Science.gov

Sample records for room temperature magnetoresistance

  1. Ultrahigh magnetoresistance at room temperature in molecular wires.

    PubMed

    Mahato, R N; Lülf, H; Siekman, M H; Kersten, S P; Bobbert, P A; de Jong, M P; De Cola, L; van der Wiel, W G

    2013-07-19

    Systems featuring large magnetoresistance (MR) at room temperature and in small magnetic fields are attractive owing to their potential for applications in magnetic field sensing and data storage. Usually, the magnetic properties of materials are exploited to achieve large MR effects. Here, we report on an exceptionally large (>2000%), room-temperature, small-field (a few millitesla) MR effect in one-dimensional, nonmagnetic systems formed by molecular wires embedded in a zeolite host crystal. This ultrahigh MR effect is ascribed to spin blockade in one-dimensional electron transport. Its generic nature offers very good perspectives to exploit the effect in a wide range of low-dimensional systems. PMID:23828887

  2. Local magnetoresistance in Fe/MgO/Si lateral spin valve at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, Tomoyuki Koike, Hayato; Oikawa, Tohru; Suzuki, Toshio; Ando, Yuichiro; Suzuki, Yoshishige; Shiraishi, Masashi

    2014-02-03

    Room temperature local magnetoresistance in two-terminal scheme is reported. By employing 1.6 nm-thick MgO tunnel barrier, spin injection efficiency is increased, resulting in large non-local magnetoresistance. The magnitude of the non-local magnetoresistance is estimated to be 0.0057 Ω at room temperature. As a result, a clear rectangle signal is observed in local magnetoresistance measurement even at room temperature. We also investigate the origin of local magnetoresistance by measuring the spin accumulation voltage of each contact separately.

  3. Giant single-molecule anisotropic magnetoresistance at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Li, Ji-Jun; Bai, Mei-Lin; Chen, Zhao-Bin; Zhou, Xiao-Shun; Shi, Zhan; Zhang, Meng; Ding, Song-Yuan; Hou, Shi-Min; Schwarzacher, Walther; Nichols, Richard J; Mao, Bing-Wei

    2015-05-13

    We report an electrochemically assisted jump-to-contact scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) break junction approach to create reproducible and well-defined single-molecule spintronic junctions. The STM break junction is equipped with an external magnetic field either parallel or perpendicular to the electron transport direction. The conductance of Fe-terephthalic acid (TPA)-Fe single-molecule junctions is measured and a giant single-molecule tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance (T-AMR) up to 53% is observed at room temperature. Theoretical calculations based on first-principles quantum simulations show that the observed AMR of Fe-TPA-Fe junctions originates from electronic coupling at the TPA-Fe interfaces modified by the magnetic orientation of the Fe electrodes with respect to the direction of current flow. The present study highlights new opportunities for obtaining detailed understanding of mechanisms of charge and spin transport in molecular junctions and the role of interfaces in determining the MR of single-molecule junctions. PMID:25894840

  4. Room temperature giant baroresistance and magnetoresistance and its tunability in Pd doped FeRh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushwaha, Pallavi; Bag, Pallab; Rawat, R.

    2015-01-01

    We report room temperature giant baroresistance (≈128%) in Fe49(Rh0.93Pd0.07)51. With the application of external pressure (P) and magnetic field (H), the temperature range of giant baroresistance (≈600% at 5 K, 19.9 kilobars and 8 T) and magnetoresistance (≈ -85% at 5 K and 8 T) can be tuned from 5 K to well above room temperature. It is shown that under external pressure, antiferromagnetic state is stabilized at room temperature and shows giant magnetoresistance (≈-55%). Due to coupled magnetic and lattice changes, the isothermal change in resistivity at room temperature under pressure (at constant H) as well as magnetic field (at constant P) can be scaled together to a single curve, when plotted as a function of X = T + 12.8 × H - 7.3 × P.

  5. Room Temperature Giant and Linear Magnetoresistance in Topological Insulator Bi2Te3 Nanosheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaolin; Du, Yi; Dou, Shixue; Zhang, Chao

    2012-06-01

    Topological insulators, a new class of condensed matter having bulk insulating states and gapless metallic surface states, have demonstrated fascinating quantum effects. However, the potential practical applications of the topological insulators are still under exploration worldwide. We demonstrate that nanosheets of a Bi2Te3 topological insulator several quintuple layers thick display giant and linear magnetoresistance. The giant and linear magnetoresistance achieved is as high as over 600% at room temperature, with a trend towards further increase at higher temperatures, as well as being weakly temperature-dependent and linear with the field, without any sign of saturation at measured fields up to 13 T. Furthermore, we observed a magnetic field induced gap below 10 K. The observation of giant and linear magnetoresistance paves the way for 3D topological insulators to be useful for practical applications in magnetoelectronic sensors such as disk reading heads, mechatronics, and other multifunctional electromagnetic applications.

  6. Electric field dependence of junction magnetoresistance in magnetite/semiconductor heterostructure at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aireddy, H.; Bhaumik, S.; Das, A. K.

    2015-12-01

    We have fabricated Fe3O4/p-Si heterojunction using pulsed laser deposition technique and explored its electro-magnetic transport properties. The heterojunction exhibits backward rectifying property at all temperatures, and appraisal of giant junction magnetoresistance (JMR) is observed at room temperature (RT). Conspicuously, the variation and sign change of JMR as a function of electric field is observed at RT. The backward rectifying behavior of the device is ascribed to the highly doped p-type (p++) semiconducting nature of Fe3O4, and the origin of electric field (voltage) dependence of magnetoresistance is explained proposing electronic band diagram of Fe3O4/SiO2/p-Si heterojunction. This interesting result may have importance to integrate Si-based magnetoresistance sources in multifunctional spintronic devices.

  7. Electric field dependence of junction magnetoresistance in magnetite/semiconductor heterostructure at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Aireddy, H.; Bhaumik, S.; Das, A. K.

    2015-12-07

    We have fabricated Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/p-Si heterojunction using pulsed laser deposition technique and explored its electro-magnetic transport properties. The heterojunction exhibits backward rectifying property at all temperatures, and appraisal of giant junction magnetoresistance (JMR) is observed at room temperature (RT). Conspicuously, the variation and sign change of JMR as a function of electric field is observed at RT. The backward rectifying behavior of the device is ascribed to the highly doped p-type (p{sup ++}) semiconducting nature of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, and the origin of electric field (voltage) dependence of magnetoresistance is explained proposing electronic band diagram of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/SiO{sub 2}/p-Si heterojunction. This interesting result may have importance to integrate Si-based magnetoresistance sources in multifunctional spintronic devices.

  8. High-density magnetoresistive random access memory operating at ultralow voltage at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jia-Mian; Li, Zheng; Chen, Long-Qing; Nan, Ce-Wen

    2011-01-01

    The main bottlenecks limiting the practical applications of current magnetoresistive random access memory (MRAM) technology are its low storage density and high writing energy consumption. Although a number of proposals have been reported for voltage-controlled memory device in recent years, none of them simultaneously satisfy the important device attributes: high storage capacity, low power consumption and room temperature operation. Here we present, using phase-field simulations, a simple and new pathway towards high-performance MRAMs that display significant improvements over existing MRAM technologies or proposed concepts. The proposed nanoscale MRAM device simultaneously exhibits ultrahigh storage capacity of up to 88 Gb inch−2, ultralow power dissipation as low as 0.16 fJ per bit and room temperature high-speed operation below 10 ns. PMID:22109527

  9. Room-temperature tunnel magnetoresistance and spin-polarized tunneling through an organic semiconductor barrier.

    PubMed

    Santos, T S; Lee, J S; Migdal, P; Lekshmi, I C; Satpati, B; Moodera, J S

    2007-01-01

    Electron spin-polarized tunneling is observed through an ultrathin layer of the molecular organic semiconductor tris(8-hydroxyquinolinato)aluminum (Alq3). Significant tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) was measured in a Co/Al2O3/Alq3/NiFe magnetic tunnel junction at room temperature, which increased when cooled to low temperatures. Tunneling characteristics, such as the current-voltage behavior and temperature and bias dependence of the TMR, show the good quality of the organic tunnel barrier. Spin polarization (P) of the tunnel current through the Alq3 layer, directly measured using superconducting Al as the spin detector, shows that minimizing formation of an interfacial dipole layer between the metal electrode and organic barrier significantly improves spin transport. PMID:17358495

  10. Hydrogen Treatment for Superparamagnetic VO2 Nanowires with Large Room-Temperature Magnetoresistance.

    PubMed

    Li, Zejun; Guo, Yuqiao; Hu, Zhenpeng; Su, Jihu; Zhao, Jiyin; Wu, Junchi; Wu, Jiajing; Zhao, Yingcheng; Wu, Changzheng; Xie, Yi

    2016-07-01

    One-dimensional (1D) transition metal oxide (TMO) nanostructures are actively pursued in spintronic devices owing to their nontrivial d electron magnetism and confined electron transport pathways. However, for TMOs, the realization of 1D structures with long-range magnetic order to achieve a sensitive magnetoelectric response near room temperature has been a longstanding challenge. Herein, we exploit a chemical hydric effect to regulate the spin structure of 1D V-V atomic chains in monoclinic VO2 nanowires. Hydrogen treatment introduced V(3+) (3d(2) ) ions into the 1D zigzag V-V chains, triggering the formation of ferromagnetically coupled V(3+) -V(4+) dimers to produce 1D superparamagnetic chains and achieve large room-temperature negative magnetoresistance (-23.9 %, 300 K, 0.5 T). This approach offers new opportunities to regulate the spin structure of 1D nanostructures to control the intrinsic magnetoelectric properties of spintronic materials. PMID:27265205

  11. Giant magnetoresistance and superparamagnetism in DyxFe100-x nanogranular magnetic thin films at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mekala, Laxman; Muhammed Shameem P., V.; Singh, Dushyanth; Kumar, M. Senthil

    2016-05-01

    In this article, DyxFe100-x nanogranular (15 ≤ x ≤ 25) thin films have been prepared at ambient temperature by dc magnetron sputtering. The correlation between the microstructure, magneto transport and magnetization properties is discussed. The grain size of Dy (Dysprosium) and Fe (Iron) was measured to be about 2 to 3nm, respectively and the distribution of grains was homogenous throughout the sample. The magnetoresistance is sensitive to microstructural changes (particle size as well as Dy concentration). At the room temperature, the magnetoresistance [MR %] increased from 0.2 to 2.2 with increase in atomic concentration of Dy from x = 15 to 25 and we obtained maximum 2.2 MR [%] for x = 25 in this series of samples. The magnetization studies have revealed that all the samples are superparamagnetic (SPM) at room temperature.

  12. Enhanced room-temperature magnetoresistance in self-assembled Ag-coated multiphasic chromium oxide nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, S; Biswas, S

    2016-09-14

    Self-assembled Ag-coated multiphasic diluted magnetic chromium oxide nanocomposites were developed by a facile chemical synthesis route involving a reaction of CrO3 in the presence of Ag(+) ions in an aqueous solution of poly-vinyl alcohol (PVA) and sucrose. The tiny ferromagnetic single domains of tetragonal and orthorhombic CrO2 (t-CrO2 and o-CrO2) embedded in a dominantly insulating matrix of antiferromagnetic Cr2O3 and Cr3O8, and paramagnetic CrO3 and Cr2O, with a correlated diamagnetic thin and discontinuous shell layer of Ag efficiently tailor useful magnetic and room-temperature magnetoresistance (RTMR) properties. The t-CrO2, o-CrO2, possible canted ferromagnetism due to spin disorder in the matrix components, and the associated exchange interactions are the elements responsible for the observed ferromagnetism in the composite structure. The chain of ferromagnetic centers embedded in the composite matrix constitutes a type of magnetic tunnel junction through which spin-polarized electrons can effectively move without significant local interruptions. Electrical transport measurements showed that the spin-dependent tunneling (SDT) mechanism in the engineered microstructure of the nanocomposites exists even at room temperature (RT). A typical sample unveils a markedly enhanced RTMR-value, e.g., -80% at an applied field (H) of 3 kOe, compared to the reported values for compacted CrO2 powders or composites. The enhanced RTMR-value observed in the Coulomb blockade regime appears not only due to the considerably suppressed spin flipping at RT but primarily due to a highly effective SDT mechanism through an interlinked structure of Ag-coated multiphasic chromium oxide nanocomposites. PMID:27524510

  13. Extraordinary Magnetoresistance At Room Temperature In Non-Magnetic Narrow-Gap Semiconductor/Metal Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solin, S. A.

    2001-03-01

    The magnetoresistance (MR) of a material object contains a physical contribution from the magnetic field dependence of the material parameters such as the mobility or carrier concentration and a geometric contribution from the dependence of the current path and output voltage on the sample shape and electrode configuration. To date, only two classes of magnetic materials, artificially layered metals which exhibit giant MR (GMR) and the manganite perovskites which exhibit colossal MR (CMR) have been considered serious candidates in the effort to improve the room temperature (RT) performance of MR sensors. For both of these classes, the physical MR dominates. In contrast, we have found that non-magnetic narrow-gap semiconductors containing patterned metallic inhomogeneities (shunts), exhibit RT geometric extraordinary MR (EMR) orders of magnitude larger than the physical MR of other materials. EMR in excess of 2000% at 0.05 Tesla and 3,000,000% at 5 T, respectively, has been observed in macroscopic ( ~ 1 mm) composite structures of InSb with patterned internal or external shunts.(S.A. Solin et al., Science 289), 1530 (2000).^,(T. Zhou, D.R. Hines and S.A. Solin, Appl. Phys. Lett., submitted.) We have been able to quantitatively account for the magnitude of the observed EMR as well as its dependence on the geometry (shape, size and placement of the shunt) using both analytic (Laplace equation with boundary conditions) and computational (Finite Element Analysis)(see the talk by L.R. Ram-Mohan et al., this conference) methods. The effect of scaling EMR structures to mesoscopic dimensions and the possible technological impact of EMR will be discussed.

  14. Low voltage tunneling magnetoresistance in CuCrO{sub 2}-based semiconductor heterojunctions at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X. R.; Han, M. J.; Shan, C.; Hu, Z. G. Zhu, Z. Q.; Chu, J. H.; Wu, J. D.

    2014-12-14

    CuCrO{sub 2}-based heterojunction diodes with rectifying characteristics have been fabricated by combining p-type Mg-doped CuCrO{sub 2} and n-type Al-doped ZnO. It was found that the current for the heterojunction in low bias voltage region is dominated by the trap-assisted tunneling mechanism. Positive magnetoresistance (MR) effect for the heterojunction can be observed at room temperature due to the tunneling-induced antiparallel spin polarization near the heterostructure interface. The MR effect becomes enhanced with the magnetic field, and shows the maximum at a bias voltage around 0.5 V. The phenomena indicate that the CuCrO{sub 2}-based heterojunction is a promising candidate for low-power semiconductor spintronic devices.

  15. Electric-field manipulation of magnetization rotation and tunneling magnetoresistance of magnetic tunnel junctions at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Aitian; Li, Peisen; Li, Dalai; Zhao, Yonggang; Zhang, Sen; Yang, Lifeng; Liu, Yan; Zhu, Meihong; Zhang, Huiyun; Han, Xiufeng

    2015-03-01

    Recent studies on the electric-field control of tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) have attracted considerable attention for low power consumption. So far two methods have been demonstrated for electric-field control of TMR. One method uses ferroelectric or multiferroic barriers, which is limited by low temperature. The other is nanoscale thin film magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ), but the assistance of a magnetic field is required. Therefore, electric-field control of TMR at room temperature without a magnetic field is highly desired. One promising way is to employ strain-mediated coupling in ferromagnetic/piezoelectric structure. Though MTJs/piezoelectric has been predicted by theory, experiment work is still lacking. We deposited CoFeB/AlOx/CoFeB on Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)0.7Ti0.3O3 (PMN-PT) ferroelectric single crystal. Under external electric fields, PMN-PT will produce a piezostrain due to piezoelectric effect, and the piezostrain transfers to ferromagnetic film to change the magnetic anisotropy. We demonstrate a reversible, continuous magnetization rotation and manipulation of TMR at room temperature by electric fields without the assistance of a magnetic field.

  16. Anisotropic magnetoresistance and piezoresistivity in structured Fe3O4-silver particles in PDMS elastomers at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Mietta, José L; Ruiz, Mariano M; Antonel, P Soledad; Perez, Oscar E; Butera, Alejandro; Jorge, Guillermo; Negri, R Martín

    2012-05-01

    Magnetorheological elastomers, MREs, based on elastic organic matrices displaying anisotropic magnetoresistance and piezoresistivity at room temperature were prepared and characterized. These materials are dispersions of superparamagnetic magnetite forming cores of aggregated nanoparticles inside silver microparticles that are dispersed in an elastomeric polymer (poly(dimethylsiloxane), PDMS), curing the polymer in the presence of a uniform magnetic field. In this way, the elastic material becomes structured as the application of the field induces the formation of filaments of silver-covered inorganic material agglomerates (needles) aligned in the direction of the field (parallel to the field). Because the magnetic particles are covered with silver, the MREs are not only magnetic but also electrical conductors. The structuration induces elastic, magnetic, and electrical anisotropic properties. For example, with a low concentration of particles in the elastic matrix (5% w/w) it is possible to obtain resistances of a few ohms when measured parallel to the needles or several megaohms in the perpendicular direction. Magnetite nanoparticles (Fe(3)O(4) NP) were synthesized by the coprecipitation method, and then agglomerations of these NPs were covered with Ag. The average size of the obtained magnetite NPs was about 13 nm, and the magnetite-silver particles, referred to as Fe(3)O(4)@Ag, form micrometric aggregates (1.3 μm). Nanoparticles, microparticles, and the MREs were characterized by XRD, TEM, SEM, EDS, diffuse reflectance, voltammetry, VSM, and SQUID. At room temperature, the synthesized magnetite and Fe(3)O(4)@Ag particles are in a superparamagnetic state (T(B) = 205 and 179 K at 0.01 T as determined by SQUID). The elastic properties and Young's modulus of the MREs were measured as a function of the orientation using a texture analysis device. The magnetic anisotropy in the MRE composite was investigated by FMR. The electrical conductivity of the MRE (

  17. Spin Hall magnetoresistance at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Uchida, Ken-ichi; Qiu, Zhiyong; Kikkawa, Takashi; Iguchi, Ryo; Saitoh, Eiji

    2015-02-02

    The temperature dependence of spin Hall magnetoresistance (SMR) in Pt/Y{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12} (YIG) bilayer films has been investigated in a high temperature range from room temperature to near the Curie temperature of YIG. The experimental results show that the magnitude of the magnetoresistance ratio induced by the SMR monotonically decreases with increasing the temperature and almost disappears near the Curie temperature. We found that, near the Curie temperature, the temperature dependence of the SMR in the Pt/YIG film is steeper than that of a magnetization curve of the YIG; the critical exponent of the magnetoresistance ratio is estimated to be 0.9. This critical behavior of the SMR is attributed mainly to the temperature dependence of the spin-mixing conductance at the Pt/YIG interface.

  18. Super-giant magnetoresistance at room-temperature in copper nanowires due to magnetic field modulation of potential barrier heights at nanowire-contact interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, Md I.; Maksud, M.; Palapati, N. K. R.; Subramanian, A.; Atulasimha, J.; Bandyopadhyay, S.

    2016-07-01

    We have observed a super-giant (∼10 000 000%) negative magnetoresistance at 39 mT field in Cu nanowires contacted with Au contact pads. In these nanowires, potential barriers form at the two Cu/Au interfaces because of Cu oxidation that results in an ultrathin copper oxide layer forming between Cu and Au. Current flows when electrons tunnel through, and/or thermionically emit over, these barriers. A magnetic field applied transverse to the direction of current flow along the wire deflects electrons toward one edge of the wire because of the Lorentz force, causing electron accumulation at that edge and depletion at the other. This lowers the potential barrier at the accumulated edge and raises it at the depleted edge, causing a super-giant magnetoresistance at room temperature.

  19. Super-giant magnetoresistance at room-temperature in copper nanowires due to magnetic field modulation of potential barrier heights at nanowire-contact interfaces.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Md I; Maksud, M; Palapati, N K R; Subramanian, A; Atulasimha, J; Bandyopadhyay, S

    2016-07-29

    We have observed a super-giant (∼10 000 000%) negative magnetoresistance at 39 mT field in Cu nanowires contacted with Au contact pads. In these nanowires, potential barriers form at the two Cu/Au interfaces because of Cu oxidation that results in an ultrathin copper oxide layer forming between Cu and Au. Current flows when electrons tunnel through, and/or thermionically emit over, these barriers. A magnetic field applied transverse to the direction of current flow along the wire deflects electrons toward one edge of the wire because of the Lorentz force, causing electron accumulation at that edge and depletion at the other. This lowers the potential barrier at the accumulated edge and raises it at the depleted edge, causing a super-giant magnetoresistance at room temperature. PMID:27320491

  20. Colossal magnetoresistance in amino-functionalized graphene quantum dots at room temperature: manifestation of weak anti-localization and doorway to spintronics.

    PubMed

    Roy, Rajarshi; Thapa, Ranjit; Kumar, Gundam Sandeep; Mazumder, Nilesh; Sen, Dipayan; Sinthika, S; Das, Nirmalya S; Chattopadhyay, Kalyan K

    2016-04-14

    In this work, we have demonstrated the signatures of localized surface distortions and disorders in functionalized graphene quantum dots (fGQD) and consequences in magneto-transport under weak field regime (∼1 Tesla) at room temperature. Observed positive colossal magnetoresistance (MR) and its suppression is primarily explained by weak anti-localization phenomenon where competitive valley (inter and intra) dependent scattering takes place at room temperature under low magnetic field; analogous to low mobility disordered graphene samples. Furthermore, using ab-initio analysis we show that sub-lattice sensitive spin-polarized ground state exists in the GQD as a result of pz orbital asymmetry in GQD carbon atoms with amino functional groups. This spin polarized ground state is believed to help the weak anti-localization dependent magneto transport by generating more disorder and strain in a GQD lattice under applied magnetic field and lays the premise for future graphene quantum dot based spintronic applications. PMID:27031679

  1. Novel room-temperature spin-valve-like magnetoresistance in magnetically coupled nano-column Fe3O4/Ni heterostructure.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Wen; Song, Wendong; Herng, Tun Seng; Qin, Qing; Yang, Yong; Zheng, Ming; Hong, Xiaoliang; Feng, Yuan Ping; Ding, Jun

    2016-08-25

    Herein, we design a room-temperature spin-valve-like magnetoresistance in a nano-column Fe3O4/Ni heterostructure without using a non-magnetic spacer or pinning layer. An Fe3O4 nano-column film is self-assembled on a Ni underlayer by the thermal decomposition method. The wet-chemical self-assembly is facile, economical and scalable. The magnetoresistance (MR) response of the Ni underlayer in the heterostructure under positive and negative out-of-plane magnetic fields differ by ∼0.25 at room temperature and ∼0.43 at 100 K. We attribute the spin-valve-like magnetoresistance to the unidirectional magnetic anisotropy of the Ni underlayer when being magnetically coupled by the Fe3O4 nano-column film. The out-of-plane negative-field magnetization is higher than the positive-field magnetization, affirming the unidirectional magnetic anisotropy of the Fe3O4/Ni heterostructure. Temperature-dependent magnetic and resistivity studies illustrate a close correlation between the magnetization transition of Fe3O4 and resistivity transition of Ni and prove a magnetic coupling between the Fe3O4 and Ni. First-principles calculations reveal that the Fe3O4/Ni model under a negative magnetic field is energetically more stable than that under a positive magnetic field. Furthermore, partial density of states (PDOS) analysis demonstrates the unidirectional magnetic anisotropy of the Ni 3d orbital. This is induced by the strong ferromagnetic coupling between Fe3O4 and Ni via oxygen-mediated Fe 3d-O 2p-Ni 3d hybridizations. PMID:27526860

  2. Magnetic properties of epitaxial Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} films with various crystal orientations and tunnel magnetoresistance effect at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Nagahama, Taro Matsuda, Yuya; Tate, Kazuya; Kawai, Tomohiro; Takahashi, Nozomi; Hiratani, Shungo; Watanabe, Yusuke; Yanase, Takashi; Shimada, Toshihiro

    2014-09-08

    Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} is a ferrimagnetic spinel ferrite that exhibits electric conductivity at room temperature (RT). Although the material has been predicted to be a half metal according to ab-initio calculations, magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) with Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} electrodes have demonstrated a small tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) effect. Not even the sign of the tunnel magnetoresistance ratio has been experimentally established. Here, we report on the magnetic properties of epitaxial Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} films with various crystal orientations. The films exhibited apparent crystal orientation dependence on hysteresis curves. In particular, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}(110) films exhibited in-plane uniaxial magnetic anisotropy. With respect to the squareness of hysteresis, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} (111) demonstrated the largest squareness. Furthermore, we fabricated MTJs with Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}(110) electrodes and obtained a TMR effect of −12% at RT. The negative TMR ratio corresponded to the negative spin polarization of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} predicted from band calculations.

  3. Anisotropic magnetoresistance of individual CoFeB and Ni nanotubes with values of up to 1.4% at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rüffer, Daniel; Slot, Marlou; Huber, Rupert; Schwarze, Thomas; Heimbach, Florian; Tütüncüoglu, Gözde; Matteini, Federico; Russo-Averchi, Eleonora; Kovács, András; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal; Zamani, Reza R.; Morante, Joan R.; Arbiol, Jordi; Fontcuberta i Morral, Anna; Grundler, Dirk

    2014-07-01

    Magnetic nanotubes (NTs) are interesting for magnetic memory and magnonic applications. We report magnetotransport experiments on individual 10 to 20 μm long Ni and CoFeB NTs with outer diameters ranging from 160 to 390 nm and film thicknesses of 20 to 40 nm. The anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) effect studied from 2 K to room temperature (RT) amounted to 1.4% and 0.1% for Ni and CoFeB NTs, respectively, at RT. We evaluated magnetometric demagnetization factors of about 0.7 for Ni and CoFeB NTs having considerably different saturation magnetization. The relatively large AMR value of the Ni nanotubes is promising for RT spintronic applications. The large saturation magnetization of CoFeB is useful in different fields such as magnonics and scanning probe microscopy using nanotubes as magnetic tips.

  4. Colossal magnetoresistance in amino-functionalized graphene quantum dots at room temperature: manifestation of weak anti-localization and doorway to spintronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Rajarshi; Thapa, Ranjit; Kumar, Gundam Sandeep; Mazumder, Nilesh; Sen, Dipayan; Sinthika, S.; Das, Nirmalya S.; Chattopadhyay, Kalyan K.

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we have demonstrated the signatures of localized surface distortions and disorders in functionalized graphene quantum dots (fGQD) and consequences in magneto-transport under weak field regime (~1 Tesla) at room temperature. Observed positive colossal magnetoresistance (MR) and its suppression is primarily explained by weak anti-localization phenomenon where competitive valley (inter and intra) dependent scattering takes place at room temperature under low magnetic field; analogous to low mobility disordered graphene samples. Furthermore, using ab-initio analysis we show that sub-lattice sensitive spin-polarized ground state exists in the GQD as a result of pz orbital asymmetry in GQD carbon atoms with amino functional groups. This spin polarized ground state is believed to help the weak anti-localization dependent magneto transport by generating more disorder and strain in a GQD lattice under applied magnetic field and lays the premise for future graphene quantum dot based spintronic applications.In this work, we have demonstrated the signatures of localized surface distortions and disorders in functionalized graphene quantum dots (fGQD) and consequences in magneto-transport under weak field regime (~1 Tesla) at room temperature. Observed positive colossal magnetoresistance (MR) and its suppression is primarily explained by weak anti-localization phenomenon where competitive valley (inter and intra) dependent scattering takes place at room temperature under low magnetic field; analogous to low mobility disordered graphene samples. Furthermore, using ab-initio analysis we show that sub-lattice sensitive spin-polarized ground state exists in the GQD as a result of pz orbital asymmetry in GQD carbon atoms with amino functional groups. This spin polarized ground state is believed to help the weak anti-localization dependent magneto transport by generating more disorder and strain in a GQD lattice under applied magnetic field and lays the premise for

  5. Room temperature magnetocaloric effect, critical behavior, and magnetoresistance in Na-deficient manganite La{sub 0.8}Na{sub 0.1}MnO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Khlifi, M. Dhahri, E.; Hlil, E. K.

    2014-05-21

    The La{sub 0.8}Na{sub 0.1}MnO{sub 3} oxide was prepared by the solid-state reaction and annealed in air. The X-ray diffraction data reveal that the sample is crystallized in a rhombohedral structure with R3{sup ¯}c space group. Magnetic study shows a second-order magnetic phase transition from ferromagnetic to paramagnetic state at the Curie temperature T{sub C} = 295 K. In addition, the magnetizations as a function of temperature and the magnetic field is used to evaluate the magnetic entropy change ΔS{sub M}. Then, we have deduced that the La{sub 0.8}Na{sub 0.1}MnO{sub 3} oxide has a large magnetocaloric effect at room temperature. Such effect is given by the maximum of the magnetic entropy change ΔS{sub Mmax} = 5.56, and by the Relative cooling power (RCP) factor which is equal to 235 under a magnetic field of 5 T. Moreover, the magnetic field dependence of the magnetic entropy change is used to determine the critical exponents β, γ, and δ which are found to be β = 0.495, γ = 1.083, and δ = 3.18. These values are consistent with the prediction of the mean field theory (β = 0.5, γ = 1, and δ = 3). Above all, the temperature dependence of electrical resistivity shows a metal–insulator transition at T{sub ρ}. The electrical resistivity decrease when we apply a magnetic field giving a magnetoresistance effect in the order of 60% at room temperature.

  6. Colossal magnetocapacitance effect at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishchaniuk, T. M.; Grygorchak, I. I.

    2014-05-01

    First nano-hybridized clathrate/cavitant structure of hierarchical architecture was synthesized. The results of investigations of the properties of initial nanoporous silica matrices MCM-41, with encapsulated in its pores of β-cyclodextrin in cavitand and cavitat (with FeSO4) states and change at room temperature in a constant magnetic field intensity of 2.75 kOe, have been presented. Phenomenon of enormous magnetocapacitance and giant negative variable-current magnetoresistance has been discovered.

  7. Temperature dependent spin transport properties of platinum inferred from spin Hall magnetoresistance measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Sibylle Althammer, Matthias; Geprägs, Stephan; Opel, Matthias; Goennenwein, Sebastian T. B.; Gross, Rudolf

    2014-06-16

    We study the temperature dependence of the spin Hall magnetoresistance (SMR) in yttrium iron garnet/platinum hybrid structures via magnetization orientation dependent magnetoresistance measurements. Our experiments show a decrease of the SMR magnitude with decreasing temperature. Using the sensitivity of the SMR to the spin transport properties of the normal metal, we interpret our data in terms of a decrease of the spin Hall angle in platinum from 0.11 at room temperature to 0.075 at 10 K, while the spin diffusion length and the spin mixing conductance of the ferrimagnetic insulator/normal metal interface remain almost constant.

  8. Room-temperature antiferromagnetic memory resistor.

    PubMed

    Marti, X; Fina, I; Frontera, C; Liu, Jian; Wadley, P; He, Q; Paull, R J; Clarkson, J D; Kudrnovský, J; Turek, I; Kuneš, J; Yi, D; Chu, J-H; Nelson, C T; You, L; Arenholz, E; Salahuddin, S; Fontcuberta, J; Jungwirth, T; Ramesh, R

    2014-04-01

    The bistability of ordered spin states in ferromagnets provides the basis for magnetic memory functionality. The latest generation of magnetic random access memories rely on an efficient approach in which magnetic fields are replaced by electrical means for writing and reading the information in ferromagnets. This concept may eventually reduce the sensitivity of ferromagnets to magnetic field perturbations to being a weakness for data retention and the ferromagnetic stray fields to an obstacle for high-density memory integration. Here we report a room-temperature bistable antiferromagnetic (AFM) memory that produces negligible stray fields and is insensitive to strong magnetic fields. We use a resistor made of a FeRh AFM, which orders ferromagnetically roughly 100 K above room temperature, and therefore allows us to set different collective directions for the Fe moments by applied magnetic field. On cooling to room temperature, AFM order sets in with the direction of the AFM moments predetermined by the field and moment direction in the high-temperature ferromagnetic state. For electrical reading, we use an AFM analogue of the anisotropic magnetoresistance. Our microscopic theory modelling confirms that this archetypical spintronic effect, discovered more than 150 years ago in ferromagnets, is also present in AFMs. Our work demonstrates the feasibility of fabricating room-temperature spintronic memories with AFMs, which in turn expands the base of available magnetic materials for devices with properties that cannot be achieved with ferromagnets. PMID:24464243

  9. Room-temperature antiferromagnetic memory resistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marti, X.; Fina, I.; Frontera, C.; Liu, Jian; Wadley, P.; He, Q.; Paull, R. J.; Clarkson, J. D.; Kudrnovský, J.; Turek, I.; Kuneš, J.; Yi, D.; Chu, J.-H.; Nelson, C. T.; You, L.; Arenholz, E.; Salahuddin, S.; Fontcuberta, J.; Jungwirth, T.; Ramesh, R.

