tomatoes and jalapeño peppers in humid storage at 4°C, 10°C, 15°C, 21°C, or 35°C for ≤12 days was investigated. The initial inoculation levels of Salmonella on peppers and tomatoes were 5.6 and 5.2 log CFU/cm(2), respectively. Air-drying of fruit surfaces resulted in contamination levels of 3.9 and 3.7 log CFU/cm(2) on inoculated peppers and tomatoes, respectively. At 21°C and 35°C, the levels of air-dried Salmonella inoculums on produce surfaces increased ≥2 log cycles, with the most rapid growth in the first 3 days. Mechanical washing on rollers (rinsing; R-treatment) or revolving brushes (rinsing and brushing; RB-treatment) with water decreased Salmonella counts by ≥2.5 log CFU/cm(2) on both peppers and tomatoes. After R- or RB-treatment, peppers stored at 21°C and 35°C permitted residual Salmonella (≤1.4 log CFU/cm(2)) to grow to 2.6-3.9 log CFU/cm(2). During storage, residual Salmonella (≤1.0 log CFU/cm(2)) on washed tomatoes increased to 3.1 log CFU/cm(2) at 35°C following R-treatment and 3.8 log CFU/cm(2) at 21°C following RB-treatment. Cold storage at 4°C and 10°C effectively prevented the proliferation of Salmonella on both washed and non-washed produce. The current study on jalapeño peppers and roma tomatoes demonstrated that Salmonella population can rebound on produce in humid storage before or after washing. The finding highlights the benefit of uninterrupted cold storage for safer produce operations. PMID:22394024

  6. Advanced DInSAR analysis for building damage assessment in large urban areas: an application to the city of Roma, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Aranno, Peppe J. V.; Marsella, Maria; Scifoni, Silvia; Scutti, Marianna; Sonnessa, Alberico; Bonano, Manuela

    2015-10-01

    Remote sensing data play an important role for the environmental monitoring because they allow to provide systematic information on very large areas and for a long period of time. Such information must be analyzed, validated and incorporated into proper modeling tools in order to become useful for performing risk assessment analysis. These approaches has been already applied in the field of natural hazard evaluation (i.e. for monitoring seismic, volcanic areas and landslides). However, not enough attention has been devoted to the development of validated methods for implementing quantitative analysis on civil structures. This work is dedicated to the comprehensive utilization of ERS / ENVISAT data store ESA SAR used to detect deformation trends and perform back-analysis of the investigated structures useful to calibrate the damage assessment models. After this preliminary analysis, SAR data of the new satellite mission (ie Cosmo SkyMed) were adopted to monitor the evolution of existent surface deformation processes and to detect new occurrence. The specific objective was to set up a data processing and data analysis chain tailored on a service that sustains the safe maintenance of the built-up environment, including critical construction such as public (schools, hospital, etc), strategic (dam, highways, etc) and also the cultural heritage sites. The analysis of the test area, in the southeastern sector of Roma, has provided three different levels and sub-levels of products from metropolitan area scale (territorial analysis), settlement scale (aggregated analysis) to single structure scale (damage degree associated to the structure).

  7. Borderline Ovarian Tumors and Diagnostic Dilemma of Intraoperative Diagnosis: Could Preoperative He4 Assay and ROMA Score Assessment Increase the Frozen Section Accuracy? A Multicenter Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Gizzo, Salvatore; Berretta, Roberto; Di Gangi, Stefania; Guido, Maria; Zanni, Giuliano Carlo; Franceschetti, Ilaria; Quaranta, Michela; Plebani, Mario; Nardelli, Giovanni Battista; Patrelli, Tito Silvio

    2014-01-01

    The aim of our study was to assess the value of a preoperative He4-serum-assay and ROMA-score assessment in improving the accuracy of frozen section histology in the diagnosis of borderline ovarian tumors (BOT). 113 women presenting with a unilateral ovarian mass diagnosed as serous/mucinous BOT at frozen-section-histology (FS) and/or confirmed on final pathology were recruited. Pathologists were informed of the results of preoperative clinical/instrumental assessment of all patients. For Group_A patients, additional information regarding He4, CA125, and ROMA score was available (in Group_B only CA125 was known). The comparison between Group A and Group B in terms of FS accuracy, demonstrated a consensual diagnosis in 62.8% versus 58.6% (P: n.s.), underdiagnosis in 25.6% versus 41.4% (P < 0.05), and overdiagnosis in 11.6% versus 0% (P < 0.01). Low FS diagnostic accuracy was associated with menopausal status (OR: 2.13), laparoscopic approach (OR: 2.18), mucinous histotype (OR: 2.23), low grading (OR: 1.30), and FIGO stage I (OR: 2.53). Ultrasound detection of papillae (OR: 0.29), septa (OR: 0.39), atypical vascularization (OR: 0.34), serum He4 assay (OR: 0.39), and ROMA score assessment (OR: 0.44) decreased the probability of underdiagnosis. A combined preoperative assessment through serum markers and ultrasonographic features may potentially reduce the risk of underdiagnosis of BOTs on FS while likely increasing the concomitant incidence of false-positive events. PMID:25431767

  8. High-resolution high-performance liquid chromatography with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry characterization of a new isoform of human salivary acidic proline-rich proteins named Roma-Boston Ser22(Phos) → Phe variant

    PubMed Central

    Iavarone, Federica; D’Alessandro, Alfredo; Tian, Na; Cabras, Tiziana; Messana, Irene; Helmerhorst, Eva J.; Oppenheim, Frank G.; Castagnola, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    During a survey of human saliva by a top-down reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry approach, two proteins eluting at 27.4 and 28.4 min, with average masses of 15 494 ± 1 and 11 142 ± 1 Da, were detected in a subject from Boston. The Δmass value (4352 Da) of the two proteins was similar to the difference in mass values between intact (150 amino acids, [a.a.]) and truncated acidic proline-rich proteins (aPRPs; 106 a.a.) suggesting an a.a. substitution in the first 106 residues resulting in a strong reduction in polarity, since under the same experimental conditions aPRPs eluted at ~22.5 min (intact) and 23.5 min (truncated forms). Manual inspection of the high-resolution high-performance liquid chromatography with electrospray ionization tandem mass spectra of the truncated isoform showed the replacement of the phosphorylated Ser-22 in PRP-3 with a Phe residue. Inspection of the tandem mass spectra of the intact isoform confirmed the substitution, which is allowed by the code transition TCT→TTT and is in agreement with the dramatic increase in elution time. The isoform was also detected in two other subjects, one from Boston (unrelated to the previous) and one from Rome. For this reason we propose to name this variant PRP-1 (PRP-3) RB (Roma-Boston) Ser22(phos)→Phe. PMID:24771659

  9. Roma Invicta! Constructing a Roman Apothecary Garden

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Debbie

    2012-01-01

    It may be quite daunting to put together a proposal for an award, especially something as prestigious as the Rolls-Royce Science Prize! But this is exactly what the author did as soon as she was appointed head of juniors at La Sagesse School in Newcastle upon Tyne. After a consultation with staff, governors, the school council and the…

  10. A newly discovered founder population: the Roma/Gypsies.

    PubMed

    Kalaydjieva, Luba; Morar, Bharti; Chaix, Raphaelle; Tang, Hua

    2005-10-01

    The Gypsies (a misnomer, derived from an early legend about Egyptian origins) defy the conventional definition of a population: they have no nation-state, speak different languages, belong to many religions and comprise a mosaic of socially and culturally divergent groups separated by strict rules of endogamy. Referred to as "the invisible minority", the Gypsies have for centuries been ignored by Western medicine, and their genetic heritage has only recently attracted attention. Common origins from a small group of ancestors characterise the 8-10 million European Gypsies as an unusual trans-national founder population, whose exodus from India played the role of a profound demographic bottleneck. Social and economic pressures within Europe led to gradual fragmentation, generating multiple genetically differentiated subisolates. The string of population bottlenecks and founder effects have shaped a unique genetic profile, whose potential for genetic research can be met only by study designs that acknowledge cultural tradition and self-identity. PMID:16163730

  11. Intercultural Education: The Position of Roma in Education=Obrazovanje za interkulturalizam: Položaj Roma u odgoju i obrazovanju

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mlinarevic, Vesnica, Ed.; Brust Nemet, Maja, Ed.; Bushati, Jozef, Ed.

    2015-01-01

    Faculty of Educational Sciences has recognized the importance of education for interculturalism, and it organizes the conference entitled "Education for interculturalism" every five years, so that all participants could gain new insights about interculturalism and strengthen their intercultural competencies. Modern interculturalism, as a…

  12. "And Roma Were Victims, Too." The Romani Genocide and Holocaust Education in Romania

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelso, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    While Holocaust education has been mandatory in Romanian schools for over a decade, educators do not necessarily teach about it. Distortion and obfuscation of Romanian Holocaust crimes during the communist and transition periods means that teachers, like the majority of Romanians, know little about their country's perpetration of genocides. From…

  13. The Cultural Responsiveness of Teacher Candidates Towards Roma Pupils in Serbia and Slovenia--Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pecek, Mojca; Macura-Milovanovic, Suncica; Vujisic-Živkovic, Nataša

    2014-01-01

    In many countries, there is a growing need for teacher awareness and sensitivity to cultural differences, what is often called culturally responsive teaching. This is why teacher education institutions are making significant efforts to require student teachers to enrol in courses that focus on understanding, tolerance and acceptance of differences…

  14. Gas hazard assessment in a densely inhabited area of Colli Albani Volcano (Cava dei Selci, Roma)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carapezza, M. L.; Badalamenti, B.; Cavarra, L.; Scalzo, A.

    2003-04-01

    The northwestern flank of the Colli Albani, a Quaternary volcanic complex near Rome, is characterised by high pCO 2 values and Rn activities in the groundwater and by the presence of zones with strong emission of gas from the soil. The most significant of these zones is Cava dei Selci where many houses are located very near to the gas emission site. The emitted gas consists mainly of CO 2 (up to 98 vol%) with an appreciable content of H 2S (0.8-2%). The He and C isotopic composition indicates, as for all fluids associated with the Quaternary Roman and Tuscany volcanic provinces, the presence of an upper mantle component contaminated by crustal fluids associated with subducted sediments and carbonates. An advective CO 2 flux of 37 tons/day has been estimated from the gas bubbles rising to the surface in a small drainage ditch and through a stagnant water pool, present in the rainy season in a topographically low central part of the area. A CO 2 soil flux survey with an accumulation chamber, carried out in February-March 2000 over a 12 000 m 2 surface with 242 measurement points, gave a total (mostly conductive) flux of 61 tons/day. CO 2 soil flux values vary by four orders of magnitude over a 160-m distance and by one order of magnitude over several metres. A fixed network of 114 points over 6350 m 2 has been installed in order to investigate temporal flux variations. Six surveys carried out from May 2000 to June 2001 have shown large variations of the total CO 2 soil flux (8-25 tons/day). The strong emission of CO 2 and H 2S, which are gases denser than air, produces dangerous accumulations in low areas which have caused a series of lethal accidents to animals and one to a man. The gas hazard near the houses has been assessed by continuously monitoring the CO 2 and H 2S concentration in the air at 75 cm from the ground by means of two automatic stations. Certain environmental parameters (wind direction and speed; atm P, T, humidity and rainfall) were also continuously recorded. At both stations, H 2S and CO 2 exceeded by several times the recommended concentration thresholds. The highest CO 2 and H 2S values were recorded always with wind speeds less than 1.5 m/s, mostly in the night hours. Our results indicate that there is a severe gas hazard for people living near the gas emission site of Cava dei Selci, and appropriate precautionary and prevention measures have been recommended both to residents and local authorities.

  15. [Psychoanalysis of historically foreign phenomena--exemplified by Sinti and Roma].

    PubMed

    Maciejewski, F

    1994-01-01

    The xenophobia directed at Gypsies has received little attention from the psychoanalytic vantage. The author approaches the subject by drawing upon Freud's work on the uncanny and Fenichel's on anti-semitism in order to analyse the transformation of fear of the foreign into hatred of the foreign. With reference to the difference in significance between anti-semitism and hostility towards Gypsies as operative factors in the process of western civilization, the author argues that, like anti-semitism, antagonism towards Gypsies is based in the projection of unacceptable aspects of the self onto others, but whereas the anti-semite's unconscious fantasies of Oedipal hatred are directed at the world of Jewish fathers and father-sons representing civilizational progress, unconscious hatred of Gypsies is levelled at the mother-sons symbolising the archaic world, with their adherence to the pleasure principle of matriarchy and their corresponding evasion of the constraints of patriarchy. PMID:8127975

  16. Perianal melanoma with a BRAF gene mutation in a young Portuguese Roma native.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    A case of a young man diagnosed with perianal nodular melanoma with a gene mutation, accompanied by regional and pulmonary metastases on initial presentation, and later on with hepatic and bone involvement, is presented. The patient underwent wide local excision but was unresponsive to dacarbazine. Targeted therapy with vemurafenib had shown clinical improvement for a 5-month duration until he showed signs of disease progression. Just after the shift of adjuvant therapy to ipilimumab, he was diagnosed with multiple cerebral metastases that eventually led to his demise 6 months after initiation of vemurafenib, having had a 12-month survival period from the time of initial melanoma diagnosis. PMID:26880821

  17. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The Roma BZCAT - 5th edition (Massaro+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massaro, E.; Giommi, P.; Leto, C.; Marchegiani, P.; Maselli, A.; Perri, M.; Piranomonte, S.; Sclavi, S.

    2016-02-01

    In the 5th Edition we use similar denomination of blazars adopted in the previous editions. Each blazar is identified by a code, with 5BZ for all blazars, a fourth letter that specifies the type (B, G, Q or U), followed by the truncated equatorial coordinates (J2000). We introduced the edition number before the letters BZ to avoid possible confusion due to the fact that several sources changed their old names because of the new adopted classification. The codes are defined in the "Note (G1)" below. The 5th edition contains 1151 BZB sources, 92 of which are reported as candidates because we could not find their optical spectra in the literature, 1909 BZQ sources, 274 BZG sources and 227 BZU objects (1 data file).

  18. Measurement and Modeling of Respiration Rate of Tomato (Cultivar Roma) for Modified Atmosphere Storage.

    PubMed

    Kandasamy, Palani; Moitra, Ranabir; Mukherjee, Souti

    2015-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine the respiration rate of tomato at 10, 20 and 30 °C using closed respiration system. Oxygen depletion and carbon dioxide accumulation in the system containing tomato was monitored. Respiration rate was found to decrease with increasing CO2 and decreasing O2 concentration. Michaelis-Menten type model based on enzyme kinetics was evaluated using experimental data generated for predicting the respiration rate. The model parameters that obtained from the respiration rate at different O2 and CO2 concentration levels were used to fit the model against the storage temperatures. The fitting was fair (R2 = 0.923 to 0.970) when the respiration rate was expressed as O2 concentation. Since inhibition constant for CO2 concentration tended towards negetive, the model was modified as a function of O2 concentration only. The modified model was fitted to the experimental data and showed good agreement (R2 = 0.998) with experimentally estimated respiration rate. PMID:26078087

  19. "Nothing about Us without Us": The Role of Inclusive Community Development in School Desegregation for Roma Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryder, Andrew Richard; Rostas, Iulius; Taba, Marius

    2014-01-01

    This article was presented at the European Conference on Educational Research, September 2012 Cadiz, Spain. The article argues that community dialogue and participation is a vital dynamic in desegregation and explores the centrality of forms of empowerment which can be described as "inclusive community development" (ICD). The segregation…

  20. Fasi fenologiche di Cupressus Sempervirens all'IIS Caffè, a Roma durante l'inverno 2016

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigismondi, Costantino; Ricciardi, Lorenzo

    2016-05-01

    The phenology of 10 trees of Cupressus Sempervirens has been monitored weekly during the winter 2016. In the month of February 2016 all pollinations occurred for our sample trees near new Moon and last quarter.

  1. Effect of Xylopia aethiopica aqueous extract on antioxidant properties of refrigerated Roma tomato variety packaged in low density polyethylene bags.

    PubMed

    Babarinde, Grace Oluwakemi; Adegoke, Gabriel O

    2015-03-01

    Effects of Xylopia aethiopica (Dunal) A. Richard aqueous extract on the antioxidants of matured tomato fruits at red stage were investigated at 13 ± 2 °C and 80 ± 5 % relative humidity. A sample treated with sodium bicarbonate and untreated samples were included. Samples packaged in low density polyethylene (30 μm thickness) bags were analysed at intervals of 5 days. The treatments revealed statistically significant differences in ascorbic acid content of stored tomato fruits. Fruits treated with 5 % X. aethiopica on day 5 of storage had 21.0 mg/100 g which was significantly (p < 0.05) higher than 18.2 mg/100 g in untreated control samples. At 15th day of storage, ascorbic acid was 10.0 and 14.2 mg/100 g in tomato fruits treated with sodium bicarbonate and 5 % X. aethiopica respectively. The carotenoid and lycopene contents were lower in sodium bicarbonate-treated and the untreated control samples than in X. aethiopica-treated sample. The total phenolic contents were better retained in X. aethiopica-treated tomato than in control. Treatment of tomato fruits with X. aethiopica at 4 & 5 % levels significantly retained the qualities evaluated. PMID:25745258

  2. Non-invasive deformation analysis of historical buildings through the advanced SBAS-DInSAR technique: the case of the city of Roma (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manunta, Michele; Bonano, Manuela; Marsella, Maria; Lanari, Riccardo

    2010-05-01

    The monitoring of urban areas and man-made structures is of key importance for the preservation of artistic, archaeological and architectural heritage. In this context, the remote sensing techniques may allow non-invasive analysis of large areas by exploiting long time series of satellite data. Among these techniques, the Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) Interferometry (InSAR) has already demonstrated to be an effective tool for monitoring the displacements occurring in the historical and artistic heritage located in the historical city centers. As a matter of fact, the InSAR technique allows producing spatially dense deformation maps with centimeter to millimeter accuracy, by exploiting the phase difference (interferogram) of temporally separated SAR images relevant to the same analyzed area. In order to guarantee the monitoring of urban area displacements, it is strategic to provide very long term deformation time series by also exploiting SAR data acquired by different sensors. Accordingly, ERS/ENVISAT data archive, providing acquisitions spanning the 1992-2010 time period, might allow us generating very long term deformation time-series. However, an ERS/ENVISAT data combination is limited by the two sensors slightly different carrier frequencies: 5.331 GHz for the ENVISAT sensor and 5.3 GHz for the ERS one. Therefore, because the interferometric phase is dependent on the radiation wavelength, the generation of conventional ERS/ENVISAT cross-interferograms is strongly affected by the induced decorrelation effects. In this work we show the effectiveness of the Small BAseline Subset (SBAS) (Berardino et al., 2002; Lanari et al., 2004) approach for the conservation, monitoring and risk prevention of cultural heritage. Indeed, the SBAS technique allows us to produce deformation time series at the scale of the single building by processing very long sequences of ERS-1/2 and ENVISAT (IS2 swath) SAR data, acquired with the same illumination geometry. In particular, the SBAS approach exploits only conventional ERS/ERS and ENVISAT/ENVISAT differential interferograms, in order to limit the decorrelation effects and improve the number of the detected coherent points. Accordingly, this method may play a key role for supporting the study and conservation strategies of the historical built heritage, monuments and artistic artifacts, due to its capability of generating deformation time series spanning time interval of more than 15 years. The presented results, achieved by applying the full resolution SBAS approach to an ERS/ENVISAT dataset relevant to the city of Rome, demonstrate the effectiveness of this technique to detect and analyze the temporal evolution of possible deformation phenomena affecting historical buildings within the investigated 1992-2009 time period. [1] P. Berardino, G. Fornaro, R. Lanari, and E. Sansosti, "A new Algorithm for Surface Deformation Monitoring based on Small Baseline Differential SAR Interferograms", IEEE Trans.Geosci. Remote Sens., Vol. 40, No 11, pp. 2375-2383, 2002. [2] Lanari, R., Mora, O., Manunta, M., Mallorquí, J.J., Berardino, P. and Sansosti, E., "A small baseline approach for investigating deformations on full resolution differential SAR interferograms", IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing, Vol. 42, pp. 1377-1386, 2004.

  3. Helping the Marginalised or Supporting the Elite? Affirmative Action as a Tool for Increasing Access to Higher Education for Ethnic Roma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garaz, Stella

    2014-01-01

    Among the many arguments against affirmative action discussed in the academic literature, there is one stating that affirmative action fails to target the most marginalised members of a disadvantaged group, and instead it supports the group's most affluent members whose socio-economic position may be comparable to that of the mainstream…

  4. Chemoradiation With Concomitant Boosts Followed by Radical Surgery in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer: Long-term Results of the ROMA-2 Prospective Phase 2 Study

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrandina, Gabriella; Gambacorta, Antonietta; Gallotta, Valerio; Smaniotto, Daniela; Fagotti, Anna; Tagliaferri, Luca; Foti, Elvira; Fanfani, Francesco; Autorino, Rosa; Scambia, Giovanni; Valentini, Vincenzo

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: This prospective, phase 2 study aimed at assessing the efficacy of accelerated fractionation radiation therapy by concomitant boosts (CBs) associated with chemoradiation therapy (CRT) of the whole pelvis, in improving the rate of pathological complete response (pCR) to treatment in patients with International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage IB2-IVA locally advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Neoadjuvant CRT included conformal irradiation of the whole pelvis with a total dose of 39.6 Gy (1.8 cGy/fraction, 22 fractions), plus additional irradiation of primary tumor and parametria with 10.8 Gy administered with CBs (0.9 cGy/fraction, 12 fractions, every other day). Concomitant chemotherapy included cisplatin (20 mg/m{sup 2}, days 1-4 and 26-30 of treatment), and capecitabine (1300 mg/m{sup 2}/daily, orally) during the first 2 and the last 2 weeks of treatment. Radical hysterectomy plus pelvic with or without aortic lymphadenectomy was performed within 6 to 8 weeks from CRT. Toxicity was recorded according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group toxicity criteria and Chassagne grading system. Based on the Simon design, 103 cases were required, and the regimen would be considered active if >45 pCR were registered (α error = 0.05; β error = 0.1). Results: pCR was documented in 51 cases (50.5%), and the regimen was considered active, according to the planned statistical assumptions. At median follow-up of 36 months (range: 7-85 months), the 3-year local failure rate was 7%, whereas the 3-year disease-free and overall survival rates were 73.0% and 86.1%, respectively. Grade 3 leukopenia and neutropenia were reported in only 1 and 2 cases, respectively. Gastrointestinal toxicity was always grade 1 or 2. Conclusions: Addition of CBs in the accelerated fractionation modality to the whole pelvis chemoradiation followed by radical surgery results in a high rate of pathologically assessed complete response to CRT and a very encouraging local control rate, with acceptable toxicity.

  5. Thermal inactivation of Salmonella and E.coli 0157:H7 on Roma tomato stem scars using high-intensity infrared laser light

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Foodborne illness associated with contaminated produce is a continuing concern. Compared to the skin surface, stem scar areas of intact fruits and vegetables harbor more bacteria and are more resistant to chemical sanitizing processes. This study evaluated a precision thermal kill process which uses...

  6. The first winter solstice observed at the meridian line of Santa Maria degli Angeli in Rome. (Italian Title: Il primo solstizio d'inverno alla meridiana di S. Maria degli Angeli in Roma)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigismondi, C.

    2014-09-01

    The great meridian line in the Basilica of Santa Maria degli Angeli in Rome was built in 1701/1702 with the scope to measure the Obliquity of the Earth's orbit in the following eight centuries, upon the will of pope Clement XI. During the winter solstice of 1701 the first measurements of the obliquity have been realized by Francesco Bianchini, the astronomer who designed the meridian line, upgrading the similar instrument realized by Giandomenico Cassini in San Petronio, Bononia. In this paper the accuracy of the data observed by Francesco Bianchini is discussed and compared with up-to-date ephemerides. The modern situation of this historical instrument is also presented.

  7. Romani Culture and Academic Success: Arguments against the Belief in a Contradiction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brüggemann, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Roma, today perceived as the most numerous European minority, face marginalisation and exclusion. Education is considered to be one of the focal points for improvement, and numerous studies have analysed and reported on the educational situation of Roma. Several studies have argued that Romani cultural values are not compatible with institutional…

  8. Romans: A Simulation of the History and Culture of Ancient Rome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staneart, Chuck; Baral, Wanda

    This simulation allows students to learn about and participate in many of the aspects of ancient Roman life that have influenced present institutions and way of life. The phases of the unit include: (1) "Daily Life"; (2) "Forum of Roma"; (3) "Temple of Apollo"; (4) "Pax Romana"; (5) "History/Mystery: 'Who Killed Mama Roma?'"; (6) "Circus Maximus"…

  9. Emerging from the Cocoon of Romani Pride: The First Graduates of the Gandhi Secondary School in Hungary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Susan Roberta

    2005-01-01

    Despite recent educational reforms in Hungary, only 33% of Roma who enter primary school subsequently enroll in secondary school, and a mere 0.2% progress to higher education. To address this situation, in 1994 the Gandhi Secondary School opened its doors as the first college preparatory school for Roma in Europe. In 2000, the school graduated 18…

  10. Preface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capone, Antonio; De Bonis, Giulia; De Vincenzi, Mario; Morselli, Aldo

    2014-04-01

    The present issue of Nuclear Instrument and Methods in Physics Research contains the Proceedings of the 4th Roma International Conference on Astroparticle Physics (RICAP'13) held in Roma at the "Sapienza" University from May 22nd to May 24th, 2013.

  11. Language Planning and Media: The Case of Romani

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halwachs, Dieter W.

    2011-01-01

    Romani media and language planning gained importance as a consequence of the political emancipation of the Roma, which is mainly based on the idea of a European Roma nation with its own culture and language. Meanwhile the study of Romani has developed from an exotic into a more or less established scientific field. However, with respect to media…

  12. The Political Status of the Romani Language in Europe. Mercator Working Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakker, Peter; Rooker, Marcia

    This paper examines the political status of Romani. the language of the Gypsies/Roma, in the European Union (EU). Even though some groups do not call themselves "Roma," all Romani speaking groups use the name "Romanes" for their language and "Romani/Romano/Romane" for everything related to their group. All groups use the same language, and all…

  13. A Hidden Minority Becomes Visible: Romani Refugee Children in the Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tamas, Judit

    2001-01-01

    Discusses educational concerns of Roma, or Gypsy, children in Canada. Provides background information on this minority group and discusses Roma attitudes toward education and Romani children's experiences in Eastern European schools. Provides suggestions for welcoming Romani children into new schools, including developing children's first and…

  14. Analysis of falsely elevated risk of ovarian malignancy algorithm in women with ovarian endometrioma

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jae Jun; Lee, Ye Ji; Kim, Ranah; Lee, Da Yong; Won, Kyu-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Objective To estimate the incidence of falsely elevated risk of ovarian malignancy algorithm (ROMA) in a group of women with pathologically confirmed endometrioma and to investigate the associated factors. Methods One hundred premenopausal women surgically diagnosed with ovarian endometrioma were selected. Preoperative clinical, laboratory, and surgical characteristics were compared between the elevated-risk group (ROMA-premenopausal value, ≥7.4%) and normal-risk group (ROMA-premenopausal value, <7.4%). Results Elevated ROMA was observed in 15 women (false positive rate, 15%). Excluding one woman with known chronic renal failure, we compared the characteristics of 99 women between the elevated-risk group (n=14) and the normalrisk group (n=85). None of the clinical and surgical variables distinguished the two groups. Serum level of CA 125 >82.3 U/mL and serum level of human epididymis protein 4 (HE4) >46 pmol/L could predict an elevated ROMA test with a statistical significance. When serum level of HE4 ≤46 pmol/L, none of the women showed an elevated ROMA test, regardless of serum level of CA 125; however, 55.6% of the women showed an elevated ROMA test when serum level of HE4 >46 pmol/L and CA 125 ≤82.3 U/mL and all women showed an elevated ROMA test when serum level of HE4 >46 pmol/L and CA 125 >82.3 U/mL. Conclusion The incidence of falsely elevated ROMA was 15% in the group of women with pathologically confirmed endometrioma. Interpretation of the ROMA results should be cautious when serum level of HE4 >46 pmol/L and CA 125 >82.3 U/mL in women with suspicious ovarian endometrioma. PMID:27462596

  15. Perspectives for the biological control of Cameraria ohridella.

    PubMed

    Zemek, Rostislav; Prenerová, Eva; Volter, Lubomír; Weyda, Frantisek; Skuhravý, Václav

    2007-01-01

    The horse chestnut leaf-miner, Cameraria ohridella Deschka et Dimic (Lepidoptera, Gracillariidae) is a serious invasive pest of Aesculus hippocastanum in Europe. The larvae of this species feed on leaf parenchyma and can reduce the tree growth. We studied the impact of parasitoids on C. ohridella in the Czech Republic and also searched for entomopathogenic fungi associated with this pest. The results showed that the rate of parasitism varied between 5% and 15% in most cases. The most parasitized stages of C. ohridella were spinning stages and especially pupae. The most abundant parasitoid species were Minotetrastichus frontalis, Pnigalio sp. and Pediobius saulius (Hymenoptera, Eulophidae). All species are polyphagous. Using the Galleria-bait method we isolated many strains of entomopathogenic fungi. Dominant species were Paecilomyces fumosoroseus, Paecilomyces farinosus and Beauveria bassiana. The perspectives of fungal bioagents in control of C. ohridella is discussed. PMID:18399483

  16. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey, W. Eugene George, Jr., Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey, W. Eugene George, Jr., Photographer July, 1961 WEST ELEVATION (RIO GRANDE RIVER FACADE). - Leocadia Leandro Garcia House, Southwest corner of Main Plaza, Roma Creek, Starr County, TX

  17. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey, W. Eugene George, Jr., Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey, W. Eugene George, Jr., Photographer July, 1961 NORTHWEST ELEVATION (RIO GRANDE RIVER FACADE). - Leocadia Leandro Garcia House, Southwest corner of Main Plaza, Roma Creek, Starr County, TX

  18. PREFACE: Young Researcher Meeting in Rome 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agostini, Fabio; Cattani, Giordano; Mazzaferro, Luca; Migliaccio, Marina; Pietrobon, Davide; Ricci Pacifici, Daniel; Stellato, Francesco; Veneziani, Marcella

    2012-10-01

    Conference logo At its third edition, the Young Researcher Meeting in Rome (YRMR) proves to be a growing event in the Italian scientific panorama. The high-quality content of the abstracts submitted to the scientific committee resulted in an exciting conference, held, for the second time, at the University of Rome 'Tor Vergata' on 20 January 2012. A busy schedule covered a large variety of cutting-edge science topics: fundamental interactions, particle physics, cosmology, astrophysics, condensed matter and biomedical physics. The broad range of the subjects discussed is the distinctive feature of the YRMR, a meeting aimed at enhancing the synergy among complementary branches of science by stimulating a fruitful exchange between theoretical, experimental and computational physics. Promoting collaborations between PhD students, postdoctoral fellows and young researchers creates a solid scientific network with an open-minded approach to discovery. In this volume, we collect the contributions that have been presented both in the form of talks and of posters. YRMR Organising and Editorial Committee Fabio Agostini (fabio.agostini@roma2.infn.it) Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Roma 'Tor Vergata' Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma Italy Giordano Cattani (giordano.cattani@roma2.infn.it) Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Roma 'Tor Vergata' INFN sezione di Roma 'Tor Vergata' Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma Italy Luca Mazzaferro (luca.mazzaferro@roma2.infn.it) Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Roma 'Tor Vergata' INFN sezione di Roma 'Tor Vergata' Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma Italy Marina Migliaccio (migliaccio@ifca.unican.es) Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria, Edificio Juan Jorda, Avenida de los Castros, E-39005 Santander, Cantabria Spain Davide Pietrobon (davide.pietrobon@jpl.nasa.gov) Jet Propulsion Laboratory - California Institute of Technology 4800 Oak Grove Drive 169-237 91109 Pasadena, CA USA Daniel Ricci Pacifici

  19. Assessing the risk of ovarian malignancy algorithm for the conservative management of women with a pelvic mass

    PubMed Central

    Lokich, Elizabeth; Palisoul, Marguerite; Romano, Nicole; Miller, M. Craig; Robison, Katina; Stuckey, Ashley; DiSilvestro, Paul; Mathews, Cara; Granai, C.O.; Lambert-Messerlian, Geralyn; Moore, Richard G.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the use of as an aid in the identification of women who can safely undergo conservative, non-surgical management. Methods All patients referred to the Program in Women’s Oncology for surgery with a pelvic mass are evaluated at a prospective multidisciplinary tumor board (TB) where ROMA and imaging are used for management recommendations. This study evaluated women presented to TB with a pelvic mass between 2009 and 2013 who had either surgical or conservative management. Results Of the 498 patients assessed, 392 (79%) had benign disease, 22 (4%) had LMP tumors, 28 (6%) had stage I-II epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), 36 (7%) had stage III-IV EOC and 20 (4%) had non-EOC. Using clinical assessment in conjunction with ROMA, the TB recommended observation in 188 (37.8%) women. All patients diagnosed with an invasive malignancy were recommended for surgery by the TB. In the 315 patients managed surgically, 212 were found to have benign disease and 84 women were diagnosed with an invasive malignancy. The sensitivity for the initial TB recommendations using ROMA in conjunction with clinical judgment for detecting malignancy was 100% with a specificity of 47.7% and a NPV of 100%. When including low malignant potential tumors the sensitivity was 99.1%. For stage I-IV EOC ROMA alone had a sensitivity of 95.3%. Conclusions ROMA in conjunction with clinical assessment can safely identify women for conservative management. PMID:26364809

  20. [Lithuania: the need for a better intergovernmental collaboration].

    PubMed

    Caplinskas, S

    1996-01-01

    An interview is presented with Saulius Caplinskas, a virologist serving as director of Lithuania's National Center to Combat AIDS and president of the AIDS Foundation, a nongovernmental organization (NGO). AIDS is viewed principally as a health issue in Lithuania, but other institutions are gradually becoming involved. Dr. Caplinskas simultaneously heads both a governmental and nongovernmental organization because some of the activities developed with risk groups are at the margin of existing laws. The NGO allows the government to be spared direct involvement in actions that the society is not yet ready to accept. Prevention programs are lacking in Lithuania because health education and promotion were a low priority of the former Soviet Union, and discussion of homosexuality, drug addiction, and prostitution was forbidden. Social workers are nonexistent in Lithuania. Government AIDS control programs in the region have been medically oriented. Lithuania's government program has a diagnostic laboratory and a department for medical, social, and psychological support of the seropositive. An AIDS hotline and an IEC section working with the general population, mass media, and specific target groups are other activities. NGOs working in the area of AIDS receive only indirect assistance, such as use of meeting rooms. NGOs are a new development in Lithuania, and the official attitude toward them remains cautious. The first priority of the AIDS program is to increase collaboration between specialists in sexually transmitted diseases, drug use, health education, and other relevant areas. A multisectorial approach should be developed to prepare for collaboration with the NGOs. PMID:12179246

  1. Rank-ordered multifractal analysis for intermittent fluctuations with global crossover behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Tam, Sunny W. Y.; Chang, Tom; Kintner, Paul M.; Klatt, Eric M.

    2010-03-15

    The rank-ordered multifractal analysis (ROMA), a recently developed technique that combines the ideas of parametric rank ordering and one-parameter scaling of monofractals, has the capabilities of deciphering the multifractal characteristics of intermittent fluctuations. The method allows one to understand the multifractal properties through rank-ordered scaling or nonscaling parametric variables. The idea of the ROMA technique is applied to analyze the multifractal characteristics of the auroral zone electric-field fluctuations observed by the SIERRA sounding rocket. The observed fluctuations span across contiguous multiple regimes of scales with different multifractal characteristics. We extend the ROMA technique such that it can take into account the crossover behavior - with the possibility of collapsing probability distribution functions - over these contiguous regimes.

  2. Rank-Ordered Multifractal Analysis of Probability Distributions in Fluid Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Cheng-Chin; Chang, Tien

    2015-11-01

    Rank-Ordered Multifractal Analysis (ROMA) was introduced by Chang and Wu (2008) to describe the multifractal characteristic of intermittent events. The procedure provides a natural connection between the rank-ordered spectrum and the idea of one-parameter scaling for monofractals. This technique has successfully been applied to MHD turbulence simulations and turbulence data observed in various space plasmas. In this paper, the technique is applied to the probability distributions in the inertial range of the turbulent fluid flow, as given in the vast Johns Hopkins University (JHU) turbulence database. In addition, a refined method of finding the continuous ROMA spectrum and the scaled probability distribution function (PDF) simultaneously is introduced.

  3. Rights of the Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cahn, Claude, Ed.

    2000-01-01

    This newsletter examines problems and rights of Romani children in East Central Europe, focusing on such topics as: the displaced childhoods of Romani children; snapshots of living conditions in various European countries; Roma child rights; Romani and non-Romani schools in Bulgaria; Romani children's rights to education in Central and Eastern…

  4. Thermal systems for landmine detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Angelo, Marco; Del Vecchio, Luca; Esposito, Salvatore; Balsi, Marco; Jankowski, Stanislaw

    2009-06-01

    This paper presents new techniques of landmine detection and localization using thermal methods. Described methods use both dynamical and static analysis. The work is based on datasets obtained from the Humanitarian Demining Laboratory of Università La Sapienza di Roma, Italy.

  5. 76 FR 71602 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-Telemanagement Forum

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-18

    ... Corporation trading as Western Power, Perth, WA, AUSTRALIA; Equateir Telecom Congo SA, RCCM Brazzaville, CONGO... Markets Partners, Darien, CT; Wind Telecomunicaziono SpA, Roma, ITALY; wwite p/l, Eaglemont, Victoria...Link Systems, Redmond, WA; InteliPower, Johannesburg, Gauteng, SOUTH AFRICA; Intelligent...

  6. OZONE-INDUCED ETHYLENE RELEASE FROM LEAF SURFACES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone-induced stress ethylene emissions from the adaxial and abaxial leaf surfaces of four plant species (Glycine max (L) Merr. cv. Dare, Lycopersicon esculentum Mill cv. Roma VF, Eucalyptus globulus Labill. and Hedera helix L.) were studied to determine if the stress ethylene di...

  7. Optical spectroscopic observations of blazars and γ-ray blazar candidates in the Sloan digital sky survey data release nine

    SciTech Connect

    Massaro, F.; Masetti, N.; D'Abrusco, R.; Paggi, A.; Funk, S.

    2014-10-01

    We present an analysis of the optical spectra available in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data release nine (SDSS DR9) for the blazars listed in the ROMA-BZCAT and for the γ-ray blazar candidates selected according to their IR colors. First, we adopt a statistical approach based on Monte Carlo simulations to find the optical counterparts of the blazars listed in the ROMA-BZCAT catalog. Then, we crossmatched the SDSS spectroscopic catalog with our selected samples of blazars and γ-ray blazar candidates, searching for those with optical spectra available to classify our blazar-like sources and, whenever possible, to confirm their redshifts. Our main objectives are to determine the classification of uncertain blazars listed in the ROMA-BZCAT and to discover new gamma-ray blazars. For the ROMA-BZCAT sources, we investigated a sample of 84 blazars, confirming the classification for 20 of them and obtaining 18 new redshift estimates. For the γ-ray blazars, indicated as potential counterparts of unassociated Fermi sources or with uncertain nature, we established the blazar-like nature of 8 out of the 27 sources analyzed and confirmed 14 classifications.

  8. Solving the "Gypsy Problem": "D.H. and Others v. the Czech Republic"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New, William S.; Merry, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    This article examines how the "discourse moment" constituted by "D.H. and Others v. the Czech Republic" might affect the future of schooling for Roma youth. In this article, the authors follow the scheme proposed by Lilie Chouliaraki and Norman Fairclough, who suggest a five-part framework for critical discourse analysis: statement of the problem,…

  9. Values of Portuguese/Non-Portuguese Mothers of Kindergarten Children, and of Kindergarten Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marchand, Helena; d'Orey, Ines

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this research was to identify continuities/discontinuities in the values of Portuguese mothers with kindergarten children belonging to high and low socio-cultural backgrounds, mothers from different cultures and kindergarten teachers. The sample was composed of sixty-five mothers (fourteen Roma, fifteen Indian, twelve African, and ten…

  10. Efficacy of post-storage irradiation to reduce Salmonella on sliced tomatoes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Contamination of tomatoes with Salmonella is a recurring food safety concern. Irradiation is a nonthermal intervention that can inactivate pathogens on fresh produce. The best practices for implementing irradiation for fresh produce have yet to be determined. Roma tomatoes were sliced and inoculated...

  11. INFLUENCE OF LIGHT ON OZONE-INDUCED 1-AMINOCYCLOPROPANE-1-CARBOXYLIC ACID AND ETHYLENE PRODUCTION FROM INTACT PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The influence of light on ozone-induced ethylene production from intact soybean (Glycine max L. Merr. cv. Dare) and tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. cv. Roma) plants was investigated. Ozone-induced stress ethylene production was 2.6-fold greater from dark-than light-incubate...

  12. Burnout and Work Engagement: Independent Factors or Opposite Poles?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez-Roma, Vicente; Schaufeli, Wilmar B.; Bakker, Arnold B.; Lloret, Susana

    2006-01-01

    Burnout researchers have proposed that the conceptual opposites of emotional exhaustion and cynicism (the core dimensions of burnout) are vigor and dedication (the core dimensions of engagement), respectively (Maslach & Leiter, 1997; Schaufeli, Salanova, Gonzalez-Roma, & Bakker, 2002). We tested this proposition by ascertaining whether two sets of…

  13. Lycopene content among organically produced tomatoes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this research was to determine how much lycopene was produced in tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum) grown organically, and if tomatoes picked at the breaker stage could obtain full lycopene content. 'Classica,' a Roma type of tomato, was highest in lycopene (106 mg/kg) and the other ...

  14. Supporting Refugee Children in 21st Century Britain: A Compendium of Essential Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutter, Jill

    This book provides information on the most recent groups of refugee children in British schools, including children from Albania, Eastern European Roma, the former Soviet Union, Iraq, Kurdistan, Algeria, Colombia, Ecuador, Bolivia, Kenya, Nigeria, and many other countries. Because educational provisions for students from refugee communities have…

  15. Representing "The Great Devouring:" Romani Characters in Young Adult Holocaust Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean-Ruzicka, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    This article discusses the representation of Roma-Sinti ("gypsy") characters in young adult literature about the Holocaust. It analyzes three primary texts: Jerry Spinelli's "Milkweed" (2003), Erich Hackl's "Farewell Sidonia" (1991), and Alexander Ramati's "And the Violins Stopped Playing"…

  16. Essay on Personal Field Experiences from an Intercultural Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furtuna, Adrian-Nicolae

    2015-01-01

    In this article I intend to analyse two of the research projects I carried out among the Roma from a critical intercultural perspective. I shall discuss some of the processes referring to the educational policy of teaching Romani mother tongue in school, considering not only the direct beneficiaries of this policy, the students, but also the…

  17. Understanding Ustasa violence.

    PubMed

    Korb, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    The Independent State of Croatia (1941-1945) was a multi-ethnic entity in which a range of political and military powers cooperated with and fought against one another. No less complicated were the ruling Ustaa movement and its relationship with Nazi Germany and Fascist Italy. The persecution of the Serbs, the Jews, and the Roma in the Independent State of Croatia was marked by differences and similarities, which were reflected the decision-making process within the Ustaa leadership. Over time, this mass violence (and Ustaa decisions) moderated due to a variety of factors: the interethnic civil war, victim reactions, local factors, and the harvest. The Italians and Germans, however, also played a role in the persecution of the Serbs, Jews, and Roma in Croatia. Simplifying narratives of the Ustaa as marginal collaborationists and state-centered concepts of genocide are inadequate when it comes to explaining Ustaa violence. PMID:20941879

  18. Ethnic and religious differentials in Bulgarian mortality, 1993-98.

    PubMed

    Kohler, Iliana V; Preston, Samuel H

    2011-03-01

    We investigated ethnic/religious mortality differentials in Bulgaria during the 1990s. The analyses employed a unique longitudinal data-set covering the entire population of Bulgaria from the census of 1992 until 1998. The mortality of Roma is very high compared to all other ethnic/religious groups. The excess applies to nearly every cause of death examined and is not entirely explained by the adverse location of Roma on social and economic variables. For young men, Muslim mortality is substantially lower than that of non-Muslims when socio-economic differences are controlled. An analysis of causes of death suggests that lower consumption of alcohol may contribute to this 'Muslim paradox'. For older Turkish women, a significant mortality disadvantage remains after controls are imposed. Suicide mortality is lower for Muslims than for Christian groups of the same ethnicity. Consistent with deteriorating economic conditions over the study period, mortality was rising, particularly for women. PMID:21294054

  19. HSMNR belongs to the most frequent types of hereditary neuropathy in the Czech Republic and is twice more frequent than HMSNL.

    PubMed

    Šafka Brožková, D; Haberlová, J; Mazanec, R; Laštůvková, J; Seeman, P

    2016-08-01

    Hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy type Russe (HMSNR), also called CMT4G, is an autosomal recessive inherited peripheral neuropathy (IPN) caused by a founder mutation in the HK1 gene. HMSNR affects only patients with Roma origin, similar to the better known HMSN type Lom clarified earlier. By testing IPN patients with Roma origin, we realized that HMSNR affects surprisingly many patients in the Czech Republic. HMSNR is one of the most frequent types of IPN in this country and appears to be twice more frequent than HMSNL. Pronounced lower limb atrophies and severe deformities often lead to walking inability in even young patients, but hands are usually only mildly affected even after many years of disease duration. The group of 20 patients with HMSNR presented here is the first report about the prevalence of HMSNR from central Europe. PMID:26822750

  20. Romaphobia among Serbian and Dutch adolescents: the role of perceived threat, nationalistic feelings, and integrative orientations.

    PubMed

    Ljujic, Vanja; Vedder, Paul; Dekker, Henk; Geel, Mitch

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the relationships between nationalism and integration attitudes on one hand, and anti-Roma prejudice on the other. Using Stephan and Stephan's threat theory, the study analyzes whether and to what extent these relationships are mediated by perceived economic and symbolic threats. Data were collected among 16- and 17-year-old students in Serbia and The Netherlands. A path analysis shows that perceived economic and symbolic threats mediate the relationships between nationalism and integration on one hand, and Romaphobia on the other. Moreover, the findings show that these relationships are comparable between Serbian and Dutch youth. Levels of threat and Romaphobia differ between countries. Youth in the Netherlands, who barely have contact opportunities with Roma, are characterized by higher threat and Romaphobia scores than Serbian youth, who have proportionally more contact opportunities. Explanations are discussed as well as implications for theory and prejudice reduction in diverse intercultural settings. PMID:22519428

  1. Ethnic and religious differentials in Bulgarian mortality, 1993–98

    PubMed Central

    Kohler, Iliana V.; Preston, Samuel H.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated ethnic/religious mortality differentials in Bulgaria during the 1990s. The analyses employed a unique longitudinal data set covering the entire population of Bulgaria from the census of 1992 until 1998. The mortality of Roma is very high compared to all other ethnic/religious groups. The excess applies to nearly every cause of death examined and is not entirely explained by the adverse location of Roma on social and economic variables. For young men, Muslim mortality is substantially lower than that of non-Muslims when socioeconomic differences are controlled. An analysis of causes of death suggests that lower consumption of alcohol may contribute to this ‘Muslim paradox’. For older Muslim women, a significant mortality disadvantage remains after controls are imposed. Suicide mortality is lower for Muslims than for Christian groups of the same ethnicity. Consistent with deteriorating economic conditions over the study period, mortality was rising, particularly for women. PMID:21294054

  2. [Screening and prevention of tuberculosis, an experiment in Marseille].

    PubMed

    Rodier, Philippe; Armengaud, Alexis; Laporte, Rémi; Benabdelkader, El Hadi; Labaume, Cendrine

    2012-01-01

    In order to apply the recommendations of the French High Council on Public Health (CSHPF), the association "Médecins du Monde" and the departmental centre for the fight against tuberculosis led; in 2010-2011, two campaigns for on-site screening, in Marseille, with Roma families in situations of precariousness. These campaigns came up against a number of difficulties which must be addressed in order to make them more effective. PMID:22420082

  3. Silicon Microstrip Detectors for the Jlab SBS Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Persio, F.; Kiprich, S.; Meddi, F.; Urciuoli, G. M.

    2014-06-01

    The INFN group of Rome is developing two silicon microstrip detector planes to be part of the tracking system of the SBS spectrometer, that will be installed in the experimental Hall A of Jefferson Labortatory, in order to improve its resolution. The detector and the PCB design were the results of models simulated using PSPICE. The entire assembly process will be realized in the INFN Roma clean room CL10000 facility.

  4. COMMITTEES: Committees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-01-01

    TAUP STEERING COMMITTEE F T Avignone, University of South Carolina B C Barish, CALTECH E Bellotti, University of Milano, INFN J Bernabeu, University of Valencia A Bottino (Chair), University of Torino, INFN N Fornengo, University of Torino, INFN T Kajita, ICRR University of Tokyo C W Kim, Johns Hopkins University, KIAS V Matveev, INR Moscow J Morales, University of Zaragoza G Raffelt, MPI Munchen D Sinclair, University of Carleton M Spiro, IN2P3 TAUP 2009 INTERNATIONAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE J J Aubert, CNRS Marseille M Baldo-Ceolin, University of Padova, INFN G Bellini, University of Milano, INFN L Bergstrom, University of Stockholm R Bernabei, University of Roma Tor Vergata, INFN A Bettini, University of Padova, INFN, LSC S Bilenky, JINR Dubna D O Caldwell, UCSB J Cronin, University of Chicago A Dar, Technion Haifa G Domogatsky, INR Moscow J Ellis, CERN E Fernandez, IFAE Barcelona E Fiorini, University of Milano, INFN T Gaisser, University of Delaware G Gelmini, UCLA G Gerbier, CEA Saclay A Giazotto, INFN Pisa F Halzen, University of Wisconsin W Haxton, University of Washington T Kirsten MPI Heidelberg L Maiani, University of Roma La Sapienza, INFN A McDonald, Queen's University K Nakamura, KEK R Petronzio, INFN, University of Roma Tor Vergata L Resvanis, University of Athens F Ronga INFN, LNF C Rubbia INFN, LNGS A Smirnov, ICTP Trieste C Spiering, DESY N Spooner, University of Sheffield A Suzuki, KEK S Ting MIT, CERN M S Turner, FNAL, University of Chicago J W F Valle, IFIC Valencia D Vignaud, APC Paris G Zatsepin, INR Moscow TAUP 2009 ORGANIZING COMMITTEE R Aloisio, LNGS R Antolini, LNGS F Arneodo, LNGS Z Berezhiani, University of L'Aquila, INFN V Berezinsky, LNGS R Cerulli, LNGS E Coccia [Chair], LNGS/INFN, U of Roma Tor Vergata N D'Ambrosio, LNGS N Fornengo, University of Torino, INFN M Laubenstein, LNGS O Palamara, LNGS L Pandola [Scientific Secretary], LNGS

  5. The SPARX Project: R & D Activity Towards X-Rays FEL Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Alesini, D.; Bellaveglia, M.; Bertolucci, S.; Biagini, M.E.; Boni, R.; Boscolo, M.; Castellano, M.; Clozza, A.; Di Pirro, G.; Drago, A.; Esposito, A.; Ferrario, M.; Filippetto, D.; Fusco, V.; Gallo, A.; Ghigo, A.; Guiducci, S.; Incurvati, M.; Ligi, C.; Marcellini, F.; Migliorati, M.; /Frascati /ENEA, Frascati /INFN, Milan /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome2 /Milan Polytechnic /UCLA /SLAC

    2005-08-05

    SPARX is an evolutionary project proposed by a collaboration among ENEA-INFN-CNR-Universita di Roma Tor Vergata aiming at the construction of a FELSASE X-ray source in the Tor Vergata Campus. The first phase of the SPARX project, funded by Government Agencies, will be focused on R&D activity on critical components and techniques for future X-ray facilities as described in this paper.

  6. Considerations on the current universal vaccination policy against hepatitis A in Greece after recent outbreaks.

    PubMed

    Mellou, Kassiani; Sideroglou, Theologia; Papaevangelou, Vassiliki; Katsiaflaka, Anna; Bitsolas, Nikolaos; Verykouki, Eleni; Triantafillou, Eleni; Baka, Agoritsa; Georgakopoulou, Theano; Hadjichristodoulou, Christos

    2015-01-01

    Greece is the only European Union member state that in 2008 included hepatitis A (HAV) vaccine in the routine national childhood immunization program (NCIP). Given that the resources allocated to public health have dramatically decreased since 2008 and that Greece is a low endemicity country for the disease, the benefit from universal vaccination has been questioned. The aim of this paper is to summarize the available epidemiological data of the disease for 1982-2013, and discuss the effects of universal vaccination on disease morbidity. Descriptive analysis, ARIMA modeling and time series intervention analysis were conducted using surveillance data of acute HAV. A decreasing trend of HAV notification rate over the years was identified (p<0.001). However, universal vaccination (~ 80% vaccine coverage of children) had no significant effect on the annual number of reported cases (p = 0.261) and has resulted to a progressive increase of the average age of infection in the general population. The mean age of cases before the inclusion of the vaccine to NCIP (24.1 years, SD = 1.5) was significantly lower than the mean age of cases after 2008 (31.7 years, SD = 2.1) (p<0.001). In the last decade, one third of all reported cases were Roma (a population accounting for 1.5% of the country's total population) and in 2013 three outbreaks with 16, 9 and 25 Roma cases respectively, were recorded, indicating the decreased effectiveness of the current immunization strategy in this group. Data suggest that universal vaccination may need to be re-considered. Probably a more cost effective approach would be to implement a program that will include: a) vaccination of high risk groups, b) universal vaccination of Roma children and improving conditions at Roma camps, c) education of the population and travel advice, and d) enhancement of the control measures to increase safety of shellfish and other foods. PMID:25590132

  7. Genetic drift and the population history of the Irish travellers.

    PubMed

    Relethford, John H; Crawford, Michael H

    2013-02-01

    The Irish Travellers are an itinerant group in Ireland that has been socially isolated. Two hypotheses have been proposed concerning the genetic origin of the Travellers: (1) they are genetically related to Roma populations in Europe that share a nomadic lifestyle or (2) they are of Irish origin, and genetic differences from the rest of Ireland reflect genetic drift. These hypotheses were tested using data on 33 alleles from 12 red blood cell polymorphism loci. Comparison with other European, Roma, and Indian populations shows that the Travellers are genetically distinct from the Roma and Indian populations and most genetically similar to Ireland, in agreement with earlier genetic analyses of the Travellers. However, the Travellers are still genetically distinct from other Irish populations, which could reflect some external gene flow and/or the action of genetic drift in a small group that was descended from a small number of founders. In order to test the drift hypothesis, we analyzed genetic distances comparing the Travellers to four geographic regions in Ireland. These distances were then compared with adjusted distances that account for differential genetic drift using a method developed by Relethford (Hum Biol 68 (1996) 29-44). The unadjusted distances show the genetic distinctiveness of the Travellers. After adjustment for the expected effects of genetic drift, the Travellers are equidistant from the other Irish samples, showing their Irish origins and population history. The observed genetic differences are thus a reflection of genetic drift, and there is no evidence of any external gene flow. PMID:23180293

  8. Survival and growth of acid-adapted and unadapted Salmonella in and on raw tomatoes as affected by variety, stage of ripeness, and storage temperature.

    PubMed

    Beuchat, Larry R; Mann, David A

    2008-08-01

    Consumption of raw round and Roma tomatoes has been associated with outbreaks of salmonellosis. A study was done to determine whether survival and growth of Salmonella in and on tomatoes is affected by variety of tomato, stage of ripeness, and storage temperature. The influence of acid adaptation of cells and site of inoculation on survival and growth was studied. Salmonella grew in stem scar and pulp tissues of round, Roma, and grape tomatoes stored at 12 and 21 degrees C but not in those tomatoes stored at 4 degrees C. Survival and growth was largely unaffected by variety and stage of ripeness at the time of inoculation. The pathogen did not grow on the skin of grape tomatoes stored at 4, 12, and 21 degrees C. Survival and growth of Salmonella inoculated into stem scar and pulp tissues of round and Roma tomatoes were unaffected by exposure of cells to an acidic (pH 4.75) environment before inoculation. Results emphasize the importance of preventing contamination of tomatoes with Salmonella at all stages of ripeness, regardless of variety or previous exposure of cells to an acidic environment. PMID:18724750

  9. Time trends in pediatric hospitalizations for hepatitis A in Greece (1999-2013): Assessment of the impact of universal infant immunization in 2008.

