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Sample records for room temperature magnetoresistance

  1. Ultrahigh magnetoresistance at room temperature in molecular wires.

    PubMed

    Mahato, R N; Lülf, H; Siekman, M H; Kersten, S P; Bobbert, P A; de Jong, M P; De Cola, L; van der Wiel, W G

    2013-07-19

    Systems featuring large magnetoresistance (MR) at room temperature and in small magnetic fields are attractive owing to their potential for applications in magnetic field sensing and data storage. Usually, the magnetic properties of materials are exploited to achieve large MR effects. Here, we report on an exceptionally large (>2000%), room-temperature, small-field (a few millitesla) MR effect in one-dimensional, nonmagnetic systems formed by molecular wires embedded in a zeolite host crystal. This ultrahigh MR effect is ascribed to spin blockade in one-dimensional electron transport. Its generic nature offers very good perspectives to exploit the effect in a wide range of low-dimensional systems. PMID:23828887

  2. Local magnetoresistance in Fe/MgO/Si lateral spin valve at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, Tomoyuki Koike, Hayato; Oikawa, Tohru; Suzuki, Toshio; Ando, Yuichiro; Suzuki, Yoshishige; Shiraishi, Masashi

    2014-02-03

    Room temperature local magnetoresistance in two-terminal scheme is reported. By employing 1.6 nm-thick MgO tunnel barrier, spin injection efficiency is increased, resulting in large non-local magnetoresistance. The magnitude of the non-local magnetoresistance is estimated to be 0.0057 Ω at room temperature. As a result, a clear rectangle signal is observed in local magnetoresistance measurement even at room temperature. We also investigate the origin of local magnetoresistance by measuring the spin accumulation voltage of each contact separately.

  3. Giant single-molecule anisotropic magnetoresistance at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Li, Ji-Jun; Bai, Mei-Lin; Chen, Zhao-Bin; Zhou, Xiao-Shun; Shi, Zhan; Zhang, Meng; Ding, Song-Yuan; Hou, Shi-Min; Schwarzacher, Walther; Nichols, Richard J; Mao, Bing-Wei

    2015-05-13

    We report an electrochemically assisted jump-to-contact scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) break junction approach to create reproducible and well-defined single-molecule spintronic junctions. The STM break junction is equipped with an external magnetic field either parallel or perpendicular to the electron transport direction. The conductance of Fe-terephthalic acid (TPA)-Fe single-molecule junctions is measured and a giant single-molecule tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance (T-AMR) up to 53% is observed at room temperature. Theoretical calculations based on first-principles quantum simulations show that the observed AMR of Fe-TPA-Fe junctions originates from electronic coupling at the TPA-Fe interfaces modified by the magnetic orientation of the Fe electrodes with respect to the direction of current flow. The present study highlights new opportunities for obtaining detailed understanding of mechanisms of charge and spin transport in molecular junctions and the role of interfaces in determining the MR of single-molecule junctions. PMID:25894840

  4. Room temperature giant baroresistance and magnetoresistance and its tunability in Pd doped FeRh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushwaha, Pallavi; Bag, Pallab; Rawat, R.

    2015-01-01

    We report room temperature giant baroresistance (≈128%) in Fe49(Rh0.93Pd0.07)51. With the application of external pressure (P) and magnetic field (H), the temperature range of giant baroresistance (≈600% at 5 K, 19.9 kilobars and 8 T) and magnetoresistance (≈ -85% at 5 K and 8 T) can be tuned from 5 K to well above room temperature. It is shown that under external pressure, antiferromagnetic state is stabilized at room temperature and shows giant magnetoresistance (≈-55%). Due to coupled magnetic and lattice changes, the isothermal change in resistivity at room temperature under pressure (at constant H) as well as magnetic field (at constant P) can be scaled together to a single curve, when plotted as a function of X = T + 12.8 × H - 7.3 × P.

  5. Room Temperature Giant and Linear Magnetoresistance in Topological Insulator Bi2Te3 Nanosheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaolin; Du, Yi; Dou, Shixue; Zhang, Chao

    2012-06-01

    Topological insulators, a new class of condensed matter having bulk insulating states and gapless metallic surface states, have demonstrated fascinating quantum effects. However, the potential practical applications of the topological insulators are still under exploration worldwide. We demonstrate that nanosheets of a Bi2Te3 topological insulator several quintuple layers thick display giant and linear magnetoresistance. The giant and linear magnetoresistance achieved is as high as over 600% at room temperature, with a trend towards further increase at higher temperatures, as well as being weakly temperature-dependent and linear with the field, without any sign of saturation at measured fields up to 13 T. Furthermore, we observed a magnetic field induced gap below 10 K. The observation of giant and linear magnetoresistance paves the way for 3D topological insulators to be useful for practical applications in magnetoelectronic sensors such as disk reading heads, mechatronics, and other multifunctional electromagnetic applications.

  6. Electric field dependence of junction magnetoresistance in magnetite/semiconductor heterostructure at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Aireddy, H.; Bhaumik, S.; Das, A. K.

    2015-12-07

    We have fabricated Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/p-Si heterojunction using pulsed laser deposition technique and explored its electro-magnetic transport properties. The heterojunction exhibits backward rectifying property at all temperatures, and appraisal of giant junction magnetoresistance (JMR) is observed at room temperature (RT). Conspicuously, the variation and sign change of JMR as a function of electric field is observed at RT. The backward rectifying behavior of the device is ascribed to the highly doped p-type (p{sup ++}) semiconducting nature of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, and the origin of electric field (voltage) dependence of magnetoresistance is explained proposing electronic band diagram of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/SiO{sub 2}/p-Si heterojunction. This interesting result may have importance to integrate Si-based magnetoresistance sources in multifunctional spintronic devices.

  7. Electric field dependence of junction magnetoresistance in magnetite/semiconductor heterostructure at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aireddy, H.; Bhaumik, S.; Das, A. K.

    2015-12-01

    We have fabricated Fe3O4/p-Si heterojunction using pulsed laser deposition technique and explored its electro-magnetic transport properties. The heterojunction exhibits backward rectifying property at all temperatures, and appraisal of giant junction magnetoresistance (JMR) is observed at room temperature (RT). Conspicuously, the variation and sign change of JMR as a function of electric field is observed at RT. The backward rectifying behavior of the device is ascribed to the highly doped p-type (p++) semiconducting nature of Fe3O4, and the origin of electric field (voltage) dependence of magnetoresistance is explained proposing electronic band diagram of Fe3O4/SiO2/p-Si heterojunction. This interesting result may have importance to integrate Si-based magnetoresistance sources in multifunctional spintronic devices.

  8. High-density magnetoresistive random access memory operating at ultralow voltage at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jia-Mian; Li, Zheng; Chen, Long-Qing; Nan, Ce-Wen

    2011-01-01

    The main bottlenecks limiting the practical applications of current magnetoresistive random access memory (MRAM) technology are its low storage density and high writing energy consumption. Although a number of proposals have been reported for voltage-controlled memory device in recent years, none of them simultaneously satisfy the important device attributes: high storage capacity, low power consumption and room temperature operation. Here we present, using phase-field simulations, a simple and new pathway towards high-performance MRAMs that display significant improvements over existing MRAM technologies or proposed concepts. The proposed nanoscale MRAM device simultaneously exhibits ultrahigh storage capacity of up to 88 Gb inch−2, ultralow power dissipation as low as 0.16 fJ per bit and room temperature high-speed operation below 10 ns. PMID:22109527

  9. Room-temperature tunnel magnetoresistance and spin-polarized tunneling through an organic semiconductor barrier.

    PubMed

    Santos, T S; Lee, J S; Migdal, P; Lekshmi, I C; Satpati, B; Moodera, J S

    2007-01-01

    Electron spin-polarized tunneling is observed through an ultrathin layer of the molecular organic semiconductor tris(8-hydroxyquinolinato)aluminum (Alq3). Significant tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) was measured in a Co/Al2O3/Alq3/NiFe magnetic tunnel junction at room temperature, which increased when cooled to low temperatures. Tunneling characteristics, such as the current-voltage behavior and temperature and bias dependence of the TMR, show the good quality of the organic tunnel barrier. Spin polarization (P) of the tunnel current through the Alq3 layer, directly measured using superconducting Al as the spin detector, shows that minimizing formation of an interfacial dipole layer between the metal electrode and organic barrier significantly improves spin transport. PMID:17358495

  10. Hydrogen Treatment for Superparamagnetic VO2 Nanowires with Large Room-Temperature Magnetoresistance.

    PubMed

    Li, Zejun; Guo, Yuqiao; Hu, Zhenpeng; Su, Jihu; Zhao, Jiyin; Wu, Junchi; Wu, Jiajing; Zhao, Yingcheng; Wu, Changzheng; Xie, Yi

    2016-07-01

    One-dimensional (1D) transition metal oxide (TMO) nanostructures are actively pursued in spintronic devices owing to their nontrivial d electron magnetism and confined electron transport pathways. However, for TMOs, the realization of 1D structures with long-range magnetic order to achieve a sensitive magnetoelectric response near room temperature has been a longstanding challenge. Herein, we exploit a chemical hydric effect to regulate the spin structure of 1D V-V atomic chains in monoclinic VO2 nanowires. Hydrogen treatment introduced V(3+) (3d(2) ) ions into the 1D zigzag V-V chains, triggering the formation of ferromagnetically coupled V(3+) -V(4+) dimers to produce 1D superparamagnetic chains and achieve large room-temperature negative magnetoresistance (-23.9 %, 300 K, 0.5 T). This approach offers new opportunities to regulate the spin structure of 1D nanostructures to control the intrinsic magnetoelectric properties of spintronic materials. PMID:27265205

  11. Giant magnetoresistance and superparamagnetism in DyxFe100-x nanogranular magnetic thin films at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mekala, Laxman; Muhammed Shameem P., V.; Singh, Dushyanth; Kumar, M. Senthil

    2016-05-01

    In this article, DyxFe100-x nanogranular (15 ≤ x ≤ 25) thin films have been prepared at ambient temperature by dc magnetron sputtering. The correlation between the microstructure, magneto transport and magnetization properties is discussed. The grain size of Dy (Dysprosium) and Fe (Iron) was measured to be about 2 to 3nm, respectively and the distribution of grains was homogenous throughout the sample. The magnetoresistance is sensitive to microstructural changes (particle size as well as Dy concentration). At the room temperature, the magnetoresistance [MR %] increased from 0.2 to 2.2 with increase in atomic concentration of Dy from x = 15 to 25 and we obtained maximum 2.2 MR [%] for x = 25 in this series of samples. The magnetization studies have revealed that all the samples are superparamagnetic (SPM) at room temperature.

  12. Enhanced room-temperature magnetoresistance in self-assembled Ag-coated multiphasic chromium oxide nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, S; Biswas, S

    2016-09-14

    Self-assembled Ag-coated multiphasic diluted magnetic chromium oxide nanocomposites were developed by a facile chemical synthesis route involving a reaction of CrO3 in the presence of Ag(+) ions in an aqueous solution of poly-vinyl alcohol (PVA) and sucrose. The tiny ferromagnetic single domains of tetragonal and orthorhombic CrO2 (t-CrO2 and o-CrO2) embedded in a dominantly insulating matrix of antiferromagnetic Cr2O3 and Cr3O8, and paramagnetic CrO3 and Cr2O, with a correlated diamagnetic thin and discontinuous shell layer of Ag efficiently tailor useful magnetic and room-temperature magnetoresistance (RTMR) properties. The t-CrO2, o-CrO2, possible canted ferromagnetism due to spin disorder in the matrix components, and the associated exchange interactions are the elements responsible for the observed ferromagnetism in the composite structure. The chain of ferromagnetic centers embedded in the composite matrix constitutes a type of magnetic tunnel junction through which spin-polarized electrons can effectively move without significant local interruptions. Electrical transport measurements showed that the spin-dependent tunneling (SDT) mechanism in the engineered microstructure of the nanocomposites exists even at room temperature (RT). A typical sample unveils a markedly enhanced RTMR-value, e.g., -80% at an applied field (H) of 3 kOe, compared to the reported values for compacted CrO2 powders or composites. The enhanced RTMR-value observed in the Coulomb blockade regime appears not only due to the considerably suppressed spin flipping at RT but primarily due to a highly effective SDT mechanism through an interlinked structure of Ag-coated multiphasic chromium oxide nanocomposites. PMID:27524510

  13. Extraordinary Magnetoresistance At Room Temperature In Non-Magnetic Narrow-Gap Semiconductor/Metal Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solin, S. A.

    2001-03-01

    The magnetoresistance (MR) of a material object contains a physical contribution from the magnetic field dependence of the material parameters such as the mobility or carrier concentration and a geometric contribution from the dependence of the current path and output voltage on the sample shape and electrode configuration. To date, only two classes of magnetic materials, artificially layered metals which exhibit giant MR (GMR) and the manganite perovskites which exhibit colossal MR (CMR) have been considered serious candidates in the effort to improve the room temperature (RT) performance of MR sensors. For both of these classes, the physical MR dominates. In contrast, we have found that non-magnetic narrow-gap semiconductors containing patterned metallic inhomogeneities (shunts), exhibit RT geometric extraordinary MR (EMR) orders of magnitude larger than the physical MR of other materials. EMR in excess of 2000% at 0.05 Tesla and 3,000,000% at 5 T, respectively, has been observed in macroscopic ( ~ 1 mm) composite structures of InSb with patterned internal or external shunts.(S.A. Solin et al., Science 289), 1530 (2000).^,(T. Zhou, D.R. Hines and S.A. Solin, Appl. Phys. Lett., submitted.) We have been able to quantitatively account for the magnitude of the observed EMR as well as its dependence on the geometry (shape, size and placement of the shunt) using both analytic (Laplace equation with boundary conditions) and computational (Finite Element Analysis)(see the talk by L.R. Ram-Mohan et al., this conference) methods. The effect of scaling EMR structures to mesoscopic dimensions and the possible technological impact of EMR will be discussed.

  14. Low voltage tunneling magnetoresistance in CuCrO{sub 2}-based semiconductor heterojunctions at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X. R.; Han, M. J.; Shan, C.; Hu, Z. G. Zhu, Z. Q.; Chu, J. H.; Wu, J. D.

    2014-12-14

    CuCrO{sub 2}-based heterojunction diodes with rectifying characteristics have been fabricated by combining p-type Mg-doped CuCrO{sub 2} and n-type Al-doped ZnO. It was found that the current for the heterojunction in low bias voltage region is dominated by the trap-assisted tunneling mechanism. Positive magnetoresistance (MR) effect for the heterojunction can be observed at room temperature due to the tunneling-induced antiparallel spin polarization near the heterostructure interface. The MR effect becomes enhanced with the magnetic field, and shows the maximum at a bias voltage around 0.5 V. The phenomena indicate that the CuCrO{sub 2}-based heterojunction is a promising candidate for low-power semiconductor spintronic devices.

  15. Electric-field manipulation of magnetization rotation and tunneling magnetoresistance of magnetic tunnel junctions at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Aitian; Li, Peisen; Li, Dalai; Zhao, Yonggang; Zhang, Sen; Yang, Lifeng; Liu, Yan; Zhu, Meihong; Zhang, Huiyun; Han, Xiufeng

    2015-03-01

    Recent studies on the electric-field control of tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) have attracted considerable attention for low power consumption. So far two methods have been demonstrated for electric-field control of TMR. One method uses ferroelectric or multiferroic barriers, which is limited by low temperature. The other is nanoscale thin film magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ), but the assistance of a magnetic field is required. Therefore, electric-field control of TMR at room temperature without a magnetic field is highly desired. One promising way is to employ strain-mediated coupling in ferromagnetic/piezoelectric structure. Though MTJs/piezoelectric has been predicted by theory, experiment work is still lacking. We deposited CoFeB/AlOx/CoFeB on Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)0.7Ti0.3O3 (PMN-PT) ferroelectric single crystal. Under external electric fields, PMN-PT will produce a piezostrain due to piezoelectric effect, and the piezostrain transfers to ferromagnetic film to change the magnetic anisotropy. We demonstrate a reversible, continuous magnetization rotation and manipulation of TMR at room temperature by electric fields without the assistance of a magnetic field.

  16. Anisotropic magnetoresistance and piezoresistivity in structured Fe3O4-silver particles in PDMS elastomers at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Mietta, José L; Ruiz, Mariano M; Antonel, P Soledad; Perez, Oscar E; Butera, Alejandro; Jorge, Guillermo; Negri, R Martín

    2012-05-01

    Magnetorheological elastomers, MREs, based on elastic organic matrices displaying anisotropic magnetoresistance and piezoresistivity at room temperature were prepared and characterized. These materials are dispersions of superparamagnetic magnetite forming cores of aggregated nanoparticles inside silver microparticles that are dispersed in an elastomeric polymer (poly(dimethylsiloxane), PDMS), curing the polymer in the presence of a uniform magnetic field. In this way, the elastic material becomes structured as the application of the field induces the formation of filaments of silver-covered inorganic material agglomerates (needles) aligned in the direction of the field (parallel to the field). Because the magnetic particles are covered with silver, the MREs are not only magnetic but also electrical conductors. The structuration induces elastic, magnetic, and electrical anisotropic properties. For example, with a low concentration of particles in the elastic matrix (5% w/w) it is possible to obtain resistances of a few ohms when measured parallel to the needles or several megaohms in the perpendicular direction. Magnetite nanoparticles (Fe(3)O(4) NP) were synthesized by the coprecipitation method, and then agglomerations of these NPs were covered with Ag. The average size of the obtained magnetite NPs was about 13 nm, and the magnetite-silver particles, referred to as Fe(3)O(4)@Ag, form micrometric aggregates (1.3 μm). Nanoparticles, microparticles, and the MREs were characterized by XRD, TEM, SEM, EDS, diffuse reflectance, voltammetry, VSM, and SQUID. At room temperature, the synthesized magnetite and Fe(3)O(4)@Ag particles are in a superparamagnetic state (T(B) = 205 and 179 K at 0.01 T as determined by SQUID). The elastic properties and Young's modulus of the MREs were measured as a function of the orientation using a texture analysis device. The magnetic anisotropy in the MRE composite was investigated by FMR. The electrical conductivity of the MRE (

  17. Spin Hall magnetoresistance at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Uchida, Ken-ichi; Qiu, Zhiyong; Kikkawa, Takashi; Iguchi, Ryo; Saitoh, Eiji

    2015-02-02

    The temperature dependence of spin Hall magnetoresistance (SMR) in Pt/Y{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12} (YIG) bilayer films has been investigated in a high temperature range from room temperature to near the Curie temperature of YIG. The experimental results show that the magnitude of the magnetoresistance ratio induced by the SMR monotonically decreases with increasing the temperature and almost disappears near the Curie temperature. We found that, near the Curie temperature, the temperature dependence of the SMR in the Pt/YIG film is steeper than that of a magnetization curve of the YIG; the critical exponent of the magnetoresistance ratio is estimated to be 0.9. This critical behavior of the SMR is attributed mainly to the temperature dependence of the spin-mixing conductance at the Pt/YIG interface.

  18. Super-giant magnetoresistance at room-temperature in copper nanowires due to magnetic field modulation of potential barrier heights at nanowire-contact interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, Md I.; Maksud, M.; Palapati, N. K. R.; Subramanian, A.; Atulasimha, J.; Bandyopadhyay, S.

    2016-07-01

    We have observed a super-giant (∼10 000 000%) negative magnetoresistance at 39 mT field in Cu nanowires contacted with Au contact pads. In these nanowires, potential barriers form at the two Cu/Au interfaces because of Cu oxidation that results in an ultrathin copper oxide layer forming between Cu and Au. Current flows when electrons tunnel through, and/or thermionically emit over, these barriers. A magnetic field applied transverse to the direction of current flow along the wire deflects electrons toward one edge of the wire because of the Lorentz force, causing electron accumulation at that edge and depletion at the other. This lowers the potential barrier at the accumulated edge and raises it at the depleted edge, causing a super-giant magnetoresistance at room temperature.

  19. Super-giant magnetoresistance at room-temperature in copper nanowires due to magnetic field modulation of potential barrier heights at nanowire-contact interfaces.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Md I; Maksud, M; Palapati, N K R; Subramanian, A; Atulasimha, J; Bandyopadhyay, S

    2016-07-29

    We have observed a super-giant (∼10 000 000%) negative magnetoresistance at 39 mT field in Cu nanowires contacted with Au contact pads. In these nanowires, potential barriers form at the two Cu/Au interfaces because of Cu oxidation that results in an ultrathin copper oxide layer forming between Cu and Au. Current flows when electrons tunnel through, and/or thermionically emit over, these barriers. A magnetic field applied transverse to the direction of current flow along the wire deflects electrons toward one edge of the wire because of the Lorentz force, causing electron accumulation at that edge and depletion at the other. This lowers the potential barrier at the accumulated edge and raises it at the depleted edge, causing a super-giant magnetoresistance at room temperature. PMID:27320491

  20. Colossal magnetoresistance in amino-functionalized graphene quantum dots at room temperature: manifestation of weak anti-localization and doorway to spintronics.

    PubMed

    Roy, Rajarshi; Thapa, Ranjit; Kumar, Gundam Sandeep; Mazumder, Nilesh; Sen, Dipayan; Sinthika, S; Das, Nirmalya S; Chattopadhyay, Kalyan K

    2016-04-14

    In this work, we have demonstrated the signatures of localized surface distortions and disorders in functionalized graphene quantum dots (fGQD) and consequences in magneto-transport under weak field regime (∼1 Tesla) at room temperature. Observed positive colossal magnetoresistance (MR) and its suppression is primarily explained by weak anti-localization phenomenon where competitive valley (inter and intra) dependent scattering takes place at room temperature under low magnetic field; analogous to low mobility disordered graphene samples. Furthermore, using ab-initio analysis we show that sub-lattice sensitive spin-polarized ground state exists in the GQD as a result of pz orbital asymmetry in GQD carbon atoms with amino functional groups. This spin polarized ground state is believed to help the weak anti-localization dependent magneto transport by generating more disorder and strain in a GQD lattice under applied magnetic field and lays the premise for future graphene quantum dot based spintronic applications. PMID:27031679

  1. Novel room-temperature spin-valve-like magnetoresistance in magnetically coupled nano-column Fe3O4/Ni heterostructure.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Wen; Song, Wendong; Herng, Tun Seng; Qin, Qing; Yang, Yong; Zheng, Ming; Hong, Xiaoliang; Feng, Yuan Ping; Ding, Jun

    2016-08-25

    Herein, we design a room-temperature spin-valve-like magnetoresistance in a nano-column Fe3O4/Ni heterostructure without using a non-magnetic spacer or pinning layer. An Fe3O4 nano-column film is self-assembled on a Ni underlayer by the thermal decomposition method. The wet-chemical self-assembly is facile, economical and scalable. The magnetoresistance (MR) response of the Ni underlayer in the heterostructure under positive and negative out-of-plane magnetic fields differ by ∼0.25 at room temperature and ∼0.43 at 100 K. We attribute the spin-valve-like magnetoresistance to the unidirectional magnetic anisotropy of the Ni underlayer when being magnetically coupled by the Fe3O4 nano-column film. The out-of-plane negative-field magnetization is higher than the positive-field magnetization, affirming the unidirectional magnetic anisotropy of the Fe3O4/Ni heterostructure. Temperature-dependent magnetic and resistivity studies illustrate a close correlation between the magnetization transition of Fe3O4 and resistivity transition of Ni and prove a magnetic coupling between the Fe3O4 and Ni. First-principles calculations reveal that the Fe3O4/Ni model under a negative magnetic field is energetically more stable than that under a positive magnetic field. Furthermore, partial density of states (PDOS) analysis demonstrates the unidirectional magnetic anisotropy of the Ni 3d orbital. This is induced by the strong ferromagnetic coupling between Fe3O4 and Ni via oxygen-mediated Fe 3d-O 2p-Ni 3d hybridizations. PMID:27526860

  2. Magnetic properties of epitaxial Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} films with various crystal orientations and tunnel magnetoresistance effect at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Nagahama, Taro Matsuda, Yuya; Tate, Kazuya; Kawai, Tomohiro; Takahashi, Nozomi; Hiratani, Shungo; Watanabe, Yusuke; Yanase, Takashi; Shimada, Toshihiro

    2014-09-08

    Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} is a ferrimagnetic spinel ferrite that exhibits electric conductivity at room temperature (RT). Although the material has been predicted to be a half metal according to ab-initio calculations, magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) with Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} electrodes have demonstrated a small tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) effect. Not even the sign of the tunnel magnetoresistance ratio has been experimentally established. Here, we report on the magnetic properties of epitaxial Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} films with various crystal orientations. The films exhibited apparent crystal orientation dependence on hysteresis curves. In particular, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}(110) films exhibited in-plane uniaxial magnetic anisotropy. With respect to the squareness of hysteresis, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} (111) demonstrated the largest squareness. Furthermore, we fabricated MTJs with Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}(110) electrodes and obtained a TMR effect of −12% at RT. The negative TMR ratio corresponded to the negative spin polarization of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} predicted from band calculations.

  3. Anisotropic magnetoresistance of individual CoFeB and Ni nanotubes with values of up to 1.4% at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rüffer, Daniel; Slot, Marlou; Huber, Rupert; Schwarze, Thomas; Heimbach, Florian; Tütüncüoglu, Gözde; Matteini, Federico; Russo-Averchi, Eleonora; Kovács, András; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal; Zamani, Reza R.; Morante, Joan R.; Arbiol, Jordi; Fontcuberta i Morral, Anna; Grundler, Dirk

    2014-07-01

    Magnetic nanotubes (NTs) are interesting for magnetic memory and magnonic applications. We report magnetotransport experiments on individual 10 to 20 μm long Ni and CoFeB NTs with outer diameters ranging from 160 to 390 nm and film thicknesses of 20 to 40 nm. The anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) effect studied from 2 K to room temperature (RT) amounted to 1.4% and 0.1% for Ni and CoFeB NTs, respectively, at RT. We evaluated magnetometric demagnetization factors of about 0.7 for Ni and CoFeB NTs having considerably different saturation magnetization. The relatively large AMR value of the Ni nanotubes is promising for RT spintronic applications. The large saturation magnetization of CoFeB is useful in different fields such as magnonics and scanning probe microscopy using nanotubes as magnetic tips.

  4. Colossal magnetoresistance in amino-functionalized graphene quantum dots at room temperature: manifestation of weak anti-localization and doorway to spintronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Rajarshi; Thapa, Ranjit; Kumar, Gundam Sandeep; Mazumder, Nilesh; Sen, Dipayan; Sinthika, S.; Das, Nirmalya S.; Chattopadhyay, Kalyan K.

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we have demonstrated the signatures of localized surface distortions and disorders in functionalized graphene quantum dots (fGQD) and consequences in magneto-transport under weak field regime (~1 Tesla) at room temperature. Observed positive colossal magnetoresistance (MR) and its suppression is primarily explained by weak anti-localization phenomenon where competitive valley (inter and intra) dependent scattering takes place at room temperature under low magnetic field; analogous to low mobility disordered graphene samples. Furthermore, using ab-initio analysis we show that sub-lattice sensitive spin-polarized ground state exists in the GQD as a result of pz orbital asymmetry in GQD carbon atoms with amino functional groups. This spin polarized ground state is believed to help the weak anti-localization dependent magneto transport by generating more disorder and strain in a GQD lattice under applied magnetic field and lays the premise for future graphene quantum dot based spintronic applications.In this work, we have demonstrated the signatures of localized surface distortions and disorders in functionalized graphene quantum dots (fGQD) and consequences in magneto-transport under weak field regime (~1 Tesla) at room temperature. Observed positive colossal magnetoresistance (MR) and its suppression is primarily explained by weak anti-localization phenomenon where competitive valley (inter and intra) dependent scattering takes place at room temperature under low magnetic field; analogous to low mobility disordered graphene samples. Furthermore, using ab-initio analysis we show that sub-lattice sensitive spin-polarized ground state exists in the GQD as a result of pz orbital asymmetry in GQD carbon atoms with amino functional groups. This spin polarized ground state is believed to help the weak anti-localization dependent magneto transport by generating more disorder and strain in a GQD lattice under applied magnetic field and lays the premise for

  5. Room temperature magnetocaloric effect, critical behavior, and magnetoresistance in Na-deficient manganite La{sub 0.8}Na{sub 0.1}MnO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Khlifi, M. Dhahri, E.; Hlil, E. K.

    2014-05-21

    The La{sub 0.8}Na{sub 0.1}MnO{sub 3} oxide was prepared by the solid-state reaction and annealed in air. The X-ray diffraction data reveal that the sample is crystallized in a rhombohedral structure with R3{sup ¯}c space group. Magnetic study shows a second-order magnetic phase transition from ferromagnetic to paramagnetic state at the Curie temperature T{sub C} = 295 K. In addition, the magnetizations as a function of temperature and the magnetic field is used to evaluate the magnetic entropy change ΔS{sub M}. Then, we have deduced that the La{sub 0.8}Na{sub 0.1}MnO{sub 3} oxide has a large magnetocaloric effect at room temperature. Such effect is given by the maximum of the magnetic entropy change ΔS{sub Mmax} = 5.56, and by the Relative cooling power (RCP) factor which is equal to 235 under a magnetic field of 5 T. Moreover, the magnetic field dependence of the magnetic entropy change is used to determine the critical exponents β, γ, and δ which are found to be β = 0.495, γ = 1.083, and δ = 3.18. These values are consistent with the prediction of the mean field theory (β = 0.5, γ = 1, and δ = 3). Above all, the temperature dependence of electrical resistivity shows a metal–insulator transition at T{sub ρ}. The electrical resistivity decrease when we apply a magnetic field giving a magnetoresistance effect in the order of 60% at room temperature.

  6. Colossal magnetocapacitance effect at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishchaniuk, T. M.; Grygorchak, I. I.

    2014-05-01

    First nano-hybridized clathrate/cavitant structure of hierarchical architecture was synthesized. The results of investigations of the properties of initial nanoporous silica matrices MCM-41, with encapsulated in its pores of β-cyclodextrin in cavitand and cavitat (with FeSO4) states and change at room temperature in a constant magnetic field intensity of 2.75 kOe, have been presented. Phenomenon of enormous magnetocapacitance and giant negative variable-current magnetoresistance has been discovered.

  7. Temperature dependent spin transport properties of platinum inferred from spin Hall magnetoresistance measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Sibylle Althammer, Matthias; Geprägs, Stephan; Opel, Matthias; Goennenwein, Sebastian T. B.; Gross, Rudolf

    2014-06-16

    We study the temperature dependence of the spin Hall magnetoresistance (SMR) in yttrium iron garnet/platinum hybrid structures via magnetization orientation dependent magnetoresistance measurements. Our experiments show a decrease of the SMR magnitude with decreasing temperature. Using the sensitivity of the SMR to the spin transport properties of the normal metal, we interpret our data in terms of a decrease of the spin Hall angle in platinum from 0.11 at room temperature to 0.075 at 10 K, while the spin diffusion length and the spin mixing conductance of the ferrimagnetic insulator/normal metal interface remain almost constant.

  8. Room-temperature antiferromagnetic memory resistor.

    PubMed

    Marti, X; Fina, I; Frontera, C; Liu, Jian; Wadley, P; He, Q; Paull, R J; Clarkson, J D; Kudrnovský, J; Turek, I; Kuneš, J; Yi, D; Chu, J-H; Nelson, C T; You, L; Arenholz, E; Salahuddin, S; Fontcuberta, J; Jungwirth, T; Ramesh, R

    2014-04-01

    The bistability of ordered spin states in ferromagnets provides the basis for magnetic memory functionality. The latest generation of magnetic random access memories rely on an efficient approach in which magnetic fields are replaced by electrical means for writing and reading the information in ferromagnets. This concept may eventually reduce the sensitivity of ferromagnets to magnetic field perturbations to being a weakness for data retention and the ferromagnetic stray fields to an obstacle for high-density memory integration. Here we report a room-temperature bistable antiferromagnetic (AFM) memory that produces negligible stray fields and is insensitive to strong magnetic fields. We use a resistor made of a FeRh AFM, which orders ferromagnetically roughly 100 K above room temperature, and therefore allows us to set different collective directions for the Fe moments by applied magnetic field. On cooling to room temperature, AFM order sets in with the direction of the AFM moments predetermined by the field and moment direction in the high-temperature ferromagnetic state. For electrical reading, we use an AFM analogue of the anisotropic magnetoresistance. Our microscopic theory modelling confirms that this archetypical spintronic effect, discovered more than 150 years ago in ferromagnets, is also present in AFMs. Our work demonstrates the feasibility of fabricating room-temperature spintronic memories with AFMs, which in turn expands the base of available magnetic materials for devices with properties that cannot be achieved with ferromagnets. PMID:24464243

  9. Room-temperature antiferromagnetic memory resistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marti, X.; Fina, I.; Frontera, C.; Liu, Jian; Wadley, P.; He, Q.; Paull, R. J.; Clarkson, J. D.; Kudrnovský, J.; Turek, I.; Kuneš, J.; Yi, D.; Chu, J.-H.; Nelson, C. T.; You, L.; Arenholz, E.; Salahuddin, S.; Fontcuberta, J.; Jungwirth, T.; Ramesh, R.

    2014-04-01

    The bistability of ordered spin states in ferromagnets provides the basis for magnetic memory functionality. The latest generation of magnetic random access memories rely on an efficient approach in which magnetic fields are replaced by electrical means for writing and reading the information in ferromagnets. This concept may eventually reduce the sensitivity of ferromagnets to magnetic field perturbations to being a weakness for data retention and the ferromagnetic stray fields to an obstacle for high-density memory integration. Here we report a room-temperature bistable antiferromagnetic (AFM) memory that produces negligible stray fields and is insensitive to strong magnetic fields. We use a resistor made of a FeRh AFM, which orders ferromagnetically roughly 100 K above room temperature, and therefore allows us to set different collective directions for the Fe moments by applied magnetic field. On cooling to room temperature, AFM order sets in with the direction of the AFM moments predetermined by the field and moment direction in the high-temperature ferromagnetic state. For electrical reading, we use an AFM analogue of the anisotropic magnetoresistance. Our microscopic theory modelling confirms that this archetypical spintronic effect, discovered more than 150 years ago in ferromagnets, is also present in AFMs. Our work demonstrates the feasibility of fabricating room-temperature spintronic memories with AFMs, which in turn expands the base of available magnetic materials for devices with properties that cannot be achieved with ferromagnets.

  10. Room temperature magneto-transport properties of nanocomposite Fe-In2O3 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tambasov, Igor A.; Gornakov, Kirill O.; Myagkov, Victor G.; Bykova, Liudmila E.; Zhigalov, Victor S.; Matsynin, Alexey A.; Yozhikova, Ekaterina V.

    2015-12-01

    A ferromagnetic Fe-In2O3 nanocomposite thin film has been synthesized by the thermite reaction Fe2O3+In→Fe-In2O3. Measurements of the Hall carrier concentration, Hall mobility and magnetoresistance have been conducted at room temperature. The nanocomposite Fe-In2O3 thin film had n=1.94·1020 cm-3, μ=6.45 cm2/Vs and negative magnetoresistance. The magnetoresistance for 8.8 kOe was ~-0.22%.The negative magnetoresistance was well described by the weak localization and model proposed by Khosla and Fischer.

  11. Enhanced room temperature magnetoresistance in p−La{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3}/SrTiO{sub 3}/n−Si heterostructure: A possible spintronics application

    SciTech Connect

    Giri, S. K. Panda, J. Hazra, S. K. Das, P. T. Nath, T. K.

    2014-04-24

    An experimental study of p−La{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3}/SrTiO{sub 3}/n−Si heterostructure in which La{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} (LCMO) and Si are separated by a thin interfacial SrTiO{sub 3} (STO) layer with typical thickness ∼ 15 nm, has been in situ fabricated with the pulsed laser deposition technique. The junction exhibits good rectifying diode like behavior over the temperature range of 10 - 300 K. The heterostructure also exhibits metal-oxide-semiconductor like behavior with all type of possible current flow mechanisms through the heterojunction. The junction magnetoresistance (JMR) (∼ 30% at 300 K) properties of p-LCMO/STO/n-Si heterostructure have been studied over the temperature range of 100-300 K. The JMR is positive and strongly depends on temperature at an applied forward bias voltage of 3 V. The relation between JMR and external magnetic field is found to be Δρ/ρ≈ α H{sup β} type, having both α and β temperature dependent. We attribute the emergence of positive JMR to the quantum mechanical tunneling transport mechanism across the heterojunction.

  12. Temperature dependence of the magnetoresistance in Co/Re superlattices on Al2O3 (112¯0)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charlton, T.; Lederman, D.

    2001-03-01

    Using a patterned hcp [Co (17 Å)/Re (7Å)]20 antiferromagnetically coupled superlattice, with the c axis in the film plane, magnetoresistance (MR) measurements were made in the temperature range between 5 K and room temperature. The MR was simulated and decomposed into its anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) and giant magnetoresistance (GMR) components using the magnetization as a function of angle determined from neutron reflectivity experiments. We find that the GMR is anisotropic and has a different temperature dependence than the AMR when I⊥c and a similar dependence when I||c, where I is the applied current. This implies that interface spin-dependent scattering plays a more significant role when I⊥c than when I||c.

  13. Temperature-Dependent Asymmetry of Anisotropic Magnetoresistance in Silicon p-n Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Yang, D. Z.; Wang, T.; Sui, W. B.; Si, M. S.; Guo, D. W.; Shi, Z.; Wang, F. C.; Xue, D. S.

    2015-01-01

    We report a large but asymmetric magnetoresistance in silicon p-n junctions, which contrasts with the fact of magnetoresistance being symmetric in magnetic metals and semiconductors. With temperature decreasing from 293 K to 100 K, the magnetoresistance sharply increases from 50% to 150% under a magnetic field of 2 T. At the same time, an asymmetric magnetoresistance, which manifests itself as a magnetoresistance voltage offset with respect to the sign of magnetic field, occurs and linearly increases with magnetoresistance. More interestingly, in contrast with other materials, the lineshape of anisotropic magnetoresistance in silicon p-n junctions significantly depends on temperature. As temperature decreases from 293 K to 100 K, the width of peak shrinks from 90° to 70°. We ascribe these novel magnetoresistance to the asymmetric geometry of the space charge region in p-n junction induced by the magnetic field. In the vicinity of the space charge region the current paths are deflected, contributing the Hall field to the asymmetric magnetoresistance. Therefore, the observed temperature-dependent asymmetry of magnetoresistance is proved to be a direct consequence of the spatial configuration evolution of space charge region with temperature. PMID:26323495

  14. Temperature-Dependent Asymmetry of Anisotropic Magnetoresistance in Silicon p-n Junctions.

    PubMed

    Yang, D Z; Wang, T; Sui, W B; Si, M S; Guo, D W; Shi, Z; Wang, F C; Xue, D S

    2015-01-01

    We report a large but asymmetric magnetoresistance in silicon p-n junctions, which contrasts with the fact of magnetoresistance being symmetric in magnetic metals and semiconductors. With temperature decreasing from 293 K to 100 K, the magnetoresistance sharply increases from 50% to 150% under a magnetic field of 2 T. At the same time, an asymmetric magnetoresistance, which manifests itself as a magnetoresistance voltage offset with respect to the sign of magnetic field, occurs and linearly increases with magnetoresistance. More interestingly, in contrast with other materials, the lineshape of anisotropic magnetoresistance in silicon p-n junctions significantly depends on temperature. As temperature decreases from 293 K to 100 K, the width of peak shrinks from 90° to 70°. We ascribe these novel magnetoresistance to the asymmetric geometry of the space charge region in p-n junction induced by the magnetic field. In the vicinity of the space charge region the current paths are deflected, contributing the Hall field to the asymmetric magnetoresistance. Therefore, the observed temperature-dependent asymmetry of magnetoresistance is proved to be a direct consequence of the spatial configuration evolution of space charge region with temperature. PMID:26323495

  15. Corneal storage at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Sachs, U; Goldman, K; Valenti, J; Kaufman, H E

    1978-06-01

    Short-term eye banking is based mainly on moist chamber and McCarey-Kaufman medium (M-K medium) preservation. Both involve a controlled 4 C temperature for storage. Warming the cornea to room temperature, however, drastically affects the endothelial viability. On enzymatic staining and histological study, the M-K medium-stored rabbit corneas had more normal endothelium than did "moist chamber" eyes when storage was prolonged for seven days at room temperature. In human corneas that were kept at 4 C for 24 hours and then exposed to a temperature of 25 C, destruction of organelles had occurred by six hours and was increased by 12 hours. Corneas that were kept in M-K medium had relatively intact endothelium after four days, but cell disruption and vacuolation was present by the seventh day. The M-K medium, therefore, affords protection to tissue warmed to room temperature, where metabolic activity is resumed. PMID:350203

  16. Room temperature terahertz polariton emitter

    SciTech Connect

    Geiser, Markus; Scalari, Giacomo; Castellano, Fabrizio; Beck, Mattias; Faist, Jerome

    2012-10-01

    Terahertz (THz) range electroluminescence from intersubband polariton states is observed in the ultra strong coupling regime, where the interaction energy between the collective excitation of a dense electron gas and a photonic mode is a significant portion of the uncoupled excitation energy. The polariton's increased emission efficiency along with a parabolic electron confinement potential allows operation up to room temperature in a nonresonant pumping scheme. This observation of room temperature electroluminescence of an intersubband device in the THz range is a promising proof of concept for more powerful THz sources.

  17. Temperature dependence of the magnetoresistance in Fe/MgO core/shell nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Boubeta, C.; Balcells, Ll.; Valencia, S.; Schmitz, D.; Monty, C.; Martínez, B.

    2009-06-01

    The temperature dependence of magnetoresistance (MR) of powdered samples consisting of spherical Fe/MgO core/shell nanoparticles was analyzed. A change of the MR from normal at room temperature to inverse at low temperatures was observed. Concomitant with this, samples showed a sudden increase in the electrical resistance when approaching TV≈120 K, i.e., indicative of the Verwey transition temperature of Fe3O4. Thus, signaling the existence of magnetite at the Fe/MgO interface, further confirmed by means of x-ray magnetic circular dichroism. The change from normal to inverse MR is related to the increase in resistance of Fe3O4 on crossing the Verwey transition and reflects the negative spin polarization of Fe3O4.

  18. Large rectification magnetoresistance in nonmagnetic Al/Ge/Al heterojunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kun; Li, Huan-Huan; Grünberg, Peter; Li, Qiang; Ye, Sheng-Tao; Tian, Yu-Feng; Yan, Shi-Shen; Lin, Zhao-Jun; Kang, Shi-Shou; Chen, Yan-Xue; Liu, Guo-Lei; Mei, Liang-Mo

    2015-09-01

    Magnetoresistance and rectification are two fundamental physical properties of heterojunctions and respectively have wide applications in spintronics devices. Being different from the well known various magnetoresistance effects, here we report a brand new large magnetoresistance that can be regarded as rectification magnetoresistance: the application of a pure small sinusoidal alternating-current to the nonmagnetic Al/Ge Schottky heterojunctions can generate a significant direct-current voltage, and this rectification voltage strongly varies with the external magnetic field. We find that the rectification magnetoresistance in Al/Ge Schottky heterojunctions is as large as 250% at room temperature, which is greatly enhanced as compared with the conventional magnetoresistance of 70%. The findings of rectification magnetoresistance open the way to the new nonmagnetic Ge-based spintronics devices of large rectification magnetoresistance at ambient temperature under the alternating-current due to the simultaneous implementation of the rectification and magnetoresistance in the same devices.

  19. Novel room temperature ferromagnetic semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Amita

    2004-11-01

    Today's information world, bits of data are processed by semiconductor chips, and stored in the magnetic disk drives. But tomorrow's information technology may see magnetism (spin) and semiconductivity (charge) combined in one 'spintronic' device that exploits both charge and 'spin' to carry data (the best of two worlds). Spintronic devices such as spin valve transistors, spin light emitting diodes, non-volatile memory, logic devices, optical isolators and ultra-fast optical switches are some of the areas of interest for introducing the ferromagnetic properties at room temperature in a semiconductor to make it multifunctional. The potential advantages of such spintronic devices will be higher speed, greater efficiency, and better stability at a reduced power consumption. This Thesis contains two main topics: In-depth understanding of magnetism in Mn doped ZnO, and our search and identification of at least six new above room temperature ferromagnetic semiconductors. Both complex doped ZnO based new materials, as well as a number of nonoxides like phosphides, and sulfides suitably doped with Mn or Cu are shown to give rise to ferromagnetism above room temperature. Some of the highlights of this work are discovery of room temperature ferromagnetism in: (1) ZnO:Mn (paper in Nature Materials, Oct issue, 2003); (2) ZnO doped with Cu (containing no magnetic elements in it); (3) GaP doped with Cu (again containing no magnetic elements in it); (4) Enhancement of Magnetization by Cu co-doping in ZnO:Mn; (5) CdS doped with Mn, and a few others not reported in this thesis. We discuss in detail the first observation of ferromagnetism above room temperature in the form of powder, bulk pellets, in 2-3 mu-m thick transparent pulsed laser deposited films of the Mn (<4 at. percent) doped ZnO. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) spectra recorded from 2 to 200nm areas showed homogeneous distribution of Mn substituting

  20. Temperature and thickness dependence of tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance in exchange-biased Py/IrMn/MgO/Ta stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichlová, H.; Novák, V.; Kurosaki, Y.; Yamada, M.; Yamamoto, H.; Nishide, A.; Hayakawa, J.; Takahashi, H.; Maryško, M.; Wunderlich, J.; Marti, X.; Jungwirth, T.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the thickness and temperature dependence of a series of Ni{}0.8Fe{}0.2/Ir{}0.2Mn{}0.8 bilayer samples with varying thickness ratio of the ferromagnet/antiferromagnet ({{t}}{{FM}}/{{t}}{{AFM}}) in order to explore the exchange coupling strengths in tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance (TAMR) devices. Specific values of {{t}}{{FM}}/{{t}}{{AFM}} lead to four distinct scenarios with specific electric responses to moderate magnetic fields. The characteristic dependence of the measured TAMR signal on applied voltage allows us to confirm its persistence up to room temperature despite an overlapped contribution by a thermal magnetic noise.

  1. Temperature-field phase diagram of extreme magnetoresistance.

    PubMed

    Fallah Tafti, Fazel; Gibson, Quinn; Kushwaha, Satya; Krizan, Jason W; Haldolaarachchige, Neel; Cava, Robert Joseph

    2016-06-21

    The recent discovery of extreme magnetoresistance (XMR) in LaSb introduced lanthanum monopnictides as a new platform to study this effect in the absence of broken inversion symmetry or protected linear band crossing. In this work, we report XMR in LaBi. Through a comparative study of magnetotransport effects in LaBi and LaSb, we construct a temperature-field phase diagram with triangular shape that illustrates how a magnetic field tunes the electronic behavior in these materials. We show that the triangular phase diagram can be generalized to other topological semimetals with different crystal structures and different chemical compositions. By comparing our experimental results to band structure calculations, we suggest that XMR in LaBi and LaSb originates from a combination of compensated electron-hole pockets and a particular orbital texture on the electron pocket. Such orbital texture is likely to be a generic feature of various topological semimetals, giving rise to their small residual resistivity at zero field and subject to strong scattering induced by a magnetic field. PMID:27274081

  2. Anomalous magnetoresistance in nanocrystalline gadolinium at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, S. P.; Kaul, S. N.

    2015-02-01

    The results of a detailed investigation of electrical resistivity, ρ(T) and transverse magnetoresistance (MR) in nanocrystalline Gd samples with an average grain size d = 12 nm and 18 nm reveal the following. Besides a major contribution to the residual resistivity, ρr(0), arising from the scattering of conduction electrons from grain surfaces/interfaces/boundaries (which increases drastically as the average grain size decreases, as expected), coherent electron-magnon scattering makes a small contribution to ρr(0), which gets progressively suppressed as the applied magnetic field (H) increases in strength. At low temperatures (T ≲ 40 K) and fields (H = 0 and H = 5 kOe), ρH(T) varies as T3/2 with a change in slope at T+ ≃ 16.5 K. As the field increases beyond 5 kOe, the T3/2 variation of ρH(T) at low temperatures (T ≲ 40 K) changes over to the T2 variation and a slight change in the slope dρH/dT2 at T+(H) disappears at H ⩾ 20 kOe. The electron-electron scattering (Fermi liquid) contribution to the T2 term, if present, is completely swamped by the coherent electron-magnon scattering contribution. As a function of temperature, (negative) MR goes through a dip at a temperature Tmin ≃ T+, which increases with H as H2/3. MR at Tmin also increases in magnitude with H and attains a value as large as ˜15% (17%) for d = 12 nm (18 nm) at H = 90 kOe. This value is roughly five times greater than that reported earlier for crystalline Gd at Tmin ≃ 100 K. Unusually large MR results from an anomalous softening of magnon modes at T ≃ Tmin ≈ 20 K. In the light of our previous magnetization and specific heat results, we show that all the above observations, including the H2/3 dependence of Tmin (with Tmin(H) identified as the Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) transition temperature, TBEC(H)), are the manifestations of the BEC of magnons at temperatures T ⩽ TBEC. Contrasted with crystalline Gd, which behaves as a three-dimensional (3D) pure uniaxial dipolar

  3. Non-magnetic organic/inorganic spin injector at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, Shinto P.; Mondal, Prakash Chandra; Naaman, Ron; Moshe, Hagay; Mastai, Yitzhak

    2014-12-15

    Spin injection into solid-state devices is commonly performed by use of ferromagnetic metal electrodes. Here, we present a spin injector design without permanent magnet; rather, the spin selectivity is determined by a chiral tunneling barrier. The chiral tunneling barrier is composed of an ultrathin Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer that is deposited on top of a chiral self-assembled monolayer (SAM), which consists of cysteine or oligopeptide molecules. The experimentally observed magnetoresistance can be up to 20% at room temperature, and it displays an uncommon asymmetric curve as a function of the applied magnetic field. These findings show that the spin injector transmits only one spin orientation, independent of external magnetic field. The sign of the magnetoresistance depends on the handedness of the molecules in the SAM, which act as a spin filter, and the magnitude of the magnetoresistance depends only weakly on temperature.

  4. Xenon porometry at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telkki, Ville-Veikko; Lounila, Juhani; Jokisaari, Jukka

    2006-01-01

    Xenon porometry is a method in which porous material is immersed in a medium and the properties of the material are studied by means of Xe129 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of xenon gas dissolved in the medium. For instance, the chemical shift of a particular signal (referred to as signal D) arising from xenon inside small pockets formed in the pores during the freezing of the confined medium is highly sensitive to the pore size. In the present study, we show that when naphthalene is used as the medium the pore size distribution of the material can be determined by measuring a single one-dimensional spectrum near room temperature and converting the chemical shift scale of signal D to the pore radius scale by using an experimentally determined correlation. A model has been developed that explains the curious behavior of the chemical shift of signal D as a function of pore radius. The other signals of the spectra measured at different temperatures have also been identified, and the influence of xenon pressure on the spectra has been studied. For comparison, Xe129 NMR spectra of pure xenon gas adsorbed to porous materials have been measured and analyzed.

  5. Temperature dependence of magnetoresistance in GdFeCo/Pt heterostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuno, Takaya; Kim, Kab-Jin; Tono, Takayuki; Kim, Sanghoon; Moriyama, Takahiro; Yoshikawa, Hiroki; Tsukamoto, Arata; Ono, Teruo

    2016-07-01

    The temperature dependence of magnetoresistance is investigated in ferrimagnetic GdFeCo/Pt heterostructures. An anomalous Hall effect (AHE) shows a monotonic behavior in temperature even across the magnetization compensation temperature T M, implying that the FeCo moment is responsible for the magnetotransport properties. An anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) exhibits a steep increase at low temperatures, which we ascribe to the contribution of a weak antilocalization in an amorphous GdFeCo layer. A spin Hall magnetoresistance (SMR) is found to exist in ferrimagnet/Pt systems and shows a moderate temperature dependence, in contrast to the SMR in YIG/Pt where a significant temperature dependence was observed. These results provide a basic understanding of the magnetotransport in amorphous ferrimagnets/heavy metal heterostructures.

  6. The tunneling magnetoresistance current dependence on cross sectional area, angle and temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z. H. Bai, Lihui; Hu, C.-M.; Hemour, S.; Wu, K.; Fan, X. L.; Xue, D. S.; Houssameddine, D.

    2015-03-15

    The magnetoresistance of a MgO-based magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) was studied experimentally. The magnetoresistance as a function of current was measured systematically on MTJs for various MgO cross sectional areas and at various temperatures from 7.5 to 290.1 K. The resistance current dependence of the MTJ was also measured for different angles between the two ferromagnetic layers. By considering particle and angular momentum conservation of transport electrons, the current dependence of magnetoresistance can be explained by the changing of spin polarization in the free magnetic layer of the MTJ. The changing of spin polarization is related to the magnetoresistance, its angular dependence and the threshold current where TMR ratio equals zero. A phenomenological model is used which avoid the complicated barrier details and also describes the data.

  7. Towards Room Temperature Spin Filtering in Oxide Tunnel Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata-Harms, Jodi; Wong, Franklin; Arenholz, Elke; Suzuki, Yuri

    2012-02-01

    Spin filtering, in which the magnetic tunnel barrier preferentially filters spin-up and spin-down electrons from a nonmagnetic electrode, has been demonstrated in junction heterostructures. By incorporating two spin filtering barriers, double spin filter magnetic tunnel junctions (DSF-MTJs) were predicted to yield magnetoresistance (MR) values orders of magnitude larger than that of conventional magnetic tunnel junctions. Recently, DSF-MTJs have exhibited spin filtering with magnetic electrodes at room temperature and at low temperature with nonmagnetic electrodes in EuS-based devices [1,2]. We have fabricated DSF-MTJs with nonmagnetic SrRuO3 electrodes and room temperature ferrimagnets, NiFe2O4 and CoFe2O4, for spin filters in pursuit of room temperature functionality. Atomic force microscopy shows smooth films quantified by roughness values between 0.1--0.5nm. X-ray magnetic circular dichroism reveals ferromagnetic Ni^2+ and Co^2+, and element-specific hysteresis loops indicate the independent switching of the two spin filters. Transport data reveals junction MR and non-linear I-V characteristics consistent with tunneling. [4pt] [1] M.G. Chapline et al., PRB, 74, 014418 (2006).[0pt] [2] G.- X. Miao et al., PRL, 102, 076601 (2009).

  8. Topological Insulators at Room Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Haijun; Liu, Chao-Xing; Qi, Xiao-Liang; Dai, Xi; Fang, Zhong; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2010-03-25

    Topological insulators are new states of quantum matter with surface states protected by the time-reversal symmetry. In this work, we perform first-principle electronic structure calculations for Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}, Sb{sub 2}Se{sub 3}, Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} crystals. Our calculations predict that Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}, Bi{sub 2}T e{sub 3} and Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} are topological insulators, while Sb{sub 2}Se{sub 3} is not. In particular, Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} has a topologically non-trivial energy gap of 0.3eV , suitable for room temperature applications. We present a simple and unified continuum model which captures the salient topological features of this class of materials. These topological insulators have robust surface states consisting of a single Dirac cone at the {Lambda} point.

  9. Room temperature creep in metals and alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Deibler, Lisa Anne

    2014-09-01

    Time dependent deformation in the form of creep and stress relaxation is not often considered a factor when designing structural alloy parts for use at room temperature. However, creep and stress relaxation do occur at room temperature (0.09-0.21 Tm for alloys in this report) in structural alloys. This report will summarize the available literature on room temperature creep, present creep data collected on various structural alloys, and finally compare the acquired data to equations used in the literature to model creep behavior. Based on evidence from the literature and fitting of various equations, the mechanism which causes room temperature creep is found to include dislocation generation as well as exhaustion.

  10. Determining Camera Gain in Room Temperature Cameras

    SciTech Connect

    Joshua Cogliati

    2010-12-01

    James R. Janesick provides a method for determining the amplification of a CCD or CMOS camera when only access to the raw images is provided. However, the equation that is provided ignores the contribution of dark current. For CCD or CMOS cameras that are cooled well below room temperature, this is not a problem, however, the technique needs adjustment for use with room temperature cameras. This article describes the adjustment made to the equation, and a test of this method.

  11. Direct observation of a highly spin-polarized organic spinterface at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Djeghloul, F.; Ibrahim, F.; Cantoni, M.; Bowen, M.; Joly, L.; Boukari, S.; Ohresser, P.; Bertran, F.; Le Fèvre, P.; Thakur, P.; Scheurer, F.; Miyamachi, T.; Mattana, R.; Seneor, P.; Jaafar, A.; Rinaldi, C.; Javaid, S.; Arabski, J.; Kappler, J. -P; Wulfhekel, W.; Brookes, N. B.; Bertacco, R.; Taleb-Ibrahimi, A.; Alouani, M.; Beaurepaire, E.; Weber, W.

    2013-01-01

    Organic semiconductors constitute promising candidates toward large-scale electronic circuits that are entirely spintronics-driven. Toward this goal, tunneling magnetoresistance values above 300% at low temperature suggested the presence of highly spin-polarized device interfaces. However, such spinterfaces have not been observed directly, let alone at room temperature. Thanks to experiments and theory on the model spinterface between phthalocyanine molecules and a Co single crystal surface, we clearly evidence a highly efficient spinterface. Spin-polarised direct and inverse photoemission experiments reveal a high degree of spin polarisation at room temperature at this interface. We measured a magnetic moment on the molecule's nitrogen π orbitals, which substantiates an ab-initio theoretical description of highly spin-polarised charge conduction across the interface due to differing spinterface formation mechanisms in each spin channel. We propose, through this example, a recipe to engineer simple organic-inorganic interfaces with remarkable spintronic properties that can endure well above room temperature. PMID:23412079

  12. Room-temperature magnetocurrent in antiferromagnetically coupled Fe/Si/Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gareev, Rashid; Schmid, Maximilian; Vancea, Johann; Back, Christian; Schreiber, Reinert; Buergler, Daniel; Schneider, Claus; Stromberg, Frank; Wende, Heiko

    2011-03-01

    Epitaxial Si-based ferromagnet/semiconductor structures demonstrate strong antiferromagnetic coupling (AFC) as well as resonant-type tunneling magnetoresistance, which vanishes at temperatures above T ~ 50 K. Magnetoresistance effects in Fe/Si/Fe close to room temperature (RT) were not established yet. By using the ballistic electron magnetomicroscopy (BEMM) techniques, with its nanometer-scaled locality we observed for the first time a spin-dependent ballistic magnetotransport in AFC structures. We found that the hot-electron collector current with energies above the Fe/GaAsP Schottky barrier reflects magnetization alignment and changes from IcAP ~ 50 fA for antiparallel alignment to IcP ~ 150 fA for the parallel one. Thus, the magnetocurrent [(IcP -IcAP) / IcAP ]*100% is near 200 % at RT. The measured BEMM hysteresis loops match nicely with the magnetic MOKE data. This work is supported by the project DFG 9209379.

  13. Electric control of magnetism at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liaoyu; Wang, Dunhui; Cao, Qingqi; Zheng, Yuanxia; Xuan, Haicheng; Gao, Jinlong; Du, Youwei

    2012-01-01

    In the single-phase multiferroics, the coupling between electric polarization (P) and magnetization (M) would enable the magnetoelectric (ME) effect, namely M induced and modulated by E, and conversely P by H. Especially, the manipulation of magnetization by an electric field at room-temperature is of great importance in technological applications, such as new information storage technology, four-state logic device, magnetoelectric sensors, low-power magnetoelectric device and so on. Furthermore, it can reduce power consumption and realize device miniaturization, which is very useful for the practical applications. In an M-type hexaferrite SrCo2Ti2Fe8O19, large magnetization and electric polarization were observed simultaneously at room-temperature. Moreover, large effect of electric field-controlled magnetization was observed even without magnetic bias field. These results illuminate a promising potential to apply in magnetoelectric devices at room temperature and imply plentiful physics behind them. PMID:22355737

  14. Temperature dependence of anisotropic magnetoresistance in antiferromagnetic Sr{sub 2}IrO{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.; Seinige, H.; Tsoi, M.; Cao, G.; Zhou, J.-S.; Goodenough, J. B.

    2015-05-07

    Temperature-dependent magnetotransport properties of the antiferromagnetic semiconductor Sr{sub 2}IrO{sub 4} are investigated with point-contact devices. The point-contact technique allows to probe very small volumes and, therefore, to look for electronic transport on a microscopic scale. Point-contact measurements with single crystals of Sr{sub 2}IrO{sub 4} were intended to see whether the additional local resistance associated with a small contact area between a sharpened Cu tip and the antiferromagnet shows magnetoresistance (MR) such as that seen in bulk crystals. Point-contact measurements at liquid nitrogen temperature revealed large MRs (up to 28%) for modest magnetic fields (250 mT) applied within an IrO{sub 2} (ab) plane with angular dependence showing a crossover from four-fold to two-fold symmetry with an increasing magnetic field. Point contact measurement exhibits distinctive anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) in comparison to a bulk experiment, imposing intriguing questions about the mechanism of AMR in this material. Temperature-dependent MR measurements show that the MR falls to zero at the Neel temperature, but the temperature dependence of the MR ratio differs qualitatively from that of the resistivity. This AMR study helps to unveil the entanglement between electronic transport and magnetism in Sr{sub 2}IrO{sub 4} while the observed magnetoresistive phenomena can be potentially used to sense the antiferromagnetic order parameter in spintronic applications.

  15. Entangling Macroscopic Diamonds at Room Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, K. C.; Sprague, M. R.; Sussman, B. J.; Nunn, J.; Langford, N. K.; Jin, X.-M.; Champion, T.; Michelberger, P.; Reim, K. F.; England, D.; Jaksch, D.; Walmsley, I. A.

    2011-12-01

    Quantum entanglement in the motion of macroscopic solid bodies has implications both for quantum technologies and foundational studies of the boundary between the quantum and classical worlds. Entanglement is usually fragile in room-temperature solids, owing to strong interactions both internally and with the noisy environment. We generated motional entanglement between vibrational states of two spatially separated, millimeter-sized diamonds at room temperature. By measuring strong nonclassical correlations between Raman-scattered photons, we showed that the quantum state of the diamonds has positive concurrence with 98% probability. Our results show that entanglement can persist in the classical context of moving macroscopic solids in ambient conditions.

  16. Dynamics of Glass Relaxation at Room Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, Roger C.; Smith, John R.; Potuzak, Marcel; Guo, Xiaoju; Bowden, Bradley F.; Kiczenski, T. J.; Allan, Douglas C.; King, Ellyn A.; Ellison, Adam J.; Mauro, John C.

    2013-06-01

    The problem of glass relaxation under ambient conditions has intrigued scientists and the general public for centuries, most notably in the legend of flowing cathedral glass windows. Here we report quantitative measurement of glass relaxation at room temperature. We find that Corning® Gorilla® Glass shows measurable and reproducible relaxation at room temperature. Remarkably, this relaxation follows a stretched exponential decay rather than simple exponential relaxation, and the value of the stretching exponent (β=3/7) follows a theoretical prediction made by Phillips for homogeneous glasses.

