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Sample records for room irradiance spectra

  1. An artificial solar spectrum substantially alters plant development compared with usual climate room irradiance spectra.

    PubMed

    Hogewoning, Sander W; Douwstra, Peter; Trouwborst, Govert; van Ieperen, Wim; Harbinson, Jeremy

    2010-03-01

    Plant responses to the light spectrum under which plants are grown affect their developmental characteristics in a complicated manner. Lamps widely used to provide growth irradiance emit spectra which are very different from natural daylight spectra. Whereas specific responses of plants to a spectrum differing from natural daylight may sometimes be predictable, the overall plant response is generally difficult to predict due to the complicated interaction of the many different responses. So far studies on plant responses to spectra either use no daylight control or, if a natural daylight control is used, it will fluctuate in intensity and spectrum. An artificial solar (AS) spectrum which closely resembles a sunlight spectrum has been engineered, and growth, morphogenesis, and photosynthetic characteristics of cucumber plants grown for 13 d under this spectrum have been compared with their performance under fluorescent tubes (FTs) and a high pressure sodium lamp (HPS). The total dry weight of the AS-grown plants was 2.3 and 1.6 times greater than that of the FT and HPS plants, respectively, and the height of the AS plants was 4-5 times greater. This striking difference appeared to be related to a more efficient light interception by the AS plants, characterized by longer petioles, a greater leaf unfolding rate, and a lower investment in leaf mass relative to leaf area. Photosynthesis per leaf area was not greater for the AS plants. The extreme differences in plant response to the AS spectrum compared with the widely used protected cultivation light sources tested highlights the importance of a more natural spectrum, such as the AS spectrum, if the aim is to produce plants representative of field conditions. PMID:20202994

  2. Spectra and Neutron Dosimetry Inside a PET Cyclotron Vault Room

    SciTech Connect

    Vega-Carrillo, Hector Rene; Mendez, Roberto; Iniguez, Maria Pilar; Marti-Climent, Joseph; Penuelas, Ivan; Barquero, Raquel

    2006-09-08

    The neutron field around a PET cyclotron was investigated during 18F radioisotope production with an 18 MeV proton beam. Pairs of thermoluminescent dosemeters, TLD600 and TLD700, were used as thermal neutron detector inside a Bonner Spheres Spectrometer to measure the neutron spectra at three different positions inside the cyclotron's vault room. Neutron spectra were also determined by Monte Carlo calculations. The hardest spectrum was observed in front of cyclotron target and the softest was noticed at the antipode of target. Neutron doses derived from the measured spectra vary between 11 and 377 mSv/{mu}A-h of proton integrated current, Doses were also measured with a single-moderator remmeter, with an active thermal neutron detector, whose response in affected by the radiation field in the vault room.

  3. Absorption spectra of irradiated XRCT radiochromic film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butson, Martin J.; Cheung, Tsang; Yu, Peter K. N.

    2006-06-01

    Gafchromic XRCT radiochromic film is a self-developing high sensitivity radiochromic film product which can be used for assessment of delivered radiation doses which could match applications such as computed tomography (CT) dosimetry. The film automatically changes colour upon irradiation changing from a yellow to green/brown colour. The absorption spectra of Gafchromic XRCT radiochromic film as measured with reflectance spectrophotometry have been investigated to analyse the dosimetry characteristics of the film. Results show two main absorption peaks produced from irradiation located at 636 nm and 585 nm. This is similar to EBT Gafchromic film. A high level of sensitivity is found for this film with a 1 cGy applied dose producing an approximate net optical density change of 0.3 at 636 nm. This high sensitivity combined with its relatively energy independent nature around the 100 kVp to 150 kVp x-ray energy range provides a unique enhancement in dosimetric measurement capabilities over currently available dosimetry films for CT applications.

  4. Irradiation dose determination below room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos-Bernal, S.; Cruz, E.; Negrón-Mendoza, A.; Bustos, E.

    2002-03-01

    The measurements presented were undertaken to provide quantitative information on the low temperature irradiation of thermoluminiscence phosphors. The crystals used were (a) LiF co-doped with Mg, Cu and P, and (b) CaSO 4 doped with Dy. The absorbed dose values in the interval studied showed a linear behavior at low doses and low temperature. The aim of this work is to test if these crystals can be used to measure the dose absorbed by solids at low temperature.

  5. Blue photoluminescence enhancement in laser-irradiated 6H-SiC at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yan; Ji, Lingfei Lin, Zhenyuan; Jiang, Yijian; Zhai, Tianrui

    2014-01-27

    Blue photoluminescence (PL) of 6H-SiC irradiated by an ultraviolet laser can be observed at room temperature in dark condition. PL spectra with Gaussian fitting curve of the irradiated SiC show that blue luminescence band (∼440 nm) is more pronounced than other bands. The blue PL enhancement is the combined result of the improved shallow N-donor energy level and the unique surface state with Si nanocrystals and graphene/Si composite due to the effect of photon energy input by the short-wavelength laser irradiation. The study can provide a promising route towards the preparation of well-controlled blue photoluminescence material for light-emitting devices.

  6. Blue photoluminescence enhancement in laser-irradiated 6H-SiC at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yan; Ji, Lingfei; Lin, Zhenyuan; Jiang, Yijian; Zhai, Tianrui

    2014-01-01

    Blue photoluminescence (PL) of 6H-SiC irradiated by an ultraviolet laser can be observed at room temperature in dark condition. PL spectra with Gaussian fitting curve of the irradiated SiC show that blue luminescence band (˜440 nm) is more pronounced than other bands. The blue PL enhancement is the combined result of the improved shallow N-donor energy level and the unique surface state with Si nanocrystals and graphene/Si composite due to the effect of photon energy input by the short-wavelength laser irradiation. The study can provide a promising route towards the preparation of well-controlled blue photoluminescence material for light-emitting devices.

  7. Principal Component Analysis of Arctic Solar Irradiance Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabbette, Maura; Pilewskie, Peter; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    During the FIRE (First ISCPP Regional Experiment) Arctic Cloud Experiment and coincident SHEBA (Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean) campaign, detailed moderate resolution solar spectral measurements were made to study the radiative energy budget of the coupled Arctic Ocean - Atmosphere system. The NASA Ames Solar Spectral Flux Radiometers (SSFRs) were deployed on the NASA ER-2 and at the SHEBA ice camp. Using the SSFRs we acquired continuous solar spectral irradiance (380-2200 nm) throughout the atmospheric column. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was used to characterize the several tens of thousands of retrieved SSFR spectra and to determine the number of independent pieces of information that exist in the visible to near-infrared solar irradiance spectra. It was found in both the upwelling and downwelling cases that almost 100% of the spectral information (irradiance retrieved from 1820 wavelength channels) was contained in the first six extracted principal components. The majority of the variability in the Arctic downwelling solar irradiance spectra was explained by a few fundamental components including infrared absorption, scattering, water vapor and ozone. PCA analysis of the SSFR upwelling Arctic irradiance spectra successfully separated surface ice and snow reflection from overlying cloud into distinct components.

  8. On designing room sheilding for total-body irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Barish, R.J.

    1996-05-01

    When designing shielding for total-body irradiation as an additional modality of treatment in an ordinary radiation therapy room, the extended treatment distance used for these patients greatly increases the workload because of the inverse-square factor. In a seeming contradiction to logic, for a facility with an exterior wall in the path of one lateral primary beam, and a restricted area behind the other primary wall, the overall shielding requirements are lower if the TBI patients are treated with the machine oriented toward the occupied interior. 4 refs.

  9. Valence photoelectron spectra of an electron-beam-irradiated C{sub 60} film

    SciTech Connect

    Onoe, Jun; Nakao, Aiko; Hida, Akira

    2004-10-04

    Valence photoelectron spectra of an electron-beam (EB) irradiated C{sub 60} film, which exhibited metallic electron-transport properties in air at room temperature, are presented. The electronic structure of the C{sub 60} film became closer to that of graphite as the EB-irradiation time increased, and its density of states around the Fermi level was eventually greater than for the graphite. This suggests that the electronic structure of the C{sub 60} film changed from a semiconductor to a semimetal and/or metal by EB irradiation. Interestingly, the electronic structure remained metallic even after five days of air exposure, which is the reason for the metallic electron-transport property in our previous report [Appl. Phys. Lett. 82, 595 (2003)].

  10. Modification of embedded Cu nanoparticles: Ion irradiation at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johannessen, B.; Kluth, P.; Giulian, R.; Araujo, L. L.; Llewellyn, D. J.; Foran, G. J.; Cookson, D. J.; Ridgway, M. C.

    2007-04-01

    Cu nanoparticles (NPs) with an average diameter of ∼25 Å were synthesized in SiO2 by ion implantation and thermal annealing. Subsequently, the NPs were exposed to ion irradiation at room temperature simultaneously with a bulk Cu reference film. The ion species/energy was varied to achieve different values for the nuclear energy loss. The short-range atomic structure and average NP diameter were measured by means of extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy and small angle X-ray scattering, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy yielded complementary results. The short-range order of the Cu films remained unchanged consistent with the high regeneration rate of bulk elemental metals. For the NP samples it was found that increasing nuclear energy loss yielded gradual dissolution of NPs. Furthermore, an increased structural disorder was observed for the residual NPs.

  11. Cross-linking of polytetrafluoroethylene during room-temperature irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Pugmire, David L; Wetteland, Chris J; Duncan, Wanda S; Lakis, Rollin E; Schwartz, Daniel S

    2008-01-01

    Exposure of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) to {alpha}-radiation was investigated to detennine the physical and chemical effects, as well as to compare and contrast the damage mechanisms with other radiation types ({beta}, {gamma}, or thermal neutron). A number of techniques were used to investigate the chemical and physical changes in PTFE after exposure to {alpha}-radiation. These techniques include: Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and fluorescence spectroscopy. Similar to other radiation types at low doses, the primary damage mechanism for the exposure of PTFE to {alpha}-radiation appears to be chain scission. Increased doses result in a change-over of the damage mechanism to cross-linking. This result is not observed for any radiation type other than {alpha} when irradiation is performed at room temperature. Finally, at high doses, PTFE undergoes mass-loss (via smallfluorocarbon species evolution) and defluorination. The amount and type of damage versus sample depth was also investigated. Other types of radiation yield damage at depths on the order of mm to cm into PTFE due to low linear energy transfer (LET) and the correspondingly large penetration depths. By contrast, the {alpha}-radiation employed in this study was shown to only induce damage to a depth of approximately 26 {mu}m, except at very high doses.

  12. Argon ion irradiation induced phase transition and room temperature ferromagnetism in the CuO thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Shoupeng; Gao, Daqiang; Xia, BaoRui; Xue, Desheng

    2016-02-01

    We have deposited a copper oxide (CuO) thin film using a magnetron sputtering system by modulating rate of oxygen flow, and we found that the phase of cuprous oxide (Cu2O) appeared after irradiation by argon ions. Magnetic measurement results indicate that the thin film exhibits room temperature ferromagnetism after irradiation, while the virgin CuO thin film is diamagnetic. Vacancies and interstitial would appear in the lattice during irradiation and phase transition, which will originate in the local magnetic moment. In combination with the analyses of Raman spectra, we believe that the ferromagnetism of the film may originate from Cu vacancies, which provides an approach in investigating the mechanism of magnetism in the diluted magnetic semiconductor.

  13. Occupant UV exposure measurements for upper-room ultraviolet germicidal irradiation.

    PubMed

    Milonova, Sonya; Rudnick, Stephen; McDevitt, James; Nardell, Edward

    2016-06-01

    The threshold limit value (TLV) guideline for ultraviolet (UV) radiation specifies that irradiance measurements to ensure occupant safety be taken over an angle of 80° at the sensor. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of an 80° field of view (FOV) tube on lower room UV-C irradiation measurements. Measurements were made in an experimental chamber at a height of 1.73m with and without an FOV tube. The FOV tube reduced the lower room irradiance readings by 18-34%, a statistically significant reduction compared to the bare sensor. An 80° FOV tube should be used for lower room irradiance measurements to comply with the TLV guideline. The resulting lower readings would allow more UV-C radiation in the upper room without compromising occupant safety. More UV-C radiation in the upper room could increase efficacy of UVGI systems for reducing transmission of airborne infectious diseases. In addition, recommendations are made to standardize lower room irradiance measurement techniques. PMID:27038734

  14. Particle LET spectra from microelectronics packaging materials subjected to neutron and proton irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browning, J. S.; Holtkamp, D. B.

    1988-12-01

    Cumulative fractions for LET spectra were measured for particles ejected from microelectronics packaging materials subjected to neutron and proton irradiation. The measurements for the neutron irradiation compare well with Monte Carlo theoretical calculations. The spectra can be used to access microelectronics vulnerabilities in strategic-nuclear- weapon, space-trapped, and neutral-beam directed-energy particle environments.

  15. Enhancement of room temperature dislocation-related photoluminescence of electron irradiated silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang Luelue; Li Dongsheng; Jin Lu; Yang Deren; Wang Shuming

    2013-01-21

    In this paper, we have investigated the room temperature dislocation-related photoluminescence of electron irradiated silicon. It is found that high temperature annealing can enhance the D1 line emission measured at room temperature. The abnormal peak shift of D1 line on the dependence of temperatures reveals the reconstruction of D1 luminescence center. It is suggested that the high temperature annealing could cause the transformation of the dislocation-point defect structure, so that the D1 luminescence is enhanced and stabilized.

  16. Quantitative characterization of modulation-doped strained quantum wells through line-shape analysis of room-temperature photoluminescence spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brierley, Steven K.

    1993-08-01

    Room-temperature photoluminescence (PL) was presented as a nondestructive characterization method for modulation-doped strained quantum well epitaxial structures suited for pseudomorphic high electron mobility transistors (pHEMTs). Though the spectra showed broad peaks, in contrast to the sharp, well-defined peaks in low-temperature PL spectra, quantitative energy data was obtained through fitting a phenomenological line-shape model to the spectra. This model included the four transitions linking the first two electron subbands and the first two heavy-hole subbands, which can take credit for all of the peaks noted in pHEMT epitaxial configurations at realistic doping levels. The obtained results revealed that by using a simple line-shape model to the room-temperature PL spectrum of a pHEMT, a substantial amount of detailed structural and electronic data can be acquired regarding the quantum well.

  17. Fracture properties of neutron-irradiated martensitic 9Cr-WVTa steels below room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, F.; Narui, M.; Kayano, H.

    1994-09-01

    Fracture properties of the reduced activation martensitic 9Cr-1WVTa and 9Cr-3WVTa steels were investigated by carrying out instrumented Charpy impact tests and tensile tests at temperatures below room temperature after irradiation in the Japan Materials Testing Reactor at 493 and 538 K. Modified 9Cr-1MoVNb steel was also examined for comparison. The irradiation-induced increase in ductile-to-brittle transition temperature was 53, 26 and 40 K for the {1}/{3} size Charpy specimens of 9Cr-1WVTa, 9Cr-3WVTa and 9Cr-1MoVNb steels, respectively, which resulted primarily from the irradiation-induced increase in yield stress. The cleavage fracture stress was 1820-1870 MPa for the three steels in unirradiated conditions, which was scarcely affected by irradiation. The deflections to the maximum load and to the brittle fracture initiation were decreased by irradiation. In the tensile test, quasi-cleavage fracture occurred at 77 K in both unirradiated and irradiated conditions. The cleavage fracture stress was 1320-1380 MPa for the tensile specimens of the three steels, which was about 1.4 times smaller than that for the Charpy specimens.

  18. Permanent optical doping of amorphous metal oxide semiconductors by deep ultraviolet irradiation at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Hyungtak; Cho, Young-Je; Bobade, Santosh M.; Park, Kyoung-Youn; Choi, Duck-Kyun; Kim, Jinwoo; Lee, Jaegab

    2010-05-31

    We report an investigation of two photon ultraviolet (UV) irradiation induced permanent n-type doping of amorphous InGaZnO (a-IGZO) at room temperature. The photoinduced excess electrons were donated to change the Fermi-level to a conduction band edge under the UV irradiation, owing to the hole scavenging process at the oxide interface. The use of optically n-doped a-IGZO channel increased the carrier density to approx10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} from the background level of 10{sup 16} cm{sup -3}, as well as the comprehensive enhancement upon UV irradiation of a-IGZO thin film transistor parameters, such as an on-off current ratio at approx10{sup 8} and field-effect mobility at 22.7 cm{sup 2}/V s.

  19. Simulation of Ginger EPR Spectra Obtained by X-Irradiation:Quantum Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laachir, S.; Moussetad, M.; Adhiri, R.; Fahli, A.; Aboulfatah, M.; Mikou, M.

    2005-08-01

    The ginger sample has been exposed to X-rays at cumulative doses. The foodstuffs irradiation is used in particular to improve their hygienic qualities and increase their shelf lives. This process has been approved by various international organizations: FAO -- AIEA -- WHO. In the present work, we propose to reproduce by simulation, based on a quantum approach, of the ESR (Electron Spin Resonance) spectra. The semi-classical approach is valid for a simple system, but not for a complex system such as an atom with hyperfine structure. In this case a quantum approach, based on spin Hamiltonian, is essential to interpret the ESR spectra. The main result is that the simulated spectra are in good agreement with the experimental ones obtained before and after irradiation.

  20. EPR spectra induced by gamma-irradiation of some dry medical herbs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yordanov, N. D.; Lagunov, O.; Dimov, K.

    2009-04-01

    The radiation-induced EPR spectra in some medical herbs are reported. The samples studied are: (i) leaves of nettle, common balm, peppermint and thyme; (ii) stalks of common balm, thyme, milfoil, yarrow and marigold; (iii) blossoms of yarrow and marigold; (iv) blossoms and leaves of hawthorn and tutsan; and (v) roots of common valerian, nettle, elecampane (black and white), restharrows and carlina. Before irradiation all samples exhibit one weak anisotropic singlet EPR line with effective g-value of 2.0050±0.0002. The radiation-induced spectra fall into three groups. EPR spectra of irradiated blossoms of yarrow and marigold, stalks of common balm, thyme, tutsan and yarrow as well as roots of common valerian, nettle and elecampane (black and white) show "cellulose-like" EPR spectrum typical for irradiated plants. It is characterized by one intense central line with g=2.0050±0.0005 and two weak satellite lines situated ca. 30 G left and right to it. EPR spectra of gamma-irradiated restharrows and carlina are complex. They may be represented by one triplet corresponding to the "cellulose-like" EPR spectrum, one relatively intense singlet, situated in the center of the spectrum, and five weak additional satellite lines left and right to the center. The last spectrum was assigned as "carbohydrate-like" type. Only one intense EPR singlet with g=2.0048±0.0005 was recorded after irradiation of leaves of nettle and common balm. The lifetime of the radiation-induced EPR spectra was followed for a period of 3 months.

  1. Measurement and calculation of characteristic prompt gamma ray spectra emitted during proton irradiation.

    PubMed

    Polf, J C; Peterson, S; McCleskey, M; Roeder, B T; Spiridon, A; Beddar, S; Trache, L

    2009-11-21

    In this paper, we present results of initial measurements and calculations of prompt gamma ray spectra (produced by proton-nucleus interactions) emitted from tissue equivalent phantoms during irradiations with proton beams. Measurements of prompt gamma ray spectra were made using a high-purity germanium detector shielded either with lead (passive shielding), or a Compton suppression system (active shielding). Calculations of the spectra were performed using a model of both the passive and active shielding experimental setups developed using the Geant4 Monte Carlo toolkit. From the measured spectra it was shown that it is possible to distinguish the characteristic emission lines from the major elemental constituent atoms (C, O, Ca) in the irradiated phantoms during delivery of proton doses similar to those delivered during patient treatment. Also, the Monte Carlo spectra were found to be in very good agreement with the measured spectra providing an initial validation of our model for use in further studies of prompt gamma ray emission during proton therapy. PMID:19864704

  2. Fluorescence spectra of blood plasma treated with ultraviolet irradiation in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalesskaya, G. A.; Maslova, T. O.

    2010-09-01

    We have studied the fluorescence spectra of blood plasma from patients with acute coronary syndrome, and also the effect of therapeutic doses of in vivo ultraviolet blood irradiation (UBI) on the spectra. We have established that the maxima in the fluorescence spectra of the original plasma samples, obtained from unirradiated blood, are located in the wavelength interval 330-340 nm, characteristic for the fluorescence of tryptophan residues. In extracorporeal UBI ( λ = 254 nm), we observed changes in the shape and also both a blue and a red shift in the maxima of the fluorescence spectra, differing in magnitude for blood plasma samples from different patients in the test group. We show that UBI-initiated changes in the fluorescence spectra of the plasma depend on the original pathological disturbances of metabolite levels, and also on the change in the oxygen-transport function of the blood and the acid-base balance, affecting the oxidative stability of the plasma. We have concluded that UV irradiation, activating buffer systems in the blood, has an effect on the universal and specific interactions of the tryptophan residue with the amino acid residues and water surrounding it.

  3. Energy spectra of primary knock-on atoms under neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, M. R.; Marian, J.; Sublet, J.-Ch.

    2015-12-01

    Materials subjected to neutron irradiation will suffer from a build-up of damage caused by the displacement cascades initiated by nuclear reactions. Previously, the main "measure" of this damage accumulation has been through the displacements per atom (dpa) index, which has known limitations. This paper describes a rigorous methodology to calculate the primary atomic recoil events (often called the primary knock-on atoms or PKAs) that lead to cascade damage events as a function of energy and recoiling species. A new processing code SPECTRA-PKA combines a neutron irradiation spectrum with nuclear recoil data obtained from the latest nuclear data libraries to produce PKA spectra for any material composition. Via examples of fusion relevant materials, it is shown that these PKA spectra can be complex, involving many different recoiling species, potentially differing in both proton and neutron number from the original target nuclei, including high energy recoils of light emitted particles such as α-particles and protons. The variations in PKA spectra as a function of time, neutron field, and material are explored. The application of PKA spectra to the quantification of radiation damage is exemplified using two approaches: the binary collision approximation and stochastic cluster dynamics, and the results from these different models are discussed and compared.

  4. Photoelectrons as a tool to evaluate solar EUV and XUV model irradiance spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, W. K.; Woods, T. N.; Fontenla, J. M.; Richards, P. G.; Tobiska, W.; Solomon, S. C.; Warren, J.

    2011-12-01

    Solar radiation below 50 nm produces a substantial portion of the F region ionization and most of the E region ionization that drives chemical reactions in the thermosphere. At times before the launch of the SDO spacecraft there is a lack of high temporal and spectral resolution Solar EUV and XUV observations, particularly below 27 nm. To address the space data various solar irradiance models have been developed. We have developed a technique to use observations of escaping photoelectron fluxes from the FAST satellite and two different photoelectron production codes driven by model solar irradiance values to systematically examine differences between observed and calculated escaping photoelectron fluxes. We have compared modeled and observed photoelectron fluxes for the interval from September 14, 2006 to January 1, 2007. This is an interval included ~ 4 solar rotations and is characterized by modest solar and geomagnetic activity. Solar irradiance models included TIMED/SEE data, which is derived from a model below 27 nm, and the FISM Version 1, the SRPM predictive model based on solar observation, HEUVAC, S2000, and NRL, solar irradiance models. We used the GLOW and FLIP photoelectron production codes. Here we focus on the differences between solar irradiance models and small differences between photoelectron production code outputs using the same solar irradiance spectra over this time period.

  5. Interference effects on room-temperature photoluminescence spectra of GaAs/Ge space solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Timo, G.L.; Flores, C.

    1994-12-31

    This paper describes a new method, based on room-temperature photoluminescence (PL), for time-saving and non-destructive characterization of thin emitter GaAs/Ge solar cells used for space application. It has been shown that the interference phenomena produced between the PL directly escaping from the surface and the PL reflected on the GaAs/Ge interface can provide information on the doping level, thickness and uniformity of the GaAs structure deposited on Ge substrates. This method can be utilized for the quality control of mass-production of GaAs/Ge solar cells for space application.

  6. Multivariate analysis of Ion Beam Induced Luminescence spectra of irradiated silver ion-exchanged silicate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valotto, Gabrio; Quaranta, Alberto; Cattaruzza, Elti; Gonella, Francesco; Rampazzo, Giancarlo

    A multivariate analysis is used for the identification of the spectral features in Ion Beam Induced Luminescence (IBIL) spectra of soda-lime silicate glasses doped with silver by Ag+-Na+ ion exchange. Both Principal Component Analysis and multivariate analysis were used to characterize time-evolving IBIL spectra of Ag-doped glasses, by means of the identification of the number and of the wavelength positions of the main luminescent features and the study of their evolution during irradiation. This method helps to identify the spectral features of the samples spectra, even when partially overlapped or less intense. This analysis procedure does not require additional input such as the number of peaks.

  7. Multivariate analysis of Ion Beam Induced Luminescence spectra of irradiated silver ion-exchanged silicate glasses.

    PubMed

    Valotto, Gabrio; Quaranta, Alberto; Cattaruzza, Elti; Gonella, Francesco; Rampazzo, Giancarlo

    2012-09-01

    A multivariate analysis is used for the identification of the spectral features in Ion Beam Induced Luminescence (IBIL) spectra of soda-lime silicate glasses doped with silver by Ag(+)-Na(+) ion exchange. Both Principal Component Analysis and multivariate analysis were used to characterize time-evolving IBIL spectra of Ag-doped glasses, by means of the identification of the number and of the wavelength positions of the main luminescent features and the study of their evolution during irradiation. This method helps to identify the spectral features of the samples spectra, even when partially overlapped or less intense. This analysis procedure does not require additional input such as the number of peaks. PMID:22571943

  8. Radiation effects on microstructure and hardness of a titanium aluminide alloy irradiated by helium ions at room and elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Tao; Zhu, Hanliang; Ionescu, Mihail; Dayal, Pranesh; Davis, Joel; Carr, David; Harrison, Robert; Edwards, Lyndon

    2015-04-01

    A 45XD TiAl alloy possessing a lamellar microstructure was irradiated using 5 MeV helium ions to a fluence of 5 × 1021 ion m-2 (5000 appm) with a dose of about 1 dpa (displacements per atom). A uniform helium ion stopping damage region about 17 μm deep from the target surface was achieved by applying an energy degrading wheel. Radiation damage defects including helium-vacancy clusters and small helium bubbles were found in the microstructure of the samples irradiated at room temperature. With increasing irradiation temperature to 300 °C and 500 °C helium bubbles were clearly observed in both the α2 and γ phases of the irradiated microstructure. By means of nanoindentation significant irradiation hardening was measured. For the samples irradiated at room temperature the hardness increased from 5.6 GPa to 8.5 GPa and the irradiation-hardening effect reduced to approximately 8.0 GPa for the samples irradiated at 300 °C and 500 °C.

  9. Surfactant-free route to hexagonal CdS nanotubes under ultrasonic irradiation in aqueous solution at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Mingwang; Wu, Zhengcui; Gao, Feng; Ye, Ying; Wei, Xianwen

    2004-01-01

    Hexagonal CdS nanotubes with external diameter of 25-125 nm and wall thickness of 10-15 nm were obtained through surfactant-free route. The reactions were completed under ultrasonic irradiation in aqueous solution at room temperature. The products were characterized with X-ray powder diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy.

  10. Minimizing the exposure of airborne pathogens by upper-room ultraviolet germicidal irradiation: an experimental and numerical study

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Y.; Chan, W. Y.; Wu, C. L.; Kong, R. Y. C.; Lai, A. C. K.

    2012-01-01

    There has been increasing interest in the use of upper-room ultraviolet germicidal irradiation (UVGI) because of its proven effectiveness in disinfecting airborne pathogens. An improved drift flux mathematical model is developed for optimizing the design of indoor upper-room UVGI systems by predicting the distribution and inactivation of bioaerosols in a ventilation room equipped with a UVGI system. The model takes into account several bacteria removal mechanisms such as convection, turbulent diffusion, deposition and UV inactivation. Before applying the model, the natural die-off rate and susceptibility constants of bioaerosols were measured experimentally. Two bacteria aerosols, Escherichia coli and Serratia marcescens, were tested for this purpose. It was found out that the general decay trend of the bioaerosol concentration predicted by the numerical model agrees well with the experimental measurements. The modelling results agree better with experimental observations for the case when the UVGI inactivation mechanism dominates at the upper-room region than for the case without UVGI. The numerical results also illustrate that the spatial distribution of airborne bacteria was influenced by both air-flow pattern and irradiance distribution. In addition to predicting the local variation of concentration, the model assesses the overall performance of an upper-room UVGI system. This model has great potential for optimizing the design of indoor an upper-room UVGI systems. PMID:22809847

  11. Irradiation tests of ITER candidate Hall sensors using two types of neutron spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Duran, I.; Viererbl, L.; Lahodova, Z.; Sentkerestiova, J.; Bem, P.