    2014-04-01

    The bistability of ordered spin states in ferromagnets provides the basis for magnetic memory functionality. The latest generation of magnetic random access memories rely on an efficient approach in which magnetic fields are replaced by electrical means for writing and reading the information in ferromagnets. This concept may eventually reduce the sensitivity of ferromagnets to magnetic field perturbations to being a weakness for data retention and the ferromagnetic stray fields to an obstacle for high-density memory integration. Here we report a room-temperature bistable antiferromagnetic (AFM) memory that produces negligible stray fields and is insensitive to strong magnetic fields. We use a resistor made of a FeRh AFM, which orders ferromagnetically roughly 100 K above room temperature, and therefore allows us to set different collective directions for the Fe moments by applied magnetic field. On cooling to room temperature, AFM order sets in with the direction of the AFM moments predetermined by the field and moment direction in the high-temperature ferromagnetic state. For electrical reading, we use an AFM analogue of the anisotropic magnetoresistance. Our microscopic theory modelling confirms that this archetypical spintronic effect, discovered more than 150 years ago in ferromagnets, is also present in AFMs. Our work demonstrates the feasibility of fabricating room-temperature spintronic memories with AFMs, which in turn expands the base of available magnetic materials for devices with properties that cannot be achieved with ferromagnets.

  10. Room temperature magneto-transport properties of nanocomposite Fe-In2O3 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tambasov, Igor A.; Gornakov, Kirill O.; Myagkov, Victor G.; Bykova, Liudmila E.; Zhigalov, Victor S.; Matsynin, Alexey A.; Yozhikova, Ekaterina V.

    2015-12-01

    A ferromagnetic Fe-In2O3 nanocomposite thin film has been synthesized by the thermite reaction Fe2O3+In→Fe-In2O3. Measurements of the Hall carrier concentration, Hall mobility and magnetoresistance have been conducted at room temperature. The nanocomposite Fe-In2O3 thin film had n=1.94·1020 cm-3, μ=6.45 cm2/Vs and negative magnetoresistance. The magnetoresistance for 8.8 kOe was ~-0.22%.The negative magnetoresistance was well described by the weak localization and model proposed by Khosla and Fischer.

  11. Enhanced room temperature magnetoresistance in p−La{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3}/SrTiO{sub 3}/n−Si heterostructure: A possible spintronics application

    SciTech Connect

    Giri, S. K. Panda, J. Hazra, S. K. Das, P. T. Nath, T. K.

    2014-04-24

    An experimental study of p−La{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3}/SrTiO{sub 3}/n−Si heterostructure in which La{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} (LCMO) and Si are separated by a thin interfacial SrTiO{sub 3} (STO) layer with typical thickness ∼ 15 nm, has been in situ fabricated with the pulsed laser deposition technique. The junction exhibits good rectifying diode like behavior over the temperature range of 10 - 300 K. The heterostructure also exhibits metal-oxide-semiconductor like behavior with all type of possible current flow mechanisms through the heterojunction. The junction magnetoresistance (JMR) (∼ 30% at 300 K) properties of p-LCMO/STO/n-Si heterostructure have been studied over the temperature range of 100-300 K. The JMR is positive and strongly depends on temperature at an applied forward bias voltage of 3 V. The relation between JMR and external magnetic field is found to be Δρ/ρ≈ α H{sup β} type, having both α and β temperature dependent. We attribute the emergence of positive JMR to the quantum mechanical tunneling transport mechanism across the heterojunction.

  12. Temperature dependence of the magnetoresistance in Co/Re superlattices on Al2O3 (112¯0)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charlton, T.; Lederman, D.

    2001-03-01

    Using a patterned hcp [Co (17 Å)/Re (7Å)]20 antiferromagnetically coupled superlattice, with the c axis in the film plane, magnetoresistance (MR) measurements were made in the temperature range between 5 K and room temperature. The MR was simulated and decomposed into its anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) and giant magnetoresistance (GMR) components using the magnetization as a function of angle determined from neutron reflectivity experiments. We find that the GMR is anisotropic and has a different temperature dependence than the AMR when I⊥c and a similar dependence when I||c, where I is the applied current. This implies that interface spin-dependent scattering plays a more significant role when I⊥c than when I||c.

  13. Temperature-Dependent Asymmetry of Anisotropic Magnetoresistance in Silicon p-n Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Yang, D. Z.; Wang, T.; Sui, W. B.; Si, M. S.; Guo, D. W.; Shi, Z.; Wang, F. C.; Xue, D. S.

    2015-01-01

    We report a large but asymmetric magnetoresistance in silicon p-n junctions, which contrasts with the fact of magnetoresistance being symmetric in magnetic metals and semiconductors. With temperature decreasing from 293 K to 100 K, the magnetoresistance sharply increases from 50% to 150% under a magnetic field of 2 T. At the same time, an asymmetric magnetoresistance, which manifests itself as a magnetoresistance voltage offset with respect to the sign of magnetic field, occurs and linearly increases with magnetoresistance. More interestingly, in contrast with other materials, the lineshape of anisotropic magnetoresistance in silicon p-n junctions significantly depends on temperature. As temperature decreases from 293 K to 100 K, the width of peak shrinks from 90° to 70°. We ascribe these novel magnetoresistance to the asymmetric geometry of the space charge region in p-n junction induced by the magnetic field. In the vicinity of the space charge region the current paths are deflected, contributing the Hall field to the asymmetric magnetoresistance. Therefore, the observed temperature-dependent asymmetry of magnetoresistance is proved to be a direct consequence of the spatial configuration evolution of space charge region with temperature. PMID:26323495

  14. Temperature-Dependent Asymmetry of Anisotropic Magnetoresistance in Silicon p-n Junctions.

    PubMed

    Yang, D Z; Wang, T; Sui, W B; Si, M S; Guo, D W; Shi, Z; Wang, F C; Xue, D S

    2015-01-01

    We report a large but asymmetric magnetoresistance in silicon p-n junctions, which contrasts with the fact of magnetoresistance being symmetric in magnetic metals and semiconductors. With temperature decreasing from 293 K to 100 K, the magnetoresistance sharply increases from 50% to 150% under a magnetic field of 2 T. At the same time, an asymmetric magnetoresistance, which manifests itself as a magnetoresistance voltage offset with respect to the sign of magnetic field, occurs and linearly increases with magnetoresistance. More interestingly, in contrast with other materials, the lineshape of anisotropic magnetoresistance in silicon p-n junctions significantly depends on temperature. As temperature decreases from 293 K to 100 K, the width of peak shrinks from 90° to 70°. We ascribe these novel magnetoresistance to the asymmetric geometry of the space charge region in p-n junction induced by the magnetic field. In the vicinity of the space charge region the current paths are deflected, contributing the Hall field to the asymmetric magnetoresistance. Therefore, the observed temperature-dependent asymmetry of magnetoresistance is proved to be a direct consequence of the spatial configuration evolution of space charge region with temperature. PMID:26323495

  15. Corneal storage at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Sachs, U; Goldman, K; Valenti, J; Kaufman, H E

    1978-06-01

    Short-term eye banking is based mainly on moist chamber and McCarey-Kaufman medium (M-K medium) preservation. Both involve a controlled 4 C temperature for storage. Warming the cornea to room temperature, however, drastically affects the endothelial viability. On enzymatic staining and histological study, the M-K medium-stored rabbit corneas had more normal endothelium than did "moist chamber" eyes when storage was prolonged for seven days at room temperature. In human corneas that were kept at 4 C for 24 hours and then exposed to a temperature of 25 C, destruction of organelles had occurred by six hours and was increased by 12 hours. Corneas that were kept in M-K medium had relatively intact endothelium after four days, but cell disruption and vacuolation was present by the seventh day. The M-K medium, therefore, affords protection to tissue warmed to room temperature, where metabolic activity is resumed. PMID:350203

  16. Room temperature terahertz polariton emitter

    SciTech Connect

    Geiser, Markus; Scalari, Giacomo; Castellano, Fabrizio; Beck, Mattias; Faist, Jerome

    2012-10-01

    Terahertz (THz) range electroluminescence from intersubband polariton states is observed in the ultra strong coupling regime, where the interaction energy between the collective excitation of a dense electron gas and a photonic mode is a significant portion of the uncoupled excitation energy. The polariton's increased emission efficiency along with a parabolic electron confinement potential allows operation up to room temperature in a nonresonant pumping scheme. This observation of room temperature electroluminescence of an intersubband device in the THz range is a promising proof of concept for more powerful THz sources.

  17. Temperature dependence of the magnetoresistance in Fe/MgO core/shell nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Boubeta, C.; Balcells, Ll.; Valencia, S.; Schmitz, D.; Monty, C.; Martínez, B.

    2009-06-01

    The temperature dependence of magnetoresistance (MR) of powdered samples consisting of spherical Fe/MgO core/shell nanoparticles was analyzed. A change of the MR from normal at room temperature to inverse at low temperatures was observed. Concomitant with this, samples showed a sudden increase in the electrical resistance when approaching TV≈120 K, i.e., indicative of the Verwey transition temperature of Fe3O4. Thus, signaling the existence of magnetite at the Fe/MgO interface, further confirmed by means of x-ray magnetic circular dichroism. The change from normal to inverse MR is related to the increase in resistance of Fe3O4 on crossing the Verwey transition and reflects the negative spin polarization of Fe3O4.

  18. Large rectification magnetoresistance in nonmagnetic Al/Ge/Al heterojunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kun; Li, Huan-Huan; Grünberg, Peter; Li, Qiang; Ye, Sheng-Tao; Tian, Yu-Feng; Yan, Shi-Shen; Lin, Zhao-Jun; Kang, Shi-Shou; Chen, Yan-Xue; Liu, Guo-Lei; Mei, Liang-Mo

    2015-09-01

    Magnetoresistance and rectification are two fundamental physical properties of heterojunctions and respectively have wide applications in spintronics devices. Being different from the well known various magnetoresistance effects, here we report a brand new large magnetoresistance that can be regarded as rectification magnetoresistance: the application of a pure small sinusoidal alternating-current to the nonmagnetic Al/Ge Schottky heterojunctions can generate a significant direct-current voltage, and this rectification voltage strongly varies with the external magnetic field. We find that the rectification magnetoresistance in Al/Ge Schottky heterojunctions is as large as 250% at room temperature, which is greatly enhanced as compared with the conventional magnetoresistance of 70%. The findings of rectification magnetoresistance open the way to the new nonmagnetic Ge-based spintronics devices of large rectification magnetoresistance at ambient temperature under the alternating-current due to the simultaneous implementation of the rectification and magnetoresistance in the same devices.

  19. Novel room temperature ferromagnetic semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Amita

    2004-11-01

    Today's information world, bits of data are processed by semiconductor chips, and stored in the magnetic disk drives. But tomorrow's information technology may see magnetism (spin) and semiconductivity (charge) combined in one 'spintronic' device that exploits both charge and 'spin' to carry data (the best of two worlds). Spintronic devices such as spin valve transistors, spin light emitting diodes, non-volatile memory, logic devices, optical isolators and ultra-fast optical switches are some of the areas of interest for introducing the ferromagnetic properties at room temperature in a semiconductor to make it multifunctional. The potential advantages of such spintronic devices will be higher speed, greater efficiency, and better stability at a reduced power consumption. This Thesis contains two main topics: In-depth understanding of magnetism in Mn doped ZnO, and our search and identification of at least six new above room temperature ferromagnetic semiconductors. Both complex doped ZnO based new materials, as well as a number of nonoxides like phosphides, and sulfides suitably doped with Mn or Cu are shown to give rise to ferromagnetism above room temperature. Some of the highlights of this work are discovery of room temperature ferromagnetism in: (1) ZnO:Mn (paper in Nature Materials, Oct issue, 2003); (2) ZnO doped with Cu (containing no magnetic elements in it); (3) GaP doped with Cu (again containing no magnetic elements in it); (4) Enhancement of Magnetization by Cu co-doping in ZnO:Mn; (5) CdS doped with Mn, and a few others not reported in this thesis. We discuss in detail the first observation of ferromagnetism above room temperature in the form of powder, bulk pellets, in 2-3 mu-m thick transparent pulsed laser deposited films of the Mn (<4 at. percent) doped ZnO. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) spectra recorded from 2 to 200nm areas showed homogeneous distribution of Mn substituting

  20. Temperature and thickness dependence of tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance in exchange-biased Py/IrMn/MgO/Ta stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichlová, H.; Novák, V.; Kurosaki, Y.; Yamada, M.; Yamamoto, H.; Nishide, A.; Hayakawa, J.; Takahashi, H.; Maryško, M.; Wunderlich, J.; Marti, X.; Jungwirth, T.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the thickness and temperature dependence of a series of Ni{}0.8Fe{}0.2/Ir{}0.2Mn{}0.8 bilayer samples with varying thickness ratio of the ferromagnet/antiferromagnet ({{t}}{{FM}}/{{t}}{{AFM}}) in order to explore the exchange coupling strengths in tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance (TAMR) devices. Specific values of {{t}}{{FM}}/{{t}}{{AFM}} lead to four distinct scenarios with specific electric responses to moderate magnetic fields. The characteristic dependence of the measured TAMR signal on applied voltage allows us to confirm its persistence up to room temperature despite an overlapped contribution by a thermal magnetic noise.

  1. Temperature-field phase diagram of extreme magnetoresistance.

    PubMed

    Fallah Tafti, Fazel; Gibson, Quinn; Kushwaha, Satya; Krizan, Jason W; Haldolaarachchige, Neel; Cava, Robert Joseph

    2016-06-21

    The recent discovery of extreme magnetoresistance (XMR) in LaSb introduced lanthanum monopnictides as a new platform to study this effect in the absence of broken inversion symmetry or protected linear band crossing. In this work, we report XMR in LaBi. Through a comparative study of magnetotransport effects in LaBi and LaSb, we construct a temperature-field phase diagram with triangular shape that illustrates how a magnetic field tunes the electronic behavior in these materials. We show that the triangular phase diagram can be generalized to other topological semimetals with different crystal structures and different chemical compositions. By comparing our experimental results to band structure calculations, we suggest that XMR in LaBi and LaSb originates from a combination of compensated electron-hole pockets and a particular orbital texture on the electron pocket. Such orbital texture is likely to be a generic feature of various topological semimetals, giving rise to their small residual resistivity at zero field and subject to strong scattering induced by a magnetic field. PMID:27274081

  2. Anomalous magnetoresistance in nanocrystalline gadolinium at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, S. P.; Kaul, S. N.

    2015-02-01

    The results of a detailed investigation of electrical resistivity, ρ(T) and transverse magnetoresistance (MR) in nanocrystalline Gd samples with an average grain size d = 12 nm and 18 nm reveal the following. Besides a major contribution to the residual resistivity, ρr(0), arising from the scattering of conduction electrons from grain surfaces/interfaces/boundaries (which increases drastically as the average grain size decreases, as expected), coherent electron-magnon scattering makes a small contribution to ρr(0), which gets progressively suppressed as the applied magnetic field (H) increases in strength. At low temperatures (T ≲ 40 K) and fields (H = 0 and H = 5 kOe), ρH(T) varies as T3/2 with a change in slope at T+ ≃ 16.5 K. As the field increases beyond 5 kOe, the T3/2 variation of ρH(T) at low temperatures (T ≲ 40 K) changes over to the T2 variation and a slight change in the slope dρH/dT2 at T+(H) disappears at H ⩾ 20 kOe. The electron-electron scattering (Fermi liquid) contribution to the T2 term, if present, is completely swamped by the coherent electron-magnon scattering contribution. As a function of temperature, (negative) MR goes through a dip at a temperature Tmin ≃ T+, which increases with H as H2/3. MR at Tmin also increases in magnitude with H and attains a value as large as ˜15% (17%) for d = 12 nm (18 nm) at H = 90 kOe. This value is roughly five times greater than that reported earlier for crystalline Gd at Tmin ≃ 100 K. Unusually large MR results from an anomalous softening of magnon modes at T ≃ Tmin ≈ 20 K. In the light of our previous magnetization and specific heat results, we show that all the above observations, including the H2/3 dependence of Tmin (with Tmin(H) identified as the Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) transition temperature, TBEC(H)), are the manifestations of the BEC of magnons at temperatures T ⩽ TBEC. Contrasted with crystalline Gd, which behaves as a three-dimensional (3D) pure uniaxial dipolar

  3. Non-magnetic organic/inorganic spin injector at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, Shinto P.; Mondal, Prakash Chandra; Naaman, Ron; Moshe, Hagay; Mastai, Yitzhak

    2014-12-15

    Spin injection into solid-state devices is commonly performed by use of ferromagnetic metal electrodes. Here, we present a spin injector design without permanent magnet; rather, the spin selectivity is determined by a chiral tunneling barrier. The chiral tunneling barrier is composed of an ultrathin Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer that is deposited on top of a chiral self-assembled monolayer (SAM), which consists of cysteine or oligopeptide molecules. The experimentally observed magnetoresistance can be up to 20% at room temperature, and it displays an uncommon asymmetric curve as a function of the applied magnetic field. These findings show that the spin injector transmits only one spin orientation, independent of external magnetic field. The sign of the magnetoresistance depends on the handedness of the molecules in the SAM, which act as a spin filter, and the magnitude of the magnetoresistance depends only weakly on temperature.

  4. Xenon porometry at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telkki, Ville-Veikko; Lounila, Juhani; Jokisaari, Jukka

    2006-01-01

    Xenon porometry is a method in which porous material is immersed in a medium and the properties of the material are studied by means of Xe129 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of xenon gas dissolved in the medium. For instance, the chemical shift of a particular signal (referred to as signal D) arising from xenon inside small pockets formed in the pores during the freezing of the confined medium is highly sensitive to the pore size. In the present study, we show that when naphthalene is used as the medium the pore size distribution of the material can be determined by measuring a single one-dimensional spectrum near room temperature and converting the chemical shift scale of signal D to the pore radius scale by using an experimentally determined correlation. A model has been developed that explains the curious behavior of the chemical shift of signal D as a function of pore radius. The other signals of the spectra measured at different temperatures have also been identified, and the influence of xenon pressure on the spectra has been studied. For comparison, Xe129 NMR spectra of pure xenon gas adsorbed to porous materials have been measured and analyzed.

  5. Temperature dependence of magnetoresistance in GdFeCo/Pt heterostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuno, Takaya; Kim, Kab-Jin; Tono, Takayuki; Kim, Sanghoon; Moriyama, Takahiro; Yoshikawa, Hiroki; Tsukamoto, Arata; Ono, Teruo

    2016-07-01

    The temperature dependence of magnetoresistance is investigated in ferrimagnetic GdFeCo/Pt heterostructures. An anomalous Hall effect (AHE) shows a monotonic behavior in temperature even across the magnetization compensation temperature T M, implying that the FeCo moment is responsible for the magnetotransport properties. An anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) exhibits a steep increase at low temperatures, which we ascribe to the contribution of a weak antilocalization in an amorphous GdFeCo layer. A spin Hall magnetoresistance (SMR) is found to exist in ferrimagnet/Pt systems and shows a moderate temperature dependence, in contrast to the SMR in YIG/Pt where a significant temperature dependence was observed. These results provide a basic understanding of the magnetotransport in amorphous ferrimagnets/heavy metal heterostructures.

  6. The tunneling magnetoresistance current dependence on cross sectional area, angle and temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z. H. Bai, Lihui; Hu, C.-M.; Hemour, S.; Wu, K.; Fan, X. L.; Xue, D. S.; Houssameddine, D.

    2015-03-15

    The magnetoresistance of a MgO-based magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) was studied experimentally. The magnetoresistance as a function of current was measured systematically on MTJs for various MgO cross sectional areas and at various temperatures from 7.5 to 290.1 K. The resistance current dependence of the MTJ was also measured for different angles between the two ferromagnetic layers. By considering particle and angular momentum conservation of transport electrons, the current dependence of magnetoresistance can be explained by the changing of spin polarization in the free magnetic layer of the MTJ. The changing of spin polarization is related to the magnetoresistance, its angular dependence and the threshold current where TMR ratio equals zero. A phenomenological model is used which avoid the complicated barrier details and also describes the data.

  7. Towards Room Temperature Spin Filtering in Oxide Tunnel Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata-Harms, Jodi; Wong, Franklin; Arenholz, Elke; Suzuki, Yuri

    2012-02-01

    Spin filtering, in which the magnetic tunnel barrier preferentially filters spin-up and spin-down electrons from a nonmagnetic electrode, has been demonstrated in junction heterostructures. By incorporating two spin filtering barriers, double spin filter magnetic tunnel junctions (DSF-MTJs) were predicted to yield magnetoresistance (MR) values orders of magnitude larger than that of conventional magnetic tunnel junctions. Recently, DSF-MTJs have exhibited spin filtering with magnetic electrodes at room temperature and at low temperature with nonmagnetic electrodes in EuS-based devices [1,2]. We have fabricated DSF-MTJs with nonmagnetic SrRuO3 electrodes and room temperature ferrimagnets, NiFe2O4 and CoFe2O4, for spin filters in pursuit of room temperature functionality. Atomic force microscopy shows smooth films quantified by roughness values between 0.1--0.5nm. X-ray magnetic circular dichroism reveals ferromagnetic Ni^2+ and Co^2+, and element-specific hysteresis loops indicate the independent switching of the two spin filters. Transport data reveals junction MR and non-linear I-V characteristics consistent with tunneling. [4pt] [1] M.G. Chapline et al., PRB, 74, 014418 (2006).[0pt] [2] G.- X. Miao et al., PRL, 102, 076601 (2009).

  8. Topological Insulators at Room Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Haijun; Liu, Chao-Xing; Qi, Xiao-Liang; Dai, Xi; Fang, Zhong; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2010-03-25

    Topological insulators are new states of quantum matter with surface states protected by the time-reversal symmetry. In this work, we perform first-principle electronic structure calculations for Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}, Sb{sub 2}Se{sub 3}, Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} crystals. Our calculations predict that Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}, Bi{sub 2}T e{sub 3} and Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} are topological insulators, while Sb{sub 2}Se{sub 3} is not. In particular, Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} has a topologically non-trivial energy gap of 0.3eV , suitable for room temperature applications. We present a simple and unified continuum model which captures the salient topological features of this class of materials. These topological insulators have robust surface states consisting of a single Dirac cone at the {Lambda} point.

  9. Room temperature creep in metals and alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Deibler, Lisa Anne

    2014-09-01

    Time dependent deformation in the form of creep and stress relaxation is not often considered a factor when designing structural alloy parts for use at room temperature. However, creep and stress relaxation do occur at room temperature (0.09-0.21 Tm for alloys in this report) in structural alloys. This report will summarize the available literature on room temperature creep, present creep data collected on various structural alloys, and finally compare the acquired data to equations used in the literature to model creep behavior. Based on evidence from the literature and fitting of various equations, the mechanism which causes room temperature creep is found to include dislocation generation as well as exhaustion.

  10. Determining Camera Gain in Room Temperature Cameras

    SciTech Connect

    Joshua Cogliati

    2010-12-01

    James R. Janesick provides a method for determining the amplification of a CCD or CMOS camera when only access to the raw images is provided. However, the equation that is provided ignores the contribution of dark current. For CCD or CMOS cameras that are cooled well below room temperature, this is not a problem, however, the technique needs adjustment for use with room temperature cameras. This article describes the adjustment made to the equation, and a test of this method.

  11. Direct observation of a highly spin-polarized organic spinterface at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Djeghloul, F.; Ibrahim, F.; Cantoni, M.; Bowen, M.; Joly, L.; Boukari, S.; Ohresser, P.; Bertran, F.; Le Fèvre, P.; Thakur, P.; Scheurer, F.; Miyamachi, T.; Mattana, R.; Seneor, P.; Jaafar, A.; Rinaldi, C.; Javaid, S.; Arabski, J.; Kappler, J. -P; Wulfhekel, W.; Brookes, N. B.; Bertacco, R.; Taleb-Ibrahimi, A.; Alouani, M.; Beaurepaire, E.; Weber, W.

    2013-01-01

    Organic semiconductors constitute promising candidates toward large-scale electronic circuits that are entirely spintronics-driven. Toward this goal, tunneling magnetoresistance values above 300% at low temperature suggested the presence of highly spin-polarized device interfaces. However, such spinterfaces have not been observed directly, let alone at room temperature. Thanks to experiments and theory on the model spinterface between phthalocyanine molecules and a Co single crystal surface, we clearly evidence a highly efficient spinterface. Spin-polarised direct and inverse photoemission experiments reveal a high degree of spin polarisation at room temperature at this interface. We measured a magnetic moment on the molecule's nitrogen π orbitals, which substantiates an ab-initio theoretical description of highly spin-polarised charge conduction across the interface due to differing spinterface formation mechanisms in each spin channel. We propose, through this example, a recipe to engineer simple organic-inorganic interfaces with remarkable spintronic properties that can endure well above room temperature. PMID:23412079

  12. Room-temperature magnetocurrent in antiferromagnetically coupled Fe/Si/Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gareev, Rashid; Schmid, Maximilian; Vancea, Johann; Back, Christian; Schreiber, Reinert; Buergler, Daniel; Schneider, Claus; Stromberg, Frank; Wende, Heiko

    2011-03-01

    Epitaxial Si-based ferromagnet/semiconductor structures demonstrate strong antiferromagnetic coupling (AFC) as well as resonant-type tunneling magnetoresistance, which vanishes at temperatures above T ~ 50 K. Magnetoresistance effects in Fe/Si/Fe close to room temperature (RT) were not established yet. By using the ballistic electron magnetomicroscopy (BEMM) techniques, with its nanometer-scaled locality we observed for the first time a spin-dependent ballistic magnetotransport in AFC structures. We found that the hot-electron collector current with energies above the Fe/GaAsP Schottky barrier reflects magnetization alignment and changes from IcAP ~ 50 fA for antiparallel alignment to IcP ~ 150 fA for the parallel one. Thus, the magnetocurrent [(IcP -IcAP) / IcAP ]*100% is near 200 % at RT. The measured BEMM hysteresis loops match nicely with the magnetic MOKE data. This work is supported by the project DFG 9209379.

  13. Temperature dependence of anisotropic magnetoresistance in antiferromagnetic Sr{sub 2}IrO{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.; Seinige, H.; Tsoi, M.; Cao, G.; Zhou, J.-S.; Goodenough, J. B.

    2015-05-07

    Temperature-dependent magnetotransport properties of the antiferromagnetic semiconductor Sr{sub 2}IrO{sub 4} are investigated with point-contact devices. The point-contact technique allows to probe very small volumes and, therefore, to look for electronic transport on a microscopic scale. Point-contact measurements with single crystals of Sr{sub 2}IrO{sub 4} were intended to see whether the additional local resistance associated with a small contact area between a sharpened Cu tip and the antiferromagnet shows magnetoresistance (MR) such as that seen in bulk crystals. Point-contact measurements at liquid nitrogen temperature revealed large MRs (up to 28%) for modest magnetic fields (250 mT) applied within an IrO{sub 2} (ab) plane with angular dependence showing a crossover from four-fold to two-fold symmetry with an increasing magnetic field. Point contact measurement exhibits distinctive anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) in comparison to a bulk experiment, imposing intriguing questions about the mechanism of AMR in this material. Temperature-dependent MR measurements show that the MR falls to zero at the Neel temperature, but the temperature dependence of the MR ratio differs qualitatively from that of the resistivity. This AMR study helps to unveil the entanglement between electronic transport and magnetism in Sr{sub 2}IrO{sub 4} while the observed magnetoresistive phenomena can be potentially used to sense the antiferromagnetic order parameter in spintronic applications.

  14. Electric control of magnetism at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liaoyu; Wang, Dunhui; Cao, Qingqi; Zheng, Yuanxia; Xuan, Haicheng; Gao, Jinlong; Du, Youwei

    2012-01-01

    In the single-phase multiferroics, the coupling between electric polarization (P) and magnetization (M) would enable the magnetoelectric (ME) effect, namely M induced and modulated by E, and conversely P by H. Especially, the manipulation of magnetization by an electric field at room-temperature is of great importance in technological applications, such as new information storage technology, four-state logic device, magnetoelectric sensors, low-power magnetoelectric device and so on. Furthermore, it can reduce power consumption and realize device miniaturization, which is very useful for the practical applications. In an M-type hexaferrite SrCo2Ti2Fe8O19, large magnetization and electric polarization were observed simultaneously at room-temperature. Moreover, large effect of electric field-controlled magnetization was observed even without magnetic bias field. These results illuminate a promising potential to apply in magnetoelectric devices at room temperature and imply plentiful physics behind them. PMID:22355737

  15. Dynamics of Glass Relaxation at Room Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, Roger C.; Smith, John R.; Potuzak, Marcel; Guo, Xiaoju; Bowden, Bradley F.; Kiczenski, T. J.; Allan, Douglas C.; King, Ellyn A.; Ellison, Adam J.; Mauro, John C.

    2013-06-01

    The problem of glass relaxation under ambient conditions has intrigued scientists and the general public for centuries, most notably in the legend of flowing cathedral glass windows. Here we report quantitative measurement of glass relaxation at room temperature. We find that Corning® Gorilla® Glass shows measurable and reproducible relaxation at room temperature. Remarkably, this relaxation follows a stretched exponential decay rather than simple exponential relaxation, and the value of the stretching exponent (β=3/7) follows a theoretical prediction made by Phillips for homogeneous glasses.

  16. Entangling Macroscopic Diamonds at Room Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, K. C.; Sprague, M. R.; Sussman, B. J.; Nunn, J.; Langford, N. K.; Jin, X.-M.; Champion, T.; Michelberger, P.; Reim, K. F.; England, D.; Jaksch, D.; Walmsley, I. A.

    2011-12-01

    Quantum entanglement in the motion of macroscopic solid bodies has implications both for quantum technologies and foundational studies of the boundary between the quantum and classical worlds. Entanglement is usually fragile in room-temperature solids, owing to strong interactions both internally and with the noisy environment. We generated motional entanglement between vibrational states of two spatially separated, millimeter-sized diamonds at room temperature. By measuring strong nonclassical correlations between Raman-scattered photons, we showed that the quantum state of the diamonds has positive concurrence with 98% probability. Our results show that entanglement can persist in the classical context of moving macroscopic solids in ambient conditions.

  17. Widely tunable room temperature semiconductor terahertz source

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Q. Y.; Slivken, S.; Bandyopadhyay, N.; Bai, Y.; Razeghi, M.

    2014-11-17

    We present a widely tunable, monolithic terahertz source based on intracavity difference frequency generation within a mid-infrared quantum cascade laser at room temperature. A three-section ridge waveguide laser design with two sampled grating sections and a distributed-Bragg section is used to achieve the terahertz (THz) frequency tuning. Room temperature single mode THz emission with a wide tunable frequency range of 2.6–4.2 THz (∼47% of the central frequency) and THz power up to 0.1 mW is demonstrated, making such device an ideal candidate for THz spectroscopy and sensing.