    PubMed

    Papaevangelou, V; Alexopoulou, Z; Hadjichristodoulou, C; Kourlamba, G; Katsioulis, A; Theodoridou, K; Spoulou, V; Theodoridou, M

    2016-07-01

    Hepatitis A vaccine was introduced in the Greek National Immunization Program in 2008. To estimate possible impact of the universal vaccination implementation, time trends of hospitalizations for hepatitis A at the Infectious Diseases Unit of a Tertiary Pediatric Hospital in Athens during 1999-2013 were analyzed. Hepatitis A hospitalizations were recorded from the discharge database and were expressed as frequencies and rate of annual departmental hospitalizations. Time series analysis (ARIMA) was used to explore trends and the impact of the vaccination. Moreover, changes in patient age, population group distribution and the duration of hospitalization were also examined. Hepatitis A hospitalizations rate significantly decreased between pre-vaccination (1999-2008) and post-vaccination (2009-2013) era from 50.5 to 20.8/1000 hospitalizations (p = 0.005). A 3-year periodicity and a trend of reduction on hepatitis A hospitalizations rates across years were noted. Roma children had significant higher rates of hepatitis A hospitalization, followed by immigrant children. Importantly, possibly due to preceding vaccine availability with considerable uptake in private market and unvaccinated group/pockets of children (Roma), overall vaccination effect was less apparent when compared to data from other countries that implemented universal vaccination. No significant change in patient age, population group distribution, or duration of hospitalization was observed. High risk groups such as Roma children should be targeted for vaccination to reduce future outbreaks. PMID:27141813

  10. Designing normative open virtual enterprises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Emilia; Giret, Adriana; Botti, Vicente

    2016-03-01

    There is an increasing interest on developing virtual enterprises in order to deal with the globalisation of the economy, the rapid growth of information technologies and the increase of competitiveness. In this paper we deal with the development of normative open virtual enterprises (NOVEs). They are systems with a global objective that are composed of a set of heterogeneous entities and enterprises that exchange services following a specific normative context. In order to analyse and design systems of this kind the multi-agent paradigm seems suitable because it offers a specific solution for supporting the social and contractual relationships between enterprises and for formalising their business processes. This paper presents how the Regulated Open Multi-agent systems (ROMAS) methodology, an agent-oriented software methodology, can be used to analyse and design NOVEs. ROMAS offers a complete development process that allows identifying and formalising of the structure of NOVEs, their normative context and the interactions among their members. The use of ROMAS is exemplified by means of a case study that represents an automotive supply chain.

  11. Distinguishing benign from malignant pelvic mass utilizing an algorithm with HE4, menopausal status, and ultrasound findings

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Karen KL; Chen, Chi-An; Nam, Joo-Hyun; Ochiai, Kazunori; Aw, Tar-Choon; Sabaratnam, Subathra; Hebbar, Sudarshan; Sickan, Jaganathan; Schodin, Beth A; Charakorn, Chuenkamon; Sumpaico, Walfrido W

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to develop a risk prediction score for distinguishing benign ovarian mass from malignant tumors using CA-125, human epididymis protein 4 (HE4), ultrasound findings, and menopausal status. The risk prediction score was compared to the risk of malignancy index and risk of ovarian malignancy algorithm (ROMA). Methods This was a prospective, multicenter (n=6) study with patients from six Asian countries. Patients had a pelvic mass upon imaging and were scheduled to undergo surgery. Serum CA-125 and HE4 were measured on preoperative samples, and ultrasound findings were recorded. Regression analysis was performed and a risk prediction model was developed based on the significant factors. A bootstrap technique was applied to assess the validity of the HE4 model. Results A total of 414 women with a pelvic mass were enrolled in the study, of which 328 had documented ultrasound findings. The risk prediction model that contained HE4, menopausal status, and ultrasound findings exhibited the best performance compared to models with CA-125 alone, or a combination of CA-125 and HE4. This model classified 77.2% of women with ovarian cancer as medium or high risk, and 86% of women with benign disease as very-low, low, or medium-low risk. This model exhibited better sensitivity than ROMA, but ROMA exhibited better specificity. Both models performed better than CA-125 alone. Conclusion Combining ultrasound with HE4 can improve the sensitivity for detecting ovarian cancer compared to other algorithms. PMID:25310857

  12. Preoperative Evaluation of Risk of Ovarian Malignancy Algorithm Index in Prediction of Malignancy of Adnexal Masses

    PubMed Central

    Farzaneh, Farah; Honarvar, Zahra; Yaraghi, Mansoore; Yaseri, Mehdi; Arab, Maliheh; Hosseini, Maryamsadat; Ashrafgangoi, Tahereh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Differentiation between benign and malignant ovarian neoplasms is essential to create a system for patient referrals. Objectives: The aim of the present prospective trial was to analyze the value of the risk of ovarian malignancy algorithm (ROMA) in prediction of adnexal masses malignancy in pre- and post-menopause women before operation. Materials and Methods: Preoperative serum samples were tested for CA125 and HE4 using fully automated methods (Abbott architect) and gained best cutoff. The ROMA index was analyzed in 99 patients (including 68 pre-menopause and 31 menopause) with adnexal masses referred to Imam Hossein Hospital/Tehran/Iran and had been scheduled for operation. The pathological results showed 43 cases (22 menopause) with malignant adnexal masses and 56 cases (9 menopauses) with benign adnexal masses. Demographical data, clinical symptoms and the ROMA index were separately analyzed and contrasted in benign and malignant in both menopause and pre-menopause patients. Results: The only significant difference was the older age of the malignant group vs. benign group (P = 0.001) regarding demographic findings. As concerns the clinical symptoms, presence of abdominal discomfort in pre-diagnosis period was the only significant parameter in malignant group (P = 0.001). Additionally, data analysis of patients as a total group showed that specificity (96.4%), positive predictive value (PPV) (94.1%), area under the curve (AUC) (0.907), and diagnostic accuracy (DA) (86.9%) of the ROMA were higher than HE4 (91.1%, 85.7%, 0.857 and 81.8%. respectively) and CA125 (87.9%, 67.3%, 0.828 and 75.8%, respectively) alone. Besides, negative predictive value (NPV) (86.4%) and sensitivity (86.1%) of CA125 were higher than HE4 (79.7% and 69.8%, respectively). In contrast, specificity of HE4 (91.1%) was higher than CA125 (67.9%). Data analysis of patients as two groups (pre and post menopause groups) showed the same results. Conclusions: Specificity, DA and AUC of

  13. PREFACE: Young Researcher Meeting, Trieste 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agostini, F.; Antolini, C.; Aversa, R.; Cattani, G.; Martinelli, M.; Mazzaferro, L.; Migliaccio, M.; Paci, F.; Pietrobon, D.; Ricci Pacifici, D.; Stellato, F.; Veneziani, M.

    2013-12-01

    YRM logo The Young Researcher Meeting (www.yrmr.it) has been a rapidly growing event for the last few years. Together with other initiatives which have emerged in several research areas, the young researcher meeting marks the awareness and the desire of PhD students, postdoctoral fellows and young researchers to play a major role in scientific progress. Devoted to the discussion and the interchange of new developments and ideas in physics, the meeting is primarily aimed at graduate students and postdoctoral researchers, who are encouraged to present their work in an informal atmosphere. One of the main purposes of the conference is to create an international network of young researchers, both experimentalists and theorists, and fruitful collaborations across the different branches of physics. Born in Rome in 2009, after three editions that strengthened it, the Young Researcher Meeting 2013 was held in Trieste. Propelled by the past success, the fourth meeting was a two-day conference on 3-4June. It was sponsored by the International School for Advanced Studies - SISSA - and the University of Padova, thus acquiring an even further international drive. In this volume, we collect some of the contributions that were presented at the conference. They cover topics in astrophysics and cosmology, particle and theoretical physics, soft and condensed matter, biophysics and medical physics. YRM Organising and Editorial Committee Fabio Agostini (fabio.agostini@roma2.infn.it) Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Roma 'Tor Vergata' Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma, Italy Claudia Antolini (claudia.antolini@sissa.it) SISSA - Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati Via Bonomea 265, 34136 Trieste, Italy Rossella Aversa (raversa@sissa.it) SISSA - Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati Via Bonomea 265, 34136 Trieste, Italy Giordano Cattani (giordano.cattani@gmail.com) Matteo Martinelli (mmartin@sissa.it) SISSA - Scuola Internazionale Superiore di

  14. Genetic and biochemical study of dual hereditary jaundice: Dubin-Johnson and Gilbert's syndromes. Haplotyping and founder effect of deletion in ABCC2.

    PubMed

    Slachtova, Lenka; Seda, Ondrej; Behunova, Jana; Mistrik, Martin; Martasek, Pavel

    2016-05-01

    Dual hereditary jaundice, a combination of Dubin-Johnson and Gilbert's syndromes, is a rare clinical entity resulting from the compound defects of bilirubin conjugation and transport. We aimed to study the hereditary jaundice in 56 members from seven seemingly unrelated Roma families, to find the causal genetic defect and to estimate its origin in Roma population. On the basis of biochemical results of total and conjugated serum bilirubin and clinical observations, ABCC2 gene, TATA box and phenobarbital enhancer (PBREM) of UGT1A1 gene were analyzed by sequencing, RFLP and fragment analysis. We found a novel variant c.1013_1014delTG in the eighth exon of ABCC2 gene in 17 individuals in homozygous state. Dual defect NG_011798.1:c.[1013_1014delTG]; NG_002601.2:g.[175492_175493insTA] in homozygous state was found in four subjects. Biochemical analyses of porphyrins and coproporphyrin isomers in urine performed by HPLC showed inverted ratio of excreted coproporphyrin, with the predominance of coproporphyrin I (up to 100%), typical for patients with Dubin-Johnson syndrome. Pursuant cultural and social specifics of the population led us to suspect a founder effect; therefore, we performed a haplotype study using genotyping data from Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human SNP Array 6.0. As a result, we detected a common 86 kbp haplotype encompassing promoter and part of the ABCC2 coding region among all families, and estimated the age of the ancestral variant to 178-185 years. In this study, we found a novel deletion in ABCC2 gene, described genetic and biochemical features of dual hereditary jaundice and confirmed the existence of founder effect and common haplotype among seven Roma families. PMID:26350512

  15. Different patterns of Toll-like receptor 2 polymorphisms in populations of various ethnic and geographic origins.

    PubMed

    Ioana, M; Ferwerda, B; Plantinga, T S; Stappers, M; Oosting, M; McCall, M; Cimpoeru, A; Burada, F; Panduru, N; Sauerwein, R; Doumbo, O; van der Meer, J W M; van Crevel, R; Joosten, L A B; Netea, M G

    2012-05-01

    Upon the invasion of the host by microorganisms, innate immunity is triggered through pathogen recognition by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs). Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are the best-studied class of PRRs, and they recognize specific pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) from various microorganisms. A large number of studies have shown that genetic variation in TLRs may influence susceptibility to infections. We assessed the genetic variation of TLR2, which encodes one of the most important TLRs, in various populations around the globe and correlated it with changes in the function of the molecule. The three best-known nonsynonymous TLR2 polymorphisms (1892C>A, 2029C>T, and 2258G>A) were assessed in different populations from the main continental masses: Romanians, Vlax-Roma, Dutch (European populations), Han Chinese (East Asia), Dogon, Fulani (Africa), and Trio Indians (America). The 2029C>T polymorphism was absent in both European and non-European populations, with the exception of the Vlax-Roma, suggesting that this polymorphism most likely arose in Indo-Aryan people after migration into South Asia. The 1892C>A polymorphism that was found exclusively in European populations, but not in Asian, African, or American volunteers, probably occurred in proto-Indo-Europeans. Interestingly, 2258G>A was present only in Europeans, including Vlax-Roma, but at a very low frequency. The differential pattern of the TLR2 polymorphisms in various populations may explain some of the differences in susceptibility to infections between these populations. PMID:22354034

  16. Quantifying the sensitivity of scent detection dogs to identify fecal contamination on raw produce.

    PubMed

    Partyka, Melissa L; Bond, Ronald F; Farrar, Jeff; Falco, Andy; Cassens, Barbara; Cruse, Alonza; Atwill, Edward R

    2014-01-01

    Consumption of raw produce commodities has been associated with foodborne outbreaks in the United States. In a recent Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report outlining the incidence of food-related outbreaks from 1998 to 2008, produce of all kinds were implicated in 46% of illnesses and 23% of deaths. Methods that quickly identify fecal contamination of foods, including produce, will allow prioritization of samples for testing during investigations and perhaps decrease the time required to identify specific brands or lots. We conducted a series of trials to characterize the sensitivity and specificity of scent detection dogs to accurately identify fecal contamination on raw agricultural commodities (romaine lettuce, spinach, cilantro, and roma tomatoes). Both indirect and direct methods of detection were evaluated. For the indirect detection method, two dogs were trained to detect contamination on gauze pads previously exposed to produce contaminated with feces. For the direct detection method, two dogs were trained to identify fecal contamination on fresh produce. The indirect method did not result in acceptable levels of sensitivity except for the highest levels of fecal contamination (25 g of feces). Each dog had more difficulty detecting fecal contamination on cilantro and spinach than on roma tomatoes. For the direct detection method, the dogs exhibited >75% sensitivity for detecting ≥0.25 g of feces on leafy greens (cilantro, romaine lettuce, and spinach) and roma tomatoes, with sensitivity declining as the amount of feces dropped below 0.025 g. We determined that use of a scent detection dog to screen samples for testing can increase the probability of detecting ≥0.025 g of fecal contamination by 500 to 3,000% when samples with fecal contamination are rare (≤1%). PMID:24405993

  17. High preoperative blood levels of HE4 predicts poor prognosis in patients with ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to assess the clinical value of preoperative blood levels of HE4 as a predictor of overall survival in patients with ovarian cancer and to validate previous data of HE4 and the ROMA algorithm including HE4 and CA125 in discriminating benign and malignant ovarian tumors. Experimental design The preoperative plasma levels of HE4 and CA125 were analyzed with ELISA in 312 patients with adnexal lesions. Tumors were classified as benign (n= 206), borderline (i.e. low malignant potential tumors) (n= 25), and well (n= 14), moderately (n= 15), and poorly (n= 51) differentiated malignant. Results In univariate Cox regression analyses high levels (dichotomized at the median) of HE4, CA125, increased age (continuous variable), advanced-stage of disease 2–4, histological grade 3 and non-optimal tumor debulking at primary surgery were all significantly associated with shorter overall survival. A multivariate Cox regression model including pre-operative available covariates HE4 and CA125 both dichotomized at median in addition to age as continuous variable showed that high levels of HE4 was an independent prognostic marker for worse prognosis HR 2.02 (95% CI 1.1-3.8). In postmenopausal women the ROMA algorithm gave the highest AUC of 0.94 (95% CI, 0.90-0.97) which was higher than the separate markers HE4 AUC 0.91 (95% CI 0.86-0.95) and CA125 AUC 0.91(95% CI 0.87-0.96). Conclusions High concentration of plasma HE4 is an independent preoperative marker of poor prognosis in patients with ovarian cancer. The algorithm ROMA discriminates in postmenopausal women between malignant and benign tumors with an AUC of 0.94. PMID:22909379

  18. Ozone-induced ethylene release from leaf surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Rodecap, K.D.; Tingey, D.T.

    1986-01-01

    Ozone-induced stress-ethylene emissions from the adaxial and abaxial leaf surfaces of four plant species (Glycine max (L) Merr. cv. Dare, Lycopersicon esculentum Mill cv. Roma VF, Eucalyptus globulus Labill. and Hedera helix L.) were studied to determine if the stress ethylene diffused through the stomata or cuticle. In plants not exposed to ozone, basal ethylene was detected above both the adaxial and abaxial leaf surfaces of all the plant species examined, indicating that some ethylene can diffuse across the leaf cuticle. Oxone-induced stress ethylene production in all species examined. These data indicate that ozone-induced stress ethylene primarily diffuses from the leaf via the stomata.

  19. EZ and GOSSIP, two new VO compliant tools for spectral analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franzetti, P.; Garill, B.; Fumana, M.; Paioro, L.; Scodeggio, M.; Paltani, S.; Scaramella, R.

    2008-10-01

    We present EZ and GOSSIP, two new VO compliant tools dedicated to spectral analysis. EZ is a tool to perform automatic redshift measurement; GOSSIP is a tool created to perform the SED fitting procedure in a simple, user friendly and efficient way. These two tools have been developed by the PANDORA Group at INAF-IASF (Milano); EZ has been developed in collaboration with Osservatorio Monte Porzio (Roma) and Integral Science Data Center (Geneve). EZ is released to the astronomical community; GOSSIP is currently in beta-testing.

  20. Special issue on `periodic systems and robust control' dedicated to Osvaldo Maria Grasselli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astolfi, Alessandro; Longhi, Sauro; Tornambè, Antonio

    2013-07-01

    This special issue celebrates the career of Osvaldo Maria Grasselli. The idea of putting together a special issue dedicated to Osvaldo surfaced during the workshop 'One-Day Symposium on Advances and Challenges in Linear Control Systems' organised at the 'Università di Roma 'Tor Vergata' on March 2012, on the occasion of his 70th birthday. This special issue, therefore, contains a record of the technical programme. The research vision of Osvaldo is conspicuous in all contributions, spanning the areas of robust control, geometric control, control of multivariable systems, periodic control systems and their applications.

  1. Application of the MST clustering to the high energy γ-ray sky. I—New possible detection of high-energy γ-ray emission associated with BL Lac objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campana, R.; Massaro, E.; Bernieri, E.; D'Amato, Q.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper we show an application of the Minimum Spanning Tree (MST) clustering method to the high-energy γ-ray sky observed at energies higher than 10 GeV in 6.3 years by the Fermi-Large Area Telescope. We report the detection of 19 new high-energy γ-ray clusters with good selection parameters whose centroid coordinates were found matching the positions of known BL Lac objects in the 5th Edition of the Roma-BZCAT catalogue. A brief summary of the properties of these sources is presented.

  2. Road safety and simulation conferences: an interdisciplinary network for safer roads.

    PubMed

    Benedetto, Andrea; Calvi, Alessandro

    2014-06-01

    From 23rd to 25th October 2013 more than 300 researchers attended the 4th International Conference on Road Safety and Simulation (RSS 2013) in Rome, Italy, hosted by the Inter Universities Research Centre for Road Safety (CRISS) at the Department of Engineering of Roma Tre University. The aim of the Conference was to create a common interdisciplinary arena for researchers and professionals involved in road safety, facilitate the exchange of know-how and progress in the last advanced techniques, methods and tools and their applications to safety analysis. This special issue highlights some of the research presented at the Conference. PMID:24913473

  3. Statistical Analysis of Random Number Generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Accardi, Luigi; Gäbler, Markus

    2011-01-01

    In many applications, for example cryptography and Monte Carlo simulation, there is need for random numbers. Any procedure, algorithm or device which is intended to produce such is called a random number generator (RNG). What makes a good RNG? This paper gives an overview on empirical testing of the statistical properties of the sequences produced by RNGs and special software packages designed for that purpose. We also present the results of applying a particular test suite--TestU01-- to a family of RNGs currently being developed at the Centro Interdipartimentale Vito Volterra (CIVV), Roma, Italy.

  4. Editors' preface for the topical issue on Seven papers on Noncommutative Geometry and Operator Algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guido, Daniele; Landi, Giovanni; Vassout, Stéphane

    2016-07-01

    This topical issue grew out of the International Conference "Noncommutative Geometry and Applications" held 16-21 June 2014 at Villa Mondragone, Frascati (Roma). The main purpose of the conference was to have a unified view of different incarnations of noncommutative geometry and its applications. The seven papers collected in the present topical issue represent a good sample of the topics covered at the workshop. The conference itself was one of the climaxes of the Franco-Italian project GREFI-GENCO, which was initiated in 2007 by CNRS and INDAM to promote and enhance collaboration and exchanges between French and Italian researchers in the area of noncommutative geometry.

  5. Police violence and sexual risk among female and transvestite sex workers in Serbia: qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Simić, Milena; Baroš, Sladjana; Platt, Lucy; Žikić, Bojan

    2008-01-01

    Objective To explore female and transvestite sex workers’ perceptions of risk in the sex work environment in Serbia. Design Qualitative interview study. Setting Street based locations for sex work in Belgrade and Pancevo, Serbia. Participants 31 female and transvestite sex workers. Results Violence, including police violence, was reported as a primary concern in relation to risk. Violence was linked to unprotected sex and the reduced capacity for avoiding sexual risk. Participants reported that coerced sex was routinely provided to the police in exchange for freedom from detainment, arrest, or fine, and was enforced by the perceived threat of violence, sometimes realised. Accounts contained multiple instances of physical and sexual assault, presented as abuses of police authority, and described policing as a form of moral punishment. This was largely through non-physical means but was also enforced through physical violence, especially towards transvestite and Roma sex workers, whose experience of police violence was reported as relentless and brutal and connected with broader social forces of discrimination in this setting, especially towards Roma. Conclusion Preventing violence towards sex workers, which can link with vulnerability to sexually transmitted infections, is a priority in Serbia. This requires monitoring perpetrators of violence, providing legal support to sex workers, and creating safer environments for sex work. PMID:18667468

  6. Test-sites for earthquake prediction experiments within the Colli Albani region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quattrocchi, F.; Calcara, M.

    In this paper we discuss some geochemical data gathered by discrete and continuous monitoring during the 1995-1996 period, carried out for earthquake prediction test-experiments throughout the Colli Albani quiescent volcano, seat of seismicity, selecting some gas discharge sites with peri-volcanic composition. In particular we stressed the results obtained at the continuous geochemical monitoring station (GMS I, BAR site), designed by ING for geochemical surveillance of seismic events. The 12/6/1995 (M=3.6-3.8) Roma earthquake together with the 3/11/1995 (M=3.1) Tivoli earthquake was the most energetic events within the Colli Albani - Roma area, after the beginning of the continuous monitoring (1991) up today: strict correlation between these seismic events and fluid geochemical anomalies in groundwater has been discovered (temperature, Eh, 222Rn, CO 2, NH 3). Separation at depth of a vapour phase, rich in reducing-acidic gases (CO 2, H 2S, etc...), from a hyper-saline brine, within the deep geothermal reservoir is hypothesised to explain the geochemical anomalies: probably the transtensional episodes accompanying the seismic sequences caused an increasing and/or triggering of the phase-separation process and fluid migration, on the regional scale of the Western sector of the Colli Albani, beyond the seismogenic depth (2-4 Km) up to surface. We draw the state of art of GMS II monitoring prototype and the selection criteria of test-sites for earthquake prediction experiments in the Colli Albani region.

  7. Description of two measles outbreaks in the Lazio Region, Italy (2006-2007). Importance of pockets of low vaccine coverage in sustaining the infection

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Despite the launch of the national plan for measles elimination, in Italy, immunization coverage remains suboptimal and outbreaks continue to occur. Two measles outbreaks, occurred in Lazio region during 2006-2007, were investigated to identify sources of infection, transmission routes, and assess operational implications for elimination of the disease. Methods Data were obtained from several sources, the routine infectious diseases surveillance system, field epidemiological investigations, and molecular genotyping of virus by the national reference laboratory. Results Overall 449 cases were reported, sustained by two different stereotypes overlapping for few months. Serotype D4 was likely imported from Romania by a Roma/Sinti family and subsequently spread to the rest of the population. Serotype B3 was responsible for the second outbreak which started in a secondary school. Pockets of low vaccine coverage individuals (Roma/Sinti communities, high school students) facilitated the reintroduction of serotypes not endemic in Italy and facilitated the measles infection to spread. Conclusions Communities with low vaccine coverage represent a more serious public health threat than do sporadic susceptible individuals. The successful elimination of measles will require additional efforts to immunize low vaccine coverage population groups, including hard-to-reach individuals, adolescents, and young adults. An enhanced surveillance systems, which includes viral genotyping to document chains of transmission, is an essential tool for evaluating strategy to control and eliminate measles PMID:20219143

  8. In situ observations of small scale neutral and plasma dynamics in the mesosphere/lower thermosphere at 79°N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strelnikov, B.; Rapp, M.; Blix, T. A.; Engler, N.; Höffner, J.; Lautenbach, J.; Lübken, F.-J.; Smiley, B.; Friedrich, M.

    2006-01-01

    From June 29 to July 6 2003, the German-Norwegian ROMA-SvalRak campaign (ROMA = Rocket borne Observations in the Middle Atmosphere) took place at the SvalRak rocket range, Ny-Ålesund (78.9°N, 11.9°E; Spitzbergen). The main scientific aim of this campaign was to study polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE) and mesospheric turbulence. During this campaign a total of three instrumented sounding rockets was launched. In addition, ground based observations with a VHF radar and a potassium lidar at Longyearbyen complemented the in situ measurements. All three sounding rockets were equipped with the CONE (COmbined sensor for Neutrals and Electrons) instrument to measure small scale structure of neutral air and electron density, and neutral temperature. The PIP (positive ion probe) instrument was used to measure small scale structure of the positive ion density. Furthermore, two cold plasma probes were flown to measure electron temperature, and a particle detector was employed to detect signatures of charged aerosols. During the first launch, an electric field experiment was also incorporated, while during the other two launches, Faraday rotation experiments yielded absolute electron number densities. During all three rocket flights a PMSE was observed by the VHF radar, whereas the potassium lidar detected a noctilucent cloud (NLC) only during the second launch. Signatures of charged particles forming the PMSE and NLC layers were recorded by the onboard particle detectors.

  9. Importation and circulation of poliovirus in Bulgaria in 2001.

    PubMed Central

    Kojouharova, Mira; Zuber, Patrick L. F.; Gyurova, Snejana; Fiore, Lucia; Buttinelli, Gabriele; Kunchev, Angel; Vladimirova, Nadejda; Korsun, Neli; Filipova, Radosveta; Boneva, Roumiana; Gavrilin, Eugene; Deshpande, Jagadish M.; Oblapenko, George; Wassilak, Steven G.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To characterize the circumstances in which poliomyelitis occurred among three children in Bulgaria during 2001 and to describe the public health response. METHODS: Bulgarian authorities investigated the three cases of polio and their contacts, conducted faecal and serological screening of children from high-risk groups, implemented enhanced surveillance for acute flaccid paralysis, and conducted supplemental immunization activities. FINDINGS: The three cases of polio studied had not been vaccinated and lived in socioeconomically deprived areas of two cities. Four Roma children from the Bourgas district had antibody titres to serotype 1 poliovirus only, and wild type 1 virus was isolated from the faeces of two asymptomatic Roma children in the Bourgas and Sofia districts. Poliovirus isolates were related genetically and represented a single evolutionary lineage; genomic sequences were less than 90% identical to poliovirus strains isolated previously in Europe, but 98.3% similar to a strain isolated in India in 2000. No cases or wild virus isolates were found after supplemental immunization activities were launched in May 2001. CONCLUSIONS: In Bulgaria, an imported poliovirus was able to circulate for two to five months among minority populations. Surveillance data strongly suggest that wild poliovirus circulation ceased shortly after supplemental immunization activities with oral poliovirus vaccine were conducted. PMID:12973639

  10. Intermittency of solar system plasma turbulence near Venus and Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teodorescu, Eliza; Echim, Marius; Chang, Tom

    2016-04-01

    We analyze magnetic field data from Venus Express (VEX) and CLUSTER to investigate the turbulent properties of the solar wind and the Earth's and Venus' magnetosheaths. A systematic study of the PDFs (Probability Distribution Functions) of the measured magnetic fluctuations and their fourth order moments (kurtosis) reveals numerous intermittent time series. The presence of intermittency is marked by non-Gaussian PDFs with heavy wings and a scale dependent kurtosis. Higher order analyses on the scale dependence of several moment orders of the PDFs, the structure functions, along with the scaling of the kurtosis allow for a selection of scales that pertain to different scaling regimes, governed by different physics. On such sub-ranges of scales we investigate the fractal structure of fluctuations through the Rank Ordered Multifractal Analysis - ROMA (Chang and Wu, 2008). ROMA is applied to a selection of intermittent magnetic field time series in the solar wind and planetary magnetosheaths and helps to quantify the turbulence properties through the estimation of a spectrum of local Hurst exponents. Research supported by the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under grant agreement no 313038/STORM, and a grant of the Romanian Ministry of National Education, CNCS - UEFISCDI, project number PN-II-ID-PCE-2012-4-0418.

  11. Cultural, social and personal ways of experiencing love – an analysis of the perception of subjectivity

    PubMed Central

    Gori, Claudia

    2011-01-01

    Summary This article is based on analysis of 4 couple’s personal and public documents, in order to integrate personal choices, values and ideas with cultural representations and social attitudes. Moreover, being based on Italian sources from the nineteenth century, the study offers an historical insight on the Italian nation-building process and its political and social foundations. This study is based on archival and printed primary sources from: Gianna Maffei and Ercole Trotti Mosti (Museo Centrale del Risorgimento – Roma – MCRR); Augusto Pierantoni and Grazia Mancini (Museo Centrale del Risorgimento – Roma); Luigi Majno and Ersilia Bronzini (Archivio Unione Femminile Nazionale – Milano); Angiolo Orvieto and Laura Cantoni (Archivio Contemporaneo Bonsanti del Gabinetto Vieuesseux – Firenze – ACGV). This study reflects on love as a political and moral issue, by linking the personal sphere of subjectivity to the public dimension of the political community. An extensive understanding of the role played by the perception and the expression of sentiments can be considered as the central issue of this analysis. PMID:22037756

  12. Numerical simulations of thermal convection at high Prandtl numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silano, Gabriella

    2008-11-01

    Direct numerical simulations of thermal convection are conducted for a cylindrical cell of aspect ratio .5ex1-.1em/ -.15em.25ex2 . The Prandtl number (Pr) varies from 10^0 to 10^4 and the Rayleigh numbers (Ra) are moderate (10^5 < Ra < 10^9). This study is motivated by the fact that the role of the Prandtl number in convective heat transport is not yet fully understood. The three-dimensional behaviors of the temperature and velocity fields, of the viscous and thermal dissipation fields, and of the diffusive and convective heat fluxes are explored. In the ranges of Pr and Ra considered, we find steady, periodic and chaotic regimes, and large-scale structures which are more complex than the single recirculation cell filling the whole volume. Multiple flow structures are found to be associated with a given set of conditions. The multiple solutions seem to be more probable at higher Pr numbers and could explain the scatter in some data trends. In collaboration with Katepalli Raju Sreenivasan, The Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics - Trieste, and Roberto Verzicco, DIM, Universitàdegli Studi di Roma Tor Vergata - Roma.

  13. Molecular genetics of MARVELD2 and clinical phenotype in Pakistani and Slovak families segregating DFNB49 hearing loss

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Gowri; Varga, Lukas; Trincot, Claire; Shahzad, Mohsin; Friedman, Penelope L.; Klimes, Iwar; Greinwald, John H.; Riazuddin, S Amer; Masindova, Ivica; Profant, Milan; Khan, Shaheen N.; Friedman, Thomas B.; Ahmed, Zubair M.; Gasperikova, Daniela; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Riazuddin, Saima

    2015-01-01

    Pathogenic mutations of MARVELD2, encoding tricellulin, a tricelluar tight junction protein, cause autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss (DFNB49) in families of Pakistan and Czech Roma origin. In fact, they are a significant cause of prelingual hearing loss in the Czech Roma, second only to GJB2 variants. Previously, we reported that mice homozygous for p.Arg497* variant of Marveld2 had a broad phenotypic spectrum, where defects were observed in the inner ear, heart, mandibular salivary gland, thyroid gland and olfactory epithelium. The current study describes the types and frequencies of MARVELD2 alleles and clinically reexamines members of DFNB49 families. We found that MARVELD2 variants are responsible for about 1.5% (95% CI: 0.8 – 2.6) of non-syndromic hearing loss in our cohort of 800 Pakistani families. The c.1331+2T>C allele is recurrent. In addition, we identified a novel large deletion in a single family, which appears to have resulted from non-allelic homologous recombination between two similar Alu short interspersed elements. Finally, we observed no other clinical manifestations co-segregating with hearing loss in DFNB49 human families, and hypothesize that the additional abnormalities in the Marveld2 mutant mouse indicates a critical non-redundant function for tricellulin in other organ systems. PMID:25666562

  14. The measles outbreak in Bulgaria, 2009-2011: An epidemiological assessment and lessons learnt.

    PubMed

    Muscat, Mark; Marinova, Lili; Mankertz, Annette; Gatcheva, Nina; Mihneva, Zafira; Santibanez, Sabine; Kunchev, Angel; Filipova, Radosveta; Kojouharova, Mira

    2016-01-01

    Measles re-emerged in a nationwide outbreak in Bulgaria from 2009 to 2011 despite reported high vaccination coverage at national level. This followed an eight-year period since the last indigenous cases of measles were detected. The Bulgarian National Centre of Infectious and Parasitic Diseases collated measles surveillance data for 2009-2011. We analysed data for age group, sex, ethnicity, diagnosis confirmation, vaccination, hospitalisation, disease complications, and death and describe the outbreak control measures taken. The outbreak started in April 2009 following an importation of measles virus and affected 24,364 persons, predominantly Roma. Most cases (73%) were among children < 15 years old. Vaccination status was available for 52% (n = 12,630) of cases. Of children 1-14 years old, 22% (n = 1,769) were unvaccinated and 70% (n = 5,518) had received one dose of a measles-containing vaccine. Twenty-four measles-related deaths were reported. The Roma ethnic group was particularly susceptible to measles. The magnitude of the outbreak resulted primarily from the accumulation of susceptible children over time. This outbreak serves as a reminder that both high vaccination coverage and closing of immunity gaps across all sections of the population are crucial to reach the goal of measles elimination. PMID:26967661

  15. Autonomous Operation of the Nanosatellite URSA MAIOR Micropropulsion System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santoni, F.

    Università degli Studi di Roma "La Sapienza", Scuola di Ingegneria Aerospaziale, Via Eudossiana 16, 00184 At Università di Roma "La Sapienza" a nanosatellite bus is under development, with one liter target volume and one kilogram target weight. This nanosatellite, called URSA MAIOR (Università di Roma "la SApienza" Micro Autonomous Imager in ORbit) has a micro camera on board to take pictures of the Earth. The nanosatellite is three axis stabilized, using a micro momentum wheel, with magnetic coils for active nutation damping and pointing control. An experimental micropropulsion system is present on-board, together with the magnetic attitude control system. The design, construction and testing of the satellite is carried on by academic personnel and by students, which are directly involved in the whole process, as it is in the spirit of in the microsatellite program at Università di Roma "La Sapienza". Few technological payloads are present on-board: an Earth imaging experiment, using a few grams commercial-off-the-shelf microcamera; commercial Li-Ion batteries are the only energy storage device; a microwheel developed at our University laboratories provides for attitude stabilization. In addition, a micropropulsion experiment is planned on-board. The Austrian Company Mechatronic, and INFM, an Italian Research Institute at Trieste are developing a microthruster for nanosatelite applications. In the frame of a cooperation established between these two Institutions and Università di Roma "La Sapienza", this newly developed hardware will be tested in orbit. The thruster is made basically of an integrated microvalve, built on a silicon chip, and a micronozzle, etched on the same silicon chip, to get supersonic expansion of the gas flow. The nominal thrust of the system is about 100microN. The throat section is about 100 micron diameter. The first phase in the construction of the microthruster has been the construction of the micronozzle on a silicon chip. A

  16. Comparison of various multifractal approaches to analyze the intermittent magnetic fluctuations observed in the Earth's magnetospheric cusp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamy, Hervé; Echim, Marius; Chang, Tom

    2014-05-01

    Several approaches exist to compute the multifractal characteristics of an intermittent set of fluctuations. First, the classical method based on the computation of the partition function uses the full set of fluctuations . Since it is dominated by the more numerous fluctuations of small amplitudes, this method can mask the fractal characteristics of minor fluctuations of much larger amplitude. To solve this issue, a new method was developed by Chang & Wu (2008) : the Rank-Ordered Multifractal Analysis (ROMA) The ROMA method offers a natural connection between the one-parameter monofractal scaling idea and the multifractal phenomenon of intermittency. The key-element in ROMA is to find s(Y), the spectrum of the scaling exponents, and Ps(Y), the scaled Probability Distribution Function (PDFs), from the raw PDFs of the variable X at various scales tau , P(X,tau), with the following scaling: P(X,tau) tau ^s(Y)=Ps(Y) with Y= X/tau ^s(Y) The first (direct) method is to use range-limited structure functions in a sufficiently small range of the scaled variable Y and search for the value of monofroctal exponent s(Y). A drawback of this approach is that the range of Y must be large enough to ensure that the statistics is meaningful. As a consequence, some cross-over behavior between fluctuations with different monofractal exponents can lead to an ambiguity with several solutions s(Y) for some ranges of Y. Also the multifractal spectrum produced is step-wise discontinuous. To overcome these difficulties, Wu & Chang (2011) have suggested a refined method where a value of the parameter s is assumed and the corresponding value of Y ensuring a collapse of the raw PDFs is searched for. The advantage of this latter approach is that s(Y) and Ps(Y) can be obtained for single values of Y. The two ROMA methods and the partition function method are used on a set of intermittent magnetic field fluctuations observed by the Cluster spacecraft in the Earth's magnetospheric cusp. Results

  17. List of Participants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bombaci, I.; Covello, A.; Marcucci, L. E.; Rosati, S.

    2009-07-01

    Armani Paolo (Università di Trento) Benhar Omar (INFN Roma) Bombaci Ignazio (Università di Pisa) Bonanno Luca (Università di Ferrara) Catara Francesco (Università di Catania) Cò Giampaolo (Università di Lecce) Colonna Maria (Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, INFN Catania) Colonna Nicola (INFN Bari) Conti Francesco (Università di Pavia) Coraggio Luigi (INFN Napoli) Covello Aldo (Università di Napoli) Cristoforetti Marco (Technische Universität München, Germania) Cuofano Carmine (Università di Ferrara) Di Toro Massimo (Università di Catania) Drago Alessandro (Università di Ferrara) Faccioli Pietro (Università di Trento) Farina Nicola (INFN Roma) Finelli Paolo (Università di Bologna) Fiorentini Giovanni (Università di Ferrara) Fortunato Lorenzo (Università di Padova) Gambacurta Danilo (Università di Catania) Gandolfi Stefano (Università di Trento) Gargano Angela (INFN Napoli) Giannini Mauro (Università di Genova) Girlanda Luca (INFN Pisa) Giusti Carlotta (INFN Pavia) Illarionov Alexei (SISSA Trieste) Itaco Nunzio (Università di Napoli) Kievsky Alejandro (INFN Pisa) Lanza Edoardo (INFN Catania) Leidemann Winfried (Università di Trento) Lenzi Silvia (Università di Padova) Lipparini Enrico (Università di Trento) Lissia Marcello (Università di Cagliari) Lo Iudice Nicola (Università di Napoli) Maieron Chiara (Università di Lecce) Marcucci Laura Elisa (Università di Pisa) Matera Francesco (Università di Firenze) Millo Raffaele (Università di Trento) Orlandini Giuseppina (Università di Trento) Pacati Franco (Università di Pavia) Pastore Alessandro (Univeristy of Jyväskylä, Finlandia) Pederiva Francesco (Università di Trento) Pisent Gualtiero (Università di Padova) Prete Gianfranco (INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro) Quarati Piero (Politecnico di Torino) Rosati Sergio (Università di Pisa) Salmè Giovanni (INFN Roma) Santopinto Elena (INFN Genova) Traini Marco (Università di Trento) Vigezzi Enrico (INFN Milano) Vitturi Andrea (Universit

  18. Multistate foodborne disease outbreaks associated with raw tomatoes, United States, 1990-2010: a recurring public health problem.

    PubMed

    Bennett, S D; Littrell, K W; Hill, T A; Mahovic, M; Behravesh, C Barton

    2015-05-01

    We examined multistate outbreaks attributed to raw tomatoes in the United States from 1990 to 2010. We summarized the demographic and epidemiological characteristics of 15 outbreaks resulting in 1959 illnesses, 384 hospitalizations, and three deaths. Most (80%) outbreaks were reported during 2000-2010; 73% occurred May-September. Outbreaks commonly affected adult (median age 34 years) women (median 58% of outbreak cases). All outbreaks were caused by Salmonella [serotypes Newport (n = 6 outbreaks), Braenderup (n = 2), Baildon, Enteritidis, Javiana, Montevideo, Thompson, Typhimurium (n = 1 each); multiple serotypes (n = 1)]. Red, round (69% of outbreaks), Roma (23%), and grape (8%) tomatoes were implicated. Most (93%) outbreaks were associated with tomatoes served predominantly in restaurants. However, traceback investigations suggested that contamination occurred on farms, at packinghouses, or at fresh-cut processing facilities. Government agencies, academia, trade associations, and the fresh tomato industry should consider further efforts to identify interventions to reduce contamination of tomatoes during production and processing. PMID:25167220

  19. Polarization of Cosmic Microwave Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzzelli, A.; Cabella, P.; de Gasperis, G.; Vittorio, N.

    2016-02-01

    In this work we present an extension of the ROMA map-making code for data analysis of Cosmic Microwave Background polarization, with particular attention given to the inflationary polarization B-modes. The new algorithm takes into account a possible cross- correlated noise component among the different detectors of a CMB experiment. We tested the code on the observational data of the BOOMERanG (2003) experiment and we show that we are provided with a better estimate of the power spectra, in particular the error bars of the BB spectrum are smaller up to 20% for low multipoles. We point out the general validity of the new method. A possible future application is the LSPE balloon experiment, devoted to the observation of polarization at large angular scales.

  20. Hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy--Lom (HMSNL): refined genetic mapping in Romani (Gypsy) families from several European countries.

    PubMed

    Chandler, D; Angelicheva, D; Heather, L; Gooding, R; Gresham, D; Yanakiev, P; de Jonge, R; Baas, F; Dye, D; Karagyozov, L; Savov, A; Blechschmidt, K; Keats, B; Thomas, P K; King, R H; Starr, A; Nikolova, A; Colomer, J; Ishpekova, B; Tournev, I; Urtizberea, J A; Merlini, L; Butinar, D; Chabrol, B; Voit, T; Baethmann, M; Nedkova, V; Corches, A; Kalaydjieva, L

    2000-12-01

    Hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy type Lom, initially identified in Roma (Gypsy) families from Bulgaria, has been mapped to 8q24. Further refined mapping of the region has been undertaken on DNA from patients diagnosed across Europe. The refined map consists of 25 microsatellite markers over approximately 3 cM. In this collaborative study we have identified a number of historical recombinations resulting from the spread of the hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy type Lom gene through Europe with the migration and isolation of Gypsy groups. Recombination mapping and the minimal region of homozygosity reduced the original 3 cM hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy type Lom region to a critical interval of about 200 kb. PMID:11053686

  1. Status of the SPARC Project

    SciTech Connect

    Alesini, D.; Bertolucci, S.; Bellaveglia, M.; Biagini, M.E.; Boni, R.; Boscolo, M.; Castellano, M.; Clozza, A.; Pirro, G.Di; Drago, A.; Esposito, A.; Ferrario, M.; Ficcadenti, L.; Filippetto, D.; Fusco, V.; Gallo, A.; Gatti, G.; Ghigo, A.; Guiducci, S.; Incurvati, M.; Ligi, C.; /Frascati /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /ENEA, Frascati /Milan, Polytechnic /UCLA /SLAC

    2006-01-25

    The SPARC project has entered its installation phase at the Frascati National Laboratories of INFN: its main goal, the promotion of an R&D activity oriented to the development of a high brightness photoinjector to drive SASE-FEL experiments, is being vigorously pursued by a collaboration among ENEA-INFN-CNR-Universita di Roma Tor Vergata-INFM-ST. In this paper we will report on the installation and test of some major components, like Ti:Sa laser system, RF gun and RF power system. Advancements in the control and beam diagnostics systems will also be reported, in particular on the emittance-meter device for beam emittance measurements in the drift space downstream the RF gun. Recent results on laser pulse shaping show the feasibility of producing 10 ps flat-top laser pulses in the UV with rise time below 1 ps. First FEL experiments have been proposed, using SASE, seeding and non-linear resonant harmonics.

  2. The impact of recent events on human genetic diversity

    PubMed Central

    Jobling, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    The historical record tells us stories of migrations, population expansions and colonization events in the last few thousand years, but what was their demographic impact? Genetics can throw light on this issue, and has mostly done so through the maternally inherited mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and the male-specific Y chromosome. However, there are a number of problems, including marker ascertainment bias, possible influences of natural selection, and the obscuring layers of the palimpsest of historical and prehistorical events. Y-chromosomal lineages are particularly affected by genetic drift, which can be accentuated by recent social selection. A diversity of approaches to expansions in Europe is yielding insights into the histories of Phoenicians, Roma, Anglo-Saxons and Vikings, and new methods for producing and analysing genome-wide data hold much promise. The field would benefit from more consensus on appropriate methods, and better communication between geneticists and experts in other disciplines, such as history, archaeology and linguistics. PMID:22312046

  3. Marginalised social groups in contemporary weee management within social enterprises investments: A study in Greece

    SciTech Connect

    Papaoikonomou, K. Kipouros, S.; Kungolos, A.; Somakos, L.; Aravossis, K.; Antonopoulos, I.; Karagiannidis, A.

    2009-05-15

    This paper deals with the creation of appropriate conditions aimed at developing social services for reuse and recycling of waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE), by the inclusion of handicapped and Roma people in the workforce. Application areas for the project are the Hellenic (Greek) regions of Thessaly and North Aegean, where these groups suffer from professional and social exclusion. The efforts to reduce unemployment in the two aforementioned groups, together with the efforts to implement related Greek and European legislation for sustainable WEEE management, are examined here. Furthermore, networking and cooperation at local, regional and central levels between small enterprises, entrepreneurships and local authorities are examined, so that these social enterprises and their corresponding investments may support the development of the Greek alternative WEEE recycling system.

  4. GUIDA: A Graphical User Interface for Optical Data Analysis of Isolated Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrosino, F.

    2015-09-01

    Studying pulsars from ground-based telescopes needs data analysis to be performed according to specific requirements. Because of the periodic behavior of these objects such requirements are expressed in terms of timing. In fact, several factors must be taken into account to correctly extract the period (frequency) and then light curves of pulsars. Until now, analysis software packages have been mainly developed for satellite data and are not completely suitable for optical observations from the ground. A software package called GUIDA has been developed to analyze optical photometric data recorded by the SiFAP instrument, completely conceived and realized at the Physics Department of La Sapienza-Università di Roma. This software package is capable of analyzing data relative to ground observations, including timing corrections, and of deriving corrected pulsar light curves.

  5. Acknowledgements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-02-01

    Ackowledgement logos The organizers of the Young Researchers' Meeting in Rome would like to thank all the scientists who participated in the meetings. We thank the Universities of Roma "Tor Vergata" and "La Sapienza" for hosting the first two editions of the conference, and the Physics and Astronomy Doctoral Schools of "La Sapienza" for sponsoring the 2nd meeting. We are grateful to Prof. Roberto Capuzzo-Dolcetta (Univ. "La Sapienza"), Prof. Enzo Marinari (Univ. "La Sapienza"), Prof. Pasquale Mazzotta (Univ. "Tor Vergata"), Prof. Giancarlo Ruocco (Univ. "La Sapienza"), Sig.ra Fernanda Lupinacci (Univ. "La Sapienza"), Dott. Marco Veneziani (Lessico Intellettuale Europeo-CNR), Dott.sa Rossella Cossu (Istituto per le Applicazioni del Calcolo-CNR) and Dott. Paolo Cabella (University of Rome "Tor Vergata") for logistical and technical support, and useful discussions. Conference photographs

  6. The Realm of Extrasolar Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferlet, Roger

    2010-10-01

    In November 1995, an article published in Nature [1] put planetary sciences not only as a new hot field in both observational and theoretical astrophysics but also as a topic with a large impact toward the layman. This article was reporting the first discovery of a planet orbiting a star beyond our Sun, namely the solar-type star 51 Pegasi. Nearly four centuries after Giordano Bruno was burnt in public in Roma partly for having intuitively claimed the plurality of worlds, we were entering the extraordinary epoch in which one of the oldest inquiries of mankind-are we alone in the Universe?-can be tackled with the scientific method, leaving aside centuries of endless speculations. To date (July 2010), almost 500 extrasolar planets are known. We shall briefly review the main detection methods, together with the big surprises which arose during these last exciting fifteen years, without being exhaustive.

  7. a Method for Virtual Anastylosis: the Case of the Arch of Titus at the Circus Maximus in Rome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canciani, M.; Falcolini, C.; Buonfiglio, M.; Pergola, S.; Saccone, M.; Mammì, B.; Romito, G.

    2013-07-01

    This paper is the first report about the development of a methodology for the virtual Anastylosis of elements belonging to an archaeological site, based on the 3d modeling of fragments. This research is the result of the cooperation between Università Roma Tre, Dipartimento di Architettura and Sovrintendenza Capitolina ai Beni Culturali; several 3D survey, modeling, information systems and archaeology experts were involved. The purpose of the research was to study the complex and stratified site of the Arch of Titus at the Circus Maximus aiming, first of all, at completing the existing traditional graphic documentation using cataloguing and survey innovative methodologies, and, secondly, at supporting new proposals for the reconstruction and Anastylosis of the Arch itself. This tested methodology whose fundamental element is the three-dimensional textured model of each fragment, can also be used in other sites and contexts.

  8. The impact of recent events on human genetic diversity.

    PubMed

    Jobling, Mark A

    2012-03-19

    The historical record tells us stories of migrations, population expansions and colonization events in the last few thousand years, but what was their demographic impact? Genetics can throw light on this issue, and has mostly done so through the maternally inherited mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and the male-specific Y chromosome. However, there are a number of problems, including marker ascertainment bias, possible influences of natural selection, and the obscuring layers of the palimpsest of historical and prehistorical events. Y-chromosomal lineages are particularly affected by genetic drift, which can be accentuated by recent social selection. A diversity of approaches to expansions in Europe is yielding insights into the histories of Phoenicians, Roma, Anglo-Saxons and Vikings, and new methods for producing and analysing genome-wide data hold much promise. The field would benefit from more consensus on appropriate methods, and better communication between geneticists and experts in other disciplines, such as history, archaeology and linguistics. PMID:22312046

  9. Porphyry of Russian Empires in Paris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulakh, Andrey

    2014-05-01

    Porphyry of Russian Empires in Paris A. G. Bulakh (St Petersburg State University, Russia) So called "Schokhan porphyry" from Lake Onega, Russia, belongs surely to stones of World cultural heritage. One can see this "porphyry" at facades of a lovely palace of Pavel I and in pedestal of the monument after Nicolas I in St Petersburg. There are many other cases of using this stone in Russia. In Paris, sarcophagus of Napoleon I Bonaparte is constructed of blocks of this stone. Really, it is Proterozoic quartzite. Geology situation, petrography and mineralogical characteristic will be reported too. Comparison with antique porphyre from the Egyptian Province of the Roma Empire is given. References: 1) A.G.Bulakh, N.B.Abakumova, J.V.Romanovsky. St Petersburg: a History in Stone. 2010. Print House of St Petersburg State University. 173 p.

  10. Proposal of a management method of rockfall risk induced on a road

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignelli, C.; Peila, D.; Lo Russo, S.

    2012-04-01

    Many kilometers of roads have adjacent rock slopes that are prone to rockfall. The analysis of risks associated with these types of instabilities is a complex operation requiring the precise assessment of hazard, the vulnerability and therefore the risk of vehicles on roads along the foothills. Engineering design of protection devices should aim to minimize risk while taking advantage of the most advanced technologies. Decision makers should be equipped with the technical tools permitting them to choose the best solution within the context of local maximum acceptable risk levels. The fulfilment of safety requirements for mountainside routes involves in many cases the implementation of protective measures and devices to control and manage rockfall and it is of key importance the evaluation of the positive effects of such measures in terms of risk reduction. A risk analysis management procedure for roads subject to rockfall phenomena using a specifically developed method named: Rockfall risk Management (RO.MA.) is presented and discussed. The method is based on statistic tools, using as input the data coming both from in situ survey and from historical data. It is important to highline that historical database are not often available and usually there is a lack of useful information due to a not complete setting of parameters. The analysis based only on historical data can be difficult to be developed. For this purpose a specific database collection system has been developed to provide geotechnical and geomechanical description of the studied rockside. This parameters and the data collected from historical database, define the input parameters of the Ro.Ma method. Moreover to allow the quantification of the harm, the data coming from the monitoring of the road by the road manager are required. The value of harm is proportional to the number of persons on the road (i.e. people in a vehicle) and the following traffic characteristics: type of vehicles (i.e. bicycles

  11. MONOLITH: a massive magnetized iron detector for atmospheric neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MONOLITH Collaboration

    2001-08-01

    The MONOLITH (Massive Observatory for Neutrino Oscillation or LImits on THeir existence) project is a proposal (N.Y. Agafonova et al., 2000) for an experiment to be installed in the Gran Sasso underground laboratory to study atmospheric neutrino oscillations with a massive magnetized iron tracking calorimeter . The main purpose is to confirm the existence of atmospheric neutrino oscillations through the explicit observation of the first oscillation minimum in νµ disappearance. The MONOLITH detector has been designed in order to discriminate among different oscillation modes and to accurately measure the oscillation parameters in a range that completely covers the Super-Kamiokande allowed region. Other measurements include studies of matter effects, the NC up down ratio, the ¯ν/ν ratio, the study of cosmic ray muons in the multi-TeV energy region, and auxiliary measurements from the CERN to Gran Sasso neutrino beam. Correspondence to: G. C. Trinchero (trinchero@to.infn.it) 1 Institutions participating to the MONOLITH Collaboration: INFN, Sezione di Napoli, Napoli, Italy Moscow Engineering Physics Insitute, Moscow, Russia Universit´a di Bologna and INFN, Bologna, Italy Columbia University, New York, USA Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, INFN, Frascati, Italy Universit´a di Torino,Torino, Italy Universit`a di Milano Bicocca and INFN Sezione di Milano, Italy M¨unster University, M¨unster, Germany Hamburg University, Hamburg, Germany INFN, Sezione di Torino, Torino, Italy Istituto di Cosmogeofisica, CNR, Torino, Italy Institute for Nuclear Research (INR), Moscow, Russia Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, INFN, Assergi, Italy Universit`a de L'Aquila and INFN, L'Aquila, Italy Universit´a di Roma, Roma, Italy Bonn University, Bonn, Germany Humboldt University Berlin, Berlin, Germany

  12. Rapid generation of value added products for seismic crisis management, using ground and satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvi, Stefano; Atzori, Simone; Pezzo, Giuseppe; Merryman Boncori, John Peter; Tolomei, Cristiano; Antonioli, Andrea; Trasatti, Elisa; Zoffoli, Simona; Coletta, Alessandro

    2013-04-01

    Rapid generation of value added products for seismic crisis management, using ground and satellite data Stefano Salvi (1), Simone Atzori (1), Giuseppe Pezzo (1), John Peter Merryman Boncori (1), Cristiano Tolomei (1), Andrea Antonioli (1), Elisa Trasatti (1), Simona Zoffoli (2), Alessandro Coletta (2) (1): Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Centro Nazionale Terremoti, via di Vigna Murata 605, 00143 Roma, Italy (2): Agenzia Spaziale Italiana, Unità Osservazione della Terra, Viale Liegi 26, 00198, Roma, Italy The increased availability of Earth Observation optical and SAR data occurred in the last few years, has stimulated new applications in many different fields. The foreseen launch of new space platforms as the Sentinel satellites, providing good monitoring frequencies and free worldwide access to data is expected to increase the number of scientific and commercial activities exploiting EO data. In the sector of natural hazards the EO data have already demonstrated to be indispensable for the generation of information products for the prevention, and emergency management phases. In particular, the Italian Space Agency has promoted and funded, together with INGV, the development of dedicated infrastructures for the generation of advanced information products supporting different phases of the seismic and volcanic risk management cycles. These products were based mainly on SAR data from the COSMO-SkyMed 4-satellite constellation, and on optical data from commercial and scientific platforms, integrated with data from ground monitoring networks. During the last few years, such infrastructures have been tested under operational conditions and the products distributed to the Italian Civil Protection authority for validation and assessment. Here, with reference to the earthquake emergency management, we will present the infrastructure, the rapid mapping information products and some examples of activities during the latest seismic crises.

  13. Section Editors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groep, D. L.; Bonacorsi, D.

    2014-06-01

    1. Data Acquisition, Trigger and Controls Niko NeufeldCERNniko.neufeld@cern.ch Tassos BeliasDemokritosbelias@inp.demokritos.gr Andrew NormanFNALanorman@fnal.gov Vivian O'DellFNALodell@fnal.gov 2. Event Processing, Simulation and Analysis Rolf SeusterTRIUMFseuster@cern.ch Florian UhligGSIf.uhlig@gsi.de Lorenzo MonetaCERNLorenzo.Moneta@cern.ch Pete ElmerPrincetonpeter.elmer@cern.ch 3. Distributed Processing and Data Handling Nurcan OzturkU Texas Arlingtonnurcan@uta.edu Stefan RoiserCERNstefan.roiser@cern.ch Robert IllingworthFNAL Davide SalomoniINFN CNAFDavide.Salomoni@cnaf.infn.it Jeff TemplonNikheftemplon@nikhef.nl 4. Data Stores, Data Bases, and Storage Systems David LangeLLNLlange6@llnl.gov Wahid BhimjiU Edinburghwbhimji@staffmail.ed.ac.uk Dario BarberisGenovaDario.Barberis@cern.ch Patrick FuhrmannDESYpatrick.fuhrmann@desy.de Igor MandrichenkoFNALivm@fnal.gov Mark van de SandenSURF SARA sanden@sara.nl 5. Software Engineering, Parallelism & Multi-Core Solveig AlbrandLPSC/IN2P3solveig.albrand@lpsc.in2p3.fr Francesco GiacominiINFN CNAFfrancesco.giacomini@cnaf.infn.it Liz SextonFNALsexton@fnal.gov Benedikt HegnerCERNbenedikt.hegner@cern.ch Simon PattonLBNLSJPatton@lbl.gov Jim KowalkowskiFNAL jbk@fnal.gov 6. Facilities, Infrastructures, Networking and Collaborative Tools Maria GironeCERNMaria.Girone@cern.ch Ian CollierSTFC RALian.collier@stfc.ac.uk Burt HolzmanFNALburt@fnal.gov Brian Bockelman U Nebraskabbockelm@cse.unl.edu Alessandro de SalvoRoma 1Alessandro.DeSalvo@ROMA1.INFN.IT Helge MeinhardCERN Helge.Meinhard@cern.ch Ray PasetesFNAL rayp@fnal.gov Steven GoldfarbU Michigan Steven.Goldfarb@cern.ch

  14. Dissecting the molecular architecture and origin of Bayash Romani patrilineages: genetic influences from South-Asia and the Balkans.