    2010-10-15

    We report on irradiation tests of InSb based Hall sensors at two irradiation facilities with two distinct types of neutron spectra. One was a fission reactor neutron spectrum with a significant presence of thermal neutrons, while another one was purely fast neutron field. Total neutron fluence of the order of 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2} was accumulated in both cases, leading to significant drop of Hall sensor sensitivity in case of fission reactor spectrum, while stable performance was observed at purely fast neutron spectrum. This finding suggests that performance of this particular type of Hall sensors is governed dominantly by transmutation. Additionally, it further stresses the need to test ITER candidate Hall sensors under neutron flux with ITER relevant spectrum.

  12. Irradiation tests of ITER candidate Hall sensors using two types of neutron spectra.

    PubMed

    Ďuran, I; Bolshakova, I; Viererbl, L; Sentkerestiová, J; Holyaka, R; Lahodová, Z; Bém, P

    2010-10-01

    We report on irradiation tests of InSb based Hall sensors at two irradiation facilities with two distinct types of neutron spectra. One was a fission reactor neutron spectrum with a significant presence of thermal neutrons, while another one was purely fast neutron field. Total neutron fluence of the order of 10(16) cm(-2) was accumulated in both cases, leading to significant drop of Hall sensor sensitivity in case of fission reactor spectrum, while stable performance was observed at purely fast neutron spectrum. This finding suggests that performance of this particular type of Hall sensors is governed dominantly by transmutation. Additionally, it further stresses the need to test ITER candidate Hall sensors under neutron flux with ITER relevant spectrum. PMID:21033987

  13. Solar Irradiance Reference Spectra (SIRS) for the 2008 Whole Heliosphere Interval (WHI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, Thomas N.; Chamberlin, Phillip C.; Harder, Jerald W.; Hock, Rachel A.; Snow, Martin; Eparvier, Francis G.; Fontenla, Juan; McClintock, William E.; Richard, Erik C.

    2009-01-01

    The IHY2007 Whole Heliosphere Interval (WHI) for solar Carrington Rotation 2068 (20 March to 16 April 2008) has been very successful in obtaining a wide variety of solar, heliospheric, and planetary observations during times of solar cycle minimum conditions. One of these efforts is the generation of solar irradiance reference spectra (SIRS) from 0.1 nm to 2400 nm using a combination of satellite and sounding rocket observations. These reference spectra include daily satellite observations from TIMED Solar Extreme ultraviolet Experiment (SEE) and Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) instruments. The extreme ultraviolet range is also improved with higher spectral resolution observations using the prototype SDO Extreme ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE) aboard a sounding rocket launched on 14 April 2008. The SIRS result is an important accomplishment in that it is the first data set to have simultaneous measurements over the full spectral coverage up to 2400 nm during solar cycle minimum conditions.

  14. A study of the physiological changes and the nutritional qualities of irradiated apples and the effect of irradiation on apples stored at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuanyao, Wang; Mengyue, Jiang; Meixu, Gao; xiuye, Ma; Shufen, Zhang; Shucheng, Liu

    1993-07-01

    The effects of γ-irradiation on the metabolism and nutritional qualities of cold Delicious apples and on the lethality of verticillate pathogenic fungi have been studied. The storage effect of irradiation on apples at room temperature has been observed. The results showed that the respiratory intensity of irradiated apple at 0.3-0.5 kGy was near or lower than that of unirradiated apple after 15 days irradiation. The amount of ethylene release was obviously inhibited when fruits were irradiated with 0.3-0.7 kGy. The flesh firmness of apple irradiated with 0.3-0.9 kGy was higher than that of unirradiated apple with the increasing of storage time. The negative correlations between the flesh firmness and the activities of pectinesterase (PE), polygalacturonase (PG) were observed when the dosage was lower than 1.5 kGy. The 2.0 kGy irradiation damaged the ultrastructure of cells, induced the softening of apple. When apples were irradiated with 0.7-2.0 kGy, the contents of 4 important volatile components of apple would be decreased. However, the dosage mentioned above had no effects on the pure chemicals. The studies showed that there was no significant effect of irradiation with 0.3-2.0 kGy on the nutritional qualities of apples and this dosage range could effectively control the verticillate pathogenic fungi. The result of storage experiments showed that the rotting fruits were obviously decreased by 0.3-0.9 kGy irradiation.

  15. The characterization of upper-room ultraviolet germicidal irradiation in inactivating airborne microorganisms.

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Gwangpyo; First, Melvin W; Burge, Harriet A

    2002-01-01

    In this study, we explored the efficacy of upper-room ultraviolet germicidal irradiation (UVGI) in reducing the concentration of Serratia marcescens and Mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) aerosols in enclosed places. We constructed a facility (4.5 m x 3 m x 2.9 m) in which both ceiling- and wall-mounted UV fixtures (UV output: 10W and 5W respectively) were installed. The use of ceiling- and wall-mounted UV fixtures (total UV output: 15W) without mixing fan reduced the concentration of S. marcescens aerosols by 46% (range: 22-80%) at 2 air changes per hour (ACH) and 53% (range: 40-68%) at 6 ACH. The use of ceiling- and wall-mounted UV fixtures with mixing fan increased the UV effectiveness in inactivating S. marcescens aerosols to 62% (range: 50-78%) at 2 ACH and to 86% (81-89%) at 6 ACH. For BCG aerosols, UV effectiveness in inactivating BCG aerosols at 6 ACH were 52% (range: 11-69%) by ceiling-mounted UV fixture only (total UV output: 10W) and 64% (51-83%) by both ceiling- and wall-mounted UV fixtures (total UV output: 15W). Our results indicated that the equivalent ventilation rate attributable to upper-room UVGI for BCG aerosols ranged from 1 ACH to 22 ACH for ceiling-mounted UV fixtures and from 6.4 ACH to 28.5 ACH for ceiling- and wall-mounted UV fixtures. Both generalized linear and generalized additive models were fitted to all our data. The regression results indicated that the number of UV fixtures, use of mixing fan, and air exchange rate significantly affected UV effectiveness (p < 0.01, 0.01, 0.01 respectively). However, the strain difference (S. marcescens vs. BCG) appeared less important in UV effectiveness (p = 0.26). Our results also indicated that UV effectiveness increased at higher temperature ((italic)p(/italic) < 0.01), lower dry-bulb temperature ((italic)p(/italic) = 0.21), and colder air from a supply grill located near the ceiling (p = 0.22). PMID:11781170

  16. Comparison of hospital room surface disinfection using a novel ultraviolet germicidal irradiation (UVGI) generator.

    PubMed

    Jelden, Katelyn C; Gibbs, Shawn G; Smith, Philip W; Hewlett, Angela L; Iwen, Peter C; Schmid, Kendra K; Lowe, John J

    2016-09-01

    The estimated 721,800 hospital acquired infections per year in the United States have necessitated development of novel environmental decontamination technologies such as ultraviolet germicidal irradiation (UVGI). This study evaluated the efficacy of a novel, portable UVGI generator (the TORCH, ChlorDiSys Solutions, Inc., Lebanon, NJ) to disinfect surface coupons composed of plastic from a bedrail, stainless steel, chrome-plated light switch cover, and a porcelain tile that were inoculated with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) or vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis (VRE). Each surface type was placed at 6 different sites within a hospital room and treated by 10-min ultraviolet-C (UVC) exposures using the TORCH with doses ranging from 0-688 mJ/cm(2) between sites. Organism reductions were compared with untreated surface coupons as controls. Overall, UVGI significantly reduced MRSA by an average of 4.6 log10 (GSD: 1.7 log10, 77% inactivation, p < 0.0001) and VRE by an average of 3.9 log10 (GSD: 1.7 log10, 65% inactivation, p < 0.0001). MRSA on bedrail was reduced significantly (p < 0.0001) less than on other surfaces, while VRE was reduced significantly less on chrome (p = 0.0004) and stainless steel (p = 0.0012) than porcelain tile. Organisms out of direct line of sight of the UVC generator were reduced significantly less (p < 0.0001) than those directly in line of sight. UVGI was found an effective method to inactivate nosocomial pathogens on surfaces evaluated within the hospital environment in direct line of sight of UVGI treatment with variation between organism and surface types. PMID:27028152

  17. Absolute absorption spectra of batho- and photorhodopsins at room temperature. Picosecond laser photolysis of rhodopsin in polyacrylamide.

    PubMed Central

    Kandori, H; Shichida, Y; Yoshizawa, T

    1989-01-01

    Picosecond laser photolysis of rhodopsin in 15% polyacrylamide gel was performed for estimating absolute absorption spectra of the primary intermediates of cattle rhodopsin (bathorhodopsin and photorhodopsin). Using a rhodopsin digitonin extract embedded in 15% polyacrylamide gel, a precise percentage of bleaching of rhodopsin after excitation of a picosecond laser pulse was measured. Using this value, the absolute absorption spectrum of bathorhodopsin was calculated from the spectral change before and 1 ns after the picosecond laser excitation (corresponding to the difference spectrum between rhodopsin and bathorhodopsin). The absorption spectrum of bathorhodopsin thus obtained displayed a lambda max at 535 nm, which was shorter than that at low temperature (543 nm) and a half band-width broader than that measured at low temperature. The oscillator strength of bathorhodopsin at room temperature was smaller than that at low temperature. The absolute absorption spectrum of photorhodopsin was also estimated from the difference spectrum measured at 15 ps after the excitation of rhodopsin (Shichida, Y., S. Matuoka, and T. Yoshizawa. 1984. Photobiochem. Photobiophys. 7:221-228), assuming a sequential conversion of photorhodopsin to bathorhodopsin. Its lambda max was located at approximately 570 nm, and the oscillator strength was smaller than those of rhodopsin and bathorhodopsin. PMID:2790133

  18. Microstructure chemistry and mechanical properties of Ni-based superalloy Rene N4 under irradiation at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, C.; Kirk, M.; Li, M.; Hattar, Khalid Mikhiel; Wang, Y.; Anderoglu, O.; Valdez, J.; Uberuaga, B. P.; Dickerson, R.; Maloy, S. A.

    2015-06-14

    Nickel superalloys with cubic L12 structured γ' (Ni3(Al, Ti)) precipitates exhibit high strength at high temperatures and excellent corrosion resistance when exposed to water. Unlike prior studies on irradiation damage of other Ni-based superalloys, our study on Rene N4 involves much larger γ' precipitates, ~450 nm in size, a size regime where the irradiation-induced disordering and dissolution kinetics and the corresponding mechanical property evolution are unknown. Under heavy ion irradiation at room temperature, the submicron-sized γ' precipitates were fully disordered at ~0.3 dpa and only later partially dissolved after 75 dpa irradiation. Nanoindentation experiments indicate that the mechanical properties of the alloy change significantly, with a dramatic decrease in hardness, with irradiation dose. Three contributions to the change in hardness were examined: defect clusters, disordering and dissolution. Moreover, the generation of defect clusters in the matrix and precipitates slightly increased the indentation hardness, while disordering of the submicron-sized γ' precipitates resulted in a dramatic decrease in the total hardness, which decreased further during the early stages of the intermixing between γ' precipitates and matrix (<18 dpa). As a result, controlling the long-range-ordering and chemical intermixing can be used to tailor the mechanical properties of Ni-based superalloys under irradiation.

  19. Microstructure chemistry and mechanical properties of Ni-based superalloy Rene N4 under irradiation at room temperature

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sun, C.; Kirk, M.; Li, M.; Hattar, Khalid Mikhiel; Wang, Y.; Anderoglu, O.; Valdez, J.; Uberuaga, B. P.; Dickerson, R.; Maloy, S. A.

    2015-06-14

    Nickel superalloys with cubic L12 structured γ' (Ni3(Al, Ti)) precipitates exhibit high strength at high temperatures and excellent corrosion resistance when exposed to water. Unlike prior studies on irradiation damage of other Ni-based superalloys, our study on Rene N4 involves much larger γ' precipitates, ~450 nm in size, a size regime where the irradiation-induced disordering and dissolution kinetics and the corresponding mechanical property evolution are unknown. Under heavy ion irradiation at room temperature, the submicron-sized γ' precipitates were fully disordered at ~0.3 dpa and only later partially dissolved after 75 dpa irradiation. Nanoindentation experiments indicate that the mechanical properties ofmore » the alloy change significantly, with a dramatic decrease in hardness, with irradiation dose. Three contributions to the change in hardness were examined: defect clusters, disordering and dissolution. Moreover, the generation of defect clusters in the matrix and precipitates slightly increased the indentation hardness, while disordering of the submicron-sized γ' precipitates resulted in a dramatic decrease in the total hardness, which decreased further during the early stages of the intermixing between γ' precipitates and matrix (<18 dpa). As a result, controlling the long-range-ordering and chemical intermixing can be used to tailor the mechanical properties of Ni-based superalloys under irradiation.« less

  20. Stratospheric mean state: modelling the sensitivity to different solar irradiance spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misios, Stergios; Tourpali, Klairie; Habbereiter, Margit

    2016-04-01

    The sensitivity of the stratospheric mean state to four different reference solar irradiance spectra describing a quite Sun (year 2008) is investigated using a chemistry climate model. Simulations show that the mean thermal state of the stratosphere depends considerably on the specified spectrum given that the annual mean temperature in tropical stratopause varies by more than 3 K, in some cases. Temperature anomalies are stronger in boreal winter and the polar night westerlies strengthen by about 15%. The simulated ozone climatology is also influenced by the choice of the reference spectrum and our model simulates concentration changes up to 6-7% in the middle stratosphere. Given that net effect of the ozone response is to dump temperature anomalies, we find an amplified temperature perturbation of about 20-30% in twin simulations without interactive chemistry coupling. Using a 2-D chemistry climate model we trace the spectral regions that contribute the most to the simulated changes in the stratosphere.

  1. Investigation of thermal annealing by gamma irradiation at room temperature in LiNbO3 crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajor, Andrzej L.; Kaczmarek, Slawomir M.; Pracka, Izabella; Swirkowicz, Marek; Wronska, Teresa

    2001-08-01

    An interesting phenomenon of thermal annealing in gamma irradiated undoped, and photorefractive Cu- and Fe-doped, Z- oriented LiNbO3 crystal has been observed. Prior and after each gamma irradiation the crystals were thermally annealed in the air at 800 degrees C for a couple of hours. Optical homogeneity was investigated on the entire area of LiNbO3 wafers by measuring distributions of birefringence, the principal azimuth, transmission, and parameters associated with birefringence dispersion, and also by measurements of additional absorption in a few wafers' points. It has been rather unexpectedly observed that the classical thermal annealing can lead to a decease in optical homogeneity in the majority of cases. It is attributed to generation of an internal electric field by the pyroelectric effect, and to the electrooptic effect involved thereafter. On the other hand, the secondary electrons generated by gamma irradiation are believed to increase the optical homogeneity by increasing the crystal's conductivity and dissipating this field. A uniform temperature heating across the wafer generated by this irradiation is also a helpful factor in this gamma- annealing. It has been found that this effect at room temperature by this irradiation is also a helpful factor in this gamma-annealing. It has been found that this effect at room temperature is small for gamma irradiation of 105 Gy, while increasing the doses to 106 Gy and 107 Gy can profile in a considerable reduction of the optical inhomogeneity. A certain influence of Cu-doping on this effect has also been observed.

  2. Solar Irradiance Reference Spectra (SIRS) for IHY2007 Whole Heliosphere Interval (WHI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, T.; Chamberlin, P.; Snow, M.; Harder, J.

    2008-12-01

    The IHY2007 Whole Heliosphere Interval (WHI) for solar Carrington Rotation 2068 (20 March to 16 April 2008) has been very successful in obtaining a wide variety of solar, heliospheric, and planetary observations during times of solar cycle minimum conditions. One of these efforts is the generation of solar irradiance reference spectra (SIRS) from 0.1 nm to 2400 nm using a combination of satellite and sounding rocket observations. These reference spectra include daily satellite observations from TIMED Solar EUV Experiment (SEE) from 0.1 nm to 116 nm and from Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) instruments from 116 nm to 2400 nm. The EUV range is also improved with higher spectral resolution observations from 6 nm to 105 nm using the prototype SDO EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) aboard a sounding rocket launched on 14 April 2008. The SIRS result is an important accomplishment in that it is the first time in having simultaneous measurements over the full spectral coverage up to 2400 nm and during solar cycle minimum conditions. The SIRS data from 0.1 nm to 2400 nm and in 0.1-nm intervals (on 0.05 nm centers) are available from http://ihy2007.org/WHI/.

  3. XAS spectroelectrochemistry: reliable measurement of X-ray absorption spectra from redox manipulated solutions at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Best, Stephen P; Levina, Aviva; Glover, Chris; Johannessen, Bernt; Kappen, Peter; Lay, Peter A

    2016-05-01

    The design and operation of a low-volume spectroelectrochemical cell for X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) of solutions at room temperature is described. Fluorescence XAS measurements are obtained from samples contained in the void space of a 50 µL reticulated vitreous carbon (sponge) working electrode. Both rapid electrosynthesis and control of the effects of photoreduction are achieved by control over the flow properties of the solution through the working electrode, where a good balance between the rate of consumption of sample and the minimization of decomposition was obtained by pulsing the flow of the solution by 1-2 µL with duty cycle of ∼3 s while maintaining a small net flow rate (26-100 µL h(-1)). The performance of the cell in terms of control of the redox state of the sample and minimization of the effects of photoreduction was demonstrated by XAS measurements of aqueous solutions of the photosensitive Fe(III) species, [Fe(C2O4)3](3-), together with that of the electrogenerated [Fe(C2O4)3](4-) product. The current response from the cell during the collection of XAS spectra provides an independent measure of the stability of the sample of the measurement. The suitability of the approach for the study of small volumes of mM concentrations of protein samples was demonstrated by the measurement of the oxidized and electrochemically reduced forms of cytochrome c. PMID:27140154

  4. Reconstitution and Upgrade of the Thermal Neutron Irradiation Facility in the Basement Medical Room of the MIT Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Harling, Otto, K.; Riley, Kent, J.; Binns, Peter J.

    2004-12-31

    The M-011 thermal neutron beam has been reconstituted and upgraded to provide a high intensity and high quality facility for preclinical and certain clinical studies. Intensities of thermal neutrons in the beam range from 5.0-8.5 x 109 n cm-2 s-1. Beam contamination is at a low level where it has no practical influence on beam performance. New computer controlled dose and beam monitoring systems have been implemented which assure precise dose delivery and redundant safety interlocks. An additional beam shutter and massive shielding in the back of the medical room have been added which significantly reduce room background and now permit staff entry without the necessity for lowering the reactor power. This system is needed for BNCT research by the MIT group as well as other US groups. This need became acute with the closure of the BMRR which previously had the only high quality thermal neutron irradiation facility for BNCT in the USA.

  5. Gamma-irradiated dry fruits. An example of a wide variety of long-time dependent EPR spectra.

    PubMed

    Yordanov, Nicola D; Pachova, Zdravka

    2006-03-13

    EPR spectra of dry, sugar containing fruits--raisins, sultanas, figs, dates, peaches, blue plums and chokeberry recorded before and after irradiation with gamma-rays, are reported. It is shown that weak singlet EPR line with 2.0031+/-0.0005 can be recorded before irradiation of seeds, stones or skin of chokeberry, figs and raisins as well as flesh of blue plum, raisins and peaches. EPR signals of various shape are distinguished after irradiation in different parts of the fruits, as well as in randomly cut pieces of them: As a result, randomly cut pieces of dry fruits suitable for EPR studies, containing various constituents, exhibit different in shape and intensity EPR spectra. Kinetic studies followed for 1 year on the time stability of all reported EPR signals indicate that intensity ratio between the simultaneously appearing EPR signals in particular fruit varies from 1:20 immediately after irradiation to 1:0.5 at the end of the period. These observations open a new possibility for identification of irradiated fruits - using the magnitude of the intensity ratio to find the approximate date of radiation processing in the first ca. 30-100 days. PMID:16497546

  6. Shielding design of a treatment room for an accelerator-based epithermal neutron irradiation facility for BNCT.

    PubMed

    Evans, J F; Blue, T E

    1996-11-01

    Protecting the facility personnel and the general public from radiation exposure is a primary safety concern of an accelerator-based epithermal neutron irradiation facility. This work makes an attempt at answering the questions "How much?" and "What kind?" of shielding will meet the occupational limits of such a facility. Shielding effectiveness is compared for ordinary and barytes concretes in combination with and without borated polyethylene. A calculational model was developed of a treatment room , patient "scatterer," and the epithermal neutron beam. The Monte Carlo code, MCNP, was used to compute the total effective dose equivalent rates at specific points of interest outside of the treatment room. A conservative occupational effective dose rate limit of 0.01 mSv h-1 was the guideline for this study. Conservative Monte Carlo calculations show that constructing the treatment room walls with 1.5 m of ordinary concrete, 1.2 m of barytes concrete, 1.0 m of ordinary concrete preceded by 10 cm of 5% boron-polyethylene, or 0.8 m of barytes concrete preceded by 10 cm of 5% boron-polyethylene will adequately protect facility personnel. PMID:8887513

  7. Shielding design of a treatment room for an accelerator-based epithermal neutron irradiation facility for BNCT

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J.F.; Blue, T.E.

    1996-11-01

    Protecting the facility personnel and the general public from radiation exposure is a primary safety concern of an accelerator-based epithermal neutron irradiation facility. This work makes an attempt at answering the questions {open_quotes}How much?{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}What kind?{close_quotes} of shielding will meet the occupational limits of such a facility. Shielding effectiveness is compared for ordinary and barytes concretes in combination with and without borated polyethylene. A calculational model was developed of a treatment room, patient {open_quotes}scatterer,{close_quotes} and the epithermal neutron beam. The Monte Carlo code, MCNP, was used to compute the total effective dose equivalent rates at specific points of interest outside of the treatment room. A conservative occupational effective dose rate limit of 0.01 mSv h{sup {minus}1} was the guideline for this study. Conservative Monte Carlo calculations show that constructing the treatment room walls with 1.5 m of ordinary concrete, 1.2 m of barytes concrete, 1.0 m of ordinary concrete preceded by 10 cm of 5% boron-polyethylene, or 0.8 m of barytes concrete preceded by 10 cm of 5% boron-polyethylene will adequately protect facility personnel. 20 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Influence of ageing on Raman spectra and the conductivity of monolayer graphene samples irradiated by heavy and light ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butenko, A.; Zion, E.; Kaganovskii, Yu.; Wolfson, L.; Richter, V.; Sharoni, A.; Kogan, E.; Kaveh, M.; Shlimak, I.

    2016-07-01

    The influence of long-term ageing (about one year) on the Raman scattering (RS) spectra and the temperature dependence of conductivity has been studied in two series of monolayer graphene samples irradiated by different doses of C+ and Xe+ ions. It is shown that the main result of ageing consists of changes in the intensity and position of D- and G- and 2D-lines in RS spectra and in an increase of the conductivity. The observed effects are explained in terms of an increase of the radius of the "activated" area around structural defects.

  9. Optical properties of irradiated imidazolium based room temperature ionic liquids: new microscopic insights into the radiation induced mutations.

    PubMed

    Guleria, Apurav; Singh, Ajay K; Adhikari, Soumyakanti

    2015-04-28

    Considering the future perspectives of room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) in areas involving high radiation fields (such as the nuclear fuel cycle and space applications), it is essential to probe and have a microscopic understanding of the radiation induced perturbations in the molecular structures and the intrinsic bonding interactions existing in the ILs. Herein, a focused investigation concerning the photophysical behavior of post-irradiated FAP (fluoroalkyl phosphate) imidazolium ILs revealed considerable rearrangements and bonding realignments of the ionic moieties in the ILs on irradiation, however, their physicochemical properties do not change significantly even at high absorbed doses. Most interestingly, the well-established excitation wavelength dependent fluorescence (FL) behavior of the ILs was considerably perturbed on irradiation and this is attributed to the radiation induced decoupling of pre-existing different associated structures of ions, and the subsequent formation of oligomers and other species containing multiple bond order groups. This was further substantiated by vibrational studies, where peaks appearing in the range 1600-1800 cm(-1) indicated the formation of double bonded products. Furthermore, for the hydroxyl functionalized (in the alkyl side chain of the imidazolium cation) IL, a blue shift in the O-H stretching frequency was observed for the -OH group H-bonded to the FAP anion (νOH···[FAP](-)), while a red shift was observed for the H-bonded -OH groups in the cationic clusters. The FL lifetime values were found to increase with irradiation, which clearly indicates the enhancement in the rigidity level in the vicinity of the ions, thereby hindering the non-radiative decay processes. Such studies could contribute to the fundamental understanding of the radiation driven perturbations in the structure-property relationships, which eventually affect the radiolytic degradation pathways and the product distribution in RTILs. PMID

  10. Effects of annealing treatment and gamma irradiation on the absorption and fluorescence spectra of Cr:GSGG laser crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, D. L.; Luo, J. Q.; Xiao, J. Z.; Zhang, Q. L.; Jiang, H. H.; Yin, S. T.; Wang, Y. F.; Ge, X. W.

    2008-09-01

    The influence of annealing treatments and gamma-ray irradiation on the absorption and fluorescence spectra of Cr:GSGG crystals grown by the Czochralski method has been investigated. Two absorption bands located near 686 nm and 1050 nm were weakened markedly after the crystal was re-annealed in H2 atmosphere, which is due to the Cr4+ ions being de-oxidized into Cr3+ ions. The other two weak additional absorption bands induced by gamma-ray irradiation appearing near 310 nm and 480 nm are ascribed to the Fe2+ ions and F-type color centers, respectively. In particular, the gamma-ray irradiation with a dose of 100 Mrad has an effect of improving slightly the luminescence properties of Cr:GSGG crystals. The improvement mechanism is analyzed and discussed.

  11. Electron spectra of xenon clusters irradiated with a laser-driven plasma soft-x-ray laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Namba, S.; Takiyama, K.; Hasegawa, N.; Kishimoto, M.; Nishikino, M.; Kawachi, T.

    2011-11-15

    Xenon clusters were irradiated with plasma soft-x-ray laser pulses (having a wavelength of 13.9 nm, time duration of 7 ps, and intensities of up to 10 GW/cm{sup 2}). The laser photon energy was high enough to photoionize 4d core electrons. The cross section is large due to a giant resonance. The interaction was investigated by measuring the electron energy spectra. The photoelectron spectra for small clusters indicate that the spectral width due to the 4d hole significantly broadens with increasing cluster size. For larger clusters, the electron energy spectra evolve into a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution, as a strongly coupled cluster nanoplasma is generated.

  12. Heavy ion irradiation-induced microstructural evolution in pyrochlore Lu2Ti2O7 at room temperature and 723 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Q. R.; Zhang, J.; Dong, X. N.; Guo, Q. X.; Li, N.

    2015-11-01

    Polycrystalline pyrochlore Lu2Ti2O7 pellets were irradiated with 600 keV Kr3+ at room temperature and 723 K to a fluence of 4×1015 ions/cm2, corresponding to an average ballistic damage dose of 10 displacements per atom in the peak damage region. Irradiation-induced microstructural evolution was examined by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy. Incomplete amorphization was observed in the sample irradiated at room temperature due to the formation of nano-crystal which has the identical structure of pyrochlore, and the formation of nano-crystal is attributed to the mechanism of epitaxial recrystallization. However, an ordered pyrochlore phase to a swelling disordered fluorite phase transformation is occurred for the Lu2Ti2O7 sample irradiated at 723 K, which is due to the disordering of metal cations and anion vacancies.

  13. gamma-Irradiation effects on the thermal decomposition behaviour and IR absorption spectra of piperacillin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahfouz, R. M.; Gaffar, M. A.; Abu El-Fadl, A.; Hamad, Ar. G. K.

    2003-11-01

    The thermal decomposition behaviour of unirradiated and pre-gamma-irradiated piperacillin (pipril) as a semi-synthetic penicillin antibiotic has been studied in the temperature range of (273-1072 K). The decomposition was found to proceed through three major steps both for unirradiated and gamma-irradiated samples. Neither appearance nor disappearance of new bands in the IR spectrum of piperacillin was recorded as a result of gamma-irradiation but only a decrease in the intensity of most bands was observed. A degradation mechanism was suggested to explain the bond rupture and the decrease in the intensities of IR bands of gamma-irradiated piperacillin.