  18. Room Temperature Multiferroicity of Charge Transfer Crystals.

    PubMed

    Qin, Wei; Chen, Xiaomin; Li, Huashan; Gong, Maogang; Yuan, Guoliang; Grossman, Jeffrey C; Wuttig, Manfred; Ren, Shenqiang

    2015-09-22

    Room temperature multiferroics has been a frontier research field by manipulating spin-driven ferroelectricity or charge-order-driven magnetism. Charge-transfer crystals based on electron donor and acceptor assembly, exhibiting simultaneous spin ordering, are drawing significant interests for the development of all-organic magnetoelectric multiferroics. Here, we report that a remarkable anisotropic magnetization and room temperature multiferroicity can be achieved through assembly of thiophene donor and fullerene acceptor. The crystal motif directs the dimensional and compositional control of charge-transfer networks that could switch magnetization under external stimuli, thereby opening up an attractive class of all-organic nanoferronics. PMID:26257033

  19. Silicene field-effect transistors operating at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Li; Cinquanta, Eugenio; Chiappe, Daniele; Grazianetti, Carlo; Fanciulli, Marco; Dubey, Madan; Molle, Alessandro; Akinwande, Deji

    2015-03-01

    Free-standing silicene, a silicon analogue of graphene, has a buckled honeycomb lattice and, because of its Dirac bandstructure combined with its sensitive surface, offers the potential for a widely tunable two-dimensional monolayer, where external fields and interface interactions can be exploited to influence fundamental properties such as bandgap and band character for future nanoelectronic devices. The quantum spin Hall effect, chiral superconductivity, giant magnetoresistance and various exotic field-dependent states have been predicted in monolayer silicene. Despite recent progress regarding the epitaxial synthesis of silicene and investigation of its electronic properties, to date there has been no report of experimental silicene devices because of its air stability issue. Here, we report a silicene field-effect transistor, corroborating theoretical expectations regarding its ambipolar Dirac charge transport, with a measured room-temperature mobility of ˜100 cm2 V-1 s-1 attributed to acoustic phonon-limited transport and grain boundary scattering. These results are enabled by a growth-transfer-fabrication process that we have devised—silicene encapsulated delamination with native electrodes. This approach addresses a major challenge for material preservation of silicene during transfer and device fabrication and is applicable to other air-sensitive two-dimensional materials such as germanene and phosphorene. Silicene's allotropic affinity with bulk silicon and its low-temperature synthesis compared with graphene or alternative two-dimensional semiconductors suggest a more direct integration with ubiquitous semiconductor technology.

  20. Temperature dependence of spin Hall magnetoresistance in W/CoFeB bilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuno, Takaya; Taniguchi, Takuya; Kim, Sanghoon; Baek, Seung-heon Chris; Park, Byong-Guk; Moriyama, Takahiro; Kim, Kab-Jin; Ono, Teruo

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the temperature dependence of the spin Hall magnetoresistance (SMR) in a W/CoFeB bilayer. The SMR is found to increase with decreasing temperature. An analysis based on the SMR theory suggests that the spin Hall angle of W and/or the spin polarization of CoFeB can be the origin of the temperature dependence of the SMR. We also find that the spin diffusion length and the resistivity of W do not significantly vary with temperature, which indicates the necessity of further study on the electron transport mechanism in W films to reveal the origin of the spin Hall effect in W.

  1. Large magnetoresistance in non-magnetic silver chalcogenides and new class of magnetoresistive compounds

    DOEpatents

    Saboungi, Marie-Louis; Price, David C. L.; Rosenbaum, Thomas F.; Xu, Rong; Husmann, Anke

    2001-01-01

    The heavily-doped silver chalcogenides, Ag.sub.2+.delta. Se and Ag.sub.2+.delta. Te, show magnetoresistance effects on a scale comparable to the "colossal" magnetoresistance (CMR) compounds. Hall coefficient, magnetoconductivity, and hydrostatic pressure experiments establish that elements of narrow-gap semiconductor physics apply, but both the size of the effects at room temperature and the linear field dependence down to fields of a few Oersteds are surprising new features.

  2. Room Temperature and Elevated Temperature Composite Sandwich Joint Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Sandra P.

    1998-01-01

    Testing of composite sandwich joint elements has been completed to verify the strength capacity of joints designed to carry specified running loads representative of a high speed civil transport wing. Static tension testing at both room and an elevated temperature of 350 F and fatigue testing at room temperature were conducted to determine strength capacity, fatigue life, and failure modes. Static tension test results yielded failure loads above the design loads for the room temperature tests, confirming the ability of the joint concepts tested to carry their design loads. However, strength reductions as large as 30% were observed at the elevated test temperature, where all failure loads were below the room temperature design loads for the specific joint designs tested. Fatigue testing resulted in lower than predicted fatigue lives.

  3. Temperature-dependence of current-perpendicular-to-the-plane giant magnetoresistance spin-valves using Co2(Mn1-xFex)Ge Heusler alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, M. R.; Nakatani, T. M.; Stewart, D. A.; York, B. R.; Read, J. C.; Choi, Y.-S.; Childress, J. R.

    2016-04-01

    The properties of Co2(Mn1-xFex)Ge (CMFG) (x = 0-0.4) Heusler alloy magnetic layers within polycrystalline current-perpendicular-to-the plane giant magnetoresistance (CPP-GMR) spin-valves are investigated. CMFG films annealed at 220-320 °C exhibit partly ordered B2 structure with an order parameter SB2 = 0.3-0.4, and a lower SB2 was found for a higher Fe content. Nevertheless, CPP-GMR spin-valve devices exhibit a relatively high magnetoresistance ratio of ˜13% and a magnetoresistance-area product (ΔRA) of ˜6 mΩ μm2 at room temperature, which is almost independent of the Fe content in the CMFG films. By contrast, at low temperatures, ΔRA clearly increases with higher Fe content, despite the lower B2 ordering for increasing the Fe content. Indeed, first-principles calculations reveal that the CMFG alloy with a partially disordered B2 structure has a greater density of d-state at the Fermi level in the minority band compared to the Fe-free (Co2MnGe) alloy. This could explain the larger ΔRA measured on CMFG at low temperatures by assuming that s-d scattering mainly determines the spin asymmetry of resistivity as described in Mott's theory.

  4. Temperature-Dependent Three-Dimensional Anisotropy of the Magnetoresistance in WTe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thoutam, L. R.; Wang, Y. L.; Xiao, Z. L.; Das, S.; Luican-Mayer, A.; Divan, R.; Crabtree, G. W.; Kwok, W. K.

    2015-07-01

    Extremely large magnetoresistance (XMR) was recently discovered in WTe2 , triggering extensive research on this material regarding the XMR origin. Since WTe2 is a layered compound with metal layers sandwiched between adjacent insulating chalcogenide layers, this material has been considered to be electronically two-dimensional (2D). Here we report two new findings on WTe2 : (1) WTe2 is electronically 3D with a mass anisotropy as low as 2, as revealed by the 3D scaling behavior of the resistance R (H ,θ )=R (ɛθH ) with ɛθ=(cos2θ +γ-2sin2θ )1 /2 , θ being the magnetic field angle with respect to the c axis of the crystal and γ being the mass anisotropy and (2) the mass anisotropy γ varies with temperature and follows the magnetoresistance behavior of the Fermi liquid state. Our results not only provide a general scaling approach for the anisotropic magnetoresistance but also are crucial for correctly understanding the electronic properties of WTe2 , including the origin of the remarkable "turn-on" behavior in the resistance versus temperature curve, which has been widely observed in many materials and assumed to be a metal-insulator transition.

  5. Temperature-Dependent Three-Dimensional Anisotropy of the Magnetoresistance in WTe_{2}.

    PubMed

    Thoutam, L R; Wang, Y L; Xiao, Z L; Das, S; Luican-Mayer, A; Divan, R; Crabtree, G W; Kwok, W K

    2015-07-24

    Extremely large magnetoresistance (XMR) was recently discovered in WTe_{2}, triggering extensive research on this material regarding the XMR origin. Since WTe_{2} is a layered compound with metal layers sandwiched between adjacent insulating chalcogenide layers, this material has been considered to be electronically two-dimensional (2D). Here we report two new findings on WTe_{2}: (1) WTe_{2} is electronically 3D with a mass anisotropy as low as 2, as revealed by the 3D scaling behavior of the resistance R(H,θ)=R(ϵ_{θ}H) with ϵ_{θ}=(cos^{2}θ+γ^{-2}sin^{2}θ)^{1/2}, θ being the magnetic field angle with respect to the c axis of the crystal and γ being the mass anisotropy and (2) the mass anisotropy γ varies with temperature and follows the magnetoresistance behavior of the Fermi liquid state. Our results not only provide a general scaling approach for the anisotropic magnetoresistance but also are crucial for correctly understanding the electronic properties of WTe_{2}, including the origin of the remarkable "turn-on" behavior in the resistance versus temperature curve, which has been widely observed in many materials and assumed to be a metal-insulator transition. PMID:26252701

  6. Imprinting bulk amorphous alloy at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Song-Yi; Park, Eun-Soo; Ott, Ryan T.; Lograsso, Thomas A.; Huh, Moo-Young; Kim, Do-Hyang; Eckert, Jürgen; Lee, Min-Ha

    2015-11-13

    We present investigations on the plastic deformation behavior of a brittle bulk amorphous alloy by simple uniaxial compressive loading at room temperature. A patterning is possible by cold-plastic forming of the typically brittle Hf-based bulk amorphous alloy through controlling homogenous flow without the need for thermal energy or shaping at elevated temperatures. The experimental evidence suggests that there is an inconsistency between macroscopic plasticity and deformability of an amorphous alloy. Moreover, imprinting of specific geometrical features on Cu foil and Zr-based metallic glass is represented by using the patterned bulk amorphous alloy as a die. These results demonstrate the ability of amorphous alloys or metallic glasses to precisely replicate patterning features onto both conventional metals and the other amorphous alloys. In conclusion, our work presents an avenue for avoiding the embrittlement of amorphous alloys associated with thermoplastic forming and yields new insight the forming application of bulk amorphous alloys at room temperature without using heat treatment.

  7. Imprinting bulk amorphous alloy at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Song-Yi; Park, Eun-Soo; Ott, Ryan T.; Lograsso, Thomas A.; Huh, Moo-Young; Kim, Do-Hyang; Eckert, Jürgen; Lee, Min-Ha

    2015-01-01

    We present investigations on the plastic deformation behavior of a brittle bulk amorphous alloy by simple uniaxial compressive loading at room temperature. A patterning is possible by cold-plastic forming of the typically brittle Hf-based bulk amorphous alloy through controlling homogenous flow without the need for thermal energy or shaping at elevated temperatures. The experimental evidence suggests that there is an inconsistency between macroscopic plasticity and deformability of an amorphous alloy. Moreover, imprinting of specific geometrical features on Cu foil and Zr-based metallic glass is represented by using the patterned bulk amorphous alloy as a die. These results demonstrate the ability of amorphous alloys or metallic glasses to precisely replicate patterning features onto both conventional metals and the other amorphous alloys. Our work presents an avenue for avoiding the embrittlement of amorphous alloys associated with thermoplastic forming and yields new insight the forming application of bulk amorphous alloys at room temperature without using heat treatment. PMID:26563908

  8. Imprinting bulk amorphous alloy at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Kim, Song-Yi; Park, Eun-Soo; Ott, Ryan T; Lograsso, Thomas A; Huh, Moo-Young; Kim, Do-Hyang; Eckert, Jürgen; Lee, Min-Ha

    2015-01-01

    We present investigations on the plastic deformation behavior of a brittle bulk amorphous alloy by simple uniaxial compressive loading at room temperature. A patterning is possible by cold-plastic forming of the typically brittle Hf-based bulk amorphous alloy through controlling homogenous flow without the need for thermal energy or shaping at elevated temperatures. The experimental evidence suggests that there is an inconsistency between macroscopic plasticity and deformability of an amorphous alloy. Moreover, imprinting of specific geometrical features on Cu foil and Zr-based metallic glass is represented by using the patterned bulk amorphous alloy as a die. These results demonstrate the ability of amorphous alloys or metallic glasses to precisely replicate patterning features onto both conventional metals and the other amorphous alloys. Our work presents an avenue for avoiding the embrittlement of amorphous alloys associated with thermoplastic forming and yields new insight the forming application of bulk amorphous alloys at room temperature without using heat treatment. PMID:26563908

  9. Room-temperature semiconductor heterostructure refrigeration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, K. A.; Larsson, Magnus; Mal'shukov, A. G.

    2005-07-01

    With the proper design of semiconductor tunneling barrier structures, we can inject low-energy electrons via resonant tunneling, and take out high-energy electrons via a thermionic process. This is the operation principle of our semiconductor heterostructure refrigerator (SHR) without the need of applying a temperature gradient across the device. Even for the bad thermoelectric material AlGaAs, our calculation shows that at room temperature, the SHR can easily lower the temperature by 5-7K. Such devices can be fabricated with the present semiconductor technology. Besides its use as a kitchen refrigerator, the SHR can efficiently cool microelectronic devices.

  10. Individual room temperature control: A peaceful solution to thermostat wars

    SciTech Connect

    Pieper, C.A. )

    1994-01-01

    This article addresses the problem of maintaining thermal comfort in individual rooms using an individual room temperature control concept to provide greater occupant comfort and potentially reduce energy consumption. The topics of the article include occupant temperature control methods, multi-room zone control, HVAC system operation, computer simulation, and the results of using individual room temperature control.

  11. Room temperature spin valve effect in NiFe/WS2/Co junctions

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Muhammad Zahir; Iqbal, Muhammad Waqas; Siddique, Salma; Khan, Muhammad Farooq; Ramay, Shahid Mahmood

    2016-01-01

    The two-dimensional (2D) layered electronic materials of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) have been recently proposed as an emerging canddiate for spintronic applications. Here, we report the exfoliated single layer WS2-intelayer based spin valve effect in NiFe/WS2/Co junction from room temperature to 4.2 K. The ratio of relative magnetoresistance in spin valve effect increases from 0.18% at room temperature to 0.47% at 4.2 K. We observed that the junction resistance decreases monotonically as temperature is lowered. These results revealed that semiconducting WS2 thin film works as a metallic conducting interlayer between NiFe and Co electrodes. PMID:26868638

  12. Room temperature spin valve effect in NiFe/WS2/Co junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, Muhammad Zahir; Iqbal, Muhammad Waqas; Siddique, Salma; Khan, Muhammad Farooq; Ramay, Shahid Mahmood

    2016-02-01

    The two-dimensional (2D) layered electronic materials of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) have been recently proposed as an emerging canddiate for spintronic applications. Here, we report the exfoliated single layer WS2-intelayer based spin valve effect in NiFe/WS2/Co junction from room temperature to 4.2 K. The ratio of relative magnetoresistance in spin valve effect increases from 0.18% at room temperature to 0.47% at 4.2 K. We observed that the junction resistance decreases monotonically as temperature is lowered. These results revealed that semiconducting WS2 thin film works as a metallic conducting interlayer between NiFe and Co electrodes.

  13. Room temperature spin valve effect in NiFe/WS2/Co junctions.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Muhammad Zahir; Iqbal, Muhammad Waqas; Siddique, Salma; Khan, Muhammad Farooq; Ramay, Shahid Mahmood

    2016-01-01

    The two-dimensional (2D) layered electronic materials of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) have been recently proposed as an emerging canddiate for spintronic applications. Here, we report the exfoliated single layer WS2-intelayer based spin valve effect in NiFe/WS2/Co junction from room temperature to 4.2 K. The ratio of relative magnetoresistance in spin valve effect increases from 0.18% at room temperature to 0.47% at 4.2 K. We observed that the junction resistance decreases monotonically as temperature is lowered. These results revealed that semiconducting WS2 thin film works as a metallic conducting interlayer between NiFe and Co electrodes. PMID:26868638

  14. Magnetic heat pumping near room temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, G. V.

    1976-01-01

    It is shown that magnetic heat pumping can be made practical at room temperature by using a ferromagnetic material with a Curie point at or near operating temperature and an appropriate regenerative thermodynamic cycle. Measurements are performed which show that gadolinium is a resonable working material and it is found that the application of a 7-T magnetic field to gadolinium at the Curie point (293 K) causes a heat release of 4 kJ/kg under isothermal conditions or a temperature rise of 14 K under adiabatic conditions. A regeneration technique can be used to lift the load of the lattice and electronic heat capacities off the magnetic system in order to span a reasonable temperature difference and to pump as much entropy per cycle as possible

  15. Temperature and bias dependence of anisotropic magnetoresistance in antiferromagnetic Sr2IrO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seinige, Heidi; Wang, Cheng; Cao, Gang; Zhou, Jian-Shi; Goodenough, John B.; Tsoi, Maxim

    2015-03-01

    We study anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) in antiferromagnetic (AFM) Mott insulator Sr2IrO4. Such AMR is a promising candidate for monitoring the magnetic order parameter in AFM spintronics. Here we present temperature- and electrical bias-dependent measurements of the point-contact AMR in single crystals of Sr2IrO4. The point-contact technique allows to probe very small volumes and, therefore, look for electronic transport in Sr2IrO4 on a microscopic scale. Point-contact measurements at liquid nitrogen temperature revealed a large negative magnetoresistance (MR) for magnetic fields applied within IrO2 a-b plane and electric currents flowing perpendicular to the plane. The observed MR decreases with increasing temperature and falls to zero at TNéel ~ 240 K. Interestingly, the temperature dependence of MR ratios differs qualitatively from that of the resistivity. The point-contact measurements also show a strong dependence of MR on the dc bias applied to the contact. The latter can be associated with correlations between electronic transport and magnetic order in Sr2IrO4. This work was supported in part by C-SPIN, one of six centers of STARnet, a Semiconductor Research Corporation program, sponsored by MARCO and DARPA, and by NSF Grants DMR-1207577, DMR-1265162 and DMR-1122603.

  16. Realization of ground-state artificial skyrmion lattices at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Dustin A.; Maranville, Brian B.; Balk, Andrew L.; Kirby, Brian J.; Fischer, Peter; Pierce, Daniel T.; Unguris, John; Borchers, Julie A.; Liu, Kai

    2015-01-01

    The topological nature of magnetic skyrmions leads to extraordinary properties that provide new insights into fundamental problems of magnetism and exciting potentials for novel magnetic technologies. Prerequisite are systems exhibiting skyrmion lattices at ambient conditions, which have been elusive so far. Here, we demonstrate the realization of artificial Bloch skyrmion lattices over extended areas in their ground state at room temperature by patterning asymmetric magnetic nanodots with controlled circularity on an underlayer with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA). Polarity is controlled by a tailored magnetic field sequence and demonstrated in magnetometry measurements. The vortex structure is imprinted from the dots into the interfacial region of the underlayer via suppression of the PMA by a critical ion-irradiation step. The imprinted skyrmion lattices are identified directly with polarized neutron reflectometry and confirmed by magnetoresistance measurements. Our results demonstrate an exciting platform to explore room-temperature ground-state skyrmion lattices. PMID:26446515

  17. Realization of ground-state artificial skyrmion lattices at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, Dustin A.; Maranville, Brian B.; Balk, Andrew L.; Kirby, Brian J.; Fischer, Peter; Pierce, Daniel T.; Unguris, John; Borchers, Julie A.; Liu, Kai

    2015-10-08

    We report that the topological nature of magnetic skyrmions leads to extraordinary properties that provide new insights into fundamental problems of magnetism and exciting potentials for novel magnetic technologies. Prerequisite are systems exhibiting skyrmion lattices at ambient conditions, which have been elusive so far. We demonstrate the realization of artificial Bloch skyrmion lattices over extended areas in their ground state at room temperature by patterning asymmetric magnetic nanodots with controlled circularity on an underlayer with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA). Polarity is controlled by a tailored magnetic field sequence and demonstrated in magnetometry measurements. The vortex structure is imprinted from the dots into the interfacial region of the underlayer via suppression of the PMA by a critical ion-irradiation step. In conclusion, the imprinted skyrmion lattices are identified directly with polarized neutron reflectometry and confirmed by magnetoresistance measurements. Our results demonstrate an exciting platform to explore room-temperature ground-state skyrmion lattices.

  18. Realization of ground-state artificial skyrmion lattices at room temperature

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gilbert, Dustin A.; Maranville, Brian B.; Balk, Andrew L.; Kirby, Brian J.; Fischer, Peter; Pierce, Daniel T.; Unguris, John; Borchers, Julie A.; Liu, Kai

    2015-10-08

    We report that the topological nature of magnetic skyrmions leads to extraordinary properties that provide new insights into fundamental problems of magnetism and exciting potentials for novel magnetic technologies. Prerequisite are systems exhibiting skyrmion lattices at ambient conditions, which have been elusive so far. We demonstrate the realization of artificial Bloch skyrmion lattices over extended areas in their ground state at room temperature by patterning asymmetric magnetic nanodots with controlled circularity on an underlayer with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA). Polarity is controlled by a tailored magnetic field sequence and demonstrated in magnetometry measurements. The vortex structure is imprinted from themore » dots into the interfacial region of the underlayer via suppression of the PMA by a critical ion-irradiation step. In conclusion, the imprinted skyrmion lattices are identified directly with polarized neutron reflectometry and confirmed by magnetoresistance measurements. Our results demonstrate an exciting platform to explore room-temperature ground-state skyrmion lattices.« less

  19. Imprinting bulk amorphous alloy at room temperature

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kim, Song-Yi; Park, Eun-Soo; Ott, Ryan T.; Lograsso, Thomas A.; Huh, Moo-Young; Kim, Do-Hyang; Eckert, Jürgen; Lee, Min-Ha

    2015-11-13

    We present investigations on the plastic deformation behavior of a brittle bulk amorphous alloy by simple uniaxial compressive loading at room temperature. A patterning is possible by cold-plastic forming of the typically brittle Hf-based bulk amorphous alloy through controlling homogenous flow without the need for thermal energy or shaping at elevated temperatures. The experimental evidence suggests that there is an inconsistency between macroscopic plasticity and deformability of an amorphous alloy. Moreover, imprinting of specific geometrical features on Cu foil and Zr-based metallic glass is represented by using the patterned bulk amorphous alloy as a die. These results demonstrate the abilitymore » of amorphous alloys or metallic glasses to precisely replicate patterning features onto both conventional metals and the other amorphous alloys. In conclusion, our work presents an avenue for avoiding the embrittlement of amorphous alloys associated with thermoplastic forming and yields new insight the forming application of bulk amorphous alloys at room temperature without using heat treatment.« less

  20. Room temperature electrically injected polariton laser.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Pallab; Frost, Thomas; Deshpande, Saniya; Baten, Md Zunaid; Hazari, Arnab; Das, Ayan

    2014-06-13

    Room temperature electrically pumped inversionless polariton lasing is observed from a bulk GaN-based microcavity diode. The low nonlinear threshold for polariton lasing occurs at 169 A/cm(2) in the light-current characteristics, accompanied by a collapse of the emission linewidth and small blueshift of the emission peak. Measurement of angle-resolved luminescence, polariton condensation and occupation in momentum space, and output spatial coherence and polarization have also been made. A second threshold, due to conventional photon lasing, is observed at an injection of 44 kA/cm(2). PMID:24972222

  1. Temperature dependence of tunneling magnetoresistance in epitaxial magnetic tunnel junctions using a Co2FeAl Heusler alloy electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenhong; Sukegawa, Hiroaki; Inomata, Koichiro

    2010-09-01

    Spin-valve-type epitaxial magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) consisting of a full-Heusler alloy Co2FeAl (CFA) and a MgO tunnel barrier were fabricated on a single-crystal MgO(001) substrate using sputtering method for all the layers. Experimental temperature-dependent tunnel magnetoresistance in the MTJs was revealed to be fitted well using spin wave excitation model for tunneling spin polarization, P(T)=P0(1-αT3/2) up to room temperature, where P0 is the spin polarization at 0 K and α is a fitting parameter. The determined P and α are shown to be significantly different between bottom and top CFA electrodes facing a MgO barrier. It is demonstrated that the bottom CFA deposited on a Cr buffer has a low α and behaves as a half-metal with P˜1 in terms of the Δ1 symmetry due to the coherent tunneling through a MgO barrier.

  2. Absorber Materials at Room and Cryogenic Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    F. Marhauser, T.S. Elliott, A.T. Wu, E.P. Chojnacki, E. Savrun

    2011-09-01

    We recently reported on investigations of RF absorber materials at cryogenic temperatures conducted at Jefferson Laboratory (JLab). The work was initiated to find a replacement material for the 2 Kelvin low power waveguide Higher Order Mode (HOM) absorbers employed within the original cavity cryomodules of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). This effort eventually led to suitable candidates as reported in this paper. Furthermore, though constrained by small funds for labor and resources, we have analyzed a variety of lossy ceramic materials, several of which could be usable as HOM absorbers for both normal conducting and superconducting RF structures, e.g. as loads in cavity waveguides and beam tubes either at room or cryogenic temperatures and, depending on cooling measures, low to high operational power levels.

  3. Structure of room temperature ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Yethiraj, Arun

    2016-10-19

    The structure of room temperature ionic liquids is studied using molecular dynamics simulations and integral equation theory. Three ionic liquids 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium hexfluorophosphate, [C n MIM] [PF6], for n  =  1, 4, and 8, are studied using a united atom model of the ions. The primary interest is a study of the pair correlation functions and a test of the reference interaction site model theory. There is liquid-like ordering in the liquid that arises from electrostatic attractions and steric packing considerations. The theory is not in quantitative agreement with the simulation results and underestimates the degree of liquid-like order. A pre-peak in the static structure factor is seen in both simulations and theory, suggesting that this is a geometric effect arising from a packing of the alkyl chains. PMID:27546807

  4. Atomically resolved force microscopy at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Morita, Seizo

    2014-04-24

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) can now not only image individual atoms but also construct atom letters using atom manipulation method even at room temperature (RT). Therefore, the AFM is the second generation atomic tool following the scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). However the AFM can image even insulating atoms, and also directly measure/map the atomic force and potential at the atomic scale. Noting these advantages, we have been developing a bottom-up nanostructuring system at RT based on the AFM. It can identify chemical species of individual atoms and then manipulate selected atom species to the predesigned site one-by-one to assemble complex nanostructures consisted of multi atom species at RT. Here we introduce our results toward atom-by-atom assembly of composite nanostructures based on the AFM at RT including the latest result on atom gating of nano-space for atom-by-atom creation of atom clusters at RT for semiconductor surfaces.

  5. Electrorecovery of actinides at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Stoll, Michael E; Oldham, Warren J; Costa, David A

    2008-01-01

    There are a large number of purification and processing operations involving actinide species that rely on high-temperature molten salts as the solvent medium. One such application is the electrorefining of impure actinide metals to provide high purity material for subsequent applications. There are some drawbacks to the electrodeposition of actinides in molten salts including relatively low yields, lack of accurate potential control, maintaining efficiency in a highly corrosive environment, and failed runs. With these issues in mind we have been investigating the electrodeposition of actinide metals, mainly uranium, from room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) and relatively high-boiling organic solvents. The RTILs we have focused on are comprised of 1,3-dialkylimidazolium or quaternary ammonium cations and mainly the {sup -}N(SO{sub 2}CF{sub 3}){sub 2} anion [bis(trif1uoromethylsulfonyl)imide {equivalent_to} {sup -}NTf{sub 2}]. These materials represent a class of solvents that possess great potential for use in applications employing electrochemical procedures. In order to ascertain the feasibility of using RTILs for bulk electrodeposition of actinide metals our research team has been exploring the electron transfer behavior of simple coordination complexes of uranium dissolved in the RTIL solutions. More recently we have begun some fundamental electrochemical studies on the behavior of uranium and plutonium complexes in the organic solvents N-methylpyrrolidone (NMP) and dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO). Our most recent results concerning electrodeposition will be presented in this account. The electrochemical behavior of U(IV) and U(III) species in RTILs and the relatively low vapor pressure solvents NMP and DMSO is described. These studies have been ongoing in our laboratory to uncover conditions that will lead to the successful bulk electrodeposition of actinide metals at a working electrode surface at room temperature or slightly elevated temperatures. The RTILs we

  6. Room Temperature Electrical Detection of Spin Polarized Currents in Topological Insulators.

    PubMed

    Dankert, André; Geurs, Johannes; Kamalakar, M Venkata; Charpentier, Sophie; Dash, Saroj P

    2015-12-01

    Topological insulators (TIs) are a new class of quantum materials that exhibit a current-induced spin polarization due to spin-momentum locking of massless Dirac Fermions in their surface states. This helical spin polarization in three-dimensional (3D) TIs has been observed using photoemission spectroscopy up to room temperatures. Recently, spin polarized surface currents in 3D TIs were detected electrically by potentiometric measurements using ferromagnetic detector contacts. However, these electric measurements are so far limited to cryogenic temperatures. Here we report the room temperature electrical detection of the spin polarization on the surface of Bi2Se3 by employing spin sensitive ferromagnetic tunnel contacts. The current-induced spin polarization on the Bi2Se3 surface is probed by measuring the magnetoresistance while switching the magnetization direction of the ferromagnetic detector. A spin resistance of up to 70 mΩ is measured at room temperature, which increases linearly with current bias, reverses sign with current direction, and decreases with higher TI thickness. The magnitude of the spin signal, its sign, and control experiments, using different measurement geometries and interface conditions, rule out other known physical effects. These findings provide further information about the electrical detection of current-induced spin polarizations in 3D TIs at ambient temperatures and could lead to innovative spin-based technologies. PMID:26560203

  7. Improved tunneling magnetoresistance at low temperature in manganite junctions grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, R.; Kleiner, R.; Koelle, D.; Petrov, A. Yu.; Davidson, B. A.; Mino, L. Alvarez

    2011-04-18

    We report resistance versus magnetic field measurements for a La{sub 0.65}Sr{sub 0.35}MnO{sub 3}/SrTiO{sub 3}/La{sub 0.65}Sr{sub 0.35}MnO{sub 3} tunnel junction grown by molecular-beam epitaxy, that show a large field window of extremely high tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) at low temperature. Scanning the in-plane applied field orientation through 360 deg., the TMR shows fourfold symmetry, i.e., biaxial anisotropy, aligned with the crystalline axis but not the junction geometrical long axis. The TMR reaches {approx}1900% at 4 K, corresponding to an interfacial spin polarization of >95% assuming identical interfaces. These results show that uniaxial anisotropy is not necessary for large TMR, and lay the groundwork for future improvements in TMR in manganite junctions.

  8. Manipulation of magnetization switching and tunnel magnetoresistance via temperature and voltage control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Houfang; Wang, Ran; Guo, Peng; Wen, Zhenchao; Feng, Jiafeng; Wei, Hongxiang; Han, Xiufeng; Ji, Yang; Zhang, Shufeng

    2015-12-01

    Magnetization switching between parallel and antiparallel alignments of two magnetic layers in magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) is conventionally controlled either by an external magnetic field or by an electric current. Here, we report that the manipulation of magnetization switching and tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) in perpendicularly magnetized CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB MTJs can be achieved by both temperature and voltage. At a certain range of temperature, coercivity crossover between top and bottom magnetic layers is observed in which the TMR ratio of the MTJs is almost unmeasurable. Furthermore, the temperature range can be tuned reversibly by an electric voltage. Magnetization switching driven by the voltage reveals an unconventional phenomenon such that the voltage driven coercivity changes with temperature are quite different for top and bottom CoFeB layers. A model based on thermally-assisted domain nucleation and propagation is developed to explain the frequency and temperature dependence of coercivity. The present results of controlling the magnetization switching by temperature and voltage may provide an alternative route for novel applications of MTJs based spintronic devices.

