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Sample records for room temperature magnetic

  1. Electric control of magnetism at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liaoyu; Wang, Dunhui; Cao, Qingqi; Zheng, Yuanxia; Xuan, Haicheng; Gao, Jinlong; Du, Youwei

    2012-01-01

    In the single-phase multiferroics, the coupling between electric polarization (P) and magnetization (M) would enable the magnetoelectric (ME) effect, namely M induced and modulated by E, and conversely P by H. Especially, the manipulation of magnetization by an electric field at room-temperature is of great importance in technological applications, such as new information storage technology, four-state logic device, magnetoelectric sensors, low-power magnetoelectric device and so on. Furthermore, it can reduce power consumption and realize device miniaturization, which is very useful for the practical applications. In an M-type hexaferrite SrCo2Ti2Fe8O19, large magnetization and electric polarization were observed simultaneously at room-temperature. Moreover, large effect of electric field-controlled magnetization was observed even without magnetic bias field. These results illuminate a promising potential to apply in magnetoelectric devices at room temperature and imply plentiful physics behind them. PMID:22355737

  2. Magnetic heat pumping near room temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, G. V.

    1976-01-01

    It is shown that magnetic heat pumping can be made practical at room temperature by using a ferromagnetic material with a Curie point at or near operating temperature and an appropriate regenerative thermodynamic cycle. Measurements are performed which show that gadolinium is a resonable working material and it is found that the application of a 7-T magnetic field to gadolinium at the Curie point (293 K) causes a heat release of 4 kJ/kg under isothermal conditions or a temperature rise of 14 K under adiabatic conditions. A regeneration technique can be used to lift the load of the lattice and electronic heat capacities off the magnetic system in order to span a reasonable temperature difference and to pump as much entropy per cycle as possible

  3. Room-temperature chiral magnetic skyrmions in ultrathin magnetic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulle, Olivier; Vogel, Jan; Yang, Hongxin; Pizzini, Stefania; de Souza Chaves, Dayane; Locatelli, Andrea; Menteş, Tevfik Onur; Sala, Alessandro; Buda-Prejbeanu, Liliana D.; Klein, Olivier; Belmeguenai, Mohamed; Roussigné, Yves; Stashkevich, Andrey; Chérif, Salim Mourad; Aballe, Lucia; Foerster, Michael; Chshiev, Mairbek; Auffret, Stéphane; Miron, Ioan Mihai; Gaudin, Gilles

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic skyrmions are chiral spin structures with a whirling configuration. Their topological properties, nanometre size and the fact that they can be moved by small current densities have opened a new paradigm for the manipulation of magnetization at the nanoscale. Chiral skyrmion structures have so far been experimentally demonstrated only in bulk materials and in epitaxial ultrathin films, and under an external magnetic field or at low temperature. Here, we report on the observation of stable skyrmions in sputtered ultrathin Pt/Co/MgO nanostructures at room temperature and zero external magnetic field. We use high lateral resolution X-ray magnetic circular dichroism microscopy to image their chiral Néel internal structure, which we explain as due to the large strength of the Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction as revealed by spin wave spectroscopy measurements. Our results are substantiated by micromagnetic simulations and numerical models, which allow the identification of the physical mechanisms governing the size and stability of the skyrmions.

  4. Room-temperature chiral magnetic skyrmions in ultrathin magnetic nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Boulle, Olivier; Vogel, Jan; Yang, Hongxin; Pizzini, Stefania; de Souza Chaves, Dayane; Locatelli, Andrea; Menteş, Tevfik Onur; Sala, Alessandro; Buda-Prejbeanu, Liliana D; Klein, Olivier; Belmeguenai, Mohamed; Roussigné, Yves; Stashkevich, Andrey; Chérif, Salim Mourad; Aballe, Lucia; Foerster, Michael; Chshiev, Mairbek; Auffret, Stéphane; Miron, Ioan Mihai; Gaudin, Gilles

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic skyrmions are chiral spin structures with a whirling configuration. Their topological properties, nanometre size and the fact that they can be moved by small current densities have opened a new paradigm for the manipulation of magnetization at the nanoscale. Chiral skyrmion structures have so far been experimentally demonstrated only in bulk materials and in epitaxial ultrathin films, and under an external magnetic field or at low temperature. Here, we report on the observation of stable skyrmions in sputtered ultrathin Pt/Co/MgO nanostructures at room temperature and zero external magnetic field. We use high lateral resolution X-ray magnetic circular dichroism microscopy to image their chiral Néel internal structure, which we explain as due to the large strength of the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction as revealed by spin wave spectroscopy measurements. Our results are substantiated by micromagnetic simulations and numerical models, which allow the identification of the physical mechanisms governing the size and stability of the skyrmions. PMID:26809057

  5. Electron spin coherence near room temperature in magnetic quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Moro, Fabrizio; Turyanska, Lyudmila; Wilman, James; Fielding, Alistair J; Fay, Michael W; Granwehr, Josef; Patanè, Amalia

    2015-01-01

    We report on an example of confined magnetic ions with long spin coherence near room temperature. This was achieved by confining single Mn(2+) spins in colloidal semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) and by dispersing the QDs in a proton-spin free matrix. The controlled suppression of Mn-Mn interactions and minimization of Mn-nuclear spin dipolar interactions result in unprecedentedly long phase memory (TM ~ 8 μs) and spin-lattice relaxation (T1 ~ 10 ms) time constants for Mn(2+) ions at T = 4.5 K, and in electron spin coherence observable near room temperature (TM ~ 1 μs). PMID:26040432

  6. Room Temperature Characterization of a Magnetic Bearing for Turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montague, Gerald; Jansen, Mark; Provenza, Andrew; Jansen, Ralph; Ebihara, Ben; Palazzolo, Alan

    2002-01-01

    Open loop, experimental force and power measurements of a three-axis, radial, heteropolar magnetic bearing at room temperature for rotor speeds up to 20,000 RPM are presented in this paper. The bearing, NASA Glenn Research Center's and Texas A&M's third generation high temperature magnetic bearing, was designed to operate in a 1000 F (540 C) environment and was primarily optimized for maximum load capacity. The experimentally measured force produced by one C-core of this bearing was 630 lb. (2.8 kN) at 16 A, while a load of 650 lbs (2.89 kN) was predicted at 16 A using 1D circuit analysis. The maximum predicted radial load for one of the three axes is 1,440 lbs (6.41 kN) at room temperature. The maximum measured load of an axis was 1050 lbs. (4.73 kN). Results of test under rotating conditions showed that rotor speed has a negligible effect on the bearing's load capacity. A single C-core required approximately 70 W of power to generate 300 lb (1.34 kN) of magnetic force. The room temperature data presented was measured after three thermal cycles up to 1000 F (540 C), totaling six hours at elevated temperatures.

  7. Room Temperature Magnetic Barrier Layers in Magnetic Tunnel Junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson-Cheeseman, B. B.; Wong, F. J.; Chopdekar, R. V.; Arenholz, E.; Suzuki, Y.

    2010-03-09

    We investigate the spin transport and interfacial magnetism of magnetic tunnel junctions with highly spin polarized LSMO and Fe3O4 electrodes and a ferrimagnetic NiFe2O4 (NFO) barrier layer. The spin dependent transport can be understood in terms of magnon-assisted spin dependent tunneling where the magnons are excited in the barrier layer itself. The NFO/Fe3O4 interface displays strong magnetic coupling, while the LSMO/NFO interface exhibits clear decoupling as determined by a combination of X-ray absorption spectroscopy and X-ray magnetic circular dichroism. This decoupling allows for distinct parallel and antiparallel electrode states in this all-magnetic trilayer. The spin transport of these devices, dominated by the NFO barrier layer magnetism, leads to a symmetric bias dependence of the junction magnetoresistance at all temperatures.

  8. Electric-field control of magnetic order above room temperature.

    PubMed

    Cherifi, R O; Ivanovskaya, V; Phillips, L C; Zobelli, A; Infante, I C; Jacquet, E; Garcia, V; Fusil, S; Briddon, P R; Guiblin, N; Mougin, A; Ünal, A A; Kronast, F; Valencia, S; Dkhil, B; Barthélémy, A; Bibes, M

    2014-04-01

    Controlling magnetism by means of electric fields is a key issue for the future development of low-power spintronics. Progress has been made in the electrical control of magnetic anisotropy, domain structure, spin polarization or critical temperatures. However, the ability to turn on and off robust ferromagnetism at room temperature and above has remained elusive. Here we use ferroelectricity in BaTiO3 crystals to tune the sharp metamagnetic transition temperature of epitaxially grown FeRh films and electrically drive a transition between antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic order with only a few volts, just above room temperature. The detailed analysis of the data in the light of first-principles calculations indicate that the phenomenon is mediated by both strain and field effects from the BaTiO3. Our results correspond to a magnetoelectric coupling larger than previous reports by at least one order of magnitude and open new perspectives for the use of ferroelectrics in magnetic storage and spintronics. PMID:24464245

  9. Electric-field control of magnetic order above room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherifi, R. O.; Ivanovskaya, V.; Phillips, L. C.; Zobelli, A.; Infante, I. C.; Jacquet, E.; Garcia, V.; Fusil, S.; Briddon, P. R.; Guiblin, N.; Mougin, A.; Ünal, A. A.; Kronast, F.; Valencia, S.; Dkhil, B.; Barthélémy, A.; Bibes, M.

    2014-04-01

    Controlling magnetism by means of electric fields is a key issue for the future development of low-power spintronics. Progress has been made in the electrical control of magnetic anisotropy, domain structure, spin polarization or critical temperatures. However, the ability to turn on and off robust ferromagnetism at room temperature and above has remained elusive. Here we use ferroelectricity in BaTiO3 crystals to tune the sharp metamagnetic transition temperature of epitaxially grown FeRh films and electrically drive a transition between antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic order with only a few volts, just above room temperature. The detailed analysis of the data in the light of first-principles calculations indicate that the phenomenon is mediated by both strain and field effects from the BaTiO3. Our results correspond to a magnetoelectric coupling larger than previous reports by at least one order of magnitude and open new perspectives for the use of ferroelectrics in magnetic storage and spintronics.

  10. Enhanced magnetic Purcell effect in room-temperature masers

    PubMed Central

    Breeze, Jonathan; Tan, Ke-Jie; Richards, Benjamin; Sathian, Juna; Oxborrow, Mark; Alford, Neil McN

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the world’s first room-temperature maser was demonstrated. The maser consisted of a sapphire ring housing a crystal of pentacene-doped p-terphenyl, pumped by a pulsed rhodamine-dye laser. Stimulated emission of microwaves was aided by the high quality factor and small magnetic mode volume of the maser cavity yet the peak optical pumping power was 1.4 kW. Here we report dramatic miniaturization and 2 orders of magnitude reduction in optical pumping power for a room-temperature maser by coupling a strontium titanate resonator with the spin-polarized population inversion provided by triplet states in an optically excited pentacene-doped p-terphenyl crystal. We observe maser emission in a thimble-sized resonator using a xenon flash lamp as an optical pump source with peak optical power of 70 W. This is a significant step towards the goal of continuous maser operation. PMID:25698634

  11. Enhanced magnetic Purcell effect in room-temperature masers.

    PubMed

    Breeze, Jonathan; Tan, Ke-Jie; Richards, Benjamin; Sathian, Juna; Oxborrow, Mark; Alford, Neil McN

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the world's first room-temperature maser was demonstrated. The maser consisted of a sapphire ring housing a crystal of pentacene-doped p-terphenyl, pumped by a pulsed rhodamine-dye laser. Stimulated emission of microwaves was aided by the high quality factor and small magnetic mode volume of the maser cavity yet the peak optical pumping power was 1.4 kW. Here we report dramatic miniaturization and 2 orders of magnitude reduction in optical pumping power for a room-temperature maser by coupling a strontium titanate resonator with the spin-polarized population inversion provided by triplet states in an optically excited pentacene-doped p-terphenyl crystal. We observe maser emission in a thimble-sized resonator using a xenon flash lamp as an optical pump source with peak optical power of 70 W. This is a significant step towards the goal of continuous maser operation. PMID:25698634

  12. Electron spin coherence near room temperature in magnetic quantum dots

    PubMed Central

    Moro, Fabrizio; Turyanska, Lyudmila; Wilman, James; Fielding, Alistair J.; Fay, Michael W.; Granwehr, Josef; Patanè, Amalia

    2015-01-01

    We report on an example of confined magnetic ions with long spin coherence near room temperature. This was achieved by confining single Mn2+ spins in colloidal semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) and by dispersing the QDs in a proton-spin free matrix. The controlled suppression of Mn–Mn interactions and minimization of Mn–nuclear spin dipolar interactions result in unprecedentedly long phase memory (TM ~ 8 μs) and spin–lattice relaxation (T1 ~ 10 ms) time constants for Mn2+ ions at T = 4.5 K, and in electron spin coherence observable near room temperature (TM ~ 1 μs). PMID:26040432

  13. Manganese perovskites for room temperature magnetic refrigeration applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phan, Manh-Huong; Peng, Hua-Xin; Yu, Seong-Cho; Tho, Nguyen Duc; Nhat, Hoang Nam; Chau, Nguyen

    2007-09-01

    We found the large magnetocaloric effect (MCE) in La 0.6Ca 0.3Pb 0.1MnO 3 (sample No. 1), La 0.7Ca 0.2Pb 0.1MnO 3 (sample No. 2), and La 0.7Ca 0.1Pb 0.2MnO 3 (sample No. 3) perovskites, which were prepared by a conventional ceramic method. For a magnetic field change of 13.5 kOe, the magnetic entropy change (Δ SM) reached values of 2.55, 2.53 and 3.72 J/kg K for samples Nos. 1, 2 and 3, respectively. Interestingly, the large Δ SM was found to occur around 300 K for all samples investigated, which allows magnetic refrigeration at room temperature. These perovskites have the large magnetic entropy changes induced by low magnetic field change, which is beneficial for the household application of active magnetic refrigerant (AMR) materials.

  14. Room temperature active regenerative magnetic refrigeration: Magnetic nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shir, Farhad; Yanik, Levent; Bennett, Lawrence H.; Della Torre, Edward; Shull, Robert D.

    2003-05-01

    Nanocomposites have several advantages as a refrigerant for 100-300 K applications compared to the other common methods of assembling a magnetic refrigeration bed, such as a layered thermal bed, or mixing of different magnetic materials. This article discusses the thermodynamics and heat transfer analysis of an ideal and real active magnetic regenerative refrigeration cycle. An algorithm for the choice of optimum parameters is derived.

  15. Mn,Cd-metallothionein-2: a room temperature magnetic protein.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Ching; Lee, Shang-Fan; Sun, Kein-Wen; Ho, Chien-Chang; Chen, Yu-Ting; Chang, Cheng-Hung; Kan, Lou-Sing

    2006-02-24

    Naturally occurring metallothionein (MT) is a metal binding protein, which binds to seven Zn2+ through 20 conserved cysteines and forms two metal binding clusters with a Zinc-Blende structure. We demonstrate that the MT, when substituting the Zn2+ ions by Mn2+ and Cd2+, exhibits magnetic hysteresis loop observable by SQUID from 10 to 330 K. The magnetic moment may have originated from the bridging effect of the sulfur atoms between the metal ions that leads to the alignment of the electron spins of the Mn2+ ions inside the clusters. The protein backbone may restrain the net spin moment of Mn2+ ions from thermal fluctuation. The modified magnetic-metallothionein is a novel approach to creating molecular magnets with operating temperatures up to 330 K. PMID:16403435

  16. Magnetic switching of ferroelectric domains at room temperature in multiferroic PZTFT

    PubMed Central

    Evans, D.M.; Schilling, A.; Kumar, Ashok; Sanchez, D.; Ortega, N.; Arredondo, M.; Katiyar, R.S.; Gregg, J.M.; Scott, J.F.

    2013-01-01

    Single-phase magnetoelectric multiferroics are ferroelectric materials that display some form of magnetism. In addition, magnetic and ferroelectric order parameters are not independent of one another. Thus, the application of either an electric or magnetic field simultaneously alters both the electrical dipole configuration and the magnetic state of the material. The technological possibilities that could arise from magnetoelectric multiferroics are considerable and a range of functional devices has already been envisioned. Realising these devices, however, requires coupling effects to be significant and to occur at room temperature. Although such characteristics can be created in piezoelectric-magnetostrictive composites, to date they have only been weakly evident in single-phase multiferroics. Here in a newly discovered room temperature multiferroic, we demonstrate significant room temperature coupling by monitoring changes in ferroelectric domain patterns induced by magnetic fields. An order of magnitude estimate of the effective coupling coefficient suggests a value of ~1 × 10−7 sm−1. PMID:23443562

  17. Exchange bias and room-temperature magnetic order in molecular layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, Manuel; Ibrahim, Fatima; Boukari, Samy; Isshiki, Hironari; Joly, Loïc; Peter, Moritz; Studniarek, Michał; da Costa, Victor; Jabbar, Hashim; Davesne, Vincent; Halisdemir, Ufuk; Chen, Jinjie; Arabski, Jacek; Otero, Edwige; Choueikani, Fadi; Chen, Kai; Ohresser, Philippe; Wulfhekel, Wulf; Scheurer, Fabrice; Weber, Wolfgang; Alouani, Mebarek; Beaurepaire, Eric; Bowen, Martin

    2015-10-01

    Molecular semiconductors may exhibit antiferromagnetic correlations well below room temperature. Although inorganic antiferromagnetic layers may exchange bias single-molecule magnets, the reciprocal effect of an antiferromagnetic molecular layer magnetically pinning an inorganic ferromagnetic layer through exchange bias has so far not been observed. We report on the magnetic interplay, extending beyond the interface, between a cobalt ferromagnetic layer and a paramagnetic organic manganese phthalocyanine (MnPc) layer. These ferromagnetic/organic interfaces are called spinterfaces because spin polarization arises on them. The robust magnetism of the Co/MnPc spinterface stabilizes antiferromagnetic ordering at room temperature within subsequent MnPc monolayers away from the interface. The inferred magnetic coupling strength is much larger than that found in similar bulk, thin or ultrathin systems. In addition, at lower temperature, the antiferromagnetic MnPc layer induces an exchange bias on the Co film, which is magnetically pinned. These findings create new routes towards designing organic spintronic devices.

  18. Room-Temperature Magnetism Realized by Doping Fe into Ferroelectric LiTaO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Ying-Jie; Zhang, Qing-Hua; Shen, Xi; Ni, Xiao-Dong; Yao, Yuan; Yu, Ri-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    We synthesize LiTa1-xFexO3-σ (LTFO) ceramics by the conventional solid-state reaction method. The samples remain single phase up to x = 0.09. The magnetic measurements show that the doping of Fe successfully realizes ferromagnetism of LTFO at room temperature. The dielectric measurements indicate that LTFO is ferroelectric, similarly to LiTaO3 (LTO), but its ferroelectric Curie temperature seems to decrease with the increasing Fe content. By means of doping Fe ions into LTO, the coexistence of spontaneous electric polarization and spontaneous magnetic moment is realized at room temperature.

  19. Transition-metal-based magnetic refrigerants for room-temperature applications.

    PubMed

    Tegus, O; Brück, E; Buschow, K H J; de Boer, F R

    2002-01-10

    Magnetic refrigeration techniques based on the magnetocaloric effect (MCE) have recently been demonstrated as a promising alternative to conventional vapour-cycle refrigeration. In a material displaying the MCE, the alignment of randomly oriented magnetic moments by an external magnetic field results in heating. This heat can then be removed from the MCE material to the ambient atmosphere by heat transfer. If the magnetic field is subsequently turned off, the magnetic moments randomize again, which leads to cooling of the material below the ambient temperature. Here we report the discovery of a large magnetic entropy change in MnFeP0.45As0.55, a material that has a Curie temperature of about 300 K and which allows magnetic refrigeration at room temperature. The magnetic entropy changes reach values of 14.5 J K-1 kg-1 and 18 J K-1 kg-1 for field changes of 2 T and 5 T, respectively. The so-called giant-MCE material Gd5Ge2Si2 (ref. 2) displays similar entropy changes, but can only be used below room temperature. The refrigerant capacity of our material is also significantly greater than that of Gd (ref. 3). The large entropy change is attributed to a field-induced first-order phase transition enhancing the effect of the applied magnetic field. PMID:11805828

  20. Study on magnetic mirror array image intensifier to work at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yuanhe; Yu, Yang; Gao, HaiYang; Liu, Shulin; Wang, Xiaolin

    2015-09-10

    In order to improve the detection capability of the current low-light-level (LLL) imaging systems at room temperature, a new device, a magnetic mirror array image intensifier (MMAII), is proposed in this paper. A magnetic mirror array device (MMAD) is coupled into an image intensifier which sits between the photocathode and the microchannel plate (MCP). The trace photoelectrons, one after another, are first sufficiently accumulated by the MMAD over a long time at room temperature, and then they are released and enter the MCP for further gain. These two steps are used to improve the detection capability at the LLL imaging system at room temperature. After the two-dimensional magnetic field distribution of the magnetic mirror array (MMA) is calculated, the MMA is designed and optimized with a rubidium Nd-Fe-B permanent magnet. Three groups of ideal parameters for the Nd-Fe-B permanent magnet MMAD, with a magnetic mirror ratio of 1.69, for all of them have been obtained. According to the research results on the noise of the escape cone of the MMAII, the angle between the incident direction and the axis is greater than 57°, so the trace electrons must be constrained by the magnetic mirror. We made 54 MMAs from Nd-Fe-B permanent magnets and packaged them in a container. Then the system was evacuated to 10-3  Pa at room temperature. It was found by experiment that the trace electrons could be actually constrained by the MMAD. The MMAII can be applied to images for static LLL objects. PMID:26368978

  1. Room temperature ferromagnetism in ZnO using non-magnetic dopants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Nasir; Atri, Asha; Singh, Budhi; Ghosh, Subhasis

    2016-05-01

    We studied the magnetic properties of Ag and Cu doped ZnO thin films deposited by magnetron sputtering. Robust room temperature ferromagnetism is observed in the films. Comparative to Cu doped films Ag doped films shows significant increase in ferromagnetism. Spectroscopic ellipsometry studies are also done to see the change in band structure with different metal doping content.

  2. Optical multichannel room temperature magnetic field imaging system for clinical application

    PubMed Central

    Lembke, G.; Erné, S. N.; Nowak, H.; Menhorn, B.; Pasquarelli, A.

    2014-01-01

    Optically pumped magnetometers (OPM) are a very promising alternative to the superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) used nowadays for Magnetic Field Imaging (MFI), a new method of diagnosis based on the measurement of the magnetic field of the human heart. We present a first measurement combining a multichannel OPM-sensor with an existing MFI-system resulting in a fully functional room temperature MFI-system. PMID:24688820

  3. Optical multichannel room temperature magnetic field imaging system for clinical application.

    PubMed

    Lembke, G; Erné, S N; Nowak, H; Menhorn, B; Pasquarelli, A

    2014-03-01

    Optically pumped magnetometers (OPM) are a very promising alternative to the superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) used nowadays for Magnetic Field Imaging (MFI), a new method of diagnosis based on the measurement of the magnetic field of the human heart. We present a first measurement combining a multichannel OPM-sensor with an existing MFI-system resulting in a fully functional room temperature MFI-system. PMID:24688820

  4. Advances in methods to obtain and characterise room temperature magnetic ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    Lorite, I.; Kumar, P.; Esquinazi, P.; Straube, B.; Villafuerte, M.; Ohldag, H.; Rodríguez Torres, C. E.; Perez de Heluani, S.; Antonov, V. N.; Bekenov, L. V.; Ernst, A.; and others

    2015-02-23

    We report the existence of magnetic order at room temperature in Li-doped ZnO microwires after low energy H{sup +} implantation. The microwires with diameters between 0.3 and 10 μm were prepared by a carbothermal process. We combine spectroscopy techniques to elucidate the influence of the electronic structure and local environment of Zn, O, and Li and their vacancies on the magnetic response. Ferromagnetism at room temperature is obtained only after implanting H{sup +} in Li-doped ZnO. The overall results indicate that low-energy proton implantation is an effective method to produce the necessary amount of stable Zn vacancies near the Li ions to trigger the magnetic order.

  5. Advances in methods to obtain and characterise room temperature magnetic ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorite, I.; Straube, B.; Ohldag, H.; Kumar, P.; Villafuerte, M.; Esquinazi, P.; Rodríguez Torres, C. E.; Perez de Heluani, S.; Antonov, V. N.; Bekenov, L. V.; Ernst, A.; Hoffmann, M.; Nayak, S. K.; Adeagbo, W. A.; Fischer, G.; Hergert, W.

    2015-02-01

    We report the existence of magnetic order at room temperature in Li-doped ZnO microwires after low energy H+ implantation. The microwires with diameters between 0.3 and 10 μm were prepared by a carbothermal process. We combine spectroscopy techniques to elucidate the influence of the electronic structure and local environment of Zn, O, and Li and their vacancies on the magnetic response. Ferromagnetism at room temperature is obtained only after implanting H+ in Li-doped ZnO. The overall results indicate that low-energy proton implantation is an effective method to produce the necessary amount of stable Zn vacancies near the Li ions to trigger the magnetic order.

  6. Room temperature optical and magnetic properties of polyvinylpyrrolidone capped ZnO nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Chakrabarti, Mahuya; Chakrabarti, Keka R.; Sanyal, D.; Chakrabarti, A.

    2009-09-15

    Defect induced room temperature ferromagnetic properties of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) capped nanocrystalline ZnO samples have been studied. Crystal phase and the lattice parameter of the synthesized nanocrystalline samples have been determined from X-ray diffraction spectra (XRD) and high-resolution transmission electron micrographs (HR-TEM). Room temperature photoluminescence (PL) spectrum for the bare ZnO sample shows a strong band at {approx} 379 nm and another band at {approx} 525 nm. The PL spectra also revealed that the number of oxygen vacancies in the uncapped sample is more than the PVP capped sample. Both sample exhibit ferromagnetic property at room temperature when annealed at 500 deg. C for 3 h, due to the formation of adequate oxygen vacancy related defects. The saturation magnetization for the annealed PVP capped sample is found to be larger compared to that for the uncapped sample.

  7. Designing switchable polarization and magnetization at room temperature in an oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, P.; Pitcher, M. J.; Alaria, J.; Niu, H.; Borisov, P.; Stamenov, P.; Claridge, J. B.; Rosseinsky, M. J.

    2015-09-01

    Ferroelectric and ferromagnetic materials exhibit long-range order of atomic-scale electric or magnetic dipoles that can be switched by applying an appropriate electric or magnetic field, respectively. Both switching phenomena form the basis of non-volatile random access memory, but in the ferroelectric case, this involves destructive electrical reading and in the magnetic case, a high writing energy is required. In principle, low-power and high-density information storage that combines fast electrical writing and magnetic reading can be realized with magnetoelectric multiferroic materials. These materials not only simultaneously display ferroelectricity and ferromagnetism, but also enable magnetic moments to be induced by an external electric field, or electric polarization by a magnetic field. However, synthesizing bulk materials with both long-range orders at room temperature in a single crystalline structure is challenging because conventional ferroelectricity requires closed-shell d0 or s2 cations, whereas ferromagnetic order requires open-shell dn configurations with unpaired electrons. These opposing requirements pose considerable difficulties for atomic-scale design strategies such as magnetic ion substitution into ferroelectrics. One material that exhibits both ferroelectric and magnetic order is BiFeO3, but its cycloidal magnetic structure precludes bulk magnetization and linear magnetoelectric coupling. A solid solution of a ferroelectric and a spin-glass perovskite combines switchable polarization with glassy magnetization, although it lacks long-range magnetic order. Crystal engineering of a layered perovskite has recently resulted in room-temperature polar ferromagnets, but the electrical polarization has not been switchable. Here we combine ferroelectricity and ferromagnetism at room temperature in a bulk perovskite oxide, by constructing a percolating network of magnetic ions with strong superexchange interactions within a structural scaffold

  8. Designing switchable polarization and magnetization at room temperature in an oxide.

    PubMed

    Mandal, P; Pitcher, M J; Alaria, J; Niu, H; Borisov, P; Stamenov, P; Claridge, J B; Rosseinsky, M J

    2015-09-17

    Ferroelectric and ferromagnetic materials exhibit long-range order of atomic-scale electric or magnetic dipoles that can be switched by applying an appropriate electric or magnetic field, respectively. Both switching phenomena form the basis of non-volatile random access memory, but in the ferroelectric case, this involves destructive electrical reading and in the magnetic case, a high writing energy is required. In principle, low-power and high-density information storage that combines fast electrical writing and magnetic reading can be realized with magnetoelectric multiferroic materials. These materials not only simultaneously display ferroelectricity and ferromagnetism, but also enable magnetic moments to be induced by an external electric field, or electric polarization by a magnetic field. However, synthesizing bulk materials with both long-range orders at room temperature in a single crystalline structure is challenging because conventional ferroelectricity requires closed-shell d(0) or s(2) cations, whereas ferromagnetic order requires open-shell d(n) configurations with unpaired electrons. These opposing requirements pose considerable difficulties for atomic-scale design strategies such as magnetic ion substitution into ferroelectrics. One material that exhibits both ferroelectric and magnetic order is BiFeO3, but its cycloidal magnetic structure precludes bulk magnetization and linear magnetoelectric coupling. A solid solution of a ferroelectric and a spin-glass perovskite combines switchable polarization with glassy magnetization, although it lacks long-range magnetic order. Crystal engineering of a layered perovskite has recently resulted in room-temperature polar ferromagnets, but the electrical polarization has not been switchable. Here we combine ferroelectricity and ferromagnetism at room temperature in a bulk perovskite oxide, by constructing a percolating network of magnetic ions with strong superexchange interactions within a structural scaffold

  9. Room-temperature magnetism on the zigzag edges of phosphorene nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Guang; Xu, Shenglong; Zhang, Wei; Ma, Tianxing; Wu, Congjun

    2016-08-01

    Searching for room-temperature ferromagnetic semiconductors has evolved into a broad field of material science and spintronics for decades, nevertheless, these novel states remain rare. Phosphorene, a monolayer black phosphorus with a puckered honeycomb lattice structure possessing a finite band gap and high carrier mobility, has been synthesized recently. Here we show, by means of two different large-scale quantum Monte Carlo methods, that relatively weak interactions can lead to remarkable edge magnetism in the phosphorene nanoribbons. The ground state constrained path quantum Monte Carlo simulations reveal strong ferromagnetic correlations along the zigzag edges, and the finite temperature determinant quantum Monte Carlo calculations show a high Curie temperature up to room temperature.

  10. Room-temperature perpendicular magnetic anisotropy of MgO/Fe/MgO ultrathin films

    SciTech Connect

    Kozioł-Rachwał, A.; Ślęzak, T.; Przewoźnik, J.; Skowroński, W.; Stobiecki, T.; Wilgocka-Ślęzak, D.; Qin, Q. H.; Dijken, S. van; Korecki, J.

    2013-12-14

    We used the anomalous Hall effect to study the magnetic properties of MgO/Fe(t)/MgO(001) structures in which the Fe thickness t ranged from 4 Å to 14 Å. For the iron deposited at 140 K, we obtained perpendicular magnetization at room temperature below the critical thickness of t{sub c} = (9 ± 1) Å. In the vicinity of t{sub c}, the easy magnetization axis switched from an out-of-plane orientation to an in-plane orientation, and the observed spin-reorientation transition was considered in terms of the competition among different anisotropies. The perpendicular magnetization direction was attributed to magnetoelastic anisotropy. Finally, the temperature-dependent spin-reorientation transition was analyzed for Fe thicknesses close to t{sub c}.

  11. A new class of chiral materials hosting magnetic skyrmions beyond room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Tokunaga, Y.; Yu, X. Z.; White, J. S.; Rønnow, H. M.; Morikawa, D.; Taguchi, Y.; Tokura, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Skyrmions, topologically protected vortex-like nanometric spin textures in magnets, have been attracting increasing attention for emergent electromagnetic responses and possible technological applications for spintronics. In particular, metallic magnets with chiral and cubic/tetragonal crystal structure may have high potential to host skyrmions that can be driven by low electrical current excitation. However, experimental observations of skyrmions have been limited to below room temperature for the metallic chiral magnets, specifically for the MnSi-type B20 compounds. Towards technological applications, transcending this limitation is crucial. Here we demonstrate the formation of skyrmions with unique spin helicity both at and above room temperature in a family of cubic chiral magnets: β-Mn-type Co-Zn-Mn alloys with a different chiral space group from that of B20 compounds. Lorentz transmission electron microscopy, magnetization and small-angle neutron scattering measurements unambiguously reveal formation of a skyrmion crystal under application of a magnetic field in both thin-plate and bulk forms. PMID:26134284

  12. A new class of chiral materials hosting magnetic skyrmions beyond room temperature.

    PubMed

    Tokunaga, Y; Yu, X Z; White, J S; Rønnow, H M; Morikawa, D; Taguchi, Y; Tokura, Y

    2015-01-01

    Skyrmions, topologically protected vortex-like nanometric spin textures in magnets, have been attracting increasing attention for emergent electromagnetic responses and possible technological applications for spintronics. In particular, metallic magnets with chiral and cubic/tetragonal crystal structure may have high potential to host skyrmions that can be driven by low electrical current excitation. However, experimental observations of skyrmions have been limited to below room temperature for the metallic chiral magnets, specifically for the MnSi-type B20 compounds. Towards technological applications, transcending this limitation is crucial. Here we demonstrate the formation of skyrmions with unique spin helicity both at and above room temperature in a family of cubic chiral magnets: β-Mn-type Co-Zn-Mn alloys with a different chiral space group from that of B20 compounds. Lorentz transmission electron microscopy, magnetization and small-angle neutron scattering measurements unambiguously reveal formation of a skyrmion crystal under application of a magnetic field in both thin-plate and bulk forms. PMID:26134284

  13. Magnetism in transition metal-substituted germanane: A search for room temperature spintronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Minglei; Ren, Qingqiang; Zhao, Yiming; Wang, Sake; Yu, Jin; Tang, Wencheng

    2016-04-01

    Using first-principles calculations, we investigated the geometric structure, binding energy, and magnetic behavior of monolayer germanane substitutional doped with transition metals. Our work demonstrates that germanane with single vacancy forms strong bonds with all studied impurity atoms. Magnetism is observed for Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, and Ni doping. Doping of Ti and Mn atoms results in half-metallic properties, while doping of Cr results in dilute magnetic semiconducting state. We estimate a Curie temperature of about 735 K for Mn-substituted system in the mean-field approximation at impurity concentration 5.56%. Furthermore, when increasing the impurity concentration to 12.5%, Curie temperatures of Ti and Mn-substituted systems are 290 and 1120 K, respectively. Our studies demonstrate the potential of Ti and Mn-substituted germanane for room temperature spintronic devices.