  14. Line Coupling Effects in the Isotropic Raman Spectra of N2: A Quantum Calculation at Room Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thibault, Franck; Boulet, Christian; Ma, Qiancheng

    2014-01-01

    We present quantum calculations of the relaxation matrix for the Q branch of N2 at room temperature using a recently proposed N2-N2 rigid rotor potential. Close coupling calculations were complemented by coupled states studies at high energies and provide about 10200 two-body state-to state cross sections from which the needed one-body cross-sections may be obtained. For such temperatures, convergence has to be thoroughly analyzed since such conditions are close to the limit of current computational feasibility. This has been done using complementary calculations based on the energy corrected sudden formalism. Agreement of these quantum predictions with experimental data is good, but the main goal of this work is to provide a benchmark relaxation matrix for testing more approximate methods which remain of a great utility for complex molecular systems at room (and higher) temperatures.

  15. Monomeric C-phycocyanin at room temperature and 77 K. Resolution of the absorption and fluorescence spectra of the individual chromophores and the energy-transfer rate constants

    SciTech Connect

    Debreczeny, M.P.; Sauer, K. Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA ); Zhou, J.; Bryant, D.A. )

    1993-09-23

    At both room temperature (RT) and 77 K, the absorption and fluorescence spectra of the three individual chromophore types ([alpha][sub 84], [beta][sub 84], and [beta][sub 155]) found in monomeric C-phycocyanin ([alpha][sup PC][beta][sup PC]), isolated from the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002, were resolved along with the rates of energy transfer between the chromophores. The cpcB/C155S mutant, whose PC is missing the [beta][sub 155] chromophore, was useful in effecting this resolution. At RT, the single broad peak in the visible region of the absorption spectrum of ([alpha][sup PC][beta][sup PC]) was resolved into its three-component spectra by comparing the steady-state absorption spectra of the isolated wild-type [alpha] subunit of PC ([alpha][sup PC]) (containing only the [alpha][sub 84] chromophore) with those of the monomeric PCs isolated from the mutant strain ([alpha][sup PC][beta]*) and the wild-type strain ([alpha][sup PC][beta][sup PC]). At 77 K, the visible region of the absorption spectrum of ([alpha][sup PC][beta][sup PC]) splits into two peaks. This partial resolution at 77 K of the chromophore spectra of ([alpha][sup PC][beta][sup PC]) when compared with the 77 K absorption spectra of [alpha][sup PC], [beta][sup PC], and ([alpha][sup PC][beta]*) provided a confirmation of our RT assignments of the chromophore absorption spectra. 38 refs., 9 figs., 6 tabs.

  16. Far infrared spectra of amorphous and crystalline water ice and changes in these phases as the result of proton irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, Reggie L.; Moore, Marla H.

    1992-01-01

    Far infrared spectra from 20 microns (500 cm(sup -1)) to 100 microns (100 cm(sup -1)) of water ice were measured. Amorphous ice deposited at 13 K has one absorption band at 45 microns (220 cm(sup -1)). Amorphous ice evolves into a crystalline form with absorptions at 44 microns (229 cm(sup -1)) and 62 microns (162 cm(sup -1)) as the temperature is increased to 155 K. Spectra documenting this phase change are presented as well as spectra of crystalline ice at temperatures between 13 K and 155 K. Far infrared spectra of amorphous and crystalline water ice before and after proton irradiation are also presented. Changes in these two forms are discussed in relation to ices in comets, grains, and planetary satellites in various radiation environments. Observations of non-terrestrial clathrate hydrates are still lacking despite the fact that clathrates first were suggested to exist in cometary and interstellar ices over forty years ago. Spectroscopy, the most direct method of astronomical detection, has been hampered by the similarity of clathrate hydrate spectra to those of unenclathrated guest molecules and solid H2O. A methanol (CH3OH) clathrate hydrate, using a recently published procedure, was prepared and its far-IR spectrum investigated. The spectrum is quite differenct from that of either unenclathrated CH3OH or solid H2O and so should be of value in astronomical searches for this clathrate.

  17. Gamma-irradiated dry fruits. An example of a wide variety of long-time dependent EPR spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yordanov, Nicola D.; Pachova, Zdravka

    2006-03-01

    EPR spectra of dry, sugar containing fruits—raisins, sultanas, figs, dates, peaches, blue plums and chokeberry recorded before and after irradiation with gamma-rays, are reported. It is shown that weak singlet EPR line with 2.0031 ± 0.0005 can be recorded before irradiation of seeds, stones or skin of chokeberry, figs and raisins as well as flesh of blue plum, raisins and peaches. EPR signals of various shape are distinguished after irradiation in different parts of the fruits, as well as in randomly cut pieces of them: Seeds of raisins, chokeberry and figs give a singlet line. Stones from blue plums and peaches exhibit typical "cellulose-like" EPR signal consisting of an intense singlet line with g = 2.0033 ± 0.0005 and 2 week satellite lines situated ca. 30 G left and right to it. Stones of dates are the only sample in which "sugar-like" spectrum is recorded. Skin of raisins and figs exhibits "sugar-like" EPR spectrum whereas that of dates and chokeberry—a singlet line. Under the same experimental conditions skin of sultanas, peaches and blue plums are EPR silent. Flesh of raisins, sultanas, figs, dates and peaches exhibits "sugar-like" EPR spectrum, flesh of blue plums gives a singlet EPR line and that of chokeberry is EPR silent. As a result, randomly cut pieces of dry fruits suitable for EPR studies, containing various constituents, exhibit different in shape and intensity EPR spectra. Kinetic studies followed for 1 year on the time stability of all reported EPR signals indicate that intensity ratio between the simultaneously appearing EPR signals in particular fruit varies from 1:20 immediately after irradiation to 1:0.5 at the end of the period. These observations open a new possibility for identification of irradiated fruits - using the magnitude of the intensity ratio to find the approximate date of radiation processing in the first ca. 30-100 days.

  18. Implementation and workflow for PET monitoring of therapeutic ion irradiation: a comparison of in-beam, in-room, and off-line techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakirin, Georgy; Braess, Henning; Fiedler, Fine; Kunath, Daniela; Laube, Kristin; Parodi, Katia; Priegnitz, Marlen; Enghardt, Wolfgang

    2011-03-01

    An independent assessment of the dose delivery in ion therapy can be performed using positron emission tomography (PET). For that a distribution of positron emitters which appear as the result of interaction between ions of the therapeutic beam and the irradiated tissue is measured during or after the irradiation. Three concepts for PET monitoring implemented in various therapy facilities are considered in this paper. The in-beam PET concept relies on the PET measurement performed simultaneously to the irradiation by means of a PET scanner which is completely integrated into the irradiation site. The in-room PET concept allows measurement immediately after irradiation by a standalone PET scanner which is installed very close to the irradiation site. In the off-line PET scenario the measurement is performed by means of a standalone PET/CT scanner 10-30 min after the irradiation. These three concepts were evaluated according to image quality criteria, integration costs, and their influence onto the workflow of radiotherapy. In-beam PET showed the best performance. However, the integration costs were estimated as very high for this modality. Moreover, the performance of in-beam PET depends heavily on type and duty cycle of the accelerator. The in-room PET is proposed for planned therapy facilities as a good compromise between the quality of measured data and integration efforts. For facilities which are close to the nuclear medicine departments off-line PET can be suggested under several circumstances.

  19. Measurement of the charged particle spectra from neutron irradiated tissue-equivalent plastic

    SciTech Connect

    Earls, L.M.

    1981-01-01

    The charged particle spectra from the 49 MeV deuteron on beryllium neutron beam onto Shonka A-150 tissue-equivalent plastic has been measured as a function of off-axis angle from 10/sup 0/ to 90/sup 0/. Particle detection was accomplished by silicon detectors in a detector telescope array. A ..delta..E-E algorithm was used to identify particles. Average particle energies for protons, deuterons, and alpha particles have been calculated and compared with calculations made by Wells. Certain discrepancies between Wells' slowing down spectra and the detected charged particle spectra have been observed.

  20. Io's surface composition based on reflectance spectra of sulfur/salt mixtures and proton-irradiation experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nash, D. B.; Fanale, F. P.

    1977-01-01

    Available full-disk reflectance spectra of Io in the range 0.3 to 2.5 microns have been used to determine a surface compositional model for Io that is consistent with Io's other known chemical and physical properties. Results indicate that the surface of Io contains abundant dehydrated salts of high Na, Mg, and Fe(3+) content such as bloedite and ferrous iron sulfate. Experiments were performed studying the irradiation damage effects from low-energy proton bombardment, since Io is immersed in Jupiter's magnetosphere.

  1. Effect of combination of chitosan coating and irradiation on physicochemical and functional properties of chicken egg during room-temperature storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xian De; Jang, Aera; Kim, Dong Hun; Lee, Bong Duk; Lee, Mooha; Jo, Cheorun

    2009-07-01

    The effect of combination of chitosan coating and irradiation on quality and storage stability of shell egg was investigated. Salmonella typhimurium inoculated on eggshell was not detected by irradiation of 2.0 kGy at day 0 and/or chitosan coating (1%, pH 5.0) after 3 days of storage. One-day-old fresh chicken egg was chitosan coated and irradiated at 0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 kGy by gamma ray. The egg samples were stored at room temperature for 14 days and the effects of the combination treatment on internal physicochemical and functional properties were investigated. The Haugh unit of egg was decreased by irradiation even at 0.5 kGy. Irradiation increased the lipid oxidation in egg yolk at 2 kGy but the egg with chitosan coating reduced the level of lipid oxidation. Irradiation increased the foaming ability of egg white and decreased viscosity of egg yolk and white. Results suggested that combination of irradiation and chitosan coating can improve safety of shell egg but irradiation treatment may reduce the egg quality for direct consumption. However, an improved functional property for further processing and efficient separation of egg white and yolk can be expected for egg processing industry using irradiation.

  2. Effects induced by gamma-irradiation and thermal treatment on the infrared spectra of ferrocene in its disordered state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaffar, M. A.; Abd-Elrahman, M. I.

    2004-10-01

    Lattice, rotation and intramolecular vibrations of ferrocene, Fe(C5H5)(2), crystallites of the C-2h(5) factor group in the disordered phase are calculated using the correlation theorem based on group theory. The correlation between the species of the C-1 site symmetry occupied by cyclopentadienyl molecules and those of the factor group C-2h, of the crystal are calculated. The number of lattice vibrations of the cyclopentadienyl molecules is found to be 12. with active modes in Raman and infrared (IR) spectra. The same number of rotations for the cyclopentadienyl molecules is expected to be allowed in both spectra. The active number of intramolecular vibrations for the cyclopentadienyl molecules having D-5 molecular symmetry is expected to be 80 vibrations in both the Raman and the IR spectra. The effect of gamma-irradiation with different doses and heat treatment at different temperatures on the IR spectra of ferrocene in the energy range 4000-200 cm(-1) is discussed. A number of bands continuously shifted their position, and a decrease in intensity with increasing gamma-dose is observed. New bands appeared in this spectral region for different annealing temperatures and different gamma-doses. These changes are discussed in terms of intermolecular interactions between molecules within the unit cell.

  3. Determination of proton and neutron spectra in the LANSCE spallation irradiation facility

    SciTech Connect

    James, M.R.; Maloy, S.A.; Sommer, W.F.; Fowler, M.M.; Dry, D.; Ferguson, P.D.; Mueller, G.; Corzine, R.K.

    1999-06-01

    Materials samples were recently irradiated in the Los Alamos Radiation Effects Facility (LASREF) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) to provide data for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) project on the effect of irradiation on the mechanical and physical properties of materials. The targets were configured to expose samples to a variety of radiation environments including, high-energy protons, mixed protons and high-energy neutrons, and low-energy neutrons. The samples were irradiated for approximately six months during a ten month period using an 800 MeV proton beam with a circular Gaussian shape of approximately 2{sigma} = 3.0 cm. At the end of this period, the samples were extracted and tested. Activation foils were also extracted that had been placed in proximity to the materials samples. These were used to quantify the fluences in various locations.

  4. Impact of Room Location on UV-C Irradiance and UV-C Dosage and Antimicrobial Effect Delivered by a Mobile UV-C Light Device.

    PubMed

    Boyce, John M; Farrel, Patricia A; Towle, Dana; Fekieta, Renee; Aniskiewicz, Michael

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate ultraviolet C (UV-C) irradiance, UV-C dosage, and antimicrobial effect achieved by a mobile continuous UV-C device. DESIGN Prospective observational study. METHODS We used 6 UV light sensors to determine UV-C irradiance (W/cm2) and UV-C dosage (µWsec/cm2) at various distances from and orientations relative to the UV-C device during 5-minute and 15-minute cycles in an ICU room and a surgical ward room. In both rooms, stainless-steel disks inoculated with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE), and Clostridium difficile spores were placed next to sensors, and UV-C dosages and log10 reductions of target organisms achieved during 5-minute and 15-minute cycles were determined. Mean irradiance and dosage readings were compared using ANOVA. RESULTS Mean UV-C irradiance was nearly 1.0E-03 W/cm2 in direct sight at a distance of 1.3 m (4 ft) from the device but was 1.12E-05 W/cm2 on a horizontal surface in a shaded area 3.3 m (10 ft) from the device (P4 to 1-3 for MRSA, >4 to 1-2 for VRE and >4 to 0 log10 for C. difficile spores, depending on the distance from, and orientation relative to, the device with 5-minute and 15-minute cycles. CONCLUSION UV-C irradiance, dosage, and antimicrobial effect received from a mobile UV-C device varied substantially based on location in a room relative to the UV-C device. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;37:667-672. PMID:27004524

  5. Neural network radiative transfer solvers for the generation of high resolution solar irradiance spectra parameterized by cloud and aerosol parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, M.; Kosmopoulos, P. G.; Kazadzis, S.; Keramitsoglou, I.; Kiranoudis, C. T.

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on the development of a neural network (NN) model for instantaneous and accurate estimation of solar radiation spectra and budgets geared toward satellite cloud data using a ≈2.4 M record, high-spectral resolution look up table (LUT) generated with the radiative transfer model libRadtran. Two NN solvers, one for clear sky conditions dominated by aerosol and one for cloudy skies, were trained on a normally-distributed and multiparametric subset of the LUT that spans a very broad class of atmospheric and meteorological conditions as inputs with corresponding high resolution solar irradiance target spectra as outputs. The NN solvers were tested by feeding them with a large (10 K record) "off-grid" random subset of the LUT spanning the training data space, and then comparing simulated outputs with target values provided by the LUT. The NN solvers demonstrated a capability to interpolate accurately over the entire multiparametric space. Once trained, the NN solvers allow for high-speed estimation of solar radiation spectra with high spectral resolution (1 nm) and for a quantification of the effect of aerosol and cloud optical parameters on the solar radiation budget without the need for a massive database. The cloudy sky NN solver was applied to high spatial resolution (54 K pixel) cloud data extracted from the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) onboard the geostationary Meteosat Second Generation 3 (MSG3) satellite and demonstrated that coherent maps of spectrally-integrated global horizontal irradiance at this resolution can be produced on the order of 1 min.

  6. Effect of irradiance spectra on the photoinduced toxicity of three polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, S.A.; Mount, D.R.; Burkhard, L.P.; Ankley, G.T.; Makynen, E.A.; Leonard, E.N.

    2000-05-01

    Photoinduced toxicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is dependent on the concentration of compounds present and the dose of light received. Of the light present, only those wavelengths absorbed by the compound have the potential to initiate the photochemical events underlying phototoxicity. This suggests that variation in light spectra present in natural waters, arising from variation in dissolved organic carbon composition, is an important determinant of phototoxicity risk in specific, PAH-contaminated waterbodies. To quantify the effect of environmentally realistic variation in light spectra on toxicity, brine shrimp (Artemia salina) assays were conducted under various light spectra and with three PAHs (pyrene, fluoranthene, and anthracene) of known phototoxicity potential. In these spectral assays, the total ultraviolet light present was equivalent; only the spectral characteristics varied. Based on the absorbance spectra of these PAHs, it was predicted that toxicity, quantified using immobilization as the endpoint, would vary significantly among light spectra in pyrene assays, but not in anthracene assays, and that variation in toxicity in fluoranthene assays would be intermediate. The results supported these assumptions. In the pyrene exposures, the glass filter time to 50% population immobilization (IT50) (39.5 min) was 117% longer than the KCr filter IT50 (18.2 min). In the fluoranthene exposures, the glass filter IT50 (49.5 min) was 27% longer than the KCr filter IT50 (39.1 min). In the anthracene exposures, the glass filter IT50 (62.2 min) was not statistically different from the KCr filter IT50 (63.8 min). Comparison of these results with the results of assays conducted under neutral-density filters (that change intensity but not spectral distribution) demonstrate that multiplying spectral intensity by wavelength-specific absorbance accurately predicts relative photoinduced toxicity among the experimental treatments. These results indicate

  7. Reflectance Spectra of CM2 Chondrite Mighei Irradiated with Pulsed Laser and Implications for Low-Albedo Asteroids and Martian Moons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moroz, L. V.; Hiroi, T.; Shingareva, T. V.; Basilevsky, A. T.; Fisenko, A. V.; Semjonova, L. F.; Pieters, C. M.

    2004-01-01

    Micrometeoritic bombardment is an important space weathering process modifying surface optical properties of airless solar system bodies. We have used irradiation with a microsecond pulsed laser as an experimental method to simulate such a process on various targets. The experiment discussed here was performed on a powdered sample of CM2 carbonaceous chondrite Mighei. Shingareva et al. report the details of experimental procedure as well as the results of mineralogical and chemical studies of the irradiated material. Here we present reflectance spectra of irradiated Mighei samples and discuss their spectral properties compared to those of non-irradiated meteorite and low-albedo small solar system bodies.

  8. Effect of excess PbBr2 on photoluminescence spectra of CH3NH3PbBr3 perovskite particles at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Xin; Zhang, Kun; Li, Yanping; Yao, Li; Zhang, Yinfeng; Wang, Yilun; Zhai, Wenhao; Tao, Li; Du, Honglin; Ran, Guangzhao

    2016-02-01

    The organic-inorganic halide perovskites have promising applications in light-emitting devices besides solar cells. We here prepare CH3NH3PbBr3 perovskite particles on SiO2 substrates and find that the photoluminescence (PL) spectrum of the particles at room temperature has two peaks, locating at 529 and 549 nm, respectively, much different from that of the corresponding films prepared on the oxygen plasma-cleaned SiO2 substrates, which has a single peak. The double peaks have different temperature-dependence behaviors. By the x-ray diffraction and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy analyses, excess PbBr2 is detected inside the particles. We deduce that such excess PbBr2 has introduced shallow level defects. It is concluded that band-to-band recombination and these defects result in the double-peaked feature of the PL spectra of CH3NH3PbBr3 particles at room temperature.

  9. Irradiation induced ferromagnetism at room temperature in TiO{sub 2} thin films: X-ray magnetic circular dichroism characterizations

    SciTech Connect

    Thakur, Hardeep; Sharma, K. K.; Thakur, P.; Brookes, N. B.; Kumar, Ravi; Singh, A. P.; Kumar, Yogesh; Gautam, S.; Chae, K. H.

    2011-05-09

    We report on the room temperature ferromagnetism in the swift heavy ion (SHI) irradiated TiO{sub 2} thin films by x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) experiments at the O K and Ti L{sub 3,2} absorption edges. The XAS/XMCD measurements provide direct evidence of magnetic polarization of the O 2p and Ti 3d orbitals. The unquenched orbital magnetic moment within the O 2p shell is ferromagnetically coupled to the neighboring Ti moments, which illustrates the intense hybridization of the O 2p and Ti 3d orbitals induced by SHI irradiation.

  10. The effects of boron on the electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of alanine irradiated with thermal neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Ciesielski, B.; Wielopolski, L.

    1995-10-01

    The effects of boric acid admixture on the intensity and line structure of EPR spectra of free radicals produced in alanine by thermal neutrons are presented. The EPR signal enhancement, up to a factor of 40 depending on the boron concentration, is related to additional energy deposition in alanine crystals by the disintegration products resulting from the capture of a thermal neutron by boron, {sup 10}B(n,{alpha}){sup 7}Li. The changes in the shape of the EPR spectra observed by changing the microwave power are due to the differences in the microwave power saturation of the free radicals produced by a low-LET radiation and those produced by the high-LET components of the radiation after the neutron capture reaction. 27 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Numerical Modeling of Indoor Environment with a Ceiling Fan and an Upper-Room Ultraviolet Germicidal Irradiation System

    PubMed Central

    ZHU, SHENGWEI; SREBRIC, JELENA; RUDNICK, STEPHEN N.; VINCENT, RICHARD L.; NARDELL, EDWARD A.

    2013-01-01

    This study proposes a numerical modeling method for the indoor environment with ceiling fans and upper-room ultraviolet germicidal irradiation (UR-UVGI) fixtures. The numerical modeling deployed steady-state Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) with a rotating reference frame to simulate the rotation of fan blades. CFD was validated with experimental data of velocity field and fraction of microorganism remaining at the exhaust diffuser. The fraction of microorganism remaining represented the ratio of the concentration of airborne microorganisms measured with UVGI turned on to the one measured with UVGI turned off. According to the validation results, the CFD model correctly reproduced the air movement induced by the rotation of ceiling fan. When the ambient ventilation rate was 2 ACH (air changes per hour) or 6 ACH, the CFD model accurately predicted the average vertical speeds in the section 2.44 m above the floor with the errors less than 10%, regardless of the ceiling fan's rotational direction or speed. In addition, the simulation results showed that the fraction of microorganism remaining increased with the ambient air exchange rate when the fan blew air downward with a rotational speed as high as 235 rpm, which corresponded with the experimental results. Furthermore, the simulation results accurately predicted the fraction of microorganism remaining when the ambient air exchange rate was 2 ACH. We conclude that this novel numerical model can reproduce the effects of ceiling fans and UR-UVGI fixtures on indoor environment, and should aid in the investigation of the impact of ceiling fans on UR-UVGI disinfection efficacy. PMID:24426180

  12. Numerical Modeling of Indoor Environment with a Ceiling Fan and an Upper-Room Ultraviolet Germicidal Irradiation System.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shengwei; Srebric, Jelena; Rudnick, Stephen N; Vincent, Richard L; Nardell, Edward A

    2014-02-01

    This study proposes a numerical modeling method for the indoor environment with ceiling fans and upper-room ultraviolet germicidal irradiation (UR-UVGI) fixtures. The numerical modeling deployed steady-state Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) with a rotating reference frame to simulate the rotation of fan blades. CFD was validated with experimental data of velocity field and fraction of microorganism remaining at the exhaust diffuser. The fraction of microorganism remaining represented the ratio of the concentration of airborne microorganisms measured with UVGI turned on to the one measured with UVGI turned off. According to the validation results, the CFD model correctly reproduced the air movement induced by the rotation of ceiling fan. When the ambient ventilation rate was 2 ACH (air changes per hour) or 6 ACH, the CFD model accurately predicted the average vertical speeds in the section 2.44 m above the floor with the errors less than 10%, regardless of the ceiling fan's rotational direction or speed. In addition, the simulation results showed that the fraction of microorganism remaining increased with the ambient air exchange rate when the fan blew air downward with a rotational speed as high as 235 rpm, which corresponded with the experimental results. Furthermore, the simulation results accurately predicted the fraction of microorganism remaining when the ambient air exchange rate was 2 ACH. We conclude that this novel numerical model can reproduce the effects of ceiling fans and UR-UVGI fixtures on indoor environment, and should aid in the investigation of the impact of ceiling fans on UR-UVGI disinfection efficacy. PMID:24426180

  13. Production of proton beams with narrow-band energy spectra from laser-irradiated ultrathin foils

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, A. P. L; Gibbon, P.

    2007-01-15

    Three-dimensional gridless particle simulations of proton acceleration via irradiation of a very thin foil by a short-pulse, high-intensity laser have been performed to evaluate recently proposed microstructured target configurations. It is found that a pure proton microdot target does not by itself result in a quasimonoenergetic proton beam. Such a beam can only be produced with a very lightly doped target, in qualitative agreement with one-dimensional theory. The simulations suggest that beam quality in current experiments could be dramatically improved by choosing microdot compositions with a 5-10 times lower proton fraction.

  14. Plasma scale-length effects on electron energy spectra in high-irradiance laser plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culfa, O.; Tallents, G. J.; Rossall, A. K.; Wagenaars, E.; Ridgers, C. P.; Murphy, C. D.; Dance, R. J.; Gray, R. J.; McKenna, P.; Brown, C. D. R.; James, S. F.; Hoarty, D. J.; Booth, N.; Robinson, A. P. L.; Lancaster, K. L.; Pikuz, S. A.; Faenov, A. Ya.; Kampfer, T.; Schulze, K. S.; Uschmann, I.; Woolsey, N. C.

    2016-04-01

    An analysis of an electron spectrometer used to characterize fast electrons generated by ultraintense (1020W cm-2 ) laser interaction with a preformed plasma of scale length measured by shadowgraphy is presented. The effects of fringing magnetic fields on the electron spectral measurements and the accuracy of density scale-length measurements are evaluated. 2D EPOCH PIC code simulations are found to be in agreement with measurements of the electron energy spectra showing that laser filamentation in plasma preformed by a prepulse is important with longer plasma scale lengths (>8 μ m ).

  15. Characterization of neutron flux spectra in the irradiation sites of a 37 GBq 241Am-Be isotopic source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yücel, Haluk; Budak, Mustafa Guray; Karadag, Mustafa; Yüksel, Alptuğ Özer

    2014-11-01

    For the applicability of instrumental neutron activation analysis (NAA) technique, an irradiation unit with a 37 GBq 241Am-Be neutron source was installed at Institute of Nuclear Sciences of Ankara University. Design and configuration properties of the irradiation unit are described. It has two different sample irradiation positions, one is called site #1 having a pneumatic sample transfer system and the other is site #2 having a location for manual use. In order to characterize neutron flux spectra in the irradiation sites, the measurement results were obtained for thermal (Фth) and epithermal neutron fluxes (Фepi), thermal to epithermal flux ratio (f) and epithermal spectrum shaping factors (α) by employing cadmium ratios of gold (Au) and molybdenum (Mo) monitors. The activities produced in these foils were measured by using a p-type, 44.8% relative efficiency HPGe well detector. For the measured γ-rays, self-absorption and true coincidence summing effects were taken into account. Additionally, thermal neutron self-shielding and resonance neutron self-shielding effects were taken into account in the measured results. For characterization of site #1, the required parameters were found to be Фth = (2.11 ± 0.05) × 103 n cm-2 s-1, Фepi = (3.32 ± 0.17) × 101 n cm-2 s-1, f = 63.6 ± 1.5, α = 0.045 ± 0.009, respectively. Similarly, those parameters were measured in site #2 as Фth = (1.49 ± 0.04) × 103 n cm-2 s-1, Фepi = (2.93 ± 0.15) × 101 n cm-2 s-1, f = 50.9 ± 1.3 and α = 0.038 ± 0.008. The results for f-values indicate that good thermalization of fast neutrons on the order of 98% was achieved in both sample irradiation sites. This is because an optimum combination of water and paraffin moderator is used in the present configuration. In addition, the shielding requirements are met by using natural boron oxide powder (5.5 cm) and boron loaded paraffin layers against neutrons, and a 15 cm thick lead bricks against gamma-rays from source and its

  16. Facile fabrication of high-performance InGaZnO thin film transistor using hydrogen ion irradiation at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, Byung Du; Park, Jin-Seong; Chung, K. B.

    2014-10-20

    Device performance of InGaZnO (IGZO) thin film transistors (TFTs) are investigated as a function of hydrogen ion irradiation dose at room temperature. Field effect mobility is enhanced, and subthreshold gate swing is improved with the increase of hydrogen ion irradiation dose, and there is no thermal annealing. The electrical device performance is correlated with the electronic structure of IGZO films, such as chemical bonding states, features of the conduction band, and band edge states below the conduction band. The decrease of oxygen deficient bonding and the changes in electronic structure of the conduction band leads to the improvement of device performance in IGZO TFT with an increase of the hydrogen ion irradiation dose.

  17. Neutron irradiation of superconductors and damage energy scaling of different neutron spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, P. A.; Weber, H. W.; Guinan, M. W.; Birtcher, R. C.; Brown, B. S.; Greenwood, L. R.

    1985-08-01

    Three different neutron sources were used to irradiate identical sets of NbTi superconductors up to about half the lifetime dose of a superconducting magnet in a fusion reactor. Based on a careful source characterization of the TRIGA Mark-II reactor in Vienna, the spallation neutron source IPNS at Argonne and the 14 MeV neutron source RTNS-II at Livermore, the damage energy cross sections were calculated for four different types of NbTi alloys (42, 46.5, 49 and 54 wt % Ti). The experimental results on the variations of critical current densities j sub c with neutron dose are found to scale within the experimental uncertainties with the appropriate damage energy cross sections. This first explicit proof of damage energy scaling for j sub c-variations in superconductors is considered to be most valuable for the evaluation of radiation damage in superconductors under fusion reactor conditions.