  17. Room Temperature Multiferroicity of Charge Transfer Crystals.

    PubMed

    Qin, Wei; Chen, Xiaomin; Li, Huashan; Gong, Maogang; Yuan, Guoliang; Grossman, Jeffrey C; Wuttig, Manfred; Ren, Shenqiang

    2015-09-22

    Room temperature multiferroics has been a frontier research field by manipulating spin-driven ferroelectricity or charge-order-driven magnetism. Charge-transfer crystals based on electron donor and acceptor assembly, exhibiting simultaneous spin ordering, are drawing significant interests for the development of all-organic magnetoelectric multiferroics. Here, we report that a remarkable anisotropic magnetization and room temperature multiferroicity can be achieved through assembly of thiophene donor and fullerene acceptor. The crystal motif directs the dimensional and compositional control of charge-transfer networks that could switch magnetization under external stimuli, thereby opening up an attractive class of all-organic nanoferronics. PMID:26257033

  18. Widely tunable room temperature semiconductor terahertz source

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Q. Y.; Slivken, S.; Bandyopadhyay, N.; Bai, Y.; Razeghi, M.

    2014-11-17

    We present a widely tunable, monolithic terahertz source based on intracavity difference frequency generation within a mid-infrared quantum cascade laser at room temperature. A three-section ridge waveguide laser design with two sampled grating sections and a distributed-Bragg section is used to achieve the terahertz (THz) frequency tuning. Room temperature single mode THz emission with a wide tunable frequency range of 2.6–4.2 THz (∼47% of the central frequency) and THz power up to 0.1 mW is demonstrated, making such device an ideal candidate for THz spectroscopy and sensing.

  19. Silicene field-effect transistors operating at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Li; Cinquanta, Eugenio; Chiappe, Daniele; Grazianetti, Carlo; Fanciulli, Marco; Dubey, Madan; Molle, Alessandro; Akinwande, Deji

    2015-03-01

    Free-standing silicene, a silicon analogue of graphene, has a buckled honeycomb lattice and, because of its Dirac bandstructure combined with its sensitive surface, offers the potential for a widely tunable two-dimensional monolayer, where external fields and interface interactions can be exploited to influence fundamental properties such as bandgap and band character for future nanoelectronic devices. The quantum spin Hall effect, chiral superconductivity, giant magnetoresistance and various exotic field-dependent states have been predicted in monolayer silicene. Despite recent progress regarding the epitaxial synthesis of silicene and investigation of its electronic properties, to date there has been no report of experimental silicene devices because of its air stability issue. Here, we report a silicene field-effect transistor, corroborating theoretical expectations regarding its ambipolar Dirac charge transport, with a measured room-temperature mobility of ˜100 cm2 V-1 s-1 attributed to acoustic phonon-limited transport and grain boundary scattering. These results are enabled by a growth-transfer-fabrication process that we have devised—silicene encapsulated delamination with native electrodes. This approach addresses a major challenge for material preservation of silicene during transfer and device fabrication and is applicable to other air-sensitive two-dimensional materials such as germanene and phosphorene. Silicene's allotropic affinity with bulk silicon and its low-temperature synthesis compared with graphene or alternative two-dimensional semiconductors suggest a more direct integration with ubiquitous semiconductor technology.

  20. Temperature dependence of spin Hall magnetoresistance in W/CoFeB bilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuno, Takaya; Taniguchi, Takuya; Kim, Sanghoon; Baek, Seung-heon Chris; Park, Byong-Guk; Moriyama, Takahiro; Kim, Kab-Jin; Ono, Teruo

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the temperature dependence of the spin Hall magnetoresistance (SMR) in a W/CoFeB bilayer. The SMR is found to increase with decreasing temperature. An analysis based on the SMR theory suggests that the spin Hall angle of W and/or the spin polarization of CoFeB can be the origin of the temperature dependence of the SMR. We also find that the spin diffusion length and the resistivity of W do not significantly vary with temperature, which indicates the necessity of further study on the electron transport mechanism in W films to reveal the origin of the spin Hall effect in W.

  1. Room Temperature and Elevated Temperature Composite Sandwich Joint Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Sandra P.

    1998-01-01

    Testing of composite sandwich joint elements has been completed to verify the strength capacity of joints designed to carry specified running loads representative of a high speed civil transport wing. Static tension testing at both room and an elevated temperature of 350 F and fatigue testing at room temperature were conducted to determine strength capacity, fatigue life, and failure modes. Static tension test results yielded failure loads above the design loads for the room temperature tests, confirming the ability of the joint concepts tested to carry their design loads. However, strength reductions as large as 30% were observed at the elevated test temperature, where all failure loads were below the room temperature design loads for the specific joint designs tested. Fatigue testing resulted in lower than predicted fatigue lives.

  2. Large magnetoresistance in non-magnetic silver chalcogenides and new class of magnetoresistive compounds

    DOEpatents

    Saboungi, Marie-Louis; Price, David C. L.; Rosenbaum, Thomas F.; Xu, Rong; Husmann, Anke

    2001-01-01

    The heavily-doped silver chalcogenides, Ag.sub.2+.delta. Se and Ag.sub.2+.delta. Te, show magnetoresistance effects on a scale comparable to the "colossal" magnetoresistance (CMR) compounds. Hall coefficient, magnetoconductivity, and hydrostatic pressure experiments establish that elements of narrow-gap semiconductor physics apply, but both the size of the effects at room temperature and the linear field dependence down to fields of a few Oersteds are surprising new features.

  3. Temperature-dependence of current-perpendicular-to-the-plane giant magnetoresistance spin-valves using Co2(Mn1-xFex)Ge Heusler alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, M. R.; Nakatani, T. M.; Stewart, D. A.; York, B. R.; Read, J. C.; Choi, Y.-S.; Childress, J. R.

    2016-04-01

    The properties of Co2(Mn1-xFex)Ge (CMFG) (x = 0-0.4) Heusler alloy magnetic layers within polycrystalline current-perpendicular-to-the plane giant magnetoresistance (CPP-GMR) spin-valves are investigated. CMFG films annealed at 220-320 °C exhibit partly ordered B2 structure with an order parameter SB2 = 0.3-0.4, and a lower SB2 was found for a higher Fe content. Nevertheless, CPP-GMR spin-valve devices exhibit a relatively high magnetoresistance ratio of ˜13% and a magnetoresistance-area product (ΔRA) of ˜6 mΩ μm2 at room temperature, which is almost independent of the Fe content in the CMFG films. By contrast, at low temperatures, ΔRA clearly increases with higher Fe content, despite the lower B2 ordering for increasing the Fe content. Indeed, first-principles calculations reveal that the CMFG alloy with a partially disordered B2 structure has a greater density of d-state at the Fermi level in the minority band compared to the Fe-free (Co2MnGe) alloy. This could explain the larger ΔRA measured on CMFG at low temperatures by assuming that s-d scattering mainly determines the spin asymmetry of resistivity as described in Mott's theory.

  4. Temperature-Dependent Three-Dimensional Anisotropy of the Magnetoresistance in WTe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thoutam, L. R.; Wang, Y. L.; Xiao, Z. L.; Das, S.; Luican-Mayer, A.; Divan, R.; Crabtree, G. W.; Kwok, W. K.

    2015-07-01

    Extremely large magnetoresistance (XMR) was recently discovered in WTe2 , triggering extensive research on this material regarding the XMR origin. Since WTe2 is a layered compound with metal layers sandwiched between adjacent insulating chalcogenide layers, this material has been considered to be electronically two-dimensional (2D). Here we report two new findings on WTe2 : (1) WTe2 is electronically 3D with a mass anisotropy as low as 2, as revealed by the 3D scaling behavior of the resistance R (H ,θ )=R (ɛθH ) with ɛθ=(cos2θ +γ-2sin2θ )1 /2 , θ being the magnetic field angle with respect to the c axis of the crystal and γ being the mass anisotropy and (2) the mass anisotropy γ varies with temperature and follows the magnetoresistance behavior of the Fermi liquid state. Our results not only provide a general scaling approach for the anisotropic magnetoresistance but also are crucial for correctly understanding the electronic properties of WTe2 , including the origin of the remarkable "turn-on" behavior in the resistance versus temperature curve, which has been widely observed in many materials and assumed to be a metal-insulator transition.

  5. Temperature-Dependent Three-Dimensional Anisotropy of the Magnetoresistance in WTe_{2}.

    PubMed

    Thoutam, L R; Wang, Y L; Xiao, Z L; Das, S; Luican-Mayer, A; Divan, R; Crabtree, G W; Kwok, W K

    2015-07-24

    Extremely large magnetoresistance (XMR) was recently discovered in WTe_{2}, triggering extensive research on this material regarding the XMR origin. Since WTe_{2} is a layered compound with metal layers sandwiched between adjacent insulating chalcogenide layers, this material has been considered to be electronically two-dimensional (2D). Here we report two new findings on WTe_{2}: (1) WTe_{2} is electronically 3D with a mass anisotropy as low as 2, as revealed by the 3D scaling behavior of the resistance R(H,θ)=R(ϵ_{θ}H) with ϵ_{θ}=(cos^{2}θ+γ^{-2}sin^{2}θ)^{1/2}, θ being the magnetic field angle with respect to the c axis of the crystal and γ being the mass anisotropy and (2) the mass anisotropy γ varies with temperature and follows the magnetoresistance behavior of the Fermi liquid state. Our results not only provide a general scaling approach for the anisotropic magnetoresistance but also are crucial for correctly understanding the electronic properties of WTe_{2}, including the origin of the remarkable "turn-on" behavior in the resistance versus temperature curve, which has been widely observed in many materials and assumed to be a metal-insulator transition. PMID:26252701

  6. Imprinting bulk amorphous alloy at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Song-Yi; Park, Eun-Soo; Ott, Ryan T.; Lograsso, Thomas A.; Huh, Moo-Young; Kim, Do-Hyang; Eckert, Jürgen; Lee, Min-Ha

    2015-11-13

    We present investigations on the plastic deformation behavior of a brittle bulk amorphous alloy by simple uniaxial compressive loading at room temperature. A patterning is possible by cold-plastic forming of the typically brittle Hf-based bulk amorphous alloy through controlling homogenous flow without the need for thermal energy or shaping at elevated temperatures. The experimental evidence suggests that there is an inconsistency between macroscopic plasticity and deformability of an amorphous alloy. Moreover, imprinting of specific geometrical features on Cu foil and Zr-based metallic glass is represented by using the patterned bulk amorphous alloy as a die. These results demonstrate the ability of amorphous alloys or metallic glasses to precisely replicate patterning features onto both conventional metals and the other amorphous alloys. In conclusion, our work presents an avenue for avoiding the embrittlement of amorphous alloys associated with thermoplastic forming and yields new insight the forming application of bulk amorphous alloys at room temperature without using heat treatment.

  7. Imprinting bulk amorphous alloy at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Song-Yi; Park, Eun-Soo; Ott, Ryan T.; Lograsso, Thomas A.; Huh, Moo-Young; Kim, Do-Hyang; Eckert, Jürgen; Lee, Min-Ha

    2015-01-01

    We present investigations on the plastic deformation behavior of a brittle bulk amorphous alloy by simple uniaxial compressive loading at room temperature. A patterning is possible by cold-plastic forming of the typically brittle Hf-based bulk amorphous alloy through controlling homogenous flow without the need for thermal energy or shaping at elevated temperatures. The experimental evidence suggests that there is an inconsistency between macroscopic plasticity and deformability of an amorphous alloy. Moreover, imprinting of specific geometrical features on Cu foil and Zr-based metallic glass is represented by using the patterned bulk amorphous alloy as a die. These results demonstrate the ability of amorphous alloys or metallic glasses to precisely replicate patterning features onto both conventional metals and the other amorphous alloys. Our work presents an avenue for avoiding the embrittlement of amorphous alloys associated with thermoplastic forming and yields new insight the forming application of bulk amorphous alloys at room temperature without using heat treatment. PMID:26563908

  8. Imprinting bulk amorphous alloy at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Kim, Song-Yi; Park, Eun-Soo; Ott, Ryan T; Lograsso, Thomas A; Huh, Moo-Young; Kim, Do-Hyang; Eckert, Jürgen; Lee, Min-Ha

    2015-01-01

    We present investigations on the plastic deformation behavior of a brittle bulk amorphous alloy by simple uniaxial compressive loading at room temperature. A patterning is possible by cold-plastic forming of the typically brittle Hf-based bulk amorphous alloy through controlling homogenous flow without the need for thermal energy or shaping at elevated temperatures. The experimental evidence suggests that there is an inconsistency between macroscopic plasticity and deformability of an amorphous alloy. Moreover, imprinting of specific geometrical features on Cu foil and Zr-based metallic glass is represented by using the patterned bulk amorphous alloy as a die. These results demonstrate the ability of amorphous alloys or metallic glasses to precisely replicate patterning features onto both conventional metals and the other amorphous alloys. Our work presents an avenue for avoiding the embrittlement of amorphous alloys associated with thermoplastic forming and yields new insight the forming application of bulk amorphous alloys at room temperature without using heat treatment. PMID:26563908

  9. Room-temperature semiconductor heterostructure refrigeration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, K. A.; Larsson, Magnus; Mal'shukov, A. G.

    2005-07-01

    With the proper design of semiconductor tunneling barrier structures, we can inject low-energy electrons via resonant tunneling, and take out high-energy electrons via a thermionic process. This is the operation principle of our semiconductor heterostructure refrigerator (SHR) without the need of applying a temperature gradient across the device. Even for the bad thermoelectric material AlGaAs, our calculation shows that at room temperature, the SHR can easily lower the temperature by 5-7K. Such devices can be fabricated with the present semiconductor technology. Besides its use as a kitchen refrigerator, the SHR can efficiently cool microelectronic devices.

  10. Individual room temperature control: A peaceful solution to thermostat wars

    SciTech Connect

    Pieper, C.A. )

    1994-01-01

    This article addresses the problem of maintaining thermal comfort in individual rooms using an individual room temperature control concept to provide greater occupant comfort and potentially reduce energy consumption. The topics of the article include occupant temperature control methods, multi-room zone control, HVAC system operation, computer simulation, and the results of using individual room temperature control.

  11. Room temperature spin valve effect in NiFe/WS2/Co junctions

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Muhammad Zahir; Iqbal, Muhammad Waqas; Siddique, Salma; Khan, Muhammad Farooq; Ramay, Shahid Mahmood

    2016-01-01

    The two-dimensional (2D) layered electronic materials of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) have been recently proposed as an emerging canddiate for spintronic applications. Here, we report the exfoliated single layer WS2-intelayer based spin valve effect in NiFe/WS2/Co junction from room temperature to 4.2 K. The ratio of relative magnetoresistance in spin valve effect increases from 0.18% at room temperature to 0.47% at 4.2 K. We observed that the junction resistance decreases monotonically as temperature is lowered. These results revealed that semiconducting WS2 thin film works as a metallic conducting interlayer between NiFe and Co electrodes. PMID:26868638

  12. Room temperature spin valve effect in NiFe/WS2/Co junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, Muhammad Zahir; Iqbal, Muhammad Waqas; Siddique, Salma; Khan, Muhammad Farooq; Ramay, Shahid Mahmood

    2016-02-01

    The two-dimensional (2D) layered electronic materials of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) have been recently proposed as an emerging canddiate for spintronic applications. Here, we report the exfoliated single layer WS2-intelayer based spin valve effect in NiFe/WS2/Co junction from room temperature to 4.2 K. The ratio of relative magnetoresistance in spin valve effect increases from 0.18% at room temperature to 0.47% at 4.2 K. We observed that the junction resistance decreases monotonically as temperature is lowered. These results revealed that semiconducting WS2 thin film works as a metallic conducting interlayer between NiFe and Co electrodes.

  13. Room temperature spin valve effect in NiFe/WS2/Co junctions.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Muhammad Zahir; Iqbal, Muhammad Waqas; Siddique, Salma; Khan, Muhammad Farooq; Ramay, Shahid Mahmood

    2016-01-01

    The two-dimensional (2D) layered electronic materials of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) have been recently proposed as an emerging canddiate for spintronic applications. Here, we report the exfoliated single layer WS2-intelayer based spin valve effect in NiFe/WS2/Co junction from room temperature to 4.2 K. The ratio of relative magnetoresistance in spin valve effect increases from 0.18% at room temperature to 0.47% at 4.2 K. We observed that the junction resistance decreases monotonically as temperature is lowered. These results revealed that semiconducting WS2 thin film works as a metallic conducting interlayer between NiFe and Co electrodes. PMID:26868638

  14. Magnetic heat pumping near room temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, G. V.

    1976-01-01

    It is shown that magnetic heat pumping can be made practical at room temperature by using a ferromagnetic material with a Curie point at or near operating temperature and an appropriate regenerative thermodynamic cycle. Measurements are performed which show that gadolinium is a resonable working material and it is found that the application of a 7-T magnetic field to gadolinium at the Curie point (293 K) causes a heat release of 4 kJ/kg under isothermal conditions or a temperature rise of 14 K under adiabatic conditions. A regeneration technique can be used to lift the load of the lattice and electronic heat capacities off the magnetic system in order to span a reasonable temperature difference and to pump as much entropy per cycle as possible

  15. Temperature and bias dependence of anisotropic magnetoresistance in antiferromagnetic Sr2IrO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seinige, Heidi; Wang, Cheng; Cao, Gang; Zhou, Jian-Shi; Goodenough, John B.; Tsoi, Maxim

    2015-03-01

    We study anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) in antiferromagnetic (AFM) Mott insulator Sr2IrO4. Such AMR is a promising candidate for monitoring the magnetic order parameter in AFM spintronics. Here we present temperature- and electrical bias-dependent measurements of the point-contact AMR in single crystals of Sr2IrO4. The point-contact technique allows to probe very small volumes and, therefore, look for electronic transport in Sr2IrO4 on a microscopic scale. Point-contact measurements at liquid nitrogen temperature revealed a large negative magnetoresistance (MR) for magnetic fields applied within IrO2 a-b plane and electric currents flowing perpendicular to the plane. The observed MR decreases with increasing temperature and falls to zero at TNéel ~ 240 K. Interestingly, the temperature dependence of MR ratios differs qualitatively from that of the resistivity. The point-contact measurements also show a strong dependence of MR on the dc bias applied to the contact. The latter can be associated with correlations between electronic transport and magnetic order in Sr2IrO4. This work was supported in part by C-SPIN, one of six centers of STARnet, a Semiconductor Research Corporation program, sponsored by MARCO and DARPA, and by NSF Grants DMR-1207577, DMR-1265162 and DMR-1122603.

  16. Realization of ground-state artificial skyrmion lattices at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, Dustin A.; Maranville, Brian B.; Balk, Andrew L.; Kirby, Brian J.; Fischer, Peter; Pierce, Daniel T.; Unguris, John; Borchers, Julie A.; Liu, Kai

    2015-10-08

    We report that the topological nature of magnetic skyrmions leads to extraordinary properties that provide new insights into fundamental problems of magnetism and exciting potentials for novel magnetic technologies. Prerequisite are systems exhibiting skyrmion lattices at ambient conditions, which have been elusive so far. We demonstrate the realization of artificial Bloch skyrmion lattices over extended areas in their ground state at room temperature by patterning asymmetric magnetic nanodots with controlled circularity on an underlayer with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA). Polarity is controlled by a tailored magnetic field sequence and demonstrated in magnetometry measurements. The vortex structure is imprinted from the dots into the interfacial region of the underlayer via suppression of the PMA by a critical ion-irradiation step. In conclusion, the imprinted skyrmion lattices are identified directly with polarized neutron reflectometry and confirmed by magnetoresistance measurements. Our results demonstrate an exciting platform to explore room-temperature ground-state skyrmion lattices.

  17. Realization of ground-state artificial skyrmion lattices at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Dustin A.; Maranville, Brian B.; Balk, Andrew L.; Kirby, Brian J.; Fischer, Peter; Pierce, Daniel T.; Unguris, John; Borchers, Julie A.; Liu, Kai

    2015-01-01

    The topological nature of magnetic skyrmions leads to extraordinary properties that provide new insights into fundamental problems of magnetism and exciting potentials for novel magnetic technologies. Prerequisite are systems exhibiting skyrmion lattices at ambient conditions, which have been elusive so far. Here, we demonstrate the realization of artificial Bloch skyrmion lattices over extended areas in their ground state at room temperature by patterning asymmetric magnetic nanodots with controlled circularity on an underlayer with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA). Polarity is controlled by a tailored magnetic field sequence and demonstrated in magnetometry measurements. The vortex structure is imprinted from the dots into the interfacial region of the underlayer via suppression of the PMA by a critical ion-irradiation step. The imprinted skyrmion lattices are identified directly with polarized neutron reflectometry and confirmed by magnetoresistance measurements. Our results demonstrate an exciting platform to explore room-temperature ground-state skyrmion lattices. PMID:26446515

  18. Realization of ground-state artificial skyrmion lattices at room temperature

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gilbert, Dustin A.; Maranville, Brian B.; Balk, Andrew L.; Kirby, Brian J.; Fischer, Peter; Pierce, Daniel T.; Unguris, John; Borchers, Julie A.; Liu, Kai

    2015-10-08

    We report that the topological nature of magnetic skyrmions leads to extraordinary properties that provide new insights into fundamental problems of magnetism and exciting potentials for novel magnetic technologies. Prerequisite are systems exhibiting skyrmion lattices at ambient conditions, which have been elusive so far. We demonstrate the realization of artificial Bloch skyrmion lattices over extended areas in their ground state at room temperature by patterning asymmetric magnetic nanodots with controlled circularity on an underlayer with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA). Polarity is controlled by a tailored magnetic field sequence and demonstrated in magnetometry measurements. The vortex structure is imprinted from themore » dots into the interfacial region of the underlayer via suppression of the PMA by a critical ion-irradiation step. In conclusion, the imprinted skyrmion lattices are identified directly with polarized neutron reflectometry and confirmed by magnetoresistance measurements. Our results demonstrate an exciting platform to explore room-temperature ground-state skyrmion lattices.« less

  19. Imprinting bulk amorphous alloy at room temperature

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kim, Song-Yi; Park, Eun-Soo; Ott, Ryan T.; Lograsso, Thomas A.; Huh, Moo-Young; Kim, Do-Hyang; Eckert, Jürgen; Lee, Min-Ha

    2015-11-13

    We present investigations on the plastic deformation behavior of a brittle bulk amorphous alloy by simple uniaxial compressive loading at room temperature. A patterning is possible by cold-plastic forming of the typically brittle Hf-based bulk amorphous alloy through controlling homogenous flow without the need for thermal energy or shaping at elevated temperatures. The experimental evidence suggests that there is an inconsistency between macroscopic plasticity and deformability of an amorphous alloy. Moreover, imprinting of specific geometrical features on Cu foil and Zr-based metallic glass is represented by using the patterned bulk amorphous alloy as a die. These results demonstrate the abilitymore » of amorphous alloys or metallic glasses to precisely replicate patterning features onto both conventional metals and the other amorphous alloys. In conclusion, our work presents an avenue for avoiding the embrittlement of amorphous alloys associated with thermoplastic forming and yields new insight the forming application of bulk amorphous alloys at room temperature without using heat treatment.« less

  20. Room temperature electrically injected polariton laser.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Pallab; Frost, Thomas; Deshpande, Saniya; Baten, Md Zunaid; Hazari, Arnab; Das, Ayan

    2014-06-13

    Room temperature electrically pumped inversionless polariton lasing is observed from a bulk GaN-based microcavity diode. The low nonlinear threshold for polariton lasing occurs at 169 A/cm(2) in the light-current characteristics, accompanied by a collapse of the emission linewidth and small blueshift of the emission peak. Measurement of angle-resolved luminescence, polariton condensation and occupation in momentum space, and output spatial coherence and polarization have also been made. A second threshold, due to conventional photon lasing, is observed at an injection of 44 kA/cm(2). PMID:24972222

  1. Absorber Materials at Room and Cryogenic Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    F. Marhauser, T.S. Elliott, A.T. Wu, E.P. Chojnacki, E. Savrun

    2011-09-01

    We recently reported on investigations of RF absorber materials at cryogenic temperatures conducted at Jefferson Laboratory (JLab). The work was initiated to find a replacement material for the 2 Kelvin low power waveguide Higher Order Mode (HOM) absorbers employed within the original cavity cryomodules of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). This effort eventually led to suitable candidates as reported in this paper. Furthermore, though constrained by small funds for labor and resources, we have analyzed a variety of lossy ceramic materials, several of which could be usable as HOM absorbers for both normal conducting and superconducting RF structures, e.g. as loads in cavity waveguides and beam tubes either at room or cryogenic temperatures and, depending on cooling measures, low to high operational power levels.

  2. Temperature dependence of tunneling magnetoresistance in epitaxial magnetic tunnel junctions using a Co2FeAl Heusler alloy electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenhong; Sukegawa, Hiroaki; Inomata, Koichiro

    2010-09-01

    Spin-valve-type epitaxial magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) consisting of a full-Heusler alloy Co2FeAl (CFA) and a MgO tunnel barrier were fabricated on a single-crystal MgO(001) substrate using sputtering method for all the layers. Experimental temperature-dependent tunnel magnetoresistance in the MTJs was revealed to be fitted well using spin wave excitation model for tunneling spin polarization, P(T)=P0(1-αT3/2) up to room temperature, where P0 is the spin polarization at 0 K and α is a fitting parameter. The determined P and α are shown to be significantly different between bottom and top CFA electrodes facing a MgO barrier. It is demonstrated that the bottom CFA deposited on a Cr buffer has a low α and behaves as a half-metal with P˜1 in terms of the Δ1 symmetry due to the coherent tunneling through a MgO barrier.

  3. Atomically resolved force microscopy at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Morita, Seizo

    2014-04-24

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) can now not only image individual atoms but also construct atom letters using atom manipulation method even at room temperature (RT). Therefore, the AFM is the second generation atomic tool following the scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). However the AFM can image even insulating atoms, and also directly measure/map the atomic force and potential at the atomic scale. Noting these advantages, we have been developing a bottom-up nanostructuring system at RT based on the AFM. It can identify chemical species of individual atoms and then manipulate selected atom species to the predesigned site one-by-one to assemble complex nanostructures consisted of multi atom species at RT. Here we introduce our results toward atom-by-atom assembly of composite nanostructures based on the AFM at RT including the latest result on atom gating of nano-space for atom-by-atom creation of atom clusters at RT for semiconductor surfaces.

  4. Structure of room temperature ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Yethiraj, Arun

    2016-10-19

    The structure of room temperature ionic liquids is studied using molecular dynamics simulations and integral equation theory. Three ionic liquids 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium hexfluorophosphate, [C n MIM] [PF6], for n  =  1, 4, and 8, are studied using a united atom model of the ions. The primary interest is a study of the pair correlation functions and a test of the reference interaction site model theory. There is liquid-like ordering in the liquid that arises from electrostatic attractions and steric packing considerations. The theory is not in quantitative agreement with the simulation results and underestimates the degree of liquid-like order. A pre-peak in the static structure factor is seen in both simulations and theory, suggesting that this is a geometric effect arising from a packing of the alkyl chains. PMID:27546807

  5. Electrorecovery of actinides at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Stoll, Michael E; Oldham, Warren J; Costa, David A

    2008-01-01

    There are a large number of purification and processing operations involving actinide species that rely on high-temperature molten salts as the solvent medium. One such application is the electrorefining of impure actinide metals to provide high purity material for subsequent applications. There are some drawbacks to the electrodeposition of actinides in molten salts including relatively low yields, lack of accurate potential control, maintaining efficiency in a highly corrosive environment, and failed runs. With these issues in mind we have been investigating the electrodeposition of actinide metals, mainly uranium, from room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) and relatively high-boiling organic solvents. The RTILs we have focused on are comprised of 1,3-dialkylimidazolium or quaternary ammonium cations and mainly the {sup -}N(SO{sub 2}CF{sub 3}){sub 2} anion [bis(trif1uoromethylsulfonyl)imide {equivalent_to} {sup -}NTf{sub 2}]. These materials represent a class of solvents that possess great potential for use in applications employing electrochemical procedures. In order to ascertain the feasibility of using RTILs for bulk electrodeposition of actinide metals our research team has been exploring the electron transfer behavior of simple coordination complexes of uranium dissolved in the RTIL solutions. More recently we have begun some fundamental electrochemical studies on the behavior of uranium and plutonium complexes in the organic solvents N-methylpyrrolidone (NMP) and dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO). Our most recent results concerning electrodeposition will be presented in this account. The electrochemical behavior of U(IV) and U(III) species in RTILs and the relatively low vapor pressure solvents NMP and DMSO is described. These studies have been ongoing in our laboratory to uncover conditions that will lead to the successful bulk electrodeposition of actinide metals at a working electrode surface at room temperature or slightly elevated temperatures. The RTILs we

  6. Room Temperature Electrical Detection of Spin Polarized Currents in Topological Insulators.

    PubMed

    Dankert, André; Geurs, Johannes; Kamalakar, M Venkata; Charpentier, Sophie; Dash, Saroj P

    2015-12-01

    Topological insulators (TIs) are a new class of quantum materials that exhibit a current-induced spin polarization due to spin-momentum locking of massless Dirac Fermions in their surface states. This helical spin polarization in three-dimensional (3D) TIs has been observed using photoemission spectroscopy up to room temperatures. Recently, spin polarized surface currents in 3D TIs were detected electrically by potentiometric measurements using ferromagnetic detector contacts. However, these electric measurements are so far limited to cryogenic temperatures. Here we report the room temperature electrical detection of the spin polarization on the surface of Bi2Se3 by employing spin sensitive ferromagnetic tunnel contacts. The current-induced spin polarization on the Bi2Se3 surface is probed by measuring the magnetoresistance while switching the magnetization direction of the ferromagnetic detector. A spin resistance of up to 70 mΩ is measured at room temperature, which increases linearly with current bias, reverses sign with current direction, and decreases with higher TI thickness. The magnitude of the spin signal, its sign, and control experiments, using different measurement geometries and interface conditions, rule out other known physical effects. These findings provide further information about the electrical detection of current-induced spin polarizations in 3D TIs at ambient temperatures and could lead to innovative spin-based technologies. PMID:26560203

  7. Improved tunneling magnetoresistance at low temperature in manganite junctions grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, R.; Kleiner, R.; Koelle, D.; Petrov, A. Yu.; Davidson, B. A.; Mino, L. Alvarez

    2011-04-18

    We report resistance versus magnetic field measurements for a La{sub 0.65}Sr{sub 0.35}MnO{sub 3}/SrTiO{sub 3}/La{sub 0.65}Sr{sub 0.35}MnO{sub 3} tunnel junction grown by molecular-beam epitaxy, that show a large field window of extremely high tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) at low temperature. Scanning the in-plane applied field orientation through 360 deg., the TMR shows fourfold symmetry, i.e., biaxial anisotropy, aligned with the crystalline axis but not the junction geometrical long axis. The TMR reaches {approx}1900% at 4 K, corresponding to an interfacial spin polarization of >95% assuming identical interfaces. These results show that uniaxial anisotropy is not necessary for large TMR, and lay the groundwork for future improvements in TMR in manganite junctions.

  8. Manipulation of magnetization switching and tunnel magnetoresistance via temperature and voltage control

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Houfang; Wang, Ran; Guo, Peng; Wen, Zhenchao; Feng, Jiafeng; Wei, Hongxiang; Han, Xiufeng; Ji, Yang; Zhang, Shufeng

    2015-01-01

    Magnetization switching between parallel and antiparallel alignments of two magnetic layers in magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) is conventionally controlled either by an external magnetic field or by an electric current. Here, we report that the manipulation of magnetization switching and tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) in perpendicularly magnetized CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB MTJs can be achieved by both temperature and voltage. At a certain range of temperature, coercivity crossover between top and bottom magnetic layers is observed in which the TMR ratio of the MTJs is almost unmeasurable. Furthermore, the temperature range can be tuned reversibly by an electric voltage. Magnetization switching driven by the voltage reveals an unconventional phenomenon such that the voltage driven coercivity changes with temperature are quite different for top and bottom CoFeB layers. A model based on thermally-assisted domain nucleation and propagation is developed to explain the frequency and temperature dependence of coercivity. The present results of controlling the magnetization switching by temperature and voltage may provide an alternative route for novel applications of MTJs based spintronic devices. PMID:26658213

  9. Manipulation of magnetization switching and tunnel magnetoresistance via temperature and voltage control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Houfang; Wang, Ran; Guo, Peng; Wen, Zhenchao; Feng, Jiafeng; Wei, Hongxiang; Han, Xiufeng; Ji, Yang; Zhang, Shufeng

    2015-12-01

    Magnetization switching between parallel and antiparallel alignments of two magnetic layers in magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) is conventionally controlled either by an external magnetic field or by an electric current. Here, we report that the manipulation of magnetization switching and tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) in perpendicularly magnetized CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB MTJs can be achieved by both temperature and voltage. At a certain range of temperature, coercivity crossover between top and bottom magnetic layers is observed in which the TMR ratio of the MTJs is almost unmeasurable. Furthermore, the temperature range can be tuned reversibly by an electric voltage. Magnetization switching driven by the voltage reveals an unconventional phenomenon such that the voltage driven coercivity changes with temperature are quite different for top and bottom CoFeB layers. A model based on thermally-assisted domain nucleation and propagation is developed to explain the frequency and temperature dependence of coercivity. The present results of controlling the magnetization switching by temperature and voltage may provide an alternative route for novel applications of MTJs based spintronic devices.

  10. Manipulation of magnetization switching and tunnel magnetoresistance via temperature and voltage control.

    PubMed

    Liu, Houfang; Wang, Ran; Guo, Peng; Wen, Zhenchao; Feng, Jiafeng; Wei, Hongxiang; Han, Xiufeng; Ji, Yang; Zhang, Shufeng

    2015-01-01

    Magnetization switching between parallel and antiparallel alignments of two magnetic layers in magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) is conventionally controlled either by an external magnetic field or by an electric current. Here, we report that the manipulation of magnetization switching and tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) in perpendicularly magnetized CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB MTJs can be achieved by both temperature and voltage. At a certain range of temperature, coercivity crossover between top and bottom magnetic layers is observed in which the TMR ratio of the MTJs is almost unmeasurable. Furthermore, the temperature range can be tuned reversibly by an electric voltage. Magnetization switching driven by the voltage reveals an unconventional phenomenon such that the voltage driven coercivity changes with temperature are quite different for top and bottom CoFeB layers. A model based on thermally-assisted domain nucleation and propagation is developed to explain the frequency and temperature dependence of coercivity. The present results of controlling the magnetization switching by temperature and voltage may provide an alternative route for novel applications of MTJs based spintronic devices. PMID:26658213

  11. Room temperature molecular up conversion in solution.

    PubMed

    Nonat, Aline; Chan, Chi Fai; Liu, Tao; Platas-Iglesias, Carlos; Liu, Zhenyu; Wong, Wing-Tak; Wong, Wai-Kwok; Wong, Ka-Leung; Charbonnière, Loïc J

    2016-01-01

    Up conversion is an Anti-Stokes luminescent process by which photons of low energy are piled up to generate light at a higher energy. Here we show that the addition of fluoride anions to a D2O solution of a macrocyclic erbium complex leads to the formation of a supramolecular [(ErL)2F](+) assembly in which fluoride is sandwiched between two complexes, held together by the synergistic interactions of the Er-F-Er bridging bond, four intercomplex hydrogen bonds and two aromatic stacking interactions. Room temperature excitation into the Er absorption bands at 980 nm of a solution of the complex in D2O results in the observation of up converted emission at 525, 550 and 650 nm attributed to Er centred transitions via a two-step excitation. The up conversion signal is dramatically increased upon formation of the [(ErL)2F](+) dimer in the presence of 0.5 equivalents of fluoride anions. PMID:27302144

  12. Room temperature molecular up conversion in solution

    PubMed Central

    Nonat, Aline; Chan, Chi Fai; Liu, Tao; Platas-Iglesias, Carlos; Liu, Zhenyu; Wong, Wing-Tak; Wong, Wai-Kwok; Wong, Ka-Leung; Charbonnière, Loïc J.

    2016-01-01

    Up conversion is an Anti-Stokes luminescent process by which photons of low energy are piled up to generate light at a higher energy. Here we show that the addition of fluoride anions to a D2O solution of a macrocyclic erbium complex leads to the formation of a supramolecular [(ErL)2F]+ assembly in which fluoride is sandwiched between two complexes, held together by the synergistic interactions of the Er-F-Er bridging bond, four intercomplex hydrogen bonds and two aromatic stacking interactions. Room temperature excitation into the Er absorption bands at 980 nm of a solution of the complex in D2O results in the observation of up converted emission at 525, 550 and 650 nm attributed to Er centred transitions via a two-step excitation. The up conversion signal is dramatically increased upon formation of the [(ErL)2F]+ dimer in the presence of 0.5 equivalents of fluoride anions. PMID:27302144

  13. Room-temperature single-electron junction.

    PubMed Central

    Facci, P; Erokhin, V; Carrara, S; Nicolini, C

    1996-01-01

    The design, realization, and test performances of an electronic junction based on single-electron phenomena that works in the air at room temperature are hereby reported. The element consists of an electrochemically etched sharp tungsten stylus over whose tip a nanometer-size crystal was synthesized. Langmuir-Blodgett films of cadmium arachidate were transferred onto the stylus and exposed to a H2S atmosphere to yield CdS nanocrystals (30-50 angstrom in diameter) imbedded into an organic matrix. The stylus, biased with respect to a flat electrode, was brought to the tunnel distance from the film and a constant gap value was maintained by a piezo-electric actuator driven by a feedback circuit fed by the tunneling current. With this set-up, it is possible to measure the behavior of the current flowing through the quantum dot when a bias voltage is applied. Voltage-current characteristics measured in the system displayed single-electron trends such as a Coulomb blockade and Coulomb staircase and revealed capacitance values as small as 10(-19) F. PMID:11607710

  14. Operation of a Giant Magnetoresistive (GMR) Digital Isolator, Type IL510, Under Extreme Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard; Hammoud, Ahmad; Panko, Scott

    2010-01-01

    A relatively new type of signal isolation based on Giant Magnetoresistive (GMR) technology was investigated for potential use in harsh temperature environments. Operational characteristics of the 2Mbps single channel, IL510-Series commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) digital isolator chip was obtained under extreme temperature exposure and thermal cycling in the range of -190 C to +120 C. The isolator was evaluated in terms of its output signal delivery and stability, output rise (t(sub r)) and fall times (t(sub f)), and propagation delays at 50% level between input and output during low to high (t(sub PLH)) and high to low (t(sub PHL)) transitions. The device performed very well throughout the entire test temperature range as no significant changes occurred either in its function or in its output signal timing characteristics. The limited thermal cycling, which comprised of 12 cycles between -190 C and +120 C, also had no influence on its performance. In addition, the device packaging underwent no structural damage due to the extreme temperature exposure. These preliminary results indicate that this semiconductor chip has the potential for use in a temperature range that extends beyond its specified regime. Additional and more comprehensive testing, however, is required to establish its operation and reliability and to determine its suitability for long-term use in space exploration missions.

  15. Non-local magnetoresistance in YIG/Pt nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Goennenwein, Sebastian T. B. Pernpeintner, Matthias; Gross, Rudolf; Huebl, Hans; Schlitz, Richard; Ganzhorn, Kathrin; Althammer, Matthias

    2015-10-26

    We study the local and non-local magnetoresistance of thin Pt strips deposited onto yttrium iron garnet. The local magnetoresistive response, inferred from the voltage drop measured along one given Pt strip upon current-biasing it, shows the characteristic magnetization orientation dependence of the spin Hall magnetoresistance. We simultaneously also record the non-local voltage appearing along a second, electrically isolated, Pt strip, separated from the current carrying one by a gap of a few 100 nm. The corresponding non-local magnetoresistance exhibits the symmetry expected for a magnon spin accumulation-driven process, confirming the results recently put forward by Cornelissen et al. [“Long-distance transport of magnon spin information in a magnetic insulator at room temperature,” Nat. Phys. (published online 14 September 2015)]. Our magnetotransport data, taken at a series of different temperatures as a function of magnetic field orientation, rotating the externally applied field in three mutually orthogonal planes, show that the mechanisms behind the spin Hall and the non-local magnetoresistance are qualitatively different. In particular, the non-local magnetoresistance vanishes at liquid Helium temperatures, while the spin Hall magnetoresistance prevails.

  16. Room-Temperature Multiferroic Hexagonal LuFeO3

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Xuemei; Balke, Nina; Chi, Miaofang; Gai, Zheng; Keavney, David; Lee, Ho Nyung; Shen, Jian; Snijders, Paul C; Wang, Wenbin; Ward, Thomas Z; Xu, Xiaoshan; Yi, Jieyu; Zhu, Leyi; Christen, Hans M; Zhao, Jun

    2013-01-01

    We observed the coexistence of ferroelectricity and weak ferromagnetism at room temperature in the hexagonal phase of LuFeO3 stabilized by epitaxial thin film growth. While the ferroelectricity in hexagonal LuFeO3 can be understood as arising from its polar structure, the observation of weak ferromagnetism at room temperature is remarkable considering the frustrated triangular spin structure. An explanation of the room temperature weak ferromagnetism is proposed in terms of a subtle lattice distortion revealed by the structural characterization. The combination of ferroelectricity and weak ferromagnetism in epitaxial films at room temperature offers great potential for the application of this novel multiferroic material in next generation devices.

  17. Electrical and Magneto-Resistivity Measurements on Amorphous Copper-Titanium Alloys at Low Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Renyong

    1992-01-01

    The anomalous transport properties of highly disordered metallic glasses, which require corrections to the classical Boltzmann theory, are due to quantum interference effects of the scattered electron waves. These corrections provide new contributions to the resistivity: "weak localization" and "electron-electron interaction". To study these quantum interference effects, we have made the highest-precision measurements, so far, of the resistances of the amorphous rm Cu_{50}Ti_{50 } and rm Cu_{60}Ti _{40} ribbons at much lower temperatures than before (15mK < T < 6K) and in small magnetic fields (0T < B < 0.2T). To measure the resistance and temperature accurately, we developed a novel method: measuring the resistance perpendicular to the ribbons with potassium as the non-superconducting glue between the CuTi ribbons and two Cu electrodes in order to make excellent electrical and thermal contact. With this method, we were able to measure the resistances with a relative precision of Deltarho/rho = 10^{-7}-10 ^{-8} and temperatures reliably down to 15mK with an error of less than 1mK. The zero field resistances and magnetoresistances were analyzed using weak localization theories that include the Zeeman splitting and electron-electron interaction theories. Possible background contributions from the K layers, the Cu electrodes, and their boundaries are quantified in the analysis. In zero field, these background contributions were negligible for T<3K. At zero magnetic field and T<0.15K, we found that electron -electron interaction dominates the resistance, while weak localization makes a nontrivial contribution to the resistance for T>0.15K. In contrast, at the lowest temperatures, the magnetoresistances were dominated by weak localization with Zeeman splitting and Maki-Thompson superconducting fluctuations. For higher magnetic fields and lowest temperatures (B/T > 1 T/K), we find discrepancies between our data and the theoretical calculations. We found that most of the

  18. Water in Room Temperature Ionic Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fayer, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Room temperature ionic liquids (or RTILs, salts with a melting point below 25 °C) have become a subject of intense study over the last several decades. Currently, RTIL application research includes synthesis, batteries, solar cells, crystallization, drug delivery, and optics. RTILs are often composed of an inorganic anion paired with an asymmetric organic cation which contains one or more pendant alkyl chains. The asymmetry of the cation frustrates crystallization, causing the salt's melting point to drop significantly. In general, RTILs are very hygroscopic, and therefore, it is of interest to examine the influence of water on RTIL structure and dynamics. In addition, in contrast to normal aqueous salt solutions, which crystallize at low water concentration, in an RTIL it is possible to examine isolated water molecules interacting with ions but not with other water molecules. Here, optical heterodyne-detected optical Kerr effect (OHD-OKE) measurements of orientational relaxation on a series of 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate RTILs as a function of chain length and water concentration are presented. The addition of water to the longer alkyl chain RTILs causes the emergence of a long time bi-exponential orientational anisotropy decay. Such decays have not been seen previously in OHD-OKE experiments on any type of liquid and are analyzed here using a wobbling-in-a-cone model. The orientational relaxation is not hydrodynamic, with the slowest relaxation component becoming slower as the viscosity decreases for the longest chain, highest water content samples. The dynamics of isolated D2O molecules in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate (BmImPF6) were examined using two dimensional infrared (2D IR) vibrational echo spectroscopy. Spectral diffusion and incoherent and coherent transfer of excitation between the symmetric and antisymmetric modes are examined. The coherent transfer experiments are used to address the nature of inhomogeneous

  19. Novel spintronics devices for memory and logic: prospects and challenges for room temperature all spin computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian-Ping

    An energy efficient memory and logic device for the post-CMOS era has been the goal of a variety of research fields. The limits of scaling, which we expect to reach by the year 2025, demand that future advances in computational power will not be realized from ever-shrinking device sizes, but rather by innovative designs and new materials and physics. Magnetoresistive based devices have been a promising candidate for future integrated magnetic computation because of its unique non-volatility and functionalities. The application of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy for potential STT-RAM application was demonstrated and later has been intensively investigated by both academia and industry groups, but there is no clear path way how scaling will eventually work for both memory and logic applications. One of main reasons is that there is no demonstrated material stack candidate that could lead to a scaling scheme down to sub 10 nm. Another challenge for the usage of magnetoresistive based devices for logic application is its available switching speed and writing energy. Although a good progress has been made to demonstrate the fast switching of a thermally stable magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) down to 165 ps, it is still several times slower than its CMOS counterpart. In this talk, I will review the recent progress by my research group and my C-SPIN colleagues, then discuss the opportunities, challenges and some potential path ways for magnetoresitive based devices for memory and logic applications and their integration for room temperature all spin computing system.

  20. Room-temperature stabilization of nanoscale superionic Ag2Se

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, T.; Wittenberg, J. S.; Lindenberg, A. M.

    2014-10-01

    Superionic materials are multi-component solids in which one sub-lattice exhibits high ionic conductivity within a fixed crystalline structure. This is typically associated with a structural phase transition occurring significantly above room temperature. Here, through combined temperature-resolved x-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry, we map out the nanoscale size-dependence of the Ag2Se tetragonal to superionic phase transition temperature and determine the threshold size for room-temperature stabilization of superionic Ag2Se. For the first time, clear experimental evidence for such stabilization of the highly ionic conducting phase at room temperature is obtained in ˜2 nm diameter spheres, which corresponds to a >100 °C suppression of the bulk phase transition temperature. This may enable technological applications of Ag2Se in devices where high ionic conductivity at room temperature is required.

  1. Room-temperature stabilization of nanoscale superionic Ag₂Se.

    PubMed

    Hu, T; Wittenberg, J S; Lindenberg, A M

    2014-10-17

    Superionic materials are multi-component solids in which one sub-lattice exhibits high ionic conductivity within a fixed crystalline structure. This is typically associated with a structural phase transition occurring significantly above room temperature. Here, through combined temperature-resolved x-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry, we map out the nanoscale size-dependence of the Ag₂Se tetragonal to superionic phase transition temperature and determine the threshold size for room-temperature stabilization of superionic Ag2Se. For the first time, clear experimental evidence for such stabilization of the highly ionic conducting phase at room temperature is obtained in ∼2 nm diameter spheres, which corresponds to a >100 °C suppression of the bulk phase transition temperature. This may enable technological applications of Ag₂Se in devices where high ionic conductivity at room temperature is required. PMID:25249347

  2. Large exchange bias in polycrystalline MnN/CoFe bilayers at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinert, Markus; Büker, Björn; Graulich, Dominik; Dunz, Mareike

    2015-10-01

    We report on the new polycrystalline exchange bias system MnN/CoFe, which shows exchange bias of up to 1800 Oe at room temperature with a coercive field around 600 Oe. The room-temperature values of the interfacial exchange energy and the effective uniaxial anisotropy are estimated to be Jeff=0.41 mJ /m2 and Keff=37 kJ /m3 . The thermal stability was found to be tunable by controlling the nitrogen content of MnN. The maximum blocking temperature exceeds 325 ∘C, however the median blocking temperature in the limit of thick MnN is 160 ∘C . Good oxidation stability through self-passivation was observed, enabling the use of MnN in lithographically defined microstructures. As a proof of principle we demonstrate a simple giant magnetoresistance stack exchange biased with MnN, which shows clear separation between parallel and antiparallel magnetic states. These properties come along with a surprisingly simple manufacturing process for the MnN films.

  3. Room temperature to cryogenic electrical interface

    SciTech Connect

    Faris, S.M.

    1988-04-26

    A monolithic superconductive chip is described comprising: a. a substrate with a low temperature region and a high temperature region; b. a low temperature electronic circuit formed on the low temperature region and including an element which is superconductive when it has a temperature below a critical level; and c. electrical conductors formed on the substrate, the conductors being connected to the electronic circuit and traversing the substrate to the high temperature region.

  4. Resistivity dependence of magnetoresistance in Co/ZnO films

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We report the dependence of magnetoresistance effect on resistivity (ρ) in Co/ZnO films deposited by magnetron sputtering at different sputtering pressures with different ZnO contents. The magnitude of the resistivity reflects different carrier transport regimes ranging from metallic to hopping behaviors. Large room-temperature magnetoresistance greater than 8% is obtained in the resistivity range from 0.08 to 0.5 Ω · cm. The magnetoresistance value decreases markedly when the resistivity of the films is less than 0.08 Ω · cm or greater than 0.5 Ω · cm. When 0.08 Ω · cm < ρ < 0.5 Ω · cm, the conduction contains two channels: the spin-dependent tunneling channel and the spin-independent second-order hopping (N = 2). The former gives rise to a high room-temperature magnetoresistance effect. When ρ > 0.5 Ω · cm, the spin-independent higher-order hopping (N > 2) comes into play and decreases the tunneling magnetoresistance value. For the samples with ρ < 0.08 Ω · cm, reduced magnetoresistance is mainly ascribed to the formation of percolation paths through interconnected elongated metallic Co particles. This observation is significant for the improvement of room-temperature magnetoresistance value for future spintronic devices. PMID:24393445

  5. Large, non-saturating magnetoresistance in WTe2.

    PubMed

    Ali, Mazhar N; Xiong, Jun; Flynn, Steven; Tao, Jing; Gibson, Quinn D; Schoop, Leslie M; Liang, Tian; Haldolaarachchige, Neel; Hirschberger, Max; Ong, N P; Cava, R J

    2014-10-01

    Magnetoresistance is the change in a material's electrical resistance in response to an applied magnetic field. Materials with large magnetoresistance have found use as magnetic sensors, in magnetic memory, and in hard drives at room temperature, and their rarity has motivated many fundamental studies in materials physics at low temperatures. Here we report the observation of an extremely large positive magnetoresistance at low temperatures in the non-magnetic layered transition-metal dichalcogenide WTe2: 452,700 per cent at 4.5 kelvins in a magnetic field of 14.7 teslas, and 13 million per cent at 0.53 kelvins in a magnetic field of 60 teslas. In contrast with other materials, there is no saturation of the magnetoresistance value even at very high applied fields. Determination of the origin and consequences of this effect, and the fabrication of thin films, nanostructures and devices based on the extremely large positive magnetoresistance of WTe2, will represent a significant new direction in the study of magnetoresistivity. PMID:25219849

  6. Large, non-saturating magnetoresistance in WTe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Mazhar N.; Xiong, Jun; Flynn, Steven; Tao, Jing; Gibson, Quinn D.; Schoop, Leslie M.; Liang, Tian; Haldolaarachchige, Neel; Hirschberger, Max; Ong, N. P.; Cava, R. J.

    2014-10-01

    Magnetoresistance is the change in a material's electrical resistance in response to an applied magnetic field. Materials with large magnetoresistance have found use as magnetic sensors, in magnetic memory, and in hard drives at room temperature, and their rarity has motivated many fundamental studies in materials physics at low temperatures. Here we report the observation of an extremely large positive magnetoresistance at low temperatures in the non-magnetic layered transition-metal dichalcogenide WTe2: 452,700 per cent at 4.5 kelvins in a magnetic field of 14.7 teslas, and 13 million per cent at 0.53 kelvins in a magnetic field of 60 teslas. In contrast with other materials, there is no saturation of the magnetoresistance value even at very high applied fields. Determination of the origin and consequences of this effect, and the fabrication of thin films, nanostructures and devices based on the extremely large positive magnetoresistance of WTe2, will represent a significant new direction in the study of magnetoresistivity.

  7. Room temperature and productivity in office work

    SciTech Connect

    Seppanen, O.; Fisk, W.J.; Lei, Q.H.

    2006-07-01

    Indoor temperature is one of the fundamental characteristics of the indoor environment. It can be controlled with a degree of accuracy dependent on the building and its HVAC system. The indoor temperature affects several human responses, including thermal comfort, perceived air quality, sick building syndrome symptoms and performance at work. In this study, we focused on the effects of temperature on performance at office work. We included those studies that had used objective indicators of performance that are likely to be relevant in office type work, such as text processing, simple calculations (addition, multiplication), length of telephone customer service time, and total handling time per customer for call-center workers. We excluded data from studies of industrial work performance. We calculated from all studies the percentage of performance change per degree increase in temperature, and statistically analyzed measured work performance with temperature. The results show that performance increases with temperature up to 21-22 C, and decreases with temperature above 23-24 C. The highest productivity is at temperature of around 22 C. For example, at the temperature of 30 C, the performance is only 91.1% of the maximum i.e. the reduction in performance is 8.9%.

  8. Fabrication method for a room temperature hydrogen sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seal, Sudipta (Inventor); Shukla, Satyajit V. (Inventor); Ludwig, Lawrence (Inventor); Cho, Hyoung (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A sensor for selectively determining the presence and measuring the amount of hydrogen in the vicinity of the sensor. The sensor comprises a MEMS device coated with a nanostructured thin film of indium oxide doped tin oxide with an over layer of nanostructured barium cerate with platinum catalyst nanoparticles. Initial exposure to a UV light source, at room temperature, causes burning of organic residues present on the sensor surface and provides a clean surface for sensing hydrogen at room temperature. A giant room temperature hydrogen sensitivity is observed after making the UV source off. The hydrogen sensor of the invention can be usefully employed for the detection of hydrogen in an environment susceptible to the incursion or generation of hydrogen and may be conveniently used at room temperature.

  9. Neutron absorbing room temperature vulcanizable silicone rubber compositions

    DOEpatents

    Zoch, Harold L.

    1979-11-27

    A neutron absorbing composition comprising a one-component room temperature vulcanizable silicone rubber composition or a two-component room temperature vulcanizable silicone rubber composition in which the composition contains from 25 to 300 parts by weight based on the base silanol or vinyl containing diorganopolysiloxane polymer of a boron compound or boron powder as the neutron absorbing ingredient. An especially useful boron compound in this application is boron carbide.

  10. Irradiation dose determination below room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos-Bernal, S.; Cruz, E.; Negrón-Mendoza, A.; Bustos, E.

    2002-03-01

    The measurements presented were undertaken to provide quantitative information on the low temperature irradiation of thermoluminiscence phosphors. The crystals used were (a) LiF co-doped with Mg, Cu and P, and (b) CaSO 4 doped with Dy. The absorbed dose values in the interval studied showed a linear behavior at low doses and low temperature. The aim of this work is to test if these crystals can be used to measure the dose absorbed by solids at low temperature.

  11. Thermal Effect in Opal Below Room Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Buerger, Martin J.; Shoemaker, Gerald L.

    1972-01-01

    Opal, once believed to be amorphous silica, was shown by Levin and Ott (1932, J. Amer. Chem. Soc. 54, 828-829) to give an x-ray powder pattern of the high-temperature form of cristobalite. The early explanation of this anomalous existence of a phase below its high-low transition temperature is now known to be untenable. One of us suggested that the tiny sizes of the component cristobalite crystals might explain the anomaly; if so, the transition might be expected below ambient temperatures. The record of a du Pont 900 Thermoanalyzer indeed revealed heat effects in opal below ambient temperatures, with an exotherm having a maximum at about -40° on cooling and an endotherm that began about -50° on heating. This was not a latent-heat effect due to the high-low transition of cristobalite, however, for the low-cristobalite pattern persisted to below -50°. Opal normally contains 4-9% water, which is tenaciously held; water loss is nearly linear with temperatures up to about 422°, when water loss is abruptly complete. Water-free opal does not display the thermal effect, but the same opal rehydrated does display it. Water is housed in minute voids, judged to be a few hundred Ångströms across, between minute particles of cristobalite. This water behaves differently from water in bulk, for its begins to melt at about -50°. PMID:16592025

  12. Room Temperature Magnetic Barrier Layers in Magnetic Tunnel Junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson-Cheeseman, B. B.; Wong, F. J.; Chopdekar, R. V.; Arenholz, E.; Suzuki, Y.

    2010-03-09

    We investigate the spin transport and interfacial magnetism of magnetic tunnel junctions with highly spin polarized LSMO and Fe3O4 electrodes and a ferrimagnetic NiFe2O4 (NFO) barrier layer. The spin dependent transport can be understood in terms of magnon-assisted spin dependent tunneling where the magnons are excited in the barrier layer itself. The NFO/Fe3O4 interface displays strong magnetic coupling, while the LSMO/NFO interface exhibits clear decoupling as determined by a combination of X-ray absorption spectroscopy and X-ray magnetic circular dichroism. This decoupling allows for distinct parallel and antiparallel electrode states in this all-magnetic trilayer. The spin transport of these devices, dominated by the NFO barrier layer magnetism, leads to a symmetric bias dependence of the junction magnetoresistance at all temperatures.

  13. Control and Room Temperature Optimization of Energy Efficient Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Djouadi, Seddik M; Kuruganti, Phani Teja

    2012-01-01

    The building sector consumes a large part of the energy used in the United States and is responsible for nearly 40% of greenhouse gas emissions. It is therefore economically and environmentally important to reduce the building energy consumption to realize massive energy savings. In this paper, a method to control room temperature in buildings is proposed. The approach is based on a distributed parameter model represented by a three dimensional (3D) heat equation in a room with heater/cooler located at ceiling. The latter is resolved using finite element methods, and results in a model for room temperature with thousands of states. The latter is not amenable to control design. A reduced order model of only few states is then derived using Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD). A Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR) is computed based on the reduced model, and applied to the full order model to control room temperature.

  14. Systematic Angular Study of Magnetoresistance in Permalloy Connected Kagome Artificial Spin Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jungsik; Le, Brian; Watts, Justin; Leighton, Chris; Samarth, Nitin; Schiffer, Peter

    Artificial spin ices are nanostructured two-dimensional arrays of ferromagnetic elements, where frustrated interactions lead to unusual collective magnetic behavior. Here we report a room-temperature magnetoresistance study of connected permalloy (Ni81Fe19) kagome artificial spin ice networks, wherein the direction of the applied in-plane magnetic field is systematically varied. We measure both the longitudinal and transverse magnetoresistance in these structures, and we find certain transport geometries of the network show strong angular sensitivity - even small variations in the applied field angle lead to dramatic changes of the magnetoresistance response. We also investigate the magnetization reversal of the networks using magnetic force microscopy (MFM), demonstrating avalanche behavior in the magnetization reversal. The magnetoresistance features are analyzed using an anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) model. Supported by the US Department of Energy. Work at the University of Minnesota was supported by Seagate Technology, NSF MRSEC, and a Marie Curie International Outgoing Fellowship within the 7th European Community Framework Programme.

  15. Nature of room-temperature photoluminescence in ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    Shan, W.; Walukiewicz, W.; Ager III, J.W.; Yu, K.M.; Yuan, H.B.; Xin, H.P.; Cantwell, G.; Song, J.J.

    2004-11-11

    The temperature dependence of the photoluminescence (PL) transitions associated with various excitons and their phonon replicas in high-purity bulk ZnO has been studied at temperatures from 12 K to above room temperature (320 K). Several strong PL emission lines associated with LO phonon replicas of free and bound excitons are clearly observed. The room temperature PL spectrum is dominated by the phonon replicas of the free exciton transition with the maximum at the first LO phonon replica. The results explain the discrepancy between the transition energy of free exciton determined by reflection measurement and the peak position obtained by the PL measurement.

  16. Strong-coupling theory of high-temperature superconductivity and colossal magnetoresistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, A. S.

    2005-08-01

    We argue that the extension of the BCS theory to the strong-coupling regime describes the high-temperature superconductivity of cuprates and the colossal magnetoresistance (CMR) of ferromagnetic oxides if the phonon dressing of carriers and strong attractive correlations are taken into account. The attraction between carriers, which is prerequisite to high-temperature superconductivity, is caused by an almost unretarted electron-phonon interaction sufficient to overcome the direct Coulomb repulsion in the strong-coupling limit, where electrons become polarons and bipolarons (real-space electron or hole pairs dressed by phonons). The long-range Froehlich electron-phonon interaction has been identified as the most essential in cuprates providing "superlight" lattice polarons and bipolarons. A number of key observations have been predicted and/or explained with polarons and bipolarons including unusual isotope effects, normal state (pseudo)gaps, upper critical fields, etc. Here some kinetic, magnetic, and more recent thermomagnetic normal state measurements are interpreted in the framework of the strong-coupling theory, including the Nernst effect and normal state diamagnetism. Remarkably, a similar strong-coupling approach offers a simple explanation of CMR in ferromagnetic oxides, while the conventional double-exchange (DEX) model, proposed half a century ago and generalised more recently to include the electronphonon interaction, is in conflict with a number of modern experiments. Among these experiments are site-selective spectroscopies, which have shown that oxygen p-holes are current carriers rather than d-electrons in ferromagnetic manganites (and in cuprates) ruling out DEX mechanism of CMR. Also some samples of ferromagnetic manganites manifest an insulating-like optical conductivity at all temperatures contradicting the DEX notion that their ferromagnetic phase is metallic. On the other hand, the pairing of oxygen holes into heavy bipolarons in the

  17. Proposal for a room-temperature diamond maser.

    PubMed

    Jin, Liang; Pfender, Matthias; Aslam, Nabeel; Neumann, Philipp; Yang, Sen; Wrachtrup, Jörg; Liu, Ren-Bao

    2015-01-01

    The application of masers is limited by its demanding working conditions (high vacuum or low temperature). A room-temperature solid-state maser is highly desirable, but the lifetimes of emitters (electron spins) in solids at room temperature are usually too short (∼ns) for population inversion. Masing from pentacene spins in p-terphenyl crystals, which have a long spin lifetime (∼0.1 ms), has been demonstrated. This maser, however, operates only in the pulsed mode. Here we propose a room-temperature maser based on nitrogen-vacancy centres in diamond, which features the longest known solid-state spin lifetime (∼5 ms) at room temperature, high optical pumping efficiency (∼10(6) s(-1)) and material stability. Our numerical simulation demonstrates that a maser with a coherence time of approximately minutes is feasible under readily accessible conditions (cavity Q-factor ∼5 × 10(4), diamond size ∼3 × 3 × 0.5 mm(3) and pump power <10 W). A room-temperature diamond maser may facilitate a broad range of microwave technologies. PMID:26394758

  18. Proposal for a room-temperature diamond maser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Liang; Pfender, Matthias; Aslam, Nabeel; Neumann, Philipp; Yang, Sen; Wrachtrup, Jörg; Liu, Ren-Bao

    2015-09-01

    The application of masers is limited by its demanding working conditions (high vacuum or low temperature). A room-temperature solid-state maser is highly desirable, but the lifetimes of emitters (electron spins) in solids at room temperature are usually too short (~ns) for population inversion. Masing from pentacene spins in p-terphenyl crystals, which have a long spin lifetime (~0.1 ms), has been demonstrated. This maser, however, operates only in the pulsed mode. Here we propose a room-temperature maser based on nitrogen-vacancy centres in diamond, which features the longest known solid-state spin lifetime (~5 ms) at room temperature, high optical pumping efficiency (~106 s-1) and material stability. Our numerical simulation demonstrates that a maser with a coherence time of approximately minutes is feasible under readily accessible conditions (cavity Q-factor ~5 × 104, diamond size ~3 × 3 × 0.5 mm3 and pump power <10 W). A room-temperature diamond maser may facilitate a broad range of microwave technologies.