  14. Stability of succinylcholine solutions stored at room temperature studied by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Adnet, Frederic; Le Moyec, Laurence; Smith, Charles E; Galinski, Michel; Jabre, Patricia; Lapostolle, Frederic

    2007-03-01

    The effect of storage temperature on the stability of two succinylcholine chloride solutions (20 and 50 mg/ml) was evaluated. Molecular composition was analysed using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. At room temperature, the degradation rate constant was 1.2%/month for the 20 mg/ml solution and 2.1%/month for the 50 mg/ml solution. The corresponding monthly degradation rates for the two solutions were 0.18% and 0.30% when stored at 4 degrees C, and 5.4% and 8.1% when stored at 37 degrees C. If a 10% loss of potency is considered acceptable, then the 20 and 50 mg/ml succinylcholine solutions can be stored in emergency resuscitation carts at room temperature for 8.3 and 4.8 months, respectively. PMID:17351219

  15. Magnetic and magneto-optical properties of Ni/Pt multilayers with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivas, G.; Shin, Sung-Chul

    1999-06-01

    The magnetic and magneto-optical properties of Ni/Pt multilayers exhibiting square Kerr hysterisis loops at room temperature were studied. Squared polar Kerr hysterisis loops at room temperature in Ni/Pt multilayer thin films were obtained for the samples prepared by sequential DC magnetron sputter deposition of nickel and platinum with tNi=13-21 Å and tPt=3.5-7.5 Å. The coercivity of these multilayers was in the range of 400-1100 Oe. The saturation magnetization was found to show an inverse dependence on the nickel sublayer thickness. About a monolayer of Ni at interface was observed to behave less magnetically than the interior Ni atoms. The polar Kerr rotation exhibited an increasing trend with decreasing wavelength in the spectral range of 7000-4000 Å. The maximum of the polar Kerr rotation was found to shift to a higher wavelength with increasing nickel sublayer thickness.

  16. Metastable gamma-Iron Nickel Nanostructures for Magnetic Refrigeration Near Room Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ucar, Huseyin

    The observation of a giant magnetocaloric effect in Gd5Ge 1.9Si2Fe0.1 has stimulated the magnetocaloric research in the last two decades. However, the high price of Gd and its proclivity to corrosion of these compounds have prevented their commercial use. To reduce raw materials cost, transition metal-based alloys are investigated to replace rare earth-based materials. Environmental considerations, substitution for scarce and strategic elements, and cost considerations all speak to potential contributions of these new materials to sustainability. Efforts in improving the refrigeration capacity (RC) of refrigerants mainly rely on broadening the magnetic entropy change. One promising technique is to couple two phases of magnetic materials with desirable properties. Second is the investigation of nanoparticle synthesis routes, with ball milling being the most widely used one. The motivation for the nanoparticles synthesis is rooted in their inherent tendency to have distributed exchange coupling, which will broaden the magnetic entropy curve. As proven with the cost analysis, the focus is believed to shift from improving the RC of refrigerants toward finding the most economically advantageous magnetic refrigerant with the highest performance. Mechanically alloyed Fe70Ni30 and Fe72Ni 28 alloys were characterized in terms of their structural and magnetic properties. Previous studies showed that single phase FCC gamma-FeNi alloys with 26-30 at. % Ni have Curie temperatures, TC, near room temperature. Having TC near room temperatures along with large magnetization makes gamma-FeNi alloys attractive for room temperature magnetocaloric cooling technologies. To obtain a single gamma-phase, particles were solution annealed in the gamma-phase field and water quenched. The preferential oxidation of Fe during ball milling was used as a means to tune the TC of the alloy. Refrigeration capacities, RCFWHM, of the Fe70Ni30 and the Fe72Ni28 alloys were calculated to be 470 J/kg and

  17. Non-magnetic organic/inorganic spin injector at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, Shinto P.; Mondal, Prakash Chandra; Naaman, Ron; Moshe, Hagay; Mastai, Yitzhak

    2014-12-15

    Spin injection into solid-state devices is commonly performed by use of ferromagnetic metal electrodes. Here, we present a spin injector design without permanent magnet; rather, the spin selectivity is determined by a chiral tunneling barrier. The chiral tunneling barrier is composed of an ultrathin Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer that is deposited on top of a chiral self-assembled monolayer (SAM), which consists of cysteine or oligopeptide molecules. The experimentally observed magnetoresistance can be up to 20% at room temperature, and it displays an uncommon asymmetric curve as a function of the applied magnetic field. These findings show that the spin injector transmits only one spin orientation, independent of external magnetic field. The sign of the magnetoresistance depends on the handedness of the molecules in the SAM, which act as a spin filter, and the magnitude of the magnetoresistance depends only weakly on temperature.

  18. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Magnetic control of large room-temperature polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ashok; Sharma, G. L.; Katiyar, R. S.; Pirc, R.; Blinc, R.; Scott, J. F.

    2009-09-01

    Numerous authors have referred to room-temperature magnetic switching of large electric polarizations as 'the Holy Grail' of magnetoelectricity. We report this long-sought effect, obtained using a new physical process of coupling between magnetic and ferroelectric nanoregions. Solid state solutions of PFW [Pb(Fe2/3W1/3)O3] and PZT [Pb(Zr0.53Ti0.47)O3] exhibit some bi-relaxor qualities, with both ferroelectric relaxor characteristics and magnetic relaxor phenomena. Near 20% PFW the ferroelectric relaxor state is nearly unstable at room temperature against long-range ferroelectricity. Here we report magnetic switching between the normal ferroelectric state and a magnetically quenched ferroelectric state that resembles relaxors. This gives both a new room-temperature, single-phase, multiferroic magnetoelectric, (PbFe0.67W0.33O3)0.2(PbZr0.53Ti0.47O3)0.8 ('0.2PFW/0.8PZT'), with polarization, loss (<1%), and resistivity (typically 108-109 Ω cm) equal to or superior to those of BiFeO3, and also a new and very large magnetoelectric effect: switching not from +Pr to -Pr with applied H, but from Pr to zero with applied H of less than a tesla. This switching of the polarization occurs not because of a conventional magnetically induced phase transition, but because of dynamic effects: increasing H lengthens the relaxation time by 500 × from<200 ns to>100 µs, and it strongly couples the polarization relaxation and spin relaxations. The diverging polarization relaxation time accurately fits a modified Vogel-Fulcher equation in which the freezing temperature Tf is replaced by a critical freezing field Hf that is 0.92 ± 0.07 T. This field dependence and the critical field Hc are derived analytically from the spherical random bond random field model with no adjustable parameters and an E2H2 coupling. This device permits three-state logic (+Pr,0,-Pr) and a condenser with >5000% magnetic field change in its capacitance; for H = 0 the coercive voltage is 1.4 V across 300 nm for

  19. Electric-field manipulation of magnetization rotation and tunneling magnetoresistance of magnetic tunnel junctions at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Aitian; Li, Peisen; Li, Dalai; Zhao, Yonggang; Zhang, Sen; Yang, Lifeng; Liu, Yan; Zhu, Meihong; Zhang, Huiyun; Han, Xiufeng

    2015-03-01

    Recent studies on the electric-field control of tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) have attracted considerable attention for low power consumption. So far two methods have been demonstrated for electric-field control of TMR. One method uses ferroelectric or multiferroic barriers, which is limited by low temperature. The other is nanoscale thin film magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ), but the assistance of a magnetic field is required. Therefore, electric-field control of TMR at room temperature without a magnetic field is highly desired. One promising way is to employ strain-mediated coupling in ferromagnetic/piezoelectric structure. Though MTJs/piezoelectric has been predicted by theory, experiment work is still lacking. We deposited CoFeB/AlOx/CoFeB on Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)0.7Ti0.3O3 (PMN-PT) ferroelectric single crystal. Under external electric fields, PMN-PT will produce a piezostrain due to piezoelectric effect, and the piezostrain transfers to ferromagnetic film to change the magnetic anisotropy. We demonstrate a reversible, continuous magnetization rotation and manipulation of TMR at room temperature by electric fields without the assistance of a magnetic field.

  20. Towards a new class of heavy ion doped magnetic semiconductors for room temperature applications

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Juwon; Subramaniam, Nagarajan Ganapathi; Agnieszka Kowalik, Iwona; Nisar, Jawad; Lee, Jaechul; Kwon, Younghae; Lee, Jaechoon; Kang, Taewon; Peng, Xiangyang; Arvanitis, Dimitri; Ahuja, Rajeev

    2015-01-01

    The article presents, using Bi doped ZnO, an example of a heavy ion doped oxide semiconductor, highlighting a novel p-symmetry interaction of the electronic states to stabilize ferromagnetism. The study includes both ab initio theory and experiments, which yield clear evidence for above room temperature ferromagnetism. ZnBixO1−x thin films are grown using the pulsed laser deposition technique. The room temperature ferromagnetism finds its origin in the holes introduced by the Bi doping and the p-p coupling between Bi and the host atoms. A sizeable magnetic moment is measured by means of x-ray magnetic circular dichroism at the O K-edge, probing directly the spin polarization of the O(2p) states. This result is in agreement with the theoretical predictions and inductive magnetometry measurements. Ab initio calculations of the electronic and magnetic structure of ZnBixO1−x at various doping levels allow to trace the origin of the ferromagnetic character of this material. It appears, that the spin-orbit energy of the heavy ion Bi stabilizes the ferromagnetic phase. Thus, ZnBixO1−x doped with a heavy non-ferromagnetic element, such as Bi, is a credible example of a candidate material for a new class of compounds for spintronics applications, based on the spin polarization of the p states. PMID:26592564

  1. Electric field control of room temperature ferromagnetism in III-N dilute magnetic semiconductor films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nepal, N.; Luen, M. Oliver; Zavada, J. M.; Bedair, S. M.; Frajtag, P.; El-Masry, N. A.

    2009-03-01

    We report on the electrical field control of ferromagnetism (FM) at room temperature in III-N dilute magnetic semiconductor (DMS) films. A GaMnN layer was grown on top of an n-GaN substrate and found to be almost always paramagnetic. However, when grown on a p-type GaN layer, a strong saturation magnetization (Ms) was observed. This FM in GaMnN can be controlled by depletion of the holes in the GaMnN/p-GaN/n-GaN multilayer structures. We have demonstrated the dependence of the FM on the thickness of the p-GaN in this heterostructure and on the applied bias to the GaN p-n junction. The Ms was measured by an alternating gradient magnetometer (AGM) and a strong correlation between the hole concentration near the GaMnN/p-GaN interface and the magnetic properties of the DMS was observed. At room temperature an anomalous Hall effect was measured for zero bias and an ordinary Hall effect for reverse bias in a fully depleted p-GaN layer. This is in close agreement with the AGM measurement results.

  2. Local electrical control of magnetic order and orientation by ferroelastic domain arrangements just above room temperature.

    PubMed

    Phillips, L C; Cherifi, R O; Ivanovskaya, V; Zobelli, A; Infante, I C; Jacquet, E; Guiblin, N; Ünal, A A; Kronast, F; Dkhil, B; Barthélémy, A; Bibes, M; Valencia, S

    2015-01-01

    Ferroic materials (ferromagnetic, ferroelectric, ferroelastic) usually divide into domains with different orientations of their order parameter. Coupling between different ferroic systems creates new functionalities, for instance the electrical control of macroscopic magnetic properties including magnetization and coercive field. Here we show that ferroelastic domains can be used to control both magnetic order and magnetization direction at the nanoscale with a voltage. We use element-specific X-ray imaging to map the magnetic domains as a function of temperature and voltage in epitaxial FeRh on ferroelastic BaTiO3. Exploiting the nanoscale phase-separation of FeRh, we locally interconvert between ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic states with a small electric field just above room temperature. Imaging and ab initio calculations show the antiferromagnetic phase of FeRh is favoured by compressive strain on c-oriented BaTiO3 domains, and the resultant magnetoelectric coupling is larger and more reversible than previously reported from macroscopic measurements. Our results emphasize the importance of nanoscale ferroic domain structure and the promise of first-order transition materials to achieve enhanced coupling in artificial multiferroics. PMID:25969926

  3. Local electrical control of magnetic order and orientation by ferroelastic domain arrangements just above room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, L. C.; Cherifi, R. O.; Ivanovskaya, V.; Zobelli, A.; Infante, I. C.; Jacquet, E.; Guiblin, N.; Ünal, A. A.; Kronast, F.; Dkhil, B.; Barthélémy, A.; Bibes, M.; Valencia, S.

    2015-01-01

    Ferroic materials (ferromagnetic, ferroelectric, ferroelastic) usually divide into domains with different orientations of their order parameter. Coupling between different ferroic systems creates new functionalities, for instance the electrical control of macroscopic magnetic properties including magnetization and coercive field. Here we show that ferroelastic domains can be used to control both magnetic order and magnetization direction at the nanoscale with a voltage. We use element-specific X-ray imaging to map the magnetic domains as a function of temperature and voltage in epitaxial FeRh on ferroelastic BaTiO3. Exploiting the nanoscale phase-separation of FeRh, we locally interconvert between ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic states with a small electric field just above room temperature. Imaging and ab initio calculations show the antiferromagnetic phase of FeRh is favoured by compressive strain on c-oriented BaTiO3 domains, and the resultant magnetoelectric coupling is larger and more reversible than previously reported from macroscopic measurements. Our results emphasize the importance of nanoscale ferroic domain structure and the promise of first-order transition materials to achieve enhanced coupling in artificial multiferroics. PMID:25969926

  4. Local electrical control of magnetic order and orientation by ferroelastic domain arrangements just above room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, L. C.; Cherifi, R. O.; Ivanovskaya, V.; Zobelli, A.; Infante, I. C.; Jacquet, E.; Guiblin, N.; Ünal, A. A.; Kronast, F.; Dkhil, B.; Barthélémy, A.; Bibes, M.; Valencia, S.

    2015-05-01

    Ferroic materials (ferromagnetic, ferroelectric, ferroelastic) usually divide into domains with different orientations of their order parameter. Coupling between different ferroic systems creates new functionalities, for instance the electrical control of macroscopic magnetic properties including magnetization and coercive field. Here we show that ferroelastic domains can be used to control both magnetic order and magnetization direction at the nanoscale with a voltage. We use element-specific X-ray imaging to map the magnetic domains as a function of temperature and voltage in epitaxial FeRh on ferroelastic BaTiO3. Exploiting the nanoscale phase-separation of FeRh, we locally interconvert between ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic states with a small electric field just above room temperature. Imaging and ab initio calculations show the antiferromagnetic phase of FeRh is favoured by compressive strain on c-oriented BaTiO3 domains, and the resultant magnetoelectric coupling is larger and more reversible than previously reported from macroscopic measurements. Our results emphasize the importance of nanoscale ferroic domain structure and the promise of first-order transition materials to achieve enhanced coupling in artificial multiferroics.

  5. Magnetic refrigeration: an eco-friendly technology for the refrigeration at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aprea, C.; Greco, A.; Maiorino, A.; Masselli, C.

    2015-11-01

    Magnetic refrigeration is an emerging, environment-friendly technology based on a magnetic solid that acts as a refrigerant by magneto-caloric effect (MCE). In the case of ferromagnetic materials MCE is a warming as the magnetic moments of the atom are aligned by the application of a magnetic field, and the corresponding cooling upon removal of the magnetic field. There are two types of magnetic phase changes that may occur at the Curie point: first order magnetic transition (FOMT) and second order magnetic transition (SOMT). The reference cycle for magnetic refrigeration is AMR (Active Magnetic Regenerative cycle) where the magnetic material matrix works both as a refrigerating medium and as a heat regenerating medium, while the fluid flowing in the porous matrix works as a heat transfer medium. Regeneration can be accomplished by blowing a heat transfer fluid in a reciprocating fashion through the regenerator made of magnetocaloric material that is alternately magnetized and demagnetized. In this paper, attention is directed towards the near room-temperature range. We compare the energetic performance of a commercial R134a refrigeration plant to that of a magnetic refrigerator working with an AMR cycle. Attention is devoted to the evaluation of the environmental impact in terms of a greenhouse effect. The comparison is performed in term of TEWI index (Total Equivalent Warming Impact) that takes into account both direct and indirect contributions to global warming. In this paper the AMR cycle works with different magnetic refrigerants: pure gadolinium, second order phase magnetic transition (Pr0.45Sr0.35MnO3) and first order phase magnetic transition alloys (Gd5Si2Ge2, LaFe11.384Mn0.356Si1.26H1.52, LaFe1105Co0.94Si110 and MnFeP0.45As0.55). The comparison, carried out by means of a mathematical model, clearly shows that GdSi2Ge2 and LaFe11.384Mn0.356Si1.26H1.52 has a TEWI index always lower than that of a vapor compression plant. Furthermore, the TEWI of the AMR

  6. Design of dilute magnetic semiconductors with room temperature ferromagnetism by controlling spinodal decompostion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Kazunori

    2008-03-01

    Owing to the recent development of the first-principles method for calculating magnetic properties of dilute magnetic semiconductors (DMS), it has been recognized that the magnetic percolation effect is disastrous to the high temperature ferromagnetism in DMS in particular for low concentrations [1]. The exchange interactions calculated from first-principles are strong for nearest neighbors, but those interactions are short ranged and can not play an important role for realizing high- TC because the solubility of magnetic impurities into DMS is too low to achieve magnetic percolation. To overcome this difficulty and realize room temperature ferromagnetism, we focus on the spinodal decomposition in DMS, and suggest that by controlling the spinodal decomposition high blocking temperature can be realized leading to ferromagnetic behaviour at high temperature [2]. We calculate electronic structure of DMS from first-principles by using the Korringa- Kohn-Rostoker coherent potential approximation (KKR-CPA) method. Then, chemical pair interactions and magnetic exchange interactions between magnetic are calculated. We use the Monte Carlo techniques to simulate spinodal decomposition of DMS and to estimate the magnetic properties of them [3]. The computer simulations for the magnetization process of the decomposition phases indicate that we can control super-paramagnetic blocking temperature by optimizing the size of the clusters by changing the crystal growth condition. This simulation suggests the material design of high blocking temperature DMS by controlling the spinodal decomposition [2].As another approach for realizing high-Tc DMS we propose co-doping method to increase solubility limit of transition metal impurities in DMS [4]. This work is based on the collaboration with H. Katayama-Yoshida and T. Fukushima. [1] L. Bergqvist et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 137202 (2004), K. Sato et al., Phys. Rev. B 70, 201202 (2004) [2] K. Sato et al., Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 46, L682

  7. Lateral spin transfer torque induced magnetic switching at room temperature demonstrated by x-ray microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buhl, M.; Erbe, A.; Grebing, J.; Wintz, S.; Raabe, J.; Fassbender, J.

    2013-10-01

    Changing and detecting the orientation of nanomagnetic structures, which can be used for durable information storage, needs to be developed towards true nanoscale dimensions for keeping up the miniaturization speed of modern nanoelectronic components. Therefore, new concepts for controlling the state of nanomagnets are currently in the focus of research in the field of nanoelectronics. Here, we demonstrate reproducible switching of a purely metallic nanopillar placed on a lead that conducts a spin-polarized current at room temperature. Spin diffusion across the metal-metal (Cu to CoFe) interface between the pillar and the lead causes spin accumulation in the pillar, which may then be used to set the magnetic orientation of the pillar. In our experiments, the detection of the magnetic state of the nanopillar is performed by direct imaging via scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM).

  8. Characterization of ZnO:Co particles prepared by hydrothermal method for room temperature magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yingzi; Huo, Dexuan; He, Haiping; Li, Yuan; Li, Lingwei; Wang, Huawen; Qian, Zhenghong

    2012-03-01

    ZnO based diluted magnetic semiconductor particles (ZnO:Co) have been grown using a hydrothermal method with good crystallinity. The atomic percentage of Co presented in the specimen is about 0.01. Based on the x-ray diffraction and high-resolution transition electron, Co is found to be incorporated into ZnO lattice without evidence of obvious Co precipitates. However, from photoluminescence (PL) spectra in the range of 1.94 -3.45 eV, a strong broad emission centered around 600 nm (2.07 eV) in the visible range as well as a relatively weak peak at 2.81 eV are observed, indicating the presence of Co impurities. Moreover, intrinsic emissions such as DOX suggest that at least some Co have been doped into ZnO lattice, substituting for Zn2+ ions. The PL results further confirm the substitution of Zn2+ ions by Co, which leads to the changes of the electronic band structures. Magnetism could be realized at room temperature for the ZnO:Co nanoparticles under our experimental conditions although with low coercivity. The field-cooled and zero-field-cooled curves can be explained as a result of competition between the ferromagnetic and the antiferromagnetic ordering in the ZnO:Co nanoparticles. Combining the results from PL and magnetism characterization, it is reasonable to think that both doped Co in the ZnO lattice and Co impurities contribute to magnetism in ZnO:Co nanoparticles at room temperature.

  9. Selected room temperature magnetic parameters as a function of mineralogy, concentration and grain size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, C.; Dekkers, M. J.

    A data set of room temperature magnetic parameters for several iron oxides and sulphides was compiled from the available literature. The aim was to propose the most effective methods for assessing mineralogy, concentration and domain state within environmental magnetic studies. Establishing the magnetic mineralogy is essential for a correct interpretation of concentration and grain-size indicative parameters. Hematite and in particular goethite are recognised by their high (remanent) coercivities. The ratio of saturation remanent magnetisation to susceptibility is suited for assessing mineralogy; for low coercivity minerals, high values of the ratio are indicative of pyrrhotite. Greigite and maghemite both have intermediate ratios, while very low values suggest the presence of (titano)magnetite. From the concentration-dependent parameters mass specific susceptibility, saturation remanent magnetisation and susceptibility of anhysteretic remanent magnetisation, susceptibility displayed the least grain-size dependence. Therefore, it is perhaps the best indicator of concentration, under the proviso of uniform mineralogy and when paramagnetic and diamagnetic contributions are taken into consideration. All minerals showed a decrease in coercivity and remanence ratios with increasing grain size for sizes larger than one micrometer. In contrast, the coercivity of goethite showed an increase with grain size. Assessment of domain state was complicated by very small and large grains displaying similar magnetic properties.

  10. Electric control of magnon frequencies and magnetic moment of bismuth ferrite thin films at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ashok; Scott, J. F.; Katiyar, R. S.

    2011-01-01

    Here, we report the tuning of room-temperature magnon frequencies from 473 GHz to 402 GHz (14%) and magnetic moment from 4 to 18 emu∕cm3 at 100 Oe under the application of external electric fields (E) across interdigital electrodes in BiFeO3 (BFO) thin films. A decrease in magnon frequencies and increase in phonon frequencies were observed with Magnon and phonon Raman intensities are asymmetric with polarity, decreasing with positive E (+E) and increasing with negative E (−E) where polarity is with respect to in-plane polarization P. The magnetoelectric coupling (α) is proved to be linear and a rather isotropic α = 8.5 × 10−12 sm−1. PMID:21901050

  11. Induction heating studies of magnetite nanospheres synthesized at room temperature for magnetic hyperthermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashad, M. M.; El-Sayed, H. M.; Rasly, M.; Nasr, M. I.

    2012-11-01

    An investigation of the synthesis of Fe3O4 nanopowders by the co-precipitation method is reported from aqueous and ethanol mediums. X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and vibrating sample magnetometer are utilized to study the effect of variation of synthesis conditions on the crystal structure, crystallite size, microstructure and magnetic properties of the formed powders. The XRD analysis showed that the crystalline Fe3O4 phase was formed at Fe3+/Fe2+ molar ratio 2.0 prepared at room temperature for 1 h at pH 10. The crystallite size was in the range between 8 and 11 nm. TEM micrographs showed that the particles appeared as nanospheres. Superparamagnetic nanoparticles with low coercivity and remanence magnetization were achieved. Heating properties of the nanosphere samples in an alternating magnetic field at 160 KHz were evaluated. An excellent heating efficiency for the sample prepared in ethanol medium is a result of more relaxation losses occurring due to its small particle size.

  12. Room-temperature magnetic properties of SiC based nanowires synthesized via microwave heating method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Song; Wang, Jigang

    2016-07-01

    Two kinds of ferromagnetic SiC based nanowires with and without Ni catalyst were successfully synthesized by employing microwave heating method. The comprehensive characterizations and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) have been applied to investigate the micro-structures and magnetic properties of as-grown nanowires. For the nanowires synthesized without using Ni catalyst, the diameters and lengths are in the range of 20-60 nm and dozens of micrometers, respectively. Particularly, the results of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) show that the nanowires consist of SiC core and SiOx shell. The SiC/SiOx coaxial nanowires exhibit room-temperature ferromagnetism with saturation magnetization (Ms) of 0.2 emu/g. As to the nanowires obtained using Ni catalyst, the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) results indicate that the Ni catalyzed nanowires have a nano-particle attached on the tip and a uniform diameter of approximately 50 nm. The vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth mechanism can be used to explain the formation of the Ni catalyzed nanowires. The detection result of VSM indicates that the Ni catalyzed nanowires possess the paramagnetism and the ferromagnetism, simultaneously. The enhancement of the ferromagnetism, compared with the SiC/SiOx coaxial nanowires, could be attributed to the Ni2Si and NiSi phases.

  13. Room temperature magnetization in Co-doped anatase phase of TiO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimipour, Masoud; Mageto, Maxwel Joel; Etefagh, Reyhaneh; Azhir, Elahe; Mwamburi, Mghendi; Topalian, Zareh

    2013-01-01

    CoxTi1-xO2 films were deposited by spray pyrolysis technique on Si(1 0 0) substrates at 475 °C. A hydro-alcoholic solution containing titanium (iv) isopropoxide and Co(NO3)2 with various Co doping levels from x = 0-0.015 in solution was used as spray solution. Grazing incident angle of X-ray diffraction illustrates that the CoxTi1-xO2 films are single phase and polycrystal with mixed orientations. Study of surface morphology of the films by atomic force microscope reveals that the annealing atmosphere does not significantly affect the grain size and the microstructure of the films. This study provides further insight into the importance of annealing atmosphere on magnetization of the films. Room temperature magneto-optical Kerr measurement was employed in polar mode. A hysteresis loop and a paramagnetic behavior have been recorded for samples annealed in H2 ambient gas and air, respectively. Chemical composition analysis by X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy showed that Co atoms are bounded to oxygen and no metallic clusters are present. Moreover, it indicates the formation of high spin Co2+ for the sample x = 0.008 annealed in H2 ambient gas. The origin of magnetization can be attributed to the contribution of oxygen vacancies in the spin polarization of the structure.

  14. Observation of room-temperature magnetic skyrmions and their current-driven dynamics in ultrathin metallic ferromagnets.

    PubMed

    Woo, Seonghoon; Litzius, Kai; Krüger, Benjamin; Im, Mi-Young; Caretta, Lucas; Richter, Kornel; Mann, Maxwell; Krone, Andrea; Reeve, Robert M; Weigand, Markus; Agrawal, Parnika; Lemesh, Ivan; Mawass, Mohamad-Assaad; Fischer, Peter; Kläui, Mathias; Beach, Geoffrey S D

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic skyrmions are topologically protected spin textures that exhibit fascinating physical behaviours and large potential in highly energy-efficient spintronic device applications. The main obstacles so far are that skyrmions have been observed in only a few exotic materials and at low temperatures, and fast current-driven motion of individual skyrmions has not yet been achieved. Here, we report the observation of stable magnetic skyrmions at room temperature in ultrathin transition metal ferromagnets with magnetic transmission soft X-ray microscopy. We demonstrate the ability to generate stable skyrmion lattices and drive trains of individual skyrmions by short current pulses along a magnetic racetrack at speeds exceeding 100 m s(-1) as required for applications. Our findings provide experimental evidence of recent predictions and open the door to room-temperature skyrmion spintronics in robust thin-film heterostructures. PMID:26928640

  15. Observation of room-temperature magnetic skyrmions and their current-driven dynamics in ultrathin metallic ferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Seonghoon; Litzius, Kai; Krüger, Benjamin; Im, Mi-Young; Caretta, Lucas; Richter, Kornel; Mann, Maxwell; Krone, Andrea; Reeve, Robert M.; Weigand, Markus; Agrawal, Parnika; Lemesh, Ivan; Mawass, Mohamad-Assaad; Fischer, Peter; Kläui, Mathias; Beach, Geoffrey S. D.

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic skyrmions are topologically protected spin textures that exhibit fascinating physical behaviours and large potential in highly energy-efficient spintronic device applications. The main obstacles so far are that skyrmions have been observed in only a few exotic materials and at low temperatures, and fast current-driven motion of individual skyrmions has not yet been achieved. Here, we report the observation of stable magnetic skyrmions at room temperature in ultrathin transition metal ferromagnets with magnetic transmission soft X-ray microscopy. We demonstrate the ability to generate stable skyrmion lattices and drive trains of individual skyrmions by short current pulses along a magnetic racetrack at speeds exceeding 100 m s-1 as required for applications. Our findings provide experimental evidence of recent predictions and open the door to room-temperature skyrmion spintronics in robust thin-film heterostructures.

  16. Atomic magnetic gradiometer for room temperature high sensitivity magnetic field detection

    DOEpatents

    Xu,Shoujun; Lowery, Thomas L.; Budker, Dmitry; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Wemmer, David E.; Pines, Alexander

    2009-08-11

    A laser-based atomic magnetometer (LBAM) apparatus measures magnetic fields, comprising: a plurality of polarization detector cells to detect magnetic fields; a laser source optically coupled to the polarization detector cells; and a signal detector that measures the laser source after being coupled to the polarization detector cells, which may be alkali cells. A single polarization cell may be used for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) by prepolarizing the nuclear spins of an analyte, encoding spectroscopic and/or spatial information, and detecting NMR signals from the analyte with a laser-based atomic magnetometer to form NMR spectra and/or magnetic resonance images (MRI). There is no need of a magnetic field or cryogenics in the detection step, as it is detected through the LBAM.

  17. Extraordinary Magnetoresistance At Room Temperature In Non-Magnetic Narrow-Gap Semiconductor/Metal Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solin, S. A.

    2001-03-01

    The magnetoresistance (MR) of a material object contains a physical contribution from the magnetic field dependence of the material parameters such as the mobility or carrier concentration and a geometric contribution from the dependence of the current path and output voltage on the sample shape and electrode configuration. To date, only two classes of magnetic materials, artificially layered metals which exhibit giant MR (GMR) and the manganite perovskites which exhibit colossal MR (CMR) have been considered serious candidates in the effort to improve the room temperature (RT) performance of MR sensors. For both of these classes, the physical MR dominates. In contrast, we have found that non-magnetic narrow-gap semiconductors containing patterned metallic inhomogeneities (shunts), exhibit RT geometric extraordinary MR (EMR) orders of magnitude larger than the physical MR of other materials. EMR in excess of 2000% at 0.05 Tesla and 3,000,000% at 5 T, respectively, has been observed in macroscopic ( ~ 1 mm) composite structures of InSb with patterned internal or external shunts.(S.A. Solin et al., Science 289), 1530 (2000).^,(T. Zhou, D.R. Hines and S.A. Solin, Appl. Phys. Lett., submitted.) We have been able to quantitatively account for the magnitude of the observed EMR as well as its dependence on the geometry (shape, size and placement of the shunt) using both analytic (Laplace equation with boundary conditions) and computational (Finite Element Analysis)(see the talk by L.R. Ram-Mohan et al., this conference) methods. The effect of scaling EMR structures to mesoscopic dimensions and the possible technological impact of EMR will be discussed.

  18. High-efficiency resonant amplification of weak magnetic fields for single spin magnetometry at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trifunovic, Luka; Pedrocchi, Fabio L.; Hoffman, Silas; Maletinsky, Patrick; Yacoby, Amir; Loss, Daniel

    2015-06-01

    Magnetic resonance techniques not only provide powerful imaging tools that have revolutionized medicine, but they have a wide spectrum of applications in other fields of science such as biology, chemistry, neuroscience and physics. However, current state-of-the-art magnetometers are unable to detect a single nuclear spin unless the tip-to-sample separation is made sufficiently small. Here, we demonstrate theoretically that by placing a ferromagnetic particle between a nitrogen-vacancy magnetometer and a target spin, the magnetometer sensitivity is improved dramatically. Using materials and techniques that are already experimentally available, our proposed set-up is sensitive enough to detect a single nuclear spin within ten milliseconds of data acquisition at room temperature. The sensitivity is practically unchanged when the ferromagnet surface to the target spin separation is smaller than the ferromagnet lateral dimensions; typically about a tenth of a micrometre. This scheme further benefits when used for nitrogen-vacancy ensemble measurements, enhancing sensitivity by an additional three orders of magnitude.