  18. Photobleaching of arterial fluorescent compounds: characterization of elastin, collagen and cholesterol time-resolved spectra during prolonged ultraviolet irradiation.

    PubMed

    Marcu, L; Grundfest, W S; Maarek, J M

    1999-06-01

    To study the photobleaching of the main fluorescent compounds of the arterial wall, we repeatedly measured the time-resolved fluorescence of elastin, collagen and cholesterol during 560 s of excitation with nitrogen laser pulses. Three fluence rate levels were used: 0.72, 7.25 and 21.75 microW/mm2. The irradiation-related changes of the fluorescence intensity and of the time-resolved fluorescence decay constants were characterized for the emission at 390, 430 and 470 nm. The fluorescence intensity at 390 nm decreased by 25-35% when the fluence delivered was 4 mJ/mm2, a common value in fluorescence studies of the arterial wall. Cholesterol fluorescence photobleached the most, and elastin fluorescence photobleached the least. Photobleaching was most intense at 390 nm and least intense at 470 nm such that the emission spectra of the three compounds were markedly distorted by photobleaching. The time-resolved decay constants and the fluorescence lifetime were not altered by irradiation when the fluence was below 4 mJ/mm2. The spectral distortions associated with photobleaching complicate the interpretation of arterial wall fluorescence in terms of tissue content in elastin, collagen and cholesterol. Use of the time-dependent features of the emission that are not altered by photobleaching should increase the accuracy of arterial wall analysis by fluorescence spectroscopy. PMID:10378012

  19. Computer simulation and study of the IR spectra of irradiated polymer materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabdrakipov, V. Z.; Kupchishin, A. A.; Kupchishin, A. I.; Tlebaev, K. B.; Gyngazov, V. A.

    2016-02-01

    Within the framework of MDDP the calculations of IR spectra have been performed for the initial polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and its state with the cation which satisfactorily describing experimental data. The calculations were made using the MDDP (modified neglect of diatomic differential overlap), implemented in the program MOPAC 2012. A feature of the method is that the overlap integrals are replaced by the δ-function, single-site Coulomb and exchange integrals are calculated by atomic parameters Slater-Condon. In recent years the studies of the structure and physico-chemical properties of polyethylene terephthalate and composites made on it basis have got the intensive development. Comparison of calculations with experimental data gives their satisfactory agreement.

  20. Efficacy of ultraviolet germicidal irradiation of upper-room air in inactivating airborne bacterial spores and mycobacteria in full-scale studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Peng; Peccia, Jordan; Fabian, Patricia; Martyny, John W.; Fennelly, Kevin P.; Hernandez, Mark; Miller, Shelly L.

    The efficacy of ultraviolet germicidal irradiation (UVGI) for inactivating airborne bacterial spores and vegetative mycobacteria cells was evaluated under full-scale conditions. Airborne bacteria inactivation experiments were conducted in a test room (87 m 3), fitted with a modern UVGI system (216 W all lamps operating, average upper zone UV irradiance 42±19 μW cm -2) and maintained at 25°C and 50% relative humidity, at two ventilation rates (0 and 6 air changes per hour). Bacillus subtilis (spores), Mycobacterium parafortuitum, and Mycobacterium bovis BCG cells were aerosolized continuously into the room such that their numbers and physiologic state were comparable both with and without the UVGI and ventilation system operating. Air samples were collected using glass impingers (9 breathing-zone locations) and multi-stage impactors, and collected bacteria were quantified using direct microscopy and standard culturing assays. UVGI reduced the room-average concentration of culturable airborne bacteria between 46% and 80% for B. subtilis spores, between 83% and 98% for M. parafortuitum, and 96-97% for M. bovis BCG cells, depending on the ventilation rate. An additional set of experiments, in which M. parafortuitum was aerosolized into the test room and then allowed to decay under varying UVGI and ventilation rates, yielded an inactivation rate of 16±1.2 h -1 for the UVGI system, all lamps operating. The Z value (inactivation rate normalized to UVGI irradiance) was estimated to be 1.2±0.15×10 -3 cm 2 μW -1 s -1 for aerosolized M. parafortuitum at 50% relative humidity.

  1. Measurements of X-ray spectra from irradiated gold foils at the OMEGA Laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Joshua; Keiter, Paul; Drake, Paul; Klein, Sallee; Fein, Jeff

    2014-10-01

    In many HED systems high intensity x-rays can be used to measure plasma properties such as density and temperature. At the OMEGA laser facility, these X-rays are produced by irradiating a metal foil with high-intensity lasers, which heats the foil and causes it to act as a quasi-continuum x-ray source for radiography or absorption spectroscopy. As this emission is quasi-continuous and the transmission of x-rays through a material varies with photon energy a well-characterized x-ray source is vital. Therefore, in order to optimize diagnostics reliant upon x-rays it is necessary to gain a better understanding of how the x-ray emission from these targets varies over time and varying beam energy. We will present experimental results studying the effect that beam energy and pulse length have on M-band and sub-keV x-ray emission generated from a 5 μm thick gold disk using time-resolved spectroscopy and a Henway crystal spectrometer. This work is funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, through the NNSA-DS and SC-OFES Joint Program in High-Energy-Density Laboratory Plasmas, Grant Number DE-NA0001840, and the National Laser User Facility Program, Grant Number DE-NA0000850, and through the Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester by the NNSA/OICF under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC52-08NA28302.

  2. Triton Emission Spectra in Some Target Nuclei Irradiated by Ultra-Fast Neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tel, E.; Kaplan, A.; Aydın, A.; Büyükuslu, H.; Demirkol, İ.; Arasoğlu, A.

    2010-08-01

    High-current proton accelerator technologies make use of spallation neutrons produced in ( p,xn) and ( n,xn) nuclear reactions on high-Z targets. The produced neutrons are moderated by heavy water. These moderated neutrons are subsequently captured on 3He to produce tritium via the ( n,p) reaction. Tritium self-sufficiency must be maintained for a commercial power plant. So, working out the systematics of ( n,t) reaction cross sections and triton emission differential data are important for the given reaction taking place on various nuclei at different energies. In this study, triton emission spectra by using ultra-fast neutrons (incident neutron energy >50 MeV), the ( n,xt) reactions for some target nuclei as 16O, 27Al, 56Fe, 59Co, 208Pb and 209Bi have been investigated. In the calculations, the pre-equilibrium and equilibrium effects have been used. The calculated results have been compared with the experimental data taken from the literature.

  3. Bandstructure, optical spectra, and mean free paths in the room-temperature structure of CH3NH3PbI3 from many-body perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigil-Fowler, Derek; Bernardi, Marco; Louie, Steven G.

    2015-03-01

    The organometallic halide pervoskites have generated enormous interest due to the rapidly increasing efficiency of solar cells fabricated from these materials. Most research on the organometallic halide pervoskites has been experimental due to the challenges posed by these materials to theoretical study, including the size of the unit cell, the presence of many defects, the orientational disorder in of the methyammonium (MA) cation, and the heavy atoms involved with the corresponding large spin-orbit coupling (SOC). We study the room-temperature tetragonal structure of CH3NH3PbI3 using density functional theory (DFT) and a many-body Green's functions approach. We use DFT to study the effect of the dependence of the bandstructure on the orientation of the MA cation, while we perform GW and GW plus Bethe-Salpeter equation (GW-BSE) calculations to study the quasiparticle bandstructure and optical spectra, respectively, paying close attention to convergence and the effect of SOC. We particularly investigate the existence of a proposed charge-transfer state in this material. We also briefly discuss the mean free paths due to electron-phonon and electron-electron scattering in the ideal structure. This work was supported by NSF Grant No. DMR10-1006184, and U.S. DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231 and the DOE SciDAC program. Computational resources were provided by NERSC. D.V.-F. acknowledges funding from the NSF's Blue Waters Fellowship.

  4. Small-Scale Mechanical Testing on Proton Beam-Irradiated 304 SS from Room Temperature to Reactor Operation Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vo, H.; Reichardt, A.; Howard, C.; Abad, M. D.; Kaoumi, D.; Chou, P.; Hosemann, P.

    2015-12-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are common structural components in light water reactors. Because reactor components are subjected to harsh conditions such as high operating temperatures and neutron radiation, they can undergo irradiation-induced embrittlement and related failure, which compromises reliable operation. Small-scale mechanical testing has seen widespread use as a testing method for both ion- and reactor-irradiated materials because it allows access to the mechanical properties of the ion beam-irradiated region, and for safe handling of a small amount of activated material. In this study, nanoindentation and microcompression testing were performed on unirradiated and 10 dpa proton-irradiated 304 SS, from 25°C to 300°C. Increases in yield stress (YS), critical resolved shear stress (CRSS) and hardness ( H) were seen in the irradiated region relative to the unirradiated region. Relationships between H, YS, and CRSS of irradiated and unirradiated materials are discussed over this temperature range.

  5. Optical and infrared absorption spectra of 3d transition metal ions-doped sodium borophosphate glasses and effect of gamma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelghany, A. M.; ElBatal, F. H.; Azooz, M. A.; Ouis, M. A.; ElBatal, H. A.

    2012-12-01

    Undoped and transition metals (3d TM) doped sodium borophosphate glasses were prepared. UV-visible absorption spectra were measured in the region 200-900 nm before and after gamma irradiation. Experimental optical data indicate that the undoped sodium borophosphate glass reveals before irradiation strong and broad UV absorption and no visible bands could be identified. Such UV absorption is related to the presence of unavoidable trace iron impurities within the raw materials used for preparation of this base borophosphate glass. The TMs-doped glasses show absorption bands within the UV and/or visible regions which are characteristic to each respective TM ion in addition to the UV absorption observed from the host base glass. Infrared absorption spectra of the undoped and TMs-doped glasses reveal complex FTIR consisting of extended characteristic vibrational bands which are specific for phosphate groups as a main constituent but with the sharing of some vibrations due to the borate groups. This criterion was investigated and approved using DAT (deconvolution analysis technique). The effects of different TMs ions on the FTIR spectra are very limited due to the low doping level (0.2%) introduced in the glass composition. Gamma irradiation causes minor effect on the FTIR spectra specifically the decrease of intensities of some bands. Such behavior is related to the change of bond angles and/or bond lengths of some structural building units upon gamma irradiation.

  6. Measurement of leakage neutron spectra from graphite cylinders irradiated with D-T neutrons for validation of evaluated nuclear data.

    PubMed

    Luo, F; Han, R; Chen, Z; Nie, Y; Shi, F; Zhang, S; Lin, W; Ren, P; Tian, G; Sun, Q; Gou, B; Ruan, X; Ren, J; Ye, M

    2016-10-01

    A benchmark experiment for validation of graphite data evaluated from nuclear data libraries was conducted for 14MeV neutrons irradiated on graphite cylinder samples. The experiments were performed using the benchmark experimental facility at the China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE). The leakage neutron spectra from the surface of graphite (Φ13cm×20cm) at 60° and 120° and graphite (Φ13cm×2cm) at 60° were measured by the time-of-flight (TOF) method. The obtained results were compared with the measurements made by the Monte Carlo neutron transport code MCNP-4C with the ENDF/B-VII.1, CENDL-3.1 and JENDL-4.0 libraries. The results obtained from a 20cm-thick sample revealed that the calculation results with CENDL-3.1 and JENDL-4.0 libraries showed good agreements with the experiments conducted in the whole energy region. However, a large discrepancy of approximately 40% was observed below the 3MeV energy region with the ENDF/B-VII.1 library. For the 2cm-thick sample, the calculated results obtained from the abovementioned three libraries could not reproduce the experimental data in the energy range of 5-7MeV. The graphite data in CENDL-3.1 were verified for the first time and were proved to be reliable. PMID:27620063

  7. Correlations Between Variations in Solar EUV and Soft X-Ray Irradiance and Photoelectron Energy Spectra Observed on Mars and Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, W. K.; Brain, D. A.; Mitchell, D. L.; Bailey, S. M.; Chamberlin, P. C.

    2013-01-01

    Solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV; 10-120 nm) and soft X-ray (XUV; 0-10 nm) radiation are major heat sources for the Mars thermosphere as well as the primary source of ionization that creates the ionosphere. In investigations of Mars thermospheric chemistry and dynamics, solar irradiance models are used to account for variations in this radiation. Because of limited proxies, irradiance models do a poor job of tracking the significant variations in irradiance intensity in the EUV and XUV ranges over solar rotation time scales when the Mars-Sun-Earth angle is large. Recent results from Earth observations show that variations in photoelectron energy spectra are useful monitors of EUV and XUV irradiance variability. Here we investigate photoelectron energy spectra observed by the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Electron Reflectometer (ER) and the FAST satellite during the interval in 2005 when Earth, Mars, and the Sun were aligned. The Earth photoelectron data in selected bands correlate well with calculations based on 1 nm resolution observations above 27 nm supplemented by broadband observations and a solar model in the 0-27 nm range. At Mars, we find that instrumental and orbital limitations to the identifications of photoelectron energy spectra in MGS/ER data preclude their use as a monitor of solar EUV and XUV variability. However, observations with higher temporal and energy resolution obtained at lower altitudes on Mars might allow the separation of the solar wind and ionospheric components of electron energy spectra so that they could be used as reliable monitors of variations in solar EUV and XUV irradiance than the time shifted, Earth-based, F(10.7) index currently used.

  8. Correlations between variations in solar EUV and soft X-ray irradiance and photoelectron energy spectra observed on Mars and Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, W. K.; Brain, D. A.; Mitchell, D. L.; Bailey, S. M.; Chamberlin, P. C.

    2013-11-01

    extreme ultraviolet (EUV; 10-120 nm) and soft X-ray (XUV; 0-10 nm) radiation are major heat sources for the Mars thermosphere as well as the primary source of ionization that creates the ionosphere. In investigations of Mars thermospheric chemistry and dynamics, solar irradiance models are used to account for variations in this radiation. Because of limited proxies, irradiance models do a poor job of tracking the significant variations in irradiance intensity in the EUV and XUV ranges over solar rotation time scales when the Mars-Sun-Earth angle is large. Recent results from Earth observations show that variations in photoelectron energy spectra are useful monitors of EUV and XUV irradiance variability. Here we investigate photoelectron energy spectra observed by the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Electron Reflectometer (ER) and the FAST satellite during the interval in 2005 when Earth, Mars, and the Sun were aligned. The Earth photoelectron data in selected bands correlate well with calculations based on 1 nm resolution observations above 27 nm supplemented by broadband observations and a solar model in the 0-27 nm range. At Mars, we find that instrumental and orbital limitations to the identifications of photoelectron energy spectra in MGS/ER data preclude their use as a monitor of solar EUV and XUV variability. However, observations with higher temporal and energy resolution obtained at lower altitudes on Mars might allow the separation of the solar wind and ionospheric components of electron energy spectra so that they could be used as reliable monitors of variations in solar EUV and XUV irradiance than the time shifted, Earth-based, F10.7 index currently used.

  9. A comparative study of the neutron flux spectra in the MNSR irradiation sites for the HEU and LEU cores using the MCNP4C code.

    PubMed

    Dawahra, S; Khattab, K; Saba, G

    2015-10-01

    A comparative study for fuel conversion from the HEU to LEU in the Miniature Neutron Source Reactor (MNSR) has been performed in this paper using the MCNP4C code. The neutron energy and lethargy flux spectra in the first inner and outer irradiation sites of the MNSR reactor for the existing HEU fuel (UAl4-Al, 90% enriched) and the potential LEU fuels (U3Si2-Al, U3Si-Al, U9Mo-Al, 19.75% enriched and UO2, 12.6% enriched) were investigated using the MCNP4C code. The neutron energy flux spectra for each group was calculated by dividing the neutron flux by the width of each energy group. The neutron flux spectra per unit lethargy was calculated by multiplying the neutron energy flux spectra for each energy group by the average energy of each group. The thermal neutron flux was calculated by summing the neutron fluxes from 0.0 to 0.625 eV, the fast neutron flux was calculated by summing the neutron fluxes from 0.5 MeV to 10 MeV for the existing HEU and potential LEU fuels. Good agreements have been noticed between the flux spectra for the potential LEU fuels and the existing HEU fuels with maximum relative differences less than 10% and 8% in the inner and outer irradiation sites. PMID:26142805

  10. EPR Investigation of Irradiated Curry Powder

    SciTech Connect

    Duliu, O. G.; Ali, S. I.; Georgescu, R.

    2007-04-23

    Gamma-ray irradiated curry powder, a well priced oriental spice was investigated in order to establish the ability of EPR to detect the presence and time stability of free irradiation free-radicals. Accordingly, curry powder aliquots were irradiated with gradually increasing absorbed doses up to 11.3 kGy. The EPR spectra of all irradiated samples show the presence of al last two different species of free radicals, whose concentration increased monotonously with the absorbed doses. A 100 deg. C isothermal annealing of irradiated samples has shown a differential reduction of amplitude of various components of the initial spectra, but even after 3.6 h of thermal treatment, the remaining amplitude represents no less then 30% of the initial ones. The same peculiarities have been noticed after more than one year storage at room temperature, all of them being very useful in establishing the existence of any previous irradiation treatment.

  11. Some gamma-irradiation-induced aspects of the infrared spectra, X-ray fluorescence, luminescence spectra and electric conductivity of natural materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youssef, S. K.; El-Sakr, N. S.

    1995-09-01

    Infrared (IR) and X-ray fluorescence analyses of samples of quartz crystal were performed under various annealing conditions in the range 25-700° C for 1 h and gamma exposure doses from 10 0 to 10 7 Gy. The results show composition changes with change of the sample annealing temperature as well as gamma irradiation doses beyond 10 5 Gy. Data for IR and X-ray fluorescence analyses are also compared with those for gamma-induced response changes of thermoluminescence and electric conductivity of the quartz crystals.

  12. Enhanced room temperature oxidation in silicon and porous silicon under 10 keV x-ray irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ryckman, Judson D.; Reed, Robert A.; Weller, Robert A.; Fleetwood, D. M.; Weiss, S. M.

    2010-12-01

    We report the observation of enhanced oxidation on silicon and porous silicon samples exposed in air ambient to high-dose-rate 10 keV x-ray radiation at room temperature. The evolution of the radiation-induced oxide growth is monitored by ellipsometry and interferometric reflectance spectroscopy. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy shows the emergence of Si-O-Si stretching modes and corresponding suppression of SiH{sub x} and Si-Si modes in the porous silicon samples. The radiation response depends strongly on initial native oxide thickness and Si-H surface species. The enhanced oxidation mechanism is attributed to photoinduced oxidation processes wherein energetic photons are used to dissociate molecular oxygen and promote the formation of more reactive oxygen species.

  13. The effect of gamma irradiation on electrical and dielectric properties of organic-based Schottky barrier diodes (SBDs) at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uslu, Habibe; Yıldırım, Mert; Altındal, Şemsettin; Durmuş, Perihan

    2012-04-01

    The effect of 60Co (γ-ray) irradiation on the electrical and dielectric properties of Au/Polyvinyl Alcohol (Ni,Zn-doped)/n-Si Schottky barrier diodes (SBDs) has been investigated by using capacitance-voltage (C-V) and conductance-voltage (G/ω-V) measurements at room temperature and 1 MHz. The real capacitance and conductance values were obtained by eliminating series resistance (Rs) effect in the measured capacitance (Cm) and conductance (Gm) values through correction. The experimental values of the dielectric constant (ɛ'), dielectric loss (ɛ″), loss tangent (tanδ), ac electrical conductivity (σac) and the real (M') and imaginary (M″) parts of the electrical modulus were found to be strong functions of radiation and applied bias voltage, especially in the depletion and accumulation regions. In addition, the density distribution of interface states (Nss) profile was obtained using the high-low frequency capacitance (CHF-CLF) method for before and after irradiation. The Nss-V plots give two distinct peaks for both cases, namely before radiation and after radiation, and those peaks correspond to two different localized interface states regions at M/S interface. The changes in the dielectric properties in the depletion and accumulation regions stem especially from the restructuring and reordering of the charges at interface states and surface polarization whereas those in the accumulation region are caused by series resistance effect.

  14. Phosphorescence induced by pressure and continuous light irradiation of benzophenone and 4,4`-bis(dimethylamino)benzophenone in solid polymers at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Dreger, Z.A.; Lang, J.M.; Drickamer, H.G.

    1996-03-14

    We report efficient room temperature phosphorescence induced by pressure (PIP) and/or by continuous light irradiation (light-induced phosphorescence (LIP)) in two ketones: benzophenone (BP) and its p-dimethylamino-substituted (Michler`s ketone (MK)) both dissolved in solid poly(ethyl methacrylate) (PEMA). Under pressure both BP and MK reveal a remarkable growth of the phosphorescence intensity: 2 orders of magnitude (within 5 kbar) and 1 order of magnitude (within 50 kbar) respectively for MK and BP. For MK, above 5 kbar the phosphorescence intensity significantly decreases, but for BP the decrease is negligible even above 50 kbar. A model based on the increase of the amount of {pi},{pi}{sup *} character in the predominately n,{pi}{sup *} triplet state with increasing pressure is proposed to account for the observed features of the PIP. The LIP occurs only at pressures below the maximum in the PIP. With prolonged irradiation, the overall shape of the phosphorescence intensity curve versus time depends on pressure, exciting light intensity, and concentration. A tentative explanation of the LIP effect is given that assumes a creation of the phosphorescent photoproduct via the hydrogen abstraction reaction. 36 refs., 14 figs.

  15. Facile room-temperature synthesis of carboxylated graphene oxide-copper sulfide nanocomposite with high photodegradation and disinfection activities under solar light irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Shuyan; Liu, Jincheng; Zhu, Wenyu; Hu, Zhong-Ting; Lim, Teik-Thye; Yan, Xiaoli

    2015-01-01

    Carboxylic acid functionalized graphene oxide-copper (II) sulfide nanoparticle composite (GO-COOH-CuS) was prepared from carboxylated graphene oxide and copper precursor in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) by a facile synthesis process at room temperature. The high-effective combination, the interaction between GO-COOH sheets and CuS nanoparticles, and the enhanced visible light absorption were confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectra (DRS) and Photoluminescence (PL) spectra. The as-synthesized GO-COOH-CuS nanocomposite exhibited excellent photocatalytic degradation performance of phenol and rhodamine B, high antibacterial activity toward E. coli and B. subtilis, and good recovery and reusability. The influence of CuS content, the synergistic reaction between CuS and GO-COOH, and the charge-transfer mechanism were systematically investigated. The facile and low-energy synthesis process combined with the excellent degradation and antibacterial performance signify that the GO-COOH-CuS has a great potential for water treatment application. PMID:26553709

  16. Facile room-temperature synthesis of carboxylated graphene oxide-copper sulfide nanocomposite with high photodegradation and disinfection activities under solar light irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Shuyan; Liu, Jincheng; Zhu, Wenyu; Hu, Zhong-Ting; Lim, Teik-Thye; Yan, Xiaoli

    2015-11-01

    Carboxylic acid functionalized graphene oxide-copper (II) sulfide nanoparticle composite (GO-COOH-CuS) was prepared from carboxylated graphene oxide and copper precursor in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) by a facile synthesis process at room temperature. The high-effective combination, the interaction between GO-COOH sheets and CuS nanoparticles, and the enhanced visible light absorption were confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectra (DRS) and Photoluminescence (PL) spectra. The as-synthesized GO-COOH-CuS nanocomposite exhibited excellent photocatalytic degradation performance of phenol and rhodamine B, high antibacterial activity toward E. coli and B. subtilis, and good recovery and reusability. The influence of CuS content, the synergistic reaction between CuS and GO-COOH, and the charge-transfer mechanism were systematically investigated. The facile and low-energy synthesis process combined with the excellent degradation and antibacterial performance signify that the GO-COOH-CuS has a great potential for water treatment application.

  17. Facile room-temperature synthesis of carboxylated graphene oxide-copper sulfide nanocomposite with high photodegradation and disinfection activities under solar light irradiation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shuyan; Liu, Jincheng; Zhu, Wenyu; Hu, Zhong-Ting; Lim, Teik-Thye; Yan, Xiaoli

    2015-01-01

    Carboxylic acid functionalized graphene oxide-copper (II) sulfide nanoparticle composite (GO-COOH-CuS) was prepared from carboxylated graphene oxide and copper precursor in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) by a facile synthesis process at room temperature. The high-effective combination, the interaction between GO-COOH sheets and CuS nanoparticles, and the enhanced visible light absorption were confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectra (DRS) and Photoluminescence (PL) spectra. The as-synthesized GO-COOH-CuS nanocomposite exhibited excellent photocatalytic degradation performance of phenol and rhodamine B, high antibacterial activity toward E. coli and B. subtilis, and good recovery and reusability. The influence of CuS content, the synergistic reaction between CuS and GO-COOH, and the charge-transfer mechanism were systematically investigated. The facile and low-energy synthesis process combined with the excellent degradation and antibacterial performance signify that the GO-COOH-CuS has a great potential for water treatment application. PMID:26553709

  18. Structural changes of polytetrafluoroethylene during irradiation in oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shuling; Fu, Congli; Gu, Aiqun; Yu, Zili

    2015-04-01

    To study the effect of irradiation on PTFE structure and prepare modified PTFE micropowder, PTFE was irradiated with dose up to 4 MGy in oxygen at room temperature. The structures of both irradiated and unirradiated PTFE samples were comparatively characterized by IR, XPS, Raman spectra and XRD measurement. The results showed that new groups of acyl fluoride (COF), carboxylic acid (COOH) and trifluoromethyl (CF3) were formed under heavy radiation exposure in oxygen. In addition, the expansion of crystallite size or crystal lattice was first reported for the irradiated PTFE. The formation of new chemical groups and the expansion of crystallite size were elucidated by structural changes occurring in irradiation.

  19. Spectral Irradiance Calibration in the Infrared. Part 4; 1.2-35 micrometer Spectra of Six Standard Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Martin; Witteborn, Fred C.; Walker, Russell, G.; Bregman, Jesse D.; Wooden, Diane H.

    1995-01-01

    Five new absolutely calibrated continuous stellar spectra from 1.2 to 35 microns are presented. The spectra were constructed as far as possible from actual observed spectral fragments taken from the ground, the Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO), and the IRAS Low Resolution Spectrometer (LRS). These stars (beta Peg, alpha Boo, beta And, beta Gem, and alpha Hya) augment the author's already created complete absolutely calibrated spectrum for alpha Tau. All these spectra have a common calibration pedigree. The wavelength coverage is ideal for calibration of many existing and proposed ground-based, airborne, and satellite sensors.

  20. Monte Carlo simulation of prompt γ-ray spectra from depleted uranium under D-T neutron irradiation and electron recoil spectra in a liquid scintillator detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian-Guo, Qin; Cai-Feng, Lai; Rong, Liu; Tong-Hua, Zhu; Xin-Wei, Zhang; Bang-Jiao, Ye

    2016-03-01

    To overcome the problem of inefficient computing time and unreliable results in MCNP5 calculation, a two-step method is adopted to calculate the energy deposition of prompt γ-rays in detectors for depleted uranium spherical shells under D-T neutron irradiation. In the first step, the γ-ray spectrum for energy below 7 MeV is calculated by MCNP5 code; secondly, the electron recoil spectrum in a BC501A liquid scintillator detector is simulated based on EGSnrc Monte Carlo Code with the γ-ray spectrum from the first step as input. The comparison of calculated results with experimental ones shows that the simulations agree well with experiment in the energy region 0.4-3 MeV for the prompt γ-ray spectrum and below 4 MeVee for the electron recoil spectrum. The reliability of the two-step method in this work is validated. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (91226104) and National Special Magnetic Confinement Fusion Energy Research, China (2015GB108001)

  1. Spectral Irradiance Calibration in the Infrared. Part 7; New Composite Spectra, Comparison with Model Atmospheres, and Far-Infrared Extrapolations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Martin; Witteborn, Fred C.; Carbon, Duane F.; Davies, John K.; Wooden, Diane H.; Bregman, Jesse D.

    1996-01-01

    We present five new absolutely calibrated continuous stellar spectra constructed as far as possible from spectral fragments observed from the ground, the Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO), and the IRAS Low Resolution Spectrometer. These stars-alpha Boo, gamma Dra, alpha Cet, gamma Cru, and mu UMa-augment our six, published, absolutely calibrated spectra of K and early-M giants. All spectra have a common calibration pedigree. A revised composite for alpha Boo has been constructed from higher quality spectral fragments than our previously published one. The spectrum of gamma Dra was created in direct response to the needs of instruments aboard the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO); this star's location near the north ecliptic pole renders it highly visible throughout the mission. We compare all our low-resolution composite spectra with Kurucz model atmospheres and find good agreement in shape, with the obvious exception of the SiO fundamental, still lacking in current grids of model atmospheres. The CO fundamental seems slightly too deep in these models, but this could reflect our use of generic models with solar metal abundances rather than models specific to the metallicities of the individual stars. Angular diameters derived from these spectra and models are in excellent agreement with the best observed diameters. The ratio of our adopted Sirius and Vega models is vindicated by spectral observations. We compare IRAS fluxes predicted from our cool stellar spectra with those observed and conclude that, at 12 and 25 microns, flux densities measured by IRAS should be revised downwards by about 4.1% and 5.7%, respectively, for consistency with our absolute calibration. We have provided extrapolated continuum versions of these spectra to 300 microns, in direct support of ISO (PHT and LWS instruments). These spectra are consistent with IRAS flux densities at 60 and 100 microns.