  19. Proposal for a room-temperature diamond maser

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Liang; Pfender, Matthias; Aslam, Nabeel; Neumann, Philipp; Yang, Sen; Wrachtrup, Jörg; Liu, Ren-Bao

    2015-01-01

    The application of masers is limited by its demanding working conditions (high vacuum or low temperature). A room-temperature solid-state maser is highly desirable, but the lifetimes of emitters (electron spins) in solids at room temperature are usually too short (∼ns) for population inversion. Masing from pentacene spins in p-terphenyl crystals, which have a long spin lifetime (∼0.1 ms), has been demonstrated. This maser, however, operates only in the pulsed mode. Here we propose a room-temperature maser based on nitrogen-vacancy centres in diamond, which features the longest known solid-state spin lifetime (∼5 ms) at room temperature, high optical pumping efficiency (∼106 s−1) and material stability. Our numerical simulation demonstrates that a maser with a coherence time of approximately minutes is feasible under readily accessible conditions (cavity Q-factor ∼5 × 104, diamond size ∼3 × 3 × 0.5 mm3 and pump power <10 W). A room-temperature diamond maser may facilitate a broad range of microwave technologies. PMID:26394758

  20. Room temperature DNA storage with slide-mounted Aphid specimens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most of the conventional molecular studies of aphids destroy the specimen in order to extract DNA. This DNA is subsequently stored in low temperature freezers. Room temperature storage of DNA with microscope slide-mounted voucher material is demonstrated by developing a system that uses filter pa...

  1. Acoustic method for measuring air temperature and humidity in rooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanev, N. G.

    2014-05-01

    A method is proposed to determine air temperature and humidity in rooms with a system of sound sources and receivers, making it possible to find the sound velocity and reverberation time. Nomograms for determining the air temperature and relative air humidity are constructed from the found sound velocity and time reverberation values. The required accuracy of measuring these parameters is estimated.

  2. Giant electrocaloric effect in ferroelectric nanotubes near room temperature.

    PubMed

    Liu, Man; Wang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Ferroelectric perovskite oxides possess large electrocaloric effect, but only at high temperature, which limits their potential as next generation solid state cooling devices. Here, we demonstrate from phase field simulations that a giant adiabatic temperature change exhibits near room temperature in the strained ferroelectric PbTiO₃ nanotubes, which is several times in magnitude larger than that of PbTiO₃ thin films. Such giant adiabatic temperature change is attributed to the extrinsic contribution of unusual domain transition, which involves a dedicated interplay among the electric field, strain, temperature and polarization. Careful selection of external strain allows one to harness the extrinsic contribution to obtain large adiabatic temperature change in ferroelectric nanotubes near room temperature. Our finding provides a novel insight into the electrocaloric response of ferroelectric nanostructures and leads to a new strategy to tailor and improve the electrocaloric properties of ferroelectric materials through domain engineering. PMID:25578434

  3. Giant electrocaloric effect in ferroelectric nanotubes near room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Man; Wang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Ferroelectric perovskite oxides possess large electrocaloric effect, but only at high temperature, which limits their potential as next generation solid state cooling devices. Here, we demonstrate from phase field simulations that a giant adiabatic temperature change exhibits near room temperature in the strained ferroelectric PbTiO3 nanotubes, which is several times in magnitude larger than that of PbTiO3 thin films. Such giant adiabatic temperature change is attributed to the extrinsic contribution of unusual domain transition, which involves a dedicated interplay among the electric field, strain, temperature and polarization. Careful selection of external strain allows one to harness the extrinsic contribution to obtain large adiabatic temperature change in ferroelectric nanotubes near room temperature. Our finding provides a novel insight into the electrocaloric response of ferroelectric nanostructures and leads to a new strategy to tailor and improve the electrocaloric properties of ferroelectric materials through domain engineering. PMID:25578434

  4. Large, Tunable Magnetoresistance in Nonmagnetic III-V Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Li, Sichao; Luo, Wei; Gu, Jiangjiang; Cheng, Xiang; Ye, Peide D; Wu, Yanqing

    2015-12-01

    Magnetoresistance, the modulation of resistance by magnetic fields, has been adopted and continues to evolve in many device applications including hard-disk, memory, and sensors. Magnetoresistance in nonmagnetic semiconductors has recently raised much attention and shows great potential due to its large magnitude that is comparable or even larger than magnetic materials. However, most of the previous work focus on two terminal devices with large dimensions, typically of micrometer scales, which severely limit their performance potential and more importantly, scalability in commercial applications. Here, we investigate magnetoresistance in the impact ionization region in InGaAs nanowires with 20 nm diameter and 40 nm gate length. The deeply scaled dimensions of these nanowires enable high sensibility with less power consumption. Moreover, in these three terminal devices, the magnitude of magnetoresistance can be tuned by the transverse electric field controlled by gate voltage. Large magnetoresistance between 100% at room temperature and 2000% at 4.3 K can be achieved at 2.5 T. These nanoscale devices with large magnetoresistance offer excellent opportunity for future high-density large-scale magneto-electric devices using top-down fabrication approaches, which are compatible with commercial silicon platform. PMID:26561728

  5. Room temperature ferromagnetism in Teflon due to carbon dangling bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Y. W.; Lu, Y. H.; Yi, J. B.; Feng, Y. P.; Herng, T. S.; Liu, X.; Gao, D. Q.; Xue, D. S.; Xue, J. M.; Ouyang, J. Y.; Ding, J.

    2012-03-01

    The ferromagnetism in many carbon nanostructures is attributed to carbon dangling bonds or vacancies. This provides opportunities to develop new functional materials, such as molecular and polymeric ferromagnets and organic spintronic materials, without magnetic elements (for example, 3d and 4f metals). Here we report the observation of room temperature ferromagnetism in Teflon tape (polytetrafluoroethylene) subjected to simple mechanical stretching, cutting or heating. First-principles calculations indicate that the room temperature ferromagnetism originates from carbon dangling bonds and strong ferromagnetic coupling between them. Room temperature ferromagnetism has also been successfully realized in another polymer, polyethylene, through cutting and stretching. Our findings suggest that ferromagnetism due to networks of carbon dangling bonds can arise in polymers and carbon-based molecular materials.

  6. Bulk nuclear polarization enhanced at room temperature by optical pumping.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Ran; Bretschneider, Christian O; London, Paz; Budker, Dmitry; Gershoni, David; Frydman, Lucio

    2013-08-01

    Bulk (13)C polarization can be strongly enhanced in diamond at room temperature based on the optical pumping of nitrogen-vacancy color centers. This effect was confirmed by irradiating single crystals at a ~50 mT field promoting anticrossings between electronic excited-state levels, followed by shuttling of the sample into an NMR setup and by subsequent (13)C detection. A nuclear polarization of ~0.5%--equivalent to the (13)C polarization achievable by thermal polarization at room temperature at fields of ~2000 T--was measured, and its bulk nature determined based on line shape and relaxation measurements. Positive and negative enhanced polarizations were obtained, with a generally complex but predictable dependence on the magnetic field during optical pumping. Owing to its simplicity, this (13)C room temperature polarizing strategy provides a promising new addition to existing nuclear hyperpolarization techniques. PMID:23952444

  7. Giant room-temperature elastocaloric effect in ferroelectric ultrathin films.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Infante, Ingrid C; Lou, Xiaojie; Bellaiche, Laurent; Scott, James F; Dkhil, Brahim

    2014-09-17

    Environmentally friendly ultrathin BaTiO3 capacitors can exhibit a giant stress-induced elastocaloric effect without hysteresis loss or Joule heating. By combining this novel elastocaloric effect with the intrinsic electrocaloric effect, an ideal refrigeration cycle with high performance (temperature change over 10 K with a wide working-temperature window of 60 K) at room temperature is proposed for future cooling applications. PMID:25042767

  8. Nanostructured Materials for Room-Temperature Gas Sensors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Liu, Xianghong; Neri, Giovanni; Pinna, Nicola

    2016-02-01

    Sensor technology has an important effect on many aspects in our society, and has gained much progress, propelled by the development of nanoscience and nanotechnology. Current research efforts are directed toward developing high-performance gas sensors with low operating temperature at low fabrication costs. A gas sensor working at room temperature is very appealing as it provides very low power consumption and does not require a heater for high-temperature operation, and hence simplifies the fabrication of sensor devices and reduces the operating cost. Nanostructured materials are at the core of the development of any room-temperature sensing platform. The most important advances with regard to fundamental research, sensing mechanisms, and application of nanostructured materials for room-temperature conductometric sensor devices are reviewed here. Particular emphasis is given to the relation between the nanostructure and sensor properties in an attempt to address structure-property correlations. Finally, some future research perspectives and new challenges that the field of room-temperature sensors will have to address are also discussed. PMID:26662346

  9. Electron spin coherence near room temperature in magnetic quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Moro, Fabrizio; Turyanska, Lyudmila; Wilman, James; Fielding, Alistair J; Fay, Michael W; Granwehr, Josef; Patanè, Amalia

    2015-01-01

    We report on an example of confined magnetic ions with long spin coherence near room temperature. This was achieved by confining single Mn(2+) spins in colloidal semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) and by dispersing the QDs in a proton-spin free matrix. The controlled suppression of Mn-Mn interactions and minimization of Mn-nuclear spin dipolar interactions result in unprecedentedly long phase memory (TM ~ 8 μs) and spin-lattice relaxation (T1 ~ 10 ms) time constants for Mn(2+) ions at T = 4.5 K, and in electron spin coherence observable near room temperature (TM ~ 1 μs). PMID:26040432

  10. Trace vapour detection at room temperature using Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chou, Alison; Radi, Babak; Jaatinen, Esa; Juodkazis, Saulius; Fredericks, Peter M

    2014-04-21

    A miniaturized flow-through system consisting of a gold coated silicon substrate based on enhanced Raman spectroscopy has been used to study the detection of vapour from model explosive compounds. The measurements show that the detectability of the vapour molecules at room temperature depends sensitively on the interaction between the molecule and the substrate. The results highlight the capability of a flow system combined with Raman spectroscopy for detecting low vapour pressure compounds with a limit of detection of 0.2 ppb as demonstrated by the detection of bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate, a common polymer additive emitted from a commercial polyvinyl chloride (PVC) tubing at room temperature. PMID:24588003

  11. Ether-based nonflammable electrolyte for room temperature sodium battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jinkui; Zhang, Zhen; Li, Lifei; Yang, Jian; Xiong, Shenglin; Qian, Yitai

    2015-06-01

    Safety problem is one of the key points that hinder the development of room temperature sodium batteries. In this paper, four well-known nonflammable organic compounds, Trimethyl Phosphate (TMP), Tri(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl) phosphite (TFEP), Dimethyl Methylphosphonate (DMMP), Methyl nonafluorobuyl Ether (MFE), are investigated as nonflammable solvents in sodium batteries for the first time. Among them, MFE is stable towards sodium metal at room temperature. The electrochemical properties and electrode compatibility of MFE based electrolyte are investigated. Both Prussian blue cathode and carbon nanotube anode show good electrochemical performance retention in this electrolyte. The results suggest that MFE is a promising option as nonflammable electrolyte additive for sodium batteries.

  12. Efficient room-temperature Spin Hall nano-oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zholud, Andrei; Urazhdin, Sergei

    2014-03-01

    Spin current injected into a ferromagnet exerts a spin torque on the magnetization, modifying its dynamical damping. Complete compensation of damping by spin current can result in magnetization auto-oscillations, as was demonstrated for in-plane point-contact spin Hall oscillator devices utilizing Pt spin Hall material as a source of spin current and permalloy (Py) as active magnetic layer. Electronic spectroscopy has demonstrated microwave generation by oscillations of magnetization at cryogenic temperatures, but this microwave generation decreases with increasing temperature and disappears at room temperature. We will describe a new device geometry that decouples spin transport from the magnetic configuration by separate patterning of the spin Hall Pt layer and the active Py layer. We demonstrate that this device geometry can operate at smaller driving dc currents for microwave generation that persists up to room temperature. We discuss the physical mechanisms that affect the temperature- and geometry-dependent performance of spin Hall nano-oscillators.

  13. Room-Temperature-Cured Copolymers for Lithium Battery Gel Electrolytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B.; Tigelaar, Dean M.

    2009-01-01

    Polyimide-PEO copolymers (PEO signifies polyethylene oxide) that have branched rod-coil molecular structures and that can be cured into film form at room temperature have been invented for use as gel electrolytes for lithium-ion electric-power cells. These copolymers offer an alternative to previously patented branched rod-coil polyimides that have been considered for use as polymer electrolytes and that must be cured at a temperature of 200 C. In order to obtain sufficient conductivity for lithium ions in practical applications at and below room temperature, it is necessary to imbibe such a polymer with a suitable carbonate solvent or ionic liquid, but the high-temperature cure makes it impossible to incorporate and retain such a liquid within the polymer molecular framework. By eliminating the high-temperature cure, the present invention makes it possible to incorporate the required liquid.

  14. Room temperature ferromagnetic (Fe₁-xCox)₃BO₅ nanorods.

    PubMed

    He, Shuli; Zhang, Hongwang; Xing, Hui; Li, Kai; Cui, Hongfei; Yang, Chenguang; Sun, Shouheng; Zeng, Hao

    2014-07-01

    Cobalt-doped ferroferriborate ((Fe1-xCox)3BO5) nanorods (NRs) are synthesized by a one-pot high-temperature organic-solution-phase method. The aspect ratios of the NRs are tuned by the heating rate. These NRs form via anisotropic growth along twin boundaries of the multiply twinned nuclei. Magnetic properties are dramatically modified by Co substitutional doping, changing from antiferromagnetic order at low temperatures to ferromagnetic above room temperature, with a greatly enhanced magnetic ordering temperature. These anisotropic ferromagnetic NRs with a high ordering temperature may provide a new platform for understanding nanomagnetism and for magnetic applications. PMID:24905634

  15. Protocols for dry DNA storage and shipment at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Ivanova, Natalia V; Kuzmina, Masha L

    2013-01-01

    The globalization of DNA barcoding will require core analytical facilities to develop cost-effective, efficient protocols for the shipment and archival storage of DNA extracts and PCR products. We evaluated three dry-state DNA stabilization systems: commercial Biomatrica® DNAstable® plates, home-made trehalose and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) plates on 96-well panels of insect DNA stored at 56 °C and at room temperature. Controls included unprotected samples that were stored dry at room temperature and at 56 °C, and diluted samples held at 4 °C and at −20 °C. PCR and selective sequencing were performed over a 4-year interval to test the condition of DNA extracts. Biomatrica® provided better protection of DNA at 56 °C and at room temperature than trehalose and PVA, especially for diluted samples. PVA was the second best protectant after Biomatrica® at room temperature, whereas trehalose was the second best protectant at 56 °C. In spite of lower PCR success, the DNA stored at −20 °C yielded longer sequence reads and stronger signal, indicating that temperature is a crucial factor for DNA quality which has to be considered especially for long-term storage. Although it is premature to advocate a transition to DNA storage at room temperature, dry storage provides an additional layer of security for frozen samples, protecting them from degradation in the event of freezer failure. All three forms of DNA preservation enable shipment of dry DNA and PCR products between barcoding facilities. PMID:23789643

  16. Room-temperature ferromagnetism in thin films of LaMnO3 deposited by a chemical method over large areas.

    PubMed

    Vila-Fungueiriño, José Manuel; Rivas-Murias, Beatriz; Rodríguez-González, Benito; Txoperena, O; Ciudad, D; Hueso, Luis E; Lazzari, Massimo; Rivadulla, Francisco

    2015-03-11

    Hole-doping into the Mott insulator LaMnO3 results in a very rich magneto-electric phase diagram, including colossal magnetoresistance and different types of charge and orbital ordering. On the other hand, LaMnO3 presents an important catalytic activity for oxygen reduction, which is fundamental for increasing the efficiency of solid-oxide fuel cells and other energy-conversion devices. In this work, we report the chemical solution (water-based) synthesis of high-quality epitaxial thin films of LaMnO3, free of defects at square-centimeter scales, and compatible with standard microfabrication techniques. The films show a robust ferromagnetic moment and large magnetoresistance at room temperature. Through a comparison with films grown by pulsed laser deposition, we show that the quasi-equilibrium growth conditions characteristic of this chemical process can be exploited to tune new functionalities of the material. PMID:25667996

  17. Coherent population trapping in a crystalline solid at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesov, Roman

    2005-11-01

    Observation of coherent population trapping (CPT) at ground-state Zeeman sublevels of Cr3+ ion in ruby at room temperature is reported. A mechanism of CPT, not owing to optical pumping, is revealed in a situation when the optical pulse duration is shorter than the population decay time from the excited optical state.

  18. SPRAY: Single Donor Plasma Product For Room Temperature Storage

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Garrett S.; Lozier, Jay N.; Nghiem, Khanh; Clibourn, Douglas; Klein, Harvey G.; Flegel, Willy A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Spray drying techniques are commonly utilized in the pharmaceutical, dairy and animal feed industries for processing liquids into powders but have not been applied to human blood products. Spray dried protein products are known to maintain stability during storage at room temperature. Study design and methods Plasma units collected at the donor facility were shipped overnight at room temperature to a processing facility where single-use spray drying occurred. After 48 hours storage at room temperature, the spray dried plasma product was split in two and rehydrated with 1.5% glycine or deionized water and assayed for chemistry analytes and coagulation factors. Matched fresh frozen plasma (FFP) was analyzed in parallel as controls. Results Reconstitution was achieved for both rehydration groups within five minutes (n=6). There was no statistically significant intergroup difference in recovery for total protein, albumin, IgG, IgA, and IgM (96% or higher). With the exception of factor VIII (58%), the recovery of clotting factors in the glycine reconstituted products ranged from 72% to 93%. Glycine reconstitution was superior to deionized water. Conclusion We documented proteins and coagulation activities were recovered in physiologic quantities in reconstituted spray dried plasma products. Further optimization of the spray drying method and reconstitution fluid may result in even better recoveries. Spray drying is a promising technique for preparing human plasma that can be easily stored at room temperature, shipped, and reconstituted. Rapid reconstitution of the microparticles results in a novel plasma product from single donors. PMID:22043873

  19. Reductions of aryl bromides in water at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Fennewald, James C.; Landstrom, Evan B.; Lipshutz, Bruce H.

    2015-01-01

    Micellar nanoreactors derived from commercially available ‘Nok’ (SPGS-550-M), in the presence of Fu’s catalyst and a mild hydride source (NaBH4), are useful for facile debromination of functionalized aromatic derivatives. This mild and environemntally responsible process is utlized in water at room temperature, and the reaction mixtures can be smoothly recycled. PMID:26273116

  20. Room-Temperature Ionic Liquids for Electrochemical Capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fireman, Heather; Yowell, Leonard; Moloney, Padraig G.; Arepalli, Sivaram; Nikolaev, P.; Huffman, C.; Ready, Jud; Higgins, C.D.; Turano, S. P.; Kohl, P.A.; Kim, K.

    2009-01-01

    A document discusses room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) used as electrolytes in carbon-nanotube-based, electrochemical, double-layer capacitors. Unlike the previous electrolyte (EtNB4 in acetonitrile), the RTIL used here does not produce cyanide upon thermal decomposition and does not have a moisture sensitivity.

  1. Required Be Capsule Strength For Room Temperature Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, B

    2005-03-21

    The purpose of this memo is to lay out the criteria for the Be capsule strength necessary for room temperature transport. Ultimately we will test full thickness capsules by sealing high pressures inside, but currently we are limited to both thinner capsules and alternative measures of capsule material strength.

  2. Magnetoresistance of a Low-k Dielectric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGowan, Brian Thomas

    Low-k dielectrics have been incorporated into advanced computer chip technologies as a part of the continuous effort to improve computer chip performance. One drawback associated with the implementation of low-k dielectrics is the large leakage current which conducts through the material, relative to silica. Another drawback is that the breakdown voltage of low-k dielectrics is low, relative to silica [1]. This low breakdown voltage makes accurate reliability assessment of the failure mode time dependent dielectric breakdown (TDDB) in low-k dielectrics critical for the successful implementation of these materials. The accuracy with which one can assess this reliability is currently a topic of debate. These material drawbacks have motivated the present work which aims both to contribute to the understanding of electronic conduction mechanisms in low-k dielectrics, and to improve the ability to experimentally characterize changes which occur within the material prior to TDDB failure. What follows is a study of the influence of an applied magnetic field on the conductivity of a low-k dielectric, or in other words, a study of the material's magnetoresistance. This study shows that low-k dielectrics used as intra-level dielectrics exhibit a relatively large negative magnetoresistance effect (˜2%) at room temperature and with modest applied magnetic fields (˜100 Oe). The magnetoresistance is attributed to the spin dependence of trapping electrons from the conduction band into localized electronic sites. Mixing of two-electron spin states via interactions between electron spins and the the spins of hydrogen nuclei is suppressed by an applied magnetic field. As a result, the rate of trapping is reduced, and the conductivity of the material increases. This study further demonstrates that the magnitude of the magnetoresistance changes as a function of time subjected to electrical bias and temperature stress. The rate that the magnetoresistance changes correlates to the

  3. Diluted magnetic semiconductor nanowires exhibiting magnetoresistance

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Peidong; Choi, Heonjin; Lee, Sangkwon; He, Rongrui; Zhang, Yanfeng; Kuykendal, Tevye; Pauzauskie, Peter

    2011-08-23

    A method for is disclosed for fabricating diluted magnetic semiconductor (DMS) nanowires by providing a catalyst-coated substrate and subjecting at least a portion of the substrate to a semiconductor, and dopant via chloride-based vapor transport to synthesize the nanowires. Using this novel chloride-based chemical vapor transport process, single crystalline diluted magnetic semiconductor nanowires Ga.sub.1-xMn.sub.xN (x=0.07) were synthesized. The nanowires, which have diameters of .about.10 nm to 100 nm and lengths of up to tens of micrometers, show ferromagnetism with Curie temperature above room temperature, and magnetoresistance up to 250 Kelvin.

  4. Evaluation of Ceramic Honeycomb Core Compression Behavior at Room Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bird, Richard K.; Lapointe, Thomas S.

    2013-01-01

    Room temperature flatwise compression tests were conducted on two varieties of ceramic honeycomb core specimens that have potential for high-temperature structural applications. One set of specimens was fabricated using strips of a commercially-available thin-gage "ceramic paper" sheet molded into a hexagonal core configuration. The other set was fabricated by machining honeycomb core directly from a commercially available rigid insulation tile material. This paper summarizes the results from these tests.

  5. Mechanical Resonators for Quantum Optomechanics Experiments at Room Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norte, R. A.; Moura, J. P.; Gröblacher, S.

    2016-04-01

    All quantum optomechanics experiments to date operate at cryogenic temperatures, imposing severe technical challenges and fundamental constraints. Here, we present a novel design of on-chip mechanical resonators which exhibit fundamental modes with frequencies f and mechanical quality factors Qm sufficient to enter the optomechanical quantum regime at room temperature. We overcome previous limitations by designing ultrathin, high-stress silicon nitride (Si3 N4 ) membranes, with tensile stress in the resonators' clamps close to the ultimate yield strength of the material. By patterning a photonic crystal on the SiN membranes, we observe reflectivities greater than 99%. These on-chip resonators have remarkably low mechanical dissipation, with Qm˜108, while at the same time exhibiting large reflectivities. This makes them a unique platform for experiments towards the observation of massive quantum behavior at room temperature.

  6. Room-temperature magnetoelectric multiferroic thin films and applications thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Katiyar, Ram S; Kuman, Ashok; Scott, James F.

    2014-08-12

    The invention provides a novel class of room-temperature, single-phase, magnetoelectric multiferroic (PbFe.sub.0.67W.sub.0.33O.sub.3).sub.x (PbZr.sub.0.53Ti.sub.0.47O.sub.3).sub.1-x (0.2.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.0.8) (PFW.sub.x-PZT.sub.1-x) thin films that exhibit high dielectric constants, high polarization, weak saturation magnetization, broad dielectric temperature peak, high-frequency dispersion, low dielectric loss and low leakage current. These properties render them to be suitable candidates for room-temperature multiferroic devices. Methods of preparation are also provided.

  7. Atom inlays performed at room temperature using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, Yoshiaki; Abe, Masayuki; Hirayama, Shinji; Oyabu, Noriaki; Custance, Óscar; Morita, Seizo

    2005-02-01

    The ability to manipulate single atoms and molecules laterally for creating artificial structures on surfaces is driving us closer to the ultimate limit of two-dimensional nanoengineering. However, experiments involving this level of manipulation have been performed only at cryogenic temperatures. Scanning tunnelling microscopy has proved, so far, to be a unique tool with all the necessary capabilities for laterally pushing, pulling or sliding single atoms and molecules, and arranging them on a surface at will. Here we demonstrate, for the first time, that it is possible to perform well-controlled lateral manipulations of single atoms using near-contact atomic force microscopy even at room temperature. We report the creation of 'atom inlays', that is, artificial atomic patterns formed from a few embedded atoms in the plane of a surface. At room temperature, such atomic structures remain stable on the surface for relatively long periods of time.

  8. Mechanical Resonators for Quantum Optomechanics Experiments at Room Temperature.

    PubMed

    Norte, R A; Moura, J P; Gröblacher, S

    2016-04-01

    All quantum optomechanics experiments to date operate at cryogenic temperatures, imposing severe technical challenges and fundamental constraints. Here, we present a novel design of on-chip mechanical resonators which exhibit fundamental modes with frequencies f and mechanical quality factors Q_{m} sufficient to enter the optomechanical quantum regime at room temperature. We overcome previous limitations by designing ultrathin, high-stress silicon nitride (Si_{3}N_{4}) membranes, with tensile stress in the resonators' clamps close to the ultimate yield strength of the material. By patterning a photonic crystal on the SiN membranes, we observe reflectivities greater than 99%. These on-chip resonators have remarkably low mechanical dissipation, with Q_{m}∼10^{8}, while at the same time exhibiting large reflectivities. This makes them a unique platform for experiments towards the observation of massive quantum behavior at room temperature. PMID:27104723

  9. Room Temperature Characterization of a Magnetic Bearing for Turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montague, Gerald; Jansen, Mark; Provenza, Andrew; Jansen, Ralph; Ebihara, Ben; Palazzolo, Alan

    2002-01-01

    Open loop, experimental force and power measurements of a three-axis, radial, heteropolar magnetic bearing at room temperature for rotor speeds up to 20,000 RPM are presented in this paper. The bearing, NASA Glenn Research Center's and Texas A&M's third generation high temperature magnetic bearing, was designed to operate in a 1000 F (540 C) environment and was primarily optimized for maximum load capacity. The experimentally measured force produced by one C-core of this bearing was 630 lb. (2.8 kN) at 16 A, while a load of 650 lbs (2.89 kN) was predicted at 16 A using 1D circuit analysis. The maximum predicted radial load for one of the three axes is 1,440 lbs (6.41 kN) at room temperature. The maximum measured load of an axis was 1050 lbs. (4.73 kN). Results of test under rotating conditions showed that rotor speed has a negligible effect on the bearing's load capacity. A single C-core required approximately 70 W of power to generate 300 lb (1.34 kN) of magnetic force. The room temperature data presented was measured after three thermal cycles up to 1000 F (540 C), totaling six hours at elevated temperatures.

  10. Ultra-broadband and high-responsive photodetectors based on bismuth film at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, J. D.; Shao, J. M.; Yang, G. W.

    2015-07-01

    Bismuth (Bi) has undergone researches for dozens of years on account of its abundant physics including the remarkably high mobility, exceptional large positive magnetoresistance and the coexistence of an insulating interior as well as metallic surfaces. Very recently, two-dimensional topologically-protected surface states immune to nonmagnetic perturbation such as surface oxidation and impurity scattering were experimentally demonstrated through systematic magnetotransport measurements, e.g. weak antilocalization effect and angular dependent Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations. Such robust metallic surface states, which are efficient in carrier transportation, along with its small bulk gap (14 meV) make Bi favored for high-responsive broadband photodetection. Here, we for the first time demonstrate the stable ultra-broadband photoresponse from 370 nm to 1550 nm with good reproducibility at room temperature based on a Bi photodetector. The fabricated device’s responsivity approaches 250 mA/W, accompanied with a rise time of 0.9 s and a decay time of 1.9 s. The photocurrent is linear dependent on the voltage and incident power, offering good tunability for multi-purpose applications. Thickness-dependent conductance and photocurrent reveal that the bulk is the optically active layer while the surface channel is responsible for carrier transportation. These findings pave an avenue to develop ultra-broadband Bi photodetectors for the next-generation multifunctional optoelectronic devices.

  11. Ultra-broadband and high-responsive photodetectors based on bismuth film at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Yao, J. D.; Shao, J. M.; Yang, G. W.

    2015-01-01

    Bismuth (Bi) has undergone researches for dozens of years on account of its abundant physics including the remarkably high mobility, exceptional large positive magnetoresistance and the coexistence of an insulating interior as well as metallic surfaces. Very recently, two-dimensional topologically-protected surface states immune to nonmagnetic perturbation such as surface oxidation and impurity scattering were experimentally demonstrated through systematic magnetotransport measurements, e.g. weak antilocalization effect and angular dependent Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations. Such robust metallic surface states, which are efficient in carrier transportation, along with its small bulk gap (14 meV) make Bi favored for high-responsive broadband photodetection. Here, we for the first time demonstrate the stable ultra-broadband photoresponse from 370 nm to 1550 nm with good reproducibility at room temperature based on a Bi photodetector. The fabricated device’s responsivity approaches 250 mA/W, accompanied with a rise time of 0.9 s and a decay time of 1.9 s. The photocurrent is linear dependent on the voltage and incident power, offering good tunability for multi-purpose applications. Thickness-dependent conductance and photocurrent reveal that the bulk is the optically active layer while the surface channel is responsible for carrier transportation. These findings pave an avenue to develop ultra-broadband Bi photodetectors for the next-generation multifunctional optoelectronic devices. PMID:26197433

  12. Room-Temperature Deposition of NbN Superconducting Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thakoor, S.; Lamb, J. L.; Thakoor, A. P.; Khanna, S. K.

    1986-01-01

    Films with high superconducting transition temperatures deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering. Since deposition process does not involve significantly high substrate temperatures, employed to deposit counter electrode in superconductor/insulator/superconductor junction without causing any thermal or mechanical degradation of underlying delicate tunneling barrier. Substrates for room-temperature deposition of NbN polymeric or coated with photoresist, making films accessible to conventional lithographic patterning techniques. Further refinements in deposition technique yield films with smaller transition widths, Tc of which might approach predicted value of 18 K.

  13. Room temperature giant magnetoimpedance in polycrystalline La0.75Ba0.25MnO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Pawan; Rubi, Km; Mahendiran, R.

    2016-05-01

    We report the magnetic field dependence of electrical impedance Z in polycrystalline La0.75Ba0.25MnO3 a function of frequency from f = 1 MHz to 1 GHz at room temperature. The magnetoimpedance [MI = ΔZ/Z(0) where ΔZ = Z(H)-Z(0)] is -37.5 % (-58.5%) at 1(10) MHz for H = 1.2 kOe, which far exceeds mere -1.15% dc magnetoresistance. As f increases above 10 MHz, MI decreases in magnitude and changes sign from negative to positive. The change in sign of MI results from the transition of a single peak at H = 0 to two peaks at H = ± Hp accompanied by a minimum at the origin. Hp shifts towards higher field with increasing frequency. The occurrence of giant radio-frequency magnetoimpedance is promising for low-field sensor applications.

  14. Single-electron tunneling at room temperature in cobalt nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, H.; Vancea, J.; Hoffmann, H.

    2002-02-01

    We report on the observation of the Coulomb blockade with Coulomb staircases at room temperature in cobalt nanoparticles, with sizes ranging between 1 and 4 nm. A monolayer of these particles is supported by a thin 1-2 nm thick Al2O3 film, deposited on a smooth Au(111) surface. The local electrical transport on isolated Co clusters was investigated with a scanning tunneling microscope (STM). The tunnel contact of the STM tip allowed us to observe single-electron tunneling in the double barrier system STM-tip/Co/Al2O3/Au. Very high values of the Coulomb blockade of up to 1.0 V were reproducibly measured at room temperature on different particles with this setup. The current-voltage characteristics fit well by simulations based on the orthodox theory of single-electron tunneling.

  15. Stability of blood gases in ice and at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Liss, H P; Payne, C P

    1993-04-01

    Arterial blood samples from 75 patients were analyzed for PO2, PCO2, and pH at 0, 15, and 30 min. After the baseline analysis, 60 samples were kept in ice while 59 samples were left at room temperature. There was a statistically significant increase in the PO2 at 15 min and again at 30 min in both groups. There was a statistically significant decrease in the PCO2 at 15 min in both groups. There were no further changes in the PCO2 at 30 min in either group. There was a statistically significant decrease in the pH at 15 min in both groups. There was a further statistically significant decrease in the pH at 30 min in the group of blood samples left at room temperature but not in those in ice. There is no reason to keep arterial blood in ice if blood gas analysis is done within 30 min. PMID:8131450

  16. Room temperature hyperpolarization of nuclear spins in bulk

    PubMed Central

    Tateishi, Kenichiro; Negoro, Makoto; Nishida, Shinsuke; Kagawa, Akinori; Morita, Yasushi; Kitagawa, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), a means of transferring spin polarization from electrons to nuclei, can enhance the nuclear spin polarization (hence the NMR sensitivity) in bulk materials at most 660 times for 1H spins, using electron spins in thermal equilibrium as polarizing agents. By using electron spins in photo-excited triplet states instead, DNP can overcome the above limit. We demonstrate a 1H spin polarization of 34%, which gives an enhancement factor of 250,000 in 0.40 T, while maintaining a bulk sample (∼0.6 mg, ∼0.7 × 0.7 × 1 mm3) containing >1019 1H spins at room temperature. Room temperature hyperpolarization achieved with DNP using photo-excited triplet electrons has potentials to be applied to a wide range of fields, including NMR spectroscopy and MRI as well as fundamental physics. PMID:24821773

  17. Enhanced magnetic Purcell effect in room-temperature masers.

    PubMed

    Breeze, Jonathan; Tan, Ke-Jie; Richards, Benjamin; Sathian, Juna; Oxborrow, Mark; Alford, Neil McN

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the world's first room-temperature maser was demonstrated. The maser consisted of a sapphire ring housing a crystal of pentacene-doped p-terphenyl, pumped by a pulsed rhodamine-dye laser. Stimulated emission of microwaves was aided by the high quality factor and small magnetic mode volume of the maser cavity yet the peak optical pumping power was 1.4 kW. Here we report dramatic miniaturization and 2 orders of magnitude reduction in optical pumping power for a room-temperature maser by coupling a strontium titanate resonator with the spin-polarized population inversion provided by triplet states in an optically excited pentacene-doped p-terphenyl crystal. We observe maser emission in a thimble-sized resonator using a xenon flash lamp as an optical pump source with peak optical power of 70 W. This is a significant step towards the goal of continuous maser operation. PMID:25698634

  18. Disorder-induced Room Temperature Ferromagnetism in Glassy Chromites

    PubMed Central

    Araujo, C. Moyses; Nagar, Sandeep; Ramzan, Muhammad; Shukla, R.; Jayakumar, O. D.; Tyagi, A. K.; Liu, Yi-Sheng; Chen, Jeng-Lung; Glans, Per-Anders; Chang, Chinglin; Blomqvist, Andreas; Lizárraga, Raquel; Holmström, Erik; Belova, Lyubov; Guo, Jinghua; Ahuja, Rajeev; Rao, K. V.

    2014-01-01

    We report an unusual robust ferromagnetic order above room temperature upon amorphization of perovskite [YCrO3] in pulsed laser deposited thin films. This is contrary to the usual expected formation of a spin glass magnetic state in the resulting disordered structure. To understand the underlying physics of this phenomenon, we combine advanced spectroscopic techniques and first-principles calculations. We find that the observed order-disorder transformation is accompanied by an insulator-metal transition arising from a wide distribution of Cr-O-Cr bond angles and the consequent metallization through free carriers. Similar results also found in YbCrO3-films suggest that the observed phenomenon is more general and should, in principle, apply to a wider range of oxide systems. The ability to tailor ferromagnetic order above room temperature in oxide materials opens up many possibilities for novel technological applications of this counter intuitive effect. PMID:24732685

  19. Primary and secondary room temperature molten salt electrochemical cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, G. F.; Dymek, C. J., Jr.

    1985-07-01

    Three novel primary cells which use room temperature molten salt electrolytes are examined and found to have high open circuit potentials in the 1.75-2.19 V range, by comparison with the Al/AlCl3-MEICl concentration cell; their cathodes were of FeCl3-MEICl, WCl6-MEICl, and Br2/reticulated vitreous carbon together with Pt. Also, secondary electrochemical cell candidates were examined which combined the reversible Al/AlCl3-MEICl electrode with reversible zinc and cadmium molten salt electrodes to yield open circuit potentials of about 0.7 and 1.0 V, respectively. Room temperature molten salts' half-cell reduction potentials are given.

  20. Room temperature particle detectors based on indium phosphide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yatskiv, R.; Grym, J.; Zdansky, K.; Pekarek, L.

    2010-01-01

    A study of electrical properties and detection performance of particle detectors based on bulk InP and semiconducting LPE layers operated at room temperature is presented. Bulk detectors were fabricated on semi-insulating InP crystals grown by liquid-encapsulated Czochralski (LEC) technique. High purity InP layers of both n- and p-type conductivity were used to fabricate detector structures with p-n junction. The detection performance of particle detectors was measured by pulse-height spectra with alpha particles emitted from 241Am source at room temperature. Better noise properties were achieved for detectors with p-n junctions due to better quality contacts on p-type layers.

  1. Outrunning free radicals in room-temperature macromolecular crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Owen, Robin L.; Axford, Danny; Nettleship, Joanne E.; Owens, Raymond J.; Robinson, James I.; Morgan, Ann W.; Doré, Andrew S.; Lebon, Guillaume; Tate, Christopher G.; Fry, Elizabeth E.; Ren, Jingshan; Stuart, David I.; Evans, Gwyndaf

    2012-01-01

    A significant increase in the lifetime of room-temperature macromolecular crystals is reported through the use of a high-brilliance X-ray beam, reduced exposure times and a fast-readout detector. This is attributed to the ability to collect diffraction data before hydroxyl radicals can propagate through the crystal, fatally disrupting the lattice. Hydroxyl radicals are shown to be trapped in amorphous solutions at 100 K. The trend in crystal lifetime was observed in crystals of a soluble protein (immunoglobulin γ Fc receptor IIIa), a virus (bovine enterovirus serotype 2) and a membrane protein (human A2A adenosine G-protein coupled receptor). The observation of a similar effect in all three systems provides clear evidence for a common optimal strategy for room-temperature data collection and will inform the design of future synchrotron beamlines and detectors for macro­molecular crystallography. PMID:22751666

  2. Enhanced magnetic Purcell effect in room-temperature masers

    PubMed Central

    Breeze, Jonathan; Tan, Ke-Jie; Richards, Benjamin; Sathian, Juna; Oxborrow, Mark; Alford, Neil McN

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the world’s first room-temperature maser was demonstrated. The maser consisted of a sapphire ring housing a crystal of pentacene-doped p-terphenyl, pumped by a pulsed rhodamine-dye laser. Stimulated emission of microwaves was aided by the high quality factor and small magnetic mode volume of the maser cavity yet the peak optical pumping power was 1.4 kW. Here we report dramatic miniaturization and 2 orders of magnitude reduction in optical pumping power for a room-temperature maser by coupling a strontium titanate resonator with the spin-polarized population inversion provided by triplet states in an optically excited pentacene-doped p-terphenyl crystal. We observe maser emission in a thimble-sized resonator using a xenon flash lamp as an optical pump source with peak optical power of 70 W. This is a significant step towards the goal of continuous maser operation. PMID:25698634

  3. Electron spin coherence near room temperature in magnetic quantum dots

    PubMed Central

    Moro, Fabrizio; Turyanska, Lyudmila; Wilman, James; Fielding, Alistair J.; Fay, Michael W.; Granwehr, Josef; Patanè, Amalia

    2015-01-01

    We report on an example of confined magnetic ions with long spin coherence near room temperature. This was achieved by confining single Mn2+ spins in colloidal semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) and by dispersing the QDs in a proton-spin free matrix. The controlled suppression of Mn–Mn interactions and minimization of Mn–nuclear spin dipolar interactions result in unprecedentedly long phase memory (TM ~ 8 μs) and spin–lattice relaxation (T1 ~ 10 ms) time constants for Mn2+ ions at T = 4.5 K, and in electron spin coherence observable near room temperature (TM ~ 1 μs). PMID:26040432

  4. Room Temperature Creep Of SiC/SiC Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morscher, Gregory N.; Gyekenyesi, Andrew; Levine, Stanley (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    During a recent experimental study, time dependent deformation was observed for a damaged Hi-Nicalon reinforced, BN interphase, chemically vapor infiltrated SiC matrix composites subjected to static loading at room temperature. The static load curves resembled primary creep curves. In addition, acoustic emission was monitored during the test and significant AE activity was recorded while maintaining a constant load, which suggested matrix cracking or interfacial sliding. For similar composites with carbon interphases, little or no time dependent deformation was observed. Evidently, exposure of the BN interphase to the ambient environment resulted in a reduction in the interfacial mechanical properties, i.e. interfacial shear strength and/or debond energy. These results were in qualitative agreement with observations made by Eldridge of a reduction in interfacial shear stress with time at room temperature as measured by fiber push-in experiments.

  5. Room-temperature Formation of Hollow Cu2O Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, Ling-I; Tsung, Chia-Kuang; Huang, Wenyu; Yang, Peidong

    2010-01-18

    Monodisperse Cu and Cu2O nanoparticles (NPs) are synthesized using tetradecylphosphonic acid as a capping agent. Dispersing the NPs in chloroform and hexane at room temperature results in the formation of hollow Cu2O NPs and Cu@Cu2O core/shell NPs, respectively. The monodisperse Cu2O NPs are used to fabricate hybrid solar cells with efficiency of 0.14percent under AM 1.5 and 1 Sun illumination.

  6. Spontaneous Polarization Buildup in a Room-Temperature Polariton Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Baumberg, J. J.; Christopoulos, S.; Kavokin, A. V.; Grundy, A. J. D.; Baldassarri Hoeger von Hoegersthal, G.; Butte, R.; Christmann, G.; Feltin, E.; Carlin, J.-F.; Grandjean, N.; Solnyshkov, D. D.; Malpuech, G.

    2008-09-26

    We observe the buildup of strong ({approx}50%) spontaneous vector polarization in emission from a GaN-based polariton laser excited by short optical pulses at room temperature. The Stokes vector of emitted light changes its orientation randomly from one excitation pulse to another, so that the time-integrated polarization remains zero. This behavior is completely different from any previous laser. We interpret this observation in terms of the spontaneous symmetry breaking in a Bose-Einstein condensate of exciton polaritons.

  7. Preparation and Use of a Room-Temperature Catalytic Converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Gareth; Mark, Bernard; Chen, Xijia; Furch, Toran; Singmaster, K. A.; Wagenknecht, Paul S.

    2001-12-01

    A solid-state catalyst that effectively converts a CO/air mixture to CO2 at room temperature is readily prepared. The catalyst, which is composed of metallic gold on iron(III) oxide, is loaded into a simple flow cell to test its catalytic activity. Mixtures of CO and air are run through the catalyst and subsequently analyzed by gas-phase infrared spectroscopy to determine the effectiveness of the catalyst.

  8. Room-temperature direct alkynylation of arenes with copper acetylides.

    PubMed

    Theunissen, Cédric; Evano, Gwilherm

    2014-09-01

    C-H bond in azoles and polyhalogenated arenes can be smoothly activated by copper acetylides to give the corresponding alkynylated (hetero)arenes by simple reaction at room temperature in the presence of phenanthroline and lithium tert-butoxide under an oxygen atmosphere. These stable, unreactive, and readily available polymers act as especially efficient and practical reagents for the introduction of an alkyne group to a wide number of arenes under remarkably mild conditions. PMID:25115357

  9. Room Temperature Hydrosilylation of Silicon Nanocrystals with Bifunctional Terminal Alkenes

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yixuan; Hessel, Colin M.; Bogart, Timothy; Panthani, Matthew G.; Rasch, Michael R.; Korgel, Brian A.

    2013-01-01

    H-terminated Si nanocrystals undergo room temperature hydrosilylation with bifunctional alkenes with distal polar moieties—ethyl-, methyl-ester or carboxylic acids—without the aid of light or added catalyst. The passivated Si nanocrystals exhibit bright photoluminescence (PL) and disperse in polar solvents, including water. We propose a reaction mechanism in which ester or carboxylic acid groups facilitate direct nucleophilic attack of the highly curved Si surface of the nanocrystals by the alkene. PMID:23312033

  10. Mercuric iodine room temperature gamma-ray detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patt, Bradley E.; Markakis, Jeffrey M.; Gerrish, Vernon M.; Haymes, Robert C.; Trombka, Jacob I.

    1990-01-01

    high resolution mercuric iodide room temperature gamma-ray detectors have excellent potential as an essential component of space instruments to be used for high energy astrophysics. Mercuric iodide detectors are being developed both as photodetectors used in combination with scintillation crystals to detect gamma-rays, and as direct gamma-ray detectors. These detectors are highly radiation damage resistant. The list of applications includes gamma-ray burst detection, gamma-ray line astronomy, solar flare studies, and elemental analysis.

  11. Nonlinear nanochannels for room temperature terahertz heterodyne detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, Jeremie; Nouvel, Philippe; Penot, Alexandre; Varani, Luca; Sangaré, Paul; Grimbert, Bertrand; Faucher, Marc; Ducournau, Guillaume; Gaquière, Christophe; Iñiguez-de-la-Torre, Ignacio; Mateos, Javier; Gonzalez, Tomas

    2013-12-01

    The potentialities of AlGaN/GaN nanochannels with broken symmetry (also called self-switching diodes) as direct and heterodyne THz detectors are analyzed. The operation of the devices in the free space heterodyne detection scheme have been measured at room temperature with RF up to 0.32 THz and explained as a result of high-frequency nonlinearities using Monte Carlo simulations. Intermediate-frequency bandwidth of 40 GHz is obtained.

  12. Observation of Room Temperature Ferromagnetism in InN Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Roul, Basanta; Kumar, Mahesh; Bhat, Thirumaleshwara N; Rajpalke, Mohana K; Krupanidhi, S B; Kumar, Nitesh; Sundaresan, A

    2015-06-01

    The room temperature ferromagnetic behavior of InN nanostructures grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) is explored by means of magnetization measurements. The saturation magnetization and remanent magnetization are found to be strongly dependent on the size of the nanostructures. This suggests that the ferromagnetism is essentially confined to the surface of the nanostructures due to the possible defects. Raman spectroscopy shows the existence of indium vacancies which could be the source of ferromagnetic ordering in InN nanostructures. PMID:26369060

  13. A Na(+) Superionic Conductor for Room-Temperature Sodium Batteries.

    PubMed

    Song, Shufeng; Duong, Hai M; Korsunsky, Alexander M; Hu, Ning; Lu, Li

    2016-01-01

    Rechargeable lithium ion batteries have ruled the consumer electronics market for the past 20 years and have great significance in the growing number of electric vehicles and stationary energy storage applications. However, in addition to concerns about electrochemical performance, the limited availability of lithium is gradually becoming an important issue for further continued use and development of lithium ion batteries. Therefore, a significant shift in attention has been taking place towards new types of rechargeable batteries such as sodium-based systems that have low cost. Another important aspect of sodium battery is its potential compatibility with the all-solid-state design where solid electrolyte is used to replace liquid one, leading to simple battery design, long life span, and excellent safety. The key to the success of all-solid-state battery design is the challenge of finding solid electrolytes possessing acceptable high ionic conductivities at room temperature. Herein, we report a novel sodium superionic conductor with NASICON structure, Na3.1Zr1.95Mg0.05Si2PO12 that shows high room-temperature ionic conductivity of 3.5 × 10(-3) S cm(-1). We also report successful fabrication of a room-temperature solid-state Na-S cell using this conductor. PMID:27572915

  14. A Highly Reversible Room-Temperature Sodium Metal Anode

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Owing to its low cost and high natural abundance, sodium metal is among the most promising anode materials for energy storage technologies beyond lithium ion batteries. However, room-temperature sodium metal anodes suffer from poor reversibility during long-term plating and stripping, mainly due to formation of nonuniform solid electrolyte interphase as well as dendritic growth of sodium metal. Herein we report for the first time that a simple liquid electrolyte, sodium hexafluorophosphate in glymes (mono-, di-, and tetraglyme), can enable highly reversible and nondendritic plating–stripping of sodium metal anodes at room temperature. High average Coulombic efficiencies of 99.9% were achieved over 300 plating–stripping cycles at 0.5 mA cm–2. The long-term reversibility was found to arise from the formation of a uniform, inorganic solid electrolyte interphase made of sodium oxide and sodium fluoride, which is highly impermeable to electrolyte solvent and conducive to nondendritic growth. As a proof of concept, we also demonstrate a room-temperature sodium–sulfur battery using this class of electrolytes, paving the way for the development of next-generation, sodium-based energy storage technologies. PMID:27163006

  15. Room temperature d0 ferromagnetism in ZnS nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proshchenko, Vitaly; Horoz, Sabit; Tang, Jinke; Dahnovsky, Yuri

    2016-06-01

    Room temperature ferromagnetic semiconductors have a great deal of advantage because of their easy integration into semiconductor devices. ZnS nanocrystals (NCs), bulk, and surfaces exhibit d0 ferromagnetism at room temperature. The experiments reveal that NC ferromagnetism takes place at low and room temperatures only due to Zn vacancies (S vacancies do not contribute). To understand the mechanism of d0 ferromagnetism, we introduce the surface-bulk model of a nanocrystal, which includes both surface and bulk magnetizations. The calculations demonstrate that the surface has the higher than bulk magnetization. We find the mechanism of the ferromagnetism is due to sulfur s- and p-electrons in a tetrahedral crystal field. The bulk magnetic moment increases with Zn vacancy concentration at small concentrations and then goes down at larger concentrations. A surface magnetic moment behaves differently with the concentration. It is always a monotonically rising function. We find that the total NC magnetic moment increases with the size and concentration of Zn vacancies (only low concentrations). We also study the magnetization per unit cell where we find that it decreases for the surface and increases for bulk magnetism with the NC size.

  16. Bonding of glass microfluidic chips at room temperatures.

    PubMed

    Jia, Zhi-Jian; Fang, Qun; Fang, Zhao-Lun

    2004-09-15

    A simple, room-temperature bonding process was developed for the fabrication of glass microfluidic chips. High-quality bonding with high yields (>95%) was achieved without the requirement of clean room facilities, programmed high-temperature furnaces, pressurized water sources, adhesives, or pressurizing weights. The plates to be bonded were sequentially prewashed with acetone, detergent, high-flow-rate (10-20 m/s) tap water, and absolute ethyl alcohol and were soaked in concentrated sulfuric acid for 8-12 h. The plates were again washed in high-flow-rate tap water for 5 min and, finally, with demineralized water. The plates were bonded by bringing the cleaned surfaces into close contact under a continuous flow of demineralized water and air-dried at room temperature for more than 3 h. This bonding process features simple operation, good smoothness of the plate surface, and high bonding yield. The procedures can be readily applied in any routine laboratory. The bonding strength of glass chips thus produced, measured using a shear force testing procedure, was higher than 6 kg/cm(2). The mechanism for the strong bonding strength is presumably related to the formation of a hydrolyzed layer on the plate surfaces after soaking the substrates in acid or water for extended periods. Microfluidic chips bonded by the above procedure were tested in the CE separation of fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled amino acids. PMID:15362926

  17. Remote control of magnetostriction-based nanocontacts at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Jammalamadaka, S Narayana; Kuntz, Sebastian; Berg, Oliver; Kittler, Wolfram; Kannan, U Mohanan; Chelvane, J Arout; Sürgers, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    The remote control of the electrical conductance through nanosized junctions at room temperature will play an important role in future nano-electromechanical systems and electronic devices. This can be achieved by exploiting the magnetostriction effects of ferromagnetic materials. Here we report on the electrical conductance of magnetic nanocontacts obtained from wires of the giant magnetostrictive compound Tb0.3Dy0.7Fe1.95 as an active element in a mechanically controlled break-junction device. The nanocontacts are reproducibly switched at room temperature between "open" (zero conductance) and "closed" (nonzero conductance) states by variation of a magnetic field applied perpendicularly to the long wire axis. Conductance measurements in a magnetic field oriented parallel to the long wire axis exhibit a different behaviour where the conductance switches between both states only in a limited field range close to the coercive field. Investigating the conductance in the regime of electron tunneling by mechanical or magnetostrictive control of the electrode separation enables an estimation of the magnetostriction. The present results pave the way to utilize the material in devices based on nano-electromechanical systems operating at room temperature. PMID:26323326

  18. Remote control of magnetostriction-based nanocontacts at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jammalamadaka, S. Narayana; Kuntz, Sebastian; Berg, Oliver; Kittler, Wolfram; Kannan, U. Mohanan; Chelvane, J. Arout; Sürgers, Christoph

    2015-09-01

    The remote control of the electrical conductance through nanosized junctions at room temperature will play an important role in future nano-electromechanical systems and electronic devices. This can be achieved by exploiting the magnetostriction effects of ferromagnetic materials. Here we report on the electrical conductance of magnetic nanocontacts obtained from wires of the giant magnetostrictive compound Tb0.3Dy0.7Fe1.95 as an active element in a mechanically controlled break-junction device. The nanocontacts are reproducibly switched at room temperature between “open” (zero conductance) and “closed” (nonzero conductance) states by variation of a magnetic field applied perpendicularly to the long wire axis. Conductance measurements in a magnetic field oriented parallel to the long wire axis exhibit a different behaviour where the conductance switches between both states only in a limited field range close to the coercive field. Investigating the conductance in the regime of electron tunneling by mechanical or magnetostrictive control of the electrode separation enables an estimation of the magnetostriction. The present results pave the way to utilize the material in devices based on nano-electromechanical systems operating at room temperature.

  19. A Na+ Superionic Conductor for Room-Temperature Sodium Batteries

    PubMed Central

    Song, Shufeng; Duong, Hai M.; Korsunsky, Alexander M.; Hu, Ning; Lu, Li

    2016-01-01

    Rechargeable lithium ion batteries have ruled the consumer electronics market for the past 20 years and have great significance in the growing number of electric vehicles and stationary energy storage applications. However, in addition to concerns about electrochemical performance, the limited availability of lithium is gradually becoming an important issue for further continued use and development of lithium ion batteries. Therefore, a significant shift in attention has been taking place towards new types of rechargeable batteries such as sodium-based systems that have low cost. Another important aspect of sodium battery is its potential compatibility with the all-solid-state design where solid electrolyte is used to replace liquid one, leading to simple battery design, long life span, and excellent safety. The key to the success of all-solid-state battery design is the challenge of finding solid electrolytes possessing acceptable high ionic conductivities at room temperature. Herein, we report a novel sodium superionic conductor with NASICON structure, Na3.1Zr1.95Mg0.05Si2PO12 that shows high room-temperature ionic conductivity of 3.5 × 10−3 S cm−1. We also report successful fabrication of a room-temperature solid-state Na-S cell using this conductor. PMID:27572915

  20. Remote control of magnetostriction-based nanocontacts at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Jammalamadaka, S. Narayana; Kuntz, Sebastian; Berg, Oliver; Kittler, Wolfram; Kannan, U. Mohanan; Chelvane, J. Arout; Sürgers, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    The remote control of the electrical conductance through nanosized junctions at room temperature will play an important role in future nano-electromechanical systems and electronic devices. This can be achieved by exploiting the magnetostriction effects of ferromagnetic materials. Here we report on the electrical conductance of magnetic nanocontacts obtained from wires of the giant magnetostrictive compound Tb0.3Dy0.7Fe1.95 as an active element in a mechanically controlled break-junction device. The nanocontacts are reproducibly switched at room temperature between “open” (zero conductance) and “closed” (nonzero conductance) states by variation of a magnetic field applied perpendicularly to the long wire axis. Conductance measurements in a magnetic field oriented parallel to the long wire axis exhibit a different behaviour where the conductance switches between both states only in a limited field range close to the coercive field. Investigating the conductance in the regime of electron tunneling by mechanical or magnetostrictive control of the electrode separation enables an estimation of the magnetostriction. The present results pave the way to utilize the material in devices based on nano-electromechanical systems operating at room temperature. PMID:26323326

  1. A Highly Reversible Room-Temperature Sodium Metal Anode.

    PubMed

    Seh, Zhi Wei; Sun, Jie; Sun, Yongming; Cui, Yi

    2015-11-25

    Owing to its low cost and high natural abundance, sodium metal is among the most promising anode materials for energy storage technologies beyond lithium ion batteries. However, room-temperature sodium metal anodes suffer from poor reversibility during long-term plating and stripping, mainly due to formation of nonuniform solid electrolyte interphase as well as dendritic growth of sodium metal. Herein we report for the first time that a simple liquid electrolyte, sodium hexafluorophosphate in glymes (mono-, di-, and tetraglyme), can enable highly reversible and nondendritic plating-stripping of sodium metal anodes at room temperature. High average Coulombic efficiencies of 99.9% were achieved over 300 plating-stripping cycles at 0.5 mA cm(-2). The long-term reversibility was found to arise from the formation of a uniform, inorganic solid electrolyte interphase made of sodium oxide and sodium fluoride, which is highly impermeable to electrolyte solvent and conducive to nondendritic growth. As a proof of concept, we also demonstrate a room-temperature sodium-sulfur battery using this class of electrolytes, paving the way for the development of next-generation, sodium-based energy storage technologies. PMID:27163006

  2. Temperature driven transition from giant to tunneling magneto-resistance in Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/Alq{sub 3}/Co spin Valve: Role of Verwey transition of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, P. Rawat, R.; Potdar, S. R.; Choudhary, R. J.; Banerjee, A.

    2014-05-07

    We demonstrate interface energy level engineering, exploiting the modification in energy band structure across Verwey transition temperature (T{sub V}) of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, in a Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}(111)/Alq{sub 3}/Co spin-valve (SV). I-V characteristics exhibit a transition in conduction mode from carrier injection to tunneling across T{sub V} of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} electrode. Both giant magneto-resistance (GMR) and tunneling MR (TMR) have been observed in a single SV, below and above T{sub V}, respectively. We have achieved room-temperature SV operation in our device. We believe that the tuning of charge gap at Fermi level across T{sub V} resulting in a corresponding tuning of conduction mode and a unique cross over from GMR to TMR.

  3. Electrical creation of spin polarization in silicon at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, Ron

    2010-03-01

    The integration of magnetism and mainstream semiconductor electronics could impact information technology in ways beyond imagination. A pivotal step is the implementation of spin-based electronic functionality in silicon devices. Much of the interest in silicon derives from its prevalence in semiconductor technology and from the robustness and longevity of spin as it is only weakly coupled to other degrees of freedom in the material. Recently it has become possible to induce and detect spin polarization in otherwise non-magnetic semiconductors (GaAs and Si) using all-electrical structures, but so far at temperatures below 150 K and only in n-type material. The main challenges are: (i) to design fully electrical silicon-based spintronic devices with large spin signals, (ii) to demonstrate device operation at room temperature, (iii) to do so for n-type and p-type material, and (iv) to find ways to manipulate spins and spin flow with a gate electric field. After a brief overview of the state of affairs, our recent advances in these areas are described. In particular, we demonstrate room-temperature electrical injection of spin polarization into n-type and p-type silicon from a ferromagnetic tunnel contact, spin manipulation using the Hanle effect, and the electrical detection of the induced spin accumulation. It is shown that a spin splitting as large as 2.9 meV can be created in Si at room temperature, corresponding to an electron spin polarization of 4.6%. The results open the way to the implementation of spin functionality in complementary silicon devices and electronic circuits operating at ambient temperature, and to the exploration of their prospects as well as the fundamental rules that govern their behavior. [4pt] [1] S.P. Dash, S. Sharma, R.S. Patel, M.P. de Jong and R. Jansen, Nature 462, 491 (2009).

  4. Fusion-neutron effects on magnetoresistivity of copper stabilizer materials

    SciTech Connect

    Guinan, M.W.; Van Konynenburg, R.A.

    1983-02-24

    The objective of this work is to quantify the changes which occur in the magnetoresistivity of coppers (having various purities and pretreatments, and at magnetic fields up to 12 T during the course of sequential fusion neutron irradiations at about 4/sup 0/K and anneals to room temperature. In conjunction with work in progress by Coltman and Klabunde of ORNL, the results should lead to engineering design data for the stabilizers of superconducting magnets in fusion reactors. These magnets are expected to be irradiated during reactor operation and warmed to room temperature periodically during maintenance.