  9. Manipulation of magnetization switching and tunnel magnetoresistance via temperature and voltage control

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Houfang; Wang, Ran; Guo, Peng; Wen, Zhenchao; Feng, Jiafeng; Wei, Hongxiang; Han, Xiufeng; Ji, Yang; Zhang, Shufeng

    2015-01-01

    Magnetization switching between parallel and antiparallel alignments of two magnetic layers in magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) is conventionally controlled either by an external magnetic field or by an electric current. Here, we report that the manipulation of magnetization switching and tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) in perpendicularly magnetized CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB MTJs can be achieved by both temperature and voltage. At a certain range of temperature, coercivity crossover between top and bottom magnetic layers is observed in which the TMR ratio of the MTJs is almost unmeasurable. Furthermore, the temperature range can be tuned reversibly by an electric voltage. Magnetization switching driven by the voltage reveals an unconventional phenomenon such that the voltage driven coercivity changes with temperature are quite different for top and bottom CoFeB layers. A model based on thermally-assisted domain nucleation and propagation is developed to explain the frequency and temperature dependence of coercivity. The present results of controlling the magnetization switching by temperature and voltage may provide an alternative route for novel applications of MTJs based spintronic devices. PMID:26658213

  10. Manipulation of magnetization switching and tunnel magnetoresistance via temperature and voltage control.

    PubMed

    Liu, Houfang; Wang, Ran; Guo, Peng; Wen, Zhenchao; Feng, Jiafeng; Wei, Hongxiang; Han, Xiufeng; Ji, Yang; Zhang, Shufeng

    2015-01-01

    Magnetization switching between parallel and antiparallel alignments of two magnetic layers in magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) is conventionally controlled either by an external magnetic field or by an electric current. Here, we report that the manipulation of magnetization switching and tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) in perpendicularly magnetized CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB MTJs can be achieved by both temperature and voltage. At a certain range of temperature, coercivity crossover between top and bottom magnetic layers is observed in which the TMR ratio of the MTJs is almost unmeasurable. Furthermore, the temperature range can be tuned reversibly by an electric voltage. Magnetization switching driven by the voltage reveals an unconventional phenomenon such that the voltage driven coercivity changes with temperature are quite different for top and bottom CoFeB layers. A model based on thermally-assisted domain nucleation and propagation is developed to explain the frequency and temperature dependence of coercivity. The present results of controlling the magnetization switching by temperature and voltage may provide an alternative route for novel applications of MTJs based spintronic devices. PMID:26658213

  11. Room temperature molecular up conversion in solution.

    PubMed

    Nonat, Aline; Chan, Chi Fai; Liu, Tao; Platas-Iglesias, Carlos; Liu, Zhenyu; Wong, Wing-Tak; Wong, Wai-Kwok; Wong, Ka-Leung; Charbonnière, Loïc J

    2016-01-01

    Up conversion is an Anti-Stokes luminescent process by which photons of low energy are piled up to generate light at a higher energy. Here we show that the addition of fluoride anions to a D2O solution of a macrocyclic erbium complex leads to the formation of a supramolecular [(ErL)2F](+) assembly in which fluoride is sandwiched between two complexes, held together by the synergistic interactions of the Er-F-Er bridging bond, four intercomplex hydrogen bonds and two aromatic stacking interactions. Room temperature excitation into the Er absorption bands at 980 nm of a solution of the complex in D2O results in the observation of up converted emission at 525, 550 and 650 nm attributed to Er centred transitions via a two-step excitation. The up conversion signal is dramatically increased upon formation of the [(ErL)2F](+) dimer in the presence of 0.5 equivalents of fluoride anions. PMID:27302144

  12. Room temperature molecular up conversion in solution

    PubMed Central

    Nonat, Aline; Chan, Chi Fai; Liu, Tao; Platas-Iglesias, Carlos; Liu, Zhenyu; Wong, Wing-Tak; Wong, Wai-Kwok; Wong, Ka-Leung; Charbonnière, Loïc J.

    2016-01-01

    Up conversion is an Anti-Stokes luminescent process by which photons of low energy are piled up to generate light at a higher energy. Here we show that the addition of fluoride anions to a D2O solution of a macrocyclic erbium complex leads to the formation of a supramolecular [(ErL)2F]+ assembly in which fluoride is sandwiched between two complexes, held together by the synergistic interactions of the Er-F-Er bridging bond, four intercomplex hydrogen bonds and two aromatic stacking interactions. Room temperature excitation into the Er absorption bands at 980 nm of a solution of the complex in D2O results in the observation of up converted emission at 525, 550 and 650 nm attributed to Er centred transitions via a two-step excitation. The up conversion signal is dramatically increased upon formation of the [(ErL)2F]+ dimer in the presence of 0.5 equivalents of fluoride anions. PMID:27302144

  13. Room-temperature single-electron junction.

    PubMed Central

    Facci, P; Erokhin, V; Carrara, S; Nicolini, C

    1996-01-01

    The design, realization, and test performances of an electronic junction based on single-electron phenomena that works in the air at room temperature are hereby reported. The element consists of an electrochemically etched sharp tungsten stylus over whose tip a nanometer-size crystal was synthesized. Langmuir-Blodgett films of cadmium arachidate were transferred onto the stylus and exposed to a H2S atmosphere to yield CdS nanocrystals (30-50 angstrom in diameter) imbedded into an organic matrix. The stylus, biased with respect to a flat electrode, was brought to the tunnel distance from the film and a constant gap value was maintained by a piezo-electric actuator driven by a feedback circuit fed by the tunneling current. With this set-up, it is possible to measure the behavior of the current flowing through the quantum dot when a bias voltage is applied. Voltage-current characteristics measured in the system displayed single-electron trends such as a Coulomb blockade and Coulomb staircase and revealed capacitance values as small as 10(-19) F. PMID:11607710

  14. Operation of a Giant Magnetoresistive (GMR) Digital Isolator, Type IL510, Under Extreme Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard; Hammoud, Ahmad; Panko, Scott

    2010-01-01

    A relatively new type of signal isolation based on Giant Magnetoresistive (GMR) technology was investigated for potential use in harsh temperature environments. Operational characteristics of the 2Mbps single channel, IL510-Series commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) digital isolator chip was obtained under extreme temperature exposure and thermal cycling in the range of -190 C to +120 C. The isolator was evaluated in terms of its output signal delivery and stability, output rise (t(sub r)) and fall times (t(sub f)), and propagation delays at 50% level between input and output during low to high (t(sub PLH)) and high to low (t(sub PHL)) transitions. The device performed very well throughout the entire test temperature range as no significant changes occurred either in its function or in its output signal timing characteristics. The limited thermal cycling, which comprised of 12 cycles between -190 C and +120 C, also had no influence on its performance. In addition, the device packaging underwent no structural damage due to the extreme temperature exposure. These preliminary results indicate that this semiconductor chip has the potential for use in a temperature range that extends beyond its specified regime. Additional and more comprehensive testing, however, is required to establish its operation and reliability and to determine its suitability for long-term use in space exploration missions.

  15. Non-local magnetoresistance in YIG/Pt nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Goennenwein, Sebastian T. B. Pernpeintner, Matthias; Gross, Rudolf; Huebl, Hans; Schlitz, Richard; Ganzhorn, Kathrin; Althammer, Matthias

    2015-10-26

    We study the local and non-local magnetoresistance of thin Pt strips deposited onto yttrium iron garnet. The local magnetoresistive response, inferred from the voltage drop measured along one given Pt strip upon current-biasing it, shows the characteristic magnetization orientation dependence of the spin Hall magnetoresistance. We simultaneously also record the non-local voltage appearing along a second, electrically isolated, Pt strip, separated from the current carrying one by a gap of a few 100 nm. The corresponding non-local magnetoresistance exhibits the symmetry expected for a magnon spin accumulation-driven process, confirming the results recently put forward by Cornelissen et al. [“Long-distance transport of magnon spin information in a magnetic insulator at room temperature,” Nat. Phys. (published online 14 September 2015)]. Our magnetotransport data, taken at a series of different temperatures as a function of magnetic field orientation, rotating the externally applied field in three mutually orthogonal planes, show that the mechanisms behind the spin Hall and the non-local magnetoresistance are qualitatively different. In particular, the non-local magnetoresistance vanishes at liquid Helium temperatures, while the spin Hall magnetoresistance prevails.

  16. Room-Temperature Multiferroic Hexagonal LuFeO3

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Xuemei; Balke, Nina; Chi, Miaofang; Gai, Zheng; Keavney, David; Lee, Ho Nyung; Shen, Jian; Snijders, Paul C; Wang, Wenbin; Ward, Thomas Z; Xu, Xiaoshan; Yi, Jieyu; Zhu, Leyi; Christen, Hans M; Zhao, Jun

    2013-01-01

    We observed the coexistence of ferroelectricity and weak ferromagnetism at room temperature in the hexagonal phase of LuFeO3 stabilized by epitaxial thin film growth. While the ferroelectricity in hexagonal LuFeO3 can be understood as arising from its polar structure, the observation of weak ferromagnetism at room temperature is remarkable considering the frustrated triangular spin structure. An explanation of the room temperature weak ferromagnetism is proposed in terms of a subtle lattice distortion revealed by the structural characterization. The combination of ferroelectricity and weak ferromagnetism in epitaxial films at room temperature offers great potential for the application of this novel multiferroic material in next generation devices.

  17. Electrical and Magneto-Resistivity Measurements on Amorphous Copper-Titanium Alloys at Low Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Renyong

    1992-01-01

    The anomalous transport properties of highly disordered metallic glasses, which require corrections to the classical Boltzmann theory, are due to quantum interference effects of the scattered electron waves. These corrections provide new contributions to the resistivity: "weak localization" and "electron-electron interaction". To study these quantum interference effects, we have made the highest-precision measurements, so far, of the resistances of the amorphous rm Cu_{50}Ti_{50 } and rm Cu_{60}Ti _{40} ribbons at much lower temperatures than before (15mK < T < 6K) and in small magnetic fields (0T < B < 0.2T). To measure the resistance and temperature accurately, we developed a novel method: measuring the resistance perpendicular to the ribbons with potassium as the non-superconducting glue between the CuTi ribbons and two Cu electrodes in order to make excellent electrical and thermal contact. With this method, we were able to measure the resistances with a relative precision of Deltarho/rho = 10^{-7}-10 ^{-8} and temperatures reliably down to 15mK with an error of less than 1mK. The zero field resistances and magnetoresistances were analyzed using weak localization theories that include the Zeeman splitting and electron-electron interaction theories. Possible background contributions from the K layers, the Cu electrodes, and their boundaries are quantified in the analysis. In zero field, these background contributions were negligible for T<3K. At zero magnetic field and T<0.15K, we found that electron -electron interaction dominates the resistance, while weak localization makes a nontrivial contribution to the resistance for T>0.15K. In contrast, at the lowest temperatures, the magnetoresistances were dominated by weak localization with Zeeman splitting and Maki-Thompson superconducting fluctuations. For higher magnetic fields and lowest temperatures (B/T > 1 T/K), we find discrepancies between our data and the theoretical calculations. We found that most of the

  18. Water in Room Temperature Ionic Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fayer, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Room temperature ionic liquids (or RTILs, salts with a melting point below 25 °C) have become a subject of intense study over the last several decades. Currently, RTIL application research includes synthesis, batteries, solar cells, crystallization, drug delivery, and optics. RTILs are often composed of an inorganic anion paired with an asymmetric organic cation which contains one or more pendant alkyl chains. The asymmetry of the cation frustrates crystallization, causing the salt's melting point to drop significantly. In general, RTILs are very hygroscopic, and therefore, it is of interest to examine the influence of water on RTIL structure and dynamics. In addition, in contrast to normal aqueous salt solutions, which crystallize at low water concentration, in an RTIL it is possible to examine isolated water molecules interacting with ions but not with other water molecules. Here, optical heterodyne-detected optical Kerr effect (OHD-OKE) measurements of orientational relaxation on a series of 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate RTILs as a function of chain length and water concentration are presented. The addition of water to the longer alkyl chain RTILs causes the emergence of a long time bi-exponential orientational anisotropy decay. Such decays have not been seen previously in OHD-OKE experiments on any type of liquid and are analyzed here using a wobbling-in-a-cone model. The orientational relaxation is not hydrodynamic, with the slowest relaxation component becoming slower as the viscosity decreases for the longest chain, highest water content samples. The dynamics of isolated D2O molecules in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate (BmImPF6) were examined using two dimensional infrared (2D IR) vibrational echo spectroscopy. Spectral diffusion and incoherent and coherent transfer of excitation between the symmetric and antisymmetric modes are examined. The coherent transfer experiments are used to address the nature of inhomogeneous

  19. Novel spintronics devices for memory and logic: prospects and challenges for room temperature all spin computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian-Ping

    An energy efficient memory and logic device for the post-CMOS era has been the goal of a variety of research fields. The limits of scaling, which we expect to reach by the year 2025, demand that future advances in computational power will not be realized from ever-shrinking device sizes, but rather by innovative designs and new materials and physics. Magnetoresistive based devices have been a promising candidate for future integrated magnetic computation because of its unique non-volatility and functionalities. The application of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy for potential STT-RAM application was demonstrated and later has been intensively investigated by both academia and industry groups, but there is no clear path way how scaling will eventually work for both memory and logic applications. One of main reasons is that there is no demonstrated material stack candidate that could lead to a scaling scheme down to sub 10 nm. Another challenge for the usage of magnetoresistive based devices for logic application is its available switching speed and writing energy. Although a good progress has been made to demonstrate the fast switching of a thermally stable magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) down to 165 ps, it is still several times slower than its CMOS counterpart. In this talk, I will review the recent progress by my research group and my C-SPIN colleagues, then discuss the opportunities, challenges and some potential path ways for magnetoresitive based devices for memory and logic applications and their integration for room temperature all spin computing system.

  20. Room-temperature stabilization of nanoscale superionic Ag2Se

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, T.; Wittenberg, J. S.; Lindenberg, A. M.

    2014-10-01

    Superionic materials are multi-component solids in which one sub-lattice exhibits high ionic conductivity within a fixed crystalline structure. This is typically associated with a structural phase transition occurring significantly above room temperature. Here, through combined temperature-resolved x-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry, we map out the nanoscale size-dependence of the Ag2Se tetragonal to superionic phase transition temperature and determine the threshold size for room-temperature stabilization of superionic Ag2Se. For the first time, clear experimental evidence for such stabilization of the highly ionic conducting phase at room temperature is obtained in ˜2 nm diameter spheres, which corresponds to a >100 °C suppression of the bulk phase transition temperature. This may enable technological applications of Ag2Se in devices where high ionic conductivity at room temperature is required.

  1. Room-temperature stabilization of nanoscale superionic Ag₂Se.

    PubMed

    Hu, T; Wittenberg, J S; Lindenberg, A M

    2014-10-17

    Superionic materials are multi-component solids in which one sub-lattice exhibits high ionic conductivity within a fixed crystalline structure. This is typically associated with a structural phase transition occurring significantly above room temperature. Here, through combined temperature-resolved x-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry, we map out the nanoscale size-dependence of the Ag₂Se tetragonal to superionic phase transition temperature and determine the threshold size for room-temperature stabilization of superionic Ag2Se. For the first time, clear experimental evidence for such stabilization of the highly ionic conducting phase at room temperature is obtained in ∼2 nm diameter spheres, which corresponds to a >100 °C suppression of the bulk phase transition temperature. This may enable technological applications of Ag₂Se in devices where high ionic conductivity at room temperature is required. PMID:25249347

  2. Large exchange bias in polycrystalline MnN/CoFe bilayers at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinert, Markus; Büker, Björn; Graulich, Dominik; Dunz, Mareike

    2015-10-01

    We report on the new polycrystalline exchange bias system MnN/CoFe, which shows exchange bias of up to 1800 Oe at room temperature with a coercive field around 600 Oe. The room-temperature values of the interfacial exchange energy and the effective uniaxial anisotropy are estimated to be Jeff=0.41 mJ /m2 and Keff=37 kJ /m3 . The thermal stability was found to be tunable by controlling the nitrogen content of MnN. The maximum blocking temperature exceeds 325 ∘C, however the median blocking temperature in the limit of thick MnN is 160 ∘C . Good oxidation stability through self-passivation was observed, enabling the use of MnN in lithographically defined microstructures. As a proof of principle we demonstrate a simple giant magnetoresistance stack exchange biased with MnN, which shows clear separation between parallel and antiparallel magnetic states. These properties come along with a surprisingly simple manufacturing process for the MnN films.

  3. Room temperature to cryogenic electrical interface

    SciTech Connect

    Faris, S.M.

    1988-04-26

    A monolithic superconductive chip is described comprising: a. a substrate with a low temperature region and a high temperature region; b. a low temperature electronic circuit formed on the low temperature region and including an element which is superconductive when it has a temperature below a critical level; and c. electrical conductors formed on the substrate, the conductors being connected to the electronic circuit and traversing the substrate to the high temperature region.

  4. Resistivity dependence of magnetoresistance in Co/ZnO films

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We report the dependence of magnetoresistance effect on resistivity (ρ) in Co/ZnO films deposited by magnetron sputtering at different sputtering pressures with different ZnO contents. The magnitude of the resistivity reflects different carrier transport regimes ranging from metallic to hopping behaviors. Large room-temperature magnetoresistance greater than 8% is obtained in the resistivity range from 0.08 to 0.5 Ω · cm. The magnetoresistance value decreases markedly when the resistivity of the films is less than 0.08 Ω · cm or greater than 0.5 Ω · cm. When 0.08 Ω · cm < ρ < 0.5 Ω · cm, the conduction contains two channels: the spin-dependent tunneling channel and the spin-independent second-order hopping (N = 2). The former gives rise to a high room-temperature magnetoresistance effect. When ρ > 0.5 Ω · cm, the spin-independent higher-order hopping (N > 2) comes into play and decreases the tunneling magnetoresistance value. For the samples with ρ < 0.08 Ω · cm, reduced magnetoresistance is mainly ascribed to the formation of percolation paths through interconnected elongated metallic Co particles. This observation is significant for the improvement of room-temperature magnetoresistance value for future spintronic devices. PMID:24393445

  5. Large, non-saturating magnetoresistance in WTe2.

    PubMed

    Ali, Mazhar N; Xiong, Jun; Flynn, Steven; Tao, Jing; Gibson, Quinn D; Schoop, Leslie M; Liang, Tian; Haldolaarachchige, Neel; Hirschberger, Max; Ong, N P; Cava, R J

    2014-10-01

    Magnetoresistance is the change in a material's electrical resistance in response to an applied magnetic field. Materials with large magnetoresistance have found use as magnetic sensors, in magnetic memory, and in hard drives at room temperature, and their rarity has motivated many fundamental studies in materials physics at low temperatures. Here we report the observation of an extremely large positive magnetoresistance at low temperatures in the non-magnetic layered transition-metal dichalcogenide WTe2: 452,700 per cent at 4.5 kelvins in a magnetic field of 14.7 teslas, and 13 million per cent at 0.53 kelvins in a magnetic field of 60 teslas. In contrast with other materials, there is no saturation of the magnetoresistance value even at very high applied fields. Determination of the origin and consequences of this effect, and the fabrication of thin films, nanostructures and devices based on the extremely large positive magnetoresistance of WTe2, will represent a significant new direction in the study of magnetoresistivity. PMID:25219849

  6. Large, non-saturating magnetoresistance in WTe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Mazhar N.; Xiong, Jun; Flynn, Steven; Tao, Jing; Gibson, Quinn D.; Schoop, Leslie M.; Liang, Tian; Haldolaarachchige, Neel; Hirschberger, Max; Ong, N. P.; Cava, R. J.

    2014-10-01

    Magnetoresistance is the change in a material's electrical resistance in response to an applied magnetic field. Materials with large magnetoresistance have found use as magnetic sensors, in magnetic memory, and in hard drives at room temperature, and their rarity has motivated many fundamental studies in materials physics at low temperatures. Here we report the observation of an extremely large positive magnetoresistance at low temperatures in the non-magnetic layered transition-metal dichalcogenide WTe2: 452,700 per cent at 4.5 kelvins in a magnetic field of 14.7 teslas, and 13 million per cent at 0.53 kelvins in a magnetic field of 60 teslas. In contrast with other materials, there is no saturation of the magnetoresistance value even at very high applied fields. Determination of the origin and consequences of this effect, and the fabrication of thin films, nanostructures and devices based on the extremely large positive magnetoresistance of WTe2, will represent a significant new direction in the study of magnetoresistivity.

  7. Room temperature and productivity in office work

    SciTech Connect

    Seppanen, O.; Fisk, W.J.; Lei, Q.H.

    2006-07-01

    Indoor temperature is one of the fundamental characteristics of the indoor environment. It can be controlled with a degree of accuracy dependent on the building and its HVAC system. The indoor temperature affects several human responses, including thermal comfort, perceived air quality, sick building syndrome symptoms and performance at work. In this study, we focused on the effects of temperature on performance at office work. We included those studies that had used objective indicators of performance that are likely to be relevant in office type work, such as text processing, simple calculations (addition, multiplication), length of telephone customer service time, and total handling time per customer for call-center workers. We excluded data from studies of industrial work performance. We calculated from all studies the percentage of performance change per degree increase in temperature, and statistically analyzed measured work performance with temperature. The results show that performance increases with temperature up to 21-22 C, and decreases with temperature above 23-24 C. The highest productivity is at temperature of around 22 C. For example, at the temperature of 30 C, the performance is only 91.1% of the maximum i.e. the reduction in performance is 8.9%.

  8. Fabrication method for a room temperature hydrogen sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seal, Sudipta (Inventor); Shukla, Satyajit V. (Inventor); Ludwig, Lawrence (Inventor); Cho, Hyoung (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A sensor for selectively determining the presence and measuring the amount of hydrogen in the vicinity of the sensor. The sensor comprises a MEMS device coated with a nanostructured thin film of indium oxide doped tin oxide with an over layer of nanostructured barium cerate with platinum catalyst nanoparticles. Initial exposure to a UV light source, at room temperature, causes burning of organic residues present on the sensor surface and provides a clean surface for sensing hydrogen at room temperature. A giant room temperature hydrogen sensitivity is observed after making the UV source off. The hydrogen sensor of the invention can be usefully employed for the detection of hydrogen in an environment susceptible to the incursion or generation of hydrogen and may be conveniently used at room temperature.

  9. Neutron absorbing room temperature vulcanizable silicone rubber compositions

    DOEpatents

    Zoch, Harold L.

    1979-11-27

    A neutron absorbing composition comprising a one-component room temperature vulcanizable silicone rubber composition or a two-component room temperature vulcanizable silicone rubber composition in which the composition contains from 25 to 300 parts by weight based on the base silanol or vinyl containing diorganopolysiloxane polymer of a boron compound or boron powder as the neutron absorbing ingredient. An especially useful boron compound in this application is boron carbide.

  10. Irradiation dose determination below room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos-Bernal, S.; Cruz, E.; Negrón-Mendoza, A.; Bustos, E.

    2002-03-01

    The measurements presented were undertaken to provide quantitative information on the low temperature irradiation of thermoluminiscence phosphors. The crystals used were (a) LiF co-doped with Mg, Cu and P, and (b) CaSO 4 doped with Dy. The absorbed dose values in the interval studied showed a linear behavior at low doses and low temperature. The aim of this work is to test if these crystals can be used to measure the dose absorbed by solids at low temperature.

  11. Thermal Effect in Opal Below Room Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Buerger, Martin J.; Shoemaker, Gerald L.

    1972-01-01

    Opal, once believed to be amorphous silica, was shown by Levin and Ott (1932, J. Amer. Chem. Soc. 54, 828-829) to give an x-ray powder pattern of the high-temperature form of cristobalite. The early explanation of this anomalous existence of a phase below its high-low transition temperature is now known to be untenable. One of us suggested that the tiny sizes of the component cristobalite crystals might explain the anomaly; if so, the transition might be expected below ambient temperatures. The record of a du Pont 900 Thermoanalyzer indeed revealed heat effects in opal below ambient temperatures, with an exotherm having a maximum at about -40° on cooling and an endotherm that began about -50° on heating. This was not a latent-heat effect due to the high-low transition of cristobalite, however, for the low-cristobalite pattern persisted to below -50°. Opal normally contains 4-9% water, which is tenaciously held; water loss is nearly linear with temperatures up to about 422°, when water loss is abruptly complete. Water-free opal does not display the thermal effect, but the same opal rehydrated does display it. Water is housed in minute voids, judged to be a few hundred Ångströms across, between minute particles of cristobalite. This water behaves differently from water in bulk, for its begins to melt at about -50°. PMID:16592025

  12. Room Temperature Magnetic Barrier Layers in Magnetic Tunnel Junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson-Cheeseman, B. B.; Wong, F. J.; Chopdekar, R. V.; Arenholz, E.; Suzuki, Y.

    2010-03-09

    We investigate the spin transport and interfacial magnetism of magnetic tunnel junctions with highly spin polarized LSMO and Fe3O4 electrodes and a ferrimagnetic NiFe2O4 (NFO) barrier layer. The spin dependent transport can be understood in terms of magnon-assisted spin dependent tunneling where the magnons are excited in the barrier layer itself. The NFO/Fe3O4 interface displays strong magnetic coupling, while the LSMO/NFO interface exhibits clear decoupling as determined by a combination of X-ray absorption spectroscopy and X-ray magnetic circular dichroism. This decoupling allows for distinct parallel and antiparallel electrode states in this all-magnetic trilayer. The spin transport of these devices, dominated by the NFO barrier layer magnetism, leads to a symmetric bias dependence of the junction magnetoresistance at all temperatures.

  13. Systematic Angular Study of Magnetoresistance in Permalloy Connected Kagome Artificial Spin Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jungsik; Le, Brian; Watts, Justin; Leighton, Chris; Samarth, Nitin; Schiffer, Peter

    Artificial spin ices are nanostructured two-dimensional arrays of ferromagnetic elements, where frustrated interactions lead to unusual collective magnetic behavior. Here we report a room-temperature magnetoresistance study of connected permalloy (Ni81Fe19) kagome artificial spin ice networks, wherein the direction of the applied in-plane magnetic field is systematically varied. We measure both the longitudinal and transverse magnetoresistance in these structures, and we find certain transport geometries of the network show strong angular sensitivity - even small variations in the applied field angle lead to dramatic changes of the magnetoresistance response. We also investigate the magnetization reversal of the networks using magnetic force microscopy (MFM), demonstrating avalanche behavior in the magnetization reversal. The magnetoresistance features are analyzed using an anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) model. Supported by the US Department of Energy. Work at the University of Minnesota was supported by Seagate Technology, NSF MRSEC, and a Marie Curie International Outgoing Fellowship within the 7th European Community Framework Programme.

  14. Control and Room Temperature Optimization of Energy Efficient Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Djouadi, Seddik M; Kuruganti, Phani Teja

    2012-01-01

    The building sector consumes a large part of the energy used in the United States and is responsible for nearly 40% of greenhouse gas emissions. It is therefore economically and environmentally important to reduce the building energy consumption to realize massive energy savings. In this paper, a method to control room temperature in buildings is proposed. The approach is based on a distributed parameter model represented by a three dimensional (3D) heat equation in a room with heater/cooler located at ceiling. The latter is resolved using finite element methods, and results in a model for room temperature with thousands of states. The latter is not amenable to control design. A reduced order model of only few states is then derived using Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD). A Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR) is computed based on the reduced model, and applied to the full order model to control room temperature.

  15. Nature of room-temperature photoluminescence in ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    Shan, W.; Walukiewicz, W.; Ager III, J.W.; Yu, K.M.; Yuan, H.B.; Xin, H.P.; Cantwell, G.; Song, J.J.

    2004-11-11

    The temperature dependence of the photoluminescence (PL) transitions associated with various excitons and their phonon replicas in high-purity bulk ZnO has been studied at temperatures from 12 K to above room temperature (320 K). Several strong PL emission lines associated with LO phonon replicas of free and bound excitons are clearly observed. The room temperature PL spectrum is dominated by the phonon replicas of the free exciton transition with the maximum at the first LO phonon replica. The results explain the discrepancy between the transition energy of free exciton determined by reflection measurement and the peak position obtained by the PL measurement.

  16. Strong-coupling theory of high-temperature superconductivity and colossal magnetoresistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, A. S.

    2005-08-01

    We argue that the extension of the BCS theory to the strong-coupling regime describes the high-temperature superconductivity of cuprates and the colossal magnetoresistance (CMR) of ferromagnetic oxides if the phonon dressing of carriers and strong attractive correlations are taken into account. The attraction between carriers, which is prerequisite to high-temperature superconductivity, is caused by an almost unretarted electron-phonon interaction sufficient to overcome the direct Coulomb repulsion in the strong-coupling limit, where electrons become polarons and bipolarons (real-space electron or hole pairs dressed by phonons). The long-range Froehlich electron-phonon interaction has been identified as the most essential in cuprates providing "superlight" lattice polarons and bipolarons. A number of key observations have been predicted and/or explained with polarons and bipolarons including unusual isotope effects, normal state (pseudo)gaps, upper critical fields, etc. Here some kinetic, magnetic, and more recent thermomagnetic normal state measurements are interpreted in the framework of the strong-coupling theory, including the Nernst effect and normal state diamagnetism. Remarkably, a similar strong-coupling approach offers a simple explanation of CMR in ferromagnetic oxides, while the conventional double-exchange (DEX) model, proposed half a century ago and generalised more recently to include the electronphonon interaction, is in conflict with a number of modern experiments. Among these experiments are site-selective spectroscopies, which have shown that oxygen p-holes are current carriers rather than d-electrons in ferromagnetic manganites (and in cuprates) ruling out DEX mechanism of CMR. Also some samples of ferromagnetic manganites manifest an insulating-like optical conductivity at all temperatures contradicting the DEX notion that their ferromagnetic phase is metallic. On the other hand, the pairing of oxygen holes into heavy bipolarons in the

  17. Proposal for a room-temperature diamond maser.

    PubMed

    Jin, Liang; Pfender, Matthias; Aslam, Nabeel; Neumann, Philipp; Yang, Sen; Wrachtrup, Jörg; Liu, Ren-Bao

    2015-01-01

    The application of masers is limited by its demanding working conditions (high vacuum or low temperature). A room-temperature solid-state maser is highly desirable, but the lifetimes of emitters (electron spins) in solids at room temperature are usually too short (∼ns) for population inversion. Masing from pentacene spins in p-terphenyl crystals, which have a long spin lifetime (∼0.1 ms), has been demonstrated. This maser, however, operates only in the pulsed mode. Here we propose a room-temperature maser based on nitrogen-vacancy centres in diamond, which features the longest known solid-state spin lifetime (∼5 ms) at room temperature, high optical pumping efficiency (∼10(6) s(-1)) and material stability. Our numerical simulation demonstrates that a maser with a coherence time of approximately minutes is feasible under readily accessible conditions (cavity Q-factor ∼5 × 10(4), diamond size ∼3 × 3 × 0.5 mm(3) and pump power <10 W). A room-temperature diamond maser may facilitate a broad range of microwave technologies. PMID:26394758

  18. Proposal for a room-temperature diamond maser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Liang; Pfender, Matthias; Aslam, Nabeel; Neumann, Philipp; Yang, Sen; Wrachtrup, Jörg; Liu, Ren-Bao

    2015-09-01

    The application of masers is limited by its demanding working conditions (high vacuum or low temperature). A room-temperature solid-state maser is highly desirable, but the lifetimes of emitters (electron spins) in solids at room temperature are usually too short (~ns) for population inversion. Masing from pentacene spins in p-terphenyl crystals, which have a long spin lifetime (~0.1 ms), has been demonstrated. This maser, however, operates only in the pulsed mode. Here we propose a room-temperature maser based on nitrogen-vacancy centres in diamond, which features the longest known solid-state spin lifetime (~5 ms) at room temperature, high optical pumping efficiency (~106 s-1) and material stability. Our numerical simulation demonstrates that a maser with a coherence time of approximately minutes is feasible under readily accessible conditions (cavity Q-factor ~5 × 104, diamond size ~3 × 3 × 0.5 mm3 and pump power <10 W). A room-temperature diamond maser may facilitate a broad range of microwave technologies.

  19. Proposal for a room-temperature diamond maser

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Liang; Pfender, Matthias; Aslam, Nabeel; Neumann, Philipp; Yang, Sen; Wrachtrup, Jörg; Liu, Ren-Bao

    2015-01-01

    The application of masers is limited by its demanding working conditions (high vacuum or low temperature). A room-temperature solid-state maser is highly desirable, but the lifetimes of emitters (electron spins) in solids at room temperature are usually too short (∼ns) for population inversion. Masing from pentacene spins in p-terphenyl crystals, which have a long spin lifetime (∼0.1 ms), has been demonstrated. This maser, however, operates only in the pulsed mode. Here we propose a room-temperature maser based on nitrogen-vacancy centres in diamond, which features the longest known solid-state spin lifetime (∼5 ms) at room temperature, high optical pumping efficiency (∼106 s−1) and material stability. Our numerical simulation demonstrates that a maser with a coherence time of approximately minutes is feasible under readily accessible conditions (cavity Q-factor ∼5 × 104, diamond size ∼3 × 3 × 0.5 mm3 and pump power <10 W). A room-temperature diamond maser may facilitate a broad range of microwave technologies. PMID:26394758

  20. Room temperature DNA storage with slide-mounted Aphid specimens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most of the conventional molecular studies of aphids destroy the specimen in order to extract DNA. This DNA is subsequently stored in low temperature freezers. Room temperature storage of DNA with microscope slide-mounted voucher material is demonstrated by developing a system that uses filter pa...

  1. Acoustic method for measuring air temperature and humidity in rooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanev, N. G.

    2014-05-01

    A method is proposed to determine air temperature and humidity in rooms with a system of sound sources and receivers, making it possible to find the sound velocity and reverberation time. Nomograms for determining the air temperature and relative air humidity are constructed from the found sound velocity and time reverberation values. The required accuracy of measuring these parameters is estimated.