  2. Spectral Irradiance Calibration in the Infrared. Part 6; 3-35 microns Spectra of Three Southern Standard Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Martin; Witteborn, Fred C.; Bregman, Jesse D.; Wooden, Diane H.; Salama, Alberto; Metcalfe, Leo

    1996-01-01

    We present three new absolutely calibrated continuous stellar spectra from 3 to 35 microns, constructed as far as possible from actual observed spectral fragments taken from the Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO), and the IRAS Low Resolution Spectrometer (LRS). These stars- alpha(sup 1) Cen, alpha TrA, and epsilon Car-augment our previous archive of complete absolutely calibrated spectra for northern K and M giants. All these spectra have a common calibration pedigree. The wavelength coverage is ideal for calibration of many existing and proposed ground-based, airborne, and satellite sensors. KAO and IRAS data in the 15-30 micron range suggest that the spectra of cool giants are close to Rayleigh-Jeans slopes. Our observations of alpha(sup 1) Cen, absolutely calibrated via our adopted Sirius model, indicate an angular diameter in very good agreement with values in the literature, demonstrating 'closure' of the set of spectra within our absolute framework. We compare our observed alpha(sup 1) Cen spectrum with a published grid of theoretical models from Kurucz, and adopt a plausible theoretical shape, that fits our spectrum, as a secondary reference spectrum in the southern sky.

  3. Analysis of Electron and Antineutrino Energy Spectra from Fissile Samples under Irradiation based on Gross Theory of Beta-decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, T.; Tachibana, T.; Chiba, S.

    2016-06-01

    We applied the gross theory of β-decay to calculate the reactor electron and antineutrino ({{{bar ν }}{e}}) spectra emitted from 235,238U and 239,241Pu by summing up all the contributions from a large number of decaying fission-products (FPs). We make it clear what kinds of transition types and FP nuclides are important to shape the lepton spectra. After taking the ambiguity in the current data for fission yields and Qβ-values into account, we suggested a possibility that the high-energy part of the widely referred electron-spectra by Schreckenbach et al., almost only one experimental data set available now, might possibly be too low. Arguments on a special role of the odd(Z)-odd(N) nuclides and on the consistency between U-238 and other fissiles in the experimental data lead to the importance of a new and independent measurement of electron energy spectra which could be converted into the reactor {{{bar ν }}{e}} spectra.

  4. Spectral Irradiance Calibration in the Infrared.IV. 1.2-35 micron spectra of six standard stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Martin; Witteborn, Fred C.; Walker, Russell G.; Bregman, Jesse D.; Wooden, Diane H.

    1995-07-01

    We present five new absolutely calibrated continuous stellar spectra from 1.2 to 35 μm, constructed as far as possible from actual observed spectral fragments taken from the ground, the Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO), and the IRAS Low Resolution Spectrometer (LRS). These stars -- β Peg, α Boo, β And, β Gem, and α Hya -- augment our already created complete absolutely calibrated spectrum for α Tau. All these spectra have a common calibration pedigree. The wavelength coverage is ideal for calibration of many existing and proposed ground-based, airborne, and satellite sensors.

  5. Spectral Irradiance Calibration in the Infrared. Part 4; 1.2 - 35 microns Spectra of Six Standard Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Martin; Witteborn, Fred C.; Walker, Russell G.; Bregman, Jesse D.; Wooden, Diane H.

    1995-01-01

    We present five new absolutely calibrated continuous stellar spectra from 1.2 to 35 microns, constructed as far as possible from actual observed spectral fragments taken from the ground, the Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO), and the IRAS Low Resolution Spectrometer (LRS). These stars- beta Peg, alpha Boo, beta And, beta Gem, and alpha Hya-augment our already created complete absolutely calibrated spectrum for alpha Tau. All these spectra have a common calibration pedigree. The wavelength coverage is ideal for calibration of many existing and proposed ground-based, airborne, and satellite sensors.

  6. Spectral Irradiance Calibration in the Infrared. 4; 1.2-35um Spectra of Six Standard Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Martin; Witteborn, Fred C.; Walker, Russell G.; Bregman, Jesse D.; Wooden, Diane H.

    1995-01-01

    We present five new absolutely calibrated continuous stellar spectra from 1.2 to 35 microns, constructed as far as possible from actual observed spectral fragments taken from the ground, the Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO), and the IRAS Low Resolution Spectrometer (LRS). These stars, Beta Peg, Delta Boo, Beta And, Beta Gem, and Delta Hya, augment our already created complete absolutely calibrated spectrum for a Tau. All these spectra have a common calibration pedigree. The wavelength coverage is ideal for calibration of many existing and proposed ground-based, airborne, and satellite sensors.

  7. Characterization by combined optical and FT infrared spectra of 3d-transition metal ions doped-bismuth silicate glasses and effects of gamma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ElBatal, F. H.; Abdelghany, A. M.; ElBatal, H. A.

    2014-03-01

    Optical and infrared absorption spectral measurements were carried out for binary bismuth silicate glass and other derived prepared samples with the same composition and containing additional 0.2% of one of 3d transition metal oxides. The same combined spectroscopic properties were also measured after subjecting the prepared glasses to a gamma dose of 8 Mrad. The experimental optical spectra reveal strong UV-near visible absorption bands from the base and extended to all TMs-doped samples and these specific extended and strong UV-near visible absorption bands are related to the contributions of absorption from both trace iron (Fe3+) ions present as contaminated impurities within the raw materials and from absorption of main constituent trivalent bismuth (Bi3+) ions. The strong UV-near visible absorption bands are observed to suppress any further UV bands from TM ions. The studied glasses show obvious resistant to gamma irradiation and only small changes are observed upon gamma irradiation. This observed shielding behavior is related to the presence of high Bi3+ ions with heavy mass causing the observed stability of the optical absorption. Infrared absorption spectra of the studied glasses reveal characteristic vibrational bands due to both modes from silicate network and the sharing of Bi-O linkages and the presence of TMs in the doping level (0.2%) causes no distinct changes within the number or position of the vibrational modes. The presence of high Bi2O3 content (70 mol%) appears to cause stability of the structural building units towards gamma irradiation as revealed by FTIR measurements.

  8. Hot-electron influence on L-shell spectra of multicharged Kr ions generated in clusters irradiated by femtosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Hansen, S B; Shlyaptseva, A S; Faenov, A Y; Skobelev, I Y; Magunov, A I; Pikuz, T A; Blasco, F; Dorchies, F; Stenz, C; Salin, F; Auguste, T; Dobosz, S; Monot, P; D' Oliveira, P; Hulin, S; Safronova, U I; Fournier, K B

    2002-10-01

    Strong L-shell x-ray emission has been obtained from Kr clusters formed in gas jets and irradiated by 60-500-fs laser pulses. Spectral lines from the F-, Ne- Na-, and Mg-like charge states of Kr have been identified from highly resolved x-ray spectra. Spectral line intensities are used in conjunction with a detailed time-dependent collisional-radiative model to diagnose the electron distribution functions of plasmas formed in various gas jet nozzles with various laser pulse durations. It is shown that L-shell spectra formed by relatively long nanosecond-laser pulses can be well described by a steady-state model without hot electrons when opacity effects are included. In contrast, adequate modeling of L-shell spectra from highly transient and inhomogeneous femtosecond-laser plasmas requires including the influence of hot electrons. It is shown that femtosecond-laser interaction with gas jets from conical nozzles produces plasmas with higher ionization balances than plasmas formed by gas jets from Laval nozzles, in agreement with previous work for femtosecond laser interaction with Ar clusters. PMID:12443335

  9. Comparison of high-resolution solar irradiance spectra and the solar luminosity in the period 1980-1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Walter E., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    In this research, we aim to determine to what extent the solar irradiance changes measured through the 1980's from orbiting vehicles are accompanied by spectroscopic irradiance changes observable from the ground. We describe fractional changes in line absorption as 'blanketing'. In section 2, we briefly review results obtained in an earlier project and which have been published. Section 3 describes the data of this investigation; section 4 describes the data reduction; section 5 describes the observational results in terms of blanketing; and section 6 describes the interpretation of the measured changes. Section 7 contains an outline of possible uses for Doppler-shift data that emerges with the measurements of the blanketing variations. Section 8 is an outline for future research suggested by our results in this project.

  10. Microdosimetric spectra measurements of JANUS neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, I.R.; Williamson, F.S.

    1985-01-01

    Neutron radiation from the JANUS reactor at Argonne National Laboratory is being used with increasing frequency for major biological experiments. The fast neutron spectrum has a Kerma-weighted mean energy of 0.8 MeV and low gamma-ray contamination. In 1984 the JANUS fission converter plate of highly enriched uranium was replaced by one made of low-enriched uranium. We recorded microdosimetric spectra at several different positions in the high-flux irradiation room of JANUS before the change of the converter plate. Each set of measurements consisted of spectra taken at three different site diameters (0.5, 1.0, and 5.0 ..mu..m) and in both ''attenuator up'' and ''attenuator down'' configurations. At two conventional dosimetry reference positions, two sets of measurements were recorded. At three biological reference positions, measurements simulating several biological irradiation conditions, were taken. The dose rate at each position was estimated and compared with dose rates obtained previously by conventional dosimetry. Comparison of the different measurements showed no major change in spectra as a function of position or irradiation condition. First results from similar sets of measurements recorded after the installment of the new converter plate indicate no major change in the spectra. 11 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  11. Creation of nanosize defects in LiF crystals under 5- and 10-MeV Au ion irradiation at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Lushchik, A.; Lushchik, Ch.; Vasil'chenko, E.; Schwartz, K.; Neumann, R.; Trautmann, C.; Papaleo, R.; Sorokin, M.; Volkov, A. E.

    2007-08-01

    Investigation of radiation defects induced by the irradiation of LiF crystals with 5- or 10-MeV Au ions (fluences of 10{sup 11}-2x10{sup 14} ions/cm{sup 2}; flux varies by 2 orders of magnitude) at room temperature has been performed using the methods of optical absorption and high-temperature (400-750 K) thermoactivation spectroscopy. The creation efficiency of color centers (F,F{sub 2},F{sub 3},...) and colloids drastically depends on both the fluence and ion flux (beam current). Besides impurity (magnesium) colloids with the absorption band peaked at 4.4-4.6 eV, the broad absorption band at 2.3-3.3 eV related to intrinsic Li colloids is reliably distinguished. The creation efficiency of Li colloids by 5-MeV Au ions is lower than that by 10-MeV ions, which form {delta} electrons with higher energies sufficient for the creation of cation excitons ({approx}62 eV). The cation exciton decays, in turn, with the formation of a group of spatially close F centers. At a high ion flux, the next bombarding ions hit the same crystal region with a small time delay (10-100 s) and also form, after similar intermediate processes, the groups of F centers that participate in the formation of stable agglomerates of several F{sub 3} or even more complex centers, which serve as stable (up to 620 K) seeds for nanosize Li colloids. The peculiarities of the formation, enlargement, and annealing of intrinsic colloids in LiF crystals are considered, invoking a formal analog with the processes in photographic materials based on silver halides.

  12. Size- and intensity-dependent photoelectron spectra from gas-phase gold nanoparticles irradiated by intense femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, J.; Robatjazi, S. J.; Makhija, V.; Vajdi, A.; Li, X.; Malakar, Y.; Pearson, W. L.; Rudenko, A.; Sorensen, C.; Stierle, J.; Kling, M. F.

    2016-05-01

    Nanoparticles bridge the gap between atomic/molecular and bulk matter offering unique opportunities to study light interactions with complex systems, in particular, near-field enhancements and excitation of plasmons. Here we report on a systematic study of photoelectron emission from isolated gold nanoparticles irradiated by 800 nm, 25 fs laser pulses at 10-50 TW/ cm2 peak intensities. A combination of an aerodynamic lens nanoparticle injector, high-energy velocity-map imaging spectrometer and a high-speed, single-shot camera is employed to record shot by shot photoelectron emission patterns from individual particles. By sorting the recorded images according to the number of emitted electrons, we select the events from the regions of particular laser intensities within the laser focus, thus, essentially avoiding focal volume averaging. Using this approach, we study the intensity- and size-dependence of photoelectron energy and angular distributions for particle sizes ranging from 5 nm to 400 nm. This work is supported by NSF Award No. IIA-143049. JRML operations and personal are supported by the Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division, Office of BES, Office of Science, U. S. DOE.

  13. Infrared and Ultraviolet Spectra of Methane Diluted in Solid Nitrogen and Irradiated with Electrons during Deposition at Various Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, Chih-Hao; Chen, Sian-Cong; Liu, Meng-Chen; Huang, Tzu-Ping; Wu, Yu-Jong

    2016-06-01

    We recorded the infrared and ultraviolet absorption spectra of CH4:N2 matrix samples that underwent electron bombardment during deposition in the temperature range of 10–44 K. In contrast to a previous experiment on the IR spectroscopy of electron-bombarded icy samples, methyl and azide radicals became the main products upon electron bombardment during deposition; furthermore, reduced production of nitrile species was observed for deposition at 10 and 20 K. On the other hand, for deposition above 33 K, the observed bands of the radical species (such as methyl and azide) decreased, and bands of large nitriles appeared. This observation may suggest that radical species easily diffuse and recombine to form more complex molecules in solid nitrogen at higher temperatures. Further measurements of similar samples at 10–33 K in the UV region revealed the intense band of azide radicals at 272.5 nm and weak, broad, overlapping features of methyl and azide radicals in the 225–197 nm region. For deposition at 44 K, only a broad feature centered at 219.4 nm was observed, and the possible carriers of nitrile species were proposed based on the corresponding IR spectrum and theoretical predictions of excitation energy. This band is similar to the observed absorption feature of Pluto’s surface recorded by the Hubble telescope in terms of both band position and bandwidth. Our findings therefore further support the suggestion that complex nitrile species may exist on the surface of Pluto.

  14. Room Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuttruff, Heinrich; Mommertz, Eckard

    The traditional task of room acoustics is to create or formulate conditions which ensure the best possible propagation of sound in a room from a sound source to a listener. Thus, objects of room acoustics are in particular assembly halls of all kinds, such as auditoria and lecture halls, conference rooms, theaters, concert halls or churches. Already at this point, it has to be pointed out that these conditions essentially depend on the question if speech or music should be transmitted; in the first case, the criterion for transmission quality is good speech intelligibility, in the other case, however, the success of room-acoustical efforts depends on other factors that cannot be quantified that easily, not least it also depends on the hearing habits of the listeners. In any case, absolutely "good acoustics" of a room do not exist.

  15. EPR investigation of some traditional oriental irradiated spices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duliu, Octavian G.; Georgescu, Rodica; Ali, Shaban Ibrahim

    2007-06-01

    The 9.50 GHz electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of unirradiated and 60Co γ-ray irradiated cardamom ( Elettaria cardamomum L. Maton, Zingiberaceae), ginger (( Zingiber officinale Rosc., Zingiberaceae), and saffron ( Crocus sativus L., Iridaceae) have been investigated at room temperature. All unirradiated spices presented a weak resonance line with g-factors around free-electron ones. After γ-ray irradiation at an absorbed dose of up to 11.3 kGy, the presence of EPR spectra whose amplitude increase monotonously with the absorbed dose has been noticed with all spices. A 100 °C isothermal annealing of 11.3 kGy irradiated samples has shown a differential reduction of amplitude of various components that compose initial spectra, but even after 3.6 h of thermal treatment, the remaining amplitude represents no less then 30% of the initial ones. The same peculiarities have been noticed after 83 days storage at room temperature but after 340 days storage at ambient conditions only irradiated ginger displays a weak signal that differs from those of unirradiated sample. All these factors could be taken into account in establishing at which extent the EPR is suitable to evidence any irradiation treatment applied to these spices.

  16. Memory's Room.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carruthers, Mary

    1999-01-01

    Describes the Liberal Arts Studiolo from the Ducal Palace at Guibbio, Italy. Discusses how the room's design and decoration mirrors its educational uses. Notes that the object of education was to provide the young person with a kind of mental library of materials that could be drawn upon quickly. (RS)

  17. The effect of neutron irradiation on the properties of AlGaAs/GaAs laser diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, C. E.; Heflinger, D.; Reel, R.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of neutron irradiation on several properties of both single and multiple stripe laser diodes have been examined. Prior to fast neutron irradiation, total light output as a function of laser current, threshold current, near-field pattern, far-field pattern, and laser output wavelength spectra were measured at room temperature. These measurements were then repeated at intermittent neutron fluence levels. It was observed that the threshold current increased with neutron fluence for all devices examined. In contrast, neutron irradiation had only an indirect effect on the remainder of the laser diode properties in that the higher currents required for operation after irradiation caused variations in these properties.

  18. Room-temperature fracture in V-(4-5)Cr-(4-5)Ti tensile specimens irradiated in Fusion-1 BOR-60 experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Gazda, J.; Meshii, M.; Tsai, H.

    1998-09-01

    Specimens of V-(4-5)Cr-(4-5)Ti alloys were irradiated to {approx}18 dpa at 320 C in the Fusion-1 capsule inserted into the BOR-60 reactor. Tensile tests at 23 C indicated dramatic yield strength increase (>300%), lack of work hardening, and minimal (<1%) total elongations. SEM analysis of fracture and side surfaces were conducted to determine reduction in are and the mode of fracture. The reduction of area was negligible. All but one specimen failed by a combination of ductile shear deformation and cleavage crack growth. Transgranular cleavage cracks were initiated by stress concentrations at the tips of the shear bands. In side-view observations, evidence was found of slip bands typically associated with dislocation channeling. No differences due to pre-irradiation heat treatment and heat-to-heat composition variations were detected. The only deviation from this behavior was found in V-4Cr-4Ti-B alloy, which failed in the grip portion by complete cleavage cracking.

  19. SPECIAL ISSUE DEVOTED TO THE 80TH ANNIVERSARY OF ACADEMICIAN N G BASOV'S BIRTH: Emission spectra of a plasma observed upon irradiation of solid targets by high-intensity ultrashort laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergunova, G. A.; Ivanov, E. M.; Rozanov, Vladislav B.

    2003-02-01

    The spectral radiative losses are investigated in a plasma under conditions typical of a plasma produced upon irradiation of solid targets by high-intensity (up to 1017 W cm-2 ultrashort (10-13-10-9 s) laser pulses. The comparison of the calculated X-ray spectra with the experimental data for aluminum and carbon plasmas shows their satisfactory agreement. These studies made it possible to test the methods in use and to conclude that it is necessary to introduce supplements into the collision — radiation model for calculating the optical characteristics of a nonequilibrium plasma of complex chemical composition.

  20. 10 CFR 36.67 - Entering and leaving the radiation room.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Entering and leaving the radiation room. 36.67 Section 36.67 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR IRRADIATORS Operation of Irradiators § 36.67 Entering and leaving the radiation room. (a) Upon first entering the radiation room of a panoramic irradiator after...

  1. Basement utility room (room 24; air handling room), near the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Basement utility room (room 24; air handling room), near the west end of the combat operations center, looking southwest towards fan system one, air ducts, and walk-in filter rooms. The exterior equipment well is visible at the left - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Combat Operations Center, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  2. Structural, Dielectric and Temperature Dependent Raman Spectroscopic Studies on Swift Heavy Ion Irradiated Tgs Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajpai, P. K.; Shah, Deepak; Kumar, Ravi; Kumar, Ashok; Katiyar, R. S.

    2011-11-01

    Polar cleavage surface of tri-glycine sulphate (TGS) of important room temperature ferroelectric crystal irradiated with 100 MeV oxygen ion beam are characterized to understand the effect of irradiation on structural, dielectric and vibrational modes of the crystal. X-ray diffraction results show lattice parameters a and b in monoclinic unit cell decrease with increasing fluence, whereas parameter `c' increases. However, the irradiated crystal remains in monoclinic phase. Dielectric anomaly peak value associated with paraelectric—ferroelectric phase transition gets reduce with irradiation and Tc shift towards lower temperature. A comparison of the Raman spectra of unirradiated crystal with those irradiated in both paraelectric and ferroelectric phase reveals the molecular ion getting distorted as a result of irradiation.

  3. Measurement of LET (linear energy transfer) spectra using CR-39 at different depths of water irradiated by 171 MeV protons: A comparison with Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, G. S.; Tripathy, S. P.; Molokanov, A. G.; Aleynikov, V. E.; Sharma, S. D.; Bandyopadhyay, T.

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we have used CR-39 detectors to estimate the LET (linear energy transfer) spectrum of secondary particles due to 171 MeV proton beam at different depths of water including the Bragg peak region. The measured LET spectra were compared with those obtained from FLUKA Monte Carlo simulation. The absorbed dose (DLET), dose equivalent (HLET) were estimated using the LET spectra. The values of DLET and HLET per incident proton fluence were found to increase with the increase in depth of water and were maximum at Bragg peak.

  4. Space weathering of asteroidal surfaces. Influence on the UV-Vis spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaňuchová, Z.; Baratta, G. A.; Garozzo, M.; Strazzulla, G.

    2010-07-01

    Context. The surfaces of airless bodies in the Solar System are continuously altered by the bombardment of micrometeoroids and irradiation by solar wind, flares, and cosmic particles. Major effects of this process - space weathering - are darkening and “reddening” of the spectra of surface materials, as well as a “degrading” of absorption features. Aims: We studied the changes induced by energetic ion irradiation in the ultraviolet-visual-near-infrared (UV-Vis-NIR) (0.2-0.98 μm) reflectance spectra of targets selected to mimic the surfaces of airless bodies in the inner Solar System. Our chosen targets are olivine pellets, pure or covered by an organic polymer (polystyrene), which is transparent before irradiation. Polystyrene is used as a template for organic matter of low volatility that can be present on asteroidal surfaces. Moreover we measured the changes induced by ion irradiation in the absorption coefficient of the polymer. The purpose was to have a tool to better compare laboratory with observed spectra and distinguish between planetary objects with pure silicate surfaces and those whose surface is covered by organic matter exposed to cosmic ion bombardment. Methods: The samples were irradiated in vacuum, at room temperature, with 200 keV protons or 200-400 keV argon ions. Before, during, and after irradiation diffuse reflectance spectra were acquired. Polystyrene films were also deposited on quartz substrates and irradiated while transmittance spectra were recorded. Results: We measured the variations of the absorption coefficient of polystyrene as a function of ion fluence. We showed that after ion irradiation the diffuse reflectance spectra of the samples covered by organics exhibit a much more significant variation than those of pure silicates. The spectra of targets made of olivine plus polystyrene can be fitted by using the measured absorption coefficient of polystyrene. Conclusions: The results obtained for pure olivine extend to the UV the

  5. Identification of gamma-irradiated fruit juices by EPR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksieva, K. I.; Dimov, K. G.; Yordanov, N. D.

    2014-10-01

    The results of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) study on commercially available juices from various fruits and different fruit contents: 25%, 40%, 50%, and 100%, homemade juices, nectars and concentrated fruit syrups, before and after gamma-irradiation are reported. In order to remove water from non- and irradiated samples all juices and nectars were filtered; the solid residue was washed with alcohol and dried at room temperature. Only concentrated fruit syrups were dried for 60 min at 40 °C in a standard laboratory oven. All samples under study show a singlet EPR line with g=2.0025 before irradiation with exception of concentrated fruit syrups, which are EPR silent. Irradiation of juice samples gives rise to complex EPR spectra which gradually transferred to “cellulose-like” EPR spectrum from 25% to 100% fruit content. Concentrated fruit syrups show typical “sugar-like“ spectra due to added saccharides. All EPR spectra are characteristic and can prove radiation treatment. The fading kinetics of radiation-induced EPR signals were studied for a period of 60 days after irradiation.

  6. Correlation of radiation-induced changes in mechanical properties and microstructural development of Alloy 718 irradiated with mixed spectra of high-energy protons and spallation neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sencer, B. H.; Bond, G. M.; Garner, F. A.; Hamilton, M. L.; Maloy, S. A.; Sommer, W. F.

    2001-07-01

    Alloy 718 is a γ '(Ni 3(Al,Ti))-γ″(Ni 3Nb) hardenable superalloy with attractive strength, and corrosion resistance. This alloy is a candidate material for use in accelerator production of tritium (APT) target and blanket applications, where it would have to withstand low-temperature irradiation by high-energy protons and spallation neutrons. The existing data base, relevant to such irradiation conditions, is very limited. Alloy 718 has therefore been exposed to a particle flux and spectrum at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE), closely matching those expected in the APT target and blanket applications. The yield stress of Alloy 718 increases with increasing dose up to ˜0.5 dpa, and then decreases with further increase in dose. The uniform elongation, however, drastically decreases with increasing dose at very low doses (<0.5 dpa), and does not recover when the alloy later softens somewhat. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) investigation of Alloy 718 shows that superlattice spots corresponding to the age-hardening precipitate phases γ ' and γ″ are lost from the diffraction patterns for Alloy 718 by only 0.6 dpa, the lowest proton-induced dose level achieved in this experiment. Examination of samples that were neutron irradiated to doses of only ˜0.1 dpa showed that precipitates are faintly visible in diffraction patterns but are rapidly becoming invisible. It is proposed that the γ ' and γ″ first become disordered (by <0.6 dpa), but remain as solute-rich aggregates that still contribute to the hardness at relatively low dpa levels, and then are gradually dispersed at higher doses.

  7. Thermal annealing and UV irradiation effects on structure, morphology, photoluminescence and optical absorption spectra of EDTA-capped ZnS nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osman, M. A.; Othman, A. A.; El-Said, Waleed A.; Abd-Elrahim, A. G.; Abu-sehly, A. A.

    2016-02-01

    Monodispersed ZnS nanoparticles (NPs) were prepared by the chemical precipitation method. Thermally induced structural, morphological and optical changes have been investigated using x-ray diffraction, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, optical absorption, photoluminescence (PL), and Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopy. It was found that D increases with increasing annealing temperature (T a). The onset of the ZnS phase transition from cubic to hexagonal structure takes place at 400 °C, while cubic ZnS transforms into hexagonal ZnO via thermal oxidation in air at 600 °C. It is also noted that increasing T a results in the red shift of the optical band gap (E\\text{g}\\text{opt} ) and the thermal bleaching of exciton absorption. The PL spectrum of as-prepared ZnS nanopowder shows UV emission bands at 363 and 395 nm and blue and green emission at 438 and 515 nm, respectively. With increasing T a up to 500 °C, these bands were quenched and red-shifted. In addition, the UV irradiation effects on colloidal ZnS NPs were investigated. UV irradiation at a dose  <13 J cm-2 leads to a decrease in D, the blue shift of E\\text{g}\\text{opt} and the enhancement of PL intensity. This behavior was explained in terms of surface modification by photopolymerization, the formation of a ZnSO4 passivation layer, as well as the reduction of D by photocorrosion. At a UV irradiation dose  <13 J cm-2 both E\\text{g}\\text{opt} and D did not change and PL intensity was quenched, which were caused by the creation of nonradiative surface states by the photodegradation of the capping agent and photopassivated layer. The mechanism of the PL emission process in ZnS NPs was discussed and an energy band diagram was proposed.

  8. BIOLOGICAL IRRADIATION FACILITY

    DOEpatents

    McCorkle, W.H.; Cern, H.S.

    1962-04-24

    A facility for irradiating biological specimens with neutrons is described. It includes a reactor wherein the core is off center in a reflector. A high-exposure room is located outside the reactor on the side nearest the core while a low-exposure room is located on the opposite side. Means for converting thermal neutrons to fast neutrons are movably disposed between the reactor core and the high and low-exposure rooms. (AEC)

  9. Diamond structure recovery during ion irradiation at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deslandes, Alec; Guenette, Mathew C.; Belay, Kidane; Elliman, Robert G.; Karatchevtseva, Inna; Thomsen, Lars; Riley, Daniel P.; Lumpkin, Gregory R.