    PubMed

    Klarić, Irena Martinović; Salihović, Marijana Pericić; Lauc, Lovorka Barać; Zhivotovsky, Lev A; Rootsi, Siiri; Janićijević, Branka

    2009-03-01

    The Bayash are a branch of Romanian speaking Roma living dispersedly in Central, Eastern, and Southeastern Europe. To better understand the molecular architecture and origin of the Croatian Bayash paternal gene pool, 151 Bayash Y chromosomes were analyzed for 16 SNPs and 17 STRs and compared with European Romani and non-Romani majority populations from Europe, Turkey, and South Asia. Two main layers of Bayash paternal gene pool were identified: ancestral (Indian) and recent (European). The reduced diversity and expansion signals of H1a patrilineages imply descent from closely related paternal ancestors who could have settled in the Indian subcontinent, possibly as early as between the eighth and tenth centuries AD. The recent layer of the Bayash paternal pool is dominated by a specific subset of E1b1b1a lineages that are not found in the Balkan majority populations. At least two private mutational events occurred in the Bayash during their migrations from the southern Balkans toward Romania. Additional admixture, evident in the low frequencies of typical European haplogroups, J2, R1a, I1, R1b1b2, G, and I2a, took place primarily during the early Bayash settlement in the Balkans and the Romani bondage in Romania. Our results indicate two phenomena in the Bayash and analyzed Roma: a significant preservation of ancestral H1a haplotypes as a result of considerable, but variable level of endogamy and isolation and differential distribution of less frequent, but typical European lineages due to different patterns of the early demographic history in Europe marked by differential admixture and genetic drift. PMID:18785634

  15. PREFACE: Nanoscale science and technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellucci, Stefano

    2008-11-01

    ://www.lnf.infn.it/conference/nn2000/default.html N&N2001, Frascati (Roma), Italy, 17-27 October 2001, http://www.lnf.infn.it/conference/nn2001/Welcome.html N&N2002, Frascati (Roma), Italy, 23-28 September 2002, http://www.lnf.infn.it/conference/nn2002/ N&N2003, Frascati (Roma), Italy, 15-19 September 2003, http://www.lnf.infn.it/conference/nn2003/ N&N2004, Frascati (Roma), Italy, 14-20 October 2004, http://www.lnf.infn.it/conference/nn2004/ n&n2005, Monteporzio Catone (Roma), Italy, 14-16 November 2005, http://www.lnf.infn.it/conference/nn2005/ n&n2006, Monteporzio Catone (Roma), Italy, 6-9 November 2006, http://www.lnf.infn.it/conference/nn2006/ In order to enable the exchange of knowledge and collaboration among the different scientists in the field of nanotechnology, whilst also offering an opportunity for those who are just beginning to get involved with it, allowing them to meet contacts and get prime, up-to-date information from the experts, a special poster and equipment session displayed various firm's institutional activities in selected areas of application where nanoscience can have a deep impact. The participants were also able to get involved with sample testing. Tutorial lectures were delivered at the school, addressing general and basic questions about nanotechnology, such as what they are, how does one go about them, what purposes can they serve. In tutorial sessions the nature of nanotechnology, the instruments of current use in its characterizations and the possible applicative uses were described at an introductory level. The first day was devoted to three sessions: Aerospace, defense, biomedicine. Electronics and mechanical properties. Materials and characterizations. The first session was opened by a lecture by J Kenny, who talked about the use of carbon nanotubes for polymer matrix nanocomposites. He reported how plasma functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (F-SWNTs) reacted with a primary aliphatic amine can be used for preparing an integrated nanotube composite

  16. FOREWORD: TAUP 2005: Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Topics in Astroparticle and Underground Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottino, Alessandro; Coccia, Eugenio; Morales, Julio; Puimedónv, Jorge

    2006-04-01

    qualities, was illustrated. The TAUP Steering Committee recalls with deep gratitude that John Bahcall served continuously as a member of the TAUP International Advisory Committee and that he gave an inspired and brilliant conclusive talk at TAUP 2003 in Seattle. Our astroparticle community will miss him greatly. The TAUP 2005 Organizing Committee thanks Ministerio de Educación y Ciencia, Gobierno de Aragón, Zaragoza University, INFN, IUPAP, PaNAGIC and Ibercaja for sponsoring the Conference, and the Rector and Vice-Rector of the Zaragoza University for their hospitality in the magnificent Paraninfo Palace, where the meeting was held. We wish to thank Venya Berezinsky, José Bernabéu and José Angel Villar for their invaluable contribution in the scientific shaping of the conference and in the preparation of the present volume. Very special thanks are due to Ms Mercedes Fatás and Ms Franca Masciulli, our workshop secretaries, for their continuous and excellent work in the organization of the conference, and to Ms Leopolda Benazzato for her invaluable assistance during the conference. We also gratefully thank the technical staff: Cristina Gil, Francisco Javier Mena and Alfonso Ortiz de Solórzano for their invaluable help. As announced at the end of the conference, TAUP 2007 will be held in Sendai, Japan, hosted by the Tohoku University with the chairs of Professors Atsuto Suzuki and Kunio Inoue. COMMITTEES TAUP STEERING COMMITTEE F. T. Avignone, U. South Carolina B. Barish, CALTECH E. Bellotti, U. Milano/INFN J. Bernabéu, U. Valenciav A. Bottino (chair), U. Torino/INFN V. de Alfaro, U. Torino/INFN T. Kajita, ICRR Tokyo C. W. Kim, JHU Baltimore/KIAS Seoul E. Lorenz U. München V. Matveev, INR Moscow J. Morales, U. Zaragoza D. Sinclair, U. Carleton TAUP 2005 INTERNATIONAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE J. J. Aubert, CNRS Marseille J. Bahcall, U. Princeton M. Baldo-Ceolin, U. Padova/INFN L. Bergström, U. Stockholm R. Bernabei, U. Roma Tor Vergata/INFN A. Bettini, U. Padova/INFN S

  17. URSA MAIOR: a One Liter Nanosatellite Bus for Low Cost Access to Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santoni, F.

    One of the main limitations in the access to space for developing countries is the economical effort typically required by space missions. Secondly, space activity is a field of very high technology, requiring technical skills, education and practice, at a level which is seldom reached by developing countries. Interventions aimed to facilitate access to space for developing countries should be focussed primarily on the missions allowing access to space at reasonable cost. Moreover, perhaps more importantly, they should emphasize conducting the mission design, construction, ground testing and operation in orbit as an open activity, accessible to developing countries personnel, in order to set up an education process, which is not just selling a product ready satellite. Universities could have a very important role in this activity. Many Universities around the world have designed, built and launched small satellites. Università di Roma "La Sapienza" set up a program for the construction of small satellites in an academic environment, involving directly the students in the design, construction, ground testing and operation in orbit. The first satellite built in the framework of this program, UNISAT, was successfully launched in September 2000. The second, UNISAT-2, initially scheduled for launch in 2001, has been delayed by the launch provider to late 2002. These two satellites, based on a modular design, emphasizing ease of construction and assembly, weight roughly 10 kg. The realization of these satellites was made possible within the regular financing given to university research programs, keeping down cost by the use of commercial off the shelf components instead of space rated ones. The microsatellite experience at Università di Roma "La Sapienza", is going further with the development of a new nanosatellite bus, URSA MAIOR (Università di Roma "la SApienza" Micro Autonomous Imager in ORbit), aiming at cutting down cost and possibly improving performance. The

  18. URSA MAIOR: a One Liter Nanosatellite Bus for Low Cost Access to Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santoni, F.

    One of the main limitations in the access to space for developing countries is the economical effort typically required by space missions. Secondly, space activity is a field of very high technology, requiring technical skills, education and practice, at a level which is seldom reached by developing countries. Interventions aimed to facilitate access to space for developing countries should be focussed primarily on the missions allowing access to space at reasonable cost. Moreover, perhaps more importantly, they should emphasize conducting the mission design, construction, ground testing and operation in orbit as an open activity, accessible to developing countries personnel, in order to set up an education process, which is not just selling a product ready satellite. Universities could have a very important role in this activity. Many Universities around the world have designed, built and launched small satellites. Università di Roma "La Sapienza" set up a program for the construction of small satellites in an academic environment, involving directly the students in the design, construction, ground testing and operation in orbit. The first satellite built in the framework of this program, UNISAT, was successfully launched in September 2000. The second, UNISAT-2, initially scheduled for launch in 2001, has been delayed by the launch provider to late 2002. These two satellites, based on a modular design, emphasizing ease of construction and assembly, weight roughly 10 kg. The realization of these satellites was made possible within the regular financing given to university research programs, keeping down cost by the use of commercial off the shelf components instead of space rated ones. The microsatellite experience at Università di Roma "La Sapienza", is going further with the development of a new nanosatellite bus, URSA MAIOR (Università di Roma "la SApienza" Micro Autonomous Imager in ORbit), aiming at cutting down cost and possibly improving performance. The

  19. Geochemical background/baseline values in top soils of Campania region: assessment of the toxic elements threat to ecosystem and human health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vivo, B.; Lima, A.; Albanese, S.; Bove, M.; Cicchella, D.; Civitillo, D.; Cosenza, A.; Grezzi, G.

    2009-04-01

    . 2007b. Geochemical Environmental Atlas of the Soils of Avellino. Aracne Editrice, Roma. ALBANESE, S. 2008. Geochemistry: Expl., Env., Anal., 8, 49-57. ALBANESE S., DE LUCA M. L., DE VIVO B., LIMA A. and GREZZI G., 2008. In: Environmental Geochemistry: Site characterization, Data analysis and Case histories (De Vivo B., Belkin H. E. and Lima A., Eds). Elsevier, Amsterdam, 391-404. ALBANESE, S., CIVITILLO, D., COSENZA, A., DE VIVO, B., & LIMA., A., J. Geoch. Explor.. In press. CICCHELLA, D., DE VIVO, B. & LIMA, A. 2003. Science of the Total Environment, 308 (1-3), 121-131. CICCHELLA, D., DE VIVO, B. & LIMA, A. 2005. Geochemistry: Expl., Env., Anal., 5, 29-40. CICCHELLA, D., DE VIVO, B., LIMA, A., ALBANESE, S., MCGILL, R.A.R. & PARRISH, R.R. 2008a. Geochemistry: Expl.,. Env., Ana.s, 8, 103-112. CICCHELLA, D., FEDELE, L., DE VIVO, B., ALBANESE, S. & LIMA, A. 2008b. Geochemistry: Expl., Env., Anal., 8, 31-40. CICCHELLA, D., ALBANESE, S., DE VIVO, B., LIMA, A., GREZZI, G. & ZUPPETTA, A. 2009. Geochemical Environmental Atlas of the soils of Benevento. Aracne Editrice, Roma. DE VIVO B. and LIMA A., 2008. In: Environmental Geochemistry: Site characterization, Data analysis and Case histories (De Vivo B., Belkin H. E. and Lima A., Eds). Elsevier, Amsterdam, 355-385. DE VIVO, B., LIMA, A., ALBANESE, S. & CICCHELLA, D. 2003. Geochemical Environmental Atlas of Campania Region. De Frede Editore, Napoli. DE VIVO, B., LIMA, A., ALBANESE, S. & CICCHELLA, D. 2006a. Geochemical Environmental Atlas of Campania Region. Aracne Editrice, Roma. DE VIVO, B., CICCHELLA, D., LIMA, A. & ALBANESE, S. 2006b. Geochemical Environmental Atlas of the Urban and Provincial Soils of Napoli. Aracne Editrice, Roma. FEDELE, L., DE VIVO, B., LIMA, A., CICCHELLA, D. & ALBANESE, S. 2007. Geochemical Environmental Atlas of the Soils of Salerno. Aracne Editrice, Roma. LIMA, A., DE VIVO, B., GREZZI, G., ALBANESE, S. & CICCHELLA, D. 2007. Geochemical Environmental Atlas of the Soils of Caserta. Aracne Editrice

  20. Clarification of Tomato Juice with Polygalacturonase Obtained from Tomato Fruits Infected by Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Ajayi, A A; Peter-Albert, C F; Akeredolu, M; Shokunbi, A A

    2015-02-01

    Two varieties of tomato fruits commonly available in Nigerian markets are the Roma VF and Ibadan local varieties of tomato fruits. The Roma VF fruits are oval in shape. It is a common type of cultivar in the Northern region of Nigeria and it is not susceptible to cracking. The Ibadan local variety of tomato fruits is a local variety commonly found on farmers fields in South-western region of Nigeria. They are highly susceptible to cracking. The Ibadan local variety was employed for this research. There are lots of benefits derived from the consumption of tomato fruits. The fruits can be made into tomato juice clarified with pectinases. Polygalacturonase is one of the pectinases used commercially in the clarification of fruit juice from different fruits. This study examined the production of polygalacturonase during the deterioration of tomato fruits by Aspergillus niger and the role of the purified polygalacturonase in the clarification of tomato juice. Tomato fruits of the Ibadan local variety were inoculated with mycelia discs containing spores of a 96-h-old culture of Aspergillus niger served as the inoculum. The organism from the stock culture was subcultured onto potato dextrose agar plates. The extraction of polygalacturonase after 10 days of incubation at 27 degrees C was carried out by homogenizing the fruits with liquid extractant using the MSE homogenizer after the deteriorated fruits had been chilled for 30 min inside a freezer. Control fruits were similarly treated except that sterile potato dextrose agar served as the inoculum. The effect of different temperature of incubation and different volume of enzyme on the tomato juice from the tomato fruits was investigated. Extracts from the inoculated fruits exhibited appreciable polygalacturonase activity. The juice with polygalacturonase was visually clearer and more voluminous than the juice treated with water for all parameters studied. The highest volume of juice was obtained after an incubation period

  1. COGNITIVE-HD study: protocol of an observational study of neurocognitive functioning and association with clinical outcomes in adults with end-stage kidney disease treated with haemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Suetonia C; Ruospo, Marinella; Barulli, Maria Rosaria; Iurillo, Annalisa; Saglimbene, Valeria; Natale, Patrizia; Gargano, Letizia; Murgo, Angelo M; Loy, Clement; van Zwieten, Anita; Wong, Germaine; Tortelli, Rosanna; Craig, Jonathan C; Johnson, David W; Tonelli, Marcello; Hegbrant, Jörgen; Wollheim, Charlotta; Logroscino, Giancarlo; Strippoli, G F M

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The prevalence of cognitive impairment may be increased in adults with end-stage kidney disease compared with the general population. However, the specific patterns of cognitive impairment and association of cognitive dysfunction with activities of daily living and clinical outcomes (including withdrawal from treatment) among haemodialysis patients remain incompletely understood. The COGNITIVE impairment in adults with end-stage kidney disease treated with HemoDialysis (COGNITIVE-HD) study aims to characterise the age-adjusted and education-adjusted patterns of cognitive impairment (using comprehensive testing for executive function, perceptual-motor function, language, learning and memory, and complex attention) in patients on haemodialysis and association with clinical outcomes. Methods and analysis A prospective, longitudinal, cohort study of 750 adults with end-stage kidney disease treated with long-term haemodialysis has been recruited within haemodialysis centres in Italy (July 2013 to April 2014). Testing for neurocognitive function was carried out by a trained psychologist at baseline to assess cognitive functioning. The primary study factor is cognitive impairment and secondary study factors will be specific domains of cognitive function. The primary outcome will be total mortality. Secondary outcomes will be cause-specific mortality, major cardiovascular events, fatal and non-fatal myocardial infarction and stroke, institutionalisation, and withdrawal from treatment at 12 months. Ethics and dissemination This protocol was approved before study conduct by the following responsible ethics committees: Catania (approval reference 186/BE; 26/09/2013), Agrigento (protocol numbers 61–62; 28/6/2013), USL Roma C (CE 39217; 24/6/2013), USL Roma F (protocol number 0041708; 23/7/2013), USL Latina (protocol number 20090/A001/2011; 12/7/2013), Trapani (protocol number 3413; 16/7/2013) and Brindisi (protocol number 40259; 6/6/2013). All participants

  2. In situ observations of small scale neutral and plasma dynamics in the mesosphere / lower thermosphere at 79° N.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strelnikov, B.; Rapp, M.; Blix, T. A.; Wilms, S.; Engler, N.; Höffner, J.; Lübken, F.-J.; Smiley, B.; Friedrich, M.

    From June 29 to July 7 2003, the German-Norwegian ROMA/SVALRAK campaign (ROMA = Rocket borne Observations in the Middle Atmosphere) took place at the SVALRAK rocket range, Ny-Ålesund (79°N, 11°E; Spitsbergen). The main scientific aim of this campaign was to study polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE) and mesospheric turbulence. During this campaign a total of three instrumented sounding rockets was launched. In addition, ground based observations with a VHF radar and a potassium lidar at Longyearbyen complemented the in situ measurements. All three sounding rockets were equipped with the CONE (= COmbined sensor for Neutrals and Electrons) instrument to measure small scale structure of neutral air and electron density, and neutral temperature. The PIP (= Positive Ion Probe) instrument was used to measure small scale structure of the positive ion density. Furthermore, two cold plasma probes (CPP) were used to measure electron temperature, and a particle detector was employed to detect signatures of charged aerosols. During the first launch, an electric field experiment was also incorporated, while during the other two launches, Faraday rotation experiments yielded absolute electron number densities. During all three rocket flights a PMSE was observed by the VHF radar, whereas the potassium lidar detected a noctilucent cloud (NLC) only during the second launch. Signatures of the charged particles forming the PMSE and NLC layers were recorded by the onboard particle detectors. During the first launch neutral air density fluctuations indicating turbulence in the altitude region from ˜ 74 km up to ˜ 90 km were detected by the CONE instrument. In addition, CONE recorded very strong and high frequency neutral density fluctuations between altitudes of 90 km up to the apogee of ˜ 106 km. Clearly, these fluctuations are of non-turbulent origin. Strong positive ion and electron density fluctuations were also detected in the same altitude region (˜ 90 -106 km). These

  3. PREFACE: 1st-2nd Young Researchers Meetings in Rome - Proceedings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    YRMR Organizing Committee; Cannuccia, E.; Mazzaferro, L.; Migliaccio, M.; Pietrobon, D.; Stellato, F.; Veneziani, M.

    2011-03-01

    Students in science, particularly in physics, face a fascinating and challenging future. Scientists have proposed very interesting theories, which describe the microscopic and macroscopic world fairly well, trying to match the quantum regime with cosmological scales. Between the extremes of this scenario, biological phenomena in all their complexity take place, challenging the laws we observe in the atomic and sub-atomic world. More and more accurate and complex experiments have been devised and these are now going to test the paradigms of physics. Notable experiments include: the Large Hadronic Collider (LHC), which is going to shed light on the physics of the Standard Model of Particles and its extensions; the Planck-Herschel satellites, which target a very precise measurement of the properties of our Universe; and the Free Electron Lasers facilities, which produce high-brilliance, ultrafast X-ray pulses, allowing the investigation of the fundamental processes of solid state physics, chemistry, and biology. These projects are the result of huge collaborations spread across the world, involving scientists belonging to different and complementary research fields: physicists, chemists, biologists and others, keen to make the best of these extraordinary laboratories. Even though each branch of science is experiencing a process of growing specialization, it is very important to keep an eye on the global picture, remaining aware of the deep interconnections between inherent fields. This is even more crucial for students who are beginning their research careers. These considerations motivated PhD students and young post-docs connected to the Roman scientific research area to organize a conference, to establish the background and the network for interactions and collaborations. This resulted in the 1st and 2nd Young Researchers Meetings in Rome (http://ryrm.roma2.infn.it), one day conferences aimed primarily at graduate students and post-docs, working in physics in Italy

  4. PREFACE: DISCRETE 2010: Symposium on Prospects in the Physics of Discrete Symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Domenico, Antonio; Bini, Cesare; Bloise, Caterina; Bossi, Fabio; Faccini, Riccardo; Gauzzi, Paolo; Isidori, Gino; Lipari, Paolo; Ludovici, Lucio; Silvestrini, Luca

    2011-12-01

    The Symposium DISCRETE2010 on Prospects in the Physics of Discrete Symmetries was held at the Sapienza Universitàa di Roma, Italy from 6-11 December 2010. This second edition, after the successful one in Valencia in 2008, covered all theoretical and experimental progress in the field, and aimed at a thorough discussion on the latest developments. The topics covered included: T, C, P, CP symmetries; accidental symmetries (B, L conservation); CPT symmetry, decoherence, Lorentz symmetry breaking; neutrino mass and mixing; cosmology and astroparticles, dark matter searches; experimental prospects at LHC, Super flavor factories, and new facilities. The Symposium was organized in plenary sessions with a total of 23 invited talks, and parallel sessions with a total of 80 talks including both invited and selected contributions from the submitted abstracts. The speakers of the plenary sessions were: Achille Stocchi, Andreas Weiler, Kevin Pitts, Tim Gershon, Marco Sozzi, Neal Weiner, Vasiliki Mitsou, Bernard Sadoulet, Gianfranco Bertone, J. Eric Grove, Mauro Mezzetto, Alexei Yu Smirnov, Oliviero Cremonesi, Antonio Riotto, Reno Mandolesi, Brett Altschul, Jose Bernabeu, Lawrence Hall, Marco Grassi, Yannis K. Semertzidis, Riccardo Barbieri, Gigi Rolandi, Luciano Maiani. The Symposium venue was the CNR (Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche) headquarter building, close to the Sapienza University. At the end of the Symposium a special open session, devoted to a wider audience, was held at the Pontifical University of the Holy Cross, in the historical center of Rome. The symposium was attended by about 140 participants, about half coming from Italy, and the rest mainly from other European countries and United States. Among the social events was a concert at the Aula Magna of the Sapienza University, and a social dinner in the historical Palazzo Pallavicini-Rospigliosi on the Quirinale Hill. The next symposium of the series will be organised by IST, Universidade Tàecnica de Lisboa

  5. Incorporating surface indicators of reservoir permeability into reservoir volume calculations: Application to the Colli Albani caldera and the Central Italy Geothermal Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordano, Guido; De Benedetti, Arnaldo Angelo; Bonamico, Andrea; Ramazzotti, Paolo; Mattei, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    The Quaternary Roman Volcanic Province extends for over 200 km along the Tyrrhenian margin of the Italian peninsula and is composed of several caldera complexes with significant associated geothermal potential. In spite of the massive programs of explorations conducted by the then state-owned ENEL and AGIP companies between the 1970s and 1990s, and the identification of several high enthalpy fields, this resource remains so far unexploited, although it occurs right below the densely populated metropolitan area of Roma capital city. The main reason for this failure is that deep geothermal reservoirs are associated with fractured rocks, the secondary permeability of which has been difficult to predict making the identification of the most productive volumes of the reservoirs and the localisation of productive wells uncertain. As a consequence, almost half of the many exploration deep bore-holes drilled in the area reached a dry target. This work reviews available data and re-assesses the geothermal potential of caldera-related systems in Central Italy, by analysing in detail the case of the Colli Albani caldera system, the closest to Roma capital city. A GIS based approach identifies the most promising reservoir volumes for geothermal exploitation and uses an improved volume method approach for the evaluation of geothermal potential. The approach is based on a three dimensional matrix of georeferenced spatial data; the A axis accounts for the modelling of the depth of the top of the reservoirs based on geophysical and direct data; the B axis accounts for the thermal modelling of the crust (i.e. T with depth) based on measured thermal gradients. Both A and B data are necessary but not sufficient to identify rock volumes actually permeated by geothermal fluids in fractured reservoirs. We discuss the implementation of a C axis that evaluates all surface data indicating permeability in the reservoir and actual geothermal fluid circulation. We consider datasets on: i

  6. PMSE and E-region plasma instability: In situ observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strelnikov, B.; Rapp, M.; Zecha, M.; Blix, T. A.; Friedrich, M.; Yeoman, T. K.

    2009-01-01

    From 29 June to July 6, 2003, the ROMA-Svalrak (Rocketborne Observations of the Middle Atmosphere at the Svalrak facilities) sounding rocket campaign took place at Ny-Alesund (Spitsbergen, geographical coord. 79oN, 12oE, geomagnetic coord. 76oN, 110oE). Three sounding rockets were launched to study neutral air turbulence and small scale plasma dynamics around polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE). During all three flights both PMSE and plasma instability events were observed. It is known that small-scale field aligned structures in the E-region plasma density can be created by unstable electromagnetic waves. The mechanism responsible for creating the structures causing radar echoes (PMSE) is believed to be neutral air turbulence in the presence of heavy charged particles. E-region plasma irregularities recorded during the last rocket flight (labeled RO-MI-03) were observed only during the upleg of the trajectory but not during the downleg. Also, on the upleg there was no clear spatial separation between PMSE and the plasma instability regions. In the current paper we consider this transition region in detail.

  7. GB-InSAR monitoring and observational method for landslide emergency management: the Montaguto earthflow (AV, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrigno, F.; Gigli, G.; Fanti, R.; Casagli, N.

    2015-12-01

    On 10 March 2010, due to the heavy rainfall that occurred on the previous days, the Montaguto earthflow reactivated, involving the road SS 90 "Delle Puglie", as had happened previously in May 2005 and in September 2009, and reaching the Roma-Bari railway. This determined a special attention of the National Civil Protection Department and a widespread monitoring and analysis program was initiated. A monitoring activity using GB-InSAR (Ground Based Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar) system began, in order to investigate the landslide kinematics, to plan urgent safety measures for risk mitigation and to design long term stabilization work. In this paper the GB-InSAR monitoring system results and its applications in the Observational Method (OM) approach are presented. The paper also highlights how the OM based on the GB-InSAR technique can produce savings in cost and time on engineering projects, without compromising safety, and how it can also benefit the geotechnical community by increasing scientific knowledge. This study focuses on the very much active role played by the monitoring activities, in both the design and plan modifications; with a special consideration for the emergency phase.

  8. The evaluation of a PCR-based method for identification of Salmonella enterica serotypes from environmental samples and various food matrices.

    PubMed

    Jean-Gilles Beaubrun, Junia; Cheng, Chorng-Ming; Chen, Kai-Shun; Ewing, Laura; Wang, Hua; Agpaoa, Maria C; Huang, Mei-Chiung J; Dickey, Erin; Du, Jamie M; Williams-Hill, Donna M; Hamilton, Brittany; Micallef, Shirley A; Rosenberg Goldstein, Rachel E; George, Ashish; Joseph, Sam W; Sapkota, Amy R; Jacobson, Andrew P; Tall, Ben D; Kothary, Mahendra H; Dudley, Kim; Hanes, Darcy E

    2012-09-01

    The most commonly used method for serotyping Salmonella spp. is based on the Kaufmann-White scheme, and is composed of serological reactions using antibodies to LPS agglutinins. The multiplex PCR used in this investigation was established by Kim et al. to serotype the 30 most common clinical Salmonella serotypes, as determined by CDC. The PCR assay consists of two five-plex reactions and a single two-plex PCR reaction, based on six genetic loci from Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium and four loci from S. enterica serotype Typhi. In this investigation, we further evaluated the method for serotyping Salmonella spp. using a reference collection, environmental samples collected from a Mid-Atlantic region tomato farm study, four food matrices spiked with different Salmonella serotypes and a proficiency test. The PCR assay was first evaluated using DNA isolated from pure cultures of isolates obtained from various clinical and environmental samples, and then DNA isolated from broth cultures of food matrices of "Red round" and Roma tomatoes, Romaine lettuce, green onions and Serrano peppers spiked with serotypes Newport, Typhimurium, Javiana and Saintpaul, respectively. The results showed that the PCR assay correctly serotyped Salmonella spp. from the clinical, environmental, spiked food matrices, and proficiency test samples. These findings are significant because the PCR assay was successful in the identification of Salmonella in the spiked samples in a broth culture containing other non-salmonella organism. This method may be a useful resource for the food safety community. PMID:22608224

  9. Exploring old caves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luana Belli, Maria

    2015-04-01

    Quarries, caves and mines often contain fossils. During the '30s in Rome, the urban expansion needs for building materials such as gravel, sand and clay were extracted from quarries that surrounded the city. One of these quarries in particular, in the area of Saccopastore (Nomentana area 3 km from the University Sapienza Roma) returned an ancient human fossil skull belonging to a Neanderthal (most likely a female) who lived in Latium about 120,000 years ago. Detailed studies of this fossil were carried out by Sergio Sergi, the son of the founder of the Museum of Anthropology in Rome, Giuseppe Sergi. The museum was founded in 1884 and was later transferred to the University City (1934) where it is still located. Professor Maria Luana Belli, a science teacher in the Liceo Scientifico "G. Keplero" is a volunteer and collaborator with the Museum "G. Sergi", and she and her students retrace the places of the discovery on the trail of the Neanderthals, for understanding the evolution of the territory in a perspective of interdisciplinary teaching.

  10. Survey of Expert Opinion on Intelligence: Causes of International Differences in Cognitive Ability Tests

    PubMed Central

    Rindermann, Heiner; Becker, David; Coyle, Thomas R.

    2016-01-01

    Following Snyderman and Rothman (1987, 1988), we surveyed expert opinions on the current state of intelligence research. This report examines expert opinions on causes of international differences in student assessment and psychometric IQ test results. Experts were surveyed about the importance of culture, genes, education (quantity and quality), wealth, health, geography, climate, politics, modernization, sampling error, test knowledge, discrimination, test bias, and migration. The importance of these factors was evaluated for diverse countries, regions, and groups including Finland, East Asia, sub-Saharan Africa, Southern Europe, the Arabian-Muslim world, Latin America, Israel, Jews in the West, Roma (gypsies), and Muslim immigrants. Education was rated by N = 71 experts as the most important cause of international ability differences. Genes were rated as the second most relevant factor but also had the highest variability in ratings. Culture, health, wealth, modernization, and politics were the next most important factors, whereas other factors such as geography, climate, test bias, and sampling error were less important. The paper concludes with a discussion of limitations of the survey (e.g., response rates and validity of expert opinions). PMID:27047425

  11. Discovery of Selective Histone Deacetylase 6 Inhibitors Using the Quinazoline as the Cap for the Treatment of Cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhuang; Wang, Taijin; Wang, Fang; Niu, Ting; Liu, Zhuowei; Chen, Xiaoxin; Long, Chaofeng; Tang, Minghai; Cao, Dong; Wang, Xiaoyan; Xiang, Wei; Yi, Yuyao; Ma, Liang; You, Jingsong; Chen, Lijuan

    2016-02-25

    Novel selective histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) inhibitors using the quinazoline as the cap were designed, synthesized, and evaluated for HDAC enzymatic assays. N-Hydroxy-4-(2-methoxy-5-(methyl(2-methylquinazolin-4-yl)amino)phenoxy)butanamide, 23bb, was the most potent selective inhibitor for HDAC6 with an IC50 of 17 nM and showed 25-fold and 200-fold selectivity relative to HDAC1 and HDAC8, respectively. In vitro, 23bb presented low nanomolar antiproliferative effects against panel of cancer cell lines. Western blot analysis further confirmed that 23bb increased acetylation level of α-tubulin in vitro. 23bb has a good pharmacokinetic profile with oral bioavailability of 47.0% in rats. In in vivo efficacy evaluations of colorectal HCT116, acute myelocytic leukemia MV4-11, and B cell lymphoma Romas xenografts, 23bb more effectively inhibited the tumor growth than SAHA even at a 4-fold reduced dose or ACY-1215 at the same dose. Our results indicated that 23bb is a potent oral anticancer candidate for selective HDAC6 inhibitor and deserves further investigation. PMID:26443078

  12. Dental size and shape in the Roman imperial age: two examples from the area of Rome.

    PubMed

    Manzi, G; Santandrea, E; Passarello, P

    1997-04-01

    Different socioeconomic strata of Roman imperial age are represented by two large dental samples recovered from archaeological excavations near Rome, Italy. Teeth are investigated for crown dimensions and morphological variants. One sample, comprising 1,465 permanent teeth, represents the rural town of Lucus Feroniae (LFR) and is mainly composed of slaves and war veterans. The other, comprising 734 teeth from the Isola Sacra necropolis at Portus Romae (NIS), represents the "middle class" segment of an urban population. Both series show small dental dimensions and fit at the lower end of the trend toward dental reduction in Europe from the Upper Paleolithic to the historical times. The urban sample is less variable metrically and less sexually dimorphic than the rural one. The analysis of discrete crown traits shows absence of rare phenotypic variants in both series. The urban sample is also less variable in this last respect, suggesting that the gene pool of this particular "stratum" of the NIS population was more homogeneous than that of LFR. The occurrence of enamel hypoplasia indicates that metabolic stress during growth and development was similar in LFR and NIS. The overall set of available data is evaluated in the light of the history of the two Roman sites and the composition of each population. PMID:9140539

  13. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Non-Fermi blazar sample (Xiong+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, D.; Zhang, X.; Bai, J.; Zhang, H.

    2015-11-01

    The selection criteria for the sample were that we tried to select the largest group of blazars included in the multi-frequency catalogue of blazars (the Roma BZCAT; Massaro et al.. 2009, Cat. J/A+A/495/691) with reliable broad-line luminosity (used as a proxy for disc luminosity), redshift, black hole mass and jet kinetic power. The sample of FBs was directly from Xiong & Zhang (2014MNRAS.441.3375X). The νpeak and Lpeak of our FBs were collected from Finke (2013ApJ...763..134F) and Meyer et al. (2011, Cat. J/ApJ/740/98), and the νpeak and Lpeak of NFBs from Nieppola et al. (2006, Cat. J/A+A/445/441; 2008, Cat. J/A+A/488/867), Meyer et al. (2011, Cat. J/ApJ/740/98), Wu, Gu & Jiang (2009RAA.....9..168W) and Aatrokoski et al. (2011A&A...536A..15P). (1 data file).

  14. Blazar Demographics Using Multiwavelength Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Peiyuan; Massaro, F.; Urry, C. Megan

    2016-01-01

    Blazars are ideal laboratories to study relativistic jets in AGN, which are thought to be an important channel for feeding energy into galaxies and clusters. We present multi-wavelength SEDs of 2214 blazars with known redshifts, based on the Roma-BZCAT data across 12 frequency bands ranging from radio to gamma-ray. We confirm the anti-correlation between radio luminosity and synchrotron peak frequency, (part of what defines the "blazar sequence"), although with greater scatter than seen previously in studies of far fewer blazars. We describe an empirical estimator of luminosities in those 12 frequency bands using only the radio luminosity at 1.4 GHz and the redshift as inputs. Using this estimator, we study the demographics of blazars by comparing Monte-Carlo simulations to blazar surveys at several different frequencies and flux limits. We recover the observed evolutionary parameter for both low-frequency peaked (V/Vmax≈0.6) and high-frequency peaked (V/Vmax≈0.4) blazars, proving that selection effects cause the high-frequency-peaked sources to appear to anti-evolve even though the same underlying evolution was assumed in the simulation. We also show that the if instead we randomly assign fluxes independent of radio luminosity, the simulated blazar samples disagree strongly with the observed ones. These simulations confirm that luminosity and SED shape must indeed be linked in a physical blazar sequence.

  15. Estimation of the time-dependent radioactive source-term from the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident using atmospheric transport modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoeppner, M.; Plastino, W.; Budano, A.; De Vincenzi, M.; Ruggieri, F.

    2012-04-01

    Several nuclear reactors at the Fukushima Dai-ichi power plant have been severely damaged from the Tōhoku earthquake and the subsequent tsunami in March 2011. Due to the extremely difficult on-site situation it has been not been possible to directly determine the emissions of radioactive material. However, during the following days and weeks radionuclides of 137-Caesium and 131-Iodine (amongst others) were detected at monitoring stations throughout the world. Atmospheric transport models are able to simulate the worldwide dispersion of particles accordant to location, time and meteorological conditions following the release. The Lagrangian atmospheric transport model Flexpart is used by many authorities and has been proven to make valid predictions in this regard. The Flexpart software has first has been ported to a local cluster computer at the Grid Lab of INFN and Department of Physics of University of Roma Tre (Rome, Italy) and subsequently also to the European Mediterranean Grid (EUMEDGRID). Due to this computing power being available it has been possible to simulate the transport of particles originating from the Fukushima Dai-ichi plant site. Using the time series of the sampled concentration data and the assumption that the Fukushima accident was the only source of these radionuclides, it has been possible to estimate the time-dependent source-term for fourteen days following the accident using the atmospheric transport model. A reasonable agreement has been obtained between the modelling results and the estimated radionuclide release rates from the Fukushima accident.

  16. Enabling data analysis à la PROOF on the Italian ATLAS Tier-2s using PoD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Nardo, Roberto; Ganis, Gerardo; Vilucchi, Elisabetta; Annovi, Alberto; Antonelli, Mario; Carlino, Gianpaolo; De Salvo, Alessandro; Doria, Alessandra; Manafov, Anar; Martini, Agnese; Testa, Marianna

    2012-12-01

    We describe our experience using PROOF for data analysis on the Italian ATLAS-Tier2 in Frascati, Napoli and Roma1. To enable PROOF on the cluster we used PoD, Proof-on-Demand. PoD is a set of tools designed to interact with any Local Resource Management System (LRMS) to start the PROOF daemons. In this way any user can quickly setup its own PROOF cluster on the resources, with the LRMS taking care of scheduling, priorities and accounting. Usage of PoD has steadily increased in the last years, and the product has now reached a production level quality. PoD features an abstract interface to LRMSs and provides plugins for several LRMSs. In our tests we used both the gLite and PBS plug-ins, the latter being the native LRMS handling the resources under test. Data were accessed via XRootD with file discovery provided by the standard ATLAS tools. The Storage Element was Disk Pool Manager (DPM) which traditionally uses RFIO rfio data access protocol; we added XRootD on top of this system so PoD could access the data. We describe the configuration and setup details and the results of some benchmark tests we run on the facility.

  17. Remote sensing of regional pyroclastic deposits on the north central portion of the lunar nearside

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawke, B. R.; Campbell, B. A.; Lucey, P. G.; Peterson, C. A.; Coombs, C. R.

    1991-01-01

    High-resolution 3.0-cm radar data for the Rima Bode regional pyroclastic deposit and a number of UV-visible reflectance spectra for regional pyroclastic deposits on the north-central portion of the lunar nearside are analyzed and compared to existing data. The data obtained indicate that small craters in this deposit excavated loose unwelded pyroclastic particles, suggesting that welded layers or lenses do not exist at depths within the deposit's core area. The 70-cm radar data indicate that the Roma Bode deposit is thinner than the pyroclastic unit on the Aristarchus Plateau. The surfaces of all these regional pyroclastic deposits are dominated by ilmenite-rich black spheres, and contamination by low-Ti, nonpyroclastic debris appears to be minimal. The fine-grained block-free uncontaminated Rima Bode would be ideal for lunar mining operations and for rapidly covering lunar base modules with an adequate thickness of shielding material for protection from meteorite impact and space radiation.

  18. [Haplotypes of mtDNA-HV1/HV2 in non-related individuals of Caucasian population living in the Slovak Republic].

    PubMed

    Repiská, V; Lehocký, I; Galatová, J; Böhmer, D

    2010-01-01

    Evaluation of the frequency index for mtDNA particular sequences in the Caucasian population is crucial for forensic practice. There are two hypervariable regions in the mtDNA D-loop, HV1 and HV2. Both of them, 610 bp altogether, were sequenced, 342 bp from the hypervariable region HV1 (16024-16365) and 268 bp from the hypervariable region HV2 (73-340). We have analyzed 374 randomly selected non-related individuals of th e Caucasian population and 192 individuals of the Roma subpopulation living in Slovakia. The main goals of the work were to introduce and standardize methods of analysis of variability of the HV1 and HV2 regions of mtDNA for forensic use; to characterize the variability of mtDNA in the Slovakian population taking into account the subpopulations; classification of mtDNA profiles into haplotype groups, and comparison with other haplotype groups in Europe in the frame of phylogenetic studies. PMID:21287808

  19. The O3-Vet project: integration of a standard nomenclature of clinical terms in a veterinary electronic medical record for veterinary hospitals.

    PubMed

    Zaninelli, M; Campagnoli, A; Reyes, M; Rojas, V

    2012-11-01

    In order to improve the hospital information system of the Chilean University Hospital, the Veterinary Medicine School of Universidad de Chile made a research cooperation with Università San Raffaele Roma to develop and test a new release of the O3-Vet software application. O3-Vet was selected by the Chilean University mainly for two reasons: (1) it uses human medicine standardized technologies such as "Health Level 7" (HL7) and "Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise" (IHE), which allow a good level of data sharing and hospital management; (2) it is open source, which means it can be adapted to specific hospital needs. In the new release, a subset of diagnostic terms was added from the "Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine Clinical Terms" (SNOMED CT), selected by the "American Animal Hospital Association" (AAHA) to standardize the filing of clinical data and its retrieval. Results from a limited survey of veterinarians of the University (n=9) show that the new release improved the management of the Chilean University Hospital and the ability to retrieve useful clinical data. PMID:22595264

  20. Interference of Bilirubin in the Determination of Magnesium with Methyl Thymol Blue

    PubMed Central

    Maksinovic, Rada; Ketin, Sonja; Biocanin, Rade

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Jaundice is a disease named for the yellow color of the skin. This color is the result of elevated levels of bilirubin in the blood serum. In Roma from Krusevac region in the last few years have seen the emergence of jaundice. Material and methods: In 80 of them (40 suffering and 40 from control group) were performed tests of numerous parameters in the laboratories of the Health Center in Krusevac. Magnesium was determined by spectrophotometry with methyl thymol blue, titanium yellow and blue xylidene. Bilirubin was determined by Jandrešek Grofov’s method. Results: The results were within the expectations, in addition to magnesium which was determined with methyl thymol blue. In all patients suffering from jaundice concentration of magnesium (0.67 ±0.14 mmol/l) statistically was significantly lower than tested of the control group (0.91± 0.059 mmol/). There is no theoretical data to reduce the concentration of magnesium in serum as a result of jaundice. That’s why we determined magnesium both in the control group and in sufferings with two methods as the titanium yellow, and xylidene blew. With these two methods we obtained results that were examined were within normal limits. Conclusion: This has led us to conclude that the determination of bilirubin interferes with magnesium methyl thymol blue. PMID:26244045

  1. Resurgence of measles in Serbia 2010-2011 highlights the need for supplementary immunization activities.

    PubMed

    Nedeljković, J; Rakić Adrović, S; Tasić, G; Kovačević-Jovanović, V; Lončarević, G; Hübschen, J M; Muller, C P

    2016-04-01

    Between December 2010 and August 2011 an outbreak of measles occurred in Serbia with 363 reported cases. Sera and/or nose/throat swabs were collected from 193 patients and tested for measles-specific IgM antibodies by ELISA and viral RNA by RT-PCR, respectively. Epidemiological data were obtained from the surveillance database of the Institute of Public Health of Serbia. Of the 363 cases involved in the outbreak, 113 were laboratory confirmed. More than one third of the patients were hospitalized (n = 130, 35·8%) and for 15 (4·1% of the reported outbreak cases) the infection was complicated by pneumonia. Mostly pre-school children aged ⩽4 years (37·8%) and adults aged ⩾30 years (27·3%) were affected. The majority of patients belonged to the Roma population with a preponderance of female cases (57·0%). Nearly 94% of the patients were either unvaccinated or of unknown vaccination status. The main outbreak virus was the D4-Hamburg strain. The outbreak in Serbia occurred after several years of very low measles incidence despite a high routine immunization coverage in the general population, suggesting that special efforts to identify and vaccinate susceptible population groups are required even in countries with apparently good disease control. PMID:26449667

  2. PREFACE: Tenth International Conference on Topics in Astroparticle and Underground Physics (TAUP2007)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Kunio; Suzuki, Atsuto; Mitsui, Tadao

    2008-07-01

    Otsuka, and Ms Yuri Endo, our workshop secretaries, for their continuous and excellent work in the organization of the conference, and to Ms Chiyo Itoh, and Ms Machiko Mizutani, for their invaluable assistance during the conference. We also gratefully thank the technical staff: Tomoaki Takayama, Hiromitsu Hanada, Takashi Nakajima, for their invaluable help. As announced at the end of the conference, TAUP 2009 will be held in Gran Sasso, Italy, hosted by the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN) with the chair of Professor Eugenio Coccia. Kunio Inoue, Atsuto Suzuki and Tadao Mitsui COMMITTEES TAUP Steering Committee F T Avignone U South Carolina B C Barish CALTECH E Bellotti U Milano/INFN J Bernabéu U Valencia A Bottino (chair) U Torino/INFN V de Alfaro U Torino/INFN T Kajita ICRR U Tokyo C W Kim Johns Hopkins Univ /KIAS E Lorenz U München V Matveev INR Moskow J Morales U Zaragoza D Sinclair U Carleton M Spiro IN2P3 TAUP 2007 International Advisory Committee J J Aubert CNRS Marseille M Baldo-Ceolin U Padova/INFN V Berezinsky INFN-LNGS/INR L Bergström U Stockholm R Bernabei U Roma Tor Vergata/INFN A Bettini U Padova/INFN S Bilenky JINR Dubna D O Caldwell U C Santa Barbara E Coccia INFN-LNGS/U Roma Tor Vergata J Cronin U Chicago A Dar Technion Haifa G Domogatsky INR Moscow H Ejiri U Osaka J Ellis CERN E Fernández IFAE Barcelona E Fiorini U Milano/INFN G Fogli U Bari/INFN T Gaisser U Delaware G Gelmini UCLA G Gerbier CEA Saclay F Halzen U Wisconsin W Haxton U Washington T Kirsten MPI Heidelberg L Maiani U Roma/INFN A McDonald Queen's U K Nakamura KEK E Peterson U Minneapolis R Petronzio INFN/U Roma Tor Vergata G Raffelt MPI München R Rebolo IAC Tenerife L Resvanis U Athens P Salati U Savoie/LAPTH Annecy A Smirnov ICTP Trieste N Spooner U Sheffield S Ting MIT/CERN Y Totsuka U Tokyo M S Turner FNAL/U Chicago J W F Valle IFIC Valencia D Vignaud APC Paris F von Feilitzsch T U München G Zatsepin INR Moscow TAUP 2007 Organizing Committee A Bottino U Torino/INFN D

  3. A neurogenetics approach to defining differential susceptibility to institutional care

    PubMed Central

    Brett, Zoe H.; Sheridan, Margaret; Humphreys, Kate; Smyke, Anna; Gleason, Mary Margaret; Fox, Nathan; Zeanah, Charles; Nelson, Charles; Drury, Stacy

    2014-01-01

    An individual's neurodevelopmental and cognitive sequelae to negative early experiences may, in part, be explained by genetic susceptibility. We examined whether extreme differences in the early caregiving environment, defined as exposure to severe psychosocial deprivation associated with institutional care compared to normative rearing, interacted with a biologically informed genoset comprising BDNF (rs6265), COMT (rs4680), and SIRT1 (rs3758391) to predict distinct outcomes of neurodevelopment at age 8 (N = 193, 97 males and 96 females). Ethnicity was categorized as Romanian (71%), Roma (21%), unknown (7%), or other (1%). We identified a significant interaction between early caregiving environment (i.e., institutionalized versus never institutionalized children) and the a priori defined genoset for full-scale IQ, two spatial working memory tasks, and prefrontal cortex gray matter volume. Model validation was performed using a bootstrap resampling procedure. Although we hypothesized that the effect of this genoset would operate in a manner consistent with differential susceptibility, our results demonstrate a complex interaction where vantage susceptibility, diathesis stress, and differential susceptibility are implicated. PMID:25663728

  4. Lo Gnomone Clementino Astronomia Meridiana in Basilica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigismondi, Costantino

    2014-05-01

    Costruito per chiara volontà del papa 70 anni dopo il caso Galileo, lo Gnomone Clementino è un grande telescopio solare che non fa uso di lenti a 92 anni dall’invenzione del cannocchiale. Queste due caratteristiche basterebbero da sole a giustificare l’interesse verso questo strumento. L’astronomia meridiana è alla base dell’astrometria e dell’astrofisica moderna. Lo Gnomone Clementino sta oggi all’astronomia, come il veliero “Amerigo Vespucci” sta alla Marina Italiana. E’ possibile svolgere ogni genere di osservazione e studio su questo strumento, e dal 2002 vi tengo lezioni teorico-pratiche del corso di Storia dell’Astronomia e La Terra nel Sistema Solare della Sapienza, Università di Roma, Facoltà di Lettere e Filosofia. Questo testo aggiunge alcuni tasselli alla ricerca storica sulla meridiana, appoggiandosi, com’è naturale, sulle spalle di giganti che mi hanno preceduto in questi studi. In particolare la misura dell’azimut della meridiana, ed il suo inquadramento tra gli strumenti simili ed alcuni studi di astrometria sui dati del 1701-1703 di Bianchini, che sono apparsi fin’ora soltanto su riviste specializzate ed in Inglese vengono qui proposti in Italiano e semplificati, per valorizzare sempre più questa straordinaria opera d’arte e di scienza.

  5. SXI: The Soft X-ray Imager on Board of the EXIST Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagliaferri, Gianpiero; Natalucci, L.; Basso, S.; Bazzano, A.; Caraveo, P.; Conconi, P.; Grindlay, J. E.; Pareschi, G.; Ubertini, P.; Uslenghi, M.; Villa, G.

    2010-01-01

    The Soft X-ray Imager (SXI), sensitive in the 0.1-10 keV band, is a X-ray telescope foreseen on board of the EXIST mission. SXI is proposed as a contribution of ASI, the Italian space agency, and it is fully developed by Italian institutes. The current optical design is based on 26 mirror-shells and provides an effective area comparable to one XMM-Newton mirror module up to 3 keV and somewhat lower from 3 to 10 keV. The realization of these shells is based on the well-proven Nichel replication-process technology. We present the optical design of the SXI mirror module and describe its characteristics in term of effective area and imaging capability, summarizing also the characteristics of the full SXI telescope. Acknowledgement: the study of the SXI telescope in Italy is carried out at the INAF-OABr, INAF-IASF_Milano and INAF-IASF_Roma Institutes and is financed by the Italian Space Agency under the ASI contract I/088/06/0.

  6. Analysis of pottery from the Palatine Hills of Rome

    SciTech Connect

    Landsberger, S.; Wisseman, S.; Desena, E.; Hostetter, E.; Pena, T.

    1994-12-31

    During the past several summers the Soprintendenza Archeologica di Roma and the American Academy in Rome have carried out collaborative excavations on the late Roman complex located on the northeastern slope of the Palatine Hill. The late Roman complex is situated on the lower slopes of the area commonly known as Vigna Barberini, after its 17th century owners. Because this area, as well as most of the east slope of the Palatine, has never been systematically explored, it remains from an archaeological point of view essentially unknown. The overall aim of the excavations is to investigate layout, function, and occupational history of a mid-to-late imperial building complex located just southwest of the Arch of Constatine. Part of this international project is the chemical characterization of Roman fineware pottery from archaeological excavations on the site of the imperial palaces. Excavation has yielded more than 8 t of Late Roman and Early Medieval pottery (circa 3rd to 10th centuries A.D.). Many classes of pottery have already been classified by their provenance based on distribution patterns, but others require chemical characterization to separate similar clays. To that end routine neutron activation analysis (NAA) methods have been used to analyze {approximately}200 pieces of pottery.

  7. Enrico Fermi and the Dolomites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battimelli, Giovanni; de Angelis, Alessandro

    2014-11-01

    Summer vacations in the Dolomites were a tradition among the professors of the Faculty of Mathematical and Physical Sciences at the University of Roma since the end of the XIX century. Beyond the academic walls, people like Tullio Levi-Civita, Federigo Enriques and Ugo Amaldi sr., together with their families, were meeting friends and colleagues in Cortina, San Vito, Dobbiaco, Vigo di Fassa and Selva, enjoying trekking together with scientific discussions. The tradition was transmitted to the next generations, in particular in the first half of the XX century, and the group of via Panisperna was directly connected: Edoardo Amaldi, the son of the mathematician Ugo sr., rented at least during two summers, in 1925 and in 1949, and in the winter of 1960, a house in San Vito di Cadore, and almost every year in the Dolomites; Enrico Fermi was a frequent guest. Many important steps in modern physics, in particular the development of the Fermi-Dirac statistics and the Fermi theory of beta decay, are related to scientific discussions held in the region of the Dolomites.

  8. A multilingual and multimodal approach to literacy teaching and learning in urban education: a collaborative inquiry project in an inner city elementary school

    PubMed Central

    Ntelioglou, Burcu Yaman; Fannin, Jennifer; Montanera, Mike; Cummins, Jim

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents findings from a collaborative inquiry project that explored teaching approaches that highlight the significance of multilingualism, multimodality, and multiliteracies in classrooms with high numbers of English language learners (ELLs). The research took place in an inner city elementary school with a large population of recently arrived and Canadian-born linguistically and culturally diverse students from Gambian, Indian, Mexican, Sri Lankan, Tibetan and Vietnamese backgrounds, as well as a recent wave of Roma students from Hungary. A high number of these students were from families with low-SES. The collaboration between two Grade 3 teachers and university-based researchers sought to create instructional approaches that would support students’ academic engagement and literacy learning. In this paper, we described one of the projects that took place in this class, exploring how a descriptive writing unit could be implemented in a way that connected with students’ lives and enabled them to use their home languages, through the creation of multiple texts, using creative writing, digital technologies, and drama pedagogy. This kind of multilingual and multimodal classroom practice changed the classroom dynamics and allowed the students access to identity positions of expertise, increasing their literacy investment, literacy engagement and learning. PMID:24994986

  9. Marker and pen graffiti cleaning on diverse calcareous stones by different laser techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andriani, S. E.; Catalano, I. M.; Daurelio, G.; Albanese, A.

    2007-05-01

    Industries nowadays continuously produce new types of inks for markers and pens, so new different graffiti appear . In this paper laser cleaning tests on 41 new marker and pen types ( fluorescent, permanent, water-based, acrylic tempera, metallic paint, waterproof inks ), applied into laboratory on different litho- type samples (Chianca, Travertino di Roma, Tufo Carparo fine grain, Sabbie), typical stones employed in much more monuments in Puglia and Italian architectures were carried out. The same ones, were exposed for twelve months to outdoor ageing, subject to sunshine, rain, wind, IR and UV solar radiations. Ablation experiments and tests by using different cleaning techniques, each one in Dry and Wet condition (classic technique, Daurelio technique 1 and Daurelio technique 2 and others new techniques) and two different Nd:YAG laser systems (Palladio by QUANTA SYSTEM and SMART CLEAN II by EL.EN.), were adopted. The experimental modes, N-Mode (1064nm - 150, 300 and 500 μs pulse duration), Q-Switch (1064nm - 8 ns pulse duration) and SFR (Short Free Running - 1064 nm - 40 to 110μs pulse duration) were tested on each marked stones. It was found that according to the different ink types and stone substrate, Q-Switch laser cleaning ablation with optimized laser technique are the best solution to marker an pen graffiti removal. The work is still in progress.

  10. Added value of a household-level study during an outbreak investigation of Salmonella serotype Saintpaul infections, New Mexico 2008.

    PubMed

    Boore, A L; Jungk, J; Russo, E T; Redd, J T; Angulo, F J; Williams, I T; Cheek, J E; Gould, L H

    2013-10-01

    In 2008, nationwide investigations of a Salmonella serotype Saintpaul outbreak led first to consumer warnings for Roma and red round tomatoes, then later for jalapeño and serrano peppers. In New Mexico, where there were a large number of cases but no restaurant-based clusters, the NM Department of Health and the Indian Health Service participated with CDC in individual-level and household-level case-control studies of infections in New Mexico and the Navajo Nation. No food item was associated in the individual-level study. In the household-level study, households with an ill member were more likely to have had jalapeño peppers present during the exposure period and to have reported ever having serrano peppers in the household. This report illustrates the complexity of this investigation, the limitations of traditional individual-level case-control studies when vehicles of infection are ingredients or commonly eaten with other foods, and the added value of a household-level study. PMID:23228507

  11. ATP Synthase Deficiency due to TMEM70 Mutation Leads to Ultrastructural Mitochondrial Degeneration and Is Amenable to Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Braczynski, Anne K.; Vlaho, Stefan; Müller, Klaus; Wittig, Ilka; Blank, Anna-Eva; Tews, Dominique S.; Drott, Ulrich; Kleinle, Stephanie; Abicht, Angela; Horvath, Rita; Plate, Karl H.; Stenzel, Werner; Goebel, Hans H.; Schulze, Andreas; Harter, Patrick N.; Kieslich, Matthias; Mittelbronn, Michel

    2015-01-01

    TMEM70 is involved in the biogenesis of mitochondrial ATP synthase and mutations in the TMEM70 gene impair oxidative phosphorylation. Herein, we report on pathology and treatment of ATP synthase deficiency in four siblings. A consanguineous family of Roma (Gipsy) ethnic origin gave birth to 6 children of which 4 were affected presenting with dysmorphic features, failure to thrive, cardiomyopathy, metabolic crises, and 3-methylglutaconic aciduria as clinical symptoms. Genetic testing revealed a homozygous mutation (c.317-2A>G) in the TMEM70 gene. While light microscopy was unremarkable, ultrastructural investigation of muscle tissue revealed accumulation of swollen degenerated mitochondria with lipid crystalloid inclusions, cristae aggregation, and exocytosis of mitochondrial material. Biochemical analysis of mitochondrial complexes showed an almost complete ATP synthase deficiency. Despite harbouring the same mutation, the clinical outcome in the four siblings was different. Two children died within 60 h after birth; the other two had recurrent life-threatening metabolic crises but were successfully managed with supplementation of anaplerotic amino acids, lipids, and symptomatic treatment during metabolic crisis. In summary, TMEM70 mutations can cause distinct ultrastructural mitochondrial degeneration and almost complete deficiency of ATP synthase but are still amenable to treatment. PMID:26550569

  12. Accumulation of heavy metals by vegetables grown in mine wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Cobb, G.P.; Sands, K.; Waters, M.; Wixson, B.G.; Dorward-King, E.