  2. Giant electrocaloric effect in ferroelectric nanotubes near room temperature.

    PubMed

    Liu, Man; Wang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Ferroelectric perovskite oxides possess large electrocaloric effect, but only at high temperature, which limits their potential as next generation solid state cooling devices. Here, we demonstrate from phase field simulations that a giant adiabatic temperature change exhibits near room temperature in the strained ferroelectric PbTiO₃ nanotubes, which is several times in magnitude larger than that of PbTiO₃ thin films. Such giant adiabatic temperature change is attributed to the extrinsic contribution of unusual domain transition, which involves a dedicated interplay among the electric field, strain, temperature and polarization. Careful selection of external strain allows one to harness the extrinsic contribution to obtain large adiabatic temperature change in ferroelectric nanotubes near room temperature. Our finding provides a novel insight into the electrocaloric response of ferroelectric nanostructures and leads to a new strategy to tailor and improve the electrocaloric properties of ferroelectric materials through domain engineering. PMID:25578434

  3. Giant electrocaloric effect in ferroelectric nanotubes near room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Man; Wang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Ferroelectric perovskite oxides possess large electrocaloric effect, but only at high temperature, which limits their potential as next generation solid state cooling devices. Here, we demonstrate from phase field simulations that a giant adiabatic temperature change exhibits near room temperature in the strained ferroelectric PbTiO3 nanotubes, which is several times in magnitude larger than that of PbTiO3 thin films. Such giant adiabatic temperature change is attributed to the extrinsic contribution of unusual domain transition, which involves a dedicated interplay among the electric field, strain, temperature and polarization. Careful selection of external strain allows one to harness the extrinsic contribution to obtain large adiabatic temperature change in ferroelectric nanotubes near room temperature. Our finding provides a novel insight into the electrocaloric response of ferroelectric nanostructures and leads to a new strategy to tailor and improve the electrocaloric properties of ferroelectric materials through domain engineering. PMID:25578434

  4. Large, Tunable Magnetoresistance in Nonmagnetic III-V Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Li, Sichao; Luo, Wei; Gu, Jiangjiang; Cheng, Xiang; Ye, Peide D; Wu, Yanqing

    2015-12-01

    Magnetoresistance, the modulation of resistance by magnetic fields, has been adopted and continues to evolve in many device applications including hard-disk, memory, and sensors. Magnetoresistance in nonmagnetic semiconductors has recently raised much attention and shows great potential due to its large magnitude that is comparable or even larger than magnetic materials. However, most of the previous work focus on two terminal devices with large dimensions, typically of micrometer scales, which severely limit their performance potential and more importantly, scalability in commercial applications. Here, we investigate magnetoresistance in the impact ionization region in InGaAs nanowires with 20 nm diameter and 40 nm gate length. The deeply scaled dimensions of these nanowires enable high sensibility with less power consumption. Moreover, in these three terminal devices, the magnitude of magnetoresistance can be tuned by the transverse electric field controlled by gate voltage. Large magnetoresistance between 100% at room temperature and 2000% at 4.3 K can be achieved at 2.5 T. These nanoscale devices with large magnetoresistance offer excellent opportunity for future high-density large-scale magneto-electric devices using top-down fabrication approaches, which are compatible with commercial silicon platform. PMID:26561728

  5. Room temperature ferromagnetism in Teflon due to carbon dangling bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Y. W.; Lu, Y. H.; Yi, J. B.; Feng, Y. P.; Herng, T. S.; Liu, X.; Gao, D. Q.; Xue, D. S.; Xue, J. M.; Ouyang, J. Y.; Ding, J.

    2012-03-01

    The ferromagnetism in many carbon nanostructures is attributed to carbon dangling bonds or vacancies. This provides opportunities to develop new functional materials, such as molecular and polymeric ferromagnets and organic spintronic materials, without magnetic elements (for example, 3d and 4f metals). Here we report the observation of room temperature ferromagnetism in Teflon tape (polytetrafluoroethylene) subjected to simple mechanical stretching, cutting or heating. First-principles calculations indicate that the room temperature ferromagnetism originates from carbon dangling bonds and strong ferromagnetic coupling between them. Room temperature ferromagnetism has also been successfully realized in another polymer, polyethylene, through cutting and stretching. Our findings suggest that ferromagnetism due to networks of carbon dangling bonds can arise in polymers and carbon-based molecular materials.

  6. Bulk nuclear polarization enhanced at room temperature by optical pumping.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Ran; Bretschneider, Christian O; London, Paz; Budker, Dmitry; Gershoni, David; Frydman, Lucio

    2013-08-01

    Bulk (13)C polarization can be strongly enhanced in diamond at room temperature based on the optical pumping of nitrogen-vacancy color centers. This effect was confirmed by irradiating single crystals at a ~50 mT field promoting anticrossings between electronic excited-state levels, followed by shuttling of the sample into an NMR setup and by subsequent (13)C detection. A nuclear polarization of ~0.5%--equivalent to the (13)C polarization achievable by thermal polarization at room temperature at fields of ~2000 T--was measured, and its bulk nature determined based on line shape and relaxation measurements. Positive and negative enhanced polarizations were obtained, with a generally complex but predictable dependence on the magnetic field during optical pumping. Owing to its simplicity, this (13)C room temperature polarizing strategy provides a promising new addition to existing nuclear hyperpolarization techniques. PMID:23952444

  7. Giant room-temperature elastocaloric effect in ferroelectric ultrathin films.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Infante, Ingrid C; Lou, Xiaojie; Bellaiche, Laurent; Scott, James F; Dkhil, Brahim

    2014-09-17

    Environmentally friendly ultrathin BaTiO3 capacitors can exhibit a giant stress-induced elastocaloric effect without hysteresis loss or Joule heating. By combining this novel elastocaloric effect with the intrinsic electrocaloric effect, an ideal refrigeration cycle with high performance (temperature change over 10 K with a wide working-temperature window of 60 K) at room temperature is proposed for future cooling applications. PMID:25042767

  8. Nanostructured Materials for Room-Temperature Gas Sensors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Liu, Xianghong; Neri, Giovanni; Pinna, Nicola

    2016-02-01

    Sensor technology has an important effect on many aspects in our society, and has gained much progress, propelled by the development of nanoscience and nanotechnology. Current research efforts are directed toward developing high-performance gas sensors with low operating temperature at low fabrication costs. A gas sensor working at room temperature is very appealing as it provides very low power consumption and does not require a heater for high-temperature operation, and hence simplifies the fabrication of sensor devices and reduces the operating cost. Nanostructured materials are at the core of the development of any room-temperature sensing platform. The most important advances with regard to fundamental research, sensing mechanisms, and application of nanostructured materials for room-temperature conductometric sensor devices are reviewed here. Particular emphasis is given to the relation between the nanostructure and sensor properties in an attempt to address structure-property correlations. Finally, some future research perspectives and new challenges that the field of room-temperature sensors will have to address are also discussed. PMID:26662346

  9. Electron spin coherence near room temperature in magnetic quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Moro, Fabrizio; Turyanska, Lyudmila; Wilman, James; Fielding, Alistair J; Fay, Michael W; Granwehr, Josef; Patanè, Amalia

    2015-01-01

    We report on an example of confined magnetic ions with long spin coherence near room temperature. This was achieved by confining single Mn(2+) spins in colloidal semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) and by dispersing the QDs in a proton-spin free matrix. The controlled suppression of Mn-Mn interactions and minimization of Mn-nuclear spin dipolar interactions result in unprecedentedly long phase memory (TM ~ 8 μs) and spin-lattice relaxation (T1 ~ 10 ms) time constants for Mn(2+) ions at T = 4.5 K, and in electron spin coherence observable near room temperature (TM ~ 1 μs). PMID:26040432

  10. Trace vapour detection at room temperature using Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chou, Alison; Radi, Babak; Jaatinen, Esa; Juodkazis, Saulius; Fredericks, Peter M

    2014-04-21

    A miniaturized flow-through system consisting of a gold coated silicon substrate based on enhanced Raman spectroscopy has been used to study the detection of vapour from model explosive compounds. The measurements show that the detectability of the vapour molecules at room temperature depends sensitively on the interaction between the molecule and the substrate. The results highlight the capability of a flow system combined with Raman spectroscopy for detecting low vapour pressure compounds with a limit of detection of 0.2 ppb as demonstrated by the detection of bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate, a common polymer additive emitted from a commercial polyvinyl chloride (PVC) tubing at room temperature. PMID:24588003

  11. Ether-based nonflammable electrolyte for room temperature sodium battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jinkui; Zhang, Zhen; Li, Lifei; Yang, Jian; Xiong, Shenglin; Qian, Yitai

    2015-06-01

    Safety problem is one of the key points that hinder the development of room temperature sodium batteries. In this paper, four well-known nonflammable organic compounds, Trimethyl Phosphate (TMP), Tri(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl) phosphite (TFEP), Dimethyl Methylphosphonate (DMMP), Methyl nonafluorobuyl Ether (MFE), are investigated as nonflammable solvents in sodium batteries for the first time. Among them, MFE is stable towards sodium metal at room temperature. The electrochemical properties and electrode compatibility of MFE based electrolyte are investigated. Both Prussian blue cathode and carbon nanotube anode show good electrochemical performance retention in this electrolyte. The results suggest that MFE is a promising option as nonflammable electrolyte additive for sodium batteries.

  12. Efficient room-temperature Spin Hall nano-oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zholud, Andrei; Urazhdin, Sergei

    2014-03-01

    Spin current injected into a ferromagnet exerts a spin torque on the magnetization, modifying its dynamical damping. Complete compensation of damping by spin current can result in magnetization auto-oscillations, as was demonstrated for in-plane point-contact spin Hall oscillator devices utilizing Pt spin Hall material as a source of spin current and permalloy (Py) as active magnetic layer. Electronic spectroscopy has demonstrated microwave generation by oscillations of magnetization at cryogenic temperatures, but this microwave generation decreases with increasing temperature and disappears at room temperature. We will describe a new device geometry that decouples spin transport from the magnetic configuration by separate patterning of the spin Hall Pt layer and the active Py layer. We demonstrate that this device geometry can operate at smaller driving dc currents for microwave generation that persists up to room temperature. We discuss the physical mechanisms that affect the temperature- and geometry-dependent performance of spin Hall nano-oscillators.

  13. Room-Temperature-Cured Copolymers for Lithium Battery Gel Electrolytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B.; Tigelaar, Dean M.

    2009-01-01

    Polyimide-PEO copolymers (PEO signifies polyethylene oxide) that have branched rod-coil molecular structures and that can be cured into film form at room temperature have been invented for use as gel electrolytes for lithium-ion electric-power cells. These copolymers offer an alternative to previously patented branched rod-coil polyimides that have been considered for use as polymer electrolytes and that must be cured at a temperature of 200 C. In order to obtain sufficient conductivity for lithium ions in practical applications at and below room temperature, it is necessary to imbibe such a polymer with a suitable carbonate solvent or ionic liquid, but the high-temperature cure makes it impossible to incorporate and retain such a liquid within the polymer molecular framework. By eliminating the high-temperature cure, the present invention makes it possible to incorporate the required liquid.

  14. Room temperature ferromagnetic (Fe₁-xCox)₃BO₅ nanorods.

    PubMed

    He, Shuli; Zhang, Hongwang; Xing, Hui; Li, Kai; Cui, Hongfei; Yang, Chenguang; Sun, Shouheng; Zeng, Hao

    2014-07-01

    Cobalt-doped ferroferriborate ((Fe1-xCox)3BO5) nanorods (NRs) are synthesized by a one-pot high-temperature organic-solution-phase method. The aspect ratios of the NRs are tuned by the heating rate. These NRs form via anisotropic growth along twin boundaries of the multiply twinned nuclei. Magnetic properties are dramatically modified by Co substitutional doping, changing from antiferromagnetic order at low temperatures to ferromagnetic above room temperature, with a greatly enhanced magnetic ordering temperature. These anisotropic ferromagnetic NRs with a high ordering temperature may provide a new platform for understanding nanomagnetism and for magnetic applications. PMID:24905634

  15. Protocols for dry DNA storage and shipment at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Ivanova, Natalia V; Kuzmina, Masha L

    2013-01-01

    The globalization of DNA barcoding will require core analytical facilities to develop cost-effective, efficient protocols for the shipment and archival storage of DNA extracts and PCR products. We evaluated three dry-state DNA stabilization systems: commercial Biomatrica® DNAstable® plates, home-made trehalose and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) plates on 96-well panels of insect DNA stored at 56 °C and at room temperature. Controls included unprotected samples that were stored dry at room temperature and at 56 °C, and diluted samples held at 4 °C and at −20 °C. PCR and selective sequencing were performed over a 4-year interval to test the condition of DNA extracts. Biomatrica® provided better protection of DNA at 56 °C and at room temperature than trehalose and PVA, especially for diluted samples. PVA was the second best protectant after Biomatrica® at room temperature, whereas trehalose was the second best protectant at 56 °C. In spite of lower PCR success, the DNA stored at −20 °C yielded longer sequence reads and stronger signal, indicating that temperature is a crucial factor for DNA quality which has to be considered especially for long-term storage. Although it is premature to advocate a transition to DNA storage at room temperature, dry storage provides an additional layer of security for frozen samples, protecting them from degradation in the event of freezer failure. All three forms of DNA preservation enable shipment of dry DNA and PCR products between barcoding facilities. PMID:23789643

  16. Room-temperature ferromagnetism in thin films of LaMnO3 deposited by a chemical method over large areas.

    PubMed

    Vila-Fungueiriño, José Manuel; Rivas-Murias, Beatriz; Rodríguez-González, Benito; Txoperena, O; Ciudad, D; Hueso, Luis E; Lazzari, Massimo; Rivadulla, Francisco

    2015-03-11

    Hole-doping into the Mott insulator LaMnO3 results in a very rich magneto-electric phase diagram, including colossal magnetoresistance and different types of charge and orbital ordering. On the other hand, LaMnO3 presents an important catalytic activity for oxygen reduction, which is fundamental for increasing the efficiency of solid-oxide fuel cells and other energy-conversion devices. In this work, we report the chemical solution (water-based) synthesis of high-quality epitaxial thin films of LaMnO3, free of defects at square-centimeter scales, and compatible with standard microfabrication techniques. The films show a robust ferromagnetic moment and large magnetoresistance at room temperature. Through a comparison with films grown by pulsed laser deposition, we show that the quasi-equilibrium growth conditions characteristic of this chemical process can be exploited to tune new functionalities of the material. PMID:25667996

  17. Magnetoresistance of a Low-k Dielectric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGowan, Brian Thomas

    Low-k dielectrics have been incorporated into advanced computer chip technologies as a part of the continuous effort to improve computer chip performance. One drawback associated with the implementation of low-k dielectrics is the large leakage current which conducts through the material, relative to silica. Another drawback is that the breakdown voltage of low-k dielectrics is low, relative to silica [1]. This low breakdown voltage makes accurate reliability assessment of the failure mode time dependent dielectric breakdown (TDDB) in low-k dielectrics critical for the successful implementation of these materials. The accuracy with which one can assess this reliability is currently a topic of debate. These material drawbacks have motivated the present work which aims both to contribute to the understanding of electronic conduction mechanisms in low-k dielectrics, and to improve the ability to experimentally characterize changes which occur within the material prior to TDDB failure. What follows is a study of the influence of an applied magnetic field on the conductivity of a low-k dielectric, or in other words, a study of the material's magnetoresistance. This study shows that low-k dielectrics used as intra-level dielectrics exhibit a relatively large negative magnetoresistance effect (˜2%) at room temperature and with modest applied magnetic fields (˜100 Oe). The magnetoresistance is attributed to the spin dependence of trapping electrons from the conduction band into localized electronic sites. Mixing of two-electron spin states via interactions between electron spins and the the spins of hydrogen nuclei is suppressed by an applied magnetic field. As a result, the rate of trapping is reduced, and the conductivity of the material increases. This study further demonstrates that the magnitude of the magnetoresistance changes as a function of time subjected to electrical bias and temperature stress. The rate that the magnetoresistance changes correlates to the

  18. SPRAY: Single Donor Plasma Product For Room Temperature Storage

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Garrett S.; Lozier, Jay N.; Nghiem, Khanh; Clibourn, Douglas; Klein, Harvey G.; Flegel, Willy A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Spray drying techniques are commonly utilized in the pharmaceutical, dairy and animal feed industries for processing liquids into powders but have not been applied to human blood products. Spray dried protein products are known to maintain stability during storage at room temperature. Study design and methods Plasma units collected at the donor facility were shipped overnight at room temperature to a processing facility where single-use spray drying occurred. After 48 hours storage at room temperature, the spray dried plasma product was split in two and rehydrated with 1.5% glycine or deionized water and assayed for chemistry analytes and coagulation factors. Matched fresh frozen plasma (FFP) was analyzed in parallel as controls. Results Reconstitution was achieved for both rehydration groups within five minutes (n=6). There was no statistically significant intergroup difference in recovery for total protein, albumin, IgG, IgA, and IgM (96% or higher). With the exception of factor VIII (58%), the recovery of clotting factors in the glycine reconstituted products ranged from 72% to 93%. Glycine reconstitution was superior to deionized water. Conclusion We documented proteins and coagulation activities were recovered in physiologic quantities in reconstituted spray dried plasma products. Further optimization of the spray drying method and reconstitution fluid may result in even better recoveries. Spray drying is a promising technique for preparing human plasma that can be easily stored at room temperature, shipped, and reconstituted. Rapid reconstitution of the microparticles results in a novel plasma product from single donors. PMID:22043873

  19. Reductions of aryl bromides in water at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Fennewald, James C.; Landstrom, Evan B.; Lipshutz, Bruce H.

    2015-01-01

    Micellar nanoreactors derived from commercially available ‘Nok’ (SPGS-550-M), in the presence of Fu’s catalyst and a mild hydride source (NaBH4), are useful for facile debromination of functionalized aromatic derivatives. This mild and environemntally responsible process is utlized in water at room temperature, and the reaction mixtures can be smoothly recycled. PMID:26273116

  20. Coherent population trapping in a crystalline solid at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesov, Roman

    2005-11-01

    Observation of coherent population trapping (CPT) at ground-state Zeeman sublevels of Cr3+ ion in ruby at room temperature is reported. A mechanism of CPT, not owing to optical pumping, is revealed in a situation when the optical pulse duration is shorter than the population decay time from the excited optical state.

  1. Room-Temperature Ionic Liquids for Electrochemical Capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fireman, Heather; Yowell, Leonard; Moloney, Padraig G.; Arepalli, Sivaram; Nikolaev, P.; Huffman, C.; Ready, Jud; Higgins, C.D.; Turano, S. P.; Kohl, P.A.; Kim, K.

    2009-01-01

    A document discusses room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) used as electrolytes in carbon-nanotube-based, electrochemical, double-layer capacitors. Unlike the previous electrolyte (EtNB4 in acetonitrile), the RTIL used here does not produce cyanide upon thermal decomposition and does not have a moisture sensitivity.

  2. Required Be Capsule Strength For Room Temperature Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, B

    2005-03-21

    The purpose of this memo is to lay out the criteria for the Be capsule strength necessary for room temperature transport. Ultimately we will test full thickness capsules by sealing high pressures inside, but currently we are limited to both thinner capsules and alternative measures of capsule material strength.

  3. Diluted magnetic semiconductor nanowires exhibiting magnetoresistance

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Peidong; Choi, Heonjin; Lee, Sangkwon; He, Rongrui; Zhang, Yanfeng; Kuykendal, Tevye; Pauzauskie, Peter

    2011-08-23

    A method for is disclosed for fabricating diluted magnetic semiconductor (DMS) nanowires by providing a catalyst-coated substrate and subjecting at least a portion of the substrate to a semiconductor, and dopant via chloride-based vapor transport to synthesize the nanowires. Using this novel chloride-based chemical vapor transport process, single crystalline diluted magnetic semiconductor nanowires Ga.sub.1-xMn.sub.xN (x=0.07) were synthesized. The nanowires, which have diameters of .about.10 nm to 100 nm and lengths of up to tens of micrometers, show ferromagnetism with Curie temperature above room temperature, and magnetoresistance up to 250 Kelvin.

  4. Evaluation of Ceramic Honeycomb Core Compression Behavior at Room Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bird, Richard K.; Lapointe, Thomas S.

    2013-01-01

    Room temperature flatwise compression tests were conducted on two varieties of ceramic honeycomb core specimens that have potential for high-temperature structural applications. One set of specimens was fabricated using strips of a commercially-available thin-gage "ceramic paper" sheet molded into a hexagonal core configuration. The other set was fabricated by machining honeycomb core directly from a commercially available rigid insulation tile material. This paper summarizes the results from these tests.

  5. Mechanical Resonators for Quantum Optomechanics Experiments at Room Temperature.

    PubMed

    Norte, R A; Moura, J P; Gröblacher, S

    2016-04-01

    All quantum optomechanics experiments to date operate at cryogenic temperatures, imposing severe technical challenges and fundamental constraints. Here, we present a novel design of on-chip mechanical resonators which exhibit fundamental modes with frequencies f and mechanical quality factors Q_{m} sufficient to enter the optomechanical quantum regime at room temperature. We overcome previous limitations by designing ultrathin, high-stress silicon nitride (Si_{3}N_{4}) membranes, with tensile stress in the resonators' clamps close to the ultimate yield strength of the material. By patterning a photonic crystal on the SiN membranes, we observe reflectivities greater than 99%. These on-chip resonators have remarkably low mechanical dissipation, with Q_{m}∼10^{8}, while at the same time exhibiting large reflectivities. This makes them a unique platform for experiments towards the observation of massive quantum behavior at room temperature. PMID:27104723

  6. Mechanical Resonators for Quantum Optomechanics Experiments at Room Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norte, R. A.; Moura, J. P.; Gröblacher, S.

    2016-04-01

    All quantum optomechanics experiments to date operate at cryogenic temperatures, imposing severe technical challenges and fundamental constraints. Here, we present a novel design of on-chip mechanical resonators which exhibit fundamental modes with frequencies f and mechanical quality factors Qm sufficient to enter the optomechanical quantum regime at room temperature. We overcome previous limitations by designing ultrathin, high-stress silicon nitride (Si3 N4 ) membranes, with tensile stress in the resonators' clamps close to the ultimate yield strength of the material. By patterning a photonic crystal on the SiN membranes, we observe reflectivities greater than 99%. These on-chip resonators have remarkably low mechanical dissipation, with Qm˜108, while at the same time exhibiting large reflectivities. This makes them a unique platform for experiments towards the observation of massive quantum behavior at room temperature.

  7. Room-temperature magnetoelectric multiferroic thin films and applications thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Katiyar, Ram S; Kuman, Ashok; Scott, James F.

    2014-08-12

    The invention provides a novel class of room-temperature, single-phase, magnetoelectric multiferroic (PbFe.sub.0.67W.sub.0.33O.sub.3).sub.x (PbZr.sub.0.53Ti.sub.0.47O.sub.3).sub.1-x (0.2.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.0.8) (PFW.sub.x-PZT.sub.1-x) thin films that exhibit high dielectric constants, high polarization, weak saturation magnetization, broad dielectric temperature peak, high-frequency dispersion, low dielectric loss and low leakage current. These properties render them to be suitable candidates for room-temperature multiferroic devices. Methods of preparation are also provided.

  8. Atom inlays performed at room temperature using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, Yoshiaki; Abe, Masayuki; Hirayama, Shinji; Oyabu, Noriaki; Custance, Óscar; Morita, Seizo

    2005-02-01

    The ability to manipulate single atoms and molecules laterally for creating artificial structures on surfaces is driving us closer to the ultimate limit of two-dimensional nanoengineering. However, experiments involving this level of manipulation have been performed only at cryogenic temperatures. Scanning tunnelling microscopy has proved, so far, to be a unique tool with all the necessary capabilities for laterally pushing, pulling or sliding single atoms and molecules, and arranging them on a surface at will. Here we demonstrate, for the first time, that it is possible to perform well-controlled lateral manipulations of single atoms using near-contact atomic force microscopy even at room temperature. We report the creation of 'atom inlays', that is, artificial atomic patterns formed from a few embedded atoms in the plane of a surface. At room temperature, such atomic structures remain stable on the surface for relatively long periods of time.

  9. Room Temperature Characterization of a Magnetic Bearing for Turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montague, Gerald; Jansen, Mark; Provenza, Andrew; Jansen, Ralph; Ebihara, Ben; Palazzolo, Alan

    2002-01-01

    Open loop, experimental force and power measurements of a three-axis, radial, heteropolar magnetic bearing at room temperature for rotor speeds up to 20,000 RPM are presented in this paper. The bearing, NASA Glenn Research Center's and Texas A&M's third generation high temperature magnetic bearing, was designed to operate in a 1000 F (540 C) environment and was primarily optimized for maximum load capacity. The experimentally measured force produced by one C-core of this bearing was 630 lb. (2.8 kN) at 16 A, while a load of 650 lbs (2.89 kN) was predicted at 16 A using 1D circuit analysis. The maximum predicted radial load for one of the three axes is 1,440 lbs (6.41 kN) at room temperature. The maximum measured load of an axis was 1050 lbs. (4.73 kN). Results of test under rotating conditions showed that rotor speed has a negligible effect on the bearing's load capacity. A single C-core required approximately 70 W of power to generate 300 lb (1.34 kN) of magnetic force. The room temperature data presented was measured after three thermal cycles up to 1000 F (540 C), totaling six hours at elevated temperatures.

  10. Ultra-broadband and high-responsive photodetectors based on bismuth film at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, J. D.; Shao, J. M.; Yang, G. W.

    2015-07-01

    Bismuth (Bi) has undergone researches for dozens of years on account of its abundant physics including the remarkably high mobility, exceptional large positive magnetoresistance and the coexistence of an insulating interior as well as metallic surfaces. Very recently, two-dimensional topologically-protected surface states immune to nonmagnetic perturbation such as surface oxidation and impurity scattering were experimentally demonstrated through systematic magnetotransport measurements, e.g. weak antilocalization effect and angular dependent Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations. Such robust metallic surface states, which are efficient in carrier transportation, along with its small bulk gap (14 meV) make Bi favored for high-responsive broadband photodetection. Here, we for the first time demonstrate the stable ultra-broadband photoresponse from 370 nm to 1550 nm with good reproducibility at room temperature based on a Bi photodetector. The fabricated device’s responsivity approaches 250 mA/W, accompanied with a rise time of 0.9 s and a decay time of 1.9 s. The photocurrent is linear dependent on the voltage and incident power, offering good tunability for multi-purpose applications. Thickness-dependent conductance and photocurrent reveal that the bulk is the optically active layer while the surface channel is responsible for carrier transportation. These findings pave an avenue to develop ultra-broadband Bi photodetectors for the next-generation multifunctional optoelectronic devices.

  11. Ultra-broadband and high-responsive photodetectors based on bismuth film at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Yao, J. D.; Shao, J. M.; Yang, G. W.

    2015-01-01

    Bismuth (Bi) has undergone researches for dozens of years on account of its abundant physics including the remarkably high mobility, exceptional large positive magnetoresistance and the coexistence of an insulating interior as well as metallic surfaces. Very recently, two-dimensional topologically-protected surface states immune to nonmagnetic perturbation such as surface oxidation and impurity scattering were experimentally demonstrated through systematic magnetotransport measurements, e.g. weak antilocalization effect and angular dependent Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations. Such robust metallic surface states, which are efficient in carrier transportation, along with its small bulk gap (14 meV) make Bi favored for high-responsive broadband photodetection. Here, we for the first time demonstrate the stable ultra-broadband photoresponse from 370 nm to 1550 nm with good reproducibility at room temperature based on a Bi photodetector. The fabricated device’s responsivity approaches 250 mA/W, accompanied with a rise time of 0.9 s and a decay time of 1.9 s. The photocurrent is linear dependent on the voltage and incident power, offering good tunability for multi-purpose applications. Thickness-dependent conductance and photocurrent reveal that the bulk is the optically active layer while the surface channel is responsible for carrier transportation. These findings pave an avenue to develop ultra-broadband Bi photodetectors for the next-generation multifunctional optoelectronic devices. PMID:26197433

  12. Room-Temperature Deposition of NbN Superconducting Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thakoor, S.; Lamb, J. L.; Thakoor, A. P.; Khanna, S. K.

    1986-01-01

    Films with high superconducting transition temperatures deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering. Since deposition process does not involve significantly high substrate temperatures, employed to deposit counter electrode in superconductor/insulator/superconductor junction without causing any thermal or mechanical degradation of underlying delicate tunneling barrier. Substrates for room-temperature deposition of NbN polymeric or coated with photoresist, making films accessible to conventional lithographic patterning techniques. Further refinements in deposition technique yield films with smaller transition widths, Tc of which might approach predicted value of 18 K.

  13. Room temperature giant magnetoimpedance in polycrystalline La0.75Ba0.25MnO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Pawan; Rubi, Km; Mahendiran, R.

    2016-05-01

    We report the magnetic field dependence of electrical impedance Z in polycrystalline La0.75Ba0.25MnO3 a function of frequency from f = 1 MHz to 1 GHz at room temperature. The magnetoimpedance [MI = ΔZ/Z(0) where ΔZ = Z(H)-Z(0)] is -37.5 % (-58.5%) at 1(10) MHz for H = 1.2 kOe, which far exceeds mere -1.15% dc magnetoresistance. As f increases above 10 MHz, MI decreases in magnitude and changes sign from negative to positive. The change in sign of MI results from the transition of a single peak at H = 0 to two peaks at H = ± Hp accompanied by a minimum at the origin. Hp shifts towards higher field with increasing frequency. The occurrence of giant radio-frequency magnetoimpedance is promising for low-field sensor applications.

  14. Room temperature particle detectors based on indium phosphide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yatskiv, R.; Grym, J.; Zdansky, K.; Pekarek, L.

    2010-01-01

    A study of electrical properties and detection performance of particle detectors based on bulk InP and semiconducting LPE layers operated at room temperature is presented. Bulk detectors were fabricated on semi-insulating InP crystals grown by liquid-encapsulated Czochralski (LEC) technique. High purity InP layers of both n- and p-type conductivity were used to fabricate detector structures with p-n junction. The detection performance of particle detectors was measured by pulse-height spectra with alpha particles emitted from 241Am source at room temperature. Better noise properties were achieved for detectors with p-n junctions due to better quality contacts on p-type layers.

  15. Outrunning free radicals in room-temperature macromolecular crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Owen, Robin L.; Axford, Danny; Nettleship, Joanne E.; Owens, Raymond J.; Robinson, James I.; Morgan, Ann W.; Doré, Andrew S.; Lebon, Guillaume; Tate, Christopher G.; Fry, Elizabeth E.; Ren, Jingshan; Stuart, David I.; Evans, Gwyndaf

    2012-01-01

    A significant increase in the lifetime of room-temperature macromolecular crystals is reported through the use of a high-brilliance X-ray beam, reduced exposure times and a fast-readout detector. This is attributed to the ability to collect diffraction data before hydroxyl radicals can propagate through the crystal, fatally disrupting the lattice. Hydroxyl radicals are shown to be trapped in amorphous solutions at 100 K. The trend in crystal lifetime was observed in crystals of a soluble protein (immunoglobulin γ Fc receptor IIIa), a virus (bovine enterovirus serotype 2) and a membrane protein (human A2A adenosine G-protein coupled receptor). The observation of a similar effect in all three systems provides clear evidence for a common optimal strategy for room-temperature data collection and will inform the design of future synchrotron beamlines and detectors for macro­molecular crystallography. PMID:22751666

  16. Enhanced magnetic Purcell effect in room-temperature masers

    PubMed Central

    Breeze, Jonathan; Tan, Ke-Jie; Richards, Benjamin; Sathian, Juna; Oxborrow, Mark; Alford, Neil McN

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the world’s first room-temperature maser was demonstrated. The maser consisted of a sapphire ring housing a crystal of pentacene-doped p-terphenyl, pumped by a pulsed rhodamine-dye laser. Stimulated emission of microwaves was aided by the high quality factor and small magnetic mode volume of the maser cavity yet the peak optical pumping power was 1.4 kW. Here we report dramatic miniaturization and 2 orders of magnitude reduction in optical pumping power for a room-temperature maser by coupling a strontium titanate resonator with the spin-polarized population inversion provided by triplet states in an optically excited pentacene-doped p-terphenyl crystal. We observe maser emission in a thimble-sized resonator using a xenon flash lamp as an optical pump source with peak optical power of 70 W. This is a significant step towards the goal of continuous maser operation. PMID:25698634

  17. Single-electron tunneling at room temperature in cobalt nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, H.; Vancea, J.; Hoffmann, H.