    2015-12-01

    CVD diamond is irradiated by 5 MeV carbon ions, with each sample held at a different temperature (300-873 K) during irradiations. The defect structures resulting from the irradiations are evident as vacancy, interstitial and amorphous carbon signals in Raman spectra. The observed variation of the full width at half maximum (FWHM) and peak position of the diamond peak suggests that disorder in the diamond lattice is reduced for high temperature irradiations. The dumbbell interstitial signal is reduced for irradiations at 873 K, which suggests this defect is unstable at these temperatures and that interstitials have migrated to crystal surfaces. Near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy results indicate that damage to the diamond structure at the surface has occurred for room temperature irradiations, however, this structure is at least partially recovered for irradiations performed at 473 K and above. The results suggest that, in a high temperature irradiation environment such as a nuclear fusion device, in situ annealing of radiation-created defects can maintain the diamond structure and prolong the lifetime of diamond components.

  10. Microstructural origins of radiation-induced changes in mechanical properties of 316 L and 304 L austenitic stainless steels irradiated with mixed spectra of high-energy protons and spallation neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sencer, B. H.; Bond, G. M.; Hamilton, M. L.; Garner, F. A.; Maloy, S. A.; Sommer, W. F.

    2001-07-01

    A number of candidate alloys were exposed to a particle flux and spectrum at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) that closely match the mixed high-energy proton/neutron spectra expected in accelerator production of tritium (APT) window and blanket applications. Austenitic stainless steels 316 L and 304 L are two of these candidate alloys possessing attractive strength and corrosion resistance for APT applications. This paper describes the dose dependence of the irradiation-induced microstructural evolution of SS 316 L and 304 L in the temperature range 30-60°C and consequent changes in mechanical properties. It was observed that the microstructural evolution during irradiation was essentially identical in the two alloys, a behavior mirrored in their changes in mechanical properties. With one expection, it was possible to correlate all changes in mechanical properties with visible microstructural features. A late-term second abrupt decrease in uniform elongation was not associated with visible microstructure, but is postulated to be a consequence of large levels of retained hydrogen measured in the specimens. In spite of large amounts of both helium and hydrogen retained, approaching 1 at.% at the highest exposures, no visible cavities were formed, indicating that the gas atoms were either in solution or in subresolvable clusters.

  11. Estimators of bottom reflectance spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estep, L.; Holloway, J.

    1992-01-01

    Estimators of in situ bottom spectral reflectance are calculated from multi-station optical field data gathered with standard instrumentation from different sites. These spectra are then compared to reflectance spectra measured in the laboratory of the bottom sediments collected in the field for the stations at these different sites. The relative fit of the estimated spectral curves to those measured in the laboratory was measured. The most accurate absolute estimation was provided by the single scattering irradiance model.

  12. Spectral Irradiance Calibration in the Infrared. X. A Self-Consistent Radiometric All-Sky Network of Absolutely Calibrated Stellar Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Martin; Walker, Russell G.; Carter, Brian; Hammersley, Peter; Kidger, Mark; Noguchi, Kunio

    1999-04-01

    We start from our six absolutely calibrated continuous stellar spectra from 1.2 to 35 μm for K0, K1.5, K3, K5, and M0 giants. These were constructed as far as possible from actual observed spectral fragments taken from the ground, the Kuiper Airborne Observatory, and the IRAS Low Resolution Spectrometer, and all have a common calibration pedigree. From these we spawn 422 calibrated ``spectral templates'' for stars with spectral types in the ranges G9.5-K3.5 III and K4.5-M0.5 III. We normalize each template by photometry for the individual stars using published and/or newly secured near- and mid-infrared photometry obtained through fully characterized, absolutely calibrated, combinations of filter passband, detector radiance response, and mean terrestrial atmospheric transmission. These templates continue our ongoing effort to provide an all-sky network of absolutely calibrated, spectrally continuous, stellar standards for general infrared usage, all with a common, traceable calibration heritage. The wavelength coverage is ideal for calibration of many existing and proposed ground-based, airborne, and satellite sensors, particularly low- to moderate-resolution spectrometers. We analyze the statistics of probable uncertainties, in the normalization of these templates to actual photometry, that quantify the confidence with which we can assert that these templates truly represent the individual stars. Each calibrated template provides an angular diameter for that star. These radiometric angular diameters compare very favorably with those directly observed across the range from 1.6 to 21 mas.

  13. EPR studies of gamma-irradiated taurine single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulut, A.; Karabulut, B.; Tapramaz, R.; Köksal, F.

    2000-04-01

    An EPR study of gamma-irradiated taurine [C 2H 7NO 3S] single crystal was carried out at room temperature. The EPR spectra were recorded in the three at mutually perpendicular planes. There are two magnetically distinct sites in monoclinic lattice. The principle values of g and hyperfine constants for both sites were calculated. The results have indicated the presence of 32ṠO -2 and 33ṠO -2 radicals. The hyperfine values of 33ṠO -2 radical were used to obtain O-S-O bond angle for both sites.

  14. Positron annihilation Doppler broadening spectroscopy study on Fe-ion irradiated NHS steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Huiping; Wang, Zhiguang; Gao, Xing; Cui, Minghuan; Li, Bingsheng; Sun, Jianrong; Yao, Cunfeng; Wei, Kongfang; Shen, Tielong; Pang, Lilong; Zhu, Yabin; Li, Yuanfei; Wang, Ji; Song, Peng; Zhang, Peng; Cao, Xingzhong

    2015-02-01

    In order to study the evolution of irradiation-induced vacancy-type defects at different irradiation fluences and temperatures, a new type of ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steel named NHS (Novel High Silicon) was irradiated by 3.25 MeV Fe-ion at room temperature and 723 K to fluences of 4.3 × 1015 and 1.7 × 1016 ions/cm2. After irradiation, vacancy-type defects were investigated with variable-energy positron beam Doppler broadening spectra. Energetic Fe-ions produced a large number of vacancy-type defects in the NHS steel, but one single main type of vacancy-type defect was observed in both unirradiated and irradiated samples. The concentration of vacancy-type defects decreased with increasing temperature. With the increase of irradiation fluence, the concentration of vacancy-type defects increased in the sample irradiated at RT, whereas for the sample irradiated at 723 K, it decreased. The enhanced recombination between vacancies and excess interstitial Fe atoms from deeper layers, and high diffusion rate of self-interstitial atoms further improved by diffusion via grain boundary and dislocations at high temperature, are thought to be the main reasons for the reversed trend of vacancy-type defects between the samples irradiated at RT and 723 K.

  15. Tensile and shear fracture behavior of fiber reinforced plastics at 77K irradiated by various radiation sources

    SciTech Connect

    Humer, K.; Weber, H.W.; Tschegg, E.K.; Egusa, Shigenori; Birtcher, R.C.; Gerstenberg, H.

    1993-08-01

    Influence of radiation damage (gamma, electron, neutron) on mechanical properties of fiber reinforced plastics (FRPs) has been investigated. Different types of FRPs (two or three dimensional E-, S- or T-glass fiber reinforcement, epoxy or bismaleimide resin) have been irradiated at room temperature with 2 MeV electrons and {sup 6O}Co {gamma}-rays up to 1.8 {times} 1 0{sup 8} Gy as well as with different reactor spectra up to a fast neutron fluence of 5 {times} lO{sup 22} m{sup {minus}2} (E > 0.1 MeV). Tensile and intralaminar shear tests were carried out on the irradiated samples at 77 K. Some samples were irradiated at 5 K and tested at 77 K with and without an annealing cycle to room temperature. Results on the influence of these radiation conditions and of warm-up cycles on the mechanical properties of FRPs are compared and discussed.

  16. Synthesis and magnetic characterization of magnetite obtained by monowavelength visible light irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Yulong; Wei, Yu; Sun, Yuhan; Wang, Jing

    2012-03-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Magnetite was synthesized under monowavelength LED irradiation at room temperature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Different wavelength irradiations led to distinctive characteristics of magnetite. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Particle sizes of magnetite were controlled by different irradiation wavelengths. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Wavelength affects the magnetic characteristics of magnetite. -- Abstract: Magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles were controllably synthesized by aerial oxidation Fe{sup II}EDTA solution under different monowavelength light-emitting diode (LED) lamps irradiation at room temperature. The results of the X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectra show the formation of magnetite nanoparticle further confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscope (FTIR) and the difference in crystallinity of as-prepared samples. Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} particles are nearly spherical in shape based on transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Average crystallite sizes of magnetite can be controlled by different irradiation light wavelengths from XRD and TEM: 50.1, 41.2, and 20.3 nm for red, green, and blue light irradiation, respectively. The magnetic properties of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} samples were investigated. Saturation magnetization values of magnetic nanoparticles were 70.1 (sample M-625), 65.3 (sample M-525), and 58.2 (sample M-460) emu/g, respectively.

  17. Xenon porometry at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telkki, Ville-Veikko; Lounila, Juhani; Jokisaari, Jukka

    2006-01-01

    Xenon porometry is a method in which porous material is immersed in a medium and the properties of the material are studied by means of Xe129 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of xenon gas dissolved in the medium. For instance, the chemical shift of a particular signal (referred to as signal D) arising from xenon inside small pockets formed in the pores during the freezing of the confined medium is highly sensitive to the pore size. In the present study, we show that when naphthalene is used as the medium the pore size distribution of the material can be determined by measuring a single one-dimensional spectrum near room temperature and converting the chemical shift scale of signal D to the pore radius scale by using an experimentally determined correlation. A model has been developed that explains the curious behavior of the chemical shift of signal D as a function of pore radius. The other signals of the spectra measured at different temperatures have also been identified, and the influence of xenon pressure on the spectra has been studied. For comparison, Xe129 NMR spectra of pure xenon gas adsorbed to porous materials have been measured and analyzed.

  18. The Upstairs Room - Room for Controversy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poole, Mary F.

    1973-01-01

    Doubtless everyone is tired of the subject of censorship; but I do have to give vent to my feelings when they are as intense as they are over the selection of a book as full of profanity as a Newbery honor book ( The Upstairs Room''). (Author/SM)

  19. 10 CFR 36.67 - Entering and leaving the radiation room.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Entering and leaving the radiation room. 36.67 Section 36.67 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR IRRADIATORS Operation of Irradiators § 36.67 Entering and leaving the radiation room. (a) Upon first entering...

  20. 10 CFR 36.67 - Entering and leaving the radiation room.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Entering and leaving the radiation room. 36.67 Section 36.67 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR IRRADIATORS Operation of Irradiators § 36.67 Entering and leaving the radiation room. (a) Upon first entering...

  1. 10 CFR 36.67 - Entering and leaving the radiation room.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Entering and leaving the radiation room. 36.67 Section 36.67 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR IRRADIATORS Operation of Irradiators § 36.67 Entering and leaving the radiation room. (a) Upon first entering...

  2. 10 CFR 36.67 - Entering and leaving the radiation room.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Entering and leaving the radiation room. 36.67 Section 36.67 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR IRRADIATORS Operation of Irradiators § 36.67 Entering and leaving the radiation room. (a) Upon first entering...

  3. Unlocking the Locker Room.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. Clair, Dean

    1996-01-01

    Discusses locker-room design standards and common challenges when complying with the Americans with Disabilities Act. Accessibility and safety considerations for shower, toilet, and locker areas are addressed, as are entrance vestibules, drying and grooming areas, and private dressing rooms. (GR)

  4. Clean room wiping liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, W.B.

    1991-12-01

    A water-based liquid containing isopropyl alcohol, ammonium hydroxide, and surfactants was developed to replace 1,1,2-trichlorotrifluoroethane for the dampening of clean room wiping cloths used to wipe clean benches, clean room equipment, and latex finger cots and gloves.

  5. Storm Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    portion is defined by the day/night boundary (known as the terminator).

    These two images illustrate only a small fraction of the information contained in a single LEISA scan, highlighting just one aspect of the power of infrared spectra for atmospheric studies.

  6. Room-temperature near-infrared electroluminescence from boron-diffused silicon pn junction diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Si; Gao, Yuhan; Fan, Ruixin; Li, Dongsheng; Yang, Deren

    2015-02-01

    Silicon pn junction diodes with different doping concentrations were prepared by boron diffusion into Czochralski (CZ) n-type silicon substrate. Their room-temperature near-infrared electroluminescence (EL) was measured. In the EL spectra of the heavily boron doped diode, a luminescence peak at ~1.6 μm (0.78 eV ) was observed besides the band-to-band line (~1.1eV) under the condition of high current injection, while in that of the lightly boron doped diode only the band-to-band line was observed. The intensity of peak at 0.78 eV increases exponentially with current injection with no observable saturation at room temperature. Furthermore, no dislocations were found in the cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy image, and no dislocation-related luminescence was observed in the low-temperature photoluminescence spectra. We deduce the 0.78 eV emission originates from the irradiative recombination in the strain region of diodes caused by the diffusion of large number of boron atoms into silicon crystal lattice.

  7. Oxalate molecule as the trap for gamma-irradiation energy in the amorphous aluminosilicate Al2(OH)6H4SiO4

    SciTech Connect

    Nothig-Laslo, V.; Horvath, L.; Bilinski, H. )

    1990-07-01

    Paramagnetic species which were the products of gamma irradiation at 77 K and at room temperature were studied by ESR spectroscopy in the amorphous aluminosilicate, Al2(OH)6H4SiO4, prepared in the presence and in the absence of oxalate ion. The aluminosilicate precipitated from the solution containing the oxalate ion in 10(-4) mol dm-3 concentration contained the oxalate only in trace amounts. When gamma-irradiated at 77 K and at room temperature, this compound gave the stable paramagnetic species represented by the single ESR line centered at g = 2.000. We ascribe this spectrum to the CO2- radical formed from the oxalate ion. The same aluminosilicate prepared in the absence of the oxalate either produced no stable paramagnetic product after gamma irradiation at room temperature or resulted in composite ESR spectra, indicating the presence of several paramagnetic species if irradiated at 77 K. Complex ESR spectra were transformed by heating to the stable paramagnetic centers which differed from the one obtained from oxalate ion. We conclude that in Al2(OH)6H4SiO4 oxalate acts as a trap for the gamma-radiation energy.

  8. Identification of irradiated sage tea ( Salvia officinalis L.) by ESR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tepe Çam, Semra; Engin, Birol

    2010-04-01

    The use of electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy to accurately distinguish irradiated from unirradiated sage tea was examined. Before irradiation, sage tea samples exhibit one asymmetric singlet ESR signal centered at g=2.0037. Besides this central signal, two weak satellite signals situated about 3 mT left and right to it in radiation-induced spectra. Irradiation with increasing doses caused a significant increase in radiation-induced ESR signal intensity at g=2.0265 (the left satellite signal) and this increase was found to be explained by a polynomial varying function. The stability of that radiation-induced ESR signal at room temperature was studied over a storage period of 9 months. Also, the kinetic of signal at g=2.0265 was studied in detail over a temperature range 313-353 K by annealing samples at different temperatures for various times.

  9. Degradation kinetics of poly(ether-urethane) Estane® induced by electron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dannoux, A.; Esnouf, S.; Begue, J.; Amekraz, B.; Moulin, C.

    2005-07-01

    Radiation effects on a segmented aromatic poly(ether-urethane) induced by electron beam irradiation under oxygen atmosphere were investigated using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) in order to determine the degradation mechanisms. Thin films have been irradiated under a dose rate of 1 MGy/h with absorbed doses varying from 25 to 1000 kGy under O2. FTIR spectra have shown the formation of hydroperoxides, carboxylic acids, primary amines, alcohols, esters and formates. Moreover, the decrease of urethane and ether absorbances revealed the degradation of both soft and hard segments. Spin-trapping technique was used to monitor the evolution of short-lived peroxy and alkyl radicals at room temperature. Finally, a mechanism of degradation for electron irradiated polyurethane is proposed.

  10. ESR studies of some. gamma. -irradiated organic crystals. [N-tert-butylacrylamide, propionamide

    SciTech Connect

    Kilic, S.; Baysal, B.M.

    1981-12-01

    Acrylamide, N-tert-butylacrylamide, and propionamide crystals were irradiated at -196/sup 0/C and the structures of radicals studied by ESR spectroscopy at various temperatures. The ..gamma..-irradiated acrylamide crystals show a five-line spectrum which is similar in shape to the signal obtained from the ..gamma..-irradiated propionamide crystals. Two types of radicals are produced in irradiated acrylamide and propionamide crystals at -196/sup 0/C. When the irradiated samples are kept at -78/sup 0/C the spectrum of propionamide remains the same, except in intensity. In contrast to this, the acrylamide spectrum changes to a triplet because of dimerization. Upon warming the irradiated acrylamide sample to between -50 and -30/sup 0/C, some small new peaks become apparent on either side of the triplet. These new peaks disappear above -20/sup 0/C and the spectrum changes to a triplet because of polymerization. To observe the changes in the ESR spectra of ..gamma..-irradiated N-tert-butylacrylamide we kept the sample at various temperatures from -196 to 100/sup 0/C. From -196/sup 0/C to about room temperature the spectrum is a quintet. At and above 35/sup 0/C, the spectrum changes to a triplet with shoulders on either side of the main peaks. With further warming above 80/sup 0/C the spectrum changes to a broad triplet.

  11. Interior. Balance room for chemistry laboratory. Storage room for glassware ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior. Balance room for chemistry laboratory. Storage room for glassware and reference room with frequently used chemistry and chemical engineering texts. - Thomas A. Edison Laboratories, Building No. 2, Main Street & Lakeside Avenue, West Orange, Essex County, NJ

  12. Central room (delivery room on plan) between the east and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Central room (delivery room on plan) between the east and west reading rooms, showing built-in card catalog drawers. View to south. - Sacramento Junior College, Library, 3835 Freeport Boulevard, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  13. 15. Readiness Crew Building interior, Room 105, former briefing room, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Readiness Crew Building interior, Room 105, former briefing room, looking northwest. Projection room in at the back wall. Thalheimer - Whiteman Air Force Base, Bomber Alert Facility S-6, 1300 Alert Road, Knob Noster, Johnson County, MO

  14. NCI Grant Resources Room

    Cancer.gov

    If you’re interested in information about NCI grants, visit the Grant Resources Room. You can talk to NCI staff about grant application and review processes, and even schedule a one-on-one consultation.

  15. Novel room temperature ferromagnetic semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Amita

    2004-11-01

    Today's information world, bits of data are processed by semiconductor chips, and stored in the magnetic disk drives. But tomorrow's information technology may see magnetism (spin) and semiconductivity (charge) combined in one 'spintronic' device that exploits both charge and 'spin' to carry data (the best of two worlds). Spintronic devices such as spin valve transistors, spin light emitting diodes, non-volatile memory, logic devices, optical isolators and ultra-fast optical switches are some of the areas of interest for introducing the ferromagnetic properties at room temperature in a semiconductor to make it multifunctional. The potential advantages of such spintronic devices will be higher speed, greater efficiency, and better stability at a reduced power consumption. This Thesis contains two main topics: In-depth understanding of magnetism in Mn doped ZnO, and our search and identification of at least six new above room temperature ferromagnetic semiconductors. Both complex doped ZnO based new materials, as well as a number of nonoxides like phosphides, and sulfides suitably doped with Mn or Cu are shown to give rise to ferromagnetism above room temperature. Some of the highlights of this work are discovery of room temperature ferromagnetism in: (1) ZnO:Mn (paper in Nature Materials, Oct issue, 2003); (2) ZnO doped with Cu (containing no magnetic elements in it); (3) GaP doped with Cu (again containing no magnetic elements in it); (4) Enhancement of Magnetization by Cu co-doping in ZnO:Mn; (5) CdS doped with Mn, and a few others not reported in this thesis. We discuss in detail the first observation of ferromagnetism above room temperature in the form of powder, bulk pellets, in 2-3 mu-m thick transparent pulsed laser deposited films of the Mn (<4 at. percent) doped ZnO. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) spectra recorded from 2 to 200nm areas showed homogeneous distribution of Mn substituting

  16. Solid organic residues produced by irradiation of hydrocarbon-containing H2O and H2O/NH3 ices - Infrared spectroscopy and astronomical implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khare, B. N.; Thompson, W. R.; Murray, B. G. J. P. T.; Chyba, C. F.; Sagan, C.

    1989-01-01

    Plasma-discharge irradiations were conducted for the methane clathrate expected in outer solar system satellites and cometary nuclei; also irradiated were ices prepared from other combinations of H2O with CH4, C2H6, or C2H2. Upon evaporation of the yellowish-to-tan irradiated ices, it is found that a colored solid film adheres to the walls of the reaction vessel at room temperature. These organic films are found to exhibit IR band identifiable with alkane, aldehide, alcohol, and perhaps alkene, as well as substituted aromatic functional groups. These spectra are compared with previous studies of UV- or photon-irradiated nonclathrated hydrocarbon-containing ices.

  17. SHMUTZ & PROTON-DIAMANT H + Irradiated/Written-Hyper/Super-conductivity(HC/SC) Precognizance/Early Experiments Connections: Wet-Graphite Room-Tc & Actualized MgB2 High-Tc: Connection to Mechanical Bulk-Moduli/Hardness: Diamond Hydrocarbon-Filaments, Disorder, Nano-Powders:C,Bi,TiB2,TiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wunderman, Irwin; Siegel, Edward Carl-Ludwig; Lewis, Thomas; Young, Frederic; Smith, Adolph; Dresschhoff-Zeller, Gieselle

    2013-03-01

    SHMUTZ: ``wet-graphite''Scheike-....[Adv.Mtls.(7/16/12)]hyper/super-SCHMUTZ-conductor(S!!!) = ``wet''(?)-``graphite''(?) = ``graphene''(?) = water(?) = hydrogen(?) =ultra-heavy proton-bands(???) = ...(???) claimed room/high-Tc/high-Jc superconductOR ``p''-``wave''/ BAND(!!!) superconductIVITY and actualized/ instantiated MgB2 high-Tc superconductors and their BCS- superconductivity: Tc Siegel[ICMAO(77);JMMM 7,190(78)] connection to SiegelJ.Nonxline-Sol.40,453(80)] disorder/amorphous-superconductivity in nano-powders mechanical bulk/shear(?)-moduli/hardness: proton-irradiated diamond, powders TiB2, TiC,{Siegel[Semis. & Insuls.5:39,47, 62 (79)])-...``VS''/concommitance with Siegel[Phys.Stat.Sol.(a)11,45(72)]-Dempsey [Phil.Mag. 8,86,285(63)]-Overhauser-(Little!!!)-Seitz-Smith-Zeller-Dreschoff-Antonoff-Young-...proton-``irradiated''/ implanted/ thermalized-in-(optimal: BOTH heat-capacity/heat-sink & insulator/maximal dielectric-constant) diamond: ``VS'' ``hambergite-borate-mineral transformable to Overhauser optimal-high-Tc-LiBD2 in Overhauser-(NW-periodic-table)-Land: CO2/CH4-ETERNAL-sequestration by-product: WATER!!!: physics lessons from

  18. Wash room, bunkhouse, first floor interior. This room is a ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Wash room, bunkhouse, first floor interior. This room is a screened porch with the original sinks extant. Light and ventilation was borrowed from the wash room into the toilets and bathing rooms. - Sespe Ranch, Bunkhouse, 2896 Telegraph Road, Fillmore, Ventura County, CA

  19. Visiting Room 501

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curwen, Margaret Sauceda

    2009-01-01

    Students in Room 501 were exploring and negotiating their lives as transnational citizens. In a globalized world of instantaneous information and communication, Latino students are shaping, morphing, and evolving into a new generation. This study highlights one group of students who were aspiring toward middle class, which is not the typical…

  20. Technology Equipment Rooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, C. William

    2001-01-01

    Examines telecommunications equipment room design features that allow for growth and can accommodate numerous equipment replacements and upgrades with minimal service disruption and with minimal cost. Considerations involving the central hub, power and lighting needs, air conditioning, and fire protection are discussed. (GR)

  1. Detention Room Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salem, Terry

    1973-01-01

    This article describes how the detention room in one school system was changed in favor of group counseling sessions. In the counseling sessions, the counselors could aid students in identifying the problems which disturb them in order to improve self-understanding and status in school. (JC)

  2. Rooms with a View

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hourihan, Peter; Berry, Millard, III

    2006-01-01

    When well-designed and integrated into a campus living or learning space, an atrium can function as the heart and spirit of a building, connecting interior rooms and public spaces with the outside environment. However, schools and universities should seek technological and HVAC solutions that maximize energy efficiency. This article discusses how…

  3. Plasma deposition of amorphous silicon carbide thin films irradiated with neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huran, J.; Bohacek, P.; Kucera, M.; Kleinova, A.; Sasinkova, V.; IEE SAS, Bratislava, Slovakia Team; Polymer Institute, SAS, Bratislava, Slovakia Team; Institute of Chemistry, SAS, Bratislava, Slovakia Team

    2015-09-01

    Amorphous silicon carbide and N-doped silicon carbide thin films were deposited on P-type Si(100) wafer by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) technology using silane, methane, ammonium and argon gases. The concentration of elements in the films was determined by RBS and ERDA method. Chemical compositions were analyzed by FTIR spectroscopy. Photoluminescence properties were studied by photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL). Irradiation of samples with various neutron fluencies was performed at room temperature. The films contain silicon, carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen and small amount of oxygen. From the IR spectra, the films contained Si-C, Si-H, C-H, Si-N, N-H and Si-O bonds. No significance effect on the IR spectra after neutron irradiation was observed. PL spectroscopy results of films showed decreasing PL intensity after neutron irradiation and PL intensity decreased with increased neutron fluencies. The measured current of the prepared structures increased after irradiation with neutrons and rise up with neutron fluencies.

  4. In-growth of an electrically active defect in high-purity silicon after proton irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Nylandsted Larsen, A.; Juul Pedersen, H.; Christian Petersen, M.; Privitera, V.; Gurimskaya, Y.; Mesli, A.

    2013-12-14

    Defect-related energy levels in the lower half of the band gap of silicon have been studied with transient-capacitance techniques in high-purity, carbon and oxygen lean, plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition grown, n-and p-type silicon layers after 2-MeV proton irradiations at temperatures at or just below room temperature. The in-growth of a distinct line in deep-level transient spectroscopy spectra, corresponding to a level in the band gap at E{sub V} + 0.357 eV where E{sub V} is the energy of the valence band edge, takes place for anneal temperatures at around room temperature with an activation energy of 0.95 ± 0.08 eV. The line disappears at an anneal temperature of around 450 K. The corresponding defect is demonstrated not to contain boron, carbon, oxygen, or phosphorus. Possible defect candidates are discussed.

  5. Irradiation of nitrogen-rich ices by swift heavy ions. Clues for the formation of ultracarbonaceous micrometeorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augé, B.; Dartois, E.; Engrand, C.; Duprat, J.; Godard, M.; Delauche, L.; Bardin, N.; Mejía, C.; Martinez, R.; Muniz, G.; Domaracka, A.; Boduch, P.; Rothard, H.

    2016-08-01

    Context. Extraterrestrial materials, such as meteorites and interplanetary dust particles, provide constraints on the formation and evolution of organic matter in the young solar system. Micrometeorites represent the dominant source of extraterrestrial matter at the Earth's surface, some of them originating from large heliocentric distances. Recent analyses of ultracarbonaceous micrometeorites recovered from Antarctica (UCAMMs) reveal an unusually nitrogen-rich organic matter. Such nitrogen-rich carbonaceous material could be formed in a N2-rich environment, at very low temperature, triggered by energetic processes. Aims: Several formation scenarios have been proposed for the formation of the N-rich organic matter observed in UCAMMs. We experimentally evaluate the scenario involving high energy irradiation of icy bodies subsurface orbiting at large heliocentric distances. Methods: The effect of Galactic cosmic ray (GCR) irradiation of ices containing N2 and CH4 was studied in the laboratory. The N2-CH4 (90:10 and 98:2) ice mixtures were irradiated at 14 K by 44 MeV Ni11+ and 160 MeV Ar15+ swift heavy ion beams. The evolution of the samples was monitored using in-situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The evolution of the initial ice molecules and new species formed were followed as a function of projectile fluence. After irradiation, the target was annealed to room temperature. The solid residue of the whole process left after ice sublimation was characterized in-situ by infrared spectroscopy, and the elemental composition was measured ex-situ. Results: The infrared bands that appear during irradiation allow us to identify molecules and radicals (HCN, CN-, NH3, ...). The infrared spectra of the solid residues measured at room temperature show similarities with that of UCAMMs. The results point towards the efficient production of a poly-HCN-like residue from the irradiation of N2-CH4 rich surfaces of icy bodies. The room temperature residue provides a viable

  6. Visible to deep ultraviolet range optical absorption of electron irradiated borosilicate glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tie-Shan; Duan, Bing-Huang; Tian, Feng; Peng, Hai-Bo; Chen, Liang; Zhang, Li-Min; Yuan, Wei

    2015-07-01

    To study the room-temperature stable defects induced by electron irradiation, commercial borosilicate glasses were irradiated by 1.2 MeV electrons and then ultraviolet (UV) optical absorption (OA) spectra were measured. Two characteristic bands were revealed before irradiation, and they were attributed to silicon dangling bond (E’-center) and Fe3+ species, respectively. The existence of Fe3+ was confirmed by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements. After irradiation, the absorption spectra revealed irradiation-induced changes, while the content of E’-center did not change in the deep ultraviolet (DUV) region. The slightly reduced OA spectra at 4.9 eV was supposed to transform Fe3+ species to Fe2+ species and this transformation leads to the appearance of 4.3 eV OA band. By calculating intensity variation, the transformation of Fe was estimated to be about 5% and the optical absorption cross section of Fe2+ species is calculated to be 2.2 times larger than that of Fe3+ species. Peroxy linkage (POL, ≡Si-O-O-Si≡), which results in a 3.7 eV OA band, is speculated not to be from Si-O bond break but from Si-O-B bond, Si-O-Al bond, or Si-O-Na bond break. The co-presence defect with POL is probably responsible for 2.9-eV OA band. Project supported by the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities of China (Grant No. lzujbky-2014-16).