  5. Sign change of magnetoresistance in Gd-doped amorphous carbon granular films.

    PubMed

    Ding, Shihao; Jin, Chao; Fan, Ziwei; Li, Peng; Bai, Haili

    2015-11-11

    Gd/C granular films with 11% Gd were fabricated by facing-target magnetron sputtering at room temperature and then annealed at 300-650 °C for 1.5 h. A magnetoresistance of -82% was obtained in the Gd/C films annealed at 650 °C at 3 K under a magnetic field of 50 kOe. A sign change of the magnetoresistance from negative to positive and then back to negative was observed in all samples as the temperature decreases. Grain boundary scattering effects, wave-function-shrinkage, cotunneling and Gd-Gd interactions account for the mechanisms of the magnetoresistance effects in different temperature regions. The sign of the magnetoresistance also varies as the magnetic field increases. At the transition temperature of 25 K, the wave-function-shrinkage effect competes with cotunneling and Gd-Gd interactions at different magnetic fields. The competition between the wave-function-shrinkage effect and the grain boundary scattering effect is approximately at the transition temperature of 100 K. The temperature range of positive magnetoresistance expands and transition temperatures are changed as the annealing temperature increases. It is related to the expansion of the temperature region for the wave-function-shrinkage effect which occurs in the Mott variable range hopping conduction mechanism. PMID:26527080

  6. Spin transport and temperature-dependent giant positive junction magnetoresistance in CoFe2O4/SiO2/ p-Si heterostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panda, J.; Nath, T. K.

    2016-02-01

    The observation of giant positive junction magnetoresistance (JMR) in our cobalt ferrite (CFO)/p-Si heterojunction has been reported here. The pulsed laser deposition technique has been used for fabrication of the heterojunction. The junction confirms a very good rectifying magnetic diode like behavior at low temperature, whereas at high temperatures the junction shows nonlinear I- V characteristics. The magnetic field-dependent magnetoresistance (MR) of both CFO film and across the heterojunction have been studied in detail. The CFO film shows negative MR behavior, whereas the junction shows large positive JMR behavior throughout the temperature range. The spin lifetime (142 ps) and spin diffusion length (331 nm) have been estimated of the heterostructure at 10 K. The highest JMR value (~1600 %) has been observed at 10 K, and it gradually decreases at higher temperature range. The origin of positive JMR in our heterojunction has been best explained by the standard spin injection theory.

  7. Single-molecule spectroscopy and dynamics at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, X.S.

    1996-12-01

    The spirit of studying single-molecule behaviors dates back to the turn of the century. In addition to Einstein`s well-known work on Brownian motion, there has been a tradition for studying single {open_quotes}macromolecules{close_quotes} or a small number of molecules either by light scattering or by fluorescence using an optical microscope. Modern computers have allowed detailed studies of single-molecule behaviors in condensed media through molecular dynamics simulations. Optical spectroscopy offers a wealth of information on the structure, interaction, and dynamics of molecular species. With the motivation of removing {open_quotes}inhomogeneous broadening{close_quotes}, spectroscopic techniques have evolved from spectral hole burning, fluorescence line narrowing, and photo-echo to the recent pioneering work on single-molecule spectroscopy in solids at cryogenic temperatures. High-resolution spectroscopic work on single molecules relies on zero phonon lines which appear at cryogenic temperatures, and have narrow line widths and large absorption cross sections. Recent advances in near-field and confocal fluorescence have allowed not only fluorescence imaging of single molecules with high spatial resolutions but also single-molecule spectroscopy at room temperature. In this Account, the author provides a physical chemist`s perspective on experimental and theoretical developments on room-temperature single-molecule spectroscopy and dynamics, with the emphasis on the information obtainable from single-molecule experiments. 61 refs., 9 figs.

  8. Room-temperature resonant quantum tunneling transport of macroscopic systems.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Zhengwei; Wang, Xuemin; Yan, Dawei; Wu, Weidong; Peng, Liping; Li, Weihua; Zhao, Yan; Wang, Xinmin; An, Xinyou; Xiao, Tingting; Zhan, Zhiqiang; Wang, Zhuo; Chen, Xiangrong

    2014-11-21

    A self-assembled quantum dots array (QDA) is a low dimensional electron system applied to various quantum devices. This QDA, if embedded in a single crystal matrix, could be advantageous for quantum information science and technology. However, the quantum tunneling effect has been difficult to observe around room temperature thus far, because it occurs in a microcosmic and low temperature condition. Herein, we show a designed a quasi-periodic Ni QDA embedded in a single crystal BaTiO3 matrix and demonstrate novel quantum resonant tunneling transport properties around room-temperature according to theoretical calculation and experiments. The quantum tunneling process could be effectively modulated by changing the Ni QDA concentration. The major reason was that an applied weak electric field (∼10(2) V cm(-1)) could be enhanced by three orders of magnitude (∼10(5) V cm(-1)) between the Ni QDA because of the higher permittivity of BaTiO3 and the 'hot spots' of the Ni QDA. Compared with the pure BaTiO3 films, the samples with embedded Ni QDA displayed a stepped conductivity and temperature (σ-T curves) construction. PMID:25307500

  9. Electric-field control of magnetic order above room temperature.

    PubMed

    Cherifi, R O; Ivanovskaya, V; Phillips, L C; Zobelli, A; Infante, I C; Jacquet, E; Garcia, V; Fusil, S; Briddon, P R; Guiblin, N; Mougin, A; Ünal, A A; Kronast, F; Valencia, S; Dkhil, B; Barthélémy, A; Bibes, M

    2014-04-01

    Controlling magnetism by means of electric fields is a key issue for the future development of low-power spintronics. Progress has been made in the electrical control of magnetic anisotropy, domain structure, spin polarization or critical temperatures. However, the ability to turn on and off robust ferromagnetism at room temperature and above has remained elusive. Here we use ferroelectricity in BaTiO3 crystals to tune the sharp metamagnetic transition temperature of epitaxially grown FeRh films and electrically drive a transition between antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic order with only a few volts, just above room temperature. The detailed analysis of the data in the light of first-principles calculations indicate that the phenomenon is mediated by both strain and field effects from the BaTiO3. Our results correspond to a magnetoelectric coupling larger than previous reports by at least one order of magnitude and open new perspectives for the use of ferroelectrics in magnetic storage and spintronics. PMID:24464245

  10. Electric-field control of magnetic order above room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherifi, R. O.; Ivanovskaya, V.; Phillips, L. C.; Zobelli, A.; Infante, I. C.; Jacquet, E.; Garcia, V.; Fusil, S.; Briddon, P. R.; Guiblin, N.; Mougin, A.; Ünal, A. A.; Kronast, F.; Valencia, S.; Dkhil, B.; Barthélémy, A.; Bibes, M.

    2014-04-01

    Controlling magnetism by means of electric fields is a key issue for the future development of low-power spintronics. Progress has been made in the electrical control of magnetic anisotropy, domain structure, spin polarization or critical temperatures. However, the ability to turn on and off robust ferromagnetism at room temperature and above has remained elusive. Here we use ferroelectricity in BaTiO3 crystals to tune the sharp metamagnetic transition temperature of epitaxially grown FeRh films and electrically drive a transition between antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic order with only a few volts, just above room temperature. The detailed analysis of the data in the light of first-principles calculations indicate that the phenomenon is mediated by both strain and field effects from the BaTiO3. Our results correspond to a magnetoelectric coupling larger than previous reports by at least one order of magnitude and open new perspectives for the use of ferroelectrics in magnetic storage and spintronics.

  11. Room-temperature spin thermoelectrics in metallic films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tölle, Sebastian; Gorini, Cosimo; Eckern, Ulrich

    2014-12-01

    Considering metallic films at room temperature, we present the first theoretical study of the spin Nernst and thermal Edelstein effects that takes into account dynamical spin-orbit coupling, i.e., direct spin-orbit coupling with the vibrating lattice (phonons) and impurities. This gives rise to a novel process, namely, a dynamical side-jump mechanism, and to dynamical Elliott-Yafet spin relaxation, never before considered in this context. Both are the high-temperature counterparts of the well-known T =0 side-jump and Elliott-Yafet, central to the current understanding of the spin Hall, spin Nernst and Edelstein (current-induced spin polarization) effects at low T . We consider the experimentally relevant regime T >TD , with TD the Debye temperature, as the latter is lower than room temperature in transition metals such as Pt, Au and Ta typically employed in spin injection/extraction experiments. We show that the interplay between intrinsic (Bychkov-Rashba type) and extrinsic (dynamical) spin-orbit coupling yields a nonlinear T dependence of the spin Nernst and spin Hall conductivities.

  12. Magnetoresistance, electrical conductivity, and Hall effect of glassy carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.F.

    1983-02-01

    These properties of glassy carbon heat treated for three hours between 1200 and 2700/sup 0/C were measured from 3 to 300/sup 0/K in magnetic fields up to 5 tesla. The magnetoresistance was generally negative and saturated with reciprocal temperature, but still increased as a function of magnetic field. The maximum negative magnetoresistance measured was 2.2% for 2700/sup 0/C material. Several models based on the negative magnetoresistance being proportional to the square of the magnetic moment were attempted; the best fit was obtained for the simplest model combining Curie and Pauli paramagnetism for heat treatments above 1600/sup 0/C. Positive magnetoresistance was found only in less than 1600/sup 0/C treated glassy carbon. The electrical conductivity, of the order of 200 (ohm-cm)/sup -1/ at room temperature, can be empirically written as sigma = A + Bexp(-CT/sup -1/4) - DT/sup -1/2. The Hall coefficient was independent of magnetic field, insensitive to temperature, but was a strong function of heat treatment temperature, crossing over from negative to positive at about 1700/sup 0/C and ranging from -0.048 to 0.126 cm/sup 3//coul. The idea of one-dimensional filaments in glassy carbon suggested by the electrical conductivity is compatible with the present consensus view of the microstructure.

  13. Room-temperature antiferromagnetism in CuMnAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Máca, F.; Mašek, J.; Stelmakhovych, O.; Martí, X.; Reichlová, H.; Uhlířová, K.; Beran, P.; Wadley, P.; Novák, V.; Jungwirth, T.

    2012-04-01

    We report on an experimental and theoretical study of CuMn-V compounds. In agreement with previous works we find low-temperature antiferromagnetism with Néel temperature of 50 K in the cubic half-Heusler CuMnSb. We demonstrate that the orthorhombic CuMnAs is a room-temperature antiferromagnet. Our results are based on X-ray diffraction, magnetization, transport, and differential thermal analysis measurements, and on density-functional theory calculations of the magnetic structure of CuMn-V compounds. In the discussion part of the paper we make a prediction, based on our density-functional theory calculations, that the electronic structure of CuMn-V compounds makes a transition from a semimetal to a semiconductor upon introducing the lighter group-V elements.

  14. Terahertz pulsed photogenerated current in microdiodes at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Ilkov, Marjan; Torfason, Kristinn; Manolescu, Andrei Valfells, Ágúst

    2015-11-16

    Space-charge modulation of the current in a vacuum diode under photoemission leads to the formation of beamlets with time periodicity corresponding to THz frequencies. We investigate the effect of the emitter temperature and internal space-charge forces on the formation and persistence of the beamlets. We find that temperature effects are most important for beam degradation at low values of the applied electric field, whereas at higher fields, intra-beamlet space-charge forces are dominant. The current modulation is most robust when there is only one beamlet present in the diode gap at a time, corresponding to a macroscopic version of the Coulomb blockade. It is shown that a vacuum microdiode can operate quite well as a tunable THz oscillator at room temperature with an applied electric field above 10 MV/m and a diode gap of the order of 100 nm.

  15. Does the electric power grid need a room temperature superconductor?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malozemoff, A. P.

    2013-11-01

    Superconductivity can revolutionize electric power grids, for example with high power underground cables to open urban power bottlenecks and fault current limiters to solve growing fault currents problems. Technology based on high temperature superconductor (HTS) wire is beginning to meet these critical needs. Wire performance is continually improving. For example, American Superconductor has recently demonstrated long wires with up to 500 A/cm-width at 77 K, almost doubling its previous production performance. But refrigeration, even at 77 K, is a complication, driving interest in discovering room temperature superconductors (RTS). Unfortunately, short coherence lengths and accelerated flux creep will make RTS applications unlikely. Existing HTS technology, in fact, offers a good compromise of relatively high operating temperature but not so high as to incur coherence-length and flux-creep limitations. So - no, power grids do not need RTS; existing HTS wire is proving to be what grids really need.

  16. Iron bulk lasers working under cryogenic and room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelínková, H.; Doroshenko, M. E.; Šulc, J.; Jelínek, M.; Nemec, M.; Zagoruiko, Y. A.; Kovalenko, N. O.; Gerasimenko, A. S.; Puzikov, V. M.; Komar, V. K.

    2014-12-01

    Temperature dependence of spectroscopic characteristics as well as laser properties of the bulk Bridgman-grown Fe:ZnSe and Fe,Cr:Zn1-xMgxSe (x = 0.19, 0.38) active media were investigated under room and various cryogenic - liquid nitrogen - temperature . The pumping was provided by Er:YAG laser radiation at the wavelength of 2.94 μm, with energy 15 mJ in 110 ns Q-switched pulse or 200 mJ in 220 μs free-running pulse. The 55 mm long hemispherical resonator was formed by a dichroic pumping mirror (T = 92 % @ 2.94 μm and R = 100% @ 4.5 μm) and a concave output coupler (R = 95 % @ 4.5 μm, r = 200 mm). A strong dependence of generated output radiation parameters on temperature was observed for all samples.

  17. Room temperature GaAsSb single nanowire infrared photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ziyuan; Yuan, Xiaoming; Fu, Lan; Peng, Kun; Wang, Fan; Fu, Xiao; Caroff, Philippe; White, Thomas P.; Tan, Hark Hoe; Jagadish, Chennupati

    2015-11-01

    Antimonide-based ternary III-V nanowires (NWs) allow for a tunable bandgap over a wide range, which is highly interesting for optoelectronics applications, and in particular for infrared photodetection. Here we demonstrate room temperature operation of GaAs0.56Sb0.44 NW infrared photodetectors grown by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy. These GaAs0.56Sb0.44 NWs have uniform axial composition and show p-type conductivity with a peak field-effect mobility of ˜12 cm2 V-1 s-1). Under light illumination, single GaAs0.56Sb0.44 NW photodetectors exhibited typical photoconductor behavior with an increased photocurrent observed with the increase of temperature owing to thermal activation of carrier trap states. A broadband infrared photoresponse with a long wavelength cutoff at ˜1.66 μm was obtained at room temperature. At a low operating bias voltage of 0.15 V a responsivity of 2.37 (1.44) A/W with corresponding detectivity of 1.08 × 109 (6.55 × 108) {{cm}}\\sqrt{{{Hz}}}/{{W}} were achieved at the wavelength of 1.3 (1.55) μm, indicating that ternary GaAs0.56Sb0.44 NWs are promising photodetector candidates for small footprint integrated optical telecommunication systems.

  18. Non-diffusive thermal conductivity in semiconductors at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maznev, Alexei; Johnson, Jeremy; Eliason, Jeffrey; Nelson, Keith; Minnich, Austin; Collins, Kimberlee; Chen, Gang; Cuffe, John; Kehoe, Timothy; Sotomayor Torres, Clivia

    2012-02-01

    The ``textbook'' value of phonon mean free path (MFP) in silicon at room temperature is ˜40 nm. However, a large contribution to thermal conductivity comes from low-frequency phonons with much longer MFPs. We find that heat transport in semiconductors such as Si and GaAs significantly deviates from the Fourier law at distances much longer than previously thought, >=1 μm at room temperature and above. We use the laser-induced transient thermal grating technique in which absorption of crossed laser pulses in a sample sets up a sinusoidal temperature profile monitored via diffraction of a probe laser beam. By changing the period of the thermal grating we vary the thermal transport distance within the range ˜1-10 μm. In measurements performed on thin free-standing Si membranes and on bulk GaAs the thermal grating decay time deviates from the expected quadratic dependence on the grating period, thus providing model-independent evidence of non-diffusive transport. The simplicity of the experimental configuration permits analytical treatment of non-equilibrium phonon transport with the Boltzmann transport equation. Our analysis shows that at small grating periods the effective thermal conductivity is reduced due to diminishing contributions of ``ballistic'' low-frequency phonons with long MFPs.

  19. Room temperature luminescence and ferromagnetism of AlN:Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.; Cai, G. M.; Wang, W. J.

    2016-06-01

    AlN:Fe polycrystalline powders were synthesized by a modified solid state reaction (MSSR) method. Powder X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy results reveal the single phase nature of the doped samples. In the doped AlN samples, Fe is in Fe2+ state. Room temperature ferromagnetic behavior is observed in AlN:Fe samples. Two photoluminescence peaks located at about 592 nm (2.09 eV) and 598 nm (2.07 eV) are observed in AlN:Fe samples. Our results suggest that AlN:Fe is a potential material for applications in spintronics and high power laser devices.

  20. Superradiance of High Density Frenkel Excitons at Room Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H. Z.; Zheng, X. G.; Zhao, F. L.; Gao, Z. L.; Yu, Z. X.

    1995-05-01

    Superradiance of high density Frenkel excitons in an R-phycoerythrin single crystal is observed at room temperature for the first time. No fluorescence is observed except the emission at the sharp exciton band when the superradiance of excitons occurs, and the higher the pump density, the sharper the emission bandwidth. A redshift and a blueshift are observed at the rise time and the fall time of the emission pulse, respectively. The experimental results also imply deformed-boson properties of high density Frenkel excitons.

  1. Development of bulk GaAs room temperature radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    McGregor, D.S.; Knoll, G.F. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering); Eisen, Y. . Soreq Nuclear Research Center); Brake, R. )

    1992-10-01

    This paper reports on GaAs, a wide band gap semiconductor with potential use as a room temperature radiation detector. Various configurations of Schottky diode detectors were fabricated with bulk crystals of liquid encapsulated Czochralski (LEC) semi-insulating undoped GaAs material. Basic detector construction utilized one Ti/Au Schottky contact and one Au/Ge/Ni alloyed ohmic contact. Pulsed X-ray analysis indicated pulse decay times dependent on bias voltage. Pulse height analysis disclosed non-uniform electric field distributions across the detectors tentatively explained as a consequence of native deep level donors (EL2) in the crystal.

  2. Continued development of room temperature semiconductor nuclear detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hadong; Cirignano, Leonard; Churilov, Alexei; Ciampi, Guido; Kargar, Alireza; Higgins, William; O'Dougherty, Patrick; Kim, Suyoung; Squillante, Michael R.; Shah, Kanai

    2010-08-01

    Thallium bromide (TlBr) and related ternary compounds, TlBrI and TlBrCl, have been under development for room temperature gamma ray spectroscopy due to several promising properties. Due to recent advances in material processing, electron mobility-lifetime product of TlBr is close to Cd(Zn)Te's value which allowed us to fabricate large working detectors. We were also able to fabricate and obtain spectroscopic results from TlBr Capacitive Frisch Grid detector and orthogonal strip detectors. In this paper we report on our recent TlBr and related ternary detector results and preliminary results from Cinnabar (HgS) detectors.

  3. Dynamics and structure of room temperature ionic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fayer, Michael D.

    2014-11-01

    Room temperature ionic liquids (RTIL) are intrinsically interesting because they simultaneously have properties that are similar to organic liquids and liquid salts. In addition, RTILs are increasingly being considered for and used in technological applications. RTILs are usually composed of an organic cation and an inorganic anion. The organic cation, such as imidazolium, has alkyl chains of various lengths. The disorder in the liquid produced by the presence of the alkyl groups lowers the temperature for crystallization below room temperature and can also result in supercooling and glass formation rather than crystallization. The presence of the alkyl moieties also results in a segregation of the liquid into ionic and organic regions. In this article, experiments are presented that address the relationship between RTIL dynamics and structure. Time resolved fluorescence anisotropy measurements were employed to study the local environments in the organic and ionic regions of RTILs using a nonpolar chromophore that locates in the organic regions and an ionic chromophore that locates in the ionic regions. In the alkyl regions, the in plane and out of plane orientational friction coefficients change in different manners as the alkyl chains get longer. Both friction coefficients converge toward those of a long chain length hydrocarbon as the RTIL chains increase in length, which demonstrates that for sufficiently long alkyl chains the RTIL organic regions have properties similar to a hydrocarbon. However, putting Li+ in the ionic regions changes the friction coefficients in the alkyl regions, which demonstrates that changes of the ion structural organization influences the organization of the alkyl chains. Optical heterodyne detected optical Kerr effect (OHD-OKE) experiments were used to examine the orientational relaxation dynamics of RTILs over times scales of a hundred femtoseconds to a hundred nanoseconds. Detailed temperature dependent studies in the liquid and

  4. Identifying multiexcitons in Mo S2 monolayers at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyun Seok; Kim, Min Su; Kim, Hyun; Lee, Young Hee

    2016-04-01

    One of the unique features of atomically thin two-dimensional materials is strong Coulomb interactions due to the reduced dielectric screening effect; this feature enables the study of many-body phenomena such as excitons, trions, and biexcitons. However, identification of biexcitons remains unresolved owing to their broad peak feature at room temperature. Here, we investigate multiexcitons in monolayer Mo S2 using both electrical and optical doping and identify the transition energies for each exciton. The binding energy of the assigned biexciton is twice that of the trion, in quantitative agreement with theoretical predictions. The biexciton population is predominant under optical doping but negligible under electrical doping. The biexciton population is quadratically proportional to the exciton population, obeying the mass-action theory. Our results illustrate the stable formation of not only trions but also biexcitons due to strong Coulomb interaction even at room temperature; therefore, these results provide a deeper understanding of the complex excitonic behaviors in two-dimensional semiconductors.

  5. Observation of room-temperature skyrmion Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, W.; Zhang, X.; Upadhyaya, P.; Zhang, W.; Yu, G.; Jungfleisch, M.; Fradin, F.; Pearson, J.; Tserkovnyak, Y.; Wang, K.; Heinonen, O.; Zhou, Y.; Te Velthuis, Suzanne; Hoffmann, A.

    The realization of room-temperature magnetic skyrmions is key to enabling the implementation of skyrmion-based spintronics. In this work, we present the efficient conversion of chiral stripe domains into Néel skyrmions through a geometrical constriction patterned in a Ta/CoFeB/TaOx trilayer film at room temperature. This is enabled by an interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction, and laterally divergent current-induced spin-orbit torques. We further show the generation of magnetic skyrmions solely by the divergent spin-orbit torques through a nonmagnetic point contact. By increasing the current density, we observe the skyrmion Hall effect - that is the accumulation of skyrmions at one side of the device. The related Hall angle for skyrmion motion is also revealed under an ac driving current. Financial support for the work at Argonne came from Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Science, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division, work at UCLA was supported by TANMS.

  6. Simple room temperature bonding of thermoplastics and poly(dimethylsiloxane).

    PubMed

    Sunkara, Vijaya; Park, Dong-Kyu; Hwang, Hyundoo; Chantiwas, Rattikan; Soper, Steven A; Cho, Yoon-Kyoung

    2011-03-01

    We describe a simple and versatile method for bonding thermoplastics to elastomeric polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) at room temperature. The bonding of various thermoplastics including polycarbonate (PC), cyclic olefin copolymer (COC), polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), and polystyrene (PS), to PDMS has been demonstrated at room temperature. An irreversible bonding was formed instantaneously when the thermoplastics, activated by oxygen plasma followed by aminopropyltriethoxysilane modification, were brought into contact with the plasma treated PDMS. The surface modified thermoplastics were characterized by water contact angle measurements and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The tensile strength of the bonded hybrid devices fabricated with PC, COC, PMMA, and PS was found to be 430, 432, 385, and 388 kPa, respectively. The assembled devices showed high burst resistance at a maximum channel pressure achievable by an in-house built syringe pump, 528 kPa. Furthermore, they displayed very high hydrolytic stability; no significant change was observed even after the storage in water at 37 °C over a period of three weeks. In addition, this thermoplastic-to-PDMS bonding technique has been successfully employed to fabricate a relatively large sized device. For example, a lab-on-a-disc with a diameter of 12 cm showed no leakage when it spins for centrifugal fluidic pumping at a very high rotating speed of 6000 rpm. PMID:21152492

  7. A stable room-temperature sodium-sulfur battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Shuya; Xu, Shaomao; Agrawral, Akanksha; Choudhury, Snehashis; Lu, Yingying; Tu, Zhengyuan; Ma, Lin; Archer, Lynden A.

    2016-06-01

    High-energy rechargeable batteries based on earth-abundant materials are important for mobile and stationary storage technologies. Rechargeable sodium-sulfur batteries able to operate stably at room temperature are among the most sought-after platforms because such cells take advantage of a two-electron-redox process to achieve high storage capacity from inexpensive electrode materials. Here we report a room-temperature sodium-sulfur battery that uses a microporous carbon-sulfur composite cathode, and a liquid carbonate electrolyte containing the ionic liquid 1-methyl-3-propylimidazolium-chlorate tethered to SiO2 nanoparticles. We show that these cells can cycle stably at a rate of 0.5 C (1 C=1675, mAh g-1) with 600 mAh g-1 reversible capacity and nearly 100% Coulombic efficiency. By means of spectroscopic and electrochemical analysis, we find that the particles form a sodium-ion conductive film on the anode, which stabilizes deposition of sodium. We also find that sulfur remains interred in the carbon pores and undergo solid-state electrochemical reactions with sodium ions.

  8. Exfoliated black phosphorus gas sensing properties at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donarelli, M.; Ottaviano, L.; Giancaterini, L.; Fioravanti, G.; Perrozzi, F.; Cantalini, C.

    2016-06-01

    Room temperature gas sensing properties of chemically exfoliated black phosphorus (BP) to oxidizing (NO2, CO2) and reducing (NH3, H2, CO) gases in a dry air carrier have been reported. To study the gas sensing properties of BP, chemically exfoliated BP flakes have been drop casted on Si3N4 substrates provided with Pt comb-type interdigitated electrodes in N2 atmosphere. Scanning electron microscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy characterizations show respectively the occurrence of a mixed structure, composed of BP coarse aggregates dispersed on BP exfoliated few layer flakes bridging the electrodes, and a clear 2p doublet belonging to BP, which excludes the occurrence of surface oxidation. Room temperature electrical tests in dry air show a p-type response of multilayer BP with measured detection limits of 20 ppb and 10 ppm to NO2 and NH3 respectively. No response to CO and CO2 has been detected, while a slight but steady sensitivity to H2 has been recorded. The reported results confirm, on an experimental basis, what was previously theoretically predicted, demonstrating the promising sensing properties of exfoliated BP.

  9. Low-field magnetoelectric effect at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitagawa, Yutaro; Hiraoka, Yuji; Honda, Takashi; Ishikura, Taishi; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Kimura, Tsuyoshi

    2010-10-01

    The discoveries of gigantic ferroelectric polarization in BiFeO3 (ref. 1) and ferroelectricity accompanied by a magnetic order in TbMnO3 (ref. 2) have renewed interest in research on magnetoelectric multiferroics, materials in which magnetic and ferroelectric orders coexist, from both fundamental and technological points of view. Among several different types of magnetoelectric multiferroic, magnetically induced ferroelectrics in which ferroelectricity is induced by complex magnetic orders, such as spiral orders, exhibit giant magnetoelectric effects, remarkable changes in electric polarization in response to a magnetic field. Many magnetically induced ferroelectrics showing the magnetoelectric effects have been found in the past several years. From a practical point of view, however, their magnetoelectric effects are useless because they operate only far below room temperature (for example, 28K in TbMnO3 (ref. 2) and 230K in CuO (ref. 11)). Furthermore, in most of them, the operating magnetic field is an order of tesla that is too high for practical applications. Here we report materials, Z-type hexaferrites, overcoming these problems on magnetically induced ferroelectrics. The best magnetoelectric properties were obtained for Sr3Co2Fe24O41 ceramics sintered in oxygen, which exhibit a low-field magnetoelectric effect at room temperature. Our result represents an important step towards practical device applications using the magnetoelectric effects.

  10. Linear magnetoelectricity at room temperature in perovskite superlattices by design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Saurabh; Das, Hena; Fennie, Craig J.

    2015-11-01

    Discovering materials that display a linear magnetoelectric (ME) effect at room temperature is a challenge. Such materials could facilitate devices based on the electric field control of magnetism. Here we present simple, chemically intuitive design rules to identify a class of bulk magnetoelectric materials based on the "bicolor" layering of P b n m ferrite perovskites, e.g., LaFeO3/LnFeO3 superlattices, Ln = lanthanide cation. We use first-principles density functional theory calculations to confirm these ideas. We elucidate the origin of this effect and show it is a general consequence of the layering of any bicolor P b n m perovskite superlattice in which the number of constituent layers are odd (leading to a form of hybrid improper ferroelectricity). Our calculations suggest that the ME effect in these superlattices is larger than that observed in the prototypical magnetoelectric materials Cr2O3 and BiFeO3. Furthermore, in these proposed materials, the strength of the linear ME coupling increases with the magnitude of the induced spontaneous polarization which is controlled by the La/Ln cation radius mismatch. We use a simple mean field model to show that the proposed materials order magnetically above room temperature.

  11. A stable room-temperature sodium-sulfur battery.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shuya; Xu, Shaomao; Agrawral, Akanksha; Choudhury, Snehashis; Lu, Yingying; Tu, Zhengyuan; Ma, Lin; Archer, Lynden A

    2016-01-01

    High-energy rechargeable batteries based on earth-abundant materials are important for mobile and stationary storage technologies. Rechargeable sodium-sulfur batteries able to operate stably at room temperature are among the most sought-after platforms because such cells take advantage of a two-electron-redox process to achieve high storage capacity from inexpensive electrode materials. Here we report a room-temperature sodium-sulfur battery that uses a microporous carbon-sulfur composite cathode, and a liquid carbonate electrolyte containing the ionic liquid 1-methyl-3-propylimidazolium-chlorate tethered to SiO2 nanoparticles. We show that these cells can cycle stably at a rate of 0.5 C (1 C=1675, mAh g(-1)) with 600 mAh g(-1) reversible capacity and nearly 100% Coulombic efficiency. By means of spectroscopic and electrochemical analysis, we find that the particles form a sodium-ion conductive film on the anode, which stabilizes deposition of sodium. We also find that sulfur remains interred in the carbon pores and undergo solid-state electrochemical reactions with sodium ions. PMID:27277345

  12. Primary standard of optical power operating at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dönsberg, Timo; Sildoja, Meelis; Manoocheri, Farshid; Merimaa, Mikko; Petroff, Leo; Ikonen, Erkki

    2014-08-01

    The Predictable Quantum Efficient Detector (PQED) is evaluated as a new primary standard of optical power. Design and characterization results are presented for a new compact room temperature PQED that consists of two custom-made induced junction photodiodes mounted in a wedged trap configuration. The detector assembly includes a window aligned in Brewster angle in front of the photodiodes for high transmission of p polarized light. The detector can also be operated without the window, in which case a dry nitrogen flow system is utilized to prevent dust contamination of the photodiodes. Measurements of individual detectors at the wavelength of 488 nm indicate that reflectance and internal quantum efficiency are consistent within 14 ppm and 10 ppm (ppm = part per million), respectively, and agree with the predicted values. The measured photocurrent ratio of the two photodiodes confirms the predicted value for s and p polarized light, and the spatial variation in the photocurrent ratio can be used to estimate the uniformity in the thickness of the silicon dioxide layer on the surface of the photodiodes. In addition, the spatial non-uniformity of the responsivity of the PQED is an order of magnitude lower than that of single photodiodes. Such data provide evidence that the room temperature PQED may replace the cryogenic radiometer as a primary standard of optical power in the visible wavelength range.

  13. Self-transducing silicon nanowire electromechanical systems at room temperature.

    PubMed

    He, Rongrui; Feng, X L; Roukes, M L; Yang, Peidong

    2008-06-01

    Electronic readout of the motions of genuinely nanoscale mechanical devices at room temperature imposes an important challenge for the integration and application of nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS). Here, we report the first experiments on piezoresistively transduced very high frequency Si nanowire (SiNW) resonators with on-chip electronic actuation at room temperature. We have demonstrated that, for very thin (~90 nm down to ~30 nm) SiNWs, their time-varying strain can be exploited for self-transducing the devices' resonant motions at frequencies as high as approximately 100 MHz. The strain of wire elongation, which is only second-order in doubly clamped structures, enables efficient displacement transducer because of the enhanced piezoresistance effect in these SiNWs. This intrinsically integrated transducer is uniquely suited for a class of very thin wires and beams where metallization and multilayer complex patterning on devices become impractical. The 30 nm thin SiNW NEMS offer exceptional mass sensitivities in the subzeptogram range. This demonstration makes it promising to advance toward NEMS sensors based on ultrathin and even molecular-scale SiNWs, and their monolithic integration with microelectronics on the same chip. PMID:18481896

  14. Unconditional polarization qubit quantum memory at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namazi, Mehdi; Kupchak, Connor; Jordaan, Bertus; Shahrokhshahi, Reihaneh; Figueroa, Eden

    2016-05-01

    The creation of global quantum key distribution and quantum communication networks requires multiple operational quantum memories. Achieving a considerable reduction in experimental and cost overhead in these implementations is thus a major challenge. Here we present a polarization qubit quantum memory fully-operational at 330K, an unheard frontier in the development of useful qubit quantum technology. This result is achieved through extensive study of how optical response of cold atomic medium is transformed by the motion of atoms at room temperature leading to an optimal characterization of room temperature quantum light-matter interfaces. Our quantum memory shows an average fidelity of 86.6 +/- 0.6% for optical pulses containing on average 1 photon per pulse, thereby defeating any classical strategy exploiting the non-unitary character of the memory efficiency. Our system significantly decreases the technological overhead required to achieve quantum memory operation and will serve as a building block for scalable and technologically simpler many-memory quantum machines. The work was supported by the US-Navy Office of Naval Research, Grant Number N00141410801 and the Simons Foundation, Grant Number SBF241180. B. J. acknowledges financial assistance of the National Research Foundation (NRF) of South Africa.

  15. A stable room-temperature sodium–sulfur battery

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Shuya; Xu, Shaomao; Agrawral, Akanksha; Choudhury, Snehashis; Lu, Yingying; Tu, Zhengyuan; Ma, Lin; Archer, Lynden A.

    2016-01-01

    High-energy rechargeable batteries based on earth-abundant materials are important for mobile and stationary storage technologies. Rechargeable sodium–sulfur batteries able to operate stably at room temperature are among the most sought-after platforms because such cells take advantage of a two-electron-redox process to achieve high storage capacity from inexpensive electrode materials. Here we report a room-temperature sodium–sulfur battery that uses a microporous carbon–sulfur composite cathode, and a liquid carbonate electrolyte containing the ionic liquid 1-methyl-3-propylimidazolium-chlorate tethered to SiO2 nanoparticles. We show that these cells can cycle stably at a rate of 0.5 C (1 C=1675, mAh g−1) with 600 mAh g−1 reversible capacity and nearly 100% Coulombic efficiency. By means of spectroscopic and electrochemical analysis, we find that the particles form a sodium-ion conductive film on the anode, which stabilizes deposition of sodium. We also find that sulfur remains interred in the carbon pores and undergo solid-state electrochemical reactions with sodium ions. PMID:27277345

  16. New Flexible Channels for Room Temperature Tunneling Field Effect Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Boyi; Asthana, Anjana; Hazaveh, Paniz Khanmohammadi; Bergstrom, Paul L.; Banyai, Douglas; Savaikar, Madhusudan A.; Jaszczak, John A.; Yap, Yoke Khin

    2016-02-01

    Tunneling field effect transistors (TFETs) have been proposed to overcome the fundamental issues of Si based transistors, such as short channel effect, finite leakage current, and high contact resistance. Unfortunately, most if not all TFETs are operational only at cryogenic temperatures. Here we report that iron (Fe) quantum dots functionalized boron nitride nanotubes (QDs-BNNTs) can be used as the flexible tunneling channels of TFETs at room temperatures. The electrical insulating BNNTs are used as the one-dimensional (1D) substrates to confine the uniform formation of Fe QDs on their surface as the flexible tunneling channel. Consistent semiconductor-like transport behaviors under various bending conditions are detected by scanning tunneling spectroscopy in a transmission electron microscopy system (in-situ STM-TEM). As suggested by computer simulation, the uniform distribution of Fe QDs enable an averaging effect on the possible electron tunneling pathways, which is responsible for the consistent transport properties that are not sensitive to bending.

  17. Room-temperature chiral magnetic skyrmions in ultrathin magnetic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulle, Olivier; Vogel, Jan; Yang, Hongxin; Pizzini, Stefania; de Souza Chaves, Dayane; Locatelli, Andrea; Menteş, Tevfik Onur; Sala, Alessandro; Buda-Prejbeanu, Liliana D.; Klein, Olivier; Belmeguenai, Mohamed; Roussigné, Yves; Stashkevich, Andrey; Chérif, Salim Mourad; Aballe, Lucia; Foerster, Michael; Chshiev, Mairbek; Auffret, Stéphane; Miron, Ioan Mihai; Gaudin, Gilles

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic skyrmions are chiral spin structures with a whirling configuration. Their topological properties, nanometre size and the fact that they can be moved by small current densities have opened a new paradigm for the manipulation of magnetization at the nanoscale. Chiral skyrmion structures have so far been experimentally demonstrated only in bulk materials and in epitaxial ultrathin films, and under an external magnetic field or at low temperature. Here, we report on the observation of stable skyrmions in sputtered ultrathin Pt/Co/MgO nanostructures at room temperature and zero external magnetic field. We use high lateral resolution X-ray magnetic circular dichroism microscopy to image their chiral Néel internal structure, which we explain as due to the large strength of the Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction as revealed by spin wave spectroscopy measurements. Our results are substantiated by micromagnetic simulations and numerical models, which allow the identification of the physical mechanisms governing the size and stability of the skyrmions.

  18. HPXe ionization chambers for γ spectrometry at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ottini-Hustache, S.; Monsanglant-Louvet, C.; Haan, S.; Dmitrenko, V.; Grachev, V.; Ulin, S.

    2004-01-01

    High pressure xenon (HPXe) ionization chambers exhibit many characteristics which make them particularly suitable for industrial γ spectrometry at room or higher temperature. The use of a gas as detection medium allows one to reach very large effective volumes and makes these chambers relatively insensitive to radiation damage. Further, the high atomic number of xenon ( Z=54) enhances the total absorption of incident photons and provides, combined to high pressure, a good enough detection efficiency with respect to solid state detectors. Furthermore, such ionization chambers with Frisch grid appear to be very stable over wide periods (e.g. a research prototype has been used aboard MIR orbital station for several years) and temperature range (up to 180°), without maintenance. The characteristics of different prototypes are presented. Their detection efficiency and energy resolution are studied as a function of incident γ ray energy. New developments in electronics and signal processing are also investigated to improve their performances.

  19. Room temperature quantum coherence in a potential molecular qubit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bader, Katharina; Dengler, Dominik; Lenz, Samuel; Endeward, Burkhard; Jiang, Shang-Da; Neugebauer, Petr; van Slageren, Joris

    2014-10-01

    The successful development of a quantum computer would change the world, and current internet encryption methods would cease to function. However, no working quantum computer that even begins to rival conventional computers has been developed yet, which is due to the lack of suitable quantum bits. A key characteristic of a quantum bit is the coherence time. Transition metal complexes are very promising quantum bits, owing to their facile surface deposition and their chemical tunability. However, reported quantum coherence times have been unimpressive. Here we report very long quantum coherence times for a transition metal complex of 68 μs at low temperature (qubit figure of merit QM=3,400) and 1 μs at room temperature, much higher than previously reported values for such systems. We show that this achievement is because of the rigidity of the lattice as well as removal of nuclear spins from the vicinity of the magnetic ion.

  20. Room temperature skyrmion ground state stabilized through interlayer exchange coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Gong Schmid, Andreas K.; Mascaraque, Arantzazu; N'Diaye, Alpha T.

    2015-06-15

    Possible magnetic skyrmion device applications motivate the search for structures that extend the stability of skyrmion spin textures to ambient temperature. Here, we demonstrate an experimental approach to stabilize a room temperature skyrmion ground state in chiral magnetic films via exchange coupling across non-magnetic spacer layers. Using spin polarized low-energy electron microscopy to measure all three Cartesian components of the magnetization vector, we image the spin textures in Fe/Ni films. We show how tuning the thickness of a copper spacer layer between chiral Fe/Ni films and perpendicularly magnetized Ni layers permits stabilization of a chiral stripe phase, a skyrmion phase, and a single domain phase. This strategy to stabilize skyrmion ground states can be extended to other magnetic thin film systems and may be useful for designing skyrmion based spintronics devices.

  1. Room temperature quantum coherence in a potential molecular qubit.

    PubMed

    Bader, Katharina; Dengler, Dominik; Lenz, Samuel; Endeward, Burkhard; Jiang, Shang-Da; Neugebauer, Petr; van Slageren, Joris

    2014-01-01

    The successful development of a quantum computer would change the world, and current internet encryption methods would cease to function. However, no working quantum computer that even begins to rival conventional computers has been developed yet, which is due to the lack of suitable quantum bits. A key characteristic of a quantum bit is the coherence time. Transition metal complexes are very promising quantum bits, owing to their facile surface deposition and their chemical tunability. However, reported quantum coherence times have been unimpressive. Here we report very long quantum coherence times for a transition metal complex of 68 μs at low temperature (qubit figure of merit QM=3,400) and 1 μs at room temperature, much higher than previously reported values for such systems. We show that this achievement is because of the rigidity of the lattice as well as removal of nuclear spins from the vicinity of the magnetic ion. PMID:25328006

  2. A Polar Corundum Oxide Displaying Weak Ferromagnetism at Room Temperature

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Combining long-range magnetic order with polarity in the same structure is a prerequisite for the design of (magnetoelectric) multiferroic materials. There are now several demonstrated strategies to achieve this goal, but retaining magnetic order above room temperature remains a difficult target. Iron oxides in the +3 oxidation state have high magnetic ordering temperatures due to the size of the coupled moments. Here we prepare and characterize ScFeO3 (SFO), which under pressure and in strain-stabilized thin films adopts a polar variant of the corundum structure, one of the archetypal binary oxide structures. Polar corundum ScFeO3 has a weak ferromagnetic ground state below 356 K—this is in contrast to the purely antiferromagnetic ground state adopted by the well-studied ferroelectric BiFeO3. PMID:22280499

  3. Enabling NIR imaging at room temperature using quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Calvez, S.; Bourvon, H.; Kanaan, H.; Meunier-Della Gatta, S.; Philippot, C.; Reiss, P.

    2011-10-01

    Imaging in visible light at room temperature is now a well-mastered technology, whereas imaging in the near infrared (NIR) remains a challenge. NIR imaging has many applications like sensing, night vision and biological diagnostics. Unfortunately, silicon detectors are inefficient above 1000 nm, and other IR technologies still need low working temperatures and are thus expensive. Colloidal quantum dots can overcome these limitations thanks to their absorption wavelength tunability depending on their chemical composition and size. After a brief review of this research field, we will present the preparation of hybrid photodetectors using NIR absorbing PbS quantum dots in combination with poly(3-hexylthiopene) and PCBM. We discuss different solution based deposition processes for device fabrication (spincoating, dip-coating, doctor blading, inkjet printing). Preliminary device tests result in a detectivity of 4.7.109 Jones at 1300 nm.

  4. Enhanced room temperature ferromagnetism in antiferromagnetic NiO nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Ravikumar, Patta; Kisan, Bhagaban; Perumal, A.

    2015-08-15

    We report systematic investigations of structural, vibrational, resonance and magnetic properties of nanoscale NiO powders prepared by ball milling process under different milling speeds for 30 hours of milling. Structural properties revealed that both pure NiO and as-milled NiO powders exhibit face centered cubic structure, but average crystallite size decreases to around 11 nm along with significant increase in strain with increasing milling speed. Vibrational properties show the enhancement in the intensity of one-phonon longitudinal optical (LO) band and disappearance of two-magnon band due to size reduction. In addition, two-phonon LO band exhibits red shift due to size-induced phonon confinement effect and surface relaxation. Pure NiO powder exhibit antiferromagnetic nature, which transforms into induced ferromagnetic after size reduction. The average magnetization at room temperature increases with decreasing the crystallite size and a maximum moment of 0.016 μ{sub B}/f.u. at 12 kOe applied field and coercivity of 170 Oe were obtained for 30 hours milled NiO powders at 600 rotation per minute milling speed. The change in the magnetic properties is also supported by the vibrational properties. Thermomagnetization measurements at high temperature reveal a well-defined magnetic phase transition at high temperature (T{sub C}) around 780 K due to induced ferromagnetic phase. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies reveal a good agreement between the EPR results and magnetic properties. The observed results are described on the basis of crystallite size variation, defect density, large strain, oxidation/reduction of Ni and interaction between uncompensated surfaces and particle core with lattice expansion. The obtained results suggest that nanoscale NiO powders with high T{sub C} and moderate magnetic moment at room temperature with cubic structure would be useful to expedite for spintronic devices.

  5. Enhanced room temperature ferromagnetism in antiferromagnetic NiO nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravikumar, Patta; Kisan, Bhagaban; Perumal, A.

    2015-08-01

    We report systematic investigations of structural, vibrational, resonance and magnetic properties of nanoscale NiO powders prepared by ball milling process under different milling speeds for 30 hours of milling. Structural properties revealed that both pure NiO and as-milled NiO powders exhibit face centered cubic structure, but average crystallite size decreases to around 11 nm along with significant increase in strain with increasing milling speed. Vibrational properties show the enhancement in the intensity of one-phonon longitudinal optical (LO) band and disappearance of two-magnon band due to size reduction. In addition, two-phonon LO band exhibits red shift due to size-induced phonon confinement effect and surface relaxation. Pure NiO powder exhibit antiferromagnetic nature, which transforms into induced ferromagnetic after size reduction. The average magnetization at room temperature increases with decreasing the crystallite size and a maximum moment of 0.016 μB/f.u. at 12 kOe applied field and coercivity of 170 Oe were obtained for 30 hours milled NiO powders at 600 rotation per minute milling speed. The change in the magnetic properties is also supported by the vibrational properties. Thermomagnetization measurements at high temperature reveal a well-defined magnetic phase transition at high temperature (TC) around 780 K due to induced ferromagnetic phase. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies reveal a good agreement between the EPR results and magnetic properties. The observed results are described on the basis of crystallite size variation, defect density, large strain, oxidation/reduction of Ni and interaction between uncompensated surfaces and particle core with lattice expansion. The obtained results suggest that nanoscale NiO powders with high TC and moderate magnetic moment at room temperature with cubic structure would be useful to expedite for spintronic devices.

  6. Room temperature homogeneous flow in a bulk metallic glass with low glass transition temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, K.; Xia, X. X.; Bai, H. Y.; Zhao, D. Q.; Wang, W. H.

    2011-04-01

    We report a high entropy metallic glass of Zn20Ca20Sr20Yb20(Li0.55Mg0.45)20 via composition design that exhibiting remarkable homogeneous deformation without shear banding under stress at room temperature. The glass also shows properties such as low glass transition temperature (323 K) approaching room temperature, low density and high specific strength, good conductivity, polymerlike thermoplastic manufacturability, and ultralow elastic moduli comparable to that of bones. The alloy is thermally and chemically stable.

  7. Room temperature homogeneous flow in a bulk metallic glass with low glass transition temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, K.; Xia, X. X.; Bai, H. Y.; Zhao, D. Q.; Wang, W. H.

    2011-04-04

    We report a high entropy metallic glass of Zn{sub 20}Ca{sub 20}Sr{sub 20}Yb{sub 20}(Li{sub 0.55}Mg{sub 0.45}){sub 20} via composition design that exhibiting remarkable homogeneous deformation without shear banding under stress at room temperature. The glass also shows properties such as low glass transition temperature (323 K) approaching room temperature, low density and high specific strength, good conductivity, polymerlike thermoplastic manufacturability, and ultralow elastic moduli comparable to that of bones. The alloy is thermally and chemically stable.

  8. Anomalous oscillatory magnetoresistance in superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunchur, Milind N.; Dean, Charles L.; Ivlev, Boris I.

    2016-08-01

    We report oscillatory magnetoresistance in various superconducting films, with a magnetic-field period Δ B ˜0.1 T that is essentially independent of sample dimensions, temperature, transport current, and the magnitude and orientation of the magnetic field, including magnetic fields oriented parallel to the film plane. The characteristics of these oscillations seem hard to reconcile with previously established mechanisms for oscillations in magnetoresistance, suggesting the possibility of another type of physical origin.

  9. Linearization strategies for high sensitivity magnetoresistive sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Ana V.; Leitao, Diana C.; Valadeiro, João; Amaral, José; Freitas, Paulo P.; Cardoso, Susana

    2015-10-01

    Ultrasensitive magnetic field sensors envisaged for applications on biomedical imaging require the detection of low-intensity and low-frequency signals. Therefore linear magnetic sensors with enhanced sensitivity low noise levels and improved field detection at low operating frequencies are necessary. Suitable devices can be designed using magnetoresistive sensors, with room temperature operation, adjustable detected field range, CMOS compatibility and cost-effective production. The advent of spintronics set the path to the technological revolution boosted by the storage industry, in particular by the development of read heads using magnetoresistive devices. New multilayered structures were engineered to yield devices with linear output. We present a detailed study of the key factors influencing MR sensor performance (materials, geometries and layout strategies) with focus on different linearization strategies available. Furthermore strategies to improve sensor detection levels are also addressed with best reported values of ˜40 pT/√Hz at 30 Hz, representing a step forward the low field detection at room temperature.

  10. Electrical detection of proton-spin motion in a polymer device at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehme, Christoph

    With the emergence of spintronics concepts based on organic semiconductors there has been renewed interest in the role of both, electron as well as nuclear spin states for the magneto-optoelectronic properties of these materials. In spite of decades of research on these molecular systems, there is still much need for an understanding of some of the fundamental properties of spin-controlled charge carrier transport and recombination processes. This presentation focuses on mechanisms that allow proton spin states to influence electronic transition rates in organic semiconductors. Remarkably, even at low-magnetic field conditions and room temperature, nuclear spin states with energy splittings orders of magnitude below thermal energies are able to influence observables like magnetoresistance and fluorescence. While proton spins couple to charge carrier spins via hyperfine interaction, there has been considerable debate about the nature of the electronic processes that are highly susceptible to these weak hyperfine fields. Here, experiments are presented which show how the magnetic resonant manipulation of electron and nuclear spin states in a π-conjugated polymer device causes changes of the device current. The experiments confirm the extraordinary sensitivity of electronic transitions to very weak magnetic field changes and underscore the potential significance of spin-selection rules for highly sensitive absolute magnetic fields sensor concepts. However, the relevance of these magnetic-field sensitive spin-dependent electron transitions is not just limited to semiconductor materials but also radical pair chemistry and even avian magnetoreceptors This work was supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering under Award #DE-SC0000909. The Utah NSF - MRSEC program #DMR 1121252 is acknowledged for instrumentation support.

  11. Adsorption of CO Molecules on Si(001) at Room Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Eonmi; Eom, Daejin; Kim, Hanchul; Koo, Ja-Yong

    2015-03-01

    Initial adsorption of CO molecules on Si(001) is investigated by using room-temperature (RT) scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and density functional theory calculations. Theoretical calculations show that only one adsorption configuration of terminal-bond CO (T-CO) is stable and that the bridge-bond CO is unstable. All the abundantly observed STM features due to CO adsorption can be identified as differently configured T-COs. The initial sticking probability of CO molecules on Si(001) at RT is estimated to be as small as ~ 1 x 10-4 monolayer/Langmuir, which is significantly increased at high-temperature adsorption experiments implying a finite activation barrier for adsorption. Thermal annealing at 900 K for 5 min results in the dissociation of the adsorbed CO molecules with the probability of 60-70% instead of desorption, indicating both a strong chemisorption state and an activated dissociation process. The unique adsorption state with a large binding energy, a tiny sticking probability, and a finite adsorption barrier is in stark contrast with the previous low-temperature (below 100 K) observations of a weak binding, a high sticking probability, and a barrierless adsorption. We speculate that the low-temperature results might be a signature of a physisorption state in the condensed phase.

  12. Advances in materials for room temperature hydrogen sensors.

    PubMed

    Arya, Sunil K; Krishnan, Subramanian; Silva, Hayde; Jean, Sheila; Bhansali, Shekhar

    2012-06-21

    Hydrogen (H(2)), as a source of energy, continues to be a compelling choice in applications ranging from fuel cells and propulsion systems to feedstock for chemical, metallurgical and other industrial processes. H(2), being a clean, reliable, and affordable source, is finding ever increasing use in distributed electric power generation and H(2) fuelled cars. Although still under 0.1%, the distributed use of H(2) is the fastest growing area. In distributed H(2) storage, distribution, and consumption, safety continues to be a critical aspect. Affordable safety systems for distributed H(2) applications are critical for the H(2) economy to take hold. Advances in H(2) sensors are driven by specificity, reliability, repeatability, stability, cost, size, response time, recovery time, operating temperature, humidity range, and power consumption. Ambient temperature sensors for H(2) detection are increasingly being explored as they offer specificity, stability and robustness of high temperature sensors with lower operational costs and significantly longer operational lifetimes. This review summarizes and highlights recent developments in room temperature H(2) sensors. PMID:22582176

  13. Contracting cardiomyocytes in hydrophobic room-temperature ionic liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Hoshino, Takayuki; Fujita, Kyoko; Higashi, Ayako; Sakiyama, Keiko; Ohno, Hiroyuki; Morishima, Keisuke

    2012-10-19

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Biocompatible room-temperature ionic liquid was applied on beating cardiomyocyte. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The lifetime of beating cardiomyocytes was depended on anion functional group. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A longer lifetime was recorded for no functional group on alkyl chain on their anion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Amino group on alkyl chain and fluorine in anion induced fatal condition changes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We reported liquid electrolyte interface to stimulate cardiomyocytes. -- Abstract: Room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) are drawing attention as a new class of nonaqueous solvents to replace organic and aqueous solvents for chemical processes in the liquid phase at room temperature. The RTILs are notable for their characteristics of nonvolatility, extremely low vapor pressure, electric conductivity, and incombustibility. These distinguished properties of RTILs have brought attention to them in applications with biological cells and tissue in vacuum environment for scanning electron microscopy, and in microfluidic devices for micro-total analysis system (micro-TAS). Habitable RTILs could increase capability of nonaqueous micro-TAS for living cells. Some RTILs seemed to have the capability to replace water in biological applications. However, these RTILs had been applied to just supplemental additives for biocompatible test, to fixed cells as a substitute for an aqueous solution, and to simple molecules. None of RTILs in which directly soaks a living cell culture. Therefore, we demonstrated the design of RTILs for a living cell culture and a liquid electrolyte to stimulate contracting cardiomyocytes using the RTILs. We assessed the effect of RTILs on the cardiomyocytes using the beating lifetime to compare the applicability of RTILs for biological applications. Frequent spontaneous contractions of cardiomyocytes were confirmed in amino acid anion RTILs [P{sub 8,8,8,8}][Leu] and [P{sub 8

  14. Transversal magnetoresistance in Weyl semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klier, J.; Gornyi, I. V.; Mirlin, A. D.

    2015-11-01

    We explore theoretically the magnetoresistivity of three-dimensional Weyl and Dirac semimetals in transversal magnetic fields within two alternative models of disorder: (i) short-range impurities and (ii) charged (Coulomb) impurities. Impurity scattering is treated using the self-consistent Born approximation. We find that an unusual broadening of Landau levels leads to a variety of regimes of the resistivity scaling in the temperature-magnetic field plane. In particular, the magnetoresistance is nonmonotonous for the white-noise disorder model. For H →0 the magnetoresistance for short-range impurities vanishes in a nonanalytic way as H1 /3. In the limits of strongest magnetic fields H , the magnetoresistivity vanishes as 1 /H for pointlike impurities, while it is linear and positive in the model with Coulomb impurities.

  15. Giant magnetoresistance due to magnetoelectric currents in Sr{sub 3}Co{sub 2}Fe{sub 24}O{sub 41} hexaferrites

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xian; Su, Zhijuan; Sokolov, Alexander; Hu, Bolin; Andalib, Parisa; Chen, Yajie Harris, Vincent G.

    2014-09-15

    The giant magnetoresistance and magnetoelectric (ME) effects of Z-type hexaferrite Sr{sub 3}Co{sub 2}Fe{sub 24}O{sub 41} were investigated. The present experiments indicated that an induced magnetoelectric current in a transverse conical spin structure not only presented a nonlinear behavior with magnetic field and electric field but also depended upon a sweep rate of the applied magnetic field. More interestingly, the ME current induced magnetoresistance was measured, yielding a giant room temperature magnetoresistance of 32.2% measured at low magnetic fields (∼125 Oe). These results reveal great potential for emerging applications of multifunctional magnetoelectric ferrite materials.

  16. Tailoring room temperature photoluminescence of antireflective silicon nanofacets

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, Tanmoy; Kumar, M.; Ghatak, J.; Som, T.; Kanjilal, A.; Sahoo, P. K.

    2014-09-21

    In this paper, a fluence-dependent antireflection performance is presented from ion-beam fabricated nanofaceted-Si surfaces. It is also demonstrated that these nanofacets are capable of producing room temperature ultra-violet and blue photoluminescence which can be attributed to inter-band transitions of the localized excitonic states of different Si-O bonds at the Si/SiO{sub x} interface. Time-resolved photoluminescence measurements further confirm defect-induced radiative emission from the surface of silicon nanofacets. It is observed that the spectral characteristics remain unchanged, except an enhancement in the photoluminescence intensity with increasing ion-fluence. The increase in photoluminescence intensity by orders of magnitude stronger than that of a planar Si substrate is due to higher absorption of incident photons by nanofaceted structures.

  17. Modification of embedded Cu nanoparticles: Ion irradiation at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johannessen, B.; Kluth, P.; Giulian, R.; Araujo, L. L.; Llewellyn, D. J.; Foran, G. J.; Cookson, D. J.; Ridgway, M. C.

    2007-04-01

    Cu nanoparticles (NPs) with an average diameter of ∼25 Å were synthesized in SiO2 by ion implantation and thermal annealing. Subsequently, the NPs were exposed to ion irradiation at room temperature simultaneously with a bulk Cu reference film. The ion species/energy was varied to achieve different values for the nuclear energy loss. The short-range atomic structure and average NP diameter were measured by means of extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy and small angle X-ray scattering, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy yielded complementary results. The short-range order of the Cu films remained unchanged consistent with the high regeneration rate of bulk elemental metals. For the NP samples it was found that increasing nuclear energy loss yielded gradual dissolution of NPs. Furthermore, an increased structural disorder was observed for the residual NPs.

  18. Defects in silicon plastically deformed at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leipner, H. S.; Wang, Z.; Gu, H.; Mikhnovich, V. V., Jr.; Bondarenko, V.; Krause-Rehberg, R.; Demenet, J.-L.; Rabier, J.

    2004-07-01

    The article [1] describes specific features of positron trapping in silicon plastically deformed at room temperature. The results are related to the dislocation core structure and the inhomogeneous deformation. The picture shows the probability density function of a positron localized in a vacancy in silicon. The calculation was performed with the superimposed-atom model. The degree of localization and consequently the defect-related positron lifetime vary for different open-volume defects, such as vacancies, voids, and dislocations.The first author, Hartmut S. Leipner, is CEO of the Center of Materials Science of the University Halle-Wittenberg. His research activities are focused on the characterization of extended defects in semiconductors.

  19. Emergence of room-temperature ferroelectricity at reduced dimensions.

    PubMed

    Lee, D; Lu, H; Gu, Y; Choi, S-Y; Li, S-D; Ryu, S; Paudel, T R; Song, K; Mikheev, E; Lee, S; Stemmer, S; Tenne, D A; Oh, S H; Tsymbal, E Y; Wu, X; Chen, L-Q; Gruverman, A; Eom, C B

    2015-09-18

    The enhancement of the functional properties of materials at reduced dimensions is crucial for continuous advancements in nanoelectronic applications. Here, we report that the scale reduction leads to the emergence of an important functional property, ferroelectricity, challenging the long-standing notion that ferroelectricity is inevitably suppressed at the scale of a few nanometers. A combination of theoretical calculations, electrical measurements, and structural analyses provides evidence of room-temperature ferroelectricity in strain-free epitaxial nanometer-thick films of otherwise nonferroelectric strontium titanate (SrTiO3). We show that electrically induced alignment of naturally existing polar nanoregions is responsible for the appearance of a stable net ferroelectric polarization in these films. This finding can be useful for the development of low-dimensional material systems with enhanced functional properties relevant to emerging nanoelectronic devices. PMID:26383947

  20. Realization of a flux-driven memtranstor at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi-Peng, Shen; Da-Shan, Shang; Yi-Sheng, Chai; Young, Sun

    2016-02-01

    The memtranstor has been proposed to be the fourth fundamental circuit memelement in addition to the memristor, memcapacitor, and meminductor. Here, we demonstrate the memtranstor behavior at room temperature in a device made of the magnetoelectric hexaferrite (Ba0.5Sr1.5Co2Fe11AlO22) where the electric polarization is tunable by external magnetic field. This device shows a nonlinear q-φ relationship with a butterfly-shaped hysteresis loop, in agreement with the anticipated memtranstor behavior. The memtranstor, like other memelements, has a great potential in developing more advanced circuit functionalities. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grants Nos. 11227405, 11534015, 11274363, and 11374347) and the Natural Science Foundation from the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. XDB07030200).

  1. Calculation of the room-temperature shapes of unsymmetric laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyer, M. W.

    1981-01-01

    A theory explaining the characteristics of the cured shapes of unsymmetric laminates is presented. The theory is based on an extension of classical lamination theory which accounts for geometric nonlinearities. A Rayleigh-Ritz approach to minimizing the total potential energy is used to obtain quantitative information regarding the room temperature shapes of square T300/5208 (0(2)/90(2))T and (0(4)/90(4))T graphite-epoxy laminates. It is shown that, depending on the thickness of the laminate and the length of the side the square, the saddle shape configuration is actually unstable. For values of length and thickness that render the saddle shape unstable, it is shown that two stable cylindrical shapes exist. The predictions of the theory are compared with existing experimental data.

  2. Microstructure of room temperature ionic liquids at stepped graphite electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Guang; Li, Song; Zhao, Wei; Cummings, Peter T.

    2015-07-14

    Molecular dynamics simulations of room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) [emim][TFSI] at stepped graphite electrodes were performed to investigate the influence of the thickness of the electrode surface step on the microstructure of interfacial RTILs. A strong correlation was observed between the interfacial RTIL structure and the step thickness in electrode surface as well as the ion size. Specifically, when the step thickness is commensurate with ion size, the interfacial layering of cation/anion is more evident; whereas, the layering tends to be less defined when the step thickness is close to the half of ion size. Furthermore, two-dimensional microstructure of ion layers exhibits different patterns and alignments of counter-ion/co-ion lattice at neutral and charged electrodes. As the cation/anion layering could impose considerable effects on ion diffusion, the detailed information of interfacial RTILs at stepped graphite presented here would help to understand the molecular mechanism of RTIL-electrode interfaces in supercapacitors.

  3. Room-temperature ferromagnetism in cerium dioxide powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakhmatullin, R. M.; Pavlov, V. V.; Semashko, V. V.; Korableva, S. L.