    2000-03-01

    Lead, cadmium, arsenic, and zinc were quantified in mine wastes and in soils mixed with mine wastes. Metal concentrations were found to be heterogeneous in the wastes. Iceberg lettuce, Cherry Belle radishes, Roma bush beans, and Better Boy tomatoes were cultivated in mine wastes and in waste-amended soils. Lettuce and radishes had 100% survival in the 100% mine waste treatments compared to 0% and 25% survival for tomatoes and beans, respectively. Metal concentrations were determined in plant tissues to determine uptake and distribution of metals in the edible plant parts. Individual soil samples were collected beneath each plant to assess metal content in the immediate plant environment. This analysis verified heterogeneous metal content of the mine wastes. The four plant species effectively accumulated and translocated lead, cadmium, arsenic, and zinc. Tomato and bean plants contained the four metals mainly in the roots and little was translocated to the fruits. Radish roots accumulated less metals compared to the leaves, whereas lettuce roots and leaves accumulated similar concentrations of the four metals. Lettuce leaves and radish roots accumulated significantly more metals than bean and tomato fruits. This accumulation pattern suggests that consumption of lettuce leaves or radish roots from plants grown in mine wastes would pose greater risks to humans and wildlife than would consumption of beans or tomatoes grown in the same area. The potential risk may be mitigated somewhat in humans, as vegetables grown in mine wastes exhibited stunted growth and chlorosis.

  13. A New Fast Silicon Photomultiplier Photometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meddi, F.; Ambrosino, F.; Nesci, R.; Rossi, C.; Sclavi, S.; Bruni, I.; Ruggieri, A.; Sestito, S.

    2012-05-01

    The realization of low-cost instruments with high technical performance is a goal that deserves some efforts in an epoch of fast technological developments; indeed, such instruments can be easily reproduced and therefore allow new research programs to be opened in several observatories. We realized a fast optical photometer based on the SiPM technology, using commercially available modules. Using low-cost components, we have developed a custom electronic chain to extract the signal produced by a commercial MPPC module produced by Hamamatsu Photonics, in order to obtain submillisecond sampling of the light curve of astronomical sources (typically, pulsars). In the early 2011 February, we observed the Crab pulsar with the Cassini telescope with our prototype photometer, deriving its period and power spectrum and the shape of its light curve, in very good agreement with the results obtained in the past with other instruments. Based on observations made with the 152 cm Cassini telescope at the Loiano station of the Bologna Observatory and with the 50 cm telescope of the Università di Roma "La Sapienza" at Vallinfreda (Rome).

  14. [Impact and state of the art of regional healthcare planning and management guidelines in a local health authority of the Lazio region (Italy)].

    PubMed

    Priori, Maria Rosaria; Barbato, Angelo

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of health care planning and management guidelines, elaborated by the Lazio regional healthcare authority, on the organizational structure and operational processes of local health authorities and, more specifically, of the Roma C local health authority. The guidelines are made up of three volumes and mainly describe an operational model, rather than being a set of standard references aimed at standardizing the quality of information low systems in local healthcare authorities. The guidelines are essentially a didactic text, and were elaborated by a consulting firm, Engineering Management Consulting, on behalf of the Lazio regional authority. In the first section, the main concepts are defined, while in subsequent sections, detailed models regarding the specific subject matter are described. Although the guidelines represent a useful tool in the process of converting local health authorities of the Lazio region into "business" organizations, so far they have been of use only in the first phase of assessment of different organizational models for healthcare planning and management. There is still a long way ahead towards defining standard procedures and references for describing activities and costs. This is what should hopefully be achieved briefly and which will necessarily require the introduction of a data warehouse and business intelligence software that will allow monitoring of activities and making short term predictions through the use balanced scorecards and data mining. PMID:18084348

  15. Fluorescence detection of telomerase activity in cancer cell extracts based on autonomous exonuclease III-assisted isothermal cycling signal amplification.

    PubMed

    Ding, Caifeng; Li, Xiaoqian; Wang, Wei; Chen, Yaoyao

    2016-09-15

    Based on the extension reaction of a telomerase substrate (TS) primer in the presence of the telomerase, strand-displacement process to perform more stable longer duplex chain, and stepwise hydrolysis of mononucleotides from the blunt or the recessed 3'-hydroxyl termini of duplex DNA in the presence of Exonuclease III (Exo III), an amplified fluorescence detection of telomerase activity in the cancer cells was described in this manuscript. A fluorescence probe DNA, a quencher DNA, and a TS primer were mixed to construct a three-chain DNA structure and a two-chain DNA structure because the amount of the TS primer was less than the other two DNA. In the presence of the telomerase, the quencher DNA was replaced from the probe DNA and the telomerase activity could be determined with the fluorescence enhancement. The telomerase activity in HeLa extracts equivalent to 6-2000 cells was detected by this method. Moreover, the strategy was further proved by using telomerase extracted from Romas cells. With the multiple rounds of isothermal strand displacement and the hydrolysis process, constituted consecutive of signal amplification for the novel detection paradigm that allowed measuring of telomerase activity in crude cancer cell extracts confirmed the reliability and practicality of the protocol, which reveal this platform holds great promise in the biochemical assay for the telomerase activity in early diagnosis for cancers. PMID:27108253

  16. The Representation of Cultural Heritage from Traditional Drawing to 3d Survey: the Case Study of Casamary's Abbey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canciani, M.; Saccone, M.

    2016-06-01

    In 3D survey the aspects most discussed in the scientific community are those related to the acquisition of data from integrated survey (laser scanner, photogrammetric, topographic and traditional direct), rather than those relating to the interpretation of the data. Yet in the methods of traditional representation, the data interpretation, such as that of the philological reconstruction, constitutes the most important aspect. It is therefore essential in modern systems of survey and representation, filter the information acquired. In the system, based on the integrated survey that we have adopted, the 3D object, characterized by a cloud of georeferenced points, defined but their color values, defines the core of the elaboration. It allows to carry out targeted analysis, using section planes as a tool of selection and filtering data, comparable with those of traditional drawings. In the case study of the Abbey of Casamari (Veroli), one of the most important Cistercian Settlement in Italy, the survey made for an Agreement with the Ministry of Cultural Heritage and Activities and Tourism (MiBACT) and University of RomaTre, within the project "Accessment of the sismic safety of the state museum", the reference 3D model, consisting of the superposition and geo-references data from various surveys, is the tool with which yo develop representative models comparable to traditional ones. It provides the necessary spatial environment for drawing up plans and sections with a definition such as to develop thematic analysis related to phases of construction, state of deterioration and structural features.

  17. An orientable solar panel system for nanospacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santoni, Fabio; Piergentili, Fabrizio; Candini, Gian Paolo; Perelli, Massimo; Negri, Andrea; Marino, Michele

    2014-08-01

    An orientable deployed solar array system for 1-5 kg weight nanospacecraft is described, enhancing the achievable performance of these typically power-limited systems. The system is based on a deployable solar panel system, previously developed with cooperation between Laboratorio di Sistemi Aerospaziali of University of Roma “la Sapienza” and the company IMT (Ingegneria Marketing Tecnologia). The system proposed is a modular one, and suitable in principle for the 1U, 2U and 3U standard Cubesat bus, even if the need for three axis attitude stabilization makes it typically preferred for 3U Cubesats. The size of each solar panel is the size of a lateral Cubesat surface. A single degree of freedom maneuvering capability is given to the deployed solar array, in order to follow the apparent motion of the sun as close as possible, given the mission requirements on the spacecraft attitude. Considerable effort has been devoted to design the system compatible with the Cubesat standard, being mounted outside on the external spacecraft structure, without requiring modifications on the standard prescriptions. The small available volume is the major constraint, which forces to use miniaturized electric motor technology. The system design trade-off is discussed, leading to the selection of an architecture based on two independently steerable solar array wings.

  18. Observations of wintertime mesopause temperature with the ALOMAR Weber Na Lidar during winter 2004/05

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, D.; Blum, U.; Williams, B.; Vance, J.; She, C.-Y.; Singer, W.; Hoppe, U.-P.

    2005-08-01

    The ALOMAR Weber Na Lidar is a sodium fluorescence lidar, designed by the Colorado State University (CSU) lidar group and operated by CSU, Colorado Research Associates/NorthWest Research Associates (CoRA/NWRA) and the Norwegian Defence Research Establishment (FFI). By remote spectroscopy, this instrument is used to determine N-density profiles as well as profiles of atmospheric temperature and wind from about 80-110 km. The instrument is part of the Arctic Lidar Observatory for Middle Atmosphere Research (ALOMAR), located in northern Norway (69°N), about 150 km north of the Arctic circle. During November/December 2004 and during the ROMA rocket campaign in January/February 2005 at the Andøya Rocket Range the Na Lidar was operated on several occasions. Atmospheric wind and temperature profiles retrieved from meteorological rockets were obtained during the measurement campaign. Further, the SKiYMET meteor radar performed continuous measurements during this time, providing temperature and wind data in the mesopause region. The 90-km daily average temperature from the Meteor Radar agrees with the measurements of the Na lidar. We observed different wave structures in the polar mesopause region. We will present and discuss the results of the wintertime temperature measurements in the mesopause region obtained with the ALOMAR Weber Na Lidar.

  19. ASTROKIDS: from a bookshop to the stars!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacomini, L.; Nichelli, E.; Fulco, M. T.

    2012-09-01

    The achievements of mankind are based on the interaction of discovery, invention, and innovation. Once man learnt how to utilize the laws of nature, he advanced to a being who attained greatest strength upon other creatures. An analogy can be drawn for civilisations: Those conducting fundamental research will gain strategical power. Among the sciences, astronomy and astrophysics provide the largest potential for discoveries that reach far beyond our intellectual limits. They trigger technology and have a decisive impact on the society. Within the frame of this nationwide initiative, the Institute for Space Astrophysics and Planetology (Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali, IAPS), with the collaboration of OAR (Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma), organized and realized in 2012 a number of events that took place in Rome. Thanks to the wide range of scientific activities carried out by IAPS scientists, topics ranged from Moon exploration to shooting stars, from gravity to stars' birth. In each appointment, kids had the chance to learn about planetology and astrophysics, participating to games, creating clay models, building paper spacecrafts, listening to stories and…just having fun. In this talk we will present some of the most interesting and successful stories in the Astrokids project.

  20. A GaAs pixel detectors-based digital mammographic system: Performances and imaging tests results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annovazzi, A.; Amendolia, S. R.; Bigongiari, A.; Bisogni, M. G.; Catarsi, F.; Cesqui, F.; Cetronio, A.; Colombo, F.; Delogu, P.; Fantacci, M. E.; Gilberti, A.; Lanzieri, C.; Lavagna, S.; Novelli, M.; Passuello, G.; Paternoster, G.; Pieracci, M.; Poletti, M.; Quattrocchi, M.; Rosso, V.; Stefanini, A.; Testa, A.; Venturelli, L.

    2007-06-01

    The prototype presented in this paper is based on GaAs pixel detectors read-out by the PCC/MEDIPIX I circuit. The active area of a sensor is about 1 cm 2 therefore to cover the typical irradiation field used in mammography (18×24 cm 2), 18 GaAs detection units have been organized in two staggered rows of nine chips each and moved by a stepper motor in the orthogonal direction. The system is integrated in a mammographic equipment which comprehends the X-ray tube, the bias and data acquisition systems and the PC-based control system. The prototype has been developed in the framework of the Integrated Mammographic Imaging (IMI) project, an industrial research activity aiming to develop innovative instrumentation for morphologic and functional imaging. The project has been supported by the Italian Ministry of Education, University and Research (MIUR) and by five Italian High Tech companies, Alenia Marconi Systems (AMS), CAEN, Gilardoni, LABEN and Poli.Hi.Tech., in collaboration with the universities of Ferrara, Roma "La Sapienza", Pisa and the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN). In this paper, we report on the electrical characterization and the first imaging test results of the digital mammographic system. To assess the imaging capability of such a detector we have built a phantom, which simulates the breast tissue with malignancies. The radiographs of the phantom, obtained by delivering an entrance dose of 4.8 mGy, have shown particulars with a measured contrast below 1%.

  1. Survey of Expert Opinion on Intelligence: Causes of International Differences in Cognitive Ability Tests.

    PubMed

    Rindermann, Heiner; Becker, David; Coyle, Thomas R

    2016-01-01

    Following Snyderman and Rothman (1987, 1988), we surveyed expert opinions on the current state of intelligence research. This report examines expert opinions on causes of international differences in student assessment and psychometric IQ test results. Experts were surveyed about the importance of culture, genes, education (quantity and quality), wealth, health, geography, climate, politics, modernization, sampling error, test knowledge, discrimination, test bias, and migration. The importance of these factors was evaluated for diverse countries, regions, and groups including Finland, East Asia, sub-Saharan Africa, Southern Europe, the Arabian-Muslim world, Latin America, Israel, Jews in the West, Roma (gypsies), and Muslim immigrants. Education was rated by N = 71 experts as the most important cause of international ability differences. Genes were rated as the second most relevant factor but also had the highest variability in ratings. Culture, health, wealth, modernization, and politics were the next most important factors, whereas other factors such as geography, climate, test bias, and sampling error were less important. The paper concludes with a discussion of limitations of the survey (e.g., response rates and validity of expert opinions). PMID:27047425

  2. The effect of moving cold fronts over Central Europe to the variability of the ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potuznikova, Katerina; Koucka Knizova, Petra; Boska, Josef; Sindelarova, Tereza; Mosna, Zbysek

    2015-04-01

    Cold fronts represent well known source of atmospheric waves, (especially short and medium scale AGW - acoustic gravity waves), that are able to propagate up to the ionospheric heights. In our study we focus on the effects of the transitions of cold front over the region of Central Europe on the variations of the ionosphere. We concentrate on periods of low solar and geomagnetic activity. Neutral atmosphere data are compared with the wave-like oscillations in the E and F layer. Our tropospheric data comprise synoptic maps on of 500 hPa and 850 hPa geopotential heights. Within ionospheric data we search for variability that is linked to the tropospheric disturbances. The ionospheric parameters (electron concentration and corresponding height) we analyse by the wavelet transform method. The Modern HF digisonde DPS-4 D (Digisonde Portable Sounder), which is in operation at the Pruhonice observatory (49.59 N; 14.33 E) of the Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Prague (IAP) since 2004, represents an excellent source of the ionospheric data for Central Europe. Pruhonice digisonde usually operates in standard mode - one ionogram and electron density profie N(h) each 15 minutes. Besides that, data from several european stations of the digisonde world network (data from Juliusruhe, Chilton, Brusel, Roma and Tortosa digisonde stations) are included in the study.

  3. "There's no kind of respect here" A qualitative study of racism and access to maternal health care among Romani women in the Balkans

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Roma, the largest minority group in Europe, face widespread racism and health disadvantage. Using qualitative data from Serbia and Macedonia, our objective was to develop a conceptual framework showing how three levels of racism--personal, internalized, and institutional--affect access to maternal health care among Romani women. Methods Eight focus groups of Romani women aged 14-44 (n = 71), as well as in-depth semi-structured interviews with gynecologists (n = 8) and key informants from NGOs and state institutions (n = 11) were conducted on maternal health care seeking, experiences during care, and perceived health care discrimination. Transcripts were coded, and analyzed using a grounded theory approach. Themes were categorized into domains. Results Twenty-two emergent themes identified barriers that reflected how racism affects access to maternal health care. The domains into which the themes were classified were perceptions and interactions with health system, psychological factors, social environment and resources, lack of health system accountability, financial needs, and exclusion from education. Conclusions The experiences of Romani women demonstrate psychosocial and structural pathways by which racism and discrimination affect access to prenatal and maternity care. Interventions to address maternal health inequalities should target barriers within all three levels of racism. PMID:22094115

  4. Le « Harcèlement Entre Pairs » À L'école élémentaire Tchèque: Une Question D'interprétation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohout-Diaz, Magdalena

    2008-07-01

    "PEER BULLYING" IN CZECH PRIMARY SCHOOLS: A QUESTION OF INTERPRETATION—This article questions adults' reports of an alleged increase in peer bullying at Czech primary schools. A survey on the school climate revealed that the pupils see it as a generally positive one and consider their relationships to be good. However, compared to France, their behaviour towards the adults is aggressive and rude. This apparent contradiction is linked to a conflict between the educational norms carried over from the old regime (behavioural control and conformism) and the new socio-economic paradigms (critical thinking and free enterprise). Public opinion, the media and a number of scientifically-questionable studies have drawn attention to the phenomenon of peer bullying ( šikana), and applied an imported concept to describe it ( school bullying). This makes it possible to avoid questioning the part played by the adults, the school and the researchers; justify segregating pupils from socially, culturally or economically disadvantaged backgrounds (Roma); and facilitate the country's socio-economic inclusion in the European Union by highlighting educational problems about whose nature there is general agreement.

  5. Combining Domain-driven Design and Mashups for Service Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iglesias, Carlos A.; Fernández-Villamor, José Ignacio; Del Pozo, David; Garulli, Luca; García, Boni

    This chapter presents the Romulus project approach to Service Development using Java-based web technologies. Romulus aims at improving productivity of service development by providing a tool-supported model to conceive Java-based web applications. This model follows a Domain Driven Design approach, which states that the primary focus of software projects should be the core domain and domain logic. Romulus proposes a tool-supported model, Roma Metaframework, that provides an abstraction layer on top of existing web frameworks and automates the application generation from the domain model. This metaframework follows an object centric approach, and complements Domain Driven Design by identifying the most common cross-cutting concerns (security, service, view, ...) of web applications. The metaframework uses annotations for enriching the domain model with these cross-cutting concerns, so-called aspects. In addition, the chapter presents the usage of mashup technology in the metaframework for service composition, using the web mashup editor MyCocktail. This approach is applied to a scenario of the Mobile Phone Service Portability case study for the development of a new service.

  6. Added value of a household-level study during an outbreak investigation of Salmonella serotype Saintpaul infections, New Mexico 2008

    PubMed Central

    Boore, A. L.; Jungk, J.; Russo, E.T.; Redd, J.T.; Angulo, F. J.; Williams, I. T.; Cheek, J. E.; Gould, L. H.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY In 2008, nationwide investigations of a Salmonella serotype Saintpaul outbreak led first to consumer warnings for Roma and red round tomatoes, then later for jalapeño and serrano peppers. In New Mexico, where there were a large number of cases but no restaurant-based clusters, the NM Department of Health and the Indian Health Service participated with CDC in individual-level and household-level case-control studies of infections in New Mexico and the Navajo Nation. No food item was associated in the individual-level study. In the household-level study, households with an ill member were more likely to have had jalapeño peppers present during the exposure period and to have reported ever having serrano peppers in the household. This report illustrates the complexity of this investigation, the limitations of traditional individual-level case-control studies when vehicles of infection are ingredients or commonly eaten with other foods, and the added value of a household-level study. PMID:23228507

  7. Kinetic Inductance Detectors development for mm-wave Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monfardini, A.; Swenson, L. J.; Benoit, A.; Bideau, A.; Bres, G.; Camus, P.; Garde, G.; Hoffmann, C.; Minet, J.; Rodenas, H.; Nika Collaboration

    Throughout the last decades, development of low-temperat- ure detectors focused mainly on the design of high-sensitivity, single-pixel devices. This includes such devices as semiconductor-based photodetectors and bolometers, Magnetic Metallic Calorimeters (MMC), Superconducting Tunnel Junctions (STJ), and Transition Edge Sensors (TES). However, these devices have had limited success in achieving the simultaneous large-scale array sizes and large-bandwidth operation necessary for high-speed, high-resolution detection. To overcome this performance limitation, it is advisable to focus on low-temperature detectors which are intrinsically adapted to giant-array multiplexing and ultra-fast readout. To adopt large scale frequency-domain multiplexing for low-temperature detectors, it is necessary to find detectors which"broadcast" at microwave frequencies. Superconducting microwave resonators naturally lend themselves to this task. One recent demonstration is an implementation known as Kinetic Inductance Detectors (KIDs). This detection mechanism can be adopted for low-energy EM radiation (radio, mm, THz) in continuous mode, or in pulsed mode for higher energy radiation and particles. We present an ongoing development for a KIDs instrument dedicated to millimetric ground-based observations at the 30m IRAM telescope at Pico Veleta. The Neel IRAM KIDs Array (NIKA) project is coordinated in Grenoble and involves groups in Holland (SRON), UK (Cardiff) and Italy (Roma).

  8. Dose rate dependence of the PTW 60019 microDiamond detector in high dose-per-pulse pulsed beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brualla-González, Luis; Gómez, Faustino; Pombar, Miguel; Pardo-Montero, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Recombination effects can affect the detectors used for the dosimetry of radiotherapy fields. They are important when using ionization chambers, especially in liquid-filled ionization chambers, and should be corrected for. The introduction of flattening-filter-free accelerators increases the typical dose-per-pulse used in radiotherapy beams, which leads to more important recombination effects. Diamond detectors provide a good solution for the dosimetry and quality assurance of small radiotherapy fields, due to their low energy dependence and small volume. The group of Università di Roma Tor Vergata has developed a synthetic diamond detector, which is commercialized by PTW as microDiamond detector type 60019. In this work we present an experimental characterization of the collection efficiency of the microDiamond detector, focusing on high dose-per-pulse FFF beams. The collection efficiency decreases with dose-per-pulse, down to 0.978 at 2.2 mGy/pulse, following a Fowler-Attix-like curve. On the other hand, we have found no significant dependence of the collection efficiency on the pulse repetition frequency (or pulse period).

  9. Atmospheric electric field effect in different neutron multiplicities according to Emilio Segre Obervatory one minute data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorman, L. I.; Dorman, I. V.; Iucci, N.; Ne'eman, Yu.; Pustilnik, L. A.; Sternlieb, A.; Villoresi, G.; Zukerman, I. G.

    2001-08-01

    On the basis of cosmic ray and atmospherice lectric field one minute data obtained by NM and EFS ofE milio Segre' Observatory (hight 2025 m above s.l., cut-offr igidity for vertical direction 10.8 GV) we determine thea tmospheric electric field effect in CR for total neutroni ntensity and for multiplicities m ≥1, m ≥2, m ≥3, m ≥4,m ≥5, m ≥6, m ≥7, and m ≥8, as well as for m=1, m=2,m =3, m=4, m=5, m=6, and m=7. For comparison ande xcluding primary CR variations we use also data obtainedb y NM of University "Roma Tre" (about sea level, cut-off rigidity 6.7 GV). According to the theoretical calculations of Dorman and Dorman (1995) the electric field effect in the NM counting rate must be caused mainly by catching ofs low negative muons by lead nucleus with escaping fewn eutrons. As it was shown in Dorman et al. (1999), theb iggest electric field effect is expected in the multiplicitym =1, much smaller in m=2 and negligible effect is expected in higher multiplicities. We will control this conclusion ont he basis of our experimental data. Obtained results give a possibility to estimate total acceleration and deceleration of CR particles by the atmospheric electric field._

  10. A Comprehensive Statistical Description of Radio-through-Gamma-Ray Spectral Energy Distributions of All Known Blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Peiyuan; Urry, C. Megan; Massaro, Francesco; Paggi, Alessandro; Cauteruccio, Joe; Künzel, Soren R.

    2016-06-01

    We combined multi-wavelength data for blazars from the Roma-BZCAT catalog and analyzed hundreds of X-ray spectra. We present the fluxes and spectral energy distributions (SEDs), in 12 frequency bands from radio to γ-rays, for a final sample of 2214 blazars. Using a model-independent statistical approach, we looked for systematic trends in the SEDs; the most significant trends involved the radio luminosities and X-ray spectral indices of the blazars. We used a principal component analysis (PCA) to determine the basis vectors of the blazar SEDs and, in order to maximize the size of the sample, imputed missing fluxes using the K-nearest neighbors method. Using more than an order of magnitude more data than was available when Fossati et al. first reported trends of SED shape with blazar luminosity, we confirmed the anti-correlation between radio luminosity and synchrotron peak frequency, although with greater scatter than was seen in the smaller sample. The same trend can be seen between bolometric luminosity and synchrotron peak frequency. Finally, we used all of the available blazar data to determine an empirical SED description that depends only on the radio luminosity at 1.4 GHz and the redshift. We verified that this statistically significant relation was not a result of the luminosity–luminosity correlations that are natural in flux-limited samples (i.e., where the correlation is actually caused by the redshift rather than the luminosity).

  11. Impact of Different Treatment Approaches on Pregnancy Outcomes in 99 Women Treated for Hodgkin Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    De Sanctis, Vitaliana; Filippone, Francesco Romeo; Alfo, Marco; Muni, Roberta; Cavalieri, Elena; Pulsoni, Alessandro; Annechini, Giorgia; Valeriani, Maurizio; Osti, Mattia Falchetto; Minniti, Giuseppe; Enrici, Riccardo Maurizi

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the pregnancy outcomes in women with Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) diagnosis, treated between 1972 and 1999 at Department of Radiotherapy and Hematology of University 'Sapienza' of Roma. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively studied 99 female patients that conceived after treatment for HL. Fifty-nine (59%) were treated with chemotherapy and radiotherapy, 32 (32%) with radiotherapy alone as supradiaphragmatic or as infradiaphragmatic and 8 (8%) patients with chemotherapy alone. Results: Ninety-nine patients reported 145 pregnancies. We observed 132 deliveries (2 of them twin births) after a median of 55 months (range, 14-278 months) from the end of therapy. Twelve women (12%) experienced 13 miscarriages after a median of 50 months (range, 13-120) from the end of therapy. We recorded 9/132 (7%) premature births and 3/134 babies (2%) were underweight at the time of birth. We recorded 2 cases of congenital malformations. No statistical differences were recorded when adverse pregnancy outcomes were analyzed with respect to chemotherapy alone, radiotherapy alone, or combined therapy. Conclusions: No significant associations between pregnancy outcomes and therapeutic approaches were found. In particular, the infradiaphragmatic radiotherapy showed no statistical association with miscarriages, premature birth, and low birth weight at term when compared with other therapeutic approaches.

  12. A multilingual and multimodal approach to literacy teaching and learning in urban education: a collaborative inquiry project in an inner city elementary school.

    PubMed

    Ntelioglou, Burcu Yaman; Fannin, Jennifer; Montanera, Mike; Cummins, Jim

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents findings from a collaborative inquiry project that explored teaching approaches that highlight the significance of multilingualism, multimodality, and multiliteracies in classrooms with high numbers of English language learners (ELLs). The research took place in an inner city elementary school with a large population of recently arrived and Canadian-born linguistically and culturally diverse students from Gambian, Indian, Mexican, Sri Lankan, Tibetan and Vietnamese backgrounds, as well as a recent wave of Roma students from Hungary. A high number of these students were from families with low-SES. The collaboration between two Grade 3 teachers and university-based researchers sought to create instructional approaches that would support students' academic engagement and literacy learning. In this paper, we described one of the projects that took place in this class, exploring how a descriptive writing unit could be implemented in a way that connected with students' lives and enabled them to use their home languages, through the creation of multiple texts, using creative writing, digital technologies, and drama pedagogy. This kind of multilingual and multimodal classroom practice changed the classroom dynamics and allowed the students access to identity positions of expertise, increasing their literacy investment, literacy engagement and learning. PMID:24994986

  13. PREFACE: Fourth Meeting on Constrained Dynamics and Quantum Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadoni, Mariano; Cavaglia, Marco; Nelson, Jeanette E.

    2006-04-01

    ) Georgi Dvali (NYU, USA) Sergio Ferrara (CERN) Gian Francesco Giudice (CERN) Roman Jackiw (MIT, USA) Edward W. Kolb (Fermilab, USA) Luca Lusanna (INFN Firenze, Italy) Roy Maartens (Univ. Portsmouth, UK) Hermann Nicolai (AEI, Potsdam, Germany) Tullio Regge (Politecnico di Torino, Italy) Augusto Sagnotti (Univ. Roma Tor Vergata, Italy) Kellogg S. Stelle (Imperial College London, UK) Ruth Williams (DAMTP, Cambridge, UK) SPONSORS Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Università di Cagliari Università di Torino University of Mississippi Università di Pisa Regione autonoma della Sardegna Tiscali LIST OF PARTICIPANTS Eun-Joo Ahn (University of Chicago, USA) David Alba (Università di Firenze, Italy) Stanislav Alexeyev (Lomonosov Moscow State U., Russia) Damiano Anselmi (Università di Pisa, Italy) Ignatios Antoniadis (CERN, Geneva, Switzerland) Maria Da Conceicao Bento (Instituto Superior Técnico, Lisboa, Portugal) Orfeu Bertolami (Instituto Superior Técnico, Lisboa, Portugal) Massimo Bianchi (Università di Roma Tor Vergata, Italy) Mariam Bouhmadi-Lopez (University of Portsmouth, UK) Raphael Bousso (University of California at Berkeley, USA) Mariano Cadoni (Università di Cagliari, Italy) Steven Carlip (University of California at Davis, USA) Roberto Casadio (Università di Bologna, Italy) Marco Cavaglià (University of Mississippi, USA) Demian Cho (Raman Research Institute, Bangalore, India) Theodosios Christodoulakis (University of Athens, Greece) Chryssomalis Chryssomalakos (Inst. de Ciencias Nucleares - UNAM, Mexico) Diego Julio Cirilo-Lombardo (JINR, Dubna, Russia) Denis Comelli INFN, Sezione di Ferrara, Italy ) Ruben Cordero-Elizalde (Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Mexico) Lorenzo Cornalba (Università di Roma Tor Vergata, Italy) Branislav Cvetkovic (Institute of Physics, Belgrade, Serbia ) Maro Cvitan (University of Zagreb, Croatia) Alessandro D'Adda (Università di Torino, Italy) Claudio Dappiaggi (Università di Pavia, Italy) Roberto De Leo (Università di

  14. YRMR Organizing Committee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-02-01

    University of Roma "Tor Vergata" and the Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation at the University of Portsmouth, within the context of the European Cotutela project. His thesis represents a detailed analysis of the cosmological perturbations through needlets, a statistical tool he developed together with his colleagues in Rome. In particular he focused on two main open questions in cosmology: dark energy and non-Gaussianity. He gained his Bachelors degree in physics from the University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, and his Masters in physics at the University of Roma "Tor Vergata". He spent three months at the University of California Irvine as a visiting student and is now a postdoc at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Francesco Stellato has studied the role of metals in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinsons and Alzheimers during his PhD. To this purpose, he mainly used synchrotron radiation-based techniques, e.g. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy. He is interested in the development of new-generation light sources such as high-brilliance synchrotron and Free Electron Lasers, and in their application to the structural and dynamical study of biomolecules. Marcella Veneziani is a postdoc fellow at the California Institute of Technology and the University of Rome "La Sapienza". In February 2009 she gained her PhD in Astronomy at the University of Rome "La Sapienza", and in Physics, Particles and Matter at the University of Paris Diderot. Her fields of interest are: physics of the interstellar medium and star formation; cosmic microwave background radiation; analysis of data from orbital and suborbital experiments, and instrumental calibration. She is a member of the Herschel-HiGal, the Planck-HFI and the BOOMERanG collaborations. Part of her work has been undertaken at the European Space Agency Astronomy Center and at the University of California Irvine.

  15. A Renormalization-Group Interpretation of the Connection between Criticality and Multifractals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Tom

    2014-05-01

    Turbulent fluctuations in space plasmas beget phenomena of dynamic complexity. It is known that dynamic renormalization group (DRG) may be employed to understand the concept of forced and/or self-organized criticality (FSOC), which seems to describe certain scaling features of space plasma turbulence. But, it may be argued that dynamic complexity is not just a phenomenon of criticality. It is therefore of interest to inquire if DRG may be employed to study complexity phenomena that are distinctly more complicated than dynamic criticality. Power law scaling generally comes about when the DRG trajectory is attracted to the vicinity of a fixed point in the phase space of the relevant dynamic plasma parameters. What happens if the trajectory lies within a domain influenced by more than one single fixed point or more generally if the transformation underlying the DRG is fully nonlinear? The global invariants of the group under such situations (if they exist) are generally not power laws. Nevertheless, as we shall argue, it may still be possible to talk about local invariants that are power laws with the nonlinearity of transformation prescribing a specific phenomenon as crossovers. It is with such concept in mind that we may provide a connection between the properties of dynamic criticality and multifractals from the point of view of DRG (T. Chang, Chapter VII, "An Introduction to Space Plasma Complexity", Cambridge University Press, 2014). An example in terms of the concepts of finite-size scaling (FSS) and rank-ordered multifractal analysis (ROMA) of a toy model shall be provided. Research partially supported by the US National Science Foundation and the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/ 2007-2013) under Grant agreement no. 313038/STORM.

  16. Single crystal artificial diamond detectors for VUV and soft X-rays measurements on JET thermonuclear fusion plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelone, M.; Pillon, M.; Marinelli, Marco; Milani, E.; Prestopino, G.; Verona, C.; Verona-Rinati, G.; Coffey, I.; Murari, A.; Tartoni, N.; JET-EFDA contributors

    2010-11-01

    Diamond appears to be a promising material for VUV and soft X-ray radiation detection. Its wide band-gap (5.5 eV) results in a very low leakage current (it can operate above room temperature) and its electronic properties (high carrier mobility) allow a fast time response. More importantly, it is optimally suited for harsh environment applications, like those in the JET Tokamak located at the Culham laboratory (UK). Its extreme radiation hardness is well known and another interesting feature, again related to the wide band-gap, is its selective sensitivity to radiation with wavelengths shorter than 225 nm (visible-blind detectors).We report on the performances of two photodetectors based on Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) single crystal diamonds, one optimized for extreme UV detection, the other for soft X-ray radiation detection in the 0.8-8 keV range. These detectors have been fabricated at Roma "Tor Vergata" University using a p-type/intrinsic/metal configuration and they behave like photodiodes allowing operation with no external applied voltage. They have been installed on JET inside a vacuum chamber with a direct horizontal view of JET plasma without any wavelength selection. Their low thickness, low sensitivity to gamma ray and the unbiased operation mode make both detectors ideal for a Tokamak environment. The measurements routinely performed at JET show a low intrinsic dark current (˜0.01 pA) and very high signal to noise ratio (50 dB). Both detectors show a fast response and their signals are acquired using an electronic chain and ADC able to operate at 200 kHz, providing very interesting results for MHD and Edge Localized Modes (ELMs) instability studies on fusion plasmas.

  17. COMMITTEES: LISA 7 Science Organizing Committee and Local Organizing Committee LISA 7 Science Organizing Committee and Local Organizing Committee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-05-01

    Science Organising Committee (SOC) Pierre Binetruy, APC - College de France Massimo Cerdonio, University of Padova Karsten Danzmann, AEI/University of Hannover Mike Cruise, University of Birmingham Jim Hough, University of Glasgow Oliver Jennrich, ESTEC Philippe Jetzer, University Zurich Alberto Lobo (Chair), ICE-CSIC and IEEC Yannick Mellier, IAP, Paris Bernard Schutz, AEI Potsdam Tim Sumner, Imperial College, London Jean-Yves Vinet, OCA, Nice Stefano Vitale, University of Trento Peter Bender, University of Colorado Sasha Buchman, Stanford University Joan Centrella, NASA/Goddard Neil Cornish, Montana State University Curt Cutler, NASA/JPL Sam Finn, Penn State University Jens Gundlach, NPL Craig Hogan, University of Washington Scott Hughes, MIT Piero Madau, Lick Observatory Tom Prince, NASA/JPL Sterl Phinney, Caltech Doug Richstone, University of Michigan Tuck Stebbins, NASA/Goddard Kip Thorne, Caltech Roger Blandford, Stanford University Eugenio Coccia, University of Roma-2 Carlos F Sopuerta,ICE-CSIC and IEEC Enrique Garcia-Berro, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Barcelona Seiji Kawamura, National Observatory, Japan Jay Marx, LIGO Laboratory Stephen Merkowitz, NASA/Goddard Benoit Mours, Laboratoire d'Annec Gijs Nelemans, IMAPP, Nijmegen Enric Verdaguer, University of Barcelona Clifford M Will, Washington University, St Louis Local Organising Committee (LOC) Anna Bertolín (IEEC) Priscilla Cañizares (ICE-CSIC and IEEC) Carlos F Sopuerta (ICE-CSIC and IEEC) Ivan Lloro (ICE-CSIC and IEEC),Chair Alberto Lobo (ICE-CSIC and IEEC) Nacho Mateos (ICE-CSIC and IEEC) Pilar Montes (IEEC) Miquel Nofrarias (IEEC) Juan Ramos-Castro (Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya) Josep Sanjuán (IEEC)

  18. Cranial osteology of the ankylosaurian dinosaur formerly known as Minmi sp. (Ornithischia: Thyreophora) from the Lower Cretaceous Allaru Mudstone of Richmond, Queensland, Australia.

    PubMed

    Leahey, Lucy G; Molnar, Ralph E; Carpenter, Kenneth; Witmer, Lawrence M; Salisbury, Steven W

    2015-01-01

    Minmi is the only known genus of ankylosaurian dinosaur from Australia. Seven specimens are known, all from the Lower Cretaceous of Queensland. Only two of these have been described in any detail: the holotype specimen Minmi paravertebra from the Bungil Formation near Roma, and a near complete skeleton from the Allaru Mudstone on Marathon Station near Richmond, preliminarily referred to a possible new species of Minmi. The Marathon specimen represents one of the world's most complete ankylosaurian skeletons and the best-preserved dinosaurian fossil from eastern Gondwana. Moreover, among ankylosaurians, its skull is one of only a few in which the majority of sutures have not been obliterated by dermal ossifications or surface remodelling. Recent preparation of the Marathon specimen has revealed new details of the palate and narial regions, permitting a comprehensive description and thus providing new insights cranial osteology of a basal ankylosaurian. The skull has also undergone computed tomography, digital segmentation and 3D computer visualisation enabling the reconstruction of its nasal cavity and endocranium. The airways of the Marathon specimen are more complicated than non-ankylosaurian dinosaurs but less so than derived ankylosaurians. The cranial (brain) endocast is superficially similar to those of other ankylosaurians but is strongly divergent in many important respects. The inner ear is extremely large and unlike that of any dinosaur yet known. Based on a high number of diagnostic differences between the skull of the Marathon specimen and other ankylosaurians, we consider it prudent to assign this specimen to a new genus and species of ankylosaurian. Kunbarrasaurus ieversi gen. et sp. nov. represents the second genus of ankylosaurian from Australia and is characterised by an unusual melange of both primitive and derived characters, shedding new light on the evolution of the ankylosaurian skull. PMID:26664806

  19. The Digitized First Byurakan Survey on ArmCluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickaelian, A. M.; Astsatryan, H. V.; Sahakyan, V. G.; Sargsyan, L. A.; Nesci, R.; Cirimele, G.; Harutyunian, H. A.; Magakian, T. Yu.; Sinamyan, P. K.; Mikayelyan, G. A.

    2009-10-01

    The Digitized First Byurakan Survey (DFBS) is the digitized version of the famous Markarian Survey, also known as the First Byurakan Survey (FBS). It is the largest low dispersion spectroscopic survey of the sky covering 17,000 square degrees at galactic latitudes |b|>15(o) . DFBS provides the astronomical community with images and extracted spectra for all objects present in the FBS plates. Some 1800 plates have been scanned and stored and programs were developed to compute the astrometric solution, extract the spectra, and apply wavelength and photometric calibration for the objects. The DFBS database and catalog have been assembled containing data for nearly 20,000,000 objects. A classification scheme for the DFBS spectra is being developed. DFBS has been installed on dedicated servers at Univerista di Roma ``La Sapienza" (Italy) and at present on the ArmCluster at the Institute for Informatics and Automation Problems (Armenia). A work is active on making the DFBS available through the Virtual Observatory standards and access to spectroscopic data. From the point of view of VO, the DFBS is a new database needing both image and spectra access tools and an interchange between these two standards. Algorithms, tools, and facilities needed for efficient use of the DFBS are discussed, in particular the spectra extraction, visualization, and analysis tools. New scientific projects as well as existing surveys will benefit by the digitized images and the ready-to-use extracted spectra which will allow an efficient computer-based analysis of the dataset. The Armenian Virtual Observatory (ArVO) is based on the DFBS database and other large-area surveys and catalogue data and is a part of the International Virtual Observatory Alliance (IVOA).

  20. Microbiological safety and quality of Mozzarella cheese assessed by the microbiological survey method.

    PubMed

    Losito, Francesca; Arienzo, Alyexandra; Bottini, Giorgia; Priolisi, Francesca Romana; Mari, Alberto; Antonini, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Dairy products are characterized by reduced shelf life because they are an excellent growth medium for a wide range of microorganisms. For this reason, it is important to monitor the microbiological quality of dairy products and, in particular, the total viable count and concentration of Escherichia coli, as they are indicators of the hygienic state of these products. In addition, in dairy products such as Mozzarella cheese, it is important to monitor the concentration of lactic acid bacteria (LAB), as they are the major components of starter cultures used in cheese production, contributing to the taste and texture of fermented products and inhibiting food spoilage bacteria by producing growth-inhibiting substances. For these reasons, to ensure the quality and safety of their products, cheese makers should monitor frequently, during fresh cheese production, the concentration of LAB and spoilage bacteria. However, usually, small- to medium-size dairy factories do not have an internal microbiological laboratory and external laboratories of analysis are often too expensive and require several days for the results. Compared with traditional methods, the microbiological survey (MBS) method developed by Roma Tre University (Rome, Italy) allows faster and less-expensive microbiological analyses to be conducted wherever they are necessary, without the need for a microbiological laboratory or any instrumentation other than MBS vials and a thermostat. In this paper, we report the primary validation of the MBS method to monitor LAB concentration in Mozzarella cheese and the analysis, using the MBS method, of total viable count, E. coli, and LAB concentrations in the production line of Mozzarella cheese as well as during the shelf life of the product stored at 20°C. The results obtained indicate that the MBS method may be successfully used by small- to medium-size dairy factories that do not have an internal microbiological laboratory. Using the MBS method, these dairy

  1. Optical Spectroscopic Observations of γ-Ray Blazar Candidates. III. The 2013/2014 Campaign in the Southern Hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landoni, M.; Massaro, F.; Paggi, A.; D'Abrusco, R.; Milisavljevic, D.; Masetti, N.; Smith, H. A.; Tosti, G.; Chomiuk, L.; Strader, J.; Cheung, C. C.

    2015-05-01

    We report the results of our exploratory program carried out with the southern Astrophysical Research telescope aimed at associating counterparts and establishing the nature of the Fermi Unidentified γ-ray Sources (UGSs). We selected the optical counterparts of six UGSs from the Fermi catalog on the basis of our recently discovered tight connection between infrared and γ-ray emission found for the γ-ray blazars detected by the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer in its all-sky survey. We perform for the first time a spectroscopic study of the low-energy counterparts of the Fermi UGSs, in the optical band, confirming the blazar-like nature of the whole sample. We also present new spectroscopic observations of six active galaxies of uncertain type associated with Fermi sources which appear to be BL Lac objects. Finally, we report the spectra collected for six known γ-ray blazars belonging to the Roma BZCAT that were obtained to establish their nature or better estimate their redshifts. Two interesting cases of high redshift and extremely luminous BL Lac objects (z ≥ 1.18 and z ≥ 1.02, based on the detection of Mg ii intervening systems) are also discussed. Based on observations obtained at the southern Astrophysical Research (SOAR) telescope, which is a joint project of the Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia, e Inovação (MCTI) da República Federativa do Brasil, the U.S. National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO), the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC), and Michigan State University (MSU).

  2. Virtualizing ancient Rome: 3D acquisition and modeling of a large plaster-of-Paris model of imperial Rome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guidi, Gabriele; Frischer, Bernard; De Simone, Monica; Cioci, Andrea; Spinetti, Alessandro; Carosso, Luca; Micoli, Laura L.; Russo, Michele; Grasso, Tommaso

    2005-01-01

    Computer modeling through digital range images has been used for many applications, including 3D modeling of objects belonging to our cultural heritage. The scales involved range from small objects (e.g. pottery), to middle-sized works of art (statues, architectural decorations), up to very large structures (architectural and archaeological monuments). For any of these applications, suitable sensors and methodologies have been explored by different authors. The object to be modeled within this project is the "Plastico di Roma antica," a large plaster-of-Paris model of imperial Rome (16x17 meters) created in the last century. Its overall size therefore demands an acquisition approach typical of large structures, but it also is characterized extremely tiny details typical of small objects (houses are a few centimeters high; their doors, windows, etc. are smaller than 1 centimeter). This paper gives an account of the procedures followed for solving this "contradiction" and describes how a huge 3D model was acquired and generated by using a special metrology Laser Radar. The procedures for reorienting in a single reference system the huge point clouds obtained after each acquisition phase, thanks to the measurement of fixed redundant references, are described. The data set was split in smaller sub-areas 2 x 2 meters each for purposes of mesh editing. This subdivision was necessary owing to the huge number of points in each individual scan (50-60 millions). The final merge of the edited parts made it possible to create a single mesh. All these processes were made with software specifically designed for this project since no commercial package could be found that was suitable for managing such a large number of points. Preliminary models are presented. Finally, the significance of the project is discussed in terms of the overall project known as "Rome Reborn," of which the present acquisition is an important component.

  3. Virtualizing ancient Rome: 3D acquisition and modeling of a large plaster-of-Paris model of imperial Rome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guidi, Gabriele; Frischer, Bernard; De Simone, Monica; Cioci, Andrea; Spinetti, Alessandro; Carosso, Luca; Micoli, Laura L.; Russo, Michele; Grasso, Tommaso

    2004-12-01

    Computer modeling through digital range images has been used for many applications, including 3D modeling of objects belonging to our cultural heritage. The scales involved range from small objects (e.g. pottery), to middle-sized works of art (statues, architectural decorations), up to very large structures (architectural and archaeological monuments). For any of these applications, suitable sensors and methodologies have been explored by different authors. The object to be modeled within this project is the "Plastico di Roma antica," a large plaster-of-Paris model of imperial Rome (16x17 meters) created in the last century. Its overall size therefore demands an acquisition approach typical of large structures, but it also is characterized extremely tiny details typical of small objects (houses are a few centimeters high; their doors, windows, etc. are smaller than 1 centimeter). This paper gives an account of the procedures followed for solving this "contradiction" and describes how a huge 3D model was acquired and generated by using a special metrology Laser Radar. The procedures for reorienting in a single reference system the huge point clouds obtained after each acquisition phase, thanks to the measurement of fixed redundant references, are described. The data set was split in smaller sub-areas 2 x 2 meters each for purposes of mesh editing. This subdivision was necessary owing to the huge number of points in each individual scan (50-60 millions). The final merge of the edited parts made it possible to create a single mesh. All these processes were made with software specifically designed for this project since no commercial package could be found that was suitable for managing such a large number of points. Preliminary models are presented. Finally, the significance of the project is discussed in terms of the overall project known as "Rome Reborn," of which the present acquisition is an important component.

  4. Assessment of function and clinical utility of alcohol and other drug web sites: An observational, qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The increasing popularity and use of the internet makes it an attractive option for providing health information and treatment, including alcohol/other drug use. There is limited research examining how people identify and access information about alcohol or other drug (AOD) use online, or how they assess the usefulness of the information presented. This study examined the strategies that individuals used to identify and navigate a range of AOD websites, along with the attitudes concerning presentation and content. Methods Members of the general community in Brisbane and Roma (Queensland, Australia) were invited to participate in a 30-minute search of the internet for sites related to AOD use, followed by a focus group discussion. Fifty one subjects participated in the study across nine focus groups. Results Participants spent a maximum of 6.5 minutes on any one website, and less if the user was under 25 years of age. Time spent was as little as 2 minutes if the website was not the first accessed. Participants recommended that AOD-related websites should have an engaging home or index page, which quickly and accurately portrayed the site's objectives, and provided clear site navigation options. Website content should clearly match the title and description of the site that is used by internet search engines. Participants supported the development of a portal for AOD websites, suggesting that it would greatly facilitate access and navigation. Treatment programs delivered online were initially viewed with caution. This appeared to be due to limited understanding of what constituted online treatment, including its potential efficacy. Conclusions A range of recommendations arise from this study regarding the design and development of websites, particularly those related to AOD use. These include prudent use of text and information on any one webpage, the use of graphics and colours, and clear, uncluttered navigation options. Implications for future website

  5. INTEGRAL high-energy monitoring of the X-ray burster KS 1741-293

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Cesare, G.; Bazzano, A.; Martínez Núñez, S.; Stratta, G.; Tarana, A.; Del Santo, M.; Ubertini, P.

    2007-09-01

    KS 1741-293, discovered in 1989 by the X-ray camera TTM on the Kvant module of the Mir space station and identified as an X-ray burster, had not been detected in the hard X-ray band until the advent of the INTEGRAL observatory. Moreover, this source has recently been the object of scientific discussion, being also associated with a nearby extended radio source that in principle could be the supernova remnant produced by the accretion-induced collapse in the binary system. Our long-term monitoring with INTEGRAL, covering the period from 2003 February to 2005 May, confirms that KS 1741-293 is transient in the soft and hard X-ray bands. When the source is active, from a simultaneous JEM-X and IBIS data analysis, we provide a wide-band spectrum from 5 to 100 keV, which can be fitted by a two-component model: a multiple blackbody for the soft emission and a Comptonized or a cut-off power-law model for the hard component. Finally, by the detection of two X-ray bursters with JEM-X, we confirm the bursting nature of KS 1741-293, including this source in the class of hard-tailed X-ray bursters. Based on observations with INTEGRAL, an ESA project with instruments and science data centre funded by ESA member states (especially the PI countries: Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, Switzerland, Spain), the Czech Republic and Poland, and with the participation of Russia and the USA. E-mail: giovanni.decesare@iasf-roma.inaf.it ‡ INAF personnel resident at ASDC.

  6. Optical Spectroscopic Observations of Gamma-ray Blazar Candidates. V. TNG, KPNO, and OAN Observations of Blazar Candidates of Uncertain Type in the Northern Hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Álvarez Crespo, N.; Masetti, N.; Ricci, F.; Landoni, M.; Patiño-Álvarez, V.; Massaro, F.; D'Abrusco, R.; Paggi, A.; Chavushyan, V.; Jiménez-Bailón, E.; Torrealba, J.; Latronico, L.; La Franca, F.; Smith, Howard A.; Tosti, G.

    2016-02-01

    The extragalactic γ-ray sky is dominated by emission from blazars, a peculiar class of active galactic nuclei. Many of the γ-ray sources included in the Fermi-Large Area Telescope Third Source catalog (3FGL) are classified as blazar candidates of uncertain type (BCUs) because there are no optical spectra available in the literature to confirm their nature. In 2013, we started a spectroscopic campaign to look for the optical counterparts of the BCUs and of the unidentified γ-ray sources to confirm their blazar nature. Whenever possible we also determine their redshifts. Here, we present the results of the observations carried out in the northern hemisphere in 2013 and 2014 at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo, Kitt Peak National Observatory, and Observatorio Astronómico Nacional in San Pedro Mártir. In this paper, we describe the optical spectra of 25 sources. We confirmed that all of the 15 BCUs observed in our campaign and included in our sample are blazars and we estimated the redshifts for three of them. In addition, we present the spectra for three sources classified as BL Lacs in the literature but with no optical spectra available to date. We found that one of them is a quasar (QSO) at a redshift of z = 0.208 and the other two are BL Lacs. Moreover, we also present seven new spectra for known blazars listed in the Roma-BZCAT that have an uncertain redshift or are classified as BL Lac candidates. We found that one of them, 5BZB J0724+2621, is a “changing look” blazar. According to the spectrum available in the literature, it was classified as a BL Lac, but in our observation we clearly detected a broad emission line that led us to classify this source as a QSO at z = 1.17.

  7. NEO-SURFACE: Near-Earth Objects --- SURvey oF Asteroids Close to the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dotto, E.; Perna, D.; Ieva, S.; Barucci, M.; Bernardi, F.; Fornasier, S.; Brucato, J.; De Luise, F.; Perozzi, E.; Micheli, M.; Rossi, A.

    2014-07-01

    Near-Earth Objects (NEOs) form a continuously replenished population of asteroids and dead comets that cross the Earth's orbit while orbiting the Sun. Our present knowledge of their physical properties is rather limited, especially for what concerns faint and newly-discovered objects, of which we have physical information for less than 10 % of the population. The most frequent technique to obtain physical characterizations of NEOs is the optical/NIR spectroscopy: by analyzing the object's spectral features, it is possible to detect minerals and compounds (e.g., silicates, organics, and products of aqueous-alteration processes) present on its surface, to put constraints on the thermal evolution (maximum temperature reached, aqueous alteration vs. thermal metamorphism), as well as to establish possible links with objects belonging to other populations of small bodies (e.g., main-belt asteroids, and comets) and with meteorites. In order to increase the present knowledge of the physical properties of NEOs, we are carrying out a survey called NEO-SURFACE: Near Earth Objects --- SURvey oF Asteroids Close to the Earth (http://www.oa-roma.inaf.it/planet/NEOSurface.html). We perform V+NIR spectroscopy and photometry focusing our effort, first, on NEOs with possible close approaches with the Earth (PHAs, the Potentially Hazardous Asteroids), and, second, on NEOs easily accessible for future rendezvous space missions. In cases of NEOs causing an impact hazard, physical parameters are fundamental in order to estimate their response to non-gravitational forces (mainly to the Yarkovsky effect) and therefore model their future dynamical evolution. For suitable targets for space missions, the physical characterization is needed to guarantee both the technical feasibility and the high scientific return of the mission. The results collected until now will be presented and discussed.

  8. Single crystal diamond detectors grown by chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuvè, C.; Angelone, M.; Bellini, V.; Balducci, A.; Donato, M. G.; Faggio, G.; Marinelli, M.; Messina, G.; Milani, E.; Morgada, M. E.; Pillon, M.; Potenza, R.; Pucella, G.; Russo, G.; Santangelo, S.; Scoccia, M.; Sutera, C.; Tucciarone, A.; Verona-Rinati, G.

    2007-01-01

    The detection properties of heteropitaxial (polycrystalline, pCVD) and homoepitaxial (single crystal, scCVD) diamond films grown by microwave chemical vapor deposition (CVD) in the Laboratories of Roma "Tor Vergata" University are reported. The pCVD diamond detectors were tested with α-particles from different sources and 12C ions produced by 15 MV Tandem accelerator at Southern National Laboratories (LNS) in Catania (Italy). pCVDs were also used to monitor 14 MeV neutrons produced by the D-T plasma at Joint European Torus (JET), Culham, U.K. The limit of pCVDs is the poor energy resolution. To overcome this problem, we developed scCVD diamonds using the same reactor parameters that optimized pCVD diamonds. scCVD were grown on a low cost (1 0 0) HPHT single crystal substrate. A detector 110 μm thick was tested under α-particles and under 14 MeV neutron irradiation. The charge collection efficiency spectrum measured under irradiation with a triple α-particle source shows three clearly resolved peaks, with an energy resolution of about 1.1%. The measured spectra under neutron irradiation show a well separated C(n,α0)9Be12 reaction peak with an energy spread of 0.5 MeV for 14.8 MeV neutrons and 0.3 MeV for 14.1 MeV neutrons, which are fully compatible with the energy spread of the incident neutron beams.

  9. Coupling Functions for NM-64 and NM Without Lead Derived on the Basis of Calculated Apparent Cutoff Rigidities for CR Latitude Survey from Antarctica to Italy in Minimum of Solar Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorman, L.I.; Danilova, O.A.; Tyasto, M.I.; Ptitsina, N.G.; Villoresi, G.; Iucci, N.; Parisi, M.

    L. I. Dorman (1,2), O. A. Danilova (3), M. I. Tyasto (3), N. G. Ptitsina (3), G. Villoresi (4), N. Iucci (4) and M. Parisi (4) ? (1) Israel Cosmic Ray Center affiliated to Tel Aviv University, Technion and Israel Space Agency, Israel; (2) IZMIRAN, Troitsk, Russia; (3) SPbFIZMIRAN, St. Petersburg, Russia; (4) Dipartimento di Fisica "E. Amaldi", Università "Roma Tre", Rome, Italy In Dorman et al. (2007) it was calculate the apparent cut-off rigidities for the backward route (Antarctica-Italy) of the CR latitude survey performed on a ship during 1996-1997 solar minimum. These computations were done on the basis of results of trajectory calculations for inclined cut-off rigidities for various azimuth and zenith angles (0°, 15°, 30°, 45°, 60°) and azimuth directions changing from 0° to 360° in steps of 45°. The information on integral multiplicities of secondary neutrons detected by neutron monitor in dependence of zenith angle of incoming primary CR particles have been also used. This information is based on the theoretical calculations of meson-nuclear cascades of primary protons with different rigidities arriving to the Earth's atmosphere at zenith angles 0°, 15°, 30°, 45°, 60° and 75°. By using this information and data of CR latitude survey from Antarctica to Italy in minimum of solar activity we determine coupling functions for NM-64 and NM without lead. Reference: L.I. Dorman et al. “Apparent Cutoff Rigidities for Cosmic Ray Latitude Survey from Antarctica to Italy in Minimum of Solar Activity”, Adv. Space Res., 2007 (in press).