  19. High-efficiency resonant amplification of weak magnetic fields for single spin magnetometry at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Trifunovic, Luka; Pedrocchi, Fabio L; Hoffman, Silas; Maletinsky, Patrick; Yacoby, Amir; Loss, Daniel

    2015-06-01

    Magnetic resonance techniques not only provide powerful imaging tools that have revolutionized medicine, but they have a wide spectrum of applications in other fields of science such as biology, chemistry, neuroscience and physics. However, current state-of-the-art magnetometers are unable to detect a single nuclear spin unless the tip-to-sample separation is made sufficiently small. Here, we demonstrate theoretically that by placing a ferromagnetic particle between a nitrogen-vacancy magnetometer and a target spin, the magnetometer sensitivity is improved dramatically. Using materials and techniques that are already experimentally available, our proposed set-up is sensitive enough to detect a single nuclear spin within ten milliseconds of data acquisition at room temperature. The sensitivity is practically unchanged when the ferromagnet surface to the target spin separation is smaller than the ferromagnet lateral dimensions; typically about a tenth of a micrometre. This scheme further benefits when used for nitrogen-vacancy ensemble measurements, enhancing sensitivity by an additional three orders of magnitude. PMID:25961508

  20. Near fifty percent sodium substituted lanthanum manganites—A potential magnetic refrigerant for room temperature applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sethulakshmi, N.; Anantharaman, M. R.; Al-Omari, I. A.; Suresh, K. G.

    2014-03-03

    Nearly half of lanthanum sites in lanthanum manganites were substituted with monovalent ion-sodium and the compound possessed distorted orthorhombic structure. Ferromagnetic ordering at 300 K and the magnetic isotherms at different temperature ranges were analyzed for estimating magnetic entropy variation. Magnetic entropy change of 1.5 J·kg{sup −1}·K{sup −1} was observed near 300 K. An appreciable magnetocaloric effect was also observed for a wide range of temperatures near 300 K for small magnetic field variation. Heat capacity was measured for temperatures lower than 300 K and the adiabatic temperature change increases with increase in temperature with a maximum of 0.62 K at 280 K.

  1. Giant magnetoresistance and superparamagnetism in DyxFe100-x nanogranular magnetic thin films at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mekala, Laxman; Muhammed Shameem P., V.; Singh, Dushyanth; Kumar, M. Senthil

    2016-05-01

    In this article, DyxFe100-x nanogranular (15 ≤ x ≤ 25) thin films have been prepared at ambient temperature by dc magnetron sputtering. The correlation between the microstructure, magneto transport and magnetization properties is discussed. The grain size of Dy (Dysprosium) and Fe (Iron) was measured to be about 2 to 3nm, respectively and the distribution of grains was homogenous throughout the sample. The magnetoresistance is sensitive to microstructural changes (particle size as well as Dy concentration). At the room temperature, the magnetoresistance [MR %] increased from 0.2 to 2.2 with increase in atomic concentration of Dy from x = 15 to 25 and we obtained maximum 2.2 MR [%] for x = 25 in this series of samples. The magnetization studies have revealed that all the samples are superparamagnetic (SPM) at room temperature.

  2. Room temperature dielectric and magnetic properties of Gd and Ti co-doped BiFeO{sub 3} ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Basith, M. A. E-mail: arima@yz.yamagata-u.ac.jp; Kurni, O.; Alam, M. S.; Sinha, B. L.; Ahmmad, Bashir E-mail: arima@yz.yamagata-u.ac.jp

    2014-01-14

    Room temperature dielectric and magnetic properties of BiFeO{sub 3} samples, co-doped with magnetic Gd and non-magnetic Ti in place of Bi and Fe, respectively, were reported. The nominal compositions of Bi{sub 0.9}Gd{sub 0.1}Fe{sub 1–x}Ti{sub x}O{sub 3} (x = 0.00-0.25) ceramics were synthesized by conventional solid state reaction technique. X-ray diffraction patterns revealed that the substitution of Fe by Ti induces a phase transition from rhombohedral to orthorhombic at x > 0.20. Morphological studies demonstrated that the average grain size was reduced from ∼1.5 μm to ∼200 nm with the increase in Ti content. Due to Ti substitution, the dielectric constant was stable over a wide range of high frequencies (30 kHz to 20 MHz) by suppressing the dispersion at low frequencies. The dielectric properties of the compounds are associated with their improved morphologies and reduced leakage current densities probably due to the lower concentration of oxygen vacancies in the compositions. Magnetic properties of Bi{sub 0.9}Gd{sub 0.1}Fe{sub 1–x}Ti{sub x}O{sub 3} (x = 0.00-0.25) ceramics measured at room temperature were enhanced with Ti substitution up to 20% compared to that of pure BiFeO{sub 3} and Ti undoped Bi{sub 0.9}Gd{sub 0.1}FeO{sub 3} samples. The enhanced magnetic properties might be attributed to the substitution induced suppression of spiral spin structure of BiFeO{sub 3}. An asymmetric shifts both in the field and magnetization axes of magnetization versus magnetic field curves was observed. This indicates the presence of exchange bias effect in these compounds notably at room temperature.

  3. Room temperature dielectric and magnetic properties of Gd and Ti co-doped BiFeO3 ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basith, M. A.; Kurni, O.; Alam, M. S.; Sinha, B. L.; Ahmmad, Bashir

    2014-01-01

    Room temperature dielectric and magnetic properties of BiFeO3 samples, co-doped with magnetic Gd and non-magnetic Ti in place of Bi and Fe, respectively, were reported. The nominal compositions of Bi0.9Gd0.1Fe1-xTixO3 (x = 0.00-0.25) ceramics were synthesized by conventional solid state reaction technique. X-ray diffraction patterns revealed that the substitution of Fe by Ti induces a phase transition from rhombohedral to orthorhombic at x > 0.20. Morphological studies demonstrated that the average grain size was reduced from ˜1.5 μm to ˜200 nm with the increase in Ti content. Due to Ti substitution, the dielectric constant was stable over a wide range of high frequencies (30 kHz to 20 MHz) by suppressing the dispersion at low frequencies. The dielectric properties of the compounds are associated with their improved morphologies and reduced leakage current densities probably due to the lower concentration of oxygen vacancies in the compositions. Magnetic properties of Bi0.9Gd0.1Fe1-xTixO3 (x = 0.00-0.25) ceramics measured at room temperature were enhanced with Ti substitution up to 20% compared to that of pure BiFeO3 and Ti undoped Bi0.9Gd0.1FeO3 samples. The enhanced magnetic properties might be attributed to the substitution induced suppression of spiral spin structure of BiFeO3. An asymmetric shifts both in the field and magnetization axes of magnetization versus magnetic field curves was observed. This indicates the presence of exchange bias effect in these compounds notably at room temperature.

  4. Sol-gel derived Zn1-xFexS diluted magnetic semiconductor thin films: Compositional dependent room or above room temperature ferromagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goktas, A.

    2015-06-01

    Zn1-xFexS (where x = 0.00, 0.01, 0.03, 0.05, 0.1 and 0.2) thin films were synthesized by sol-gel method. To investigate the origin of room or above room temperature ferromagnetism in these films several tools such as XRD, SEM, XPS, UV-Vis spectrophotometer and SQUİD magnetometer were used. The XRD studies showed that the phase singularity of ZnS zinc blende (hexagonal) structure. The SEM images indicated the homogeneous film surface with no cracking and increased particle size with increasing Fe-doping ratio except for 1 at.% Fe dopant. The presence of Zn, Fe, S, Si and O atoms in the films was observed in EDS spectrum. The XPS studies confirmed that the existence of Fe3+ ions in host ZnS thin films. In the UV-Vis measurements the band gap energy corresponding to the absorption edge was estimated to be approximately in the range of 3.59-2.08 eV, depending on the Fe doping level. The magnetization measurements revealed that the films had paramagnetic or ferromagnetic order depending on Fe doping ratio at 5, 100, 200, 300 and 350 K. The observed room or above room temperature ferromagnetism can be attributed to the strong p-d exchange interaction between Fe3+ d and anion (S2-) p orbitals as well as impurities.

  5. Novel room temperature ferromagnetic semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Amita

    2004-11-01

    Today's information world, bits of data are processed by semiconductor chips, and stored in the magnetic disk drives. But tomorrow's information technology may see magnetism (spin) and semiconductivity (charge) combined in one 'spintronic' device that exploits both charge and 'spin' to carry data (the best of two worlds). Spintronic devices such as spin valve transistors, spin light emitting diodes, non-volatile memory, logic devices, optical isolators and ultra-fast optical switches are some of the areas of interest for introducing the ferromagnetic properties at room temperature in a semiconductor to make it multifunctional. The potential advantages of such spintronic devices will be higher speed, greater efficiency, and better stability at a reduced power consumption. This Thesis contains two main topics: In-depth understanding of magnetism in Mn doped ZnO, and our search and identification of at least six new above room temperature ferromagnetic semiconductors. Both complex doped ZnO based new materials, as well as a number of nonoxides like phosphides, and sulfides suitably doped with Mn or Cu are shown to give rise to ferromagnetism above room temperature. Some of the highlights of this work are discovery of room temperature ferromagnetism in: (1) ZnO:Mn (paper in Nature Materials, Oct issue, 2003); (2) ZnO doped with Cu (containing no magnetic elements in it); (3) GaP doped with Cu (again containing no magnetic elements in it); (4) Enhancement of Magnetization by Cu co-doping in ZnO:Mn; (5) CdS doped with Mn, and a few others not reported in this thesis. We discuss in detail the first observation of ferromagnetism above room temperature in the form of powder, bulk pellets, in 2-3 mu-m thick transparent pulsed laser deposited films of the Mn (<4 at. percent) doped ZnO. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) spectra recorded from 2 to 200nm areas showed homogeneous distribution of Mn substituting

  6. Room temperature synthesis and one-dimensional self-assembly of interlaced Ni nanodiscs under magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pengwei; Cui, Yimin; Behan, Gavin; Zhang, Hongzhou; Wang, Rongming

    2010-07-01

    Uniform and aligned nickel nanochains with interlaced-nanodiscs structure were first synthesized by using a template-free magnetic-field-assisted method at room temperature. The interlaced-disc nanochains were composed of nanodiscs with diameters of ~90 nm and thicknesses of ~10 nm. An attachment process has been proposed to explain the observed growth of the nanodiscs. With concentration of the OH- increased, the morphology of the products transforms from star- to interlaced-nanodisc-like nanochains. Systematic magnetic measurements demonstrate that the well-aligned interlaced-nanodisc-like Ni nanochains have coercivity of about 300 Oe and effective anisotropy of about five times more than the bulk value.

  7. Graphene activating room-temperature ferromagnetic exchange in cobalt-doped ZnO dilute magnetic semiconductor quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhihu; Yang, Xiaoyu; Wang, Chao; Yao, Tao; Cai, Liang; Yan, Wensheng; Jiang, Yong; Hu, Fengchun; He, Jingfu; Pan, Zhiyun; Liu, Qinghua; Wei, Shiqiang

    2014-10-28

    Control over the magnetic interactions in dilute magnetic semiconductor quantum dots (DMSQDs) is a key issue to future development of nanometer-sized integrated "spintronic" devices. However, manipulating the magnetic coupling between impurity ions in DMSQDs remains a great challenge because of the intrinsic quantum confinement effects and self-purification of the quantum dots. Here, we propose a hybrid structure to achieve room-temperature ferromagnetic interactions in DMSQDs, via engineering the density and nature of the energy states at the Fermi level. This idea has been applied to Co-doped ZnO DMSQDs where the growth of a reduced graphene oxide shell around the Zn(0.98)Co(0.02)O core turns the magnetic interactions from paramagnetic to ferromagnetic at room temperature, due to the hybridization of 2p(z) orbitals of graphene and 3d obitals of Co(2+)-oxygen-vacancy complexes. This design may open up a kind of possibility for manipulating the magnetism of doped oxide nanostructures. PMID:25222885

  8. Imaging of room-temperature ferromagnetic nano-domains at the surface of a non-magnetic oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniuchi, T.; Motoyui, Y.; Morozumi, K.; Rödel, T. C.; Fortuna, F.; Santander-Syro, A. F.; Shin, S.

    2016-06-01

    Two-dimensional electron gases at oxide surfaces or interfaces show exotic ordered states of matter, like superconductivity, magnetism or spin-polarized states, and are a promising platform for alternative oxide-based electronics. Here we directly image a dense population of randomly distributed ferromagnetic domains of ~40 nm typical sizes at room temperature at the oxygen-deficient surface of SrTiO3, a non-magnetic transparent insulator in the bulk. We use laser-based photoemission electron microscopy, an experimental technique that gives selective spin detection of the surface carriers, even in bulk insulators, with a high spatial resolution of 2.6 nm. We furthermore find that the Curie temperature in this system is as high as 900 K. These findings open perspectives for applications in nano-domain magnetism and spintronics using oxide-based devices, for instance through the nano-engineering of oxygen vacancies at surfaces or interfaces of transition-metal oxides.

  9. Room-temperature photomagnetism in the spinel ferrite (Mn,Zn,Fe)3O4 as seen via soft x-ray magnetic circular dichroism

    SciTech Connect

    Bettinger, J.S.; Piamonteze, C.; Chopdekar, R.V.; Liberati, M.; Arenholz, E.; Suzuki, Y.

    2009-08-01

    We have used X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) in conjunction with multiplet simulations to directly probe the origin of photomagnetism in nanocrystalline (Mn,Zn,Fe){sub 3}O{sub 4}. A photomagnetic effect at room temperature has been observed in these films with HeNe illumination. We have verified an intervalence charge transfer among octahedral Fe cations to account for the increase in magnetization observed at and above room temperature in small magnetic fields. Using XMCD, we demonstrate that the dichroism of Fe in octahedral sites increases by 18% at room temperature while the dichroism of Fe in tetrahedral sites does not change.

  10. Improved room-temperature-selectivity between Nd and Fe in Nd recovery from Nd-Fe-B magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Kataoka, Y.; Kitagawa, J.; Ono, T.; Tsubota, M.

    2015-11-15

    The sustainable society requires the recycling of rare metals. Rare earth Nd is one of rare metals, accompanying huge consumption especially in Nd-Fe-B magnets. Although the wet process using acid is in practical use in the in-plant recycle of sludge, higher selectivity between Nd and Fe at room temperature is desired. We have proposed a pretreatment of corrosion before the dissolution into HCl and the oxalic acid precipitation. The corrosion produces γ-FeOOH and a Nd hydroxide, which have high selectivity for HCl solution at room temperature. Nd can be recovered as Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3}-type Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The estimated recovery-ratio of Nd reaches to 97%.

  11. Improved room-temperature-selectivity between Nd and Fe in Nd recovery from Nd-Fe-B magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kataoka, Y.; Ono, T.; Tsubota, M.; Kitagawa, J.

    2015-11-01

    The sustainable society requires the recycling of rare metals. Rare earth Nd is one of rare metals, accompanying huge consumption especially in Nd-Fe-B magnets. Although the wet process using acid is in practical use in the in-plant recycle of sludge, higher selectivity between Nd and Fe at room temperature is desired. We have proposed a pretreatment of corrosion before the dissolution into HCl and the oxalic acid precipitation. The corrosion produces γ-FeOOH and a Nd hydroxide, which have high selectivity for HCl solution at room temperature. Nd can be recovered as Mn2O3-type Nd2O3. The estimated recovery-ratio of Nd reaches to 97%.

  12. Highly Efficient Extraction of Phenolic Compounds by Use of Magnetic Room Temperature Ionic Liquids for Environmental Remediation

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Ning; Li, Min; Zhao, Lijie; Lu, Chengfei; de Rooy, Sergio L.; Warner, Isiah M.

    2011-01-01

    A hydrophobic magnetic room temperature ionic liquid (MRTIL), trihexyltetradecylphosphonium tetrachloroferrate(III) ([3C6PC14][FeCl4]), was synthesized from trihexyltetradecylphosphonium chloride and FeCl3·6H2O. This MRTIL was investigated as a possible separation agent for solvent extraction of phenolic compounds from aqueous solution. Due to its strong paramagnetism, [3C6PC14][FeCl4] responds to an external neodymium magnet, which was employed in the design of a novel magnetic extraction technique. The conditions for extraction, including extraction time, volume ratio between MRTIL and aqueous phase, pH of aqueous solution, and structures of phenolic compounds were investigated and optimized. The magnetic extraction of phenols achieved equilibrium in 20 min and the phenolic compounds were found to have higher distribution ratios under acidic conditions. In addition, it was observed that phenols containing a greater number of chlorine or nitro substitutents exhibited higher distribution ratios. For example, the distribution ratio of phenol (DPh) was 107. In contrast, 3,5-dichlorophenol distribution ratio (D3,5-DCP) had a much higher value of 6372 under identical extraction conditions. When compared with four selected traditional non-magnetic room temperature ionic liquids, our [3C6PC14][FeCl4] exhibited significantly higher extraction efficiency under the same experimental conditions used in this work. Pentachlorophenol, a major component in the contaminated soil sample obtained from a superfund site, was successfully extracted and removed by use of [3C6PC14][FeCl4] with high extraction efficiency. Pentachlorophenol concentration was dramatically reduced from 7.8 μg.mL−1 to 0.2 μg.mL−1 after the magnetic extraction by use of [3C6PC14][FeCl4]. PMID:21783320

  13. Cobalt-Doped Anatase TiO2: A Room Temperature Dilute Magnetic Dielectric Material

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, Kelli A.; Pakhomov, Alexandre; Wang, Chong M.; Heald, Steve M.; Krishnan, Kannan M.

    2005-05-15

    Structural and magnetic properties of epitaxial CoxTi₁-xO₂ films with x~2%, grown by RF magnetron sputtering from composite oxide targets on lattice matched LaAIO₃(001) substrates have been investigated. The films were sputtered at a deposition rate of ~0.12 Å/s for a range of substrate temperatures from 300°C to 750°C, followed by UHV annealing for 1 hr at 400°C and aging in air for 3 months. XRD experiments determine the best quality of highly oriented anatase (991) phase in films deposited 500-750°C. Magnetic hysteresis loops at 5K and 300K and thermoremanence measurements from 5-365 K show ferromagnetism in all samples in the whole temperature range. Annealing and aging lead to an increase of spontaneous moment an order of magnitude of up to ~1.1 µB/ Co atom at 300 K. As=deposited, annealed, and aged films were found to be highly resistive changes both in surface morphology and distribution of spontaneous magnetization in the annealed films. Possible mechanisms of the ferromagnetic behavior of such dielectric transition metal-doped oxides will be discussed.

  14. Magnetic properties measurement and discussion of an amorphous power transformer core at room and liquid nitrogen temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pronto, A. G.; Maurício, A.; Pina, J. M.

    2014-05-01

    In energy generation, transmission and distribution systems, power transformers are one of the most common and important components. Consequently, the performance of these transformers is crucial to global efficiency of the systems. To optimize transformers efficiency, the selection of an adequate ferromagnetic material is very important. For example, the use of amorphous ferromagnetic materials in transformer cores, replacing crystalline electrical steels, decreases total magnetic losses of the device. Other possible solution to increase energy systems efficiency, is the installation of high temperature superconducting power transformers (HTS transformers), normally cooled by liquid nitrogen at 77 K. In order to contribute to HTS transformer efficiency improvement, a 562.5 VA transformer with an amorphous ferromagnetic core was designed and built. For this core, the most important magnetic properties are measured at room and cryogenic temperature, and then compared with those of a typical crystalline grain-oriented electrical steel. Amorphous material magnetic losses (static and dynamic) at room and 77K are also presented and discussed.

  15. Carboxylate-based molecular magnet: One path toward achieving stable quantum correlations at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz, C.; Soares-Pinto, D. O.; Brandão, P.; dos Santos, A. M.; Reis, M. S.

    2016-02-01

    The control of quantum correlations in solid-state systems by means of material engineering is a broad avenue to be explored, since it makes possible steps toward the limits of quantum mechanics and the design of novel materials with applications on emerging quantum technologies. In this context, this letter explores the potential of molecular magnets to be prototypes of materials for quantum information technology. More precisely, we engineered a material and from its geometric quantum discord we found significant quantum correlations up to 9540 K (even without entanglement); and, in addition, a pure singlet state occupied up to around 80 K (above liquid nitrogen temperature). These results could only be achieved due to the carboxylate group promoting a metal-to-metal huge magnetic interaction.

  16. Electric field control of magnetization in Cu2O/porous anodic alumina hybrid structures at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, L. Q.; Liu, H. Y.; Sun, H. Y.; Liu, L. H.; Han, R. S.

    2016-04-01

    Cu2O nanoporous films are deposited on porous anodic alumina (PAA) substrates by DC-reactive magnetron sputtering. This paper focuses on voltage driven magnetization switching in Cu2O/PAA (CP) composite films prepared by DC-reactive magnetron sputtering. By applying a dc electric field, the magnetization of the CP composite films can be controlled in a reversible and reproducible way and shows an analogous on-off behavior. The magnitude of the change in the magnetization was about 75 emu/cm3 as the electric field was switched on and off. Resistive switching behavior was also observed in as-prepared CP composite films. Further analysis indicated that the formation/rupture of conducting filaments composed of oxygen vacancies is likely responsible for the changes in the magnetization as well as in the resistivity. Such reversible change of magnetization controlled by an electric field at room temperature may have applications in spintronics and power efficient data storage technologies.

  17. Imaging of room-temperature ferromagnetic nano-domains at the surface of a non-magnetic oxide

    PubMed Central

    Taniuchi, T.; Motoyui, Y.; Morozumi, K.; Rödel, T. C.; Fortuna, F.; Santander-Syro, A. F.; Shin, S.

    2016-01-01

    Two-dimensional electron gases at oxide surfaces or interfaces show exotic ordered states of matter, like superconductivity, magnetism or spin-polarized states, and are a promising platform for alternative oxide-based electronics. Here we directly image a dense population of randomly distributed ferromagnetic domains of ∼40 nm typical sizes at room temperature at the oxygen-deficient surface of SrTiO3, a non-magnetic transparent insulator in the bulk. We use laser-based photoemission electron microscopy, an experimental technique that gives selective spin detection of the surface carriers, even in bulk insulators, with a high spatial resolution of 2.6 nm. We furthermore find that the Curie temperature in this system is as high as 900 K. These findings open perspectives for applications in nano-domain magnetism and spintronics using oxide-based devices, for instance through the nano-engineering of oxygen vacancies at surfaces or interfaces of transition-metal oxides. PMID:27283225

  18. Imaging of room-temperature ferromagnetic nano-domains at the surface of a non-magnetic oxide.

    PubMed

    Taniuchi, T; Motoyui, Y; Morozumi, K; Rödel, T C; Fortuna, F; Santander-Syro, A F; Shin, S

    2016-01-01

    Two-dimensional electron gases at oxide surfaces or interfaces show exotic ordered states of matter, like superconductivity, magnetism or spin-polarized states, and are a promising platform for alternative oxide-based electronics. Here we directly image a dense population of randomly distributed ferromagnetic domains of ∼40 nm typical sizes at room temperature at the oxygen-deficient surface of SrTiO3, a non-magnetic transparent insulator in the bulk. We use laser-based photoemission electron microscopy, an experimental technique that gives selective spin detection of the surface carriers, even in bulk insulators, with a high spatial resolution of 2.6 nm. We furthermore find that the Curie temperature in this system is as high as 900 K. These findings open perspectives for applications in nano-domain magnetism and spintronics using oxide-based devices, for instance through the nano-engineering of oxygen vacancies at surfaces or interfaces of transition-metal oxides. PMID:27283225

  19. Recent advances in the microstructure design of materials for near room temperature magnetic cooling (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyubina, Julia

    2011-04-01

    Successful operation of a magnetic cooling device depends crucially on the performance of active magnetic refrigerant material. Extensive research activity has been concentrated on optimizing the magnetic properties of these materials by chemical composition modification. Here, it is shown how the design of appropriate microstructure can be used to control the magnetic properties as well as mechanical stability of refrigerant materials experiencing a first-order magnetic phase transition. In particular, introducing porosity in LaFe13-xSix alloys provides long-term stability by sacrificing only a small fraction of the magnetocaloric effect and results in the desired reduction of the magnetic and thermal hysteresis by a factor of 5, as compared to bulk alloys. Reducing crystallite size down to the nanometer range is shown to substantially lower magnetic hysteresis. On the other hand, the magnetocaloric effect is weakened by about 40% and 60% in alloys with grain size of 70 and 44 nm, respectively.

  20. Recent advances in the microstructure design of materials for near room temperature magnetic cooling (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Lyubina, Julia

    2011-04-01

    Successful operation of a magnetic cooling device depends crucially on the performance of active magnetic refrigerant material. Extensive research activity has been concentrated on optimizing the magnetic properties of these materials by chemical composition modification. Here, it is shown how the design of appropriate microstructure can be used to control the magnetic properties as well as mechanical stability of refrigerant materials experiencing a first-order magnetic phase transition. In particular, introducing porosity in LaFe{sub 13-x}Si{sub x} alloys provides long-term stability by sacrificing only a small fraction of the magnetocaloric effect and results in the desired reduction of the magnetic and thermal hysteresis by a factor of 5, as compared to bulk alloys. Reducing crystallite size down to the nanometer range is shown to substantially lower magnetic hysteresis. On the other hand, the magnetocaloric effect is weakened by about 40% and 60% in alloys with grain size of 70 and 44 nm, respectively.

  1. Room Temperature Multiferroicity of Charge Transfer Crystals.

    PubMed

    Qin, Wei; Chen, Xiaomin; Li, Huashan; Gong, Maogang; Yuan, Guoliang; Grossman, Jeffrey C; Wuttig, Manfred; Ren, Shenqiang

    2015-09-22

    Room temperature multiferroics has been a frontier research field by manipulating spin-driven ferroelectricity or charge-order-driven magnetism. Charge-transfer crystals based on electron donor and acceptor assembly, exhibiting simultaneous spin ordering, are drawing significant interests for the development of all-organic magnetoelectric multiferroics. Here, we report that a remarkable anisotropic magnetization and room temperature multiferroicity can be achieved through assembly of thiophene donor and fullerene acceptor. The crystal motif directs the dimensional and compositional control of charge-transfer networks that could switch magnetization under external stimuli, thereby opening up an attractive class of all-organic nanoferronics. PMID:26257033

  2. Preparation of Soft Magnetic Fe-Ni-Pb-B Alloy Nanoparticles by Room Temperature Solid-Solid Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Qin

    2013-01-01

    The Fe-Ni-Pb-B alloy nanoparticles was prepared by a solid-solid chemical reaction of ferric trichloride, nickel chloride, lead acetate, and potassium borohydride powders at room temperature. The research results of the ICP and thermal analysis indicate that the resultants are composed of iron, nickel, lead, boron, and PVP, and the component of the alloy is connected with the mole ratio of potassium borohydride and the metal salts. The TEM images show that the resultants are ultrafine and spherical particles, and the particle size is about a diameter of 25 nm. The largest saturation magnetization value of the 21.18 emu g−1 is obtained in the Fe-Ni-Pb-B alloy. The mechanism of the preparation reaction for the Fe-Ni-Pb-B multicomponent alloys is discussed. PMID:24348196

  3. Preparation of soft magnetic Fe-Ni-Pb-B alloy nanoparticles by room temperature solid-solid reaction.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Guo-Qing; Zhong, Qin

    2013-01-01

    The Fe-Ni-Pb-B alloy nanoparticles was prepared by a solid-solid chemical reaction of ferric trichloride, nickel chloride, lead acetate, and potassium borohydride powders at room temperature. The research results of the ICP and thermal analysis indicate that the resultants are composed of iron, nickel, lead, boron, and PVP, and the component of the alloy is connected with the mole ratio of potassium borohydride and the metal salts. The TEM images show that the resultants are ultrafine and spherical particles, and the particle size is about a diameter of 25 nm. The largest saturation magnetization value of the 21.18 emu g(-1) is obtained in the Fe-Ni-Pb-B alloy. The mechanism of the preparation reaction for the Fe-Ni-Pb-B multicomponent alloys is discussed. PMID:24348196

  4. Room-temperature antiferromagnetic memory resistor.

    PubMed

    Marti, X; Fina, I; Frontera, C; Liu, Jian; Wadley, P; He, Q; Paull, R J; Clarkson, J D; Kudrnovský, J; Turek, I; Kuneš, J; Yi, D; Chu, J-H; Nelson, C T; You, L; Arenholz, E; Salahuddin, S; Fontcuberta, J; Jungwirth, T; Ramesh, R

    2014-04-01

    The bistability of ordered spin states in ferromagnets provides the basis for magnetic memory functionality. The latest generation of magnetic random access memories rely on an efficient approach in which magnetic fields are replaced by electrical means for writing and reading the information in ferromagnets. This concept may eventually reduce the sensitivity of ferromagnets to magnetic field perturbations to being a weakness for data retention and the ferromagnetic stray fields to an obstacle for high-density memory integration. Here we report a room-temperature bistable antiferromagnetic (AFM) memory that produces negligible stray fields and is insensitive to strong magnetic fields. We use a resistor made of a FeRh AFM, which orders ferromagnetically roughly 100 K above room temperature, and therefore allows us to set different collective directions for the Fe moments by applied magnetic field. On cooling to room temperature, AFM order sets in with the direction of the AFM moments predetermined by the field and moment direction in the high-temperature ferromagnetic state. For electrical reading, we use an AFM analogue of the anisotropic magnetoresistance. Our microscopic theory modelling confirms that this archetypical spintronic effect, discovered more than 150 years ago in ferromagnets, is also present in AFMs. Our work demonstrates the feasibility of fabricating room-temperature spintronic memories with AFMs, which in turn expands the base of available magnetic materials for devices with properties that cannot be achieved with ferromagnets. PMID:24464243

  5. Room-temperature antiferromagnetic memory resistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marti, X.; Fina, I.; Frontera, C.; Liu, Jian; Wadley, P.; He, Q.; Paull, R. J.; Clarkson, J. D.; Kudrnovský, J.; Turek, I.; Kuneš, J.; Yi, D.; Chu, J.-H.; Nelson, C. T.; You, L.; Arenholz, E.; Salahuddin, S.; Fontcuberta, J.; Jungwirth, T.; Ramesh, R.

    2014-04-01

    The bistability of ordered spin states in ferromagnets provides the basis for magnetic memory functionality. The latest generation of magnetic random access memories rely on an efficient approach in which magnetic fields are replaced by electrical means for writing and reading the information in ferromagnets. This concept may eventually reduce the sensitivity of ferromagnets to magnetic field perturbations to being a weakness for data retention and the ferromagnetic stray fields to an obstacle for high-density memory integration. Here we report a room-temperature bistable antiferromagnetic (AFM) memory that produces negligible stray fields and is insensitive to strong magnetic fields. We use a resistor made of a FeRh AFM, which orders ferromagnetically roughly 100 K above room temperature, and therefore allows us to set different collective directions for the Fe moments by applied magnetic field. On cooling to room temperature, AFM order sets in with the direction of the AFM moments predetermined by the field and moment direction in the high-temperature ferromagnetic state. For electrical reading, we use an AFM analogue of the anisotropic magnetoresistance. Our microscopic theory modelling confirms that this archetypical spintronic effect, discovered more than 150 years ago in ferromagnets, is also present in AFMs. Our work demonstrates the feasibility of fabricating room-temperature spintronic memories with AFMs, which in turn expands the base of available magnetic materials for devices with properties that cannot be achieved with ferromagnets.

  6. Oxygen-vacancy-induced room-temperature magnetization in lamellar V{sub 2}O{sub 5} thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Cezar, A. B.; Graff, I. L. Varalda, J.; Schreiner, W. H.; Mosca, D. H.

    2014-10-28

    In this work, we study the local atomic and electronic structures as well as oxygen-vacancy-induced magnetic properties of electrodeposited V{sub 2}O{sub 5} films. Unlike stoichiometric V{sub 2}O{sub 5}, which is a diamagnetic lamellar semiconductor, our oxygen-defective V{sub 2}O{sub 5} films are ferromagnetic at room-temperature and their saturation magnetization decreases with air exposure time. X-ray absorption spectroscopy was used to monitor the aging effect on these films, revealing that freshly-made samples exhibit only local crystalline order, whereas the aged ones undoubtedly show an enhancement of crystallinity and coordination symmetry. The mean number of oxygen atoms around V tends to increase, indicating a decrease of oxygen vacancies with time. Concurrently with the decrease of oxygen vacancies, a loss of saturation magnetization is also observed. Hence, it can be concluded that the ferromagnetism of the V{sub 2}O{sub 5} films originates from a vacancy-induced mechanism, confirming the universality of this class of ferromagnetism.

  7. InAs quantum well Hall devices for room-temperature detection of single magnetic biomolecular labels.

    SciTech Connect

    Mihajlovic, G.; Xiong, P.; von Molnar, S.; Field, M.; Sullivan, G. J.; Materials Science Division; Florida State Univ.; Teledyne Scientific Co. LLC

    2007-08-01

    Hall sensors with cross width of {approx}1 {micro}m were fabricated from InAs/AlSb quantum well semiconductor heterostructures containing two-dimensional electron gas. The room-temperature device characteristics were examined by Hall effect and electronic noise measurements along with analytical calculations. In the low-frequency range, from 20 Hz to 1.6 kHz, the noise-equivalent magnetic field resolution was found to be limited by 1/f and generation-recombination noise from 22 to 3.5 {micro}T/{radical}Hz. The corresponding noise-equivalent magnetic moment resolution reached 10{sub {mu}{sub B}}{sup 6}/{radical}Hz at {approx}700 Hz and was even lower at higher frequencies. Using a phase-sensitive measurement technique, detection of a single 1.2 {micro}m diameter bead, suitable for biological applications, was achieved with a signal to noise ratio of {approx}33.3 dB, as well as detection of six 250 nm beads with a signal to noise of {approx}2.3 dB per bead. The work demonstrates the efficacy of InAs quantum well Hall devices for application in high sensitivity detection of single magnetic biomolecular labels.