    2015-08-01

    Room-temperature ferromagnetism is detected in a CeO2 powder with a grain size of about 35 nm and a low (<0.1 at %) manganese and iron content. The ferromagnetism in a CeO2 sample with a submicron crystallite size and the same manganese and iron impurity content is lower than in the nanocrystalline sample by an order of magnitude. Apart from ferromagnetism, both samples exhibit EPR spectra of localized paramagnetic centers, the concentration of which is lower than 0.01 at %. A comparative analysis of these results shows that the F-center exchange (FCE) mechanism cannot cause ferromagnetism. This conclusion agrees with the charge-transfer ferromagnetism model proposed recently.

  4. Oxidative decomposition of formaldehyde by metal oxides at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekine, Yoshika

    Formaldehyde (HCHO) is still a major indoor air pollutant in Japanese air-tight houses and is the subject of numerous complaints regarding health disorders. Authors have developed a passive-type air-cleaning material and an air cleaner using manganese oxide (77% MnO 2) as an active component and successfully reduced indoor HCHO concentrations in newly built multi-family houses. In this study, the reactivity between manganese oxide and HCHO was discussed. We tested the removal efficiencies of several metal oxides for HCHO in a static reaction vessel and found manganese oxide could react with HCHO and release carbon dioxide even at room temperature. The reactivity and mechanisms were discussed for the proposed chemical reactions. A mass balance study proved that a major product through the heterogeneous reaction between manganese oxide and HCHO was carbon dioxide. Harmful by-products (HCOOH and CO) were not found.

  5. Ratcheting fatigue behavior of Zircaloy-2 at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajpurohit, R. S.; Sudhakar Rao, G.; Chattopadhyay, K.; Santhi Srinivas, N. C.; Singh, Vakil

    2016-08-01

    Nuclear core components of zirconium alloys experience asymmetric stress or strain cycling during service which leads to plastic strain accumulation and drastic reduction in fatigue life as well as dimensional instability of the component. Variables like loading rate, mean stress, and stress amplitude affect the influence of asymmetric loading. In the present investigation asymmetric stress controlled fatigue tests were conducted with mean stress from 80 to 150 MPa, stress amplitude from 270 to 340 MPa and stress rate from 30 to 750 MPa/s to study the process of plastic strain accumulation and its effect on fatigue life of Zircaloy-2 at room temperature. It was observed that with increase in mean stress and stress amplitude accumulation of ratcheting strain was increased and fatigue life was reduced. However, increase in stress rate led to improvement in fatigue life due to less accumulation of ratcheting strain.

  6. Observation of visible luminescence from indium nitride at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Q.X.; Tanaka, T.; Nishio, M.; Ogawa, H.; Pu, X.D.; Shen, W.Z.

    2005-06-06

    InN films were grown on sapphire substrates with AlN buffer layers by reactive sputtering. C-axis-oriented crystalline InN films with a wurtzite structure were confirmed by x-ray diffraction and Raman scattering. Strong photoluminescence (PL) at 1.87 eV, together with a clear absorption edge at 1.97 eV, was observed at room temperature, which clearly demonstrates that it is not accurate in the previous assignment of an {approx}0.7 eV fundamental band gap for intrinsic InN simply from PL and absorption data. The possible origin of the present large band gap was discussed in terms of the effects of oxygen and the Burstein-Moss shift.

  7. Room temperature mechanical properties of shuttle thermal protection system materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawyer, J. W.; Rummler, D. R.

    1980-01-01

    Tests were conducted at room temperature to determine the mechanical properties and behavior of materials used for the thermal protection system of the space shuttle. The materials investigated include the LI-900 RSI tiles, the RTV-560 adhesive and the .41 cm (.16 thick) strain isolator pad (SIP). Tensile and compression cyclic loading tests were conducted on the SIP material and stress-strain curves obtained for various proof loads and load cyclic conditioning. Ultimate tensile and shear tests were conducted on the RSI, RTV, and SIP materials. The SIP material exhibits highly nonlinear stress-strain behavior, increased tangent modulus and ultimate tensile strength with increased loading rate, and large short time load relaxation and moderate creep behavior. Proof and cyclic load conditioning of the SIP results in permanent deformation of the material, hysteresis effects, and much higher tensile tangent modulus values at large strains.

  8. Room-temperature ferromagnetism in graphitic petal arrays.

    PubMed

    Rout, Chandra Sekhar; Kumar, Anurag; Kumar, Nitesh; Sundaresan, A; Fisher, Timothy S

    2011-03-01

    We report room-temperature ferromagnetism of graphitic petal arrays grown on Si substrates by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition without catalyst. The samples have been characterized by Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to confirm the absence of possible ferromagnetic impurities. The petals exhibit ferromagnetic hysteresis with saturation magnetization of ∼4.67 emu cm(-3) and coercivity of ∼105 Oe at 300 K, comparable to the reported behavior of few-layer graphene. Upon O2 annealing the saturation magnetization and coercivity decreased to 2.1 emu cm(-3) and ∼75 Oe respectively. The origin of ferromagnetism is believed to arise from the edge defects and vacancies in the petals. PMID:21264436

  9. Room-temperature ferromagnetism in graphitic petal arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rout, Chandra Sekhar; Kumar, Anurag; Kumar, Nitesh; Sundaresan, A.; Fisher, Timothy S.

    2011-03-01

    We report room-temperature ferromagnetism of graphitic petal arrays grown on Si substrates by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition without catalyst. The samples have been characterized by Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to confirm the absence of possible ferromagnetic impurities. The petals exhibit ferromagnetic hysteresis with saturation magnetization of ~4.67 emu cm-3 and coercivity of ~105 Oe at 300 K, comparable to the reported behavior of few-layer graphene. Upon O2 annealing the saturation magnetization and coercivity decreased to 2.1 emu cm-3 and ~75 Oe respectively. The origin of ferromagnetism is believed to arise from the edge defects and vacancies in the petals.

  10. Thermoelectricity in atom-sized junctions at room temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Tsutsui, Makusu; Morikawa, Takanori; Arima, Akihide; Taniguchi, Masateru

    2013-01-01

    Atomic and molecular junctions are an emerging class of thermoelectric materials that exploit quantum confinement effects to obtain an enhanced figure of merit. An important feature in such nanoscale systems is that the electron and heat transport become highly sensitive to the atomic configurations. Here we report the characterization of geometry-sensitive thermoelectricity in atom-sized junctions at room temperatures. We measured the electrical conductance and thermoelectric power of gold nanocontacts simultaneously down to the single atom size. We found junction conductance dependent thermoelectric voltage oscillations with period 2e2/h. We also observed quantum suppression of thermovoltage fluctuations in fully-transparent contacts. These quantum confinement effects appeared only statistically due to the geometry-sensitive nature of thermoelectricity in the atom-sized junctions. The present method can be applied to various nanomaterials including single-molecules or nanoparticles and thus may be used as a useful platform for developing low-dimensional thermoelectric building blocks. PMID:24270238

  11. Thermoelectricity in atom-sized junctions at room temperatures.

    PubMed

    Tsutsui, Makusu; Morikawa, Takanori; Arima, Akihide; Taniguchi, Masateru

    2013-01-01

    Atomic and molecular junctions are an emerging class of thermoelectric materials that exploit quantum confinement effects to obtain an enhanced figure of merit. An important feature in such nanoscale systems is that the electron and heat transport become highly sensitive to the atomic configurations. Here we report the characterization of geometry-sensitive thermoelectricity in atom-sized junctions at room temperatures. We measured the electrical conductance and thermoelectric power of gold nanocontacts simultaneously down to the single atom size. We found junction conductance dependent thermoelectric voltage oscillations with period 2e(2)/h. We also observed quantum suppression of thermovoltage fluctuations in fully-transparent contacts. These quantum confinement effects appeared only statistically due to the geometry-sensitive nature of thermoelectricity in the atom-sized junctions. The present method can be applied to various nanomaterials including single-molecules or nanoparticles and thus may be used as a useful platform for developing low-dimensional thermoelectric building blocks. PMID:24270238

  12. Theory of room temperature ferromagnetism in Cr modified DNA nanowire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paruğ Duru, Izzet; Değer, Caner; Eldem, Vahap; Kalayci, Taner; Aktaş, Şahin

    2016-04-01

    We investigated the magnetic properties of Cr3+ (J  <  0) ion-modified DNA (M-DNA) nanowire (1000 base) at room temperature under a uniform magnetic field (˜100 Oe) for different doping concentrations. A Monte Carlo simulation method-based Metropolis algorithm is used to figure out the thermodynamic quantities of nanowire formed by Cr M-DNA followed by analysing the dependency of the ferromagnetic behaviour of the M-DNA to dopant concentration. It is understood that ion density/base and ion density/helical of Cr3+ ions can be a tuning parameter, herewith the dopant ratio has an actual importance on the magnetic characterization of M-DNA nanowire (3%-20%). We propose the source of magnetism as an exchange interaction between Cr and DNA helical atoms indicated in the Heisenberg Hamiltonian.

  13. Complete S matrix in a microwave cavity at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Barthélemy, Jérôme; Legrand, Olivier; Mortessagne, Fabrice

    2005-01-01

    We experimentally study the widths of resonances in a two-dimensional microwave cavity at room temperature. By developing a model for the coupling antennas, we are able to discriminate their contribution from those of Ohmic losses to the broadening of resonances. Concerning Ohmic losses, we experimentally put to evidence two mechanisms: damping along propagation and absorption at the contour, the latter being responsible for variations of widths from mode to mode due to its dependence on the spatial distribution of the field at the contour. A theory, based on an S -matrix formalism, is given for these variations. It is successfully validated through measurements of several hundreds of resonances in a rectangular cavity. PMID:15697696

  14. Electrically Injected Photon-Pair Source at Room Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boitier, Fabien; Orieux, Adeline; Autebert, Claire; Lemaître, Aristide; Galopin, Elisabeth; Manquest, Christophe; Sirtori, Carlo; Favero, Ivan; Leo, Giuseppe; Ducci, Sara

    2014-05-01

    One of the main challenges for future quantum information technologies is the miniaturization and integration of high performance components in a single chip. In this context, electrically driven sources of nonclassical states of light have a clear advantage over optically driven ones. Here we demonstrate the first electrically driven semiconductor source of photon pairs working at room temperature and telecom wavelengths. The device is based on type-II intracavity spontaneous parametric down-conversion in an AlGaAs laser diode and generates pairs at 1.57 μm. Time-correlation measurements of the emitted pairs give an internal generation efficiency of 7×10-11 pairs/injected electron. The capability of our platform to support the generation, manipulation, and detection of photons opens the way to the demonstration of massively parallel systems for complex quantum operations.

  15. Simultaneous measurement of force and tunneling current at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawada, Daisuke; Sugimoto, Yoshiaki; Morita, Ken-ichi; Abe, Masayuki; Morita, Seizo

    2009-04-01

    We have performed simultaneous scanning tunneling microscopy and atomic force microscopy measurements in the dynamic mode using metal-coated Si cantilevers at room temperature. Frequency shift (Δf) and time-average tunneling current (⟨It⟩) images are obtained by tip scanning on the Si(111)-(7×7) surface at constant height mode. By measuring site-specific Δf(⟨It⟩) versus tip-surface distance curves, we derive the force (tunneling current) at the closest separation between the sample surface and the oscillating tip. We observe the drop in the tunneling current due to the chemical interaction between the tip apex atom and the surface adatom, which was found recently, and estimate the value of the chemical bonding force. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy using the same tip shows that the tip is metallic enough to measure local density of states of electrons on the surface.

  16. Cavity-Enhanced Room-Temperature Broadband Raman Memory.

    PubMed

    Saunders, D J; Munns, J H D; Champion, T F M; Qiu, C; Kaczmarek, K T; Poem, E; Ledingham, P M; Walmsley, I A; Nunn, J

    2016-03-01

    Broadband quantum memories hold great promise as multiplexing elements in future photonic quantum information protocols. Alkali-vapor Raman memories combine high-bandwidth storage, on-demand readout, and operation at room temperature without collisional fluorescence noise. However, previous implementations have required large control pulse energies and have suffered from four-wave-mixing noise. Here, we present a Raman memory where the storage interaction is enhanced by a low-finesse birefringent cavity tuned into simultaneous resonance with the signal and control fields, dramatically reducing the energy required to drive the memory. By engineering antiresonance for the anti-Stokes field, we also suppress the four-wave-mixing noise and report the lowest unconditional noise floor yet achieved in a Raman-type warm vapor memory, (15±2)×10^{-3} photons per pulse, with a total efficiency of (9.5±0.5)%. PMID:26991164

  17. Cavity-Enhanced Room-Temperature Broadband Raman Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunders, D. J.; Munns, J. H. D.; Champion, T. F. M.; Qiu, C.; Kaczmarek, K. T.; Poem, E.; Ledingham, P. M.; Walmsley, I. A.; Nunn, J.

    2016-03-01

    Broadband quantum memories hold great promise as multiplexing elements in future photonic quantum information protocols. Alkali-vapor Raman memories combine high-bandwidth storage, on-demand readout, and operation at room temperature without collisional fluorescence noise. However, previous implementations have required large control pulse energies and have suffered from four-wave-mixing noise. Here, we present a Raman memory where the storage interaction is enhanced by a low-finesse birefringent cavity tuned into simultaneous resonance with the signal and control fields, dramatically reducing the energy required to drive the memory. By engineering antiresonance for the anti-Stokes field, we also suppress the four-wave-mixing noise and report the lowest unconditional noise floor yet achieved in a Raman-type warm vapor memory, (15 ±2 )×10-3 photons per pulse, with a total efficiency of (9.5 ±0.5 )%.

  18. Room-temperature ferromagnetism in cerium dioxide powders

    SciTech Connect

    Rakhmatullin, R. M. Pavlov, V. V.; Semashko, V. V.; Korableva, S. L.

    2015-08-15

    Room-temperature ferromagnetism is detected in a CeO{sub 2} powder with a grain size of about 35 nm and a low (<0.1 at %) manganese and iron content. The ferromagnetism in a CeO{sub 2} sample with a submicron crystallite size and the same manganese and iron impurity content is lower than in the nanocrystalline sample by an order of magnitude. Apart from ferromagnetism, both samples exhibit EPR spectra of localized paramagnetic centers, the concentration of which is lower than 0.01 at %. A comparative analysis of these results shows that the F-center exchange (FCE) mechanism cannot cause ferromagnetism. This conclusion agrees with the charge-transfer ferromagnetism model proposed recently.

  19. Gas sensing properties of nanocrystalline diamond at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Kulha, Pavel; Laposa, Alexandr; Hruska, Karel; Demo, Pavel; Kromka, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Summary This study describes an integrated NH3 sensor based on a hydrogenated nanocrystalline diamond (NCD)-sensitive layer coated on an interdigitated electrode structure. The gas sensing properties of the sensor structure were examined using a reducing gas (NH3) at room temperature and were found to be dependent on the electrode arrangement. A pronounced response of the sensor, which was comprised of dense electrode arrays (of 50 µm separation distance), was observed. The sensor functionality was explained by the surface transfer doping effect. Moreover, the three-dimensional model of the current density distribution of the hydrogenated NCD describes the transient flow of electrons between interdigitated electrodes and the hydrogenated NCD surface, that is, the formation of a closed current loop. PMID:25551062

  20. Room-Temperature, Low-Barrier Boron Doping of Graphene.

    PubMed

    Pan, Lida; Que, Yande; Chen, Hui; Wang, Dongfei; Li, Jun; Shen, Chengmin; Xiao, Wende; Du, Shixuan; Gao, Hongjun; Pantelides, Sokrates T

    2015-10-14

    Doping graphene with boron has been difficult because of high reaction barriers. Here, we describe a low-energy reaction route derived from first-principles calculations and validated by experiments. We find that a boron atom on graphene on a ruthenium(0001) substrate can replace a carbon by pushing it through, with substrate attraction helping to reduce the barrier to only 0.1 eV, implying that the doping can take place at room temperature. High-quality graphene is grown on a Ru(0001) surface and exposed to B2H6. Scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed that boron is indeed incorporated substitutionally without disturbing the graphene lattice. PMID:26348981

  1. Energy resolution improvement in room-temperature CZT detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramachers, Y.; Stewart, D. Y.

    2007-12-01

    We present methods to improve the energy resolution of single channel, room-temperature Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CZT) detectors. A new preamplifier design enables the acquisition of the actual transient current from the crystals and straightforward data analysis methods yield unprecedented energy resolution for our test-detectors. These consist of an eV-CAPture Plus crystal as standard and 1 cm cube Frisch collar crystals created in-house from low-grade coplanar grid detectors. Energy resolutions of 1.9% for our collar detectors and 0.8% for the eV crystal at 662 keV were obtained. The latter compares favourably to the best existing energy resolution results from pixel detectors.

  2. Magnetoresistance of Au films

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, D. L.; Song, X. H.; Zhang, X; Zhang, Xiaoguang

    2014-01-01

    Measurement of the magnetoresistance (MR) of Au films as a function of temperature and film thickness reveals a strong dependence on grain size distribution and clear violation of the Kohler s rule. Using a model of random resistor network, we show that this result can be explained if the MR arises entirely from inhomogeneity due to grain boundary scattering and thermal activation of grain boundary atoms.

  3. Magnetoresistance of Au films

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhang, D. L.; Song, X. H.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Xiaoguang

    2014-12-10

    Measurement of the magnetoresistance (MR) of Au films as a function of temperature and film thickness reveals a strong dependence on grain size distribution and clear violation of the Kohler s rule. Using a model of random resistor network, we show that this result can be explained if the MR arises entirely from inhomogeneity due to grain boundary scattering and thermal activation of grain boundary atoms.

  4. Room-temperature terahertz oscillation of resonant tunneling diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asada, Masahiro; Suzuki, Safumi

    2013-09-01

    Our recent results of room-temperature THz oscillators using resonant tunneling diodes (RTDs) are reported. This oscillator is composed of a GaInAs/AlAs double-barrier RTD and a planar slot antenna. The maximum oscillation frequency in RTDs is limited by the electron delay time across the RTD layers, which consists of the dwell time in the resonant tunneling region and the transit time across the collector depletion region. The dwell time was reduced by a narrow quantum well, and a fundamental oscillation up to 1.31 THz with the output power of 10 μW was achieved at room temperature. Further increase in oscillation frequency is expected by optimized size and materials of the well and barriers for the dwell time and those of the collector depletion layer for the transit time. By these improvements, a fundamental oscillation up to around 2 THz is theoretically possible. For high output power, coherent power combining was demonstrated in a two-element array with offset slot antennas coupled with each other, and 610 μW at 620 GHz was obtained. Spectral characteristics were measured with a heterodyne detection, and the linewidth of less than 10 MHz was obtained. A frequency change of 1-5 % with bias voltage was also observed, which is attributed to the bias-dependent dwell time. Direct intensity modulation and wireless data transmission were demonstrated. A transmission rate of 3 Gbps with the bit error rate of 3×10-5 was obtained at 540 GHz in a preliminary experiment, which is limited by the frequency characteristics of external modulation circuits at present.

  5. Contracting cardiomyocytes in hydrophobic room-temperature ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, Takayuki; Fujita, Kyoko; Higashi, Ayako; Sakiyama, Keiko; Ohno, Hiroyuki; Morishima, Keisuke

    2012-10-19

    Room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) are drawing attention as a new class of nonaqueous solvents to replace organic and aqueous solvents for chemical processes in the liquid phase at room temperature. The RTILs are notable for their characteristics of nonvolatility, extremely low vapor pressure, electric conductivity, and incombustibility. These distinguished properties of RTILs have brought attention to them in applications with biological cells and tissue in vacuum environment for scanning electron microscopy, and in microfluidic devices for micro-total analysis system (micro-TAS). Habitable RTILs could increase capability of nonaqueous micro-TAS for living cells. Some RTILs seemed to have the capability to replace water in biological applications. However, these RTILs had been applied to just supplemental additives for biocompatible test, to fixed cells as a substitute for an aqueous solution, and to simple molecules. None of RTILs in which directly soaks a living cell culture. Therefore, we demonstrated the design of RTILs for a living cell culture and a liquid electrolyte to stimulate contracting cardiomyocytes using the RTILs. We assessed the effect of RTILs on the cardiomyocytes using the beating lifetime to compare the applicability of RTILs for biological applications. Frequent spontaneous contractions of cardiomyocytes were confirmed in amino acid anion RTILs [P(8,8,8,8)][Leu] and [P(8,8,8,8)][Ala], phosphoric acid derivatives [P(8,8,8,8)][MeO(H)PO(2)], and [P(8,8,8,8)][C(7)CO(2)]. The anion type of RTILs had influence on applicable characteristics for the contracting cardiomyocyte. This result suggested the possibility for biocompatible design of hydrophobic group RTILs to achieve biological applications with living cells. PMID:23000154

  6. Room Temperature Ferroelectricity in Ultrathin SnTe Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Kai; Liu, Junwei; Lin, Haicheng; Zhao, Kun; Zhong, Yong; Ji, Shuai-Hua; He, Ke; Wang, Lili; Ma, Xucun; Fu, Liang; Chen, Xi; Xue, Qi-Kun

    2015-03-01

    The ultrathin SnTe films with several unit cell thickness grown on graphitized SiC(0001) surface have been studied by the scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (STM/S). The domain structures, local lattice distortion and the electronic band bending at film edges induced by the in-plane spontaneous polarization along < 110 > have been revealed at atomic scale. The experiments at variant temperature show that the Curie temperature Tc of the one unit cell thick (two atomic layers) SnTe film is as high as 280K, much higher than that of the bulk counterpart (~100K) and the 2-4 unit cell thick films even indicate robust ferroelectricity at room temperature. This Tc enhancement is attributed to the stress-free interface, larger electronic band gap and greatly reduced Sn vacancy concentration in the ultrathin films. The lateral domain size varies from several tens to several hundreds of nanometers, and the spontaneous polarization direction could be modified by STM tip. Those properties of ultrathin SnTe films show the potential application on ferroelectric devices. The work was financially supported by Ministry of Science and Technology of China, National Science Foundation and Ministry of Education of China.

  7. A glass microfluidic chip adhesive bonding method at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yu-Jen; Yang, Ruey-Jen

    2006-12-01

    This paper presents a novel method using UV epoxy resin for the bonding of glass blanks and patterned plates at room temperature. There is no need to use a high-temperature thermal fusion process and therefore avoid damaging temperature-sensitive metals in a microchip. The proposed technique has the further advantage that the sealed glass blanks and patterned plates can be separated by the application of adequate heat. In this way, the microchip can be opened, the fouling microchannels may be easily cleaned-up and the plates then re-bonded to recycle the microchip. The proposed sealing method is used to bond a microfluidic device, and the bonding strength is then investigated in a series of chemical resistance tests conducted in various chemicals. Leakage of solution was evaluated in a microfluidic chip using pressure testing to 1.792 × 102 kPa (26 psi), and the microchannel had no observable leak. Electrical leakage between channels was tested by comparing the resistances of two bonding methods, and the result shows no significant electrical leakage. The performance of the device obtained from the proposed bonding method is compared with that of the thermal fusion bonding technique for an identical microfluidic device. It is found that identical results are obtained under the same operating conditions. The proposed method provides a simple, quick and inexpensive method for sealing glass microfluidic chips.

  8. The temperature dependence of the crossover magnetic field of linear magnetoresistance in the Cu0.1Bi2Se3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shiu-Ming; Yu, Shih-Hsun; Chou, Mitch

    2016-08-01

    A non-saturating linear magnetoresistance (MR) is observed in Cu0.1Bi2Se3 in a wide range of temperatures. The crossover magnetic field, B*, deviating from the linear MR, increases as the temperature increases. The experimental results show that the normalized B*, inverse MR slope and mobility follow the same temperature dependence that is consistent with the model constructed by Parich and Littlewood (PL model). The mechanism of the T 2 dependent B* is systematically and comprehensively discussed through existing theories, and might be due to the electron‑electron scattering in a highly uniform system with a few low mobility defects.

  9. Linear magnetoresistance in mosaic-like bilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisslinger, Ferdinand; Ott, Christian; Heide, Christian; Kampert, Erik; Butz, Benjamin; Spiecker, Erdmann; Shallcross, Sam; Weber, Heiko B.

    2015-08-01

    The magnetoresistance of conductors usually has a quadratic dependence on magnetic field, however, examples exist of non-saturating linear behaviour in diverse materials. Assigning a specific microscopic mechanism to this unusual phenomenon is obscured by the co-occurrence and interplay of doping, mobility fluctuations and a polycrystalline structure. Bilayer graphene has virtually no doping fluctuations, yet provides a built-in mosaic tiling due to the dense network of partial dislocations. We present magnetotransport measurements of epitaxial bilayer graphene that exhibits a strong and reproducible linear magnetoresistance that persists to B = 62 T at and above room temperature, decorated by quantum interference effects at low temperatures. Partial dislocations thus have a profound impact on the transport properties in bilayer graphene, a system that is frequently assumed to be dislocation-free. It further provides a clear and tractable model system for studying the unusual properties of mosaic conductors.

  10. Competing Mechanisms in Organic Magnetoresistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koopmans, Bert

    2013-03-01

    A surprisingly large ``organic magnetoresistance'' (OMAR) has been found in both polymers and small molecule organic semiconductors at relatively small applied magnetic fields (~ 5 mT) and at room temperature. Unlike spin-injection devices, where the occurrence of a finite spin polarization of the current is essential for measuring a finite magnetoresistance, OMAR is generally considered to be due to spin correlations between spin carrying particles in the organic material. Although the microscopic mechanisms of hyperfine field induced spin mixing are relatively well understood, it is still intensively debated which particles are involved and how they can affect the current in such a drastic manner. In this presentation recent developments and new insights as to the underlying physics are discussed. Quantitative models will be introduced, based on different pairs of particles and mechanisms, and giving rise to effects at a variety of field scales. It will be discussed how specific device physics causes a non-trivial relation between microscopic spin-dependent reactions and macroscopic device behaviour. Finally, it will be shown how comprehensive studies on especially engineered organic systems, including polymer-fullerene blends and molecular doping, can be used to pinpoint the relevance of different mechanisms in the complementary regimes. The experimentally observed linewidth, sign and amplitude of both ``high-field'' (>100 mT) and ``low-field'' (~ 5 mT) effects, as well as their bias voltage dependence display very pronounced features as a function of fullerene doping. They provide unique fingerprints for which mechanism is of relevance. After careful analysis, this allows for identification of three earlier proposed mechanisms, involving exciton-charge, electron-hole and bipolaron (polarons of like charge) reactions. Present activities are aiming at using this insight for tailoring OMAR response by design.

  11. Excess Ni-doping induced enhanced room temperature magneto-functionality in Ni-Mn-Sn based shape memory alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Pramanick, S.; Giri, S.; Majumdar, S.; Chatterjee, S.

    2014-09-15

    Present work reports on the observation of large magnetoresistance (∼−30% at 80 kOe) and magnetocaloric effect (∼12 J·kg{sup −1}·K{sup −1} for 0–50 kOe) near room temperature (∼290 K) on the Ni-excess ferromagnetic shape memory alloy Ni{sub 2.04}Mn{sub 1.4}Sn{sub 0.56}. The sample can be thought of being derived from the parent Ni{sub 2}Mn{sub 1.4}Sn{sub 0.6} alloy, where excess Ni was doped at the expense of Sn. Such Ni doping enhances the martensitic transition temperature and for the Ni{sub 2.04}Mn{sub 1.4}Sn{sub 0.56} it is found to be optimum (288 K). The doped alloy shows enhanced magneto-functional properties as well as reduced saturation magnetization as compared to the undoped counterpart at low temperature. A probable increment of antiferromagnetic correlation between Mn-atoms on Ni substitution can be accounted for the enhanced magneto-functional properties as well as reduction in saturation moment.

  12. Excess Ni-doping induced enhanced room temperature magneto-functionality in Ni-Mn-Sn based shape memory alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pramanick, S.; Chatterjee, S.; Giri, S.; Majumdar, S.

    2014-09-01

    Present work reports on the observation of large magnetoresistance (˜-30% at 80 kOe) and magnetocaloric effect (˜12 J.kg-1.K-1 for 0-50 kOe) near room temperature (˜290 K) on the Ni-excess ferromagnetic shape memory alloy Ni2.04Mn1.4Sn0.56. The sample can be thought of being derived from the parent Ni2Mn1.4Sn0.6 alloy, where excess Ni was doped at the expense of Sn. Such Ni doping enhances the martensitic transition temperature and for the Ni2.04Mn1.4Sn0.56 it is found to be optimum (288 K). The doped alloy shows enhanced magneto-functional properties as well as reduced saturation magnetization as compared to the undoped counterpart at low temperature. A probable increment of antiferromagnetic correlation between Mn-atoms on Ni substitution can be accounted for the enhanced magneto-functional properties as well as reduction in saturation moment.

  13. Quantum magnetoresistance

    SciTech Connect

    Abrikosov, A.A.

    1998-08-01

    An explanation is proposed of the unusual magnetoresistance, linear in magnetic field and positive, observed recently in nonstoichiometric silver chalcogenides. The idea is based on the assumption that these substances are basically gapless semiconductors with a linear energy spectrum. Most of the excess silver atoms form metallic clusters which are doping the remaining material to a very small carrier concentration, so that even in a magnetic field as low as 10 Oe, only one Landau band participates in the conductivity. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  14. Low cycle fatigue behavior of Zircaloy-2 at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudhakar Rao, G.; Chakravartty, J. K.; Nudurupati, Saibaba; Mahobia, G. S.; Chattopadhyay, Kausik; Santhi Srinivas, N. C.; Singh, Vakil

    2013-10-01

    Fuel cladding and pressure tubes of Zircaloy-2 in pressurized light and heavy water nuclear reactors experience plastic strain cycles due to power fluctuations in the reactor, such strain cycles cause low cycle fatigue (LCF) and could be life limiting factor for them. Factors like strain rate, strain amplitude and temperature are known to have marked influence on LCF behavior. The effect of strain rate from 10-2 to 10-4 s-1 on LCF behavior of Zircaloy-2 was studied, at different strain amplitudes between ±0.50% and ±1.25% at room temperature. Fatigue life was decreased with lowering of strain rate from 10-2 to 10-4 s-1 at all the strain amplitudes studied. While there was cyclic softening at lower strain amplitudes (Δεt/2 ⩽ ±0.60%) cyclic hardening was exhibited at higher strain amplitudes (Δεt/2 ⩾ ±1.00%) at all the strain rates. Further, there was secondary cyclic hardening during the later stage of cycling at all the strain amplitudes and the strain rates. Cyclic stress-strain hysteresis loops at the lowest strain rate of 10-4 s-1 were found to be heavily serrated, resulting from dynamic strain aging (DSA). There was significant effect of strain rate on dislocation substructure. The results are discussed in terms of high concentration of point defects generated during cyclic straining and their role in enhancing interaction between solutes and dislocations.

  15. Room-temperature chiral magnetic skyrmions in ultrathin magnetic nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Boulle, Olivier; Vogel, Jan; Yang, Hongxin; Pizzini, Stefania; de Souza Chaves, Dayane; Locatelli, Andrea; Menteş, Tevfik Onur; Sala, Alessandro; Buda-Prejbeanu, Liliana D; Klein, Olivier; Belmeguenai, Mohamed; Roussigné, Yves; Stashkevich, Andrey; Chérif, Salim Mourad; Aballe, Lucia; Foerster, Michael; Chshiev, Mairbek; Auffret, Stéphane; Miron, Ioan Mihai; Gaudin, Gilles

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic skyrmions are chiral spin structures with a whirling configuration. Their topological properties, nanometre size and the fact that they can be moved by small current densities have opened a new paradigm for the manipulation of magnetization at the nanoscale. Chiral skyrmion structures have so far been experimentally demonstrated only in bulk materials and in epitaxial ultrathin films, and under an external magnetic field or at low temperature. Here, we report on the observation of stable skyrmions in sputtered ultrathin Pt/Co/MgO nanostructures at room temperature and zero external magnetic field. We use high lateral resolution X-ray magnetic circular dichroism microscopy to image their chiral Néel internal structure, which we explain as due to the large strength of the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction as revealed by spin wave spectroscopy measurements. Our results are substantiated by micromagnetic simulations and numerical models, which allow the identification of the physical mechanisms governing the size and stability of the skyrmions. PMID:26809057

  16. Room temperature triplet state spectroscopy of organic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reineke, Sebastian; Baldo, Marc A.

    2014-01-01

    Organic light-emitting devices and solar cells are devices that create, manipulate, and convert excited states in organic semiconductors. It is crucial to characterize these excited states, or excitons, to optimize device performance in applications like displays and solar energy harvesting. This is complicated if the excited state is a triplet because the electronic transition is `dark' with a vanishing oscillator strength. As a consequence, triplet state spectroscopy must usually be performed at cryogenic temperatures to reduce competition from non-radiative rates. Here, we control non-radiative rates by engineering a solid-state host matrix containing the target molecule, allowing the observation of phosphorescence at room temperature and alleviating constraints of cryogenic experiments. We test these techniques on a wide range of materials with functionalities spanning multi-exciton generation (singlet exciton fission), organic light emitting device host materials, and thermally activated delayed fluorescence type emitters. Control of non-radiative modes in the matrix surrounding a target molecule may also have broader applications in light-emitting and photovoltaic devices.

  17. Dielectric Behavior of Biomaterials at Different Frequencies on Room Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrivastava, B. D.; Barde, Ravindra; Mishra, A.; Phadke, S.

    2014-09-01

    Propagation of electromagnetic (EM) waves in radiofrequency (RF) and microwave systems is described mathematically by Maxwell's equations with corresponding boundary conditions. Dielectric properties of lossless and lossy materials influence EM field distribution. For a better understanding of the physical processes associated with various RF and microwave devices, it is necessary to know the dielectric properties of media that interact with EM waves. For telecommunication and radar devices, variations of complex dielectric permittivity (referring to the dielectric property) over a wide frequency range are important. For RF and microwave applicators intended for thermal treatments of different materials at ISM (industrial, scientific, medical) frequencies, one needs to study temperature and moisture content dependencies of the Permittivity of the treated materials. Many techniques have been developed for the measurement of materials. In the present paper authors used Bones and scales of Fish taken from Narmada River (Rajghat Dist. Barwani) as biomaterials. Dielectric properties of Biomaterials with the frequency range from 1Hz to 10 MHz at room temperature with low water content were measured by in-situ performance dielectric kit. Analysis has been done by Alpha high performance impedance analyzer and LCR meters. The experimental work were carried out in Inter University Consortium UGC-DAE, CSR center Indore MP. Measured value indicates the dielectric constant (ɛ') dielectric loss (ɛ") decreases with increasing frequency while conductivity (σ) increases with frequency increased.

  18. Room-temperature ballistic transport in III-nitride heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Matioli, Elison; Palacios, Tomás

    2015-02-11

    Room-temperature (RT) ballistic transport of electrons is experimentally observed and theoretically investigated in III-nitrides. This has been largely investigated at low temperatures in low band gap III-V materials due to their high electron mobilities. However, their application to RT ballistic devices is limited by their low optical phonon energies, close to KT at 300 K. In addition, the short electron mean-free-path at RT requires nanoscale devices for which surface effects are a limitation in these materials. We explore the unique properties of wide band-gap III-nitride semiconductors to demonstrate RT ballistic devices. A theoretical model is proposed to corroborate experimentally their optical phonon energy of 92 meV, which is ∼4× larger than in other III-V semiconductors. This allows RT ballistic devices operating at larger voltages and currents. An additional model is described to determine experimentally a characteristic dimension for ballistic transport of 188 nm. Another remarkable property is their short carrier depletion at device sidewalls, down to 13 nm, which allows top-down nanofabrication of very narrow ballistic devices. These results open a wealth of new systems and basic transport studies possible at RT. PMID:25614931

  19. Engineering Room-temperature Superconductors Via ab-initio Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulian, Mamikon; Melkonyan, Gurgen; Gulian, Armen

    The BCS, or bosonic model of superconductivity, as Little and Ginzburg have first argued, can bring in superconductivity at room temperatures in the case of high-enough frequency of bosonic mode. It was further elucidated by Kirzhnitset al., that the condition for existence of high-temperature superconductivity is closely related to negative values of the real part of the dielectric function at finite values of the reciprocal lattice vectors. In view of these findings, the task is to calculate the dielectric function for real materials. Then the poles of this function will indicate the existence of bosonic excitations which can serve as a "glue" for Cooper pairing, and if the frequency is high enough, and the dielectric matrix is simultaneously negative, this material is a good candidate for very high-Tc superconductivity. Thus, our approach is to elaborate a methodology of ab-initio calculation of the dielectric function of various materials, and then point out appropriate candidates. We used the powerful codes (TDDF with the DP package in conjunction with ABINIT) for computing dielectric responses at finite values of the wave vectors in the reciprocal lattice space. Though our report is concerned with the particular problem of superconductivity, the application range of the data processing methodology is much wider. The ability to compute the dielectric function of existing and still non-existing (though being predicted!) materials will have many more repercussions not only in fundamental sciences but also in technology and industry.

  20. Investigation of Room temperature Ferromagnetism in Mn doped Ge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colakerol Arslan, Leyla; Toydemir, Burcu; Onel, Aykut Can; Ertas, Merve; Doganay, Hatice; Gebze Inst of Tech Collaboration; Research Center Julich Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    We present a systematic investigation of structural, magnetic and electronic properties of MnxGe1 -x single crystals. MnxGe1-x films were grown by sequential deposition of Ge and Mn by molecular-beam epitaxy at low substrate temperatures in order to avoid precipitation of ferromagnetic Ge-Mn intermetallic compounds. Reflected high energy electron diffraction and x-ray diffraction observations revealed that films are epitaxially grown on Si (001) substrates from the initial stage without any other phase formation. Magnetic measurements carried out using a physical property measurement system showed that all samples exhibited ferromagnetism at room temperature. Electron spin resonance indicates the presence of magnetically ordered localized spins of divalent Mn ions. X-ray absorption measurements at the Mn L-edge confirm significant substitutional doping of Mn into Ge-sites. The ferromagnetism was mainly induced by Mn substitution for Ge site, and indirect exchange interaction of these magnetic ions with the intrinsic charge carriers is the origin of ferromagnetism. The magnetic interactions were better understood by codoping with nonmagnetic impurities. This work was supported by Marie-Curie Reintegration Grant (PIRG08-GA-2010-276973).

  1. New Flexible Channels for Room Temperature Tunneling Field Effect Transistors

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Boyi; Asthana, Anjana; Hazaveh, Paniz Khanmohammadi; Bergstrom, Paul L.; Banyai, Douglas; Savaikar, Madhusudan A.; Jaszczak, John A.; Yap, Yoke Khin

    2016-01-01

    Tunneling field effect transistors (TFETs) have been proposed to overcome the fundamental issues of Si based transistors, such as short channel effect, finite leakage current, and high contact resistance. Unfortunately, most if not all TFETs are operational only at cryogenic temperatures. Here we report that iron (Fe) quantum dots functionalized boron nitride nanotubes (QDs-BNNTs) can be used as the flexible tunneling channels of TFETs at room temperatures. The electrical insulating BNNTs are used as the one-dimensional (1D) substrates to confine the uniform formation of Fe QDs on their surface as the flexible tunneling channel. Consistent semiconductor-like transport behaviors under various bending conditions are detected by scanning tunneling spectroscopy in a transmission electron microscopy system (in-situ STM-TEM). As suggested by computer simulation, the uniform distribution of Fe QDs enable an averaging effect on the possible electron tunneling pathways, which is responsible for the consistent transport properties that are not sensitive to bending. PMID:26846587

  2. New Flexible Channels for Room Temperature Tunneling Field Effect Transistors

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hao, Boyi; Asthana, Anjana; Hazaveh, Paniz Khanmohammadi; Bergstrom, Paul L.; Banyai, Douglas; Savaikar, Madhusudan A.; Jaszczak, John A.; Yap, Yoke Khin

    2016-02-05

    Tunneling field effect transistors (TFETs) have been proposed to overcome the fundamental issues of Si based transistors, such as short channel effect, finite leakage current, and high contact resistance. Unfortunately, most if not all TFETs are operational only at cryogenic temperatures. Here we report that iron (Fe) quantum dots functionalized boron nitride nanotubes (QDs-BNNTs) can be used as the flexible tunneling channels of TFETs at room temperatures. The electrical insulating BNNTs are used as the one-dimensional (1D) substrates to confine the uniform formation of Fe QDs on their surface as the flexible tunneling channel. Consistent semiconductor-like transport behaviors under variousmore » bending conditions are detected by scanning tunneling spectroscopy in a transmission electron microscopy system (insitu STM-TEM). Ultimately, as suggested by computer simulation, the uniform distribution of Fe QDs enable an averaging effect on the possible electron tunneling pathways, which is responsible for the consistent transport properties that are not sensitive to bending.« less

  3. Room temperature triplet state spectroscopy of organic semiconductors

    PubMed Central

    Reineke, Sebastian; Baldo, Marc A.

    2014-01-01

    Organic light-emitting devices and solar cells are devices that create, manipulate, and convert excited states in organic semiconductors. It is crucial to characterize these excited states, or excitons, to optimize device performance in applications like displays and solar energy harvesting. This is complicated if the excited state is a triplet because the electronic transition is ‘dark’ with a vanishing oscillator strength. As a consequence, triplet state spectroscopy must usually be performed at cryogenic temperatures to reduce competition from non-radiative rates. Here, we control non-radiative rates by engineering a solid-state host matrix containing the target molecule, allowing the observation of phosphorescence at room temperature and alleviating constraints of cryogenic experiments. We test these techniques on a wide range of materials with functionalities spanning multi-exciton generation (singlet exciton fission), organic light emitting device host materials, and thermally activated delayed fluorescence type emitters. Control of non-radiative modes in the matrix surrounding a target molecule may also have broader applications in light-emitting and photovoltaic devices. PMID:24445870

  4. Electrodrift purification of materials for room temperature radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    James, Ralph B.; Van Scyoc, III, John M.; Schlesinger, Tuviah E.

    1997-06-24

    A method of purifying nonmetallic, crystalline semiconducting materials useful for room temperature radiation detecting devices by applying an electric field across the material. The present invention discloses a simple technology for producing purified ionic semiconducting materials, in particular PbI.sub.2 and preferably HgI.sub.2, which produces high yields of purified product, requires minimal handling of the material thereby reducing the possibility of introducing or reintroducing impurities into the material, is easy to control, is highly selective for impurities, retains the stoichiometry of the material and employs neither high temperatures nor hazardous materials such as solvents or liquid metals. An electric field is applied to a bulk sample of the material causing impurities present in the sample to drift in a preferred direction. After all of the impurities have been transported to the ends of the sample the current flowing through the sample, a measure of the rate of transport of mobile impurities, falls to a low, steady state value, at which time the end sections of the sample where the impurities have concentrated are removed leaving a bulk sample of higher purity material. Because the method disclosed here only acts on the electrically active impurities, the stoichiometry of the host material remains substantially unaffected.

  5. A computed room temperature line list for phosphine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa-Silva, Clara; Yurchenko, Sergei N.; Tennyson, Jonathan

    2013-06-01

    An accurate and comprehensive room temperature rotation-vibration transition line list for phosphine (31PH3) is computed using a newly refined potential energy surface and a previously constructed ab initio electric dipole moment surface. Energy levels, Einstein A coefficients and transition intensities are computed using these surfaces and a variational approach to the nuclear motion problem as implemented in the program TROVE. A ro-vibrational spectrum is computed, covering the wavenumber range 0-8000 cm-1. The resulting line list, which is appropriate for temperatures up to 300 K, consists of a total of 137 million transitions between 5.6 million energy levels. Several of the band centres are shifted to better match experimental transition frequencies. The line list is compared to the most recent HITRAN database and other laboratorial sources. Transition wavelengths and intensities are generally found to be in good agreement with the existing experimental data, with particularly close agreement for the rotational spectrum. An analysis of the comparison between the theoretical data created and the existing experimental data is performed, and suggestions for future improvements and assignments to the HITRAN database are made.

  6. New Flexible Channels for Room Temperature Tunneling Field Effect Transistors.

    PubMed

    Hao, Boyi; Asthana, Anjana; Hazaveh, Paniz Khanmohammadi; Bergstrom, Paul L; Banyai, Douglas; Savaikar, Madhusudan A; Jaszczak, John A; Yap, Yoke Khin

    2016-01-01

    Tunneling field effect transistors (TFETs) have been proposed to overcome the fundamental issues of Si based transistors, such as short channel effect, finite leakage current, and high contact resistance. Unfortunately, most if not all TFETs are operational only at cryogenic temperatures. Here we report that iron (Fe) quantum dots functionalized boron nitride nanotubes (QDs-BNNTs) can be used as the flexible tunneling channels of TFETs at room temperatures. The electrical insulating BNNTs are used as the one-dimensional (1D) substrates to confine the uniform formation of Fe QDs on their surface as the flexible tunneling channel. Consistent semiconductor-like transport behaviors under various bending conditions are detected by scanning tunneling spectroscopy in a transmission electron microscopy system (in-situ STM-TEM). As suggested by computer simulation, the uniform distribution of Fe QDs enable an averaging effect on the possible electron tunneling pathways, which is responsible for the consistent transport properties that are not sensitive to bending. PMID:26846587

  7. Tuning magnetic nanostructures and flux concentrators for magnetoresistive sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xiaolu; Liu, Yen-Fu; Ewing, Dan; Ruder, Carmen K.; De Rego, Paul J.; Edelstein, A. S.; Liou, Sy-Hwang

    2015-09-01

    The methods for the optimization of the magnetoresistive (MR) sensors are to reduce sources of noises, to increase the signal, and to understand the involved fundamental limitations. The high-performance MR sensors result from important magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) properties, such as tunneling magnetoresistance ratio (TMR), coercivity (Hc), exchange coupling field (He), domain structures, and noise properties as well as the external magnetic flux concentrators. All these parameters are sensitively controlled by the magnetic nanostructures, which can be tuned by varying junction free layer nanostructures, geometry, and magnetic annealing process etc. In this paper, we discuss some of efforts that an optimized magnetic sensor with a sensitivity as high as 5,146 %/mT. This sensitivity is currently the highest among all MR-type sensors that have been reported. The estimated noise of our magnetoresistive sensor is 47 pT/Hz1/2 at 1 Hz. This magnetoresistance sensor dissipates only 100 μW of power while operating under an applied voltage of 1 V at room temperature.

  8. Large oscillations of the magnetoresistance in nanopatterned high-temperature superconducting films.

    PubMed

    Sochnikov, Ilya; Shaulov, Avner; Yeshurun, Yosef; Logvenov, Gennady; Bozović, Ivan

    2010-07-01

    Measurements on nanoscale structures constructed from high-temperature superconductors are expected to shed light on the origin of superconductivity in these materials. To date, loops made from these compounds have had sizes of the order of hundreds of nanometres(8-11). Here, we report the results of measurements on loops of La(1.84)Sr(0.16)CuO(4), a high-temperature superconductor that loses its resistance to electric currents when cooled below approximately 38 K, with dimensions down to tens of nanometres. We observe oscillations in the resistance of the loops as a function of the magnetic flux through the loops. The oscillations have a period of h/2e, and their amplitude is much larger than the amplitude of the resistance oscillations expected from the Little-Parks effect. Moreover, unlike Little-Parks oscillations, which are caused by periodic changes in the superconducting transition temperature, the oscillations we observe are caused by periodic changes in the interaction between thermally excited moving vortices and the oscillating persistent current induced in the loops. However, despite the enhanced amplitude of these oscillations, we have not detected oscillations with a period of h/e, as recently predicted for nanoscale loops of superconductors with d-wave symmetry, or with a period of h/4e, as predicted for superconductors that exhibit stripes. PMID:20543834

  9. Large Oscillations of the Magnetoresistance in Nanopatterned High-temperature Superconducting Films

    SciTech Connect

    Sochnikov, I.; Bozovic, I.; Shaulov, A.; Yeshurun, Y.; Logvenov, G.

    2010-07-01

    Measurements on nanoscale structures constructed from high-temperature superconductors are expected to shed light on the origin of superconductivity in these materials. To date, loops made from these compounds have had sizes of the order of hundreds of nanometeres. Here, we report the results of measurements on loops of La{sub 1.84}Sr{sub 0.16}CuO{sub 4}, a high-temperature superconductor that loses its resistance to electric currents when cooled below {approx}38 K, with dimensions down to tens of nanometres. We observe oscillations in the resistance of the loops as a function of the magnetic flux through the loops. The oscillations have a period of h/2e, and their amplitude is much larger than the amplitude of the resistance oscillations expected from the Little-Parks effect. Moreover, unlike Little-Parks oscillations, which are caused by periodic changes in the superconducting transition temperature, the oscillations we observe are caused by periodic changes in the interaction between thermally excited moving vortices and the oscillating persistent current induced in the loops. However, despite the enhanced amplitude of these oscillations, we have not detected oscillations with a period of h/e, as recently predicted for nanoscale loops of superconductors with d-wave symmetry or with a period of h/4e, as predicted for superconductors that exhibit stripes.

  10. Gradient Limitations in Room Temperature and Superconducting Acceleration Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Solyak, N. A.

    2009-01-22

    Accelerating gradient is a key parameter of the accelerating structure in large linac facilities, like future Linear Collider. In room temperature accelerating structures the gradient is limited mostly by breakdown phenomena, caused by high surface electric fields or pulse surface heating. High power processing is a necessary procedure to clean surface and improve the gradient. In the best tested X-band structures the achieved gradient is exceed 100 MV/m in of {approx}200 ns pulses for breakdown rate of {approx}10{sup -7}. Gradient limit depends on number of factors and no one theory which can explain all sets of experimental results and predict gradient in new accelerating structure. In paper we briefly overview the recent experimental results of breakdown studies, progress in understanding of gradient limitations and scaling laws. Although superconducting rf technology has been adopted throughout the world for ILC, it has frequently been difficult to reach the predicted performance in these structures due to a number of factors: multipactoring, field emission, Q-slope, thermal breakdown. In paper we are discussing all these phenomena and the ways to increase accelerating gradient in SC cavity, which are a part of worldwide R and D program.

  11. Room-temperature terahertz detection based on CVD graphene transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xin-Xin; Sun, Jian-Dong; Qin, Hua; Lv, Li; Su, Li-Na; Yan, Bo; Li, Xin-Xing; Zhang, Zhi-Peng; Fang, Jing-Yue

    2015-04-01

    We report the fabrication and characterization of a single-layer graphene field-effect terahertz detector, which is coupled with dipole-like antennas based on the self-mixing detector model. The graphene is grown by chemical vapor deposition and then transferred onto an SiO2/Si substrate. We demonstrate room-temperature detection at 237 GHz. The detector could offer a voltage responsivity of 0.1 V/W and a noise equivalent power of 207 nW/Hz1/2. Our modeling indicates that the observed photovoltage in the p-type gated channel can be well fit by the self-mixing theory. A different photoresponse other than self-mixing may apply for the n-type gated channel. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61271157, 61401456, and 11403084), Jiangsu Provincial Planned Projects for Postdoctoral Research Funds (Grant No. 1301054B), the Fund from Suzhou Industry Technology Bureau (Grant No. ZXG2012024), China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (Grant No. 2014M551678), the Graduate Student Innovation Program for Universities of Jiangsu Province (Grant No. CXLX12_0724), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (Grant No. JUDCF 12032), and the Fund from National University of Defense Technology (Grant No. JC13-02-14).

  12. Above-room-temperature ferroelectricity and antiferroelectricity in benzimidazoles

    PubMed Central

    Horiuchi, Sachio; Kagawa, Fumitaka; Hatahara, Kensuke; Kobayashi, Kensuke; Kumai, Reiji; Murakami, Youichi; Tokura, Yoshinori

    2012-01-01

    The imidazole unit is chemically stable and ubiquitous in biological systems; its proton donor and acceptor moieties easily bind molecules into a dipolar chain. Here we demonstrate that chains of these amphoteric molecules can often be bistable in electric polarity and electrically switchable, even in the crystalline state, through proton tautomerization. Polarization–electric field (P–E) hysteresis experiments reveal a high electric polarization ranging from 5 to 10 μC cm−2 at room temperature. Of these molecules, 2-methylbenzimidazole allows ferroelectric switching in two dimensions due to its pseudo-tetragonal crystal symmetry. The ferroelectricity is also thermally robust up to 400 K, as is that of 5,6-dichloro-2-methylbenzimidazole (up to ~373 K). In contrast, three other benzimidazoles exhibit double P–E hysteresis curves characteristic of antiferroelectricity. The diversity of imidazole substituents is likely to stimulate a systematic exploration of various structure–property relationships and domain engineering in the quest for lead- and rare-metal-free ferroelectric devices. PMID:23250438

  13. A silicon carbide room-temperature single-photon source.

    PubMed

    Castelletto, S; Johnson, B C; Ivády, V; Stavrias, N; Umeda, T; Gali, A; Ohshima, T

    2014-02-01

    Over the past few years, single-photon generation has been realized in numerous systems: single molecules, quantum dots, diamond colour centres and others. The generation and detection of single photons play a central role in the experimental foundation of quantum mechanics and measurement theory. An efficient and high-quality single-photon source is needed to implement quantum key distribution, quantum repeaters and photonic quantum information processing. Here we report the identification and formation of ultrabright, room-temperature, photostable single-photon sources in a device-friendly material, silicon carbide (SiC). The source is composed of an intrinsic defect, known as the carbon antisite-vacancy pair, created by carefully optimized electron irradiation and annealing of ultrapure SiC. An extreme brightness (2×10(6) counts s(-1)) resulting from polarization rules and a high quantum efficiency is obtained in the bulk without resorting to the use of a cavity or plasmonic structure. This may benefit future integrated quantum photonic devices. PMID:24240243

  14. Gradient limitations in room temperature and superconducting acceleration structures

    SciTech Connect

    Solyak, N.A.; /Fermilab

    2008-10-01

    Accelerating gradient is a key parameter of the accelerating structure in large linac facilities, like future Linear Collider. In room temperature accelerating structures the gradient is limited mostly by breakdown phenomena, caused by high surface electric fields or pulse surface heating. High power processing is a necessary procedure to clean surface and improve the gradient. In the best tested X-band structures the achieved gradient is exceed 100 MV/m in of {approx}200 ns pulses for breakdown rate of {approx} 10{sup -7}. Gradient limit depends on number of factors and no one theory which can explain all sets of experimental results and predict gradient in new accelerating structure. In paper we briefly overview the recent experimental results of breakdown studies, progress in understanding of gradient limitations and scaling laws. Although superconducting rf technology has been adopted throughout the world for ILC, it has frequently been difficult to reach the predicted performance in these structures due to a number of factors: multipactoring, field emission, Q-slope, thermal breakdown. In paper we are discussing all these phenomena and the ways to increase accelerating gradient in SC cavity, which are a part of worldwide R&D program.

  15. Spontaneous Boron-doping of Graphene at Room Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Lida; Que, Yande; Du, Shixuan; Gao, Hongjun; Pantelides, Sokrates T.

    2015-03-01

    Doping graphene with boron or nitrogen is an effective way to modify its electronic properties. However, the reaction barrier for introducing these impurities is quite high, making the doping process difficult. In this work, we propose a low-energy reaction route derived from first-principles calculations and subsequently validated by experiments. The calculations show that, when graphene is placed on a ruthenium substrate and exposed to atomic boron, boron atoms can incorporate substitutionally into the graphene sheet with an energy barrier about 0.1 eV, displacing carbon atoms below the graphene sheet where they migrates away. This result suggests that spontaneous doping by boron can take place at room temperature. Following the prediction, we grew high-quality graphene on the Ru(0001) surface and then expose it to B2H6 which decomposes into atomic boron. XPS and STM results indicate that boron dopes graphene substantially without disturbing the graphene lattice, confirming the theoretical predictions. Doping by nitrogen and co-doping by B and N will also be discussed.

  16. Insulating room temperature ferromagnetic SrTiO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posadas, Agham; Mitra, Chandrima; Lin, Chungwei; Dhamdere, Ajit; Smith, David; Tsoi, Maxim; Demkov, Alex

    2013-03-01

    We report the epitaxial growth of ferromagnetic insulating material based on SrTiO3 using molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). SrTi1-xCoxO3-δ films (x = 0.1 to 0.5) were grown on Si(100) substrates via a buffer layer of four unit cells of undoped SrTiO3. The crystalline structure was characterized by reflection high energy electron diffraction, x-ray diffraction, and cross-section transmission electron microscopy. Robust room-temperature ferromagnetism is confirmed in samples with composition 30-40% Co. We also performed in situx-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of the Sr, Co, Ti, and O core levels to determine stoichiometry and cobalt oxidation state. In all single phase samples, an oxygen vacancy concentration of approximately equal to the amount of Co substitution was measured (compensated doping). In order to elucidate the origin of ferromagnetism, we also performed first-principles calculations of SrTiO3 simultaneously doped with Co and an oxygen vacancy. We find that such a configuration at concentrations of ~ 25% can result in a ferromagnetic insulating state with high spin Co2+. The ability to integrate an insulating ferromagnet on silicon in epitaxial form may potentially be useful for spin filtering and spin wave applications in the field of spintronics.

  17. Surface activation-based nanobonding and interconnection at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howlader, M. M. R.; Yamauchi, A.; Suga, T.

    2011-02-01

    Flip chip nanobonding and interconnect system (NBIS) equipment with high precision alignment has been developed based on the surface activated bonding method for high-density interconnection and MEMS packaging. The 3σ alignment accuracy in the IR transmission system was approximately ±0.2 µm. The performance of the NBIS has been preliminarily investigated through bonding between relatively rough surfaces of copper through silicon vias (Cu-TSVs) and gold-stud bumps (Au-SBs), and smooth surfaces of silicon wafers. The Cu-TSVs of 55 µm diameter and the Au-SBs of 35 µm diameter with ~6-10 nm surface roughness (RMS) were bonded at room temperature after surface activation using an argon fast atom beam (Ar-FAB) under 0.16 N per bump. Silicon wafers of 50 mm diameter with ~0.2 nm RMS surface roughness were bonded without heating after surface activation. Void-free interfaces both in Cu-TSV/Au-SB and silicon/silicon with bonding strength equivalent to bulk fracture of Au and silicon, respectively, were achieved. A few nm thick amorphous layers were observed across the silicon/silicon interface that was fabricated by the Ar-FAB. This study in the interconnection and bonding facilitates the required three-dimensional integration on the same surface for high-density electronic and biomedical systems.

  18. Room-temperature luminescence from kaolin induced by organic amines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyne, L. M.; Kloepping, R.; Pollack, G.

    1984-01-01

    Several new, room-temperature luminescent phenomena, resulting from the interaction of kaolin and various amino compounds, have been observed. The emission of light from kaolin pastes (treated with quinoline, pyridine, hydrazine, monoethanolamine, n-butylamine, and piperidine) was shown to decay monotonically over a period of hours to days. More light was released by a given amino compound after it was dried and purified. Hydrazine, in addition to the monotonically decaying photon release, produces delayed pulses of light with peak emission wavelength of 365 nm which last between several hours and several days. These photon bursts are acutely sensitive to the initial dryness of the hydrazine, both in the number of bursts and the integrated photon output. The amount of light and the capacity of the kaolin to produce the delayed burst appeared to be strongly dependent on preliminary heating and on gamma-irradiation, analogous to the dehydration-induced light pulse previously reported from the Ames Research Center. A small, delayed burst of photons occurred when piperidine and n-butylamine were removed by evaporation into an H2SO4 reservoir.

  19. Mesophases in nearly 2D room-temperature ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Manini, N; Cesaratto, M; Del Pópolo, M G; Ballone, P

    2009-11-26

    Computer simulations of (i) a [C(12)mim][Tf(2)N] film of nanometric thickness squeezed at kbar pressure by a piecewise parabolic confining potential reveal a mesoscopic in-plane density and composition modulation reminiscent of mesophases seen in 3D samples of the same room-temperature ionic liquid (RTIL). Near 2D confinement, enforced by a high normal load, as well as relatively long aliphatic chains are strictly required for the mesophase formation, as confirmed by computations for two related systems made of (ii) the same [C(12)mim][Tf(2)N] adsorbed at a neutral solid surface and (iii) a shorter-chain RTIL ([C(4)mim][Tf(2)N]) trapped in the potential well of part i. No in-plane modulation is seen for ii and iii. In case ii, the optimal arrangement of charge and neutral tails is achieved by layering parallel to the surface, while, in case iii, weaker dispersion and packing interactions are unable to bring aliphatic tails together into mesoscopic islands, against overwhelming entropy and Coulomb forces. The onset of in-plane mesophases could greatly affect the properties of long-chain RTILs used as lubricants. PMID:19886615

  20. Realization of Ground State Artificial Skyrmion Lattices at Room Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Dustin A.; Maranville, Brian B.; Balk, Andrew J.; Kirby, Brian J.; Pierce, Daniel T.; Unguris, John; Borchers, Julie A.; Fischer, Peter; Liu, Kai

    Artificial skyrmion lattices stable at ambient conditions offer a convenient and powerful platform to explore skyrmion physics and topological phenomena and motivates their inclusion in next-generation data and logic devices. In this work we present direct experimental evidence of artificial skyrmion lattices with a stable ground state at room temperature. Our approach is to pattern vortex-state Co nanodots (560 nm diameter) in hexagonal arrays on top of a Co/Pd multilayer with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy; the skyrmion state is prepared using a specific magnetic field sequence. Ion irradiation has been employed to suppress PMA in the underlayer and allow imprinting of the vortex structure from the nanodots to form skyrmion lattices, as revealed by polarized neutron reflectometry. Circularity control is realized through Co dot shape asymmetry, and confirmed by microscopy and FORC magnetometry. The vortex polarity is set during the field sequence and confirmed by magnetometry. Spin-transport studies further demonstrate a sensitivity to the skyrmion spin texture.Work supported by NSF (DMR-1008791, ECCS-1232275 and DMR-1543582)

  1. Water-driven structure transformation in nanoparticles at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hengzhong; Gilbert, Benjamin; Huang, Feng; Banfield, Jillian F

    2003-08-28

    The thermodynamic behaviour of small particles differs from that of the bulk material by the free energy term gammaA--the product of the surface (or interfacial) free energy and the surface (or interfacial) area. When the surfaces of polymorphs of the same material possess different interfacial free energies, a change in phase stability can occur with decreasing particle size. Here we describe a nanoparticle system that undergoes structural changes in response to changes in the surface environment rather than particle size. ZnS nanoparticles (average diameter 3 nm) were synthesized in methanol and found to exhibit a reversible structural transformation accompanying methanol desorption, indicating that the particles readily adopt minimum energy structural configurations. The binding of water to the as-formed particles at room temperature leads to a dramatic structural modification, significantly reducing distortions of the surface and interior to generate a structure close to that of sphalerite (tetrahedrally coordinated cubic ZnS). These findings suggest a route for post-synthesis control of nanoparticle structure and the potential use of the nanoparticle structural state as an environmental sensor. Furthermore, the results imply that the structure and reactivity of nanoparticles at planetary surfaces, in interplanetary dust and in the biosphere, will depend on both particle size and the nature of the surrounding molecules. PMID:12944961

  2. Proactive aquatic ecotoxicological assessment of room-temperature ionic liquids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kulacki, K.J.; Chaloner, D.T.; Larson, J.H.; Costello, D.M.; Evans-White, M. A.; Docherty, K.M.; Bernot, R.J.; Brueseke, M.A.; Kulpa, C.F.; Lamberti, G.A.