    2002-02-01

    We report on the observation of the Coulomb blockade with Coulomb staircases at room temperature in cobalt nanoparticles, with sizes ranging between 1 and 4 nm. A monolayer of these particles is supported by a thin 1-2 nm thick Al2O3 film, deposited on a smooth Au(111) surface. The local electrical transport on isolated Co clusters was investigated with a scanning tunneling microscope (STM). The tunnel contact of the STM tip allowed us to observe single-electron tunneling in the double barrier system STM-tip/Co/Al2O3/Au. Very high values of the Coulomb blockade of up to 1.0 V were reproducibly measured at room temperature on different particles with this setup. The current-voltage characteristics fit well by simulations based on the orthodox theory of single-electron tunneling.

  18. Stability of blood gases in ice and at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Liss, H P; Payne, C P

    1993-04-01

    Arterial blood samples from 75 patients were analyzed for PO2, PCO2, and pH at 0, 15, and 30 min. After the baseline analysis, 60 samples were kept in ice while 59 samples were left at room temperature. There was a statistically significant increase in the PO2 at 15 min and again at 30 min in both groups. There was a statistically significant decrease in the PCO2 at 15 min in both groups. There were no further changes in the PCO2 at 30 min in either group. There was a statistically significant decrease in the pH at 15 min in both groups. There was a further statistically significant decrease in the pH at 30 min in the group of blood samples left at room temperature but not in those in ice. There is no reason to keep arterial blood in ice if blood gas analysis is done within 30 min. PMID:8131450

  19. Room temperature hyperpolarization of nuclear spins in bulk

    PubMed Central

    Tateishi, Kenichiro; Negoro, Makoto; Nishida, Shinsuke; Kagawa, Akinori; Morita, Yasushi; Kitagawa, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), a means of transferring spin polarization from electrons to nuclei, can enhance the nuclear spin polarization (hence the NMR sensitivity) in bulk materials at most 660 times for 1H spins, using electron spins in thermal equilibrium as polarizing agents. By using electron spins in photo-excited triplet states instead, DNP can overcome the above limit. We demonstrate a 1H spin polarization of 34%, which gives an enhancement factor of 250,000 in 0.40 T, while maintaining a bulk sample (∼0.6 mg, ∼0.7 × 0.7 × 1 mm3) containing >1019 1H spins at room temperature. Room temperature hyperpolarization achieved with DNP using photo-excited triplet electrons has potentials to be applied to a wide range of fields, including NMR spectroscopy and MRI as well as fundamental physics. PMID:24821773

  20. Enhanced magnetic Purcell effect in room-temperature masers.

    PubMed

    Breeze, Jonathan; Tan, Ke-Jie; Richards, Benjamin; Sathian, Juna; Oxborrow, Mark; Alford, Neil McN

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the world's first room-temperature maser was demonstrated. The maser consisted of a sapphire ring housing a crystal of pentacene-doped p-terphenyl, pumped by a pulsed rhodamine-dye laser. Stimulated emission of microwaves was aided by the high quality factor and small magnetic mode volume of the maser cavity yet the peak optical pumping power was 1.4 kW. Here we report dramatic miniaturization and 2 orders of magnitude reduction in optical pumping power for a room-temperature maser by coupling a strontium titanate resonator with the spin-polarized population inversion provided by triplet states in an optically excited pentacene-doped p-terphenyl crystal. We observe maser emission in a thimble-sized resonator using a xenon flash lamp as an optical pump source with peak optical power of 70 W. This is a significant step towards the goal of continuous maser operation. PMID:25698634

  1. Disorder-induced Room Temperature Ferromagnetism in Glassy Chromites

    PubMed Central

    Araujo, C. Moyses; Nagar, Sandeep; Ramzan, Muhammad; Shukla, R.; Jayakumar, O. D.; Tyagi, A. K.; Liu, Yi-Sheng; Chen, Jeng-Lung; Glans, Per-Anders; Chang, Chinglin; Blomqvist, Andreas; Lizárraga, Raquel; Holmström, Erik; Belova, Lyubov; Guo, Jinghua; Ahuja, Rajeev; Rao, K. V.

    2014-01-01

    We report an unusual robust ferromagnetic order above room temperature upon amorphization of perovskite [YCrO3] in pulsed laser deposited thin films. This is contrary to the usual expected formation of a spin glass magnetic state in the resulting disordered structure. To understand the underlying physics of this phenomenon, we combine advanced spectroscopic techniques and first-principles calculations. We find that the observed order-disorder transformation is accompanied by an insulator-metal transition arising from a wide distribution of Cr-O-Cr bond angles and the consequent metallization through free carriers. Similar results also found in YbCrO3-films suggest that the observed phenomenon is more general and should, in principle, apply to a wider range of oxide systems. The ability to tailor ferromagnetic order above room temperature in oxide materials opens up many possibilities for novel technological applications of this counter intuitive effect. PMID:24732685

  2. Primary and secondary room temperature molten salt electrochemical cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, G. F.; Dymek, C. J., Jr.

    1985-07-01

    Three novel primary cells which use room temperature molten salt electrolytes are examined and found to have high open circuit potentials in the 1.75-2.19 V range, by comparison with the Al/AlCl3-MEICl concentration cell; their cathodes were of FeCl3-MEICl, WCl6-MEICl, and Br2/reticulated vitreous carbon together with Pt. Also, secondary electrochemical cell candidates were examined which combined the reversible Al/AlCl3-MEICl electrode with reversible zinc and cadmium molten salt electrodes to yield open circuit potentials of about 0.7 and 1.0 V, respectively. Room temperature molten salts' half-cell reduction potentials are given.

  3. Electron spin coherence near room temperature in magnetic quantum dots

    PubMed Central

    Moro, Fabrizio; Turyanska, Lyudmila; Wilman, James; Fielding, Alistair J.; Fay, Michael W.; Granwehr, Josef; Patanè, Amalia

    2015-01-01

    We report on an example of confined magnetic ions with long spin coherence near room temperature. This was achieved by confining single Mn2+ spins in colloidal semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) and by dispersing the QDs in a proton-spin free matrix. The controlled suppression of Mn–Mn interactions and minimization of Mn–nuclear spin dipolar interactions result in unprecedentedly long phase memory (TM ~ 8 μs) and spin–lattice relaxation (T1 ~ 10 ms) time constants for Mn2+ ions at T = 4.5 K, and in electron spin coherence observable near room temperature (TM ~ 1 μs). PMID:26040432

  4. Room Temperature Creep Of SiC/SiC Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morscher, Gregory N.; Gyekenyesi, Andrew; Levine, Stanley (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    During a recent experimental study, time dependent deformation was observed for a damaged Hi-Nicalon reinforced, BN interphase, chemically vapor infiltrated SiC matrix composites subjected to static loading at room temperature. The static load curves resembled primary creep curves. In addition, acoustic emission was monitored during the test and significant AE activity was recorded while maintaining a constant load, which suggested matrix cracking or interfacial sliding. For similar composites with carbon interphases, little or no time dependent deformation was observed. Evidently, exposure of the BN interphase to the ambient environment resulted in a reduction in the interfacial mechanical properties, i.e. interfacial shear strength and/or debond energy. These results were in qualitative agreement with observations made by Eldridge of a reduction in interfacial shear stress with time at room temperature as measured by fiber push-in experiments.

  5. Mercuric iodine room temperature gamma-ray detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patt, Bradley E.; Markakis, Jeffrey M.; Gerrish, Vernon M.; Haymes, Robert C.; Trombka, Jacob I.

    1990-01-01

    high resolution mercuric iodide room temperature gamma-ray detectors have excellent potential as an essential component of space instruments to be used for high energy astrophysics. Mercuric iodide detectors are being developed both as photodetectors used in combination with scintillation crystals to detect gamma-rays, and as direct gamma-ray detectors. These detectors are highly radiation damage resistant. The list of applications includes gamma-ray burst detection, gamma-ray line astronomy, solar flare studies, and elemental analysis.

  6. Nonlinear nanochannels for room temperature terahertz heterodyne detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, Jeremie; Nouvel, Philippe; Penot, Alexandre; Varani, Luca; Sangaré, Paul; Grimbert, Bertrand; Faucher, Marc; Ducournau, Guillaume; Gaquière, Christophe; Iñiguez-de-la-Torre, Ignacio; Mateos, Javier; Gonzalez, Tomas

    2013-12-01

    The potentialities of AlGaN/GaN nanochannels with broken symmetry (also called self-switching diodes) as direct and heterodyne THz detectors are analyzed. The operation of the devices in the free space heterodyne detection scheme have been measured at room temperature with RF up to 0.32 THz and explained as a result of high-frequency nonlinearities using Monte Carlo simulations. Intermediate-frequency bandwidth of 40 GHz is obtained.

  7. Room-temperature Formation of Hollow Cu2O Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, Ling-I; Tsung, Chia-Kuang; Huang, Wenyu; Yang, Peidong

    2010-01-18

    Monodisperse Cu and Cu2O nanoparticles (NPs) are synthesized using tetradecylphosphonic acid as a capping agent. Dispersing the NPs in chloroform and hexane at room temperature results in the formation of hollow Cu2O NPs and Cu@Cu2O core/shell NPs, respectively. The monodisperse Cu2O NPs are used to fabricate hybrid solar cells with efficiency of 0.14percent under AM 1.5 and 1 Sun illumination.

  8. Spontaneous Polarization Buildup in a Room-Temperature Polariton Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Baumberg, J. J.; Christopoulos, S.; Kavokin, A. V.; Grundy, A. J. D.; Baldassarri Hoeger von Hoegersthal, G.; Butte, R.; Christmann, G.; Feltin, E.; Carlin, J.-F.; Grandjean, N.; Solnyshkov, D. D.; Malpuech, G.

    2008-09-26

    We observe the buildup of strong ({approx}50%) spontaneous vector polarization in emission from a GaN-based polariton laser excited by short optical pulses at room temperature. The Stokes vector of emitted light changes its orientation randomly from one excitation pulse to another, so that the time-integrated polarization remains zero. This behavior is completely different from any previous laser. We interpret this observation in terms of the spontaneous symmetry breaking in a Bose-Einstein condensate of exciton polaritons.

  9. Preparation and Use of a Room-Temperature Catalytic Converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Gareth; Mark, Bernard; Chen, Xijia; Furch, Toran; Singmaster, K. A.; Wagenknecht, Paul S.

    2001-12-01

    A solid-state catalyst that effectively converts a CO/air mixture to CO2 at room temperature is readily prepared. The catalyst, which is composed of metallic gold on iron(III) oxide, is loaded into a simple flow cell to test its catalytic activity. Mixtures of CO and air are run through the catalyst and subsequently analyzed by gas-phase infrared spectroscopy to determine the effectiveness of the catalyst.

  10. Room-temperature direct alkynylation of arenes with copper acetylides.

    PubMed

    Theunissen, Cédric; Evano, Gwilherm

    2014-09-01

    C-H bond in azoles and polyhalogenated arenes can be smoothly activated by copper acetylides to give the corresponding alkynylated (hetero)arenes by simple reaction at room temperature in the presence of phenanthroline and lithium tert-butoxide under an oxygen atmosphere. These stable, unreactive, and readily available polymers act as especially efficient and practical reagents for the introduction of an alkyne group to a wide number of arenes under remarkably mild conditions. PMID:25115357

  11. Room Temperature Hydrosilylation of Silicon Nanocrystals with Bifunctional Terminal Alkenes

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yixuan; Hessel, Colin M.; Bogart, Timothy; Panthani, Matthew G.; Rasch, Michael R.; Korgel, Brian A.

    2013-01-01

    H-terminated Si nanocrystals undergo room temperature hydrosilylation with bifunctional alkenes with distal polar moieties—ethyl-, methyl-ester or carboxylic acids—without the aid of light or added catalyst. The passivated Si nanocrystals exhibit bright photoluminescence (PL) and disperse in polar solvents, including water. We propose a reaction mechanism in which ester or carboxylic acid groups facilitate direct nucleophilic attack of the highly curved Si surface of the nanocrystals by the alkene. PMID:23312033

  12. Observation of Room Temperature Ferromagnetism in InN Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Roul, Basanta; Kumar, Mahesh; Bhat, Thirumaleshwara N; Rajpalke, Mohana K; Krupanidhi, S B; Kumar, Nitesh; Sundaresan, A

    2015-06-01

    The room temperature ferromagnetic behavior of InN nanostructures grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) is explored by means of magnetization measurements. The saturation magnetization and remanent magnetization are found to be strongly dependent on the size of the nanostructures. This suggests that the ferromagnetism is essentially confined to the surface of the nanostructures due to the possible defects. Raman spectroscopy shows the existence of indium vacancies which could be the source of ferromagnetic ordering in InN nanostructures. PMID:26369060

  13. Temperature driven transition from giant to tunneling magneto-resistance in Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/Alq{sub 3}/Co spin Valve: Role of Verwey transition of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, P. Rawat, R.; Potdar, S. R.; Choudhary, R. J.; Banerjee, A.

    2014-05-07

    We demonstrate interface energy level engineering, exploiting the modification in energy band structure across Verwey transition temperature (T{sub V}) of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, in a Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}(111)/Alq{sub 3}/Co spin-valve (SV). I-V characteristics exhibit a transition in conduction mode from carrier injection to tunneling across T{sub V} of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} electrode. Both giant magneto-resistance (GMR) and tunneling MR (TMR) have been observed in a single SV, below and above T{sub V}, respectively. We have achieved room-temperature SV operation in our device. We believe that the tuning of charge gap at Fermi level across T{sub V} resulting in a corresponding tuning of conduction mode and a unique cross over from GMR to TMR.

  14. Bonding of glass microfluidic chips at room temperatures.

    PubMed

    Jia, Zhi-Jian; Fang, Qun; Fang, Zhao-Lun

    2004-09-15

    A simple, room-temperature bonding process was developed for the fabrication of glass microfluidic chips. High-quality bonding with high yields (>95%) was achieved without the requirement of clean room facilities, programmed high-temperature furnaces, pressurized water sources, adhesives, or pressurizing weights. The plates to be bonded were sequentially prewashed with acetone, detergent, high-flow-rate (10-20 m/s) tap water, and absolute ethyl alcohol and were soaked in concentrated sulfuric acid for 8-12 h. The plates were again washed in high-flow-rate tap water for 5 min and, finally, with demineralized water. The plates were bonded by bringing the cleaned surfaces into close contact under a continuous flow of demineralized water and air-dried at room temperature for more than 3 h. This bonding process features simple operation, good smoothness of the plate surface, and high bonding yield. The procedures can be readily applied in any routine laboratory. The bonding strength of glass chips thus produced, measured using a shear force testing procedure, was higher than 6 kg/cm(2). The mechanism for the strong bonding strength is presumably related to the formation of a hydrolyzed layer on the plate surfaces after soaking the substrates in acid or water for extended periods. Microfluidic chips bonded by the above procedure were tested in the CE separation of fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled amino acids. PMID:15362926

  15. Remote control of magnetostriction-based nanocontacts at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Jammalamadaka, S Narayana; Kuntz, Sebastian; Berg, Oliver; Kittler, Wolfram; Kannan, U Mohanan; Chelvane, J Arout; Sürgers, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    The remote control of the electrical conductance through nanosized junctions at room temperature will play an important role in future nano-electromechanical systems and electronic devices. This can be achieved by exploiting the magnetostriction effects of ferromagnetic materials. Here we report on the electrical conductance of magnetic nanocontacts obtained from wires of the giant magnetostrictive compound Tb0.3Dy0.7Fe1.95 as an active element in a mechanically controlled break-junction device. The nanocontacts are reproducibly switched at room temperature between "open" (zero conductance) and "closed" (nonzero conductance) states by variation of a magnetic field applied perpendicularly to the long wire axis. Conductance measurements in a magnetic field oriented parallel to the long wire axis exhibit a different behaviour where the conductance switches between both states only in a limited field range close to the coercive field. Investigating the conductance in the regime of electron tunneling by mechanical or magnetostrictive control of the electrode separation enables an estimation of the magnetostriction. The present results pave the way to utilize the material in devices based on nano-electromechanical systems operating at room temperature. PMID:26323326

  16. Remote control of magnetostriction-based nanocontacts at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jammalamadaka, S. Narayana; Kuntz, Sebastian; Berg, Oliver; Kittler, Wolfram; Kannan, U. Mohanan; Chelvane, J. Arout; Sürgers, Christoph

    2015-09-01

    The remote control of the electrical conductance through nanosized junctions at room temperature will play an important role in future nano-electromechanical systems and electronic devices. This can be achieved by exploiting the magnetostriction effects of ferromagnetic materials. Here we report on the electrical conductance of magnetic nanocontacts obtained from wires of the giant magnetostrictive compound Tb0.3Dy0.7Fe1.95 as an active element in a mechanically controlled break-junction device. The nanocontacts are reproducibly switched at room temperature between “open” (zero conductance) and “closed” (nonzero conductance) states by variation of a magnetic field applied perpendicularly to the long wire axis. Conductance measurements in a magnetic field oriented parallel to the long wire axis exhibit a different behaviour where the conductance switches between both states only in a limited field range close to the coercive field. Investigating the conductance in the regime of electron tunneling by mechanical or magnetostrictive control of the electrode separation enables an estimation of the magnetostriction. The present results pave the way to utilize the material in devices based on nano-electromechanical systems operating at room temperature.

  17. A Na+ Superionic Conductor for Room-Temperature Sodium Batteries

    PubMed Central

    Song, Shufeng; Duong, Hai M.; Korsunsky, Alexander M.; Hu, Ning; Lu, Li

    2016-01-01

    Rechargeable lithium ion batteries have ruled the consumer electronics market for the past 20 years and have great significance in the growing number of electric vehicles and stationary energy storage applications. However, in addition to concerns about electrochemical performance, the limited availability of lithium is gradually becoming an important issue for further continued use and development of lithium ion batteries. Therefore, a significant shift in attention has been taking place towards new types of rechargeable batteries such as sodium-based systems that have low cost. Another important aspect of sodium battery is its potential compatibility with the all-solid-state design where solid electrolyte is used to replace liquid one, leading to simple battery design, long life span, and excellent safety. The key to the success of all-solid-state battery design is the challenge of finding solid electrolytes possessing acceptable high ionic conductivities at room temperature. Herein, we report a novel sodium superionic conductor with NASICON structure, Na3.1Zr1.95Mg0.05Si2PO12 that shows high room-temperature ionic conductivity of 3.5 × 10−3 S cm−1. We also report successful fabrication of a room-temperature solid-state Na-S cell using this conductor. PMID:27572915

  18. A Na(+) Superionic Conductor for Room-Temperature Sodium Batteries.

    PubMed

    Song, Shufeng; Duong, Hai M; Korsunsky, Alexander M; Hu, Ning; Lu, Li

    2016-01-01

    Rechargeable lithium ion batteries have ruled the consumer electronics market for the past 20 years and have great significance in the growing number of electric vehicles and stationary energy storage applications. However, in addition to concerns about electrochemical performance, the limited availability of lithium is gradually becoming an important issue for further continued use and development of lithium ion batteries. Therefore, a significant shift in attention has been taking place towards new types of rechargeable batteries such as sodium-based systems that have low cost. Another important aspect of sodium battery is its potential compatibility with the all-solid-state design where solid electrolyte is used to replace liquid one, leading to simple battery design, long life span, and excellent safety. The key to the success of all-solid-state battery design is the challenge of finding solid electrolytes possessing acceptable high ionic conductivities at room temperature. Herein, we report a novel sodium superionic conductor with NASICON structure, Na3.1Zr1.95Mg0.05Si2PO12 that shows high room-temperature ionic conductivity of 3.5 × 10(-3) S cm(-1). We also report successful fabrication of a room-temperature solid-state Na-S cell using this conductor. PMID:27572915

  19. A Highly Reversible Room-Temperature Sodium Metal Anode

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Owing to its low cost and high natural abundance, sodium metal is among the most promising anode materials for energy storage technologies beyond lithium ion batteries. However, room-temperature sodium metal anodes suffer from poor reversibility during long-term plating and stripping, mainly due to formation of nonuniform solid electrolyte interphase as well as dendritic growth of sodium metal. Herein we report for the first time that a simple liquid electrolyte, sodium hexafluorophosphate in glymes (mono-, di-, and tetraglyme), can enable highly reversible and nondendritic plating–stripping of sodium metal anodes at room temperature. High average Coulombic efficiencies of 99.9% were achieved over 300 plating–stripping cycles at 0.5 mA cm–2. The long-term reversibility was found to arise from the formation of a uniform, inorganic solid electrolyte interphase made of sodium oxide and sodium fluoride, which is highly impermeable to electrolyte solvent and conducive to nondendritic growth. As a proof of concept, we also demonstrate a room-temperature sodium–sulfur battery using this class of electrolytes, paving the way for the development of next-generation, sodium-based energy storage technologies. PMID:27163006

  20. Room temperature d0 ferromagnetism in ZnS nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proshchenko, Vitaly; Horoz, Sabit; Tang, Jinke; Dahnovsky, Yuri

    2016-06-01

    Room temperature ferromagnetic semiconductors have a great deal of advantage because of their easy integration into semiconductor devices. ZnS nanocrystals (NCs), bulk, and surfaces exhibit d0 ferromagnetism at room temperature. The experiments reveal that NC ferromagnetism takes place at low and room temperatures only due to Zn vacancies (S vacancies do not contribute). To understand the mechanism of d0 ferromagnetism, we introduce the surface-bulk model of a nanocrystal, which includes both surface and bulk magnetizations. The calculations demonstrate that the surface has the higher than bulk magnetization. We find the mechanism of the ferromagnetism is due to sulfur s- and p-electrons in a tetrahedral crystal field. The bulk magnetic moment increases with Zn vacancy concentration at small concentrations and then goes down at larger concentrations. A surface magnetic moment behaves differently with the concentration. It is always a monotonically rising function. We find that the total NC magnetic moment increases with the size and concentration of Zn vacancies (only low concentrations). We also study the magnetization per unit cell where we find that it decreases for the surface and increases for bulk magnetism with the NC size.

  1. A Highly Reversible Room-Temperature Sodium Metal Anode.

    PubMed

    Seh, Zhi Wei; Sun, Jie; Sun, Yongming; Cui, Yi

    2015-11-25

    Owing to its low cost and high natural abundance, sodium metal is among the most promising anode materials for energy storage technologies beyond lithium ion batteries. However, room-temperature sodium metal anodes suffer from poor reversibility during long-term plating and stripping, mainly due to formation of nonuniform solid electrolyte interphase as well as dendritic growth of sodium metal. Herein we report for the first time that a simple liquid electrolyte, sodium hexafluorophosphate in glymes (mono-, di-, and tetraglyme), can enable highly reversible and nondendritic plating-stripping of sodium metal anodes at room temperature. High average Coulombic efficiencies of 99.9% were achieved over 300 plating-stripping cycles at 0.5 mA cm(-2). The long-term reversibility was found to arise from the formation of a uniform, inorganic solid electrolyte interphase made of sodium oxide and sodium fluoride, which is highly impermeable to electrolyte solvent and conducive to nondendritic growth. As a proof of concept, we also demonstrate a room-temperature sodium-sulfur battery using this class of electrolytes, paving the way for the development of next-generation, sodium-based energy storage technologies. PMID:27163006

  2. Remote control of magnetostriction-based nanocontacts at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Jammalamadaka, S. Narayana; Kuntz, Sebastian; Berg, Oliver; Kittler, Wolfram; Kannan, U. Mohanan; Chelvane, J. Arout; Sürgers, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    The remote control of the electrical conductance through nanosized junctions at room temperature will play an important role in future nano-electromechanical systems and electronic devices. This can be achieved by exploiting the magnetostriction effects of ferromagnetic materials. Here we report on the electrical conductance of magnetic nanocontacts obtained from wires of the giant magnetostrictive compound Tb0.3Dy0.7Fe1.95 as an active element in a mechanically controlled break-junction device. The nanocontacts are reproducibly switched at room temperature between “open” (zero conductance) and “closed” (nonzero conductance) states by variation of a magnetic field applied perpendicularly to the long wire axis. Conductance measurements in a magnetic field oriented parallel to the long wire axis exhibit a different behaviour where the conductance switches between both states only in a limited field range close to the coercive field. Investigating the conductance in the regime of electron tunneling by mechanical or magnetostrictive control of the electrode separation enables an estimation of the magnetostriction. The present results pave the way to utilize the material in devices based on nano-electromechanical systems operating at room temperature. PMID:26323326

  3. Electrical creation of spin polarization in silicon at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, Ron

    2010-03-01

    The integration of magnetism and mainstream semiconductor electronics could impact information technology in ways beyond imagination. A pivotal step is the implementation of spin-based electronic functionality in silicon devices. Much of the interest in silicon derives from its prevalence in semiconductor technology and from the robustness and longevity of spin as it is only weakly coupled to other degrees of freedom in the material. Recently it has become possible to induce and detect spin polarization in otherwise non-magnetic semiconductors (GaAs and Si) using all-electrical structures, but so far at temperatures below 150 K and only in n-type material. The main challenges are: (i) to design fully electrical silicon-based spintronic devices with large spin signals, (ii) to demonstrate device operation at room temperature, (iii) to do so for n-type and p-type material, and (iv) to find ways to manipulate spins and spin flow with a gate electric field. After a brief overview of the state of affairs, our recent advances in these areas are described. In particular, we demonstrate room-temperature electrical injection of spin polarization into n-type and p-type silicon from a ferromagnetic tunnel contact, spin manipulation using the Hanle effect, and the electrical detection of the induced spin accumulation. It is shown that a spin splitting as large as 2.9 meV can be created in Si at room temperature, corresponding to an electron spin polarization of 4.6%. The results open the way to the implementation of spin functionality in complementary silicon devices and electronic circuits operating at ambient temperature, and to the exploration of their prospects as well as the fundamental rules that govern their behavior. [4pt] [1] S.P. Dash, S. Sharma, R.S. Patel, M.P. de Jong and R. Jansen, Nature 462, 491 (2009).

  4. Sign change of magnetoresistance in Gd-doped amorphous carbon granular films.

    PubMed

    Ding, Shihao; Jin, Chao; Fan, Ziwei; Li, Peng; Bai, Haili

    2015-11-11

    Gd/C granular films with 11% Gd were fabricated by facing-target magnetron sputtering at room temperature and then annealed at 300-650 °C for 1.5 h. A magnetoresistance of -82% was obtained in the Gd/C films annealed at 650 °C at 3 K under a magnetic field of 50 kOe. A sign change of the magnetoresistance from negative to positive and then back to negative was observed in all samples as the temperature decreases. Grain boundary scattering effects, wave-function-shrinkage, cotunneling and Gd-Gd interactions account for the mechanisms of the magnetoresistance effects in different temperature regions. The sign of the magnetoresistance also varies as the magnetic field increases. At the transition temperature of 25 K, the wave-function-shrinkage effect competes with cotunneling and Gd-Gd interactions at different magnetic fields. The competition between the wave-function-shrinkage effect and the grain boundary scattering effect is approximately at the transition temperature of 100 K. The temperature range of positive magnetoresistance expands and transition temperatures are changed as the annealing temperature increases. It is related to the expansion of the temperature region for the wave-function-shrinkage effect which occurs in the Mott variable range hopping conduction mechanism. PMID:26527080

  5. Fusion-neutron effects on magnetoresistivity of copper stabilizer materials

    SciTech Connect

    Guinan, M.W.; Van Konynenburg, R.A.

    1983-02-24

    The objective of this work is to quantify the changes which occur in the magnetoresistivity of coppers (having various purities and pretreatments, and at magnetic fields up to 12 T during the course of sequential fusion neutron irradiations at about 4/sup 0/K and anneals to room temperature. In conjunction with work in progress by Coltman and Klabunde of ORNL, the results should lead to engineering design data for the stabilizers of superconducting magnets in fusion reactors. These magnets are expected to be irradiated during reactor operation and warmed to room temperature periodically during maintenance.

  6. Spin transport and temperature-dependent giant positive junction magnetoresistance in CoFe2O4/SiO2/ p-Si heterostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panda, J.; Nath, T. K.

    2016-02-01

    The observation of giant positive junction magnetoresistance (JMR) in our cobalt ferrite (CFO)/p-Si heterojunction has been reported here. The pulsed laser deposition technique has been used for fabrication of the heterojunction. The junction confirms a very good rectifying magnetic diode like behavior at low temperature, whereas at high temperatures the junction shows nonlinear I- V characteristics. The magnetic field-dependent magnetoresistance (MR) of both CFO film and across the heterojunction have been studied in detail. The CFO film shows negative MR behavior, whereas the junction shows large positive JMR behavior throughout the temperature range. The spin lifetime (142 ps) and spin diffusion length (331 nm) have been estimated of the heterostructure at 10 K. The highest JMR value (~1600 %) has been observed at 10 K, and it gradually decreases at higher temperature range. The origin of positive JMR in our heterojunction has been best explained by the standard spin injection theory.

  7. Magnetoresistance, electrical conductivity, and Hall effect of glassy carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.F.

    1983-02-01

    These properties of glassy carbon heat treated for three hours between 1200 and 2700/sup 0/C were measured from 3 to 300/sup 0/K in magnetic fields up to 5 tesla. The magnetoresistance was generally negative and saturated with reciprocal temperature, but still increased as a function of magnetic field. The maximum negative magnetoresistance measured was 2.2% for 2700/sup 0/C material. Several models based on the negative magnetoresistance being proportional to the square of the magnetic moment were attempted; the best fit was obtained for the simplest model combining Curie and Pauli paramagnetism for heat treatments above 1600/sup 0/C. Positive magnetoresistance was found only in less than 1600/sup 0/C treated glassy carbon. The electrical conductivity, of the order of 200 (ohm-cm)/sup -1/ at room temperature, can be empirically written as sigma = A + Bexp(-CT/sup -1/4) - DT/sup -1/2. The Hall coefficient was independent of magnetic field, insensitive to temperature, but was a strong function of heat treatment temperature, crossing over from negative to positive at about 1700/sup 0/C and ranging from -0.048 to 0.126 cm/sup 3//coul. The idea of one-dimensional filaments in glassy carbon suggested by the electrical conductivity is compatible with the present consensus view of the microstructure.

  8. Single-molecule spectroscopy and dynamics at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, X.S.

    1996-12-01

    The spirit of studying single-molecule behaviors dates back to the turn of the century. In addition to Einstein`s well-known work on Brownian motion, there has been a tradition for studying single {open_quotes}macromolecules{close_quotes} or a small number of molecules either by light scattering or by fluorescence using an optical microscope. Modern computers have allowed detailed studies of single-molecule behaviors in condensed media through molecular dynamics simulations. Optical spectroscopy offers a wealth of information on the structure, interaction, and dynamics of molecular species. With the motivation of removing {open_quotes}inhomogeneous broadening{close_quotes}, spectroscopic techniques have evolved from spectral hole burning, fluorescence line narrowing, and photo-echo to the recent pioneering work on single-molecule spectroscopy in solids at cryogenic temperatures. High-resolution spectroscopic work on single molecules relies on zero phonon lines which appear at cryogenic temperatures, and have narrow line widths and large absorption cross sections. Recent advances in near-field and confocal fluorescence have allowed not only fluorescence imaging of single molecules with high spatial resolutions but also single-molecule spectroscopy at room temperature. In this Account, the author provides a physical chemist`s perspective on experimental and theoretical developments on room-temperature single-molecule spectroscopy and dynamics, with the emphasis on the information obtainable from single-molecule experiments. 61 refs., 9 figs.