  8. Synthesis, sustained release properties of magnetically functionalized organic-inorganic materials: Amoxicillin anions intercalated magnetic layered double hydroxides via calcined precursors at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Liu, Qi; Zhang, Guangchun; Li, Zhanshuang; Yang, Piaoping; Jing, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Milin; Liu, Tianfu; Jiang, Zhaohua

    2009-09-01

    Zinc-aluminum-carbonate-layered double hydroxides (ZnAl-CO 3-LDHs), loaded with magnetic substrates (Fe 3O 4), were prepared for sustained drug-targeting delivery. From the X-ray diffraction results, it was found that the magnetic substrates were successfully incorporated with LDHs and highly dispersed in the hydrotalcite structure. After intercalation with an antibiotic drug (amoxicillin) by using a calcinations-reconstruction method, the basal spacing of layered double hydroxides increased from 7.51 Å to 12.35 Å, indicating that amoxicillin was successfully intercalated into the interlay space of LDHs as a monolayer. Furthermore, in vitro drug release experiments in pH 7.4 phosphate buffer solution (PBS) showed sustained release profiles with amoxicillin as a model drug. Magnetic measurements revealed that the composite possessed paramagnetic properties at room temperature.

  9. Dynamic in situ observation of voltage-driven repeatable magnetization reversal at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Ya; Hu, Jia-Mian; Nelson, C. T.; Yang, T. N.; Shen, Y.; Chen, L. Q.; Ramesh, R.; Nan, C. W.

    2016-03-01

    Purely voltage-driven, repeatable magnetization reversal provides a tantalizing potential for the development of spintronic devices with a minimum amount of power consumption. Substantial progress has been made in this subject especially on magnetic/ferroelectric heterostructures. Here, we report the in situ observation of such phenomenon in a NiFe thin film grown directly on a rhombohedral Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)0.7Ti0.3O3(PMN-PT) ferroelectric crystal. Under a cyclic voltage applied perpendicular to the PMN-PT without a magnetic field, the local magnetization of NiFe can be repetitively reversed through an out-of-plane excursion and then back into the plane. Using phase field simulations we interpret magnetization reversal as a synergistic effect of the metastable ferroelastic switching in the PMN-PT and an electrically rotatable local exchange bias field arising from the heterogeneously distributed NiO clusters at the interface.

  10. Dynamic in situ observation of voltage-driven repeatable magnetization reversal at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Ya; Hu, Jia-Mian; Nelson, C. T.; Yang, T. N.; Shen, Y.; Chen, L. Q.; Ramesh, R.; Nan, C. W.

    2016-01-01

    Purely voltage-driven, repeatable magnetization reversal provides a tantalizing potential for the development of spintronic devices with a minimum amount of power consumption. Substantial progress has been made in this subject especially on magnetic/ferroelectric heterostructures. Here, we report the in situ observation of such phenomenon in a NiFe thin film grown directly on a rhombohedral Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)0.7Ti0.3O3(PMN-PT) ferroelectric crystal. Under a cyclic voltage applied perpendicular to the PMN-PT without a magnetic field, the local magnetization of NiFe can be repetitively reversed through an out-of-plane excursion and then back into the plane. Using phase field simulations we interpret magnetization reversal as a synergistic effect of the metastable ferroelastic switching in the PMN-PT and an electrically rotatable local exchange bias field arising from the heterogeneously distributed NiO clusters at the interface. PMID:27029464

  11. Dynamic in situ observation of voltage-driven repeatable magnetization reversal at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ya; Hu, Jia-Mian; Nelson, C T; Yang, T N; Shen, Y; Chen, L Q; Ramesh, R; Nan, C W

    2016-01-01

    Purely voltage-driven, repeatable magnetization reversal provides a tantalizing potential for the development of spintronic devices with a minimum amount of power consumption. Substantial progress has been made in this subject especially on magnetic/ferroelectric heterostructures. Here, we report the in situ observation of such phenomenon in a NiFe thin film grown directly on a rhombohedral Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)0.7Ti0.3O3(PMN-PT) ferroelectric crystal. Under a cyclic voltage applied perpendicular to the PMN-PT without a magnetic field, the local magnetization of NiFe can be repetitively reversed through an out-of-plane excursion and then back into the plane. Using phase field simulations we interpret magnetization reversal as a synergistic effect of the metastable ferroelastic switching in the PMN-PT and an electrically rotatable local exchange bias field arising from the heterogeneously distributed NiO clusters at the interface. PMID:27029464

  12. Thermal plasma processed ferro-magnetically ordered face-centered cubic iron at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raut, Suyog A.; Kanhe, Nilesh S.; Bhoraskar, S. V.; Das, A. K.; Mathe, V. L.

    2014-10-01

    Here, we report tailor made phase of iron nanoparticles using homogeneous gas phase condensation process via thermal plasma route. It was observed that crystal lattice of nano-crystalline iron changes as a function of operating parameters of the plasma reactor. In the present investigation iron nanoparticles have been synthesized in presence of argon at operating pressures of 125-1000 Torr and fixed plasma input DC power of 6 kW. It was possible to obtain pure fcc, pure bcc as well as the mixed phases for iron nanoparticles in powder form as a function of operating pressure. The as synthesized product was characterized for understanding the structural and magnetic properties by using X-ray diffraction, vibrating sample magnetometer, and Mössbauer spectroscopy. The data reveal that fcc phase is ferromagnetically ordered with high spin state, which is unusual whereas bcc phase is found to be ferromagnetic as usual. Finally, the structural and magnetic properties are co-related.

  13. Porous manganese-based magnetocaloric material for magnetic refrigeration at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozano, J. A.; Kostow, M. P.; Brück, E.; de Lima, J. C.; Prata, A. T.; Wendhausen, P. A. P.

    The powder metallurgy technique has been exploited as a means to prepare porous magnetocaloric materials. The alloy Mn 1.1Fe 0.9P 0.46As 0.54 was previously synthesized by mechanical alloying followed by a solid-state reaction for crystallization and homogenization. Subsequently, the alloy was comminuted and sintered at 1298 K. The obtained sintered product is aimed to be tested in a magnetic regenerator of a prototype machine.

  14. Influence of interstitial Mn on magnetism in room-temperature ferromagnet Mn(1+delta)Sb

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Taylor, Alice E; Berlijn, Tom; Hahn, Steven E; May, Andrew F; Williams, Travis J; Poudel, Lekhanath N; Calder, Stuart A; Fishman, Randy Scott; Stone, Matthew B; Aczel, Adam A; et al

    2015-01-01

    We report elastic and inelastic neutron scattering measurements of the high-TC ferromagnet Mn(1+delta)Sb. Measurements were performed on a large, TC = 434 K, single crystal with interstitial Mn content of delta=0.13. The neutron diffraction results reveal that the interstitial Mn has a magnetic moment, and that it is aligned antiparallel to the main Mn moment. We perform density functional theory calculations including the interstitial Mn, and find the interstitial to be magnetic in agreement with the diffraction data. The inelastic neutron scattering measurements reveal two features in the magnetic dynamics: i) a spin-wave-like dispersion emanating from ferromagnetic Bragg positions (Hmore » K 2n), and ii) a broad, non-dispersive signal centered at forbidden Bragg positions (H K 2n+1). The inelastic spectrum cannot be modeled by simple linear spin-wave theory calculations, and appears to be significantly altered by the presence of the interstitial Mn ions. The results show that the influence of the int« less

  15. Robust SiO2-modified CoFe2O4 hollow nanofibers with flexible room temperature magnetic performance.

    PubMed

    Jing, Panpan; Pan, Lining; Du, Jinlu; Wang, Jianbo; Liu, Qingfang

    2015-05-21

    A range of robust SiO2-modified CoFe2O4 hollow nanofibers with high uniformity and productivity were successfully prepared via polyvinylpyrrolidone-sol assisted electrospinning followed by annealing at a high temperature of 1000 °C, and they were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, vibrating sample magnetometry, X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy in detail. It was demonstrated that amorphous SiO2 has a significant influence on not only the surface morphology, microstructure and crystalline size but also the room temperature magnetic performance of the inverse spinel CoFe2O4 nanofibers. The pure CoFe2O4 sample shows a particle chain rod-shape appearance but the SiO2-modified CoFe2O4 sample shows a robust hollow fibrous structure. With increasing SiO2 content, an increase at first and then a decrease in coercivity (Hc) and monotonously a decrease in saturation magnetization (Ms) have been determined in the obtained modified CoFe2O4 hollow nanofibers. A maximum Ms of about 80 emu g(-1) and a maximum Hc of about 1477 Oe could be, respectively, acquired from the pure CoFe2O4 nanorods and the modified CoFe2O4 hollow nanofibers with about 14.9% SiO2. The changes in Ms, Hc and the structure evolution mechanism of these SiO2-modified CoFe2O4 hollow nanofibers have been elaborated systematically. Furthermore, it is suggested that amorphous SiO2 enables effectively improving the structure endurance of 1D electrospun inorganic oxide hollow nanostructures being subjected to high temperatures. PMID:25907405

  16. Thermal plasma processed ferro-magnetically ordered face-centered cubic iron at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Raut, Suyog A.; Kanhe, Nilesh S.; Bhoraskar, S. V.; Mathe, V. L.; Das, A. K.

    2014-10-28

    Here, we report tailor made phase of iron nanoparticles using homogeneous gas phase condensation process via thermal plasma route. It was observed that crystal lattice of nano-crystalline iron changes as a function of operating parameters of the plasma reactor. In the present investigation iron nanoparticles have been synthesized in presence of argon at operating pressures of 125–1000 Torr and fixed plasma input DC power of 6 kW. It was possible to obtain pure fcc, pure bcc as well as the mixed phases for iron nanoparticles in powder form as a function of operating pressure. The as synthesized product was characterized for understanding the structural and magnetic properties by using X-ray diffraction, vibrating sample magnetometer, and Mössbauer spectroscopy. The data reveal that fcc phase is ferromagnetically ordered with high spin state, which is unusual whereas bcc phase is found to be ferromagnetic as usual. Finally, the structural and magnetic properties are co-related.

  17. A finite element analysis of room-temperature silicon crystals for the advanced photon source bending-magnet and insertion-device beams

    SciTech Connect

    Assoufid, L.; Lee, W.; Mills, D.M. )

    1995-03-01

    In this paper, the results of a series of thermal and distortion finite element analyses performed on room-temperature silicon for the three standard APS sources, namely, the bending magnet, wiggler A, and undulator A, are reported. The modeling was performed with the silicon cooled directly with water or liquid gallium through rectangular channels.

  18. A finite element analysis of room-temperature silicon crystals for the advanced photon source bending-magnet and insertion-device beams (abstract)

    SciTech Connect

    Assoufid, L.; Lee, W.; Mills, D.M. )

    1995-02-01

    In this paper, the results of a series of thermal and distortion finite element analyses performed on room-temperature silicon for the three standard APS sources, namely, the bending magnet, wiggler A, and undulator A, are reported. The modeling was performed with the silicon cooled directly with water or liquid gallium through rectangular channels.

  19. A finite element analysis of room temperature silicon crystals for the advanced photon source bending-magnet and insertion-device beams

    SciTech Connect

    Assoufid, L.; Lee, W.K.; Mills, D.

    1994-10-01

    In this paper, we give the results of a series of thermal and distortion finite element analyses performed on room temperature silicon for the three standard APS sources, namely, the bending magnet, Wiggler A, and Undulator A. The modeling was performed with the silicon cooled directly with water or liquid gallium through rectangular channels.

  20. Electric field-induced tuning of magnetism in PbFe{sub 0.5}Nb{sub 0.5}O{sub 3} at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Rayaprol, S. E-mail: brangadi@gmail.com; Mukherjee, S.; Kaushik, S. D.; Matteppanavar, S.; Angadi, B. E-mail: brangadi@gmail.com

    2015-08-07

    We study the influence of electrical poling, carried out at room temperature, on the structure and magnetism of Pb(Fe{sub 0.5}Nb{sub 0.5})O{sub 3} by analyzing the differences observed in structural and magnetic properties before and after the electrical poling. The changes observed in magnetization of Pb(Fe{sub 0.5}Nb{sub 0.5})O{sub 3} before and after electrical poling exhibit considerably strong converse magnetoelectric effect at room temperature. In addition, the strengthening of Fe/Nb-O bond due to electrical poling is discussed on the basis of Raman spectral studies and analysis of neutron diffraction patterns. The potential tunability of magnetization with electrical poling can be an ideal tool for realization of application potential of this multiferroic material.

  1. Xenon porometry at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telkki, Ville-Veikko; Lounila, Juhani; Jokisaari, Jukka

    2006-01-01

    Xenon porometry is a method in which porous material is immersed in a medium and the properties of the material are studied by means of Xe129 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of xenon gas dissolved in the medium. For instance, the chemical shift of a particular signal (referred to as signal D) arising from xenon inside small pockets formed in the pores during the freezing of the confined medium is highly sensitive to the pore size. In the present study, we show that when naphthalene is used as the medium the pore size distribution of the material can be determined by measuring a single one-dimensional spectrum near room temperature and converting the chemical shift scale of signal D to the pore radius scale by using an experimentally determined correlation. A model has been developed that explains the curious behavior of the chemical shift of signal D as a function of pore radius. The other signals of the spectra measured at different temperatures have also been identified, and the influence of xenon pressure on the spectra has been studied. For comparison, Xe129 NMR spectra of pure xenon gas adsorbed to porous materials have been measured and analyzed.

  2. Strong room temperature magnetism in highly resistive strained thin films of BiFe0.5Mn0.5O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, E.-M.; Patnaik, S.; Weal, E.; Sahonta, S.-L.; Wang, H.; Bi, Z.; Xiong, J.; Blamire, M. G.; Jia, Q. X.; MacManus-Driscoll, J. L.

    2011-01-01

    We report highly resistive strongly ferromagnetic strained thin (˜30 nm) films of BiFe0.5Mn0.5O3 (BFMO) grown on (001) SrTiO3 substrates using pulsed laser deposition. The films are tetragonal with high epitaxial quality and phase-purity. The magnetic moment and coercivity values at room temperature are 90 emu/cc (0.58μB/B-site ion) at H =3 kOe and 274 Oe, respectively. The magnetic transition temperature is strongly enhanced up to ˜600 K, which is ˜500 K higher than for pure bulk BiMnO3. Strained BFMO is a potential room temperature spin filter material for magnetic tunnel devices.

  3. Corneal storage at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Sachs, U; Goldman, K; Valenti, J; Kaufman, H E

    1978-06-01

    Short-term eye banking is based mainly on moist chamber and McCarey-Kaufman medium (M-K medium) preservation. Both involve a controlled 4 C temperature for storage. Warming the cornea to room temperature, however, drastically affects the endothelial viability. On enzymatic staining and histological study, the M-K medium-stored rabbit corneas had more normal endothelium than did "moist chamber" eyes when storage was prolonged for seven days at room temperature. In human corneas that were kept at 4 C for 24 hours and then exposed to a temperature of 25 C, destruction of organelles had occurred by six hours and was increased by 12 hours. Corneas that were kept in M-K medium had relatively intact endothelium after four days, but cell disruption and vacuolation was present by the seventh day. The M-K medium, therefore, affords protection to tissue warmed to room temperature, where metabolic activity is resumed. PMID:350203

  4. Enhanced Room Temperature Ferromagnetism by Fe Doping in Zn0.96Cu0.04O Diluted Magnetic Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthukumaran, S.; Ashokkumar, M.

    2016-02-01

    Zn0.96- x Cu0.04Fe x O (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.04) nanoparticles synthesized via the sol-gel technique had a hexagonal wurtzite ZnO structure without any Fe/Cu-related secondary phases. The crystallite size was reduced from Fe = 0% (23 nm) to Fe = 4% (16 nm) due to the suppression of grain surface growth by foreign impurities. Doping of higher Fe concentrations into Zn-Cu-O suppressed the ultra-violet (UV) emission band and balanced the defect-related visible emissions. The decrease of the UV and green emission intensity ratio ( I UV/ I green) and the UV and blue emission intensity ratio ( I UV/ I blue) in photoluminescence spectra implied an increase of defect states with the increase of Fe concentrations. All the samples showed clear room temperature ferromagnetism. The saturation magnetization was increased by Fe co-doping which was attributed to the interaction between Fe-Fe ions. X-ray photoelectron spectra confirmed the absence of secondary phases like Fe3O4.

  5. Fast Room Temperature Very Low Field-Magnetic Resonance Imaging System Compatible with MagnetoEncephaloGraphy Environment

    PubMed Central

    Galante, Angelo; Sinibaldi, Raffaele; Conti, Allegra; De Luca, Cinzia; Catallo, Nadia; Sebastiani, Piero; Pizzella, Vittorio; Romani, Gian Luca; Sotgiu, Antonello; Della Penna, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, ultra-low field (ULF)-MRI is being given more and more attention, due to the possibility of integrating ULF-MRI and Magnetoencephalography (MEG) in the same device. Despite the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) reduction, there are several advantages to operating at ULF, including increased tissue contrast, reduced cost and weight of the scanners, the potential to image patients that are not compatible with clinical scanners, and the opportunity to integrate different imaging modalities. The majority of ULF-MRI systems are based, until now, on magnetic field pulsed techniques for increasing SNR, using SQUID based detectors with Larmor frequencies in the kHz range. Although promising results were recently obtained with such systems, it is an open question whether similar SNR and reduced acquisition time can be achieved with simpler devices. In this work a room-temperature, MEG-compatible very-low field (VLF)-MRI device working in the range of several hundred kHz without sample pre-polarization is presented. This preserves many advantages of ULF-MRI, but for equivalent imaging conditions and SNR we achieve reduced imaging time based on preliminary results using phantoms and ex-vivo rabbits heads. PMID:26630172

  6. Fast Room Temperature Very Low Field-Magnetic Resonance Imaging System Compatible with MagnetoEncephaloGraphy Environment.

    PubMed

    Galante, Angelo; Sinibaldi, Raffaele; Conti, Allegra; De Luca, Cinzia; Catallo, Nadia; Sebastiani, Piero; Pizzella, Vittorio; Romani, Gian Luca; Sotgiu, Antonello; Della Penna, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, ultra-low field (ULF)-MRI is being given more and more attention, due to the possibility of integrating ULF-MRI and Magnetoencephalography (MEG) in the same device. Despite the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) reduction, there are several advantages to operating at ULF, including increased tissue contrast, reduced cost and weight of the scanners, the potential to image patients that are not compatible with clinical scanners, and the opportunity to integrate different imaging modalities. The majority of ULF-MRI systems are based, until now, on magnetic field pulsed techniques for increasing SNR, using SQUID based detectors with Larmor frequencies in the kHz range. Although promising results were recently obtained with such systems, it is an open question whether similar SNR and reduced acquisition time can be achieved with simpler devices. In this work a room-temperature, MEG-compatible very-low field (VLF)-MRI device working in the range of several hundred kHz without sample pre-polarization is presented. This preserves many advantages of ULF-MRI, but for equivalent imaging conditions and SNR we achieve reduced imaging time based on preliminary results using phantoms and ex-vivo rabbits heads. PMID:26630172

  7. Quest for high-Curie temperature MnxGe1-x diluted magnetic semiconductors for room-temperature spintronics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Tianxiao; Tang, Jianshi; Wang, Kang L.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we report the non-equilibrium growth of various Mn-doped Ge dilute magnetic semiconductor nanostructures using molecular-beam epitaxy, including quantum dots, nanodisks and nanowires. Their detailed structural and magnetic properties are characterized. By comparing the results with those in MnxGe1-x thin films, it is affirmed that the use of nanostructures helps eliminate crystalline defects and meanwhile enhance the carrier-mediate ferromagnetism from substantial quantum confinements. Our systematic studies provide a promising platform to build nonvolatile spinFET and other novel spintronic devices based upon dilute magnetic semiconductor nanostructures.

  8. Novel room-temperature spin-valve-like magnetoresistance in magnetically coupled nano-column Fe3O4/Ni heterostructure.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Wen; Song, Wendong; Herng, Tun Seng; Qin, Qing; Yang, Yong; Zheng, Ming; Hong, Xiaoliang; Feng, Yuan Ping; Ding, Jun

    2016-08-25

    Herein, we design a room-temperature spin-valve-like magnetoresistance in a nano-column Fe3O4/Ni heterostructure without using a non-magnetic spacer or pinning layer. An Fe3O4 nano-column film is self-assembled on a Ni underlayer by the thermal decomposition method. The wet-chemical self-assembly is facile, economical and scalable. The magnetoresistance (MR) response of the Ni underlayer in the heterostructure under positive and negative out-of-plane magnetic fields differ by ∼0.25 at room temperature and ∼0.43 at 100 K. We attribute the spin-valve-like magnetoresistance to the unidirectional magnetic anisotropy of the Ni underlayer when being magnetically coupled by the Fe3O4 nano-column film. The out-of-plane negative-field magnetization is higher than the positive-field magnetization, affirming the unidirectional magnetic anisotropy of the Fe3O4/Ni heterostructure. Temperature-dependent magnetic and resistivity studies illustrate a close correlation between the magnetization transition of Fe3O4 and resistivity transition of Ni and prove a magnetic coupling between the Fe3O4 and Ni. First-principles calculations reveal that the Fe3O4/Ni model under a negative magnetic field is energetically more stable than that under a positive magnetic field. Furthermore, partial density of states (PDOS) analysis demonstrates the unidirectional magnetic anisotropy of the Ni 3d orbital. This is induced by the strong ferromagnetic coupling between Fe3O4 and Ni via oxygen-mediated Fe 3d-O 2p-Ni 3d hybridizations. PMID:27526860

  9. Room temperature magnetism and metal to semiconducting transition in dilute Fe doped Sb1-xSex semiconducting alloy thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Naveen; Sarkar, Mitesh; Chawda, Mukesh; Ganesan, V.; Bodas, Dhananjay

    2015-02-01

    The magnetism was observed in very dilute Fe doped alloy thin film Fe0.008Sb1-xSex, for x = 0.01 to 0.10. These thin films were grown on silicon substrate using thermal evaporation technique. Structural, electrical, optical, charge carrier concentration measurement, surface morphology and magnetic properties were observed using glancing incidence x-ray diffraction (GIXRD), four probe resistivity, photoluminescence, Hall measurement, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and magnetic force microscopy (MFM) techniques, respectively. No peaks of iron were seen in GIXRD. The resistivity results show that activation energy increases with increase in selenium (Se) concentration. The Arrhenius plot reveals metallic behavior below room temperature. The low temperature conduction is explained by variable range-hopping mechanism, which fits very well in the temperature range 150-300 K. The decrease in density of states has been observed with increasing selenium concentration (x = 0.01 to 0.10). There is a metal-to-semiconductor phase transition observed above room temperature. This transition temperature is Se concentration dependent. The particle size distribution ˜47-61 nm is evaluated using AFM images. These thin films exhibit ferromagnetic interactions at room temperature.

  10. Room temperature terahertz polariton emitter

    SciTech Connect

    Geiser, Markus; Scalari, Giacomo; Castellano, Fabrizio; Beck, Mattias; Faist, Jerome

    2012-10-01

    Terahertz (THz) range electroluminescence from intersubband polariton states is observed in the ultra strong coupling regime, where the interaction energy between the collective excitation of a dense electron gas and a photonic mode is a significant portion of the uncoupled excitation energy. The polariton's increased emission efficiency along with a parabolic electron confinement potential allows operation up to room temperature in a nonresonant pumping scheme. This observation of room temperature electroluminescence of an intersubband device in the THz range is a promising proof of concept for more powerful THz sources.

  11. Irradiation induced ferromagnetism at room temperature in TiO{sub 2} thin films: X-ray magnetic circular dichroism characterizations

    SciTech Connect

    Thakur, Hardeep; Sharma, K. K.; Thakur, P.; Brookes, N. B.; Kumar, Ravi; Singh, A. P.; Kumar, Yogesh; Gautam, S.; Chae, K. H.

    2011-05-09

    We report on the room temperature ferromagnetism in the swift heavy ion (SHI) irradiated TiO{sub 2} thin films by x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) experiments at the O K and Ti L{sub 3,2} absorption edges. The XAS/XMCD measurements provide direct evidence of magnetic polarization of the O 2p and Ti 3d orbitals. The unquenched orbital magnetic moment within the O 2p shell is ferromagnetically coupled to the neighboring Ti moments, which illustrates the intense hybridization of the O 2p and Ti 3d orbitals induced by SHI irradiation.

  12. Magnetic properties of nitrogen-doped ZrO2: Theoretical evidence of absence of room temperature ferromagnetism

    PubMed Central

    Albanese, Elisa; Leccese, Mirko; Di Valentin, Cristiana; Pacchioni, Gianfranco

    2016-01-01

    N-dopants in bulk monoclinic ZrO2 and their magnetic interactions have been investigated by DFT calculations, using the B3LYP hybrid functional. The electronic and magnetic properties of the paramagnetic N species, substitutionals and interstitials, are discussed. Their thermodynamic stability has been estimated as a function of the oxygen partial pressure. At 300 K, N prefers interstitial sites at any range of oxygen pressure, while at higher temperatures (700–1000 K), oxygen poor-conditions facilitate substitutional dopants. We have considered the interaction of two N defects in various positions in order to investigate the possible occurrence of ferromagnetic ordering. A very small magnetic coupling constant has been calculated for several 2N-ZrO2 configurations, thus demonstrating that magnetic ordering can be achieved only at very low temperatures, well below liquid nitrogen. Furthermore, when N atoms replace O at different sites, resulting in slightly different positions of the corresponding N 2p levels, a direct charge transfer can occur between the two dopants with consequent quenching of the magnetic moment. Another mechanism that contributes to the quenching of the N magnetic moments is the interplay with oxygen vacancies. These effects contribute to reduce the concentration of magnetic impurities, thus limiting the possibility to establish magnetic ordering. PMID:27527493

  13. Magnetic properties of nitrogen-doped ZrO2: Theoretical evidence of absence of room temperature ferromagnetism.

    PubMed

    Albanese, Elisa; Leccese, Mirko; Di Valentin, Cristiana; Pacchioni, Gianfranco

    2016-01-01

    N-dopants in bulk monoclinic ZrO2 and their magnetic interactions have been investigated by DFT calculations, using the B3LYP hybrid functional. The electronic and magnetic properties of the paramagnetic N species, substitutionals and interstitials, are discussed. Their thermodynamic stability has been estimated as a function of the oxygen partial pressure. At 300 K, N prefers interstitial sites at any range of oxygen pressure, while at higher temperatures (700-1000 K), oxygen poor-conditions facilitate substitutional dopants. We have considered the interaction of two N defects in various positions in order to investigate the possible occurrence of ferromagnetic ordering. A very small magnetic coupling constant has been calculated for several 2N-ZrO2 configurations, thus demonstrating that magnetic ordering can be achieved only at very low temperatures, well below liquid nitrogen. Furthermore, when N atoms replace O at different sites, resulting in slightly different positions of the corresponding N 2p levels, a direct charge transfer can occur between the two dopants with consequent quenching of the magnetic moment. Another mechanism that contributes to the quenching of the N magnetic moments is the interplay with oxygen vacancies. These effects contribute to reduce the concentration of magnetic impurities, thus limiting the possibility to establish magnetic ordering. PMID:27527493

  14. Room-temperature ferromagnetism in Zn{sub 1-x}Co{sub x}O magnetic semiconductors prepared by sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Dinia, A.; Schmerber, G.; Meny, C.; Pierron-Bohnes, V.; Beaurepaire, E.

    2005-06-15

    We have used magnetron cosputtering to grow Zn{sub 1-x}Co{sub x}O magnetic dilute semiconductors. The growth has been performed on SiO{sub 2}/Si and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}(0001) substrates. The Co concentration has been varied between 0.1 and 0.25 and the substrate temperature between room temperature and 600 deg. C. X-ray diffraction analysis has shown that for the films grown on Si substrates the structural quality of the film is improved by increasing the growth temperature and/or postgrowth annealing. The films are textured with c axis of the wurtzite structure along the growth direction. However, for the films grown on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrate quasi-epitaxial films have been obtained for 600 deg. C substrate temperature. Magnetization measurements have shown that the ferromagnetism is directly correlated to the structural quality and appears by increasing the growth temperature and/or postgrowth annealing. Moreover, for the highly textured film a clear magnetic perpendicular anisotropy has been evidenced with the easy magnetization axis along the growth direction. To evidence the intrinsic nature of the ferromagnetism in the films, transmission optical measurements have been used. They show three absorption bands that are characteristics of d-d transitions of tetrahedrally coordinated Co{sup 2+}. This has been supported by nuclear magnetic resonance and magnetic thermal variation.

  15. Colossal magnetocapacitance effect at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishchaniuk, T. M.; Grygorchak, I. I.

    2014-05-01

    First nano-hybridized clathrate/cavitant structure of hierarchical architecture was synthesized. The results of investigations of the properties of initial nanoporous silica matrices MCM-41, with encapsulated in its pores of β-cyclodextrin in cavitand and cavitat (with FeSO4) states and change at room temperature in a constant magnetic field intensity of 2.75 kOe, have been presented. Phenomenon of enormous magnetocapacitance and giant negative variable-current magnetoresistance has been discovered.

  16. Large magnetic response in (Bi4Nd)Ti3(Fe0.5Co0.5)O15 ceramic at room-temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, F. J.; Su, P.; Wei, C.; Chen, X. Q.; Yang, C. P.; Cao, W. Q.

    2011-12-01

    Ceramics of Nd/Co co-substituted Bi5Ti3FeO15, i.e., (Bi4Nd)Ti3(Fe0.5Co0.5)O15 were prepared by the conventional solid-state reaction method. The X-ray diffraction pattern demonstrates that the sample of the layered perovskite phase was successfully obtained, even if little Bi-deficient pyrochlore Bi2Ti2O7 also existed. The ferroelectric and magnetic Curie temperatures were determined to be 1077 K and 497 K, respectively. The multiferroic property of the sample at room temperature was demonstrated by ferroelectric and magnetic measurements. Remarkably, by Nd/Co co-substituting, the sample exhibited large magnetic response with 2Mr = 330 memu/g and 2Hc = 562 Oe at applied magnetic field of 8 kOe at room temperature. The present work suggests the possibility of doped Bi5Ti3FeO15 as a potential multiferroic.

  17. Verification of antiferromagnetic exchange coupling at room temperature using polar magneto-optic Kerr effect in thin EuS/Co multilayers with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goschew, A.; Scott, M.; Fumagalli, P.

    2016-08-01

    We report on magneto-optic Kerr measurements in polar geometry carried out on a series of thin Co/EuS multilayers on suitable Co/Pd-multilayer substrates. Thin Co/EuS multilayers of a few nanometers individual layer thickness usually have their magnetization in plane. Co/Pd multilayers introduce a perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in the Co/EuS layers deposited on top, thus making it possible to measure magneto-optic signals in the polar geometry in remanence in order to study exchange coupling. Magneto-optic Kerr-effect spectra and hysteresis loops were recorded in the visible and ultraviolet photon-energy range at room temperature. The EuS contribution to the magneto-optic signal is extracted at 4.1 eV by combining hysteresis loops measured at different photon energies with polar magneto-optic Kerr-effect spectra recorded in remanence and in an applied magnetic field of 2.2 T. The extracted EuS signal shows clear signs of antiferromagnetic coupling of the Eu magnetic moments to the Co layers. This implies that the ordering temperature of at least a fraction of the EuS layers is above room temperature proving that magneto-optic Kerr-effect spectroscopy can be used here as a quasi-element-specific method.

  18. Room-Temperature Ferromagnetism of Cu-Doped ZnO Films Probed by Soft X-Ray Magnetic Circular Dichroism

    SciTech Connect

    Herng, T.S.; Ku, W.; Qi, D.-C.; Berlijn, T.; Yi, J.B.; Yang, K.S.; Dai, Y.; Feng, Y.P.; Santoso, I.; Sanchez-Hanke, C.; Gao, X.Y.; Wee, A.T.S.; Ding, J.; Rusydi, A.

    2010-11-08

    We report direct evidence of room-temperature ferromagnetic ordering in O-deficient ZnO:Cu films by using soft x-ray magnetic circular dichroism and x-ray absorption. Our measurements have revealed unambiguously two distinct features of Cu atoms associated with (i) magnetically ordered Cu ions present only in the oxygen-deficient samples and (ii) magnetically disordered regular Cu{sup 2+} ions present in all the samples. We find that a sufficient amount of both oxygen vacancies (V{sub O}) and Cu impurities is essential to the observed ferromagnetism, and a non-negligible portion of Cu impurities is uninvolved in the magnetic order. Based on first-principles calculations, we propose a microscopic 'indirect double-exchange' model, in which alignments of localized large moments of Cu in the vicinity of the V{sub O} are mediated by the large-sized vacancy orbitals.

  19. Magnetization and Resistance Switchings Induced by Electric Field in Epitaxial Mn:ZnO/BiFeO3 Multiferroic Heterostructures at Room Temperature.

    PubMed

    Li, Dong; Zheng, Wanchao; Zheng, Dongxing; Gong, Junlu; Wang, Liyan; Jin, Chao; Li, Peng; Bai, Haili

    2016-02-17

    Electric field induced reversible switchings of the magnetization and resistance were achieved at room temperature in epitaxial Mn:ZnO(110)/BiFeO3(001) heterostructures. The observed modulation of magnetic moment is ∼500% accompanying with a coercive field varying from 43 to 300 Oe and a resistive switching ratio up to ∼10(4)% with the applied voltages of ±4 V. The switching mechanisms in magnetization and resistance are attributed to the ferroelectric polarization reversal of the BiFeO3 layer under applied electric fields, combined with the reversible change of oxygen vacancy concentration at the Mn:ZnO/BiFeO3 interface. PMID:26812349

  20. Nuclear magnetic resonance on room temperature samples in nanotesla fields using a two-stage dc superconducting quantum interference device sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Körber, R.; Casey, A.; Shibahara, A.; Piscitelli, M.; Cowan, B. P.; Lusher, C. P.; Saunders, J.; Drung, D.; Schurig, Th.

    2007-10-01

    We describe a compact system for pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance at ultralow magnetic fields on small liquid samples (˜0.14ml) at room temperature. The broadband spectrometer employs an integrated two-stage superconducting quantum interference device current sensor with a coupled energy sensitivity of 50h, in the white noise limit. Environmental noise is screened using a compact arrangement of mu-metal and a superconducting shield. Proton signals in water have been observed down to 93nT (a Larmor frequency of 4.0Hz), with a minimum linewidth of 0.16Hz measured at ˜40Hz. Two-component free induction decays were observed from oil/water mixtures between 275 and 300K.