    2011-01-01

    Aquatic environments are being contaminated with a myriad of anthropogenic chemicals, a problem likely to continue due to both unintentional and intentional releases. To protect valuable natural resources, novel chemicals should be shown to be environmentally safe prior to use and potential release into the environment. Such proactive assessment is currently being applied to room-temperature ionic liquids (ILs). Because most ILs are water-soluble, their effects are likely to manifest in aquatic ecosystems. Information on the impacts of ILs on numerous aquatic organisms, focused primarily on acute LC50 and EC50 endpoints, is now available, and trends in toxicity are emerging. Cation structure tends to influence IL toxicity more so than anion structure, and within a cation class, the length of alkyl chain substituents is positively correlated with toxicity. While the effects of ILs on several aquatic organisms have been studied, the challenge for aquatic toxicology is now to predict the effects of ILs in complex natural environments that often include diverse mixtures of organisms, abiotic conditions, and additional stressors. To make robust predictions about ILs will require coupling of ecologically realistic laboratory and field experiments with standard toxicity bioassays and models. Such assessments would likely discourage the development of especially toxic ILs while shifting focus to those that are more environmentally benign. Understanding the broader ecological effects of emerging chemicals, incorporating that information into predictive models, and conveying the conclusions to those who develop, regulate, and use those chemicals, should help avoid future environmental degradation. ?? 2011 Bentham Science Publishers Ltd.

  3. Cross-linking of polytetrafluoroethylene during room-temperature irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Pugmire, David L; Wetteland, Chris J; Duncan, Wanda S; Lakis, Rollin E; Schwartz, Daniel S

    2008-01-01

    Exposure of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) to {alpha}-radiation was investigated to detennine the physical and chemical effects, as well as to compare and contrast the damage mechanisms with other radiation types ({beta}, {gamma}, or thermal neutron). A number of techniques were used to investigate the chemical and physical changes in PTFE after exposure to {alpha}-radiation. These techniques include: Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and fluorescence spectroscopy. Similar to other radiation types at low doses, the primary damage mechanism for the exposure of PTFE to {alpha}-radiation appears to be chain scission. Increased doses result in a change-over of the damage mechanism to cross-linking. This result is not observed for any radiation type other than {alpha} when irradiation is performed at room temperature. Finally, at high doses, PTFE undergoes mass-loss (via smallfluorocarbon species evolution) and defluorination. The amount and type of damage versus sample depth was also investigated. Other types of radiation yield damage at depths on the order of mm to cm into PTFE due to low linear energy transfer (LET) and the correspondingly large penetration depths. By contrast, the {alpha}-radiation employed in this study was shown to only induce damage to a depth of approximately 26 {mu}m, except at very high doses.

  4. Microstructure of room temperature ionic liquids at stepped graphite electrodes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Feng, Guang; Li, Song; Zhao, Wei; Cummings, Peter T.

    2015-07-14

    Molecular dynamics simulations of room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) [emim][TFSI] at stepped graphite electrodes were performed to investigate the influence of the thickness of the electrode surface step on the microstructure of interfacial RTILs. A strong correlation was observed between the interfacial RTIL structure and the step thickness in electrode surface as well as the ion size. Specifically, when the step thickness is commensurate with ion size, the interfacial layering of cation/anion is more evident; whereas, the layering tends to be less defined when the step thickness is close to the half of ion size. Furthermore, two-dimensional microstructure of ionmore » layers exhibits different patterns and alignments of counter-ion/co-ion lattice at neutral and charged electrodes. As the cation/anion layering could impose considerable effects on ion diffusion, the detailed information of interfacial RTILs at stepped graphite presented here would help to understand the molecular mechanism of RTIL-electrode interfaces in supercapacitors.« less

  5. Controlled synthesis of pentagonal gold nanotubes at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Bi, Yingpu; Lu, Gongxuan

    2008-07-01

    Large quantities of pentagonal gold nanotubes have been synthesized by reducing chloroauric acid with silver nanowires in an aqueous solution of hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) at room temperature. These gold nanotubes possess perfect structures, smooth surfaces, highly crystalline walls, and similar cross-sections to that of the silver template. In this process, the CTAB participation was found to be crucial for shape-controlled synthesis of pentagonal gold nanotubes. In the absence of CTAB, loose and hollow gold structures were routinely generated, while bundled gold nanotubes with rough surfaces were obtained by replacing the CTAB with poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP). The possible formation mechanism of pentagonal gold nanotubes has also been discussed on the basis of various growth stages studied by field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) images. In addition, the catalytic properties of these hollow nanostructures for hydrogen generation reaction from HCHO solution have also been investigated. They showed higher activity than that of spherical gold nanoparticles. PMID:21828702

  6. Manganese perovskites for room temperature magnetic refrigeration applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phan, Manh-Huong; Peng, Hua-Xin; Yu, Seong-Cho; Tho, Nguyen Duc; Nhat, Hoang Nam; Chau, Nguyen

    2007-09-01

    We found the large magnetocaloric effect (MCE) in La 0.6Ca 0.3Pb 0.1MnO 3 (sample No. 1), La 0.7Ca 0.2Pb 0.1MnO 3 (sample No. 2), and La 0.7Ca 0.1Pb 0.2MnO 3 (sample No. 3) perovskites, which were prepared by a conventional ceramic method. For a magnetic field change of 13.5 kOe, the magnetic entropy change (Δ SM) reached values of 2.55, 2.53 and 3.72 J/kg K for samples Nos. 1, 2 and 3, respectively. Interestingly, the large Δ SM was found to occur around 300 K for all samples investigated, which allows magnetic refrigeration at room temperature. These perovskites have the large magnetic entropy changes induced by low magnetic field change, which is beneficial for the household application of active magnetic refrigerant (AMR) materials.

  7. Above-room-temperature ferroelectricity and antiferroelectricity in benzimidazoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horiuchi, Sachio; Kagawa, Fumitaka; Hatahara, Kensuke; Kobayashi, Kensuke; Kumai, Reiji; Murakami, Youichi; Tokura, Yoshinori

    2012-12-01

    The imidazole unit is chemically stable and ubiquitous in biological systems; its proton donor and acceptor moieties easily bind molecules into a dipolar chain. Here we demonstrate that chains of these amphoteric molecules can often be bistable in electric polarity and electrically switchable, even in the crystalline state, through proton tautomerization. Polarization-electric field (P-E) hysteresis experiments reveal a high electric polarization ranging from 5 to 10 μC cm-2 at room temperature. Of these molecules, 2-methylbenzimidazole allows ferroelectric switching in two dimensions due to its pseudo-tetragonal crystal symmetry. The ferroelectricity is also thermally robust up to 400 K, as is that of 5,6-dichloro-2-methylbenzimidazole (up to ~373 K). In contrast, three other benzimidazoles exhibit double P-E hysteresis curves characteristic of antiferroelectricity. The diversity of imidazole substituents is likely to stimulate a systematic exploration of various structure-property relationships and domain engineering in the quest for lead- and rare-metal-free ferroelectric devices.

  8. Investigation of structure and magnetoresistance in Co/ZnO films

    SciTech Connect

    Quan Zhiyong; Xu Xiaohong; Li Xiaoli; Feng, Q.; Gehring, G. A.

    2010-11-15

    Co/ZnO films were deposited on glass substrates by magnetron sputtering at room temperature. The structure of the as-deposited films is studied by means of x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and the zero-field-cooled and field-cooled magnetization curves. It is shown that the as-deposited samples consist of a mixture of regions of metallic Co and semiconducting ZnO. Large negative magnetoresistance of 26% and 11.9% are observed in the as-deposited Co/ZnO film with Co concentration of 50.7 at. % at 10 K and room temperature, respectively. Structural analysis, the temperature dependence of the conductivity and magnetoresistance reveal that the magnetoresistance is induced by spin-dependent tunneling between regions of conducting magnetic Co through the ZnO semiconducting barriers. The enhanced magnetoresistance in the low temperature regime may be related to the existence of higher-order tunneling processes between large Co regions mediated by small Co particles.

  9. Phosphonium chloromercurate room temperature ionic liquids of variable composition.

    PubMed

    Metlen, Andreas; Mallick, Bert; Murphy, Richard W; Mudring, Anja-Verena; Rogers, Robin D

    2013-12-16

    The system trihexyl(tetradecyl)phosphonium ([P66614]Cl)/mercury chloride (HgCl2) has been investigated by varying the stoichiometric ratios from 4:1 to 1:2 (25, 50, 75, 100, 150, and 200 mol % HgCl2). All investigated compositions turn out to give rise to ionic liquids (ILs) at room temperature. The prepared ionic liquids offer the possibility to study the structurally and compositionally versatile chloromercurates in a liquid state at low temperatures in the absence of solvents. [P66614]2[HgCl4] is a simple IL with one discrete type of anion, while [P66614]{HgCl3} (with {} indicating a polynuclear arrangement) is an ionic liquid with a variety of polyanionic species, with [Hg2Cl6](2-) apparently being the predominant building block. [P66614]2[Hg3Cl8] and [P66614][Hg2Cl5] appear to be ILs at ambient conditions but lose HgCl2 when heated in a vacuum. For the liquids with the compositions 4:1 and 4:3, more than two discrete ions can be evidenced, namely, [P66614](+), [HgCl4](2-), and Cl(-) and [P66614](+), [HgCl4](2-), and the polynuclear {HgCl3}(-), respectively. The different stoichiometric compositions were characterized by (199)Hg NMR, Raman- and UV-vis spectroscopy, and cyclic voltammetry, among other techniques, and their densities and viscosities were determined. The [P66614]Cl/HgCl2 system shows similarities to the well-known chloroaluminate ILs (e.g., decrease in viscosity with increasing metal content after addition of more than 0.5 mol of HgCl2/mol [P66614]Cl, increasing density with increasing metal content, and the likely formation of polynuclear/polymeric/polyanionic species) but offer the advantage that they are air and water stable. PMID:24274831

  10. Instantaneous radioiodination of rose bengal at room temperature and a cold kit therefor

    DOEpatents

    O'Brien, Jr., Harold A.; Hupf, Homer B.; Wanek, Philip M.

    1981-01-01

    The disclosure relates to the radioiodination of rose bengal at room temperature and a cold-kit therefor. A purified rose bengal tablet is stirred into acidified ethanol at or near room temperature, until a suspension forms. Reductant-free .sup.125 I.sup.- is added and the resulting mixture stands until the exchange label reaction occurs at room temperature. A solution of sterile isotonic phosphate buffer and sodium hydroxide is added and the final resulting mixture is sterilized by filtration.

  11. Negative magnetoresistance in a low-k dielectric

    SciTech Connect

    McGowan, B. T.; Lloyd, J. R.

    2014-12-22

    We observed negative magnetoresistance in amorphous SiCOH, a low-k dielectric, applying modest magnetic fields (<150 Gauss) at room temperature. The conductivity increases with increasing magnetic field. The change in conductivity due to the applied magnetic field increases with electric field and has little or no temperature dependence over the range studied. The magnitude of the effect is independent of the orientation of magnetic field relative to the direction of current flow. The effect is attributed to spin constraints associated with double occupancy of a trap site under the assumption that trap sites which have double occupancy have lower hopping frequencies than traps that have single occupancy.

  12. A Variable Temperature Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction Study of Colossal Magnetoresistant NdMnAsO0.95F0.05

    PubMed Central

    Wildman, E. J.; Mclaughlin, A. C.

    2016-01-01

    The recent discovery of high temperature superconductivity in Fe arsenides has invigorated research into transition metal pnictides. Colossal magnetoresistance (CMR) has recently been reported for NdMnAsO1-xFx for x = 0.05–0.08, with a maximum magnetoresistance achieved at low temperature (MR9T(3 K)) = −95%). This appears to be a novel mechanism of CMR, which is as a result of a second order phase transition in field from an insulating antiferromagnet to a semiconducting paramagnet. Here we report a variable temperature synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction study of the CMR oxypnictide NdMnAsO0.95F0.05 between 4 K–290 K. An excellent fit to the tetragonal unit cell with space group P4/nmm is obtained over the entire temperature range, with no change in crystal structure detected down to 4 K. A coupling of the lattice and magnetic order is observed, where subtle discontinuities in the temperature variation of a and the c/a ratio are apparent as the Nd spins order antiferromagnetically and the Mn moments reorient into the basal plane at TSR. The results suggest that very small changes in lattice parameters effect the coupling between lattice, electronic and magnetic degrees of freedom. PMID:26875693

  13. A Variable Temperature Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction Study of Colossal Magnetoresistant NdMnAsO0.95F0.05.

    PubMed

    Wildman, E J; Mclaughlin, A C

    2016-01-01

    The recent discovery of high temperature superconductivity in Fe arsenides has invigorated research into transition metal pnictides. Colossal magnetoresistance (CMR) has recently been reported for NdMnAsO1-xFx for x = 0.05-0.08, with a maximum magnetoresistance achieved at low temperature (MR9T(3 K)) = -95%). This appears to be a novel mechanism of CMR, which is as a result of a second order phase transition in field from an insulating antiferromagnet to a semiconducting paramagnet. Here we report a variable temperature synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction study of the CMR oxypnictide NdMnAsO0.95F0.05 between 4 K-290 K. An excellent fit to the tetragonal unit cell with space group P4/nmm is obtained over the entire temperature range, with no change in crystal structure detected down to 4 K. A coupling of the lattice and magnetic order is observed, where subtle discontinuities in the temperature variation of a and the c/a ratio are apparent as the Nd spins order antiferromagnetically and the Mn moments reorient into the basal plane at TSR. The results suggest that very small changes in lattice parameters effect the coupling between lattice, electronic and magnetic degrees of freedom. PMID:26875693

  14. A Variable Temperature Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction Study of Colossal Magnetoresistant NdMnAsO0.95F0.05

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wildman, E. J.; McLaughlin, A. C.

    2016-02-01

    The recent discovery of high temperature superconductivity in Fe arsenides has invigorated research into transition metal pnictides. Colossal magnetoresistance (CMR) has recently been reported for NdMnAsO1-xFx for x = 0.05-0.08, with a maximum magnetoresistance achieved at low temperature (MR9T(3 K)) = -95%). This appears to be a novel mechanism of CMR, which is as a result of a second order phase transition in field from an insulating antiferromagnet to a semiconducting paramagnet. Here we report a variable temperature synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction study of the CMR oxypnictide NdMnAsO0.95F0.05 between 4 K-290 K. An excellent fit to the tetragonal unit cell with space group P4/nmm is obtained over the entire temperature range, with no change in crystal structure detected down to 4 K. A coupling of the lattice and magnetic order is observed, where subtle discontinuities in the temperature variation of a and the c/a ratio are apparent as the Nd spins order antiferromagnetically and the Mn moments reorient into the basal plane at TSR. The results suggest that very small changes in lattice parameters effect the coupling between lattice, electronic and magnetic degrees of freedom.

  15. Insensitivity of tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance to non-magnetic electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y. Y.; Song, C. Wang, G. Y.; Zeng, F.; Pan, F.

    2013-11-11

    Ferromagnetic electrodes play a crucial role in magnetoresistance effect and spin injection, whereas the essential features of non-magnetic metal electrodes in spintronics are commonly ignored except for their electrical conductivity. Here, we verify that the room-temperature tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance (TAMR) behavior in antiferromagnet-based [Pt/Co]/IrMn/AlO{sub x}/metal (metal = Pt, Au, Cu, Al) junctions is insensitive to the top metal electrodes. Similar out-of-plane signals are detected for different electrodes, in contrast to the varied shapes of in-plane TAMR curves which are most likely attributed to the differences in the multidomain structure of the magnetic electrode. This would add a different dimension to spintronics.

  16. Room temperature single-photon detectors for high bit rate quantum key distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Comandar, L. C.; Patel, K. A.; Fröhlich, B. Lucamarini, M.; Sharpe, A. W.; Dynes, J. F.; Yuan, Z. L.; Shields, A. J.; Penty, R. V.

    2014-01-13

    We report room temperature operation of telecom wavelength single-photon detectors for high bit rate quantum key distribution (QKD). Room temperature operation is achieved using InGaAs avalanche photodiodes integrated with electronics based on the self-differencing technique that increases avalanche discrimination sensitivity. Despite using room temperature detectors, we demonstrate QKD with record secure bit rates over a range of fiber lengths (e.g., 1.26 Mbit/s over 50 km). Furthermore, our results indicate that operating the detectors at room temperature increases the secure bit rate for short distances.

  17. Room-temperature macromolecular serial crystallography using synchrotron radiation.

    PubMed

    Stellato, Francesco; Oberthür, Dominik; Liang, Mengning; Bean, Richard; Gati, Cornelius; Yefanov, Oleksandr; Barty, Anton; Burkhardt, Anja; Fischer, Pontus; Galli, Lorenzo; Kirian, Richard A; Meyer, Jan; Panneerselvam, Saravanan; Yoon, Chun Hong; Chervinskii, Fedor; Speller, Emily; White, Thomas A; Betzel, Christian; Meents, Alke; Chapman, Henry N

    2014-07-01

    A new approach for collecting data from many hundreds of thousands of microcrystals using X-ray pulses from a free-electron laser has recently been developed. Referred to as serial crystallography, diffraction patterns are recorded at a constant rate as a suspension of protein crystals flows across the path of an X-ray beam. Events that by chance contain single-crystal diffraction patterns are retained, then indexed and merged to form a three-dimensional set of reflection intensities for structure determination. This approach relies upon several innovations: an intense X-ray beam; a fast detector system; a means to rapidly flow a suspension of crystals across the X-ray beam; and the computational infrastructure to process the large volume of data. Originally conceived for radiation-damage-free measurements with ultrafast X-ray pulses, the same methods can be employed with synchrotron radiation. As in powder diffraction, the averaging of thousands of observations per Bragg peak may improve the ratio of signal to noise of low-dose exposures. Here, it is shown that this paradigm can be implemented for room-temperature data collection using synchrotron radiation and exposure times of less than 3 ms. Using lysozyme microcrystals as a model system, over 40 000 single-crystal diffraction patterns were obtained and merged to produce a structural model that could be refined to 2.1 Å resolution. The resulting electron density is in excellent agreement with that obtained using standard X-ray data collection techniques. With further improvements the method is well suited for even shorter exposures at future and upgraded synchrotron radiation facilities that may deliver beams with 1000 times higher brightness than they currently produce. PMID:25075341

  18. Synthesis of tin nanocrystals in room temperature ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Le Vot, Steven; Dambournet, Damien; Groult, Henri; Ngo, Anh-tu; Petit, Christophe; Rizzi, Cécile; Salzemann, Caroline; Sirieix-Plenet, Juliette; Borkiewicz, Olaf J; Raymundo-Piñero, Encarnación; Gaillon, Laurent

    2014-12-28

    The aim of this work was to investigate the synthesis of tin nanoparticles (NPs) or tin/carbon composites, in room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs), that could be used as structured anode materials for Li-ion batteries. An innovative route for the synthesis of Sn nanoparticles in such media is successfully developed. Compositions, structures, sizes and morphologies of NPs were characterized by high-energy X-ray diffraction (HEXRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). Our findings indicated that (i) metallic tetragonal β-Sn was obtained and (ii) the particle size could be tailored by tuning the nature of the RTILs, leading to nano-sized spherical particles with a diameter ranging from 3 to 10 nm depending on synthesis conditions. In order to investigate carbon composite materials for Li-ion batteries, Sn nanoparticles were successfully deposited on the surface of multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT). Moreover, electrochemical properties have been studied in relation to a structural study of the nanocomposites. The poor electrochemical performances as a negative electrode in Li-ion batteries is due to a significant amount of RTIL trapped within the pores of the nanotubes as revealed by XPS investigations. This dramatically affected the gravimetric capacity of the composites and limited the diffusion of lithium. The findings of this work however offer valuable insights into the exciting possibilities for synthesis of novel nano-sized particles and/or alloys (e.g. Sn-Cu, Sn-Co, Sn-Ni, etc.) and the importance of carbon morphology in metal pulverization during the alloying/dealloying process as well as prevention of ionic liquid trapping. PMID:25352309

  19. Room temperature molten salt electrolytes for photoelectrochemical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Rajeshwar, K.; DuBow, J.; Singh, P.

    1982-08-01

    Mixtures of aluminum chloride (AlCl/sub 3/) with triethylammonium chloride 1,6-ethyl lutidinium bromide (EtluBr), tert-butyl pyridinium bromide (BPBr), and dialkyl imidazolium chloride (R/sub 2/ImCl), in certain molar ratios yielded ionic liquids at room temperature which were studied with respect to their applicability as electrolytes in photoelectrochemical (PEC) cells. Background voltammograms were obtained for these electrolytes on carbon and n-GaAs electrodes. The anodic stability limit was found to be enhanced on n-GaAs relative to carbon in all cases. The cathodic decomposition potential of the electrolyte showed a smaller positive shift on n-GaAs with the exception of the 3:1 AlCl/sub 3/ BPBr electrolyte. The difference in electrolyte stability behavior on carbon and n-GaAs is interpreted in terms of carrier density effects. Cyclic voltammograms were compared on carbon in the various electrolytes for a model redox system comprising the ferrocene/ferricenium couple. The separation of the cathodic and anodic waves in all the cases was consistent with a quasi-reversible redox behavior--the most sluggish electron transfer being observed in the case of the 3:1 AlCl/sub 3/-BpBr electrolyte. Capacitance-voltage measurements were made on n-GaAs electrodes in contact with the various electrolytes. Flatband-potentials (V /SUB fb/) were deduced from these data using Mott-Schottky plots. The implications of this result for PEC applications and the role of specific ion adsorption of electrolyte species on the electrostatic aspects of the n-GaAs/molten salt electrolyte-interface are discussed with the aid of energy band diagrams.

  20. Numerical simulation of the magnetoresistance effect controlled by electric field in p–n junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yang; Wen-Jie, Chen; Jiao, Wang; Zhao-Wen, Yan; Jian-Li, Qiao; Tong, Xiao; Xin, Wang; Zheng-Peng, Pang; Jian-Hong, Yang

    2016-04-01

    The magnetoresistance effect of a p–n junction under an electric field which is introduced by the gate voltage at room temperature is investigated by simulation. As auxiliary models, the Lombardi CVT model and carrier generation-recombination model are introduced into a drift-diffusion transport model and carrier continuity equations. All the equations are discretized by the finite-difference method and the box integration method and then solved by Newton iteration. Taking advantage of those models and methods, an abrupt junction with uniform doping is studied systematically, and the magnetoresistance as a function of doping concentration, SiO2 thickness and geometrical size is also investigated. The simulation results show that the magnetoresistance (MR) can be controlled substantially by the gate and is dependent on the polarity of the magnetic field.

  1. Tunnel anisotropic magnetoresistance in CoFeB|MgO|Ta junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Hatanaka, S.; Miwa, S. Matsuda, K.; Nawaoka, K.; Tanaka, K.; Morishita, H.; Goto, M.; Mizuochi, N.; Shinjo, T.; Suzuki, Y.

    2015-08-24

    We found that CoFeB|MgO|Ta tunnel junctions exhibit tunnel anisotropic magnetoresistance (TAMR) at room temperature. The tunnel junctions exhibit positive magnetoresistance with the application of a magnetic field normal to the film plane. The dependencies on the applied magnetic field angle and MgO thickness reveal that the magnetoresistance originates from the TAMR, caused by the spin polarization and the spin-orbit interaction at the CoFeB|MgO interface. We also found that the TAMR can be used to detect ferromagnetic resonance in the CoFeB. This detection method could be useful for the characterization of nanomagnets that are free from the spin-transfer effect and the stray field of a reference layer, unlike conventional magnetic tunnel junctions.

  2. Robust isothermal electric control of exchange bias at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binek, Christian

    2011-03-01

    Voltage-controlled spintronics is of particular importance to continue progress in information technology through reduced power consumption, enhanced processing speed, integration density, and functionality in comparison with present day CMOS electronics. Almost all existing and prototypical solid-state spintronic devices rely on tailored interface magnetism, enabling spin-selective transmission or scattering of electrons. Controlling magnetism at thin-film interfaces, preferably by purely electrical means, is a key challenge to better spintronics. Currently, most attempts to electrically control magnetism focus on potentially large magnetoelectric effects of multiferroics. We report on our interest in magnetoelectric Cr 2 O3 (chromia). Robust isothermal electric control of exchange bias is achieved at room temperature in perpendicular anisotropic Cr 2 O3 (0001)/CoPd exchange bias heterostructures. This discovery promises significant implications for potential spintronics. From the perspective of basic science, our finding serves as macroscopic evidence for roughness-insensitive and electrically controllable equilibrium boundary magnetization in magnetoelectric antiferromagnets. The latter evolves at chromia (0001) surfaces and interfaces when chromia is in one of its two degenerate antiferromagnetic single domain states selected via magnetoelectric annealing. Theoretical insight into the boundary magnetization and its role in electrically controlled exchange bias is gained from first-principles calculations and general symmetry arguments. Measurements of spin-resolved ultraviolet photoemission, magnetometry at Cr 2 O3 (0001) surfaces, and detailed investigations of the unique exchange bias properties of Cr 2 O3 (0001)/CoPd including its electric controllability provide macroscopically averaged information about the boundary magnetization of chromia. Laterally resolved X-ray PEEM and temperature dependent MFM reveal detailed microscopic information of the chromia

  3. Characterization and Application of Large Magnetoresistance in Organic Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohlgenannt, Markus

    2007-03-01

    Recent years have seen a surge in interest in magnetoresistive and spintronic properties of organic semiconductors, whereas this field was previously almost exclusively concerned with their electrooptical properties. We report on the extensive experimental characterization of a recently discovered large and intriguing magnetoresistive effect in organic light- emitting diodes that reaches up to 10% at room temperature for magnetic fields, B = 10mT. This magnetoresistive effect is therefore amongst the largest of any bulk material. The study includes a range of materials that show greatly different chemical structure, mobility, hyperfine and spin-orbit coupling strength. We show that the applied magnetic field affects the carrier transport inside the bulk semiconductor. By demonstrating that the effect is critically altered by the presence of strong spin- orbit coupling and that it does not occur in fullerene devices, we prove that the transport in organics sensitively depends on spin-dynamics induced by hyperfine interaction with the hydrogen protons. We discuss a possible relation between organic magnetoresistance and other magnetic field effects in organics that were known long before its discovery. As a possible mechanism we describe how Pauli's principle restricts carrier hopping between singly occupied sites near the Fermi level. However, spin-mixing by the hyperfine interaction may partially lift this restriction. Since the devices we describe can be manufactured cheaply they hold promise for applications where large numbers of magnetoresistive devices are needed, such as magnetic random- access-memory (MRAM); and applications related to organic light- emitting diode displays such as touch screens where the position of a magnetic stylus is detected (patent pending). We will show a video of a simple demonstrator device.

  4. Ordered iron aluminide alloys having an improved room-temperature ductility and method thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V.K.

    1992-01-28

    This patent describes a method for improving the room temperature ductility and high temperature strength of iron aluminide intermetallic alloys. It comprises: thermomechanically working of the alloys ; heating the alloys; and rapidly cooling the alloys.

  5. N2-broadening coefficients of methyl chloride at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bray, C.; Jacquemart, D.; Buldyreva, J.; Lacome, N.; Perrin, A.

    2012-07-01

    Methyl chloride is of interest for atmospheric applications, since this molecule is directly involved in the catalytic destruction of ozone in the lower stratosphere. In a previous work [Bray et al. JQSRT 2011;112:2446], lines positions and intensities of self-perturbed 12CH335Cl and 12CH337Cl have been studied into details for the 3.4 μm spectral region. The present work is focused on measurement and calculation of N2-broadening coefficients of the 12CH335Cl and 12CH337Cl isotopologues. High-resolution Fourier Transform spectra of CH3Cl-N2 mixtures at room-temperature have been recorded between 2800 and 3200 cm-1 at LADIR (using a classical source) and between 47 and 59 cm-1 at SOLEIL (using the synchrotron source on the AILES beamline). 612 mid-infrared transitions of the ν1 band and 86 far-infrared transitions of the pure rotational band have been analyzed using a multispectrum fitting procedure. Average accuracy on the deduced N2-broadening coefficients has been estimated to 5% and 10% in the mid- and far-infrared spectral regions, respectively. The J- and K-rotational dependences of these coefficients have been observed in the mid-infrared region and then a simulation has been performed using an empirical model for 0≤J≤50, K≤9. The 12CH335Cl-N2 line widths for 0≤J≤50 and K≤10 of the ν1 band and for 55≤J≤67 and K≤15 of the pure rotational band have been computed using a semi-classical approach involving exact trajectories and a real symmetric-top geometry of the active molecule. Finally, a global comparison with the experimental and theoretical data existing in the literature has been performed. Similar J- and K-rotational dependences have been appeared while no clear evidence for any vibrational or isotopic dependences have been pointed out.

  6. High energy sodium based room temperature flow batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamie, Jack

    As novel energy sources such as solar, wind and tidal energies are explored it becomes necessary to build energy storage facilities to load level the intermittent nature of these energy sources. Energy storage is achieved by converting electrical energy into another form of energy. Batteries have many properties that are attractive for energy storage including high energy and power. Among many different types of batteries, redox flow batteries (RFBs) offer many advantages. Unlike conventional batteries, RFBs store energy in a liquid medium rather than solid active materials. This method of storage allows for the separation of energy and power unlike conventional batteries. Additionally flow batteries may have long lifetimes because there is no expansion or contraction of electrodes. A major disadvantage of RFB's is its lower energy density when compared to traditional batteries. In this Thesis, a novel hybrid Na-based redox flow battery (HNFB) is explored, which utilizes a room temperature molten sodium based anode, a sodium ion conducting solid electrolyte and liquid catholytes. The sodium electrode leads to high voltages and energy and allows for the possibility of multi-electron transfer per molecule. Vanadium acetylacetonate (acac) and TEMPO have been investigated for their use as catholytes. In the vanadium system, 2 electrons transfers per vanadium atom were found leading to a doubling of capacity. In addition, degradation of the charged state was found to be reversible within the voltage range of the cell. Contamination by water leads to the formation of vanadyl acetylacetonate. Although it is believed that vanadyl complex need to be taken to low voltages to be reduced back to vanadium acac, a new mechanism is shown that begins at higher voltages (2.1V). Vanadyl complexes react with excess ligand and protons to reform the vanadium complex. During this reaction, water is reformed leading to the continuous cycle in which vanadyl is formed and then reduced back

  7. Tomographic reconstruction of indoor spatial temperature distributions using room impulse responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleisteiner, M.; Barth, M.; Raabe, A.

    2016-03-01

    Temperature can be estimated by acoustic travel time measurements along known sound paths. By using a multitude of known sound paths in combination with a tomographic reconstruction technique a spatial and temporal resolution of the temperature field can be achieved. Based on it, this article focuses on an experimental method in order to determine the spatially differentiated development of room temperature with only one loudspeaker and one microphone. The theory of geometrical room acoustics is being used to identify sound paths under consideration of reflections. The travel time along a specific sound path is derived from the room impulse response. Temporal variances in room impulse response can be attributed primarily to a change in air temperature and airflow. It is shown that in the absence of airflow a 3D acoustic monitoring of the room temperature can be realized with a fairly limited use of hardware.

  8. Applications of room temperature ionic liquids in interfacial polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Lining

    2006-12-01

    Room temperature ionic liquids (ILs), with their unique physical and chemical properties, have been of great interest in various areas of chemical science and engineering during the last decade. In this dissertation, polyurea and polyamide films with surface nanostructures were synthesized by interfacial polymerization (IP) with ILs without stirring. Both polymers were prepared at the interface between n-hexane and a series of 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium ILs. Nanoporous or nanofibrous polymer morphologies with various sizes ranging from 50 to 500 nm and geometries, depending on the ILs used, were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). A correlation length of ˜20nm and a suppression of three-dimensional (3-D) crystalline structure of the polyurea were found by small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively. FTIR spectra showed no significant changes in the chemical composition of the polymer by the employment of ILs. The peculiar nanostructure of the polymer could be ascribed to the intermolecular interactions between the ILs and the polymer, which affected the development of the polymer morphology. The polyamides prepared with ILs showed larger intrinsic viscosities, and consequently higher molecular weights, compared to the one prepared without ILs; this could be due to the prevention of the side reaction between sebacoyl chloride and water. The enhancement of the molecular weight renders a better thermal stability to the polyamide film, as revealed by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) which showed a higher decomposition temperature. Coating of fine particulates with polyurea by IP has been developed. With increasing stirring speed in the coating process, a decreased mean particle size and a narrower particle size distribution, as well as a lower coating weight percentage were found by particle size analysis and TGA, respectively. A Porous coating layer was formed in the IP coating in the presence of ILs. The reaction

  9. Negative magnetoresistance in Dirac semimetal Cd3As2.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; He, Hongtao; Lu, Hai-Zhou; Zhang, Huachen; Liu, Hongchao; Ma, Rong; Fan, Zhiyong; Shen, Shun-Qing; Wang, Jiannong

    2016-01-01

    A large negative magnetoresistance (NMR) is anticipated in topological semimetals in parallel magnetic fields, demonstrating the chiral anomaly, a long-sought high-energy-physics effect, in solid-state systems. Recent experiments reveal that the Dirac semimetal Cd3As2 has the record-high mobility and positive linear magnetoresistance in perpendicular magnetic fields. However, the NMR has not yet been unveiled. Here we report the observation of NMR in Cd3As2 microribbons in parallel magnetic fields up to 66% at 50 K and visible at room temperatures. The NMR is sensitive to the angle between magnetic and electrical fields, robust against temperature and dependent on the carrier density. The large NMR results from low carrier densities in our Cd3As2 samples, ranging from 3.0 × 10(17) cm(-3) at 300 K to 2.2 × 10(16) cm(-3) below 50 K. We therefore attribute the observed NMR to the chiral anomaly. In perpendicular magnetic fields, a positive linear magnetoresistance up to 1,670% at 14 T and 2 K is also observed. PMID:26744088

  10. Negative magnetoresistance in Dirac semimetal Cd3As2

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui; He, Hongtao; Lu, Hai-Zhou; Zhang, Huachen; Liu, Hongchao; Ma, Rong; Fan, Zhiyong; Shen, Shun-Qing; Wang, Jiannong

    2016-01-01

    A large negative magnetoresistance (NMR) is anticipated in topological semimetals in parallel magnetic fields, demonstrating the chiral anomaly, a long-sought high-energy-physics effect, in solid-state systems. Recent experiments reveal that the Dirac semimetal Cd3As2 has the record-high mobility and positive linear magnetoresistance in perpendicular magnetic fields. However, the NMR has not yet been unveiled. Here we report the observation of NMR in Cd3As2 microribbons in parallel magnetic fields up to 66% at 50 K and visible at room temperatures. The NMR is sensitive to the angle between magnetic and electrical fields, robust against temperature and dependent on the carrier density. The large NMR results from low carrier densities in our Cd3As2 samples, ranging from 3.0 × 1017 cm−3 at 300 K to 2.2 × 1016 cm−3 below 50 K. We therefore attribute the observed NMR to the chiral anomaly. In perpendicular magnetic fields, a positive linear magnetoresistance up to 1,670% at 14 T and 2 K is also observed. PMID:26744088

  11. Anomalous field-induced magnetoresistance behavior in Pr0.5Sr0.5MnO3 at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Dhirendra; Shahee, Aga; Rawat, Rajeev; Lalla, N. P.

    2012-06-01

    Low-temperature (LT) XRD and magnetoresistance (MR) have been studied in the single phase polycrystalline Pr0.5Sr0.5MnO3 with space-group I4/mcm. The resistance-vs-temperature (R-T) variation at zero-field show a broad paramagnetic to ferromagnetic metallic (FMM) transition at Tc ˜ 240K and it further undergoes FMM to antiferromagnetic insulating (AFMI) transition at TN ˜ 90K with a broad hysteresis indicates a disorder broadened first order phase transition (FOPT). The zero-field cooled (ZFC) MR at 5K shows an open loop with virgin curve lying outside the envelope curve. This anomalous behavior vanishes with increasing temperature. This has been attributed to field-induced transformation of AFMI to FMM phase, which remains arrested down to zero magnetic field at 5K.

  12. Ordered iron aluminide alloys having an improved room-temperature ductility and method thereof

    DOEpatents

    Sikka, Vinod K.

    1992-01-01

    A process is disclosed for improving the room temperature ductility and strength of iron aluminide intermetallic alloys. The process involves thermomechanically working an iron aluminide alloy by means which produce an elongated grain structure. The worked alloy is then heated at a temperature in the range of about 650.degree. C. to about 800.degree. C. to produce a B2-type crystal structure. The alloy is rapidly cooled in a moisture free atmosphere to retain the B2-type crystal structure at room temperature, thus providing an alloy having improved room temperature ductility and strength.

  13. Giant Coulomb blockade magnetoresistance

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiaoguang; Wen, Z. C.; Wei, H. X.; Han, Prof. X. F.

    2010-01-01

    We show that the Coulomb blockade voltage can be made to depend strongly on the electron spin in a thin magnetic granular layer inserted in the middle of an insulating layer of a tunnel junction. This strong spin dependence is predicted from the spin-dependent inter-granular conductance through any of the following effects within the granular layer, giant magnetoresistance (GMR), tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR), colossal magnetoresistance (CMR), or GMR through a polymer spacer. The resulting Coulomb blockade magnetoresistance (CBMR) ratio can exceed the magnetoresistance ratio of the granular layer itself by orders of magnitude. Unlike other magenetoresistance effects, the CBMR effect does not require magnetic electrodes.

  14. Nano-structured TiO2 film fabricated at room temperature and its acoustic properties

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jie; Cao, Wenwu; Jiang, Bei; Zhang, D S; Zheng, H; Zhou, Q; Shung, K K

    2009-01-01

    Nano-structured TiO2 thin film has been successfully fabricated at room temperature. Using a quarter wavelength characterization method, we have measured the acoustic impedance of this porous film, which can be adjusted from 5.3 to 7.19 Mrayl by curing it at different temperatures. The uniform microstructure and easy fabrication at room temperature make this material an excellent candidate for matching layers of ultra-high frequency ultrasonic imaging transducers. PMID:19672322

  15. Substrate Temperature Effects on Room Temperature Sensing Properties of Nanostructured ZnO Thin Films.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Jonnala Rakesh; Mani, Ganesh Kumar; Shankar, Prabakaran; Rayappan, John Bosco Balaguru

    2016-01-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films were deposited on glass substrates using chemical spray pyrolysis technique at different substrate temperatures such as 523, 623 and 723 K. X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns confirmed the formation of polycrystalline films with hexagonal wurtzite crystal structure and revealed the change in preferential orientation of the crystal planes. Scanning electron micrographs showed the formation of uniformly distributed spherical shaped grains at low deposition temperature and pebbles like structure at the higher temperature. Transmittance of 85% was observed for the film deposited at 723 K. The band gap of the films was found to be increased from 3.15 to 3.23 eV with a rise in deposition temperature. The electrical conductivity of the films was found to be improved with an increase in substrate temperature. Surface of ZnO thin films deposited at 523 K, 623 K and 723 K were found to be hydrophobic with the contact angles of 92°, 105° and 128° respectively. The room temperature gas sensing characteristics of all the films were studied and found that the film deposited at 623 K showed a better response towards ammonia vapour. PMID:27398478

  16. Specific features of the anisotropy of low-temperature microwave magnetoresistivity of lightly doped p-Ge due to the presence of light and heavy holes

    SciTech Connect

    Veinger, A. I. Zabrodskii, A. G.; Tisnek, T. V.; Goloshchapov, S. I.

    2011-10-15

    The microwave magnetoresistivity of lightly doped (nondegenerate) p-Ge has been studied by the electron spin resonance method. This technique can be employed to record the derivative of the microwave absorption with respect to the magnetic field on the assumption that changes in this absorption are proportional to changes in the conductivity of a semiconductor. At the 10-GHz frequency of the electromagnetic field, the averaging time of the effective masses of light and heavy holes at low temperatures is substantially longer than the oscillation period. This makes it possible to study the individual responses of light and heavy holes to the magnetic field. It is shown that the microwave magnetoabsorption associated with light holes only slightly depends on the direction of the magnetic field relative to the crystallographic axes of Ge. At the same time, the signal related to heavy holes changes by several times when a sample is rotated in a magnetic field. The experimental results are correlated with the theory of the classical magnetoresistive effect.

  17. Broadly tunable monolithic room-temperature terahertz quantum cascade laser sources.

    PubMed

    Jung, Seungyong; Jiang, Aiting; Jiang, Yifan; Vijayraghavan, Karun; Wang, Xiaojun; Troccoli, Mariano; Belkin, Mikhail A

    2014-01-01

    Electrically pumped room-temperature semiconductor sources of tunable terahertz radiation in 1-5 THz spectral range are highly desired to enable compact instrumentation for THz sensing and spectroscopy. Quantum cascade lasers with intra-cavity difference-frequency generation are currently the only room-temperature electrically pumped semiconductor sources that can operate in the entire 1-5 THz spectral range. Here we demonstrate that this technology is suitable to implementing monolithic room-temperature terahertz tuners with broadband electrical control of the emission frequency. Experimentally, we demonstrate ridge waveguide devices electrically tunable between 3.44 and 4.02 THz. PMID:25014053

  18. Systematic study of doping dependence on linear magnetoresistance in p-PbTe

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, J. M.; Chitta, V. A.; Oliveira, N. F.; Peres, M. L. Castro, S. de; Soares, D. A. W.; Wiedmann, S.; Zeitler, U.; Abramof, E.; Rappl, P. H. O.; Mengui, U. A.

    2014-10-20

    We report on a large linear magnetoresistance effect observed in doped p-PbTe films. While undoped p-PbTe reveals a sublinear magnetoresistance, p-PbTe films doped with BaF{sub 2} exhibit a transition to a nearly perfect linear magnetoresistance behaviour that is persistent up to 30 T. The linear magnetoresistance slope ΔR/ΔB is to a good approximation, independent of temperature. This is in agreement with the theory of Quantum Linear Magnetoresistance. We also performed magnetoresistance simulations using a classical model of linear magnetoresistance. We found that this model fails to explain the experimental data. A systematic study of the doping dependence reveals that the linear magnetoresistance response has a maximum for small BaF{sub 2} doping levels and diminishes rapidly for increasing doping levels. Exploiting the huge impact of doping on the linear magnetoresistance signal could lead to new classes of devices with giant magnetoresistance behavior.

  19. Stability limit of room air temperature of a VAV system

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuba, Tadahiko; Kamimura, Kazuyuki; Kasahara, Masato; Kimbara, Akiomi; Kurosu, Shigeru; Murasawa, Itaru; Hashimoto, Yukihiko

    1998-12-31

    To control heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems, it has been necessary to accept an analog system controlled mainly by proportional-plus-integral-plus-derivative (PID) action. However, when conventional PID controllers are replaced with new digital controllers by selecting the same PID parameters as before, the control loops have often got into hunting phenomena, which result in undamped oscillations. Unstable control characteristics (such as huntings) are thought to be one of the crucial problems faced by field operators. The PID parameters must be carefully selected to avoid instabilities. In this study, a room space is simulated as a thermal system that is air-conditioned by a variable-air-volume (VAV) control system. A dynamic room model without infiltration or exfiltration, which is directly connected to a simple air-handling unit without an economizer, is developed. To explore the possible existence of huntings, a numerical system model is formulated as a bilinear system with time-delayed feedback, and a parametric analysis of the stability limit is presented. Results are given showing the stability region affected by the selection of control and system parameters. This analysis was conducted to help us tune the PID controllers for optimal HVAC control.

  20. Large tunneling magnetoresistance in octahedral Fe3O4 nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Arijit; Barick, Barun; Mohapatra, Jeotikanta; Sharma, H.; Meena, S. S.; Aslam, M.

    2016-05-01

    We have observed large tunneling Magnetoresistance (TMR) in amine functionalized octahedral nanoparticle assemblies. Amine monolayer on the surface of nanoparticles acts as an insulating barrier between the semimetal Fe3O4 nanoparticles and provides multiple tunnel junctions where inter-granular tunneling is plausible. The tunneling magnetoresistance recorded at room temperature is 38% which increases to 69% at 180 K. When the temperature drops below 150 K, coulomb staircase is observed in the current versus voltage characteristics as the charging energy exceeds the thermal energy. A similar study is also carried out with spherical nanoparticles. A 24% TMR is recorded at room temperature which increases to 41% at 180 K for spherical particles. Mössbauer spectra reveal better stoichiometry for octahedral particles which is attainable due to lesser surface disorder and strong amine coupling at the <111> facets of octahedral Fe3O4 nanoparticles. Less stoichiometric defect in octahedral nanoparticles leads to a higher value of spin polarization and therefore larger TMR in octahedral nanoparticles.

  1. Giant magnetoresistance in nanogranular magnets.

    SciTech Connect

    Glatz, A.; Beloborodov, I. S.; Vinokur, V. M.; Materials Science Division; Univ. of Chicago

    2008-05-01

    We study the giant magnetoresistance of nanogranular magnets in the presence of an external magnetic field and finite temperature. We show that the magnetization of arrays of nanogranular magnets has hysteretic behavior at low temperatures leading to a double peak in the magnetoresistance which coalesces at high temperatures into a single peak. We numerically calculate the magnetization of magnetic domains and the motion of domain walls in this system using a combined mean-field approach and a model for an elastic membrane moving in a random medium, respectively. From the obtained results, we calculate the electric resistivity as a function of magnetic field and temperature. Our findings show excellent agreement with various experimental data.

  2. Enhancement of room temperature dislocation-related photoluminescence of electron irradiated silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang Luelue; Li Dongsheng; Jin Lu; Yang Deren; Wang Shuming

    2013-01-21

    In this paper, we have investigated the room temperature dislocation-related photoluminescence of electron irradiated silicon. It is found that high temperature annealing can enhance the D1 line emission measured at room temperature. The abnormal peak shift of D1 line on the dependence of temperatures reveals the reconstruction of D1 luminescence center. It is suggested that the high temperature annealing could cause the transformation of the dislocation-point defect structure, so that the D1 luminescence is enhanced and stabilized.

  3. Flashlamp Pumped, Room Temperature, Nd:YAG Laser Operating at 0.946 Micrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Norman P.; Murray, Keith E.; Walsh, Brian M.

    1998-01-01

    Room temperature operation of flashlamp pumped Nd:YAG at 0.946 micrometers was achieved with a laser rod having undoped ends. Performance was characterized and compared with 1.064 micrometer operation and other quasi four level lasers.

  4. Saccharides as Prospective Immobilizers of Nucleic Acids for Room-Temperature Structural EPR Studies.

    PubMed

    Kuzhelev, Andrey A; Shevelev, Georgiy Yu; Krumkacheva, Olesya A; Tormyshev, Victor M; Pyshnyi, Dmitrii V; Fedin, Matvey V; Bagryanskaya, Elena G

    2016-07-01

    Pulsed dipolar electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy is a powerful tool for structural studies of biomolecules and their complexes. This method, whose applicability has been recently extended to room temperatures, requires immobilization of the studied biosystem to prevent averaging of dipolar couplings; at the same time, the modification of native conformations by immobilization must be avoided. In this work, we provide first demonstration of room-temperature EPR distance measurements in nucleic acids using saccharides trehalose, sucrose, and glucose as immobilizing media. We propose an approach that keeps structural conformation and unity of immobilized double-stranded DNA. Remarkably, room-temperature electron spin dephasing time of triarylmethyl-labeled DNA in trehalose is noticeably longer compared to previously used immobilizers, thus providing a broader range of available distances. Therefore, saccharides, and especially trehalose, can be efficiently used as immobilizers of nucleic acids, mimicking native conditions and allowing wide range of structural EPR studies at room temperatures. PMID:27320083

  5. High temperature thermoplastic elastomers synthesized by living anionic polymerization in hydrocarbon solvent at room temperature

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Schlegel, Ralf; Williams, Katherine; Voyloy, Dimitry; Steren, Carlos A.; Goodwin, Andrew; Coughlin, E. Bryan; Gido, Samuel; Beiner, Mario; Hong, Kunlun; Kang, Nam -Goo; et al

    2016-03-30

    We present the synthesis and characterization of a new class of high temperature thermoplastic elastomers composed of polybenzofulvene–polyisoprene–polybenzofulvene (FIF) triblock copolymers. All copolymers were prepared by living anionic polymerization in benzene at room temperature. Homopolymerization and effects of additives on the glass transition temperature (Tg) of polybenzofulvene (PBF) were also investigated. Among all triblock copolymers studied, FIF with 14 vol % of PBF exhibited a maximum stress of 14.3 ± 1.3 MPa and strain at break of 1390 ± 66% from tensile tests. The stress–strain curves of FIF-10 and 14 were analyzed by a statistical molecular approach using a nonaffinemore » tube model to estimate the thermoplastic elastomer behavior. Dynamic mechanical analysis showed that the softening temperature of PBF in FIF was 145 °C, much higher than that of thermoplastic elastomers with polystyrene hard blocks. Microphase separation of FIF triblock copolymers was observed by small-angle X-ray scattering, even though long-range order was not achieved under the annealing conditions employed. Additionally, the microphase separation of the resulting triblock copolymers was examined by atomic force microscopy.« less

  6. Ultra-Low-Cost Room Temperature SiC Thin Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faur, Maria

    1997-01-01

    The research group at CSU has conducted theoretical and experimental research on 'Ultra-Low-Cost Room Temperature SiC Thin Films. The effectiveness of a ultra-low-cost room temperature thin film SiC growth technique on Silicon and Germanium substrates and structures with applications to space solar sells, ThermoPhotoVoltaic (TPV) cells and microelectronic and optoelectronic devices was investigated and the main result of this effort are summarized.

  7. Qualification of room-temperature-curing structural adhesives for use on JPL spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Alain; O'Donnell, Tim

    1989-01-01

    An evaluation is made of the comparative advantages of numerous room temperature-cure structural primers and adhesives applicable to spacecraft structures. The EA 9394 adhesive and BR 127 primer were chosen for use in all primary structure bonding on the Galileo spacecraft, in virtue of adequate room-temperature lap shear and peel strengths and superior mechanical properties above 200 F. EA 9394 also offers superior work life, shelf-life, and storage properties, by comparison with the EA 934 alternative.

  8. Room-temperature single-photon sources based on nanocrystal fluorescence in photonic/plasmonic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukishova, S. G.; Winkler, J. M.; Bissell, L. J.; Mihaylova, D.; Liapis, Andreas C.; Shi, Z.; Goldberg, D.; Menon, V. M.; Boyd, R. W.; Chen, G.; Prasad, P.

    2014-10-01

    Results are presented here towards robust room-temperature SPSs based on fluorescence in nanocrystals: colloidal quantum dots, color-center diamonds and doped with trivalent rare-earth ions (TR3+). We used cholesteric chiral photonic bandgap and Bragg-reflector microcavities for single emitter fluorescence enhancement. We also developed plasmonic bowtie nanoantennas and 2D-Si-photonic bandgap microcavities. The paper also provides short outlines of other technologies for room-temperature single-photon sources.

  9. Evolution of Dust Structures from Room to Cryogenic Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Antipov, S. N.; Asinovskii, E. I.; Kirillin, A. V.; Markovets, V. V.; Petrov, O. F.; Fortov, V. E.

    2008-09-07

    In this work dusty plasma of dc glow discharge at the temperatures in the range of 4.2-300 K was experimentally and numerically investigated. As it was shown in the experiments, the deep cooling of discharge tube walls leads to dramatic change of dusty plasma properties. In particular, sufficient increase of dust particle kinetic temperature (by about an order) and dust density (by several orders) was observed at low (cryogenic) temperatures. At 4.2 K, this can lead to the forming of a super dense dust structures with novel properties. Numerical simulations of charging process, dust charge fluctuation and screening of dust particle charge in plasma were made in dependence with the neutral gas temperature and dust density. The main attention was given to proper ion-atom collision analysis that allows us to investigate mechanisms of dust structure transformation observed in the cryogenic experiments.

  10. Room-temperature calorimeter for x-ray free-electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, T.; Kato, M.; Saito, N.; Tono, K.; Yabashi, M.; Ishikawa, T.

    2015-09-01

    We have developed a room-temperature calorimeter for absolute radiant power measurements of x-ray free-electron lasers. This room-temperature calorimeter is an electrical substitution device based on the equivalence of electrical and radiant heating. Consequently, the measured radiant powers are traceable to electrical standards, i.e., the International System Units (SI). We demonstrated the performance of the room-temperature calorimeter by electrical power measurements (offline tests). In the offline tests, the room-temperature calorimeter was proven to be able to measure external powers up to at least 6.9 mW, which exceeds the upper limit (˜4 mW) of a cryogenic radiometer (the primary standard detector in Japan). In addition, measurement uncertainties of the room-temperature calorimeter were evaluated to be less than 1.0%, which is adequate for the radiant power measurements of x-ray free-electron lasers. An indirect comparison with the cryogenic radiometer was performed using a synchrotron radiation source to confirm the validity of the absolute radiant powers measured with the room-temperature calorimeter. The absolute radiant powers measured by the calorimeter agreed with those measured by the cryogenic radiometer within 0.6%, which is less than the relative standard uncertainty of the comparison (1.0%).

  11. Room-temperature calorimeter for x-ray free-electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, T. Kato, M.; Saito, N.; Tono, K.; Yabashi, M.; Ishikawa, T.

    2015-09-15

    We have developed a room-temperature calorimeter for absolute radiant power measurements of x-ray free-electron lasers. This room-temperature calorimeter is an electrical substitution device based on the equivalence of electrical and radiant heating. Consequently, the measured radiant powers are traceable to electrical standards, i.e., the International System Units (SI). We demonstrated the performance of the room-temperature calorimeter by electrical power measurements (offline tests). In the offline tests, the room-temperature calorimeter was proven to be able to measure external powers up to at least 6.9 mW, which exceeds the upper limit (∼4 mW) of a cryogenic radiometer (the primary standard detector in Japan). In addition, measurement uncertainties of the room-temperature calorimeter were evaluated to be less than 1.0%, which is adequate for the radiant power measurements of x-ray free-electron lasers. An indirect comparison with the cryogenic radiometer was performed using a synchrotron radiation source to confirm the validity of the absolute radiant powers measured with the room-temperature calorimeter. The absolute radiant powers measured by the calorimeter agreed with those measured by the cryogenic radiometer within 0.6%, which is less than the relative standard uncertainty of the comparison (1.0%)

  12. Ultraviolet stimulated emission from high-temperature-annealed MgO microcrystals at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soma, Haruka; Uenaka, Yuki; Asahara, Akifumi; Suemoto, Tohru; Uchino, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Research on semiconductor nanowires underlies the development of the miniaturization of laser devices with low cost and low energy consumption. In general, nanowire lasers are made of direct band gap semiconductors, e.g., GaN, ZnO and CdS, and their band-edge emissions are used to achieve optically pumped laser emission. In addition to the existing class of nanowire lasers, we here show that air-annealed micrometer-sized MgO cubic crystals with well-defined facets exhibit room-temperature stimulated emission at 394 nm under pulsed laser pumping at ˜350 nm. Surface midgap states are assumed to be responsible for the excitation and emission processes. The present findings will not only provide opportunities for the development of miniaturized lasers composed of insulating oxides, but will also open up functionality in various families of cubic crystalline materials.

  13. Current-perpendicular-to-the-plane giant magnetoresistance in spin-valves with AgSn alloy spacers

    SciTech Connect

    Read, J. C.; Nakatani, T. M.; Smith, Neil; Choi, Y.-S.; York, B. R.; Brinkman, E.; Childress, J. R.

    2015-07-28

    We investigate the use of AgSn alloys as the spacer layer in current-perpendicular-to-the-plane magnetoresistance devices. Alloying with Sn increases resistivity but results in a reasonably long (>10 nm) spin-diffusion length, so large magnetoresistance can be achieved with thin AgSn spacers. Compared to Ag thin films, AgSn forms smaller grain sizes, reduced roughness, and exhibits less interdiffusion upon annealing, resulting in decreased interlayer magnetic coupling in exchange biased spin-valves. AgSn also shows improved corrosion resistance compared to Ag, which is advantageous for nanofabrication, including magnetic recording head sensors. Combining a AgSn spacer with Co-based Heusler alloy ferromagnet in an exchange biased, polycrystalline trilayer thinner than 12 nm results in magnetoresistance values up to 15% at room temperature.

  14. Current-perpendicular-to-the-plane giant magnetoresistance in spin-valves with AgSn alloy spacers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Read, J. C.; Nakatani, T. M.; Smith, Neil; Choi, Y.-S.; York, B. R.; Brinkman, E.; Childress, J. R.

    2015-07-01

    We investigate the use of AgSn alloys as the spacer layer in current-perpendicular-to-the-plane magnetoresistance devices. Alloying with Sn increases resistivity but results in a reasonably long (>10 nm) spin-diffusion length, so large magnetoresistance can be achieved with thin AgSn spacers. Compared to Ag thin films, AgSn forms smaller grain sizes, reduced roughness, and exhibits less interdiffusion upon annealing, resulting in decreased interlayer magnetic coupling in exchange biased spin-valves. AgSn also shows improved corrosion resistance compared to Ag, which is advantageous for nanofabrication, including magnetic recording head sensors. Combining a AgSn spacer with Co-based Heusler alloy ferromagnet in an exchange biased, polycrystalline trilayer thinner than 12 nm results in magnetoresistance values up to 15% at room temperature.

  15. Entanglement and Bell's inequality violation above room temperature in metal carboxylates.

    SciTech Connect

    Souza, A M; Soares-Pinto, D O; Sarthour, R S; Oliveira, I S; Reis, Mario S; Brandao, Paula; Moreira Dos Santos, Antonio F

    2009-01-01

    In the present work we show that a particular family of materials, the metal carboxylates, may have entangled states up to very high temperatures. From magnetic-susceptibility measurements, we have estimated the critical temperature below which entanglement exists in the copper carboxylate {Cu-2(O2CH)(4)}{Cu(O2CH)(2)(2-methylpyridine)(2)}, and we have found this to be above room temperature (T-e similar to 630 K). Furthermore, the results show that the system remains maximally entangled until close to similar to 100 K and the Bell's inequality is violated up to nearly room temperature (similar to 290 K).

  16. Low threshold interband cascade lasers operating above room temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, C. J.; Yang, B.; Yang, R. Q.

    2003-01-01

    Mid-IR type-II interband cascade lasers were demonstrated in pulsed mode at temperatures up to 325 K and in continuous mode up to 200 K. At 80 K, the threshold current density was 8.9 A/cm2 and a cw outpout power of 140 mW/facet was obtained.

  17. Magnetoresistive smart fluid (marsonpol) and devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reji, John; Suresh, G.; Narayanadas, D. J.

    2003-10-01

    Magnetorheological fluid, Electrorheological fluid and ferro fluids are the smart fluids known today. These fluids are either electrically conductive or non conductive. They do not exhibit variable electrical resistance or switching behavior. Of recent interest to researchers has been the development of new types of magnetoresistive materials. Such materials can be of large practical importance, as they will change their electrical resistance in the presence of a magnetic field. However, most materials only exhibit appreciable magnetoresistance under extreme conditions, such as high magnetic fields or low temperatures. A smart fluid whose electrical resistance can be varied by several orders of magnitude under nominal level of magnetic field is reported in this paper (designated MARSONPOL). In the absence of a magnetic field the fluid is an insulator having electrical resistance in the order of 108 ohm-meter and in the presence of a magnetic field the resistance of the material reduces to less than 1 ohm-meter, at room temperature of 30°C. The sharp and reversible change in resistivity makes the material transform from an insulator to conductor, rendering properties characteristic of either state, within a fraction of a second. Fluids with such characteristics are not reported in the literature making this development a breakthrough and opening up potentials for the development of several smart devices. One such device is the magnetic field sensor probe currently under development at NPOL. A capsule of MARSONPOL forms the basic sensor element. Depending on the strength of the Magnetic field, the electrical resistivity of the capsule undergoes changes. The present paper will discuss details of the smart fluid as well as features of the magnetic field sensor.

  18. Room-temperature quantum bit storage exceeding 39 minutes using ionized donors in silicon-28.

    PubMed

    Saeedi, Kamyar; Simmons, Stephanie; Salvail, Jeff Z; Dluhy, Phillip; Riemann, Helge; Abrosimov, Nikolai V; Becker, Peter; Pohl, Hans-Joachim; Morton, John J L; Thewalt, Mike L W

    2013-11-15

    Quantum memories capable of storing and retrieving coherent information for extended times at room temperature would enable a host of new technologies. Electron and nuclear spin qubits using shallow neutral donors in semiconductors have been studied extensively but are limited to low temperatures (≲10 kelvin); however, the nuclear spins of ionized donors have the potential for high-temperature operation. We used optical methods and dynamical decoupling to realize this potential for an ensemble of phosphorous-31 donors in isotopically purified silicon-28 and observed a room-temperature coherence time of over 39 minutes. We further showed that a coherent spin superposition can be cycled from 4.2 kelvin to room temperature and back, and we report a cryogenic coherence time of 3 hours in the same system. PMID:24233718

  19. Tunable room-temperature ferromagnet using an iron-oxide and graphene oxide nanocomposite

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Aigu L.; Rodrigues, J. N. B.; Su, Chenliang; Milletari, M.; Loh, Kian Ping; Wu, Tom; Chen, Wei; Neto, A. H. Castro; Adam, Shaffique; Wee, Andrew T. S.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic materials have found wide application ranging from electronics and memories to medicine. Essential to these advances is the control of the magnetic order. To date, most room-temperature applications have a fixed magnetic moment whose orientation is manipulated for functionality. Here we demonstrate an iron-oxide and graphene oxide nanocomposite based device that acts as a tunable ferromagnet at room temperature. Not only can we tune its transition temperature in a wide range of temperatures around room temperature, but the magnetization can also be tuned from zero to 0.011 A m2/kg through an initialization process with two readily accessible knobs (magnetic field and electric current), after which the system retains its magnetic properties semi-permanently until the next initialization process. We construct a theoretical model to illustrate that this tunability originates from an indirect exchange interaction mediated by spin-imbalanced electrons inside the nanocomposite. PMID:26100970

  20. A study on the characteristics of CO oxidation at room temperature by metallic Pt.

    PubMed

    Seo, Phil Won; Choi, Hyun Jin; Hong, Suk In; Hong, Sung Chang

    2010-06-15

    Various experiments and analysis were conducted in order to manufacture a catalyst that could very efficiently oxidize carbon monoxide at room temperature and also to identify the relevant factors influencing the oxidation reaction. Pt/TiO(2) catalyst can increase the oxidizing capability of CO at low temperature and room temperature by reduction. In FT-IR experiments, the catalyst that displayed excellent activity was capable of efficiently oxidizing CO to CO(2) using atmospheric oxygen. Based on the results of XPS analysis, we found that the reduced catalyst changed the platinum's oxidation value to Pt(+2) and Pt(+0). Through the O(2)-reoxidation experiments, the catalyst, which consisted of non-stoichiometric platinum oxidized species, displayed an excellent ability to accept oxygen. In this study, the Pt/TiO(2) catalyst was able to very efficiently oxidize CO at low temperature and room temperature even with a minute quantity of platinum. PMID:20207073

  1. Electrical Resistivity and Negative Magnetoresistance in (SNBry)x Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneto, Keiichi; Sasa, Shigehiko; Yoshino, Katsumi; Inuishi, Yoshio

    1980-11-01

    Electrical resistivity, magnetoresistance and their temperature dependences in (SNBry)x are measured for various quantity of y. By bromination, negative magnetoresistance is enhanced at 4.2 K and also appears even at 77 K, at which temperature negative magnetoresistance is not observed in undoped (SN)x. These features are remarkable for the samples heavily doped and just after doping, and are abated by pumping bromine from (SNBry)x for a few days. The possible origins for the anomalous negative magnetoresistance are discussed taking the surface state of fiber bundles or crystal due to adsorped bromine into consideration.