  10. Marginalized and socially integrated groups of IDUs in Hungary – potential bridges of HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Gyarmathy, V. Anna; Neaigus, Alan

    2008-01-01

    The discrepancy in HIV rates among Eastern and Central European injecting drug users (IDUs) suggests that, in addition to risk behaviors, social contact patterns also play an important role. We identify two groups of IDUs in Budapest, Hungary, marginalized IDUs (M-IDUs) and socially integrated IDUs (SI-IDUs), and compare their HIV/HBV/HCV social and risk network characteristics, risk behaviors, and travel patterns. Between 05/2003 and 01/2004, 29 non-treatment-recruited young IDUs in Budapest participated in ethnographic interviews and focus groups. The mean age was 23.6 years (SD=3.6); eight were female and two Roma/Gypsy. Most injected heroin (n=23) and/or amphetamines (n=10) in the past 30 days. M-IDUs had no legal employment, injected heroin and sniffed glue, and stopped using drugs in treatment/prison. SI-IDUs had regular jobs or were students, injected heroin and sniffed cocaine, and stopped using drugs before exams/tests. Both M-IDUs and SI-IDUs shared injecting equipment on occasion and used condoms rarely. M-IDUs had a large social network of “buddies” and a small risk network of “friends”. SI-IDUs had two separate large social networks of “buddies”: a M-IDU and a non-IDU network; and a small risk network of “friends”. Both groups reported monogamous sexual relationships. M-IDUs traveled within Hungary whereas SI-IDUs traveled to Western Europe. If an HIV epidemic among IDUs in Hungary is not prevented, SI-IDUs may form a potential “bridge” of HIV infection between high-risk IDU populations and the low-risk, general population, while M-IDUs may become cores of infection. Different approaches may be appropriate for M-IDUs and SI-IDUs to prevent HIV. PMID:16107433

  11. The ATLAS Software Installation System v2: a highly available system to install and validate Grid and Cloud sites via Panda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Salvo, A.; Kataoka, M.; Sanchez Pineda, A.; Smirnov, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The ATLAS Installation System v2 is the evolution of the original system, used since 2003. The original tool has been completely re-designed in terms of database backend and components, adding support for submission to multiple backends, including the original Workload Management Service (WMS) and the new PanDA modules. The database engine has been changed from plain MySQL to Galera/Percona and the table structure has been optimized to allow a full High-Availability (HA) solution over Wide Area Network. The servlets, running on each frontend, have been also decoupled from local settings, to allow an easy scalability of the system, including the possibility of an HA system with multiple sites. The clients can also be run in multiple copies and in different geographical locations, and take care of sending the installation and validation jobs to the target Grid or Cloud sites. Moreover, the Installation Database is used as source of parameters by the automatic agents running in CVMFS, in order to install the software and distribute it to the sites. The system is in production for ATLAS since 2013, having as main sites in HA the INFN Roma Tier 2 and the CERN Agile Infrastructure. The Light Job Submission Framework for Installation (LJSFi) v2 engine is directly interfacing with PanDA for the Job Management, the Atlas Grid Information System (AGIS) for the site parameter configurations, and CVMFS for both core components and the installation of the software itself. LJSFi2 is also able to use other plugins, and is essentially Virtual Organization (VO) agnostic, so can be directly used and extended to cope with the requirements of any Grid or Cloud enabled VO. In this work we will present the architecture, performance, status and possible evolutions to the system for the LHC Run2 and beyond.

  12. CALL FOR PAPERS: Photorefractive Materials and Effects for Photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-01-01

    Guest editors: Professor Valentin Vlad National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Bucharest, Romania Professor Eugenio Fazio Università di Roma `La Sapienza', Italy Professor Mike Damzen Imperial College, London, UK A topical issue of Journal of Optics A: Pure and Applied Optics will be devoted to papers reporting new results in the field of photorefractive effects and their applications in photonics. The topics to be covered will include, but are not limited to: bulletnew photorefractive materials (fast, sensitive in IR) bulletwave mixing in photorefractives bulletphotorefractive phase conjugators bulletholographic storage in photorefractive materials bulletphotorefractive spatial solitons bulletadaptive interconnection with photorefractive devices bulletphase conjugate interferometry bulletoptical analogue and digital computing (including optical correlators) bulletother applications and devices using photorefractive effects. The topical issue is scheduled for publication in November 2003. All papers will be peer reviewed and the normal refereeing standards of Journal of Optics A: Pure and Applied Optics will be maintained. Manuscripts should be prepared according to the general guidelines for authors published in the journal. Full details on how to structure an article, including specific information on figures, tables and references, are available from our Web site at www.iop.org/journals/authors/jopa. There are no page charges. In addition to the usual 25 free offprints, the contributing author of each paper published will receive a complimentary copy of the topical issue. Manuscripts should be submitted to the Publisher by 1 May 2003, although authors are strongly encouraged to submit their work as soon as possible. Please include a covering letter stating that the submission is intended for the Photorefractive Materials and Effects for Photonics special issue, to avoid treatment as a regular submission. Submission address: Dr Claire Blay

  13. Dispersion interactions in room-temperature ionic liquids: results from a non-empirical density functional.

    PubMed

    Kohanoff, Jorge; Pinilla, Carlos; Youngs, Tristan G A; Artacho, Emilio; Soler, José M

    2011-10-21

    The role of dispersion or van de Waals (VDW) interactions in imidazolium-based room-temperature ionic liquids is studied within the framework of density functional theory, using a recently developed non-empirical functional [M. Dion, H. Rydberg, E. Schröder, D. C. Langreth, and B. I. Lundqvist, Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 246401 (2004)], as efficiently implemented in the SIESTA code [G. Román-Pérez and J. M. Soler, Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 096102 (2009)]. We present results for the equilibrium structure and lattice parameters of several crystalline phases, finding a general improvement with respect to both the local density (LDA) and the generalized gradient approximations (GGA). Similar to other systems characterized by VDW bonding, such as rare gas and benzene dimers as well as solid argon, equilibrium distances and volumes are consistently overestimated by ≈7%, compared to -11% within LDA and 11% within GGA. The intramolecular geometries are retained, while the intermolecular distances and orientations are significantly improved relative to LDA and GGA. The quality is superior to that achieved with tailor-made empirical VDW corrections ad hoc [M. G. Del Pópolo, C. Pinilla, and P. Ballone, J. Chem. Phys. 126, 144705 (2007)]. We also analyse the performance of an optimized version of this non-empirical functional, where the screening properties of the exchange have been tuned to reproduce high-level quantum chemical calculations [J. Klimes, D. Bowler, and A. Michaelides, J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 22, 074203 (2010)]. The results for solids are even better with volumes and geometries reproduced within 2% of experimental data. We provide some insight into the issue of polymorphism of [bmim][Cl] crystals, and we present results for the geometry and energetics of [bmim][Tf] and [mmim][Cl] neutral and charged clusters, which validate the use of empirical force fields. PMID:22029322

  14. Deltaic margins vulnerability: the role of landscape patches in flood regulation and climate adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentini, E.; Taramelli, A.; Nguyen Xuan, A.; Filipponi, F.; Casarotti, C.; Morelli, A.

    2015-12-01

    Andrea Taramelli1,2,3, Emiliana Valentini2,3, Alessandra Nguyenxuan2, Federico Filipponi3, Chiara Casarotti2, Arianna Morelli1 1IUSS Institute for Advanced Study, Piazza della Vittoria 15, 27100, Pavia, ITALY 2Eucentre Foundation, European Centre for Training and Research in Earthquake Engineering, Pavia, Italy 3ISPRA, Institute for Environmental Protection and Research, Via Vitaliano Brancati 48, 00144, Roma Deltas are widely identified as vulnerable hotspots at the interface of the continental land mass and the world's coastal boundaries. With respect to increasing risks related to global change, the concept of ecosystem services has a capacity to contribute to safety of both, social and natural systems and vulnerability reduction. Here we study the role of the pool of ecosystem services in terms of flood mitigation and vulnerability reduction model, in a deltaic margins of the European coast (the complex land-sea system of the Waddenzee, comprising the Netherland inner coast and the islands, North Sea) then applicable to a wide variety of deltaic regions in developing areas. Extensive tidal mud flats, saltmarshes, dune ridges and sandy spits between the mainland and the chain of islands, support valuable sediment and primary production regulation along the seaside of these ecosystems. The system includes an incentive ecosystem structure (dune system) whereby economic agents would choose development activities that reduce vulnerability (flooding protection and erosion prevention) as well as satisfy production objectives (recreation and tourism). Vulnerability values extracted using remote sensing processors represent an innovative development of systems and methodologies. Using remote sensing observations, we investigate the distribution of spatial vegetation and substrate patterns controlled by changes in environmental variables acting on deltas, and we speculate the conditions under which the Real Elementary area can be defined.

  15. Levels of hexachlorocyclohexanes in agricultural environment of Sacco river valley.

    PubMed

    Pompi, V; Donnarumma, L; Rosati, S; Conte, E

    2010-01-01

    Aim of this trial was to verify the occurrence and the distribution of hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs) in soil, sediment, straw, alfalfa, other animal feed grown in farms with contaminated soil. In the present study two years of monitoring activity in the province of Roma and Frosinone was reported. Experimental trial in two contaminated sites was carried out on uptake and translocation of HCHs in maize and alfalfa. In 19 sites soil, forage and weed has been collected for two years, soil samples consisted in cores of 40 cm to test the presence of HCHs at different deep. The analytical determinations in soil and plant samples were carried out by gas liquid chromatography with electron capture detector and confirmed by mass detector. In the first year (2005- 2006) 68% of soil samples were contaminated (HCHs > LOQ) and 3% of vegetable samples. In the second year (2006- 2007) 42% of soil samples resulted positive and 26% of vegetable matrix. In particular B hexacyclohexane was detected in wheat stem (0.037 mg/kg) with a soil contamination of 0.039 mg/kg and in alfalfa (0.012 mg/kg) with presence in soil of 0.004 mg/kg. Experimental trials on maize evidenced a translocation factor for this isomer stem/soil of 0.006 mg/kg ? and for grain of 0.005 mg/kg. On alfalfa translocation factor root/soil was 0.01 and shot/soil 0.009. A propose to calculate the threshold value of soil contamination to admit crop grown destined to animal feed, would be based on HCHs LOD values weighted with translocation factor. PMID:21542481

  16. List of Participants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-07-01

    Alba Paolo (Università di Torino) Becattini Francesco (Università di Firenze) Bombaci Ignazio (Università di Pisa) Bonaccorso Angela (INFN Pisa) Colonna Maria (INFN-LNS Catania) Coraggio Luigi (INFN Napoli) Covello Aldo (Università di Napoli) Di Toro Massimo (Università di Catania) De Angelis Giacomo (INFN-LNL Legnaro) Gargano Angela (INFN Napoli) Gattobigio Mario (INLN, Université de Nice-Sophia Antipolis, CNRS, France) Gensini Paolo (INFN Lecce) Giannini Mauro (Università di Genova) Girlanda Luca (Università del Salento) Giusti Carlotta (Università di Pavia) Greco Vincenzo (Università di Catania) Grossi Eduardo (Università di Firenze) Itaco Nunzio (Università di Napoli) Kievsky Alejandro (INFN Pisa) Lanza Edoardo (INFN Catania) Lavagno Andrea (Politecnico di Torino) Logoteta Domenico (Universidade de Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal) Lo Iudice Nicola (Università di Napoli) Lombardo Maria Paola (INFN-LNF Frascati) Lo Meo Sergio (ENEA Bologna) Mannarelli Massimo (INFN-LNGS Assergi) Marcucci Laura Elisa (Università di Pisa) Matera Francesco (Università di Firenze) Orlandini Giuseppina (Università di Trento) Pacati Franco (Università di Pavia) Pederiva Francesco (Università di Trento) Pirrone Sara (INFN Catania) Puglisi Armando (Università di Catania) Radici Marco (INFN Pavia) Rinaldi Matteo (Università di Perugia) Roggero Alessandro (Università di Trento) Rolando Valentina (Università di Ferrara) Rosati Sergio (Università di Pisa) Ruggieri Marco (Università di Catania) Salmè Gianni (INFN Roma) Santopinto Elena (INFN Genova) Scopetta Sergio (Università di Perugia) Taiuti Mauro (Università di Genova) Vigezzi Enrico (INFN Milano) Viviani Michele (INFN Pisa) Vorabbi Matteo (Università di Pavia)

  17. Cranial osteology of the ankylosaurian dinosaur formerly known as Minmi sp. (Ornithischia: Thyreophora) from the Lower Cretaceous Allaru Mudstone of Richmond, Queensland, Australia

    PubMed Central

    Molnar, Ralph E.; Carpenter, Kenneth; Witmer, Lawrence M.; Salisbury, Steven W.

    2015-01-01

    Minmi is the only known genus of ankylosaurian dinosaur from Australia. Seven specimens are known, all from the Lower Cretaceous of Queensland. Only two of these have been described in any detail: the holotype specimen Minmi paravertebra from the Bungil Formation near Roma, and a near complete skeleton from the Allaru Mudstone on Marathon Station near Richmond, preliminarily referred to a possible new species of Minmi. The Marathon specimen represents one of the world’s most complete ankylosaurian skeletons and the best-preserved dinosaurian fossil from eastern Gondwana. Moreover, among ankylosaurians, its skull is one of only a few in which the majority of sutures have not been obliterated by dermal ossifications or surface remodelling. Recent preparation of the Marathon specimen has revealed new details of the palate and narial regions, permitting a comprehensive description and thus providing new insights cranial osteology of a basal ankylosaurian. The skull has also undergone computed tomography, digital segmentation and 3D computer visualisation enabling the reconstruction of its nasal cavity and endocranium. The airways of the Marathon specimen are more complicated than non-ankylosaurian dinosaurs but less so than derived ankylosaurians. The cranial (brain) endocast is superficially similar to those of other ankylosaurians but is strongly divergent in many important respects. The inner ear is extremely large and unlike that of any dinosaur yet known. Based on a high number of diagnostic differences between the skull of the Marathon specimen and other ankylosaurians, we consider it prudent to assign this specimen to a new genus and species of ankylosaurian. Kunbarrasaurus ieversi gen. et sp. nov. represents the second genus of ankylosaurian from Australia and is characterised by an unusual melange of both primitive and derived characters, shedding new light on the evolution of the ankylosaurian skull. PMID:26664806

  18. A semi-empirical model for the prediction of fouling in railway ballast using GPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchini Ciampoli, Luca; Tosti, Fabio; Benedetto, Andrea; Alani, Amir M.; Loizos, Andreas; D'Amico, Fabrizio; Calvi, Alessandro

    2016-04-01

    The first step in the planning for a renewal of a railway network consists in gathering information, as effectively as possible, about the state of the railway tracks. Nowadays, this activity is mostly carried out by digging trenches at regular intervals along the whole network, to evaluate both geometrical and geotechnical properties of the railway track bed. This involves issues, mainly concerning the invasiveness of the operations, the impacts on the rail traffic, the high costs, and the low levels of significance concerning such discrete data set. Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) can represent a useful technique for overstepping these issues, as it can be directly mounted onto a train crossing the railway, and collect continuous information along the network. This study is aimed at defining an empirical model for the prediction of fouling in railway ballast, by using GPR. With this purpose, a thorough laboratory campaign was implemented within the facilities of Roma Tre University. In more details, a 1.47 m long × 1.47 m wide × 0.48 m height plexiglass framework, accounting for the domain of investigation, was laid over a perfect electric conductor, and filled up with several configuration of railway ballast and fouling material (clayey sand), thereby representing different levels of fouling. Then, the set of fouling configurations was surveyed with several GPR systems. In particular, a ground-coupled multi-channel radar (600 MHz and 1600 MHz center frequency antennas) and three air-launched radar systems (1000 MHz and 2000 MHz center frequency antennas) were employed for surveying the materials. By observing the results both in terms of time and frequency domains, interesting insights are highlighted and an empirical model, relating in particular the shape of the frequency spectrum of the signal and the percentage of fouling characterizing the surveyed material, is finally proposed. Acknowledgement The Authors thank COST, for funding the Action TU1208 "Civil

  19. UNderstanding uptake of Immunisations in TravellIng aNd Gypsy communities (UNITING): protocol for an exploratory, qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Cath; Crocker, Annie; Emslie, Carol; Dyson, Lisa; Gallagher, Bridget; Schicker, Frieda; Shepherd, Christine; Smith, Lesley; Vousden, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Gypsies, Travellers and Roma (referred to here as Travellers) experience significantly poorer health and have shorter life expectancy than the general population. They are also less likely to access health services including immunisation. To improve immunisation rates, we need to understand what helps and hinders individuals in these communities in taking up immunisations. This study has two aims: (1) Investigate the barriers and facilitators to acceptability and uptake of immunisations among six Traveller communities in the UK; (2) Identify potential interventions to increase uptake in these Traveller communities. Methods and analysis A three-phase qualitative study with six Traveller communities. PHASE 1: In each community, we will explore up to 45 Travellers’ views about the influences on their immunisation behaviours and ideas for improving uptake in their community. PHASE 2: In each community, we will investigate 6–8 service providers’ perspectives on barriers and facilitators to childhood and adult immunisations for Traveller communities with whom they work, and ideas to improve uptake. Interview data will be analysed using the Framework approach. PHASE 3: The findings will be discussed and interventions prioritised in six workshops, each with 10–12 phase 1 and 3–4 phase 2 participants. Ethics and dissemination This research received approval from NRES Committee Yorkshire and The Humber-Leeds East (Ref. 13/YH/02). It will produce (1) findings on the barriers and facilitators to uptake of immunisations in six Traveller communities; (2) a prioritised list of potentially feasible and acceptable interventions for increasing uptake in these communities; and (3) methodological development in undertaking research with diverse Traveller communities. The study has the potential to inform new ways of delivering services to ensure high immunisation uptake. Findings will be disseminated to participants, relevant UK organisations with responsibility

  20. Y-chromosomal diversity of the Valachs from the Czech Republic: model for isolated population in Central Europe

    PubMed Central

    Ehler, Edvard; Vaněk, Daniel; Stenzl, Vlastimil; Vančata, Václav

    2011-01-01

    Aim To evaluate Y-chromosomal diversity of the Moravian Valachs of the Czech Republic and compare them with a Czech population sample and other samples from Central and South-Eastern Europe, and to evaluate the effects of genetic isolation and sampling. Methods The first sample set of the Valachs consisted of 94 unrelated male donors from the Valach region in northeastern Czech Republic border-area. The second sample set of the Valachs consisted of 79 men who originated from 7 paternal lineages defined by surname. No close relatives were sampled. The third sample set consisted of 273 unrelated men from the whole of the Czech Republic and was used for comparison, as well as published data for other 27 populations. The total number of samples was 3244. Y-short tandem repeat (STR) markers were typed by standard methods using PowerPlex® Y System (Promega) and Yfiler® Amplification Kit (Applied Biosystems) kits. Y-chromosomal haplogroups were estimated from the haplotype information. Haplotype diversity and other intra- and inter-population statistics were computed. Results The Moravian Valachs showed a lower genetic variability of Y-STR markers than other Central European populations, resembling more to the isolated Balkan populations (Aromuns, Csango, Bulgarian, and Macedonian Roma) than the surrounding populations (Czechs, Slovaks, Poles, Saxons). We illustrated the effect of sampling on Valach paternal lineages, which includes reduction of discrimination capacity and variability inside Y-chromosomal haplogroups. Valach modal haplotype belongs to R1a haplogroup and it was not detected in the Czech population. Conclusion The Moravian Valachs display strong substructure and isolation in their Y chromosomal markers. They represent a unique Central European population model for population genetics. PMID:21674832

  1. The TOPOMOD-ITN project: unravel the origin of Earth's topography from modelling deep-surface processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faccenna, C.; Funiciello, F.

    2012-04-01

    EC-Marie Curie Initial Training Networks (ITN) projects aim to improve the career perspectives of young generations of researchers. Institutions from both academic and industry sectors form a collaborative network to recruit research fellows and provide them with opportunities to undertake research in the context of a joint research training program. In this frame, TOPOMOD - one of the training activities of EPOS, the new-born European Research Infrastructure for Geosciences - is a funded ITN project designed to investigate and model how surface processes interact with crustal tectonics and mantle convection to originate and develop topography of the continents over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. The multi-disciplinary approach combines geophysics, geochemistry, tectonics and structural geology with advanced geodynamic numerical/analog modelling. TOPOMOD involves 8 European research teams internationally recognized for their excellence in complementary fields of Earth Sciences (Roma TRE, Utrecht, GFZ, ETH, Cambridge, Durham, Rennes, Barcelona), to which are associated 5 research institutions (CNR-Italy, Univ. Parma, Univ. Lausanne, Univ. Montpellier, Univ. Mainz) , 3 high-technology enterprises (Malvern Instruments, TNO, G.O. Logical Consulting) and 1 large multinational oil and gas company (ENI). This unique network places emphasis in experience-based training increasing the impact and international visibility of European research in modeling. Long-term collaboration and synergy are established among the overmentioned research teams through 15 cross-disciplinary research projects that combine case studies in well-chosen target areas from the Mediterranean, the Middle and Far East, west Africa, and South America, with new developments in structural geology, geomorphology, seismology, geochemistry, InSAR, laboratory and numerical modelling of geological processes from the deep mantle to the surface. These multidisciplinary projects altogether aim to

  2. GlioLab-a space system for Glioblastoma multiforme cells on orbit behavior study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappelletti, Chantal; Twiggs, Robert J.

    Microgravity conditions and ionizing radiation pose significant health risks for human life in space. This is a concern for future missions and also for future space tourism flights. Nev-ertheless, at the same time it is very interesting to study the effects of these conditions in unhealthy organism like biological samples affected by cancer. It is possible that space envi-ronment increases, decreases or doesn't have any effect on cancer cells. In any case the test results give important informations about cancer treatment or space tourism flight for people affected by cancer. GlioLab is a joint project between GAUSS-Group of Astrodynamics at the "Sapienza" University of Roma and the Morehead State University (MSU) Space Science Center in Kentucky. The main goal of this project is the design and manufacturing of an autonomous space system to investigate potential effects of the space environment exposure on a human glioblastoma multiforme cell line derived from a 65-year-old male and on Normal Human Astrocytes (NHA). In particular the samples are Glioblastoma multiforme cancer cells because the radiotherapy using ionizing radiation is the only treatment after surgery that can give on ground an improvement on the survival rate for this very malignant cancer. During a mission on the ISS, GlioLab mission has to test the in orbit behavior of glioblastoma cancer cells and healthy neuronal cells, which are extremely fragile and require complex experimentation and testing. In this paper engineering solutions to design and manufacturing of an autonomous space system that can allow to keep alive these kind of cells are described. This autonomous system is characterized also by an optical device dedicated to cells behavior analysis and by microdosimeters for monitoring space radiation environment.

  3. The Reverse Modelling Realized by Digital Scans and Fotomodellazione: Based on Post-Processing Compared Several Noteworthy Episodes Contained in the Basilical Complex of San Lorenzo Fuori le Mura in Rome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Mantia, M.; Lanfranchi, F.

    2013-02-01

    In the last decade, the subject area of the survey, and also that of representation, have undergone major changes with the introduction and use of advanced technologies that have revolutionized both the operational processes dedicated to the withdrawal of the measures that those graphic display data in terms of return and performance. The three-dimensional vision deriving from direct observation, or photogrammetric instrumental with the application of images, constitutes the most complete display means of the formal, morphological and material aspects of the detected object. 3D modeling offers many advantages, such as managing even the most complex geometric surfaces and its use is investing many sectors: in particular in the field of architecture serves many purposes including documentation, representation, diagnostics, materials and degradation, the enhancement and conservation of the property, etc.. The laser scanner technology together with that of fotomodellazione, is aimed to the acquisition, modeling and rendering threedimensional (3D) surface observed physical. The laser system to scan, as well as that of photographing, provides as a direct result of the measurement session a set of three-dimensional coordinates, in a reference system linked with the instrument. The high amount of sampled data, in the order of thousands per second, allows to obtain a high level of detail offering an acquisition that could be called pseudo-continuous. In this context, there is a complex major project work on the Basilica di San Lorenzo flm in Roma, - whose first partial results have recently been published - in the course of an activity which has been carried out to study and research for the establishment of procedures for processing the most appropriate and valid to be applied during post-processing for the eventual realization of a proper three-dimensional model. This paper will illustrate, through the analysis of some significant episodes of the Basilica, as the criteria

  4. Evaluation of microbial contamination of tomatoes and peppers at retail markets in Monterrey, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Cárdenas, Carmen; Molina, Karina; Heredia, Norma; García, Santos

    2013-08-01

    The source of a large outbreak of foodborne disease related to Salmonella-contaminated jalapeño peppers has been traced to Nuevo Leon, Mexico. The objective of this work was to evaluate the microbiological quality of tomatoes and jalapeño peppers from markets and supermarkets from the metropolitan area of Monterrey, Nuevo León, Mexico. One hundred sixty samples (40 bola tomatoes, 40 saladette [Roma] tomatoes, 40 serrano peppers, and 40 jalapeño peppers) were purchased. Stems from peppers were removed and analyzed separately. Samples were analyzed for indicator organisms and Salmonella, following the Mexican Official Methods. The results showed that the presence of indicator organisms varied among samples and origins, and levels were relatively high in peppers (average 4.4 to 4.7 log CFU/g for total mesophilic, 3.25 to 3.73 log CFU/g for total coliforms, and 1.69 log CFU/g for fecal coliforms). Saladette tomatoes and serrano peppers showed the greatest microorganism levels (∼1 log CFU/g higher) in comparison with the other varieties. Pepper stems typically had indicator microbial levels ∼1 to 2 log CFU/g higher than levels in smooth flesh. Only one tomato and one jalapeño sample were positive for Salmonella. However, in the case of the pepper, the contamination was found in the stem. Although the microbiological quality of tomatoes and peppers sampled was similar to that found in markets from developed countries, the presence of pathogens causes a risk of infection for consumers. PMID:23905810

  5. LISA 8 Science Organizing Committee and Local Organizing Committee LISA 8 Science Organizing Committee and Local Organizing Committee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-05-01

    Science Organising Committee (SOC) Tom Abel, Stanford University Odylio Aguiar, Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais Tal Alexander, Wizemann Institute Peter Bender, University of Colorado Pierre Binetruy, APC - College de France Sasha Buchman, Stanford University Robert Byer, Stanford University Manuela Campanelli, University of Texas Joan Centrella, NASA/Goddard Massimo Cerdonio, University of Padova Eugenio Coccia, University of Roma-2 Neil Cornish, Montana State University Michael Cruise, University of Birmingham Curt Cutler, NASA/JPL Karsten Danzmann, University of Hannover Sam Finn, Penn State University Jens Gundlach, NPL Gerhard Heinzel, Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik Craig Hogan, University of Washington Jim Hough, University of Glasgow Scott Hughes, MIT Oliver Jennrich, ESTEC Philippe Jetzer, University Zurich Seiji Kawamura, National Observatory, Japan Alberto Lobo, ICE-CSIC and IEEC Avi Loeb, Harvard University Piero Madau, Lick Observatory Yannick Mellier, IAP, Paris Peter Michelson, Stanford University Guido Mueller, University of Florida Sterl Phinney, Caltech Tom Prince, NASA/JPL Doug Richstone, University of Michigan Bernard Schutz, AEI Potsdam Tuck Stebbins, NASA/Goddard Tim Sumner, Imperial College, London Ke-Xun Sun, Stanford University Kip Thorne, Caltech Michele Vallisneri, NASA/JPL Alberto Vecchio, University of Birmingham Jean-Yves Vinet, OCA, Nice Stefano Vitale, University of Trento Rai Weiss, MIT Nick White, NASA/Goddard Local Organising Committee (LOC) Sasha Buchman (Stanford University) Robert Byer (Stanford University) Sara Charbonneau-Lefort (Stanford University) Nancy Christianson (Stanford University) John Conklin (Stanford University) Dan DeBra (Stanford University) Jan Goebel (Stanford University) Vivian Drew (Stanford University) Ke-Xun Sun (Stanford University) Lucy Zhou (Stanford University) Andrea Zoellner (Stanford University)

  6. The fantastic four.. elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsili, Antonella; D'Addezio, Giuliana; Rubbia, Giuliana; Ramieri, Caterina; Todaro, Riccardo; Scipilliti, Francesca; Tosto, Eleonora

    2015-04-01

    With a "Sunday between territory and music to 'National Institute of Geophysics and Volcanology," October 12, 2014 the headquarters of INGV Roma kicked off the activities of the second edition of the Week of Planet Earth. The laboratory of scientific outreach and museum activities together with volunteers of the National Civil Service have organized the whole day dedicated to the dissemination of earth sciences, involving adults and children. Especially for primary school children a laboratory was made involving three amusing activities all aimed at inspiring respect for the Earth: a theatrical representation called "The Fantastic 4... elements", a behavioral game and a nursery rhyme reading. The theater as a means of communication of science is an innovative and creative way to introduce children to important scientific concepts. The use of this methodology and simple language favoring the emotional involvement of the child facilitating learning. The main character is a child, chosen to facilitate the identification of the spectators with the protagonist, that through a fantastic journey discovers the importance of the four elements of our planet: earth, fire, air and water. As a second step, volunteers involved children in reading a nursery rhyme "the ABC to become a Friend of the Earth" inviting them to protect and respect the environment and its resources. Finally, the behavioral game gave indications about behaviors to adopt to safeguard the planet. Volunteers introduced a billboard divided into two colors, green to indicate the right behaviors and red for the wrong ones. Each child, after reading a card with indication on the behavior to adopt, had to decide if they were correct or not with respect to the environment safeguard. After listening to the children's answer, the volunteer gave the correct explanation about the appropriate behavior to adopt. At the end of the activities, each child received a certificate as "a friend of Planet Earth".

  7. Onomatopoeias: a new perspective around space, image schemas and phoneme clusters.

    PubMed

    Catricalà, Maria; Guidi, Annarita

    2015-09-01

    Onomatopoeias (Roma Tre, Rome, 2013; algorithms: Asaga et al. in Onomatopedia, pp 601-612, 2008) has been related to onomatopoeias since Cratilo's analysis of the analogical dimension of verbal language. Nonetheless, it is still difficult to accept a (semantic, functional or grammatical) descriptive and explicative model of onomatopoeia, because the rules that constrain processes of selection and construction remain idiosyncratic and variable (Dogana in Le parole dell'incanto. FrancoAngeli, Milano, 2002; Catricalà 2011). This article proposes a classification model based on spatial cognition criteria. The hypothesis (Catricalà 2011) is that onomatopoeias are related to image schemas (Johnson in The body in the mind. University Press, Chicago, 1987), i.e. to the visual mapping of a movement. We also refer to force dynamic (Talmy in Language typology and lexical description, pp 36-149, 1985; Jackendoff in Semantic structures. MIT Press, Cambridge, 1990) as a basic model of conceptual maps (Langacker in Grammar and conceptualization. Mouton de Gruyter, Berlin, 1999). Categories are related to the presence of specific phonemes and phoneme clusters, while visual patterns correspond to different image schemas. The association between specific categories of pseudo-onomatopoeias and specific spatial/movement patterns is also the object of an experiment focused on onomatopoeia interpretation. Most part of data confirms a correlation between image schemas as CONTAINER/CONTAINMENT (crunch, plop) or SOURCE-PATH-GOAL (tattarrattat 'shots') and an occlusive consonant, while liquid

  8. Microstructural record of cataclastic and dissolution-precipitation processes from shallow crustal carbonate strike-slip faults, Northern Calcareous Alps (Austria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Helene; Grasemann, Bernhard; Decker, Kurt

    2015-04-01

    The concept of coseismic slip and aseismic creep deformation along faults is supported by the variability of natural fault rocks and their microstructures. Faults in carbonate rocks are characterized by very narrow principal slip zones (cm to mm wide) containing (ultra)cataclastic fault rocks that accommodate most of the fault displacement. Fluidization of ultracataclastic sub layers and thermal decomposition of calcite due to frictional heating have been proposed as possible indicators for seismic slip. Dissolution-precipitation (DP) processes are possible mechanism of aseismic sliding, resulting in spaced cleavage solution planes and associated veins, indicating diffusive mass transfer and precipitation in pervasive vein networks. We investigated exhumed, sinistral strike-slip faults in carbonates of the Northern Calcareous Alps. The study presents microstructural investigations of natural carbonate fault rocks that formed by cataclastic and dissolution-precipitation related deformation processes. Faults belong to the eastern segment of the Salzachtal-Ennstal-Mariazell-Puchberg (SEMP) fault system that was formed during eastward lateral extrusion of the Eastern Alps in Oligocene to Lower Miocene. The investigated faults accommodated sinistral slip between several tens and few hundreds of meters. Microstructural analysis of fault rocks was done with scanning electron microscopy and optical microscopy. Deformation experiments of natural fault rocks are planned to be conducted at the Sapienza University of Roma and should be available at the meeting. The investigated fault rocks give record of alternating cataclastic deformation and DP creep. DP fault rocks reveal various stages of evolution including early stylolites, pervasive pressure solution seams and cleavage, localized shear zones with syn-kinematic calcite fibre growth and mixed DP/cataclastic microstructures, involving pseudo sc- and scc'-fabrics. Pressure solution seams host fine grained kaolinit, chlorite

  9. Identification of Tumor Suppressors and Oncogenes from Genomic and Epigenetic Features in Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wrzeszczynski, Kazimierz O.; Varadan, Vinay; Byrnes, James; Lum, Elena; Kamalakaran, Sitharthan; Levine, Douglas A.; Dimitrova, Nevenka; Zhang, Michael Q.; Lucito, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The identification of genetic and epigenetic alterations from primary tumor cells has become a common method to identify genes critical to the development and progression of cancer. We seek to identify those genetic and epigenetic aberrations that have the most impact on gene function within the tumor. First, we perform a bioinformatic analysis of copy number variation (CNV) and DNA methylation covering the genetic landscape of ovarian cancer tumor cells. We separately examined CNV and DNA methylation for 42 primary serous ovarian cancer samples using MOMA-ROMA assays and 379 tumor samples analyzed by The Cancer Genome Atlas. We have identified 346 genes with significant deletions or amplifications among the tumor samples. Utilizing associated gene expression data we predict 156 genes with altered copy number and correlated changes in expression. Among these genes CCNE1, POP4, UQCRB, PHF20L1 and C19orf2 were identified within both data sets. We were specifically interested in copy number variation as our base genomic property in the prediction of tumor suppressors and oncogenes in the altered ovarian tumor. We therefore identify changes in DNA methylation and expression for all amplified and deleted genes. We statistically define tumor suppressor and oncogenic features for these modalities and perform a correlation analysis with expression. We predicted 611 potential oncogenes and tumor suppressors candidates by integrating these data types. Genes with a strong correlation for methylation dependent expression changes exhibited at varying copy number aberrations include CDCA8, ATAD2, CDKN2A, RAB25, AURKA, BOP1 and EIF2C3. We provide copy number variation and DNA methylation analysis for over 11,500 individual genes covering the genetic landscape of ovarian cancer tumors. We show the extent of genomic and epigenetic alterations for known tumor suppressors and oncogenes and also use these defined features to identify potential ovarian cancer gene candidates. PMID

  10. Y-SNP L1034: limited genetic link between Mansi and Hungarian-speaking populations.

    PubMed

    Fehér, T; Németh, E; Vándor, A; Kornienko, I V; Csáji, L K; Pamjav, H

    2015-02-01

    Genetic studies noted that the Hungarian Y-chromosomal gene pool significantly differs from other Uralic-speaking populations. Hungarians show very limited or no presence of haplogroup N-Tat, which is frequent among other Uralic-speaking populations. We proposed that some genetic links need to be observed between the linguistically related Hungarian and Mansi populations.This is the first attempt to divide haplogroup N-Tat into subhaplogroups by testing new downstream SNP markers L708 and L1034. Sixty Northern Mansi samples were collected in Western Siberia and genotyped for Y-chromosomal haplotypes and haplogroups. We found 14 Mansi and 92 N-Tat samples from 7 populations. Comparative results showed that all N-Tat samples carried the N-L708 mutation. Some Hungarian, Sekler, and Uzbek samples were L1034 SNP positive, while all Mongolians, Buryats, Khanty, Finnish, and Roma samples yielded a negative result for this marker. Based on the above, L1034 marker seems to be a subgroup of N-Tat, which is typical for Mansi and Hungarian-speaking ethnic groups so far. Based on our time to most recent common ancestor data, the L1034 marker arose 2,500 years before present. The overall frequency of the L1034 is very low among the analyzed populations, thus it does not necessarily mean that proto-Hungarians and Mansi descend from common ancestors. It does provide, however, a limited genetic link supporting language contact. Both Hungarians and Mansi have much more complex genetic population history than the traditional tree-based linguistic model would suggest. PMID:25258186

  11. Match analysis and temporal patterns of fatigue in rugby sevens.

    PubMed

    Granatelli, Giampietro; Gabbett, Tim J; Briotti, Gianluca; Padulo, Johnny; Buglione, Antonio; D'Ottavio, Stefano; Ruscello, Bruno M

    2014-03-01

    Rugby sevens is a rapidly growing sport. Match analysis is increasingly being used by sport scientists and coaches to improve the understanding of the physical demands of this sport. This study investigated the physical and physiological demands of elite men's rugby sevens, with special reference to the temporal patterns of fatigue during match play. Nine players, 4 backs and 5 forwards (age 25.1 ± 3.1 years) participated during 2 "Roma 7" international tournaments (2010 and 2011). All the players were at the professional level in the highest Italian rugby union, and 5 of these players also competed at the international level. During the matches (n = 15), the players were filmed to assess game performance. Global positioning system, heart rate (HR), and blood lactate (BLa) concentration data were measured and analyzed. The mean total distance covered throughout matches was 1,221 ± 118 m (first half = 643 ± 70 m and second half = 578 ± 77 m; with a decrease of 11.2%, p > 0.05, Effect Size [ES] = 0.29). The players achieved 88.3 ± 4.2 and 87.7 ± 3.4% of the HRmax during the first and second halves, respectively. The BLa for the first and second halves was 3.9 ± 0.9 and 11.2 ± 1.4 mmol·L, respectively. The decreases in performance occurred consistently in the final 3 minutes of the matches (-40.5% in the distance covered per minute). The difference found in relation to the playing position, although not statistically significant (p = 0.11), showed a large ES (η = 0.20), suggesting possible practical implications. These results demonstrate that rugby sevens is a demanding sport that places stress on both the anaerobic glycolytic and aerobic oxidative energy systems. Strength and conditioning programs designed to train these energy pathways may prevent fatigue-induced reductions in physical performance. PMID:23722109

  12. PREFACE: XIV International Conference on Calorimetry in High Energy Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yifang

    2011-03-01

    The International Conferences on Calorimetry in High Energy Physics (also known as the Calor Conference series, started in October 1990 at Fermilab) address all aspects of calorimetric particle detection and measurement, with an emphasis on high energy physics experiments. The XIV International Conference on Calorimetry in High Energy Physics (Calor 2010) was held at the campus of the Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing, China, from May 10-14, 2010. This conference brought together more than 110 participants from 20 countries, including senior scientists and young physicists. During the five days of the conference, 98 presentations were given in seven plenary sessions. The attendees had in-depth discussions on the latest developments and innovations in calorimetry, including the exciting new LHC results. From the presentations, 83 papers were published in this proceedings. The success of the conference was due to the participants' enthusiasm and the excellent talks given by the speakers, and to the conveners for organizing the individual sessions. We would like to thank the International Advisory Committee for giving us the opportunity to host this Conference in Beijing. Finally we would like to thank all the people involved in the organization of the Conference, who have provided valuable local support. Yifang WangChair of Local Organizing Committee International Advisory Committee M DanilovITEP Moscow M DiemozINFN Roma I A EreditatoBern F L FabbriINFN Frascati T KobayashiICEPP Tokyo M LivanPavia University & INFN P LubranoINFN Perugia S MagillANL Argonne A MaioLIPP Lisbon H OberlackMPI Munich A ParaFermilab R WigmansTTU Lubbock R YoshidaANL Argonne R ZhuCaltech Local Organizing Committee Y WangIHEP (Chair) Y GaoTshinghua University T HuIHEP (Scientific secretary) C LiUSTC W LiIHEP J LuIHEP P WangIHEP T XuIHEP L ZhouIHEP Session Conveners 1) Materials and detectors - Junguang Lu (IHEP), Francesca Nessi (CERN) 2) Algorithm and simulation - Nural Akchurin

  13. Tracing of high latitude magnetopause by Interball, Polar and Geotail versus MHD and gas dynamic modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savin, S.; Zelenyi, L.; Amata, E.; Berchem, J.; Buechner, J.; Song, P.; Fuselier, S.; Kawano, H.; Mukai, T.; Maynard, N.

    L. Zelenyi (1), E. Amata (6), J. Berchem (5), J. Buechner (7), P. Song (3), S. Fuselier (13), H. Kawano (4), V. Lutsenko (1), T. Mukai (8), K. Maezawa (8), N. Maynard (2), Z. Nemecek (14), R. Nakamura (15), M. Fujimoto (10), A. Pedersen (9), E. Panov (1), I. Sandahl (11), J. Safrankova (14), J.A. Sauvaud (16), V. Smirnov (1), K. Stasiewicz (12) (2) MRC, Nashua, USA, (3) U. Mass., Lowell, USA, (4) Kyushu U., Japan, (5) UCLA, USA, (6) IFSI, Roma, Italy, (7) MPAe, Lindau, Germany, (8) ISAS, Japan, (9) Oslo U., Norway, (10) Tokyo U., Japan, (11) IRF, Kiruna, Sweden, (12) IRF-U, Uppsala, Sweden, (13) LMATC, USA, (14) Charles U., Czech Rep., (15) IWF, Graz, Austria, (16) CESR, Toulouse, France, We present two case studies of magnetosheath (MSH) interaction with the high latitude magnetopause (MP) on the basis of Interball-1, Polar, Geotail and other ISTP spacecraft data. On April 23-24, 1998 Interball & Polar over cusp and Geotail at the tail flank (GSM Z =10 Re) traced boundary layers (BL). The time-depended MHD modeling serves to unite the 6-point data with the global reconnection pattern, driven by strong solar wind (SW) disturbances. At the smaller scales the BL perturbations display similar kinked magnetic spectra and 3-wave phase coupling, the correlation length is less than the distance between Interball-Polar (3 RE). Strong SW disturbances, decelerated over cusp, penetrate deep into tail. For quiet SW local perturbations dominate at frequencies over few mHz. Similar spectral features are seen on June 19, 1998 both in stagnant MSH (Polar) and upstream 'plasma ball' (PB, Interball-1) - demagnetized heated plasma (ion beta ~ 2-15) of MSH origin inside MP. Comparison with SW magnetic spectra and plasma moments from Geotail using Gas Dynamic Convection Field model indicates that the patchy reconnection pulses at Polar location are modulated by the upstream BL fluctuations. The fluctuations result from direct interaction of PB with MSH flow by means of reflected from

  14. Cosmic Rays and Clouds, 2. Atmospheric Electric Field Effect In Different Neutron Multiplicities According To Emilio Segre' Observatory One Minute Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorman, L. I.; Dorman, I. V.; Iucci, N.; Ne'Eman, Yu.; Pustil'Nik, L. A.; Sternlieb, A.; Villoresi, G.; Zukerman, I. G.

    On the basis of cosmic ray and atmospheric electric field one minute data obtained by NM and EFS of Emilio Segre' Observatory (hight 2025 m above s.l., cut-off rigidity for vertical direction 10.8 GV) we determine the atmospheric electric field effect in CR for total neutron intensity and for multiplicities m=1, m=2, m=3, m=4, m=5, m=6, and m=7. For comparison and excluding primary CR variations we use also one minute data on neutron multiplicities obtained by NM of University "Roma Tre" (about sea level, cut-off rigidity 6.7 GV). In February 2000 were observed 14 periods of thun- derstorms with different durations (up to about 1000 min), the maximum strength of electric field was 110 kV/m. Thunderstorms were observed also in March 2000 (6 pe- riods with maximal field 112 kV/m), in April 2000 (9; 70 kV/m), in May 2000 (4; 10 kV/m), in October 2000 (10; 70 kV/m), in November 2000 (5; 50 kV/m), in De- cember 2000 (7; 88 kV/m), in January 2001 (12; 62 kV/m), in February 2001 (10; 88 kV/m). According to the theoretical calculations of Dorman and Dorman (1995) the electric field effect in the NM counting rate must be caused mainly by captchuring of slow negative muons by lead nucleus with escaping few neutrons. As it was shown in Dorman et al. (1999), the biggest electric field effect is expected in the multiplicity m=1, much smaller in m=2 and negligible effect is expected in higher multiplicities. We will control this conclusion on the basis of our experimental data. Obtained results give a possibility to estimate total acceleration and deceleration of CR particles by the atmospheric electric field. REFERENCES: Dorman L.I. and Dorman I.V., 1995. "Cosmic-ray atmospheric electric field effects". Canadian J. of Physics, Vol. 73, pp. 440-443. L.I. Dorman, I.V. Dorman, N. Iucci, M. Parisi, G. Villoresi, and I.G. Zuk- erman, 1999. "Emilio Segre' Observatory and Expected Time-Variations of Neutron Monitor Total and Multiplicities Counting Rates Caused by Cosmic Ray Particle

  15. The ESI scale, an ethical approach to the evaluation of seismic hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porfido, Sabina; Nappi, Rosa; De Lucia, Maddalena; Gaudiosi, Germana; Alessio, Giuliana; Guerrieri, Luca

    2015-04-01

    studies have been reviewed: the destructive 1976 February 4 Guatemala, earthquake (M 7.5) and the 1743 February 20 Nardò, historical earthquake (Salento, Southern Italy). The re-analysis of both earthquakes contributes to define more realistic seismic scenarios in terms of intensities assessment and consequent regional seismic hazards. References Michetti A.M., Esposito E., Guerrieri L., Porfido S., Serva L., Tatevossian R., Vittori E., Audemard F., Azuma T., Clague J., Comerci V., Gurpinar A., Mccalpin J., Mohammadioun B., Mörner N.A, Ota Y. And E. Roghozin - 2007. Intensity Scale ESI 2007, Mem. Descrittive della Carta Geologica d'Italia, Roma, 74, 53 pp

  16. Model VNIR optical constants of silicates mixtures analogues to igneous rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carli, C.; Ciarniello, M.; Serventi, G.; Capaccioni, F.; Sgavetti, M.

    2011-12-01

    Remote-sensing studies have revealed that most of the inner planets surfaces are composed of silicate bearing rocks with variable relative mineral abundances and compositions that could be indicative of genetically related rocks. Quantifying and modeling those phases in mineral mixtures is an important task to characterize the surface compositions and to understand the evolution of the crust. One approach to reach this aim is to invert the bidirectional reflectance equation(Hapke,1993), to derive optical constants of powdered materials. This approach has been applied with positive results to obtain the optical constants of mafic silicates, e.g., olivine and pyroxene, and plagioclase taking into account the effects of composition and grain-size variations. Mixtures of those mineral phases were modeled successfully starting from the optical constants of each end-member, but only few works modeled spectra of mixtures where some of the end-members could not be individually characterized. Here we present preliminary results on the determination of the optical constants of complex silicates mixtures obtained applying the Hapke's radiative transfer model to visible-near infrared reflectance spectra. The bidirectional reflectance spectra are acquired at the SLAB (Spectroscopy Laboratory, Iasf-INAF, Roma) in the wavelength range 0.35- 2.50 μm. We prepared mixtures starting from three different plagioclases with variable amount of FeO and two different mafic end-members, mixtures of pyroxenes and pyroxenes + olivine, respectively. For each plagioclase composition, mixtures varying from 20 to 90 wt.% plagioclase and multimineral mafic grains were prepared, in two grain size classes (63-125 μm and 125-250 μm), for a total of 64 samples. Moreover, to optimize the calculation of the optical constant, we have acquired spectra of the end-members in other two different grain size classes (50-75 μm and 100-125 μm). We have retrieved the single scattering albedo (w) for each

  17. An adaptive, formally second order accurate version of the immersed boundary method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, Boyce E.; Hornung, Richard D.; McQueen, David M.; Peskin, Charles S.

    2007-04-01

    Like many problems in biofluid mechanics, cardiac mechanics can be modeled as the dynamic interaction of a viscous incompressible fluid (the blood) and a (visco-)elastic structure (the muscular walls and the valves of the heart). The immersed boundary method is a mathematical formulation and numerical approach to such problems that was originally introduced to study blood flow through heart valves, and extensions of this work have yielded a three-dimensional model of the heart and great vessels. In the present work, we introduce a new adaptive version of the immersed boundary method. This adaptive scheme employs the same hierarchical structured grid approach (but a different numerical scheme) as the two-dimensional adaptive immersed boundary method of Roma et al. [A multilevel self adaptive version of the immersed boundary method, Ph.D. Thesis, Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, 1996; An adaptive version of the immersed boundary method, J. Comput. Phys. 153 (2) (1999) 509-534] and is based on a formally second order accurate (i.e., second order accurate for problems with sufficiently smooth solutions) version of the immersed boundary method that we have recently described [B.E. Griffith, C.S. Peskin, On the order of accuracy of the immersed boundary method: higher order convergence rates for sufficiently smooth problems, J. Comput. Phys. 208 (1) (2005) 75-105]. Actual second order convergence rates are obtained for both the uniform and adaptive methods by considering the interaction of a viscous incompressible flow and an anisotropic incompressible viscoelastic shell. We also present initial results from the application of this methodology to the three-dimensional simulation of blood flow in the heart and great vessels. The results obtained by the adaptive method show good qualitative agreement with simulation results obtained by earlier non-adaptive versions of the method, but the flow in the vicinity of the model heart valves

  18. Swift: 10 Years of Discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The conference Swift: 10 years of discovery was held in Roma at La Sapienza University on Dec. 2-5 2014 to celebrate 10 years of Swift successes. Thanks to a large attendance and a lively program, it provided the opportunity to review recent advances of our knowledge of the high-energy transient Universe both from the observational and theoretical sides. When Swift was launched on November 20, 2004, its prime objective was to chase Gamma-Ray Bursts and deepen our knowledge of these cosmic explosions. And so it did, unveiling the secrets of long and short GRBs. However, its multi-wavelength instrumentation and fast scheduling capabilities made it the most versatile mission ever flown. Besides GRBs, Swift has observed, and contributed to our understanding of, an impressive variety of targets including AGNs, supernovae, pulsars, microquasars, novae, variable stars, comets, and much more. Swift is continuously discovering rare and surprising events distributed over a wide range of redshifts, out to the most distant transient objects in the Universe. Such a trove of discoveries has been addressed during the conference with sessions dedicated to each class of events. Indeed, the conference in Rome was a spectacular celebration of the Swift 10th anniversary. It included sessions on all types of transient and steady sources. Top scientists from around the world gave invited and contributed talks. There was a large poster session, sumptuous lunches, news interviews and a glorious banquet with officials attending from INAF and ASI. All the presentations, as well as several conference pictures, can be found in the conference website (http://www.brera.inaf.it/Swift10/Welcome.html). These proceedings have been collected owing to the efforts of Paolo D’Avanzo who has followed each paper from submission to final acceptance. Our warmest thanks to Paolo for all his work. The Conference has been made possible by the support from La Sapienza University as well as from the ARAP

  19. PRE-SUPERNOVA EVOLUTION OF ROTATING SOLAR METALLICITY STARS IN THE MASS RANGE 13-120 M {sub Sun} AND THEIR EXPLOSIVE YIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Chieffi, Alessandro; Limongi, Marco E-mail: marco.limongi@oa-roma.inaf.it

    2013-02-10

    We present the first set of a new generation of models of massive stars with a solar composition extending between 13 and 120 M {sub Sun }, computed with and without the effects of rotation. We included two instabilities induced by rotation: the meridional circulation and the shear instability. We implemented two alternative schemes to treat the transport of the angular momentum: the advection-diffusion formalism and the simpler purely diffusive one. The full evolution from the pre-main sequence up to the pre-supernova stage is followed in detail with a very extended nuclear network. The explosive yields are provided for a variety of possible mass cuts and are available at the Web site http://www.iasf-roma.inaf.it/orfeo/public{sub h}tml. We find that both the He and the CO core masses are larger than those of their non-rotating counterparts. Also the C abundance left by the He burning is lower than in the non-rotating case, especially for stars with an initial mass of 13-25 M {sub Sun }, and this affects the final mass-radius relation, basically the final binding energy, at the pre-supernova stage. The elemental yields produced by a generation of stars rotating initially at 300 km s{sup -1} do not change substantially with respect to those produced by a generation of non-rotating massive stars, the main differences being a slight overproduction of the weak s-component and a larger production of F. Since rotation also affects the mass-loss rate, either directly or indirectly, we find substantial differences in the lifetimes as O-type and Wolf-Rayet subtypes between the rotating and non-rotating models. The maximum mass exploding as Type IIP supernova ranges between 15 and 20 M {sub Sun} in both sets of models (this value depends basically on the larger mass-loss rates in the red supergiant phase due to the inclusion of the dust-driven wind). This limiting value is in remarkably good agreement with current estimates.

  20. Demagnetization Analysis in Excel (DAIE) - An open source workbook in Excel for viewing and analyzing demagnetization data from paleomagnetic discrete samples and u-channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagnotti, Leonardo

    2013-04-01

    demagnetization plots; - Complete control of the whole workflow and possibility of implementation of the workbook by any user; - Modular structure in distinct worksheets for each type of analyses and plots, in order to make implementation and personalization easier; - Opportunity to use the workbook for educational purposes, since all the computations and analyses are easily traceable and accessible; - Automatic and fast analysis of a large batch of demagnetization data, such as those measured on u-channel samples. The DAIE workbook and the "User manual" are available for download on a dedicated web site (http://roma2.rm.ingv.it/en/facilities/software/49/daie).

  1. They see us as less than human: Metadehumanization predicts intergroup conflict via reciprocal dehumanization.

    PubMed

    Kteily, Nour; Hodson, Gordon; Bruneau, Emile

    2016-03-01

    Although the act of dehumanizing an outgroup is a pervasive and potent intergroup process that drives discrimination and conflict, no formal research has examined the consequences of being dehumanized by an outgroup-that is, "metadehumanization." Across 10 studies (N = 3,440) involving several real-world conflicts spanning 3 continents, we provide the first empirical evidence that metadehumanization (a) plays a central role in outgroup aggression that is (b) mediated by outgroup dehumanization, and (c) distinct from metaprejudice. Studies 1a and 1b demonstrate experimentally that Americans who learn that Arabs (Study 1a) or Muslims (Study 1b) blatantly dehumanize Americans are more likely to dehumanize that outgroup in return; by contrast, experimentally increasing outgroup dehumanization did not increase metadehumanization (Study 1c). Using correlational data, Study 2 documents indirect effects of metadehumanization on Americans' support for aggressive policies toward Arabs (e.g., torture) via Arab dehumanization. In the context of Hungarians and ethnic minority Roma, Study 3 shows that the pathway for Hungarians from metadehumanization to aggression through outgroup dehumanization holds controlling for outgroup prejudice. Study 4 examines Israelis' metaperceptions with respect to Palestinians, showing that: (a) feeling dehumanized (i.e., metadehumanization) is distinct from feeling disliked (i.e., metaprejudice), and (b) metadehumanization uniquely influences aggression through outgroup dehumanization, controlling for metaprejudice. Studies 5a and 5b explore Americans' metaperceptions regarding ISIS and Iran. We document a dehumanization-specific pathway from metadehumanization to aggressive attitudes and behavior that is distinct from the path from metaprejudice through prejudice to aggression. In Study 6, American participants learning that Muslims humanize Americans (i.e., metahumanization) humanize Muslims in turn. Finally, Study 7 experimentally contrasts

  2. Hydrological and thermal changes along the last 2.7 kyr in the central-western Mediterranean based on a multi-archive approach: speleothem and marine sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cisneros, Mercè; Cacho, Isabel; Fornós, Joan J.; Moreno, Ana; Stoll, Heather; Edwards, Larry; Cheng, Hai; Frigola, Jaime

    2016-04-01

    Climatic conditions over the last 2.7 kyr are reconstructed in base to six speleothems from a cave in Mallorca and a group of sediment cores from the Menorca Rise. Speleothem records provide a solid chronology in base to high resolution U/Th dating. Both δ 13C and particularly δ 18O records show pronounced oscillations related to pre-roman times as the Dark Middle Ages, the Medieval Climate Anomaly and the Little Ice Age. The geochemical proxies from the six studied speleothems have been stacked in a unique record, which provides decadal-multidecadal resolution. In parallel, Sea Surface Temperature (SST) conditions have been reconstructed in base to Globigerina bulloides-Mg/Ca ratios from a group of multicore records, and they have been combined with δ18O data to reconstruct changes in the evaporation-precipitation ratio of the basin. These records have also been stacked in a single anomaly curve after the accurate construction of robust multi-proxy chronologies (Cisneros et al., under evaluation). The comparison of the marine and speleothem records reveal the occurrence of synchronous changes in both SST and humidity conditions over land along the last 2.7 kyr, although the relationship of these two climatic variables changed along the different climatic events. These results support that the driest conditions occurred during part of the Roma Classic Period and also during the Medieval Climate Anomaly when climate conditions were mostly warm, but also during the second part of the Little Ice Age when cold conditions dominated. This combined land-sea proxy approach offers a powerful tool to reconstruct past climate variability with highly precise chronologies. REFERENCES: M. Cisneros, I. Cacho, J. Frigola, M. Canals, P. Masqué, B. Martrat, F. Lirer, and G. Margaritelli. Sea surface temperature variability in the central-western Mediterranean Sea during the last 2700 years: a multi-proxy and multi-record approach. Submitted on 28 Sep 2015 for open discussion on

  3. GeoWall use in an Introductory Geology laboratory: Impacts in Student Understanding of Field Mapping Concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, L. E.; Kelly, M.; Springer, A. E.