  1. Room temperature magnetic and dielectric properties of cobalt doped CaCu{sub 3}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 12} ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Mu, Chunhong; Song, Yuanqiang Wang, Xiaoning; Wang, Haibin

    2015-05-07

    CaCu{sub 3}Ti{sub 4−x}Co{sub x}O{sub 12} (x = 0, 0.2, 0.4) ceramics were prepared by a conventional solid state reaction, and the effects of cobalt doping on the room temperature magnetic and dielectric properties were investigated. Both X-ray diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy confirmed the presence of Cu and Co rich phase at grain boundaries of Co-doped ceramics. Scanning electron microscopy micrographs of Co-doped samples showed a striking change from regular polyhedral particle type in pure CaCu{sub 3}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 12} (CCTO) to sheet-like grains with certain growth orientation. Undoped CaCu{sub 3}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 12} is well known for its colossal dielectric constant in a broad temperature and frequency range. The dielectric constant value was slightly changed by 5 at. % and 10 at. % Co doping, whereas the second relaxation process was clearly separated in low frequency region at room temperature. A multirelaxation mechanism was proposed to be the origin of the colossal dielectric constant. In addition, the permeability spectra measurements indicated Co-doped CCTO with good magnetic properties, showing the initial permeability (μ′) as high as 5.5 and low magnetic loss (μ″ < 0.2) below 3 MHz. And the interesting ferromagnetic superexchange coupling in Co-doped CaCu{sub 3}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 12} was discussed.

  2. A finite element analysis of room temperature silicon crystals for the Advanced Photon Source bending-magnet and insertion-device beams

    SciTech Connect

    Assoufid, L.; Lee, W.K.; Mills, D.M.

    1994-08-01

    The third generation of synchrotron radiation sources, such as the Advanced Photon Source (APS), will provide users with a high brilliance x-ray beam with high power and power densities. In many cases, the first optical component to intercept the x-ray beam is a silicon-crystal monochromator. Due to extreme heat loading, the photon throughput and brilliance will be severely degraded if the monochromator is not properly designed (or cooled). This document describes a series of finite element analyses performed on room temperature silicon for the three standard APS sources, namely, the bending magnet, Wiggler A, and Undulator A. The modeling is performed with the silicon cooled directly with water or liquid gallium through rectangular channels. The temperature distributions and thermally induced deformations are presented.

  3. Topological Insulators at Room Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Haijun; Liu, Chao-Xing; Qi, Xiao-Liang; Dai, Xi; Fang, Zhong; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2010-03-25

    Topological insulators are new states of quantum matter with surface states protected by the time-reversal symmetry. In this work, we perform first-principle electronic structure calculations for Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}, Sb{sub 2}Se{sub 3}, Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} crystals. Our calculations predict that Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}, Bi{sub 2}T e{sub 3} and Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} are topological insulators, while Sb{sub 2}Se{sub 3} is not. In particular, Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} has a topologically non-trivial energy gap of 0.3eV , suitable for room temperature applications. We present a simple and unified continuum model which captures the salient topological features of this class of materials. These topological insulators have robust surface states consisting of a single Dirac cone at the {Lambda} point.

  4. Efficient room-temperature Spin Hall nano-oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zholud, Andrei; Urazhdin, Sergei

    2014-03-01

    Spin current injected into a ferromagnet exerts a spin torque on the magnetization, modifying its dynamical damping. Complete compensation of damping by spin current can result in magnetization auto-oscillations, as was demonstrated for in-plane point-contact spin Hall oscillator devices utilizing Pt spin Hall material as a source of spin current and permalloy (Py) as active magnetic layer. Electronic spectroscopy has demonstrated microwave generation by oscillations of magnetization at cryogenic temperatures, but this microwave generation decreases with increasing temperature and disappears at room temperature. We will describe a new device geometry that decouples spin transport from the magnetic configuration by separate patterning of the spin Hall Pt layer and the active Py layer. We demonstrate that this device geometry can operate at smaller driving dc currents for microwave generation that persists up to room temperature. We discuss the physical mechanisms that affect the temperature- and geometry-dependent performance of spin Hall nano-oscillators.

  5. Investigation of local structural environments and room-temperature ferromagnetism in (Fe,Cu)-codoped In2O3 diluted magnetic oxide films.

    PubMed

    An, Yukai; Xing, Yaya; Pan, Fei; Wu, Zhonghua; Liu, Jiwen

    2016-05-11

    The local structural, optical, magnetic and transport properties of (In0.95-xFexCu0.05)2O3 (0.06 ≤ x ≤ 0.20) films deposited by RF-magnetron sputtering have been systemically studied by different experimental techniques. Detailed structural analyses using XRD, XPS, EXAFS and full multiple-scattering ab initio theoretical calculations of Fe K-edge XANES show that the (In0.95-xFexCu0.05)2O3 films have the same cubic bixbyite structure as pure In2O3. The doped Fe ions exist at both +2 and +3 oxidation states, substituting for the In(3+) sites in the In2O3 lattice and forming a FeIn + 2VO complex with the O vacancy in the first coordination shell of Fe. However, the co-doped Cu atoms are not incorporated into the In2O3 lattice and form the Cu metal clusters due to high ionization energy. UV-Vis measurements show that the optical band gap Eg decreases monotonically with the increase of Fe concentration, implying an increasing s-pd exchange interaction in the films. All the films display intrinsic room-temperature (RT) ferromagnetism and the saturated magnetization (Ms) increases monotonically with Fe doping. The temperature dependence of the resistivity data suggests the conduction mechanism of Mott variable-range hopping (VRH) at low temperature, confirming that the carriers are localized. It can be concluded that the observed RT ferromagnetism in the films originates from the overlapping of polarons mediated by oxygen vacancies based on the bound magnetic polaron (BMP) model. The variation of the localization effect of carriers with Fe doping can obviously adjust the magnetic exchange interaction in the (In0.95-xFexCu0.05)2O3 films. PMID:27139011

  6. Ultrahigh magnetoresistance at room temperature in molecular wires.

    PubMed

    Mahato, R N; Lülf, H; Siekman, M H; Kersten, S P; Bobbert, P A; de Jong, M P; De Cola, L; van der Wiel, W G

    2013-07-19

    Systems featuring large magnetoresistance (MR) at room temperature and in small magnetic fields are attractive owing to their potential for applications in magnetic field sensing and data storage. Usually, the magnetic properties of materials are exploited to achieve large MR effects. Here, we report on an exceptionally large (>2000%), room-temperature, small-field (a few millitesla) MR effect in one-dimensional, nonmagnetic systems formed by molecular wires embedded in a zeolite host crystal. This ultrahigh MR effect is ascribed to spin blockade in one-dimensional electron transport. Its generic nature offers very good perspectives to exploit the effect in a wide range of low-dimensional systems. PMID:23828887

  7. Super-giant magnetoresistance at room-temperature in copper nanowires due to magnetic field modulation of potential barrier heights at nanowire-contact interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, Md I.; Maksud, M.; Palapati, N. K. R.; Subramanian, A.; Atulasimha, J.; Bandyopadhyay, S.

    2016-07-01

    We have observed a super-giant (∼10 000 000%) negative magnetoresistance at 39 mT field in Cu nanowires contacted with Au contact pads. In these nanowires, potential barriers form at the two Cu/Au interfaces because of Cu oxidation that results in an ultrathin copper oxide layer forming between Cu and Au. Current flows when electrons tunnel through, and/or thermionically emit over, these barriers. A magnetic field applied transverse to the direction of current flow along the wire deflects electrons toward one edge of the wire because of the Lorentz force, causing electron accumulation at that edge and depletion at the other. This lowers the potential barrier at the accumulated edge and raises it at the depleted edge, causing a super-giant magnetoresistance at room temperature.

  8. Super-giant magnetoresistance at room-temperature in copper nanowires due to magnetic field modulation of potential barrier heights at nanowire-contact interfaces.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Md I; Maksud, M; Palapati, N K R; Subramanian, A; Atulasimha, J; Bandyopadhyay, S

    2016-07-29

    We have observed a super-giant (∼10 000 000%) negative magnetoresistance at 39 mT field in Cu nanowires contacted with Au contact pads. In these nanowires, potential barriers form at the two Cu/Au interfaces because of Cu oxidation that results in an ultrathin copper oxide layer forming between Cu and Au. Current flows when electrons tunnel through, and/or thermionically emit over, these barriers. A magnetic field applied transverse to the direction of current flow along the wire deflects electrons toward one edge of the wire because of the Lorentz force, causing electron accumulation at that edge and depletion at the other. This lowers the potential barrier at the accumulated edge and raises it at the depleted edge, causing a super-giant magnetoresistance at room temperature. PMID:27320491

  9. Room temperature ferromagnetic (Fe₁-xCox)₃BO₅ nanorods.

    PubMed

    He, Shuli; Zhang, Hongwang; Xing, Hui; Li, Kai; Cui, Hongfei; Yang, Chenguang; Sun, Shouheng; Zeng, Hao

    2014-07-01

    Cobalt-doped ferroferriborate ((Fe1-xCox)3BO5) nanorods (NRs) are synthesized by a one-pot high-temperature organic-solution-phase method. The aspect ratios of the NRs are tuned by the heating rate. These NRs form via anisotropic growth along twin boundaries of the multiply twinned nuclei. Magnetic properties are dramatically modified by Co substitutional doping, changing from antiferromagnetic order at low temperatures to ferromagnetic above room temperature, with a greatly enhanced magnetic ordering temperature. These anisotropic ferromagnetic NRs with a high ordering temperature may provide a new platform for understanding nanomagnetism and for magnetic applications. PMID:24905634

  10. Magnetic properties of epitaxial Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} films with various crystal orientations and tunnel magnetoresistance effect at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Nagahama, Taro Matsuda, Yuya; Tate, Kazuya; Kawai, Tomohiro; Takahashi, Nozomi; Hiratani, Shungo; Watanabe, Yusuke; Yanase, Takashi; Shimada, Toshihiro

    2014-09-08

    Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} is a ferrimagnetic spinel ferrite that exhibits electric conductivity at room temperature (RT). Although the material has been predicted to be a half metal according to ab-initio calculations, magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) with Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} electrodes have demonstrated a small tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) effect. Not even the sign of the tunnel magnetoresistance ratio has been experimentally established. Here, we report on the magnetic properties of epitaxial Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} films with various crystal orientations. The films exhibited apparent crystal orientation dependence on hysteresis curves. In particular, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}(110) films exhibited in-plane uniaxial magnetic anisotropy. With respect to the squareness of hysteresis, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} (111) demonstrated the largest squareness. Furthermore, we fabricated MTJs with Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}(110) electrodes and obtained a TMR effect of −12% at RT. The negative TMR ratio corresponded to the negative spin polarization of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} predicted from band calculations.

  11. Magneto-optical controlled transmittance alteration of PbS quantum dots by moderately applied magnetic fields at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Akhilesh K.; Barik, Puspendu; Ullrich, Bruno E-mail: bruno.ullrich@yahoo.com

    2014-12-15

    We observed changes of the transmitted monochromatic light passing through a colloidal PbS quantum dot film on glass owing to an applied moderate (smaller than 1 T) magnetic field under ambient conditions. The observed alterations show a square dependence on the magnetic field increase that cannot be achieved with bulk semiconductors. The findings point to so far not recognized application potentials of quantum dots.

  12. Influence of interstitial Mn on magnetism in the room-temperature ferromagnet Mn1+δSb

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Taylor, Alice E.; Berlijn, Tom; Hahn, Steven E.; May, Andrew F.; Williams, Travis J.; Poudel, Lekhanath N; Calder, Stuart A.; Fishman, Randy Scott; Stone, Matthew B.; Aczel, Adam A.; et al

    2015-06-15

    We repormore » t elastic and inelastic neutron scattering measurements of the high-TC ferromagnet Mn1+δSb. Measurements were performed on a large, TC = 434 K, single crystal with interstitial Mn content of δ ≈ 0.13. The neutron diffraction results reveal that the interstitial Mn has a magnetic moment, and that it is aligned antiparallel to the main Mn moment. We perform density functional theory calculations including the interstitial Mn, and find the interstitial to be magnetic in agreement with the diffraction data. The inelastic neutron scattering measurements reveal two features in the magnetic dynamics: i) a spin-wave-like dispersion emanating from ferromagnetic Bragg positions (H K 2n), and ii) a broad, non-dispersive signal centered at forbidden Bragg positions (H K 2n+1). The inelastic spectrum cannot be modeled by simple linear spin-wave theory calculations, and appears to be significantly altered by the presence of the interstitial Mn ions. Finally, the results show that the influence of the interstitial Mn on the magnetic state in this system is more important than previously understood.« less

  13. Observation of Room Temperature Ferromagnetism in InN Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Roul, Basanta; Kumar, Mahesh; Bhat, Thirumaleshwara N; Rajpalke, Mohana K; Krupanidhi, S B; Kumar, Nitesh; Sundaresan, A

    2015-06-01

    The room temperature ferromagnetic behavior of InN nanostructures grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) is explored by means of magnetization measurements. The saturation magnetization and remanent magnetization are found to be strongly dependent on the size of the nanostructures. This suggests that the ferromagnetism is essentially confined to the surface of the nanostructures due to the possible defects. Raman spectroscopy shows the existence of indium vacancies which could be the source of ferromagnetic ordering in InN nanostructures. PMID:26369060

  14. Room temperature creep in metals and alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Deibler, Lisa Anne

    2014-09-01

    Time dependent deformation in the form of creep and stress relaxation is not often considered a factor when designing structural alloy parts for use at room temperature. However, creep and stress relaxation do occur at room temperature (0.09-0.21 Tm for alloys in this report) in structural alloys. This report will summarize the available literature on room temperature creep, present creep data collected on various structural alloys, and finally compare the acquired data to equations used in the literature to model creep behavior. Based on evidence from the literature and fitting of various equations, the mechanism which causes room temperature creep is found to include dislocation generation as well as exhaustion.

  15. Easily Accessible Rare-Earth-Containing Phosphonium Room-Temperature Ionic Liquids: EXAFS, Luminescence, and Magnetic Properties.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Vicente, Jorge; Dandil, Sahra; Banerjee, Dipanjan; Gunaratne, H Q Nimal; Gray, Suzanne; Felton, Solveig; Srinivasan, Geetha; Kaczmarek, Anna M; Van Deun, Rik; Nockemann, Peter

    2016-06-16

    A range of liquid rare earth chlorometallate complexes with the alkyl-phosphonium cation, [P666 14](+), has been synthesized and characterized. EXAFS confirmed the predominant liquid-state speciation of the [LnCl6](3-) ion in the series with Ln = Nd, Eu, Dy. The crystal structure of the shorter-alkyl-chain cation analogue [P4444](+) has been determined and exhibits a very large unit cell. The luminescence properties, with visible-light emissions of the liquid Tb, Eu, Pr, and Sm and the NIR emissions for the Nd and Er compounds, were determined. The effective magnetic moments were measured and fitted for the Nd, Tb, Ho, Dy, Gd, and Er samples. PMID:27203286

  16. Determining Camera Gain in Room Temperature Cameras

    SciTech Connect

    Joshua Cogliati

    2010-12-01

    James R. Janesick provides a method for determining the amplification of a CCD or CMOS camera when only access to the raw images is provided. However, the equation that is provided ignores the contribution of dark current. For CCD or CMOS cameras that are cooled well below room temperature, this is not a problem, however, the technique needs adjustment for use with room temperature cameras. This article describes the adjustment made to the equation, and a test of this method.

  17. Room temperature d0 ferromagnetism in ZnS nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proshchenko, Vitaly; Horoz, Sabit; Tang, Jinke; Dahnovsky, Yuri

    2016-06-01

    Room temperature ferromagnetic semiconductors have a great deal of advantage because of their easy integration into semiconductor devices. ZnS nanocrystals (NCs), bulk, and surfaces exhibit d0 ferromagnetism at room temperature. The experiments reveal that NC ferromagnetism takes place at low and room temperatures only due to Zn vacancies (S vacancies do not contribute). To understand the mechanism of d0 ferromagnetism, we introduce the surface-bulk model of a nanocrystal, which includes both surface and bulk magnetizations. The calculations demonstrate that the surface has the higher than bulk magnetization. We find the mechanism of the ferromagnetism is due to sulfur s- and p-electrons in a tetrahedral crystal field. The bulk magnetic moment increases with Zn vacancy concentration at small concentrations and then goes down at larger concentrations. A surface magnetic moment behaves differently with the concentration. It is always a monotonically rising function. We find that the total NC magnetic moment increases with the size and concentration of Zn vacancies (only low concentrations). We also study the magnetization per unit cell where we find that it decreases for the surface and increases for bulk magnetism with the NC size.

  18. Towards Room Temperature Spin Filtering in Oxide Tunnel Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata-Harms, Jodi; Wong, Franklin; Arenholz, Elke; Suzuki, Yuri

    2012-02-01

    Spin filtering, in which the magnetic tunnel barrier preferentially filters spin-up and spin-down electrons from a nonmagnetic electrode, has been demonstrated in junction heterostructures. By incorporating two spin filtering barriers, double spin filter magnetic tunnel junctions (DSF-MTJs) were predicted to yield magnetoresistance (MR) values orders of magnitude larger than that of conventional magnetic tunnel junctions. Recently, DSF-MTJs have exhibited spin filtering with magnetic electrodes at room temperature and at low temperature with nonmagnetic electrodes in EuS-based devices [1,2]. We have fabricated DSF-MTJs with nonmagnetic SrRuO3 electrodes and room temperature ferrimagnets, NiFe2O4 and CoFe2O4, for spin filters in pursuit of room temperature functionality. Atomic force microscopy shows smooth films quantified by roughness values between 0.1--0.5nm. X-ray magnetic circular dichroism reveals ferromagnetic Ni^2+ and Co^2+, and element-specific hysteresis loops indicate the independent switching of the two spin filters. Transport data reveals junction MR and non-linear I-V characteristics consistent with tunneling. [4pt] [1] M.G. Chapline et al., PRB, 74, 014418 (2006).[0pt] [2] G.- X. Miao et al., PRL, 102, 076601 (2009).

  19. Room temperature skyrmion ground state stabilized through interlayer exchange coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Gong Schmid, Andreas K.; Mascaraque, Arantzazu; N'Diaye, Alpha T.

    2015-06-15

    Possible magnetic skyrmion device applications motivate the search for structures that extend the stability of skyrmion spin textures to ambient temperature. Here, we demonstrate an experimental approach to stabilize a room temperature skyrmion ground state in chiral magnetic films via exchange coupling across non-magnetic spacer layers. Using spin polarized low-energy electron microscopy to measure all three Cartesian components of the magnetization vector, we image the spin textures in Fe/Ni films. We show how tuning the thickness of a copper spacer layer between chiral Fe/Ni films and perpendicularly magnetized Ni layers permits stabilization of a chiral stripe phase, a skyrmion phase, and a single domain phase. This strategy to stabilize skyrmion ground states can be extended to other magnetic thin film systems and may be useful for designing skyrmion based spintronics devices.

  20. Dynamics of Glass Relaxation at Room Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, Roger C.; Smith, John R.; Potuzak, Marcel; Guo, Xiaoju; Bowden, Bradley F.; Kiczenski, T. J.; Allan, Douglas C.; King, Ellyn A.; Ellison, Adam J.; Mauro, John C.

    2013-06-01

    The problem of glass relaxation under ambient conditions has intrigued scientists and the general public for centuries, most notably in the legend of flowing cathedral glass windows. Here we report quantitative measurement of glass relaxation at room temperature. We find that Corning® Gorilla® Glass shows measurable and reproducible relaxation at room temperature. Remarkably, this relaxation follows a stretched exponential decay rather than simple exponential relaxation, and the value of the stretching exponent (β=3/7) follows a theoretical prediction made by Phillips for homogeneous glasses.

  1. Entangling Macroscopic Diamonds at Room Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, K. C.; Sprague, M. R.; Sussman, B. J.; Nunn, J.; Langford, N. K.; Jin, X.-M.; Champion, T.; Michelberger, P.; Reim, K. F.; England, D.; Jaksch, D.; Walmsley, I. A.

    2011-12-01

    Quantum entanglement in the motion of macroscopic solid bodies has implications both for quantum technologies and foundational studies of the boundary between the quantum and classical worlds. Entanglement is usually fragile in room-temperature solids, owing to strong interactions both internally and with the noisy environment. We generated motional entanglement between vibrational states of two spatially separated, millimeter-sized diamonds at room temperature. By measuring strong nonclassical correlations between Raman-scattered photons, we showed that the quantum state of the diamonds has positive concurrence with 98% probability. Our results show that entanglement can persist in the classical context of moving macroscopic solids in ambient conditions.

  2. Widely tunable room temperature semiconductor terahertz source

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Q. Y.; Slivken, S.; Bandyopadhyay, N.; Bai, Y.; Razeghi, M.

    2014-11-17

    We present a widely tunable, monolithic terahertz source based on intracavity difference frequency generation within a mid-infrared quantum cascade laser at room temperature. A three-section ridge waveguide laser design with two sampled grating sections and a distributed-Bragg section is used to achieve the terahertz (THz) frequency tuning. Room temperature single mode THz emission with a wide tunable frequency range of 2.6–4.2 THz (∼47% of the central frequency) and THz power up to 0.1 mW is demonstrated, making such device an ideal candidate for THz spectroscopy and sensing.

  3. Magnetic-field-induced irreversible antiferromagnetic-ferromagnetic phase transition around room temperature in as-cast Sm-Co based SmCo7-xSix alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, D. Y.; Zhao, L. Z.; Liu, Z. W.

    2016-04-01

    A magnetic-field-induced irreversible metamagnetic phase transition from antiferro- to ferromagnetism, which leads to an anomalous initial-magnetization curve lying outside the magnetic hysteresis loop, is reported in arc-melted SmCo7-xSix alloys. The transition temperatures are near room temperature, much higher than other compounds with similar initial curves. Detailed investigation shows that this phenomenon is dependent on temperature, magnetic field and Si content and shows some interesting characteristics. It is suggested that varying interactions between the Sm and Co layers in the crystal are responsible for the formation of a metastable AFM structure, which induces the anomalous phenomenon in as-cast alloys. The random occupation of 3g sites by Si and Co atoms also has an effect on this phenomenon.

  4. Room temperature ferromagnetism in Teflon due to carbon dangling bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Y. W.; Lu, Y. H.; Yi, J. B.; Feng, Y. P.; Herng, T. S.; Liu, X.; Gao, D. Q.; Xue, D. S.; Xue, J. M.; Ouyang, J. Y.; Ding, J.

    2012-03-01

    The ferromagnetism in many carbon nanostructures is attributed to carbon dangling bonds or vacancies. This provides opportunities to develop new functional materials, such as molecular and polymeric ferromagnets and organic spintronic materials, without magnetic elements (for example, 3d and 4f metals). Here we report the observation of room temperature ferromagnetism in Teflon tape (polytetrafluoroethylene) subjected to simple mechanical stretching, cutting or heating. First-principles calculations indicate that the room temperature ferromagnetism originates from carbon dangling bonds and strong ferromagnetic coupling between them. Room temperature ferromagnetism has also been successfully realized in another polymer, polyethylene, through cutting and stretching. Our findings suggest that ferromagnetism due to networks of carbon dangling bonds can arise in polymers and carbon-based molecular materials.

  5. Bulk nuclear polarization enhanced at room temperature by optical pumping.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Ran; Bretschneider, Christian O; London, Paz; Budker, Dmitry; Gershoni, David; Frydman, Lucio

    2013-08-01

    Bulk (13)C polarization can be strongly enhanced in diamond at room temperature based on the optical pumping of nitrogen-vacancy color centers. This effect was confirmed by irradiating single crystals at a ~50 mT field promoting anticrossings between electronic excited-state levels, followed by shuttling of the sample into an NMR setup and by subsequent (13)C detection. A nuclear polarization of ~0.5%--equivalent to the (13)C polarization achievable by thermal polarization at room temperature at fields of ~2000 T--was measured, and its bulk nature determined based on line shape and relaxation measurements. Positive and negative enhanced polarizations were obtained, with a generally complex but predictable dependence on the magnetic field during optical pumping. Owing to its simplicity, this (13)C room temperature polarizing strategy provides a promising new addition to existing nuclear hyperpolarization techniques. PMID:23952444

  6. Room Temperature and Elevated Temperature Composite Sandwich Joint Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Sandra P.

    1998-01-01

    Testing of composite sandwich joint elements has been completed to verify the strength capacity of joints designed to carry specified running loads representative of a high speed civil transport wing. Static tension testing at both room and an elevated temperature of 350 F and fatigue testing at room temperature were conducted to determine strength capacity, fatigue life, and failure modes. Static tension test results yielded failure loads above the design loads for the room temperature tests, confirming the ability of the joint concepts tested to carry their design loads. However, strength reductions as large as 30% were observed at the elevated test temperature, where all failure loads were below the room temperature design loads for the specific joint designs tested. Fatigue testing resulted in lower than predicted fatigue lives.

  7. Low-field magnetoelectric effect at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitagawa, Yutaro; Hiraoka, Yuji; Honda, Takashi; Ishikura, Taishi; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Kimura, Tsuyoshi

    2010-10-01

    The discoveries of gigantic ferroelectric polarization in BiFeO3 (ref. 1) and ferroelectricity accompanied by a magnetic order in TbMnO3 (ref. 2) have renewed interest in research on magnetoelectric multiferroics, materials in which magnetic and ferroelectric orders coexist, from both fundamental and technological points of view. Among several different types of magnetoelectric multiferroic, magnetically induced ferroelectrics in which ferroelectricity is induced by complex magnetic orders, such as spiral orders, exhibit giant magnetoelectric effects, remarkable changes in electric polarization in response to a magnetic field. Many magnetically induced ferroelectrics showing the magnetoelectric effects have been found in the past several years. From a practical point of view, however, their magnetoelectric effects are useless because they operate only far below room temperature (for example, 28K in TbMnO3 (ref. 2) and 230K in CuO (ref. 11)). Furthermore, in most of them, the operating magnetic field is an order of tesla that is too high for practical applications. Here we report materials, Z-type hexaferrites, overcoming these problems on magnetically induced ferroelectrics. The best magnetoelectric properties were obtained for Sr3Co2Fe24O41 ceramics sintered in oxygen, which exhibit a low-field magnetoelectric effect at room temperature. Our result represents an important step towards practical device applications using the magnetoelectric effects.

  8. Studies of the Room-Temperature Multiferroic Pb(Fe0.5Ta0.5)0.4(Zr0.53Ti0.47)0.6O3: Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy, Dielectric, and Magnetic Phenomena

    PubMed Central

    Schiemer, J; Carpenter, M A; Evans, D M; Gregg, J M; Schilling, A; Arredondo, M; Alexe, M; Sanchez, D; Ortega, N; Katiyar, R S; Echizen, M; Colliver, E; Dutton, S; Scott, J F

    2014-01-01

    Recently, lead iron tantalate/lead zirconium titanate (PZTFT) was demonstrated to possess large, but unreliable, magnetoelectric coupling at room temperature. Such large coupling would be desirable for device applications but reproducibility would also be critical. To better understand the coupling, the properties of all 3 ferroic order parameters, elastic, electric, and magnetic, believed to be present in the material across a range of temperatures, are investigated. In high temperature elastic data, an anomaly is observed at the orthorhombic mm2 to tetragonal 4mm transition, Tot = 475 K, and a softening trend is observed as the temperature is increased toward 1300 K, where the material is known to become cubic. Thermal degradation makes it impossible to measure elastic behavior up to this temperature, however. In the low temperature region, there are elastic anomalies near ≈40 K and in the range 160–245 K. The former is interpreted as being due to a magnetic ordering transition and the latter is interpreted as a hysteretic regime of mixed rhombohedral and orthorhombic structures. Electrical and magnetic data collected below room temperature show anomalies at remarkably similar temperature ranges to the elastic data. These observations are used to suggest that the three order parameters in PZTFT are strongly coupled. PMID:25844085

  9. Imprinting bulk amorphous alloy at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Song-Yi; Park, Eun-Soo; Ott, Ryan T.; Lograsso, Thomas A.; Huh, Moo-Young; Kim, Do-Hyang; Eckert, Jürgen; Lee, Min-Ha

    2015-11-13

    We present investigations on the plastic deformation behavior of a brittle bulk amorphous alloy by simple uniaxial compressive loading at room temperature. A patterning is possible by cold-plastic forming of the typically brittle Hf-based bulk amorphous alloy through controlling homogenous flow without the need for thermal energy or shaping at elevated temperatures. The experimental evidence suggests that there is an inconsistency between macroscopic plasticity and deformability of an amorphous alloy. Moreover, imprinting of specific geometrical features on Cu foil and Zr-based metallic glass is represented by using the patterned bulk amorphous alloy as a die. These results demonstrate the ability of amorphous alloys or metallic glasses to precisely replicate patterning features onto both conventional metals and the other amorphous alloys. In conclusion, our work presents an avenue for avoiding the embrittlement of amorphous alloys associated with thermoplastic forming and yields new insight the forming application of bulk amorphous alloys at room temperature without using heat treatment.

  10. Imprinting bulk amorphous alloy at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Song-Yi; Park, Eun-Soo; Ott, Ryan T.; Lograsso, Thomas A.; Huh, Moo-Young; Kim, Do-Hyang; Eckert, Jürgen; Lee, Min-Ha

    2015-01-01

    We present investigations on the plastic deformation behavior of a brittle bulk amorphous alloy by simple uniaxial compressive loading at room temperature. A patterning is possible by cold-plastic forming of the typically brittle Hf-based bulk amorphous alloy through controlling homogenous flow without the need for thermal energy or shaping at elevated temperatures. The experimental evidence suggests that there is an inconsistency between macroscopic plasticity and deformability of an amorphous alloy. Moreover, imprinting of specific geometrical features on Cu foil and Zr-based metallic glass is represented by using the patterned bulk amorphous alloy as a die. These results demonstrate the ability of amorphous alloys or metallic glasses to precisely replicate patterning features onto both conventional metals and the other amorphous alloys. Our work presents an avenue for avoiding the embrittlement of amorphous alloys associated with thermoplastic forming and yields new insight the forming application of bulk amorphous alloys at room temperature without using heat treatment. PMID:26563908

  11. Imprinting bulk amorphous alloy at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Kim, Song-Yi; Park, Eun-Soo; Ott, Ryan T; Lograsso, Thomas A; Huh, Moo-Young; Kim, Do-Hyang; Eckert, Jürgen; Lee, Min-Ha

    2015-01-01

    We present investigations on the plastic deformation behavior of a brittle bulk amorphous alloy by simple uniaxial compressive loading at room temperature. A patterning is possible by cold-plastic forming of the typically brittle Hf-based bulk amorphous alloy through controlling homogenous flow without the need for thermal energy or shaping at elevated temperatures. The experimental evidence suggests that there is an inconsistency between macroscopic plasticity and deformability of an amorphous alloy. Moreover, imprinting of specific geometrical features on Cu foil and Zr-based metallic glass is represented by using the patterned bulk amorphous alloy as a die. These results demonstrate the ability of amorphous alloys or metallic glasses to precisely replicate patterning features onto both conventional metals and the other amorphous alloys. Our work presents an avenue for avoiding the embrittlement of amorphous alloys associated with thermoplastic forming and yields new insight the forming application of bulk amorphous alloys at room temperature without using heat treatment. PMID:26563908

  12. Activation and enhancement of room-temperature ferromagnetism in Cu-doped anatase TiO₂ films by bound magnetic polaron and oxygen defects.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jian-Yun; Bao, Shan-Hu; Lv, Yan-Hong; Jin, Ping

    2014-12-24

    Cu-doped anatase TiO2 films grown by magnetron sputtering at room temperature showed the unexpected observation of room-temperature ferromagnetism, which was enhanced or destroyed corresponding to low or high impurity concentration via vacuum annealing. On the basis of the analysis of composition and structure, the most important factor for activating ferromagnetism can be identified as the creation of grain boundary defects. In addition, oxygen defects can be the dominating factor for increasing the saturation moment of the 0.19 at. % Cu-doped TiO2 film from 0.564 to 26.41 emu/cm(3). These results help elucidate the origin of ferromagnetism and emphasize the role of oxygen defects for the application of ferromagnetic films. PMID:25437752

  13. Room-temperature semiconductor heterostructure refrigeration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, K. A.; Larsson, Magnus; Mal'shukov, A. G.

    2005-07-01

    With the proper design of semiconductor tunneling barrier structures, we can inject low-energy electrons via resonant tunneling, and take out high-energy electrons via a thermionic process. This is the operation principle of our semiconductor heterostructure refrigerator (SHR) without the need of applying a temperature gradient across the device. Even for the bad thermoelectric material AlGaAs, our calculation shows that at room temperature, the SHR can easily lower the temperature by 5-7K. Such devices can be fabricated with the present semiconductor technology. Besides its use as a kitchen refrigerator, the SHR can efficiently cool microelectronic devices.

  14. Individual room temperature control: A peaceful solution to thermostat wars

    SciTech Connect

    Pieper, C.A. )

    1994-01-01

    This article addresses the problem of maintaining thermal comfort in individual rooms using an individual room temperature control concept to provide greater occupant comfort and potentially reduce energy consumption. The topics of the article include occupant temperature control methods, multi-room zone control, HVAC system operation, computer simulation, and the results of using individual room temperature control.