  2. Effects of various room temperatures on terahertz radiation via optical parametric oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Nan; Liu, Hongjun; Sun, Qibing

    2014-06-01

    A terahertz (THz)-wave parametric oscillator (TPO) pumped by a stable and single-longitudinal mode Q-switched Nd:YAG laser under various room temperatures is demonstrated. It is based on a cavity TPO architecture allowing stable single-resonance operation and low oscillation threshold. The output results, including the effects of the room temperature on this wavelength-agile TPO with a MgO:LiNbO3 crystal, indicate that the performance of TPO under the lower temperature is better. We obtain a widely tunable THz-wave source in the range 104 to 226 μm via tuning the cavity flexibly under different room temperatures. The peak power of the THz wave reaches 220 mW at the wavelength of 146.2 μm when the room temperature is 20°C. The peak power of the THz wave decreases to 48 mW when the room temperature rises from 20°C to 25°C.

  3. Can doping graphite trigger room temperature superconductivity? Evidence for granular high-temperature superconductivity in water-treated graphite powder.

    PubMed

    Scheike, T; Böhlmann, W; Esquinazi, P; Barzola-Quiquia, J; Ballestar, A; Setzer, A

    2012-11-14

    Granular superconductivity in powders of small graphite grains (several tens of micrometers) is demonstrated after treatment with pure water. The temperature, magnetic field and time dependence of the magnetic moment of the treated graphite powder provides evidence for the existence of superconducting vortices with some similarities to high-temperature granular superconducting oxides but even at temperatures above 300 K. Room temperature superconductivity in doped graphite or at its interfaces appears to be possible. PMID:22949348

  4. Electrochemical study of hydrogen permeation through tungsten near room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manhard, A.; Kapser, S.; Gao, L.

    2015-08-01

    We used an electrochemical double cell to study permeation of hydrogen through a 3.5 μm thick sputter-deposited tungsten layer on a 25 μm thick palladium support. The temperature dependence of the steady-state permeation current was studied in the range from 266 to 333 K for a constant charging potential on the entry side and zero hydrogen concentration on the exit side of the sample foil. We found that the data is best described by a sum of two Arrhenius terms. We postulate that the higher activation energy of 0.86 ± 0.07 eV corresponds to permeation through bulk grains and may approach the literature value of 1.43 ± 0.26 eV for even higher temperature. For the second, lower activation energy of 0.39 ± 0.03 eV, we currently consider fast diffusion along grain boundaries the most likely explanation.

  5. Variable temperature study of the crystal and magnetic structures of the giant magnetoresistant materials LMnAsO(L = La, Nd)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emery, N.; Wildman, E. J.; Skakle, J. M. S.; McLaughlin, A. C.; Smith, R. I.; Fitch, A. N.

    2011-04-01

    A variable temperature neutron and synchrotron diffraction study has been performed on the giant magnetoresistant oxypnictides LMnAsO (L = La, Nd). The low-temperature magnetic structures have been studied, and results show a spin reorientation of the Mn2+ spins below TN (Nd) for NdMnAsO. The Mn2+ spins rotate from alignment along c to alignment into the basal plane, and the Mn2+ and Nd3+ moments refine to 3.54(4) μB and 1.93(4) μB, respectively, at 2 K. In contrast, there is no change in magnetic structure with temperature for LaMnAsO. There is no evidence of a structural transition down to 2 K; however, discontinuities in the cell volume and L-O and Mn-As bond lengths are detected at ˜150 K for both materials. This temperature coincides with the electronic transition previously reported and suggests a coupling between electronic and lattice degrees of freedom.

  6. Fiber-optic multiband radiometer for online measurements of near room temperature and emissivity.

    PubMed

    Uman, Igor; Katzir, Abraham

    2006-02-01

    A multiband infrared fiber-optic radiometer was developed for online near room temperature and emissivity measurements. Real time measurements were carried out on gray and selective bodies at near room temperature. The mean accuracy obtained for the body temperature was roughly 1 degrees C and for emissivity was roughly 0.03. The radiometer is capable of performing measurements without prior knowledge of the body emissivity. Incorporation of fiber optics allows one to perform measurements without a clear line of sight between the radiometer and the body. This radiometer will have important applications in biology, electronics, and other areas. PMID:16480197

  7. Detecting luminescence from triplet states of organic semiconductors at room temperatures using delayed electroluminescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qi; Aziz, Hany

    2014-08-01

    We demonstrate a unique approach for detecting luminescence from triplet states of organic materials in the solid state at room temperatures. The technique is based on measuring delayed electroluminescence from the material. The approach overcomes limitations of conventional spectroscopic techniques, such as the need for cooling to cryogenic temperatures, and works for a wide range of organic materials. The underlying mechanisms behind observing materials phosphorescence using this technique are studied. The results show that using a low concentration of the target material doped in a host material and a large energy differences between triplet states of target and host materials are necessary for obtaining efficient phosphorescence at room temperatures.

  8. Room-temperature observations of the weak localization in low-mobility graphene films

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Junhao; Wang, Shanyue; Qian, Di; Song, Fengqi E-mail: bgwang@nju.edu.cn; Wang, Baigeng E-mail: bgwang@nju.edu.cn; Han, Min; Zhou, Jianfeng; Wang, Xinran; Wang, Xuefeng

    2013-12-07

    We report room-temperature observations of the quantum conductance corrections caused by the weak localization in graphene films synthesized using solid-state-source chemical vapor deposition. Both Raman spectroscopy and Hall measurements showed strong disorder in the samples with a low mobility of ∼430 cm{sup 2}/V s. The emergence of weak localization at room temperature arises from the competition between the valley-dependent scattering and the thermal dephasing in such low-quality samples, although quantum effects normally appear in the samples that have an ideal structure at cryogenic temperatures. The large disorder in our low-mobility samples unexpectedly preserved the quantum mechanical weak localization.

  9. Room-Temperature Magnetism Realized by Doping Fe into Ferroelectric LiTaO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Ying-Jie; Zhang, Qing-Hua; Shen, Xi; Ni, Xiao-Dong; Yao, Yuan; Yu, Ri-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    We synthesize LiTa1-xFexO3-σ (LTFO) ceramics by the conventional solid-state reaction method. The samples remain single phase up to x = 0.09. The magnetic measurements show that the doping of Fe successfully realizes ferromagnetism of LTFO at room temperature. The dielectric measurements indicate that LTFO is ferroelectric, similarly to LiTaO3 (LTO), but its ferroelectric Curie temperature seems to decrease with the increasing Fe content. By means of doping Fe ions into LTO, the coexistence of spontaneous electric polarization and spontaneous magnetic moment is realized at room temperature.

  10. Fundamental Properties of TBAF Clathrate for Usage as a Latent Heat Storage at a Room Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizushima, Takanari; Kawamura, Hiroshi; Takao, Shingo; Yabe, Akira

    For promotion of further energy conservation, development of a coolant with a higher heat capacity regulated around a room temperature is strongly required. As a candidate of such a new coolant, we employ the clathrate hydrate, i.e., a mixture of Tetra n-butyl ammonium fluoride (TBAF) and water. This clathrate hydrate is composed of the micro crystals with an order of 100 μm in dimension. It retains fluidity and melting point at a room temperature of about 25 °C. Moreover, the melting point is able to be controlled between 25 °C and 0 °C by changing the concentration of TBAF. The temperature can be regulated by its latent heat at the melting point. Characteristics such as the latent heat and the crystal structure of the clathrate have been experimentally obtained to confirm the feasibility for its usage as the latent heat storage around a room temperature.

  11. Room-temperature ferroelectricity of SrTiO{sub 3} films modulated by cation concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Fang; Zhang, Qinghua; Yang, Zhenzhong; Gu, Junxing; Liang, Yan; Li, Wentao; Wang, Weihua; Jin, Kuijuan; Gu, Lin; Guo, Jiandong

    2015-08-24

    The room-temperature ferroelectricity of SrTiO{sub 3} is promising for oxide electronic devices controlled by multiple fields. An effective way to control the ferroelectricity is highly demanded. Here, we show that the off-centered antisite-like defects in SrTiO{sub 3} films epitaxially grown on Si (001) play the determinative role in the emergence of room-temperature ferroelectricity. The density of these defects changes with the film cation concentration sensitively, resulting in a varied coercive field of the ferroelectric behavior. Consequently, the room-temperature ferroelectricity of SrTiO{sub 3} films can be effectively modulated by tuning the temperature of metal sources during the molecular beam epitaxy growth. Such an easy and reliable modulation of the ferroelectricity enables the flexible engineering of multifunctional oxide electronic devices.

  12. Proposal of a general scheme to obtain room-temperature spin polarization in asymmetric antiferromagnetic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xingxing; Wu, Xiaojun; Li, Zhenyu; Yang, Jinlong

    2015-09-01

    Exploring magnetic semiconductors is one of the most important questions for spintronic applications. Although various solutions, such as dilute magnetic semiconductors, have been proposed, a practical spintronic device working at room temperature has not been realized. The key to address this issue is to find magnetic materials with both room-temperature magnetic ordering and large spin polarization around the Fermi energy level. Here, we predict a new concept of asymmetric antiferromagnetic (AFM) semiconductors (AAFMSs) with both features. The high temperature magnetic ordering originates from the AFM coupling between different transition metal ions with strong super-exchange interaction, whereas the large spin polarization around the Fermi energy level owes to d orbital mismatch among these ions. Through first-principles calculations, a family of double perovskites A2Cr M O6 (A =Ca ,Sr ,Ba , and M =Ru ,Os ) are predicted to be AAFMSs. This paper provides a way for developing spintronic devices working at room temperature.

  13. Designing room-temperature multiferroic materials in a single-phase solid-solution film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, H. J.; Song, C.; Cui, B.; Peng, J. J.; Li, F.; Xiao, L. R.; Pan, F.

    2016-09-01

    The search for multiferroic materials with simultaneous ferroelectric and ferromagnetic properties in a single phase at room temperature continues to be fuelled from the perspective of developing multifunctional devices. Here we design a single-phase multiferroic La0.67Sr0.33MnO3-BaTiO3 film, which possesses epitaxial single-crystal and solid-solution structure, high magnetic Curie temperature (~640 K) as well as switchable ferroelectric polarization. Moreover, a notable strain-mediated magnetoelectric coupling at room temperature in the way of modulating the magnetism with an external applied voltage is also observed. The synthetic solid-solution multiferroic film may open an extraordinary avenue for exploring a series of room-temperature multiferroic materials.

  14. Buffer-enhanced room-temperature growth and characterization of epitaxial ZnO thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, Atsushi; Hara, Wakana; Matsuda, Akifumi; Tateda, Norihiro; Otaka, Sei; Akiba, Shusaku; Saito, Keisuke; Yodo, Tokuo; Yoshimoto, Mamoru

    2005-06-06

    The room-temperature epitaxial growth of ZnO thin films on NiO buffered sapphire (0001) substrate was achieved by using the laser molecular-beam-epitaxy method. The obtained ZnO films had the ultrasmooth surface reflecting the nanostepped structure of the sapphire substrate. The crystal structure at the surface was investigated in situ by means of coaxial impact-collision ion scattering spectroscopy. It was proved that the buffer-enhanced epitaxial ZnO thin films grown at room temperature had +c polarity, while the polarity of high-temperature grown ZnO thin films on the sapphire was -c. Photoluminescence spectra at room temperature were measured for the epitaxial ZnO films, showing only the strong ultraviolet emission near 380 nm.

  15. Rectifying characteristic in all-perovskite oxide film p-n junction with room temperature ferromagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Kawai, Tomoji

    2002-06-01

    We fabricated an all-perovskite oxide p-n junction comprised of hole-doped (p-) manganite La0.9Ba0.1MnO3 and electron-doped (n-) titanate Sr0.99La0.01TiO3 films. The junction showed good rectifying properties at both room temperature and low temperature in a simple structure without inserting an insulating layer. By optimizing junction fabrication conditions, a thin La0.9Ba0.1MnO3 layer in the junction exhibited room temperature ferromagnetism and metallic conduction, which may be modulated by carrier injection from the n-type layer under an electric field. These results indicate that this p-n junction may be developed into functional, strongly correlated electronic devices able to work at room temperature.

  16. N2-broadening coefficients of methyl chloride: Measurements at room temperature and calculations at atmospheric temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbouchi Ramchani, A.; Jacquemart, D.; Dhib, M.; Aroui, H.

    2014-11-01

    Infrared spectroscopic study on methyl chloride is the first step for its accurate detection in the atmosphere. In our previous work [Barbouchi Ramchani et al. J Quant Spectrosc Radiat Transfer 2013;120:1-15], line positions, intensities and self-broadening coefficients of both 12CH335Cl and 12CH337Cl isotopologues have been studied in the 6.9 μm spectral region. The present work is focused on measurements of N2-broadening coefficients for transitions of 12CH335Cl and 12CH337Cl around 6.9 μm. For that, high-resolution Fourier transform spectra of CH3Cl-N2 mixtures have been recorded at room temperature using a rapid scan Bruker IFS 120 HR interferometer at LADIR. The N2-broadening coefficients have been retrieved using a Voigt profile and a multispectrum fitting procedure. The average accuracy of the N2-broadening obtained in this work has been estimated to be between 5% and 10% depending on the transitions. The rotational J- and K-dependences of the N2-broadening coefficients have been clearly observed and modeled using empirical polynomial expansions. The 12CH335Cl-N2 line-widths of the ν5 band have also been computed using a semi-classical approach for the PR, RR and QR sub-branches. A global comparison with the experimental data from this work but also existing in the literature was then performed. Similar J- and K-rotational dependences have been observed while no clear evidence of any vibrational or isotopic dependence has been pointed out. Finally, performing theoretical calculations of the N2-broadening coefficients at various temperatures of atmospheric interest between 200 and 296 K allowed deducing the temperature exponent of the 12CH335Cl-N2 line-widths.

  17. Mn,Cd-metallothionein-2: a room temperature magnetic protein.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Ching; Lee, Shang-Fan; Sun, Kein-Wen; Ho, Chien-Chang; Chen, Yu-Ting; Chang, Cheng-Hung; Kan, Lou-Sing

    2006-02-24

    Naturally occurring metallothionein (MT) is a metal binding protein, which binds to seven Zn2+ through 20 conserved cysteines and forms two metal binding clusters with a Zinc-Blende structure. We demonstrate that the MT, when substituting the Zn2+ ions by Mn2+ and Cd2+, exhibits magnetic hysteresis loop observable by SQUID from 10 to 330 K. The magnetic moment may have originated from the bridging effect of the sulfur atoms between the metal ions that leads to the alignment of the electron spins of the Mn2+ ions inside the clusters. The protein backbone may restrain the net spin moment of Mn2+ ions from thermal fluctuation. The modified magnetic-metallothionein is a novel approach to creating molecular magnets with operating temperatures up to 330 K. PMID:16403435

  18. Room Temperature Aging Study of Butyl O-rings

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Wilson

    2009-08-07

    During testing under the Enhanced Surveillance Campaign in 2001, preliminary data detected a previously unknown and potentially serious concern with recently procured butyl o-rings. All butyl o-rings molded from a proprietary formulation throughout the period circa 1999 through 2001 had less than a full cure. Tests showed that sealing force values for these suspect o-rings were much lower than expected and their physical properties were very sensitive to further post curing at elevated temperatures. Further testing confirmed that these o-rings were approximately 50% cured versus the typical industry standard of > 90% cured. Despite this condition, all suspect o-rings fully conformed to their QC acceptance requirements, including their individual product drawing requirements.

  19. Continuous wave room temperature external ring cavity quantum cascade laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revin, D. G.; Hemingway, M.; Vaitiekus, D.; Cockburn, J. W.; Hempler, N.; Maker, G. T.; Malcolm, G. P. A.

    2015-06-01

    An external ring cavity quantum cascade laser operating at ˜5.2 μm wavelength in a continuous-wave regime at the temperature of 15 °C is demonstrated. Out-coupled continuous-wave optical powers of up to 23 mW are observed for light of one propagation direction with an estimated total intra-cavity optical power flux in excess of 340 mW. The uni-directional regime characterized by the intensity ratio of more than 60 for the light propagating in the opposite directions was achieved. A single emission peak wavelength tuning range of 90 cm-1 is realized by the incorporation of a diffraction grating into the cavity.

  20. Continuous wave room temperature external ring cavity quantum cascade laser

    SciTech Connect

    Revin, D. G. Hemingway, M.; Vaitiekus, D.; Cockburn, J. W.; Hempler, N.; Maker, G. T.; Malcolm, G. P. A.

    2015-06-29

    An external ring cavity quantum cascade laser operating at ∼5.2 μm wavelength in a continuous-wave regime at the temperature of 15 °C is demonstrated. Out-coupled continuous-wave optical powers of up to 23 mW are observed for light of one propagation direction with an estimated total intra-cavity optical power flux in excess of 340 mW. The uni-directional regime characterized by the intensity ratio of more than 60 for the light propagating in the opposite directions was achieved. A single emission peak wavelength tuning range of 90 cm{sup −1} is realized by the incorporation of a diffraction grating into the cavity.

  1. Geopolymer - room-temperature ceramic matrix for composites

    SciTech Connect

    Davidovits, J.; Davidovics, M.

    1988-08-01

    The semiamorphous three-dimensional networks of polymeric Na, K, Li, and Mg aluminosilicates of both poly(sialate) and poly(sialate-siloxo) type, collectively known as geopolymers, harden at 20-120 C and are similar to thermoset resins, but are stable at up to 1200-1400 C without shrinkage. A wide variety of alkaline-resistant inorganic reinforcements, notably SiC fibers, have been combined with geopolymer matrices to yield nonburning, nonsmoking high-temperature composites. An SiC fiber-reinforced K-poly(sialate-siloxo) matrix, shaped and hardened at 70 C for 1.5 hr, develops flexural mean strengths of the order of 380 MPa that are retained after firing at up to 900 C. 16 references.

  2. Room Temperature Solvent-free Synthesis of Monodisperse Magnetite Nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Xiang-Rong; Daraio, C; Wang, Chong M.; Talbot, J; Jin, Sungho

    2006-03-01

    We have successfully demonstrated a facile, solvent-free synthesis of highly crystalline and monodisperse Fe3O4 nanocrystallites at ambient temperature avoiding any heating. Solid state reaction of inorganic Fe(II) and Fe(III) salts with NaOH was found to produce highly crystalline Fe3O4 nanoparticles. The reaction, if carried out in the presence of surfactant such as oleic acid-oleylamine adduct, generated monodisperse Fe3O4 nanocrystals extractable directly from the reaction mixture. The extracted nanoparticles were capable of forming self-assembled, two-dimensional and uniform periodic array. The new process utilizes inexpensive and nontoxic starting materials, and does not require a use of high boiling point and toxic solvents, thus is amenable to an environmentally desirable, large-scale synthesis of nanocrystals.

  3. Variation of Tensile Behaviour of Interstitial Free Steel Rolled at Cryogenic and Room Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anand, Gautam; Sinha, Arijit; Chattopadhyay, Partha Protim

    2012-10-01

    The deformation behaviour of interstitial free/ferritic steel has been investigated at cryogenic and room temperature. The study concerns the occurrence of microstructural damages during low temperature deformation conditions for such high stacking fault energy body centred cubic material and their role on the evolution of microstructure and mechanical properties.

  4. Ultrabright continuously tunable terahertz-wave generation at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Shin'ichiro; Nawata, Kouji; Taira, Takunori; Shikata, Jun-ichi; Kawase, Kodo; Minamide, Hiroaki

    2014-01-01

    The hottest frequency region in terms of research currently lies in the ‘frequency gap' region between microwaves and infrared: terahertz waves. Although new methods for generating terahertz radiation have been developed, most sources cannot generate high-brightness terahertz beams. Here we demonstrate the generation of ultrabright terahertz waves (brightness ~0.2 GW/sr·cm2, brightness temperature of ~1018 K, peak power of >50 kW) using parametric wavelength conversion in a nonlinear crystal; this is brighter than many specialized sources such as far-infrared free-electron lasers (~1016 K, ~2 kW). We revealed novel parametric wavelength conversion using stimulated Raman scattering in LiNbO3 without stimulated Brillouin scattering using recently-developed microchip laser. Furthermore, nonlinear up-conversion techniques allow the intense terahertz waves to be visualized and their frequency determined. These results are very promising for extending applied research into the terahertz region, and we expect that this source will open up new research fields such as nonlinear optics in the terahertz region. PMID:24898269

  5. Ultrabright continuously tunable terahertz-wave generation at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Shin'ichiro; Nawata, Kouji; Taira, Takunori; Shikata, Jun-ichi; Kawase, Kodo; Minamide, Hiroaki

    2014-01-01

    The hottest frequency region in terms of research currently lies in the 'frequency gap' region between microwaves and infrared: terahertz waves. Although new methods for generating terahertz radiation have been developed, most sources cannot generate high-brightness terahertz beams. Here we demonstrate the generation of ultrabright terahertz waves (brightness ~0.2 GW/sr·cm(2), brightness temperature of ~10(18) K, peak power of >50 kW) using parametric wavelength conversion in a nonlinear crystal; this is brighter than many specialized sources such as far-infrared free-electron lasers (~10(16) K, ~2 kW). We revealed novel parametric wavelength conversion using stimulated Raman scattering in LiNbO3 without stimulated Brillouin scattering using recently-developed microchip laser. Furthermore, nonlinear up-conversion techniques allow the intense terahertz waves to be visualized and their frequency determined. These results are very promising for extending applied research into the terahertz region, and we expect that this source will open up new research fields such as nonlinear optics in the terahertz region. PMID:24898269

  6. Room temperature aluminum antimonide radiation detector and methods thereof

    DOEpatents

    Lordi, Vincenzo; Wu, Kuang Jen J.; Aberg, Daniel; Erhart, Paul; Coombs, III, Arthur W; Sturm, Benjamin W

    2015-03-03

    In one embodiment, a method for producing a high-purity single crystal of aluminum antimonide (AlSb) includes providing a growing environment with which to grow a crystal, growing a single crystal of AlSb in the growing environment which comprises hydrogen (H.sub.2) gas to reduce oxide formation and subsequent incorporation of oxygen impurities in the crystal, and adding a controlled amount of at least one impurity to the growing environment to effectively incorporate at least one dopant into the crystal. In another embodiment, a high energy radiation detector includes a single high-purity crystal of AlSb, a supporting structure for the crystal, and logic for interpreting signals obtained from the crystal which is operable as a radiation detector at a temperature of about 25.degree. C. In one embodiment, a high-purity single crystal of AlSb includes AlSb and at least one dopant selected from a group consisting of selenium (Se), tellurium (Te), and tin (Sn).

  7. Performance evaluation of ZnO–CuO hetero junction solid state room temperature ethanol sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Ming-Ru; Suyambrakasam, Gobalakrishnan; Wu, Ren-Jang; Chavali, Murthy

    2012-07-15

    Graphical abstract: Sensor response (resistance) curves of time were changed from 150 ppm to 250 ppm alcohol concentration of ZnO–CuO 1:1. The response and recovery times were measured to be 62 and 83 s, respectively. The sensing material ZnO–CuO is a high potential alcohol sensor which provides a simple, rapid and highly sensitive alcohol gas sensor operating at room temperature. Highlights: ► The main advantages of the ethanol sensor are as followings. ► Novel materials ZnO–CuO ethanol sensor. ► The optimized ZnO–CuO hetero contact system. ► A good sensor response and room working temperature (save energy). -- Abstract: A semiconductor ethanol sensor was developed using ZnO–CuO and its performance was evaluated at room temperature. Hetero-junction sensor was made of ZnO–CuO nanoparticles for sensing alcohol at room temperature. Nanoparticles were prepared by hydrothermal method and optimized with different weight ratios. Sensor characteristics were linear for the concentration range of 150–250 ppm. Composite materials of ZnO–CuO were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), temperature-programmed reduction (TPR) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM). ZnO–CuO (1:1) material showed maximum sensor response (S = R{sub air}/R{sub alcohol}) of 3.32 ± 0.1 toward 200 ppm of alcohol vapor at room temperature. The response and recovery times were measured to be 62 and 83 s, respectively. The linearity R{sup 2} of the sensor response was 0.9026. The sensing materials ZnO–CuO (1:1) provide a simple, rapid and highly sensitive alcohol gas sensor operating at room temperature.

  8. High-sensitivity two-terminal magnetoresistance devices using InGaAs/AlGaAs two-dimensional channel on GaAs substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Di-Cheng; Pan, You-Wei; Wu, Jenq-Shinn; Lin, Shih-Wei; Lin, Sheng-Di

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate experimentally the two-terminal magnetic sensors exhibiting an extraordinary magneto-resistance effect by using an InGaAs quantum well channel with a metal-shunting structure. A high magneto-resistance of 17.3% and a sensitivity of 488.1 Ω/T have been obtained at 1 T and room temperature with our geometrical design. The two-contact configuration and the high-mobility electron transistor-compatible epitaxy structure make the devices promising for high-sensitivity magnetic sensing integration and applications.

  9. Magnetization reversal in individual Py and CoFeB nanotubes locally probed via anisotropic magnetoresistance and anomalous Nernst effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgaertl, K.; Heimbach, F.; Maendl, S.; Rueffer, D.; Fontcuberta i Morral, A.; Grundler, D.

    2016-03-01

    Using anisotropic magnetoresistance in a multi-probe configuration and local heating with a scanning laser, we investigate the magnetization reversal of individual permalloy (Py) and CoFeB nanotubes with spatial resolution. Nanocrystalline Py and amorphous CoFeB nanotubes are found to reverse via domain wall movement and chirality switching, respectively. Our experiments provide an understanding of the role of microstructure and magnetic anisotropy in the switching of ferromagnetic nanotubes at room temperature.

  10. Extremely Large Magnetoresistance at Low Magnetic Field by Coupling the Nonlinear Transport Effect and the Anomalous Hall Effect.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhaochu; Xiong, Chengyue; Zhang, Xu; Guo, Zhen-Gang; Cai, Jianwang; Zhang, Xiaozhong

    2016-04-01

    The anomalous Hall effect of a magnetic material is coupled to the nonlinear transport effect of a semiconductor material in a simple structure to achieve a large geometric magnetoresistance (MR) based on a diode-assisted mechanism. An extremely large MR (>10(4) %) at low magnetic fields (1 mT) is observed at room temperature. This MR device shows potential for use as a logic gate for the four basic Boolean logic operations. PMID:26857904

  11. A novel NO2 gas sensor based on Hall effect operating at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, J. Y.; Xie, W. M.; He, X. L.; Wang, H. C.

    2016-09-01

    Tungsten trioxide nanoparticles were obtained by a simple thermal oxidation approach. The structural and morphological properties of these nanoparticles are investigated using XRD, SEM and TEM. A WO3 thick film was deposited on the four Au electrodes to be a WO3 Hall effect sensor. The sensor was tested between magnetic field in a plastic test chamber. Room-temperature nitrogen dioxide sensing characteristics of Hall effect sensor were studied for various concentration levels of nitrogen dioxide at dry air and humidity conditions. A typical room-temperature response of 3.27 was achieved at 40 ppm of NO2 with a response and recovery times of 36 and 45 s, respectively. NO2 gas sensing mechanism of Hall effect sensor was also studied. The room-temperature operation, with the low deposition cost of the sensor, suggests suitability for developing a low-power cost-effective nitrogen dioxide sensor.

  12. Room temperature spin transport in undoped (110) GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Yokota, Nobuhide Aoshima, Yohei; Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Kawaguchi, Hitoshi

    2014-02-17

    We are reporting on our first observation of a micrometer-order electron spin transport in a (110) GaAs/AlGaAs multiple quantum well (QW) at room temperature using a space- and time-resolved Kerr rotation technique. A 37-μm transport was observed within an electron spin lifetime of 1.2 ns at room temperature when using an in-plane electric field of 1.75 kV/cm. The spatio-temporal profiles of electron spins were well reproduced by the spin drift-diffusion equations coupled with the Poisson equation, supporting the validity of the measurement. The results suggest that (110) QWs are useful as a spin transport layer for semiconductor spintronic devices operating at room temperature.

  13. Room temperature optical and magnetic properties of polyvinylpyrrolidone capped ZnO nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Chakrabarti, Mahuya; Chakrabarti, Keka R.; Sanyal, D.; Chakrabarti, A.

    2009-09-15

    Defect induced room temperature ferromagnetic properties of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) capped nanocrystalline ZnO samples have been studied. Crystal phase and the lattice parameter of the synthesized nanocrystalline samples have been determined from X-ray diffraction spectra (XRD) and high-resolution transmission electron micrographs (HR-TEM). Room temperature photoluminescence (PL) spectrum for the bare ZnO sample shows a strong band at {approx} 379 nm and another band at {approx} 525 nm. The PL spectra also revealed that the number of oxygen vacancies in the uncapped sample is more than the PVP capped sample. Both sample exhibit ferromagnetic property at room temperature when annealed at 500 deg. C for 3 h, due to the formation of adequate oxygen vacancy related defects. The saturation magnetization for the annealed PVP capped sample is found to be larger compared to that for the uncapped sample.

  14. Room temperature supramolecular columnar liquid crystals formed by hydrogen bonding of isoquinoline derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyup Lee, Jun; Lee, Seung Jun; Jho, Jae Young

    2014-07-01

    We report new self-assembled discotic liquid crystals exhibiting columnar mesophases at room temperature, which are constructed by intermolecular hydrogen bonding between the core of 1,3,5-trihydroxybenzene or 1,3,5-cyclohexanetricarboxylic acid and the peripheral molecules of isoquinoline derivatives. The mesomorphic properties of supramolecular liquid crystals were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry, polarized optical microscopy, and X-ray diffraction studies. The self-assembled liquid crystals exhibited rectangular columnar phases (Colro) with an ordered stacking structure of the mesogens in a column at room temperature, regardless of the type of the core molecule, due probably to the close-packed aromatic rings around a core molecule and the angular structure in three arms of the discotic mesogen. These room temperature columnar phases are rare examples for the discotic liquid crystals, and our findings in the present study provide a new way to prepare low melting columnar liquid crystalline materials for molecular electronics.

  15. Giant dielectric and magnetoelectric responses in insulating nanogranular films at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Nobukiyo; Masumoto, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Saburo; Maekawa, Sadamichi

    2014-01-01

    The electric and magnetic properties of matter are of great interest for materials science and their use in electronic applications. Large dielectric and magnetoelectric responses of materials at room temperature are a great advantage for electromagnetic device applications. Here we present a study of FeCo-MgF nanogranular films exhibiting giant dielectric and magnetoelectric responses at room temperature; with dielectric constant ε′=490 and magnetoelectric response Δε′/ε′0=3%. In these films, Fe-Co alloy-based nanometer-sized magnetic granules are dispersed in a Mg-fluoride-based insulator matrix. Insulating nanogranular films are a new class of multifunctional materials. The giant responses are caused by spin-dependent charge oscillation between magnetic granules via quantum-mechanical tunnelling. A possible application of such insulating nanogranular materials with giant response is in the construction of a tunable device, in which impedance components such as capacitance and inductance are tunable at room temperature. PMID:25048805

  16. Quality of Red Blood Cells Isolated from Umbilical Cord Blood Stored at Room Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Zhurova, Mariia; Akabutu, John; Acker, Jason

    2012-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) from cord blood contain fetal hemoglobin that is predominant in newborns and, therefore, may be more appropriate for neonatal transfusions than currently transfused adult RBCs. Post-collection, cord blood can be stored at room temperature for several days before it is processed for stem cells isolation, with little known about how these conditions affect currently discarded RBCs. The present study examined the effect of the duration cord blood spent at room temperature and other cord blood characteristics on cord RBC quality. RBCs were tested immediately after their isolation from cord blood using a broad panel of quality assays. No significant decrease in cord RBC quality was observed during the first 65 hours of storage at room temperature. The ratio of cord blood to anticoagulant was associated with RBC quality and needs to be optimized in future. This knowledge will assist in future development of cord RBC transfusion product. PMID:24089645

  17. Magnetic switching of ferroelectric domains at room temperature in multiferroic PZTFT

    PubMed Central

    Evans, D.M.; Schilling, A.; Kumar, Ashok; Sanchez, D.; Ortega, N.; Arredondo, M.; Katiyar, R.S.; Gregg, J.M.; Scott, J.F.

    2013-01-01

    Single-phase magnetoelectric multiferroics are ferroelectric materials that display some form of magnetism. In addition, magnetic and ferroelectric order parameters are not independent of one another. Thus, the application of either an electric or magnetic field simultaneously alters both the electrical dipole configuration and the magnetic state of the material. The technological possibilities that could arise from magnetoelectric multiferroics are considerable and a range of functional devices has already been envisioned. Realising these devices, however, requires coupling effects to be significant and to occur at room temperature. Although such characteristics can be created in piezoelectric-magnetostrictive composites, to date they have only been weakly evident in single-phase multiferroics. Here in a newly discovered room temperature multiferroic, we demonstrate significant room temperature coupling by monitoring changes in ferroelectric domain patterns induced by magnetic fields. An order of magnitude estimate of the effective coupling coefficient suggests a value of ~1 × 10−7 sm−1. PMID:23443562

  18. Room-temperature spin-polarized organic light-emitting diodes with a single ferromagnetic electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Baofu Alameh, Kamal; Song, Qunliang

    2014-05-19

    In this paper, we demonstrate the concept of a room-temperature spin-polarized organic light-emitting diode (Spin-OLED) structure based on (i) the deposition of an ultra-thin p-type organic buffer layer on the surface of the ferromagnetic electrode of the Spin-OLED and (ii) the use of oxygen plasma treatment to modify the surface of that electrode. Experimental results demonstrate that the brightness of the developed Spin-OLED can be increased by 110% and that a magneto-electroluminescence of 12% can be attained for a 150 mT in-plane magnetic field, at room temperature. This is attributed to enhanced hole and room-temperature spin-polarized injection from the ferromagnetic electrode, respectively.

  19. A study of the microchemistry of nanocrystalline barium titanate with tetragonal and pseudocubic room temperature symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacey, Robert A.

    The investigation of possible effects of undesired surface species on barium titanate, one of the most utilized ferroelectric ceramics, constitutes the focus of this work. Six commercial barium titanate powders from three manufacturers representing two different synthesis processes, with average particle sizes from 40 nm to 470 nm, were analyzed in this study. Four of the nanopowders exhibited pseudocubic room temperature symmetry. Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform (DRIFT) spectroscopic analysis of the nanopowders was conducted in ambient atmosphere at room temperature. High temperature DRIFT followed incorporating four avenues of analysis: moisture adsorption studies, deuterium oxide exchange studies, carbon dioxide adsorption studies, and high temperature analysis under dry air and UHP nitrogen atmospheres. At the highest temperature used in this study, 1173K, moisture and the accompanying incorporated protonic impurities were still present. The powders readily readsorbed moisture during rapid cooling, 170K/minute, to room temperature. The smallest powder, as received, formed spherical agglomerates up to 10 mum diameter. These sintered as separate units attaining diameters up to 60 mum during intermediate stage sintering. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicated a surface contamination layer of 10 A to 18 A; 50--70% of which was barium carbonate, the balance being atmospheric adsorbed species. Samples cooled at 3K/minute after an 1173K calcine retained cubic symmetry as indicated with high temperature X-ray diffraction. However, spectral evidence was obtained indicating that upon the rapid cooling from the 1173K calcine, a reorientation to the room temperature tetragonal symmetry was observed. Further, SEM and TEM supported this finding with visual evidence of interfacial rearrangement including corroborating electron diffraction analysis. This data, therefore, substantiated the hypothesis that the cause of the room temperature pseudocubic

  20. Assessment of DNA encapsulation, a new room-temperature DNA storage method.

    PubMed

    Clermont, Dominique; Santoni, Sylvain; Saker, Safa; Gomard, Maite; Gardais, Eliane; Bizet, Chantal

    2014-06-01

    A new procedure for room-temperature storage of DNA was evaluated whereby DNA samples from human tissue, bacteria, and plants were stored under an anoxic and anhydrous atmosphere in small glass vials fitted in stainless-steel, laser-sealed capsules (DNAshells(®)). Samples were stored in DNAshells(®) at room temperature for various periods of time to assess any degradation and compare it to frozen control samples and those stored in GenTegra™ tubes. The study included analysis of the effect of accelerated aging by using a high temperature (76°C) at 50% relative humidity. No detectable DNA degradation was seen in samples stored in DNAshells(®) at room temperature for 18 months. Polymerase chain reaction experiments, pulsed field gel electrophoresis, and amplified fragment length polymorphism analyses also demonstrated that the protective properties of DNAshells(®) are not affected by storage under extreme conditions (76°C, 50% humidity) for 30 hours, guaranteeing 100 years without DNA sample degradation. However, after 30 hours of storage at 76°C, it was necessary to include adjustments to the process in order to avoid DNA loss. Successful protection of DNA was obtained for 1 week and even 1 month of storage at high temperature by adding trehalose, which provides a protective matrix. This study demonstrates the many advantages of using DNAshells(®) for room-temperature storage, particularly in terms of long-term stability, safety, transport, and applications for molecular biology research. PMID:24955733

  1. Assessment of DNA Encapsulation, a New Room-Temperature DNA Storage Method

    PubMed Central

    Santoni, Sylvain; Saker, Safa; Gomard, Maite; Gardais, Eliane; Bizet, Chantal

    2014-01-01

    A new procedure for room-temperature storage of DNA was evaluated whereby DNA samples from human tissue, bacteria, and plants were stored under an anoxic and anhydrous atmosphere in small glass vials fitted in stainless-steel, laser-sealed capsules (DNAshells®). Samples were stored in DNAshells® at room temperature for various periods of time to assess any degradation and compare it to frozen control samples and those stored in GenTegra™ tubes. The study included analysis of the effect of accelerated aging by using a high temperature (76°C) at 50% relative humidity. No detectable DNA degradation was seen in samples stored in DNAshells® at room temperature for 18 months. Polymerase chain reaction experiments, pulsed field gel electrophoresis, and amplified fragment length polymorphism analyses also demonstrated that the protective properties of DNAshells® are not affected by storage under extreme conditions (76°C, 50% humidity) for 30 hours, guaranteeing 100 years without DNA sample degradation. However, after 30 hours of storage at 76°C, it was necessary to include adjustments to the process in order to avoid DNA loss. Successful protection of DNA was obtained for 1 week and even 1 month of storage at high temperature by adding trehalose, which provides a protective matrix. This study demonstrates the many advantages of using DNAshells® for room-temperature storage, particularly in terms of long-term stability, safety, transport, and applications for molecular biology research. PMID:24955733

  2. Entang-bling: Observing quantum correlations in room-temperature solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walmsley, I. A.; Lee, K. C.; Sprague, M.; Sussman, B.; Nunn, J.; Langford, N.; Jin, X.-M.; Champion, T.; Michelberger, P.; Reim, K.; Uk, D.; Jaksch, D.

    2013-06-01

    Quantum entanglement in the motion of macroscopic solid bodies has implications both for quantum technologies and foundational studies of the boundary between the quantum and classical worlds. Entanglement is usually fragile in room-temperature solids, owing to strong interactions both internally and with the noisy environment. We generated motional entanglement between vibrational states of two spatially separated, millimeter-sized diamonds at room temperature. By measuring strong nonclassical correlations between Raman-scattered photons, we showed that the quantum state of the diamonds has positive concurrence with 98% probability. Our results show that entanglement can persist in the classical context of moving macroscopic solids in ambient conditions.

  3. Photoexcited Individual Nanowires: Key Elements in Room Temperature Detection of Oxidizing Gases

    SciTech Connect

    Prades, J. D.; Jimenez-Diaz, R.; Manzanares, M.; Andreu, T.; Cirera, A.; Romano-Rodriguez, A.; Morante, J. R.

    2009-05-23

    Illuminating metal oxide semiconductors with ultra-violet light is a feasible alternative to activate chemical reactions at their surface and thus, using them as gas sensors without the necessity of heating them. Here, the response at room temperature of individual single-crystalline SnO{sub 2} nanowires towards NO{sub 2} is studied in detail. The results reveal that similar responses to those obtained with thermally activated sensors can be achieved by choosing the optimal illumination conditions. This finding paves the way to the development of conductometric gas sensors operated at room temperature. The power consumption in these devices is in range with conventional micromachined sensors.

  4. Room-temperature fabrication of light-emitting thin films based on amorphous oxide semiconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Junghwan; Miyokawa, Norihiko; Ide, Keisuke; Toda, Yoshitake; Hiramatsu, Hidenori; Hosono, Hideo; Kamiya, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    We propose a light-emitting thin film using an amorphous oxide semiconductor (AOS) because AOS has low defect density even fabricated at room temperature. Eu-doped amorphous In-Ga-Zn-O thin films fabricated at room temperature emitted intense red emission at 614 nm. It is achieved by precise control of oxygen pressure so as to suppress oxygen-deficiency/excess-related defects and free carriers. An electronic structure model is proposed, suggesting that non-radiative process is enhanced mainly by defects near the excited states. AOS would be a promising host for a thin film phosphor applicable to flexible displays as well as to light-emitting transistors.

  5. High room temperature optical polarization due to spin-valley coupling in monolayer WS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanbicki, A. T.; McCreary, K. M.; Kioseoglou, G.; Currie, M.; Hellberg, C. S.; Friedman, A. L.; Jonker, B. T.

    2016-05-01

    We prepare single-layer WS2 films such that the photoluminescence is from either the neutral exciton or the negatively charged trion. While the neutral exciton emission has zero polarization at room temperature, we observe a room temperature optical polarization in excess of 40% for the trion. Using an applied gate voltage, we can modulate the electron density, and subsequently the polarization of the trion emission continuously from 20-40%. Both the polarization and the emission energy monotonically track the gate voltage with the emission energy increasing by 45 meV. We discuss the role electron capture by the exciton has on suppressing the intervalley scattering process.

  6. Experimental Verification of the Number Relation at Room and Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucas, L. J.; Martin, J. F.

    1983-01-01

    The accuracy of the Neuber equation for predicting notch root stress-strain behavior at room temperature and at 650 C was experimentally investigated. Strains on notched specimens were measured with a non-contacting, interferometric technique and stresses were simulated with smooth specimens. Predictions of notch root stress-strain response were made from the Neuber Equation and smooth specimen behavior. Neuber predictions gave very accurate results at room temperature. However, the predicted interaction of creep and stress relaxation differed from experimentally measured behavior at 650 C.

  7. A 2.5-2.7 THz Room Temperature Electronic Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrini, Alain; Mehdi, Imran; Lin, Robert; Siles, Jose Vicente; Lee, Choonsup; Gill, John; Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Schlecht, Erich; Bertrand, Thomas; Ward, John

    2011-01-01

    We report on a room temperature 2.5 to 2.7 THz electronic source based on frequency multipliers. The source utilizes a cascade of three frequency multipliers with W-band power amplifiers driving the first stage multiplier. Multiple-chip multipliers are utilized for the two initial stages to improve the power handling capability and a sub-micron anode is utilized for the final stage tripler. Room temperature measurements indicate that the source can put out a peak power of about 14 microwatts with more than 4 microwatts in the 2.5 to 2.7 THz range.

  8. Bi-modal Structure of Copper via Room-Temperature Partial Recrystallization After Cryogenic Dynamic Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Dong-Hyun; Lee, Dong Jun; Kang, Minju; Park, Lee Ju; Lee, Sunghak; Kim, Hyoung Seop

    2016-04-01

    P ure copper was compressed at high strain rates (over ~3 × 103 s-1) under liquid nitrogen. This deformation resulted in bi-modal microstructures of ultrafine grains and abnormally grown micro grains, and in greater hardness (by ~30 Hv) than room-temperature, dynamically deformed copper. This bi-modal microstructure is attributable to partial recrystallization at room temperature, activated by high-energy states and by twins generated at high Zener-Hollomon parameter conditions. This result demonstrates a new approach for producing bi-modally structured materials.

  9. The role of hydrogen in room-temperature ferromagnetism at graphite surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Ohldag, Hendrik

    2011-08-12

    We present a x-ray dichroism study of graphite surfaces that addresses the origin and magnitude of ferromagnetism in metal-free carbon. We find that, in addition to carbon {pi} states, also hydrogen-mediated electronic states exhibit a net spin polarization with significant magnetic remanence at room temperature. The observed magnetism is restricted to the top {approx}10 nm of the irradiated sample where the actual magnetization reaches {approx_equal} 15 emu/g at room temperature. We prove that the ferromagnetism found in metal-free untreated graphite is intrinsic and has a similar origin as the one found in proton bombarded graphite.

  10. Room temperature operational single electron transistor fabricated by focused ion beam deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karre, P. Santosh Kumar; Bergstrom, Paul L.; Mallick, Govind; Karna, Shashi P.

    2007-07-01

    We present the fabrication and room temperature operation of single electron transistors using 8nm tungsten islands deposited by focused ion beam deposition technique. The tunnel junctions are fabricated using oxidation of tungsten in peracetic acid. Clear Coulomb oscillations, showing charging and discharging of the nanoislands, are seen at room temperature. The device consists of an array of tunnel junctions; the tunnel resistance of individual tunnel junction of the device is calculated to be as high as 25.13GΩ. The effective capacitance of the array of tunnel junctions was found to be 0.499aF, giving a charging energy of 160.6meV.

  11. Exploiting fast detectors to enter a new dimension in room-temperature crystallography

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, Robin L. Paterson, Neil; Axford, Danny; Aishima, Jun; Schulze-Briese, Clemens; Ren, Jingshan; Fry, Elizabeth E.; Stuart, David I.; Evans, Gwyndaf

    2014-05-01

    A departure from a linear or an exponential decay in the diffracting power of macromolecular crystals is observed and accounted for through consideration of a multi-state sequential model. A departure from a linear or an exponential intensity decay in the diffracting power of protein crystals as a function of absorbed dose is reported. The observation of a lag phase raises the possibility of collecting significantly more data from crystals held at room temperature before an intolerable intensity decay is reached. A simple model accounting for the form of the intensity decay is reintroduced and is applied for the first time to high frame-rate room-temperature data collection.

  12. Quantum confinement of zero-dimensional hybrid organic-inorganic polaritons at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, H. S.; Lafosse, X.; Amo, A.; Bouchoule, S.; Bloch, J.; Abdel-Baki, K.; Lauret, J.-S.; Deleporte, E.

    2014-02-24

    We report on the quantum confinement of zero-dimensional polaritons in perovskite-based microcavity at room temperature. Photoluminescence of discrete polaritonic states is observed for polaritons localized in symmetric sphere-like defects which are spontaneously nucleated on the top dielectric Bragg mirror. The linewidth of these confined states is found much sharper (almost one order of magnitude) than that of photonic modes in the perovskite planar microcavity. Our results show the possibility to study organic-inorganic cavity polaritons in confined microstructure and suggest a fabrication method to realize integrated polaritonic devices operating at room temperature.

  13. Room temperature perovskite production from bimetallic alkoxides by ketone assisted oxo supplementation (KAOS)

    SciTech Connect

    Gaskins, B.C.; Lannutti, J.J.

    1996-08-01

    Barium titanate has been prepared at room temperature from a well-characterized crystalline barium titanium oxo alkoxide by reaction with acetone. An aldol condensation apparently supplies oxygen to condensing oxo alkoxide clusters. Transmission electron microscopy confirms that the crystallites so formed are dense and perfect with an average size of approximately 85 A. Characterization of reactants and products provides a tentative understanding of structural evolution and the intermediates of the transformation. Crystalline SrTiO{sub 3} and BaZrO{sub 3} were also formed at room temperature by this same method. {copyright} {ital 1996 Materials Research Society.}

  14. Single Event Effects on Space Radiation Hardened 64K SRAMS at Room temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, O.; Schwartz, H.; McCarty, K.; Coss, J.; Barnes, C.

    1993-01-01

    The laser threshold linear Energy transfer for single event upsetscan be estimaed, even at room temperature, for space radiation hardened 64K SRAMs. The memories where independently developed to quality for the Qualified Manufacturer's List by IBM and Honeywell. The memory was so hard that high energy heavy ions generated by the Van de Graff could not determine the SEU threshold at room temperature. Use of pulsed Laser tests would meake it possible to forgo very expensive testing at ultra-high energy accelerators.

  15. Metal-Based Room-Temperature Operating Single Electron Devices Using Scanning Probe Oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Kazuhiko; Gotoh, Yoshitaka; TatsuroMaeda, TatsuroMaeda; Dagata, John; Harris, JamesS.

    1999-01-01

    Coulomb oscillation was clearly observed at room temperature in the singleelectron transistor fabricated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) nano-oxidationprocess. In order to obtain a clear Coulomb oscillation at room temperature, newand improved fabrication processes and measurement systems such as a pulse-modeAFM nano-oxidation process and a triaxial active feedback measurement system areintroduced. The Coulomb oscillation peaks appear with the period of 1.9 V at thedrain bias conditions of 0.25 V and 0.3 V. The current modulation rate ranges from20% to 30%.

  16. CeBr3 as a Room-Temperature, High-Resolution Gamma-Ray Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Guss, Michael Reed, Ding Yuan, Alexis Reed, and Sanjoy Mukhopadhyay

    2009-09-01

    Cerium bromide (CeBr3) has become a material of interest in the race for high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy at room temperature. This investigation quantified the potential of CeBr3 as a room temperature, high-resolution gamma-ray detector. The performance of CeBr3 crystals was compared to other scintillation crystals of similar dimensions and detection environments. Comparison of self-activity of CeBr3 to cerium-doped lanthanum tribromide (LaBr3:Ce) was performed. Energy resolution and relative intrinsic efficiency were measured and are presented.

  17. Experimental evidence of Ga-vacancy induced room temperature ferromagnetic behavior in GaN films

    SciTech Connect

    Roul, Basanta; Kumar, Mahesh; Rajpalke, Mohana K.; Bhat, Thirumaleshwara N.; Krupanidhi, S. B.; Kalghatgi, A. T.; Kumar, Nitesh; Sundaresan, A.

    2011-10-17

    We have grown Ga deficient GaN epitaxial films on (0001) sapphire substrate by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy and report the experimental evidence of room temperature ferromagnetic behavior. The observed yellow emission peak in room temperature photoluminescence spectra and the peak positioning at 300 cm{sup -1} in Raman spectra confirms the existence of Ga vacancies. The x-ray photoelectron spectroscopic measurements further confirmed the formation of Ga vacancies; since the N/Ga is found to be >1. The ferromagnetism is believed to originate from the polarization of the unpaired 2p electrons of N surrounding the Ga vacancy.

  18. Robust room temperature valley polarization in monolayer and bilayer WS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, Pramoda K.; Lin, Fan-Cheng; Yeh, Chao-Hui; Huang, Jer-Shing; Chiu, Po-Wen

    2016-03-01

    We report robust room temperature valley polarization in chemical-vapor-deposition (CVD) grown monolayer and bilayer WS2via polarization-resolved photoluminescence measurements using excitation below the bandgap. We show that excitation with energy slightly below the bandgap of the multi-valleyed transition metal chalcogenides can effectively suppress the random redistribution of excited electrons and, thereby, greatly enhance the efficiency of valley polarization at room temperature. Compared to mechanically exfoliated WS2, our CVD grown WS2 films also show enhancement in the coupling of spin, layer and valley degree of freedom and, therefore, provide improved valley polarization. At room temperature, using below-bandgap excitation and CVD grown monolayer and bilayer WS2, we have reached a record-high valley polarization of 35% and 80%, respectively, exceeding the previously reported values of 10% and 65% for mechanically exfoliated WS2 layers using resonant excitation. This observation provides a new direction to enhance valley control at room temperature.We report robust room temperature valley polarization in chemical-vapor-deposition (CVD) grown monolayer and bilayer WS2via polarization-resolved photoluminescence measurements using excitation below the bandgap. We show that excitation with energy slightly below the bandgap of the multi-valleyed transition metal chalcogenides can effectively suppress the random redistribution of excited electrons and, thereby, greatly enhance the efficiency of valley polarization at room temperature. Compared to mechanically exfoliated WS2, our CVD grown WS2 films also show enhancement in the coupling of spin, layer and valley degree of freedom and, therefore, provide improved valley polarization. At room temperature, using below-bandgap excitation and CVD grown monolayer and bilayer WS2, we have reached a record-high valley polarization of 35% and 80%, respectively, exceeding the previously reported values of 10% and 65% for

  19. Room temperature ballistic transport in InSb quantum well nanodevices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbertson, A. M.; Kormányos, A.; Buckle, P. D.; Fearn, M.; Ashley, T.; Lambert, C. J.; Solin, S. A.; Cohen, L. F.

    2011-12-01

    We report the room temperature observation of significant ballistic electron transport in shallow etched four-terminal mesoscopic devices fabricated on an InSb/AlInSb quantum well (QW) heterostructure with a crucial partitioned growth-buffer scheme. Ballistic electron transport is evidenced by a negative bend resistance signature which is quite clearly observed at 295 K and at current densities in excess of 106 A/cm2. This demonstrates unequivocally that by using effective growth and processing strategies, room temperature ballistic effects can be exploited in InSb/AlInSb QWs at practical device dimensions.

  20. Room-temperature single charge sensitivity in carbon nanotube field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, H. B.; Hughes, M. E.; Golovchenko, J. A.

    2006-12-01

    Electrical current fluctuation studies are reported for coaxial p-type and n-type single-wall carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (FETs). Abrupt discrete switching of the source-drain current is observed at room temperature. The authors attribute these random telegraph signals to charge fluctuating electron traps near the FET conduction channels. Evolution of the current-switching behavior associated with the occupancy of individual electron traps is demonstrated and analyzed statistically. The result strongly indicates room temperature single charge sensitivity in carbon nanotube FETs, which may offer potential applications for single molecule sensors based on suitably prepared FET devices.

  1. Lattice Changes in Shape Memory CuZnAl Alloys on Aging at Room Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çakmak, Seyfettýn; Artunç, Ekrem; Kayali, Nejdet; Adigüzel, Osman

    2001-09-01

    The aging behavior of CuZnAl martensites (Cu-21.62 wt.% Zn-5.68 wt.% Al and Cu-24.98 wt.% Zn-4.43 wt.% Al) at about 297 K was studied by analyzing diffraction line profiles obtained by X-ray diffractometry. For the alloys, the change of the lattice parameters and the tetragonality associated with the aging time at room temperature were investigated. The habit planes versus the aging time at room temperature were calculated using the De Vos-Aernoundt-Delaey model, based on the crystallographic theory of Wechsler-Lieberman-Read(WLR), and from the DO3→ 18R martensite transformation theory.

  2. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes sensor for organic liquid detection at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhary, Deepti; Khare, Neeraj; Vankar, V. D.

    2016-04-01

    We have explored the possibility of using multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) as room temperature chemical sensor for the detection of organic liquids such as ethanol, propanol, methanol and toluene. MWCNTs were synthesized by thermal chemical vapor deposition (TCVD) technique. The interdigitated electrodes were fabricated by conventional photolithography technique. The sensor was fabricated by drop depositing MWCNT suspension onto the interdigitated electrodes. The sensing properties of MWCNTs sensor was studied for organic liquids detection. The resistance of sensor was found to increase upon exposure to these liquids. Sensor shows good reversibility and fast response at room temperature. Charge transfer between the organic liquid and sensing element is the dominant sensing mechanism.

  3. Direct On-Surface Patterning of a Crystalline Laminar Covalent Organic Framework Synthesized at Room Temperature.

    PubMed

    de la Peña Ruigómez, Alejandro; Rodríguez-San-Miguel, David; Stylianou, Kyriakos C; Cavallini, Massimiliano; Gentili, Denis; Liscio, Fabiola; Milita, Silvia; Roscioni, Otello Maria; Ruiz-González, Maria Luisa; Carbonell, Carlos; Maspoch, Daniel; Mas-Ballesté, Rubén; Segura, José Luis; Zamora, Félix

    2015-07-20

    We report herein an efficient, fast, and simple synthesis of an imine-based covalent organic framework (COF) at room temperature (hereafter, RT-COF-1). RT-COF-1 shows a layered hexagonal structure exhibiting channels, is robust, and is porous to N2 and CO2 . The room-temperature synthesis has enabled us to fabricate and position low-cost micro- and submicropatterns of RT-COF-1 on several surfaces, including solid SiO2 substrates and flexible acetate paper, by using lithographically controlled wetting and conventional ink-jet printing. PMID:26095511

  4. Monte Carlo calculations of the magnetoresistance in magnetic multilayer structures with giant magnetoresistance effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prudnikov, V. V.; Prudnikov, P. V.; Romanovskiy, D. E.

    2016-06-01

    A Monte Carlo study of trilayer and spin-valve magnetic structures with giant magnetoresistance effects is carried out. The anisotropic Heisenberg model is used for description of magnetic properties of ultrathin ferromagnetic films forming these structures. The temperature and magnetic field dependences of magnetic characteristics are considered for ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic configurations of these multilayer structures. The methodology for determination of the magnetoresistance by the Monte Carlo method is introduced; this permits us to calculate the magnetoresistance of multilayer structures for different thicknesses of the ferromagnetic films. The calculated temperature dependence of the magnetoresistance agrees very well with the experimental results measured for the Fe(0 0 1)–Cr(0 0 1) multilayer structure and CFAS–Ag–CFAS–IrMn spin-valve structure based on the half-metallic Heusler alloy Co2FeAl0.5Si0.5.

  5. Magnetoresistance in magnetic and nonmagnetic rare earth compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gratz, E.; Maikis, M.; Bauer, E.; Nowotny, H.

    1995-02-01

    The temperature dependence of the magnetoresistance Δρ/ ρ of selected magnetic and nonmagnetic RE compounds in fields up to 10 T has been measured. The discussion of the positive magnetoresistance is based on Kohler's rule. It was found that deviations from Kohler's rule at low temperatures depend on the magnitude of the individual residual resistivity. Ferromagnetic compounds exhibit negative values and a minimum in the vicinity of the Curie temperature in accordance to a model calculation of Yamada and Takada. The positive Δρ/ ρ contribution in the low temperature region, observed in all magnetic compounds, is due to the dominating classical magnetoresistance in this temperature range.

  6. Enhanced performance of room-temperature-grown epitaxial thin films of vanadium dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Nag, Joyeeta; Payzant, E Andrew; More, Karren Leslie; HaglundJr., Richard F

    2011-01-01

    Stoichiometric vanadium dioxide in bulk, thin film and nanostructured forms exhibits an insulator-to-metal transition (IMT) accompanied by a structural phase transformation, induced by temperature, light, electric fields, doping or strain. We have grown epitaxial films of vanadium dioxide on c-plane (0001) of sapphire using two different procedures involving (1) room temperature growth followed by annealing and (2) direct high temperature growth. Strain at the film-substrate interface due to growth at different temperatures leads to interesting differences in morphologies and phase transition characteristics. Comparison of the morphologies and switching characteristics of the two films shows that contrary to conventional wisdom, the room-temperature grown films have smoother, more continuous morphologies and better switching performance, consistent with the behavior of epitaxially grown semiconductors.

  7. Thermal diffusivity and specific heat of dental casting alloys at room and elevated temperatures.

    PubMed

    Asaoka, K

    1997-06-01

    Thermal diffusivity and specific heat of four groups of dental casting alloys (Ag-based, Au-Pd, high karat and Ni-based alloys) were determined. Measurements were carried out from room temperature to 750 degrees C in an evacuated electric furnace with a laser flash thermal constant analyzer. There was no significant difference between the values of thermal diffusivity in the Ag-based and high karat alloys; 18-24 and 40-53 mm2/s, at room temperature and at 600 degrees C, respectively. For Au-Pd and Ni-based alloys, diffusivity was 8-12 and 3-4 mm2/s at room temperature, and 19-22 and 5-6 mm2/s at 600 degrees C, respectively. The thermal diffusivity of the alloys was significantly low compared to that of the pure-metals of which they were composed. Specific heat was determined as 0.14-0.16, 0.24-0.34, 0.17-0.19 and 0.45-0.51 kJ/(kg.K) for high karat, Ag-based, Au-Pd and Ni-based alloys, respectively, at room temperature. Oxidation of the Ni-based alloy at elevated temperature affected the value of specific heat measured. PMID:9550004

  8. Self-generated Local Heating Induced Nanojoining for Room Temperature Pressureless Flexible Electronic Packaging

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Peng; Hu, Anming; Gerlich, Adrian P.; Liu, Yangai; Zhou, Y. Norman

    2015-01-01

    Metallic bonding at an interface is determined by the application of heat and/or pressure. The means by which these are applied are the most critical for joining nanoscale structures. The present study considers the feasibility of room-temperature pressureless joining of copper wires using water-based silver nanowire paste. A novel mechanism of self-generated local heating within the silver nanowire paste and copper substrate system promotes the joining of silver-to-silver and silver-to-copper without any external energy input. The localized heat energy was delivered in-situ to the interfaces to promote atomic diffusion and metallic bond formation with the bulk component temperature stays near room-temperature. This local heating effect has been detected experimentally and confirmed by calculation. The joints formed at room-temperature without pressure achieve a tensile strength of 5.7 MPa and exhibit ultra-low resistivity in the range of 101.3 nOhm·m. The good conductivity of the joint is attributed to the removal of organic compounds in the paste and metallic bonding of silver-to-copper and silver-to-silver. The water-based silver nanowire paste filler material is successfully applied to various flexible substrates for room temperature bonding. The use of chemically generated local heating may become a potential method for energy in-situ delivery at micro/nanoscale. PMID:25788019

  9. Numerical Modelling of Airflow and Temperature Distribution in a Living Room with Different Heat Exchange Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gendelis, S.; Jakovičs, A.