    2003-12-01

    In the Fall semester of 2003, Northern Arizona University will introduce the GeoWall to its introductory geology courses. This presents an opportunity to assess the impact of this new technology on students' understanding of basic topographic concepts and the spatial relationships between geology, topography, and hydrology on a field trip. Introductory Geology fulfills the Lab Science component of the Liberal Studies Program at Northern Arizona University. The class is open to all Northern Arizona University students, and is most commonly taken by non-science majors. In this class students learn to: locate their position using maps, identify common minerals and rocks, recognize the relationship between geology and geomorphology, visualize how rocks exposed at the surface continue into the subsurface, and to draw conclusions about possible geologic hazards in different settings. In this study we will report how a GeoWall 3D visualization technology was used in a field study of a graben south of Flagstaff. The goal of the field exercise is to improve students' ability to synthesize data collected at field stops into a conceptual model of the graben, linking geology, geomorphology and hydrology. We plan to present a quantitative assessment of the GeoWall learning objectives from data collected from a paired test and control group of students. Teaching assistants (TAs) with two or more lab classes have been identified; these TAs will participate in both GeoWall and non-GeoWall lab exercises. The GeoWall use will occur outside of normal lab hours to avoid disrupting the lab schedule during the eighth week of lab. This field preparation exercise includes a 3D visualization of the Lake Mary graben rendered with the ROMA software. The following week, all students attend the graben field trip; immediately following the trip, students will interviewed about their gain in understanding of the geologic features illustrated during the field trip. The results of the post

  4. Linguistic, geographic and genetic isolation: a collaborative study of Italian populations.

    PubMed

    Capocasa, Marco; Anagnostou, Paolo; Bachis, Valeria; Battaggia, Cinzia; Bertoncini, Stefania; Biondi, Gianfranco; Boattini, Alessio; Boschi, Ilaria; Brisighelli, Francesca; Caló, Carla Maria; Carta, Marilisa; Coia, Valentina; Corrias, Laura; Crivellaro, Federica; De Fanti, Sara; Dominici, Valentina; Ferri, Gianmarco; Francalacci, Paolo; Franceschi, Zelda Alice; Luiselli, Donata; Morelli, Laura; Paoli, Giorgio; Rickards, Olga; Robledo, Renato; Sanna, Daria; Sanna, Emanuele; Sarno, Stefania; Sineo, Luca; Taglioli, Luca; Tagarelli, Giuseppe; Tofanelli, Sergio; Vona, Giuseppe; Pettener, Davide; Destro Bisol, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    The animal and plant biodiversity of the Italian territory is known to be one of the richest in the Mediterranean basin and Europe as a whole, but does the genetic diversity of extant human populations show a comparable pattern? According to a number of studies, the genetic structure of Italian populations retains the signatures of complex peopling processes which took place from the Paleolithic to modern era. Although the observed patterns highlight a remarkable degree of genetic heterogeneity, they do not, however, take into account an important source of variation. In fact, Italy is home to numerous ethnolinguistic minorities which have yet to be studied systematically. Due to their difference in geographical origin and demographic history, such groups not only signal the cultural and social diversity of our country, but they are also potential contributors to its bio-anthropological heterogeneity. To fill this gap, research groups from four Italian Universities (Bologna, Cagliari, Pisa and Roma Sapienza) started a collaborative study in 2007, which was funded by the Italian Ministry of Education, University and Research and received partial support by the Istituto Italiano di Antropologia. In this paper, we present an account of the results obtained in the course of this initiative. Four case-studies relative to linguistic minorities from the Eastern Alps, Sardinia, Apennines and Southern Italy are first described and discussed, focusing on their micro-evolutionary and anthropological implications. Thereafter, we present the results of a systematic analysis of the relations between linguistic, geographic and genetic isolation. Integrating the data obtained in the course of the long-term study with literature and unpublished results on Italian populations, we show that a combination of linguistic and geographic factors is probably responsible for the presence of the most robust signatures of genetic isolation. Finally, we evaluate the magnitude of the diversity

  5. High-energy sources at low radio frequency: the Murchison Widefield Array view of Fermi blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giroletti, M.; Massaro, F.; D'Abrusco, R.; Lico, R.; Burlon, D.; Hurley-Walker, N.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Morgan, J.; Pavlidou, V.; Bell, M.; Bernardi, G.; Bhat, R.; Bowman, J. D.; Briggs, F.; Cappallo, R. J.; Corey, B. E.; Deshpande, A. A.; Ewall-Rice, A.; Emrich, D.; Gaensler, B. M.; Goeke, R.; Greenhill, L. J.; Hazelton, B. J.; Hindson, L.; Kaplan, D. L.; Kasper, J. C.; Kratzenberg, E.; Feng, L.; Jacobs, D.; Kudryavtseva, N.; Lenc, E.; Lonsdale, C. J.; Lynch, M. J.; McKinley, B.; McWhirter, S. R.; Mitchell, D. A.; Morales, M. F.; Morgan, E.; Oberoi, D.; Offringa, A. R.; Ord, S. M.; Pindor, B.; Prabu, T.; Procopio, P.; Riding, J.; Rogers, A. E. E.; Roshi, A.; Udaya Shankar, N.; Srivani, K. S.; Subrahmanyan, R.; Tingay, S. J.; Waterson, M.; Wayth, R. B.; Webster, R. L.; Whitney, A. R.; Williams, A.; Williams, C. L.

    2016-04-01

    Context. Low-frequency radio arrays are opening a new window for the study of the sky, both to study new phenomena and to better characterize known source classes. Being flat-spectrum sources, blazars are so far poorly studied at low radio frequencies. Aims: We characterize the spectral properties of the blazar population at low radio frequency, compare the radio and high-energy properties of the gamma-ray blazar population, and search for radio counterparts of unidentified gamma-ray sources. Methods: We cross-correlated the 6100 deg2 Murchison Widefield Array Commissioning Survey catalogue with the Roma blazar catalogue, the third catalogue of active galactic nuclei detected by Fermi-LAT, and the unidentified members of the entire third catalogue of gamma-ray sources detected by Fermi-LAT. When available, we also added high-frequency radio data from the Australia Telescope 20 GHz catalogue. Results: We find low-frequency counterparts for 186 out of 517 (36%) blazars, 79 out of 174 (45%) gamma-ray blazars, and 8 out of 73 (11%) gamma-ray blazar candidates. The mean low-frequency (120-180 MHz) blazar spectral index is ⟨αlow⟩ = 0.57 ± 0.02: blazar spectra are flatter than the rest of the population of low-frequency sources, but are steeper than at ~GHz frequencies. Low-frequency radio flux density and gamma-ray energy flux display a mildly significant and broadly scattered correlation. Ten unidentified gamma-ray sources have a (probably fortuitous) positional match with low radio frequency sources. Conclusions: Low-frequency radio astronomy provides important information about sources with a flat radio spectrum and high energy. However, the relatively low sensitivity of the present surveys still misses a significant fraction of these objects. Upcoming deeper surveys, such as the GaLactic and Extragalactic All-Sky MWA (GLEAM) survey, will provide further insight into this population. Tables 5-7 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http

  6. Tightly-Coupled Plant-Soil Nitrogen Cycling: Comparison of Organic Farms across an Agricultural Landscape.

    PubMed

    Bowles, Timothy M; Hollander, Allan D; Steenwerth, Kerri; Jackson, Louise E

    2015-01-01

    How farming systems supply sufficient nitrogen (N) for high yields but with reduced N losses is a central challenge for reducing the tradeoffs often associated with N cycling in agriculture. Variability in soil organic matter and management of organic farms across an agricultural landscape may yield insights for improving N cycling and for evaluating novel indicators of N availability. We assessed yields, plant-soil N cycling, and root expression of N metabolism genes across a representative set of organic fields growing Roma-type tomatoes (Solanum lycopersicum L.) in an intensively-managed agricultural landscape in California, USA. The fields spanned a three-fold range of soil carbon (C) and N but had similar soil types, texture, and pH. Organic tomato yields ranged from 22.9 to 120.1 Mg ha-1 with a mean similar to the county average (86.1 Mg ha-1), which included mostly conventionally-grown tomatoes. Substantial variability in soil inorganic N concentrations, tomato N, and root gene expression indicated a range of possible tradeoffs between yields and potential for N losses across the fields. Fields showing evidence of tightly-coupled plant-soil N cycling, a desirable scenario in which high crop yields are supported by adequate N availability but low potential for N loss, had the highest total and labile soil C and N and received organic matter inputs with a range of N availability. In these fields, elevated expression of a key gene involved in root N assimilation, cytosolic glutamine synthetase GS1, confirmed that plant N assimilation was high even when inorganic N pools were low. Thus tightly-coupled N cycling occurred on several working organic farms. Novel combinations of N cycling indicators (i.e. inorganic N along with soil microbial activity and root gene expression for N assimilation) would support adaptive management for improved N cycling on organic as well as conventional farms, especially when plant-soil N cycling is rapid. PMID:26121264

  7. D Survey and Augmented Reality for Cultural Heritage. The Case Study of Aurelian Wall at Castra Praetoria in Rome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canciani, M.; Conigliaro, E.; Del Grasso, M.; Papalini, P.; Saccone, M.

    2016-06-01

    The development of close-range photogrammetry has produced a lot of new possibility to study cultural heritage. 3D data acquired with conventional and low cost cameras can be used to document, investigate the full appearance, materials and conservation status, to help the restoration process and identify intervention priorities. At the same time, with 3D survey a lot of three-dimensional data are collected and analyzed by researchers, but there are a very few possibility of 3D output. The augmented reality is one of this possible output with a very low cost technology but a very interesting result. Using simple mobile technology (for iPad and Android Tablets) and shareware software (in the case presented "Augment") it is possible to share and visualize a large number of 3D models with your own device. The case study presented is a part of an architecture graduate thesis, made in Rome at Department of Architecture of Roma Tre University. We have developed a photogrammetric survey to study the Aurelian Wall at Castra Praetoria in Rome. The surveys of 8000 square meters of surface have allowed to identify stratigraphy and construction phases of a complex portion of Aurelian Wall, specially about the Northern door of Castra. During this study, the data coming out of 3D survey (photogrammetric and topographic), are stored and used to create a reverse 3D model, or virtual reconstruction, of the Northern door of Castra. This virtual reconstruction shows the door in the Tiberian period, nowadays it's totally hidden by a curtain wall but, little and significative architectural details allow to know its original feature. The 3D model of the ancient walls has been mapped with the exact type of bricks and mortar, oriented and scaled according to the existing one to use augmented reality. Finally, two kind of application have been developed, one on site, were you can see superimposed the virtual reconstruction on the existing walls using the image recognition. On the other hand

  8. A new Gis-based map of villa Adriana, a multimedia guide for ancient paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canciani, M.; Chiappetta, F.; Michelini, M.; Pallottino, E.; Saccone, M.; Scortecci, A.,

    2014-06-01

    For the last fifteen years the Faculty of Architecture at the University of Roma Tre, has been working on the famous Villa Adriana in Tivoli, studying its ruins and its ancient paths, in order to better understand how the villa was originally laid out. In this paper, we will talk about one of these studies, which reconnect previous works and creates a new GIS based map of Villa Adriana. The goal of this study is to create a cultural heritage evaluation. In order to achieve this aim, we have created a multimedia guide with text, drawings, 3D reconstructions and augmented reality. This work can be summarized in five steps; first of all, a new georeferenced plan was created. This drawing is based on an orthophoto and brings together all existing surveys (from historical drawings to recent surveys). In this new work we show the current status of the ruins and the original layout of Villa Adriana according to the most recent study. The second step was a 3D survey, with extensive use of photogrammetry to verify and upgrade drawings. The next and third step involved creating the Database, within which to store, edit, analyze, share, and display linked data relating to both ancient and contemporary buildings and pathways. This GIS is based on the new plan and gathers together different orders of information: original function, paving, the old paths of each original user (Hadrian, his wife Sabina, the retinue, guests and servants) as well as the ancient system of underground tunnels. It collects all the existing data relating to Villa Adriana relevant to solving the "what/where" question. The fourth step was to create a complete 3D model of Villa Adriana. The 3D reconstruction started from the existing surveys, the documentation of recent excavation and the input of the hypothetical reconstruction of lost or buried buildings. Finally we created a multimedia guide, based on a mobile app, which took information from the database to show, in real time, during the tour, where

  9. Pre-supernova Evolution of Rotating Solar Metallicity Stars in the Mass Range 13-120 M ⊙ and their Explosive Yields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chieffi, Alessandro; Limongi, Marco

    2013-02-01

    We present the first set of a new generation of models of massive stars with a solar composition extending between 13 and 120 M ⊙, computed with and without the effects of rotation. We included two instabilities induced by rotation: the meridional circulation and the shear instability. We implemented two alternative schemes to treat the transport of the angular momentum: the advection-diffusion formalism and the simpler purely diffusive one. The full evolution from the pre-main sequence up to the pre-supernova stage is followed in detail with a very extended nuclear network. The explosive yields are provided for a variety of possible mass cuts and are available at the Web site http://www.iasf-roma.inaf.it/orfeo/public_html. We find that both the He and the CO core masses are larger than those of their non-rotating counterparts. Also the C abundance left by the He burning is lower than in the non-rotating case, especially for stars with an initial mass of 13-25 M ⊙, and this affects the final mass-radius relation, basically the final binding energy, at the pre-supernova stage. The elemental yields produced by a generation of stars rotating initially at 300 km s-1 do not change substantially with respect to those produced by a generation of non-rotating massive stars, the main differences being a slight overproduction of the weak s-component and a larger production of F. Since rotation also affects the mass-loss rate, either directly or indirectly, we find substantial differences in the lifetimes as O-type and Wolf-Rayet subtypes between the rotating and non-rotating models. The maximum mass exploding as Type IIP supernova ranges between 15 and 20 M ⊙ in both sets of models (this value depends basically on the larger mass-loss rates in the red supergiant phase due to the inclusion of the dust-driven wind). This limiting value is in remarkably good agreement with current estimates.

  10. Solar system plasma Turbulence: Observations, inteRmittency and Multifractals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echim, Marius M.

    2016-04-01

    function of the targeted system (solar wind/magnetospheres/geomagnetic indices), solar cycle phase (minimum versus maximum), type of result (PSDs, PDFs, Multifractals). The results catalogues, available online from http://www.storm-fp7.eu, include 4094 PSD spectra, 9566 PDFs and 15633 multifractal spectra (from partition function and respectively Rank Ordered (ROMA) formalisms). These results are obtained at solar maximum (2001-2002, both in the solar wind and the terrestrial magnetosheath) and solar minimum (1997-1998 in the solar wind, 2007-2008 in the solar wind, Venus and Earth magnetosheath and selected regions of the magnetosphere). Research supported by the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under grant agreement no 313038/STORM.

  11. Automatic re-picking and re-weighting of first arrival times from the Italian Seismic Network waveforms database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Stefano, R.; Amato, A.; Aldersons, F.; Kissling, E.

    2002-12-01

    The high resolution P-wave tomography of the Italian Peninsula and surrounding regions from crustal to upper mantle depths is the aim of a joint project between INGV (Roma) and ETH (Zurich). The project is subdivided into two steps, first of which is to establish a 3D P-wave velocity model for the crust, using both passive and active seismic sources. Getting a reliable high resolution model is of fundamental importance since the 3D crustal model will be used in the second step to correct teleseismic travel times following a method successfully applied in the last years to the Alps (Waldhauser et al. 2002). In the present work we focus on the passive sources dataset (local and regional events) to complement the CSS crustal information. Our keywords being "high-resolution" and "detailed model" we followed the idea, based on the experience of previous works in this area, that a large number of high quality pickings and a high level of consistency in the dataset represent the first goals. The Italian region (Western Mediterranean) is characterized by a high rate of seismicity including important seismic sequences. Since 1988, digital recordings for about 40,000 local and regional earthquakes are available, which INGV bulletin readings have been used in previous local earthquake tomography works. To increase the sampling power and to better locate some border events we will integrate Italian National Seismic Network data with recordings from other local and regional networks. Due to the large amount of data thus collected, a manual re-picking of all first arrivals would ask for a too long time while it would not prevent from human readings errors and inconsistencies. This would partially contrast the positive effect of a high-quality pickings. To meet the quality and consistency requests, we applied an advanced automatic re-picking procedure, the MannekenPick (MP), recently developed by F. Aldersons as a fast, reliable and "consistent" picker. We tested the whole

  12. Ethnobotanical remarks on Central and Southern Italy

    PubMed Central

    Guarrera, Paolo Maria; Lucia, Leporatti Maria

    2007-01-01

    Background The present paper is a brief survey on the ethnobotanical works published by the Authors since 1981, concerning the research carried out in some southern and central Italian regions. Before Roman domination these territories were first inhabited by local people, while the southern areas were colonized by the Greeks. These different cultural contributions left certain traces, both in the toponyms and in the vernacular names of the plants and, more generally, in the culture as a whole. Methods Field data were collected through open interviews, mainly of farmers, shepherds and elderly people, born or living in these areas for a long time. Voucher specimens of collected plants are preserved in the respective herbaria of the Authors and in the herbarium of "Roma Tre" University. Important contributions have been made by several students native to the areas under consideration. A comparative analysis with local specific ethnobotanical literature was carried out. Results The paper reports several examples concerning human and veterinary popular medicine and in addition some anti-parasitic, nutraceutic, dye and miscellaneous uses are also described. Moreover vernacular names and toponyms are cited. Eight regions of central and southern Italy (particularly Latium, Abruzzo, Marche and Basilicata) were investigated and the data obtained are presented in 32 papers. Most of the species of ethnobotanical interest have been listed in Latium (368 species), Marche (274) and Abruzzo (203). The paper also highlights particularly interesting aspects or uses not previously described in the specific ethnobotanical literature. Conclusion Phyto-therapy in central and southern Italy is nowadays practised by a few elderly people who resort to medicinal plants only for mild complaints (on the contrary food uses are still commonly practised). Nowadays therapeutic uses, unlike in the past, are less closely or not at all linked to ritual aspects. Several plants deserve to be taken

  13. Generation of RNA in abiotic conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Mauro, Ernesto

    Generation of RNA in abiotic conditions. Ernesto Di Mauro Dipartimento di Genetica Bi-ologia Molecolare, Universit` "Sapienza" Roma, Italy. a At least four conditions must be satisfied for the spontaneous generation of (pre)-genetic poly-mers: 1) availability of precursors that are activated enough to spontaneously polymerize. Preliminary studies showed that (a) nucleic bases and acyclonucleosides can be synthesized from formamide H2NCOH by simply heating with prebiotically available mineral catalysts [last reviewed in (1)], and that b) nucleic bases can be phosphorylated in every possible posi-tion [2'; 3'; 5'; cyclic 2',3'; cyclic 3',5' (2)]. The higher stability of the cyclic forms allows their accumulation. 2) A polymerization mechanism. A reaction showing the formation of RNA polymers starting from prebiotically plausible precursors (3',5' cyclic GMP and 3', 5'cyclic AMP) was recently reported (3). Polymerization in these conditions is thermodynamically up-hill and an equilibrium is attained that limits the maximum length of the polymer produced to about 40 nucleotides for polyG and 100 nucleotides for polyA. 3) Ligation of the synthesized oligomers. If this type of reaction could occur according to a terminal-joining mechanism and could generate canonical 3',5' phosphodiester bonds, exponential growth would be obtained of the generated oligomers. This type of reaction has been reported (4) , limited to homogeneous polyA sequences and leading to the production of polyA dimers and tetramers. What is still missing are: 4) mechanisms that provide the proof of principle for the generation of sequence complexity. We will show evidence for two mechanisms providing this proof of principle for simple complementary sequences. Namely: abiotic sequence complementary-driven terminal ligation and sequence-complementary terminal growth. In conclusion: all the steps leading to the generation of RNA in abiotic conditions are satisfied. (1) R Saladino, C Crestini, F

  14. Volcanology, history and myths of the Lake Albano maar (Colli Albani volcano, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Benedetti, A. A.; Funiciello, R.; Giordano, G.; Diano, G.; Caprilli, E.; Paterne, M.

    2008-10-01

    The polygenetic Albano maar is the most recent centre of the Colli Albani volcano, located just few kilometres to the south-east of Roma. Presently the maar hosts a 167.5 m deep crater lake, the deepest in Europe. The maar is to be considered quiescent, as phreatic activity is documented throughout the Holocene. This paper illustrates the close relationships between the activity of the maar and the history of settlement in the Roman region as recorded in the geology, archaeology, history and legends of the area. Severe fluctuations of the groundwater table and catastrophic overflows of the Lake Albano from the maar rim had occurred prior to and after the early prehistoric settlements dated in the maar area at the Eneolithic times (ca. III millennium B.C.). Repeated lahars occurred along the northwestern slope of the maar filling in the paleodrainage network and forming a vast plain. Paleohydraulic analyses on fluvial and lahar deposits originated from the Holocene phreatic activity of the Albano maar indicate sediment-water flows in excess of hundreds of cubic metres per second. Absolute age determinations of the paleosoil underlying one of the most recent deposits of the lahar succession at 5800 ± 100 yr B.P. ( 14C CAL) are in perfect agreement with the age of the overlying Eneolithic age settlements. The last catastrophic overflow is described in the Roman literature as a consequence of the anger of Poseidon against the Romans in 398 B.C. for their war against the Etruscans. In 394 B.C. the Romans decided to prevent the repetition of such events by the excavation through the maar crater wall of a 1.5 km long drain tunnel, which is still operational, keeping the lake 70 m below the lowest point of the maar rim. This tunnel drain may be regarded as the first prevention device for volcanic hazard in history and shows an unprecedented development of the engineering technology under the pressure of hazard perception. The surprising and still largely unknown results

  15. Curved orogen and syntaxes formation during subduction and collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajolet, F.; Replumaz, A.; Faccenna, C.; Lainé, R.

    2012-04-01

    The sustained convergence between India and Asia with successive stages of oceanic subduction, continental subduction and continental collision has lead to the formation of the Tibetan plateau while the Himalayan orogenic front acquired an arcuate shape convex toward the South. The Indian plate is bounded by north-south strike-slip faults, which accommodate a large indentation of Asia, between two oceanic subductions, beneath Makran to the west, beneath Indonesia to the east. Two syntaxes formed at both east and west termination of the Himalayan orogenic front at the transition between Indian and Asian plates. In order to better understand this particular configuration, we performed analog experiments at the Laboratory of Experimental Tectonics of Roma TRE to simulate, at the scale of the mantle - lithosphere system, the mechanics of the indentation process. The configuration is set to drive the India indenter towards the Asian continent with a motor-controlled-piston, to simulate far field stresses necessary for indentation. In particular, we test (1) which geometry and rheological parameters favor arcuate orogen and syntaxes formation, (2) what are the consequences on the topography of both the orogenic front and the plateau, and (3) how they relate with the subduction/collision dynamics. The setup is composed of a subducting and an overriding plate made of visco-elastic silicone putty, floating on low-viscosity syrup simulating the asthenosphere. The subducting plate simulates an oceanic lithosphere followed by a continental indenter (analog for the Indian craton) flanked or not by oceans (analog for Makran and Indonesian domains), while the upper continental plate simulates the Tibetan plateau. Results show that the curvature of the orogen and syntaxes' formation are primarily controlled by the strength and gravitational potential energy of the upper plate, and the shape of the subducting plate. A relatively strong upper plate flanked by oceans leads to a

  16. C/O: Effects on Habitability of Stellar Exoplanet Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Torrence V.; Sevin Peckmezci, Gül; Mousis, Olivier; Lunine, Jonathan I.; Madhusudhan, Nikku

    2015-11-01

    We assess how differences in the composition of exoplanet host stars might affect the availability of water in their systems, particularly the role of carbon and oxygen abundances. Water, one of the key chemical ingredients for habitability, may be in short supply in carbon-rich, oxygen-poor systems even if planets exist in the ‘habitable zone’. For the solar system, C/O = 0.55 is particularly important in determining the refractory (silicate and metal) to volatile ice ratio expected in material condensed beyond the snow line (Gaidos E. J. Icarus 145, 637, 2000; Wong M. H. et al. in Oxygen in the Solar System, G.J. MacPherson, Ed., 2008). Our analysis of published compositions for a set of exoplanet host stars (Johnson T. V. et al. ApJ. 757(2), 192, 2012) showed that the amount of condensed water ice in those systems might range from as much as 50% by mass for sub-solar C/O = 0.35 to less than a few percent for super-solar C/O = 0.7. A recent analysis using similar techniques (Pekmezci G. S., Dottorato di Ricerca in Astronomia, Università Degli Studi di Roma “Tor Vergata”, 2014) of a much larger stellar composition data set for 974 FGK stars (Petigura E. and Marcy G. Journal of Astrophysics 735, 2011), allows us to assess the possible range of water ice abundance in the circumstellar accretion disks of these ‘solar-type’ stars (of which 72 were known to have one or more planets as of 2011). Stellar C/O in a subset (457 stars) of this stellar database with reported C, O, Ni, and Fe abundances ranges from 0.3 to 1.4. The resulting computed water ice fractions and refractory (silicate + metal) fractions range from ~0 to 0.6 and 0.3 to 0.9 respectively. These results have implications for assessing the habitability of exoplanets since they constrain the amount of water available beyond the snow line for dynamical delivery to inner planets, depending on the host stars’ C/O in the circumstellar nebula. TVJ acknowledges government support at JPL

  17. Debate: Limitations on universality: the "right to health" and the necessity of legal nationality

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The "right to health," including access to basic healthcare, has been recognized as a universal human right through a number of international agreements. Attempts to protect this ideal, however, have relied on states as the guarantor of rights and have subsequently ignored stateless individuals, or those lacking legal nationality in any nation-state. While a legal nationality alone is not sufficient to guarantee that a right to healthcare is accessible, an absence of any legal nationality is almost certainly an obstacle in most cases. There are millions of so-called stateless individuals around the globe who are, in effect, denied medical citizenship in their countries of residence. A central motivating factor for this essay is the fact that statelessness as a concept is largely absent from the medical literature. The goal for this discussion, therefore, is primarily to illustrate the need for further monitoring of health access issues by the medical community, and for a great deal more research into the effects of statelessness upon access to healthcare. This is important both as a theoretical issue, in light of the recognition by many of healthcare as a universal right, as well as an empirical fact that requires further exploration and amelioration. Discussion Most discussions of the human right to health assume that every human being has legal nationality, but in reality there are at least 11 to 12 million stateless individuals worldwide who are often unable to access basic healthcare. The examples of the Roma in Europe, the hill tribes of Thailand, and many Palestinians in Israel highlight the negative health impacts associated with statelessness. Summary Stateless individuals often face an inability to access the most basic healthcare, much less the "highest attainable standard of health" outlined by international agreements. Rather than presuming nationality, statelessness must be recognized by the medical community. Additionally, it is imperative

  18. Star formation history and evolution of gas-rich dwarf galaxies in the Centaurus A group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossi, M.; Disney, M. J.; Pritzl, B. J.; Knezek, P. M.; Gallagher, J. S.; Minchin, R. F.; Freeman, K. C.

    2007-01-01

    We analyse the properties of three unusual dwarf galaxies in the Centaurus A group discovered with the HIPASS survey. From their optical morphology, they appear to be low surface brightness dwarf spheroidals, yet they are gas rich (MHI/LB > 1) with gas-mass-to-stellar light ratios larger than typical dwarf irregular galaxies. Therefore these systems appear different from any dwarfs of the Local Group. They should be favoured hosts for starburst, whereas we find a faint star formation region in only one object. We have obtained 21-cm data and Hubble Space Telescope photometry in V and I bands, and have constructed colour magnitude diagrams (CMDs) to investigate their stellar populations and to set a constraint on their age. From the comparison of the observed and model CMDs, we infer that all three galaxies are at least older than 2 Gyr (possibly even as old as 10 Gyr) and remain gas rich because their star formation rates have been very low (<~10-3Msolaryr-1) throughout. In such systems, star formation appears to have been sporadic and local, though one object (HIPASS J1321-31) has a peculiar red plume in its CMD suggesting that many of its stars were formed in a `miniburst' 300-500 Myr ago. The question of why there are no similar dwarf galaxies in the Local Group remains open. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Associations of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA), Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555; the Australia Telescope Compact Array which is part of the Australia Telescope, funded by the Commonwealth of Australia for operation as a National Facility managed by CSIRO. E-mail: marco.grossi@roma 1.infn.it ‡ Visiting Astronomer, Kitt Peak National Observatory, National Optical Astronomy Observatories, which is operated by the Association of Unicersities for for Reasearch in Astronomy. Inc. (AURA) under cooperative agreement with the National

  19. Distribution patterns and sources of metals and PAHs in an intensely urbanized area: The Acerra-Pomigliano-Marigliano conurbation (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albanese, Stefano; Lima, Annamaria; Rezza, Carmela; Ferullo, Giampiero; De Vivo, Benedetto; Chen, Wei; Qi, Shihua

    2014-05-01

    agricultural intensive land use. PAHs distribution pattern showed anomalous values across the whole study area. Especially, Benzo[a]pyrene values exceeds the trigger limits established by the Italian Environmental law (D.Lgs. 152/2006) in most of the analyzed soils and the diagnostic ratios calculated among several PAHs compounds suggested that the biomass burning in the rural sector of the study area could be a relevant source of pollution. The palm oil fuelled power plant in the northern sector of Acerra could not be excluded as a source of PAHs in the environment. [1] Albanese et al (2007) JGE 93, 21-34. [2] Cicchella et al (2008) GEEA 8 (1), 19-29. [3] De Vivo et al (2006) Aracne Editrice, Roma. 324 pp.

  20. Interaction between CME and surrounding magnetic fields producing multiple flaring sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Driel-Gesztelyi, Lidia M.

    2015-08-01

    L. van Driel-Gesztelyi (1,2,3), D. Baker (1), T. Török (4), E. Pariat (2), L.M. Green (1),D.R. Williams (1), J. Carlyle (1,5) G. Valori (1, 2), P. Démoulin (2), B. Kliem (1,7,8),D. Long (1), S.A. Matthews (1), J.-M. Malherbe (2)(1) UCL/MSSL, UK, (2) Paris Observatory, LESIA, CNRS, France, (3) Konkoly Observatory, Hungary, (4) Predictive Science, Dan Diego, USA, (5) Max Planck Inst., Göttingen, Germany, (6) INAF, Obs. Roma, Italy, (7) Potsdam Univ., Germany, (8) Yunnan Observatories, Kunming, ChinaAnalyzing Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) observations of the spectacular Coronal Mass Ejection eruption on 7 June 2011, we present evidence of coronal magnetic reconnection between the expanding magnetic structure of the CME and the magnetic fields of an adjacent active region (AR). The onset of reconnection first became apparent in the SDO/AIA images when filament plasma, originally contained within the erupting flux rope, was re-directed towards remote areas in the neighboring AR, tracing the change of large-scale magnetic connectivity. The observations are presented jointly with a topological analysis of the pre-eruption magnetic configuration, and a data-constrained numerical simulation of the three-AR complex, demonstrating the formation/intensification of current sheets along a pre-existing hyperbolic flux tube (HFT) at the interface between the CME and the neighboring AR, where a secondary flare ribbon was created. Reconnection across this current sheet resulted in the formation of new magnetic connections between the erupting magnetic structure and a neighboring AR about 200 Mm from the eruption site, in strong qualitative agreement with the observations. In addition, the CME temporarily created unusually dense plasma conditions around a reconnection region at high coronal altitudes, enabling us to observe emission resulting from it. We argue that this exceptional observation of a coronal brightening was directly observable at SDO/AIA wavelengths owing to the

  1. The correlation between Historical and Instrumental Seismicity in the Sansepolcro Basin, Northern Apennines, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardi, F.; Ciaccio, M. G.; Hunstad, I.; Palombo, B.; Ferrari, G.

    2009-04-01

    , 29, 233-244. Castello, B., G., Selvaggi, C., Chiarabba, and A., Amato (2005) CSI Catalogo della sismicità italiana 1981-2002, versione 1.0. INGV-CNT, Roma http://www.ingv.it/CSI/ Ciaccio M.G., Pondrelli S., Frepoli A. (2006) Earthquake fault-plane solutions and patterns of seismicity within the Umbria Region, Italy ANNALS OF GEOPHYSICS, VOL. 49, N. 4/5, August/October 2006. CPTI Working Group (2004) Catalogo Parametrico dei Terremoti Italiani versione 2004 (CPTI04). INGV, Bologna. http://emidius.mi.ingv.it/CPTI/

  2. Appraising the Early-est earthquake monitoring system for tsunami alerting at the Italian candidate Tsunami Service Provider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardi, F.; Lomax, A.; Michelini, A.; Lauciani, V.; Piatanesi, A.; Lorito, S.

    2015-04-01

    In this paper we present the procedure for earthquake location and characterization implemented in the Italian candidate Tsunami Service Provider at INGV in Roma. Following the ICG/NEAMTWS guidelines, the first tsunami warning messages are based only on seismic information, i.e. epicenter location, hypocenter depth and magnitude, which are automatically computed by the software Early-est. Early-est is a package for rapid location and seismic/tsunamigenic characterization of earthquakes. The Early-est software package operates on offline-event or continuous-realtime seismic waveform data to perform trace processing and picking, and, at a regular report interval, phase association, event detection, hypocenter location, and event characterization. In this paper we present the earthquake parameters computed by Early-est from the beginning of 2012 till the end of December 2014 at global scale for events with magnitude M ≥ 5.5, and the detection timeline. The earthquake parameters computed automatically by Early-est are compared with reference manually revised/verified catalogs. From our analysis the epicenter location and hypocenter depth parameters do not differ significantly from the values in the reference catalogs. The epicenter coordinates generally differ less than 20 ∓ 20 km from the reference epicenter coordinates; focal depths are less well constrained and differ generally less than 0 ∓ 30 km. Early-est also provides mb, Mwp and Mwpd magnitude estimations. mb magnitudes are preferred for events with Mwp ≲ 5.8, while Mwpd are valid for events with Mwp ≳ 7.2. The magnitude mb show wide differences with respect to the reference catalogs, we thus apply a linear correction mbcorr = mb · 0.52 + 2.46, such correction results into δmb ≈ 0.0 ∓ 0.2 uncertainty with respect the reference catalogs. As expected the Mwp show distance dependency. Mwp values at stations with epicentral distance Δ ≲ 30° are significantly overestimated

  3. The first marine record of the Bartonian Nummulites and Calcareous nannofossils at the Tihoiyeh section of the Jiroft area (Central Iran)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadi, Mehdi; Parandavar, Mohammad; Kiani-Shahvandi, Madineh; Dabaghi Sadr, Fatemeh

    2016-04-01

    The studied shallow marine sediments are situated south and southwest of Jiroft town, 180 km south of Keman, from the Tihoiyeh section (near Tihoiyeh village). These deposits at the top of the section include marly limestones with index Nummulites species such as N. perforatus (De Montfort), N. lyelli (D'Archiac and Haime). According to Schaub's nummulitic time scale (1981) and shallow benthic zonation of Serra-Kiel et al. (1998), this interval referred to Bartonian age and SBZ17 zone, respectively. Also, the calcareous nannofossil study on this interval led to identification of 19 well-preserved species belonging to 11 genera of this plankton group. Based on determined index calcareous nannofossiltaxa such as Reticulofenestra bisecta, Sphenolithus obtusus, Sphenolithus intercalaris, Cribrocentrum erbae and associated species such as Sphenolithus pseudoradians, Reticulofenestra wadeae, Cribrocentrum reticulatum and Blackites spinosus this interval assigned to the CNE15 zone of Agnini et al. (2014) that corresponds to upper part of NP16 and lower part of NP17 zones of Martini (1971). It is resulted that, the detected shallow benthic foraminifera zone, corresponds to the calcareous nannofossil zones both indicating Bartonian age. Keywords: Bartonian, Calcareous nannofossil, Nummulites, Central Iran, Tihoiyeh section. References: Agnini, C., Fornaciari, E., Raffi, I, Rita Catanzariti, R., Palike, H., Backman, J. and Rio, D., 2014. Biozonation and biochronology of Paleogene calcareous nannofossils from low and middle latitudes. Newsletters on Stratigraphy, Vol. 47 (2), Pp. 131-181. Martini, E., 1971. Standard Tertiary and Quaternary calcareous nannoplankton zonation. In: Farinacci, A. (Ed.), Proceedings 2nd International Conference Planktonic Microfossils Roma: Rome (Ed. Tecnosci.), 2, Pp. 739-785. Serra-Kiel, J., Hottinger, L., Caus, E., Drobne, K., Fernandez, C., Jauhri, A.K., Less, G., Pavlovec, R., Pignatti, J., Samso, J.M., Schaub, H., Sirel, E., Strougo, A

  4. Spectral variability of GX339-4 in a hard-to-soft state transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Santo, M.; Malzac, J.; Jourdain, E.; Belloni, T.; Ubertini, P.

    2008-10-01

    corona associated with a modest reduction of the electron heating rate. Based on observations with INTEGRAL, an ESA project with instruments and science data centre funded by ESA member states (especially the PI countries: Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, Switzerland, Spain), Czech Republic and Poland, and with participation of Russia and the USA. E-mail: melania.delsanto@iasf-roma.inaf.it

  5. Tightly-Coupled Plant-Soil Nitrogen Cycling: Comparison of Organic Farms across an Agricultural Landscape

    PubMed Central

    Bowles, Timothy M.; Hollander, Allan D.; Steenwerth, Kerri; Jackson, Louise E.

    2015-01-01

    How farming systems supply sufficient nitrogen (N) for high yields but with reduced N losses is a central challenge for reducing the tradeoffs often associated with N cycling in agriculture. Variability in soil organic matter and management of organic farms across an agricultural landscape may yield insights for improving N cycling and for evaluating novel indicators of N availability. We assessed yields, plant-soil N cycling, and root expression of N metabolism genes across a representative set of organic fields growing Roma-type tomatoes (Solanum lycopersicum L.) in an intensively-managed agricultural landscape in California, USA. The fields spanned a three-fold range of soil carbon (C) and N but had similar soil types, texture, and pH. Organic tomato yields ranged from 22.9 to 120.1 Mg ha-1 with a mean similar to the county average (86.1 Mg ha-1), which included mostly conventionally-grown tomatoes. Substantial variability in soil inorganic N concentrations, tomato N, and root gene expression indicated a range of possible tradeoffs between yields and potential for N losses across the fields. Fields showing evidence of tightly-coupled plant-soil N cycling, a desirable scenario in which high crop yields are supported by adequate N availability but low potential for N loss, had the highest total and labile soil C and N and received organic matter inputs with a range of N availability. In these fields, elevated expression of a key gene involved in root N assimilation, cytosolic glutamine synthetase GS1, confirmed that plant N assimilation was high even when inorganic N pools were low. Thus tightly-coupled N cycling occurred on several working organic farms. Novel combinations of N cycling indicators (i.e. inorganic N along with soil microbial activity and root gene expression for N assimilation) would support adaptive management for improved N cycling on organic as well as conventional farms, especially when plant-soil N cycling is rapid. PMID:26121264

  6. Fault roughness evolution with slip (Gole Larghe Fault Zone, Italian Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bistacchi, A.; Spagnuolo, E.; Di Toro, G.; Nielsen, S. B.; Griffith, W. A.

    2011-12-01

    interaction distance and are consumed faster with slip than larger ones. However, in faults, production of cataclasites and pseudotachylytes changes the contact area of sliding surfaces by interposing a layer of wear products. This layer may preserve from wearing asperities that are smaller in amplitude than the layer thickness, thus providing a mechanism that is likely to preserve small amplitude/wavelength roughness. These processes have been considered in a new spectral model of wear, which allows to model wear for self-affine surfaces and includes the accumulation of wear products within the fault zone. This model can be used to generalize our results and contribute to reconstruct a realistic model of a seismogenic fault zone (http://roma1.rm.ingv.it/laboratori/laboratorio-hp-ht/usems-project).

  7. Anatomy of a volcanic district in a carbonate fold-and-thrust belt: the northern Volsci Range (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardello, Giovanni Luca; Consorti, Lorenzo; Di Filippo, Michele

    2015-04-01

    The Volsci Range is a carbonate fold-and-thrust belt crossed by important normal faults in places associated with explosive volcanic deposits and hydrothermal ongoing activity within a moderately active seismic area (e.g., Latina earthquake 2012, Mw=3.8). Though distribution of volcanites is known, origin, volume and field characterization of a previously unstudied volcanic district is far to be addressed and it is the topic of this work. Several monogenic phreatomagmatic vents occur at the edges of the chain and within its backbone. The most relevant ones are characterized at the base by well welded to zeolitized tuffs, followed either by incoherent tuffs or by surges (e.g., Patrica, Valvisciolo) and locally by lavas (i.e., Giuliano di Roma, Pofi, Terracina) and finally by late Quaternary slope deposits. Most explosive units are largely composed by local Mesozoic platform carbonate litic clasts, showing different degrees of rounding and decarbonation. Micropalaeontology and facies analysis confirm that clasts are not older than late Jurassic and not younger than Cenomanian (Upper part of the Ostracoda and Miliolidae biozone). Therefore considering the stratigraphy beneath the vent points, litics could come from depths of about 400-600 meters. Juvenile litics of different composition, accretionary lapilli and the above mention carbonate litic clasts testify for a complex conduct composition and for the rupture of the carbonatic aquifer during eruption. Right at the southern slope of the Lepini Mounts (northern Volsci Range), as detected from the analysis of the n-2 residual gravity anomalies, monogenic circular vents (tuff rings) occur buried under Quaternary deposits or are just barely cropping out as necks (Doganella di Ninfa). Further south, despite the occurrence of pyroclastic deposits in boreholes, thickness and shape of volcanic deposits below the Pontina Plain is still unconstrained, providing a challenge for further geophysical studies. However, the

  8. The clinical use of a preparation based on phyto-oestrogens in the treatment of menopausal disorders.

    PubMed

    Russo, Roberto; Corosu, Roberto

    2003-12-01

    In order to evaluate the efficacy of soya isoflavones (genistein and daidzein) in the treatment of the principal menopausal disorders, a double blind randomized study was performed on a sample of 50 women (with an average age of 53.3 +/- 3.1 years) with Climacteric syndrome referred to the I Clinica Ostetrica e Ginecologica, Policlinico Umberto I, Roma. The research protocol involved the random subdivision of the enrolled sample into two groups of 25 women, group 1 (with an average age of 53.3 +/- 3.5 years, and an average menopausal age of 51.6 +/- 1.8 years) and group 2 (with an average age of 53.1 +/- 2.9 years, and an average menopausal age of 51.3 +/- 1.2 years), who were to receive treatment for three months with the product being studied and with a placebo. After the three-month period, as an additional check, the group initially treated with the placebo would move to the phyto-oestrogens and viceversa. All of the patients were subjected to a series of clinical and instrumental examinations and were asked to fill in a questionnaire concerning their complaints, at the start, at halfway (third month) and at the end (sixth month) of the trial. The results of the evaluation of the questionnaires performed on the 47 patients who had completed the trial showed, in the first three months, an improvement in the symptoms (hot flushes) in 11 patients treated with phyto-oestrogens against 6 patients from the group that received only the placebo. In the second three-month period the hot flushes reappeared in 4 of the 11 patients who had previously seen improvements and had then passed to the placebo. In contrast, the group that passed to the phyto-oestrogens, after treatment with the placebo, experienced the disappearance of hot flushes in 11 women, including the 6 who had already improved in the first three months. There was no significant reduction in anxiety, insomnia or vaginal dryness. None of the enrolled patients indicated complaints linked to the treatment. It

  9. PREFACE: Young Researcher Meeting, Trieste 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agostini, F.; Antolini, C.; Aversa, R.; Cattani, G.; Di Stefano, M.; Longobardi, M.; Martinelli, M.; Miceli, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Paci, F.; Pietrobon, D.; Pusceddu, E.; Stellato, F.

    2014-12-01

    Kavli Institute for Cosmology, University of Cambridge Francesco Paci (fpaci@sissa.it) SISSA - Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati Davide Pietrobon (davide.pietrobon@berkeley.edu) University of California at Berkeley Emanuela Pusceddu (emanuela.pusceddu@gmail.com) Institute of Biometeorology CNR Francesco Stellato (francesco.stellato@roma2.infn.it) INFN Roma Tor Vergata ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The organisers of the 5th Young Researcher Meeting would like to thank all the scientists who participated to the meeting. We furthermore thank all our sponsors that are listed below for supporting the event. We are grateful to the International School for Advanced Studies (SISSA) for hosting the conference for the second time, and to its director, Prof. Guido Martinelli, for his support and advice. We owe gratitude to SISSA Medialab, for organising the public event on science communication and providing technical support throughout the entire meeting. The publication of the proceedings of the conference is partially supported by the Solar Physics group in Tor Vertaga; we also acknowledge support from the University of Udine. The event was broadcast live by OggiScienza (http://oggiscienza.wordpress.com). The complete videos of the meeting can be found at the YRM Youtube channel https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCw3roeK9oC4NPc-sRQ2t0rg SISSAInternational School for Advanced Studies (SISSA), Trieste PRINPRIN 2010-2011 (MIUR 2010YJ2NYW_001) - "Symmetries, Masses and Mysteries: Electroweak symmetry breaking, flavor mixing and CP violation, and Dark Matter in the LHC era" - SISSA, Trieste BIOMolecular and Statistical Biophysics Group - SISSA, Trieste THEOPRIN 2012 (2012CPPYP7_006) - "Theoretical Astroparticle Physics" - SISSA, Trieste ASTROPRIN 2010-2011 (MIUR 2010NHBSBE_008) - "L'Universo oscuro e l'evoluzione cosmica dei barioni: dalle survey attuali a Euclid" - SISSA, Trieste UDINEDepartment of Chemistry, Physics and Environment of the University of Udine BERRILLISolar Physics

  10. PREFACE: The 5th International Symposium in Quantum Theory and Symmetries (QTS5)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arratia, O.; Calzada, J. A.; Gómez-Cubillo, F.; Negro, J.; del Olmo, M. A.

    2008-02-01

    atmosphere achieved during their stay. We hope that the experience of spending these days in Valladolid has been most fruitful for all of them. O Arratia, J A Calzada, F Gómez-Cubillo, J Negro and M A del Olmo Universidad de Valladolid, Spain Editors of the QTS5 Proceedings Conference Board S T Ali (Montreal) L L Boyle (Canterbury) M A del Olmo (Valladolid) V K Dobrev (Sofia) H D Doebner (Clausthal), Chair E Kapuscik (Cracow) V I Man'ko (Moscow) G Marmo (Naples) G S Pogosyan (Yerevan and Dubna) T H Seligman (Cuernavaca) A I Solomon (Paris and Open University) P Suranyi (Cincinnati) L C R Wijewardhana (Cincinnati) International Advisory Committee L Accardi, (Roma) M Asorey, (Zaragoza) M T Batchelor, (Canberra) C M Bender, (Washington) A Bohm, (Texas) E Celeghini, (Firenze) I Cirac, (Garching) S Ferrara, (CERN) J P Gazeau, (Paris) G Goldin , (Rutgers) F Iachello, (Yale) T Janssen, (Nijmegen) J Klauder, (Gainesville) P Kulish, (St Petersburg) B Mielnik, (Mexico DF) W Miller, (Minneapolis) M Plyushchay, (Santiago de Chile) O Ragnisco, (Roma) S Randjbar-Daemi, (ICTP) M Santander, (Valladolid) G Sierra, (Madrid) P Townsend, (Cambridge) S Twarock, (York) F Wilczek, (Boston) P Winternitz, (Montreal) K B Wolf, (Cuernavaca) Local Organizing Committee (University of Valladolid) Oscar Arratia Juan A Calzada Manuel Gadella Fernando Gómez-Cubillo José Manuel Izquierdo Sengül Kuru Javier Negro Mariano A del Olmo (Chairman) Official photograph

  11. Host Star C/O: Effects on Habitability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Torrence; Mousis, Olivier; Lunine, Jonathan; Sevin Peckmezci, Gul; Madhusudhan, Nikku

    2016-04-01

    many sub-solar C/O (0.3-0.4) systems which might have ice fractions of 40-60% (Pekmezci, Dottorato di Ricerca in Astronomia, Università Degli Studi di Roma "Tor Vergata", 2014). Thus we argue that host star C/O abundance is an important ingredient in assessing a key factor in habitability of exoplanet systems - the availability of abundant ice beyond the ice line. Efforts should continue to improve and further validate techniques for measuring this important metric. TVJ acknowledges government support at JPL/Caltech, under a contract with NASA. JIL was supported by the JWST Project through NASA. O.M. acknowledges support from CNES.

  12. The HELI-DEM model estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biagi, L.; Caldera, S.; Carcano, L.; Lucchese, A.; Negretti, M.; Sansò, F.; Triglione, D.; Visconti, M. G.

    2014-04-01

    Global DEMs are fundamental for global applications and are necessary also at the local scale, in regions where local models are not available. Local DEMs are preferred when they are available and if are characterized by better accuracies and resolutions. In general, two problems arise. Firstly, an interest region could be patched by several partly overlapping DEMs that present similar accuracies and spatial resolutions: they should be merged in a unified model. Moreover, even when the interest region is covered by one unified DEM, local DEMs with better accuracy could be available and should be used to locally improve it. All these problems have been addressed within HELI-DEM project. HELI-DEM (HELvetia-Italy Digital Elevation Model) is a project that has been funded by the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF) within the Italy-Switzerland cooperation program. It started in 2010 and finished at the end of 2013. The involved institutions in the project were Fondazione Politecnico di Milano, Politecnico di Milano, Politecnico di Torino, Regione Lombardia, Regione Piemonte and Scuola Universitaria della Svizzera Italiana. One specific aim of the project was the creation and the publication of a unified Digital Elevation Model for the part of the Alps between Italy and Switzerland. The interest area is prevalently mountainous, with heights that range from about 200 m to 4600 m. Three low Resolution DTMs (20-25-50 m of resolution) are available that partly overlap and patch the whole project area: they are characterized by accuracies of some meters. Also High Resolution DTMs (1-5 m) are available: they have accuracies of some decimeters but cover limited areas of the project. The various models are available in different reference frames (the European ETRF89 and the Italian Roma40) and are gridded either in cartographic or geographic coordinates. Before merging them, a validation of the input data has been performed in three steps: cross validation of LR DTMs

  13. Committees and organizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-07-01

    (Orsay) S Hamann (Bochum)R Varga (Košice) U Hannemann (Dresden)P Vavassori (San Sebastian) L Havela (Prague)W Wulfhekel (Karlsruhe) O Heczko (Prague)M Yamashita (Sendai) B Hernando (Oviedo)R Zdyb (Lublin) O Isnard (Grenoble)A Zhukov (San Sebastián) Z Kąkol (Kraków)A K Zvezdin (Moscow) N-T H Kim-Ngan (Kraków) International Advisory Committee (2011): Dominique Givord, President (Grenoble)Ludwig Schultz, Former President (Dresden) Manfred Albrecht (Chemnitz)Burkard Hillebrands (Kaiserslautern) Agnés Barthélémy (Paris)Andrei Kirilyuk (Nijmegen) Roy Chantrell (York)Ron Jansen (Tsukuba) Russell Cowburn (London)Nicoleta Lupu (Iasi) Tomasz Dietl (Warszawa)Caroline A Ross (Cambridge, MA) Claudia Felser (Mainz)Stefano Sanvito (Dublin) Josef Fidler (Wien)Vladimir Sechovsky (Praha) Dino Fiorani (Roma)Roberta Sessoli (Firenze) Pietro Gambardella (Bellaterra)Jozef Spałek (Kraków) Alberto Guimarães (Rio de Janeiro)

  14. PREFACE: 6th Workshop on Infrared Spectroscopy and Microscopy with Accelerator-Based Sources (WIRMS11)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupi, Stefano; Perucchi, Andrea

    2012-05-01

    This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series is dedicated to a subset of papers related to the work presented at the 6th edition of the international Workshop on Infrared Spectroscopy and Microscopy with Accelerator-Based Sources (WIRMS), held in Trieste, Italy, September 4-8 2011. Previous editions of the conference were held in Porquerolles (France), Lake Tahoe (USA), Rathen (Germany), Awaji (Japan), and Banff (Canada). This edition was organized and chaired by Stefano Lupi (Roma La Sapienza) and co-chaired by Andrea Perucchi (Elettra), with the support of the Italian Synchrotron Light Laboratory ELETTRA, which was honored to host the WIRMS workshop in its tenth anniversary. The 6th WIRMS edition addressed several different topics, ranging from biochemistry to strongly correlated materials, from geology to conservation science, and from forensics to the study of cometary dusts. Representatives from the infrared scientific programs at synchrotron light sources and free-electron-laser facilities. This edition was attended by 88 participants, including representatives from the infrared scientific programs at synchrotron light sources and free-electron-laser facilities, who enjoyed the stimulating scientific presentations, several detailed discussions, and the beautiful weather and scenery of the Trieste gulf. Participants came from 16 different nations and four continents, including many young scientists, six of which were supported by the organizers. There were 45 scientific talks divided in 11 sessions: Facilities, Microspectroscopy (I, II, III), Time-Resolved Spectroscopies, Extreme Conditions, Condensed Matter, Near-Field, Imaging, THz Techniques and High-Resolution Spectroscopy. 37 posters were also presented at two very lively evening poster sessions. We would like to use the opportunity of writing this preface to thank all the participants of the workshop for the very high level of their scientific contribution and for the very friendly atmosphere

  15. PREFACE: IUPAP C20 Conference on Computational Physics (CCP 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troparevsky, Claudia; Stocks, George Malcolm

    2012-12-01

    . We are grateful to the committees that helped put the conference together, especially the local organizing committee. Particular thanks are also due to a number of ORNL staff who spent long hours with the administrative details. We are pleased to express our thanks to the conference administrator Ann Strange (ORNL/CDP) for her responsive and efficient day-to-day handling of this event, Sherry Samples, Assistant Conference Administrator (ORNL), Angie Beach and the ORNL Conference Office, and Shirley Shugart (ORNL) and Fern Stooksbury (ORNL) who created and maintained the conference website. Editors: G Malcolm Stocks (ORNL) and M Claudia Troparevsky (UT) http://ccp2011.ornl.gov Chair: Dr Malcolm Stocks (ORNL) Vice Chairs: Adriana Moreo (ORNL/UT) James Guberrnatis (LANL) Local Program Committee: Don Batchelor (ORNL) Jack Dongarra (UTK/ORNL) James Hack (ORNL) Robert Harrison (ORNL) Paul Kent (ORNL) Anthony Mezzacappa (ORNL) Adriana Moreo (ORNL) Witold Nazarewicz (UT) Loukas Petridis (ORNL) David Schultz (ORNL) Bill Shelton (ORNL) Claudia Troparevsky (ORNL) Mina Yoon (ORNL) International Advisory Board Members: Joan Adler (Israel Institute of Technology, Israel) Constantia Alexandrou (University of Cyprus, Cyprus) Claudia Ambrosch-Draxl (University of Leoben, Austria) Amanda Barnard (CSIRO, Australia) Peter Borcherds (University of Birmingham, UK) Klaus Cappelle (UFABC, Brazil) Giovanni Ciccotti (Università degli Studi di Roma 'La Sapienza', Italy) Nithaya Chetty (University of Pretoria, South Africa) Charlotte Froese-Fischer (NIST, US) Giulia A. Galli (University of California, Davis, US) Gillian Gehring (University of Sheffield, UK) Guang-Yu Guo (National Taiwan University, Taiwan) Sharon Hammes-Schiffer (Penn State, US) Alex Hansen (Norweigan UST) Duane D. Johnson (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, US) David Landau (University of Georgia, US) Joaquin Marro (University of Granada, Spain) Richard Martin (UIUC, US) Todd Martinez (Stanford University, US) Bill

  16. Detection and Localization of Subsurface Two-Dimensional Metallic Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meschino, S.; Pajewski, L.; Schettini, G.

    2009-04-01

    "Roma Tre" University, Applied Electronics Dept.v. Vasca Navale 84, 00146 Rome, Italy Non-invasive identification of buried objects in the near-field of a receiver array is a subject of great interest, due to its application to the remote sensing of the earth's subsurface, to the detection of landmines, pipes, conduits, to the archaeological site characterization, and more. In this work, we present a Sub-Array Processing (SAP) approach for the detection and localization of subsurface perfectly-conducting circular cylinders. We consider a plane wave illuminating the region of interest, which is assumed to be a homogeneous, unlossy medium of unknown permittivity containing one or more targets. In a first step, we partition the receiver array so that the field scattered from the targets result to be locally plane at each sub-array. Then, we apply a Direction of Arrival (DOA) technique to obtain a set of angles for each locally plane wave, and triangulate these directions obtaining a collection of crossing crowding in the expected object locations [1]. We compare several DOA algorithms such as the traditional Bartlett and Capon Beamforming, the Pisarenko Harmonic Decomposition (PHD), the Minimum-Norm method, the Multiple Signal Classification (MUSIC) and the Estimation of Signal Parameters via Rotational Techinque (ESPRIT) [2]. In a second stage, we develop a statistical Poisson based model to manage the crossing pattern in order to extract the probable target's centre position. In particular, if the crossings are Poisson distributed, it is possible to feature two different distribution parameters [3]. These two parameters perform two density rate for the crossings, so that we can previously divide the crossing pattern in a certain number of equal-size windows and we can collect the windows of the crossing pattern with low rate parameters (that probably are background windows) and remove them. In this way we can consider only the high rate parameter windows (that most

  17. PREFACE: Particles and Fields: Classical and Quantum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asorey, M.; Clemente-Gallardo, J.; Marmo, G.