  15. Remote control of magnetostriction-based nanocontacts at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Jammalamadaka, S Narayana; Kuntz, Sebastian; Berg, Oliver; Kittler, Wolfram; Kannan, U Mohanan; Chelvane, J Arout; Sürgers, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    The remote control of the electrical conductance through nanosized junctions at room temperature will play an important role in future nano-electromechanical systems and electronic devices. This can be achieved by exploiting the magnetostriction effects of ferromagnetic materials. Here we report on the electrical conductance of magnetic nanocontacts obtained from wires of the giant magnetostrictive compound Tb0.3Dy0.7Fe1.95 as an active element in a mechanically controlled break-junction device. The nanocontacts are reproducibly switched at room temperature between "open" (zero conductance) and "closed" (nonzero conductance) states by variation of a magnetic field applied perpendicularly to the long wire axis. Conductance measurements in a magnetic field oriented parallel to the long wire axis exhibit a different behaviour where the conductance switches between both states only in a limited field range close to the coercive field. Investigating the conductance in the regime of electron tunneling by mechanical or magnetostrictive control of the electrode separation enables an estimation of the magnetostriction. The present results pave the way to utilize the material in devices based on nano-electromechanical systems operating at room temperature. PMID:26323326

  16. Remote control of magnetostriction-based nanocontacts at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jammalamadaka, S. Narayana; Kuntz, Sebastian; Berg, Oliver; Kittler, Wolfram; Kannan, U. Mohanan; Chelvane, J. Arout; Sürgers, Christoph

    2015-09-01

    The remote control of the electrical conductance through nanosized junctions at room temperature will play an important role in future nano-electromechanical systems and electronic devices. This can be achieved by exploiting the magnetostriction effects of ferromagnetic materials. Here we report on the electrical conductance of magnetic nanocontacts obtained from wires of the giant magnetostrictive compound Tb0.3Dy0.7Fe1.95 as an active element in a mechanically controlled break-junction device. The nanocontacts are reproducibly switched at room temperature between “open” (zero conductance) and “closed” (nonzero conductance) states by variation of a magnetic field applied perpendicularly to the long wire axis. Conductance measurements in a magnetic field oriented parallel to the long wire axis exhibit a different behaviour where the conductance switches between both states only in a limited field range close to the coercive field. Investigating the conductance in the regime of electron tunneling by mechanical or magnetostrictive control of the electrode separation enables an estimation of the magnetostriction. The present results pave the way to utilize the material in devices based on nano-electromechanical systems operating at room temperature.

  17. Remote control of magnetostriction-based nanocontacts at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Jammalamadaka, S. Narayana; Kuntz, Sebastian; Berg, Oliver; Kittler, Wolfram; Kannan, U. Mohanan; Chelvane, J. Arout; Sürgers, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    The remote control of the electrical conductance through nanosized junctions at room temperature will play an important role in future nano-electromechanical systems and electronic devices. This can be achieved by exploiting the magnetostriction effects of ferromagnetic materials. Here we report on the electrical conductance of magnetic nanocontacts obtained from wires of the giant magnetostrictive compound Tb0.3Dy0.7Fe1.95 as an active element in a mechanically controlled break-junction device. The nanocontacts are reproducibly switched at room temperature between “open” (zero conductance) and “closed” (nonzero conductance) states by variation of a magnetic field applied perpendicularly to the long wire axis. Conductance measurements in a magnetic field oriented parallel to the long wire axis exhibit a different behaviour where the conductance switches between both states only in a limited field range close to the coercive field. Investigating the conductance in the regime of electron tunneling by mechanical or magnetostrictive control of the electrode separation enables an estimation of the magnetostriction. The present results pave the way to utilize the material in devices based on nano-electromechanical systems operating at room temperature. PMID:26323326

  18. Large magnetic response in (Bi{sub 4}Nd)Ti{sub 3}(Fe{sub 0.5}Co{sub 0.5})O{sub 15} ceramic at room-temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, F. J.; Su, P.; Wei, C.; Chen, X. Q.; Yang, C. P.; Cao, W. Q.

    2011-12-15

    Ceramics of Nd/Co co-substituted Bi{sub 5}Ti{sub 3}FeO{sub 15}, i.e., (Bi{sub 4}Nd)Ti{sub 3}(Fe{sub 0.5}Co{sub 0.5})O{sub 15} were prepared by the conventional solid-state reaction method. The X-ray diffraction pattern demonstrates that the sample of the layered perovskite phase was successfully obtained, even if little Bi-deficient pyrochlore Bi{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} also existed. The ferroelectric and magnetic Curie temperatures were determined to be 1077 K and 497 K, respectively. The multiferroic property of the sample at room temperature was demonstrated by ferroelectric and magnetic measurements. Remarkably, by Nd/Co co-substituting, the sample exhibited large magnetic response with 2M{sub r} = 330 memu/g and 2H{sub c} = 562 Oe at applied magnetic field of 8 kOe at room temperature. The present work suggests the possibility of doped Bi{sub 5}Ti{sub 3}FeO{sub 15} as a potential multiferroic.

  19. Room-temperature magnetoelectric multiferroic thin films and applications thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Katiyar, Ram S; Kuman, Ashok; Scott, James F.

    2014-08-12

    The invention provides a novel class of room-temperature, single-phase, magnetoelectric multiferroic (PbFe.sub.0.67W.sub.0.33O.sub.3).sub.x (PbZr.sub.0.53Ti.sub.0.47O.sub.3).sub.1-x (0.2.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.0.8) (PFW.sub.x-PZT.sub.1-x) thin films that exhibit high dielectric constants, high polarization, weak saturation magnetization, broad dielectric temperature peak, high-frequency dispersion, low dielectric loss and low leakage current. These properties render them to be suitable candidates for room-temperature multiferroic devices. Methods of preparation are also provided.

  20. Multiple magnetic transitions and associated room temperature magneto-functionality in Ni2.048Mn1.312In0.64

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pramanick, S.; Dutta, P.; Chatterjee, S.; Giri, S.; Majumdar, S.

    2016-05-01

    Present work reports on the observation of multiple magnetic transitions in a Ni-excess ferromagnetic shape memory alloy with nominal composition Ni2.048Mn1.312In0.64. The magnetization data reveal two distinct thermal hystereses associated with two different phase transitions at different temperature regions. The high temperature magnetic hysteresis is due to the martensitic phase transition whereas the low temperature hysteresis occurs around the magnetic anomaly signifying the transition from a paramagnetic-like state to the ferromagnetic ground state within the martensite. Clear thermal hysteresis along with the sign of the curvatures of Arrott plot curves confirm the first-order nature of both the transitions. In addition, the studied alloy is found to be functionally rich with the observation of large magnetoresistance (-45% and -4% at 80 kOe) and magnetocaloric effect (+16.7 J kg-1 K-1 and -2.25 J kg-1 K-1 at 50 kOe) around these two hysteresis regions (300 K and 195 K respectively).

  1. A Polar Corundum Oxide Displaying Weak Ferromagnetism at Room Temperature

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Combining long-range magnetic order with polarity in the same structure is a prerequisite for the design of (magnetoelectric) multiferroic materials. There are now several demonstrated strategies to achieve this goal, but retaining magnetic order above room temperature remains a difficult target. Iron oxides in the +3 oxidation state have high magnetic ordering temperatures due to the size of the coupled moments. Here we prepare and characterize ScFeO3 (SFO), which under pressure and in strain-stabilized thin films adopts a polar variant of the corundum structure, one of the archetypal binary oxide structures. Polar corundum ScFeO3 has a weak ferromagnetic ground state below 356 K—this is in contrast to the purely antiferromagnetic ground state adopted by the well-studied ferroelectric BiFeO3. PMID:22280499

  2. Theory of room temperature ferromagnetism in Cr modified DNA nanowire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paruğ Duru, Izzet; Değer, Caner; Eldem, Vahap; Kalayci, Taner; Aktaş, Şahin

    2016-04-01

    We investigated the magnetic properties of Cr3+ (J  <  0) ion-modified DNA (M-DNA) nanowire (1000 base) at room temperature under a uniform magnetic field (˜100 Oe) for different doping concentrations. A Monte Carlo simulation method-based Metropolis algorithm is used to figure out the thermodynamic quantities of nanowire formed by Cr M-DNA followed by analysing the dependency of the ferromagnetic behaviour of the M-DNA to dopant concentration. It is understood that ion density/base and ion density/helical of Cr3+ ions can be a tuning parameter, herewith the dopant ratio has an actual importance on the magnetic characterization of M-DNA nanowire (3%-20%). We propose the source of magnetism as an exchange interaction between Cr and DNA helical atoms indicated in the Heisenberg Hamiltonian.

  3. Imprinting bulk amorphous alloy at room temperature

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kim, Song-Yi; Park, Eun-Soo; Ott, Ryan T.; Lograsso, Thomas A.; Huh, Moo-Young; Kim, Do-Hyang; Eckert, Jürgen; Lee, Min-Ha

    2015-11-13

    We present investigations on the plastic deformation behavior of a brittle bulk amorphous alloy by simple uniaxial compressive loading at room temperature. A patterning is possible by cold-plastic forming of the typically brittle Hf-based bulk amorphous alloy through controlling homogenous flow without the need for thermal energy or shaping at elevated temperatures. The experimental evidence suggests that there is an inconsistency between macroscopic plasticity and deformability of an amorphous alloy. Moreover, imprinting of specific geometrical features on Cu foil and Zr-based metallic glass is represented by using the patterned bulk amorphous alloy as a die. These results demonstrate the abilitymore » of amorphous alloys or metallic glasses to precisely replicate patterning features onto both conventional metals and the other amorphous alloys. In conclusion, our work presents an avenue for avoiding the embrittlement of amorphous alloys associated with thermoplastic forming and yields new insight the forming application of bulk amorphous alloys at room temperature without using heat treatment.« less

  4. Tunable room-temperature ferromagnet using an iron-oxide and graphene oxide nanocomposite

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Aigu L.; Rodrigues, J. N. B.; Su, Chenliang; Milletari, M.; Loh, Kian Ping; Wu, Tom; Chen, Wei; Neto, A. H. Castro; Adam, Shaffique; Wee, Andrew T. S.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic materials have found wide application ranging from electronics and memories to medicine. Essential to these advances is the control of the magnetic order. To date, most room-temperature applications have a fixed magnetic moment whose orientation is manipulated for functionality. Here we demonstrate an iron-oxide and graphene oxide nanocomposite based device that acts as a tunable ferromagnet at room temperature. Not only can we tune its transition temperature in a wide range of temperatures around room temperature, but the magnetization can also be tuned from zero to 0.011 A m2/kg through an initialization process with two readily accessible knobs (magnetic field and electric current), after which the system retains its magnetic properties semi-permanently until the next initialization process. We construct a theoretical model to illustrate that this tunability originates from an indirect exchange interaction mediated by spin-imbalanced electrons inside the nanocomposite. PMID:26100970

  5. Room temperature electrically injected polariton laser.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Pallab; Frost, Thomas; Deshpande, Saniya; Baten, Md Zunaid; Hazari, Arnab; Das, Ayan

    2014-06-13

    Room temperature electrically pumped inversionless polariton lasing is observed from a bulk GaN-based microcavity diode. The low nonlinear threshold for polariton lasing occurs at 169 A/cm(2) in the light-current characteristics, accompanied by a collapse of the emission linewidth and small blueshift of the emission peak. Measurement of angle-resolved luminescence, polariton condensation and occupation in momentum space, and output spatial coherence and polarization have also been made. A second threshold, due to conventional photon lasing, is observed at an injection of 44 kA/cm(2). PMID:24972222

  6. Enhanced room temperature ferromagnetism in antiferromagnetic NiO nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Ravikumar, Patta; Kisan, Bhagaban; Perumal, A.

    2015-08-15

    We report systematic investigations of structural, vibrational, resonance and magnetic properties of nanoscale NiO powders prepared by ball milling process under different milling speeds for 30 hours of milling. Structural properties revealed that both pure NiO and as-milled NiO powders exhibit face centered cubic structure, but average crystallite size decreases to around 11 nm along with significant increase in strain with increasing milling speed. Vibrational properties show the enhancement in the intensity of one-phonon longitudinal optical (LO) band and disappearance of two-magnon band due to size reduction. In addition, two-phonon LO band exhibits red shift due to size-induced phonon confinement effect and surface relaxation. Pure NiO powder exhibit antiferromagnetic nature, which transforms into induced ferromagnetic after size reduction. The average magnetization at room temperature increases with decreasing the crystallite size and a maximum moment of 0.016 μ{sub B}/f.u. at 12 kOe applied field and coercivity of 170 Oe were obtained for 30 hours milled NiO powders at 600 rotation per minute milling speed. The change in the magnetic properties is also supported by the vibrational properties. Thermomagnetization measurements at high temperature reveal a well-defined magnetic phase transition at high temperature (T{sub C}) around 780 K due to induced ferromagnetic phase. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies reveal a good agreement between the EPR results and magnetic properties. The observed results are described on the basis of crystallite size variation, defect density, large strain, oxidation/reduction of Ni and interaction between uncompensated surfaces and particle core with lattice expansion. The obtained results suggest that nanoscale NiO powders with high T{sub C} and moderate magnetic moment at room temperature with cubic structure would be useful to expedite for spintronic devices.

  7. Enhanced room temperature ferromagnetism in antiferromagnetic NiO nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravikumar, Patta; Kisan, Bhagaban; Perumal, A.

    2015-08-01

    We report systematic investigations of structural, vibrational, resonance and magnetic properties of nanoscale NiO powders prepared by ball milling process under different milling speeds for 30 hours of milling. Structural properties revealed that both pure NiO and as-milled NiO powders exhibit face centered cubic structure, but average crystallite size decreases to around 11 nm along with significant increase in strain with increasing milling speed. Vibrational properties show the enhancement in the intensity of one-phonon longitudinal optical (LO) band and disappearance of two-magnon band due to size reduction. In addition, two-phonon LO band exhibits red shift due to size-induced phonon confinement effect and surface relaxation. Pure NiO powder exhibit antiferromagnetic nature, which transforms into induced ferromagnetic after size reduction. The average magnetization at room temperature increases with decreasing the crystallite size and a maximum moment of 0.016 μB/f.u. at 12 kOe applied field and coercivity of 170 Oe were obtained for 30 hours milled NiO powders at 600 rotation per minute milling speed. The change in the magnetic properties is also supported by the vibrational properties. Thermomagnetization measurements at high temperature reveal a well-defined magnetic phase transition at high temperature (TC) around 780 K due to induced ferromagnetic phase. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies reveal a good agreement between the EPR results and magnetic properties. The observed results are described on the basis of crystallite size variation, defect density, large strain, oxidation/reduction of Ni and interaction between uncompensated surfaces and particle core with lattice expansion. The obtained results suggest that nanoscale NiO powders with high TC and moderate magnetic moment at room temperature with cubic structure would be useful to expedite for spintronic devices.

  8. Room-temperature antiferromagnetism in CuMnAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Máca, F.; Mašek, J.; Stelmakhovych, O.; Martí, X.; Reichlová, H.; Uhlířová, K.; Beran, P.; Wadley, P.; Novák, V.; Jungwirth, T.

    2012-04-01

    We report on an experimental and theoretical study of CuMn-V compounds. In agreement with previous works we find low-temperature antiferromagnetism with Néel temperature of 50 K in the cubic half-Heusler CuMnSb. We demonstrate that the orthorhombic CuMnAs is a room-temperature antiferromagnet. Our results are based on X-ray diffraction, magnetization, transport, and differential thermal analysis measurements, and on density-functional theory calculations of the magnetic structure of CuMn-V compounds. In the discussion part of the paper we make a prediction, based on our density-functional theory calculations, that the electronic structure of CuMn-V compounds makes a transition from a semimetal to a semiconductor upon introducing the lighter group-V elements.

  9. Disorder-induced Room Temperature Ferromagnetism in Glassy Chromites

    PubMed Central

    Araujo, C. Moyses; Nagar, Sandeep; Ramzan, Muhammad; Shukla, R.; Jayakumar, O. D.; Tyagi, A. K.; Liu, Yi-Sheng; Chen, Jeng-Lung; Glans, Per-Anders; Chang, Chinglin; Blomqvist, Andreas; Lizárraga, Raquel; Holmström, Erik; Belova, Lyubov; Guo, Jinghua; Ahuja, Rajeev; Rao, K. V.

    2014-01-01

    We report an unusual robust ferromagnetic order above room temperature upon amorphization of perovskite [YCrO3] in pulsed laser deposited thin films. This is contrary to the usual expected formation of a spin glass magnetic state in the resulting disordered structure. To understand the underlying physics of this phenomenon, we combine advanced spectroscopic techniques and first-principles calculations. We find that the observed order-disorder transformation is accompanied by an insulator-metal transition arising from a wide distribution of Cr-O-Cr bond angles and the consequent metallization through free carriers. Similar results also found in YbCrO3-films suggest that the observed phenomenon is more general and should, in principle, apply to a wider range of oxide systems. The ability to tailor ferromagnetic order above room temperature in oxide materials opens up many possibilities for novel technological applications of this counter intuitive effect. PMID:24732685

  10. Room temperature ferroelectric and magnetic investigations and detailed phase analysis of Aurivillius phase Bi5Ti3Fe0.7Co0.3O15 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeney, Lynette; Kulkarni, Santosh; Deepak, Nitin; Schmidt, Michael; Petkov, Nikolay; Zhang, Panfeng F.; Cavill, Stuart; Roy, Saibal; Pemble, Martyn E.; Whatmore, Roger W.

    2012-09-01

    Aurivillius phase Bi5Ti3Fe0.7Co0.3O15 (BTF7C3O) thin films on α-quartz substrates were fabricated by a chemical solution deposition method and the room temperature ferroelectric and magnetic properties of this candidate multiferroic were compared with those of thin films of Mn3+ substituted, Bi5Ti3Fe0.7Mn0.3O15 (BTF7M3O). Vertical and lateral piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) measurements of the films conclusively demonstrate that BTF7C3O and BTF7M3O thin films are piezoelectric and ferroelectric at room temperature, with the major polarization vector in the lateral plane of the films. No net magnetization was observed for the in-plane superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometry measurements of BTF7M3O thin films. In contrast, SQUID measurements of the BTF7C3O films clearly demonstrated ferromagnetic behavior, with a remanent magnetization, Br, of 6.37 emu/cm3 (or 804 memu/g), remanent moment = 4.99 × 10-5 emu. The BTF7C3O films were scrutinized by x-ray diffraction, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy, and energy dispersive x-ray analysis mapping to assess the prospect of the observed multiferroic properties being intrinsic to the main phase. The results of extensive micro-structural phase analysis demonstrated that the BTF7C3O films comprised of a 3.95% Fe/Co-rich spinel phase, likely CoFe2 - xTixO4, which would account for the observed magnetic moment in the films. Additionally, x-ray magnetic circular dichroism photoemission electron microscopy (XMCD-PEEM) imaging confirmed that the majority of magnetic response arises from the Fe sites of Fe/Co-rich spinel phase inclusions. While the magnetic contribution from the main phase could not be determined by the XMCD-PEEM images, these data however imply that the Bi5Ti3Fe0.7Co0.3O15 thin films are likely not single phase multiferroics at room temperature. The PFM results presented demonstrate that the naturally 2D nanostructured Bi5Ti3

  11. Absorber Materials at Room and Cryogenic Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    F. Marhauser, T.S. Elliott, A.T. Wu, E.P. Chojnacki, E. Savrun

    2011-09-01

    We recently reported on investigations of RF absorber materials at cryogenic temperatures conducted at Jefferson Laboratory (JLab). The work was initiated to find a replacement material for the 2 Kelvin low power waveguide Higher Order Mode (HOM) absorbers employed within the original cavity cryomodules of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). This effort eventually led to suitable candidates as reported in this paper. Furthermore, though constrained by small funds for labor and resources, we have analyzed a variety of lossy ceramic materials, several of which could be usable as HOM absorbers for both normal conducting and superconducting RF structures, e.g. as loads in cavity waveguides and beam tubes either at room or cryogenic temperatures and, depending on cooling measures, low to high operational power levels.

  12. Role of pH value during chemical reaction, and site occupancy of Ni2+ and Fe3+ ions in spinel structure for tuning room temperature magnetic properties in Ni1.5Fe1.5O4 ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, K. S. Aneesh; Bhowmik, R. N.; Mahmood, Sami H.

    2016-05-01

    The magnetic properties of Ni1.5Fe1.5O4 ferrite have been investigated using the techniques of dc magnetometry and Mӧssbauer spectroscopy. The material has been prepared by chemical reaction of metal nitrates at different pH values and subsequently, annealed at different temperatures to improve the microstructure. The samples with single-phased cubic spinel structure have been used for magnetic study. The material showed a variety of magnetic features, including superparamagnetic and soft ferromagnetic properties. At room temperature, changes of the ferromagnetic parameters of the material have been found in the range 0-47 emu/g for spontaneous magnetization, 0-0.37 for squareness, and 0-195 Oe for coercivity. Variation of the pH value during chemical reaction and changes of the grain size by thermal treatment played an important role in tuning the coexisting superparamagnetic and ferromagnetic components in the material. Samples prepared at high pH value showed small grain size and superparamagnetic features, whereas the samples prepared at low pH value produced large grain size and better ferromagnetic features. The ferromagnetic properties of the material have been enhanced by lowering the pH value and increasing the annealing temperature. Mössbauer spectra provided insight of the local magnetic order, site occupancy of Ni and Fe ions and oxidation state of Fe ions in the spinel structure of Ni1.5Fe1.5O4 ferrite.

  13. Electrical creation of spin polarization in silicon at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, Ron

    2010-03-01

    The integration of magnetism and mainstream semiconductor electronics could impact information technology in ways beyond imagination. A pivotal step is the implementation of spin-based electronic functionality in silicon devices. Much of the interest in silicon derives from its prevalence in semiconductor technology and from the robustness and longevity of spin as it is only weakly coupled to other degrees of freedom in the material. Recently it has become possible to induce and detect spin polarization in otherwise non-magnetic semiconductors (GaAs and Si) using all-electrical structures, but so far at temperatures below 150 K and only in n-type material. The main challenges are: (i) to design fully electrical silicon-based spintronic devices with large spin signals, (ii) to demonstrate device operation at room temperature, (iii) to do so for n-type and p-type material, and (iv) to find ways to manipulate spins and spin flow with a gate electric field. After a brief overview of the state of affairs, our recent advances in these areas are described. In particular, we demonstrate room-temperature electrical injection of spin polarization into n-type and p-type silicon from a ferromagnetic tunnel contact, spin manipulation using the Hanle effect, and the electrical detection of the induced spin accumulation. It is shown that a spin splitting as large as 2.9 meV can be created in Si at room temperature, corresponding to an electron spin polarization of 4.6%. The results open the way to the implementation of spin functionality in complementary silicon devices and electronic circuits operating at ambient temperature, and to the exploration of their prospects as well as the fundamental rules that govern their behavior. [4pt] [1] S.P. Dash, S. Sharma, R.S. Patel, M.P. de Jong and R. Jansen, Nature 462, 491 (2009).

  14. Structure of room temperature ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Yethiraj, Arun

    2016-10-19

    The structure of room temperature ionic liquids is studied using molecular dynamics simulations and integral equation theory. Three ionic liquids 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium hexfluorophosphate, [C n MIM] [PF6], for n  =  1, 4, and 8, are studied using a united atom model of the ions. The primary interest is a study of the pair correlation functions and a test of the reference interaction site model theory. There is liquid-like ordering in the liquid that arises from electrostatic attractions and steric packing considerations. The theory is not in quantitative agreement with the simulation results and underestimates the degree of liquid-like order. A pre-peak in the static structure factor is seen in both simulations and theory, suggesting that this is a geometric effect arising from a packing of the alkyl chains. PMID:27546807

  15. Atomically resolved force microscopy at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Morita, Seizo

    2014-04-24

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) can now not only image individual atoms but also construct atom letters using atom manipulation method even at room temperature (RT). Therefore, the AFM is the second generation atomic tool following the scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). However the AFM can image even insulating atoms, and also directly measure/map the atomic force and potential at the atomic scale. Noting these advantages, we have been developing a bottom-up nanostructuring system at RT based on the AFM. It can identify chemical species of individual atoms and then manipulate selected atom species to the predesigned site one-by-one to assemble complex nanostructures consisted of multi atom species at RT. Here we introduce our results toward atom-by-atom assembly of composite nanostructures based on the AFM at RT including the latest result on atom gating of nano-space for atom-by-atom creation of atom clusters at RT for semiconductor surfaces.

  16. Room temperature giant baroresistance and magnetoresistance and its tunability in Pd doped FeRh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushwaha, Pallavi; Bag, Pallab; Rawat, R.

    2015-01-01

    We report room temperature giant baroresistance (≈128%) in Fe49(Rh0.93Pd0.07)51. With the application of external pressure (P) and magnetic field (H), the temperature range of giant baroresistance (≈600% at 5 K, 19.9 kilobars and 8 T) and magnetoresistance (≈ -85% at 5 K and 8 T) can be tuned from 5 K to well above room temperature. It is shown that under external pressure, antiferromagnetic state is stabilized at room temperature and shows giant magnetoresistance (≈-55%). Due to coupled magnetic and lattice changes, the isothermal change in resistivity at room temperature under pressure (at constant H) as well as magnetic field (at constant P) can be scaled together to a single curve, when plotted as a function of X = T + 12.8 × H - 7.3 × P.

  17. Study of room temperature Raman scattering and XPS, high temperature electrical and low temperature magnetic properties of Zn1-yLiyO (0.00 ≤ y ≤ 0.10) nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullah Awan, Saif; Hasanain, S. K.; Mehmood, Zahid; Anjum, D. H.; Shah, Saqlain A.; Aftab, M.; Abbas, Turab Ali

    2015-11-01

    Multiferroics are potentially future materials in spintronics for memory and data storage applications. In this paper, a series of Li-doped nanoparticles were studied to investigate the effects of Li on the physical properties of the ZnO system. Analysis of structural micrographs and Raman spectra confirmed the wurtzite structure of doped samples. The vibrational modes of Zinc and oxygen atoms were labeled as E2L and E2H with an additional mode at 134 cm-1 in the doped samples. We observed the presence of interstitial and substitutional Li defects from the deconvolution of Li 1s core level spectra using high resolution x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The approximated measured values (e.g., for y = 0.04 and 0.08 samples) for interstitial Li defects were 27% and 39%, and for substitutional Li defects were 73% and 61% respectively. For the y = 0.06 composition, dc resistivity was the highest, while the transition temperature (measured from dielectric loss) was the lowest. We observed a non-monotonic trend of saturation magnetization (obtained at 50 K) against the Li concentration. The compositions having the highest magnetic moment were those having higher interstitial Li defects and lower dc resistivity. Higher hole carrier concentrations and dielectric transition temperatures were correlated with the higher magnetization. Interstitial Li defects played a key role in stabilizing more cationic Zn vacancies. Hole carriers were the major cause of long-range ferromagnetic order in these nanoparticles.

  18. Magnetic and electrical properties on possible room temperature hybrid multiferroic BaTiO3/La2/3Sr1/3MnO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ordoñez, John Edward; Gómez, María Elena; Lopera Muñoz, Wilson; Prieto, Pedro Antonio; Thin Film Group Team; Center of Excellence on Novel Materials-CENM, Cali, Colombia Team

    2015-03-01

    We addressed to deposit the ferromagnetic phase of the La1-xSrxMnO3 and the ferroelectric BaTiO3 for possible hybrid multiferroic heterostructure. We have optimized the growth parameters for depositing BaTiO3(BTO) / La2/3Ca1/3MnO3(LCMO) / (001) SrTiO3 by sputtering RF and DC, respectively, in pure oxygen atmosphere and a substrate temperature of 830°C. Keeping fixed the magnetic layer thickness (tLSMO = 40 nm) and varying the thickness of the ferroelectric layer (tBTO = 20, 40, 80, 100 nm). We want to point out the influence of the thicknesses ratio (tBTO/tLSMO) on electrical and magnetic properties. From x-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, we found the bragg peaks for LSMO maintain its position but BTO peak shift to lower Bragg angle indicating a strained BTO film. Magnetization and polarization measurements indicate a possible multiferroic behavior in the bilayers. Hysteresis loop measurements of bilayers show ferromagnetic behavior. Authors thank Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragón, Zaragoza, Spain. Work partially supported by COLCIENCIAS-UNIVALLE Project 110656933104 Contract No. 2013-0002, CI 7917 and CI 7978.

  19. Electrorecovery of actinides at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Stoll, Michael E; Oldham, Warren J; Costa, David A

    2008-01-01

    There are a large number of purification and processing operations involving actinide species that rely on high-temperature molten salts as the solvent medium. One such application is the electrorefining of impure actinide metals to provide high purity material for subsequent applications. There are some drawbacks to the electrodeposition of actinides in molten salts including relatively low yields, lack of accurate potential control, maintaining efficiency in a highly corrosive environment, and failed runs. With these issues in mind we have been investigating the electrodeposition of actinide metals, mainly uranium, from room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) and relatively high-boiling organic solvents. The RTILs we have focused on are comprised of 1,3-dialkylimidazolium or quaternary ammonium cations and mainly the {sup -}N(SO{sub 2}CF{sub 3}){sub 2} anion [bis(trif1uoromethylsulfonyl)imide {equivalent_to} {sup -}NTf{sub 2}]. These materials represent a class of solvents that possess great potential for use in applications employing electrochemical procedures. In order to ascertain the feasibility of using RTILs for bulk electrodeposition of actinide metals our research team has been exploring the electron transfer behavior of simple coordination complexes of uranium dissolved in the RTIL solutions. More recently we have begun some fundamental electrochemical studies on the behavior of uranium and plutonium complexes in the organic solvents N-methylpyrrolidone (NMP) and dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO). Our most recent results concerning electrodeposition will be presented in this account. The electrochemical behavior of U(IV) and U(III) species in RTILs and the relatively low vapor pressure solvents NMP and DMSO is described. These studies have been ongoing in our laboratory to uncover conditions that will lead to the successful bulk electrodeposition of actinide metals at a working electrode surface at room temperature or slightly elevated temperatures. The RTILs we

  20. Proposal of a general scheme to obtain room-temperature spin polarization in asymmetric antiferromagnetic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xingxing; Wu, Xiaojun; Li, Zhenyu; Yang, Jinlong

    2015-09-01

    Exploring magnetic semiconductors is one of the most important questions for spintronic applications. Although various solutions, such as dilute magnetic semiconductors, have been proposed, a practical spintronic device working at room temperature has not been realized. The key to address this issue is to find magnetic materials with both room-temperature magnetic ordering and large spin polarization around the Fermi energy level. Here, we predict a new concept of asymmetric antiferromagnetic (AFM) semiconductors (AAFMSs) with both features. The high temperature magnetic ordering originates from the AFM coupling between different transition metal ions with strong super-exchange interaction, whereas the large spin polarization around the Fermi energy level owes to d orbital mismatch among these ions. Through first-principles calculations, a family of double perovskites A2Cr M O6 (A =Ca ,Sr ,Ba , and M =Ru ,Os ) are predicted to be AAFMSs. This paper provides a way for developing spintronic devices working at room temperature.

  1. Investigation of Room temperature Ferromagnetism in Mn doped Ge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colakerol Arslan, Leyla; Toydemir, Burcu; Onel, Aykut Can; Ertas, Merve; Doganay, Hatice; Gebze Inst of Tech Collaboration; Research Center Julich Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    We present a systematic investigation of structural, magnetic and electronic properties of MnxGe1 -x single crystals. MnxGe1-x films were grown by sequential deposition of Ge and Mn by molecular-beam epitaxy at low substrate temperatures in order to avoid precipitation of ferromagnetic Ge-Mn intermetallic compounds. Reflected high energy electron diffraction and x-ray diffraction observations revealed that films are epitaxially grown on Si (001) substrates from the initial stage without any other phase formation. Magnetic measurements carried out using a physical property measurement system showed that all samples exhibited ferromagnetism at room temperature. Electron spin resonance indicates the presence of magnetically ordered localized spins of divalent Mn ions. X-ray absorption measurements at the Mn L-edge confirm significant substitutional doping of Mn into Ge-sites. The ferromagnetism was mainly induced by Mn substitution for Ge site, and indirect exchange interaction of these magnetic ions with the intrinsic charge carriers is the origin of ferromagnetism. The magnetic interactions were better understood by codoping with nonmagnetic impurities. This work was supported by Marie-Curie Reintegration Grant (PIRG08-GA-2010-276973).

  2. Green synthesis of the Cu/Fe3O4 nanoparticles using Morinda morindoides leaf aqueous extract: A highly efficient magnetically separable catalyst for the reduction of organic dyes in aqueous medium at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasrollahzadeh, Mahmoud; Atarod, Monireh; Sajadi, S. Mohammad

    2016-02-01

    This paper reports the green and in-situ preparation of the Cu/Fe3O4 magnetic nanocatalyst synthesized using Morinda morindoides leaf extract without stabilizers or surfactants. The catalyst was characterized by XRD, SEM, EDS, UV-visible, TEM, VSM and TGA-DTA. The catalytic performance of the resulting nanocatalyst was examined for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP), Congo red (CR) and Rhodamine B (RhB) in an environmental friendly medium at room temperature. The catalyst was recovered using an external magnet and reused several times without appreciable loss of its catalytic activity. In addition, the stability of the recycled catalyst has been proved by SEM and EDS techniques.