    2010-01-01

    Numerical mathematical modelling of the indoor thermal conditions and of the energy losses for separate rooms is an important part of the analysis of the heat-exchange balance and energy efficiency in buildings. The measurements of heat transfer coefficients for bounding structures, the air-tightness tests and thermographic diagnostics done for a building allow the influence of those factors to be predicted more correctly in developed numerical models. The temperature distribution and airflows in a typical room (along with the heat losses) were calculated for different heater locations and solar radiation (modelled as a heat source) through the window, as well as various pressure differences between the openings in opposite walls. The airflow velocities and indoor temperature, including its gradient, were also analysed as parameters of thermal comfort conditions. The results obtained show that all of the listed factors have an important influence on the formation of thermal comfort conditions and on the heat balance in a room.

  10. A phenomenological Landauer-type theory on colossal magnetoresistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, M.; Tian, G.-S.; Lin, T.-H.

    1996-12-01

    A two-dimensional interacting magnetic domains model is examined to explain the colossal magnetoresistance (CMR) recently observed in manganese-oxides. Electrons transport properties were studied by using Landauer's multichannel transport theory and recursive Green's function technique. Colossal magnetoresistance shows up in this system. The temperature dependence of system's MR is also studied.

  11. Shuttle suppression in room temperature sodium-sulfur batteries using ion selective polymer membranes.

    PubMed

    Bauer, I; Kohl, M; Althues, H; Kaskel, S

    2014-03-25

    A sodiated Nafion-coating on a porous polypropylene backbone was used as a cation selective separator for room temperature sodium-sulfur batteries. The capacity of the cells after 20 cycles could be enhanced by 75% to 350 mA h g(sulfur)(-1) using the new separator. PMID:24522659

  12. Palladium-Catalyzed Chemoselective and Biocompatible Functionalization of Cysteine-Containing Molecules at Room Temperature.

    PubMed

    Al-Shuaeeb, Riyadh Ahmed Atto; Kolodych, Sergii; Koniev, Oleksandr; Delacroix, Sébastien; Erb, Stéphane; Nicolaÿ, Stéphanie; Cintrat, Jean-Christophe; Brion, Jean-Daniel; Cianférani, Sarah; Alami, Mouâd; Wagner, Alain; Messaoudi, Samir

    2016-08-01

    The third generation of aminobiphenyl palladacycle pre-catalyst "G3-Xantphos" enables functionalization of peptides containing cysteine in high yields. The conjugation (bioconjugation) occurs chemoselectively at room temperature under biocompatible conditions. Extension of the method to protein functionalization allows selective bioconjugation of the trastuzumab antibody. PMID:27362372

  13. Room-temperature operation of a Co:MgF2 laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welford, D.; Moulton, P. F.

    1988-01-01

    A normal-mode, pulsed Co:MgF2 laser has been operated at room temperature for the first time. Continuous tuning from 1750 to 2500 nm with pulse energies up to 70 mJ and 46-percent slope efficiency was obtained with a 1338-nm Nd:YAG pump laser.

  14. Electrical Resistivity of Natural Diamond and Diamond Films Between Room Temperature and 1200 C: Status Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandersande, Jan W.; Zoltan, L. D.

    1993-01-01

    The electrical resistivity of diamond films has been measured between room temperature and 1200 C. The films were grown by either microwave Plasma CVD or combustion flame at three different places. The resistivities of the current films are compared to those measured for both natural IIa diamond and films grown only one to two years ago.

  15. Room-Temperature Gold-Catalysed Arylation of Heteroarenes: Complementarity to Palladium Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Cresswell, Alexander J; Lloyd-Jones, Guy C

    2016-08-26

    Tailoring of the pre-catalyst, the oxidant and the arylsilane enables the first room-temperature, gold-catalysed, innate C-H arylation of heteroarenes. Regioselectivity is consistently high and, in some cases, distinct from that reported with palladium catalysis. Tolerance to halides and boronic esters, in both the heteroarene and silane partners, provides orthogonality to Suzuki-Miyaura coupling. PMID:27325239

  16. Laser action from a terbium beta-ketoenolate at room temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorklund, S.; Filipescu, N.; Hurt, C. R.; Kellermeyer, G.; Mc Avoy, N.

    1969-01-01

    Laser activity is achieved in a solution of terbium tris at room temperature in a liquid solvent of acetonitrile or p-dioxane. After precipitation, the microcrystals of hydrated tris chelate are filtered, washed in distilled water, and dried. They show no signs of deterioration after storage.

  17. Red-light-emitting laser diodes operating CW at room temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kressel, H.; Hawrylo, F. Z.

    1976-01-01

    Heterojunction laser diodes of AlGaAs have been prepared with threshold current densities substantially below those previously achieved at room temperature in the 7200-8000-A spectral range. These devices operate continuously with simple oxide-isolated stripe contacts to 7400 A, which extends CW operation into the visible (red) portion of the spectrum.

  18. Deterministic switching of ferromagnetism at room temperature using an electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heron, J. T.; Bosse, J. L.; He, Q.; Gao, Y.; Trassin, M.; Ye, L.; Clarkson, J. D.; Wang, C.; Liu, Jian; Salahuddin, S.; Ralph, D. C.; Schlom, D. G.; Íñiguez, J.; Huey, B. D.; Ramesh, R.

    2014-12-01

    The technological appeal of multiferroics is the ability to control magnetism with electric field. For devices to be useful, such control must be achieved at room temperature. The only single-phase multiferroic material exhibiting unambiguous magnetoelectric coupling at room temperature is BiFeO3 (refs 4 and 5). Its weak ferromagnetism arises from the canting of the antiferromagnetically aligned spins by the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya (DM) interaction. Prior theory considered the symmetry of the thermodynamic ground state and concluded that direct 180-degree switching of the DM vector by the ferroelectric polarization was forbidden. Instead, we examined the kinetics of the switching process, something not considered previously in theoretical work. Here we show a deterministic reversal of the DM vector and canted moment using an electric field at room temperature. First-principles calculations reveal that the switching kinetics favours a two-step switching process. In each step the DM vector and polarization are coupled and 180-degree deterministic switching of magnetization hence becomes possible, in agreement with experimental observation. We exploit this switching to demonstrate energy-efficient control of a spin-valve device at room temperature. The energy per unit area required is approximately an order of magnitude less than that needed for spin-transfer torque switching. Given that the DM interaction is fundamental to single-phase multiferroics and magnetoelectrics, our results suggest ways to engineer magnetoelectric switching and tailor technologically pertinent functionality for nanometre-scale, low-energy-consumption, non-volatile magnetoelectronics.

  19. Light-induced long-range hydrogen motion in a-Si:H at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheong, Hyeonsik M.; Lee, S.-H.; Nelson, B. P.; Mascarenhas, A.; Deb, S. K.

    2001-03-01

    We demonstrate that one can detect minuscule amounts of hydrogen diffusion out of a-Si:H under illumination at room temperature, by monitoring the changes in the Raman spectrum of a-WO3 as a function of illumination. The Staebler-Wronski effect, the light-induce creation of metastable defects in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H), has been one of the major problems that has limited the performance of solar cells based on this material. The recently suggested ¡®hydrogen collision model¡¯ can explain many aspects of the Staebler-Wronski effect, but assumes that the photogenerated mobile hydrogen atoms can move a long distance at room temperature. However, light-induced hydrogen motion in a-Si:H has not been experimentally observed at room temperature. We utilized the high sensitivity of the Raman spectrum of electrochromic a-WO3 to hydrogen insertion to probe the long-range motion of hydrogen at room temperature. We deposited a thin (200 nm) layer of a-WO3 on top of a-Si:H, and under illumination, a change in the Raman spectrum was detected. By comparing the Raman signal changes with those for control experiments where hydrogen is electrochemically inserted into a-WO_3, we can estimate semiquantitatively the amount of hydrogen that diffuses out of the a-Si:H layer.

  20. GREEN SYNTHESIS OF SILVER AND PALLADIUM NANOPARTICLES AT ROOM TEMPERATURE USING COFFEE AND TEA EXTRACT

    EPA Science Inventory

    An extremely simple green approach that generates bulk quantities of nanocrystals of noble metals such as silver (Ag) and palladium (Pd) using coffee and tea extract at room temperature is described. The single-pot method uses no surfactant, capping agent, and/or template. The ob...

  1. Deterministic switching of ferromagnetism at room temperature using an electric field.

    PubMed

    Heron, J T; Bosse, J L; He, Q; Gao, Y; Trassin, M; Ye, L; Clarkson, J D; Wang, C; Liu, Jian; Salahuddin, S; Ralph, D C; Schlom, D G; Iñiguez, J; Huey, B D; Ramesh, R

    2014-12-18

    The technological appeal of multiferroics is the ability to control magnetism with electric field. For devices to be useful, such control must be achieved at room temperature. The only single-phase multiferroic material exhibiting unambiguous magnetoelectric coupling at room temperature is BiFeO3 (refs 4 and 5). Its weak ferromagnetism arises from the canting of the antiferromagnetically aligned spins by the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya (DM) interaction. Prior theory considered the symmetry of the thermodynamic ground state and concluded that direct 180-degree switching of the DM vector by the ferroelectric polarization was forbidden. Instead, we examined the kinetics of the switching process, something not considered previously in theoretical work. Here we show a deterministic reversal of the DM vector and canted moment using an electric field at room temperature. First-principles calculations reveal that the switching kinetics favours a two-step switching process. In each step the DM vector and polarization are coupled and 180-degree deterministic switching of magnetization hence becomes possible, in agreement with experimental observation. We exploit this switching to demonstrate energy-efficient control of a spin-valve device at room temperature. The energy per unit area required is approximately an order of magnitude less than that needed for spin-transfer torque switching. Given that the DM interaction is fundamental to single-phase multiferroics and magnetoelectrics, our results suggest ways to engineer magnetoelectric switching and tailor technologically pertinent functionality for nanometre-scale, low-energy-consumption, non-volatile magnetoelectronics. PMID:25519134

  2. Room temperature ferromagnetism in ZnO using non-magnetic dopants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Nasir; Atri, Asha; Singh, Budhi; Ghosh, Subhasis

    2016-05-01

    We studied the magnetic properties of Ag and Cu doped ZnO thin films deposited by magnetron sputtering. Robust room temperature ferromagnetism is observed in the films. Comparative to Cu doped films Ag doped films shows significant increase in ferromagnetism. Spectroscopic ellipsometry studies are also done to see the change in band structure with different metal doping content.

  3. Adhesive for polyester films cures at room temperature, has high initial tack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christian, C. M.; Fust, G. W.; Welchel, C. J.

    1966-01-01

    Quick room-temperature-cure adhesive bonds polyester-insulated flat electrical cables to metal surfaces and various other substrates. The bond strength of the adhesive may be considerably increased by first applying a commercially available polyamide primer to the polyester film.

  4. Extreme Sensitivity of Room-Temperature Photoelectric Effect for Terahertz Detection.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhiming; Zhou, Wei; Tong, Jinchao; Huang, Jingguo; Ouyang, Cheng; Qu, Yue; Wu, Jing; Gao, Yanqing; Chu, Junhao

    2016-01-01

    Extreme sensitivity of room-temperature photoelectric effect for terahertz (THz) detection is demonstrated by generating extra carriers in an electromagnetic induced well located at the semiconductor, using a wrapped metal-semiconductor-metal configuration. The excellent performance achieved with THz detectors shows great potential to open avenues for THz detection. PMID:26542882

  5. Superluminal and Ultra-Slow Light Propagation in Room-Temperature Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Robert W.; Bigelow, Matthew S.; Lepeshkin, Nick N.

    2004-12-01

    We have observed ultra-slow light propagation (57 m s-1) in ruby and superluminal (-800 m s-1) light propagation in alexandrite at room temperature. The modified light speed results from the rapid variation in refractive index associated with spectral holes and antiholes produced by the process of coherent population oscillations.

  6. Aqueous synthesis of porous platinum nanotubes at room temperature and their intrinsic peroxidase-like activity.

    PubMed

    Cai, Kai; Lv, Zhicheng; Chen, Kun; Huang, Liang; Wang, Jing; Shao, Feng; Wang, Yanjun; Han, Heyou

    2013-07-11

    Platinum nanotubes (PtNTs) exhibiting high porosity were constructed by sacrificing the exterior of tellurium nanowires (TeNWs) and disintegrating the inner part spontaneously in aqueous solution at room temperature, in which the Kirkendall effect may play an important role. The present PtNTs exhibited intrinsic peroxidase-like activity in the presence of H2O2. PMID:23598712

  7. Crystal induced phosphorescence from Benz(a)anthracene microcrystals at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Maity, Samir; Mazumdar, Prativa; Shyamal, Milan; Sahoo, Gobinda Prasad; Misra, Ajay

    2016-03-15

    Pure organic compounds that are also phosphorescent at room temperature are very rare in literature. Here, we report efficient phosphorescence emission from aggregated hydrosol of Benz(a)anthracene (BaA) at room temperature. Aggregated hydrosol of BaA has been synthesized by re-precipitation method and SDS is used as morphology directing agent. Morphology of the particles is characterized using optical and scanning electronic microcopy (SEM). Photophysical properties of the aggregated hydrosol are carried out using UV-vis, steady state and time resolved fluorescence study. The large stoke shifted structured emission from aggregated hydrosol of BaA has been explained due to phosphorescence emission of BaA at room temperature. In the crystalline state, the restricted intermolecular motions (RIM) such as rotations and vibrations are activated by crystal lattice. This rigidification effect makes the chromophore phosphorescent at room temperature. The possible stacking arrangement of the neighboring BaA within the aggregates has been substantiated by computing second order Fukui parameter as local reactivity descriptors. Computational study also reveals that the neighboring BaA molecules are present in parallel slipped conformation in its aggregated crystalline form. PMID:26720419

  8. A Knoevenagel Initiated Annulation Reaction Using Room Temperature or Microwave Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, A. Gilbert

    2007-01-01

    An experiment is presented that has the student execute a Knoevenagel initiated annulation reaction. The reaction can be carried out either through use of a microwave reactor or by allowing the mixture to stand at room temperature for two days. The student is then challenged to identify the reaction product through a guided prelab exercise of the…

  9. Homogeneous linewidths of Rhodamine 6G at room temperature from cavity-enhanced spontaneous emission rates

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, M.D.; Whitten, W.B.; Arnold, S.; Ramsey, J.M. )

    1992-11-15

    Fluorescence lifetimes of Rhodamine 6G in levitated micron-sized droplets have been measured using a time-correlated photon counting technique. The coupling of emission into spherical cavity modes of the droplet results in significant emission rate enhancements which allow estimation of the homogeneous linewidth at room temperature.

  10. Robust room temperature valley polarization in monolayer and bilayer WS2.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Pramoda K; Lin, Fan-Cheng; Yeh, Chao-Hui; Huang, Jer-Shing; Chiu, Po-Wen

    2016-03-21

    We report robust room temperature valley polarization in chemical-vapor-deposition (CVD) grown monolayer and bilayer WS2via polarization-resolved photoluminescence measurements using excitation below the bandgap. We show that excitation with energy slightly below the bandgap of the multi-valleyed transition metal chalcogenides can effectively suppress the random redistribution of excited electrons and, thereby, greatly enhance the efficiency of valley polarization at room temperature. Compared to mechanically exfoliated WS2, our CVD grown WS2 films also show enhancement in the coupling of spin, layer and valley degree of freedom and, therefore, provide improved valley polarization. At room temperature, using below-bandgap excitation and CVD grown monolayer and bilayer WS2, we have reached a record-high valley polarization of 35% and 80%, respectively, exceeding the previously reported values of 10% and 65% for mechanically exfoliated WS2 layers using resonant excitation. This observation provides a new direction to enhance valley control at room temperature. PMID:26927489

  11. 40 CFR Table B-4 to Subpart B of... - Line Voltage and Room Temperature Test Conditions

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Conditions B Table B-4 to Subpart B of Part 53 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Testing Performance Characteristics of Automated Methods for SO2, CO, O3, and NO2 Pt. 53, Subpt. B, Table B-4 Table B-4 to Subpart B of Part 53—Line Voltage and Room Temperature Test Conditions Test...

  12. 40 CFR Table B-4 to Subpart B of... - Line Voltage and Room Temperature Test Conditions

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Conditions B Table B-4 to Subpart B of Part 53 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Testing Performance Characteristics of Automated Methods for SO2, CO, O3, and NO2 Pt. 53, Subpt. B, Table B-4 Table B-4 to Subpart B of Part 53—Line Voltage and Room Temperature Test Conditions Test...

  13. 40 CFR Table B-4 to Subpart B of... - Line Voltage and Room Temperature Test Conditions

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Conditions B Table B-4 to Subpart B of Part 53 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Testing Performance Characteristics of Automated Methods for SO2, CO, O3, and NO2 Pt. 53, Subpt. B, Table B-4 Table B-4 to Subpart B of Part 53—Line Voltage and Room Temperature Test Conditions Test...

  14. Crystal induced phosphorescence from Benz(a)anthracene microcrystals at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maity, Samir; Mazumdar, Prativa; Shyamal, Milan; Sahoo, Gobinda Prasad; Misra, Ajay

    2016-03-01

    Pure organic compounds that are also phosphorescent at room temperature are very rare in literature. Here, we report efficient phosphorescence emission from aggregated hydrosol of Benz(a)anthracene (BaA) at room temperature. Aggregated hydrosol of BaA has been synthesized by re-precipitation method and SDS is used as morphology directing agent. Morphology of the particles is characterized using optical and scanning electronic microcopy (SEM). Photophysical properties of the aggregated hydrosol are carried out using UV-vis, steady state and time resolved fluorescence study. The large stoke shifted structured emission from aggregated hydrosol of BaA has been explained due to phosphorescence emission of BaA at room temperature. In the crystalline state, the restricted intermolecular motions (RIM) such as rotations and vibrations are activated by crystal lattice. This rigidification effect makes the chromophore phosphorescent at room temperature. The possible stacking arrangement of the neighboring BaA within the aggregates has been substantiated by computing second order Fukui parameter as local reactivity descriptors. Computational study also reveals that the neighboring BaA molecules are present in parallel slipped conformation in its aggregated crystalline form.

  15. RANEY® Ni catalyzed transfer hydrogenation of levulinate esters to γ-valerolactone at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhen; Huang, Yao-Bing; Guo, Qing-Xiang; Fu, Yao

    2013-06-11

    A catalytic transfer hydrogenation process was developed for the production of γ-valerolactone (GVL) from ethyl levulinate (EL) and a H-donor at room temperature. Ethyl levulinate was almost quantitatively converted to γ-valerolactone. Further, a two step process for producing GVL from biomass derived platform molecules was also reported. PMID:23648801

  16. Structure determination of an integral membrane protein at room temperature from crystals in situ

    SciTech Connect

    Axford, Danny; Foadi, James; Hu, Nien-Jen; Choudhury, Hassanul Ghani; Iwata, So; Beis, Konstantinos; Evans, Gwyndaf; Alguel, Yilmaz

    2015-05-14

    The X-ray structure determination of an integral membrane protein using synchrotron diffraction data measured in situ at room temperature is demonstrated. The structure determination of an integral membrane protein using synchrotron X-ray diffraction data collected at room temperature directly in vapour-diffusion crystallization plates (in situ) is demonstrated. Exposing the crystals in situ eliminates manual sample handling and, since it is performed at room temperature, removes the complication of cryoprotection and potential structural anomalies induced by sample cryocooling. Essential to the method is the ability to limit radiation damage by recording a small amount of data per sample from many samples and subsequently assembling the resulting data sets using specialized software. The validity of this procedure is established by the structure determination of Haemophilus influenza TehA at 2.3 Å resolution. The method presented offers an effective protocol for the fast and efficient determination of membrane-protein structures at room temperature using third-generation synchrotron beamlines.

  17. A gadolinium(iii) complex that shows room-temperature phosphorescence in the crystalline state.

    PubMed

    Nakai, Hidetaka; Kitagawa, Kazuhiro; Seo, Juncheol; Matsumoto, Takahiro; Ogo, Seiji

    2016-07-19

    This paper presents a gadolinium(iii) complex that shows blue phosphorescence in the crystalline state at room temperature under air atmosphere; color of the crystals can be changed to pale-green from blue by doping of 1-naphthol. PMID:27221814

  18. Room-temperature phosphorescence logic gates developed from nucleic acid functionalized carbon dots and graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Gui, Rijun; Jin, Hui; Wang, Zonghua; Zhang, Feifei; Xia, Jianfei; Yang, Min; Bi, Sai; Xia, Yanzhi

    2015-05-14

    Room-temperature phosphorescence (RTP) logic gates were developed using capture ssDNA (cDNA) modified carbon dots and graphene oxide (GO). The experimental results suggested the feasibility of these developed RTP-based "OR", "INHIBIT" and "OR-INHIBIT" logic gate operations, using Hg(2+), target ssDNA (tDNA) and doxorubicin (DOX) as inputs. PMID:25882250

  19. High performance nickel-palladium nanocatalyst for hydrogen generation from alkaline hydrous hydrazine at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharjee, Debaleena; Mandal, Kaustab; Dasgupta, Subrata

    2015-08-01

    Room temperature synthesized highly active bimetallic Ni60Pd40 nanocatalyst with large surface area (150 m2g-1) exerts 100% selectivity towards hydrogen generation (3 equivalents of gas in 60 min) from hydrous hydrazine under alkaline and ambient reaction conditions. This low noble metal content catalyst offers a new prospect for on-board hydrogen production system.

  20. Aerobic Oxidation in Nanomicelles of Aryl Alkynes, in Water at Room Temperature**

    PubMed Central

    Handa, Sachin; Fennewald, James C.; Rainey, Shane

    2014-01-01

    On the basis of the far higher solubility of oxygen gas inside the hydrocarbon core of nanomicelles, metal and peroxide free aerobic oxidation of aryl alkynes has been achieved in water at room temperature. Many examples are offered that illustrate broad functional group tolerance. The overall process is environmentally friendly, documented by the associated low E Factors. PMID:24616243

  1. Temperature dependent evolution of the electronic and local atomic structure in the cubic colossal magnetoresistive manganite La1-xSrxMnO3

    SciTech Connect

    Arenholz, Elke; Mannella, N.; Booth, C.H.; Rosenhahn, A.; Sell, B.C.; Nambu, A.; Marchesini, S.; Mun, B. S.; Yang, S.-H.; Watanabe, M.; Ibrahim, K.; Arenholz, E.; Young, A.; Guo, J.; Tomioka, Y.; Fadley, C.S.

    2007-12-06

    We have studied the temperature-dependent evolution of the electronic and local atomic structure in the cubic colossal magnetoresistive manganite La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}MnO{sub 3} (x= 0.3-0.4) with core and valence level photoemission (PE), x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS), extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and magnetometry. As the temperature is varied across the Curie temperature T{sub c}, our PE experiments reveal a dramatic change of the electronic structure involving an increase in the Mn spin moment from {approx} 3 {micro}B to {approx} 4 {micro}B, and a modification of the local chemical environment of the other constituent atoms indicative of electron localization on the Mn atom. These effects are reversible and exhibit a slow-timescale {approx}200 K-wide hysteresis centered at T{sub c}. Based upon the probing depths accessed in our PE measurements, these effects seem to survive for at least 35-50 {angstrom} inward from the surface, while other consistent signatures for this modification of the electronic structure are revealed by more bulk sensitive spectroscopies like XAS and XES/RIXS. We interpret these effects as spectroscopic fingerprints for polaron formation, consistent with the presence of local Jahn-Teller distortions of the MnO{sub 6} octahedra around the Mn atom, as revealed by the EXAFS data. Magnetic susceptibility measurements in addition show typical signatures of ferro-magnetic clusters formation well above the Curie temperature.

  2. Instantaneous radioiodination of rose bengal at room temperature and a cold-kit therefor. [DOE patent application

    DOEpatents

    O'Brien, H. Jr.; Hupf, H.B.; Wanek, P.M.

    The disclosure relates to the radioiodination of rose bengal at room temperature and a cold-kit therefor. A purified rose bengal tablet is stirred into acidified ethanol at or near room temperature, until a suspension forms. Reductant-free /sup 125/I/sup -/ is added and the resulting mixture stands until the exchange label reaction occurs at room temperature. A solution of sterile isotonic phosphate buffer and sodium hydroxide is added and the final resulting mixture is sterilized by filtration.

  3. Room-temperature magnetism on the zigzag edges of phosphorene nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Guang; Xu, Shenglong; Zhang, Wei; Ma, Tianxing; Wu, Congjun

    2016-08-01

    Searching for room-temperature ferromagnetic semiconductors has evolved into a broad field of material science and spintronics for decades, nevertheless, these novel states remain rare. Phosphorene, a monolayer black phosphorus with a puckered honeycomb lattice structure possessing a finite band gap and high carrier mobility, has been synthesized recently. Here we show, by means of two different large-scale quantum Monte Carlo methods, that relatively weak interactions can lead to remarkable edge magnetism in the phosphorene nanoribbons. The ground state constrained path quantum Monte Carlo simulations reveal strong ferromagnetic correlations along the zigzag edges, and the finite temperature determinant quantum Monte Carlo calculations show a high Curie temperature up to room temperature.

  4. Magnetoresistance and thermoelectric power of the Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O system

    SciTech Connect

    Mandal, P.; Poddar, A.; Das, A.N.; Chakraborty, A.; Ghosh, B.; Choudhury, P.; Lahiri, S.K.

    1988-11-01

    We report measurements of the electrical resistance, magnetoresistance, upper critical field, and thermoelectric power of Bi/sub 1/Sr/sub 1/Ca/sub 1/Cu/sub 2/O/sub x/. In the mixed-phase sample, the magnetoresistance is negligible above 120 K. It starts increasing at 116 K, passes through a maximum at about 103 K, and is followed by a sharp increase around 85 K. The thermoelectric power is positive and the hole concentration obtained from the room-temperature value of thermoelectric power is 0.165, which is in good agreement with the value 0.15 obtained by Tarascon et al. from titration and thermogravimetric-analysis experiments.

  5. Unusual angular dependent magnetoresistance in single-crystalline Co/Pt bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, X.; Li, J. X.; Ding, Z.; Liang, J. H.; Sun, L.; Wu, Y. Z.

    2016-05-01

    The magnetoresistance (MR) of the single-crystalline Co/Pt(111) bilayers was studied systematically as a function of Co or Pt thickness at room temperature. For Co thickness dCo < 6 nm, the resistances with in-plane magnetization M parallel ( R∥ ) and transverse ( R⊥ ) to current and with a perpendicular M normal ( RP ) to film show the unconventional behavior of RP>R∥>R⊥ . This MR behavior can be attributed to the combination effect of spin Hall MR with RP≈R∥>R⊥ and the geometrical size effect. In addition, the angular dependent magnetoresistance behavior of the (111)-oriented Co/Pt bilayer shows striking difference with that of the (001)-oriented Co/Pt bilayer.

  6. Development and Application of Wide Bandwidth Magneto-Resistive Sensor Based Eddy Current Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Russell A.; Simpson, John

    2010-01-01

    The integration of magneto-resistive sensors into eddy current probes can significantly expand the capabilities of conventional eddy current nondestructive evaluation techniques. The room temperature solid-state sensors have typical bandwidths in the megahertz range and resolutions of tens of microgauss. The low frequency sensitivity of magneto-resistive sensors has been capitalized upon in previous research to fabricate very low frequency eddy current sensors for deep flaw detection in multilayer conductors. In this work a modified probe design is presented to expand the capabilities of the device. The new probe design incorporates a dual induction source enabling operation from low frequency deep flaw detection to high frequency high resolution near surface material characterization. Applications of the probe for the detection of localized near surface conductivity anomalies are presented. Finite element modeling of the probe is shown to be in good agreement with experimental measurements.

  7. Room Temperature Oxide Deposition Approach to Fully Transparent, All-Oxide Thin-Film Transistors.

    PubMed

    Rembert, Thomas; Battaglia, Corsin; Anders, André; Javey, Ali

    2015-10-28

    A room temperature cathodic arc deposition technique is used to produce high-mobility ZnO thin films for low voltage thin-film transistors (TFTs) and digital logic inverters. All-oxide, fully transparent devices are fabricated on alkali-free glass and flexible polyimide foil, exhibiting high performance. This provides a practical materials platform for the low-temperature fabrication of all-oxide TFTs on virtually any substrate. PMID:26455916

  8. Room temperature broadband terahertz gains in graphene heterostructures based on inter-layer radiative transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Linlong; Du, Jinglei; Shi, Haofei Wei, Dongshan; Du, Chunlei

    2014-10-15

    We exploit inter-layer radiative transitions to provide gains to amplify terahertz waves in graphene heterostructures. This is achieved by properly doping graphene sheets and aligning their energy bands so that the processes of stimulated emissions can overwhelm absorptions. We derive an expression for the gain estimation and show the gain is insensitive to temperature variation. Moreover, the gain is broadband and can be strong enough to compensate the free carrier loss, indicating graphene based room temperature terahertz lasers are feasible.

  9. Thiazolylimines as novel ligand-systems for spin-crossover centred near room temperature.

    PubMed

    Struch, N; Wagner, N; Schnakenburg, G; Weisbarth, R; Klos, S; Beck, J; Lützen, A

    2016-09-28

    A new thiazolylimine ligand system for iron(ii) complexes which stabilises spin-crossover in solution and solid states with T1/2 temperatures around room temperature has been developed. This effect is studied in solution and solid states. Furthermore crystal packing effects are investigated offering a variety of T1/2 and even hysteresis centred at -3 °C in the solid state. PMID:27534997

  10. Experimental data of the static behavior of reinforced concrete beams at room and low temperature

    PubMed Central

    Mirzazadeh, M. Mehdi; Noël, Martin; Green, Mark F.

    2016-01-01

    This article provides data on the static behavior of reinforced concrete at room and low temperature including, strength, ductility, and crack widths of the reinforced concrete. The experimental data on the application of digital image correlation (DIC) or particle image velocimetry (PIV) in measuring crack widths and the accuracy and precision of DIC/PIV method with temperature variations when is used for measuring strains is provided as well. PMID:27158650

  11. Experimental data of the static behavior of reinforced concrete beams at room and low temperature.

    PubMed

    Mirzazadeh, M Mehdi; Noël, Martin; Green, Mark F

    2016-06-01

    This article provides data on the static behavior of reinforced concrete at room and low temperature including, strength, ductility, and crack widths of the reinforced concrete. The experimental data on the application of digital image correlation (DIC) or particle image velocimetry (PIV) in measuring crack widths and the accuracy and precision of DIC/PIV method with temperature variations when is used for measuring strains is provided as well. PMID:27158650

  12. Certification of NIST Room Temperature Low-Energy and High-Energy Charpy Verification Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Lucon, Enrico; McCowan, Chris N.; Santoyo, Ray L.

    2015-01-01

    The possibility for NIST to certify Charpy reference specimens for testing at room temperature (21 °C ± 1 °C) instead of −40 °C was investigated by performing 130 room-temperature tests from five low-energy and four high-energy lots of steel on the three master Charpy machines located in Boulder, CO. The statistical analyses performed show that in most cases the variability of results (i.e., the experimental scatter) is reduced when testing at room temperature. For eight out of the nine lots considered, the observed variability was lower at 21 °C than at −40 °C. The results of this study will allow NIST to satisfy requests for room-temperature Charpy verification specimens that have been received from customers for several years: testing at 21 °C removes from the verification process the operator’s skill in transferring the specimen in a timely fashion from the cooling bath to the impact position, and puts the focus back on the machine performance. For NIST, it also reduces the time and cost for certifying new verification lots. For one of the low-energy lots tested with a C-shaped hammer, we experienced two specimens jamming, which yielded unusually high values of absorbed energy. For both specimens, the signs of jamming were clearly visible. For all the low-energy lots investigated, jamming is slightly more likely to occur at 21 °C than at −40 °C, since at room temperature low-energy samples tend to remain in the test area after impact rather than exiting in the opposite direction of the pendulum swing. In the evaluation of a verification set, any jammed specimen should be removed from the analyses. PMID:26958453

  13. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Reproducible room temperature giant magnetocaloric effect in Fe-Rh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manekar, Meghmalhar; Roy, S. B.

    2008-10-01

    We present the results of magnetocaloric effect (MCE) studies in polycrystalline Fe-Rh alloy over a temperature range of 250-345 K across the first order antiferromagnetic to ferromagnetic transition. By measuring the MCE under various thermomagnetic histories, contrary to the long held belief, we show here explicitly that the giant MCE in Fe-Rh near room temperature does not vanish after the first field cycle. In spite of the fact that the virgin magnetization curve is lost after the first field cycle near room temperature, reproducibility in the MCE under multiple field cycles can be achieved by properly choosing a combination of isothermal and adiabatic field variation cycles in the field-temperature phase space. This reproducible MCE leads to a large effective refrigerant capacity of 324.42 J kg-1, which is larger than that of the well-known magnetocaloric material Gd5Si2Ge2. This information could be important as Fe-Rh has the advantage of having a working temperature of around 300 K, which can be used for room temperature magnetic refrigeration.

  14. Impact of Seasonal Variant Temperatures and Laboratory Room Ambient Temperature on Mortality of Rats with Ischemic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Gopalakrishanan, Sivakumar; Babu, Mg. Ramesh; Thangarajan, Rajesh; Punja, Dhiren; Jaganath, Vidyadhara Devarunda; Kanth, Akriti B.; Rao, Mohandas

    2016-01-01

    Introduction A popular rat model for hypoperfusion ischemic brain injury is bilateral common carotid artery occlusion (BCCAO). BCCAO surgery when performed in varying geographical locations and during different seasons of the year is reported to have variable mortality rates. Studies have also documented the diminishing influence of Ketamine-Xylazine (KT-XY) on thermoregulatory functions in rodents. Aim To explore the impact of seasonal variant temperatures and laboratory room ambient temperatures on mortality of rats following BCCAO surgery. Materials and Methods The study has two parts: 1 The first part is an analysis of a three year retrospective data to explore the association between the geographical season (hot summer and cold winter) induced laboratory room ambient temperature variations and the mortality rate in KT-XY anaesthetized BCCAO rats. 2. The second part investigated the effect of conditioned laboratory room ambient temperature (CAT) (23-250C) in KT-XY anaesthetized BCCAO group of rats. Rats were divided into 4 groups(n =8/group) as-Normal control, BCCAO and Sham BCCAO where they were all exposed to unconditioned ambient temperature (UCAT) during their surgery and postoperative care. And finally fourth group rats exposed to CAT during the BCCAO surgery and postoperative care. Results Pearson’s chi-square test indicates a significantly high association (p<0.006) between post-BCCAO mortality and hot season of the year. CAT during the hot season reduced the mortality rate (24% less) in post- BCCAO rats compared to the rats of UCAT. Conclusion Despite seasonal variations in temperature, conditioning the laboratory room ambient temperatures to 23–250C, induces hypothermia in KT-XY anaesthetized ischemic brain injured rodents and improves their survival rate. PMID:27190796

  15. Anomalous organic magnetoresistance from competing carrier-spin-dependent interactions with localized electronic and nuclear spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flatté, Michael E.

    Transport of carriers through disordered electronic energy landscapes occurs via hopping or tunneling through various sites, and can enhance the effects of carrier spin dynamics on the transport. When incoherent hopping preserves the spin orientation of carriers, the magnetic-field-dependent correlations between pairs of spins influence the charge conductivity of the material. Examples of these phenomena have been identified in hopping transport in organic semiconductors and colloidal quantum dots, as well as tunneling through oxide barriers in complex oxide devices, among other materials. The resulting room-temperature magnetic field effects on the conductivity or electroluminescence require external fields of only a few milliTesla. These magnetic field effects can be dramatically modified by changes in the local spin environment. Recent theoretical and experimental work has identified a regime for low-field magnetoresistance in organic semiconductors in which the spin-relaxing effects of localized nuclear spins and electronic spins interfere1. The regime is studied experimentally by the controlled addition of localized electronic spins, through the addition of a stable free radical (galvinoxyl) to a material (MEH-PPV) that exhibits substantial room-temperature magnetoresistance (20 initially suppressed by the doping, as the localized electronic spin mixes one of the two spins whose correlation controls the transport. At intermediate doping, when one spin is fully decohered but the other is not, there is a regime where the magnetoresistance is insensitive to the doping level. For much greater doping concentrations the magnetoresistance is fully suppressed as both spins that control the charge conductivity of the material are mixed. The behavior is described within a theoretical model describing the effect of carrier spin dynamics on the current. Generalizations to amorphous and other disordered crystalline semiconductors will also be described. This work was

  16. Low-field magnetoresistance up to 400 K in double perovskite Sr{sub 2}FeMoO{sub 6} synthesized by a citrate route

    SciTech Connect

    Harnagea, L.; Jurca, B.; Berthet, P.

    2014-03-15

    A wet-chemistry technique, namely the citrate route, has been used to prepare high-quality polycrystalline samples of double perovskite Sr{sub 2}FeMoO{sub 6}. We report on the evolution of magnetic and magnetoresistive properties of the synthesized samples as a function of three parameters (i) the pH of the starting solution, (ii) the decomposition temperature of the citrate precursors and (iii) the sintering conditions. The low-field magnetoresistance (LFMR) value of our best samples is as high as 5% at room temperature for an applied magnetic field of 1 kOe. Additionally, the distinguishing feature of these samples is the persistence of LFMR, with a reasonably large value, up to 400 K which is a crucial parameter for any practical application. Our study indicates that the enhancement of LFMR observed is due to a good compromise between the grain size distribution and their magnetic polarization. -- Graphical abstract: The microstructure (left panel) and corresponding low-field magnetoresistance of one of the Sr{sub 2}FeMoO{sub 6} samples synthesized in the course of this work. Highlights: • Samples of Sr{sub 2}FeMoO{sub 6} are prepared using a citrate route under varying conditions. • Magnetoresistive properties are improved and optimized. • Low-field magnetoresitence values as large as 5% at 300 K/1 kOe are reported. • Persistence of low-field magnetoresistance up to 400 K.

  17. Low-Temperature Photochemically Activated Amorphous Indium-Gallium-Zinc Oxide for Highly Stable Room-Temperature Gas Sensors.

    PubMed

    Jaisutti, Rawat; Kim, Jaeyoung; Park, Sung Kyu; Kim, Yong-Hoon

    2016-08-10

    We report on highly stable amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide (IGZO) gas sensors for ultraviolet (UV)-activated room-temperature detection of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The IGZO sensors fabricated by a low-temperature photochemical activation process and exhibiting two orders higher photocurrent compared to conventional zinc oxide sensors, allowed high gas sensitivity against various VOCs even at room temperature. From a systematic analysis, it was found that by increasing the UV intensity, the gas sensitivity, response time, and recovery behavior of an IGZO sensor were strongly enhanced. In particular, under an UV intensity of 30 mW cm(-2), the IGZO sensor exhibited gas sensitivity, response time and recovery time of 37%, 37 and 53 s, respectively, against 750 ppm concentration of acetone gas. Moreover, the IGZO gas sensor had an excellent long-term stability showing around 6% variation in gas sensitivity over 70 days. These results strongly support a conclusion that a low-temperature solution-processed amorphous IGZO film can serve as a good candidate for room-temperature VOCs sensors for emerging wearable electronics. PMID:27430635

  18. Stable room-temperature ferromagnetic phase at the FeRh(100) surface.

    PubMed

    Pressacco, Federico; Uhlίř, Vojtěch; Gatti, Matteo; Bendounan, Azzedine; Fullerton, Eric E; Sirotti, Fausto

    2016-01-01

    Interfaces and low dimensionality are sources of strong modifications of electronic, structural, and magnetic properties of materials. FeRh alloys are an excellent example because of the first-order phase transition taking place at ~400 K from an antiferromagnetic phase at room temperature to a high temperature ferromagnetic one. It is accompanied by a resistance change and volume expansion of about 1%. We have investigated the electronic and magnetic properties of FeRh(100) epitaxially grown on MgO by combining spectroscopies characterized by different probing depths, namely X-ray magnetic circular dichroism and photoelectron spectroscopy. We find that the symmetry breaking induced at the Rh-terminated surface stabilizes a surface ferromagnetic layer involving five planes of Fe and Rh atoms in the nominally antiferromagnetic phase at room temperature. First-principles calculations provide a microscopic description of the structural relaxation and the electron spin-density distribution that support the experimental findings. PMID:26935274

  19. Cu-Cu direct bonding achieved by surface method at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utsumi, Jun; Ichiyanagi, Yuko

    2014-02-01

    The metal bonding is a key technology in the processes for the microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) devices and the semiconductor devices to improve functionality and higher density integration. Strong adhesion between surfaces at the atomic level is crucial; however, it is difficult to achieve close bonding in such a system. Cu films were deposited on Si substrates by vacuum deposition, and then, two Cu films were bonded directly by means of surface activated bonding (SAB) at room temperature. The two Cu films, with the surface roughness Ra about 1.3nm, were bonded by using SAB at room temperature, however, the bonding strength was very weak in this method. In order to improve the bonding strength between the Cu films, samples were annealed at low temperatures, between 323 and 473 K, in air. As the result, the Cu-Cu bonding strength was 10 times higher than that of the original samples without annealing.

  20. Cu-Cu direct bonding achieved by surface method at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Utsumi, Jun; Ichiyanagi, Yuko

    2014-02-20

    The metal bonding is a key technology in the processes for the microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) devices and the semiconductor devices to improve functionality and higher density integration. Strong adhesion between surfaces at the atomic level is crucial; however, it is difficult to achieve close bonding in such a system. Cu films were deposited on Si substrates by vacuum deposition, and then, two Cu films were bonded directly by means of surface activated bonding (SAB) at room temperature. The two Cu films, with the surface roughness Ra about 1.3nm, were bonded by using SAB at room temperature, however, the bonding strength was very weak in this method. In order to improve the bonding strength between the Cu films, samples were annealed at low temperatures, between 323 and 473 K, in air. As the result, the Cu-Cu bonding strength was 10 times higher than that of the original samples without annealing.

  1. Room-temperature elastic constants of Sc and ScD[sub 0. 18

    SciTech Connect

    Leisure, R.G. ); Schwarz, R.B.; Migliori, A.; Lei, M. )

    1993-07-01

    The complete set of elastic constants for Sc and ScD[sub 0.18] has been measured at room temperature. The results show that the addition of hydrogen to this rare-earth metal has a qualitatively different effect than the addition of hydrogen to transition metals such as palladium, vanadium, niobium, and tantalum. In the case of Sc all five elastic constants increase with the addition of hydrogen. The bulk modulus for ScD[sub 0.18] is 9.5% higher than that for Sc. The Debye temperature computed from the room-temperature elastic constants is 355 K for Sc and 371 K for ScD[sub 0.18].

  2. Optically induced strong intermodal coupling in mechanical resonators at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Ohta, R.; Okamoto, H.; Yamaguchi, H.; Hey, R.; Friedland, K. J.

    2015-08-31

    Strong parametric mode coupling in mechanical resonators is demonstrated at room temperature by using the photothermal effect in thin membrane structures. Thanks to the large stress modulation by laser irradiation, the coupling rate of the mechanical modes, defined as half of the mode splitting, reaches 2.94 kHz, which is an order of magnitude larger than electrically induced mode coupling. This large coupling rate exceeds the damping rates of the mechanical resonators and results in the strong coupling regime, which is a signature of coherent mode interaction. Room-temperature coherent mode coupling will enable us to manipulate mechanical motion at practical operation temperatures and provides a wide variety of applications of integrated mechanical systems.

  3. Exchange bias and room-temperature magnetic order in molecular layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, Manuel; Ibrahim, Fatima; Boukari, Samy; Isshiki, Hironari; Joly, Loïc; Peter, Moritz; Studniarek, Michał; da Costa, Victor; Jabbar, Hashim; Davesne, Vincent; Halisdemir, Ufuk; Chen, Jinjie; Arabski, Jacek; Otero, Edwige; Choueikani, Fadi; Chen, Kai; Ohresser, Philippe; Wulfhekel, Wulf; Scheurer, Fabrice; Weber, Wolfgang; Alouani, Mebarek; Beaurepaire, Eric; Bowen, Martin

    2015-10-01

    Molecular semiconductors may exhibit antiferromagnetic correlations well below room temperature. Although inorganic antiferromagnetic layers may exchange bias single-molecule magnets, the reciprocal effect of an antiferromagnetic molecular layer magnetically pinning an inorganic ferromagnetic layer through exchange bias has so far not been observed. We report on the magnetic interplay, extending beyond the interface, between a cobalt ferromagnetic layer and a paramagnetic organic manganese phthalocyanine (MnPc) layer. These ferromagnetic/organic interfaces are called spinterfaces because spin polarization arises on them. The robust magnetism of the Co/MnPc spinterface stabilizes antiferromagnetic ordering at room temperature within subsequent MnPc monolayers away from the interface. The inferred magnetic coupling strength is much larger than that found in similar bulk, thin or ultrathin systems. In addition, at lower temperature, the antiferromagnetic MnPc layer induces an exchange bias on the Co film, which is magnetically pinned. These findings create new routes towards designing organic spintronic devices.

  4. Stable room-temperature ferromagnetic phase at the FeRh(100) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pressacco, Federico; Uhlίř, Vojtěch; Gatti, Matteo; Bendounan, Azzedine; Fullerton, Eric E.; Sirotti, Fausto

    2016-03-01

    Interfaces and low dimensionality are sources of strong modifications of electronic, structural, and magnetic properties of materials. FeRh alloys are an excellent example because of the first-order phase transition taking place at ~400 K from an antiferromagnetic phase at room temperature to a high temperature ferromagnetic one. It is accompanied by a resistance change and volume expansion of about 1%. We have investigated the electronic and magnetic properties of FeRh(100) epitaxially grown on MgO by combining spectroscopies characterized by different probing depths, namely X-ray magnetic circular dichroism and photoelectron spectroscopy. We find that the symmetry breaking induced at the Rh-terminated surface stabilizes a surface ferromagnetic layer involving five planes of Fe and Rh atoms in the nominally antiferromagnetic phase at room temperature. First-principles calculations provide a microscopic description of the structural relaxation and the electron spin-density distribution that support the experimental findings.

  5. Room temperature preparation of cuprous oxide hollow microspheres by a facile wet-chemical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ning; He, Hongcai; Han, Li

    2010-09-01

    Cuprous oxide hollow spheres have potential applications in drug-delivery carriers, biomedical diagnosis agents, and cell imaging. From a commercial point of view, the low-temperature, template-free, facile method is widely popular synthetic method for the synthesis of cuprous oxide hollow spheres. In this letter, we describe a novel facile template-free wet-chemical route to prepare crystallized cuprous oxide microspheres at room temperature. XRD patterns and SEM images revealed that pure crystallized cuprous oxide hollow microspheres were successfully obtained at room temperature. The diameter of cuprous oxide hollow sphere can be adjusted (0.7-7 μm) by concentration control of hydrazine hydrate. Generated N 2 gas bubbles in the aqueous solution, serving as "soft" templates, play a key role in the formation of hollow microspheres.

  6. Direct Measurement of Room-Temperature Nondiffusive Thermal Transport Over Micron Distances in a Silicon Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Jeremy A.; Maznev, A. A.; Cuffe, John; Eliason, Jeffrey K.; Minnich, Austin J.; Kehoe, Timothy; Torres, Clivia M. Sotomayor; Chen, Gang; Nelson, Keith A.

    2013-01-01

    The “textbook” phonon mean free path of heat carrying phonons in silicon at room temperature is ˜40nm. However, a large contribution to the thermal conductivity comes from low-frequency phonons with much longer mean free paths. We present a simple experiment demonstrating that room-temperature thermal transport in Si significantly deviates from the diffusion model already at micron distances. Absorption of crossed laser pulses in a freestanding silicon membrane sets up a sinusoidal temperature profile that is monitored via diffraction of a probe laser beam. By changing the period of the thermal grating we vary the heat transport distance within the range ˜1-10μm. At small distances, we observe a reduction in the effective thermal conductivity indicating a transition from the diffusive to the ballistic transport regime for the low-frequency part of the phonon spectrum.

  7. Room temperature strong light-matter coupling in three dimensional terahertz meta-atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulillo, B.; Manceau, J.-M.; Li, L. H.; Davies, A. G.; Linfield, E. H.; Colombelli, R.

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate strong light-matter coupling in three dimensional terahertz meta-atoms at room temperature. The intersubband transition of semiconductor quantum wells with a parabolic energy potential is strongly coupled to the confined circuital mode of three-dimensional split-ring metal-semiconductor-metal resonators that have an extreme sub-wavelength volume (λ/10). The frequency of these lumped-element resonators is controlled by the size and shape of the external antenna, while the interaction volume remains constant. This allows the resonance frequency to be swept across the intersubband transition and the anti-crossing characteristic of the strong light-matter coupling regime to be observed. The Rabi splitting, which is twice the Rabi frequency (2ΩRabi), amounts to 20% of the bare transition at room temperature, and it increases to 28% at low-temperature.

  8. Stable room-temperature ferromagnetic phase at the FeRh(100) surface

    PubMed Central

    Pressacco, Federico; Uhlίř, Vojtěch; Gatti, Matteo; Bendounan, Azzedine; Fullerton, Eric E.; Sirotti, Fausto

    2016-01-01

    Interfaces and low dimensionality are sources of strong modifications of electronic, structural, and magnetic properties of materials. FeRh alloys are an excellent example because of the first-order phase transition taking place at ~400 K from an antiferromagnetic phase at room temperature to a high temperature ferromagnetic one. It is accompanied by a resistance change and volume expansion of about 1%. We have investigated the electronic and magnetic properties of FeRh(100) epitaxially grown on MgO by combining spectroscopies characterized by different probing depths, namely X-ray magnetic circular dichroism and photoelectron spectroscopy. We find that the symmetry breaking induced at the Rh-terminated surface stabilizes a surface ferromagnetic layer involving five planes of Fe and Rh atoms in the nominally antiferromagnetic phase at room temperature. First-principles calculations provide a microscopic description of the structural relaxation and the electron spin-density distribution that support the experimental findings. PMID:26935274

  9. Stability of succinylcholine solutions stored at room temperature studied by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Adnet, Frederic; Le Moyec, Laurence; Smith, Charles E; Galinski, Michel; Jabre, Patricia; Lapostolle, Frederic

    2007-03-01

    The effect of storage temperature on the stability of two succinylcholine chloride solutions (20 and 50 mg/ml) was evaluated. Molecular composition was analysed using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. At room temperature, the degradation rate constant was 1.2%/month for the 20 mg/ml solution and 2.1%/month for the 50 mg/ml solution. The corresponding monthly degradation rates for the two solutions were 0.18% and 0.30% when stored at 4 degrees C, and 5.4% and 8.1% when stored at 37 degrees C. If a 10% loss of potency is considered acceptable, then the 20 and 50 mg/ml succinylcholine solutions can be stored in emergency resuscitation carts at room temperature for 8.3 and 4.8 months, respectively. PMID:17351219

  10. Iron-aluminum alloys having high room-temperature and method for making same

    DOEpatents

    Sikka, Vinod K.; McKamey, Claudette G.

    1993-01-01

    Iron-aluminum alloys having selectable room-temperature ductilities of greater than 20%, high resistance to oxidation and sulfidation, resistant pitting and corrosion in aqueous solutions, and possessing relatively high yield and ultimate tensile strengths are described. These alloys comprise 8 to 9.5% aluminum, up to 7% chromium, up to 4% molybdenum, up to 0.05% carbon, up to 0.5% of a carbide former such as zirconium, up to 0.1 yttrium, and the balance iron. These alloys in wrought form are annealed at a selected temperature in the range of 700.degree. C. to about 1100.degree. C. for providing the alloys with selected room-temperature ductilities in the range of 20 to about 29%.

  11. Thermoelectric Power Generation from Lanthanum Strontium Titanium Oxide at Room Temperature through the Addition of Graphene.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yue; Norman, Colin; Srivastava, Deepanshu; Azough, Feridoon; Wang, Li; Robbins, Mark; Simpson, Kevin; Freer, Robert; Kinloch, Ian A

    2015-07-29

    The applications of strontium titanium oxide based thermoelectric materials are currently limited by their high operating temperatures of >700 °C. Herein, we show that the thermal operating window of lanthanum strontium titanium oxide (LSTO) can be reduced to room temperature by the addition of a small amount of graphene. This increase in operating performance will enable future applications such as generators in vehicles and other sectors. The LSTO composites incorporated one percent or less of graphene and were sintered under an argon/hydrogen atmosphere. The resultant materials were reduced and possessed a multiphase structure with nanosized grains. The thermal conductivity of the nanocomposites decreased upon the addition of graphene, whereas the electrical conductivity and power factor both increased significantly. These factors, together with a moderate Seebeck coefficient, meant that a high power factor of ∼2500 μWm(-1)K(-2) was reached at room temperature at a loading of 0.6 wt % graphene. The highest thermoelectric figure of merit (ZT) was achieved when 0.6 wt % graphene was added (ZT = 0.42 at room temperature and 0.36 at 750 °C), with >280% enhancement compared to that of pure LSTO. A preliminary 7-couple device was produced using bismuth strontium cobalt oxide/graphene-LSTO pucks. This device had a Seebeck coefficient of ∼1500 μV/K and an open voltage of 600 mV at a mean temperature of 219 °C. PMID:26095083

  12. Room-temperature IR detection using pulsed laser deposited vanadium oxide bolometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajendra Kumar, R. T.; Karunagaran, B.; Mangalaraj, D.; Narayandass, Sa. K.; Manoravi, P.; Joseph, M.; Gopal, Vishnu

    2003-10-01

    We report the design, fabrication and performance of the 5 x 2 pixel uncooled microbolometer array. The test microbolometer utilizes pulsed laser deposited vanadium oxide film at room temperature as the IR sensitive layer. The microbolometer was fabricated without air-gap thermal isolation structure and the pixel area of about 200 x 800 μm2. The observed change in bolometer resistance with respect to temperature (dR/dT) as high as 9.3 x 103 Ω/°C and temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR) of about 5%/°C at room temperature, implies an excellent bolometric response. The room temperature deposition of the IR sensing layer facilitates their integration with the existing complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technology for better signal processing. IR response of the device was evaluated in the spectral region 8 - 15 μm. The preliminary IR characterization revealed that the test microbolometer exhibits responsivity (Rv) and detectivity (D*) approximately as 36 V/W and 6 x 105 cm2Hz1/2/W at chopper frequency of 10 Hz for 50 μA bias current. Provided with the air-gap thermal isolation structure, the microbolometer will exhibit responsivity (Rv) over 1.2 x 104 V/W, which compares well with the reported values.

  13. Room temperature table-like magnetocaloric effect in amorphous Gd50Co45Fe5 ribbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, G. L.; Zhao, D. Q.; Bai, H. Y.; Wang, W. H.; Pan, M. X.

    2016-02-01

    Gd50Co45Fe5 amorphous alloy ribbon with a table-like magnetocaloric effect (MCE) suitable for the ideal Ericsson cycle at room temperature has been developed. In addition to a high magnetic transition temperature of 289 K very close to that of Gd (294 K), a relatively large value of refrigerant capacity (~521 J kg-1) has been achieved under a field change of 5 T. This value of refrigerant capacity (RC) is about 27% and 70% larger than those of Gd (~410 J kg-1) and Gd5Si2Ge2 (~306 J kg-1). More importantly, the peak value of magnetic entropy change (-Δ S\\text{M}\\max ) approaches a nearly constant value of ~3.8 J  ṡ  kg-1  ṡ  K-1 under an applied field change of 0~5 T in a wide temperature span over 40 K around room temperature, which could be used as the candidate working material in the Ericsson-cycle magnetic regenerative refrigerator around room temperature.

  14. A general route toward complete room temperature processing of printed and high performance oxide electronics.

    PubMed

    Baby, Tessy T; Garlapati, Suresh K; Dehm, Simone; Häming, Marc; Kruk, Robert; Hahn, Horst; Dasgupta, Subho

    2015-03-24

    Critical prerequisites for solution-processed/printed field-effect transistors (FETs) and logics are excellent electrical performance including high charge carrier mobility, reliability, high environmental stability and low/preferably room temperature processing. Oxide semiconductors can often fulfill all the above criteria, sometimes even with better promise than their organic counterparts, except for their high process temperature requirement. The need for high annealing/curing temperatures renders oxide FETs rather incompatible to inexpensive, flexible substrates, which are commonly used for high-throughput and roll-to-roll additive manufacturing techniques, such as printing. To overcome this serious limitation, here we demonstrate an alternative approach that enables completely room-temperature processing of printed oxide FETs with device mobility as large as 12.5 cm(2)/(V s). The key aspect of the present concept is a chemically controlled curing process of the printed nanoparticle ink that provides surprisingly dense thin films and excellent interparticle electrical contacts. In order to demonstrate the versatility of this approach, both n-type (In2O3) and p-type (Cu2O) oxide semiconductor nanoparticle dispersions are prepared to fabricate, inkjet printed and completely room temperature processed, all-oxide complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) invertors that can display significant signal gain (∼18) at a supply voltage of only 1.5 V. PMID:25693653

  15. Molecular dynamics investigations of mechanical behaviours in monocrystalline silicon due to nanoindentation at cryogenic temperatures and room temperature.

    PubMed

    Du, Xiancheng; Zhao, Hongwei; Zhang, Lin; Yang, Yihan; Xu, Hailong; Fu, Haishuang; Li, Lijia

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of nanoindentation tests on monocrystalline silicon (010) surface were conducted to investigate the mechanical properties and deformation mechanism from cryogenic temperature being 10 K to room temperature being 300 K. Furthermore, the load-displacement curves were obtained and the phase transformation was investigated at different temperatures. The results show that the phase transformation occurs both at cryogenic temperatures and at room temperature. By searching for the presence of the unique non-bonded fifth neighbour atom, the metastable phases (Si-III and Si-XII) with fourfold coordination could be distinguished from Si-I phase during the loading stage of nanoindentation process. The Si-II, Si-XIII, and amorphous phase were also found in the region beneath the indenter. Moreover, through the degree of alignment of the metastable phases along specific crystal orientation at different temperatures, it was found that the temperature had effect on the anisotropy of the monocrystalline silicon, and the simulation results indicate that the anisotropy of monocrystalline silicon is strengthened at low temperatures. PMID:26537978

  16. Molecular dynamics investigations of mechanical behaviours in monocrystalline silicon due to nanoindentation at cryogenic temperatures and room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Xiancheng; Zhao, Hongwei; Zhang, Lin; Yang, Yihan; Xu, Hailong; Fu, Haishuang; Li, Lijia

    2015-11-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of nanoindentation tests on monocrystalline silicon (010) surface were conducted to investigate the mechanical properties and deformation mechanism from cryogenic temperature being 10 K to room temperature being 300 K. Furthermore, the load-displacement curves were obtained and the phase transformation was investigated at different temperatures. The results show that the phase transformation occurs both at cryogenic temperatures and at room temperature. By searching for the presence of the unique non-bonded fifth neighbour atom, the metastable phases (Si-III and Si-XII) with fourfold coordination could be distinguished from Si-I phase during the loading stage of nanoindentation process. The Si-II, Si-XIII, and amorphous phase were also found in the region beneath the indenter. Moreover, through the degree of alignment of the metastable phases along specific crystal orientation at different temperatures, it was found that the temperature had effect on the anisotropy of the monocrystalline silicon, and the simulation results indicate that the anisotropy of monocrystalline silicon is strengthened at low temperatures.

  17. Molecular dynamics investigations of mechanical behaviours in monocrystalline silicon due to nanoindentation at cryogenic temperatures and room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Du, Xiancheng; Zhao, Hongwei; Zhang, Lin; Yang, Yihan; Xu, Hailong; Fu, Haishuang; Li, Lijia

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of nanoindentation tests on monocrystalline silicon (010) surface were conducted to investigate the mechanical properties and deformation mechanism from cryogenic temperature being 10 K to room temperature being 300 K. Furthermore, the load-displacement curves were obtained and the phase transformation was investigated at different temperatures. The results show that the phase transformation occurs both at cryogenic temperatures and at room temperature. By searching for the presence of the unique non-bonded fifth neighbour atom, the metastable phases (Si-III and Si-XII) with fourfold coordination could be distinguished from Si-I phase during the loading stage of nanoindentation process. The Si-II, Si-XIII, and amorphous phase were also found in the region beneath the indenter. Moreover, through the degree of alignment of the metastable phases along specific crystal orientation at different temperatures, it was found that the temperature had effect on the anisotropy of the monocrystalline silicon, and the simulation results indicate that the anisotropy of monocrystalline silicon is strengthened at low temperatures. PMID:26537978

  18. Electronic structure basis for the extraordinary magnetoresistance in WTe2.

    PubMed

    Pletikosić, I; Ali, Mazhar N; Fedorov, A V; Cava, R J; Valla, T

    2014-11-21

    The electronic structure basis of the extremely large magnetoresistance in layered nonmagnetic tungsten ditelluride has been investigated by angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. Hole and electron pockets of approximately the same size were found at low temperatures, suggesting that carrier compensation should be considered the primary source of the effect. The material exhibits a highly anisotropic Fermi surface from which the pronounced anisotropy of the magnetoresistance follows. A change in the Fermi surface with temperature was found and a high-density-of-states band that may take over conduction at higher temperatures and cause the observed turn-on behavior of the magnetoresistance in WTe2 was identified. PMID:25479512

  19. Electronic Structure Basis for the Extraordinary Magnetoresistance in WTe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletikosić, I.; Ali, Mazhar N.; Fedorov, A. V.; Cava, R. J.; Valla, T.

    2014-11-01

    The electronic structure basis of the extremely large magnetoresistance in layered nonmagnetic tungsten ditelluride has been investigated by angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. Hole and electron pockets of approximately the same size were found at low temperatures, suggesting that carrier compensation should be considered the primary source of the effect. The material exhibits a highly anisotropic Fermi surface from which the pronounced anisotropy of the magnetoresistance follows. A change in the Fermi surface with temperature was found and a high-density-of-states band that may take over conduction at higher temperatures and cause the observed turn-on behavior of the magnetoresistance in WTe2 was identified.

  20. Quantized thermal conductance of nanowires at room temperature due to Zenneck surface-phonon polaritons.

    PubMed

    Ordonez-Miranda, José; Tranchant, Laurent; Kim, Beomjoon; Chalopin, Yann; Antoni, Thomas; Volz, Sebastian

    2014-02-01

    Based on the Landauer formalism, we demonstrate that the thermal conductance due to the propagation of Zenneck surface-phonon polaritons along a polar nanowire is independent of the material characteristics and is given by π2kB2T/3h. The giant propagation length of these energy carriers establishes that this quantization holds not only for a temperature much smaller than 1 K, as is the case for electrons and phonons, but also for temperatures comparable to room temperature, which can significantly facilitate its observation and application in the thermal management of nanoscale electronics and photonics. PMID:24580614