    2007-07-01

    , Germany) G. F. Dell Antonio (Universitá di Roma La Sapienza, Italy) A. Galindo (Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Spain) S. L. Glashow (Boston University, USA) A. M. Gleeson (University of Texas, Austin, USA) C. R. Hagen (Rochester University, NY, USA) J. Klauder (University of Florida, Gainesville, USA) A. Kossakowski (University of Torun, Poland) V.I. Manko (Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow, Russia) G. Marmo (Universitá Federico II di Napoli e INFN Sezione di Napoli, Italy) N. Mukunda (Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, India) J. V. Narlikar (Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pune, India) J. Nilsson (University of Goteborg, Sweden) S. Okubo (Rochester University, NY, USA) T. Regge (Politecnico di Torino, Italy) W. Schleich (University of Ulm, Germany) M. Scully (Texas A& M University, USA) S. Weinberg (University of Texas, Austin, USA)

    Local Organizing Committee

  18. Recent variability of the solar spectral irradiance and its impact on climate modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermolli, I.; Matthes, K.; Dudok de Wit, T.; Krivova, N. A.; Tourpali, K.; Weber, M.; Unruh, Y. C.; Gray, L.; Langematz, U.; Pilewskie, P.; Rozanov, E.; Schmutz, W.; Shapiro, A.; Solanki, S. K.; Woods, T. N.

    2013-04-01

    The lack of long and reliable time series of solar spectral irradiance (SSI) measurements makes an accurate quantification of solar contributions to recent climate change difficult. Whereas earlier SSI observations and models provided a qualitatively consistent picture of the SSI variability, recent measurements by the SORCE (SOlar Radiation and Climate Experiment) satellite suggest a significantly stronger variability in the ultraviolet (UV) spectral range and changes in the visible and near-infrared (NIR) bands in anti-phase with the solar cycle. A number of recent chemistry-climate model (CCM) simulations have shown that this might have significant implications on the Earth's atmosphere. Motivated by these results, we summarize here our current knowledge of SSI variability and its impact on Earth's climate. We present a detailed overview of existing SSI measurements and provide thorough comparison of models available to date. SSI changes influence the Earth's atmosphere, both directly, through changes in shortwave (SW) heating and therefore, temperature and ozone distributions in the stratosphere, and indirectly, through dynamical feedbacks. We investigate these direct and indirect effects using several state-of-the art CCM simulations forced with measured and modelled SSI changes. A unique asset of this study is the use of a common comprehensive approach for an issue that is usually addressed separately by different communities. We show that the SORCE measurements are difficult to reconcile with earlier observations and with SSI models. Of the five SSI models discussed here, specifically NRLSSI (Naval Research Laboratory Solar Spectral Irradiance), SATIRE-S (Spectral And Total Irradiance REconstructions for the Satellite era), COSI (COde for Solar Irradiance), SRPM (Solar Radiation Physical Modelling), and OAR (Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma), only one shows a behaviour of the UV and visible irradiance qualitatively resembling that of the recent SORCE

  19. AutoDipole - Automated generation of dipole subtraction terms -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, K.; Moch, S.; Uwer, P.

    2010-10-01

    We present an automated generation of the subtraction terms for next-to-leading order QCD calculations in the Catani-Seymour dipole formalism. For a given scattering process with n external particles our Mathematica package generates all dipole terms, allowing for both massless and massive dipoles. The numerical evaluation of the subtraction terms proceeds with MadGraph, which provides Fortran code for the necessary scattering amplitudes. Checks of the numerical stability are discussed. Program summaryProgram title: AutoDipole Catalogue identifier: AEGO_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEGO_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 138 042 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1 117 665 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Mathematica and Fortran Computer: Computers running Mathematica (version 7.0) Operating system: The package should work on every Linux system supported by Mathematica. Detailed tests have been performed on Scientific Linux as supported by DESY and CERN and on openSUSE and Debian. RAM: Depending on the complexity of the problem, recommended at least 128 MB RAM Classification: 11.5 External routines: MadGraph (including HELAS library) available under http://madgraph.hep.uiuc.edu/ or http://madgraph.phys.ucl.ac.be/ or http://madgraph.roma2.infn.it/. A copy of the tar file, MG_ME_SA_V4.4.30, is included in the AutoDipole distribution package. Nature of problem: Computation of next-to-leading order QCD corrections to scattering cross sections, regularization of real emission contributions. Solution method: Catani-Seymour subtraction method for massless and massive partons [1,2]; Numerical evaluation of subtracted matrix elements interfaced to MadGraph [3-5] (stand-alone version) using

  20. The epidemiology and the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Karlinger, K; Györke, T; Makö, E; Mester, A; Tarján, Z

    2000-09-01

    The etiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is still unknown. However, a satisfactory solution cannot be far away. IBD actually encompasses two diseases, i.e. Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerous colitis (UC). These diseases resemble each other so closely that they cannot be distinguished even pathologically, but differ from each other sufficiently to regard them as independent entities. Epidemiological observations may be helpful in identifying the true causative factors of this evasive disease. Geographically, the prevalence of the disease has a slope from North to South and, to a lesser degree, from West to East. The Western-Eastern discrepancy can be attributed to a difference in Western life styles. The incidence of the disease has been increasing world-wide of late, but its spread has been slowing down in highly affected countries. Racial and ethnic relations in different populations and immigration studies offer interesting data which can reflect genetic, inherited, environmental and behavioural factors. The disease seems to have a characteristic racial-ethnic distribution: the Jewish population is highly susceptible everywhere, but its prevalence in that population nears that of the domestic society in which they live. In Hungary, the Roma (Gypsies) have a considerably lower prevalence than the average population. This can be attributed to a genetic or environmental influence. According to age, the onset of the disease occurs more often in the second or the third decade of life, but there also is another peak in the 60s. Regarding sexual distribution, there is a slight preponderance of colitis ulcerosa in men and of Crohn's disease in women. It may correspond to the stronger auto-immune affection in the process of Crohn's disease. Environmental factors and behavioural influences also are investigated. Diet, the role of the early ages, smoking habits and the influence of hormonal status and drugs are viewed as useful contributing factors in the

    1. Enhancement of Spatial Understanding in AN Introductory Field Methods Project Through a Geowall Intervention

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Riggs, N. R.; Kelly, M. M.

      2003-12-01

      requiring the students to individually use a stereo 3D visualization of SP Crater rendered with the commercially available ROMA software in the GeoWall. The intervention includes an assessment instrument delivered inside the GeoWall that requires students to "fly" to various predetermined points of interest and describe the geologic setting at those points using well-defined rules. The lab exercise is followed by a day-long field trip to SP Crater, where the students complete a field mapping day. Additionally, we will make the GeoWall available to students during the report-writing phase of this exercise in the following week. We will analyze previous student spatial performance as measured by previous written reports over the last five years, and compare them with this group. Additionally we will report on qualitative measures of students' interest and motivation in field geology and perceptions of the usefulness of spatial technology in their learning and future careers in geology.

    2. Method for tracing simulated CO2 leak in terrestrial environment with a 13CO2 tracer

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Moni, Christophe; Rasse, Daniel

      2013-04-01

      recorded at the surface following a (60 x 60 cm) grid sampling pattern. Finally, at the end of the growing season the oats crop was harvested following a (50x50 cm) grid sampling pattern and each collected cereal bundle was tested for its isotopic signature. Results showed that the isotopic monitoring of the simulated CO2 leaks enabled to characterize finely the 3 dimensional extent of the leak within the soil-atmosphere continuum, including the assimilation of leaking CO2 by the vegetation. Acknowlegment RISCS is funded by the EC 7th Framework Programme and by industry partners ENEL I&I, Statoil, Vattenfall AB, E.ON and RWE. R&D partners are BGS, CERTH, IMARES, OGS, PML, SINTEF, University of Nottingham, Sapienza Università di Roma, Quintessa, CO2GeoNet, Bioforsk, BGR and ZERO. Four R&D institutes outside Europe participate in RISCS: CO2CRC from Australia, University of Regina from Canada and Montana State and Stanford Universities from the USA. For more information please go to the website (www.riscs-co2.eu) or contact the project coordinator David Jones (e-mail: dgj@bgs.ac.uk tel. + 44 (0)115 936 3576).

    3. Characterization and provenance of the building stones from Pompeii's archaeological site (southern Italy)

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Balassone, G.; Kastenmeier, P.; di Maio, G.; Mormone, A.; Joachimski, M.

      2009-04-01

      ). Preliminary results on source localities indicate a local provenance for a set of volcanic rock samples, whereas the possible source areas of the sedimentary litotypes seem to be more complex. New minero-petrographic data of samples from surrounding outcrops are presented and compared to the related Pompeii building stones. References Seiler F. (2006) - Current research projects. In: Aktuelle Forchungsprojeckte, Deutsches Archäologisches Institut Zentrale, 34-35. Seiler F. (2008) - Rekonstruktion der antiken Kulturlandschaften des Sarno-Beckens. Ein multidisziplinäres Kooperationsprojekt mit Partnern aus Naturwissenschaften und Altertumswissenschaften in Deutschland, Italien und England. In: P. G. Guzzo - M. P. Guidobaldi (Eds), Nuove ricerche archeologiche nell'area vesuviana (scavi 2003-2006). Convegno Internazionale, Roma 1-3 febbraio, 485-490. Kastenmeier P., Seiler F. (2007) - La ricostruzione dei paleo-paesaggi nella piana del Sarno. Quaderni Autorità di Bacino del Sarno. Studi, documentazione e ricerca, 1, 24-26.

    4. Geochemical background/baseline values in top soils of Campania region: assessment of the toxic elements threat to ecosystem and human health

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      de Vivo, B.; Lima, A.; Albanese, S.; Bove, M.; Cicchella, D.; Civitillo, D.; Cosenza, A.; Grezzi, G.

      2009-04-01

      . 2007b. Geochemical Environmental Atlas of the Soils of Avellino. Aracne Editrice, Roma

    5. Methodology of Detailed Geophysical Examination of the Areas of World Recognized Religious and Cultural Artifacts

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Eppelbaum, Lev

      2010-05-01

      the low altitudes (3-5 meters) will help geophysical cover all the studied area with a regular observation step (Eppelbaum, 2008). At the final step all these measurements (including results of the previous works) could be compiled to 4D models of different geophysical parameters (Eppelbaum and Ben-Avraham, 2002; Eppelbaum et al., 2010). Analysis of temperature field in the boreholes drilled in the vicinity of the studied site will permit to estimate the temperature (e.g., Eppelbaum et al., 2006c) in the historical period when this artifact was constructed and, correspondingly, utilize this characteristic for investigation of mechanical and other properties of the ancient building material. Studying of temporal variations of magnetic (e.g., Finkelstein and Eppelbaum) and VLF fields can be also used for determination of nature of some buried ancient remains. The geophysical investigations must be combined with geochemical, paleostructural, paleobiogeographical, paleomorphological and other methods (Eppelbaum et al., 2010). Application of informational parameters (Khesin et al., 1996; Eppelbaum et al., 2003b) will permit to present all available data by the use of integral convolution units. REFERENCES Eppelbaum, L.V., 1999. Quantitative interpretation of resistivity anomalies using advanced methods developed in magnetic prospecting. Trans. of the XXIV General Assembly of the Europ. Geoph. Soc., Strasburg 1 (1), p.166. Eppelbaum, L.V., 2000. Applicability of geophysical methods for localization of archaeological targets: An introduction. Geoinformatics, 11, No.1, 19-28. Eppelbaum, L.V., 2005. Multilevel observations of magnetic field at archaeological sites as additional interpreting tool. Proceed. of the 6th Conference of Archaeological Prospection, Roma, Italy, 4 pp. Eppelbaum, L.V., 2008. Remote operated vehicle geophysical survey using magnetic and VLF methods: proposed schemes for data processing and interpretation. Proceed. of the Symp. on the Application of

    6. Exchanging knowledge and working together in COST Action TU1208: Short-Term Scientific Missions on Ground Penetrating Radar

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Santos Assuncao, Sonia; De Smedt, Philippe; Giannakis, Iraklis; Matera, Loredana; Pinel, Nicolas; Dimitriadis, Klisthenis; Giannopoulos, Antonios; Sala, Jacopo; Lambot, Sébastien; Trinks, Immo; Marciniak, Marian; Pajewski, Lara

      2015-04-01

      This work aims at presenting the scientific results stemming from six Short-Term Scientific Missions (STSMs) funded by the COST (European COoperation in Science and Technology) Action TU1208 'Civil Engineering Applications of Ground Penetrating Radar' (Action Chair: Lara Pajewski, STSM Manager: Marian Marciniak). STSMs are important means to develop linkages and scientific collaborations between participating institutions involved in a COST Action. Scientists have the possibility to go to an institution abroad, in order to undertake joint research and share techniques/equipment/infrastructures that may not be available in their own institution. STSMs are particularly intended for Early Stage Researchers (ESRs), i.e., young scientists who obtained their PhD since no more than 8 years when they started to be involved in the Action. Duration of a standard STSM can be from 5 to 90 days and the research activities carried out during this short stay shall specifically contribute to the achievement of the scientific objectives of the supporting COST Action. The first STSM was carried out by Lara Pajewski, visiting Antonis Giannopoulos at The University of Edinburgh (United Kingdom). The research activities focused on the electromagnetic modelling of Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) responses to complex targets. A set of test scenarios was defined, to be used by research groups participating to Working Group 3 of COST Action TU1208, to test and compare different electromagnetic forward- and inverse-scattering methods; these scenarios were modelled by using the well-known finite-difference time-domain simulator GprMax. New Matlab procedures for the processing and visualization of GprMax output data were developed. During the second STSM, Iraklis Giannakis visited Lara Pajewski at Roma Tre University (Italy). The study was concerned with the numerical modelling of horn antennas for GPR. An air-coupled horn antenna was implemented in GprMax and tested in a realistically

    7. Last millennium gravity reworking processes in the western Gulf of Corinth: correlations with historical seismicity and indication of earthquake clusters

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Beckers, Arnaud; Beck, Christian; Hubert-Ferrari, Aurélia; Papatheodorou, George; Reyss, Jean-Louis

      2016-04-01

      -documented earthquakes and tsunamis, we could not find a clearly recorded sedimentary impact; - non earthquake-triggered MTDs (as the 1963 event) produced specific layers identical to the major earthquakes impacts. At the difference, for a few cores from the deep axial floor, several sandy or silty turbidites permit to establish correlations: i) between coring sites, ii) with earthquakes which stroke two different areas, respectively east and west of the concerned part of the Gulf. Furthermore, the sedimentary events show a particular time distribution for the last 600 yr: - two intervals with short recurrences: a recent one (~1900 AD-Present or ~1750 AD-Present) and an older one (~1550 AD-1700 AD or ~1450 AD-1800 AD); these time distributions differ from each coring site; - a long "quiet" period (150 to 200 yr). From these results, we tentatively consider this sedimentary record as an indicator of a migration of seismogenic faulting activity. Ref.: Albini, P., et al., 2014. Techn. Rep. I.N.G.V. Roma. Beckers, A., et al., 2015. Marine Geology, 360:55-69 Bernard, P., et al., 2006. Tectonophysics, 426:7-30. Papazachos, C., Papaioannou, C., 1997. Journal of Seismology, 1:181-201.

    8. Geomorpho-Landscapes

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Farabollini, Piero; Lugeri, Francesca; Amadio, Vittorio

      2014-05-01

      value -referring to biodiversity, geodiversity, culture- which can be considered as a special heritage. Starting from the concept of Geomorphosite, a geomorphologic landform with a scientific, cultural and socio-economical value (Panizza 2001), we propose a further definition, useful in the preliminary steps of the landscape analysis: "geomorpho-landscape" as a spatial object or component of a geological landscape, whose geo-morphological evolution, linked to the geological setting, are elements of aesthetical, semiological as well as historical and cultural value. The structure of the landscape is represented by the physical shape and spatial organization, in dynamic way: it is necessary to provide a readout of the landscape components that supplements the geo-morphological, lithological, geodiversity data (Lugeri et alii, 2012). The concept of "geomorpho-landscape" is conceived to address the need to describe by a synthetic approach the geological processes emerging at the landscape scale, allowing to link spatial patterns to geological processes Each geo-form has in itself geological, geo-morphological, landmark, historical and cultural features, of such special relevance, that they can be defined in terms of scientific quality, rarity, aesthetic appeal and educational and cultural value. Reference List AMADIO V. (2003). Analisi di sistemi e progetti di paesaggio. Franco Angeli, Milano, pp 236 AMADIO V, AMADEI M, BAGNAIA R, DI BUCCI D, LAURETI L, LISI A, LUGERI FR, LUGERI N. (2002). The role of Geomorphology in Landscape Ecology: The Landscape Unit Map of Italy', Scale 1: 250,000 ("Carta della Natura" Project). In: Allison RJ (ed) Applied Geomorphology: theory and practice. John Wiley & Sons, London, pp 265-282 APAT (2003). Carta della natura alla scala 1:250,000: metodologie di realizzazione. APAT, Manuali e linee guida 17/2003, Roma, pp 103 LUGERI F.R., FARABOLLINI P., GRAVIANO G. & AMADIO V. (2012). Geoheritage: Nature and culture in a landscape approach. European

    9. Definition of a Sinkhole hazard methodology in the Pontina Plain (Latium Region, Central Italy)

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Teoli, Pamela; Mazza, Roberto; Capelli, Giuseppe

      2010-05-01

      The work presented here is the continuation of " Sinkhole Project of Latium Region" (2002), carried out by Researchers of the Laboratory of Applied Geology and Hydrogeology of the Department of Geological Sciences of the University "Roma Tre", Rome (Italy), through which were found, in different plain of the whole Region, Sinkhole prone areas, using a methodology based on the superimposition of thematic layers corresponding to geological and anthropogenic breaking factors. In the last years several specific investigations have been conducted by Researchers of the Laboratory in the Pontina Plain, that is located in the south west of the Latium Region, concerning the geological-stratigraphic setting, the sketch of flow in the aquifers located in the Pontine depression, the chemiphysical groundwater characheteristics, the density of wells, the amount of well pumping and piezometric changes. This required the implementation of several piezometric and chemiphysical surveys, the collection and validation of a large number of stratigraphic and geophysical data. All data in the archive have been computerized and the maps vectorized. This makes it possible today to address the analysis with Geographical Information Systems and to start numerical flow simulations, regarding both the heavily drained deep confined aquifer, and the areas subject to the presence of an important water exchange between the recharge area in the Lepini Mountains (carbonatic ridge) and terrigenous aquifers of the plain. Among the main causes that trigger the catastrophic collapses there are, in fact, all the phenomena that cause the mass density reduction through erosion, leaching, dissolution. All these agents are associated with water circulation: flow, velocity, CO2 saturation rate, carbonates saturation rate. The spread in the Pontina plain of deep and high pumping wells, wrongly built without the correct way of progress, and without the realization of cemented portions properly located, can lead

    10. The Italian contribution to the CSES satellite

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Conti, Livio

      2016-04-01

      We present the Italian contribution to the CSES (China Seismo-Electromagnetic Satellite) mission. The CSES satellite aims at investigating electromagnetic field, plasma and particles in the near-Earth environment in order to study in particular seismic precursors, particles fluxes (from Van Allen belts, cosmic rays, solar wind, etc.), anthropogenic electromagnetic pollution and more in general the atmosphere-ionosphere-magnetosphere coupling mechanisms that can affect the climate changes. The launch of CSES - the first of a series of several satellite missions - is scheduled by the end of 2016. The CSES satellite has been financed by the CNSA (China National Space Agency) and developed by CEA (China Earthquake Administration) together with several Chinese research institutes and private companies such as the DFH (that has developed the CAST2000 satellite platform). Italy participates to the CSES satellite mission with the LIMADOU project funded by ASI (Italian Space Agency) in collaboration with the Universities of Roma Tor Vergata, Uninettuno, Trento, Bologna and Perugia, as well as the INFN (Italian National Institute of Nuclear Physics), INGV (Italian National Institute of Geophysics and Volcanology) and INAF-IAPS (Italian National Institute of Astrophysics and Planetology). Many analyses have shown that satellite observations of electromagnetic fields, plasma parameters and particle fluxes in low Earth orbit may be useful in order to study the existence of electromagnetic emissions associated with the occurrence of earthquakes of medium and high magnitude. Although the earthquakes forecasting is not possible today, it is certainly a major challenge - and perhaps even a duty - for science in the near future. The claims that the reported anomalies (of electromagnetic, plasma and particle parameters) are seismic precursors are still intensely debated and analyses for confirming claimed correlations are still lacking. In fact, ionospheric currents, plasma

    11. Geological and geophysical activities at Spallanzani Science Department (Liceo Scientifico Statale "Lazzaro Spallanzani" - Tivoli, Italy)

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Favale, T.; De Angelis, F.; De Filippis, L.

      2012-04-01

      The high school Liceo Scientifico "Lazzaro Spallanzani" at Tivoli (Rome) has been fully involved in the study of geological and geophysical features of the town of Tivoli and the surrounding area in the last twelve years. Objective of this activity is to promote the knowledge of the local territory from the geological point of view. Main activities: • School year 2001-2002: Setting up inside the school building of a Geological Museum focusing on "Geological Evolution of Latium, Central Italy" (in collaboration with colleagues M. Mancini, and A. Pierangeli). • March, 15, 2001: Conference of Environmental Geology. Lecturer: Prof. Raniero Massoli Novelli, L'Aquila University and Società Italiana di Geologia Ambientale. • School years 2001-2002 and 2002-2003: Earth Sciences course for students "Brittle deformation and tectonic stress in Tivoli area". • November, 2003: Conference of Geology, GIS and Remote Sensing. Lecturers: Prof. Maurizio Parotto and Dr Alessandro Cecili (Roma Tre University, Rome), and Dr Stefano Pignotti (Istituto Nazionale per la Ricerca sulla Montagna, Rome). • November, 2003, 2004 and 2005: GIS DAY, organized in collaboration with ESRI Italia. • School year 2006-2007: Earth Sciences course for students "Acque Albule basin and the Travertine of Tivoli, Latium, Central Italy" (focus on travertine formation). • School year 2010-2011: Earth Sciences course for students "Acque Albule basin and the Travertine of Tivoli. Geology, Hydrogeology and Microbiology of the basin, Latium, Central Italy" (focus on thermal springs and spa). In the period 2009-2010 a seismic station with three channels, currently working, was designed and built in our school by the science teachers Felice De Angelis and Tomaso Favale. Our seismic station (code name LTTV) is part of Italian Experimental Seismic Network (IESN) with identification code IZ (international database IRIS-ISC). The three drums are online in real time on websites http

    12. Europlanet - Joining the European Planetary Research Information Service

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Capria, M. T.; Chanteur, G.; Schmidt, W.

      2009-04-01

      to data to be integrated into the VO features of IDIS? Any combination and many more alternatives are possible. 3. Contact the staff of the selected node(s) to go through the details 4. The node's expert team will evaluate the information to ensure that it is compliant with the minimum requirements for Europlanet information providers like correct address, related field of competence, quality of data if any etc. 5. The new resource meta data (addresses, contents etc) will be added to the IDIS system including update of the search facilities 6. If data are offered for on-line access, the IDIS team will provide tools to generate a network-compatible generic interface. This one-time effort will make it possible to search the new data sets and combine them with related in-formation from other sources. Benefits for the information provider: - wide advertisement for the own resources and capabilities with increase in scientific references to the own activities and publications - new co-operation possibilities with so far unknown teams. Team exchange might be financially supported by other segments of the Europlanet RI - strong arguments for new funding applications and many more aspects List of contact web-sites: Technical node for support and management aspects: http://www.europlanet-idis.fi/ Planetary Surfaces and Interiors node: http://europlanet.dlr.de/ Planetary Plasma node: http://europlanet-plasmanode.oeaw.ac.at/ Planetary Atmospheres node: http://idis.ipsl.jussieu.fr/ Virtual Observatory Paris Data Centre: http://vo.obspm.fr/ Small Bodies and Dust node: http://www.ifsi-roma.inaf.it/europlanet/

    13. PREFACE: XIII International Conference on Calorimetry in High Energy Physics (CALOR 2008)

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Livan, Michele

      2009-07-01

      Advisory Commitee M Danilov, ITEP Moscow M Diemoz, INFN Roma I A Ereditato, Bern F Fabbri, I

    14. ERS-ENVISAT InSAR deformation time-series: a powerful tool to investigate long term surface deformation of large areas

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Lanari, Riccardo

      2010-05-01

      Satellite time series have already provided key measurements to retrieve information on the dynamic nature of Earth surface processes. We exploit in this work the availability of the large archives of spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data acquired by the ERS-1/2 and ENVISAT sensors of the European Space Agency (ESA) during the 1992-2009 time period, in order to investigate long term surface deformation of large areas. To achieve this result we take advantage of the Differential SAR Interferometry (InSAR) algorithm referred to as Small BAseline Subset (SBAS) technique (Berardino et al., 2002), which allows us to generate mean deformation velocity maps and corresponding time-series by exploiting temporally overlapping SAR dataset collected by the ERS and ENVISAT sensors (Pepe et al., 2005). In particular, we focus on the results obtained by retrieving ERS-ENVISAT deformation time-series from 1992 till today in selected case studies relevant to different scenarios. We start from the analysis of the Mt. Etna volcano (Italy) and the Napoli Bay area (Italy), the latter including three volcanic systems (the Campi Flegrei caldera, the Somma-Vesuvio volcanic complex and the Ischia island) and the city of Napoli. In addition, we present the results relevant to the cities of Istanbul (Turkey) and Roma (Italy). The overall analyses are carried out by using averaged (multilook) InSAR interferograms with a spatial resolution of about 100 x 100 m. Moreover, in selected zones we further investigate localized phenomena by zooming in the areas of interest and carrying out a InSAR analysis at full spatial resolution scale (Lanari et al., 2004). In these cases we also exploit the doppler centroid variations of the post-2000 acquisitions of the ERS-2 sensor and the carrier frequency difference between the ERS-1/2 and the ENVISAT systems in order to maximize the number of investigated SAR pixels and to improve their geocoding. The presented results demonstrate the unique

    15. Forty years experience in developing and using rainfall simulators under tropical and Mediterranean conditions

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Pla-Sentís, Ildefonso; Nacci, Silvana

      2010-05-01

      obtained with small size 500-1000 cm2, easily dismantled, drop former simulators, than with larger, nozzle, or more sophisticated equipments. In this contribution there are presented some of the rainfall simulators developed and used by the main author, and some of the results obtained in different studies of practical problems under tropical and Mediterranean conditions. References Pla, I.,G.Campero, y R.Useche.1974.Physical degradación of agricultural soils in the Western Plains of Venezuela. "Trans.10th Int.Cong.Soil.Sci.Soc". 1:231-240. .Moscú Pla, I. 1975.Effects of bitumen emulsion and polyacrilamide on some physical properties of Venezuelan soils. En "Soil Sci. Soc. Am. Special Publication"• 7. 35-46. Madison. Wisconsin . (USA). Pla, I. 1977.Aggregate size and erosion control on sloping land treated with hydrophobic bitumen emulsion."Soil Conservation and Management in the Humid Tropics".109-115. John Wiley & Sons. Pla, I.1981.Simuladores de lluvia para el estudio de relaciones suelo-agua bajo agricultura de secano en los trópicos. Rev. Fac. Agron. XII(1-2):81-93.Maracay (Venezuela) Pla, I. 1986.A routine laboratory index to predict the effects of soil sealing on soil and water conservation. En "Assesment of Soil Surface Sealing and Crusting". 154-162.State Univ. of Ghent.Gante (Bélgica Pla, I., M.C. Ramos, S. Nacci, F. Fonseca y X. Abreu. 2005. Soil moisture regime in dryland vineyards of Catalunya (Spain) as influenced by climate, soil and land management. "Integrated Soil and Water Management for Orchard Development". FAO Land and Water Bulletin 10. 41-49. Roma (Italia).

    16. Assessment of local seismic response of the Stracciacappa maar (Central Italy)

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Moscatelli, Massimiliano; Simionato, Maurizio; Gaudiosi, Iolanda; Sottili, Gianluca; Pagliaroli, Alessandro; Sirianni, Pietro; Pileggi, Domenico; Avalle, Alessandra; Giallini, Silvia; Razzano, Roberto; Mancini, Marco; Vignaroli, Gianluca; Piscitelli, Sabatino; Bellanova, Jessica; Calamita, Giuseppe; Perrone, Angela; Lanzo, Giuseppe

      2016-04-01

      properties of soils, the cyclic soil behavior was investigated in laboratory through the Double Specimen Direct Simple Shear device. Particular care was given to organic clays within the lacustrine deposits, which show a stronger linearity and lower damping ratio with respect to inorganic clays of similar plasticity. The collected geological-geophysical dataset suggests the coalescence of several eruptive centres localized at different depths and laterally distributed within the present-day Stracciacappa maar. Data are currently processed for subsequent 2D and 3D numerical simulations of site effects. REFERENCES De Rita D. and Zanetti G., 1986. I centri esplosivi di Baccano e di Stracciacappe (Sabatini orientali, Roma): analogie e differenze della modellistica esplosiva in funzione del grado di interazione acqua/magma. Memorie della Società Geologica Italiana, 35, 689-697. Marra F., Sottili G., Gaeta M., Giaccio B., Jicha B., Masotta M., Palladino D.M., Deocampo D.M., 2014. Major explosive activity in the Monti Sabatini Volcanic District (central Italy) over the 800-390 ka interval: geochronological-geochemical overview and tephrostratigraphic implications Sottili G., Palladino D.M., Marra F., Jicha B., Karner D.B., Renne P., 2010. Geochronology of the most recent activity in the Sabatini Volcanic District, Roman Province, central Italy. Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, 196, 20-30.

    17. Civil Engineering Applications of Ground Penetrating Radar: Research Perspectives in COST Action TU1208

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Pajewski, Lara; Benedetto, Andrea; Loizos, Andreas; Slob, Evert; Tosti, Fabio

      2013-04-01

      can be used by GPR operators to identify the signatures generated by uncommon targets or by composite structures. Repeated evaluations of the electromagnetic field scattered by known targets can be performed by a forward solver, in order to estimate - through comparison with measured data - the physics and geometry of the region investigated by the GPR. It is possible to identify three main areas, in the GPR field, that have to be addressed in order to promote the use of this technology in the civil engineering. These are: a) increase of the system sensitivity to enable the usability in a wider range of conditions; b) research novel data processing algorithms/analysis tools for the interpretation of GPR results; c) contribute to the development of new standards and guidelines and to training of end users, that will also help to increase the awareness of operators. In this framework, the COST Action TU1208 "Civil Engineering Applications of Ground Penetrating Radar", proposed by Lara Pajewski, "Roma Tre" University, Rome, Italy, has been approved in November 2012 and is going to start in April 2013. It is a 4-years ambitious project already involving 17 European Countries (AT, BE, CH, CZ, DE, EL, ES, FI, FR, HR, IT, NL, NO, PL, PT, TR, UK), as well as Australia and U.S.A. The project will be developed within the frame of a unique approach based on the integrated contribution of University researchers, software developers, geophysics experts, Non-Destructive Testing equipment designers and producers, end users from private companies and public agencies. The main objective of the COST Action TU1208 is to exchange and increase scientific-technical knowledge and experience of GPR techniques in civil engineering, whilst promoting the effective use of this safe and non-destructive technique in the monitoring of systems. In this interdisciplinary Action, advantages and limitations of GPR will be highlighted, leading to the identification of gaps in knowledge and technology

    18. Applications of GPR in archaeological prospecting and cultural heritage diagnostics: Research Perspectives in COST Action TU1208

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Pajewski, Lara; Benedetto, Andrea; Schettini, Giuseppe; Soldovieri, Francesco

      2013-04-01

      Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) is a safe, non-destructive and non-invasive imaging technique that can be effectively used for advanced inspection of composite structures and for diagnostics affecting the whole life-cycle of civil engineering works. GPR can also be successfully employed in archaeological prospecting and cultural heritage diagnostics. In many Countries, where the archeological patrimony is an outstanding value (as Egypt, Israel, Greece, Central and South America), GPR is usually employed both as a diagnostic tool for the preventive detection of archeological structures and as the most advanced instrument able to prospect geometry and shape of underground valuable sites. However many uncertainties persist, because of several difficulties and ambiguities due to the complexity of the image processing in heterogeneous environment. It is possible to identify three main areas, in GPR field, that have to be addressed in order to promote the use of this technology in archaeological prospecting and cultural heritage diagnostics. These are: a) increase of the system sensitivity to enable the usability in a wider range of conditions, archeological sites are often located in impervious and critical environments; b) research novel data processing algorithms/analysis tools for the interpretation of GPR results; c) contribute to the development of new standards and guidelines and to training of end users, that will also help to increase the awareness of operators. It is also important to further investigate and promote a combined use of GPR with other non-invasive advanced techniques, typically used in the archeological investigation. In this framework, the COST Action TU1208 "Civil Engineering Applications of Ground Penetrating Radar", proposed by a research team of "Roma Tre" University, Rome, Italy, has been approved in November 2012 and is going to start in April 2013. It is a 4-years ambitious project already involving 17 European Countries (AT, BE, CH, CZ, DE

    19. Bulgarian National Digital Seismological Network

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Dimitrova, L.; Solakov, D.; Nikolova, S.; Stoyanov, S.; Simeonova, S.; Zimakov, L. G.; Khaikin, L.

      2011-12-01

      The Bulgarian National Digital Seismological Network (BNDSN) consists of a National Data Center (NDC), 13 stations equipped with RefTek High Resolution Broadband Seismic Recorders - model DAS 130-01/3, 1 station equipped with Quanterra 680 and broadband sensors and accelerometers. Real-time data transfer from seismic stations to NDC is realized via Virtual Private Network of the Bulgarian Telecommunication Company. The communication interruptions don't cause any data loss at the NDC. The data are backed up in the field station recorder's 4Mb RAM memory and are retransmitted to the NDC immediately after the communication link is re-established. The recorders are equipped with 2 compact flash disks able to save more than 1 month long data. The data from the flash disks can be downloaded remotely using FTP. The data acquisition and processing hardware redundancy at the NDC is achieved by two clustered SUN servers and two Blade Workstations. To secure the acquisition, processing and data storage processes a three layer local network is designed at the NDC. Real-time data acquisition is performed using REFTEK's full duplex error-correction protocol RTPD. Data from the Quanterra recorder and foreign stations are fed into RTPD in real-time via SeisComP/SeedLink protocol. Using SeisComP/SeedLink software the NDC transfers real-time data to INGV-Roma, NEIC-USA, ORFEUS Data Center. Regional real-time data exchange with Romania, Macedonia, Serbia and Greece is established at the NDC also. Data processing is performed by the Seismic Network Data Processor (SNDP) software package running on the both Servers. SNDP includes subsystems: Real-time subsystem (RTS_SNDP) - for signal detection; evaluation of the signal parameters; phase identification and association; source estimation; Seismic analysis subsystem (SAS_SNDP) - for interactive data processing; Early warning subsystem (EWS_SNDP) - based on the first arrived P-phases. The signal detection process is performed by

    20. PREFACE: DICE 2012 : Spacetime Matter Quantum Mechanics - from the Planck scale to emergent phenomena

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Diósi, Lajos; Elze, Hans-Thomas; Fronzoni, Leone; Halliwell, Jonathan; Prati, Enrico; Vitiello, Giuseppe; Yearsley, James

      2013-06-01

      Milano), F Guerra (Università 'La Sapienza', Roma) and G Vitiello (Università di Salerno), this event traditionally dedicated to the public drew a large audience involved in lively discussions until late. The workshop was organized by L Diósi (Budapest), H-T Elze (Pisa, chair), L Fronzoni (Pisa), J J Halliwell (London), E Prati (Milano) and G Vitiello (Salerno), with most essential help from our conference secretaries L Fratino, N Lampo, I Pozzana, and A Sonnellini, all students from Pisa, and from our former secretaries M Pesce-Rollins and L Baldini. Several institutions and sponsors supported the workshop and their representatives and, in particular, the citizens of Rosignano/Castiglioncello are deeply thanked for the generous help and kind hospitality: Comune di Rosignano - A Franchi (Sindaco di Rosignano), S Scarpellini (Segreteria sindaco), L Benini (Assessore ai lavori pubblici), M Pia (Assessore all' urbanistica) REA Rosignano Energia Ambiente s.p.a. - F Ghelardini (Presidente della REA), E Salvadori and C Peccianti (Segreteria) Associazione Armunia - A Nanni (Direttore), G Mannari (Programmazione), C Perna, F Bellini, M Nannerini, P Bruni and L Meucci (Tecnici). Special thanks go to G Mannari and her collaborators for advice and great help in all the practical matters that had to be dealt with, in order to run the meeting at Castello Pasquini smoothly Funds made available by Università di Pisa, Domus Galilaeana (Pisa), Centro Interdisciplinare per lo Studio dei Sistemi Complessi - CISSC (Pisa), Dipartimento di Ingegneria Industriale (Università di Salerno), Istituto Italiano per gli Studi Filosofici - IISF (Napoli), Solvay Italia SA (Rosignano), Institute of Physics Publishing - IOP (Bristol), Springer Verlag (Heidelberg), and Hungarian Scientific Research Fund OTKA are gratefully acknowledged. Last, but not least, special thanks are due to Laura Pesce (Vitrium Galleria, San Vincenzo) for the exposition of her artwork 'arte e scienza' at Castello Pasquini

    1. Ground-penetrating radar investigation of St. Leonard's Crypt under the Wawel Cathedral (Cracow, Poland) - COST Action TU1208

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Benedetto, Andrea; Pajewski, Lara; Dimitriadis, Klisthenis; Avlonitou, Pepi; Konstantakis, Yannis; Musiela, Małgorzata; Mitka, Bartosz; Lambot, Sébastien; Żakowska, Lidia

      2016-04-01

      "Applications of Ground Penetrating Radar in urban areas: the sensitive case of historical cities." The Action TU1208 is coordinated by "Roma Tre University" (Rome, Italy) and the TS was hosted by the Cracow University of Technology (Cracow, Poland). It was attended by 25 PhD students and early-career investigators coming from Albania, Belgium, Germany, Italy, Poland, Romania, Russia and Slovenia. Trainers and Trainees had the great honour and privilege to carry out practical sessions in St Leonard's Crypt, in cooperation with the companies Restauro (Toruń, Poland) and Geoservice (Athens, Greece). Over the centuries, city centres have been continuously changing, developing and adapting to the requirements of society, architectural planning and advancing technology. Under the pressure of urbanisation, many cities and towns have significantly expanded and the limited space in their centres has been exploited more intensively. The shallow subsurface of historical cities is nowadays a very complicated scenario including reams of pipes, cables, rubble, bars and slabs of reinforced concrete, backfilled excavation trenches and pits, cellars, wells, cavities, tunnels, graves, walls and foundations of former houses, churches, monasteries, town fortifications, along with several other modern and ancient structures and manufacts. For the prospection of such a diversified, multilayered, intricate and complex underground environment, both for archaeological and civil-engineering purposes, Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) is a very effective non-destructive geophysical method. GPR is a powerful tool not only for the prospection of subsurface but also for the non-invasive testing of historical buildings, fountains, historical bridges, sculptures, frescoes, pottery and other objects collected in museums: it can give information about their state of preservation, it can significantly help to address a restoration project properly, and sometimes it can also help to achieve information of

    2. PREFACE: 5th International Workshop on Top Quark Physics (TOP2012)

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Salamanna, G.; Boisvert, V.; Cerrito, L.; Khan, A.; Moretti, S.; Owen, M.; Schwanenberger, C.

      2013-07-01

      resonances in the boosted top regime were also provided. Finally, a set of dedicated talks on the interplay between the top sector and other hot subjects, like the Higgs and SUSY, were given both at the theory and experimental level. Furthermore, ad hoc student sessions were organized to allow younger colleagues to pose questions to the senior experts in the field and contribute with their more recent studies. The conference has been a definitive success, not just scientifically: about 130 participants from all over the world created a collegiate spirit which culminated in the social events at Winchester Hall below King Arthur's table; and in a cosy 16th century barn for the social dinner. The Local Organizing Committee would like to thank all participants, and in particular the speakers, for their high level contributions to TOP 2012 and for making this a very fruitful and pleasant time together. We conclude by wishing the Organizing Committee of TOP 2013 all the best for a successful conference. We look forward to seeing everyone in Germany in 2013. Giuseppe Salamanna Local Organizing Committee London, June 2013 Local Organising Committee Veronique Boisvert (Chair, Royal Holloway, University of London) Lucio Cerrito (Queen Mary, University of London) Akram Khan (Brunel University, London) Stefano Moretti (University of Southampton) Mark Owen (University of Manchester) Giuseppe Salamanna (Queen Mary, University of London) Christian Schwanenberger (University of Manchester) International Advisory Committee Roberto Tenchini (INFN, Pisa) Martine Bosman (IFAE, Barcelona) Michelangelo Mangano (CERN) Scott Willenbrock (University of Illinois, Urbana) Werner Bernreuther (RWTH, Aachen) Jorgen D'Hondt (VUB, Brussels) Antonio Onofre (LIP, University Minho) Fabio Maltoni (UCL, Louvain) Eric Laenen (NIKHEF) Fabrizio Margaroli (INFN, Roma 1) Juan Antonio Aguilar Saavedra (University of Granada) Yvonne Peters (University of Manchester) Roberto Chierici (CERN) Markus Cristinziani

    3. High-Velocity Frictional Properties of Westerly Granite and the Role of Thermal Cracking on Gouge Production

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Passelegue, Francois; Spanuolo, Elena; Violay, Marie; Nielsen, Stefan; Di Toro, Giulio; Schubnel, Alexandre

      2016-04-01

      With the advent of high-velocity shear apparatus, several experimental studies have been conducted in recent years improving our understanding of fault friction at seismic slip rates (0.1-10 m/s). Here, we present the results of a series of tests conducted on Westerly granite, at INGV Roma, on a Slow to HIgh Velocity Apparatus (SHIVA), coupled with a high frequency monitoring (4MHz sampling rate). Experiments were conducted under normal stress (σn) ranging from 5 to 20 MPa and at sliding velocities (V) comprised between 3 mm/s and 3 m/s. Additional experiments were conducted in the presence of pore fluid at equivalent effective normal stress. In dry conditions, two friction drops are observed. The first drop is independent of the normal stress and occurs when V become higher than a critical value (Vc≈0.15 m/s). The second friction drop occurs after a critical slip weakening distance which decreases as a power law with the power density (τV). The first, abrupt, drop is explained by flash heating and weakening mechanism while the second, smooth, drop is due to the formation and growth of molten patches on the fault surface. In wet conditions, only the second drop of friction is observed. Average values of the fracture energy are independent of normal stress and sliding velocity at V > 0.01 m/s. However, measurements of elastic wave velocities travelling through the fault strongly suggest that higher damage is induced for 0.1 < V < 0.3 m/s for a same finite displacement. This observation is also supported by acoustic emission (AE) recordings. Indeed, most the AEs are recorded after the initiation of the second friction drop, that is, once the fault surface temperature is high. Some AEs are even recorded few seconds after the end of the experiments, suggesting they may be due to thermal cracking induced by heat diffusion. In addition, the presence of pore fluid pressure (water) delayed the apparition of AEs at equivalent effective pressure, supporting the link

    4. 3D modelling of the Austroalpine-Penninic collisional wedge of the NW Alps: dataset management and preliminary results

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Monopoli, Bruno; Bistacchi, Andrea; Bertolo, Davide; Dal Piaz, Giovanni; Gouffon, Yves; Massironi, Matteo; Sartori, Mario; Vittorio Dal Piaz, Giorgio

      2016-04-01

      considered as a sort of pseudo-stratigraphy, since they are the oldest feature that can be traced continuously at the map scale. For this reason we have developed a set of attributes identifying the tectonic and lithological units (a "legend"), implemented both in the GIS database and in the 3D models, which at the same time is compatible with the data structure of 3D modelling packages like Move and Skua/Gocad, and allows tracing the complex hierarchic classification of the units mapped in the GIS. This allows for the almost automatic and consistent two-way transfer of data between the GIS and geomodelling environments. E.g. results of 3D modelling, which is based on input data originally stored in the GIS, will eventually be transferred back to the GIS. The results of this study, which are preliminarily presented here, will open new opportunities to study the collision- and subduction-related nappe architecture and kinematics with younger deformations removed, and will eventually lead (with additional studies) to a step-by-step retrodeformation supported by modern technologies, following the path traced by Argand at the beginning of the 20th century. Argand E. 1909. L'exploration géologique des Alpes pennines centrales. Bull. Soc. Vaudoise Sci. Nat., 45, 217-276. Argand A. 1911. Les nappes de recouvrement des Alpes pennines et leurs prolongements structuraux. Mat. Carte Géol. Suisse, 31, 25. Argand A. 1916. Sur l'arc des Alpes occidentales. Eclogae Geol. Helv., 14, 145-191. Franchi S., Mattirolo E., Novarese V., Stella A. & Zaccagna D. 1908. Carta geologica delle Alpi Occidentali alla scala 1:400.000. Regio Ufficio Geologico, Roma. Gerlach H. 1869. Die Penninischen Alpen. N. Denkschr. Schweiz. Natf. Ges., 23, 132. Gerlach H. 1871. Das Suedwestliche Wallis. Beitraege Geol. Karte Schweiz, 9, 175. Giordano F. 1869. Sulla orografia e sulla geologica costituzione del Gran Cervino. Atti R. Acc. Sci. Torino, 4, 304-321.

    5. Geomorpho-Landscapes

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Farabollini, Piero; Lugeri, Francesca; Amadio, Vittorio

      2014-05-01

      value -referring to biodiversity, geodiversity, culture- which can be considered as a special heritage. Starting from the concept of Geomorphosite, a geomorphologic landform with a scientific, cultural and socio-economical value (Panizza 2001), we propose a further definition, useful in the preliminary steps of the landscape analysis: "geomorpho-landscape" as a spatial object or component of a geological landscape, whose geo-morphological evolution, linked to the geological setting, are elements of aesthetical, semiological as well as historical and cultural value. The structure of the landscape is represented by the physical shape and spatial organization, in dynamic way: it is necessary to provide a readout of the landscape components that supplements the geo-morphological, lithological, geodiversity data (Lugeri et alii, 2012). The concept of "geomorpho-landscape" is conceived to address the need to describe by a synthetic approach the geological processes emerging at the landscape scale, allowing to link spatial patterns to geological processes Each geo-form has in itself geological, geo-morphological, landmark, historical and cultural features, of such special relevance, that they can be defined in terms of scientific quality, rarity, aesthetic appeal and educational and cultural value. Reference List AMADIO V. (2003). Analisi di sistemi e progetti di paesaggio. Franco Angeli, Milano, pp 236 AMADIO V, AMADEI M, BAGNAIA R, DI BUCCI D, LAURETI L, LISI A, LUGERI FR, LUGERI N. (2002). The role of Geomorphology in Landscape Ecology: The Landscape Unit Map of Italy', Scale 1: 250,000 ("Carta della Natura" Project). In: Allison RJ (ed) Applied Geomorphology: theory and practice. John Wiley & Sons, London, pp 265-282 APAT (2003). Carta della natura alla scala 1:250,000: metodologie di realizzazione. APAT, Manuali e linee guida 17/2003, Roma, pp 103 LUGERI F.R., FARABOLLINI P., GRAVIANO G. & AMADIO V. (2012). Geoheritage: Nature and culture in a landscape approach. European

    6. Damage evaluation for crops exposed to a simulated leakage of geologically stored CO2 using hyperspectral imaging technology

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Burud, Ingunn; Moni, Christophe; Flø, Andreas; Rolstad Denby, Cecilie; Rasse, Daniel

      2013-04-01

      , University of Nottingham, Sapienza Università di Roma, Quintessa, CO2 GeoNet, Bioforsk, BGR and ZERO. For more information please go to the website (www.riscs-co2.eu) or contact the project coordinator David Jones (e-mail: dgj@bgs.ac.uk tel. +44(0)115-936-3576).

    7. Ground-penetrating radar investigation of St. Leonard's Crypt under the Wawel Cathedral (Cracow, Poland) - COST Action TU1208

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Benedetto, Andrea; Pajewski, Lara; Dimitriadis, Klisthenis; Avlonitou, Pepi; Konstantakis, Yannis; Musiela, Małgorzata; Mitka, Bartosz; Lambot, Sébastien; Żakowska, Lidia

      2016-04-01

      "Applications of Ground Penetrating Radar in urban areas: the sensitive case of historical cities." The Action TU1208 is coordinated by "Roma Tre University" (Rome, Italy) and the TS was hosted by the Cracow University of Technology (Cracow, Poland). It was attended by 25 PhD students and early-career investigators coming from Albania, Belgium, Germany, Italy, Poland, Romania, Russia and Slovenia. Trainers and Trainees had the great honour and privilege to carry out practical sessions in St Leonard's Crypt, in cooperation with the companies Restauro (Toruń, Poland) and Geoservice (Athens, Greece). Over the centuries, city centres have been continuously changing, developing and adapting to the requirements of society, architectural planning and advancing technology. Under the pressure of urbanisation, many cities and towns have significantly expanded and the limited space in their centres has been exploited more intensively. The shallow subsurface of historical cities is nowadays a very complicated scenario including reams of pipes, cables, rubble, bars and slabs of reinforced concrete, backfilled excavation trenches and pits, cellars, wells, cavities, tunnels, graves, walls and foundations of former houses, churches, monasteries, town fortifications, along with several other modern and ancient structures and manufacts. For the prospection of such a diversified, multilayered, intricate and complex underground environment, both for archaeological and civil-engineering purposes, Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) is a very effective non-destructive geophysical method. GPR is a powerful tool not only for the prospection of subsurface but also for the non-invasive testing of historical buildings, fountains, historical bridges, sculptures, frescoes, pottery and other objects collected in museums: it can give information about their state of preservation, it can significantly help to address a restoration project properly, and sometimes it can also help to achieve information of

    8. PREFACE: XIII International Conference on Calorimetry in High Energy Physics (CALOR 2008)

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Livan, Michele

      2009-07-01

      Advisory Commitee M Danilov, ITEP Moscow M Diemoz, INFN Roma I A Ereditato, Bern F Fabbri, INFN Frascati T Kobayashi, ICEPP Tokyo P Lubrano, INFN Perugia S Magill, ANL Argonne A Maio, LIP Lisbon H Oberlack, MPI Munich A Para, Fermilab K Pretzl, Bern Y Wang, IHEP Beijing R Wigmans, TTU Lubbock R Yoshida, ANL Argonne R Zhu, Caltech Local Organizing Committee R Ferrari, INFN Pavia M Fraternali, Università di Pavia G Gaudio, INFN Pavia M Livan, Università di Pavia (Chair) P Pedroni, INFN Pavia D A Scannicchio, INFN Pavia V Vercesi, INFN Pavia Session Organizers Operating Calorimeters W Sakumoto (University of Rochester) D Schamberger (State University of NY at Stony Brook) Calorimetric Techniques C De La Taille (Université de Paris-Sud) Paul Lecoq (CERN) Frank Maas (GSI-Mainz University) Jan Stark (LPSC Grenoble) Astrophysics and neutrinos I Gil Botella (CIEMAT) A Vacchi (INFN Trieste) LHC P Bloch (CERN) L Serin (Laboratoire de l'Accelerateur Lineaire/IN2P3/CNRS) New Techniques N Akchurin (Texas Tech University) F Salvatore (Royal Holloway University of London) Simulation T Carli (CERN) A Rimoldi (INFN e Università di Pavia) Organization Dipartimento di Fisica Nucleare e Teorica - Università degli Studi di Pavia Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Sezione di Pavia Università degli Studi di Pavia Pragma Congressi, Corso Mazzini, 9 - Pavia Sponsored by CAEN HAMAMATSU Photonis Italia Iseg Spezialelektrinik GmbH Wiener

    9. PREFACE: IUPAP C20 Conference on Computational Physics (CCP 2011)

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Troparevsky, Claudia; Stocks, George Malcolm

      2012-12-01

      . We are grateful to the committees that helped put the conference together, especially the local organizing committee. Particular thanks are also due to a number of ORNL staff who spent long hours with the administrative details. We are pleased to express our thanks to the conference administrator Ann Strange (ORNL/CDP) for her responsive and efficient day-to-day handling of this event, Sherry Samples, Assistant Conference Administrator (ORNL), Angie Beach and the ORNL Conference Office, and Shirley Shugart (ORNL) and Fern Stooksbury (ORNL) who created and maintained the conference website. Editors: G Malcolm Stocks (ORNL) and M Claudia Troparevsky (UT) http://ccp2011.ornl.gov Chair: Dr Malcolm Stocks (ORNL) Vice Chairs: Adriana Moreo (ORNL/UT) James Guberrnatis (LANL) Local Program Committee: Don Batchelor (ORNL) Jack Dongarra (UTK/ORNL) James Hack (ORNL) Robert Harrison (ORNL) Paul Kent (ORNL) Anthony Mezzacappa (ORNL) Adriana Moreo (ORNL) Witold Nazarewicz (UT) Loukas Petridis (ORNL) David Schultz (ORNL) Bill Shelton (ORNL) Claudia Troparevsky (ORNL) Mina Yoon (ORNL) International Advisory Board Members: Joan Adler (Israel Institute of Technology, Israel) Constantia Alexandrou (University of Cyprus, Cyprus) Claudia Ambrosch-Draxl (University of Leoben, Austria) Amanda Barnard (CSIRO, Australia) Peter Borcherds (University of Birmingham, UK) Klaus Cappelle (UFABC, Brazil) Giovanni Ciccotti (Università degli Studi di Roma 'La Sapienza', Italy) Nithaya Chetty (University of Pretoria, South Africa) Charlotte Froese-Fischer (NIST, US) Giulia A. Galli (University of California, Davis, US) Gillian Gehring (University of Sheffield, UK) Guang-Yu Guo (National Taiwan University, Taiwan) Sharon Hammes-Schiffer (Penn State, US) Alex Hansen (Norweigan UST) Duane D. Johnson (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, US) David Landau (University of Georgia, US) Joaquin Marro (University of Granada, Spain) Richard Martin (UIUC, US) Todd Martinez (Stanford University, US) Bill

    10. PREFACE: DICE 2012 : Spacetime Matter Quantum Mechanics - from the Planck scale to emergent phenomena

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Diósi, Lajos; Elze, Hans-Thomas; Fronzoni, Leone; Halliwell, Jonathan; Prati, Enrico; Vitiello, Giuseppe; Yearsley, James

      2013-06-01

      Milano), F Guerra (Università 'La Sapienza', Roma) and G Vitiello (Università di Salerno), this event traditionally dedicated to the public drew a large audience involved in lively discussions until late. The workshop was organized by L Diósi (Budapest), H-T Elze (Pisa, chair), L Fronzoni (Pisa), J J Halliwell (London), E Prati (Milano) and G Vitiello (Salerno), with most essential help from our conference secretaries L Fratino, N Lampo, I Pozzana, and A Sonnellini, all students from Pisa, and from our former secretaries M Pesce-Rollins and L Baldini. Several institutions and sponsors supported the workshop and their representatives and, in particular, the citizens of Rosignano/Castiglioncello are deeply thanked for the generous help and kind hospitality: Comune di Rosignano - A Franchi (Sindaco di Rosignano), S Scarpellini (Segreteria sindaco), L Benini (Assessore ai lavori pubblici), M Pia (Assessore all' urbanistica) REA Rosignano Energia Ambiente s.p.a. - F Ghelardini (Presidente della REA), E Salvadori and C Peccianti (Segreteria) Associazione Armunia - A Nanni (Direttore), G Mannari (Programmazione), C Perna, F Bellini, M Nannerini, P Bruni and L Meucci (Tecnici). Special thanks go to G Mannari and her collaborators for advice and great help in all the practical matters that had to be dealt with, in order to run the meeting at Castello Pasquini smoothly Funds made available by Università di Pisa, Domus Galilaeana (Pisa), Centro Interdisciplinare per lo Studio dei Sistemi Complessi - CISSC (Pisa), Dipartimento di Ingegneria Industriale (Università di Salerno), Istituto Italiano per gli Studi Filosofici - IISF (Napoli), Solvay Italia SA (Rosignano), Institute of Physics Publishing - IOP (Bristol), Springer Verlag (Heidelberg), and Hungarian Scientific Research Fund OTKA are gratefully acknowledged. Last, but not least, special thanks are due to Laura Pesce (Vitrium Galleria, San Vincenzo) for the exposition of her artwork 'arte e scienza' at Castello Pasquini

    11. PREFACE: 30th EPS Conference on Controlled Fusion and Plasma Physics

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Koch, R.; Lebedev, S.