  3. Giant and reversible room-temperature elastocaloric effect in a single-crystalline Ni-Fe-Ga magnetic shape memory alloy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yang; Zhao, Dewei; Liu, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Good mechanical properties and large adiabatic temperature change render Heusler-type Ni2FeGa-based magnetic shape memory alloys as a promising candidate material for solid-state mechanical cooling application at ambient conditions. Superelastic behavior and associated elastocaloric effect strongly reply on deformation conditions (e.g. applied strain rate and strain level) of stress-induced martensitic transformations. With the aim of developing high-performance elastic cooling materials, in this work, we have carried out a systematic study on a Ni54Fe19Ga27 [420]-oriented single crystal by exploring the interaction between dynamic deformation parameters and thermal response. A giant and reversible adiabatic temperature change of ±7.5 K triggered by a low stress of 30 MPa was achieved. Such a high specific cooling performance thus offers the great advantage for the small scale solid-state mechanical cooling applications. Besides, a significant temporary residual strain effect has been observed at high strain rate, which is unfavorable for reversible elastocaloric effect but can be overcome by reducing stress hysteresis, and/or by elevating initial environmental temperature. The established criterion for the desirable reversible elastocaloric properties goes beyond the present system, and can be applicable for other shape memory alloys used for elastic cooling techniques. PMID:27138030

  4. Giant and reversible room-temperature elastocaloric effect in a single-crystalline Ni-Fe-Ga magnetic shape memory alloy.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Zhao, Dewei; Liu, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Good mechanical properties and large adiabatic temperature change render Heusler-type Ni2FeGa-based magnetic shape memory alloys as a promising candidate material for solid-state mechanical cooling application at ambient conditions. Superelastic behavior and associated elastocaloric effect strongly reply on deformation conditions (e.g. applied strain rate and strain level) of stress-induced martensitic transformations. With the aim of developing high-performance elastic cooling materials, in this work, we have carried out a systematic study on a Ni54Fe19Ga27 [420]-oriented single crystal by exploring the interaction between dynamic deformation parameters and thermal response. A giant and reversible adiabatic temperature change of ±7.5 K triggered by a low stress of 30 MPa was achieved. Such a high specific cooling performance thus offers the great advantage for the small scale solid-state mechanical cooling applications. Besides, a significant temporary residual strain effect has been observed at high strain rate, which is unfavorable for reversible elastocaloric effect but can be overcome by reducing stress hysteresis, and/or by elevating initial environmental temperature. The established criterion for the desirable reversible elastocaloric properties goes beyond the present system, and can be applicable for other shape memory alloys used for elastic cooling techniques. PMID:27138030

  5. Giant and reversible room-temperature elastocaloric effect in a single-crystalline Ni-Fe-Ga magnetic shape memory alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yang; Zhao, Dewei; Liu, Jian

    2016-05-01

    Good mechanical properties and large adiabatic temperature change render Heusler-type Ni2FeGa-based magnetic shape memory alloys as a promising candidate material for solid-state mechanical cooling application at ambient conditions. Superelastic behavior and associated elastocaloric effect strongly reply on deformation conditions (e.g. applied strain rate and strain level) of stress-induced martensitic transformations. With the aim of developing high-performance elastic cooling materials, in this work, we have carried out a systematic study on a Ni54Fe19Ga27 [420]-oriented single crystal by exploring the interaction between dynamic deformation parameters and thermal response. A giant and reversible adiabatic temperature change of ±7.5 K triggered by a low stress of 30 MPa was achieved. Such a high specific cooling performance thus offers the great advantage for the small scale solid-state mechanical cooling applications. Besides, a significant temporary residual strain effect has been observed at high strain rate, which is unfavorable for reversible elastocaloric effect but can be overcome by reducing stress hysteresis, and/or by elevating initial environmental temperature. The established criterion for the desirable reversible elastocaloric properties goes beyond the present system, and can be applicable for other shape memory alloys used for elastic cooling techniques.

  6. Linear magnetoelectricity at room temperature in perovskite superlattices by design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Saurabh; Das, Hena; Fennie, Craig J.

    2015-11-01

    Discovering materials that display a linear magnetoelectric (ME) effect at room temperature is a challenge. Such materials could facilitate devices based on the electric field control of magnetism. Here we present simple, chemically intuitive design rules to identify a class of bulk magnetoelectric materials based on the "bicolor" layering of P b n m ferrite perovskites, e.g., LaFeO3/LnFeO3 superlattices, Ln = lanthanide cation. We use first-principles density functional theory calculations to confirm these ideas. We elucidate the origin of this effect and show it is a general consequence of the layering of any bicolor P b n m perovskite superlattice in which the number of constituent layers are odd (leading to a form of hybrid improper ferroelectricity). Our calculations suggest that the ME effect in these superlattices is larger than that observed in the prototypical magnetoelectric materials Cr2O3 and BiFeO3. Furthermore, in these proposed materials, the strength of the linear ME coupling increases with the magnitude of the induced spontaneous polarization which is controlled by the La/Ln cation radius mismatch. We use a simple mean field model to show that the proposed materials order magnetically above room temperature.

  7. Observation of room-temperature skyrmion Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, W.; Zhang, X.; Upadhyaya, P.; Zhang, W.; Yu, G.; Jungfleisch, M.; Fradin, F.; Pearson, J.; Tserkovnyak, Y.; Wang, K.; Heinonen, O.; Zhou, Y.; Te Velthuis, Suzanne; Hoffmann, A.

    The realization of room-temperature magnetic skyrmions is key to enabling the implementation of skyrmion-based spintronics. In this work, we present the efficient conversion of chiral stripe domains into Néel skyrmions through a geometrical constriction patterned in a Ta/CoFeB/TaOx trilayer film at room temperature. This is enabled by an interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction, and laterally divergent current-induced spin-orbit torques. We further show the generation of magnetic skyrmions solely by the divergent spin-orbit torques through a nonmagnetic point contact. By increasing the current density, we observe the skyrmion Hall effect - that is the accumulation of skyrmions at one side of the device. The related Hall angle for skyrmion motion is also revealed under an ac driving current. Financial support for the work at Argonne came from Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Science, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division, work at UCLA was supported by TANMS.

  8. Room-temperature ferromagnetism in graphitic petal arrays.

    PubMed

    Rout, Chandra Sekhar; Kumar, Anurag; Kumar, Nitesh; Sundaresan, A; Fisher, Timothy S

    2011-03-01

    We report room-temperature ferromagnetism of graphitic petal arrays grown on Si substrates by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition without catalyst. The samples have been characterized by Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to confirm the absence of possible ferromagnetic impurities. The petals exhibit ferromagnetic hysteresis with saturation magnetization of ∼4.67 emu cm(-3) and coercivity of ∼105 Oe at 300 K, comparable to the reported behavior of few-layer graphene. Upon O2 annealing the saturation magnetization and coercivity decreased to 2.1 emu cm(-3) and ∼75 Oe respectively. The origin of ferromagnetism is believed to arise from the edge defects and vacancies in the petals. PMID:21264436

  9. Room-temperature ferromagnetism in graphitic petal arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rout, Chandra Sekhar; Kumar, Anurag; Kumar, Nitesh; Sundaresan, A.; Fisher, Timothy S.

    2011-03-01

    We report room-temperature ferromagnetism of graphitic petal arrays grown on Si substrates by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition without catalyst. The samples have been characterized by Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to confirm the absence of possible ferromagnetic impurities. The petals exhibit ferromagnetic hysteresis with saturation magnetization of ~4.67 emu cm-3 and coercivity of ~105 Oe at 300 K, comparable to the reported behavior of few-layer graphene. Upon O2 annealing the saturation magnetization and coercivity decreased to 2.1 emu cm-3 and ~75 Oe respectively. The origin of ferromagnetism is believed to arise from the edge defects and vacancies in the petals.

  10. Can doping graphite trigger room temperature superconductivity? Evidence for granular high-temperature superconductivity in water-treated graphite powder.

    PubMed

    Scheike, T; Böhlmann, W; Esquinazi, P; Barzola-Quiquia, J; Ballestar, A; Setzer, A

    2012-11-14

    Granular superconductivity in powders of small graphite grains (several tens of micrometers) is demonstrated after treatment with pure water. The temperature, magnetic field and time dependence of the magnetic moment of the treated graphite powder provides evidence for the existence of superconducting vortices with some similarities to high-temperature granular superconducting oxides but even at temperatures above 300 K. Room temperature superconductivity in doped graphite or at its interfaces appears to be possible. PMID:22949348

  11. Room temperature molecular up conversion in solution.

    PubMed

    Nonat, Aline; Chan, Chi Fai; Liu, Tao; Platas-Iglesias, Carlos; Liu, Zhenyu; Wong, Wing-Tak; Wong, Wai-Kwok; Wong, Ka-Leung; Charbonnière, Loïc J

    2016-01-01

    Up conversion is an Anti-Stokes luminescent process by which photons of low energy are piled up to generate light at a higher energy. Here we show that the addition of fluoride anions to a D2O solution of a macrocyclic erbium complex leads to the formation of a supramolecular [(ErL)2F](+) assembly in which fluoride is sandwiched between two complexes, held together by the synergistic interactions of the Er-F-Er bridging bond, four intercomplex hydrogen bonds and two aromatic stacking interactions. Room temperature excitation into the Er absorption bands at 980 nm of a solution of the complex in D2O results in the observation of up converted emission at 525, 550 and 650 nm attributed to Er centred transitions via a two-step excitation. The up conversion signal is dramatically increased upon formation of the [(ErL)2F](+) dimer in the presence of 0.5 equivalents of fluoride anions. PMID:27302144

  12. Room temperature molecular up conversion in solution

    PubMed Central

    Nonat, Aline; Chan, Chi Fai; Liu, Tao; Platas-Iglesias, Carlos; Liu, Zhenyu; Wong, Wing-Tak; Wong, Wai-Kwok; Wong, Ka-Leung; Charbonnière, Loïc J.

    2016-01-01

    Up conversion is an Anti-Stokes luminescent process by which photons of low energy are piled up to generate light at a higher energy. Here we show that the addition of fluoride anions to a D2O solution of a macrocyclic erbium complex leads to the formation of a supramolecular [(ErL)2F]+ assembly in which fluoride is sandwiched between two complexes, held together by the synergistic interactions of the Er-F-Er bridging bond, four intercomplex hydrogen bonds and two aromatic stacking interactions. Room temperature excitation into the Er absorption bands at 980 nm of a solution of the complex in D2O results in the observation of up converted emission at 525, 550 and 650 nm attributed to Er centred transitions via a two-step excitation. The up conversion signal is dramatically increased upon formation of the [(ErL)2F]+ dimer in the presence of 0.5 equivalents of fluoride anions. PMID:27302144

  13. Room-temperature single-electron junction.

    PubMed Central

    Facci, P; Erokhin, V; Carrara, S; Nicolini, C

    1996-01-01

    The design, realization, and test performances of an electronic junction based on single-electron phenomena that works in the air at room temperature are hereby reported. The element consists of an electrochemically etched sharp tungsten stylus over whose tip a nanometer-size crystal was synthesized. Langmuir-Blodgett films of cadmium arachidate were transferred onto the stylus and exposed to a H2S atmosphere to yield CdS nanocrystals (30-50 angstrom in diameter) imbedded into an organic matrix. The stylus, biased with respect to a flat electrode, was brought to the tunnel distance from the film and a constant gap value was maintained by a piezo-electric actuator driven by a feedback circuit fed by the tunneling current. With this set-up, it is possible to measure the behavior of the current flowing through the quantum dot when a bias voltage is applied. Voltage-current characteristics measured in the system displayed single-electron trends such as a Coulomb blockade and Coulomb staircase and revealed capacitance values as small as 10(-19) F. PMID:11607710

  14. Magnetic nanoparticle temperature estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, John B.; Rauwerdink, Adam M.; Hansen, Eric W.

    2009-05-15

    The authors present a method of measuring the temperature of magnetic nanoparticles that can be adapted to provide in vivo temperature maps. Many of the minimally invasive therapies that promise to reduce health care costs and improve patient outcomes heat tissue to very specific temperatures to be effective. Measurements are required because physiological cooling, primarily blood flow, makes the temperature difficult to predict a priori. The ratio of the fifth and third harmonics of the magnetization generated by magnetic nanoparticles in a sinusoidal field is used to generate a calibration curve and to subsequently estimate the temperature. The calibration curve is obtained by varying the amplitude of the sinusoidal field. The temperature can then be estimated from any subsequent measurement of the ratio. The accuracy was 0.3 deg. K between 20 and 50 deg. C using the current apparatus and half-second measurements. The method is independent of nanoparticle concentration and nanoparticle size distribution.

  15. Room-Temperature Multiferroic Hexagonal LuFeO3

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Xuemei; Balke, Nina; Chi, Miaofang; Gai, Zheng; Keavney, David; Lee, Ho Nyung; Shen, Jian; Snijders, Paul C; Wang, Wenbin; Ward, Thomas Z; Xu, Xiaoshan; Yi, Jieyu; Zhu, Leyi; Christen, Hans M; Zhao, Jun

    2013-01-01

    We observed the coexistence of ferroelectricity and weak ferromagnetism at room temperature in the hexagonal phase of LuFeO3 stabilized by epitaxial thin film growth. While the ferroelectricity in hexagonal LuFeO3 can be understood as arising from its polar structure, the observation of weak ferromagnetism at room temperature is remarkable considering the frustrated triangular spin structure. An explanation of the room temperature weak ferromagnetism is proposed in terms of a subtle lattice distortion revealed by the structural characterization. The combination of ferroelectricity and weak ferromagnetism in epitaxial films at room temperature offers great potential for the application of this novel multiferroic material in next generation devices.

  16. Room temperature quantum coherence in a potential molecular qubit.

    PubMed

    Bader, Katharina; Dengler, Dominik; Lenz, Samuel; Endeward, Burkhard; Jiang, Shang-Da; Neugebauer, Petr; van Slageren, Joris

    2014-01-01

    The successful development of a quantum computer would change the world, and current internet encryption methods would cease to function. However, no working quantum computer that even begins to rival conventional computers has been developed yet, which is due to the lack of suitable quantum bits. A key characteristic of a quantum bit is the coherence time. Transition metal complexes are very promising quantum bits, owing to their facile surface deposition and their chemical tunability. However, reported quantum coherence times have been unimpressive. Here we report very long quantum coherence times for a transition metal complex of 68 μs at low temperature (qubit figure of merit QM=3,400) and 1 μs at room temperature, much higher than previously reported values for such systems. We show that this achievement is because of the rigidity of the lattice as well as removal of nuclear spins from the vicinity of the magnetic ion. PMID:25328006

  17. Room temperature quantum coherence in a potential molecular qubit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bader, Katharina; Dengler, Dominik; Lenz, Samuel; Endeward, Burkhard; Jiang, Shang-Da; Neugebauer, Petr; van Slageren, Joris

    2014-10-01

    The successful development of a quantum computer would change the world, and current internet encryption methods would cease to function. However, no working quantum computer that even begins to rival conventional computers has been developed yet, which is due to the lack of suitable quantum bits. A key characteristic of a quantum bit is the coherence time. Transition metal complexes are very promising quantum bits, owing to their facile surface deposition and their chemical tunability. However, reported quantum coherence times have been unimpressive. Here we report very long quantum coherence times for a transition metal complex of 68 μs at low temperature (qubit figure of merit QM=3,400) and 1 μs at room temperature, much higher than previously reported values for such systems. We show that this achievement is because of the rigidity of the lattice as well as removal of nuclear spins from the vicinity of the magnetic ion.

  18. Water in Room Temperature Ionic Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fayer, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Room temperature ionic liquids (or RTILs, salts with a melting point below 25 °C) have become a subject of intense study over the last several decades. Currently, RTIL application research includes synthesis, batteries, solar cells, crystallization, drug delivery, and optics. RTILs are often composed of an inorganic anion paired with an asymmetric organic cation which contains one or more pendant alkyl chains. The asymmetry of the cation frustrates crystallization, causing the salt's melting point to drop significantly. In general, RTILs are very hygroscopic, and therefore, it is of interest to examine the influence of water on RTIL structure and dynamics. In addition, in contrast to normal aqueous salt solutions, which crystallize at low water concentration, in an RTIL it is possible to examine isolated water molecules interacting with ions but not with other water molecules. Here, optical heterodyne-detected optical Kerr effect (OHD-OKE) measurements of orientational relaxation on a series of 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate RTILs as a function of chain length and water concentration are presented. The addition of water to the longer alkyl chain RTILs causes the emergence of a long time bi-exponential orientational anisotropy decay. Such decays have not been seen previously in OHD-OKE experiments on any type of liquid and are analyzed here using a wobbling-in-a-cone model. The orientational relaxation is not hydrodynamic, with the slowest relaxation component becoming slower as the viscosity decreases for the longest chain, highest water content samples. The dynamics of isolated D2O molecules in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate (BmImPF6) were examined using two dimensional infrared (2D IR) vibrational echo spectroscopy. Spectral diffusion and incoherent and coherent transfer of excitation between the symmetric and antisymmetric modes are examined. The coherent transfer experiments are used to address the nature of inhomogeneous

  19. Room temperature ferroelectric and magnetic investigations and detailed phase analysis of Aurivillius phase Bi{sub 5}Ti{sub 3}Fe{sub 0.7}Co{sub 0.3}O{sub 15} thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Keeney, Lynette; Kulkarni, Santosh; Deepak, Nitin; Schmidt, Michael; Petkov, Nikolay; Zhang, Panfeng F.; Roy, Saibal; Pemble, Martyn E.; Whatmore, Roger W.; Cavill, Stuart

    2012-09-01

    Aurivillius phase Bi{sub 5}Ti{sub 3}Fe{sub 0.7}Co{sub 0.3}O{sub 15} (BTF7C3O) thin films on {alpha}-quartz substrates were fabricated by a chemical solution deposition method and the room temperature ferroelectric and magnetic properties of this candidate multiferroic were compared with those of thin films of Mn{sup 3+} substituted, Bi{sub 5}Ti{sub 3}Fe{sub 0.7}Mn{sub 0.3}O{sub 15} (BTF7M3O). Vertical and lateral piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) measurements of the films conclusively demonstrate that BTF7C3O and BTF7M3O thin films are piezoelectric and ferroelectric at room temperature, with the major polarization vector in the lateral plane of the films. No net magnetization was observed for the in-plane superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometry measurements of BTF7M3O thin films. In contrast, SQUID measurements of the BTF7C3O films clearly demonstrated ferromagnetic behavior, with a remanent magnetization, B{sub r}, of 6.37 emu/cm{sup 3} (or 804 memu/g), remanent moment = 4.99 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} emu. The BTF7C3O films were scrutinized by x-ray diffraction, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy, and energy dispersive x-ray analysis mapping to assess the prospect of the observed multiferroic properties being intrinsic to the main phase. The results of extensive micro-structural phase analysis demonstrated that the BTF7C3O films comprised of a 3.95% Fe/Co-rich spinel phase, likely CoFe{sub 2-x}Ti{sub x}O{sub 4}, which would account for the observed magnetic moment in the films. Additionally, x-ray magnetic circular dichroism photoemission electron microscopy (XMCD-PEEM) imaging confirmed that the majority of magnetic response arises from the Fe sites of Fe/Co-rich spinel phase inclusions. While the magnetic contribution from the main phase could not be determined by the XMCD-PEEM images, these data however imply that the Bi{sub 5}Ti{sub 3}Fe{sub 0.7}Co{sub 0.3}O{sub 15} thin

  20. The role of hydrogen in room-temperature ferromagnetism at graphite surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Ohldag, Hendrik

    2011-08-12

    We present a x-ray dichroism study of graphite surfaces that addresses the origin and magnitude of ferromagnetism in metal-free carbon. We find that, in addition to carbon {pi} states, also hydrogen-mediated electronic states exhibit a net spin polarization with significant magnetic remanence at room temperature. The observed magnetism is restricted to the top {approx}10 nm of the irradiated sample where the actual magnetization reaches {approx_equal} 15 emu/g at room temperature. We prove that the ferromagnetism found in metal-free untreated graphite is intrinsic and has a similar origin as the one found in proton bombarded graphite.

  1. Room-temperature stabilization of nanoscale superionic Ag2Se

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, T.; Wittenberg, J. S.; Lindenberg, A. M.

    2014-10-01

    Superionic materials are multi-component solids in which one sub-lattice exhibits high ionic conductivity within a fixed crystalline structure. This is typically associated with a structural phase transition occurring significantly above room temperature. Here, through combined temperature-resolved x-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry, we map out the nanoscale size-dependence of the Ag2Se tetragonal to superionic phase transition temperature and determine the threshold size for room-temperature stabilization of superionic Ag2Se. For the first time, clear experimental evidence for such stabilization of the highly ionic conducting phase at room temperature is obtained in ˜2 nm diameter spheres, which corresponds to a >100 °C suppression of the bulk phase transition temperature. This may enable technological applications of Ag2Se in devices where high ionic conductivity at room temperature is required.

  2. Room-temperature stabilization of nanoscale superionic Ag₂Se.

    PubMed

    Hu, T; Wittenberg, J S; Lindenberg, A M

    2014-10-17

    Superionic materials are multi-component solids in which one sub-lattice exhibits high ionic conductivity within a fixed crystalline structure. This is typically associated with a structural phase transition occurring significantly above room temperature. Here, through combined temperature-resolved x-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry, we map out the nanoscale size-dependence of the Ag₂Se tetragonal to superionic phase transition temperature and determine the threshold size for room-temperature stabilization of superionic Ag2Se. For the first time, clear experimental evidence for such stabilization of the highly ionic conducting phase at room temperature is obtained in ∼2 nm diameter spheres, which corresponds to a >100 °C suppression of the bulk phase transition temperature. This may enable technological applications of Ag₂Se in devices where high ionic conductivity at room temperature is required. PMID:25249347

  3. Understanding the magnetic interaction between intrinsic defects and impurity ions in room-temperature ferromagnetic Mg1-x Fe x O thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapilashrami, Mukes; Wang, Yung Jui; Li, Xin; Glans, Per-Anders; Fang, Mei; Riazanova, Anastasia V.; Belova, Lyubov M.; Rao, K. V.; Luo, Yi; Barbiellini, Bernardo; Lin, Hsin; Markiewicz, Robert; Bansil, Arun; Hussain, Zahid; Guo, Jinghua

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the nature and characteristics of the intrinsic defects and impurities in the dielectric barrier separating the ferromagnetic electrodes in a magnetic tunneling junction is of great importance for understanding the often observed ‘barrier-breakdown’ therein. In this connection, we present herein systematic experimental (SQUID and synchrotron-radiation-based x-ray absorption spectroscopy) and computational studies on the electronic and magnetic properties of Mg1-x Fe x O thin films. Our studies reveal: (i) defect aggregates comprised of basic and trimer units (Fe impurity coupled to 1 or 2 Mg vacancies) and (ii) existence of two competing magnetic orders, defect- and dopant-induced, with spin densities aligning anti-parallel if the trimer is present in the oxide matrix. These findings open up new avenues for designing tunneling barriers with high endurance and tunneling effect upon tuning the concentration/distribution of the two magnetic orders.

  4. Understanding the magnetic interaction between intrinsic defects and impurity ions in room-temperature ferromagnetic Mg1-xFexO thin films.

    PubMed

    Kapilashrami, Mukes; Wang, Yung Jui; Li, Xin; Glans, Per-Anders; Fang, Mei; Riazanova, Anastasia V; Belova, Lyubov M; Rao, K V; Luo, Yi; Barbiellini, Bernardo; Lin, Hsin; Markiewicz, Robert; Bansil, Arun; Hussain, Zahid; Guo, Jinghua

    2016-04-20

    Understanding the nature and characteristics of the intrinsic defects and impurities in the dielectric barrier separating the ferromagnetic electrodes in a magnetic tunneling junction is of great importance for understanding the often observed 'barrier-breakdown' therein. In this connection, we present herein systematic experimental (SQUID and synchrotron-radiation-based x-ray absorption spectroscopy) and computational studies on the electronic and magnetic properties of Mg1-xFexO thin films. Our studies reveal: (i) defect aggregates comprised of basic and trimer units (Fe impurity coupled to 1 or 2 Mg vacancies) and (ii) existence of two competing magnetic orders, defect- and dopant-induced, with spin densities aligning anti-parallel if the trimer is present in the oxide matrix. These findings open up new avenues for designing tunneling barriers with high endurance and tunneling effect upon tuning the concentration/distribution of the two magnetic orders. PMID:26987741

  5. Room temperature to cryogenic electrical interface

    SciTech Connect

    Faris, S.M.

    1988-04-26

    A monolithic superconductive chip is described comprising: a. a substrate with a low temperature region and a high temperature region; b. a low temperature electronic circuit formed on the low temperature region and including an element which is superconductive when it has a temperature below a critical level; and c. electrical conductors formed on the substrate, the conductors being connected to the electronic circuit and traversing the substrate to the high temperature region.

  6. Realization of a flux-driven memtranstor at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi-Peng, Shen; Da-Shan, Shang; Yi-Sheng, Chai; Young, Sun

    2016-02-01

    The memtranstor has been proposed to be the fourth fundamental circuit memelement in addition to the memristor, memcapacitor, and meminductor. Here, we demonstrate the memtranstor behavior at room temperature in a device made of the magnetoelectric hexaferrite (Ba0.5Sr1.5Co2Fe11AlO22) where the electric polarization is tunable by external magnetic field. This device shows a nonlinear q-φ relationship with a butterfly-shaped hysteresis loop, in agreement with the anticipated memtranstor behavior. The memtranstor, like other memelements, has a great potential in developing more advanced circuit functionalities. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grants Nos. 11227405, 11534015, 11274363, and 11374347) and the Natural Science Foundation from the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. XDB07030200).

  7. Robust isothermal electric control of exchange bias at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binek, Christian

    2011-03-01

    Voltage-controlled spintronics is of particular importance to continue progress in information technology through reduced power consumption, enhanced processing speed, integration density, and functionality in comparison with present day CMOS electronics. Almost all existing and prototypical solid-state spintronic devices rely on tailored interface magnetism, enabling spin-selective transmission or scattering of electrons. Controlling magnetism at thin-film interfaces, preferably by purely electrical means, is a key challenge to better spintronics. Currently, most attempts to electrically control magnetism focus on potentially large magnetoelectric effects of multiferroics. We report on our interest in magnetoelectric Cr 2 O3 (chromia). Robust isothermal electric control of exchange bias is achieved at room temperature in perpendicular anisotropic Cr 2 O3 (0001)/CoPd exchange bias heterostructures. This discovery promises significant implications for potential spintronics. From the perspective of basic science, our finding serves as macroscopic evidence for roughness-insensitive and electrically controllable equilibrium boundary magnetization in magnetoelectric antiferromagnets. The latter evolves at chromia (0001) surfaces and interfaces when chromia is in one of its two degenerate antiferromagnetic single domain states selected via magnetoelectric annealing. Theoretical insight into the boundary magnetization and its role in electrically controlled exchange bias is gained from first-principles calculations and general symmetry arguments. Measurements of spin-resolved ultraviolet photoemission, magnetometry at Cr 2 O3 (0001) surfaces, and detailed investigations of the unique exchange bias properties of Cr 2 O3 (0001)/CoPd including its electric controllability provide macroscopically averaged information about the boundary magnetization of chromia. Laterally resolved X-ray PEEM and temperature dependent MFM reveal detailed microscopic information of the chromia

  8. Realization of ground-state artificial skyrmion lattices at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Dustin A.; Maranville, Brian B.; Balk, Andrew L.; Kirby, Brian J.; Fischer, Peter; Pierce, Daniel T.; Unguris, John; Borchers, Julie A.; Liu, Kai

    2015-01-01

    The topological nature of magnetic skyrmions leads to extraordinary properties that provide new insights into fundamental problems of magnetism and exciting potentials for novel magnetic technologies. Prerequisite are systems exhibiting skyrmion lattices at ambient conditions, which have been elusive so far. Here, we demonstrate the realization of artificial Bloch skyrmion lattices over extended areas in their ground state at room temperature by patterning asymmetric magnetic nanodots with controlled circularity on an underlayer with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA). Polarity is controlled by a tailored magnetic field sequence and demonstrated in magnetometry measurements. The vortex structure is imprinted from the dots into the interfacial region of the underlayer via suppression of the PMA by a critical ion-irradiation step. The imprinted skyrmion lattices are identified directly with polarized neutron reflectometry and confirmed by magnetoresistance measurements. Our results demonstrate an exciting platform to explore room-temperature ground-state skyrmion lattices. PMID:26446515

  9. Realization of ground-state artificial skyrmion lattices at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, Dustin A.; Maranville, Brian B.; Balk, Andrew L.; Kirby, Brian J.; Fischer, Peter; Pierce, Daniel T.; Unguris, John; Borchers, Julie A.; Liu, Kai

    2015-10-08

    We report that the topological nature of magnetic skyrmions leads to extraordinary properties that provide new insights into fundamental problems of magnetism and exciting potentials for novel magnetic technologies. Prerequisite are systems exhibiting skyrmion lattices at ambient conditions, which have been elusive so far. We demonstrate the realization of artificial Bloch skyrmion lattices over extended areas in their ground state at room temperature by patterning asymmetric magnetic nanodots with controlled circularity on an underlayer with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA). Polarity is controlled by a tailored magnetic field sequence and demonstrated in magnetometry measurements. The vortex structure is imprinted from the dots into the interfacial region of the underlayer via suppression of the PMA by a critical ion-irradiation step. In conclusion, the imprinted skyrmion lattices are identified directly with polarized neutron reflectometry and confirmed by magnetoresistance measurements. Our results demonstrate an exciting platform to explore room-temperature ground-state skyrmion lattices.

  10. Realization of ground-state artificial skyrmion lattices at room temperature

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gilbert, Dustin A.; Maranville, Brian B.; Balk, Andrew L.; Kirby, Brian J.; Fischer, Peter; Pierce, Daniel T.; Unguris, John; Borchers, Julie A.; Liu, Kai

    2015-10-08

    We report that the topological nature of magnetic skyrmions leads to extraordinary properties that provide new insights into fundamental problems of magnetism and exciting potentials for novel magnetic technologies. Prerequisite are systems exhibiting skyrmion lattices at ambient conditions, which have been elusive so far. We demonstrate the realization of artificial Bloch skyrmion lattices over extended areas in their ground state at room temperature by patterning asymmetric magnetic nanodots with controlled circularity on an underlayer with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA). Polarity is controlled by a tailored magnetic field sequence and demonstrated in magnetometry measurements. The vortex structure is imprinted from themore » dots into the interfacial region of the underlayer via suppression of the PMA by a critical ion-irradiation step. In conclusion, the imprinted skyrmion lattices are identified directly with polarized neutron reflectometry and confirmed by magnetoresistance measurements. Our results demonstrate an exciting platform to explore room-temperature ground-state skyrmion lattices.« less

  11. Giant dielectric and magnetoelectric responses in insulating nanogranular films at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Nobukiyo; Masumoto, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Saburo; Maekawa, Sadamichi

    2014-01-01

    The electric and magnetic properties of matter are of great interest for materials science and their use in electronic applications. Large dielectric and magnetoelectric responses of materials at room temperature are a great advantage for electromagnetic device applications. Here we present a study of FeCo-MgF nanogranular films exhibiting giant dielectric and magnetoelectric responses at room temperature; with dielectric constant ε′=490 and magnetoelectric response Δε′/ε′0=3%. In these films, Fe-Co alloy-based nanometer-sized magnetic granules are dispersed in a Mg-fluoride-based insulator matrix. Insulating nanogranular films are a new class of multifunctional materials. The giant responses are caused by spin-dependent charge oscillation between magnetic granules via quantum-mechanical tunnelling. A possible application of such insulating nanogranular materials with giant response is in the construction of a tunable device, in which impedance components such as capacitance and inductance are tunable at room temperature. PMID:25048805

  12. Room temperature neutron diffraction and magnetic studies of multiferroic Pb0.9Bi0.1Fe0.55Nb0.45O3 solid solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadami, S. T.; Matteppanavar, S.; Shivaraja, I.; Rayaprol, S.; Deshpande, S. K.; Angadi, B.

    2016-05-01

    The Pb0.9Bi0.1Fe0.55Nb0.45O3 (PBFNO) solid solution was synthesized by single step solid state reaction method and the optimized parameters are 700°C for 2hr (calcination) and 800°C for 3hr (sintering). The formation of desired material was confirmed using X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Neutron Diffraction (ND) studies. The structural and magnetic properties of the sintered pellets were investigated at room temperature (RT) through XRD, ND and Magnetic (M-H) studies. The structural analysis was carried out by Rietveld refinement through the Full Prof program. Rietveld refined XRD and ND patterns confirms the monoclinic structure with Cm space group and obtained cell parameters from the ND data are a = 5.651(2) Å, b = 5.658(2) Å, c = 4.005(1) Å and α = 90°, β = 89.98(1)°, γ = 90°. RT M-H curve studies have been carried out. It shows the clear opening of hysteresis (M-H) loop, is evidenced as the existence of weak ferromagnetism at RT. The M-H data shows existence weak ferromagnetism embedded in an antiferromagnetic matrix structure. The dielectric constant with frequency shows the formation of barrier layers at the grain and grain boundary interfaces gives rise to interfacial space charge polarization.

  13. Entanglement and Bell's inequality violation above room temperature in metal carboxylates.

    SciTech Connect

    Souza, A M; Soares-Pinto, D O; Sarthour, R S; Oliveira, I S; Reis, Mario S; Brandao, Paula; Moreira Dos Santos, Antonio F

    2009-01-01

    In the present work we show that a particular family of materials, the metal carboxylates, may have entangled states up to very high temperatures. From magnetic-susceptibility measurements, we have estimated the critical temperature below which entanglement exists in the copper carboxylate {Cu-2(O2CH)(4)}{Cu(O2CH)(2)(2-methylpyridine)(2)}, and we have found this to be above room temperature (T-e similar to 630 K). Furthermore, the results show that the system remains maximally entangled until close to similar to 100 K and the Bell's inequality is violated up to nearly room temperature (similar to 290 K).

  14. Designing room-temperature multiferroic materials in a single-phase solid-solution film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, H. J.; Song, C.; Cui, B.; Peng, J. J.; Li, F.; Xiao, L. R.; Pan, F.

    2016-09-01

    The search for multiferroic materials with simultaneous ferroelectric and ferromagnetic properties in a single phase at room temperature continues to be fuelled from the perspective of developing multifunctional devices. Here we design a single-phase multiferroic La0.67Sr0.33MnO3-BaTiO3 film, which possesses epitaxial single-crystal and solid-solution structure, high magnetic Curie temperature (~640 K) as well as switchable ferroelectric polarization. Moreover, a notable strain-mediated magnetoelectric coupling at room temperature in the way of modulating the magnetism with an external applied voltage is also observed. The synthetic solid-solution multiferroic film may open an extraordinary avenue for exploring a series of room-temperature multiferroic materials.