  7. Self-Irradiation Effects on 99Mo Reagents and Products

    SciTech Connect

    Carson, S.D.; Garcia, M.J.; McDonald, M.J.; Simpson, R.L.; Tallant, D.R.

    1998-10-07

    produced in 1996 and shipped to pharmaceutical houses for evaluation of compatibility with oxime solution used to precipitate `?vfo as the oxime complex is both air and light-sensitive, and containing a black precipitate that forms during shipment, presumably as a result of self- irradiation. Addition of sodium hypochlorite to the product solution prior to shipment prevents precipitate formation, indicating the precipitate is a reduced form of `%lo. to remove any precipitate. Duplicate aliquots of the filtered samples were titrated to a phenolphthalein irradiation and afler standing at room temperature for 86.4 hours. Precipitates were washed to a FTIR analysis of the white precipitate showed it to be alpha benzoin oxime. Since the basic After 86.4 hours, no precipitate had formed in bottles containing sodium hypochlorite. Black precipitate had formed in all bottles that did not contain sodium hypochlorite after 14.4 hours. The precipitate appeared to initially form on the surface of the HDPE sample bottles and Black precipitate was first noticed in sample set 1 after 28.8 hrs' irradiation. No visible sample containing precipitate was kept at room temperature in the original bottle. Precipitate in sample sets 2 and 3. Since no precipitate formed in these bottles, this was equivalent to duplicate samples. Once the precipitate in the 20-mL aliquots that had been set aside had returned to sample sets 1 through 3 and the samples with redissolved precipitate all experienced an average decrease in base strength of 0.013 meq mL-l. Sample 1-C had a decrease of 0.004 meq mL-l and sample 1-D had returned to the initial value of 0.198 meq mL-l. Raman spectra for the black precipitate from samples l-C, 1-D and supplemental sample set 1 Fig. 2. Raman spectra of the black precipitate formed in 9%40 product solutions after 28.8,43.2, 72 and 86.4 hours of `oCo irradiation in Sandia's Gamma Irradiation Facility. increase with time, as seen in the titration of 1-C and 1-D samples

  8. Clean room wiping cloths

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, W.B.

    1981-01-01

    The suitability of various fabrics for use as clean room wiping cloths was investigated. These fabrics included knit polyester, knit nylon, urethane foam, woven cotton, nonwoven polyester, nonwoven rayon, nonwoven polyethylene and polypropylene, and woven nylon. These materials were tested for detachable lint and fibers, deterioration, and oil content which could leave contaminating films on wiped surfaces. Well-laundered nylon and polyester cloths knitted from filamentary yarn, with hems, were found to be suitable. (LCL)

  9. Optimizing Operating Room Scheduling.

    PubMed

    Levine, Wilton C; Dunn, Peter F

    2015-12-01

    This article reviews the management of an operating room (OR) schedule and use of the schedule to add value to an organization. We review the methodology of an OR block schedule, daily OR schedule management, and post anesthesia care unit patient flow. We discuss the importance of a well-managed OR schedule to ensure smooth patient care, not only in the OR, but throughout the entire hospital. PMID:26610624

  10. [Virtual room of gastroenterology].

    PubMed

    Spinelli, Osvaldo Mateo; Fittipaldi, Mónica Elsa; Henderson, Eduardo; Krabshuis, Justus Hendrik

    2010-12-01

    The amount of published information and its continuing growth can no longer be managed by an individual searcher. One of today's great challenges for the academic researcher and clinician is to find a relevant scientific article using bibliographic search strategies. We aimed to design and build a Virtual Room of Gastroenterology (VRG) generating real-time automated search strategies and producing bibliographic and full text search results. These results update and complement with the latest evidence the Clinical Guideline Program of the World Gastroenterology Organisation. The HTML driven interface provides a series of pre-formulated MeSH based search strategies for each Aula. For each topic between 10 and 20 specific terms, qualifiers and subheadings are identified. The functionality of the VRG is based on the PubMed's characteristic that allows a search strategy to be captured as a web address. The VRG is available in Spanish and English, and the access is free. There are 28 rooms currently available. All together these rooms provide an advanced bibliographic access using more than 900 pre-programmed MeSH driven strategies. In a further very recent development some of the topics of VRG now allow cascade based searches. These searches look at resource sensitive options and possible ethnic difference per topic. The VRG allows significant reductions in time required to design and carry out complex bibliographic searches in the areas of gastroenterology, hepatology and endoscopy. The system updates automatically in real-time thus ensuring the currency of the results. PMID:21381412

  11. 14. Door leading from Boiler Room to Pattern Room. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Door leading from Boiler Room to Pattern Room. - Central of Georgia Railway, Savannah Repair Shops & Terminal Facilities, Engine Boiler & Pattern Building, Bounded by West Broad, Jones, West Boundary & Hull Streets, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  12. Interior. Storage room for glassware and reference room with frequentlyused ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior. Storage room for glassware and reference room with frequently-used chemistry and chemical engineering texts. - Thomas A. Edison Laboratories, Building No. 2, Main Street & Lakeside Avenue, West Orange, Essex County, NJ

  13. DETAIL VIEW OF OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT ROOM, FIRING ROOM NO. 3, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT ROOM, FIRING ROOM NO. 3, FACING SOUTHEAST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Launch Control Center, LCC Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  14. DETAIL VIEW OF OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT ROOM, FIRING ROOM NO. 4, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT ROOM, FIRING ROOM NO. 4, FACING WEST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Launch Control Center, LCC Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  15. DETAIL VIEW OF OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT ROOM, FIRING ROOM NO. 3, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT ROOM, FIRING ROOM NO. 3, FACING NORTH - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Launch Control Center, LCC Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  16. DETAIL VIEW OF OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT ROOM, FIRING ROOM NO. 3, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT ROOM, FIRING ROOM NO. 3, FACING EAST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Launch Control Center, LCC Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  17. Supreme Court Room (room 573), looking westsouthwest (bearing 250). Not ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Supreme Court Room (room 573), looking west-southwest (bearing 250). Not that missing scones are to be returned and presently obscured ceiling is proposed for restoration. - California State Library & Courts Building, 914 Capitol Mall, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  18. 11. FIRST FLOOR, EAST ROOM, DOORWAY TO WEST ROOM ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. FIRST FLOOR, EAST ROOM, DOORWAY TO WEST ROOM ON LEFT AND BOTTOM OF STAIRWAY ON RIGHT - Whitcomb Cabin, BZ Corners, Glenwood County Road (Conboy Lake National Wildlife Refuge), Glenwood, Klickitat County, WA

  19. 16. Readiness Crew Building interior, Room 105, former briefing room, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. Readiness Crew Building interior, Room 105, former briefing room, looking southeast. Thalheimer - Whiteman Air Force Base, Bomber Alert Facility S-6, 1300 Alert Road, Knob Noster, Johnson County, MO

  20. 24. Perimeter acquisition radar building room #203, communications room ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. Perimeter acquisition radar building room #203, communications room - Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex, Perimeter Acquisition Radar Building, Limited Access Area, between Limited Access Patrol Road & Service Road A, Nekoma, Cavalier County, ND

  1. MACHINE ROOM FROM DOORWAY TO COMMUNICATIONS ROOM, VIEW FACING SOUTHWEST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MACHINE ROOM FROM DOORWAY TO COMMUNICATIONS ROOM, VIEW FACING SOUTHWEST. - Naval Air Station Barbers Point, World War II Command Center, Midway Street east of Lexington Avenue, Ewa, Honolulu County, HI

  2. 175. STORAGE ROOM, SOUTH WALL OF STORAGE ROOM, ADDED WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    175. STORAGE ROOM, SOUTH WALL OF STORAGE ROOM, ADDED WITH ELEVATOR ADDITION OF 1905. WALL IS EXTERIOR OF ORIGINAL WAGON WORKS OF 1883. - Gruber Wagon Works, Pennsylvania Route 183 & State Hill Road at Red Bridge Park, Bernville, Berks County, PA

  3. INTERIOR VIEW OF THE LIVING ROOM. DINING ROOM AND PANTRY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW OF THE LIVING ROOM. DINING ROOM AND PANTRY IN THE BACKGROUND. VIEW FACING NORTHEAST. - Hickam Field, Fort Kamehameha Officers' Housing Type Z, 19 Worchester Avenue, Honolulu, Honolulu County, HI

  4. 21. Perimeter acquisition radar building room #200, electrical equipment room ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. Perimeter acquisition radar building room #200, electrical equipment room - Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex, Perimeter Acquisition Radar Building, Limited Access Area, between Limited Access Patrol Road & Service Road A, Nekoma, Cavalier County, ND

  5. 8. VIEW OF ROOM 101 (ASSEMBLY ROOM) FROM NORTHEAST CORNER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. VIEW OF ROOM 101 (ASSEMBLY ROOM) FROM NORTHEAST CORNER SHOWING FLEXIBLE AIR-CONDITIONING DUCT - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Vehicle Support Building, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  6. 13. Interior view of conference room looking into break room ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Interior view of conference room looking into break room beyond; along west side of upper level; view to southwest. - Ellsworth Air Force Base, Mess Hall & Administration Building, 1301 Ellsworth Street, Blackhawk, Meade County, SD

  7. INTERIOR VIEW OF A TYPICAL ROOM (ROOM NO. 209), FACING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW OF A TYPICAL ROOM (ROOM NO. 209), FACING NORTH. THE SINK AND MIRROR MAY HAVE BEEN FROM THE ORIGINAL CONSTRUCTION. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Bachelor Officer Quarters, Dealy Circle, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  8. View from window of southeast room (bed room no. 1), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View from window of southeast room (bed room no. 1), second floor, commandant's house, looking east across parade ground. - Fort Simcoe, Commandant's House & Blockhouse, Fort Simcoe Road, White Swan, Yakima County, WA

  9. Entry area from living room with dining room beyond and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Entry area from living room with dining room beyond and stairs to second floor through doorway to the right (southern unit) - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Officers' Quarters, West Charlie Kelly Boulevard & South Hutton Street, Southwest Corner, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  10. Temperature, stress, and annealing effects on the luminescence from electron-irradiated silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, C. E.; Johnson, E. S.; Compton, W. D.; Noonan, J. R.; Streetman, B. G.

    1973-01-01

    Low-temperature photoluminescence spectra are presented for Si crystals which have been irradiated with high-energy electrons. Studies of isochronal annealing, stress effects, and the temperature dependences of the luminescence are used to discuss the nature of the luminescent transitions and the properties of defects. Two dominant bands present after room-temperature anneal of irradiated material are discussed, and correlations of the properties of these bands are made with known Si defects. A band between 0.8 and 1.0 eV has properties which are related to those of the divacancy, and a band between 0.6 and 0.8 eV has properties related to those of the Si-G15(K) center. Additional peaks appear in the luminescence after high-temperature anneal; the influence of impurities and the effects of annealing of these lines are discussed.

  11. EPR study of gamma irradiated DL-methionine sulfone single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karabulut, Bünyamin; Yıldırım, İlkay

    2015-12-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) study of gamma irradiated dl-2-amino-4-(Methylsulfonyl) butyric acid (dl-methionine sulfone, hereafter dl-ABA) single crystals and powder was performed at room temperature. It has been found that this compound indicates the existence of C. O2- and N. H2 radicals after γ-irradiation. While g and hyperfine splitting values for the N. H2 radical were observed, for the C. O2- radical, only the g factor was measured. The EPR spectra have shown that N. H2 radical has two groups each having two distinct sites and C. O2- radical has one site. The principal g and hyperfine values for all sites were analyzed.

  12. On the structure of defect centers in γ-irradiated alkali silicate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cases, R.; Griscom, D. L.

    1984-02-01

    An EPR study after room temperature γ-irradiation on potassium silicate glasses of two chemical compositions and different 17O and 29Si isotopic enrichments has been carried out. Isochronal anneal experiments on 17O-enriched samples have confirmed the model for the trapped-hole center HC 1 as comprising a trapped hole on a pure 2p π orbital of a single nonbridging oxygen. Besides the well known HC 1 and HC 2 EPR spectra, new resonances have been isolated and identified as due to three types of oxygen-related defects (interstitial O 2- ions; O 2- bonded to the glass network; and interstitial ozonide ions O 3-). Using 29Si-enriched samp simulations a 370 G doublet has been demonstrated to arise from an E'-like defect for which a tentative model is given. The formation of all these defects by irradiation depends on chemical composition of the glass.

  13. Night Spectra Quest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Stephen

    1995-01-01

    Presents the Night Spectra Quest, a pocket-sized chart that identifies in color the spectra of all the common night lights and has an integrally mounted, holographic diffraction grating to look through. (JRH)

  14. Commander's conference room (room 202), closet and hallway to bathroom ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Commander's conference room (room 202), closet and hallway to bathroom and bedroom, leading to conference room 211. Viewing windows look down on the display area. View to north - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Combat Operations Center, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  15. Room with a View: Ethical Encounters in Room 13

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grube, Vicky

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author describes ethical encounters in Room 13, a schoolroom where children made what they wanted, posed their own questions, and ran an art room like a small business. In Room 13 children had the responsibility to maintain all aspects of the art studio. Specific decisions fell to an annually elected management team, a small…

  16. 45. 1915 CLOTH ROOM ADJACENT TO PICKER ROOM, SECOND FLOOR, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    45. 1915 CLOTH ROOM ADJACENT TO PICKER ROOM, SECOND FLOOR, NORTH END OF MILL NO. 2, WALL ON LEFT DIVIDING CLOTH ROOM ADDED LATER (PROBABLY C. 1970s). - Prattville Manufacturing Company, Number One, 242 South Court Street, Prattville, Autauga County, AL

  17. Characterization and antioxidant properties of alcoholic extracts from gamma irradiated κ-carrageenan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Relleve, Lorna; Abad, Lucille

    2015-07-01

    Different extracts from unirradiated and gamma irradiated κ-carrageenan (solid and 1% w/v aqueous solution) were obtained with isopropyl alcohol (IPA) at concentrations of 40%, 60% and 80% v/v at room temperature. Physical and chemical properties of the different IPA extracts were analyzed by GPC, UV, and FT-IR. The extracts consisted of low molecular weight fragments with an average molecular weight (Mw) ranging from 2300 Da to 5000 Da. UV analyses of extracts from irradiated carrageenan showed varying maximum absorptions in the range of 265-280 nm. FT-IR spectra of all extracts from irradiated carrageenan showed all the important functional groups of carrageenan in the fingerprint region (4000-600 cm-1) and additional carbonyl C=O and C=C double bond peaks. Antioxidant properties of the different extracts were investigated using reducing power assay. The reducing power of extracts from the irradiated solution follows the order of 80%>60%>40% while no trend was observed for all extracts from irradiated solid κ-carrageenan.

  18. Characterization of ion-irradiation-induced defects in multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehtinen, Ossi; Nikitin, Timur; Krasheninnikov, Arkady V.; Sun, Litao; Banhart, Florian; Khriachtchev, Leonid; Keinonen, Juhani

    2011-07-01

    We study the effects of Ar+, He+ and C+ ion irradiation on multi-walled carbon nanotubes at room and elevated temperatures with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Raman spectroscopy. Based on the TEM data, we introduce a universal damage scale for the visual analysis and characterization of irradiated nanotubes. We show for the first time that the amount of irradiation-induced damage in nanotubes is larger than the value predicted for bulk materials using the simple binary collision approximation, which may be associated with higher defect production due to electronic stopping in these nanoscale systems. The Raman spectra of the irradiated samples are in qualitative agreement with the TEM data and indicate the presence of irradiation-induced defects. However, it is difficult to obtain quantitative information on defect concentration due to non-uniform distribution of defects in the nanotube films and in part due to the presence of other carbon nanosystems in the samples, such as graphitic crystallites and carbon onions.

  19. One Room Schools in Iowa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruth, Amy, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    This issue focuses on one-room school houses in Iowa. At one time, almost 14,000 one-room schools dotted Iowa's rural landscape. Articles explore Native American schools of the past and present, segregation of black students, and Amish schools. An article remembering one-room schools describes the early schools from 1830 to 1858, township schools…

  20. Effect of positron source irradiation on positronium annihilation in fine powdered alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z. W.; Chen, Z. Q.

    2016-09-01

    Positron lifetime and Doppler broadening of positron annihilation radiation were measured as a function of time to study the irradiation effect by 22Na positron source in fine powdered alumina. The γ-Al2O3 samples were put in a vacuum chamber with a pressure of about 10-6 Torr and were cooled down to 10 K by a closed-cycle helium gas refrigerator. The irradiation of γ-Al2O3 samples by positron source was taken for a duration of about two days immediately after the sample was cooled down. After that, the sample was subjected to a warm up process from 10 K to 300 K with a step of 10 K. Positron lifetime and Doppler broadening spectra were measured simultaneously during these processes. Two long lifetime components corresponding to ortho-positronium annihilation were observed. A significant shortening of these long lifetime components and a large increase in S parameter is observed during irradiation. It is supposed that positron source irradiation creates a large number of paramagnetic centers on the surface of the γ-Al2O3 grains, which induce spin conversion quenching of positronium. The irradiation induced paramagnetic centers are unstable above 70 K and are nearly annealed out when the temperature rises to 190 K. After warming up of the sample to room temperature, the positron lifetime spectrum is identical to that before irradiation. It was also found that after irradiation, a medium long lifetime component of about 5 ns appears, of which the intensity increases with increasing irradiation time. This may be originated from the formation of the surface o-Ps state. This surface o-Ps state is also inhibited at elevated temperatures. Our results indicate that positronium is a very sensitive probe for the surface defects in porous materials.

  1. Design of YCF-1 mobile γ irradiator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hehu, Zhang; Chuanzhen, Wang

    1993-07-01

    YCF-1 Mobile irradiator is designed by BINE of China. It has been put into running in YanJi city of Jilin province. It is able to be moved to border and distance places and area lumped and spreading out of agricultural products to service. It can play a important role in demonstration and extending irradiation technology in food irradiation, disinfestation, sterilization and quarantine, etc. This paper describes the features and design considerations of mobile irradiator. This irradiator adopted Cesium-137 source. The design capacity of loading source is 9.25PBq (250kCi), A half-time of Cs- 137 is 30.2 years long, exchanging source is not needed utilization rate of energy is higher, and the shielding is thinner, The Weight is lighter, The dose rate on the surface of it is 0.0025mSv/h in accordance with national standard. The internal size of irradiation room is 1800×1800×900mm (L×W×H), The sheilding of irradiation room is a steel shell filled with lead. The thickness of lead is 18cm. The irradiator is installed on a special flat truck. The size of the truck is 7000×3400×4200mm (L×W×H). The weight of irradiator is more than 80 150kw. The main components and parts of irradiator are: source, source racks and hoist, irradiation chamber, storage source chamber, the product's transport system, dose monitoring system, ventilation system and safety interlock system, etc.

  2. Neutron Spectra and H*(10) in a 15 MV Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Benites, J.; Vega-Carrillo, H. R.; Hernandez-Davila, V. M.; Rivera, T.; Carrillo, A.; Mondragon, R.

    2010-12-07

    Neutron spectra and the ambient dose equivalent were calculated inside the bunker of a 15 MV Varian linac model CLINAC iX. Calculations were carried out using Monte Carlo methods. Neutron spectra in the vicinity of isocentre show the presence of evaporation and knock-on neutrons produced by the source term, while epithermal and thermal neutron remain constant regardless the distance respect to isocentre, due to room return. Along the maze neutron spectra becomes softer as the detector moves along the maze. The ambient dose equivalent is decreased but do not follow the 1/r{sup 2} rule due to changes in the neutron spectra.

  3. CEBAF Control Room Renovation

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Spata; Thomas Oren

    2005-05-01

    The Machine Control Center (MCC) at Jefferson Lab's Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) was initially constructed in the early 1990s and based on proven technology of that era. Through our experience over the last 15 years and in our planning for the facility's 12 GeV upgrade we reevaluated the control room environment to capitalize on emerging visualization and display technologies and improve workflow processes and ergonomic attributes. This effort also sets the foundation for the redevelopment of the accelerator's control system to deliver high reliability performance with improvements in beam specifications management and information flow. The complete renovation was performed over a three-week maintenance period with no interruption to beam operations. We present the results of this effort.

  4. CEBAF Control Room Renovation

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Spata; Anthony Cuffe; Thomas Oren

    2005-03-22

    The Machine Control Center (MCC) at Jefferson Lab's Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) was constructed in the early 1990s and based on proven technology of that era. Through our experience over the last 15 years and in our planning for the facilities 12 GeV upgrade we reevaluated the control room environment to capitalize on emerging visualization and display technologies and improve on work-flow processes and ergonomic attributes. The renovation was performed in two phases during the summer of 2004, with one phase occurring during machine operations and the latter, more extensive phase, occurring during our semi-annual shutdown period. The new facility takes advantage of advances in display technology, analog and video signal management, server technology, ergonomic workspace design, lighting engineering, acoustic ceilings and raised flooring solutions to provide a marked improvement in the overall environment of machine operations.

  5. CEBAF Control Room Renovation

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Spata; Thomas Oren

    2005-05-01

    The Machine Control Center at Jefferson Lab's Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility was initially constructed in the early 1990s and based on proven technology of that era. Through our experience over the last 15 years and in our planning for the facilities 12 GeV upgrade we reevaluated the control room environment to capitalize on emerging visualization and display technologies and improve on workflow processes and ergonomic attributes. This effort also sets the foundation for the redevelopment of the accelerator's control system to deliver high reliability performance with improvements in beam specifications management and information flow. The complete renovation was performed over a three-week period with no interruption to beam operations. We present the results of this effort.

  6. Binaural room simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehnert, H.; Blauert, Jens; Pompetzki, W.

    1991-01-01

    In every-day listening the auditory event perceived by a listener is determined not only by the sound signal that a sound emits but also by a variety of environmental parameters. These parameters are the position, orientation and directional characteristics of the sound source, the listener's position and orientation, the geometrical and acoustical properties of surfaces which affect the sound field and the sound propagation properties of the surrounding fluid. A complete set of these parameters can be called an Acoustic Environment. If the auditory event perceived by a listener is manipulated in such a way that the listener is shifted acoustically into a different acoustic environment without moving himself physically, a Virtual Acoustic Environment has been created. Here, we deal with a special technique to set up nearly arbitrary Virtual Acoustic Environments, the Binaural Room Simulation. The purpose of the Binaural Room Simulation is to compute the binaural impulse response related to a virtual acoustic environment taking into account all parameters mentioned above. One possible way to describe a Virtual Acoustic Environment is the concept of the virtual sound sources. Each of the virtual sources emits a certain signal which is correlated but not necessarily identical with the signal emitted by the direct sound source. If source and receiver are non moving, the acoustic environment becomes a linear time-invariant system. Then, the Binaural Impulse Response from the source to a listener' s eardrums contains all relevant auditory information related to the Virtual Acoustic Environment. Listening into the simulated environment can easily be achieved by convolving the Binaural Impulse Response with dry signals and representing the results via headphones.

  7. Mechanical response of proton beam irradiated nitinol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afzal, Naveed; Ghauri, I. M.; Mubarik, F. E.; Amin, F.

    2011-01-01

    The present investigation deals with the study of mechanical behavior of proton beam irradiated nitinol at room temperature. The specimens in austenitic phase were irradiated over periods of 15, 30, 45 and 60 min at room temperature using 2 MeV proton beam obtained from Pelletron accelerator. The stress-strain curves of both unirradiated and irradiated specimens were obtained using a universal testing machine at room temperature. The results of the experiment show that an intermediate rhombohedral (R) phase has been introduced between austenite and martensite phase, which resulted in the suppression of direct transformation from austenite to martensite (A-M). Stresses required to start R-phase ( σRS) and martensitic phase ( σMS) were observed to decrease with increase in exposure time. The hardness tests of samples before and after irradiation were also carried out using Vickers hardness tester. The comparison reveals that the hardness is higher in irradiated specimens than that of the unirradiated one. The increase in hardness is quite sharp in specimens irradiated for 15 min, which then increases linearly as the exposure time is increased up to 60 min. The generation of R-phase, variations in the transformation stresses σRS and σMS and increase in hardness of irradiated nitinol may be attributed to lattice disorder and associated changes in crystal structure induced by proton beam irradiation.

  8. EPR study on gamma-irradiated fruits dehydrated via osmosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yordanov, N. D.; Aleksieva, K.

    2007-06-01

    The shape and time stability of the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of non- and γ-irradiated papaya, melon, cherry and fig samples dehydrated via osmosis are reported. It is shown that non-irradiated samples are generally EPR silent whereas γ-irradiated exhibit "sugar-like" EPR spectra. The recorded EPR spectra are monitored for a period of 7 months after irradiation (stored at low humidity and in the dark). The results suggest longer period of unambiguous identification of the radiation processing of osmose dehydrated fruits. Therefore, the Protocol EN 13708,2001 issued by CEN is fully applicable for the studied fruit samples.

  9. Photographic spectra of fireballs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovička, J.

    2016-01-01

    Two methods of spectroscopy of meteors using image intensified video cameras and classical photographic film cameras are compared. Video cameras provide large number of low resolution spectra of meteors of normal brightness, which can be used for statistical studies. Large format film cameras have been used through the history and provide high resolution spectra, which can be used to derive temperature, density and absolute abundances of various elements in the radiating plasma. The sensitivity of films is, however, low and only spectra of bright meteors (fireballs) can be studied. Examples of photographic fireball spectra are provided.

  10. Crack spectra analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Tiernan, M.

    1980-09-01

    Crack spectra derived from velocity data have been shown to exhibit systematics which reflect microstructural and textural differences between samples (Warren and Tiernan, 1980). Further research into both properties and information content of crack spectra have yielded the following: Spectral features are reproducible even at low pressures; certain observed spectral features may correspond to non-in-situ crack populations created during sample retrieval; the functional form of a crack spectra may be diagnostic of the sample's grain texture; hysteresis is observed in crack spectra between up and down pressure runs - it may be due to friction between the faces of closed crack populations.

  11. Absorption Spectra of Magnesium Sulphite Hexahydrate Doped with Nickel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petkova, Petya N.; Bunzarov, Zhelyu I.; Iliev, Ilia A.; Dimov, Todor N.

    2007-04-01

    In the work are presented absorption spectra of MgSO3.6H2O monocrystals doped with Ni. The spectra are measured in a wide spectral range (200 - 1200nm) at room temperature with polarized light. The impurity of Ni changes essentially the absorption of MgSO3.6H2O because it causes the appearance of additional spectral structures.

  12. Acoustic echoes reveal room shape.

    PubMed

    Dokmanic, Ivan; Parhizkar, Reza; Walther, Andreas; Lu, Yue M; Vetterli, Martin

    2013-07-23

    Imagine that you are blindfolded inside an unknown room. You snap your fingers and listen to the room's response. Can you hear the shape of the room? Some people can do it naturally, but can we design computer algorithms that hear rooms? We show how to compute the shape of a convex polyhedral room from its response to a known sound, recorded by a few microphones. Geometric relationships between the arrival times of echoes enable us to "blindfoldedly" estimate the room geometry. This is achieved by exploiting the properties of Euclidean distance matrices. Furthermore, we show that under mild conditions, first-order echoes provide a unique description of convex polyhedral rooms. Our algorithm starts from the recorded impulse responses and proceeds by learning the correct assignment of echoes to walls. In contrast to earlier methods, the proposed algorithm reconstructs the full 3D geometry of the room from a single sound emission, and with an arbitrary geometry of the microphone array. As long as the microphones can hear the echoes, we can position them as we want. Besides answering a basic question about the inverse problem of room acoustics, our results find applications in areas such as architectural acoustics, indoor localization, virtual reality, and audio forensics. PMID:23776236

  13. A proposed update to the solar irradiance spectrum used in LOWTRAN and MODTRAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert O.; Gao, Bo-Cai

    1993-01-01

    The calibrated upwelling radiance spectra measured by AVIRIS are increasingly being analyzed with radiative transfer codes. Analysis of AVIRIS data with the LOWTRAN and MODTRAN radiative transfer codes has led to indications of an error in the solar irradiance spectra used by these codes. This paper presents evidence for the error and proposed update to the solar irradiance spectra used by LOWTRAN and MODTRAN.