      2003-12-01

      The 30th EPS Conference on Controlled Fusion and Plasma Physics took place in St Petersburg, Russian Federation, on 7th--11th July 2003. It was jointly organized by the Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute, the St Petersburg State Polytechnical University and Technical University Applied Physics Ltd, on behalf of the Plasma Physics Division of the European Physical Society (EPS). The members of the local organizing committee were drawn from these institutions: B Kuteev, Chair, Polytechnical University S Lebedev, Vice-Chair, Ioffe Institute A Lebedev, Scientific Secretary, Ioffe Institute V Bakharev, TUAP Ltd V Grigor'yants, Ioffe Institute V Sergeev, Polytechnical University N Zhubr, Ioffe Institute Over the years, the annual conference of the Plasma Physics Division of the European Physical Society has widened its scope. Contributions to the present conference covered widely diversified fields of plasma physics, ranging from magnetic and inertial fusion to low temperature plasmas. Plasma sizes under investigation ranged from tiny to astronomical. The topics covered during the conference were distributed over the following categories: tokamaks, stellarators, high intensity laser produced plasmas and inertial confinement, alternative magnetic confinement, plasma edge physics, plasma heating and current drive, diagnostics, basic plasma physics, astrophysical and geophysical plasmas and low temperature plasmas. The scientific programme and paper selection were the responsibility of the Programme Committee appointed by the Board of the EPS Plasma Physics Division. The committee was composed of: R Koch, Chairman, ERM/KMS Brussels, Belgium E Ascasibar, CIEMAT Madrid, Spain S Atzeni, Università di Roma, Italy G Bonhomme, LPMI Nancy, France C Chiuderi, Università di Firenze, Italy B Kuteev, St Petersburg State Polytechnical,University, Russian Federation M Mauel, Contact person APS-DPP, Columbia University New York, USA R A Pitts, EPFL/CRPP Lausanne, Switzerland R Salomaa

    12. Damage evaluation for crops exposed to a simulated leakage of geologically stored CO2 using hyperspectral imaging technology

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Burud, Ingunn; Moni, Christophe; Flø, Andreas; Rolstad Denby, Cecilie; Rasse, Daniel

      2013-04-01

      , University of Nottingham, Sapienza Università di Roma, Quintessa, CO2 GeoNet, Bioforsk,

    13. ROV advanced magnetic survey for revealing archaeological targets and estimating medium magnetization

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Eppelbaum, Lev

      2013-04-01

      magnetic field for the models of thin bed, thick bed and horizontal circular cylinder; some of these procedures demand performing measurements at two levels over the earth's surface), (6) advanced 3D magnetic-gravity modeling for complex media, and (7) development of 3D physical-archaeological (or magnetic-archaeological) model of the studied area. ROV observations also permit to realize a multimodel approach to magnetic data analysis (Eppelbaum, 2005). Results of performed 3D modeling confirm an effectiveness of the proposed ROV low-altitude survey. Khesin's methodology (Khesin et al., 2006) for estimation of upper geological section magnetization consists of land magnetic observations along a profile disposing under inclined relief with the consequent data processing (this method cannot be applied at flat topography). The improved modification of this approach is based on combination of straight and inclined ROV observations that will help to obtain parameters of the medium magnetization with areas of flat terrain relief. ACKNOWLEDGEMENT This investigation is funding from the Tel Aviv University - the Cyprus Research Institute combined project "Advanced coupled electric-magnetic archaeological prospecting in Cyprus and Israel". REFERENCES Eppelbaum, L.V., 2005. Multilevel observations of magnetic field at archaeological sites as additional interpreting tool. Proceed. of the 6th Conference of Archaeological Prospection, Roma, Italy, 1-4. Eppelbaum, L.V., 2010. Archaeological geophysics in Israel: Past, Present and Future. Advances of Geosciences, 24, 45-68. Eppelbaum, L.V., 2011. Study of magnetic anomalies over archaeological targets in urban conditions. Physics and Chemistry of the Earth, 36, No. 16, 1318-1330. Eppelbaum, L.V., Alperovich, L., Zheludev, V. and Pechersky, A., 2011. Application of informational and wavelet approaches for integrated processing of geophysical data in complex environments. Proceed. of the 2011 SAGEEP Conference, Charleston, South Carolina

    14. Difficulties in the evaluation and measuring of soil water infiltration

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Pla-Sentís, Ildefonso

      2013-04-01

      conditions by the land management, but also due to the manipulation of the soil before and during the measurement. Direct "in situ" field evaluations have to be preferred in any case to indirect deductions from other soil characteristics measured under laboratory conditions in the same soils, or in other soils, through the so called "pedo-transfer" functions, or through the use of stochastic models such as the SCS Curve Number Method, or of other models using empirical or physical approaches, which have demonstrated to be of limited value in most of the cases. References Philip, J. R., 1954., An infiltration equation with physical significance: Soil Sci..,v. 77, p. 153-157. Philip, J. R., 1958. The theory of infiltration, pt. 7: Soil Sci., v. 85, no. 6, p. 333-337. Pla, I.1981. Simuladores de lluvia para el estudio de relaciones suelo-agua bajo agricultura de secano en los trópicos. Rev. Fac. Agron. XII(1-2):81-93.Maracay (Venezuela) Pla, I. 1986. A routine laboratory index to predict the effects of soil sealing on soil and water conservation. En "Assesment of Soil Surface Sealing and Crusting". 154-162.State Univ. of Ghent.Gante (Bélgica Pla, I., 1997. A soil water balance model for monitoring soil erosion processes and effects on steep lands in the tropics. Soil Technology. 11(1):17-30. Elsevier Pla, I., M.C. Ramos, S. Nacci, F. Fonseca y X. Abreu. 2005. Soil moisture regime in dryland vineyards of Catalunya (Spain) as influenced by climate, soil and land management. "Integrated Soil and Water Management for Orchard Development". FAO Land and Water Bulletin 10. 41-49. Roma (Italia). Pla, I., 2006. Hydrological approach for assessing desertification processes in the Mediterranean region. In W.G. Kepner et al. (Editors), Desertification in the Mediterranean Region. A Security Issue. 579-600 Springer. Heidelberg (Germany) Pla, I. 2011. Evaluación y Modelización Hidrológica para el Diagnóstico y Prevención de "Desastres Naturales". Gestión y Ambiente 14 (3): 17-22. UN

    15. List of Participants

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      2007-11-01

      Mohab Abou ZeidVrije Universiteit, Brussel Joke AdamKatholieke Universiteit Leuven Nikolas AkerblomMax-Planck-Institut für Physik, München Luis Fernando Alday Utrecht University Stelios Alexandris University of Patras Antonio Amariti Università di Milano-Bicocca Nicola Ambrosetti Université de Neuchâtel Pascal Anastasopoulos Università di Roma Tor Vergata Laura Andrianopoli Enrico Fermi Center Carlo Angelantonj Università di Torino Lilia Anguelova Queen Mary, University of London Daniel AreanUniversidade de Santiago de Compostela Gleb ArutyunovUtrecht University Spyros Avramis NTU Athens—University of Patras Ioannis Bakas University of Patras Subrata Bal Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies Igor Bandos Valencia University Jessica Barrett University of Iceland Marco Baumgartl Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule, Zürich Jacopo Bechi Università di Firenze James Bedford Queen Mary, University of London Jorge Bellorin Universidad Autonoma de Madrid Francesco Benini SISSA, Trieste Eric Bergshoeff Centre for Theoretical Physics, University of Groningen Gaetano BertoldiUniversity of Wales, Swansea Adel Bilal Laboratoire de Physique Théorique, École Normale Superieure, Paris Matthias Blau Université de Neuchâtel Johannes BroedelUniversität Hannover Felix Brümmer Universität Heidelberg Julio Cesar Bueno de Andrade São Paulo State University—UNESP Cliff Burgess McMaster University Agostino Butti Laboratoire de Physique Théorique, École Normale Superieure, Paris Marco Caldarelli Universitat de Barcelona Pablo G Camara Centre de Physique Théorique, École Polytechnique, Palaiseau Joan Camps Universitat de Barcelona Felipe Canoura FernandezUniversidade de Santiago de Compostela Luigi Cappiello Università di Napoli Federico II Luca Carlevaro École Polytechnique, Palaiseau Roberto Casero Centre de Physique Théorique, École Polytechnique, Palaiseau Claudio Caviezel Max-Planck-Institut für Physik, München Alessio Celi Universitat de Barcelona Anna

    16. List of Participants

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      2008-11-01

      Davide CassaniLaboratoire de Physique Théorique, École Normale Supérieure, Paris Alejandra CastroUniversity of Michigan Claudio Caviezel Max-Planck-Institut für Physik, München Alessio Celi Universitat de Barcelona Anna Ceresole Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Università di Torino Athanasios ChatzistavrakidisNational Technical University of Athens Wissam ChemissanyCentre for Theoretical Physics, University of Groningen Eugen-Mihaita CioroianuUniversity of Craiova Andres CollinucciTechnische Universität Wien Paul CookUniversità di Roma, Tor Vergata Lorenzo CornalbaUniversità di Milano-Bicocca Aldo CotroneKatholieke Universiteit Leuven Ben Craps Vrije Universiteit, Brussel Stefano Cremonesi SISSA, Trieste Riccardo D'AuriaPolitecnico di Torino Gianguido Dall'AgataUniversity of Padova Jose A de AzcarragaUniversidad de Valencia Jan de BoerInstituut voor Theoretische Fysica, Universiteit van Amsterdam Sophie de BuylInstitut des Hautes Études Scientifiques, Bures-sur-Yvette Marius de LeeuwUtrecht University Frederik De RooVrije Universiteit, Brussel Jan De Rydt Katholieke Universiteit Leuven and CERN, Geneva Bernard de WitInstitute for Theoretical Physics, Utrecht University Stephane DetournayIstituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Milano Paolo Di Vecchia Niels Bohr Institute, København Eugen DiaconuUniversity of Craiova Vladimir Dobrev Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia Nick DoreyUniversity of Cambridge Hajar Ebrahim NajafabadiIPM, Tehran Federico Elmetti Università di Milano Oleg Evnin Vrije Universiteit, Brussel Francesco Fiamberti Università di Milano Davide Forcella SISSA, Trieste and CERN, Geneva Valentina Forini Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin Angelos Fotopoulos Università di Torino Denis Frank Université de Neuchâtel Marialuisa Frau Università di Torino Matthias Gaberdiel Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH), Zürich Diego Gallego SISSA/ISAS, Trieste Maria Pilar Garcia del

    17. Exchanging knowledge and working together in COST Action TU1208: Short-Term Scientific Missions on Ground Penetrating Radar

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Santos Assuncao, Sonia; De Smedt, Philippe; Giannakis, Iraklis; Matera, Loredana; Pinel, Nicolas; Dimitriadis, Klisthenis; Giannopoulos, Antonios; Sala, Jacopo; Lambot, Sébastien; Trinks, Immo; Marciniak, Marian; Pajewski, Lara

      2015-04-01

      This work aims at presenting the scientific results stemming from six Short-Term Scientific Missions (STSMs) funded by the COST (European COoperation in Science and Technology) Action TU1208 'Civil Engineering Applications of Ground Penetrating Radar' (Action Chair: Lara Pajewski, STSM Manager: Marian Marciniak). STSMs are important means to develop linkages and scientific collaborations between participating institutions involved in a COST Action. Scientists have the possibility to go to an institution abroad, in order to undertake joint research and share techniques/equipment/infrastructures that may not be available in their own institution. STSMs are particularly intended for Early Stage Researchers (ESRs), i.e., young scientists who obtained their PhD since no more than 8 years when they started to be involved in the Action. Duration of a standard STSM can be from 5 to 90 days and the research activities carried out during this short stay shall specifically contribute to the achievement of the scientific objectives of the supporting COST Action. The first STSM was carried out by Lara Pajewski, visiting Antonis Giannopoulos at The University of Edinburgh (United Kingdom). The research activities focused on the electromagnetic modelling of Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) responses to complex targets. A set of test scenarios was defined, to be used by research groups participating to Working Group 3 of COST Action TU1208, to test and compare different electromagnetic forward- and inverse-scattering methods; these scenarios were modelled by using the well-known finite-difference time-domain simulator GprMax. New Matlab procedures for the processing and visualization of GprMax output data were developed. During the second STSM, Iraklis Giannakis visited Lara Pajewski at Roma Tre University (Italy). The study was concerned with the numerical modelling of horn antennas for GPR. An air-coupled horn antenna was implemented in GprMax and tested in a realistically

    18. Growing Galaxies Gently

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      2010-10-01

      helium as "heavy elements". [2] By carefully splitting up the faint light coming from a galaxy into its component colours using powerful telescopes and spectrographs, astronomers can identify the fingerprints of different chemicals in remote galaxies, and measure the amounts of heavy elements present. With the SINFONI instrument on the VLT astronomers can go one better and get a separate spectrum for each part of an object. This allows them to make a map that shows the quantity of heavy elements present in different parts of a galaxy and also determine where in the galaxy star formation is occurring most vigorously. More information This research was presented in a paper, Gas accretion in distant galaxies as the origin of chemical abundance gradients, by Cresci et al., to appear in Nature on 14 October 2010. The team is composed of G. Cresci (Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Italy), F. Mannucci (Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Italy), R. Maiolino (INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, Italy), A. Marconi (Universitá di Firenze, Italy), A. Gnerucci (Universitá di Firenze, Italy) and L. Magrini (Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Italy). ESO, the European Southern Observatory, is the foremost intergovernmental astronomy organisation in Europe and the world's most productive astronomical observatory. It is supported by 14 countries: Austria, Belgium, the Czech Republic, Denmark, France, Finland, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom. ESO carries out an ambitious programme focused on the design, construction and operation of powerful ground-based observing facilities enabling astronomers to make important scientific discoveries. ESO also plays a leading role in promoting and organising cooperation in astronomical research. ESO operates three unique world-class observing sites in Chile: La Silla, Paranal and Chajnantor. At Paranal, ESO operates the Very Large Telescope, the world's most advanced visible

    19. Study of the heavy flavour fractions in z+jets events from proton-antiproton collisions at energy = 1.96 TeV with the CDF II detector at the Tevatron collider

      SciTech Connect

      Mastrandrea, Paolo; /Siena U.

      2008-06-01

      at the end of 2008. In the meanwhile the only running accelerator able to provide collisions suitable for the search of the Higgs boson is the Tevatron at Fermilab, a proton-antiproton collider with a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV working at 3 {center_dot} 10{sup 32}cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} peak luminosity. These features make the Tevatron able for the direct search of the Higgs boson in the 115-200 GeV mass range. Since the coupling of the Higgs boson is proportional to the masses of the particles involved, the decay in b{bar b} has the largest branching ratio for Higgs mass < 135 GeV and thus the events Z/W + b{bar b} are the main background to the Higgs signal in the most range favored by Standard Model fits. In this thesis a new technique to identify Heavy Flavour quarks inside high - P{sub T} jets is applied to events with a reconstructed Z boson to provide a measurement of the Z+b and Z+c inclusive cross sections. The study of these channels represent also a test of QCD in high transferred momentum regime, and can provide information on proton pdf. This new Heavy Flavour identication technique (tagger) provides an increased statistical separation between b, c and light flavours, using a new vertexing algorithm and a chain of artificial Neural Networks to exploit as much information as possible in each event. For this work I collaborated with the Universita di Roma 'La Sapienza' group working in the CDF II experiment at Tevatron, that has at first developed this tagger. After a brief theoretical introduction (chapter 1) and a description of the experimental apparatus (chapter 2), the tagger itself and its calibration procedure are described in chapter 3 and 4. The chapter 5 is dedicated to the event selection and the chapter 6 contains the results of the measurement and the study of the systematic errors.

    20. FOREWORD: TAUP 2005: Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Topics in Astroparticle and Underground Physics

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Bottino, Alessandro; Coccia, Eugenio; Morales, Julio; Puimedónv, Jorge

      2006-04-01

      qualities, was illustrated. The TAUP Steering Committee recalls with deep gratitude that John Bahcall served continuously as a member of the TAUP International Advisory Committee and that he gave an inspired and brilliant conclusive talk at TAUP 2003 in Seattle. Our astroparticle community will miss him greatly. The TAUP 2005 Organizing Committee thanks Ministerio de Educación y Ciencia, Gobierno de Aragón, Zaragoza University, INFN, IUPAP, PaNAGIC and Ibercaja for sponsoring the Conference, and the Rector and Vice-Rector of the Zaragoza University for their hospitality in the magnificent Paraninfo Palace, where the meeting was held. We wish to thank Venya Berezinsky, José Bernabéu and José Angel Villar for their invaluable contribution in the scientific shaping of the conference and in the preparation of the present volume. Very special thanks are due to Ms Mercedes Fatás and Ms Franca Masciulli, our workshop secretaries, for their continuous and excellent work in the organization of the conference, and to Ms Leopolda Benazzato for her invaluable assistance during the conference. We also gratefully thank the technical staff: Cristina Gil, Francisco Javier Mena and Alfonso Ortiz de Solórzano for their invaluable help. As announced at the end of the conference, TAUP 2007 will be held in Sendai, Japan, hosted by the Tohoku University with the chairs of Professors Atsuto Suzuki and Kunio Inoue. COMMITTEES TAUP STEERING COMMITTEE F. T. Avignone, U. South Carolina B. Barish, CALTECH E. Bellotti, U. Milano/INFN J. Bernabéu, U. Valenciav A. Bottino (chair), U. Torino/INFN V. de Alfaro, U. Torino/INFN T. Kajita, ICRR Tokyo C. W. Kim, JHU Baltimore/KIAS Seoul E. Lorenz U. München V. Matveev, INR Moscow J. Morales, U. Zaragoza D. Sinclair, U. Carleton TAUP 2005 INTERNATIONAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE J. J. Aubert, CNRS Marseille J. Bahcall, U. Princeton M. Baldo-Ceolin, U. Padova/INFN L. Bergström, U. Stockholm R. Bernabei, U. Roma Tor Vergata/INFN A. Bettini, U. Padova/INFN S

    1. Evidence of human-induced morphodynamic changes along the Campania coastal areas (southern Italy) since the 3rd-4th cent. AD

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Russo Ermolli, Elda; Romano, Paola; Liuzza, Viviana; Amato, Vincenzo; Ruello, Maria Rosaria; Di Donato, Valentino

      2014-05-01

      the first archaic settlement (late 6th cent. BC) was unearthed. The Graeco-Roman town expanded downhill, exploiting the growth of a coastal plain, where occasional phases of flooding coexisted with the life of the citizens [6]. The onset of the 3rd cent. AD was characterized by phases of extreme floods which also occurred during the 4th and 5th cent. AD leading to several meters of ground-level aggradation and the burial of buildings [6, 7]. Although the three investigated sites are located in rather different morphological context, they show the evidence of a disequilibrium in the morphodynamics which started in the 3rd-4th cent. AD. The vast amount of collected data strongly suggest that this disequilibrium is a clear sign of a socio-economic decline which affected the Roman Empire during this period rather than the consequence of a climatic deterioration towards dryer conditions, for which no detailed data are available in the Mediterranean area [8]. The abandonment of the towns and their surroundings triggered increased soil erosion on the slopes suffering deforestation and in the farmlands for reduced maintenance, enhancing accumulation rates at the foothills and along coastal areas. References [1] D'Agostino, B., Giampaola, D., 2005. Osservazioni storiche e archeologiche sulla fondazione di Neapolis, in: Harris, W.V., Lo Cascio, E. (Eds.), Noctes Campanae, studi di storia antica e archeologia dell'Italia pre-romana e romana in memoria di Martin W. Frederiksen, Napoli, 63-72. [2] Giampaola, D., Carsana, V., Boetto, G., Bartolini, M., Capretti, C., Galotta, G., Giachi, G., Macchioni, N., Nugari, M. P., Pizzo, B., 2006. La scoperta del porto di Neapolis: dalla ricostruzione topografica allo scavo e al recupero dei relitti. Arch. Mar. Medit., Int. J. Underwat. Arch. 2, 47-91, Ist. Ed. Poligr.Int. MMVI, Pisa - Roma. [3] Allevato, E., Russo Ermolli, E., Boetto, G., Di Pasquale, G., 2010. Pollen-wood analysis at the Neapolis harbour site (1st-3rd century AD, southern

    2. Difficulties in the evaluation and measuring of soil water infiltration

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Pla-Sentís, Ildefonso

      2013-04-01

      conditions by the land management, but also due to the manipulation of the soil before and during the measurement. Direct "in situ" field evaluations have to be preferred in any case to indirect deductions from other soil characteristics measured under laboratory conditions in the same soils, or in other soils, through the so called "pedo-transfer" functions, or through the use of stochastic models such as the SCS Curve Number Method, or of other models using empirical or physical approaches, which have demonstrated to be of limited value in most of the cases. References Philip, J. R., 1954., An infiltration equation with physical significance: Soil Sci..,v. 77, p. 153-157. Philip, J. R., 1958. The theory of infiltration, pt. 7: Soil Sci., v. 85, no. 6, p. 333-337. Pla, I.1981. Simuladores de lluvia para el estudio de relaciones suelo-agua bajo agricultura de secano en los trópicos. Rev. Fac. Agron. XII(1-2):81-93.Maracay (Venezuela) Pla, I. 1986. A routine laboratory index to predict the effects of soil sealing on soil and water conservation. En "Assesment of Soil Surface Sealing and Crusting". 154-162.State Univ. of Ghent.Gante (Bélgica Pla, I., 1997. A soil water balance model for monitoring soil erosion processes and effects on steep lands in the tropics. Soil Technology. 11(1):17-30. Elsevier Pla, I., M.C. Ramos, S. Nacci, F. Fonseca y X. Abreu. 2005. Soil moisture regime in dryland vineyards of Catalunya (Spain) as influenced by climate, soil and land management. "Integrated Soil and Water Management for Orchard Development". FAO Land and Water Bulletin 10. 41-49. Roma (Italia). Pla, I., 2006. Hydrological approach for assessing desertification processes in the Mediterranean region. In W.G. Kepner et al. (Editors), Desertification in the Mediterranean Region. A Security Issue. 579-600 Springer. Heidelberg (Germany) Pla, I. 2011. Evaluación y Modelización Hidrológica para el Diagnóstico y Prevención de "Desastres Naturales". Gestión y Ambiente 14 (3): 17-22. UN

    3. Periodic cycle of stretching and breaking of the head of gravity currents

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Nogueira, H. I. S.; Adduce, C.; Alves, E.; Franca, M. J.

      2012-04-01

      its particular buoyancy drives the advance of the current, with a different celerity from the tail. The head is highly concentrated being the main engine of convection of the released mass, being subjected to entrainment at the interface with the ambient fluid. The aim of the present work is to experimentally investigate the dynamics of the head, including continuous entrainment and cycles of stretching and breaking observed in the laboratory. Experiments were conducted at the Laboratory of Hydraulics of University of Rome "Roma Tre" in a 3.0 m long, 0.20 m wide and 0.30 m deep transparent Perspex flume. Four lock-exchange release tests were performed varying the density of the saline water. For smooth bed and for a fixed value of water depth, h = 0.20 m, the following four different initial densities of the salt-water mixture were analysed: 1015, 1030, 1045 and 1060 kg/m3. A controlled quantity of dye is added to the saline water in the lock to provide flow visualization and to serve as density tracer. The development of the current is recorded with a 25 Hz CCD camera under controlled light conditions. The resulting video frames are thus converted into grey scale matrices and a calibration procedure establishes a non-linear relation, experimentally determined, between the gray scale values and the quantity of dye in the water. The quantity of dye is converted into salt concentration by assuming a linear relation between quantities, dye and salt, allowing thus the estimation of the 2D instantaneous current density distribution. The experiments allowed the observation of the dynamics of the head of unsteady density currents in detail, including a cyclic increase in dimension and mass due to entrainment followed by a division in two distinct patches. A frontal one continues the drive downstream whereas a subsequent one is left behind and incorporated in the tail, thus indicating that the loss of saline mass in the head is not only due to continuous entrainment at the

    4. Predictive models and spatial analysis for the study of deserted medieval villages in Basilicata Region (Italy)

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Biscione, Marilisa; Danese, Maria; Masini, Nicola; Sabia, Canio

      2016-04-01

      (August 5, 2013); doi:10.1117/12.2027954 Danese M., Masini N., Biscione M., Lasaponara R. 2014. Predictive modeling for preventive Archaeology: Overview and case study. Central European Journal of Geosciences. March 2014,Volume 6, Issue 1, 42-55, doi: 10.2478/s13533-012-0160-5 G. Demians d'Archimbaud - Rougiers, Castrum médiéval déserté. In : Pays Sainte-Baume 9 (2001) 6-8 Lasaponara R., Masini N. 2009, Full-waveform Airborne Laser Scanning for the detection of medieval archaeological microtopographic relief, Journal of Cultural Heritage, 10S, pp. e78-e82, doi:10.1016/j.culher.2009.10.004. Lasaponara R., Leucci G., Masini N., Persico R., Scardozzi G., 2016, Towards an operative use of remote sensing for exploring the past using satellite data: The case study of Hierapolis (Turkey), Remote sensing of Environment, vol. 174: 148-164, doi:10.1016/j.rse.2015.12.016 Masini N. 1998, La fotointerpretazione aerea finalizzata allo studio morfologico dei siti urbani e fortificati medioevali della Basilicata, in "Castra ipsa possunt et debent reparari." Indagini conoscitive e metodologie di restauro delle strutture castellane normanno-sveve, a cura C. D. Fonseca, Roma, Edizioni De Luca, tomo I, pp. 205-250, ISBN: 8880162888 Podobnikar, T., Veljanovski, T., Stanèiè, Z., Oštir, K. (2001) Archaeological Predictive Modelling in Cultural Resource Management. In: Konečný, M. (ed): GI in EUROPE: integrative - interoperable - interactive. Proceedings of 4th Agile Conference on Geographic Information Science, April 19-21 2001, Brno, pp. 535-544.

    5. GOODS Missing Black Hole Report: Hundreds Found!

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      2007-10-01

      can see the elephant for the first time." Consistent results were also recently obtained by Fabrizio Fiore of the Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma and his team. Their results will appear in the Jan 1, 2008, issue of Astrophysical Journal. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Ala., manages the Chandra program for the agency's Science Mission Directorate. The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory controls science and flight operations from the Chandra X-ray Center in Cambridge, Mass. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., manages the Spitzer Space Telescope mission for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington. Science operations are conducted at the Spitzer Science Center at the California Institute of Technology, also in Pasadena. Caltech manages JPL for NASA

    6. Periodic cycle of stretching and breaking of the head of gravity currents

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Nogueira, H. I. S.; Adduce, C.; Alves, E.; Franca, M. J.

      2012-04-01

      its particular buoyancy drives the advance of the current, with a different celerity from the tail. The head is highly concentrated being the main engine of convection of the released mass, being subjected to entrainment at the interface with the ambient fluid. The aim of the present work is to experimentally investigate the dynamics of the head, including continuous entrainment and cycles of stretching and breaking observed in the laboratory. Experiments were conducted at the Laboratory of Hydraulics of University of Rome "Roma Tre" in a 3.0 m long, 0.20 m wide and 0.30 m deep transparent Perspex flume. Four lock-exchange release tests were performed varying the density of the saline water. For smooth bed and for a fixed value of water depth, h = 0.20 m, the following four different initial densities of the salt-water mixture were analysed: 1015, 1030, 1045 and 1060 kg/m3. A controlled quantity of dye is added to the saline water in the lock to provide flow visualization and to serve as density tracer. The development of the current is recorded with a 25 Hz CCD camera under controlled light conditions. The resulting video frames are thus converted into grey scale matrices and a calibration procedure establishes a non-linear relation, experimentally determined, between the gray scale values and the quantity of dye in the water. The quantity of dye is converted into salt concentration by assuming a linear relation between quantities, dye and salt, allowing thus the estimation of the 2D instantaneous current density distribution. The experiments allowed the observation of the dynamics of the head of unsteady density currents in detail, including a cyclic increase in dimension and mass due to entrainment followed by a division in two distinct patches. A frontal one continues the drive downstream whereas a subsequent one is left behind and incorporated in the tail, thus indicating that the loss of saline mass in the head is not only due to continuous entrainment at the

    7. PREFACE: A tribute to Virginio Bortolani

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Brivio, Gian Paolo

      2007-08-01

      published by Plenum Press in 1990, are still a classic in surface science, and we often refer to them as the 'red book' by the colour of its cover reminiscent of another more famous book. But I do not wish to dwell upon pleasant memories of my relationship with Virginio Bortolani any longer. We should better record a few important facts of his broad activity. J P Toennies will outline Bortolani's achievements in the field of surface phonons and vibrations in a review article of this volume. So I would like to stress other very important contributions of his to the scientific development in this country and to the international community. In the late seventies surface physics was being studied by very few and tiny groups in Italy (mainly at Genova, Milano and Roma Universities). But Bortolani was able to form the first theoretical group of international reputation in this field in Italy at Modena University. In this respect he was surely helped by his previous experience at the Cavendish Laboratory working with V Heine on the theory of pseudopotentials and with N Mott. This allowed him to be at the forefront of condensed matter theory so that to propose and carry out exciting research subjects. Bortolani also supervised all the initiatives in the 70s and 80s from which Modena has grown so much as to be now considered an internationally recognized centre of surface science and nanotechnology. Second, by organizing a conference in Modena every year the week before Christmas (the so-called Congressino di Modena by the Italian participants), he promoted the diffusion of surface physics in the country: it became soon traditional for bright young physicists to come to Modena on that occasion, and, because of the exciting and friendly atmosphere, to turn to surface investigations. The catalysing activity of Bortolani is also confirmed by the number of his students who have matured into excellent scientists or technologists: Carlo Calandra, Carlo Maria Bertoni, Franca Manghi

    8. PREFACE: Nanoscale science and technology

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Bellucci, Stefano

      2008-11-01

      ://www.lnf.infn.it/conference/nn2000/default.html N&N2001, Frascati (Roma), Italy, 17-27 October 2001, http://www.lnf.infn.it/conference/nn2001/Welcome.html N&N2002, Frascati (Roma), Italy, 23-28 September 2002, http://www.lnf.infn.it/conference/nn2002/ N&N2003, Frascati (Roma), Italy, 15-19 September 2003, http://www.lnf.infn.it/conference/nn2003/ N&N2004, Frascati (Roma), Italy, 14-20 October 2004, http://www.lnf.infn.it/conference/nn2004/ n&n2005, Monteporzio Catone (Roma), Italy, 14-16 November 2005, http://www.lnf.infn.it/conference/nn2005/ n&n2006, Monteporzio Catone (Roma), Italy, 6-9 November 2006, http://www.lnf.infn.it/conference/nn2006/ In order to enable the exchange of knowledge and collaboration among the different scientists in the field of nanotechnology, whilst also offering an opportunity for those who are just beginning to get involved with it, allowing them to meet contacts and get prime, up-to-date information from the experts, a special poster and equipment session displayed various firm's institutional activities in selected areas of application where nanoscience can have a deep impact. The participants were also able to get involved with sample testing. Tutorial lectures were delivered at the school, addressing general and basic questions about nanotechnology, such as what they are, how does one go about them, what purposes can they serve. In tutorial sessions the nature of nanotechnology, the instruments of current use in its characterizations and the possible applicative uses were described at an introductory level. The first day was devoted to three sessions: Aerospace, defense, biomedicine. Electronics and mechanical properties. Materials and characterizations. The first session was opened by a lecture by J Kenny, who talked about the use of carbon nanotubes for polymer matrix nanocomposites. He reported how plasma functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (F-SWNTs) reacted with a primary aliphatic amine can be used for preparing an integrated nanotube composite

    9. PREFACE: Particles and Fields: Classical and Quantum

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Asorey, M.; Clemente-Gallardo, J.; Marmo, G.

      2007-07-01

      , Germany)

    M. Asorey (Universidad de Zaragoza, Spain)
    G. F. Dell Antonio (Universitá di Roma La Sapienza, Italy)
    A. Galindo (Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Spain)
    S. L. Glashow (Boston University, USA)
    A. M. Gleeson (University of Texas, Austin, USA)
    C. R. Hagen (Rochester University, NY, USA)
    J. Klauder (University of Florida, Gainesville, USA)
    A. Kossakowski (University of Torun, Poland)
    V.I. Manko (Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow, Russia)
    G. Marmo (Universitá Federico II di Napoli e INFN Sezione di Napoli, Italy)
    N. Mukunda (Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, India)
    J. V. Narlikar (Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pune, India)
    J. Nilsson (University of Goteborg, Sweden)
    S. Okubo (Rochester University, NY, USA)
    T. Regge (Politecnico di Torino, Italy)
    W. Schleich (University of Ulm, Germany)
    M. Scully (Texas A& M University, USA)
    S. Weinberg (University of Texas, Austin, USA)

    Local Organizing Committee

    M. Asorey (Universidad de Zaragoza, Spain)
    L. J. Boya (Universidad de Zaragoza, Spain). Co-Chair
    J. F. Cariñena (Universidad de Zaragoza, Spain)
    J. Clemente-Gallardo (Universidad de Zaragoza, Spain)
    F. Falceto (Universidad de Zaragoza, Spain)
    G. Marmo (Universitá Federico II di Napoli e INFN Sezione di Napoli, Italy) Co-Chair
    G. Morandi (Universitá di Bologna, Italy)

    Participants

    ACHARYA, Raghunath: Arizona State University, USA
    AGUADO, Miguel M.: Max-Planck-Institut für Quantenoptik, Garching, Germany
    ASOREY, Manuel: Universidad de Zaragoza, Spain

  21. PREFACE: A tribute to Virginio Bortolani

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brivio, Gian Paolo

    2007-08-01

    published by Plenum Press in 1990, are still a classic in surface science, and we often refer to them as the 'red book' by the colour of its cover reminiscent of another more famous book. But I do not wish to dwell upon pleasant memories of my relationship with Virginio Bortolani any longer. We should better record a few important facts of his broad activity. J P Toennies will outline Bortolani's achievements in the field of surface phonons and vibrations in a review article of this volume. So I would like to stress other very important contributions of his to the scientific development in this country and to the international community. In the late seventies surface physics was being studied by very few and tiny groups in Italy (mainly at Genova, Milano and Roma Universities). But Bortolani was able to form the first theoretical group of international reputation in this field in Italy at Modena University. In this respect he was surely helped by his previous experience at the Cavendish Laboratory working with V Heine on the theory of pseudopotentials and with N Mott. This allowed him to be at the forefront of condensed matter theory so that to propose and carry out exciting research subjects. Bortolani also supervised all the initiatives in the 70s and 80s from which Modena has grown so much as to be now considered an internationally recognized centre of surface science and nanotechnology. Second, by organizing a conference in Modena every year the week before Christmas (the so-called Congressino di Modena by the Italian participants), he promoted the diffusion of surface physics in the country: it became soon traditional for bright young physicists to come to Modena on that occasion, and, because of the exciting and friendly atmosphere, to turn to surface investigations. The catalysing activity of Bortolani is also confirmed by the number of his students who have matured into excellent scientists or technologists: Carlo Calandra, Carlo Maria Bertoni, Franca Manghi

  22. Is the April 6th 2009 L'Aquila earthquake a confirmation of the "seismic landscape" concept?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blumetti, Anna Maria; Comerci, Valerio; Guerrieri, Luca; Michetti, Alessandro Maria; Serva, Leonello; Vittori, Eutizio

    2010-05-01

    -generated mountain fronts in Central Apennines (Central Italy); geomorphological features and seismotectonic implications. Earth Surface Processes and Landforms, 18, 203-223. Blumetti A.M. (1995) - Neotectonic investigations and evidence of paleo­seismicity in the epicentral area of the January-February 1703 Central Italy earthquakes. Bulletin of the American Association of Engineering Geologists, Special Volume n. 6: "Perspectives in Paleoseismology", Texas A&M University, Chapter 7, 83-100. Blumetti A.M., Guerrieri L. (2007) - Fault-generated mountain fronts and the identification of fault segments: implications for seismic hazard assessment. Boll. Soc. Geol. It. (Ital.J.Geosci.), 126 (2), 307-322. Blumetti, A.M., Comerci, V., Di Manna, P., Guerrieri L., Vittori E. (2009) - Geological effects induced by the L'Aquila earthquake (6 April 2009; ML=5.8) on the natural environment. Preliminary Report. 38 pp. http://www.apat.gov.it/site/_files/Inqua/2009_abruzzo_earthquake_report.pdf. Chiarabba, C. et al. (2009) - The 2009 L'Aquila (central Italy) Mw 6.3 earthquake: Main shock and aftershocks. Geophys. Res. Lett., 36, L18308, Michetti A.M., Audemard F., Marco S. (2005) - Future trends in paleoseismology: Integrated study of the seismic landscape as a vital tool in seismic hazard analyses, In: Michetti A.M., Audemard F., Marco S. (Editors), "Paleoseismology, integrated study of the Quaternary geological record for earthquake deformation and faulting", Special Issue, Tectonophysics, 408 (1-4), 3-21. Serva L. Blumetti A.M., Guerrieri L. & Michetti A. M. (2002) - The Apennine intermountain basins: the result of repeated strong earthquakes over a geological time interval. Boll. Soc. Geol. It. Special Volume 1, 939-946. Uria de Llanos A. (1703) - Relazione overo itinerario fatto dall'auditore Alfonso Uria del Llanos per riconoscere li danni causati dalli passati terremoi seguiti li 14 Gennaro e 2 Febraro M.DCCIII: Stamperi Gaetano Zenobj, Roma. Vittori E., G. Deiana, E. Esposito, L. Ferreli

  23. PREFACE: International Conference on Magnetism (ICM 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goll, Gernot; Löhneysen, Hilbert v.; Loidl, Alois; Pruschke, Thomas; Richter, Manuel; Schultz, Ludwig; Sürgers, Christoph; Wosnitza, Jochen

    2010-11-01

    helped to run the conference. We are grateful for financial support to Universität Karlsruhe (TH) and Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (both institutions merged to form the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) as of 1 October 2009), International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP), the City of Karlsruhe, Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German National Science Foundation) and the European Commission through COST MPNS Action P16. Hilbert v Löhneysen Karlsruhe Institute of Technology Email address: hilbert.loehneysen@kit.edu Logo Conference Organization Chairperson Hilbert v Löhneysen, Karlsruhe Members of IUPAP Commission 9 Magnetism C Chang, TaipeiD Kaczorowski, Wroclaw khrouhou, SfaxP H Kes, Leiden M A Continentino, NiteróiS Maekawa, Sendai D E Dahlberg, MinnesotaI Mertig, Halle D Fiorani, RomaD McMorow, London M R Freeman, EdmontonS Rezende, Recife D Givord, GrenobleS Sanvito, Dublin A Granovsky, MoscowJ Xiaofeng, Shanghai International Advisory Board G Aeppli, UKM Gingras, Canada I Affleck, CanadaJ C Gomez Sal, Spain J Akimitsu, JapanP A Grünberg, Germany D Awschalom, USAB Heinrich, Canada S D Bader, USAT J Hicks, Australia E Baggio-Saitovitch, BrazilM R Ibarra, Spain M N Baibich, BrazilY H Jeong, Korea G Baskaran, IndiaB Keimer, Germany E Bauer, AustriaG Kotliar, USA R J Birgeneau, USAR B Laughlin, USA P Bruno, GermanyP A Lee, USA J Chapman, UKG G Lonzarich, UK Y Endoh, JapanA MacDonald, USA A Fert, FranceM B Maple, USA J Fink, GermanyA J Millis, USA Z Fisk, USAL W Molenkamp, Germany J Flouquet, FranceJ A Mydosh, Germany A J Freeman, USAY Maeno, Japan H Fukuyama, JapanK Miyake, Japan P Fulde, GermanyP Nordblad, Sweden H Ohno, JapanF Steglich, Germany H R Ott, SwitzerlandT Takabatake, Japan Y Onuki, JapanJ L Tholence, France S S P Parkin, USAY Tokura, Japan A P Ramirez, USAK Ueda, Japan T M Rice, SwitzerlandD Vollhardt, Germany Z X Shen, USAE F Wassermann, Germany S -C Shin, KoreaM K Wu, Taiwan T Shinjo, JapanD Y Xing, China J C Slonczewski, USAY D Yao

  24. Star Death Beacon at the Edge of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-09-01

    , hence, its distance. "The value we derived has since then been confirmed by spectroscopic observations made by another team using the Subaru telescope", said Angelo Antonelli (Roma Observatory), another member of the team.

  25. The Dark Side of Nature: the Crime was Almost Perfect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-12-01

    Astrofisico di Arcetri, Italy), Guido Chincarini (INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera & Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Italy), Nino Panagia (Space Telescope Science Institute, USA), Gianpiero Tagliaferri, Dino Fugazza, Sergio Campana, Stefano Covino, and Paolo D'Avanzo (INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera, Italy), Daniele Malesani (SISSA/ISAS, Italy and Dark Cosmology Centre, Copenhagen), Vincenzo Testa, L. Angelo Antonelli, Silvia Piranomonte, and Luigi Stella (INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, Italy), Vanessa Mangano (INAF/IASF Palermo, Italy), Kevin Hurley (University of California, Berkeley, USA), I. Felix Mirabel (ESO), and Leonardo J. Pellizza (Instituto de Astronomia y Fisica del Espacio). The Danish-led team is composed of Johan P. U. Fynbo, Darach Watson, Christina C. Thöne, Tamara M. Davis, Jens Hjorth, José Mará Castro Cerón, Brian L. Jensen, Maximilian D. Stritzinger, and Dong Xu (Dark Cosmology Centre, University of Copenhagen, Denmark), Jesper Sollerman (Dark Cosmology Centre and Department of Astronomy, Stockholm University, Sweden), Uffe G. Jørgensen, Tobias C. Hinse, and Kristian G. Woller (Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen), Joshua S. Bloom, Daniel Kocevski, Daniel Perley (Department of Astronomy, University of California at Berkeley, USA), Páll Jakobsson (Centre for Astrophysics Research, University of Hertfordshire, UK), John F. Graham and Andrew S. Fruchter (Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, USA), David Bersier (Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, UK), Lisa Kewley (University of Hawaii, Institute of Astronomy, USA), Arnaud Cassan and Marta Zub (Astronomisches Rechen-Institut, Zentrum für Astronomie der Universität Heidelberg, Germany), Suzanne Foley (School of Physics, University College Dublin, Ireland), Javier Gorosabel (Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia, Granada, Spain), Keith D. Horne (SUPA Physics/Astronomy, University of St Andrews, Scotland, UK), Sylvio

  26. Methodology of Detailed Geophysical Examination of the Areas of World Recognized Religious and Cultural Artifacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eppelbaum, Lev

    2010-05-01

    the low altitudes (3-5 meters) will help geophysical cover all the studied area with a regular observation step (Eppelbaum, 2008). At the final step all these measurements (including results of the previous works) could be compiled to 4D models of different geophysical parameters (Eppelbaum and Ben-Avraham, 2002; Eppelbaum et al., 2010). Analysis of temperature field in the boreholes drilled in the vicinity of the studied site will permit to estimate the temperature (e.g., Eppelbaum et al., 2006c) in the historical period when this artifact was constructed and, correspondingly, utilize this characteristic for investigation of mechanical and other properties of the ancient building material. Studying of temporal variations of magnetic (e.g., Finkelstein and Eppelbaum) and VLF fields can be also used for determination of nature of some buried ancient remains. The geophysical investigations must be combined with geochemical, paleostructural, paleobiogeographical, paleomorphological and other methods (Eppelbaum et al., 2010). Application of informational parameters (Khesin et al., 1996; Eppelbaum et al., 2003b) will permit to present all available data by the use of integral convolution units. REFERENCES Eppelbaum, L.V., 1999. Quantitative interpretation of resistivity anomalies using advanced methods developed in magnetic prospecting. Trans. of the XXIV General Assembly of the Europ. Geoph. Soc., Strasburg 1 (1), p.166. Eppelbaum, L.V., 2000. Applicability of geophysical methods for localization of archaeological targets: An introduction. Geoinformatics, 11, No.1, 19-28. Eppelbaum, L.V., 2005. Multilevel observations of magnetic field at archaeological sites as additional interpreting tool. Proceed. of the 6th Conference of Archaeological Prospection, Roma, Italy, 4 pp. Eppelbaum, L.V., 2008. Remote operated vehicle geophysical survey using magnetic and VLF methods: proposed schemes for data processing and interpretation. Proceed. of the Symp. on the Application of

  27. PREFACE: XVth International Conference on Calorimetry in High Energy Physics (CALOR2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akchurin, Nural

    2012-12-01

    reconstruction and trigger of jets, missing transverse energy, electrons, photons, and taus. Pile-up, anomalous signals, and noise mitigation techniques were also discussed in the conference. On the last day, several future R&D initiatives were presented: highly granular CALICE with different technology options and plans for the dual-readout DREAM projects were the main topics. Although these approaches are quite different conceptually, future experiments will certainly benefit from their innovations. Concluding remarks by the chair of the organizing committee, Nural Akchurin (TTU), summarized the highlights of the conference and invited proposals to host the CALOR2014 conference in Europe, as the conference venue rotates between the Americas, Europe, and Asia every two years. We strived hard to keep the cost of this conference as low as possible without sacrificing the scientific mission. I am delighted to report that we were able to provide support for six junior colleagues to participate in this conference. I am also grateful to the institutions, industrial partners, and agencies that provided the support that made a lot possible: Texas Tech University, the University of New Mexico, Los Alamos National Laboratory, the US Department of Energy, CAEN, and the Wiener Plein & Baus, Corp. I also would like to thank the session conveners who organized sessions and reviewed the papers. The members of the local organizing committee were instrumental to the success of this conference: their experience and attention to detail were invaluable. Most of all, I extend my appreciation to the conference participants and to all my other colleagues who continue to enrich the field of calorimetry through their hard work and creativity. The future is bright. Nural Akchurin Chair of the Organizing Committee International Advisory Committee: Mikhail Danilov, ITEP Moscow Marcella Diemoz, INFN Roma I Antonio Ereditato, Univ. of Bern Franco L. Fabbri, INFN Frascati Tomio Kobayashi, ICEPP Tokyo Michele

  28. List of Participants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-11-01

    Davide CassaniLaboratoire de Physique Théorique, École Normale Supérieure, Paris Alejandra CastroUniversity of Michigan Claudio Caviezel Max-Planck-Institut für Physik, München Alessio Celi Universitat de Barcelona Anna Ceresole Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Università di Torino Athanasios ChatzistavrakidisNational Technical University of Athens Wissam ChemissanyCentre for Theoretical Physics, University of Groningen Eugen-Mihaita CioroianuUniversity of Craiova Andres CollinucciTechnische Universität Wien Paul CookUniversità di Roma, Tor Vergata Lorenzo CornalbaUniversità di Milano-Bicocca Aldo CotroneKatholieke Universiteit Leuven Ben Craps Vrije Universiteit, Brussel Stefano Cremonesi SISSA, Trieste Riccardo D'AuriaPolitecnico di Torino Gianguido Dall'AgataUniversity of Padova Jose A de AzcarragaUniversidad de Valencia Jan de BoerInstituut voor Theoretische Fysica, Universiteit van Amsterdam Sophie de BuylInstitut des Hautes Études Scientifiques, Bures-sur-Yvette Marius de LeeuwUtrecht University Frederik De RooVrije Universiteit, Brussel Jan De Rydt Katholieke Universiteit Leuven and CERN, Geneva Bernard de WitInstitute for Theoretical Physics, Utrecht University Stephane DetournayIstituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Milano Paolo Di Vecchia Niels Bohr Institute, København Eugen DiaconuUniversity of Craiova Vladimir Dobrev Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia Nick DoreyUniversity of Cambridge Hajar Ebrahim NajafabadiIPM, Tehran Federico Elmetti Università di Milano Oleg Evnin Vrije Universiteit, Brussel Francesco Fiamberti Università di Milano Davide Forcella SISSA, Trieste and CERN, Geneva Valentina Forini Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin Angelos Fotopoulos Università di Torino Denis Frank Université de Neuchâtel Marialuisa Frau Università di Torino Matthias Gaberdiel Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH), Zürich Diego Gallego SISSA/ISAS, Trieste Maria Pilar Garcia del

  29. List of Participants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-11-01

    Mohab Abou ZeidVrije Universiteit, Brussel Joke AdamKatholieke Universiteit Leuven Nikolas AkerblomMax-Planck-Institut für Physik, München Luis Fernando Alday Utrecht University Stelios Alexandris University of Patras Antonio Amariti Università di Milano-Bicocca Nicola Ambrosetti Université de Neuchâtel Pascal Anastasopoulos Università di Roma Tor Vergata Laura Andrianopoli Enrico Fermi Center Carlo Angelantonj Università di Torino Lilia Anguelova Queen Mary, University of London Daniel AreanUniversidade de Santiago de Compostela Gleb ArutyunovUtrecht University Spyros Avramis NTU Athens—University of Patras Ioannis Bakas University of Patras Subrata Bal Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies Igor Bandos Valencia University Jessica Barrett University of Iceland Marco Baumgartl Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule, Zürich Jacopo Bechi Università di Firenze James Bedford Queen Mary, University of London Jorge Bellorin Universidad Autonoma de Madrid Francesco Benini SISSA, Trieste Eric Bergshoeff Centre for Theoretical Physics, University of Groningen Gaetano BertoldiUniversity of Wales, Swansea Adel Bilal Laboratoire de Physique Théorique, École Normale Superieure, Paris Matthias Blau Université de Neuchâtel Johannes BroedelUniversität Hannover Felix Brümmer Universität Heidelberg Julio Cesar Bueno de Andrade São Paulo State University—UNESP Cliff Burgess McMaster University Agostino Butti Laboratoire de Physique Théorique, École Normale Superieure, Paris Marco Caldarelli Universitat de Barcelona Pablo G Camara Centre de Physique Théorique, École Polytechnique, Palaiseau Joan Camps Universitat de Barcelona Felipe Canoura FernandezUniversidade de Santiago de Compostela Luigi Cappiello Università di Napoli Federico II Luca Carlevaro École Polytechnique, Palaiseau Roberto Casero Centre de Physique Théorique, École Polytechnique, Palaiseau Claudio Caviezel Max-Planck-Institut für Physik, München Alessio Celi Universitat de Barcelona Anna

  30. Ashes from the Elder Brethren

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-03-01

    based is now in press in the European journal Astronomy & Astrophysics. It is also available on the web as astro-ph/0012457. Notes [1]: 1 billion = 1,000 million. [2]: The team members in the ESO Large Program 165-L0263 devoted to the analysis of globular cluster dwarf stars, described in this Press Release, are: Raffaele Gratton (PI), Eugenio Carretta , Riccardo Claudi , Silvano Desidera , Sara Lucatello (Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, Italy), Gisella Clementini , Angela Bragaglia (Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, Italy), Paolo Molaro , Piercarlo Bonifacio , Miriam Centurion (Osservatorio Astronomico di Trieste, Italy), Francesca D' Antona (Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, Italy), Vittorio Castellani (Universita' di Pisa, Italy), Alessandro Chieffi (CNR-IAS, Italy), Oscar Straniero (Osservatorio di Teramo, Italy), Luca Pasquini , Patrick Francois (ESO), Francois Spite , Monique Spite (Observatoire de Meudon, France), Chris Sneden (University of Texas at Austin, USA), Frank Grundahl (University of Aarhus, Denmark). [3]: While it is apparent that some mass is transferred from the Planetary Nebulae to the stars, the details of this process are not clear. It may have happened before the stars here observed were formed, or later. In the latter case, the accretion may have occurred only during a particular evolutionary phase, some 100 million years after the cluster formed, i.e. about 11 to 15 billion years ago, and in very dense environments. Moreover, the accretion rate will depend on the relative velocities: only stars that move slowly with respect to the interstellar medium has a good chance of accreting matter. This may also be (part of) an explanation of the observed, large differences from star to star. [4]: A photo of a large planetary nebula is available as PR Photo 38a/98 and information about VLT observations of white dwarf stars in globular clusters are described in PR 20/99. Technical information about the photo PR Photo 06a/01 The image has been

  31. Announcing the 2013 Measurement Science and Technology Outstanding Paper Awards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foss, John; Dewhurst, Richard; Yacoot, Andrew; Tadigadapa, Srinivas; Peters, Kara

    2014-07-01

    Laser-based Techniques Detection of excited level population transfer in an MOT through the measurement of trapped atom number. L Moi1, G Batignani1, A Khanbekyan1, K Khanbekyan1, C Marinelli1, E Mariotti1, L Marmugi1, L Corradi2, A Dainelli2, R Calabrese3, G Mazzocca3, L Tomassetti3 and P Minguzzi4 1CNISM, Physics Department, University of Siena, via Roma 56, 53100 Siena, Italy 2INFN—Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, viale dell'Università 2, 35020 Legnaro (PD), Italy 3University of Ferrara and INFN, via Saragat 1, 44122 Ferrara, Italy 4CNISM, Physics Department, University of Pisa, largo Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa, Italy The selected paper [7] applies a direct fluorescence detection scheme to monitor the very low number of trapped atoms, simulating the conditions in a francium magneto-optical trap (MOT). Precise atomic parity nonconservation measurements are inherently difficult due to the fact that extremely weak signals must be detected. By scanning a probe beam across a resonance condition and then detecting the MOT fluorescence, the authors were able to monitor the population transfer from the ground level and the first excited level in the MOT. The significance of this work is that it presents a rapid and flexible method to detect the number of trapped atoms in conditions where very low numbers of these atoms are present. Such high precision measurements are essential in nuclear physics and are fundamental to our understanding of nuclear decay processes. We have selected this article for the Best Paper Award because the measurement technique demonstrated is not only innovative, but also flexible to implement as it is wavelength independent and presents a high signal to noise ratio. The experimental configuration was also extremely well documented in the paper, including a detailed estimate of the detection limits. Data were presented for many different excitation mechanisms to show the wide applicability of the measurement technique. It is expected that this

    1. The VLT Unravels the Nature of the Fastest Binary Star

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      2002-03-01

      wave space experiment, the European Space Agency's Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) that will be launched in about 10 years' time, will be sufficiently sensitive to be able to reveal this radiation from RX J0806.3+1527 with a high degree of confidence. Such an observational feat would open an entirely new window on the universe. More information The results described in this Press Release were announced in IAU Circular 7835 and will shortly appear in print in the European research journal Astronomy & Astrophysics Letters ("RX J0806.3+1527: a double degenerate binary with the shortest known orbital period (321 s)" by G.L. Israel and co-authors), cf. astro-ph/0203043. The 5-min optical modulation was detected independently by another group led by G. Ramsay, cf. astro-ph/0203053. Note [1]: The team consists of GianLuca Israel and Luigi Stella at the Astronomical Observatory of Rome (Italy), Stefano Covino and Sergio Campana at the Astronomical Observatory of Brera (Milan, Italy), Wolfgang Hummel, Gianni Marconi and Gero Rupprecht at the European Southern Observatory, Immo Appenzeller and Otmar Stahl at the University of Heidelberg (Germany), Wolfgang Gassler and Karl-Heinz Mantel at the University of Munich (Germany), Christopher Mauche at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (USA), Ulisse Munari at the Astronomical Observatory of Padua (Italy), Ignacio Negueruela at the Astronomical Observatory of Strasbourg (France), Harald Nicklas at the University of Göttingen (Germany), and Richard Smart at the Astronomical Observatory of Turin (Italy). [2]: See the research article by Israel et al. (1999, Astronomy &A, Vol. 349, p. L1). Contact GianLuca Israel Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma Italy Tel.: +39 06 9428 6437 email: gianluca@ulysses.mporzio.astro.it Technical information about the photos PR Photo 10a/02 is reproduced from FORS1-exposures, obtained in November 1999 in the U- and R-bands, and both lasting 300 sec. The field measures 2.0 x 1.5 arcmin 2. PR

    2. Archaeological Geophysics in Israel: Past, Present and Future

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Eppelbaum, L. V.

      2009-04-01

      localization of archaeological targets: An introduction. Geoinformatics, 11, No.1, 19-28. Eppelbaum, L.V., 2005. Multilevel observations of magnetic field at archaeological sites as additional interpreting tool. Proceed. of the 6th Conference of Archaeological Prospection, Roma, Italy, 4 pp. Eppelbaum, L.V., 2007a. Localization of Ring Structures in Earth's Environments. Proceed. of the 7th Conference of Archaeological Prospection. Nitra, Slovakia, 145-148. Eppelbaum, L.V., 2007b. Revealing of subterranean karst using modern analysis of potential and quasi-potential fields. Proceed. of the Symp. on the Application of Geophysics to Engineering and Environmental Problems, Denver, USA, 797-810. Eppelbaum, L.V., 2008a. Remote operated vehicle geophysical survey using magnetic and VLF methods: proposed schemes for data processing and interpretation. Proceed. of the Symp. on the Application of Geophysics to Engineering and Environmental Problems, Philadelphia, USA, 938-963. Eppelbaum, L.V., 2008b. On the application of near-surface temperature investigations for delineation of archaeological targets. Trans. of the 1st International Workshop on Advances in Remote Sensing for Archaeology and Cultural Heritage Management, Rome, Italy, 179-183. Eppelbaum, L.V., 2009. Application of microgravity at archaeological sites in Israel: some estimation derived from 3D modeling and quantitative analysis of gravity field. Proceed. of the Symp. on the Application of Geophysics to Engineering and Environmental Problems, Denver, USA, 10 pp. Eppelbaum, L. and Ben-Avraham, Z., 2002. On the development of 4D geophysical Data Base of archaeological sites in Israel. Trans. of the Conf. of the Israel Geol. Soc. Ann. Meet., MaHagan - Lake Kinneret, Israel, p.21. Eppelbaum, L., Ben-Avraham, Z., and Itkis, S., 2003a. Ancient Roman Remains in Israel provide a challenge for physical-archaeological modeling techniques. First Break, 21 (2), 51-61. Eppelbaum, L.V., Ben-Avraham, Z., and Itkis, S.E., 2003b