  15. Room temperature and productivity in office work

    SciTech Connect

    Seppanen, O.; Fisk, W.J.; Lei, Q.H.

    2006-07-01

    Indoor temperature is one of the fundamental characteristics of the indoor environment. It can be controlled with a degree of accuracy dependent on the building and its HVAC system. The indoor temperature affects several human responses, including thermal comfort, perceived air quality, sick building syndrome symptoms and performance at work. In this study, we focused on the effects of temperature on performance at office work. We included those studies that had used objective indicators of performance that are likely to be relevant in office type work, such as text processing, simple calculations (addition, multiplication), length of telephone customer service time, and total handling time per customer for call-center workers. We excluded data from studies of industrial work performance. We calculated from all studies the percentage of performance change per degree increase in temperature, and statistically analyzed measured work performance with temperature. The results show that performance increases with temperature up to 21-22 C, and decreases with temperature above 23-24 C. The highest productivity is at temperature of around 22 C. For example, at the temperature of 30 C, the performance is only 91.1% of the maximum i.e. the reduction in performance is 8.9%.

  16. The role of hydrogen in room-temperature ferromagnetism at graphite surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Ohldag, H.; Esquinazi, P.; Arenholz, E.; Spemann, D.; Rothermel, M.; Setzer, A.; Butz, T.

    2010-05-01

    We present a x-ray dichroism study of graphite surfaces that addresses the origin and magnitude of ferromagnetism in metal-free carbon. We find that, in addition to carbon {pi} states, also hydrogen-mediated electronic states exhibit a net spin polarization with significant magnetic remanence at room temperature. The observed magnetism is restricted to the top {approx}10 nm of the irradiated sample where the average magnetization reaches {approx_equal} 15 emu/g at room temperature. We prove that the ferromagnetism found in metal-free untreated graphite is intrinsic and has a similar origin as the one found in proton bombarded graphite. Also, our findings show that the magnetic properties of graphite surfaces, thin films or two dimensional graphene samples can be reliably studied using soft x-ray dichroism. Fundamental new insight into the magnetic properties of carbon based systems can thus be obtained.

  17. Fabrication method for a room temperature hydrogen sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seal, Sudipta (Inventor); Shukla, Satyajit V. (Inventor); Ludwig, Lawrence (Inventor); Cho, Hyoung (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A sensor for selectively determining the presence and measuring the amount of hydrogen in the vicinity of the sensor. The sensor comprises a MEMS device coated with a nanostructured thin film of indium oxide doped tin oxide with an over layer of nanostructured barium cerate with platinum catalyst nanoparticles. Initial exposure to a UV light source, at room temperature, causes burning of organic residues present on the sensor surface and provides a clean surface for sensing hydrogen at room temperature. A giant room temperature hydrogen sensitivity is observed after making the UV source off. The hydrogen sensor of the invention can be usefully employed for the detection of hydrogen in an environment susceptible to the incursion or generation of hydrogen and may be conveniently used at room temperature.

  18. Neutron absorbing room temperature vulcanizable silicone rubber compositions

    DOEpatents

    Zoch, Harold L.

    1979-11-27

    A neutron absorbing composition comprising a one-component room temperature vulcanizable silicone rubber composition or a two-component room temperature vulcanizable silicone rubber composition in which the composition contains from 25 to 300 parts by weight based on the base silanol or vinyl containing diorganopolysiloxane polymer of a boron compound or boron powder as the neutron absorbing ingredient. An especially useful boron compound in this application is boron carbide.

  19. Irradiation dose determination below room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos-Bernal, S.; Cruz, E.; Negrón-Mendoza, A.; Bustos, E.

    2002-03-01

    The measurements presented were undertaken to provide quantitative information on the low temperature irradiation of thermoluminiscence phosphors. The crystals used were (a) LiF co-doped with Mg, Cu and P, and (b) CaSO 4 doped with Dy. The absorbed dose values in the interval studied showed a linear behavior at low doses and low temperature. The aim of this work is to test if these crystals can be used to measure the dose absorbed by solids at low temperature.

  20. Giant single-molecule anisotropic magnetoresistance at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Li, Ji-Jun; Bai, Mei-Lin; Chen, Zhao-Bin; Zhou, Xiao-Shun; Shi, Zhan; Zhang, Meng; Ding, Song-Yuan; Hou, Shi-Min; Schwarzacher, Walther; Nichols, Richard J; Mao, Bing-Wei

    2015-05-13

    We report an electrochemically assisted jump-to-contact scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) break junction approach to create reproducible and well-defined single-molecule spintronic junctions. The STM break junction is equipped with an external magnetic field either parallel or perpendicular to the electron transport direction. The conductance of Fe-terephthalic acid (TPA)-Fe single-molecule junctions is measured and a giant single-molecule tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance (T-AMR) up to 53% is observed at room temperature. Theoretical calculations based on first-principles quantum simulations show that the observed AMR of Fe-TPA-Fe junctions originates from electronic coupling at the TPA-Fe interfaces modified by the magnetic orientation of the Fe electrodes with respect to the direction of current flow. The present study highlights new opportunities for obtaining detailed understanding of mechanisms of charge and spin transport in molecular junctions and the role of interfaces in determining the MR of single-molecule junctions. PMID:25894840

  1. Realization of Ground State Artificial Skyrmion Lattices at Room Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Dustin A.; Maranville, Brian B.; Balk, Andrew J.; Kirby, Brian J.; Pierce, Daniel T.; Unguris, John; Borchers, Julie A.; Fischer, Peter; Liu, Kai

    Artificial skyrmion lattices stable at ambient conditions offer a convenient and powerful platform to explore skyrmion physics and topological phenomena and motivates their inclusion in next-generation data and logic devices. In this work we present direct experimental evidence of artificial skyrmion lattices with a stable ground state at room temperature. Our approach is to pattern vortex-state Co nanodots (560 nm diameter) in hexagonal arrays on top of a Co/Pd multilayer with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy; the skyrmion state is prepared using a specific magnetic field sequence. Ion irradiation has been employed to suppress PMA in the underlayer and allow imprinting of the vortex structure from the nanodots to form skyrmion lattices, as revealed by polarized neutron reflectometry. Circularity control is realized through Co dot shape asymmetry, and confirmed by microscopy and FORC magnetometry. The vortex polarity is set during the field sequence and confirmed by magnetometry. Spin-transport studies further demonstrate a sensitivity to the skyrmion spin texture.Work supported by NSF (DMR-1008791, ECCS-1232275 and DMR-1543582)

  2. Thermal Effect in Opal Below Room Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Buerger, Martin J.; Shoemaker, Gerald L.

    1972-01-01

    Opal, once believed to be amorphous silica, was shown by Levin and Ott (1932, J. Amer. Chem. Soc. 54, 828-829) to give an x-ray powder pattern of the high-temperature form of cristobalite. The early explanation of this anomalous existence of a phase below its high-low transition temperature is now known to be untenable. One of us suggested that the tiny sizes of the component cristobalite crystals might explain the anomaly; if so, the transition might be expected below ambient temperatures. The record of a du Pont 900 Thermoanalyzer indeed revealed heat effects in opal below ambient temperatures, with an exotherm having a maximum at about -40° on cooling and an endotherm that began about -50° on heating. This was not a latent-heat effect due to the high-low transition of cristobalite, however, for the low-cristobalite pattern persisted to below -50°. Opal normally contains 4-9% water, which is tenaciously held; water loss is nearly linear with temperatures up to about 422°, when water loss is abruptly complete. Water-free opal does not display the thermal effect, but the same opal rehydrated does display it. Water is housed in minute voids, judged to be a few hundred Ångströms across, between minute particles of cristobalite. This water behaves differently from water in bulk, for its begins to melt at about -50°. PMID:16592025

  3. Control and Room Temperature Optimization of Energy Efficient Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Djouadi, Seddik M; Kuruganti, Phani Teja

    2012-01-01

    The building sector consumes a large part of the energy used in the United States and is responsible for nearly 40% of greenhouse gas emissions. It is therefore economically and environmentally important to reduce the building energy consumption to realize massive energy savings. In this paper, a method to control room temperature in buildings is proposed. The approach is based on a distributed parameter model represented by a three dimensional (3D) heat equation in a room with heater/cooler located at ceiling. The latter is resolved using finite element methods, and results in a model for room temperature with thousands of states. The latter is not amenable to control design. A reduced order model of only few states is then derived using Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD). A Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR) is computed based on the reduced model, and applied to the full order model to control room temperature.

  4. Nature of room-temperature photoluminescence in ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    Shan, W.; Walukiewicz, W.; Ager III, J.W.; Yu, K.M.; Yuan, H.B.; Xin, H.P.; Cantwell, G.; Song, J.J.

    2004-11-11

    The temperature dependence of the photoluminescence (PL) transitions associated with various excitons and their phonon replicas in high-purity bulk ZnO has been studied at temperatures from 12 K to above room temperature (320 K). Several strong PL emission lines associated with LO phonon replicas of free and bound excitons are clearly observed. The room temperature PL spectrum is dominated by the phonon replicas of the free exciton transition with the maximum at the first LO phonon replica. The results explain the discrepancy between the transition energy of free exciton determined by reflection measurement and the peak position obtained by the PL measurement.

  5. Near-edge x-ray absorption studies of Na-doped tetracyanoethylene films: A model system for the V(TCNE)x room-temperature molecular magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlegrim, E.; Gao, B.; Kanciurzewska, A.; de Jong, M. P.; Wu, Z.; Luo, Y.; Fahlman, M.

    2008-02-01

    V(TCNE)x , with TCNE=tetracyanoethylene and xtilde 2 , is an organic-based molecular magnet with potential to be used in spintronic devices. With the aim of shedding light on the unoccupied frontier electronic structure of V(TCNE)x we have studied pristine TCNE and sodium-intercalated TCNE by near edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy as well as with theoretical calculations. Sodium-intercalated TCNE was used as a model system of the more complex V(TCNE)x and both experimental and theoretical results of the model compound have been used to interpret the NEXAFS spectra of V(TCNE)x . By comparing the experimental and theoretical C K -edge of pristine TCNE, the contributions from the various carbon species (cyano and vinyl) could be disentangled. Upon fully sodium intercalation, TCNE is n doped with one electron per molecule and the features in the C and N K -edge spectra of pristine TCNE undergo strong modification caused by partially filling the TCNE lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO). When comparing the C and N K -edge NEXAFS spectra of fully sodium-doped TCNE with V(TCNE)x , the spectra are similar except for broadening of the features which originates from structural disorder of the V(TCNE)x films. The combined results from the model system and V(TCNE)x suggest that the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital with density on the nitrogen atoms in V(TCNE)x has no significant hybridization with vanadium and is similar to the so-called singly occupied molecular orbital of the TCNE anion. This suggests that the LUMO of V(TCNE)x is TCNE- or vanadiumlike, in contrast to the frontier occupied electronic structure where the highest occupied molecular orbital is a hybridization between V(3d) and cyano carbons. The completely different nature of the unoccupied and occupied frontier electronic structure of the material will most likely affect both charge injection and transport properties of a spintronic device featuring V(TCNE)x .

  6. Proposal for a room-temperature diamond maser.

    PubMed

    Jin, Liang; Pfender, Matthias; Aslam, Nabeel; Neumann, Philipp; Yang, Sen; Wrachtrup, Jörg; Liu, Ren-Bao

    2015-01-01

    The application of masers is limited by its demanding working conditions (high vacuum or low temperature). A room-temperature solid-state maser is highly desirable, but the lifetimes of emitters (electron spins) in solids at room temperature are usually too short (∼ns) for population inversion. Masing from pentacene spins in p-terphenyl crystals, which have a long spin lifetime (∼0.1 ms), has been demonstrated. This maser, however, operates only in the pulsed mode. Here we propose a room-temperature maser based on nitrogen-vacancy centres in diamond, which features the longest known solid-state spin lifetime (∼5 ms) at room temperature, high optical pumping efficiency (∼10(6) s(-1)) and material stability. Our numerical simulation demonstrates that a maser with a coherence time of approximately minutes is feasible under readily accessible conditions (cavity Q-factor ∼5 × 10(4), diamond size ∼3 × 3 × 0.5 mm(3) and pump power <10 W). A room-temperature diamond maser may facilitate a broad range of microwave technologies. PMID:26394758

  7. Proposal for a room-temperature diamond maser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Liang; Pfender, Matthias; Aslam, Nabeel; Neumann, Philipp; Yang, Sen; Wrachtrup, Jörg; Liu, Ren-Bao

    2015-09-01

    The application of masers is limited by its demanding working conditions (high vacuum or low temperature). A room-temperature solid-state maser is highly desirable, but the lifetimes of emitters (electron spins) in solids at room temperature are usually too short (~ns) for population inversion. Masing from pentacene spins in p-terphenyl crystals, which have a long spin lifetime (~0.1 ms), has been demonstrated. This maser, however, operates only in the pulsed mode. Here we propose a room-temperature maser based on nitrogen-vacancy centres in diamond, which features the longest known solid-state spin lifetime (~5 ms) at room temperature, high optical pumping efficiency (~106 s-1) and material stability. Our numerical simulation demonstrates that a maser with a coherence time of approximately minutes is feasible under readily accessible conditions (cavity Q-factor ~5 × 104, diamond size ~3 × 3 × 0.5 mm3 and pump power <10 W). A room-temperature diamond maser may facilitate a broad range of microwave technologies.

  8. Proposal for a room-temperature diamond maser

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Liang; Pfender, Matthias; Aslam, Nabeel; Neumann, Philipp; Yang, Sen; Wrachtrup, Jörg; Liu, Ren-Bao

    2015-01-01

    The application of masers is limited by its demanding working conditions (high vacuum or low temperature). A room-temperature solid-state maser is highly desirable, but the lifetimes of emitters (electron spins) in solids at room temperature are usually too short (∼ns) for population inversion. Masing from pentacene spins in p-terphenyl crystals, which have a long spin lifetime (∼0.1 ms), has been demonstrated. This maser, however, operates only in the pulsed mode. Here we propose a room-temperature maser based on nitrogen-vacancy centres in diamond, which features the longest known solid-state spin lifetime (∼5 ms) at room temperature, high optical pumping efficiency (∼106 s−1) and material stability. Our numerical simulation demonstrates that a maser with a coherence time of approximately minutes is feasible under readily accessible conditions (cavity Q-factor ∼5 × 104, diamond size ∼3 × 3 × 0.5 mm3 and pump power <10 W). A room-temperature diamond maser may facilitate a broad range of microwave technologies. PMID:26394758

  9. Room temperature DNA storage with slide-mounted Aphid specimens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most of the conventional molecular studies of aphids destroy the specimen in order to extract DNA. This DNA is subsequently stored in low temperature freezers. Room temperature storage of DNA with microscope slide-mounted voucher material is demonstrated by developing a system that uses filter pa...

  10. Acoustic method for measuring air temperature and humidity in rooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanev, N. G.

    2014-05-01

    A method is proposed to determine air temperature and humidity in rooms with a system of sound sources and receivers, making it possible to find the sound velocity and reverberation time. Nomograms for determining the air temperature and relative air humidity are constructed from the found sound velocity and time reverberation values. The required accuracy of measuring these parameters is estimated.

  11. Stable room-temperature ferromagnetic phase at the FeRh(100) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pressacco, Federico; Uhlίř, Vojtěch; Gatti, Matteo; Bendounan, Azzedine; Fullerton, Eric E.; Sirotti, Fausto

    2016-03-01

    Interfaces and low dimensionality are sources of strong modifications of electronic, structural, and magnetic properties of materials. FeRh alloys are an excellent example because of the first-order phase transition taking place at ~400 K from an antiferromagnetic phase at room temperature to a high temperature ferromagnetic one. It is accompanied by a resistance change and volume expansion of about 1%. We have investigated the electronic and magnetic properties of FeRh(100) epitaxially grown on MgO by combining spectroscopies characterized by different probing depths, namely X-ray magnetic circular dichroism and photoelectron spectroscopy. We find that the symmetry breaking induced at the Rh-terminated surface stabilizes a surface ferromagnetic layer involving five planes of Fe and Rh atoms in the nominally antiferromagnetic phase at room temperature. First-principles calculations provide a microscopic description of the structural relaxation and the electron spin-density distribution that support the experimental findings.

  12. Stable room-temperature ferromagnetic phase at the FeRh(100) surface.

    PubMed

    Pressacco, Federico; Uhlίř, Vojtěch; Gatti, Matteo; Bendounan, Azzedine; Fullerton, Eric E; Sirotti, Fausto

    2016-01-01

    Interfaces and low dimensionality are sources of strong modifications of electronic, structural, and magnetic properties of materials. FeRh alloys are an excellent example because of the first-order phase transition taking place at ~400 K from an antiferromagnetic phase at room temperature to a high temperature ferromagnetic one. It is accompanied by a resistance change and volume expansion of about 1%. We have investigated the electronic and magnetic properties of FeRh(100) epitaxially grown on MgO by combining spectroscopies characterized by different probing depths, namely X-ray magnetic circular dichroism and photoelectron spectroscopy. We find that the symmetry breaking induced at the Rh-terminated surface stabilizes a surface ferromagnetic layer involving five planes of Fe and Rh atoms in the nominally antiferromagnetic phase at room temperature. First-principles calculations provide a microscopic description of the structural relaxation and the electron spin-density distribution that support the experimental findings. PMID:26935274

  13. Stable room-temperature ferromagnetic phase at the FeRh(100) surface

    PubMed Central

    Pressacco, Federico; Uhlίř, Vojtěch; Gatti, Matteo; Bendounan, Azzedine; Fullerton, Eric E.; Sirotti, Fausto

    2016-01-01

    Interfaces and low dimensionality are sources of strong modifications of electronic, structural, and magnetic properties of materials. FeRh alloys are an excellent example because of the first-order phase transition taking place at ~400 K from an antiferromagnetic phase at room temperature to a high temperature ferromagnetic one. It is accompanied by a resistance change and volume expansion of about 1%. We have investigated the electronic and magnetic properties of FeRh(100) epitaxially grown on MgO by combining spectroscopies characterized by different probing depths, namely X-ray magnetic circular dichroism and photoelectron spectroscopy. We find that the symmetry breaking induced at the Rh-terminated surface stabilizes a surface ferromagnetic layer involving five planes of Fe and Rh atoms in the nominally antiferromagnetic phase at room temperature. First-principles calculations provide a microscopic description of the structural relaxation and the electron spin-density distribution that support the experimental findings. PMID:26935274

  14. Giant electrocaloric effect in ferroelectric nanotubes near room temperature.

    PubMed

    Liu, Man; Wang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Ferroelectric perovskite oxides possess large electrocaloric effect, but only at high temperature, which limits their potential as next generation solid state cooling devices. Here, we demonstrate from phase field simulations that a giant adiabatic temperature change exhibits near room temperature in the strained ferroelectric PbTiO₃ nanotubes, which is several times in magnitude larger than that of PbTiO₃ thin films. Such giant adiabatic temperature change is attributed to the extrinsic contribution of unusual domain transition, which involves a dedicated interplay among the electric field, strain, temperature and polarization. Careful selection of external strain allows one to harness the extrinsic contribution to obtain large adiabatic temperature change in ferroelectric nanotubes near room temperature. Our finding provides a novel insight into the electrocaloric response of ferroelectric nanostructures and leads to a new strategy to tailor and improve the electrocaloric properties of ferroelectric materials through domain engineering. PMID:25578434

  15. Giant electrocaloric effect in ferroelectric nanotubes near room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Man; Wang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Ferroelectric perovskite oxides possess large electrocaloric effect, but only at high temperature, which limits their potential as next generation solid state cooling devices. Here, we demonstrate from phase field simulations that a giant adiabatic temperature change exhibits near room temperature in the strained ferroelectric PbTiO3 nanotubes, which is several times in magnitude larger than that of PbTiO3 thin films. Such giant adiabatic temperature change is attributed to the extrinsic contribution of unusual domain transition, which involves a dedicated interplay among the electric field, strain, temperature and polarization. Careful selection of external strain allows one to harness the extrinsic contribution to obtain large adiabatic temperature change in ferroelectric nanotubes near room temperature. Our finding provides a novel insight into the electrocaloric response of ferroelectric nanostructures and leads to a new strategy to tailor and improve the electrocaloric properties of ferroelectric materials through domain engineering. PMID:25578434

  16. Direct observation of a highly spin-polarized organic spinterface at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Djeghloul, F.; Ibrahim, F.; Cantoni, M.; Bowen, M.; Joly, L.; Boukari, S.; Ohresser, P.; Bertran, F.; Le Fèvre, P.; Thakur, P.; Scheurer, F.; Miyamachi, T.; Mattana, R.; Seneor, P.; Jaafar, A.; Rinaldi, C.; Javaid, S.; Arabski, J.; Kappler, J. -P; Wulfhekel, W.; Brookes, N. B.; Bertacco, R.; Taleb-Ibrahimi, A.; Alouani, M.; Beaurepaire, E.; Weber, W.

    2013-01-01

    Organic semiconductors constitute promising candidates toward large-scale electronic circuits that are entirely spintronics-driven. Toward this goal, tunneling magnetoresistance values above 300% at low temperature suggested the presence of highly spin-polarized device interfaces. However, such spinterfaces have not been observed directly, let alone at room temperature. Thanks to experiments and theory on the model spinterface between phthalocyanine molecules and a Co single crystal surface, we clearly evidence a highly efficient spinterface. Spin-polarised direct and inverse photoemission experiments reveal a high degree of spin polarisation at room temperature at this interface. We measured a magnetic moment on the molecule's nitrogen π orbitals, which substantiates an ab-initio theoretical description of highly spin-polarised charge conduction across the interface due to differing spinterface formation mechanisms in each spin channel. We propose, through this example, a recipe to engineer simple organic-inorganic interfaces with remarkable spintronic properties that can endure well above room temperature. PMID:23412079

  17. Temperature compensation for miniaturized magnetic sector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinha, Mahadeva P. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Temperature compensation for a magnetic sector used in mass spectrometry. A high temperature dependant magnetic sector is used. This magnetic sector is compensated by a magnetic shunt that has opposite temperature characteristics to those of the magnet.

  18. Room-Temperature Ferromagnetism in Chemically Synthesized Sn₁-xCox O₂ Powders

    SciTech Connect

    Punnoose, Alex; Hays, Jason S.; Gopal, Vidyut; Shutthanandan, V.

    2004-08-30

    Room temperature ferromagnetism is observed in chemically synthesized powder samples of Sn₁₋xCox O₂ with x = 0.005 and 0.01. Magnetic hysteresis loops are ovserved at 300K with coercivity Hc ~ 630 Oe, saturation magnetization Ms ~0.133μв and about 31% remenance. Analyses of the magnetization data of paramagnetic samples with x = 0.01 and 0.03, measured as a function of temperature (3-330K) and magnetic field (up to 50kOe), indicated the presence of Co²⁺ ions with spin S = 3/2. Magnetic data obtained from samples prepared at different temperatures indicate that the observed ferromagnetism for x ≤ 0.01 might have been triggered by changes in the oxygen stiochiometry.

  19. High room temperature ferromagnetic moment of Ho substituted nanocrystalline BiFeO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakuria, Pankaj; Joy, P. A.

    2010-10-01

    Magnetic properties of trivalent rare-earth ion substituted nanocrystalline BiFeO3 have been studied for the compositions Bi0.875R0.125FeO3 (R=La, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, and Yb). All compositions show ferromagnetic characteristics at room temperature, with enhanced magnetization after substitution. Very high magnetization (at 6 T), almost three times that of the unsubstituted composition, is observed for R=Ho, and highest remnant magnetization is obtained for R=Nd and Sm. The magnetic transition temperature is increased by ˜20 K for R=La. The results show that it is possible to tune the magnetic characteristics of the nanocrystalline multiferroic BiFeO3 by the choice of the rare-earth ion.

  20. Giant room-temperature elastocaloric effect in ferroelectric ultrathin films.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Infante, Ingrid C; Lou, Xiaojie; Bellaiche, Laurent; Scott, James F; Dkhil, Brahim

    2014-09-17

    Environmentally friendly ultrathin BaTiO3 capacitors can exhibit a giant stress-induced elastocaloric effect without hysteresis loss or Joule heating. By combining this novel elastocaloric effect with the intrinsic electrocaloric effect, an ideal refrigeration cycle with high performance (temperature change over 10 K with a wide working-temperature window of 60 K) at room temperature is proposed for future cooling applications. PMID:25042767

  1. Nanostructured Materials for Room-Temperature Gas Sensors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Liu, Xianghong; Neri, Giovanni; Pinna, Nicola

    2016-02-01

    Sensor technology has an important effect on many aspects in our society, and has gained much progress, propelled by the development of nanoscience and nanotechnology. Current research efforts are directed toward developing high-performance gas sensors with low operating temperature at low fabrication costs. A gas sensor working at room temperature is very appealing as it provides very low power consumption and does not require a heater for high-temperature operation, and hence simplifies the fabrication of sensor devices and reduces the operating cost. Nanostructured materials are at the core of the development of any room-temperature sensing platform. The most important advances with regard to fundamental research, sensing mechanisms, and application of nanostructured materials for room-temperature conductometric sensor devices are reviewed here. Particular emphasis is given to the relation between the nanostructure and sensor properties in an attempt to address structure-property correlations. Finally, some future research perspectives and new challenges that the field of room-temperature sensors will have to address are also discussed. PMID:26662346

  2. Trace vapour detection at room temperature using Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chou, Alison; Radi, Babak; Jaatinen, Esa; Juodkazis, Saulius; Fredericks, Peter M

    2014-04-21

    A miniaturized flow-through system consisting of a gold coated silicon substrate based on enhanced Raman spectroscopy has been used to study the detection of vapour from model explosive compounds. The measurements show that the detectability of the vapour molecules at room temperature depends sensitively on the interaction between the molecule and the substrate. The results highlight the capability of a flow system combined with Raman spectroscopy for detecting low vapour pressure compounds with a limit of detection of 0.2 ppb as demonstrated by the detection of bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate, a common polymer additive emitted from a commercial polyvinyl chloride (PVC) tubing at room temperature. PMID:24588003

  3. Ether-based nonflammable electrolyte for room temperature sodium battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jinkui; Zhang, Zhen; Li, Lifei; Yang, Jian; Xiong, Shenglin; Qian, Yitai

    2015-06-01

    Safety problem is one of the key points that hinder the development of room temperature sodium batteries. In this paper, four well-known nonflammable organic compounds, Trimethyl Phosphate (TMP), Tri(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl) phosphite (TFEP), Dimethyl Methylphosphonate (DMMP), Methyl nonafluorobuyl Ether (MFE), are investigated as nonflammable solvents in sodium batteries for the first time. Among them, MFE is stable towards sodium metal at room temperature. The electrochemical properties and electrode compatibility of MFE based electrolyte are investigated. Both Prussian blue cathode and carbon nanotube anode show good electrochemical performance retention in this electrolyte. The results suggest that MFE is a promising option as nonflammable electrolyte additive for sodium batteries.

  4. Room-temperature ferromagnetism in Li-doped p -type luminescent ZnO nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chawla, Santa; Jayanthi, K.; Kotnala, R. K.

    2009-03-01

    We have observed ferromagnetism in Li-doped ZnO nanorods with Curie temperature up to 554 K. Li forms shallow acceptor states in substitutional zinc sites giving rise to p -type conductivity. An explicit correlation emerges between increase in hole concentration with decrease in magnetization and Curie temperature in ZnO:Li. Occurrence of ferromagnetism at room temperature has been established with observed magnetic domain formation in ZnO:Li pellets in magnetic force microscopy and prominent ferromagnetic resonance signal in electron paramagnetic resonance spectrum. Magnetic ZnO:Li nanorods are luminescent, showing strong near UV emission. Substitutional Li atoms can induce local moments on neighboring oxygen atoms, which when considered in a correlated model for oxygen orbitals with random potentials introduced by dopant atom could explain the observed ferromagnetism and high Curie temperature in ZnO:Li nanorods.

  5. Room-Temperature-Cured Copolymers for Lithium Battery Gel Electrolytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B.; Tigelaar, Dean M.

    2009-01-01

    Polyimide-PEO copolymers (PEO signifies polyethylene oxide) that have branched rod-coil molecular structures and that can be cured into film form at room temperature have been invented for use as gel electrolytes for lithium-ion electric-power cells. These copolymers offer an alternative to previously patented branched rod-coil polyimides that have been considered for use as polymer electrolytes and that must be cured at a temperature of 200 C. In order to obtain sufficient conductivity for lithium ions in practical applications at and below room temperature, it is necessary to imbibe such a polymer with a suitable carbonate solvent or ionic liquid, but the high-temperature cure makes it impossible to incorporate and retain such a liquid within the polymer molecular framework. By eliminating the high-temperature cure, the present invention makes it possible to incorporate the required liquid.

  6. Cavity-Enhanced Room-Temperature Magnetometry Using Absorption by Nitrogen-Vacancy Centers in Diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, K.; Leefer, N.; Jarmola, A.; Dumeige, Y.; Acosta, V. M.; Kehayias, P.; Patton, B.; Budker, D.

    2014-04-01

    We demonstrate a cavity-enhanced room-temperature magnetic field sensor based on nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond. Magnetic resonance is detected using absorption of light resonant with the 1042 nm spin-singlet transition. The diamond is placed in an external optical cavity to enhance the absorption, and significant absorption is observed even at room temperature. We demonstrate a magnetic field sensitivity of 2.5 nT/√Hz , and project a photon shot-noise-limited sensitivity of 70 pT/√Hz for a few mW of infrared light, and a quantum projection-noise-limited sensitivity of 250 fT/√Hz for the sensing volume of ˜90 μm ×90 μm×200 μm.

  7. A novel NO2 gas sensor based on Hall effect operating at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, J. Y.; Xie, W. M.; He, X. L.; Wang, H. C.

    2016-09-01

    Tungsten trioxide nanoparticles were obtained by a simple thermal oxidation approach. The structural and morphological properties of these nanoparticles are investigated using XRD, SEM and TEM. A WO3 thick film was deposited on the four Au electrodes to be a WO3 Hall effect sensor. The sensor was tested between magnetic field in a plastic test chamber. Room-temperature nitrogen dioxide sensing characteristics of Hall effect sensor were studied for various concentration levels of nitrogen dioxide at dry air and humidity conditions. A typical room-temperature response of 3.27 was achieved at 40 ppm of NO2 with a response and recovery times of 36 and 45 s, respectively. NO2 gas sensing mechanism of Hall effect sensor was also studied. The room-temperature operation, with the low deposition cost of the sensor, suggests suitability for developing a low-power cost-effective nitrogen dioxide sensor.

  8. Room-temperature spin-polarized organic light-emitting diodes with a single ferromagnetic electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Baofu Alameh, Kamal; Song, Qunliang

    2014-05-19

    In this paper, we demonstrate the concept of a room-temperature spin-polarized organic light-emitting diode (Spin-OLED) structure based on (i) the deposition of an ultra-thin p-type organic buffer layer on the surface of the ferromagnetic electrode of the Spin-OLED and (ii) the use of oxygen plasma treatment to modify the surface of that electrode. Experimental results demonstrate that the brightness of the developed Spin-OLED can be increased by 110% and that a magneto-electroluminescence of 12% can be attained for a 150 mT in-plane magnetic field, at room temperature. This is attributed to enhanced hole and room-temperature spin-polarized injection from the ferromagnetic electrode, respectively.

  9. Room-temperature in situ nuclear spin hyperpolarization from optically pumped nitrogen vacancy centres in diamond

    DOE PAGESBeta

    King, Jonathan P.; Jeong, Keunhong; Vassiliou, Christophoros C.; Shin, Chang S.; Page, Ralph H.; Avalos, Claudia E.; Wang, Hai-Jing; Pines, Alexander

    2015-12-07

    Low detection sensitivity stemming from the weak polarization of nuclear spins is a primary limitation of magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging. Methods have been developed to enhance nuclear spin polarization but they typically require high magnetic fields, cryogenic temperatures or sample transfer between magnets. Here we report bulk, room-temperature hyperpolarization of 13C nuclear spins observed via high-field magnetic resonance. The technique harnesses the high optically induced spin polarization of diamond nitrogen vacancy centres at room temperature in combination with dynamic nuclear polarization. We observe bulk nuclear spin polarization of 6%, an enhancement of ~170,000 over thermal equilibrium. The signal ofmore » the hyperpolarized spins was detected in situ with a standard nuclear magnetic resonance probe without the need for sample shuttling or precise crystal orientation. In conclusion, hyperpolarization via optical pumping/dynamic nuclear polarization should function at arbitrary magnetic fields enabling orders of magnitude sensitivity enhancement for nuclear magnetic resonance of solids and liquids under ambient conditions.« less

  10. Room-temperature in situ nuclear spin hyperpolarization from optically pumped nitrogen vacancy centres in diamond

    SciTech Connect

    King, Jonathan P.; Jeong, Keunhong; Vassiliou, Christophoros C.; Shin, Chang S.; Page, Ralph H.; Avalos, Claudia E.; Wang, Hai-Jing; Pines, Alexander

    2015-12-07

    Low detection sensitivity stemming from the weak polarization of nuclear spins is a primary limitation of magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging. Methods have been developed to enhance nuclear spin polarization but they typically require high magnetic fields, cryogenic temperatures or sample transfer between magnets. Here we report bulk, room-temperature hyperpolarization of 13C nuclear spins observed via high-field magnetic resonance. The technique harnesses the high optically induced spin polarization of diamond nitrogen vacancy centres at room temperature in combination with dynamic nuclear polarization. We observe bulk nuclear spin polarization of 6%, an enhancement of ~170,000 over thermal equilibrium. The signal of the hyperpolarized spins was detected in situ with a standard nuclear magnetic resonance probe without the need for sample shuttling or precise crystal orientation. In conclusion, hyperpolarization via optical pumping/dynamic nuclear polarization should function at arbitrary magnetic fields enabling orders of magnitude sensitivity enhancement for nuclear magnetic resonance of solids and liquids under ambient conditions.