  14. 16. Bus Room (also known as Switch Gear Room), view ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. Bus Room (also known as Switch Gear Room), view to the southeast. An air circuit breaker compressor (visible in photograph number 2) was once attached to the main bus relay visible in the background of the photograph. - Washington Water Power Clark Fork River Cabinet Gorge Hydroelectric Development, Powerhouse, North Bank of Clark Fork River at Cabinet Gorge, Cabinet, Bonner County, ID

  15. 16. Perimeter acquisition radar building room #102, electrical equipment room; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. Perimeter acquisition radar building room #102, electrical equipment room; the prime power distribution system. Excellent example of endulum-types shock isolation. The grey cabinet and barrel assemble is part of the polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) retrofill project - Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex, Perimeter Acquisition Radar Building, Limited Access Area, between Limited Access Patrol Road & Service Road A, Nekoma, Cavalier County, ND

  16. 2. ENGINE ROOM AND CHIPPY ENGINE ROOM OF THE DIAMOND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. ENGINE ROOM AND CHIPPY ENGINE ROOM OF THE DIAMOND MINE, LOOKING NORTH. THE MAIN HOIST USED A FLAT CABLE, WHICH WAS SCRAPPED IN THE 1950s. THE ORIGINAL DIXON CABLE STILL EXISTS IN THE CHIPPY HOIST HOUSE. - Butte Mineyards, Diamond Mine, Butte, Silver Bow County, MT

  17. 49. Machinery rooms on north tower. Facing north. Machinery rooms ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    49. Machinery rooms on north tower. Facing north. Machinery rooms contain all motors, motor controllers, and gears for operating one span, in this case, the north span. Note bell with continuous operating clapper for use as fog signals. - Henry Ford Bridge, Spanning Cerritos Channel, Los Angeles-Long Beach Harbor, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  18. 35. VIEW OF TELEMETRY ROOM (ROOM 106) FROM ITS NORTHWEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35. VIEW OF TELEMETRY ROOM (ROOM 106) FROM ITS NORTHWEST CORNER SHOWING TM-ISE-3 TELEMETRY CHECKOUT SYSTEM AND HONEYWELL TAPE RECORDER - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Operations Building, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  19. 17. Perimeter acquisition radar building room #105, mechanical equipment room ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. Perimeter acquisition radar building room #105, mechanical equipment room no. 1; sign reads: Heat exchangers (shell and tube type). Provide precise temperature control of water for cooling critical electronic equipment - Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex, Perimeter Acquisition Radar Building, Limited Access Area, between Limited Access Patrol Road & Service Road A, Nekoma, Cavalier County, ND

  20. 37. DINING ROOM FROM BALCONY. THE DINING ROOM ROOF IS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    37. DINING ROOM FROM BALCONY. THE DINING ROOM ROOF IS SUPPORTED BY A SCISSOR TRUSS SYSTEM REINFORCED WITH TURNBUCKLE IRON RODS AND GUSSET PLATES (NOTE: THIS SYSTEM DIFFERS FROM THE LOBBY). - Old Faithful Inn, 900' northeast of Snowlodge & 1050' west of Old Faithful Lodge, Lake, Teton County, WY

  1. 12. INTERIOR OF LIVING ROOM FROM DINING ROOM SHOWING OPEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. INTERIOR OF LIVING ROOM FROM DINING ROOM SHOWING OPEN FRONT DOOR AT PHOTO CENTER AND OPEN DOOR TO BEDROOM NO. 1 AT PHOTO LEFT. VIEW TO NORTH. - Bishop Creek Hydroelectric System, Plant 4, Worker Cottage, Bishop Creek, Bishop, Inyo County, CA

  2. Looking west in the basement utility room, room 24, overview ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Looking west in the basement utility room, room 24, overview of air handling system, large walk-in filter, large ducts, pipes, and gauges - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Combat Operations Center, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  3. From living room through french doors toward room in southeast ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    From living room through french doors toward room in southeast corner of south unit - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Civilian Employees' Quarters, North Hickey Street, West side, 150 feet North of intersection of North Hickey Street & West Loosley Avenue, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  4. 38. NORTHEAST ROOM, SECOND FLOOR, SOUTH WALL. ROOM COMPLETELY WALLED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    38. NORTHEAST ROOM, SECOND FLOOR, SOUTH WALL. ROOM COMPLETELY WALLED WITH RANDOM WIDTH BOARDS WHICH WERE PAPERED OR PLASTERED OVER. THIS WAS TYPICAL THROUGHOUT HOUSE EXCEPT FOR WOOD PANELED WALLS - John Mark Verdier House, 801 Bay & Scott Streets, Beaufort, Beaufort County, SC

  5. 10. CONTROL ROOM INTERIOR. Looking into southwest corner. CONTROL ROOM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. CONTROL ROOM INTERIOR. Looking into southwest corner. CONTROL ROOM INTERIOR, SHOWING ESCAPE HATCH. Looking north along east wall. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Instrumentation & Control Building, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  6. LIVING ROOM WITH THE SLIDING DOORS TO DINING ROOM ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    LIVING ROOM WITH THE SLIDING DOORS TO DINING ROOM ON THE LEFT. SHOWING THE WOOD GRILLE TO THE FOYER. VIEW FACING SOUTHEAST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, U-Shaped Two-Bedroom Duplex Type 1, Acacia Road, Birch Circle, and Cedar Drive, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  7. Improving operating room schedules.

    PubMed

    Li, Fei; Gupta, Diwakar; Potthoff, Sandra

    2016-09-01

    Operating rooms (ORs) in US hospitals are costly to staff, generate about 70 % of a hospital's revenues, and operate at a staffed-capacity utilization of 60-70 %. Many hospitals allocate blocks of OR time to individual or groups of surgeons as guaranteed allocation, who book surgeries one at a time in their blocks. The booking procedure frequently results in unused time between surgeries. Realizing that this presents an opportunity to improve OR utilization, hospitals manually reschedule surgery start times one or two days before each day of surgical operations. The purpose of rescheduling is to decrease OR staffing costs, which are determined by the number of concurrently staffed ORs. We formulate the rescheduling problem as a variant of the bin-packing problem with interrelated items, which are the surgeries performed by the same surgeon. We develop a lower bound (LB) construction algorithm and prove that the LB is at least (2/3) of the optimal staffing cost. A key feature of our approach is that we allow hospitals to have two shift lengths. Our analytical results form the basis of a branch-and-bound algorithm, which we test on data obtained from three hospitals. Experiments show that rescheduling saves significant staffing costs. PMID:25687390

  8. Action spectra again?

    PubMed

    Coohill, T P

    1991-11-01

    Action spectroscopy has a long history and is of central importance to photobiological studies. Action spectra were among the first assays to point to chlorophyll as the molecule most responsible for plant growth and to DNA as the genetic material. It is useful to construct action spectra early in the investigation of new areas of photobiological research in an attempt to determine the wavelength limits of the radiation region causing the studied response. But due to the severe absorption of ultraviolet (UV) radiation by biological samples, UV action spectra were first limited to small cells (bacteria and fungi). Advances in techniques (e.g. single cell culture) and analysis allowed accurate action spectra to be reported even for mammalian cells. But precise analytical action spectra are often difficult to obtain when large, pigmented, or groups of cells are investigated. Here some action spectra are limited in interpretation and merely supply a wavelength vs effect curve. When polychromatic sources are employed, the interpretation of action spectra is even more complex and formidable. But such polychromatic action spectra can be more directly related to ambient responses. Since precise action spectra usually require the completion of a relatively large number of careful experiments using somewhat sophisticated equipment over a range of at least six wavelengths, they are often not pursued. But they remain central to the elucidation of the effect being studied. The worldwide community has agreed that stratospheric ozone is depleting, with the possibility of a consequent rise in the amount of UV-B (290-320 nm) reaching the earth's surface. It is therefore essential that new action spectra be completed for UV-B effects on a large variety of responses of human, animal, and aquatic plant systems. Combining these action spectra with the known amounts of UV-B reaching the biosphere can give rise to solar UV effectiveness spectra that, in turn, can give rise to estimates

  9. Neutron irradiation effects in magnesium-aluminate spinel doped with transition metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritsyna, V. T.; Afanasyev-Charkin, I. V.; Kobyakov, V. A.; Sickafus, K. E.

    2000-12-01

    We present data on optical properties for stoichiometric (MgO · Al 2O 3) and non-stoichiometric (MgO · 2Al 2O 3) spinel crystals: (1) nominally pure; (2) doped with transition metals Mn, Cr, and Fe to a concentration of 0.01 wt%; (3) irradiated with neutrons to a fluence of 1.8×10 21 m -2; (4) post-annealed at 650 K. The temperature during neutron irradiation was 350 K. Optical absorption and thermoluminescence measurements were performed on irradiated and annealed samples at room temperature. Results of absorption measurements show spectra with the following features: (1) a prominent band at 2.33 eV (for stoichiometric spinel); (2) overlapping bands attributed to hole centers (3.17 eV); (3) optical centers on antisite defects (3.78 and 4.14 eV); (4) F +- and F-centers (4.75 and 5.3 eV); (5) bands related to defect complexes. For nominally pure samples, the efficiency of optical center formation in stoichiometric spinel is half that in non-stoichiometric spinel. Doped crystals exhibit high efficiencies for defect creation, independent of spinel composition. All dopants enhance the efficiency of defect creation in spinel. Doping with Mn has the least effect on increasing the number of radiation-induced stable defects. Apparently, impurities in spinel serve as centers for stabilization of irradiation-induced interstitials or vacancies.

  10. X- and Q-band EPR studies on fine powders of irradiated plants. New approach for detection of their radiation history by using Q-band EPR spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yordanov, Nicola D.; Aleksieva, Katerina

    2004-01-01

    X- and Q-band EPR studies after γ-irradiation of some dry spices and aromatic herbs are reported. Before irradiation all samples show only one singlet line in X-band EPR, whereas the Q-band EPR spectrum of the same samples is a superposition of two individual spectra—one corresponding to the above EPR signal, with an anisotropic spectrum, and a second one consisting of six lines due to the Mn 2+ naturally present in plants. The radiation induced EPR signal due to cellulose free radicals was not detected after γ-irradiation, but only the increase of the natural signal present before the irradiation. The fading kinetic of this EPR signal was monitored in three cases—when samples were kept in plastic bags without any special conditioning after irradiation, when samples were covered with paraffin before irradiation and when samples were dried at 60°C for 1 h before irradiation. The studies show that stability of radiation induced EPR signals decreases in the order of: paraffin covered > heated before irradiation > kept at room conditions. The two EPR spectra in the Q-band—one with radiation dependent intensity and a second due to Mn 2+, which is radiation independent allow identification of previous radiation treatment based on the fact that Mn 2+ quantity in the sample is constant whereas the quantity of radiation-induced free radicals is temperature dependent. It was found that for irradiated samples the ratio between EPR intensity of the free radicals and that of Mn 2+ before and after heating decreases with 50-60% whereas for non-irradiated samples it is ca. 10-15%.

  11. Thermodynamic analysis of spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, G. E.; Shriner, J. F. Jr.

    2008-04-04

    Although random matrix theory had its initial application to neutron resonances, there is a relative scarcity of suitable nuclear data. The primary reason for this is the sensitivity of the standard measures used to evaluate spectra--the spectra must be essential pure (no state with a different symmetry) and complete (no states missing). Additional measures that are less sensitive to these experimental limitations are of significant value. The standard measure for long range order is the {delta}{sub 3} statistic. In the original paper that introduced this statistic, Dyson and Mehta also attempted to evaluate spectra with thermodynamic variables obtained from the circular orthogonal ensemble. We consider the thermodynamic 'internal energy' and evaluate its sensitivity to experimental limitations such as missing and spurious levels. Monte Carlo simulations suggest that the internal energy is less sensitive to mistakes than is {delta}{sub 3}, and thus the internal energy can serve as a addition to the tool kit for evaluating experimental spectra.

  12. Ferromagnetic resonance spectra of H2-reduced minerals and glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Richard V.; Allen, Carlton C.

    1994-01-01

    In an earlier paper, we reported that H2 reduction of basaltic glass, olivine, pyroxene, and plagioclase resulted in the formation of metallic iron, in the darkening and reddening of the reflectance spectra, and the masking of individual spectral features in the visible and near-IR. In this work, we report FMR spectra for H2-reduced minerals and glasses that include the samples studied in the earlier paper. The FMR spectra were reduced at room temperature at a nominal frequency of 9.5 GHz. Sample saturation magnetization reported as F3(0) was measured with a vibrating sample magnetometer.

  13. Bulk nuclear polarization enhanced at room temperature by optical pumping.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Ran; Bretschneider, Christian O; London, Paz; Budker, Dmitry; Gershoni, David; Frydman, Lucio

    2013-08-01

    Bulk (13)C polarization can be strongly enhanced in diamond at room temperature based on the optical pumping of nitrogen-vacancy color centers. This effect was confirmed by irradiating single crystals at a ~50 mT field promoting anticrossings between electronic excited-state levels, followed by shuttling of the sample into an NMR setup and by subsequent (13)C detection. A nuclear polarization of ~0.5%--equivalent to the (13)C polarization achievable by thermal polarization at room temperature at fields of ~2000 T--was measured, and its bulk nature determined based on line shape and relaxation measurements. Positive and negative enhanced polarizations were obtained, with a generally complex but predictable dependence on the magnetic field during optical pumping. Owing to its simplicity, this (13)C room temperature polarizing strategy provides a promising new addition to existing nuclear hyperpolarization techniques. PMID:23952444

  14. Analysis of primary damage in silicon carbide under fusion and fission neutron spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Daxi; Zang, Hang; Zhang, Peng; Xi, Jianqi; Li, Tao; Ma, Li; He, Chaohui

    2014-12-01

    Irradiation parameters on primary damage states of SiC are evaluated and compared for the first wall of ITER under deuterium-deuterium (DD) and deuterium-tritium (DT) operation, the high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) and high flux isotope reactor (HFIR). With the same neutron fluence, the studied fusion spectra produce more damage and much higher gas production than the fission spectra. Due to comparable gas production and similar weighted primary recoil spectra, HFIR is considered suitable to simulate the neutron irradiation in an HTGR. In contrast to the significant differences between the weighted primary recoil spectra of the fission and the fusion spectra, the weighted secondary recoil spectra of HFIR and HTGR match those of DD and DT, indicating that displacement cascades by the fission and the fusion irradiation are similar when the damage distribution among damaged regions by secondary recoils is taken into account.

  15. Radioluminescence Investigation Of Ion-irradiated Phosphors

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobsohn, Luiz; Muenchausen, Ross; Bennett, Bryan

    2008-01-01

    Phosphors are materials that emit light under the excitation of incoming radiation. This property is used, among other applications, in radiation detection. Efficient energy transfer from the ionization track to the luminescent centers must occur to yield significant light output. Besides, the investigation of the effects of ion irradiation on the luminescence of phosphors is comparatively unexplored. In this work, we review radioluminescence (RL) investigation of ion-irradiated oxides and oxide phosphors, and present preliminary data on the effects of ion irradiation on the luminescence of intrinsic phosphor Bi{sub 4}Ge{sub 3}0{sub 12} (BGO). Commercial crystals were irradiated, and the irradiation effects characterized by means of RL measurements as a function of temperature, from 10K to room temperature (RT), and optical absorption measurements. Overall, surface modification induced by ion irradiation leads to higher luminescence output.

  16. Free radical kinetics on irradiated fennel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaoki, Rumi; Kimura, Shojiro; Ohta, Masatoshi

    2008-09-01

    Herein, an electron spin resonance study on the behavior of organic radicals in fennel before and after irradiation is reported. The spectrum of irradiated fennel composed of the spectrum component derived from the un-irradiated sample (near g=2.005) and the spectra components derived from carbohydrates. The time decay of intensity spectral components was well explained by first-order kinetics with a variety of rate constants. Especially, the signal at near g=2.02 ascribed to stable cellulose-derivative components is expected to be a good indicator in the identification of irradiated plant samples.

  17. 33. ROOM A (WEST ROOM) LOOKING SOUTHWEST. The windows above ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. ROOM A (WEST ROOM) LOOKING SOUTHWEST. The windows above the original Ministers' Gallery were raised in 1888 when inside toilet facilities were added on the other side of the west wall. Note the sloped window sills which provided more light. Also at the rear of the Meeting House a caretaker's apartment was added in 1908. - Twelfth Street Meeting House, 20 South Twelfth Street, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  18. Neutron Spectra in a 15 MV LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    Vega-Carrillo, H. R.; Chu, Wei-Han; Tung, Chuan-Jong; Lan, Jen-Hong

    2010-12-07

    Neutron spectra were calculated inside the treatment hall of a 15 MV LINAC, calculations were carried out using Monte Carlo methods. With a Bonner sphere spectrometer with pairs of thermoluminiscent dosimeters the neutron spectrum at 100 cm from the isocenter was measured and compared with the calculated spectrum. All the spectra in the treatment hall show the presence of evaporation and knock-on neutrons; also the room-return due to the hall features is shown. In the maze the large contribution are due to epithermal and thermal neutrons. A good agreement between the calculated and measured spectrum at 100 cm was noticed, from this comparison the differences are attributed to the water content in the concrete of the hall.

  19. Persistent Conductivity in Post-Growth Doped ZnO Films Following Pulsed UV Laser Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lisa J.; Exarhos, Gregory J.

    2010-12-30

    Solution and rf sputter deposited doped ZnO films were subjected to cumulative 4-nsec pulses of 355 nm light from a pulsed Nd:YAG laser at fluences between 5 and 150 mJ/cm2. Film densification, change in refractive index, and an increase in conductivity were observed following room temperature irradiation in air, a carbon monoxide reducing environment, or under vacuum. At fluences between 20 and 80 mJ/cm2, the films did not damage catastrophically under irradiation and high visible transparency persisted. The increase in conductivity is attributed to creation of oxygen vacancies and subsequent promotion of free carriers into the conduction band. Effects were most pronounced in films treated in vacuum. All treated films became insulating again upon equilibration in air at room temperature after several days. Films were characterized by means of UV-VIS-NIR transmission spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and Hall measurements. Analysis of interference fringes in measured transmission spectra allowed evaluation of optical properties. Raman measurements showed an increase of LO mode intensity with respect to TO mode intensity as the films became more conducting in accord with previous work. Results of this study are not only important for continued development of transparent conducting oxides, but also provide compelling evidence for the role of free carriers as initiators of the laser damage process in these wide bandgap metal oxide films.

  20. 32 CFR 518.9 - Reading room.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Reading room. 518.9 Section 518.9 National... RELATIONS THE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT PROGRAM FOIA Reading Rooms § 518.9 Reading room. (a) Reading room... the records described, DA may elect to place other records in their reading room, and also make...

  1. Nuclear reactor control room construction

    DOEpatents

    Lamuro, Robert C.; Orr, Richard

    1993-01-01

    A control room 10 for a nuclear plant is disclosed. In the control room, objects 12, 20, 22, 26, 30 are no less than four inches from walls 10.2. A ceiling 32 contains cooling fins 35 that extend downwards toward the floor from metal plates 34. A concrete slab 33 is poured over the plates. Studs 36 are welded to the plates and are encased in the concrete.

  2. Nuclear reactor control room construction

    DOEpatents

    Lamuro, R.C.; Orr, R.

    1993-11-16

    A control room for a nuclear plant is disclosed. In the control room, objects labelled 12, 20, 22, 26, 30 in the drawing are no less than four inches from walls labelled 10.2. A ceiling contains cooling fins that extend downwards toward the floor from metal plates. A concrete slab is poured over the plates. Studs are welded to the plates and are encased in the concrete. 6 figures.

  3. Effects of irradiation at low temperature on V-4Cr-4Ti

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, D.J.; Snead, L.L.; Zinkle, S.J.

    1996-10-01

    Irradiation at low temperatures (100 to 275{degrees}C) to 0.5 dpa causes significant embrittlement and changes in the subsequent room temperature tensile properties of V-4Cr-4Ti. The yield strength and microhardness at room temperature increase with increasing irradiation temperature. The tensile flow properties at room temperature show large increases in strength and a complete loss of work hardening capacity with no uniform ductility. Embrittlement, as measured by an increase in the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature, increases with increasing irradiation temperature, at least up to 275{degrees}C. This embrittlement is not due to pickup of O or other interstitial solutes during the irradiation.

  4. The 'Room within a Room' Concept for Monitored Warhead Dismantlement

    SciTech Connect

    Tanner, Jennifer E.; Benz, Jacob M.; White, Helen; McOmish, Sarah; Allen, Keir; Tolk, Keith; Weeks, George E.

    2014-12-01

    Over the past 10 years, US and UK experts have engaged in a technical collaboration with the aim of improving scientific and technological abilities in support of potential future nuclear arms control and non-proliferation agreements. In 2011 a monitored dismantlement exercise provided an opportunity to develop and test potential monitoring technologies and approaches. The exercise followed a simulated nuclear object through a dismantlement process and looked to explore, with a level of realism, issues surrounding device and material monitoring, chain of custody, authentication and certification of equipment, data management and managed access. This paper focuses on the development and deployment of the ‘room-within-a-room’ system, which was designed to maintain chain of custody during disassembly operations. A key challenge for any verification regime operating within a nuclear weapon complex is to provide the monitoring party with the opportunity to gather sufficient evidence, whilst protecting sensitive or proliferative information held by the host. The requirement to address both monitoring and host party concerns led to a dual function design which: • Created a controlled boundary around the disassembly process area which could provide evidence of unauthorised diversion activities. • Shielded sensitive disassembly operations from monitoring party observation. The deployed room-within-a-room was an integrated system which combined a number of chain of custody technologies (i.e. cameras, tamper indicating panels and enclosures, seals, unique identifiers and radiation portals) and supporting deployment procedures. This paper discusses the bounding aims and constraints identified by the monitoring and host parties with respect to the disassembly phase, the design of the room-within-a-room system, lessons learned during deployment, conclusions and potential areas of future work. Overall it was agreed that the room-within-a-room approach was effective but

  5. Virus diffusion in isolation rooms.

    PubMed

    Kao, P H; Yang, R J

    2006-03-01

    In hospitals, the ventilation of isolation rooms operating under closed-door conditions is vital if the spread of viruses and infection is to be contained. Engineering simulation, which employs computational fluid dynamics, provides a convenient means of investigating airflow behaviour in isolation rooms for various ventilation arrangements. A cough model was constructed to permit the numerical simulation of virus diffusion inside an isolation room for different ventilation system configurations. An analysis of the region of droplet fallout and the dilution time of virus diffusion of coughed gas in the isolation room was also performed for each ventilation arrangement. The numerical results presented in this paper indicate that the parallel-directional airflow pattern is the most effective means of controlling flows containing virus droplets. Additionally, staggering the positions of the supply vents at the door end of the room relative to the exhaust vents on the wall behind the bed head provides effective infection control and containment. These results suggest that this particular ventilation arrangement enhances the safety of staff when performing medical treatments within isolation rooms. PMID:16359753

  6. Investigations of Cadmium Manganese Telluride Crystals for Room-Temperature Radiation Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, G.; Bolotnikov, A.; Camarda, G.; Cui, Y.; Hossain, A.; Kim, K.; Carcelen, V.; Gul, R.; James, R.

    2009-10-06

    Cadmium manganese telluride (CMT) has high potential as a material for room-temperature nuclear-radiation detectors. We investigated indium-doped CMT crystals taken from the stable growth region of the ingot, and compared its characteristics with that from the last-to-freeze region. We employed different techniques, including synchrotron white-beam X-ray topography (SWBXT), current-voltage (I-V) measurements, and low-temperature photoluminescence spectra, and we also assessed their responses as detectors to irradiation exposure. The crystal from the stable growth region proved superior to that from the last-to-freeze region; it is a single-grain crystal, free of twins, and displayed a resistivity higher by two orders-of-magnitude. The segregation of indium dopant in the ingot might be responsible for its better resistivity. Furthermore, we recorded a good response in the detector fabricated from the crystal taken from the stable growth region; its ({mu}{tau}){sub e} value was 2.6 x 10{sup -3} cm{sup 2}/V, which is acceptable for thin detectors, including for applications in medicine.

  7. Electron spin resonance study of γ-irradiated Anatolian chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayda, Canan; Engin, B. I. R. O. L.; Polat, Mustafa; Aydin, Talat

    In this study, an electron spin resonance (ESR) investigation on γ-irradiated chickpea cultivated in Turkey is reported in detail. ESR spectra of unirradiated (control) chickpea were composed of an equally spaced sextet originating from the presence of Mn2+ ions and a single weak resonance signal both centered at gD2.0054±0.0006. Although irradiation was found to have no effect on the Mn2+ signals, it caused a noteworthy increase in free radical signal intensity of chickpea in the studied dose range of (0.1-4.5 kGy). In addition, the ESR spectrum of irradiated chickpea recorded at low scan range (10 mT) showed that there were more than one radical species, having different spectral features, contributing to the central resonance signal. From this point of view, we focussed on the free radical signal in the present study. The area under the ESR absorption curve which is related to the free radical concentration was determined from the experimental spectra recorded throughout the study, and its variation with microwave power, radiation dose, storage time and temperature was investigated in detail. Free radical concentration was observed to decay very fast within the first 15 days after the irradiation cessation and little thereafter. At the end of the storage period (60 days), the free radical concentration is still higher than that of the control (unirradiated) sample. The decay of free radical concentration at room and high temperatures were described well by the sum of three second-order decay functions representing three different radical species (A, B and C). The activation energies of these radicals, evaluated by Arrhenius analysis, are in the order EC>EB>EA. Simulation calculations have shown that three radical species (A, B and C) of different spectral parameters were found to best explain the experimental values.

  8. [Food irradiation].

    PubMed

    Migdał, W

    1995-01-01

    A worldwide standard on food irradiation was adopted in 1983 by Codex Alimentarius Commission of the Joint Food Standard Programme of the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations and the World Health Organization (WHO). As a result, 41 countries have approved the use of irradiation for treating one or more food items and the number is increasing. Generally, irradiation is used to: food loses, food spoilage, disinfestation, safety and hygiene. The number of countries which use irradiation for processing food for commercial purposes has been increasing steadily from 19 in 1987 to 33 today. In the frames of the national programme on the application of irradiation for food preservation and hygienization an experimental plant for electron beam processing has been established in Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology. The plant is equipped with a small research accelerator Pilot (19MeV, 1 kW) and an industrial unit Elektronika (10MeV, 10 kW). On the basis of the research there were performed at different scientific institutions in Poland, health authorities have issued permission for irradiation for: spices, garlic, onions, mushrooms, potatoes, dry mushrooms and vegetables. PMID:8619113

  9. Tissue irradiator

    DOEpatents

    Hungate, F.P.; Riemath, W.F.; Bunnell, L.R.

    1975-12-16

    A tissue irradiator is provided for the in-vivo irradiation of body tissue. The irradiator comprises a radiation source material contained and completely encapsulated within vitreous carbon. An embodiment for use as an in- vivo blood irradiator comprises a cylindrical body having an axial bore therethrough. A radioisotope is contained within a first portion of vitreous carbon cylindrically surrounding the axial bore, and a containment portion of vitreous carbon surrounds the radioisotope containing portion, the two portions of vitreous carbon being integrally formed as a single unit. Connecting means are provided at each end of the cylindrical body to permit connections to blood- carrying vessels and to provide for passage of blood through the bore. In a preferred embodiment, the radioisotope is thulium-170 which is present in the irradiator in the form of thulium oxide. A method of producing the preferred blood irradiator is also provided, whereby nonradioactive thulium-169 is dispersed within a polyfurfuryl alcohol resin which is carbonized and fired to form the integral vitreous carbon body and the device is activated by neutron bombardment of the thulium-169 to produce the beta-emitting thulium-170.

  10. Stochastic annealing simulation of copper under neutron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Heinisch, H.L.; Singh, B.N.

    1998-03-01

    This report is a summary of a presentation made at ICFRM-8 on computer simulations of defect accumulation during irradiation of copper to low doses at room temperature. The simulation results are in good agreement with experimental data on defect cluster densities in copper irradiated in RTNS-II.