  9. Room-temperature resonant quantum tunneling transport of macroscopic systems.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Zhengwei; Wang, Xuemin; Yan, Dawei; Wu, Weidong; Peng, Liping; Li, Weihua; Zhao, Yan; Wang, Xinmin; An, Xinyou; Xiao, Tingting; Zhan, Zhiqiang; Wang, Zhuo; Chen, Xiangrong

    2014-11-21

    A self-assembled quantum dots array (QDA) is a low dimensional electron system applied to various quantum devices. This QDA, if embedded in a single crystal matrix, could be advantageous for quantum information science and technology. However, the quantum tunneling effect has been difficult to observe around room temperature thus far, because it occurs in a microcosmic and low temperature condition. Herein, we show a designed a quasi-periodic Ni QDA embedded in a single crystal BaTiO3 matrix and demonstrate novel quantum resonant tunneling transport properties around room-temperature according to theoretical calculation and experiments. The quantum tunneling process could be effectively modulated by changing the Ni QDA concentration. The major reason was that an applied weak electric field (∼10(2) V cm(-1)) could be enhanced by three orders of magnitude (∼10(5) V cm(-1)) between the Ni QDA because of the higher permittivity of BaTiO3 and the 'hot spots' of the Ni QDA. Compared with the pure BaTiO3 films, the samples with embedded Ni QDA displayed a stepped conductivity and temperature (σ-T curves) construction. PMID:25307500

  10. Electric-field control of magnetic order above room temperature.

    PubMed

    Cherifi, R O; Ivanovskaya, V; Phillips, L C; Zobelli, A; Infante, I C; Jacquet, E; Garcia, V; Fusil, S; Briddon, P R; Guiblin, N; Mougin, A; Ünal, A A; Kronast, F; Valencia, S; Dkhil, B; Barthélémy, A; Bibes, M

    2014-04-01

    Controlling magnetism by means of electric fields is a key issue for the future development of low-power spintronics. Progress has been made in the electrical control of magnetic anisotropy, domain structure, spin polarization or critical temperatures. However, the ability to turn on and off robust ferromagnetism at room temperature and above has remained elusive. Here we use ferroelectricity in BaTiO3 crystals to tune the sharp metamagnetic transition temperature of epitaxially grown FeRh films and electrically drive a transition between antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic order with only a few volts, just above room temperature. The detailed analysis of the data in the light of first-principles calculations indicate that the phenomenon is mediated by both strain and field effects from the BaTiO3. Our results correspond to a magnetoelectric coupling larger than previous reports by at least one order of magnitude and open new perspectives for the use of ferroelectrics in magnetic storage and spintronics. PMID:24464245

  11. Electric-field control of magnetic order above room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherifi, R. O.; Ivanovskaya, V.; Phillips, L. C.; Zobelli, A.; Infante, I. C.; Jacquet, E.; Garcia, V.; Fusil, S.; Briddon, P. R.; Guiblin, N.; Mougin, A.; Ünal, A. A.; Kronast, F.; Valencia, S.; Dkhil, B.; Barthélémy, A.; Bibes, M.

    2014-04-01

    Controlling magnetism by means of electric fields is a key issue for the future development of low-power spintronics. Progress has been made in the electrical control of magnetic anisotropy, domain structure, spin polarization or critical temperatures. However, the ability to turn on and off robust ferromagnetism at room temperature and above has remained elusive. Here we use ferroelectricity in BaTiO3 crystals to tune the sharp metamagnetic transition temperature of epitaxially grown FeRh films and electrically drive a transition between antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic order with only a few volts, just above room temperature. The detailed analysis of the data in the light of first-principles calculations indicate that the phenomenon is mediated by both strain and field effects from the BaTiO3. Our results correspond to a magnetoelectric coupling larger than previous reports by at least one order of magnitude and open new perspectives for the use of ferroelectrics in magnetic storage and spintronics.

  12. Room-temperature spin thermoelectrics in metallic films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tölle, Sebastian; Gorini, Cosimo; Eckern, Ulrich

    2014-12-01

    Considering metallic films at room temperature, we present the first theoretical study of the spin Nernst and thermal Edelstein effects that takes into account dynamical spin-orbit coupling, i.e., direct spin-orbit coupling with the vibrating lattice (phonons) and impurities. This gives rise to a novel process, namely, a dynamical side-jump mechanism, and to dynamical Elliott-Yafet spin relaxation, never before considered in this context. Both are the high-temperature counterparts of the well-known T =0 side-jump and Elliott-Yafet, central to the current understanding of the spin Hall, spin Nernst and Edelstein (current-induced spin polarization) effects at low T . We consider the experimentally relevant regime T >TD , with TD the Debye temperature, as the latter is lower than room temperature in transition metals such as Pt, Au and Ta typically employed in spin injection/extraction experiments. We show that the interplay between intrinsic (Bychkov-Rashba type) and extrinsic (dynamical) spin-orbit coupling yields a nonlinear T dependence of the spin Nernst and spin Hall conductivities.

  13. Terahertz pulsed photogenerated current in microdiodes at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Ilkov, Marjan; Torfason, Kristinn; Manolescu, Andrei Valfells, Ágúst

    2015-11-16

    Space-charge modulation of the current in a vacuum diode under photoemission leads to the formation of beamlets with time periodicity corresponding to THz frequencies. We investigate the effect of the emitter temperature and internal space-charge forces on the formation and persistence of the beamlets. We find that temperature effects are most important for beam degradation at low values of the applied electric field, whereas at higher fields, intra-beamlet space-charge forces are dominant. The current modulation is most robust when there is only one beamlet present in the diode gap at a time, corresponding to a macroscopic version of the Coulomb blockade. It is shown that a vacuum microdiode can operate quite well as a tunable THz oscillator at room temperature with an applied electric field above 10 MV/m and a diode gap of the order of 100 nm.

  14. Room-temperature antiferromagnetism in CuMnAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Máca, F.; Mašek, J.; Stelmakhovych, O.; Martí, X.; Reichlová, H.; Uhlířová, K.; Beran, P.; Wadley, P.; Novák, V.; Jungwirth, T.

    2012-04-01

    We report on an experimental and theoretical study of CuMn-V compounds. In agreement with previous works we find low-temperature antiferromagnetism with Néel temperature of 50 K in the cubic half-Heusler CuMnSb. We demonstrate that the orthorhombic CuMnAs is a room-temperature antiferromagnet. Our results are based on X-ray diffraction, magnetization, transport, and differential thermal analysis measurements, and on density-functional theory calculations of the magnetic structure of CuMn-V compounds. In the discussion part of the paper we make a prediction, based on our density-functional theory calculations, that the electronic structure of CuMn-V compounds makes a transition from a semimetal to a semiconductor upon introducing the lighter group-V elements.

  15. Iron bulk lasers working under cryogenic and room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelínková, H.; Doroshenko, M. E.; Šulc, J.; Jelínek, M.; Nemec, M.; Zagoruiko, Y. A.; Kovalenko, N. O.; Gerasimenko, A. S.; Puzikov, V. M.; Komar, V. K.

    2014-12-01

    Temperature dependence of spectroscopic characteristics as well as laser properties of the bulk Bridgman-grown Fe:ZnSe and Fe,Cr:Zn1-xMgxSe (x = 0.19, 0.38) active media were investigated under room and various cryogenic - liquid nitrogen - temperature . The pumping was provided by Er:YAG laser radiation at the wavelength of 2.94 μm, with energy 15 mJ in 110 ns Q-switched pulse or 200 mJ in 220 μs free-running pulse. The 55 mm long hemispherical resonator was formed by a dichroic pumping mirror (T = 92 % @ 2.94 μm and R = 100% @ 4.5 μm) and a concave output coupler (R = 95 % @ 4.5 μm, r = 200 mm). A strong dependence of generated output radiation parameters on temperature was observed for all samples.

  16. Does the electric power grid need a room temperature superconductor?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malozemoff, A. P.

    2013-11-01

    Superconductivity can revolutionize electric power grids, for example with high power underground cables to open urban power bottlenecks and fault current limiters to solve growing fault currents problems. Technology based on high temperature superconductor (HTS) wire is beginning to meet these critical needs. Wire performance is continually improving. For example, American Superconductor has recently demonstrated long wires with up to 500 A/cm-width at 77 K, almost doubling its previous production performance. But refrigeration, even at 77 K, is a complication, driving interest in discovering room temperature superconductors (RTS). Unfortunately, short coherence lengths and accelerated flux creep will make RTS applications unlikely. Existing HTS technology, in fact, offers a good compromise of relatively high operating temperature but not so high as to incur coherence-length and flux-creep limitations. So - no, power grids do not need RTS; existing HTS wire is proving to be what grids really need.

  17. Room temperature GaAsSb single nanowire infrared photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ziyuan; Yuan, Xiaoming; Fu, Lan; Peng, Kun; Wang, Fan; Fu, Xiao; Caroff, Philippe; White, Thomas P.; Tan, Hark Hoe; Jagadish, Chennupati

    2015-11-01

    Antimonide-based ternary III-V nanowires (NWs) allow for a tunable bandgap over a wide range, which is highly interesting for optoelectronics applications, and in particular for infrared photodetection. Here we demonstrate room temperature operation of GaAs0.56Sb0.44 NW infrared photodetectors grown by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy. These GaAs0.56Sb0.44 NWs have uniform axial composition and show p-type conductivity with a peak field-effect mobility of ˜12 cm2 V-1 s-1). Under light illumination, single GaAs0.56Sb0.44 NW photodetectors exhibited typical photoconductor behavior with an increased photocurrent observed with the increase of temperature owing to thermal activation of carrier trap states. A broadband infrared photoresponse with a long wavelength cutoff at ˜1.66 μm was obtained at room temperature. At a low operating bias voltage of 0.15 V a responsivity of 2.37 (1.44) A/W with corresponding detectivity of 1.08 × 109 (6.55 × 108) {{cm}}\\sqrt{{{Hz}}}/{{W}} were achieved at the wavelength of 1.3 (1.55) μm, indicating that ternary GaAs0.56Sb0.44 NWs are promising photodetector candidates for small footprint integrated optical telecommunication systems.

  18. Non-diffusive thermal conductivity in semiconductors at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maznev, Alexei; Johnson, Jeremy; Eliason, Jeffrey; Nelson, Keith; Minnich, Austin; Collins, Kimberlee; Chen, Gang; Cuffe, John; Kehoe, Timothy; Sotomayor Torres, Clivia

    2012-02-01

    The ``textbook'' value of phonon mean free path (MFP) in silicon at room temperature is ˜40 nm. However, a large contribution to thermal conductivity comes from low-frequency phonons with much longer MFPs. We find that heat transport in semiconductors such as Si and GaAs significantly deviates from the Fourier law at distances much longer than previously thought, >=1 μm at room temperature and above. We use the laser-induced transient thermal grating technique in which absorption of crossed laser pulses in a sample sets up a sinusoidal temperature profile monitored via diffraction of a probe laser beam. By changing the period of the thermal grating we vary the thermal transport distance within the range ˜1-10 μm. In measurements performed on thin free-standing Si membranes and on bulk GaAs the thermal grating decay time deviates from the expected quadratic dependence on the grating period, thus providing model-independent evidence of non-diffusive transport. The simplicity of the experimental configuration permits analytical treatment of non-equilibrium phonon transport with the Boltzmann transport equation. Our analysis shows that at small grating periods the effective thermal conductivity is reduced due to diminishing contributions of ``ballistic'' low-frequency phonons with long MFPs.

  19. Room temperature luminescence and ferromagnetism of AlN:Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.; Cai, G. M.; Wang, W. J.

    2016-06-01

    AlN:Fe polycrystalline powders were synthesized by a modified solid state reaction (MSSR) method. Powder X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy results reveal the single phase nature of the doped samples. In the doped AlN samples, Fe is in Fe2+ state. Room temperature ferromagnetic behavior is observed in AlN:Fe samples. Two photoluminescence peaks located at about 592 nm (2.09 eV) and 598 nm (2.07 eV) are observed in AlN:Fe samples. Our results suggest that AlN:Fe is a potential material for applications in spintronics and high power laser devices.

  20. Superradiance of High Density Frenkel Excitons at Room Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H. Z.; Zheng, X. G.; Zhao, F. L.; Gao, Z. L.; Yu, Z. X.

    1995-05-01

    Superradiance of high density Frenkel excitons in an R-phycoerythrin single crystal is observed at room temperature for the first time. No fluorescence is observed except the emission at the sharp exciton band when the superradiance of excitons occurs, and the higher the pump density, the sharper the emission bandwidth. A redshift and a blueshift are observed at the rise time and the fall time of the emission pulse, respectively. The experimental results also imply deformed-boson properties of high density Frenkel excitons.

  1. Development of bulk GaAs room temperature radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    McGregor, D.S.; Knoll, G.F. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering); Eisen, Y. . Soreq Nuclear Research Center); Brake, R. )

    1992-10-01

    This paper reports on GaAs, a wide band gap semiconductor with potential use as a room temperature radiation detector. Various configurations of Schottky diode detectors were fabricated with bulk crystals of liquid encapsulated Czochralski (LEC) semi-insulating undoped GaAs material. Basic detector construction utilized one Ti/Au Schottky contact and one Au/Ge/Ni alloyed ohmic contact. Pulsed X-ray analysis indicated pulse decay times dependent on bias voltage. Pulse height analysis disclosed non-uniform electric field distributions across the detectors tentatively explained as a consequence of native deep level donors (EL2) in the crystal.

  2. Continued development of room temperature semiconductor nuclear detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hadong; Cirignano, Leonard; Churilov, Alexei; Ciampi, Guido; Kargar, Alireza; Higgins, William; O'Dougherty, Patrick; Kim, Suyoung; Squillante, Michael R.; Shah, Kanai

    2010-08-01

    Thallium bromide (TlBr) and related ternary compounds, TlBrI and TlBrCl, have been under development for room temperature gamma ray spectroscopy due to several promising properties. Due to recent advances in material processing, electron mobility-lifetime product of TlBr is close to Cd(Zn)Te's value which allowed us to fabricate large working detectors. We were also able to fabricate and obtain spectroscopic results from TlBr Capacitive Frisch Grid detector and orthogonal strip detectors. In this paper we report on our recent TlBr and related ternary detector results and preliminary results from Cinnabar (HgS) detectors.

  3. Dynamics and structure of room temperature ionic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fayer, Michael D.

    2014-11-01

    Room temperature ionic liquids (RTIL) are intrinsically interesting because they simultaneously have properties that are similar to organic liquids and liquid salts. In addition, RTILs are increasingly being considered for and used in technological applications. RTILs are usually composed of an organic cation and an inorganic anion. The organic cation, such as imidazolium, has alkyl chains of various lengths. The disorder in the liquid produced by the presence of the alkyl groups lowers the temperature for crystallization below room temperature and can also result in supercooling and glass formation rather than crystallization. The presence of the alkyl moieties also results in a segregation of the liquid into ionic and organic regions. In this article, experiments are presented that address the relationship between RTIL dynamics and structure. Time resolved fluorescence anisotropy measurements were employed to study the local environments in the organic and ionic regions of RTILs using a nonpolar chromophore that locates in the organic regions and an ionic chromophore that locates in the ionic regions. In the alkyl regions, the in plane and out of plane orientational friction coefficients change in different manners as the alkyl chains get longer. Both friction coefficients converge toward those of a long chain length hydrocarbon as the RTIL chains increase in length, which demonstrates that for sufficiently long alkyl chains the RTIL organic regions have properties similar to a hydrocarbon. However, putting Li+ in the ionic regions changes the friction coefficients in the alkyl regions, which demonstrates that changes of the ion structural organization influences the organization of the alkyl chains. Optical heterodyne detected optical Kerr effect (OHD-OKE) experiments were used to examine the orientational relaxation dynamics of RTILs over times scales of a hundred femtoseconds to a hundred nanoseconds. Detailed temperature dependent studies in the liquid and

  4. Low-field magnetoelectric effect at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitagawa, Yutaro; Hiraoka, Yuji; Honda, Takashi; Ishikura, Taishi; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Kimura, Tsuyoshi

    2010-10-01

    The discoveries of gigantic ferroelectric polarization in BiFeO3 (ref. 1) and ferroelectricity accompanied by a magnetic order in TbMnO3 (ref. 2) have renewed interest in research on magnetoelectric multiferroics, materials in which magnetic and ferroelectric orders coexist, from both fundamental and technological points of view. Among several different types of magnetoelectric multiferroic, magnetically induced ferroelectrics in which ferroelectricity is induced by complex magnetic orders, such as spiral orders, exhibit giant magnetoelectric effects, remarkable changes in electric polarization in response to a magnetic field. Many magnetically induced ferroelectrics showing the magnetoelectric effects have been found in the past several years. From a practical point of view, however, their magnetoelectric effects are useless because they operate only far below room temperature (for example, 28K in TbMnO3 (ref. 2) and 230K in CuO (ref. 11)). Furthermore, in most of them, the operating magnetic field is an order of tesla that is too high for practical applications. Here we report materials, Z-type hexaferrites, overcoming these problems on magnetically induced ferroelectrics. The best magnetoelectric properties were obtained for Sr3Co2Fe24O41 ceramics sintered in oxygen, which exhibit a low-field magnetoelectric effect at room temperature. Our result represents an important step towards practical device applications using the magnetoelectric effects.

  5. Linear magnetoelectricity at room temperature in perovskite superlattices by design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Saurabh; Das, Hena; Fennie, Craig J.

    2015-11-01

    Discovering materials that display a linear magnetoelectric (ME) effect at room temperature is a challenge. Such materials could facilitate devices based on the electric field control of magnetism. Here we present simple, chemically intuitive design rules to identify a class of bulk magnetoelectric materials based on the "bicolor" layering of P b n m ferrite perovskites, e.g., LaFeO3/LnFeO3 superlattices, Ln = lanthanide cation. We use first-principles density functional theory calculations to confirm these ideas. We elucidate the origin of this effect and show it is a general consequence of the layering of any bicolor P b n m perovskite superlattice in which the number of constituent layers are odd (leading to a form of hybrid improper ferroelectricity). Our calculations suggest that the ME effect in these superlattices is larger than that observed in the prototypical magnetoelectric materials Cr2O3 and BiFeO3. Furthermore, in these proposed materials, the strength of the linear ME coupling increases with the magnitude of the induced spontaneous polarization which is controlled by the La/Ln cation radius mismatch. We use a simple mean field model to show that the proposed materials order magnetically above room temperature.

  6. A stable room-temperature sodium-sulfur battery.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shuya; Xu, Shaomao; Agrawral, Akanksha; Choudhury, Snehashis; Lu, Yingying; Tu, Zhengyuan; Ma, Lin; Archer, Lynden A

    2016-01-01

    High-energy rechargeable batteries based on earth-abundant materials are important for mobile and stationary storage technologies. Rechargeable sodium-sulfur batteries able to operate stably at room temperature are among the most sought-after platforms because such cells take advantage of a two-electron-redox process to achieve high storage capacity from inexpensive electrode materials. Here we report a room-temperature sodium-sulfur battery that uses a microporous carbon-sulfur composite cathode, and a liquid carbonate electrolyte containing the ionic liquid 1-methyl-3-propylimidazolium-chlorate tethered to SiO2 nanoparticles. We show that these cells can cycle stably at a rate of 0.5 C (1 C=1675, mAh g(-1)) with 600 mAh g(-1) reversible capacity and nearly 100% Coulombic efficiency. By means of spectroscopic and electrochemical analysis, we find that the particles form a sodium-ion conductive film on the anode, which stabilizes deposition of sodium. We also find that sulfur remains interred in the carbon pores and undergo solid-state electrochemical reactions with sodium ions. PMID:27277345

  7. Observation of room-temperature skyrmion Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, W.; Zhang, X.; Upadhyaya, P.; Zhang, W.; Yu, G.; Jungfleisch, M.; Fradin, F.; Pearson, J.; Tserkovnyak, Y.; Wang, K.; Heinonen, O.; Zhou, Y.; Te Velthuis, Suzanne; Hoffmann, A.

    The realization of room-temperature magnetic skyrmions is key to enabling the implementation of skyrmion-based spintronics. In this work, we present the efficient conversion of chiral stripe domains into Néel skyrmions through a geometrical constriction patterned in a Ta/CoFeB/TaOx trilayer film at room temperature. This is enabled by an interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction, and laterally divergent current-induced spin-orbit torques. We further show the generation of magnetic skyrmions solely by the divergent spin-orbit torques through a nonmagnetic point contact. By increasing the current density, we observe the skyrmion Hall effect - that is the accumulation of skyrmions at one side of the device. The related Hall angle for skyrmion motion is also revealed under an ac driving current. Financial support for the work at Argonne came from Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Science, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division, work at UCLA was supported by TANMS.

  8. Simple room temperature bonding of thermoplastics and poly(dimethylsiloxane).

    PubMed

    Sunkara, Vijaya; Park, Dong-Kyu; Hwang, Hyundoo; Chantiwas, Rattikan; Soper, Steven A; Cho, Yoon-Kyoung

    2011-03-01

    We describe a simple and versatile method for bonding thermoplastics to elastomeric polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) at room temperature. The bonding of various thermoplastics including polycarbonate (PC), cyclic olefin copolymer (COC), polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), and polystyrene (PS), to PDMS has been demonstrated at room temperature. An irreversible bonding was formed instantaneously when the thermoplastics, activated by oxygen plasma followed by aminopropyltriethoxysilane modification, were brought into contact with the plasma treated PDMS. The surface modified thermoplastics were characterized by water contact angle measurements and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The tensile strength of the bonded hybrid devices fabricated with PC, COC, PMMA, and PS was found to be 430, 432, 385, and 388 kPa, respectively. The assembled devices showed high burst resistance at a maximum channel pressure achievable by an in-house built syringe pump, 528 kPa. Furthermore, they displayed very high hydrolytic stability; no significant change was observed even after the storage in water at 37 °C over a period of three weeks. In addition, this thermoplastic-to-PDMS bonding technique has been successfully employed to fabricate a relatively large sized device. For example, a lab-on-a-disc with a diameter of 12 cm showed no leakage when it spins for centrifugal fluidic pumping at a very high rotating speed of 6000 rpm. PMID:21152492

  9. Unconditional polarization qubit quantum memory at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namazi, Mehdi; Kupchak, Connor; Jordaan, Bertus; Shahrokhshahi, Reihaneh; Figueroa, Eden

    2016-05-01

    The creation of global quantum key distribution and quantum communication networks requires multiple operational quantum memories. Achieving a considerable reduction in experimental and cost overhead in these implementations is thus a major challenge. Here we present a polarization qubit quantum memory fully-operational at 330K, an unheard frontier in the development of useful qubit quantum technology. This result is achieved through extensive study of how optical response of cold atomic medium is transformed by the motion of atoms at room temperature leading to an optimal characterization of room temperature quantum light-matter interfaces. Our quantum memory shows an average fidelity of 86.6 +/- 0.6% for optical pulses containing on average 1 photon per pulse, thereby defeating any classical strategy exploiting the non-unitary character of the memory efficiency. Our system significantly decreases the technological overhead required to achieve quantum memory operation and will serve as a building block for scalable and technologically simpler many-memory quantum machines. The work was supported by the US-Navy Office of Naval Research, Grant Number N00141410801 and the Simons Foundation, Grant Number SBF241180. B. J. acknowledges financial assistance of the National Research Foundation (NRF) of South Africa.

  10. Identifying multiexcitons in Mo S2 monolayers at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyun Seok; Kim, Min Su; Kim, Hyun; Lee, Young Hee

    2016-04-01

    One of the unique features of atomically thin two-dimensional materials is strong Coulomb interactions due to the reduced dielectric screening effect; this feature enables the study of many-body phenomena such as excitons, trions, and biexcitons. However, identification of biexcitons remains unresolved owing to their broad peak feature at room temperature. Here, we investigate multiexcitons in monolayer Mo S2 using both electrical and optical doping and identify the transition energies for each exciton. The binding energy of the assigned biexciton is twice that of the trion, in quantitative agreement with theoretical predictions. The biexciton population is predominant under optical doping but negligible under electrical doping. The biexciton population is quadratically proportional to the exciton population, obeying the mass-action theory. Our results illustrate the stable formation of not only trions but also biexcitons due to strong Coulomb interaction even at room temperature; therefore, these results provide a deeper understanding of the complex excitonic behaviors in two-dimensional semiconductors.

  11. Primary standard of optical power operating at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dönsberg, Timo; Sildoja, Meelis; Manoocheri, Farshid; Merimaa, Mikko; Petroff, Leo; Ikonen, Erkki

    2014-08-01

    The Predictable Quantum Efficient Detector (PQED) is evaluated as a new primary standard of optical power. Design and characterization results are presented for a new compact room temperature PQED that consists of two custom-made induced junction photodiodes mounted in a wedged trap configuration. The detector assembly includes a window aligned in Brewster angle in front of the photodiodes for high transmission of p polarized light. The detector can also be operated without the window, in which case a dry nitrogen flow system is utilized to prevent dust contamination of the photodiodes. Measurements of individual detectors at the wavelength of 488 nm indicate that reflectance and internal quantum efficiency are consistent within 14 ppm and 10 ppm (ppm = part per million), respectively, and agree with the predicted values. The measured photocurrent ratio of the two photodiodes confirms the predicted value for s and p polarized light, and the spatial variation in the photocurrent ratio can be used to estimate the uniformity in the thickness of the silicon dioxide layer on the surface of the photodiodes. In addition, the spatial non-uniformity of the responsivity of the PQED is an order of magnitude lower than that of single photodiodes. Such data provide evidence that the room temperature PQED may replace the cryogenic radiometer as a primary standard of optical power in the visible wavelength range.

  12. Self-transducing silicon nanowire electromechanical systems at room temperature.

    PubMed

    He, Rongrui; Feng, X L; Roukes, M L; Yang, Peidong

    2008-06-01

    Electronic readout of the motions of genuinely nanoscale mechanical devices at room temperature imposes an important challenge for the integration and application of nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS). Here, we report the first experiments on piezoresistively transduced very high frequency Si nanowire (SiNW) resonators with on-chip electronic actuation at room temperature. We have demonstrated that, for very thin (~90 nm down to ~30 nm) SiNWs, their time-varying strain can be exploited for self-transducing the devices' resonant motions at frequencies as high as approximately 100 MHz. The strain of wire elongation, which is only second-order in doubly clamped structures, enables efficient displacement transducer because of the enhanced piezoresistance effect in these SiNWs. This intrinsically integrated transducer is uniquely suited for a class of very thin wires and beams where metallization and multilayer complex patterning on devices become impractical. The 30 nm thin SiNW NEMS offer exceptional mass sensitivities in the subzeptogram range. This demonstration makes it promising to advance toward NEMS sensors based on ultrathin and even molecular-scale SiNWs, and their monolithic integration with microelectronics on the same chip. PMID:18481896

  13. A stable room-temperature sodium–sulfur battery

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Shuya; Xu, Shaomao; Agrawral, Akanksha; Choudhury, Snehashis; Lu, Yingying; Tu, Zhengyuan; Ma, Lin; Archer, Lynden A.

    2016-01-01

    High-energy rechargeable batteries based on earth-abundant materials are important for mobile and stationary storage technologies. Rechargeable sodium–sulfur batteries able to operate stably at room temperature are among the most sought-after platforms because such cells take advantage of a two-electron-redox process to achieve high storage capacity from inexpensive electrode materials. Here we report a room-temperature sodium–sulfur battery that uses a microporous carbon–sulfur composite cathode, and a liquid carbonate electrolyte containing the ionic liquid 1-methyl-3-propylimidazolium-chlorate tethered to SiO2 nanoparticles. We show that these cells can cycle stably at a rate of 0.5 C (1 C=1675, mAh g−1) with 600 mAh g−1 reversible capacity and nearly 100% Coulombic efficiency. By means of spectroscopic and electrochemical analysis, we find that the particles form a sodium-ion conductive film on the anode, which stabilizes deposition of sodium. We also find that sulfur remains interred in the carbon pores and undergo solid-state electrochemical reactions with sodium ions. PMID:27277345

  14. A stable room-temperature sodium-sulfur battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Shuya; Xu, Shaomao; Agrawral, Akanksha; Choudhury, Snehashis; Lu, Yingying; Tu, Zhengyuan; Ma, Lin; Archer, Lynden A.

    2016-06-01

    High-energy rechargeable batteries based on earth-abundant materials are important for mobile and stationary storage technologies. Rechargeable sodium-sulfur batteries able to operate stably at room temperature are among the most sought-after platforms because such cells take advantage of a two-electron-redox process to achieve high storage capacity from inexpensive electrode materials. Here we report a room-temperature sodium-sulfur battery that uses a microporous carbon-sulfur composite cathode, and a liquid carbonate electrolyte containing the ionic liquid 1-methyl-3-propylimidazolium-chlorate tethered to SiO2 nanoparticles. We show that these cells can cycle stably at a rate of 0.5 C (1 C=1675, mAh g-1) with 600 mAh g-1 reversible capacity and nearly 100% Coulombic efficiency. By means of spectroscopic and electrochemical analysis, we find that the particles form a sodium-ion conductive film on the anode, which stabilizes deposition of sodium. We also find that sulfur remains interred in the carbon pores and undergo solid-state electrochemical reactions with sodium ions.

  15. Exfoliated black phosphorus gas sensing properties at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donarelli, M.; Ottaviano, L.; Giancaterini, L.; Fioravanti, G.; Perrozzi, F.; Cantalini, C.

    2016-06-01

    Room temperature gas sensing properties of chemically exfoliated black phosphorus (BP) to oxidizing (NO2, CO2) and reducing (NH3, H2, CO) gases in a dry air carrier have been reported. To study the gas sensing properties of BP, chemically exfoliated BP flakes have been drop casted on Si3N4 substrates provided with Pt comb-type interdigitated electrodes in N2 atmosphere. Scanning electron microscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy characterizations show respectively the occurrence of a mixed structure, composed of BP coarse aggregates dispersed on BP exfoliated few layer flakes bridging the electrodes, and a clear 2p doublet belonging to BP, which excludes the occurrence of surface oxidation. Room temperature electrical tests in dry air show a p-type response of multilayer BP with measured detection limits of 20 ppb and 10 ppm to NO2 and NH3 respectively. No response to CO and CO2 has been detected, while a slight but steady sensitivity to H2 has been recorded. The reported results confirm, on an experimental basis, what was previously theoretically predicted, demonstrating the promising sensing properties of exfoliated BP.

  16. Enabling NIR imaging at room temperature using quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Calvez, S.; Bourvon, H.; Kanaan, H.; Meunier-Della Gatta, S.; Philippot, C.; Reiss, P.

    2011-10-01

    Imaging in visible light at room temperature is now a well-mastered technology, whereas imaging in the near infrared (NIR) remains a challenge. NIR imaging has many applications like sensing, night vision and biological diagnostics. Unfortunately, silicon detectors are inefficient above 1000 nm, and other IR technologies still need low working temperatures and are thus expensive. Colloidal quantum dots can overcome these limitations thanks to their absorption wavelength tunability depending on their chemical composition and size. After a brief review of this research field, we will present the preparation of hybrid photodetectors using NIR absorbing PbS quantum dots in combination with poly(3-hexylthiopene) and PCBM. We discuss different solution based deposition processes for device fabrication (spincoating, dip-coating, doctor blading, inkjet printing). Preliminary device tests result in a detectivity of 4.7.109 Jones at 1300 nm.

  17. Room temperature skyrmion ground state stabilized through interlayer exchange coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Gong Schmid, Andreas K.; Mascaraque, Arantzazu; N'Diaye, Alpha T.

    2015-06-15

    Possible magnetic skyrmion device applications motivate the search for structures that extend the stability of skyrmion spin textures to ambient temperature. Here, we demonstrate an experimental approach to stabilize a room temperature skyrmion ground state in chiral magnetic films via exchange coupling across non-magnetic spacer layers. Using spin polarized low-energy electron microscopy to measure all three Cartesian components of the magnetization vector, we image the spin textures in Fe/Ni films. We show how tuning the thickness of a copper spacer layer between chiral Fe/Ni films and perpendicularly magnetized Ni layers permits stabilization of a chiral stripe phase, a skyrmion phase, and a single domain phase. This strategy to stabilize skyrmion ground states can be extended to other magnetic thin film systems and may be useful for designing skyrmion based spintronics devices.

  18. Room temperature quantum coherence in a potential molecular qubit.

    PubMed

    Bader, Katharina; Dengler, Dominik; Lenz, Samuel; Endeward, Burkhard; Jiang, Shang-Da; Neugebauer, Petr; van Slageren, Joris

    2014-01-01

    The successful development of a quantum computer would change the world, and current internet encryption methods would cease to function. However, no working quantum computer that even begins to rival conventional computers has been developed yet, which is due to the lack of suitable quantum bits. A key characteristic of a quantum bit is the coherence time. Transition metal complexes are very promising quantum bits, owing to their facile surface deposition and their chemical tunability. However, reported quantum coherence times have been unimpressive. Here we report very long quantum coherence times for a transition metal complex of 68 μs at low temperature (qubit figure of merit QM=3,400) and 1 μs at room temperature, much higher than previously reported values for such systems. We show that this achievement is because of the rigidity of the lattice as well as removal of nuclear spins from the vicinity of the magnetic ion. PMID:25328006

  19. New Flexible Channels for Room Temperature Tunneling Field Effect Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Boyi; Asthana, Anjana; Hazaveh, Paniz Khanmohammadi; Bergstrom, Paul L.; Banyai, Douglas; Savaikar, Madhusudan A.; Jaszczak, John A.; Yap, Yoke Khin

    2016-02-01

    Tunneling field effect transistors (TFETs) have been proposed to overcome the fundamental issues of Si based transistors, such as short channel effect, finite leakage current, and high contact resistance. Unfortunately, most if not all TFETs are operational only at cryogenic temperatures. Here we report that iron (Fe) quantum dots functionalized boron nitride nanotubes (QDs-BNNTs) can be used as the flexible tunneling channels of TFETs at room temperatures. The electrical insulating BNNTs are used as the one-dimensional (1D) substrates to confine the uniform formation of Fe QDs on their surface as the flexible tunneling channel. Consistent semiconductor-like transport behaviors under various bending conditions are detected by scanning tunneling spectroscopy in a transmission electron microscopy system (in-situ STM-TEM). As suggested by computer simulation, the uniform distribution of Fe QDs enable an averaging effect on the possible electron tunneling pathways, which is responsible for the consistent transport properties that are not sensitive to bending.

  20. Room-temperature chiral magnetic skyrmions in ultrathin magnetic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulle, Olivier; Vogel, Jan; Yang, Hongxin; Pizzini, Stefania; de Souza Chaves, Dayane; Locatelli, Andrea; Menteş, Tevfik Onur; Sala, Alessandro; Buda-Prejbeanu, Liliana D.; Klein, Olivier; Belmeguenai, Mohamed; Roussigné, Yves; Stashkevich, Andrey; Chérif, Salim Mourad; Aballe, Lucia; Foerster, Michael; Chshiev, Mairbek; Auffret, Stéphane; Miron, Ioan Mihai; Gaudin, Gilles

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic skyrmions are chiral spin structures with a whirling configuration. Their topological properties, nanometre size and the fact that they can be moved by small current densities have opened a new paradigm for the manipulation of magnetization at the nanoscale. Chiral skyrmion structures have so far been experimentally demonstrated only in bulk materials and in epitaxial ultrathin films, and under an external magnetic field or at low temperature. Here, we report on the observation of stable skyrmions in sputtered ultrathin Pt/Co/MgO nanostructures at room temperature and zero external magnetic field. We use high lateral resolution X-ray magnetic circular dichroism microscopy to image their chiral Néel internal structure, which we explain as due to the large strength of the Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction as revealed by spin wave spectroscopy measurements. Our results are substantiated by micromagnetic simulations and numerical models, which allow the identification of the physical mechanisms governing the size and stability of the skyrmions.

  1. HPXe ionization chambers for γ spectrometry at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ottini-Hustache, S.; Monsanglant-Louvet, C.; Haan, S.; Dmitrenko, V.; Grachev, V.; Ulin, S.

    2004-01-01

    High pressure xenon (HPXe) ionization chambers exhibit many characteristics which make them particularly suitable for industrial γ spectrometry at room or higher temperature. The use of a gas as detection medium allows one to reach very large effective volumes and makes these chambers relatively insensitive to radiation damage. Further, the high atomic number of xenon ( Z=54) enhances the total absorption of incident photons and provides, combined to high pressure, a good enough detection efficiency with respect to solid state detectors. Furthermore, such ionization chambers with Frisch grid appear to be very stable over wide periods (e.g. a research prototype has been used aboard MIR orbital station for several years) and temperature range (up to 180°), without maintenance. The characteristics of different prototypes are presented. Their detection efficiency and energy resolution are studied as a function of incident γ ray energy. New developments in electronics and signal processing are also investigated to improve their performances.

  2. Room temperature quantum coherence in a potential molecular qubit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bader, Katharina; Dengler, Dominik; Lenz, Samuel; Endeward, Burkhard; Jiang, Shang-Da; Neugebauer, Petr; van Slageren, Joris

    2014-10-01

    The successful development of a quantum computer would change the world, and current internet encryption methods would cease to function. However, no working quantum computer that even begins to rival conventional computers has been developed yet, which is due to the lack of suitable quantum bits. A key characteristic of a quantum bit is the coherence time. Transition metal complexes are very promising quantum bits, owing to their facile surface deposition and their chemical tunability. However, reported quantum coherence times have been unimpressive. Here we report very long quantum coherence times for a transition metal complex of 68 μs at low temperature (qubit figure of merit QM=3,400) and 1 μs at room temperature, much higher than previously reported values for such systems. We show that this achievement is because of the rigidity of the lattice as well as removal of nuclear spins from the vicinity of the magnetic ion.

  3. A Polar Corundum Oxide Displaying Weak Ferromagnetism at Room Temperature

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Combining long-range magnetic order with polarity in the same structure is a prerequisite for the design of (magnetoelectric) multiferroic materials. There are now several demonstrated strategies to achieve this goal, but retaining magnetic order above room temperature remains a difficult target. Iron oxides in the +3 oxidation state have high magnetic ordering temperatures due to the size of the coupled moments. Here we prepare and characterize ScFeO3 (SFO), which under pressure and in strain-stabilized thin films adopts a polar variant of the corundum structure, one of the archetypal binary oxide structures. Polar corundum ScFeO3 has a weak ferromagnetic ground state below 356 K—this is in contrast to the purely antiferromagnetic ground state adopted by the well-studied ferroelectric BiFeO3. PMID:22280499

  4. Enhanced room temperature ferromagnetism in antiferromagnetic NiO nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Ravikumar, Patta; Kisan, Bhagaban; Perumal, A.

    2015-08-15

    We report systematic investigations of structural, vibrational, resonance and magnetic properties of nanoscale NiO powders prepared by ball milling process under different milling speeds for 30 hours of milling. Structural properties revealed that both pure NiO and as-milled NiO powders exhibit face centered cubic structure, but average crystallite size decreases to around 11 nm along with significant increase in strain with increasing milling speed. Vibrational properties show the enhancement in the intensity of one-phonon longitudinal optical (LO) band and disappearance of two-magnon band due to size reduction. In addition, two-phonon LO band exhibits red shift due to size-induced phonon confinement effect and surface relaxation. Pure NiO powder exhibit antiferromagnetic nature, which transforms into induced ferromagnetic after size reduction. The average magnetization at room temperature increases with decreasing the crystallite size and a maximum moment of 0.016 μ{sub B}/f.u. at 12 kOe applied field and coercivity of 170 Oe were obtained for 30 hours milled NiO powders at 600 rotation per minute milling speed. The change in the magnetic properties is also supported by the vibrational properties. Thermomagnetization measurements at high temperature reveal a well-defined magnetic phase transition at high temperature (T{sub C}) around 780 K due to induced ferromagnetic phase. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies reveal a good agreement between the EPR results and magnetic properties. The observed results are described on the basis of crystallite size variation, defect density, large strain, oxidation/reduction of Ni and interaction between uncompensated surfaces and particle core with lattice expansion. The obtained results suggest that nanoscale NiO powders with high T{sub C} and moderate magnetic moment at room temperature with cubic structure would be useful to expedite for spintronic devices.

  5. Enhanced room temperature ferromagnetism in antiferromagnetic NiO nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravikumar, Patta; Kisan, Bhagaban; Perumal, A.

    2015-08-01

    We report systematic investigations of structural, vibrational, resonance and magnetic properties of nanoscale NiO powders prepared by ball milling process under different milling speeds for 30 hours of milling. Structural properties revealed that both pure NiO and as-milled NiO powders exhibit face centered cubic structure, but average crystallite size decreases to around 11 nm along with significant increase in strain with increasing milling speed. Vibrational properties show the enhancement in the intensity of one-phonon longitudinal optical (LO) band and disappearance of two-magnon band due to size reduction. In addition, two-phonon LO band exhibits red shift due to size-induced phonon confinement effect and surface relaxation. Pure NiO powder exhibit antiferromagnetic nature, which transforms into induced ferromagnetic after size reduction. The average magnetization at room temperature increases with decreasing the crystallite size and a maximum moment of 0.016 μB/f.u. at 12 kOe applied field and coercivity of 170 Oe were obtained for 30 hours milled NiO powders at 600 rotation per minute milling speed. The change in the magnetic properties is also supported by the vibrational properties. Thermomagnetization measurements at high temperature reveal a well-defined magnetic phase transition at high temperature (TC) around 780 K due to induced ferromagnetic phase. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies reveal a good agreement between the EPR results and magnetic properties. The observed results are described on the basis of crystallite size variation, defect density, large strain, oxidation/reduction of Ni and interaction between uncompensated surfaces and particle core with lattice expansion. The obtained results suggest that nanoscale NiO powders with high TC and moderate magnetic moment at room temperature with cubic structure would be useful to expedite for spintronic devices.

  6. Room temperature homogeneous flow in a bulk metallic glass with low glass transition temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, K.; Xia, X. X.; Bai, H. Y.; Zhao, D. Q.; Wang, W. H.

    2011-04-01

    We report a high entropy metallic glass of Zn20Ca20Sr20Yb20(Li0.55Mg0.45)20 via composition design that exhibiting remarkable homogeneous deformation without shear banding under stress at room temperature. The glass also shows properties such as low glass transition temperature (323 K) approaching room temperature, low density and high specific strength, good conductivity, polymerlike thermoplastic manufacturability, and ultralow elastic moduli comparable to that of bones. The alloy is thermally and chemically stable.

  7. Room temperature homogeneous flow in a bulk metallic glass with low glass transition temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, K.; Xia, X. X.; Bai, H. Y.; Zhao, D. Q.; Wang, W. H.

    2011-04-04

    We report a high entropy metallic glass of Zn{sub 20}Ca{sub 20}Sr{sub 20}Yb{sub 20}(Li{sub 0.55}Mg{sub 0.45}){sub 20} via composition design that exhibiting remarkable homogeneous deformation without shear banding under stress at room temperature. The glass also shows properties such as low glass transition temperature (323 K) approaching room temperature, low density and high specific strength, good conductivity, polymerlike thermoplastic manufacturability, and ultralow elastic moduli comparable to that of bones. The alloy is thermally and chemically stable.

  8. Anomalous oscillatory magnetoresistance in superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunchur, Milind N.; Dean, Charles L.; Ivlev, Boris I.

    2016-08-01

    We report oscillatory magnetoresistance in various superconducting films, with a magnetic-field period Δ B ˜0.1 T that is essentially independent of sample dimensions, temperature, transport current, and the magnitude and orientation of the magnetic field, including magnetic fields oriented parallel to the film plane. The characteristics of these oscillations seem hard to reconcile with previously established mechanisms for oscillations in magnetoresistance, suggesting the possibility of another type of physical origin.

  9. Linearization strategies for high sensitivity magnetoresistive sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Ana V.; Leitao, Diana C.; Valadeiro, João; Amaral, José; Freitas, Paulo P.; Cardoso, Susana

    2015-10-01

    Ultrasensitive magnetic field sensors envisaged for applications on biomedical imaging require the detection of low-intensity and low-frequency signals. Therefore linear magnetic sensors with enhanced sensitivity low noise levels and improved field detection at low operating frequencies are necessary. Suitable devices can be designed using magnetoresistive sensors, with room temperature operation, adjustable detected field range, CMOS compatibility and cost-effective production. The advent of spintronics set the path to the technological revolution boosted by the storage industry, in particular by the development of read heads using magnetoresistive devices. New multilayered structures were engineered to yield devices with linear output. We present a detailed study of the key factors influencing MR sensor performance (materials, geometries and layout strategies) with focus on different linearization strategies available. Furthermore strategies to improve sensor detection levels are also addressed with best reported values of ˜40 pT/√Hz at 30 Hz, representing a step forward the low field detection at room temperature.

  10. Electrical detection of proton-spin motion in a polymer device at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehme, Christoph

    With the emergence of spintronics concepts based on organic semiconductors there has been renewed interest in the role of both, electron as well as nuclear spin states for the magneto-optoelectronic properties of these materials. In spite of decades of research on these molecular systems, there is still much need for an understanding of some of the fundamental properties of spin-controlled charge carrier transport and recombination processes. This presentation focuses on mechanisms that allow proton spin states to influence electronic transition rates in organic semiconductors. Remarkably, even at low-magnetic field conditions and room temperature, nuclear spin states with energy splittings orders of magnitude below thermal energies are able to influence observables like magnetoresistance and fluorescence. While proton spins couple to charge carrier spins via hyperfine interaction, there has been considerable debate about the nature of the electronic processes that are highly susceptible to these weak hyperfine fields. Here, experiments are presented which show how the magnetic resonant manipulation of electron and nuclear spin states in a π-conjugated polymer device causes changes of the device current. The experiments confirm the extraordinary sensitivity of electronic transitions to very weak magnetic field changes and underscore the potential significance of spin-selection rules for highly sensitive absolute magnetic fields sensor concepts. However, the relevance of these magnetic-field sensitive spin-dependent electron transitions is not just limited to semiconductor materials but also radical pair chemistry and even avian magnetoreceptors This work was supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering under Award #DE-SC0000909. The Utah NSF - MRSEC program #DMR 1121252 is acknowledged for instrumentation support.

  11. Advances in materials for room temperature hydrogen sensors.

    PubMed

    Arya, Sunil K; Krishnan, Subramanian; Silva, Hayde; Jean, Sheila; Bhansali, Shekhar

    2012-06-21

    Hydrogen (H(2)), as a source of energy, continues to be a compelling choice in applications ranging from fuel cells and propulsion systems to feedstock for chemical, metallurgical and other industrial processes. H(2), being a clean, reliable, and affordable source, is finding ever increasing use in distributed electric power generation and H(2) fuelled cars. Although still under 0.1%, the distributed use of H(2) is the fastest growing area. In distributed H(2) storage, distribution, and consumption, safety continues to be a critical aspect. Affordable safety systems for distributed H(2) applications are critical for the H(2) economy to take hold. Advances in H(2) sensors are driven by specificity, reliability, repeatability, stability, cost, size, response time, recovery time, operating temperature, humidity range, and power consumption. Ambient temperature sensors for H(2) detection are increasingly being explored as they offer specificity, stability and robustness of high temperature sensors with lower operational costs and significantly longer operational lifetimes. This review summarizes and highlights recent developments in room temperature H(2) sensors. PMID:22582176

  12. Adsorption of CO Molecules on Si(001) at Room Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Eonmi; Eom, Daejin; Kim, Hanchul; Koo, Ja-Yong

    2015-03-01

    Initial adsorption of CO molecules on Si(001) is investigated by using room-temperature (RT) scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and density functional theory calculations. Theoretical calculations show that only one adsorption configuration of terminal-bond CO (T-CO) is stable and that the bridge-bond CO is unstable. All the abundantly observed STM features due to CO adsorption can be identified as differently configured T-COs. The initial sticking probability of CO molecules on Si(001) at RT is estimated to be as small as ~ 1 x 10-4 monolayer/Langmuir, which is significantly increased at high-temperature adsorption experiments implying a finite activation barrier for adsorption. Thermal annealing at 900 K for 5 min results in the dissociation of the adsorbed CO molecules with the probability of 60-70% instead of desorption, indicating both a strong chemisorption state and an activated dissociation process. The unique adsorption state with a large binding energy, a tiny sticking probability, and a finite adsorption barrier is in stark contrast with the previous low-temperature (below 100 K) observations of a weak binding, a high sticking probability, and a barrierless adsorption. We speculate that the low-temperature results might be a signature of a physisorption state in the condensed phase.

  13. Contracting cardiomyocytes in hydrophobic room-temperature ionic liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Hoshino, Takayuki; Fujita, Kyoko; Higashi, Ayako; Sakiyama, Keiko; Ohno, Hiroyuki; Morishima, Keisuke

    2012-10-19

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Biocompatible room-temperature ionic liquid was applied on beating cardiomyocyte. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The lifetime of beating cardiomyocytes was depended on anion functional group. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A longer lifetime was recorded for no functional group on alkyl chain on their anion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Amino group on alkyl chain and fluorine in anion induced fatal condition changes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We reported liquid electrolyte interface to stimulate cardiomyocytes. -- Abstract: Room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) are drawing attention as a new class of nonaqueous solvents to replace organic and aqueous solvents for chemical processes in the liquid phase at room temperature. The RTILs are notable for their characteristics of nonvolatility, extremely low vapor pressure, electric conductivity, and incombustibility. These distinguished properties of RTILs have brought attention to them in applications with biological cells and tissue in vacuum environment for scanning electron microscopy, and in microfluidic devices for micro-total analysis system (micro-TAS). Habitable RTILs could increase capability of nonaqueous micro-TAS for living cells. Some RTILs seemed to have the capability to replace water in biological applications. However, these RTILs had been applied to just supplemental additives for biocompatible test, to fixed cells as a substitute for an aqueous solution, and to simple molecules. None of RTILs in which directly soaks a living cell culture. Therefore, we demonstrated the design of RTILs for a living cell culture and a liquid electrolyte to stimulate contracting cardiomyocytes using the RTILs. We assessed the effect of RTILs on the cardiomyocytes using the beating lifetime to compare the applicability of RTILs for biological applications. Frequent spontaneous contractions of cardiomyocytes were confirmed in amino acid anion RTILs [P{sub 8,8,8,8}][Leu] and [P{sub 8

  14. Transversal magnetoresistance in Weyl semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klier, J.; Gornyi, I. V.; Mirlin, A. D.

    2015-11-01

    We explore theoretically the magnetoresistivity of three-dimensional Weyl and Dirac semimetals in transversal magnetic fields within two alternative models of disorder: (i) short-range impurities and (ii) charged (Coulomb) impurities. Impurity scattering is treated using the self-consistent Born approximation. We find that an unusual broadening of Landau levels leads to a variety of regimes of the resistivity scaling in the temperature-magnetic field plane. In particular, the magnetoresistance is nonmonotonous for the white-noise disorder model. For H →0 the magnetoresistance for short-range impurities vanishes in a nonanalytic way as H1 /3. In the limits of strongest magnetic fields H , the magnetoresistivity vanishes as 1 /H for pointlike impurities, while it is linear and positive in the model with Coulomb impurities.

  15. Giant magnetoresistance due to magnetoelectric currents in Sr{sub 3}Co{sub 2}Fe{sub 24}O{sub 41} hexaferrites

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xian; Su, Zhijuan; Sokolov, Alexander; Hu, Bolin; Andalib, Parisa; Chen, Yajie Harris, Vincent G.

    2014-09-15

    The giant magnetoresistance and magnetoelectric (ME) effects of Z-type hexaferrite Sr{sub 3}Co{sub 2}Fe{sub 24}O{sub 41} were investigated. The present experiments indicated that an induced magnetoelectric current in a transverse conical spin structure not only presented a nonlinear behavior with magnetic field and electric field but also depended upon a sweep rate of the applied magnetic field. More interestingly, the ME current induced magnetoresistance was measured, yielding a giant room temperature magnetoresistance of 32.2% measured at low magnetic fields (∼125 Oe). These results reveal great potential for emerging applications of multifunctional magnetoelectric ferrite materials.

  16. Room-Temperature, Low-Barrier Boron Doping of Graphene.

    PubMed

    Pan, Lida; Que, Yande; Chen, Hui; Wang, Dongfei; Li, Jun; Shen, Chengmin; Xiao, Wende; Du, Shixuan; Gao, Hongjun; Pantelides, Sokrates T

    2015-10-14

    Doping graphene with boron has been difficult because of high reaction barriers. Here, we describe a low-energy reaction route derived from first-principles calculations and validated by experiments. We find that a boron atom on graphene on a ruthenium(0001) substrate can replace a carbon by pushing it through, with substrate attraction helping to reduce the barrier to only 0.1 eV, implying that the doping can take place at room temperature. High-quality graphene is grown on a Ru(0001) surface and exposed to B2H6. Scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed that boron is indeed incorporated substitutionally without disturbing the graphene lattice. PMID:26348981

  17. Room-temperature ferromagnetism in cerium dioxide powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakhmatullin, R. M.; Pavlov, V. V.; Semashko, V. V.; Korableva, S. L.

    2015-08-01

    Room-temperature ferromagnetism is detected in a CeO2 powder with a grain size of about 35 nm and a low (<0.1 at %) manganese and iron content. The ferromagnetism in a CeO2 sample with a submicron crystallite size and the same manganese and iron impurity content is lower than in the nanocrystalline sample by an order of magnitude. Apart from ferromagnetism, both samples exhibit EPR spectra of localized paramagnetic centers, the concentration of which is lower than 0.01 at %. A comparative analysis of these results shows that the F-center exchange (FCE) mechanism cannot cause ferromagnetism. This conclusion agrees with the charge-transfer ferromagnetism model proposed recently.

  18. Oxidative decomposition of formaldehyde by metal oxides at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekine, Yoshika

    Formaldehyde (HCHO) is still a major indoor air pollutant in Japanese air-tight houses and is the subject of numerous complaints regarding health disorders. Authors have developed a passive-type air-cleaning material and an air cleaner using manganese oxide (77% MnO 2) as an active component and successfully reduced indoor HCHO concentrations in newly built multi-family houses. In this study, the reactivity between manganese oxide and HCHO was discussed. We tested the removal efficiencies of several metal oxides for HCHO in a static reaction vessel and found manganese oxide could react with HCHO and release carbon dioxide even at room temperature. The reactivity and mechanisms were discussed for the proposed chemical reactions. A mass balance study proved that a major product through the heterogeneous reaction between manganese oxide and HCHO was carbon dioxide. Harmful by-products (HCOOH and CO) were not found.

  19. Ratcheting fatigue behavior of Zircaloy-2 at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajpurohit, R. S.; Sudhakar Rao, G.; Chattopadhyay, K.; Santhi Srinivas, N. C.; Singh, Vakil

    2016-08-01

    Nuclear core components of zirconium alloys experience asymmetric stress or strain cycling during service which leads to plastic strain accumulation and drastic reduction in fatigue life as well as dimensional instability of the component. Variables like loading rate, mean stress, and stress amplitude affect the influence of asymmetric loading. In the present investigation asymmetric stress controlled fatigue tests were conducted with mean stress from 80 to 150 MPa, stress amplitude from 270 to 340 MPa and stress rate from 30 to 750 MPa/s to study the process of plastic strain accumulation and its effect on fatigue life of Zircaloy-2 at room temperature. It was observed that with increase in mean stress and stress amplitude accumulation of ratcheting strain was increased and fatigue life was reduced. However, increase in stress rate led to improvement in fatigue life due to less accumulation of ratcheting strain.

  20. Observation of visible luminescence from indium nitride at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Q.X.; Tanaka, T.; Nishio, M.; Ogawa, H.; Pu, X.D.; Shen, W.Z.

    2005-06-06

    InN films were grown on sapphire substrates with AlN buffer layers by reactive sputtering. C-axis-oriented crystalline InN films with a wurtzite structure were confirmed by x-ray diffraction and Raman scattering. Strong photoluminescence (PL) at 1.87 eV, together with a clear absorption edge at 1.97 eV, was observed at room temperature, which clearly demonstrates that it is not accurate in the previous assignment of an {approx}0.7 eV fundamental band gap for intrinsic InN simply from PL and absorption data. The possible origin of the present large band gap was discussed in terms of the effects of oxygen and the Burstein-Moss shift.

  1. Room temperature mechanical properties of shuttle thermal protection system materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawyer, J. W.; Rummler, D. R.

    1980-01-01

    Tests were conducted at room temperature to determine the mechanical properties and behavior of materials used for the thermal protection system of the space shuttle. The materials investigated include the LI-900 RSI tiles, the RTV-560 adhesive and the .41 cm (.16 thick) strain isolator pad (SIP). Tensile and compression cyclic loading tests were conducted on the SIP material and stress-strain curves obtained for various proof loads and load cyclic conditioning. Ultimate tensile and shear tests were conducted on the RSI, RTV, and SIP materials. The SIP material exhibits highly nonlinear stress-strain behavior, increased tangent modulus and ultimate tensile strength with increased loading rate, and large short time load relaxation and moderate creep behavior. Proof and cyclic load conditioning of the SIP results in permanent deformation of the material, hysteresis effects, and much higher tensile tangent modulus values at large strains.

  2. Tailoring room temperature photoluminescence of antireflective silicon nanofacets

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, Tanmoy; Kumar, M.; Ghatak, J.; Som, T.; Kanjilal, A.; Sahoo, P. K.

    2014-09-21

    In this paper, a fluence-dependent antireflection performance is presented from ion-beam fabricated nanofaceted-Si surfaces. It is also demonstrated that these nanofacets are capable of producing room temperature ultra-violet and blue photoluminescence which can be attributed to inter-band transitions of the localized excitonic states of different Si-O bonds at the Si/SiO{sub x} interface. Time-resolved photoluminescence measurements further confirm defect-induced radiative emission from the surface of silicon nanofacets. It is observed that the spectral characteristics remain unchanged, except an enhancement in the photoluminescence intensity with increasing ion-fluence. The increase in photoluminescence intensity by orders of magnitude stronger than that of a planar Si substrate is due to higher absorption of incident photons by nanofaceted structures.

  3. Modification of embedded Cu nanoparticles: Ion irradiation at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johannessen, B.; Kluth, P.; Giulian, R.; Araujo, L. L.; Llewellyn, D. J.; Foran, G. J.; Cookson, D. J.; Ridgway, M. C.

    2007-04-01

    Cu nanoparticles (NPs) with an average diameter of ∼25 Å were synthesized in SiO2 by ion implantation and thermal annealing. Subsequently, the NPs were exposed to ion irradiation at room temperature simultaneously with a bulk Cu reference film. The ion species/energy was varied to achieve different values for the nuclear energy loss. The short-range atomic structure and average NP diameter were measured by means of extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy and small angle X-ray scattering, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy yielded complementary results. The short-range order of the Cu films remained unchanged consistent with the high regeneration rate of bulk elemental metals. For the NP samples it was found that increasing nuclear energy loss yielded gradual dissolution of NPs. Furthermore, an increased structural disorder was observed for the residual NPs.

  4. Defects in silicon plastically deformed at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leipner, H. S.; Wang, Z.; Gu, H.; Mikhnovich, V. V., Jr.; Bondarenko, V.; Krause-Rehberg, R.; Demenet, J.-L.; Rabier, J.

    2004-07-01

    The article [1] describes specific features of positron trapping in silicon plastically deformed at room temperature. The results are related to the dislocation core structure and the inhomogeneous deformation. The picture shows the probability density function of a positron localized in a vacancy in silicon. The calculation was performed with the superimposed-atom model. The degree of localization and consequently the defect-related positron lifetime vary for different open-volume defects, such as vacancies, voids, and dislocations.The first author, Hartmut S. Leipner, is CEO of the Center of Materials Science of the University Halle-Wittenberg. His research activities are focused on the characterization of extended defects in semiconductors.

  5. Emergence of room-temperature ferroelectricity at reduced dimensions.

    PubMed

    Lee, D; Lu, H; Gu, Y; Choi, S-Y; Li, S-D; Ryu, S; Paudel, T R; Song, K; Mikheev, E; Lee, S; Stemmer, S; Tenne, D A; Oh, S H; Tsymbal, E Y; Wu, X; Chen, L-Q; Gruverman, A; Eom, C B

    2015-09-18

    The enhancement of the functional properties of materials at reduced dimensions is crucial for continuous advancements in nanoelectronic applications. Here, we report that the scale reduction leads to the emergence of an important functional property, ferroelectricity, challenging the long-standing notion that ferroelectricity is inevitably suppressed at the scale of a few nanometers. A combination of theoretical calculations, electrical measurements, and structural analyses provides evidence of room-temperature ferroelectricity in strain-free epitaxial nanometer-thick films of otherwise nonferroelectric strontium titanate (SrTiO3). We show that electrically induced alignment of naturally existing polar nanoregions is responsible for the appearance of a stable net ferroelectric polarization in these films. This finding can be useful for the development of low-dimensional material systems with enhanced functional properties relevant to emerging nanoelectronic devices. PMID:26383947

  6. Realization of a flux-driven memtranstor at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi-Peng, Shen; Da-Shan, Shang; Yi-Sheng, Chai; Young, Sun

    2016-02-01

    The memtranstor has been proposed to be the fourth fundamental circuit memelement in addition to the memristor, memcapacitor, and meminductor. Here, we demonstrate the memtranstor behavior at room temperature in a device made of the magnetoelectric hexaferrite (Ba0.5Sr1.5Co2Fe11AlO22) where the electric polarization is tunable by external magnetic field. This device shows a nonlinear q-φ relationship with a butterfly-shaped hysteresis loop, in agreement with the anticipated memtranstor behavior. The memtranstor, like other memelements, has a great potential in developing more advanced circuit functionalities. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grants Nos. 11227405, 11534015, 11274363, and 11374347) and the Natural Science Foundation from the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. XDB07030200).

  7. Calculation of the room-temperature shapes of unsymmetric laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyer, M. W.

    1981-01-01

    A theory explaining the characteristics of the cured shapes of unsymmetric laminates is presented. The theory is based on an extension of classical lamination theory which accounts for geometric nonlinearities. A Rayleigh-Ritz approach to minimizing the total potential energy is used to obtain quantitative information regarding the room temperature shapes of square T300/5208 (0(2)/90(2))T and (0(4)/90(4))T graphite-epoxy laminates. It is shown that, depending on the thickness of the laminate and the length of the side the square, the saddle shape configuration is actually unstable. For values of length and thickness that render the saddle shape unstable, it is shown that two stable cylindrical shapes exist. The predictions of the theory are compared with existing experimental data.

  8. Microstructure of room temperature ionic liquids at stepped graphite electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Guang; Li, Song; Zhao, Wei; Cummings, Peter T.

    2015-07-14

    Molecular dynamics simulations of room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) [emim][TFSI] at stepped graphite electrodes were performed to investigate the influence of the thickness of the electrode surface step on the microstructure of interfacial RTILs. A strong correlation was observed between the interfacial RTIL structure and the step thickness in electrode surface as well as the ion size. Specifically, when the step thickness is commensurate with ion size, the interfacial layering of cation/anion is more evident; whereas, the layering tends to be less defined when the step thickness is close to the half of ion size. Furthermore, two-dimensional microstructure of ion layers exhibits different patterns and alignments of counter-ion/co-ion lattice at neutral and charged electrodes. As the cation/anion layering could impose considerable effects on ion diffusion, the detailed information of interfacial RTILs at stepped graphite presented here would help to understand the molecular mechanism of RTIL-electrode interfaces in supercapacitors.

  9. Cavity-Enhanced Room-Temperature Broadband Raman Memory.

    PubMed

    Saunders, D J; Munns, J H D; Champion, T F M; Qiu, C; Kaczmarek, K T; Poem, E; Ledingham, P M; Walmsley, I A; Nunn, J

    2016-03-01

    Broadband quantum memories hold great promise as multiplexing elements in future photonic quantum information protocols. Alkali-vapor Raman memories combine high-bandwidth storage, on-demand readout, and operation at room temperature without collisional fluorescence noise. However, previous implementations have required large control pulse energies and have suffered from four-wave-mixing noise. Here, we present a Raman memory where the storage interaction is enhanced by a low-finesse birefringent cavity tuned into simultaneous resonance with the signal and control fields, dramatically reducing the energy required to drive the memory. By engineering antiresonance for the anti-Stokes field, we also suppress the four-wave-mixing noise and report the lowest unconditional noise floor yet achieved in a Raman-type warm vapor memory, (15±2)×10^{-3} photons per pulse, with a total efficiency of (9.5±0.5)%. PMID:26991164

  10. Cavity-Enhanced Room-Temperature Broadband Raman Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunders, D. J.; Munns, J. H. D.; Champion, T. F. M.; Qiu, C.; Kaczmarek, K. T.; Poem, E.; Ledingham, P. M.; Walmsley, I. A.; Nunn, J.

    2016-03-01

    Broadband quantum memories hold great promise as multiplexing elements in future photonic quantum information protocols. Alkali-vapor Raman memories combine high-bandwidth storage, on-demand readout, and operation at room temperature without collisional fluorescence noise. However, previous implementations have required large control pulse energies and have suffered from four-wave-mixing noise. Here, we present a Raman memory where the storage interaction is enhanced by a low-finesse birefringent cavity tuned into simultaneous resonance with the signal and control fields, dramatically reducing the energy required to drive the memory. By engineering antiresonance for the anti-Stokes field, we also suppress the four-wave-mixing noise and report the lowest unconditional noise floor yet achieved in a Raman-type warm vapor memory, (15 ±2 )×10-3 photons per pulse, with a total efficiency of (9.5 ±0.5 )%.